SURVEY OF PRODUCTION in CANADA 1926

SURVEY OF PRODUCTION in CANADA 1926
I'
V
CANADA
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
DOMINION BUREAU OF STATLSTICS
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH
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.
SURVEY OF PRODUCTION
in
CANADA
1926
Publi.hed by aihonty of the Hon. James Malcolm, M. P.,
Minister of Trade and Commerc*-.
OTTAWA
1928
c:I:IcN BfFuiU EPISCICS
d•;LLjAL STATICTICS BRANCH
(''N
j j rt.0 t ,.
lcrcir.icr..'t.otIciar,: h.H. Coats,i., F'.3.3.(,Hcr., P.R.C.'.
Gers-r1 3..tics r'arcn: S.. Cudrnore,
FTY OF' PR CC TON IC CAN,
196.
The nt value of Oanudi,xn producticn, according tc a survey just ccmpleted by l.r.ø
Oominioi bure.au of Statistics, was greater in 1926 than in any cther year since the
of post-war inflation in 19O. Tae value of production in 1926 was 6 .6 P.C. greater
than in 195, which held second place in the six-year pericd. The marked increase in
19E is accourtd for by the commencement of the active industrial conditions evident
in many lir.es throughout that year and down, to the present timE.. The net value cf cornrncdi.tis producd in Canada during 1926, as estimated by the bureau on the basis of
statistics cumpiled by its various branches, was 3,€13,COC,OOC. This aircunt ccmpare
with 3,325,000,000 in 195 and ç3,018,000,000 in 19 2 .
These values were produced by approximately 65 p.r. of the gainfully 'mp1oyed
perscrs in the ominion- tflose engaged in the various kinds of "productior.", define.d
accc.rdirig to the s'ua1 acceptation of the term as includir.g agriculture., torestry,
fisheries, trapping, minir.g, manufacturing, construction, etc. The remaining 35 p.c.
of the gainfully employed must also be considered to be producers in the larger sense
of trio word, bdr.g er.gaed in activities such as trars } ortaticn, trade, administration,
the. professions, domestic and personal service. Since. the values given in, the preceding
paragraph were produced by only 65 p.c. or thirteer,-twentieths ci' the employed population,
we may add se.ver.-thirteenths to the above totals to obtain a r.ugh estimate of the
value in dollars of the total productive activity of all the gainfully employed people
of Car 1 da, acccrdir.g to the ecor.ouist's definition of "prcductior.', which approximates
to the concept of national income. according to this broader interpretation, production
ir, 19E rpresente.d created values of
5,556,000,000, as compared with $5,115,00C,000
in 19z5 and .,4,E43,C!C..C,000 for 1924.
The.
rinc::s of Production.
Oor.fining our sub dser.t analysis to the net production of cornmoditio, "not"
pcc:i. tins signifying the value 'eft in the producers' hands after th elimination
of tn- vaie of the materials consumed in the production process , it is noteworthy that
in all the nine branches of production except forestry, increases were shown in 1926
cve.r 1925 while the decline ir,f ores -try was insignificant. The greatest percentag
air. was in construction, thp r,et output in 1926 being 251,C00,00O 3 an increase cf
r49,000,000, or 24 p.r. ilanufacturing, howevr, took first place ir the matter of
absolute. increases, the net output 0f the rr.anufacturing industries in 1926 being
l,5l9,0Cc- , 0(c, compared with 1,361,000,000 in 195, an increasp of e158,00C,000 or
mor than 1 p.c.ir.eral production was valued at 240,000,000 as compard with
27,CCG,C0C - , an increase of 14,000,0CC or 6 p.c. The advance in agricultural production was cver •13(,000,000 or 2.4 p.c., the total for 1926 being l,373 ,000,000.
Important increases were also attained in the fisheries -r1d electric power divisions
where the. gains were 17.5 p.c. and 12 p.c. respectively. A slight decrease was shown
in fcre-stry production, while the total for custom and re,air industries, estimated
for purposes of comparison.., also shows ar appreciable. increase.
£t summary of the grcss and net values of production in the years from
1923 tc
1926 is given by industries in Table. 1 or page 5, while details are given for 1924 to
19C6 in Table 3 er. pages 7 ar.c 3.
Reiatv' Importance of trio 3everul Brar, - res ci froucticr.
In viw of tne greater increase in manufacturing production. in 1926, the load
of manufactures over agriculture, which was 1.5 p.r. in 1925, was increased to 10
ir. 1926. Agricultural 1jroluctior. in 19 2 6 represented 38 p.c. of thp not output of
all branches, wnile the value added by the manufacturing processes in 1926 was 42.0
p.c. of the total nt production, as explained below, a number of the industries
listed under rranufarturos are also inc luded in the several oxtractivo industries with
which they are assccia -cedahen this duplicatior is eliminated, the cutp.ut of the
_r
I
p
I
'anufacturing industries not elsevihere included is 33.3 p.c. of the total ret protior.. Forestry held third place with a percentage of 8.7 P.C. in 1926 and 9.4
in 19.5. Construction moved up into fourth ,1ace , with a percentage of 6.9
followed closely by mining, with a percentage of 6.7 p.c.; in 195 mining re.r'serted 6.8 p.c. and cor.struction 6.1 p.c. The electric power group had an output
cf 2.L p.c. of the total net production. Repair work, fin:nir and trapping follcw'ri
iith percntage!s in i96 of 1.9, 1.6 and 0.5 respectively.
Th Trrd of Provincial Production during the Post-war Period of ieovey.
ihi1e each of the provinces novJec1 a eecline in the net value of productior. in
1921 as compared with 1920, the trend riring the period of recovery lasting frcrn 192 1
to 1926 exhibited considerable variation in the different provir.ces. In Prince
Zdward Island, the lowest point was reached in 1922, with substantial recovery from
JqZ4 to 1926. The depression in Nova Scotia was maintained from 1920 to 195, produetior. in 196 showing a marked reversal if the trend in preceding years; the great
strike in the coal mines waa partly responsible for the poor showing in 1925. The
trend in New Brunswick was generally similar to that in Nova Scotia, the chief variatior,
being an increase in 1925, '.iiti, a further suigit increase in 1926.
In .ueboc the decline in 1921 was very severe. During the subsequent pericc
the chief features were the substantial gain in 1923, the minor recession of 1921: er.d
the markd recovery in 1925, continued in 1926. The decline of 191 was also very
savre in Ontario, but after that year ir.oreuses were recorded. The increase in 1924
over the precedin year was very slight, but aside from this partial interruption, a
steady rate of increase was maintained from l92 to 1926.
The special feature in the case of Manitoba was the marked increase in 194,
compared with the preceding year. The decline of 1925 was more than counterbalanced
by tii increase in 1926. .ihile a decline was shown in Saskatchewan in 1921 , the total
cf 1920 was exceded in 1922 and again in 1925, when agricultural revenues w(-rp very
sati3fa"tory. -iigh p oints in the net value of production in Alberta were attair.ed
in 1923 and 1926. In British Columbia, steady increases were shown during the recovery from 1922 to 1926, the upward trend being fairly continuous during the fiv years.
Comparisons sf 1926 with 1925, by Frovincs
The net value of produ':t ice snowed incr asi s during 1926 compared with 195
in eight provinces and th( , Yukon, while a decline was experienced in Saskatchewan.
The increase in Prince Edward Island Was nearly
brunswick showed an increase of 43,00OXCO or 3.3 p.c.
was 30,070,00C or 30 P.C. Production in çuebor during
sentir.g an inreas cf 5,00C,000 or h p.c. ever 1925.
,'iC'
an
9 j.
3,000,000 or 12 p.c. New
while the gain in Nova Scotia
1926 was6l,oOo,COe, reproThe total for Ontario was
increase of 11 3, 000 , 000 or
r1aL.1.aton w'owr. in the Prairie Provinces in this ccmparisor..
Saskc.tchewan •xperier.oed a decline of .9 ,000,00C or 2 p.c. , while the marked increan.
of 37,00O 3 OOG' or 14 p.c. was shown in Alberta. The increase in Llunitoba WLS alsc
substantial, amounting tc 19 ,000,000 or 10 p.r.
The considerable increase of 11 p.c.
was sncwr. in British Columbia, where the net value if production was 289,0OO,O00.
Table 2 for summary of values.)
Relativ' Prou.tior. by Provircs
Ontario. and uebec held first and eLaond places among the provinces in the
ret value of production, and the percentage of Ontario to the total was ever higher
than in 1925.The net output ir. the twc provinces during 1926 represented 38.0 P.C.
and 23.8 p.c. respectively, compared with 37.9 p.c. and 23.9 p.c. in 1925. Saskatch'.war held third place with a percentage of 9.7 in 1926, compared with 10.8 in
1 9 2 5. Alberta occupirI fourth place in 196 with a prcentagu of 8.1, while British
Columbia was fifth with a percentage of 8.c, and Manitoba sixth with a percer.tag of
-
• .3ccLi,u Lrunswick and Prince Edward Island were rxt in irnportarc in
order rued with perc-ntages in 1926 of 3.4 and 2.5 and 0.7, r.epctively. The
eon Territory ccr.tribued 0.2 to th total.
Typ;s cf Froductiie cctiviti;: in ttirin: s, 1926.
Prction ic Nova 3cotia was principally in ti agric ultural, rrturir.
rc1 mining industries, which were respectively acccuctablc for 31 p.c., 28 P.C. and
23.5 p.c. of tn net output of the province; the contribution of manufactures, asid'
from processes carried on in connection with the extractive industries, was 20.6 p.c.
In view of the recession in the lumber industry in New Brunswick, agriculture tooK
first place us a producer of new wealth, the proportion being 36.6 p.c. , whilc
forestry furnished an output of 29.7 p.c. Manufacturing occupied third place with
an output of 19 p.c., tallcwed by fisheries with 5.9 p.c.gricu1ture , iric1udir
fur frrning, contributed 66.6 p.c. of the net output of Prince Edward Island. A
decline in the net output of forestry and construction in the Maritime Provinces was
counterbalced by increases in agricultere, rrar.ufactures, mining and other lines.
The net result was that the value of production was 16 p.c. grater in 1926 thar, il,
the preceding year, Nova Scotia alore showir.g an increas of nearly 30 p.i'.
Th product thrived from manufactures in uobec was greater than
any other industry. ;anufactures, aside from the output of establishments associated
with the extractive industries, contributed 43.9 p.c., while the net output of the
entir: manufacturing division, referred to the same base, was 53.7 p.c. Farming
am second with a production of 24.3 p.c., and construrtion with an output cf 11.9 p.c.
occupied third place. with the exception of agriculture, increases were shown in
each of the brunches of production in 1926, as compard with 1925. The ircreasos in
manufactures and in the generation of electrical energy reached 13.3 p.c. and 13.7
p.c. respectively.
The r.-t production from the manufactures of Ontario, when stripped of all
duplication, was 649,66E,662 or 47.3 P.C. of the total, ccrnpar-ri with 376,09 2 ,000
or, 27.6 p.c. from agricultur. Construction held third place with 6.9 p.c. of the
total, and forestry folio'.'. d with 6.4 P.C.
The mining output was 6.2 p.c. of the ret
production o1 the provirc . The increases in 1926 over 1925 in agric ulturc, constructior,, Jectric pou,r, trapping, repair work and manufactures rnre thur courterbalanced the decline in tb ru.tinirig branches of production. The net output of
manufactur-:s increased by 71,700,000, and agriculture showed a gain of 14 ,70c,000.
ixcept in forc.stry, fisheries and construction, Ontario led the other provinces and
divisions in the pruductd.veness of the main branches of industry. The province
yi ided prredence ie forestry operations and in constructior, tc uebec alone , VJhli'
British Columbia, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick obtained a greater income from the
fish.ris. Nearly 51 p.c. of the net manufacturing output of the country was cor.tributd by Ontario, and 47.5 P.C. of the 'agricultural incorfio was derived from the seine
source.
About 90 p.c. of the output of Saskatchewar, was obtair.ed from farming, which
also largely predominated as a producer of new wealth ir. Manitoba and Alberta, the
prcpor'tior.s being 60 P.C. and 75 p.c. respectively. Mineral production, chiefly
coal-mining, held s.cond place in alberta, with an output of 9 p.c. of the provincial
total. Manulacturir.g was second in importance in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Larger
grair. yi1ds accounted for the increase in the net production of Manitoba und Alberta,
while -agricultural inCOme showed a decline in. Saskatchewan. Despite the decline in
Saskatchewan, the net value of production in th' three Pr:Jrie Prcvir.c'-s showed an increase ov.r 1925 of
47,00C,00( or 6 p.c.
The net production from rranufacturii.g in British ;olumbiu during 1926 vias in
excess of 4 11 1 ,7 0 0,000, but mor, than half of this amount was derived from irnr.ufactur irg processes closely associated -.ith the primary industries ) especially legging and
fishing. The remainder,
4,GQ0,000, was 16.6 p.c. of the net output of the provir.c€-.
sid from nnufacturing, forestry constituted the ohi'f source of r.e' wcalih - about
6.6 p.c. of the iotai output of th province was contributed by the for' ot. Mir.ir.g
and farming followed in crder, with oercentages of 23 and 12 resptctively. The gen,.ral increase in the net output of production in the province during 192 indicaten
ti-cit the. lmprov-:mn.erit Jr. business conditions was well rlistribut'ei throughout t}- ' main
branch'.s of industry. (See Tables 4 and 5 for details).
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thj ci Computation
Thu chief difficulty Cncourterei in the preparation of a staenient cf, genra1
production is the duplication, resulting from the i.endency in usual Icractice to rrau
undue extension of the corcupt of several of the branches of pro ductior,. For example,
the making of brick, tile and ceuert are fr.quently included in 'mineral productior"
as being th; first finished products of commrcial value resultin g from the producticn
process; fre4uently, hcevur, they are regarded as "manufactures" in VjeW of the
nature of the production process - both allocations being correct according to th
point of vi.ew. The breatur part of the duplication requiring adjudtment consists in
•:eIactuirJb processes which are carried on in close association with the 1rimary
•r xtractive ir,dustri-s, for exampi;, dairy factories, ehich ar; closely associated
u, farming are regardea as manufacturing industries. Shipbuilding may also be
eJiocated as a part of construction or ireluded in th total for manufacturing. To
guard igainst any inisccnception in this regard the various dispositions of the items
failing under more than on- category are shovin in Table 3.
"Gross" and "Nut' Pro Suction.- Thu values of products are shown under two
hu3.dir.gs , narely, "grc.ss' and "nut". 'Gross" production shows the total val* of all
the individual coruodities produced under a particular heading. "Net" production
represents an attempt to eliminate the value of materials consumed in the productior.
proc.ss. For purposes of ordinary economic discussion, the nut figures should be use
in prtfcrr;nce to the gross, because of th large amount of duplication Whion th€
latter includes cn account of thu necessity of making the individual items se].f contained.
Int-rfr;tatior ct' Itros. - Thu primary industries of agriculture, fishing,
forestry, e.inie, tc. , ar separated in this statement from the secondary of
manufacturing procuoses. Th clos association btwen the two and the ovurlappings
that ru apt to occur hav already beer pcintd out. As furth';r .-xpiainirg the
rocedur , ti.et sac ben followed in drawing up th; tabis, th- following notes are
-
igrictltur. - fairy i'actoriLs are included under this heading; farm dairy
prcH to (gross) enc lude tb rk1ilr consumed whole and sold to dairy factories, and
huttr, tr. , mao on the farm.
'cr.:stry. - For.stry production is understood to consist of thu operations in
th woods as w:.11 as thos J saw-mills and pulp-mills, the latter being limited to
the making of first products such as lumber, lath, shir.gls, pulp and cooperagu stock.
Fur Production. - The item of fur production is limited to wild life producticr..
To obtain a. total of tn 1eltries produced in Canada, it would he necessary to add
to the wild life output tb production of pelts on fur farms.
iir'era1 Production.- Ur.dr mineral production all items are ir:cluded that
mignt b a] locet d to "manufactures". Considerable ov€ rlapping eXIStS as between
"mis rd production" on the One hard and 'manufactures" or tb; other. The Bureau
prsents tb. itail d statistics of these groups (the chief of which ar smelting,
brick, certant, lime, td.) in its reports on mineral production, since their product
is the first to which a ccreme rcial value is ordinarily assigned.
Total manufacturir..e.Te figure giver. fcr th heading is a comprehensive or.'
including t}i svral Ite me liet d with the c-xtractive industries abcvu , though alsD
fru ntly r;garucd as "rrenu1'ectur:s", viz. , dairy factories, fish canning and curing,
sa.-mills, pulp-rr.ills, shipbuilding and certain mineral industries. This duplication
is eliminated from th grand total as well as from "manufactures, n.e. S.", listed
ir. Tubi 3.
uanefsctarir.g, r.... s.- Thu figures given for manufactures, r4.-.s., are
xclusive of te calu of tL products of all manufacturing processes ciosiy
associated with th extractv industries that ar frequently included under this
suading; ht r4ce it is obvious that the grand total is equivalent to an wicunt obtained
y .fidirig the values for manuf.ctures, r. .. s. , and for thu other eight QivsiOss.
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NEW
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T:
I
Jjvjjc.n
924
1923
Lidus Lr3,
b
15
Net
riculture1,440 ,1,5u1,u1,Y(1,o(,1,530,41,7j1,146,u95,50C 1,792,o,o071,342,u09,42C 1 ,179,175,253 1,373,J'l•:,000
4 26,69o,350
313 ,74o ,537
Fisherios
54,019,235
4.,5,545
Trapp iri
16,164,559
225,055,74o
Fc r e st r y
,773, 11 9
3l2,u,5)4
311,265,0'47
43. ,745,d13
313, 41 2 ,b42
56,U14, 651
44,53 ,:j5
61 ,o,6,u67
47,942,131
73,052,9 0 5
1,1o4,559
14 ,7 05, 6 3 4
14,/o5,634
14, 77b,173
li, ,7j...,173
17,6u9,036
17 ,.6u5 ,u36
214 , 75 , 331
230,016,492
253,512,742
226,5u3,333
279 ,674,700
240, 437 , 123
433,d16,94
209 ,53 ,4u
4
)4
1tic Fo,er
kO Lal
Primary
2,7,'t/I,uo2 1,7;1,.2i,123 ,.?C),22u 2,ci;C,7,4O-,u24,5+',4d3 2,',',i13
r
107,1 1 '+,-r!331u,1,o12,1U2,L
'cstructir.324,7,i5.212,155,020
and repair (a)90,o37,3cl 5d,053,266 90,d37,3515Li,053,2 6696,2&),00C 01,34,000.07,j67,9OO6 d,]3,O00
U125'+,1 1 bC,079,5U7
.anufactures (b) jOL1 ij , 02
-,
Tctal Second-
ry PrciducLion (b) 340,31
i..LCT
,, uu,
f:
,dl1,52,3),u'aJ, 790 ,.
, ;i3,741,0b4,b71
; i ,, 21•+, 5j0 ,, 3673, 2aa
(a)Onttics oftc:..Repair iere not clleetcd aftei 152 , ;t.d tL:r-ra,ct1s for-tJ
The tctajs for 1925/11ere estikod acccrdin to. 1y.ta.; crInicr rftring.
.L524,
ii.
and 1526
(L)
The iter "Lanufacturis" includes dair7 factories, sa'.;:.il.c, pu1 1 :i1s, fisr. cannir, and curing, shipouilding and certain mineral inLstfies,
v:hich are also included in cthr headings above. This dup1icaion amounting in 1523 to a gross of V501,320,i12 and a net of 291,4U3,9C3, in
1924 to a gross cf 503,44(3,53 and a nei of 2'f5,j1u,9E, in 1525 to a i'C5S cf03,13,3-( ac. it of y 32,j4,606 and in 1526 c a icss
r
13,c. .F.
4.
RW
•
___
I
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z4 tc
R•J2. 1..
i
rrta;(
ci Total
-
2 4
GrcValue
It Value
24,370,343
16, 1 38,3 6 1
Icva Scct.a
145,356,067
New Bruri5wlck
1Jt
aluo
i'2.
rercortaeG
cf Total
Fercentages
1 9 2
csValue
Net Value
of Tctal
Net
rc ss Value
Net Value
C.E
30,433, 2 99
23,110,406
0.7
31,C4o,019
23,9 4,c9C
0.7
90,071,433
.2
143,322,354
94,06,633
2.9
1E9,2d9,434
122,90,2bJ
3.4
127, 4 29,u91
70,296,070
2.6
141,,85,238
o7,097,61 4
2.6
143,89,963
5o,004,329
2.5
( uebed
1,07,31 6 , 65 6
729,992,866
24.2
1,318,067,0 8 7
795,993,53 1
23.9
1 , 4 27,395,573
860,554,498
23.8
Ontario
2,147,755,210
1,217,764,312
40.3
2,260,740,955259,737, 13 8
J7.9
2,473,574,405
1,372,596,603
3u.0
279,326,851
190,022,463
6.3
290 ,3 6 3, 2 5 8
lc1,977,811
30 4,955, 0 2 4
200,635,190
3j0 ,903, 24. 0
2 31, 254 , 4 7 1
7.9
4 6 7, 63 2 , 165
360,433,59
1C.0
430,401,912
351,744,9 4
290,589,566
210,972,370
7.0
356,165,710
257,040,994
7.7
379,2 8 1,71 8
294,1u1,181
366,499,403
236,016,575
7.8
4 00,373,303
260,941,481
7.9
447,353,935
2d9,19,42 4
2,60,1E.0
2,o51,140
0.1
3,97u,55
3,95E,127
0.1
4 ,53u,1,37
3,010,122,u6i
100.0
5,41 2 ,657,934 3325, 1 15,59 4
1000
Frince 22..'ar2Is1ard
~
LanitGba
asktche ar.
Alberta
ritih Colunbia
Iukor.
GRAND TOTAL
10111128 F.
VL
0.0
,
,61L,t7'
3,013,455,54c
108
L
I
I
ON
(
-7iOF THE vij o F:ODUCIIO: I::nTc- 19214, 1925
A.iD 1926, ITDICATLG T:THoD OF c0i.1tTTA:r::
-
Clc.ssiiication
:proc'.uction
1924
19251926
$
ricu1ture
?iuld Crops
Fruits aid Veet'.'o1es
:1e products
Tobacco
Grass and clover seed
lIOjICY
Flax Fibre
9140,865,000
143, o35,000
5,991,000
14,359,000
3,300,000
14,339,000
712,000
ToLl Fiela iiusbndry ............ 1,003,201,000
c.ri £iL.1s
We ol
Dz - iry Products
Diry Butter
Creciiery Butter
Herce Hade Cheese
Factory Cheese
$
1,078b 64, 100
147, 5r,000
5,255,000
7,00)4,000
3,59 14,000
$
1,039,721,000
U2,706,OCO
14,596,000
7,380,000
5,097,000
1,956,000
203,000
2,~ 9,000
5 4, ooo
1,1145, 19iJ, 100
1,1oi,14614,00o
~
98,637,000
175,383,000
14,i14o,000
3,771,000
-
:jiscellaneous Factory Products
iiilk Coiisuiaed fresh or other-
wise used
Poultry and es
Fur Farming
29,3 47,000
6 3, 62 5, 203
32,128,799
214,201,923
15, ?2 4, 173
36, 571,55b
16, 98 2, 7 4 7
85,585,1463
60,536,000
92,383,0)48
6 9, 6 75, 000
76,615
63,005,097
95,07
28,253,000
61,753,000
80,000
28,505,000
17, 767,000
109,658,OCO 1/
83,569,000
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Pelts
jiim1 as
Tot.1 àninal Husbandry..........
Tot. 1 A.;ricu1tur.1 Proluction.
'orustry
665,000
782,000 1 ,225, 0 CC
2,553,000 2,597,0002,295,OCO
137,69 14,500(2)197.,691',3 5o(2)271,0,300
1,1140,595,500i,3L1.: .:,s:9,1420 1,373,31414,000
-
Los for Liriber
Pulp Wood
Raii'47ay t i e s
All other forest products
75,309,51773,320,3697,921,416
44,2141,5s4 145,012,602 63,007,119
114,251,1450 114,1491,5576,792,oz
76,3)414,159 73,1452,033 55,715,706
Total Forestr; Oporrtions
Sw i1l Droducts
Pulp mill products
213,1 146,710?09,276,5612014,1436,325
Totcl 1.i11in,. 0er.tions.........
Tot1 Forestr- Production........
Fisheries
Fish soil fresh by fisherien
98,119,13710)4,13,231 105, 1405,256
311,265,5147 313,1412,3142312,51414,554
5 2 ,036,7 14951,932,50056,261,176
52,203,731 52,1 147,080
-
Srles to cannin and curing
estai)1ishe:ItS
Fish douestic ily cured
:is'n can:iinand curing
esta'o1ishents(va1ue added)
Total Fisieries Production .......
15,5314,961
16,060,932
15,6314,657
11, 1450,1416
13,953,936
16,692,352
2,O1,312
1,500,207
1,535,182
15,1457,546
16 9 14 27,056
19 1 1495,1412
'ff,534,2)5
7,9'-i2,131
b,e0,o33
-
Fur Production (Wild Life)114,755,6314 114,778,173 17,609,036
(1) Three per ce.It for wastae was deducted frcm vclue of milk consumed fresh in 19 2 6.
(_) Cost of feed is deducted from the 'ross for rnia1 husbadry.
21
-
TABLE 3. - DETILD STT 2T o: TIM VALUE OF P.RODUCTIOI' IN CAiDA DURING 1924, 1925
AD 1926 ITICATING THE LITHOD OF COiUTCI011 (Concluded).
Net Production
C1assificctioi i;inin
Pig Iron from Canadian ore
Other metallics
Salt refining
Other non-metallic
Cement
rick and tile
Fire brick and fire clay
Clay sewer pipe
Stoneware and potter
Lime
Other structural materials and
clay products
Total lineral Prbcluction ..........
lectric Liht and. Power (a)
1924
1925
1926
54,199
102,352,329
1,37)4,780
70, 1421,229
13,653,517
7,046,355
584,838
1,3 4 3,197
240,687
3,176,541
.117,082,296
1)410,697
70, 14.141,10)4
l4,O)4G,704
7,37 4 ,551
702,707
1,182)45)4
269,979
3,387, 6 52
-,
115,237,581
1,4SO,149
63,759,995
13,013,26
8,146,51
706,9814
1,77,2 4 7
322,726
3,761,1484
9,333,67 14
1O,685187
209,533, 24.06
226,53,333
12,811,160
214.0,1437,123
714,616,863
79,3)41,58)4
86,933,733
Totcl Primary Production1,795,681,1485 2,02)4,9)47,1483 2 , 0 69,529, 109
Cons tructi. on
Genercl construction 178,948,500193,500,000242,271,000
Shipbuilding
8 ,165,9158,602,8906,617,323 Total Construction 187,11 14 , 1415202,102,890251,066,323
Custom and repair 58,053,26661,53 14,00068,7143,000
Lanu.factu.re S
Vegetable Products
Aniiia1 products
Textiles
Wood and paper
Iron and steel
Non-ferrous metals
Non-metallic minerals
Chemicals
Uiscellaneous including
Central Electric Stations
-
220,330,7 14.6
109,733,926
141,803,602
300,1425,516
1 74 ,107,327
50,9 6 8, 0 79
76,832,578
53,905,3214
227,526,377
115,863,1479
.1)43,950,12)4
310,642,862
205,041,508
85,701,76
78,969,8140
56,607,527
244,004,302
122,920,658
163,502,261
339,062,685
247,168, 1476
92,888,719
91,863,60)4
62,1464,944
128)486,801
136,576,1424
155,303,597
Totl Lnuf&ctures (b)
1,256,6143,901
1,360,879,907
Total SecondLry Production
1,501,611,582
1,6214,516,797
1 79, 2146
1,839,010,569
3,016,182,081
3,325,115,594
3, 61 3)455,9 148
GRAD TOTAL (b)
1 ,51 1 9,
(a) This amount is exclusive of duplication involved in purchases of power by
reporting compcnies.
() The itea "total iiianuactures° includes the ol1owiag industries which are also
shown elsewhere, the eaount of the application being deducted from the grnd total.
Dairy factories
Sai11s end pulp mills
Fish cannintM curing
Shipbui1din
Uiaeral industries
Electric power
Total
iaufactures, n.e.s.
35,222,1446 96,119,137
1 5, 1 57,5)46
8,165,915
27,1476,1714
95,169,768
279,310,986
977,332 ,9 1 5
30,653,832
108,397,898
16)427, 056
8,602,690
57,679,128
1 02,567,6 2
3214,3248,666
31,950, 1 39
lO6,L4.06,256
114 ,15 6 , 635
8,617,323
62,17,5)4)4
G,933,733
315,083,730
1,036,531,221
1,204,095,516
'!-
I
a
Lj.BL
- V.LUE OF P0Ufi 1T;Q;5 o'Lu:i
4.
Priice.dward
1925
Grcss
Arjcu1ture
Forestry
Fisheries
Trappirg
24,803,854
.Is1ar:
19,590,009.
Gross
cv a
:
i'
Scotia
1 9 25
1926
Net
1925192
Net
rcss
1926
Net
Gross
Net
26,302,220
2 2,53 0 , 00 0
41,164,453
31,109,785
4 5,70 6 ,342
38,054,000
857,239
784,911
797,959
743,082
1 1 ,757, 8 71
9,923,622
12,363,993
10,177,119
2,228,604
1,598,119
1,923,866
1,355,934
13,914,346
10,213,779
16,551,521
12,505,922
3,349
3,349
4,454
4,454
226,354
226,394
177,137
177,137
1 7,625,612
17, 62 5, 612
28,873,792
26,67,792
-
-
-
-
Electric Fcwer
132,573
132,234
198,891
156,607
2,559,231
2,028,845
2,755,045
2,2u6,171
Ccnstructior,
345,600
224,500
374,000
243,000
5,246 ,2C2
3,572,058
4, 8 32,3 02
3,325, 1 79
Custcrr axd Ppair
249,000
150,000
2(2,900
167,0 0C
3,240,000
2,070,0 00
3,611,000
2,310,000
Larufactures (a)
4,290,149
1,484,484
4,0(9,335
1,431,375
(,033,7u1
27,179,C5
73,505,642
34,36,377
Grafld Tctal (a)
30,433,299
23,110,406
31,40,019
25,9 4 , 8 9O
143,32,354
94,82b,633
169,289,434
122,096,283
(a) See page 13 for nct in regard tc duplictior.
TAL 4 - 'ALL OF rtL0oT1CN IN T- FRC.VIN CF Ci:ILA HiRiNG 192 AKI. L9/ BY 1LUOTiU
QUEBEC
NE!3RUN3ICJC
1925
39,962,109
40,3 4 ,71 0
5,824,071
161,754
1,743, 85 8
Fisheries
Trapping
Mining
21ectric Power
Construction
Custom & Repair
Mar.ufactures (a)
1,624,445
4,373,3 00
2, 0 25, 00 0
73,3+,660
192t
31,5 12 , 1 7 4
28,994,744
4,796,589
161,754
1,743,858
1,259,633
2,841,000
l,29,000
28,1u,368
38,81,553
38,981,389
6,338,097
234,832
1,811,104
1,859,611
4 ,593, 000
2,260,000
74,122,239
1925
:
Net:
Gross
Ne t
Gross
Agriculture
Forestry
-
Grc
192€
-
Net
32,906, 000
305,405,788
221,49,735
26,767,453
132,587,113
96,402,357
5,325, 4 7 8
734,832
1,811,104
1,399,166
2,989,000
1,445,000
30,047,278
3,486,418
2,199,306
24,272,593
26,129,838
129,9 0 4,685
16,570,000
8 20,5 6 3,757
3,044,919
2 ,199,306
24,272,593
22,764,893
84,d1,928
±1,860,000
4 0 8 ,103,754
GRAL' TOTAL(a) 141,589,238 87,097,61414C,699,963 90,004,329 1, 316, 067,087 795,993,531
WTARI
1 92 5
Gross
Agriculture
Forestry
Fisheries
TrappLng
Mining
Electric Power
Construction
Custcn & Repair
bianufactureE (a)
GFNL TCTAL(a)
(a) See paGe
11/13/28. U.
520,244,520
131,602,383
3,436,412
3,34,912
93,814,720
49,651,990
123,797,433
4 4 ,232,0 00
1,527, 1 54,660
2,2(&,7rO,955
Net
3E3,400,46A
93,271,213
3,43€.,412
3,3C,912
87,992,370
35,427,897
79,67 4 ,315
23,291,000
698,216,992
1,259,737, 1 3 8
13 for note Jr, regard ti, dup1icaticr.
-
Gross
1 9 2
558,984,5O1
127,33 8 , 14 7
3,152,193
3,799,348
92,536,728
56,332,508
144,894,829
4 9,5 10 , 000
1 , 6 77,933,504
2,473,74,405
Oross
38,092,000
146,708,685
5,53 4 , 245
1,466,939
1,56€,843
2,276,759
4,767,119
13,115,579
7,473, 000
124,145,763
2 90 ,3(3, 28
7,E95,69
3,152,193
3,759,348
84,702,296
39,778,330
94,060,078
31,650,000
769, 886 ,831
1,372,596,603
liet
29E,90,988
149,30,270
3,5 81 ,3 84
2 ,923, 8 09
25,956,193
31,550,700
1 57,8 8 8,388
20,500,000
905,300,624
2 09,33 8 , 000
99,65,34
3,110,9E4
2,923,b09
25,956,193
25,894,000
102,000,142
13,1u6,000
462 ,373,2 1 1
1 , 42 7,395,573 d0,554,498
MANITOBA
1 9 2 5 -
Net
Grc.ss
1 9 2-
Net
112,402,851
4,414,973
1,4EE,939
1,566,843
2, 2 76,759
4,245,537
8,626,039
4,772, 0 00
52,462,650
181,977,811
Nt
145,495,121
4,792,129
2,320,003
1,5156,239
3,073,52 8
5,35o,630
19,212,701
8,1b2,000
132,71o, 4 52
3O4,95,C24
120,166,00C
3,904,185
2,32o,003
1,550,239
3, 0 73,' 28
4,770,16(
12,479,354
5,334,006
57,717,923
200,835,198
'F
I
AN 15 2 Y ii±STI1S, (vrit.)
CAsgATCE,iA
AL PERTA
1 9
Agrici1tui
Forectry
Fi3heries
Trapping
9
Net
0
(
2,5,'r75
33
2,5 0 5,3db
494,082
1,796,956
1,076,392
J1ectric Power
2,562,368
1,923100
Constructicn
Custom & iepair
c,LL ,000
I anufacturs (a)
4C
GRAND TCTAL(a).67,C2,165
,
1,796,096
1,076,392
2,0'r9,200
3,200,00L
3,0-9,0U0
1 5 ,(5
(G,433,59
RITIH
2
Net:
-
I
d1,t,CuI'
2,0o3,71
44,20b
1,609,622
1,193,39 4
3,085,747
14,251,5 00
6,720,000
7,10o,097
r30,481,912
2,70,729
3(,2
,'
'Jro2E
(rrcso
25,1,9t
i9,(C,32
3,0,5o
4 5 7 ,5 0 4
3,37 0 ,3 45
4,7oo,7 6
450,504
2,006,282
25,31,866
3,533,728
3, 06 7,5 00
6,31,000
7),1k?,17
35C,165,70
2,006,202
749,076
2,170,57
26,977,027
3,018,791
10,050,400
7,00u,000
03,),E)1
379,201,7Io
3,202,354
2,51-,000
4,05I,000
29, 7 57,007
57,0)i0,994
-
4,017,87
749076
2,1/o,567
26,977,027
3,42,654
6,519,000
'r,525,006
395,U95
296,101,101
YJKGN
192h
19
hOt
2i9,71,00C
-
2 5,3 10 , 666
:
1?E
let
1 9 2 6
Net
,
444,288
1,609,622
1, 1 93,394
3,01,082
9,260,000
4,296,000
,u2
35L ,744,9 4 6
CCL'Ji.FIA
192
1 9
Lirc 6S
Net
G rosu
-
-
-
-
-
1
Agri1ture
f0,J51,d90
3~,1.1,43C
4 7, 6 93,751
35,495,000
10 c,65 6 ,3 06
30,572,521
73,753, 2 02
22,.-L,61u
,395,519
E',c5,212
16,635,050
5,197,00C
113,6 1 7,771
37,565,891
1,779,111
97,021,201
10,41,862
29,oC6,413
5,232,0Cc
2 1 6 ,775,4
77,410,561
27,367,109
1,779,111
65 5 622,976
6,119,144
19,412,570
5,910,000
99,9,855
2 4 9, 1 19,71-p
111,773,090
GRAND TOTAL(a) IOL.,373,303
260,911,b1
4- 7, 2 7,75L
209,109,011
Forestry
Fisberjes
Trapping
1iinirg
1ectric Power
Construction
Custon, & Repair
ivanufacture(a)
i,395,51
0 5,992,301
9,237,5b4
24,562,002
6 ,13 0 , 00 0
7,356,703
t1kL1oatiLr.
11/13/26. I.Y.
.15,370
-
2,C7,628
1 ,79 1 ,641
88,726
15,37C
2,07,828
1,791,641
74,268
-
-
3,343,917
2,221,013
3,345,17
2,226,13
9,155
13
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3, 97b, 5 6 5,
k
- 12 tcL 1. .1r1ui[c:uc3s ivclve du- 1icrted amounts which were dc:'ucted in
c:.utin the rr.nd total for each prcvi:ice. The duDlicatica arises from l.LClUajfl in
two laces c nuifcer of industries which ayce regarded. as extractive cr as iaaufacturia rocesses. ShipbuildinG has been included under construction as well as under
cnufacturi. The followia state ient .;ives the amount of the du- 1icction ty provinces:
:
1925
rss
1926.
Net
Gross
Net
'1'
2,477,069
357,200
2,2145,606
691,562
Scot
17,14145,1456
9,12,962
1 9,50 7,3 140
9,101,14114
Tw rucwick
2y,g)414,69
13,996,506
29,115,162
12,920,962
ueb e c
147,130,1411
7,93,959
lG6,3j,9s3
14,599,3O5
0nt rio
236,540,075
133,1426,1439
2140,907,353
i ani tab a
16,691,6714
10,336,70
17,764,579
10,1497,000
Saskat c'newan
10,703,007
5,596, 14114
10,937,232
5,1472,231
Alberta
1)4 ,29,9 70
7,70 3, 2 S
114,959,216
7,7914,117
British Columbia
130,001,015
614,370,13
1149,5146,9314
63,714,950
CAi.DL
603,132,346
324,314S,636
650,369,1405
315,C(3,730
Prince
d.wc.rd Island.
120,222,16
I
P
••-
S -
F rir.
;Lap.5r.g
.inirg
:ectriFcvier
Constructic
iepirkrk
1aufacture,
G?JdI T(TAL
T( tal na ;fjtres
tc:r.tctaicirtrjeticr)
h.
31.
6.3
iCI 1UTE1.
TO T,7TCTi.
.6.
7.
e
z4.
C.
Z 9.'i
12.1
11.6
1C.1.4
5.9
0.4
u.4
7.
0.3
0.1
0. L
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
2.0
2.0
3.0
1.4
1.6
1.5
lb.E
3.3
100.0
0.0
10.5
10. 6
.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
C./
18.6
0.0
1.0
0..
0.E
0.9
Q.c.
2.9
21
3.3
2.2
15.0
1.8
2.7
1.9
20.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
6.4
..
2V.7
23.5
kacrjr
J5
3.3
5.5
.9
5. ,
2.
E,
ns-w ic
19
i99
S
3.4
.-,
o:mt:C
va
Fdw,-:. r
F'crtry
iserLes
C:.
3.3
1.E
19.0
2.9
10.7
1.5
41.3
3.0
3.0
12.0
1.5
'r3.9
100.0
100.0
iu0.0
1U0.L
5.7
3j.4
1.j
53.7
27.0
6.4
01.o
0.2
0.3
0.6
0.9
.
.9
.3
. 7
0.5
9.i
0.7
0.5
1.3
2e3
.8
2.c
23.1
1.5
0.3
0.3
2.7
0.9
1.1
1.2
4'r.O
E.2
2.9
6.8
2.3
47.3
100.0
100.0
1U.0
100.0
Ioo.0
i0C0
%t.1
.u.0
7.0
2.8
6.3
2.3
.
T0.
2,6
.4
U
Alt erta
9:
i52
Agri1tcr
Fcrestry
1.3
1.4
Fisheries
0.2
0.2
Traççirg
c.8
9.8
1.2
1.0
1.6
8.4
0.7
9.2
1.2
2.2
1.5
c.0
E1ctric Fcwer
Cc:rjtrctjcn
RFpiri.rk
iufature.s,:i.e..
100.0
o:: roTkL
Tct1
t;r'iitt1CILt-
e
t:
.L1.
100.0
ll.f
0na 3
CCJiIia
152
13.1
26.3
8.6
0.
24.7
2,8
6.4
2.0
iCO 3 (.
172
26.8
9.5
0.6
22.7
2. t
2.0
ir.0
100.0
(Z.
-
-
t.'
(Ct)irc1ec th traç.irçrc:1str7 c f 4C0 Terr..
11/13/ 28 I .Y.
40.
9.4
L.3
1.4
o.3
(a)5.9 (a)0.4
-
35.0
8.7
1.6
0.5
0.1
2.4
6.9
100.0
100 .0
-
33.3
1'.jC.(
iO6.0
V•V
uU.G
S
V
-
I
rir.
r,wrr
I sJ.ard
F'rii- stry
GHkNI TE TAL
Tc tal rrar.fti'ec (j.ir'itue
tc grarU tc tal cf it wticr)
tL
t1 r:a..,ft;t rj'::tr.ta e
;rnr1 tt1L (I net Irc Q uo,10
31.(
.3
r.z
C
00
3 6.1
29.;
....
5.5
5.9
U.'
2.0
3...
33.3
'I
C2
03
c.0
o.
lb.t
1.5
2.0
1.4
i.b
1.0
0.9
J .0
2.7
2.
15.0
.7
1.9
20.5
3.3
1.5
Ib.t
3.3
i.E
19.0
100.0
1:o.0
111.0
lOu.0
10.0
lOu.0
1
1
c.0
6.4
1.3
0.2
c.8
9.0
1.2
1.0
1.6
8.4
40
1.4
0.2
0.7
9.2
1.2
2.2
1.5
0.6
100.1
100.5
Cc z umi ia
1I2 19M
13.1
2c.3
b.(
C.Y
14.7
2.8
0.4
2.0
1 3. 0
10C.(
':r±.-
12.3
26.8
.9.5
U.
22.7
2.L
0.:
2.L
i0( .1
3
7
L52
COY
oa
.0
2..
10.7
lo
+1.5
lu,O
Or r t
i y 2v
luu.c
t.
1915
19 m
1.5
24..
..
27.0
£J • .
a
lm.c
.
.
.-
.
7.0
•
i.
cL
WE
1,
5
c.
.
C.e
0.0
0.1
0
09
(cj
Pj
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