Front Section

Front Section
University Calendar 2015-16
2015
Fall 2015
August
May
September
S MT W R F S
12 3 4 5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 181920212223 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
October
June
1 2
3
4
5
6
7 8 9 10111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
November
282930
July
1234 5 6 7
8
9
10 11
December
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
August
January
1
2 3 4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
3031
September
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
272829
2
9
16
23
30
3
10
17
24
4
11
18
25
5
12
19
26
October
123
4 5 6
7
8
9
10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18192021222324
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
November
1 2 3
4
5
6
7
8 9 1011121314
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
2930
December
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
272829
2
3
9
10
16 17
23 24
30 31
4
11
18
25
5
12
19
26
27
Residence halls open—7:00 a.m.
31
Classes begin; Late registration and drop/add begins
3
Last day to add, late register, change grading options, drop
or change sections for first-half block courses
7
Labor Day (offices closed)
10 Last day to add, late register, change grading options, drop
or change sections in semester courses - strictly enforced
10
Last day to make change to health insurance selection
18
Tuition/Fees due, strictly enforced (see page 25)
2
Last day to withdraw from first-half block courses
23Midsemester
28
Midterm grades must be submitted online by noon
29 Last day to add, late register, change grading options, drop
or change sections for second-half block courses
2-6 Advising week for Spring 2016
4
Priority registration for Spring 2016 begins
13
Last day to withdraw from individual semester courses
25
Last day to withdraw from the university for Fall 2015
25-27 Thanksgiving holiday (classes excused)
2
Last day to withdraw from second-half block courses
11
Last day of classes
14-18 Finals Week
19
Residence halls close—12:00 p.m.
4
Final grades must be submitted online by noon (1/4/16)
Spring 2016
January
18
Martin Luther King Jr./Wyoming Equality Day
(offices closed)
22
Residence halls open - 8:00 a.m.
25
Classes begin; late registration and drop/add begin
28 Last day to add, late register, change grading options, drop
or change sections for first-half block courses
February
1
Registration for Summer 2016 main campus courses begins
3
Last day to add, late register, change grading options, drop
or change sections in semester courses - strictly enforced
3
Last day to make change to health insurance selection
12
Tuition/Fees due, strictly enforced (see page 25)
26
Last day to withdraw from first-half block courses
March 11Midsemester
14-18 Spring break
23
Midterm grades must be submitted online by noon
24 Last day to add, late register, change grading options, drop
or change sections for second-half block courses
March/April28-1 Advising week for Fall 2016
March
30
Priority registration for Fall 2016 begins
April
7
Last day to withdraw from individual courses
22
Last day to withdraw from second-half block courses
22
Last day to withdraw from the university for spring 2016
May
6
Last day of classes
9-13 Finals Week
14Commencement
14
Residence halls close—12:00 p.m.
19
Final grades must be submitted online by noon
Notes:
(1) Refer to the Class Schedule for information on registration.
(2) Subject to change on not less than 30 days’ notice unless an actual emergency arises, in which
event the administration may exercise its option to make any change without notice.
2
2016
January
S
M T
W
R
F
S
12
3 4 5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17181920212223
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
February
1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
2829
3
4
5
6
10111213
17 18 19 20
24 25 26 27
March
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20 21 22
272829
2 3
9
10
16 17
23 24
30 31
4
11
18
25
5
12
19
26
April
12
3 4 5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17181920212223
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
May
1 2 3
4
5
6
7
8 9 1011121314
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
293031
June
5 6 7
12 13 14
19 20 21
26 27 28
1234
8
9
10 11
15 16 17 18
22 23 24 25
29 30
July
12
3 4 5
6
7
8
9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17181920212223
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
August
1 2
7 8 9
14 15 16
21 22 23
282930
3
4
5
6
10111213
17 18 19 20
24 25 26 27
31
Table of Contents
College and Division Programs
Academic Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Admission to the University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Credit Available to Undergraduate Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Commonly Used Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Course Prefixes and Description Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Courses of Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Division of Student Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
FERPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Grading System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Graduation Requirements and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Honor Societies and Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Other University Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Registration and Enrollment in Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Special Programs and Facilities for Research and Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Student Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
University Accreditation/Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
University Calendar 2015-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
University Outreach Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
University Studies Designations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
University Studies Program 2015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
University Studies Program 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
College of Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
College of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
College of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .368
College of Engineering and Applied Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416
College of Health Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
College of Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .530
Armed Forces Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537
Bachelor of Applied Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .542
Earth System Science Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544
Faculty Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563
Honors Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 560
Information Literacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 551
Intercollegiate Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 552
Interdisciplinary Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .520
National Outdoor Leadership School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554
School of Energy Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556
School of Environment and Natural Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545
UWYO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .562
University Catalogs Available
University Catalog—Online only
Law School Bulletin—College of Law, Dept. 3035—(307) 766‑6416
Summer Bulletin—Online only
(All addresses: 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071)
University of Wyoming World-Wide Web address: www.uwyo.edu
The University of Wyoming is built upon a strong foundation of integrity, respect and trust. All members of the university community have
a responsibility to be honest and the right to expect honesty from others. Any form of academic dishonesty is unacceptable to our community
and will not be tolerated.
The University of Wyoming is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and institution and does not discriminate on the basis of
race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, individual handicap, or veteran status in any aspect of employment or services. The institution’s
educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are administered on a nondiscriminatory basis subject
to the provisions of all civil rights laws and statutes. Evidence of practices that are not consistent with this policy should be reported to the
Employment Practices Officer, 766-3459.
3
Administration
The Trustees of the University of Wyoming
Administrative Officers
Dave Palmerlee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President
John MacPherson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President
Jeff Marsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Secretary
Dave True . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Treasurer
Arley Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . Assistant Vice President and Special Assistant
to the VP of Administration
Carolyn Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Auxiliary Services
Mike Samp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chief, Campus Police
Larry Blake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Facilities Planning
James Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Physical Plant
Finance:
Officers
Members
Term
Year
Appointed/ReappointedExpires
2007/2013
2013
2011
2011
2015
2005/2011
2013
2013
2015
2015
2015
2015
David Bostrom, Worland
Larry Gubbels, Douglas
John MacPherson, Saratoga
Jeff Marsh, Torrington
Dick Scarlett, Wilson
Dave Palmerlee, Buffalo
Wava Tully, Lusk
Dave True, Casper
Mike Massie, Laramie
John McKinley, Cheyenne
Michelle Sullivan, Sheridan
Mel Baldwin, Star Valley
Student Affairs:
Shelley Dodd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Admissions
Keener Fry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Executive Director, Alumni Relations
Patrick Moran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Campus Recreation
Jo Chytka . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Center for Advising and Career Services
Lane Buchanan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Registrar, Office of the Registrar
Eric Webb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Executive Director of Residence Life, Dining
Services, and the Wyoming Union
Pilar Flores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Student Educational Opportunity
Kathy Bobbitt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Director, Student Financial Aid
Joanne Steane, M.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Student Health Services
Keith Evashevski . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, University Counseling Center
Darcy DeTienne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Wyoming Union
2019
2019
2017
2017
2021
2017
2019
2019
2017
2021
2021
2021
Academic Officers
Ex Officio
Matt Mead, Governor of Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ex Officio
Jillian Balow, State Superintendent of Public Instruction . . . . . . . Ex Officio
Jim Rose, Executive Director Wyoming Community
College Comission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ex Officio
Richard McGinity, President of the University of Wyoming . . . . .Ex Officio
Brian Scheuler, President of the Associated Students
of the University of Wyoming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ex Officio
Frank Galey . . . . Dean, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Donna Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean and
Director, Academic and Student Programs
Glen Whipple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean and
Director, UW Extension
Bret Hess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean and
Director, Wyoming Agricultural Experiment Station
Roger Coupal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Agricultural and Applied Economics
Warrie Means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Head, Animal Science
Bruce Cameron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Family and Consumer Sciences
Gerard Andrews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Microbiology Program
Mark M. Stayton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Molecular Biology
James Heitholt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Head, Plant Sciences
John Tanaka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Ecosystem Science and Management
William Laegreid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Veterinary Sciences and
Director, Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory
University Officers
Richard McGinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President
David Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President, Academic Affairs
Alyson Hagy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Associate VP, Academic Affairs of
Undergraduate Education
Tami Benham Deal . . . . Interim Associate VP, Academic Affairs Personnel
Ann Hild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Associate VP, Academic Affairs of
Graduate Education
Bill Mai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President for Administration
Mark Collins . . . . . Associate Vice President for Administrative Operations
Janet Lowe . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Vice President for Fiscal Administration
Chris Boswell . . . Vice President for Governmental and Community Affairs
Robert Aylward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President for Information Technology
Ben Blalock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President for Institutional Advancement
and President/CEO, UW Foundation
John Stark. . . . . . . . . . . . Foundation Senior Vice President for Development
Bill Gern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President for Research and
Economic Development
Dorothy Yates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Vice President for Research and
Economic Development
Sara Axelson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President for Student Affairs
Sean Blackburn . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Vice President for Student Affairs
and Dean of Students
Tom K. Burman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Intercollegiate Athletics
Rick Miller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice President and General Counsel
Paula Lutz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Greg Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean
Robert Schuhmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Associate Dean
Audrey Shalinsky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Associate Dean
Tracey Patton . . . . . . . . . . Director, African American and Diaspora Studies
Christopher Caskey Russell . . . . . . . . . . . Director, American Indian Studies
Frieda Knobloch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, American Studies Program
James Ahern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Anthropology
Ricki Klages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Art
David G. Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Botany
Keith Carron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Chemistry
Ken Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chair, Communication and Journalism
Adrienne Freng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Criminal Justice
Vacant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Earth System Science
Peter Parolin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, English
Cathy Connolly . . . . . . . . . Director, Gender and Women’s Studies Program
4
Administration
and Applied Science
Steven Barrett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean
Bart Geerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Associate Dean
Thomas Parish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Atmospheric Science
Hertanto Adidharma . . . Interim Head, Chemical & Petroleum Engineering
Anthony Denzer . . . . . . Interim Head, Civil and Architectural Engineering
James Caldwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Computer Science
John McInroy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Paul A. Dellenback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Mechanical Engineering
Gerald R. Webster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Geography
Paul Heller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Geology and Geophysics
David Messenger . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Global and Area Studies Program
Michael Brose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, History
Cecilia Aragon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Director, Latina/o Studies Program
Mark Lyford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Director, Life Sciences Program
Farhad Jafari . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Mathematics
Joy Landeira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Modern and Classical Languages
Theresa Bogard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Music
Pranz-Peter Griesmaier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Philosophy
Daniel Dale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Physics and Astronomy
Teena Gabrielson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Political Science
Karen Bartsch Estes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Psychology
Kristine Utterback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Religious Studies
Donna Barnes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Sociology
Ken Gerow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Head, Statistics
Leigh Selting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Theatre and Dance
Donal Skinner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Zoology and Physiology
Joseph Steiner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, College of Health Sciences
Mary Burman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, Fay W. Whitney School of Nursing
Linda Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, School of Pharmacy
Mary Hardin-Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean, Academic Affairs
Jun Ren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean, Research
Rex Gantenbein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Center for Rural Health
Research and Education
Teresa Ukrainetz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Division of
Communication Disorders
Derek Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Division of Kinesiology and Health
Donna Bliss . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Division of Social Work
Vacant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Director, Medical Education
Beth Robitaille . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, UW Family Medicine Residency
Program at Casper
Ronald Malm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, UW Family Medicine Residency
Program at Cheyenne
Sandy Root-Elledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Executive Director, Wyoming
Institute for Disabilities (WIND)
Tim Robinson . . . . . . . . . . . Director, WWAMI Medical Education Program
Sanjay Putrevu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, College of Business
Owen Phillips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean
Phillip Vaca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean
Penne Ainsworth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chairman, Accounting
Frederic Sterbenz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chairman, Economics and Finance
Roland Kidwell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chairman, Management and Marketing
Steve Farkas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, M.B.A. Program
Amber Mercil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, M.S. Accounting Program
Klaast van’t Veld . . . Director, Economics and Finance Graduate Programs
Kelly Tian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Marketing Ph.D. Program
D. Ray Reutzel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, College of Education
Leslie Rush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean
Suzanne Young . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean
John Kambutu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Department of Educational Studies
Peter Moran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Department of Elementary/Early
Childhood Education
Kate Welsh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Department of Secondary Education
Mary Alice Bruce . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, Department of Professional Studies
Audrey M. Kleinsasser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Wyoming
School-University Partnership
Jacqueline Leonard
Director, Science and Mathematics Teaching Center
Margaret Hudson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Principal, UW Lab School
Klint Alexander . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, College of Law
James Delaney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean
Other Academic Officers
Michael Pishko . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, College of Engineering
5
Administration
Susan Frye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, Outreach School
Scott Seville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interim Director, UW-Casper and
Associate Dean, Outreach School
Anne Alexander . . .Associate Dean and Director of International Programs
W. Reed Scull . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean/Division Head,
Outreach Credit Programs
Lori Phillips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Dean, University Libraries
“Indy” Burke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, William D. Ruckelshaus Institute
and the Helga Otto Haub School of
Environment and Natural Resources
Mark Northam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Director, School of Energy Resources
Tay Johannes, Lt. Col. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, U.S. Air Force ROTC
Mitch Day, Lt. Col. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Head, U.S. Army ROTC
Susan Aronstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Honors Program
Cathy Corbett . . . . . . . . . . Interim Co-Director, John P. Ellbogen Center for
Teaching and Learning
Meg Van Baalen-Wood . . Interim Co-Director, John P. Ellbogen Center for
Teaching and Learning
Rob Hurless . . . . . . . . . Interim Director, Institute for Energy Research and
Director, Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute
Mark Greene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, American Heritage Center
Susan Moldenhauer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Director, Art Museum
Academic Coordinators
Outreach School
Richard Ward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cheyenne
Linda Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Torrington
Amy McClure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Riverton, Jackson
Beverly Bell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Powell, Cody
Dawn Kiesel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gillette, Sheridan
Troy Archuleta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Rock Springs, Rawlins
Maggie Farrell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dean, University Libraries
For a complete list of all faculty and staff and their contact information, please
see the UW Campus Directory or the UW Web site at www.uwyo.edu.
6
Mission Statement
The University of Wyoming aspires to be one of the nation’s finest
public land-grant research universities. We serve as a statewide resource
for accessible and affordable higher education of the highest quality;
rigorous scholarship; technology transfer; economic and community
development; and responsible stewardship of our cultural, historical,
and natural resources.
• Nurture an environment that values and manifests diversity,
free expression, academic freedom, personal integrity, and mutual respect; and
• Promote opportunities for personal growth, physical health,
athletic competition, and leadership development for all members of the University community.
In the exercise of our primary mission to promote learning, we
seek to provide academic and co-curricular opportunities that will:
• Expose students to the frontiers of scholarship and creative
activity and the complexities of an interdependent world;
• Ensure individual interactions among students, faculty, and
staff;
As Wyoming’s only university, we are committed to outreach and
service that extend our human talent and technological capacity to serve
the people in our communities, our state, the nation, and the world.
The primary vehicles for identifying the specific actions and resource allocations needed to accomplish this complex mission are the
University’s strategic plans, revised periodically.
University of Wyoming Non-Discrimination Statement
The University is committed to equal opportunity for all persons in all facets of the University’s operations. The University’s policy has
been, and will continue to be, one of nondiscrimination, offering equal opportunity to all employees and applicants for employment on the basis
of their demonstrated ability and competence without regard to such matters as race, sex, gender, color, religions, national origin, disability,
age, veteran status, sexual orientation, genetic information, political belief, or other status protected by state and federal statutes or University
Regulations. It shall also be the policy of the University to utilize an affirmative action approach in the recruiting, hiring and promotion of
women, people of color and other persons from designated groups covered by federal statutes, executive orders and implementing regulations
in order to achieve a diverse workforce and student body.
For more information please see UW Regulation 1-3 (Equal Employment Opportunity/Diversity Program).
University Communication Statement
but is not limited to, policy announcements, emergency notices,
meeting and event notifications, course syllabi and requirements,
and correspondence between faculty, staff, and students. Such
correspondence is mailed only to the University official email address.
The University of Wyoming assigned email account shall be one
of the official means of communication with all students, faculty, and
staff. All community members are responsible for all information sent
to them via their University assigned email account. Members who
choose to manually forward mail from their University email accounts
are responsible for ensuring that all information, including attachments,
is transmitted in its entirety to the preferred account.
Faculty, staff, and students are expected to check their email on a
frequent and consistent basis in order to stay current with Universityrelated communications. All faculty, staff, and students are required to maintain an Faculty, staff, and students have the responsibility to recognize that
@uwyo.edu computer account. This account provides both an online certain communications may be time-critical.
identification key and a University official email address. The University
sends much of its correspondence solely through email. This includes,
7
University Accreditation/Membership
The University of Wyoming, and all UW academic programs are
accredited by The Higher Learning Commission, a commission of the
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on
Institutions of Higher Education, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500,
Chicago, IL 60604 or (800) 621-7440.
Holds membership in:
• American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education
• American Association of University Women
• American Council on Education
• American Society for Engineering Education
• Association for the Advancement of International Education
• Association of Academic Survey Research Organizations
• Association of American Colleges and Universities
• Council for the Advancement and Support of Education
• Council of Academic Deans from Research Education
Institutions
• Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences
• Council of Graduate Schools
• Justice Research and Statistics Association
• Greater Western Library Alliance
• Associate of Public and Land Grant Universities
• National Network for Educational Renewal
• University Professional and Continuing Education Association
• Western Cooperative for Educational Technology
• Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
In addition, many individual academic programs are either approved, accredited or hold membership as indicated below.
Recognized or accredited by:
• ABET (formerly known as Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology)
• Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education
• Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education
• American Alliance of Museums
• American Association of Professional Landmen
• American Association of Vet Lab Diagnosticians
• American Bar Association
• American Chemical Society
• American Dental Association
• American Psychological Association
• Association of American Law Schools
• Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business - International
• Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education
• Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
• Computer Science Accreditation Commission
(a participating body of ABET)
• Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related
Educational Programs
• Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech Language Pathology
• Council on Social Work Education
• National Association of Schools of Music
• National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
• Newberry Consortium for American Indian Studies
• Society for Range Management
• Wyoming Professional Teaching Standards Board
Institution Articulation Agreements:
• NOLS - National Outdoor Leadership School
• Pikes Peak Community College, Colorado Community College Commission
• Teton Science School
• Wyoming Community Colleges
Memberships are also held in various discipline-related organizations. For more information, contact the appropriate department.
For information regarding accreditation/membership, contact the
Office of Academic Affairs.
The University of Wyoming is a member of, and active participant
in, the National Commission on Accrediting, an organization which
endeavors to coordinate all accrediting activities.
Assessment of Student Learning at the University of Wyoming
portfolios, exams and senior capstone projects. In order for UW’s assessment efforts to be successful, students must become engaged in the
process. As such, students are expected and/or required to complete
various assessments as determined by the university or department
prior to the awarding of degrees.
The University of Wyoming is committed to providing students
with high quality academic programs and services. As a result, UW is
actively engaged in several processes to assess student learning with
the ultimate goal of continuous improvement. A university wide assessment plan and individual department plans are in various stages of
implementation. The purpose of these plans is to identify and articulate
student learning outcomes – the skills, abilities, and knowledge that
students are expected to acquire by the completion of their programs –
and the means by which these outcomes would be measured. Learning
is assessed at the university, college and departmental levels. Current
assessment activities include, but are not limited to, surveys, interviews,
For more information regarding the student learning outcomes for
a particular program of study, see the section on College and Division
Programs. For further information about the University of Wyoming’s
assessment of student learning efforts, see the Assessment of Student
Learning webpage at www.uwyo.edu/assessment.
8
FERPA
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (PL-380)
General Statement
Any other access allowed by law must be recorded showing the
legitimate educational or other purpose and the signature of the person
gaining access. The student concerned shall be entitled to review this
information.
The University of Wyoming has the responsibility for effectively
supervising any access to and/or release of official data/information
related to the education records of its students. Certain items of information about individual students are fundamental to the educational
process and must be recorded. This recorded information concerning
students must be used only for clearly‑defined purposes, must be safeguarded and controlled to avoid violations of personal privacy, and must
be appropriately disposed of when the justification for its collection
and retention no longer exists.
Release of Information
No personally identifiable information shall be disclosed to any
individual (including parents, spouse, or other students) or organization except as follows:
1. Disclosure is authorized in writing by the student.
In this regard, the university is committed to protecting, to the
maximum extent possible, the right of privacy of all individuals about
whom it holds information, records, and files. Access to, and release
of, such records is restricted to the student concerned, to parents of
dependent students, to others with the student’s written consent, to
officials within the university, to a court of competent jurisdiction, and
otherwise pursuant to law.
2. Disclosure is to university officers or employees who need to
know so as to accomplish legitimate university purposes related
to their functions.
3. Disclosure is to a governmental agency, educational organization,
parent of a dependent student, or other entity as described by
federal regulations or otherwise required by state or federal law.
Custodians of records should obtain interpretations whenever
third parties request personally identifiable information.
Access
4. To authorized educational authorities at the local, state, and federal
level.
All official information collected and maintained in the university
identifiable with an individual student will be made available for inspection and review at the written request of that student subject to
certain exceptions.
5. When disclosure of any personally identifiable data/information
from university records about a student is demanded pursuant to
court order or lawfully issued subpoena, the staff member receiving such order shall, if possible, immediately notify the student
concerned in writing prior to compliance with such order or
subpoena. (NOTE: In fulfillment of its responsibilities to monitor certain state benefit and entitlement programs, the Wyoming
state auditor may issue to the university from time to time an administrative subpoena for a listing of currently enrolled full‑time
students, the students’ social security numbers, and information
relating to the nature and amount of any educational financial aid
being received by such students. Upon being served with such a
subpoena, the university will provide the information requested
without further notice.)
For purposes of access to records at the University of Wyoming, students enrolled (or formerly enrolled) for academic credit or audit at the
university shall have access to official records concerning themselves.
A request for general access to all official records, files, and data
maintained by the university must be made in writing to the registrar
or to other person(s) as designated by the university officer in charge
of the unit maintaining records. A request for access to official data
maintained in a particular office may be made to the administrative
head of the office.
When students (or former students) appear at a given office and
request access to the university record about themselves:
6. Data/information from university records about students will be
released for approved research purposes only if the identity of the
student involved is fully protected, or if the research is related to
official university business and not publicly disseminated.
1. The student must provide proper identification verifying that he
or she is the person whose record is being accessed.
2. The designated staff person(s) must supervise the review of the
contents of the record with the student.
7. Information from university records may be released to appropri­
ate persons in connection with an emergency if the knowledge
of such information is necessary to protect the health or safety
of a student or other persons.
3. Inspection and review shall be permitted within a period not to
exceed 45 days from the date of the student’s request.
4. Students will be free to make notes concerning the contents, but
no material will be removed from the record at the time.
The university officer responsible for the records from which
informa­t ion is released shall maintain with the student’s record a listing
of disclosures of personally identifiable information, except disclosures
in accordance with items 1 and 2 above for which no record need be
kept. The listing shall identify the parties who requested or obtained
information and the legitimate interests these parties had in making
the request.
Recordkeeping personnel and members of the faculty and staff
with administrative assignment may have access to records and files
for internal educational purposes as well as for routine necessary clerical, administrative, and statistical purposes as required by the duties
of their jobs. The name and position of the official responsible for the
maintenance of each type of education record may be obtained from
the registrar of the university.
9
Rights of Students
Public or Directory Information
Challenges to the Record
The following items are considered public data/information and
may be disclosed by the university in response to inquiries concerning
individual students, whether the inquiries are in person, in writing, or
over the telephone:
1. Name;
2. Affirmation of whether currently enrolled;
3. Campus location.
All students shall have the opportunity to challenge any item in their
file which they consider to be inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. A student shall initiate a challenge by submitting a request in
writing for the deletion or correction of the particular item. The request
shall be made to the custodian of the particular record in question.
If the custodian and the student involved are unable to resolve the
matter to the satisfaction of both parties, the written request for deletion or correction shall be submitted by the student to such person as
designated by the president of the university who shall serve as the
hearing officer. The student shall be given the opportunity for a hearing at which the student may present oral or written justification for
the request for deletion or correction. The hearing officer may obtain
such other information as he or she deems appropriate for use in the
hearing and shall give the student a written decision on the matter
within 30 days from the conclusion of the hearing. If the decision of
the hearing officer is to deny the deletion or correction of an item in
the student’s file, the student shall be entitled to submit a written statement presenting the student’s position with regard to the item to the
hearing officer. Both the written decision of the hearing officer and
the statement submitted by the student shall be inserted in the student’s
file. The decision of the hearing officer shall be final.
Unless students have officially filed a written request with the university registrar within ten working days after the first day of classes for
a semester that disclosure not be made without their written permission,
the following items, in addition to those above, are considered public/
directory information; may be included in appropriate university/campus directories and publications; and may be disclosed by designated
staff members in response to inquiries concerning individual students,
whether the inquiries are in person, in writing, or over the telephone:
1. School, college, department, major, or division;
2. Dates of enrollment;
3. Degrees received;
4. Honors received;
5. Local address and phone number;
6. Home address (permanent);
7. Email address;
8. Participation in officially recognized activities and sports;
9. Weight and height of members of athletic teams;
10.Full-time or part-time enrollment.
Grades may be challenged under this procedure only on the basis
of the accuracy of their transcription or posting.
Exception to the Policy
It is the position of the university that certain data/information
maintained in various offices of the university is not subject to the
provisions of this policy with regard to inspection, review, challenge,
correction, or deletion. Exceptions to “education records” include:
alumni records, employment records, law enforcement records, medical
records, sole possession records, and university disciplinary records.
Letters of Appraisal/Recommendation
Candid appraisals and evaluations of performance and potential
are an essential part of the educational process. Clearly, the providing
of such information to prospective employers, to other educational
institutions, or to other legitimately concerned outside individuals
and agencies is necessary and in the interest of the particular student.
1. Statements submitted by parent(s)/guardian or spouse in support
of financial aid or residency determinations are considered to be
confidential between those persons and the university and are not
subject to the provisions of this policy except with the written
consent of the persons involved. Such documents are not regarded
as part of the student’s official record.
Data/information which was part of university records prior to
January 1, 1975 and which was collected and maintained as confidential
information will not be disclosed to students. Should a student desire
access to a confidential letter of appraisal received prior to January 1,
1975, the student shall be advised to have the writer of that appraisal
notify, in writing, the concerned records custodian of the decision
as to whether or not the writer is willing to have the appraisal made
available for the student’s review. Unless a written response is received
approving a change of status in the letter, the treatment of the letter as
a confidential document shall continue.
2. University employment records of students are not included in this
policy, except as provided under the Wyoming Public Records Act.
3. With regard to general health data, only that data/information
which is used by the university in making a decision regarding
the student’s status is subject to review by the student under this
policy. Written psychiatric or psychological case notes which
form the basis for diagnoses, recommendations, or treatment
plans remain privileged information not accessible to the student. Such case notes are not considered to be part of official university
records. To ensure the availability of correct and helpful interpretations of any psychological test scores, notes, or other evaluative
or medical materials, the contents of these files for an individual
student may be reviewed by that student only in consultation with
a professional staff member of the specific department involved. Records that are subject to FERPA are not subject to the HIPAA
Privacy Rule.
Documents of appraisal relating to students and collected by the
university or any department or office of the university on or after
January 1, 1975, will be maintained confidentially only if a waiver of
the right of access has been executed by the student. In the absence of
such a waiver, all such documents will be available for the student’s
inspection and review.
If a student files a written waiver with the department or office
concerned, letters of appraisal received pursuant to that waiver will
be maintained confidentially. Forms will be available for this purpose.
10
Rights of Students
4. Records relating to a continuing or active criminal investigation
by the University of Wyoming Police Department, or records of
said office not relating to the student’s status with the university,
are not subject to this policy.
5. No student is entitled to see information or records that pertain to
another student, to parents, or to other third parties. A student
is entitled to review only that portion of an official record or file
that pertains to him or her.
6. The personal files, or sole possession records, of members of the
faculty and staff which concern students, including private correspondence, and notes which refer to students, are not regarded
as official records of the university. This includes notes intended
for the personal use of the faculty and never intended to be official
records of the university. In order to be sole possession records,
they cannot be shared with anyone else.
The decedent’s next of Kin. The request must be accompanied
by official documentation.
Members of the family or other persons with the written
approval from the decedent’s next of kin or the personal representative of the decedent’s estate. Absent written approval
from the family or representative of the estate, only directory
information will be disclosed.
•
In response to a subpoena or court order.
•
To any other individual, if determined by the University to be
in the best interest of the decedent or the University.
Students are hereby notified that controlling provisions of federal
law are contained in Sec. 438, Pub. L.90‑247, Title IV, as amended, 88
Stat. 571‑574 (U.S.C. 1232g) and regulations set forth in the code of
Federal Regulations, 34 C.F.R. sections 99.1 to 99.67 (1981). Complaints
of institutional noncompliance may be made to the Department of
Education as provided in the regulations.
Within the first year following the death of a student, the University
will release the educational records of the decedent to the following
individuals:
•
•
Rights of Students
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)’s protection of personally identifiable information in a student’s education record ends at the time of a student’s death. The University of Wyoming’s
policy on the release of a deceased student’s records is as follows:
If the student submitted a signed Authorization to Release
Educational Records form which designated the person(s)
eligible to request and/or receive educational records, the
information will be released to the individual on that form.
The individual designated as the personal representative of
the decedent’s estate. The request must be accompanied by
official documentation.
After one year has elapsed following the death of an individual
student, the University may release the educational records of the
decedent at the University’s discretion.
Release of Personally Identifiable Information in a
Deceased Student’s Education Record
•
•
11
Honor Societies and Programs
All Academic Disciplines
College of Arts and Sciences
Phi Beta Kappa has been one of the most respected societies in the
world for more than 200 years. Phi Beta Kappa was founded in 1776 at
the College of William and Mary, Virginia. Within a decade, chapters
arose at Yale, Harvard, and Dartmouth. The Wyoming chapter received
its charter in 1940, and today fewer than 270 colleges and universities
in the United States meet the strict qualifications for housing a chapter.
UW faculty and administrators annually elect to membership fewer than
one‑tenth of the leading scholars of the senior class, candidates for the
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. In exceptional
cases a junior may be elected. In addition to having a distinguished
academic record, a student eligible for Phi Beta Kappa must pursue a
balanced and broad course of study, which includes a foreign language
as well as courses in math, the sciences, and the humanities. At least
90 hours of the student’s course work must be in the liberal arts and
sciences. Students are reviewed for eligibility and are notified by mail
the spring of their election. Phi Beta Kappa promotes the ideal of a
community of scholarship, and every year the Chapter sponsors an
eminent visiting lecturer for the entire university.
Art ‑ A Bachelor of Fine Arts in art is considered honorary.
Botany ‑ This Honors Program is for students majoring in botany or biology with strong interests in botanical science and independent research.
Application to the botany department may be made after completion
of the sophomore year with a cumulative grade point average of 3.3.
Chemistry ‑ American Chemical Society - The Department of Chemistry
is closely associated with the Local Wyoming Chapter of the American
Chemical Society. The American Chemical Society (ACS) is one of the
largest scientific societies in the world - its purpose is to promote chemistry and educate the public on the impacts of the chemical profession
on the economy, technology, and education. The ACS organizes both
national and regional scientific meetings; our local section supports
student travel to these meetings. The chemistry department also sponsors a Student Affiliates section of the ACS, which is mentored by a UW
chemistry faculty member and serves the needs of our chemistry majors.
Communication - Lambda Pi Eta recognizes, fosters, and rewards
outstanding scholastic achievement while stimulating interest in the
communication discipline.
The national honor society of Phi Kappa Phi, founded in 1897,
recognizes and encourages superior scholarship in all curricula of the
colleges and divisions of the university. No other honor society has
higher academic standards for admission. Good character is also an
essential supporting attribute for those scholars elected to membership.
The University of Wyoming chapter of Phi Kappa Phi sets minimum
cumulative grade point requirements at 3.5 for seniors, 3.8 for juniors
and 3.9 for graduate students. In addition, there are minimum requirements in terms of hours completed at UW. Since the chapter may initiate
no more than ten percent of the number of seniors in each college, the
actual grade point cutoff is often higher than these minimums. In the
spring of each year, students’ records are reviewed and letters of invitation are sent to those eligible for election to the society. Supplementing
the work of its chapter, the national society awards fellowships for
graduate study.
Criminal Justice - Alpha Phi Sigma - Epsilon Omega Chapter, criminal
justice honorary. A national honorary society for Criminal Justice that
recognizes the academic excellence of Criminal Justice students. Alpha
Phi Sigma is a collaboration with the Academy of Criminal Justice
Sciences.
English ‑ English Honors Program enables junior and senior English
majors who carry a grade point average of 3.5 or better in their English
courses to intensify and enhance their studies by working closely with a
supervising faculty member to develop a senior honors project, a major
piece of writing on a literary topic. Sigma Tau Delta - Alpha Mu Omicron
Chapter, international English honor society.
Gender and Women’s Studies - National Women’s Studies Association;
one of its primary objectives promoting and supporting the production
and dissemination of knowledge about women and gender through
teaching, learning, research and service in academic and other settings.
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Geography ‑ Gamma Theta Upsilon ‑ Eta Eta Chapter candidates must
have completed three semesters of college coursework and three courses
in Geography, with a grade point average of 3.0 or higher for these
courses. Contact department for more information.
Agriculture majors - Alpha Zeta is a national honorary for students in
agriculture who demonstrate academic excellence, character and leadership. Applications for membership are sent to eligible students. Gamma
Sigma Delta is a national honor society open to students in agriculture.
Potential members are invited to membership based upon academic
excellence. Phi Upsilon Omicron is a national honor society in family and
consumer sciences. Potential members are invited to membership based
on academic excellence and leadership.
12
Honor Societies
Geology ‑ Eligible students are Bachelor of Science degree holders
with honors, majoring in geology or geophysics. They must meet an
overall grade point average of 3.2, a grade point average of 3.2 in the
major, and successful completion of an independent research project.
Contact department for details.
Political Science - Pi Sigma Alpha, Epsilon Beta Chapter “to stimulate
scholarship and intelligent interest in political science.” The society
functions at the national level, sponsoring programs and events of value
to the profession and teaching of political science, and at the chapter
level. Each chapter is encouraged to provide a framework for enriching
the exposure of its members and the wider university community to
the study of government and issues of public concern.
Global and Area Studies ‑ Sigma Iota Rho, national honorary.
Membership in Sigma Iota Rho is intended not only to enhance the
credentials of its members, though public recognition of the best and the
brightest students in international studies is one of our main purposes,
but is meant to encourage a life-long devotion to a better understanding
of the world we live in and to continuing support for and engagement
in education, service, and occupational activities that reflect the mission
of Sigma Iota Rho. In that way we do not limit ourselves to once-a-year
pats on the back during the induction of new members, but internalize
the belief that our purpose for studying international affairs is not only
to position ourselves to succeed in a globalized society, but to make
the world we live in a better place through our contributions in our
work and day-to-day life.
Pi Alpha Alpha, national public administration honorary. The purpose of
Pi Alpha Alpha is to encourage and recognize outstanding scholarship
and accomplishment in public affairs and administration. Its objectives,
such as fostering integrity, professionalism, and effective performance,
promote the advancement of quality in the education and practice of
the art and science of public affairs and administration. PAA membership identifies those with the highest performance levels in educational
programs preparing them for public service careers.
Psychology - Psi Chi - The Psychology Department supports a chapter
of Psi Chi, the International Honor Society in Psychology. This local
Psi Chi group functions within a larger Psychology Club that serves
undergraduates interested in Psychology. The chapter and club are
jointly involved in many activities, including community service projects, peer advising and graduation festivities.
History ‑ Phi Alpha Theta
Journalism ‑ Society of Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi
Languages ‑ Alpha of Wyoming Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi - To honor those
who attain excellence in the study of the Spanish language and in the
study of the literature and culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples; to
honor those who have made the Hispanic contributions to modern
culture better known in the English-speaking world; to encourage
college and university students to acquire a greater interest in and a
deeper understanding of Hispanic culture; to foster friendly relations
and mutual respect between the nations of Hispanic speech and those of
English speech; to serve its membership in ways which will contribute
to the attainment of the goals and ideals of the society.
Sociology - Alpha Kappa Delta, the international honorary society for
sociology. In addition, sociology majors with a 3.2 overall GPA, a 3.5
GPA in sociology courses and two 5000-level sociology classes graduate
with honors in sociology.
College of Business
Accounting - Beta Alpha Psi, Delta Alpha Chapter, is the UW chapter
of the national accounting honorary. Membership in this very active
student honorary is awarded only to the very best accounting students.
Business Administration - Beta Gamma Sigma is the national scholastic honor society. It is the arm of the accrediting group, AACSB
International. Membership is very selective and based on class rank
and grade point average.
Music ‑ Presser Award is conferred by vote of the department faculty
for outstanding senior in music. Pi Kappa Lambda, selected by faculty
on the basis of outstanding scholarship and musical accomplishments.
Physics and Astronomy - Sigma Pi Sigma; American Physical Society (APS)
The American Physical Society (www.aps.org) is a non-profit membership organization working to advance and diffuse the knowledge of
physics through its outstanding research journals, scientific meetings,
and education, outreach, advocacy and international activities. APS
represents over 50,000 members, including physicists in academia, national laboratories and industry in the United States and throughout the
world. Society offices are located in College Park, MD (Headquarters),
Ridge, NY, and Washington, DC. American Astronomical Society (AAS)
The American Astronomical Society (aas.org) is the major organization of professional astronomers in North America. The mission of the
American Astronomical Society is to enhance and share humanity’s
scientific understanding of the universe.
College of Education
Kappa Delta Pi - Alpha Mu Chapter is the university chapter of the international honor society in education. The purpose of the society is
to promote excellence in and recognize outstanding contributions to
education. Invitation for membership is extended to those persons who
exhibit commendable professional qualities, worthy educational ideals
and sound scholarship.
Mu Na Tau Chapter of Chi Sigma Iota is a Counseling Academic and
Professional Honor Society International for counselors-in-training,
counselor educators, and professional counselors. The mission of
Chi Sigma Iota is to promote scholarship, research, professionalism,
leadership, and excellence in counseling, and to recognize high attainment in the pursuit of academic and clinical excellence in the field of
counseling. The CSI International homepage can be found at www.
csi-net.org/index.cfm. The local chapter, Mu Nu Tau, encourages the
furtherance of high standards of scholarship and professional practice
through study groups, speaker programs, workshops, colloquia awards,
social activities, and networking opportunities.
13
Honor Societies
College of Engineering and Applied Science
University Honors Program
Engineering majors - Tau Beta Pi is a national honor society for all
engineering majors. The purposes of the society are to honor outstanding student scholarship and to provide a spirit of liberal culture in the
College of Engineering and Applied Science. Membership is offered
to outstanding junior, senior and graduate engineering students of high
scholastic ability and exemplary character.
The National Collegiate Honors Council and The Western Regional Honors
Council provide recognition for students, faculty, and administrators in
the area of academic achievement, civic responsibililty, and personal
development.
College of Law
Law majors - Order of the Coif is an honorary society which recognizes
legal scholastic excellence. Each year, the chapter may initiate into
membership those students who graduate in the highest ten percent
of their class.
College of Health Sciences
Kinesiology - Phi Epsilon Kappa is a national professional fraternity
dedicated to enhancing education, promotion of student research, community outreach, and professional development for persons pursing
careers in health, physical education, recreation, and other related fields.
Outreach
University of Wyoming at Casper - The Round Table Honor Society - Open
to UWC undergraduate students in all colleges with a 3.3 or higher
GPA. Recognizes scholastic achievement and provides an opportunity
for the development of leadership and service. Tau Sigma - Recognizing
and promoting the academic excellence and involvement of transfer
students.
Nursing - Sigma Theta Tau - academic leadership honorary. The mission
of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International is
advancing world health and celebrating nursing excellence in scholarship, leadership, and service.
Pharmacy - Rho Chi Society, Academic Honorary. The Rho Chi Society
encourages and recognizes excellence in intellectual achievement and
advocates critical inquiry in all aspects of pharmacy. The Society further
encourages high standards of conduct and character and fosters fellowship among its members; Phi Lambda Sigma, Pharmacy Leadership
Society - to support pharmacy leadership commitment by recognizing
leaders and fostering leadership development.
Social Work - Phi Alpha - academic honorary. The purpose of Phi
Alpha Honor Society is to provide a closer bond among students of
social work and promote humanitarian goals and ideals. Phi Alpha
fosters high standards of education for social workers and invites into
membership those who have attained excellence in scholarship and
achievement in social work.
Alpha Epsilon Delta - Preprofessional honorary for those interested in
health care careers.
14
Academic Majors
T
he university confers bachelor’s degrees for complet ion of academic disciplines established by the faculties of the colleges of Agriculture,
Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, Engineering, and Health Sciences.
Within each college, faculty expertise is concentrated in schools, departments,
divisions, and programs to provide relevant advice, instruction, service, and
research. College and department faculty administer the various major disciplines
of study in subject areas selected by the students (including, when authorized,
multi-college majors). Majors approved by the Trustees are listed below.
If a student is not ready to declare a major concentration, an “undeclared”
classification is available in each of the colleges. If the student is not ready to
declare a college, a classification of “undeclared college and undeclared major”
is available. The “undeclared” status is intended to be temporary for purposes of
career exploration. Students are advised to declare and concentrate upon a major
discipline as soon as possible.
A student who wishes to concurrently pursue a degree in more than one
major must have advance approval of the involved college advisers and deans.
Requirements for each of the majors must be fulfilled and credits in each must be
applied to the same level of degree (i.e. bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral). Students
should consult with responsible faculty advisers in each major being attempted.
Please refer to the section on concurrent majors and dual degrees in this catalog.
Minimum requirements for earning credits or a degree in any established
major are fixed in advance and kept current by the faculty of the responsible
units. Most established majors allow the students considerable latitude to attain
individual goals. Selection of a major enables the student to study a body of
knowledge in depth and concentrate on subjects of particular interest. A student
may simultaneously earn credits in two majors, if approved by the respective
departments.
Colleges:
AG: College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
AS: College of Arts and Sciences
CB: College of Business
ED: College of Education
Major Title
B
M
Accounting (CB)
*
*
Agricultural business (AG)
Agricultural communications (AG)
EN: College of Engineering and Applied Science
HS: College of Health Sciences
LAW: College of Law
SER: School of Energy Resources
UW: Interdisciplinary
Degrees:
B = Bachelor’s
M = Master’s
D = Doctorate
O = Other
Major Title
B
M
Communication (AS)
*
*
*
Computer engineering (EN)
*
*
Computer science (EN)
*
D
O
Agricultural and applied economics (AG)
*
Counseling (ED)
Agricultural economics/water resources (AG)
*
Counselor education and supervision (ED)
Agricultural education (ED)
*
Creative writing (AS)
Agroecology (AG)
*
Criminal justice (AS)
*
Agronomy (AG)
*
*
*
*
*
Curriculum and instruction (ED)
American studies (AS)
*
*
Animal and veterinary science (AG)
*
*
*
Ecology (UW)
Anthropology (AS)
*
*
*
Economics (CB)
Architectural engineering (EN)
*
Economics and finance
*
Art (AS)
*
Economics/water resources (CB)
*
Art History (AS)
*
Education (ED)
Astronomy/astrophysics (AS)
*
Electrical engineering (EN)
*
Elementary education (ED)
*
Elementary and special education
*
*
Biomedical sciences (AG, EN, AS, HS)
Botany (AS)
*
*
*
Botany/water resources (AS)
Dental hygiene (HS)
*
Earth System Science (affiliated major, interdisciplinary)
*
*
*
*
*
Energy resource managment and development (SER)
*
*
*
Energy systems engineering (EN)
*
*
English (AS)
*
*
Entomology (AG)
*
*
*
*
*
*
Business economics (CB)
*
Chemical engineering (EN)
*
*
*
Environmental engineering (EN)
Chemistry (AS)
*
*
*
Environmental geology/geohydrology (AS)
*
Chemistry (ACS approved) (AS)
*
Family and consumer sciences (AG)
*
*
Civil engineering (EN)
*
Finance (CB)
*
*
Civil engineering/water resources (EN)
*
Environment and natural resources (affiliated major) (UW)
*
*
Food science and human nutrition (AG)
15
*
*
Business administration (CB)
*
*
*
*
Biology (AS)
O
*
American Indian studies (AS)
Atmospheric Science (EN)
D
*
*
*
*
Academic Majors
Colleges:
AG: College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
AS: College of Arts and Sciences
CB: College of Business
ED: College of Education
EN: College of Engineering and Applied Science
HS: College of Health Sciences
LAW: College of Law
SER: School of Energy Resources
UW: Interdisciplinary
Major Title
B
M
French (AS)
*
*
Gender and women’s studies (AS)
*
Geography (AS)
*
Geography/water resources (AS)
Geology (AS)
*
Geology and earth sciences (AS)
*
D
O
Degrees:
B = Bachelor’s
M = Master’s
D = Doctorate
O = Other
Major Title
B
M
D
Petroleum engineering (EN)
*
*
*
*
*
Pharmacy (professional) (HS)
*
Philosophy (AS)
*
*
Physical education teaching (HS)
*
Physics (AS)
*
Physics plus (AS)
*
Physiology (AS)
*
*
Geology/water resources (AS)
*
Geophysics (AS)
*
*
*
*
*
*
Political science (AS)
*
*
History (AS)
*
*
Psychology (AS)
*
*
Humanities/fine arts (AS)
*
International studies (AS)
*
Journalism (AS)
*
Rangeland ecology and watershed management (AG)
*
*
*
*
Religious studies (AS)
*
*
Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Environment and Natural
Resoures (interdisciplinary)
*
Russian (AS)
Secondary education (ED)
*
Juris Doctor/Master of Public Administration
(interdisciplinary)
*
Self-designed major (AS)
*
Social science (AS)
*
Social work (HS)
*
*
Sociology (AS)
*
*
*
Kinesiology and health (HS)
Kinesiology and health promotion (HS)
*
Management (CB)
*
Marketing (CB)
*
Mathematics (AS)
*
Mathematics/science (AS)
*
Mechanical engineering (EN)
*
Medical laboratory science (HS)
*
Microbiology (AG)
*
*
*
Molecular and cellular life sciences (UW)
Molecular biology (AG)
*
*
Music (AS)
*
Music education (AS)
*
*
Music performance (AS)
*
*
Natural science (AS)
*
Neuroscience (UW)
*
Nursing (HS)
*
Organizational leadership (Bachelor of Applied Sciences)
(AG)
*
*
Spanish (AS)
*
Special education (ED)
*
Speech, language and hearing sciences (HS)
*
Statistics (AS)
*
*
Technical education (ED) - available only at the UW/CC
Center
*
*
Theatre and dance (AS)
*
Theatre and dance (professional) (AS)
*
Trades and industrial education (ED)
*
Wildlife and fisheries biology and management
(professional) (AS)
*
*
*
*
16
*
*
Speech-language pathology (HS)
*
*
*
Soil science/water resources (AG)
*
Nursing practice (HS)
*
Soil science (AG)
*
Management and marketing (CB)
*
*
Rangeland ecology and watershed management/water
resources (AG)
Juris Doctor (LAW)
*
*
Public administration (AS)
*
*
*
Planning (community and regional) (AS)
German (AS)
Hydrologic science (UW)
O
*
*
Zoology and physiology (AS)
*
*
Zoology and physiology/water resources (AS)
*
Admission to the University
Admissions Office
1a. High School Graduates: Cumulative high school unweighted
grade point average of 3.0 or above based on a 4.0 grading scale,
and an ACT test score of at least 21 or a SAT test score (critical
reading and math scores) of at least a 980.
150 Knight Hall
Department 3435
1000 E. University Avenue
Laramie, WY 82071-2000
www.uwyo.edu/admissions
307-766-5160
800-342-5996
1b. Graduates with less than 30 transferable college credit hours:
Cumulative transferable college GPA must be at least 2.0; submit
your high school transcript, ACT or SAT test score, and meet 1a.
1c. Home Schooled must meet the same requirements as high
school graduates; submit transcripts and ACT or SAT test scores.
Home schooled students must also submit a Home School Credit
Evaluation Form completed by their instructor and available at
www.uwyo.edu/admissions/freshman/admission-requirements.
html .
I. Undergraduate Admission
UW welcomes all students to apply and will consider each student
based on their individual academic achievement. Students may apply for
admission up to one year before they intend to enroll online at www.
uwyo.edu/apply. Admission decisions are made on a rolling basis as
soon as all application materials are received in the Admissions Office.
To avoid delays and complications, all application materials should be
on file in the Admissions Office at least 30 days before the beginning
of the semester.
2. Completion of at least 19 high school units in the following
pre-college curriculum (a unit=1 year):
English
Required Admission Application Materials
Four units of English or their competency-based equivalents are
required, of which at least three units must have a substantial writing component. Speech and other communication-based courses
which contain “a substantial writing component” may be used
to meet this requirement.
Mathematics
Four units of mathematics or their competency-based equivalents
are required, to include the concepts of a college preparatory
Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry sequence. It is strongly recommended that Algebra II, Geometry or a higher level math course
be taken during the senior year of high school.
Science
Four units of science or their competency-based equivalents are
required. At least one of the units must be from the physical
sciences--physics, chemistry, or a college preparatory physical science course. The other two units may be from any combination
of biological, life, physical or earth/space science.
Social Science
Three years of social studies or their competency-based equivalents are required, to include a combination of the following
subject matter: World History, American History, Geography,
American Government; or Economic Systems and Institutions.
Foreign Language
Two sequenced years of the same foreign language.
Electives
Two units of additional coursework chosen from any of the following subjects: fine and performing arts, social and behavioral studies, humanities, additional foreign language, or career-technical
course.
•Online application completed at www.uwyo.edu/apply
•$40 non-refundable undergraduate application fee
•Official high school and/or college transcripts
•Official standardized test scores (ACT or SAT)
ACT or SAT results are required for new freshmen, applicants
under 21 years in age, and used for admission, math placement, academic advising and academic scholarship consideration. High school
students should take the ACT or SAT during the spring of their junior
year or fall of their senior year. To be considered official, scores need
to be submitted to UW directly from the testing agency or on the high
school transcript. Writing sections in both the ACT and SAT are not
considered as part of the admission requirements. All official student transcripts must be sent directly to the
Admissions Office by the originating institution. A final, official high
school transcript indicating the graduation date is required post- graduation to complete admission requirements. UW Admissions only accepts
faxed transcripts from Wyoming community colleges.
Orientation: All new freshmen and transfer students are strongly
encouraged to attend new student orientation prior to their first UW
semester. Sessions provide students with an opportunity to meet
faculty and staff, plan an academic schedule, explore credit transfer,
discuss college life, and register for courses. Additional information
on orientation is available at www.uwyo.edu/orientation.
A. New Freshmen
1. Assured Admission
To qualify for assured admission to the University of Wyoming,
high school graduates who are first-time college students or college
transfers with fewer than 30 transferable semester credit hours, must
meet the following minimum admission requirements and complete
the pre-college curriculum (see section 2).
2. Admission With Support
Admission with support will be granted to first-time college students
or students with fewer than 30 transferable semester credit hours who
do not qualify for assured admission, but who satisfy the following
requirements.
17
Admission to the University
C. International Undergraduate Applicants
a. Submit official ACT or SAT test scores.
b. Graduates of state accredited high schools who have a cumulative
unweighted high school grade point average of:
The University of Wyoming will admit international students who
meet admission requirements. Application deadlines are June 1 for fall
semester, November 1 for spring semester and April 1 for summer session. The $40.00 non-refundable undergraduate application fee must
be received before the application will be processed. o 2.5-2.99
Or
o2.25-2.49 with a minimum composite ACT test score of 20 or
1. Supply official, attested academic records and examination results. The records should be sent directly to the Admissions Office by
the school attended. Applicants must also provide an English
translation of all required academic records, and complete all
applications and correspondence in English.
SAT score of 960 (math/critical reading combined)
c. Completion of the precollege curriculum with no more than two
deficiencies. In addition, no more than one deficiency can be in
each of the precollege curriculum categories.
2. Provide proof of satisfactory English ability if student’s native
language is not English. This can be done by providing official
score reports from TOEFL or IELTS. The minimum acceptable
TOEFL score is 525 (71 iBT) for most majors or a 550 (80 iBT)
for Engineering. The minimum acceptable IELTS score for most
majors is 6.0 with a 6.5 required of prospective Engineering students. Contact Admissions ([email protected]) to inquire
about other possible alternatives to the TOEFL and IELTS.
Terms of Admission With Support
Space in the Synergy program is limited; applicants admissible under
this category are encouraged to apply early. Students admitted with support will be a part of the Synergy
Program and may access information at www.uwyo.edu/synergy. It is
strongly recommended that students stay within 12-15 credit hours in
their first semester. Students who wish to go above 15 hours should
contact the Synergy Coordinator at (307) 766-4322 or [email protected]
edu to discuss an exception.
3. Provide evidence of adequate financial resources to pay the total
cost of their education. The Confidential Financial Statement
for undergraduate international applicants can be found online
at www.uwyo.edu/admissions/international/requirements-firstyear.html.
Holistic Alternative Admissions
Exception Process
Students who do not meet the qualifications for assured admission
or admission with support may be evaluated for admission under the
Holistic Alternative Admission process. Please see www.uwyo.edu/
admissions in the admission requirement section for more information.
4. Official ACT or SAT results are recommended, but not required
for international applicants.
5. Proof of immunization for measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and
testing for tuberculosis are required prior to registration.
B. Undergraduate Transfer Students
D. General Educational Development (GED)
Certificate Holders
College transfer students with 30 or more transferable semester
credit hours must have a 2.0 or higher cumulative grade point average
for admission to UW. College students interested in transferring to UW
should go online to www.uwyo.edu/transfer.
Undergraduate applicants with GED credentials should contact the
University’s Office of Admissions for specific application requirements.
Applicants who have taken college-level course work and desire to
transfer to the University of Wyoming should apply for admission and
have one official transcript from each previously attended college or
university sent directly to the Admissions Office. Course work from
regionally accredited institutions will be evaluated by the Office of
the Registrar.
E. Adult Nontraditional Students
Nontraditional admission requirements are:
1. Minimum age of 25;
2. Minimum of three years since last enrollment in college courses,
except correspondence;
Transfer students with less than 30 transferable semester hours must
also have an official copy of their high school transcript sent directly to
the Admissions Office by their former high school. Transfer students
under age 21, who have less than 30 transferable credit hours, must
also have their ACT or SAT results sent to the UW Admissions Office.
3. Send official copy of high school transcript or GED scores and
any college transcripts directly to the UW Admissions Office by
the previous institutions.
4. Students admitted under this policy are undeclared majors and
will receive their initial academic advising from the Center for
Advising and Career Services in 228 Knight Hall, (307) 766‑2398.
Admission Exception Process
College transfer students who do not meet the 2.0 grade point
average requirement for admission to UW may initiate a request for
admission by exception. Applicants should describe in writing the
rationale for their specific exception request and send the request to
the Admissions Office.
5. Students considered for adult nontraditional admission must have
had a 2.0 or higher grade point average in high school.
6. Neither ACT nor SAT scores are required for students over 21.
Students working toward a second bachelor’s degree are consid­ered
undergraduate students and are subject to all undergraduate policies
and regulations.
18
Admission to the University
F. High School Guest Students
Some departments may require scores from the Graduate
Management Admission Test (GMAT), rather than the GRE, with a
minimum score of 500.
High school seniors and juniors will be considered for admission to
UW as high school guests. The following requirements must be met:
Please note that some departments require higher GRE/GMAT
scores than what is required by the Admissions Office.
1. Complete a UW High School Guest application;
2. Have an official copy of the most recent high school transcript,
showing an overall GPA of at least 3.0 sent directly to the Admissions Office;
Letters of recommendation may also be required by some departments.
Graduate applicants should contact the respective academic departments for questions concerning application status, degree program
requirements, deadlines, and supplemental application materials they
may require.
3. Submit a positive written recommendation from the high school
counselor or principal;
4. Submit available ACT or SAT scores.
If high school guest admission is granted, it is for one semester
at a time. Subsequent enrollment requires the most recent transcript
and new written permission from the high school. High school guests
may take up to 6 credit hours per semester. Advising will be provided
by the Center for Advising and Career Services in 228 Knight Hall,
(307) 766-2398.
Students admitted with graduate standing may elect to take any undergraduate or graduate courses for which they are prepared, subject to
restrictions as outlined in the University Catalog. However, tuition will be
assessed at the graduate level for all courses taken with graduate status.
Admission to graduate study does not automatically make a student a
candidate for an advanced degree.
G. Undergraduate Non-Degree Student
Note: Students working toward a second bachelor’s degree are not
considered graduate students and are subject to all undergraduate
regulations.
1. Must complete and submit a Non-Degree Student application and
pay a non-refundable $40.00 application fee.
B. International Graduate Applicants
2. Transcripts and test scores are not required for non-degree status.
3. Non-degree students may enroll in a maximum of 8 credit hours
per semester (maximum of two courses). Only 12 credit hours
taken in this status may be used towards a UW degree.
All graduate international students must also submit the following
in additional to application materials required by the Academic
Department.
4. Admission with non-degree status is not available to international
students or students on suspension.
1. Provide proof of satisfactory English ability if student’s native
language is not English. This can be done by providing official
score reports from TOEFL or IELTS. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score is 540 (76 iBT). The minimum acceptable
IELTS score is 6.5. Contact Admissions ([email protected]
edu) to inquire about other possible alternatives to the TOEFL
and IELTS.
5. Students admitted with non-degree status are assessed tuition and
fees at the same tuition rate as degree-seeking students.
6. Students admitted with non-degree status do not qualify to receive
financial aid.
II. Graduate Admission
2. As with the GRE/GMAT scores, many departments may require
a higher level of English proficiency than what is required by the
Admissions Office.
A. Graduate Applicants
Prospective students are encouraged to consult with their respective
academic department regarding the admission process before making
a formal UW application.
3. Provide evidence of adequate financial resources to pay the total
cost of their education. The Confidential Financial Statement
for undergraduate international applicants can be found online at
www.uwyo.edu/admissions/international/requirements-graduate.
html. Students who are awarded a full graduate assistantship may
not need to provide this documentation.
Applicants must submit the UW graduate application and the nonrefundable application fee. One set of official transcripts must be sent
directly to the UW Admissions Office from each previous collegiate
institution.
C. Graduate Non-Degree Student
Domestic applicants must have completed at least a bachelor’s degree
from a regionally accredited institution. All applicants should have at
least a 3.0 cumulative GPA (scale of 4.0).
1. Must complete and submit a Non-Degree Student application
including a non-refundable $40.00 application fee.
2. Transcripts are required for proof of undergraduate degree for
non-degree status, and must be submitted to the Admissions
Office.
Applicants whose department requires the Graduate Record
Examination (GRE) must request official scores be sent to the
Admisssions Office directly from the Educational Testing Service
(ETS). Our institution code with ETS is 4855. A score of at least 150
on the verbal reasoning section and a score of at least 141 on the quantitative reasoning section is required, (for doctoral programs a score of
at least 153 on the verbal reasoning section and a score of at least 144
on the quantitative reasoning section is required).
3. Non-degree students may enroll in a maximum of 8 credit hours
per semester (maximum of two courses). Only 12 credit hours
taken in this status may be used towards a UW degree. This
12-credit hour rule may be decreased if prior courses were reserved
for graduate credit as either an undergraduate or as non-degree
student.
19
Admission to the University
IV. WWAMI Medical Education Program
4. Admission with non-degree status is not available to international
students or students on suspension.
WWAMI is a contract program between the University of Wyoming
and the University of Washington for medical education. Admission
is twofold.
5. Students admitted with non-degree status are assessed tuition and
fees at the same tuition rate as degree-seeking students.
6. Students admitted with non-degree status do not qualify to receive
financial aid.
1. Applicants must be certified residents of Wyoming. To be eligible
for certification, the applicant or parent or guardian must be a
legal resident of the State of Wyoming for five continuous years
immediately prior to enrolling at the University of Washington.
Applications for certification are located at www.uwyo.edu/hs/
wiche-wwami-wydent-program/index.html and are due no later
than October 15 of the year prior to the anticipated start date of
medical school. Participants pay reduced tuition and must either
pay back the money expended on their behalf plus interest or
practice medicine in Wyoming for three years.
7. Non-degree graduate students who decide to pursue a degree must
apply to and be accepted by their respective graduate program
and the Admissions Office.
III. College of Law Admission
(307) 766-6416
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/Law/
Admission to the professional curriculum of law is granted by the
College of Law Admissions Committee. The College of Law reserves the
right to restrict the number of entering students to a class size consistent
with its facilities and its educational objectives. Additional information
and requirements are provided on the College of Law website.
2. Applicants apply to the University of Washington School of
Medicine through the usual procedures and are subject to criteria
established by the University of Washington. Information may
be obtained from the College of Health Sciences, Preprofessional
Advising Office, Dept. 3432, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie,
WY 82071; (307) 766-6704 or (307) 766-3499 or [email protected]
edu.
1. Complete the electronic University of Wyoming College of Law
Application for Admission through LSAC between October 1 and
March 15. Applications received by December 1 will be considered
for early admission.
V. WYDENT Dental Education Program
WYDENT is a contract program between the University of
Wyoming and the University of Nebraska College of Dentistry
and Creighton University School of Dentistry for dental education. Admission is twofold. 2. Submit the application fee online through the College of Law website or by sending a check or money order to the College of Law.
3. Applicants must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college
or university (subject to some limited exceptions).
1. Applicants must be certified residents of Wyoming. To be eligible for certification, the applicant or parent or guardian must
be a legal resident of the State of Wyoming for five continuous
years immediately prior to enrolling in dental school. The application for certification is located at http://www.uwyo.edu/hs/
wiche-wwami-wydent-program/index.html and is due no later
than October 15 of the year prior to the anticipated start date in
dental school. Participants pay reduced tuition and must either
pay back the money expended on their behalf or practice dentistry
in Wyoming for three years. 4. Take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) administered by the
Law School Admission Council (LSAC) no later than the February
administration. The LSAT is given four times each year at numerous locations within and outside of the United States. Information
about the test, dates, test locations and application form may be
obtained from LSAC, Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940-0998, (215)
968-1001, or on the Web at www.lsac.org.
5. Register with LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service (CAS) between
September and January. Registration with CAS can be completed
through the LSAC website (www.lsac.org). An official transcript
from each college attended must be sent directly to CAS. It is
advisable to register with CAS at the same time one registers for
the LSAT. CAS prepares a report and forwards a copy to each
law school to which application has been made. Applicants do
not send transcripts directly to the College of Law until they are
admitted. For more information about CAS, go to www.lsac.org.
2. Applicants must apply to the dental schools through the usual
procedures and are subject to admission criteria established by
the dental schools. Information is available from the College of
Health Sciences; Preprofessional Advising Office; Dept. 3432,
1000 East University Av; Laramie WY 82071 (307) 766-6704 or
(307) 766-3499 or [email protected]
6. International students must supply current TOEFL scores. Minimum scores required for admission are 600 on the written exam
or 100 on the internet-based exam. International students must
take the LSAT exam and register with the Law School Admissions Council (www.lsac.org). If a transcript analysis will not be
provided by the LSAC for any foreign educational institutions
attended, official transcripts must be provided with an English
translation.
VI. School of Pharmacy Admission
Admission to the preprofessional pharmacy program is through
the university admission process described previously.
Admission to the professional curriculum leading to the entry-level
professional Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is granted by the
Dean of the School of Pharmacy upon the advice of the School of
Pharmacy Admissions Committee. The application process requires
that students apply to the School of Pharmacy using PharmCAS, for
more information about PharmCAS log on to www.Pharmcas.org. The
application deadline is February 3rd for fall admission. Admission to the
professional program is limited and competitive. For further information, contact the School of Pharmacy, Dept. 3375, 1000 E. University
Ave., Laramie, WY 82071; (307) 766-6132.
20
Admission to the University
VII. Other Information
Residency Student Classification
The following Trustee regulations govern the classification of
students at the University of Wyoming as resident or non-resident
for tuition purposes, and shall be administered by the Associate
Vice President for Enrollment Management and Registrar. (Trustee
Regulation, Chapter VIII, Section 3.)
Wyoming Senior Citizen Policy
Wyoming senior citizens, age 65 and over, who have been admitted
to UW may enroll in university courses on a space available basis at no
cost upon presentation of evidence of age and Wyoming residence prior
to the beginning of the term in which classes will be taken.
Student Classification for Tuition Assessment
Since standard registration fees will not be assessed, additional
student benefits will not be available under the senior citizen policy.
Alternatively, full-time senior citizen students wishing to receive student benefits may enroll and pay regular registration fees. Scheduled
Outreach School classes which meet minimum enrollment requirements
are included in the courses available to senior citizens.
The University of Wyoming assesses tuition for Wyoming residents
at the in-state rate; non-residents are charged out-of-state tuition. The
Associate Vice President shall administer the following guidelines
for Enrollment Management and Registrar to govern University of
Wyoming students for purposes of in-state or out-of-state tuition
assessment for courses of study offered at the University. Universitysponsored courses of study arranged with institutions outside Wyoming
may have different residency requirements.
Board of Trustee Retirement Benefits
Beginning Spring 2002, official board retirees may attend University
of Wyoming classes on a space available basis at no cost. To qualify
for this benefit, you must be an official board retiree, 25 years of
university service or age 60 with 15 years of immediately preceding
university service.
1. The following students are Wyoming residents:
a. Individuals who are financial dependents or
under the age of 24 with a parent, guardian or
spouse who lives in the State of Wyoming.
b.Individuals who are recipients of Wyoming
high school credentials.
c.Active Wyoming National Guard members and U.S. Armed
Forces members stationed in Wyoming, and their dependents.
d.Individuals with a permanent home in Wyoming and
who have resided in the State for at least one full year.
To determine if a permanent Wyoming home has been
established, the following factors are considered: evidence that
any former home has been abandoned; full-time employment
performed or contracted for in Wyoming for one continuous
year; ownership of home or property in Wyoming; one year of
continual presence in Wyoming; former Wyoming residency
and maintaining state ties; reliance on Wyoming resources for
significant financial support; Wyoming vehicle registration;
Wyoming address on most recent federal income tax form; A
valid Wyoming driver’s license; Wyoming voter registration.
Readmission
Readmission is the process for former University of Wyoming
students to again be admitted to the university. Former UW students
who have attended another college since their last UW enrollment
must have one official transcript from each college sent directly to the
UW Admissions Office. Undergraduate students who are returning
to UW after an absence of one semester or longer should complete an
application for admission at least 30 days prior to registration, thereby
allowing sufficient time to avoid delays in registration.
Academic Reinstatement: Former students who are on academic
suspension at UW must petition for reinstatement through the dean
of their college. Reinstatement petitions must be submitted at least 15
calendar days before the beginning of general registration for each term.
Academic Renewal: An undergraduate student who returns to
UW and has not completed a college course at UW (excluding flexible
enrollment [correspondence study]), during the previous five years,
will have the option of continuing his or her earlier UW cumulative
GPA or commencing a new cumulative GPA under the Academic
Renewal policy. Interested students must submit the Academic Renewal
Application Form (which can be obtained in the Office of the Registrar)
to the registrar no later than ten class days before the last day of classes
of the semester in which the student returns to UW.
Residing in Wyoming primarily as a student will not support a claim
for resident status.
e.Graduate students with University-funded fellowships.
f. Wyoming residents temporarily absent from the state due to military service, attendance at an educational institution, or other type of documented temporary sojourn.
g.Individuals who have been awarded resident tuition status at a
Wyoming Community College and who attend the University
within one year of leaving the Wyoming Community College.
The entire UW transcript will remain intact. A note indicating the
policy will precede the new part of the UW transcript if the student opts
for academic renewal. At the discretion of the academic department
in which the student is enrolled, credit hours for which the student
earned the grade of C or better may be applied toward the completion
of the degree requirements. The list of any departmentally approved
courses must be indicated on the Academic Renewal Application Form
when initially submitted to the registrar. No further changes may be
requested.
2. The following students are non-residents:
a.Individuals who do not qualify for Section 1 above
b.Individuals who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents except as provided by Section 1b. above.
3. Reduced tuition rates calculated at one hundred fifty percent
(150%) of resident tuition are available to the following nonresidents:
a.Graduates of the University of Wyoming and their spouses;
b.Children of University of Wyoming graduates.
A student’s GPA and completed courses that were applied to a baccalaureate degree are not eligible for academic renewal.
21
Admission to the University
4. Change of residence classification shall be governed by the following process:
a.An initially assigned non-resident classification may be
reviewed by the Associate Vice President for Enrollment
Management and Registrar when a request and
accompanying documentation is provided on or before the
first day of classes. A decision on reclassification by the
Associate Vice President may be appealed to the Residence
Classification Committee within twenty (20) calendar days
of the date of the Associate Vice President’s decision. No
reclassification will be retroactive to previous terms.
b.Individuals may be reclassified for the following term
when facts indicate that a change in residency has occurred
since the time of original residence classification.
c.The Associate Vice President for Enrollment
Management and Registrar are responsible for
the administration of this procedure.
Exemptions may be granted to the requirement in two instances: a
medical exemption for a contraindication noted above, and a religious
exemption. A medical exemption requires completion of the Medical
Exemption Form with a notation of the reason for the exemption
and a medical clinician signature. To claim a religious exemption, a
notarized form must be completed and submitted. If an outbreak of
one of these illnesses occurs on campus, students granted an exemption may be excluded from campus for the duration of the outbreak.
Exemption forms can be found on the Student Health Service website
(www.uwyo.edu/shser).
For students unable to verify MMR vaccinations, the vaccine is
available at the Student Health Service for a nominal charge. It will
be administered prior to registration for any eligible student, without
an appointment, during office hours. Do not wait until registration to
comply with the MMR immunization requirement, as this will delay
the process.
In addition to the MMR requirement, international students are
required to undergo tuberculosis screening prior to registration. Based
on screening, a tuberculosis (Mantoux) skin test or blood test may be
performed, and, if positive, a chest x-ray obtained with consultation
with a Student Health Service physician. The student is responsible
for the costs incurred for these tests.
5. There shall be a Residence Classification Committee consisting of three members appointed by the President, chaired by
the Associate vice President for Enrollment Management and
Registrar who shall not vote. The duties of this Committee shall
be as follows:
i. To render interpretations and rulings at the
request of the Associate Vice President for
Enrollment management and Registrar;
ii.To serve as an appeals committee for students who
wish to appeal the decision of the Associate Vice
President for Enrollment Management and Registrar;
iii. To consider University policies in the area of
residence classification and make recommendation
to the Trustees of the University of Wyoming.
Campus Safety
The University of Wyoming Police Department (UWPD) provides
comprehensive law enforcement and security services to all components
of the University including the academic campus, and other properties
owned or controlled by the University. The University Police Officers
are commissioned under Wyoming State Statute and have the full range
of police authorities granted any peace officer including power to arrest, on property owned by or under the control of the University of
Wyoming, including adjacent public streets and sidewalks. University
Security Officers work closely with our police officers in constantly
patrolling University properties and assisting employees and visitors in
accessing University facilities. The UWPD operates 24 hours a day, 365
days a year, and is located at 1426 East Flint, Laramie, Wyoming 82071.
Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
Immunization Requirement
The University of Wyoming has implemented a policy to protect
the University community against measles (rubeola), mumps, and
rubella. All new on-campus students must provide proof of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella prior to registration. The Student
Immunization Form (available on the web at http://www.uwyo.edu/
shser/_files/docs/mmr%20-%20student%20immunization%20form.
pdf) can be completed, verifying compliance with this requirement,
and sent to the Student Health Service prior to registration. Two
doses of MMR vaccine are required. Other acceptable methods to
comply with the requirement are detailed on the Form. Please note
that the Form must be verified and signed by a health care clinician.
Alternatively, a verified copy of an immunization record can be appended to the Form.
Campus safety is the responsibility of all members of the university
community. Faculty/staff, students, and guests are encouraged to report crimes and other concerning behavior or observations promptly.
The Dean of Students Office, Student Conduct, The STOP Violence
Program, and the Office of Diversity and Employment Practices are
available to provide further information.
A full description of campus safety, crime statistics, and educational programs designed to increase safety on campus is available
in the 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report of the University
of Wyoming. To access the report, go to www.uwyo.edu/uwpd/_
files/2014uwsecurityreport.pdf.
The only contraindication to the MMR immunization is a previous severe allergic reaction to the vaccine or vaccine component
(neomycin, gelatin). Relative (temporary) contraindications include:
pregnancy; persons with immunosuppressive illnesses or treatment;
moderate or severe acute illness; and recent receipt of blood products.
If you are uncertain as to whether you should receive the immunization, please talk with your health care clinician.
22
Student Financial Aid
The Office of Student Financial Aid coordinates all student financial
assistance available at UW. Available aid includes scholarships, grants
(Hathaway Scholarships, Federal Pell, Federal SEOG), loans (Federal
Perkins, Federal Direct, Federal PLUS and private) and employment
(Federal Work-Study).
The Student Financial Aid office will help all qualified applicants
to secure aid, but resources are limited. Aid is offered first to those
applicants whose materials are completed and received by March 1 prior
to the academic year for which aid is sought. Federal Pell Grants and
Federal Direct Loans are available to qualified applicants throughout
the year.
Unless another deadline is specified, prospective students seeking
scholarships should send an application for admission, the nonrefundable application fee and a copy of their current high school or college
transcript to the UW Admissions Office by March 1. Students who have
attended another college must have that college submit an academic
transcript to the UW Admissions Office.
Students seeking federal aid or assistance based on their finan­cial
need must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
Applicants may do so at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Allow one week for processing. UW recommends using IRS Data Retrieval (available two weeks
after filing taxes) when completing the FAFSA. Final responsibility for
ensuring that all required documents are received in a timely manner
rests with the applicant.
Enrollment Requirements
Students must attend classes to be eligible for federal financial aid
or be prepared to pay all the money back. Most scholarships require
the recipient to be enrolled full time. Hathaway Scholarships, Federal
Pell Grants, and veteran’s benefits may be pro-rated for part-time enrollment and Federal Direct Loans may only be borrowed by students
enrolled for at least half time (a minimum of 6 hours for undergraduate, law and pharmacy students; a minimum of 4.5 hours for graduate
students). Federal Pell Grants and Federal SEOG Grants are available
to undergraduate students who have not completed the requirements for
their first undergraduate degree. Classes for audit are not acceptable for
any kind of financial aid. Generally, Federal aid is not available for UW
Flexible Enrollment (correspondence) courses, for continuous registration hours, or for audit hours. For details, ask a financial aid adviser.
Eligibility Requirements
To receive federal financial aid (such as Federal Pell, and Federal
SEOG grants, Federal Work Study, Federal Perkins, Federal Direct
[subsidized or unsubsidized], and Federal Direct PLUS loans) you must
meet the following conditions and provide supporting documentation
when requested to do so: have a high school diploma or its equivalent,
be enrolled or accepted for admission as a regular student at UW, not
be concurrently enrolled in an elementary or a secondary school, be
enrolled in a degree program, be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen,
have a demonstrated financial need if required, not exceeded lifetime
Pell grant eligibility, if a Pell grant student, be prepared to prove attendance, maintain satisfactory academic progress (SAP), not be in default
on a federal student loan or owe an overpayment of a federal grant at
any institution (or, if so, have made satisfactory arrangements to repay or otherwise resolve the overpayment or default), not have borrowed in
excess of the annual or aggregate loan limits of a federal loan program
(loan borrowers only), agree to use funds received only for educational
costs, register with the Selective Service if required, and not have had
federal financial aid benefits suspended as result of a drug conviction.
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
The University Of Wyoming Office Of Student Financial Aid is
responsible for ensuring that all students receiving federal financial aid
meet minimum standards. The University of Wyoming standard of
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) measures all students’ academic
performance.
Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed at the end of each payment period (fall, spring, summer) and the following three areas are
measured:
1. Qualitative -- UW cumulative grade point average (Cum GPA)
earned
2. Quantitative (Pace)-- completion rate for coursework enrolled
3. Timeframe- maximum time frame to complete a degree
Minimum Standard Requirements
Qualitative Standard
A student must successfully meet the following minimum UW
cumulative GPA for their program:
•Undergraduate programs - 2.0
•Professional programs - 2.0
•Graduate programs - 3.0
Quantitative Standard (Pace)
A student must successfully complete 67% of the cumulative hours
attempted.
Pace = Cumulative # of credit hours successfully completed
Cumulative # of credit hours attempted
The following courses do count as attempted and completed in the
SAP calculation.
•Successfully completed courses with grades of A, B, C, D, or S
•Transfer hours accepted toward completion of the student’s program
•Academic Renewal hours earned through previous enrollment
•Advanced Placement Credit
•Incomplete grades that are now completed
•Experiential Learning Credits
•Summer Session credits successfully completed
•Credits earned through Study Abroad and Consortium agreements
23
Student Financial Aid
The following courses do count as attempted and not completed
in the SAP calculation:
Financial Aid Probation
Students who have successfully appealed a financial aid suspension
are placed on probation and are eligible to receive federal aid for one
more payment period. After Probation, the student must be making SAP
or successfully following their academic plan. Students are reviewed
each term for compliance with their Academic Plan and SAP Standards. •Failed
•Withdrawn
•Incomplete
•Repeat
Reinstatement
•Unsatisfactory
If a student loses federal financial aid eligibility due to not meeting
SAP standards, they can regain eligibility in one of the following ways:
The following courses do not count as attempted or completed in
the SAP calculation:
1. Completing courses using their own resources that will satisfy the
deficient SAP area.
•Correspondence
•Audit
2. Successfully appealing by submitting a SAP Appeal Form with
supporting documentation.
•Credit by exam
•Remedial
SAP Appeal Process
•Enrichment
Students who have been suspended can appeal their status by submitting the SAP Appeal Form (one semester or multi semesters) and a
formal written request with supporting documentation to the financial
aid office no later than the conclusion of the “Drop/Add” period for
the current semester. The appropriate appeal form is available to the
student once they have met with a SAP counselor. The SAP Appeal
Form must include the following:
Timeframe Standard
A student must be making progress toward a degree. The University
of Wyoming sets the following maximum timeframe for student degrees:
•Undergraduate- 180 hours (150% of 120 hours)
•Master’s Program- 45 hours (150% of 30 hours)
•an explanation with supporting documentation of any
extenuating circumstances that prevented the student from
maintaining satisfactory academic progress,
•Doctorate Program- 108 hours (150% of 72 hours)
•Law- 135 hours (150% of 90 hours)
•an explanation of what has changed that will allow the student
to succeed academically,
•Pharmacy- 213 hours (150% of 146 hours)
Transfer hours accepted toward completion of the student’s program
are used in the calculation of the Timeframe Standard.
•an academic plan signed by academic advisor that will enable
student success, and
When pursuing multiple degrees or changing majors the maximum
time frame may be adjusted based on a student generated appeal that
includes a degree audit.
•a degree audit for those students who have reached their
maximum timeframe.
All appeals are reviewed by a Financial Aid SAP committee. The
review time for appeals may take a minimum of 2 weeks. Students
will be notified of the results by email and/or mail. If the appeal is
denied, students may request an additional review by the Director of
Financial Aid. Students must submit new information with supporting
documentation for a secondary review. The Director’s decision is final.
Sap Statuses
Financial Aid Warning
Students who have not met the minimum standard requirements for
the previous semester will be placed on a Warning status. Students on
Warning status are eligible for financial aid for one additional payment
period. Students who do not meet Minimum Standard Requirements
at the end of their Warning semester will be placed on Suspension for
the next term. Note: Students who receive all failing grades in a semester
are immediately placed on financial aid suspension.
Funds Distribution
Each student who registers has his or her own student account with
the university. Once a qualified student has registered for classes and
accepted their awards on WyoRecords, the Office of Student Financial
Aid will authorize the electronic transfer of funds from UW financial
aid accounts to the student’s individual account at the university.
Financial Aid Suspension
Students who have not met the minimum standard requirements (after being placed on Warning) are placed on Suspension. Students who
are on Suspension are not eligible for financial aid unless a SAP appeal
with academic plan is approved by the SAP Committee. Submitting
an appeal does not guarantee approval. Students awaiting a decision
on their SAP appeal are responsible for paying their tuition and fees
by the payment deadline.
First-time borrowers of federal student loans must participate in
entrance loan counseling (view a web presentation). All student loan
borrowers must participate in an exit loan interview (in person or on
the web) prior to leaving UW.
Federal Work-Study funds are paid as payroll checks or direct
deposit on the 15th and last working day of the month. Payroll checks
may be direct deposited or mailed to the student.
The university will automatically charge a student’s account for
tuition and fees based on the student’s enrollment. Likewise, if the
student is living in a university residence hall, room and board charges
will be placed on the student’s account.
24
Student Financial Aid
Any financial aid credited to a student’s account will automatically
pay tuition and fees first and then charges for room and board in UW
residence halls. Unless directed otherwise in writing by the student,
any remainder will be applied to other university charges. If a negative
balance results, a credit balance will be prepared by the university and
will be refunded to the student through the University’s electronic
refunding process.
Scholarships awarded for the academic year will be split into two
equal payments to the recipient’s student account with one to be paid
at the beginning of each semester. Most non-UW scholarships are paid
in the fall semester unless the donor or selection committee specifically
directs that it be paid differently.
Students enrolled in a domestic or international exchange program
or a study abroad program approved by UW for academic credit are
eligible to apply for federal student financial assistance. Likewise, students concurrently enrolled in classes at two or more eligible institutions of post-secondary education may apply for federal aid. A special
consortium agreement between institutions must be completed prior to
each semester a concurrently enrolled student seeks aid. Those granted
a Federal Work-Study allocation have opportunities to perform community services to earn their allocation.
Information describing available aid, award criteria, rights and responsibilities of aid recipients, costs of attendance or refund and repayment policies and schedules is available by writing to Office of Student
Financial Aid, Dept. 3335, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY
82071, or viewing the financial aid web site at www.uwyo.edu/SFA/.
Important: Students are assumed to be full-time when their initial
financial aid is determined. If you plan to attend less than full-time
in any semester, your financial aid will be adjusted to reflect your true
tuition costs. It is always best to make the Office of Student Financial
Aid aware of your intended enrollment prior to the start of a semester so
that accurate amounts of financial aid may be applied to your account.
Financial aid policies are subject to change without notice to reflect
modifications in federal, state and institutional laws and regulations.
Veterans Educational Benefits
Students who have served in the armed forces may be allowed credit
for courses taken in some military schools. Students who desire to apply for credit on the basis of the military schools should submit a copy
of the DD-214 Form or its equivalent to the Office of the Registrar.
Individual colleges will determine whether such courses will be applicable to degree programs.
All veterans seeking educational benefits must register with the
veterans’ certification specialist in the Office of Student Financial Aid,
174 Knight Hall, (307) 766-2525. This includes completing a veteran’s
registration card each semester.
Those veterans not completing a veteran’s registration card by
the last day of the late registration period will be dropped from VA
educational assistance at the university. Class load requirements for
veterans are as follows:
Undergraduate and Pharm.D. Veterans:
Full-time
12 or more credit hours
3/4 time
at least 9, but fewer than 12 hours
1/2 time
Less than 1/2 at least 6, but fewer than 9 hours
registration credit hour fee reimbursement only
Graduate and Law Veterans:
Full-time 9 or more graduate credit hours or certification by the Office of the Registrar*
3/4 time
at least 7 but fewer than 9 graduate credit hours or certification by the Office of the Registrar*
1/2 time
at least 4.5, but fewer than 7 graduate credit hours
Less than 1/2 registration credit hour fee reimbursement only
*The final responsibility for seeing that the veterans’ certification
specialist has a certification from the Office of the Registrar rests with
the student. It must be received by the last day of scheduled registration.
If any portion of a veteran’s schedule is composed of courses which
are less than the full semester in length (i.e., short courses, workshops,
“blocked” courses, etc.), the rate of benefit payment may be affected.
If you have any questions or concerns, contact the veteran’s certification specialist in the Office of Student Financial Aid, 174 Knight Hall,
(307) 766-2525.
Withdrawal from a class or classes could reduce a veteran’s benefits
for that term. For details, contact the veteran’s certification specialist
in the Office of Student Financial Aid.
National Guard Benefit
Active Wyoming National Guard members in good standing and
considered to be satisfactory participants may apply to participate in
the Guard’s Education Assistance Plan. The Plan provides 100 percent
tuition and mandatory fee payment for all courses (except repeated
courses) leading to one degree at UW, as long as the recipient continues
to meet academic and service commitment requirements. Recipients
must agree to serve in the Guard for at least two years after earning
their degrees. This benefit may be used concurrently with Veterans
Educational (GI Bill) Benefits. For information and application packets, please contact the Wyoming National Guard at 800-832-1959, ext.
5262, the UW Outreach School at 800-448-7801, or the UW financial
aid office at (307) 766-3016.
25
Tuition and Fees
Semester Tuition and Fee Schedule 2015-16
(subject to change)
A $15.00 payment plan enrollment fee is charged per semester.
The payment plan allows for two additional payments approximately
six weeks and nine weeks into the term. Please see the semester class
schedule for the exact due dates. Interest of 1.5% per month may be
charged on all past due amounts.
The University of Wyoming semester tuition and fee schedules for
the 2015-16 academic year, which begins with fall semester 2015, will
be available on WyoRecords or from Accounts Receivable, Room 250,
Knight Hall, on April 1, 2015.
Charges for a course delivered by Outreach Credit Programs are
due approximately one month before the first day of the class or upon
enrollment, whichever occurs later. Please contact Outreach Credit
Programs (1-800-448-7801) for details and for exact deadline dates.
Summer school tuition and fees will be published in the Summer
Bulletin.
Full-time undergraduate refers to undergraduate students enrolled
for 12 or more hours, and part-time undergraduate refers to undergraduate students enrolled for less than 12 hours. At the graduate level, 9 or
more hours is considered full time and less than 9 hours is classified
as part time. Fees do not include special fees.
Special Course Registration Fees
Additional charges (special course and college fees) must be paid
by students enrolling in those courses and colleges with approved
special fees. Fees for these courses and colleges will be indicated in
the semester Class Schedule.
Student Benefit Package and Insurance
At the beginning of each semester, the part-time student benefit
package will be added to student accounts of all part-time students
(6 through 11.5 credit hours for undergraduates and 4.5 through 8.5
credit hours for graduate students) who have elected to purchase UW
health insurance. The benefit package allows part-time students the
same benefits as full-time students including, but not limited to, the
use of Student Health Service, Half Acre Gym and the opportunity to
apply for short-term emergency student loans.
Tuition Waivers
Graduate students taking less than 4.5 credit hours should contact
their academic department and also refer to the “Graduate Student
Optional Fee Package Petition” document, which may be found on
the Office of the Registrar website. Graduate students not receiving
a fee waiver need to pay for the package at the Cashier’s Office, 170
Knight Hall.
A student failing to pay fees, charges, fines, penalties, deposits or
short term loans as prescribed by the Trustees of the University of
Wyoming shall be denied registration at the university and copies of
academic transcripts and/or diplomas until such fees, charges, fines,
penalties, deposits or short term loans are paid in full. A ten-day wait is
required before a student loan hold can be removed if the debt is paid
with a personal check. Contact Accounts Receivable or the Student
Financial Operations Office in Knight Hall for information regarding
financial holds.
If an employee, spouse of an employee or cooperating agency waiver
is used for payment of tuition and/or fees, the properly completed and
signed waiver must be received by the Accounts Receivable office by
the first day of the term. Late waivers will not be accepted. All waivers
will be applied to accounts after the drop deadline.
Financial Holds
Each enrolling student will be required, as part of the registration
process, to make a Student Medical Insurance selection. If the eligible
student selects “YES” to the question, the premium will be assessed on the student’s account. If the student selects “NO,” they
will not be assessed for the premium. Part-time students who
select yes for the health insurance will also be assessed for the
Part-time Student Benefit Package. Student medical insurance
is mandatory for international students.
Summer Session 2015
Please refer to the 2015 Summer Bulletin for rates and applicable
deadlines.
Refunds/Cancellations
Tuition and course fees will be canceled or refunded to a student
who officially drops a class or classes, withdraws from the university
through the Dean of Students office, or changes enrollment status (i.e.
non-resident to resident; full-time to part-time) in accordance with the
institutional refund policy outlined below.
For questions regarding the Student Medical Insurance program,
contact the Student Medical Insurance Advocate (248 Knight Hall) at
(307) 766-3025 between 8 a.m. and noon weekdays.
Tuition and Fee Payment 2015-16
All university charges are due prior to 4 p.m. the third Friday of
each Fall and Spring Term. No tuition penalty will be assessed for dropping and adding during
the drop period identified in the term’s class schedule unless all classes
are dropped or an all-school withdrawal is processed. Students who
withdraw from individual courses after the end of the drop/add period
will have their charges canceled in accordance with the institutional
refund policy outlined below.
An institutional Payment Plan is available for students who:
1. have made the 1st installment payment of 1/3 total current term
charges due plus 100% of prior term charges, required prior to 4
p.m. the third Friday of the term or
2. have “OFFERED and ACCEPTED” financial aid equal to or
greater than the 1/3 total current term charges plus 100% of
prior term charges.
Mandatory fees, late registration fees, or service fees are not refundable.
The portion of tuition refund/cancellation is computed from the
first day of the term, not class meeting pattern. If a student’s initial
registration includes blocked classes or short courses that begin at a later
26
Tuition and Fees
date, the refund/cancellation will still be computed from the first day
of the term. If a student’s initial registration occurs during an approved
late registration period, the date for computing a refund/cancellation
will be the first day of the term.
The date of a student’s withdrawal from UW will be the date of
the student’s notification to the Office of Student Life of an intent to
withdraw. When a student fails to officially withdraw from UW, it will
be assumed that the withdrawal date is the midpoint of the semester
or the last date of documented academic activity.
Institutional Refund Schedule
Before first day of semester
100%
Semester Class Day 1-8
100%
Semester Class Day 9-15 80%
Semester Class Day 16-20 70%
Semester Class Day 21-25 60%
Semester Class Day 26-30 50%
Semester Class Day 31-35 40%
Semester Class Day 36 on 0%
UW will repay the lesser of (1) the total amount of unearned aid or
(2) an amount equal to the student’s institutional charges multiplied by
the percentage of unearned aid. “Institutional charges” is defined as
charges for tuition and fees, plus room and board charges for students
living in UW residence halls and apartments. It does not include such
charges as bookstore charges, student health insurance premiums,
parking citations, or library fines.
The amount of unearned aid owed by the student on a loan may be
repaid under the normal repayment terms of the loan. The amount of
unearned aid owed by the student on a grant must be repaid immediately.
Any amount of earned aid not yet disbursed to the student will be
offered to the student. Such offers will cover any undisbursed grants
first, followed by the undisbursed loans.
Examples of these calculations are available in Accounts Receivable.
The refund schedule for Outreach School courses may vary; see the
Outreach School course schedule for current dates.
Examples of how the amount of unearned federal aid a student must
return is calculated are available from a professional adviser in the office
of Student Financial Aid. A chart detailing the percentage of earned and
unearned aid, by calendar day of the semester, is provided in the term’s
class schedule. In brief, to determine the percentage of earned federal
aid, the calculation will use the total number of calendar days in the
term divided by the total number of calendar days the student attended.
Financial Aid Federal Return of Funds Policy
A student who receives federal financial aid (other than Federal
Work Study pay checks) and chooses to complete less than 60% of an
academic term is considered not to have earned all the federal aid he
or she has been awarded.
• If aid already disbursed is equal to earned aid, no further action
is required.
• If aid already disbursed is less than earned aid, additional aid may
be offered to the student after he or she withdraws.
• If aid already disbursed is greater than earned aid, UW and/or the
student must return some federal funds.
Interaction of Federal Return of Funds Policy and
Institutional Refund Policy
When a student who receives federal financial aid withdraws from
the university, he or she may owe a repayment of federal funds and/or
be due a refund from UW or owe an additional amount to UW. The
Federal Return of Funds policy will be applied before any refund due
under the UW policy is disbursed. For details on the application of
these policies to a specific situation, please consult with the Accounts
Receivable Office, 250 Knight Hall, (307) 766-6232.
To determine whether federal funds have been earned or must be
returned, UW follows this procedure:
1. Determine the percentage of the term the student completed. This
is calculated by dividing the number of calendar days (including
weekends) in a term into the number of calendar days that the
student was in attendance for that term.
Student WyoOne ID Cards
2. Apply the percentage of time attended to the total amount of federal
aid the student was eligible to receive for the term. This is the
student’s “earned aid.”
28 Knight Hall, (307) 766-5268
ID cards are issued to all students during their first semester of
enrollment. These cards are used throughout the student’s entire career
at the university.
3. Subtract the amount of earned aid from the amount of aid actually
disbursed to the student. A positive remainder is the student’s
“unearned aid.” A negative remainder is the student’s “earned
aid” that may still be offered to the student.
The ID card, also referred to as the WyoOne card, is needed to
pick up transcripts, financial aid, cash checks, access student health
services, attend athletic events, enter recreation facilities, check out
library books and materials, food service access, enter residence halls,
and other necessities. Visit the online card office at uwadmnweb.uwyo.
edu/idoffice/ to make deposits, view transaction history, and access
other card management features.
4. Determine the amount of unearned aid remaining that must be
repaid by the student. Subtract the amount of unearned aid repaid
by the institution from the total amount of unearned aid.
All unearned aid will be returned to the federal student loan lender
or federal aid accounts in the following order: (1) Unsubsidized Stafford
Loan; (2) Subsidized Student Loan; (3) Federal Perkins Loan; (4)
Federal PLUS (Parent) Loan; (5) Federal Pell Grant; (6) ACG-Smart;
(7) Federal SEOG Grant. Any amount owed by the student on a grant
will be reduced by 50%.
The WyoOne card may also be used as a debit card to make purchases on campus after the deposit account is established. Spouses,
domestic partners and dependents of students are eligible for an ID card.
27
Credit Available to Undergraduate Students
The University of Wyoming offers credit towards an
undergraduate degree through:
I. University of Wyoming Credit
Instructed Classes
Courses are offered on campus and at Outreach School settings
around the state, including recognized academic courses under faculty
general supervision such as intern­ships, clerkships, clinical experience,
co‑op programs, etc.
Distance courses. Unlike some institutions, UW delivers courses at
a distance through its mainstream academic departments, not through
a separate academic unit. Academic department heads have the authority to assign instructors to distance-delivered courses, including online
courses. They also have a responsibility to ensure that those courses are
comparable in rigor and effectiveness to courses delivered face to face.
For this reason, when a department offers a UW course both face
to face and at a distance, any UW student may satisfy any relevant
university-, college-, and department-level requirements or elective
credit by taking the course in either format. This policy applies to
Laramie-based students as well as students taking courses delivered
through the Outreach School.
Exceptions may arise when it is necessary to reserve space in a
distance-delivered course for off-campus students, who can’t take the
face-to-face version. In these cases, departments may reserve spaces
for off-campus students. But to the extent that spaces remain available
after all interested off-campus students have enrolled, these spaces must
be available to interested on-campus students.
Correspondence Study
A maximum of 24 semester hours may be earned by correspondence
study courses regardless of where the credit is earned. Correspondence
study courses taken by postbaccalaureate students will appear on the
transcript but will not be included in cumulative hours earned, as correspondence study credit is not applicable toward a postbaccalaureate
degree.
Credit by Examination
While there is no maximum placed on the amount of credit
earned by examination, credit so earned does not count in fulfilling
the residency requirement of 30 hours of upper division University of
Wyoming credit.
Students showing proficiency by passing examinations such as the
College Board Advanced Placement Program (AP), for example, or
examinations developed by University of Wyoming departments may
earn college credit through the level of demonstrated proficiency. Credit
may be allowed on the basis of any testing procedure acceptable to
any department, which may include tests of the AP program and both
the general and subject (specific) examinations of the College Level
Examination Program (CLEP).
A student may not earn credit by examination in a course if the
student has completed a course in the subject matter area above the
level of the course for which the examination is sought. However, at the
discretion of the departments involved, during the drop/add period a
student may challenge a lower-level course while enrolled in a higherlevel course in the same subject matter area, if the course challenged is
a prerequisite for the course in which the student is currently enrolled.
An examination of an appropriate type and content for the credit
sought may be conducted to determine if the applicant’s proficiency
is equivalent to that which could be expected upon completion of a
college-level course in the subject. An applicant found to have this level
of proficiency will be awarded credit for that course and allowed to proceed either with more advanced courses or with courses in other areas.
Information concerning credit by examination can be obtained by
contacting the Office of the Registrar.
Options include:
• Specific departmental course examinations
• Subject CLEP tests
• AP tests
• International Baccalaureate (IB)
Eligible students who pay the testing fee of $80.00 may not be
denied an examination in the introductory undergraduate course in
any department, if such an examination exists. “Introductory course”
is interpreted as that course which is prerequisite for successive courses
in the department. Additional fees for examinations offered by testing
agencies other than the University of Wyoming are determined by the
agency concerned.
Grades of S or U (satisfactory/unsatisfactory) are given in all
examinations. Credit by examination is not included in the student’s
grade point average; it is, however, included in the hours earned toward
graduation. The grade of S is the equivalent of C or better. See below for
specific subject requirements. Entry on the student’s academic record
for credit by examination is made only if a grade of S is obtained and
is noted as a grade obtained by examination.
To qualify for undergraduate credit, the student must be currently
registered at the University of Wyoming as a degree candidate. The
student must also be able to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the chair
of the department involved that background experience has prepared
him or her to attempt a challenge examination if such an examination
is sought. The department chair’s decision will be based upon existing
departmental constraints such as accreditation, graduation requirements, and program requirements.
The use of credit by examination, or credit for prior learning, in
graduate programs is to be determined by the student’s consulting
committee in conjunction with the dean of theaffected college.
A student may not be allowed credit by examination in a course in
which the student is currently or was previously enrolled either for credit
or as a visitor or auditor, except that credit by examination may be used
as a means to obtain credit for courses previously taken at institutions
from which credit is nontransferable. A student may not challenge
equivalent courses.
28
Credit Available to Undergraduate Students
Advanced Placement (AP) Information
Subject
Art History
Biology
Acceptable
Score
4+
4, or 5
Spanish Language
3
SPAN 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. Spanish I, II
Spanish Language
4
SPAN 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
Spanish I and II and 2nd yr. Spanish I
Spanish Language
5
SPAN 1010, 1020, 2030, 2040 (16), 1st yr.
Spanish I, II; 2nd yr. Spanish I, II
Spanish Literature
and Culture
2
No credit but student contact
department for placement
Spanish Literature
and Culture
3
SPAN 2030 (4), 2nd yr. Spanish I
Spanish Literature
and Culture
4+
SPAN 2030, 2140 (7); 2nd yr. Spanish I,
Introduction to Literature
Statistics
3+
STAT 2050 (4), Fund of Statistics
Studio Art 2D
4+
ART Elective (3)
Studio Art 3D
4+
ART Elective (3)
Studio Art Drawing
4+
ART Elective (3)
LIFE 1010 (4), General Biology
MATH 2200 (4), Calculus I
Calculus BC
3, 4, or 5
MATH 2200, 2205 (8), Calculus I and II
CHEM 1020, 1030 (8), General
Chemistry I and II
Computer Science A
4
COSC 1010 (4), Intro to Computer
Science I
Computer Science A
5
COSC 1010, 1030 (9), Intro to Computer
Science I, Computer Science I
4 or 5
COSC 1010, 1030 (8), Intro to Computer
Science I and II
Computer Science
AB
UW Course Number(s)/Title(s),
Semester Credit Hours
ART 2020 (3), Art History II
3, 4, or 5
4 or 5
Acceptable
Score
UW Course Number(s)/Title(s),
Semester Credit Hours
Calculus AB
Chemistry
Subject
Environmental
Science
3, 4, or 5
European History
3, 4, or 5
HIST 1120 (3), Western Civ. II
French Language
3
FREN 1010 (4), 1st yr. French I
French Language
4
FREN 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. French I
and II
French Language
5
FREN 1010, 1020, 2010 (12), 1st yr.
French I, II, 2nd yr. French I
*Credit is available for either Language and Composition or Literature
and Composition, not both.
French Literature
3
FREN 2140 (3), Intro to Reading
German Language
3
GERM 1010 (4), 1st yr German I
College Level Examination Prep (CLEP)
German Language
4
GERM 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. German
I and II
German Language
5
GERM 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr
German I, II, 2nd yr. German I
Government and
Politics
3, 4, or 5
Government Comp.
3, 4, or 5
Human Geography
4 or 5
Language &
Composition
Latin Literature
4 or 5
3
ENR 1200 (4), Environment
U.S. History
4 or 5
HIST 1210, 1220 (6), US History I and II
World History
4
HIST 1330 (3), World Civ. from 1450
World History
5
HIST 1330, 1320 (6), World Civilizations
to 1450 and from 1450
Subject
Acceptable
Score
UW Course Number(s)/Title(s),
Semester Credit Hours
American
Government
50 or above
POLS 0000 (3), (fulfills US Constitution
requirement, eligible to take the onehour Wyoming Constitution exam)
Analyzing and
50 or above
USP CH (3)
Biology
50 or above
LIFE 1010 (4), General Biology
Introductory
Business Law
50 or above
MGT 1040 (3)
Calculus
50 or above
MATH 2200 (4), Calculus I
Chemistry
50 or above
CHEM 1020 (4), Gen. Chemistry I
ENGL 1010 (3), English
Composition*
College Algebra
50 or above
MATH 1400 (3), College Algebra
Financial Accounting
50 or above
ACCT 1010 (3), without USP
LATN 1010 (4), 1st yr. Latin I
French Language
41 to 49
FREN 1010 (4), 1st yr. French I
50 to 56
FREN 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. French I
and II
POLS 0000 (3) (fulfills the US
Constitution requirement; eligible
to take the one-hour Wyoming
Constitution exam)
Interpreting Literature
UNST GOV (3), Comparative
Government Credit
GEOG 1020 (3), Intro to Human
Geography
Latin Literature
4
LATN 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. Latin I, II
French Language
Latin Literature
5
Latin 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr. Latin
I, II, 2nd yr. Latin I
French Language
57 or above
German Language
40 to 47
GERM 1010 (4), 1st yr. German I
GERM 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. German
I and II
FREN 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
French I, II, 2nd yr. French I
Literature &
Composition
4 or 5
ENGL 1010 (3), English Composition
Microeconomics
4 or 5
ECON 1020 (3), Principles of
Microeconomics
German Language
48 to 53
Macroeconomics
4 or 5
ECON 1010 (3), Principles of
Macroeconomics
German Language
54 or above
GERM 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
German I, II, 2nd yr. German I
Music Theory
4 or 5
MUSC 1030 (3), Music Theory I and
MUSC 1035 (1), Aural Theory I
History of the U.S. I
50 or above
HIST 1210 (3), United States History I
Humanities
50 or above
ENGL 2130 (3) Creative Impulse
Information Systems
and Computer
Applications
50 or above
COSC 1200 (3) Computer Information
Systems
Intro to Educational
Psychology
47 or above
3 hours of general transfer credit
Pre-Calculus
50 or above
MATH 1450 (5), Algebra &
Trigonometry
Physics B
4 or 5
PHYS 1310 (4), College Physics I
Physics C
4 or 5
PHYS 1310, 1320 (8), College Physics I
and II
Psychology
Spanish Language
3, 4, or 5
2
PSYC 1000 (3), General Psychology
No credit, but student should ontact the department for possible
placement in SPAN 1020
29
Credit Available to Undergraduate Students
Subject
Acceptable
Score
UW Course Number(s)/Title(s),
Semester Credit Hours
Organizational
Behavior
46 or above
3 hours general elective credit
MGT 3210 (3), Management &
Organization
Money and Banking
48 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Personal Finance
46/400
3 hours general elective credit
Physical Geology
46 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Principles of Finance
400 or above
3 hours upper-division elective credit
Principles of
Financial Accounting
50 or above
ACCT 1010 (3) no USP credit
Principles of Physical
Science
47 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Principles of Public
Speaking
47 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Principles of
Supervision
400 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Rise and Fall of the
Soviet Union
49 or above
3 hours upper-division elective credit
49/400
3 hours upper-division elective credit
Principles of
Management
50 or above
Principles of
Marketing
50 or above
MKT 3210 (3), Intro to Marketing
Principles of
Macroeconomics
50 or above
ECON 1010 (3), Principles of
Macroeconomics
Principles of
Microeconomics
50 or above
ECON 1020 (3), Principles of
Microeconomics
Introductory
Psychology
50 or above
PSYC 1000 (3), General Psychology
Social Sciences and
History
50 or above
USP CS (3)
Spanish Language
41 to 49
SPAN 1010 (4), 1st yr. Spanish I
Spanish Language
50 to 53
SPAN 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. Spanish I
and II
Spanish Language
54 or above
SPAN 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
Spanish I, II, 2nd yr. Spanish I
Statistics
48 or above
STAT 2070 (4), Intro to Statistics for
Social Sciences
Introductory
Sociology
56 or above
SOC 1000 (3), Sociological Principles
Western Civ. I
50 or above
HIST 1110 (3), Western Civilization I
Western Civ. II
50 or above
HIST 1120 (3), Western Civilization II
Substance Abuse
International Baccalaureate (IB)
Subject
DANTES Standardized Subject Tests (DSST)
Subject
Acceptable
Score
General
Anthropology
50 or above
USP CS, G (3)
Art of the Western
World
50 or above
USP CA (3)
Civil War and
Reconstruction
47 or above
3 hours upper-division elective credit
Criminal Justice
46 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Environment and
Humanity
46 or above
3 hours of general elective credit
Ethics in America
50 or above
USP CH (3)
Here’s to your Health
400 or above
PEAC 1001 (3) lecture component; must
complete activity for USP P credit
History of the
Vietnam War
53 or above
HIST 1220 (3) US History II
Human/Cultural
Geography
48 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Human Resource
Management
46 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Introduction to
Business
400 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Introduction to
Computing
400 or above
3 hours general elective credit
Introduction to
World Religions
50 or above
RELI 1000 (3), Introduction to Religion
Lifespan
Development
Psychology
50 or above
3 hours general transfer credit
Management
Information Systems
400 or above
3 hours general elective credit
30
UW Course Number(s)/Title(s),
Semester Credit Hours
Adv. Math SL
4+
MATH 2200, 2205 (8), Calculus I and II
Social/Cultural
Anthropology HL
4+
ANTH 2200 (3), World Culture
Social/Cultural
Anthropology SL
4+
ANTH 1200 (3), Intro to Cultural
Anthropology
4
ART 1000 (3), General Art Studio
ART 1010 (3), General Art History
Art/Design HL
UW Course Number(s)/Title(s),
Semester Credit Hours
Acceptable
Score
Biology HL
4+
LIFE 1010 (4), General Biology
Biology SL
4+
LIFE 1010 (4), General Biology
Chemistry HL
4
CHEM 1020 (4), Gen. Chemistry I
Chemistry HL
5+
CHEM 1020 (4), Gen. Chemistry I
CHEM 1030 (4), Gen. Chemistry II
Chemistry SL
5+
ELEC 1000 (4), Physical Science
Elective, USP SP
Computer Science
HL
4+
COSC 1010, 1030 (8), Intro to Computer
Science I and II
Computer Science SL
4+
COSC 1010 (4), Intro to Computer
Science I
Economics HL
4+
ECON 1000 (3), Global Econ. Issues
Economics HL
5+
ECON 1010(3), Principles of
Macroeconomics; ECON 1020 (3),
Principles of Microeconomics
Economics SL
4+
ECON 1000 (4), Global Econ. Issues
English HL
4+
ELEC 1000 (3), USP Credit for WA or
C1
Environmental
Systems and
Societies
4+
ENR 1200 (4), Environment
French Language
4
FREN 1010 (4), 1st yr. French
French Language
5
FREN 1010, 1020 (8) 1st yr. French I
and II
French Language
6/7
FREN 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
French I, II, 2nd yr. French I
German Language
4
Germ 1010 (4) 1st yr. German I
German Language
5
Germ 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. German I
and II
Credit Available to Undergraduate Students
Subject
Acceptable
Score
German Language
6/7
History - American
HL
4
History-European
4+
UNST CS (3), Cultural Context Social
Science
History - Africa HL
4+
ELEC 1000 (3), Transfer Credit Elective
History - Asia and
Oceania HL
4+
ELEC 1000 (3), Transfer Credit Elective
History - Europe and
the Middle East HL
4+
ELEC 1000 (3), Transfer Credit Elective
Information
Technology/Global
Awareness
4+
UNST G (3), Global Awareness
Macroeconomics,
Principles of
6/7
ECON 1010 (3), Principles of
Macroeconomics
Math SL
4+
MATH 1450 (3), Algebra &
Trigonometry
Math HL
Math Studies
Music HL
GERM 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
German I, II, 2nd yr. German I
II. Transfer Credit
4
MATH 2200, 2205 (8), Calculus I and II
4+
UNST QA (3), Quantitative Reasoning I
Music 1000 (3), Intro to Music
Music Theory SL
4+
Music 1000 (3), Intro to Music
Philosophy HL
4+
3 hours of general transfer credit
Psychology SL
4
4+
RUSS 1010 (4), 1st yr. Russian I
Russian Language
5
RUSS 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. Russian I
and II
Russian Language
6/7
Spanish Language
4
SPAN 1010 (4), 1st yr. Spanish I
Spanish Language
5
SPAN 1010, 1020 (8), 1st yr. Spanish I
and II
Spanish Language
6/7
Performance/
Theatre Prod. HL
4+
Students transferring to UW must have the registrar or records office
of the previous school(s) send an official transcript to the University
of Wyoming Admissions Office. Once all final transcripts have been
received by the Admissions Office, the degree analysts in the Office
of the Registrar will create an electronic record of all courses that
transfer to UW.
PSYC 1000 (3), General Psychology
4
B or A
Transfer credit includes college courses accepted from other regionally accredited colleges or universities. Such course work must be
considered equivalent or comparable to course work required by the
University of Wyoming. The university accepts only academic courses
in the study of religion similar to those offered by the Religious Studies
Program in the College of Arts and Sciences.
PHYS 1110, 1120 (8), General Physics I
and II
Russian Language
Theory of
Knowledge
The number of credit hours able to be earned by means of a portfolio evaluation is normally limited to 12. Such credit, when awarded,
shall be for specific University of Wyoming content-oriented courses
(rather than given as X number of hours of credit in a general discipline
area), following the college course model of assessment as defined by
the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning. Portfolio assessment, when used, will be conducted by a committee of appropriate
tenured faculty including at least one member with the academic rank
of professor. All credit assigned for experiential learning based upon portfolio
evaluations is excluded from the minimum credit hour requirements as set forth in
the university requirements.
HIST 1210, 1220 (6), US History I and II
4
Physics HL
student’s degree program can be enriched by freeing time needed to
take additional courses, or accelerated to earn the baccalaureate degree
earlier and commence postgraduate studies sooner.
UW Course Number(s)/Title(s),
Semester Credit Hours
Evaluations are not accomplished for students working toward a
Second Bachelor’s Degree. Second Bachelor’s students should consult
with their adviser concerning the applicability of transfer work to their
UW degree program.
RUSS 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
Russian I, II, 2nd yr. Russian I
The recording of credit does not automatically imply acceptance
toward a degree since degree requirements vary from major to major. Acceptance of credit toward a major is dependent upon final approval
by the student’s academic adviser. Questions concerning the transferability of course work from other institutions should be directed to the
Office of the Registrar.
SPAN 1010, 1020, 2030 (12), 1st yr.
Spanish I, II, 2nd yr. Spanish I
3 hours of USP CH credit
a. UW Policy (Academic Affairs Policy Letter, 9
October 2012)
THEA 2050 (3), Theatre Practice
Visual Art SL
4
ART EL (6), Art Elective, USP CA
Visual Art HL
4
ART EL (12), Art Elective, USP CA
UW maintains a system for accepting transfer credits from other
institutions and prides itself on forward-looking approaches to distance
education. The following clarifies policies for:
• Accepting transfer credit from Wyoming’s public community
colleges
• Accepting transfer credit for students transferring to UW from
other institutions
• Accepting transfer credit for students enrolled at UW
Portfolio Evaluations
In recognition of factors in our society that produce great individual
differences in backgrounds and preparation of students entering the
university, the university has developed various options to assess extrainstitutional college-level learning. To qualify for undergraduate credit,
the student must be currently registered at the University of Wyoming
as a degree candidate.
1..Transfer credit from Wyoming’s public community colleges
For any student, UW will accept credit earned at any Wyoming
public community college in accordance with the Wyoming Higher
Education Course Transfer Guide/Statewide Course Catalogue. This
policy applies to students transferring to UW and to students enrolled
at UW who take courses at one of these community colleges while they
pursue degrees at UW.
Credit based on faculty evaluation of the kinds and extent of collegelevel learning which an applicant has acquired in prior extra-institutional
settings, evidenced in a portfolio of documentation, may count toward
university undergraduate graduation requirements. In such event, the
31
Credit Available to Undergraduate Students
b. Process
UW maintains an active regimen of institution-wide and disciplinespecific articulation with Wyoming community colleges. These discussions, together with department-driven decisions about which courses
to list in the statewide common course-numbering system, provide
mechanisms that can ensure appropriate levels of course equivalency.
Transfer credit includes college courses accepted from other accredited colleges or universities. Such course work must be considered
equivalent to course work required by the University of Wyoming.
Students transferring to UW must have the registrar or records office of previous school(s) send an official transcript to the University
of Wyoming Admissions Office. Once all final transcripts have been
received by the Admissions Office, the degree analysts in the Office
of the Registrar will create an electronic record of all courses that
transfer to UW.
2..Transfer credit for students transferring from other
institutions
The UW registrar’s office maintains a list of course equivalencies
and courses accepted for general credit from other institutions of higher
learning. In maintaining this list, the registrar, in consultation with
academic departments as necessary, determines which outside courses:
• are equivalent to specific UW courses when students transfer to UW
• count for general university-level credit when students transfer to UW
• are not transferable for university-level credit when students transfer
to UW.
The recording of credit does not automatically imply acceptance
toward a degree since degree requirements vary from major to major.
Acceptance of credit toward a major is dependent upon final approval
by the student’s academic adviser. Questions concerning the transferability of course work from other institutions should be directed to the
Office of the Registrar.
For course beyond the 1000-2000 level and in cases where questions arise, the registrar relies on academic departments to make the
assessment.
c. Articulation Agreements
1. Wyoming Community College Articulation Agreement
For any student transferring to UW from another institution of
higher learning, UW will adhere to the registrar’s equivalency and
general transfer list on the date that the transcript is evaluated. If a
course in question doesn’t appear in the list, the registrar will follow
the normal protocol, in consultation with academic departments, to
make a determination. If an academic department determines that an
outside course improperly appears on the list, the registrar will correct
the list according to the department’s guidance. The corrected list will
apply to subsequent transfer students but not retroactively.
Students entering UW beginning fall 2001 and who have completed
an AA, AS, or AB degree from a Wyoming Community College (spring
2001 or later) receive credit toward completion of the lower division
general education requirements included in the University Studies
Program. Two types of graduates are addressed in this agreement:
a. All Wyoming community college graduates (AA, AS, or AB degree)
who have completed the prescribed thirty (30) credit hour Wyoming
community college Common General Education Core and, in
addition, a second three (3) credit hour college-level math course,
will be deemed to have met UW’s lower-division general education
requirements.
b. All Wyoming community college graduates (AA , AS, or AB degree)
who have completed the prescribed thirty (30) credit hour Wyoming
community college Common General Education Core, but who lack
the second three (3) credit hour college-level math course will be
required to complete the second mathematics course either at the
community college or at the University before they will be deemed
to have met UW’s lower-division general education requirements.
3..Transfer credit for students enrolled at UW
The university’s faculty and administration expect UW students to
earn credits by taking courses at UW. Exceptions may be appropriate
in some instances. For example, the university encourages students
to pursue opportunities to study abroad, whether through UW course
offerings or through other approved programs. As another example,
a student who spends a summer in another university town may also
have a compelling case for taking a non-UW course and applying the
credits to the UW transcript. There are many other possibilities.
This articulation agreement applies to graduates receiving an
Associate of Arts, an Associate of Sciences, or an Associates of Business
degree from any of the seven Wyoming Community Colleges spring
2001 or later. All graduates with an AA , AS, or AB degree complete
a minimum of 64 college-level credits with a minimum of 2.0 GPA.
For any student enrolled at UW, the university will guarantee transfer credits only for courses for which the student has received prior,
course-specific approval from an academic advisor and the affected
academic department head. A Transfer Guarantee Form should be
submitted prior to enrolling for a transfer course. Nontraditional credits awarded by another institution will not
normally be accepted by the University of Wyoming. They may be
validated by departmental exam within the faculty regulations allowing
for such examinations. Credits awarded at other institutions based on
ACT or SAT scores or College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
general examinations will not be accepted as transfer credit, unless the
examination score appears on the transcript.
The only exceptions are transferable credits from Wyoming community colleges, as discussed above. In considering requests of this
type, academic department heads may take into account the student’s
circumstances, department- and university-level learning outcomes
such as global awareness, and the department faculty’s assessment of
the course’s content, level, and academic rigor.
This policy has no effect on such programs as WICHE’s Internet
Course Exchange and other inter-institutional arrangements through
which courses taught elsewhere count as credit-bearing UW courses.
32
Credit Available to Undergraduate Students
2. Colorado Community College Articulation Agreement
Wyoming Transfer Catalogue
Graduates of regionally accredited Colorado community colleges
earning an AA/AS Spring 2012 or later are awarded the lower-division
general education core in the same manner as graduates of Wyoming
community colleges, with the exception of the UW/WY Government
and Constitutions requirement. Students must complete the Wyoming
component through coursework or challenge exam. The Wyoming Transfer Catalog is available at https://wyossb.
uwyo.edu/bnrprod/bwckytfc.p_display_transfer_catalog. The page
allows searches of how courses from other collegiate institutions will
transfer to the University of Wyoming (UW) or which UW courses
may be offered at other institutions. Transfer courses which return
values of “NA” in the UW Subject field are not transferable to UW. If a course is offered at another collegiate institution but is not found
in the Wyoming Transfer Catalog, please feel free to contact the UW
Office of the Registrar at [email protected] or (307) 766-5272 to
inquire of the process to have new courses evaluated for transferability. Community college students intending to transfer to UW are
encouraged to meet with their advisors and review both the Wyoming
Transfer Catalog and the UW Catalog when planning their program of
study to ensure courses taken at the community colleges will transfer
to UW in their desired major. UW advisors may apply transferable
courses to individual major requirements in accordance with college/
departmental policies.
Spring 2008 (and later) graduates of Pikes Peak Community College
are included due to a pre-existing articulation agreement.
3. Other Community College Articulation Agreements
Spring 2012 and later AA/AS graduates of Western Nebraska, MidPlains (Nebraska), and Colby (Kansas) Community Colleges will be
extended the lower-division general education core in the same manner
as Colorado schools above.
Transfer Credit from Regionally-Accredited U.S. Colleges and
Universities
The page https://wyossb.uwyo.edu/bnrprod/bwckytfc.p_display_
transfer_catalog allows students to look up courses that the University
of Wyoming has previously accepted from regionally accredited U.S.
institutions. When a direct match to a Wyoming course cannot be determined, general elective and/or University Studies credit is awarded. Transfer courses which return values of “NA” in the UW Subject field
are not transferable to UW. If a particular course is not found, that may
simply mean that no one has previously attempted to transfer it in. All
new classes will be evaluated on an individual basis. All new upperdivision courses will initially be given upper-division general elective
credit. The university faculty will then determine whether or not an
upper-division course has a direct UW equivalency.
Credit is awarded credit hour for credit hour. Quarter hours are
recognized as two-thirds (2/3) of a semester hour.
Should a course be transferred as an elective, it may be substituted for a major requirement with adviser approval. Elective courses
may also be considered for University Studies requirements via the
University Studies petition process.
The fact that a course appears in the list is no guarantee that the
course will transfer in each individual case. Students intending to
transfer to UW are encouraged to meet with their advisors and review
both the Transfer Catalog and the UW Catalog when planning their
program of study to ensure courses taken elsewhere will transfer to
UW in their desired major. Final determination of transfer credit acceptance is made by the University Registrar and faculty. Students
must submit official transcripts of all completed coursework before a
final determination can be made on credit transfer.
These equivalencies are subject to change without notice.
33
III. Military Service Courses
Students who have served in the Armed Forces may be allowed
transfer credit for courses taken in some military schools. Students
who desire to apply for credit on the basis of their military schooling
should submit a copy of their DD-214 form or AARTS/SMART/CCAF
transcript (or equivalent) to the UW Admissions Office. The degree
analysts in the Office of the Registrar determine whether the course
work is transferable to UW. Evaluations for the granting of credit for
military-based training are based on recommendations in the American
Council of Education (ACE) guidelines. Individual colleges will determine whether such course work is applicable to their degree programs.
The Grading System
The cumulative grade point average is defined as the sum of all grade
points earned in University of Wyoming residence, correspondence, or
the Outreach School, divided by all credit hours attempted for letter
grade, with the following exceptions:
Students are evaluated according to the following grading system:
Grade Pts.
A
4.000
A-
3.667
Definition
1. The credit hours shall not be counted in courses in which marks of
W, S, or U were assigned, or in which marks of I (for incomplete)
are still in effect.
B+3.333
B3.000
B-
2. For repeated courses:
2.667
C+2.333
C2.000
C-
1.667
D+1.333
D1.000
a. First repeat: only the second credit and grade is used to calculate
the cumulative grade point average.
b. If repeated more than once, only the last credit and grade earned
is used to calculate the cumulative grade point average.
c. A student is limited to a maximum of three (3) attempts, including withdrawals, in any course at the University of Wyoming.
F
0.000 Failure (may be assigned as a grade for failure to attend or to indicate failure to formally withdraw)
I
Incomplete (temporary mark pending coursework completion as agreed in a signed document). See section on incompletes below for details.
d. If a mark of W, S, or U is assigned in a repeated course, the
previous grade assigned will stand except when an S or U is earned
repeating a previous S or U.
W
Withdrawal (from the individual course or all courses), only if the student follows the official withdrawal procedure. If a student enrolls in a course and then abandons it (stops attending) without following the official withdrawal
procedure, a grade of F will be assigned.
e. Courses applied towards one completed degree may be repeated
as part of a second degree; however, the grade and grade point
average in the original degree will not be changed.
3. Transfer grades are not counted in the UW grade point average.
If a course taken at UW is repeated for the first time at another
institution, the credits and grade earned at UW will be deleted
from computation of the UW cumulative grade point average if
credit for the repeated course is transferred to UW.
S
Satisfactory (equivalent to a C or better [B or better in courses numbered 5000 or above]; see general information on S/U grading below)
4. For graduate students, courses numbered below 4000 are not
added in to the semester and cumulative totals, nor computed
into the GPA.
U
Unsatisfactory (see general information on S/U grading below)
UK
Unable to compute grades (for midterm grades only)
Incompletes (I)
A grade of “I” (incomplete) is a temporary grade assigned to students
who, due to unforeseen circumstances, were unable to complete all work
required for a course. It may be awarded only if the class instructor
has approved a petition to be filed prior to grade submission by the
instructor to the Registrar at the end of the term in which the student
was enrolled in the class. (UW Regulation 6-720)
Grade Points
Each letter-graded course carries grade point value computed as:
the total credit hours earned in the course multiplied by the point
value of the letter grade earned. For example: a student earning an A
(point value of 4) in a 3 credit-hour course would earn 12 grade points
for the course.
Time allowed for completing course requirements will normally not
exceed 120 calendar days beyond the end of the semester in which the I
was given. The dean of a college may designate certain research courses
where the 120‑day limit may be extended by the instructor; however,
the completion date even in these courses should not be later than the
time of graduation for the student unless the student is reserving the
particular course for graduate credit.
Semester (or Term) Grade Point Average
The semester grade point average (GPA) is the sum of all grade
points earned in a semester or term divided by all credit hours attempted
for letter grade. Credit hours in courses in which marks of I, W, S, or
U were assigned, as well as developmental courses, are excluded.
If the final grade for the course is not received in the Office of the
Registrar by the date indicated on the authorization, the I will revert
to an F. Should graduation occur in the interim, the I can stand permanently or it can still be completed within the specified deadline, but
the student’s GPA at graduation with all associated honors will stand
as computed.
Cumulative Grade Point Average
The average of all grades earned by a student below is termed the
cumulative grade point average. It is used for determining activity
eligibility, honors, probation, suspension, graduation, and for all comparisons or purposes requiring measurement of academic standing.
34
Grading System
General Information on S/U Grading
End of Semester Grade Reports
The grade of S (satisfactory) is interpreted to include grades A-C
and the grade of U (unsatisfactory) to include grades D-F on the conventional grade scale for courses numbered less than 5000 (for courses
5000 or above, the grade of S is interpreted to included grades A and
B). Credit hours of S/U courses are counted as hours attempted toward
graduation. However, neither the S nor U grade carries grade points
and neither will be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade
point average.
Final grades are available on WyoRecords as soon as possible (usually within five working days) after the close of the semester or term.
Definitions
1. Cumulative semester hours attempted shall be the total of all credit
hours attempted through the University of Wyoming, except
for credit hours attempted in repeating a course, those in which
marks of W were assigned, and those accepted in transfer from
other institutions.
Students may not take a course for S/U credit to satisfy University
Studies Program requirements, unless the course is offered for S/U
only; (e.g., POLS 1000, or the equivalent history or economics courses,
may not be taken for S/U).
If a mark of S or U is assigned in a repeated course, the previous grade assigned will stand except when an S or U is earned repeating a
previous S or U.
Students must signify at the time of registration or schedule modification whether they are taking any course for S/U grades. Faculty will
be notified of the student’s decision.
Grade Appeal
The faculties of the various colleges and interdisciplinary programs
shall determine the number of credit hours of S that may be used to
satisfy degree requirements in their programs. They may also place
restrictions upon the use of S credits to satisfy college or major requirements. In addition, they may designate particular courses in their
colleges as courses to be offered for S/U only.
A recorded grade may be changed through established appeal processes within individual colleges. Contact your department for further
information about appealing a grade.
Academic Transcripts
Official transcripts of individual academic records at UW are sent
from the Office of the Registrar upon written authorization signed
by the individual. Individuals may also authorize the release of their
academic transcripts through WyoRecords. All financial obligations to
the university must be cleared before a transcript may be released or
viewed on WyoRecords.
A student who changes majors within a college or who transfers to a
different college may petition for the acceptance of S credits previ­ously
earned if such credits are in conflict with faculty-established regulations
for the new major or college.
Mid-Term Grades
Transcripts are produced on a first-come, first-served basis and one
to two business days must be allowed. Individuals are asked to anticipate
transcript needs and submit requests to the Office of the Registrar as
far in advance as possible. Usually, 10-15 days are needed at the close
of a semester to record semester grades and issue transcripts. Sameday transcript service is available for a $10 fee (limit of 2 transcripts).
Mid-term grades for all courses numbered below 5000 are to be
submitted by instructors on WyoRecords the week following midsemester. Grades which can be assigned by faculty are:
Grade Definition
DPoor
F
Failure (may also be assigned as a grade for failure to
attend or to indicate failure to formally withdraw)
S
Satisfactory (equivalent to a C or better) in cases where the class is offered for S/U or the student has elected the S/U option
2. The cumulative grade point average is defined as the sum of all
grade points earned through the University of Wyoming divided
by the sum of all credit hours attempted through the university,
except for credit hours in which marks of W, S, U, or I are assigned
or those of an initial course which has been repeated. When a
course has been repeated, only the last grade points and credit
hours assigned for repeats of the course shall be entered in the
computation of the cumulative grade point average.
Partial transcripts are not issued. Each transcript includes the complete academic record at the University of Wyoming and the number
of credits from other institutions accepted by UW.
Official transcripts of credit earned at other institutions which
have been presented for admission or evaluation of credit become the
property of the University of Wyoming and are not reissued or copied
for distribution. This includes high school records and any other type
of supporting documents. Transcripts of work completed at other
institutions should be obtained directly from the issuing institution.
U Unsatisfactory (equivalent to a D or F) in cases where the class is offered for S/U or the student had elected the S/U option
UK Unknown; unable to compute grade
Applicability of transfer credit toward any degree is dependent on
the curriculum pursued by the student.
The UK grade may be assigned if, due to lack of performance assessments such as exams, papers, homework, etc., a faculty member is
unable to make a determination of a midterm grade.
In preparing transcripts for graduate students or second bachelor’s
degree candidates whose undergraduate work was taken elsewhere, the
University of Wyoming includes on its transcripts no detailed reference
Please note that the midsemester grade received in any particular class reflects
the assessment of student performance during the first portion of the semester only.
Mid-term grades are available on WyoRecords.
35
Grading System
Academic Probation and Suspension
to that undergraduate work, mention being limited to designation of
the degree and date received and the name of the institution granting
the degree.
Undergraduate Students
Academic Status
In order to graduate, every student is expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress, which is based on scholastic performance.
Current academic status will be indicated on internal documents and
grade reports as:
Honor Roll
Undergraduate and law students who achieve high scholastic grades
are honored by being placed on the President’s Honor Roll, the academic
Dean’s Honor Roll, or the Provost’s Honor Roll.
• good standing
• academic probation
The requirements to be met to attain these honors are:
• academic suspension: normally not eligible to petition for
reinstatement until one full semester, exclusive of summer term,
has elapsed. The dean of the college in which a suspended person
wishes to continue may waive the four-month delay if the dean
is assured that the person has made suitable progress toward
resolving the academic deficiencies.
For President’s or Dean’s Honor Roll:
1. Undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 12 UW semester hours on a basis of A, B, C, D, or F. Exception: if a student
is student teaching, the student must be enrolled in a minimum
of 12 UW semester hours, at least 7 of which must be graded on
the basis of A, B, C, D, or F with no semester grade of I. Courses
taken for audit do not count for honor roll purposes.
Undergraduate Academic Probation
2. A GPA of 4.0 for the President’s Honor Roll.
1. Academic probation shall constitute notice that a student is not progressing satisfactorily toward the bachelor’s degree or Pharm.D.
3. A GPA of 3.25 or better for the academic Dean’s Freshman Honor
Roll.
2. A student enrolled at the University shall be placed on academic
probation at the end of the semester or summer term when his/
her cumulative GPA at UW falls below a 2.00.
4. A GPA of 3.4 or better for the academic Dean’s Honor Roll for
undergraduates above freshman standing.
5. In the College of Law, students are eligible for the academic Dean’s
Honor Roll when enrolled in a minimum of 13 UW semester hours
of law courses. In the College of Law, a grade point average of
3.25 or better is required for first year students and a GPA of 3.4
or better is required for second and third-year students for the
academic Dean’s Honor Roll.
3. A student placed on academic probation will be so notified by
email.  This information is also available on WyoRecords. 
4. A student shall be removed from academic probation at the end
of the semester or summer term in which his/her cumulative
GPA is 2.00 or above.
5. Students who fail to remove themselves from probation or earn a
semester grade point average below 2.0 in the next semester or
summer term attempted will be suspended from the university
for not maintaining the criteria for satisfactory academic progress.
Students on probation who register for a semester or summer term
and then withdraw from that semester or term will be suspended,
as it is considered an attempted semester or term.
6. Students having consortium agreements with other institutions are
not considered to be full-time for honor roll purposes.
For the Provost’s List:
1. Undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 6 UW semester hours, but fewer than 12 UW semester hours, of which at
least 6 UW semester hours must be graded on the basis of A, B,
C, D, or F with no semester grade of I. Courses taken for audit
do not count for honor roll purposes.
Undergraduate Academic Suspension
1. Academic suspension is the dismissal of a student from the University due to the student not making satisfactory academic progress
toward the bachelor’s degree.
2. A GPA of 3.5 or better.
Graduate Students
2. A student who is suspended for unsatisfactory academic performance should not be permitted to petition for reinstatement until
one full semester, exclusive of summer term, has elapsed. Students
may petition once per semester for reinstatement, and, if denied
by any college or the Center for Advising and Career Services,
cannot petition for reinstatement until the next fall or spring semester, unless there are documented extenuating circumstances
justifying immediate reinstatement.
Graduate Students are not eligible for the President’s Honor Roll,
the academic Dean’s Honor Roll, or the Provost’s List.
3. A suspended student may not enroll for any University of Wyoming
credit classes (including on-campus, online, correspondence, and
Outreach).
4. Credit earned at another accredited college or university while a
student is suspended from the University may be accepted under
the usual regulations governing the transfer of credit after the
student has been reinstated.
5. A student placed on academic suspension will be so notified by
letter.
36
Grading System
Undergraduate Academic Reinstatement
Academic Renewal
1. A college may have an academic reinstatement policy that is more
restrictive than the general university policy.
An undergraduate student who returns to the University and who
has not completed or withdrawn from a college course at UW (excluding correspondence study courses) during the previous five years will
have the option of continuing his or her earlier UW cumulative GPA
or commencing a new cumulative GPA under the Academic Renewal
policy. The student must submit the Academic Renewal Application
Form (which may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar) to the
registrar no later than ten class days before the last day of classes of
the semester in which the student returns to UW.
2. Academic reinstatement is the readmission of a suspended student
to the University. The student is eligible to be considered for readmission.  The reinstated student will be on academic probation
during his/her first semester or summer term of reinstatement
after which he/she may be removed from this probation.
3. A petition for reinstatement must be submitted no later than 15 days
before the beginning of the semester or summer term in which the
student wishes to register.  A petition received after this deadline
may not be processed until after the regular registration period.
The entire UW transcript will remain intact. A note indicating the
policy will precede the new part of the UW transcript if the student opts
for academic renewal. At the discretion of the academic department
in which the student is enrolled, credit hours for which the student
earned the grade of C or better may be applied toward the completion
of the degree requirements. The list of any departmentally-approved
courses must be indicated on the Academic Renewal Application Form
when initially submitted to the registrar. No further changes may be
requested.
4. The decision on a petition for reinstatement will be made by the
dean (or designee) of the college in which the student wishes to
enroll.  Undeclared students should contact the Director of the
Center for Advising and Career Services. A student who has been
reinstated must remain in the college in which he/she has been
reinstated for that semester.
5. Students placed on academic suspension are eligible for a maximum
of three reinstatements. Any student placed on academic suspension for the fourth time is not eligible for reinstatement for a
minimum of five years from the end of the last term of attendance.
A student’s GPA and completed courses that were applied to a baccalaureate degree are not eligible for academic renewal.
Graduate students are not eligible for academic renewal.
6. Students who are suspended as a result of spring semester grades
will have the suspension invoked at the beginning of the summer term, excluding any course(s) which had begun prior to the
determination of the academic suspension.
Graduate Students
A graduate student enrolled at the university will be placed on
academic probation at the end of a semester or summer session when
his or her graduate cumulative UW grade point average in 4000-level
or higher courses is below 3.0. Students who fail to bring their graduate
GPA to 3.0 and remove themselves from probation after one semester
or summer session will be suspended from the university. A suspended
student may petition his/her academic program for reinstatement to
the same degree program. A reinstated student will be on probation
and may be subject to other performance criteria as specified by the
dean of the affected department.
Exceptions
Upon the request of a person placed on academic suspension or
denied reinstatement, the vice president for academic affairs may review
the circumstances and reverse the decision of the dean if the vice president for academic affairs deems it necessary to prevent a gross injustice.
The above GPA requirement is considered to be a minimum requirement. Individual departments or programs may modify these
minimum performance standards and establish department- or program-specific criteria for satisfactory academic progress. A graduate
student may be dismissed from a degree program for lack of satisfactory academic progress, as determined by the department or program
offering the degree.
The above regulations governing academic probation, suspension,
and reinstatement do not apply to students enrolled in the College of
Law.
37
Registration and Enrollment in Courses
Registration Procedures
Change of Registration
Eligible students can register, drop, add, and list their courses through
WyoRecords. To insure that students have seen an adviser, access
numbers for each semester’s registration are distributed through the
academic advisers. Directions for registration are contained in the appropriate Class Schedule. Class Schedules are available online no later than
one week prior to advising week. Students are responsible for following
directions and deadlines contained in the Class Schedules.
Modification of a course schedule during the drop/add time period
is accomplished through WyoRecords. After the end of the drop/add
period, individual class withdrawals can be done by the students on
WyoRecords Changes to a student’s registration or withdrawals are not
official until the process is completed as prescribed.
The period of time allowed for modifying a student’s schedule
or withdrawing during the summer session or other special terms is
established in regulations or by the registrar, subject to the approval
of the vice president for academic affairs.
The following categories of continuing students in good standing or
on academic probation are eligible to register for the semesters indicated:
1. For the fall semester:
a. All students who were enrolled the
previous fall or spring semester.
b. Summer session students cleared by the Admissions Office for fall. (This does not include those admitted for summer only.)
2. For the spring semester:
All students who were enrolled the
previous spring or fall semester.
3. For the summer session:
Students who were enrolled the previous summer, fall, or spring semester.
During the fall and/or spring semester(s):
1. Dropping a class or changing sections: A student may drop classes or
change sections of the same course during the first eight class
days of the semester (four class days for blocked courses).
2. Adding a course or changing grading option: A student may add classes
or change grading options or hours in variable-credit courses
during the first ten class days of the semester (five class days for
blocked courses).
3. Withdrawal from a course: After the designated drop/add period, students may officially withdraw from individual regular term courses
until ten class days after mid-semester. They may withdraw from
blocked courses until five class days after the middle of the course.
A mark of W will be assigned indicating withdrawal.
4. Withdrawal from the university (termination of enrollment): A student may
terminate all fall or spring semester enrollments if formal procedures are completed through the Dean of Students Office prior to
the last 15 calendar days of the semester. A mark of W is assigned
to each course, indicating official termination for that semester.
All other applicants and students should complete admission
requirements by the admission deadline. (Refer to the sections on
undergraduate and graduate admissions in this catalog for deadlines.)
All information requested during admission and registration is
important to the student and to the university and should be kept accurate and complete. If a student’s address, telephone, major, adviser,
or other vital information changes after enrollment, the Office of the
Registrar should be informed without delay.
Choice of College and Major
The academic adviser is an excellent source of information about
the adviser’s professional field for students who have selected a major. Students who are undecided about the selection of a college and/or
major and who seek specialized assistance in choosing educational and
vocational objectives should contact the Center for Advising and Career
Services. These units have programs designed to help the undeclared
student acquire the tools to make an intelligent decision regarding an
appropriate major discipline.
Academic Adviser
Academic advising is a decision-making process involving a partnership between the academic adviser and the student (advisee). In this
partnership, issues and questions regarding personal, professional, and
educational goals are examined and evaluated. This includes, but is not
limited to, planning an appropriate course of study and the scheduling
of classes.
The purpose of academic advising is to promote rational, informed,
and independent choices by the student. To that end, the academic adviser is a significant link for the student to other resources in the university
community. Students are expected to take the initiative in developing
the adviser-advisee relationship and to assume an ever-increasing role
in developing their own academic, career, and personal goals.
Change of College, Major, or Adviser
Students who wish to change their college, major, or adviser should
obtain the appropriate form from either the Office of the Registrar
or the office of the dean of the college of their current enrollment. Students wishing to transfer from one college to another must secure
the signatures of both their present and future deans. Graduate students
need the approval of the college dean and the head of the department
to which the student is transferring. After all appropriate signatures
have been obtained, the student should take the form to the Office of
the Registrar.
38
Registration and Enrollment
Graduate Credit for Seniors
Students who have completed their undergraduate work at the
university and who wish to embark upon a graduate program, even
through continuing their graduate work in the same field they pursued
as undergraduates, will need to apply for graduate admission. (Refer
to the section on graduate admission in this catalog for deadlines.) Undergraduate students taking graduate-level courses which are
not in any way a part of their undergraduate degree have the option
of later using such courses for purposes beyond the bachelor’s degree
requirements. If the student intends to pursue a graduate degree or
needs the courses noted on the academic transcript as reserved for
graduate credit for job classification (i.e. advancement on teacher salary
schedules, etc.) the student should file a petition. The petition should
be filed by midterm of the semester which is requested. The petition
form is available on the Graduate Student Forms page on the Office of
the Registrar website. Courses may not be retroactively reserved once
a semester has ended.
Definitions for Student Classifications
Code
FR
SO
JR
SR
GR
LW1
LW2
LW3
MD1
PH1
PH2
PH3
PH4
Class Definition by earned hours
Freshman
Under 30 credits
Sophomore
30 but less than 60 credits
Junior 60 but less than 90 credits
Senior 90 or more credits
Graduate Student
Law student (professional level) first year
Law student (professional level) second year
Law student (professional level) third year
Medical student (professional level) first year
Pharm.D. (professional level) first year (0-33 semester hours)
Pharm.D. (professional level) second year (34-69
semester hours)
Pharm.D. (professional level) third year (70-104 semester hours)
Pharm.D. (professional level) fourth year (105+ semester hours)
Repeating a Course
Students may repeat course work; however, credit earned in any
given course (or equivalent course) is applicable toward a degree requirement only once. All grade entries remain on the student’s record,
but only the last grade earned will be calculated in the UW cumulative
grade point average. Refer to the Cumulative Grade Point Average
section of this catalog for further information. Variable-credit courses
are not considered as repeats unless the department head provides
written certification that the course content was, in fact, repeated.
Courses repeated will remain as entries on the academic transcript.
Courses applied towards one completed degree may be repeated as part
of a second degree; however, the grade and grade point average in the
original degree will not be changed. A student is limited to a maximum
of three (3) attempts in any course at the University of Wyoming. An
“attempt” includes any instance in which the student earns a grade for
the course or withdraws from the course. The three-attempt limit does
not apply to courses identified in the University Catalog as being appropriate for students to take multiple times. A student can petition for
exceptions to this limitation through established university procedures
(UW Regulation 8-238).
Credit Hour Load
Undergraduates: An average of 15 hours of work each semester
is considered a normal load. Maximum credit loads are 20 hours in all
colleges. Normally, not more than 12 hours of undergraduate credit may
be earned during the summer session. An approved Overload Petition
form must be filed to exceed these maximums. Overload Petition forms
are available online or from the Office of the Registrar.
Graduate students: 14 hours of credit is the average and 16 hours
the maximum amount of credit allowed per semester for full-time
graduate students. A student who has been assigned an assistantship for
the academic year is usually restricted to a load of 13 semester hours.
Normally, not more than 8 hours of credit may be earned in course work
during an eight-week summer session. An approved Overload Petition
form must be filed to exceed these maximums. Overload Petition forms
are available online or from the Office of the Registrar.
Class Attendance
Each student shall attend the lectures, recitations, and laboratories,
and participate in field work deemed necessary to adequately fulfill the
academic requirements of each course. Each instructor, at the beginning of every semester, shall stipulate the attendance policy necessary
for satisfactory completion of the course.
The Dean of Students Office may issue authorized absences for
participation in university-sponsored activities and for other unusual
circumstances. If students have been hospitalized, or if they have been
directed by the Student Health Service or their private physician to stay
at their place of residence because of illness, the Student Health Service
or their private physician may issue a statement giving the dates of the
student’s confinement which the student may show to the instructor
without verification from the Dean of Students Office.
Auditing a Course
The privilege of non-credit enrollment in a class is available, upon
approval of the adviser and the instructor, to any university student.
The auditing privilege is subject to the same fee schedule as credit
courses. Auditors are expected to attend class regularly and complete
such graded work as required by the instructor. It is the responsibility
of the student to determine and fulfill the requirements for a satisfactory audit. Though this auditing privilege carries full rights of class
participation, it definitely offers no academic credit, does not count
toward full- or part-time status, and will result in a mark of satisfactory
(SA/S) or unsatisfactory (UA/U). Subsequent credit for the course by
special examination is not available.
All instructors shall permit students who have official authorized
absences to make up missed course work without penalty. An authorized
absence, however, merely gives the individual who missed the class an
opportunity to make up the work and in no way excuses him or her
from the work required.
39
Registration and Enrollment
Withdrawal from the University
Academic Dishonesty
Withdrawal from the university is the official termination of student
status prior to the end of a term. Students wishing to withdraw from
all on-campus classes should initiate the procedure with the Dean of
Students Office. Withdrawal from the university is not permitted during the last 15 days of a term.
Whatever form academic dishonesty may take, the university community regards it as a serious offense. An act is academically dishonest
when, and only when, it is an act attempted or performed in order to
misrepresent one’s involvement in an academic task in any way. Such
conduct will result in imposition of sanctions pursuant to University
Regulations.
(Termination of Enrollment)
After clearing with the Dean of Students Office, the withdrawal
form must be presented to the university cashier for initial processing. The Office of the Registrar will report withdrawals to instructors
concerned.
It is the responsibility of both the student and person in charge of
an academic task, respectively, to make reasonable efforts to learn of,
or make known, the expectations and standards of conduct required in
the performance of an academic task. Failure on the part of the student
to observe and maintain required standards of academic honesty will
require corrective action by officials.
Students withdrawing from Outreach courses should contact the
Outreach School.
Course Withdrawal
Students wishing to withdraw from some but not all course work
can initiate the process on WyoRecords. See the Change of Registration
section on preceding pages for deadlines.
A class withdrawal is not official unless filed with the Office of the
Registrar. Unauthorized discontinuance of enrollment or unofficial
abandonment of classes will result in a failing grade.
40
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Academic Record Regulations
All regulations are subject to change without notice by action of
various administrative officers, the University of Wyoming Board of
Trustees, and the appropriate departments and divisions. Published
regulations are the minimum requirements for any advanced degree.
Transfer Credit Available to Graduate Students
With committee and college approval, a student may submit up to
a total of 12 pre-admission hours that may be a culmination of nondegree, reserved, and/or transfer hours. The total number of hours
allowed from each category is as follows: 12 non-degree graduate
hours; 9 transfer; and 6 undergraduate. A student may elect to utilize
a combination of the three different areas to total the 12 maximum
allowed (i.e. 6 non-degree hours, 3 transfer hours, and 3 reserved
hours). Please review the individual sections of the catalog that cover
the specific policies for non-degree hours, reserving coursework for
graduate credit, and transfer credit.
Admission Regulations
Admission to Candidacy
Time spent in graduate study or accumulation of credit hours will
not necessarily allow a student to become a candidate for an advanced
degree. Admission to candidacy is an expression of the judgment of
those who have observed the work and reviewed the credentials of
the student, and deem the student worthy of the opportunity to complete the work for an advanced degree. Admission to candidacy for an
advanced degree requires a specified procedure for specific degrees.
To transfer hours earned at another institution to a graduate program at UW, the student must provide an official transcript from the
institution where the credits were earned. This official transcript must
be part of the student’s permanent file. The student must also provide
evidence that the course was approved for graduate credit at the institution where the course was taken.
Admission Status Categories
Advanced-degree applicants may be admitted to the University of
Wyoming in one of the following categories:
Admitted Graduate Student signifies the applicant has been accepted by the university and by a major department to work toward
an advanced degree.
No more than 9 semester hours that have been transferred from
another accredited institution may be used for meeting the credit hour
requirements of a master’s student’s program. Transferred hours must
carry a B or better grade and will not reduce the residence requirements.
Transferred credit will be subject to the approval of the appropriate
major professor and the college dean and must be completed prior to
approval of a master’s degree program of study for which the credit is
to apply. S/U or P/F transfer hours are not acceptable on a program
of study.
A Graduate Student admitted with conditions signifies the applicant did not meet the formal admission requirements but has sufficient
potential that the university and the major department are convinced
that the student will be successful as an advanced-degree candidate.
Conditions are usually placed on such students in the form of performance criteria for the first one or two semesters. If the conditions of
admission are not met within the specified time period, the student
may be denied admission to the university graduate program and the
degree program.
Coursework hours approved for transfer from another college or
university are considered as part of the 12-credit-hour pre-admission
course limitation for master’s and educational specialist students.
The student and an adviser in the major department should monitor
progress toward meeting the established conditions. The department
is responsible for notifying the university when all conditions have
been met.
Hours transferred from other institutions for a doctoral program
must carry a letter grade of B (3.0) or better (A=4). Doctoral (Ed.D.
and Ph.D.) candidates may transfer up to 48 credit hours of such
coursework, only four of which can be thesis research. Transfer hours
for doctoral students are not considered as part of the 12-hour preadmission course limitation.
Students should be certain they understand their admission status.
Re-enrollment or Re-admission
Any student not registered at UW during the previous 12 months
must be readmitted.
Correspondence Courses and Credit by Examination
Correspondence courses and credit by examination courses are not
acceptable on graduate programs of study.
A departmental request for readmission must be submitted to the
college dean in writing.
Second Baccalaureate Degrees
Students are required to be continuously enrolled unless a formal
leave of absence has been approved.
A student working toward a second baccalaureate degree is subject
to all regulations concerning undergraduates and is not considered a
graduate student. Students requesting to reserve coursework for graduate credit must be able to complete their undergraduate degree within
12 months of the request. NOTE: Only six hours of undergraduate
coursework reserved for graduate credit will be allowed for consideration in a graduate degree program.
When enrollment is interrupted for one or more years, without
an approved leave, students are automatically reclassified as inactive
students and must reapply for admission.
Students are encouraged to review previously submitted programs
of study. Coursework older than six years old will need to be petitioned.
Students are encouraged to review previously submitted committees.
Students who do not reenroll immediately after being readmitted
may become inactive again and will need to repeat the process.
41
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
credits to satisfy college or major requirements. In addition, they may
designate particular courses in their colleges as courses to be offered
for S/U only.
Requirements for a second degree are considered separate from the
first degree. Hours from the first master’s degree may not be used for
completing the hours toward the second master’s. Hours from the first
doctoral degree may not be used for completing the hours toward the
second doctorate. Hours from an earned doctorate may not be used in
a subsequent master’s degree. In accordance with the academic unit’s
policy or the decision of the candidate’s graduate committee, the hours
earned toward the Ed.S. degree may, under specified conditions, be
used to meet the requirements for a doctorate.
The grade of S in thesis and dissertation research is a judgment that
the student is adequately engaged in the required research objective.
It in no way implies that the final thesis or the thesis defense will be
judged of sufficient quality for the award of the appropriate degree.
Incomplete Grades
The incomplete grade (I) is a temporary grade used under circumstances where awarding a grade would be unjust or not reflective of
the student’s actual performance in a course. An incomplete grade may
not be assigned unless accompanied by a written authorization. Time
allowed for completing course requirements will normally not exceed
120 calendar days beyond the end of the semester in which the I was
given. The dean of a college may designate certain research courses
where the 120-day limit may be extended by the instructor.
Grade Point Average
A minimum 3.0 grade point average (GPA) is required for all
coursework required for an advanced degree. Hours for which a C
was earned may be balanced by a corresponding number of hours for
which an A was earned. Departments and divisions have the option
of indicating subject areas in which they will not accept grades of C
for credit regardless of accumulated grade point average. No credit
will be allowed toward an advanced degree for coursework in which a
grade lower than C is earned.
The I will revert to an F if the final grade for the course is not
received in the Office of the Registrar by the date indicated on the
authorization. Students receiving an incomplete in any course(s) listed
in their program of study must have the incomplete removed by the
end of the semester in which they turn in their intent to graduate. If the
incomplete is not removed, the student will not graduate that semester.
A graduate student enrolled at the university shall be placed on
academic probation at the end of a semester or summer session when
his or her graduate cumulative UW grade point average in 4000-level or
higher courses is below 3.0. Students who fail to bring their graduate
GPA to 3.0 and remove themselves from probation after one semester
or summer session will be suspended from the university. A suspended
student may petition their academic program for reinstatement to the
same degree program. A reinstated student will be on probation and
may be subject to other performance criteria as specified by the dean
of the affected department.
Academic Dishonesty
Academic dishonesty and scholarly misconduct will not be tolerated.
Academic dishonesty is an act attempted or performed that misrepresents one’s involvement in an academic task in any way, or permits
another student to misrepresent the latter’s involvement in an academic
task by assisting in the misrepresentation (UW Regulation 6-802).
The above GPA requirement is considered to be a minimum requirement. Individual departments or programs may modify these
minimum performance standards and establish department- or program-specific criteria for satisfactory academic progress. A graduate
student may be dismissed from a degree program for lack of satisfactory academic progress, as determined by the department or program
offering the degree.
If academic dishonesty has been established, the offending student
shall receive a failing grade for the course in question. If two such
acts have been recorded at different times or in different courses, the
student shall be suspended from the university in accordance with UW
Regulation 6-802. These actions shall not preclude the imposition of
other sanctions by university officers including the loss of benefits
from programs, scholarships, and other opportunities normally afforded students.
Grades earned in coursework that are not included in the approved
program of study for each candidate for an advanced degree will not be
included in the accumulated grade point average to determine eligibility
for an advanced degree. These courses are, however, included in the
GPA as listed on the academic record if the courses are numbered 4000
or above, and are used in determining probation/suspension.
Degree Revocation
UW Regulation 8-254
The University of Wyoming is a state higher education institution
whose Trustees are legislatively empowered to confer degrees on students who have earned them, upon the recommendation of the faculty.
The Board of Trustees recognizes that there may be instances where
a degree is awarded to an individual who, upon review, has not properly completed all requirements for the degree. In such instances, the
Board of Trustees may revoke the degree. This regulation establishes
the process for such revocation.
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Grades
All courses taken to fulfill the requirements for the degree program must be taken for letter grade (A-F) except those courses given
for S/U only.
The grade of S (satisfactory) is interpreted to include grades A-C
and the grade of U (unsatisfactory) to include grades D-F on the conventional grade scale for courses numbered less than 5000 (for courses
5000 or above, the grade of S is interpreted to included grades A and
B). Credit hours of S/U courses are counted as hours attempted toward
graduation. However, neither the S nor U grade carries grade points
and neither will be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade
point average.
Grounds for revoking a degree include convincing evidence that
the degree recipient failed to complete the requirements for the degree
that were in effect at the time of the degree conferral. Included in this
category is evidence that the candidate engaged in academic misconduct
serious enough to negate bona fide completion of one or more substantive degree requirements. Additional information can be found at
http://www.uwyo.edu/generalcounsel/_files/docs/UW-Reg-8-254.pdf.
The faculties of the various colleges shall determine the number
of credit hours of S that may be used to satisfy degree requirements
in their programs. They may also place restrictions upon the use of S
42
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Course Numbering for Graduate Credit
Courses offered for graduate credit are
distinguished by number as follows:
4000-4999 are primarily for junior and senior students, but also
may be used as part of some graduate programs of study
5000-5999 are primarily for graduate students
In-Residence Coursework (Residency)
In-residence coursework includes courses and/or research work on
the UW Laramie campus, at an approved UW off-campus course site,
and/or research work done for credit in the field under the direction
of a UW faculty member.
The minimum number of semester credit hours that must be earned
on the UW Laramie campus or at an approved UW setting for a particular degree program shall be determined by the individual colleges.
In no case shall these minimum numbers of credit hours be less than
21 hours beyond the bachelor’s degree for the master’s degree, 21 hours
beyond the master’s degree for the educational specialist degree, or 24
hours beyond the bachelor’s degree for the doctoral degree.
Courses numbered 5000 or above may be taken by undergraduate
students having the necessary prerequisites. If a course is filled, graduate students will have preference and undergraduates may be asked to
relinquish their place in the course. Graduate students may enroll in
courses numbered 1000-3999 to remove undergraduate deficiencies,
but only those numbered 4000 and above will be computed into the
graduate GPA and be allowed for graduate credit.
In computing the in-residence requirements for the Plan A thesis
and doctoral degrees, credit earned working on the thesis or dissertation shall apply.
Dual listed Courses
If a course is dual listed at the 4000/5000 level, the course must be
taken at the 5000 level to receive graduate credit regardless of whether
the course is in the student’s primary program area.
Limitation of 4000-level Coursework Hours
Beginning with students admitted to the spring 2007 semester,
only 12 credit hours of 4000-level coursework will be permitted on
the graduate program of study.
The syllabus for a dual listed course must specifically differentiate expectations, outcomes and assessment between the 4000 and
5000-level components, clearly describing the additional effort needed
for graduate level credit. This may include but is not limited to intellectual skills, discipline-specific competencies and challenging learning
outcomes. For example, students enrolled in the 5000-level course
may be required to lead discussion sessions, submit a portfolio, write a
paper or may be involved in a service learning component, internship
or collaborative assignment designed to provide experience in applying
course information in different contexts.
Repetition of Courses
No more than two courses (total of six credit hours) available for
graduate credit may be repeated by students at the graduate level. This
regulation does not apply to those courses carrying variable credit (e.g.,
research or independent study). Variable credit courses are considered
repeated only when so certified in writing by the instructor and the
registrar.
Students enrolled in the 5000-level course will be expected to demonstrate greater sophistication in content expertise, inquiry, creativity,
communication, problem solving, analytic reasoning and/or collaborative learning compared with those enrolled in the 4000 course.
Time Allowance and Limitations
Master’s students and educational specialists have six calendar
years to complete their degrees from the beginning of the first course
taken and listed on the program of study. Doctoral candidates have
four calendar years after the successful completion of their preliminary
examination to complete their degree.
Courses Not Applicable Toward Advanced Degrees
Only courses at the 4000 or 5000 level may be counted for graduate credit. However, some 4000- and 5000-level courses may not be
applicable toward undergraduate or graduate degrees. These courses
are listed below:
**** 5959. Enrichment Studies in ___. (Any course
numbered 5959 is not applicable toward UW degrees.)
EDUC 4740. Field Studies in ___. (Any course
in the College of Education numbered 4740
is not applicable toward UW degrees.)
CNSL 5740. Continuing Education in ____.
KIN/HLED 4074. Field Studies in ____.
HLED 4970. Field Experience in Health Education.
Continuous Enrollment
A student may request that up to 12 hours of graduate-level coursework, taken during the student’s graduate, non-degree status, be used
toward a program of study should the student choose to pursue a
graduate degree at the University of Wyoming. This would be subject to
the approval of the student’s graduate committee and the college dean.
These hours can be affected by other pre-admission hours.
Once admitted, all degree seeking graduate students must maintain
continuous enrollment. Unless a formal leave of absence is approved,
all students should maintain at least one hour of continuous enrollment
in the semester or session they expect to receive the degree. Students
should maintain enrollment for two of the three academic semesters.
Reactivation will be required if the student has not enrolled in classes
within the previous 12 months. Contact your department to investigate
your status. The department will contact the Office of the Registrar to
initiate reactivation. Students who have been inactive for a long span of
time should also investigate the status of their committees, programs of
study, and time to degree status. If a summer-to-summer only enrolling
student intends to finish his/her degree and graduate during a fall or
spring semester, he or she must be enrolled for the appropriate number
of hours, as required of all students, during the semester of intended
graduation. International students’ enrollment status is monitored by
the office of International Students and Scholars and the office should
be contacted for more information.
Outreach Courses
Research, Investigations, or Independent Study
Non-Degree Hours
Courses such as Individual Problems; Special Problems; Research in
.....; Investigations in .....; etc. may not be used to develop information
or material that will be submitted as a thesis or dissertation.
Outreach courses, to carry graduate credit, must satisfy achievement
criteria acceptable to the Office of the Registrar and must be taken under
the auspices of UW, or involve study completed at an off-campus center.
43
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Reserving Coursework for Graduate Credit
Approved graduate level courses taken prior to completing the baccalaureate degree, but not part of that degree’s requirements, may be
applied to the master’s or doctoral program with the approval of the
student’s committee. Approval for reserving the coursework is rendered
jointly by the adviser and college dean, and applies only to courses taken
within 12 months of completion of the baccalaureate degree.
If a course is dual listed at the 4000/5000 level, the course must
be taken at the 5000 level to receive graduate credit. Each 4000- or
5000-level course must be reserved for graduate credit by completing
the Request to Reserve Coursework for Graduate Credit form, obtained
online at www.uwyo.edu/uwgrad. The form must be completed and
submitted to the Office of the Registrar prior to the semester or Summer
Session in which the coursework is taken. These courses will appear on the undergraduate transcript with a
notation that they have been reserved for graduate credit.
NOTE: Students will only be allowed to transfer six hours of
coursework that has been reserved for graduate credit into their degree
program.
Petitions and Appeals
The University of Wyoming, as a fully-accredited public institution of higher education, must comply with general laws, regulations,
and principles of fairness, uniformity, and accountability. Exceptions
to uniform application of general regulations are justified only in extraordinary circumstances. Exceptions to regulations may be petitioned
by submitting the appropriate form to the college dean. If any of the
signers recommend that the petition be denied, the registrar may deny
the exception, make further inquiries, or refer the matter to the provost for direction. If all the signers recommend that the exception be
granted, the registrar may concur (and process the exception) or may
deny the exception and refer the matter to the provost for direction. If
the petition is denied by the registrar, the student may elect to pursue
the petition with the provost.
The Graduate Student Appeals Board (GSAB) was established
to provide an appellate body to review appeals of graduate students
concerning retention in graduate programs, employment as graduate
assistants, and charges of academic dishonesty or scientific misconduct. The GSAB will not hear appeals of course grades or charges of
academic dishonesty associated with a course (these appeals will be
handled by the procedures of the college in which the course is offered).
Appeals emanating from Plan B, thesis, or dissertation research will be
heard by the GSAB even though thesis and dissertation research are
designated by course numbers. Policies and procedures for graduate
student appeals are modeled after those used by the University Board
of Student Appeals.
The GSAB will not hear appeals of course grades or charges of
academic dishonesty associated with a course other than a research
course, e.g. thesis, non-thesis, or dissertation research. Policies and
procedures concerning appeals may be found on the Graduate Student
Resources web site.
Degree Completion Regulations
Declaring a Graduation Date
An Anticipated Graduation Date form must be filed for the semester
in which graduation is planned. This form puts the student on the list
for graduation. If graduation does not occur during the projected semester, the student must submit a new form no later than the deadline
date for the new final semester. By the designated deadline, students
who are entering their semester of graduation should:
Pay their associated graduation fees (diploma and/
or certificate fee plus the digitizing fee if thesis/
dissertation is involved) and retain receipt.
Download the Anticipated Graduation Form
from the Office of the Registrar Web site.
Submit to the Office of the Registrar
If discrepancies are found during the degree check, the Degree
Analyst will contact the student/chair with instructions for resolution.
Following the student’s defense, the student will submit a signed
Report on Final Examination form to the Office of the Registrar. All
students whose programs require a Thesis/Dissertation must submit
the document to ProQuest before the last day of classes. Once the final
examination period is over, Degree Analysts will review the degree
evaluation to verify that any discrepancies have been corrected, final
grades on any remaining coursework have been posted, and all required
forms/documents have been submitted. Once all requirements have
been met, the degree will be awarded.
Program of Study
Unless otherwise specified, each student must submit a program
of study to the Office of the Registrar for approval. The program of
study form is available online at www.uwyo.edu/uwgrad. Return the
completed form with all required attachments to the Office of the
Registrar. Degree Analysts will transcribe the program into a degree
evaluation, which constitutes an agreement between the student, the
student’s committee, and the university wherein the minimum coursework requirements for that student’s degree are listed. The program
should be filed no later than the beginning of the student’s second
semester (or second Summer Session if enrolling only in summers). No
master’s student will be a candidate for a degree until his/her program
is approved by the head of the appropriate department and the college
dean. Master’s degree candidacy occurs with the approval of the program of study. Candidacy in the doctorate occurs upon certification of
successful completion of the preliminary examination.
Some degree programs require more hours of credit than the
minimum requirement of the university. Students should consult their
advisers as well as the college and department sections in this catalog.
The program filed must include the appropriate minimum number of
semester hours of graduate credit required. Changes to the approved
program must be petitioned on the Office of the Registrar’s Request
for Change in Graduate Program form.
44
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Examinations
member who is usually from the student’s home department, program,
or division. An individual with an off-campus affiliation, an external
committee member, may serve as an optional, fourth voting participant
in a Master’s committee with the approval of the major professor and
the department head or departmental designee. The external member of
the committee is a faculty member at a peer institution or an individual
holding professional expertise that will contribute to the committee.
Such an appointment pertains exclusively to work on the Master’s
committee and assumes that the external member would be able to
participate fully in the essential components of the degree-granting
process. The external member cannot replace the outside member.
Examinations may be required of any graduate student or advanceddegree candidate at such time or of such nature as the department or
the student’s graduate committee may require. It is standard procedure
for doctoral students (Ph.D. and Ed.D. students) to be given a preliminary examination, and for final examinations to be conducted for both
master’s and doctoral students. It is common for the nature of these
exams to differ from one academic unit to another.
Preliminary Examination
The preliminary examination will be held at least 15 weeks prior to
the final examination. The preliminary examination may not be given
before: (a) the research tool requirements, if any, have been met and
certification approved;
Educational specialist committees consist of at least a member of
the faculty from that same department, and a member of the faculty
from outside the major department. The educational specialist’s committee must have three members and will ordinarily not have more
than five members.
(b) at least 30 hours of coursework have been completed; and (c) the
doctoral program of study has been approved. The format and conduct
of this examination shall be the responsibility of the student’s committee, in line with any departmental policies (see specific department).
Doctoral committees will consist of at least five members, no fewer
than three of whom must be from the candidate’s major department or
division. Every committee must designate a committee chair (the major
professor) and an outside member both of whom must be members of
the UW faculty. The outside member is defined as a UW faculty member
holding an appointment in a division or college other than the one in
which the candidate will receive the Ph.D. degree. An individual with an
off-campus affiliation may serve on graduate committees as an external
member with the approval of the major professor and the department
head or departmental designee. The external member of the committee is a faculty member at a peer institution or an individual holding
an earned doctorate whose expertise will contribute to the dissertation
committee. Such an appointment pertains exclusively to work on the
dissertation committee and assumes that the external member would
be able to participate fully in the essential components of the dissertation process. The external member cannot replace the outside member.
Following the completion of the departmental preliminary examination, the Report on Preliminary Examination must be submitted to
the Office of the Registrar regardless if the student passed or failed.
The favorable vote of the majority of the student’s graduate committee
members will be accepted as passing. In case of failure, the student may
attempt the examination once more after not less than one nor more
than four semesters have elapsed. When the preliminary examination
has been successfully completed, and the report of the committee is on
file in the Office of the Registrar, the student is considered a doctoral
student admitted to candidacy for the degree. At this time, the doctoral
candidate has four years to complete the degree process.
Final Examination
The final examination may not be held until after the beginning of
the semester or session in which coursework is completed. Two weeks
before the final examination, please make public the proposed date, time
and place of the examination. The committee may require the candidate
to take a written examination as well as an oral examination. The oral
and/or written examination should be held by the student’s graduate
committee at least 10 days before the end of the term of graduation.
The committee will serve in an advisory capacity for development
of the student’s coursework and research programs and must approve
the official program of study filed with the Office of the Registrar. The
committee will also determine pass or fail on the preliminary examination, approve or disapprove the dissertation or project report, and will
conduct the final examination.
The written vote of each member of a candidate’s committee must
be on record in the Office of the Registrar on the Report of Final
Examination form, indicating the majority of the committee members’
approval, before any candidate will be recommended for an advanced
degree. A student failing his/her final examination may retake the
examination once after a reasonable period of time has elapsed.
The doctoral committee must be on file with the Office of the
Registrar before the program of study form is submitted. Changes in
committee membership or major professor assignment can be requested
at any time by the department/division head. This is normally done in
consultation with the student and committee chair.
Graduate Committee
The prospective Ph.D. student should refer to the specific department in which he/she desires to major to ascertain what languages
or research tools are required. Certification of a language or tool, if
required, will be made by the appropriate agency or department of the
university to the Office of the Registrar when proficiency requirements
have been met to fulfill the tool requirements. Students may demonstrate proficiency on a standardized language examination prepared by
the Educational Testing Service, or by receiving at least a grade of B in
a course (or courses) specified by a department on this campus or on a
reading test administered by the department. It will be each student’s
responsibility to see that certification of proficiency for tool requirements is made. Coursework certification may be made from transcripts
filed by the student with the Office of the Registrar.
Language or Other Tool Requirements for Doctoral Candidates
A student’s graduate committee is appointed by the college dean and
is based on the recommendation of the department or division chair
or head. The committee functions to guide the student in coursework
selection, the degree project construction, and requirements completion
of the degree. All committees will have at least one member from the
appropriate department/division as chairperson and a member from
outside the major department/division.
The Master’s committee, usually constructed by the student and
his or her major professor in consultation with the department chair
or division head, consists of at least three members: the chair of the
committee (the major professor) from the appropriate department or
division, a faculty member of a department or division other than the
one awarding the degree (the outside member), and a third committee
45
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Report on Final Examination
With the foregoing principle and definitions as guidance, the following policies will be used regarding use of classified and proprietary
research for theses and dissertations:
This form provides documentation from the student’s committee
that the student has passed the Final Examination/Defense. If applicable, it also indicates the committee has approved the thesis/dissertation and the student agrees to make publicly available via ProQuest.
This form must be on file with the office of the prior to graduation.
Classified research cannot be used for a thesis or dissertation.
Proprietary research may be used for theses and dissertations.
However, any delay caused by the proprietary nature of the research
must be alleviated before the thesis or dissertation is submitted to the
Office of the Registrar. Such delays cannot exceed six months without the approval of the college dean. Delays greater than 12 months
in length will be approved only in unusual circumstances unless
embargoed as approved in advance by the college dean. Sponsors of
proprietary research should be aware that theses and dissertations are
accessible to the public upon acceptance.
Students wishing to embargo/copyright or otherwise delay release
of their thesis/dissertation must have previous authorization of the
college dean on file in the Office of the Registrar.
Survey of Earned Doctorates
The university requires the Survey of Earned Doctorates provided
and the certified RFE form on or before the date established by the
Office of the Registrar for fulfilling the requirements for advanced
degrees each semester. The survey (for registration with the National
Research Council) is available on the Graduate Student Resources Web
site. All Ph.D. students must complete this survey.
Format for Utilization of Journal Articles in Thesis and
Dissertations
The master’s thesis and doctoral dissertation are integral components of the graduate learning experience. Writing the thesis or dissertation not only sharpens vital communication skills but also provides
the opportunity to expand upon research detail, include unpublished
results and engage in creative speculation and synthesis of research
outcomes to a degree greater than normally allowed by journal editors. Thesis or Dissertation
The candidate shall submit an electronic thesis or dissertation showing by its form and organization the candidate's ability to write acceptably and use the language. The thesis or dissertation must be approved
by the student’s graduate committee. Approval shall be indicated using
the Report of Final Examination form. No attempt will be made to
evaluate the thesis or dissertation in terms of credit hours. The thesis
or dissertation must meet the standards established by the University
Libraries, ProQuest Information and Learning, and be approved by
the committee chair. It must be submitted to the candidate’s committee at least three weeks prior to the final examination. The thesis or
dissertation must be available for inspection by any other member of
the faculty who may wish to examine it.
For many disciplines, publication of student research in peerreviewed journals is a hallmark of successful graduate education. It
validates the significance of the scholarly results and is beneficial for
student, mentor and the institution. To encourage publication of thesis
or dissertation results and to avoid requiring degree candidates to recreate thesis or dissertation chapters from peer-reviewed publications, the
university permits the utilization of published papers as the foundation
for theses and dissertations subject to the following conditions:
The publications must be refereed and must have been accepted for
publication in scholarly journals of high quality. The source should be
cited in the comprehensive introductory chapter.
Digitizing Requirement
All graduate students accept as a condition of enrollment that
completed theses and dissertations will be published through ProQuest
Information and Learning. This involves a special fee. The appropriate
form for submitting the thesis/dissertation is available when submitting
the project electronically through ProQuest Information and Learning.
The publications must be written by the student. Editorial oversight
by the mentor and committee is allowable and desirable; however, the
mentor and committee have the responsibility to ensure that the student
is the main author.
Patenting or Copyright by UW
If there is more than one publication, the articles submitted must
form a coherent whole, having a well-defined intellectual focus and
advancing novel contributions along a clearly identified line of inquiry.
In some cases, where significant university funds or resources have
been used in dissertation research, the university may claim an interest
in patenting or copyrighting the results. When this seems likely, the
student (or the student’s major professor) should consult with the college dean or the vice president for research.
For multi-authored articles, the contribution of each author must be
clearly stated in the preface or introduction to the thesis or dissertation.
A comprehensive, cohesive and coherent introduction and
discussion must be incorporated as separate chapters. These chapters
should summarize the current state of knowledge and the rationale for
the research. They should clarify how each chapter is interconnected
and provide a meaningful synthesis and discussion of chapter results
as part of a coherent whole.
Classified or Proprietary Research
The process of research in graduate education is one of free and
open inquiry involving the student and faculty. Final examinations for
graduate degrees are open to all faculty, and theses and dissertations
are accessible to the public upon acceptance by the university unless
embargoed as approved in advance.
Appendices can be attached to include expanded methodology,
unpublished data, tables, etc. Where appropriate, the appendices may
be in electronic formats, provided the data are readily accessible to the
international scholarly community.
For the purposes of this policy, classified research is defined as research that has a security classification established by a federal agency.
Classified research projects also require approval of the trustees before
being initiated. Proprietary research is defined as research for which
the sponsor requires a delay in publication.
An abstract is not sufficient to address these criteria.
46
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Graduate Degree Regulations
Plan B Master’s
Master’s Candidates
This program type carries a minimum of 30 hours of coursework,
but some variants require more than 30 hours of credit (see specific
program requirements in this catalog). At least 14 of these hours must
be in the student’s major field. The student’s committee in specific
programs may modify this requirement. The Plan B non-thesis program type differs from the thesis program type in that it may include
additional hours of coursework instead of thesis hours. It permits a
wider distribution of courses and permits a wider array of possible
final products than the Plan A thesis program type. For example, the
Plan B project may resemble a thesis, but the topic is not research or
original. The non-thesis project may take the form of a business plan
or a professional portfolio. The Plan B project can, but does not have
to, be a paper (see the next section). Each academic unit that engages
in Plan B non-thesis activities often has its own set of principles that
guide students in that unit.
The functional and contractual document for the individual student
master’s degree is the program of study. It includes a declaration that
the student will pursue a particular project plan: either a Plan A thesis
or a Plan B non-thesis. Once the program of study has been approved
for a master’s student, the student advances to candidacy. After the
student’s program of study has been filed with the college, the approvals of the major professor and the college dean are required to transfer
from one project plan type to another. If such a change is made, some
credit under the original program of study may not meet requirements
of the new program of study. The master’s program of study, whether
a declared thesis or non-thesis project plan, must include a minimum
of 30 hours of graduate credit.
Current policy specifically requires a culminating defense for Plan
A master’s programs but does not address a similar requirement for
non-thesis, Plan B programs.
Most, but by no means all, of the academic units that have students
pursuing master’s degrees in the Plan B non-thesis category have the
students prepare a paper, or sometimes two papers, as their final project. In the selection of a subject and preparation of the paper(s), the
student shall be guided by the adviser or, in some academic units, by
the instructor(s) in charge of the course(s) connected to the paper(s).
The paper(s) should present the results of study and at a level of scholastic quality commensurate with a Plan A thesis project. The Plan B
non-thesis is different from the Plan A thesis in that it is not an indepth research project. The student and his or her adviser often, but
not always, decide if a project will be Plan A or Plan B. Academic units
have principles that guide students in this selection. Many units have
rules that precisely dictate the type of program and project a student
can conduct.
Recognizing that plan A and B programs are academically equivalent and that a capstone event is an integral component of the graduate
learning experience. Plan B programs also require an oral defense.
The defense structure and format is flexible but it should allow
opportunity for the student to demonstrate content comprehension
and application, critical and quantitative analysis, creative thinking,
problem solving, synthesis and evaluation.
Following the defense, regardless of the outcome, the student
will submit a Report of Final Examination form to the Office of the
Registrar. This form is available on the Graduate Student Resources
Web site.
Plan A Master’s
The format for the Plan B non-thesis paper should follow that of the
Plan A thesis. However, Plan B non-thesis paper titles do not appear on
the student’s transcript, whereas, Plan A thesis titles do; further, Plan B
non-thesis papers are not filed in the University Libraries and they are
not submitted to ProQuest. They are filed with the major academic unit.
This program type must reflect a minimum of 26 hours of acceptable
graduate coursework and four hours of 5960. Thesis Research. The Plan
A thesis option accommodates original research, although the degree
of originality and the definition thereof is sometimes program specific.
The planning, development, and production of the thesis is guided by
the committee chair and the graduate committee.
Students pursuing the master of arts in teaching or the master
of science in teaching should follow the regulations listed under the
specific requirements for the master’s degree with the minor modifications listed below.
The thesis is the final, written product of the project. General
required guidelines for preparing a thesis are available in the “Thesis
and Dissertation Format Guide.” The thesis must be submitted to the
student’s committee at least two weeks before the intended date of final
examination. To finalize the master’s program and project, an electronic
copy of the thesis is submitted to ProQuest and the Report of Final
Examination is on file in the Office of the Registrar.
Other Master’s Programs
Some Master’s programs require additional coursework in
place of the thesis. These programs include the Master of Business
Administration (42 hours) and the Master of Public Administration
(39 credits). These programs may also have different requirements
pertaining to graduate committees and do not require the submission
of a program of study.
The electronic copy must meet the standards established by the
faculty and those of the University Libraries. This copy submitted to
ProQuest will ultimately be deposited in the University Libraries. Each
student should normally plan to produce at least three copies of his/
her thesis: one for the thesis director, one for the department, and one
to retain for personal use.
47
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Educational Specialist Candidates
(These programs are currently under review)
M.A.T./M.S.T. Degrees
Candidates for the M.A.T. or the M.S.T. should have completed the
requirements for teacher certification prior to application for admission to graduate study. In exceptional cases, however, applicants may
be admitted to graduate study even though they fall short of certification requirements. The M.A.T./M.S.T. program is completely separate
from the certification requirements. Hours used to meet certification
requirements cannot be applied toward the M.A.T./M.S.T. degrees.
Coursework leading to the educational specialist degree has been
designed for persons who desire additional preparation beyond the
master’s level but are not interested in pursuing a doctorate.
The program of study must include a minimum of 30 semester
hours, 15 of which must be in the student’s area of specialization. Six
of the required hours must be in the form of specifically designated
professional activity in education (such as supervision, administration, research, classroom experimentation, or technical assistance) and
must be directed and supervised by the student’s major professor or a
designee. Approval of the program of study for an Ed.S. student is the
admission to candidacy. In accordance with the academic unit’s policy
or the decision of the candidate’s graduate committee, the hours earned
toward the Ed.S. degree may, under specified conditions, be used to
meet the requirements for a doctorate.
The M.A.T./M.S.T. degrees are only modifications of the Plan B
non-thesis option and are subject to the requirements of the admitting
department and the general requirements of the faculty.
At least 24 of the 30 semester hours required must be in a particular
teaching area (e.g., chemistry, history, etc.), with at least 12 hours in one
department. A student working jointly in two departments must take
at least 12 hours from each department.
The M.S.T. is designed for one teaching area and must include 18
hours in, or the total required by, that area. A program designed for
two teaching areas must include 12 hours in, or required by, each of the
specified two areas. Courses offered by the Science and Mathematics
Teaching Center do not constitute a separate area in themselves but may
be applied to an appropriate area. A program designed for two teaching areas must be approved by the heads of both departments, and the
graduate committee for this program must include one member from
each department. The M.S.T. is intended for individuals teaching at
the secondary level. The program should represent the student’s needs.
A written report must be submitted concerning the specifically
designated professional activity. The graduate committee will evaluate
the report for competency in English expression, organization, and
significance of the contribution to the student’s field of specialization.
This report will also serve as a basis for the final oral examination and
must be filed with the student’s major professor.
Each doctoral student must furnish satisfactory evidence of having
had three years of successful professional experience. This experience
may be in teaching or administration or both. The student’s graduate
committee will determine what experience shall be required and when
this requirement has been satisfied.
Doctor of Philosophy Candidates
The doctor of philosophy degree does not represent a specified
amount of work over a definite period of time but rather the attainment of independent and comprehensive scholarship in a particular
field. Such scholarship will be manifest in a thorough acquaintance
with present knowledge and a demonstrated capacity for research. The
fulfilling of the following requirements suggests, therefore, only the
minimum task one must undertake to earn the doctor of philosophy
degree. No amount of time spent in graduate study or accumulation of
credit hours entitles the student to become a candidate for this degree.
Doctor of Education Candidates
The degree of doctor of education (Ed.D.) is offered to competent
students who wish to pursue a program of studies and to participate in
appropriate activities in preparation for professional service in teaching,
administrative, and supervisory positions in education. The program
is designed to meet the needs of those for whom intensive research is
not a practical prerequisite to vocational goals. Doctoral students are
expected to participate not only in organized coursework but also in
informal types of activities that will insure breadth of outlook and
technical competence.
The program of study must include a minimum of 72 semester hours
of credit at the 4000 level or above from UW or equivalent levels from
another approved university. This 72-hour requirement may include
graduate credits earned while working toward the master’s degree in
the same area, but at least 42 hours (of the 72) must be earned in formal
coursework. Additional credits toward the 72-hour requirement may
include additional formal course credits, 5980 Dissertation Research,
or 5990 Internship. The program must be on file in the Office of the
Registrar before the preliminary examination can be scheduled.
Each doctoral student must furnish satisfactory evidence of having
had three years of successful professional experience. This experience
may be in teaching or administration or both. The student’s graduate
committee will determine what experience shall be required and when
this requirement has been satisfied.
At least 36 semester hours must be earned in the major field. The
degree requires a minimum of 72 graduate hours (beyond the bachelor’s
degree) to complete all requirements. In addition to the program of
studies in organized coursework, the doctoral student will be required
to complete an approved applied project report or dissertation within
the major field of professional specialization.
A student who has taken a major part of his/her undergraduate and
graduate training at UW may be required by his/her graduate committee
to do a specified portion of graduate work at some other institution.
The program must be on file in the Office of the Registrar before the
preliminary examination can be scheduled.
48
Graduate Student Regulations and Policies
Miscellaneous Regulations
Armed Services
Time spent in the armed services is not computed in the total time
allowed to complete the requirements for an advanced degree; however,
students who are eligible and wish to use this time exclusion must file
the leave of absence petition.
New Parent Accommodation Policy
The University of Wyoming is dedicated to ensuring optimal success
for all graduate students. However, new parents are frequently forced
to interrupt their education cycle, sometimes in a transient manner but
often permanently.
International Students
The New Parent Accommodation policy is designed to allow new
parents to maintain full-time, registered student status and facilitate
their return to full participation in graduate activities in a seamless
manner without penalty. The policy applies to full-time students
enrolled in a graduate program. If both members of the new parent
partnership are UW graduate students, one but not both will be eligible
for the full accommodation. However, university encourages accommodation of schedules for exams, assignments and programs of study
for the graduate student partner. This accommodation does not apply
to part-time students.
Upon arriving at the University of Wyoming, international students
are required to visit the International Students and Scholars (ISS) office. This office:
provides support and counsel for UW’s international
students and scholars population regarding aspects
of immigration regulations and procedures,
orients this population to the policies and expectations of the
university, the educational system, and the U.S. culture,
hosts a mandatory orientation program for all new international
students before the beginning of each semester.
A student anticipating becoming a new parent is eligible for accommodation consideration for a period of up to one semester. The
exact accommodation period will begin on the date specified on the
New Parent Accommodation petition approved by the college dean.
This petition must be filed and approved prior to the actual date of
childbirth or adoption. Additional information can be found at www.
uwyo.edu/uwgrad.
Please see the ISS Web site for detailed information (www.uwyo.
edu/iss).
International graduate assistants with teaching responsibilities
must complete the English Proficiency Assessment Program and must
participate in the Graduate Student Teaching and Learning Symposium.
Check the Graduate Student Resources Web site (www.uwyo.edu/
uwgrad) for dates and times.
49
Graduation Requirements and Procedures
Graduation Requirements
Students are personally responsible for knowing degree requirements and enrolling in courses that fulfill their degree program.
Students, with the help of their advisers, design their program to satisfy
their needs and aims. Students will be required to complete assessment
activities as determined by the university prior to the awarding of
degrees. Students are likewise held responsible for knowing regulations governing the standard of work required for continuance in the
university involving academic probation and suspension.
Although this catalog is intended to set forth the various provisions for study and requirements for the awarding of degrees, periodic
revisions of the provisions for study and degree requirements are appropriate (because of advances in knowledge, changes in occupational
requirements, academic preparation of students, and in faculty and
facilities at the university). In order for the catalog to be available in
spring of each year, publication must begin the previous October. This
is almost a year before the requirements specified therein become effective the following fall and almost five years before a student entering at
that time could graduate. Accordingly, the university cannot guarantee
the awarding of a degree based on the unchanged requirements as set
forth in a particular catalog.
Graduate Student Requirements
Graduate students must declare a graduation date. Anticipated
Graduation Date forms may be submitted at any time, but should be
submitted as early in the term of graduation as possible. A Program
of Study/degree evaluation, and Committee Assignment (if required)
and Preliminary Examination Results forms (doctoral students only)
must be on file before the Anticipated Graduation Date form will be
processed. Upon receipt of the form, your Degree Analyst will verify
that all course requirements have been met. If discrepancies are found,
the Degree Analyst will contact you with instructions on how to resolve
them. Your Degree Analyst will also verify that you have registered for
a minimum of one semester hour for the current semester. If you have
questions, please contact the appropriate Degree Analyst.
Prepare for your Defense
A formal public announcement of thesis and dissertation defenses
is required. Contact your department for specific procedures.
Prior to the defense, complete the Report of Final Examination
form and take it to the defense.
After the Defense
Following the defense and when all committee signatures have been
secured (note: committee chairs may delay signature until all necessary
changes to the thesis/dissertation/non-thesis paperwork have been
made and approved), submit the form to the Office of the Registrar.
After submission of the Report of Final Examination Results form
indicating all changes/revision have been made and the thesis/dissertation is approved for final submission, student will submit the document
for format review and final electronic publication to ProQuest. You
will be advised if additional corrections are required.
If you have not previously done so, pay your graduation fees online
or at the Cashier’s Office, Knight Hall 170 by the last day of classes
for the semester.
Ph.D. students only: Complete the NORC national survey of doctoral students. This is done using the Survey of Earned Doctorates on
the NORC website. At the end of the survey, you will be prompted
to send an email indicating completion of the survey. Please send this
email to [email protected]
Adjustment to Changing Requirements
Students are expected to inform themselves of changes in degree
requirements by reviewing the catalogs that are published annually
and their Degree Evaluation reports; then, when necessary, adjust their
degree plans accordingly.
If university or college requirements are changed, students are
encouraged to adopt the new requirements; however, students will
have the option of graduating under the requirements in effect when
they entered the university or one of Wyoming’s community colleges,
provided the courses are still available. The student must accept either
the new requirements or the requirements in effect when they entered
the university or one of Wyoming’s community colleges in their entirety,
not a combination from each. Students changing colleges within the
university or reentering the university after one or more years away
are expected to adopt the requirements in effect at the time of the
reentry. Any substitution to the above must be approved in writing by
the student’s adviser and the college dean and added to the student’s
advising folder in the department or college.
If departmental requirements are changed, students will ordinarily
be permitted to continue under the requirements in effect when they
entered that major department provided there has not been an interruption in their education for a year or more; however, students are
encouraged to adopt the new requirements in total, or to accept, with
the written approval of the student’s adviser within the department,
those of the new requirements which would not be an undue hardship.
Notice of changes will be available from departmental offices and
advisers. It is the responsibility of students to keep in touch with their
major departments, to learn of changes in requirements, and to plan
ahead so that necessary courses can be taken by the expected time of
completing a degree. Many courses are not given every semester and
some not every year.
If required prerequisites for a course are changed, notice may be
obtained from the department offices. The university cannot continue
two courses, one with and one without a newly-adopted prerequisite.
The student must therefore meet the new prerequisite or obtain permission from the instructor to enroll in the course. In the event of any
doubt as to the adequacy of preparation for a course, the student should
consult with the instructor or an adviser in the department as far in
advance as possible. Independent study, if approved, may be accepted
in lieu of a specific course prerequisite.
50
Graduation Requirements and Procedures
Scholarship Standards
3. Students must complete a minimum of 42 upper division (junior/
senior) or graduate-level semester credit hours, 30 of which must
be earned from the University of Wyoming. Credit by examination
does not count towards the required 30 hours of residency credit.
A UW cumulative grade point average of at least 2.000 is required for
undergraduate degrees. The cumulative grade point average is defined as
the sum of all grade points earned in residence, correspondence study, or
outreach at the University of Wyoming, with the following exceptions:
4. Not more than 24 semester hours of correspondence study courses
may be used toward fulfilling requirements for a bachelor’s degree.
1. The credit hours shall not be counted in courses in which marks of
W, S, or U were assigned, or in which marks of I (for incomplete)
are still in effect.
5. Not more than 4 semester hours of credit in physical activity courses
can count toward a bachelor’s degree.
6. The last credit applicable to degree requirements must be earned
from the University of Wyoming with the following exception:
students of senior standing may complete degree requirements
elsewhere by obtaining special permission of the department head,
adviser, and college dean, and declaring an anticipated graduation
date with the Office of the Registrar.
2. For repeated courses:
a. First repeat: only the second credit and grade is used to calculate
the cumulative GPA.
b. If repeated more than once, only the last grade is used to calculate the cumulative GPA.
c. If a mark of W, S, or U is assigned in a repeated course, the
previous grade assigned will stand except when an S or U is earned
repeating a previous S or U.
d. Courses applied towards one completed degree may be repeated
as part of a second degree; however, the grade and GPA in the
original degree will not be changed.
7. Native language credit: students are not allowed university credit
for language courses below the 4000-level in their native language.
Assessment Requirement
Students may be required to complete assessment activities as determined by the university prior to the awarding of degrees.
3. Transfer grades are not counted in the UW GPA. If a course taken at
UW is repeated for the first time at another institution, the credits
and grade earned at UW will be deleted from the UW cumulative GPA if credit for the repeated course is transferred to UW.
Second Bachelor’s Degree
Students seeking a second bachelor’s degree must meet all of the
university and college requirements as prescribed for a first bachelor’s
degree. Students whose first degree was received from an institution
where English is not the predominant language must complete the
University Studies Writing I (WA) and II (WB) requirements. The
second bachelor’s degree may have the same title as the first degree and
may be in the same college as the first degree; but if in the same college it
must be in a different major. Grades earned in all undergraduate course
work (including courses applied towards a previous UW bachelor’s
degree) are included in the calculation of the cumulative GPA.
4. For graduate students, courses numbered below 4000 are not
added into the semester and cumulative totals, nor computed into
the GPA.
University Studies Program
Students who entered the University of Wyoming, one of Wyoming’s
community colleges, or an out-of-state academic institution fall 2015
or later, are required to complete the University Studies Program 2015,
a university-wide program in general education. The detailed requirements for the University Studies Program are provided in this catalog
on page 54.
The minimum study requirement for a second bachelor’s degree is
30 additional semester hours earned from the University of Wyoming,
12 of which must be in upper division (junior/senior-level) or graduatelevel courses. However, a student must also fulfill all of the college and
major requirements for the second degree. Credit by examination does
not count toward UW residency. The 30 hours is in addition to the
study requirement for the first degree for those students earning the
first degree from the University of Wyoming. The 30 additional hours
would be added to the degree requiring the least number of hours. Both
degrees may be awarded at the same commencement.
Semester Hour Requirements
Completion of the total minimum credit hours for degrees from the various colleges is
indicated below:
College of Agriculture
College of Arts and Sciences
College of Business College of Education College of Engineering
College of Health Sciences
120-128 hours
121-132 hours
120 hours
120-128 hours
128-132 hours
120-142 hours
Courses applied towards one completed degree may be repeated as
part of a second degree; however, the grade and GPA in the original
degree will not be changed.
Students with a bachelors degree from an accredited U.S. institution will be considered to have met the UW University Studies (USP)
program requirements, with the exception of the US and Wyoming
Constitution requirement, unless previously completed.
These minimum hour requirements are in line with the higher
learning commission’s criteria for accreditation.
University Requirements
Second Bachelor’s Degree Transfer Policy
1. A cumulative GPA of 2.000 or better from the University of
Wyoming.
Policy for University Catalog for loading transfer work for second
bachelor’s degree students
2. Satisfactory completion of the prescribed curriculum in which the
degree is sought, including fulfillment of the entrance requirements in the college concerned.
Typically, undergraduate coursework from other collegiate institutions will not be loaded into the University of Wyoming student
database after a bachelor’s degree has been earned for the student. In
situations in which a student who has previously earned one bachelor’s
51
Graduation Requirements and Procedures
Degree Evaluation/Declaring a Graduation Date
degree from the University of Wyoming is subsequently required to
take coursework from another collegiate institution to fulfill major
and overall hour requirements for a second degree from the university,
the student’s department can ask the Office of the Registrar to load
selected courses into the student’s record. As with all students who
wish to earn two bachelor’s degrees from the university, the student
will be required to successfully complete the following requirements:
The degree evaluation shows requirements of the degree program
and the progress that the student is making toward meeting those
requirements. Any discrepancies should be reported to a degree analyst in the Office of the Registrar as soon as possible. Students are
responsible for notifying their degree analyst of their anticipated
date of graduation. Students are encouraged to submit the Anticipated
Graduation Date form as early as possible in the expected term of graduation. Delaying this action could affect graduation, as requirements
indicated on the degree evaluation must be met prior to a student being
cleared for graduation. Students may review their degree evaluation
on WyoRecords.
• Major requirements for the major of the second degree
• College requirements for the college which will award the second degree
• A minimum of 30 additional semester hours over the minimum
required for the student’s first degree
• At least 60 earned semester hours from the University of
Wyoming (30 required hours for first degree, 30 additional
hours required for second degree)
• At least 60 earned semester hours of upper division (3000+- or
junior/senior- level) credit (48 required upper division hours
for first degree, 12 additional upper division hours required for
second degree)
• At least 42 earned semester hours of upper division (3000+- or
junior/senior- level) credit from the University of Wyoming
(30 required upper division hours from UW for first degree, 12
additional upper division hours from UW required for second
degree)
Graduation Fee
Payment of the graduation fee of $25.00 for each degree to be
earned is due from all graduates at least three weeks before graduation.
A late fee of $5.00 is added if the graduation fee is paid less than three
weeks before graduation. Students in certificate programs are charged
a $12.50 graduation fee for each certificate.
Grades
Final grades covering completion of course work in correspondence
study, outreach courses, transfer, special examinations, and incomplete
work from previous attendance must be in the Office of the Registrar
prior to when final grades are due for the term in which the degree is
to be conferred.
Concurrent Majors
Students may pursue a concurrent major in one or more colleges.
Only one degree (BA, BS, etc.) will be awarded from the college of
the primary major. All university curricular requirements, including
the University Studies Program requirements must be met only once.
Requirements for secondary major(s) will be established by the academic
departments and may include college requirements, in addition to all
major requirements. An academic adviser in each major is required and
each adviser must review requirements. The degree will be granted on
one date only and only one diploma will be awarded. Both majors will
be indicated on the academic transcript and diploma.
Final Approval
Final recommendation of the faculty and approval of the University
Trustees for conferral of degrees is required. The trustees may, for good
cause, decline to confer a degree upon any candidate.
Participation in Commencement Exercises
The official graduation dates for the 2015-16 academic year are
August 14, 2015, December 11, 2015, and May 14, 2016. To be eligible
for a graduation date, all work must be completed prior to that date.
Dual Degrees
All academic colleges hold commencement exercises on the May
graduation date. Several of the colleges also have commencement
exercises in December. Check the appropriate college dean’s office for
specific information. Seniors are considered candidates for graduation.
Students in certificate programs do not participate in Commencement.
Participation in the exercise does not automatically confer degrees. Confirmation of graduation will occur after a review of
final course work.
It is possible to pursue degrees in one or more colleges. The university requirements and University Studies Program requirements
must be met only once. Students must meet the all college and major
requirements of both majors. Students must complete an additional
30 semester hours from the University of Wyoming, 12 of which must
be in upper-division (junior/senior-level) or graduate-level courses
beyond the credit hour requirement for the degree with the minimum
number of credit hours required. An academic adviser in each major is
required and each adviser must review requirements. Multiple degrees
and multiple diplomas will be awarded; however, the completion date
must be the same. Both colleges, degrees, and majors will be indicated
on the academic transcript.
Commencement exercises are a historical academic custom involving participation by all segments of the university and attendance by
members of the graduate’s families and friends as well as the general
public. Those students who participate in commencement exercises are
expected to wear appropriate traditional academic regalia.
52
Graduation Requirements and Procedures
Graduation with Honors
Designations of summa cum laude, magna cum laude, and cum
laude will be added to the baccalaureate academic transcripts and
diplomas of graduating undergraduate students earning at least 48 credit
hours from the University of Wyoming (of which 45 hours must be
for A-F grades) based on the following percentages:
Top 1% summa cum laude
Next 4% magna cum laude
Next 5% cum laude
as computed from the GPAs of graduating undergraduate students in
each college. Honors graduates will be identified by comparison to a
5-year rolling grade point distribution computed for each college, to
be recomputed annually each spring semester.
These designations are effective with the fall 2000 semester and
are not retroactive.
Honor graduation will be granted for students in the College of
Law upon successful completion of 56 hours in the college with a
cumulative GPA of 3.4 or better based on University of Wyoming
College of Law courses.
A Doctor of Pharmacy is awarded with honor by the university
to a student who graduates with scholarship in pharmacy of unusual
excellence as defined by the School of Pharmacy.
53
The University Studies Program 2015
S
tudents who enter the University of Wyoming or a Wyoming community college beginning in fall 2015 will be required to meet the USP 2015
requirements for graduation. Requirements of the USP are divided into categories based on the student learning outcomes. All courses are
mutually exclusive of each other; no single course may count in more than one category. USP designated courses are open to all UW students
(with a few exceptions for the Synergy and Honors Programs).
Knowledge of Human Culture, the Physical & Natural World, and the U.S. & Wyoming Constitutions Credits
Human Culture (H)6
Students will understand human behaviors, activities, ideas, and values in different situations and contexts. Complete six approved credit
hours of coursework. Approved coursework does not include courses taken within the student’s major department.
Physical and Natural World (PN)6
Students will understand the fundamental concepts of scientific and quantitative inquiry and develop the ability to understand the relevance of scientific, technological, and quantitative skills to contemporary society. Complete six approved credit hours of course work.
Approved coursework does not include courses taken from the student’s major department.
U.S. & Wyoming Constitutions (V)3
Students will demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. and Wyoming constitutions in order to develop the combination of knowledge,
values, and motivation to participate in and improve the life of our local and global communities. Approved V courses fulfill both the
U.S. and Wyoming Constitution requirements. Intellectual and Practical Skills Credits
Communication 1 (C1)
3
Students will develop skills in written, oral, and digital communication as appropriate to specific disciplines and courses at the introductory, intermediate, and advanced level. Through repeated instruction, practice, and feedback, the communication sequence will emphasize and progressively develop transferable skills for students’ academic work and future professions. The introductory course (C1) will
emphasize foundational skills for academic writing. Communication 1 must be completed with a C or better.
Communication 2 (C2)
3
Intermediate courses (C2) will emphasize foundational oral and digital communication skills and continue to build on writing skills.
Successful completion of C1 is required prior to enrolling in a C2 course. This category can be fulfilled by courses taken from the student’s major department. Communication 2 must be completed with a C or better.
Communication 3 (C3)
3
Advanced courses (C3) will emphasize using the discourse of a discipline or interdisciplinary field to communicate to academic or professional audiences through written, oral, and digital communication. Successful completion of C2 is required prior to enrolling in a C3
course. This category can be fulfilled by courses taken from the students’ major department. First-Year Seminar (FY)
3
Students will critically examine and evaluate evidence, claims, beliefs, or points of view about meaningful, relevant issues. Students will
be introduced to active learning, inquiry of pressing issues, and individual and collaborative processing of ideas through the First-Year
Seminar curriculum. These skills will be reinforced throughout the baccalaureate experience. The First-Year Seminar will provide the
skills and philosophy necessary for success as a student and life-long learner. Students will have an opportunity to select from a wide
range of academic courses covering unique and interesting subject matter focused on developing critical thinking, communication, and
information literacy skills. Colleges, departments, and programs cannot require a particular FY class for a major. First-Year Seminar
must be completed with a C or better.
Quantitative Reasoning (Q)
3
Students will reason and solve quantitative problems from a wide array of authentic contexts and everyday life situations. All students must
fulfill the Q requirement, either by placing out of the course or through successfully completing the Q course. Personal & Social Responsibility Credits
No mandatory USP courses. Students will have varied experiences depending on coursework and co-curricular activities chosen by them. Wyoming Community colleges have defined a Common General Education Core Curriculum as a component of an associate’s degree. Per
the articulation agreement, an AA or AS or AB degree from a Wyoming community college will satisfy the lower-division requirements of the
University Studies Program. Students transferring to UW from any Wyoming community college without an associate’s degree will have their
transcript reviewed on a course-by-course basis.
Students who enrolled at the University of Wyoming or a Wyoming community college prior to the fall of 2015 and who maintained continuous enrollment have the option of satisfying USP 2003 or USP 2015 requirements.
54
University Studies 2015
The following courses were approved for the University Studies
Program 2015 at the time this catalog went to press. The process of
course approval is ongoing. For a complete and updated list of approved
courses, see the USP web site at www.uwyo.edu/unst/usp2015/.
ENGL 1010
ESL
1210
HP
1020
ART
4790
Art History Seminar
BOT
4100
Scientific Communication
CHE
4080
Process Design II
CHEM 4010
Communication in Chemistry
COJO 3010
Business and Professional Communication
COJO 3190
Cross Cultural Communication
COJO 4110
Feature Writing Seminar
COJO 4160
African Rhetoric
COJO 4233
Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Media
COJO 4260
Rhetoric and Social Justice
ECON 4240
History of Economic Thought
EDSE 4271
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Mathematics Education
EDSE 4272
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Art Education K-12
EDSE 4273
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Social Studies Education
EDSE 4275
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Science Education
EDSE 4276
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Modern Language Education
EDSE 4277
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Pedagogy Technical Education
ENGL 4010
Technical Writing in the Professions
ENGL 4025
Writing for the Web
ENGL 4075
Writing for Non-Profits
ENGL 4990
Senior Seminar
ESE
4060
Systems Design I
ESL
4010
Technical Writing for International Students
FCSC 4182
Textile Industry and the Environment
FREN 4200
Introduction to Research
GEOG 3280
Spatial Methods
GEOL 4820
Capstone
HIST 4030
Senior Capstone Seminar
INST 4110
International Development
INST 4950
Capstone
ME
4060
Systems Design I
MGT
4470
Negotiations and Conflict Resolution
MICR 4321
Microbiology Capstone
MKT 4450
Advanced Marketing Management
MLSK 4860
Laboratory Management
MOLB 4320
Investigations in Molecular Biology
MUSC 4265
Elementary and Secondary Music Methods
MUSC 4330
Baroque Period
MUSC 4340
Romantic Period
NURS 4055
Evidence-Based Nursing for the RN
PHCY 6102
Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics
PHCY 6241
Organizational and Societal Issues Within the Health Care System
PHCY 6245
Patient/Professional Interactions
PHCY 6250
Drug Literature Evaluation
PHCY 6270
Intermediate Pharmacy Practicum
PHCY 6370
Advanced Pharmacy Experience Orientation
PHCY 6471
Internal Medicine II
PHCY 6473
Ambulatory Pharmaceutical Care
PHYS 3650
Advanced Modern Physics Lab
POLS 4810
Seminar in Political Philosophy
POLS 4840
Seminar in Public Law
POLS 4850
Seminar in American Political Institutions
POLS 4870
Seminar in International Relations: Comparative Genocide
RELI 4000
Theories in Religion
REWM 4900
Rangeland Management and Planning
RUSS 4200
Senior Seminar: Russian Culture
SOC
4090
Sociological Research Methods
Communication 1 (C1)
College Composition and Rhetoric
English Composition for International Students
Freshman Colloquium I
Communication 2 (C2)
AAST 2240
Introduction to African Studies
AAST 2360
African American History, 1619-Present
AGEC 3020
Practice Makes Perfect: Applying Principles of Economics to Current Agricultural and Agribusiness Problems
ANTH 2000
Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
ARBC 3060
Communicating in Arabic
ART
3710
Gender and Humanities
CHIN 3055
Business Chinese I
COJO 2010
Public Speaking
ECON 2400
Economics of the Environment
EDST 3000
Teacher as Practitioner
ENGL 2005
Technical Writing in the Sciences
ENGL 2020
Introduction to Literature
ENGL 2035
Writing for Public Forums
ENR
2000
Environment and Society
ESL
3050
Advanced Academic Writing for International Students
FCSC 2170
Clothing and Modern Society
FCSC 2200
Professionalism and Communication in Family and Consumer Sciences
FREN 3050
Third Year French I
GEOL 2200
Communication Earth Science
GERM 3050
Third Year German I
HIST 2360
African American History, 1619-Present
HP
2020
Freshman Colloquium II
INST 2240
Introduction to African Studies
INST 2250
Introduction to Latin American Studies
INST 2280
Introduction to European Studies
KIN
3012
Teaching Laboratory I
POLS 2200
Politics of Europe
POLS 3680
Introduction to Emperical Political Analysis
RELI 2200
Contemporary American Religion
RELI 2320
History of Islam
RELI 2450
Traditional African Religions
RELI 3245 Christianity Since Darwin
REWM 4530/ Ecological Applications and Seminr
4830
RUSS 3050
Third Year Russian I
SPAN 3050
Third Year Spanish I
WMST 2500
Gender and Society
WMST 3710
Gender and Humanities
AAST
AAST
AAST
ACCT
AECL
AGEC
AGEC
ANSC
ANTH
ART
ART
4160
4233
4260
4600
4990
4965
4670
4630
3300
4010
4600
Communication 3 (C3)
African Rhetoric
Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Media
Rhetoric and Social Justice
Accounting Ethics and Professionalism
Agroecology Seminar
Agribusiness Entrepreneurial Management and Communication
Technical Communication for Agribusiness Majors
Topics and Issues in Animal Science
Ethnographic Methods
Contemporary Art: Theory and Practice
Professional Practices and Strategies
55
University Studies 2015
SOC
SOWK
SPAN
SPPA
THEA
THEA
WMST
ZOO
4110
4570
4200
4750
4200
4930
4233
4100
International Development
Social Work Research Methods
Introduction to Research
Research Methods in Communication Disorders
20th Century Dance
Theatre History I
Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Media
Scientific Communication
First-Year Seminar (FY)
AAST 1101
African American in the Equality State
AGEC 1101
Public (mis)perceptions of agriculture
AMST 1101
Cultures of College
ANTH 1101
Anthropology of Monsters
ART
1101
Reading Tex(tiles): Exploring Fabric as a Vehicle for Communication
BUSN 1101
Decision Making in Business
CHST 1101
Latina/o Popular Culture: Art, Theare, Media, Music and Sports
CNSL 1101
E.P.I.C. Leadership
COJO 1101
Small Group Communication
COJO 1101
Trending Now: Media Literacy in the 21st Century
COSC 1101
The Beauty and Joy of Computing
EDEC 1101
The Power of Play
EDSE 1101
Superheroes, Stan Lee, and Studying for Success: What does popular culture have to do with research?
EDST 1101
Fight the Power: Diversity and Social Justice
EDST 1101
The Citizen Factory: Schooling and Democracy in the US
ENGL 1101
Night of the Living Film: Zombies, Living Dead, Walkers... Humans
ENR
1101
Thinking Like a Mountain: Environmental Problems, Interdisciplinary Solutions
ERS
1101
Energy and Society
ES
1101
Introduction to Engineering Study
FCSC 1101
People, Place, Profit and Policy: Sustainability and Well-
Being in the Built Environment
FCSC 1101
Building Connections Between Human and Environmental Health
FDSC 1101
Feeding the Planet: Mankind’s Greatest Challenge
GEOL 1101
Water Planet
HLSC 1101
Aging in America
INST 1101
Society and the Outsider
ITEC 1101
Are you naked online? Taking control of your digital image
KIN
1101
Kinesiology - the Science of Human Movement
KIN
1101
Contemporary Issues in North American Sport
MOLB 1101
The Neanderthal and the nucleus; the molecular biology of being human
NURS 1101
Should Health Care Fly?
PATB 1101
One Health: People, Animals, and the Environment - Zero Degree of Separation
PHCY 1101
Navigating Survival: A Compass for Campus Mental Health
PHYS 1101
What really happened: How scientific theories come about
PHYS 1101
Creationism vs. Evolution
PLNT 1101
Eating as an Agricultural Act
POLS 1101
Dangerous Ideas: First Amendment Civil Liberties in Theory and Practice
RELI 1101
Worlds of Religion
RELI 1101
Gilgamesh to the Bomb
SPAN 1101
Keep Calm and Don’t Eat That!
STAT 1101
The Power of Confidence
THEA 1101
Theatre as Manifesto
56
UWYO 1101
Ingredients for Academic and Career Success
UWYO 1101
Your Loyal Correspondent: Journals, Letters, and Diaries in Peace and Conflict
UWYO 1101
Spiritual Intelligence
UWYO 1101
The Challenge of Sustainability: Project-Based Learning
UWYO 1101
Synergy: Investing Worlds of Work
UWYO 1101
Ignite Your Passion: Creating Change Through Service and Action
UWYO 1101
Inve$ting in the Future You: Financial Literacy from College to Career
UWYO 1101
Outdoor Leadership
UWYO 1101
Keep Your Money, We Want Change: Leadership for a Better World
UWYO 1101
Synergy: Sections 1-18
WMST 1101
Sex and the International City
ZOO
1101
I heard it through the grapevine
AAST
AGEC
AMST
AMST
ANTH
ANTH
ANTH
ART
ART
CHIN
CHIN
CHIN
CHST
CLAS
COJO
COJO
ECON
ECON
ECON
EDEL
EDST
EDST
ENGL
ENR
FCSC
FCSC
FREN
FREN
FREN
FREN
FREN
GEOG
GEOG
GERM
GERM
GERM
GERM
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HP
HP
3000
4600
2010
2110
1200
1450
3400
2010
2020
1010
1020
3160
1300
2020
1000
1030
1000
1010
1020
2280
2450
2480
2410
3000
1180
3220
1010
1020
2030
2040
2130
1000
1020
1010
1020
2030
2040
1320
4340
4405
4406
4410
4415
1151
2151
Human Culture (H)
African American Music
Community Economic Analysis
Introduction to American Studies
Cultural Diversity in America
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
World Archaeology
Hunters & Gatherers
Art History Survey I
Art History Survey II
First Year Chinese I
First Year Chinese II
See Movies, Touch China
Intro to Latina/o Studies
Classical Greek Civilization
Introduction to Mass Media
Interpersonal Communication
Global Economic Issues
Principles of Macro Economics
Principles of Micro Economics
Literature for Children
Foundations for Development and Learning
Diversity and the Publics of Schooling
Literary Genres
Approaches to the ENR Problem Solving
Applied Design
Multicultural Influences on Children and Families
First Year French I
First Year French II
Second Year French I
Second Year French II
Contemporary French Culture
World Regionaly Geography
Human Geography
First Year German I
First Year German II
Second Year German I
Second Year German II
World History to 1750
Social History of American Women
American Encounters to 1850
American Encounters from 1850
American in an Early Modern World
Entangled Worlds, Entangled Lives: Indigenous People and Colonizers before 1850
Colloquium I
Japanese Modern Culture and Society
University Studies 2015
HP
JAPN
JAPN
LATN
LATN
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
PHIL
PHIL
PSYC
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RUSS
RUSS
RUSS
RUSS
SOC
SPAN
SPAN
SPAN
SPAN
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
WIND
WIND
WMST
WMST
WMST
2153
1010
1020
1010
1020
1000
1390
1400
1405
1415
1417
1430
3390
3400
3405
3415
3417
3430
4490
1000
2345
1000
1000
2050
2315
2330
3090
1010
1020
2030
2040
1000
1010
1020
2030
2040
1000
1100
1410
1420
1430
1440
1480
2200
2480
2100
2700
1080
2000
2700
Physical and Natural World (PN)
AECL 1000
Agroecology
ANTH 1100
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
ANTH 1300
Introduction to Archaeology
ASTR 1050
Survey of Astronomy
ASTR 1070
The Earth: Its Physical Environment
ATSC 2000
Introduction to Meterology
CHEM 1000
Introductory Chemistry
CHEM 1020
General Chemistry I
CHEM 1030
General Chemistry II
CHEM 1050
Adcanced General Chemistry I
CHEM 1060
Advanced General Chemistry II
ENR
1200
Environment
ENR
1500
Water, Dirt and Earth’s Environment
ENTO 1000
Insect Biology
GEOG 1010
Introduction to Physical Geography
GEOL 1100
Introduction to Physical Geology
GEOL 1500
Water, Dirt and Earth’s Environment
GEOL 3600
Earth and Mineral Resources
GEOL 3650
Energy for Society: Addressing the Engergy Grand Challenge
LIFE
1002
Discovering Science
LIFE
1003
Current Issues in Biology
LIFE
1010
General Biology
LIFE
1020
Life Sciences
PHYS 1050
Concepts of Physics
PHYS 1090
Fundamentals of the Physical Universe
PHYS 1110
General Physics I
PHYS 1120
General Physics II
PHYS 1210
Engineering Physics I
PHYS 1220
Engineering Physics II
PLNT 2025
Horticultural Science
Bali: Life and Art
First Year Japanese I
First Year Japanese II
First Year Latin, I
First Year Latin, II
Intro to Music
Jazz Ensemble I
Collegiate Chorale I
Singing Statesmen I
Bel Canto I
Civic Chorus I
Symphony Orchestra I
Jazz Ensemble II
Collegiate Chorale II
Singing Statesmen II
Bel Canto II
Civic Chorus II
Symphony Orchestra II
History of Rock and Roll
Introduction to Philosophy
Natural Resource Ethics
General Psychology
Introduction to Religion
Religions of Asia
History of Non-Western Religions
Islam in the Modern World
Middle East and Israel in Film
First Year Russian I
First Year Russian II
Second Year Russian I
Second Year Russian II
Sociological Principles
First Year Spanish I
First Year Spanish II
Second Year Spanish I
Second Year Spanish II
Introduction to Theatre
Beginning Acting
Ballet I/I
Ballet I/II
Modern Dance I/I
Modern Dance I/II
Beginning Jazz Dance
Backgrounds of Dance
Jazz II
Introduction to Disability Studies
Gender and Disability
Intro to Women’s Studies
Intro to LGBTQ/NS Studies
Gender and Disability
Quantitative Reasoning (Q)
MATH 1000
Problem Solving
MATH 1105
Data, Probability, & Algebra for Elementary School Teachers
MATH 1123
Math, Music and Acoustics
MATH 1400
College Algebra
MATH 1405
Trigonometry
MATH 2200
Calculus I
MATH 2205
Calculus II
MATH 2350
Business Calculus
MATH 1050
Finite Mathematics
STAT 2050
Fundamentals in Statistics
STAT 2070
Introductory Statistics for the Social Sciences
ECON
HIST
HIST
HIST
POLS
POLS
1200
1211
1221
1251
1000
1100
U.S. and Wyoming Constitutions (V)
Economics, Law, and Government
US to 1865
US from 1865
History of Wyoming
American and Wyoming Government
Wyoming Government*
* will only meet Wyoming portion of V requirement. Will be able to use this in combination with US Constitutions course (transferred)
57
University Studies Designations
B
eginning Fall Semester 2015, students entering UW are required to
fulfill the University Studies Program 2015. Students who
entered UW or a Wyoming community college prior to fall 2015
may complete the previous University Studies Program (USP 2003). Students must complete all of the requirements in the program under
which they are enrolled, (either USP 2003 or USP 2015). Students who
are currently under the USP 2003 requirement may choose to switch
to USP 2015 with a University Studies Petition; however, they will be
responsible for completing all of the USP 2015 requirements. Careful
selection of courses is essential, as some courses may satisfy both 2003
and 2015 USP requirements, while others do not.
The following table displays the codes for both USP 2003 and USP
2015. The major difference between codes for the two systems is the
use of alphanumeric designations for the old (2003) USP system, and
solely letter designations for the new (2015) USP system. The sequence
A, B, C, used for Writing and Quantitative Reasoning Categories would
stand for Introductory, Lower Division, and Upper Division.
USP codes are listed in course descriptions in brackets with the 2003
USP code followed by the 2015 USP code, ( e.g. [QBQ]).
Area
USP 2003
Codes
Integrated Cultural Context
USP 2015
Codes
C
-
Humanities
CH
H
Social Sciences
CS
H
Arts
CA
H
Diversity in the United States
D
-
Global Awareness
G
-
Intellectual Community
I
-
First-Year Seminar
-
FY
Information Literacy
L
-
Oral Communication
O
-
Physical Activity and Health
P
-
Quantitative Reasoning I
QA
Q
Quantitative Reasoning II
QB
Q
Quantitative Reasoning III
-
Q
Integrated Science
S
-
Biological Science
SB
PN
Physical Science
SP
PN
Earth Science
SE
PN
US and Wyoming Constitutions
V
V
Writing I
WA
C1
Writing II
WB
C2
Writing III
WC
C3
58
The University Studies Program 2003
Students first entering UW in the Fall 2003 semester or later
must satisfy the USP 2003 requirements. USP codes are listed in
course descriptions in brackets with the 2003 USP code followed
by the 2015 USP code (e.g. [QBQ]).
An education at the University of Wyoming is grounded in a broad
understanding of human knowledge developed through a range of
courses and co-curricular activities, the most important of which is the
University Studies Program of general education, required of all UW
students. The specialized knowledge of a major evolves from general
education. These two components of an education are complementary,
enhancing one another throughout a student’s career.
Area
Cultural Context
CS - Social and Behavioral Sciences
CA - Fine Arts
Three hours of Integrated Cultural Context (C) may be substituted for
one of the three categories.
U.S. & Wyoming Constitution
Physical Activity & Health
1
Embeddable Components are those that may be in a course dedicated
solely to that topic, or embedded in courses dedicated to the core
components of University Studies, or embedded in courses required for
the major. Embeddable Components will ordinarily be fulfilled in the
context of three-credit hour courses.
Information Literacy
Hours
1
L - One approved course
1
D - One approved course
Global Awareness
1
G - One approved course
Writing 2
1-3
WB - One mid-level writing or writingintensive course (2000-4999 level)
1
Writing 3
Writing
1
WC - One upper-division writing or writingintensive course (3000-4999 level)
3
Total:
Oral Communications
1
3
QA - Quantitative Reasoning I
1
3
QB - Quantitative Reasoning II
1
3
1-2
4-8
1
30-36
Wyoming Community Colleges have defined a Common General
Education Core Curriculum as a component of an associate’s degree. Per the articulation agreement, an AA or AS degree from a Wyoming
community college plus three additional credits of mathematics will satisfy the lower-division requirements of the University Studies Program. Students transferring to UW from any Wyoming community college
without an associate’s degree will have their transcript reviewed on a
course by course basis. See page 32 for specific information regarding
the Wyoming Community College Articulation Agreement.
Quantitative Reasoning
Science
1
Embeddable Components
I - Offered in academic departments. May be
taken for 1-3 credit hours
O - One approved course emphasizing oral
communication skills
1
P - Complete an approved P course.
Core Components are mutually exclusive; meaning, two core components
may not be fulfilled by the same course. Except for the QA, core courses
may have topics from the embeddable components list included in their
curriculum
WA - Students must complete a WA course
with a grade of C or better
1
V - Approved V courses fulfill both US and
Wyoming Constitution requirements
Diversity in the U.S.
1
9
CH - Humanities
Core Components:
Intellectual Community
3
Complete nine approved credit hours, three hours from each of the three
categories.
Requirements of the University Studies Program 2003 are:
# of
courses
Hours
Complete one approved Integrated Science
(S) course, which must have a laboratory
component.
The goal of the University Studies Program is to provide a general
education that will help students develop for full participation in a
technologically intricate world including:
1. The ability to express oneself in speech and writing;
2. The ability to locate, evaluate, and use information;
3. The ability to examine problems from quantitative, qualitative,
and scientific perspectives;
4. Encouragement to become active citizens in a diverse society;
5. Gaining perspective to appreciate the viewpoints and deal with
complex issues of others through multi- and inter-disciplinary
inquiry;
6. Understanding the responsibility to participate in a democratic
society;
7. Communicating clearly in a civic environment.
Area
# of
courses
Complete two approved courses from any of the following categories. At
least one of the courses must have a laboratory component.
Students who enrolled at the University of Wyoming prior to the fall
of 2015 and who maintained continuous enrollment have the option of
satisfying USP 2003 or USP 2015 requirements. Wyoming community
college students who transfer to UW will have the option of meeting
either the USP 2003 requirements or the USP 2015 requirements.
SB - Biological Sciences
SP - Physical Sciences
SE - Earth Sciences
or
59
University Studies 2003
The following courses were approved for the University Studies
Program 2003 at the time this catalog went to press. The process of
course approval is ongoing. For a complete and updated list of approved
courses, see the USP web site at www.uwyo.edu/unst/usp-2003/.
AAST
AGRI
AIST
AMST
AMST
CHST
CLAS
COJO
ENGL
FCSC
HIST
WMST
4546
4546
4546
3100
4546
4546
2020
2110
4546
4546
4546
2000
Cultural Context - Integrated (C)
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Food in American Culture
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Classical Greek Civilization
Nonverbal Communication
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Intro to GLBTQ/NS Studies
AAST
ANTH
ART
ART
ART
ART
ART
CHST
COJO
COJO
EDEL
ENGL
FCSC
KIN
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
MUSC
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
THEA
WMST
WMST
2730
2730
1005
2010
2020
2730
4830
4100
2400
3200
3170
4830
1180
2004
1000
1380
1400
1430
2050
3480
4315
1000
1100
1410
1420
1430
1440
2200
4200
4100
4830
Cultural Context - Arts (CA)
African Creativity and Ritual
African Creativity and Ritual
Drawing I
Art History Survey I
Art History II: Renaissance through Modern Art
African Creativity and Ritual
Victorian Women’s Lives: Their Art, Literature and Culture
US Latina/o Theatre
Introduction to Photography
Graphics of Communication
Meaning in Art
Victorian Women’s Lives: Their Art, Literature and Culture
Applied Design
Movement Core V: Creative Movement and Dance in Physical Education
Introduction to Music
Wind Ensemble
Collegiate Chorale
University Orchestra
Historical Survey I
String Ensemble: Chamber Music
America’s Ethnic Music
Intro to Theater
Beginning Acting
Ballet I/I
Ballet I/II
Modern Dance I/I
Modern Dance I/II
Backgrounds of Dance
20th Century Dance
US Latina/o Theatre
Victorian Women’s Lives: Their Art, Literature and Culture
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AMST
AMST
AMST
ANTH
ARE
ART
ART
ART
CHST
CHST
CLAS
COJO
EDEL
EDEL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
FREN
GERM
GERM
GERM
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HP
HP
KIN
PHIL
60
2450
3260
4000
4020
4160
2290
2340
2345
2010
2700
3400
2700
3030
2700
3710
4610
2360
4470
2040
4160
2275
2280
1080
2020
2340
2345
2360
2410
2425
2430
2435
3150
3710
4470
2140
2140
3006
3150
1110
2080
2250
2252
2290
2315
2320
2700
3275
3710
1151
1161
1040
1000
Cultural Context - Humanities (CH)
African Traditional Religions
African Spirits in the New World
Quest for Civil Rights: Martin Luther King, Malcolm X and the Civil Rights Era
The Black West
African American Rhetoric
History of North American Indians
Native American Culture and Literature
American Indians in Hollywood Film
Introduction to American Studies
Introduction to Museology
Popular Music and Sexualities
Introduction to Museology
History of Architecture
Introduction to Museology
Gender and Humanities
Studies in Art
Mexican American Literature
Mexican American Literature
Classical Roman Civilization
African American Rhetoric
Literature for Young Children
Literature for Children
Introduction to Women’s Studies
Introduction to Literature
Native American Culture and Literature
American Indians in Hollywood Film
Mexican American Literature
Literary Genres
Literatures in English I
Literatures in English II
Literatures in English III, 1865- present
World Literature
Gender and Humanities
Mexican American Literature
Introduction to Reading
Introduction to Literature
20TH Century German Culture and Civilization
German History and Culture
Western Civilization I
The Holocaust
American Religious History I (to 1865)
American Religious History II (1865-1945)
History of North American Indians
History of non-Western Religions
History of Islam
Introduction to Museology
World Christianities
Gender and Humanities
Freshman Honors Colloquium I
Freshman Honors Colloquium II
Contemporary Topics in North American Sport
Introduction to Philosophy
University Studies 2003
PHIL
PHIL
PHIL
PHIL
PHIL
PHIL
PHYS
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RNEW
RUSS
RUSS
SPAN
WIND
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
2100
2300
2310
2330
2345
2420
4690
1000
2040
2050
2080
2110
2200
2250
2252
2315
2320
2410
2450
3260
3275
3400
4160
2345
2140
3205
2140
2100
1080
3400
3650
3710
4520
The Greek Mind
Ethics in Practice
Philosophy of Religion
Environmental Ethics
Natural Resource Ethics
Critical Thinking
Science Fact, Fiction and Future
Introduction to Religion
Religions of the Middle East
Religions of Asia
The Holocaust
Introduction to the Old Testament
Contemporary American Religion
American Religious History I (to 1865)
American Religious History II (1865-1945)
History of non-Western Religions
History of Islam
Varieties of Non-Belief in the Western World
African Traditional Religions
African Spirits in the New World
World Christianities
Religion in the American West
Moses, Jesus, and Muhammad
Natural Resource Ethics
Introduction to Reading
Russian Folklore and Folk Life
Introduction to Literature
Introduction to Disability Studies
Introduction to Women’s Studies
Popular Music and Sexualities
Contemporary U.S. Immigrant Women Writers
Gender and Humanities
Gender and Sexuality in Postcolonial Writing
AAST
AAST
AGEC
AGEC
AIR
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AMST
ANTH
ANTH
ANTH
ANTH
ANTH
CHST
CHST
CHST
CNSL
COJO
COJO
COJO
COJO
CNSL
ECON
ECON
ECON
ECON
3670
4231
1010
1020
3020
1001
1350
2210
3400
4492
2110
1200
1300
1450
2200
2210
1100
2370
3800
2200
1000
1040
4231
4232
2200
1000
1010
1020
1300
Cultural Context - Social Sciences (CS)
African Diaspora
Minority Media Ownership
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Air Force Leadership II
Foundations in American Indian Studies
American Indians in Contemporary Society
North American Indians
Traditional Ecological Knowledge
Indian Cultures of Latin America, 15th Century - Present
Cultural Diversity in America
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Introduction to Archaeology
World Archaeology
Understanding Cultures
North American Indians
Introduction to Chicano Studies
Chicano History: Origins to 1900
Chicanas/os in Contemporary Society
Introduction to Student Leadership
Introduction to Mass Media
Introduction to Human Communication
Minority Media Ownership
Media Convergence
Introduction to Student Leadership
Global Economic Issues
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Oil: Business, Culture, and Power
61
ECON
EDST
ENR
ENR
FCSC
FCSC
FCSC
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
GEOG
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
NURS
NURS
NURS
POLS
POLS
POLS
PSYC
SOC
SOC
SOC
SPPA
WIND
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
1400
2450
4000
4890
2121
3220
4117
1000
1020
2370
3030
3400
3550
4040
1320
1330
2040
2370
4410
4492
1060
1200
1330
2350
4155
4175
4680
4155
4175
4960
1200
2000
2430
1000
1000
1350
4680
4070
4020
3800
4155
4175
4580
4960
Topics in Economics: Sports Economics
Human Lifespan Development
Approaches to Environment and Natural Resource Problem-Solving
Topics in Environment and Natural Resources
Child Development
Multicultural Influences on the Young Child
Understanding Community Leadership
World Regional Geography
Introduction to Human Geography
Chicano History: Origins to 1900
Geography and Development
Traditional Ecological Knowledge
Natural Hazards and Society
Conservation of Natural Resources
World History to 1750
World History from 1750
Imperial China
Chicano History: Origins to 1900
America in an Early Modern World
Indian Cultures of Latin America, 15th Century - Present
World Regional Geography
Non-Western Political Cultures
World History from 1750
How the World Really Works
Women, War and Health
Gender, Women and Health
Shanghai: Past & Present
Women, War and Health
Gender, Women and Health
Women’s Bodies/Women’s Minds
Non-Western Political Cultures
Current Issues in American Politics
Parties, Interest Groups & Elections
General Psychology
Sociological Principles
American Indians in Contemporary Society
Shanghai: Past & Present
Deaf Culture and the History of Deaf America
Disability: Supports and Services
Chicanas/os in Contemporary Society
Women, War and Health
Gender, Women and Health
Gender, Global Change, and Development
Women’s Bodies/Women’s Minds
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AAST
AGRI
AIST
AIST
1000
1030
2350
4000
4020
4100
4160
4231
4233
4250
4455
4546
4675
4985
4546
1001
1350
Diversity in the US (D)
Introduction to African American Studies
Social Justice in the 21st Century
Introduction to African American Literature
Black Freedom Movement
The Black West
African American Religious Culture
African American Rhetoric
Minority Media Ownership
Race, Ethnicity, Gender in Media
The Harlem Renaissance
Literature of Enslavement
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
US Women of Color
Rhetoric and Social Justice
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Foundations in American Indian Studies
American Indians in Contemporary Society
University Studies 2003
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AIST
AMST
AMST
AMST
AMST
AMST
ANTH
CHST
CHST
CHST
CHST
CHST
CHST
CHST
CHST
CHST
CHST
COJO
COJO
COJO
COJO
EDSE
EDST
EDST
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
AAST
ENGL
FCSC
FCSC
GEOG
GEOG
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
KIN
MUSC
2210
2290
2340
2345
3000
3100
3400
4000
4110
4546
1030
2110
3400
4250
4546
2210
1030
1100
2360
2370
3200
3800
4100
4470
4546
4675
3190
4160
4231
4985
4254
2480
4110
1080
2340
2345
2350
2360
3100
4450
4470
4455
4546
3220
4546
2370
3400
2250
2252
2290
2370
2389
3000
4000
4405
4406
4546
1040
4315
North American Indians
History of North American Indians
Native American Culture and Literature
American Indians in Hollywood Films
Plains Culture and History
Tribal Literature of the Great Plains
Traditional Ecological Knowledge
Indians of Wyoming
Educational Foundations in American Indian Education
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Social Justice in the 21st Century
Cultural Diversity in America
Popular Music and Sexualities
The Harlem Renaissance
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
North American Indians
Social Justice in the 21st Century
Introduction to Chicano Studies
Mexican American Literature
Chicano History: Origins to 1900
Perspectives of Chicana Studies
Chicanas/os in Contemporary Society
US Latina/o Theatre
Chicano/a Folklore
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
US Women of Color
Cross-Cultural Communication
African American Rhetoric
Minority Media Ownership
Rhetoric and Social Justice
Becoming a Reflective Practitioner: Specific Pedagogy in Music
Diversity and the Politics of Schooling
Educational Foundations in American Indian Education
Introduction to Women’s Studies
Native American Culture and Literature
American Indians in Hollywood Film
Introduction to African American Literature
Mexican American Literature
Tribal Literatures of the Great Plains
African American Novel
Chicano/a Folklore
Literature of Enslavement
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Multicultural Influences on the Young Child
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Chicano History: Origins to 1900
Traditional Ecological Knowledge
American Religious History I (to 1865)
American Religious History II (1865-1945)
History of North American Indians
Chicano History: Origins to 1900
History of Women and the American West
Plains Culture and History
Indians of Wyoming
American Encounters: Cross Cultural Relations to 1850
American Encounters from 1850
Agriculture: Rooted in Diversity
Contemporary Topics in North American Sport
America’s Ethnic Music
NURS
PHIL
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
REWM
RNEW
SOC
SOC
SOWK
SPPA
WIND
WIND
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
3020
2345
2200
2250
2252
3400
4100
4051
2345
1350
2350
4060
4070
2100
2700
1030
1080
2000
2389
2700
3200
3400
3650
3800
4100
4233
4675
Cultural Diversity in Family Health Care
Natural Resource Ethics
Contemporary American Religion
American Religious History I (to 1865)
American Religious History II (1865-1945)
Religion in the American West
African American Religious Culture
Environmental Politics
Natural Resource Ethics
American Indians in Contemporary Society
Race and Ethnic Relations
Diversity and Difference in Social Work
Deaf Studies
Introduction to Disability Services
Gender and Disabilities
Social Justice in the 21st Century
Introduction to Women’s Studies
Intro to GLBTQ/NS Studies
History of Women and the American West
Women with Disabilities
Perspectives of Chicana Studies
Popular Music and Sexualities
Contemporary US Immigrant Women Writers
Chicanas/os in Contemporary Society
US Latina/o Theatre
Race, Ethnicity, Gender in Media
US Women of Color
Global Awareness (G)
AS
2200
British Life and Culture
AAST 2450
African Traditional Religions
AAST 2730
African Creativity and Ritual
AAST 3260
African Spirits in the New World
AAST 3670
African Diaspora
AECL 1000
Agroecology
AGEC 3860
Economics of World Food & Agriculture
AGEC 4280
International Food and Farm Cultures
AGEC 4880
International Agricultural Trade, Markets and Policy
AIR
4010
National Security Affairs I
AIST
4492
Indian Cultures of Latin America, 15th Century - Present
ANTH 1200
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1300
Introduction to Archaeology
ANTH 1450
World Archaeology
ANTH 2200
Understanding Cultures
ANTH 2730
African Creativity and Ritual
ANTH 3015
Introduction to the Music of the World’s Peoples
ARE
3030
History of Architecture
ART
2730
African Creativity and Ritual
ART
4650
International Art Studio, Turkey/India
BUSN 2000
Introduction to International Business
CHIN 3055
Business Chinese
CRMJ 4280
Comparative Criminal Justice
ECON 1000
Global Economic Issues
ECON 1300
Oil: Business, Culture, and Power
ECON 2400
Economics of the Environment
ENGL 3150
World Literature
ENR
2000
Environment and Society
ESS
3480
Environmental Change
FCSC 4181
Global Textile Marketplace
FREN 2140
Introduction to Reading
GEOG 1000
World Regional Geography
GEOG 1020
Introduction to Human Geography
62
University Studies 2003
GEOG
GEOG
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GERM
GERM
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HIST
HLSC
HLSC
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
INST
LANG
LIFE
MOLB
MUSC
NURS
NURS
PHIL
POLS
POLS
POLS
POLS
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RELI
RUSS
RUSS
SOC
SOC
SOC
SOC
3030
3480
1600
3600
3650
2140
3150
1320
1330
2040
2315
2320
3220
3275
4410
4350
4492
4100
4520
1060
1200
1330
2000
2230
2310
2350
3000
3100
3400
3860
4100
4110
4155
4175
4240
4250
4370
4680
3140
2002
4520
3015
4155
4175
3250
1200
2300
2310
4890
1000
2040
2050
2315
2320
2450
3275
3260
2140
3205
3000
3050
3100
4110
SOC
SOC
SOWK
SPAN
SPAN
THEA
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
WMST
Geography and Development
Environmental Change
Global Sustainability
Earth & Mineral Resources
Energy: A Geological Perspective
Introduction to Literature
German History and Culture
World History to 1750
World History from 1750
Imperial China
History of non-Western Religions
History of Islam
History of the Modern Middle East
World Christianities
America in an Early Modern World
Global History
Indian Cultures of Latin America, 15th Century - Present
Global Public Health
Public Health in Developing Countries
World Regional Geography
Non-Western Political Cultures
World History from 1750
Introduction to International Business
Introduction to Asian Studies
Introduction to International Relations
How the World Really Works
Social Change
Chinese Society
Politics and Society of Turkey
Economics of World Food & Agriculture
Global Public Health
Sociology of International Development
Women, War, and Health
Gender, Women, and Health
Global Sex Work and Trafficking
Economic Development in Asia
Global Political Economy
Shanghai: Past & Present
Anime: History and Culture
Global Ecology
Public Health in Developing Countries
Introduction of the Musics of the World’s Peoples
Women, War, and Health
Gender, Women, and Health
Global Justice
Non-Western Political Cultures
World Politics in the Post-Cold War Era
Introduction to International Relations
Seminar in Comparative Politics
Introduction to Religion
Religions of the Middle East
Religions of Asia
History of non-Western Religions
History of Islam
African Traditional Religions
World Christianities
African Spirits in the New World
Introduction to Reading
Russian Folklore and Folk Life
Social Change
Japanese Society
Chinese Society
Sociology of International Development
4370
4680
4881
2140
3120
2200
4155
4175
4240
4590
4520
4580
Global Political Economy
Shanghai: Past & Present
International Studies
Introduction to Literature
Survey of Spanish American Literature
Backgrounds of Dance
Women, War and Health
Gender, Women and Health
Global Sex Work and Trafficking
Women of India
Gender and Sexuality in Postcolonial Writing
Gender, Global Change, and Development
Intellectual Community (I)
AS
1000
Intellectual Community of Undeclared Students
AS
3105
From Gilgamesh to the Bomb
AAST 1030
Social Justice in the 21st Century
ACCT 1010
Principles of Accounting I
ADED 1000
Adult Education Inquiry
ADED 1008
Eastern Thought Western Practice
AGEC 1000
Agriculture and Applied Economics Orientation
AGRI 1001
Intellectual Community and Information Literacy in Agriculture
AGRI 3000
Discovering and Utilizing Ideas and Information
AIST
1030
Social Justice in the 21st Century
AMST 1030
Social Justice in the 21st Century
ANSC 1000
Intellectual Community in Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ANTH 1000
Intellectual Community in Anthropology
ART
1115
Digital Media
CHEM 1001
The Chemical Community
CHST 1030
Social Justice in the 21st Century
CNSL 1000
Relationship Skills: Counseling in Action
COJO 1001
Issues in the Mass Media
COJO 1041
Issues in Human Communication
CRMJ 1005
Issues in Criminal Justice
EDAD 1000
Schools and Democracy
EDEL 1000
Exploring Hot Topics in Education
EDSE 1000
Exploring Hot Topics in Secondary Education
EDST 1500
Education for Social Justice
ENGL 1030
Intellectual Community in Cinema, etc.
ENGL 1040
Introduction to Creative Writing
ENR
1100
Environment and Natural Resource Problems and Policies
ENR
1400
Biodiversity: Science and Society
ES
1000
Orientation to Engineering
ESS
1000
Wyoming in the Earth System
FCSC 1010
Perspectives in Family and Consumer Sciences
GEOL 1001
Intellectual Community/Earth Sciences
HIST 1010
Introduction to History: Encounters with Difference
HLSC 1010
Exploring the Health Sciences
HLSC 1020
Intellectual Community: Women in Sports
HP
1000
Intellectual Communities
INST 1010
International Studies Proseminar
ITEC 1000
Visual Literacy for Life and Learning
KIN
1004
Foundations of Physical Education
KIN
1005
Kinesiology, Health, and Teaching Physical Activity
LANG 1030
Intellectual Community in Cinema, etc.
LIFE
1001
Biology as Culture
MATH 1305
Bit Streams and Digital Dreams
MOLB 1010
Science and Society
MUSC 1003
Introduction to University Life as a Music Major
NURS 1000
Introduction to the Intellectual Community in Nursing
63
University Studies 2003
PATB
POLS
PSYC
PSYC
RELI
SOC
SOWK
SOWK
SPPA
THEA
THEA
UWYO
UWYO
UWYO
UWYO
WMST
WMST
WMST
1001
1111
1001
1111
1100
1100
1001
1002
1010
1020
1021
1000
1205
1450
1600
1020
1030
1090
Discovering Careers in Veterinary Medicine
Issues in Political Science
Issues in Psychology
Psychology and Social Justice
Worlds of Religion
Social Problems
Intellectual Community in Social Work
Intellectual Community: The Social Work Profession
Introduction to Communication Disorders
Theatre and Dance Intellectual Community
Freshman Seminar: Academic and Professional Issues in Dance
Intellectual Community of Undeclared Students
SSS Furst Year Seminar
Building Community, Affirming Diversity: Strategies for Success in College and Life
Veterans Transition Course
Intellectual Community: Women in Sports
Social Justice in the 21st Century
Women in Contemporary Society
Information Literacy (L)
AS
1000
Intellectual Community of Undeclared Students
ACCT 1020
Principles of Accounting II
AGEC 1000
Agriculture and Applied Economics Orientation
AGRI 1001
Intellectual Community and Information Literacy in Agriculture
AGRI 3000
Discovering and Utilizing Ideas and Information
ANSC 1000
Intellectual Community in Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ANTH 2000
Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
ART
1310
Sculpture I
BOT
3100
Plants and Civilization
BOT
4100
Writing in Biological Sciences
CHEM 1001
The Chemical Community
CNSL 1000
Relationship Skills: Counseling in Action
CNSL 2200
Introduction to Student Leadership
COJO 1001
Issues in the Mass Media
COJO 1041
Issues in Human Communication
CRMJ 1005
Issues in Criminal Justice
EDSE 1000
Exploring Hot Topics in Secondary Education
EDST 1500
Education for Social Justice
ENGL 4025
Writing for the Web
ENR
1100
Environment & Natural Resources Problems & Policies
ENR
1400
Biodiversity: Science and Society
ES
1000
Orientation to Engineering
ES
1002
Introduction to Engineering Information Literacy
ESS
1000
Wyoming in the Earth System
FCSC 1010
Perspectives in Family and Consumer Sciences
GEOG 2150
Foundations of Geographic Information Science and Technology
GEOL 1001
Intellectual Community/Earth Sciences
HIST 3020
Historical Methods/Introduction to Historical Methodology
HLSC 1010
Exploring the Health Sciences
HLSC 1020
Intellectual Community: Women in Sports
HP
1020
Freshman Honors Colloquium I
HP
1151
Freshman Honors Colloquium I
INST 1010
International Studies Proseminar
ITEC 1000
Visual Literacy for Life and Learning
ITEC 2360
Teaching with Microcomputers
KIN
1004
Foundations of Physical Education
KIN
1005
Kinesiology, Health, and Teaching Physical Activity
LBRY 3010
Research from a Distance
LBRY
LIFE
MOLB
MUSC
NURS
NURS
NURS
PHCY PATB
POLS
PSYC
SOC
SOWK
SOWK
SOWK
SPPA
THEA
THEA
UWYO
UWYO
UWYO
UWYO
WMST
WMST
ZOO
3020
1001
1010
1003
1000
4055
4125
6250
1001
1111
1001
1100
1001
1002
1900
1010
1020
1021
1000
1205
1450
1600
1020
1900
4100
Managing and Navigating the World of Information
Biology as Culture
Science and Society
Introduction to University Life as a Music Major
Introduction to the Intellectual Community in Nursing
Evidence-Based Nursing for the RN
Evidence-Based Nursing
Drug Literature Evaluation
Discovering Careers in Veterinary Medicine
Issues in Political Science
Issues in Psychology
Social Problems
Intellectual Community in Social Work
Intellectual Community: The Social Work Profession
Women and Leadership
Introduction to Communication Disorders
Theatre and Dance Intellectual Community
Freshman Seminar: Academic and Professional Issues in Dance
Intellectual Community of Undeclared Students
SSS Furst Year Seminar
Building Community, Affirming Diversity: Strategies for Success in College and Life
Veterans Transition Course
Intellectual Community: Women in Sports
Women and Leadership
Writing in Biological Sciences
ARMY
COJO
COJO
EDST
ENR
ERS
HP
PETE
PETE
SOWK
WMST
3010
1010
1020
3000
1000
1000
2020
4720
4735
1900
1900
Oral Communication (O)
Leadership and Tactics II
Public Speaking
Communication and Civic Engagement
Teacher as Practitioner
Energy and Society
Energy and Society
Freshman Honors Colloquim II
Petroleum Engineering Design I
Petroleum Engineering Design II
Women and Leadership
Women and Leadership
NURS
PEAC
3630
1001
Physical Activity and Health (P)
Nursing Therapeutics: Health Promotion
Physical Activity and Your Health
Quantitative Reasoning (QA)
MATH 1000
Problem Solving
MATH 1100
Number and Operations for Elementary School Teachers
MATH 1400
College Algebra
MATH 1405
Trigonometry
MATH 1450
Algebra and Trigonometry
ENR
ENR
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
SOC
STAT
STAT
STAT
STAT
64
4500
4510
1050
1105
2200
2350
2070
2000
2010
2050
2070
Quantitative Reasoning (QB)
Risk Analysis
Applied Risk Analysis
Finite Math
Math for Elementary School Teachers II
Calculus I
Business Calculus
Introductory Statistics for the Social Sciences
Statistics and the World
Statistical Concepts for Business and Management Science
Fundamentals of Statistics
Introductory Statistics for the Social Sciences
University Studies 2003
GEOL 1005
GEOL 1600
LIFE
1002
Natural Science - Integrated Science (S)
Earth History
Global Sustainability
Discovering Science
AECL
AECL
AECL
ANTH
ENR
ENTO
ENTO
KIN
KIN
LIFE
LIFE
LIFE
LIFE
PLNT
PLNT
PSYC
ZOO
ZOO
1000
2025
2026
1100
1200
1000
1001
2040
2041
1003
1010
1020
2002
2025
2026
4080
2040
2041
Natural Science - Biological (SB)
Agroecology
Horticultural Science
Horticultural Sciences Laboratory
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Environment
Insect Biology (no lab)
Insect Biology (with lab)
Human Anatomy
Human Anatomy Laboratory
Current Issues in Biology
General Biology
Life Science
Global Ecology
Horticultural Science
Horticultural Science Laboratory
Physiological Psychology
Human Anatomy
Human Anatomy Laboratory
AECL
ASTR
ASTR
ATSC
ENR
ESS
GEOG
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
GEOL
SOIL
2010
1050
1070
2000
1500
2000
1010
1070
1100
1200
1500
2000
2080
3080
3400
3600
3650
2010
Natural Science - Earth (SE)
Introduction to Soil Science
Survey of Astronomy
The Earth: Its Physical Environment
Introduction to Meteorology
Water, Dirt, and the Earth’s Environment
Geochemical Cylces and the Earth System
Introduction to Physical Geography
The Earth: Its Physical Environment
Introduction to Physical Geology
Historical Geology
Water, Dirt, and the Earth’s Environment
Foundations of Geology I
General Field Geology
General Field Geology
Geological Hazards
Earth & Mineral Resources
Energy: A Geological Perspective
Introduction to Soil Science
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
CHEM
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
PHYS
1000
1020
1030
1050
1060
1050
1090
1110
1120
1210
1220
1310
1320
Natural Science - Physical (SP)
Introductory Chemistry
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis I
General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis II
Concepts of Physics
Fundamentals of the Physical Universe
General Physics I
General Physics II
Engineering Physics I
Engineering Physics II
College Physics I
College Physics II
ECON
HIST
HIST
HIST
HP
POLS
1200
1211
1221
1251
1200
1000
ENGL 1010
HP
1020
U.S. and Wyoming Constitutions (V)
Economics, Law and Government
United States History to 1865
US from 1865
Wyoming History
US and Wyoming Government
American and Wyoming Government
Writing 1 (WA)
College Composition and Rhetoric
Freshman Honors Colloquium I
Writing 2 (WB)
AAST 2350
Introduction to African American Literature
AGEC 3400
Agricultural Law
AMST 2010
Introduction to American Studies
ANTH 3015
Introduction to the Music of the World’s Peoples
ANTH 3300
Ethnographic Methods in Anthropology
ARE
3210
Civil Engineering Materials
CE
3210
Civil Engineering Materials
CHE
3040
Unit Operations Laboratory I
CLAS 2020
Classical Greek Civilization
CLAS 2040
Classical Roman Civilization
COJO 2100
News Writing and Reporting
ECON 2400
Economics and the Environment
EDST 3000
Teacher as Practitioner
ENGL 2005
Writing in Technology and the Sciences
ENGL 2020
Introduction to Literature
ENGL 2125
Writing in Popular Genres
ENGL 2030
Critical Reading and Writing
ENGL 2035
Writing for Public Forums
ENGL 2350
Introduction to African American Literature
ENGL 2410
Literary Genres
ENR
4000
Approaches to Environment and Natural Resource Problem-Solving
ESS
3480
Environmental Change
FCSC 2170
Clothing in Modern Society
FREN 3050
Third Year French I
GEOG 3480
Environmental Change
GERM 3050
Third Year German I
GERM 4080
German-English and English-German Translation
HP
2020
Freshman Honors Colloquim II
HIST 3020
Historical Methods/Introduction to Historical Methodology
LANG 3140
Anime: History and Culture
MUSC 3015
Introduction of the Musics of the World’s Peoples
PETE 4720
Petroleum Engineering Design II
POLS 3500
Gender and Society
POLS 3600
American Political Thought
PSYC 2000
Research Methods in Psychology
REWM 4830
Ecological Applications for Wildlife Management
SOC
3500
Gender and Society
SPAN 3050
Intermediate Spanish Composition & Conversation
WMST 3500
Gender and Society
WMST 4400
Women and Work
65
University Studies 2003
AAST
AAST
ACCT
AECL
AGEC
AGEC
AGEC
AIST
AMST
AMST
ANSC
ANTH
BOT
CHE
COJO
COJO
COJO
COJO
CRMJ
ECON EDEL
EDEL
EDSE
EDSE
EDSE
EDSE
EDSE
EDSE
EDSE
EDSE
EDSE
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENR
4100
4233
4600
4990
4950
4960
4965
4460
4051
4985
4630
4010
4100
4080
3160
4100
4110
4233
4280
4240
4309
4409
3278
4254
4270
4271
4272
4273
4275
4276
4277
4000
4010
4025
4075
4460
4990
4051
Writing 3 (WC)
African American Religious Culture
Race, Gender, Ethnicity in the Media
Ethics and Professionalism
Agroecology Seminar
Senior Thesis I
Senior Thesis II
Agribusiness Strategy and Ethics Capstone
American Indian Literature
Environmental Politics and Administration
Senior Seminar
Topics and Issues in Animal Science
History of Anthropological Thought
Writing in Biological Sciences
Process Design II
Theory of Language and Society
Investigative Reporting
Feature Writing Seminar
Race, Gender, Ethnicity in the Media
Comparative Criminal Justice
History of Economic Thought
Elementary Literacy Methods
Elementary Math/Science Methods
Subject Matter Specific Methods I: Secondary Agriculture Education
Becoming a Reflective Practitioner: Specific Pedagogy in Music
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary English Education
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Mathematics Education
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Art Education K-12
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Social Studies Education
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Science
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Modern Language Education
Subject Matter Specific Methods II: Secondary Industrial Technology Education
21st Century Issues in Professional Writing
Technical Writing in the Professions
Writing for the Web
Writing for Non-Profits
American Indian Literature
Senior Seminar
Environmental Politics and Administration
ENR
4900
Environment and Natural Resources Assessment Practice
ERS
4900
Energy Resource Management Capstone
ESE
4070
Energy Systems Design II
ESS
4950
Exploring the Earth System
FCSC 4127
Directing Preschool and Day Care Programs
FCSC 4182
Textile Industry and the Environment
FREN 4140
17th Century French Literature
GEOG 4051
Environmental Politics and Administration
GEOG 4540
Topics in Cultural Ecology
GEOL 3080
General Field Geology
GEOL 4820
Capstone
GERM 3006
20TH Century German Culture and Civilization
HIST 4030
Departmental Proseminar
INST 4110
Sociology of International Development
INST 4950
Capstone
KIN
3015
Teaching Lab II and Assessment in Physical Education
ME
4070
System Design II
MOLB 4300
Writing in Molecular Biology
NURS 4125
Evidence-Based Nursing
NURS 4255
Nursing Leadership
PETE 4735
Petroleum Engineering Design II
PHCY 6250
Drug Literature Evaluation
PHYS 4690
Science Fact, Fiction and Future
POLS 4051
Environmental Politics and Administration
POLS 4850
Seminar in American Politics and Institutions
POLS 4890
Seminar in Comparative Politics
PSYC 4050
Experimental Psychology
PSYC 4220
Psychopharmacology
PSYC 4740
Advanced Social Psychology
PSYC 4830
Senior Thesis in Psychology
RELI 4000
Theories of Religion
RELI 4100
African American Religious Culture
REWM 4051
Environmental Politics and Administration
REWM 4900
Rangeland Management Planning
SOC
3090
Social Research Methods
SOC
4110
Sociology of International Development
SOC
4650
Urban Sociology
SOWK 4570
Social Work Research Project
SPAN 4200
Introduction to Research
SPPA
4750
Research Methods in Communication Disorders
THEA 4200
20th Century Dance
THEA 4330
History of American Musical Theatre
THEA 4930
Theatre History I
WMST 4233
Race, Gender, Ethnicity in the Media
WMST 4700
Feminist Theories and Methodologies
ZOO
4100
Writing in Biological Sciences
66
Division of Student Affairs
Sara Axelson, Vice President, Student Affairs
408 Old Main, (307) 766-5123, Fax: (307) 766-2696
T
he Division of Student Affairs is the administrative unit of the university that is responsible for providing leadership and coordination
of programs and services designed to support student learning and
development in and outside the classroom.
International Students and Scholars
Jill Johnson, Associate Director of Admissions
Cheney International Center, Suite 5, (307) 766-5193
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/ISS
In partnership with UW faculty, staff, and students, the Division
of Student Affairs orchestrates the enrollment management departments of the University to recruit and retain a student body of the size
and diversity appropriate to the needs of the state, the demands of the
world of work, and the resources of the institution. The division also
develops and delivers services, programs, and facilities that promote
the intellectual, personal, cultural, and civic development of students;
coordinates efforts to create a caring community in which individuals
are respected, encouraged to pursue excellence, and achieve their potential; and fosters honoring the diversity of individuals and cultures.
International students, numbering over 850 from nearly 90 countries, are a vital part of international education at the University of
Wyoming. As such, International Students and Scholars (ISS) works
to promote an interchange of ideas and understanding from among all
of the countries represented on campus. ISS is responsible for recruitment of international students and provides advising and counseling to
all international students/scholars for their academic, social, personal,
and immigration concerns. The office also promotes and implements
social and cultural activities for international awareness and educational exchange through International Education Week, Friendship
Families, American Conversation Club, international coffee hours,
and other special programs. Many of these activities are coordinated
through the ISS-sponsored International Resource Center in the Cheney
International Center, Room 1.
There are three service clusters within the Division of Student
Affairs which include Enrollment Management; Health and Wellness;
and Residence Life, Dining Services, and the Wyoming Union. The
Enrollment Management cluster consists of the Admissions Office;
Center for Advising and Career Services; Office of the Registrar; Student
Educational Opportunity which includes University Disability Support
Services; and Office of Student Financial Aid. The Health and Wellness
cluster includes Campus Recreation; the Dean of Students Office
which includes Multicultural Affairs; Student Health Service; and the
University Counseling Center which includes the university’s drug and
alcohol education program. The third cluster consists of Residence Life,
Dining Services, and the Wyoming Union. The Associated Students of
the University of Wyoming (ASUW) is also a part of the Division of
Student Affairs and is an essential component of the support services
structure designed to help students succeed.
International students and visitors are required to contact
International Students and Scholars to confirm their arrival at the
University of Wyoming and to consider the office their primary contact
for further information and assistance. Students must be enrolled as
full-time students each semester as required by the U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration Services. The ISS e-mail address is [email protected]
National Student Exchange: The University of Wyoming is a member
of the National Student Exchange (NSE) consortium. Through NSE,
students are provided an opportunity to attend one of more than 175
U.S. institutions in the NSE consortium. NSE offers a student the
chance to live in another part of the United States and to travel and
experience college life in different settings for an academic semester
or a year under his or her normal UW tuition and fees. Financial aid is
often available and academic credit is guaranteed to transfer back to UW.
Enrollment Management
Admissions Office
For more information about the National Student Exchange, please
contact International Students and Scholars, Cheney International
Center, Suite 5 or call (307) 766-5193. The e-mail address is [email protected]
uwyo.edu.
Shelley Dodd, Director of Admissions
150 Knight Hall, (307) 766-5160
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/admissions
A new undergraduate student’s first official contact with the
University of Wyoming is often through the Admissions Office. This
unit is responsible for recruiting/admitting undergraduate students to
the university. Responsibilities include the development of effective
school relations, programs with high schools and community colleges, recruitment of prospective freshmen and undergraduate transfer
students, the orientation of new undergraduates, and the administration of resident/nonresident regulations for tuition classification. The
Admissions Office determines initial scholarship eligibility for all
new undergraduate students. This office also facilitates the admission
process for graduate students. The Admissions Office also manages
the International Students and Scholars office. A detailed description
of admission to the university and procedures can be found in the
admission policies section of this publication.
Center for Advising and Career Services
Jo Chytka, Director
222 Knight Hall, (307) 766-2398
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/CACS
The Center for Advising and Career Services (CACS) provides
a variety of services to UW students, including advising undecided
students, and A&S undeclared students; providing academic support
to various populations of probationary, conditionally admitted, and
reinstated students; assisting students campus-wide with their career
exploration, planning, and job search needs; assisting in coordinating
discussions, information dissemination, and event planning between
the various professional advisors and advising offices on campus; and
coordinating national tests and exams through the University Testing
Center in Knight Hall, Room 4.
67
Division of Student Affairs
CACS is committed to providing a comprehensive and integrated
service that moves a student along a continuum of receiving academic
advising, exploring academic and career options, selecting a college
major, and finally, implementing his/her degree in the world of work.
Student Educational Opportunity (SEO)
Undeclared students and A&S students admitted with support,
placed on probation, or reinstated to the university are highly encouraged to meet with a CACS career counselor. The purpose of this meeting is to analyze the student’s past academic progress and future career
goals to develop a strategic plan to maximize his/her academic success
and future employment opportunities. CACS also works closely with
other campus offices and departments to engage students in available
study skill and tutorial resources.
Student Educational Opportunity is composed of both on-campus
and outreach projects with offices throughout Wyoming. These projects serve students who are first generation; income-eligible; students
with cognitive, psychological or physical disabilities; ethnic minority
students; and non-traditional students. SEO assists eligible students
to plan and prepare for entry into higher education, succeed in the
higher education environment, and graduate from college by providing
academic success services, disability-related accommodations when appropriate, and instruction in basic skills, career, and personal development. All projects within SEO seek to increase the public awareness of
the needs of ethnic minority, first generation, income-eligible students,
and students with disabilities in an educational environment.
Pilar Flores, Director
330 Knight Hall, (307) 766-6189 (TTY: 307-766-3073)
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/SEO
Students interested in engaging in career exploration activities may
make an appointment to meet with a career counselor to discuss their
career goals and/or confirm their choice of major. Various assessment
tools that provide feedback on the match between a student’s interests
or personality type and the world of work, are available. CACS career
specialists provide information pertaining to a broad range of career
fields, internship opportunities, specific employer information, general
job search strategies, and federal government application processes.
On-Campus Projects
McNair Scholars Program: The McNair Scholars Program prepares
students to pursue doctoral level study. Services include intensive
academic support including tutoring and academic counseling; activities related to successful application to graduate school and pursuit
of financial aid opportunities; preparation for the GRE; and faculty
mentoring. The capstone of the program is a paid summer research
internship program which prepares students for admission to graduate
level education. Students who are juniors and seniors, income-eligible
and first generation college students, or who are from ethnic minority
groups underrepresented in graduate education qualify for program
services. The McNair Scholars Project is a federally funded TRIO
project. Note: this is a graduate school preparation program; it is not
a scholarship program.
Students are advised on how to use the UW2Career database on
the CACS homepage to find out about and apply for summer, internship, and permanent job opportunities. Each year numerous employer
representatives from business, industry, health care, education, and
government visit CACS to interview students for these types of opportunities. All information pertaining to these visits is contained in
the eRecruiting link on the CACS homepage. Students need to register
with CACS to obtain their username and password.
CACS hosts numerous general and specialized job fairs each year
for students and alumni. Upcoming job fair dates can be found on the
CACS homepage.
Student Success Services: The Student Success Services (SSS) project
offers academic support to students who are first generation college
students, income-eligible, and/or individuals with disabilities. Student
Success Services provides assistance with academics, personal/social
choices, financial issues and pursuit of financial aid opportunities,
and choice of college major and related career opportunities. The SSS
project also provides its students with individual and group tutoring.
All services are free to eligible participants and services are intended
to help students be successful in college and to stay in college through
graduation. SSS is a federally funded TRIO project.
The University Testing Center: The University Testing Center coordinates national tests and exams and is housed in the Knight Hall
basement, Room 4. Students may register to take national tests and
professional school entrance exams. Information is available on the
University Testing Center web site www.uwyo.edu/UTC or by calling
(307) 766-2188.
Office of the Registrar
Lane Buchanan, Interim Registrar
167 Knight Hall, (307) 766-5272
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/registrar
University Disability Support Services: University Disability Support
Services (UDSS) provides a variety of services for students with physical, sensory, cognitive, or psychological disabilities including printed
materials in alternative format, note-taking assistance, classroom relocation, testing accommodations, access to adaptive computers, parking
assistance, advocacy, sign language interpreters, real-time transcribing,
mobility orientation for the blind, as well as other academic support
services. UDSS assists UW to meet its legal and ethical obligations under
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990. Services are coordinated with the efforts of
the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and Wyoming Services for
the Visually Impaired, when appropriate. Students with disabilities
who anticipate needing accommodations to fully participate in classes
and programs at the University of Wyoming are strongly encouraged
to register with UDSS and provide documentation of their disability.
The Office of the Registrar is responsible for overseeing course
registration, transcripts, verification of enrollment, adding/dropping/
withdrawing from courses, and for maintaining student academic records. This involves responsibility for web registration, as well as preparation and electronic publication of the fall and spring Class Schedules,
Summer Bulletin, and University Catalog. The office is also responsible
for the electronic degree audit program, graduate record processing,
and for determining whether or not students have successfully met
all degree requirements. Additionally, this office evaluates all transfer
credit for undergraduate students to determine transferability as well
as UW equivalents.
68
Division of Student Affairs
Office of Student Financial Aid
Outreach Projects
Kathy Bobbitt, Interim Director
174 Knight Hall, (307) 766-2118
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/SFA
Educational Opportunity Center: The Educational Opportunity Center
(EOC) assists first generation and income-eligible adults throughout
Wyoming to continue their education. Services include assistance with
college and financial aid applications, career and college exploration, and
GED preparation. Outreach offices are located in Casper, Cheyenne,
Ethete, Evanston, Powell, Riverton, and Sheridan. EOC is a federally
funded TRIO project.
The Office of Student Financial Aid assists students in obtaining
funds to attend the University of Wyoming by coordinating and administering all forms of financial assistance to students. Four broad categories of aid are available: scholarships, grants, loans, and work-study emGEAR-UP Wyoming: The Wyoming Statewide GEAR-UP project ployment. Over 1,000 different scholarship programs, funded through
provides services to 2,000 income-eligible pre-college students through- federal, state, institutional, and private sources, are coordinated. Federal
out the state each year.  Student services include career exploration, Pell, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are
advising and supporting students in taking a college preparation cur- available to undergraduate students with significant financial need, who
riculum, college preparation, ACT preparation, college exploration, are pursuing a first bachelor’s degree. Hathaway Scholarships, Federal
application, and planning, and assistance with financial aid processes Perkins, Federal Direct and Federal Direct PLUS Loans are available
and procedures. Student services are provided through GEAR-UP to qualified students. Federal Work‑Study employment is available to
coordinators located at each of Wyoming’s seven community colleges.  students with a qualifying level of financial need. For additional inforThe GEAR-UP grant also works with the Wyoming Department of mation, please refer to the Student Financial Aid section in this catalog.
Education in providing teacher training and school improvement
initiatives.  All GEAR-UP services are aimed at increasing student Health and Wellness
academic preparation and performance levels suited for post-secondary
education, rates of high school graduation, rates of post-secondary Campus Recreation
education participation and graduation, and GEAR-UP student and Pat Moran, Director
family knowledge of post-secondary education options, high school Half Acre Recreation and Wellness Center
Phone: (307) 766-3370
preparation needs, and means of financing.
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/Rec
Upward Bound Math/Science: The Upward Bound Math/Science
Our mission is to provide recreational opportunities to a diverse
Program (UBMS) provides services to income-eligible and first generacampus
community that enhance the learning and workplace environtion 9th through 12th grade high school students throughout Wyoming.
ment
and
promote mental and physical health via quality facilities,
UBMS is designed to generate the skills and motivation necessary to
equipment,
and programs. Our programs, which include open recrebe successful in high school and to complete a college degree program
ation,
intramural
sports, club sports, and the outdoor program, offer
in a math or science area. Assistance with high school coursework and
a
broad
range
of
coordinated
activities for individuals and groups that
tasks related to college enrollment are provided throughout the acapromote
health
awareness,
a
sense
of community and a lifelong appredemic year. The UBMS program includes a six-week summer academic
ciation
for
wellness
and
recreational
activities. Supporting the value
session with an intensified math and science curriculum that includes
of
student
development,
our
programs
strive to offer opportunities
performing active research under the guidance of university staff and
to
students
that
develop
leadership
skills
and promote responsibilgraduate students. UBMS is a federally funded TRIO project.
ity while maintaining a balance between personal, professional, and
Upward Bound: The Upward Bound program works with income- academic pursuits.
eligible, first generation high school students (grades 9-12) and their
families to help them gain the skills and motivation necessary to suc- Open Recreation
cessfully complete high school and to pursue a college degree. The Half Acre Recreation and Wellness Center, First Floor
program includes a six-week summer academic component designed to Phone: (307) 766-3370
help students develop academically and socially in a university setting.
The Open Recreation program is housed primarily in newly renoTutorial and enrichment services are provided throughout the academic
year and participants and their families receive individualized assistance vated Half Acre Recreation and Wellness Center with additional recrein completing tasks related to successful college enrollment. Outreach ational opportunities in the Corbett building on the east campus. UW’s
offices are located in Albany, Fremont, Laramie, and Natrona counties. Open Recreation program, available to the entire student population,
faculty, staff and spouses, provides quality equipment for individuals
Upward Bound is a federally funded TRIO project.
to participate in non-organized, informal activities such as basketball,
volleyball, racquetball, or badminton. Patrons can also take advantage of
swimming, weight training, aerobic training, personal training services,
and group fitness and instructional classes. For more information on
the open recreation program, stop by the Member Services window
in the lobby of Half Acre, pick up a Campus Recreation brochure, or
visit the Campus Recreation web site.
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Division of Student Affairs
Dean of Students Office
Intramural Sports
Half Acre Recreation and Wellness Center, Second Floor
Phone: (307) 766-4175
Sean Blackburn, Dean of Students and Associate Vice
President for Student Affairs
128 Knight Hall, (307) 766-3296
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/DOS
UW’s Intramural Sports program offers organized individual and
team competitive sport events in men’s, women’s, and co-recreational
leagues. Students and employees can participate in organized recreation
level sport competition in approximately 30 activities per semester such
as flag football, soccer, inner-tube water polo, wrestling, badminton,
basketball, volleyball, or table tennis. Information is available from the
Rec Sports Office or on the Campus Recreation web site. Every member
of the university community is encouraged to become familiar with
the many aspects of intramural sports, which are designed to encourage participation and socialization regardless of previous experiences,
sport skills, or group affiliation. Come alone or with a group to sign
up for a fun time.
The Dean of Students Office (DOS) provides a variety of UW student support services. The staff in DOS work to enhance the quality of
life for all UW students. Assistance with situational needs and student
life concerns of individual students and groups of students regarding
their personal, academic, and/or social welfare are coordinated by the
DOS staff.
Several offices and programs comprise the Dean of Students
Office. These include the Dean of Students, Multicultural Affairs,
STOP Violence Program, Student Legal Services, welfare check, and
Student Judicial Affairs, all located in Knight Hall. Fraternity and
Sorority Life, Multicultural Resource Center, Rainbow Resource Center,
Nontraditional Student Center, Women’s Center, and Student Media
offices are located in the Wyoming Union. The Veterans Services
Center is located in 241 Knight Hall.
Club Sports
Half Acre Recreation and Wellness Center, Second Floor
Phone: (307) 766-6396
The Club Sports program offers a higher level of athletic sport
competition than Open Recreation and Intramural Sports to UW
students. Some of the current UW Club Sport teams for men and
women include badminton, baseball, volleyball, soccer, ice hockey,
rugby, cycling, Nordic ski racing, lacrosse, softball, racquetball, fencing, cricket, water polo, tennis, triathlon and equestrian. UW faculty
or staff with an interest in coaching or officiating a club sport should
contact the Rec Sports office. Visit our web site for more information
on Club Sport teams and activities.
Services available through the Dean of Students Office include individual advisement and consultation regarding situational student life
concerns; referral coordination with other university and community
services; conflict resolution and consultation regarding student conduct,
rights, and responsibilities; advisement in grievance procedures, due
process, and student appeals of disputed decisions; official university
withdrawals; and authorized absences and emergency contacts.
DOS staff also have responsibilities as advisers to ASUW and/
or student organizations including Panhellenic and Interfraternity
Councils, ASUW Nontraditional Student Council, United Multicultural
Council, and Freshman Senate.
Outdoor Program
Half Acre Recreation and Wellness Center, First Floor
Phone: (307) 766-2402
The professional staff provide direct assistance to students and
groups at any time in the student’s career at the university. Information,
individual advisement and consultation, and assistance with administrative procedures are facilitated in the Knight Hall offices.
UW’s Outdoor Program (OP) offers a variety of outdoor experiences as well as training to use the brand new indoor climbing and
bouldering wall. Participants have opportunities to develop lifetime
recreational skills, gain an appreciation and concern for our natural
environment, and meet new people. OP sponsors a variety of seasonal
programs and outings throughout the year. These activities range
from day and weekend trips to nearby destinations to extended trips at
unique destinations. OP also runs clinics and sponsors guest speakers,
presentations, and other educational programs. Activities are offered
for all skill levels through such venues as back country ski outings, trail
running, snowshoe outings, back country hiking and camping trips, or
rock climbing. OP provides an extensive line of rental equipment to
the campus community. The Outdoor Program staff is ready to expose
the university community to a whole new realm of experiences not
available anywhere else on campus. Visit the office or our web site for
more information on OP activities and services.
Fraternity and Sorority Life: The fraternities and sororities at UW
provide a living/learning environment designed to support the goals
of their members. Through intentional educational programs, the FSL
program coordinator facilitates personal growth, scholastic achievement, and leadership development, and is available for individual and
group consultation. STOP Violence Program: The mission of the STOP Violence Program
is to prevent domestic/relationship violence, sexual assault, and stalking
on the campus of the University of Wyoming. Awareness and prevention efforts are provided by this office through outreach and educational activities. The coordinator works closely with the University
Counseling Center (UCC), Campus Police (UWPD), Residence Life,
and other offices to provide programs.
Another focus of the STOP Violence Program is to provide support and resources to students affected by violence. One resource is
an on-campus advocate who can help a student access services through
university departments and/or community agencies. Support is also
offered by providing information to these students, their friends, and
families, about the effects of domestic/relationship violence, stalking,
or sexual assault. Walk-in hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, (307)
766-3296. For after hours emergencies, please call (307) 745-3556 (the
Albany County Safe Project).
70
Division of Student Affairs
Multicultural Resource Center (MRC) - the place for personal
and intellectual exploration on academic excellence, student leadership
& advocacy, inter-cultural awareness, and diversity.
Student Conduct, Rights and Responsibilities: The Trustees, as a governing body of the university, are charged with the statutory duty and
authority to make all rules and regulations including the administrative
responsibility to regulate and control whatever conduct and behavior
of the members of the university community impedes, obstructs, or
threatens the achievement of the educational goals and mission of the
university. The university community, in order to function in an orderly and creative manner, ascribes to a code of conduct to which the
student must adhere. This information, entitled Student Code of Conduct,
is distributed to each student who is granted admission to the university. This information and other university regulations are published
in order to inform students of their rights and responsibilities and the
minimum ethical standard of conduct expected of them as members of
the university community. Additional copies of this information may
be obtained at the Dean of Students Office or on the web.
Located in Room 103 of the Wyoming Union, the MRC is a space
provided by Multicultural Affairs which serves as a home-away-fromhome for UW students. The MRC offers support services for students
from all backgrounds in an environment that values diversity.
Numerous events take place at the MRC during the course of the
year. Please join us for our Monthly Town Hall Meetings, Recognized
Student Organization (RSO) events, and special presentations by guests
who visit the UW campus.
The MRC houses collections of ethnic magazines, books and videos that have a focus on culture, diversity and academics. The MRC
also provides access to eight computers, printers (black and white/
color), study tables, a flat screen TV, and some of the most comfortable couches in the Wyoming Student Union. For more information
call (307) 766-6463.
Student Media Office: The Student Media Office is partially funded
by student fees. It meets the informative, educational, and cultural
needs of the university community through such publications as The
Branding Iron (the daily student newspaper published Tuesday-Friday and
weekly during the summer session), the literary magazine Owen Wister
Review (published spring semester), and the feature magazine Frontiers
(published fall and spring semesters) which are published under the
auspices of the Board for Student Media.
Nontraditional and Gender Programs
Dolores Cardona, Ph.D., Associate Dean of Students
Dean of Students Office
114 Knight Hall, (307)766-6228
Nontraditional & Gender Programs, part of the Dean of Students
Office, serve nontraditional students, women students, and LGBTQIA
students through three student centers with peer connections and programming aimed at helping students to be successful at UW.
The board is composed of students, faculty, staff, and selected
members of the Wyoming Press Association. These publications provide an excellent opportunity for students to gain valuable experience
in newspaper, magazine, advertising, sales, and production.
Nontraditional Student Center: The Nontraditional Student Center
(NSC) serves as a supportive student center conveniently located in
Wyoming Union 104 (766-6258) where nontraditional students or adult
learners gather to study, use computers, socialize, meet other students,
have an adult conversation, and find out information and resources
for financial aid and scholarships, community services, and academic
support while at UW. The NSC is also a location where many UW
commuter students meet and work from while on the Laramie campus.
Nontraditional students are students over 25 years of age, married,
single parents, veterans, commuters, or students returning to college
after several years away. For more information, visit the web site at
www.uwyo.edu/ntscenter. For more information about student publications, contact the
Student Media Office, Room 302, Wyoming Union, (307) 766-6190.
Student Legal Services: Legal services are provided to University of
Wyoming students by a full-time attorney. This service is provided
through student fees to ASUW, and there is no additional charge for the
attorney’s time. The attorney assists students seeking advice in connection with personal legal problems. Information is readily available on a
variety of subjects. Student Legal Services also facilitates the effective
and prompt handling of legal referrals, (307) 766-6347.
Multicultural Affairs
Conrad Chavez, Manager, Multicultural Affairs
Dean of Students Office
117 Knight Hall, (307) 766-6193
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/oma
Women’s Center: Women’s leadership and women’s issues are also of
concern to the Women’s Center, regardless if you are a traditional or
nontraditional undergraduate or graduate woman student. Programs like
Women in Math, Science, and Engineering (WIMSE) are offered along
with other programming of interest to women. Student computers and
resources are available in Union 102 (766-6797). For more information,
visit the web site at www.uwyo.edu/womenscenter.
Multicultural Affairs (MA) exemplifies its commitment to diversity
and academic success through its various programs to provide academic
and social support to ethnic minorities and all students interested in
diversity and multiculturalism on the UW campus.
Rainbow Resource Center: The Rainbow Resource Center (RRC) serves
as a resource for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQIA)
students, faculty and staff, their family and friends as well as the larger
Laramie community. The RRC provides support, advocacy, education, the facilitation of programs, and a library of over 800 books on
LGBTQIA issues. The center also has many other resources, including
magazine titles, movies, network-connected computers with printing,
and references to other services that are queer-friendly. Students gather
to study, relax, and socialize in a safe environment. The RRC is located
in Union 106. For more information, call (307) 766-3478 or visit the
web site at www.uwyo.edu/rrc.
From academic programming consisting of our Discover Excellence
and Continuing Excellence workshop series, a tutoring program,
scholarship opportunities and individual meetings with staff, academic
success can be achieved.
Socially, MA works to connect students with one of over 20 culturally diverse recognized student organizations as well as our own
Multicultural Student Leadership Initiative program. Home to the
Multicultural Resource Center, students can come and experience enhanced learning through gaining a greater self-understanding, advocacy
in support of diversity, learning to appreciate individual similarities
and differences, and enhancing feelings of engagement, belonging,
and loyalty.
71
Division of Student Affairs
Veterans Services Center
Marty Martinez
Dean of Students Office
241 Knight Hall, (307)766-6908
a summer fee for SHS. Students not enrolled for summer but who were
enrolled spring semester and are pre-registered for fall semester may
pay the same summer fee to be eligible to use the SHS. Payment of the
fee provides visits with clinicians and nurses at no cost. Affordable
laboratory diagnostic procedures, medications, and office procedures
are available. There are also nominal charges for supplies such as ace
bandages, splints, crutches, and other medical devices. A consultant
nutritionist is also available.
Located in Knight Hall 241, the Veterans Services Center has
resources, a computer lab, a lounge area, and a social “mess area”
where veterans and their dependents, spouses, and friends can meet
and support each other. Special events, programs, and student groups
are coordinated out of the center. The staff works to improve access
to and success in college for students who are veterans. For more
information, call (307) 766-6908 or visit the web site at http://www.
uwyo.edu/vetservices/.
The hours of the Student Health Service can be found on our
web site. An after-hours nurse advice line is available when the SHS
is closed at night and on weekends by calling (307) 766-2130. All
students are urged to have adequate health insurance coverage for illnesses or emergency visits to the local hospital, urgent care clinic, or a
physician’s office when the Student Health Service is closed. Insurance
coverage is also recommended for medical care that is not available
at the Student Health Service, including treatment of major injuries,
surgery, and hospitalization. The student is responsible for all charges
for services provided by persons or institutions outside of the Student
Health Service.
Associated Students of the University of Wyoming
(ASUW)
020 Wyoming Union, (307) 766-5204
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/ASUW
The Associated Students of the University of Wyoming (ASUW) is
comprised of three branches: the Executive, Legislative, and Judicial.
All full-time, fee-paying students are members of ASUW. Officers
and 30 senators are elected annually by the students, and each senator
represents one of the seven colleges. They meet weekly to consider
areas of concern to students.
University Counseling Center
Keith Evashevski, Psy.D., Director
341 Knight Hall, (307) 766-2187
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/UCC
The ASUW student government represents student opinion to the
administration, faculty, staff, and State of Wyoming legislature. ASUW
participation across the university ensures that university policies are
made with the concerns of students in mind. In addition, the ASUW
president serves as an ex-officio (non-voting) member of the University
of Wyoming Board of Trustees and conveys student opinion to the
institution’s highest governing body.
ASUW also provides their own programs and services for students. Included in these programs are ASTEC (technical services),
located in the Wyoming Union; Student Legal Services in Knight
Hall; and several councils: Freshman Senate, Non-Tradiational Student
Council, Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, and the United
Multicultural Council.
Student Health Service
Joanne Steane, M.D., Director
Student Health Building, (307) 766-2130
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/ShSer
The Student Health Service (SHS) provides personalized health
care to eligible students by maintaining a high quality medical outpatient clinic. The clinic provides primary health care, health education,
and preventive services to enable students to complete their course of
studies. The professional staff consists of four physicians, one nurse
practitioner, a psychiatric nurse practitioner, one physician assistant, two registered pharmacists, and registered nurses, in addition to other
professional and administrative personnel.
Undergraduate and professional full-time students taking 12 or
more credit hours and graduate students taking 9 or more hours are
eligible for services at the SHS. Undergraduate and graduate part-time
students who have purchased the Optional Student Fee Package are
also eligible. Enrollment in, or waiver from, the University of Wyoming
Student Medical Insurance Program has no effect on eligibility to use
the Student Health Service. Students enrolled during the summer pay
72
The University Counseling Center (UCC) provides comprehensive,
time-effective mental health services to the university students and consultation on issues with parents, staff, and faculty. The UCC is a
resource center for students to enhance personal success skills in dealing
with the challenging and sometimes stressful university environment.
The professional UCC staff work together with students to help them
find effective ways to approach concerns and problems. Students are
supported in learning to make healthy lifestyle choices that promote
their personal, social, and academic goals. Group and individual
counseling services, in a professional and confidential atmosphere, are
provided to students with personal and interpersonal concerns. Other
services include crisis intervention, walk-in consultation, and education to the UW community. Individual counseling appointments are
made in person during regular office hours, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (summer
hours: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) Monday through Friday. The UCC offers
walk-in services, various hours a day, when students may simply walk
in to be seen for a brief appointment, to determine future services
they might need. Counseling services are free to UW students. For
after-hour emergencies, students can talk to an on-call counselor by
calling 766-8989.
Campus Consultation and Outreach: UCC staff consults with academic
and student services personnel, student leaders, and university administration regarding counseling and mental health issues and ways to
better the UW living/learning environment. Outreach programs can
be initiated by student or staff request or by UCC staff bringing issues
of concern to various campus populations. Some current issues include
destigmatizing mental health, suicide prevention, respect for diversity,
sexual orientation issues, and stress management. Generally, UCC
asks for a minimum of two weeks notice for an outreach presentation;
however, in urgent situations triggered by trauma, outreach programs
will be offered on a shorter notice. The Center hosts the Lifesavers
Coalition - a group of campus and community partners who have an
interest in training others in the skills of suicide prevention, and also
have a focus on how to be proactive with wellness.
Division of Student Affairs
The residence halls also provide several additional services to our
students:
UCC collaborates closely with the STOP Violence Program in the
Dean of Students Office by providing counseling support to students
who are victims of sexual violence as well as collaborative programming
regarding prevention of sexual violence and membership with Campus
Coalition for the Prevention of Sexual and Relationship Violence.
AWARE (Alcohol Wellness Alternatives, Research and Education): The
AWARE Program is committed to a healthy campus community and
a drug-free learning environment. AWARE Program staff utilize best
practices in providing drug and alcohol education and prevention programming for the University of Wyoming campus and community. The
AWARE Program promotes a standard of wellness in regard to healthy
choices surrounding alcohol use and the prevention of illicit drug use
by college students. To achieve these goals, the AWARE Program
offers a broad range of services ranging from individual interventions
to consultative and educational services for campus groups and the
community at large. AWARE also coordinates the Cowboy UP Peer
Education group. Additionally, the AWARE Program coordinates the
A-Team, a campus-community coalition dedicated to reducing underage and excessive alcohol use. For more information, please visit the
web site at www.uwyo.edu/aware or feel free to contact via telephone
at (307) 766-2187, email ([email protected]), or in person by visiting
341 Knight Hall.
•
Laundry facilities on-site in each hall
•
On-site computer labs and study rooms
•
Mail service
•
Free tutoring in the Student Learning Center
•
24-hour emergency custodial & maintenance services
•
Upgraded cable TV that includes channels like ESPN U, HBO,
The Sundance Channel, and your own HBO GO account
Room assignments are made according to the date the completed
contract form is received. The housing deposit is included in the enrollment confirmation deposit paid by new UW students. Students
returning to UW who wish to live in the residence halls must pay the
housing deposit when they complete their housing contract. Hall,
roommate, and other preferences may be indicated on the contract and
will be considered. Students wishing to room together should submit
contracts together prior to the posted deadline of May 1.
New Student Live-in Policy: The UW Trustees have established
a policy requiring all new students to live in the UW residence halls
during their first academic year on campus and to take a minimum of
the 12-accesses-per-week dining plan. The policy is based on extensive
student development research indicating that a student’s chance of
academic success and satisfaction with the college experience greatly
improves through the residential living experience.
Residence Life, Dining Services, and
Wyoming Union
Residence Life & Dining Services
For a student to be considered for an exemption to the policy, a
request with appropriate documentation must be sent to Residence Life
& Dining Services, Dept. 3394, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY
82071. Students will be considered exempt from the policy if they can
provide documentation for one of the following:
Eric Webb, Executive Director, Residence Life, Dining
Services, and the Wyoming Union
Washakie Center, Lower Level, (307) 766-3175
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/reslife-dining
Residence Life & Dining Services is committed to providing clean,
comfortable and affordable housing and dining, with the belief that
these elements are an essential component of a student’s education,
personal growth, and college experience.
•
21 years of age or older
•
Married
•
Single parent with custody of child(ren)
The university operates seven furnished residence halls, a variety of
furnished and unfurnished apartments, as well as Washakie Center, nine
on-campus dining establishments and University Catering and Events.
•
Reside with parent(s) or legal guardian(s) within a 60-mile
radius of Laramie or in a property purchased by parent(s)
or
legal guardian(s)
Residence Halls: The residence halls provide convenient living, studying, educational programming & social activities and dining accommodations for the university community. Various living environments
are available. Full-time, live-in professional staff and graduate assistants
live in the community, along with student resident assistants. The
staff is available to all students to help make residence hall living an
enjoyable and productive part of campus life. We have seven residence
halls for students:
•
Completion of two semesters as a full-time student or the
equivalent credit hours at UW, or another university or college
•
Have documented medical or health conditions prohibiting
residence hall living
•
Downey Hall
•
Hill/Crane Hall (for students of sophomore class standing and above)
•
Honors House
•
McIntryre Hall
•
Orr Hall
•
White Hall
Students must apply for exemption prior to 5 p.m. the day before
the halls open for the semester (August 26, 2015 for the fall 2015 semester). Housing accommodations at the University Apartments may
be available for students who have children or minors living with them
or students of sophomore status or above.
Dining Services: A variety of dining plans, services, and payment
options are offered for on and off-campus students, faculty, and staff. Dining plans are identified by the number of times a customer may
access Washakie Dining Center per week. Additional Dining Dollars
can be added to any dining plan, allowing for additional meals and
services at dining locations across campus.
73
Division of Student Affairs
All students living in the residence halls may choose between the
“Unlimited-,” any 15-, or any 12- dining plans. Students living in Hill/
Crane Halls may purchase the any-7 or above dining plan. Meals are
served during the contract periods for each semester. Limited services
will be available over Thanksgiving and Spring Break.
Apartment assignments are made on a year-round basis. The date
an application is received is used in determining assignment priority.
Requests should be made as early as possible after acceptance to the
university.
Bison Run Village offers an on-campus living community for single,
upper-class students. The fully- furnished townhome style apartments
are rented by the bedroom and feature shared kitchen, dining and living
room spaces with single, private bedrooms and private or semi-private
bathrooms. Applications for Bison Run Village open during the spring
semester for the following fall semester.
Washakie Dining Center, the social and cultural hub of the residence
halls, features marketplace dining with 10 serving platforms. Meals at
the Washakie Dining Center can be purchased in several ways:
•
UW Student ID card (WyoOne Card)
•
Dining Dollars
•
Cash previously deposited to the holder’s WyoOne account.
•
Credit cards (VISA and MasterCard)
•
Cash
Application forms and additional information about apartment
rates, availability, and eligibility guidelines may be obtained by contacting Residence Life and Dining Services, (307) 766-3176, toll free
at (866) 653-0212, email [email protected] or online at www.
uwyo.edu/reslife-dining.
Dining plans are not just for students living in the residence halls.
Any student, staff member, or faculty member can purchase one of the
varieties of dining plans designed to fit his/her needs. Off-Campus Housing: The University assumes no responsibility for
the students’ choice of off-campus living environment. Students living
off-campus are encouraged to contract for meals with Residence Life
& Dining Services.
For additional information about the residence halls, dining plans,
or university apartments visit www.uwyo.edu/reslife-dining; call toll
free (866) 653-0212; or if in Laramie, (307) 766-3175 (residence halls)
or 766-3176 (university apartments); FAX (307) 766-3613 or email
[email protected] Information may also be obtained by writing
to Residence Life & Dining Services, Dept. 3394, 1000 E. University
Ave., Laramie, WY 82071.
Wyoming Union
Darcy DeTienne, Director
001 Wyoming Union, (307) 766-3765
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/Union
The Wyoming Union is the community center for campus life,
enhancing and complementing out-of-class educational experiences.
Open daily, the Union provides facilities, services, and various activities to all of the campus community.
Campus Dining Options: In addition to Washakie Dining Center,
a variety of convenient and affordable dining options are located in
the Wyoming Union and throughout campus to further meet the dining needs of busy students. These locations offer unique atmospheres
and customizable menu selections, with several locations open into
the evening and on weekends. Each dining location accepts Dining
Dollars, WyoOne card funds, Cash, Mastercard and Visa. Cash is not
accepted at Elements. Plus, UW Campus Dining now offers Tapingo,
a mobile food ordering application (download on your smartphone via
the Apple or Google Play stores) available at most of the campus dining
locations.
•
Elements
•
Pita Pit
•
Rolling Mill Café
•
CJ’s
•
Snowy Range Top & Go
•
S’Pokes Pizza
•
Panda Express
•
The Book & Bean
•
Rendezvous
The Wyoming Union has a number of services available. A variety
of food services, including Panda Express and Pita Pit, are located on
the main level as well as CJ’s Convenience Store, the Copy and Print
Center, Union Information Desk/Ticket Office, University Store, a
computer lounge, the Multicultural Resource Center, the Nontraditional
Student Center, Women’s Center, Rainbow Resource Center, and ATM
service. The Campus Activities Center, Union administrative offices,
ASUW Student Government, Center for Service, Leadership, and
Community Engagement, Gallery 234, ASTEC (Associated Students
Technical Services), Greek Affairs office, computer lab, Pete’s Game
Room, program lounge, and the Gardens (appetizer and beverage bar)
are located on the lower level.
The Wyoming Union Information Desk offers campus as well as
community information and ticket sales. UW Dining Services provides
meals, snacks and catering service. The Union’s conference and meeting facilities include rooms of various sizes and a large ballroom. For
reservations and information on these services, contact the Events
Office at (307) 766-3161.
University Apartments: The University provides one and two-bedroom furnished or unfurnished apartments for students. Located on the
east side of campus, the River Village, Landmark Village and Spanish
Walk apartment communities are near shopping centers, recreational
areas, and the hospital. The apartments also offer children’s programs
and a community center.
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Division of Student Affairs
Students who participate in the leadership of any of these committees or organizations gain valuable hands on experience in negotiation,
programming, problem solving, marketing, public speaking, teamwork,
and leadership, as well as opportunities for personal growth.
Campus Activities Center
The Campus Activities Center (CAC) serves as the hub of student
activities on campus. Professional staff in the office offer guidance
and assistance for programming committees, late-night programming
efforts, more than 200 recognized student organizations (RSOs), and
student leadership development.
The Service, Leadership, and Community Engagement Center
(SLCE)
Recognized student organizations at the University of Wyoming are
established to promote a learning and social experience for individuals
who share common interests. Students are encouraged to join and are
free to organize associations that will provide opportunities to participate in educational, academic, cultural, and social activities. The staff
in the Campus Activities Center is available to help groups of students
develop organizations, sponsor activities, and coordinate efforts with
other entities on campus. A complete listing and descriptive classification of all current recognized student organizations is available from
the CAC and online at www.uwyo.edu/cac.
The Service, Leadership, and Community Engagement Center
(SLCE) is located on the lower level of the Wyoming Union. SLCE is
predicated on the notion that universities have a responsibility to prepare all students for active citizenship. A healthy American democracy
demands ethical, engaged leadership, and SLCE seeks to cultivate these
ideals among our UW students. Students are invited and encouraged to
visit the office in Rooms 006 and 011 in the Wyoming Union to explore
the many opportunities available, including:
•
First Year Institute
•
Alternative Breaks
•
Local and national days of service
• Friday Night Fever (FNF) (coordinating free alternative programming every Friday night and some Saturdays)
•
Good Mule Project
•
Leadership development programs
• The Student Activities Council (SAC), (coordinating free
quality entertainment and activities for all students
throughout the academic year)
•
Community engagement programs
The CAC is also home to a number of campus-wide programming
committees. These include:
• The Concerts and Convocations Committee (C&C) (coordinating
big-name entertainment at an affordable ticket price)
• Visual and Cultural Arts (VCA) (coordinating Gallery 234 exhibits and culturally diverse programs throughout the year)
75
Other University Services
University Store
Misty Eaton, Manager
Wyoming Union, 1-800-370-2676, (307) 766-3264,
TTY: (307) 766-3267
Web site: www.uwyostore.com;
www.facebook.com/uwyostore
The University Store is a self-supporting university department
founded in 1921. It provides students, faculty, staff, and campus
visitors with a variety of products and services. In order to fulfill its
primary mission, the store stocks new and used textbooks, textbook
rentals, e-textbooks, general books, school supplies, office products,
educationally priced computer software, fine art supplies and electronics. The University Store is an authorized Lenovo distributor and an
Apple Authorized campus store offering a full line of Apple products
and accessories. As a convenience, the store also stocks additional
items such as gifts, insignia gifts and clothing, greeting cards, candy
and sundries. Services the store provides include prepaid textbook
reservations, bookbinding, special order book service, cap and gown
rental, used book buyback, and postage stamps, as well as UPS, FAX
and Federal Express.
The University Store is located on the main level of the Wyoming
Union. Hours of operation during the academic year are: 7:30 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday; TBA Saturday.
Music
Theresa Bogard, Department Head
258 Fine Arts Center, (307) 766-5242
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/music
The Department of Music offers many opportunities for students
to participate in musical activities, as well as, to hear concerts by faculty
artists, student ensembles and visiting artists. All qualified students
within the university, no matter their major, are invited to participate
for credit in any of the following: Marching Band, Symphonic Band,
Wind Ensemble, Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra, Collegiate
Chorale, Opera Theater, Jazz Band, Bel Canto, Singing Statesmen, Civic
Chorus, and the many smaller ensembles such as string ensembles, brass
ensembles, percussion ensemble, and various chamber groups. Note:
some ensembles are by audition only. Private lessons on any instrument
and voice are available at a fee to all interested students.
Summer offerings may include lessons, workshops, seminars, and
regular courses. A summer music camp for students in grades 7 through
12 is also offered which includes band, choral, orchestral and keyboard
experiences culminating in gala concerts. For further information,
please write to the Department of Music, Dept. 3037, 1000 E. University
Ave., Laramie, WY 82071 or [email protected]
Theatre and Dance
Leigh Selting, Department Head
205 Fine Arts Center, (307) 766-2198
Theatre and Dance at the University of Wyoming offers students
an excellent opportunity to participate in all aspects of theatre and
dance arts. Auditions for productions are open to all qualified students
within the university regardless of major or college. The production
program provides opportunities for students to participate in technical
theatre stage crews, set construction, costuming, lighting and sound.
There are also opportunities to perform dance, drama, musicals and
operas. Playwriting, screen writing, directing and choreography are
available through upper-division courses. The Fine Arts Center contains a proscenium theatre, an experimental theatre, an acting for the
camera studio and a dance studio, plus full support facilities for scene
and costume construction. Full-time university students may purchase
tickets through the Fine Arts Ticket Office at a greatly reduced price.
University Police Department
Mike Samp, Chief of Police
1426 E. Flint, (307) 766-5179
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/UWPD
The University Police Department is responsible for crime prevention, public safety, and law enforcement in the UW community. The
department is staffed by 14 certified peace officers, four security guards,
and eight full‑time staff members. All officers are fully trained and
have arrest authority. The department operates 24 hours per day, 365
days a year. To keep members of the UW community aware of police
activity on campus, the department maintains a chronological log of
all incidents reported to the department. This log is open for public
inspection through the UWPD web site. University crime reports are
also included annually in the United States Department of Justice publication, Crime in the United States. Crime statistics, as well as other
public safety information, are included in the Annual Security/Clery
Report, which is available online. Department personnel present public
safety programs upon request to any group or organization. Further
information is available through the UWPD World Wide Web site.
Bicycle Regulations The University of Wyoming Bicycle Program
was developed to promote an environment in which bicycles, pedestrians, and motor vehicles can safely co-exist. Persons riding bicycles
are asked to familiarize themselves with the regulations and bike paths
described in the pamphlet Safe Cycling at UW, which is available on the
University Police Department web site. All bicycles must be registered.
76
Other University Services
University of Wyoming Alumni Association
Keener Fry, Executive Director
222 South 22nd Street, (307) 766-4166
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/alumni
Cowboy Parents
Office of Alumni Relations
214 S. 14th Street, (307) 766-4166
Web Site: www.uwyo.edu/cowboyparents
The University of Wyoming Alumni Association has been serving
the university and alumni since the association was first organized
in 1895. The primary role of the UWAA is to connect and reconnect
alumni to the institution and each other through effective communication and meaningful engagement. The Alumni Association creates
partnerships that advance UW and enrich the lives of students and
alumni worldwide.
Cowboy Parents is an organization that provides parents and
families with their own University of Wyoming connection serving
as a conduit for information and assistance. Cowboy Parents offers
opportunities for families to get involved with the goal of promoting
student success while also providing the institution with a unique perspective from parents and families. Cowboy Parents provides email
updates, frequent and timely publications, volunteer opportunities,
and much more.
The Alumni Association currently serves nearly 119,000 former
students of the University of Wyoming. UWAA provides scholarships
to Wyoming and out-of-state high school seniors, undergraduate and
graduate students, non-traditional students, Wyoming community
college transfer students, veterans and underrepresented multicultural
students with a commitment of over $100,000 annually. UWAA promotes faculty excellence and development with its annual Outstanding
Faculty Award. The Outstanding Faculty Award was created for graduating seniors who wish to nominate a teacher/professor who made a
difference in their college careers.
In the fall of 2014, the UWAA expanded its external alumni relations activities to the Marian H. Rochelle Gateway Center and joined
the Admissions Office, the Center for Advising and Career Services,
and the UW Foundation to offer enhanced services to students and
alumni. The historic Alumni House, located at 214 South 14th Street,
continues to serve the central campus and our students.
The Wyo-gold/Student Alumni Association works to increase student
awareness of what the Alumni Association means to the university.
Each year, Wyo-gold also sponsors the UW Homecoming Parade and
senior send-off.
77
University Outreach Programs
University Outreach Mission
UW Extension can be accessed on campus through its administrative offices in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In
the state, UW Extension offices are found in each county and serve
as resources to the county, while also representing a major connection
between the university and the people of Wyoming.
In the exercise of our primary mission to promote learning, we seek
to provide academic and co-curricular opportunities that will:
• Expose students to the frontiers of scholarship and creative
activity and the complexities of an interdependent world;
Outreach School
• Ensure individual interactions among students, faculty, and
staff;
Susan Frye, Ph.D., Dean, Outreach School
R. Scott Seville, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Interim Director,
UW-Casper and Professor of Zoology and Physiology
W. Reed Scull, Ed.D., Associate Dean and
Director, Outreach Credit Programs
Anne Alexander, Associate Dean and Director,
International Programs
Dept. 3106, 1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie, WY 82071
333 Wyoming Hall, (307) 766-3152
Web site: uwyo.edu/outreach
The mission of the Outreach School is to extend the University
of Wyoming to our state and the world, while bringing the world
to Wyoming. Our programs and services are organized under five
units, with UW Outreach Regional Centers located in communities
throughout Wyoming.
The five units of the Outreach School working in partnership to
deliver a broad spectrum of UW programs are:
• Nurture an environment that values and manifests diversity,
free expression, academic freedom, personal integrity, and mutual
respect; and
• Promote opportunities for personal growth, physical health,
athletic competition, and leadership development for all members
of the University community.
As Wyoming’s only university, we are committed to outreach and
service that extend our human talent and technological capacity to serve
the people in our communities, our state, the nation, and the world.
Outreach Units
The University of Wyoming serves the state through its two outreach units, each of which is an integral part of the university’s mission.
The two units consist of the University of Wyoming Extension and
the Outreach School.
University of Wyoming Extension
Glen Whipple, Director
103 Agriculture Building, (307) 766-5124
Division of Outreach Credit Programs
W. Reed Scull, Ed.D., Associate Dean and Director
Web site: uwyo.edu/outreach/ocp
The University of Wyoming was the first university west of the
Missouri to offer correspondence courses. For over a century UW has
sent its faculty across the state to meet with citizens, students, teachers, business owners, ranchers, and farmers to help them learn. Today
the Division of Outreach Credit Programs, in partnership with the
university’s colleges and departments, extends the university learning
experience to students across the state and nation with audio, video
conferencing, independent learning via correspondence or semester
based, and Web-based or online instruction.
Using on-site, online, and mediated instruction, the division delivers
UW baccalaureate degree completion programs as well as certificate
and graduate degree programs. Upper division undergraduate- and
graduate-level courses are also offered to satisfy continuing professional education requirements or to meet requests for professional
development. The division also offers a wide variety of educational opportunities for teachers in collaboration with the College of Education
and school districts.
The 1914 Smith-Lever Act created the University of Wyoming
Extension, stating that its purpose was to “provide instruction and
practical demonstrations in agriculture, home economics and related
subjects.” The University of Wyoming Extension is part of a national
educational network which establishes partnerships with the United
States Department of Agriculture, the state of Wyoming, the University
of Wyoming, and county and tribal governments. UW Extension maintains offices in 27 Wyoming communities.
The mission of the University of Wyoming Extension is to provide
lifelong learning opportunities for the people of Wyoming and empower
them to make choices that enhance their quality of life. To accomplish
its mission, the UW Extension continually updates its programs to meet
the changing priorities, organizational structures and external relationships of Wyoming and its citizens. It is a dynamic organization pledged
to providing educational programs which enable Wyoming citizens to
improve their lives and communities through partnerships that put experience and research knowledge to work. The UW Extension delivers
university research-based knowledge to Wyoming consumers through
the broad program areas of Profitable and Sustainable Agricultural
Systems, 4-H and Youth Development, Nutrition and Food Safety,
Sustainable Management of Rangeland Resources, and Community
Development Education. Programs include a wide range of topic areas,
including food and nutrition, water quality, wildlife, crop production,
resource management, and energy related issues.
Undergraduate Majors
Social Science
Agroecology “3+1” (requires one year in Laramie)
Bachelor of Applied Science
Business Administration (online)
Criminal Justice
Family and Consumer Sciences (online)
Psychology
RN to BSN (online)
Accelerated BSN (2nd Bachelor’s)
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University Outreach Programs
Hybrid courses are delivered through a combination of web-based
instruction and one or more other delivery methods.
Correspondence study courses, or print-based courses, meet the
needs of site-bound students by offering a variety of study opportunities.
These courses are designed to provide flexibility with open enrollment
throughout the year, a more self-paced and independent study format,
and nine months to complete each course. For further information,
contact the Division of Outreach Credit Programs, Dept. 3274, 1000
E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071; (800) 448-7801; or e-mail:
[email protected]
Graduate Majors
Master of Business Administration (online) (MBA)
English
Public Andministration (MPA)
Kinesiology and Health
Nursing—Nurse Educator (online)
Speech-Language Pathology (currently in redesign for Fall 2015)
College of Education - Master of Education Programs
Educational Administration in Adult and Post-Secondary Education (online)
Educational Administration in K-12 Educational Leadership
Instructional Technology (online)
Curriculum and Instruction
Special Education
International Programs Office
Anne Alexander, Associate Dean and Director
(307) 766-3677
Web site: uwyo.edu/intprograms
The International Programs Office is the home of
internationalization at the University of Wyoming. Explore what we
do for the campus community to promote global citizenship - you
can start here, and go anywhere.
Doctoral Program
Educational Administration in Adult &
Post-Secondary Education
Educational Administration in K-12 Educational Leadership
Nursing Practice (DNP)
University of Wyoming at Casper
Scott Seville, Ph.D., Associate Dean and Interim Director
125 College Drive, Casper WY 82601
(307) 268-2713
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/outreach/uwcasper/
Since 1976, the University of Wyoming-Casper (UWC), in partnership with Casper College, has offered on-site courses and a slate of
College of Education Programs
university degree programs in Casper. UW-Casper is also the location
Early Childhood Program Director Certificate
in Natrona County for statewide degree programs and classes offered
Teachers of American Indian Children Certificate/Endorsement through Outreach Credit Programs.
Early Childhood, Birth to Five Endorsement
UW-Casper was established to meet the needs of students unable to
Early Childhood, Birth to Eight Endorsement
move to Laramie. Some of these students are nontraditional students
Early Childhood, Special Education Endorsement
who may be older or have families, homes, or jobs in the Casper area.
Literacy Certificate/Endorsement
UW-Casper is designed to meet the academic needs of students in
a setting that provides small class sizes, dedicated staff, and award Online Instruction Certificate
winning faculty. Courses are taught by resident and visiting faculty
Principal in K-12 Educational Leadership Certificate/ who are regular or part-time members of UW academic departments.
Endorsement
A full-service office handles admission, registration, financial aid, and
English as a Second Language (ESL) Endorsement/Certificate
advising.
Special Education Endorsement/Certificate
Classes are taught on-site in the Union/University Building at the
School District Superintendant in K-12 Educational Leadership Casper College campus. On average, more than 700 students enroll in
UW courses and degree programs through UW-Casper each semester,
Endorsement/Certificate
and more than 3,000 students have received their UW degrees.
Special Education Director Endorsement
Certificate and Endorsement Programs
Land Surveying Certificate
School Social Work Graduate Preparatory Certificate
Audio conferencing uses long-distance telephone lines and a
centrally-located audio conferencing bridge to link as many as 96 class
sites at a time. These courses usually can be delivered to any location
at which there is a telephone line, provided at least three students are
enrolled at each site. If a course is offered statewide or nationwide,
students in any location may take the course as long as there is sufficient enrollment at that site. Audio conferencing courses may include
recorded lectures as well as an online component that provides a number
of communication and information sharing tools.
Video conferencing is an interactive technology enabling students
at each site to see and hear each other and their instructor. Video conference courses can be delivered to specific sites in Wyoming. Video
conference courses may include an online component.
Web-based and online courses are available “anytime, anyplace.”
They are, however, semester-based and often include specific times
for student and faculty dialogue. Learning online is interactive and
collaborative; students generally need to be online in class a few times
each week throughout the semester. Students and instructors share
discoveries and materials throughout each developmental step of the
course using online communication tools such as e-mail, threaded
discussions, document sharing, and live chat sessions.
Undergraduate Majors
Applied Science
Biology
Business Administration
Communication
Criminal Justice
Elementary Education
English
Family and Consumer Sciences
Humanities and Fine Arts
Journalism
Mathematics and Science
Medical Laboratory Sciences - Coming Soon
Nursing
Psychology
Secondary Science Education, Biology
Social Science
Social Work
Technical Education
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University Outreach Programs
ing services. All of the services are available to government clients,
educational institutions, and non-profit organizations at modest rates.
UWTV accepts commercial clients at appropriate rates.
For further information, contact the Division of Outreach
Technology Services, Dept. 3106, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie,
WY 82071; (307) 766-4999; [email protected]
Graduate Majors Offered - available statewide, offered through Outreach Credit Programs
Adult and Post-Secondary Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Educational Leadership
English
Executive MBA (Online)
Instructional Technology
Kinesiology and Health
Nursing—Nurse Educator
Public Administration (MPA)
Social Work
Speech-Language Pathology
Wyoming Public Media
Christina Kuzmych, General Manager
Web site: wyomingpublicmedia.org
Wyoming Public Media (WPM) delivers three radio services to residents of Wyoming and beyond, as well as internet streaming, podcasts,
and web information services via wyomingpublicmedia.org. Wyoming
Public Radio (WPR) is WPM’s primary service and is the state’s only
National Public Radio member. WPR has been serving Wyoming for
47 years with news, music, and entertainment, now with 27 FM stations and translators statewide. WPM also operates two full time music
services, Classical Wyoming and Jazz Wyoming with FM, HD-2, and
HD-3 networks expanding across Wyoming.
Doctoral Degrees Offered - available statewide through Outreach
Credit Programs
Adult/Post-Secondary Education, Ed.D., Ph.D.
Educational Administration in K-12 Educational Leadership,
Ed.D., Ph.D.
Nursing Practice, DNP
Wyoming Public Radio (FM and HD Stations)
Afton: KUWA-FM 91.3 and in HD 91.3-1
Alta/Driggs: KUWR- FM 91.3
Buffalo: KBUW-FM 90.5 and in HD 90.5-1
Casper: KUWC-FM 91.3 and in HD 91.3-1
HD Classical Wyoming 91.3-2 and
HD Jazz Wyoming 91.3-3
Cheyenne: KUWR-FM 91.9 and in HD 91.9-1
HD Classical Wyoming 91.9-2 and
HD Jazz Wyoming 91.9-3
Cody: KUWP-FM 90.1 and in HD 90.1-1
HD Classical Wyoming 90.1-2 and
HD Jazz Wyoming 90.1-3
Douglas: KDUW-FM 91.7
Dubois: KUWR 91.3
Evanston: KUWZ 89.7
Fort Washakie: KUWW-FM 90.9
Gillette: KUWG-FM 90.9 and in HD 90.9-1
Green River: KUWZ-FM 90.5 and in HD 90.5-1
Classical Wyoming FM 88.5
Jackson: KUWJ-FM 90.3 and in HD 90.3-1
HD Classical Wyoming 90.3-2
HD Jazz Wyoming 90.3-3
Kaycee: KUWK-FM 88.7
Lander: KUWW-FM 90.9
Classical Wyoming FM 91.9
Laramie: KUWR- 91.9 and in HD 91.9-1
Classical Wyoming 88.5 and HD 91.9-2 and
Jazz Wyoming 90.1 and HD 91.9-3
Lusk: KUWV-FM 90.7
Newcastle: KUWN-FM 90.5 and in HD 90.5-1
Pinedale: KUWX-FM 90.9 and in HD 90.9-1
Powell: KUWP-FM 90.1 and in HD 90.1-1
Rawlins: KUWI-FM 89.9
Certificate Programs Offered - available statewide, offered
through Outreach Credit Programs
Early Childhood Mental Health
Early Childhood Program Director
Land Surveying
Teachers of American Indian Children
Endorsements - available statewide, offered through Outreach Credit Programs
Early Childhood, Birth to Five
Early Childhood, Special Education
English as a Second Language
Principal
Special Education
Wyoming Reading
For more information, contact UW-Casper at 125 College Drive,
Casper, WY 82601; (307) 268-2713, (877) 264-9930; or e-mail: [email protected]
Division of Outreach Technology Services
Tony Pedersen, Director
Web site: uwyo.edu/outreach/ots
The Division of Outreach Technology Services (OTS) provides
technological support for the programs and services offered through
the Outreach School. The division units are University of Wyoming
Television (UWTV) and OTS, in partnership with UW’s IT Division,
manages and operates the Outreach Video Network (OVN) at 50 sites
in 21 communities statewide.
UWTV provides full professional services for video production,
programming, and distribution. These services also include streaming
video, video conferencing, and video/DVD duplicating. Instructional
TV conferencing classrooms on the Laramie campus are utilized
primarily for Outreach credit courses. UWTV’s production facilities
include a full production studio, several single cameras for on-location
productions, three Avid edit suites, and DVD duplication and stream-
80
University Outreach Programs
NORTHWEST REGIONAL CENTER—CODY
Serving Big Horn, Park, and Washakie Counties
1501 Stampede Ave., Unit 9020, Cody, WY 82414
(307) 587-9837
Riverton: KUWT-FM 91.3 and in HD 91.3-1
Jazz Wyoming 90.5
Rock Springs: KUWZ-FM 90.5 and in HD 90.5-1
Classical Wyoming FM 88.5
Saratoga: KUWI-FM 89.9
Sheridan: KSUW-FM 91.3 and in HD 91.3-1
Sundance: KUWD-FM 91.5 and in HD 91.5-1
Thermopolis: KUWT-FM 91.3 and in HD 91.3-1
HD Classical Wyoming 91.3-2 and
HD Jazz Wyoming 91.3-3
Torrington: KUWR-FM 89.9
Worland: KUWT-FM 93.3
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CENTER—CHEYENNE
Serving Laramie and Platte Counties
Laramie County Community College Career & Technical Bldg.
1400 East College Drive, Cheyenne, WY 82007
(307) 632-8949
EASTERN REGIONAL CENTER—TORRINGTON
Serving Converse, Goshen, Niobrara, and Weston Counties
at Eastern Wyoming College
3200 West “C” Street, Torrington, WY 82240
(307) 532-8204
Stream all services at WyomingPublicMedia.org.
For further information, contact Wyoming Public Media at Dept.
3984, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071-2000; (307) 7664240 in Laramie, or (800) 729-5897 within Wyoming.
SOUTHWEST REGIONAL CENTER—ROCK SPRINGS
Serving Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, and Uinta Counties
at Western Wyoming Community College
2500 College Drive, Box G-340, Rock Springs, WY 82901
(307) 382-1817
UW Outreach Regional Centers
An academic coordinator administers each Outreach Regional
Center. These individuals are responsible for coordinating adult education and educational activities sponsored by the university and the
Outreach School. Please visit http://www.uwyo.edu/outreach/regionalcenters.asp for more information.
WEST CENTRAL REGIONAL CENTER—RIVERTON
Serving Fremont, Hot Springs, and Teton Counties
2660 Peck Avenue, Box 58, Riverton, WY 82501
(307) 856-8651
NORTHEAST REGIONAL CENTER—SHERIDAN
Serving Campbell, Crook, Johnson, and Sheridan Counties
Box 1500, WATT Building, Sheridan, WY 82801
(307) 672-8737
WEST CENTRAL REGIONAL CENTER—JACKSON
Serving Fremont, Hot Springs, and Teton Counties
at Center for the Arts Building
240 S. Glenwood, P.O. Box 4901, Jackson, WY 83001
(307) 734-0224
NORTHEAST REGIONAL CENTER—GILLETTE
Serving Campbell, Crook, Johnson, and Sheridan Counties
300 West Sinclair, Gillette, WY 82718
(307) 686-0044
NATRONA COUNTY—UW at Casper
125 College Drive, Casper, WY 82601
(307) 268-2713
NORTHWEST REGIONAL CENTER—POWELL
Serving Big Horn, Park, and Washakie Counties
231 West 6th Street, Powell, WY 82435
(307) 754-6108
81
Special Programs and Facilities for Research and Study
The Libraries
CHAD E. HUTCHINS, B.A. University of Colorado, Boulder 1999;
M.A. 2001; M.L.I.S. University of Texas, Austin 2004; Associate Librarian, University Libraries 2014, 2008.
DAVID KRUGER, B.S. South Dakota State University 1991; B.S.Ed.
Minot State University 1994; M.A. Kansas State University 1996; M.L.S.
University of Missouri 1998; Associate Librarian, University Libraries
2004, 1998.
CASSANDRA KVENILD, B.A. University of Wyoming 1996;
M.L.I.S. University of Washington, Seattle 2000; Associate Librarian,
University Libraries 2014, 2008.
DAVID MACAULAY, B.A. University of New Brunswick 1986; M.A.
McGill University 1993; M.L.I.S. 2010; Assistant Librarian, University
Libraries 2014.
JENNIFER MAYER, B.A. University of Wyoming 1991; M.L.I.S.
University of Oklahoma 1996; Associate Librarian, University Libraries 2005, 1999.
DEBORAH McCARTHY, B.A. Lycoming College 1983; M.L.S.
Texas Women’s University 1989; M.B.A. New Mexico State University
2003; Associate Librarian 2009, 2004.
TAMI MORSE, B.A. University of California, Davis 1981; M.A. University of California, San Diego 1987; M.L.S. San Jose State University
2001; Associate Librarian, University Libraries 2013, 2006.
MICHAEL L. NELSON, B.A. Kalamazoo College 1973; M.Lib.
University of Washington 1978; M.A. Montana State University 1980;
Associate Librarian, University Libraries 1991, 1984.
JUDITH E. PASEK, B.S. University of Michigan 1977; M.S. University of Missouri 1980; Ph.D. University of Nebraska 1987; M.L.I.S. Wayne
State University 2013; Assistant Librarian, University Libraries 2014.
LORI J. PHILLIPS, B.A. University of Wyoming 1989; M.L.S.
University of Arizona 1991; Associate Librarian, University Libraries
1999, 1992.
JULIA PROCTOR, B.A. Western Washington University 2005; M.S.
University of Michigan 2009; Assistant Librarian 2012.
BRYAN RICUPERO, B.A. Boston University 1996; M.L.I.S. University of Kentucky 2012; Assistant Librarian, University Libraries 2014.
LAWRENCE SCHMIDT, B.S. Montana State University 1987; M.S.
1995; M.L.S. Emporia State University 2002; Associate Librarian,
University Libraries 2008, 2002.
LORI J. TERRILL, B.A. University of Wyoming 1993; M.L.S. Emporia State University 1995; Associate Librarian, University Libraries
2006, 2000.
SHANNON THARP, B.A. Drake University 2005; M.F.A. University of Washington, Seattle 2007; M.L.I.S. 2013; Assistant Librarian,
University Libraries 2014.
WILLIAM O. VAN ARSDALE, III, B.A. Southwestern CollegeKansas 1968; M.A. University of Denver 1973; Associate Profes­sor,
University Libraries 1987, 1981.
KELLY VISNAK, B.A. Metropolitan State College of Denver 1993;
M.L.S. Emporia State University Denver 1997; Assistant Librarian,
University Libraries 2011.
Mary M. Farrell, Dean
William Robertson Coe Library, (307) 766-3279
The University Libraries include the William Robertson Coe
Library, the Emmett Chisum Special Collection; the Library Annex,
located in the basement of the Biological Science Building, housing
government publications and older journals; the Brinkerhoff Earth
Resources Information Center, located in the S.H. Knight Geology
Building; the Learning Resource Center, located in the Education
Building; the Rocky Mountain Herbarium Research Collection, located
in the Aven Nelson Building; and the National Park Service Research
Center collection in Jackson, Wyoming. UW-Casper is served by the
Casper College Goodstein Foundation Library.
The libraries’ cataloged collections total over 1.6 million volumes,
with over 33,000 volumes added annually. 14,000 active periodical and
serial titles are supplemented with access to over 90,000 unique electronic journals and over 800,000 ebooks. In addition, the libraries provide
extensive microforms collections and a library of over 175,000 maps,
and serve as a depository for United States government publications.
Through participation in the Wyoming Libraries Database
(WYLD), Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (“Alliance”), the
Greater Western Library Alliance (GWLA), OCLC, the National
Network of Libraries of Medicine, on-line information retrieval systems,
and the interlibrary loan network, access is provided to other library
resources from throughout the nation and the world.
The College of Law maintains a separate Law Library.
Library Faculty:
SANDRA M. BARSTOW, B.A. Kalamazoo College 1973; M.L.S.
Western Michigan University 1977; M.B.A. Rollins College 1983; Librarian, University Libraries 2004, 1988.
STEPHEN C. BOSS, B.M. Simpson College 1983; B.A. 1984; M.L.S.
University of Denver 1985; M.A. 1986; Associate Librarian, University
Libraries 2008, 2002.
KAIJSA CALKINS, B.A. University of Washington, Bothell 2001;
M.L.S. University of Washington, Seattle 2004; Associate Librarian,
University Libraries 2012, 2006.
KATE CONERTON, B.A. University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire 2011;
M.L.I.S. University of British Columbia 2013; Assistant Librarian 2013.
MARY M. FARRELL, B.A. University of Missouri, Kansas City 1984;
M.L.S. University of Arizona 1988; M.P.A. Arizona State University
1992; Dean of Libraries, University Libraries 2002.
JENNY GARCIA, B.A. Regis University, 1989; M.L.S. Emporia State
University 1992; Associate Librarian, University Libraries 2009, 2003.
CHERYL GOLDENSTEIN, B.A. Bethany College 1982; M.L.S.
University of Texas at Austin 1997; Associate Librarian, University
Libraries 2009, 2002.
TAMSEN L. HERT, B.A. Colorado State University 1975; M.L.S.
Emporia State University 1984; M.A. 1988; Librarian, University Libraries 2014, 1986.
CYNTHIA D. HUGHES, B.A. The College of William and Mary
1994; M.L.I.S. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1996; Assistant Librarian, University Libraries 2014.
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Research and Study
Centennial Complex
The faculty archivists of the AHC are state, regional, national,
and international leaders in their fields, speaking and publishing on
historical, archival, and library topics. Several teach national workshops. The Center’s reference archivists are leaders in their profession
in undergraduate outreach and instruction. Students and faculty are
encouraged to visit and make use of the collections – no appointments
are necessary. The American Heritage Center hours are: Reading Room
(M, 10am-9pm; Tu-F, 8am-5pm) / Toppan Library (M-F, 8:30am-5pm)
/ Building (M-F, 8am-5pm).
Designed by internationally prominent architect Antoine Predock
to represent both an “archival mountain” and a town at the foot of
the mountain, this dramatic building contains the collections of the
American Heritage Center and the UW Art Museum. It is located
at 2111 Willett Drive, just north of the Arena Auditorium and War
Memorial Stadium.
American Heritage Center
Mark A. Greene, Director
(307) 766-4114
Web site: http://ahc.uwyo.edu
American Heritage Center Faculty:
TYLER G. CLINE, B.A. Humboldt State University 2009; M.A.
Sacramento State 2011; Assistant Archivist 2013.
RACHAEL DREYER, B.A. Grinnell College 2004; M.I.S. University
of Michigan 2009; Assistant Archivist 2011.
RICHARD G. EWIG, B.A. University of Wyoming 1979; M.A. 1980;
Associate Archivist 2010, 1994.
MARK A. GREENE, B.A. Ripon College 1980; M.A. University of
Michigan 1984; Director 2002.
GINNY KILANDER, B.A. Indiana University 1992; M.A. University
of Wyoming 1998; Associate Archivist 2010, 1999.
ANNE MARIE LANE, B.A. University of Missouri 1973; M.A. University of Kansas 1980; M.L.S. University of Arizona 1992; Archivist/
Curator of Rare Books 2011, 1995.
LESLIE C. WAGGENER, B.A. University of Texas, Austin 1995;
M.L.I.S. 2000; Associate Archivist 2012, 2007, 2000.
D. CLAUDIA THOMPSON, B.A. Metropolitan State College,
Denver 1977; M.A. University of Denver 1978; Archivist 2011, 1995.
AMANDA STOW, B.A. Colorado State University 2004; M.L.I.S.
University of Denver 2007; Assistant Archivist 2012.
JOHN WAGGENER, B.A. University of Wyoming 1994; M.A. 2001;
Associate Archivist 2012, 2007, 2000.
The American Heritage Center (AHC) is the university’s repository
of manuscripts collections, its rare books library, and its official archives.
The Center is one of the largest and most consulted non-governmental
repositories in the United States. In 2010 it was recognized as one of the
most distinguished archives in the nation when it received the Society
of American Archivists’ Distinguished Service Award.
The Center places service to UW undergraduates, graduate students,
and faculty as its highest priority. However, because the AHC’s collections are known worldwide, UW undergraduates using the Center’s
holdings might be working alongside scholars from Japan or Nigeria
or the producers of PBS’s American Experience.
The AHC’s collections are of interest to far more than history majors. Each year Center archivists work with students in more than two
dozen disciplines at UW: Art, African-American Studies, Agricultural
Education, American Indian Studies, American Studies, Anthropology,
Botany, Business Administration, Civil Engineering, Creative Writing,
Energy Law, Geography and Recreation, History, International Studies,
Lab School, English, Music, Nursing, Pharmacy, Political Science,
Religious Studies, Secondary Education, Sociology, University Studies,
Women’s Studies, Zoology. The AHC also works with a dozen public
school classes annually.
Art Museum
Susan Moldenhauer, Director & Chief Curator
(307) 766-6622
Web site: http://www.uwyo.edu/artmuseum
• Like most major university repositories, the AHC collects both
regionally and nationally in select areas. Major subject concentrations
of the 75,000 cubic foot manuscript collections include Wyoming and
the American West, the mining and petroleum industries, Western politics and leadership, conservation, journalism, transportation, and 20th
century entertainment such as popular music, radio, television, and film.
Located on the east side of campus in the award-winning Centennial
Complex, the Art Museum was established to “bring the world of
art to Wyoming.” As an academic museum and a leader in the arts,
the Art Museum collects, preserves, exhibits and interprets visual art
from around the world to challenge, inspire and educate the people of
Wyoming and beyond, and serves as a gathering place for interdisciplinary discourse, dialogue and community interaction.
• The Toppan Library is the University’s rare book center. More
than 50,000 items range from medieval illuminated manuscripts to
the 21st century. Subject strengths include the American West, British
and American literature, early exploration of North America, religion,
hunting and fishing, natural history, women authors, and the book
arts. Unlike most rare book libraries, it is an active teaching site and
welcomes both undergraduates and the public.
The Art Museum’s permanent collection is comprised of over 8,000
objects, which includes European and American paintings, prints,
sculpture and drawings as well as special collections of 18th and 19th
century Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, 15th through 19th century Persian
and Indian miniature paintings, 20th century Haitian art, 20th century Japanese netsuke, 20th century and contemporary photography,
and Rapa Nui, Papua New Guinea, African, and Native American
artifacts. From 15th century Old Master prints to French Rococo,
German Expressionism, Fauvism, Modernism, Surrealism, Abstract
Expressionism and Contemporary Art, the collection of paintings,
drawings, prints, sculpture, photography, and arts of many cultures
and periods, all relate to the development of American art, historically
and in all forms.
The AHC website has earned several national awards. Our digital
collections contain 100,000+ photos and historical documents: http://
digitalcollections.uwyo.edu.
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Research and Study
Exhibitions support the academic mission of the University of
Wyoming, provide original resource material for students of all ages,
and enhance the cultural life of Wyoming’s citizens and visitors. The Art
Museum features an average of 15-17 exhibitions annually. Exhibitions
rotate generally on a semester schedule, allowing professors to incorporate original artwork into their curriculum and providing access
for students to view and use the exhibitions as a resource for original
research and scholarship. The schedule typically combines exhibitions
curated from the permanent collection, contemporary art by regional,
national and international artists, and art from the American West.
Through its Museum as Classroom approach, the University of
Wyoming Art Museum places art at the center of learning for all ages,
supports the academic mission of the University, assists in preparing
our future workforce with essential skills, and enhances the cultural
life of Wyoming’s citizens and visitors. The Art Museum provides extensive education programs for all ages, including preschool through
12th grade, university students and adults. Using the museum’s exhibitions as inspiration, participants create their own art and experience
an investigative studio process. Learning from the masters is the
museum’s key objective and all classes are based on the model of observe, question, explore, create, and reflect. In the spring of 2013, the
Art Museum initiated a teaching gallery model in the Guthrie Special
Exhibitions Teaching Gallery. Works of art are selected with faculty
and the installation is divided into four sections, one exhibition per
wall for each class. While the gallery is designed to meet the needs
of the academic community, it is also open to the public in order to
demonstrate connections between the Art Museum and teaching across
the curriculum, supporting UW’s academic mission. The Art Museum
works with faculty to use the collection as a teaching resource and encourages the opportunity for students to study original artwork. The
Art Museum’s Resource Room is available for curator led class visits
to view artwork from that collection on on exhibit in the galleries. Students are also welcome to use the collection and Resource Room
for individual research projects and internships.
Art Express, the museum’s outreach programs, include the Ann
Simpson Artmobile Program and the Touring Exhibition Service, which
provide Museum as Classroom opportunities to Wyoming people in
even the most remote communities. The Artmobile brings original art
and a museum educator to provide programs in schools, community
centers, libraries and art and senior centers.. The Artmobile brings
original art and a museum educator to Wyoming’s communities for
programs in schools, community centers, museums, and galleries. The
Touring Exhibition Service circulates as many as eight exhibitions of
original art to venues across the state and beyond.
Art Museum Faculty
HEATHER BENDER, B.A. Salisbury State University 1991; Master
Teacher 2009.
WENDY BREDEHOFT, B.F.A. University of Wyoming 1984;
M.F.A. Vermont College 1996; Education Curator/Assistant Research
Scientist 2006. Education Curator/Associate Research Scientist 2012.
NICOLE CRAWFORD, B.A. University of Nebraska 1997; M.A.
2005; Curator of Collections/Assistant Lecturer 2009.
RACHEL MILLER, B.A. University of Wyoming 2007; M.A. University of Denver 2009; Assistant Curator/Assistant Research Scientist
2009.
SUSAN MOLDENHAUER, B.F.A. Northern Illinois University
1974; M.F.A. The Pennsylvania State University 1982. Curator of Museum Programs 1991; Assistant Director and Senior Curator 1996;
Director and Chief Curator 2002.
ERICA RAMSEY, B.F.A., B.A. University of Wyoming 2009; Ann
Simpson Artmobile Curator 2013.
Anthropology Museum
The museum offers exhibits related to the four subfields of anthropology: archaeology, biological, linguistic, and cultural. The main
gallery follows the “Human Odyssey,” from the evolution of humans
in Africa several million years ago to the spread of our species throughout the world, and on to the Late Pleistocene entry into the Americas.
The Colby Mammoth Site, the Vore buffalo jump and other Wyoming
archaeology sites are featured, with much of the museum devoted to
a celebration of the rich Native American heritage of the Plains and
Rocky Mountains. Other displays featuring archaeological research and
world cultural diversity can be found in hallway displays throughout
the building.
The Anthropology Museum is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday during the academic year. During the summer, hours
are from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Division of Information Technology
Robert Aylward, Vice President for Information Technology
IT Center, Room 372, (307) 766-4860
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/InfoTech
The Division of Information Technology provides students,
faculty and staff with technology infrastructure and support services-computing systems, networking, technical support for systems and
applications, computer support, academic and classroom technology
support, training, telecommunications services, and research computing support including high performance computing. Use of these
University computing and data facilities is governed by UW Regulation
3-690, Ethical Use of Computers and Data Communications Facilities.
The Museum Store offers museum publications (exhibition catalogs
and posters), collection notecards and reproduction prints, and unique
logo items that include tote bags, t-shirts, and lapel pins.
The office of the Vice President of the Division of Information
Technology is located in room 372 of the Information Technology
Center and is open during normal business hours. Those in need of
assistance are encouraged to call the Client Support Help Desk at 7664357, option 1.
The Art Museum is free to all and is open Monday through Saturday,
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Hours are extended to include Mondays until 9
pm in the months of February, March, April, September, October, and
November. Additional information on the Art Museum is available
on its webpage, www.uwyo.edu/artmuseum; Facebook (University of
Wyoming Art Museum), Instagram (#uwartmuseum) and YouTube
(uwartmuseum).
IT’s Help Desk: provides technology support during normal business hours. The fastest way to contact the UWIT Help Desk is to use
the Help page at http://support.uwyo.edu. Other options to contact
the help desk are to email [email protected] or call 307-766-HELP
(4357), option 1. Help Desk hours are posted at www.uwyo.edu/
InfoTech/services/helpdesk/. Client Support maintains “How To” help
documents which cover subjects such as University computer accounts,
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Research and Study
Data Center Operations (DC Ops): manages and operates the
6,000 ft2 University Data Center, located in the Information Technology
Center. The Data Center provides a state of the art, highly redundant infrastructure space for university IT equipment. University departments
may apply for co-location space in the Data Center to house appropriate
production computing equipment. See the ITC Data Center web page
(www.uwyo.edu/InfoTech/aboutit/itc/dc) for more information on
co-location, or contact DC Ops at [email protected]
how to connect to the network and how to access available software in
the computing facilities. A complete listing of available documentation
is online at www.uwyo.edu/AskIT.
IT Service Center and Resnet: provides help to students, faculty,
and staff with personal computers and mobile devices. The Service
Center is located in the ITC building room 160 and is typically open
Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm with reduced hours during breaks and
the summer months. The Service Center is closed during all University
holidays.
Research Support: supports high performance computing researchers and computational science. Research Support has installed a
mid-range high performance cluster that is available to researchers and
students across campus. If you have questions regarding local, regional
or national high performance computer, please contact IT research
support by email at [email protected] or call 766-RSIT (7748).
One of the primary goals of the Service Center while helping
with personal computing devices is to teach customers. Therefore,
Information Technology does not allow devices to be dropped off to
be repaired. IT requests its customers to take an active role and remain
with their device while any repair work is underway. Computer Maintenance & Sales: provides repair and general
hardware support for PCs, laser printers, and other equipment as well
as manufacturer warranty repair support for most Apple, Dell, and
Lenovo products. Computer repair requests may be submitted by filling out the web form at www.uwyo.edu/ITRepair or by contacting the
Help Desk at 766-HELP (4357), option 1. IT Sales provides pre-sale
consulting services for a wide range of computer products, specializing
in Dell, with consultants located in the ITC who may be contacted at
766-2875 or via e-mail at [email protected] The UW Bookstore is an
Apple Authorized Campus Store and takes care of all Apple sales to
the campus community.
Telecom Services: provides a range of telecommunications services
on campus. Data connections, basic phone service, long distance, and
Unified Messaging (voice mail) are ordered through the IT Teldesk.
Contact Information Technology’s Telecom Help Desk in the ITC
building, room 377 or call 766-HELP (4357), option 2, for more information.
Internet and Network Access: an extensive campus-wide data
network provides connectivity to the Internet in most campus buildings, computer labs across campus, and university housing. Wireless
Ethernet (Wi-Fi) is available in most campus locations. Students, faculty, and staff should connect to the UWyo wireless network, since it
is a faster, more secure connection than UWguest. More information
can be found at www.uwyo.edu/askit or call the IT Help Desk at 766HELP (4357), option 1.
Software Sales: provides Adobe, Microsoft and statistical software
to eligible faculty, staff, and students. For more information on available software and prices, please visit http://www.uwyo.edu/infotech/
services/software/.
Computer Labs: are located throughout campus for students, faculty, and staff use. The computers labs contain computers with a wide
variety of software and computing equipment. Some labs are staffed
by student lab assistants who are able to answer questions. Computer
labs in Coe Library and the Information Technology Center are open
and staffed 24 hours during the normal academic year. The UWStudent
Remote Lab System is a collection of lab machines that are designed to
be accessed from off campus networks. The remote lab is configured
similar to the UWStudent labs found on campus.
Geological Museum
(307) 766-2646, 2650
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/geomuseum
The Geological Museum, in the east wing of the S.H. Knight
Geology Building, exhibits the story of ancient Wyoming. Highlight
exhibits include: one of only six mounted fossil skeletons of the wellknown dinosaur Apatosaurus (Brontosaurus); mounted skeletal cast of
the world-renowned “Big Al” the Allosaurus; a 50-million-year-old
garfish from Wyoming’s Green River Formation (one of the largest
complete freshwater fossil fish on display in the world); casts of skulls of
Wyoming’s state dinosaur, Triceratops; and its contemporary, Tyrannosaurus
rex; mounted skeletons of Miocene rhinos and camels; and a fluorescent
mineral room, featuring specimens from Wyoming and the world. The
museum maintains important display collections (particularly vertebrate
and invertebrate fossils) that are available for study by students, as well
as scientists from other institutions. The museum provides unique opportunities for undergraduate students to pursue research and display
projects in Wyoming paleontology.
More information, including a link to the UW Student Remote Lab
System, a complete listing of labs, lab schedules, and software policies,
is available online at microlab.uwyo.edu. For questions and assistance,
please e-mail [email protected] or call the Help Desk at 766-HELP
(4357), option 1.
Classroom Technology Support (CTS): provides support and
maintenance for audio visual and other technology used in classrooms
across campus. For immediate assistance when teaching in a general
pool classroom, pick up the phone; the phone will automatically connect
to the UW IT Help Desk at the top of the queue. If the issue cannot be
resolved over the phone, someone will arrive promptly to provide assistance. Workshops for classroom technologies are available by request.
Call 766-2872 for more information. Workshops for all classrooms are
also provided by ECTL and CTS at the beginning of each semester.
Please go to www.uwyo.edu/centralscheduling/classroom-building/
training.html for further details. Lecture capture technology (Wyocast)
is available in several classrooms on campus. For more information on
this popular technology please visit http://www.uwyo.edu/infotech/
services/multimedia/wyocast/
85
Research and Study
William D. Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment
and Natural Resources
The goals of the Biodiversity Institute are three-fold: to support
research in biodiversity science and its impacts on the environment
and society; to provide opportunities for the education of students
in the scientific and social aspects of biodiversity; and to engage the
public in essential discussions of the value of biological diversity and
the consequences of its loss.
Nicole Korfanta, Director
Bim Kendall House
804 E. Fremont St.
Laramie, Wyoming 82072
Phone: (307) 766-5080, Fax: (307) 766-5099
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/haub/ruckelshaus-institute
Projects include providing grants for biodiversity research and
natural history collections support, studying the Berry Center’s green
roof as a model for sustainable technology, developing a biodiversity
curriculum for the University of Wyoming, publishing a biodiversity
atlas series, and building a web portal for citizen biodiversity science
in Wyoming, among others.
The William D. Ruckelshaus Institute is housed within the Haub
School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of
Wyoming. The Ruckelshaus Institute conducts policy analysis and
research, offers resources and facilitation to support collaborative
decision making, and provides outreach for natural resource professionals and the public.
The Biodiversity Institute also organizes and hosts events including concert seriese, biodiversity films, art exhibits, expeditions, and
speakers.
Research and Policy Analysis: Through proactive initiatives and
by invitation, the Ruckelshaus Institute produces neutral scientific,
technial, and socioeconomic analysis on natural resource issues important to Wyoming and the West. Since 1994, the Institute has made
information available on topics as diverse as land use, wildlife, water,
energy-environment linkages, and environmental policy.
Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center
Jeff Hamerlinck, Director
Agriculture C, Room 337 (307) 766-2532
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/wygisc
The Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC)
has a mission to advance the understanding and application of geographic information science through basic and applied research, education and training, information and technology transfer, and by promoting utilization of geospatial technologies for science, management,
and decision making within the University and throughout the state
and region. Examples of geospatial technologies include geographic
information systems, geographic cartography and visualization, Global
Positioning System-based mapping, and image processing of remotelysensed Earth resource data derived from aircraft or satellites. Broad
applications areas exist in both environmental and social sciences, as
well as agriculture, engineering and business.
Collaborative Solutions: The Ruckelshaus Institute supports
inclusive and collaborative approaches to environmental conflict resolution by facilitating and convening collaborative processes, offering
trainings in mediation and collaborative decision making for natural
resource professionals, and teaching courses in negotiation theory for
UW students.
Outreach: The Ruckelshaus Institute makes research available to
stakeholders through accessible publications and by convening conferences on critical natural resource issues. Our Wyoming Open Spaces
Initiative, Energy Mitigation Research and Outreach Initiative, and
other publications serve a range of environmental and natural resource
stakeholders including policy makers, government agencies, non-profits,
industry, and the public.
Established in 2001, WyGISC operates under the Office of
Academic Affairs and in close coordination with the Office of Research,
providing assistance to all units on campus and to numerous private,
local, state, and federal entities in Wyoming and the Rocky Mountain
region. Services include research collaboration, technical expertise,
geospatial technology short course training, and geospatial data dissemination.
Biodiversity Institute
Carlos Martinez del Rio, Director
Berry Biodiversity Conservation Center, Room 231
Phone: (307) 766-6240
Email: [email protected]
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/biodiversity
WyGISC encourages undergraduate and graduate student participation in its research projects and has sponsored students from the McNair
Scholars Program and other student research apprentice programs, as
well as graduate students affiliated with participating departments and
research centers. Part-time employment and internship opportunities
are often available. Inquiries may be directed to the center using the
contact information provided above.
The University of Wyoming’s Biodiversity Institute, established in
2012, promotes research, education, and public engagement around
biological diversity in all its forms and on all scales. The institute is a
center where scholars and the public convene to expand understanding of biodiversity science and to explore the interplay between human
society and the natural world.
The Biodiversity Institute is a division of the Haub School of
Environment and Natural Resources, whose academic programs and
institutes advance the understanding and resolution of complex environmental and natural resource challenges. The Biodiversity Institute
fosters conservation of biodiversity by enabling all citizens to participate
in scientific discovery.
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Research and Study
Statistical Consulting Center
UW National Park Service Research Center
The Statistical Consulting Center, a unit of the Department of
Statistics, exists to coordinate the statistical knowledge and skills available within the department with the subject-matter expertise of other
scientists throughout the university, and to bring that combination to
bear on applied research problems in diverse areas. The center can provide assistance in research design, sampling, data collection, and/or data
analysis for the full range of research needs. The initial consultation is
free. Thereafter, a variety of mechanisms are available to acknowledge
the contributions of statistical consulting to a given research project,
including co-authorship on a scholarly publication, membership on a
thesis or dissertation committee, direct compensation to the consultant
at private consulting rates, subcontracting with the center on a grant
project, etc. On occasion, the center can also offer paid employment
and internships to graduate students who have appropriate training and
skills to assist other researchers. For further information about any of
the services available through the Statistical Consulting Center, please
contact the center via the contact information above.
The research center operates in a field station at the historic AMK
Ranch in Grand Teton National Park, located 65 km north of Jackson,
Wyoming. The field station provides scientists abundant research
opportunities in the diverse terrestrial and aquatic environments of
Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks as well as the surrounding National Forests and Wilderness areas that make up the entire
Greater Yellowstone area (GYA). The station has housing for up to
60 researchers and provides terrestrial and aquatic laboratories, boats,
field equipment, conference rooms, internet service and a library, all
on site. A small grants program provides funding yearly for individual
proposals up to $5,000 as well as scholarship and intern funding for
projects conducted in the GYA. Field courses and conference are accommodated in the spring and fall seasons. A weekly seminar series
with a barbecue dinner is presented throughout the summer.
Ken Gerow, Director
337 Ross Hall, (307) 766-6600
(307) 766-4227
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/uwnps
Inquiries concerning the UW-NPS Research Center program should
be addressed to: Director, University of Wyoming-National Park Service
Research Center, Dept. 3166, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY
82071 or emailed to [email protected]
Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center
Stephen Bieber, Director
UW Office Annex, Second Floor
Dept. 3925; 1000 E. University Ave.
Laramie, Wyoming 82071
Phone: (307) 766-2189, Fax: (307)766-2759
Email: [email protected]
Web site: http://wysac.uwyo.edu
Red Buttes Environmental Biology Laboratory
Within a few miles of Laramie, the Department of Zoology and
Physiology operates the Red Buttes Environmental Biology Laboratory,
a 9,600-square-foot facility equipped to handle both aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates. An aquatic ecology and toxicology laboratory, uniquely
designed to accommodate a wide range of test conditions of water flow,
temperature and composition, is available within the facility. Animal
holding and surgical rooms are specifically constructed to accommodate
experimentation on small (e.g. mice, squirrels), medium (e.g. coyote,
badger) and large (e.g. elk, bighorn sheep) mammals. Outdoor corrals
and fish runs are also available on the 400-acre site.
The Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) provides information for decision-makers by collecting, managing and analyzing
data. WYSAC acts as a nucleus to the University for applied research,
policy analysis, needs assessment and evaluation studies, with special
emphasis on topics related to education, the environment, criminal
justice and substance abuse. WYSAC personnel provide assistance to
the academic community, University administrative units and both
the public and private sectors throughout Wyoming and the region.
Interested parties can call upon the center’s expertise in survey methods,
evaluation research, and information technology to carry out their data
collection and analysis on a contract basis.
Inquiries concerning the Red Buttes Environmental Biology
Laboratory should be addressed to the Department Head, Department
of Zoology and Physiology, Dept. 3166, 1000 E. University Ave.,
Laramie, WY 82071.
Rocky Mountain Herbarium
Located in the Aven Nelson Building, the Rocky Mountain
Herbarium and the associated U.S. Forest Service National Herbarium
contain more than 1,250,000 plant specimens. The primary functions
of the herbarium are to (1) serve as a source of information on the flora
of the Rocky Mountain region in general and Wyoming in particular;
(2) aid in the identification of plants submitted by ranchers, farmers,
county agents, and state and federal agencies throughout the region;
and (3) serve as a source of research and teaching material in systematic
and ecological botany. Thousands of specimens are loaned each year to
recognized institutions throughout the United States where research
requires a knowledge of western plants. The web site (www.rmh.uwyo.
edu) contains data on more than 700,000 specimens as well as thousands
of specimen images and interactive distribution maps.
Services include opinion polling, drawing and construction of
samples, design of questionnaires, computer data recording, tabulation
of data, policy analysis and software development. A computer-assisted
telephone interviewing system (CATI) is maintained in the center for
use by trained interviewers. The center has staff knowledgeable in
current US postal regulations for mail surveys, along with hardware
and software for scanning the returns. Surveys are also conducted by
e-mail, on the Internet, through in-person interviewing and in focus
groups. The center offers paid employment and internships to students
assisting in such tasks.
For further information on WYSAC or if interested in a graduate
assistantship with WYSAC, contact WYSAC via the contact information provided.
Open to university students and other qualified researchers, the
herbarium invites queries regarding the identification of plants. Those
persons wishing assistance in the identification of a plant should send
two specimens to the herbarium. Inquiries should be addressed to The
Curator, Rocky Mountain Herbarium, Department of Botany, Dept.
3165, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071.
87
Research and Study
Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research
Unit
Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
(WICHE)
(307) 766-5415
Web site: www.wyocoopunit.org
Email: [email protected]
www.coopunits.org/Wyoming
The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education
(WICHE) was created in 1953 by the governors and legislators of the
western states. The primary commitment is to provide access to educational programs through interstate cooperation. Wyoming provides
opportunities for qualified residents in the following programs:
The Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is supported by the University of Wyoming, the Wyoming Game and Fish
Department, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Wildlife Management
Institute. The three permanent unit staff members serve as full faculty
in the Department of Zoology and Physiology.
Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP) offers certified Wyoming
residents access to professional education in the fields of dentistry,
medicine, occupational therapy, optometry, osteopathic medicine,
physical therapy, physician’s assistant, podiatry, and veterinary medicine.
To be eligible for certification, the applicant must be a legal resident of
the State of Wyoming for one year immediately prior to enrolling in
professional school. Applications for certification are located at www.
uwyo.edu/hs/wiche-wwami-wydent-program/index.html and are due
no later than October 15 of the year preceding the anticipated start date
of professional school. Applicants who are accepted to a professional
program and who receive state support pay reduced tuition. In all fields
except veterinary medicine, students receiving state support must either
pay back the money expended on their behalf, or practice in their fields
in the state of Wyoming for three years. State support is dependent on
continued appropriations from the Wyoming State Legislature.
The Unit conducts research on many types of fish and wildlife issues.
A primary emphasis is on evaluating the ecology and management of
fish and wildlife in the northern Rocky Mountain region. Much of the
Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s field research is conducted
through the Unit. Both students hired as technicians as well as graduate
assistants are involved in Unit research. Additional details of the Unit’s
research program can be found at www.wyocoopunit.org.
For further information contact the Wyoming Cooperative Research
Unit, Dept. 3166, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY 82071, or
[email protected]
Study Abroad/Exchange
Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP): provides opportunities
for qualified Wyoming residents to attend distinctive or health-related
graduate programs in participating WICHE states and territories.
Those accepted pay resident or significantly reduced tuition at the
school they attend.
(307) 766-6681
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: www.uwyo.edu/studyabroad/
Study abroad and student international exchange opportunities
are available through the International Programs Office, located on
the first floor of the Cheney International Center. UW students with
a minimum 2.75 GPA are eligible to apply to participate in a wide
variety of for-credit programs of study outside the U.S. Some work
and internship options may be available. The exchange/study abroad
staff works with students individually to tailor the program of study
to their specific needs. Considerations are made for cost, financial aid
opportunities, transfer of credit, safety and health, time-to-graduation,
country or region desired, and optional foreign language requirements.
Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE): allows residents of participating states and territories to attend a participating institution at reduced
cost of 150% of the institution’s resident tuition. Not all institutions in
the participating states offer WUE opportunities.
The University of Wyoming invites competitive applicants from
participating states and territories and awards WUE to highly qualified
students. Information can be obtained from the UW Admissions Office.
Information about WICHE programs may be obtained from the
WICHE Certifying Office; Dept. 3432, 1000 E. University Ave.;
Laramie, WY 82071; (307)766-6704 or (307)766-3499 or [email protected]
edu or WICHE Student Exchange Program, 3035 Center Green Drive,
Suite 200; Boulder, CO 80301-2204, (303) 541-0214.
In addition to perfecting foreign language skills (in non-Englishspeaking countries) and learning about another culture in depth,
international education makes for a life-changing experience. It alters
perspectives by developing flexibility and critical thinking. International
education also engenders a sense of what it is to be an American, what
it is to be a citizen of the world, and who we are individually. Study
abroad and exchange can help clarify life and professional goals, and
often develops greater direction, focus, and motivation for the remaining years of university life, and beyond.
Wilhelm G. Solheim Mycological Herbarium
The Wilhelm G. Solheim Mycological Herbarium, housed on the
third floor of the Aven Nelson Building, facilitates the study of symbiotic and biotrophic fungi. The herbarium contains approximately
50,000 specimens of fungi from around the world and the largest collection of fungi in the Rocky Mountain Region. These collections are
available for study by qualified students and researchers. Specimens
may be borrowed by institutions without charge for a one-year period.
Inquiries should be addressed to The Curator, Solheim Mycological
Herbarium, Department of Botany, Dept. 3165, 1000 E. University
Ave., Laramie, WY 82071.
Through a combination of foreign partner universities, study
abroad consortia, and cooperating U.S. universities, UW provides
study abroad opportunities at hundreds of locations across the globe.
Exchange opportunities also exist – they represent programs where
students at partner institutions pay their home university tuition and
fees, then simply exchange places. As another path to an international
experience, self-designed programs of study with non-partner entities
can be arranged as well.
88
Research and Study
Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory
Commonly Held Misconceptions about Study Abroad
1174 Snowy Range Road, (307) 766-9925
E-mail: [email protected]
Web site: wyovet.uwyo.edu
Myth 1: I can’t afford to study abroad.
Fact: There are many programs available that cost the same or nearly
the same as attending UW.
Located west of campus and operated by the Department of
Veterinary Sciences, the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory (WSVL)
is responsible for diagnosis and reporting of animal diseases. Areas of
expertise include morphological and clinical pathology, bacteriology,
virology, toxicology, parasitology, electron microscopy, molecular
diagnostics, and serology.
Myth 2: I can’t use my financial aid to study abroad.
Fact: Financial aid can be used for study abroad. There are also
scholarships available to offset additional costs of study. Cheney
Grants and Fellowships are unique to qualified, full-time students
who study abroad from UW.
Myth 3: I can’t study abroad for less than a semester.
Cooperative diagnostic and research activities are conducted
with various state and federal agencies. The WSVL building also
houses a UW classroom, laboratories for the Wyoming Game and Fish
Department, and Wyoming Department of Agriculture Analytical
Services Laboratory. Students are encouraged to conduct domestic and
wildlife disease research in an interdisciplinary setting.
Fact: There are many short courses led by UW faculty for a shorter
period of time during the winter break, or spring break, as well
as recommended field courses with a study abroad component
offered in the summer session.
Myth 4: Because I speak English only, I am limited to Englishspeaking countries for study abroad.
For further information contact WSVL, 1174 Snowy Range Road,
Laramie, WY 82070.
Fact: There are a great many programs abroad for English speakers in
non-English speaking countries. In order to attract U.S. students,
many foreign universities offer courses in English.
Myth 5: I can’t graduate on time if I study abroad.
Fact: Study Abroad advisers work with you and your academic adviser
to select a place of study that offers the courses you require to
complete your degree on time.
Myth 6: My adviser doesn’t recommend study abroad.
Advice: Speak with your department chair and/or dean about this.
Your adviser may subscribe to the study abroad myths outlined
here. Don’t be swayed by them.
Myth 7: There is nowhere abroad I can complete courses in my major.
Fact: UW offers hundreds of study abroad sites overseas. There are
programs for every major.
Myth 8: It is dangerous to live abroad.
Fact: Study overseas is no more or less dangerous than it is in the U.S.
UW carefully selects and monitors our students’ study locations.
Just exercise the same precautions you do at home, when visiting
a U.S. city, and when walking at night.
Myth 9: Study abroad is not important.
Fact: Only 3% of U.S. undergraduates study abroad during college.
The U.S. needs its citizens to be internationally competent so that
the nation can secure itself and its economic future in the 21st century, and employers value the skills that come from study abroad.
For further information, contact International Programs at the
phone number or e-mail above, or by writing to Study Abroad and
Exchange, Department 3707, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, WY
82071.
89
Commonly Used Terms
Academic load: The total semester hours of credit for all courses
taken during a specified time—semester or summer session.
Academic probation: Probation is the status of an undergraduate
student who is not progressing satisfactorily toward his or her degree.
An undergraduate student shall be placed on probation at the end of
the semester or term when his or her cumulative grade point average
(GPA) falls below a 2.0; 3.0 for graduate students.
Academic reinstatement: Restoration of a student’s eligibility to
register for courses after being on academic suspension. This process
requires a petition that is first reviewed by the dean of the student’s
college or the Center for Advising and Career Services. Academic reinstatement does not guarantee restoration of financial aid eligibility
which is a separate process handled by the financial aid office.
Academic suspension: The status of a person whose enrollment at
UW has been terminated because of unsat isfactory academic progress
towards either an undergraduate or graduate degree.
Accredited: A term applied to a school or specific program which
has been recognized by a national or regional organization as meeting
certain academic standards for quality and educational environment.
The University of Wyoming, and all UW academic programs are accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central
Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Institutions of
Higher Education. This is the highest level of accreditation in the
United States. Some academic programs have professional standards
established by their respective accrediting associations.
Add and drop deadlines: The latest date in an academic term when a
course may be added or dropped from a student’s class schedule without
approval of someone other than the student. Adding and dropping of
courses is done through WyoRecords.
Admission: The process of being admitted to the university with the
opportunity to take classes.
AP exam: An Advanced Placement Examination from the College
Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) in a specific subject area available nationally to high school students. Obtain information on taking
the examination from a high school guidance counselor. Information
on university course credit for these examinations is available from the
Office of the Registrar.
Audit: Individuals who want to take a course but who do not want either a grade or credit for taking it may register as an audit. The instructor
for the course determines the amount of work and/or participation that
is required. Marks of either Audit/Satisfactory or Audit/Unsatisfactory
are assigned. Audit hours are charged tuition at the normal rate. Audit
hours are not used to determine full- or part-time status.
Banner: Banner is a suite of products that are used as our student
information system.
Class schedule: A publication containing a listing of all courses
scheduled to be offered during a specific semester or summer session.
Class Schedules are available on the Web.
CLEP test: Subject area examination administered by the College
Entrance Examination Board.
Concentration: A collection of courses within a major which focuses
on a particular subject area.
Continuing probation: A student is placed on academic probation at
the end of the semester or term when his or her cumulative grade point
average (GPA) falls below a 2.0. A student is considered on continuing
probation in subsequent semesters if the student earns a term GPA of
2.0 or above but whose cumulative GPA is still below a 2.0.
Corequisite: A course to be taken or a requirement to be fulfilled at
the same time as a particular course is being taken.
Cross-listed course: A course which is identical in content, title,
credit hours, and requirements which is offered by one or more academic departments. The four-digit course number must be the same.
This designation must be approved by the University Course Review
Committee.
Curriculum: The set of courses in a particular degree program. More
generally, the courses (in total) offered in a college or university.
Degree requirements: Degree requirements include all requirements
of the university (including University Studies Program), college, academic department, and major. All requirements must be successfully
met in order to obtain a specific degree.
Drop: To discontinue enrollment in a course or courses prior to the end
of the drop/add period at the beginning of a term. A dropped course
does not appear on the student’s academic transcript. Dropping from
a class does not influence a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress
measurement, but may impact the amount of financial aid a student
earns for the semester in question.
Dual-listed course: A course which is offered at both the 4000- and
5000-level that is identical in course prefix, content, title, and credit
hours. The last three digits of the four-digit course number must be
the same. The 5000-level course must require additional work beyond
that required for the 4000-level course. This designation must be approved by the University Course Review Committee.
Financial aid reinstatement: Restoration of one’s financial aid eligibility based on being granted an exception to financial aid or scholarship
rules. Financial aid restoration is a separate process from and is not
guaranteed by academic reinstatement.
Full-time: A student taking 12 or more credit hours at the undergraduate level or 9 or more credit hours at the graduate level is considered a
full-time student. During the summer session, undergraduate students
enrolled in 6 or more credit hours and graduate students enrolled in
4.5 or more credit hours are considered full-time.
Grade point average: The semester grade point average (GPA) is the
sum of all grade points earned in a semester or term divided by all credit
hours attempted for letter grade. Credit hours in courses in which marks
of I, W, S, or U were assigned are excluded. The cumulative grade point
average is the average of all grades earned at UW.
Lower-division course: Courses normally taken during the freshman
and sophomore years. Lower division courses are those numbered
between 1000 and 2999.
Major: The primary disciplinary interest or academic subject area of
a student as represented by one of the curricula offered by the various
academic departments. The undergraduate degree may or may not carry
the same title as the major. Every student has one or more majors but
may or may not have a minor or concentration.
90
Commonly Used Terms
Minor: A secondary subject area interest (to the major) represented by
a specified set of hours and/or courses. Differs from a concentration in
that a minor is not a subdivision of the major subject area.
Transfer credit evaluations: An evaluation of previous college-level
course work from another regionally-accredited academic institution,
international post-secondary institution, standardized test, or military
course work to determine whether courses are transferable to UW as
well as to determine any UW equivalents.
Option: A concentration of elective courses within a major which
emphasizes one aspect of the major, chosen by a student according to
his or her interests.
University Catalog: The University Catalog, is the official document
of the university which includes information on all undergraduate
academic programs and their requirements, courses offered by each
academic department, lists of faculty, policies and procedures related
to admission, financial aid, all registration activity, and tuition and fees.
A student’s degree requirements are based on the University Catalog in
effect the year he or she enters either UW or another catalog year as
approved with a petition.
Orientation: A program of one to three days on campus designed to
acquaint a new student with the facilities, policies, sources of information and assistance, and academic and social environment. Academic
advising and registration are also included.
Prerequisite: A requirement to be completed before enrollment in
a course or a degree program. Prerequisites for individual courses are
listed in their course description in this catalog. The statement, “or
consent of instructor” is implied for all prerequisites. Students are
responsible for being aware of a course’s prerequisites prior to enrolling in the course.
Upper-division course: Courses normally taken during the junior and
senior years. These courses are numbered from 3000 – 4999.
“W” Number: A student’s unique identifier in the Banner/WyoRecords system will begin with “W”. This “W” number replaces the
Social Security Number as a student’s unique identifier.
Registration: The process of officially enrolling into one or more
courses or matriculation at the university.
Withdrawal: To discontinue enrollment in a course or courses after the
end of the drop/add period. When withdrawing from one or more, but
not all, courses, a student should complete the process on WyoRecords.
To withdraw from all courses in a semester, a student should begin the
process in the Dean of Students Office. A mark of W will be placed on
the student’s academic transcript for each course. Withdrawal from a
course or from the university may impact both a student’s current and
future receipt of financial aid. Ask a financial aid office professional
before withdrawal.
Satisfactory academic progress: Satisfactory Academic Progress
only applies to federal financial aid applicants and recipients. Three
measures of a student’s advancement toward the earning of his or her
stated degree objective are 1) a grade point average putting the student
in good academic standing, 2) a ratio of credit hours earned compared
to credit hours attempted in the student’s most recent academic year,
and 3) a comparison of the number of credit hours attempted in a
college career compared to the number of hours required to earn the
pursued degree.
WyoRecords: The University of Wyoming portal used for communication with the campus community, registration activity, grade posting,
financial aid, course management, and advising. A specialized version
of WyoRecords is available for all enrolled students, faculty, staff, and
alumni.
Semester: The division of the calendar year used in academic scheduling. A semester is roughly 15 weeks in length.
Semester credit hour: The unit of academic credit for course work.
91
Courses of Instruction
Changes in Catalog Information
course, if different from the established semester credit-hours limit. For
example, “1-3 (Max.9)” means that a student may earn between 1 and
3 hours of credit for that course within one semester and a maximum
of 9 hours within a degree career. The course description indicates
any prerequi­sites for that course and if it is offered for satisfactory/
unsatisfactory grading only.
The course offerings and requirements of the University of
Wyoming are under examination and revision continually. This catalog
is not a contract; it merely presents the offerings and requirements in
effect at the time of publication and in no way guarantees that the offerings and requirements will not change.
Course Levels
Not all courses are offered each term. The listing of courses does
not imply a contractual obligation to offer the same during the year
of publication of this catalog. The university reserves the right to offer, limit, or cancel course offerings for academic, funding, or facility
considerations, and to cancel any offered course for which there is not
sufficient enrollment.
University courses are distinguished by number indicating five levels
of instruction as follows:
0000‑0999 Preparatory courses (no credit)
1000‑2999 Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores
3000‑4999 Primarily for Juniors and Seniors
5000‑5999 Primarily for Graduate Students
6000-6999 Law courses, WWAMI courses, and Doctor of Pharmacy courses
The university reserves the right to change approved course listings
at any time during a student’s term of residence.
Preparatory Courses Taught at UW by Laramie
County Community College
A bracketed course number [ ] indicates a previous number of the
same course. Double credit cannot be earned by repeating a course.
The University of Wyoming has contracted for Laramie County
Community College to offer preparatory courses on the university
campus. University students will register through the normal university
registration process. Inclusion of these courses in a student’s schedule
will count as part of the credit load for determining full-time status;
however, UW credit is not awarded. For further information, contact
the LCCC coordinator, Ross Hall, rooms 26 and 27, (307) 766‑2514.
Prerequisites are the primary factor which normally govern whether
a student enrolls for any particular course. However, individual departments and/or colleges may place additional restrictions on course
enrollments (e.g. enrollment may be restricted by student classification).
Enrollment in engineering courses is generally limited to engineering students.
Law courses are normally open only to students approved for the
program.
Course Credits
Graduate students may enroll in courses numbered 1000‑3999 to
satisfy undergraduate deficiencies but only courses numbered 4000
and above will be computed into the graduate GPA and allowed for
graduate credit.
The amount of credit offered for any course work published in this
catalog is based on and governed by prior university faculty recom­
mendation and institutional determinations.
A credit hour denotes a unit of academic work. Normally, one credit
hour is earned in a course meeting one hour per week for a semester
(15‑16 weeks). Each credit hour unit requires an average of three hours
of student effort per week. In variable credit courses, the efforts required of the students are proportional to the credit hours attempted.
University Studies Program Designations*
Even if topics differ in separate sections, variable credits limit the
credits which can be earned in that course in one semester and career
maximum limit the credits from that course considered toward any
one degree.
Format of Course Listings
On the following pages, courses approved for offering are listed by
college, program subject, and course level (number).
C1 =
Communication 1
C2 =
Communication 2
C3 =
Communication 3
FY =
First-Year Seminar
H
Human Culture
=
PN =
Physical and Natural World
Q
=
Quantitative Reasoning
V
=
U.S. and Wyoming Constitutions
*Please note: Throughout the department pages and course descriptions in this
catalog, a few of the USP 2015 designations will appear as such: C1 = COM1;
C2 = COM2; C3 = COM3; FY = FYS.
The heading which precedes the brief description of each course
shows the current course identification number; former course
number(s), if any, in brackets; course title; a designation in bold brackets
([QBQ], e.g. [USP 2003USP 2015]), if any, concerning applicability of the course to the University Studies Program (see below for
designation); an indicator, if any, concerning applicability of the course
in postgraduate-careers; the number of semester credit hours established
for the course (fixed or variable with the semester); and the career
maximum of credit for successive term enrollments in the identified
92
Course Prefixes and Description Index
Prefix
Department
Page
Prefix
Department
Page
AS
Arts and sciences
156
ENTO
Entomology
115
AAST
African American and diaspora studies
157
ENVE
Environmental Engineering
460
ACCT
Accounting
347
ERS
School of Energy Resources
558
ADED
Adult education
395
ES
Engineering Science
417
AECL
Agroecology
143
ESCI
Science Education
384
AGEC
Agricultural economics
101
ESE
Energy systems engineering
467
English as a Second Language
259
AGRI
Agriculture
96
ESL
AIR
Air Force ROTC
541
ESM
Ecosystem Science and Management
114
AIST
American Indian studies
160
ESS
Earth system science
544
AMST
American studies
164
FCSC
Family and consumer science
127
ANSC
Animal science
106
FDSC
Food science
109
ANTH
Anthropology
167
FIN
Finance
356
ARBC
Arabic
244
FREN
French
259
ARE
Architectural engineering
440
GEOG
Geography
220
ARMY
Army ROTC
539
GEOL
Geology
230
ART
Art
176
GERM
German
261
ASTR
Astronomy
295
GRK
Greek
263
ATSC
Atmospheric science
419
HIST
History
244
BE
Bioengineering
459
HLED
Health education
485
BMS
Biomedical Science
520
HLSC
Health sciences
469
BOT
Botany
183
HM
Human medicine
489
BUSN
Business
345
HP
Honors program
560
CE
Civil engineering
434
IMGT
Information management
348
CHE
Chemical engineering
424
INBU
International business
359
CHEM
Chemistry
188
INST
International studies
239
Instructional technology
403
CHIN
Chinese
259
ITEC
CHST
Latina/o studies
267
JAPN
Japanese
263
CLAS
Classics
258
KIN
Kinesiology
479
Languages
263
COJO
Communication and journalism
194
LANG
CNSL
Counseling
391
LATN
Latin
263
COSC
Computer science
448
LAW
Law
532
CRMJ
Criminal justice
201
LBRY
Information Literacy
551
DHYG
Dental hygience
470
LIBS
Library sciences
405
DSCI
Decision science
357
LIFE
Life Science
269
ECOL
Ecology
522
LS
Land Surveying
442
ECON
Economics
352
LTED
Literacy Education
383
EDAD
Educational administration
399
MATH
Mathematics
273
EDAG
Agricultural education
411
MBAM
Master of Business Administration
365
Online Master of Business Administration
366
EDCI
Curriculum and instruction
379
MBAX
EDEC
Early childhood education
388
ME
Mechanical engineering
463
EDEL
Elementary education
387
MGT
Management
360
Microbiology
134
EDEX
Exceptional children
407
MICR
EDRE
Educational Research
401
MKT
Marketing
362
EDSE
Secondary education
410
MLSK
Medical laboratory science
512
EDST
Educational studies
385
MOLB
Molecular biology
138
EE
Electrical engineering
456
MUSC
Music
283
EMAT
Mathematics Education
383
NASC
Natural science
413
ENGL
English
206
NEUR
Neuroscience
342
ENR
Environment and Natural Resources
546
NURS
Nursing
462
93
Course Prefixes and Description Index
Prefix
Department
Page
Prefix
Department
Page
PATB
Pathobiology
147
RNEW
Renewable resources
114
Russian
264
PEAC
Physical education - activity
479
RUSS
PEAT
Varsity Athletics
479
SOC
Sociology
319
PETE
Petroleum engineering
428
SOIL
Soil sciences
120
PHCY
Pharmacy
506
SOWK
Social work
515
PHIL
Philosophy
291
SPAN
Spanish
265
PHYS
Physics
297
SPPA
Speech language pathology
474
PLNT
Plant sciences
144
STAT
Statistics
324
POLS
Political science
301
THEA
Theatre and dance
331
PRST
Professional Studies
409
UWYO
University of Wyoming DSP
562
PSYC
Psychology
309
WIND
Wyoming Institute for Disabilities
519
Women’s studies
212
Zoology and physiology
338
RELI
Religious studies
315
WMST
REWM
Rangeland ecology and watershed management
117
ZOO
94
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