COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SECTION 6

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS SECTION 6
SECTION 6
COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
66

INFORMATION CONTAINED WITHIN CREDIT COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
The first part of the course description contains the course discipline
abbreviation, number, title, and the student unit value of the course.
Example: ENGL 150: Reading and Composition 1A, 3.0 Units. It
also contains the hours required for the course, the number of times
the course may be repeated for credit (if any), and any prerequisites,
corequisites, advisories, or other limitations.
The second part of the description is a brief explanation of the
material covered in the course.
At the end of the description, University of California (UC) and
California State University (CSU) transfer and Associate degree
information is included.
For further information regarding transfer or degree requirements, please refer to the Graduation and Degree Requirements
Section and the Transfer Information Section of this catalog.
NONCREDIT COURSES
The college offers free noncredit courses in several areas; please
see the Noncredit listings at the end of Course Descriptions for
courses in Basic Skills (ESBS), Disabled Students Programs and
Services (DSPN), and Vocational (VOCN). For English as a Second
Language Noncredit (ESLN) courses, please see the ESL listings. For
Nursing Education Vocational (VOCN) courses, please see Nursing
Education (NE) listings. No credit is awarded for noncredit courses.
Noncredit courses have no prerequisites or repeatability restrictions,
and vary in the number of hours of instruction offered.
STUDENT UNITS AND HOURS
Credit for courses offered at College of Marin is awarded in semester
units. The value of the course is calculated on the basis of one unit
for each lecture hour per week for one semester (together with two
hours of preparation outside class) or three hours of laboratory work
per week for one semester. Semesters (Fall and Spring) are 16 to 18
weeks in duration; the Summer session is 6 weeks. Courses meeting
in the Summer session, or for less than the full semester, require an
equivalent number of hours prorated on a per week basis.
PREREQUISITES, COREQUISITES, AND ADVISORIES
Prerequisites
A prerequisite is a condition of enrollment that a student is required
to meet in order to demonstrate current readiness for enrollment
in a particular course or program. The College requires students to
complete prerequisite courses with a grade of C, P, or higher prior
to registering in the course requiring the prerequisites. Examples of
courses that may require prerequisites:
1. Courses for which specific prerequisites have been justified by
content review, the appropriate level of scrutiny and any other
validation procedures required by law (Title 5, 55201 a-f).
2. Sequential courses in a degree-applicable program.
3. Courses requiring a prerequisite to transfer to a four-year college.
4. Courses requiring preparation to protect health and safety.
5. Technical or vocational courses or programs that require special
preparation.
MARIN.EDU
Equivalent Course Work/ Prerequisite Challenges
Some prerequisites may be satisfied by equivalent course work from
an accredited institution other than College of Marin. Students also
have the right to challenge prerequisites on certain, specified grounds
and procedures. Please contact a counselor for more information.
Corequisites
A corequisite is a condition of enrollment consisting of a course that
a student is required to take simultaneously in order to enroll in another course. Courses that require corequisites include courses that
are part of a closely related lecture-laboratory pairing; for example,
English 92 and English 92L. Students may not enroll in one without
enrolling in the other.
Advisories
An advisory is a condition that a student is advised, but not required,
to meet before or in conjunction with enrollment in a course or
educational program. For example, students enrolled in Biology 110
are advised to also enroll in Biology 110L.
Other Limitations
Other limitations on enrollment may include:
1. Courses that require public performance or competition.
2. Blocks of courses for which enrollment is limited in order to
create a cohort of students.
Physical Sciences Prerequisite Recency Requirement
To ensure student success, certain chemistry and physics courses
have established 5-year prerequisite recency requirements beginning
in Fall 2014. The chemistry prerequisites for CHEM 131, 132, 132E,
231, 232 and 232E and the physics prerequisites for PHYS 108B,
207B and 207C must have been successfully completed within the
past 5 years. Students may challenge these recency requirements by
taking a test, by arrangement with the Physical Sciences Department
chairperson.
GRADING SYSTEMS
Different grading systems are used for different courses. Some will be
limited to letter grades, some will be limited to pass/no pass grading
and the remainder will be optional letter or pass/no pass grades,
upon agreement between the instructor and student. For some
disciplines, grading is indicated in the catalog before the discipline’s
course descriptions. In general, courses required for a student’s fouryear major should be taken on a letter grade basis.
COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM
Courses in this catalog and in the schedule of classes are numbered
in the following sequence:
• 0-099: Preparatory/remedial courses and courses that do not
apply to the major. Courses numbered 00-99 are not applicable to
the Associate degree.
• 100-199: Courses taken during the first year of academic work or
the first 30 units of course work. Courses numbered 100-199 are
applicable to the Associate degree.
• 200-299: Courses taken during the second year of academic work
or the second 30 units of course work. Courses numbered 200-299
are applicable to the Associate degree.
• 039 - Selected Topics: New “pilot” preparatory/remedial courses
that do not apply to the Associate Degree. (Selected Topics courses
are not listed in this catalog.)
CATALOG 2015/2016
• 139 - Selected Topics: New “pilot” courses that may be applicable
to the Associate degree and are accepted for CSU elective credit
(with limit). (Selected Topics courses are not listed in this catalog.)
• 249 - Independent Study: Offered in most disciplines, by prior
arrangement with instructor, for 1 to 3 units, requiring 3 laboratory hours weekly per unit. Please see Independent Study listing.
Independent Study courses may be applicable to the Associate
Degree.
REPEATABLE COURSES
Under certain circumstances, students may repeat courses in which a
grade of “C” or higher or “CR” or “P” was earned. Effective Fall 2013,
many courses in Art, Dance, Drama, Music, and Kinesiology are no
longer eligible for repeatability. Current courses that are repeatable
are identified in the course descriptions. For more information about
course repetition, please see Section 2 of this catalog, “Admissions,
Registration, and Academic Information.”
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
There are excellent and increasing opportunities for men and women
in all areas of the administration of justice field. Education and
training is becoming more important for those who seek careers in
criminal justice. This program is designed to provide a solid foundation of knowledge that will prepare the student for initial employment, advancement, or transfer to a four-year college or university.
Career Options
Border Patrol Agent, California Highway Patrol, Correctional
Counseling, County and State Park Ranger, Court Administration,
Deputy Sheriff, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Immigration and
Naturalization Service, Law, Paralegal, Police Officer, State Correctional Officer
Faculty
Sandy Boyd
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8200
A.A.-T. IN ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE
Associate in Arts in Administration of Justice for Transfer degree
(AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Administration of Justice for
Transfer degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain of a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
Administration of Justice
67
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses (6 units):
AJ
110
Introduction to Administration of Justice 3
AJ
111
Criminal Law
3
List A - select two courses (6 units):
AJ
113
Criminal Procedures
3
AJ
116
Juvenile Law and Procedure
3
AJ
212
Introduction to Evidence
3
AJ
215
Introduction to Investigation
3
List B - select two courses (6-7 units):
Any course from List A not already used
3
SOC
110
Introduction to Sociology
3
STAT
115
Introduction to Statistics
4
Or
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
PSY
110
Introduction to Psychology
3
PHIL
112
Introduction to Logic
3
Total Major Units
18-19
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE):
0-6 units/0-6 units
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
37 units/39 units
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives (IGETC/CSU-GE):
4-11 units/2-9 units
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
60
A.S. IN ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE, OCCUPATIONAL
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded)
An Associate in Science degree is awarded for satisfactory performance in major courses, as well as completion of general education
and graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement in
Administration of Justice is awarded for satisfactory completion of
courses required for the major.
Students wishing to earn a degree or Certificate of Achievement
in Administration of Justice should be aware that it might take longer
than two years. However, courses are offered on a two-year cycle, and
with planning, a student can complete a degree and/or Certificate of
Achievement in a two year period.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
AJ
110
Introduction to Administration of Justice 3
AJ
111
Criminal Law
3
AJ
113
Criminal Procedures
3
AJ
116
Juvenile Law and Procedure
3
AJ
118
Community and Human Relations
3
AJ
204
Crime and Delinquency
3
Or
SOC 184
Criminology
3
AJ
212
Introduction to Evidence
3
AJ
215
Introduction to Investigation
3
AJ/SOC 220
Vice, Narcotics, and Organized Crime
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
27
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE COURSES (AJ)
AJ 110: Introduction to Administration of Justice
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The history and philosophy of justice as it evolved throughout the
world; in-depth study of the American system and the various
subsystems; roles and role expectations of criminal justice agents
in their interrelationships in society; concepts of crime causation,
68
American Sign Language
MARIN.EDU
punishments and rehabilitation; ethics, education, and training for
professionalism in the social system. (CSU/UC)
AJ 220: Vice, Narcotics, and Organized Crime
AJ 111: Criminal Law
This course examines the relationship between organized crime and
the community. It covers the impact of organized crime, history of
organized crime, relationship to the social structure, symptoms of
organized crime (e.g. corruption, dysfunctional behavior, violence),
and attempts to control organized crime and the role of the legal
system. Sociological theory and concepts from criminal justice are
integrated into the course. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Historical development, philosophy of law and constitutional provisions; definitions, classifications of crimes and their applications to
the system of administration of justice; legal research, review of case
law, methodology, and concepts of law as a social force. Explores
crimes against persons, property, and the state as a social, religious,
and historical ideology. (CSU/UC)
AJ 113: Criminal Procedures
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Legal processes from prearrest, arrest through trial, sentencing and
correctional procedures; a review of the history of case and common
law; conceptual interpretations of law as reflected in court decisions;
study of case law methodology and case research as the decisions
impact the procedures of the justice system. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
American Sign Language (ASL) courses are designed to meet the
needs of the Deaf community in the United States and Canada.
American Sign Language is a full natural language at the core of a
new literary tradition, in both poetry and theatre. It is an alternative
language choice for students completing general education humanities requirements at College of Marin.
AJ 118: Community and Human Relations
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in American
Sign Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
The relationship of criminal justice agents and the community;
causal and symptomatic aspects of community understanding; lack
of cooperation and mistrust; study of behavioral causes; ways to
develop and maintain amicable relationships. (CSU/UC)
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE COURSES (ASL)
AJ 204: Crime and Delinquency
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as AJ 204 or
SOC 184; credit awarded for only one course.
This introductory course emphasizes visual readiness skills for
recognition and expression of appropriate facial expressions and
body movements, response to commands, and learning how to
visualize the environment. Communicative functions, vocabulary,
grammar, and cultural aspects of the deaf community are introduced
and studied. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area
6A: UC Language other than English
AJ 116: Juvenile Law and Procedure
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Techniques of handling juvenile offenders and victims; prevention
and repression of delinquency; diagnosis and referral; organization
of community resources. Juvenile law and juvenile court procedures.
(CSU)
An introduction to the major theoretical explanations of criminal
behavior; social and economic factors which contribute to crime;
major typologies of criminal behavior; criminal justice systems and
research; courts, probation and parole; police and other institutions.
The course takes a sociological perspective and integrates theories
from sociology, criminology, and criminal justice. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area D-0
AJ 212: Introduction to Evidence
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Origin, development, philosophy, and constitutional basis of
evidence; constitutional and procedural considerations affecting
arrest, search and seizures; kinds and degrees of evidence and rules
governing admissibility; judicial decisions interpreting individual
rights; and case studies viewed from a conceptual level. (CSU)
AJ 215: Introduction to Investigation
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Fundamentals of investigation; techniques of crime scene search and
recording; collection and preservation of physical evidence; modus
operandi processes; sources of information; interview and interrogation; follow-up investigation. (CSU)
ASL 101: Elementary Sign Language I
ASL 102: Elementary Sign Language II
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ASL 101.
A continuation of ASL 101; exchanging information, identifying
others, making requests, giving reasons, options, simple directions,
and asking for clarification. Discussions revolve around classes, the
campus, home, work and transportation, physical descriptions of
people and objects, general conversation skills, visual perception and
specific specialization skills, and the continuation of the cultural
study of the deaf community. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6A: UC Language other than English
ASL 110: History and Culture of Deaf People in
America
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course identifies basic anthropological approaches toward the
examination and study of minority groups in general, with specific
emphasis on American Deaf culture as a minority group. Includes
CATALOG 2015/2016
an introductory comparison of the structures of visual and spoken
languages and a presentation of the normative system of laws in
America that has developed for deaf Americans. (CSU) AA/AS Areas
C and G, CSU Areas C-2 or D-1
ASL 203: Intermediate Sign Language III
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ASL 102.
This course is a continuation of ASL 101 and 102, expanding upon
the conversational and grammar functions, and delving more deeply
into Deaf Culture. Skills to be learned include locating things, asking
for solutions to everyday problems, telling about life events and
personal background, making suggestions and requests, and asking
permission. Students learn how to engage in more sustained communication in ASL, sometimes on philosophical and cultural topics.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6A:
UC Language other than English
ASL 204: Intermediate Sign Language IV
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ASL 203.
This course strives for a higher level of conversation and narration
skills. Topics include describing problems at home, work and school,
expressing opinions and feelings and argumentation; i.e., how to
disagree with someone and potentially change that person’s mind.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, IGETC Area 6: UC Language other than
English
ANTHROPOLOGY
Anthropology is a scientific discipline concerned with all aspects
of humankind: human biology and genetics; ancestral fossils and
evolutionary processes; primates; cultures of the world; language and
customs; cross-cultural marriage and family processes; prehistory
and archaeology; art, healing, religion, and technology. Because it
is such a diverse discipline, one may find anthropologists uncovering our early ancestors in Africa, excavating a pyramid in Central
America, studying peoples in New Guinea or in San Francisco, collecting information on orangutans in Southeast Asia, and advising
business and government on customs in India.
Career Options
Archaeologist, Consultant, Criminologist, Cultural Anthropologist,
Ethnologist, Forensic Scientist, Genetic Counselor, Governmental
Consultant, Industrial Consultant, International Business, Journalist, Linguist, Marketing Specialist, Museum Curator, Park Naturalist/Ranger, Peace Corps/Vista Worker, Physical Anthropologist,
Prehistorian, Primatologist, Public Health Worker, Researcher,
Scientific Illustrator, Social Worker, Teacher, Technical Writer, Tour
Organizer, United Nations Advisor, Zoo Curator, Zoologist
Faculty
Jessica Park
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
A.A.-T. IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
Anthropology
69
To complete the Associate in Arts in Anthropology for Transfer
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses (9 units):
ANTH 101
Introduction to Physical/Biological Anthropology
3
ANTH 102
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3
ANTH 110
Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory
3
List A - select one course:
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
Or
STAT 115
Introduction to Statistics
4
List B - select one to two courses (3-5 units):
PSY 205
Introduction to Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology 3
Or
SOC 205
Introduction to Research Methods and Data Analysis in Sociology
3
BIOL 120
Human Anatomy
5
GEOL 120
Physical Geology
3
And
GEOL 120L Physical Geology Laboratory
1
GEOL 103
Environmental Geology
3
GEOG 125
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 3
List C - select one course:
Any course from List B not already used.
ANTH 103
Globalization and Peoples and Cultures of the World
3
ANTH 204 Native American Cultures
3
ANTH 208 Magic, Folklore and Healing
3
ANTH 215
Native Americans of California
3
HIST 214
History of Latin America
3
HUM 118 Introduction to World Religions
3
GEOG 102 The Human Environment
3
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology
3
ETST 110
Introduction to Ethnic Studies
3
ETST 151
Native American History
3
SPCH 128 Intercultural Communication
3
Total Major Units
19-22
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE):
15-19 units/15-19 units
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
37 units/39 units
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives (IGETC/CSU-GE): 16-23 units/14-21 units
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
60
70
Anthropology
ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES (ANTH)
MARIN.EDU
ANTH 104: Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ANTH 101: Introduction to Physical/Biological
Anthropology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines evolutionary theory as a unifying theory that
encompasses human variation and human evolution, as well as
genetics and the human genome. Topics include primates, including
behavior, anatomy, and features of the skeletal system; forensic analysis; archaeological theory and methodology; scientific method; and
an overview of the most significant fossil sites that relate to human
evolution. The department has an extensive collection of fossil casts
that allows students the opportunity to actually see them in person
rather than relying solely upon photographs or descriptions. Some
instructors may require field trips to local zoos, museums or lectures.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2, IGETC Area 5B
ANTH 101L: Physical/Biological Anthropology
Laboratory
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ANTH 101 or concurrent
enrollment.
Laboratory and related exercises selected from the fields of: genetics,
the human genome, human variability, medical genetics, nonhuman
primates, human dental and skeletal anatomy, forensics, primate
behavior, reconstruction, fossil hominids, the scientific method
including probability and research design. This course covers in
greater detail areas which are taught in ANTH 101and which require
the active participation of students in learning how to accomplish
specific tasks related to the above areas. Field trips may be included.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5C
ANTH 102: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The study of human behavior from a cross cultural perspective.
Emphasis is placed on non Western societies. Areas that may be
covered are social organization, belief systems and ritual behavior,
socialization, psychological anthropology, economic organization,
social stratification, theory, and other selected topics. A goal of the
course is to create a greater degree of cross cultural awareness by
attempting to promote an understanding of and appreciation for the
richness and diversity of human culture. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B,
CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ANTH 103: Globalization and Peoples and Cultures
of the World
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course explores what is happening to cultural groups from
diverse regions around the world. The focus is on cultural change,
impact of technology, and external and regional pressures and
how they impact local groups. The roles of women and children,
ethnic/racial/religious violence, class conflict, poverty, child/female
trafficking, slavery, child soldiers, disease, forced migration, famine
and genocide are covered. The roles of the World Bank, World Trade
Organization, multi-national corporations, and local and regional
elites are presented as they relate to the lives of specific ethnic groups.
Theory from ethnology and ethnography are used as a basis for
analysis. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
This course introduces students to the anthropological study of
language, verbal and non-verbal human communication. Using
a cross-cultural perspective, students examine the relationship
between culture and the ways in which humans communicate. Topics include structural linguistics, biological and cultural mechanisms
of language acquisition, historical linguistics, and sociocultural
linguistics, as well as issues surrounding language loss and conservation. (CSU)
ANTH 110: Introduction to Archaeology and
Prehistory
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course includes the methods of recovery, analysis and interpretation of material culture, current research questions, current
controversies, frauds of the past, ethical problems confronting the
archaeologist and some of the spectacular discoveries. Some of the
questions to be explored include the origin of art and writing, the
evolution of tool making, how and why agriculture began, why
civilizations rose and fell, and who settled the Americas. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ANTH 150: Introduction to Research Methods
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or PSY 110 or ANTH
101 or ANTH 102. May be taken as ANTH 150, BEHS 150, PSY 150, or
SOC 150; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the methods, logic, and empirical and analytical strategies behavioral scientists use to study the social world.
Students gain knowledge and practical experience in the scientific
method, evaluation of evidence, and the research design and
development process. Key topics include qualitative and quantitative
modes of inquiry, formulating research questions, developing and
testing hypotheses, ethics of research, and developing a study design
and methodology. (CSU)
ANTH 204: Native American Cultures
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This survey course examines early examples of habitation in the
western hemisphere. The course illustrates the peopling of the
Americas and lifeways of native cultures in addition to colonialism
and its impacts on native peoples. Traditional cultural systems, social
organization, religious beliefs, art, and economy are discussed for selected cultural groups. Contemporary conditions of native peoples in
the hemisphere, including land rights, tribal independence, natural
resource rights, and social problems are examined. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Areas B & G, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ANTH 208: Magic, Folklore, and Healing
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys belief systems and folklore from a cross cultural
perspective. It asks: What do we know about the origins of belief
systems? Why do people in most societies believe in unseen spirits
and powers? How do people use supernatural or special powers to
gain control over their own lives or the lives of others? What is the
subdiscipline of folklore and how does it relate to the subject matter
and to anthropology as a whole? Examples are drawn from a wide
variety of cultural areas. (CSU/UC) CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
Architecture
CATALOG 2015/2016
ANTH 215: Native Americans of California
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The study of California Native Americans includes the prehistoric
period (as seen through archaeology), contact with explorers, the
mission period, post mission, and contemporary issues. Major
linguistic groups are discussed in terms of environmental setting,
subsistence, technology, political organization, social structure,
religion, ceremonial life, art, and mythology. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Areas B & G, CSU Area D-1, IGETC Area 4A
ARCHITECTURE
Mankind has been designing and building permanent structures
for about twelve thousand years, and these structures have come to
dominate the environment that most people inhabit. The architect
faces an exciting challenge: to understand the sometimes competing
needs of individuals and groups, the need to protect our natural
environment, the technical requirements of buildings and structures,
the role of economics, and the importance of designing projects
that not only meet these quantifiable needs but that also inspire and
delight us.
In the twenty-first century, the value of green/sustainable design
is becoming more and more obvious and is an important part of our
curriculum. We also offer rich classes in architectural design, drafting and presentation, architecture as a profession, computer aided
design, and history of architecture.
Courses in the Architecture Department are designed to serve
students who aspire to transfer to other schools of architecture by
giving them a sound basis in critical thinking and fundamental
knowledge of the discipline, to offer a two year degree option for
those who wish to achieve a solid base of knowledge and skills for
work in architecture or related fields, and to present learning opportunities to those whose interest in architecture is directed toward
more personal rather than career goals.
Career Options
Architect, Architectural Designer, Architectural Illustrator,
Architectural Model Maker, Architectural Product Developer,
Architectural Specification Writer, Construction Manager, Director/
Administrator of Architectural Firm, Interior Architect, Landscape
Designer, Professor of Architecture, Researcher, Structural Engineer,
Theater Set Designer, Urban Planner.
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
A.S. IN ARCHITECTURE
The associate degree program in Architecture is designed to prepare
students for work in architecture, architectural drafting and illustration, construction, and other fields where knowledge of architectural
history, design, and communication is useful. Some courses are
available online with no on-campus attendance required. Students
who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional general
education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for
the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ARCH 100
History of Architecture I
3
ARCH 101
History of Architecture II
3
ARCH 102
History of Architecture III
3
ARCH 110
Beginning Architectural Design
ARCH 111
Intermediate Architectural Design
ARCH 120
Beginning Architectural Drawing
ARCH 130
Introduction to Architecture and Environmental Design
And one of the following:
ARCH 121
Intermediate Architectural Drawing
Or
ARCH 140
Digital Tools for Architectural Design
Or
ARCH 141
Computer Drawing for Architecture and Construction
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
71
4
4
4
3
4
4
4
28
ARCHITECTURE COURSES (ARCH)
ARCH 100: History of Architecture I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class traces the development of architecture and cities throughout the world from the earliest permanent settlements at the end of
the Ice Age to the 1100s C.E., emphasizing the evolution of architectural ideas and the connection between architecture and culture.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ARCH 101: History of Architecture II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class traces the development of architecture and cities throughout the world from the 1100s C.E. to the end of the nineteenth
century, emphasizing the evolution of architectural ideas and the
connection between architecture and culture. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ARCH 102: History of Architecture III
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class traces the development of architecture and cities throughout the world during the twentieth century, emphasizing the evolution of architectural ideas and the connection between architecture
and culture. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area
3A
ARCH 110: Beginning Architectural Design
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This design course explores fundamental principles and issues of
architectural design through the use of abstract design projects.
Students interested in architecture, interior design, landscape
design, engineering, building construction, gallery or theatre design,
sculpture and other fine arts create their own design solutions, moving from beginning sketches through development, to final models.
Students develop an architectural vocabulary and thought process
in a group studio environment, and address formal, symbolic and
contextual concepts of architecture. (CSU/UC)
ARCH 111: Intermediate Architectural Design
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: ARCH 110 and 120.
This design course explores local urban and rural architectural design projects through lectures, design projects, site visits, individual
and group critiques, model building and drawings. Human needs,
social factors, public/private issues, contexture, historic precedent,
and aesthetic perception are emphasized. Students learn about design
methodology, site and program analysis, and presentation tech-
72
Art
niques. Students further address formal, symbolic, and contextual
issues of architecture. (CSU)
ARCH 120: Beginning Architectural Drawing
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
In this foundation course, students learn hard-line drawing skills
and architectural conventions including plan, elevation, section,
paraline and perspective drawing, as well as freehand sketching and
presentation rendering. Communication between designers, clients
and builders is emphasized. Appropriate for those interested in
interior design, landscape architecture, construction and engineering. (CSU)
ARCH 121: Intermediate Architectural Drawing
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ARCH 120.
Advisories: ARCH 110 and 130; may be taken concurrently.
A practical intermediate course in architectural drawing. It builds
on basic drawing and lettering techniques, and introduces more
advanced applications for architectural projections (plan, section and
elevation), detail and working drawings, and architectural rendering.
Basic wood frame construction is introduced and applied to practical
architectural and construction problems. (CSU)
ARCH 130: Introduction to Architecture and
Environmental Design
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides a foundation for future architecture, interior
design, landscape architecture, and city planning courses. It explores
the basic elements of architecture and the built environment
including form, organizational principles, context, materials, and
the sensory qualities of design. The design process and professional
practice are also addressed. Emphasis is placed on the process of
developing one’s personal approach to design, the ways in which
people experience architecture, and the relationship of architecture
to society. (CSU/UC)
ARCH 140: Digital Tools for Architectural Design
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ARCH 120 or
concurrent enrollment. Advisory: ARCH 110 or 130.
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laboration. The class is taught using industry standard software; basic
concepts and skills apply to most CAD applications. (CSU)
ART
The study of art will enrich the student’s experience of the world,
and encourage the student to draw upon creative resources. An
education in art can lead to professional or vocational careers, as
well as enhance abilities in other fields. The Art Department offers a
foundation in theoretical and practical skills, and the opportunity to
work in a wide variety of specific art media.
Career Options
Animator, Art Appraiser, Art Critic/Writer, Art Director, Art Historian, Art Therapist, Arts Administrator, Arts and Crafts, Calligrapher, Cartoonist, Ceramist, Commercial Artist, Designer, Exhibition
Designer, Fashion Apparel, Fashion Illustrator, Floral Designer,
Furniture Designer, Graphic Designer, Industrial Color Consultant,
Interior Designer/Decorator, Jeweler, Landscape Designer, Medical/
Scientific Illustrator, Museum/Gallery Staff, Operator, Paste-Up
Copy-Camera, Photographer, Print Maker, Printer, Product Designer, Sculptor, Sign Painter, Specialist, Stage Set Designer, Textile
Designer, Typographer
Faculty
William Abright, Chester Arnold, Jason Dunn, Patricia Hulin, Kevin Muller, Polly
Steinmetz, Katherine Wagner
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
A.A.-T. IN ART HISTORY
Associate in Arts in Art History for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Art History for Transfer
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
Students learn basic 3D computer modeling applications for use in
architectural design and related fields, augmenting hand modeling
and drawing techniques already in place. Includes use of computerbased presentation tools for effective communication; helpful in the
design studio and later with clients and broader audiences such as
city planners and neighbors. The class uses current industry standard
software; the concepts learned will also serve students encountering
other modeling/presentation programs in the future. (CSU)
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
ARCH 141: Computer Drawing for Architecture and
Construction
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ARCH 120. Advisory:
ARCH 110.
Students learn the skills needed to produce 3D computer models
and to extract 2D construction drawings from them (plans, sections
and elevations). These skills reinforce the hand-drawing conventions taught in ARCH 120. Students acquire the tools for project
development and construction drawing necessary in internships
and practice. Emphasizes the effective communication and logical
organization that facilitates drawing, the revision process and col-
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses:
ART
101
History of Ancient Art
3
ART
102
History of European Art
3
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
4
List A - select one course:
ART
104
History of Asian Art
3
ART
108
Arts of the Americas (also offered as ETST 108 or HUM 108)
3
ART
110
History of Islamic Art
3
List B - select one course:
Art
CATALOG 2015/2016
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
113
3-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
134
Life Drawing I
4
MMST 112
Design I: Fundamentals
3
ART
170
Ceramics I
4
ART
180
Sculpture I
4
ART
190
Black and White Photography I
4
List C - select one course:
Any course from List A or List B not already used
ART
103
History of Modern Art
3
ART
105
History of Contemporary Art 3
ART
106
History of Women Artists
3
ART
107
History of American Art
3
ARCH 100
History of Architecture I
3
ARCH 101
History of Architecture II
3
ARCH 102
History of Architecture III
3
DANC 108
Dance History: Dancing: The Pleasure, Power and Art of Movement 3
DRAM 110 Introduction to the Theatre
3
DRAM 150 Introduction to Stagecraft
3
DRAM 260 Musical Theatre Production Workshop
3
FILM/HUM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4
FILM/HUM 109B History of Film: 1950 to Present
4
MUS 101 Introduction to Classical Music
3
MUS 102 Music Masterworks
3
MUS 105 Rock, Pop and Jazz 3
MUS 106 Music Fundamentals
3
Total Major Units
19-21
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE): 6 units/6 units
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
37 units/39 units
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives ( (IGETC/CSU-GE):
8-10 units/6-8 units
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
60
A.A. IN ART
The Art Program provides transfer, professional preparation, personal development, general interest, and general education, as well
as an Associate in Arts degree. Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional general education and graduation
requirements, will be awarded the associate degree. Courses are
offered at both campuses. Students may take courses at either campus
to fulfill requirements for the major. Note: Students are required to
complete English 150 for the associate degree. All students should
consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
4
One art history course from the following:
ART
101
History of Ancient Art
3
ART
102
History of European Art
3
ART
103
History of Modern Art
3
ART
104
History of Asian Art
3
ART
105
History of Contemporary Art 3
ART
106
History of Women Artists
3
ART
107
History of American Art
3
ART
108
Arts of the Americas (also offered as ETST 108 or HUM 108)
3
And 12 additional units from the following:
ART
113
3-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
114
Interior Design I
4
ART
116
Jewelry Design I
4
ART
118
Art Gallery Design and Management I
4
ART
129
Materials and Techniques
ART
134
Life Drawing I
ART
140
Painting I
ART
144
Watercolor I
ART
146
Life Painting I
ART
148
Color Theory
ART
152
Printmaking I
ART
154
Surface Design on Fabric
ART
165
Fiber Sculpture I
ART
170
Ceramics I
ART
175A Primitive Ceramics
ART
180
Sculpture I
ART
185
Life Sculpture I
ART
190
Black and White Photography I ART
193
Beginning Digital Photography
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
73
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
23
A.S. IN DESIGN, APPLIED, OCCUPATIONAL
Courses in this program are offered at both campuses. Students
may take courses at either campus to fulfill requirements for the
major. The program offers a problem solving approach to design. The
students elect the emphasis area (either two-dimensional or threedimensional) that is most compatible with their occupational goals.
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
113
3-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
4
ART
148
Color Theory
4
Any course in Art History:
ART
101
History of Ancient Art
3
ART
102
History of European Art
3
ART
103
History of Modern Art
3
ART
104
History of Asian Art
3
ART
105
History of Contemporary Art
3
ART 106
History of Women Artist
3
ART
107
History of American Art
3
ART
108 History of Arts of the Americas (also offered as ETST 108 or HUM 108) 3
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
3
TOTAL CORE UNITS
22
Additionally, applied design majors with an emphasis in two-dimensional design must
complete 16 units (four courses) from the following art studio courses:
ART
131
Drawing and Composition II
4
ART
134
Life Drawing I
4
ART
135* Life Drawing II
4
ART
140
Painting I
4
ART
141* Painting II
4
ART
144
Watercolor I
4
ART
145* Watercolor II
4
ART
152
Printmaking I
4
ART
153* Printmaking II
4
ART
190
Black and White Photography I
4
ART
191* Black and White Photography II
4
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
42
* More advanced classes offered, but major requirements must be satisfied from the courses
listed above.
74
Art
Additionally, applied design majors with an emphasis in three-dimensional design
must complete 16 units (four courses) from the following art studio courses:
ART
116
Jewelry Design I
4
ART
117* Jewelry Design II
4
ART
118
Art Gallery Design and Management I
4
ART
119* Art Gallery Design and Management II
4
ART
165
Fiber Sculpture I
4
ART
170
Ceramics I
4
ART
171* Ceramics II
4
ART
180
Sculpture I
4
ART
181* Sculpture II
4
ART
185
Life Sculpture I
4
ART
186* Life Sculpture II
4
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
38
* More advanced classes offered, but major requirements must be satisfied from the courses
listed above.
A.S. IN DESIGN, APPLIED — INTERIOR, OCCUPATIONAL
Some courses in this program are offered at both campuses. Students
may take courses at either campus to fulfill requirements for the
major. Someone wisely said that it requires the knowledge of the historian, the connoisseur, the merchant, the engineer, the psychologist,
and the artist to be a good designer. The following program reflects
that teaching philosophy and gives the most advantageous sequence
for required and recommended classes. Students who complete the
requirements listed below, plus additional general education and
graduation requirements, will be awarded the associate degree.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the associate
degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Freshman Year - First Semester
ART
112
2-D Art Fundamentals
4
ART
114
Interior Design I
4
ART
130
Drawing and Composition I
4
Freshman Year – Second Semester
ARCH 120
Beginning Architectural Drawing
4
ART
102
History of European Art
3
ART
115
Interior Design II (Fall only)
4
Sophomore Year - First Semester
ARCH 110
Beginning Architectural Design
4
ART
214
Interior Design III (Spring only)
4
BUS
121
New Venture Creation
3
Sophomore Year - Second Semester
ART
103
History of Modern Art
3
ARCH 140
2-D Computer Graphics for Architecture
4
ART
148
Color Theory
4
In addition:
One art studio course other than those required for the major
4
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
49
ART COURSES (ART)
ART 101: History of Ancient Art
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys early art and visual culture in a selection of sites,
including prehistoric, Near Eastern, Greek, Roman, and Byzantine.
Emphasis is placed on enhancing students’ ability to observe and
describe visual works, and to understand them in their social and
MARIN.EDU
historical context. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
ART 102: History of European Art
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class surveys the visual creations of a variety of European
cultures from medieval times to the mid-nineteenth century. The
interactions of cultures and religions are considered in relation
to their art. Emphasis is placed on enhancing students’ ability to
observe and describe visual works, and to understand them in their
social and historical context. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 103: History of Modern Art
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class is a survey of art and visual culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. (For focus on recent art, see Art 105.)
Emphasis is placed on enhancing the student’s ability to observe and
describe visual works, and to understand them in their social and
historical context. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
ART 104: History of Asian Art
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is a comparative study of art and visual culture in the
Far East, including India, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.
Work in a variety of materials is studied in relation to its social and
religious contexts. The role of Asian art in the contemporary world is
considered, including work by expatriate artists. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 105: History of Contemporary Art
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course covers recent art, focusing on the art and visual culture
of the last thirty years. Emphasis is on new concepts and techniques
by a diverse selection of artists. The visual and social issues raised by
contemporary art is considered. Includes field trips to art galleries
or other points of interest. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1,
IGETC Area 3A
ART 106: History of Women Artists
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class introduces visual work by women of diverse cultures and
identities. A variety of media is covered, from historical to contemporary eras. Students develop visual awareness, and familarity with
the social circumstances in which the work was produced. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 107: History of American Art
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class surveys the art and visual culture of the United States
in historical and contemporary eras, including work by a diverse
selection of artists. A variety of media will be presented through
classroom presentations and field trips. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
Art
CATALOG 2015/2016
ART 108: History of Arts of the Americas
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as Art 108,
ETST 108, or HUM 108; credit awarded for only one course.
This course covers a selection of the art and visual culture of the
Americas: North, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean.
Art of the United States focuses on works from the culturally diverse
peoples of the Bay Area. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C & G, CSU Area
C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 109: Gallery Seminar in Art
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Seminar in art history based on art available in museums, galleries,
and collections. This course may be conducted at any site where
original art objects are available for study and discussion. It includes
assigned reading, lectures, and discussion trips to study art. Seminar
discussion and presentations follow field trips. Content and areas of
concentration may vary depending on locations and availability of
art. (CSU)
ART 110: History of Islamic Art
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This survey of Islamic art considers the development of artistic forms
produced for the practice of Islam, as well as art and architecture
produced for and by people who live in predominantly Islamic
regions. Visual cultures from Spain to China are discussed, from the
7th century C.E. to the present. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ART 112: 2-D Art Fundamentals
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introductory level studio course that encourages students to
express themselves by using and understanding the elements of 2-D
art: line, shape, texture, value, color, perspective, and space. Principles of composition are explored using a wide variety of media. This
course is required for art majors and highly recommended for all art
students. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 113: 3-D Art Fundamentals
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introductory level studio course that encourages students to
express themselves by using and understanding the elements of 3-D
art: line, plane, volume, mass, surface treatment, light and shadow.
Principles of composition will be explored using a wide variety of
materials that may include wire, cardboard, plaster, clay, papiermache, and mixed media. This course is required for art majors and
highly recommended for all art students. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 114: Interior Design I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introduction to interior design theory and practice, contemporary architecture and furniture design, space design, color theory
and application, construction methods, materials and terminology,
architectural drafting, and interior design client work and presentations. The class includes discussion, lecture, audiovisual materials,
field trips and guest lectures. (CSU) CSU Area C-1
ART 115: Interior Design II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 2. No prerequisite.
Covers period design and decorations from the styles of antiquity
through the Victorian era. Extensive reading is required to cover the
75
historic evolution of interior design in the Western world. A number
of tests, as well as oral, visual, and written projects, are given. This
course may also include field trips that relate to history and interior
design. (CSU)
ART 116: Jewelry Design I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Design and creation of jewelry utilizing basic construction and
casting techniques. Emphasis is on basic skill development. (CSU)
CSU Area C-1
ART 117: Jewelry Design II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 116.
Advanced design and creation of jewelry. Emphasizes development
of soldering skills, die forming, forging, constructed hinges and
catches, and intermediate stone setting. Casting is included. (CSU)
ART 118: Art Gallery Design and Management I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is geared to bring awareness and professional skills to
both studio arts students and those wanting to be employed in the
arts. The class teaches the basic mechanics of preparing, organizing,
designing, and installing art exhibitions at the College of Marin Fine
Art Gallery. Field trips include visits to local galleries, museums,
artist’s studios, other educational venues, non-profit art spaces, and
alternative exhibition venues. (CSU) CSU Area C-1
ART 119: Art Gallery Design and Management II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 118.
This course emphasizes the demonstration of students’ skill, responsibility, and command of concepts and practices involved in the
basic mechanics of preparing, organizing, designing, and installing
art exhibitions at the College of Marin Fine Art Gallery with direct
instructor supervision. The course is geared to studio arts students
and those seeking employment in the arts. Field trips include visits to
local galleries, museums, artist’s studios, other educational venues,
non-profit art spaces, and alternative exhibition venues. (CSU)
ART 128: Art Field Trips
1-4 Units. 0.75 lecture and 0.75 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be
taken as Art 128, ETST 128, or HUM 128; credit awarded for only one
course.
A complement to art history and studio art courses, this course
allows students to experience the art and architecture of sites like
New York, Mexico City, and Rome first-hand. Pre-trip lectures set
up background for an intensive field trip(s) that may include visits
to museums, galleries, libraries, artists’ studios, and to architectural
and archeological sites where lecture, discussion, and personal
exploration take place. May be used to bring students to a major
media-specific conference. (CSU)
ART 129: Materials and Techniques
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Through lecture/demonstrations and hands-on practice, this course
familiarizes students with historical methods and materials of
painting, including paleolithic painting, egg tempera, encaustic, true
fresco and oil techniques of the Renaissance. Assignments involve
making the paint required for creating examples of each medium,
personalizing and adapting the methods to a modern context. (CSU/
UC)
76
Art
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ART 130: Drawing and Composition I
ART 141: Painting II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 140.
Exercises in line, light and shadow, texture, proportion, and
perspective rendering of objects in space; development of composition awareness by means of balance, focal point, area of emphasis,
proportion, economy, etc. A variety of graphic materials (pencil,
charcoal, pen and ink, washes, etc.) is used for both realistic and experimental drawing approaches. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques,
and supervision of works in progress. A sketchbook and/or portfolio
of work done in and out of class may be required. Required of all art
majors. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
The more advanced the student, the more a strong individual approach is encouraged. Because of the varied abilities and experience
found at this level, the semester assignments are self-imposed but
reviewed by the instructor on the basis of scope, technical improvement, and development of concept. Attendance is essential for
instructional, studio, and “critique” sessions. Oil, acrylic, and mixed
media. (CSU/UC)
ART 131: Drawing and Composition II
A course designed to acquaint beginners with the materials, techniques, and experience of painting with watercolor. Frequent critique
sessions, lectures, and demonstrations examine topics such as paper
selection and reaction to the medium, the tendency of watercolor to
flow, and its qualities of transparency and evaporation. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area C-1
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 130.
Continuation of drawing exercises in line, light and shadow, texture,
and perspective rendering of objects in space; development of
principles of composition. A variety of graphic materials (pencil,
charcoal, pen and ink, washes, etc.) is used for both realistic and
experimental drawing as well as an introduction to the use of color
and collage in drawing. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and
supervision of work in progress. A sketchbook and/or portfolio of
work in and out of class may be required. (CSU/UC)
ART 134: Life Drawing I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 130.
This course provides students with a basic understanding of
proportion, structure, and superficial anatomy of the human figure,
combined with further study of appropriate media and drawing techniques. Required of art majors. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 135: Life Drawing II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 134.
This course provides students with a basic understanding of
proportion, structure, and superficial anatomy of the human figure,
combined with further study of appropriate media and drawing
techniques. Required of art majors. (CSU/UC)
ART 138: Advanced Critique
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A monthly critique/seminar designed for intermediate to advanced
students of painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, textiles, photography, jewelry, and mixed media to have their work reviewed
and participate in the review from a variety of perspectives. Note:
“Advanced” means the student has taken a number of courses in art
or is a working artist who wants feedback on his/her work. (CSU)
ART 140: Painting I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 112 or 130.
This course is designed to teach the process of making paintings.
Students methodically cover the essential steps: selecting significant
shapes, balancing composition, mixing paints, perfecting techniques
and developing skills. Four paintings are required of all students.
Attendance is essential for instructional, studio and critique sessions.
Oil, acrylic and mixed media. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area C-1
ART 144: Watercolor I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ART 145: Watercolor II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 144.
A continuation of Watercolor I, but with greater emphasis on
personal development and expression. Students are encouraged to
develop a visual vocabulary and way of using the watercolor medium
to express their own ideas and way of seeing things. (CSU/UC)
ART 146: Life Painting I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 140.
The development and refinement of painting skills, form, and composition using the human figure as subject matter. Both traditional
and experimental means of expression are examined. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and supervision of work in progress. Painting
and/or a portfolio of work in and out of class may be required. (CSU/
UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 147: Life Painting II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 146.
Continued development and refinement of painting skills, form,
and composition using the human figure as a subject matter. Both
traditional and experimental means of expression are examined.
Lectures, demonstrations, critiques, and supervision of work in
progress. Painting and/or a portfolio of work in and out of class may
be required. (CSU/UC)
ART 148: Color Theory
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The general theory and practice of color and its uses in painting,
interior design, architecture, and computer-based design. The course
includes color mixing, color matching, color harmonies, color
interactions, and the effects of different lighting sources on color. The
physics and biology of color are explained, and various cultures’ use
of color is discussed. Color as it applies to still life, landscape, and
portraiture is demonstrated and practiced. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 152: Printmaking I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 130. Advisory:
Art 125.
This course introduces the concepts and techniques of basic fine art
printmaking. Instruction and studio work include intaglio (etching
and drypoint), relief (woodcut and linocut) collagraph and monotype
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77
methods. Photo polymer/solar plate techniques incorporating computer generated images are also introduced. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
are required to use basic design and drawing skills in the development of their assignments. (CSU/UC)
ART 153: Printmaking II
ART 176: Pottery on the Wheel
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 152.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisories: Art
112 or 113; and 130.
A continuing course in the concepts and techniques of printmaking.
Instruction and studio work include intaglio (etching, drypoint, and
engraving), relief (woodcut and linocut) collagraph and monotype
methods. Emphasis is on the fine arts approach to printmaking
although the relationship of these processes to the graphic arts is
explored. Formal and individual critiques on work. (CSU/UC)
ART 165: Fiber Sculpture I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art 112
and 113.
Construction processes involved with interworking of flexible
elements by such techniques as layering, bonding, plaiting, stitching,
and weaving, in a scale that may range from personal object to installation. (CSU) CSU Area C-1
ART 166: Fiber Sculpture II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art
165.
Open to students from all art disciplines including textiles, who seek
to integrate construction with sculpture, painting, and crafts, etc.
An exploration of flexible, fragile, or fibrous materials such as cloth,
paper, plastic, reed, wire, and threads. (CSU)
ART 170: Ceramics I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A basic general ceramics course for those who want to survey various
forming techniques and become familiar with ceramic glaze materials and kiln firing. Students develop an awareness of ceramic design
and explore individual solutions to specific technical and conceptual
assignments. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 171: Ceramics II
This course concentrates on the use of the potter’s wheel in the
creation of functional and sculptural ceramic objects. Techniques
of wheel throwing and trimming cups, bowls, vases, pitchers, lidded
forms, closed forms, teapots and plates will be demonstrated as well
as handle making. Students are required to use basic design and
drawing skills in the development of their assignments. Emphasis is
on refinement of technique rather than quantity. Covers stoneware
glaze development, kiln loading, stoneware and soda firing. (CSU/
UC)
ART 176AB: Pottery on the Wheel I and II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: A: none; B: Art 176A.
Advisories: Art 112 or 113; and 130.
These courses concentrate on the use of the potter’s wheel in the
creation of functional and sculptural ceramic objects. Techniques
of wheel throwing and trimming cups, bowls, vases, pitchers, lidded
forms, closed forms, teapots and plates, as well as handle making.
Students are required to use basic design and drawing skills in the
development of their assignments. Includes use of stoneware glazes,
kiln loading and raku and soda firing. (CSU/UC)
ART 177: Hand Built Ceramics
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisories: Art
113 and 130.
This course concentrates on handbuilding functional ceramic ware
and sculptural objects. Techniques of slab building, coiling, modeling, and press molding cups, bowls, vases, teapots and sculptural
forms are demonstrated. Students are required to use basic design
and drawing skills in developing their assignments. Emphasizes
exploration and creative refinement of technique. (CSU/UC)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 170. Advisory:
Art 113 or 130 or concurrent enrollment.
ART 180: Sculpture I
A second semester beginning ceramics course for those who wish
to continue developing the basic techniques of wheel throwing and
slab building methods with an emphasis on increasingly advanced
projects. Direct participation in glaze preparation and kiln firing.
Students are expected to produce work reflecting an intermediate
understanding of ceramic design, and to explore individual project
resolutions through drawings and group discussion. (CSU/UC)
Study of the structure of form as manifest in self-expression. Survey
of the history of sculpture including contemporary directions.
Instruction in basic techniques of stone and wood carving, modeling,
moldmaking, welding, bronze casting, and plaster. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area C-1
ART 175ABCD: Primitive Ceramics
Study of the structure of form as manifest in self-expression. Survey
of the history of sculpture including contemporary directions.
Instruction in basic techniques of stone and wood carving, modeling,
moldmaking, welding, bronze casting, and plaster. (CSU/UC)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Advisory for all levels: Art 113 and
130. Prerequisites: A: none; B: Art 175A; C: Art 175B; D: Art 175C.
This family of courses surveys the forming and firing methods that
have been the basis of worldwide ceramic traditions before the use of
glazes and modern equipment. Locating clay deposits; preparation
of clay and slip colors. Level A includes coil-forming and burnishing techniques and pit firing, sawdust firing and dung firing. Level
B includes pinching and press mold techniques and charcoal and
smudge firing. Level C includes paddle and anvil forming techniques
and wood sagger and grass firing. Level D includes large format coil
and throw forming techniques; and primary kiln design. Students
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ART 181: Sculpture II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ART 185: Life Sculpture I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
In this class, both classical and contemporary approaches to figure
sculpture are studied. Working from live models, students learn
to interpret the pose, study spatial relationship and proportion,
experiment with scale and learn to compose as they examine human
form. Materials may include clay, wax, and plaster. Historical and
78
Art
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contemporary approaches to the figure are studied in slide lectures
and readings. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 196: Digital Scanning and Archiving of Film,
Slides, and Prints
ART 186: Life Sculpture II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 185.
In this class, both classical and contemporary approaches to
sculpture are studied. Working from live models, students learn to
interpret the pose, study spatial relationship and proportion, experiment with scale, and learn to compose as they examine the human
form. Materials may include clay, wax, and plaster. Historical and
contemporary approaches to the figure are studied in slide lectures
and readings. (CSU/UC)
ART 190: Black and White Photography I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introduction to black and white photography. The basics of
camera use, film development and darkroom printing are presented
with an emphasis on balancing technical skills with artistic expression. Group critiques and visual slide presentations help to inform
bi-weekly shooting assignments. Basic adjustable 35mm film camera
and lens are required. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
ART 191: Black and White Photography II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 190.
This intermediate, darkroom-based course is designed to meet the
needs of art students, photography majors and others who qualify
for an intermediate semester of black and white photography. The
class emphasizes balancing technical skill with development of
concept and artistic expression. Continued discussion and analysis
of student work in group and individual critiques. Greater control
over technique is developed. Assignments are presented as visual
problems to be solved in different ways. Basic adjustable 35mm film
camera and lens required. Shooting assignments outside of class time
are required. (CSU/UC)
ART 192: Black and White Photography III
4.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 190.
This darkroom-based course emphasizes the development of concept
and individual artistic expression. Continued development of
individual strengths and future projects are introduced through assignments. Basic adjustable 35mm film camera and lens are required.
(CSU/UC)
Discover how to design a logical system to organize and locate
image files using cutting-edge, user-friendly, affordable photography
software. Obtain marketable skills and/or archive important images
for future generations. Excellent for art students, photography
majors, and others who have negatives or slides and would like to
scan, modify, or simply archive them digitally using a film scanner. Emphasis is on developing skills through basic assignments.
Software: Adobe Lightroom. (CSU)
ART 200: Portfolio Development
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as Art 200 or
MMST 200A, 200D or 200E; credit awarded for only one course.
Through lecture, research and critiques, students develop a professional portfolio of their personal artwork that reflects their interests,
skills and career goals. This course is for students who have accomplished artistic skills and wish to develop strategies of self-promotion
for their body of work. (CSU)
ART 213: Internship for Art Careers
3.0 Units. 1 lecture, 1.5 lab and 4.5 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 200.
This course bridges the gap between the classroom and the creative
industries. By providing an on-campus lecture class coupled with a
short-term internship, students gain an understanding of applying
their creative work in a real-life situation. Expectations are characterized by work-group activities, multiple projects under deadline, and
collaborative efforts. Internships are not guaranteed. Intern projects
may be suitable for students’ portfolios. (CSU)
ART 216: Jewelry Design III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 117.
This course involves more advanced forming methods, tool making,
repousse, advanced hinges and catches, stone setting, rubber mold
making and casting. (CSU)
ART 217: Jewelry Design IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 216.
ART 193: Beginning Digital Photography
Advanced design and creation of jewelry, emphasizing the functional, conceptual and aesthetic aspects of designing. Includes advanced
forming techniques, advanced hinges and catches, stone setting,
rubber mold making and casting. (CSU)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ART 218: Art Gallery Design and Management III
The exploration of photography as an art form using digital tools and
software. Emphasis is balanced between technical skill and the creative process. In-class exercises, out-of-class shooting assignments,
and group critiques. A basic digital camera is required. (CSU/UC)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 119.
ART 194: Intermediate Digital Photography
4.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 193.
The continued exploration and development of individual photographic digital projects. Emphasis is balanced between improving
technical skill and continuing the creative process. Continued
discussion through critique. A basic digital camera is required.
(CSU/UC)
Advanced course to allow students to apply practical application of
techniques, materials, aims, and principles covered in the first two
semesters. Students to plan and assume responsibilities for various
phases of proposed exhibits to be installed in the Kentfield Campus
Fine Arts Gallery. (CSU)
ART 219: Art Gallery Design and Management IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 218.
Advanced course to allow students to apply practical application of
techniques, materials, aims, and principles covered in the first three
semesters. Students take greater responsibility for all phases of one
specific exhibit to be exhibited at the Kentfield Campus Fine Arts
Gallery. (CSU)
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ART 234: Life Drawing III
ART 246: Life Painting III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 135.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 147.
Lectures, demonstrations, and supervision of work in progress.
Drawing from undraped models. Classwork stresses the expressive
qualities of the figure, and drawing accurately and sensitively with
a variety of media. A sketchbook of work done outside of class is
required. (CSU/UC)
A continuation of painting practices in developing the figure as part
of the composition, correct proportions of the figure in space, light
and shadow, and brushwork. Oil or acrylic paint is used for both
realistic and experimental figure painting, and for developing an
awareness of the use of color. Lectures, demonstrations, critiques,
and supervision of work in progress. Paintings and/or a portfolio of
work done in and out of class may be required. (CSU/UC)
ART 235: Life Drawing IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 234.
Lectures, demonstrations, and supervision of work in progress.
Drawing from undraped models. Classwork stresses the expressive
qualities of the figure, and drawing accurately and sensitively with
a variety of media. A sketchbook of work done outside of class is
required. (CSU/UC)
ART 240: Painting III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 141.
ART 247: Life Painting IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 246.
Advanced instruction in painting the human figure. Individualized
instruction allows for emphasis to be placed on either portraiture or
painting the entire figure. Concepts of color, design and style are included for the advanced student. Experimentation in new techniques
and materials is encouraged. (CSU/UC)
The more advanced the student, the more a strong individual approach is encouraged. Because of the varied abilities and experience
found at this level, the semester assignments are self-imposed but
reviewed by the instructor on the basis of scope, technical improvement, and development of concepts. Attendance is essential for
instructional, studio, and “critique” sessions. Oil, acrylic, and mixed
media. (CSU/UC)
ART 252: Printmaking III
ART 241: Painting IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 252.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 240.
The more advanced the student, the more a strong individual approach is encouraged. Because of the varied abilities and experience
found at this level, the semester assignments are self-imposed but
reviewed by the instructor on the basis of scope, technical improvement, and development of concepts. Attendance is essential for
instructional, studio, and “critique” sessions. Oil, acrylic, and mixed
media. (CSU/UC)
ART 244: Watercolor III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 145.
This course emphasizes personal expression as well as mastery of the
technical challenges particular to the medium. Students are encouraged to further their commitment to their work, balancing technical
skills in direct correlation to their work’s content. Frequent critique
sessions, lectures, and demonstrations examine paper selection and
reaction to the medium, the tendency of watercolor to flow, and its
qualities of transparency and evaporation. (CSU/UC)
ART 245: Watercolor IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 244.
This course continues the emphasis on personal expression and
exploration, and on mastering technical challenges particular to the
medium. Students further their commitment to their work, balancing technical skills in direct correlation to their work’s content. Frequent critique sessions, lectures, and demonstrations examine paper
selection and reaction to the medium, the tendency of watercolor to
flow, and its qualities of transparency and evaporation. (CSU/UC)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 153.
An advanced course in the concepts and techniques of fine art
printmaking. Instruction and studio work include drypoint, etching
and engraving, linocut and collagraphs, monotype and solar plate
exploration. (CSU)
ART 253: Printmaking IV
A continuing course in the concepts and techniques of fine art printmaking. Instruction and studio work include advanced explorations
in intaglio, relief, lithography, monotype, collagraphs, and photo
polymer plate processes. (CSU)
ART 265: Fiber Sculpture III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art
166.
Experimental media in the textile construction field encourage ideas
not bound by a vast history and lend themselves to fresh and spontaneous ways of working with surface and structure. Application of
skills and personal direction to advanced level work. Emphasis on
developing individual concepts and expression. (CSU)
ART 266: Fiber Sculpture IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Art
265.
Emphasis is placed on the design process and development of a
personal strategy for problem solving. Problems pertaining to
perception, use of the imagination, and expanding imagery are given
in areas of construction technique as well as dyeing and surface
treatment. Students are expected to have a body of finished work that
demonstrates their explorations and conceptual approach at the end
of this class. (CSU)
80
Art
ART 270: Ceramics III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 171. Advisory:
Art 113 or 130.
Advanced and in-depth interpretation of common class projects
with greater expectations of further technical and conceptual
development. Mentoring of beginning students, lab assistance in
glaze preparation, kiln loading and firing. Advanced proficiency with
various types of clay bodies and glaze formulation. Concentration
on individual projects which illustrate more comprehensive aesthetic
understanding and technical independence. (CSU)
ART 271: Ceramics IV
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ART 278T: Large Scale Ceramics: Emphasis on Tile
and Murals
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 171 or 177.
Advisories: Art 112, 113, 130.
This course is intended for the intermediate and advanced ceramics
student who is already well grounded in basic clay working skills
and glazing methods. This is an opportunity to enlarge the scale of
individual work as well as participate in the design, creation and
installation of public art. Examples of historical and contemporary
architectural and large scale ceramics are explored through field
trips, slide lectures and visits to regional sites. (CSU)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 270. Advisories:
Art 113 and 130.
ART 280: Sculpture III
Advanced and in-depth interpretation of the common class project
with greater expectations of further technical and conceptual
development. Mentoring of beginning students, lab assistance in
glaze calculation, kiln loading and firing. Advanced proficiency with
various types of clay bodies and glaze formulation. Concentration
on individual projects which illustrate more comprehensive aesthetic
understanding and technical independence. (CSU)
Study of the structure of form as manifest in self-expression. Survey
of the history of sculpture, including contemporary directions.
Instruction in basic techniques of stone and wood carving, modeling,
moldmaking, welding, bronze casting, and plaster. Visiting artists
participate and field trips to museums and galleries are planned.
(CSU)
ART 275: Ceramic Sculpture
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 171 or 177.
Advisory: Art 113 or 130.
Advanced study of ceramics with a focus on the technical and aesthetic considerations of ceramics as a sculptural medium. Intended
for students already well grounded in basic techniques who are
interested in the study of historical and contemporary approaches to
clay as an expressive medium. (CSU/UC)
ART 276: Advanced Wheel Thrown Ceramics
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 176. Advisory:
Art 113 and 130.
An in-depth interpretation of wheel thrown ceramics with greater
expectations of further technical and conceptual development. Mentoring of beginning students, lab assistance in glaze calculation, kiln
loading and firing. Advanced proficiency with various types of clay
bodies and glaze formulation. Concentration on individual projects
which illustrate more comprehensive aesthetic understanding and
technical independence. (CSU/UC)
ART 278F: Large Scale Ceramics: Emphasis on the
Figure as Primary Subject
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 171 or 177.
Advisories: Art 113 and 130.
This course, intended for intermediate and advanced ceramics students who are already well grounded in basic clay working skills and
glazing methods, is an opportunity to enlarge the scale of individual
work as well as participate in the design, creation and installation
of public art. Each project requires progressive technical ability and
is assigned according to the student’s level of experience, areas of
interest and skill level. Examples of historical and contemporary
architectural and large scale ceramics are explored through field
trips, slide lectures and visits to regional sites. (CSU)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ART 281: Sculpture IV
Study of the structure of form as manifest in self-expression. Survey
of the history of sculpture, including contemporary directions.
Instruction in basic techniques of stone and wood carving, modeling,
moldmaking, welding, bronze casting, and plaster. Visiting artists
participate and field trips to museums and galleries are planned.
(CSU)
ART 285: Life Sculpture III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 186.
This is a continuation of Life Sculpture II. Continued exploration
of development and technique with emphasis on individual investigation of content. Students have an opportunity to move toward
abstraction to explore basic concepts of modern sculpture. (CSU/UC)
ART 286: Life Sculpture IV
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 285.
This is a continuation of Life Sculpture III. Continued exploration
of development and technique with emphasis on individual investigation of content. Students have an opportunity to move toward
abstraction to explore basic concepts of modern sculpture. (CSU/UC)
ART 290: Black and White Photography IV
4.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Art 190.
An emphasis on the development of individual artistic expression
using advanced techniques. Continued development of individual
projects working towards a portfolio. Darkroom use. A basic 35mm
adjustable film camera and lens are required. (CSU/UC)
ART 295: Advanced Projects in Art
4.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Completion of highest course
level in area of study, such as Art 131, 217, 235, 241, 245, 247, 271, 281,
286, or 290. Advisory: Art 138 and 118.
This course provides advanced students with the opportunity
to design and implement individual creative projects under the
direction of the instructor. It provides a forum for exploring and
testing potential project ideas that students take from concept to final
product. Intended for students who are ready to plan, design, and
CATALOG 2015/2016
execute independent projects such as exhibitions, publications, and
installations. May be taken four times for credit with a distinctive
project required each time. (CSU)
ART 296: Advanced Group Projects in Art
4.0 Units. 6 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Completion of highest
course level in area of study, such as Art 131, 217, 235, 241, 245, 247,
271, 281, 286, or 290. Advisory: Art 138 and 118.
This course provides advanced students with the opportunity to
design and implement group creative projects under the direction of
the instructor. It provides a forum for exploring and testing potential
project ideas that students take from concept to final product. Intended for students who are ready to plan, design, and execute group
projects such as public installations and group exhibitions. May be
taken up to four times for credit, with a distinctive group project
required each time. (CSU)
ASTRONOMY
Will the universe expand forever? Is there life on other planets? How
do stars form? These are only a few of the exciting questions confronting astronomers. The development of space observatories, the
construction of large telescopes on earth, and the availability of large
computers for data analysis and theoretical calculations has been
accompanied by a rapid growth in the sophistication of this field.
Career Options
Astronomer/Astrophysicist, Astronomy Instructor, Director of
Planetarium/Science Museums, Observatory Staff Member, Technical Staff Member
Department Phone: 415-485-9549
ASTRONOMY COURSES (ASTR)
ASTR 101: Introduction to Astronomy
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is a non-mathematical description of the universe designed especially for the nonscience student. Topics include motions
in the sky, historical astronomy, Newton’s laws, gravitation, light, the
solar system, stellar evolution, galaxies, and cosmology. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC 5A
ASTR 117L: Introduction to Astronomy Lab
1.0 Unit. 3.3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ASTR 101 or concurrent
enrollment.
This course will develop students’ ability to investigate and solve
problems in astronomy. Techniques of experimentation, direct
observation, data gathering, and interpretation are employed to
solve both classical and contemporary problems in astronomy. The
class includes observations using telescopes, astrophotography, and
computer acquisition of data. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area
B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area 5A
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
81
AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR
TECHNOLOGY
The Automotive Collision Repair Technology Program is designed
to prepare students for entry into one or more of the many service
branches of the expanding automotive collision repair and maintenance fields. This program will also meet the needs of those in the
adult community interested in acquiring the knowledge and skills
necessary to repair and maintain the appearance and value of their
personal vehicles.
Career Options
Auto Design Engineer, Insurance Estimator/Adjuster, Owner/Operator/Manager (Independent or Dealer), Specialist in Body Work,
Specialist in Painting, Working Foreman
Faculty
Ron Palmer
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8532
A.S. IN AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR TECHNOLOGY,
MASTER COLLISION REPAIR, OCCUPATIONAL
The Automotive Collision Repair Technology Program is offered at
the Indian Valley Campus. Students who complete the requirements
for Master Collision Repair in ACRT listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded an
Associate in Science degree. In addition, students may be credited
with up to two years toward their apprenticeship in Marin County’s
automotive reconditioning and refinishing market. Note: Students
are required to complete English 150 for the associate degree. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ACRT/AUTO 95
Applied Automotive Math
1
ACRT
101
Basic Sheet Metal Operations for Automotive Collision Repair
2
ACRT
102
Introduction to Automotive Collision Repair
2
ACRT
103
Nonstructural Analysis and Damage Repair
2
ACRT
104
Structural Analysis and Damage Repair
2
ACRT
105
Advanced Structural Analysis and Damage Repair
2
ACRT
106
Metal Fabrication
2
ACRT
107
MIG Welding for Automotive Collision Repair
2
ACRT
201
Automotive Paint: Waterborne, Clearcoats, and Detailing
4
ACRT
202
Automotive Paint: Three-Stage and Custom Painting
4
ACRT/AUTO 225 Automotive Careers and Customer Relations 2
ACRT
279
Frame Straightening and Repair
2
AUTO
111
Automotive Maintenance – Intermediate
3
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
5
ACRT
160A Automotive Painting and Refinishing Repair Workshop
1.5
ACRT
160B Automotive Dent and Damage Repair Workshop
1.5
ACRT
160C Automotive Structural Repair Workshop
1.5
ACRT
160D Automotive Mechanical and Electrical Repair Workshop
1.5
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
41
82
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR TECHNOLOGY COURSES
(ACRT)
ACRT 100: Career Math, Resumes and Customer
Relations
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. May also be taken as AUTO 100; credit
awarded for only one course.
This couse reviews addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages. Also
included are ratio and proportion, the metric system, graphs and
applications specific to automotive technology, paint mixing ratios
and writing repair orders. Training on writing a resume, filling
out job applications, developing a portfolio, and organizing and
completing a personal tax form. The course covers worker/employer
relationships and addresses customer relations in the industry which
includes improving individual attitudes, productivity and morale in
the workplace.
ACRT 101: Basic Sheet Metal Operations for
Automotive Collision Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces basic metalworking techniques and their
usefulness in other applications. It includes basic metal straightening fundamentals and introduces tools, techniques, and theories of
metalworking. Students learn how to follow a professionally prepared
blueprint or personal drawing, and learn about hybrid technology
components and new vehicle aerodynamics. They study metallurgy,
and manufacturing technology as it applies to the new methods of
mass production. (CSU)
ACRT 101A: Basic Sheet Metal Operations for
Automotive Collision Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 101.) (CSU)
ACRT 102: Introduction to Automotive Collision
Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces basic auto body repair techniques and their
usefulness in other applications. The course includes basic panel
repair and introduces tools, techniques, and theories of body repair
and priming. Students learn how to follow a professionally prepared
blueprint or personal drawing, and learn about hybrid technology
components and new vehicle aerodynamics. They study metallurgy,
and manufacturing technology as it applies to the new methods of
mass production. (CSU)
ACRT 102A: Introduction to Automotive Collision
Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 102.) (CSU)
ACRT 103: Nonstructural Analysis and Damage
Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces nonstructural analysis techniques and their
usefulness in other applications. The course includes basic metal
repair fundamentals, and introduces tools and techniques. Students
learn how to follow a professionally prepared blueprint or personal
MARIN.EDU
drawing, and learn about repair of hybrid technology components.
The course includes manufacturing technology as it applies to the
new methods of mass production, including new vehicle aerodynamics, and the study of basic metallurgy and synthetic substitutes.
(CSU)
ACRT 103A: Nonstructural Analysis and Damage
Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 103.) (CSU)
ACRT 104: Structural Analysis and Damage Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces structural analysis techniques and their
usefulness in other applications. The course includes basic metal
straightening fundamentals, and introduces tools, techniques, and
theories of damage repair. Students learn how to follow a professionally prepared blueprint or personal drawing. They learn about repair
of hybrid technology components, and study manufacturing technology as it applies to the new methods of mass production, including
new vehicle aerodynamics. Additional topics include metallurgy,
synthetic substitutes, and mathematical/geometric predictions of
what happens during impact/repair. (CSU)
ACRT 104A: Structural Analysis and Damage Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 104.) (CSU)
ACRT 105: Advanced Structural Analysis and
Damage Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces advanced structural analysis techniques and
their usefulness in other applications. The course includes advanced
metal straightening fundamentals, and introduces tools, techniques,
and theories of plastic damage repair. Students learn how to follow
a professionally prepared blueprint or personal drawing, and learn
about repair of hybrid technology components. Additional topics
include manufacturing technology, new vehicle aerodynamics,
metallurgy, synthetic substitutes, and mathematical/geometric
predictions of what happens during impact/repair. (CSU)
ACRT 105A: Advanced Structural Analysis and
Damage Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 105.) (CSU)
ACRT 106: Metal Fabrication
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces advanced metal fabrication techniques and
their usefulness in other applications. The course includes basic
metal straightening fundamentals, and introduces tools, techniques,
and theory of metal fabrication. Students learn how to follow a professionally prepared blueprint or personal drawing. Upon completion, students should be able to build components/chassis with the
correct geometric angles, and to fabricate, form, and fit various sheet
metal components to meet industry standards. (CSU)
CATALOG 2015/2016
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
ACRT 106A: Metal Fabrication
ACRT 164A: Automotive Plastic Repair Workshop
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 106.) (CSU)
A skill-building workshop in the area of automotive plastic repair.
Students work on projects of their choice under the direction
and supervision of the instructor. Practice includes methods and
techniques in all levels of auto plastic repair. Related aspects of the
automotive collision repair field are also reviewed and practiced.
(CSU)
ACRT 107: MIG Welding for Automotive Collision
Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces basic auto body repair techniques using the
MIG (metal inert gas) Welder. The course includes a short introduction to welding, and introduces MIG techniques and theories of
metalworking. Students learn how to follow a professionally prepared
blueprint or personal drawing. Other topics include hybrid technology components, manufacturing technology as it applies to the new
methods of mass production including new vehicle aerodynamics,
and metallurgy. (CSU)
ACRT 107A: MIG Welding for Automotive Collision
Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
83
ACRT 169: Metalworking and Fundamentals I
6.0 Units. 6 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course prepares students to successfully enter the automotive
collision repair field, and to understand metalworking techniques
for their usefulness in other applications. It includes basic metal
straightening fundamentals and introduces the beginner to the tools,
techniques, and theory of metalworking. Through this practicum
experience, students have the opportunity to integrate their classroom knowledge in a workplace environment. (CSU)
(For course description, please see ACRT 107.) (CSU)
ACRT 171: Dent and Damage Repair
ACRT 160A: Automotive Painting and Refinishing
Repair Workshop
This course introduces proper techniques for repairing exterior auto
body panels that meet industry standards. The class analyzes different damaged panels and makes repair plans, including removal and
sequential plans for repair. I-CAR training materials are used, and
I-CAR certification may be earned. (CSU)
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A skill-building workshop in the area of automotive refinishing.
Students work on projects of their choice under the direction and
supervision of the instructor. Practice includes methods and techniques in all levels of auto refinishing. Related aspects of the automotive collision repair field are also reviewed and practiced. (CSU)
ACRT 161A: Automotive Dent and Damage Repair
Workshop
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A skill-building workshop in the area of automotive dent and
damage repair. Students work on projects of their choice under the
direction and supervision of the instructor. Practice includes methods and techniques in all levels of auto non-structural repair. Related
aspects of the automotive collision repair field are also reviewed and
practiced. (CSU)
ACRT 162A: Automotive Structural Repair Workshop
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A skill-building workshop in the area of automotive structural
repair. Students work on projects of their choice under the direction
and supervision of the instructor. Practice includes methods and
techniques in all levels of auto structural repair. Related aspects of
the automotive collision repair field are also reviewed and practiced.
(CSU)
ACRT 163A: Automotive Mechanical and Electrical
Repair Workshop
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A skill-building workshop in the area of automotive mechanical
and electrical repair. Students work on projects of their choice under
the direction and supervision of the instructor. Practice includes
methods and techniques in all levels of auto mechanical and electrical repair. Related aspects of the automotive collision repair field are
also reviewed and practiced. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
ACRT 180: Panel Replacement
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
This course covers the basic procedures involved in the removal and
replacement of quarter panels, rocker panels, door panels, and top
panels. It also includes the various methods available for splicing
damaged body panels or sections, rocker panels, floor sections, and
front and rear body clips. I-CAR materials are used, and I-CAR
certification may be earned. (CSU)
ACRT 201: Automotive Paint: Waterborne, Clear
Coat, and Detailing
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the highly-skilled field of automotive spot
painting and refinishing. It includes a comprehensive study of the
materials, equipment, and techniques necessary for the successful
application of automotive refinishing material. The course also
includes auto body care and maintenance: buffing, rubbing, and
polishing. Through the practicum experience, students have the
opportunity to integrate their classroom knowledge in a workplace
environment. (CSU)
ACRT 201A: Automotive Paint: Waterborne, Clear
Coat, and Detailing
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 201.) (CSU)
84
Automotive Technology
MARIN.EDU
ACRT 202: Automotive Paint: Three-Stage and
Custom Painting
ACRT 290A: Electric Vehicle Conversion and Hybrid
Maintenance
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces students to the highly-skilled field of automotive three-stage and custom painting. It includes a comprehensive
study of the materials, equipment, and techniques necessary for the
successful application of automotive refinishing material. Through
the practicum experience, students have the opportunity to integrate
their classroom knowledge in a workplace environment. (CSU)
(For course description, please see ACRT 290.) (CSU)
ACRT 202A: Automotive Paint: Three-Stage and
Custom Painting
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 202.) (CSU)
ACRT 225: Automotive Careers and Customer
Relations
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as ACRT 225
or AUTO 225; credit awarded for only one course.
This course provides training on how to write a resume, fill out a job
application, develop a portfolio, and organize and complete a personal tax form. The course covers work ethics and worker/employer
relations. It addresses customer relations in the auto repair industry
and includes how to improve individual attitudes, productivity, and
morale in the workplace. Students also examine methods of work
and time-scheduling in independent automotive repair dealerships,
service stations and manufactures dealerships. Speakers from the
automotive industry present their personal career experiences. (CSU)
ACRT 279: Frame Straightening and Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course covers conventional and unitized constructed vehicle
frames, straightening and alignment of each type, alignment at cross
members, rear and side frame members, suspension systems, and
steering principles in their relationship to frame alignment. Through
this practicum experience, students will have the opportunity to
integrate their classroom knowledge in a workplace environment.
(CSU)
ACRT 279A: Frame Straightening and Repair
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see ACRT 279.) (CSU)
ACRT 290: Electric Vehicle Conversion and Hybrid
Maintenance
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
May be taken as ACRT 290 or ELEC 290; credit awarded for only one
course.
This course covers hybrid maintenance, guiding students through
the complete process of converting a vehicle from a gasoline engine
to an electrically-powered engine. Through lecture and hands-on
experience, students learn the principles behind good component
layout, battery rack and box design, construction details, and electrical wiring. Additional topics include AC and DC drive systems, types
of batteries, selecting the right chassis, transmission adapter housing
design, and handling chargers and controllers. (CSU)
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY
The Automotive Technology Program is offered at the Indian Valley
Campus. It is designed to prepare students to enter the automotive
service repair industry. The program has been certified by Automotive Technician Training Standards (ATTS) meeting strict industry
standards in its specialty areas. While completing the program for
the A.S. degree or a Certificate of Achievement, students are required
to work in the service repair industry, as well as provide their own
basic tool set. Four Certificates of Achievement are offered.
Career Options
Auto Mechanic - General, Brake Specialist, Computer Systems
Specialist, Diagnostician Specialist, Electrical Repair Specialist,
Emission Control Systems Specialist, Factory Service Representative,
Front End Specialist, Fuel Injection Specialist, Parts Salesperson,
Pre-Teacher Training, Private Business Owner, Service Manager,
Transmission Specialist, Tune-Up Specialist
Faculty
Nick Fara, Ron Palmer
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8531
A.S. IN AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY: MASTER REPAIR
TECHNICIAN, OCCUPATIONAL
(Certificates of Achievement also awarded.)
An Associate of Science degree in Automotive Technology: Master
Repair Technician is awarded for satisfactory completion of the technical requirements, as well as the general education requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory performance
in required technical training. The Master Repair Technician career
path is designed to prepare students to enter the automotive service
repair industry at the third year apprenticeship level. The goal
of this Certificate is to provide the student with both theory and
manipulative skills training in Engine Repair, Brakes, Suspensions,
Drive Trains, Heating and Air Conditioning, Electrical/Performance
Systems and Emission Technician areas included in the Automotive Technician Training Standards (ATTS). While completing the
program for the Certificate of Achievement or degree, students are
required to work 2000 hours in the service repair industry, as well
as provide their own basic tool set. Note: Students are required to
complete English 150 for the associate degree. All students should
consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
AUTO/ACRT 95* Applied Automotive Math 1
AUTO
112
Automotive Engines
4
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
5
AUTO
114
Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
4
AUTO
116
Automotive Electrical Systems
6
AUTO
118
Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
6
AUTO/ACRT 225 Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
2
AUTO
228
Automotive Computer Controls
4
AUTO
229
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
4
AUTO
232
Automatic Transmission/ Transaxles
4
Automotive Technology
CATALOG 2015/2016
AUTO
233
Manual Drive Trains and Axles
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
AUTO
238
Basic Area Clean Air Car Course
AUTO
240
Enhanced Area Clean Air Car Course
AUTO
249
Independent Study (Fieldwork)
MACH 120
Machine Technology I
MACH 130
Welding I
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
4
2.5
3.5
1
4
3
2
60
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT IN AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNOLOGY: CHASSIS REPAIR TECHNICIAN
The Chassis Repair Technician career path is designed to prepare
students to enter the automotive service repair industry at the second
year apprenticeship level or higher. The goal of this certificate is to
provide the student with both theory and manipulative skills training in engine repair, brakes, suspensions, drive trains, and heating
and air conditioning areas included in the Automotive Technician
Training Standards (ATTS). While completing the certificate program, students are required to work 1500 hours in the service repair
industry, as well as provide their own basic tool set.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
AUTO/ACRT 95
Applied Automotive Math 1
AUTO
112
Automotive Engines
4
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
5
AUTO
118
Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
6
AUTO/ACRT 225 Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
2
AUTO
232
Automatic Transmission/ Transaxles
4
AUTO
233
Manual Drive Trains and Axles
4
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
2.5
AUTO
249C Independent Study (Fieldwork)
3
MACH 120
Machine Technology I
3
MACH 130
Welding I
2
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
36.5
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT IN AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNOLOGY: ELECTRICAL/PERFORMANCE TECHNICIAN
The Electrical/Performance Technician career path is designed to
prepare students to enter the automotive service repair industry
at the second year apprenticeship level or higher. The goal of this
certificate is to provide the student with both theory and manipulative skills training in electrical/performance systems area included
in the Automotive Technician Training Standards (ATTS). While
completing the certificate program, students are required to work
1000 hours in the service repair industry, as well as provide their own
basic tool set.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Select 29.5 units from the following courses:
AUTO/ACRT 95
Applied Automotive Math 1
AUTO
113
Specialized Electronic Training
5
AUTO
114
Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
4
AUTO
116
Automotive Electrical Systems
6
AUTO/ACRT 225 Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
2
AUTO
228
Automotive Computer Controls
4
AUTO
229
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
4
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
2.5
AUTO
249B Independent Study (Fieldwork)
2
AUTO
281
Electrical and Electronic Systems Training - A6 Alternative
2
85
AUTO
283
Engine Performance Diagnosis and Repair - A8 Alternative
2
AUTO
285
Advanced Engine Performance/Emissions - L1 Alternative
2
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
MINIMUM OF 29.5
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT IN AUTOMOTIVE
TECHNOLOGY: EMISSIONS/PERFORMANCE TECHNICIAN
The Emissions/Performance Technician career path is designed to
prepare students to enter the automotive service repair industry
at the second year apprenticeship level or higher. The goal of this
Certificate is to provide the student with both theory and manipulative skills training in Electrical/Performance Systems and Emission
Technician areas included in the Automotive Technician Training
Standards (ATTS). In addition the courses are required by the Bureau
of Automotive Repair to meet the educational requirement to be
eligible to take the test to become an Advanced Emission Specialist
Smog Technician. While completing the certificate program, students are required to work 1000 hours in the service repair industry,
as well as provide their own basic tool set.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
AUTO/ACRT 95
Applied Automotive Math 1
AUTO
114
Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
4
AUTO/ACRT 225 Automotive Careers and Customer Relations
2
AUTO
229
Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting and Diagnosis
4
AUTO
235
Automotive Air Conditioning
2.5
AUTO
238
Basic Area Clean Air Car Course
3.5
AUTO
240
Enhanced Area Clean Air Car Course
1
AUTO
249B Independent Study (Fieldwork)
2
AUTO
281
Electrical and Electronic System Training – A6 Alternative
2
AUTO
283
Engine Performance Diagnosis and Repair – A8 Alternative
2
AUTO
285
Advanced Engine Performance/Emissions – L1 Alternative
2
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
26
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY COURSES (AUTO)
AUTO 100: Career Math, Resumes and Customer
Relations
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. May also be taken as ACRT 100; credit
awarded for only one course.
This couse reviews addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages. Also
included are ratio and proportion, the metric system, graphs and
applications specific to automotive technology, paint mixing ratios
and writing repair orders. Training on writing a resume, filling
out job applications, developing a portfolio, and organizing and
completing a personal tax form. The course covers worker/employer
relationships and addresses customer relations in the industry which
includes improving individual attitudes, productivity and morale in
the workplace.
AUTO 110: Introduction to Automotive Maintenance
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
An introductory course studying basic lab procedures, safety, service
information, oil change service, under hood inspection, under vehicle service and belts, hoses, tubing services, tire and wheel service,
and cooling system service. (CSU)
86
Automotive Technology
AUTO 111: Automotive Maintenance - Intermediate
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This intermediate course provides training in engine testing and
repair, engine performance, fuel and emission service, general
electrical system repair, battery service, brake service and suspension, and steering and alignment service. (CSU)
AUTO 112: Automotive Engines
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive engines used on cars, pickups, light trucks, and utility
vehicles. The course covers operation and repair of automotive
engines including disassembly, testing, and reassembly. Automotive
machine shop skills are not included. (CSU)
AUTO 112A: Automotive Engines
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 112.) (CSU)
AUTO 113: Specialized Electronic Training
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in electrical and electronic systems
used on cars, pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. It includes
theory and operations of OHMS law, Digital Volt Ohm Meters, electrical circuits, wiring diagrams, schematics, and wire repair. (CSU)
AUTO 113A: Specialized Electronic Training
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
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systems; and service rack, pinion, and worm gear steering gears.
Diagnosing and troubleshooting all of these systems is included.
Health and safety working with asbestos is stressed. (CSU)
AUTO 118A: Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
6.0 Units. 3 lecture and 9 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 118.) (CSU)
AUTO 215A: Vehicle Service
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides instruction in theory and hands-on performance of the basic service skills, including engine inspection and
repair, transmission and transaxles, and heating and air conditioning, needed for initial employment in the automotive service field.
(CSU)
AUTO 228: Automotive Computer Controls
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive computer control systems used on cars, pickups, light
trucks and utility vehicles. It covers operation of sensors, actuators
and control modules, and the use of modern scan tools, Digital Storage Oscilloscopes and diagnostic tools. (CSU)
AUTO 228A: Automotive Computer Controls
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 228.) (CSU)
(For course description, please see AUTO 113.) (CSU)
AUTO 229: Automotive Systems, Troubleshooting
and Diagnosis
AUTO 114: Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive electronic systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks,
and utility vehicles. It covers the diagnostic thought process used to
diagnose and repair cranking, charging, ignition, air bag, lighting
systems, gauge and instrument panels, horn, wiper/washer, and
accessory systems. (CSU)
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive fuel systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. It covers operation and repair of fuel systems, carburetors, and electronic fuel injection systems. Modern diagnostic tools
and equipment are used. (CSU)
AUTO 114A: Automotive Basic Fuel Systems
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 114.) (CSU)
AUTO 116: Automotive Electrical Systems
6.0 Units. 3 lecture and 9 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive electrical systems used in cars, pickups, light trucks, and
utility vehicles. Emphasis is placed on developing a comprehensive
understanding of all electrical components, with special emphasis on
diagnosis, repair, and testing of electrical systems. (CSU)
AUTO 116A: Automotive Electrical Systems
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 116.) (CSU)
AUTO 118: Brakes, Alignment and Suspension
6.0 Units. 3 lecture and 9 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
This course provides training on wheel balance, wheel alignment,
brake repair, automotive suspensions, and steering systems. Students
learn to balance wheels; operate wheel aligners including four-wheel
computer aligners; repair and service disc, drum, and anti-lock brake
AUTO 229A: Automotive Systems and ASE
Preparation
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive electronic systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks
and utility vehicles. It covers the diagnostic thought process used to
diagnose and repair cranking, charging, ignition, air bag, lighting
systems, gauge and instrument panels, horn, wiper/washer, and accessory systems. Each section of study includes an ASE review. (CSU)
AUTO 230: Alternative Fuel Vehicles
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 2. No prerequisite.
Advisory: AUTO 113 and 116.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
computer-controlled light duty vehicles. The course covers diesel,
bio-diesel, CNG, LPG, LNG, electric engines, fuel systems, air induction, exhaust systems and electronic controls. (CSU)
AUTO 230A: Alternative Fuel Vehicles
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 230.) (CSU)
Behavioral Science
CATALOG 2015/2016
AUTO 233: Manual Drive Trains and Axles
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive manual transmissions and transaxles used on cars,
pickups, light trucks, and utility vehicles. It covers construction,
function, and principles of operation including clutches, transmissions, transaxles and 4-wheel drive systems. (CSU)
87
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
Behavioral science is an interdisciplinary study of human behavior,
encompassing such disciplines as anthropology, psychology, and sociology. The courses offered are intended to be used as a background
for general education.
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
AUTO 233A: Manual Drive Trains and Axles
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 233.) (CSU)
AUTO 235: Automotive Air Conditioning
2.5 Units. 2 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This course provides training in diagnosing and servicing modern
automotive heating and air conditioning systems used on cars, pickups, light trucks and utility vehicles. It covers construction, function
and principles of heating and air conditioning systems, components
and controls. (CSU)
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE COURSES (BEHS)
BEHS 103: Human Sexuality
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Students may receive
credit for BEHS 103 or BIOL 108A, but not both courses.
AUTO 239: Bureau of Automotive Repair (B.A.R.)
Update Training
This survey course examines aspects of human sexual behavior. Topics are considered from psychological, social, cultural, and biological perspectives. Topics include sexual anatomy and physiology,
hormones, conception and contraception, sex research, sex and the
lifespan, human sexual activities and behaviors, sexual orientation,
gender, sex and society, and contemporary sexual issues. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7 or E, IGETC Area 4
1.0 Unit. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. Eighteen lecture hours.
BEHS 105: Sex Roles in Contemporary Society
This course meets Bureau of Automotive Repair (B.A.R.) biennial
update requirements for smog technicians wishing to renew their
state license. (CSU)
AUTO 244: Smog Check Inspector Level 1 and 2
Training
5.5 Units. 3 lecture and 5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course satisfies the educational prerequisite to become a
California Bureau of Automotive Repair Smog Check Inspector. The
course provides engine and emission control systems training as well
as training on BAR rules and regulations. (CSU)
AUTO 244A: Smog Check Inspector Level 1 and 2
Training
5.5 Units. 3 lecture and 5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see AUTO 244.) (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines the ways in which female and male roles and
sex role stereotyping influence our lives. Topics include biological
and cultural contributions to sex role-playing in interpersonal relationships, and the impact of sex roles on personal growth. Emphasis
on the social and personal implications of moving toward androgyny
(role-free human behavior and identity). (CSU/UC)
BEHS 114: Chemical Dependency
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines the behavioral and psychological effects
of chemical dependency. Included is an analysis of the effects of
substance abuse on the family and the sociological conditions
contributing to substance abuse. The primary focus is on the role of
the mental health professional in issues of substance abuse. (CSU)
CSU Area D-7 or E
AUTO 250A: Automotive Service Excellence (ASE)
Certification Exam Preparation
BEHS 118: Drugs and Behavior
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces concepts, theories, and perspectives associated with the behavioral analysis of drugs and alcohol. The definitions of various types of drug use, drug abuse, and drug dependence
are addressed. The pharmacological perspective is also explained,
including the factors that influence drug action and the classification
of psychoactive drugs and their effects. Legal drugs, such as alcohol,
tobacco, and psychotherapeutic drugs are discussed and analyzed
using the behavioral perspective. (CSU/UC) CSU Area E
This course prepares students for the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Certification tests. It covers ASE tests
A1 through A8, and G1.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
BEHS 130: Race and Ethnicity
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as BEHS 130
or SOC 130; credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers an in-depth examination of race and ethnicity in
the United States. Specifically, students gain a greater understanding
of the concepts of race and ethnicity and the historic and present-day
implications of prejudice, discrimination, and racism in our society.
Students examine various theories of racial and ethnic stratification,
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immigration and the assimilation process, new and changing ethnoracial identities, and dominant-minority group interactions. (CSU)
BEHS 150: Introduction to Research Methods
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or PSY 110 or ANTH
101 or ANTH 102. May be taken as ANTH 150, BEHS 150, PSY 150, or
SOC 150; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the methods, logic, and empirical and analytical strategies behavioral scientists use to study the social world.
Students gain knowledge and practical experience in the scientific
method, evaluation of evidence, and the research design and
development process. Key topics include qualitative and quantitative
modes of inquiry, formulating research questions, developing and
testing hypotheses, ethics of research, and developing a study design
and methodology. (CSU)
BEHS 252: Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
3.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 4.5 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. Prerequisite: PSY
110, 112 or 114 or SOC 110 or concurrent enrollment. May be taken as
BEHS 252 or PSY 252; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is designed to give students meaningful participation
in a psychologically related community service agency in order to
understand the applications of psychological principles, theories, and
concepts. With the mutual consent of student and instructor each
student is placed in a school, social agency, special education program, mental health agency, or community organization and works
under the direct supervision of someone with a degree, credential, or
demonstrated expertise in psychology or sociology. (CSU)
BIOLOGY
Biology career options include dozens of intriguing specialties. One
can concentrate on microbiology and investigate viruses, bacteria,
or molds. One can focus on cytology and study cells or histology and
delve into the structure of animal and vegetable tissue. Ichthyology,
parasitology, embryology, genetics, ecology, and biochemistry are a
few of the other choices in the field. Emerging areas of emphasis include the concern for the environment and allied health professions.
Career Options
Agricultural Biologist, Biochemist, Biologist, Botanist, Chiropractor,
Dentist, Entomologist, Environmental Specialist, Fish and Game
Technical Aide, Fish and Game Warden, Food Technologist, Forester,
Genetic Counselor, Horticulturist, Industrial Hygienist, Inhalation
Therapist, Laboratory Technician, Marine Biologist, Medical Technologist, Microbiologist, Nuclear Medical Technician, Nutritionist,
Occupational Therapist, Orthotist-Prosthetist, Osteopath, Park
Naturalist/Ranger, Pharmacist, Pharmacologist, Physical Therapist,
Physician/Surgeon, Podiatrist, Registered Nurse, Research Assistant,
Sanitarian, Scientific Illustrator, Speech Pathologist/ Audiologist,
Teacher, Technical Writer, Veterinarian, Wildlife Specialist, X-Ray
Technician, Zoo Curator, Zoologist
Faculty
Fernando Agudelo-Silva, Becky Brown, Tina Christensen, Paul da Silva, Jamie
Deneris, David Egert, Joseph Mueller
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
MARIN.EDU
A.S. IN BIOLOGY
(Certificate of Achievement in Natural History also awarded. Skills
Certificate available in Environmental Science.)
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. While students may take classes at both campuses,
courses required for the major are offered at the Kentfield Campus.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the associate
degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
BIOL
112A Majors’ Biology: Animals, Protozoa, Evolution and Classification
5
BIOL
112B Majors’ Biology: Plants, Algae, Fungi, and Ecology
5
BIOL 112C Majors’ Biology: Molecules, Cells, Prokaryotes and Genetics
5
And
CHEM 115
Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
4
Or
CHEM 131
General Chemistry I
5
And
CHEM 132
General Chemistry II
5
MATH 104
Plane Trigonometry
3
PHYS
108A General Physics I
4
PHYS
108B General Physics II
4
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
30-36
Natural History Certificate of Achievement
The Natural History Certificate of Achievement is a field experience
program based on scientific principles and concepts for students
who want to develop a comprehensive understanding of the natural
world. It is especially designed for elementary school teachers,
natural history museum and environmental docents, and environmental educators. For students interested in receiving an Associate in
Science degree in Biology, see requirements under that major.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
BIOL
101
Field Biology
3
BIOL
110
Introduction to Biology
3
BIOL
161
Field Botany
3
BIOL
162
General Ecology
3
BIOL
235
General Marine Biology
4
GEOG 112
Meteorology and Climatology
3
GEOL
120
Physical Geology
3
GEOL
120L Physical Geology Laboratory
1
Select one field course from the following:
GEOL
125
Field Geology I
2.5
GEOL
126
Field Geology II
2
GEOL
128
Geologic Studies of Point Reyes and the San Andreas Fault
2
In addition, complete six units from the following courses:
BIOL/ENVS 143 Stewardship of Marin Parks and Open Spaces
4
BIOL
164
Introduction to Mammalogy
3
BIOL
165
World of Insects
2
BIOL
165L Introduction to Insect Biodiversity Laboratory
2
BIOL
167
Introduction to Herpetology
3
BIOL
169A Introduction to Ornithology A
3
BIOL
169B Introduction to Ornithology B
3
BIOL
171
Biology of Marine Mammals
3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
MINIMUM OF 31
Environmental Science Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within a program. Skills
Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job
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CATALOG 2015/2016
entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program
or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to upgrade or
advance in an existing career.
This is the starting point for all those interested in environmental
science. The program leading to this certificate introduces students
to the major areas of environmental science, provides the basic
background necessary for analysis and solution of environmental
problems, gives an overview of some of the most important problems
in Marin and provides direct contact with people solving them. It is
designed to be completed in two years. It can be added to a College
of Marin AA/AS degree to improve transferability to bachelor’s
programs in environmental science. It can also be earned apart from
any degree to show mastery of the basics of the field of environmental
science and to increase the diversity of job options in the field.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
BIOL/GEOL 138 Introduction to Environmental Science
4
BIOL
110 Introduction to Biology
3
CHEM 105
Chemistry in the Human Environment
3
Or
GEOL
120
Physical Geology
3
Or
GEOG 101 Physical Environment
3
BIOL/GEOL 142 Environmental Policy and Decision-Making
3
Or
BIOL/GEOL 145 Ethics in Science
3
Or
GEOG 102
Human Environment
3
BIOL
143 Stewardship of Marin Parks and Open Spaces
4
Or
BIOL 147
Food, People, Health, and the Environment
4
Or
BIOL 148
Marin County Agriculture
3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
16-17
BIOLOGY COURSES (BIOL)
BIOL 099: General Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 99 or
GEOL 99; credit awarded for only one course.
This late-start course is designed for students who have not reached
the level of success they desired in high school or college science
courses and for individuals returning to school after an extended
absence. The course covers basic scientific principles and concepts
of the physical and life sciences and prepares students to move into
other science classes with the information, understanding, and
skills required to succeed. Introductory topics in biology, chemistry,
geography, geology, meteorology, and physics are discussed.
BIOL 100: Nutrition
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course covers the basic principles of human nutrition and their
relationship to health and wellness including energy in nutrition;
main nutrients; vitamins, minerals and water; digestion; changing
nutritional needs through life’s stages; and connections between
food and sustainability. This foundation class is designed for people
interested in careers related to health and fitness and various aspects
of food, and for anyone curious or concerned about nutrition. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area E
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BIOL 101: Field Biology
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This outdoor field course is designed to give nonmajors in biology an
overview of Marin’s varied plant and animal communities. Most of
Marin’s 25 biotic community types are investigated including aquatic
and terrestrial. Identification of plants, animals, and ecology are
major areas of emphasis. (CSU) AA/AS Area A
BIOL 104: The Ecology of Infectious Diseases
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is designed for both science and nonscience majors
interested in understanding the distribution and spread of infectious
diseases. Emphasis is on the role that specific environments play in
determining where and when epidemics will occur. Topics include
the biology and ecology of microorganisms and their hosts, geographic medicine, the impact of human activity on the incidence and
transmission of infectious diseases, and epidemics in human history.
(CSU)
BIOL 107: Human Biology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 107
or KIN 107; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the structure, function, and development of
the human body, and foundational concepts to explore personal and
societal issues involving human biology. Topics include an introduction to scientific methods of investigation and some elementary
chemistry (no previous background necessary) as a basis for understanding human functions such as movement, digestion, circulation,
reproduction, and other systems. Some diseases and other causes
of body malfunction are discussed. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU
Area B-2, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 108A: Human Sexuality
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Students may receive
credit for BIOL 108A or BEHS 103, but not both courses.
This survey course covers human sexuality from a cross-disciplinary
approach, examining sexuality from physiological, anatomical,
behavioral, and cross-cultural perspectives. Topics include conception, fetal development, labor and birth, puberty, menstruation,
sexual intercourse, menopause, sexually transmitted diseases,
sexual variations, masturbation, contraception, anatomy, hormones,
medical disorders, pornography, relationships, sexuality and current
trends in the research of sexual behavior. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area D-7 or E, IGETC Area 4G
BIOL 109: Heredity and Evolution
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the principles of genetics and evolution. The
factors that govern inheritance and natural selection are presented,
and their impact on physical and cultural evolution discussed.
Current issues surrounding genetic counseling, genetic engineering,
recombinant DNA technologies, and emerging infectious diseases
are introduced. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2, IGETC
Area 5B
BIOL 110: Introduction to Biology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Concurrent
enrollment in BIOL 110L.
An introduction to the science of biology for nonmajors and the
most basic course for biology majors, this course gives a broad
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overview of modern biology that should be equally useful to those
needing a foundation for later work in biology, health sciences, the
environmental sciences, or to those simply wanting to understand
and participate more intelligently in a human society more and
more influenced by biological discoveries. It presents the essentials
of most of the principal areas of biology: ecology, evolution, genetics,
anatomy, physiology, cell biology and molecular biology. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2, IGETC Area 5B
BIOL 110L: Introduction to Biology Laboratory
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL 110 or
concurrent enrollment.
A hands-on course designed to develop basic laboratory skills and
techniques and to illustrate basic biological concepts and principles
for majors and non-majors. Essential skills include use of lab and
field equipment and recording and interpretation of observations.
Subjects in ecology, evolution, genetics, anatomy, physiology, cell
biology and molecular biology are investigated through observations
and experiments in the laboratory and in the field. Sequence of topics
is synchronized with that of BIOL 110. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5C
BIOL 112A: Majors’ Biology: Animals, Protozoa,
Evolution and Classification
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Math 103 or 103AB
or 103XY or satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test. Advisories:
BIOL 110 and 110L.
This is the first in a three-semester sequence equivalent to the
majors’ biology sequences at other colleges and universities. It covers
basic topics in evolution and classification, as well as fundamentals
of anatomy, physiology, and classification of protozoa and animals.
In the laboratory, students investigate the structure, function and
evolutionary implications of animals using standard laboratory
and field techniques. Students engage in experimental design and
analysis. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 and B-3, IGETC
Area 5B and 5C
BIOL 112B: Majors’ Biology: Plants, Algae, Fungi,
and Ecology
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and
110L, and Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on Math
Assessment Test. Advisory: CHEM 131.
This is the second in a three-semester sequence that is the equivalent
of the majors’ biology sequences at other colleges and universities.
This semester covers basic topics in general ecology as well as fundamentals of anatomy, physiology, classification, evolution and ecology
of the major groups of algae, plants and fungi. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area A, CSU Area B-2 and B-3, IGETC Area 5B and 5C
BIOL 112C: Majors’ Biology: Molecules, Cells,
Prokaryotes and Genetics
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and 110L,
CHEM 131, and Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on
Math Assessment Test.
This third semester in the biology majors’ sequence covers the
fundamentals of molecular and cell biology, genetics and molecular
evolution, DNA technology, and the biology of viruses, bacteria,
and archaea. Students incorporate lecture concepts into laboratory
MARIN.EDU
experiments which they design, carry out, analyze and report. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 and B-3, IGETC Area 5B and 5C
BIOL 113: Introduction to Biotechnology
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and 110L.
This course provides a foundation in biotechnology concepts and
techniques. Students become familiar with current biotechnology
and molecular biology techniques, and learn to efficiently design and
analyze experiments, accurately interpret scientific data, effectively
communicate their knowledge, and understand the impact scientific
discoveries have on the population and the environment. Students
practice laboratory calculations and proper scientific documentation
in laboratory notebooks. (CSU)
BIOL 120: Human Anatomy
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 and 110L.
Advisory: Completion of ENGL 98 or equivalent.
A study of the gross and microscopic structure of the tissues, organs
and organ systems of the human body, including major functions.
The class makes use of models, slides, prosections and dissection
(including human cadavers). Includes introduction to related fields
such as histology and embryology. Appropriate for students going
into allied health fields, kinesiology, anthropology and art. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 and B-3, IGETC Area 5B and 5C
BIOL 138: Introduction to Environmental Sciences
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as
BIOL 138 or ENVS 138; credit awarded for only one course.
This science-based course takes an interdisciplinary approach to
understanding the environmental crisis that confronts us all. Discussions focus on understanding ecosystem services, how humans
interfere with earth’s life support systems, and how to deal with the
environmental problems we face. Field studies may include visits
to restoration projects, local ecosystems, and local environmental
conferences. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-2 & B-3,
IGETC Area 5A or 5B or 5C
BIOL 140: Environmental Field Techniques
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 140 or
GEOL 140; credit awarded for only one course.
This field-based course teaches the fundamentals of environmental
sampling and monitoring. Topics include surveying and mapping;
data collection and management; and hydrological, geological, and
biological assessment methods. (CSU)
BIOL 141: Global Climate Change: Science, Impact
and Solutions
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 141,
ENVS 141, or GEOG 141; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces scientific, ecological, and economic issues
underlying the threat of global climate change. It also develops an
integrated approach to analysis of climate change processes, and an
assessment of proposed policy measures to develop solutions. (CSU)
BIOL 142: Environmental Policy and DecisionMaking
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 142,
GEOL 142, or ENVS 142; credit awarded for only one course.
Environmental policy and subsequent regulation is one way of
managing the relationship between human activities and their effects
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CATALOG 2015/2016
on natural ecosystems. This course is a study of federal, state, and
local environmental legislation and its history. The course chronicles
America’s awakening to environmental issues and the ways in which
decisions affecting the environment occur. The content of the course
is vital to environmental policymakers, scientists, and advocates.
(CSU/UC)
BIOL 143: Stewardship of Marin Parks and Open
Spaces
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as
BIOL 143 or ENVS 143; credit awarded for only one course.
Besides making Marin a desirable place in which to live and travel, its
nonurbanized park and open space areas carry with them a great responsibility: preservation and enhancement of their best qualities for
present and future generations. Fulfilling this responsibility involves
a diverse mix of philosophical, legislative, biological, sociological
and logistical challenges. The course includes essential background
material, interviews with current management personnel, and field
visits to parkland and open space areas of special interest. (CSU)
BIOL 145: Ethics in Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 145
or GEOL 145; credit awarded for only one course.
This interdisciplinary course explores some of the most pressing
issues facing our society today, enabling students to investigate and
understand the controversies surrounding current and future technologies, and helping them make rational decisions in their own lives
and at the voting booth. Topics include scientific fraud, recombinant
DNA technologies, the human genome project, energy and land use,
and toxic waste. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C
BIOL 147: Food, People, Health and the Environment
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as
BIOL 147 or ENVS 147; credit awarded for only one course.
This course examines the past, present and future of the global
food system; inputs, outputs, and practices of agriculture, the chief
method for securing food from the environment and the basis of
human civilization; and the distribution, accessibility, and consumption of food by people throughout the world. The class presents
possible solutions to some of the most pressing problems facing the
human race as we struggle to feed ourselves and be healthy, while
enhancing our overall environment. (CSU/UC)
BIOL 148: Marin County Agriculture
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as
BIOL 148 or ENVS 148; credit awarded for only one course.
This course focuses on one of Marin County’s most significant
human activities in terms of use of land and other natural resources,
preservation of a valuable way of life, generation of economic benefits
and formation of the unique character of the local environment. It
offers a general agricultural overview; historical background and
explanation of important biological, social and economic processes;
and insights provided by current Marin County agricultural systems
including beef and dairy, poultry, shellfish, flowers, fruits and
vegetables, from planning and production through marketing and
consumption. Includes field trips to notable local farms. (CSU)
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BIOL 150: Environmental Science Seminar and
Fieldwork
3.0 Units. 1 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. Prerequisite: BIOL 138
or GEOL 138. May be taken as BIOL 150 or ENVS 150; credit awarded
for only one course.
This overview of the career options in environmental science
introduces potential employers in the field and provides firsthand
experience of working to solve environmental problems. After receiving general career information, students work with community agencies or organizations according to procedures established by mutual
agreement. Students meet in class on campus for initial orientation,
to discuss progress during the semester, and to present results of their
experiences at the end. (CSU)
BIOL 159: Introduction to Aquatic Biology
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A field and hands-on laboratory course on the natural history and
ecology of both living and nonliving components of freshwater
environments. It offers practical experience in the identification and
interrelationships of local plant and animal species found in freshwater ecosystems. Students gain field experience in interpreting basic
concepts in ecology, biotic zonation, and survival through adaptation
and natural selection. (CSU) AA/AS Area A
BIOL 160: Soil: Ecology and Management
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken
as BIOL 160 or ELND 160; credit awarded for only one course.
This class explores how soil forms and develops, its physical and
biological components, and their interrelationships. Topics include
a historical review of soil/human interactions, soil formation from
parent material, classification, physical properties such as texture and
structure, life forms found in the soil and their interrelationships,
relationships between soil properties and soil’s ability to support
plant growth, and approaches to use soil in a sustainable manner.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
BIOL 161: Field Botany
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A comprehensive introduction to the native plants of Marin County,
emphasizing identification, systematics, ecology, and natural history
of Marin’s vascular plants, with a brief overview of local bryophytes.
Laboratory investigations include hands-on study and identification
of live plant specimens. Field explorations aid ecological understanding of natural plant groupings, and provide added experience in
identification. (CSU)
BIOL 162: General Ecology
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
110.
Introduction to the ecology of organisms in their environment,
emphasizing ecology of global, regional and local environmental
sustainability. Field explorations are used in understanding ecological concepts in relation to Marin’s biotic communities. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5B and 5C
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Biology
BIOL 163: Ecology of Estuaries
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
110.
Special ecological study of the greater San Francisco Bay estuary
system of rivers, Delta, sloughs/marshes, lower bays, and Tomales
Bay/Bolinas Lagoon habitats. Dynamics of natural ecology and man’s
encroachment/pollution are studied. (CSU)
BIOL 164: Introduction to Mammalogy
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
110.
Introduction to the natural history, ecology, and behavior of
mammals, emphasizing the natural history of California mammals,
techniques in studying mammals, and tracking and interpretation of
mammal sign. Laboratory investigations include hands-on analysis
of mammal anatomy and physiology. Field explorations are used in
understanding mammalogy concepts in relation to survival strategies. (CSU)
BIOL 165: The World of Insects
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL 110.
A general introduction to the largest group of organisms on earth
today. Topics include insect structure and function, history and
evolution, habitats and adaptations, and ecological relationships with
other organisms, including those of major economic importance to
humans in the areas of agriculture, architecture, forestry, animal
husbandry, medicine and public health. As befits such a diverse and
hard-to-ignore group, insect roles in literature, folklore, philosophy,
painting, sculpture and other arts will not be neglected. (CSU)
BIOL 165L: Introduction to Insect Biodiversity
Laboratory
2.0 Units. 6 lab and 2 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL 165.
As the largest group of animals on earth, and one that strongly
affects humans, insects invite closer study by all who are interested in
the living world. This course provides hands-on experience in learning to find insects, to identify them, and to recognize evolutionary
and ecological patterns in their sometimes bewildering abundance
and diversity. Sight recognition of the major orders and families,
basic field and laboratory procedures, and visits to a representative
selection of insect habitats in Marin. (CSU)
BIOL 167: Introduction to Herpetology
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
110.
An introduction to the natural history, ecology, and behavior of
reptiles and amphibians, emphasizing reptiles and amphibians of
Western North America, techniques in studying reptiles, and field
observation. Field explorations are used in understanding herpetology concepts in relation to survival strategies. (CSU)
BIOL 169A: Introduction to Ornithology A
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
110.
This science-based course takes a field oriented approach to understanding the biology of birds, including bird form and function,
anatomy, physiology, flight mechanics and migration. Visits to local
wildlife refuges, lagoons, lakes, shorelines and forests to learn to
identify and observe migrating shorebirds and raptors and wintering
MARIN.EDU
waterfowl. This fall course concentrates on migratory species and
wintering waterfowl. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A
BIOL 169B: Introduction to Ornithology B
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
110.
This science-based course takes a field oriented approach to understanding the biology of birds, including bird behavior, vocal behavior,
bird reproductive biology, and avian ecology. Visits to local wildlife
refuges, lagoons, lakes, shorelines and forests to learn to identify and
observe summer residents and nesting birds. (CSU) AA/AS Area A
BIOL 171: Biology of Marine Mammals
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Taking an integrated approach to the biology of marine carnivores,
cetaceans and sirenians, lecture, laboratory and field explorations
provide a framework for fundamental biological and ecological
concepts. Topics include functional morphology, sensory systems,
energetics, reproduction, communication and cognition, behavior,
distribution, population biology, feeding ecology, and the physiological adaptations that have enabled marine mammals to exploit their
aquatic environment such as diving, thermoregulation, osmoregulation, and orientation. (CSU/UC)
BIOL 224: Human Physiology
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and 110L
or equivalent, and CHEM 110 or 114. Advisory: completion of ENGL 98
or 98SL or equivalent.
This course examines the function and structure of the human body,
emphasizing physiochemical and homeostatic mechanisms. The
laboratory introduces clinical and research techniques for studying
and measuring various physiological parameters, along with technical writing skills. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3,
IGETC Area 5B and 5C
BIOL 235: General Marine Biology
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
110 and 110L. Class includes field trips. Field trips may meet earlier and
run later than scheduled to take advantage of low tides.
This laboratory and field course provides an overview of marine
plant and animal communities, including fundamental physical
oceanography, marine ecology, marine zoology, marine botany, and
field studies, emphasizing local marine communities: rocky intertidal estuaries, salt marshes, sandflats, mudflats, and floating docks.
Laboratory investigations include phytoplankton and zooplankton
studies, fish identification and internal morphology, marine invertebrate identification, and marine algae preservation techniques. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5B and 5C
BIOL 237: Marine Ecology Field Studies
2.0 Units. No prerequisite. Sixteen lecture and forty-eight laboratory
hours during a nine-day field trip.
An introduction to the natural history and ecology of marine plants
and animals, emphasizing identification, evolution, life histories, and
survival strategies of intertidal and subtidal organisms of the Pacific
Northwest coast. Terrestrial systems such as temperate rain forests
are investigated to compare with marine systems. Field investigations
include hands-on analysis of marine algae, invertebrate, vertebrate,
and nonliving interrelationships. (CSU)
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BIOL 240: Microbiology
BIOL 270: Practicum in Identification and Taxonomy
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and 110L;
plus CHEM 110 or 114. Advisory: ENGL 98 or 98SL or equivalent.
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL 161 or
165L or 169A/B or equivalent.
This course, primarily for biology and health science majors, is a
lecture/laboratory based course with equal emphasis on both. The
fundamentals of microbial taxonomy, ecology, anatomy, physiology,
genetics, and biotechnology are covered. Viruses, bacteria, fungi,
protists, and helminths are discussed. Emphasis is on the role that
microorganisms play in human health and disease. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area A, CSU Area B-2 or B-3, IGETC Area 5B and 5C
This course provides students the opportunity to increase their
skills in identification and classification of the organisms of Marin
County and the surrounding area to the levels frequently needed
for biodiversity studies and environmental assessments. Students
already familiar with the basics of classification (and who can already
identify, on sight, families of chosen groups) progress from this level
to the genus and species levels of identification and classification of
their groups of interest. Work may include preparation of specimens,
review of pertinent literature, use of dichotomous keys, reference to
museum specimens, and use of camera and microscopes.
BIOL 244A: Alaska Field Studies
3.0 Units. Repeat: 2. No prerequisite. Two-week field trip; 50 hours per
week plus six hours of pre-trip lecture.
A two-week field investigation of the Kenai Peninsula, interior and
far north of Alaska. This area is biologically significant for its great
abundance and diversity of mammal and bird life. The class explores
various ecosystems, from coastal forests to arctic tundra. Participants should be in good physical condition and be able to withstand
rigorous, unpleasant conditions. A nonobligatory ground transportation fee of $300 is requested; participants pay for their own airfare
and food. (CSU)
BUSINESS
BIOL 244B: Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Field
Studies
Career Options
Accounting Clerk, Administrative Assistant, Administrator, Analyst,
Banking Services, Bookkeeper, Claims Agent, Computer Operations,
Employment Counselor, Employment Interviewer, Entrepreneur,
Entry-level Financial Services, Franchise Business Owner, Government Service, Insurance Agent, Management Assistant, Management
Trainee, Manager, Office Clerk, Office Manager, Public Administration, Purchasing Agent/ Buyer, Real Estate, Retail/Industrial
Sales, Sales Representative, Securities Sales Worker, Small Business
Manager, Small Business Owner, Stockbroker, Supervisor, Transfer
to Bachelor’s Program
1.5 Units. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite. One-week field trip; 50 hours per
week plus 6 hours of pre-trip lecture.
A one-week field investigation of the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem.
This area is biologically significant for its great abundance and
diversity of mammal, bird and microbial life. The class explores various ecosystems, from interior forests to riparian wetlands. Emphasis
is on wolf reintroduction, fire ecology and thermophilic microbes. A
nonobligatory ground transportation fee of $150 is requested; participants pay for their own food, camp and park fees. (CSU)
BIOL 250: Scientific Research and Reporting
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. Advisories: BIOL
110 and GEOL 120. Can be taken as BIOL 250 or GEOL 250; credit
awarded for only one course.
A hands-on, individualized course designed to walk learners step
by step through a scientific research project of their choice. The final
report of their findings will be delivered at a professional meeting.
This course is designed for science majors who have completed the
first year of their curriculum and desire a hands-on, real world
experience in science. (CSU/UC)
BIOL 251: Biological Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 251
or PSY 251; credit awarded for only one course.
This class explores the basic brain processes underlying the functioning of the human mind. Topics include basic synaptic functioning,
psychopharmacology, stress and the immune system, learning and
memory, sleep, mood disorders, schizophrenia, language, motor and
sensory systems, sexuality, consciousness, endocrine function and
interactions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-9, IGETC Area
4
The business curriculum provides students with skills and knowledge for employment in a variety of business related occupations.
The program emphasizes the development of skills necessary for
entry-level employment including self-employment. The curriculum
also provides students with the foundation courses that will help
them prepare for transfer to a four-year college or university.
Faculty
Christine Li, Norman Pacula, Nancy Willet
Department Phone: 415-485-9610
A.S.-T. IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Associate in Science in Business Administration for Transfer
degree (AS-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Science in Business Administration
for Transfer degree (AS-T), a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
94
Business
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses
BUS
107
Business Law
3
BUS
112
Financial Accounting 4
BUS 113
Managerial Accounting
5
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
3
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
3
List A - select one course (3-4 units):
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
Or
STAT
115
Introduction to Statistics
4
MATH 121
Calculus I with Applications
3
List B - select both courses, or any course from List A not already used, for a total of 6
units:
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
3
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
27-28
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT IN BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
This program is designed to provide education for business careers
including self-employment, professional advancement, and retraining. It equips students with the basic knowledge and skills in entrylevel management and supervision. It also prepares students to start,
operate, and grow new or existing ventures, and helps those who
work in large organizations to become more entrepreneurial in their
outlook and performance. The Certificate is awarded for the satisfactory completion of the core requirements plus an additional 9 units
from the listed electives. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
3
BUS
112
Financial Accounting 4
BUS
150
Supervision and Management 3
BUS
144
Business Communication
3
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3
TOTAL CORE UNITS
16
Electives (9 units minimum)
BUS
107
Business Law
3
BUS 121Entrepreneurship
3
BUS 124Marketing
3
CIS
171
Applied Spreadsheet Design
3
CIS
173
Applied Presentations and Publications
3
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
3
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
3
And
STAT
115
Introduction to Statistics
4
Or
MATH 115
Introduction to Statistics
4
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
25
MARIN.EDU
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT IN APPLIED ACCOUNTING,
OCCUPATIONAL
This program provides training for entry-level bookkeepers, as well
as individuals with bookkeeping experience who wish to gain a
better conceptual background in accounting and finance.
The Certificate is awarded for the satisfactory completion of the
core requirements plus an additional 3 units from the listed electives.
All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
3
BUS
112
Financial Accounting 4
BUS
113
Managerial Accounting
5
BUS
115
Applied Computer Accounting
3
CIS
110
Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3
CIS
171
Applied Spreadsheet Design
3
TOTAL CORE UNITS
21
Electives (3 units minimum)
BUS 124Marketing
3
BUS
107
Business Law
3
BUS
144
Business Communication
3
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
3
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
24
Skills Certificate in Business Management and Supervision
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within a program. Skills
Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job
entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program
or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to upgrade or
advance in an existing career.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
BUS
101
Introduction to Business 3
BUS
144
Business Communication
3
BUS
150
Supervision and Management 3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
9
BUSINESS COURSES (BUS)
BUS 101: Introduction to Business
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This survey course explores the history, environment and functional
areas of business, and analyzes the following topics: comparative
economic systems focused on capitalism, globalization, ethical
behavior and social responsibility, business ownership, entrepreneurship, marketing, accounting, finance, information technology,
environmental issues, and productivity. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B,
CSU Area D-7
BUS 107: Business Law
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course develops students’ understanding of the basic principles
of business law and applications to typical business situations. Topics
include law of contracts, agency and employment, negotiable instruments, personal property, bailments, sales of goods, real property,
and partnerships. (CSU/UC)
Business Office Systems
CATALOG 2015/2016
95
BUS 112: Financial Accounting
BUS 144: Business Communication
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ENGL 79.
An introduction to accounting practice, principles and analysis. This
course is basic for students in accounting, business administration,
economics, law and other professions. It covers the accounting cycle
for a service enterprise and for a merchandising enterprise, preparation of financial statements, internal control, valuation of receivables,
depreciation and fixed asset disposal, debt structure, corporate
capitalization and retained earnings, and finishing with a thorough
discussion of financial statement analysis. (CSU/UC)
This course emphasizes the application of effective writing techniques and strategies to business communication problems found
in organizations. Students analyze cases, then organize and prepare
various business documents such as resumes, letters, memoranda,
reports, business plans, and proposals. (CSU)
BUS 113: Managerial Accounting
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: BUS 112.
This course covers fund flow analysis, basic managerial cost concepts
and developments in contemporary managerial accounting, cost
accounting systems, cost-volume-profit relationships, budgetary
planning and control, responsibility accounting, performance evaluation through standard costs, and incremental analysis and capital
budgeting. (CSU/UC)
BUS 115: Applied Computer Accounting
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BUS
112.
A first course in the operation of computerized accounting software,
designed for business entrepreneurs who will be using a computerized accounting system in their business as well as students training
to be professional accountants. Subjects include overview of software,
setting up a company, entering and paying bills, working with lists,
setting up and managing inventory, invoicing customers and receiving payment, processing banking-related transactions and preparing
bank reconciliations, preparing a budget, processing payroll, and
preparation of reports and graphs. (CSU)
BUS 121: Entrepreneurship
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course focuses on the entrepreneur and the concepts, skills,
information, attitudes, alternatives and resources relevant for success
in starting, operating and managing a new venture. The course covers the environment, resources, business plan, accounting, financing,
marketing, management, and legal aspects; it includes industry and
market research and requires students (in teams) to write a business
plan feasibility analysis. (CSU)
BUS 124: Marketing
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory course on the vital business area of marketing
is open to all students. Topics include marketing’s role in society,
the market structure, channels of distribution, retail institutions,
product development, packaging, pricing, and promotion. (CSU)
BUS 129: The Art of Selling
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Through active participation, students/entrepreneurs learn how to
gain and maintain a competitive edge by developing effective sales
strategies and techniques. The course covers all phases of the selling
process. Participants learn the “how” as well as the “why” of selling
and then have an opportunity to apply these techniques in a critiqued
videotaped sales presentation. (CSU)
BUS 150: Supervision and Management
3.0 units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory course covers the core concepts and current
issues related to supervision and management. Students learn how
to assume supervisory responsiblity and how to apply management
prinicples in today’s reapidly changing world of work. (CSU)
BUSINESS OFFICE SYSTEMS
The business office systems curriculum is designed to develop the
knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed by workers in today’s automated offices. Students can acquire the training and skills necessary
to enter the job market, update knowledge and skills to reenter the
marketplace, or retrain in order to maintain a present position or
obtain a promotion. The skills developed in this curriculum are also
useful to students who wish to enrich their business and computer
expertise for personal use.
Courses emphasize skill development in business office systems
with specialties available in the medical and office management
areas. Most courses include hands-on computer use so students learn
necessary computer skills as well as the individual course material.
Career Options
Administrative Assistant, Bank Teller, Clerical Assistant, Executive
Assistant, General Office Worker, Human Resources Assistant,
Medical Office Assistant, Medical Office Manager, Medical Receptionist, Medical Records Clerk, Medical Scheduler, Medical Secretary, Medical Transcriber, Microcomputer User, Office Assistant,
Office Manager, Payroll Assistant, Receptionist, Records Clerk,
Research Assistant, Secretary, Transcribing Machine Operator, Word
Processing Manager, Word Processing Operator
Department Phone: 415-485-9610
Administrative Assistant Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement Program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
The Administrative Assistant Certificate indicates that foundation
courses needed for entry-level employment in office support have
been successfully completed.
96
Chemistry
MARIN.EDU
Note: Before a Business Office Systems Skills Certificate is granted,
the student must demonstrate the ability to keyboard a minimum
of 35 words-a-minute with five or fewer errors.
CHEMISTRY COURSES (CHEM)
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
CIS 170
Windows OS for PC Users 3
BOS
150
Applied Word Processing Design
3
BOS
151
Electronic Office Skills
3
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
BUSINESS OFFICE SYSTEMS COURSES (BOS)
BOS 150: Applied Word Processing Design
CHEM 105: Chemistry in the Human Environment
A nonmathematical course for liberal arts and nonscience majors,
exploring chemistry in relation to society. A general introduction
and discussion of the development and manifestations of concepts of
chemistry and their applications in our environment including living
systems. Special considerations are given to current topics, environmental issues, energy production, nutrition, medicine, and consumer
products. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS
170.
CHEM 105L: Chemistry in the Human Environment:
Laboratory
Microsoft Word software is used in this Windows-based course to
develop beginning and intermediate word processing skills. Topics
include creating letters, memos, reports, tables, graphics, mail merge,
styles, and forms. Students complete desktop publishing projects
using online sources to access multimedia resources. (CSU)
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or concurrent
enrollment.
BOS 151: Electronic Office Skills
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BOS
150 and CIS 170.
Current Microsoft Office software is used in this Windows-based
course, designed to develop beginning and intermediate administrative office skills using Excel, Access, PowerPoint, and Outlook.
The course focuses on individual and integrated office projects that
support business tasks found in the modern business office. (CSU)
CHEMISTRY
Chemistry is by far the largest field of employment in the sciences. A
wide range of opportunities awaits the chemist in business, industry,
government, and in the field of education. Approximately threefourths of all chemists are employed by private industry in such fields
as petroleum, primary metals, electrical equipment, aerospace, paper,
food, and rubber.
Career Options
Biochemist, Chemical Engineer, Dentist, Failure Analyst, Food
and Drug Officer, Food Chemist, Forensic Chemist, Hydrologist,
Industrial Chemist, Nutritionist, Oceanographer, Patent Agent,
Pharmaceutical Salesperson, Physician, Pollution Control Expert,
Process Control Worker, Product Developer, Quality Control
Worker, Quantitative Analyst, Researcher and Developer, Teacher,
Textile Chemist, Toxicologist
Faculty
Erik Dunmire, Patrick Kelly, Scott Serafin
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
Chemistry Prerequisite Recency Requirement
To ensure student success, certain chemistry and physics courses
have established 5-year prerequisite recency requirements beginning
in Fall 2014. The chemistry prerequisites for CHEM 131, 132, 132E,
231, 232 and 232E and the physics prerequisites for PHYS 108B,
207B and 207C must have been successfully completed within the
past 5 years. Students may challenge these recency requirements by
taking a test, by arrangement with the Physical Sciences Department
chairperson.
A laboratory-demonstration course designed to illustrate and exercise the basic chemistry concepts presented in CHEM 105. Students
explore the significance of chemistry concepts to consumer, health
and environmental themes through tangible laboratory experiments.
Satisfies the general education requirement in physical sciences with
a laboratory component. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1
and B-3, IGETC Area 5C
CHEM 110: Chemistry for Allied Health Sciences
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB
or 101XY or eligibility for Math 103 based on the Math Assessment test.
This introductory one-semester survey of the fundamental concepts
and laboratory techniques of general, organic, and biochemistry
emphasizes applications within the Health Sciences. Students apply
the fundamental concepts of chemistry to problem solving through
analytical reasoning, and by conducting scientific investigations in a
laboratory setting. The course meets admission requirements for the
A.S. degree in Registered Nursing and other allied health sciences,
and fulfills a general elective requirement in natural sciences. (CSU)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 and B-3
CHEM 114: Introduction to Chemistry
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB
or 101XY or eligibility for Math 103 based on the Math Assessment
Test.
This course covers problem-solving techniques using dimensional
analysis, basic principles of inorganic chemistry, and elementary
qualitative and quantitative laboratory experiments. The course is
designed to prepare students for CHEM 115 and 131, and satisfies a
CSU general education requirement in physical sciences as well as
a requirement by the COM Nursing Program. CHEM 114 and 115
represent one year of chemistry for most baccalaureate programs in
nursing, health sciences, physical therapy, laboratory and medical
technology, as well as non-science majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC Area 5A 5C
CHEM 115: Survey of Organic and Biochemistry
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHEM 114. Not open
to those who have had Chemistry 231.
This one-semester survey of the classes of organic compounds
emphasizes materials of interest to students of biological sciences,
including the chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates,
lipids and nucleic acids. The laboratory covers techniques in organic
chemistry with applications to biologically interesting compounds.
Chinese
CATALOG 2015/2016
The course is intended for dental hygiene, nursing (baccalaureate
program), health science, laboratory and medical technology, preoptometry, some predental and nonphysical science majors. CHEM
114 and 115 represent one year of chemistry for most baccalaureate
programs in nursing, health science, laboratory and medical technology, and nonscience majors. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1 and B-3,
IGETC Area 5A and 5C
CHEM 131: General Chemistry I
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: CHEM 114 or
satisfactory score on Chemistry Placement Test, and Math 103 or
103AB or 103XY or satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test. The
chemistry prerequisite must have been completed within the past 5
years.
Fundamental principles of chemistry including such topics as atomic
theory, nomenclature, thermochemistry, bonding, structure and
polarity, stoichiometry, gases, liquids and solids, intermolecular
forces, solutions, and a brief introduction to organic chemistry and
biochemistry. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 and B-3,
IGETC Area 5A and 5C
97
CHEM 232E: Organic Chemistry II, Lecture Only
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHEM 231. The prerequisite
must have been completed within the past 5 years.
The second semester of the one-year organic chemistry course
without laboratory for those who need a total of eight units, such as
some biology, environmental science, health, and chemical engineering majors. The material is taught from a mechanistic approach,
focusing on reactivity and multi-step synthesis, as well as classical
and cutting-edge analysis of organic compounds including NMR, IR,
GC/MS and UV/Vis spectroscopy. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1
CHINESE
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHEM 131. The
prerequisite must have been completed within the past 5 years.
A major reason for studying the Chinese language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning Chinese, one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
A continuation of CHEM 131 emphasizing kinetics, thermodynamics, aqueous solution equilibriums, electrochemistry, and selected
topics from nuclear chemistry, descriptive inorganic chemistry,
materials, metals and coordination compounds. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area A, CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC Area 5A and 5C
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent.
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
CHEM 132E: General Chemistry II, Lecture Only
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Chinese
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
CHEM 132: General Chemistry II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHEM 131. The prerequisite
must have been completed within the past 5 years.
Lecture material of Chemistry 132 for those engineering and science
majors who need eight units (one year) of general chemistry but only
one semester of lab. Bioengineering and chemical engineering majors
should enroll in Chemistry 132. Not open to those who have had
Chemistry 132. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
CHEM 231: Organic Chemistry I
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHEM 132. The
prerequisite must have been completed within the past 5 years.
CHINESE COURSES (CHIN)
The first semester of the one-year intensive organic chemistry
sequence for students majoring in chemistry, environmental science,
biochemistry, chemical engineering, cell and molecular biology, and
related fields; and for students satisfying premedical, predental, and
other health science prerequisites. The study of fundamental topics,
including structure, function, stereochemistry, nomenclature, reactions, mechanisms and multistep synthesis of organic compounds.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC Area 5A
CHIN 100: Chinese Basics
CHEM 232: Organic Chemistry II
CHIN 101: Elementary Chinese Mandarin I
5.0 Units. 3 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHEM 231. The
prerequisite must have been completed within the past 5 years.
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The second semester of the one-year organic chemistry course
including laboratory for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry, and most premedical and predental curricula. Students who need
only eight units of organic chemistry, see CHEM 232E. (CSU/UC)
CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC Area 5A and 5C
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides an initial encounter with the Chinese language, introducing the pinyin system, partial pictograms, radicals,
components, and parts of character formation, and Chinese cultural
aspects and values. The course teaches pronunciation, basic strokes,
and simple characters to enable students to feel comfortable and
confident to begin CHIN 101. (CSU)
This course develops proficiency in listening and speaking skills
in Chinese/Mandarin, and provides a foundation in literacy skills.
Students also gain knowledge and appreciation of Chinese culture.
The acquisition of Chinese/Mandarin language skills and an appreciation of China’s role in the global community are goals of the
course. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 6A:
UC Language Other Than English
98
College Skills
CHIN 102: Elementary Chinese Mandarin II
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHIN 101.
In this course, students develop further communicative skills in
Chinese Mandarin. Students gain knowledge and appreciation of
Chinese culture, history, and China’s new role in global economics
and politics. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area
3B and 6A: UC Language other than English
CHIN 110: Conversational Chinese Mandarin I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An intensive study of practical Chinese conversation, designed for
students who wish to acquire skills of spoken modern colloquial
Mandarin for travelers and those doing business in China. Oral
practice in speaking and understanding Chinese through audiovisual packages related to daily working environment and life. Topics
include everyday conversation among in-groups (husband-wife,
friend-friend, among the family), everyday conversation between
out-groups (superior-inferior, between unknowns), nonverbal communication, and culturally correct Chinese conversation. (CSU)
CHIN 112: Conversational Chinese Mandarin II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: CHIN 110.
This course emphasizes modern colloquial Chinese in conversation
and the study of elementary grammar, designed for students who
want to learn at a faster pace in the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar. Use of audio materials improves accuracy
and fluency in pronunciation. (CSU)
COLLEGE SKILLS
The College Skills Department consists of three pre-college programs: English Skills, Credit ESL, and Noncredit ESL. All three
programs serve students who need to develop their study and communication skills in order to succeed.
Faculty
Rebecca Beal, Barbara Bonander, Karen Koenig, Cheo Massion, Sara McKinnon,
Beth Patel, Alicia (Meg) Pasquel, Patricia Seery, Wendy L. Walsh, Blaze Woodlief
Department Phone: 415-485-9642
NONCREDIT ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESLN/ESLV)
The Noncredit ESL program primarily serves the burgeoning
immigrant population of Marin County. Through free noncredit
ESL classes, the program has helped countless Marin residents from
over 75 countries fulfill their educational, career and personal goals
to become productive members of our community. Noncredit ESL
offers multi-skill classes at the Kentfield and Indian Valley campuses
as well as at several off-campus locations. In addition, there are
pronunciation classes and vocational ESL classes. Noncredit ESL
classes are open entry and open exit.
Please see the English as a Second Language Noncredit (ESLN and
ESLV) category for individual course listings.
CREDIT ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)
The credit ESL program offers instruction for non-native English
speakers with intermediate to advanced levels of English proficiency.
Our students come with a variety of goals, from transferring and
earning degrees to improving their skills for the workforce and
for everyday life. Our program prepares them with the academic
MARIN.EDU
language and student skills they will need to succeed in their other
credit-level coursework.
The core of the Credit ESL program encompasses 4 levels in ESL
(50-60-70-80) plus two more parallel sections of the English Department’s classes (98 and 120) which prepare students for English 150
(freshman composition). At each level separate classes are offered to
cover Grammar/Writing and Reading/Vocabulary. In addition there
are pronunciation classes and listening/speaking classes.
Please see the English as a Second Language (ESL) category for
individual course listings.
ENGLISH SKILLS
The English Skills program provides English and study skills courses
to help students develop reading, writing, thinking and social skills
so that they can enroll in and profit from instruction in credit courses and/or successfully get a job and advance in that job. Students
come to English Skills classes to achieve a variety of goals: some to
get better jobs, some to move horizontally into workforce programs
such as dental assisting or metals technology, and some to succeed in
transfer-level courses. The English Skills program provides the developmental levels of College of Marin’s writing sequence. The program
consists of the developmental English courses, open-entry skills lab
classes and a GED preparation program. The majority of the courses
are conducted on the Kentfield campus; however, an open-entry lab
is offered on the Indian Valley Campus two afternoons a week. The
IVC classes mostly accommodate Court Reporting Students.
Please see the English (ENGL) category (courses numbered
062-097) for individual course listings.
COMMUNICATION
For additional Communication courses, please see Film and
Video.
The curriculum is designed to provide theory and skills for those
who are interested in mass media, television and films, whether
students’ goals be transfer, professional, or self-enrichment.
Career Options
Animator, Announcer, Broadcast Technician, Camera Operator,
Community Affairs Director, Disc Jockey, Engineering Technician,
Film Director, Film Editor, Freelance Film Maker, Light Technician,
News Broadcaster, News Director, Producer, Production Engineer,
Program Assistant, Promotion Sales Manager, Public Relations Representative, Reporter, Sales Account Executive, Screenwriter, Sound
Editor, Sound Recorder, Sportscaster, Studio Technician, Teacher,
Traffic Manager, Tutor, Videotape Photographer, Writer
Faculty
Bonnie Borenstein, Patricia O’Keefe
Department Phone: 415-485-9348
CATALOG 2015/2016
A.A.-T. IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES
Associate in Arts in Communication Studies for Transfer degree
(AA-T)
This degree is intended for students who plan to transfer to the
California State University (CSU) with a major in Communication
Studies.
The Associate in Arts in Communication Studies for Transfer
degree (AA-T) provides students with a breadth of courses that
cover the many facets of communication, including public speaking,
argumentation, mass media, and interpersonal and group communication. Students will develop their communication practices while
studying theories and concepts that examine the role of communication in interpersonal relationships and society.
To complete the Associate in Arts Degree in Communication
Studies for Transfer (AA-T), a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Course (3 Units):
SPCH
122
Public Speaking
3
Required Electives - select two courses (6 units):
SPCH
132
Argumentation and Persuasion
3
SPCH
120
Interpersonal Communication
3
SPCH
130
Small Group Communication
3
Required Electives - select two courses (6 units):
SPCH
128
Intercultural Communication
3
SPCH
140
Oral Interpretation of Literature I
3
COMM/JOUN 110 Introduction to Mass Communication and Media Literacy
3
Required Electives - select one course (3-4 units):
JOUN 115
Reporting and Writing for Mainstream Media
3
ENGL
151
Reading and Composition 1B
4
Or
ENGL
155
Critical Thinking and Composition
4
ANTH
102
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3
PSY
110
Introduction to Psychology
3
SOC 110
Introduction to Sociology
3
* Or any 3-unit course, not listed above, that is CSU-transferable as communication studies.
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
18-19
A.A. IN COMMUNICATION, MASS COMMUNICATIONS
OPTION
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
Communication
99
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
COMM/JOUN 110 Introduction to Mass Communication and Media Literacy 3
FILM
150
Introduction to Film and Video Production
4
COMM/JOUN 160 Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the Media
3
JOUN 115
Reporting and Writing for Mainstream Media
3
MMST 110
Introduction to Multimedia
3
One course from the following:
FILM/HUM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4
FILM/HUM 109B History of Film: 1950 to the Present
4
And three additional units from the following:
JOUN 122
Newspaper Production, Writing
3
JOUN 123
Newspaper Production
3
SPCH
140
Oral Interpretation of Literature I
3
SPCH
155
Radio and Television Announcing and Performance
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
23
COMMUNICATIONS COURSES (COMM)
COMM 110: Introduction to Mass Communication
and Media Literacy
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ECON 125 or
ETST 125 or HIST 125 or POLS 125 or SSC 125. May be taken as COMM
110 or JOUN 110; credit awarded for only one course.
A critical survey of mass media from a humanities and social science
perspective, this course provides an overview of the salient theories,
history, and economic and social forces that shape mass media
technologies and messages. Students examine the historical development of major print, electronic, interactive, and image-based media
in terms of their sociocultural consequences and influence in order
to more effectively interpret and make decisions about the meanings
of mass media messages. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area D-7,
IGETC Area 4G
COMM 155: Radio and Television Announcing and
Performance
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as COMM
155 or SPCH 155; credit awarded for only one course.
This course prepares students to communicate more effectively
through the electronic media. Students explore how to articulate
messages, vary pitch and volume to the text and context, pronounce
words according to accepted standards, express thoughts and feelings
with confidence, understand and interpret the meaning of a message,
and communicate ideas from a variety of prompts. (CSU)
COMM 160: Images of Race, Gender, and Class in
the Media
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as COMM
160 or JOUN 160; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is designed to help students become more “media literate” and socially aware by critically examining the role of the media
in enabling, facilitating, or challenging various social constructions
including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, and disability. The course addresses a variety of entertainment and news content
in print and electronic media, and analyzes these texts within their
historical context. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C and G, CSU Area D-3
or D-4, IGETC Area 4C and 4D
100
Computer Information Systems
COMPUTER INFORMATION
SYSTEMS
The Computer Information Systems curriculum is designed to
provide education for computer-related careers, professional
advancement, and transfer preparation. Courses provide “handson” computer use that emphasizes the development of the skills
necessary for employment and personal use of computers. Program
specialties include desktop network, desktop publishing, microcomputer manager, and microcomputer programmer.
Career Options
Computer Sales Representative, Computer Software Specialist,
Desktop Publishing Specialist, Hardware and Software Consultant,
Help Desk Technician, Microcomputer Applications Specialist,
Microcomputer Manager, Microcomputer Software Support Technician, Network Technician, Programmer, Systems Administrator,
Systems Integrator
Faculty
John Hinds, A. Joe Ritchie
Department Phone: 415-485-9610
Repeatability Policy Statement for Computer Information Systems
Courses
Students must petition to repeat any course in Computer Information Systems for the purpose of meeting the two-year currency
requirement for a degree or skills certificate.
A.S. IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded. Skills Certificates in
Microsoft Office Database Specialist and Microsoft Office Specialist
are also awarded.)
Study in the field of Computer Information Systems is designed to
prepare students for entry-level positions in the business information
systems field. In addition to the core courses, students select one
or more CIS/BOS (Business Office Systems) elective courses which
enhance their understanding of particular areas of interest.
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements in the core program (21 units) and a minimum of an
additional 3 units of elective CIS/BOS courses, as well as completion
of general education and graduation requirements.
A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion of the
core program (21 units) plus an additional 3 units selected from the
list of CIS/BOS elective courses.
A Skills Certificate is earned by satisfactory completion of the
required courses as listed for the specific Skills Certificate. Note:
Students must complete English 150 to satisfy the Associate degree.
Transfer students are advised to complete English 150. All students
should consult a counselor.
CORE PROGRAM
The following courses are required of all Computer Information
Systems degree students:
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
CIS 110 Introduction to Computer Information Systems 3
CIS 170 Window OS for PC Users 3
CIS
171 Applied Spreadsheet Design 3
CIS 172 Applied Database Design 3
CIS 173 Applied Presentations and Publications 3
CIS 174 Applied Website Design 3
MARIN.EDU
CIS 275 Networking Fundamentals and Practices TOTAL CORE UNITS
3
21
Electives
In addition to the core program listed above, each Computer Information Systems degree/
certificate student must complete a minimum of 3 additional units from the following list:
BOS 150 Applied Word Processing Design 3
CIS 137 Advanced Database Design 1.5
CIS 215 Visual BASIC Programming 3.5
CIS 237 SQL Programming 1.5
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
24-24.5
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
Microsoft Office Database Specialist Skills Certificate
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
CIS 172
Applied Database Design
3
CIS 137
Advanced Database Design
1.5
CIS 237
SQL Programming
1.5
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
6
Microsoft Office Specialist Skills Certificate
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
BOS 150
Applied Word Processing
3
CIS 171
Applied Spreadsheet Design
3
CIS 173 Applied Presentations and Publications 3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
9
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSES (CIS)
CIS 110: Introduction to Computer Information
Systems
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This is an introductory survey of the needs for and roles of computer
information systems within organizations. Emphasis is on information technology requirements for organizations, history, hardware,
programming, systems development, personal computers, Internet,
and networks. Students work with personal computers using application software for word processing, spreadsheets, and databases.
Programs are written and run in a high level language. (CSU/UC)
CIS 120: Information & Communications Technology
Essentials
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the computer hardware and software skills
needed to help meet the growing demand for entry-level ICT
professionals. The fundamentals of computer hardware and software,
as well as advanced concepts such as security, networking, and the
responsibilities of an ICT professional are introduced. Preparation
for CompTIA’s A+ certification exam is included. (CSU)
CATALOG 2015/2016
Computer Information Systems
101
CIS 137: Advanced Database Design
CIS 173: Applied Presentations and Publications
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS 110
or 170.
Students concentrate on advanced topics and techniques such as
designing complex forms and reports, customizing the user interface,
automating tasks with macros, using and writing Visual Basic for
Applications code, and finally, managing and securing a database.
(CSU)
CIS 155A: Systems and Network Administration
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS
275.
This course provides the knowledge and skills required to build,
maintain, troubleshoot, and support server and workstation
hardware and software technologies. Students learn to identify
environmental issues; understand and comply with disaster recovery
and physical/software security procedures; become familiar with
industry terminology and concepts; and understand server and
workstation roles, specializations, and interactions within the overall
computing environment. (CSU)
CIS 160: Introduction to Information Systems
Security
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS
275.
An introduction to the fundamental principles and topics of
information technology security and risk management at the
organizational level. It addresses hardware, software, processes, communications, applications, and policies and procedures with respect
to organizational cybersecurity and risk management. (CSU)
CIS 170: Windows OS for PC Users
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides an introduction to hardware, operating systems,
and application software environment of the personal computer
running under Windows. Topics include Windows environment,
menus, dialog boxes, folder management, explorer, disk maintenance
and other Window tools. Students gain the skills and confidence
necessary to succeed in additional application training courses
in spreadsheets, database design, word processing and Web page
construction, as well as the transfer level comprehensive computer
concepts course. (CSU)
CIS 171: Applied Spreadsheet Design
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS 110
or 170.
Students learn to use a personal computer spreadsheet software program to design, create, and manipulate worksheets to meet management, marketing, accounting, and other business needs. (CSU)
CIS 172: Applied Database Design
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS 110
or 170.
In this course on the design and installation of a database for
personal computers, students use the features of database software
to implement database applications using development tools to
integrate information from other applications, analyze data, utilize
internet capabilities, include forms for data input and validation, and
produce custom reports. (CSU)
Fundamental design and layout requirements for the creation of
effective computer generated presentations and printed documents
for business. Students learn and experience the operation of software
packages that deal with layout, composition, typography, use of color
and choice of various output media. (CSU)
CIS 174: Applied Website Design
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS 170
or 110.
This course teaches the design and implementation of websites using
Microsoft Expression Web. Students learn how a graphical website
editor creates static and dynamic pages and controls site management. (CSU)
CIS 215: Visual BASIC Programming
3.5 Units. 3 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS
110.
Students plan and create their own interactive Windows applications
using Visual BASIC on a personal computer. Logic and computation
problems develop skill in developing interactive BASIC programs.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
CIS 237: Introduction to SQL Programming
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS
137.
This course extends students’ relational database application
development knowledge using SQL (Structured Query Language).
Students concentrate on learning the SQL programming language
including single and multiple-table queries, updating data, database
administration, reports and embedded SQL. (CSU)
CIS 275: Networking Fundamentals and Practices
3 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS 170
or 110.
This course introduces the design of server-based networks, including virtual environments. By researching and developing a case study
of a typical network, students explore and implement basic concepts
of networks. Topics include LAN, WAN, MAN and wireless network
hardware, network operating systems, virtualization and operating
system imaging, cloud computing, and network applications. (CSU)
102
Computer Science
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Computers play a role in most facets of our daily lives, from our
acquisition and use of vast amounts of information throughout the
day, to the myriad ways we communicate with each other, to the
appliances we use in our home, to our transportation both public
and private. The computer science degree program is designed to
help students gain the skills necessary to take part in the responsible
design and management of our future technology.
Career Options
Careers for graduates of computer science programs include job
titles as diverse as software developer, computer hardware engineer,
systems analyst, game developer, computer engineer, web developer,
technical writer, program manager, site reliability engineer, researcher, technical account manager, and private consultant. Computer
science majors hold positions in large multinational corporations;
federal, state, and local governments; private companies; technical
start-ups; and consulting firms.
Faculty
Mia Chia
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
Transfer
With an associate degree in computer science, students can transfer
to bachelor degree programs in areas such as applied computer
science and engineering, computer graphics, computer information
systems, and computer information technology. Additionally, there
are degrees with concentrations in artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, networks and security, software engineering,
networking and data communication, bioinformatics, computer
game design, homeland security, materials science and engineering,
nuclear engineering, applied math, scientific computation, telecommunications, multimedia, and applied computing.
A.S. IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
Computer science students may choose among several paths to meet
requirements for the associate degree. There are three entry-level
courses, Computer Science 130, 135, and 150 (C++, JAVA, and
MATLAB), that each fulfill the requirements for any of the upperlevel courses. Students who complete the requirements listed below,
plus additional general education and graduation requirements, will
be awarded the associate degree. Due to the diversity among degree
programs, students should talk with a counselor or faculty member
about their career goals and transfer requirements as they prepare
to make their class choices. Note: Students are required to complete
English 150 for the associate degree. All students should consult a
counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
COMP 130
Introduction to Computer Programming Using C++
4
Or
COMP 135
Introduction to Programming in JAVA
4
Or
COMP 150
Programming in MATLAB for Engineers
4
COMP 160
Computer Organization: An Assembly Language Perspective
3
COMP 220
Data Structures and Algorithms
3
COMP/MATH 117 Discrete Mathematics
3
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
MATH 116
Linear Algebra
3
MATH 123
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
5
MARIN.EDU
MATH 124
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
PHYS
207A Mechanics and Properties of Matter
PHYS
207B Electricity and Magnetism
And one of the following advanced programming courses:
COMP 235
Advanced Programming in C++
COMP 232
Advanced Programming in JAVA
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
5
5
5
4
4
43
COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES (COMP)
COMP 117: Discrete Mathematics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 121 or 123. Can be taken
as COMP 117 or Math 117; credit awarded for only one course.
A survey of topics including set theory, combinatorics, graph theory,
algorithm, logic, Boolean algebra, formal languages, and probability theory. Recommended for mathematics majors and students
interested in engineering and applied fields. (CSU/UC) CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2A
COMP 130: Introduction to Computer Programming
Using C++
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB
or 103XY or sufficient score on Math Assessment Test.
An introduction to problem-solving using a structured, objectoriented programming language in C++ for those without prior
programming experience. Examples and programming assignments
are drawn from many areas, involving both numerical and nonnumerical applications. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
COMP 135: Introduction to Programming in JAVA
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB
or 103XY or sufficient score on Math Assessment Test.
Introduction to computer programming using JAVA for computer
science majors and computer professionals. Course concepts include
problem-solving techniques, program design, charting, control
structures, primitive data types, array and string data structures,
operations, algorithms, reading and writing files, exception handling, and applets. Object-oriented features are introduced, including
classes, objects, inheritance, and parameter passing. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area E
COMP 150: Programming in MATLAB for Engineers
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 123. May be
taken as COMP 150 or ENGG 150; credit awarded for only one course.
Designed to meet computer programming requirements for
engineering transfer students, this course utilizes the MATLAB
environment to provide a working knowledge of computer-based
problem-solving methods relevant to science and engineering,
including programming and numerical analysis techniques. Students
outline, write, test, and debug computer programs to solve problems
and display results, emphasizing proper documentation of computer
code and reports. Common examples and applications of physics and
engineering are used throughout the course. (CSU/UC)
Counseling
CATALOG 2015/2016
COMP 160: Computer Organization: An Assembly
Language Perspective
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: COMP 130 or 135 or 150, or
ENGG 150.
103
Faculty
Luz Briceno-Moreno, Gina Cullen, Dawn Danz, Rinetta Early, Caitlin Escobar, Luna
Finlayson, Bruce Furuya, Rachel Klein, Alexandra Magallanes-Rivera, Pamela
Mize-Kurzman, Kristin Perrone, Byron Ramey, Karen Robinson, Troy Stevenson
Computer architecture and techniques of assembly language
programming as applied with Intel microprocessors. Topics include
theory and concepts of virtual memory, pipelines, caches, and
multitasking. IA-32 hardware architecture (bus, memory, stack, I/O,
interrupts), design of structured assembly language code, arithmetic
instructions, simple data transfer, input/output and disk processing
concepts. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
Department Phone: 415-485-9431
Disabled Students: 415-485-9406
COMP 220: Data Structures and Algorithms
This course provides College of Marin students with an introduction
to campus services, programs, degree and transfer requirements,
and college culture. Students develop an educational plan and learn
strategies for success in college. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: COMP 130 or 135 or 150, or
ENGG 150.
This is a follow-up computer science course after a high-level
language programming course, such as C++ or JAVA. Data structures and their implementations as abstract data types are presented,
including lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, heaps, and hash tables.
An object-oriented approach is emphasized in software designs. The
C++ STL framework will be introduced. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E
COMP 232: Advanced Programming in JAVA
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: COMP 130 or 135 or
150, or ENGG 150.
JAVA programming for both computer science majors and computer
professionals. Review of JAVA syntax, data types, data structures,
exception handling, and object-oriented features including classes,
objects, and inheritance. The course will introduce advanced JAVA
features including polymorphism, encapsulation, interfaces, abstraction, file IO, generics, collections, multithreading, concurrency, client
server and network programming with sockets. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area E
COMP 235: Advanced Programming in C++
COUNSELING COURSES (COUN)
COUN 101: Educational Planning and Preparation
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
COUN 105: Achieving Success in College
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This course assists students in developing both personal and academic management strategies essential to success in college. Topics
include managing time, critical reading, improving test preparation,
research strategies, learning styles, effective problem solving, and
goal-setting. (CSU)
COUN 110: Academic Success Strategies
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An overview of the concepts and significant factors that contribute
to college transfer and college success, including social awareness,
cultural identity, goal setting, study skills, career/major exploration,
information competency, and college resources. Introduction to
academic planning focused on the transfer institution. Focus on
understanding college/university systems, and on the relationship of
cultural experiences and college success. (CSU/UC)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: COMP 130 or 135 or
150, or ENGG 150.
COUN 114: College Success Investigations
This advanced programming course in C++ offers students a deeper
understanding of the language and its advanced features and
techniques. Topics include namespaces, derived classes, abstract
classes, multiple inheritance, polymorphism, compositions, template
classes, containers of Standard Template Library (STL), exceptions,
dynamic memory management, and design of libraries. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area E
An in-depth guide to introduce students to the role of higher education in society and understanding their role within the academic
community. The course focuses on the determination of personal and
professional life goals, using a reflective model of decision-making
that is applicable in a variety of situations over an individual’s
lifespan. Topics include academic and career planning, study skills,
team development, and self-understanding. (CSU/UC)
COUNSELING
Counseling courses are designed to provide an in-depth exploration
into the process of self-knowledge. The courses are specifically intended to enhance student study habits, provide insights into career
possibilities, and establish suitable educational planning. Courses
are taught both informally and experientially in order to arrive at a
realistic view of oneself and to enable students to better assess their
potential for making informed decisions. In addition to the established offerings, special topics are offered periodically in response to
student interest.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
COUN 115: Planning for Success in College
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This course focuses on how to successfully prepare to transfer to UC,
CSU, and private universities and colleges. Topics include developing
an educational plan and selecting courses for transfer, admission
criteria and the review process, choosing a college major, developing
an effective personal statement, completing applications and use of
internet resources. (CSU)
104
Court Reporting
MARIN.EDU
COUN 116: Transfer Success and Educational
Planning
preparation, interviewing techniques, and labor market research.
(CSU)
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
COUN 136ABC: Career Internship
The purpose of this course is to provide a global perspective about
the transfer process to a four-year univeristy that includes transfer
exploration, transfer policies, academic requirements, transfer
planning and processes, and available tools and services in support
of transfer goals. Students have the opportunity to broaden their
perspectives by examing the role of higher education in society. The
course guides students to examine their life plan and achievements,
and develop a strong personal statement. Students complete a cost
analysis and explore resources to fund their education. (CSU/UC)
COUN 125: How to Study Effectively
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces students to proven study techniques, including assessing learning styles, time management, stress reduction,
listening and lecture note taking, efficient textbook reading, preparing for exams, improving memory, and critical thinking and writing.
(CSU)
COUN 125L: Effective Study Skills Lab
0.5 Unit. 1 lab hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides students the opportunity to assess their current
study skills, and in the lab setting develop and practice proven study
techniques in effective textbook reading, active listening, lecture note
taking, exam preparation, memory and concentration improvement,
and time budgeting. (CSU)
COUN 130: Career Life Skills Planning
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course focuses on the determination of personal and professional life goals using a reflective model of decision-making applicable in
a variety of situations over an individual’s lifespan. Through a study
of career decision making, students explore the impact of psycho-social, physical, and affective factors on their own cognitive processes.
The course addresses workplace cultural pluralism, technological
awareness, one’s role and impact in the workforce, choosing a college
major, and changing jobs and career fields. (CSU) CSU Area E
COUN 133: Career Exploration
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory course provides students with a practical approach
to making career and educational decisions. Self-assessment inventories and assignments help students discover their interests, values,
skills, lifestyle needs, and personality profile. (CSU)
COUN 133A: Career Exploration
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This short course introduces self-assessment including interests,
skills, values, and personality style, as it relates to career transition
and choosing a major. (CSU)
COUN 135: Effective Job Search Strategies
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite. Two lecture hours weekly
for four weeks.
This course teaches strategies for identifying internships and jobs
that provide hands-on experience related to students’ chosen career.
The course emphasizes job search strategies, resume and cover letter
1.0 (A), 2.0 (B), or 3.0 (C) Units. 3 (A), 6 (B), or 9 (C) lab hrs/wk.
Prerequisite: COUN 135.
This internship course offers students the opportunity to develop
marketable skills in their major area of study. It allows students to
work (paid or unpaid) in an area of academic or career interest, build
their resumes and develop their professional network. (CSU)
COUN 179: Student Development and Transfer
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The process of transferring from the community college system to a
college or university can be overwhelming and complex, personally
and academically. This course enables students to actively participate in planning their educational and career goals by providing
information about the process and requirements for transferring.
Students examine the stages of adult development, learn to embrace a
culturally diverse world, and explore their identity as it relates to life
decisions and career choices. The class addresses the challenges and
obstacles that students may see impeding in their transfer process
and their identity formation. Students learn how to adjust to one’s
changing role in a culturally diverse society. (CSU)
COURT REPORTING
The Court Reporting Program is designed for students interested
in acquiring the skill necessary to secure employment as a verbatim
reporter in our courts of law and legal and business offices.
Career Options
Convention Reporter, Court Reporter, Deposition Reporter, Freelance Reporter, Hearing Reporter
Faculty
Kristin Acredolo
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8226
The College of Marin Court Reporting Program is recognized by the
Court Reporters Board of California. For information concerning
the minimum requirements that a Court Reporting Program must
meet in order to be recognized, contact The Court Reporters Board
of California, 2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 230, Sacramento, CA
95833. Phone: 916-263-3660
A.S. IN COURT REPORTING, OCCUPATIONAL, LEGAL
TRANSCRIPTION TECHNOLOGY OPTION
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
The Legal Transcription Technology Option is offered only at the
Indian Valley Campus. This curriculum offers students the opportunity to prepare for a career as a proofreader, scopist and/or transcript
production technician for court reporters, medical or legal administrative assistant, medical or legal transcriptionist, or text entry
specialist. The courses also partially fulfill the Certified Shorthand
Reporters Board requirements to qualify to take the State Certified
Shorthand Reporters Examination. An Associate in Science degree
in Court Reporting, Legal Transcription Technology, is earned
by completing the courses listed below and the College of Marin
graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded
CATALOG 2015/2016
for satisfactory completion of all courses required for the major.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the associate
degree. All students should consult a counselor.
PREREQUISITE
English 120 or equivalent.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Students must register for eight units of skill building classes each fall and spring semester,
and four units in the summer session, to satisfy a Court Reporters Board of California
regulation.
Fall Semester
COUR 110
Theory of Machine Shorthand
8
COUR 167
Procedures and Ethics for the Court/Deposition Reporter
1
COUR 168A Spelling and Vocabulary for the Court Reporter
1
MEDA 165
Medical Terminology I
2
Spring Semester
COUR 112
Skill Development I
4
COUR 120
Skill Development II
4
COUR 166
Legal Terminology and CSR Law
2
COUR 169A Computer-Aided Transcription
2
Fall Semester
COUR 140
Skill Development III
4
COUR 160
Skill Development IV
4
COUR 168B Grammar/Punctuation/Proofreading I
2
COUR 169B Transcript Preparation/Formatting
2
Spring Semester
COUR 168C Grammar/Punctuation/Proofreading II
2
MEDA 166
Medical Terminology II 2
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
40
* Applied toward the Certificate of Achievement only.
A.S. IN COURT REPORTING, OCCUPATIONAL, CERTIFIED
SHORTHAND REPORTER OPTION
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded)
The Certified Shorthand Reporter Option is offered only at the Indian Valley Campus. This program in conjunction with the academic
courses required for the Legal Transcription Technology Option
will fulfill the Certified Shorthand Reporters Board requirements to
qualify to take the State Certified Shorthand Reporters Examination.
An Associate in Science degree in Court Reporting, Certified Shorthand Reporters Option, is earned by completing the courses listed
below, the academic courses required for the Legal Transcription
Technology Option, and the College of Marin graduation requirements. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory
completion of all courses required for the major. In addition, students
must pass all required skills tests, up to and including a 10-minute
200 wpm 4-Voice test with at least 97.5% accuracy (Qualifier). The
total length of time it takes to complete the machine shorthand skill
requirements varies with each student. Note: Students are required
to complete English 150 for the associate degree. All students should
consult a counselor.
PREREQUISITES
Completion of: Court Reporting 110, 112, 120, 140, 160, 166, 167,
168A, 168B, 169A, 169B; Medical Assisting 165; completion of or
concurrent enrollment in Court Reporting 168C and Medical Assisting 166.
Court Reporting
105
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Students must also register for eight units of skill building classes each semester to satisfy a
Court Reporters Board of California regulation.
Spring Semester
COUR 180
Skill Development V
4
COUR 200
Skill Development VI
4
Fall Semester
COUR 220A Skill Development VII-A
4
COUR 220B Skill Development VII-B
4
WE
298B Occupational Work Experience
2
Spring Semester
COUR 220C Skill Development VII-C
4
COUR 225
Mastery Skill Development VIII
4
COUR 283
CSR/RPR Written Exam Preparation
1
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
27 (67 including prerequisites)
COURT REPORTING COURSES (COUR)
COUR 110: Theory of Machine Shorthand
8.0 Units. 4 lecture and 12 lab hrs/wk. Additional 6 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: ENGL 120,
120SL, 120AC, or English Placement Test or equivalent.
This course introduces the theory of machine stenography and
operation of the stenotype machine. The course develops knowledge
of stenotype theory, fluent stroking and reading of stenotype notes,
and the ability to take dictation at 60-80 wpm for three minutes with
90% or better accuracy. Students are required to provide their own
stenotype machine. (CSU)
COUR 112: Skill Development I
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 110.
Corequisite: COUR 120.
Students complete the machine shorthand theory textbook. This
course concludes the introduction of stenotype theory principles;
improves fluent reading, writing, and transcription of stenotype
notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 80-100 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5%
accuracy; and continues the development of technical, medical, legal,
and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events.
Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
(CSU)
COUR 120: Skill Development II
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 110.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at
100-120 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice
tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of
technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization
with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. (CSU)
106
Court Reporting
COUR 120A: Skill Development II-A: Shorthand
Speed Acceleration
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 120.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
120-wpm skills tests due to drops and hesitation, emphasizes speed
development techniques to improve stenotype machine dexterity;
develops the ability to take dictation at 100-120 wpm on 5-minute
literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students
simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 120B: Skill Development II-B: Briefs and
Phrases
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 120.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
120-wpm skills tests, emphasizes briefing and phrasing techniques
to improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to take
dictation at 100-120 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 120C: Skill Development II-C: Accuracy
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 120.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
120-wpm skills tests, emphasizes accuracy and realtime writing to
improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to take
dictation at 100-120 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 140: Skill Development III
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 120.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes, develops the ability to take dictation
at 120-140 wpm on 5- to 7.5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 140A: Skill Development III-A: Shorthand
Speed Acceleration
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 140.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
140-wpm skills tests, emphasizes speed development techniques to
MARIN.EDU
improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to take
dictation at 140 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 140B: Skill Development III-B: Briefs and
Phrases
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 140.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
140-wpm skills tests, emphasizes briefing and phrasing techniques
to improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to
take dictation at 140 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 140C: Skill Development III-C: Accuracy
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 140.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
140-wpm skills tests, emphasizes accuracy and realtime writing to
improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to take
dictation at 140 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 141: Usage, Punctuation and Proofreading for
the Court Reporter
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98A and ENGL 98B.
This course presents grammar, usage, punctuation, sentence rhetoric,
and error recognition and editing on a professional level to court
reporting students, and others whose professional field demands precise skills in independent writing, proofreading, and transcription of
oral language. The course emphasizes syntax, diction, structure, and
proofreading directly appropriate for court reporting but also vital
to business communications, technical report writing, and medical
transcription. (CSU)
COUR 160: Skill Development IV
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 120.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes, develops the ability to take dictation
at 140-160 wpm on 5- to 7.5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
CATALOG 2015/2016
Court Reporting
COUR 160A: Skill Development IV-A: Shorthand
Speed Acceleration
COUR 168A: Spelling & Vocabulary for the Court
Reporter
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 160.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120, 120SL, 120AC, or
English Placement Test or equivalent.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
160-wpm skills tests, emphasizes speed development techniques to
improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to take
dictation at 160 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 160B: Skill Development IV-B: Briefs and
Phrases
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 160.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
160-wpm skills tests, emphasizes briefing and phrasing techniques
to improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to
take dictation at 160 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 160C: Skill Development IV-C: Accuracy
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 160.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
160-wpm skills tests, emphasizes accuracy and realtime writing to
improve stenotype machine dexterity; develops the ability to take
dictation at 160 wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 166: Legal Terminology and CSR Law
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
General concepts of law to include real and personal property;
negligence and personal injury; contracts, wills, probate, and domestic relations; corporate law, insurance, criminal law and equity;
procedural law including trial procedures; subpoenas, depositions,
appellate procedures and the structure of the judicial system; and
California codes applicable to the practice of court reporting. (CSU)
COUR 167: Procedures and Ethics for the Court/
Deposition/CART Reporter
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. No prerequisite.
This course explores the career opportunities in court, deposition,
and CART reporting, concentrating on the ethics and procedures
inherent to these careers. Field trips may include courthouses and
deposition agencies. (CSU)
107
Designed for court reporting students, this online course develops
the spelling and vocabulary skills necessary for professional success.
Topics include medical, legal and technical vocabulary and commonly misspelled and confused words.
COUR 168B: Grammar/Punctuation/Proofreading
for the Court Reporter Part I
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120, 120SL, 120AC, or
English Placement Test or equivalent.
Designed for court reporting students, this online course develops
the grammar, punctuation, and proofreading skills necessary for
professional success. Topics include punctuating spoken English,
sentence structure, capitalization, paragraphing, and correct grammar usage as it pertains to transcription of legal proceedings.
COUR 168C: Grammar/Punctuation/Proofreading
for the Court Reporter Part II
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: COUR 168B.
Designed for court reporting students, this online course continues
to develop topics presented in COUR 168B, developing the grammar,
punctuation and proofreading skills necessary for professional success. Topics include punctuating spoken English, sentence structure,
capitalization, paragraphing, and correct grammar usage as it
pertains to transcription of legal proceedings.
COUR 169A: Computer-Aided Transcription
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: COUR 110.
Students develop knowledge and skill in the use of a computer-aided
transcription system. Introduction of the computerized stenotype
machine, computer editing, printing, realtime reporting, and reporting technology in the court reporting industry are emphasized.
Instruction is a combination of lecture, demonstration, simulation
on the computer, and class discussion. (CSU)
COUR 169B: Transcript Preparation/Formatting
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: COUR 169A.
This course emphasizes the transcription of the verbatim record of
depositions, hearings, and judicial proceedings with court reporting
software while adhering to the state’s minimum transcript format
standards. Students develop proficiency in performing editing and
proofreading functions for court reporters using CAT software. The
course also introduces Communication Access Realtime Translation
(CART). Instruction is a combination of lecture, demonstration on
the computer, class discussion, and individual practice. (CSU)
COUR 169D: Stenocaptioning I
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: COUR 169A or 169C.
This course concentrates on developing the skill and knowledge
necessary to write a conflict-free stenographic reporting method to
provide instantaneous translation with at least 95% accuracy. (CSU)
108
Court Reporting
MARIN.EDU
COUR 170A: Summer Intensive I-A
COUR 171C: Summer Intensive II-C
3.0 Units. 5.5 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk for 6 weeks. Prerequisite: COUR
112.
3.0 Units. 5.5 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk for 6 weeks. Prerequisite: COUR
200.
This course reinforces stenotype theory principles; develops and improves fluency in reading, writing, and transcribing stenotype notes;
develops the ability to take dictation at 80-100 wpm on 5-minute
literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and
general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students
simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
This course reinforces stenotype theory principles; develops and
improves fluency in reading, writing, and transcribing stenotype
notes; develops and improves the ability to take dictation at 180-225+
wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice
tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of
technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization
with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 170B: Summer Intensive I-B
3.0 Units. 5.5 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk for 6 weeks. Prerequisite: COUR
120.
This course reinforces stenotype theory principles; develops and
improves fluency in reading, writing, and transcribing stenotype
notes; develops and improves the ability to take dictation at 100-140
wpm on 5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with
95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
COUR 170C: Summer Intensive I-C
COUR 180: Skill Development V
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 140.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes, develops the ability to take dictation
at 160-180 wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 5.5 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk for 6 weeks. Prerequisite: COUR
140.
COUR 180A: Skill Development V-A: Shorthand
Speed Acceleration
This course reinforces stenotype theory principles; develops and
improves fluency in reading, writing, and transcribing stenotype
notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 120-160 wpm on 5- to
7.5-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with 95% to
97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current
events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 180.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
COUR 171A: Summer Intensive II-A
3.0 Units. 5.5 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk for 6 weeks. Prerequisite: COUR
160.
This course reinforces stenotype theory principles; develops and
improves fluency in reading, writing, and transcribing stenotype
notes; develops and improves the ability to take dictation at 140-180
wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice
tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of
technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization
with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 171B: Summer Intensive II-B
3.0 Units. 5.5 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk for 6 weeks. Prerequisite: COUR
180.
This course reinforces stenotype theory principles; develops and
improves fluency in reading, writing, and transcribing stenotype
notes; develops and improves the ability to take dictation at 160-200
wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice
tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of
technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization
with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a
variety of situations. (CSU)
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
180-wpm skills tests, emphasizes speed development techniques;
improves stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent reading of
stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 180 wpm on
5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with
95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
COUR 180B: Skill Development V-B: Briefs and
Phrases
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 180.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
180-wpm skills tests, emphasizes briefing and phrasing techniques;
improves stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent reading of
stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 180 wpm on
5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with
95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
COUR 180C: Skill Development V-C: Accuracy
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 180.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
180-wpm skills tests, emphasizes accuracy and realtime writing;
Court Reporting
CATALOG 2015/2016
improves stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent reading of
stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 180 wpm on
5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with
95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
COUR 200: Skill Development VI
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 160.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes, develops the ability to take dictation
at 180-200 wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 200A: Skill Development VI-A: Shorthand
Speed Acceleration
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 200.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
200-wpm skills tests, emphasizes speed development techniques;
improves stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent reading of
stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 200 wpm on
5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with
95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
COUR 200B: Skill Development VI-B: Briefs and
Phrases
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 200.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
200-wpm skills tests, emphasizes briefing and phrasing techniques;
improves stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent reading of
stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 200 wpm on
5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with
95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical,
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of
situations. (CSU)
COUR 220A: Skill Development VII-A
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 180.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation
at 200-225 wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 220B: Skill Development VII-B
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 180.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation
at 200-225 wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice
and 4-voice tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the
acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary, and
familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 220C: Skill Development VII-C
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 180.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at
200-225 wpm on 5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and
4-voice (Qualifier) tests with 95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues
the acquisition of technical, medical, legal, and general vocabulary,
and familiarization with current events. Students simulate the role of
court reporter in a variety of situations. (CSU)
COUR 225: Mastery Skill Development VIII
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 200
or equivalent.
This course develops stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent
reading of stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation
at 200 wpm on 5-minute literary tests, 240 wpm on 5-minute jury
charge tests, and 260 wpm on 5-minute 2-voice tests with at least 95%
accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical, medical, legal,
and general vocabulary, and familiarization with current events.
Students simulate the role of court reporter in a variety of situations.
(CSU)
COUR 200C: Skill Development VI-C: Accuracy
COUR 283: CSR/RPR Written Exam Preparation
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Additional 3 weekly independent
lab hours using Web-based learning platform. Prerequisite: COUR 200.
Total of 8 units of court reporting skills development courses required.
1.0 Unit1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This post-remedial course, for students who have not completed all
200-wpm skills tests, emphasizes accuracy and realtime writing;
improves stenotype machine dexterity; improves fluent reading of
stenotype notes; develops the ability to take dictation at 200 wpm on
5- to 10-minute literary, jury charge, 2-voice and 4-voice tests with
95% to 97.5% accuracy; and continues the acquisition of technical,
109
This course is a comprehensive review of legal, medical and technical
terminology, court structure, applicable code sections, grammar,
word usage, and punctuation in preparation for the Certified Shorthand Reporter and the Registered Professional Reporter written
examinations. (CSU)
110
Dance
DANCE
As well as developing high levels of physical and mental skills,
dance provides a means to express creatively the personal side of
our nature. Through its study students gain an understanding and
appreciation of dance as an art form whether their goal be a career in
dance or the sheer pleasure of movement.
Career Options
Choreographer, Commercial Theater Dancer, Composer, Concert
Dancer, Costumer, Dance Critic, Dance Teacher, Dance Therapist,
Night Club Entertainer, Notator, Reconstructor, Recreation Leader,
Stage/Theater Designer, Studio Worker, Television Producer
Faculty
David Jones, Kristi Kuhn, Sandi Weldon
Department Phone: 415-485-9315
A.A. IN DANCE
The A.A. degree prepares students for transfer into a four-year dance
major or performing arts program. It serves as basic preparation for
professional performance and/or teaching careers, as well as being a
springboard into further study of other dance-related areas. Students
who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional general
education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for
the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
Technique Courses
The following requirements are the minimum. The student is advised
to take as many technique courses as possible in order to develop the
highest skill level in any of the styles.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Nine technique courses are required for the major, distributed as follows, achieving a
minimum of 18.5 units.
Ballet, two different courses from:
DANC 126A Beginning Ballet Fundamentals
1.5
DANC 126B Beginning Ballet
1.5
DANC 126C Intermediate Beginning Ballet
1.5
DANC 126D Advanced Beginning Ballet
1.5
DANC 128A Beginning Intermediate Ballet
2.0
DANC 128B Intermediate Ballet
2.0
DANC 227A Beginning Advanced Ballet
2
DANC 227B Advanced Ballet
2
Modern Dance, two different courses from:
DANC 130A Beginning Modern Dance Fundamentals
1.5
DANC 130B Beginning Modern Dance
1.5
DANC 130C Intermediate Beginning Modern Dance
1.5
DANC 130D Advanced Beginning Modern Dance
1.5
DANC 133A Beginning Intermediate Modern Dance
2
DANC 133B Intermediate Modern Dance
2
DANC 233A Beginning Advanced Modern Dance
2
DANC 233B Advanced Modern Dance
2
Jazz, one course from:
DANC 122A Introduction to Jazz Dance
2
DANC 122B Beginning Jazz
2
DANC 123A Beginning Intermediate Jazz Dance
2
DANC 123B Intermediate Jazz 2
Select one course from the following:
DANC 109A Conditioning, Injury Prevention and Technique Analysis
2
DANC 109B Conditioning, Injury Prevention and Technique Analysis
2
MARIN.EDU
History and Choreography, must complete both:
DANC 108
Dance History
DANC135 Choreography
Electives: Two additional courses from any of the above or from:
DANC 111A-D Hip Hop
DANC 119
African Haitian Dance
DANC 121
Popular Dance Styles
DANC 161
Beginning Ballroom Dance
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
3
2.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
MINIMUM OF 18.5
Performance and Production
Students with a dance career in mind should perform as frequently as possible. Students who
wish to choreograph or teach must have knowledge, by experience, of what dancers deal with
in performance.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
One course from:
DANC 160A Introduction to Dance Performance Skills
1.5
DANC 241A-D Dance Company
2 to 5
DANCE COURSES (DANC)
DANC 103: History of Musical Theatre
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as Music 103,
Dance 103 or Drama 103; credit awarded for only one course.
This course surveys the history of American musical theatre and its
effects on popular culture. The course explores the development of
the musical in the context of American theatre history, through a
multicultural study of the evolution of this uniquely American art
form. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
DANC 108: Dance History: Dancing - The Pleasure,
Power, and Art of Movement
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course covers the major theatrical traditions as well as dance as
a social, cultural and religious expression. It describes dance history
and anthropology from six continents and highlights the important
ways in which dance functions in human societies. The course
focuses on dance as an expression of social order and power, as
classical art, as a medium of cultural fusion, and as an expression of
individual artists. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC
Area 3A
DANC 109A: Conditioning, Injury Prevention and
Technique Analysis
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class emphasizes alignment, placement, strength, injury prevention, and efficient joint articulation through non-impact floor, barre,
and other non- and low-impact dance conditioning methods. Muscle
and skeletal terminology and basic ballet terminology are introduced. Technique analysis allows time for instructor and student to
work one-on-one to assess and address movement issues. (CSU)
DANC 109B: Conditioning, Injury Prevention and
Technique Analysis
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This continuation of Dance 109A includes technique analysis, allowing instructor and student to work one-on-one to correct important
technical issues. Activities emphasize alignment, placement,
strength, injury prevention, and efficient joint articulation through
Dance
CATALOG 2015/2016
the use of floor, barre, and other low-impact dance conditioning
methods. Appropriate for those actively dancing or those returning
to dance after an injury or period of inactivity. (CSU)
DANC 111: Hip Hop
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class introduces hip-hop choreography with the use of isolations, techniques, and movement combinations derived from current
and recent popular hip-hop music. The class teaches rhythm, musicality, coordination, and hip-hop choreography. Historical elements
of this dance form are also covered. (CSU) AA/AS Area H
DANC 111ABCD: Hip Hop (Introductory through
Advanced Levels)
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
111
DANC 122A: Introductory Jazz Dance
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class introduces jazz dance, emphasizing movement exercises
involving rhythmic sequences. Fundamental elements of jazz dance
technique, as well as early historical influences, are explored. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 122B: Beginning Jazz Dance
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
122A.
This class focuses on beginning-level jazz dance, including movement exercises involving rhythmic sequences, and the fundamental
elements of jazz dance technique. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU
Area E
This series of classes, from introductory to advanced levels, introduce
hip-hop choreography with the use of isolations, techniques, and
movement combinations derived from current and recent popular
hip-hop music, emphasizing rhythm, musicality and coordination.
Historical elements of this dance form are also covered. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 123A: Intermediate Jazz Dance
DANC 112: Dancing in America
DANC 123B: Intermediate Jazz Dance
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
123A.
An introduction to the basic skills of a variety of dance styles indigenous to America to be selected from such forms as street dance,
ballroom, movement games, jazz, and tap. Two or three of these
forms will be selected per semester for examination of their historical
and socio-cultural backgrounds, movement theory, and execution of
technique and style. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 117: Dancercise
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course promotes total fitness through dance, rhythmic movement, aerobics, strengthening and relaxation exercises, yoga, and
Pilates. The pulse-monitored program is structured to produce
metabolic efficiency and increase energy, endurance, strength, and
flexibility through an introduction of a variety of dance styles including Latin, hip hop, swing, jazz, modern, and disco. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area H
DANC 119: African-Haitian Dance
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course includes skills in African-Haitian dance based on the
technique of Katherine Dunham, emphasizing development of
rhythmic awareness through barre and floor progressions. Movement phases are based upon authentic dances from Africa and
the Caribbean Islands. Participants learn to use their body parts
polyrhythmically and in isolation. The history and the culture of the
people are also studied. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 121: Popular Dance Styles
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class enhances beginning students’ skill in mastering popular
dance styles of the twentieth century. Exploring the technical basis of
these styles fosters understanding and appreciation of the emergence
of popular dance in the last century. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU
Area E
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An intermediate course in jazz dance, emphasizing movement exercises involving rhythmic sequences. Fundamental elements of jazz
dance technique, as well as early historical influences, are explored.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
An intermediate course in jazz dance, emphasizing movement exercises involving rhythmic sequences. Fundamental elements of jazz
dance technique, as well as early historical influences, are explored.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 126A: Ballet Fundamentals
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Beginning ballet with exercises for body awareness and alignment,
flexibility, balance, strength, and stamina. Center floor work with
basic adagio and allegro movements, jumps and turns. References
to different national styles and ballet history. (CSU) AA/AS Area H,
CSU Area E
DANC 126B: Beginning Ballet
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
126A
A continuing course in beginning ballet, emphasizing arm placement. Includes exercises for body awareness and alignment,
flexibility, balance, strength, and stamina. Center floor work with
basic adagio and allegro movements, jumps and turns. References
to different national styles and ballet history. (CSU) AA/AS Area H,
CSU Area E
DANC 126C: Intermediate Beginning Ballet
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
126B.
This beginning ballet class continues from Dance 126B, emphasizing
arm positions, placement and carriage. Includes exercises for body
awareness, alignment, flexibility, balance, strength, and stamina.
Center floor work with basic adagio and allegro movements, jumps
and turns. References to different national styles and ballet history.
(CSU) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
112
Dance
MARIN.EDU
DANC 126D: Advanced Beginning Ballet
DANC 132: Musical Theatre
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
126C.
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This beginning ballet class continues from Dance 126C, emphasizing
the standing leg. Includes exercises for body awareness, alignment,
flexibility, balance, strength and stamina. Center floor work with
basic adagio and allegro movements, jumps and turns. References to
national styles and ballet history. (CSU) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 128A: Beginning Intermediate Ballet
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
126D.
This course provides beginning intermediate ballet students with
continued training in ballet technique, emphasizing proper body
alignment, increased flexibility and fluidity. Includes study of the
Russian ballet innovators of the mid-19th and early 20th centuries.
(CSU) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
The study and practice of a variety of dance styles from musical
theatre such as jazz, soft shoe, vaudeville, chorus line, ethnic dance,
and ballroom dance. Explores the integration of music, dance and
acting that is characteristic of musical theatre. Broadway musicals
are studied in groups, duets, or solos. Inlcudes acting, vocal training, audition techniques, basic dance steps and terminology, and
choreography. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 133A: Beginning Intermediate Modern Dance
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
130D.
This beginning intermediate modern dance technique course further
develops students’ ability to use the body as an instrument of expression, emphasizing performance skills and techniques of specific
modern dance styles. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 128B: Intermediate Ballet
DANC 133B: Intermediate Modern Dance
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
128A.
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
130D.
Intermediate ballet technique, emphasizing body alignment and
placement, foot articulation, leg rotation, port de bras. Attention to
the linkage of steps, quality of individual movements, and principles
of artistic expression. (CSU) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
Intermediate modern technique, adding falls and sight reading of
simple movement phrases to skills developed in beginning modern
dance. Continued emphasis on alignment, centering, balance and
sensitivity to space-time-energy in movement. (CSU) AA/AS Area H,
CSU Area E
DANC 130A: Beginning Modern Dance
Fundamentals
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This beginning modern dance course explores positioning, alignment, and centering as they apply to balance, turns, elevations, and
movement in and through space. Examines a variety of movement
qualities, rhythms, and phrasing as well as space-time energy
concepts. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 130B: Modern Dance I
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
130A.
Beginning modern dance technique. Continued emphasis on
positioning, alignment, and centering as they apply to balance, turns,
elevations, and movement in and through space. Examines a variety
of movement qualities, rhythms, and phrasing as well as space-time
energy concepts. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 134: Dance Improvisation
2.5 Units. 2.125 lecture and 2.125 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Improvisation as a major part of dance training and a
process essential to all art forms. Designed to develop
sensitivity in movement to oneself, others, time,
space, energy, motion and to the moment. Structured
and free improvisational techniques are used that
lead to the excitement of creativity on the move, and
to an understanding of improvisation as an art in itself
as well as a prelude to choreography. (CSU)
DANC
135: The Art of Choreography I
2.5 Units. 2 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
DANC 130C: Intermediate Beginning Modern Dance
The craft of choreography, its ingredients and tools. Discussion
and exploration of form, content, design, and the elements of time,
space, and energy. Examination of shapes, texture, focus, dynamics,
rhythm, and phrasing. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
130B.
DANC 142A: Beginning Tap Dance
This continuation of beginning modern dance technique reinforces
fundamentals and emphasizes placement and alignment of the body.
Further development of knowledge, skills, and abilities for beginning
levels of modern dance. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 130D: Advanced Beginning Modern Dance
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
130C.
This course, the last of four beginning-level modern dance courses,
focuses on the technical skills required to move to a beginning-intermediate level of modern dance, and provides further development of
skills and knowledge. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course familiarizes students with the theory, terminology,
history, and technique of tap dancing and tap notation. It includes
footwork, progressions, patterns, and movement combinations which
are developed into dances using a variety of tap styles including
Latin, Rhythm Tap, Irish, Soft Shoe, American, and Buck and Wing.
(CSU) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 160AB: Introduction to Dance Performance
Skills
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Basic skills of rehearsal and performance. Development of projection, stage presence, mastering stage space and artistic expression.
CATALOG 2015/2016
Students perform in and/or choreograph for group, small groups,
duet or solo pieces which are presented in a studio venue. (CSU/UC*
160A only) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
DANC 161: Beginning Ballroom Dance
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Fundamentals of ballroom dance. Students learn the basics of such
dances as the cha cha, fox-trot, waltz, salsa, and swing. Includes
discussion of the origins and development of these dances and their
contribution to the dance world. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 170: Summer Intensive: Workshop in
Broadway Dance I
1.5 Units. 1.125 lecture and 2.25 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Three
lecture and six laboratory hours weekly for six weeks during the
summer.
An intensive workshop focusing on a comparative analysis of the
styles of Broadway dances from the past to the present. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H
DANC 171: Summer Intensive: Workshop in
Broadway Dance II
1.5 Units. 1.125 lecture and 2.25 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Dance 170.
An intensive workshop focusing on the historical social sources
which shaped Broadway dances with emphasis on learning to utilize
these sources as a means of becoming an expressive interpreter of the
art. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 172: Summer Intensive: Contemporary Dance
Workshop I
1.5 Units. 1.125 lecture and 2.25 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An intensive workshop experience focusing on movement, improvisation, and composition as related to the contemporary period.
Beginning to intermediate level. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 173: Summer Intensive: Contemporary Dance
Workshop II
1.5 Units. 2.25 lecture and 3.375 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Dance 172.
A continuation of the skills developed in Dance 172, this intensive
workshop focuses on movement, improvisation, and composition as
related to the contemporary period. Intermediate to advanced level.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 175: Summer Intensive: Workshop in Classical
Performance II
1.5 Units. 1.125 lecture and 2.25 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Dance 126.
This intermediate workshop requires intermediate- to advanced-level
classical movement skills. Emphasizes theatrical focus and projection
as they relate to performance. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DANC 227A: Beginning Advanced Ballet
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
128B.
Advanced ballet technique and vocabulary, emphasizing fluidity of
movement and integration of the physical, mental and emotional
skills that create the total dancer. (CSU) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area E
Dental Assisting: Registered
113
DANC 227B: Advanced Ballet
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
227A.
Advanced ballet technique and vocabulary, integrating technique,
artistry, strength and flexibility. Special emphasis on half-point work
both at the barre and in the center. (CSU) AA/AS Area H, CSU Area
E
DANC 233A: Beginning Advanced Modern Dance
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
133B.
This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving
anatomical awareness and developing a deeper understanding of the
skills and principles of various modern dance techniques. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H
DANC 233B: Advanced Modern Dance
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Dance
233A.
Advanced modern dance technique, focusing on centering and
energy flow as they function in alignment, turns, falls, extensions,
elevations and movements through space. Emphasizes trust of the
uniqueness of one’s own movement expression. (CSU) AA/AS Area
H, CSU Area E
DANC 241ABCD: Dance Company
2-5 Units. 6-15 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Audition required.
Students rehearse and perform faculty choreography in a formal
concert (predetermined number of scheduled performances). Focus
on technique, choreographic phrasing, artistry, and performance
presence. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
DENTAL ASSISTING: REGISTERED
This program combines the technical knowledge and skills required
to function successfully as a chairside dental assistant with the essential aspects of office procedures. The expanded functions that are
required for state licensure are taught to clinical proficiency.
Career Options
Dental Assisting in Dental Clinics, Hospitals or Correctional
Facilities, Private Dental Offices; Dental Office Management, Dental
Receptionist, Dental Insurance Auditor, Dental Product Sales, Dental
Assisting Instructor
Faculty
Kathleen Rooney, Program Coordinator
Department Phone: 415-485-9319
FAX: 415- 485-9328
A.S. IN DENTAL ASSISTING: REGISTERED
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
The Registered Dental Assisting Program is offered only at the Indian
Valley Campus. It is a sequential program leading to an Associate in
Science degree and a Certificate of Achievement.
Graduates are eligible to sit for the State Registered Dental Assistant Licensure Examinations, which requires mandatory live-scan
fingerprinting. Graduates are also eligible for the Dental Assisting
National Board Examination.
114
Dental Assisting: Registered
Students must maintain a C grade or higher in all courses to earn
their Certificate of Completion, a requirement of the Commission on
Accreditation.
College of Marin’s courses in Registered Dental Assisting, in
addition to fulfilling the College of Marin graduation requirements,
will award an Associate in Science degree. These courses will transfer
toward a Bachelor’s degree in Health Science at California State
Universities (see a counselor or Director of Dental Assisting for more
details.) Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the
associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
Required:
1. Completion of English 98 or English 98SL with a grade of C or
higher, or completion of a college-level English course with a
grade of C or higher.
MARIN.EDU
in the Fall semester prior to student participation in internships at
dental clinics or externships in dental offices.
Skills Certificates
Skills certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational program. Skills certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning
with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement
program. Skills Certificates require less than 18 units and are shorter
in duration than the Certificate of Achievement.
The Skills Certificate provides the student with knowledge of the
fundamental language/skill necessary for dental courses.
Program Application Procedure:
1. Applicants must complete English Requirement (see above).
Radiology Safety Skills Certificate
Successful completion of Dental Assisting 182 and 186 will earn the
student a Radiology Certificate approved the Board of Dental Examiners under the Department of Consumer Affairs administered by
the Committee of Dental Auxiliaries. This certificate is a prerequisite
to be eligible to sit for the State Registered Dental Assistant licensure
examination and a copy of the certificate is issued to the Committee
on Dental Auxiliaries. Records of participants must be maintained
for five years.
This certificate allows the individual to expose dental radiographs
on patients within the private dental office or dental clinic. No individual is allowed to expose dental radiographs without this certificate
in the State of California.
2. Applicants must contact the Dental Assisting Department for
availability and assistance in the selection of classes to be admitted to the program.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
DENT
182
Dental Radiology
3
DENT
186
Clinical Dental Radiology
3
3. Applicants must file an application for admission with the College
of Marin Office of Enrollment Services.
Coronal Polish Skills Certificates
Successful completion of Dental Assisting 183 will earn the student
a Coronal Polish Certificate. This course is approved by the Board
of Dental Examiners under the Department of Consumer Affairs
administered by the Committee on Dental Auxiliaries and is a
prerequisite to be eligible to sit for the State Registered Dental Assistant licensure examination. The original certificate is issued to the
Committee on Dental Auxiliaries. Records of participants must be
maintained for five years.
This certificate allows the individual to polish dentition under the
direct supervision of a dentist in the private dental office or dental
clinic.
2. High school diploma or equivalent.
3. Applicants must be 18 years or older, which is a state requirement
to operate dental radiation equipment.
Advisory:
1. English 116 or higher; may be taken concurrently during the
program.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
First Semester
DENT
172
Dental Science I
3
DENT
174
Dental Materials
3
DENT
176
Dental Morphology, Histology, and Recordings
3
DENT
180
Chairside I
3
DENT
182
Dental Radiology
3
Second Semester
DENT
178
Dental Science II
3
DENT
183
Advanced Dental Procedures
1.5
DENT
184
Chairside Procedures II
5
DENT
186
Clinical Dental Radiology
1.5
DENT
187
Clinical/Technique Practicum
1
DENT
188
Chairside Clinical and Operative Procedures
6
DENT
190
Dental Practice Management and Economics
2
Summer Session
DENT
192
Clinical Applications in Dental Offices
2
DENT
192A Pit and Fissure Sealants
1
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
38
Notes:
1. The above courses may be taken in two years. The coursework is
sequential and must be taken in the semester offered. Only those
students completing the first semester may advance to the following semesters. Courses must be taken in the semester as indicated
above.
2. Current CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), Hepatitis B vaccination, Tetanus vaccination, and TB testing must be completed
REQUIREMENTUNITS
DENT
183
Advanced Dental Procedures
1.5
Ultrasonic Scaling Skills Certificate
Successful completion of Dental Assisting 183 will earn the student a
certificate in ultrasonic scaler usage in an orthodontic setting.
This course is approved by the Board of Dental Examiners under
the Department of Consumer Affairs administered through the
Committee on Dental Auxiliaries. The original certificate is issued to
the Committee on Dental Auxiliaries. Records of participants must
be maintained for five years.
This certificate allows the individual to use an ultrasonic scaler to
remove excess supragingival cement around orthodontic bands in
a private dental office or dental clinic under direct supervision of a
dentist.
REQUIREMENTUNITS
DENT
183
Advanced Dental Procedures
1.5
CATALOG 2015/2016
Pit and Fissure Sealants Skills Certificate
Successful completion of Dental Assisting 192A will earn the student
a certificate in Pit and Fissure Sealants. This course is approved by
the Board of Dental Examiners under the Department of Consumer
Affairs administered by the Committee on Dental Auxiliaries. A
copy of the certificate is sent to the Committee on Dental Auxiliaries.
Records of participants must be maintained for five years.
This certificate allows the individual to prepare the teeth by
etching and apply the sealant that protects the dentition from dental
decay in a private dental office or dental clinic under the direct supervision of a dentist.
REQUIREMENTUNITS
DENT
192A Pit and Fissure Sealants
1
Infection Control Skills Certificate
Successful completion of Dental Assisting 101 and 101L will earn the
student a certificate in Dental Sterilization. This course will train the
student to decontaminate, sterilize or process dental instruments and
dental equipment to meet OSHA standards and EPA on Infection
Control. Students who complete this course can become employed in
a private dental office or clinic as a Sterilization Assistant.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
DENT
101
Introduction to Dental Sterilization
.5
DENT
101L Introduction to Dental Sterilization Lab
.5
Dental Assisting: Registered
115
the student to demonstrate and practice disinfection, sterilization
procedures and dental charting. (CSU)
DENT 172: Dental Science I
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL
or sufficient score on English Placement Test.
This course instructs students in human anatomy, histology, and
physiology as these relate to the head, neck, and body systems in
dentistry. The course introduces microbiology as it relates to the
control of infection and disease to include methods of sterilization
and disinfection within the dental environment. The lab covers applications of dental infection control, cross-contamination prevention,
OSHA regulations, and disposal of contaminated materials. (CSU)
DENT 174: Dental Materials
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: DENT 176 or
concurrent enrollment.
An introduction to the physical and chemical properties of dental
materials, and the preparation, placement and removal of provisional
restorations as allowed by the State Dental Practice Act. The lab covers the applications of placement of temporary sedative restorations;
placement of cement bases and liners; taking, pouring, and trimming
of preliminary impression materials; fabricating temporary crowns
and restorations; preparing final impression materials; and assisting
in composite/bonding and crown/bridge dental procedures. (CSU)
DENTAL ASSISTING COURSES (DENT)
DENT 176: Dental Morphology, Histology, and
Recordings
DENT 100: Introduction to Health Careers
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or
sufficient score on English Placement Test.
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as DENT 100,
MEDA 100, or NE 100; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in
a health profession. It provides an overview of the current health care
delivery system, the physical, mental, and emotional demands of the
workplace, and the skills needed by the healthcare worker today and
in the future. Students learn about qualifications and professional
preparation needed for various careers, and analyze the roles and
responsibilities in today’s health care environment. The course is
designed to help students develop realistic career goals, and to give
an appreciation of how the current health care delivery system is
influencing individual health professional roles and responsibilities.
DENT 101: Introduction to Dental Sterilization
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. Corequisite:
DENT 101L. Advisory: ENGL 98 or 98SL.
Community dentists require sterilization assistants to be trained in
disinfection and sterilization procedures in compliance with strict
State OSHA Standards for infection control, hazardous communication and waste management. This course provides the student with
entry-level knowledge of these standards, and also covers basic dental
terminology and dental charting. (CSU)
DENT 101L: Introduction to Dental Sterilization Lab
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. Corequisite: DENT
101.
Community dentists require sterilization assistants to be trained in
disinfection and sterilization procedures in compliance with strict
State OSHA Standards for infection control, hazard communication
and waste management. This lab course provides the opportunity for
This course presents dental terminology as it relates to tooth morphology and histology, charting, tooth nomenclature systems, cavity
classifications, patient’s vital signs, oral examination, diagnosis, and
treatment planning. In lab, students identify permanent and primary
dentition and their nomenclature, location and function; distinguish
normal tooth anatomy from oral lesions; and demonstrate the ability
to record dental charting, perform oral examinations and take vital
signs as part of the patient’s dental record. (CSU)
DENT 178: Dental Science II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or sufficient
score on English Placement Test.
This course covers oral pathology, preventive dentistry, nutrition,
medical emergencies, pharmacology, and special needs patients as
they relate to dentistry. Applied psychology and communication
skills with dental patients and coworkers are explored. (CSU)
DENT 180: Chairside I
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: DENT 176 or
concurrent enrollment.
This course covers the use and care of dental equipment; identification, application, and distribution of dental hand instruments and
rotary instruments; pre set tray set-ups and their sequence of use;
preparation of the dental operatory; application of rubber dams,
matrix retainers, topical anesthetic and provisional restorations;
four-handed dentistry techniques; and preparation for chairside
assisting in a clinical setting. (CSU)
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Drama/Theatre Arts
DENT 182: Dental Radiology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: DENT 176 or
concurrent enrollment.
This introductory course presents information and background on
the production and projection of film and digital dental radiographs,
including safety concerns. In lab students expose, process, mount
and evaluate dental radiographs for diagnostic purposes. Includes
exposure and darkroom techniques, and patient management. (CSU)
DENT 183: Advanced Dental Procedures
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: DENT 180.
This course covers basic knowledge for coronal polishing, topical
fluorides, bleaching tray fabrication and ultrasonic scaler cement
removal. Upon successful completion of this course students earn the
State Certificate for coronal polish and ultrasonic scaler for cement
removal. (CSU)
DENT 184: Chairside Procedures II
MARIN.EDU
DENT 190: Dental Practice Management and
Economics
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: ENGL 98 or 98SL or
sufficient score on English Placement Test, and High school diploma or
equivalent.
A dental office management course designed to develop basic skills
and background in all phases of dental reception functions and office
management procedures, including computer management, oral and
written communication, bookkeeping skills, case presentation and
financial arrangements, collection techniques, insurance processing, banking procedures, computing salaries and small business tax
records, inventory control and job seeking skills. Also covers legal
parameters of the State Dental Practice Act with regard to dental
auxiliaries and HIPAA Patient Privacy Regulations. (CSU)
DENT 192: Clinical Applications in Dental Offices
2.0 Units. 26 lab hrs/wk for 4 weeks. Prerequisite: DENT 183 and 186.
Corequisite: DENT 192A.
This course provides entry-level knowledge of dental specialties such
as surgical endodontics, orthodontics, periodontics, oral surgery and
implants, removable prosthodontics, and pediatric dentistry. It also
covers the role of the dental assistant with nitrous oxide conscious
sedation, and registered dental assisting legal functions according to
the State Dental Practice Act. (CSU)
This course is designed to give students meaningful participation in
a dental office or clinic in order to understand and apply the Dental
Assisting chairside skills needed in the dental industry under the
direct supervision of the dental staff. Weekly meetings provide the
opportunity to present case management journals and observations,
discuss perceptions and apply or improve assisting skills to their
internship. (CSU)
DENT 186: Clinical Dental Radiology
DENT 192A: Pit and Fissure Sealants
1.5 Unit. 1 lecture and .5 lab hrs/wk for 4 weeks. Prerequisite: DENT
182. Students must be at least 18 years old.
1.0 Unit. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk for 4 weeks. Prerequisite: DENT 176.
Corequisite: DENT 192.
This course provides instruction in methods of exposure and
evaluation of diagnostic quality dental x-rays on patients. Students
learn to distinguish normal dental anatomy from dental anomalies.
Instruction includes methodology for exposing intra-oral digital and
extra-oral panoramic dental radiographs. Upon completion of this
course and the lab, students earn their Radiation Safety Certificate
for the State of California. (CSU)
This course is designed to give students knowledge in the application
of pit and fissure sealants on patients. This course partially satisfies
the State Dental Board to earn a Certificate in Pit and Fissure Sealants. (CSU)
DENT 187: Clinical/Technique Practicum
The Drama Program offers a variety of major productions on the
main stage and in the studio theater. A thriving Drama Club sponsors student productions and events, and the Brown Bag Theater
series offers lunch hour programs, including student-directed
productions.
The Theatre Arts curriculum is designed to provide an interdisciplinary approach to drama whether a student’s goals are transfer,
professional or self-enrichment. Students participate in all aspects
of production including acting, directing, various facets of technical
theatre, and the design and building of sets, lights, costumes, sound
and properties. In addition, there is a strong emphasis on the historical and theoretical contexts of the art-form as students examine
works of dramatic literature, historical context, and criticism.
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: DENT 176 and 180.
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: DENT 174, 180, and 182.
A clinical practicum to provide individual self-study practice for specific dental assisting skills such as exposing, processing and mounting dental radiographs; taking study model impressions, pouring and
trimming models; taking bite registration; fabricating provisional
crowns; placing temporary restorations; fabricating bleaching trays
and mouth guards under the supervision of an instructor. (CSU)
DENT 188: Chairside Clinical Operative Procedures
6.0 Units. 1 lecture and 15 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. Prerequisite: DENT
174 and 180. Students must have CPR, Hepatitis B, tetanus vaccinations
and TB testing before going to the dental school. One weekly lecture/
seminar and 262.5 off-campus hours.
Clinical practice utilizing Four-Handed Dentistry at chairside,
including extended functions in general dentistry delegated to the
dental assistant and registered dental assistant by the State Dental
Practice Act in private dental offices and clinics. Weekly seminars are
held to discuss student progress and provide instruction and suggestions for student improvement. (CSU)
DRAMA/THEATRE ARTS
Career Options
Actor/Actress, Advertising Representative, Broadcast Technician,
Business Agent, Casting Director, Choreographer, Comedian,
Community Cultural Program Director, Costume Designer, Critic,
Director, Dramatic Coach, Extra, Fundraiser, Hair Stylist, Lighting
Operator, Makeup Artist, Mime, Playwright, Press Agent, Producer,
Prop Maker, Public Affairs Director, Radio/TV Announcer, Recreation Specialist, Sales Representative, Set Builder, Set Carpenter,
Set Designer, Set Painter, Sound Technician, Stage Manager, Stage
Technician, Stunt Performer, Teacher, Theater Business Manager
Drama/Theatre Arts
CATALOG 2015/2016
Faculty
Lisa Morse, William Allen Taylor
Department Phone: 415-485-9555
A.A.-T. IN THEATRE ARTS
The Associate in Arts in Theatre Arts for Transfer Degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a degree on the way to
transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Theatre Arts for Transfer
Degree (AA-T), a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements;
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core: 9 units total:
DRAM 110 Introduction to the Theatre 3
DRAM 130 Theory and Practice in Acting I
3
To complete the Core requirements, select 3 units total from the following 6 courses:
Rehearsal and Performance Production:
DRAM 245 Rehearsal and Performance 3
DRAM 246 Rehearsal and Performance of a Modern Comedy 3
DRAM 260 Musical Theatre Production Workshop 3
Technical Theatre in Production:
DRAM 164 Production Crew 1
DRAM 252B Seminar and Fieldwork Experience B 3
List A: select 9 units from the following list:
DRAM 131 Theory and Practice in Acting II
3
DRAM 116 Survey of Dramatic Literature: Ancient Greeks to the Present
3
DRAM 150 Introduction to Stagecraft
3
DRAM 151 Introduction to Set Design
3
DRAM 152 Introduction to Stage Costume
3
May be counted in List A if not taken as part of the required core:
DRAM 164 Production Crew
1
DRAM 245 Rehearsal and Performance
3
DRAM 246 Rehearsal and Performance of a Modern Comedy
3
DRAM 252B Seminar and Field Experience B
3
DRAM 260 Musical Theatre Production Workshop
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
18
A.A. IN DRAMA
The drama major is offered only at the Kentfield Campus. The Drama
Department gives students experience in writing, performing,
designing and constructing sets, as well as in costume and makeup.
It is an interdisciplinary program involving dance, art, music, and
the English disciplines. Students in the program may transfer to fouryear institutions or go into television and professional theatre groups.
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
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associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
DRAM 110
Introduction to the Theatre
3
DRAM 150
Introduction to Stagecraft
3
DRAM 252B Seminar and Fieldwork Experience B
3
Six units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 116
Survey of Dramatic Literature – Ancient Greek to the Present
3
DRAM 117
Survey of Dramatic Literature – Shakespeare and His Theatre
3
DRAM 119
Theatre Criticism
3
Six units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 160
Production Stagecraft
1
DRAM 161
Production Preparation – Sets and Properties
1
DRAM 162
Production Preparation – Costumes and Hair
1
DRAM 163
Production Preparation – Lights and Sound
1
DRAM 164
Production Crew
1
DRAM 166
Stage Makeup: Theory and Practice
1
DRAM 168
Theatre Management
1.5
Eight units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 126
Improvisation for the Theatre
3
DRAM 130
Theory and Practice in Acting I
3
DRAM 134
Acting for Director’s Workshop
.5
DRAM 137
Stage Combat
.5
DRAM 237
Techniques of Audition
.5
DRAM 240
Directing for the Stage
3
Three units to be selected from the following:
DRAM 125
Stage Movement
2
DRAM 129AB Voice for the Stage
1
DANC 132
Musical Theatre
1.5
MUS
181
Voice I
1
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
32
DRAMA COURSES (DRAM)
DRAM 103: History of Musical Theatre
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as Music 103,
Dance 103 or Drama 103; credit awarded for only one course.
This course surveys the history of American musical theatre and its
effects on popular culture. The course explores the development of
the musical in the context of American theatre history, through a
multicultural study of the evolution of this uniquely American art
form. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
DRAM 110: Introduction to the Theatre
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A survey course designed to foster appreciation for the theatre by
the student not majoring in drama, and an orientation course for the
drama major. Topics include the purpose of theatre, significant milestones in theatre history, a behind-the-scenes look at play production,
and trends in contemporary theatre. Lectures are combined with
viewing of live and videotaped scenes representing different types of
theatre. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
DRAM 116: Survey of Dramatic Literature: Ancient
Greek to the Present
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys the history of the theatre and dramatic literature
from the Greek classical period to the present. Recommended for
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Drama/Theatre Arts
MARIN.EDU
drama majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B
DRAM 130: Theory and Practice in Acting I
DRAM 117: Survey of Dramatic Literature:
Shakespeare and His Theatre
Beginning class in acting techniques. Exercises in characterization,
pantomime, improvisation, voice projection, and body movement.
Required for drama majors. (CSU/UC)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines selected plays of Shakespeare, and analyzes
their aesthetic, cultural, historical and literary significance. Recommended for drama majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C , CSU Area
C-2, IGETC Area 3B
DRAM 125: Stage Movement
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The study and practice of the art of physical theatre. Laban, Michael
Chekov, Suzuki, character construction, improvisatory movement,
mask work, psychological gesture, and other techniques are explored.
This class addresses the need for mastery over the physical realm
in theatre. Recommended for all actors and required for all theatre
majors. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 126: Improvisation for the Theatre
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A participatory class in which students practice skills necessary to
support improvised performances. Students engage in activities that
draw upon their ability to relax, concentrate, and respond spontaneously and honestly. The class calls upon and extends students’
imagination, and provides opportunities to practice narrative skills.
Includes public performances. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 127: Improvisation Performance
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 4 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Advisory: Drama 126.
In this course, students rehearse as an ensemble, develop performance skills, and perform improvisational theatre pieces. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 128: Improvisation II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 126.
This intermediate improvisation class, for students with prior improv
experience, explores ensemble performance and different improv
genres: narrative, long form, social commentary, and dramatic
improv. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 129A: Voice for the Stage I
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class teaches students to efficiently use the instrument that is
their voice. Students explore various vocal techniques and examine
differences in the British and American systems of voice acting. Recommended for all actors and required for all drama majors. (CSU)
DRAM 129B: Voice for the Stage II
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama 129A.
This class offers a more intermediate/advanced approach to voice
training, combining the techniques of Kristin Linklater and Cicely
Berry, and applying them to the text of specific acting roles in the
theatre. Recommended for all actors and required for all drama
majors. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: Drama 134.
DRAM 131: Theory and Practice in Acting II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Drama 130.
Advisory: Drama 134.
This class emphasizes the creation and analysis of a character
through intensive rehearsal of scenes. Recommended for drama
majors. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 134: Acting for the Director’s Workshop
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Acting in student-directed scenes from Drama 240: Stage Direction.
Audition, rehearsal and performance in student-directed scenes.
(CSU/UC)
DRAM 137: Stage Combat
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class covers the history, theory and practice of the art of stage
combat. Students learn a controlled simulated approach to performing punches, slaps, falls and choreographed sword work. For drama
majors. (CSU)
DRAM 143: Storytelling and Personal Narratives
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
In this class, students conceive and perform original autobiographical stories in a workshop setting. Good for all levels, from early
childhood educators to potential performing artists and monologists.
(CSU)
DRAM 144: Comedy Theory and Technique
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces basic elements of theatrical comedy. Through
the study, discussion, and practice of selected comic material, both
historic and modern, students develop a variety of comedic stage
techniques. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 150: Introduction to Stagecraft
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Theory and practice in theatre production stagecraft. A study of all
backstage principles of design, fabrication, materials and tools used
in scenery, costumes, lighting and other stage properties. Includes
vocabulary for theatrical elements allowing students to critically
evaluate any and all theatrical productions. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
DRAM 151: Introduction to Set Design
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Drama 150.
An introduction to stage design from page to stage. Includes basic
concepts of design, painting techniques, set construction, set movement, basic drafting, set dressings and prop construction. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 152: Introduction to Stage Costume
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Drama 150.
The study of costume history, design, and basic construction techniques as an introduction to basic theatrical costuming, including
fabrics, pattern making, and draping. (CSU/UC)
CATALOG 2015/2016
DRAM 160: Production Stagecraft
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This general course in the practical aspects of stagecraft and production support includes set, properties and costume construction and
organization; theatrical lighting; stage rigging; sound development;
shop organization; and production office support. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 161: Production Preparation - Sets and
Properties
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Drama 160.
Practical participation in the construction of scenery and properties
for a staged production. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 162: Production Preparation - Costumes and
Hair
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 2.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Drama
160.
Practical participation in the construction, care and maintenance of
theatrical costumes and basic hair styling and wig care and maintenance for departmental productions. (CSU/UC)
Drama/Theatre Arts
119
preparation and analysis of major roles in selected scenes from plays
of various types and periods. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 237: Techniques of Audition
0.5 Unit. 0.375 lecture and 1.125 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Advisory: Drama 130.
A workshop for acting students, covering the techniques of the audition process and how to prepare for auditions, including memorizing
monologues, cold reading from scripts, interview techniques, resume
preparation, and finding a suitable monologue. (CSU)
DRAM 240: Directing for the Stage
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 2 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Drama 110, 130, and 134.
This class focuses on the transference of the written script into live
action on the stage. Students learn fundamentals of script analysis,
design concepts, casting, composition, blocking, actor-coaching,
characterization, and rehearsal techniques as they relate to the play
production process. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 245: Rehearsal and Performance
DRAM 163: Production Preparation - Lights and
Sound
3.0 Units. 9 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Audition based
upon a standardized level of performance for College productions.
Corequisite: Drama 160 or 161 or 162 or 163.
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 2.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Drama
160.
In this course, students act in the scheduled department production
of a play. In addition, students are required to participate in the
technical production areas covered by any of the corequisites, for a
minimum of three weekly lab hours. (CSU/UC)
A general course in the practical application of lighting and sound
techniques for a departmental production. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 164: Production Crew
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 2.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Advisory: Drama 150.
This course offers participation in a running crew for theatrical
productions. Students are trained for crewing assignments such as
lighting technician, sound technician, dresser, wardrobe mistress/
master, backstage crew, properties management, assistant stage
manager, and stage manager. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 246: Rehearsal and Performance of a Modern
Comedy
3.0 Units. 9 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Audition based
upon a standardized level of performance for College productions.
Corequisite: Drama 160 or 161 or 162 or 163.
DRAM 166: Stage Makeup: Theory and Practice
In this course, students act in the scheduled department production of a modern comedy play. In addition, students are required to
participate in the technical production areas covered by any of the
corequisites, for a minimum of three weekly lab hours. (CSU/UC)
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
DRAM 252B: Seminar and Fieldwork Experience B
Designed for students interested in the application of stage makeup,
this course covers basic, old age, and character makeup for varioussized theatres. Also includes animals, fantasy, Kabuki, and Chinese
opera. Students are required to purchase makeup supplies following
instructor’s guidelines. (CSU/UC)
3.0 Units. 1 lecture and 8 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Drama
150 or 168 or 130.
DRAM 217: Shakespearean Text Analysis for the
Actor
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite:
Drama 245.
This class covers techniques for actors to analyze the text of a play by
William Shakespeare, to prepare for the performance of a role in a
Drama Department production. Focus on verse and prose speaking,
discovery of character through the language and historical stylistic
approach to the performance of Shakespeare on stage. (CSU/UC)
DRAM 230: Advanced Acting Techniques
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Audition based
upon a standardized level of performance.
This course, designed to further the student’s practical application in
role preparation and performance techniques, emphasizes intensive
This course is designed to give theatre students meaningful work
experience in the areas of technical theatre, theatre management and
performance. Each student works at a theatre company under the
supervision of an artistic, technical or managerial employee of the
theatre. In the weekly seminar, students receive lectures on various
theatre occupations and discuss the skill-set necessary for securing
work in the theatre. (CSU)
DRAM 260: Musical Theatre Production Workshop
3.0 Units. 9 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Audition based upon
a standardized level of performance for roles in College productions.
Corequisite: Drama 160, 161, 162, 163, or 164.
This course involves acting, singing, and dancing/movement in the
scheduled department production of a musical theatre play. Students
also participate in the technical production areas of sets, lights,
costumes, or crew. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1
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Early Childhood Education
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
The Early Childhood Education Program is designed to prepare
students to become teachers or directors in children’s centers,
nursery and preschools, prekindergartens, infant-toddler programs,
employer-supported children’s centers, extended day-care or family
day-care programs.
Career Options
Teacher, Head Teacher, or Director of: Children’s Centers, EmployerSupported Children’s Centers, Extended Day Programs, Family DayCare Programs, Infant-Toddler Programs, Nursery and Preschools,
Parent Cooperative Nursery Schools, Prekindergarten Programs
Faculty
Peggy Dodge - ECE Coordinator; Shaquam Edwards
Department Phone: 415-485-9319
Note: All coursework applicable to Early Childhood Education
degrees, certificates, licenses, and permits must be completed with
a grade of C, P, CR or higher.
A.S.-T. IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
The Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education for Transfer
degree (AS-T) is primarily intended for the student who wants
to earn a degree on the way to transferring to a California State
University.
To complete the Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education for Transfer degree (AS-T), a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses
ECE
110
Child Development 3
ECE
112
Child, Family, and Community 3
ECE
114
Principles and Practices of Teaching Young Children 3
ECE
115
Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum 3
ECE
116
Observation and Assessment 3
ECE
280
ECE Fieldwork and Seminar I: Beginning Practicum 3
ECE
131
Health, Safety, and Nutrition Practices for Young Children 3
ECE
208
Teaching in a Diverse Society 3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
24
MARIN.EDU
A.S. IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, OCCUPATIONAL
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded. Skills Certificate in Early
Childhood Education Core also awarded.)
To obtain an Associate in Science degree with a major in Early
Childhood Education, students must complete the required courses,
as well as general education courses and graduation requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is also awarded. In addition, a Skills Certificate is earned by satisfactory completion of the required courses.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the associate
degree. All students should consult a counselor.
Students who wish to enter the Early Childhood Education
Program are advised to contact the program coordinator to discuss
options for beginning the program and for tailoring individual
scheduling needs to the structure of the program. Students enrolling
in the student teaching practicum courses must fill out an application and complete all forms required by the ECE Student Teaching
Program prior to beginning their student teaching placements.
Child development knowledge is a key competency for success
in early childhood education classes. Students with limited college
background or experience with science textbook reading should seriously consider taking ECE 101, Introduction to Child Development,
among their first courses in Early Childhood Education.
REQUIREMENTS UNITS
Core Requirements:
ECE
100
Licensing and Permits: Introduction to Childcare Programs
.5
ECE
110
Child Development
3
ECE
112
Child, Family, and Community
3
ECE
114
Principles and Practices of Teaching Young Children
3
ECE
115
Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
3
ECE
116
Observation and Assessment
3
ECE
131
Health, Safety and Nutrition Practices for Young Children
3
ECE
208
Teaching in a Diverse Society
3
ECE
222
Working with Special Needs Children in Early Childhood Settings
2
ECE
280
ECE Fieldwork and Seminar I: Beginning Practicum
3
ECE
281
ECE Fieldwork and Seminar II: Advanced Practicum
3
PSY
114
The Psychology of Human Development: Lifespan+
3
Electives (choose 2 courses from the following list):
ECE
133
Creative Art Curriculum for Young Children
2
ECE 135
Working with Children’s Challenging Behavior
2
ECE
137
Emergent Literacy in the Early Childhood Classroom
3
ECE
205
Integrated Curriculum and the Project Approach
3
ECE
217
Fostering Creativity in the Classroom
2
ECE
218
Infant and Toddler Development
3
ECE
220A Early Childhood Education Administration A
3
ECE
220B Early Childhood Education Administration B
3
ECE
224
Working with Parents in Early Childhood Programs
2
ECE
225
Guidance and Limit-Setting in the Early Childhood Classroom
2
ECE
226
Exploration and Discovery in Math and Science
3
ECE
295
Supervising Adults in Early Childhood Programs
2
+ Also fulfills College of Marin graduation requirement and CSU transfer requirements,
Areas D-9 or E.
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
MINIMUM OF 36.5
Early Childhood Education
CATALOG 2015/2016
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CERTIFICATE OF
ACHIEVEMENT
Upon completion of the Early Childhood Education Certificate of
Achievement, a student would be academically eligible to apply for
the Teacher level of the Child Development Permit issued by the
Commission on Teacher Credentialing.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ECE
100
Licensing and Permits: Introduction to Childcare Programs
.5
ECE
110
Child Development
3
ECE
112
Child, Family and Community
3
ECE
114
Principles and Practices of Teaching Young Children
3
ECE
115
Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
3
ECE
116
Observation and Assessment
3
ECE
131
Health, Safety and Nutrition Practices for Young Children
3
ECE
208
Teaching in a Diverse Society
3
ECE
222
Working with Special Needs Children in Early Childhood Settings
2
ECE
280
ECE Fieldwork and Seminar I: Beginning Practicum
3
PSY
114
Psychology of Human Development: Lifespan
3
ENGL
120 Introduction to College Reading and Composition II
3
Or ENGL
120SL Introduction to College Reading and Composition II – for Non-Native English Speakers
3
SUBTOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
And 10 General Education units, including: At least 3 units in Humanities or Fine Arts from the following:
• Speech 128
• Dance 121
• Art 112
• Spanish 101, 102
• American Sign Language 101, 102
And at least 3 units in Math or Science from the following:
• Geology 120, 120L
• Kinesiology 107 or Biology 107 (cross-listed)
• Mathematics 101, 101AB, 101XY, 102G, 103, 103AB, 103XY, or 115
• Statistics 115
And at least 4 units from the following:
• Speech 120, 128
• Dance 121
• Art 112
• Spanish 101, 102
• American Sign Language 101, 102
• Geology 120, 120L
• Mathematics 101, 101AB, 101XY, 102G, 103, 103AB, 103XY, or 115
• Statistics 115
• English 116, 150, 151, 155
• Kinesiology 107 or Biology 107 (cross-listed)
• Political Science 100
• History 118
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
32.5
121
A student who has an Early Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate has completed 9-12 of the units required for the next level of
certificate, the Certificate of Achievement in Early Childhood Education. A student who has completed the required courses for the Early
Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate has met the coursework
requirements of the Department of Social Services to be a teacher in a
Title 22 preschool or children’s center. Upon completion of the Early
Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate a student would be
eligible to apply for the Associate Teacher level of the Child Development permit, issued by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ECE
101
Introduction to Child Development
3
Or
ECE
110
Child Development 3
ECE
112
Child, Family, and Community
3
ECE
114
Principles and Practices of Teaching Young Children
3
ECE
115
Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
12
Licensing Coursework Requirements:
The Department of Social Services requires that anyone working in
a children’s program as a teacher have at least 12 semester units of
coursework in early childhood education, with at least one course in
each of the following three subject areas:
1. Child or Human Growth and Development (ECE 101 or 110)
2. Child, Family and Community, or Child-Family Relations (ECE
112)
3. Programs and Curriculum (ECE 114*, 115*, 116, 120, 131, 132,
133, 134, 135, 137, 205, 208, 217, 218, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 280**,
281**)
*Recommended (Core) Courses for 12 ECE units. Only one of the
recommended courses in Child Development is necessary.
**ECE 280 and 281 may be counted as units in the Programs and
Curriculum category or as 96 hours of experience, but not both.
Child Development Permit Requirements:
The California Department of Education requires that anyone working in a children’s program subsidized by the Child Development
Division obtain the appropriate permit from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.
1. For Child Development Assistant Teacher Permit: Six units of
early childhood education (ECE) or child development (CD)
courses. No experience requirement.
2. For Child Development Associate Teacher Permit: Twelve units in
ECE/CD including the core* courses. Experience requirement: 50
days (3 or more hours per day) within 2 years.
42.5
Early Childhood Education Core Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
3. For Child Development Teacher Permit: Twenty-four units in
ECE/CD including the core* courses, plus 16 units in general
education**. Experience requirement: 175 days (3 or more hours
per day) within 4 years.
4. For Child Development Master Teacher Permit: Twenty-four units
in ECE/CD including the core* courses, plus 16 units in general
education**, plus 6 units in an ECE/CD area of specialization, plus
2 units of adult supervision (ECE 295). Experience requirement:
350 days (3 or more hours per day) within 4 years.
5. For Child Development Site Supervisor Permit: Associate degree
(or 60 units) with at least 24 units in ECE/CD including the core *
courses, plus 6 units in administration (ECE 220A, 220B), 2 units
122
Early Childhood Education
in adult supervision (ECE 295). Experience requirement: 350 days
(3 or more hours per day) within 4 years, including at least 100
days supervising adults.
6. For Child Development Program Director Permit: BA/BS degree
or higher including 24 units in ECE/CD, including the core*
courses, plus 6 units in early childhood education administration
(ECE 220A, 220B), 2 units in adult supervision (ECE 295). Experience requirement: Site supervisor status and one program year of
adult supervision experience.
*Core courses for the Child Development permit include at least one
course in each of the following three subject areas:
1. Child or Human Growth and Development (ECE 101 or 110)
2. Child, Family and Community, or Child-Family Relations (ECE
112)
3. Programs and Curriculum (ECE 114, 115, 116, 120, 131, 132, 133,
134, 135, 137, 205, 208, 217, 218, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 280***,
281***)
**General Education units require one course in each of the four
degree-applicable general education categories: English/Language
Arts; Math or Science; Social Sciences; Humanities and/or Fine Arts.
***ECE 280 and 281 may be counted as units in the Programs and
Curriculum category or as 96 hours of experience, but not both.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COURSES (ECE)
ECE 100: Licensing and Permits: Introduction to
Childcare Programs
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides information regarding state requirements for
being a teacher in a licensed children’s program and for obtaining
a Child Development Permit. Coursework requirements for the
Associate of Science degree and Certificate of Achievement in Early
Childhood Education are reviewed. Information about setting up
a family childcare program is also included. This course is recommended for people wishing to learn about career options in ECE and
for providers already working in the field. (CSU)
ECE 101: Introduction to Child Development
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory course explains the ages and stages of development
from birth through adolescence, describing physical, intellectual, social and emotional growth. Emphasis is on the practical application
of principles and the adult role in supporting optimal growth. This
course meets the Department of Social Services licensing requirements for coursework in early childhood education. It also meets
requirements for all levels of the Child Development Permit. (CSU)
ECE 110: Child Development
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines major physical, psychosocial, and cognitive/
language developmental milestones for children, both typical and
atypical, from conception through adolescence. Interactions between
maturational processes and environmental factors are emphasized.
While studying developmental theory and investigative research
methodologies, students observe children, evaluate individual differences and analyze characteristics of development at various stages.
The course meets Department of Social Services licensure require-
MARIN.EDU
ments for coursework in ECE and Child Development Permits.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7 and E, IGETC Area 4
ECE 112: Child, Family, and Community
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines the developing child in a societal context,
focusing on the interrelationship of family, school and community,
emphasizing historical and sociocultural factors. It highlights the
processes of socialization and identity development, showing the
importance of respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and
empower families. The course is required by the Department of
Social Services to satisfy licensure requirements for coursework in
ECE and Child Development Permits. (CSU) AA/AS Area B, CSU
Area D-7
ECE 114: Principles and Practices of Teaching Young
Children
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An examination of the underlying theoretical principles of developmentally appropriate practices applied to programs and environments, emphasizing the key role of relationships, constructive adultchild interactions, and teaching strategies in supporting physical,
social, creative and intellectual development for all children. Includes
review of the historical roots of early childhood programs and the
evolution of professional practices promoting advocacy, ethics and
professional identity. (CSU)
ECE 115: Introduction to Early Childhood Curriculum
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ECE 101 or 110.
An overview of the knowledge and skills required to provide appropriate curriculum and environments for children from birth to age
six. Students examine the teacher’s role in supporting development
and engagement for all young children. The course provides strategies for developmentally-appropriate practices based on observation
and assessments across the curriculum, including academic content
areas; play, art and creativity; and development of social-emotional,
communication, and cognitive skills. (CSU)
ECE 116: Observation and Assessment
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ECE 101 or 110.
This course focuses on the appropriate use of assessment and
observation strategies that document development, growth, play
and learning to join with families and professionals in promoting
children’s success. Recording strategies, rating systems, portfolios
and multiple assessment tools are explored. (CSU)
ECE 120: Planning and Teaching an After School
Program
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course includes age-appropriate activities for after school
programs, aspects of after school care, and strategies for working
with and understanding children in after school settings. (CSU)
ECE 131: Health, Safety, and Nutrition Practices for
Young Children
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Introduction to the laws, regulations, standards, policies, procedures
and early childhood curriculum related to children’s health, safety
and nutrition. Key components ensuring physical and mental health
and safety for both children and staff are identified, along with the
CATALOG 2015/2016
Early Childhood Education
123
importance of collaboration with families and health professionals.
Certificates issued upon successful completion of Pediatric CPR and
First Aid training components. (CSU)
ence, art, music and movement. The course introduces the innovative
project approach demonstrated in the preschools of Reggio Emilia,
Italy. (CSU)
ECE 132: Planning and Leading Circle Times with
Young Children
ECE 208: Teaching in a Diverse Society
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Examination of the development of social identities in diverse societies, including theoretical and practical implications of oppression
and privilege as they apply to young children, families, programs,
classrooms and teaching. Various classroom strategies are explored,
emphasizing culturally and linguistically appropriate anti-bias approaches, supporting all children in becoming competent members
of a diverse society. Includes self-examination and reflection on
issues related to social identity, stereotypes and bias, social and
educational access, media and schooling. (CSU)
This course examines approaches for planning and leading circle
times for preschoolers, toddlers, school-agers and mixed age groups.
Features ideas for materials, songs and activities for large groups, and
strategies for managing groups and guiding young children during
circle times. The course can be applied towards licensing and Child
Development Permit coursework requirements in the subject area of
Programs and Curriculum. (CSU)
ECE 133: Creative Art Curriculum for Young Children
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ECE 217: Fostering Creativity in the Classroom
In this course students learn how to plan, design and present a
process-oriented art curriculum for young children. Through inclass hands-on art activities, students sample a variety of media for
children. An overview of current trends in early art education is also
included. (CSU)
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ECE 134: Understanding Young Children’s
Temperaments
ECE 218: Infant and Toddler Development
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A study of infants and toddlers from pre-conception to age three,
including physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional growth
and development. The course applies theoretical frameworks to
interpret behavior and interactions between heredity and environment, emphasizing the role of family and relationships in development.(CSU)
This course provides information about how to work with children of
different temperaments. It includes an examination of the different
temperament types, an overview of research on temperament and
children, how to recognize the different temperamental traits, and
strategies and approaches for working successfully with young children of different temperamental types in group care and classroom
settings. (CSU)
ECE 135: Working With Children’s Challenging
Behavior
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
In this course, students discuss descriptors and characteristics of
challenging behavior of young children in early childhood classroom
settings. Strategies and approaches for managing such behavior are
featured. Methods for working with parents when their child displays
challenging behavior and for locating outside help are also included.
(CSU)
ECE 137: Emergent Literacy in the Early Childhood
Classroom
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces students to developing early literacy curriculum that aligns with California Infant/Toddler and Preschool Learning Foundations and Frameworks. Includes methods for setting up
a classroom and planning curriculum to foster the development of
language and literacy skills. (CSU)
ECE 205: Integrated Curriculum and the Project
Approach
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ECE 115. Advisory: ECE 114.
This course provides information, ideas, and hands-on experience in
developing curriculum for young children that integrates activities
across all areas of the curriculum--mathematics, language arts, sci-
This course offers a variety of strategies and hands-on ideas for
fostering creativity in young children. It examines aspects of creative
thinking and provides methods for planning creative activities in all
curriculum areas. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ECE 219: Care and Education for Infants and
Toddlers
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course applies current theory and research to the care and
education of infants and toddlers in group settings, and examines
essential policies, principles, and practices that lead to quality care
and developmentally appropriate curriculum for children from birth
to 36 months. (CSU)
ECE 220A: Early Childhood Education
Administration A
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Introduction to the administration of early childhood programs.
Covers program types, budget, management, regulations, laws,
and development and implementation of policies and procedures.
Examines the administrative tools, philosophies, and techniques
needed to organize, open, and operate an early care and education
program. The course can be applied toward the administration
course requirement of the Site Supervisor and Program Director
Child Development Permits and meets Community Care Licensing
standards for administration courses required for Directors. (CSU)
124
Early Childhood Education
MARIN.EDU
ECE 220B: Early Childhood Education
Administration B
suitable for young children, and develop and implement age-appropriate activities to explore those concepts. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ECE 220A or concurrent
enrollment.
ECE 239: Current Issues in Early Childhood
Education
This course provides in-depth examination of early childhood
program administration, including topics such as implementing
regulation requirements; program assessment and evaluation;
child assessments; effective leadership strategies; staff development,
supervision and evaluation; nutrition programs; and developing
parent partnerships. Administration of Title 5 and Title 22 childcare
program requirements is also examined. The course can be applied
toward credit needed for Site Supervisor and Program Director Child
Development Permits. (CSU)
ECE 222: Working with Special Needs Children in
Early Childhood Settings
2.0 Units. 2.25 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Overview of children with special needs and the impact on families.
Maximizing potential through education, support, legislative knowledge, curriculum adaptations, community resources, and career
opportunities. Students identify and examine special needs in young
children, review the current legislation and guidelines for working
with children in early childhood classrooms, examine modalities of
effective communication with parents of young children with special
needs, and evaluate approaches for assisting special needs children in
classroom routines. (CSU)
ECE 223: Music Activities for Young Children
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Through a survey of teaching methods and hands-on music activities, this course enables students to develop a rich and enjoyable music program for young children, understand basic musical concepts,
present culturally diverse music activities, and foster reading and
math readiness through music. This course meets the Department of
Social Services’ requirement for coursework in the area of Programs
and Curriculum. (CSU)
ECE 224: Working with Parents in Early Childhood Programs
2.0
Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course includes approaches and techniques for working with
parents in infant/toddler, preschool and extended day programs;
strategies for planning and leading parent-teacher conferences; effective techniques for communicating with parents; and ideas for parent
involvement in early childhood programs. (CSU)
ECE 225: Guidance and Limit-Setting in the Early
Childhood Classroom
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Strategies and approaches for guiding and setting limits with infants, toddlers, and
preschoolers in classroom settings are presented and explored in this
course. Also featured are methods for assisting young children in
conflict resolution. (CSU)
ECE 226: Exploration and Discovery in Math and
Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ECE 101 or 110.
This course familiarizes students with elements of the scientific
method and how those elements can be present in curriculum for
young children. Students actively explore math and science concepts
3.0 Units. No prerequisite. Hours will vary with selected topic.
Specialized and contemporary topics in ECE are the focus of this
course. The subject matter varies with the needs and interests of the
students. The course content meets educational requirements for
Department of Social Services licensing and Child Development
Permit attainment. (CSU)
ECE 260: Marin Childcare Conference and Follow-up
One-Day Workshop
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Part I of this course is a day-long, 8-hour, off-campus conference for
childcare providers and other interested parties. Participants may
choose from mid-morning and afternoon workshops on current issues, trends, and policies in ECE. A keynote presentation is included.
Part II consists of a one-day, on-campus workshop in which the
instructor reviews and expands on topics presented in conference.
(CSU)
ECE 261: Early Childhood Education Conference
Course
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
This is a conference-format course. Topics and content vary. The
course can be used to meet Professional Growth requirements for
renewal of the Teacher, Master Teacher, Site Supervisor, or Director
level of Child Development Permit issued by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (CSU)
ECE 261ABC: Early Childhood Education Conference
Course A, B, C, or D
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
These are conference-format courses. Topics and content of the
courses vary. They may be used to meet “Professional Growth” requirements for renewal of the Teacher, Master Teacher, Site Supervisor, or Director levels of the Child Development Permit issued by the
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (CSU)
ECE 280: Early Childhood Education Fieldwork and
Seminar I: Beginning Practicum
3.0 Units. 1 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ECE 115. Advisory:
ECE 116. Other limitations on enrollment: evidence of physical exam
and TB test within past 6 months and up-to-date immunization records;
also must complete Criminal Record Clearance statement prior to
fieldwork placement.
A demonstration of developmentally appropriate early childhood
teaching competencies under guided supervision. Students will
utilize practical classroom experiences to make connections between
theory and practice, develop professional behaviors, and build a comprehensive understanding of children and families. Child centered,
play-oriented approaches to teaching, learning, and assessment; and
knowledge of curriculum content areas will be emphasized as student
teachers design, implement and evaluate experiences that promote
positive development and learning for all young children. (CSU)
Economics
CATALOG 2015/2016
ECE 281: Early Childhood Education Fieldwork and
Seminar II: Advanced Practicum
3.0 Units. 1 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ECE 280. Other
limitations on enrollment: evidence of physical exam and TB test from
within the past 6 months and up-to-date immunization records; also
must complete Criminal Record Clearance statement prior to fieldwork
placement.
Advanced training in planning, preparing, implementing and
evaluating various curriculum activities and techniques with young
children in an early education and care settings. Integration of
curriculum and documentation of individual children’s competencies is emphasized. A seminar is included, in which students
discuss teaching strategies and curriculum development techniques.
Includes six hours weekly working directly with children in the
campus Children’s Centers or in California Early Childhood Mentor
program classrooms. (CSU)
ECE 295: Supervising Adults in Early Childhood
Programs
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Methods and principles of supervising student teachers, volunteers,
staff, and other adults in early care and education settings. The course
emphasizes roles and development of early childhood professionals as mentors and leaders. It meets the requirements on the Child
Development Permit Matrix for adult supervision units required for
Master Teacher or Site Supervisor permits.(CSU)
ECONOMICS
Courses in economics provide students with a foundation of preparation for careers in business and government. Economists who work
in business are expected to help their firms adapt to the changing
environment. This typically involves short- and long-term economic
forecasts of how changes in the economic environment will affect
various aspects of business, such as marketing, purchasing, industrial
relations, and finance. Most economists employed by the government are specialists in such fields as agriculture, labor, business, and
international trade.
Career Options
Actuary, Appraiser, Bank Examiner, Budget Analyst, Business
Writer/Editor, Credit Investigator, Econometrician, Economist,
Environmental Consultant, Financial Analyst, Industrial Analyst,
Insurance Underwriter, International Economist, Investment
Economist, Labor Economist, Lawyer, Management Consultant,
Management Trainee, Market Research Analyst, Mortgage/Loan
Specialist, Pension Consultant, Pricing Analyst, Research Economist,
Securities Analyst, Statistician, Stock Broker, Tax Analyst, Teacher,
Traffic Manager, Transportation Economist, Urban Planner, Wage
and Salary Specialist
Faculty
Norman Pacula
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
125
A.A.-T. IN ECONOMICS
Associate in Arts in Economics for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Economics for Transfer
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses:
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
3
ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics
3
MATH 115 Probability and Statistics 4
Or
STAT 115 Introduction to Statistics
4
MATH 121 Calculus I with Applications
3
And
MATH 122 Calculus II with Applications
3
Or
MATH 123 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
5
List A. Select one course:
MATH 124 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
5
BUS 112 Financial Accounting
4
BUS 113 Managerial Accounting
5
CIS 110 Introduction to Computer Information Systems
3
BUS 144 Business Communication
3
List B. Select one course:
MATH 223 Analytic Geometry, Vector Analysis and Calculus III
5
MATH 116 Linear Algebra
3
Total Major Units
21-26
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE): 9 units/9 units
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
37 units/39 units
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives (IGETC/CSU-GE): 6-11 units/4-9 units
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
60
126
Education
MARIN.EDU
ECONOMICS COURSES (ECON)
ECON 215: Survey of Current Issues
ECON 101: Principles of Macroeconomics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as ECON
215, POLS 215, or SSC 215; credit awarded for only one course.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or
sufficient score on Math Placement Test. Advisory: Eligibility for ENGL
120. ECON 102 may be taken before ECON 101.
This introductory course provides a comprehensive overview of the
economy as a whole by examining both long-run and short-run macroeconomic issues. Topics include scarcity, comparative economic
systems, domestic output and national income, growth, unemployment, inflation, aggregate demand and supply. It also includes an
examination of international trade, government stabilization policy,
money and banking, and financial institutions. Students are exposed
to both macroeconomic theory and contemporary macroeconomic
issues. Special emphasis is placed on developing economic tools and
applying those tools to understanding contemporary issues. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-2, IGETC Area 4B
ECON 102: Principles of Microeconomics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or
satisfactory score on the Math Assessment Test. Advisory: Eligibility for
ENGL 120. ECON 101 and ECON 102 may be taken in either order.
This course introduces microeconomic analysis and focuses on
choices of individual economic decision-makers. Topics include the
economic perspective, how markets work, market failures, consumers, producers and efficiency, businesses and costs of production
in various market structures, gains from trade, and globalization.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-2, IGETC Area 4B
ECON 120: Introduction to Environmental
Economics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ECON 101 or
102.
This course introduces the interdependent relationship between
economics and the environment. It focuses on how to apply economic concepts to study the sources of, and remedies for, environmental problems. It examines analytical tools of economics, such as
cost-benefit analysis and welfare analysis, to study problems with
environmental dimensions, and covers the circumstances in which
markets fail to efficiently allocate resources in the presence of negative externalities. Students learn objectives used in the development
of environmental policies, and examine the role of government and
policies to address issues such as energy, water, biodiversity, wildlife,
global climate change, and long-term sustainability. (CSU)
ECON 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in
Economics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Eligibility for
ENGL 150. Can be taken as ECON 125, ETST 125, HIST 125, POLS 125,
or SSC 125; credit awarded for only one course.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods of research in the social sciences and develops skills required
to organize such thought and research into effective, college level
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
This course is an opportunity to critically examine and discuss
significant world developments and to attempt to understand the
sources of those developments. Student focus on issues of particular
interest and share that information with the group. When possible,
informed participants in world and national events meet with the
class to share insights. (CSU)
EDUCATION
Courses in this area provide students with an introduction to the
field of public education and practical experience in literacy, curriculum planning, and classroom assessment. Courses include field
placement in classrooms under the supervision of an experienced
mentor teacher.
Faculty
Sandy Boyd
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
Education Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificates of
Achievement.
The Education Certificate indicates that the student has successfully completed foundation coursework in education, teaching and
learning, and has gained experience working as a volunteer in a K-12
classroom.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
EDUC
110
Introduction to Education
3
EDUC
111
Foundations of Teaching
3
EDUCATION COURSES (EDUC)
EDUC 110: Introduction to Education
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A foundation for understanding the public education system for
those interested in teaching and learning, this course includes
information about school governance, the nature of teaching as a
profession, and the philosophies of education. (CSU/UC)
EDUC 111: Foundations of Teaching
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course explores what it means to be a professional teacher in
the current high-stakes environment of education. Building upon a
strong mentoring approach, the course helps students make decisions
about their teaching future by fostering an awareness of the realities
of teaching in America today. Practical perspectives for meeting the
challenges of teaching as well as practical and foundational topics
provide students with a well-rounded view of the teaching profession.
(CSU/UC)
Engineering
CATALOG 2015/2016
127
ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY
ENGINEERING
Courses in this area provide a limited introduction to electronics
and telecommunication technology. They are designed to equip the
student with basic terminology, concepts, and some measurement
and diagnostic skills.
No profession has as many diverse specialties and applications as
engineering. Few other professions offer the challenge, financial
rewards, and opportunity to make a contribution to the betterment
of our environment and standard of living as engineering.
There are many specialties in engineering, and within each area
there are countless subdivisions. Our technology has grown so
pervasive and complex that each facet of an engineering problem
demands a specific type of training and expertise.
Career Options
Automated Test Technician, Automotive Electronics Technician,
Broadcast Technician, Communications Technician, Computer
Network Technician, Computer Systems Technician, Consumer
Electronics Technician, Data Communications Technician,
Industrial Controls Technician, Medical Electronics Technician,
Network Switch Installer/Configurer, PBX Installer/Configurer,
Quality Control Technician, Robotics Technician, Satellite Systems
Technician, Telecommunication Products Technical Representative,
Telecommunications System Analyst, Telecommunications System
Consultant, Telecommunications System Sales Representative,
Telecommunications Traffic Analyst
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8200
ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY COURSES (ELEC)
ELEC 120: Electrical Fundamental and Alternative
Energies
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Introduction to the principles, terminology, and measurements of
electrical circuits, and to the generation of power by solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, wind, hydrogen cells, and electric vehicles.
Emphasis on the fundamentals of AC/DC circuits and their common
uses. (CSU)
ELEC 200: Solar PV Design for Residential and Small
Commercial
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Join the “rooftop revolution” with this introductory course for
residential and small commercial owners and those wishing to gain
jobs in the solar field. The course guides students through the steps
to design and install a working PV system for your home or small
commercial building, and qualifies students to take the National
NABCEP (North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners)
Test. (CSU)
ELEC 290: Electric Vehicle Conversion and Hybrid
Maintenance
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken
as ELEC 290 or ACRT 290; credit awarded for only one course.
This course covers hybrid maintenance, guiding students through
the complete process of converting a vehicle from a gasoline engine
to an electrically-powered engine. Through lecture and hands-on
experience, students learn the principles behind good component
layout, battery rack and box design, construction details, and electrical wiring. Additional topics include AC and DC drive systems, types
of batteries, selecting the right chassis, transmission adapter housing
design, and handling chargers and controllers. (CSU)
Career Options
Aerodynamicist, Agricultural Engineer, Ceramic Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Customer Service Representative,
Designer, Drafter, Electrical Engineer, Electronics Engineer, Field
Service Engineer, Industrial Engineer, Management Analyst, Marine
Engineer, Materials Scheduler, Mechanical Engineer, Metallographer, Metallurgical Engineer, Mining Engineer, Nuclear Engineer,
Operations Analyst, Petroleum Engineer, Production Manager,
Project Director, Research Scientist, Safety Engineer, Sales Engineer,
Surveyor, Systems Analyst, Technical Illustrator, Tester, Welding
Technician
Faculty
Erik Dunmire
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
ENGINEERING COURSES (ENGG)
ENGG 110A: Introduction to the Engineering
Profession
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An overview of the engineering profession, including a survey of
career fields and a discussion of academic requirements at College of
Marin and other institutions. The course aids students in developing
career goals, academic plans, and personal success strategies. (CSU/
UC)
ENGG 111: Computer Tools for Scientists and
Engineers: Spreadsheets
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY or
sufficient score on the Math Assessment Test.
An introduction to computer tools and techniques useful for data
analysis, problem solving, and communication in science and engineering coursework and professional activities. Students learn to use
spreadsheet software to perform routine data analysis, including use
of mathematical equations, statistical analysis, graphing, curve fitting, and a variety of numerical problem-solving techniques. (CSU)
ENGG 125: Introductory Engineering Graphics
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces orthographic and perspective projections,
helping the student develop 3D visualization design drawing skills.
Students learn industry ANSI and ISO standards used in creating
detail and assembly drawings. Auxiliary and section views, mechanical tolerancing and dimensioning are learned through extensive 2D
CAD and solid 3D modeling with Inventor. Important teamwork
skills are fostered through group projects and documentation of the
entire design process. (CSU/UC)
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English
ENGG 150: Programming in MATLAB for Engineers
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 123. May be
taken as ENGG 150 or COMP 150; credit awarded for only one course.
Designed to meet computer programming requirements for
engineering transfer students, this course utilizes the MATLAB
environment to provide a working knowledge of computer-based
problem-solving methods relevant to science and engineering,
including programming and numerical analysis techniques. Students
outline, write, test, and debug computer programs to solve problems
and display results, emphasizing proper documentation of computer
code and reports. Common examples and applications of physics and
engineering are used throughout the course. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 220: Electric Circuit Analysis
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisites: PHYS 207B, and Math 224 or
concurrent enrollment.
An introduction to the theory and analysis of electric circuits, including basic quantities and analytical techniques; network theorems
and modeling; natural and forced responses of first- and secondorder RLC circuits; AC circuit analysis and power calculations; and
linear models of common devices such as transistors, operational
amplifiers, and transformers. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 220L: Electric Circuits Lab
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This optional lab to accompany ENGG 220 introduces electric
measurements and laboratory instrumentation, as well as a practical
verification of electrical circuit theory. Students build and analyze a
variety of circuits, including Operational Amplifiers, and investigate
first and second order transient response and AC steady state behavior. Students learn how to use oscilloscopes, multimeters, function
generators, power supplies, and computer simulation tools to study
electric circuits. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 235: Engineering Mechanics: Statics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: PHYS 207A, and Math 124 or
concurrent enrollment.
An introduction for engineering students to applied vector mechanics of rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Students learn standard
engineering techniques for the analysis of external and internal
forces in structures, distributed force problems, friction, centroids,
and moments of inertia. (CSU/UC)
ENGG 245: Engineering Materials Science
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: CHEM 131 and
PHYS 207A.
The internal structures and resulting behaviors of materials used
in engineering applications (including metals, ceramics, polymers,
and composites) are studied, emphasizing the effects of heat, stress,
imperfections, and chemical environments. Laboratories provide
direct observations of the structures and behaviors discussed in the
course, experience with the operation of testing equipment, and the
preparation of experimental reports. (CSU/UC)
MARIN.EDU
ENGLISH
The essence of the English major involves the development of skills
and techniques such as looking at language development and literature in-depth. This elicits the ability to analyze, to ascertain assumptions, to determine values, and to make intelligent judgments and
decisions. For these reasons, a major in English would be appropriate
for the professions of law, medicine, or industry.
Career Options
Advertising Copy Writer, Bookstore Manager/Staff, Continuity
Writer, Editor, Foreign Service Officer, Freelance Writer, Fundraiser,
Grant Writer, Interviewer, Journalist, Lawyer, Legislative Assistant,
Librarian, Management Trainee, Media Specialist, News Analyst,
Newspaper Reporter, Personnel Specialist, Public Information
Officer, Publicity Director, Publishing Agent, Radio/TV Announcer,
Reader, Research Assistant, Sales Representative, Scriptwriter,
Speech Pathologist, Teacher, Technical Writer, Training Specialist
Faculty
Windee Cottle, Tonya Hersch, Ingrid Kelly, David King, Ali Klinger, Karen Koenig,
Cara Kreit, Trine Miller, Alicia (Meg) Pasquel, John Sutherland, James Tipton,
Stephanie Wells, Blaze Woodlief
Department Phone:
Kentfield Campus: 415-485-9348
Indian Valley Campus: 415- 883-2211, Ext. 8326
A.A.-T. IN ENGLISH
Associate in Arts in English for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn
a degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
It provides students with a solid basis for the continuing study of
English, American and world literature and develops skills in critical
thinking and writing. An English major is the foundation for careers
requiring verbal proficiency, analytic skills, literary competence,
insight, and the exercise of judgment.
To complete the Associate in Arts in English for Transfer degree
(AA-T), a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Course (4 units):
ENGL
151
Reading and Composition (1B)
4
List A - select two courses (6 units):
ENGL
221A Survey of American Literature I
3
ENGL
221B Survey of American Literature II
3
ENGL
222
Survey of English Literature I
3
ENGL
223
Survey of English Literature II
3
English
CATALOG 2015/2016
ENGL
224
Survey of World Literature I
3
ENGL
225
Survey of World Literature II
3
List B - select two courses (6 units):
(Or any course from List A not used above)
ENGL 202
Creative Writing I
3
ENGL
212
Introduction to Poetry
3
ENGL
230
Survey of Shakespeare
3
List C - select one course (3 units):
(Or any course from Lists A or B not used above)
ENGL
203
Creative Writing II
3
ENGL 208
Short Fiction
3
ENGL
214
The Popular Novel
3
ENGL
218
The American Short Story
3
ENGL 219
Voices and Visions
3
ENGL 235
Women in Literature
3
ENGL 237
The Literature of American Cultures
3
ENGL
240
Classic Children’s Literature
3
ENGL 242
Global Writings
3
JOUN 115
Reporting and Writing for Mainstream Media
3
BUS
144
Business Communication
3
SPCH 140
Oral Interpretation of Literature I
3
HUM
100A Introduction to Humanities: Ancient Greece to the Medieval Period 3
Or
HUM
100B Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to the Modern Period
3
DRAM 110
Introduction to Theatre
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
19
ENGLISH COURSES (ENGL)
English 130, 150, 151, 155: Letter grade only.
All other courses: Letter grade or pass/no pass.
In general, courses required for a transfer student’s four-year
major should be taken on a letter grade basis.
College of Marin offers an English assessment testing service to
provide prospective students with information with which to make
informed decisions when enrolling in English courses. Students
are provided with their test scores. Students registering for English
courses who need help in interpreting their individual placement test
scores and/or in deciding whether to register for or remain enrolled
in an English course can seek assistance from a counselor or their
English instructor.
For information about the English Assessment Test, students
can call the Testing Office at (415) 4859469 (located in the Student
Services Building, Room 18, Kentfield Campus); or (415) 883-2211,
ext. 8326 (located at Indian Valley Campus).
ENGLISH SKILLS COURSES
(ENGL 062 THROUGH ENGL 097)
Please see College Skills category for department information.
ENGL 062: Developmental Reading and Writing
129
ENGL 062L: Developmental Reading and Writing
Lab
1.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: ENGL 62.
This lab will reinforce and extend the reading and writing skills
learned in English 62. May be taken four times for credit.
ENGL 070-079: ENGLISH SKILLS OPEN LAB
1.0 Unit for each course. 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Students are
advised to meet with the instructor to determine appropriate courses
to take.
A series of one-unit minicourses designed to help students develop
basic English language skills. Offered on an individualized basis,
each module may be entered and completed at any time during the
semester, and, with an approved in-progress grade, completed the
following semester. Each one-unit course requires approximately 48
hours of work.
ENGL 070: ENGL 071: ENGL 072: ENGL 073: ENGL 074: ENGL 075: ENGL 076: ENGL 077: ENGL 078: ENGL 079: Phonics
Spelling I
Spelling II
Vocabulary I
Vocabulary II
Reading I
Reading II
Independent Reading
Special Interest Workshop
Grammar Review
ENGL 092: Reading and Writing Skills
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: ENGL 92L.
Students develop their abilities to analyze and respond to reading
material in a variety of disciplines. At the same time, they learn to
construct well-organized and developed paragraphs using correct
grammar and sentence structure.
ENGL 092L: Reading & Writing Skills Lab
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: English 92.
In this course, students practice and extend the reading, grammar,
and writing skills introduced in English 92, receiving personal help
with assignments from a professional staff.
ENGL 093: College Reading and Composition
5.0 units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Corequisite: ENGL 093L.
This course prepares students for success in college-level reading and
writing tasks. Students practice reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop skills for effective academic writing. The focus is on writing fluently, using effective
organizational structures and developing ideas with support, using
the conventions of standard written English. Assignments explore
the connections among readings, personal experiences, observations,
and class discussions.
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: ENGL 62L.
ENGL 093L: College Reading and Composition Lab
This course introduces the related ideas required for academic
reading and writing: main ideas, logical support, implied meanings,
relationships, patterns of organization, and vocabulary building.
Students learn how to write complete sentences of various types, plan
before writing, and construct well-organized paragraphs.
1.0 unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Corequisite: ENGL 093.
In this course, students practice and extend the reading, writing, and
grammar skills introduced in English 93, receiving personal help
with assignments from a professional staff.
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English
ENGL 095: Advanced Spelling
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ENGL 71 or 72 or 75th
percentile on pretest.
Designed primarily for students in the Court Reporting Program,
this course provides the skills to master English spelling at an advanced level. Students build their visual memory, study phonetic and
structural patterns, and study frequently misspelled and misused
words.
ENGL 096: Advanced Vocabulary
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ENGL 73 or 74 or 75th
percentile on pretest.
Designed primarily for students in the Court Reporting Program,
this course presents strategies for building an extensive vocabulary.
Topics include the history and etymology of English, dictionary
skills, using context clues, word parts, and other word analysis skills.
ENGL 097: Critical Reading
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ENGL 76 or 75th
percentile on pretest.
Designed primarily for students in the Court Reporting Program,
this course significantly increases students’ reading comprehension
and critical thinking abilities. Topics include vocabulary in context,
structural analysis of difficult material, inference, and conclusion
and judgment skills.
PRECOLLEGIATE LEVEL COURSES – NONTRANSFERABLE
ENGL 098: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 92 or 93 or
ESL 83 or English Placement Test or equivalent.
This course prepares students for success in college-level reading and
writing tasks. Students practice reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop skills for effective academic writing. The focus is on writing fluently, using effective
organizational structures, and developing ideas with support, using
the conventions of standard written English. Assignments explore
the connections among readings, personal experiences, observations,
and class discussions. Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in
the Writing Center.
ENGL 098A: Grammar and Usage
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This self-paced, open-entry course instructs students in sentencelevel grammar (major sentence elements, clause patterns) and usage
(pronoun case and agreement, subject-verb agreement, and verb
forms and tenses). The course presents methods students may use to
analyze the grammatical components of sentences.
ENGL 098B: Sentence Structure and Punctuation
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course enables students to identify various sentence structures;
recognize phrase and clause functions; avoid common structure errors such as run-on sentences, faulty parallel structure, and improper
modification; and punctuate sentences accurately using the comma,
semicolon, dash, and parentheses. Further, this course introduces
creative sentence composition with variations of structure, use of
verbal phrases, and stylistic balance and subordination.
MARIN.EDU
ENGL 098SL: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition I - for Non-Native English Speakers
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ESL 83 or ENGL 92
or ENGL 93 or English Placement Test or equivalent.
This course, for bilingual/non-native English speakers, prepares
students for success in college-level reading and writing tasks. Students practice reading, writing, grammar skills and critical thinking
to improve reading comprehension and develop skills for effective
academic writing. The focus is on writing fluently, using effective organizational structures, and developing ideas with support, using the
conventions of standard written English. Assignments help explore
connections among readings, personal experience, observation, and
class discussion. Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in the
Writing Center or the ESL Lab.
ENGL 099: Intensive Grammar Review
0.5 Unit. 1.5 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
This intensive, self-paced course reviews common problems in grammar, punctuation, and usage. It is not intended to be an exhaustive
study of the subject, but rather a focused review of such typical
mistakes as run-ons, fragments, agreement errors, faulty parallelism,
and inappropriate punctuation. This course is designed for students
in ENGL 150, 151, and 155, but may be taken by anyone wanting to
improve basic grammar skills.
COLLEGE LEVEL COURSES - TRANSFERABLE
ENGL 116: College Reading
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A course designed to strengthen students’ ability to understand
and respond to college-level readings in all disciplines. Emphasis
is on critically evaluating purpose, support, conclusions, tone, and
language. Vocabulary enhancement is included. (CSU)
ENGL 120: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or
English Placement Test or equivalent.
Students sharpen their skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop composing
techniques for effective academic writing. This course prepares
students for success in college level academic reading and writing,
emphasis being placed upon thinking clearly and logically and upon
the construction of cogent arguments. Requires one hour weekly of
guided practice in the Writing Center. (CSU)
ENGL 120AC: Accelerated Introduction to College
Reading and Composition
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 92 and 92L or English
Placement Test.
In this rigorous, accelerated course, students develop skills in reading, writing and critical thinking to prepare for ENGL 150 and for
success in other courses with college-level reading and writing tasks.
The course emphasizes writing clearly, and constructing logical,
well-supported arguments; it focuses on standard English usage, diction, punctuation, grammar, and sentence variety within the context
of the essay. Assignments show interconnections among readings,
personal experience, research, observation, and class discussion.
English
CATALOG 2015/2016
ENGL 120SL: Introduction to College Reading and
Composition II - for Non-Native English Speakers
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or
English Placement Test or equivalent.
This course, for non-native English speakers, prepares students for
success in college-level academic reading and writing, emphasis
being placed upon the construction of cogent arguments. Students
sharpen their skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking to improve reading comprehension and to develop composing techniques
for effective academic writing. They also review standard usage, appropriate diction, punctuation, grammar, and ways to achieve variety
in sentence structure. Assignments show the interconnection among
readings, personal experience, observation, and class discussion.
Requires one hour weekly of guided practice in the ESL Lab and/or
Writing Center Lab. (CSU/UC)
ENGL 130: Critical Thinking
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This introductory-level course in the arts of rhetoric and logic sharpens students’ abilities to reason clearly. They learn to recognize and
analyze common fallacies found in political statements, magazine
commentary, news coverage, editorials, advertisements, and classical
persuasive works, developing ways to organize ideas and express
them rationally, and ways to judge the quality of ideas and the purposes of various examples ranging from propaganda to persuasion to
philosophy. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area A-3
ENGL 150: Reading and Composition (1A)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or 120AC
or English Placement Test or equivalent.
This course develops and refines students’ writing, reading, and
critical thinking abilities. Students read and discuss various works
and write expository and argumentative prose, including a research
paper. The course emphasizes gathering, evaluating and documenting evidence. During the semester, students are required to write
numerous essays for a total of between 8,000-10,000 words. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area D, CSU Area A-2, IGETC Area 1A
ENGL 151: Reading and Composition (1B)
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 150 or equivalent.
This critical thinking/composition course highlights literary texts
as material from which students derive samples to use in critical
constructions of their own. Texts include critical and argumentative
essays, biographical or historical discussions, belletristic writing,
textual analysis, poetry, drama, short stories, and novels. Students
learn to identify arguments, both in persuasive polemical discourse
where arguments are presented and defended, and in subtler, more
emotional texts where arguments are implied or masked, and to
distinguish fallacious reasoning from cogent reasoning in a variety
of formats. A minimum of 8,000 words of writing (including two
revisions) is required. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C or E, CSU Area A-3,
IGETC Area 1B
ENGL 155: Critical Thinking and Composition
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 150 or equivalent.
This course develops rhetorical, critical, argumentative, and organizational skills in written composition, and heightened perceptivity
in analytical reading. Extensive analysis of writing models focuses
on deductive, inductive, and inferential reasoning; assumptions
131
and inferences embedded in arguments; informal logical fallacies;
divergent world views; and incoherencies and biases in presentation.
Student essays are expected to demonstrate a capacity for presenting
complex ideas in a clear, coherent, and convincing manner, with
particular attention to organization and style. A minimum of 8,000
words of writing is required of each student. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
E, CSU Area A-3, IGETC Area 1B
ENGL 202: Creative Writing I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or 120AC
or English Placement Test or equivalent.
This reading and writing course engages eligible students in both the
study and practice of the crafts of fiction, poetry, and drama. (CSU/
UC) CSU Area C-2
ENGL 203: Creative Writing II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or 120AC
or equivalent, and ENGL 202.
This reading and writing course engages eligible students in both
the study and practice of the crafts of fiction, poetry, and drama. It
continues and develops the study and practice begun in ENGL 202.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area C-2
ENGL 208: Short Fiction
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course examines short stories and novellas as works of literary
art. Readings include representative short fiction by mainstream
writers and by writers representing different cultural heritages.
Lectures provide historical and cultural background helpful in appreciating the literature; class discussions focus on interpretation and
on the analysis of traditional literary devices such as plot, character,
point of view, setting, style, and theme. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 212: Introduction to Poetry
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course examines poetry as a major literary genre, and introduces the fundamental nature of poetry through an examination of
poetic forms, poetic devices (rhyme, meter), imagery, diction, tone,
figures of speech, meaning, and idea. The course also addresses the
historical and cultural factors that have influenced poetry’s stylistic
developments. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B
ENGL 214: The Popular Novel
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course includes twentieth-century American literature that has
been very successful in the marketplace. Some novels, like “The Great
Gatsby” and “The Old Man and the Sea”, are now considered classics;
others are minor, but well-crafted works. Students examine the novel
as a literary genre and as a reflection of the dynamics and diversity of
American life. In addition to reading the novels, students view films
based on the novels, and produce assignments demonstrating their
analytical thinking and writing skills. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
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English
MARIN.EDU
ENGL 218: The American Short Story
ENGL 222: Survey of English Literature I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course introduces the American literary tradition through
reading selected short stories and related criticism, which might also
be supplemented by viewing video productions of the selected stories.
Students analyze and compare short works of fiction for thematic
content and express their understanding through written responses,
examinations, and classroom discussion. Authors include Ernest
Hemingway, William Faulkner, Mark Twain, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and
others. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
This survey covers major texts in English literature, from its AngloSaxon beginnings through the initial stages of modern English in the
mid-17th century and into the 18th century Age of Enlightenment,
including texts such as Beowulf, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Swift’s
Gulliver’s Travels. Lectures provide historical and cultural contexts
and critical methods for analysis of the texts in class discussions.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 219: Voices and Visions
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or 120AC
or English Placement Test or equivalent.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ENGL 223: Survey of English Literature II
This course offers a close look at the creative lives of at least thirteen
American poets. Beginning with precursors Whitman and Dickinson, the programs cover the entire range of twentieth century
verse. While exploring the varieties of poetic inspiration, students
gain experience in reading for comprehension and pleasure. Writers
include Frost, Eliot, Pound, Moore, Williams, Plath, and others.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2
This survey course in English literature covers important works from
the late 18th century through the 20th century. Lectures supply the
background necessary for appreciation of the works and suggest
the wealth of literary material available to the intellectually curious
reader or to the student of literature. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU
Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 220: Detective Fiction
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course traces the development of the genre from classic mysteries to hard-boiled detective stories to police procedurals. Students
read representative works by such authors as Poe, Doyle, Christie,
Hammett, Chandler, and MacDonald. The course emphasizes the
conventions of the form, the elements of fiction, the methods of critical thinking used in solving crimes, and the ethical problems raised
in the works under discussion. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 221A: Survey of American Literature I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or 120AC
or English Placement Test or equivalent.
Students examine representative American writings, with emphasis
shared between the “major” authors and works from America’s
“other” voices, including Native American, Chicano and Hispanic
American, and African-American authors. Lectures, discussions and
media presentations will relate the literature to the developing social
and philosophical attitudes that characterize American society.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 221B: Survey of American Literature II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or 120AC
or English Placement Test or equivalent.
Students examine representative American writers from the Civil
War to the present, with emphasis shared between the canonized
“major” authors and works from Hispanic and African-American
authors. Lectures, discussions and media presentations relate the
literature to the developing social and philosophical attitudes that
characterize American society. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 224: Survey of World Literature I
This course surveys representative imaginative literature of the
world (excluding English and American literature) from antiquity
through the Renaissance. Students examine works from Homer
and Sophocles to Cervantes and Rabelais. Students view each work
through both an artistic and a cultural lens, in order to see how the
narrative mode and lyric and dramatic forms have evolved through
the centuries. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area
3B
ENGL 225: Survey of World Literature II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course surveys representative imaginative literature of the world
(excluding English and American literature) from early modern to
post modern times. Students examine works ranging from Voltaire
and Goethe to Sartre and Kafka. They view each work through both
an artistic and a cultural lens, in order to see how the narrative mode
and lyric and dramatic forms have evolved through the centuries.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 230: Survey of Shakespeare
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This survey examines representative plays from each period in
Shakespeare’s career, locating the plays in their historical context.
Lectures define critical approaches that invite discussion of the
dramatic and literary qualities of Shakespeare’s work. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 235: Women in Literature
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
The representation of the character and role of women in Western
culture from Greek tragedy through contemporary literature, with
a particular emphasis on American literature, is examined through
the analysis of selected texts. The primary focus is on women in
CATALOG 2015/2016
American literature by both male and female authors, the writing of
minority women, and the political and cultural context of literature.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C and G, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 237: The Literature of American Cultures
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: English 120 or 120SL or
English Placement Test or equivalent.
This class explores the richness and diversity of American culture by
studying the literature of several social and ethnic groups, including
works by African-American, Native American, Jewish American,
Latino, and Asian American writers. Through close readings of
representative texts, the course focuses on themes of identity and
community in the context of contemporary cultural history. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C and G, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 240: Classic Children’s Literature
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
An inquiry into the basic nature of children’s literature: what are
its social, philosophical, spiritual, and esthetic values? The course
considers techniques and modern critical theories, but focuses on
practical criticism for the nonspecialist. Specific works studied are
representative of several genres, cultures, and periods of children’s
literature. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGL 242: Global Writings
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent. Can be taken as ENGL 242 or HUM 242;
credit awarded for only one course.
The cultural diversity and complex history of our globalized world
are explored through a variety of contemporary writings. Discussion
and analyses of representative texts focus on colonial exploitation,
political domination, liberation, formations of racism, gender inequality, expressions of cultural power, ethnic conflict and division,
immigration and migrancy, and processes of globalization. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
ENGLISH AS A SECOND
LANGUAGE (ESL)
This program, administered by the College Skills department,
consists of credit and noncredit courses, and is recommended for
nonnative speakers of English. It offers students the opportunity to
develop and practice basic English grammar, writing, and reading skills. Both credit and noncredit courses are designed to help
students improve communication by developing their listening and
speaking skills. Noncredit courses are offered from beginning to
intermediate levels. Credit courses are offered from intermediate to
advanced levels.
Please see College Skills category for department information.
Faculty (Noncredit)
Cheo Massion, Sara McKinnon, Patricia Seery
Faculty (Credit)
Rebecca Beal, Barbara Bonander, Beth Patel, Wendy L. Walsh, Blaze Woodlief
Department Phone: 415-485-9644
English as a Second Language (ESL)
133
Placement Testing
College of Marin offers an English as a Second Language placement
testing service to provide prospective students with information with
which to make informed decisions when enrolling in ESL courses.
Students are provided with their test scores. Students registering for
ESL courses who need help interpreting their individual placement
test scores, and/or deciding whether to register for or remain in an
ESL course, can seek assistance from a counselor or their instructor.
For information about the ESL Placement Test, students can call
the Testing Office at (415) 485-9469 (located in the Student Services
building, Room 18, Kentfield Campus).
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE NONCREDIT COURSES
(ESLN; ESLV)
ESLN 008: Beginning Citizenship
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is
repeatable. Advisory: ESL Placement Test. Students should be in levels
010-025.
This course introduces low-level ESL students to vocabulary and
content required to pass the USCIS Naturalization Test, including
the application process, civics, and basic oral, reading and writing
skills.
ESLN 009: Intermediate Citizenship
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test. Students should be in levels 030-040 or above.
This course prepares intermediate ESL students to pass the USCIS
Naturalization Test, covering the application process, civics, and
basic oral, reading and writing skills.
ESLN 010: Beginning ESL
0.0 Unit. 2.8 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This course will introduce beginning English learners to basic everyday English vocabulary, expressions and instructions to describe
everyday actions, needs and abilities. Emphasis will be placed on
aural comprehension and basic survival skills.
ESLN 010A: Beginning ESL A
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This course, for beginning English learners who know some basic
English vocabulary, introduces everyday English vocabulary,
expressions, and instructions to describe everyday actions, needs and
abilities.
ESLN 010B: Beginning ESL B
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This course is for beginning English learners who know some basic
English vocabulary. The course will introduce students to everyday
English vocabulary, expressions and instructions to describe everyday actions, needs and abilities.
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English as a Second Language (ESL)
ESLN 010C: Beginning ESL C
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This course introduces beginning English learners to basic everyday
English vocabulary, expressions and structures to describe everyday
actions, needs and abilities. The class emphasizes developing confidence and understanding simple written and spoken instructions
and stories.
ESLN 010L: Beginning ESL - Long
0.0 Unit. 9 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course introduces beginning English learners to basic everyday English vocabulary, expressions and instructions to describe
everyday actions, needs and abilities. Emphasis is placed on aural
comprehension and basic survival skills. The course meets for more
hours to give more opportunity to focus on reading and writing
skills.
ESLN 010X: Beginning ESL Summer Review
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This short Level-10 summer course offers a chance to review basic
grammar points learned during the year, and/or to focus on reading,
vocabulary development, or interactive communication skills.
ESLN 015: ESL for Employment: Job Search Skills
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course, designed for those interested in finding and retaining
employment, focuses on developing the language skills necessary
to identify a job, pursue the written application process, participate
in an oral interview, and accept employment. Assignments include
completing a master application and online application; and writing
a resume, list of references, cover letter, and thank-you note.
ESLN 020: High Beginning ESL A
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
In the first part of high beginning ESL, students will learn to ask for
and give basic information about yesterday, today and tomorrow
and to express basic likes, wants, needs, abilities and obligations in
conversation and in written form.
ESLN 020L: High Beginning ESL - Long
0.0 Unit9 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
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the use of audiovisual materials related to survival skills, asking for
directions, giving personal information and making appointments.
ESLN 020X: High Beginning ESL A Summer Review
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This short High Beginning ESL A summer course offers a chance to
review basic grammar points learned during the year, and/or to focus
on reading, vocabulary development, or interactive communication
skills.
ESLN 025: High Beginning ESL B
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
In the second part of high beginning ESL, students practice expressing basic likes, wants, needs, abilities and obligations and talking
about yesterday, today and tomorrow. They also begin to negotiate
and interact on the telephone, at work and in the community.
ESLN 025X: High Beginning ESL B Summer Review
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This short High Beginning ESL B summer course offers a chance to
review basic grammar points learned during the year, and/or to focus
on reading, vocabulary development, or interactive communication
skills.
ESLN 030: Low Intermediate ESL A
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
ESLN 030 students know everyday survival English, but want to
learn to talk about their experiences in life and at work. They learn to
describe how their lives were before they came to this country. The
focus is on learning more verbs and verb forms.
ESLN 030L: Low Intermediate ESL A - Long
0.0 Unit. 9 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
ESLN 30 students know everyday survival English, but want to learn
to talk about their experiences in life and at work. They learn to
describe how their lives were before they came to this country. The
focus is on learning more verbs and verb forms. The course meets for
more hours to give more opportunity to focus on reading and writing
skills.
ESLN 030X: Low Intermediate ESL A Summer Review
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
In this high beginning ESL course, students learn to ask for and
give basic information about yesterday, today and tomorrow and to
express basic likes, wants, needs, abilities and obligations in conversation and in written form. They will also learn to negotiate and
interact on the telephone, at work and in the community. This course
meets for more hours to give more opportunity to focus on reading
and writing skills.
This short Low Intermediate ESL A summer course offers a chance to
review basic grammar points learned during the year, and/or to focus
on reading, vocabulary development, or interactive communication
skills.
ESLN 020LS: High Beginning Listening and Speaking
ESLN 035 is the second part of the low intermediate level. Students
review and build upon basic English skills and survival skills covered
in Levels 010-030. They may read and discuss short adapted fiction
or nonfiction in class and write about personal abilities and experiences.
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test. Recommended for students concurrently enrolled in
levels 010-015 or 020-025.
This is a beginning (Level 10/15) and high beginning (Level 20/25)
noncredit ESL course emphasizing listening and speaking skills.
Practice in speaking and listening comprehension of English through
ESLN 035: Low Intermediate ESL B
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
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English as a Second Language (ESL)
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ESLN 035L: Low Intermediate ESL B - Long
ESLN 040X: Credit ESL Preparation Summer Review
0.0 Unit. 9 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
ESLN 035 is the second part of the low intermediate level. Students
review and build upon basic English skills and survival skills covered
in levels 10-30. They may read and discuss short adapted fiction or
nonfiction in class and write about personal abilities and experiences.
The course meets for more hours to give more opportunity to focus
on reading and writing skills.
This short Credit ESL Preparation summer course offers a chance
to review grammar points learned during the year, and/or to focus
on reading, vocabulary development, or interactive communication
skills.
ESLN 035X: Low Intermediate ESL B Summer Review
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This short Low Intermediate ESL B summer course offers a chance to
review basic grammar points learned during the year, and/or to focus
on reading, vocabulary development, or interactive communication
skills.
ESLN 040: Credit ESL Preparation Course
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
Students in ESLN 040 continue to develop their intensive and
extensive reading skills, make oral presentations and use an English
dictionary, the library and the internet for simple research projects.
In preparation for transitioning to credit ESL, regular attendance,
homework and group participation are strongly encouraged.
ESLN 040A: Credit ESL Preparation A
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
Students in ESL 040A continue to develop their intensive and
extensive reading skills; make oral presentations; and use an English
dictionary, the library, and the internet for simple research projects.
In preparation for transitioning to credit ESL, regular attendance,
homework, and group participation are strongly encouraged.
ESLN 040B: Credit ESL Preparation B
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
Students in ESL 040B continue to develop their intensive and
extensive reading skills; make oral presentations; and use an English
dictionary, the library, and the internet for simple research projects.
In preparation for transitioning to credit ESL, regular attendance,
homework, and group participation are strongly encouraged.
ESLN 053: Intermediate ESL: Writing and Grammar
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory:
ESL Placement Test.
This course introduces the conventions of standard written English
to intermediate ESL students and reviews basic grammar structures.
Emphasis is placed on sentence structure and the correct use of
tenses.
ESLN 054: Intermediate ESL: Grammar
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hr/wk. Course is repeatable. No
prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This course reviews basic grammar structures for intermediate ESL
students, with emphasis on verb tenses.
ESLN 056: Intermediate ESL: Words I (Vocabulary/
Spelling/Reading/Discussion)
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This course is designed to improve the reading comprehension
and vocabulary usage of nonnative speakers of English. The course
includes reading skills, study skills, short stories, and the reading of
short novels.
ESLN 058A: Pronunciation for Non-Native English
Speakers I
0.0 Unit. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course provides ESL students the opportunity to improve their
production of standard American English. Students practice the consonant phoneme system and the rhythm of the language, including
syllable count and stress patterns, to become more intelligible and to
gain understanding of spoken English.
ESLN 058B: Pronunciation for Non-Native English
Speakers II
ESLN 040L: Credit ESL Preparation - Long
0.0 Unit. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
0.0 Unit. 9 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course provides ESL students the opportunity to improve their
production of standard American English. Students practice the
vowel phoneme system in words, phrases and in discourse. They
practice stress and intonation patterns, linking, assimilation, and
prominence to become more intelligible and to gain understanding
of spoken English.
Students in ESL 040L continue to develop their intensive and
extensive reading skills; make oral presentations; and use an English
dictionary, the library, and the internet for simple research projects.
In preparation for transitioning to credit ESL, regular attendance,
homework, and group participation are strongly encouraged. This
course meets for more hours to give more opportunity to focus on
reading and writing skills.
ESLN 040LS: Low Intermediate Listening and
Speaking
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test. Students should be in level 040.
In this college ESL preparation course in speaking and listening
skills, students improve their spoken fluency and accuracy in English
through listening comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, idioms,
pronunciation and presentation skills.
ESLN 059: Review of Low Intermediate ESL
0.0 Unit. 3.375 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This review course is designed for students who have completed or
are in the process of completing the ESL 50 or 60 level, or for students
who, through the ESL Placement test, have qualified for the ESL 60
level.
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English as a Second Language (ESL)
ESLN 060: Intermediate ESL: Listening and Speaking
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This intermediate course in listening and speaking communication skills is recommended for students enrolled in ESL 50-level or
60-level courses. Students are introduced to the formal and informal
speaking and listening skills to provide a bridge to educational and
career opportunities.
ESLN 063: High Intermediate ESL: Writing and
Grammar
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course is suitable for the high intermediate student with a good
foundation in English grammar and writing. There is an emphasis on
grammatical accuracy and on writing a logical sequence of sentences
in organized paragraphs. Completion of all 50-level ESL courses or
the appropriate score on the ESL Placement Test is recommended.
ESLN 064: High Intermediate ESL: Grammar
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hr/wk. Course is repeatable.
This grammar course is designed to improve language skills for
high-intermediate speakers of ESL. Requires one hour weekly to be
arranged in the ESL lab. Recommended completion of all 50-level
ESL classes. (See time chart in schedule for ESL lab.)
ESLN 066: High Intermediate ESL: Words II
(Vocabulary/Spelling/Reading/Discussion)
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course provides high intermediate ESL students with practice
reading stories and short novels, newspapers and other non-fiction
materials. Students are introduced to academic reading and study
skills, and learn to use various resources available at the COM
library. Completion of all 50-level ESL courses is recommended.
ESLN 068: American Topics
0.0 Unit. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course helps students understand important American topics,
past and present, through lecture, reading, and discussion. Examples
of topics include the education system, the American Dream, drugs
and drug treatment.
ESLN 073: Low Advanced ESL: Writing and Grammar
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture and 1 TBA hr/wk. Course is repeatable.
In this course, low advanced ESL students review paragraph writing
and are introduced to the essay. Intermediate and advanced grammar structures and punctuation are reviewed. Completion of all
60-level ESL courses or the appropriate score on the ESL placement
test is recommended.
ESLN 074: Low Advanced Grammar for ESL Students
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hr/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course is designed for low advanced ESL students who need to
refine their understanding of grammar. Recommended completion
of all 60-level ESL courses.
ESLN 076: Low Advanced ESL: Words III
(Vocabulary/Spelling/Reading/Discussion)
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course is designed to improve the reading comprehension
and academic vocabulary of low advanced non-native speakers of
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English. This course includes reading skills, study skills, novel reading, and library research projects. Recommended completion of all
60-level ESL courses.
ESLN 079: Review of Intermediate ESL
0.0 Unit. 3.375 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This review course is designed for ESL students at the low advanced
level who have completed or are in the process of completing the ESL
70 or 80 level, or for students who, through the ESL Placement test,
have qualified for the ESL 80 level.
ESLN 080: Advanced ESL: Listening and Speaking
(Social/Academic/Workplace)
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Completion of all
70-level ESL courses recommended.
This course in listening and speaking skills is recommended for
low-advanced to advanced ESL students. It helps students improve
the listening and speaking skills necessary to participate in college,
workplace and everyday life situations. Students practice listening
and note-taking skills, conduct interviews, give presentations and
lead discussion sessions.
ESLN EFCW: English as a Second Language for
Childcare Workers
0.0 Unit. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This class is for high-beginning to low-intermediate ESL students
who need to improve their English skills to care for infants and
young children and communicate with co-workers and parents in
daycare centers and pre-schools. Students learn vocabulary and
grammar related to child development and caregiving activities;
improve pronunciation; read books, play games and sing songs; learn
effective language to help children set limits and solve problems;
practice clarifying instructions and communicating information;
discuss health and safety; complete job-related forms; learn to describe job experience and fill out a job application; and become aware
of resources for future learning. Students may observe childcare
centers and share their findings in class.
ESLN EFG: English as a Second Language for
Gardeners
0.0 Unit. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL Placement Test.
This class is for high-beginning to low-intermediate ESL students
working or planning to work in landscaping. The course goal is
twofold: it covers basic landscaping content, and students learn
language and cultural expectations necessary for success on the job.
Topics include practicing the English needed to discuss plant and
pest management, common plant identification and employment
issues. The class offers hands-on experience, role plays for language
use, new vocabulary and pronunciation instruction.
ESLN LIT: ESL Literacy
0.0 Unit. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable.
This course introduces beginning English learners to the basic English writing system, numbers, etc. It develops reading skills through
sight words, phonics, and storytelling.
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ESLN NCLAB: ESL Noncredit Lab
ESLV 005: English for Childcare B
0.0 Unit. 8 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test.
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
Advisory: ESLN 35 or above.
The ESL Lab is a self-paced, individualized, open-entry/open-exit
course. Students use ESL software, audio tapes, videos and reading
material to develop their skills in English.
This class is for intermediate English language learners who as parents, babysitters, and childcare workers need to be able to communicate with young children to help them set limits, solve problems, and
give, ask for, and clarify information or instructions from co-workers
and parents. Students develop vocabulary and grammar needed for
communication in basic care-giving activities. They improve reading
and pronunciation skills through children’s books, games, and songs.
Health and safety issues are covered.
ESLN PRON: Noncredit ESL Pronunciation
0.0 Unit. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test. Students should be in levels 020-040
This course provides Noncredit ESL students from ESLN Levels
020-040 with practice in English pronunciation. The primary goal
is to help ESL students to be understood when they are speaking
English. This includes learning how to listen to English in order to
acquire better pronunciation and intonation skills. Students work on
(a) individual sounds, (b) the sounds in context in sentences, and (c)
sentence rhythm and stress employing the same sounds.
ESLV 001: ESL for Customer Service Jobs
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
This class is for anyone who would like to improve their customer
service skills and learn the most professional customer service
language for all industries, emphasizing the language and
techniques of the hotel, restaurant, and retail fields.
ESLV 002: ESL for Housekeepers and Custodians
ESLV 006: ESL-ECE Bridge Class A
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
Advisory: ESL levels 40-60.
This course is designed to prepare students interested in the Early
Childhood Education program for classes which are only offered
in English. Note: the course is intended as a supplement, not a
replacement, to the regular credit ESL program. Students learn to
observe and describe child behavior orally and in writing using early
childhood development vocabulary, practice finding main ideas and
support in selections from related textbooks, and develop communication skills and good study habits.
ESLV 007: ESL-ECE Bridge Class B
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
Advisory: ESL levels 50-70.
This course is designed for students who are presently working
as housekeepers or janitors in private homes, hotels, or buildings,
or those who are seeking positions in those fields. The class will
emphasize and demonstrate the specific English language skills
required for success and advancement in those fields. The course will
teach language suitable for real-world housekeeping situations and
will include actual hands-on experiences with cleaning situations.
The class is most suitable for students at the high beginning (ESLN
20) and higher levels.
This is the second-level course designed to prepare students interested in the Early Childhood Education Program for classes which
are only offered in English. Note: It is intended as a supplement
(not a replacement) to the regular credit ESL program. Students
improve their pronunciation and use of Early Childhood Education
vocabulary to describe child interaction, supervision and guidance
strategies orally and in writing. Students discuss and practice different types of written assignments and read unadapted passages from
Early Childhood Education textbooks.
ESLV 003: Communication Skills for Healthcare
Workers
ESLV 008: ESL for Gardeners
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
This course is designed for healthcare workers and others interested
in healthcare fields. The focus will be on the language skills necessary to function in a medical/dental environment. Emphasis is on
social and cultural skills for successful interaction with patients and
co-workers.
ESLV 004: English for Childcare A
0.0 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
Advisory: ESLN 20.
This course is for low intermediate to intermediate ESL students
working or planning to work in gardening or landscaping. Students
learn language and cultural expectations necessary to communicate
in English with employers, customers, co-workers and emergency
medical care providers. The course includes work on accent correction.
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
Advisory: ESLN 20, 25, or 30.
ESLV 012: ESL for Employment: Reading and Writing
Emphasis
This class is for high beginning English language learners who as
parents, babysitters, and childcare workers need to be able to communicate with young children, co-workers, and parents. Students
develop vocabulary and grammar needed for communication in
basic care-giving activities. They improve reading and pronunciation
skills through childrens’ books, games, and songs.
0.0 Unit. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
This course, for those interested in finding and retaining employment, focuses on developing the language skills necessary to identify
a job and pursue the written application process. Assignments
include completing a master application, an online application, writing a resume and list of references, a cover letter, and thank-you note.
138
English as a Second Language (ESL)
MARIN.EDU
ESLV 014: ESL for Employment: Listening and
Speaking Emphasis
count and stress patterns, to become more intelligible and to gain
understanding of spoken English.
0.0 Unit. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
ESL 058B: Pronunciation for Non-Native English
Speakers II
This course, for those interested in finding and retaining employment, focuses on developing the language skills necessary to find
work. Emphasizes the oral and listening skills required to interact
effectively in applying for a job, participate in an oral interview, and
accept employment.
ESLV 015: ESL for Employment: Job Search Skills
0.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
This course is designed for those interested in finding and retaining
employment, focusing on developing the language skills necessary
to identify a job, pursue the written application process, participate
in an oral interview, and accept employment. Assignments include
completing a master application, an online application, writing a
resume and list of references, a cover letter, and thank-you note.
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CREDIT COURSES (ESL)
ESL 040L: Low Intermediate ESL Skills Lab
0.5-1 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. 1.5 laboratory
hours weekly for 0.5 student unit, or three laboratory hours weekly for
one student unit.
ESL students improve their English in this interactive computerbased multimedia course. This lab offers low intermediate students
the opportunity to practice their listening, pronunciation, speaking,
vocabulary, and grammar skills in a self-paced laboratory environment. American culture and ESL life skills are included.
ESL 053: Intermediate ESL: Writing and Grammar
2.0 Units. 4 lecture and 1 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This course introduces the conventions of standard written English
to intermediate ESL students and reviews basic grammar structures.
Emphasis is placed on sentence structure and the correct use of
tenses.
ESL 054: Intermediate ESL: Grammar
1.5 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This course reviews basic grammar structures for intermediate ESL
students. Emphasis is placed on the verb tenses.
ESL 056: Intermediate ESL: Words I (Vocabulary,
Spelling, Reading, and Discussion)
2.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test.
This course improves the reading comprehension and vocabulary
usage of non-native speakers of English. This course includes reading
skills, study skills, short stories and the reading of short novels.
ESL 058A: Pronunciation for Non-Native English
Speakers I
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test.
This course provides ESL students the opportunity to improve their
pronunciation of standard American English. Students practice the
vowel phoneme system in words, phrases, and in discourse; stress
and intonation patterns; linking; assimilation; and prominence to become more intelligible and to gain understanding of spoken English.
ESL 059: Review of Intermediate ESL
3.0 Units. 3.375 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This review course is designed for ESL students who have completed
or are in the process of completing the ESL 50 or 60 level, or for ESL
students who, through the ESL Placement Test, have qualified for the
ESL 60 level.
ESL 060: Intermediate ESL: Listening and Speaking
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test or completion of ESL 40L.
An intermediate course in listening and speaking communication
skills recommended for students enrolled in ESL 50-level or 60-level
courses. Students are introduced to formal and informal speaking
and listening skills to provide a bridge to educational and career
opportunities.
ESL 063: High Intermediate ESL: Writing and
Grammar
4.0 Units. 4 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test or completion of all 50-level ESL courses.
This course is suitable for the high intermediate student with a good
foundation in English grammar and writing. The class emphasizes
grammatical accuracy and writing a logical sequence of sentences in
organized paragraphs. Requires one hour weekly to be arranged in
the ESL Lab.
ESL 064: High Intermediate ESL: Grammar
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test or completion of all ESL 50-level courses.
This grammar course is designed to improve the language skills of
high intermediate ESL students. Requires one hour weekly to be
arranged in the ESL Lab.
ESL 066: High Intermediate ESL: Words II
(Vocabulary/Spelling/Reading/Discussion)
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test or completion of all 50-level ESL courses.
This course provides high intermediate ESL students with practice
reading stories, short novels, newspapers and other non-fiction
materials. Students are introduced to academic reading and study
skills, and learn to use the resources available at the COM Library.
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test.
ESL 068: American Topics
This course provides ESL students the opportunity to improve their
pronunciation of standard American English. Students practice the
sound system and the rhythm of the language, including syllable
This course helps students understand important American topics,
past and present, through lectures, reading, and discussion. Ex-
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
CATALOG 2015/2016
Environmental Landscaping
139
amples of topics include the education system, the American Dream,
and drugs and drug treatment.
and note taking skills and conduct interviews, give presentations and
lead discussion sessions.
ESL 070: Advanced Pronunciation through
Performance
ESL 083: Advanced ESL: Writing and Grammar
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test and completion of ESL 58A and 58B or ESL 60.
This course in advanced pronunciation is recommended for
intermediate and advanced English learners. Students improve their
listening and speaking through performance with skills necessary
for communication in English in and out of the classroom.
ESL 073: Low Advanced ESL: Writing and Grammar
4.0 Units. 4 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test or completion of all ESL 60-level courses.
In this course, low advanced ESL students review paragraph writing
and are introduced to the essay. Intermediate and advanced grammar structures and punctuation are reviewed.
ESL 074: Low Advanced ESL: Grammar
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test or completion of all 60-level ESL courses.
This course is designed for low advanced ESL students who need to
refine their understanding of grammar.
ESL 076: Low Advanced ESL: Words III (Vocabulary/
Spelling/Reading/Discussion)
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test or completion of all ESL 60-level courses.
This course improves the reading comprehension and academic
vocabulary of low advanced non-native speakers of English. This
course includes reading skills, study skills, novel reading, and library
research projects.
ESL 078: Current Events for ESL Students
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test or completion of all ESL 60-level courses.
This course introduces students to current events, with attention
given to contemporary local, national, and international events,
using newspapers, magazines, television, films, and radio. Students
develop greater awareness of global issues, applying the academic
skills they have learned in previous and concurrent ESL classes.
ESL 079: Review of Low Advanced ESL
3.0 Units. 3.375 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test.
This review course is designed for ESL students at the low advanced
level, who have completed or are in the process of completing the ESL
70 or 80 level, or for ESL students who, through the ESL Placement
Test, have qualified for the ESL 80 level.
ESL 080: Advanced ESL: Listening and Speaking for
Social, Academic and Workplace Situations
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test or completion of all ESL 70-level courses.
This course in listening and speaking skills is recommended for
low-advanced to advanced ESL students. It helps students improve
the listening and speaking skills necessary to participate in college,
workplace and everyday life situations. Students practice listening
4.0 Units. 4 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test and completion of all 70-level ESL courses.
This ESL course is suitable for the advanced student with a strong
foundation in English grammar and writing. The course is designed
to review and build upon grammar and writing skills, enabling the
student to function in academic courses.
ESL 084: Advanced ESL: Grammar
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL
Placement Test and completion of all 70-level ESL courses.
This course is designed for advanced ESL students who need to refine
their understanding of grammar for academic writing.
ESL 086: Advanced ESL: Vocabulary and Reading
Skills
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ESL Placement
Test or completion of all 70-level ESL courses.
This course is designed to help advanced ESL students improve
reading comprehension and develop academic vocabulary. It also
improves study skills for more effective reading of textbooks and
other material, including short fiction.
ESL 088: Editing for ESL Students
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: concurrent
enrollment in ESL 083, ENGL 98SL, ENGL 120SL, or other composition
courses.
This course is designed for ESL students enrolled in advanced writing
courses; students learn to identify and correct errors of syntax, logic
and structure in their own writing at the final draft stage. Areas of
concentration include common errors in shifting tenses, grammar,
punctuation, logical organization, and paragraph/essay structure.
ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPING
Environmental landscaping is more than making the world around
us a beautiful place. It’s about creating environments that function
practically and in harmony with nature. It’s growing plants, establishing organic farms, designing spaces, and installing landscapes.
The courses are designed to meet the needs of both the home or
professional landscaper, farmer, or gardener. The field is appealing to
those wanting to work in outdoor occupations, as well as those who
like to work with high-tech equipment. This curriculum is designed
so that graduates, depending on their interest, abilities, and achievement, may qualify for employment in a wide variety of careers.
Career Options
Arboriculture (Tree Care), Commercial Landscape Management,
Environmental Planning, Interiorscape Design and Maintenance,
Landscape Design and Installation, Landscape Irrigation, Organic
Farming, Park Supervising, Residential and Estate Maintenance
Faculty
Fernando Agudelo-Silva
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8200
140
Environmental Landscaping
A.S. IN ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPING: LANDSCAPING,
ORGANIC FARMING AND GARDENING
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded)
This curriculum is designed so that graduates, depending on their
interests, abilities, and achievement, may qualify for employment in a
wide variety of careers.
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of
all requirements in the core program and completion of general
education and graduation requirements. Students who complete
only the required courses for the major will receive a Certificate of
Achievement. Additional Certificates of Achievement are available
in the ELND areas of Landscape and Garden Design and Landscape,
Organic Farm, and Garden Production. Note: Students are required
to complete English 150 for the associate degree. All students should
consult a counselor.
MARIN.EDU
ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPING COURSES (ELND)
ELND 101: Introductory Principles for Sustainable
Landscapes, Farms and Gardens
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introductory foundation in the practices of sustainable landscaping, farming, and gardening, this course is important for anyone
interested in using agricultural resources in an ecologically sound
way. It covers key concepts for the development and installation of
farms, gardens, or landscapes according to principles of ecological
sustainability, and includes concepts such as site analysis, plant selection, soils, and economic and social considerations. (CSU)
ELND 109F: Principles and Practices of Organic
Farming and Gardening - Fall
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ELND
109S Principles and Practices of Organic Farming and Gardening - Spring 3
Or
ELND
109F Principles and Practices of Organic Farming and Gardening - Fall
3
ELND
115S Plant Identification, Selection, and Propagation - Spring
3
ELND
115F Plant Identification, Selection, and Propagation - Fall
3
ELND
150
Integrated Pest Management in Landscapes, Farms, and Gardens
3
ELND
160
Soil: Ecology and Management
3
ELND
190
Irrigation of Landscapes, Farms, and Gardens
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
18
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT IN ENVIRONMENTAL
LANDSCAPING: LANDSCAPE AND GARDEN DESIGN
Academic study and hands-on training in the basic skills and
procedures of organic farming and gardening. Topics include applied
soil science, managing long-term soil fertility, establishment of
greenhouse systems and applicable methods of plant propagation, a
review of basic botany for gardeners, site analysis, and Spring plant
selection. (CSU)
REQUIREMENTS
ELND
101
Introductory Principles of Sustainable Landscapes, Farms, and Gardens3
ELND
115S Plant Identification, Selection, and Propagation - Spring
3
ELND
115F Plant Identification, Selection, and Propagation - Fall
3
ELND 120A Landscape Ecology 1.5
ELND 120B Landcape Ecology
1.5
ELND
140
Introductory Principles of Sustainable Landscape Design
3
ELND
160
Soil: Ecology and Management
3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
18
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT IN ENVIRONMENTAL
LANDSCAPING: LANDSCAPE, ORGANIC FARM, AND GARDEN
PRODUCTION
REQUIREMENTS
ELND
109F Principles and Practices of Organic Farming and Gardening - Fall
3
ELND
109S Principles and Practices of Organic Farming and Gardening - Spring 3
ELND
120A Landscape Ecology
1.5
ELND
120B Landscape Ecology
1.5
ELND
150
Integrated Pest Management in Landscapes, Farms, and Gardens
3
ELND
160
Soil: Ecology and Management
3
ELND 190
Irrigation of Landscapes, Farms and Gardens
3
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
18
Academic study and hands-on training in the basic skills and
procedures of organic farming and gardening. Topics include applied
soil science, management of long-term soil fertility, establishment of
greenhouse systems and applicable methods of plant propagation,
a review of basic botany for gardeners, site analysis, and Fall plant
selection. (CSU)
ELND 109S: Principles and Practices of Organic
Farming and Gardening - Spring
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ELND 115F: Plant Identification, Selection and
Propagation - Fall
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course focuses on plants adapted to our climate to create appropriate, sustainable gardens and landscapes. It includes discussions
of specific plants, walks in varied landscapes, field trips to local
botanical gardens, and demonstrations of seasonal selection of planting materials. (CSU)
ELND 115S: Plant Identification, Selection and
Propagation - Spring
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory course familiarizes students with appropriate
plants for Bay Area gardens and landscapes. It features live specimens, in-depth lectures, and field trips. Each plant is discussed
with details of name, origin, habitat, growth pattern, size, cultural
requirements, methods of propagation, and botanical descriptions.
(CSU)
CATALOG 2015/2016
ELND 116F: California Plant Identification, Selection
and Propagation - Fall
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course explores many facets of California native plants, including propagation, selection, design, uses, cultural needs, ecological
adaptations, and identification of important species. The course
focuses on fall-blooming and fruiting species, and is important in
determining appropriate landscape and urban garden concepts for
sustainable gardens throughout the Bay Area and beyond. (CSU/UC)
ELND 116S: California Plant Identification, Selection
and Propagation - Spring
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course explores many facets of California native plants, including propagation, selection, design, uses, cultural needs, ecological
adaptations, and identification of important species. The course
focuses on spring establishment of native plants, and is important in
determining appropriate landscape and urban garden concepts for
sustainable gardens throughout the Bay Area and beyond. (CSU/UC)
ELND 120A: Landscape Ecology
1.5 Units. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
This class, essential for anyone interested in ecologically sound
gardening and landscaping, covers evolution of ecological concepts,
structure and function of plant ecosystems, factors that regulate
plant communities, the effects of climate on plant communities, and
their relevance for gardening and landscaping. This short class is the
first half of a two-class sequence on plant ecology. (CSU)
ELND 120B: Landscape Ecology
1.5 Units. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class, essential for anyone interested in ecologically sound
gardening and landscaping, covers ecological interactions that regulate plant communities such as biogeochemical cycles, predation,
parasitism, disease, competitions, and their relevance for gardening,
landscaping and ecological studies. This short class is the second half
of a two-class sequence on plant ecology. (CSU)
ELND 140: Introductory Principles of Sustainable
Landscape Design
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course covers trends and principles of landscape design,
landscape drawing, basic site analysis, plant traits, and sustainability
considerations. (CSU)
ELND 150: Integrated Pest Management in
Landscapes, Farms and Gardens
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course covers principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM),
applied to manage a wide variety of life forms including insects,
mites, microbes, and unwanted vegetation in landscapes, farms, and
gardens. It includes arthropod, microbe and unwanted plant identification, and strategies, tools, and techniques to reduce their impact
on plants. The course addresses cultural, biological, and chemical
management methods. (CSU)
Environmental Landscaping
141
ELND 160: Soil: Ecology and Management
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken
as BIOL 160 or ELND 160; credit awarded for only one course.
This class explores how soil forms and develops, its physical and
biological components, and their interrelationships. Topics include
a historical review of soil/human interactions, soil formation from
parent material, classification, physical properties such as texture and
structure, life forms found in the soil and their interrelationships,
relationships between soil properties and soil’s ability to support
plant growth, and approaches to use soil in a sustainable manner.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
ELND 170: Landscape, Farm and Garden
Construction
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys materials and techniques used in the construction of landscapes, farms, and gardens. Topics include irrigation,
drainage, and soil amendments. Students learn to read and interpret
plans and specifications, as well as elementary surveying and grade
interpretation. The course also provides information necessary for
the California Landscape Contractors examination. (CSU)
ELND 180: Landscape, Farm and Garden Estimating
and Management
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ELND
170.
A study of business practices related to the construction of landscapes, farms, and gardens. Includes publications for new jobs, site
evaluation, landscape plans (design), and specifications. Topics
include office and business practices for the landscape contracting
industry, bid document breakdowns, price comparison, capital
expenditures, preparation of bid documents, subcontracting, certificates of insurance, lien notices, and as-built drawings. (CSU)
ELND 190: Irrigation of Landscapes, Farms and
Gardens
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class covers topics essential to providing water, in an ecologically sensitive manner, to plants in farms, gardens, and landscapes.
Concepts include soil/water/plant/weather relationships, basic
hydraulics, site information, irrigation requirements, and the design
and installation of diverse types of irrigation systems. (CSU)
ELND 201: Special Topics in Landscape Design
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: A
drafting course or an introductory course in landscape design.
This class explores current and specialized landscape design. Topics
include current design trends in light of ecological, social, economic
and technology circumstances. (CSU)
ELND 202: Specialized Landscape Construction
Projects
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class explores specialized aspects of landscape materials and
construction. Topics include tools, techniques, materials (such as
wood, stone, brick, tile and concrete), and processes necessary to
build a wide variety of structures in landscapes. Students participate
in class projects to build diverse structures utilized in gardens and
landscapes. (CSU)
142
Environmental Science
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
Faculty
Fernando Agudelo-Silva, Becky Brown, Paul da Silva, Joseph Mueller
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSES (ENVS)
ENVS 138: Introduction to Environmental Sciences
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as
ENVS 138 or BIOL 138; credit awarded for only one course.
This science-based course takes an interdisciplinary approach to
understanding the environmental crisis that confronts us all. Discussions focus on understanding ecosystem services, how humans
interfere with earth’s life support systems, and how to deal with the
environmental problems we face. Field studies may include visits
to restoration projects, local ecosystems, and local environmental
conferences. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 or B-2 & B-3,
IGETC Area 5A or 5B
ENVS 141: Global Climate Change: Science, Impact
and Solutions
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 141,
ENVS 141, or GEOG 141; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces scientific, ecological, and economic issues
underlying the threat of global climate change. It also develops an
integrated approach to analysis of climate change processes, and an
assessment of proposed policy measures to develop solutions. (CSU)
ENVS 142: Environmental Policy and DecisionMaking
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as ENVS 142,
BIOL 142, or GEOL 142; credit awarded for only one course.
Environmental policy and subsequent regulation is one way of
managing the relationship between human activities and their effects
on natural ecosystems. This course is a study of federal, state, and
local environmental legislation and its history. The course chronicles
America’s awakening to environmental issues and the ways in which
decisions affecting the environment occur. The content of the course
is vital to environmental policymakers, scientists, and advocates.
(CSU/UC)
ENVS 143: Stewardship of Marin Parks and Open
Spaces
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as
ENVS 143 or BIOL 143; credit awarded for only one course.
Besides making Marin a desirable place in which to live and travel, its
nonurbanized park and open space areas carry with them a great responsibility: preservation and enhancement of their best qualities for
present and future generations. Fulfilling this responsibility involves
a diverse mix of philosophical, legislative, biological, sociological
and logistical challenges. The course includes essential background
material, interviews with current management personnel, and field
visits to parkland and open space areas of special interest. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
ENVS 147: Food, People, Health and the
Environment
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as
ENVS 147 or BIOL 147; credit awarded for only one course.
This course examines the past, present and future of the global
food system; inputs, outputs, and practices of agriculture, the chief
method for securing food from the environment and the basis of
human civilization; and the distribution, accessibility, and consumption of food by people throughout the world. The class presents
possible solutions to some of the most pressing problems facing the
human race as we struggle to feed ourselves and be healthy, while
enhancing our overall environment. (CSU/UC)
ENVS 148: Marin County Agriculture
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as
ENVS 148 or BIOL 148; credit awarded for only one course.
This course focuses on one of Marin County’s most significant
human activities in terms of use of land and other natural resources,
preservation of a valuable way of life, generation of economic benefits
and formation of the unique character of the local environment. It
offers a general agricultural overview; historical background and
explanation of important biological, social and economic processes;
and insights provided by current Marin County agricultural systems
including beef and dairy, poultry, shellfish, flowers, fruits and
vegetables, from planning and production through marketing and
consumption. Includes field trips to notable local farms. (CSU)
ENVS 150: Environmental Science Seminar and
Fieldwork
3.0 Units. 1 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. Prerequisite: BIOL 138
or GEOL 138. May be taken as ENVS 150 or BIOL 150; credit awarded
for only one course.
This overview of the career options in environmental science
introduces potential employers in the field and provides firsthand
experience of working to solve environmental problems. After receiving general career information, students work with community agencies or organizations according to procedures established by mutual
agreement. Students meet in class on campus for initial orientation,
to discuss progress during the semester, and to present results of their
experiences at the end. (CSU)
Ethnic Studies
CATALOG 2015/2016
ETHNIC STUDIES
The Ethnic Studies course offerings are intended for those who
desire a deeper understanding of American minority peoples and
their communities. Students receive a unique, interdisciplinary
educational experience with courses emphasizing the historical and
philosophical impact of the cultures of African American, Hispanic
American, Asian American, and American Indian peoples, and their
contributions to the culture of the United States.
Career Options
Art Historian, Biographer, Curriculum Developer, Education
Administrator, Environmental Studies, Global Studies, Historian,
International Affairs, Journalist, Librarian, Market Research Analyst, News Analyst, Research Specialist, Teacher, Writer
Faculty
Walter B. Turner
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES (ETST)
ETST 108: History of Arts of the Americas
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as ETST 108,
Art 108, or HUM 108; credit awarded for only one course.
This course covers a selection of the art and visual culture of the
Americas: North, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean.
Art of the United States focuses on works from the culturally diverse
peoples of the Bay Area. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C & G, CSU Area
C-1, IGETC Area 3A
ETST 110: Introduction to Ethnic Studies
143
century focuses on the history, social movements, and political
aspirations of African Americans in the context of American
history. Emphasizes the African Diaspora, Black Nationalism, the
development of independent separate institutions, and the historical
background to the civil rights movement. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B
or F & G, CSU Area D-3 or D-6, IGETC Area 4C, CSU US History,
Constitution, and American Ideals
ETST 121: History of Latinos in the United States
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This historical survey of the Latino/Latina experience in North
America from pre-Columbian experiences through the contemporary era focuses on the development of a distinctive Latino culture
and its political, social, and economic manifestations in the context
of American history. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or F & G, CSU Area
D-3 or D-6, IGETC Area 4C, CSU US History, Constitution, and
American Ideals
ETST 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in
Ethnic Studies
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Eligibility for
ENGL 150. Can be taken as ECON 125, ETST 125, HIST 125, POLS 125,
or SSC 125; credit awarded for only one course.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods of research in the social sciences and develops skills required
to organize such thought and research into effective, college level
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
ETST 128: Art Field Trips
A survey course designed to promote academic and professional
knowledge of, and sensitivity to, historical and cultural developments
important to understanding ethnic groups and their experiences
in the United States. Students examine the specific historical and
contemporary legacies of race, class, prejudice, diversity, and immigration. The course introduces topics such as multiculturalism,
ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, and migration. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area B & G, CSU Area D-3, IGETC Area 4C
1-4 Units. 0.75 lecture and 0.75 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Can be taken as Art 128, ETST 128, or HUM 128; credit awarded for
only one course.
ETST 111: History of African Americans (A)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ENGL
120. Please note: ETST 111 is not a prerequisite for ETST 112.
A
historical survey of the African/African American experience from
developments on the African continent to the beginning of the
twentieth century in American history. The course explores Nile
Valley cultures, the influences of trade and Islam, European-African
interactions, Caribbean and South American developments, slavery
in North America, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the growth of
a distinctive African American culture. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B
or F & G, CSU Area D-3 or D-6, IGETC Area 4C, CSU US History,
Constitution, and American Ideals
ETST 112: History of African Americans (B)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ENGL 120.
Please note: ETST 111 is not a prerequisite for ETST 112.
This historical survey of the African American experience in the
United States from the American Revolution to the twenty-first
A complement to art history and studio art courses, this course
allows students to experience the art and architecture of sites like
New York, Mexico City, and Rome first-hand. Pre-trip lectures set
up background for an intensive field trip(s) that may include visits
to museums, galleries, libraries, artists’ studios, and to architectural
and archeological sites where lecture, discussion, and personal
exploration take place. May be used to bring students to a major
media-specific conference. (CSU)
ETST 151: Native American History
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory historical survey of Native American cultures of
North America from the pre-colonial period to the present emphasizes the diversity of North American Native cultures and their social
and political evolution. Key themes include issues of land, political
and social interactions with European cultures, and late-twentieth
century political and economic developments. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Areas B or F & G, CSU Area D-3 or D-6, IGETC Area 4C, CSU US
History, Constitution, and American Ideals
ETST 154: Native American Literature
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys Native American literature and culture, focusing
on the work of selected Native American authors, both poets and
144
Film/Video
fiction writers, and emphasizing the regional and cultural diversity of
Native American cultures and the social issues they face. The course
also develops students’ creative writing skills and their cultural
sensitivity. The goal of the class is to understand the Native American
experience in the context of Native American literature and the
history of this American hemisphere. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or C
& G, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
FILM/VIDEO
The curriculum is designed to provide theory and skills for those
who are interested in films, television and broadcast studio, whether
students’ goals be transfer, professional, or self-enrichment. The
production courses are hands-on, with equal emphasis on aesthetic
principles and technology.
Career Options
Animator, Announcer, Broadcast Technician, Camera Operator,
Disc Jockey, Engineering Technician, Film Director, Film Editor,
Freelance Film Maker, Light Technician, News Broadcaster, News
Director, Producer, Production Engineer, Program Assistant,
Reporter, Screenwriter, Sound Editor, Sound Recorder, Sportscaster,
Studio Technician, Teacher, Videotape Photographer, Writer
Faculty
Frank Crosby
Department Phone: 415-485-9348
A.A. IN COMMUNICATION, FILMMAKING OPTION
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
FILM
150
Introduction to Filmmaking
4
FILM
240
Advanced Production Projects
3
FILM
170
Workshop in Cinematography
3
FILM
175
Nonlinear Editing for Film and Video
3
Six additional units to be selected from the following:
FILM/HUM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4
FILM/HUM 109B History of Film: 1950 to the Present
4
COMM/JOUN 110 Introduction to Mass Communication and Media Literacy
3
COMM/JOUN 160 Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the Media
3
COMM 161
Introduction to Screenwriting
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
19
A.A. IN COMMUNICATION, SCREENWRITING OPTION
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
FILM/HUM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4
FILM/HUM 109B History of Film: 1950 to the Present
4
FILM
161
Introduction to Screenwriting
3
FILM
162* Advanced Film and Television Writing
(Must be taken twice for six units.)
6
FILM
150
Introduction to Filmmaking
4
One course selected from the following:
MARIN.EDU
COMM/JOUN 110 Introduction to Mass Communication and Media Literacy
COMM/JOUN 160 Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the Media
COMM 162
Advanced Film and Television Writing
Any other film or television production course
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
3
3
3
4
24-25
FILM/VIDEO COURSES (FILM; COMM)
FILM 109A: History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as FILM 109A
or HUM 109A; credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers a chronological survey of narrative film as art,
business, technology, and politics from the beginning of the movies
in the 1890s to post World War II. Periods and movements covered
include the Silent Era, German Expressionism, Soviet Avant Garde
and editing of the 1920s, French classicism, American Studio Period
and sound, as well as the history of censorship in the United States.
Classroom screenings of representative films. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
FILM 109B: History of Film: 1950 to Present
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as FILM 109B
or HUM 109B; credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers a chronological and international survey of film
as art, business, technology, and as an expression of the culture
and politics of the times and places from which it emerges. Topics
include post-1940s film noir, neorealism, the French New Wave, “art
cinema,” documentary film, national cinemas throughout the world,
and independent film directors and movements in the 21st century.
Classroom screenings of representative films. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
FILM 140: Film Directing
3.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
In this course students learn the theory, process and practical
application of directing narrative, documentary, commercial,
promotional and training motion-picture projects. The focus of
the class is on how the director functions in the process of casting,
script breakdown, scene blocking, development and interpretation of
content/scripts and crew functions. This course is for those considering a career in media or who use media for personal expression or
enjoyment. (CSU)
FILM 150: Introduction to Film and Video Production
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is for students who are considering a career in motionpicture imaging or who want to learn about film and video production for personal enrichment. Students learn motion-picture theory
and process, and use digital video, motion-picture film and computers to develop basic motion-picture imaging and visual communication skills. (CSU)
FILM 151: Video Production: Shooting on Location
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
In this hands-on class, students develop a basic set of video production and visual communication skills. Using small and lightweight
digital video equipment, working individually and in groups,
students learn how to shoot video on location for documentary,
Fire Technology
CATALOG 2015/2016
145
narrative, music, experimental, interview, personal and promotional
projects. (CSU)
dialogue, plot motivation, development of characters’ psychological
needs, and plot tightening for pacing are given. (CSU)
FILM 161: Introduction to Screenwriting
COMM 175: Nonlinear Editing for Film and Video
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the basics of dramatic writing, emphasizing
the three-act structure of the feature film screenplay and plot logic.
Students analyze feature films and screenplays for structure, pacing,
and characterization; complete a treatment or outline for a feature
film; and practice writing scenes in the correct format. (CSU)
This course provides basic instruction in the theory and practical
application of nonlinear editing for film and video using nonlinear
workstations such as Avid and Final Cut Pro. The emphasis is on
developing skills through hands-on work and practice. (CSU)
FILM 162: Intermediate Narrative Story Writing for
Cinema, Television, and Gaming
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisites: COMM 140, 150,
166, and 170.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: FILM 161 or COMM
161.
In this intermediate screenwriting course, students master the conceptual, creative and technical skills needed to write feature-length
screenplays. Topics include dialogue, subtext, plot logic, character
motivation, and plot tightening for pacing. (CSU)
FILM 170: Workshop in Cinematography
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FILM 150 or COMM
150.
This intermediate-level class teaches techniques of cinematography
and lighting via classroom instruction, exercises, and studio and
location shooting on film and video. Students learn how to maintain
camera and lighting equipment, and are introduced to the responsibilities of camera and lighting crew positions. (CSU)
FILM 240: Advanced Production Projects
3 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FILM 150 or COMM 150.
Advisories: FILM 140, 166, and 170, or COMM 140, 166, and 170.
An advanced-level seminar where students produce advanced film
and video projects, work as crew on the projects of fellow students,
and gainpractical experience in film and video postproduction.
(CSU)
COMM 140: Film Direction
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The theory, process, and practical application of directing narrative,
documentary, commercial, promotional, and training motion-picture projects. The class focuses on how the director functions in the
process of casting, script breakdown, scene blocking, development,
interpretation of script/content, and crew functions. (CSU)
COMM 161: Introduction to Screenwriting
COMM 240: Advanced Production Projects
This advanced level seminar allows students to work on their secondyear film projects. It includes a critical and analytical evaluation
of students’ films, working as crew on other advanced students’
projects, and completing postproduction work. (CSU)
FIRE TECHNOLOGY
These courses provide occupational education and training for men
and women who wish to pursue coursework in fire technology.
Department Phone: 415-883-2211, Ext. 8108
Emergency Medical Technician Training Course Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement. The Emergency Medical Technician Training Course certificate
meets the requirements of the California Health and Safety Code for
basic EMT-1 training. The approving authority is the Marin County
Emergency Medical Service Agency. This course completion is valid
for two years from the completion date and shall be recognized
statewide. Note: This is not an EMT-1 Certificate.
REQUIREMENTUNITS
FIRE
112
Emergency Medical Technician-1
7
FIRE TECHNOLOGY COURSES (FIRE)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
FIRE 112: Emergency Medical Technician I
This course teaches the basics of dramatic writing, emphasizing
the three-act structure of the feature film screenplay and plot logic.
Students learn to write to create sympathy for characters, using
interesting dramatic and comedic conflict, and developing a believable transformational arc for the characters. Students analyze feature
films and screenplays for structure, pacing, and characterization,
complete a treatment or outline for a feature film, and practice writing scenes in the correct format. (CSU)
7.0 Units. 5.5 lecture and 4.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: First Aid for
Public Safety Personnel (FIRE 215 or KIN 215) or equivalent and CPR for
Health Care Providers. Previous EMT-1, EMT-2, EMT-P accepted. Plus 4
testing hours to be arranged.
COMM 162: Advanced Film and Television Writing
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: COMM 161.
In this workshop-seminar course, students present original worksin-progress for rewrite suggestions. Lessons in issues of subtext,
This course provides instruction in the theory and skills required
for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT-1) scope of practice,
and eligibility to sit for the National Registry of Emergency Medical
Technician (NREMT) certification exam. Supervised clinical experience with emergency ambulance providers and hospital emergency
room is included. A health clearance, drug screening clearance, and
a criminal background clearance are required by clinical agencies. (CSU) For more information, please refer to the department
website:www.marin.edu/firetech.
146
French
MARIN.EDU
FIRE 120A: Emergency Medical Technician-1
Refresher A
FRENCH
1.5 Units. 1.5 lecture and 0.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Current EMT-1 Certification.
Bonjour! French is spoken by over 220 million people worldwide.
Demographers predict that by 2025 it will be the most widely spoken
language in Europe, and that by 2050 there will be over 700 million
French speakers around the world. Currently, French is an official
language of 29 countries, second only to English in this category.
French is one of the working languages of numerous international
organizations including the United Nations and the European
Union. In addition, French has played an important role in art, literature, film, cuisine, viticulture, sports, politics, international business,
science, medicine, and global communication. Proficiency in French
and knowledge of French-speaking cultures enhance any profession
and field of specialization, and enrich one’s intellectual growth.
This course, required for recertification of EMT-1 personnel, provides didactic and skills instruction, updating students in all areas of
emergency room prehospital care as contained in the EMT-1 scope of
practice. (CSU)
FIRE 120B: Emergency Medical Technician-1
Refresher B
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Current
EMT-1 Certification. Plus 4 testing hours to be arranged.
This course, required for recertification of EMT-1 personnel, provides didactic and skills instruction, updating students in all areas of
emergency room prehospital care as contained in the EMT-1 scope of
practice. (CSU)
FIRE 215: Advanced First Aid/First Responder
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May also be
taken as KIN 215; credit awarded for only one course.
This introductory course is designed for lay persons interested in,
or for professionals who require, First Responder training per State
of California (Title 22) or U.S. DOT standards. The class teaches the
basic pre-hospital care skills needed to render care at the scene of an
emergency until more highly trained emergency medical response
personnel arrive. Includes basic anatomy and body systems; lifting
and moving patients; airway management; patient assessment;
medical, behavioral, and trauma emergencies; terrorism awareness;
and an overview of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system.
This course is a prerequisite for the Emergency Medical Technician
Program. (CSU/UC)
FIRE 255: Wildland Fire Fighting
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
A basic course designed to give the student a fundamental understanding of wildland fire behavior, safety equipment, dozer safety,
construction of handlines, and fire control. May be taken four times
for credit. (CSU)
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Film Industry, Foreign Correspondent,
Foreign Service Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business, Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel
Agent, Viticulture.
Faculty
Nadia Sanko
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in French
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
A.A. IN FRENCH
Students may take classes at either campus to fulfill requirements
for the major. Students who complete the requirements listed below,
plus additional general education and graduation requirements,
will be awarded the associate degree. Note: Students are required to
complete English 150 for the associate degree. All students should
consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
FREN
101
Elementary French I
5
FREN
102
Elementary French II
5
FREN
203
Intermediate French III
5
In addition, complete one course from the following:
FREN
108A French Culture and Literature Go to the Cinema
3
FREN
108B French Culture and Literature Go to the Cinema
3
FREN
110
Conversational French I
4
FREN
112
Conversational French II
4
FREN
114
Conversational French III
4
FREN
204
Intermediate French IV
4
FREN
225
Advanced French I
3
FREN
226
Advanced French II
3
FREN
249A Independent Study
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
MINIMUM OF 18
French Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within a program. Skills
French
CATALOG 2015/2016
Certificates require less than 18 units and are shorter in duration
than the Certificate of Achievement.
The French Skills Certificate provides a way for students to verify
that they have reached a level of proficiency in the French language.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
FREN
101
Elementary French I
5
FREN
102
Elementary French II
5
FREN
203
Intermediate French III
5
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
15
FRENCH COURSES (FREN)
FREN 101: Elementary French I
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A beginning course offering study and practice in speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing French, along with an exploration of cultural aspects of the French-speaking world. The three-hour
weekly laboratory requirement enhances the student’s verbal and
comprehension skills through the use of audiovisual materials.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 6: UC
Language other than English
FREN 102: Elementary French II
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 101.
147
gender, race, music, dance, and cuisine. Students view a variety of
classic and contemporary films and participate in French conversational activities designed to apply and expand on grammar concepts
and vocabulary covered in lower-level language courses. Films may
vary by semester. (CSU)
FREN 110: Conversational French I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Use of modern colloquial French in conversation with elementary
grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the
spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar. Oral practice
in speaking, understanding, and correct pronunciation of French,
using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations. (CSU)
FREN 112: Conversational French II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 110.
Continued use of modern colloquial French in conversation with
elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct
pronunciation of French, using audiovisual materials depicting
everyday situations. (CSU)
FREN 114: Conversational French III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 112.
Further emphasis is placed on the structure of the language, verbal
communication, and understanding of French culture. Continued
use of the language laboratory for further mastery. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other
than English
Continued use of modern colloquial French in conversation with
elementary grammar. Designed for students wishing to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct
pronunciation of French, using audiovisual materials depicting
everyday situations. (CSU)
FREN 108A: French Culture and Literature Go to the
Cinema
FREN 203: Intermediate French III
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent.
This course introduces students to films inspired by classic, significant, and, in many instances, famous literary pieces, emphasizing
connections between the novels/stories and their artistic expression
in film. This course examines trends in French literature and film,
and establishes connections between literature, film, and sociocultural and political changes in French-speaking countries. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
FREN 108B: French Culture and Literature Go to the
Cinema
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent.
This course introduces students to films inspired by twentieth-century cultural developments in French society. The course examines
trends in French literature, and establishes connections between
socio-cultural and political changes in French-speaking countries
and their artistic expression in literature and film. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
FREN 108C: French Conversation and Culture
Through Film
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hr/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent.
This summer French film course is a fun and manageable way to
maintain and develop French language skills during the summer session. Through film, the course introduces important socio-cultural
topics including immigration, political oppression, social resistance,
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 102. Advisory:
Concurrent enrollment in FREN 114.
Review and expansion of grammatical concepts with continued
emphasis on verbal communication. Introduction to literary and
journalistic readings for vocabulary and idiom expansion as well
as cultural enrichment. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
FREN 204: Intermediate French IV
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 203.
A further study of the French language with a review of the grammar
and extensive readings from the literature and press with emphasis
on verbal communication. An exploration of the use of French and
the impact of French culture outside of France. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other
than English
FREN 225: Advanced French I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 204.
This course aims to expand the student’s knowledge of the French
language and civilization through the study of grammar, literature,
and the French press, with particular emphasis on present-day
France. Additional emphasis is placed on an advanced level of verbal
communication. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
148
Geography
FREN 226: Advanced French II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: FREN 225.
Advanced French language and civilization through the study of
grammar, literature, and the French press, with particular emphasis
on present-day France. Advanced-level practice of verbal communication in French. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
GEOGRAPHY
There is a wide diversity of careers that geography offers. Possible
avenues for specialization include business, government, teaching,
cartography, conservation, land use, photogrammetry, climatology,
soil and agriculture, urban and regional planning, resource evaluation, industrial location sites, and marketing research.
Career Options
Cartographer, City Planner, Computer Mapper, Geographic Analyst,
International Economist, Land Officer, Location Analyst, Map
Curator, Market Researcher, News and Travel Magazine Editor, Soil
Conservationist, Teacher, Transportation Planner
Faculty
Dayna Quick
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
A.A.-T. IN GEOGRAPHY
Associate in Arts in Geography for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Geography for Transfer
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses (6-7 Units):
GEOG 101
The Physical Environment
3
And
GEOG 101L Physical Environment Laboratory
1
GEOG 102
The Human Environment
3
List A - select two to three courses (6-9 units):
GEOG 109
Geography of Calironia
3
GEOG 125
Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
3
GEOG 112
Meteorology and Climatology
3
List B - select two courses (6 units):
Any course from List A not already used
3
ANTH
102
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3
MARIN.EDU
GEOL
120
Physical Geology
Total Major Units
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE):
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives (IGETC/CSU-GE)::
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
3
19
10-13 units/10-13 units
37 units/39 units
14-17 units/12-15 units
60
GEOGRAPHY COURSES (GEOG)
GEOG 101: The Physical Environment
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Description, explanation and world distribution of the natural phenomena that constitute man’s physical environment. The phenomena
surveyed include earth-sun relationships, weather, climate, soils, and
landforms. Principles of map construction and interpretation are
also studied. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area
5A
GEOG 101L: Physical Environment Laboratory
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: GEOG 101 or concurrent
enrollment.
Practical observations and applications of the geographic grid,
atlases and topographic maps; rocks and tectonic activity, weather
and climate, and natural vegetation and soils. Exercises are designed
to supplement GEOG 101. Classes meet periodically at off-campus
locations within Marin County and students are expected to provide
their own transportation. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1
and B-3, IGETC Area 5C
GEOG 102: The Human Environment
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course offers students an overview of the interrelationships between human societies and the environment. It examines population
distribution and growth, migrations, environmental modifications,
and the spatial distribution of phenomena such as language, religion,
economic systems, and urbanization. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU
Area D-5, IGETC Area 4
GEOG 109: Geography of California
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A thematic approach to the state’s issues, processes and topics
relevant to geography including climate, landforms, natural vegetation, water resources, cultural landscape, ethnic diversity, urban
and agricultural regions and the economy. The course explores the
physical and human landscapes that have evolved as a result of the
human-environment interface. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A or B, CSU
Area D-5, IGETC Area 4
GEOG 112: Meteorology and Climatology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This survey course in climatology and meteorology introduces students to the atmospheric sciences and the consequences that face the
floral and faunal assemblage of the earth as man and nature continue
to alter the atmosphere and subsequent climate. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
Geology
CATALOG 2015/2016
GEOG 116: Field Geography, Marin County
1.5 Units. 3 lecture and 4 lab hrs/wk for 6 weeks. No prerequisite.
Each offering includes field exposure and experience with data collection techniques related to Marin’s bio-geographic zones, geologic
bedrock and soils characteristics, hydrological, atmospheric, and
cultural geographic characteristics. (CSU)
GEOG 125: Introduction to Geographic Information
Systems
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Familiarity with
Windows operating system and software is highly recommended.
This interdisciplinary course explores Geographic Information
Systems (GIS) for acquisition, storage, management, analysis, modification, and presentation of spatial data. Using lecture with hands-on
computer time, the course introduces GIS through the use of ArcGIS
software, Google Earth, and GPS software. Includes a project module
that stresses accession and application of data in the student’s chosen
academic area of interest. (CSU/UC)
GEOG 127: Introduction to Spatial Analysis Using
Geographic Information Systems
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: GEOG 125.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the true power of Geographic
Information Systems (GIS) Spatial Analysis. Using lecture with
hands-on computer time, the course teaches students how to analyze
spatial data and find hidden patterns or relationships, and present
these results in graphic form using ArcGIS software. Includes a
project module that stresses accession and application of spatial data
in the student’s chosen academic area of interest. (CSU)
GEOG 141: Global Climate Change: Science, Impact
and Solutions
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as BIOL 141,
ENVS 141, or GEOG 141; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces scientific, ecological, and economic issues
underlying the threat of global climate change. It also develops an
integrated approach to analysis of climate change processes, and an
assessment of proposed policy measures to develop solutions. (CSU)
GEOLOGY
Geologists are curious about the world in which they live. The earth
is their laboratory. Geology is the fundamental discipline used to
explain the natural earth systems that shape our changing planet.
Today the majority of geoscientists are employed in the environmental fields, but many are also employed in the exploration for and
production of natural resources.
Career Options
Aerial Photo Interpreter, Earth Historian, Environmental Geologist,
Exploration Geophysicist, Field Geologist, Geochemist, Geological
Engineer, Geological Technician, Geology Drafter, Hydrologist,
Laboratory Research Worker, Map Editor, Meteorologist, Mining
Geologist, Oceanographer, Paleontological Assistant, Paleontologist,
Park Naturalist, Petroleum Geologist, Petrologist, Prospector, Research Scientist, Scientific Illustrator, Sedimentologist, Seismologist,
Soils Engineer, Teacher, Technical Writer, Tester, Weather Observer
149
Faculty
Steven Newton
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
A.S.-T. IN GEOLOGY
Associate in Science in Geology for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Science in Geology for Transfer
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units* or 90 quarter units that are eligible
for transfer to the California State University, including both of
the following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
GEOL
120
Physical Geology
3
GEOL
120L Physical Geology Laboratory
1
GEOL
121
Historical Geology
4
CHEM 131
General Chemistry I
5
CHEM 132
General Chemistry II
5
MATH 123
Analytic Geometry and Calculus
5
MATH 124
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
5
Total Major Units
28
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE): 7 units/7 units
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
37 units/39 units
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives (IGETC/CSU-GE):
2 units/0 units
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
60
A.S. IN GEOLOGY
While students may take classes at both campuses, the majority of
courses required for the major are offered at the Kentfield Campus.
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
CHEM 131
General Chemistry I
5
CHEM 132
General Chemistry II
5
GEOL
120
Physical Geology
3
GEOL
120L Physical Geology Lab
1
GEOL
121
Historical Geology
4
GEOL
125
Field Geology I
2.5
Or
GEOL
126
Field Geology II
2
GEOL
201
Elementary Mineralogy
4
MATH 104
Plane Trigonometry
3
PHYS
108A General Physics I
4
PHYS
108B General Physics II
4
150
Geology
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
MARIN.EDU
35-35.5
GEOLOGY COURSES (GEOL)
GEOL 099: General Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as GEOL 99
or BIOL 99; credit awarded for only one course.
This late-start course is designed for students who have not reached
the level of success they desired in high school or college science
courses and for individuals returning to school after an extended
absence. The course covers basic scientific principles and concepts
of the physical and life sciences and prepares students to move into
other science classes with the information, understanding, and
skills required to succeed. Introductory topics in biology, chemistry,
geography, geology, meteorology, and physics are discussed.
GEOL 110: Earth Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Not open to students who
have taken or are taking GEOL 120.
This course introduces the basic principles of geology, emphasizing plate tectonics, mineralogy, petrology, paleontology, and the
formation of landforms. Field trips to local areas of interest. This
nonlaboratory course is intended for non-majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 114: Geology of California
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the geological processes responsible for the
formation of this state’s incredibly diverse and strikingly beautiful
landscape. Emphasizes the tectonic and erosional forces that have
formed and continue to alter California’s landforms and rich mineral
resources. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 101: Geological Field Excursions to National
Parks
GEOL 115: Volcanoes
1.0 Unit. 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: GEOL 102. There
will be three 2-day field trips.
This course on the nature and force of volcanic eruptions acquaints
students with the earth’s major volcanic landforms, the tectonic
processes responsible for their eruptive character, the specific types
of eruptions they generate, and the rock forms they produce. (CSU)
An opportunity to see and understand more fully the geology,
landforms, and natural environment of national parks. The course is
repeatable if different national parks are studied. (CSU)
GEOL 102: Geologic Setting of the National Parks
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
GEOL 116: Volcanoes and Earthquakes
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Designed to enrich the student’s knowledge of the natural environments of national parks, with emphasis on parks of the western
hemisphere. (CSU)
An introduction to the geological workings of Earth, focusing on
the study of the causes, processes, and products of volcanoes and
earthquakes. Great natural disasters and scientific efforts to predict
such disasters are studied. (CSU/UC)
GEOL 103: Environmental Geology
GEOL 120: Physical Geology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The fascinating study of the interactions of the human race and the
physical environment. The course centers on how mankind alters
the physical environment to better suit our immediate needs, and
how these alterations dictate the course of our future. The emphasis
is always on the balance between short-term reward and long-term
consequence. Field trips may be offered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A,
CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
GEOL 107: Introduction to Rocks and Minerals
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A course for anyone interested in learning about the types of rocks
and minerals that form the bedrock below their feet. Lectures focus
on the dynamic geo-tectonic processes that form these stones;
laboratory investigations develop skills and techniques necessary
for identification of common minerals and rocks. Field trips to local
sites of interest may be included. A portion of the course is dedicated
to optical mineralogy, petrography, and basic lapidary techniques.
(CSU)
GEOL 109: General Oceanography
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This survey course in ocean science introduces the physical and
biological processes that have formed, and maintain the health of,
the earth’s oceans and seas. The course is particularly important for
students considering a career in marine science or technology, and
is strongly encouraged for environmental science majors. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A study of the evolution of the Earth and the dynamic disequilibrium
that exists between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and
biosphere. The course focuses on rocks, minerals, geologic structures
and landforms. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC
Area 5A
GEOL 120L: Physical Geology Laboratory
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: GEOL 120 or concurrent
enrollment.
This laboratory involves hands-on interaction with minerals, rocks,
maps, and geologic computer programs. This course is meant as a
complement to GEOL 120 (Physical Geology), though students may
take the couses at separate times. Field trips to local areas of interest
may be included. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-3, IGETC
Area 5C
GEOL 121: Historical Geology
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: GEOL 120 and
120L.
The study of the evolution, over geologic time, of the land and life
forms of the planet Earth as observed in the rock and fossil record.
The course examines the dynamic changes in the surface condition
of the Earth’s environment--the very alterations that have caused five
mass extinctions in the biosphere. Students evaluate the evolution of
landscapes by observing them firsthand, in the field. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC Area 5A and 5C
Geology
CATALOG 2015/2016
151
GEOL 125: Field Geology I
GEOL 140: Environmental Field Techniques
2.5 Units. 78.75 hours of field investigation to be arranged over
three weekends, and 16 lecture hours to be arranged. Repeat: 1.
Prerequisite: GEOL 110 or 120 or concurrent enrollment.
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as GEOL 140 or
BIOL 140; credit awarded for only one course.
Lecture and field trips introduce geologic field studies, and acquaint
students with the geology and geologic history of Northern California. (CSU/UC)
GEOL 126: Field Geology II
2.0 Units. A ten-day field trip during the spring break and 12 lecture
hours to be arranged. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: GEOL 120. Corequisite:
GEOG 101. Contact instructor before enrolling.
The study of geologic phenomena in selected areas of the Western
United States. The course covers fundamental principles of field geology including rock identification, geologic mapping, and structural
interpretation of various terrains. Students must be in good physical
condition. (CSU/UC)
GEOL 127A: Extended Field Studies
1.5 Units. A seven-day field trip and eight lecture hours to be arranged.
Prerequisite: GEOL 120.
A one-week field investigation of a selected area. (CSU)
GEOL 127B: Extended Field Studies
3.0 Units. A fourteen-day field trip and sixteen lecture hours to be
arranged. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: GEOL 120.
This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of environmental
sampling and monitoring. Topics include surveying and mapping;
data collection and management; and hydrological, geological,
and biological assessment methods. This course is field based, and
emphasizes the mastery of practical field techniques. (CSU)
GEOL 142: Environmental Policy and DecisionMaking
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as GEOL 142,
BIOL 142, or ENVS 142; credit awarded for only one course.
Environmental policy and subsequent regulation is one way of
managing the relationship between human activities and their effects
on natural ecosystems. This course is a study of federal, state, and
local environmental legislation and its history. The course chronicles
America’s awakening to environmental issues and the ways in which
decisions affecting the environment occur. The content of the course
is vital to environmental policymakers, scientists, and advocates.
(CSU/UC)
GEOL 145: Ethics in Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as GEOL 145
or BIOL 145; credit awarded for only one course.
A two-week field investigation of selected areas in the Western
United States. Students emerge from this field experience with a
suite of rocks, minerals and fossils of various time periods, and an
appreciation of the unique geology of the West and of the science of
geology in general. (CSU)
This course explores some of the most pressing issues facing our
society today. It enables students to investigate and understand the
controversies surrounding current and future technologies, and
helps them make rational decisions when faced with situations in
their own lives and at the voting booth. The course is appropriate for
both science and nonscience majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C
GEOL 128: Geologic Studies of Point Reyes and the
San Andreas Fault
GEOL 201: Elementary Mineralogy
2.0 Units. A three-hour meeting is required at the beginning for
logistics. Five eight-hour sessions. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
Marin County is blessed with an extraordinary geology. This course
focuses on the Point Reyes Peninsula and its relationship to the
San Andreas Fault System. The course meets for a total of 40 hours
at geologically unique locations chosen to illustrate the geological
features and geological history of this portion of the county through
field lecture, direct observation and geological exercises. (CSU)
GEOL 129: Field Studies of Marin East of the San
Andreas Fault
2.0 Units. A three-hour meeting is required at the beginning for
logistics. Five eight-hour sessions. No prerequisite.
Marin County is blessed with an extraordinary geology. This field
lecture course focuses on the area east of the San Andreas Fault. The
course meets for a total of 40 hours at geologically unique locations
chosen to illustrate the geological features and geological history of
this portion of the county through field lecture, direct observation
and geological exercises. (CSU)
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: GEOL 120.
An introduction to the basic principles of mineralogy including
crystallography; the basic concepts of physical, chemical, and optical
mineralogy; and the formation and occurrence of mineral deposits.
Laboratory work includes the determination of minerals by physical properties, chemical tests with the use of the blowpipe, crystal
morphology, and the study of minerals in thin section under the
polarizing microscope. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1 or B-3, IGETC Area
5A and 5C
GEOL 250: Scientific Research and Reporting
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisories: BIOL 110 and
GEOL 120. Can be taken as GEOL 250 or BIOL 250; credit awarded for
only one course.
A hands-on, individualized course designed to walk learners step
by step through a scientific research project of their choice. The final
report of their findings will be delivered at a professional meeting.
This course is designed for science majors who have completed the
first year of their curriculum and desire a hands-on, real world
experience in science. (CSU/UC)
152
Health Education
HEALTH EDUCATION
The field of health education promotes physical health and wellness,
exploring important issues such as weight control, nutrition, and
stress management. Coursework in this field can lead to certification
as a personal fitness trainer, or can prepare students for other careers
as wellness and fitness professionals.
Career Options
Activity Specialist, Adaptive Physical Education
Specialist, Athletic Club Manager, Athletic Manager, Athletic
Trainer, Camp Director, Coach, Corrective Therapist, Emergency
Medical Technician, Fire Fighter, Health Club Staff Member, Massage Therapist, Personal Fitness Trainer, Physical Therapist, Public
Health Educator, Recreation Leader/Director, Recreation Therapist,
Teacher/Instructor
Faculty
Cheryl Rogow, Kathleen Smyth
Department Phone: 415-485-9580
Personal Fitness Trainer Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within a program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry
skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or
may constitute a skill set that enables a student to upgrade or advance
in an existing career. Skills Certificates require less than 18 units and
are shorter in duration than the Certificate of Achievement.
The Personal Fitness Trainer Skills Certificate constitutes a
skill and knowledge set that enables students to either begin as an
entry-level Personal Fitness Trainer (PFT) or advance in their already
existing PFT careers.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
KIN
121 Personal Trainer Certification Course 3.5
Choose 13-14 units from the following list:
KIN/BIOL 107 Human Biology 3
KIN/HED 114
Introduction to Kinesiology
3
HED 115 Weight Control, Exercise and Nutrition 3
KIN/HED 119
Effective Teaching Strategies in Wellness and Fitness
3
KIN /HED 118
Sports Nutrition for Health and Performance
2
KIN 120 Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
(also offered as PSY 130)
3
KIN/HED 143 Introduction to Sports Medicine 3
KIN/FIRE 215 Advanced First Aid/First Responder or
2
Any two physical activity courses (one unit each)
2
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
16-16.5
MARIN.EDU
HED 114: Introduction to Kinesiology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HED 114
or KIN 114; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces an interdisciplinary approach to the study of
human movement, provides an overview of the importance of the
sub-disciplines in kinesiology, and addresses career opportunities in
the areas of teaching, coaching, allied health and fitness professions.
(CSU/UC)
HED 115: Weight Control, Exercise and Nutrition
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is designed to act as an educational support program and
resource center for individuals who desire to develop or desire to help
others develop a new healthier lifestyle, including weight management, exercise, and proper nutritional behaviors. The latest research
in the wellness and fitness field will be emphasized. (CSU/UC)
HED 118: Sports Nutrition for Health and
Performance
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HED 118
or KIN 118; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is designed for personal fitness trainers, athletes, coaches
and parents who are seeking sports-specific nutrition for aerobic,
anaerobic and speed-endurance training. Topics include fueling
the athlete, energy systems, metabolism, hydration, sports nutrition products, ergogenics, weight management, and sports-specific
nutritional needs to improve athletic performance. (CSU)
HED 119: Effective Teaching Strategies in Wellness
and Fitness
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: HED 116 or KIN
116. Can be taken as HED 119 or KIN 119; credit awarded for only one
course.
This course is designed to help students become more effective wellness and fitness professionals. Students develop a toolbox of practical
teaching, learning and evaluation methods to increase their ability to
convey their knowledge to others in this field and more successfully
impact their future clients, students, or athletes. (CSU)
HED 130: Contemporary Health Issues
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course includes, but is not limited to, the study of physical and
psychological health, creating healthy relationships, avoiding and
overcoming harmful habits, prevention of disease, and developing
healthy lifestyles. (CSU/UC) CSU Area E
HEALTH EDUCATION COURSES (HED)
HED 140: Stress Management and Health
HED 112: Drugs and Society
This course examines the theoretical framework of stress and stressmanagement techniques. Areas of study include defining stress,
understanding psychological theories of stress, causes of stress,
and health consequences of stress. Students examine and analyze
strategies to manage and cope with stress, such as time management,
relaxation techniques, communication skills, diet, and exercise.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area E
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course covers the historical, sociological, physiological, pharmacological, and legal aspects of drugs, and emphasizes the effects
of tobacco, alcohol, narcotics, restricted drugs, and other substances.
Nutrition, genetics, environment, and poly-drug factors concerning
drug actions are discussed. The various education, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation approaches to the problem of drug abuse are
covered. (CSU) CSU Area E
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
History
CATALOG 2015/2016
HED 143: Introduction to Sports Medicine
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: KIN 107 or BIOL
107. Can be taken as HED 143 or KIN 143; credit awarded for only one
course.
This course introduces methods of prevention, recognition, evaluation, rehabilitation, reconditioning, taping, and immediate care of
athletic injuries to the upper and lower extremities. The course can
benefit coaches from all sports, students interested in the athletic
training profession, and the physically active individual. Anatomy,
mechanism-of-injury, and pathology are stressed. (CSU/UC)
HED 216A: American Red Cross Lifeguard Training
1.5 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Students must be able to perform the following pretest: [1] Tread
water continuously in the diving pool for two minutes using legs only;
[2] Swim 500 yards continuously with no time limit using the following
strokes: crawl stroke, breast stroke, side stroke for at least 100 yards
each; [3] Submerge to a minimum depth of seven feet and retrieve a
ten-pound object and return to the surface with the object at no time
limit. Can be taken as HED 216A or KIN 216A; credit awarded for only
one course.
This course is designed for those desiring to fulfill the requirements
for the American Red Cross Lifeguard Certification. (CSU)
HISTORY
History is an evolving record of human emotions, human aspirations, and human successes and failures. Historians deal with goals,
fears, interests, and prejudices of people in the past and the impact of
their thoughts and actions on the people of today and tomorrow. The
study of history is a valuable adjunct for many careers both inside
and outside of the social sciences.
Career Options
Archaeologist, Archivist, Biographer, Criminologist, Documentary
Film Writer, Environmental Studies, Foreign Service Officer, Genealogist, Global Studies, Historian, Historical Archaeologist, Historical Editor, Historical Society Administrator, International Affairs,
Lawyer, Librarian, Market Research Analyst, Media Consultant,
Museum Guide, News Analyst, Paralegal Assistant, Park Naturalist/
Ranger, Patent Examiner, Peace Corps/Vista Worker, Preservationist,
Private Investigator, Research Specialist, Teacher, Writer/Journalist
Faculty
Yolanda Bellisimo, Paul Cheney, Walter B. Turner
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
A.A.-T. IN HISTORY
Associate in Arts in History for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in History for Transfer degree, a
student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
153
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses:
HIST
117
History of the United States I
3
HIST
118
History of the United States II
3
List A - select two courses:
HIST
101
World History I: Origins of the Major Traditions
4
Or
HIST
110
Western Civilization I: to 1350
3
And
HIST 111
Western Civilization II: 1350 to 1815
3
HIST 102 World History II: Evolution of the Modern World
4
Or
HIST 112 Western Civilization III: the 19th and 20th Centuries
3
List B - select one course from each area:
Area 1:
Any diversity course defined as World History 1500 or World History since 1500 if not used
in List A.
HIST 101 World History I: Origins of the Major Traditions
4
Or
HIST 102 World History II: Evolution of the Modern World
4
HIST 211 Women in American History and Politics
3
HIST 212 History and Politics of Modern Asia
3
HIST 214 History of Latin America
3
HIST 216 History of Mexico
3
HIST 238 History of Africa
3
ETST 111 History of African Americans A
3
ETST 112 History of African Americans B
3
ETST 121 History of Latinos in the United States
3
ETST 151 Native American History
3
JOUN/COMM 160 Images of Race, Gender and Class in the Media
3
ASL 101 Elementary Sign Language I
5
CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese Mandarin I
5
FREN 101 Elementary French I
5
ITAL 101 Elementary Italian I
5
JPNS 101 Elementary Japanese I
5
SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I
5
Area 2.
Any course not used in List A.
ART 101 History of Ancient Art
3
ART
102 History of European Art
3
ART
104 History of Asian Art
3
ART
107 History of American Art
3
ANTH 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3
ANTH 103 Globalization and Peoples and Cultures of the World
3
ANTH 110 Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory
3
ANTH 204 Native American Cultures
3
POLS 102 Comparative Political Systems
3
POLS 103 Political Theory
3
POLS 104 International Relations
3
POLS 117 The Middle East: A Political Perspective
3
POLS 201 Understanding Globalization
3
154
History
POLS 210 War, Peace and the United Nations
Total Major Units
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE):
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives (IGETC/CSU-GE):
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
MARIN.EDU
3
18-22
9-12 units/9-15 units
37 units/39 units
10-17 units/8-18 units
60
HISTORY COURSES (HIST)
HIST 100: Major Trends and Selected Topics in
American History
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
History of the United States from Native Americans before Columbus to the present. Economic, social and political institutions,
developments and processes are examined. HIST 100 may fulfill the
transfer requirement for those majoring in non-social science fields.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B or F, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4, CSU
US History, Constitution, and American Ideals
HIST 101: World History I: Origins of the Major
Traditions
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Beginning with the earliest transitions of human societies to sedentary communities, this course investigates the original river-based
civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, and China; the evolution
of early societies in Sub-Saharan Africa and the pre-Columbian
Americas; major Eurasian states and empires of antiquity (Hellenic,
Persian, Chinese, Indian, Roman); major pre-Columbian civilizations including Inca, Maya, and the Valley of Mexico; and the transformations of the post-classical world, with emphasis on the impacts
of the universalizing traditions of Christianity, Islam and Buddhism.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
civilization, Chinese alchemy, the Copernican Revolution and
Newtonian synthesis, the industrial and biological revolutions of the
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and twentieth century transformations (relativity, the atom, genes and DNA, cyberspace, string
theory). (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 109: History of California
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A survey of California’s past through the Native American, Spanish,
Mexican, and American periods. Among the topics covered are the
California missions, the Gold Rush era, San Francisco’s “Victorian”
era, and recent political, economic, social, cultural and democratic
developments. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B & G, CSU Area D-6,
IGETC Area 4
HIST 110: Western Civilization I: to 1350
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Note: History 110, 111, and
112 may be taken in any sequence and require no prerequisites. They
are especially recommended for students who intend to pursue their
education toward a Bachelor’s degree.
This course examines Western Civilization from its Middle Eastern
origins through the classical Greek and Roman civilizations and the
Middle Ages. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Areas C-2 and D-6,
IGETC Area 4
HIST 111: Western Civilization II: 1350 to 1815
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Note: History 110, 111, and
112 may be taken in any sequence and require no prerequisites. They
are especially recommended for students who intend to pursue their
education toward a Bachelor’s degree.
This course examines Western Civilization during the Renaissance,
the Enlightenment, through the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, concluding with the Congress of Vienna. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area B, CSU Areas C-2 and D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 102: World History II: Evolution of the Modern
World
HIST 112: Western Civilization III: the 19th and 20th
Centuries
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Note: History 110, 111, and
112 may be taken in any sequence and require no prerequisites. They
are especially recommended for students who intend to pursue their
education toward a Bachelor’s degree.
Beginning with the overseas voyages of discovery during the 15th
century C.E., this course traces the growing complexity of global
interaction associated with early modern societies in their preindustrial phases. The focus includes demographic, institutional,
cultural, material, and epidemiological aspects of trans-continental
and trans-oceanic exchanges. The second half of the course examines
societies from a global perspective as they come to be transformed by
the revolutionary forces of industrialization and secular ideologies,
producing the rise and fall of states and empires, the unleashing
of two world wars and countless regional conflicts, and redefining
the nature of a contemporary world increasingly globalized and
interdependent, but fraught with perils and challenges. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 103: Science, Technology, and Civilization
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is a nontechnical introduction to the history of science
and technology, examining their impact on civilization, including
significant social, political, religious, ethical, artistic and intellectual
repercussions resulting from scientific and technological advances.
Themes and topics include (but are not limited to) the Neolithic
Revolution, ancient Greek mathematics and cosmology, Islamic
A study of Western Civilization during the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries beginning with the Congress of Vienna and concluding
with the contemporary world. This course examines the growth of
industrial civilization, nationalism and imperialism, the interaction
of the West with the non-Western world, and idealism and realism in
the experience of Western Civilization. Analysis involves the search
for artifacts such as continuity and change in patterns of development and motivation. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Areas C-2 and
D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 117: History of the United States I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A survey of the economic, political, social, and cultural evolution of
the United States from Native Americans before Columbus through
the Civil War. Note: History 117 and 118 are recommended (instead
of History 100) or required for majors and minors in history, teaching, social science, pre-legal, and certain other areas. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area B or F, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4, CSU US History,
Constitution, and American Ideals
Humanities
CATALOG 2015/2016
155
HIST 118: History of the United States II
HIST 214: History of Latin America
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A survey of the economic, political, social, and cultural development
of the United States from 1865 to the present. Note: History 117 and
118 are recommended (instead of History 100) or required for majors
and minors in history, teaching, social science, pre-legal, and certain
other areas. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B or F, CSU Area D-6, IGETC
Area 4, CSU US History, Constitution, and American Ideals
A historical survey of Latin America beginning with pre-Columbian
societies. The survey investigates European colonization, colonial
culture combined with native culture and national emergence in
the nineteenth century. It also covers the economic maturity of the
twentieth century, the emergence of indigenous culture, and Latin
America’s striving for independent identity. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in
History
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Eligibility for
ENGL 150. Can be taken as ECON 125, ETST 125, HIST 125, POLS 125,
or SSC 125; credit awarded for only one course.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods of research in the social sciences and develops skills required
to organize such thought and research into effective, college level
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
HIST 206: History of Russia
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys Russian history from the earliest times through
the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of its successor
states. It emphasizes the unique features of Russia’s past and commonalities Russian history shares with histories of other societies
and traditions. Special attention is given to the nature and demise
of the Soviet Union, and to the transitional and successor states of
the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 211: Women in American History and Politics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HIST 211
or POLS 211; credit awarded for only one course.
This course, a social and political history of women and women’s
movements in American society, examines the development of
American institutions and ideals with respect to women’s roles
and status; analyzes women’s relationship to economic, political,
and social processes; explores cultural models of womanhood; and
examines how women define themselves and how they have enacted
change. Key themes include the diversity of American women and
developing a framework for understanding gender in relation to race,
ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religion. Includes research in both
primary and secondary sources. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B, F, or G;
CSU Areas D-4, D-6, and D-8; IGETC Area 4
HIST 212: History and Politics of Modern Asia
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HIST 212
or POLS 212; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the history and politics of Asia since 1945,
including the study of East, South, and Southeast Asia. The course
emphasizes the political outcomes of the development of Asia as a
consequence of both internal societal influences as well as external
political and economic pressures. (CSU)/UC Area D-6 and D-8
IGETC Area 4
HIST 216: History of Mexico
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A study of Mexico beginning with pre-Columbian societies, this
course examines how the social, cultural, and political changes
under Spanish colonization led to the independence movement and
a search for national identity. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area
D-6, IGETC Area 4
HIST 238: History of Africa
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A historical and political survey of the African continent, from the
early geographical and anthropological background to twenty-firstcentury African developments. The course provides a basis for understanding the developments that have shaped the various peoples,
countries, and regions of Africa. Key themes include unity with
diversity, influences of geography and trade, Nile Valley cultures,
Africa’s contacts with Europe and Asia, influences of colonialism and
independence, and the global realities of twenty-first century Africa.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-6, IGETC Area 4
HUMANITIES
Courses in humanities enable students to seek an understanding of a
broad cross section of cultural experience through such disciplines as
literature, art, and other visual forms.
Career Options
Classicist, Journalist, Minister, Peace Corps Worker, Teacher
Faculty
John Marmysz
Department Phone: 415-485-9348
A.A. IN HUMANITIES
The Humanities Program creates a broad base for the humanities
major. The program also allows liberal arts students the opportunity
to create an interdisciplinary major based on a particular interest.
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Nine units in humanities to be chosen from the following:
HUM
100A Introduction to Humanities: Ancient Greece to Medieval Period
3
HUM
100B Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to the Modern Period
3
HUM
114
The Long Search: An Introduction to the World’s Religions
3
Or
HUM
118
Introduction to World Religion
3
HUM
125
Myth, Symbol, and the Arts
3
In addition, 9 units to be chosen from the following:
156
Humanities
(Please note: Students may not repeat courses chosen from the humanities courses listed
above.)
Architectural History
ARCH 100
History of Architecture I
3
ARCH 101
History of Architecture II
3
ARCH 102
History of Architecture III
3
Art History
ART
101
History of Ancient Art
3
ART
102
History of European Art
3
ART
103
History of Modern Art
3
ART
104
History of Asian Art
3
ART
105
History of Contemporary Art
3
ART
106
History of Women Artists
3
ART
107
History of American Art
3
ART
108
Arts of the Americas (also offered as ETST 108 or HUM 108)
3
Dance History
DANC 108
Dance History: Dancing – The Pleasure, Power, and Art of Movement 3
Film History and Criticism
HUM/COMM 109A History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4
HUM/COMM 109B History of Film: 1950 to Present
4
History of Theatre
DRAM 110
Introduction to the Theatre
3
DRAM 112
Drama: Play, Performance Perception
3
DRAM 116
Survey of Dramatic Literature: Ancient Greek to the Present
3
DRAM 117
Survey of Dramatic Literature: Shakespeare and His Theatre
3
Humanities
HUM
100A Introduction to Humanities: Ancient Greece to Medieval Period
3
HUM
100B Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to the Modern Period
3
HUM
107
Humanities through the Arts
3
HUM
114
The Long Search: An Introduction to the World’s Religions
3
Or
HUM
118
Introduction to World Religion
3
HUM
125
Myth, Symbol, and the Arts
3
Literature
ENGL
212
Introduction to Poetry
3
ENGL
218
The American Short Story
3
ENGL
219
Voices and Visions
3
ENGL
220
Detective Fiction
3
ENGL
221A Survey of American Literature I
3
ENGL
221B Survey of American Literature II
3
ENGL
222
Survey of English Literature I
3
ENGL
223
Survey of English Literature II
3
ENGL
224
Survey of World Literature I
3
ENGL
225
Survey of World Literature II
3
ENGL
230
Survey of Shakespeare
3
ENGL
235
Women in Literature
3
Music History
MUS
101
Introduction to Classical Music
3
Philosophy
PHIL
110
Introduction to Philosophy
3
PHIL
111
Introduction to Ethics
3
PHIL
117
History of Philosophy: Late Modern to Contemporary
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
MINIMUM OF 18
MARIN.EDU
HUMANITIES COURSES (HUM)
HUM 100A: Introduction to Humanities: Ancient
Greece to the Medieval Period
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This humanities sequence introduces students to Western culture.
This course focuses on the epics, philosophy, and architecture of
Greek and Roman culture, and the themes and conflicts the modern
world has inherited. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B
HUM 100B: Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance
to the Modern Period
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This humanities sequence introduces students to Western culture.
This course focuses on the developing Renaissance and the impact on
Europe’s “rebirth” of Asian and Arabic ideas; the scientific revolution
of Shakespeare’s England; the political revolutions of the seventeenth
and eighteenth centuries; Romanticism; the new paradigms of Freud,
Marx, and Darwin; and the Age of Anxiety. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 107: Humanities Through the Arts
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys the full range of artistic expression from ancient
times to the present, examining the relation between human creativity and the larger cultural setting. Through 15 hours of videotaped
programs hosted by poet Maya Angelou, students can observe how
various art forms--painting and music, sculpture and architecture,
drama and film--all reflect humankind’s continuing quest for dignity
and meaning. This self-paced course offers the non art specialist an
accessible introduction to the interplay of art forms evolving over the
centuries. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 108: History of Arts of the Americas
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HUM 108,
ETST 108, or Art 108; credit awarded for only one course.
This course covers a selection of the art and visual culture of the
Americas: North, Central, and South America, and the Caribbean.
Art of the United States focuses on works from the culturally diverse
peoples of the Bay Area. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C & G, CSU Area
C-1, IGETC Area 3A
HUM 109A: History of Film: Beginning to 1950
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HUM 109A
or FILM 109A; credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers a chronological survey of narrative film as art,
business, technology, and politics from the beginning of the movies
in the 1890s to post World War II. Periods and movements covered
include the Silent Era, German Expressionism, Soviet Avant Garde
and editing of the 1920s, French classicism, American Studio Period
and sound, as well as the history of censorship in the United States.
Classroom screenings of representative films. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
Italian
CATALOG 2015/2016
157
HUM 109B: History of Film: 1950 to Present
HUM 242: Global Writings
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HUM 109B
or FILM 109B; credit awarded for only one course.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent. Can be taken as HUM 242 or ENGL 242;
credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers a chronological and international survey of film
as art, business, technology, and as an expression of the culture
and politics of the times and places from which it emerges. Topics
include post-1940s film noir, neorealism, the French New Wave, “art
cinema,” documentary film, national cinemas throughout the world,
and independent film directors and movements in the 21st century.
Classroom screenings of representative films. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
HUM 114: The Long Search: An Introduction to the
World’s Religions
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent. Students may receive credit for HUM 114
or 118, but not both courses.
Thirteen one-hour cassettes in this series trace the journey of a lone
traveling host on his global search for religious understanding. Along
the way he witnesses the modern interpretation of new and ancient
religions, studying each religion’s history as well as its relationship
to the host society. Class meetings with the instructor augment the
videocassette tapes with lecture and discussion. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 118: Introduction to World Religions
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent. Students may receive credit for HUM 118
or 114, but not both courses.
An introduction to the major religious traditions of the world and
the spiritual practices of preliterate or primal religions. The course
focuses equally on East and West, principles and practice, history
and psychology. Examples of the art, music and literature of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Chinese Religion, Judaism, Christianity
and primal religions are presented to enhance the experience and
understanding of the religions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area
C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 125: Myth, Symbol, and the Arts
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course examines myth and folklore from a variety of cultures
in order to see the function and role of myth in culture, how mythic
symbols work in literature and the arts, and how these symbols have
a psychological and cultural relevance to people today. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
HUM 128: Art Field Trips
1-4 Units. 0.75 lecture and 0.75 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Can be taken as Art 128, ETST 128, or HUM 128; credit awarded for
only one course.
A complement to art history and studio art courses, this course
allows students to experience the art and architecture of sites like
New York, Mexico City, and Rome first-hand. Pre-trip lectures set
up background for an intensive field trip(s) that may include visits
to museums, galleries, libraries, artists’ studios, and to architectural
and archeological sites where lecture, discussion, and personal
exploration take place. May be used to bring students to a major
media-specific conference. (CSU)
The cultural diversity and complex history of our globalized world
are explored through a variety of contemporary writings. Discussion
and analyses of representative texts focus on colonial exploitation,
political domination, liberation, formations of racism, gender inequality, expressions of cultural power, ethnic conflict and division,
immigration and migrancy, and processes of globalization. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
INDEPENDENT STUDY
Independent study courses are offered in most disciplines and are
designed to give students an opportunity to participate in enriched
academic experiences not covered within the scope of available
curriculum offerings. Students plan and execute a project under an
instructor’s direction.
Students interested in registering for independent study should
contact the discipline instructor to obtain an Application for
Independent Study (instructor contract). The completed Application
and an Add Card must then be submitted to the Office of Enrollment
Services.
INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES
249ABC: Independent Study
1-3 Units. Three laboratory hours weekly per unit. Limit to Enrollment:
One course in the discipline and/or prerequisite(s) determined by the
appropriate discipline. Prior arrangement with instructor is required.
ITALIAN
A major reason for studying the Italian language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning Italian one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent
Faculty
Michele Martinisi, Rossana Pagani
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Italian
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
158
Italian
MARIN.EDU
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
correct pronunciation of Italian, using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations. (CSU)
Skills Certificate in Italian
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within a program. Skills
Certificates require less than 18 units and are shorter in duration
than the Certificate of Achievement.
The Italian Skills Certificate provides a way for students to verify
that they have reached a level of proficiency in the Italian language.
ITAL 114: Conversational Italian III
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
ITAL
101
Elementary Italian I
5
ITAL
102
Elementary Italian II
5
ITAL
203
Intermediate Italian III
5
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
15
ITALIAN COURSES (ITAL)
ITAL 101: Elementary Italian I
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A beginning course offering study and practice in speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing Italian, along with exploration of cultural aspects of Italy. The three-hour weekly laboratory
requirement enhances the student’s verbal and comprehension skills
through the use of audiovisual materials. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 6: UC Language other than English
ITAL 102: Elementary Italian II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or 112.
Continued use of modern colloquial Italian in conversation and
the study of elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish
to acquire skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal
grammar. Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding,
and correct pronunciation of Italian, using online and audiovisual
materials depicting everyday situations. (CSU)
ITAL 203: Intermediate Italian III
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 102.
In-depth study of Italian with grammar review, composition, and
introduction to literature. The language laboratory offers the use of
audiovisual materials for improved fluency and accuracy in pronunciation as well as the presentation of cultural and literary topics.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC
Language other than English
ITAL 204: Intermediate Italian IV
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 203.
Continuation of study and practice in speaking, understanding,
reading, and writing Italian. Completion of in-depth review of Italian grammar, as well as readings in literature, history, and culture of
the Italian people. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 101.
ITAL 225: Advanced Italian I
Further emphasis on the structure of the language, verbal communication, and understanding the Italian culture. Continued use of the
language laboratory for further mastery of the language. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language
other than English
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 204.
ITAL 108A: Italian Culture Through Cinema
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ITAL 101.
This course introduces students to prominent films that portray
historical and sociocultural aspects of Italian society. Topics include
fascism, colonialism, World War II, the Holocaust, the economic
struggle and miracle of postwar Italy, organized crime, and the role
of Italy in the modern world. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area
3B
ITAL 110: Conversational Italian I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Use of modern colloquial Italian in conversation and the study of
elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct pronunciation
of Italian, using online and audiovisual materials depicting everyday
situations. (CSU)
ITAL 112: Conversational Italian II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or 110.
Continued use of modern colloquial Italian in conversation and
the study of elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish
to acquire skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal
grammar. Continued oral practice in speaking, understanding, and
Courses aimed at expanding the student’s knowledge of the Italian language and civilization through the study of grammar and
literature. Emphasis is placed on acquiring an advanced level of
verbal expression in conversation, reading, and writing. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language
other than English
ITAL 226: Advanced Italian II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 225 or equivalent.
An advanced course offering practice in speaking, understanding,
reading and writing Italian, emphasizing the civilization and culture
of Italy. The course introduces literary analysis of short stories,
poems and novels. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
ITAL 228: Italian Conversation and Culture Through
Film
1.0 Unit. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ITAL 102.
This course introduces students to Italian cinema, culture, and
language. Focus is on acquiring and improving conversational ability
and cultural comprehension through the study of film. Students
practice speaking and writing Italian extensively and build practical
vocabulary, emphasizing comprehension and oral/written expression. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C
Japanese
CATALOG 2015/2016
159
JAPANESE
JPNS 110: Conversational Japanese
A major reason for studying the Japanese language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning Japanese, one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
Use of modern colloquial Japanese in conversation and the study of
elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire
skills of the spoken language with a minimum of formal grammar.
Oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct pronunciation
of Japanese, using audiovisual materials depicting everyday situations. (CSU)
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent.
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Japanese
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
JPNS 112: Conversational Japanese II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. Prerequisite: JPNS 101 or 110.
Continued use of modern colloquial Japanese in conversation and
the study of elementary grammar. Designed for students who want to
learn the spoken language at a faster pace, with a minimum of formal
grammar. Use of audio materials improves accuracy and fluency in
pronunciation. (CSU)
JPNS 203: Intermediate Japanese III
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: JPNS 102.
An in-depth study of Japanese, with grammar review, oral practice,
composition, and introduction to literature. The language laboratory
offers the use of audiovisual materials for improved fluency and
accuracy in pronunciation as well as the presentation of cultural and
literary topics. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
JPNS 204: Intermediate Japanese IV
JAPANESE COURSES (JPNS)
JPNS 101: Elementary Japanese I
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A beginning course offering study and practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Japanese along with an exploration
of the cultural aspects of Japan. The weekly laboratory requirement
enhances students’ verbal and listening comprehension skills
through use of the audiovisual materials. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 6: UC Language other than English
JPNS 102: Elementary Japanese II
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: JPNS 101.
Students further develop their ability to speak, read, and write
Japanese in this class. They increase their knowledge of Japanese
culture and society, improve communication skills, and learn 100
Kanji characters. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B or 6: UC Language other than English
JPNS 108: Japanese Conversation through the
Movies
1.0 Unit. 1.125 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: JPNS 101.
This course offers intensive study of practical Japanese conversation
via presentation of selected films of certain Japanese directors, such
as Akira Kurosawa, Kon Ichikawa, or Masaki Shuo. Students read
selections from the original novels or film scripts. May be taken more
than once for credit provided the same topic is not repeated. (CSU)
AA/AS Area C (three units)
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: JPNS 203.
Continuation of the study and practice of speaking, understanding,
reading, and writing Japanese. Completion of in-depth review of
grammar, as well as readings in the literature, history, and culture
of the Japanese people. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B and 6: Language other than English
JPNS 225: Advanced Japanese I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: JPNS 204.
This course is aimed at expanding students’ knowledge of Japanese
language, culture, history, ways of thinking and geography, through
the study of advanced grammar, literature, essays and newspaper
articles. Emphasizes the acquisition of an advanced level of verbal
expression in discussion, reading and writing. (CSU) CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
JPNS 226: Advanced Japanese II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: JPNS 225.
This course is aimed at further expanding students’ knowledge of
Japanese language, culture, history, ways of thinking and geography,
through the study of advanced grammar, literature, essays and
newspaper articles. Emphasizes the acquisition of an advanced level
of verbal expression in discussion, reading and writing. (CSU) CSU
Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
160
Journalism
MARIN.EDU
JOURNALISM
JOUN 123: Newspaper and Media Production II
The main goals of journalism courses are to prepare students to
become accurate and thorough researchers and precise writers. The
discipline emphasizes the need to think and write clearly and has a
two-fold purpose: to prepare students for careers in newspaper work,
television, and radio news or public relations, and to provide a study
of mass media communications for students who desire to enhance
their liberal education.
This laboratory course gives students who wish to help produce the
student newspaper and work on its website, but who do not wish to
be writers for the paper, the opportunity to develop their knowledge
and skills in a variety of journalistic publication functions, including
advertising, circulation, graphics, photography, desktop publishing,
website design and maintenance, and development of digital journalism products such as audio slideshows. Together with JOUN 122,
students in this class produce the student newspaper and website.
(CSU)
Career Options
Advertising Copywriter, Broadcaster, Feature Writer, Newspaper
Writer, Photojournalist, Print Journalist, Public Relations Worker,
Publications Editor, Publicist: Trade/Business/Labor, Writer/Editor
3.0 Units. 9 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite.
JOUN 160: Images of Race, Gender, and Class in the
Media
Department Phone: 415-485-9348
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as JOUN 160
or COMM 160; credit awarded for only one course.
JOURNALISM COURSES (JOUN)
This course is designed to help students become more “media literate” and socially aware by critically examining the role of the media
in enabling, facilitating, or challenging various social constructions
including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, and disability. The course addresses a variety of entertainment and news content
in print and electronic media, and analyzes these texts within their
historical context. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C and G, CSU Area D-3
or D-4, IGETC Area 4C and 4D
JOUN 110: Introduction to Mass Communication and
Media Literacy
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ECON 125 or
ETST 125 or HIST 125 or POLS 125 or SSC 125. May be taken as JOUN
110 or COMM 110; credit awarded for only one course.
A critical survey of mass media from a humanities and social science
perspective, this course provides an overview of the salient theories,
history, and economic and social forces that shape mass media
technologies and messages. Students examine the historical development of major print, electronic, interactive, and image-based media
in terms of their sociocultural consequences and influence in order
to more effectively interpret and make decisions about the meanings
of mass media messages. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area D-7,
IGETC Area 4G
JOUN 115: Reporting and Writing for Mainstream
Media
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: ENGL 120 or
120SL.
This course introduces writing for the modern media including
newspapers, Internet, television, radio, magazines, public relations, advertising, and photojournalism. Major topics include “the
newsroom,” the ingredients of a news story, qualities of good writing
and ethics, interviewing, gathering information, feature writing,
press releases, obituaries, press conferences, “beats,” and the legal
ramifications of reporting. Skills in reporting and writing a news
story are developed through writing for the student newspaper or
other publications. (CSU)
KINESIOLOGY
A career in kinesiology or physical education offers many job
possibilities. One may be a director or a counselor or instructor in a
program of physical activity at a camp or youth agency. Other possibilities are playground supervisor or coach of a team or officiating
at sports events. There are also opportunities for teaching children
with special problems such as physical or mental disabilities.
Career Options
Activity Specialist, Adaptive Physical Education Specialist, Athletic
Club Manager, Athletic Equipment Salesperson, Athletic Trainer,
Camp Director, Coach, Correctional Officer, Corrective Therapist,
Emergency Medical Technician, Fire Fighter, Health Club Staff
Member, Athletic Manager, Massage Therapist, Park Director, Physical Therapist, Police Officer, Professional Athlete, Public Health Educator, Recreation Leader/Director, Recreation Therapist, Recruiter,
Scout, Sports Official, Sports Shop Owner/Operator, Sportswriter/
Announcer, Stunt Performer, Teacher/Instructor
Faculty
George Adams, Steve Berringer, Cheryl Rogow, Warren Lager, Kathleen Smyth
Department Phone: 415-485-9580
JOUN 122: Newspaper and Media Production I
3.0 Units. 9 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. No prerequisite. Advisory: JOUN 115
or ENGL 150.
This laboratory course gives students the opportunity to apply their
knowledge and skills in news writing and reporting for all journalistic-based media. Students in this course serve as the editorial board
of the student newspaper, “The Echo Times;” together with JOUN
123, they produce the newspaper and its website. Students produce
summaries and special leads, headlines, story and page designs.
(CSU)
A.A. IN KINESIOLOGY AND HEALTH
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students must complete English 150 to satisfy
the Associate degree. Transfer students are advised to complete
English 150. All students should consult a counselor.
**Students may substitute Dance classes for the physical activity
requirement.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Choose 12 units from:
Kinesiology
CATALOG 2015/2016
BIOL 100Nutrition
KIN/BIOL 107
Human Biology
KIN/HED 114
Intro to Kinesiology
KIN/HED 118
Sports Nutrition for Health and Performance
KIN/HED 119
Effective Teaching Strategies
KIN
120
Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
(also offered as PSY 130)
KIN
121
Personal Trainer Certification Course
KIN/HED 143
Introduction to Sports Medicine
KIN/FIRE 215
Advanced First Aid/First Responder
HED
115
Weight Control, Exercise and Nutrition
HED
130
Contemporary Health Issues
HED
140
Stress Management and Health
**And choose 6 units from:
KIN
110ABCD Mat Pilates
KIN
112ABCD Zumba
KIN
117ABCD Basketball
KIN
125ABCD Fitness
KIN
127
Functional Training
KIN 147Soccer
KIN
155ABCD Swimming KIN
156ABCD Aquatic Fitness
KIN
160ABCD Tennis
KIN
164
Sports Conditioning
KIN
169ABCD Weight Training
KIN
173ABCD Yoga
KIN
175
Intercollegiate Baseball
KIN
176
Intercollegiate Basketball
KIN
180
Intercollegiate Soccer
KIN
181
Intercollegiate Softball
KIN
182
Intercollegiate Volleyball
KIN
183
Intercollegiate Swimming
KIN
185
Intercollegiate Track and Field
KIN
190
Baseball Theory
KIN
191
Soccer Theory
KIN
192
Basketball Theory
KIN
193
Swim Theory
KIN
194
Volleyball Theory
KIN
196
Softball Theory
KIN
198
Track and Field Theory
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3.5
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
1.5
18
Personal Fitness Trainer Skills Certificate
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificate of
Achievement.
The Personal Fitness Trainer Skills Certificate constitutes a
skill and knowledge set that enables students to either begin as an
entry-level Personal Fitness Trainer (PFT) or advance in their already
existing PFT careers.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
KIN
121 Personal Trainer Certification Course 3.5
Choose 13-14 units from the following list:
KIN/BIOL 107 Human Biology 3
KIN/HED 114
Introduction to Kinesiology
3
161
HED 115 Weight Control, Exercise and Nutrition 3
KIN/HED 119
Effective Teaching Strategies in Wellness and Fitness
3
KIN /HED 118
Sports Nutrition for Health and Performance
2
KIN 120 Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology
(also offered as PSY 130)
3
KIN/HED 143 Introduction to Sports Medicine 3
KIN/FIRE 215 Advanced First Aid/First Responder or
3
Any two physical activity courses (one unit each)
2
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
16.5-17.5
KINESIOLOGY COURSES (KIN)
KIN 107: Human Biology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as KIN 107 or
BIOL 107; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the structure, function, and development of
the human body, and foundational concepts to explore personal and
societal issues involving human biology. Topics include an introduction to scientific methods of investigation and some elementary
chemistry (no previous background necessary) as a basis for understanding human functions such as movement, digestion, circulation,
reproduction, and other systems. Some diseases and other causes
of body malfunction are discussed. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU
Area B-2, IGETC Area 5B
KIN 110ABCD: Mat Pilates
1-2 Units. 3-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels, introduces the Pilates method of body conditioning, emphasizing core
musculature as it applies to everyday movement, and developing
core strength, posture, breath control, body alignment and flexibility.
Benefits include balance, body awareness, relaxation, injury prevention, stress reduction and increased self-confidence. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area H
KIN 112ABCD: Zumba Fitness
1-2 Units. 3-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Zumba is a fusion of Latin and international music-dance themes,
creating a dynamic, exciting, effective fitness system. This sequence
of courses, from beginning to intermediate levels, features aerobic/
fitness interval training and resistance training with a combination
of fast and slow rhythms that maximize caloric output and tone and
sculpt the body. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 114: Introduction to Kinesiology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HED 114
or PE 114; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces an interdisciplinary approach to the study of
human movement, provides an overview of the importance of the
sub-disciplines in kinesiology, and addresses career opportunities in
the areas of teaching, coaching, allied health and fitness professions.
(CSU/UC)
KIN 117ABCD: Basketball
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels, is
designed for all students interested in playing basketball. Individual
offensive, defensive and team concepts of basketball are emphasized.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
162
Kinesiology
MARIN.EDU
KIN 118: Sports Nutrition for Health and
Performance
training,” working core level muscles, aerobic and anaerobic capacities, and upper body strength. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as KIN 118 or
HED 118; credit awarded for only one course.
KIN 127: Functional Training
This course is designed for personal fitness trainers, athletes, coaches
and parents seeking sports-specific nutrition for aerobic, anaerobic
and speed-endurance training. Topics include fueling the athlete,
energy systems, metabolism, hydration, sports nutrition products,
ergogenics, weight management, and sports-specific nutritional
needs to improve athletic performance. (CSU)
KIN 119: Effective Teaching Strategies in Wellness
and Fitness
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: HED 114 or KIN
114. Can be taken as HED 119 or KIN 119; credit awarded for only one
course.
This course is designed to help students become more effective wellness and fitness professionals. Students develop a toolbox of practical
teaching, learning and evaluation methods to increase their ability to
convey their knowledge to others in this field and more successfully
impact their future clients, students, or athletes. (CSU)
KIN 120: Introduction to Sport and Exercise
Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as KIN 120 or
PSY 130; credit awarded for only one course.
This course examines the psychological theories and techniques
that are applied to sport, exercise and other achievement-related
situations. The course emphasizes the enhancement of performance
and personal growth of athletes, coaches, and exercise participants.
Students also learn mental skills that they can transfer from sport
and exercise settings to their everyday lives. (CSU)
1-2 Units. 3-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces principles and guidelines for developing
physical fitness using functional movements. Exercise activities use
functional body weight movements to improve strength, flexibility,
endurance, and explosion. Movements may include a combination
of jumping, sprinting, pushing, and pulling; routines may include
medicine balls, ropes, agility ladders, and suspension training. (CSU)
KIN 128: High-Intensity Interval Training
0.5-2 Units. Weekly activity hours: 2 for .5 units, 3 for 1 unit, or 6 for 2
units. No prerequisite.
This advanced fitness course uses the High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) system of organizing cardiorespiratory training, which
calls for repeated short-duration, high-intensity exercise intervals
interspersed with lower-intensity intervals of active recovery. (CSU)
KIN 129ABCD: Golf
1-2 Units. 3-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels, focuses
on skill development and acquiring the knowledge to participate in
and enjoy the sport of golf. Demonstration, audio-visual aids, lecture,
and active participation are utilized to achieve improvement and
enjoyment of golf. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 131: Intercollegiate Student Athlete Success
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
KIN 121: Personal Trainer Certification Course
This course introduces the skills necessary to become a successful
intercollegiate athlete. Topics include, but are not limited to, NCAA
and NAIA rules and regulations, goal-setting, communication, timeand stress-management, and injury prevention. (CSU)
3.5 Units. 3 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: BIOL
107 or PE 107.
KIN 132: Individual Activities
This course prepares students to meet the stringent certification
standards set forth by the American Council on Exercise (ACE).
Through a variety of health and fitness training and evaluation
techniques, students engage in an assortment of practical experiences
while developing a thorough understanding of core exercise concepts
and principles. Practical scientific theory as well as the hands-on application skills necessary for the delivery of safe and effective health
and fitness within the general population are emphasized. (CSU)
KIN 125ABCD: Fitness
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces principles and guidelines for developing
physical fitness, from beginning to advanced levels. Students
participate in exercises and activities designed to improve their
cardiovascular system and muscular strength. The course includes
jogging, hiking, power walking, and strength and flexibility routines.
Exercise routines may also be performed with cardio machines, free
weights, and physio balls. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 126: Plyometric Training
1-2 Units. 3-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course utilizes plyometric training techniques to enhance
competitive athletic performance in conjunction with “boot camp
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is designed for the student who is unable to enroll in
a regularly scheduled physical activity class. Individual fitness
programs are developed and logged by each student with guidance
from the instructor to meet personal fitness goals. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area H
KIN 143: Introduction to Sports Medicine
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: KIN 107 or BIOL
107. Can be taken as KIN 143 or HED 143; credit awarded for only one
course.
This course introduces methods of prevention, recognition, evaluation, rehabilitation, reconditioning, taping, and immediate care of
athletic injuries to the upper and lower extremities. The course can
benefit coaches from all sports, students interested in the athletic
training profession, and the physically active individual. Anatomy,
mechanism-of-injury, and pathology are stressed. (CSU/UC)
KIN 147: Soccer
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course emphasizes the development of soccer technical skills,
knowledge of game rules, indoor and outdoor soccer team tactics,
and systems of play. This course teaches and builds upon the funda-
Kinesiology
CATALOG 2015/2016
mentals of soccer in order to enhance the future soccer performance
of all students. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 155ABCD: Swimming
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels,
presents a variety of strokes and skills necessary to be competent in
the aquatic environment. Emphasizes stroke and endurance development. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 156ABCD: Aquatic Fitness
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Knowledge
and demonstration of efficient swimming skill.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels,
provides students the opportunity to develop and maintain cardiovascular fitness through swimming. Instruction in competitive swim
strokes, starts, and turns; and in interval, sprint, and distance training. Individualized workouts available. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 160ABCD: Tennis
1-2 Units. 3-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels, familiarizes students with the game of tennis, emphasizing fundamental
skills and strategy. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 164: Sports Conditioning
163
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC PROGRAM:
An extensive intercollegiate athletic program for both men and
women is available. This program includes the following classes; each
may be taken four times for credit. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
All courses: 2.0 Units. Ten to fifteen activity hours weekly.
Prerequisite: Team member.
KIN 175: KIN 176: KIN 180: KIN 181: KIN 182: KIN 183: KIN 185: Baseball
Basketball (Men and Women)
Soccer (Men and Women)
Softball (Women)
Volleyball (Women)
Swimming and Diving (Men and Women)
Track and Field (Men and Women)
KIN 190: Baseball Theory
1.5-2 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk for 1.5 units. Repeat: 3. No
prerequisite.
An intensive course designed to train students in the development
of a baseball program at any level. Emphasizes the development of
individual technique and skills. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 191: Soccer Theory
1.5-2 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk for 1.5 units. Repeat: 3. No
prerequisite.
This course instructs students in the various forms of conditioning
and training techniques used in different sports, emphasizing muscle
balance, breath control, aerobic training, anaerobic training, flexibility, nutrition, time management, injury prevention, and strength
training. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
This course, for intermediate/advanced soccer players looking to
further their knowledge of the sport, emphasizes the history and
evolution of the game of soccer, defensive and offensive tactics,
training methods, current trends, and the rules of the game. Includes
soccer-themed training in strength, speed, and agility. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H
KIN 167ABCD: Volleyball
KIN 192: Basketball Theory
1-2 Units. 3-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels, instructs students in the fundamentals of volleyball, including passing,
serving, hitting, and setting. It focuses on promoting team play by
emphasizing rules and strategies. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 169ABCD: Weight Training
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels,
introduces the basic principles of fitness using a variety of modalities including weight machines and free weights. Students create an
individual fitness program with a focus on proper technique and
injury prevention. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 173ABCD: Yoga
0.5-2 Units. 2-6 activity hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This sequence of courses, from beginning to advanced levels, focuses
on the physical aspects of yoga, emphasizing proper alignment to
maximize the benefits of the practice. Students develop strength,
flexibility, endurance, and grace in the poses. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
H
1.5-2 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk for 1.5 units. Repeat: 3. No
prerequisite.
This course helps students understand the fundamentals of playing
and coaching basketball. Individual and team skills development are
stressed. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 193: Swimming Theory
1.5-2 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk for 1.5 units. Repeat: 3. No
prerequisite.
This intensive course helps students understand and utilize the
fundamentals and theory of training and competing in the sport of
swimming. Emphasizes the development of individual technique and
skills. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 194: Volleyball Theory
1.5-2 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk for 1.5 units. Repeat: 3. No
prerequisite.
This intensive course helps students understand and utilize the
fundamentals and theory of training and competing in the sport of
volleyball. Emphasizes the development of individual technique and
skills. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
164
Library
KIN 196: Softball Theory
1.5-2 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk for 1.5 units. Repeat: 3. No
prerequisite.
An intensive course designed to train students in the development
of a softball program at any level. Emphasizes the development of
individual technique and skills. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
KIN 198: Track and Field Theory
1.5-2 Units. 1 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk for 1.5 units. Repeat: 3. No
prerequisite.
An intensive course designed to help students understand and utilize
the fundamentals and theory of training for and competing in the
sport of track and field. Emphasizes the development of team and
individual techniques and skills. (CSU) AA/AS Area H
KIN 215: Advanced First Aid/First Responder
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 1.5 hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May also be
taken as FIRE 215; credit awarded for only one course.
This introductory course is designed for lay persons interested in,
or for professionals who require, First Responder training per State
of California (Title 22) or U.S. DOT standards. The class teaches the
basic pre-hospital care skills needed to render care at the scene of an
emergency until more highly trained emergency medical response
personnel arrive. Includes basic anatomy and body systems; lifting
and moving patients; airway management; patient assessment;
medical, behavioral, and trauma emergencies; terrorism awareness;
and an overview of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system.
This course is a prerequisite for the Emergency Medical Technician
Program. (CSU/UC)
LIBRARY
Learning the techniques of library research will enable students to
make use of this resource with confidence and efficiency. Library
Skills courses enable students to manage information in an era of
information explosion, whether their interests are academic, professional, or personal.
Faculty
John Erdmann, Sarah Frye, David Patterson
Department Phone: 415-485-9475
LIBRARY COURSE (LIBR)
LIBR 110: Introduction to Library Resources: A SelfDirected Approach
1.0 Unit. 1.125 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Self-paced. No regularly
scheduled class meetings. Completion of the course represents
approximately eighteen to thirty-six hours of academic work.
A self-paced course that facilitates the use of the library and teaches
the basic skills needed for library research. The resources studied and
the skills learned are applicable to any library - academic, public or
special. Topics include the card catalog; important reference works
such as encyclopedias, dictionaries, and almanacs; periodicals;
periodical indexes; and book reviews. (CSU/UC)
MARIN.EDU
MACHINE AND METALS
TECHNOLOGY
Study in the field of machine and metals technology is designed as
preparation for entrance into metalworking occupations. Graduates
may enter the fields dealing with industrial production, prototype
construction, special die work, or research and development. The
courses in welding are designed to provide opportunity for the development of skills, knowledge, and experience for employment in the
occupation and as auxiliary experience for persons in other majors.
Career Options
Certified Welder, Lathe Operator, Machinist, Machinist Apprentice,
Mechanical Technician, Numerical Control Operator, Production
Welder, Tool and Die Maker, Tool Company Representative, Welder
Fabricator, Welding Technician
Faculty
Arthur Lutz
Department Phone: 415-883-2211, Ext. 8108
A.S. IN MACHINE AND METALS TECHNOLOGY,
OCCUPATIONAL
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
An Associate of Science degree in Machine and Metals Technology,
Occupational is awarded for satisfactory completion of the major
requirements, as well as the general education requirements. A
Certificate of Achievement is awarded for satisfactory completion
of the major requirements as listed below. This program is offered at
the Indian Valley Campus. Note: Students are required to complete
English 150 for the associate degree. All students should consult a
counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
First Semester
MACH 130
Welding I
2
MACH 140
Intermediate Machine Tool Processes
4
MACH 145
Computer Numerical Control Machining/Mill
3
MACH 165
Blueprint Reading for the Machine Trades
2
Second Semester
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1.5
ELEC
100
Fundamentals of Electronics
2
MACH 97
Machine Trades Math
2
MACH 155
Computer Numerical Control Machining/Lathe
3
MACH 240
Advanced Machine Tool Processes
4
Third Semester
ENGG 256
Practical Materials Science
3
MACH 131
Welding II
2
MACH 250
Applications of Machine Tool Technology
2
WE
298B Occupational Work Experience B
2
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
32.5
CATALOG 2015/2016
Machine and Metals Technology
165
MACHINE AND METALS TECHNOLOGY COURSES (MACH)
MACH 155: Computer Numerical Control Machining/
Lathe
MACH 120: Machine Technology I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A lecture and demonstration course presenting the principles of
modern computer numerical control practice on lathes and horizontal machining centers. Students learn to program, edit, and set up
equipment. CAD-CAM software use will be covered. (CSU)
A survey course in the principles of general machine shop processes
utilizing lathes, milling machines, surface grinders and drilling machines; practice in general bench operations and the use of precision
measuring and machining instruments. May be taken three times for
credit. (CSU)
MACH 165: Blueprint Reading for the Machine
Trades
MACH 121: Machine Technology II
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MACH 120.
This course builds upon the fundamentals established in MACH 120.
Emphasizes advanced machining techniques utilizing lathes, milling
machines, grinders, and drilling machines. Perfecting manipulative
skill, competency, and machine tool theory is stressed. (CSU)
This course provides instruction in blueprint reading for machinists
and for related mechanical trades. Course material includes view
visualization, dimensioning methods, terminology and standards,
and geometric tolerancing. Metrics and welding symbology will be
included. (CSU)
MACH 130: Welding I
MACH 230: Advanced Welding
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Fundamental theory and application of welding shop tools and
power equipment. Introduction to oxy-fuel welding and cutting,
manual shielded arc (stick), and welding in the flat and horizontal
positions. Technical study and practice in the safe use of gases, grinders, torches, and arc welders. (CSU)
Advanced theory and application of the MIG, TIG and Plasma
processes. Preparation for plate certifications with the MIG and stick
processes. May be taken three times for credit. (CSU)
MACH 130A: Welding
(For course description, please see MACH 230.) (CSU)
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
MACH 230A: Advanced Welding
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see MACH 130.) (CSU)
MACH 240: Advanced Machine Tool Processes
MACH 131: Welding II
This advanced course on the theory and practice of metal removal
and fabrication emphasizes advanced practice on lathes, milling
machines, surface grinders, and heat treating equipment. Theoretical
considerations include precision measurement techniques, cutting
tool technology, gearing, and nontraditional machining methods.
Computer numerical control and CAD-CAM techniques will be
discussed. (CSU)
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MACH 130.
Introductory theory and application of the MIG, TIG, and Plasma
processes. Advanced stick welding on plate in all positions. (CSU)
MACH 131A: Welding II
2.0 Units. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
(For course description, please see MACH 131.) (CSU)
MACH 140: Intermediate Machine Tool Processes
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MACH
120.
This course is an intermediate level practice and theory of metal
removal and fabrication, emphasizing the use of lathes, milling
machines, grinders, and drills. Theoretical considerations include
measurement, layout and planning, cutting tool theory, feeds and
speeds, tooling, heat treatment, and numerical control overview.
(CSU)
MACH 145: Computer Numerical Control
Machining/Mill
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A course in the theoretical principles and practical applications of
computer numerical control with CAD-CAM applied to the milling
machine and machine centers. (CSU)
4.0 Units. 2 lecture and 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
MACH 250: Applications of Machine Tool
Technology
2.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Advanced laboratory practice for students pursuing certification
in machine and metals technology. Projects involve state-of-theindustry techniques. (CSU)
166
Mathematics
MATHEMATICS
The courses in mathematics provide training in both pure and
applied mathematics, leading to careers in business, research, and
government. Many majors (such as physical and biological sciences,
engineering, and business) are dependent upon the use of applied
mathematics.
MARIN.EDU
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives (IGETC/CSU-GE):
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
37 units/39 units
3-9 units/1-7 units
60
MATHEMATICS COURSES (MATH)
Department Phones:
Kentfield Campus: 415-485-9510
Indian Valley Campus: 415-883-2211, Ext. 8510
In addition to traditional lecture-based mathematics courses, College
of Marin also offers a self-paced “Individualized Mathematics Program” in the Math Lab at both campuses. The self-paced lab courses
are: Math 95XY, 101XY, and 103XY.
The college offers a mathematics assessment testing service to
help students make informed decisions when enrolling in mathematics courses. Students are provided with their test scores. Students
registering for mathematics courses who need help in interpreting
their placement test scores, and/or in deciding whether to register for
or remain enrolled in a mathematics course, can seek assistance from
a counselor or their mathematics instructor.
For information about the Mathematics Assessment Test, students
can call the Testing Office at (415) 485-9469 (located in the Student
Services Center, Room 238, Kentfield Campus) or (415) 883-2211, ext.
8510 (Indian Valley Campus).
All mathematics courses may be taken for a letter grade or pass-no
pass. In general, courses required for a transfer student’s four-year
major should be taken on a letter grade basis.
A.S.-T. IN MATHEMATICS
BASIC SKILLS MATH COURSES – NONTRANSFERABLE
Associate in Science in Mathematics for Transfer degree (AS-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
MATH 025: Coping with Math Anxiety
Career Options
Accountant, Actuary, Appraiser/Assessor, Bookkeeper, Budget
Analyst, Buyer, Carpenter, Claims Adjuster, Computer Applications
Engineer, Cost Estimator, Credit Analyst, Demographer, Electronics
Technician, Engineering Technician, Financial Analyst, Insurance
Underwriter, Loan Officer, Manager, Information Science, Market
Research Analyst, Mathematical Technician, Mathematician, Operations Research Analyst, Programmer, Purchasing Agent, Research
Assistant, Revenue Agent, Statistician, Stockbroker, Systems Analyst,
Teacher, Teller, Wage and Salary Administrator, Weight Analyst
Faculty
Maula Allen, George Golitzin, John Jacob, Jacek Kostyrko, Laurie Ordin, Irina
Roderick, Frederick Schmitt, Maria Young
To complete the Associate in Science in Mathematics for Transfer
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MATH 123
Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
5
MATH 124
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
5
MATH 223
Analytic Geometry, Vector Analysis and Calculus II
5
Choose a minimum of 6 units from the lists below with at least 3 units from List A:
List A:
MATH 116
Linear Algebra
3
List B - select one course:
MATH 117
Discrete Mathematics
3
PHYS
207A Mechanics and Properties of Matter
5
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
Total Major Units
21-23
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE):
3-7 units/3-7 units
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A four-week course designed to help all students from all areas
confront and deal with their fears and anxieties with mathematics.
MATH 085: Arithmetic Skills
2.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: COUN 125.
The fundamentals of arithmetic with emphasis on computational
skills. Topics include addition, subtraction, multiplication, and
division of whole numbers, problem solving, applications, and an
introduction to decimals.
MATH 095: Basic and Intermediate Math Skills
2.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 85 or sufficient score on
Math Assessment Test.
This course covers addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
of whole numbers, fractions, mixed numerals, and decimals; square
roots, percents, and applications of arithmetic to include ratio and
proportion; some pre-algebra topics; and measurement to include
area and volume. This course or its equivalents satisfy the prerequisite for Math 101. The course is offered in two additional modes: in
a self-paced mode in the Math Lab (Math 95XY), and in a twosemester lecture/discussion mode (Math 95AB).
MATH 095X: Basic Math Skills
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 85.
Approximately four hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or
until the course is completed.
Taken with Math 95Y, this course is equivalent to Math 95. It is
designed for students who wish to develop basic mathematics skills
in a self-paced environment. Topics include addition, subtraction,
multiplication, division, square roots, prime numbers, greatest
Mathematics
CATALOG 2015/2016
167
common divisors, least common multiples, and arithmetic of whole
numbers. Fractions and decimals are used in applied problems. Ratio
and proportion to include applications.
MATH 101Y: Elementary Algebra
MATH 095Y: Intermediate Math Skills
For students wishing to learn elementary algebra in a self-paced
environment. This pair of courses taken in sequence, Math 101X followed by Math 101Y, is equivalent to Math 101. Topics include solving
equations containing fractional expressions, systems of equations
and graphs, inequalities, operations with radicals, quadratic equations, and applied problems.
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 95A or Math
95X. Approximately four hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks
or until the course is completed.
Taken with Math 95X, this course is equivalent to Math 95. It is
designed for students wishing to develop intermediate mathematics
skills in a self-paced environment. Topics include percent; elementary statistics to include averages and graphs; measurement to include
length, area and volume; pre-algebra, and applications.
COLLEGE LEVEL MATH COURSES – NONTRANSFERABLE
MATH 101: Elementary Algebra
3.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 95 or 95B or 95Y or
sufficient score on Math Assessment Test.
A one-semester introduction to elementary algebra. Topics will
include linear equations, inequalities, systems with applications,
polynomials, rational expressions, exponents, roots, radicals,
and quadratic equations. This course or its equivalents satisfy the
prerequisite for Math 103. The course is offered in two additional
modes: in a self-paced mode in the Math Lab (Math 101XY), and in a
two-semester lecture/discussion mode (Math 101AB).
MATH 101A: Elementary Algebra I
1.5 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 95 or 95B or 95Y or
sufficient score on Math Assessment Test.
An introduction to elementary algebra. Taken with Math 101B, this
course is equivalent to Math 101. It is designed for students wishing
to take more time learning elementary algebra. Topics include linear
equations and inequalities, slope of lines, linear graphs, and systems
of equations.
MATH 101B: Elementary Algebra II
1.5 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101A or 101X.
A continuation of elementary algebra. Taken with Math 101A, this
course is equivalent to Math 101. It is designed for students wishing to take more time learning elementary algebra. Topics include
polynomials, rational expressions, exponents, roots, radicals, and
quadratic equations.
MATH 101X: Elementary Algebra
1.5 Units. 6.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 95 or 95B or 95Y or
satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test. Students may not be
enrolled concurrently in Math 101Y. An average of six hours weekly in
the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course is completed.
For students wishing to learn elementary algebra in a self-paced environment. This pair of courses taken in sequence, Math 101X followed
by Math 101Y, is equivalent to Math 101. Topics include algebraic
notation, properties of integers and rational numbers, operations
on integers and rational numbers, solving equations and systems,
operations with polynomials, operations with fractional expressions,
applied problems and formulas.
1.5 Units. 6.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101X. An average of six
hours weekly in the Math Lab for eight weeks or until the course is
completed.
MATH 103: Intermediate Algebra
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or
satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test.
This one-semester course extends many of the concepts introduced
in elementary algebra. The real number properties, polynomials, rational expressions, first degree equations, inequalities and
applications, exponents, radicals, quadratic equations, and complex
numbers are treated in greater detail. In addition, functions and their
graphs, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, linear programming, and exponential and logarithmic functions are covered.
This course or its equivalents satisfy the prerequisite for Math 104,
105, 109, 110, 114, 115, and 121. The course is offered in two additional modes: in a self-paced mode in the Math Lab (Math 103XY),
and in a two-semester lecture/discussion mode (Math 103AB). AA/
AS Math Proficiency; AA/AS Area E
MATH 103A: Intermediate Algebra I
2.5 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or
satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test.
This course, taken with Math 103B, is equivalent to Math 103. It is designed for students wishing to take more time learning intermediate
algebra. Topics include real number properties, polynomials, rational
expressions, first degree equations, inequalities and applications,
systems of linear equations with matrix elimination methods, linear
programming, functions, and graphs. AA/AS Math Proficiency
(combined with Math 103B); AA/AS Area E (combined with Math
103B)
MATH 103B: Intermediate Algebra II
2.5 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103A or 103X.
This course, taken with Math 103A, is equivalent to Math 103. It is
designed for students wishing to take more time learning intermediate algebra. Topics include quadratic, radical, and quadratic form
equations; relation, functions, inverses and their graphs; graphs and
equations of lines, parabolas, and circles; systems of equations and
inequalities; matrices and linear programming; exponential and
logarithmic functions; applications. AA/AS Math Proficiency (combined with Math 103A); AA/AS Area E (combined with Math 103B)
MATH 103X: Intermediate Algebra
2.5 Units. 1 lecture and 5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101 or 101AB
or 101XY or satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test. Students may
not be enrolled concurrently with Math 103Y. An average of six hours
weekly in the Math Lab until the course is completed. Students wishing
to complete 103X and Y in one semester must complete 103X in eight
weeks.
This self-paced course, the first of a two-part sequence equivalent to
Math 103, is an extension of the concepts introduced in elementary
algebra. New topics include absolute value inequalities and equa-
168
Mathematics
MARIN.EDU
tions, systems of linear equations with matrix elimination methods,
linear programming, functions and graphs.
AA/AS Math Proficiency (combined with Math 103Y); AA/AS Area E
(combined with Math 103Y)
statistics, introduction to probability theory, probability distributions, data sampling, estimation, correlation, hypothesis testing.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 103Y: Intermediate Algebra
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 123.
2.5 Units. 1 lecture and 5.625 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103A or
103X. An average of six hours weekly in the Math Lab until the course is
completed.
This self-paced course, the second of a two-part sequence equivalent
to Math 103, is an extension of the concepts introduced in elementary
algebra. New topics include rational expressions; equations and their
applications; radicals, equations, and applications; quadratic functions and their graphs and applications; exponential and logarithmic
functions and applications; conic sections; systems of nonlinear
equations; and the binomial theorem.
AA/AS Math Proficiency (combined with Math 103X); AA/AS Area E
(combined with Math 103X)
MATH 116: Linear Algebra
The study of systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vector
spaces, inner product spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and
eigenvectors, and applications. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2 MATH 117: Discrete Mathematics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 121 or 123. Can be taken
as Math 117 or COMP 117; credit awarded for only one course.
A survey of topics including set theory, combinatorics, graph theory,
algorithm, logic, Boolean algebra, formal languages, and probability theory. Recommended for mathematics majors and students
interested in engineering and applied fields. (CSU/UC) CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2A
COLLEGE LEVEL MATH COURSES – TRANSFERABLE
MATH 121: Calculus I with Applications
MATH 104: Plane Trigonometry
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY
or satisfactory score on Pre-Calculus Assessment Test.
Trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions; graphs, equations and identities involving the trigonometric functions; triangle
solutions, vector applications, and DeMoivre’s Theorem. (CSU) AA/
AS Area E, CSU Area B-4
Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, exponential,
and logarithmic functions. Standard applications of the derivative to
drawing graphs of functions of one real variable and to optimization
problems are included. Business applications of profit maximization
and consumer/producer surplus are covered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 105: College Algebra
MATH 122: Calculus II with Applications
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or
satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test. May be taken concurrently
with Math 104.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Math 121, and Math 104 or
satisfactory score on Trigonometry Placement Test.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY
or satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test.
This course includes an introduction to the elementary logic necessary for understanding mathematical proofs; emphasis on functions
and graphs (both algebraic and transcendental); polynomial equations and their roots; solutions of inequalities (including absolute
values); introduction to sequences, series, and conic sections. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 109: Pre-Calculus College Algebra and
Trigonometry
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: 103 or 103AB or 103XY or
satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test.
An intensive, combined course in pre-calculus, algebra, and trigonometry, intended to prepare students for calculus. Topics include
polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric
functions; the binomial theorem; arithmetic and geometric sequences and series; mathematical induction; trigonometric identities; polar
coordinates; conic sections; vectors; and applications of right angle
trigonometry. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area
2
MATH 115: Probability and Statistics
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB or 103XY
or satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test. Credit will be awarded
for either Math 115 or STAT 115, but not both courses.
An in-depth introduction to probability and statistics appropriate for
students in the math and life/earth science disciplines. Descriptive
Topics include multivariable calculus, partial derivatives, double
integrals, methods of integration, the calculus of trigonometric functions, first order ordinary differential equations, calculus applied to
probability and statistics, infinite series, and applications. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 123: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Math 104 or 104XY and Math
105, or Math 109, or satisfactory score on Math Placement Test.
Introduction to differential and integral calculus of functions of one
real variable. Continuous functions, limit of a function at a point,
the derivative; differentiation formulas and rules for one-variable
functions, implicit differentiation; mean value theorem and its application to optimization and curve sketching, linear approximation
and differential notation; applications of the Riemann integral to
finding areas, volumes of solids of revolutions, work, centroids, and
total force on a plane submerged in a fluid. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E,
CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 124: Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 123.
A continuation of Math 123 to include the inverse function theorem
for functions of one real variable, derivatives of inverse trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic, hyperbolic and inverse hyperbolic
functions. Introduction to first order ordinary differential equations, techniques of integration, improper integrals, indeterminate
forms, sequences, series, power series functions, and the calculus of
CATALOG 2015/2016
Medical Assisting
169
parameterized plane curves. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area
B-4, IGETC Area 2
greater than five years before certification award must be repeated, or
the student can pursue credit by examination.
MATH 199: Seminar for Tutors
A.S. IN MEDICAL ASSISTING: ADMINISTRATIVE AND
CLINICAL OPTION, OCCUPATIONAL
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103AB
or 103XY or satisfactory score on Math Assessment Test.
This course helps student tutors develop their understanding of the
principles of mathematics and of effective mathematics tutoring.
Students learn how to recognize different learning styles so that
they may better help others analyze their study habits and problemsolving skills, and how to communicate more effectively and provide
an encouraging tutoring environment. (CSU)
MATH 223: Analytic Geometry, Vector Analysis and
Calculus III
5.0 Units. 5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 124.
A continuation of Math 124 to include solid analytic geometry,
vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and
vector analysis including Green’s, Stoke’s, and divergence theorems.
(CSU/UC) CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MATH 224: Elementary Differential Equations
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 124. Advisory:
Concurrent enrollment in Math 223.
Elementary theory of differential equations including first order
equations, second and higher order linear equations, the methods
of power series, and Laplace transforms; first order linear systems,
numerical methods, partial differential equations, Fourier series, and
boundary value problems. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
MEDICAL ASSISTING
This program provides the opportunity for the development of basic
entry-level skills necessary for employment in a clinical/medical office environment. In a rapidly growing profession, medical assistants
work directly with physicians and other health care personnel as
team members in providing patient services. Medical assistants
perform a variety of clinical, laboratory, and administrative functions in physicians’ offices, medical clinics, laboratories, and specific
hospital departments.
The program is offered only at the Indian Valley Campus.
Students may elect to complete an Associate in Science degree, or a
Certificate of Achievement: Administrative and Clinical, Administrative, or Clinical. Students may elect to complete a Skills Certificate
for Medical Terminology Skills and MediSoft Skills. The Certificate
of Achievement options require a minimum of two semesters to
complete. Students may take courses on a part-time basis.
Career Options
Administrative and/or Clinical Medical Office Assistant, Clinical/
Administrative Research Assistant, Insurance Coder/Biller, Medical
Lab Assistant (Clinics, Hospitals, Private Labs), Medical Office
Manager, Veterinary Hospital Front Office Assistant
Department Phone: 415-485-9319
Cesar Pomajulca, Program Coordinator
Phone: 415- 883-2211, Ext. 8536
Recency Statement
Medical Assisting courses must be completed no longer than five
years before departmental certification is awarded. Courses taken
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements, as well as the completion of general education and
graduation requirements. Note: Students are required to complete
English 150 for the associate degree. All students should consult a
counselor. The Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion
of the program requirements as shown in the following list. Please
note that program courses must be completed with a grade of C or
better.
No program application procedure is required; however it is
advisable to see a counselor. Students may enter in the fall or spring
semester. Those currently working in the health care field may
receive consent to enroll in selected courses on a pass/no pass basis.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MEDA 160
Introduction to Medical Assisting Careers
2
MEDA 161
Administrative Medical Office Procedures
2
MEDA 162
Medical Financial Procedures 1.5
MEDA 163
Medical Office Computers -MediSoft
2
MEDA 163L Medical Office Computers - Medisoft Laboratory
0.5
MEDA 164
The Electronic Health Record
2
MEDA 164L The Electronic Health Record Laboratory
0.5
MEDA 165
Medical Terminology I
2
MEDA 166
Medical Terminology II
2
MEDA 170
Clinical Procedures I
2
MEDA 170L Clinical Procedures I Laboratory
1
MEDA 171
Medical Laboratory Procedures 2.5
MEDA 171L Medical Laboratory Procedures Laboratory 1.5
MEDA 172
Understanding Human Disease
3
MEDA 173
Pharmacology for Medical Assistants 1.5
MEDA 174L Clinical Externship 2.5
BOS
120* Computer Keyboarding
1
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1.5
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
31
*40 wpm proficiency required. Proof of proficiency must be submitted to the Enrollment
Services Office for graduation.
A.S. IN MEDICAL ASSISTING: ADMINISTRATIVE OPTION,
OCCUPATIONAL
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements, as well as the completion of general education and
graduation requirements. Note: Students are required to complete
English 150 for the associate degree. All students should consult a
counselor. The Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion
of the program requirements as shown in the following list. Please
note that program courses must be completed with a grade of C or
better.
No program application procedure is required, however it is
advisable to see a counselor. Students may enter in the fall or spring
semester. Those currently working in the health care field may
receive consent to enroll in selected courses on a pass/no pass basis.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MEDA 160
Introduction to Medical Assisting Careers
2
170
Medical Assisting
MARIN.EDU
MEDA 161
Administrative Medical Office Procedures
2
MEDA 162
Medical Financial Procedures 1.5
MEDA 163
Medical Office Computers -MediSoft
2
MEDA 163L Medical Office Computers - Medisoft Laboratory
0.5
MEDA 164
The Electronic Health Record
2
MEDA 164L The Electronic Health Record Laboratory 0.5
MEDA 165
Medical Terminology I
2
MEDA 166
Medical Terminology II
2
MEDA 174L Clinical Externship 2.5
BOS
120* Computer Keyboarding
1
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1.5
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
19.5
* 40 wpm proficiency required. Proof of proficiency must be submitted to the Enrollment
Services Office for graduation.
cal assisting and the roles and responsibilities of today’s health care
environment. Additional topics include interpersonal dynamics and
communications, safety practices in the workplace, legal and ethical
principles and cultural diversity in the delivery of patient care. (CSU)
A.S. IN MEDICAL ASSISTING: CLINICAL OPTION,
OCCUPATIONAL
This course examines the basic financial operations and procedures
used in medical offices. Topics include accounting principles and
methods, banking, financial record management, financial procedure terms, international classification of diseases, management
of claims and working with private, public, managed care and
government-sponsored health insurance programs. (CSU)
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded.)
The Associate in Science degree is awarded for completion of all
requirements, as well as the completion of general education and
graduation requirements. Note: Students are required to complete
English 150 for the associate degree. All students should consult a
counselor. The Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion
of the program requirements as shown in following list. Please note
that program courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.
No program application procedure is required, however it is
advisable to see a counselor. Students may enter in the fall or spring
semester. Those currently working in the health care field may
receive consent to enroll in selected courses on a pass/no pass basis.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MEDA 160
Introduction to Medical Assisting Careers
2
MEDA 164
The Electronic Health Record
2
MEDA 164L The Electronic Health Record Laboratory
0.5
MEDA 165
Medical Terminology I
2
MEDA 166
Medical Terminology II
2
MEDA 170
Clinical Procedures I
2
MEDA 170L Clinical Procedures I Laboratory
1
MEDA 171
Medical Laboratory Procedures
2.5
MEDA 171L Medical Laboratory Procedures Laboratory 1.5
MEDA 172
Understanding Human Disease
3
MEDA 173
Pharmacology for Medical Assistants 1.5
MEDA 174L Clinical Externship
2.5
BOS
120* Computer Keyboarding
1
CIS
101
Introduction to Personal Computers and Operating Systems
1.5
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
25
* 40 wpm proficiency required. Proof of proficiency must be submitted to the Enrollment
Services Office for graduation.
MEDA 161: Administrative Medical Office
Procedures
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introduction to the medical front office, emphasizing management procedures. Topics include medical law and ethics, reception,
telephone techniques, management of appointments, patient records
and medical office management. (CSU)
MEDA 162: Medical Office Financial Procedures
1.5 Units. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
MEDA 163: Medical Office Computers: MediSoft
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: MEDA 163L.
Advisories: BOS 120 and CIS 101.
This theory course introduces software used for patient financial
record management. It focuses on the basic functions of the MediSoft
program, including recording patient information, creating and
updating patient financial records, entering patient and insurance
company financial transactions, and scheduling appointments.
(CSU)
MEDA 163L: Medical Office Computers - MediSoft
Laboratory
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: MEDA 163.
Advisories: BOS 120 and CIS 101.
This laboratory class applies theory learned in MEDA 163, providing students with practical experience on the computer using the
MediSoft program. (CSU)
MEDA 164: The Electronic Health Record
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: MEDA 164L.
Advisories: BOS 120 and CIS 101.
This theory course introduces electronic medical records used in the
health care setting, focusing on the development and maintenance of
patients’ electronic medical record (based on a Spring Chart software
format). Topics include health record standards, data management,
patient chart basics, appointments, recording office visit information,
and laboratory test and prescription order management. (CSU)
MEDICAL ASSISTING COURSES (MEDA)
MEDA 164L: The Electronic Health Record
Laboratory
MEDA 160: Introduction to Medical Assisting
Careers
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: MEDA 164.
Advisories: BOS 120 and CIS 101.
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course, designed for students interested in pursuing a career in
medical assisting, provides an overview of the current health care
delivery system; the physical, mental and emotional demands of the
workplace and the skills required of medical assistants. The course
covers qualifications and professional preparation needed for medi-
This laboratory class applies theory learned in MEDA 164, providing
students with practical experience on the computer using electronic
health record software. (CSU)
CATALOG 2015/2016
MEDA 165: Medical Terminology I
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken before or
after MEDA 166.
This course introduces the fundamentals of medical term analysis
and word construction, emphasizing the spelling of anatomical,
pathological, surgical and diagnostic terminology. Material is
presented in a systems approach with units on the integumentary,
respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and nervous systems.
(CSU)
MEDA 166: Medical Terminology II
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken before or
after MEDA 165.
This course introduces the fundamentals of medical term analysis
and word construction, emphasizing the spelling of anatomical,
pathological, surgical and diagnostic terminology. Material is
presented in a systems approach with units on the urinary, digestive,
male and female reproductive, obstetrics and neonatology, eye, ear
and endocrine systems. (CSU)
MEDA 170: Clinical Procedures I
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: MEDA 170L.
This course introduces clinical medical assisting techniques and procedures commonly practiced in a medical office or clinic: vital signs,
anthropometric measurements, assisting with minor office surgery,
performing selected physical therapy procedures, sterilization and
disinfection of instruments, sterile and nonsterile dressing changes,
medical office emergencies, visual screening and auditory acuity, and
assisting with complete and selected specialty exams. Medical asepsis
and infection control are emphasized during all procedures. (CSU)
MEDA 170L: Clinical Procedures I Laboratory
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: MEDA 170.
This skills lab introduces clinical medical assisting performance
and skills techniques and procedures common to primary care in a
family practice medical office: vital signs, anthropometric measurements, assisting with minor office surgery, promoting tissue healing
through selected physical therapy modalities, demonstrating appropriate sterilization and disinfection procedures, safely operating
the autoclave, performing sterile and nonsterile dressing changes,
responding to emergencies, performing visual and auditory irrigation, medication administration, ear acuity testing, and positioning
the patient for selected specialty exams. Students must demonstrate
appropriate hand washing at all times. (CSU)
MEDA 171: Medical Laboratory Procedures
2.5 Units. 2.5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MEDA 170. Corequisite:
MEDA 171L.
This course introduces selected and common screening laboratory
and clinical procedures performed in medical offices. Topics include
EKGs, the microscope, hematology, urinalysis, various specimen
collections, radiology and diagnostic tests. Asepsis and universal
precautions are stressed. The role of medical assistants in procedures
including injections and skin tests is discussed. (CSU)
Medical Assisting
171
MEDA 171L: Medical Laboratory Procedures
Laboratory
1.5 Units. 4.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MEDA 170. Corequisite: MEDA
171.
This course is the medical laboratory that accompanies MEDA 171.
Students practice basic laboratory skills and learn how to perform
diagnostic tests in medical office and clinical laboratories, and how
to administer injections and venipunctures. (CSU)
MEDA 172: Understanding Human Diseases
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MEDA 165 or
166.
This theory course presents human diseases from an anatomic and
physiologic point of view. Signs and symptoms are presented after a
brief review of anatomical and physiological components. Diagnosis
and general treatment are also introduced. Includes lecture and
case studies to provide and reinforce theory, and to develop critical
thinking skills. (CSU)
MEDA 173: Pharmacology for Medical Assistants
1.5 Units. 1.5 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 85. Advisories: MEDA
165 or 166.
This theory course introduces common drugs and medications, drug
terminology, pharmacy law and ethics, prescription abbreviations,
measurements and dosage calculations, and drug classifications and
actions. (CSU)
MEDA 174LA: Medical Assisting Externship Administrative
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: MEDA 160, 161, 162, 164, and
165 or 166; additional requirements: recent physical examination,
health clearance, required immunizations; BLS/CPR certificates
required before the first day of externship.
This experience facilitates students’ transition into the role of the
medical assistant. Working under the direct supervision of licensed
healthcare professionals in a medical office or clinical setting,
students participate in front-office management within the administrative medical assistant scope of practice. (CSU)
MEDA 174LB: Medical Assisting Externship - Clinical
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: MEDA 160, 164, 170, 172, and
165 or 166; additional requirements: recent physical examination,
health clearance, required immunizations; BLS/CPR certificate required
on first day of externship.
This experience facilitates students’ transition into the role of the
medical assistant. Working under the direct supervision of licensed
healthcare professionals in a medical office or clinical setting, students provide care to patients and participate in front-office management within the clinical medical assistant scope of practice. (CSU)
MEDA 174LC: Medical Assisting Externship Administrative and Clinical
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: MEDA 160, 161, 162, 164,
170, 172, and 165 or 166; additional requirements: recent physical
examination, required immunizations, health clearance; BLS/CPR
certificate required on first day of externship.
This experience facilitates students’ transition into the role of the
medical assistant. Working under the direct supervision of licensed
healthcare professionals in a medical office or clinical setting,
students provide care to patients and participate in front-office
172
Multimedia Studies
management within the administrative and clinical medical assistant
scope of practice. (CSU)
MULTIMEDIA STUDIES
This program is designed to provide a link between content, technology and creative vision for emerging digital artists. Each course
provides hands-on experience for professional advancement, career
related training, and transfer preparation for university degrees.
Each course develops the creative process through project-based
learning that prepares students to be resourceful and independent,
and to succeed in the wide range of multimedia careers.
Career Options
Animator, Application Designer, Art Director, CGI Effects Artist,
Game Level Designer, Graphic or Production Artist, Illustrator,
Interface Designer, Project Manager, Video Editor, Video Producer,
Visual Designer, Web Designer, Web Developer
Faculty
James Gonzalez, Derek Wilson
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8200
A.S. IN MULTIMEDIA STUDIES
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded. Skills Certificates in
Multimedia Foundation, Multimedia 3-D, Print Design, Video
Production, and Web Authoring available.)
This curriculum is designed to provide education for digital and
new media-related careers, professional advancement and transfer
preparation.
A Certificate of Achievement is awarded for completion of the
core program plus course requirements for each intended specialty.
An Associate in Science (A.S.) degree is awarded for completion
of all requirements in the core program and chosen specialty as well
as completion of general education and graduation requirements.
Note: Students are required to complete English 150 for the associate
degree. All students should consult a counselor.
Repetition Policy
Students may petition to repeat MMST courses if two years have
lapsed since they last attended said course. College of Marin petition
procedures are located in the Enrollment Services section of the
catalog.
Core Requirements
The following courses are required of all Multimedia Studies degree
and Certificate of Achievement students:
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MMST 101
Orientation to Multimedia
.5
MMST 110
Introduction to Multimedia
3
MMST 111
Multimedia Production
3
MMST 213
Internship in Multimedia
3
TOTAL CORE UNITS
12.5
Specialties
In addition to the core requirements listed above, each Multimedia
Studies degree and Certificate of Achievement student will complete
one of the following specialties:
MARIN.EDU
AUTHORING SPECIALTY
Provides training and experience of digital media as it applies to
website design, development, and promotion with an emphasis on
skills related to the production of interactive content for delivery over
the web.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MMST 131A Web Design I
3
MMST 131B Web Design II
3
MMST 131C Web Design III
3
MMST 134A Interactive Media Design I
3
MMST 134B Interactive Media Design II
3
MMST 200A Authoring: Portfolio Development
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
27.5 including core
DESIGN SPECIALTY
Provides an overview of training and experience required for a career
in design. The Design Specialty includes the growing number of formats affected by design--interactive, print, web, and mobile devices.
Traditional elements of graphic design are also covered.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MMST 112
Design I: Fundamentals
3
MMST 120
Multimedia I: Digital Drawing
3
MMST 122
Design II: Graphics & Typography
3
MMST 150
Photoshop I: Intermediate Techniques
3
MMST 183
Design III: Page Layout
3
MMST 200D Design: Portfolio Development
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
27.5 including core
ENTERTAINMENT SPECIALTY
Provides training and experience for the entertainment-related
segments of multimedia. The Entertainment Specialty provides an
overview of skills required for games, movies, popular media, and
interactive devices.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
MMST 141
3DI: Modeling & Textures
3
MMST 142
Game Development I: Design and Creation
3
MMST 146
Video and Sound I: Editing
3
MMST 161
3DIII: Animation
3
MMST 166
Video Effects I: Transitions and Titles
3
MMST 200E Entertainment: Portfolio Development
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
27.5 including core
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificates of
Achievement.
Multimedia Studies Skills Certificates
Each Multimedia Studies Skills Certificate student must complete the
required courses as outlined for the specific certificate(s):
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Multimedia 3-D Skills Certificate
MMST 124
Beginning Modeling, Texturing, and Animation in 3DS Max
3
MMST 163
3D Character Animation: Complex Lighting and Materials
3
Multimedia Studies
CATALOG 2015/2016
MMST 173
Intermediate 3D Modeling and Animation (Level II)
Multimedia Print Design Skills Certificate
MMST 150
Photoshop I: Intermediate Techniques
MMST 160
Photoshop II: Calibration and Printing
MMST 183
Design III: Page Layout
MMST 193
Print and Packaging Design
Multimedia Web Authoring Skills Certificate
MMST 131A Web Design I
MMST 131B Web Design II
MMST 131C Web Design III
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
MULTIMEDIA STUDIES COURSES (MMST)
MMST 101: Orientation to Multimedia
0.5 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk for 8 weeks. No prerequisite.
Digital media is becoming the predominant method for receiving
news and entertainment. This course covers the tools and techniques
needed to become literate in this new digital media universe. Armed
with the knowledge and skills learned in the course, students will
be able to safely and effectively find and consume the tremendous
amount of digital media now available in many formats and delivery
platforms. (CSU)
MMST 110: Introduction to Multimedia
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST 101.
Mass media is giving way to personal and participatory media. This
survey course examines these changes and their likely long-term
effects, on both the media industry and society. Coursework introduces students to a wide range of digital media content, including
interactive media, mobile media, search engines, streaming video
and audio, podcasts, online communities, blogs, wikis and other
social media. (CSU)
MMST 111: Multimedia Production
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: CIS
110.
An opportunity to explore the different aspects and content of
multimedia projects. Students are introduced to team development
and production schedules as they learn the basic tools and methods
for developing graphics, sound, video, and authored environments
that simulate real-life projects and deadlines. (CSU)
MMST 112: Design I: Fundamentals
3.0 Units. 5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides fundamental knowledge of visual design as it
applies to multimedia and graphic design. General topics include
illustration, logo design, packaging, photo processing, photo correction, and visual design for websites. Assignments involve the creation
of original work using current digital software tools. Design skills are
developed through projects, research, and critiques. (CSU)
MMST 120: Multimedia I: Digital Drawing
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides hands-on training of sketching, drawing, and
illustrating using current hardware, tablets, and creative software.
Traditional pictorial skills and knowledge are developed through
hands-on multimedia drawing projects. (CSU)
173
MMST 122: Design II: Graphics and Typography
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
112.
This course provides typography and graphic design knowledge
through hands-on projects for visual design. Topics include typography, color methods, design theory, and production techniques.
Assignments involve the creation of original work using current
digital software tools. Design skills are developed through projects,
research, and critiques. (CSU)
MMST 124: Beginning Modeling, Texturing, and
Animation in 3DS Max
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This foundation class provides working knowledge, resources, and
learning techniques for 3D software. The class covers beginning 3D
modeling and texturing to create models appropriate for real-time
and pre-rendered contexts, animating non-character assets using
the broad toolset available to 3D animators, and character animation using simple deformations. Students develop self-evaluation
techniques to expand the skills necessary to produce photo-real or
fantasy models. (CSU)
MMST 125: Intermediate Modeling and Texturing in
3DS Max
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 124.
This course emphasizes modeling/texturing usable assets for realtime and pre-rendered contexts. Animating non-character assets,
using the broad toolset available to 3D animators, and/or character
animation using simple deformations. Techniques are reviewed and
refined to build self-evaluation skills and to produce usable photo
real or fantasy models, with focus on control using available tools.
(CSU)
MMST 130: Multimedia II: Digital Painting
3.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST 120.
This course provides hands-on training of sketching, under-painting,
and painting using current hardware, tablets, and creative software.
Traditional pictorial skills and knowledge will be developed through
hands-on multimedia painting projects. (CSU)
MMST 131A: Web Design I
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
101.
This course introduces the tools and practices of modern Web site
design and development. Students learn methods for designing and
creating attractive and effective Web pages. Production skills are
developed through the research, design, development and testing of a
small Web site. (CSU)
MMST 131B: Web Design II
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 131A.
This course provides intermediate-level instruction in the tools and
practices of modern Web site design and development. Students learn
methods for designing and creating Web sites that are attractive,
functional, and easy to use. Production skills are developed through
the research, design, development and testing of working Web sites.
(CSU)
174
Multimedia Studies
MMST 131C: Web Design III
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 131B.
This course provides advanced-level instruction in the tools and
practices of modern Web site design and development. Students learn
methods for designing and creating Web sites that are attractive,
functional, and easy to use. Production skills are developed through
the research, design, development and testing of working Web sites.
(CSU)
MMST 134A: Interactive Media Design I
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
101.
This course introduces the tools and practices of modern interactive
media design and development. Design and production skills are
developed through the research, design, development, and debugging
of interactive media for the Web and other digital media products.
(CSU)
MMST 134B: Interactive Media Design II
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 134A.
This course provides intermediate-level instruction covering the
scripts and tools for creating interactive products for the Web and
other media. Design scripting and production skills are developed
through the research, design, development, and debugging of interactive media for the Web and other digital media products. (CSU)
MMST 134C: Interactive Media Design III
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 134B.
This course provides advanced-level instruction covering the scripting skills and techniques required to design and create fully interactive digital media. Instruction covers modern scripting concepts
including all the fundamental components of modern scripting
languages, including variables, operators, objects, events, arrays,
custom functions, and more. (CSU)
MMST 135: AutoCAD I: Technical Drawing
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
135.
This course develops drafting and technical drawing skills using
AutoCAD. Basic math, computer, and drawing skills are highly
encouraged for success in this course. The course is ideal for multimedia students interested in further developing their skills to work
as 3D artists and animators in the entertainment industry, and also
recommended for students pursuing careers in fabrication/prototyping, industrial design, and manufacturing. (CSU)
MMST 141: 3DI: Modeling & Textures
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides working knowledge and techniques to develop
and texture models using 3D software. It covers beginning 3D
modeling and texturing to create models appropriate as real-time
and pre-rendered assets. Students develop skills to create models for
animation and games. (CSU)
MMST 142: Game Development I: Design and
Creation
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces students to the basics of game development
using analysis, research, and critiques to design and create a working
game. Students learn about the game industry and what is expected
MARIN.EDU
to develop an interactive/video game through assignments that
simulate employment by a game developer. (CSU)
MMST 145: AutoCAD II: 3D Drawing & Printing
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course develops 3D drafting and drawing skills using AutoCAD.
Basic math, computer, and drawing skills are highly encouraged for
success in this course. The course is ideal for multimedia students
interested in further developing their skills to work as 3D artists and
animators in the entertainment industry, and highly recommended
for students pursuing careers in fabrication/prototyping, industrial
design, and manufacturing. (CSU)
MMST 146: Video and Sound I: Editing
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A conceptual and practical framework for artistic and production
video techniques. The course provides hands-on experience in the
various production techniques of video editing, including organization, source material, audio, exporting, logging, and archiving.
(CSU)
MMST 150: Photoshop I: Intermediate Techniques
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
112.
This course provides intermediate knowledge of creative techniques
for imaging and artwork. Design skills are developed through exercises and projects using hands-on exercises, research, and critiques.
Includes creative and production techniques to prepare images for
professional projects using Photoshop and other current imaging
software. (CSU)
MMST 151: 3D II: Modeling & Rigging
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
141.
This course provides working knowledge and techniques to develop
and texture models using 3D software. It covers intermediate and
advanced 3D modeling and texturing to create models appropriate
as real-time and pre-rendered assets. Students develop skills to create
models for animation and games. (CSU)
MMST 152: Game Development II: Level Design and
Production
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 142.
This course guides students through the development process of creating a video game, with emphasis on teamwork. Industry software
and techniques are used to design, storyboard, model, animate, script
and publish a 3D video game. Students work in teams with assigned
tasks to develop a multi-level game, including compelling story and
cut-scenes. (CSU)
MMST 156: Video and Sound II: Advanced Editing
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 146.
This course offers intermediate and advanced video editing techniques. Topics include asset management, HD and/or 3D source
material, stereo and surround audio, exporting to various formats,
and color correction. Through hands-on exercises and projects, the
course develops creative and technical skills for advanced video
editing. (CSU)
CATALOG 2015/2016
Multimedia Studies
175
MMST 160: Photoshop II: Calibration and Printing
MMST 176: Video Effects II: Advanced Techniques
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 150.
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides advanced knowledge of techniques and practices for successful printing of digital images and artwork. It includes
advanced creative and production techniques to prepare students for
professional-level projects. Completed work is suitable for portfolios
or exhibiting. (CSU)
This course offers advanced video editing techniques using effects.
Topics include 3D, motion tracking, character animation, and color.
Through hands-on exercises and projects, the course develops
creative and technical skills using dynamic effects for motion and
composites. (CSU)
MMST 161: 3D III: Animation
MMST 183: Design III: Page Layout
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
150 and 151.
The first eight weeks of this course address environment creation for
3D scenes, emphasizing lighting, materials, atmospheres, particles
systems and special effects, and how to dress a scene for believability
in 3D animation or game play. The second eight weeks introduce the
character animation pipeline, including design, modeling, rigging,
and animation. A working understanding of artistic principles and
3D and 2D digital graphics is highly recommended. Because this
course covers the tools and techniques used to make video game
artwork and assets, it compliments and integrates with any of the
concurrently offered game design courses (MMST 142, 152, 162 and
172). Students develop skills to create models for animation and
games. (CSU)
MMST 163: 3-D Character Animation: Complex
Lighting and Materials
3.0 Units. 2.5 lecture and 2.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class focuses on 3-D lighting and how to dress it for believability, including atmospheres and particle systems, as well as special
effects such as glows, flares, and blurs. The course develops skills
in setting up lights, atmospheres, particle systems, and cameras, in
building believable textures, and in creating environments for 3-D
animation or game play. (CSU)
MMST 166: Video Effects I: Transitions and Titles
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
146.
This course offers intermediate video editing techniques using
effects for effective transitions, titles, and animations. Topics include
Chroma keys, Photoshop source material, animation, titles, and color
effects. Through hands-on exercises and projects, the course develops
creative and technical skills. (CSU)
MMST 171: 3D IV: Advanced Animation
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: MMST
161.
The first eight weeks of this course expand existing skills in environment creation for 3D scenes, emphasizing lighting, materials,
atmospheres, particles systems, and special effects, and how to dress
a scene for believability in 3D animation or game play. The second
eight weeks expand existing skills in the character animation pipeline, including design, modeling, rigging, and animation. A working
understanding of artistic principles and 3D and 2D digital graphics
is highly recommended. Because this course covers the tools and
techniques used to make video game artwork and assets, it complements and integrates with any of the concurrently offered game
design courses (MMST 142, 152, 162 and 172). Students develop skills
to create models for animation and games. (CSU)
This course provides basic knowledge of layout design as it applies to
printed media and paperless publishing. Design and layout skills are
developed through hands-on projects. (CSU)
MMST 193: Design IV: Advanced Layout Projects
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MMST 183.
This course provides advanced knowledge of layout and design
as applied to packaging, digital books and folio apps for tablets.
Assignments involve the creation of designs involving 4/C printing,
packaging dies, and alternate documents for ebooks and folio apps.
(CSU)
MMST 200A: Authoring: Portfolio Development
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as
MMST 200A, D, or E, or as Art 200; credit awarded for only one course.
Through lecture, hands-on practice, research and critiques, students
develop a professional portfolio that reflects their interests, skills,
and career goals in multimedia authoring. The course is for students
who have accomplished authoring skills and wish to create a cohesive
body of work for the multimedia industry. (CSU)
MMST 200D: Design: Portfolio Development
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as
MMST 200A, D, or E, or as Art 200; credit awarded for only one course.
Through lecture, hands-on practice, research and critiques, students
develop a professional portfolio that reflects their interests, skills,
and career goals in graphic arts or graphic design. The course is for
students who have accomplished design skills and wish to create a
cohesive body of work for the design or multimedia industry. (CSU)
MMST 200E: Entertainment: Portfolio Development
3.0 Units. 2 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as
MMST 200A, D, or E, or as Art 200; credit awarded for only one course.
Through lecture, hands-on practice, research and critiques, students
develop a professional portfolio that reflects their interests, skills,
and career goals in multimedia entertainment (3D, games, film/
video). The course is for students who have accomplished multimedia
skills and wish to create a cohesive body of work for the multimedia
industry. (CSU)
MMST 210A: Advanced Project: Authoring
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides the opportunity to design and implement a
group or individual authoring project, and a forum for discussing
and testing potential project ideas. Students receive guidance and
support to complete their projects. Intended for students who need
assistance not available in other multimedia authoring classes. (CSU)
176
Music
MMST 210D: Advanced Project: Design
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides the opportunity to design and implement a
group or individual design project, and a forum for discussing and
testing potential project ideas. Students recieve guidance and support
to complete their projects. Intended for students who need assistance
not available in other multimedia design classes. (CSU)
MMST 210E: Advanced Project: Entertainment
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course provides the opportunity to design and implement a
group or individual entertainment project, and a forum for discussing and testing potential project ideas. Students recieve guidance and
support to complete their projects. Intended for students who need
assistance not available in other multimedia entertainment classes.
(CSU)
MMST 213: Internship in Multimedia
3.0 Units. 1 lecture, 1.5 lab and 5 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 2. Prerequisite:
MMST 200 or Art 200.
This course bridges the gap between the classroom and the multimedia industry, providing an on-campus lecture class coupled with one
or more short-term internship projects for real clients. Expectations
are characterized by work-group activities, multiple projects under
deadline, and collaborative efforts. Internships are not guaranteed.
Intern projects may be suitable for students’ portfolios. (CSU)
MUSIC
A career in music today demands from all performers and participants a sophisticated knowledge of theory, history, performance
standards, and practices in all musical fields whether classical, jazz,
rock, or popular. Whatever branch of the music career you may find
yourself pursuing, academic music experience is valuable in your
background.
Career Options
Agent, Arranger, Arts Administrator, Band Director, Business
Manager, Choral Leader, Composer, Concert Hall Manager, Conductor, Copyist, Disc Jockey, Electronic Writer and Computer Specialist,
Instrument Maker, Instrument Repair Technician, Instrumental
Musician, Lyricist, Music Coach, Music Critic, Music Director,
Music Editor, Music Librarian, Music Publishing Editor, Music Store
Owner/Staff, Music Therapist, Musicologist, Performer, Piano TunerTechnician, Private Instructor, Recreation Therapist, Singer, Teacher
Faculty
Trevor Bjorklund, Paul Smith, Jim Stopher
Department Phone: 415-485-9460
Music courses with no prerequisites: 101, 102, 105, 106, 116, 121,
162, 163, 173, 181, 182, 279, 281, 282.
The Music Program at College of Marin
Music students enter college with varying levels of musical experience and training. While certain music courses are open to everyone,
a standardized audition is required for more advanced classes. Most
classes require that a student have some basic skill at reading musical
notation and some familiarity with musical terminology. Music 106
is designed to provide this theoretical background. Students already
familiar with classical music periods, forms, and styles may wish to
MARIN.EDU
take the Music Placement Test; passing this test exempts students
from taking Music 101.
In order to sufficiently understand the required music theory,
students are advised to acquire and develop their skills in ear training and piano concurrently with the concepts taught in that level of
music theory. Therefore, the program is designed so that a student
is enrolled in all the 100-level courses simultaneously (i.e., taking
Theory I, Ear Training I, and Piano I all in the same semester). If this
is not possible, students are advised to take piano before taking the
same level of music theory.
Performance is required of all music majors; they are required to
be in a major performing ensemble (see below), and are encouraged
to perform in regular monthly recital hours.
To receive a comprehensive music education beyond the degree
requirements, the music department recommends certain electives,
depending on the student’s area of concentration:
• All music majors need small ensemble experience: Music 180 (for
instrumentalists) or Music 183 (for vocalists).
• Jazz students: Music 113 (Jazz Improvisation).
• Composition students: Music 214 (Composition), Music 178, 179,
279 (one or more strings classes on any level), a music notation
course, and Music 116 and 117.
• Electronic music students, or students interested in careers in the
recording industry: Music 116 and 117.
• Vocalists: Music 181, 182, 281, and 282.
• Majors in music education or music therapy: Music 178, 179, and
162; a music notation course; and Music 181 and 182.
Performing Ensembles
The Music Department has several performing groups that serve
the various interests and abilities of students and the community:
an orchestra, bands, choruses, instrumental and choral ensembles,
instrumental and vocal jazz ensembles. These groups present
scheduled concerts as well as perform on special occasions during
the school year.
Music majors must be enrolled in one of the following ensembles
each semester: MUS 162, 163, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, or 177. These
large ensembles provide students the opportunity for musical growth
at all stages of their development. Participation in a major performing ensemble is just as essential, if not more so, to those just learning
the basic music vocabulary as to those who have the opportunity to
perform solos with the ensemble. Those whose major performing
medium is a band or orchestra instrument must be in either Music
162, 167, or 168. Those whose performance medium is voice, or
whose instrument is one not usually associated with ensemble work
(piano, guitar, etc.), must be in either Music 163 or 169. Pianists may
partly fulfill this requirement as noted in the Music 165 and Music
166 course descriptions, however.
Standardized Auditions
Several music courses require an audition based upon a standardized
level of performance. Every student who participates in one of these
courses is expected to meet the musical requirements of the particular audition. Auditions will vary from course to course.
Music
CATALOG 2015/2016
A.A. IN MUSIC
Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional
general education and graduation requirements, will be awarded the
associate degree. Note: Students are required to complete English 150
for the associate degree. All students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Theory
111
Theory I
3
MUS
112
Theory II
3
MUS
211
Theory III
3
MUS
212
Theory IV
3
MUS
Ear Training
121
Ear Training I
2
MUS
122
Ear Training II
2
MUS
221
Ear Training III
2
MUS
222
Ear Training IV
2
MUS
Music Literature and Analysis
101
Introduction to Classical Music (or passing score on placement test) 3
MUS
102
Music Masterworks
3
MUS
Piano
171
Piano I
2
MUS
172
Piano II
2
MUS
271
Piano III
2
MUS
Plus a major performing ensemble each semester to be chosen from the following:
1.5
MUS162Band
163
College Chorus
1.5
MUS
165* Piano Ensemble
1.5
MUS
166* Piano Repertoire and Interpretation
1.5
MUS
167
Symphony Orchestra
1.5
MUS 168
Community Symphonic Band
1.5
MUS
169
Marin Oratorio
1.5
MUS
177
Jazz Ensemble
1.5
MUS
36
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
* Music majors who are pianists may satisfy two semesters of the major performing
ensemble requirements with each of these courses.
MUSIC COURSES (MUS)
MUS 101: Introduction to Classical Music
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
The appreciation and enjoyment of classical music through analytical
listening. The study of musical elements; the development of musical
forms and styles, vocal and instrumental media, the lives of the great
composers, and analyses of their works. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
MUS 102: Music Masterworks
3.0 Units. 3 lecture and 1 TBA hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Successful completion of either Music 101 or 106.
Guided listening and discussion, with examples of music masterworks from the beginning of available music history to the present.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
MUS 103: History of Musical Theatre
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as Music 103,
Dance 103 or Drama 103; credit awarded for only one course.
This course surveys the history of American musical theatre and its
effects on popular culture. The course explores the development of
177
the musical in the context of American theatre history, through a
multicultural study of the evolution of this uniquely American art
form. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
MUS 105: Rock, Pop and Jazz
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A multicultural study of the evolution of American musical styles
including blues, early country and folk, jazz, rhythm and blues, soul,
rock and roll, pop, mambo, salsa, samba, bossa nova, hip hop, and
hybrid forms. Emphasis is on the African-American, EuropeanAmerican, and Latin-American origins of these contemporary styles
and their historical contexts. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas C & G, CSU
Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
MUS 106: Music Fundamentals
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Music 163. Not
open to students who have completed Music 111, 112, 211, or 212.
Designed for anyone interested in acquiring basic music skills for
performance, teaching or composition. Includes music reading, notation, terminology, piano keyboard, sight singing, and ear training.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-1
MUS 108: Introduction to World Music
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Learn about the world’s cultures through their music, understood
on their own terms. Learn to identify non-western musical materials
and instruments and non-western rhythms and harmony in order
to understand the musical and uniquely cultural meanings inherent in the music of specific populations. The course also introduces
ethnomusicology, by exploring methodology distinct from that of
traditional western art music. (CSU) AA/AS Area C
MUS 109: Music in Society
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Explore the social and psychological effects of everyday music in
everyday life, from background music in restaurants and malls, to
television commercials and film scores, to personal listening choices
in public and private. Learn to “decode” the music that surrounds
us, and to understand how genre and medium combine in contextspecific situations to produce controlled conscious and subconscious
reactions in a “hearing but not listening” public. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-1, IGETC Area 3A
MUS 111: Theory I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: read simple music. Advisory:
concurrent enrollment in Music 121, 171, and a major performing
ensemble.
Beginning music theory. Review of scales, meter signatures,
intervals, triads, and seventh chords. Study of four-part harmonic
progression including cadences, voice leading and doubling rules,
and some non-harmonic tones. (CSU/UC)
MUS 112: Theory II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Music 111. Advisory:
concurrent enrollment in Music 122, 172, and one major performing
ensemble.
Continued study of harmonic progressions, focusing on secondary
triads and their inversions, sequences, non-harmonic tones, and
counterpoint. Introduction to seventh chords. (CSU/UC)
178
Music
MARIN.EDU
MUS 113: Jazz Improvisation
MUS 162: Band
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Advisory: Basic instrumental/vocal technique and a willingness to take
risks.
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
An introduction to improvisation for instrumentalists and vocalists
who wish to develop their ability to perform jazz solos. Students learn
jazz harmony, melody and rhythm, and apply this knowledge to the
craft of improvisation. (CSU/UC)
MUS 116: Desktop Musician I
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Basic concepts of electronic music synthesis, digital audio recording, and MIDI. The class emphasizes creating original multi-track
recordings using loops, software instruments, and audio tracks; and
includes editing, mixing, and mastering techniques. Supervised
hands-on practice sessions in addition to required individual lab
time. (CSU)
MUS 117: Desktop Musician II
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MUS 116.
A continuation of the basic concepts of electronic music synthesis,
digital audio recording, and MIDI. The class emphasizes creating
original multi-track recordings using loops, software instruments,
and audio tracks; and includes editing, mixing, and mastering
techniques. Supervised hands-on practice sessions in addition to
required individual lab time. (CSU)
MUS 121: Ear Training I
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Read simple
music; know major scales. Advisory: Music 106.
The ear training component of the complete music major package.
Instruction includes rhythmic and melodic sight reading and singing; rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic aural perception; and some
keyboard harmony. (CSU/UC)
MUS 122: Ear Training II
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Music 121.
The ear training component of the music major package. The course
parallels the concepts and harmonic materials taught in Music 112.
Instruction includes rhythmic and melodic sight reading; rhythmic,
melodic, and harmonic aural perception; some keyboard harmony;
melodic and harmonic simple intervals; triads in inversions and V7
chords; diatonic melodies; subdivisions of the beat into 2 to 4 parts;
and harmonic progressions, including diatonic triads and V7. (CSU/
UC)
MUS 151: Applied Music I
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. Corequisite: MUS
106, 111, 112, 211, or 212, or by audition.
This course. designed for music majors, is the individualized study
of the appropriate undergraduate transfer-level techniques and
repertoire for the specific instrument (or voice) being studied. It
emphasizes the progressive development of skills needed for solo
performance. Each week students take a 1-hour individual lesson
and complete appropriate practice hours. Achievement is evaluated
through a juried performance. (CSU)
A daytime instrumental ensemble for traditional band instrumentalists. Intermediate players are accepted as well as more advanced ones.
This course satisfies the major performing ensemble requirement for
music majors. A public performance is required. (CSU/UC)
MUS 163: College Chorus
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
A chorus of mixed voices open to all students. The rehearsal and
performance of choral music of a moderate degree of difficulty. Vocal
techniques and musical skills are emphasized. Participation in public
performances is required. (CSU/UC)
MUS 165: Piano Ensemble
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
The study, rehearsal, and performance of music for piano ensemble
(one piano/four hands, two pianos/four hands, etc). Music majors
who are pianists may satisfy two semesters of the major performing
ensemble requirement with this course. (CSU/UC)
MUS 166: Piano Repertoire and Interpretation
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Music
272 and standardized audition.
A chronological survey of piano literature, stressing stylistic features.
Students will perform in class and at a final recital. Music majors
who are pianists may satisfy two semesters of the major performing
ensemble requirement with this course. (CSU/UC)
MUS 167: Symphony Orchestra
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
The study, rehearsal, and performance of music composed for chamber orchestra and full symphony orchestra from Baroque, Classical,
Romantic, and contemporary periods. Fulfills the Major Performing
Ensemble requirement for the Associate degree in Music. Participation in public performances is required. (CSU/UC)
MUS 168: Community Symphonic Band
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
An instrumental ensemble for traditional band instrumentalists.
This course satisfies the Major Performing Ensemble requirement
for music majors. Participation in public performances is required.
(CSU/UC)
MUS 169: Marin Oratorio: the Community Chorus at
College of Marin
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
A chorus of mixed voices of experienced choral singers that prepares
and performs choral masterworks. Students must have previous
choral experience, a pleasing, blending voice, and music reading
ability. Advanced vocal techniques and choral skills are emphasized.
Participation in public performances is required. Students may be
required to participate in sectional rehearsals outside of class time
and to assist in various facets of concert production. (CSU/UC)
Music
CATALOG 2015/2016
179
MUS 171: Piano I
MUS 190: Opera Workshop
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Read simple music, or Music 106.
2.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Standardized audition.
This series of courses builds skills for keyboard proficiency, developing musicianship and correlating with subjects studied in other
components of the music program. (CSU/UC)
MUS 172: Piano II
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 171.
This series of courses builds skills for keyboard proficiency, developing musicianship and correlating with subjects studied in other
components of the music program. (CSU/UC)
MUS 177: Jazz Ensemble
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
A course in large jazz ensemble performance. Intermediate and
advanced skills are required. This course satisfies the major performing ensemble requirement for music majors. A public performance is
required. (CSU/UC)
MUS 178: Strings I
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Ability to read simple music, or Music 106.
Beginning study in an orchestral string instrument, including violin,
viola, cello and string bass. (CSU/UC)
MUS 179: Strings II
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Ability to read simple music, or Music 178.
Beginning instruction in an orchestral string instrument, including
violin, viola, cello and string bass. (CSU/UC)
MUS 180: Chamber Music Ensemble
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
The study, rehearsal and performance of repertoire for small
instrumental ensembles (may include voice). Music from Baroque,
Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras may be included, depending
on skill level of players and instrumentation available. (CSU/UC)
MUS 181: Voice I
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Read simple music, or Music 106.
Rehearsal and performance of a staged opera production. Participation in public performance is required and is the final exam for the
course. (CSU)
MUS 191: Musical Production: Orchestra
1.5 Units. 3.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Standardized
audition.
Rehearsal and performance of orchestral accompaniment to staged
musical productions. Participation in public performances is
required and is the final exam for this course. (CSU/UC)
MUS 192: Opera Festival
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Standardized audition.
Restaging of an on-campus opera production for off-campus performances. Participation in public performances is required and is the
final exam for the course. (CSU)
MUS 193: Musical Production: Cast
1.5 Units. 3.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Standardized
audition.
Rehearsal and performance of all vocal music aspects of staged musical production. Participation in public performances is required and
is the final exam for this course. (CSU/UC)
MUS 211: Theory III
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Music 112. Advisory:
concurrent enrollment in Music 221, 271, and a major performing
ensemble.
Students will study four-part harmony utilizing diatonic sevenths,
secondary chords, and modulation. Exercises, analysis, and composition are included, as well as some keyboard harmony. Introduction to
short forms of composition. (CSU/UC)
MUS 212: Theory IV
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Music 211. Advisory:
concurrent enrollment in Music 222, 272, and a major performing
ensemble.
Further study of chromatic harmony, including mode mixture,
Neapolitan and augmented sixths, extended harmony, and modulation to more remote keys, followed by an overview of impressionism
and 20th and 21st century compositional techniques. Analysis and
composition, some keyboard applications. (CSU/UC)
Elementary class instruction in the fundamentals of singing, principles of tone production, and voice development. (CSU/UC)
MUS 214: Music Composition Seminar
MUS 182: Voice II
Continued elementary class instruction in the fundamentals of singing, principles of tone production, and voice development. (CSU/UC)
The study of compositional techniques, methods of notation, and
individual creation of musical compositions. Students work on
creative assignments of their own choice, listen to recordings, present in-class performances, and complete several small or one large
composition during the semester. (CSU/UC)
MUS 183: Chamber Singers
MUS 221: Ear Training III
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Music 122.
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 181.
A small select choir of mixed voices performing music written for
small choral ensembles. Participation in public performances is
required. (CSU/UC)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ability to read and write
musical notation.
A continuation of Music 121 and 122, the ear training component of
the music major package. This course parallels the concepts and harmonic materials taught in Music Theory III (Music 211). Instruction
includes rhythmic and melodic sight reading; rhythmic, melodic,
180
Nursing Education: Registered
and harmonic aural perception; and some keyboard harmony.
Includes study of compound intervals, seventh chords, melodies with
chromaticism, subdivisions of the beat into two to seven parts, and
harmonic progressions including secondary chords. (CSU/UC)
MUS 222: Ear Training IV
MARIN.EDU
MUS 278: Strings III
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 179.
Continuing intermediate study of an orchestral string instrument.
(CSU/UC)
2.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Music 221.
MUS 279: Strings IV
A continuation of Music 121, 122, and 221. The ear training component of the music major package. This course parallels the concepts
and harmonic materials taught in Music Theory IV (Music 212).
Instruction includes rhythmic and melodic sight reading; rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic aural perception, and some keyboard
harmony. Includes study of compound intervals, seventh chords in
inversion, synthetic and other unusual scales, chromatic, modal, and
atonal melody, complex meter changes, polyrhythm, irregular meter,
and harmonic progressions including mode mixture, Neapolitan and
augmented sixth chords. (CSU/UC)
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 278.
MUS 261: Small Ensemble Techniques
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
This class focuses on improving the skills of the musician in a small
ensemble. Recommended for students who have already had chamber music or other small ensemble experience. (CSU/UC)
MUS 262: Large Ensemble Techniques
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite:
Standardized audition.
This class is designed to improve the practice, rehearsal, and performance skills of musicians in large music ensembles. Previous large
ensemble experience is recommended. (CSU/UC)
MUS 271: Piano III
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 172.
This series of courses builds skills for keyboard proficiency, developing musicianship and correlating with subjects studied in other
components of the music program. (CSU/UC)
MUS 272: Piano IV
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 271.
This series of courses builds skills for keyboard proficiency, developing musicianship and correlating with subjects studied in other
components of the music program. (CSU/UC)
MUS 273: Piano V
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 272.
A continuation of Music 271 and 272, with more emphasis on the
development of functional knowledge of musical structure, melody,
rhythm, harmony and form. Attention is given to individual levels of
achievement. (CSU/UC)
MUS 274: Piano VI
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 273.
A continuation of Music 272 and 273, with more emphasis on the
development of functional knowledge of musical structure, melody,
rhythm, harmony and form. Attention is given to individual levels of
achievement. (CSU/UC)
Continuing advanced study of an orchestral string instrument.
(CSU/UC)
MUS 281: Voice III
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 182.
Intermediate instruction in the fundamentals of singing, principles
of tone production, and voice development with emphasis on vocal
literature. (CSU/UC)
MUS 282: Voice IV
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory:
Music 281.
A more advanced development and refinement of the fundamentals
of singing, principles of tone production, and voice development with
emphasis on more advanced vocal literature. (CSU/UC)
MUS 287: Chamber Orchestra
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Repeats: 3.
Advisory: Music 279.
An orchestra primarily of stringed instruments designed to prepare
players not yet ready for Community Symphony Orchestra, but more
advanced than Strings I-IV. Individual and ensemble string techniques are emphasized. (CSU)
MUS 288: Advanced Voice Workshop
1.0 Unit. 0.5 lecture and 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite.
Advisory: Music 282.
Advanced instruction in the fundamental techniques of singing,
principles of tone production, and voice development, with emphasis
on advanced vocal literature. (CSU/UC)
NURSING EDUCATION:
REGISTERED
The Registered Nursing Education Program at College of Marin
prepares students for entry into the nursing profession, and serves as
a foundation for advanced nursing studies. The Program faculty view
Nursing Education as an individualized, collaborative endeavor that
assists students in acquiring the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for entry-level nursing practice. Emphasizing critical thinking,
effective communication, and cultural and clinical competence,
the Program aims to prepare graduates for roles as care providers
across the health care continuum, as managers of care, and as active
members of the nursing profession. The Program affirms the dignity
and worth of each individual, and strives to educate students who are
adaptable, responsible, politically aware, and committed to lifelong
learning. Graduates are prepared for entry-level practice in a variety
of healthcare settings.
CATALOG 2015/2016
The Registered Nursing Program is guided and approved by the
Board of Registered Nursing and accredited by the National League
for Nursing Accrediting Commission through fall 2015. Graduates
are prepared to take the National Council Licensure Examination for
Registered Nurses. The Program offers opportunities for advanced
placement for returning, transfer and challenge students.
Students must complete prerequisite courses and assessments
prior to application and entry into the Program. All potential
applicants are advised to meet with a College of Marin counselor to
clarify requirements and develop an education plan.
Faculty
Molly Johnson, Jeannie Langinger, Sara Lefkowitz, Joyce Passer, Diane Ridley,
Joanna Ruddle, Stephanie Strozier
Department Phone: 415-485-9319
www.marin.edu/nursing
Please note: The Registered Nursing Program will implement
curriculum changes for the class entering the Program in fall of
2015. Students entering during the 2014-2015 academic year must
complete the degree requirements as listed by the end of the 2016
summer session.
A. Courses Taken at Other Colleges or Universities:
The Program has seven prerequisite courses in addition to courses
required to complete the nursing licensing exam and earn the
Associate in Science degree. Courses completed at other colleges
or universities may be used to meet these requirements if they are
determined to be equivalent to those offered at College of Marin.
To determine equivalency, each course must be evaluated through
the procedure identified below. There is no guarantee that a course
taken at another college or university will be equivalent to one at the
College of Marin. Applicants will receive a copy of their completed
equivalency evaluation to assist in develop of their education plan.
Refer to “Admissions Information” in Section 2 of this catalog for
additional information regarding this process.
• Beginning September 1, approximately 1 year prior to the fall
date of entry into the Program, submit materials for evaluation of
equivalency to Enrollment Services, College of Marin, 835 College
Avenue, Kentfield, CA 94909.
• Required materials include official transcripts for all courses
taken at other colleges or universities in the United States.
Transcripts must be ordered within one calendar year of the date
of application. Also required is the Petition for Substitution for the
Nursing Program, available at www.marin.edu/nursing.
• Nursing courses completed at foreign colleges or universities must
be evaluated by the California Board of Registered Nursing for
consideration of equivalency. More information is available at
www.rn.gov. Refer to Foreign College Transcripts, under “Academic Records” in Section 2 of this catalog for more information.
B. Credit by Examination:
Students may “challenge” program prerequisite or corequisite courses
by use of the college Credit by Examination Process described under
“Advanced Placement/Academic Credit” in Section 2 of this catalog.
A “challenge” must be completed prior to submitting an application
for entry into the Program. “Challenge” courses must be graded
using a letter grade; Pass/No Pass grades are not accepted.
Nursing Education: Registered
181
C. Graduation Requirements for Students with a Prior Bachelor’s
Degree:
Applicants who have verification of an earned Bachelor’s degree
from a regionally accredited United States college or university may
be awarded the Associate of Science degree upon completion of all
courses required for nursing licensure. This includes all program prerequisite courses, nursing education courses and speech, psychology
and anthropology/sociology courses listed under Degree Requirements, below. Please see a counselor for more information.
A.S. IN NURSING: REGISTERED (R.N.), OCCUPATIONAL OR
TRANSFER
The Registered Nursing Education Program, in preparation for licensure as a registered nurse, is offered only at the Kentfield Campus
and requires two academic years of prescribed courses, including
acquisition of the Associate in Science degree. The curriculum is offered in four semesters. Clinical placements require day and evening
scheduling Monday through Saturday. Because the clinical rotations
are scheduled on both days and evenings, it is strongly recommended
that all course requirements for registered nursing licensure and the
Associate of Science degree be taken prior to entry into the program.
Degree Requirements:
• Human Anatomy (BIOL 120)
• Human Physiology (BIOL 224)
• Microbiology (BIOL 240)
• Chemistry (CHEM 110, 114 or 115)
• English (ENGL 150)
• Nursing Education 180, 188, 185, 210, 212, 214, 216, 220A, 220B,
225, 181, 180L, 185L, 182, 210L, 212L, 214L, 216L, 203, 225L
• Psychology 110; and 112 or 114
• One course to be selected from: Anthropology 102, 103, or 208; or
Sociology 110 or 140
• One course to be selected from: Speech 110, 120, 122, 128, 130 or
132
• Completion of College of Marin General Education requirements
Note: The College of Marin Registered Nursing Education Program must respond to changing legal/contractual requirements.
Board of Registered Nursing Content Required for Licensure
Suggested Sequence of Courses for Students
REQUIREMENTS (Curriculum through the graduating class of 2016)
Freshman Year — First Semester
NE
101
Level I Nursing Skills Laboratory
NE
135
Nursing I: Fundamentals of Nursing
NE
135L Nursing I: Fundamentals Clinical Laboratory
NE
138
Introduction to Pharmacology
and Medication Administration for Nurses
PSY
110
Introduction to Psychology
Communication Skills Requirement
Freshman Year — Second Semester
NE
102
Level II Nursing Skills Laboratory
NE
140
Nursing II: Medical-Surgical Nursing
NE
140L Nursing II: Medical-Surgical Clinical Laboratory
NE
210
Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family
NE
210L Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family Clinical Laboratory
NE
220A Pharmacology in Nursing-A
UNITS
1
4
2.5
1
3
3
.5
3
2.5
2
2
1
182
Nursing Education: Registered
PSY
112
Child and Adolescent Psychology
3
Or
PSY
114
The Psychology of Human Development: Lifespan
3
Sophomore Year — Third Semester
NE
203
Level III: Nursing Skills Laboratory
.5
NE
212
Nursing in Mental Health and Nursing of the Older Adult
2
NE
212L Nursing in Mental Health and Nursing
of the Older Adult Clinical Laboratory
2
NE
214
Nursing III: Advanced Concepts in Mobility, Sensation and Cognition 2
NE
214L Nursing III: Advanced Concepts in Mobility, Sensation and Cognition
Clinical Laboratory
2.5
NE
220B Pharmacology in Nursing
1
Behavioral and/or Social Sciences Requirement
3
Sophomore Year — Fourth Semester
NE
216
Nursing III: Advanced Concepts in Cardiovascular Oxygenation and
Renal Function
2
NE
216L Nursing III: Advanced Concepts in Cardiovascular Oxygenation and
Renal Function Clinical Laboratory
2.5
NE
225
Nursing Leadership and Management
2
NE
225L Clinical Transitions: Clinical Laboratory
2.5
Communication Skills Requirement
3
Additional Courses Required for General Education Degree
American Institutions
3
Humanities
3
Physical Education
1
Cross Cultural Studies
3
Communication and Analytical Thinking
3
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
66.5
Note: Only those completing all the nursing requirements of a
semester may advance to the following semester.
NURSING COURSE REQUIREMENTS UNITS
(New Nursing Curriculum to begin with class of 2017, entering August 2015. Note that
the General Education courses cited in the previous curriculum sequence are still to be
considered as part of new curriculum.)
First Semester
NE
180
Fundamentals of Nursing
3
NE
180L Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical Laboratory
2
NE
181
Clinical Application Laboratory I
.5
NE
185
Medical-Surgical Nursing I
3
NE
185L Medical-Surgical Nursing I Clinical Laboratory
2
NE
188 Pharmacology I 1
Second Semester
NE 182 Clinical Application Laboratory II .5
NE 280 Medical Surgical Nursing II
2
NE 280L Medical Surgical Nursing II Clinical Laboratory 2
NE 283A Maternal Child Nursing A 2
NE 283AL Maternal Child Nursing A Clinical Laboratory 2
NE 288A Pharmacology II
1
Third Semester
NE 281 Clinical Application Laboratory III .5
NE 283B Maternal Child Nursing B
2
NE 283BL Maternal Child Nursing B Clinical Laboratory
2
NE 284 Mental Health Nursing and Care of the Older Adult 2
NE 284L Mental Health Nursing and Care of the Older Adult Clinical Laboratory 2
NE 288B Pharmacology III 1
Fourth Semester
NE 285 Medical Surgical Nursing III 2
NE 285L Medical Surgical Nursing III Clinical Laboratory 2.5
NE 286 Professional Role Development 1
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NE 286L Professional Role Development Clinical Laboratory
TOTAL NURSING UNITS
Note: Only those completing all the nursing requirements of a
semester may advance to the following semester.
2.5
38.5
ENROLLMENT PROCEDURES FOR NEW STUDENTS
The following information pertains to students planning to enroll
in the first semester of the Program. Transfer, advanced placement
and reentry student information is included in the following section,
“Enrollment Procedures for Returning, Transfer or Challenge
Students.” Please read and follow the directions carefully. Please also
refer to the Program website for details: www.marin.edu/nursing. It
is recommended that all students meet with a college counselor prior
to applying to the program to plan their course of study.
A. Application Dates
Completed applications must be submitted to the Enrollment
Services department between January 2 and February 1 of the
academic year when enrollment is requested. If either date occurs
on a school holiday or weekend, the next following business day will
apply. Applications will not be accepted prior to January 2 and late
applications will not be considered.
B. Program Requirements for Consideration of Admission
1. Applicants must submit a complete application, demonstrate
completion of all program prerequisite courses with a grade of
“C” or better, be in good academic standing at College of Marin,
meet the minimum assessment score on the Chancellor’s Formula
(72%), and meet the established minimal score on the ATI TEAS
V assessment test.
2. Prerequisite Course Information:
• Grades of C- (minus) or lower, Pass/Fail, and Credit/No Credit
on prerequisite courses will not be accepted.
• Some Nursing Program prerequisite courses have their own
prerequisites. Please review the college catalog or meet with a
counselor to develop a plan of completion.
• There is no recency requirement for prerequisite courses.
3. Seven Prerequisite Courses:
• NE 90: Introduction to Nursing Education and Practice.
• *Chemistry: One semester of college chemistry (CHEM 110 or
114 or 115) or one year high school chemistry.
• *Anatomy: One four- or five- (semester) unit college human
anatomy course with laboratory (BIOL 120).
• *Physiology: One four- or five- (semester) unit college human
physiology course (BIOL 224) with laboratory.
• Math: Math 101 or 101AB or 101XY or College of Marin
assessment test qualifying for Math 103 (challenge option).
Please note: Math 103 is the college graduation requirement.
• English: English 150.
• *Microbiology: One four- or five- (semester) unit college
microbiology course (BIOL 240) with laboratory.
*Please Note: All science courses must contain a laboratory
component. Online prerequisite science courses or those with virtual
labs will not be accepted.
1. Prerequisite Courses Completed at Other Institutions:
Prerequisite and corequisite courses completed at other colleges
or universities must be equivalent to those offered at College
CATALOG 2015/2016
of Marin. Students requesting equivalency for courses must
complete the following:
• Between September 1 and October 31 submit a completed
Petition for Substitution for Nursing Program Courses. This
form is available on the nursing program website: http://www.
marin.edu/nursing.
• Submit the completed form with official transcripts for
all courses and catalog descriptions for each course. The
transcript must be ordered and dated within one calendar
year from the application date. The catalog description must
be from the college catalog from the academic year(s) the
course(s) was completed.
• Submit all materials to Enrollment Services.
• Retain the evaluation and submit a copy with your nursing
program application.
C. Chancellor’s Admission Formula
Applicants who successfully complete all prerequisites and submit a
complete application must achieve a Chancellor’s Formula assessment score of at least 72% for further consideration. The assessment
score is determined by a formula using the following:
• Overall college GPA for the last five years or ten semesters;
• Grade received in English 150;
• GPA of core biology courses: Anatomy, Physiology and
Microbiology;
• Number of course repetitions in the core biology courses
which includes grades of D, F, Incomplete, FW, No Credit, No
Pass or W.
D. ATI TEAS Testing
Applicants with a random selection number of 100 or less (see
Section F, “Application Process,” below), who have successfully
completed all prerequisites and received an assessment score of at
least 72% on the Chancellor’s Formula will need to complete the ATI
(Assessment Technologies Incorporated) TEAS (Test of Essential
Academic Skills) Version V, meeting or exceeding the minimal score
of 62.
E. Prior Experience in Healthcare
All applicants must document prior healthcare experience. This can
be paid or volunteer experience. Applications which do not document prior healthcare experience will be disqualified.
F. APPLICATION PROCESS (FOR FIRST-SEMESTER
STUDENTS)
1. Complete the application for enrollment in the Registered
Nursing Program and submit prior to the February 1 deadline.
All forms are available online at http://www.marin.edu/nursing.
It is the responsibility of the applicant to submit a complete and
accurate application with all required materials. All materials
submitted as part of the application are the property of College
of Marin and will not be returned. The college does not assume
responsibility for notifying applicants of incomplete applications.
The application materials include official transcripts, course
descriptions, and a signed Petition of Substitution for prerequisite
and corequisite courses taken at other colleges and universities.
Applicants must be in good academic standing at College of
Marin. Submit the application in a sealed envelope to:
Nursing Education: Registered
183
Enrollment Services
College of Marin
835 College Avenue
Kentfield, CA 94904-2590
2. Random Selection: Each year, the Program receives more
requests for enrollment than the Program is able to accommodate.
Enrollment in the Program is limited due to clinical placements
and student safety needs. Thirty-six (36) students are offered space
each year for the following fall semester. In the event the number
of applications exceeds available spaces, a computerized random
selection of applications is utilized. Each applicant receives a
number for the current application period. This number is used
to offer enrollment, contingent upon verification of each admission requirement. To meet the need for timely processing and
notification by stated deadlines, applications numbered 1-100 are
reviewed initially for calculation of the Chancellor’s Formula and
TEAS V testing. In the event that additional spaces are available, the next 100 applications will complete calculation of the
Chancellor’s Formula and TEAS V.
3. Calculation of Chancellor’s Formula: Applications containing
complete information and required documents are reviewed for
program prerequisites and coursework. Courses completed at
College of Marin (or those evaluated as equivalent to College of
Marin courses) are used in the determination of this formula. A
completed, signed Petition for Substitution form must be included
in the application documents for any prerequisite and corequisite
courses taken at other colleges. Using the formula described in
Section C, “Chancellor’s Formula,” above, a numerical score is
determined. A score of 72% or greater must be attained to be
considered for admission to the Program. Applicants with a score
of less than 72% will be disqualified.
4. Completion of ATI Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS),
Version V: Applicants who score 72% or higher on the Chancellor’s Formula are allowed to complete the TEAS test at College of
Marin. The Program only accepts results from the Version V test.
Applicants who score 62 or higher on the TEAS Version V will be
offered space based on their random selection number, until all
available spaces have been filled. Students who do not achieve a
score of at least 62 on the TEAS will be disqualified for the current
application period but may retest after completion of remediation
(see Section G, number 4, below). Applicants who have taken the
TEAS V test prior to application to the program must request
that an official score report be mailed directly from the vendor
(Assessment Technology Institute) to the Nursing Department.
Please note: applicants must take TEAS V. Earlier versions of the
TEAS, such as TEAS 4.0, are not accepted.
5. Notification of Space: Applicants who have met all of the above
requirements will be offered space based on their random selection number until all spaces are filled. Applicants are responsible
for providing accurate contact information (including a current
email address, as notification is by email). Notification is given by
June 1. No information regarding admission will be given over the
phone or without verification of student identity.
6. Background Screening and Drug Screening:
• Clinical facilities require students placed at their site to pass a
background screening. Information regarding this screening is
included with materials upon the offer of space in the Program.
184
Nursing Education: Registered
• All applicants tentatively accepted into the Program must
complete a Criminal Background Clearance at a cost of approximately $50, paid by the student prior to enrollment. Each
clinical facility has the right to refuse placement of a nursing
student based on criminal background information. Due to the
dynamic state of clinical placement sites, applicants must be
able to attend every clinical facility utilized by the Program. In
the event that any facility refuses placement, the offer of space
in the Program will be withdrawn.
• Requirements vary among clinical facilities. Generally an
applicant who has a history of felony and/or misdemeanor
convictions or any bar exclusion or other ineligibility for
federal program participation could be refused placement.
Examples include but are not limited to, DUI (Driving Under
the Influence) convictions, any conviction involving child or
elder abuse, or any conviction dealing with violence. It is not
possible to determine acceptance or refusal by a clinical facility
on an individual basis. Applicants should consider their prior
background before submitting an application to the Nursing
Program.
• Prior to obtaining a license to practice as a Registered Nurse,
all graduates must report felony and misdemeanor convictions
along with submission of fingerprints. The Board of Registered
Nursing may deny licensure based on prior convictions. For
a list of convictions substantially related to the practice of nursing, please contact the Board of Registered Nursing Web page:
www.rn.ca.gov. It is possible for a student to clear the initial
background check and be denied licensure by the BRN.
• Many healthcare facilities require additional background
checks prior to employment. A prior history of criminal activity may result in denial of employment.
• Students who have questions about the background screening, Nursing Program eligibility, or the Board of Registered
Nursing requirements should contact the Dean of Health
Sciences. Students with histories of any of the above events are
encouraged to meet with a counselor to discuss career options,
including those outside of health care.
7. Drug Screening: Clinical agencies require mandatory drug
screening. Students with a positive drug screening test may
be denied placement at clinical facilities which would require
withdrawal of the offer of space. The cost is $51, to be paid by the
student. The list of drugs tested and the procedure are posted on
the website. All admitted students must use the designated drug
testing sites. The drug screening test is completed using nursing
program forms, and undertaken after the offer of program placement. Prior testing results or results from other organizations will
not be accepted.
8. Health Clearance: All applicants will receive a health and immunization form to be completed by a licensed healthcare provider.
Applicants must be able to participate in all clinical activities to
enter the Program.
G. Applicants Not Admitted to the Program:
1. Disqualification: An application may be disqualified for any of
the following reasons:
• Application is incomplete.
• Official transcripts for all courses have not been submitted.
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• All prerequisite courses have not been completed.
• Did not meet the 72% minimal score on the Chancellor’s
Formula.
• Did not achieve a 62 or greater on the ATI TEAS V test.
• Does not have proof of healthcare experience.
• Failure of criminal background clearance.
• Failure of drug screening.
• Readmission guidelines are not followed.
• Demonstrates violation of the COM Student Conduct Policy.
• Disqualified applicants will receive information identifying
the reason for the disqualification. Disqualified applicants may
apply during the next application period pending correction of
the reason(s) for the disqualification.
Qualified but No Available Space: An applicant may be qualified
but not admitted due to lack of available space. If an applicant is not
admitted, a new application and updated supporting documents
must be submitted the next application period.
1. Waiting List: Ten candidates from each application period
become a “wait list” for the following year. Candidates are chosen
in rank order from the random selection numbers assigned during the prior application period. Wait list candidates must meet all
NEW Program requirements. Wait list candidates include those
who successfully remediate and pass the TEAS test, as well as
those who met all qualifications at the time of application. The remaining eligible applicants from the prior year are included with
the current year’s applicants (first-time applicants) and assigned
numbers as described above if the number of eligible applicants
exceeds openings.
2. ATI TEAS V Remediation: Demonstration of readiness to
enter the Program includes successful completion of the Deanprescribed remediation plan and achieving a score of 62 or higher
on the TEAS V retest. Any applicant who does not complete the
remediation requirements within one year, and/or does not pass
the TEAS, will be required to restart the application process as a
new student, which forfeits admission preference. Applicants who
need to remediate should make an appointment with the Dean of
Health Sciences to review the TEAS results and determine a plan
of remediation. Upon completion of the remediation, applicants
must meet again with the Dean to provide verification that all
areas have been completed.
3. Reapplication: Applicants who were determined eligible (met all
eligibility requirements and passed the TEAS), but not selected
due to a lack of sufficient openings or inability to meet the TEAS
cut score, must resubmit a new application form and new, updated
support documents to be considered for the next year’s Program
openings.
CATALOG 2015/2016
ENROLLMENT PROCEDURES FOR RETURNING
READMISSION, TRANSFER, OR CHALLENGE STUDENTS
Please refer to the Program website for details: www.marin.edu/
nursing.
Definitions:
• Returning Readmission student: A student who left the College of Marin Registered Nursing Education Program.
• Transfer student: A student who successfully completed one
or more semesters of nursing education courses in another
program.
• Challenge student: A student with prior nursing education
(LVN) or other health care education or experience who wishes
to enter the Program with advanced standing and receive
credit for previous education or prior work experience.
1. All types of admission are on a space-available basis, dependent
upon the semester of entry and required course(s). Submission
of an application is not a guarantee of space. Please note that
applicants who are admitted on a space-available basis do not
have a guarantee that space is available in subsequent semesters.
Applicants must be prepared for a short time interval between
notification of available space and beginning the program.
2. Application Dates:
• Fall Entry – 1st and 3rd semester of Program: Applications accepted January 2 through February 1
• Spring Entry – 2nd or 4th semesters of Program: Applications
accepted September 1 through October 1
• Applications will only be accepted during the identified application period.
• Incomplete applications will not be considered.
• Students who are admitted after a year absence or longer may be
required to:
• Submit prior course work for official audit.
• Officially petition to repeat prior coursework according to Title
5 guidelines.
• Meet current program admission requirements.
3. Program Prerequisites: All applicants, including returning,
transfer and challenge students, must complete all required
program prerequisite courses with a grade of “C” or better, and
must be in good academic standing at College of Marin. Refer
to information under “Enrollment Procedures (for First-Year
Students)” above, Section B, number 2, “Prerequisite Course
Information.”
4. Chancellor’s Formula: All applicants, including returning,
transfer and challenge students, must meet the minimal score
on the Chancellor’s Formula of 72%. Refer to Section F above for
more information.
5. ATI TEAS V: All applicants, including returning, transfer and
challenge students, must meet the minimal score of 62 on the
TEAS V exam. Refer to Section F above for more information.
6. Nursing Courses: Applicants requesting credit for completed
nursing courses must submit official transcripts, course descriptions and course syllabi for all such courses. Courses are reviewed
by the nursing department for equivalency and appropriate Program placement. Courses in nursing education that were taken
Nursing Education: Registered
185
three or more years prior to a return to a nursing program will not
be accepted. Courses taken in a vocational nursing program will
not be subject to this policy if the applicant possesses a current
LVN (licensed vocational nurse) license in the state of California.
7. Challenge of nursing courses: Applicants who have related
experiences to qualify for a challenge must follow the college
process noted on under “Admissions Information” in Section 2 of
this catalog.
8. Licensed Vocational Nurse Applicants: To receive credit for prior
nursing coursework in an approved vocational nursing program,
in addition to the process and required information noted in the
previous section for new students, applicants must submit the
following:
• Official transcripts from vocational nursing school or program
requested within one calendar year of the date of application.
• Copy of current California LVN license
• Evidence of current work experience defined as at least one
year of continuous employment in the role of a licensed vocational nurse within the last three years. This evidence must be
in the form of a written letter from the employer on company
letterhead.
9. Degree option: To obtain the Associate of Science Degree, applicants must complete all Program prerequisite and corequisite
courses, meet the minimal score on the Chancellor’s Formula of
72% and meet the cut score on the TEAS V of 62. NE 135, 135L,
138, 140 can be waived. Based upon review of transcripts, NE 210
and 210L may also be waived.
10.LVN 30-unit option: Students selecting this option will not
obtain a degree nor be considered a graduate of the College of
Marin Registered Nursing Program. Students will qualify for the
licensing exam as a non-graduate, which may limit employment
options and future education opportunities. Prerequisites for
this option are Physiology (BIOL 224) and Microbiology (BIOL
240). Applicants must meet 72% on the Chancellor’s Formula but
are not required to complete the TEAS V exam. All applicants
wishing to select this entry option must meet with the Director of
Health Sciences prior to submitting an application.
A. APPLICATION PROCESS (FOR RETURNING
READMISSION, TRANSFER, OR CHALLENGE STUDENTS)
1. Returning Students:
• Readmission is not guaranteed.
• Submit an application to return to the Program by identified
due dates.
• For return to fall courses, submit the application January 2 to
February 1. For return to spring courses, submit the application September 1 to October 31.
• Meet with the Director of Health Sciences to review and
provide verification that the Remediation Plan has been
completed. Refer to the COM RN Program Student Handbook
available at www.marin.edu/nursing for more information.
• A student is eligible for readmission only once.
• A student who fails any two nursing courses, fails a second
course after readmission, fails a clinical course, or withdraws
from the Program twice, is not eligible for readmission.
2. Transfer Students:
186
Nursing Education: Registered
• Request evaluation of prerequisite and corequisite courses
using the college process described in Section B, “Program
Requirements for Consideration of Admission.”
• Submit an application to the Program by identified due dates.
• To transfer to second- and fourth-semester courses (in spring),
applications are due September 1 to October 31. To transfer to
first- or third-semester nursing courses (in fall), applications
are due January 2 to February 1.
• Download the application from www.marin.edu/nursing and
complete.
• Submit application with two copies of official transcripts,
course descriptions for nursing courses and course syllabi
for nursing courses. Transcripts must be ordered within one
calendar year of the date of application.
• Course information will be reviewed by the nursing department to determine equivalency and appropriate placement in
the Program.
• Pending review of materials and determination that the
minimal score for the Chancellor’s Formula has been met, applicants will either be scheduled for the TEAS V exam or asked
to provide official verification of their latest test score. Repeated
TEAS scores must not exceed one score per year or only the
lower score will be considered.
3. Challenge Students:
• Request evaluation of prerequisite and corequisite courses
using the process described in Section B, “Program Requirements for Consideration of Admission.”
• Submit an application to the nursing program by identified due
dates, identifying degree or 30-unit option.
• For LVN applicants, submit the materials identified in “Enrollment Procedures for Returning Readmission, Transfer, or
Challenge Students.”
• Course information is reviewed by the nursing department
and Enrollment Services to determine equivalency and appropriate placement in the Program.
• Pending review of materials and determination that the
minimal score for the Chancellor’s Formula has been met, applicants will either be scheduled for the ATI TEAS V exam or
asked to provide official verification of their latest TEAS score.
4. Priority Admission into the Program for Returning Readmission, Transfer and Challenge Students:
• All admissions are on a program space-available basis.
• First priority: Returning students who left the program in
good standing defined as successful completion of all nursing
courses.
• Second priority: LVN Challenge Degree-Option Applicants.
• Third priority: Transfer students and Returning students who
left the program not in good standing (defined as a theory or
clinical course failure).
• Fourth priority: LVN Challenge 30-unit Option applicants.
• In the event that there is more than one applicant in any
priority level, a random selection process will be undertaken
to provide a ranking number to each applicant in that priority
category.
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• Any applicant determined eligible but not selected due to lack
of space must resubmit a new application and updated support
documents during the next application period for consideration.
• Applicants who did not meet the TEAS V score will not be
considered for admission but may remediate and retake the
test after completion of the Remediation Plan developed by the
Dean of Health Sciences.
ADDITIONAL PROGRAM INFORMATION
1. Advisory Courses: In addition to completing required prerequisite courses, the Program strongly recommends that prospective
students take two additional courses that will help them prepare
for the nursing program:
• NE 95: Effective Strategies for Success in the Registered Nursing Program
• CIS 110: Introduction to Computer Operating Systems
2. Considerations Regarding Entry into the Program: The College
of Marin RN Program is a full-time, rigorous course of study requiring both classroom and clinical learning experiences. Courses
are scheduled both day and evenings and may include weekend
hours. Each nursing course must be completed with a score of
75% or higher (or a Pass in a clinical course) to continue in the
Program. Students considering nursing as a career option should
develop a personal schedule that allows for Program instruction,
study time at a ratio of 3 study hours per hour of class instruction,
and personal time. Students are expected to exhibit professional
behavior at all times. Patient advocacy and patient safety are
primary considerations for all nursing professionals. Any student
whose conduct displays potential harm to patient well-being as
determined by the faculty will be withdrawn from the Program.
All students are expected to participate in all Program activities,
both classroom and clinical, in order to continue in the Program.
Any student whose conduct displays potential harm to peers,
faculty or the patient’s well-being as determined by the faculty
will be withdrawn from the Program.
3. Repeatability: Title 5 does not allow students to repeat any
nursing courses taken within the past 3 years. A petition to repeat
a course must be submitted to Enrollment Services. Auditing of
prior nursing courses may be mandated if the student is unable to
repeat necessary courses.
4. High School Education or Equivalent: Title 16, Section 1412
of the California Code of Regulations states that proof of high
school education or the equivalent (high school diploma, GED,
high school equivalency, college degree) is required by the person
applying for a license as a registered nurse. The Program requires
this proof for licensure application for students not pursuing the
degree option.
5. IV Insertion Skills Certificate: This certificate is awarded to
RN students upon successful completion of the NE 203 skills lab
training classes in IV insertion. Students must demonstrate competency in the knowledge and skill of IV policy and procedure in
a return demonstration in the skills lab, and three successful IV
insertions on patients in the hospital in NE 225L.
6. Transfer: The Program faculty strongly support graduates
continuing their education to obtain the Bachelors and Masters
Degree in Nursing. Students planning to transfer to a four-year
CATALOG 2015/2016
institution should complete lower division major requirements
and general education pattern for the appropriate transfer
institution and major. Exact major requirements for UC and CSU
institutions can be found on www.assist.org. Please see a counselor for more information, as curriculum requirements may vary
among transfer universities. Graduates of the Registered Nursing
Education Program may transfer to a number of colleges and
universities to study for a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. Contact the Registered Nursing Education Department for
information regarding the following schools:
• Sonoma State University (www.sonoma.edu/adnmsn)
• San Francisco State University (www.nursing.sfsu.edu)
• Dominican University of California (www.dominican.edu/
academics/hns/nursing)
NURSING EDUCATION COURSES (NE)
Please note: The Registered Nursing Program has implemented curriculum changes for the
class entering the Program in fall of 2015 and thereafter. The following courses constitute the
old curriculum, which applies to students entering during the 2014-2015 academic year and
prior. These students must complete the (old) degree requirements as listed by the end of the
2016 summer session.
NE 090: Introduction to Nursing Education and
Practice
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is required for all applicants to the Registered Nursing
Program, and recommended for all persons seeking information
about nursing education and the role of the Registered Nurse. We
navigate the program’s website, reviewing the program overview
and the necessary COM resources to provide updated enrollment
procedures and admission requirements into the nursing program.
Identification of basic skills needed for nursing, including test taking,
time management, and coping strategies are explored.
NE 095: Effective Strategies for Success in the
Registered Nursing Program
1.0 Unit. 1.0 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is designed to help nursing students attain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to grow and thrive in the College
of Marin Registered Nursing Program. Students are introduced to
critical thinking, QSEN (Quality, Safety, and Education in Nursing),
time management, successful study skills, stress management, and
test-taking techniques.
NE 099: Internship in Health Careers
1.5 Units. 0.5 lecture and 3.375 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Corequisite: NE 100.
A career-preparation and internship course for students concurrently
enrolled in NE 100. Students learn essential employment skills,
including interviewing techniques, prior to working as an intern in a
business that corresponds to the NE 100 course topic.
NE 100: Introduction to Health Careers
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as DENT 100,
MEDA 100, or NE 100; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in
a health profession. It provides an overview of the current health care
delivery system, the physical, mental, and emotional demands of the
Nursing Education: Registered
187
workplace, and the skills needed by the healthcare worker today and
in the future. Students learn about qualifications and professional
preparation needed for various careers, and analyze the roles and
responsibilities in today’s health care environment. The course is
designed to help students develop realistic career goals, and to give
an appreciation of how the current health care delivery system is
influencing individual health professional roles and responsibilities.
NE 101: Level I Nursing Skills Laboratory
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisites: NE 138 and 135.
Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
First-year registered nursing students (Level I) learn and practice
basic assessment and technical skills fundamental to professional
nursing across the lifespan in the safety of a simulated clinical
environment. Instruction includes presentation of evidence-based
practice and scientific rationales for performance of technical skills,
skill demonstrations, and the opportunity for guided/supervised
student practice. (CSU)
NE 102: Level II Nursing Skills Laboratory
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: NE 140. To enroll
in this course, students must be enrolled in the COM RN Program.
This course provides opportunities for first-year registered nursing
students (Level II) to learn and practice intermediate assessment
and technical skills fundamental to professional nursing across the
lifespan in the safety of a simulated clinical environment. Instruction includes presentation of evidence-based practice and scientific
rationales for performance of technical skills, skill demonstrations,
and the opportunity for guided/supervised student practice. In addition to the achievement of technical skill competency, emphasis is
placed on integrating the use of the nursing process, communication
and documentation skills, client care management skills, and critical
thinking and problem solving skills through the use of clinical
simulations and case scenarios. (CSU)
NE 103: Open Skills Laboratory
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 2. No prerequisite. Corequisites: NE
101 and/or 102. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing
Program.
This course provides opportunities for registered nursing students
who are enrolled in one of the required first-year skills labs (NE 101
or 102) to have additional supervised practice performing clinical
skills that are required for the profession of registered nursing. (CSU)
NE 110: Role Transition: LVN to RN
1.0 Unit. 1.0 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Admission to LVN to RN
Transition. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course is designed to assist the LVN students to adapt to change
and transition as they pursue education to become a registered nurse.
Topics include the role of the registered nurse, change theory, a
critical thinking model, nursing care planning, leadership and legal
responsibilities, and intravenous therapy management and medication administration. Meets the National League of Nursing Accrediting Commission standards. (CSU)
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Nursing Education: Registered
NE 135: Nursing I: Fundamentals of Nursing
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisites: ENGL 150; BIOL 120,
224, 240; CHEM 110 or 114 or 115; and NE 90. Corequisite: NE 138.
Advisory: CIS 101. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing
Program.
This foundation course for nursing practice presents concepts related
to clients within the context of their environments, including growth
and development, culture, and health-illness, and to the health care
delivery system and the political, economic, and social factors that
affect it. The course introduces caring in nursing, critical thinking in
applying the nursing process and managing client care, communication, client education, and legal and ethical practice. Students learn
how to perform an age-specific health assessment and basic physical
examination, to recognize alterations in these assessments, and
to engage in therapeutic interventions that promote and maintain clients’ health. Students learn fundamental nursing concepts related to
care of immobilized clients, surgical clients, clients with alterations
in skin/tissue integrity, and clients with sensory alterations. (CSU)
NE 135L: Nursing I: Fundamentals Clinical
Laboratory
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisites. Corequisites: NE 101 and
135. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course is the clinical laboratory for NE 135. Students learn
to perform an age-specific health assessment and a basic physical
examination, to recognize alterations in these assessments, and
to engage in activities that promote and maintain clients’ health.
Students apply the nursing process to the care of the immobilized
client, the surgical client, the client with an alteration in skin/tissue
integrity, and the client with a sensory alteration. (CSU)
NE 138: Introduction to Pharmacology and
Medication Administration for Nurses
1.0 Unit1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 101. Corequisite: NE 135.
Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course focuses on the registered nurse’s role in drug therapy.
It introduces principles of pharmacology emphasizing drug dosage calculation; explores legal, ethical, cultural, psychological and
educational aspects of medication administration; and provides a
framework based on the nursing process for the safe preparation and
administration of medications to all age groups. The course focuses
on principles for the safe preparation and administration of medications by enteral, topical, inhalation, and parenteral routes. (CSU)
NE 140: Nursing II: Medical-Surgical Nursing
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisites: NE 135 and 138. Must be
enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course builds on nursing concepts presented in Nursing I and
prepares students to apply the nursing process to pediatric and adult
clients with non-critical/moderately complex medical-surgical conditions. The selected medical-surgical conditions involve alterations
in fluid/electrolytes and acid/base balance, oxygenation, nutrition,
elimination, and endocrine regulation. Included are concepts of
pathophysiology, medical/surgical management, and collaborative
care. Emphasis on the nurse’s role in preventing health problems,
reducing complications, and maintaining physiological and psychological integrity. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
NE 140L: Nursing II: Medical-Surgical Clinical
Laboratory
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisites. Corequisites: NE 102 and
140. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course is the clinical laboratory for NE 140. Students apply the
nursing process to the care of pediatric and adult clients with noncritical/moderately complex medical-surgical conditions, involving
alterations in fluid/electrolytes and acid/base balance, oxygenation,
nutrition, elimination and endocrine regulation. Students learn to
conduct a comprehensive nursing assessment and to intervene to
prevent health problems and reduce complications. Students learn
to manage care for two moderately complex clients and to apply
risk reduction strategies to protect the client and maintain legal and
ethical nursing practice. (CSU)
NE 203: Level III Nursing Skills Laboratory
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 102. To enroll in this course,
students must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course provides opportunities for second-year registered
nursing students (Level III) to engage in critical thinking and
problem solving while learning and practicing advanced assessment
and technical skills fundamental to professional nursing across the
lifespan in the safety of a simulated clinical environment. Includes
instruction to provide and reinforce theory and explain the context
of the skill, skill demonstrations, and the opportunity for guided
student practice. In addition to the achievement of technical skill
competency, emphasis is placed on integrating the use of the nursing
process, communication and documentation skills, client care
management skills, and critical thinking and problem solving skills
through the use of clinical simulations and case scenarios. (CSU)
NE 205: Open Skills Laboratory
0.5 Unit. 1.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 2. Prerequisite: NE 203 or concurrent
enrollment. To enroll in this course, students must be enrolled in the
COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course provides opportunities for registered nursing students
who have completed the required first-year skills labs (NE 101 and
102) to have additional supervised practice performing clinical skills
that are required for the profession of registered nursing. Students
may enroll in NE 205 to review and practice skills during the third
and fourth semesters of the registered nursing program. (CSU)
NE 210: Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 140. Corequisite: NE 210L.
Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course presents nursing care for the childbearing family during
the prenatal, labor and delivery, postpartum, and neonatal periods.
Emphasizes the nurse’s role in promotion of wellness and prevention of complications through health education. Students learn to
recognize maternal and fetal high-risk conditions during pregnancy,
birth, and after delivery that require collaborative care. Nursing
management for childbearing women planning a pregnancy, including contraception and abortion, and some common women’s health
disorders are discussed. Included are concepts related to evidencebased practice, to effective management of resources, and to legal and
ethical issues within reproductive health. (CSU)
CATALOG 2015/2016
NE 210L: Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family
Clinical Laboratory
2.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisites: NE 102 and 210
or 203. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This is the clinical laboratory that accompanies the
Childbearing Family course. Students apply nursing
concepts to the care of the family during the prenatal,
labor and delivery, postpartum, neonatal, and
women’s health periods in hospital and community
settings. Students further develop clinical reasoning
and technical skills to promote maternal and newborn
health and to recognize and prevent complications.
(CSU) NE 212: Nursing in Mental Health and Nursing
of the Older Adult
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 140. Must be enrolled in
the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course has two components: nursing in mental health, and
nursing of the older adult. Nursing in mental health focuses on the
application of the nursing process and principles of therapeutic
communication to the care of pediatric and adult clients with
selected mental disorders. Included are concepts of psychobiology,
treatment modalities, collaborative care, and legal and ethical issues
within mental health. Nursing of the older adult focuses on nursing
interventions for health promotion, the management of common
geriatric syndromes, and care of the older adult with multi-system
problems. Included are the effects of a large aging population on
health care; legal, ethical and public policy issues affecting care of
older adults; and end-of-life care for clients across the lifespan and
their families. (CSU)
NE 212L: Nursing in Mental Health and Nursing of
the Older Adult Clinical Laboratory
2.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 140. Corequisites: NE 212 and
102 or 103. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course is the clinical laboratory for NE 212. Students apply
the nursing process to the care of pediatric and adult clients with
selected mental disorders and to the care of older adults in acute and
community settings. Students collaborate with other health care
professionals in health care management, health education, and
resolution of legal and ethical issues in mental and geriatric health.
Students further develop therapeutic communication techniques
and approaches for care of clients and families in crisis, individuals
demonstrating challenging behaviors, and clients at end-of-life and
their families. (CSU)
NE 214: Nursing III: Advanced Concepts in Mobility,
Sensation, and Cognition
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 140. Must be enrolled in
the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course builds on concepts presented in Nursing I and Nursing
II. The course takes a holistic approach and emphasizes nursing
management of clients across the lifespan with acute and chronic
diseases involving the neurological, musculoskeletal, sensory
and immunological systems. Approaches to nursing and medical
management during each phase of the disease process, starting with
the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, through acute hospitalization
and into post hospitalization care are presented. The student learns to
apply the nursing process to the care of clients who are experiencing
Nursing Education: Registered
189
chronic pain and grief and loss. Students collaborate with the multidisciplinary health care team in all aspects of care. Students compare
and contrast the role of the nurse in hospital care, home health care,
rehabilitative care, and long term care. (CSU)
NE 214L: Nursing III: Clinical Laboratory - Advanced
Concepts in Mobility, Sensation, and Cognition
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisites: NE 214 and 102
or 203. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This is the clinical laboratory that accompanies NE 214. Students
apply nursing concepts to the care of the client and family who are
experiencing acute or chronic neurological, orthopedic or immunological problems in the hospital, community and rehabilitative
settings. Students further develop clinical reasoning and technical
skills to promote health and to recognize and prevent complications,
and collaborate with other professionals in health care management,
client education, and resolution of legal and ethical issues in medical
surgical nursing. (CSU)
NE 216: Nursing III: Advanced Concepts in
Cardiovascular Oxygenation and Renal Function
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisites: NE 210, 212, or 214. Must be
enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course builds on nursing concepts presented in Nursing II
and focuses on clients with complex alterations in physiological
and psychological integrity and the resulting health consequences.
The course presents advanced concepts related to the nursing
management and collaborative care of clients across the lifespan
with select critical and/or complex cardiovascular, respiratory, and
renal problems. Critical care during select life-threatening and
emergency situations, including shock, sepsis, and multiple organ
dysfunction syndrome, are addressed. This course prepares students
within complex client health situations to prioritize and organize
care; identify emerging health patterns or complications that require
prompt attention; and compare feasible options to resolve clinical
problems. (CSU)
NE 216L: Nursing III: Advanced Concepts in
Cardiovascular Oxygenation and Renal Function
Laboratory
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: NE 216; 203 for
students enrolled in NE 216L during fall [third semester of program].
Students enrolled in NE 216L during spring [fourth semester of
program] will have completed NE 203. Must be enrolled in the COM
Registered Nursing Program.
This course is the clinical laboratory that accompanies NE 216.
Students apply the nursing process to the care of adult and pediatric
clients with select critical and/or complex cardiovascular, respiratory,
and renal problems; collaborate with other health care professionals
in health care management, health education, and resolution of legal
and ethical issues of clients across the lifespan; and further develop
skill in prioritizing and organizing care, identifying emerging health
problems, and resolving clinical problems within complex client
health situations. (CSU)
NE 220A: Pharmacology in Nursing
1.0 Unit. 1.125 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 138. Must be enrolled in
the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course provides students with a sound understanding of the
pharmacologic properties of drug classes, with special emphasis on
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Nursing Education: Registered
the clinical application of drug therapy through the nursing process
and clinical case studies. It focuses on the mechanism of action,
indications, dosage, and adverse effects of major drug classes and
individual (prototype) drugs. Classifications of medications covered
include: analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs, anesthetics including drugs used in conscious sedation, sedatives, hypnotic drugs,
anti-anxiety, antibiotics and miscellaneous drugs; antifungal and
antiviral drugs, anti-asthmatic and glucocorticoid. Drugs affecting
the gastrointestinal tract, insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents, and
thyroid replacement. Vaccines, drugs affecting reproductive system,
including female sex hormones and contraceptives. (CSU)
NE 220B: Pharmacology in Nursing
1.0 Unit. 1.125 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 138. Must be enrolled in
the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course provides students with a sound understanding of the
pharmacologic properties of drug classes, with special emphasis on
the clinical application of drug therapy through the nursing process
and clinical case studies. Classifications of medications covered
include: cardiac glycosides, calcium channel blockers, ace inhibitors,
antidysrhythmics, antihypertensives, diuretics, vasodilators, anticoagulants, thrombolytics, antihyperlipidemics, psychotherapeutics,
immunosuppressants and immunomodulators, chemotherapy
agents, and anticonvulsants. Drugs affecting Parkinson’s myasthenia
gravis, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and substances of abuse.
(CSU)
NE 225: Nursing Leadership and Management
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisites: NE 210, 212, 214, 216. Must
be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This theoretical foundation for understanding organizational
behavior and developing nursing leadership and management skills
assists students in the transition from nursing student to graduate
Registered Nurse. Focus is on decision making, prioritization, time
and stress management, staffing, delegation, team work, conflict
management, and cost containment. Legal, ethical, economic, and
sociopolitical issues that affect health care delivery and the nursing profession are explored. Professional issues discussed include
membership in professional organizations, nurse’s rights, workplace
safety, advocacy and political activism, licensure and guidelines for
obtaining employment, and strategies for successful transition into
practice for the new graduate RN. (CSU)
NE 225L: Clinical Transition: Clinical Laboratory
2.5 Units. 7.5 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisite: NE 225. Must be
enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This clinical laboratory that accompanies NE 225 provides opportunities for students to integrate cumulative nursing knowledge and
experience into clinical practice; to organize and manage care for
a group of clients; to actively collaborate with clients, families, and
health care team members; and to further develop technical skill
competencies under the direct supervision of a preceptor and the
indirect supervision of a faculty liaison. Particular emphasis is given
to the development of leadership/management skills required of a
nurse in an entry level position. (CSU)
MARIN.EDU
NURSING EDUCATION COURSES (NE)
Please note: The Registered Nursing Program has implemented curriculum changes for the
class entering the Program in fall of 2015 and thereafter. The following courses constitute the
NEW curriculum.
NE 180: Fundamentals of Nursing
3.0 Units. 6 lecture hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: ENGL 150; BIOL
120, 224, 240; CHEM 110; NE 90. Corequisites: NE 180L, 188. Advisory:
CIS 110. Students must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing
Program.
This is a foundational course that provides a framework for professional nursing practice emphasizing the national Quality and Safety
Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative. Basic nursing concepts
introduced in this course include professionalism, safety, infection
control, cultural competence, health promotion, health assessment,
psychosocial concepts, basic care and comfort skills, the nursing
process, communication, and client teaching. These concepts are
applied to patients across the lifespan. [Replaces NE 135.] (CSU)
NE 180L: Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical
Laboratory
3.0 Units. 12 clinical hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: background
clearance, health clearance, CPR for the Health Care Professional.
Corequisites: NE 180, 181, and 188. Students must be enrolled in the
COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course is the clinical laboratory to accompany NE 180. Students
apply basic nursing concepts including professionalism, safety,
infection control, cultural competence, health promotion, health
assessment, psychosocial concepts, basic care and comfort skills,
communication, and client teaching to the care of clients across the
lifespan. Students utilize the nursing process to plan and implement
patient-centered care for clients in a variety of healthcare settings.
[Replaces NE 135L.] (CSU)
NE 181: Clinical Application Laboratory I
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Corequisites: NE 188, 180, and
180L. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course provides opportunities for first-year registered nursing
students (Level I) to learn and practice basic assessment and technical skills fundamental to professional nursing across the lifespan in
the safety of a simulated clinical environment. Instruction includes
presentation of evidence-based practice and scientific rationales
for performance of nursing skills, skill demonstrations, and the
opportunity for guided/supervised student practice. In addition to
the achievement of technical skill competency, emphasis is placed on
integrating the use of the nursing process, communication and documentation skills, client care management skills, and critical thinking
and problem-solving skills through the use of clinical simulations
and case scenarios. [Replaces NE 101.] (CSU)
NE 182: Clinical Application Laboratory II
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 181. Corequisites: NE 185 and
185L. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course provides opportunities for first-year registered nursing
students (Level II) to learn and practice intermediate assessment
and technical skills fundamental to professional nursing across the
lifespan in the safety of a simulated clinical environment. Instruction includes presentation of evidence-based practice and scientific
rationales for performance of technical skills, skill demonstrations,
and the opportunity for guided/supervised student practice. In ad-
CATALOG 2015/2016
Nursing Education: Registered
191
dition to the achievement of technical skill competency, emphasis is
placed on integrating the use of the nursing process, communication
and documentation skills, client care management skills, and critical
thinking and problem-solving skills through the use of clinical
simulations and case scenarios. (CSU)
to promote health and to recognize and prevent complications.
(CSU)
NE 185: Medical-Surgical Nursing I
This course provides opportunities for second-year nursing students
(Level III) to apply theory and technical skills fundamental to
the performance of professional nursing across the lifespan in the
safety of a simulated clinical environment. Includes presentation of
indications and rationales for nursing interventions and technical
skills, adaptations required for various situations, skill demonstrations, and the opportunity for guided student practice. In addition
to the achievement of technical skill competency, emphasis is placed
on integrating the nursing process, communication and documentation skills, client care management skills, and critical thinking and
problem solving skills through the use of clinical simulations and
case scenarios. [Replaces NE 203.] (CSU)
3.0 Units. 6 lecture hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisite: NE 180.
Corequisites: NE 185L, NE 188. Must be enrolled in the COM
Registered Nursing Program.
This course builds on concepts presented in NE 180, focusing on
nursing management of patients with recurring and common medical surgical conditions in acute and community settings. It provides
the learner with a systematic method of analyzing and prioritizing
assessment data, and applies pathophysiologic concepts to the care of
select medical surgical patients. [Replaces NE 140.] (CSU)
NE 185L: Medical Surgical Nursing I Clinical
Laboratory
2.0 Units. 12 clinical hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisite: NE 180L.
Corequisites: NE 181, 185, and 188. Must be enrolled in the COM
Registered Nursing Program.
This clinical laboratory accompanying NE 185 builds on concepts
presented in NE 180, focusing on the nursing management of adult
clients with common and recurring medical surgical conditions. It
provides a systematic method of analyzing and prioritizing assessment data, and applies pathophysiologic concepts to the care of
medical surgical patients in a variety of health care settings. Students
begin to develop clinical judgement and implement therapeutic
nursing interventions to promote health and prevent complications.
[Replaces NE 140L.] (CSU)
NE 188: Pharmacology I
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or 101AB or 101XY
or sufficient score on the Math Assessment Test. Corequisite: NE 180.
Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This foundational course focuses on the basic knowledge, skills,
and attitudes required of the Registered nurse for the safe dosage
calculation, preparation, and administration of medications to all age
groups. Principles of pharmacology, legal and ethical considerations,
risk reduction strategies, and accurate drug dosage calculation are
emphasized. [Replaces NE 138.] (CSU)
NE 280: Medical Surgical Nursing II
2.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisite: NE 185.
Corequisite: NE 280L. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered
Nursing Program.
This course builds on concepts presented in NE 185, focusing on
nursing management of moderately complex medical surgical clients
in the acute care, rehabilitative care, and community settings. Nursing concepts related to neurology and cancer are emphasized. (CSU)
NE 280L: Medical Surgical Nursing II Clinical
Laboratory
2.0 Units. 12 clinical hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisite: NE 185L.
Corequisites: NE 280, 182, and 288A. Must be enrolled in the COM
Registered Nursing Program.
This clinical laboratory accompanying NE 280 applies nursing
concepts to the management of moderately complex medical surgical
clients in a variety of healthcare settings. Students further develop
clinical judgement and implement therapeutic nursing interventions,
NE 281: Clinical Application Laboratory III
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 182. Must be enrolled in the
COM Registered Nursing Program.
NE 283A: Maternal Child Nursing A
2.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: NE 185 and
188. Corequisite: NE 283AL. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered
Nursing Program.
This theory course introduces family-centered and culturally aware
nursing care of the childbearing family during the prenatal, intrapartum, postpartum, and neonatal periods. Wellness promotion in
the new family is emphasized through patient education of evidencebased self-care and parenting practices. Select women’s reproductive
health concerns such as family planning, infertility, and sexually
transmitted diseases are covered, as are the healthcare concerns of
the menopausal woman. (CSU)
NE 283AL: Maternal Child Nursing A Clinical
Laboratory
2.0 Units. 12 lab hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: NE 185L and 181.
Corequisite: NE 283A. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered
Nursing Program.
This 96-hour clinical rotation exposes students to a variety of
obstetrical-related units in the hospital setting: labor and delivery,
postpartum, well baby, intensive care nursery, and antenatal testing.
Additional community clinics serving diverse patient populations
provide observational experiences in a range of women’s reproductive healthcare. The simulation lab allows students to further explore
and manage the nursing care of select reproductive and neonate
scenarios. [Replaces NE 210.] (CSU)
NE 283B: Maternal Child Nursing B
2.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisite: NE 185 and 188.
Corequisite: NE 238BL. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered
Nursing Program.
This course focuses on the integration and application of the nursing
process as it relates to children and families. Common health issues
from infancy to adolescence are examined using the standards of
competent practice, QSEN competencies, developmental theory,
cultural competency, health promotion, illness prevention, and
restorative and end-of-life care. (CSU)
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Nursing Education: Registered
MARIN.EDU
NE 283BL: Maternal Child Nursing B Clinical
Laboratory
NE 285L: Medical Surgical Nursing III Clinical
Laboratory
2.0 Units. 12 lab hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: NE 185L and 181.
Corequisite: NE 283B. Must be enrolled in COM Registered Nursing
Program.
2.5 Units. 15 lab hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisite: NE 280L.
Corequisites: NE 285, 281, and 288B. Must be enrolled in the COM
Registered Nursing Program.
In this lab course accompanying NE 283B, clinical experiences
provide opportunities for students to demonstrate clinical nursing
competencies in simulation and in a variety of pediatric settings,
incorporating health promotion, illness prevention, and restorative
and end-of-life care. (CSU)
In this clinical laboratory accompanying NE 285, students apply the
nursing process to focus on the nursing management of unstable,
complex patients with multisystem problems. Students apply
advanced medical surgical nursing concepts to further develop
prioritization and organizational skills, identify emergent patient
care needs, and use clinical judgement to promote optimum patient
outcome. [Replaces NE 216L.] (CSU)
NE 284: Mental Health Nursing and Care of the
Older Adult
2.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: NE 185 and
188. Corequisite: NE 284L. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered
Nursing Program.
NE 286: Professional Role Development
This course focuses on mental health concepts related to individuals,
families, and communities, emphasizing the nurse-client relationship, commonly occurring mental illnesses, psychopharmacology,
and other major treatment modalities. Community mental health
issues such as environmental stressors, abuse, violence, substance
abuse, and homelessness are emphasized. The course also focuses
on the care of older adults, emphasizing promoting healthy aging,
managing common geriatric syndromes and chronic illnesses, and
addressing end-of-life care. Impacts of an increasing aging population on the health care system, and ethical, legal, and public policy
issues in the care of older adults are included. [Replaces NE 212.]
(CSU)
This course focuses on professional, management, and career skills
needed by senior nursing students to make a successful transition to
graduate Registered nurse. Professional issues include membership
in nursing organizations, political activism, ethical and legal issues,
health care economics, and current policy issues that affect health
care delivery and the nursing profession. Patient care management
skills include staffing and assignments, delegation and supervision,
conflict management, quality assurance, and risk management.
Career issues include the process for obtaining licensure, guidelines
for writing resumes and cover letters, and interview preparation.
[Replaces NE 225.] (CSU)
NE 284L: Mental Health Nursing and Care of the
Older Adult Clinical Laboratory
2.0 Units. 12 lab hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: NE 185L and 181.
Corequisite: NE 284. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing
Program.
In this clinical laboratory accompanying NE 284, students apply the
nursing process to the care of pediatric and adult clients with select
mental disorders. Students collaborate with other health care professionals in management, health education, and resolution of legal and
ethical issues in mental health. Students further develop therapeutic
communication techniques and approaches for care of clients and
families in crisis, and for individuals demonstrating challenging
behaviors. Students also apply the nursing process to the care of older
adults in acute and community settings, emphasizing promoting
healthy aging, managing common geriatric syndromes and chronic
illnesses, and providing end-of-life care. [Replaces NE 225L.] (CSU)
NE 285: Medical Surgical Nursing III
2.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisite: NE 280.
Corequisite: NE 285L. Must be enrolled in the COM Registered
Nursing Program.
This course builds on concepts presented in NE 280, focusing on the
nursing management of unstable, complex patients with multisystem
problems. Nursing concepts related to complex multisystem problems including complex respiratory and cardiovascular problems,
sepsis and shock, kidney failure, and burns are explored. [Replaces
NE 216.] (CSU)
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 285. Corequisite: NE 286L.
Must be enrolled in the COM Registered Nursing Program.
NE 286L: Professional Role Development Clinical
Laboratory
2.5 Units. 15 lab hrs/wk for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: NE 285L, 283AL,
283BL, 284L, 288B, and 281. Corequisite: NE 286. Must be enrolled in
the COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course, the clinical laboratory accompanying NE 286, provides
experiences that facilitate the transition from student to graduate
Registered nurse. It provides opportunities to integrate cumulative
nursing knowledge and experience into clinical practice; to manage
care for a group of clients; to actively collaborate with clients, families, and health care team members; and to further develop technical
skill competencies under the direct supervision of a preceptor and
the indirect supervision of a faculty liaison. Particular emphasis is
given to the development of leadership/management skills required
of a nurse in an entry-level position. [Replaces NE 225L.] (CSU)
NE 288A: Pharmacology II
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 188. Must be enrolled in the
COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course builds upon concepts presented in NE 188, highlighting
the major drug classifications, common prototype medications,
and nursing management of drug therapy. Research findings and
theory-based knowledge are applied in assessing the needs of clients
for medications, safe medication administration, and patient education. Focus is on the basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes required
for evidence-based medication administration and monitoring in
the major drug categories. Representative medications affecting the
following systems are discussed: neurological, gastrointestinal, respiratory, endocrine, cardiovascular, integumentary, renal, and sensory.
Lifespan differences and complementary/alternative therapies are
described as they affect medication administration. [Replaces NE
220A.] (CSU)
Philosophy
CATALOG 2015/2016
NE 288B: Pharmacology III
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: NE 188. Must be enrolled in the
COM Registered Nursing Program.
This course builds upon concepts presented in NE 288A, highlighting the major drug classifications, common prototype medications,
and nursing management of drug therapy. Research findings and
theory-based knowledge are applied in assessing the needs of clients
for medications, safe medication administration, and patient education. Focus is on the basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes required
for evidence-based medication administration and monitoring in the
major drug categories. Representative medications are discussed: antibiotic/antifungal/antiviral, chemotherapy agents, immunomodulators, substances of abuse, psychotherapeutic drugs, vaccines, drugs
that modify uterine function, and drugs indicated for bone and joint
disorders. Complementary/alternative therapies are described as they
affect and interact with medication administration. [Replaces NE
220B.] (CSU)
NURSING EDUCATION NONCREDIT REVIEW COURSES
The following noncredit courses are offered in support of the College
of Marin Registered Nursing Program. Please refer to the Registered
Nursing Department website for details: www.marin.edu/nursing.
VOCN 6010: Review of Nursing Care and Skills for
RN Students
0.0 Unit.
This course offers the RN student additional practice in the class/
clinical/laboratory setting. It is designed to provide additional practice and remediation in topics ranging from assessment, nursing care
planning, documentation, communication, medication administration, nursing skills, and organization, to critical thinking and clinical
decision making. Students must be enrolled in COM’s RN program,
and are recommended to this course by their clinical instructor.
193
PHILOSOPHY
The aim of philosophy courses is to understand how the great minds
of the past and present have perceived and answered the most challenging questions about knowledge and reality and then to develop
one’s own philosophy. This discipline encourages the acquisition and
development of creative thought processes.
Career Options
Attorney, Communicator, Computer Scientist, Counselor, Educator,
Journalist, Minister, Politician, Social Worker, Teacher
Faculty
John Marmysz
Department Phone: 415-485-9348
A.A.-T. IN PHILOSOPHY
Associate in Arts in Philosophy for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Philosophy for Transfer
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
VOCN 6015: Successful RN Preceptor Course
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
0.0 Unit. 5 lecture hrs/wk..
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
This course prepares registered nurses to be effective preceptors
for fourth-semester nursing students. The course includes content
related to roles and responsibilities of the preceptor: supervision
and legal issues, communication plan, values clarification, writing
behavioral objectives, the advisement and evaluation process; and
accidents and injuries.
VOCN 6020: Test of Essential Academic Skills
Preparation Course
0.0 Unit. 0.75 lecture and 0.125 TBA hrs/wk.
This course introduces the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS)
test plan, describing content areas of reading comprehension; mathematics; science and technical reasoning; and English and English
language skills, and discusses test taking skills. The last meeting
includes a post assessment test, grading the test, and how to register
for the TEAS.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses (6 units):
PHIL 112 Introduction to Logic
3
PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy
3
Or
PHIL 111 Introduction to Ethics
3
List A. Select one (3 units)
Any course from required core not already used
PHIL 115 History of Philosophy: Ancient
3
PHIL 117 History of Philosophy: Late Modern to Contemporary
3
List B. Select two (6 units)
Any course from List A not already used
HUM 100A Introduction to Humanities: Ancient Greece to the Medieval Period 3
Or
HIST 110 Western Civilization I: to 1350
3
Or
HIST 111
Western Civilization II: 1350 to 1815
3
HUM 100B Introduction to Humanities: Renaissance to the Modern Period
3
Or
HIST 112 Western Civilization III: the 19th and 20th Centuries
3
List C. Select one (3 units)
Any course from List A or List B not already used
Courses articulated as CSU GE Area C2 or IGETC Area 3B:
194
Physical Education
MARIN.EDU
DRAM 116 Survey of Dramatic Literature: Ancient Greek to the Present
ENGL 208 Short Fiction
ENGL 212 Introduction to Poetry
ENGL 214
The Popular Novel
ENGL 218 The American Short Story
ENGL 220 Detective Fiction
ENGL 221A Survey of American Literature I
ENGL 221B Survey of American Literature II
ENGL 222 Survey of English Literature
ENGL 223 Survey of English Literature II
ENGL 224 Survey of World Literature I
ENGL 225 Survey of World Literature II
ENGL 230 Survey of Shakespeare
ENGL 235 Women in Literature
ENGL 237 The Literature of American Cultures
ENGL 240 Classic Children’s Literature
ENGL 242 Global Writings
ETST 154 Native American Literature
FREN 225 Advanced French I
FREN 226 Advanced French II
HUM 107 Humanities Through the Arts
HUM 114 The Long Search: An Introduction to the World’s Religions
HUM 118 Introduction to World Religions
HUM 125 Myth, Symbol, and the Arts
HUM 242 Global Writings
ITAL 225 Advanced Italian I
ITAL 226 Advanced Italian II
JPNS 225 Advanced Japanese I
JPNS 226 Advanced Japanese II
SPAN 225 Advanced Spanish I
SPAN 226 Advanced Spanish II
Total Major Units
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC/CSU-GE):
Required IGETC/CSU-GE Breadth:
Remaining CSU Transferable Electives(IGETC/CSU-GE):
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
6-12 units/9-15 units
37 units/39 units
11-17 units/12-18 units
60
PHILOSOPHY COURSES (PHIL)
PHIL 110: Introduction to Philosophy
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent. PHIL 110 is not a prerequisite for PHIL
111.
This course introduces major thinkers, movements and ideas in the
western philosophical tradition. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU
Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
PHIL 111: Introduction to Ethics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course introduces students to the major philosophical ethical
theories and encourages them to apply these theories to situations in
contemporary culture. Students gain an increased understanding of
the role that ethical reasoning plays in the maintenance of culture.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
PHIL 112: Introduction to Logic
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 120 or 120SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
An introduction to the logical analysis and evaluation of arguments.
Topics covered include: argument diagramming, categorical logic,
sentential logic, and formal and informal fallacies. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C or E, CSU Area A-3
PHIL 115: History of Philosophy: Ancient
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL
or English Placement Test or equivalent.
An introduction to ancient Greek philosophy, focusing on the
Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Cynics, Stoics, Epicureans
and Skeptics. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
PHIL 116: History of Philosophy: Medieval
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
An introduction to the history of Medieval philosophy from St.
Augustine to Sir William of Ockham. (CSU/UC) CSU Area C-2,
IGETC Area 3B
PHIL 117: History of Philosophy: Late Modern to
Contemporary
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
This course deals with the history of philosophy from the end of the
eighteenth century to the contemporary period. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
PHIL 118: Aesthetics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: ENGL 98 or 98SL or English
Placement Test or equivalent.
An introduction to aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art. (CSU/
UC) CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
For standard Physical Education courses, please see the Kinesiology
discipline.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES (PE)
PE 070: Adapted Aquatics
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Prerequisite:
Recommendation of student’s physician, completed medical form, and
a student educational plan.
A class for any student who will benefit from a program of aquatic
exercise. Swimming skills are not necessary. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
H
PE 071: Adaptive Fitness and Strength Training
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Prerequisite:
Recommendation of student’s health care provider including
completed medical form, and a student educational plan.
An aerobic fitness class developed to meet the needs of students with
physical disabilites. Students will participate in group exercise activities (sitting or standing) designed to enhance cardiovascular fitness,
Physics
CATALOG 2015/2016
strength, flexibility, coordination, and balance. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
AreaH
PE 072: Adapted General Conditioning
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Prerequisite:
Recommendation of student’s physician, completed medical form, and
a student educational plan.
In this course, designed for students with physical disabilities, under
the direction of the instructor, students develop a personalized
fitness program based on their individual needs, including the use of
stationary bicycles, treadmills, weights and other adapted equipment.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
PE 074: Adapted Yoga
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Prerequisite:
Recommendation of student’s physician, completed medical form, and
a student educational plan.
This is a safe yoga, breathing, and relaxation course designed for
students with physical disabilities. Instruction includes total body
movement, breathing and relaxation techniques. Emphasis is on
proper alignment, mind/body connection, and stress reduction
techniques. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
PE 075: Adapted Tai Chi
0.5 Unit. 2 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Prerequisite:
Recommendation of student’s physician, completed medical form, and
a student educational plan.
This class introduces the art of Tai Chi, specifically the Yang style
short form and long form. Designed for students with physical disabilities, movements are adapted to the needs of each student, so that
all may participate successfully at their appropriate level. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area H
PE 076: Adapted Zumba Fitness
0.5 Unit. 2 activity hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Prerequisite:
Recommendation of student’s physician, completed medical form, and
a student educational plan.
This class is a fusion of international music and dance (primarily
Latin) that creates a dynamic, exciting, and effective total body fitness program yet is low-impact and can be modified for individuals
with disabilities and/or who use a chair. While exploring a medley of
easy-to-follow dance rhythms and variations, the class is accessible to
most everyone, regardless of age or skill level. No dance experience is
necessary. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
PE 079: Adapted Awareness Through Movement
0.5 Unit. 2 activity hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. Prerequisite:
Recommendation of student’s physician, completed medical form, and
a student educational plan.
This class provides group lessons in the Feldenkrais group movement
method, where students learn to move with awareness to improve
functioning, balance, coordination, posture and well being. The
lessons increase the capacity for easier and more effective movement
in everyday activities. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area H
195
PHYSICS
The study of physics is extensive. It includes such fields as astronomy,
optics, nuclear and high-energy physics, acoustics, solid state physics,
biophysics, and geophysics. The career physicist may stand on a
missile-launching pad, go beneath the sea or ascend into the upper
atmosphere. Today, however, nuclear physicists represent the largest
single group of full-time employed physicists.
Career Options
Acoustic Physicist, Air Pollution Specialist, Astronomer, Astrophysicist, Atomic Physicist, Biophysicist, Chemical Engineer, Civil
Engineer, Consumer Safety Officer, Electrical Engineer, Electronic
and Molecular Physicist, Electro-Optical Engineer, Environmental
Studies Specialist, Food and Drug Inspector, Geophysicist, Industrial Research and Development Specialist, Instrument Designer,
Inventor, Laboratory Assistant, Material Researcher, Mechanical
Engineer, Metallurgist, Nuclear Physicist, Operations Researcher,
Patent Examiner, Pharmacologist, Physical Chemist, Physics Research Technician, Quality Control Specialist, Solid State Physicist,
Statistician, Systems Analyst, Teacher, Technical Writer, Theoretical
Physicist, Thermodynamics Physicist
Faculty
David Everitt, Leah Sharp
Department Phone: 415-485-9510
Physics Prerequisite Recency Requirement
To ensure student success, certain chemistry and physics courses
have established 5-year prerequisite recency requirements beginning
in Fall 2014. The chemistry prerequisites for CHEM 131, 132, 132E,
231, 232 and 232E and the physics prerequisites for PHYS 108B,
207B and 207C must have been successfully completed within the
past 5 years. Students may challenge these recency requirements by
taking a test, by arrangement with the Physical Sciences Department
chairperson.
A.S.-T. IN PHYSICS
Associate in Science in Physics for Transfer degree (AS-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Science in Physics for Transfer degree,
a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses:
196
Political Science
PHYS 207A Mechanics and Properties of Matter
PHYS 207B Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 207C Heat, Light, Sound, and Modern Physics
MATH 123
Analytic Geometry and Calculus
MATH 124
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II
MATH 223
Analytic Geometry, Vector Analysis and Calculus II
Total Major Units
Maximum Units Double-Counted (IGETC only):
Required IGETC:
Remaining CSU Transferrable Electives (IGETC):
TOTAL DEGREE UNITS
MARIN.EDU
5
5
5
5
5
5
30
7 units
37 units
0 units
60
PHYSICS COURSES (PHYS)
PHYS 108A: General Physics I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 104 or
sufficient score on the Math Assessment Test. Advisory: Math 121.
This course introduces topics in physics including motion, forces,
energy, oscillation, waves, fluids, heat, and thermodynamics. Emphasizes problem-solving based in algebra and trigonometry, as well as
laboratory investigations and experimental techniques. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC Area 5A and 5C
PHYS 108AC: General Physics I (Calculus
Supplement)
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Physics 108A or concurrent
enrollment, and Math 121 or sufficient score on the Math Assessment
Test.
Covers basic concepts of kinematics, forces, rotational motion, fluids,
oscillations, and waves, heat, and thermodynamics with a calculusbased set of problem assignments. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1
PHYS 108B: General Physics II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: PHYS 108A. The
prerequisite must have been completed within the past 5 years.
A continuation of introductory topics in physics, focusing on the
basic laws and concepts of electricity and magnetism, including
the treatment of electric fields, charges and potentials, capacitance,
electric current, basic DC and AC circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, electromagnetic waves, light, and geometric optics.
Emphasizes problem-solving based in algebra and trigonometry, as
well as laboratory investigations and experimental techniques. (CSU/
UC) CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC Area 5A and 5C
PHYS 108BC: General Physics II (Calculus
Supplement)
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: PHYS 108B or concurrent
enrollment, and Math 122.
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics with a calculus-based set of problem
assignments. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1
PHYS 110: Introductory Physics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introduction to the development and manifestation of the basic
physical laws, the process of scientific inquiry and discovery, and the
relationship and responsibilities of science to society. (CSU/UC) AA/
AS Area A, CSU Area B-1, IGETC Area 5A
PHYS 110L: Conceptual Physics Laboratory
1.0 Units. 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: PHYS 110 or concurrent
enrollment.
This laboratory course introduces basic physical laws covered in
PHYS 110. Experiments revealing basic physical laws are performed
with an emphasis on scientific laboratory, experimental, and datainterpretation techniques. (CSU/UC) IGETC Area 5C
PHYS 207A: Mechanics and Properties of Matter
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: Math 123, and Math
124 or concurrent enrollment.
This course develops the physical laws, concepts, and mathematical
tools needed to describe motion and the action of forces. Central
ideas include Newton’s laws of motion, conservation of energy, and
conservation of linear and angular momentum. Emphasizes problem
solving. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area A, CSU Area B-1 and B-3, IGETC
Area 5A And 5C
PHYS 207B: Electricity and Magnetism
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: PHYS 207A, and
Math 223 or concurrent enrollment. The physics prerequisite must have
been completed within the past 5 years.
This course develops both microscopic and macroscopic descriptions
of electricity and magnetism. The microscopic viewpoint is described
by Maxwell’s four equations, which relate electric and magnetic fields
to electric charges and currents, and by Coulomb’s law. The macroscopic description involves simple AC and DC circuit analysis, which
includes Ohm’s law and the concepts of resistance, capacitance,
inductance, impedance, and electrical resonance. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area B-1 and B-3
PHYS 207C: Heat, Light, Sound, and Modern Physics
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisites: PHYS 207A, and
Math 223 or concurrent enrollment. The physics prerequisite must have
been completed within the past 5 years.
This course develops the concepts and laws describing four different
but related topics. The major ideas include the first and second laws of
thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, interference and diffraction of light and sound waves, optical instruments, atomic structure
of matter, nuclear physics, and a brief introduction to quantum
theory. (CSU/UC) CSU Area B-1 and B-3
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Political science is the study of government and politics. The major in
political science is primarily designed for the student who desires a
liberal arts education with a political science emphasis and who plans
to enter a career in government service or public administration,
seeks training for positions in the overseas agencies of the United
States government, intends to pursue the study of law, or who wants
to specialize in journalism or writing with an emphasis on government.
Career Options
Administrative Assistant, Attorney, Campaign Aide/Manager, City/
County Manager, Claims Examiner, Congressional Staff Member,
Consumer Protection Specialist, Contract Administrator, Customs
Inspector, Diplomat, Economist, Elected Official, Environmental
Studies, Equal Opportunity Specialist, Foreign Service Officer,
Global Studies, International Relations Specialist, Labor Organizer,
Political Science
CATALOG 2015/2016
Labor Relations Manager, Law Clerk, Legislative Aide, Lobbyist,
Paralegal Assistant, Patent Examiner, Political Scientist, Public Administrator, Public Information Officer, Research Specialist, Teacher,
Union Representative, Urban/Regional Planner, Writer/Journalist
Faculty
Yolanda Bellisimo, Paul Cheney
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
A.A.-T. IN POLITICAL SCIENCE
Associate in Arts in Political Science for Transfer degree (AA-T)
This degree is primarily intended for the student who wants to earn a
degree on the way to transferring to a California State University.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Political Science for Transfer
degree (AA-T), a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Course (3 units):
POLS
101
Introduction to the Government of the United States
3
Required Electives - List A - select three courses (9-10 units):
POLS
100
American Political Institutions
3
POLS
102
Comparative Political Systems
3
POLS
103
Political Theory
3
POLS
104
International Relations
3
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
Or
STAT
115
Introduction to Statistics
4
Required Electives - List B - select two courses (6-8 units):
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
3
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
3
ETST
111
History of African Americans (A)
3
ETST
112
History of African Americans (B)
3
ETST
121
History of Latinos in the United States
3
ETST
151
Native American History
3
GEOG 102
The Human Environment
3
HIST 100
Major Trends and Selected Topics in American History
3
HIST
101
World History I: Origins of the Major Traditions
4
HIST
102
World History II: Evolution of the Modern World
4
HIST
109
History of California
3
HIST 110
Western Civilization I: to 1350
3
HIST 111
Western Civilization II: 1350 to 1815
3
HIST 112
Western Civilization III: the 19th and 20th Centuries
3
HIST
117
History of the United States I
3
HIST
118
History of the United States II
3
HIST
206
History of Russia
3
HIST 211
Women in History and Politics
3
HIST 214
History of Latin America
HIST 215
History of England
HIST 216
History of Mexico
HIST
238
History of Africa
POLS
117
The Middle East: A Political Perspective
POLS
211
Women in American History and Politics
POLS 219
The Politics of the United States Presidency
POLS
220
American Foreign Policy
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
197
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
18-21
POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES (POLS)
POLS 100: American Political Institutions
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys American political institutions, roles, processes
and problems at the national, state, and local level. Emphasis is on
the political values of our society and how these values are reflected
in institutions, processes, and policies. Students learn to question,
analyze, and interpret public policy and current events and discover
how they, as citizens, can help shape and influence government
policy. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B or F, CSU Area D-8, IGETC Area 4,
CSU U.S. History, Constitution, and American Ideals
POLS 101: Introduction to the Government of the
United States
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. POLS 101 is recommended
over POLS 100 for majors in prelegal, social sciences, liberal arts, and
teaching.
An introduction to political science as a survey of American
government. Students learn methods of political analysis and the
application of these methods to the study of American government.
The course emphasizes national government but provides an understanding of government at the state and local level as well. Students
develop insights into the clash of ideas in American politics and how
they can influence political outcomes. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B or
F, CSU Area D-8, IGETC Area 4, CSU U.S. History, Constitution,
and American Ideals
POLS 102: Comparative Political Systems
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is designed to help students gain knowledge of the
world’s diverse political structures and practices. It focuses on
specific countries and general concepts used to interpret key political
relationships within nations, and to compare political, economic and
social systems among nations. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area
D-8, IGETC Area 4
POLS 103: Political Theory
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introduction to the history of political thought from Plato to the
present. Present examples of the theory and practice of politics and
the description and analysis of political behavior are related to great
political thinkers of the past. New approaches to solve political and
social problems are discussed. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area
D-8, IGETC Area 4
198
Political Science
POLS 104: International Relations
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and
practice of international relations. The course identifies the various
players in global politics and describes and explains their behavior
and the structure of the international system in which they operate.
Included is an examination of not only the traditional subjects of
international relations, such as power, nationalism, diplomacy, and
war, but also those transnational factors that have come to play a
critical role in an increasingly interdependent world, such as immigration, trade and economic/financial activities, the environment,
human rights, and terrorism. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area
D-8, IGETC Area 4
POLS 117: The Middle East: A Political Perspective
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course surveys the major political developments in the Middle
East in their historical and cultural context from the rise of Islam
to the present, emphasizing the developments of the post-Cold War
period and contemporary politics. The wide range of viewpoints
regarding the role of political elites, great powers, oil, the Arab-Israeli
conflict, gender politics, and factors impacting the growth of democracy in the Middle East are explored. (CSU/UC) CSU Area D-8
POLS 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in
Political Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Eligibility for
ENGL 150. Can be taken as ECON 125, ETST 125, HIST 125, POLS 125,
or SSC 125; credit awarded for only one course.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods of research in the social sciences and develops skills required
to organize such thought and research into effective, college level
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
POLS 201: Understanding Globalization
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course explores the current wave of global political, economic,
and social change, and the opportunities and challenges it brings to
states, institutions, and individuals. Focus is on what the individual
needs to know and understand to be an effective participant in these
rapidly-changing global phenomena. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU
Area D-7, IGETC Area 4
POLS 203: Understanding Terrorism
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Using lecture, class and group discussion, project based learning, audiovisual materials, and guest speakers, this course is a multidimensional exploration of terrorism from historical, political, ideological,
and religious perspectives. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B
POLS 210: War, Peace, and the United Nations
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the study of diplomacy in international crises,
emphasizing the role of the United Nations and other international organizations in processes and politics that prevent war and
preserve peace. Students learn to question, analyze, and interpret
MARIN.EDU
international news and events to understand the role of negotiation
and mediation in international relations. The course also includes
optional student participation in the proceedings of a regional Model
United Nations. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-8, IGETC
Area 4H
POLS 211: Women in American History and Politics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as POLS 211
or HIST 211; credit awarded for only one course.
This course, a social and political history of women and women’s
movements in American society, examines the development of
American institutions and ideals with respect to women’s roles
and status; analyzes women’s relationship to economic, political,
and social processes; explores cultural models of womanhood; and
examines how women define themselves and how they have enacted
change. Key themes include the diversity of American women and
developing a framework for understanding gender in relation to race,
ethnicity, class, sexuality, and religion. Includes research in both
primary and secondary sources. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas B, F, or G;
CSU Areas D-4, D-6, and D-8; IGETC Area 4
POLS 212: History and Politics of Modern Asia
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as HIST 212
or POLS 212; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the history and politics of Asia since 1945,
including the study of East, South, and Southeast Asia. The course
emphasizes the political outcomes of the development of Asia as a
consequence of both internal societal influences as well as external
political and economic pressures. (CSU/UC) CSU Area D-6 and D-8,
IGETC Area 4
POLS 215: Survey of Current Issues
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as ECON
215, POLS 215, or SSC 215; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is an opportunity to critically examine and discuss
significant world developments and to attempt to understand the
sources of those developments. Student focus on issues of particular
interest and share that information with the group. When possible,
informed participants in world and national events meet with the
class to share insights. (CSU)
POLS 219: The Politics of the United States
Presidency
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class provides students with a detailed understanding of the
modern American presidency by examining the theory and realities behind Executive Branch power. Topic covered include basic
concepts of American government, the relationships between various
branches of government, the role of interest groups, and the legacy of
the American presidency for both national and international affairs.
The class uses primary as well as secondary sources to contrast
historical developments with recent presidential administrations.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-8, IGETC Area 4
POLS 220: American Foreign Policy
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A survey of the theoretical, historical, and empirical factors involved
in the formation of United States foreign policy since World War
II, this course focuses on the causes and consequences of America’s
role in the world during both the Cold War and post Cold War
Psychology
CATALOG 2015/2016
periods. Particular attention is paid to contemporary problems such
as globalization, climate change, and terrorism, and how these are
influenced by the dynamics of America’s history, political culture,
and government system. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-8,
IGETC Area 4
PSYCHOLOGY
The course offerings are designed to familiarize students with the
facts, theories, and contemporary trends in psychology and human
development and how these principles can be incorporated into a
meaningful understanding of oneself. For students intending to
major in psychology, there are several areas of concentration and
career options.
Career Options
Activities Director, Administrator, Advertising Account Executive,
Art Therapist, Child Psychologist, Clinical Psychologist, Community
Mental Health Worker, Correctional Officer, Counselor, Customer
Service Representative, Drug/Alcohol Counselor, Employee Relations Specialist, Employment Interviewer/Counselor, Experimental
Psychologist, Industrial Psychologist, Manpower Development
Specialist, Market Research Analyst, Marriage, Family and Child
Counselor, Minister, Personnel Specialist, Probation/Parole Officer,
Program Director, Psychiatric Social Worker, Psychiatric Technician, Psychiatrist, Psychometrist, Public Health Educator, Public
Relations Representative, Recreation Specialist/Therapist, Rehabilitation Counselor, Research Assistant, Residential Counselor, Sales
Representative, School Psychologist, Special Education, Speech
Pathologist/Therapist, Statistician, Training Specialist, Welfare
Worker, Youth Organization Leader
Faculty
Shawn Purcell, Robert McCoy, Susan Rahman
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
A.A.-T. IN PSYCHOLOGY
Associate in Arts in Psychology for Transfer
This degree is intended for students who plan to transfer to the
California State University (CSU) with a major in psychology.
Students who complete the degree will be guaranteed admission to a
CSU campus and will be prepared to pursue a bachelors’ degree in a
similar major.
The Associate in Arts in Psychology for Transfer (AA-T) offers a
breadth of courses in the discipline and allows the students to satisfy
the lower division major preparation requirements. The degree
introduces students to the theories and practices in psychology.
Upon completion of the degree, students will be able to identify and
describe the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical
findings, and historical trends in psychology. Students will apply the
scientific method and critical thinking skills to formulate and evaluate valid hypotheses in the field as well as describe how psychological
principles are applied in business, industry, childrearing and social
interactions. Furthermore, students will be able to articulate how
basic psychosocial factors influence behavior, attitudes, and personal
presuppositions.
199
To complete the Associate in Arts in Psychology for Transfer (AAT) degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses (10 units)
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
PSY
110
Introduction to Psychology 3
PSY
205
Introduction to Research Methods and Data Analysis in Psychology 3
Required Elective (choose one course; 3 units):
BIOL
110
Introduction to Biology
3
BIOL/PSY 251
Biological Psychology
3
Required Elective (choose one course; 3 units):
PSY
112
Child and Adolescent Psychology
3
PSY
114
The Psychology of Human Development: Lifespan
3
PSY
204
Abnormal Psychology
3
PSY/SOC 230
Social Psychology
3
Required Elective (3 units):
ANTH 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthroplogy
3
PSY
111
Personality Dynamics and Effective Behavior
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
19
PSYCHOLOGY COURSES (PSY)
PSY 110: Introduction to Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines traditional areas of psychological investigation
from a scientific perspective. Topics include scientific methodology,
human development, personality, psychological measurement,
psychopathology, psychotherapy, motivation, perception, social
influences on behavior, cognitive processes, learning, and biological
basis of behavior. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-9 or E,
IGETC Area 4
PSY 111: Personality Dynamics and Effective
Behavior
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course presents major theoretical and research perspectives
on personality description, development, dynamics, and change,
and examines how these theories and research findings can be
effectively applied in our own lives. Topics include the dimensions
of personality traits and the development of tests to measure these
traits in individuals; factors influencing the day-to-day functioning
of individuals including conscious and unconscious motivations,
self-concept, self-esteem, and coping mechanisms; considerations of
gender and social and cultural influences; and therapy, growth, and
200
Psychology
MARIN.EDU
maturational perspectives on personality. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B,
CSU Area D-9 or E, IGETC Area 4
PSY 145: Psychology in Modern Life
PSY 112: Child and Adolescent Psychology
This course examines the psychological, physiological, and sociocultural factors involved in personality development, interpersonal
relationships, and social processes. The course teaches important
psychological principles, concepts, skills, and research, with the
goals of improving the quality of our own lives and relationships. It
emphasizes knowledge, insights, and skills that students can apply to
their own lives, particularly in areas such as life satisfaction, personal
satisfaction, careers, relationships, health, and stress management.
(CSU) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-9 or E
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course emphasizes the understanding of children and adolescents through the study of the psychological and developmental
changes they undergo. The course examines physiological, social/
emotional, cognitive, and personality development from birth
through adolescence. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-9 or E,
IGETC Area 4
PSY 114: The Psychology of Human Development:
Lifespan
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines human development from conception through
old age. Physical, intellectual, social, and personality development
are included. Emphasis is placed on the continuity of development
as well as on individual differences. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU
Area D-9 or E, IGETC Area 4
PSY 116: Theories of Personality
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A survey of the major theories of personality. Psychoanalytic,
interpersonal, humanistic, behavioral, social-cognitive, and trait
theories will be covered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-9,
IGETC Area 4
PSY 125: Psychology of Violence
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course examines the psychological bases of violence against self,
intimates, associates, and strangers in such diverse settings as the
home, workplace, school, streets, and other public places. Theories
explaining violent behavior as the result of biology, of shame and
low self-esteem, of failures of attachment, empathy, and guilt, of
media violence, and of prejudice and hatred are examined. The roles
of prisons, drugs, guns, poverty, racism, sexism, homophobia, and
mental illness in precipitating violence are assessed. (CSU)
PSY 130: Introduction to Sport and Exercise
Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as PSY 130 or
PE 120; credit awarded for only one course.
This course examines the psychological theories and techniques
that are applied to sport, exercise and other achievement-related
situations. The course emphasizes the enhancement of performance
and personal growth of athletes, coaches, and exercise participants.
Students also learn mental skills that they can transfer from sport
and exercise settings to their everyday lives. (CSU)
PSY 140: Marriage, Family, and Intimate
Relationships
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as PSY 140 or
SOC 140; credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers students a theoretical and practical understanding
of the variety of intimate social and family relationships existing in
contemporary society. While the course covers traditional marriage
and nuclear family relationships, it also emphasizes other lifestyles,
e.g., singles, gay, blended families, etc. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B,
CSU Area D-7 or E, IGETC Area 4
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
PSY 150: Introduction to Research Methods
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or PSY 110 or ANTH
101 or ANTH 102. May be taken as ANTH 150, BEHS 150, PSY 150, or
SOC 150; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the methods, logic, and empirical and analytical strategies behavioral scientists use to study the social world.
Students gain knowledge and practical experience in the scientific
method, evaluation of evidence, and the research design and
development process. Key topics include qualitative and quantitative
modes of inquiry, formulating research questions, developing and
testing hypotheses, ethics of research, and developing a study design
and methodology. (CSU)
PSY 204: Abnormal Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: PSY 110.
Principles of general psychology applied to the field of psychopathology. A survey of the major diagnostic disorders together with the
theories of the cause of mental illness, and of the major psychotherapeutic methods in relation to their practical and theoretical value.
This introduction to abnormal psychology is directed toward those
with an interest in applied psychology. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B,
CSU Area D-9, IGETC Area 4
PSY 205: Introduction to Research Methods and
Data Analysis in Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: PSY 110. Advisory: Math 115 or
STAT 115. Can be taken as PSY 205 or SOC 205; credit awarded for only
one course.
This course prepares students for upper-level division work in the
psychology and sociology majors. The course examines the following
topics: conducting Internet and library research; formulating testable
hypotheses; methods of examining processes, causality, the power of
social events, and the associations between phenomena; and appropriate selection and use of nonparametric and parametric statistics.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B or E, CSU Area D-9 or D-0, IGETC Area 4
PSY 230: Social Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as PSY 230 or
SOC 230; credit awarded for only one course.
This interdisciplinary course covers sociological and psychological approaches to important social phenomena. The diverse topics
include altruism; attitude formation and attitude change; conformity; person perception and social labeling; reference groups; social
conflict and conflict resolution; human aggression; intergroup
processes; intragroup processes; interpersonal attraction; social
networks, statuses and roles; and the social development of the self.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7, IGETC Area 4
Real Estate
CATALOG 2015/2016
PSY 251: Biological Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as PSY 251 or
BIOL 251; credit awarded for only one course.
This class explores the basic brain processes underlying the functioning of the human mind. Topics include basic synaptic functioning,
psychopharmacology, stress and the immune system, learning and
memory, sleep, mood disorders, schizophrenia, language, motor and
sensory systems, sexuality, consciousness, endocrine function and
interactions. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-9, IGETC Area
4
PSY 252: Seminar and Fieldwork Experience
3.0 Units. 1.5 lecture and 4.5 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 1. Prerequisite: PSY
110, 112 or 114 or SOC 110 or concurrent enrollment. May be taken as
PSY 252 or BEHS 252; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is designed to give students meaningful participation
in a psychologically related community service agency in order to
understand the applications of psychological principles, theories, and
concepts. With the mutual consent of student and instructor each
student is placed in a school, social agency, special education program, mental health agency, or community organization and works
under the direct supervision of someone with a degree, credential, or
demonstrated expertise in psychology or sociology. (CSU)
REAL ESTATE
The Real Estate Program is designed to serve the individual planning
to enter the real estate profession, the person who wishes to improve
skills and qualify for the real estate sales and broker’s license, and active professionals working on license renewal. Upon completing the
Real Estate Program, students are eligible for positions in real estate
sales offices, banks, savings and loan corporations, title companies,
escrow companies, organizations, and as independent real estate
brokers.
Career Options
Appraiser, Escrow Officer, Loan Officer, Mortgage Lender, Property
Developer, Property Manager, Real Estate Agent, Real Estate Broker,
Real Estate Counselor, Sales Agent
Department Phone: 415-485-9610
A.S. IN REAL ESTATE, OCCUPATIONAL
(Certificate of Achievement also awarded. Skills Certificates in Real
Estate Appraisal, Finance, Law, and Property Management also
available.)
Courses are offered at both campuses. Students may take classes at
either campus and complete requirements for the major. Real estate
brokers and sales persons must also pass an examination given by
the State of California, Department of Real Estate. Students who
complete only the six real estate courses required for the major (Real
Estate 115, 116, 117, 210, 212, and 215) are eligible for the Certificate
of Achievement. An Associate in Science degree is awarded for
satisfactory performance in major courses (six Real Estate courses
listed plus Business 101, 107, and 112) as well as completion of general
education and graduation requirements. Note: Students are required
to complete English 150 for the associate degree. All students should
consult a counselor.
201
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Freshman Year
BUS
101
Introduction to Business
3
BUS
107
Business Law
3
REAL
115* Real Estate Principles
3
REAL
116* Real Estate Practice
3
REAL
117* Legal Aspects of Real Estate
3
Sophomore Year
BUS
112
Financial Accounting
4
REAL
210* Real Estate Finance
3
REAL
212* Real Estate Appraisal I
3
REAL
215* Real Estate Economics
3
*Courses required for Certificate of Achievement only.
TOTAL CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT UNITS
18
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
28
Skills Certificates
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within an occupational
program. Skills Certificates may be part of a “ladder” of skills, beginning with job entry skills and leading to a full Certificate of Achievement program or may constitute a skill set that enables a student to
upgrade or advance in an existing career. Skills Certificates require
less than 18 units and are shorter in duration than the Certificates of
Achievement.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Real Estate Appraisal Skills Certificate
REAL
115
Real Estate Principles
3
REAL
116
Real Estate Practice
3
REAL
212
Real Estate Appraisal I
3
Real Estate Finance Skills Certificate
REAL
115
Real Estate Principles
3
REAL
116
Real Estate Practice
3
REAL
210
Real Estate Finance
3
Real Estate Law Skills Certificate
REAL
115
Real Estate Principles
3
REAL
116
Real Estate Practice
3
REAL
117
Legal Aspects of Real Estate
3
Real Estate Property Management Skills Certificate
REAL
115
Real Estate Principles
3
REAL
116
Real Estate Practice
3
REAL
218
Property Management
3
REAL ESTATE COURSES (REAL)
REAL 115: Real Estate Principles
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This fundamental real estate course emphasizes the basic concepts
and terminology necessary for understanding the complexities of the
real estate profession. The Department of Real Estate requires this
course and Real Estate Practice (REAL 116), plus one other elective
course to be taken prior to sitting for the Real Estate Salesperson’s
Exam. This course is also one of the eight courses required to sit for
the Real Estate Broker’s Exam. Specific course content is applicable
towards Real Estate Appraiser Licensing (check with real estate
instructors for content and subject categories based on Office of Real
Estate Appraiser’s requirements). (CSU)
202
Social Science
REAL 116: Real Estate Practice
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: REAL 115.
This course introduces students to the day-to-day practice in a real
estate office. It includes understanding agency obligations inherent in
real estate practice and provides practice in the basic skills necessary to succeed in a real estate career. This course, plus REAL 115,
plus one other elective course, are required to sit for the Real Estate
Salesperson’s Exam. This is also one of the eight courses required to
sit for the Real Estate Broker’s Exam. (CSU)
REAL 117: Legal Aspects of Real Estate
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: REAL 115.
A study of California real estate law covering agency, contracts,
disclosures, landlord/tenant disputes, development and the environment, property taxes, common interest subdivisions, escrow and title
insurance boundary disputes, and the effects of trusts and bankruptcy on property transactions. This course is one of the acceptable
electives for obtaining a Real Estate Sales license and is also one of
the eight courses required to sit for the Real Estate Broker’s Exam.
(CSU)
REAL 210: Real Estate Finance
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: REAL 115.
A study of real estate finance includes lending policies and problems,
financing residential and commercial properties, and the Federal
and State entities that oversee lending practices. This course is one
of the acceptable electives for obtaining a Real Estate Sales license
and is also one of the eight courses required to sit for the Real Estate
Broker’s Exam. (CSU)
REAL 212: Real Estate Appraisal I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory course covers the purposes of appraisals, the appraisal process, and the different approaches, methods, and techniques used to determine the value of various property types. This
course is one of the acceptable electives for obtaining a Real Estate
Sales license and is also one of the eight courses required to sit for the
Real Estate Broker’s Exam. (CSU)
REAL 215: Real Estate Economics
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: REAL 115.
This course provides the means to interpret economic activities for
the mutual benefit of property owners, investors, and real estate
professionals. It includes relating business and real estate cycles to
forecasting land use and capital growth patterns, the clash of land
use controls, and the dynamics of community demographics and
property investment alternatives. This course is one of the acceptable
electives for obtaining a Real Estate Sales license and is also one of
the eight courses required to sit for the Real Estate Broker’s Exam.
(CSU)
REAL 217: Advanced Real Estate Appraisal II
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: REAL 212.
This course addresses the appraisal of income producing properties
and the techniques and methodology used by appraisers to convert
cash flows into indicators of value. This course is one of the acceptable electives for obtaining a Real Estate Broker’s License. Specific
course content is applicable towards Real Estate Appraiser Licensing
MARIN.EDU
(check with real estate instructors for content and subject categories
based on Office of Real Estate Appraiser’s requirements). (CSU)
REAL 218: Property Management
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: REAL 115.
This course identifies the tools and methods of managing income
properties, emphasizing owner/tenant relations, evictions, contracts,
cash flows, and employment regulations. It is one of the acceptable
electives for obtaining a Real Estate Sales license and is also one of
the eight courses required to sit for the Real Estate Broker’s Exam.
(CSU)
REAL 219: Escrows
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: REAL 115.
This course emphasizes the methods and techniques of escrow
procedures with an additional focus on the title industry and the
complex considerations that can affect title. This course can enhance
a student’s ability to seek employment in not just real estate sales or
appraisal, but also opens up employment opportunities in the escrow
and title industries. This course is one of the acceptable electives for
obtaining a Real Estate Sales license or a Real Estate Broker’s License.
(CSU)
REAL 220: California Loan Brokering
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: REAL 115.
This course introduces the student to the complex laws affecting the
loan brokering business. It is designed for those already involved
in a real estate career and for those considering a career in the real
estate loan marketplace. It is also a valuable course for borrowers so
that they can understand the loan process. This course is one of the
acceptable electives for obtaining a Real Estate Sales license or a Real
Estate Broker’s License. Specific course content is applicable towards
Real Estate Appraiser Licensing (check with real estate instructors
for content and subject categories based on Office of Real Estate
Appraiser’s requirements). (CSU)
SOCIAL SCIENCE
The social science field is interdisciplinary and designed for students
who wish to gain a broader understanding of the social sciences
than is possible in a major offered by a single discipline. The aim of
the social science major is to provide an opportunity for students
who wish to build on the foundation of their general education and
become familiar with more than one area of social science.
Career Options
Civil Service Worker, Community Organizer, Educator, Environmental Studies, Foreign Service Worker, Journalist, Management
Trainer, Public Administrator, Researcher, Social Worker, Statistician, Teacher, Urban Planner
Faculty
Yolanda Bellisimo, Walter B. Turner
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
Sociology
CATALOG 2015/2016
203
SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES (SSC)
SOCIOLOGY
SSC 115: Leadership and Governance
Sociology explores the patterns in human behavior and tries to make
sense out of the many forces in society that shape individual lives.
Courses in sociology provide the tools and intellectual frameworks
students can use to better understand the society in which they live.
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course defines leadership and the development of leadership
skills, including communication, facilitation, problem solving, and
conflict resolution. Critical review of governance structure of the
college and the district and comparison to other college governance
structures. (CSU)
SSC 115AL: Leadership and Governance Learning
Lab
1.0 Unit. 3 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: SSC 115 or concurrent
enrollment.
This course provides appropriate laboratory assignments regarding
service on governance committees. This laboratory provides students
the opportunity to apply critical thought to work experience situations in leadership and governance positions. Assignments direct
students to focus upon planning, implementing, and evaluating their
work in college/student organizations and governance committees.
(CSU)
SSC 115BL: Leadership and Governance Learning
Lab
2.0 Units. 6 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: SSC 115 or concurrent
enrollment.
This course provides appropriate laboratory assignments regarding
service on governance committees. This laboratory provides students
the opportunity to apply critical thought to work experience situations in leadership and governance positions. Assignments direct
students to focus upon planning, implementing, and evaluating their
work in college/student organizations and governance committees.
(CSU)
SSC 125: Research Methods and Term Papers in
Social Science
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: Eligibility for
ENGL 150. Can be taken as ECON 125, ETST 125, HIST 125, POLS 125,
or SSC 125; credit awarded for only one course.
This course focuses on the elements of critical thinking and methods of research in the social sciences and develops skills required
to organize such thought and research into effective, college level
presentations. Students are encouraged to select areas of research
from other courses taken during the semester or from areas of special
interest including politics, history, economics, education, women’s
studies, ethnic studies, current issues, and issues of community
concern. (CSU/UC)
SSC 215: Survey of Current Issues
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as ECON
215, POLS 215, or SSC 215; credit awarded for only one course.
This course is an opportunity to critically examine and discuss
significant world developments and to attempt to understand the
sources of those developments. Student focus on issues of particular
interest and share that information with the group. When possible,
informed participants in world and national events meet with the
class to share insights. (CSU)
Career Options
Administrator, Adoptions Worker, Affirmative Action Officer, Camp
Counselor, Community Outreach Worker, Consumer Research
Assistant, Corrections Officer, Criminologist, Crisis Counselor, Demographer, Drug/Alcohol Counselor, Eligibility Worker, Employee
Relations Assistant, Employment Interviewer, FBI Agent, Geriatric
Specialist, Intake Interviewer, Marriage, Family, and Child Counselor, Penologist, Police Officer, Probation/Parole Officer, Program
Director, Psychiatric Social Worker, Recreation Therapist, Rehabilitation Counselor, Research Worker, Residential Counselor, Social
Ecologist, Social Service Aide, Social Statistician, Social Worker,
Sociologist, Teacher, Volunteer Coordinator, Welfare Worker, Youth
Organization Leader
Faculty
Marco Gonzalez, Susan Rahman
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
A.A.-T. IN SOCIOLOGY
Associate in Arts in Sociology for Transfer
This degree is intended for students who plan to transfer to the
California State University (CSU) with a major in sociology.
The Associate in Arts in Sociology for Transfer (AA-T) provides
students with a breadth of courses in sociology that prepares students
in the theory, research, and methodologies of the discipline. The
courses satisfy the lower-division major preparation requirements,
allowing students to transfer into the sociology major or similar major at the CSU. The study of sociology explores the patterns in human
behavior and tries to make sense out of the many forces in society
that shape individual lives. Courses in sociology provide the tools
and intellectual frameworks students can use to better understand
the society in which they live.
To complete the Associate in Arts in Sociology for Transfer (AA-T)
degree, a student must:
1. Complete 60 semester units or 90 quarter units that are eligible for
transfer to the California State University, including both of the
following:
• The Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum
(IGETC) or the California State University General Education
– Breadth Requirements.
• A minimum of 18 semester units or 27 quarter units in a major
or area of emphasis, as determined by the community college
district. Up to 12 units may be double-counted.
2. Complete all courses in the major with a grade of “C” or better, or
“P” if the course is taken as “pass/no pass.”
3. Obtain a minimum grade point average of 2.0.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
Required Core Courses (7 Units)
SOC
110
Introduction to Sociology
3
MATH 115
Probability and Statistics
4
Required Electives - choose two (6 Units)
204
Spanish
SOC
112
Social Deviance and Problems
SOC
205
Introduction to Research Methods and Data Analysis in Sociology
SOC
114
Global Social Issues
Required Electives - choose two (6 Units)
SOC
140
Marriage, Family, and Intimate Relationships
SOC 184Criminology
SOC/PSY 230
Social Psychology
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
MARIN.EDU
3
3
3
3
3
3
19
SOCIOLOGY COURSES (SOC)
SOC 110: Introduction to Sociology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A course designed to develop a sociological perspective; it explores
the relationship between individual and group behavior and the
nature of societal and institutional influences upon individuals and
groups, and the resulting patterns of behavior. The core areas of
sociology are covered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-0,
IGETC Area 4
SOC 112: Modern Social Problems
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Students identify and analyze contemporary forms of deviant
behavior generally defined as social problems by members of society.
The course includes theoretical considerations of these problems,
observations and descriptive interpretations, and field application
of the sociological knowledge required in the classroom. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-0, IGETC Area 4
SOC 114: Global Social Issues
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An opportunity to review and analyze some of the most important
social problems of the current age from a global perspective, this
course centers upon contemporary descriptions of major social
conflicts, international disputes, and natural disasters. The course
provides sociological models for theoretical consideration and
analysis. Topics may include resource war, religious and political
terrorism, nuclear proliferation, poverty, population growth and
migrations, sexual exploitation, drug smuggling, ecological pollution, and climate change. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7,
IGETC Area 4
SOC 130: Race and Ethnicity
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. May be taken as BEHS 130
or SOC 130; credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers an in-depth examination of race and ethnicity in
the United States. Specifically, students gain a greater understanding
of the concepts of race and ethnicity and the historic and present-day
implications of prejudice, discrimination, and racism in our society.
Students examine various theories of racial and ethnic stratification,
immigration and the assimilation process, new and changing ethnoracial identities, and dominant-minority group interactions. (CSU)
SOC 140: Marriage, Family and Intimate
Relationships
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as SOC 140
or PSY 140; credit awarded for only one course.
This course offers students a theoretical and practical understanding
of the variety of intimate social and family relationships existing in
contemporary society. While the course covers traditional marriage
and nuclear family relationships, it also emphasizes other lifestyles,
e.g., singles, gay, blended families, etc. Within the context of each
lifestyle, topics such as communication, social roles, sexual behavior,
decision making, child rearing, and everyday life interaction are
covered. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7 or E, IGETC Area
4
SOC 150: Introduction to Research Methods
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or PSY 110 or ANTH
101 or ANTH 102. May be taken as ANTH 150, BEHS 150, PSY 150, or
SOC 150; credit awarded for only one course.
This course introduces the methods, logic, and empirical and analytical strategies behavioral scientists use to study the social world.
Students gain knowledge and practical experience in the scientific
method, evaluation of evidence, and the research design and
development process. Key topics include qualitative and quantitative
modes of inquiry, formulating research questions, developing and
testing hypotheses, ethics of research, and developing a study design
and methodology. (CSU)
SOC 205: Introduction to Research Methods and
Data Analysis in Sociology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SOC 110. Advisory: Math 115
or STAT 115. Can be taken as SOC 205 or PSY 205; credit awarded for
only one course.
This course prepares students for upper-level division work in the
psychology and sociology majors. The course examines the following
topics: conducting Internet and library research; formulating testable
hypotheses; methods of examining processes, causality, the power of
social events, and the associations between phenomena; and appropriate selection and use of nonparametric and parametric statistics.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B or E, CSU Area D-9 or D-0, IGETC Area 4
SOC 230: Social Psychology
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as SOC 230
or PSY 230; credit awarded for only one course.
This interdisciplinary course covers sociological and psychological approaches to important social phenomena. The diverse topics
include altruism; attitude formation and attitude change; conformity; person perception and social labeling; reference groups; social
conflict and conflict resolution; human aggression; intergroup
processes; intragroup processes; interpersonal attraction; social
networks, statuses and roles; and the social development of the self.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area B, CSU Area D-7, IGETC Area 4
SPANISH
A major reason for studying the Spanish language is the enrichment
of one’s intellectual growth in the context of the rest of the world. In
learning Spanish, one also learns about the culture, philosophy, and
civilization of another people, thereby broadening understanding of
the world. On the practical side, any field of specialization (journalism, medicine, law, business, teaching) is enhanced if one can speak
another language. In California, knowledge of a modern language
is now required in many jobs that deal with the public such as Civil
Service, social work, nursing, and other service-oriented fields.
Spanish
CATALOG 2015/2016
205
Career Options
Diplomatic Service, Editor, Foreign Correspondent, Foreign Service
Officer, Hotel Management, Import/Export, International Business,
Teacher, Tour Guide, Translator/Interpreter, Travel Agent
SPANISH COURSES (SPAN)
Faculty
Andrei Barashkov, Michele Martinisi, Rossana Pagani, Nadia Sanko
Department Phone: 415-485-9480
A beginning course offering study and practice in speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing Spanish, along with exploration
of the cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. The threehour weekly laboratory requirement enhances the student’s verbal
and comprehension skills through the use of audiovisual materials. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 6: UC
Language other than English
Policy Statement Regarding Sequence of Enrollment in Spanish
Language Classes
Although students are advised to enroll in language courses
sequentially, they will not be precluded from enrolling in lower
level language classes after completion of more advanced courses.
Students should be aware, however, that units resulting from the
lower level courses may not be accepted at transfer institutions as a
part of the required transferring units.
A.A. IN SPANISH
Spanish language courses serve a dual purpose, which is to acquire
structural and verbal skills, which satisfy both academic and cultural
needs. The program serves both transfer students and those seeking
self-enrichment. Students may take classes at either campus to fulfill
requirements for the major. Students who complete the requirements listed below, plus additional general education and graduation
requirements, will be awarded the associate degree. Note: Students
are required to complete English 150 for the associate degree. All
students should consult a counselor.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
SPAN
101
Elementary Spanish I
5
SPAN
102
Elementary Spanish II
5
SPAN
203
Intermediate Spanish III
5
In addition, complete one course from the following:
SPAN
110 Conversational Spanish I
4
SPAN
112 Conversational Spanish II
4
SPAN
114 Conversational Spanish III
4
SPAN
128A Spanish Conversation and Culture Through Film
3
SPAN 203HB Intermediate Spanish for Heritage and Bilingual Speakers
4
SPAN
204
Intermediate Spanish IV
4
SPAN
225
Advanced Spanish I
3
SPAN
226
Advanced Spanish II
3
SPAN
228C Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture through Film
3
SPAN
230A Culture and Civilization of Spain and South America
3
SPAN 230B Culture and Civilization of Mexico and Central America
3
SPAN
230C Culture and Civilization of Spain
3
TOTAL MAJOR UNITS
18-19
Skills Certificate in Spanish
Skills Certificates are an acknowledgement that the student has
attained a specified set of competencies within a program. Skills
Certificates require less than 18 units and are shorter in duration
than the Certificate of Achievement.
The Spanish Skills Certificate provides a way for students to verify
that they have reached a level of proficiency in the Spanish language.
REQUIREMENTSUNITS
SPAN
101
Elementary Spanish I
5
SPAN
102
Elementary Spanish II
5
SPAN
203
Intermediate Spanish III
5
TOTAL CERTIFICATE UNITS
15
SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 101.
A continuing course offering study and practice in speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing Spanish, along with exploration
of the cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world. The threehour weekly laboratory requirement enhances the student’s verbal
and comprehension skills through the use of audiovisual materials.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC
Language other than English
SPAN 110: Conversational Spanish I
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
Use of modern colloquial Spanish with elementary grammar. Designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the spoken language
with a minimum of formal grammar. Oral practice in speaking, understanding, and correct pronunciation of Spanish, using audiovisual
materials depicting everyday situations. (CSU)
SPAN 112: Conversational Spanish II
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 110 or
equivalent.
A beginning course offering students the opportunity to understand and speak Spanish using elementary grammar. The course
is designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the spoken
language with a minimum of formal grammar. Students also work
on acquiring good pronunciation in Spanish. The three-hour weekly
website requirement enhances students’ verbal and comprehension
skills through listening and speaking. (CSU)
SPAN 114: Conversational Spanish III
4.0 Units. 3 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 112.
A continuing course offering students the opportunity to understand and speak Spanish using elementary grammar. The course
is designed for students who wish to acquire skills of the spoken
language with a minimum of formal grammar. Students also work
on acquiring good pronunciation in Spanish. The three-hour weekly
website requirement enhances students’ verbal and comprehension
skills through listening and speaking. (CSU)
SPAN 120: Spanish for Health Care Professionals I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This Spanish conversation course is designed for health care
professionals and workers who wish to learn Spanish with the goal
of applying it in their working environment. No prior knowledge of
Spanish is needed. Fulfills continuing education requirements for
registered nurses. (CSU)
206
Spanish
MARIN.EDU
SPAN 121: Spanish for Health Care Professionals II
SPAN 225: Advanced Spanish I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 120 or equivalent.
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent.
A continuing Spanish conversation course designed for health care
professionals and workers who wish to learn Spanish with the goal of
applying it in their working environment. Fulfills continuing education requirements for registered nurses. (CSU)
An advanced course offering students practice in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Spanish based on the civilization
and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than
English
SPAN 122: Spanish for Teachers
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
SPAN 226: Advanced Spanish II
This beginning Spanish course is designed to meet the basic needs of
teachers who wish to learn Spanish with the goal of communicating
with students and parents in their working environment. No prior
knowledge of Spanish is required. Fulfills continuing education
requirements for teachers and is useful vocationally. (CSU)
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Spanish 225 or equivalent.
SPAN 128A: Spanish Conversation and Culture
Through Film
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 102.
An advanced course offering students further practice in speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing Spanish based on the civilization and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. (CSU/UC) AA/AS
Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other
than English
SPAN 228C: Advanced Spanish Conversation and
Culture Through Film
Through film, this course introduces important socio-cultural
topics relevant in the Spanish-speaking world (including immigration, political oppression, social resistance, gender, race, music,
and dance), providing opportunities for students to develop their
speaking skills. Students view a variety of classic and contemporary
Spanish films and participate in Spanish conversational activities
designed to enable them to apply and expand on grammar concepts
and vocabulary covered in Spanish 101 and 102. In addition, students
complete final papers and oral presentations in Spanish on a cultural
topic of their choice. Films may vary by semester. (CSU/UC) CSU
Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 203.
SPAN 203: Intermediate Spanish III
Study of language, heritage, culture, traditions, music, art, literature,
historic and current events of Spain and South American countries.
The course is conducted entirely in Spanish; students are expected
to have knowledge of verb tenses and other grammatical structures.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC
Language other than English
5.0 Units. 4 lecture and 3 lab hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Spanish 102.
In-depth study of the language with grammar review, oral practice,
composition, and introduction to literature. The language laboratory
offers the use of audiovisual materials for improved fluency and
accuracy in pronunciation as well as the presentation of cultural and
literary topics. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC
Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
SPAN 203HB: Intermediate Spanish for Heritage and
Bilingual Speakers
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Oral Fluency in Spanish.
An intermediate course tailored to the needs of bilingual students
who have had little formal study of the Spanish language. This course
focuses on reading, writing and vocabulary as well as cultural aspects
of all Spanish-speaking countries. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU
Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than English
SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish IV
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or equivalent.
An intermediate course offering students practice in speaking,
understanding, reading, and writing Spanish, primarily in relation
to the history and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3-B and 6: UC Language
other than English
This course introduces traditional and modern trends in Spanish and
Latin American film, and to establish connections between sociocultural and political changes in Spanish-speaking countries and their
films--the most artistic and expressive medium of the past century.
An intermediate level of Spanish is required, as students will give
oral and written presentations in Spanish. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C,
CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
SPAN 230A: Culture and Civilization of Spain and
South America
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 102.
SPAN 230B: Culture and Civilization of Mexico and
Central America
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 102.
Study of the language, heritage, culture, traditions, music, art, literature, historic and current events of Mexico and Central American
countries. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish; students are
expected to have knowledge of verb tenses and other grammatical
structures. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B
and 6: UC Language other than English
SPAN 230C: Culture and Civilization of Spain
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: SPAN 102.
Study of the language, heritage, culture, traditions, music, art, literature, historic and current events of Spain. The course is conducted
entirely in Spanish; students are expected to have knowledge of verb
tenses and other grammatical structures. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
C, CSU Area C-2, IGETC Area 3B and 6: UC Language other than
English
Speech
CATALOG 2015/2016
SPEECH
Courses in speech offer a fundamental and valuable skill for all
students. Learning to communicate our ideas orally with ease and
persuasion is of significant value, whether it is used interpersonally
between friends, within decision-making groups, or before large
audiences.
Career Options
Communication Analyst, Interpersonal Communications Consultant, Lawyer, Public Relations Representative, Sales, Radio Announcer, Speech Therapist, Speech Writer
Faculty
Patricia O’Keefe, Bonnie Borenstein
Department Phone: 415-485-9348
SPEECH COURSES (SPCH)
SPCH 110: Introduction to Speech Communication
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An introductory course in the art of public speaking with an
emphasis on building self-confidence through frequent performance
experiences. Students provide quality written and oral feedback of
peer performances based on the five canons of rhetoric. (CSU/UC)
AA/AS Area E, CSU Area A-1, IGETC Area 1C
SPCH 120: Interpersonal Communication
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the theories, processes and principles of
interpersonal communication, and builds self-confidence through
oral communication performance experience. Through research
and in-class oral presentations, students examine how human
characteristics and the communicative environment affect the way
people communicate. Students demonstrate and apply skills through
presentations and written reflections. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU
Area A-1, IGETC Area 1C
SPCH 122: Public Speaking
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
A survey course designed to introduce students to three specific
areas of public speaking: informative speaking, persuasive speaking,
and entertainment speaking. Emphasis is on analyzing the audience, adapting ideas and evidence in support of a thesis, developing language suitable to the occasion, and practicing delivery to
effectively convey the message. The course develops critical listening
skills through performance and evaluation. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area
E, CSU Area A-1, IGETC Area 1C
SPCH 128: Intercultural Communication
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This introductory course surveys the basic theories and research in
the area of intercultural communication, focusing on the application
of this knowledge in understanding and improving human interaction in both domestic and international contexts. Students examine
the social, societal, structural and historical dimensions of relations
between and among racial, ethnic, and gender groups in contemporary U.S. society and our global community. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Areas
C or E, & G, CSU Area D-7, IGETC 4G
207
SPCH 130: Small Group Communication
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Advisory: English 120 or
120SL.
This course offers practical experience in the techniques of leading
and participating in small group discussions. Effective small group
discussion techniques such as speaking on panels, symposiums,
problem-solving groups, conflict resolution within small groups as
well as leadership skills and parliamentary procedures are covered.
This course is designed for students intending to major in speech
(communication), business, international business, education, and all
fields of study and certification that require group and team-building
skills. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area A-1, IGETC Area 1C
SPCH 132: Argumentation and Persuasion
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
An argumentation and debate theory course designed to develop
critical thinking skills through written and oral arguments. Students
create written briefs on current issues. Each brief includes the stock
issues of advocacy, an understanding of the stakeholders, their
philosophical perspectives, and impacts on changing the status quo.
(CSU/UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area A-1 or A-3, IGETC Area 1C
SPCH 140: Oral Interpretation of Literature I
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course introduces the field of oral interpretation of literature,
emphasizing awareness and appreciation of prose and poetry, and
what happens to the written word when it is read aloud for the listening pleasure of an audience. Recommended for speech and theatre
arts majors. (CSU/UC) AA/AS Area C, CSU Area C-2
SPCH 155: Radio and Television Announcing and
Performance
3.0 Units. 3 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Can be taken as SPCH 155
or COMM 155; credit awarded for only one course.
This course prepares students to communicate more effectively
through the electronic media. Students explore how to articulate
messages, vary pitch and volume to the text and context, pronounce
words according to accepted standards, express thoughts and feelings
with confidence, understand and interpret the meaning of a message,
and communicate ideas from a variety of prompts. (CSU)
208
Statistics
STATISTICS
Department Phone: 415-485-9630
STATISTICS COURSES (STAT)
STAT 115: Introduction to Statistics
4.0 Units. 4 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Math 103 or 103B or 103Y or
sufficient score on Math Assessment Test. Credit awarded for either
Math 115 or STAT 115, but not both courses.
This course is an introduction to statistics for students in social
science and business disciplines. It covers descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, linear and multiple regression, correlation,
sampling, statistical inference and time series analysis. Illustrations
are taken from the various social sciences and from business. (CSU/
UC) AA/AS Area E, CSU Area B-4, IGETC Area 2
STUDY SKILLS
Department Phone: 415-485-9345
STUDY SKILLS COURSES (STSK)
STSK 050: Understanding Learning Disabilities
0.5 Unit. 0.5 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This class explores topics related to the field of learning disabilities,
including causes of learning disabilities, effects of learning disabilities, evaluation, accommodations, and other relevant issues.
STSK 053: Basic Math Skills
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
This course serves students with basic math computation learning
problems. Covers basic math skills, including addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, and
decimals using a variety of resources.
STSK 054: Writing Improvement
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
This course, designed for students with language based learning
disabilities, helps students write coherent paragraphs, and covers
grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph organization.
STSK 056: How to Study in College
1.0 Unit. 1 lecture hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite.
This course, specifically for students with learning disabilities,
teaches college-level study techniques. Major topics include setting
goals, managing time, improving concentration and memory, taking
notes, organizing study materials, reading textbooks, dealing with
test anxiety, and preparing for and taking essay and multiple choice
tests.
MARIN.EDU
STSK 070: Study Skills Workshop: Evaluation
0.5 Unit. 1.65 lab hrs/wk. No prerequisite. Open-entry, open-exit
classes.
A laboratory designed to provide individual testing and remediation
of academic skills for students defined as having a dysfunction or
delay in one or more processes or skills. Provides support for learning disabled students attending academic courses. STSK 70 must be
taken by all new students.
STSK 076: Study Skills Workshop: Study Techniques
0.5 Unit. 1.65 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite. Openentry, open-exit classes.
A laboratory designed to provide individual testing and remediation
of academic skills for students defined as having a dysfunction or
delay in one or more processes or skills. Provides support for learning disabled students attending academic courses.
STSK 077: Study Skills Workshop: Adapted
Computer Learning
0.5 Unit. 1.65 lab hrs/wk. Course is repeatable. No prerequisite. Openentry, open-exit classes.
A laboratory designed to provide individual testing and remediation
of academic skills for students defined as having a dysfunction or
delay in one or more processes or skills. Provides support for learning disabled students attending academic courses.
STSK 078: Study Skills Workshop: Acquired Brain
Injury
0.5 Unit. 1.65 lab hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. No prerequisite. Open-entry,
open-exit class.
A laboratory designed to provide individual testing and remediation
of academic skills for students defined as having a dysfunction or
delay in one or more processes or skills. Provides support for learning disabled students attending academic courses.
STSK 161: Seminar for Tutors
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. No prerequisite.
This course is offered in conjunction with the Tutoring and Learning
Center and is designed to train students to become effective tutors
at College of Marin. Students learn about the role of a tutor, effective
communication, group tutoring strategies, learning styles, and study
skills. (CSU)
STSK 162: Community Action Skills Lab
2.0 Units. 2 lecture hrs/wk. Prerequisite: Enrolled in at least nine units,
including two units for STSK 162.
This course is designed to train students to provide peer assistance to
EOPS and VEA students in Student Affairs, orientation, EOPS counseling, and Health Services. Topics include peer counseling techniques, working with special student populations, and an overview of
assessment and information on all student services. (CSU)
Noncredit Courses
CATALOG 2015/2016
WORK EXPERIENCE
EDUCATION
Cooperative Work Experience Education offers the student the
opportunity to earn college credit for planned learning activities
related to employment. Working students, with the assistance of
an instructor-coordinator and the on-job supervisor (employer),
set up goals to be accomplished during the school term. This
may include, but is not limited to, completing projects, attending group and/or individual meetings with the coordinator,
participating in career workshops, learning new job skills,
reading material related to human relations on the job, etc. The
instructor-coordinator visits each employer during the school
term and the cooperating employers are required to provide
written evaluation of student’s performance on the job.
Faculty
Sandy Boyd
Department Phone: 415-457-8811, Ext. 8200
Work Experience Information
Employment may be related to student’s planned course of study
(Occupational Work Experience Education) or not have this
direct relationship (General Work Experience Education).
Students in any field who seek paid, educationally related employment are encouraged to contact the Job Placement Office for
information and assistance.
Students may attend classes while
working (parallel plan) or attend college full time 1 semester and
work full time the following semester (alternate semester plan).
On the parallel plan students can earn up to 3 (general) or 4 (occupational) units per term; on the alternate plan they may earn
up to 8 units while off campus and working full time.
There are limits to the total number of units a student may
earn while attending California community colleges. General
Work Experience Education is limited to 6 semester units. Occupational Work Experience Education is limited to 16 semester
units. A combination of General and Occupational Work
Experience is limited to 16 semester units.
Note: Students may not concurrently enroll in Behavioral
Science 252 or Psychology 252 and also receive credit for Work
Experience Education courses.
Veterans note: Veterans Administration regulations may affect student benefits for these courses. Check with the Veterans’
Office for latest information.
209
WORK EXPERIENCE COURSES (WE)
WE 298ABCD: Occupational Work Experience
1-4 Units. 5-20 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Enrollment in one
other credit course, and be a continuing student. A minimum of five
hours of employment per week per unit.
In this academic course, work sites serve as “off-campus classrooms,”
extending classroom-based occupational learning to a work site in a
field directly related to the student’s educational or occupational goal.
The course can help students develop necessary work habits, open
doors to new employment experiences, or assist in acquiring skills
and knowledge necessary for advancement in their current employment. Specific student units (1-4) are based on the number of hours a
student works each week over the semester. (CSU)
WE 299ABC: General Work Experience
1-3 Units. 5-15 TBA hrs/wk. Repeat: 3. Prerequisite: Enrollment in at
least seven units of college courses including Work Experience. A
minimum of five hours of employment per week per unit.
An academic course in which work sites serve as “off-campus
classrooms.” Faculty, employers and students work together to create
meaningful work-based educational experiences by developing and
achieving specific learning objectives related to their jobs. The course
helps students develop necessary work habits, opens doors to new
employment experiences, and assists students in acquiring skills and
knowledge necessary for advancement in their current employment.
(CSU)
NONCREDIT COURSES
College of Marin offers free noncredit courses in the following areas:
Basic Skills, Disabled Students Programs and Services, English as
a Second Language Noncredit (ESLN; please see ESL category for
ESLN course listings), Health and Safety Courses, Nursing Education Vocational (Please see Nursing Education category for course
listings) and Vocational.
BASIC SKILLS (ESBS)
ESBS 3010: GED (General Educational Development)
Preparation
0.0 Unit.
Do you need a high school diploma for a certain job? Qualification to
enter a vocational program? A brush-up to start college? Do you want
to show your parents (or kids) that you can do it, or to just feel better
about yourself? If so, free help is available. This open-entry GED class
lets you enroll at any time during the semester. Pretesting determines
your skill levels. An individual study plan focuses on your needs
and goals. Instructor assistance and guidance is available at all listed
times. Self-paced improvement removes time pressure. Practice testing assures your readiness. The drop-in Learning Lab allows flexible
scheduling. Call 415.485.9363 (lab) for further information.
210
Noncredit Courses
ESBS 3020: Basic Skills
0.0 Unit.
This program offers free instruction to any adult wishing to improve
pre-college skills such as reading comprehension, writing, or math.
Brush-up for College of Marin’s placement tests is also available. The
class structure is the same as the GED (High School Equivalency)
Preparation course described above. For further information call
415.485.9363.
DISABLED STUDENTS PROGRAMS AND SERVICES (DSPN)
DSPN 5000: Adaptive Movement: Aerobics
0.0 Unit.
This is a dance class designed to meet the needs of disabled adults
and physically disabled persons. The class is for beginners and for
those who think they can’t dance a step. Various styles of dance will
be included and music will accompany the warm-ups and routines.
Relaxation and stretching exercises will be a part of each class.
DSPN 5005: Interpersonal Skills and Guidance for
the Disabled 1: Stroke Support
0.0 Unit.
Psychologist works individually and in group setting with students
to discover avenues to realize students’ best qualities in interpersonal
communications and in life situations. Offers special guidance in
learning confidence and ways to achieve best potential. Instructor
consent required.
DSPN 5010: Interpersonal Skills and Guidance for
the Disabled 2: Developmentally Delayed Learners
0.0 Unit.
Psychologist works individually and in group setting with students
to discover avenues to realize students’ best qualities in interpersonal
communications and in life situations. Offers special guidance in
learning confidence and ways to achieve best potential. Instructor
consent required.
DSPN 5015: Interpersonal Skills and Guidance for
the Disabled 4: Creative Writing Skills
0.0 Unit.
Psychologist works individually and in group setting with students
to discover avenues to realize students’ best qualities in interpersonal
communications and in life situations. Offers special guidance in
learning confidence and ways to achieve best potential. Instructor
consent required.
DSPN 5020: Introduction to Aural Rehabilitation:
Management of Hearing Loss
0.0 Unit.
This course is offered to help adults with mild to moderate hearing
loss learn new ways to cope with impaired hearing. Family members
and interested professionals are encouraged to enroll.
MARIN.EDU
DSPN 5025: Community Re-Entry Following Brain
Injury Level I
0.0 Unit.
The course focuses on teaching skills that support participants to
build connections in the community through increased ability to
develop relationships, communicate effectively, manage difficult
behaviors, enhance skills and understand limitations.
DSPN 5030: Community Re-Entry Following Brain
Injury Level 2
0.0 Unit.
The course focuses on teaching skills that support participants to
build connections in the community through increased ability to
develop relationships, communicate effectively, manage difficult
behaviors, enhance skills and understand limitations.
VOCATIONAL (VOCN)
VOCN 6000: Activity Coordinator State Certification
Training
0.0 Unit.
A state-required training course for students interested in working as an “Activity Coordinator” in long term care settings. Topics
include psycho-social issues, state and federal regulations, leadership
and group dynamics, calendar and program development, medical
disorders, dementia, quality of life issues and much more.
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