D65 SP DHOM
D65
Draper Header for Self-Propelled
Windrowers
Operator’s Manual
147725 Revision A
2016 Model Year
Original Instruction
The harvesting specialists.
D65 Draper Header for Self-Propelled Windrowers
Published: June 2015
Declaration of Conformity
147725
i
Revision A
147725
ii
Revision A
Introduction
This instructional manual contains information on the D65 Draper Header for Self-Propelled Windrowers. It is
designed to serve a dual function in your grain, hay, and specialty crop harvesting operation. Teamed with your
self-propelled windrower power unit and optional hay conditioner, D65 Draper Headers will cut and lay crop into
uniform, fluffy windrows.
Carefully read all the material provided before attempting to unload, assemble, or use the machine.
Use this manual as your first source of information about the machine. If you follow the instructions provided, your
header will work well for many years. If you require more detailed service information, a technical manual is available
from your MacDon Dealer.
The “Table of Contents” and “Index” will guide you to specific areas of this manual. Study the “Table of Contents” to
familiarize yourself with how the information is organized.
Keep this manual handy for frequent reference and to pass
on to new Operators or Owners. A manual storage case is
located inside the header left endshield.
Call your MacDon Dealer if you need assistance,
information, or additional copies of this manual.
NOTE:
Keep your MacDon publications up-to-date. The
most current version can be downloaded from our
website (www.macdon.com) or from our Dealer-only site
(https://portal.macdon.com) (login required).
This manual is also available in the Russian language. It
can be ordered from MacDon, downloaded from the Dealer
Portal (https://portal.macdon.com) or from our International
website (http://www.macdon.com/world).
147725
iii
Figure 1: Manual Storage Location
Revision A
List of Revisions
The following lists the changes from the previous version (169899 Revision A) of this document.
Summary of Change
Refer To
• D65 Draper Header for Self-Propelled Windrowers
Operator’s Manual from 169899 Rev A to
147725 Rev A
New book part number
• 8.3 Unloading and Assembly, page 266
New declaration of conformity
Declaration of Conformity, page i
Revised recommended settings
3.6.2 Header Settings, page 44
• 2 Product Overview, page 23
Re-organized sections
• 8 Reference, page 253
• 5.9 Reel Drive, page 209
Added new kit
147725
6.1.1 Multi-Crop Rapid Reel Conversion Kit, page 227
iv
Revision A
Model and Serial Number
Record the model number, serial number, and model year of the header and Slow Speed Transport/Stabilizer Wheel
option (if installed) on the lines below.
NOTE:
Right-hand (RH) and left-hand (LH) designations are determined from the operator’s position, facing forward.
Draper Header
Header Model:
Serial Number:
Year:
The serial number plate (A) is located beside the knife
drive motor on the left-hand endsheet.
Figure 2: Header
Slow Speed Transport/Stabilizer Wheel Option
Serial Number:
Year:
The serial number plate (A) is located on the right-hand
axle assembly.
Figure 3: Transport/Stabilizer Option
147725
v
Revision A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Declaration of Conformity .................................................................................................................. i
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... iii
List of Revisions ..............................................................................................................................iv
Model and Serial Number................................................................................................................. v
1
Safety .................................................................................................................................................... 1
1.1
Safety Alert Symbols........................................................................................................................ 1
1.2
Signal Words................................................................................................................................... 2
1.3
General Safety ................................................................................................................................ 3
1.4
Maintenance Safety ......................................................................................................................... 5
1.5
Hydraulic Safety .............................................................................................................................. 6
1.6
Safety Signs .................................................................................................................................... 7
1.6.1
Installing Safety Decals ............................................................................................................ 7
1.7
Safety Decal Locations .................................................................................................................... 8
1.8
Understanding Safety Signs ........................................................................................................... 15
2
Product Overview................................................................................................................................ 23
2.1
Definitions ..................................................................................................................................... 23
2.2
Component Identification................................................................................................................ 25
2.3
Specifications ................................................................................................................................ 26
3
Operation ............................................................................................................................................ 31
3.1
Owner/Operator Responsibilities..................................................................................................... 31
3.2
Operational Safety ......................................................................................................................... 32
3.2.1
Header Safety Props .............................................................................................................. 32
3.2.2
Reel Safety Props .................................................................................................................. 33
Engaging Reel Safety Props............................................................................................ 33
Disengaging Reel Safety Props ....................................................................................... 34
3.2.3
Endshields............................................................................................................................. 35
Opening Endshields........................................................................................................ 35
Closing Endshields ......................................................................................................... 36
Removing Endshields ..................................................................................................... 37
Installing Endshields ....................................................................................................... 38
Adjusting Endshields....................................................................................................... 39
3.2.4
Daily Start-Up Check .............................................................................................................. 40
3.3
Break-in Period.............................................................................................................................. 41
3.4
Shutting Down the Machine............................................................................................................ 42
3.5
Cab Controls ................................................................................................................................. 43
3.6
Header Setup ................................................................................................................................ 44
3.6.1
Header Attachments............................................................................................................... 44
3.6.2
Header Settings ..................................................................................................................... 44
3.6.3
Reel Settings ......................................................................................................................... 47
3.7
Header Operating Variables ........................................................................................................... 49
3.7.1
Cutting Height ........................................................................................................................ 49
Cutting Off the Ground .................................................................................................... 49
Cutting On the Ground .................................................................................................... 53
3.7.2
Header Float .......................................................................................................................... 55
3.7.3
Header Angle......................................................................................................................... 55
Controlling Header Angle ................................................................................................ 55
3.7.4
Reel Speed............................................................................................................................ 56
Optional Reel Drive Sprockets ......................................................................................... 56
3.7.5
Ground Speed ....................................................................................................................... 56
3.7.6
Draper Speed ........................................................................................................................ 57
3.7.7
Knife Speed ........................................................................................................................... 57
3.7.8
Reel Height............................................................................................................................ 58
3.7.9
Reel Fore-Aft Position ............................................................................................................ 58
147725
vii
Revision A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Adjusting Reel Fore-Aft Position ...................................................................................... 59
Repositioning Fore-Aft Cylinders on Single Reel ............................................................... 60
Repositioning Fore-Aft Cylinders on Double Reel.............................................................. 62
3.7.10
Reel Tine Pitch....................................................................................................................... 65
Reel Cam Settings .......................................................................................................... 65
Adjusting Reel Cam ........................................................................................................ 67
3.7.11
Crop Dividers ......................................................................................................................... 67
Removing Crop Dividers with Latch Option from Header ................................................... 67
Removing Crop Dividers without Latch Option from Header............................................... 68
Installing Crop Dividers with Latch Option onto Header ..................................................... 69
Installing Crop Dividers without Latch Option onto Header................................................. 70
3.7.12
Crop Divider Rods .................................................................................................................. 72
Removing Crop Divider Rods .......................................................................................... 72
Rice Divider Rods ........................................................................................................... 73
3.8
Delivery Opening ........................................................................................................................... 74
3.8.1
Adjusting Delivery Opening on Header with Manual Deck Shift.................................................. 74
3.8.2
Adjusting Delivery Opening on Header with Hydraulic Deck Shift............................................... 75
3.9
Double Windrowing........................................................................................................................ 76
3.9.1
Shifting Decks Hydraulically .................................................................................................... 76
3.9.2
Shifting Decks Manually.......................................................................................................... 77
3.9.3
Using Double Windrow Attachment (DWA)............................................................................... 78
3.10 Windrow Types.............................................................................................................................. 79
3.11 Haying Tips ................................................................................................................................... 81
3.11.1
Curing ................................................................................................................................... 81
3.11.2
Topsoil Moisture ..................................................................................................................... 81
3.11.3
Weather and Topography........................................................................................................ 81
3.11.4
Windrow Configuration ........................................................................................................... 81
3.11.5
Driving on Windrow ................................................................................................................ 82
3.11.6
Raking and Tedding................................................................................................................ 82
3.11.7
Chemical Drying Agents ......................................................................................................... 82
3.12 Levelling the Header ...................................................................................................................... 83
3.13 Unplugging Cutterbar ..................................................................................................................... 84
3.14 Upper Cross Auger (UCA) .............................................................................................................. 85
3.14.1
Removing Beater Bars............................................................................................................ 86
3.14.2
Installing Beater Bars ............................................................................................................. 87
3.15 Transporting Header ..................................................................................................................... 88
3.15.1
Transporting Header on Windrower ......................................................................................... 88
3.15.2
Towing................................................................................................................................... 88
Attaching Header to Towing Vehicle ................................................................................. 89
Towing the Header .......................................................................................................... 89
3.15.3
Converting from Transport to Field Position.............................................................................. 90
Removing Tow-Bar ......................................................................................................... 90
Storing the Tow-Bar ........................................................................................................ 91
Moving Front (Left) Wheels into Field Position .................................................................. 92
Moving Rear (Right) Wheels into Field Position................................................................. 93
3.15.4
Converting from Field to Transport Position.............................................................................. 95
Moving Front (Left) Wheels into Transport Position ........................................................... 95
Moving Rear (Right) Wheels into Transport Position.......................................................... 97
Attaching Tow-Bar..........................................................................................................100
3.16 Storing the Header........................................................................................................................103
4
Header Attachment/Detachment ........................................................................................................105
4.1
Attaching Header to Windrower .....................................................................................................105
4.2
Detaching Header from Windrower ................................................................................................108
147725
viii
Revision A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
5
Maintenance and Servicing ................................................................................................................ 111
5.1
Preparing Machine for Servicing .................................................................................................... 111
5.2
Maintenance Specifications ........................................................................................................... 112
5.2.1
Recommended Fluids and Lubricants ..................................................................................... 112
5.2.2
Installing a Roller Chain ......................................................................................................... 112
5.2.3
Installing a Sealed Bearing .................................................................................................... 113
5.3
Maintenance Requirements ........................................................................................................... 114
5.3.1
Maintenance Schedule/Record............................................................................................... 115
5.3.2
Break-In Inspection ............................................................................................................... 116
5.3.3
Preseason/Annual Service ..................................................................................................... 117
5.3.4
End-of-Season Service .......................................................................................................... 117
5.3.5
Checking Hydraulic Hoses and Lines...................................................................................... 118
5.3.6
Lubrication and Servicing....................................................................................................... 118
Service Intervals ............................................................................................................ 119
Greasing Procedure.......................................................................................................124
5.4
Electrical ......................................................................................................................................126
5.4.1
Replacing Light Bulbs ............................................................................................................126
5.5
Knife ............................................................................................................................................127
5.5.1
Replacing Knife Section.........................................................................................................127
5.5.2
Removing Knife.....................................................................................................................129
5.5.3
Removing Knifehead Bearing.................................................................................................129
5.5.4
Installing Knifehead Bearing...................................................................................................130
5.5.5
Installing Knife ......................................................................................................................130
5.5.6
Spare Knife...........................................................................................................................131
5.5.7
Knife Guards.........................................................................................................................131
Adjusting Knife Guards...................................................................................................131
Replacing Pointed Guards on a Single-Knife Header........................................................133
Replacing Pointed Guards on a Double-Knife Header ......................................................133
Replacing Stub Guards on a Single-Knife Header ............................................................134
Replacing Stub Guards on a Double-Knife Header...........................................................135
Checking Knife Hold-Downs ...........................................................................................136
5.5.8
Knifehead Shield ...................................................................................................................138
Installing Knifehead Shield .............................................................................................138
5.6
Knife and Knife Drive ....................................................................................................................140
5.6.1
Knife Drive Box .....................................................................................................................140
Checking Mounting Bolts................................................................................................140
Removing Knife Drive Box..............................................................................................140
Removing Knife Drive Box Pulley....................................................................................144
Installing Knife Drive Box Pulley......................................................................................145
Installing Knife Drive Box................................................................................................145
Changing Oil in Knife Drive Box ......................................................................................148
5.6.2
Knife Drive Belts ...................................................................................................................148
Non-Timed Knife Drive Belts...........................................................................................148
Timed Double-Knife Drive Belts ......................................................................................151
5.7
Drapers........................................................................................................................................163
5.7.1
Removing Drapers ................................................................................................................163
5.7.2
Installing Drapers ..................................................................................................................163
5.7.3
Adjusting Draper Tension .......................................................................................................165
5.7.4
Removing Endless Draper .....................................................................................................167
5.7.5
Installing Endless Draper .......................................................................................................169
5.7.6
Adjusting Header Draper Tracking ..........................................................................................170
5.7.7
Adjusting Deck Height ...........................................................................................................172
5.7.8
Draper Roller Maintenance ....................................................................................................174
Inspecting Draper Roller Bearing ....................................................................................174
147725
ix
Revision A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Draper Deck Idler Roller .................................................................................................174
Draper Deck Drive Roller................................................................................................177
5.7.9
Replacing Draper Deflectors ..................................................................................................181
Removing Wide Draper Deflectors ..................................................................................181
Installing Wide Draper Deflectors ....................................................................................182
Removing Narrow Draper Deflectors ...............................................................................184
Installing Narrow Draper Deflectors.................................................................................185
5.8
Reel.............................................................................................................................................186
5.8.1
Reel Clearance to Cutterbar...................................................................................................186
Measuring Reel Clearance .............................................................................................186
Adjusting Reel Clearance ...............................................................................................188
5.8.2
Reel Frown ...........................................................................................................................189
Adjusting Reel Frown .....................................................................................................189
5.8.3
Centering the Reel ................................................................................................................190
Centering Double Reels .................................................................................................190
Centering Single Reel ....................................................................................................191
5.8.4
Reel Tines ............................................................................................................................191
Removing Steel Tines ....................................................................................................191
Installing Steel Tines ......................................................................................................192
Removing Plastic Fingers ...............................................................................................192
Installing Plastic Fingers.................................................................................................193
5.8.5
Tine Tube Bushings...............................................................................................................194
Removing Bushings from Five-, Six- or Nine-Bat Reels ....................................................194
Installing Bushings on Five-, Six- or Nine-Bat Reels .........................................................199
5.8.6
Reel Endshields ....................................................................................................................206
Replacing Endshield ......................................................................................................206
Replacing Support .........................................................................................................207
5.9
Reel Drive ....................................................................................................................................209
5.9.1
Replacing Reel Drive Cover ...................................................................................................209
Removing Drive Cover ...................................................................................................209
Installing Drive Cover .....................................................................................................210
5.9.2
Adjusting Reel Drive Chain Tension ........................................................................................ 211
Loosening Drive Chain ................................................................................................... 211
Tightening Drive Chain ...................................................................................................212
5.9.3
Replacing Reel Drive Sprocket...............................................................................................213
Removing Drive Sprocket ...............................................................................................213
Installing Drive Sprocket.................................................................................................214
5.9.4
Replacing Double Reel U-Joint...............................................................................................215
Removing Double Reel U-Joint .......................................................................................215
Installing Double Reel U-Joint.........................................................................................216
5.9.5
Replacing Reel Drive Motor ...................................................................................................217
Removing Reel Drive Motor............................................................................................217
Installing Reel Drive Motor..............................................................................................218
5.9.6
Replacing Drive Chain on Double Reel ...................................................................................219
Replacing Chain Using the Reel Drive Method.................................................................219
Replacing Chain Using Breaking the Chain Method .........................................................221
5.9.7
Replacing Drive Chain on Single Reel ....................................................................................221
5.10 Transport System (Optional) ..........................................................................................................223
5.10.1
Checking Wheel Bolt Torque ..................................................................................................223
5.10.2
Checking Axle Bolt Torque .....................................................................................................224
5.10.3
Checking Tire Pressure .........................................................................................................225
6
Options and Attachments ..................................................................................................................227
6.1
Reel.............................................................................................................................................227
6.1.1
Multi-Crop Rapid Reel Conversion Kit.....................................................................................227
147725
x
Revision A
TABLE OF CONTENTS
6.1.2
Lodged Crop Reel Finger Kit ..................................................................................................227
6.1.3
PR15 Tine Tube Reel Conversion Kit......................................................................................228
6.1.4
Reel Endshield Kit .................................................................................................................228
6.1.5
Reel Tine Tube Reinforcing Kit ...............................................................................................229
6.2
Cutterbar......................................................................................................................................230
6.2.1
Cutterbar Wearplate ..............................................................................................................230
6.2.2
Knifehead Shield ...................................................................................................................230
6.2.3
Stub Guard Conversion Kit ....................................................................................................231
6.2.4
Vertical Knife Mounts.............................................................................................................231
6.3
Header.........................................................................................................................................232
6.3.1
Divider Latch Kit ....................................................................................................................232
6.3.2
Stabilizer Wheels ..................................................................................................................232
6.3.3
Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels.................................................................................233
6.4
Crop Delivery ...............................................................................................................................234
6.4.1
Double Draper Drive (DDD) Kit...............................................................................................234
6.4.2
Double Windrow Attachment (DWA) .......................................................................................234
6.4.3
Draper Deflector (Narrow)......................................................................................................234
6.4.4
Draper Deflector (Wide) .........................................................................................................235
6.4.5
Draper Extension Kit..............................................................................................................235
6.4.6
End Swath Deflector Rods (End Delivery) ...............................................................................236
6.4.7
HC10 Hay Conditioner...........................................................................................................236
6.4.8
Hydraulic Deck Shift Package ................................................................................................236
6.4.9
Swath Forming Rods (Center Delivery) ...................................................................................237
6.4.10
Upper Cross Auger (UCA) .....................................................................................................237
6.4.11
Upper Cross Auger (UCA) Hydraulic Kit for Double Draper Drive (DDD) ...................................237
6.4.12
Upper Cross Auger (UCA) Case Drain Kit for Single Draper Drive (SDD) ..................................238
6.4.13
Rice Divider Rods .................................................................................................................238
7
Troubleshooting .................................................................................................................................239
7.1
Crop Loss at Cutterbar ..................................................................................................................239
7.2
Cutting Action and Knife Components ............................................................................................241
7.3
Reel Delivery................................................................................................................................244
7.4
Header and Drapers .....................................................................................................................246
7.5
Cutting Edible Beans ....................................................................................................................248
7.6
Windrow Formation.......................................................................................................................252
8
Reference ...........................................................................................................................................253
8.1
Conversion Chart..........................................................................................................................253
8.2
Torque Specifications ....................................................................................................................254
8.2.1
SAE Bolt Torque Specifications ..............................................................................................254
8.2.2
Metric Bolt Specifications .......................................................................................................256
8.2.3
Metric Bolt Specifications Bolting into Cast Aluminum ..............................................................259
8.2.4
Flare-Type Hydraulic Fittings..................................................................................................259
8.2.5
O-Ring Boss (ORB) Hydraulic Fittings (Adjustable)..................................................................261
8.2.6
O-Ring Boss (ORB) Hydraulic Fittings (Non-Adjustable) ..........................................................263
8.2.7
O-Ring Face Seal (ORFS) Hydraulic Fittings...........................................................................264
8.3
Unloading and Assembly...............................................................................................................266
Index ..................................................................................................................................................267
147725
xi
Revision A
1
1.1
Safety
Safety Alert Symbols
This safety alert symbol indicates important safety
messages in this manual and on safety signs on
the header.
This symbol means:
• ATTENTION!
• BECOME ALERT!
• YOUR SAFETY IS INVOLVED!
Carefully read and follow
accompanying this symbol.
the
safety
message
Why is safety important to you?
• Accidents disable and kill
Figure 1.1: Safety Symbol
• Accidents cost
• Accidents can be avoided
147725
1
Revision A
SAFETY
1.2
Signal Words
Three signal words, DANGER, WARNING, and CAUTION, are used to alert you to hazardous situations. The
appropriate signal word for each situation has been selected using the following guidelines:
DANGER
Indicates an imminently hazardous situation that, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
WARNING
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury. It
may also be used to alert against unsafe practices.
CAUTION
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury. It
may be used to alert against unsafe practices.
147725
2
Revision A
SAFETY
1.3
General Safety
CAUTION
The following are general farm safety precautions
that should be part of your operating procedure for
all types of machinery.
Protect yourself.
• When assembling, operating, and servicing machinery,
wear all the protective clothing and personal safety
devices that could be necessary for the job at hand.
Don’t take chances. You may need the following:
• Hard hat
• Protective footwear with slip resistant soles
Figure 1.2: Safety Equipment
• Protective glasses or goggles
• Heavy gloves
• Wet weather gear
• Respirator or filter mask
• Be aware that exposure to loud noises can cause
hearing impairment or loss. Wear suitable hearing
protection devices such as ear muffs or ear plugs to
help protect against objectionable or loud noises.
Figure 1.3: Safety Equipment
• Provide a first aid kit for use in case of emergencies.
• Keep a fire extinguisher on the machine. Be sure the
fire extinguisher is properly maintained. Be familiar with
its proper use.
• Keep young children away from the machinery at
all times.
• Be aware that accidents often happen when the
Operator is tired or in a hurry. Take the time to
consider the safest way. Never ignore the warning
signs of fatigue.
Figure 1.4: Safety Equipment
147725
3
Revision A
SAFETY
• Wear close-fitting clothing and cover long hair. Never
wear dangling items such as scarves or bracelets.
• Keep all shields in place. Never alter or remove safety
equipment. Make sure driveline guards can rotate
independently of the shaft and can telescope freely.
• Use only service and repair parts made or approved by
the equipment manufacturer. Substituted parts may not
meet strength, design, or safety requirements.
Figure 1.5: Safety Around Equipment
• Keep hands, feet, clothing, and hair away from moving
parts. Never attempt to clear obstructions or objects
from a machine while the engine is running.
• Do NOT modify the machine.
Non-authorized
modifications may impair machine function and/or
safety. It may also shorten the machine’s life.
• To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected startup
of machine, always stop engine and remove key from
ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
Figure 1.6: Safety Around Equipment
• Keep the service area clean and dry. Wet or oily floors
are slippery. Wet spots can be dangerous when working
with electrical equipment. Be sure all electrical outlets
and tools are properly grounded.
• Keep work area well lit.
• Keep machinery clean. Straw and chaff on a hot
engine is a fire hazard. Do NOT allow oil or grease to
accumulate on service platforms, ladders, or controls.
Clean machines before storage.
• Never use gasoline, naphtha, or any volatile material
for cleaning purposes. These materials may be toxic
and/or flammable.
• When storing machinery, cover sharp or extending
components to prevent injury from accidental contact.
147725
4
Figure 1.7: Safety Around Equipment
Revision A
SAFETY
1.4
Maintenance Safety
To ensure your safety while maintaining the machine:
• Review the operator’s manual and all safety items
before operation and/or maintenance of the machine.
• Place all controls in Neutral, stop the engine, set
the park brake, remove the ignition key, and wait for
all moving parts to stop before servicing, adjusting,
and/or repairing.
• Follow good shop practices:
– Keep service areas clean and dry
– Be sure electrical
properly grounded
outlets
and
tools
are
Figure 1.8: Safety Around Equipment
– Use adequate lighting for the job at hand
• Relieve pressure from hydraulic circuits before servicing
and/or disconnecting the machine.
• Make sure all components are tight and that steel lines,
hoses, and couplings are in good condition before
applying pressure to hydraulic systems.
• Keep hands, feet, clothing, and hair away from all
moving and/or rotating parts.
• Clear the area of bystanders, especially children, when
carrying out any maintenance, repairs or, adjustments.
• Install transport lock or place safety stands under the
frame before working under the header.
• If more than one person is servicing the machine at the
same time, be aware that rotating a driveline or other
mechanically-driven component by hand (for example,
accessing a lube fitting) will cause drive components in
other areas (belts, pulleys, and knives) to move. Stay
clear of driven components at all times.
Figure 1.9: Equipment NOT Safe for Children
• Wear protective gear when working on the machine.
• Wear heavy gloves when working on knife components.
Figure 1.10: Safety Equipment
147725
5
Revision A
SAFETY
1.5
Hydraulic Safety
• Always place all hydraulic
before dismounting.
controls
in
Neutral
• Make sure that all components in the hydraulic system
are kept clean and in good condition.
• Replace any worn, cut, abraded, flattened, or crimped
hoses and steel lines.
• Do NOT attempt any makeshift repairs to the hydraulic
lines, fittings, or hoses by using tapes, clamps, cements,
or welding. The hydraulic system operates under
extremely high pressure. Makeshift repairs will fail
suddenly and create hazardous and unsafe conditions.
Figure 1.11: Testing for Hydraulic Leaks
• Wear proper hand and eye protection when searching
for high-pressure hydraulic leaks. Use a piece of
cardboard as a backstop instead of hands to isolate
and identify a leak.
• If injured by a concentrated high-pressure stream of
hydraulic fluid, seek medical attention immediately.
Serious infection or toxic reaction can develop from
hydraulic fluid piercing the skin.
Figure 1.12: Hydraulic Pressure Hazard
• Make sure all components are tight and steel lines,
hoses, and couplings are in good condition before
applying pressure to a hydraulic system.
Figure 1.13: Safety Around Equipment
147725
6
Revision A
SAFETY
1.6
Safety Signs
• Keep safety signs clean and legible at all times.
• Replace safety
become illegible.
signs
that
are
missing
or
• If original parts on which a safety sign was installed are
replaced, be sure the repair part also bears the current
safety sign.
• Safety signs are
Parts Department.
available
from
your
Dealer
Figure 1.14: Operator’s Manual Decal
1.6.1
Installing Safety Decals
1. Clean and dry the installation area.
2. Decide on the exact location before you remove the decal backing paper.
3. Remove the smaller portion of the split backing paper.
4. Place the sign in position and slowly peel back the remaining paper, smoothing the sign as it is applied.
5. Prick small air pockets with a pin and smooth out.
147725
7
Revision A
SAFETY
1.7
Safety Decal Locations
Figure 1.15: Upper Cross Auger
A - MD #174682
Figure 1.16: Slow Speed Transport
A - MD #220799
147725
8
Revision A
SAFETY
Figure 1.17: Slow Speed Transport Tow-Bar
A - MD #220797
B - MD #220798
Figure 1.18: Vertical Knife
A - MD #174684
147725
9
Revision A
SAFETY
Figure 1.19: Endsheets, Reel Arms, Backsheet
A - MD #131393
E - MD #131392 (2 Places)
147725
B - MD #174632
F - MD #131391 (2 Places)
C - MD #184371
G - MD #174436
10
D - MD #184371 (Double Knife Only)
H - MD #184371 (Double Knife
2 Places)
Revision A
SAFETY
Figure 1.20: Backtube: 15-Foot Header
A - MD #184422
147725
B - MD #184372
C - MD #131391
11
Revision A
SAFETY
Figure 1.21: Backtube: 20-Foot Header
A - MD #184372
147725
B - MD #166466
C - MD #131391
12
Revision A
SAFETY
Figure 1.22: Backtube: 25-Foot Header
A - MD #184372
147725
B - MD #166466
C - MD #131391
13
Revision A
SAFETY
Figure 1.23: Backtube: 30-, 35-, 40-Foot Header
A - MD #184372
D - MD #131392 (30- & 35- Ft. Double Reel Only)
147725
B - MD #166466
E - MD #184372 (Split Frame)
14
C - MD #131391
Revision A
SAFETY
1.8
Understanding Safety Signs
MD #113482
General hazard
and servicing
pertaining
to
machine
operation
CAUTION
To avoid injury or death from improper or unsafe
machine operation:
• Read the operator’s manual and follow all safety
instructions. If you do not have a manual, obtain one
from your Dealer.
• Do not allow untrained persons to operate the machine.
• Review safety instructions with all Operators every year.
Figure 1.24: MD #113482
• Ensure that all safety signs are installed and legible.
• Make certain everyone is clear of machine before
starting engine and during operation.
• Keep riders off the machine.
• Keep all shields in place and stay clear of moving parts.
• Disengage header drive, put transmission in Neutral,
and wait for all movement to stop before leaving
operator’s position.
• Shut down the engine and remove the key from ignition
before servicing, adjusting, lubricating, cleaning, or
unplugging machine.
• Engage safety props to prevent lowering of header or
reel before servicing in the raised position (refer to the
header operator’s manual).
• Use slow moving vehicle emblem and flashing warning
lights when operating on roadways unless prohibited
by law.
MD #131391
Crushing hazard
DANGER
• Rest header on ground or engage safety props before
going under unit.
Figure 1.25: MD #131391
147725
15
Revision A
SAFETY
MD #131392
Crushing hazard
WARNING
• To avoid injury from fall of raised reel; fully raise reel,
stop the engine, remove the key, and engage safety
prop on each reel support arm before working on or
under reel.
• Refer to header operator’s manual.
Figure 1.26: MD #131392
MD #131393
Reel hazard
WARNING
• To avoid injury from fall of raised reel; fully raise reel,
stop the engine, remove the key, and engage safety
prop on each reel support arm before working on or
under reel.
• Refer to header operator’s manual.
Figure 1.27: MD #131393
MD #166466
High pressure oil hazard
WARNING
• Do not go near leaks.
• High pressure oil easily punctures skin causing serious
injury, gangrene, or death.
• If injured, seek emergency medical help. Immediate
surgery is required to remove oil.
• Do not use finger or skin to check for leaks.
• Lower load or relieve hydraulic pressure before
loosening fittings.
147725
16
Figure 1.28: MD #166466
Revision A
SAFETY
MD #166833
Run-over hazard
WARNING
• Remove key from ignition.
• Read tractor and mower manufacturer’s manuals for
inspection and maintenance instructions.
• Read the windrower and header manuals for inspection
and maintenance instructions.
Figure 1.29: MD #166425
MD #174436
High pressure oil hazard
WARNING
• Do not go near leaks.
• High pressure oil easily punctures skin causing serious
injury, gangrene, or death.
• If injured, seek emergency medical help. Immediate
surgery is required to remove oil.
• Do not use finger or skin to check for leaks.
• Lower load or relieve hydraulic pressure before
loosening fittings.
Figure 1.30: MD #174436
MD #174632
Reel entanglement hazard
CAUTION
• To avoid injury from entanglement with rotating reel,
stand clear of header while machine is running.
Figure 1.31: MD #174632
147725
17
Revision A
SAFETY
MD #174682
Auger entanglement hazard
CAUTION
• To avoid injury from entanglement with rotating auger,
stand clear of header while machine is running.
Figure 1.32: MD #174682
MD #174684
Sharp component hazard
CAUTION
• Wear heavy canvas or leather gloves when working
with knife.
• Be sure no one is near the vertical knife when removing
or rotating knife.
Figure 1.33: MD #174684
147725
18
Revision A
SAFETY
MD #184372
General hazard
and servicing
pertaining
to
machine
operation
CAUTION
To avoid injury or death from improper or unsafe
machine operation:
• Read the operator’s manual and follow all safety
instructions. If you do not have a manual, obtain one
from your Dealer.
• Do not allow untrained persons to operate the machine.
• Review safety instructions with all Operators annually.
Figure 1.34: MD #184372
• Ensure that all safety signs are installed and legible.
• Make certain everyone is clear of machine before
starting engine and during operation.
• Keep riders off the machine.
• Keep all shields in place and stay clear of moving parts.
• Disengage header drive, put transmission in Neutral,
and wait for all movement to stop before leaving
operator’s position.
• Shut off the engine and remove the key from ignition
before servicing, adjusting, lubricating, cleaning, or
unplugging machine.
• Engage safety props to prevent lowering of raised unit
before servicing in the raised position.
• Use slow moving vehicle emblem and flashing warning
lights when operating on roadways unless prohibited
by law.
MD #184422
Keep shields in place hazard
WARNING
• Do not place hand.
• To avoid injury, stop the engine and remove the key
before opening power drive system shield.
• Keep all shields in place.
Figure 1.35: MD #184422
147725
19
Revision A
SAFETY
MD #193147
Transport/roading hazard
WARNING
• Ensure tow-bar lock mechanism is locked.
Figure 1.36: MD #193147
MD #220797
Tipping hazard in transport mode
WARNING
• Read the operator’s manual for more information on
potential tipping or roll-over of header while transporting.
Figure 1.37: MD #220797
MD #220798
Loss of control hazard in transport
CAUTION
• Do not tow the header with a dented or otherwise
damaged tow pole (the circle with the red X shows a
dent in the pole).
• Consult the operator’s manual for more information.
Figure 1.38: MD #220798
147725
20
Revision A
SAFETY
MD #220799
Transport/roading hazard
WARNING
• Ensure tow-bar lock mechanism is locked.
Figure 1.39: MD #220799
147725
21
Revision A
2
Product Overview
2.1
Definitions
The following terms and acronyms may be used in this manual.
Term
Definition
API
American Petroleum Institute
ASTM
American Society of Testing and Materials
Bolt
A headed and externally threaded fastener that is designed to be paired with a nut
Cab-forward
Windrower operation with the Operator and cab facing in the direction of travel
CDM
Cab display module on a self-propelled windrower
Center-link
A hydraulic cylinder link between the header and the machine to which it is attached:
It is used to change header angle
CGVW
Combined vehicle gross weight
D-Series header
MacDon D50, D60, and D65 rigid draper headers
DK
Double knife
DKD
Double-knife drive
DDD
Double-draper drive
DR
Double reel
DWA
Double Windrow Attachment
Finger tight
Finger tight is a reference position where sealing surfaces or components are
making contact with each other and the fitting has been tightened to a point where
the fitting is no longer loose
FFFT
Flats from finger tight
GSL
Ground speed lever
GVW
Gross vehicle weight
Hard joint
A joint made with the use of a fastener where the joining materials are
highly incompressible
Hex key
A hex key or Allen key (also known by various other synonyms) is a tool of
hexagonal cross-section used to drive bolts and screws that have a hexagonal
socket in the head (internal-wrenching hexagon drive)
HDS
Hydraulic deck shift
hp
Horsepower
ISC
Intermediate Speed Control
JIC
Joint Industrial Council: A standards body that developed the standard sizing and
shape for original 37° flared fitting
Knife
A cutting device which uses a reciprocating cutter (also called a sickle)
n/a
Not applicable
Nut
An internally threaded fastener that is designed to be paired with a bolt
147725
23
Revision A
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
Term
Definition
NPT
National Pipe Thread: A style of fitting used for low pressure port openings Threads
on NPT fittings are uniquely tapered for an interference fit
ORB
O-ring boss: A style of fitting commonly used in port opening on manifolds, pumps,
and motors
ORFS
O-ring face seal: A style of fitting commonly used for connecting hoses and tubes
This style of fitting is also commonly called ORS, which stands for O-ring seal
PTO
Power take-off
RoHS (Reduction of
Hazardous Substances)
A directive by the European Union to restrict the use of certain hazardous
substances (such as hexavalent chromium used in some yellow zinc platings)
SAE
Society of Automotive Engineers
Screw
A headed and externally threaded fastener that threads into preformed threads or
forms its own thread in one of the mating parts
SDD
Single-draper drive
Self-Propelled (SP)
Windrower
Self-propelled machine consisting of a power unit with a header
SK
Single knife
SKD
Single-knife drive
Soft joint
A joint made with the use of a fastener where the joining materials are compressible
or experience relaxation over a period of time
spm
Strokes per minute
SR
Single reel
Tractor
Agricultural type tractor
Truck
A four-wheel highway/road vehicle weighing no less than 7500 lbs (3400 kg)
Timed knife drive
Synchronized motion applied at the cutterbar to two separately driven knives from a
single hydraulic motor
Tension
Axial load placed on a bolt or screw, usually measured in pounds (lb) or Newtons (N)
TFFT
Turns from finger tight
Torque
The product of a force X lever arm length, usually measured in foot-pounds (ft·lbf)
or Newton-meters (N·m)
Torque angle
A tightening procedure where the fitting is assembled to a precondition (finger
tight) and then the nut is turned further a number of degrees or a number of flats to
achieve its final position
Torque-tension
The relationship between the assembly torque applied to a piece of hardware and
the axial load it induces in the bolt or screw
UCA
Upper cross auger
Untimed knife drive
Unsynchronized motion applied at the cutterbar to two separately driven knives
from a single hydraulic motor or two hydraulic motors
Washer
A thin cylinder with a hole or slot located in the center that is to be used as a spacer,
load distribution element, or a locking mechanism
Windrower
Power unit of a self-propelled header
147725
24
Revision A
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
2.2
Component Identification
Figure 2.1: D65 Windrower Header Components
A - Reel Cam
D - Center Reel Arm Prop Handle
G - Reel Safety Prop
K - Skid Shoe
N - Crop Divider
147725
B - Pick-Up Reel Tines
E - Hydraulic Connections
H - Endshield
L - Reel Fore-Aft Cylinder
P - Crop Divider Rod
25
C - Drapers
F - Transport Light
J - Reel Lift Cylinder
M - Knife Drive Box
Q - Reel Endshield
Revision A
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
2.3
Specifications
| D65 | Attachments
S: standard / OF: optional (factory installed) / OD: optional (dealer installed) / -: not available
Cutterbar
Effective cutting width (distance between crop divider points)
15-ft. header
15.00 ft. (180 in. [4572 mm])
S
20-ft. header
20.00 ft. (240 in. [6096 mm])
S
25-ft. header
25.00 ft. (300 in. [7620 mm])
S
30-ft. header
30.00 ft. (360 in. [9144 mm])
S
35-ft. header
35.00 ft. (420 in. [10,668 mm])
S
40-ft. header
40.00 ft. (480 in. [12192 mm])
S
Cutterbar lift range at guard tip (center-link fully
retracted)
49-13/16 in. (1265 mm)
Knife
Single-knife drive: One hydraulic motor with V-belt to one heavy duty (MD) knife drive box
OF
Double-knife drive 15–35 ft. (timed): One hydraulic motor with two cogged belts to two heavy
duty MD knife drive boxes
OF
Double-knife drive 40 ft. (untimed): Two hydraulic motors with banded-belts to two heavy duty
(MD) knife drive boxes
OF
Knife stroke
3 in. (76 mm)
S
20, 25 ft.
1200–1400
S
30 ft.
1200–1400
S
35 ft.
1100–1300
S
40 ft.
1050–1200
S
15 ft.
1500–1900
S
20, 25 ft.
1400–1700
S
30 ft.
1200–1600
S
35 ft.
1200–1400
S
40 ft.
1100–1400
S
Single-knife speed (strokes per minute)1
Double-knife speed (strokes per
minute)1
Knife Sections
Over-serrated / solid / bolted / 9 serrations per inch
OF
Over-serrated / solid / bolted / 14 serrations per inch
OF
Knife overlap at center (double-knife headers)
1/8 in. (3 mm)
S
1. Under normal cutting conditions, knife speed taken at the knife drive pulley should be set between 600 and
640 rpm (1200 and 1280 spm). If set to low side of chart, you could experience knife stalling.
147725
26
Revision A
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
Guards and Hold-Downs
Guard: pointed / forged / double heat treated (DHT)
Hold-down: sheet metal / adjustment bolt
OF
Guard: pointed / forged / case hardened (CH)
Hold-down: sheet metal / adjustment bolt
OF
Guard: stub / forged bottom / forged top / adjustment plate
OF
Guard: stub / forged bottom / sheet metal top / adjustment bolt
OF
Guard: four point / no-choke design (two long points with tangs / two short points without tangs)
OF
Guard Angle (Cutterbar on Ground)
Center-link retracted
15–25 ft.
7.5 Degrees
S
Center-link retracted
30–40 ft.
2.5 Degrees
S
Center-link extended
15–25 ft.
17.0 Degrees
S
Center-link extended
30–40 ft.
12.0 Degrees
S
Draper width
41-5/8 in. (1057 mm)
S
Draper drive
Hydraulic
S
Draper speed
0–742 fpm (225 m/min.)
S
15 ft.
60-5/8 – 69-11/16 in.
(1540–1770 mm)
S
20, 25, 30,
35, 40 ft.
67-1/8 – 76-11/16 in.
(1720–1950 mm)
S
Conveyor (Draper) and Decks
Delivery opening width (center delivery) / variable by
shifting decks
Delivery opening height (under frame tube at 8 in.
cutting height)
Center-link
fully
retracted
37-5/8 in. (955 mm)
S
Center-link
fully
extended
43-1/2 in. (1105 mm)
S
PR15 Pick-Up Reel
5, 6, or 9
Quantity of tine tubes
Center tube diameter
Finger tip radius
15 to 30 ft.
8 in. (203 mm)
35 ft.
10 in. (254 mm)
Factory set
31-1/2 in. (800 mm)
Adjustment range
30-3/16 – 31-1/2 in.
(766–800 mm)
Effective reel diameter (via cam profile)
65 in. (1650 mm)
Finger length
11 in. (290 mm)
Finger spacing (staggered on alternate bats)
6 in. (150 mm)
Reel drive
Hydraulic
S
Reel speed (auto-adjust from cab using ground speed index)
0–85 rpm
S
147725
27
Revision A
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
Frame and Structure
Cut width + 15-1/8 in.
(384 mm)
Header width (field mode)
Header only
Header width (transport
mode—reel fore-aft
fully retracted)
With
HC10 Hay
Conditioner
installed
(B)2 (long dividers
installed)
104 in. (2636 mm)
(A)2 (long dividers
removed)
97 in. (2452 mm)
(B)2 (long dividers
installed)
112 in. (2834 mm)
(A)2 (long dividers
removed)
104 in. (2650 mm)
S
-
Figure 2.2: Header Width
2. Refer to Figure 2.2: Header Width, page 28.
147725
28
Revision A
PRODUCT OVERVIEW
Attachments
HC10 Hay Conditioner
OD
Roll length
72 in. (1830 mm)
Outside diameter
9-1/8 in. (232 mm)
Roll tube diameter
6-5/8 in. (168 mm)
Roll speed
847–915 rpm
Upper Cross Auger
OD
Outside diameter
Tube diameter
12 in. (305 mm)
All sizes except 25 ft.
6 in. (152 mm)
25 ft.
7 in. (178 mm)
Stabilizer Wheel / Slow Speed Transport
OD
Wheels
15 in.
Tires
P205/75 R-15
Weight
Estimated weight range with base header (variances are due to different package configurations)
15-ft. header
2937–3302 lb (1329–1497 kg)
20-ft. header
3146–3600 lb (1430–1633 kg)
25-ft. header
3547–3872 lb (1605–1753 kg)
30-ft. header
4370–4812 lb (1981–2178 kg)
35-ft. header
4808–5337 lb (2181–2480 kg)
40-ft. header
147725
North America frame
5197–5704 lb (235 –2593 kg)
Export frame
5437 lb (2461 kg)
29
Revision A
3
3.1
Operation
Owner/Operator Responsibilities
CAUTION
• It is your responsibility to read and understand this manual completely before operating the header.
Contact your MacDon Dealer if an instruction is not clear to you.
• Follow all safety messages in the manual and on safety decals on the machine.
• Remember that YOU are the key to safety. Good safety practices protect you and the people around you.
• Before allowing anyone to operate the header, for however short a time or distance, make sure they have
been instructed in its safe and proper use.
• Review the manual and all safety related items with all Operators annually.
• Be alert for other Operators not using recommended procedures or not following safety precautions.
Correct these mistakes immediately, before an accident occurs.
• Do NOT modify the machine. Unauthorized modifications may impair the function and/or safety of the
machine and also may reduce the length of service you receive from your machine.
• The safety information given in this manual does not replace safety codes, insurance needs, or laws
governing your area. Be sure your machine meets the standards set by these regulations.
147725
31
Revision A
OPERATION
3.2
Operational Safety
CAUTION
Adhere to the following safety precautions:
• Follow all safety and operational instructions
provided in your operator’s manuals. If you do
not have a windrower manual, get one from your
Dealer and read it thoroughly.
• Never attempt to start the engine or operate the
machine except from the windrower seat.
• Check the operation of all controls in a safe, clear
area before starting work.
• Do NOT allow riders on the windrower.
Figure 3.1: No Riders
CAUTION
• Never start or move the machine until you are sure
all bystanders have cleared the area.
• Avoid travelling over loose fill, rocks, ditches,
or holes.
• Drive slowly through gates and doorways.
• When working on inclines, travel uphill or downhill
whenever possible. Be sure to keep transmission
in gear when travelling downhill.
• Never attempt to get on or off a moving machine.
• Do NOT leave Operator’s station while the engine
is running.
Figure 3.2: Bystander Safety
• To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected
startup of a machine, always stop the engine
and remove the key before adjusting or removing
plugged material from the machine.
• Check for excessive vibration and unusual noises.
If there is any indication of trouble, shut down
and inspect the machine. Follow proper shutdown
procedure.
Refer to 3.4 Shutting Down the
Machine, page 42.
• Operate only in daylight or good artificial light.
3.2.1
Header Safety Props
The header safety props are located on the header lift cylinders. The safety props prevent the lift cylinders
from inadvertently retracting and lowering the header.
147725
32
Revision A
OPERATION
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
3.2.2
Reel Safety Props
The reel safety props, located on the reel support arms, prevent the reel from unexpectedly lowering.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
IMPORTANT:
To prevent damage to the reel support arms, do NOT transport the header with the reel safety props engaged.
Engaging Reel Safety Props
1. Raise reel to maximum height.
2. Move reel safety props (A) to engaged position
(as shown).
NOTE:
Keep pivot bolt (B) sufficiently tight so prop
remains in stored position when not in use but
can be engaged using hand force.
Figure 3.3: Reel Safety Prop – Left Side
Outer Arm
147725
33
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Use handle (A) to move lock rod to inboard position (B)
which engages pin (C) under prop.
4. Lower reel until safety props contact the outer arm
cylinder mounts and the center arm pins.
Figure 3.4: Reel Safety Prop – Center Arm
Disengaging Reel Safety Props
1. Raise the reel to maximum height.
2. Move the reel safety props (A) back inside the
reel arms.
Figure 3.5: Reel Safety Prop – Left Side
Outer Arm
147725
34
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Use the handle (B) to move the lock rod (A) to the
outboard position.
Figure 3.6: Reel Safety Prop – Center Arm
3.2.3
Endshields
A hinged, polyethylene endshield is fitted on each end of the header.
Opening Endshields
1. Remove lynch pin (A) and tool (B) from pin (C) at top
rear of endshield.
Figure 3.7: Left-Hand Endshield
147725
35
Revision A
OPERATION
2. Use tool (B) to unlock latch (A) at lower rear corner
of endshield.
3. Lift endshield at the aft end to clear the pin at the top
rear of the endshield.
4. Swing endshield out and away from the header while
maintaining forward pressure to prevent the endshield
from slipping out of tab (C) at the front of the endsheet.
IMPORTANT:
Do NOT force the endshield once it has reached its
end of travel or damage to the endshield structure
may result. The endshield is designed to open
sufficiently to allow access to the drive system and
manual case.
Figure 3.8: Left-Hand Endshield
NOTE:
If additional access is required to the front of the
drives area, carefully disengage the front of the
endshield from the tab (C) at the front of the
endsheet and swing the front of the endshield
away from the header.
NOTE:
If complete access to the endsheet area is
required, remove the endshield. Refer to
Removing Endshields, page 37.
Figure 3.9: Left-Hand Endshield Open
Closing Endshields
1. Maintain forward pressure and swing the rear of the
endshield towards the header.
2. Lift the endshield and engage pin (A) located on the top
of the endsheet frame with the hole in endshield (B).
Figure 3.10: Left-Hand Endshield
147725
36
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Push in the endshield to engage lower latch (A).
4. Use tool (B) to lock lower latch (A).
Figure 3.11: Left-Hand Endshield
5. Replace tool (B) and lynch pin (A) on top pin (C).
Figure 3.12: Left-Hand Endshield Pin
Removing Endshields
1. Open the endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields,
page 35.
2. Remove the acorn nut (A) securing the endshield to
support (B).
3. Lift the endshield off support (B).
Figure 3.13: Left-Hand Endshield
147725
37
Revision A
OPERATION
Installing Endshields
1. Position the endshield onto support (A), and align the
hole in the endshield with the stud (B) on the support.
Figure 3.14: Left-Hand Endshield
2. Secure the endshield to the support with acorn nut (A).
3. Close the endshield.
page 36.
Refer to Closing Endshields,
NOTE:
Plastic endshields may expand or contract when
subjected to large temperature changes. Top pin
and lower catch bracket positions can be adjusted
to compensate for dimensional changes. Refer to
Adjusting Endshields, page 39.
Figure 3.15: Left-Hand Endshield
147725
38
Revision A
OPERATION
Adjusting Endshields
Plastic endshields may expand or contract when subjected to large temperature changes. The position of the top
pin and lower catch can be adjusted to compensate for dimensional changes.
1. Measure gap ‘X’ between the front end of the endshield
and the header frame and compare the measurement
to the values provided in Table 3.1 Gap “X” Chart, page
39.
Table 3.1 Gap “X” Chart
Temperature
°F (°C)
Gap ‘X’
in. (mm)
25 (-4)
1-1/8 (28)
45 (7)
1 (24)
65 (18)
13/16 (20)
85 (29)
5/8 (16)
105 (41)
1/2 (12)
125 (52)
5/16 (8)
145 (63)
3/16 (4)
165 (89)
0
Figure 3.16: Left-Hand Endshield
If adjustments are required, proceed as follows:
2. Open the endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields,
page 35.
3. Loosen nut (A) on pin (B) from inside the endsheet
using a 3/4 in. (19 mm) socket.
4. Close the endshield and adjust its position to achieve
the gap ‘X’ between the front end of the endshield and
the header frame.
5. Open the endshield and tighten nut (A).
6. Loosen the bolts on catch (C), and adjust the catch as
required to reposition the endshield. Ensure there is
a snug fit between the top of the endshield and the
header frame and that the endshield is fully engaged
on pin (B).
Figure 3.17: Left-Hand Endshield
7. Tighten the bolts on catch (C).
8. Close the endshield.
page 36.
147725
Refer to Closing Endshields,
39
Revision A
OPERATION
3.2.4
Daily Start-Up Check
CAUTION
• Clear the area of other persons, pets, etc. Keep
children away from machinery. Walk around the
machine to be sure no one is under, on, or close
to it.
• Wear close-fitting clothing and protective shoes
with slip-resistant soles.
• Remove foreign objects from the machine and
surrounding area.
• As well, carry with you any protective clothing and
personal safety devices that could be necessary
through the day. Do NOT take chances. You may
need a hard hat, protective glasses or goggles,
heavy gloves, a respirator or filter mask, or wet
weather gear.
Figure 3.18: Safety Devices
• Protect against noise. Wear a suitable hearing
protective device such as ear muffs or ear plugs
to protect against objectionable or uncomfortable
loud noises.
Complete the following tasks each day before start-up:
1. Check the machine for leaks or any parts that are
missing, broken, or not working correctly.
NOTE:
Use proper procedure when searching for
pressurized fluid leaks. Refer to 5.3.5 Checking
Hydraulic Hoses and Lines, page 118.
2. Clean all lights and reflective surfaces on the machine.
3. Perform all daily maintenance.
Refer to 5.3.1
Maintenance Schedule/Record, page 115.
147725
40
Revision A
OPERATION
3.3
Break-in Period
NOTE:
Until you become familiar with the sound and feel of your new header, be extra alert and attentive.
After attaching the header to the windrower for the first time, follow these steps:
1. Operate the machine with reel drapers and knife running slowly for five minutes, watching and listening FROM
THE OPERATOR’S SEAT for binding or interfering parts.
NOTE:
Reel and side drapers will not operate until oil flow fills the lines.
2. Perform the items specified. Refer to 5.3.2 Break-In Inspection, page 116.
CAUTION
Before investigating an unusual sound or attempting to correct a problem, shut off engine and remove key.
147725
41
Revision A
OPERATION
3.4
Shutting Down the Machine
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
To shut down, and before leaving the windrower seat for any reason, follow these steps:
• Park on level ground whenever possible.
• Lower the header fully.
• Place all controls in NEUTRAL or PARK.
• Disengage the header drive.
• Lower and fully retract the reel.
• Stop the engine and remove the key from the ignition.
• Wait for all movement to stop.
147725
42
Revision A
OPERATION
3.5
Cab Controls
CAUTION
Be sure all bystanders are clear of machine before starting engine or engaging any header drives.
Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for identification of in-cab controls for:
• Header engage/disengage control
• Header height
• Header angle
• Ground speed
• Reel speed
• Reel height
• Reel fore-aft position
147725
43
Revision A
OPERATION
3.6
3.6.1
Header Setup
Header Attachments
Several attachments to improve performance of your D65 header are available as options that can be installed by
your MacDon Dealer. Refer to 6 Options and Attachments, page 227 in this manual for a description of each item.
3.6.2
Header Settings
This table is a guideline for setting up the D65 Draper Header. Settings other than those suggested can be made
to suit various crops and conditions not covered here.
147725
44
Revision A
147725
45
>8
(>203)
4–8
(102–203)
<4
(<102)
Stubble
Height
in. (mm)
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
Light
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
Light
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
Light
On
On
On
4–7
0–3
4–7
0–3
4–7
0–3
Crop
Divider Header
Condition Rods Angle3
Medium
High
Medium
High
Medium
High
Knife
Speed4
3
2
3
2
3
2
5–10
10
10–15
5–10
10
10–15
5–10
10
10–15
Reel
Reel
Tine Speed
Pitch5
%6
4 or 5
6 or 7
4 or 5
6 or 7
4 or 5
6 or 7
Not
applicable
Down
Center or
down
Up or
center
Reel
Skid Shoe
Fore-Aft7 Position8
Variable
Variable
Storage
Stabilizer
Wheels9
Not required
Not required
Not required
Upper Cross
Auger
150
(667)
70
(311)
70
(311)
Float
lbf (N)10
3. Set header angle as shallow as possible (setting A) with center-link and skid shoes while maintaining cutting height. Refer to Controlling Header
Angle, page 55.
4. Refer to 3.7.7 Knife Speed, page 57.
5. Refer to Reel Cam Settings, page 65.
6. Percentage above ground speed. Refer to 3.7.4 Reel Speed, page 56.
7. Refer to 3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft Position, page 58.
8. Skid shoe position is used in combination with header angle to determine the cutting height when cutting on or very close to the ground. Refer
to 3.7.1 Cutting Height, page 49.
9. Stabilizer wheels are used to limit the side-to-side movement when cutting off the ground in rolling terrain, and to minimize bouncing. Refer to
Adjusting Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels, page 50.
10. Force required to lift header at ends. Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for adjustment procedures.
Cereals
Crop
Type
Table 3.2 Recommended Header Settings
OPERATION
Revision A
147725
2–6
(51–153)
On
ground
On
ground
On
ground
Edible
beans
Grass
Alfalfa
>8
(>203)
4–8
(102–203)
Stubble
Height
in. (mm)
Flax
Canola
Crop
Type
46
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
Light
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
Light
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
Light
Lodged
Heavy
On
On
Off
Variable
Variable
8–10
8–10
4–7
0–3
Normal
On
4–7
8–10
Light
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
On
1
High
High
Medium
High
Low
3
2
3
2
3
2
2
3
2
4
Medium
Low
Light
8–10
2
10–15
10
10–15
10
5–10
10
5–10
5–10
10
5–10
5–10
10
5–10
Reel
Reel
Tine Speed
Pitch5
%6
2
On
Medium
Knife
Speed4
Lodged
Heavy
Normal
Light
Divider Header
Crop
Condition Rods Angle3
6 or 7
6 or 7
3 or 4
6 or 7
3 or 4
6 or 7
3 or 4
6 or 7
Up or
center
Up or
center
Up or
center
Center or
down
Not
applicable
Center or
down
Variable
Center or
down
Variable
Reel
Skid Shoe
Fore-Aft7 Position8
Storage
Storage
Storage
Variable
Variable
Variable
Stabilizer
Wheels9
Not required
Not required
Not required
Not required
Recommended
Not required
Recommended
Not required
Upper Cross
Auger
70–100
(311–445)
70–100
(311–445)
100
(445)
70–100
(311–445)
150
(667)
70–100
(311–445)
Float
lbf (N)10
OPERATION
Revision A
OPERATION
3.6.3
Reel Settings
The following chart illustrates the profile of the reel at each cam or finger pitch setting as well as the reel position
relative to the ground at different positions on the reel arm. Refer to 3.6.2 Header Settings, page 44 for applicability
of each finger pattern and reel position.
Table 3.3 D65 Recommended Reel Settings
Cam Setting Number
(Finger Speed Gain)
Reel Position
Number
1 (0)
6 or 7
2 (20%)
3 or 4
147725
Reel Finger Pattern
47
Revision A
OPERATION
Cam Setting Number
(Finger Speed Gain)
Reel Position
Number
3 (30%)
6 or 7
4 (35%)
2 or 3
Reel Finger Pattern
NOTE:
• Adjust the reel forward to get closer to the ground while tilting the header back. Fingers/tines will dig into the
ground at extreme reel-forward positions, so adjust skid shoes or header angle to compensate. Adjust the reel
rearwards to position the reel further away from the ground when tilting the header forward.
• Header tilt can be increased to position the reel closer to the ground, or decreased to position the reel further
from the ground, while keeping material flowing onto drapers.
• To leave the maximum amount of stubble behind in lodged crop, raise the header and increase the header tilt to
keep the reel close to the ground. Position the reel fully forward.
• The reel may have to be moved back to prevent lumps or plugging on the cutterbar in thinner crops.
• Minimum crop carrying capacity (minimum area of exposed draper between the reel and the header backsheet)
occurs with the reel in the furthest aft position.
• Maximum crop carrying capacity (maximum area of exposed draper between the reel and the header backsheet)
occurs with the reel in the furthest forward position.
• The tip speed of the fingers/tines at the cutterbar becomes higher than the reel speed at higher cam settings
due to the nature of the cam action. Refer to Table 3.3 D65 Recommended Reel Settings, page 47.
147725
48
Revision A
OPERATION
3.7
Header Operating Variables
Satisfactory function of the header in all situations requires making proper adjustments to suit various crops
and conditions.
Correct operation reduces crop loss and increases productivity. As well, proper adjustments and timely maintenance
will increase the length of service you receive from your machine.
The variables listed in Table 3.4 Operating Variables, page 49 and detailed on the following pages will affect the
performance of your header.
You will quickly become adept at adjusting the machine to achieve the results you desire. Most of the adjustments
have been preset at the factory, but the settings can be changed to suit crop conditions.
Table 3.4 Operating Variables
Variable
Section
Cutting Height
3.7.1 Cutting Height, page 49
Header Float
3.7.2 Header Float, page 55
Header Angle
3.7.3 Header Angle, page 55
Reel Speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page 56
Ground Speed
3.7.5 Ground Speed, page 56
Draper Speed
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page 57
Knife Speed
3.7.7 Knife Speed, page 57
Reel Height
3.7.8 Reel Height, page 58
Reel Fore-Aft Position
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft Position, page 58
Reel Tine Pitch
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch, page 65
Crop Divider Rods
3.7.12 Crop Divider Rods, page 72
3.7.1
Cutting Height
The header design allows Operators to cut the crop above the ground in relation to the desired stubble height
or to cut the crop at ground level with the header on the ground. Cutting height will vary depending on type of
crop, crop conditions, etc.
Cutting Off the Ground
The stabilizer wheel system is designed to minimize bouncing at the header ends and may be used to float the
header to achieve an even cutting height when cutting above ground level in cereal grains. The system produces
even stubble height and greatly reduces operator fatigue.
Cutting height is controlled using a combination of the windrower header height control and a stabilizer wheel system
(or stabilizer/slow speed transport wheel system).
The stabilizer wheel system (or stabilizer/slow speed transport wheel system) is available only for 30-, 35-, 40-, and
45-foot headers.
147725
49
Revision A
OPERATION
Adjusting Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels
A properly adjusted header will achieve a balance between the amount of header weight carried by the float and
the amount carried by the stabilizer/slow speed transport wheels.
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
1. Raise the header so the stabilizer wheels are off the ground. Shut down engine and remove the key.
2. Check that the float is working properly. Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for instructions.
3. Remove the hairpin (A) from the latch on the right
wheel assembly.
4. Disengage the latch (B), lift the wheel out of the hook,
and place on the ground as shown. (This reduces
weight of assembly and makes adjusting the wheel
position easier.)
5. Lift the left wheel slightly to support the weight, and the
pull handle (C) upwards to release the lock.
6. Lift the left wheel to the desired height and engage the
support channel into the slot (D) in the upper support.
7. Push down on the handle (C) to lock.
8. Lift the right wheel back into the field position and
ensure the latch (B) is engaged.
Figure 3.19: Right Wheel
9. Secure the latch with hairpin (A).
10. Support the wheel weight by lifting slightly with one
hand, and pull up on handle (A) to release the lock.
11. Lift the wheels to the desired height, and engage the
support channel into the slot (B) in the upper support.
12. Push down on the handle (A) to lock.
Figure 3.20: Left Wheel
147725
50
Revision A
OPERATION
13. Lower the header to the desired cutting height using
the windrower controls and check the load indicator.
Figure 3.21: Load Indicator
IMPORTANT:
Continuous operation with excessive spring
compression (i.e., load indicator reading greater than
‘4’ or a compressed length (A) less than 11-5/8 in.
[295 mm]) can result in damage to the suspension
system.
14. Adjust the header angle to the desired working angle
with the machine’s header angle controls. If header
angle is not critical, set it to mid-position.
15. Use the windrower cab display module (CDM) controls
to automatically maintain cutting height. Refer to your
windrower operator’s manual for details.
Figure 3.22: Spring Compression
Adjusting Stabilizer Wheels
A properly adjusted header will achieve a balance between the amount of header weight carried by the float and
the amount carried by the stabilizer wheels.
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
1. Raise the header until the stabilizer wheels are off the ground. Shut down engine and remove the key.
2. Check that the float is working properly. Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for instructions.
CAUTION
Handle may be under tension—especially when the wheels are on the ground. Raise the header until the
wheels are off the ground before making adjustments.
147725
51
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Support the wheel weight by lifting slightly with one
hand on handle (B), and pull up on the handle (A) to
release the lock.
4. Lift the wheel using handle (B), and engage the support
channel into the center slot (C) in the upper support.
5. Push down on the handle (A) to lock.
Figure 3.23: Stabilizer Wheel
6. Lower the header to the desired cutting height using
the windrower controls and check the load indicator.
Figure 3.24: Load Indicator
IMPORTANT:
Continuous operation with excessive spring
compression (i.e., load indicator reading greater
than ‘4’ or a compressed length less than
11-5/8 in. [295 mm]) (A) can result in damage to the
suspension system.
7. Adjust the header angle to the desired working angle
with the machine’s header angle controls. If header
angle is not critical, set it to mid-position.
8. Use the windrower cab display module (CDM) controls
to automatically maintain cutting height. Refer to your
windrower operator’s manual for details.
Figure 3.25: Spring Compression
147725
52
Revision A
OPERATION
Cutting On the Ground
Cutting on the ground is performed with the header fully lowered and the cutterbar on the ground. The orientation of
the knife and knife guards relative to the ground (header angle) is controlled by the skid shoes and the center-link—it
is NOT controlled by the header lift cylinders. The skid shoes and center-link allow the Operator to adjust to field
conditions and maximize the amount of material cut while reducing damage to the knife caused by stones and debris.
The header float system floats the header over the surface to compensate for ridges, trenches, and other variations
in ground contour to prevent the cutterbar from pushing into the ground or leaving uncut crop.
Refer to the following for additional information:
•
Adjusting Inner Skid Shoe, page 54
•
Adjusting Outer Skid Shoe, page 54
• 3.7.3 Header Angle, page 55
• 3.7.2 Header Float, page 55
147725
53
Revision A
OPERATION
Adjusting Inner Skid Shoe
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Raise header to full height, engage safety props, shut off engine, and remove key.
2. Raise the stabilizer wheels or slow speed transport wheels fully (if installed). Refer to the following:
•
Adjusting Stabilizer Wheels, page 51
•
Adjusting Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels, page 50
3. Remove the lynch pin (A) from each skid shoe.
4. Hold the shoe (B) and remove the pin (C) by
disengaging from the frame and pulling away from
the shoe.
5. Raise or lower the skid shoe (B) to achieve the desired
position using the holes in the support (D) as a guide.
6. Install the pin (C), engage in frame, and secure with
lynch pin (A).
7. Check that all of the skid shoes are adjusted to the
same position.
8. Adjust the header angle to the desired working position
using the machine’s header angle controls. If the
header angle is not critical, set it to the mid-position.
Figure 3.26: Inner Skid Shoe
9. Check the header float as described in your windrower
operator’s manual.
Adjusting Outer Skid Shoe
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Raise the header to its full height, engage the safety props, shut off the engine, and remove the key from
the ignition.
2. Raise the stabilizer wheels or slow speed transport wheels fully (if installed). Refer to the following:
•
Adjusting Stabilizer Wheels, page 51
•
Adjusting Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels, page 50
147725
54
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Remove the lynch pin (A) from each skid shoe (B).
4. Hold the shoe (B) and remove the pin (C) by
disengaging from the frame and pulling away from
the shoe.
5. Raise or lower the skid shoe (B) to achieve the desired
position using the holes in the support (D) as a guide.
6. Reinstall pin (C), engage in frame, and secure with
lynch pin (A).
7. Check that all of the skid shoes are adjusted to the
same position.
8. Check the header float as described in your windrower
operator’s manual.
3.7.2
Figure 3.27: Outer Skid Shoe
Header Float
D65 windrower headers are designed to ride on the skid shoes when cutting on the ground. The windrower float
system reduces the ground pressure so that the header floats over obstacles and follows ground contours instead of
being supported by the windrower lift cylinders. Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for details about header
float adjustments.
3.7.3
Header Angle
Header angle is the angle between the drapers and the ground and is adjustable to accommodate crop conditions
and/or soil types.
Header angle (A) is a critical factor for effectively cutting on
the ground because it determines the actual distance (B)
between the knives and the ground. The header rotates at
the point of skid shoe/ground contact (C) by adjusting the
length of the center-link thereby adjusting the position of
the guards and knives.
Header angle (A) is synonymous with guard angle (D)
which is the angle between the upper surface of the guards
and the ground.
Figure 3.28: Header Angle
Controlling Header Angle
Header angle varies by adjusting the length of the top center-link (mechanical or hydraulic) between the windrower
and the header.
Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for adjustment details.
147725
55
Revision A
OPERATION
3.7.4
Reel Speed
Reel speed is one of the factors that determines how crop is moved from the cutterbar onto the drapers.
The reel performs best when it appears to be driven by the ground. It should move the cut crop evenly through the
cutterbar and onto the drapers without bunching and with minimal disturbance.
In standing crop, reel speed should be slightly higher than, or equal to, ground speed.
In flattened crop or crop that is leaning away from the cutterbar, the reel speed needs to be higher than the ground
speed. To achieve this, either increase the reel speed or decrease the ground speed.
Excessive shattering of grain heads or crop loss over the header backtube may indicate that the reel speed is too
high. Excessive reel speed also increases reel component wear and overloads the reel drive.
Slower reel speeds can be used with nine-bat reels which is advantageous in shatter prone crops.
NOTE:
Nine-bat reels are available on 15-, 20-, and 25-foot headers from the factory. A conversion kit to change from a
six-bat reel to a nine-bat reel is available for these headers.
Refer to 3.6.2 Header Settings, page 44 for recommended reel speeds in specific crops and crop conditions.
The reel speed is adjustable using the controls in the windrower cab. Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for
adjustment details.
Optional Reel Drive Sprockets
Optional reel drive sprockets for use in special crop conditions are available as an alternative to the
factory-installed sprocket.
The header is factory-equipped with a 19-tooth sprocket that drives the reel and it is suitable for most crops. Other
sprockets are available that provide more torque to the reel in heavy cutting conditions or allow for higher reel speeds
in light crops when operating at increased ground speeds.
For installation details, refer to 5.9.3 Replacing Reel Drive Sprocket, page 213.
3.7.5
Ground Speed
Operating at the proper ground speed will result in cleanly cut crops and evenly distributed material in uniform
windrows.
Refer to 3.10 Windrow Types, page 79 for effects of ground speed on windrow formation.
Reduce ground speed in difficult cutting conditions to reduce loads on cutting components and drives.
Use lower ground speeds in very light crops (e.g., short soybeans) to allow the reel to pull in short plants. Start at
3.0–3.5 mph (4.8–5.8 km/h) and adjust as required.
Higher ground speeds may require heavier float settings to prevent excessive bouncing that causes uneven cutting
and possible damage to the cutting components. If ground speed is increased, draper and reel speeds should
generally be increased to handle the extra material.
Figure 3.29: Ground Speed vs Acres, page 57 illustrates the relationship between ground speed and area cut for
the various sized headers.
147725
56
Revision A
OPERATION
Figure 3.29: Ground Speed vs Acres
A - 15 Foot
D - 30 Foot
G - acres/hour
K - kilometers/hour
B - 20 Foot
E - 35 Foot
H - miles/hour
C - 25 Foot
F - 40 Foot
J - hectares per hour
Example: A 25-foot header operating at a ground speed of 6 mph (9.7 km/h) would produce a cut area of
approximately 18 acres (7.3 hectares) in one hour.
3.7.6
Draper Speed
Correct draper speed is an important factor for achieving good flow of the cut crop away from the cutterbar.
The draper speed is controlled with the windrower cab display module (CDM). Refer to your windrower operator’s
manual for instructions.
Adjust the draper speed to achieve good feeding of crop for a good windrow. Excessive draper speed will reduce
draper life.
3.7.7
Knife Speed
The header knife drive is driven by the windrower hydraulic pump and is controlled with the windrower cab display
module (CDM). The default speed is 1200 strokes per minute (spm). Refer to your windrower operator’s manual.
Table 3.5 Knife Speed Guidelines
Header Size (ft.)
147725
Recommended Knife Speed Range (spm)
Single Knife
Double Knife
15 ft.
—
1500–1900
20, 25 ft.
1200–1400
1400–1700
57
Revision A
OPERATION
Header Size (ft.)
3.7.8
Recommended Knife Speed Range (spm)
Single Knife
Double Knife
30 ft.
1200–1400
1200–1600
35 ft.
1100–1300
1200–1400
40 ft.
1050–1200
1100–1400
Reel Height
The crop type and condition determines the operating height of the reel.
Set the reel height to carry material past the knife and onto the drapers with minimal disturbance and damage to the
cut crop. Also, refer to 3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft Position, page 58.
The reel height is controlled using switches in the windrower cab.
The following conditions might result if the reel is set too low:
• Crop loss over the header backtube
• Crop disturbance on the drapers caused by the reel fingers
• Crop being pushed down by the tine tubes
The following conditions might result if the reel is set too high:
• Cutterbar plugging
• Crop lodging and being left uncut
• Grain stalks dropping ahead of cutterbar
Refer to 3.6.2 Header Settings, page 44 for recommended reel height in specific crops and crop conditions.
IMPORTANT:
Maintain adequate clearance to prevent fingers contacting the knife or the ground. Refer to 5.8.1 Reel Clearance
to Cutterbar, page 186.
3.7.9
Reel Fore-Aft Position
Reel fore-aft position is a critical factor for achieving the best results in adverse conditions. The reel position is
factory-set for normal conditions, but it can be adjusted forwards or backwards as required using the controls
inside the cab.
The reel can be moved approximately 9 in. (227 mm) further aft by repositioning the fore-aft cylinders on the reel
arms to accommodate certain crop conditions.
For double-reel headers, refer to Repositioning Fore-Aft Cylinders on Double Reel, page 62.
For single-reel headers, refer to Repositioning Fore-Aft Cylinders on Single Reel, page 60.
147725
58
Revision A
OPERATION
A decal (A) is attached to the right reel support arm for
identifying reel position. The aft edge of the cam disc (B)
is the reel fore-aft position marker.
For straight standing crop, center the reel over the cutterbar
(4–5 on decal).
For crops that are down, tangled, or leaning, it may be
necessary to move the reel ahead of the cutterbar (lower
number on decal).
IMPORTANT:
Adjust to a steeper header angle if experiencing difficulty
picking up flattened crop. Refer to Controlling Header
Angle, page 55 for adjustment instructions. Adjust
reel position only if header angle adjustments are not
satisfactory.
Figure 3.30: Fore-Aft Decal
Refer to 3.6.2 Header Settings, page 44 for recommended
reel positions in specific crops and crop conditions.
NOTE:
In crops that are difficult to pick up such as rice, or severely lodged crops that require full forward positioning of
the reel, set the reel tine pitch to provide proper placement of the crop onto the drapers. Refer to 3.7.10 Reel
Tine Pitch, page 65 for adjustment details.
Adjusting Reel Fore-Aft Position
1. Select FORE-AFT mode on the selector switch in
the cab.
2. Operate the hydraulics to move the reel to the desired
position while using the decal (A) as a reference.
3. Check the reel clearance to cutterbar after making
changes to the cam setting. Refer to the following for
measurement and adjustment procedures:
• 5.8.1 Reel Clearance to Cutterbar, page 186
• 5.8.2 Reel Frown, page 189
IMPORTANT:
Operating with the reel too far forward can result in
the fingers contacting the ground. When operating
with the reel in this position, lower the skid shoes or
adjust the header tilt as required to prevent damaging
the fingers.
147725
59
Figure 3.31: Fore-Aft Decal
Revision A
OPERATION
Repositioning Fore-Aft Cylinders on Single Reel
The reel can be moved approximately 9 in. (227 mm) further aft by repositioning the fore-aft cylinders on
the reel arms.
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
Reposition the right reel arm cylinder as follows:
NOTE:
Reel components not shown in illustration for
improved clarity.
1. Position reel fully aft with support arms horizontal.
2. Stop the engine and remove the key from the ignition.
3. Remove the four bolts (A) securing the cylinder
bracket (B) to the reel arm.
4. Push/pull the reel until bracket (B) lines up with the
fore/aft set of holes (C).
5. Reinstall the four bolts (A) securing the cylinder
bracket (B) to the reel arm at the new position.
Figure 3.32: Right Arm Cylinder – Forward
Position
Figure 3.33: Right Arm Cylinder – Rearward
Position
147725
60
Revision A
OPERATION
Reposition the left reel arm cylinder as follows:
NOTE:
Reel components not shown in illustration for
improved clarity.
1. Remove pin (A) securing cylinder (B) to bracket/light
assembly (C).
2. Remove bolts (D) securing bracket/light assembly (C)
to the reel arm, and remove the bracket/light assembly.
3. Remove the cable tie securing the harness to the
bracket/light assembly (C) or reel arm if necessary.
4. Swivel the light to the working position as shown.
Figure 3.34: Forward Position
5. Reposition the bracket/light assembly (C) on the
reel arm as shown, and secure with four bolts (D)
Tighten bolts.
6. Push the reel back and attach cylinder (B) to the
bracket/light assembly (C) with pin (A). Secure pin
with cotter pin.
7. Secure the light harness to
assembly (C) using a cable tie.
the
bracket/light
8. Check the reel clearance to the backsheet, upper cross
auger (if installed), and reel braces.
9. Adjust the reel tine pitch if necessary. Refer to 3.7.10
Reel Tine Pitch, page 65.
Figure 3.35: Rearward Position
147725
61
Revision A
OPERATION
Repositioning Fore-Aft Cylinders on Double Reel
The reel can be moved approximately 9 in. (227 mm) further aft by repositioning the fore-aft cylinders on
the reel arms.
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
Reposition the center arm cylinder as follows:
NOTE:
Reel components not shown in illustration for
improved clarity.
1. Position reel fully aft with support arms horizontal.
2. Stop engine and remove key.
3. Remove four bolts (A) securing cylinder bracket (B) to
reel arm.
4. Push/pull reel until bracket (B) lines up with the fore/aft
set of holes (C).
5. Reinstall four bolts (A) to secure bracket (B) to reel arm
at new position.
Figure 3.36: Forward Position
Figure 3.37: Rearward Position
147725
62
Revision A
OPERATION
Reposition right arm cylinder as follows:
NOTE:
Reel components not shown in illustration for
improved clarity.
1. Remove four bolts (A) securing cylinder bracket (B) to
the reel arm.
2. Push reel back until bracket (B) lines up with the aft set
of holes (C).
3. Reinstall the four bolts (A) to secure bracket to reel arm
at new position.
Figure 3.38: Forward Position
Figure 3.39: Rearward Position
147725
63
Revision A
OPERATION
Reposition the left reel arm cylinder as follows:
NOTE:
Reel components not shown in illustration for
improved clarity.
1. Remove pin (A) securing cylinder (B) to bracket/light
assembly (C).
2. Remove bolts (D) securing bracket/light assembly (C)
to the reel arm, and remove the bracket/light assembly.
3. Remove the cable tie securing the harness to the
bracket/light assembly (C) or reel arm if necessary.
4. Swivel the light to the working position as shown.
Figure 3.40: Forward Position
5. Reposition the bracket/light assembly (C) on the
reel arm as shown, and secure with four bolts (D)
Tighten bolts.
6. Push the reel back and attach cylinder (B) to the
bracket/light assembly (C) with pin (A). Secure pin
with cotter pin.
7. Secure the light harness to
assembly (C) using a cable tie.
the
bracket/light
8. Check the reel clearance to the backsheet, upper cross
auger (if installed), and reel braces.
9. Adjust the reel tine pitch if necessary. Refer to 3.7.10
Reel Tine Pitch, page 65.
Figure 3.41: Rearward Position
147725
64
Revision A
OPERATION
3.7.10
Reel Tine Pitch
IMPORTANT:
The following describes the conceptual and operational guidelines of the pick-up reel. Please read carefully
before operating the machine.
The pick-up reel is designed to pick up flattened and severely lodged crops. It is not always necessary to increase
the tine pitch (select a higher cam setting) to pick up lodged crops, however, because the cam setting is mainly used
to determine how the crop gets delivered onto the drapers.
The positioning of the fingers relative to the ground (tine pitch) is not significantly affected by the cam setting. For
example, with the cam position range at 33°, the corresponding finger pitch range is only 5° at the lowest point of
the reel’s rotation.
For the best results, use the minimum cam setting that delivers the crop past the rear edge of the cutterbar and onto
the drapers. Refer to 3.6.2 Header Settings, page 44.
Reel Cam Settings
The following outlines the function of each cam setting and provides set-up guidelines for various crop conditions.
The setting numbers are visible above the slots on the cam disc. Refer to Adjusting Reel Cam, page 67.
Cam Position 1, Reel Position 6 or 7 delivers the most
even crop flow onto the drapers without fluffing up or
disturbing the material.
• This setting will release crop close to the cutterbar and
works best if the cutterbar is on the ground.
• Some crops will not be delivered past the cutterbar
when the cutterbar is raised off the ground and the reel
is pushed forward; therefore, set the initial reel speed
approximately equal to the ground speed.
Figure 3.42: Finger Profile – Position 1
Cam Position 2, Reel Position 3 or 4 is the recommended
starting position for most crops and conditions.
• If the crop is stalling on the cutterbar when the reel is in
the forward position, increase the cam setting to push
the crop past the rear edge of the cutterbar.
• If the crop is getting fluffed or if there is a disruption to
the flow across the drapers, decrease the cam setting.
• This setting generates a fingertip speed that is
approximately 20% faster than the reel speed.
Figure 3.43: Finger Profile – Position 2
147725
65
Revision A
OPERATION
Cam Position 3, Reel Position 6 or 7 is mainly used to
leave long stubble.
• This position allows the reel to reach forward and lift the
crop across the knife and onto the drapers.
• This setting generates a fingertip speed that is
approximately 30% faster than the reel speed.
Figure 3.44: Finger Profile – Position 3
Cam Position 4, Reel Position 2 or 3 is used with the reel
fully forward to leave the maximum amount of stubble in
lodged crops.
• This position allows the reel to reach forward and lift the
crop across the knife and onto the drapers.
• This setting generates a fingertip speed that is
approximately 35% faster than the reel speed.
Figure 3.45: Finger Profile – Position 4
Cam Position 4, Header Angle At Maximum, and Reel
Fully Forward provides the maximum amount of reel reach
below the cutterbar to pick up lodged crops.
• Leaves a significant amount of stubble when cutting
height is set to approximately 8 in. (203 mm). In damp
materials such as rice, it’s possible to double the ground
speed because of the reduction of cut material.
• This setting generates a fingertip speed that is
approximately 35% faster than the reel speed.
NOTE:
Higher cam settings with the reel fore-aft position set
between 4–5 sharply decreases the draper capacity
because the reel disrupts the crop flow across the
drapers and the fingers engage the crop that is moving
on the drapers. High cam settings are recommended
only with the reel at, or close to, full forward settings.
Figure 3.46: Finger Profile – Position 4
IMPORTANT:
The reel to cutterbar clearance should always be checked following adjustments to reel tine pitch and reel fore-aft
position, refer to 5.8.1 Reel Clearance to Cutterbar, page 186.
147725
66
Revision A
OPERATION
Refer to 3.6.2 Header Settings, page 44 for recommended reel tine pitch in specific crops and crop conditions.
Adjusting Reel Cam
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
1. Turn the latch pin (A) counterclockwise using a 3/4 in.
wrench to release the cam disc.
2. Use the wrench on bolt (B) to rotate the cam disc and
align the latch pin (A) with the desired cam disc hole
position (C) (1 to 4).
NOTE:
Bolt (B) is positioned through the cam disc
(transparent view shown in illustration for
improved clarity).
3. Turn the latch pin (A) clockwise to engage and lock the
cam disc.
Figure 3.47: Reel Cam Positioner
4. Repeat the above procedure for the opposite reel.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure the cam is secured into position before
operating the machine.
3.7.11
Crop Dividers
Crop dividers are used to help divide the crop when harvesting. They are removable to allow installation of vertical
knives and to decrease transport width.
Removing Crop Dividers with Latch Option from Header
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Lower reel, raise header, stop engine, remove key, and engage header safety props. For instructions, refer to
your windrower operator’s manual.
2. Open or remove endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields, page 35.
147725
67
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Lift safety lever (A).
4. Hold onto crop divider (B), push lever (C) to open latch,
and lower crop divider.
Figure 3.48: Crop Divider
5. Lift crop divider off endsheet and store as follows:
a. Insert pin (A) on crop divider into hole in endsheet
at location shown.
b. Lift crop divider and position lugs (B) on crop
divider into bracket on endsheet. Ensure lugs
engage bracket.
6. Close or install endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields,
page 35.
Figure 3.49: Stored Crop Divider
Removing Crop Dividers without Latch Option from Header
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Lower reel, raise header, stop engine, remove key, and engage safety props. For instructions, refer to your
windrower operator’s manual.
2. Open or remove endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields, page 35.
147725
68
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Remove bolt (A), lock washer, and flat washer.
4. Lower crop divider (B) and then lift to remove
from endsheet.
5. Close or install endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields,
page 35.
Figure 3.50: Crop Divider
Installing Crop Dividers with Latch Option onto Header
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Lower reel, raise header, stop engine, remove key, and engage safety props. For instructions, refer to your
windrower operator’s manual.
2. Open or remove endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields, page 35.
3. Remove crop divider from storage location by lifting
crop divider to disengage lugs (A) at lower end
and then lowering it slightly to disengage pin (B)
from endsheet.
Figure 3.51: Stored Crop Divider
147725
69
Revision A
OPERATION
4. Position crop divider as shown by inserting lugs (A) into
holes in endsheet.
5. Lift forward end of crop divider until pin (B) at top of
crop divider engages and closes latch (C).
6. Push safety lever (D) downwards to lock pin into
latch (C).
Figure 3.52: Crop Divider
7. Pull at the tip of the crop divider and ensure there is
no lateral movement. If necessary, adjust bolts (A) to
tighten crop divider and eliminate lateral movement.
8. Close or install endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields,
page 35.
Figure 3.53: Crop Divider
Installing Crop Dividers without Latch Option onto Header
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Lower reel, raise header, stop engine, remove key, and engage safety props. For instructions, refer to your
windrower operator’s manual.
2. Open or remove endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields, page 35.
147725
70
Revision A
OPERATION
3. Remove crop divider from storage location by lifting
crop divider to disengage lugs (A) at lower end
and then lowering it slightly to disengage pin (B)
from endsheet.
Figure 3.54: Stored Crop Divider
4. Position crop divider as shown by inserting lugs (A) into
holes in endsheet.
Figure 3.55: Crop Divider
5. Lift forward end of crop divider and install bolt (A) and
special stepped washer (B) (step towards divider).
Tighten bolt.
6. Pull at the tip of the crop divider and ensure there is
no lateral movement. If necessary, adjust bolts (A) to
tighten crop divider and eliminate lateral movement.
7. Close or install endshields. Refer to 3.2.3 Endshields,
page 35.
Figure 3.56: Crop Divider
147725
71
Revision A
OPERATION
3.7.12
Crop Divider Rods
Crop divider rods are used in conjunction with crop dividers. The removable crop divider rods are most useful
when crop is down, but in standing crops, using only crop dividers is recommended.
Table 3.6 Crop Divider Rods Recommended Use
With Divider Rods
Without Divider Rods
Alfalfa
Lodged cereal
Edible beans
Canola
Peas
Milo
Flax
Soybeans
Rice
Grass seed
Sudan grass
Soybeans
Lentils
Winter forage
Standing cereal
Removing Crop Divider Rods
1. Loosen bolt (A) and remove crop divider rod (B) from
both sides of header.
Figure 3.57: Crop Divider Rod
2. Store both crop divider rods inboard on the right
side endsheet.
Figure 3.58: Right Side Endsheet
147725
72
Revision A
OPERATION
Rice Divider Rods
Optional rice divider rods provide improved performance in
tall and tangled rice crops. Refer to 6.4.13 Rice Divider
Rods, page 238.
The installation and removal procedures are the same as
for standard crop divider rods.
Figure 3.59: Divider Rod for Rice
147725
73
Revision A
OPERATION
3.8
Delivery Opening
The width and location of the delivery opening affects the width and configuration of the windrow.
The decision to widen or narrow the center delivery opening, or to double windrow, should be based on the
following factors:
• Windrower pick-up capability
• Type and yield of crop
• Weather conditions (rain, humidity, wind)
• Drying time available
Refer to 3.10 Windrow Types, page 79 for the strengths and weaknesses of the various windrow configurations with
respect to these factors.
Also refer to 3.9 Double Windrowing, page 76.
3.8.1
Adjusting Delivery Opening on Header with Manual Deck Shift
Both decks can be positioned to vary the delivery opening
from 60-5/8 to 69-11/16 in. (1540–1770 mm) for the 15-ft.
header and from 67-1/8 to 76-11/16 in. (1720–1950 mm)
for 20- to 40-ft. models.
1. Loosen bolts (A) on both decks.
2. Slide decks desired amount. Retighten bolts (A).
Figure 3.60: Manual Deck Shift
147725
74
Revision A
OPERATION
3.8.2
Adjusting Delivery Opening on Header with Hydraulic Deck Shift
The delivery opening can be changed by moving the inboard deck shift stops.
1. Remove bolts (A).
2. Slide stop (B) outboard to decrease the maximum
opening size,
or inboard to increase the
maximum opening.
CAUTION
Adjust the outboard stops to prevent the decks from
contacting each other.
3. Reinstall bolts (A) and tighten.
Figure 3.61: Hydraulic Deck Shift
147725
75
Revision A
OPERATION
3.9
Double Windrowing
Double windrowing is laying two swaths side-by-side. Larger capacity combines or forage harvesters can then pick
up twice as much material in a single pass, saving time and fuel.
Double windrowing is performed with the D65 Draper Headers by two methods: deck shifting or using the Double
Windrow Attachment (DWA).
Deck shifting is used for crops that don’t require conditioning, such as grains, canola, and beans for example. Refer to
• 3.9.1 Shifting Decks Hydraulically, page 76
• 3.9.2 Shifting Decks Manually, page 77
Forage crops such as alfalfa, hay, and some grasses are cut and then fed into the HC10 Hay Conditioner. The DWA
system allows double windrowing with conditioner-equipped windrowers up to 30 ft. Refer to 3.9.3 Using Double
Windrow Attachment (DWA), page 78.
3.9.1
Shifting Decks Hydraulically
The hydraulic deck shift feature allows you to select center, left, or right delivery from the windrower cab. It is only
available on the 25-, 30-, and 35-ft. headers.
Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for identification and operation of the deck shift control.
To lay a double-windrow, do the following:
NOTE:
30-ft. headers equipped with transport or stabilizer
system require that the wheels be in the raised position
to avoid interfering with the windrow.
1. Position the decks at the left end of header to deliver
crop from right end (A) for the first round.
2. To deliver crop from the left end (B) of the header, use
the deck shift control in the windrower to shift the decks
to the right end of the header.
3. Complete the second round to lay a double windrow.
4. Repeat above steps to lay additional double windrow.
Figure 3.62: Double Windrowing
NOTE:
The end delivery opening is designed to give
adequate clearance between the first windrow and
the standing crop, and optimum space between the
two windrows.
147725
76
Revision A
OPERATION
3.9.2
Shifting Decks Manually
Both decks can be moved manually to deliver the crop from the center or right/left end on 25- to 40-ft. headers.
To deliver crop from the right end, move the decks to the left end of the header as follows:
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
1. Loosen bolt (A) on the right deck.
2. Slide deck to close off the center opening. Retighten
bolt (A).
Figure 3.63: Right Deck Shown
3. Reverse the draper drive motor hoses (A) on the
moved deck so that the draper turns the same direction
as the existing deck.
NOTE:
Loosen clamp on plastic sleeve at drive motor so
that hoses (A) can be reversed. Retighten clamp.
NOTE:
To deliver crop from the left end, move the decks to
the right end of the header following the steps above.
Figure 3.64: Right Deck Motor
147725
77
Revision A
OPERATION
To lay a double-windrow, do the following:
NOTE:
30-ft. headers equipped with transport or stabilizer
system, require that the wheels be in the raised
position to avoid interfering with the windrow.
4. Position decks at the left end of header to deliver crop
from right end (A).
5. Complete one round or one length of the field.
6. Complete the second round or length in the opposite
direction to lay a double windrow.
7. Repeat above steps to lay additional double windrow.
Figure 3.65: Double Windrowing
3.9.3
Using Double Windrow Attachment (DWA)
Allows double windrowing of cut and conditioned forage type crops.
The conditioned crop is deposited onto the side delivery
system draper (A) and delivered to the side of the
windrower when required. Draper speed and deck position
are controlled with switches in the windrower cab.
To lay a double-windrow, do the following:
1. Complete one round or one length of the field.
2. Complete the second round or length in the opposite
direction to lay a double windrow.
3. Repeat above steps to lay additional double windrow.
NOTE:
The DWA system shuts off the draper
automatically when it is raised and allows the
crop to be deposited between the tractor wheels
as it would be without the side delivery system.
147725
Figure 3.66: Double Windrowing
78
Revision A
OPERATION
3.10
Windrow Types
There are three basic criteria by which the quality of a windrow is measured:
• Weight Distribution: Heads and stalks distributed evenly across full width of windrow
• Good Curing: A loose, open windrow for better drying
• Good Weatherability: A well-formed windrow that supports heads off the ground and holds together in extreme
weather conditions
Windrow Type
Herringbone
Fantail
Dovetail
Parallel
147725
Weight
Distribution
Curing
Weatherability
The most desirable
form of windrow,
stalks are crossed and
interwoven. Heads
are distributed across
full width of windrow.
This windrow can
be formed by center
delivery only.
Good
Good
Excellent
The stalks are crossed
in the center and
the heads are in line
along outside edges.
This windrow can
be formed by center
delivery only.
Fair
The stalks are lined
along outside edges
of windrow and heads
are crossed in center.
This windrow can
be formed by center
delivery only.
Poor
The stalks are
parallel to windrow
and heads evenly
distributed across
width of windrow.
This windrow can be
formed by center
delivery or end
delivery.
Good
Description
Machine Setting
Guidelines
• Reel
and
ground
speed
approximately
equal
• Medium
speed
draper
• Center delivery
Fair
Fair
• Low draper speed
• Low header angle
• Center delivery
Fair
Poor
• High
speed
draper
• High header angle
• Center delivery
Good
Good
• Medium
speed
draper
• Medium
angle
header
• Center or
delivery
79
end
Revision A
OPERATION
Windrow Type
45° Diagonal
75° Diagonal
147725
Weight
Distribution
Curing
Weatherability
The stalks are
lined along one
edge and heads
are along opposite
edge, 45° to windrow
perpendicular. This
windrow can be
formed by end delivery
or by center delivery, if
the crop is leaning to
one side.
Poor
Fair
Poor
The stalks are closer
to parallel than the 45°
windrow. Stalk tips are
lined along one edge
with heads opposite,
75° to windrow
perpendicular. This
windrow can be
formed by end delivery
or by center delivery, if
the crop is leaning to
one side.
Fair
Description
Machine Setting
Guidelines
• Low reel speed
• Less aggressive
tine pitch
• End delivery or
center delivery if
crop is leaning
Good
Fair
• Low reel speed
• Less aggressive
tine pitch
• End delivery or
center delivery if
crop is leaning
80
Revision A
OPERATION
3.11
Haying Tips
The following information may be useful when using the D65 Draper Header in hay crops.
3.11.1
Curing
A quick cure will maintain top quality because
• 5% of the protein is lost for each day hay lies on the ground.
• The sooner the cut hay is off, the earlier the start for new growth.
Leaving the windrow as wide and thin as possible makes for the quickest curing. The cured hay should be baled as
soon as possible.
3.11.2
Topsoil Moisture
On wet soil, the general rule of wide and thin does NOT apply. A narrower windrow will dry faster than hay left flat
on wet ground.
When the ground is wetter than the hay, moisture from the soil is absorbed by the hay above it. Determine topsoil
moisture level before cutting. Use a moisture tester or estimate level using the table below.
Level
% Moisture
Condition
Wet
Over 45%
Soil is muddy
Damp
25–45%
Shows footprints
Dry
Under 25%
Surface is dusty
If ground is wet due to irrigation, wait until soil moisture drops below 45%.
If ground is wet due to frequent rains, cut when weather allows and let the forage lie on wet ground until it dries to
the moisture level of the ground. The cut hay will dry no more until the ground under it dries, so consider moving
the windrow to drier ground.
3.11.3
Weather and Topography
Cut as much hay as possible by mid day, when drying conditions are best.
Fields sloping south get up to 100% more exposure to the sun’s heat than the north sloping fields. If hay is baled
and chopped, consider baling the south facing fields and chopping fields facing north.
When relative humidity is high, the evaporation rate is low and hay dries slower.
If there is no wind, saturated air becomes trapped around the windrow. Raking or tedding will expose the hay to
fresher, less saturated air.
Cutting hay perpendicular to the direction of the prevailing winds is also recommended.
3.11.4
Windrow Configuration
The following windrow characteristics are desirable:
147725
81
Revision A
OPERATION
Configuration
Advantage
High and fluffy
Movement of air through the windrow is more important to
the curing process than is direct sunlight.
Consistent formation, not bunchy
Permits an even flow of material into the baler, chopper,
etc. and allows for more even drying.
Even distribution of material across windrow
Results in even and consistent bales to minimize handling
and stacking problems.
Properly conditioned
Prevents excessive leaf damage.
Refer to 3.7 Header Operating Variables, page 49 for instructions on adjusting the header.
3.11.5
Driving on Windrow
Driving on previously cut windrows can lengthen drying time by a full day in hay that will not be raked. If practical,
set forming shields for a narrower windrow that can be straddled.
NOTE:
Driving on the windrow in high yielding crops may be unavoidable if a full width windrow is necessary.
3.11.6
Raking and Tedding
Raking or tedding speeds up drying, however, benefits must be evaluated against additional leaf losses which will
be the result.
There is little or no advantage to raking or tedding if the ground beneath the windrow is dry. Large windrows on
damp or wet ground should be turned over when they reach 40–50% moisture.
Hay should not be raked or tedded at less than 25% moisture, or excessive yield losses will result.
3.11.7
Chemical Drying Agents
Hay drying agents work by removing wax from legume surfaces, enabling water to escape and evaporate faster.
However, treated hay lying on wet ground will also absorb ground moisture faster. Before deciding to use a drying
agent, costs and benefits relative to your area should be carefully evaluated.
147725
82
Revision A
OPERATION
3.12
Levelling the Header
The windrower linkages are factory-set to provide the proper level for the header and should not normally
require adjustment.
NOTE:
The float springs are NOT used to level the header.
If the header is not level, check the pressure of the windrower’s tires to ensure they are properly inflated (refer to
your windrower’s operator’s manual).
If the header is still not level, adjust the windrower linkages as required (refer to the appropriate section in the
windrower’s operator’s manual).
147725
83
Revision A
OPERATION
3.13
Unplugging Cutterbar
To remove plugged material from the cutterbar, follow these steps:
1. Stop forward movement of machine and disengage header drives.
2. Raise header to prevent it from filling with dirt, and engage header drive clutch.
3. If plug does NOT clear, disengage header drive clutch and raise header fully.
CAUTION
Lowering rotating reel on a plugged cutterbar will damage the reel components.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
4. Shut off engine and remove key.
5. Engage header safety props.
CAUTION
Wear heavy gloves when working around or handling knives.
6. Clean off cutterbar by hand.
NOTE:
If cutterbar plugging persists, refer to 7 Troubleshooting, page 239.
147725
84
Revision A
OPERATION
3.14
Upper Cross Auger (UCA)
The UCA improves delivery of very bulky crops across the
header and onto the windrow.
Beater bars assist in delivering material through the
header opening, but the beater bars are removable if
wrapping occurs.
IMPORTANT:
The UCA drive motor must be equipped with a case drain
kit when used on single draper drive headers. See your
MacDon Dealer for details.
Figure 3.67: Upper Cross Auger
147725
85
Revision A
OPERATION
3.14.1
Removing Beater Bars
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
1. Lower the header to the ground, stop the engine, and
remove the key from the ignition.
2. Remove bolts (A) securing the beater bars (B) and
clamps (C) to the auger tubes, and remove the beater
bars and clamps.
Figure 3.68: Single-Reel Headers
Figure 3.69: Beater Bars
147725
86
Revision A
OPERATION
3.14.2
Installing Beater Bars
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected
startup of machine, always stop engine and remove
key before making adjustments to machine.
1. Lower the header to the ground, stop the engine, and
remove the key from the ignition.
2. Position one beater bar (B) and one clamp set (C)
onto the auger tube and loosely secure with carriage
bolt (A) and nut. Bolt head MUST face the direction of
auger rotation.
3. Position the remaining clamp sets (C) onto the auger
tube and loosely attach to the beater bar (B) with
carriage bolts (A) and nuts. Bolt heads MUST face the
direction of auger rotation.
Figure 3.70: Single-Reel Headers
4. Position the second beater bar (B) in clamp sets (C)
and secure with carriage bolts (A) and nuts.
5. Tighten bolts.
Figure 3.71: Beater Bars
147725
87
Revision A
OPERATION
3.15
Transporting Header
WARNING
Do NOT drive windrower with header attached on a road or highway at night, or in conditions which reduce
visibility, such as fog or rain. The width of the header may not be apparent under these conditions.
3.15.1
Transporting Header on Windrower
CAUTION
• Check local laws for width regulations and lighting or marking requirements before transporting
on roads.
• Follow all recommended procedures in your windrower operator’s manual for transporting, towing, etc.
• Disengage header drive clutch when travelling to and from the field.
• Before driving windrower on a roadway, be sure flashing amber lamps, red tail lamps, and head lamps
are clean and working properly. Pivot amber lamps for best visibility by approaching traffic. Always use
these lamps on roads to provide adequate warning to other vehicles.
• Do NOT use field lamps on roads; they may confuse other drivers.
• Before driving on a roadway, clean slow moving vehicle emblem and reflectors. Adjust rear view mirror
and clean windows.
• Lower the reel fully and raise header unless transporting in hills.
• Maintain adequate visibility and be alert for roadside obstructions, oncoming traffic, and bridges.
• When travelling downhill, reduce speed and keep header at a minimum height. This provides maximum
stability if forward motion is stopped for any reason. Raise header completely at bottom of grade to
avoid contacting ground.
• Travel speed should be such that complete control and machine stability are maintained at all times.
3.15.2
Towing
Headers with the Slow Speed Transport/Stabilizer Wheel option can be towed behind a properly configured MacDon
windrower or an agricultural tractor. Refer to the windrower operator’s manual for instructions.
147725
88
Revision A
OPERATION
Attaching Header to Towing Vehicle
CAUTION
Adhere to the following slow speed transport instructions to prevent loss of control leading to bodily injury
and/or machine damage:
• Weight of towing vehicle
braking performance.
must
exceed
header
weight
to
ensure
adequate
control
and
• Do NOT tow with any highway-capable vehicle. Use only an agricultural tractor, agricultural combine,
or a properly configured MacDon windrower.
• Ensure reel is fully lowered and back on support arms to increase header stability during transport. For
headers with hydraulic reel fore-aft, never connect the fore-aft couplers to each other or the circuit will
be complete and the reel could creep forward during transport.
• Check that all pins are properly secured in transport position at wheel supports, cutterbar support,
and hitch.
• Check tire condition and pressure prior to transporting.
• Connect hitch to towing vehicle using a proper hitch pin with a spring locking pin or other
suitable fastener.
• Attach hitch safety chain to towing vehicle. Adjust safety chain length to provide only enough slack to
permit turning.
• Connect header 7-pole plug wiring harness to mating receptacle on towing vehicle.
receptacle is available from your MacDon Dealer parts department).
(The 7-pole
• Ensure lights are functioning properly and clean the slow moving vehicle sign and other reflectors. Use
flashing warning lights unless prohibited by law.
Towing the Header
CAUTION
Adhere to the following slow speed transport instructions to prevent loss of control leading to bodily injury
and/or machine damage:
• Do NOT exceed 25 mph (40 km/h). Reduce transport speed to less than 5 mph (8 km/h) for corners and
slippery or rough conditions.
• Turn corners at only very low speeds (5 mph [8km/h] or less). Header stability is reduced while cornering
because front wheel moves to the left.
• Do NOT accelerate when making or coming out of a turn.
• Obey all highway traffic regulations in your area when transporting on public roads. Use flashing amber
lights unless prohibited by law.
147725
89
Revision A
OPERATION
3.15.3
Converting from Transport to Field Position
Removing Tow-Bar
1. Block the tires to prevent the header from rolling, and
unhook the header from the towing vehicle.
2. Disconnect the electrical connector (A) on the tow-bar.
3. Remove pin (B) from the tow-bar, and disassemble the
outer section (C) from the inner section (D).
Figure 3.72: Tow-Bar Assembly
4. Disconnect the electrical connector (A) at the
front wheel.
Figure 3.73: Wiring Connector
5. Remove clevis pin (A) and set aside for reinstallation.
6. Push latch (B) and lift the tow-bar (C) from the hook.
Release latch.
7. Install clevis pin (A).
Figure 3.74: Tow-Bar Latch
147725
90
Revision A
OPERATION
Storing the Tow-Bar
1. Place the inner end of the outer half of the tow-bar into
the cradle (A) on the left side of the header backtube.
2. Secure clevis/pintle end of the tow-bar in support (B) on
the endsheet using hitch pin (C). Secure with lynch pin.
3. Install the rubber strap (D) on the cradle (A).
Figure 3.75: Tow-Bar Storage – Left Side
4. Place the inner end of the outer half of the tow-bar into
the cradle (A) on the right side of the header backtube.
5. Secure the tube end of the tow-bar in support (B) on
the endsheet using hitch pin (C). Secure with hairpin.
6. Install the rubber strap (D) on the cradle (A).
Figure 3.76: Tow-Bar Storage – Right Side
147725
91
Revision A
OPERATION
7. Attach the header to the windrower. Refer to the
windrower operator’s manual for instructions.
IMPORTANT:
Carrying the tow-bar on the header will affect
the main header float. Refer to your windrower
operator’s manual for adjustment procedures.
8. Place the transport wheels into field position. Refer to
the following:
•
Moving Front (Left) Wheels into Field Position, page
92
•
Moving Rear (Right) Wheels into Field Position,
page 93
Moving Front (Left) Wheels into Field Position
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Raise the header fully and engage the header
safety props.
2. Swivel the front wheel assembly (A) so the wheels are
aligned with the lower frame.
3. Remove pin (B) and pull the wheel assembly towards
the rear of header. Store the pin in hole (C) at the top
of the leg.
4. Pull handle (D) upwards to release and lower the
linkage into the vertical support.
Figure 3.77: Front (Left) Wheels
147725
92
Revision A
OPERATION
5. Align lift hook (A) with lug (B) and lift the wheel
assembly to engage the pin in the lift hook. Ensure
latch (C) is engaged.
6. Install clevis pin (D) and secure to the center of the axle
with hairpin.
Figure 3.78: Front (Left) Wheels
7. Lift the wheel assembly to the desired height and slide
the linkage (A) into the appropriate slot in the vertical
support.
8. Push down on the handle (B) to lock.
Figure 3.79: Front (Left) Wheels
Moving Rear (Right) Wheels into Field Position
1. Pull pin (A) on the left side rear wheel. Swivel the wheel
clockwise and lock with pin.
Figure 3.80: Rear Wheel – Left Side
147725
93
Revision A
OPERATION
2. Remove pin (A) and store at location (B).
3. Pull handle (C) upwards to release.
4. Lift the wheel to the desired height and engage the
support channel into slot (D) in the vertical support.
5. Push down on handle (C) to lock.
Figure 3.81: Rear Wheel – Left Side
6. Pull the pin (A) on brace (B) on the left-hand wheel in
front of the cutterbar. Disengage the brace from the
cutterbar and lower the brace against the axle (C).
7. Remove pin (D), lower support (E) onto axle, and
reinsert pin into support.
8. Swing the axle (C) clockwise towards the rear of
the header.
Figure 3.82: Right Rear Axle
147725
94
Revision A
OPERATION
9. Pull pin (A) on right-hand wheel, swivel the wheel
counterclockwise to position shown, and lock with
pin (A).
10. Remove the hairpin (B) from the latch (C).
11. Lift the wheel, lift latch (C), and engage lug (D) onto the
left axle. Ensure the latch closes.
12. Secure the latch with hairpin (B) ensuring the open end
of the pin faces the rear of the windrower.
NOTE:
The hairpin can become dislodged by crop if
installed with the open end facing the cutterbar.
Figure 3.83: Rear Axles
IMPORTANT:
Check that wheels are locked and that handle is
in locked position.
13. Complete the conversion by ensuring the left side (A)
and right side (B) wheels are in the position shown.
Figure 3.84: Field Position
3.15.4
Converting from Field to Transport Position
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
Moving Front (Left) Wheels into Transport Position
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
147725
95
Revision A
OPERATION
CAUTION
Stand clear of wheels and release linkage carefully as
wheels will drop once the mechanism is released.
1. Pull the handle (B) upwards to release and raise the
linkage (A) fully upwards into the vertical support.
2. Raise the header fully, stop the engine, and remove the
key from ignition. Engage the header safety props.
Figure 3.85: Raising Linkage
3. Remove the hair pin and clevis pin (A).
4. Pull the latch handle (B) to release the suspension
linkage (C), and pull the suspension linkage away from
the spindle (D).
5. Lower the wheels slowly.
Figure 3.86: Left Front Wheels
6. Lower the handle (B) to lock.
Figure 3.87: Locking Linkage
147725
96
Revision A
OPERATION
7. Remove the pin (A) from storage at the top of the
leg (B).
8. Move and swivel the wheels clockwise until the
connector (C) is turned towards the front end of
the header.
9. Insert pin (A) and turn to lock.
10. Lower the header until the left wheels are just touching
the ground.
Figure 3.88: Left Front Wheels
Moving Rear (Right) Wheels into Transport Position
1. Remove the hairpin (A) from the latch (B).
2. Lift the latch (B), disengage the right axle (C), and lower
to the ground.
CAUTION
Stand clear of wheels and release linkage carefully as
wheels will drop once the mechanism is released.
3. Pull handle (D) carefully to release the spring and lower
the wheel to the ground.
4. Lift the wheel and linkage with handle (E) and position
the linkage in the second slot from the bottom.
5. Lower the handle (C) to lock.
Figure 3.89: Separating Axles
147725
97
Revision A
OPERATION
6. Remove the pin (A) and install at location (B) to secure
the linkage. Turn the pin to lock.
7. Pull the pin (D), swivel the wheel (C) counterclockwise
90°, and release the pin to lock.
Figure 3.90: Wheel Position
8. Ensure the left wheel is in the transport position
as shown.
Figure 3.91: Left Wheel in Transport Position
9. Pull the pin (A) and swivel the right rear wheel (B)
clockwise 90°.
Figure 3.92: Right Rear Wheel
147725
98
Revision A
OPERATION
10. Lock the wheel (A) with pin (B). Move the right axle (C)
to the front of the header.
Figure 3.93: Right Rear Wheel
11. Remove the pin (A), raise support (B) to the position
shown, and reinsert pin.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure the pin (A) engages the tube on the axle.
12. Swing the brace (C) into the position shown and
insert the brace into the slot (D) behind the cutterbar.
Position the brace so that pin (E) engages the hole
in the bracket (F). The right hand wheel is now in
transport position.
13. Disengage the header cylinder lift stops.
14. Detach the header’s hydraulic and electrical
connections from the windrower. Refer to 4 Header
Attachment/Detachment, page 105.
15. Start the windrower and lower the header to
the ground.
Figure 3.94: Right Rear Wheel Position
147725
99
Revision A
OPERATION
Attaching Tow-Bar
The tow-bar consists of two sections which make storage and handling easier.
1. Unhook the rubber strap (D) from the cradle (A) on the
right side of the header.
2. Remove the clevis pin (C) and detach the tube end
from the support (B).
3. Replace the clevis pin (C).
4. Lift the inner half of the tow-bar off the header and place
it near the left side of the header.
Figure 3.95: Tow-Bar Removal – Right Side
5. Unhook the rubber strap (D) from the cradle (A) on the
left side of the header.
6. Remove the hitch pin (C) from the support (B), and
remove the tow-bar.
7. Install the rubber strap (D) on the cradle (A).
Figure 3.96: Tow-Bar Removal – Left Side
147725
100
Revision A
OPERATION
8. Connect the outer half (B) of the tow-bar to the inner
half (A).
Figure 3.97: Tow-Bar Assembly
9. Lift the outer half (B) and insert it into the inner half (A).
Figure 3.98: Tow-Bar Assembly
10. Secure the two halves together with the L-pin (A) and
then turn to lock. Secure the L-pin with ring (B).
11. Connect the electrical harness to connector (C).
Figure 3.99: Tow-Bar Assembly
147725
101
Revision A
OPERATION
12. Position the tow-bar (A) onto the axle, and push
against the latch (B) until the tow-bar pins drop into
the hooks (C).
13. Check that latch (B) has engaged the tow-bar.
14. Install the clevis pin (D) and secure with hairpin.
Figure 3.100: Attaching Tow-Bar
15. Connect the electrical harness (A) at the front wheel.
Figure 3.101: Harness Connection
147725
102
Revision A
OPERATION
3.16
Storing the Header
Perform the following procedures at the end of each operating season:
CAUTION
Never use gasoline, naphtha, or any volatile material for cleaning purposes. These materials may be toxic
and/or flammable.
CAUTION
Cover cutterbar and knife guards to prevent injury from accidental contact.
1. Clean the header thoroughly.
2. Store the machine in a dry, protected place if possible. If storing outside, always cover with a waterproof canvas
or other protective material.
NOTE:
If storing the machine outside, remove the drapers and store them in a dark, dry place. If not removing
the drapers, store the header with the cutterbar lowered so water and snow will not accumulate on the
drapers. The weight of water and snow accumulation puts excessive stress on the drapers and header.
3. Lower the header onto blocks to keep the cutterbar off the ground.
4. Lower the reel completely. If stored outside, tie the reel to the frame to prevent rotation caused by the wind.
5. Repaint all worn or chipped painted surfaces to prevent rust.
6. Loosen the drive belts.
7. Lubricate the header thoroughly leaving excess grease on the fittings to keep moisture out of the bearings.
8. Apply grease to exposed threads, cylinder rods, and sliding surfaces of components.
9. Check for worn components and repair as necessary.
10. Check for broken components and order replacements from your Dealer. Immediate repair of these items will
save time and effort at the beginning of next season.
11. Replace or tighten any missing or loose hardware.
147725
103
Revision A
4
Header Attachment/Detachment
This chapter includes instructions for setting up, attaching, and detaching the header.
4.1
Attaching Header to Windrower
Refer to your windrower operator’s manual for instructions for mechanically attaching the header to the
self-propelled windrower.
Refer to the following procedures for electrical and hydraulic connections.
Header drive hydraulic hoses and electrical harness are located on the left cab-forward side of the windrower. The
reel drive and control hoses are located on the right cab-forward side.
To attach the header to a windrower, follow these steps:
1. Before connecting header drive hydraulics (A) and
electrical harness (B) to header, check connectors and
clean if required.
Figure 4.1: Header Drive Hoses
2. Disengage and rotate lever (A) counterclockwise to
fully up position.
3. Remove cap (B) securing electrical connector to frame.
4. Move hose bundle (C) from windrower around hose
support on header.
Figure 4.2: Header Drive Hoses
147725
105
Revision A
HEADER ATTACHMENT/DETACHMENT
5. Push hose connectors onto mating receptacle until
collar on receptacle snaps into lock position.
6. Remove cover on electrical receptacle (A).
7. Push electrical connector onto receptacle and turn
collar on connector to lock it in.
8. Attach cover to mating cover on tractor wiring.
Figure 4.3: Header Receptacles
A - Electrical Connector
C - Case Drain (Double Knife)
E - Return
B - Knife Drive
D - Draper Drive
9. Lower lever (A) and engage in down position.
Figure 4.4: Hose Storage
10. Before connecting reel hydraulics, check connectors
and clean if required.
Figure 4.5: Reel Hose Storage
147725
106
Revision A
HEADER ATTACHMENT/DETACHMENT
11. Open cover on header receptacle (A).
12. Push in lock button (B) and pull handle (C) to half
open position.
Figure 4.6: Reel Hydraulics Receptacle
13. Remove hose bundle with multi-coupler (C) from
windrower, locate onto header receptacle and push
handle (B) to engage pins on connector.
14. Push handle away from hoses until lock button (A)
snaps out.
15. Raise and lower header and reel a few times to allow
trapped air to pass back to the reservoir.
Figure 4.7: Reel Hose Connection
147725
107
Revision A
HEADER ATTACHMENT/DETACHMENT
4.2
Detaching Header from Windrower
To detach the header from the windrower,
these steps:
follow
1. Fully lower the reel.
2. To disconnect the reel hydraulics, push in lock
button (A) and pull handle (B) to disengage
multicoupler (C) from header receptacle.
3. Route hose bundle back onto windrower and store
multicoupler (C) on hose support.
Figure 4.8: Reel Hydraulics
4. Close cover on header receptacle (A).
Figure 4.9: Close Cover
5. To disconnect header drive hydraulics, disengage and
rotate lever (A) counterclockwise to fully up position.
6. Disconnect electrical connector from header.
Figure 4.10: Header Drive Hydraulics
147725
108
Revision A
HEADER ATTACHMENT/DETACHMENT
7. To disconnect hoses from header, line up slot (A) in
collar with pin (B) on connector.
8. Push collar toward pin and pull connector to disengage.
9. Install caps on connectors and hose ends (if equipped).
Figure 4.11: Quick Disconnect
10. Route hose bundle (A) back onto hose support
on windrower.
11. Rotate lever (B) and lock in down position.
12. Install cap (C) on electrical connector.
13. Detach header from windrower. Refer to the windrower
operator’s manual.
Figure 4.12: Hose Storage
147725
109
Revision A
5
Maintenance and Servicing
The following instructions provide information about routine header service. Detailed maintenance and service
information is contained in the technical service manual that is available from your Dealer. A parts catalog is provided
in the plastic manuals case inside the left endshield.
Log hours of operation and use the maintenance record provided (refer to 5.3.1 Maintenance Schedule/Record,
page 115) to keep track of your scheduled maintenance.
5.1
Preparing Machine for Servicing
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of a raised machine, always stop engine
and remove key before leaving the operator’s seat, and always engage safety props before going under
the machine for any reason.
CAUTION
To avoid personal injury, perform the following procedures before servicing header or opening
drive covers:
1. Lower the header fully. If it is necessary to service the header in the raised position, always engage the
safety props.
2. Stop the engine and remove the key from the ignition.
3. Engage the park brake.
4. Wait for all moving parts to stop.
147725
111
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.2
Maintenance Specifications
5.2.1
Recommended Fluids and Lubricants
Ensure your machine operates at top efficiency by using clean fluids and lubricants only.
• Use clean containers to handle all fluids and lubricants.
• Store fluids and lubricants in an area protected from dust, moisture, and other contaminants.
Lubricant
Grease
Specification
Description
Use
Capacities
SAE
multi-purpose
High temperature extreme
pressure (EP2) performance
with 1% max. Molybdenum
disulphide (NLGI grade 2)
As required unless
otherwise specified.
—
Knife drive box
2.3 quarts (2.2 liters)
Main drive gearbox
2.6 quarts (2.5 liters)
Lithium base
Gear
lubricant
5.2.2
SAE 85W-140
API service class GL-5
Installing a Roller Chain
To install a roller chain, follow these steps:
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
1. Locate ends of chain on sprocket.
2. Install pin connector (A) into chain, preferably from the
sprocket backside.
3. Install connector (B) onto pins.
4. Install spring clip (C) onto front pin (D) with closed end
of clip in direction of sprocket rotation.
5. Locate one leg of clip in groove of aft pin (E).
6. Press other leg of spring clip over face of aft pin (E)
until it slips into groove. Do NOT press clip lengthwise
from closed end.
7. Ensure clip is seated in grooves of pins.
Figure 5.1: Arrow Shows Direction of Rotation
147725
112
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.2.3
Installing a Sealed Bearing
To install a sealed bearing, follow these steps:
1. Clean shaft and coat with rust preventative.
2. Install flangette (A), bearing (B), second flangette (C),
and lock collar (D).
NOTE:
The locking cam is only on one side of the bearing.
3. Install (but do NOT tighten) flangette bolts (E).
4. When the shaft is correctly located, lock the lock collar
with a punch. The collar should be locked in the same
direction the shaft rotates. Tighten the setscrew in
the collar.
5. Tighten flangette bolts.
6. Loosen flangette bolts on mating bearing one turn and
retighten. This will allow the bearing to line up.
147725
113
Figure 5.2: Sealed Bearing
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.3
Maintenance Requirements
Periodic maintenance requirements are organized according to service intervals.
Regular maintenance is the best insurance against early wear and untimely breakdowns. Following the maintenance
schedule will increase your machine’s life.
When servicing the machine, refer to the specific headings in this section and use only fluids and lubricants specified
in 5.2.1 Recommended Fluids and Lubricants, page 112.
Log hours of operation, use the maintenance record, and keep copies of your maintenance records (refer to 5.3.1
Maintenance Schedule/Record, page 115).
If a service interval specifies more than one timeframe, e.g., "100 hours or Annually", service the machine at
whichever interval is reached first.
IMPORTANT:
Recommended intervals are for average conditions. Service the machine more often if operating under
adverse conditions (severe dust, extra heavy loads, etc.).
CAUTION
Carefully follow safety messages. Refer to 5.1 Preparing Machine for Servicing, page 111 and 1 Safety,
page 1.
147725
114
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.3.1
Maintenance Schedule/Record
Copy this page to continue record.
Maintenance
Record
Action:
 - Lubricate
 - Check
▲ - Change
Hour Meter Reading
Date
Serviced by
First Use, Refer to 5.3.2 Break-In Inspection, page 116
End of Season, Refer to 5.3.4 End-of-Season Service, page 117
10 Hours or Daily11

Hydraulic hoses and
lines12

Knife sections, guards,
and hold-downs12
 Tire pressure12

Knife (except in sandy
conditions)12
25 Hours
 Knifehead(s)12
50 Hours
 Draper roller bearings

Knife drive box oil - first
50 hours only
100 Hours or Annually11
 Draper seal
 Reel drive chain tension

Reel tine/cutterbar
clearance
 Knife drive belt tension
 Wheel bolt torque

Knife drive box lubricant
level

Knife drive box mounting
bolts
 Reel drive chain

Upper cross auger
right-hand bearing
11. Whichever occurs first.
12. A record of daily maintenance is not required, but is at the Owner’s/Operator’s discretion.
147725
115
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Maintenance
Record
Action:
 - Lubricate
 - Check
▲ - Change
250 Hours or Annually11
 Draper seal

Upper cross auger center
support and U-joint
 Reel drive U-joint

Transport axle pivot
bushings
500 Hours or Annually11
 Draper seal
 Reel shaft bearings

Stabilizer/slow speed
transport wheel bearings
1000 Hours or 3 Years11
▲ Knife drive box lubricant
5.3.2
Break-In Inspection
Break-in inspections involve checking belts, fluids, and performing general machine inspections for loose hardware
or other areas of concern. Break-in inspections ensure that all components can operate for an extended period
without requiring service or replacement.
Timing
Item
Refer To
Check for loose hardware.
Tighten to required torque.
8.2 Torque Specifications, page 254
Check knife drive belts tension.
Periodically check for first 50 hours.
Tensioning Timed Knife Drive Belts, page 155
Tensioning Non-Timed Knife Drive Belts, page 150
At 10 hours
Check knife drive box mounting bolts.
Checking Mounting Bolts, page 140
At 50 hours
Change knife drive box lubricant.
Changing Oil in Knife Drive Box, page 148
At 5 hours
147725
116
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.3.3
Preseason/Annual Service
Perform the following procedures at the beginning of each operating season:
CAUTION
• Review this manual to refresh your memory on the safety and operating recommendations.
• Review all the safety decals and other decals on the header and note the hazard areas.
• Be sure all the shields and guards are properly installed and secured.
safety equipment.
Never alter or remove
• Be sure you understand and have practiced safe use of all controls. Know the capacity and operating
characteristics of the machine.
• Check the first aid kit and fire extinguisher. Know where they are and how to use them.
1. Lubricate the machine completely. Refer to Service Intervals, page 119.
2. Adjust the tension on the drive belts. Depending on your equipment. Refer to Tensioning Non-Timed Knife Drive
Belts, page 150.
3. Perform all the annual maintenance. Refer to 5.3.1 Maintenance Schedule/Record, page 115.
5.3.4
End-of-Season Service
Perform the following procedures at the end of each operating season:
CAUTION
Never use gasoline, naphtha or any volatile material for cleaning purposes. These materials may be toxic
and/or flammable.
CAUTION
Cover cutterbar and knife guards to prevent injury from accidental contact.
1. Clean the header thoroughly.
2. Store the machine in a dry, protected place if possible. If storing outside, always cover with a waterproof canvas
or other protective material.
NOTE:
If storing the machine outside, remove the drapers and store them in a dark, dry place. If not removing
the drapers, store the header with the cutterbar lowered so water and snow will not accumulate on the
drapers. The weight of water and snow accumulation puts excessive stress on the drapers and header.
3. Lower the header onto blocks to keep the cutterbar off the ground.
4. Lower the reel completely. If stored outside, tie the reel to the frame to prevent rotation caused by the wind.
5. Repaint all worn or chipped painted surfaces to prevent rust.
6. Loosen the drive belts.
7. Lubricate the header thoroughly leaving excess grease on the fittings to keep moisture out of the bearings.
8. Apply grease to exposed threads, cylinder rods, and sliding surfaces of components.
9. Check for worn components and repair as necessary.
147725
117
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
10. Check for broken components and order replacements from your Dealer. Immediate repair of these items will
save time and effort at the beginning of next season.
11. Replace or tighten any missing or loose hardware. Refer to 5.2 Maintenance Specifications, page 112.
5.3.5
Checking Hydraulic Hoses and Lines
Check hydraulic hoses and lines daily for signs of leaks.
WARNING
• Avoid high-pressure fluids. Escaping fluid can
penetrate the skin causing serious injury. Relieve
pressure before disconnecting hydraulic lines.
Tighten all connections before applying pressure.
Keep hands and body away from pin holes and
nozzles which eject fluids under high pressure.
• If ANY fluid is injected into the skin, it must
be surgically removed within a few hours by a
doctor familiar with this type of injury or gangrene
may result.
Figure 5.3: High Pressure Warning
• Use a piece of cardboard or paper to search
for leaks.
IMPORTANT:
Keep hydraulic coupler tips and connectors clean. Dust,
dirt, water, and foreign material are the major causes of
hydraulic system damage. Do NOT attempt to service
hydraulic system in the field as it require WHITE ROOM
CARE during overhaul.
Figure 5.4: Checking Leak
5.3.6
Lubrication and Servicing
CAUTION
To avoid personal injury, before servicing header or opening drive covers, follow procedures in 5.1
Preparing Machine for Servicing, page 111.
Refer to 5.2.1 Recommended Fluids and Lubricants, page 112 for recommended lubricants.
Log hours of operation and use the Maintenance Record provided to keep a record of scheduled maintenance. Refer
to 5.3.1 Maintenance Schedule/Record, page 115.
147725
118
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Service Intervals
Refer to the illustrations on the following pages to identify the various locations that require lubrication and
servicing. Illustrations are organized by the frequency of service that is required.
IMPORTANT:
Unless otherwise specified, use high temperature extreme pressure (EP2) performance with 1% maximum
molybdenum disulphide (NLGI grade 2) lithium base.
Knife: Except in sandy conditions.
Figure 5.5: Every 10 Hours or Daily
Knifehead:
NOTE:
To prevent binding and/or excessive wear caused by
knife pressure on the guards, do NOT over grease the
knifehead (A). Apply only one to two pumps using a
mechanical grease gun (do NOT use an electric grease
gun). If more than six to eight pumps of the grease gun
are required to fill the cavity, replace the seal in the
knifehead. Refer to 5.5.3 Removing Knifehead Bearing,
page 129.
NOTE:
Check for signs of excessive heating on first few guards
after greasing. If required, relieve pressure by pressing
check-ball in grease fitting.
147725
119
Figure 5.6: Every 25 Hours
A - Knifehead (Single Knife [1 Place]; Double Knife [2 Places])
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Figure 5.7: Every 100 Hours
A - Knife Drive Box (Check Oil Level Between Lower Hole and
End of Dipstick [B])
D - Reel Drive Chain (1 Place) (Double Reel Shown – Single Reel Similar)
147725
C - Upper Cross Auger Bearing (1 Place)
E - Hydraulic Couplers (Use WD40® or Equivalent)
120
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Figure 5.8: Every 250 Hours
A - Upper Cross Auger U-joint13
B - Upper Cross Auger Bearing (2 Places)
13. U-joint has an extended lubrication cross and bearing kit. Stop greasing when greasing becomes difficult or if
U-joint stops taking grease. Overgreasing will damage U-joint. Six to eight pumps are sufficient at first grease
(factory). Decrease grease interval as U-joint wears and requires more than six pumps.
147725
121
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Figure 5.9: Every 250 Hours (Continued)
A - Rear Axle Pivots
C -Frame/Wheel Pivot (1 Place) - Both Sides
B - Front Wheel Pivot (1 Place)
D - Double Reel U-Joint (1 Place)14
14. U-joint has an extended lubrication cross and bearing kit. Stop greasing when greasing becomes difficult or if
U-joint stops taking grease. Overgreasing will damage U-joint. Six to eight pumps are sufficient at first grease
(factory). Decrease grease interval as U-joint wears and requires more than six pumps.
147725
Revision A
122
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Figure 5.10: Every 500 Hours
A - Reel Right Bearing (1 Place)
147725
B - Reel Center Bearing (1 Place)
123
C - Wheel Bearings (4 Places)
D - Reel Left Bearing (1 Place)
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Greasing Procedure
Greasing points are marked on the machine by decals showing a grease gun and grease interval in hours of
operation. Master grease point location decals are provided on the header.
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
Refer to 5.2.1 Recommended Fluids and Lubricants, page
112 for recommended lubricants.
Log hours of operation and use the Maintenance Record
provided to keep a record of scheduled maintenance.
Refer to 5.3.1 Maintenance Schedule/Record, page 115.
Figure 5.11: Greasing Interval Decal
Figure 5.12: FD75 Master Grease Point Decal
147725
124
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Wipe grease fitting with a clean cloth before greasing
to avoid injecting dirt and grit.
2. Inject grease through fitting with grease gun until
grease overflows fitting (except where noted).
3. Leave excess grease on fitting to keep out dirt.
4. Replace any loose or broken fittings immediately.
5. Remove and thoroughly clean any fitting that will
not take grease. Also clean lubricant passageway.
Replace fitting if necessary.
6. Use clean, high temperature extreme pressure
grease only.
Figure 5.13: Single-Knife Header Master Grease
Point Decal
Figure 5.14: Double-Knife HeaderMaster Grease
Point Decal
147725
125
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.4
Electrical
Use electrical tape and wire clips as required to prevent wires from dragging or rubbing.
Keep lights clean and replace defective bulbs.
5.4.1
Replacing Light Bulbs
To replace a light bulb, follow these steps:
1. Using a Phillips screwdriver, remove screws (A) from
fixture and remove plastic lens.
2. Replace bulb and reinstall plastic lens and screws.
NOTE:
Use bulb trade #1156 for amber clearance lights and
#1157 for red tail light (Slow Speed Transport option).
Figure 5.15: Clearance Light
147725
126
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.5
Knife
WARNING
Keep hands clear of the area between guards and
knife at all times.
CAUTION
To avoid personal injury, before servicing machine or
opening drive covers, refer to 5.1 Preparing Machine
for Servicing, page 111.
CAUTION
Wear heavy gloves when working around or
handling knives.
Figure 5.16: Cutterbar Hazard
5.5.1
Replacing Knife Section
Check daily that knife sections are firmly bolted to the knife back and are not worn or broken. Damaged or worn
sections leave behind uncut plants. A worn or broken section can be replaced without removing knife from cutterbar.
Coarse serrated sections last longer than fine serrated sections in dirty or sandy conditions.
Fine serrated sections perform better in fine stemmed grasses and plants that contain more fibrous stems.
147725
127
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
To replace a section, follow these steps:
1. Stroke knife as required, to center the section (A)
between guards.
2. Remove nuts (B).
3. Remove bars (C) and lift section off the knife bar.
4. If section is under a splice bar (D), remove the bar.
5. Clean any dirt off of knife back and position new section
on knife.
IMPORTANT:
Do NOT mix fine and coarse sections on same knife.
6. Reposition bars (C) and/or (D) and install lock nuts (B).
NOTE:
If replacing a screw, make sure to fully insert it. Do
not use the nut to draw the screw into the knife bar.
7. Torque nuts to 7 ft·lbf (9.5 N·m).
Figure 5.17: Cutterbar
147725
128
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.5.2
Removing Knife
WARNING
Stand to rear of knife during removal to reduce risk of injury from cutting edges. Wear heavy gloves when
handling knife.
Manually stroke knife to its outer limit and clean area
around the knifehead.
1. Wrap a chain around knifehead and pull knife out.
2. For SINGLE-KNIFE DRIVE with splice plate, remove
bolts from splice plate and pull knife out from both ends.
Figure 5.18: Knifehead
5.5.3
Removing Knifehead Bearing
WARNING
Stand to rear of knife during removal to reduce risk of injury from cutting edges. Wear heavy gloves when
handling knife.
IMPORTANT:
The following procedure applies to single-knife headers. Repeat this procedure for each knife on
double-knife headers.
1. Remove the knife. Refer to 5.5.2 Removing Knife, page 129.
NOTE:
It is not necessary to wrap the knifehead to protect the bearing if it is being replaced.
2. Using a flat-ended tool with approximately the same
diameter as pin (A). Tap the seal (B), bearing (C),
plug (D), and O-ring (E) from the underside of the
knifehead.
NOTE:
Seal (B) can be replaced without removing the
bearing. When changing seal, check pin and needle
bearing for wear. Replace if necessary.
Figure 5.19: Knifehead Bearing Assembly
147725
129
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.5.4
Installing Knifehead Bearing
To install the knifehead bearing, follow these steps:
1. Place O-ring (E) and plug (D) in knifehead.
IMPORTANT:
Install the bearing with the stamped end (the end
with identification markings) facing up.
2. Using a flat-ended tool (A) with approximately the same
diameter as the bearing (C), push the bearing into the
knifehead until the top of the bearing is flush with the
step in knifehead.
3. Install seal (B) into the knifehead with the lip
facing outwards.
IMPORTANT:
To avoid premature knifehead or knife drive box
failure, be sure there is no looseness in the fit of the
knifehead pin and the needle bearing, and the fit of
the knifehead pin and output arm.
Figure 5.20: Knifehead Bearing Assembly
4. Install knife. Refer to 5.5.5 Installing Knife, page 130.
5.5.5
Installing Knife
WARNING
Stand to rear of knife during installation to reduce risk of injury from cutting edges. Wear heavy gloves
when handling knife.
To install a knife, follow these steps:
1. Slide knife into place and align knifehead with the output arm.
NOTE:
For ease of removing or installing knifehead pin,
remove grease zerk from pin.
2. Install knifehead pin (A) through the output arm and
into the knifehead.
3. Set groove (B) in knifehead pin 1/16 in. (1.5 mm)
above (C). Install the 5/8 in. x 3 hex head bolt (D) and
nut and torque to 160 ft·lbf (217 N·m).
Figure 5.21: Knifehead
147725
130
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Install grease zerk (A) into the knifehead pin, turn the
grease zerk for easy access.
IMPORTANT:
Grease knifehead just enough to start a slight
downward movement. Over-greasing will lead to
knife misalignment which causes guards to overheat
and drive systems to overload.
Figure 5.22: Knifehead
5.5.6
Spare Knife
A spare knife may be stored in the header frame tube (A)
at the left end. Ensure knife is secured in place.
Figure 5.23: Spare Knife
5.5.7
Knife Guards
Check DAILY that guards are aligned and that knife sections are contacting shear surface of each guard.
Adjusting Knife Guards
To adjust knife guards, follow these steps:
NOTE:
The guard straightening tool (MD #140135) is available
from your MacDon Dealer.
147725
131
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. To adjust guard tips upward, position tool as shown,
and pull up.
Figure 5.24: Upward Adjustment
2. To adjust tips downward, position tool as shown and
push down.
TIP:
If trouble is encountered cutting tangled or
fine-stemmed material, install a knife hold-down
on every guard and then replace lower guards
with stub guards.
3. If material is tough to cut, install stub guards with top
guard and adjuster plate. A kit is available from your
MacDon Dealer. Refer to 6.2.3 Stub Guard Conversion
Kit, page 231.
Figure 5.25: Downward Adjustment
147725
132
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Replacing Pointed Guards on a Single-Knife Header
To replace pointed knife guards on a single-knife header, follow these steps:
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always
engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
1. Stroke knife so that knife sections are spaced midway
between the guards.
2. Remove two nuts (B) and bolts that attach guard (A)
and hold-down (C) (if applicable) to cutterbar.
3. Remove guard, hold-down, and plastic wear plate
(if installed).
4. Position new guard (A) and plastic wear plate (if
applicable) on cutterbar, and install bolts.
Figure 5.26: Cutterbar
IMPORTANT:
The first four outboard guards on drive side(s) of
header do not have a ledger plate. Ensure that
proper replacement is installed.
5. Install hold-down, and secure with nuts. Tighten nuts
to 50 ft·lbf (68 N·m).
6. Check and adjust clearance between hold-down and
knife. Refer to Checking Knife Hold-Downs, page 136.
Figure 5.27: Guards
A - Normal
B - Drive Side
C - Half Guard (End)
Replacing Pointed Guards on a Double-Knife Header
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
Refer to Replacing Pointed Guards on a Single-Knife Header, page 133 for typical guard replacement.
The guard near the center of the double-knife header (where the two knives overlap) requires a slightly different
replacement procedure.
To replace the pointed center guard or center top guide on a double-knife header, follow these steps:
147725
133
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Remove two bolts and nuts (B) that attach knife
guard (A) and top guide (C) to cutterbar.
2. Remove knife guard, plastic wear plate (if installed),
top guide (C), and adjuster bar (D).
Figure 5.28: Double-Knife Guard
3. Position plastic wear plate (if applicable), replacement
guard (A), adjuster bar, and top guide (B). Install bolts,
but do NOT tighten.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure center guard (A) (right of cutterbar split)
has offset cutting surfaces.
NOTE:
Top guide (B) must accommodate the two
overlapping knives at center guard location on
double-knife header. Ensure replacement is the
correct part.
4. Check and adjust clearance between hold-down and
knife. Refer to Checking Knife Hold-Downs, page 136.
Figure 5.29: Double-Knife Guard
Replacing Stub Guards on a Single-Knife Header
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
Stub guards complete with top guides and adjuster plates, are designed to cut tough crops. Only 15-, 20-, 25-, 30-,
and 35-ft. headers can be equipped with stub guards.
147725
134
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
To replace stub guards, follow these steps:
1. Remove the two nuts (A) and bolts that attach stub
guard (B) and top guide (C) to cutterbar.
2. Remove guard, plastic wear plate (if installed), top
guide, and adjuster bar (D).
3. Position plastic wear plate (if applicable), replacement
stub guard (B), adjuster bar (D), top guide (C), and
install bolts and nuts (A). Do NOT tighten.
IMPORTANT:
Note position of mitre on adjuster bar (D). Bar
should be reinstalled in same position. Mitres
should not be adjacent to each other.
Figure 5.30: Stub Guards
IMPORTANT:
The first four outboard guards (B) on the drive
side(s) of the header do NOT have a ledger plate
like the normal guards (A). Ensure that the proper
replacement is installed.
4. Check and adjust clearance between hold-down and
knife. Refer to Checking Knife Hold-Downs, page 136.
Figure 5.31: Stub Guards
Replacing Stub Guards on a Double-Knife Header
Refer to Replacing Stub Guards on a Single-Knife Header, page 134 for typical guard replacement.
The guard at the center of the double-knife header, where the two knives overlap, requires a slightly different
replacement procedure.
To replace the center guard or center top guide, follow these steps:
147725
135
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Remove the two nuts (A) and bolts that attach guard (B)
and top guide (C) and adjuster bar (D) to cutterbar.
2. Remove guard, plastic wear plate (if installed), top
guide (C), and adjuster bar (D).
3. Locate plastic wear plate (if applicable), replacement
guard (B), adjuster bar (D), top guide (C), and install
bolts, but do NOT tighten.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure center guard (B) has offset cutting surfaces.
The top guide (C), which is an inverted normal stub
guard, must accommodate the two overlapping knives
at center guard location on double-knife header.
Ensure replacements are correct part.
4. Check and adjust clearance between hold-down and
knife. Refer to Checking Knife Hold-Downs, page 136.
Figure 5.32: Stub Guards
Checking Knife Hold-Downs
Check daily that knife hold-downs are set to prevent knife sections from lifting off guards, but still permit knife to slide
without binding. If there is evidence that the hold-downs are not properly adjusted, check the clearance between
the hold-down and knife section with a feeler gauge.
Refer to:
•
Adjusting Hold-Downs with Pointed Guards, page 137
•
Adjusting Hold-Downs with Stub Guards, page 138
NOTE:
Guards should be aligned prior to adjusting hold-downs. Refer to Adjusting Knife Guards, page 131.
147725
136
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Adjusting Hold-Downs with Pointed Guards
To adjust the clearance between hold-downs and knife on
header with pointed guards, follow these steps:
1. Check the clearance (A) between the normal
hold-down and knife section with a feeler gauge. The
clearance should be 0.004–0.024 in. (0.1–0.6 mm).
2. Adjust as required by turning bolt (B).
NOTE:
For larger adjustments, it may be necessary to
loosen nuts (C), turn adjuster bolt (B), then retighten
nuts (C).
Figure 5.33: Hold-Down Clearance
3. Check the clearances between the center guard
hold-down (A) and knife section with a feeler gauge.
The clearances should be:
• 0.004–0.016 in. (0.1–0.4 mm) at guide tip (B)
• 0.004–0.040 in. (0.1–1.0 mm) at rear of guide (C)
4. If required, adjust clearances as follows:
a. Torque nuts (D) to 35 ft·lbf (46 N·m).
b. Turn the three adjuster bolts (E) as required.
c.
Torque nuts (D) to 53 ft·lbf (72 N·m).
5. After adjusting all hold-downs, run header at a low
engine speed and listen for noise due to insufficient
clearance.
Insufficient clearance will also result
in overheating of the knife and guards. Readjust
as necessary.
147725
137
Figure 5.34: Hold-Down Clearance
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Adjusting Hold-Downs with Stub Guards
To adjust the clearance between hold-downs and knife for
all stub guards, follow these steps:
1. Check the clearances between the center guard
hold-down (A) and knife section with a feeler gauge.
The clearances should be:
• 0.004–0.016 in. (0.1–0.4 mm) at guide tip (B)
• 0.004–0.040 in. (0.1–1.0 mm) at rear of guide (C)
2. If required, adjust clearances as follows:
a. Torque nuts (D) to 35 ft·lbf (46 N·m).
b. Turn the three adjuster bolts (E) as required.
c.
Torque nuts (D) to 53 ft·lbf (72 N·m).
Figure 5.35: Stub Guards
3. After adjusting all hold-downs, run header at a low
engine speed and listen for noise due to insufficient
clearance.
Insufficient clearance will also result
in overheating of the knife and guards. Readjust
as necessary.
5.5.8
Knifehead Shield
The shield attaches to the endsheet and reduces the knifehead opening to prevent cut crop from accumulating in
the knifehead cut-out, especially in severely lodged crops.
The shield(s) and mounting hardware are available from your MacDon Dealer.
IMPORTANT:
Shields should be removed when cutting with the cutterbar on the ground in muddy conditions. Mud may pack
into the cavity behind the shield and cause knife drive box failures.
Installing Knifehead Shield
The knifehead shield is supplied in flattened form and can be bent to suit installation on pointed or stub guard
cutterbars and on double-knife headers. Shields are slightly different depending on header size and guard
configuration. Ensure proper shield is used. Refer to the header parts catalog for proper replacement parts.
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Raise reel fully, lower header to ground, shut down windrower, and remove key.
2. Engage reel arm locks.
CAUTION
Wear heavy gloves when working around or handling knives.
147725
138
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
3. Place knifehead shield (A) against endsheet as shown.
Orient the shield so that cutout matches profile of
knifehead and/or hold-downs.
4. Bend shield along slit to conform to endsheet.
5. Align mounting holes and then install two 3/8 in. x 1/2
Torx® head bolts (B).
6. Snug up bolts just enough so that shield can be
adjusted as close as possible to the knifehead.
7. Manually rotate knife drive box pulley to move knife
and check for areas of contact between the knifehead
and shield.
8. If required, adjust shield to avoid interference with
the knife.
Figure 5.36: Knifehead Shield
9. Tighten bolts.
147725
139
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.6
Knife and Knife Drive
5.6.1
Knife Drive Box
Knife drive boxes are belt driven by a hydraulic motor that is powered by the adapter hydraulic pump, and convert
rotational motion into the reciprocating motion of the knife.
CAUTION
To avoid personal injury, before servicing machine or opening drive covers, refer to 5.1 Preparing Machine
for Servicing, page 111.
Checking Mounting Bolts
Check the torque on the four knife drive box mounting bolts
(A) and (B), after the first 10 hours of operation and every
100 hours thereafter.
1. Torque side bolts (A) first, then the bottom bolts (B).
Torque to 200 ft·lbf (271 N m).
Figure 5.37: Knife Drive Box
Removing Knife Drive Box
Single and Untimed Double Knife
This procedure applies to single and untimed double-knife drive boxes.
1. Open endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields, page
35.
2. Loosen the two bolts (A) that secure the motor
assembly to header endsheet.
3. Loosen the tension on the belt by turning the tensioning
bolt (B) counterclockwise.
Figure 5.38: Knife Drive
147725
140
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Open the access cover (A) on the endsheet behind
cutterbar to provide clearance between the knife drive
box pulley and the endsheet.
Figure 5.39: Access Cover
5. Remove belt (A) from drive pulley (B).
6. Slip belt (A) over and behind the knife drive
box pulley (C). Use notch in pulley to assist in
removing belt.
Figure 5.40: Knife Drive
7. Manually stroke knife to its outer limit and clean area
around the knifehead.
8. Remove bolt (A).
9. Remove the grease zerk (B) from the pin.
10. Use a screwdriver or a chisel in slot (C) to release load
on knifehead pin.
11. Pry pin upward with a screwdriver in pin groove until
pin is clear of knifehead.
12. Push the knife assembly inboard until it is clear of the
output arm.
13. Seal bearing in knifehead with plastic or tape, unless it
is being replaced.
147725
141
Figure 5.41: Knifehead
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
14. Remove bolt (A) that clamps the knife drive arm to the
knife drive box output shaft.
15. Remove the knife drive arm (B) from the knife drive box
output shaft.
16. Remove the four knife drive box mounting bolts (C, D).
NOTE:
Do NOT remove bolt (E), this is factory set. It is
used to position the knife drive box in the proper
fore-aft position.
17. Remove knife drive box and place on a bench
for disassembly.
CAUTION
Knife drive box with pulley weighs over 65 lb (35 kg).
Use care when removing or installing. Lug (L) can
be used for lifting. If speed sensor is installed at this
location, you will need to remove it before using it
for lifting.
18. For double-knife headers,
opposite end.
repeat procedure for
Figure 5.42: Knife Drive Box
Timed Double Knife
NOTE:
Procedure is the same for both ends of the timed double-knife header. Images shown are for the left end,
right end is opposite.
1. Open endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields, page
35.
2. Loosen two nuts (A) on belt idler bracket to relieve
tension on belt.
3. Loosen nut (B) on idler pulley and slide idler down to
loosen belt.
Figure 5.43: Knife Drive
147725
142
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Open the access cover (A) on the endsheet behind
cutterbar to provide clearance between the knife drive
box pulley and the endsheet.
Figure 5.44: Access Cover
5. Manually stroke knife to its outer limit and clean area
around the knifehead.
6. Remove bolt (A).
7. Remove the grease zerk (B) from the pin.
8. Use a screwdriver or a chisel in slot (C) to release load
on knifehead pin.
9. Pry pin upward with a screwdriver in pin groove until
pin is clear of knifehead.
10. Push the knife assembly inboard until it is clear of the
output arm.
11. Seal bearing in knifehead with plastic or tape, unless it
is being replaced.
147725
143
Figure 5.45: Knifehead
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
12. Remove bolt (A) that clamps the knife drive arm to the
knife drive box output shaft.
13. Remove the knife drive arm (B) from the knife drive box
output shaft.
14. Remove the four knife drive box mounting bolts (C, D).
NOTE:
Do NOT remove bolt (E), this is factory set. It is
used to position the knife drive box in the proper
fore-aft position.
15. Remove knife drive box and place on a bench
for disassembly.
CAUTION
Knife drive box with pulley weighs over 65 lb (35 kg).
Use care when removing or installing. Lug (L) can
be used for lifting. If speed sensor is installed at this
location, you will need to remove it before using it
for lifting.
Figure 5.46: Knife Drive Box
Removing Knife Drive Box Pulley
To remove knife drive box pulley, follow these steps:
1. Loosen and remove the knife drive box pulley clamping
bolt (A) and nut (B) and remove knife drive box
pulley (C).
2. Remove pulley using a three-jaw puller.
Figure 5.47: Knife Drive Box and Pulley
147725
144
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Installing Knife Drive Box Pulley
To install the knife drive box pulley, follow these steps:
1. Ensure splines and bores in pulley or drive arm are free
of paint oil and solvents.
2. Apply Loctite® #243 adhesive (or equivalent) to spline.
Apply in two bands (A) around shaft, with one band at
end of spline and one band approximately mid-way.
3. Install pulley (B) until flush with end of shaft.
4. Secure pulley with 5/8 in. x 3 hex head bolt with
distorted thread NC lock nut and torque to 160 ft·lbf
(217 N·m).
Figure 5.48: Knife Drive Box
Installing Knife Drive Box
This procedure can be used for single- and double-knife headers.
NOTE:
If the pulley was removed from the knife drive box, refer to Installing Knife Drive Box Pulley, page 145. If the
pulley was not removed, then proceed to Step 1., page 145.
CAUTION
Knife drive box with pulley weighs over 65 lb (35 kg).
Use care when removing or installing. Lug (L) can
be used for lifting. If speed sensor is installed at this
location, you will need to remove it before using it
for lifting.
1. Place knife drive box into position on header mount and
locate belt on pulley.
2. Install two 5/8 in. x 1.75 grade 8 hex head bolts (A)
at the side and two 5/8 in. x 2.25 grade 8 hex head
bolts (B) underneath to mount knife drive box to frame.
3. Slightly tighten knife drive box side bolts (A) first, then
the bottom bolts (B), to ensure proper contact with
vertical and horizontal mounting surfaces. Do NOT
torque bolts at this time.
Figure 5.49: Knife Drive Box
147725
145
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Apply Loctite® #243 to the output shaft in two
bands (A).
5. Slide output arm (B) onto output shaft. Rotate pulley to
ensure drive arm just clears frame on inboard stroke to
ensure proper placement on splines.
Figure 5.50: Knife Drive Box
6. Position output arm (A) to farthest outboard position.
Move output arm (A) up or down on splined shaft until
it almost contacts knifehead (B). Exact clearance (C)
will be set when installing knifehead pin.
Figure 5.51: Knifehead
7. To secure arm to knife drive output shaft, torque output
arm bolt (A) to 160 ft·lbf (217 N·m).
Figure 5.52: Knife Drive Box
147725
146
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
NOTE:
For ease of removing or installing knifehead pin,
remove grease zerk from pin.
8. Install knifehead pin (A) through the output arm and
into the knifehead.
9. Set groove (B) in knifehead pin 1/16 in. (1.5 mm)
above (C). Install the 5/8 in. x 3 hex head bolt (D) and
nut and torque to 160 ft·lbf (217 N·m).
Figure 5.53: Knifehead
10. Install grease zerk (A) into the knifehead pin, turn the
grease zerk for easy access.
IMPORTANT:
Grease knifehead just enough to start a slight
downward movement. Over-greasing will lead to
knife misalignment which causes guards to overheat
and drive systems to overload.
Figure 5.54: Knifehead
11. Check the knife drive box pulley and drive pulley
alignment. If adjustment is required, contact your
MacDon Dealer.
12. Tighten knife drive box side bolts (A) first, then the
bottom bolts (B). Torque to 200 ft·lbf (271 N·m).
13. Stroke the output arm to mid stroke, check and ensure
that the knife bar does not contact the front of the
first guard. If adjustment is required, contact your
MacDon Dealer.
14. Install and tension the knife drive belt(s). Refer to 5.6.2
Knife Drive Belts, page 148. For timed double-knife
headers, also check the knife timing. Refer to Adjusting
Double-Knife Timing, page 156 for timing instructions.
15. Close endshield. Refer to Closing Endshields, page
36.
Figure 5.55: Knife Drive Box
147725
147
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Changing Oil in Knife Drive Box
Change knife drive box lubricant after the first 50 hours of operation and every 1000 hours (or 3 years) thereafter.
To change the oil in the knife drive box, follow these steps:
1. Raise header to allow a suitable container to be placed
under the knife box drain to collect oil.
2. Open endshield(s).
page 35.
Refer to Opening Endshields,
3. Remove breather/dipstick (A) and drain plug (B).
4. Allow oil to drain.
5. Reinstall drain plug (B).
6. Add oil to knife drive box.
Refer to 5.2.1
Recommended Fluids and Lubricants, page 112
for quantity.
7. Close endshield(s). Refer to Closing Endshields, page
36.
Figure 5.56: Knife Drive Box
5.6.2
Knife Drive Belts
Non-Timed Knife Drive Belts
The knife drive box is driven by a V-belt that is powered by a hydraulic motor on the header left endsheet. There is
an identical drive system at the opposite end of 40-foot double-knife headers.
Removing Non-Timed Knife Drive Belt
This procedure describes the removal of the knife drive belt on single-knife headers and double-knife headers with
non-timed drives.
NOTE:
Procedure is the same for both ends of a double-knife header.
147725
148
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Open endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields, page
35.
2. Loosen the two bolts (A) that secure the motor
assembly to header endsheet.
3. Loosen the belt by turning the tensioning bolt (B)
counterclockwise.
Figure 5.57: Knife Drive
4. Open the access cover (A) on the endsheet behind
cutterbar to provide clearance between the knife drive
box pulley and the endsheet.
Figure 5.58: Access Cover
5. Remove belt (A) from drive pulley (B).
6. Slip belt (A) over and behind the knife drive
box pulley (C). Use notch in pulley to assist in
removing belt.
Figure 5.59: Knife Drive
Installing Non-Timed Knife Drive Belts
NOTE:
Procedure is the same for both ends of the double-knife header.
147725
149
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Route knife drive belt (A) around knife drive box
pulley (C) and knife drive pulley (B). Use notch in
pulley (C) to assist in installing belt.
NOTE:
When installing new belt, never pry belt over pulley.
Be sure drive motor is fully forward.
2. Tension knife drive belt.
Refer to Tensioning
Non-Timed Knife Drive Belts, page 150.
Figure 5.60: Knife Drive
3. Reinstall the access cover (A) and secure it with bolt.
4. Close endshield. Refer to Closing Endshields, page
36.
Figure 5.61: Access Cover
Tensioning Non-Timed Knife Drive Belts
This procedure applies to single- and double-knife headers with non-timed drives.
IMPORTANT:
To prolong the belt and drive life, do NOT overtighten belt.
1. Open the left endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields,
page 35.
2. Loosen the two bolts (A) that secure the motor
assembly to the header endsheet.
3. Turn adjuster bolt (B) clockwise to move the drive
motor until a force of 20 lbf (89 N) deflects the belt (C)
3/4–1 in. (20–25 mm) at the mid-span.
Figure 5.62: Left-Hand Shown – Right-Hand
Opposite for Double-Knife Headers
147725
150
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Ensure the clearance between the belt (A) and belt
guide (B) is 1/32 in. (1 mm).
5. Loosen three bolts (C), and adjust the position of the
guide (B) as required.
6. Tighten bolts (C).
7. Close the endshield.
page 36.
Refer to Closing Endshields,
NOTE:
Readjust the tension of a new belt after a short run-in
period (about five hours).
Figure 5.63: Knife Drive
Timed Double-Knife Drive Belts
This section applies to 35-foot and smaller double-knife model D65 Draper Headers with timed drives.
Removing Timed Drive V-Belts
1. Open left endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields,
page 35.
2. Loosen two bolts (A) on endsheet.
3. Turn adjuster bolt (B) to loosen the two V-belts (C) and
remove them.
Figure 5.64: Knife Drive V-Belts
Installing Timed Drive V-Belts
NOTE:
New belts must be installed as a matched pair.
147725
151
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
NOTE:
Never pry belt over pulley. Be sure drive motor is
fully forward.
1. Install V-belts (C) onto pulleys.
IMPORTANT:
To prolong belt and drive life, do NOT overtighten belt.
2. Turn adjuster bolt (B) to tighten belts. The belts should
deflect 5/32 in. (4 mm) with 12–17 lbf (52–77 N)
of force applied to each belt at mid-span when
properly tensioned.
3. Tighten the two bolts (A).
4. Close endshield. Refer to Closing Endshields, page
36.
Figure 5.65: Knife Drive V-Belts
5. Check tension of new belts after a short run-in period
(about 5 hours).
Removing Timed Knife Drive Belt
This procedure is applicable to the knife drive on both left and right sides.
1. Open endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields, page
35.
2. Loosen two nuts (A) on belt idler bracket to relieve
tension on belt.
3. Loosen nut (B) on idler pulley and slide idler down to
loosen belt.
Figure 5.66: Knife Drive
147725
152
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
NOTE:
The following two steps are not applicable to the
right side drive.
4. Loosen two bolts (A) on endsheet.
5. Turn adjuster bolt (B) to loosen the two V-belts (C) and
remove them.
Figure 5.67: Knife Drive V-Belts
6. Open the access panel (A) inside the draper opening,
just behind cutterbar. This will give you access to the
knife drive pulley.
7. Remove the knife drive belt.
Figure 5.68: Access Cover
Installing Timed Knife Drive Belt
This procedure is applicable to the knife drive on both left and right sides.
If there are problems with belt alignment. Refer to Adjusting Belt Tracking, page 159.
1. Route knife drive belt (A) around knife drive pulley (B)
and knife drive box pulley (C).
NOTE:
When installing belt, never pry belt over pulley.
Figure 5.69: Left-Hand – Right-Hand Similar
147725
153
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
NOTE:
The following two steps do not apply to the right
side drive.
2. Install the two V-belts (C) and turn adjuster bolt (B) to
tension them. Tension is checked at mid-span of the
belts. The belts should deflect 5/32 in. (4 mm) with
12–17 lbf (52–77 N) of force applied to each belt.
NOTE:
Ensure drive motor is fully forward to allow
V-belt’s installation.
3. Tighten the two bolts (A) on endsheet.
Figure 5.70: Knife Drive V-Belts
4. Ensure that knives are timed before tightening belt.
Refer to Adjusting Double-Knife Timing, page 156.
5. Slide the idler pulley (A) in the slot on the support
bracket (B) to take up the slack in the timing belt.
NOTE:
Ensure that the lower nut (C) is as high in the slot
as possible.
6. Tighten the nut (D) to 157–173 ft·lbf (212–234 N·m).
Figure 5.71: Knife Drive
7. Tension knife drive belt. Refer to Tensioning Timed
Knife Drive Belts, page 155.
8. Close endshield. Refer to Closing Endshields, page
36.
9. Reinstall the access panel (A) and secure it with a bolt.
Figure 5.72: Access Cover
147725
154
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Tensioning Timed Knife Drive Belts
This describes the tensioning procedure for the timed left and right knife drive belts. The illustrations for the
right side are opposite to what is shown.
IMPORTANT:
To prolong belt and drive life, do NOT over-tighten belt.
IMPORTANT:
Do NOT use the adjuster bolt at the drive pulley to adjust timing belt tension.
1. Open left endshield. Refer to Opening Endshields,
page 35.
2. Loosen two nuts (A) on knife drive belt idler bracket.
Figure 5.73: Knife Drive
3. Position pry bar (A) under the idler bracket (C), and
push the bracket up until a force of 6 lb (27 N) deflects
the belt 1/2 in. (13 mm) at mid-point of the upper span.
NOTE:
Placing a piece of wood (B) under pry bar (A) will
protect the paint of the machine.
Figure 5.74: Knife Drive
147725
155
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Tighten nuts (C) to 54–59 ft·lbf (73–80 N·m) when
proper belt tension is achieved.
5. Remove pry bar (A) and wood (B).
NOTE:
Readjust tension of a new belt after a short run-in
period (about five hours).
Figure 5.75: Knife Drive
6. Check that clearance (A) between belt (B) and
guide (C) is 1/32–1/16 in. (0.5–1.5 mm).
7. If necessary, loosen bolts (D) and adjust guide as
required. Tighten bolts.
8. Repeat procedure for opposite side of header.
9. Close endshields.
Figure 5.76: Belt Guide
Adjusting Double-Knife Timing
Timed double-knife D65 Draper Headers, 35-foot and smaller, require that knives are properly timed to move in
opposite directions.
1. Open both endshields. Refer to Opening Endshields, page 35.
2. Remove the belt on the right-hand side. Refer to Removing Timed Knife Drive Belt, page 152.
3. Rotate the left knife drive box driven pulley clockwise
until the left knife (A) is at the center of the inboard
stroke (B) (moving towards center of header).
NOTE:
Center stroke is when the knife sections (C) are
centered between guard points.
Figure 5.77: Timing: Left Side
147725
156
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Rotate the right knife drive box pulley counterclockwise
until the right knife (A) is at the center of the
inboard stroke (B) (moving towards center of header).
NOTE:
Center stroke is when the knife sections (C) are
centered between guard points.
Figure 5.78: Timing: Right Side
5. Install right-hand belt (A).
NOTE:
To maintain timing, knife drive box driver and driven
pulleys must not rotate as the belt is tightened.
Figure 5.79: Knife Drive: Right Side
6. Rotate the idler pulley bracket (A) down and slide the
idler pulley up by hand to remove most of the belt slack.
Tighten nut (B).
Figure 5.80
147725
157
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
7. Position pry bar (A) under the idler bracket (C), and
push the bracket up until a force of 6 lb (27 N) deflects
the belt 1/2 in. (13 mm) at mid-point of the upper span.
NOTE:
Placing a piece of wood (B) under pry bar (A) will
protect the paint of the machine.
Figure 5.81: Left Side Shown-Right
Side Opposite
8. Tighten nuts (C) to 54–59 ft·lbf (73–80 N·m) when
proper belt tension is achieved.
9. Check that the timing belts are properly seated in the
grooves on both driver and driven pulleys.
10. Check for correct knife timing by rotating the drive
slowly by hand and observe knives where they overlap
at the centre of the header.
IMPORTANT:
The knives must move in opposite directions and
begin moving at exactly the same time.
11. If the knives do not begin moving at the same time,
loosen the right side drive belt (B) just enough to allow
the belt to be repositioned to the next cog(s) and
proceed as follows:
a. If right knife ‘leads’ left knife, rotate RIGHT SIDE
driven pulley (A) clockwise.
b. If right knife ‘lags’ left knife, rotate RIGHT SIDE
driven pulley (A) counterclockwise.
12. Retension the right side drive belt as per above,
ensuring that the drive pulleys do not rotate.
IMPORTANT:
Do NOT use the adjuster bolt at the drive pulley to
adjust timing belt tension.
13. Recheck the timing.
14. Close both endshields. Refer to Closing Endshields,
page 36.
Figure 5.82
147725
158
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Adjusting Belt Tracking
The following procedure is applicable to the left side knife drive and the right side knife drive on timed drive headers.
IMPORTANT:
A belt that is not tracking properly is subject to premature failure. Ensure the pulleys are aligned and parallel.
Follow the belt tensioning procedures in this manual to avoid misalignment.
The cogged timing belt should be centered on the knife drive box pulley and at least 0.08 in. (2 mm) from either
edge when the header is running. The belt should also avoid constant contact with the flanges on the drive pulley
but occasional contact is acceptable. A gap should be visible between the belt and the pulley flanges.
To correct tracking problems, proceed as follows:
1. Open the endshields.
CAUTION
Exercise extreme care when operating the header
with the endshields open.
2. Operate the header and observe how the belt is
tracking on both the drive pulley and the knife drive
box pulley on both sides of the header.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected
startup of machine, always stop engine and remove
key before making adjustments to machine.
3. Shut down the windrower and remove key from ignition
before making any adjustments.
4. If the belt is tracking toward the inboard side of the
drive pulley, the likely cause is a toe-out problem (belt
tends to move toward the low tension side of the pulley
[inboard]). Proceed to Step 7., page 160 to correct
the problem.
5. If the belt is tracking toward the outboard side of the
drive pulley, the likely cause is a toe-in problem (belt
tends to move toward the low tension side of the pulley
[outboard]). Proceed to Step 7., page 160 to correct
the problem.
147725
159
Figure 5.83: Knife Drive Pulley
A - Toe-Out: Left Side
C - Toe-In: Left Side
B - Toe-Out: Right Side
D - Toe-In: Right Side
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
6. If the belt (A) is tracking to one side of the knife drive
box pulley (B), the likely cause is an out of position
idler pulley (C). Proceed to Step 8., page 161 to correct
the problem.
Figure 5.84: Knife Drive Belt
7. To correct the tracking problem on the drive pulley,
adjust the position of the cross shaft support tube
as follows:
a. Loosen nut (A) on support assembly (B).
b. Slide the support (B) rearward in slot (C) to correct
toe-out condition, or forward to correct toe-in
condition.
c.
Retighten nut (A).
d. Operate the header and check the tracking. Adjust
the support assembly as required.
e. If the belt tracking problem continues, proceed to
Step 9., page 162.
147725
160
Figure 5.85: Cross-Shaft Support
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
8. To correct the tracking problem on the knife drive box
pulley, adjust the position of the idler as follows:
a. Loosen nuts (A) and (B) and move bracket and
idler until belt is loose.
b. Remove nut (B) securing idler to bracket, and
remove lock washer, idler pulley, and flat washer.
c.
Install the idler pulley (C), ensuring it lines up with
the knife drive box pulley, using flat washer(s) (D)
as required.
d. Reinstall lock washer (E) and nut (B).
e. Tension the belt. Refer to Tensioning Timed Knife
Drive Belts, page 155.
f.
Operate the header and check the tracking.
Figure 5.86: Knife Drive
147725
161
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
9. If further adjustment to correct the drive pulley tracking
is required, proceed as follows:
a. Loosen nut (A) on idler and nuts (B) on
idler bracket.
b. Loosen nuts (C) at drive pulley location.
c.
Turn adjuster bolt (D) clockwise to correct a toe-in
problem, which will allow the belt to track inboard.
d. Turn adjuster bolt (D) counterclockwise to correct
a toe-out problem, which will allow the belt to
track outboard.
e. Tighten nuts (C) at drive pulley location.
f.
Tension the belt. Refer to Tensioning Timed Knife
Drive Belts, page 155.
Figure 5.87: Knife Drive: Left Side
g. Operate the header and check the tracking. Adjust
the drive pulley if required, as per the above steps.
Figure 5.88: Knife Drive: Right Side
147725
162
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.7
Drapers
Replace drapers if torn, cracked, or missing slats.
5.7.1
Removing Drapers
To remove a draper, follow these steps:
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
1. Raise reel and engage reel safety props.
2. Raise header and engage safety props.
3. Move draper until draper joint is in work area.
NOTE:
Deck can also be shifted towards center to provide opening at endsheet.
4. Release tension on the draper. Refer to 5.7.3 Adjusting Draper Tension, page 165.
5. Remove fasteners (A) and tube connectors (B) at the
draper joint.
6. Pull draper from deck.
Figure 5.89: Draper Connector
5.7.2
Installing Drapers
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
NOTE:
Check the deck height before installing the drapers. Refer to 5.7.7 Adjusting Deck Height, page 172.
147725
163
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Apply talc, baby powder, or talc/graphite lubricant
mix to the draper surface that forms the seal with the
cutterbar and to the underside of the draper guides.
2. Insert the draper into the deck at the outboard end
under the rollers. Pull the draper into the deck while
feeding it at the end.
3. Feed in the draper until it can be wrapped around the
drive roller.
4. Insert the opposite end of the draper into the deck over
the rollers. Pull the draper fully into the deck.
Figure 5.90: Installing Draper
5. Loosen the mounting bolts (B) on the rear deck
deflector (A) (this may help with draper installation).
Figure 5.91: Draper Seal
6. Attach the ends of the draper with tube connectors (B),
screws (A) (with the heads facing the center opening),
and nuts.
7. Adjust the draper tension. Refer to 5.7.3 Adjusting
Draper Tension, page 165.
Figure 5.92: Draper Connector
147725
164
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
8. Check the draper seal between the drapers and the
cutterbar. Ensure there is a 0.04–0.08 in. (1–2 mm)
gap (A) between the cutterbar (C) and the draper (B).
9. Refer to 5.7.7 Adjusting Deck Height, page 172 to
achieve the proper gap.
Figure 5.93: Draper Seal
10. Adjust the backsheet deflector (A) (if required) by
loosening nut (D) and moving the deflector until there
is a 1/32–5/16 in. (1–7 mm) gap (C) between the
draper (B) and the deflector.
11. Operate the drapers with the engine at idle so the talc
or talc/graphite lubricant makes contact and adheres
to the draper seal surfaces.
Figure 5.94: Draper Seal
5.7.3
Adjusting Draper Tension
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
NOTE:
The drapers are tensioned at the factory and should NOT require adjustment. If adjustment is required, tension
the drapers just enough to prevent slipping and to keep the draper from sagging below the cutterbar.
147725
165
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Ensure the white indicator bar (A) is at the halfway point
in the window.
WARNING
Check to be sure all bystanders have cleared the area.
2. Start the engine and raise the header.
3. Stop the engine, remove the key from the ignition, and
engage the header safety props.
Figure 5.95: Left-Hand Tension Adjuster
Shown – Right-Hand Opposite
4. Ensure the draper guide (the rubber track on the
underside of the draper) is properly engaged in the
groove on the drive roller.
Figure 5.96: Drive Roller
5. Ensure the idler roller is between the guides.
Figure 5.97: Idler Roller
147725
166
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
IMPORTANT:
Do NOT adjust nut (C). This nut is used for draper
alignment only.
6. Turn the adjuster bolt (A) counterclockwise to loosen,
and the white indicator bar (B) will move outboard in
the direction of arrow (D) to indicate that the draper is
loosening. Loosen until the white indicator bar is at the
halfway point in the window.
7. Turn the adjuster bolt (A) clockwise to tighten, and the
white indicator bar (B) will move inboard in the direction
of arrow (E) to indicate that the draper is tightening.
Tighten until the white indicator bar is at the halfway
point in the window.
IMPORTANT:
• To avoid premature failure of the draper, draper
rollers, and/or tightener components, do not
operate with the tension set so the white bar is
not visible.
• To prevent scooping dirt, ensure the draper is tight
enough that it does not sag below the point where
the cutterbar contacts the ground.
5.7.4
Figure 5.98: Left-Hand Tension Adjuster
Shown – Right-Hand Opposite
Removing Endless Draper
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Raise reel and engage reel props.
2. Raise header and install safety props.
147725
167
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
3. Turn bolt (A) counterclockwise to fully loosen draper.
White indicator bar (B) will move outboard in direction
of arrow to indicate that draper is loosening.
Figure 5.99: Draper Tensioner
4. Push draper away from cutterbar (as shown) to expose
deck support (A).
NOTE:
There are two or three supports depending on
header size.
5. Remove two center nuts (B) at each support.
6. Move deck away from cutterbar to disengage
deck supports.
Figure 5.100: Deck Support
147725
168
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
7. Insert a pry bar (A) into the hole located in the deck
at the approximate deck mid-point location, and lift the
deck clear of the cutterbar.
NOTE:
Ensure pry bar is long enough to accommodate
the width of the draper.
8. Support pry bar (A) on a suitably sized stand (B).
Figure 5.101: Lifting the Deck
9. Pull draper off deck and onto pry bar.
10. Remove stand (B), draper, and pry bar (A).
Figure 5.102: Removing Draper
5.7.5
Installing Endless Draper
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Insert a pry bar (A) through draper and locate bar
in hole in deck located at approximately the deck
mid-point.
NOTE:
Pry bar should be sufficient length to
accommodate width of draper.
2. Lift deck clear of cutterbar and support bar on a suitably
sized stand (B).
3. Slide draper onto deck.
Figure 5.103: Supporting the Draper
147725
169
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Lift deck, remove stand (B), and lower deck into
position. Remove pry bar (A).
Figure 5.104: Lifting the Deck
5. Line-up deck supports (A) with bolts in deck.
6. Move deck towards cutterbar to engage deck supports.
7. Install nuts (B) and tighten.
8. Adjust draper tension. Refer to 5.7.3 Adjusting Draper
Tension, page 165.
Figure 5.105: Deck Support
5.7.6
Adjusting Header Draper Tracking
Each draper deck has a fixed drive roller (A) and a spring-loaded idler roller (B) that can be aligned using the
adjuster rods so the draper tracks properly on the rollers.
CAUTION
To avoid personal injury, before servicing machine or opening drive covers, refer to 5.1 Preparing Machine
for Servicing, page 111.
147725
170
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Table 5.1 Header Draper Tracking
Tracking
Backward
Forward
At
Location
Drive
Roller
Backward
Adjustment
Method
Increase ‘X’
Tighten nut
(C)
Decrease ‘X’
Loosen nut
(C)
Increase ‘Y’
Tighten nut
(C)
Decrease ‘Y’
Loosen nut
(C)
Idler Roller
Forward
1. Refer to Table 5.1 Header Draper Tracking, page 171 to
determine which roller requires adjustment and which
adjustments are necessary.
Figure 5.106: Draper Tracking Adjustments
A - Drive Roller
B - Idler Roller
X - Drive Roller Adjust
C - Draper Direction
Y - Idler Roller Adjust
NOTE:
To change ‘X’, adjust the back end of the roller
using the adjuster mechanism at the inboard end of
the deck.
2. Adjust the drive roller at ‘X’ as follows:
a. Loosen nuts (A) and jam nut (B).
b. Turn the adjuster nut (C).
Figure 5.107: Left Side Drive Roller
3. Adjust the idler roller ‘Y’ as follows:
a. Loosen nut (A) and jam nut (B).
b. Turn the adjuster nut (C).
NOTE:
If the draper does not track at the idler roller end
after the idler roller adjustment, the drive roller is
likely not square to the deck. Adjust the drive
roller, and then readjust the idler roller.
Figure 5.108: Left Side Idler Roller
147725
171
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.7.7
Adjusting Deck Height
Maintain deck height so the draper runs just below the cutterbar. With a new header or newly installed draper, set
the initial gap to 1/8 in. (3 mm). To prevent material from entering the drapers and cutterbar, you may need to
decrease the deck clearance to 0–1/32 in. (0–1 mm) after the initial break-in period of approximately 50 hours.
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Check the deck height and ensure the draper (B) runs
just below the cutterbar (C) with a gap (A) of 1/8 in.
(3 mm) between the top of the deck front track and
the cutterbar.
NOTE:
Measurement is at the supports with the header
in working position and the decks fully forward.
Figure 5.109: Draper Seal
2. Loosen the draper tension. Refer to 5.7.3 Adjusting
Draper Tension, page 165.
3. Lift the front edge of the draper (A) past the cutterbar
(B) to expose the deck support.
Figure 5.110: Draper Adjustment
147725
172
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Loosen the two lock nuts (A) on the deck support (B)
one-half turn only.
NOTE:
The number of deck supports (B) is determined
by the header size: four on single reels, and
eight on double reels.
5. Tap the deck (C) to lower the deck relative to the deck
supports. Tap the deck support (B) using a punch to
raise the deck relative to the deck supports.
Figure 5.111: Deck Support
6. Set the deck (A) to a gap (B) of 5/16–3/8 in. (8–9 mm)
below the cutterbar (C) to create a seal.
7. Tighten the deck support hardware (D).
8. Recheck the gap (B) to ensure it is properly set to
5/16–3/8 in. (8–9 mm).
9. Tension the draper. Refer to 5.7.3 Adjusting Draper
Tension, page 165.
Figure 5.112: Deck Support
10. Adjust the backsheet deflector (A) (if required) by
loosening nut (D) and moving the deflector until there
is a 1/32–5/16 in. (1–7 mm) gap (C) between the
draper (B) and the deflector.
Figure 5.113: Backsheet Deflector
147725
173
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.7.8
Draper Roller Maintenance
The draper rollers have non-greaseable bearings. The external seal should be checked every 200 hours (more
frequently in sandy conditions) to obtain the maximum bearing life.
Inspecting Draper Roller Bearing
If a bad bearing is suspected in one of the draper rollers, a quick way to check is by using an infrared thermometer.
1. Engage header
three minutes.
and
run
for
approximately
2. Check the temperature of each of the roller
arms (A), (B), and (C) on each deck. The temperature
should not exceed 80°F (44°C) above ambient
temperature.
Figure 5.114: Roller Arms
Draper Deck Idler Roller
Removing Draper Idler Roller
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of a raised machine, always stop engine
and remove key before leaving the operator’s seat, and always engage safety props before going under
the machine for any reason.
NOTE:
If the draper connector is not visible, engage the header until the connector is accessible (preferably close to
the outboard end of the deck).
1. Start the engine, raise the header, and raise the reel.
2. Stop the engine, remove the key, engage the reel
safety props, and engage the header safety props.
3. Loosen the draper by turning adjuster bolt (A)
counterclockwise.
Figure 5.115: Tensioner
147725
174
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Remove the screws (A), tube connectors (B), and nuts
from the draper joint to uncouple the draper.
5. Pull the draper off the idler roller.
Figure 5.116: Draper Connector
6. Remove the bolts (A) and washer at the ends of the
idler roller.
7. Spread the roller arms (B) and (C) and remove the
idler roller.
Figure 5.117: Idler Roller
Replacing Draper Idler Roller Bearing
1. Remove the draper idler roller assembly.
Removing Draper Idler Roller, page 174.
147725
Refer to
175
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
2. Remove the bearing assembly (A) and seal (B) from
the roller tube (C) as follows:
a. Attach a slide hammer (D) to the threaded shaft (E)
in the bearing assembly.
b. Tap out the bearing assembly (A) and seal (B).
3. Clean the inside of the roller tube (C), check the tube
for signs of wear or damage, and replace if necessary.
Figure 5.118: Idler Roller Bearing
4. Install the new bearing assembly (A) by pressing
the outer race of the bearing into the tube until it is
9/16–19/32 in. (14–15 mm) (B) from the outside edge
of the tube.
5. Apply the recommended grease in front of the bearing
assembly (A). Refer to 5.2.1 Recommended Fluids and
Lubricants, page 112.
6. Install a new seal (C) at the roller opening, and install
a flat washer (1.0 in. I.D. x 2.0 in. O.D.) on the seal.
7. Tap the seal (C) into the roller opening with a suitably
sized socket.
Tap the washer and the bearing
assembly (A) until the seal is 1/8–3/16 in. (3–4 mm) (D)
from the outside edge of the tube.
147725
176
Figure 5.119: Idler Roller Bearing
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Installing Draper Idler Roller
1. Position the stub shaft into the idler roller in the forward
arm (B) on the deck.
2. Push on the roller to slightly deflect the forward arm so
the stub shaft at the rear of the roller can be slipped
into the rear arm (C).
3. Install bolts (A) with washers, and torque to 70 ft·lbf
(93 N·m).
4. Wrap the draper over the idler roller, close the draper,
and set the tension. Refer to 5.7.2 Installing Drapers,
page 163.
5. Run the machine and verify the draper tracks correctly.
Adjust the draper tracking if required. Refer to 5.7.6
Adjusting Header Draper Tracking, page 170.
Figure 5.120: Idler Roller
Draper Deck Drive Roller
Removing Draper Drive Roller
1. If draper connector is not visible, engage the header until the connector is accessible, preferably close to the
outboard end of the deck.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
2. Raise header and reel, and then shutdown the engine.
3. Engage header lift cylinder safety props and reel lift cylinder safety props.
4. Loosen draper by
counterclockwise.
turning
adjuster
bolt
(A)
Figure 5.121: Tensioner
147725
177
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5. Remove fasteners (A) and tube connectors (B) at the
draper joint to uncouple the draper.
6. Pull the draper off the drive roller.
Figure 5.122: Draper Connector
7. Line up the setscrews with the hole (A) in the guard.
Remove the two setscrews that hold the motor onto
the drive roller.
NOTE:
The setscrews are a 1/4 turn apart.
8. Remove the four bolts (B) that hold motor to the drive
roller arm.
NOTE:
Plastic shield (C) may require removal to gain access
to the top bolt.
Figure 5.123: Drive Roller
9. Remove bolt (A) that secures the other end of the drive
roller (B) to the support arm.
10. Remove the drive roller (B).
Figure 5.124: Drive Roller
Replacing Draper Drive Roller Bearing
1. Remove the draper idler roller assembly. Refer to Removing Draper Drive Roller, page 177.
147725
178
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
2. Remove the bearing assembly (A) and seal (B) from
the roller tube (C) as follows:
a. Attach a slide hammer (D) to the threaded shaft (E)
in the bearing assembly.
b. Tap out the bearing assembly (A) and seal (B).
3. Clean the inside of the roller tube (C), check the tube
for signs of wear or damage, and replace if necessary.
Figure 5.125: Drive Roller Bearing
4. Install the new bearing assembly (A) by pressing
the outer race of the bearing into the tube until it is
9/16–19/32 in. (14–15 mm) (B) from the outside edge
of the tube.
5. Apply the recommended grease in front of the bearing
assembly (A). Refer to 5.2.1 Recommended Fluids and
Lubricants, page 112.
6. Install a new seal (C) at the roller opening, and install
a flat washer (1.0 in. I.D. x 2.0 in. O.D.) on the seal.
7. Tap the seal (C) into the roller opening with a suitably
sized socket.
Tap the washer and the bearing
assembly (A) until the seal is 1/8–3/16 in. (3–4 mm) (D)
from the outside edge of the tube.
147725
179
Figure 5.126: Drive Roller Bearing
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Installing Draper Drive Roller
1. Position the drive roller (B) between the roller
support arms.
2. Install bolt (A) that holds the drive roller to the arm
closest to the cutterbar. Torque bolt to 70 ft·lbf
(95 N·m).
3. Grease motor shaft and insert into the end of the
drive roller.
Figure 5.127: Drive Roller
4. Secure motor to the roller support with four bolts (A).
Torque to 20 ft·lbf (27 N·m).
NOTE:
Tighten any loosened bolts and reinstall plastic
shield (B), if removed.
5. Tighten the two setscrews through access hole (C).
Figure 5.128: Drive Roller
6. Wrap the draper over the drive roller and attach ends of
draper with tube connectors (B), screws (A), and nuts.
NOTE:
Head of screws must face the center opening.
Figure 5.129: Draper Connector
147725
180
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
7. Tension the draper with tensioner bolt (A) and follow the
directions on the decal for proper draper tensioning.
8. Disengage the reel and header safety props.
9. Start the engine and lower header and reel.
10. Run machine to verify that draper tracks correctly.
11. If adjustment is required, refer to 5.7.6 Adjusting
Header Draper Tracking, page 170.
Figure 5.130: Draper Tensioner
5.7.9
Replacing Draper Deflectors
Removing Wide Draper Deflectors
To remove draper deflector, follow these steps:
NOTE:
Left end removal is illustrated.
1. Raise reel fully and lower header to ground.
2. Shift decks to allow work space at one end of header if hydraulic deck shift installed, otherwise move decks
manually after shutting down windrower.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
3. Stop engine, remove key, and engage reel safety props.
4. Open endshield.
5. Loosen nuts (A) on cutterbar until retainer (B) is loose.
Figure 5.131: Deflector Retainer
147725
181
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
6. Remove fasteners securing deflector to endsheet.
Nuts (A) are accessible from endshield side. Nuts (B)
on uppermost fasteners are accessible from behind
the deflector (C).
7. Remove the deflector (C).
Figure 5.132: Wide Deflector
8. Remove bolts (A) and remove deflector support (B).
9. If support (B) will not be reinstalled, replace lower
bolt (B) that holds belt guide (C) on opposite side of
endsheet.
10. Repeat above steps for opposite end.
Figure 5.133: Deflector Support
Installing Wide Draper Deflectors
To install draper deflector, follow these steps:
NOTE:
Left installation is illustrated.
1. Raise reel fully and lower header to ground.
2. Shift decks to allow work space at one end of header, if hydraulic deck shift is installed. Otherwise, move decks
manually after shutting down windrower.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
3. Stop engine, remove key, and engage reel safety props.
4. Open endshield.
147725
182
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5. Loosen bolts (A) on cutterbar until retainer (B) is loose.
6. Remove existing bolt that secures belt guide (C) on
opposite side of endsheet.
7. Locate support (D) and reinstall bolt (E), with nut on
far side.
8. Install a second 3/8 in. x 3/4 carriage bolt (F) and lock
nut. Do NOT tighten bolts.
Figure 5.134: Deflector Support
9. Position deflector (A) as shown and adjust forward
edge for best fit on cutterbar. Slide deflector under
retainer (B).
10. Loosely install seven 3/8 in. x 3/4 carriage bolts (C)
with lock nuts to attach deflector to endsheet. Bolt
heads face inboard.
11. Adjust position of deflector to obtain best fit at cutterbar
and aft edge. Tighten bolts (C) as required to maintain
best fit.
12. Tighten bolts (D) on retainer (B). Torque to 65 ft·lbf
(88 N·m).
Figure 5.135: Wide Deflector
13. Adjust position of support (A) so that tip contacts the
deflector (B). Tighten bolts (C).
14. Repeat above steps for opposite end.
Figure 5.136: Deflector Support
147725
183
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Removing Narrow Draper Deflectors
To remove narrow draper deflectors, follow these steps:
NOTE:
Left-end removal is illustrated.
1. Raise reel fully and lower header to ground.
2. Shift decks to allow work space at one end of header, if hydraulic deck shift installed. Otherwise, move decks
manually after shutting down windrower.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
3. Stop engine, remove key, and engage reel safety props.
4. Open endshield.
5. Remove the two Torx® head screws (A) and lock nuts.
6. Remove the three carriage bolts (B) and lock nuts, and
remove aft deflector (C).
Figure 5.137: Aft Deflector
7. Remove the four screws (A) and remove deflector (B).
8. Repeat above steps for opposite end.
Figure 5.138: Forward Deflector
147725
184
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Installing Narrow Draper Deflectors
Narrow deflectors can replace wide deflectors if bunching occurs at the ends of the header when decks are set
for center delivery.
To install narrow draper deflectors, follow these steps:
NOTE:
Left-end installation is illustrated.
1. Raise reel fully and lower header to ground.
2. Shift decks to allow work space at one end of header, if hydraulic deck shift installed. Otherwise, move decks
manually after shutting down windrower.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
3. Stop engine, remove key, and engage reel safety props.
4. Open endshield.
5. Position forward deflector (B) onto endsheet and
temporarily install forward and aft 3/8 in. x 5/8 self
tapping screws (A).
6. Check fit of forward end of deflector onto cutterbar.
There should be no gap between deflector and
cutterbar. Remove and bend deflector as required, to
obtain best fit.
7. Install the four 3/8 in. x 5/8 self-tapping screws (A)
and tighten.
Figure 5.139: Forward Deflector
8. Position aft deflector (C) as shown and install
three 3/8 in. x 3/4 carriage bolts (B) and lock nuts.
Orientation of bolts not important.
9. Install two Torx® head screws (A) and lock nuts with
heads facing down.
10. Tighten all fasteners.
11. Repeat above steps for opposite end.
Figure 5.140: Aft Deflector
147725
185
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.8
Reel
CAUTION
To avoid personal injury, before servicing machine or opening drive covers, refer to 5.1 Preparing Machine
for Servicing, page 111.
5.8.1
Reel Clearance to Cutterbar
The minimum clearance between the reel fingers and the cutterbar ensures that the reel fingers do not contact
the cutterbar during operation. The clearance is adjusted at the factory, but adjustments may be necessary
before the header is put into operation.
The finger to guard/cutterbar clearances with reels fully lowered are shown in Table 5.2 Finger to Guard/Cutterbar
Clearance, page 186.
Table 5.2 Finger to Guard/Cutterbar Clearance
Header Width
15 ft.
20 ft.
‘X’ +/- 1/8 in. (3 mm) at Reel Ends
Single Reel
3/4 in.
(20 mm)
25 ft.
1 in.
(25 mm)
30 ft.
1-3/4 in.
(45 mm)
35 ft.
2-3/8 in.
(60 mm)
40 ft.
–
Double Reel
–
3/4 in.
(20 mm)
Figure 5.141: Finger Clearance
Measuring Reel Clearance
To measure the finger-to-guard/cutterbar clearance, follow these steps:
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Park header on level ground.
147725
186
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
2. Set the fore-aft position to the middle position on the
reel arm indicator decal (A).
3. Fully lower the reel.
4. Shut down engine. Remove key from ignition.
Figure 5.142: Fore-Aft Position
5. Measure clearance (X) between points (Y) and (Z) at
ends of each reel (A).
NOTE:
The reel is factory-set to provide more clearance
at the center of the reel than at the ends (‘frown’)
to compensate for reel flexing.
6. Check all possible points of contact between points (Y)
and (Z). Depending on reel fore-aft position, minimum
clearance can occur at guard tine, hold-down,
or cutterbar.
Figure 5.143: Clearance
Figure 5.144: Single Reel Measurement
Locations (Two Places)
147725
187
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Figure 5.145: Double Reel Measurement
Locations (Four Places)
7. If necessary, refer to Adjusting Reel Clearance, page
188 for adjustment procedure.
Adjusting Reel Clearance
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under header for any reason.
1. Adjust outboard reel arm lift cylinders to set clearance
at outboard ends of reel as follows:
a. Loosen bolt (A).
b. Turn cylinder rod (B) out of clevis to raise reel and
increase clearance to cutterbar, or turn cylinder rod
into clevis to lower reel and decrease clearance.
c.
Tighten bolt (A).
d. Repeat at opposite side.
Figure 5.146: Outside Reel Arm
147725
188
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
2. For Double Reel Only: Adjust center arm lift cylinder
stop (A) to change clearance at inboard ends of reels
as follows:
NOTE:
Instructions apply to double-reel headers only
and are performed from the underside of the arm.
a. Loosen nut (B).
b. Turn nut (C) counterclockwise to raise reel and
increase clearance to cutterbar, or clockwise to
lower reel and decrease clearance.
c.
5.8.2
Tighten nut (B).
Figure 5.147: Looking Up at Arm Underside
Reel Frown
The reel is factory-set to provide more clearance at the center of the reel than at the ends (‘frown’) to compensate
for reel flexing.
Adjusting Reel Frown
The frown is adjusted by repositioning the hardware connecting the reel tube arms to the reel discs.
NOTE:
Measure the frown profile before disassembling the reel for servicing so the profile can be maintained
during reassembly.
1. Position the reel over the cutterbar (between ‘4’ and ‘5’
on the fore-aft position decal). This position provides
adequate clearance at all reel fore-aft positions.
2. Record the measurement at each reel disc location for
each reel tube.
Figure 5.148: Fore-Aft Position Decal
147725
189
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
3. Starting with the reel disc closest to the center of the
header and proceeding outward towards the ends,
adjust the header profile as follows:
a. Remove bolts (A).
b. Loosen bolt (B) and adjust arm (C) until desired
measurement is obtained between the reel tube
and the cutterbar.
NOTE:
Allow the reel tubes to curve naturally and
position the hardware accordingly.
c.
Reinstall bolts (A) in aligned holes and tighten.
Figure 5.149: Reel Arm
5.8.3
Centering the Reel
The reel(s) should be centered between the endsheets.
Centering Double Reels
To center the reels, follow these steps:
1. Loosen bolt (A) on each brace (B).
2. Move forward end of reel center support arm (C)
laterally as required, to center both reels.
3. Tighten bolts (A) and torque to 265 ft·lbf (359 N·m).
Figure 5.150: Reel Center Support Arm
147725
190
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Centering Single Reel
To center the reel, follow these steps:
1. Loosen bolt (A) on brace (B) at both ends of reel.
2. Move forward end of reel support arm (C).
3. Tighten bolts (A) and torque to 265 ft·lbf (359 N·m).
Figure 5.151: Reel Support Arm
5.8.4
Reel Tines
IMPORTANT:
Keep reel tines in good condition. Straighten or replace as required.
Removing Steel Tines
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
1. Lower header and raise reel. Engage reel safety props.
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up or fall of raised machine, always stop engine,
remove key, and engage safety props before going under machine for any reason.
2. Shut down engine and remove key from ignition.
3. Remove tine tube bushings from the applicable tine tube at center and left discs. Refer to Removing Bushings
from Five-, Six- or Nine-Bat Reels, page 194.
147725
191
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Temporarily attach reel arms (B) to reel disc, using
original attachment locations (A).
5. Cut damaged tine(s) so that it can be removed
from tube.
6. Remove bolts on existing tines and slide tines over to
replace tine that was cut off in previous step. Remove
reel arms (B) from tube as required.
Figure 5.152: Reel Arm
Installing Steel Tines
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure tine tube is supported at all times to prevent damage to the tube or other components.
1. Slide new tines and reel arm (A) onto end of tube.
2. Install tine tube bushings. Refer to 5.8.5 Tine Tube
Bushings, page 194.
3. Attach tines to tine bar with bolts and nuts (B).
Figure 5.153: Tine Tube
Removing Plastic Fingers
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
147725
192
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
1. Remove screw (A) with a Torx® Plus 27 IP
socket wrench.
Figure 5.154: Plastic Fingers
2. Push finger top clip back toward reel tube and remove
from finger tube.
Figure 5.155: Plastic Fingers
Installing Plastic Fingers
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
1. Position finger on rear of finger tube and engage lug at
bottom of finger in lower hole in finger tube.
2. Gently lift top flange and rotate finger until lug in top
flange engages upper hole in finger tube.
Figure 5.156: Plastic Fingers
147725
193
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
IMPORTANT:
Do NOT apply force to finger prior to tightening
mounting screw. Applying force to finger without screw
tightened will break finger or shear off locating pins.
3. Install screw (A) and torque to 75–80 in·lbf
(8.5–9.0 N·m) with a Torx®-Plus 27 IP socket wrench.
Figure 5.157: Plastic Fingers
5.8.5
Tine Tube Bushings
Removing Bushings from Five-, Six- or Nine-Bat Reels
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
NOTE:
If only replacing the cam end bushing, refer to Cam End Bushings.
Center Disc and Tail-End Bushings
1. Lower header, raise reel fully, and engage reel safety props.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure tine tube is supported at all times to prevent damage to the tube or other components.
2. Remove reel endshields and endshield support (C)
from the tail end of the reel at applicable tine
tube location.
NOTE:
There are no endshields on the center disc.
3. Remove bolts (A) securing arm (B) to disc.
IMPORTANT:
Note the hole locations in arm and disc and
ensure bolts are reinstalled at original locations.
Figure 5.158: Tail End
147725
194
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Release bushing clamps (A) using a small screwdriver
to separate the serrations. Pull clamp off tine tube.
Figure 5.159: Bushing Clamp
5. Rotate arm (A) clear of disc and slide arm inboard off
bushing and remove bushing halves (B). If required,
remove the next tine or plastic finger, so the arm can
slide off the bushing. Refer to:
•
Removing Plastic Fingers, page 192
•
Removing Steel Tines, page 191
Figure 5.160: Bushing
Cam End Bushings
NOTE:
Removing cam end bushings requires that the tine
tube be moved through the disc arms to expose
the bushing.
6. At the cam end, remove endshields and endshield
support (A) at applicable tine tube location on the
cam end.
Figure 5.161: Cam End
147725
195
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
7. At the tail end, remove reel endshields and endshield
support (C) at applicable tine tube location.
NOTE:
There are no endshields on the center discs.
8. At the tail and center discs, remove bolts (A) securing
arm (B) to disc.
Figure 5.162: Tail End
9. At the tine tube support (if installed) locations, either
release the bushing clamps or disconnect the support
channels from the tube support, depending on which
tine tube is being moved. Three tine tubes (B) require
that the channels be disconnected and two (C) require
only to remove the bushing clamp.
Figure 5.163: Tine Tube Supports
10. Remove bolt (A) at cam linkage so that tine tube (B) is
free to rotate.
Figure 5.164: Cam End
147725
196
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
11. Release bushing clamps (A) at the cam disc with a
small screwdriver to separate the serrations. Move
clamps off bushings.
Figure 5.165: Bushing Clamp
12. Slide tine tube (A) outboard to expose the bushing.
Remove the bushing halves (B). If required, remove
the next tine or plastic finger, so the arm can slide off
the bushing. Refer to:
•
Removing Plastic Fingers, page 192
•
Removing Steel Tines, page 191
Figure 5.166: Cam End
Tine Tube Bushings (If Installed)
If the tine tube reinforcing kit is installed:
13. Locate the support (A) that requires a new bushing.
14. Remove four bolts (B) securing channels (C) to
support (A).
15. If finger (D) is too close to support (A), to allow access
to bushing, remove screw (E) and finger (D). For
instructions, refer to Removing Plastic Fingers, page
192.
Figure 5.167: Tine Tube Support
147725
197
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
16. Release bushing clamp (A) using a small screwdriver
to separate the serrations.
Move clamp clear
of bushing.
Figure 5.168: Bushing Clamp
Figure 5.169: Bushing Clamp
147725
198
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
17. Slide support (A) off of the bushing halves (B).
NOTE:
Two tine tubes have supports that are assembled
opposite to what is shown. Those supports (A)
can be rotated for the flange to clear the channels
before they can be moved off the bushing. The
tine tube can also be moved outward slightly.
18. Remove the bushing halves (B).
Figure 5.170: Support
Figure 5.171: Opposite Support
Installing Bushings on Five-, Six- or Nine-Bat Reels
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury from fall of raised reel, always engage reel safety props before going under raised
reel for any reason.
IMPORTANT:
Ensure tine tube is supported at all times to prevent damage to the tube or other components.
147725
199
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
NOTE:
A pair of modified channel lock pliers is recommended
to install the bushing clamps. Secure pliers (A) in vice
and grind in a notch (B) at the end of each arm that fits
the clamp (C).
Figure 5.172: Modified Pliers
Cam End Bushings
1. Position bushing halves (B) on tine tube with flangeless
end adjacent to reel arm, and locate lug in each
bushing half in hole in tine tube.
2. Slide tine tube (A) toward tail end of reel to insert the
bushing (B) into the reel arm. If tine tube supports are
installed, ensure that the bushings at those locations
slide into the support.
3. Reinstall fingers or tines if removed. Refer to:
•
Installing Steel Tines, page 192
•
Installing Plastic Fingers, page 193
Figure 5.173: Cam End
4. Install bushing clamp (A) onto tine tube, adjacent to
flangeless end of bushing (B).
5. Position clamp (A) on bushings (B) so that edges
of clamp and bushing are flush when clamp fits into
groove on bushing and lock tabs are engaged.
Figure 5.174: Bushing
147725
200
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
6. Tighten clamp (A) with modified channel lock pliers (B)
so that finger pressure will NOT move clamp.
IMPORTANT:
Overtightening clamp may result in breakage.
Figure 5.175: Installing Clamp
7. Line up tine bar (B) with cam arm and install bolt (A).
Torque bolt to 120 ft·lbf (165 N·m).
Figure 5.176: Cam End
8. At the center disc, install the bolts (A) securing arm (B)
to disc.
9. At the tail end, install reel arm (B) and endshield
support (C) from the tail end of the reel at applicable
tine tube location with bolts (A).
NOTE:
There are no endshields on the center discs.
Figure 5.177: Tail End
147725
201
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
10. At the cam end, install endshield support (A) at
applicable tine tube location on the cam end.
11. Reinstall reel endshields.
Endshields, page 206.
Refer to 5.8.6 Reel
Figure 5.178: Cam End
Center Disc and Tail End Bushings
12. Position bushing halves (B) on tine tube with flangeless
end adjacent to reel arm, and locate lug in each
bushing half in hole in tine tube.
13. Slide reel arm (A) onto bushing (B) and position against
disc at original location.
14. Reinstall any fingers or tines that were removed.
Refer to:
•
Installing Steel Tines, page 192
•
Installing Plastic Fingers, page 193
Figure 5.179: Tail End
15. Install bushing clamp (A) onto tine tube, adjacent to
flangeless end of bushing (B).
16. Position clamp (A) on bushings (B) so that edges
of clamp and bushing are flush when clamp fits into
groove on bushing and lock tabs are engaged.
Figure 5.180: Bushing
147725
202
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
17. Tighten clamp (A) with modified channel lock pliers (B)
so that finger pressure will NOT move clamp.
IMPORTANT:
Over-tightening clamp may result in breakage.
Figure 5.181: Clamp
18. At the center disc, install the bolts (A) securing arm (B)
to disc.
19. At the tail end, install reel arm (B) and endshield
support (C) at applicable tine tube location with
bolts (A). Reinstall endshields.
NOTE:
There are no endshields on the center discs.
Figure 5.182: Tail End
147725
203
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Tine Tube Support (If installed) Bushings
20. Position bushing halves (B) on tine tube with flangeless
end adjacent to reel arm, and locate lug in each
bushing half in hole in tine tube.
21. Slide support (C) onto bushing (B). For the opposite
tine tube, rotate support (C) or slightly move tine tube
so that it clears channels (D).
Figure 5.183: Support
Figure 5.184: Opposite Support
22. Install bushing clamp (A) onto tine tube, adjacent to
flangeless end of bushing (B).
23. Position clamp (A) on bushings (B) so that edges
of clamp and bushing are flush when clamp fits into
groove on bushing and lock tabs are engaged.
Figure 5.185: Bushing Clamp
147725
204
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
24. Tighten clamp (A) with modified channel lock pliers (B)
so that finger pressure will not move clamp.
IMPORTANT:
Over-tightening clamp may result in breakage.
Figure 5.186: Clamp
25. Reattach channels (C) to support (A) with screws (B)
and nuts. Torque screws to 32 ft·lbf (43 N·m).
26. Reinstall any fingers (D) that were removed with
screws (E). Refer to Installing Plastic Fingers, page
193.
Figure 5.187: Support
Figure 5.188: Opposite Support
147725
205
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.8.6
Reel Endshields
The reel endshields and supports do not require regular maintenance, but should be checked periodically for damage
and for loose or missing fasteners. Endshields or supports that are slightly dented or deformed may be repaired.
Severely damaged components should be replaced.
Reel endshields can be attached to either end of the reel.
Replacing Endshield
WARNING
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected startup of machine, always stop engine and remove key
before making adjustments to machine.
1. Lower header and reel, and shutdown engine. Remove key from ignition.
2. Manually rotate reel for access to endshield (A) to
be replaced.
3. Remove three bolts (B).
Figure 5.189: Reel Endshields
4. Lift end of endshield (A) off support (B).
Figure 5.190: Reel Endshields
147725
206
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5. Lift endshield off supports.
Figure 5.191: Reel Endshields
6. Move endshield (A) away from support (B), and place
new endshield (C) onto supports.
7. Reattach end of endshield (A) to support (B).
8. Reinstall bolts (D).
9. Tighten all hardware.
Figure 5.192: Reel Endshields
Replacing Support
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
1. Lower header and reel, and shut down engine. Remove key from ignition.
2. Manually rotate reel for access to endshield support (A)
to be replaced.
3. Remove bolt (B) from support (A).
4. Remove bolts (C) from support (A) and two
adjacent supports.
Figure 5.193: Endshield Supports
147725
207
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5. Move endshields (A) away from tine tube and rotate
support (B) towards reel to remove it.
6. Insert tabs of new support (B) into slots in endshields
and rotate into endshields. Ensure tabs engage
both endshields.
7. Secure support (B) to disc with bolt (C) and nut. Do
not tighten.
8. Secure endshields (A) to support (B) with bolt (C) and
nut. Do not tighten.
9. Reattach supports with bolts (C) and nuts.
10. Check clearance between tine tube and endshield
support, and adjust if necessary.
Figure 5.194: Endshield Supports
11. Torque nuts to 20 ft·lbf (27 N·m).
147725
208
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.9
Reel Drive
The reel is hydraulically driven through a chain case that is attached to the right end of the reel on a single-reel
header, and between the reels on a double-reel header.
5.9.1
Replacing Reel Drive Cover
Removing Drive Cover
DANGER
To avoid bodily injury or death from unexpected start-up of machine, always stop engine and remove key
from ignition before leaving operator’s seat for any reason.
Single Reel Drive:
1. Stop the engine and remove the key from the ignition.
2. Remove four bolts (A) securing the cover (B) to the
reel drive.
Figure 5.195: Drive Cover – Single Reel
Double Reel Drive:
3. Stop the engine and remove the key from the ignition.
4. Remove six bolts (A) securing the upper cover (B) to
the reel drive and lower cover (C).
Figure 5.196: Drive Cover – Double Reel
147725
209
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5. Remove three bolts (A) and remove the lower cover (B)
if necessary.
Figure 5.197: Drive Cover – Double Reel
Installing Drive Cover
Single Reel Drive:
1. Position the drive cover (B) onto the reel drive and
secure with four bolts (A).
Figure 5.198: Drive Cover – Single Reel
Double Reel Drive:
2. Position the lower drive cover (B) onto the reel drive (if
previously removed) and secure with three bolts (A).
Figure 5.199: Drive Cover – Double Reel
147725
210
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
3. Position the upper drive cover (B) onto the reel drive
and lower cover (C) and secure with six bolts (A).
Figure 5.200: Drive Cover – Double Reel
5.9.2
Adjusting Reel Drive Chain Tension
Loosening Drive Chain
1. Remove the drive cover, refer to Removing Drive
Cover, page 209.
2. Loosen six nuts (A). Slide the motor (B) and motor
mount (C) down towards the reel shaft.
Figure 5.201: Single-Reel Drive Shown –
Double-Reel Drive Similar
Figure 5.202: Single-Reel Drive – Viewed from
Underside of Reel
147725
211
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Tightening Drive Chain
1. Ensure the six bolts (A) securing the motor mount to
the chain case are loose.
Figure 5.203: Single Reel Drive Shown – Double
Reel Similar
2. Slide the motor (A) and motor mount (B) upwards until
the chain (C) is tight.
Figure 5.204: Single Reel Drive Shown – Double
Reel Similar
147725
212
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
3. Tighten six nuts (A).
4. Ensure there is 1/8 in. (3 mm) of slack at the chain
midspan. Adjust if necessary.
5. Torque nuts (A) to 54 lbf·ft (73 N·m).
6. Install the drive cover, refer to Installing Drive Cover,
page 210.
Figure 5.205: Single Reel Drive Shown – Double
Reel Similar
Figure 5.206: Single Reel Drive – Viewed from
Underside of Reel
5.9.3
Replacing Reel Drive Sprocket
Removing Drive Sprocket
1. Loosen the drive chain, refer to Loosening Drive Chain,
page 211.
147725
213
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
2. Remove the drive chain (A) from the drive sprocket (B).
Figure 5.207: Reel Drive
3. Remove the cotter pin (A), slotted nut (B), and flat
washer (C) from the motor shaft.
4. Remove the drive sprocket (D). Ensure the key
remains in the shaft.
IMPORTANT:
To prevent damaging the motor, use a puller if
the drive sprocket does not come off by hand.
Do NOT use a pry bar and/or hammer to remove
the drive sprocket (D).
Figure 5.208: Reel Drive
Installing Drive Sprocket
1. Align the keyway in sprocket (D) with the key on the
motor shaft, and slide the sprocket onto the shaft.
Secure with flat washer (C) and slotted nut (B).
2. Torque slotted nut (B) to 40 lbf·ft (54 N·m).
3. Install cotter pin (A). If necessary, tighten the slotted
nut (B) to the next slot to install the cotter pin.
Figure 5.209: Reel Drive
147725
214
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Install the drive chain (A) onto the drive sprocket (B).
Figure 5.210: Reel Drive
5. Tighten the drive chain, refer to Tightening Drive Chain,
page 212.
5.9.4
Replacing Double Reel U-Joint
The double reel drive U-joint allows each reel to move independently from the other.
Lubricate the U-joint according to the specifications. Refer to 5.3.6 Lubrication and Servicing, page 118.
Replace the U-joint if severely worn or damaged. Refer to Removing Double Reel U-Joint, page 215.
Removing Double Reel U-Joint
1. Remove the drive cover, refer to Removing Drive
Cover, page 209.
2. Support the inboard end of the right reel with a front end
loader and nylon slings (A) (or equivalent lifting device).
IMPORTANT:
Avoid damaging or denting the center tube by
supporting the reel as close to the end disc
as possible.
Figure 5.211: Reel and Reel Support
147725
215
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
3. Remove the six bolts (A) attaching the U-joint flange (B)
to the driven sprocket (C).
4. Remove the U-joint.
NOTE:
It may be necessary to move the right-hand reel
sideways for the U-joint to clear the tube.
Figure 5.212: U-Joint
Installing Double Reel U-Joint
NOTE:
It may be necessary to move the right-hand reel sideways for the U-joint to clear the reel tube.
1. Position the U-joint flange (B) onto the driven
sprocket (C) as shown. Install six bolts (A) and
hand-tighten. Do NOT torque the bolts.
Figure 5.213: U-Joint
2. Position the right-hand reel tube against the reel drive
and engage the stub shaft into the U-joint pilot hole.
3. Rotate the reel until the holes in the end of the reel tube
and U-joint flange (B) line up.
4. Apply Loctite® #243 (or equivalent) to four 1/2 in.
bolts (A) and secure with lock washers.
5. Torque to 75–85 ft·lbf (102–115 N·m).
Figure 5.214: U-Joint
147725
216
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
6. Remove the temporary reel support (A).
Figure 5.215: Supporting Reel
7. Install the drive cover, refer to Installing Drive Cover,
page 210.
5.9.5
Replacing Reel Drive Motor
The reel drive motor does not require regular maintenance or servicing. If problems occur with the motor, remove it
and have it serviced at your MacDon Dealer.
Removing Reel Drive Motor
1. Loosen the drive chain, refer to Loosening Drive Chain,
page 211.
2. Remove the drive sprocket, refer to Removing Drive
Sprocket, page 213.
3. Disconnect the hydraulic lines (A) at the motor (B). Cap
or plug open ports and lines.
NOTE:
Mark the hydraulic lines (A) and their locations in the
motor (B) to ensure correct reinstallation.
4. Remove four nuts and bolts (C) and remove the
motor (A). Retrieve the spacer (not shown) from
between the motor (B) and the motor mount
(if installed).
Figure 5.216: Reel Motor and Hoses
147725
217
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Installing Reel Drive Motor
1. Slide the motor mount (A) up or down so the motor
mounting holes (B) are accessible through the
openings in the chain case.
Figure 5.217: Reel Drive Motor Mounting Holes
2. Attach the motor (A) (and spacer if previously removed)
to the motor mount (B) with four 1/2 in. x 1-3/4 in.
countersunk bolts and nuts (C).
3. Torque nuts (C) to 54 lbf·ft (73 N·m).
4. Install the hydraulic fittings (not shown) if installing
new motor, and torque to 81–89 ft·lbf (110–120 N·m).
Figure 5.218: Reel Drive Motor
5. Remove the caps or plugs from the ports and lines
and connect the hydraulic lines (A) to the hydraulic
fittings (B) on the motor (C).
NOTE:
Ensure the hydraulic lines (A) are installed at their
original locations.
Figure 5.219: Reel Motor and Hoses
6. Install the drive sprocket, refer to Installing Drive
Sprocket, page 214.
7. Tighten the drive chain, refer to Tightening Drive Chain,
page 212.
147725
218
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.9.6
Replacing Drive Chain on Double Reel
Refer to the following two methods for replacing the drive chain on a high torque double-reel drive:
•
Replacing Chain Using the Reel Drive Method, page 219
•
Replacing Chain Using Breaking the Chain Method, page 221
NOTE:
Both procedures are acceptable, but disconnecting the reel drive method is preferable because it doesn’t
affect the chain’s integrity.
Replacing Chain Using the Reel Drive Method
1. Loosen the drive chain, refer to Loosening Drive Chain,
page 211.
2. Support the inboard end of the right reel with a front end
loader and nylon slings (A) (or equivalent lifting device).
IMPORTANT:
Avoid damaging or denting the center tube by
supporting the reel as close to the end disc
as possible.
Figure 5.220: Supporting Reel
3. Remove the four bolts (A) securing the reel tube to the
U-joint flange (B).
Figure 5.221: U-Joint
147725
219
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
4. Move the right-hand reel sideways to separate the reel
tube (A) from the U-joint (B).
5. Remove the drive chain (C).
6. Route the new chain (C) over the U-joint (B) and
position onto the sprockets.
Figure 5.222: Replacing Chain
7. Position the right-hand reel tube (A) against the
reel drive and engage the stub shaft into the U-joint
pilot hole.
8. Rotate the reel until the holes in end of the reel tube
and U-joint flange (B) line up.
9. Apply Loctite® #243 (or equivalent) to four 1/2 in.
bolts (A) and secure with lock washers.
10. Torque to 75–85 ft·lbf (102–115 N·m).
Figure 5.223: U-Joint
11. Remove the temporary reel support (A).
Figure 5.224: Supporting Reel
147725
220
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
Replacing Chain Using Breaking the Chain Method
1. Grind off the head of a link rivet on the chain (A), punch
out the rivet, and remove the chain.
2. Grind off the head of a link rivet on the new chain,
punch out the rivet, and separate the chain.
3. Position the ends of the new chain onto the
sprocket (B).
Figure 5.225: Reel Drive
4. Install the pin connector (A) (not available as a MacDon
part) into the chain (preferably from the backside of
the sprocket).
5. Install connector (B) onto pins.
6. Install the spring clip (C) onto the front pin (D) with the
closed end of the spring clip facing the direction of the
sprocket rotation.
7. Position one leg of the spring clip (C) into the groove
of the aft pin (E).
8. Press the other leg of the spring clip (C) over the face
of the aft pin (E) until it slips into the groove. Do NOT
press the spring clip lengthwise from the closed end.
9. Ensure the spring clip (C) is seated into the grooves of
the front pin (D) and aft pin (E).
Figure 5.226: Chain
10. Tighten the drive chain, refer to Tightening Drive Chain,
page 212.
5.9.7
Replacing Drive Chain on Single Reel
1. Loosen the drive chain, refer to Loosening Drive Chain,
page 211.
147725
221
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
2. Lift the chain (A) off the drive sprocket (B).
3. Lower the chain until free of the lower sprocket (C) and
remove the chain from the drive.
4. Position the new chain (A) around the bottom teeth on
the lower sprocket (C).
5. Lift the chain onto the drive sprocket (B) ensuring all
the links are properly engaged in the teeth.
Figure 5.227: Reel Drive
6. Tighten the drive chain, refer to Tightening Drive Chain,
page 212.
147725
222
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.10
Transport System (Optional)
Refer to 6.3.3 Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels, page 233 for more information.
5.10.1
Checking Wheel Bolt Torque
If a transport system is installed, follow procedure for torquing the wheel bolts.
IMPORTANT:
Whenever a wheel is removed and reinstalled, check
torque after one hour of operation and every 100 hours
thereafter. Maintain 80–90 ft·lbf (110–120 N·m) torque.
Follow bolt tightening sequence as shown.
Figure 5.228: Bolt Tightening Sequence
147725
223
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.10.2
Checking Axle Bolt Torque
If a transport system is installed, follow this procedure for torquing the axle bolts.
Figure 5.229: Axle Bolts
1. Check and tighten axle bolts DAILY until torque is maintained as follows:
• (A): 180 ft·lbf (244 N·m)
• (B): 150 ft·lbf (203 N·m)
• (C): 180 ft·lbf (244 N·m)
147725
224
Revision A
MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING
5.10.3
Checking Tire Pressure
Check tire pressure daily.
recommended in following table:
Size
Maintain
pressure
Load Range
Pressure
D
65 psi
(448 kPa)
E
80 psi
(552 kPa)
ST205/75 R15
WARNING
• Service tires safely.
• A tire can explode during inflation and cause
serious injury or death.
• Do NOT stand over tire. Use a clip-on chuck and
extension hose.
• NEVER increase air pressure beyond pressure
specified on tire sidewall to seat the bead on
the rim.
• Replace the tire if it has a defect.
• Replace a wheel rim, which has cracks, wear or
severe rust.
Figure 5.230: Inflation Warning
• NEVER weld a wheel rim.
• NEVER use force on an inflated or partially
inflated tire.
• Make sure the tire is correctly seated before
inflating to operating pressure.
• If the tire is not in correct position on the rim, or is
too full of air, the tire bead can loosen on one side,
causing air to leak at high speed and with great
force. An air leak of this nature can thrust the tire
in any direction, endangering anyone in the area.
• Make sure all the air is removed from a tire before
removing the tire from a rim.
• Do NOT remove, install or make repairs to a tire on
a rim unless you have the proper equipment and
experience to perform the job. Take the tire and
rim to a qualified tire repair shop.
147725
225
Revision A
6
Options and Attachments
The following options and attachments are available for use with your header. Most come with installation
instructions. See your MacDon Dealer for availability and ordering information.
6.1
6.1.1
Reel
Multi-Crop Rapid Reel Conversion Kit
This kit decreases the time required to change the fore-aft
cylinder position on the reel support arm from the normal
operating location to a farther aft location that minimizes
disturbance of the crop. The reel fore-aft cylinders can also
be quickly relocated back to the normal operating position.
For use on double-reel units only.
MD #B5943
Figure 6.1: Center Arm – Left and Right Similar
6.1.2
Lodged Crop Reel Finger Kit
The steel fingers attach to ends of every other tine bar and
help in clearing material in heavy, hard-to-cut crops such
as lodged rice.
Each kit contains three fingers for the cam end and three
fingers for the tail end of the reel. Hardware, installation
and adjustment instructions are included with the kit.
MD #B4831
Figure 6.2: Lodged Crop Finger
147725
227
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.1.3
PR15 Tine Tube Reel Conversion Kit
This kit allows conversion of a six-bat reel to a nine-bat reel.
Order bundles by header size and type:
• 15 ft. – Steel Fingers MD #B5654
• 20 ft. – Steel Fingers MD #B5655
• 25 ft. – Plastic Fingers MD #B5277
• 30 ft. – Plastic Fingers MD #B527815
• 30 ft. – Steel Fingers MD #B565715
• 35 ft. – Plastic Fingers MD #B5674
NOTE:
Must order additional endshields when converting reel.
6.1.4
Reel Endshield Kit
The steel shields attach to ends of the reel(s) and help
in clearing material in heavy, hard-to-cut crops. They are
standard equipment on all, except nine-bat headers. See
your MacDon Dealer for more information. Installation and
adjustment instructions are included with the kit.
Figure 6.3: Reel Endshields
15. Double-reel units only
147725
228
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.1.5
Reel Tine Tube Reinforcing Kit
The reel tine tube reinforcing kit is available for five-bat and
six-bat reels when cutting extremely heavy crops where
high reel loads are experienced.
• Five-Bat – MD #B5825
• Six-Bat – MD #B5826
Figure 6.4: Five-Bat Shown – Six-Bat Similar
147725
229
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.2
6.2.1
Cutterbar
Cutterbar Wearplate
Available as an attachment, they are recommended for
cutting on the ground where soil adheres to steel.
Bundles by header size:
• 15 ft. – MD #B4864
• 20 ft. – MD #B4865
• 25 ft. – MD #B4838
• 30 ft. – MD #B4839
• 35 ft. – MD #B4840
• 40 ft. – MD #B4841
Figure 6.5: Cutterbar Wearplate
6.2.2
Knifehead Shield
The shields attach to the endsheets and reduce the
knifehead opening to prevent cut crop, particularly severely
lodged crop, from accumulating over the knifehead, which
could damage the knife drive box and the endsheet.
Order kit according to header size and guard type.
Regular Guards:
• 30 ft. and larger – MD #220101
Stub Guards:
• 30 ft. and larger – MD #220103
Figure 6.6: Knifehead Shield
147725
230
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.2.3
Stub Guard Conversion Kit
Stub guards, complete with top guides and adjuster shoes,
are designed to cut tough crops.
Installation and adjustment instructions are included in
the kit.
Order bundle according to the length of your header:
• 15 ft. – MD #B5009
• 20 ft. – MD #B5010
• 25 ft. – MD #B5011
• 30 ft. – MD #B5012
• 35 ft. – MD #B5013
Figure 6.7: Stub Guards
6.2.4
Vertical Knife Mounts
The vertical knife16 mounts allow installation of vertically
oriented knives onto both ends of the header.
Installation and adjustment instructions are included with
the bundle.
Order bundles based on left or right side:
• Left-hand – MD #B5757
• Right-hand – MD #B5758
NOTE:
If mounting on multiple headers, you will also require the
auxiliary vertical knife plumbing kit MD #B5406.
Figure 6.8: Vertical Knife Mount
16. Must be purchased from a separate supplier.
147725
231
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.3
6.3.1
Header
Divider Latch Kit
The latches attach to the endsheets. They allow for
quick removal of endsheet divider cones to accommodate
storage and if required, to reduce the transport width of the
header. Installation instructions are included with the kit.
MD #B5607
Figure 6.9: Divider Latch
6.3.2
Stabilizer Wheels
The stabilizer wheels help stabilize the header in field
conditions that would otherwise cause the header to
bounce and result in uneven cutting height. Installation
and adjustment instructions are included with the kit.
Available as an attachment for use with 30-, 35-, and
40-ft. headers.
MD #C1986
Figure 6.10: Stabilizer Wheel
147725
232
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.3.3
Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels
The Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels help stabilize
the header in field conditions that would otherwise cause
the header to bounce, and result in uneven cutting height.
This system is similar to the Stabilizer Wheel option.
The Stabilizer/Slow Speed Transport Wheels convert to
transport mode to allow the header to be towed behind
a properly configured MacDon windrower (or agricultural
tractor) at slow speed. A tow pole is included in the kit.
For use on 30-, 35-, and 40-ft. headers.
MD #C1997
Figure 6.11: Stabilizer/Transport Wheels
147725
233
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.4
6.4.1
Crop Delivery
Double Draper Drive (DDD) Kit
This option minimizes draper slipping in heavy forage crops
when using the side delivery feature, by having four draper
rollers powered instead of the normal two.
Installation instructions are included with the kit.
Available for 30- to 40-ft. headers.
MD #B565317
6.4.2
Double Windrow Attachment (DWA)
The DWA18 lays up to 48 ft. (14.6 m) of crop in a single
windrow which is ideal for today’s large forage harvesters.
It is only intended for mounting on SP windrowers equipped
with an HC10 Conditioner19.
MD #C1987
Figure 6.12: Double Windrow Attachment
6.4.3
Draper Deflector (Narrow)
Narrow metal deflectors attach to the inboard side of the
endsheets and prevent material from falling through the
gap between the endsheet and draper while minimizing
reel carryover in bushy type crops.
They are not
recommended for double windrowing, wide deflectors are
available for this purpose.
Refer to the D65 Draper Header for Combines
and Self-Propelled Windrowers Parts Catalog for
required parts.
Figure 6.13: Draper Deflector
17. MD #B5606 is required to operate both upper cross auger (UCA) and double draper drive (DDD) on an
SP Windrower.
18. This option is not compatible with the M105 SP Windrower.
19. This option is not for use with the M205 or M105 SP Windrower.
147725
234
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.4.4
Draper Deflector (Wide)
Wide metal deflectors attach to the inboard side of the
endsheets, to prevent material from falling through the gap
between the endsheet and draper.
Refer to the D65 Draper Header for Combines and
Self-Propelled Windrowers for required parts.
Figure 6.14: Draper Deflector
6.4.5
Draper Extension Kit
This kit increases the length of each deck up to 10 in.
(250 mm) into the header opening which decreases the
swath width when cutting light/thin crops.
It includes roller support extensions, a draper repair kit
and necessary hardware. Installation instructions are
also included.
MD #B540720
Figure 6.15: Draper Extension
20. Not for use with Double Draper Drive (DDD).
147725
235
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.4.6
End Swath Deflector Rods (End Delivery)
End deflector rods are used for double swathing with end
delivery only, but can be kept on for center delivery.
The rods help prevent the delivered crop at the opening
from interfering with standing crop.
Installation and adjustment instructions are included with
the kit.
Order bundles based on left or right end.
• Left – MD #B5088
• Right – MD #B5089
Figure 6.16: Swath Deflector
6.4.7
HC10 Hay Conditioner
The hay conditioner will lay uniform, fluffy windrows.
Conditioning or crimping the cut hay allows moisture
release for quicker drying and earlier processing.
Installation instructions, operating instructions, and parts
list are included.
MD #C1982
NOTE:
Not for use on M205 Windrower.
Figure 6.17: Hay Conditioner
6.4.8
Hydraulic Deck Shift Package
This system allows shifting of the decks from the operator’s
console when double-swathing.
Installation and adjustment instructions are included with
the kit.
Available on 25-, 30-, 35-, and 40-ft. headers.
MD #B5664
Figure 6.18: Hydraulic Deck Shift
147725
236
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.4.9
Swath Forming Rods (Center Delivery)
The rods form the windrow such that the heads are in the
center and thus are protected from shatter. The rods are
mainly used for grass seed cutting applications.
Installation and adjustment instructions are included with
the kit.
MD #4803
Figure 6.19: Swath Forming Rods
6.4.10
Upper Cross Auger (UCA)
Attaches in front of the backtube, the UCA improves
feeding of crop to the center of the header in heavy crop
conditions. Ideal for high volume harvesting of forages,
oats, canola, mustard and other tall, bushy, hard to
feed crops.
Order bundle21 according to the length of your header:
• 15 ft. – MD #B4844
• 25 ft. – MD #B4846
• 30 ft. – MD #B4847
• 35 ft. – MD #B4848
• 40 ft. – MD #B4849
Figure 6.20: Upper Cross Auger
6.4.11 Upper Cross Auger (UCA) Hydraulic Kit for Double Draper
Drive (DDD)
This kit is required to provide hydraulic power to the
UCA on headers with both UCA and DDD kits installed.
Operating both options without this kit can result in damage
to the UCA motor and inadequate power to the draper
drive system. This kit is not applicable to M100 and
M105 Windrowers.
MD #B5606
21. MD #B5606 is required to operate both upper cross auger (UCA) and double draper drive (DDD) on an
SP Windrower.
147725
237
Revision A
OPTIONS AND ATTACHMENTS
6.4.12 Upper Cross Auger (UCA) Case Drain Kit for Single Draper
Drive (SDD)
This kit is intended for SDD headers equipped with an
UCA and is applicable to all M-Series windrowers, except
the M205.
MD #5842
Figure 6.21: Case Drain
6.4.13
Rice Divider Rods
The rice divider rods attach to the left-hand and right-hand
endsheet cones and perform the same function in tall and
tangled rice crops as standard equipment crop dividers.
Installation instructions are included with the kit.
MD #B5609
Figure 6.22: Rice Divider Rod
147725
238
Revision A
7
7.1
Troubleshooting
Crop Loss at Cutterbar
Symptom
Problem
Solution
Section
Cutterbar too high
Lower cutterbar
3.7.1 Cutting Height, page
49
Header angle too low
Increase header angle
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Reel too high
Lower reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page 58
Reel too far back
Move reel forward
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Ground speed too fast for
reel speed
Reduce ground speed or
increase reel speed
Does not pick up
down crop
Cut grain falling
ahead of cutterbar
147725
Speed,
• 3.7.5 Ground
page 56
Increase finger pitch
aggressiveness
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Install lifter guards
See your MacDon Dealer
Reel speed too fast
Reduce reel speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page 56
Reel too low
Raise reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page 58
Ground speed too fast
Reduce ground speed
3.7.5 Ground Speed, page
56
Crop too ripe
Operate at night when
humidity is higher
—
Ground speed too slow
Increase ground speed
3.7.5 Ground Speed, page
56
Reel speed too slow
Increase reel speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page 56
Reel too high
Lower reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page 58
Cutterbar too high
Lower cutterbar
3.7.1 Cutting Height, page
49
Reel too far forward
Move reel back on arms
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Cutting at speeds over
6 mph (10 km/h) with high
torque (10-tooth) reel drive
sprocket
Replace with standard
torque (19-tooth) reel drive
sprocket
Worn or broken knife
components
Replace components
Reel fingers not lifting crop
sufficiently
Heads shattering or
breaking off
• 3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
239
• See your MacDon Dealer
• 5.9.3
Drive
213
Replacing Reel
Sprocket, page
5.5 Knife, page 127
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem
Solution
Section
Crowding uncut crop
Allow enough room for crop
to be fed to cutterbar
—
Broken knife sections
Replace broken sections
5.5.1 Replacing Knife
Section, page 127
Excessive bouncing
at normal field speed
Float set too light
Adjust header float
3.7.2 Header Float, page
55
Divider rod running
down standing crop
Divider rods too long
Remove divider rod
3.7.12 Crop Divider Rods,
page 72
Bushy or tangled
crop flows over
divider rod, builds
up on endsheets
Divider rods providing
insufficient separation
Install long divider rods
3.7.12 Crop Divider Rods,
page 72
Reel not frowning or not
centered in header
Adjust reel frown or reel
horizontal position
Knife hold-downs not
adjusted properly
Adjust hold-downs so knife
works freely, but still keep
sections from lifting off
guards
Checking Knife
Hold-Downs, page 136
Knife sections or guards
are worn or broken
Replace all worn and
broken cutting parts
5.5 Knife, page 127
Header is not level
Level header
3.12 Levelling the Header,
page 83
Reel fingers not lifting crop
properly ahead of knife
Adjust reel position/finger
pitch
Symptom
Strips of uncut
material
Crop not being cut
at ends
Material
accumulating in
gap between cut-out
in endsheet and
knifehead
147725
• 3.7.9
Reel
Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
• 5.8.2 Reel Frown, page
189
• 3.7.9
Reel
Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
• 3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
• See your MacDon Dealer
Divider runs down thick
crop at ends, preventing
proper feeding due to
material bridging the cutter
guards
Replace three or four end
guards with stub guards
Crop heads leaning away
from knifehead hole in
endsheet
Add knifehead shield(s),
except in damp/sticky soils
• 5.5.7 Knife Guards, page
131
• 6.2.3
Stub
Guard
Conversion Kit, page 231
240
6.2.2 Knifehead Shield,
page 230
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
7.2
Cutting Action and Knife Components
Symptom
Ragged or uneven
cutting of crop
Problem
Solution
Section
Knife hold-downs not
adjusted properly
Adjust hold-downs
Checking Knife
Hold-Downs, page 136
Knife sections or guards
are worn or broken
Replace all worn and
broken cutting parts
5.5 Knife, page 127
Knife is not operating at
recommended speed
Check engine speed of
windrower
Refer to your windrower
operator’s manual
Ground speed too fast for
reel speed
Reduce ground speed or
increase reel speed
Reel fingers not lifting crop
properly ahead of knife
Adjust reel position / finger
pitch
Cutterbar too high
Lower cutting height
3.7.1 Cutting Height, page
49
Header angle too flat
Steepen header angle
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Bent knife, causing binding
of cutting parts
Straighten a bent knife.
Align guards
Cutting edge of guards not
close enough, or parallel to
knife sections
Align guards
• 3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
• 3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
• 3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
5.5.7 Knife Guards, page
131
• 5.5.7 Knife
page 131
Tangled / tough to cut crop
Install stub guards
Loose knife drive belt
147725
Move reel forward
MacDon
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
•
Tensioning Non-Timed
Knife Drive Belts, page
150
•
Tensioning Timed Knife
Drive Belts, page 155
Adjust drive belt tension
241
Guards,
• 6.2.3
Stub
Guard
Conversion Kit, page
231
• See
your
Dealer
Reel too far back
Speed,
• 3.7.5 Ground
page 56
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Symptom
Problem
Solution
Reel too high or too far
forward
Lower reel or move reel
rearward
Ground speed too slow
Increase ground speed
Loose knife drive belt
Section
• 3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
• 3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
3.7.5 Ground Speed, page
56
•
Tensioning Non-Timed
Knife Drive Belts, page
150
•
Tensioning Timed Knife
Drive Belts, page 155
Adjust drive belt tension
Improper knife hold-down
adjustment
Adjust hold-down
Checking Knife
Hold-Downs, page 136
Dull or broken knife
sections
Replace knife section
5.5.1 Replacing Knife
Section, page 127
Bent or broken guards
Align or replace guards
5.5.7 Knife Guards, page
131
Reel fingers not lifting crop
properly ahead of knife
Adjust reel position / finger
pitch
Steel pick-up fingers
contacting knife
Increase reel clearance to
cutterbar, or adjust frown
Float too heavy
Adjust springs for
lighter float
3.7.2 Header Float, page
55
Raise cutterbar by lowering
skid shoes
Cutting On the Ground,
page 53
Install cut-out sections
See your MacDon Dealer
Flatten header angle
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Check engine speed of
windrower
Refer to your windrower’s
operator’s manual
Knife plugging
Mud or dirt build-up on
cutterbar
Knife is not operating at
recommended speed
147725
242
• 3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
• 3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
• 5.8.1 Reel Clearance to
Cutterbar, page 186
• 5.8.2 Reel Frown, page
189
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Symptom
Excessive header
vibration
Problem
Solution
Section
Knife hold-downs not
adjusted properly
Adjust hold-downs
Checking Knife
Hold-Downs, page 136
Knives on double-knife
drive not timed
Adjust knife timing
Adjusting Double-Knife
Timing, page 156
Knife not operating at
recommended speed
Check engine speed of
windrower
Refer to your windrower’s
operator’s manual
Excessive knife wear
Replace knife
• 5.5.2 Removing Knife,
page 129
• 5.5.5 Installing
page 130
Loose or worn knifehead
pin or drive arm
Tighten or replace parts
Knife,
• 5.5.3
Removing
Knifehead Bearing, page
129
• 5.6.1 Knife Drive Box,
page 140
Bent cutterbar
Straighten cutterbar
See your MacDon Dealer
Bent or broken guard
Straighten or replace
5.5.7 Knife Guards, page
131
Worn knifehead pin
Replace
5.5.3 Removing Knifehead
Bearing, page 129
Knife back breakage
Dull knife
Replace
• 5.5.2 Removing Knife,
page 129
• 5.5.5 Installing
page 130
Excessive breakage
of knife sections or
guards.
147725
Knife,
Knife hold-downs not
adjusted properly
Adjust hold-downs
Checking Knife
Hold-Downs, page 136
Cutterbar operating too low
in stony conditions
Raise cutterbar, using
skid shoes
Cutting On the Ground,
page 53
Float is set too heavy
Adjust for lighter float
3.7.2 Header Float, page
55
Bent or broken guard
Straighten or replace
5.5.7 Knife Guards, page
131
Header angle too steep
Flatten header angle
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
243
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
7.3
Reel Delivery
Symptom
Reel not releasing
material in normal
standing crop
Reel not releasing
material in lodged and
standing crop (reel fully
lowered)
Wrapping on reel end
Reel releases crop too
quickly
Reel will not lift
Reel will not turn
Reel motion uneven
under no load
147725
Problem
Solution
Section
Reel speed too fast
Reduce reel speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
Reel too low
Raise reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Reel tines too aggressive
Reduce cam setting
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel too far back
Move reel forward
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Reel tines too aggressive
for standing crop
Reduce cam setting
(1 or 2)
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel tines too aggressive
Reduce cam setting
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel too low
Raise reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Reel speed too fast
Reduce reel speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
Crop conditions
Install optional endshields
See your MacDon Dealer
Reel not centered in
header
Center reel in header
5.8.3 Centering the Reel,
page 190
Reel tines not aggressive
enough
Increase cam setting
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel too far forward
Move reel back
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Reel lift couplers are
incompatible or defective
Change quick coupler
—
Control set at 0
Activate reel speed control
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
Quick couplers not
properly connected
Connect couplers
4.1 Attaching Header to
Windrower, page 105
Reel drive chain
disconnected
Connect chain
5.9.7 Replacing Drive
Chain on Single Reel,
page 221
Excessive slack in reel
drive chain
Tighten chain
5.9.2 Adjusting Reel Drive
Chain Tension, page 211
244
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Symptom
Reel motion is uneven
or stalls in heavy crops
Plastic fingers cut at tip
Plastic fingers bent
rearward at tip
Plastic fingers bent
forward at tip (opposite
of above)
Plastic fingers bent
close to tine tube.
147725
Problem
Solution
Section
Reel speed too fast
Reduce reel speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
Reel fingers not
aggressive enough
Move to a more
aggressive finger pitch
notch
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel too low
Raise reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Relief valve on windrower
has low relief pressure
setting
Increase relief pressure
to manufacturer’s
recommendations
Refer to the windrower
operator’s manual
Low oil reservoir level on
windrower (Sometimes
more than one reservoir)
Fill to proper level
Relief valve malfunction
Replace relief valve
Cutting tough crops with
standard torque (19-tooth)
reel drive sprocket
Replace with high torque
(10-tooth) or 14-tooth reel
drive sprocket
5.9.3 Replacing Reel
Drive Sprocket, page 213
Insufficient reel to
cutterbar clearance
Increase clearance
5.8.1 Reel Clearance to
Cutterbar, page 186
Raise header
3.7.1 Cutting Height, page
49
Decrease header tilt
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Move reel aft
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Raise header
3.7.1 Cutting Height, page
49
Decrease header tilt
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Move reel aft
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Reel digging into ground
with reel speed slower
than ground speed
Reel digging into ground
with reel speed faster than
ground speed
Excessive plugging at
cutterbar with wads of crop
accumulating at cutterbar
while maintaining reel
operation
Correct plugging/cutting
issues
Stop reel before plugging
becomes excessive
245
3.13 Unplugging
Cutterbar, page 84
—
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
7.4
Header and Drapers
Symptom
Problem
Solution
Section
Header lift insufficient
Low relief pressure
Increase relief pressure
See your MacDon Dealer
Speed control set too low
Increase control setting
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page
57
Relief pressure too low
Increase relief pressure to
recommended setting
See your MacDon Dealer
Windrower header drive
too slow
Adjust to correct speed for
windrower model
Refer to the windrower
operator’s manual
Worn out gear pump
Replace pump
See your MacDon Dealer
Pressure compensator
(V7) set too low
Adjust to increase setting
Refer to your windrower
operator’s manual
Drapers are loose
Tighten drapers
Drive or idler roller
wrapped with material
Loosen draper and clean
rollers
Slat or connector bar
jammed by frame or
material
Loosen draper and clear
obstruction
Roller bearing seized
Replace
5.7.8 Draper Roller
Maintenance, page 174
Low hydraulic oil
Fill windrower reservoir to
full level
See your MacDon Dealer
Incorrect relief setting at
flow control valve
Adjust relief setting
See your MacDon Dealer
Lower reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Insufficient draper
speed
Draper will not move
Draper stalling
Material not feeding
evenly off knife
Header angle too low
Hesitation in flow of
bulky crop
147725
Material overload
on drapers
5.7.3 Adjusting Draper
Tension, page 165
• 6.2.3
Stub
Guard
Conversion Kit, page
231
Install stub guards
• 5.5.7 Knife
page 131
Guards,
• See
your
Dealer
MacDon
Increase header angle
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Increase side draper
speed
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page
57
Install upper cross auger
6.4.10 Upper Cross Auger
(UCA), page 237
Add flighting extensions
See your MacDon Dealer
246
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Symptom
Problem
Solution
Drapers back-feed
Drapers running too slow
in heavy crop
Increase draper speed
Crop is thrown across
opening and under
opposite side draper
Drapers running too fast
in light crop
Reduce draper speed
Material accumulates
inside or under front
edge of draper
Deck height improperly
adjusted
Adjust deck height
5.7.7 Adjusting Deck
Height, page 172
Material wrapping at
upper cross auger
beater bars
Crop conditions do not
require beater bars
Remove beater bars
3.14.1 Removing Beater
Bars, page 86
End deflectors too wide
For headers with manual
deck shift only, trim
deflector or replace
with narrow deflector
(MD #172381)
3.13 Unplugging
Cutterbar, page 84
Material accumulating
on end deflectors and
releasing in bunches
147725
247
Section
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page
57
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
7.5
Cutting Edible Beans
Symptom
Plants being stripped
and complete or partial
plants left behind
Problem
Solution
Section
Header off ground
Lower header to ground
and run on skid shoes
and/or cutterbar
Cutting On the Ground,
page 53
Float set too light—rides
on high spots and does
not lower soon enough
Set float for:
- Dry ground: 100–150 lbf
- Wet ground: 50–100 lbf
3.7.2 Header Float, page
55
Reel too high
Fully retract reel cylinders
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Reel too high with
cylinders fully retracted
Adjust reel height
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Finger pitch not
aggressive enough
Adjust finger pitch
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel too far aft
Move reel forward until
the fingertips skim the soil
surface with header on the
ground and the center-link
properly adjusted
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Lengthen center-link
If cutting on ground,
header angle can
be increased by fully
retracting lift cylinders
Header angle too shallow
Reel too slow
Adjust reel speed to be
marginally faster than
ground speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
Ground speed too fast
Lower ground speed
3.7.5 Ground Speed, page
56
Skid shoes too low
Raise skid shoes to
highest setting
Cutting On the Ground,
page 53
Dirt packs on bottom
of cutterbar and raises
cutterbar off the ground
Install plastic wear strips
on bottom of cutterbar and
skid shoes
See your MacDon Dealer
Dirt packing on bottom of
cutterbar with plastic wear
strips on cutterbar and
raises cutterbar off the
ground
147725
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Ground too wet. Allow soil
to dry
Manually clean the
bottom of cutterbar
when accumulation gets
unacceptable
248
—
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Symptom
Plants being stripped
and complete or partial
plants left behind
(cont’d)
Excessive losses at
dividers
Plant vines pinched
between top of draper
and cutterbar
Crop accumulating at
guards and not moving
rearward onto drapers
Problem
Solution
Section
Plastic wear strip for
cutterbar has been
installed over top of
steel wear plates
Remove steel cutterbar
wear plates when
installing the plastic
wear strips for cutterbar
—
Header not level
Level header
3.12 Levelling the Header,
page 83
Worn/damaged knife
sections
Replace sections or
complete knife
5.5 Knife, page 127
Parts of vines get caught in
pointed guard tip. (Occurs
more in row-cropped
beans that are hilled from
cultivating)
Install stub guard kit
6.2.3 Stub Guard
Conversion Kit, page
231
Divider rod running down
crop and shattering pods
Remove divider rod
Vines and plants build up
on endsheet
Install divider rod
Cutterbar has filled up
with trash with draper to
cutterbar gap properly
adjusted
Raise header fully at each
end of field, or as required
and shift decks back and
forth to help clean out
cutterbar
Shifting of decks with
header raised does not
clean out cutterbar debris
Manually remove debris
from cutterbar cavity
to prevent damage to
drapers
Reel finger pitch not
aggressive enough
Increase finger
aggressiveness (cam
position)
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel too high
Lower reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Minimum reel clearance to
cutterbar setting too high
Readjust reel minimum
height with cylinders fully
retracted
Adjusting Reel Clearance,
page 188
Reposition reel
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Reel speed too high
Reduce reel speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
Bean pods are too dry
Cut at night with heavy
dew once pods have
softened
—
Reel finger pitch too
retarded
Increase finger
aggressiveness (cam
position)
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel too far forward
Reel too far forward
Reel shattering pods
147725
249
3.7.12 Crop Divider Rods,
page 72
—
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Symptom
Cutterbar guards
breaking
Problem
Solution
Section
Float insufficient
Increase float
3.7.2 Header Float, page
55
Consider installing
optional stub guards
Tip: Experiment with a
few guards on a section of
cutterbar to compare the
performance of the two
different styles of guards
Excessive number of
rocks in field
Readjust float to make
header lighter
Header too heavy
Decrease header angle
with lift cylinders
Header angle too steep
Cutterbar pushing too
much trash and dirt
Cutterbar fills up
with dirt
Shorten the center-link
Cutterbar pushing too
much dirt in certain
locations for length
of field
147725
Guards,
• 6.2.3
Stub
Guard
Conversion Kit, page
231
3.7.2 Header Float, page
55
3.7.3 Header Angle, page
55
Regular guards push dirt
and plug up with trash
or plug up with trash and
then push dirt
Install stub guard kit
6.2.3 Stub Guard
Conversion Kit, page
231
Insufficient support for
header
Install center skid shoes
on header
Cutting On the Ground,
page 53
Adjust front deck supports
to obtain proper clearance
between cutterbar and
draper
5.7.7 Adjusting Deck
Height, page 172
Excessive gap between
top of front of draper and
cutterbar
Raise header fully at each
end of field or as required
and shift decks back and
forth to help clean out
cutterbar
Reel fingers (steel) bent
and hook plants from crop
flow on drapers
Reel carries over odd
plants in same location
• 5.5.7 Knife
page 131
Dirt accumulation on end
of fingers prevent plants
dropping off fingers onto
drapers
Tire tracks or row crop
ridges
Rolling land along length
of field
—
Straighten fingers (steel)
Raise reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Adjust reel fore and aft
location to move fingers
out of the ground
3.7.9 Reel Fore-Aft
Position, page 58
Cut at angle to ridges or
crop rows to allow knife
and guards to clean out
better
—
Cut at 90° to undulations,
provided knife floats
across without digging in
250
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
Problem
Solution
Section
Excessive accumulation
of crop on drapers (up to
height of reel center tube)
Increase draper speed
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page
57
Finger pitch too retarded
Increase finger pitch
3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
Reel wraps up with crop
Reel too low
Raise reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Reel ends wrap up
with crop
Uncut crop interfering on
reel ends
Add reel endshields
Refer to the header parts
catalog
Symptom
Reel carries over
excessive amounts
of plants or wads
147725
251
Revision A
TROUBLESHOOTING
7.6
Windrow Formation
Symptom
Heads on ground and
scattered
Problem
Solution
Section
Draper speed too slow
Increase draper speed
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page
57
Draper angle too flat
Increase header angle
Controlling Header Angle,
page 55
Ground speed too slow
Increase ground speed
3.7.5 Ground Speed, page
56
Crop too ripe
Cut material before
too mature
—
Draper speed too slow
Increase draper speed
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page
57
Delivery opening too wide
Decrease delivery
opening width
3.8 Delivery Opening,
page 74
Draper speed too fast or
header angle too steep
Reduce draper speed
and/or decrease
header angle
Ground speed too fast
Reduce ground speed
3.7.5 Ground Speed, page
56
Crop too green
Allow to mature
—
Crop leaning to one side
and reel too slow
Increase reel speed to
re-orient crop parallel
to draper slats and/or
increase finger pitch
aggressiveness
Ground speed too fast for
drapers, causing heads to
fan out and crop to leave
drapers unevenly
Reduce ground speed or
increase draper speed
Reel too low
Raise reel
3.7.8 Reel Height, page
58
Reel speed too fast
Reduce reel speed
3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
Hollow in center
All heads in center
All heads to one side
Uneven windrow (any
crop condition)
147725
252
3.7.6 Draper Speed, page
57
3.7.3 Header Angle, page
55
• 3.7.4 Reel Speed, page
56
• 3.7.10 Reel Tine Pitch,
page 65
• 3.7.5 Ground Speed,
page 56
• 3.7.6 Draper
page 57
Speed,
Revision A
8
Reference
8.1
Conversion Chart
Table 8.1 Conversion Chart
Quantity
Inch-Pound Units
Unit Name
Abbreviation
Area
Acres
acres
Flow
US gallons
per minute
Force
Factor
SI Units (Metric)
Unit Name
Abbreviation
x 0.4047 =
Hectares
ha
gpm
x 3.7854 =
Liters per minute
L/min
Pounds force
lbf
x 4.4482 =
Newtons
N
Inch
in.
x 25.4 =
Millimeters
mm
Foot
ft.
x 0.305 =
Meters
m
Power
Horsepower
hp
x 0.7457 =
Kilowatts
kW
x 6.8948 =
Kilopascals
kPa
Pressure
Pounds per
square inch
x .00689 =
Megapascals
MPa
÷ 14.5038 =
Bar (Non-SI)
bar
Length
Torque
Temperature
Velocity
Volume
Weight
147725
psi
Pound feet or
foot pounds
ft·lbf
x 1.3558 =
Newton meters
N·m
Pound inches or
inch pounds
in·lbf
x 0.1129 =
Newton meters
N·m
Degrees
Fahrenheit
˚F
(˚F-32) x 0.56 =
Celsius
˚C
Feet per minute
ft/min
x 0.3048 =
Meters per
minute
m/min
Feet per second
ft/s
x 0.3048 =
Meters per
second
m/s
Miles per hour
mph
x 1.6063 =
Kilometres per
hour
km/h
US gallons
US gal
x 3.7854 =
Liters
L
Ounces
oz.
x 29.5735 =
Milliliters
ml
Cubic inches
in.3
x 16.3871 =
Cubic
centimeters
cm3 or cc
Pounds
lbs
x 0.4536 =
Kilograms
kg
253
Revision A
REFERENCE
8.2
Torque Specifications
The following tables provide the correct torque values for various bolts, cap screws, and hydraulic fittings.
• Tighten all bolts to the torque values specified in the charts (unless otherwise noted throughout this manual).
• Replace hardware with the same strength and grade of bolt.
• Use the torque value tables as a guide and periodically check tightness of bolts.
• Understand torque categories for bolts and cap screws by using their identifying head markings.
8.2.1
SAE Bolt Torque Specifications
Torque values shown in the following tables are valid for non-greased, or non-oiled threads and heads; therefore,
do NOT grease or oil bolts or cap screws unless otherwise specified in this manual.
Table 8.2 SAE Grade 5 Bolt and Grade 5 Free
Spinning Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
1/4-20
*106
*117
11.9
13.2
5/16-18
*218
*241
24.6
27.1
3/8-16
32
36
44
48
7/16-14
52
57
70
77
1/2-13
79
87
106
118
9/16-12
114
126
153
170
5/8-11
157
173
212
234
3/4-10
281
311
380
420
7/8-9
449
496
606
669
1-8
611
676
825
912
147725
Figure 8.1: Bolt Grades
A - Nominal Size
C - SAE-5
254
B - SAE-8
D - SAE-2
Revision A
REFERENCE
Table 8.3 SAE Grade 5 Bolt and Grade F Distorted
Thread Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
1/4-20
*72
*80
8.1
9
5/16-18
*149
*164
16.7
18.5
3/8-16
22
24
30
33
7/16-14
35
39
48
53
1/2-13
54
59
73
80
9/16-12
77
86
105
116
5/8-11
107
118
144
160
3/4-10
192
212
259
286
7/8-9
306
338
413
456
1-8
459
507
619
684
Figure 8.2: Bolt Grades
A - Nominal Size
C - SAE-5
B - SAE-8
D - SAE-2
Table 8.4 SAE Grade 8 Bolt and Grade G Distorted
Thread Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
1/4-20
*150
*165
16.8
18.6
5/16-18
18
19
24
26
3/8-16
31
34
42
46
7/16-14
50
55
67
74
1/2-13
76
84
102
113
9/16-12
109
121
148
163
5/8-11
151
167
204
225
3/4-10
268
296
362
400
7/8-9
432
477
583
644
1-8
647
716
874
966
147725
Figure 8.3: Bolt Grades
A - Nominal Size
C - SAE-5
255
B - SAE-8
D - SAE-2
Revision A
REFERENCE
Table 8.5 SAE Grade 8 Bolt and Grade 8 Free
Spinning Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
1/4-20
*150
*165
16.8
18.6
5/16-18
26
28
35
38
3/8-16
46
50
61
68
7/16-14
73
81
98
109
1/2-13
111
123
150
166
9/16-12
160
177
217
239
5/8-11
221
345
299
330
3/4-10
393
435
531
587
7/8-9
633
700
855
945
1-8
863
954
1165
1288
8.2.2
Figure 8.4: Bolt Grades
A - Nominal Size
C - SAE-5
B - SAE-8
D - SAE-2
Metric Bolt Specifications
Table 8.6 Metric Class 8.8 Bolts and Class 9 Free
Spinning Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
3-0.5
*13
*14
1.4
1.6
3.5-0.6
*20
*22
2.2
2.5
4-0.7
*29
*32
3.3
3.7
5-0.8
*59
*66
6.7
7.4
6-1.0
*101
*112
11.4
12.6
8-1.25
20
23
28
30
10-1.5
40
45
55
60
12-1.75
70
78
95
105
14-2.0
113
124
152
168
16-2.0
175
193
236
261
20-2.5
341
377
460
509
24-3.0
589
651
796
879
147725
Figure 8.5: Bolt Grades
256
Revision A
REFERENCE
Table 8.7 Metric Class 8.8 Bolts and Class 9 Distorted
Thread Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
3-0.5
*9
*10
1
1.1
3.5-0.6
*14
*15
1.5
1.7
4-0.7
*20
*22
2.3
2.5
5-0.8
*40
*45
4.5
5
6-1.0
*69
*76
7.7
8.6
8-1.25
*167
*185
18.8
20.8
10-1.5
28
30
37
41
12-1.75
48
53
65
72
14-2.0
77
85
104
115
16-2.0
119
132
161
178
20-2.5
233
257
314
347
24-3.0
402
444
543
600
Figure 8.6: Bolt Grades
Table 8.8 Metric Class 10.9 Bolts and Class 10 Free
Spinning Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
3-0.5
*18
*19
1.8
2
3.5-0.6
*27
*30
2.8
3.1
4-0.7
*41
*45
4.2
4.6
5-0.8
*82
*91
8.4
9.3
6-1.0
*140
*154
14.3
15.8
8-1.25
28
31
38
42
10-1.5
56
62
75
83
12-1.75
97
108
132
145
14-2.0
156
172
210
232
16-2.0
242
267
326
360
20-2.5
472
521
637
704
24-3.0
815
901
1101
1217
147725
Figure 8.7: Bolt Grades
257
Revision A
REFERENCE
Table 8.9 Metric Class 10.9 Bolts and Class 10
Distorted Thread Nut
Nominal
Size (A)
Torque (ft·lbf)
(*in·lbf)
Torque (N·m)
Min.
Max.
Min.
Max.
3-0.5
*12
*13
1.3
1.5
3.5-0.6
*19
*21
2.1
2.3
4-0.7
*28
*31
3.1
3.4
5-0.8
*56
*62
6.3
7
6-1.0
*95
*105
10.7
11.8
8-1.25
19
21
26
29
10-1.5
38
42
51
57
12-1.75
66
73
90
99
14-2.0
106
117
143
158
16-2.0
165
182
222
246
20-2.5
322
356
434
480
24-3.0
556
614
750
829
147725
Figure 8.8: Bolt Grades
258
Revision A
REFERENCE
8.2.3
Metric Bolt Specifications Bolting into Cast Aluminum
Table 8.10 Metric Bolt Bolting into Cast Aluminum
Bolt Torque
Nominal
Size (A)
8.8
(Cast Aluminum)
10.9
(Cast Aluminum)
ft·lbf
N·m
ft·lbf
N·m
M3
–
–
1
–
M4
–
–
2.6
4
M5
–
–
5.5
8
M6
6
9
9
12
M8
14
20
20
28
M10
28
40
40
55
M12
52
70
73
100
M14
–
–
–
–
M16
–
–
–
–
8.2.4
Figure 8.9: Bolt Grades
Flare-Type Hydraulic Fittings
1. Check flare (A) and flare seat (B) for defects that might
cause leakage.
2. Align tube (C) with fitting (D) and thread nut (E) onto
fitting without lubrication until contact has been made
between the flared surfaces.
3. Torque the fitting nut (E) to the specified number of
flats from finger tight (FFFT) or to a given torque value
in Table 8.11 Flare-Type Hydraulic Tube Fittings, page
260.
4. Use two wrenches to prevent fitting (D) from rotating.
Place one wrench on the fitting body (D) and tighten
nut (E) with the other wrench to the torque shown.
Figure 8.10: Hydraulic Fitting
5. Assess the final condition of the connection.
147725
259
Revision A
REFERENCE
Table 8.11 Flare-Type Hydraulic Tube Fittings
Torque Value22
SAE Dash Size
Thread Size (in.)
-2
Flats from Finger Tight (FFFT)
ft·lbf
N·m
Tube
Swivel Nut or
Hose
5/16–24
3–4
4–5
—
—
-3
3/8–24
5–6
7–8
—
—
-4
7/16–20
13–14
18–19
2-1/2
2
-5
1/2–20
14–15
19–21
2
2
-6
9/16–18
22–24
30–33
2
1-1/2
-8
3/4–16
42–46
57–63
2
1-1/2
-10
7/8–14
60–66
81–89
1-1/2
1-1/2
-12
1-1/16–12
83–91
113–124
1-1/2
1-1/4
-14
1-3/16–12
100–110
136–149
1-1/2
1-1/4
-16
1-5/16–12
118–130
160–176
1-1/2
1
-20
1-5/8–12
168–184
228–250
1
1
-24
1-7/8–12
195–215
264–291
1
1
-32
2-1/2–12
265–291
359–395
1
1
-40
3–12
—
—
1
1
22. Torque values shown are based on lubricated connections as in reassembly.
147725
260
Revision A
REFERENCE
8.2.5
O-Ring Boss (ORB) Hydraulic Fittings (Adjustable)
1. Inspect O-ring (A)
obvious defects.
and
seat
(B)
for
dirt
or
2. Back off the lock nut (C) as far as possible. Ensure
that washer (D) is loose and is pushed toward the lock
nut (C) as far as possible.
3. Check that O-ring (A) is NOT on the threads and adjust
if necessary.
4. Apply hydraulic system oil to the O-ring (A).
Figure 8.11: Hydraulic Fitting
5. Install fitting (B) into port until back up washer (D) and
O-ring (A) contact the part face (E).
6. Position angle fittings by unscrewing no more than
one turn.
7. Turn lock nut (C) down to washer (D) and tighten to
torque shown. Use two wrenches, one on fitting (B)
and the other on lock nut (C).
8. Check the final condition of the fitting.
Figure 8.12: Hydraulic Fitting
147725
261
Revision A
REFERENCE
Table 8.12 O-Ring Boss (ORB) Hydraulic Fittings (Adjustable)
SAE Dash Size
Thread Size (in.)
-2
Torque Value23
ft·lbf (*in·lbf)
N·m
5/16–24
*53–62
6–7
-3
3/8–24
*106–115
12–13
-4
7/16–20
14–15
19–21
-5
1/2–20
15–24
21–33
-6
9/16–18
19–21
26–29
-8
3/4–16
34–37
46–50
-10
7/8–14
55–60
75–82
-12
1-1/16–12
88–97
120–132
-14
1-3/8–12
113–124
153–168
-16
1-5/16–12
130–142
176–193
-20
1-5/8–12
163–179
221–243
-24
1-7/8–12
199–220
270–298
-32
2-1/2–12
245–269
332–365
23. Torque values shown are based on lubricated connections as in reassembly.
147725
262
Revision A
REFERENCE
8.2.6
O-Ring Boss (ORB) Hydraulic Fittings (Non-Adjustable)
1. Inspect O-ring (A)
obvious defects.
and
seat
(B)
for
dirt
or
2. Check that O-ring (A) is NOT on the threads and adjust
if necessary.
3. Apply hydraulic system oil to the O-ring.
4. Install fitting (C) into port until fitting is hand tight.
5. Torque fitting (C) according to the values in
Table 8.13 O-Ring Boss (ORB) Hydraulic Fittings
(Non-Adjustable), page 263.
6. Check the final condition of the fitting.
Figure 8.13: Hydraulic Fitting
Table 8.13 O-Ring Boss (ORB) Hydraulic Fittings (Non-Adjustable)
SAE Dash Size
Thread Size (in.)
-2
Torque Value24
ft·lbf (*in·lbf)
N·m
5/16–24
*53–62
6–7
-3
3/8–24
*106–115
12–13
-4
7/16–20
14–15
19–21
-5
1/2–20
15–24
21–33
-6
9/16–18
19–21
26–29
-8
3/4–16
34–37
46–50
-10
7/8–14
55–60
75–82
-12
1-1/16–12
88–97
120–132
-14
1-3/8–12
113–124
153–168
-16
1-5/16–12
130–142
176–193
-20
1-5/8–12
163–179
221–243
-24
1-7/8–12
199–220
270–298
-32
2-1/2–12
245–269
332–365
24. Torque values shown are based on lubricated connections as in reassembly.
147725
263
Revision A
REFERENCE
8.2.7
O-Ring Face Seal (ORFS) Hydraulic Fittings
1. Check components to ensure that the sealing surfaces
and fitting threads are free of burrs, nicks, scratches,
or any foreign material.
Figure 8.14: Hydraulic Fitting
2. Apply hydraulic system oil to the O-ring (B).
3. Align the tube or hose assembly so that the flat face
of the sleeve (A) or (C) comes in full contact with
O-ring (B).
4. Thread tube or hose nut (D) until hand-tight. The nut
should turn freely until it is bottomed out.
5. Torque fittings according to the values in Table 8.14
O-Ring Face Seal (ORFS) Hydraulic Fittings, page
265.
NOTE:
If applicable, hold the hex on the fitting body (E)
to prevent rotation of fitting body and hose when
tightening the fitting nut (D).
Figure 8.15: Hydraulic Fitting
6. Use three wrenches when assembling unions or joining
two hoses together.
7. Check the final condition of the fitting.
147725
264
Revision A
REFERENCE
Table 8.14 O-Ring Face Seal (ORFS) Hydraulic Fittings
SAE Dash Size
Thread Size (in.)
Tube O.D. (in.)
-3
Note26
-4
Torque Value25
ft·lbf
N·m
3/16
–
–
9/16
1/4
18–21
25–28
-5
Note26
5/16
–
–
-6
11/16
3/8
29–32
40–44
-8
13/16
1/2
41–45
55–61
-10
1
5/8
59–65
80–88
-12
1-3/16
3/4
85–94
115–127
-14
Note26
7/8
–
–
-16
1-7/16
1
111–122
150–165
-20
1-11/16
1-1/4
151–167
205–226
-24
1–2
1-1/2
232–256
315–347
-32
2-1/2
2
376–414
510–561
25. Torque values and angles shown are based on lubricated connection as in reassembly.
26. O-ring face seal type end not defined for this tube size.
147725
265
Revision A
REFERENCE
8.3
Unloading and Assembly
Refer to the header-specific instructions for unloading, assembly, and setup procedures that are included with your
shipment. The instruction part numbers are shown in the following table:
Shipping Destination
Header Description
MacDon Instruction
Part Number
North America
D65 Draper Header for
Self-Propelled Windrowers
MD #147739
Export (anywhere other than
North America)
D65 Draper Header for
Self-Propelled Windrowers
MD #147740
147725
266
Revision A
Index
A
AHHC
definitions ........................................................ 23
API
definitions ........................................................ 23
ASTM
definitions ........................................................ 23
axle bolts .......................................................... 224
B
bearings
draper drive rollers ......................................... 178
draper idler rollers .......................................... 175
beater bars
installing .......................................................... 87
removing ......................................................... 86
belts
knife drive
non-timed ................................................... 148
tensioning non-timed drive belts................... 150
timed.......................................................... 151
knife drive belt (non-timed drive)
installing belts – SK, DK .............................. 149
removing belt – SK, DK ............................... 148
knife drive belt (timed drive)
adjusting belt tracking – SK, DK ................... 159
adjusting timing (DK 35-ft and smaller) –
LH, RH ..................................................... 156
installing belts – DK header – LH, RH........... 153
removing belt – DK header – LH, RH............ 152
tensioning belt – LH, RH.............................. 155
v-belt (timed drive)
installing v-belt............................................ 151
removing v-belt ........................................... 151
break-in inspections ............................................116
break-in period .................................................... 41
C
cab forward
definitions ........................................................ 23
cams
adjusting .......................................................... 67
center-links ......................................................... 23
See also hydraulic links
definitions ........................................................ 23
chains
reel drive
adjusting tension ..........................................211
component identification....................................... 25
conversion charts .............................................. 253
crop divider rods .................................................. 72
removing ......................................................... 72
crop dividers........................................................ 67
installing on header without latch option ............. 70
installing onto header with latch option............... 69
removing from header with latch option.............. 67
removing from header without latch option ......... 68
cutterbars
unplugging ....................................................... 84
wearplate....................................................... 230
cutting
height .............................................................. 49
off the ground................................................... 49
adjusting stabilizer wheels ............................. 51
adjusting stabilizer/slow speed transport
wheels........................................................ 50
on the ground................................................... 53
D
D-Series headers
definitions ........................................................ 23
daily start-up checks ............................................ 40
decal locations ...................................................... 8
decks
shifting hydraulically ......................................... 76
shifting manually .............................................. 77
definition of terms ................................................ 23
delivery openings................................................. 74
changing on header with hydraulic deck
shift ............................................................... 75
changing on header with manual deck shift......... 74
divider latch kits................................................. 232
divider rods ......................................................... 72
removing ......................................................... 72
DK
definitions ........................................................ 23
double draper drives .......................................... 234
double reels
centering ....................................................... 190
double windrow attachments ......................... 78, 234
DR
definitions ........................................................ 23
draper decks
adjusting height .............................................. 172
draper deflectors
narrow ........................................................... 234
installing ..................................................... 185
removing .................................................... 184
INDEX
wide .............................................................. 235
installing ..................................................... 182
removing .................................................... 181
draper extension kits.......................................... 235
draper roller bearings
inspecting ...................................................... 174
drapers ............................................................. 163
adjusting tension ............................................ 165
adjusting tracking ........................................... 170
drive roller
installing ..................................................... 180
removing .................................................... 177
drive roller bearings
replacing bearings....................................... 178
endless draper
installing ..................................................... 169
removing .................................................... 167
idler roller
removing .................................................... 174
idler roller bearings
replacing .................................................... 175
idler rollers
installing ..................................................... 177
removing .................................................... 174
installing drapers ............................................ 163
removing draper ............................................. 163
speed .............................................................. 57
drive rollers
draper
installing drive roller .................................... 180
removing drive roller.................................... 177
drapers
replacing bearings....................................... 178
DWA
definitions ........................................................ 23
E
electrical
maintenance .................................................. 126
replacing light bulbs........................................ 126
end of season service .........................................117
endshields........................................................... 35
adjusting .......................................................... 39
closing............................................................. 36
installing .......................................................... 38
opening ........................................................... 35
removing ......................................................... 37
engine forward
definitions ........................................................ 23
G
glossary .............................................................. 23
greasing procedures .......................................... 124
ground speeds .................................................... 56
guards
knife guards ................................................... 131
adjusting .................................................... 131
replacing pointed guards – DK header.......... 133
replacing pointed guards – SK header .......... 133
replacing stub guards – DK header .............. 135
replacing stub guards – SK header............... 134
stub guard conversion kit ................................ 231
H
haying tips........................................................... 81
HC10 Hay Conditioners ..................................... 236
header drapers
installing drapers ............................................ 163
headers
attaching to windrower.................................... 105
attachments ..................................................... 44
controls ........................................................... 43
deck heights
adjusting .................................................... 172
definitions ........................................................ 23
detaching from windrower ............................... 108
header angle.................................................... 55
controlling..................................................... 55
header float...................................................... 55
levelling ........................................................... 83
operating variables ........................................... 49
recommended setting ....................................... 44
safety prop....................................................... 32
setup ............................................................... 44
towing the header............................................. 88
transporting...................................................... 88
transporting on windrower................................. 88
unloading and assembly ................................. 266
hold-downs, See knives
hydraulic deck shifts ..................................... 76, 236
hydraulics
fittings
flare-type .................................................... 259
O-ring boss (ORB) adjustable ...................... 261
O-ring boss (ORB) non-adjustable ............... 263
O-ring face seal (ORFS) .............................. 264
hoses and lines ...............................................118
hydraulic safety .................................................. 6
I
idler rollers
draper
removing idler roller..................................... 174
drapers
INDEX
installing idler rollers.................................... 177
removing .................................................... 174
replacing .................................................... 175
inspections
break-in ..........................................................116
K
knife drive belts, See belts
knife drives........................................................ 140
adjusting timed DK headers ............................ 156
knife drive box................................................ 140
changing oil ................................................ 148
installing pulley ........................................... 145
installing untimed SK, DK ............................ 145
mounting bolts ............................................ 140
removing .................................................... 140
removing pulley .......................................... 144
removing timed DK, LH, RH......................... 142
removing untimed SK, DK ........................... 140
knives ............................................................... 127
hold-down
adjusting on headers with pointed
guards ...................................................... 137
adjusting on headers with stub guards.......... 138
checking..................................................... 136
installing knife ................................................ 130
knife guards
adjusting .................................................... 131
checking..................................................... 131
replacing pointed guards – DK header.......... 133
replacing pointed guards – SK header .......... 133
replacing stub guards – DK header .............. 135
replacing stub guards – SK header............... 134
knife section
replacing .................................................... 127
knifehead bearing
installing ..................................................... 130
removing .................................................... 129
knifehead shield ...................................... 138, 230
installing ..................................................... 138
removing knife ............................................... 129
spare location ................................................ 131
speed .............................................................. 57
vertical knife mounts....................................... 231
L
light bulbs
replacing........................................................ 126
lodged crop reel finger kits ................................. 227
lubrication and servicing......................................118
greasing procedure ........................................ 124
M
maintenance
draper roller ................................................... 174
electrical ........................................................ 126
end of season service......................................117
preseason/annual service ................................117
requirements...................................................114
schedule/record ..............................................115
service intervals ..............................................119
specifications ..................................................112
storage .......................................................... 103
maintenance and servicing .................................. 111
maintenance safety ............................................ 5
preparing for servicing ..................................... 111
manual deck shifts ............................................... 77
metric bolts
torque specifications....................................... 256
model numbers
record................................................................ v
motors
reel drive ....................................................... 217
reel drives............................................... 217–218
mounting bolts
knife drive box................................................ 140
multi-crop rapid reel conversion kits .................... 227
O
oils
knife drive box
changing oil ................................................ 148
operating variables
headers ........................................................... 49
operations ........................................................... 31
operator responsibilities ....................................... 31
options.............................................................. 227
cutterbar wearplate......................................... 230
divider latch kit ............................................... 232
double draper drive ........................................ 234
double windrow attachment............................. 234
draper deflector
narrow........................................................ 234
wide ........................................................... 235
draper extension kit ........................................ 235
hay conditioner............................................... 236
hydraulic deck shift ......................................... 236
knifehead shield ...................................... 138, 230
lodged crop reel finger kit................................ 227
multi-crop rapid reel conversion kit .................. 227
PR15 tine tube reel conversion kit ................... 228
reel drive sprocket ............................................ 56
reel endshield kit ............................................ 228
rice divider ..................................................... 238
rice divider rods................................................ 73
INDEX
stabilizer wheel .............................................. 232
stabilizer/slow speed transport wheel............... 233
stub guard conversion kit ................................ 231
swath deflector rod (end delivery) .................... 236
swath forming rods (center delivery) ................ 237
tine tube kit .................................................... 229
transport system............................................. 223
upper cross auger ..................................... 85, 237
upper cross auger case drain kit for SDD ......... 238
upper cross auger hydraulic kit for DDD ........... 237
vertical knife mount kit .................................... 231
owner responsibilities........................................... 31
P
pick-up reels, See PR15 pick-up reels
PR15 pick-up reels
adjusting cam................................................... 67
centering ....................................................... 190
double reel ................................................. 190
single reel................................................... 191
drive chains
adjusting tension ..........................................211
replacing chain on double-reel drive
using break chain method ........................ 221
replacing chain on double-reel drives ........... 219
replacing chain on single-reel drives............. 221
fore-aft position ................................................ 58
adjusting ...................................................... 59
repositioning cylinders
double reel ................................................ 62
single reel ................................................. 60
frown ............................................................. 189
adjusting .................................................... 189
height .............................................................. 58
plastic finger
installing ..................................................... 193
removing .................................................... 192
recommended setting ....................................... 47
reel clearance ................................................ 186
adjusting .................................................... 188
measuring .................................................. 186
reel drive ....................................................... 209
sprocket
optional ..................................................... 56
reel drive motor .............................................. 217
reel drive motors
installing ..................................................... 218
removing .................................................... 217
reel drives
covers
installing.................................................. 210
removing................................................. 209
replacing ................................................. 209
drive chains
loosening .................................................211
tightening ................................................ 212
drive sprockets
installing.................................................. 214
removing................................................. 213
installing double reel U-joints ....................... 216
removing double reel U-joints ...................... 215
replacing chain on double-reel drives
using reel method .................................... 219
replacing double reel U-joints....................... 215
sprockets
replacing ................................................. 213
reel endshield ................................................ 206
kit .............................................................. 228
replacing .................................................... 206
replacing support ........................................ 207
reel safety prop
disengaging .................................................. 34
reel safety props............................................... 33
reel setting ....................................................... 65
reel speed........................................................ 56
reel tine pitch ................................................... 65
reel tines........................................................ 191
steel tine
installing ..................................................... 192
removing .................................................... 191
tine tube bushing............................................ 194
installing on 5-, 6- or 9-bat reels ................... 199
removing from 5-, 6- or 9-bat reels ............... 194
preseason/annual service....................................117
product overview ................................................. 23
pulleys
installing ........................................................ 145
removing ....................................................... 144
R
recommended fluids and lubricants ......................112
recommended settings
header............................................................. 44
reel.................................................................. 47
reel drives
drive chains
replacing chain on double-reel drive
using break chain method ........................ 221
using reel method .................................... 219
replacing chain on double-reel drives ........... 219
replacing chain on single-reel drives............. 221
reel fore-aft positions ........................................... 58
adjusting .......................................................... 59
reel safety props .................................................. 33
engaging ......................................................... 33
reel speeds ......................................................... 56
INDEX
reels, See PR15 pick-up reels
references
definition of terms ............................................. 23
unloading and assembly ................................. 266
rice divider rods ................................................... 73
rice dividers....................................................... 238
roller chains
installing .........................................................112
rpm
definitions ........................................................ 23
S
SAE
bolt torques.................................................... 254
definitions ........................................................ 23
safety.................................................................... 1
alert symbols...................................................... 1
daily start-up check .......................................... 40
decal locations ................................................... 8
general safety .................................................... 3
header props.................................................... 32
hydraulic safety .................................................. 6
maintenance and servicing.................................. 5
operational....................................................... 32
reel safety props............................................... 33
safety sign decals............................................... 7
installing decals .............................................. 7
interpreting decals......................................... 15
signal words....................................................... 2
sealed bearings
installing .........................................................113
serial numbers
location.............................................................. v
record................................................................ v
service intervals..................................................119
servicing, See maintenance and servicing
setting up the header ......................................... 266
shutting down procedures .................................... 42
single reels
centering ....................................................... 191
SK
definitions ........................................................ 23
skid shoes, See cutting on the ground
adjusting inner skid shoe .................................. 54
adjusting outer skid shoe .................................. 54
spare knives...................................................... 131
specifications ...................................................... 26
torque specifications....................................... 254
speed
draper speed.................................................... 57
ground speed................................................... 56
knife ................................................................ 57
reel speed........................................................ 56
spm
definitions ........................................................ 23
sprockets ................................................... 209–214
optional reel drive sprocket ............................... 56
replacing reel drive sprockets .......................... 213
SR
definitions ........................................................ 23
stabilizer wheels ................................................ 232
adjusting .......................................................... 51
stabilizer/slow speed transport wheels ................ 233
adjusting .......................................................... 50
start-up
daily check....................................................... 40
steel tines
installing ........................................................ 192
removing ....................................................... 191
stub guard conversion kit ................................... 231
swath deflector rods (end delivery)...................... 236
swath forming rods (center delivery).................... 237
T
tine tubes
bushing ......................................................... 194
installing on 5-, 6- or 9-bat reels ................... 199
removing from 5-, 6- or 9-bat reels ............... 194
reel conversion kit .......................................... 228
tine tube kit .................................................... 229
tire inflation/pressure.......................................... 225
torque specifications .......................................... 254
axle bolts ....................................................... 224
flare-type hydraulic fittings .............................. 259
metric bolt specifications ................................. 256
bolting into cast aluminum ........................... 259
O-ring boss (ORB) fittings
(non-adjustable) ........................................... 263
O-ring boss (ORB) hydraulic fittings
(adjustable) .................................................. 261
O-ring face seal (ORFS) fittings....................... 264
SAE bolt torque specifications ......................... 254
tow-bars
attaching........................................................ 100
removing ......................................................... 90
storing ............................................................. 91
towing
attaching header to towing vehicle..................... 89
attaching tow-bars ..................................... 90, 100
converting from field to transport ....................... 95
converting from transport to field ....................... 90
moving front (left) wheels to field position........... 92
moving front (left) wheels to transport
position .......................................................... 95
moving rear (right) wheels to field position ......... 93
INDEX
moving rear (right) wheels to transport
position .......................................................... 97
towing the header........................................88–89
tractors
definitions ........................................................ 23
transport system ................................................ 223
axle bolt torque .............................................. 224
tire inflation/pressure ...................................... 225
tow-bar
attaching .................................................... 100
wheel bolt torque............................................ 223
transport systems
converting from field to transport ....................... 95
moving front (left) wheels to transport
position....................................................... 95
moving rear (right) wheels to transport
position....................................................... 97
converting from transport to field ....................... 90
moving front (left) wheels to field position......... 92
moving rear (right) wheels to field
position....................................................... 93
tow-bars
removing ...................................................... 90
storing .......................................................... 91
troubleshooting.................................................. 239
crop loss at cutterbar ...................................... 239
cutting action and knife components ................ 241
cutting edible beans........................................ 248
header and drapers ........................................ 246
reel delivery ................................................... 244
windrow formation .......................................... 252
trucks
definitions ........................................................ 23
U
U-joints
reel drives............................................... 215–216
unloading and assembly..................................... 266
upper cross augers ....................................... 85, 237
case drain kit for SDD..................................... 238
hydraulic kit for DDD....................................... 237
installing beater bars ........................................ 87
removing beater bars........................................ 86
V
V-belts (timed drive)
installing ........................................................ 151
removing ....................................................... 151
W
wheels and tires
tire inflation/pressure ...................................... 225
wheel bolt torque............................................ 223
windrowers
attaching to header......................................... 105
definitions ........................................................ 23
detaching from header.................................... 108
header attachment/detachment ....................... 105
transporting header .......................................... 88
windrows
chemical drying agents ..................................... 82
configuration .................................................... 81
curing .............................................................. 81
delivery opening ............................................... 74
double windrowing............................................ 76
driving on......................................................... 82
haying tips ....................................................... 81
raking and tedding............................................ 82
topsoil moisture ................................................ 81
types ............................................................... 79
weather and topography ................................... 81
MacDon Industries Ltd.
680 Moray Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Canada R3J 3S3
t. (204) 885-5590
f. (204) 832-7749
MacDon, Inc.
10708 N. Pomona Avenue
Kansas City, Missouri
United States 64153-1924
t. (816) 891-7313
f. (816) 891-7323
MacDon Australia Pty. Ltd.
A.C.N. 079 393 721
P.O. Box 243, Suite 3, 143 Main Street
Greensborough, Victoria, Australia 3088
t. 03 9432 9982
f. 03 9432 9972
LLC MacDon Russia Ltd.
123317 Moscow, Russia
10 Presnenskaya nab, Block C
Floor 5, Office No. 534, Regus Business Centre
t. +7 495 775 6971
f. +7 495 967 7600
CUSTOMERS
MacDon.com
DEALERS
Portal.MacDon.com
Trademarks of products are the marks of their
respective manufacturers and/or distributors.
Printed in Canada
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement