Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School Application

Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School Application
Polk State College
Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Application
Dr. Eileen Holden, President
Stephen Hull, Provost Lakeland Campus
Sallie Brisbane, Collegiate High School Director
Submitted August 2012
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
APPLICATION COVER SHEET
NAME OF PROPOSED CHARTER SCHOOL: Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
NAME OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION/MUNICIPALITY UNDER WHICH CHARTER WILL BE
ORGANIZED OR OPERATED: Polk State College
The Organization has applied for 501(c)(3) Non-profit Status: Yes X
No
Provide the name of the person who will serve as the primary contact for this Application. The primary
contact should serve as the contact for follow-up, interviews, and notices regarding this Application.
NAME OF CONTACT PERSON: Sallie Brisbane
TITLE/RELATIONSHIP TO NONPROFIT: Director of Polk State College Collegiate Charter High School
MAILING ADDRESS: 3425 Winter Lake Road, Lakeland, Florida
PRIMARY TELEPHONE: ( 863) 669-2322 _ ALTERNATE TELEPHONE: (863) 297-1000
E-MAIL ADDRESS: [email protected]
NAME OF EDUCATION SERVICE PROVIDER (if any): Not applicable
NAME OF PARTNER/PARENT ORGANIZATION (if any): Polk State College
Projected School Opening: August 2013
School Year
Grade Levels
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Fourth Year
Fifth Year
11-12
11-12
11-12
11-12
11-12
Total Projected Student
Enrollment
75-100
125-200
300
300
300
Student Enrollment Capacity
(if known)
100
200
300
300
300
I certify that I have the authority to submit this application and that all information contained herein is
complete and accurate, realizing that any misrepresentation could result in disqualification from the
application process or revocation after award. I understand that incomplete applications will not be
considered. The person named as the contact person for the application is so authorized to serve as the
primary contact for this application on behalf of the applicant.
See Appendix 11
Signature
Title
Printed Name
Date
Sallie Brisbane
7/27/12
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 3
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Executive Summary
This charter school application will establish the Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School, hereafter
referenced as Polk State Lakeland Pathways, a charter school to serve 300 youth between the ages of 16 and 21.
Eligible applicants will be individuals who have earned 45% of the credits required for high school graduation but who
have disengaged from academic studies.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will replicate a model established by the Gateway to College National Network
and recognized by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The educational program and curriculum are specifically
designed to serve disengaged youth, introduce them to college coursework, and position them for college success
when they graduate from high school. Enrollees will take at least three college courses while in high school; and while
graduates are expected to earn a minimum of nine college credits, many will earn more.
During the first semester of enrollment, each student will participate in the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation
to build both academic and personal skills to support the transition of students to college courses. Each student will
then pursue an individualized high school and college schedule.
All high school and college courses will be taught on the Polk State College Lakeland Campus, and most or all high
school courses will be offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate individuals who cannot access the
traditional high school schedule. Coursework will employ both blended and face-to-face delivery so students will have
maximum flexibility in accessing instruction and supplemental support. Furthermore, students will be able to access
tutoring and one-to-one instructional support within the program. Each student will also have a formal mentoring
relationship with one or more school employees.
An application process will be used to identify students who demonstrate a willingness to re-engage in education and
who have foundation skills in reading, writing, and math. Additionally, as part of the lottery and selection process,
priority will be given to an applicant who also exhibits one or more of the following:
 Has been out of school for a minimum of three months as indicated by school enrollment records
 Is a custodial parent or a parent participating in financial support of a child as indicated by birth, court, or
financial records
 Can demonstrate that he or she is the primary caretaker for family members during traditional school hours as
indicated by a notarized statement of parent or guardian
 Is considered to be over age as verified by birth certificate or student records
 Is homeless as verified by a state-approved organization
 Can provide any other documentation acceptable to Polk State Lakeland Pathways administration to show that
he or she has significant difficulty participating in a traditional daytime high school schedule and will benefit
from enrollment at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Enrollment at Polk State Lakeland Pathways is expected to be as follows:
 During year one, this charter school will enroll 75 to 100 juniors and seniors. Up to 100 students will be
enrolled in August. Additional students will be accepted in January if enrollment slots are available.
 During the second year, total enrollment is expected to be between 125 to 200 juniors and seniors.
 By year three, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will reach its full enrollment, not to exceed 300 juniors and
seniors. This level of enrollment will then be maintained.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will demonstrate high achievement as reflected in the intent of five school
goals:
 The members of each cohort exiting the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation will have experienced
success and will voice a commitment to remain in school through graduation.
 Enrollees will be retained through high school graduation.
 Graduates will have demonstrated a readiness to succeed in college coursework.
 Students will participate in appropriate State assessments and will demonstrate success in the assessment
processes.
 Graduates will have earned college credit prior to graduating from high school and will transition into a
college or other postsecondary program when they leave high school.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Table of Contents
Section
I. Educational Plan
1. Mission, Guiding Principles, Purpose
2. Target Population and Student Body
3. Educational Program Design
4. Curriculum Plan
5. Student Performance, Assessment and Evaluation
6. Exceptional Students
7. English Language Learners
8. School Climate and Discipline
II. Organization Plan
9. Governance
10. Management
11. Educational Service Providers
12. Human Resources Employment
13. Student Recruitment and Enrollment
III. Business Plan
14. Facilities
15. Transportation Services
16. Food Service
17. Budget
18. Financial Management and Oversight
19. Action Plan
IV. Statement of Assurances
Tables
Table 1: Gateway to College Replication Requirements and Polk State College/Polk State Lakeland
Pathways Status
Table 2: Curriculum Types
Table 3: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation Courses
Table 4: Graduation Requirements
Table 5: Term 2 Schedule at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Table 6: Meeting High School Graduation Requirements at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Table 7: Assessments to be used and both Frequency and Use of Assessment
Table 8: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Staffing Plan
Table 9: Classroom Utilization at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Table 10: Anticipated Facilities Cost
Table 11: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Start-Up Timetable
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 5
Figures
Figure 1: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Continuous Improvement Process
Figure 2: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Organizational Chart
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53
Appendices
1. Curriculum Types How do decisions about curriculum and instruction impact student achievement?
2. Charter School Handbook
3. District Board of Trustee Information
4. Resumes
a. Dr. Eileen Holden, College President
b. Stephen Hull, Lakeland Campus Provost
c. Sallie Brisbane, Collegiate High School Director
d. Teresa Martinez, DBOT Chairperson
5. Polk State Lakeland Pathways Job Descriptions
6. Salary Schedule Page for Charter High School Instructors
7. Polk State College Employee Handbook
8. Polk State Lakeland Pathways Budget and Month Cash Flow Projection
9. Letters of Support
10. Transportation Zone, Bus Routes, Free Transportation Marketing Flyer
11. Signed Cover Sheet
12. Signed Statement of Assurance
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
I. EDUCATIONAL PLAN
Section 1: Mission, Guiding Principles and Purpose
A. Provide the mission statement for the proposed charter school.
The mission of the Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School, hereafter referenced as Polk State
Lakeland Pathways, is to provide an educational environment that will prepare previously disengaged students
between the ages of 16 and 21 to graduate from high school with the skills for college success.
Applicants are expected to be individuals who have earned at least 45% of the credits required for high school
graduation but have disconnected from academic studies as demonstrated by:
 Excessive absences
 Inattentiveness or nonperformance within the school environment
 Withdrawal from school
The expanded mission specifies that Polk State Lakeland Pathways will:
 Present a rigorous, meaningful educational experience
 Provide students with scheduling processes and mentoring support to meet their individual educational and life
needs
 Produce high school graduates who have experienced success in college courses and are positioned to complete
a college degree
B. Describe how the school will utilize the guiding principles found in section 1002.33(2)(a), F.S.
1. Meet high standards of student achievement while providing parents flexibility . Polk State Lakeland
Pathways will emphasize four operational practices to meet this principle:
 Students who have disengaged from the traditional high school experience will be given the opportunity
to accelerate their learning and prepare for college.
 Each student will receive individualized support through mentoring, academic guidance, and a College
Success Plan to meet academic, personal, and career development needs.
 Students will be on an open college campus and will acquire the study skills, self -discipline, and selfawareness to be successful in a highly academic environment.
 Students will complete high school and demonstrate the skills to have full access to the Polk State
College coursework without the need for academic remediation.
2. Promote enhanced academic success and financial efficiency by aligning responsibility and
accountability. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be fully accountable for utilizing charter school funds to
provide both an efficient and effective educational program that will maximize success of students in a
combined high school and college curriculum.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways, its staff, and its students will focus their attention on several practices directly
aligned with this principle. Practices will include the following:
 During their first semester at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, all students will be enrolled in the Polk
State Lakeland Pathways Foundation. This experience will be designed to build both academic and personal
skills and prepare them to transition to college courses. The school will employ a four-period day schedule. A
full-time schedule for the Foundation will include:
o College Success (SLS 1101), a Polk State College course designed to help Polk State Lakeland
Pathways enrollees learn and practice the habits needed to be successful college students.
o A high school reading, English, and math course. High school course assignments will be based on a
student’s academic history and on his or her performance on FCAT 2.0 Reading and on the
Postsecondary Education Readiness Test (PERT), which is taken by all students at the time of
application.
Note that a comparable exam, such as the College Placement Test (CPT), may be substituted in
some instances for the PERT because of a limit being imposed on the number of times an
individual can be administered the PERT. References to the PERT throughout this document are to
be interpreted as the PERT or a comparable college-entry exam.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 7




There are at least two situations in which a college course will be substituted for a high school
academic course:
 If a student demonstrates through PERT performance that he or she has the skills required to
enroll in college coursework in the area of math, a college math course may replace the high
school math.
 A student who demonstrates college-ready skills in reading through both FCAT 2.0 Reading
and PERT performance may be enrolled in a college elective.
All Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will receive individualized College Success Plans that will
guide their progress toward both a high school diploma and an Associate of Arts or Associate of
Science degree. Additionally, some students will include a Bachelor of Applied Science or Bachelor of
Science degree in their academic plans.
Students will take as many dual enrollment courses as their academic standing will permit, thus taking
full advantage of the financial efficiency of the system.
The mission of both secondary education and the Florida state college and university system will be
addressed through Polk State Lakeland Pathways. The overall K-12 and university system will maximize
efficiency as students meet goals attached to each.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will provide for shared-facility use. It will share classrooms and offices
with the Polk State College Collegiate High School (Collegiate High School). Students will also have
access to a college library; the Teaching, Learning, & Computing Center; college classrooms and labs;
and college instructors.
3. Provide parents with sufficient information on whether their child is reading at grade level and
whether the child gains at least a year’s worth of learning for every year spent in the charter school. Polk
State Lakeland Pathways’ mission calls for students to read at a college readiness level by the time they graduate
from high school. Information provided to both students and parents will include the following:
 At the time of application, all students will be administered the PERT through the Polk State College
testing process. Polk State Lakeland Pathways personnel will then review results with students and
their parents. As part of the review process, they will outline a plan to provide instruction as needed
to prepare each student to earn the PERT cut scores that are required by Polk State College for
enrollment in college courses. Each time students and their parents meet with the school ’s guidance
counselor, PERT scores will be reviewed as part of the academic planning process. This will occur at
least once annually.
 Tenth grade FCAT 2.0 Reading results will also be reviewed at the time of enrollment. Students who
have not taken or not passed FCAT 2.0 Reading will receive direct instruction to prepare them to do
so. Each time FCAT 2.0 Reading results are received, Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will share
them with the students tested and with their parents. Results will be given directly to the student to
take home. Results will also be reviewed with parents in conferences.
C. Describe how the school will meet the prescribed purposes for charter schools found in section
1002.33(2)(b), F.S.
1. Improve student learning and academic achievement. Improving student learning and academic
achievement is at the heart of the mission of this school. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will replicate a
model established by the Gateway to College National Network and recognized by the Bill and Melinda Gates
Foundation. The model is described in Section 3.B, beginning on page 15.
An important element of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways program will be the individualized support provided
to each student through mentoring and academic guidance. Polk State Lakeland Pathways personnel will
create an individualized College Success Plan for each student at the time of enrollment. That plan will be
designed to meet academic, personal, and career development needs and will be reviewed and updated on a
term-by-term basis.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will become familiar with the college environment through use of College
facilities. They will also enroll in at least three college courses while in high school. By the time they graduate from high
school, Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will be prepared to complete a college degree.
Disengaged youth who take advantage of Polk State Lakeland Pathways are expected to:
 Graduate from high school with a standard high school diploma
 Earn cut scores on PERT reading, sentence skills, and math as required to access the full rang e of Polk
State College courses
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School



Perform successfully on all applicable Florida student assessment exams
Complete at least three college courses by the time of high school graduation
Transition from Polk State Lakeland Pathways into Polk State College or another postsecondary
institution
The full text of student performance goals and objectives is found in Section 5.A, beginning on page 40.
2. Increase learning opportunities for all students, with a special emphasis on low-performing students and
reading. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will provide a unique learning opportunity for students who have
disengaged from the traditional high school experience and have not demonstrated the skill to enter the current
collegiate high schools.
All students will be administered the PERT at the time of application. Any student who does not earn the PERT
cut score in the area of reading, sentence skills, or math required for enrollment in Polk State College
coursework will be enrolled in specified high school courses designed to prepare them to perform well on the
PERT. Students who have not taken or not passed FCAT 2.0 Reading will receive direct instruction to
prepare them to do so.
Every student will have a College Success Plan that will outline his or her projected coursework from the time
of entry though high school graduation. An individual’s plan will be based specifically on his or her academic
needs.
All high school coursework will be presented through a blended model. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will
contract with Florida Virtual School (FLVS) or another Florida Department of Education-approved provider for
the online coursework that will then be taught by Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructors. The blended model
provides for a highly individualized instructional environment. Students who are able to work independently on
individual course components will be able to do so; those who need individualized help w ill have it readily
available. Each instructor will also closely monitor every student’s progress and performance.
In addition to academic support to be made available in the classroom, Polk State Lakeland Pathways students
will be able to access both instruction and tutoring in the school’s CHART lab. The lab will have a dedicated
space adjacent to the Polk State Lakeland Pathways offices. It will be used as both an online classroom and a
tutoring/resource lab. The CHART lab will have 24 computers available for student use, and a certified
instructor or a lab manager will be in the lab during school hours.
Students will also be able to take advantage of tutoring through the College’s Teaching/Learning Computing
Center (TLCC). The TLCC also has 70 computers available for student use throughout the day and evening.
3. Encourage the use of innovative learning methods. Since Polk State Lakeland Pathways will enroll
students who have disengaged from the traditional school environment, the school will be required to use
innovative learning methods, which will concentrate on:
 Meeting the needs of individual students
 Engaging them in authentic learning experiences
 Leveraging their interest in technology into learning gains
Examples of each category are as follows:
 Meeting Individual Student Needs
o The school will achieve success by combining high academic expectations with one-to-one advising
and support. Students will work with the guidance counselor and resource specialist(s) on issues
ranging from transportation, study habits, and individual life needs to course selection and applying
for scholarships. The wrap-around support of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will keep
students on the right track for success.
o Course offerings will be delivered through a combination of fac e-to-face and blended
courses. The blended courses will engage studen ts in online curricula within a virtual
learning environment that provides for face-to-face support from instructors and tutors.
Students who excel independently will have the freedom to do so. Those who need
individualized attention will receive that. All students will be closely monitored to ensure
success.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 9
o
o
o
During their first semester at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, students will be enrolled in the
Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation, described in the response to Section 1.B.2 on page
6.
All Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will receive individualized College Success Plans
that will guide their progress toward both a high school diploma and an Associate of Arts o r
Associate of Science degree. For some students, plans may include Bachelor of Applied
Science or Bachelor of Science degrees.
Students will be actively engaged in a culture of reflection and academic excellence. The
school will provide both a full-time guidance counselor and at least one full-time resource
specialist to address the needs of 200 students.

Engaging Students in a Rigorous Curriculum with an Emphasis on Authentic Learning
o Students will be enrolled in both high school and college courses that are designed to
introduce them to the demands of college in a fail-safe environment. The curriculum is
outlined in Section 4.A, beginning on page 26.
o Polk State Lakeland Pathways high school instructors will guide enrollees as they build and
practice the skills and habits for college success.
o Project-based learning will be a primary instructional strategy used at Polk State Lakeland
Pathways. Students will develop both independently and in student teams. They will
analyze and solve problems, design products, communicate plans, and demonstrate the
ability to research and think both critically and creatively. Details regarding the educational
program and the school’s teaching and learning strategies are presented in Section 3.B,
beginning on page13.

Leveraging Student Interest in Technology
o High school courses will be taught using a blended learning model as described in Section
3.B. on page 22.
o Technology will be used across the Polk State Lakeland Pathways curriculum to support
authentic learning experiences and engage students as they acqui re and practice skills to
include research, design, analysis, composition, and communication.
o Polk State Lakeland Pathways will maximize the use of online learning to engage students’
creativity and encourage their involvement. Examples of online strategies will include but
not be limited to the following:
 The school will allow students to use social networking sites to engage them with social
and collaborative learning.
 Online communities will provide opportunities for students to collaborate on projects.
 Students with unique life situations will be able to participate in online teams even
when not on campus.
4. Require the measurement of learning outcomes. The overarching learning goal of Polk State
Lakeland Pathways will be to position each enrollee to earn a college degree. Polk State Lakeland
Pathways graduates will be expected to have earned PERT scores in reading, sentence skills, and math to
provide them with full access to all Polk State College courses.
Assessments that will be used to evaluate students’ academic skills will include but not be limited to the
following:
 The PERT will be administered to all potential students at the time of application. Reading, math, and
sentence skills will be assessed, and instruction of enrollees will focus on raising those skills to the
point that they will be able to take college courses. Each student will participate in PERT retakes until
he or she meets the cut score.
th
 Students who have not taken or have not passed the 10 grade FCAT 2.0 Reading will receive reading
instruction to prepare them with the skills to pass that exam. FCAT 2.0 Reading retakes will be
administered in the fall and spring of each school year as long as the required state measurement is in
place.
 End-of-course (EOC) exams will be administered for Polk State Lakeland Pathways courses as they
become available. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will emphasize the alignment among the written,
taught, and tested curriculum as explained in Section 4. A, on page 26.
 Any additional required state assessments will be administered to Polk State Lakeland Pathways
enrollees.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Furthermore, within the program, students will participate in course-related assessment activities.
Examples are listed as part of the response to Section 3.B on page 18. Authentic assessment strategies
will require them to demonstrate what they have learn ed and what they are able to do.
Students will also have earned college credits prior to high school graduation. The school’s guidance
counselor and resource specialist(s) will closely monitor the performance of students in college courses
and will adjust schedules as needed.
The school’s educational goals and objectives , requiring the measurement of learning outcomes, are listed
as part of the response to Section 5.A, beginning on page 40.
D. Describe how the charter school will fulfill, if applicable, the optional purposes of charter schools found in
section 1002.33(2)(c), F.S.
1. Create innovative measurement tools. Authentic assessment strategies will be wid ely used at Polk
State Lakeland Pathways. They will include digital portfolios, peer review of personal web pages, student
exhibitions, and standards-based projects. Traditional measurement tools require students to select a
response; authentic assessments will require Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees to perform tasks
and provide direct evidence of learning.
2. Provide rigorous competition within the public school district to stimulate continual improvement
in all public schools. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will provide a quality, nontraditional choice for
students who have disengaged from the traditional school environment. It is not necessarily designed to
compete with existing, traditional programs. However, it will supplement instructional programs currently
available to the designated student population.
3. Expand the capacity of the public school system. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will expand capacity
because it will provide for the enrollment of 300 high school students on the Polk State College campus. Using
the College facilities to provide a high school instructional program expands t he capacity of the system.
Additionally, Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will be able to maximize the college credits they earn
while in high school. They will thus save both time and money.
Also, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will serve students who have disengaged from the traditional high school
environment. Some students who choose Polk State Lakeland Pathways will have dropped out of school and so
will not be in the system at all.
Finally, the nontraditional school hours, offering classes in the afternoon and evening, will provide students
access to high school coursework at a time not normally available. It will furthermore maximize the use of
facilities.
4. Mitigate the educational impact created by the development of n ew residential dwelling units. This
optional purpose will not be directly addressed through the implementation of Polk State Lakeland Pathways.
5. Create new professional opportunities for teachers, including ownership of the learning program at the
school site. Just as in Polk State College’s existing collegiate high schools, Polk State Lakeland Pathways
instructors will make up a small and creative learning community dedicated to the success of all students. Polk
State Lakeland Pathways faculty and staff will work collaboratively, sharing the goal of maximizing student success
while improving their own professional practices.
The belief of the school and the staff will be that the in-house professionals have the expertise to ensure that all
students have meaningful and successful learning experiences. Staff members will become individually and
collectively knowledgeable about the Gateway to College National Network components and strategies and will
work together to implement them across courses.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will develop personalized learning experiences for students. Thus, the attention of
staff will extend beyond classroom activities and will address a student’s state of mind, which may well be the
result of conditions outside the school. Instructors will work with the guidance counselor and resource
specialist(s) to identify and practice communication strategies most likely to motivate the school’s unique student
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 11
population.
Finally, a major school-wide strategy will be to leverage student interest in technology in order to enhance
learning, teamwork, and creativity. Students will be enrolled in online coursework, which will allow them to
progress at individual rates. They will also be engaged with e -books, blogs, social networking, etc. as part of the
learning process.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will research strategies, attend conferences and workshops, share best
practices, and use students as a primary resource in identifying and implementing strategies most re levant and
meaningful to enrollees.
Section 2: Target Population and Student Body
A. Describe the anticipated target population to be served. If applicable, applicants should describe if they
will target, in accordance with the law, certain populations defined in section 1002.33(10)(e), F.S.
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways target population will be motivated youth ages 16 to 21 who have disengaged from
the traditional high school experience.
Applicants are expected to be individuals who have earned
at least 45% of the credits required for high school
graduation but have disconnected from academic studies
as demonstrated by:
 Excessive absences
 Inattentiveness or nonperformance within the
school environment
 Withdrawal from school
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will accept applications
from students living anywhere in the district, but most
students are expected to come from the Lakeland
community.
A motivated individual is one who is likely to find
success at Polk State Lakeland Pathways because
he or she is:
o Ready to trust Polk State Lakeland Pathways
and its staff
o Energetic enough to work harder than ever
before
o Able to see himself/herself as a college
graduate
o Determined to be successful in all areas of life
o Yearning for a new identity
To be considered a qualified applicant, a potential student must:
 Have scored a minimum of 50 on the reading, writing, and math sections of the PERT. This score does not
position students to take college coursework, but it does demonstrate the academic foundation to reach the
PERT cut scores by the time of high school graduation.
 Create a written essay explaining why he or she has chosen to apply.
 Participate in an interview with school personnel.
 Submit an application for entry.
 Meet requirements of a disciplinary background screening.
As part of the selection process, priority will be given to any applicant who:
 Has been out of school for a minimum of three months as indicated by school enrollment records
 Is a custodial parent or a parent participating in financial support of a child as indicated by birth, court, or
financial records
 Can demonstrate that he or she is the primary caretaker for family members during traditional school hours as
indicated by a notarized statement of parent or guardian
 Is considered to be over age as verified by birth certificate or student records
 Is homeless as verified by a state-approved organization
 Can provide any other documentation acceptable to Polk State Lakeland Pathways administration to show that
he or she has significant difficulty participating in a traditional daytime high school schedule and will benefit
from enrollment at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Certain populations defined in section 1002.33(10)(e), F.S that will be targeted at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
include:
 Students within specific age groups or grade levels as stated above.
 Students considered at risk of dropping out of school or academic failure.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will also provide for the following student groups who meet application requirements to
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
be given priority preference within their application group (qualified or priority):
 Students who are the children of a member of the governing board of the charter school
 Students who are the children of an employee of the charter school
B. Provide the following projection for each year of proposed operation: the grades that the school will serve, the
projected number of students to be served in each grade, the number of students expected in each class, and the
total number of students enrolled.
Entering Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will have earned at least 45% of the credits required for high school
graduation at the time of entry. All students will thus be categorized as high school juniors or seniors. While planners
expect most students to enter as juniors, it is certainly possible that applicants with priority characteristics, as listed on
page 6, will enter the school with enough credits to be considered seniors. Furthermore, since students will sometimes
move at an accelerated pace, a student’s grade-level status may change from one term to the next. Therefore, the
school is not projecting enrollment numbers by grade level. It is instead focused on the total enrollment per year.
Enrollment at Polk State Lakeland Pathways is expected to be as follows:
 During its first year, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will enroll 75 to 100 juniors and seniors in the fall semester.
 During its second year, enrollment is expected to be between 125 to 200 juniors and seniors.
 By year three, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will reach its full enrollment, not to exceed 300 juniors and
seniors. This level of enrollment will then be maintained.
C. Provide a description of how the student population projections were developed.
The projected student population for each of the first three years is based on two factors:
 The timeline required to establish Polk State Lakeland Pathways as a well-known choice option for disengaged
students
 The fact that no more than 100 new students will be admitted in August of each year
Specifics for each of the first three years are as follows:
 The first year, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will have completed its first marketing campaign and expects to
accept approximately one third of its total enrollment. While both juniors and seniors may enroll, most new
students are expected to be juniors.
 In year two, a second cohort will be accepted and most new students will be juniors. The school anticipates
having a large group of both juniors and seniors enrolled during year two.
 By year three, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be well established in the community and is expected to
reach full enrollment.
Section 3: Educational Program Design
A. Describe the school’s daily schedule and annual calendar, including the annual number of days and hours of
instructional time.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will follow the standard 180-day calendar. It will mirror that of the Collegiate High School
and will be aligned as closely as possible with the Polk State College and Polk County School Board calendars.
Students will be scheduled into a four-period day, which allows them to complete a one-credit high school course in a
semester. Each class will meet 90 minutes per day, 450 minutes per week, and 8,100 per term.
Classes will be scheduled beginning at approximately 2:00 p.m. and will run until 8:30 or 9:00 p.m. The afternoon and
evening schedule is part of the non-traditional school design.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 13
B. Describe the proposed charter school’s educational program.
Overall Educational Program
The mission of Polk State Lakeland Pathways is to provide an educational environment that will prepare previously
disengaged high school students to graduate from high school with the skills for college success.
The school’s design will aim to meet that mission as it engages students in a rigorous and nontraditional high school
experience with characteristics that will include but are not limited to the following:
 All courses will be taught on the Polk State College Lakeland Campus.
 Most or all high school courses will be offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate individuals who
cannot access the traditional high school schedule.
 Coursework will employ both blended and face-to-face delivery, so students will have maximum flexibility in
accessing instruction and supplemental support.
 Students will be able to take advantage of tutoring and one-to-one instructional support within the high school and
college environments.
 Enrollees will take at least three college courses while at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, and while graduates are
expected to earn nine college credits, many will earn more. Students will have the advantage of participating in a
college-course experience that is embedded within the high school support structure.
 Each student will have an individualized College Success Plan to include a program-of-study to:
o Accelerate the rate at which he or she can graduate from high school with a college-ready designation
o Maximize college credits earned prior to high school graduation
 All students will have formal mentoring relationships with one or more school employees. These relationships will
be characterized by regularly-scheduled meetings and systematic communication systems through which mentors
will be alerted when mentees have either:
o School performance issues to include excessive absences or class performance challenges
o Life issues such as child care needs or housing challenges that may act as barriers to education
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways will include a summer course schedule that will maintain a year-round engagement
of students.
 School personnel, including a guidance counselor and resource specialist(s), will develop and implement holistic
services and processes to address the whole student, with the intent of keeping students in school through high
school graduation.
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways educational program will pull from four complementary but distinct parts:




Part 1-Gateway to College National Network—Polk State Lakeland Pathways intends to replicate the
essential elements found in the Gateway to College National Network model. This proven model for preparing
disengaged high school students for college success mirrors the Polk State Lakeland Pathways mission.
Part 2-Daggett System for Effective Instruction—The Daggett System complements and supplements the
components of the Gateway to College National Network model. It also includes key functions or elements that
will be essential in establishing Polk State Lakeland Pathways as a continuously improving, small learning
community.
Part 3-Marzano Evaluation Model—The instructional and leadership practices of Polk State Lakeland
Pathways personnel will provide the foundation on which other educational practices can be implemented. Polk
State College’s charter schools are implementing strategies identified through the research of Dr. Robert
Marzano to be effective.
Part 4-Blended Learning—Polk State Lakeland Pathways will contract with FLVS or another Florida
Department of Education-approved provider for its licensed curriculum, which will then be taught by a Polk
State Lakeland Pathways instructor. The instructor will provide for face-to-face instruction and tutoring to
supplement instruction delivered through the online course component.
Section 3.B. Part 1-Gateway to College National Network
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will replicate components that have been used successfully by the Gateway to College
National Network, described as follows on the Network’s website (http://www.gatewaytocollege.org/home.asp):
Portland Community College created the Gateway to College program in 2000 to help reconnect high school
dropouts with their education. Through the program, students complete their high school diploma requirements
at community and technical colleges while simultaneously earning college credits toward an associate’s degree
or certificate. Young people who had little chance of graduating from high school are achieving post-secondary
14
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
success. Gateway to College’s innovative approach captured the attention of the Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation, which initially funded the replication of Gateway to College as part of its Early College High School
Initiative. Since 2003, Gateway to College has evolved from a single-site program into a national network of 35
colleges in 20 states partnering with more than 125 school districts.
The website also reports that the Network has collected six years of performance outcomes to
demonstrate the model’s success. Outcomes address attendance, sense of connection, improved
academic performance, and college credit accumulation. Specific outcomes are reported on page
25.
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation website, http://www.gatesfoundation.org/grantee-profiles/Pages/gateway-tocollege.aspx, describes the Gateway to College National Network and states, “Gateway to College breaks the myth
that high school dropouts can’t or won’t succeed in school.”
The description goes on to say:
As a result of joining the Gateway to College National Network, young people who had little chance of
graduating from high school are achieving success beyond high school. By reengaging dropouts as students
and offering them tailored support, Gateway to College has developed an innovative, proven model for helping
at-risk youth graduate high school and earn credits toward college completion. The model, which emphasizes
both academic and personal skills, teaches students how to thrive in an educational setting and helps prepare
them for the transition to college.
Polk State College and Polk State Lakeland Pathways will establish either a formal or informal relationship with the
Gateway to College National Network:
 Formal relationship: Polk State College has applied to the Gateway to College National Network for a start-up
grant. If grant dollars are received, they will support initial program planning, training, technical assistance,
coaching, and evaluation provided by the National Network staff.  Informal relationship: If Polk State College is not awarded a grant, the College will use the infrastructure and
expertise available through its overall organization and the current collegiate high schools to support the
implementation of all essential elements within the Gateway to College National Network.
The Gateway to College Network requirements for replication are stated on the Network’s website. Table 1, below,
lists each replication requirement with a Polk State College/Polk State Lakeland Pathways statement of status.
1.
1.
1.
1.
2.
1.
Table 1: Gateway to College Replication Requirements and Polk State College/Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Status
Replication Requirement—A program must:
Status Statement—Polk State College:
1. Have the ability to align curriculum to allow
1. Has already implemented two charter high schools and has
students to meet the requirements for both high
established the alignment of courses to allow students to earn
school and college completion, earn college
high school and college credits simultaneously. Polk State
credits, and achieve college success.
Lakeland Pathways will build on that model and adapt as required
to meet the needs of disengaged youth.
2. Serve a high school dropout population.
2. Has made a commitment to serve disengaged youth as
defined in Section 2.A above. Enrollees will include individuals
who have dropped out of school.
3. Provide all classes in the college setting.
3. Has dedicated space for Polk State Lakeland Pathways
classes on the Polk State College Lakeland campus.
4. Provide an initial learning environment blending3. 4. Developed the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation,
rigorous academics with personal support.
described on page 8, to provide the initial learning experience
called for by the Network.
5. Follow the Essential Elements of the model,
5.
which include:
a. Significant Dual Credit | Gateway to
a. Has already demonstrated the ability to work with high school
College is a college-based dual credit
students and position them to earn a significant number of college
program that serves eligible students who credits prior to high school graduation. Polk State Lakeland
have dropped out of (or are unlikely to
Pathways will build on that knowledge and experience base in
graduate from) high school and who
meeting the needs of its students.
simultaneously earn a high school
diploma and substantial college credit.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 15
Table 1: Gateway to College Replication Requirements and Polk State College/Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Status
Replication Requirement—A program must:
Status Statement—Polk State College:
b. Sustainable Partnerships | Gateway to
b. Has developed Polk State Lakeland Pathways to function as a
College leverages the capacity of school
charter school with a formal contract with Polk County Schools. It
districts, colleges, and other community
will also seek to act in a supplemental relationship with Polk
organizations to create sustainable
County Schools programs that serve disengaged youth.
programs that help meet the local need
Additionally, Polk State Lakeland Pathways is creating community
for dropout recovery.
partnerships with agencies serving disengaged youth and with
agencies that will support program components.
c. Holistic Student Support | Gateway to
c. Will open Polk State Lakeland Pathways with a guidance
College provides wrap-around student
counselor and one resource specialist who will provide wrapsupport to meet the academic, social, and around services as called for by the Gateway to College Network.
emotional needs of our students in an
environment that fosters the development
of knowledge and skills necessary to
succeed in school and in life.
d. Innovative Teaching and Learning |
d. Has specified in this document the strategies to be used to
Gateway to College encourages the
address each of the seven Gateway to College principles of
implementation of innovative pedagogical
teaching and learning. Details are provided, beginning on page
techniques based on both research and
18.
proven practices in effective teaching and
learning.
e. Intentional Collaboration | Gateway to
e. Will ensure that Polk State Lakeland Pathways implements the
College integrates collaboration,
continuous improvement process used with the College’s current
continuous improvement, and
charter schools. This process will be driven by charter goals,
professional development, with the goal of School Improvement Plan goals, and outcomes of the new Polk
improving student success and program
State College Charter School Personnel Evaluation Plan. The
sustainability.
process includes a focus on student success and program
sustainability. A professional development plan for the school and
for each member of the professional staff will be created annually.
The continuous improvement process is reflected in Figure 1 on
page 56.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation
A key element of the Gateway to College model is the cohort experience students have in their first semester of
enrollment. During the first term at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, all students will be enrolled in a schedule as
described in Section 1.B.2 on page 7.
Though Polk State College professors typically teach College Success (SLS 1101), certified Polk State Lakeland
Pathways staff members will teach College Success to Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees.
Specific content area courses in which each student is enrolled will be listed in his or her College Success Plan and will
be based on the student’s performance on the PERT, on his or her academic history, and on whether he or she has
taken and passed FCAT 2.0 Reading.
Gateway to College Principles of Teaching and Learning
Instructor behaviors at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be deliberate and focused and will be designed to implement
the seven Gateway to College principles of teaching and learning. Some strategies and activities used in individual
courses will address multiple principles.
The description of Polk State Lakeland Pathways strategies listed for each principle below is not intended to be
comprehensive. It is intended to provide a general description of the school’s educational program as aligned with the
principle.
Principles and overall Polk State Lakeland Pathways alignment are as listed below:

Gateway to College Principle #1-Integrated, Outcomes-based Curriculum and Instruction: Instructors
16
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
work together to develop an integrated, coherent curriculum centered on interdisciplinary themes,
enabling students to apply what they learn in one course to their learning in other courses. All
instruction is designed around the essential question: What do students need to know and be able to
do to be successful college students? Outcomes clearly define what students will be able to do “out
there,” once they complete a class rather than what they will do in class. Students are able to articulate
the intended outcome(s) for all learning experiences and describe how those outcomes are relevant to
their goals. All instructional activities are intentionally designed to help students understand the
concepts or develop the skills required to achieve the intended outcomes rather than to “cover” a
body of information.
The emphasis on college success will begin when each new Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollee meets
with staff to create his or her individual College Success Plan. The theme of college success will then be
applied in all aspects and throughout all classes that make up the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation
experience.
Students will continually be reminded that their achievements at Polk State Lakeland Pathways and at Polk
State College will forever influence their quality of life. They will perform activities to underscore the importance
of a college degree and to show them that once they leave school, they will be positioned to “earn what they
have learned.”
Instructors will work collaboratively to infuse the interdisciplinary theme of college success throughout
curriculum and instruction. Instructors will:
o Be given common planning time.
o Collaborate regularly with the resource specialist(s) to address college-success learning needs specific
to students.
o Participate in professional development to create interdisciplinary strategies. Activities each year will
include both College and charter school workshops.
o Implement strategies specific to their content areas.

Gateway to College Principle #2-Rigor: Instructors are aware of incoming student ability levels and
tailor learning challenges to the student’s developmental level. Students build problem-solving and
critical thinking skills including analysis, synthesis, and evaluation, as they engage in meaningful
projects or explore driving questions. Instructors cultivate an “ethic of excellence” in which students
develop habits and internal standards for producing high quality work, which, in turn, serves as a
source of pride. By holding students to high expectations while offering high levels of encouragement
and support, instructors enable students to meet those expectations, gain confidence as learners, and
view themselves as belonging in college, thereby setting the stage for success.
The pervasive message to be conveyed to Polk State Lakeland Pathways students by all staff, including
instructors, will be, “You are capable and you are hard-working. You will be successful at Polk State Lakeland
Pathways, at Polk State College, and in life.”
Beginning with the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation experience, students will be placed in
appropriate learning challenges. Individual College Success Plans will then be updated and adjusted based on
student performance in Polk State Lakeland Pathways coursework and on standardized tests (PERT and
FCAT 2.0 Reading or other state assessments).
Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructors will focus teaching and learning activities in all courses on building
student skills for success in rigorous college courses. Additionally, students will be initiated into the world of
college as soon as they enter the school. During their first term at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, students will
be enrolled in College Success (SLS 1101). Each student is expected to take a minimum of two other college
courses while at Polk State Lakeland Pathways. Many students will take more. Potential college courses to be
used for dual enrollment credit are included in Table 6 on page 39.

Gateway to College Principle #3-Relationships - Collaborative, Inclusive Learning Communities: A
caring, solution-focused approach to working with students is the foundation for all learning.
Instructors develop personal connections with students and foster an environment that values and
respects individual differences. Instructors design learning activities that teach and reinforce the skills
and habits required for effective collaborative learning. They teach students how to build a supportive
community that lives within and outside of the classroom (e.g., in study groups).
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 17
Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructors and students will make up a small learning community. Instructors
will directly and deliberately teach students the skills and behaviors they need to be successful at Polk State
College. Activities will include those listed below:
o
o
o
o
o

Class activities will require students to work in teams. They will also learn in a controlled setting how to
function in study groups and will practice being members of study groups.
Students will learn to act in a peer-editing role, practicing how to both give and receive peer feedback
regarding assignments to be graded using a rubric.
Students will learn to read a college course syllabus and will practice the behaviors required to interact
effectively with college professors.
Students will visit College facilities such as the library and the Teaching/Learning Computing Center
with their high school instructors so they will know where facilities are located and how they are to go
about accessing services and materials in each location.
Additionally, the guidance counselor and resource specialist(s) working with Polk State Lakeland
Pathways enrollees will counsel students and provide personalized support specific to individual
needs.
Gateway to College Principle #4-Relevance - Project-based, Active Learning: Students develop
knowledge, understanding, and skills through active engagement with meaningful, interdisciplinary,
collaborative projects or driving questions, rather than through disconnected, isolated assignments.
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways theme is college success, and it will be established for each student from
the day he or she enters the school. College Success (SLS 1101), to be taken by every student during term 1,
establishes college survival skills. Those skills will also be both taught and practiced in every high school
course. Students will quickly become aware that there is both a common theme and a common language
spoken at Polk State Lakeland Pathways and at Polk State College.
Also, during the first term at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, students will learn how important they can be to
each other. They will be engaged in organized, structured projects and assignments that will require them to
interact with the College campus and facilities and discuss their findings with Polk State Lakeland Pathways
instructors. They will also have to demonstrate that they can use College resources to complete assignments.
The use of study groups and peer editing processes will facilitate a system through which students will
learn how to learn together and support each other. They will complete and present projects in groups.
The intent will be to have them practice teamwork, effective communication, and problem solving.
Students will be taught and will practice effective ways to deal with frustration and how to find solutions
that are not immediately obvious.
Additionally, every class taken by a student at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be tied to college
success:
o Each student taking a high school English course at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be
preparing to take the College’s first composition course.
o Students taking any of the high school math courses will be preparing to earn the cut score on the
PERT to give them entry into intermediate or college algebra.
o Reading classes will also be used to prepare students to earn the cut score on PERT reading in
order to gain entry to the vast majority of college courses.
o Science courses taken at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will address specific subject area content
but also stress the scientific method, needed for success in any College science course.
o The Junior Achievement curriculum will be brought into Polk State Lakeland Pathways classes.
Both presentations and activities will reinforce career goals for students and remind them why
success in college coursework is so important.

Gateway to College Principle #5-Constructing Meaning: Instructors teach students how to understand
new concepts by adding to, modifying, or reorganizing existing knowledge and concepts. They help
students solve new problems by drawing on previous experiences and they make the learning process
explicit so that students are able to recognize the connections between new learning and existing
concepts and skills. Instructional activities are flexible enough to provide students with opportunities
to learn in ways that are meaningful to them.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructors will approach new learning in a highly structured, methodical way.
18
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
They will consciously address students’ existing knowledge, concepts, experiences, work habits,
communication skills, etc. from two perspectives:
o
o
Using and strengthening that which is meaningful, applicable, and appropriate in terms of college
success.
Modifying and/or unlearning and relearning if existing knowledge, assumptions, habits, communication
skills, and concepts act as a hindrance to success at Polk State Lakeland Pathways and at Polk State
College.
The approach taken at Polk State Lakeland Pathways to prepare students for college success will be much like
that taken in a formal athletic program to teach students with athletic potential who have played basketball in
neighborhood lots to play on a highly-disciplined, skilled, and competitive team.

Gateway to College Principle #6-Personal Growth: Instructors help students overcome self-defeating
beliefs by recognizing that academic success is attributable to controllable factors such as hard work,
persistence, and resilience rather than innate ability or luck. By promoting habits such as setting
SMART goals, organization, and self- advocacy, instructors help students identify themselves as
independent, successful college students. In order to empower students to take responsibility for their
own learning, instructors help students discover and understand their learning style, the conditions
under which they best learn, and their role in the learning process. Instructors teach students specific
strategies for learning, reasoning, and problem solving. They structure opportunities for students to
reflect on and evaluate their learning and identify strategies for improvement.
At Polk State Lakeland Pathways, instructors will promote habits such as setting SMART goals, organization,
and self- advocacy:
o
o
o
As part of the Foundation experience, each student will develop a specific, measurable, attainable,
relevant, and timely goal to indicate what he or she wants to achieve in school.
Students will learn and practice organizational skills in all the high school courses.
Self-advocacy is essential for success in the college environment. Students will be taught and will
practice self-advocacy strategies.
Overall, instructors will teach students to identify themselves as independent, successful college students.
They will show students how to access and use the college environment and will provide them with practice
and experience in dealing with college facilities, services, and resources and with conditions for success in
college courses (such as working with a course syllabus).
In order to empower students to take responsibility for their own learning, instructors will facilitate activities
through which students will discover and understand their learning styles, the conditions under which they best
learn, and their role in the learning process. Instructors will further demonstrate specific strategies for learning,
reasoning, and problem solving. They will structure opportunities for students to reflect on and evaluate their
learning and identify strategies for improvement.
Every student will then graduate from Polk State Lakeland Pathways with a personal portfolio that will
document his or achievements and readiness for further education and career success.

Gateway to College Principle #7-Assessment: Instructors design projects and other performance tasks
that provide evidence that the student is capable of achieving the intended outcome(s). Through the
use of rubrics, students can distinguish “what is good” for a particular project and can differentiate
between high quality and poor work. Instructors structure opportunities for students to make their
work public within and outside of the classroom and teach students how to give and receive
constructive feedback. In the pursuit of excellence, instructors and student peers provide formative
feedback on multiple drafts of projects, rather than a “one and done” approach. Feedback is solutionfocused, helping students recognize how strengths and past successes provide keys to overcoming
new challenges. Data-based decision-making guides the improvement of student and program
outcomes. Instructors regularly and collaboratively reflect on direct evidence of learning (individual
student performance on projects, tests, and other performance tasks) and indirect evidence of learning
(student reflections and feedback). The Cycle of Inquiry is regularly used to analyze aggregate
measures of student progress, including course success rates and student success on the
comprehensive campus.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 19
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will create and maintain a safe environment in which students learn how to
achieve success. Instructors will employ strategies to facilitate student success on the comprehensive campus:
o
o
o
o
o
Rubrics will be used to aid students in identifying indicators instructors expect to see in assignments,
papers, and projects.
Cooperative learning activities will engage students in dialogue, problem solving, and creative learning
processes to expand their thinking and build on existing skills. Students will rely on each other’s
knowledge and skills in order to be successful. They will teach and learn from each other.
Peer editing processes will give individual students feedback on assignments before they are
submitted for a grade. Students will help each other improve their work. As they play the role of editor,
individual students will also have a chance to reflect on their own work.
Project-based learning and presentations will require students to demonstrate what they have learned.
They will also have the opportunity to give each other feedback and to learn from the challenges and
successes demonstrated by their peers
Finally, students will be encouraged to redo assignments and to retake exams in order to improve
performance.
Instructors will apply these performance indicators along with more traditional paper-pencil exams and
standardized test results to continually review their instructional strategies and the alignment of the school’s
written, taught, and tested curriculum. Teachers will individually and as a group make adjustments to the
education process as a result of their findings.
Some of the questions to be used by Polk State Lakeland Pathways teachers and staff to assess the
effectiveness of the school’s curriculum are listed as part of the response to Section 4.F, beginning on page
47.
Section 3.B.Part 2-The Daggett System for Effective Instruction
The Daggett System for Effective Instruction – Where Research and Best Practices Meet (June 2011), published by Dr.
Willard Daggett and The International Center for Leadership in Education, found on the center’s website at
http://www.leadered.com/pdf/DSEI%20White%20Paper%207-11.pdf, emphasizes many of the same elements of an
effective instructional system as are implemented in the Gateway to College National Network.
This publication stresses the role of the educational system in creating an effective program. It states:
The Daggett System leverages more than the teacher in the classroom. It emphasizes vertical alignment —
with organizational systems and structures and with instructional leadership — and horizontal alignment —
with teaching colleagues and classroom resources — as keys to success. Because teachers are the most
powerful influence on instruction, the entire system needs to be focused on making teachers effective.
Therefore, the Daggett System provides a coherent focus across an entire education system: Organizational
Leadership, Instructional Leadership, and Teaching.
The six Teaching elements listed in The Daggett System closely mirror those of the Gateway to College National
Network. The approach to be used to address each at Polk State Lakeland Pathways has been adequately addressed
with the Network principles above. Elements include:






The Daggett System Teacher Element 1: Embrace rigorous and relevant expectations for all students.
The Daggett System Teacher Element 2: Build strong relationship with students.
The Daggett System Teacher Element 3: Possess depth of content knowledge and make it relevant to
students.
The Daggett System Teacher Element 4: Facilitate rigorous and relevant instruction based on how
students learn.
The Daggett System Teacher Element 5: Demonstrate expertise in use of instructional strategies,
technology, and best practices.
The Daggett System Teacher Element 6: Use assessments to guide and differentiate instruction.
The Daggett System, however, goes beyond these and also lists key functions or elements to be implemented as part
of Organizational Leadership and Instructional Leadership.
The six primary functions of Organizational Leadership and a description of how each will influence the Polk State
20
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Lakeland Pathways education program are as follows:

The Daggett Organizational Leadership Element 1: Create a culture of high expectations. All staff
members, students, parents, and stakeholders will claim and be accountable for the high expectations stated in
the school’s mission. Students and staff will continually revisit both performance of students and the support
they need to maximize success. Additionally, achievement will be highly publicized both inside and outside the
building.
The pervasive questions to be continually answered at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be
o Why is the mission of Polk State Lakeland Pathways important to us?
o What are we collectively and individually doing to ensure success?
o What can we change or improve to address any gaps we see in performance?

The Daggett Organizational Leadership Element 2: Create a shared vision. The Polk State Lakeland
Pathways planners have already engaged College and Collegiate High School staff members in the planning
process. The College’s District Board of Trustees is the Founding Board for Polk State Lakeland Pathways. As
soon as the charter award is received, planners will inform the entire College and will promote the charter on
the College’s and the Collegiate High School’s website. The Collegiate High School Director will conduct the
first meeting of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways School Advisory Council (LP-SAC) by December 2012. The
director will then work through the LP-SAC and a variety of other community partners to disseminate the
school’s mission with groups and individuals who will provide support to the Polk State Lakeland Pathways
instructional program. Letters of support from community members are included as Appendix 9, beginning on
page 157. Collegiate High School personnel will initiate Polk State Lakeland Pathways recruitment activities in
January. They will promote the opportunities through strategies to include the use of websites, community
contacts, mail-outs, etc. The school’s instructors will be chosen based on their passion for the mission, and
both students and parents will commit to the mission when they apply to Polk State Lakeland Pathways. The
mission statement will be highly visible in the Polk State Lakeland Pathways facilities and will guide schoolwide decisions.

The Daggett Organizational Leadership Element 3: Build leadership capacity. As a small learning
community, Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members will share leadership. They will collaborate on all
major decisions regarding teaching and learning. They will analyze student performance data and use results
to create improvement goals and strategies. They will develop the School Improvement Plan each summer and
will determine professional development needs most appropriate to help staff members improve the
educational program design.

The Daggett Organizational Leadership Element 4: Align organizational structures and systems to
vision. Following a model of shared leadership already in place in the Collegiate High School, Polk State
Lakeland Pathways staff members will continually examine those organizational characteristics that are to be
supported and those that need to change.

The Daggett Organizational Leadership Element 5: Align teacher/administrator selection, support, and
evaluation. The Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members will be directly involved in the hiring process
and will select individuals best suited to designated school roles. The shared leadership model will then
position staff members to identify and implement the resources they need.
Additionally, the new Polk State College Charter School Personnel Evaluation and Development System,
found on the Collegiate High School website at http://www.chspsc.org/, supports a continuous improvement
process that examines student performance, instructional practices, and professional elements. Professional
development will be aligned with annual evaluation results.

The Daggett Organizational Leadership Element 6: Support decision making with data systems. A
primary strength of Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be its ability to strengthen the educational program by
continually examining student-performance data. The data warehouse, developed by Collegiate High School
personnel, provides up-to-date performance data for individual students or for groups. This information will be
used by Polk State Lakeland Pathways and will allow staff members to make adjustments in an individual
student’s College Success Plan, in instructional strategies used in an individual course, or in school-wide
strategies being used to address overall performance goals.
Furthermore, the Daggett System concentrates on five elements of Instructional Leadership, all of which will
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 21
influence the Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructional program:

The Daggett Instructional Leadership Element 1: Use research to establish urgency for higher
expectations. The focus of this element is on continually reinforcing the importance of achievement, keeping
the mission and goals of Polk State Lakeland Pathways as a motivating factor for staff and students.
The educational program is built around the school’s mission. From the day of application, students and
parents will demonstrate their commitment to ensuring that the students complete both high school and
college. That commitment will then be reinforced in the enrollment contract and will be revisited every time a
College Success Plan is reviewed.
Staff members will demonstrate the same commitment when they choose to apply to Polk State Lakeland
Pathways and adopt the role of key change agents in the lives of the students. Their commitment will be
reinforced every time they examine student performance data and adjust instructional strategies.

The Daggett Instructional Leadership Element 2: Align curriculum to standards. The alignment of the
written, taught, and tested curriculum is addressed in Section 4.A, beginning on page 26.

The Daggett Instructional Leadership Element 3: Integrate literacy and math across all content areas.
The Daggett Model states as follows:
Literacy and math are essential for success in college and careers and are therefore consistent with
the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), with special emphasis in the English language arts
standards placed on text complexity and non-fiction transactional reading and writing. The CCSS also
emphasizes the practical applications of literacy. All teachers at all grades and across all subjects
need to assume responsibility for this heightened emphasis on broad-based literacy development.
Similarly, the CCSS focuses on what it calls “Standards of Mathematical Practice,” which consist of
process standards (such as problem solving, reasoning and proof) and “strands of mathematical
proficiency” (including adaptive reasoning, strategic competence, conceptual understanding,
procedural fluency and productive disposition). Therefore Instructional Leadership must ensure the
integration and application of literacy and math standards across all curriculums.
This element is tied to the overall Polk State Lakeland Pathways educational program, its focus on preparing
students with reading and math skills as assessed by the PERT, and the learning strategies students will use
to build their reading, thinking, and problem-solving skills across content areas.

The Daggett Instructional Leadership Element 4: Facilitate data-driven decision making to inform
instruction. The Polk State Lakeland Pathways educational program will be data driven. Additional detail is
provided in the response to Section 4.F, beginning on page 47, and Section 5.A, beginning on page 40.

The Daggett Instructional Leadership Element 5: Provide opportunities for focused professional
collaboration and growth. The Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will be fortunate to work in a small
learning community flexible enough to provide for total staff collaboration and possessing resources to meet
both individual and group needs.
Collaboration has been addressed with prior elements of the Daggett Model and is truly the underpinning of the
effectiveness of Polk State Lakeland Pathways and its educational program. Professional development needs
of the group will be addressed each year during the staff retreat when staff members will collectively create the
new or revised School Improvement Plan.
Additional professional development opportunities will include the following:
o Individual growth goals and learning needs will be created by each instructor in collaboration with the
director during pre-school every August. Every instructor will be encouraged to attend a conference or
workshop directly related to his or her instructional responsibilities or to the theme of college success.
o Instructors will act as “in-house experts” for specific educational program priorities. For example, an
instructor will attend a conference focused on a specific instructional technology strategy and will then
return to school to act as both a trainer and resource for his or her peers.
o Finally, the College will offer Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members a variety of professional
development opportunities to include workshops available to all College personnel as well as the
possibility of pursuing additional degrees to enhance individual instructional effectiveness.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Section 3.B.Part 3-Marzano Evaluation Model
Another component of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways educational program will revolve around how instructors and
instructional leaders carry out their responsibilities.
Polk State College has elected to use the Robert Marzano Evaluation Model (Marzano Model) as the basis for its
charter school personnel evaluation system because the College and its current charter schools see the value of the
research-based instructional and leadership strategies in terms of supporting the educational process.
Section 3.B.Part 4-Blended Learning
Finally, at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, students will take advantage of online courses delivered in a blended
instructional model.
High school courses taught as part of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways curriculum will be contracted through FLVS or
another Florida Department of Education-approved vendor. They will be taught by Polk State Lakeland Pathways
instructors and will include a face-to-face component in addition to the online coursework. Furthermore, the face-toface component will take advantage of virtual learning strategies to include the use of social media, e-books, and
blogs.
The use of the blended online learning model is designed to purposely appeal to diverse learning styles. It will also
allow students to proceed at their own pace through course materials.
C. Describe the research base for the educational program.
The research underlying the Polk State Lakeland Pathways educational program is related to:
 The success of the Gateway to College National Network
 The research findings of Dr. Willard Daggett as reflected in The Daggett System for Effective Instruction
 The Robert Marzano Instructional Evaluation Model
 Other research related to the Polk State Lakeland Pathways educational program
Gateway to College National Network
In creating a plan to implement Polk State Lakeland Pathways, Polk State College examined the Gateway to
College National Network with outcomes as listed in Section 3.F on page 24. While the program is relatively
young, its early results are impressive. The fact that it has been reviewed and recognized by the Bill and Melinda
Gates Foundation, now awarding grants to colleges wanting to join the Network, provided additional credibility to
the Network and its model.
Specific quotes from the Gates Foundation website are included on page 16. After careful review, the College has
pursued a Gateway to College National Network start-up grant and intends to replicate that model in Polk State
Lakeland Pathways.
The Daggett System for Effective Instruction
The Daggett System for Effective Instruction – Where Research and Best Practices Meet (June 2011), published by Dr.
Willard Daggett and The International Center for Leadership in Education, is found at the Center’s website at
http://www.leadered.com/pdf/DSEI%20White%20Paper%207-11.pdf. This white paper is one of a multitude of related
research resources available through The International Center for Leadership in Education.
The Robert Marzano Evaluation Model
Research regarding the Marzano Model is accessible through the Florida Department of Education website
(http://www.fldoe.org/arra/TeacherEvaluationSystems.asp, using the link: Research Based and Evaluation Studies on
the Marzano Evaluation Model.
That link accesses a PDF, which introduces the Marzano model’s research base, wherein it states:
“The Marzano Evaluation Model is currently being used by the Florida Department of Education (DOE) as a
model that districts can use or adapt as their evaluation model. That Marzano Evaluation Model is based on a
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 23
number of previous, related works that include: What Works in Schools (Marzano, 2003), Classroom
Instruction that Works (Marzano, Pickering, & Pollock, 2001), Classroom Management that Works (Marzano,
Pickering, & Marzano, 2003), Classroom Assessment and Grading that Work (Marzano, 2006), The Art and
Science of Teaching (Marzano, 2007), Effective Supervision: Supporting the Art and Science of Teaching
(Marzano, Frontier, & Livingston, 2011). Each of these works was generated from a synthesis of the research
and theory. Thus the mode can be considered an aggregation of the research on those elements that have
traditionally been shown to correlate with student academic achievement.”
Additional research is found on the Learning Sciences International website at http://www.marzanoevaluation.com/.
Other Research
College personnel also reviewed other research with findings that reinforce the strategies being planned for Polk
State Lakeland Pathways and those implemented at Gateway to College National Network sites.
In 2008, College Summit, a national non-profit organization that helps high schools raise their college enrollment rates
by building college-going culture, presented a white paper entitled High Schools as Launch Pads: How College-Going
Culture Improves Graduation Rates in Low-Income High Schools. It is found at
http://www.collegesummit.org/images/uploads/WhitePaper_new.pdf and states,
A growing body of research suggests that students who work hard in high school do so because they connect
their efforts with college and career rewards after high school. Therefore, in order to raise graduation rates,
schools need to stop seeing high school graduation as their ultimate goal and start seeing themselves as a
launch pad for college and career success.”
The National Dropout Prevention Center/Network speaks to the importance of establishing a meaningful learning
environment for students at-risk of leaving school and identifies research-based strategies that have a positive impact
on the dropout rate (http://www.dropoutprevention.org/effective-strategies). The Polk State Lakeland Pathways
educational design incorporates five of these strategies. The network describes them as follows:
1. Mentoring/Tutoring—Mentoring is a one-to-one caring, supportive relationship between a mentor and a
mentee that is based on trust. Tutoring, also a one-to-one activity, focuses on academics and is an
effective practice when addressing specific needs such as reading, writing, or math competencies.
2. Alternative Schooling—Alternative schooling provides potential dropouts a variety of options that can lead
to graduation, with programs paying special attention to the student's individual social needs and academic
requirements for a high school diploma.
3. Active Learning—Active learning embraces teaching and learning strategies that engage and involve
students in the learning process. Students find new and creative ways to solve problems, achieve success,
and become lifelong learners when educators show them that there are different ways to learn.
4. Educational Technology—Technology offers some of the best opportunities for delivering instruction to
engage students in authentic learning, addressing multiple intelligences, and adapting to students' learning
styles.
5. Individualized Instruction—Each student has unique interests and past learning experiences. An
individualized instructional program for each student allows for flexibility in teaching methods and
motivational strategies to consider these individual differences.
Furthermore, in a 2008 report, an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES),
What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), presented recommendations that focus on reducing high school dropout rates
http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/PracticeGuide.aspx?sid=9. Four strategies were found to have moderate impact on
lowering dropout rates. All four are included in the Gateway to College National Network and will be implemented in the
Polk State Lakeland Pathways educational program design.
They are, as listed in the IES document:
1. Assign adult advocates to students at risk of dropping out. Adult advocates should have an appropriate
background and low caseloads, and be purposefully matched with students. Adequate training and support
should be provided for advocates.
2. Provide academic support and enrichment to improve academic performance. Help students to improve
academic performance and reengage in school. This should be implemented in conjunction with other
recommendations.
3. Personalize the learning environment and instructional process. A personalized learning environment creates a
sense of belonging and fosters a school climate where students and teachers get to know one another and can
provide academic, social, and behavioral encouragement.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
4. Provide rigorous and relevant instruction to better engage students in learning and provide the skills needed to
graduate and to serve them after they leave school. Engagement can be increased by providing students with
the necessary skills to complete high school and by introducing students to postsecondary options.
D. Explain how the educational program aligns with the school’s mission.
The mission of Polk State Lakeland Pathways is to provide an educational environment that will prepare previously
disengaged students, ages 16 to 21 years old, to graduate from high school with the skills for college success.
The educational program described in Section 3.B, beginning on page 13, has been proven successful with an
identical population at multiple colleges across the country.
E. Explain how the services the school will provide to the target population will help them attain the Next
Generation Sunshine State Standards, as required by section 1002.33, F.S.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will provide its students with the preparation they need to address requirements of the
Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and the Common Core State Standards as they are implemented. The
implementation of one of the Daggett System’s Instructional Leadership elements, Align Curriculum to Standards,
will be critical in the transition process. More specifics about this element and the strategies to achieve it are provided in
Section 4.A, beginning on the bottom of page 26.
Moreover, the value of the proposed educational program in preparing students for success with the Common Core
Standards is emphasized in The Daggett System for Effective Instruction – Where Research and Best Practices Meet,
which states,
While teachers must have strong content expertise in the subjects they teach, effective instruction is more than
just a transmittal of knowledge. It is equally the ability to make connections, show relevance, nurture
engagement and embed understanding. The new Common Core State Standards will require this same
rigorous-but-relevant approach to teaching and the next generation assessments will require students to show
their ability to apply higher order thinking, not just recall knowledge.
Finally, the intensely individualized nature of each student’s College Success Plan and the personalized support
provided at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will ensure that each enrollee receives the coursework and tutoring needed
for success in meeting standards.
Section 4.F, beginning on page 47, lists components to be addressed through the school’s curriculum evaluation
process. Component 4 focuses specifically on student performance on State Assessments directly aligned with Next
Generation Sunshine State Standards and Common Core State Standards. The school will continually assess and
adjust the effectiveness of the educational program in terms of its effectiveness in preparing students for success.
If the school intends to replicate an existing school design:
F. Provide evidence that the existing design has been effective and successful in raising student
achievement. The effectiveness of an existing school design can be demonstrated by providing
evidence of organizational viability and the success of the academic program, including
compliance with legal requirements, as well as a direct relationship between program elements and
student achievement.
Polk State College intends to replicate some or all components of the Gateway to College National
Network model at Polk State Lakeland Pathways. Replication may occur through a formal or
informal relationship.
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways mission mirrors that presented for the Gateway to College
National Network on its website (http://www.gatewaytocollege.org/home.asp): “Gateway to College
empowers youth who have dropped out of high school or ar e not on track to graduate to earn a
diploma and dual credit in a supportive college environment.”
The website also reports that the Network has collected six years of performance outcomes to
demonstrate the model’s success. Outcomes address:
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 25




Attendance—Average attendance rate of students was 82%.
Sense of connection—Students report that they:
o Have experienced a substantial reduction in problems with peers, school administration, and faculty,
compared to their experiences in high school.
o Feel safer and "more cared for" than they did while enrolled in high school.
Improved academic performance—Overall performance shows that students:
o Passed 72% of nearly 70,000 college courses (with a C or better).
o Passed 80% of their first transfer-level core courses.
College credit accumulation—Students graduated from high school with an average of 35 college semester
credits.
Both the Network and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have documented Network outcomes.
Additionally, the success of prior replications of t he model is illustrated by the fact that a model first
established at Portland Community College in 2000 has evolved since 2003 into a national network of 35
colleges in 20 states partnering with more than 125 school districts.
G. Describe the applicant’s capacity to replicate an existing school design. The capacity to replicate can
be demonstrated by providing credible and well-defined strategies for replication, including the
financial and human resources necessary to replicate the design.
As stated above, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will replicate some or all components of the Gateway
to College National Network model.
Table 1 on page 17 lists both the network’s requirements for replication and a status statement for
each requirement, indicating Polk State College’s readiness to do so.
Replication may occur through a formal or informal relationship. In either situation, the Collegiate
High School Director will provide oversight for Polk State Lakeland Pathways and will take responsibility for
hiring the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Assistant Director who will act as the program director, accountable
for implementing Gateway to College essential elements. The charter budget includes all personnel required
to implement the Gateway to College components; and the charter school budget, including project
personnel, is designed to support Gateway to College implementation.
Formal Relationship with Gateway to College National Network
Polk State College has applied to the Gateway to College National Network for a start-up grant. If grant dollars are
received, they will support initial program planning, training, technical assistance, coaching, and evaluation provided by
the National Network staff.
Informal Relationship with Gateway to College National Network
Polk State College and Polk State Lakeland Pathways have the capacity to implement all the requirements of the
Gateway to College model without grant dollars. These requirements and the essential elements are the backbone of
Lakeland Pathway’s educational design as presented in Sections 3.B and C, beginning on page 13.
Additionally, Polk State College personnel have spoken directly to their contact at the Gateway to College National
Network and have confirmed that even if the College and Polk State Lakeland Pathways are not selected for the grant,
there will be opportunities to explore other avenues to access resources of the Network, including conference and
professional development activities.
26
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Section 3 Research References
 Gateway to College National Network website at http://www.gatewaytocollege.org/home.asp includes Network
mission, description, and outcomes.
 Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation website at http://www.gatesfoundation.org/grantee-profiles/Pages/gateway-tocollege.aspx provides information about the Gateway to College National Network and about the Gates
Foundation investment in expanding the Gateway to College model to more sites.
 The Daggett System for Effective Instruction – Where Research and Best Practices Meet (June 2011), published
by Dr. Willard Daggett and The International Center for Leadership in Education, is found at the Center’s website
at http://www.leadered.com/pdf/DSEI%20White%20Paper%207-11.pdf. This white paper and additional
information on the Center’s website provide insight into the Daggett System.
 Research regarding the Marzano Model is accessible through the Florida Department of Education website at
http://www.fldoe.org/arra/TeacherEvaluationSystems.asp and on the Learning Sciences International website at
http://www.marzanoevaluation.com/.
 Additional research to show the appropriateness of the Lakeland Pathways model for disengaged youth can be
found in:
o A white paper entitled High Schools as Launch Pads: How College-Going Culture Improves Graduation
Rates in Low-Income High Schools. It is found on the College Summit website, at
http://www.collegesummit.org/images/uploads/WhitePaper_new.pdf.
o Information found on the National Dropout Prevention Center/Network website at
http://www.dropoutprevention.org/effective-strategies.
o A 2008 report from the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), presenting recommendations that focus on
reducing high school dropout rates at http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/PracticeGuide.aspx?sid=9.
Section 4: Curriculum Plan
A. Describe the school’s curriculum in the core academic areas, illustrating how it will prepare
students to achieve the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. If the curriculum has not been
developed, describe how the plan for curriculum development shows how students will be prepared to
attain the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways system of curriculum is built around five components. The student learning
needs related to these components are interrelated, and they all either include instruction tied to preparing
students to achieve state assessment standards (Sunshine State or Common Core) or are dependent on
student success on the assessment instruments.
The first step taken by Polk State Lakeland Pathways planners in terms of developing the school’s curriculum
has been to identify specific courses to be taught in order to address each component.
A full description of the five components is provided, beginning on page 30. A summary of each includes:
 Component #1: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation—The curriculum included in the Foundation term has
been carefully selected to provide for success of students who have previously disengaged from school and to position
enrollees for further accomplishments in both the high school and the college curricula. Any student who has not taken or
has not passed FCAT 2.0 Reading will be assigned to a reading course.
 Component #2: High School Graduation—
The courses and programs-of-study offered at
High School
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be
Graduation
developed around the goal of ensuring that its
students graduate with a standard high school
diploma. All high school coursework will be
Lakeland
selected to help students perform well on state
PERT
Pathways
assessments so that they will be positioned to
Quality in 16
Foundation
earn the standard diploma.
Types of
 Component #3: The PERT—All Polk State
Curriculum
Lakeland Pathways enrollees will enter the
school with the intent to complete high school
and transition to college. Part of the school’s
curriculum will focus on teaching and learning
College
State
Coursework
Assessments
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 27


the skills required to earn the PERT cut scores in reading, sentence skills, and math. These scores are required for
students to access college coursework. The goal of Common Core State Standards and of the Partnership for
Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is on preparing students with the skills for success in
college and careers.
Component #4: Florida State Assessments—Ensuring student success on state assessments is one of five school
goals. The school’s curriculum will be directly tied to this preparation and will address Next Generation Sunshine State
Standards and Common Core State Standards as well as additional assessments required by the PARCC.
Component #5: College Coursework—An essential part of the school’s mission is to prepare every student to be
successful in a Polk State College degree program and to help them earn as many college credits as possible while still
in high school. In order to achieve this part of the mission, students need to pass FCAT 2.0 Reading as soon as possible.
They also need to build the math and reading skills to perform well on the PERT. Finally, they must build a level of
competence in each content area to equip them for success in college coursework. Mastering State Standards will be
central to their success.
In addition to specifying five curriculum components and identifying the coursework connected to each, a
larger and more comprehensive view of curriculum encompasses types of curriculum found in every class.
Types of Curriculum
written
tested
At Polk State Lakeland Pathways, curriculum is defined as more than the scope
and sequence of courses to be taught. It is also defined as more than a list of
common core standards. Curriculum encompasses what is written, what
teachers teach, and what is assessed. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will use a
data-driven decision making process as part of its concentrated and continuous
effort to keep these three aligned.
taught
Furthermore, curriculum is a complex and dynamic entity. In an article entitled
“Curriculum types: How do decisions about curriculum and instruction impact
student achievement?” (2008), Steven M. Weber identifies the written, taught,
and tested curricula as three of 16 curriculum types, all of which will be addressed by Polk State Lakeland Pathways.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways planners know that these 16 types or educational concepts address curriculum
decisions that are made either consciously or unconsciously. The emphasis at Polk State Lakeland
Pathways is to be certain that decisions regarding all types of curriculum are consciously considered and
applied.
All 16 curriculum types are listed in Table 2. The contents of this table are taken directly from the article, which is
included with a list of references as Appendix 1, beginning on page 84.
Table 2: Curriculum Types
Curriculum
Description
Type
Aligned
“Teaching alone will not improve test scores. Teaching has to be aligned (on task) and purposive
(cumulative)”
(English, 2000, p. 104).
ConceptBased
Differentiated
“One of the tasks of curriculum leadership is to use the right methods to bring the written, the taught,
the supported, and the tested curriculums into closer alignment, so that the learned curriculum is
maximized”
(Glatthorn, 1987, p. 4).
“Teachers in thinking classrooms understand how to use concepts to integrate student thinking at a
deeper level of understanding – a level where knowledge can be transferred to other situations and
times”
(Erickson, 2007, p. 22).
Concepts are timeless, universal, abstract and broad. The conceptual transfer of knowledge includes
the application of concepts or universal generalizations across time, cultures or situations (Erickson,
2007, p. 129).
Differentiated instruction occurs when a teacher proactively plans varied approaches to what
students need to learn, how they will learn it, and/or how they can express what they have learned in
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Table 2: Curriculum Types
Curriculum
Description
Type
order to increase the likelihood that each student will learn as much as he or she can as efficiently as
possible (Tomlinson, 2003, p. 151).
Hidden
Guaranteed
and Viable
Learned
Null
“In differentiated classrooms, teachers provide specific ways for each individual to learn as deeply as
possible and as quickly as possible, without assuming one student's road map for learning is identical
to anyone else’s” (Tomlinson, 1999, p. 2).
The messages of hidden curriculum may support or contradict each other as well as the written
curriculum. For example, while school social studies curriculum typically emphasizes and even
celebrates democratic political systems and principles, such as one person-one vote, majority rule and
minority rights, separation of church and state, equality before the law, and due process, these
principles are not always practiced in public school classrooms and corridors.
“If teachers can lay out a sound – a viable – set of standards and can then guarantee (more or less)
that these standards actually get taught, we can raise levels of achievement immensely”
(Schmoker, 2006, p. 36).
In his book What Works in Schools, Robert Marzano (2003) shares research that affirms the fact that
the number one factor that increases levels of learning is what gets taught. Marzano calls this a
“guaranteed and viable curriculum.”
The learned curriculum is what the students actually learn from the taught curriculum. Common
formative assessments assist educators in monitoring the written and taught curriculum while
assessing student understanding.
“The gap between what is taught and what is learned—both intended and unintended—is large”
(Cuban, 1992, p. 223).
The null curriculum is that which is not taught in schools.
Eisner (1994) suggests that what curriculum designers and/or teachers choose to leave out of the
curriculum—the null curriculum—sends a covert message about what is to be valued (p. 96-97).
“What children don’t learn is as important as what they do learn. What the curriculum neglects is as
important as what it teaches” (Eisner).
Purposeful
“Curriculum design has become more an issue of deciding what you won’t teach as well as what you
will teach. You cannot do it all. As a designer, you must choose the essential” (Jacobs, 1997, p. 27).
Although educators must choose the essential, their choices about what is left out of the curriculum
becomes the null curriculum.
“All learners benefit from and should receive instruction that reflects clarity about purposes and
priorities of content” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006, 6).
“Many educational programs do not have clearly defined purposes”
(Tyler, 1949, p.1).
Received
“Schooling at its best reflects a purposeful arrangement of parts and details, organized with deliberate
intention, for achieving the kinds of learning we seek”
(Wiggins & McTighe, 2007, p. 9).
The received curriculum is not always the intended or taught curriculum. Each student brings his or
her own background and prior knowledge to the classroom. Student understanding is impacted by
each student’s perception of the aligned, hidden, null, spiral, and tested curricula.
Understanding of the received curriculum is critically important as it guides the curriculum and
instruction decisions made by teachers and administrators. Just because content was taught does not
necessarily mean it was caught. In a Professional Learning Community educators meet on a regular
basis to assess the received curriculum and to provide information on student understanding to
teachers and administrators at the next grade level.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 29
Table 2: Curriculum Types
Curriculum
Description
Type
Rigorous
“Academic rigor is an essential characteristic of effective curriculum, instruction and assessment.
Students learn when they are challenged to use the full range of their talents and intellectual abilities to
address authentic and complex academic tasks in professional and real-life events. All students should
have the opportunity to participate in qualitatively different academic environments that build upon their
interests, strengths and personal goals” (NCDPI).
See NCDPI’s Definition for Rigor
Spiral
Bruner (1960) wrote, “A curriculum as it develops should revisit this basic ideas repeatedly, building
upon them until the student has grasped the full formal apparatus that goes with them” (p. 13).
Analyzing curriculum maps allows teachers and administrators to reflect upon the spiral curriculum.
Another strategy for analyzing the spiral curriculum is called vertical alignment.
Taught
Tested
Sergiovanni (1990) wrote, “Schools have multiple and often conflicting purposes that make exact
alignment of structure and purpose difficult, if not impossible” (p. 27).
The taught curriculum is what teachers actually teach in the classroom. Traditionally, the written
curriculum
(state and local documents) has not matched the taught curriculum among teachers within a school.
Jacobs (1997) wrote, “If there are gaps among teachers within buildings, there are virtual Grand
Canyons among buildings in a district (p. 3).
The tested curriculum provides valuable feedback about each student’s understanding of essential
content, concepts and skills.
If the tested curriculum is not aligned with the written curriculum then teachers, students and parents
will have a difficult time assessing the student understanding.
Timeless &
Timely
st
21 Century
“The extent to which any test is useful in reteaching any given curriculum is the extent to which that test
does indeed measure the curriculum in the first place”
(English, 2000, p. 65).
As curriculum developers we are required to make ongoing decisions about curriculum. Heidi Hayes
Jacobs said, “There’s a need for both timeless curriculum content and timely content. What seems to
be falling by the wayside is timely content. We have to make decisions about what we shed and what
we keep—and some of what we’re holding on to is predicated on outdated ideas”
(Perkins-Gough, 2003, pp. 12-17).
According to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction:
st
Future-Ready Students for 21 Century
Click on link above
st
Future-Ready Schools for 21 Century
Click on link above
Written
“All students will graduate from a rigorous, relevant academic program that equips them with the
knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to succeed in both post-secondary education and 21st
Century careers and to be participating, engaged citizens.”
- North Carolina State Board of Education
The written curriculum specifies what is to be taught and is produced by the state, the school system,
the school, and the classroom teacher.
The written curriculum will have little impact on student achievement unless it becomes the taught
curriculum or more importantly a ‘guaranteed and viable’ curriculum, which is agreed upon by a team of
teachers.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways personnel will be knowledgeable about types of curriculum and will ensure that they are
consciously imbedded through the five curriculum components.
30
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Curriculum Components
The specifics of each of the five curriculum components are presented below.
Component #1: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation
During their first semester at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, all students will be enrolled in the Polk State
Lakeland Pathways Foundation. Most students will be enrolled in a high school reading, English, and math course.
During the Foundation term, students will be introduced to two distinct characteristics of the educational program that
directly affect the school’s curriculum delivery system:
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will be enrolled in a four-period day schedule, which will allow them to
earn four high school credits each term and eight during a traditional school year. Students will also be
enrolled in at least one class each summer. Therefore, in a 12-month time period, an individual will be able to
earn a minimum of nine credits toward a high school diploma. This is compared to seven in a traditional high
school.
 Since Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will enter the school with unique and varied academic histories,
most or all of the high school core courses and electives will be offered through a contract between Polk State
Lakeland Pathways and FVLS or another Florida Department of Education-approved provider. However, a
certified Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructor will teach each of the virtual core courses within a blended
instructional model that will provide a face-to-face component as part of the course.
A likely choice of high school courses to be taken by Polk State Lakeland Pathways students during their Foundation
experience is included in Table 3.
Table 3: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation Courses
Subject Area
Course
High School Credit
College Credit
English*
English 2,3, or 4
1
0
Math**
Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Math 1
0
for College Success, or Math for
College Readiness
Elementary Algebra (MAT 0024)—
1 (.5 per course)
6 elective credits
possible choice for students who have
earned a score of 96-112 on math
portion of PERT to be followed by
Intermediate Algebra (MAT1033)
Reading**
Reading 1 or 2, Intensive Reading, or 1
0
Critical Thinking
College Success
College Success (SLS 1101)
.5
3
Note: Any courses offered at the honors level may be used for an individual student as appropriate.
*English 1 will be made available to any students who have not passed that course.
** A student who has met the cut score in PERT math and in PERT and FCAT 2.0 Reading may be placed in a college
course instead of related courses listed in Table 3.
All students will take College Success (SLS 1101), a Polk State College course designed to help students learn and
practice the habits of mind needed to be successful college students.
College Success is defined in the Polk State College Catalog as follows: Through this course, students develop and
improve academic skills including active listening, college-level reading, note taking, test taking, and library use, as well
as advance their memory and recall techniques and the use of college resources. Students discover their individual
learning styles and determine how to adjust their methods of learning for greater success. Variables such as health,
finances, relationships, and attitudes that may either interfere with or enhance academic success are also analyzed.
Component #2: High School Graduation
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways guidance counselor will create a College Success Plan for each Polk State
Lakeland Pathways student at the time of enrollment. Each student’s plan will be developed with the intent of
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 31
positioning the student for high school graduation while giving him or her the opportunity to earn as many college
credits as possible.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will comply with graduation requirements as specified in the Polk County Schools
Student Progression Plan. Enrollees will complete the 24-credit requirement for high school graduation and will do so
through a combination of high school and college coursework. The 24 required high school credits include those listed
in Table 4.
Table 4: Graduation Requirements
Core courses
16
English
Mathematics
Science
Social studies
Fine arts or practical arts
Physical education including integration of health
Major area of interest
Other
TOTAL
4
4
3
3
1
1
4
4
24
Term 2 at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
In Term 2 (second semester of first year of enrollment), student schedules will become more individualized than during
the Foundation. However, for students categorized as juniors, a likely course list will be as itemized in Table 5 below.
Table 5: Term 2 Schedule at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Subject Area
Course
High School Credit
College Credit
English**
English 3 or 4
1
0
Math**
Geometry, Algebra 2, Math for
1
0
College Success, or Math for College
Readiness
Elementary Algebra (MAT 0024)—
1 (.5 per course)
6 elective credits
possible choice for students who have
earned a score of 96-112 on math
portion of PERT to be followed by
Intermediate Algebra (MAT1033)
Social Studies
American History
1
0
Reading**
Reading 1 or 2, Intensive Reading, or 1
0
Critical Thinking
Note: Any courses offered at the honors level may be used for an individual student as appropriate. Also, additional
English, math, or science courses may be offered as needed.
** A student who has met the cut score in PERT math and in PERT and FCAT 2.0 Reading may be placed in a college
course instead of related courses listed in Table 5.
Term 3—Summer
In the summer following the first year of enrollment at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, enrollees will take:
o A college course: Introduction to Computers and Information Systems (CGS 1061). Students will earn 3 hours
in elective college credits and 1 high school elective credit.
o Students may take additional college courses if they have demonstrated the academic readiness to do so.
Courses may include:
o Introduction to Humanities (HUM 2020) or Ethics (PHI 2600) for .5 high school elective credit and 3
hours to satisfy the AA or AS degree college humanities core requirement.
o Wellness, Nutrition, Personal Growth and Fitness (HSC 1101, 3-hr. course) or Wellness Concepts
(HLP 1081, 2-hr.course) to satisfy the high school .5 credit in personal fitness and 3 or 2 hours in the
college science core.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Subsequent Terms
Subsequent terms at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be highly individualized, especially since the credits earned by
individuals prior to enrolling at Polk State Lakeland Pathways are expected to vary significantly. However, students will
complete coursework to fully meet high school graduation requirements through some combination of the high school
courses and/or their college equivalents as listed in Table 6.
Table 6: Meeting High School Graduation Requirements at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Requirement
High School
College Courses to be used as Possible
College
Courses and
Substitutions for One or More Requirements
Credits
Credits
English
English 1, 2, 3, & 4
College Composition (ENC 1101)
3
(4 credits)
College Composition II (ENC 1102)
3
Introduction to Literature (LIT 1000)
3
Math
Algebra 1, Geometry, Intermediate Algebra (MAT 1033)
3
(4 credits)
Algebra 2, Math for
College Algebra (MAC 1105)
3
College Success, or
Topics in Mathematics (MGF 1106)
3
Math for College
Explorations in Mathematics (MGF 1107)
3
Readiness
Precalculus Algebra (MAC 1140)
3
Social Studies
World History
World Civilization to 1500 (WOH 1012)
3
(3 credits)
World Civilization 1500 to Present (WOH 1022)
3
American History
History of the United States 1607-1877 (AMH
3
1010)
3
Government (.5)
History of the United States 1877-Present (AMH
3
Economics (.5)
1020)
3
American National Government (POS 2041)
Principles of Macroeconomics (ECO 2013)
Science
Biology
Survey of Biological Science (BSC 1005c)
4
(3 credits)
Chemistry
Introductory Chemistry (CHM 1025c)
4
Physics
Basic Concepts of Physics (PHY 2001c)
4
Earth Science
Earth Science (ESC 1000)
3
Physical Science
Survey of Physical Science (PSC 1121)
3
Fine or
Journalism
Speech Communication (SPC 1608)
3
Practical Arts
Music Appreciation (MUL 1010)
3
(1 credit)
Introduction to film (FIL 1000)
3
PE including
Lifestyle Fitness
Integration of
Design
Personal
(.5 credit)
Wellness, Nutrition, Personal Growth and Fitness
3
Either of the college
Fitness
(HSC 1101)
2
wellness courses
(1 credit)
Wellness Concepts (HLP1081)
meets the HS
personal fitness
credit.
Other
Foreign Language
(8 credits)
recommended:
Spanish 1
First Year Spanish 1 (SPN 1130) or other language 5
Spanish 2
First Year Spanish 2 (SPN 1131) or other language 5
(2 credits total)
Polk State Lakeland
College Success (SLS 1101)
3
Pathways required
General Leadership (SLS 1261)
3
college electives
Introduction to Computers and Information
3
(1.5 credits)
Systems (CGS 1061)
Other electives
Other college electives specific to the student
specific to student
(3.5 credits)
HS
Credit
s
1
1
1
.5
1
1
1
1
.5
.5
.5
.5
.5
.5
1
1
1
.5
.5
1
1
1
.5
.5
1
1
.5
.5
.5
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 33
Component #3: Student Performance on the PERT
In order to take most college courses, Polk State Lakeland Pathways students must earn the cut scores on
PERT reading, sentence skills, and math. All students will be enrolled in high school reading courses until
they meet the reading and sentence skills requirements. They will be scheduled into a high school math
course each term until they are able to earn the required score in PERT math.
Component #4: Florida State Assessments
A primary focus of both Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and the Common Core State Standards,
as applied to high school coursework, is on ensuring that when students complete courses, they will be able
to demonstrate specific skills and competencies; and when students finish high school, they will have the skills
needed for success in college and careers. That focus is aligned with the mission of Polk State Lakeland
Pathways, which intends to position students to earn a standard high school diploma and be ready for college
coursework.
In order to earn a standard high school diploma, students must perform adequately on all Florida assessment
measures. In order to be certain that they do so, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will put Next Generation
Sunshine State Standards and Common Core State Standards in the forefront of its curricular focus.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will enroll all students who have not taken or have not passed FCAT 2.0
Reading in a reading course or reading courses until they do so. More detail regarding the reading curriculum
is provided in Section 4.C, beginning on page 35.
EOC exams will be administered in all Polk State Lakeland Pathways courses for which they have been
developed. Instructors will use student outcomes to continually address the alignment of the written, taught,
and tested curricula for each of these courses. Assessment results will be used to modify curriculum in order
to improve performance.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will enroll students categorized as high school juniors and seniors. Its first
student cohort will enter in August of 2013. Based on the timeline found on the Florida Department of
Education website, assessment activities to be used at Polk State Lakeland Pathways during the first two
years and thereafter, as appropriate, will include:

2013-2014
o In the fall of 2013 and, if necessary, again in the spring of 2014, Polk State Lakeland
Pathways will administer FCAT 2.0 Reading retakes to all juniors and seniors who have not
passed or have not taken the exam.
o Polk State Lakeland Pathways will administer any and all EOC exams available for courses
taught in the school.

2014-2015
o In the fall of 2014 and, if necessary, again in the spring of 2015, Polk State Lakeland
Pathways will administer FCAT 2.0 Reading retakes to all juniors and seniors who have not
passed or have not taken the exam.
o Polk State Lakeland Pathways will administer any and all EOC exams available for courses
taught in the school.
o Polk State Lakeland Pathways will also administer any and all PARCC common core assessments (in
addition to EOC exams) available for grades 11 and 12.
Component #5: College Achievement
Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will take a minimum of three college courses, allowing them to also earn nine
college credits prior to graduating from high school. Additionally, any student who qualifies to take extra college
courses may substitute college courses for high school courses through dual enrollment and may also take a fifth
course each term, thus adding to the number of both high school and college credits earned in a given year and
overall.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
While students will be encouraged to maximize college credits earned, the larger and more important focus will be to
create College Success Plans to position students for success.
When enrolled in college courses, students will not have to pay registration, matriculation, or laboratory fees. They will
not be charged for textbooks. Dual enrollment courses will be weighted the same as courses taught through other
acceleration mechanisms.
Some Polk State Lakeland Pathways students should be able to enroll in selected core academic dual enrollment
courses as early as their first semester in the school.
B. Describe the research base and foundation materials that were used or will be used to develop the
curriculum.
General Research
When planners began developing the college transition program to serve disengaged youth, they addressed two
research questions:
 Are such programs advisable and successful?
 If so, what high school-to-college curriculum models have been successful with disengaged youth.
Some of the research referenced in Section 3.C, beginning on page 22, helped answer the first question.
Planners also looked at specific models. They examined both the Middle College and the Early College models,
which are defined on the Middle College National Consortium website, http://www.mcnc.us/about/middle-earlycollege/, as follows:
Middle College High Schools are secondary schools, authorized to grant diplomas in their own name, located
on college campuses across the nation. The Middle Colleges are small, with usually 100 or fewer students per
grade level and they provide a rigorous academic curriculum within a supportive and nurturing environment to
a student population that has been historically under-served and underrepresented in colleges. While at the
Middle College, students have the opportunity to take some college classes at no cost to themselves.
Early College High Schools are schools with all the characteristics of Middle Colleges – location on a college
campus, strong academic program, supportive environment – and are designed to serve the same target
population. Early Colleges also have a defined and structured program that enables the high school
students to earn both their high school diplomas and their Associates Degree in 4 to 5 years with no cost to
the student.
The Middle College/Early College initiative has shown positive student outcomes, also listed on that website.
One school/program that began as an Early College is the Portland Community College Gateway to College
program, which was established in in 2000. As stated earlier in this proposal, that site has evolved into a national
network with programs or schools in 35 colleges across the country and can document very positive student
outcomes. While the Gateway to College National Network model provides the educational program design to be
applied as appropriate at Polk State Lakeland Pathways, it also includes a model of high-level academic curriculum.
Curriculum Components
As planners began identifying the coursework and program-of-study to be included at Polk State Lakeland
Pathways, they were able to pull together the characteristics found in Gateway to College sites with the findings that
have resulted from the implementation of two collegiate high schools at Polk State College. Both strongly influenced
the detail of the school’s eventual course and program offerings. Additional research into state and school district
requirements as well as college course offerings and degree specifications eventually framed the curriculum
components. A few examples of how these research elements are combined are listed below:
 The Gateway to College National Network outlines a Foundation component. The planners at Polk State
College are implementing that component, using subject area courses recommended by the Gateway to
College National Network but with specific courses identified by staff at the Collegiate High School. For
example, the Collegiate High School staff is particularly adamant about enrolling all new students in College
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 35




Success (SLS 1101), a Polk State College course found to be very helpful, especially when taught by
charter school instructors, in transitioning high school students into the college environment.
The Gateway to College model plans for students to transition after the Foundation term into college
coursework. The planners have used outcomes from the two collegiate high schools to establish programsof-study that have been found to be most successful in achieving student success on both FCAT 2.0
Reading and the PERT in order to provide for a timely and successful transition.
Planners also paid close attention to a timeline provided on the Florida Department of Education website,
http://www.fldoe.org/asp/k12memo/pdf/tngcbtf.pdf, which lays out the state assessment timeline. That
timeline will eventually change state assessment requirements.
The focus on positioning students to earn college credits is a significant piece of the Gateway to College
model. The two Polk State College collegiate high schools have both anecdotal and quantitative data
regarding student experiences in a multitude of college courses. This data and knowledge will help drive the
choice of individual courses into which Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will be enrolled.
The Polk County Schools Student Progression Plan provided the graduation requirements to be in place at
Polk State Lakeland Pathways. Planners used the Polk State College Catalog to specify college courses
likely to be used for dual enrollment credit.
Curriculum Types
The Steve Weber article (Appendix 1) and the curriculum references and links included in that article have been
significantly helpful in establishing insight into the strategies that will be used to ensure that Polk State Lakeland
Pathways curriculum is effective in educating the school’s enrollees.
C. Describe the school’s reading curriculum. Provide evidence that reading is a primary focus of the school
and that there is a curriculum and set of strategies for students who are reading at grade level or higher and a
separate curriculum and strategy for students reading below grade level. The reading curriculum must be
consistent with effective teaching strategies and be grounded in scientifically-based reading research.
Competency in the area of reading is a requirement for all Polk State Lakeland Pathways students. When students
apply to Polk State Lakeland Pathways, they will take the PERT, which includes reading assessment. All students who
have not taken or have not passed FCAT 2.0 Reading will also be assessed in the area of reading. Individual course
schedules will be created based on student performance on these assessments.
Students Reading Below Grade Level
The Polk County Schools Pupil Progression Plan specifies as follows: Students who score at Level 1 on FCAT Reading
must be enrolled in an intensive reading course the following year. Fluent Level 1 and Fluent Level 2 students are
mandated to have a minimum of 45 minutes of daily reading instruction. Dysfluent level 1 and Dysfluent level 2
students must have a minimum of 90 blocked minutes of reading instruction daily. An alternate option for Level 2 fluent
students is placement in a content area course in which reading strategy instruction is delivered by a CAR-PD
endorsed teacher (S. 1003.25.4156 F.S.).
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will teach the required reading courses for students who have scored at FCAT levels 1
and 2. The same course(s) will be used for any student who has not met the cut score on PERT reading. Each course
will provide for 90 minutes of daily reading instruction.
The reading instructor will administer the Florida Assessments for Instruction in Reading (FAIR) to those students that
scored a level 1 or a level 2 on FCAT Reading. Student gains will be monitored from the FAIR adaptive program by
using a reading comprehension test, a maze test, and a word analysis test.
The FAIR will be administered three times during the academic year. The first assessment will provide the baseline
assessment, which is the reading comprehension test. The second assessment will be given mid-year and will review
what learning gains have taken place, based on the intervention that was necessary from the first assessment. The
final assessment will be administered at the end of the year and will provide data showing whether students will benefit
from further enrollment in an intensive reading class or a content area class.
The reading instructor will teach the intensive reading classes. Content area reading instruction will be provided by the
reading or English instructor. Test results from the FAIR are available to teachers the day following test administration.
36
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Additionally, the high school reading classes will use a blended learning curriculum licensed from FVLS or another
Florida Department of Education-approved provider. Teachers employed by Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be
provided professional development to effectively utilize strategies in a blended learning environment.
Recent research indicates that cooperative learning will help improve the comprehension of students who are having
difficulties with reading. Instructors will use student scores from FCAT 2.0 Reading and the FAIR assessment to plan
reading instruction.
Additionally, the work of Palincsar, A. S. & Brown, A. L. (1984), which is cited throughout current research on reading
comprehension will guide many of the instructional strategies used with Polk State Lakeland Pathways students.
Strategies include:
1. Identifying similarities and differences in making patterns and comparing things
a. Graphic Organizers
b. Charts or Tables
c. Comparing characters
2. Cooperative Learning
a. Vocabulary
b. Written papers
c. Answering and generating questions: Reading articles and developing questions for understanding
provides higher levels of thinking.
3. Story Structure
a. Asking questions from the literature
b. Characters
c. Goals of the character
d. Action taken on the outcome
4. Summarizing
a. Identifying the main idea in a paragraph
b. Composing a concise statement of the central concept from a long passage.
5. Differentiated Reading Instructions—The National Reading Panel (2000) concluded that readers of all ability
levels benefit from comprehension strategy instruction. The instruction provided must match the needs of the
learner with the assignments. One size does not fit all.
Reading and English instructors will be consciously aware of the 16 curriculum types when working with students who
have reading challenges. They will also employ instructional strategies tied to the education program as described in
Section 3.B, beginning on page 13. Students will be provided with instruction that fits their need and learning styles
based on scoring from FCAT and FAIR assessment.
Students Reading At Grade Level and Higher
Students who meet the reading cut score on the PERT and have passed FCAT 2.0 Reading are reading at or above
grade level. Their instruction will incorporate the research-based instructional strategies included in Section 3.B.,
beginning on page 13.
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways program design is infused with instructional elements to build reading and thinking
skills as called for in the CCSS. As noted by Willard Daggett in The Daggett System for Effective Instruction – Where
Research and Best Practices Meet, “The CCSS also emphasizes the practical applications of literacy. All teachers at
all grades and across all subjects need to assume responsibility for this heightened emphasis on broad-based literacy
development.”
Additionally, students who are reading above grade level will participate in ACT-prep instructional activities that will
include an emphasis on preparing to perform well on ACT reading.
D. Explain how students who enter the school below grade level will be engaged in and benefit from the
curriculum.
As has been described earlier in this proposal, Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members will create a College
Success Plan for each student when he or she enters the school. The plan will take into consideration a student’s
performance on FCAT and PERT and will also be based on a review of the student’s academic history.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 37
High school programs-of-study will be specifically created to prepare students for success on FCAT 2.0 Reading and
on the PERT. Also, strategies used throughout the educational program are designed to prepare students, including
those who enter below grade level, to build reading, thinking, and coping skills in order to be successful in both the
high school and the College.
Finally, Polk State Lakeland Pathways incorporates a wrap-around support model that provides a guidance counselor
and at least one resource specialist for 200 students. These two professionals will work with both instructors and
students to ensure that individual student needs, both academic and personal, are adequately addressed.
E. Describe proposed curriculum areas to be included other than the core academic areas.
Each student who enters Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be pursuing a college degree. His or her College Success Plan will
include the courses needed for high school graduation and will be built to some degree around the career he or she expects to
eventually enter. One great advantage students will have is that if they meet PERT score requirements, they will have access to
the full array of courses offered through Polk State College.
The guidance counselor and the resource specialist are choosing electives to assist students to:
o Take full advantage of dual enrollment courses that can be used to meet both high school core and elective credit
requirements
o Choose courses aligned with a student’s degree and career plans
When a student is scheduled into an elective course, whether high school or college, the choice will also focus on positioning
students for success in Polk State College’s Associate of Arts degree program or in one of the College’s Associate of Science,
Bachelor of Applied Science, or Bachelor of Science degree programs. A student may then choose to remain at Polk State
College to earn a Bachelor of Applied Science or Bachelor of Science degree. Additionally, students may be able to elect to pursue
postsecondary vocational certificates that are embedded in AS degree programs.
F. Describe how the effectiveness of the curriculum will be evaluated.
Evaluating the effectiveness of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways curriculum will concentrate on answering a series of questions
and using the answers to help drive the school’s continuous improvement process as shown in Figure 1 on page 56.
Questions will speak to the school’s five curriculum components. These components listed below are those that have been
identified at the time of creating the proposal. Additional ones may be added after the school is operational. The questions listed for
each component are not intended to be all-inclusive. As part of a continuous improvement process, Polk State Lakeland Pathways
personnel will continually identify, answer, and address performance and improvement questions.
The following components and questions are seen as central to the Polk State Lakeland Pathways mission:
Component #1: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation—The curriculum included in the Foundation term has
been carefully chosen to provide for success of students who have previously disengaged from school and to position
enrollees for further accomplishments in both the high school and the college curricula.
Questions to assess success of the Foundation curriculum:
1. When students leave during the Foundation term, what reason do they give for leaving or what frustrations have
been noted for those students prior to their withdrawal?
2. When students withdraw, what are the withdrawal codes? What percentage of students leave to transfer to
another school setting in or out of state as opposed to those who exit with a withdrawal code indicating that they
are dropping out of school?
3. How successful are students in the individual courses within the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation?
4. What are the perceptions of students who complete the Foundation term regarding their success?
5. What do instructors and other Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff report regarding the effectiveness of the
Foundation experience to include the choice of courses, instructional techniques, technology, materials, etc.?
6. When asked about the degree to which the Foundation term has met students’ needs regarding keeping them in
school and providing for their success, what are the responses of parents?
7. How many and what percentage of students at the end of the Foundation term indicate that the following
statement applies to them? “I am capable and I am hard-working. I will be successful at Polk State
Lakeland Pathways, at Polk State College, and in life.”
8. How do the responses to these questions differ for subgroups based on gender, race/ethnicity,
ESE/non-ESE, ELL/non-ELL, and economically disadvantaged/non-economically disadvantaged?
38
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
9.
How do the answers differ for subgroups based on their initial performance on the PERT and on their
FCAT 2.0 Reading performance prior to entering Polk State Lakeland Pathways?
10. What are the characteristics of individuals who are retained and who are successful in the Foundation
experience as compared to those who are not?
a. How do these characteristics align with the characteristics of students targeted for
enrollment?
b. Does the Foundation curriculum appear to be appropriate for the targeted student
population?
Component #2: Student Retention and Graduation—Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will be individuals at
risk of not graduating from high school. Once students have completed the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation, a
primary school goal is to retain students through high school graduation.
Questions to assess the effectiveness of the overall school curriculum in terms of retaining students, maintaining their
confidence, and ensuring their completion of high school:
1. When applied on a term-by-term basis and/or overall, what are the answers to the questions for Component #1
when applied to the overall Polk State Lakeland Pathways program following the Foundation term?
2. How many and what percentage of Polk State Lakeland Pathways seniors who exit with a withdrawal code other
than transferring to another school do so with a code indicating high school graduation?
3. How does the graduation rate as generated in #2 for each subgroup compare to that of the cohort?
Component #3: Student Performance on the PERT—All Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will enter the school
with the intent of completing high school and entering college. In order to be able to access all Polk State College courses
and ultimately earn a college degree, these students will have to earn a specified cut score on the three sections of the
PERT: reading, sentence skills, and math. Curriculum used in the reading and math courses should prepare them for
success on the PERT.
Questions to assess effectiveness of PERT related curriculum:
1. What are scores of students not meeting the PERT criteria at the time of admission?
2. What is the status of each student at the end of each course?
a. If not ready to retest, what are perceptions of instructors and staff regarding each student’s performance
and growth since entering?
b. If retested, what is the performance on the retest? What apparent improvement can be documented?
3. Are results conclusive enough (in a term or over time) to identify curriculum adjustments to be made in individual
courses or changes to be made in the choice of courses used for PERT preparation?
4. What are the characteristics in terms of attendance, overall course performance, documented personal
challenges, etc. among those who earn the cut scores by the time of graduation as opposed to those who don’t?
5. What do students report regarding the value of the PERT preparation courses and the strategies used in each?
6. What are perceptions of instructors and staff regarding PERT curriculum effectiveness and recommended
changes?
7. When asked, what do parents say they have observed regarding the degree to which their children are engaged
and the level of frustration or confidence they have observed? What recommendations do they have for
improvement?
8. What differences in performance or perceptions are observed for subgroups based on gender,
race/ethnicity, ESE/non-ESE, ELL/non-ELL, and economically disadvantaged/non-economically
disadvantaged?
9. Based on these questions on a term-by-term basis and over time, what can school staff conclude about the
effectiveness of curriculum overall and by individual course and subject in terms of preparing students for
success on the PERT?
Component #4: Florida Assessments—The success of Polk State Lakeland Pathways’ mission depends directly on
the success of its students on state assessments, including those related to Next Generation Sunshine Standards,
Common Core State Standards, and the Partnership for PARCC.
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways will enroll students categorized as juniors and seniors. Some enrollees
will not have taken or will have not passed FCAT 2.0 Reading. Retakes will be administered.
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways will also administer EOC exams as they are made available.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 39

While PARCC assessments have not yet been developed, a press release from the U.S. Department
of Education (September 2010) projects that assessment will be ready for the 2014-2015 school year.
It also states,
The PARCC coalition will test students' ability to read complex text, complete research
projects, excel at classroom speaking and listening assignments, and work with digital media.
PARCC will also replace the one end-of-year high stakes accountability test with a series of
assessments throughout the year that will be averaged into one score for accountability
purposes, reducing the weight given to a single test administered on a single day, and
providing valuable information to students and teachers throughout the year.
(http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/us-secretary-education-duncan-announces-winnerscompetition-improve-student-asse)
Questions to examine the effectiveness of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways curriculum in terms of preparing students for
these assessments:
1. How many and what percentage of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates pass FCAT 2.0 Reading?
2. How many and what percentage of students pass EOC exams each term?
3. How many and what percentage of enrollees meet performance expectations on PARCC assessments?
4. What are performance outcomes per term or year, and what are performance trends over time on FCAT 2.0
Reading, on EOC exams, and on PARCC assessment as indicated by the aggregated and disaggregated
student performance data with a focus on groups as designated in questions 9-11 under Component #1?
5. What are student and parent perceptions regarding the degree to which the Polk State Lakeland Pathways
curriculum prepares students for each category of assessment? For EOC exams, what are perceptions per
course? What are suggestions for improvement?
6. When Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructors and staff members review performance outcomes, what are
their findings and what are plans for better aligning curriculum with assessment requirements?
Component #5: College Success—Every Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollee will have declared intent to go to
college. It is the mission of the school to prepare every student to be successful in a Polk State College degree program.
In addition to meeting the cut scores on the PERT, an evaluation of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways curriculum will
examine student performance in college courses and whether students transition from Polk State Lakeland Pathways to
college or postsecondary education at the time of high school graduation.
Questions to be used to examine the effectiveness of the school’s curriculum in terms of preparing its high school
graduates for success in college:
1. How many and what percentage of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates earn college credits by the time
of high school graduation?
2. How many and what percentage of graduates earn:
a. 9 credits?
b. 12 credits?
c. 15 credits?
d. 30 credits?
e. 45 credits?
f. A degree?
3. What is the average number of college credits earned by members of the graduating class?
4. How many and what percentage of graduates fail two or more college courses during their enrollment at Polk
State Lakeland Pathways?
5. What college courses do Polk State Lakeland Pathways students who go on to graduate from high school most
often fail? What courses are or could be offered at Polk State Lakeland Pathways to prepare students for
success in those courses?
6. What are the perceptions of students and their parents regarding their preparedness for success in the college
courses?
7. What patterns emerge when student performance results are reviewed to show performance outcomes for
subgroups as listed in questions 9-11 for Component #1?
8. What suggestions do students and their parents offer regarding changes to be made in the Polk State Lakeland
Pathways curriculum to better prepare students for success in college courses?
40
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
9.
What do instructors and staff members conclude, based on student performance in college courses, regarding
the effectiveness of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways curriculum and changes that should be made?
Section 4 Research References not included in those listed for Section 3

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Middle College and Early College models are defined on the Middle College National Consortium website,
http://www.mcnc.us/about/middle-early-college/. Curriculum components found in Middle and Early Colleges are
very similar to those to be in place at Lakeland Pathways. The Gateway to College National Network model
originated in an Early College program.
“Curriculum types: How do decisions about curriculum and instruction impact student achievement?” (2008), by
Steven M. Weber, included as Appendix 1, beginning on page 84, provides a description of 16 curriculum types
that are infused throughout the Lakeland Pathways curriculum components.
Polk County Schools Student Progression Plan outlines high school graduation requirements.
Polk State College Catalog lists college courses and outlines degree requirements.
A timeline provided on the Florida Department of Education website,
http://www.fldoe.org/asp/k12memo/pdf/tngcbtf.pdf, lays out the timeline that will eventually change State
assessment requirements.
A 2010 press release from the U.S. Department of education found at http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/ussecretary-education-duncan-announces-winners-competition-improve-student-asse) provides some insight into the
intent of the PARCC.
A current review of research regarding reading instruction, “A Review of the Current Research on Comprehension
Instruction,” (2010) developed by the National Reading Technical Assistance Center, RMC Research Corporation
cites Palinscar, A.S. & Brown, A.L. (1984) and is found at
http://www2.ed.gov/programs/readingfirst/support/compfinal.pdf.
Section 5: Student Performance, Assessment and Evaluation
A. State the school’s educational goals and objectives for improving student achievement. Indicate how much
academic improvement students are expected to show each year, how student progress and performance will be
evaluated, and the specific results to be attained.
Lakeland Pathways will enroll students who have already disengaged from the traditional school experience. Some
have dropped out of school, and all or most have life challenges that get in the way of academic success. Because
the Lakeland Pathways students will already have demonstrated, in one way or another, that they are unlikely to
finish high school, charter performance outcomes, as tied to objectives, will often be lower than what would be
anticipated for the general high school population of Polk County.
In response to Section 4.A, beginning page 26, this proposal lists five curriculum components. These are the same
components that drive the evaluation questions listed in Section 4.F, beginning on page 37. These identical
components also provide the framework for the school’s educational goals and objectives .
Goal 1
The new school’s first challenge is to ensure that the students they enroll, who have already disengaged from the
traditional high school experience, find success in their first term at Polk State Lakeland Pathways. Students must
exit the Foundation experience feeling successful.
Goal 1: The members of each cohort exiting the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation will have
experienced success and will voice intent to remain in school through graduation.
Goal 1 Objectives 2013-2014:
 Objective 1.A: At least 35% of students who complete the Foundation experience will have earned a
passing grade in three out of four Foundation courses.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 41

Objective 1.B: At least 70% of students who complete the Foundation experience will indicate on a survey
that they intend to remain in school through graduation.
Goal 1 Baseline Data: Polk State Lakeland Pathways planners have projected performance based on the
characteristics of the targeted student population and the planned academic program. Baseline data will be collected
during the 2013-2014 school year. Projected performance for future years may then need to be adjusted.
Goal 1 Objectives in Subsequent Years: Performance in relation to each objective is expected to improve and
then remain steady as required to ensure that by 2017-2018 performance in relation to each objective is as listed
below:
 Objective 1.A: At least 37% of students who complete the Foundation experience will have earned a
passing grade in three out of four Foundation courses.
 Objective 1.B: At least 72% of students who complete the Foundation experience will indicate on a survey
that they intend to remain in school through graduation.
Goal 2
Once students complete the Foundation term, they will demonstrate their commitment to completing a demanding
curriculum and graduating from high school.
Goal 2: Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will stay in school through high school graduation.
Goal 2 Objectives 2013-2014:

Objective 2.A: At least 80% of students who complete the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation and
later exit the school will do so with a withdrawal code indicating either transfer to another school or high
school graduation.
Goal 2 Additional Objectives 2014-2015:
 Objective 2.B: At least 82% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways students categorized as seniors at the
beginning of the school year who do not withdraw to enter another school will graduate from Polk State
Lakeland Pathways.
 Objective 2.C: At least 80% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates who entered Polk State Lakeland
Pathways with a GPA of 2.0 or lower will leave Polk State Lakeland Pathways with a higher GPA than they
had when they entered.
Goal 2 Baseline Data: Polk State Lakeland Pathways planners have projected performance based on the
characteristics of the targeted student population and the planned academic program. Baseline data will be
collected during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 school years. Projected performance for future years may then need
to be adjusted.
Goal 2 Objectives in Subsequent Years: Performance in relation to each objective is expected to improve and
then remain steady as required to ensure that by 2017-2018, performance in relation to each objective is as listed
below:
 Objective 2.A: At least 82% of students who complete the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation and
later exit the school will do so with a withdrawal code indicating transfer to another school or high school
graduation.
 Objective 2.B: At least 84% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways students categorized as seniors at the
beginning of the school year who do not withdraw to enter another school will graduate from Polk State
Lakeland Pathways.
 Objective 2.C: At least 82% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates who originally entered the school
with a GPA of 2.0 or lower will leave Polk State Lakeland Pathways with a higher GPA than they had when
they entered.
Goal 3
At entry into the school, Polk State Lakeland Pathways students are not expected to earn the cut scores on the
PERT required to give them full access to Polk State College coursework. However, it is important for each Polk
State Lakeland Pathways student to earn those scores by the time of graduation.
42
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Goal 3: By the time of high school graduation, Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will have
demonstrated a readiness to succeed in college coursework.
Goal 3 Objectives 2013-2014: Polk State Lakeland Pathways does not expect to graduate any students during its
first year. There are no Goal 5 objectives for 2013-2014.
Goal 3 Objectives 2014-2015:


Objective 3.A: At least 75% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will meet the PERT cut scores in
the areas of reading and sentence skills.
Objective 3.B: At least 50% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will meet the PERT cut score in
the area of math.
Goal 3 Baseline Data: Polk State Lakeland Pathways planners have projected performance based on the
characteristics of the targeted student population and the planned academic program. Baseline data will be collected
during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 school years. Projected performance for future years may then need to be
adjusted.
Goal 3 Objectives in Subsequent Years: Performance in relation to each objective is expected to improve and
then remain steady as required to ensure that by 2017-2018, performance in relation to each objective is as listed
below:
 Objective 3.C: At least 77% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will meet the PERT cut scores in
the areas of reading and sentence skills.
 Objective 3.D: At least 52% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will meet the PERT cut score in
the area of math.
Goal 4
A primary goal of all Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will be tied to their performance on Florida
assessments as related to Next Generation Sunshine State Standards (FCAT 2.0 Reading retakes), Common Core
State Standards (CCSS) as assessed through EOC exams, and the PARCC.
Goal 4: Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will participate in appropriate state assessments and will
demonstrate success in the assessment processes.
Goal 4 Objective 2013-2014:
 Objective 4.A: At least 90% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees who have not taken or have not
passed FCAT 2.0 Reading will participate in retakes in the fall and/or the spring of the school year.
 Objective 4.B: At least 90% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways students enrolled in a course in which an
EOC exam is available will participate in the EOC exam process.
Goal 4 Baseline Data:
 The only Goal 4 objective for which performance data can be assessed is Objective 4.C. The Florida
Department of Education High School Feedback Report shows that an average of 41.8% of Polk County’s
th
2008, 2009, and 2010 graduates scored 3 or higher on 10 grade FCAT Reading. The student population to
be served at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be made up of individuals who have not been successful in
the traditional school setting. While the school will actively seek to provide them with a successful academic
experience, planners are not comfortable in projecting ultimate performanc e to be higher than the average
district performance on the most recent High School Feedback Report.
 There is no performance data available for junior- and senior-level EOC exams. The only projected
performance included in this document is tied to the percentage of students who will participate in the
assessment process. Additional performance objectives will be set and included in the Polk State Lakeland
Pathways School Improvement Plan as soon as assessments are available and results are received.
Goal 4 Objectives in Subsequent Years: Performance in relation to each objective is expected to improve and
then remain steady as required to ensure that by 2017-2018, performance in relation to each objective is as listed
below:
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 43
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

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Objective 4.C: At least 92% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees who have not taken or have not
past FCAT 2.0 Reading will participate in retakes in the fall and/or the spring of the school year (until 20152016 or until FCAT 2.0 Reading is completely phased out).
Objective 4.D: At least 92% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways students enrolled in a course in which an
EOC exam is available will participate in the EOC exam process.
Objective 4.E: At least 90% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will have passed FCAT 2.0
Reading by the time of graduation (until 2015-2016 or until FCAT 2.0 Reading is completely phased out).
Objective 4.D: At least 90% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollees will participate in PARCC
assessments as they are made available.
Goal 5
When Polk State Lakeland Pathways students enter the charter high school, they will declare intent to complete a
college degree. The mission of the school is to prepare them to do so. One indicator of success is a demonstrated
ability of students to successfully complete college coursework while in high school. Additionally, the success
students experience in high school will determine whether they transition into college at the time of high school
graduation.
Goal 5: Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will have earned college credit prior to graduating from
high school and will transition into a college or other postsecondary program when they leave Polk State
Lakeland Pathways.
Goal 5 Objectives 2013-2014: Polk State Lakeland Pathways does not expect to graduate any students during its
first year. There are no Goal 5 objectives for 2013-2014.
Goal 5 Objectives 2014-2015:
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Objective 5.A: At least 85% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will have successfully completed
at least one dual enrollment course.
Objective 5.B: At least 85% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will have earned at least nine
college credits.
Objective 5.C: The average number of college credits earned by Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates
will equal or exceed 9.
Objective 5.D: At least 50% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will voice an intention to continue
college or postsecondary coursework based on responses to a senior exit survey.
Objective 5.E: At least 35% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will transition to a Florida public
postsecondary institution based on a combination of findings from Polk State College institutional research
records and the Florida Department of Education High School Feedback Report.
Goal 5 Baseline Data: Polk State Lakeland Pathways planners examined performance of Polk County (district)
graduates in relation to Objectives 5.A and 5.E. The student population to be served at Polk State Lakeland
Pathways will be made up of individuals who have not been successful in the traditional school setting. While the
school will actively seek to provide them with a successful college transition, planners are not comfortable in
projecting performance to be higher than the averaged district perform ance on the most recent High School
Feedback Report. Polk County (district) outcomes for 5.A and 5.D are as listed below:
 5.A: The average percentage of 2008, 2009, and 2010 Polk County (district) graduates who completed at least
one AP, IB, AICE, or Dual Enrollment course was 34.7%.
 5.E: The average percentage of 2008, 2009, and 2010 Polk County (district) graduates who were enrolled in a
Florida public postsecondary institution in the fall following high school graduation was 43.9%.
Polk County’s 2008, 2009, and 2010 High School Feedback results are found at
http://data.fldoe.org/readiness/default.cfm?action=view_trends&district=42107&institution=2805&CFID=5003529&C
FTOKEN=ff052a0b25785f98-EF32B341-5056-8C3F-16C9FDFADF8A7035.
For objectives 5.B, 5.C, and 5.D, Polk State Lakeland Pathways planners have projected performance based on the
characteristics of the targeted student population and the planned academic program. Baseline data will be collected
during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 school years. Projected performance for future years may then need to be
adjusted.
44
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Goal 5 Objectives in Subsequent Years: Performance in relation to each objective is expected to improve and
then remain steady as required to ensure that by 2017-2018 performance in relation to each objective is as listed
below:
 Objective 5.A: At least 87% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will have successfully completed
at least one dual enrollment course.
 Objective 5.B: At least 87% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will have earned at least 9 college
credits.
 Objective 5.C: The average number of college credits earned by Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates
will equal or exceed 11.
 Objective 5.D: At least 52% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will voice an intention to continue
college or postsecondary coursework based on responses to a senior exit survey.
 Objective 5.E: At least 37% of Polk State Lakeland Pathways graduates will transition to a Florida Public
postsecondary institution based on a combination of findings from Polk State College institutional research
records and the Florida Department of Education High School Feedback Report.
B. Describe the school’s student placement procedures and promotion standards.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will follow the Polk County Schools Student Progression Plan in terms of placement,
promotion, and graduation standards.
C. If the school will serve high school students, describe the methods used to determine if a student has
satisfied the requirements specified in section 1003.425, F.S., and any proposed additional requirements.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will follow graduation requirements as outlined in the Polk County Schools Student
Progression Plan and as listed in Table 4 on page 37. The school will also follow the Student Progression Plan’s
specified requirements for certifying high school credits: The principal has the responsibility for all phases of the school
program including awarding of credits and certification that graduation requirements have been met. Credits are
earned as a result of a passing grade in a bona fide credit course that is listed with a course code number. Granting
credits for transfer students is the responsibility of the principal.
At Polk State Lakeland Pathways, the guidance counselor will confirm that each student has earned specific high
school credits and met performance requirements to be awarded a standard high school diploma. The director will then
certify that graduation requirements have been met.
Additionally, at the time of enrollment Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will ensure that students are aware of
graduation requirements, including the use of both the SAT and ACT as possible alternative assessments to meet the
test requirements of FCAT reading. Students will also take the PERT at the time of enrollment and will be retested as
needed until students can demonstrate that they are college-ready. All Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will
have a College Success Plan developed at the time of enrollment. Each plan will focus on the completion of a college
degree and will be updated at least annually. Furthermore, students will be enrolled in one college course during their
first term at Polk State Lakeland Pathways and will take at least three college courses prior to high school graduation.
Finally, each Polk State Lakeland Pathways enrollee will be encouraged to maximize the number of college credits
earned prior to high school graduation. School personnel will address individual student interests as well as their
demonstrated readiness for college coursework as they both create and update College Success Plans and related
programs-of-study.
D. Describe how baseline achievement data will be established, collected, and used. Describe the methods
used to identify the educational strengths and needs of students and how these baseline rates will be
compared to the academic progress of the same students attending the charter school.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will continually examine baseline achievement data for individual students and for
groups of students. Individual student data will be entered into the Polk State College Lakeland Charter School Data
Warehouse at the time of enrollment and will be updated throughout a student’s enrollment at Polk State Lakeland
Pathways. Data entered into the warehouse will include student demographics and performance in relation to each
charter and School Improvement Plan goal. Data will then be used to examine performance of individuals and of
groups.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 45
Its uses will include but will not necessarily be limited to the following:
 The guidance counselor and resource specialist(s) will use baseline achievement data including academic
histories and performance on FCAT and PERT to create a student’s College Success Plan and to place the
student in specific reading, math, and English classes for the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation
experience.
 Math and reading instructors will use PERT scores, and the reading instructor will use FCAT 2.0 Reading
scores to plan individualized instruction for students.
 Performance of students in the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation will be closely scrutinized at the end
of each term to assess its effectiveness in transitioning students into the college experience. Results will be
used when needed to adjust Foundation components and/or strategies.
 Instructors and staff will use EOC exam results to examine the degree to which the school is showing
alignment among the written, taught, and tested curricula. Adjustments in both curriculum and instructional
strategies will then be made as appropriate.
 Throughout each school year and at the end of the year, student retention and graduation rates will be
examined and will be used to assess the degree to which students are being retained as called for in Goal 2.
 Additional state assessments, made available through PARCC, will be examined as part of the school’s
continuous improvement process. Results will be used in the School Improvement Plan process as
appropriate.
 Staff members will continually examine student performance in college coursework in order to make
scheduling adjustments for individual students, to assess the degree to which the high school curriculum is
positioning students for college success, and to scrutinize the appropriateness of specific college courses for
the Polk State Lakeland Pathways student population.
Student and school performance will drive the school’s annual continuous improvement process to be implemented as
reflected in Figure 1 on page 56.
46
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
July/August--In 2013, school staff will collaborate to identify performance
goals, strategies, and professional development needs for year one. They
will create the school's first School Improvement Plan (SIP) with a focus
on meeting charter goals.In subsequent years, school staff will identify
performance gaps, create improvement goals, list improvement strategies,
specify a timeline for implementation, designate individuals responsible for
each activity, and stipulate professional develoment needed by individuals
and staff.
June of each year--School performance will be
assessed regarding each charter goal and each
improvement goal as listed in the Lakeland
Pathways SIP.
August through December--The SIP will be implemented.
Staff meetings and planning sessions will then be devoted to
monitoring performance, assessing strategy implementation,
and creating new strategies in order to maximize
performance.
January through May--Staff members will use a
mid-year assessment and follow-up with
additional monitoring and adjustments to move
students, staff, and the school as close as
possible to expected performance outcomes.
Figure 1: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Continuous Improvement Process
E. Identify the types and frequency of assessments that the school will use to measure and monitor student
performance.
Assessments to be used to measure and monitor student assessment will include but will not necessarily be limited to
those listed in Table 7. For each assessment, the table also lists frequency of administration and how results will be
used.
Table 7: Assessments to be Used and Frequency and Use of Assessment
Assessment
Frequency of Assessment
Purpose/Use of Assessment Results
PERT
The PERT will be administered
Performance on the PERT will determine
to all students when they apply
student readiness for enrollment in college
for admission to Polk State
courses. Initial scores will be used to place
Lakeland Pathways.
students in math and reading classes and to
Instructors will then determine
plan their instruction. Retest results will be
when individual students are
used to confirm readiness for college
ready to retest, based on
coursework or to determine additional
student performance in math
preparation needs of testers.
and reading courses.
FCAT 2.0
FCAT reading will be
Students will be placed in reading classes
Reading
administered to students in
upon enrollment at Polk State Lakeland
October and April.
Pathways, based on performance on FCAT
2.0 Reading. Results will be used after each
testing session to determine individual student
needs.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 47
Table 7: Assessments to be Used and Frequency and Use of Assessment
Assessment
Frequency of Assessment
Purpose/Use of Assessment Results
EOC Exams
EOC exams will be
Results will be used to confirm student
administered at the end of
performance as called for by the Florida
each term for those courses
Department of Education. Results will also be
for which exams have been
used to assess the effectiveness of curriculum
developed.
and to make adjustments as determined
appropriate.
PARCC
PARCC assessments will be
Results will be used to confirm student
Assessments
administered as they are made
performance as called for by the Florida
available.
Department of Education. Results will also be
used to assess the effectiveness of curriculum
and to make adjustments as determined
appropriate.
In addition to the formalized and standardized assessment instruments listed above, instructors will use assessment
instruments and processes within each course. A number of assessment techniques are mentioned in Section 3.B,
beginning on page 15. They will include written tests, performance-based assessments, group projects, etc. Instructors
will then use results in an ongoing manner to adjust instruction.
F. Describe how student assessment and performance data will be used to evaluate and inform instruction.
Table 7 listed above with Section 5.E describes how student assessment and performance data will be used.
G. Describe how student assessment and performance information will be shared with students and with parents.
Strategies to share student assessment and performance information with students and parents will include but not be limited to
the following:
 At the time of enrollment, Polk State Lakeland Pathways personnel will include at minimum the guidance counselor and a
resource specialist to meet with individual students and their parents to create the student’s College Success Plan. All
student assessment information will be shared and used in the creation process.
 At the end of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation experience, students will meet individually with their resource
specialist or with the counselor to review their progress, examine course-by-course performance, discuss any additional
assessment results, and revise if needed any term 2 course assignments. Parents will be invited to participate in these
conferences.
 At least annually, students and their parents will have a formal meeting with the guidance counselor and will review both
the most recent assessment results and the trends shown in performance outcomes since enrollment at Polk State
Lakeland Pathways.
 As assessments are administered to students between formally scheduled meetings, results will be presented to students
and parents in a timely manner. In some situations, results will be mailed. In others, conferences will be scheduled. In any
case in which an assessment result calls for an alteration in a student’s College Success Plan, a formal conference will be
scheduled.
Section 6: Exceptional Students
A. Please indicate the level of service that the school will provide to students with disabilities by selecting
from the list below.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will provide for ESE programs in accordance with federal, state, and local
policies and procedures and specifically the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973,10005.05, 1003.57, 1001,42 and 1002.33, Florida Statue, and Chapter 6A-6 of the
State Board of Education Administrative Rule. The school will be responsible for the delivery of all educational
and related services indicated on the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP). Polk State Lakeland Pathways
will serve students working towards a standard diploma. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will not be able to serve
students seeking a special diploma nor make the necessary modifications/accommodations for students whose least
restrictive environment is a self-contained classroom. Applicants will be fully informed of space and staff limitations.
Related services (e.g., speech/language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and counseling) will
be provided by Polk State Lakeland Pathways and or paid for through a separate contract. Students with
disabilities who meet the following criteria will be eligible to apply to Polk State Lakeland Pathways: The school will
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
serve students with disabilities whose needs can be met in a regular classroom environment (at least 80% of
instruction occurring in a class with non-disabled peers) with the provision of reasonable supplementary
supports and services and/or modifications and accommodations.
In the event that a student comes to Polk State Lakeland Pathways with an IEP, it will be implemented in the classroom
with the full support of the entire staff. Instructors and leaders will monitor student progress in the same intervals as the
rest of the student body.
If a student is in need of a 504 and has a documented need or a perceived need, the administration, in conjunction with
parents, teachers, and students, will convene a 504 eligibility or plan meeting. During the meeting, attendees will review
concerns about the student’s performance and current accommodations. The committee may recommend additional
accommodations or strategies or request further evaluation. Meetings will answer multiple questions:
 What is the nature of the student’s continued struggles?
 Is this problem a potential disability?
 Can reasonable accommodations be made in the classroom?
 Is further evaluation necessary?
After a 504 meeting, the team will continue to closely monitor the student’s performance and adapt the
accommodations or strategies as appropriate. The team will review evidence of accommodations and progress made
and monitor the success of the student at least quarterly.
B. Describe how the school will ensure that students with disabilities will have an equal opportunity of being
selected for enrollment in the charter school.
Recruitment strategies will make Polk State Lakeland Pathways information available to students with disabilities and
those without disabilities. Students with disabilities who are eligible to apply to Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be
shown the same consideration for enrollment as any other student. The application form will reflect a line to ask if the
student currently has an IEP or a Section 504 plan in order to ensure no break of services occurs upon acceptance.
C. Describe how the school will work with the sponsor to ensure the charter school is the appropriate
placement for each student with a disability, based on the student’s needs.
The school will review each application with an IEP accepted at Polk State Lakeland Pathways and will determine the
need and level of services to ensure that students can be accommodated appropriately. The school will be
responsible for the delivery of all educational and related services indicated on the students IEP. Related services
e.g., speech, language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and counseling will be provided by the school
staff or paid for through a separate contract. The school will have the responsibility of conducting the evaluation of the
students referred for potential ESE placement and for the re-evaluation of the ESE student in accordance with federal
and state mandates. In the event that a student is accepted, monitored for progress, and found not to be progressing,
the school will hold an IEP meeting with the sponsor in attendance to assist in locating the appropriate educational
environment to meet the student’s need. If it is determined by an IEP committee that the needs of a student with
disabilities cannot be met at the school, steps will be taken to secure another placement for the student in
accordance with federal and state mandates.
D. Describe how the school will utilize the regular school facilities and adapt them to the needs of exceptional
students to the maximum extent appropriate, including the use of supplementary aids and services.
Students with disabilities will have access to the entire Polk State College campus and to all facilities used by Polk State
Lakeland Pathways students and staff. The following safeguards will be in place to monitor student success in the learning
environment:
 Annual IEP review as required by law
 Goal progress
 Attention to parental feedback
 Report card assessment
 Evaluation assessment
 Collaboration with the district in self-assessment.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 49
Student success will also be monitored carefully to ensure students are making learning gains while in the program. In
addition, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will review an exceptional education student’s standardized assessment scores to
ensure that he or she is making gains in reading and math.
E. Describe how the school’s effectiveness in serving exceptional education students will be evaluated.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will evaluate its effectiveness in serving exceptional education students through the
following processes:
 Annual IEP reviews as required by law
 Attention to parental feedback
 Goal progress
 Grades earned
 Collaboration with the district in self-assessment
Student success will also be closely monitored as part of the school’s assessment and review process. The school will
carefully review student assessment results in the areas of reading and math.
F. Explain how exceptional students who enter the school below grade level will be engaged in and benefit
from the curriculum
Exceptional students entering below grade level will receive individualized attention to include the following:
 The Polk State Lakeland Pathways guidance counselor and resource specialist(s) will create a College Success Plan
for every entering student based on the number of credits earned prior to enrollment, a student’s performance on the
PERT, and whether the student has passed FCAT 2.0 Reading.
 Each student will then be enrolled in the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation and will thereafter have an
individualized high school and college course schedule.
 The holistic approach to be employed at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will focus on moving every student from being
disengaged from the academic environment to earning a high school diploma with all the skills for college success.
Support will address both academic and personal needs, which may include life issues as much as school issues.
G. Provide the school’s projected population of students with disabilities and describe how the projection
was made.
Due to the unique program demographics Lakeland Pathways does not anticipate more than 10% of the school’s
projected population of students with disabilities. Currently the Polk County School District serves approximately
11,621 students in grades 11 and 12. The ESE population represented in these groups is approximately 621 students
or 14% including all exceptionalities. Lakeland Pathways will not be able to serve students seeking a special diploma
nor make special accommodations/modifications for students whose least restrictive environment is a self-contained
classroom. The projection takes into account this represented population. This overall projection was made based on
the number of students served by the school district and the number of students projected to enroll in the program.
H. Identify the staffing plan, based on the above projection, for the school’s special education program, including
the number and qualifications of staff.
Because Polk State Lakeland Pathways anticipates that at least 10% of the projected population will serve with
exceptionalities or disabilities, it is vital that the staffing plan accommodate their specific needs. Lakeland Pathways
Collegiate High School will hire one adjunct/contracted teacher to serve the Exceptional Student Education
population based on the above projection. ESE instructors will be hired in accordance with federal, state and local
policies and procedures and specifically the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), and Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
I. Describe how the school will serve gifted and talented students.
Gifted and talented students will be considered as applicants, using the same criteria applied to all other students.
Each student will have a College Success Plan created based on his or her past academic performance and
performance on student assessments. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will certainly provide an environment in which a
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
gifted and talented student can be challenged and can move at his or her own pace through both the high school and
college curricula. Polk State Lakeland Pathways may prove to be an excellent placement for gifted and talented
students who have disengaged from the traditional high school environment.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will monitor and comply with a gifted or talented student’s established IEP.
Section 7: English Language Learners
A. Describe how the school will comply with state and federal requirements for serving English language
learners, including the procedures that will be utilized for identifying such students and providing support
services.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will comply with state and federal requirements for serving English Language Learners (ELLs),
to include strict observance of teacher training requirements. Instructors and administrators will have the ESOL endorsement
or other required ESOL training or be working toward that goal. In addition, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will respect the
rights provided the student under the Multicultural Education and Training Advocacy (META) consent decree, including
appropriate programming, accommodations, and ESOL strategies.
The majority of ELL-qualified Polk State Lakeland Pathways applicants will arrive with an ELL identification or plan in place,
and all modifications will be observed. In the event an ELL student enrolls in Polk State Lakeland Pathways without a plan, the
school will follow the steps for identifying and serving ELL students:
1. Identify potential ELL students via the Home Language Survey: The Home Language Survey queries the
parents of the student about language practices in the home. If one or more responses indicate a home language
other than English, the administration will proceed to Step 2.
2. Screen for language proficiency within the first twenty days of a student’s tenure: The initial screening
instrument is the IPT aural/oral test of listening and speaking skills. English language reading and writing proficiency
will be evaluated with the IPT Reading/Writing assessment. Any potential ELL student scoring at or below proficiency
level will be considered to be Limited English Proficient and provided services to assist the student to navigate the
regular curriculum.
3. Form an ELL Committee if necessary: This committee will include the instructor and administrator, but is not limited
to these individuals. Parents will be invited to participate in all aspects of this process. The ELL Committee is the final
authority for all decisions regarding the education of the ELL student.
4. Determine the ELL student’s need for instructional assistance: Appropriate ESOL strategies are documented in
instructors’ plans. Polk State Lakeland Pathways will employ ESOL strategies such as visual prompts and student
heritage language/English dictionaries in every classroom. Instruction and assessments will be modified for the
student’s level of language proficiency. Students will be graded on their progress in content areas, and not language
proficiency. Standardized assessment test modifications will be provided as directed by law.
5. Evaluate student progress by tracking academic and social performance: Progress will be communicated to
parents. Whenever possible, interpreters and materials written in the home language will be used. Teachers will
document progress in basic curriculum performance as well as evaluation of English language proficiency. Tracking
of progress will be documented, including basic curriculum performance, as well as the continued assessment of
English-language proficiency via observation and social encounters.
6. Exit the student from the ESOL program based upon assessment and performance: Exit from the ESOL
program is considered when the student begins to approach the percentage score cutoff on the measure of English
language proficiency, beginning with the state CELLA evaluation. Elements for consideration include language
proficiency, classroom performance and achievement, teacher recommendations, criterion-referenced tests, and
writing samples.
For the prescribed period of two years following exit from the ESOL program, the student will continue to be observed
periodically to ensure the continued progress of the student toward academic success.
B. Identify the staffing plan for the school’s English language learner program, including the number and
qualifications of staff.
Each Polk State Lakeland Pathways instructor and leader will have the ESOL endorsement on his or her teaching
certificate, will have another required ESOL training completed, or will be working toward that goal. Following the
strategies and instructional techniques suggested by TESOL, Polk State Lakeland Pathways expects that modifications
and accommodations will result in ELL student success.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 51
If, however, it is demonstrated that progress in English language proficiency or in academic content areas is not being
made, Polk State Lakeland Pathways may choose to hire an ELL specialist for advisement about developing a plan to
assist the ELL student.
C. Explain how English Language Learners who enter the school below grade level will be engaged in and benefit
from the curriculum.
English Language Learners entering below grade level will receive individualized attention to include the following:
 The Polk State Lakeland Pathways guidance counselor and resource specialist(s) will create a College Success Plan
for every entering student based on the number of credits earned prior to enrollment, a student’s performance on the
PERT, and whether the student has passed FCAT 2.0 Reading.
 Each student will then be enrolled in the Polk State Lakeland Pathways Foundation and will thereafter have an
individualized high school and college course schedule.
 The holistic approach to be employed at Polk State Lakeland Pathways will focus on moving every student from being
disengaged from the academic environment to earning a high school diploma with all the skills for college success.
Support will address both academic and personal needs, which may include life issues as much as school issues.
Section 8: School Climate and Discipline
A. Describe the school’s planned approach to classroom management and student discipline.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways’ staff will establish and maintain a safe and orderly classroom environment that will both
promote and support learning. The highly individualized learning atmosphere will engage all students and maintain their
focus on the learning process.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will have a student handbook, modeled after the current Polk State College Charter High
School Handbook, which will be given to students and their parents at the time of enrollment. Procedures to be used in
the school to make the handbook and its contents part of the culture include the following:
 The Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will review the handbook with students during orientation and will
clearly state behavior expectations.
 The rules, procedures, and policies that are referenced or stated in the handbook and that govern student
conduct at Polk State College and in its charter schools will be clearly understood and applied by Polk State
Lakeland Pathways instructors, leadership, and staff.
 Positive expectations for student achievement and performance will be posted in the school.
 As part of its holistic approach to education, the school’s resource specialist(s) will work individually with Polk
State Lakeland Pathways students to address any behavior challenges.
The current Polk State College Charter High School Handbook is included as Appendix 2, beginning on page 80. It
states, in part, as follows:
Students at Polk State College are expected to act in a responsible manner so as to support and enhance the
educational process. Polk State College has a tradition of excellent conduct by its students, and the degree of
responsibility they exhibit is a reflection of the educational atmosphere of the college. Although the vast
majority of students will never be affected when acts of unacceptable conduct occur, they must be dealt with in
a manner supportive of our educational purpose.
Polk State College’s District Board of Trustees (DBOT) has established rules that define unacceptable
conduct, set forth the penalties and disciplinary procedures that apply when violations occur, and described
the due process requirements that will be used. College administration has created College procedures to
provide guidance for carrying out these rules.
The “Student Rights and Responsibilities” section of the Polk State College Student Handbook reflects the
rules and procedures as it provides all students with guidelines expected of them. All collegiate charter high
school students and parents are expected to read and understand this section of the handbook. The
handbook states, in part, as listed below.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Student safety is Polk State College’s priority. To ensure safety, the following actions are prohibited on
campus, at any College-related activity, or at other locations as may be provided by law. Violation of any
Board rules may lead to disciplinary warning, probation, suspension, expulsion, or other appropriate and
authorized penalty. The following are some examples of unacceptable conduct:
 Illegal use or possession of drugs or narcotics
 Actions which are disruptive to the normal, orderly and peaceful operation of the College
 Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages in violation of State law and College policy
 Cheating or plagiarizing on tests, projects, or assignments
 Stealing
 Illegal gambling
 Use of indecent or abusive language
 Unauthorized use of the College name
 Lewd or indecent conduct
 Violation of local ordinances or of State or Federal law
 Hazing
 Forgery, alteration, or misuse of documents or records
 Furnishing false information with the intent to deceive
 Possession and/or use of firearms, fireworks, explosive chemicals, and other lethal weapons
 Repeated offenses of a less serious nature
 Participation by students in disruptive activities at state institutions of higher learning as defined and
prohibited under the provision of Section 877.13, Florida Statutes
In addition to the DBOT rules and the College procedures, the collegiate charter high schools have created
policies to address Florida State Statutes that are specific to K-12 educational programs and schools and
which supersede College rules and procedures to the degree specified in the text of the Statutes. This
handbook presents these collegiate charter high school policies.
B. Describe the school’s Code of Conduct, including the school’s policies for discipline, suspension, and
dismissal.
Whether they are in high school or college classes, Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will be expected to comply
with all Polk State College DBOT rules and College procedures, which are available on the College website at
http://www.polk.edu/businessandcommunity/rulesproc/Pages/default.aspx. They contain consequences of
behavior to include dismissal and withdrawal.
Additionally, as referenced in Section 8.A above, the current Polk State College collegiate charter high
schools have created policies to address Florida State Statutes that are specific to K-12 educational programs
and schools and which are not addressed through the DBOT rules or College procedures. These policies are
presented to students as part of the Polk State College Charter High School Handbook.
In the event that new Florida Statutes specific to K-12 education are passed that are not addressed by DBOT rules or
College procedures, Polk State Lakeland Pathways administrators and staff will work with the College and the staff
members of the College’s two collegiate charter high schools to amend procedures, create new procedures, or add
policies to the existing high school handbook. The current handbook is included as Appendix 2, beginning on page 80.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 53
II. ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN
Section 9: Governance
A. Describe how the school will organize as or be operated by a non-profit organization.
Polk State College is a public, state-funded Florida college. Polk State College is a non-profit organization and will be
responsible for operating Polk State Lakeland Pathways.
B. Provide an organizational chart for the school and a narrative description of the chart. Clearly describe the
proposed reporting structure to the governing board and the relationship of the board to the school’s
leader and administration.
Polk State College District Board of Trustees
Polk State College President
Provost of Polk State College’s Lakeland Campus
Lakeland Pathways Director
(also Collegiate High School Director)
Lakeland Pathways Assistant Director, Instructors, and Staff
Figure 2: Organizational Chart
The Collegiate High School Director will oversee the day-to-day operations of the school. The director will report
directly to the Polk State College Lakeland Campus Provost who will report to the College President. The Polk State
College President reports directly to the District Board of Trustees.
Resumes are included in Appendix 4, beginning on page 88.
 Dr. Eileen Holden, Polk State College President
 Stephen Hull, Polk State College Lakeland Campus Provost
 Sallie Brisbane, Collegiate High School Director
 Teresa Martinez, current District Board of Trustees Chairperson
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways Director position is considered to be a major administrative appointment with
significant duties and responsibilities. The director will be a qualified individual with experience in budgeting, planning,
implementing, and evaluating programs for high school students. The director will be responsible for recommending
employment, supervising, and evaluating all school staff.
The director will supervise an assistant director, one guidance counselor, at least one resource specialist, high school
instructors, and an administrative assistant.
Additionally a school advisory committee will be established and will be comprised of parents, students, and community
members. Letters of support from community members, some of whom may serve on the LP-SAC, are included as
Appendix 9, beginning on page 157. The advisory committee will meet on a quarterly basis to monitor the school
improvement process and to support the school’s strategic action items tied to continuous improvement.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
C. Provide a description of the responsibilities and obligations of the governing board as a whole.
The Polk State College District Board of Trustees, acting as the governing board of Polk State Lakeland Pathways, is
accountable for the academic, financial, and operational policies of the school.
The governing board will approve all budgets, set policy, establish procedures, approve selection of the director, and
ensure the financial and administrative management of the school. Further, the governing board, through the College
president, will ensure that the school’s performance standards are met or exceeded, that ongoing assessments are
accomplished, that financial reports are made and controls are in place, that state and district requirements are met,
and that annual progress and accountability reports are made to the sponsor and other entities as required by law.
The governing board, however, is not involved in the daily administration of the program.
D. Describe the policies and procedures by which the governing board will operate, including board powers and
duties; board member selection, removal procedures and term limits; code of ethics, conflict of interest, and
frequency of meetings. Charter school governing boards must be guided by a set of by-laws that define
how the board will operate. Applicants may include their proposed by-laws.
Polk State College’s District Board of Trustees will act as its Governing Board. The Polk State College website states:
Polk State College, like Florida’s other state colleges, is governed by a locally autonomous District Board of
Trustees that serves without compensation. The Trustees are vested with decision-making power in all matters of
College policy, programs, building, budget, and personnel. The Governor of Florida appoints this group of seven
outstanding local citizens. The Trustees meet once a month and contribute their time and talent to guide PSC in its
mission of being a “quality-driven educational institution, providing access to affordable associate and
baccalaureate degrees, career certificates, and workforce development programs, delivered by diverse, qualified
faculty and staff who are committed to student learning and achievement through the consistent practice of
collaboration and focus on excellence.”
(http://www.polk.edu/businessandcommunity/Pages/DistrictBoardofTrustees.aspx)
Polk State College’s District Board of Trustees (DBOT) operates in compli ance with a set of DBOT Rules. Those
most closely applicable to the requirements of Section 9.B are listed under individual headings below. A list of all
rules and a link to the text of each are found at
http://www.polk.edu/businessandcommunity/rulesproc/Pages/Rules.aspx.
Board Member Selection and Powers and Duties
DBOT Rule 1.01, Board Membership and Duties, addresses board powers and duties, stating as follows:
The District Board of Trustees has adopted the following policy with regard to Board membership and
organization:
1. Membership of the Board is established in accordance with Sections 1001.61-65 and 1004.70 of the Florida
Statutes and State Board of Education Regulations 6A-14.024. Members of the Board are appointed by the
Governor and confirmed by the Senate in regular session. Trustees shall be appointed for terms of four (4)
years and may be reappointed. Terms shall expire on May 31 of the year of expiration, or as soon thereafter as
the successor shall be qualified to serve.
2. At the first regular meeting each year in July, the Board shall organize by electing a Chair and Vice-Chair.
The President shall act as ex-officio secretary.
A.
If a vacancy should occur in the chair, the Board shall proceed to elect a chair at the ensuing regular or
special meeting. At the organizational meeting, the President shall act as Chair until the organizational
meeting is completed.
B.
The Chair and the Secretary shall then make and sign a copy of the proceedings of organization,
including the schedule for regular meetings, annex their affidavits that the same is a true and correct
copy of the original, and the Secretary shall file the document with the Florida Department of Education
– Chancellor’s Office.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 55
3. The Board is constituted by a body corporate by the name of "The District Board of Trustees of Polk State
College, Florida." In all suits against the Board, service of process shall be had on the Chair of the Board or, in
the absence of the Chair, on another member of the Board.
DBOT Rule 1.03, Duties and Powers of the Board, further specifies, “Board duties and powers are set forth in
Florida Statutes and the State Board of Education Administrative Rules.”
Removal Procedures and Term Limits
Term limits are addressed in DBOT Rule 1.01, Board Membership and Duties, which says, “Trustees shall be
appointed for terms of four (4) years and may be reappointed. Terms shall expire on May 31 of the year of expiration,
or as soon thereafter as the successor shall be qualified to serve.” The full text of this rule is included, beginning on
page 66 above.
The suspension and removal of a member of the District Board of Trustees of a Florida community college is governed
by the procedures set forth in Article IV, Section 7 of the Florida Constitution and Title X, Chapter 112, Section 52, and
Title XVLIII, Section 1001.61 (4) of the FS. Causes for suspension or removal are outlined in these provisions and due
process is afforded the affected trustees as defined in the Florida Constitution Article I, Section 9.
Code of Ethics and Conflict of Interest
DBOT Rule 1.06, Code of Ethics, provides the text of the code of ethics. Item number 3 also specifically speaks
to conflicts of interest:
The following Code of Ethics applies to Polk State College Trustees:
1. Evidence good citizenship in community and state affairs.
2. Refrain from making any decisions or commitments concerning community college governance, except in
Board meetings or when designated by the Board to do so.
3. Avoid situations leading to conflicts of interest. If a trustee chooses to vote or abstain from voting on an
issue which inures special private gain or loss, Form8A Memorandum of Voting Conflict for State Officers
must be completed.
4. Bring credit to the College through personal effort, either directly or indirectly, in business, social,
professional and personal relationships.
5. Make decisions, which are responsive to the geographic distribution and social, ethnic, economic, and
diverse demographic composition of the community.
6. Make decisions, which give priority to the students. Keep well informed on matters pertaining to the
community college system. Fulfill responsibilities without regard to prejudice or partisanship.
Frequency of Meetings
DBOT Rule 1.02, Board Meetings, provides general guidelines regarding frequency of meetings when it says:
Regular Meetings. The Board shall meet on the regular meeting dates scheduled by the Board in their
organizational meeting held after July 1 of each year. The Board will review the meeting agenda format at its
August meeting and approve changes if appropriate.
Special Meetings. The Board shall convene in special meetings by the Chairperson, by the President when
requested by the Chairperson, or the majority of the Board, or by the majority of the Board itself. In the event
that the President shall fail to call the special meeting when requested to do so, such meeting may be called by
the Chairperson of the Board, or by a majority of the members of the Board, by giving two (2) days' written
notice of the time and purpose of the meeting to all members and to the President.
Regular DBOT meetings are scheduled for the third Monday of the month. There are 10 regularly scheduled
meetings held each year. None are scheduled in July and December.
There is also an annual Board Retreat in the fall of each year, and a budget workshop is held in June. Meetings
are posted on the Polk State College website and can be found at
http://www.polk.edu/Lists/Calendar%20of%20Events/DBOTMeetings.aspx.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
E. Explain how the founding group for the school intends to transition to a governing board.
The Polk State College District Board of Trustees is the Founding Board and will be the Governing Board of Polk State
Lakeland Pathways.
F. Describe the plans for board member recruitment and development, including the orientation process for new
members and ongoing professional development.
Membership of the Board is established in accordance with Sections 1001.61-65 and 1004.70 of the Florida Statutes
and State Board of Education Regulations 6A-14.024. Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor and
confirmed by the Senate in regular session. Trustees shall be appointed for terms of four (4) years and may be
reappointed. Terms shall expire on May 31 of the year of expiration, or as soon thereafter as the successor shall be
qualified to serve.
DBOT Rule 1.08, New Members, states, “The Board Secretary will arrange suitable briefing sessions for new
members to orient them to their duties as Board members.”
The Polk State College President acts as Board Secretary and ensures that Board members receive all required
trainings, which are then reflected in meeting notes. The President also provides for ongoing professional development
as required to make Board members aware of new College initiatives or requirements.
G. List each of the proposed members of the school’s governing board, indicating any ex-officio members
and vacant seats to be filled. For each proposed member, provide a brief description of the person’s
background that highlights the contribution he/she intends to make through service as a governing board
member and any office of the board that individual holds.
As of the time of this application, members of the Polk State College District Board of Trustees are as follows:
 Teresa Martinez, Chair, is the owner of the Institute of Spanish Communication Inc., and a Polk State
College alumna.
 Mark G. Turner, Vice Chair, is an attorney practicing in the areas of Real Estate, Estate Planning, Probate
and Guardianship, Business Law, and Civil Litigation.
 Dan Dorrell is a CPA. and a partner at Cross, Fernandez & Riley, LLP, specializing in a variety of industries
including, agriculture, medical, manufacturing, legal and other professional services.
 Ricardo Garcia is owner and operator of Gulf Coast Avionics Corp. of Lakeland, Pacific Coast Avionics of
Portland, OR., and Central Florida Avionics & Instruments of Leesburg.
 Gregory Littleton is President and Chief Executive Officer of Citizens Bank & Trust.
 Linda Pilkington is the Director of Physician, Community and Government Relations at Heart of Florida
Regional Medical Center.
 E.S. “Ernie” Pinner is Chairman/President/Ceo of CenterState Banks of Florida, Inc.
Dr. Eileen Holden, President of Polk State College, acts as Corporate Secretary to the Board.
Additional information on each Trustee is found in Appendix 3, beginning on page 85.
On May 31, 2013, the four-year terms of four trustees will expire. Those individuals are Teresa Martinez, Mark
Turner, Rick Garcia, and E.S. “Ernie” Pinner. In 2013, the Governor will appoint new trustees whose appointments
will be confirmed by the State senate.
H. Outline the methods to be used for resolving disputes between a parent and the school.
The Polk State College Student Handbook provides specific directions for a student who has a dispute with the College.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will apply the stated procedure whether there is a dispute with the College or
with the charter school. The only distinction is that if the dispute involves the high school, a student or parent will make
contact with the Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members.
Handbook directions state:
STUDENT APPEAL/ COMPLAINT POLICY
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 57
Polk State College students are assured the opportunity to express informal appeals and complaints and to
initiate formal appeals and complaints regarding the operation of the College and the actions of its employees
performing their duties as stated in the DBOT Rule 4.26, 4.01, and 3.27, and College Procedure 6076.
Students are encouraged to pursue resolution of their appeals/complaints with the appropriate College staff in
the informal phase. If resolution is not achieved, the formal phase may be pursued. Students who pursue the
formal phase of the process should confer with the Campus Dean of Student Services, who can provide
information regarding this process.
PETITIONS
Students who feel the College’s regulations are not interpreted or applied fairly may petition Polk State
College’s Petitions Committee. The Petitions Committee reviews each individual’s written request and
makes a recommendation. Information about the petitioning process is available from academic advisors.
The full text of the handbook can be found on the Polk State College website at http://catalog.polk.edu/index.php.
DBOT rules and College procedures are also on the website. Individual rules can be accessed at
http://www.polk.edu/businessandcommunity/rulesproc/Pages/Rules.aspx.
The link to procedures is at http://www.polk.edu/businessandcommunity/rulesproc/Pages/Procedures.aspx.
I. If the school is filing the application in conjunction with a college, university, museum, educational institution,
another nonprofit organization or any other partner, provide the following information:
Name of the partner organization. The Polk State Lakeland Pathways application is being developed in conjunction
with Polk State College.
Name of the contact person at the partner organization and that person’s full contact information. The name of the
contact person at Polk State College is Stephen Hull, Provost of the Lakeland Campus. His contact information is as
follows:
 Mailing address: Polk State College, 3425 Winter Lake Road, Lakeland, Florida
 Phone: (863) 297-1094
 Email: [email protected]
A description of the nature and purpose of the school’s partnership with the organization. Polk State College
will provide overall management structure for the charter school. The two entities will share faculty, facilities, and
services. The charter school students will have access to programs and services brought to the Polk State College
campus.
An explanation of how the partner organization will be involved in the governance of the school. The Polk State
College District Board of Trustees will be the governing board of the charter school.
Section 10: Management
A. Describe the management structure of the school. Include job descriptions for teachers and each
administrative position that identify key roles, responsibilities and accountability.
The Collegiate High School Director will act as Director of Polk State Lakeland Pathways. That position reports
directly to the Lakeland Campus Provost who reports to the Polk State College President. The President reports
directly to the College’s District Board of Trustees.
The Collegiate High School Director will supervise all Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members. Positions will
include the:




Assistant Director
Guidance Counselor
Resource Specialist(s)
Administrative Assistant
58
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School

Instructors
Job descriptions for all positions except the resource specialist are included as Appendix 5, beginning on page
105. The resource specialist position is new, specific to the Polk State Lakeland Pathways initiative. The job
description will be finalized during the fall of 2012.
B. Outline the criteria and process that will be used to select the school’s leader.
The Collegiate High School Director will act as the leader for Polk State Lakeland Pathways. Sallie Brisbane currently fills that
description, and she holds all educational and background requirements specified in the job description.
When hiring a new director, Polk State College will use Procedure 6014, Recruiting/Employment Processes, to advertise
and fill the position. The procedures states in part: All hiring managers or screening committees must recommend the
most qualified candidate for employment. This recommendation is based on job criteria as outlined in the job
classification descriptions and their expanded job descriptions for specific jobs. Criteria outlined by the current
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools must be considered where appropriate. These considerations must be
made without regard to age, race, religion, color, sex, national origin, marital status, or disability in compliance with
Executive Orders and Titles VI, VII and IX of the Civil Rights Act as amended.
The full text of the procedure is found on the Polk State College website at
http://www.polk.edu/businessandcommunity/rulesproc/Proc/6014.pdf.
The College’s commitment to providing for equity in employment is also specified in Procedure 6052, Equal
Opportunity/Equity and Access, which says: Polk State College is an equal access equal opportunity institution
committed to excellence through diversity in education and employment. The College complies with all state and
federal laws granting rights to applicants for employment or admission to the college, employees, and students. The
College prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, creed, ethnicity, national origin, gender, age,
religion, marital status, veteran status, genetic information or disability in any of its employment, policies or practices,
educational programs or activities.
C. Provide a staffing plan for each year of the charter term aligned with the school’s projected enrollment as
detailed on the cover page of this application.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways staffing plan will be adjusted to reflect the needs of the school. The staff will be highly
qualified and suited to meet the needs of the disengaged student. The number of staff will increase according to the
student population numbers and curricular needs. The staffing plan is as listed in Table 8 on page 72.
Table 8: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Staffing Plan
School Year
2012-2013
2013-2014
Grades Served
11 – 12
11 – 12
Projected Enrollment
100
200
School Administrator
2 (Director
2 (Director
@ 25% & Asst. @ 25% & Asst.
Dir. @ 100%)
Dir. @ 100%)
Guidance Counselor
1
1
Highly Qualified Teachers 4
5
Resource Specialist
1
1
Administrative Asst.
1 @ 25%
1 @ 25%
2014-2015
11 – 12
300
2 (Director
@ 25% & Asst.
Dir. @ 100%)
1
6
1
1 @ 25%
2015-2016
11 – 12
300
2 (Director
@ 50% & Asst.
Dir. @ 100%)
1
6
1
1 @ 50%
2016-2017
11 – 12
300
2 (Director
@ 50% & Asst.
Dir. @ 100%)
1
6
1
1 @ 50%
D. Explain the school’s plan for recruitment, selection, and development.
Recruiting/Selecting Staff
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways Director will be responsible for all steps involved in recruiting and hiring the
school’s staff. All Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members will be recruited and selected by used Polk State
College Procedure 6014, which is referenced in the response to Section 10.B on page 58 above.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 59
Staff (Professional) Development
Polk State College defines staff development as the improvement of staff performance through activities, which update
and upgrade competence specified for present or planned positions. Staff includes all regular full-time and regular parttime employees. Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will participate in:

College-wide development activities appropriate to the needs of the school staff or to specific staff
members.

Polk State Lakeland Pathways development activities designed to further the school improvement process.

Individual activities that build a staff member’s skill or competence, and that, in some situations, will result
in training brought back to the school to enhance performance of additional school personnel.
Section 11: Education Service Providers—Neither Polk State College nor Polk State Lakeland Pathways intends to contract
with an Education Service Provider.
Section 12: Human Resources and Employment
A. Explain the school’s compensation plan, including whether staff will be publicly or privately employed.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members will be Polk State College employees and will be part of the Florida
Retirement System. The Polk State College Summary of Benefits providing detail regarding other benefits can be accessed
on the Polk State College website at
http://www.polk.edu/businessandcommunity/humanresources/Pages/EmployeeandBenefitsInformation.aspx (PSC
Summary of Benefits).
All components of the College’s compensation plan are currently applied to all College charter school employees. The
Collegiate High School Faculty Pay Table from the Polk State College Salary Schedule is included as Appendix 6,
beginning on page 127.
However, in compliance with the Student Success Act, Polk State College is creating a new charter school evaluation plan.
An accompanying salary schedule will be developed to meet requirements of the Act. Once the charter school salary
schedule is approved, new charter school employees will be subject to that schedule. Existing staff members will have the
option of opting in to the new schedule or remaining with the existing College schedule.
B. Describe the personnel policies and procedures to which staff will be required to adhere, including
expectations for participation in the school’s professional development program. If personnel policies and
procedures have not been developed provide a clear plan, including timeline, for the development and
approval by governing board.
College Personnel Policies and Procedures
Employee Handbook
Every Polk State College employee, including those who work for one of the College’s charter schools, receives a copy
of the Polk State College Employee Handbook when he or she comes to the College. This handbook is included as
Appendix 7, beginning on page 129.
The employee handbook provides a brief statement regarding staff development when it says, “Staff and Program
Development funds are available to all part-time and full-time regular employees to pay for conferences, workshops, and
college courses for the development of skills in your area of responsibility. Contact your supervisor for information.”
Polk State Lakeland Pathways Policies
Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff members will be subject to all the College’s policies and procedures with the
exception of:
 Those that are tied to the Polk State College Charter School Personnel Evaluation and Development System,
which can be found on the Collegiate High School website at http://www.chspsc.org/
 Processes required to meet the requirements of the School Improvement Plan process
 Any additional processes or procedures specific to K-12 Statutes
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Section 13: Student Recruitment and Enrollment
A. Describe the plan for recruiting students, including strategies for reaching the school’s targeted populations
and those that might otherwise not have easy access to information on available educational options.
A major recruitment strategy for Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be built around a strong community partnership,
through which organizations and individuals who work most closely with youth likely to benefit from Polk State
Lakeland Pathways will refer them to the school. The Collegiate High School Director will organize the Polk State
Lakeland Pathways School Advisory Council (LP-SAC) to be in place by December 2012 and will include members
who will act as primary “recruiters” within the community. Additional formal strategies to recruit students to Polk State
Lakeland Pathways will include but not be limited to those listed below:






The College and Polk State Lakeland Pathways will create a variety of paper marketing materials to build
awareness within the community.
The director and school staff will create relationships with the leaders of complementary programs within the
district in order to identify potential students. These programs will include those within and outside of the
school system.
The College will also provide general marketing information through the College’s website, the Polk State
Lakeland Pathways website, and ongoing press releases.
Information released by the College will include publications of multiple “recruit nights” to be held each winter.
Each recruit night will be held on the Lakeland campus. Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will present
potential students with information about the school. Attendees will then interact with staff, tour the campus,
and ask questions specific to their individual situations.
The College will also host school district guidance counselor breakfasts annually. These breakfasts will be
used to ensure that counselors have a thorough understanding of the Polk State Lakeland Pathways design
since they will identify students at risk of dropping out and will refer them to Polk State Lakeland Pathways.
The College’s Annual Report to the Community will be used to distribute Polk State Lakeland Pathways
information.
B. Explain how the school will achieve a racial/ethnic balance reflective of the community it serves or with the
racial/ethnic range of other local public schools.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will not discriminate based upon race or ethnicity. The school staff will continually compare
school demographics to that of Lakeland secondary schools and to high schools across the district. The demographics of
comparable schools will also be closely examined once those schools are identified by the district.
Recruitment efforts that will be used to reach the maximum number of potential students and to reach a wide range of
community will include those listed below:
 In the past, Polk County Schools has provided Polk State College’s charter schools with addresses for all students in
a given grade. If that information continues to be available, it will be used to do massive mail-outs.
 The electronic billboard on Highway 98 will also be used to advertise Polk State Lakeland Pathways to the general
community.
 Recruitment messages will appear on the Polk State College website, the Collegiate High School website, and the
Polk State Lakeland Pathways website.
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways informational brochures will be printed in Spanish as well as English.
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will work with community and faith-based partners to reach out to prospective
students from all communities.
 The school will use electronic communication, including websites, Twitter, and Facebook to promote recruiting
activities.
 The proven successful foundation of the current Polk State College charter high schools will be used to attract
students from all communities. Word-of-mouth is Polk State College’s charter schools’ most reliable recruitment
technique.
C. Describe the school’s enrollment policies and procedures, including an explanation of the enrollment timeline,
criteria and/or any preferences for enrollment, and lottery process.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways recruitment activities will be ongoing throughout the year. Using strategies listed in the
response to Section 13.A, Polk State Lakeland Pathways personnel will continually work with partners throughout the
community to recruit youth most likely to benefit from the Polk State Lakeland Pathways program.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 61
The formal recruitment/enrollment process, to include recruit nights, will be initiated in January of each school year.
Applications will be due in early March in order for applicants to be included in the lottery process. Lottery numbers will be
assigned on or around April 1, and initial letters of acceptance will be delivered by mid April. Interested youth may continue to
submit applications after lottery numbers are assigned but those applications will not be considered until all qualified
applicants who were part of the lottery are offered an enrollment opportunity.
To be considered for enrollment, a potential student must:
 Be positioned to begin the next school year with enough credits to be considered a high school junior.
 Have scored a minimum of 50 on the reading, writing, and math sections of the PERT. This score does not
position students to take college coursework, but it does demonstrate the academic foundation to reach the
PERT cut scores by the time of high school graduation.
 Create a written essay explaining why he or she has chosen to apply.
 Participate in an interview with school personnel.
 Submit an application for entry.
As part of the selection process, priority will be given to any applicant who also exhibits one or more of the following:
 Has been out of school for a minimum of three months as indicated by school enrollment records
 Is a custodial parent or a parent participating in financial support of a child as indicated by birth, court, or
financial records
 Can demonstrate that he or she is the primary caretaker for family members during traditional school hours as
indicated by a notarized statement of parent or guardian
 Is considered to be overage (18 years of age or older) as an incoming junior as verified by birth certificate or
student records
 Is homeless as verified by a social service organization
 Can provide any other documentation acceptable to Polk State Lakeland Pathways administration to show that
he or she has significant difficulty participating in a traditional daytime high school schedule and will benefit
from enrollment at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Once applications are received, Polk State Lakeland Pathways personnel will divide accepted applications into two
groups:
 Those representing applicants with priority status because they have demonstrated that they have disengaged
from the traditional school experience
 Those for individuals who are qualified but have none of the priority indicators
The list of priority applicants will be filtered through a lottery and put in numerical order. The same process will be used
to number applicants on the qualified list. Applicants will then be accepted in numbered order from the priority list. If all
priority applicants are offered an enrollment spot and there are still spots available, applicants will be accepted in
numerical order from the qualified list until all available slots are filled.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will also provide for the following student groups who meet application requirements to
be given priority preference within their application group (qualified or priority) as defined above.
 Students who are the children of a member of the governing board of the charter school.
 Students who are the children of an employee of the charter school.
D. Explain any student and/or family contracts that will be used as a requisite for initial and continued enrollment
in the school. Describe if and how the school will enforce such contracts.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be an appropriate choice option for disengaged students who are serious
about being part of the school’s mission. As part of the recruitment and enrollment process, students and their
parents (if applicable), will be presented with school expectations and will sign the following documents to
demonstrate their commitment to success:
 Enrollment Form to acknowledge that they have read and understand the school’s mission and goals
and that they agree to meet the goals
 Participation Agreement, which specifies an agreement to abide by a list of school policies
 Expectations Agreement (students and parents) to include expected behaviors, interactions, and
collaboration among parents, students, and staff
During each student’s annual review and in the event that a student is found to be noncompliant with school
policies or failing to demonstrate a commitment to meeting school goals, Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
review agreements with students and parents. In some situations, a student may be placed on a separate shortterm performance agreement to address specified performance objectives.
E. Explain any other efforts to encourage parental and community involvement, if applicable.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will employ a variety of strategies to engage parents, community members, students
and other stakeholders. They will include but will not be limited to the following:
 The Collegiate High School Director will organize the Polk State Lakeland Pathways School Advisory Council
(LP-SAC) to be in place by December 2012. The LP-SAC will engage business/community partners, parents,
students, college personnel, and a school system representative in providing ongoing advisement to the
school.
 Surveys, to include the annual climate survey but also surveys addressing specific school improvement issues,
will be administered to random sets of parents and students to address ongoing school issues.
 Focus groups will be conducted annually with small groups of students and parents to collect their perceptions
regarding the degree to which Polk State Lakeland Pathways is meetings its stated mission and to collect their
suggestions for improvement.
 The school’s director, assistant director, guidance counselor, and resource specialist(s) will host formal parent
group meetings throughout the year. The focus of these meetings will be to share school information and to
answer parent questions.
 Parents will be invited to submit questions at any time to specific school staff members. Contacts may be
made through phone calls or email correspondence.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 63
III. BUSINESS PLAN
Section 14: Facilities
If the site is acquired:
A. Describe the proposed facility, including location, size and layout of space.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be housed on the Lakeland Campus of Polk State College at 3425 Winter Lake
Road, Lakeland, Florida, 33803. The charter school will be located in the LAC Building, which is the heart of the
campus. The Polk State Lakeland Pathways offices and classrooms will be adjacent to other College classrooms and
to the College’s student center. Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will have access to all College facilities and
services.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will share offices and classrooms used by the Collegiate High School. This is possible
because the Polk State Lakeland Pathways classes will begin later in the day to accommodate the needs of the target
population. Existing space and facilities will be used for Polk State Lakeland Pathways. No new space will be
constructed; existing space does not have to be remodeled.
Eight classrooms are dedicated for use by the charter schools. The configuration of the charter school offices provides
a conference room for small seminars and personal advising. Restrooms, elevators, doors, and offices are accessible
for individuals with disabilities.
Total square footage of Polk State Lakeland Pathways classrooms is 7,028 square feet. Four of the classrooms have
a total of 686 square feet each. Each of these classrooms can accommodate up to 21 students at a time. The other
four classrooms have square footage ranging from 1,009 square feet to 1,690 square feet. They can easily
accommodate the maximum class size of 25 students. The classroom that has 1,690 square feet can house both a
face-to-face class of students and a lab for online learning simultaneously. The CHART lab can also be used for 24
students at any one time to participate in online course component. The total number of students to be served in these
eight classrooms is reflected in Table 9 below.
Table 9: Classroom Utilization at Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Room
Square
Footage
st
1101 (1 floor)
Utilization
Total
Students
Basis for Utilization #
1,009
CHART lab/online learning
24
Number of computers
floor)
1,495
Classroom
25
Class size limitation
1202 (2 floor)
nd
1203 (2 floor)
nd
1204 (2 floor)
nd
1206 (2 floor)
nd
1207 (2 floor)
nd
1208 (2 floor)
686
686
686
686
1,100
1,689
Classroom
Classroom
Classroom
Classroom
Classroom
Combination (Shared)
classroom/online lab
ALL CLASSROOMS
21
21
21
21
25
50
Square footage
Square footage
Square footage
Square footage
Class size limitation
Square footage and class size
limitation
nd
1201 (2
nd
TOTAL
8,037*
208*
* A total of 38.6 square feet per student
Other Lakeland campus buildings house auditorium facilities, classrooms, the library, the TLCC, and administrative
offices.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways intends to contract with Polk County Schools to complete fire inspections. Since these
facilities are used and will continue to be used by the Collegiate High School during the day, all inspections should be
up to date.
64
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
B. Describe the actions that will be taken to ensure the facility is in compliance with applicable laws, regulations and
policies and is ready for the school’s opening.
The space to be utilized by Polk State Lakeland Pathways is currently used by Polk State College’s Collegiate
Charter High School. The facilities are in compliance with applicable laws, regulations, and policies and will be ready
to host the new school.
C. Describe how the facility will meet the school’s capacity needs for students to be served.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways has planned for facilities based on the requirements of the State of Florida Class Size
Amendment, and the Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff will ensure full compliance with the requirement. Allocated
classroom space provides for 38.6 square feet per student.
Additionally, approximately 4,500 square feet of space have been allocated for Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff
offices and conference rooms.
D. Explain the anticipated costs for the facility, including renovation, rent, utilities and maintenance. Identify, if
applicable, any funding sources (other than state and local funding) that will be applied to facilities-related costs.
The financial plan for the proposed school should align with the facilities-related costs described.
The following cost will be reviewed on an annual basis
Table 10: Anticipated Facilities Cost
Expense per month
2012-2013
2013-2014
100
200
Students
Students
Facility Lease
In-kind
In-kind
Electric/Utilities
In-kind
In-kind
Internet
In-kind
In-kind
Repair/Maintenance In-kind
In-kind
Telephone
In-kind
In-kind
Total Facility
$0
$0
2014-2015
300
Students
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
$0
2014-2015
300
Students
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
$0
2014-2015
300
Students
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
In-kind
40
E. Describe the back-up facilities plan. What is the alternate plan for facilities if the proposed facility is not
available or is determined to be inappropriate for the school’s opening?
Stephen Hull, Polk State College Lakeland Campus Provost has made a commitment to provide space on the Lakeland
campus for Polk State Lakeland Pathways. If the planned facilities are not available, comparable facilities will be made
available.
Mr. Hull’s commitment is specifically stated in his letter, included in Appendix 9 beginning on page 157.
Section 15: Transportation Service
A. Describe the school’s plan for transportation, including any plans for contracting services. Your plan should
3
discuss, to the greatest extent possible, the issues relevant to the school’s transportation plans.
Through contracts negotiated by Polk State College, all College students and staff can use public transportation
through Citrus Connection free of charge beginning in June 2012. Polk State Lakeland Pathways students will be Polk
State College students and therefore will have access to free public transportation that will take them to the Polk State
College Lakeland Campus where the school will be located. Students will also be able to use the public transportation
service at no cost to travel between campuses
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways transportation zone will align with that of Crystal Lake Elementary School and
serves the entire school zone.
See attached projected school zone and bus routes included on page 165 as part of Appendix 10.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 65
Section 16: Food Service
A. Describe the school’s plan for food services, including any plans for contracting services or plans to
participate in the National School Lunch Program.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will have a contract with Oasis, the food vendor for Polk State College, through which
students who are eligible for free or reduced lunch are provided a variety of food options at no cost to the student. The
same kind of contract is currently in place for Polk State College’s two existing collegiate charter high schools.
Section 17 Budget
A. Provide an operating budget covering each year of the requested charter term that contains revenue
projections, expenses and anticipated fund balances. The budget should be based on the projected student
enrollment indicated on the cover page of the application.
The Polk State Lakeland Pathways budget is included as Appendix 8, beginning on page 151.
B. Provide a start-up budget that contains a balance sheet, revenue projections, including source of
revenues, expenses and anticipated fund balance. The start-up budget must cover any period prior to the
beginning of FTE payments in which the school will expend funds on activities necessary for the successful
start-up of the school.
Included in this application is a basic budget developed from FEFP funds only. A second budget shall be developed to
address funds anticipated from the receipt of start-up dollars provided through the Charter Schools Program grant. In
addition, Polk State Lakeland Pathways has applied for funds available through the Gateway to College program and
anticipates meeting all expectations for this grant. For the purpose of this charter application, the budget will not
include any start-up funds.
C. Provide a detailed narrative description of the revenue and expenditure assumptions on which the
operating and start-up budget are based. The budget narrative should provide sufficient information to
fully understand how budgetary figures were determined.
Revenue Assumptions
Operating Revenue Assumptions: The 2012-2013 Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP) revenue of
$520,386.00 was projected using the most current Charter Revenue Estimate Worksheet with a projected total
student population of 100 for three of four periods per day (unweighted FTE 100) Base Student 9th – 12th grade.
Therefore, the FEFP revenue totaled $$520,386.00 for the first year of the operation.
The 2013-2014 Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP) revenue $1,040,749.00 was projected using the the
most current Charter Revenue Estimate Worksheet with a projected total student population of 200 for three of
four periods per day (unweighted FTE 200) Base Student 9th – 12th grade. Therefore, the FEFP revenue totaled
$1,040,749 for the first second year of the operation.
The 2014-2015, 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 Florida Education Finance Program (FEFP) revenue $1,561,134 was
projected using the the most current Charter Revenue Estimate Worksheet with a projected total student
population of 300 for three of four periods per day (unweighted FTE 300) Base Student 9th – 12th grade.
Therefore, the FEFP revenue totaled $1,561,134.00 for the third, fourth and fifth years of operation.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Expenditure Assumptions
Operating Budget Expenditure Assumptions
Lakeland Pathways has the following expenditures currently budgeted: instructional personnel, instructional
support personnel, school administrative personnel, instructional materials and other classroom related
expenditures, professional development, technology support, facility operation, insurance, contracted services,
capital expenses, and administrative expenses.
Instructional Personnel: Instruction expenditures include instructional staff salaries and benefits for (3) FTE
classroom teachers in year 1, five (5) FTE classroom teachers in year 2 and six (6) FTE classroom teachers in
years 3-5 and adjunct teachers (0). The instructional salaries ($133,062.48) were computed using an average
salary of $44,354.16 per year. This totals $133,062.48 in year 1, $228,423.92in year 2 and $282,331.97 in
years 3-5.
Benefits for instructional support staff include:
 Retirement (5% of salaries in year 1, 5 % in years 2-5).
 Social security and Medicare (7.65% of salaries)
 Health insurance ($6,448 Per person)
 Workers compensation (0% of salaries).
The total cost of salaries and benefits for instruction personnel is $175,779.44 in year 1, $301,754.71 in
year 2 and $372,968.82 in years 3-5.
Substitute teachers are budgeted at $ $22.17 an hour plus social security (5.5 % of salaries) and workers
compensation (0 % of salaries). Teachers accumulate 5 days of paid leave days. This makes the total
estimated expenditure for substitute teachers $47,747.26 in year 1, $49,179.67 in year 2, and
$50,655.067 in years 3-5 (cost centers 150).
Instructional Support Personnel: Instruction support expenditures include salaries and benefits for one fulltime school guidance counselor and salaries and benefits for one full-time resource specialist. The salaries were
computed using average Polk State College salaries for similar positions.
Benefits for instructional support staff include:
 Retirement (6.5% of salaries in year 1, and 7.9% in years 2-5).
 Social security and Medicare (7.65% of salaries)
 Health insurance ($8531.75 Per person)
 Workers compensation (0% of salaries).
The total cost for salaries and benefits for instructional support staff is $118,667.89 In year 1, and
$220,436.85 In years 2-5.
School Administrative Personnel: School administration expenditures include salaries and benefits for a fulltime Assistant Director; salaries and benefits for a Director at 25%; and salaries and benefits for an
administrative assistant I at 25%. The salaries were computed using Polk State College salaries for similar
positions.
Benefits for administrative staff include:
 Retirement (8% of salaries in year 1, and 8% in years 2-5).
 Social security and Medicare (7.65% of salaries)
 Health insurance costs an average of (4600.00 Per person)
 Workers compensation (0% of salaries).
The total cost for salaries and benefits for school administrative staff is $121,153.37 In year 1, and
$253,319.58 In years 2-5.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 67
Classroom Supplies and Instructional Materials: Estimated costs for instructional supplies and other
instructional materials needed for year 1 include general classroom supplies $2500, textbooks $0 and software
for virtual learning lab $15,500. Polk State College Lakeland Collegiate High School will provide access (in-kind)
to classroom furniture/equipment and technology (hardware/software).
Estimated costs for instructional supplies and other materials needed for year 2 include general supplies $4000,
textbook $0 and software for virtual learning lab $30,000. Polk State College Lakeland Collegiate High School
will provide access (in-kind) to classroom furniture/equipment and technology (hardware/software) for year 2.
Estimated costs for instructional supplies and other materials needed for year 3 include general supplies $5500,
and textbook $0 and software for virtual learning lab $40,000. Polk State College Lakeland Collegiate High
School will provide access (in-kind) to classroom furniture/equipment and technology (hardware/software).
years 3-5.
Instructional Materials – Media: Estimated costs for media supplies and other materials is $800 for year 1,
$1050 for year 2, and $1250 for years 3-5 (based upon the instructional materials media FEFP allocation).
District Administrative Expenses: the standard 5% cost to the district for administrative services will total
$26,019.30 in year 1, $52,037.45 in year 2 and $65,047.24 in years 3-5 (cost center).
College Administrative Expense: The standard 5% cost to the college for administrative expenses will be
a total of $300,000 for year 3 calculated at $1000 per FTE Student. The college has agreed in kind to not
charge an administrative fee of the first two years of operations.
Finance Expense: $7000 per year (cost center) is the estimated annual cost to hire a qualified CPA firm to
perform required annual financial audit.
Facilities: The total cost of the facility is to be waived for years 1 and 2 as in-kind provided by Polk State
College. Rental/Facility use to include building usage, custodial, utilities, repairs and maintenance for years 3-5
will be calculated on a basis of $1000 per student. The total cost for years 3-5 will be $200,000 per year.
Insurance: Standard student insurance will be carried at the cost that has been found to be reasonable in
expectations. Insurance cost includes:
 Student Accident $300 in year 1, $450 in year 2, and $500 in years 3-5 (based on the number of students
enrolled.
The total amount for all expenditures for the 20122013 school year is and is based upon totaling up all sections
of expenditures. Subtracting total expenditures from total revenue equals the ending fund balance for year one..
2013-2014
Total Revenue:
$520,386.00
Ending Fund
Balance, Year 1
Total
Expenditures:
_
$487,000.00
=
$33,386
For subsequent years, the available fund balance increases.
Total Funding
2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017
100 students 200 students 300 students 300 students
$520,386
$1,040,749 $1,561,134 $1,561,134
Total Expenses
$487,000.
$651,219.71 $1,061,544.94
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Reserve
Total
$33,386.00
$389,529.29 $499,589.06
Reserve %
6.41%
24.95%
16.00%
D. Explain how the governing board will monitor the budget, including a strategy for addressing
revenue shortfalls due to lower than expected enrollment.
Processes to be used by the governing board are described in section 18.A and B. Polk State College procedure
6003, budget development, describes the budget process used by the college and includes contingencies for
addressing shortfalls. That procedure states in part as follows:
Section 1011.84 (3) (e), Florida Statutes establishes a minimum ending fund balance of 5%
that must be maintained. This ending fund balance is considered as unavailable except in dire
emergencies in which case the District Board of Trustees may authorize the President to allocate this
fund as necessary. Pursuant to this section if such expenditure is authorized the President will notify
the State Board of Education. The DBOT has established an additional 2% over and above the
statutory fund balance criterion as a reserve for economic uncertainties and to meet other nonrecurring needs of the College. In addition to these statutory requirements, the budget will be
evaluated compared to the distribution of funds between instructional and non-instructional expense
classifications relative to the systems averages for the categories described in Section 1011.84(3), FS
E. Provide monthly cash flow projections for the school’s start-up period (i.e. from the date on which the
application is approved to the beginning of the first fiscal year of operation) through the first year of operation.
Monthly expenditures for Polk State Lakeland Pathways are anticipated to be paid upon receipt of FEFP funds
and/or startup grant funds at the beginning of the first year of operation. The following estimated monthly cash flow
projections were derived from the 2011-2012 Revenue Projection Worksheet. This figure was determined by taking
total annual revenue of $520,386 divided by 12 months for an approximate monthly operating activity total of
$43,365. See Appendix 8 beginning on page 151.
F. Describe the school’s fundraising plan, if applicable. Report on the current status of any fundraising
efforts, including verification of any fundraising monies reported in the school’s start-up or operating
budgets.
Lakeland Pathways plans to solicit community businesses and organizations. In addition the Polk State Foundation has
partnered with the two existing charter schools sponsored by Polk State to assist with fund raising efforts. All privately
raised funds will be considered unencumbered and without spending limitations.
Section 18: Financial Management and Oversight
A. Describe who will manage the school’s finances and how the school will ensure financial resources are properly
managed.
As an integral component of the overall Polk State College organization, Polk State Lakeland Pathways will enjoy the support,
resources, and expertise of an established and successful public education institution. The charter school will promote financial
efficiency by aligning responsibility with accountability. Existing Polk State College financial management and accounting
procedures will comprise the basic procedures of the charter school.
Polk State College has always put a very high percentage of its budget into the direct cost of instruction. This allows the College to
continually provide among the highest mean daily salaries for full-time instructional personnel in the Community College System.
Through good financial management, the College has been able to provide a high quality education at a low cost to the student.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 69
Polk State College has a well-trained finance department, consisting of qualified and experienced personnel in the areas of finance,
accounting, and auditing. Annual Financial Reports reflect that Polk State College continues to be financially sound and, through its
dedication to fiscal responsibility, is expected to maintain this position. Polk State College takes great pride in its history of
consistently outstanding audits of its financial affairs and those of its two existing charter high schools and will strive to continue
success in this area.
The finance department of Polk State College will establish a separate internal accounting system for Polk State Lakeland
Pathways to meet the requirements of Florida State and the Florida Department of Education regulations and to comply with all
state and federal financial reporting requirements. The College will also assign an accountant to be specifically responsible for
managing all charter school finances.
B. Describe the financial controls, including an annual audit and regular board review of financial statements, which will
be employed to safeguard finances.
Accountability regarding financial management and internal accounting of the school will be ensured by following specified
procedures. A school personnel expenditure limit will be set at $75.00. Two signatures will be required on all checks and school
financial transactions. School credit cards will be issued to the Collegiate High School Director. An informal audit will take place on a
monthly basis to ensure accountability. The governing board will review all financial reports and expenditures on a quarterly basis,
and an outside consultant will be retained to perform a review of all expenditures.
External auditors and reviews of all financial records will be conducted annually in accordance with the procedures of Polk State
College and the Polk State College Business and Finance Office.
C. Describe the method by which accounting records will be maintained.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will utilize the Financial and Program Cost Accounting and Reporting for Florida Schools.
D. Describe how the school will store student and financial records.
All student records will be located and stored at the Lakeland Campus of Polk State College. Hard copies of high school records
will be maintained in a vault. The vault is rated for three (3) hour fire safety. Records will be kept in accordance with the
regulations prescribed by the Florida Department of Education. Access to records will be limited to the school’s administrative
staff.
Specified school personnel will have access to financial records and budgetary items. All financial records will be stored in a
secured file storage space at Polk State Lakeland Pathways and within the College’ Business Office.
The Polk State College Registrar will maintain college student records and online transcripts.
E. Describe the insurance coverage the school will obtain, including applicable health, workers compensation, general
liability, property insurance and directors and officers liability coverage.
Because Polk State Lakeland Pathways will be a component of the Polk State College, a public entity governed by the
District Board of Trustees, the charter school’s liability insurance, property insurance, and workers’ compensation
insurance will be provided under the requirements of the standard operations governing the College. As a public entity,
specific Florida Statutes relating to limitations of legal action and immunity govern Polk State College and will apply to
Polk State Lakeland Pathways.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways will comply with all applicable Florida Statutory requirements. Appropriate coverage will
be provided as required, including accident insurance on the students, at the appropriate level through a private insurer
with an A-rated carrier or better as rated by A.M. Best Rating Service.
Polk State Lakeland Pathways personnel will be provided health insurance through the College’s health insurance
plan.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Section 19: Action Plan
A. Present a timetable for the school’s start-up.
The timetable of activities required for start-up of Polk State Lakeland Pathways will include specific actions listed in
Table 11 below. The Collegiate High School Director and the Polk State College Lakeland Campus Provost will
facilitate start-up activities. Additionally, the timeline for hiring staff members and the addition of specific training events
tied to the Gateway to College National Network may slightly modify the timeline in the event of the possible receipt of
a Gateway to College start-up grant.
Table 11: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Start-Up Timetable
Date
Activity
Outcome
August
The charter proposal is submitted.
Polk County School Board (PCSB) personnel review the
2, 2012
proposal. The board approves the charter.
August
Polk State College submits charter
Application will be submitted by August 2, 2012, deadline
2012
application.
for review by Polk County School Board.
October
Award notification is received.
Polk State College personnel move forward with the
2012
planning process.
October
 College personnel and the District
 Community relationships are established.
2012 –
Board of Trustees are notified of
 LP-SAC is established and functional and positioned
January
charter approval.
to support the opening of Polk State Lakeland
2013
Pathways.
 DBOT takes any actions as
required.
o Budget and financial processes established
within College
 College staff members establish
o CHS Director identified as internal and
the identity of Polk State Lakeland
external point-of-contact
Pathways within the College and
o Phones, offices, print material, website, etc.
create initial Polk State Lakeland
are designated/created for Polk State
Pathways materials.
Lakeland Pathways
 The Collegiate High School (CHS)
 Marketing materials to be used during recruitment
Director:
activities are created. Information includes but is not
o Meets with representatives
limited to:
from key organizations to
o Applicant requirements
plan recruitment activities.
o School mission and goals
o Creates the school’s SAC
o Transportation details
(LP-SAC) and conducts
o Food service information
organizational meeting.
o Student expectations
o Creates recruitment
materials to be used for
 Materials to be used during student application and
winter/spring recruitment.
enrollment processes are in place.
o Communicates with high
schools and programs that
may have qualified
applicants.
o Initiates the process to
recruit, identify, and hire
Polk State Lakeland
Pathways staff.
February The CHS Director submits the Florida
The FDOE will have the grant proposal for additional
2013
Department of Education (FDOE)
charter funding.
Public Charter School Grant
application.
February  CHS personnel conduct Polk State  The initial Polk State Lakeland Pathways cohort will
– April
Lakeland Pathways recruitment
apply and be accepted for enrollment in August 2013.
2013
activities as part of the regularly
 Qualified applicants receive letters confirming:
scheduled winter/spring
o An invitation for enrollment.
recruitment process.
o Notification that they are on a waiting list.
 The CHS Director also works with
 The general framework for enrollment and scheduling
community organizations and
will be in place.
individual schools to identify youth
 The school’s 2013-2014 school calendar will be
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 71
Table 11: Polk State Lakeland Pathways Start-Up Timetable
Date
Activity
Outcome
most likely to benefit from the Polk
established.
State Lakeland Pathways mission
 The school handbook for 2013-2014 will be finalized.
and to ensure that those
 Collegiate High School staff members prepare initial
individuals receive recruitment
equipment and material orders to be processed as
materials.
soon as budget is available.
 The CHS Director, Assistant
Director, and Guidance Counselor
create the initial master schedule
(including assignment of courses to
classrooms) for Polk State
Lakeland Pathways.
 The CHS Director, the CHS staff,
and College leadership create the
charter school calendar for 20132014
May
Start-up grant received.
 The College is informed of receipt of grant.
2013
 The start-up grant budget is established in the College
and activities implemented.
June Required governing board training
 All DBOT members can be certified as having
August
in completed.
completed governance training as appropriate.
2013
 Student records are received and
 Staff members are in place, student records are
student record system established
reviewed, and initial student schedules created.
in Genesis.
 The school system will conduct the pre-opening site
visit.
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff
members are selected.
 Incoming students and parents meet with guidance
 All facilities designations are
counselor and resource specialist to create Student
finalized (office and classroom
Success Plans and Foundation schedules.
assignments).
 Students and parents participate in orientation, tour
 Pre-opening site visit is conducted.
the school, confirm all courses, and have questions
answered.
 The school’s initial School
Improvement Plan is created.
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways opens!
 Polk State Lakeland Pathways staff
members participate in the annual
staff retreat, participating in
planning and training with CHS
staff members.
 Students are enrolled, orientation
takes place, and school starts.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
IV.
STATEMENT OF ASSURANCES
This form must be signed by a duly authorized representative of the applicant group and submitted with the application
for a charter school.
As the authorized representative of the applicant group, I hereby certify that the information submitted in this
application for a charter for Polk State College Lakeland Pathway Charter High School is accurate and true to the best
of my knowledge and belief; and further, I certify that, if awarded a charter, the school:

Will be nonsectarian in its programs, admission policies, employment practices and operations.

Will enroll any eligible student who submits a timely application, unless the school receives a greater number
of applications than there are spaces for students, in which case students will be admitted through a random
selection process.

Will adhere to the antidiscrimination provisions of section 1000.05, F.S.

Will adhere to all applicable provision of state and federal law relating to the education of students with
disabilities, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1974; and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Will adhere to all applicable provisions of federal law relating to students who are limited English proficient,
including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Educational Opportunities Act of 1974.

Will participate in the statewide assessment program created under section 1008.22, F.S.

Will comply with Florida statutes relating to public records and public meetings, including Chapter 119, Florida
Statutes, and section 286.011, F.S., which are applicable to applicants even prior to being granted a charter.

Will obtain and keep current all necessary permits, licenses and certifications related to fire, health and safety
within the building and on school property.

Will provide for an annual financial audit in accordance with section 218.39, F.S.
The governing board, at its discretion, allows Sallie Brisbane (name), CHS Director (title) to sign as the legal
correspondent for the school.
See Signed Copy in Appendix 12
______________________________________________
Signature
Sallie C. Brisbane
Printed Name
Date
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 73
Appendix 1
Curriculum Types
How do decisions about curriculum and instruction
impact student achievement?
Steven Weber
74
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Curriculum Types
How do decisions about curriculum and instruction impact student achievement?
Types of Curriculum
Educators are curriculum developers, yet finding a common definition for the term curriculum can be a daunting
challenge. According to English (2000), “curriculum is any document that exists in a school that defines the work of
teachers by identifying the content to be taught and the methods to be used” (p.2).
Teachers and administrators often focus on the Big Three, the written, taught and tested curriculum, in order to
maximize the learned curriculum (Glatthorn, 1987). The brief descriptions below will introduce educators to types of
curriculum which impact student achievement. This short list can assist collaborative teams in identifying areas of
strengths and weaknesses within a school as teachers and administrators continue to develop curriculum and assess
student understanding of key concepts and skills. A general awareness of each of the curriculum types listed below
can assist teachers and administrators in increasing student understanding and raising student achievement.
Listed in Alphabetical Order
Curriculum Type
Aligned
Concept-Based
Differentiated
Description
“Teaching alone will not improve test scores. Teaching has to be aligned (on task)
and purposive (cumulative)”
(English, 2000, p. 104).
“One of the tasks of curriculum leadership is to use the right methods to bring the
written, the taught, the supported, and the tested curriculums into closer alignment,
so that the learned curriculum is maximized”
(Glatthorn, 1987, p. 4).
“Teachers in thinking classrooms understand how to use concepts to integrate
student thinking at a deeper level of understanding – a level where knowledge can be
transferred to other situations and times”
(Erickson, 2007, p. 22).
Concepts are timeless, universal, abstract and broad. The conceptual transfer of
knowledge includes the application of concepts or universal generalizations across
time, cultures or situations (Erickson, 2007, p. 129).
Differentiated instruction occurs when a teacher proactively plans varied approaches
to what students need to learn, how they will learn it, and/or how they can express
what they have learned in order to increase the likelihood that each student will learn
as much as he or she can as efficiently as possible (Tomlinson, 2003, p. 151).
“In differentiated classrooms, teachers provide specific ways for each individual to
learn as deeply as possible and as quickly as possible, without assuming one student's
road map for learning is identical to anyone else’s” (Tomlinson, 1999, p. 2).
Hidden
The messages of hidden curriculum may support or contradict each other as well as
the written curriculum. For example, while school social studies curriculum typically
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 75
Guaranteed and Viable
Learned
emphasizes and even celebrates democratic political systems and principles, such as
one person-one vote, majority rule and minority rights, separation of church and
state, equality before the law, and due process, these principles are not always
practiced in public school classrooms and corridors.
“If teachers can lay out a sound – a viable – set of standards and can then guarantee
(more or less) that these standards actually get taught, we can raise levels of
achievement immensely”
(Schmoker, 2006, p. 36).
In his book What Works in Schools, Robert Marzano (2003) shares research that
affirms the fact that the number one factor that increases levels of learning is what
gets taught. Marzano calls this a “guaranteed and viable curriculum.”
The learned curriculum is what the students actually learn from the taught
curriculum. Common formative assessments assist educators in monitoring the
written and taught curriculum while assessing student understanding.
“The gap between what is taught and what is learned—both intended and
unintended—is large” (Cuban, 1992, p. 223).
Null
The null curriculum is that which is not taught in schools.
Eisner (1994) suggests that what curriculum designers and/or teachers choose to
leave out of the curriculum—the null curriculum—sends a covert message about
what is to be valued (p. 96-97).
“What children don’t learn is as important as what they do learn. What the
curriculum neglects is as important as what it teaches” (Eisner).
Purposeful
“Curriculum design has become more an issue of deciding what you won’t teach as
well as what you will teach. You cannot do it all. As a designer, you must choose the
essential” (Jacobs, 1997, p. 27). Although educators must choose the essential, their
choices about what is left out of the curriculum becomes the null curriculum.
“All learners benefit from and should receive instruction that reflects clarity about
purposes and priorities of content” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006, 6).
“Many educational programs do not have clearly defined purposes”
(Tyler, 1949, p.1).
Received
“Schooling at its best reflects a purposeful arrangement of parts and details,
organized with deliberate intention, for achieving the kinds of learning we seek”
(Wiggins & McTighe, 2007, p. 9).
The received curriculum is not always the intended or taught curriculum. Each
student brings their own background and prior knowledge to the classroom. Student
understanding is impacted by each student’s perception of the aligned, hidden, null,
spiral, and tested curricula.
Understanding of the received curriculum is critically important as it guides the
curriculum and instruction decisions made by teachers and administrators. Just
because content was taught does not necessarily mean it was caught. In a
Professional Learning Community educators meet on a regular basis to assess the
received curriculum and to provide information on student understanding to teachers
and administrators at the next grade level.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Rigorous
“Academic rigor is an essential characteristic of effective curriculum, instruction and
assessment. Students learn when they are challenged to use the full range of their
talents and intellectual abilities to address authentic and complex academic tasks in
professional and real-life events. All students should have the opportunity to
participate in qualitatively different academic environments that build upon their
interests, strengths and personal goals” (NCDPI).
See NCDPI’s Definition for Rigor
Spiral
Bruner (1960) wrote, “A curriculum as it develops should revisit this basic ideas
repeatedly, building upon them until the student has grasped the full formal
apparatus that goes with them” (p. 13).
Analyzing curriculum maps allows teachers and administrators to reflect upon the
spiral curriculum. Another strategy for analyzing the spiral curriculum is called
vertical alignment.
Taught
Tested
Sergiovanni (1990) wrote, “Schools have multiple and often conflicting purposes that
make exact alignment of structure and purpose difficult, if not impossible” (p. 27).
The taught curriculum is what teachers actually teach in the classroom. Traditionally,
the written curriculum
(state and local documents) has not matched the taught curriculum among teachers
within a school.
Jacobs (1997) wrote, “If there are gaps among teachers within buildings, there are
virtual Grand Canyons among buildings in a district (p. 3).
The tested curriculum provides valuable feedback about each student’s
understanding of essential content, concepts and skills.
If the tested curriculum is not aligned with the written curriculum then teachers,
students and parents will have a difficult time assessing the student understanding.
“The extent to which any test is useful in reteaching any given curriculum is the
extent to which that test does indeed measure the curriculum in the first place”
(English, 2000, p. 65).
Timeless & Timely
As curriculum developers we are required to make ongoing decisions about
curriculum. Heidi Hayes Jacobs said, “There’s a need for both timeless curriculum
content and timely content. What seems to be falling by the wayside is timely
content. We have to make decisions about what we shed and what we keep—and
some of what we’re holding on to is predicated on outdated ideas”
(Perkins-Gough, 2003, pp. 12-17).
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 77
21st Century
According to the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction:
Future-Ready Students for 21st Century
Click on link above
Future-Ready Schools for 21st Century
Click on link above
“All students will graduate from a rigorous, relevant academic program that equips
them with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to succeed in both postsecondary education and 21st Century careers and to be participating, engaged
citizens.”
Written
North Carolina State Board of Education
The written curriculum specifies what is to be taught and is produced by the state,
the school system, the school, and the classroom teacher.
The written curriculum will have little impact on student achievement unless it
becomes the taught curriculum or more importantly a ‘guaranteed and viable’
curriculum, which is agreed upon by a team of teachers.
An essential act of our profession is the design of curriculum and learning experiences to meet specified purposes.
- Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe Understanding by Design (1998)
References
Author unknown. (2006). Future-ready students for the 21st century. Retrieved August 6, 2008, from
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/state_board/boardgoals.pdf.
Author unknown. (2006). Future-ready students for the 21st century: What will a future-ready school look like?
Retrieved August 2, 2008, from
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/sbe_meetings/revisions/2006/pdfs/0608futurereadystudents.pdf
Bruner, J. (1960). The Process of Education, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Cuban, L. (1992). Curriculum stability and change. In Jackson, P. (Ed.), Handbook of research on curriculum (pp. 216247). New York, NY: Macmillan.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Eisner, E. (1994). The educational imagination: On the design and evaluation of school programs, 3rd ed. New York,
NY: Macmillan College Publishing.
English, F.W. (2000). Deciding what to teach and test: Developing, aligning and
auditing the curriculum. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Erickson, H.L. (2007). Concept-based curriculum and instruction for the thinking
classroom. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Hargett, V. (2004). The non-negotiables of academic rigor. Retrieved July 30, 2008,
from http://www.ncpublicschools.org/ec/development/gifted/nonnegotiables/.
Glatthorn, A.A. (1987). Curriculum renewal. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Jacobs, H.H. (1997). Mapping the big picture: Integrating curriculum and assessment
K-12. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Marzano, R.J. (2003). What works in schools: Translating research into action.
Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Perkins-Gough, D. (2004). Creating a timely curriculum: A conversation with Heidi Hayes Jacobs. Educational
Leadership, 61(4), 12-17.
Schmoker, M. (2006). Results now: How we can achieve unprecedented improvements in teaching and learning.
Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Sergiovanni, T.J. (1990). Value-added leadership: How to get extraordinary performance in schools. New York, NY:
Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.
Tomlinson, C. A. (1999). The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners. Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Tomlinson, C.A. & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating differentiated instruction and
understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 79
Tyler, R.W. (1949). Basic principles of curriculum and instruction. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.
Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and
Curriculum Development.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Appendix 2
Polk State College Charter High School Handbook
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 81
Introduction
Students at Polk State College Lakeland Collegiate High School are expected to act in a responsible manner so as to
support and enhance the educational process. Polk State College has a tradition of excellent conduct by its students,
and the degree of responsibility they exhibit is a reflection of the educational atmosphere of the college. Although the
vast majority of students will never be affected when acts of unacceptable conduct occur, they must be dealt with in a
manner supportive of our educational purpose.
Polk State College’s District Board of Trustees (DBOT) has established rules that define unacceptable conduct, set
forth the penalties and disciplinary procedures that apply when violations occur, and describe the due process
requirements that will be used. College administration has created Polk State College Procedures to provide guidance
for carrying out these rules.
The “Student Rights and Responsibilities” section of the Polk State College Student Handbook reflects the rules and
procedures as it provides all students with guidelines expected of them. All collegiate charter high school students and
parents are expected to read and understand this section of the handbook. The handbook states, in part, as listed
below.
Student safety is Polk State College’s priority. To ensure safety, the following actions are prohibited on campus, at any
College-related activity, or at other locations as may be provided by law. Violation of any Board rules may lead to
disciplinary warning, probation, suspension, expulsion, or other appropriate and authorized penalty. The following are
some examples of unacceptable conduct:
















Illegal use or possession of drugs or narcotics
Actions which are disruptive to the normal, orderly and peaceful operation of the College
Possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages in violation of State law and College policy
Cheating or plagiarizing on tests, projects, or assignments
Stealing
Illegal gambling
Use of indecent or abusive language
Unauthorized use of the College name
Lewd or indecent conduct
Violation of local ordinances or of State or Federal law
Hazing
Forgery, alteration, or misuse of documents or records
Furnishing false information with the intent to deceive
Possession and/or use of firearms, fireworks, explosive chemicals, and other lethal weapons
Repeated offenses of a less serious nature
Participation by students in disruptive activities at state institutions of higher learning as defined and prohibited under the
provision of Section 877.13, Florida Statutes
In addition to the DBOT Rules and the Polk State College Procedures, the collegiate charter high schools have created
policies to address Florida State Statutes that are specific to K-12 educational programs and schools and which
supersede College rules and procedures to the degree specified in the text of the Statutes. This handbook presents
these collegiate charter high school policies.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Collegiate Charter High School Policies (Superseding DBOT Rules and PSC Procedures as
specified by Florida Statute)
HS.1
Teacher and Principal (Director) Control of Students (State Statute 1003.31)
During the time a student is on a school bus or is on the school campus participating in a designated collegiate charter
high school class or activity, the student is under the control and direction of the principal (director) or his/her designee,
the teacher, or other collegiate charter high school staff.
(Please note that since school bus transportation is provided through a contract with the Polk County School Board,
students riding a school bus are also subject to all PCSB rules and policies while on the bus.)
HS.2
Authority of Teachers (State Statute 1003.32)
Each collegiate charter high school director will support the authority of collegiate charter high school teachers to
remove disobedient, disrespectful, violent, abusive, uncontrollable, or disruptive students from the classroom; and when
appropriate and available, place such students in an alternative educational setting.
HS.3
Bullying and Harassment (State Statute 1006.147)
Bullying or harassment of any collegiate charter high school student or staff member is prohibited during any charter
school related or sponsored program or activity or through the use of data or computer software that is accessed
through a charter school computer, computer system or computer network.
“Bullying” means systematically and chronically inflicting physical hurt or psychological distress on one or more
students and may involve teasing; social exclusion; threat or intimidation; stalking; physical violence; theft; sexual,
religious or racial harassment; public humiliation; or destruction of property. (Definition related to stalking is found in
State Statute 784.048)
“Harassment” means threatening, insulting, or dehumanizing gesture or the use of data or computer software or written,
verbal or physical conduct directed against a charter school student or a staff member. It places a person in
reasonable fear of harm or danger to his or her person or damage to his or her property. It has the effect of
substantially interfering with a student’s educational performance, opportunity or benefit or has the effect of
substantially disrupting the orderly operation of the collegiate charter high school.
Bullying and harassment include retaliation against a student or school employee for asserting or alleging an act of
bullying or harassment. Reporting an act of bullying or harassment that is not made in good faith is considered an act
of retaliation.
The collegiate charter high schools provide opportunities for students and staff to report incidents of bullying and
harassment. A reporting form is found on each of the collegiate charter high school websites, accessed through the
Polk State College website at www.polk.edu. This reporting form can be completed and put in the “bully box” located in
the main office at each collegiate charter high school, or it can be submitted electronically via email to the principal
(director) or his/her designee. The email address is on each website.
A report of bullying or harassment will be investigated by the principal (director) or assistant principal (assistant
director). The school counselor will not be involved in the investigation. However, the counselor will be involved in
developing a plan of action for the victim if it is determined that bullying or harassment has occurred.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 83
HS.4
Attendance (State Statute 1003.04)
Every collegiate charter high school student is expected to attend school. The school will monitor and record
attendance in each high school class. A parent may be asked to justify a student’s absence. Since attendance has a
direct impact on student achievement, poor attendance may result in a low course grade. It may also threaten a
student’s overall success in the collegiate charter high school, and could result in removal from the program. For every
three days of unexcused absence from a class in a 9 week grading period, the student will be dropped one letter grade
on his progress report/report card.
HS.5
Hazing (State Statute 1006.135)
Hazing is defined in State Statute as follows:
Any action or situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health or
safety of a student for the purpose of initiation or admission into or affiliation with any organization
operating under the sanction of a school. Hazing shall include, but is not limited to pressuring or
coercing the student into violating state or federal law , any brutality of a physical nature, such as
whipping, beating, branding, exposures to the elements, forced consumption of any food, liquor,
drug, or other substance, or any forced physical activity which would adversely affect the physical
health or safety of the student, and shall include any activity which would subject the individual to
extreme mental stress, such as sleep deprivation, forced exclusion from social contact, forced
conduct which could result in extreme embarrassment, or any other forced activity which could
adversely affect the mental health or dignity of the student.
Hazing does not include customary athletic events or other similar contests or competitions or any
activity or conduct that furthers a legal and legitimate objective.
Collegiate charter high school students found to be engaged in hazing will be subject to Polk State College
Rule 4.16.
HS.6
Leaving School Grounds (State Statute 1003.31)
State Statute states that each student is to be under the control and direction of the principal (director) or designee
during the time he or she is in school or is otherwise in route to or from school (if on school bus) or is presumed by law
to be attending school. For this reason, each collegiate charter high school student is to be on the assigned Polk State
College campus from 7:15 a.m. until 1:45 p.m. unless an early release form is on file in the school’s administrative
office.
An early release form allows a student to come to campus after 7:15 a.m. or to leave prior to 1:45 p.m. in order to
accommodate scheduled classes. Once a student exercises the early release and leaves campus on a given day, he
or she is expected to remain off campus the remainder of the school day.
A student who must leave campus during the school day and who does not have an early release form on file to
address the specific time to be off campus, must sign-out in the school’s administrative office.
HS.7
Withdrawal
Every effort will be made to assure student success at either of the collegiate charter high schools. However, a student
will be withdrawn if remaining at a collegiate charter high school puts the student’s high school graduation in jeopardy,
and/or the student demonstrates an inability to be successful in a college environment.
84
HS.8
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Discipline Appeals (State Statute 1006.09 )
If a parent does not agree with the disciplinary action imposed by the director or designee, the parent may appeal as
follows:
 The written notice of disciplinary action shall inform the parent of the right to an appeal to be conducted by the
director within five days of the notice if requested by the parent.
 If the parent does not request a hearing or appear at a scheduled hearing, it shall be assumed that the parent
is in agreement with the disciplinary action imposed.
 The student and parent must attend the hearing and may have one person in attendance at the hearing to
represent them. Any witness directly involved in the incident may also be present at the hearing or may submit
a written statement with the permission of his or her parent.
HS.9
Electronic Devices
Wireless communication devices shall not be activated or used during school hours or on school buses. Cell
phones/Electronic Device use by a student during an unauthorized time will result in the teacher or administrator
directing the student to turn off the device and to put it away; administration shall be notified. Repeated use of an
electronic device may result in an administrator confiscating the device and returning it to the parent after a
parent/administrator conference. Any failure to comply with a directive by a teacher or administrator for the student to
shut off and put away the device shall result in a referral stating insubordination. Any student who violates the provisions
of this section is guilty of a breach of conduct punishable as below.
No student may have in his or her possession any wireless communication device or any other item that records, stores, or
transmits data during any standardized testing (FCAT, SSS, NRT, etc.). Students who choose to bring wireless communication
devices to school do so at their own risk. Cell phones and other wireless communication devices are small and easily lost. There is
also a high incidence of theft of these devices.
On occasion, Polk State College Lakeland Collegiate High School will loan out equipment (Kindle, Laptop, etc.) for students to use.
Any equipment loaned out to students is to be returned in the same condition. Any equipment that is lost, stolen, or damaged will be
expected to be paid for by the student/parent whom it was loaned to.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 85
Appendix 3
Polk State College
District Board of Trustees
Information
86
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
POLK STATE COLLEGE DISTRICT BOARD OF TRUSTEES:

Teresa Martinez, Chair, is the owner of the Institute of Spanish Communication Inc. and a PSC alumna. She
also produces and hosts “Communidad Viva” a daily Spanish talk show on PGTV and she hosts and produces
a Spanish radio talk show. Mrs. Martinez, a native of Cuba, is also a columnist for Vision Latina. Her family fled
Cuba when she was 15 years old and relocated to Polk County. After graduating from PSC in 1975, she
attended the University of Central Florida, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Spanish. Mrs. Martinez
spent 11 years teaching Spanish at Lakeland High School. She is on the board of directors of the Lakeland
Area Chamber of Commerce and Central Florida Speech and Hearing Center. She is a member of the National
Association of Women Business Owners, which has given her its Woman of Distinction Award. Mrs. Martinez
was selected as the International Individual of the Year in 1997 by the Central Florida Development Council.
She received the Governor’s Point of Light Award, and in 2006 the Polk County Board of County
Commissioners proclaimed a Teresa Martinez Day in recognition of her contributions during the 2004
hurricane season.

Mark G. Turner, Vice Chair, is an attorney practicing in the areas of Real Estate, Estate Planning, Probate
and Guardianship, Business Law and Civil Litigation. He is a native of Winter Haven and is a past president of
the Polk State College Foundation and the Greater Winter Haven Area Chamber of Commerce and has served
in leadership roles for the Community Foundation of Greater Winter Haven, Girls Inc., Main Street Winter
Haven, American Red Cross and Habitat For Humanity. He is a graduate of Leadership Winter Haven and
Leadership Polk and was a Florida Blue Key Leadership Honorary member at the University of Florida. He
holds a B.A. in political science (University of Florida) and a J.D. (Stetson University College of Law)

Dan Dorrell is a C.P.A. and a partner at Cross, Fernandez & Riley, LLP, specializes in a variety of industries
including agriculture, medical, manufacturing, legal and other professional services. He was a member of Polk
State’s first graduating class and his extensive community involvements include service on the Sebring Utilities
Commission, the Sebring Chamber of Commerce, the Highlands County Family YMCA (which he helped to
found) and the Florida State University and Polk State College Alumni Associations. He also serves on the
board of Sun Trust Bank and helped to found the Highlands County Leadership Program. He is a veteran of
the Florida National Guard and holds a B.S. in finance (Florida State University) as well as an A.A. from Polk
State.

Ricardo Garcia is owner and operator of Gulf Coast Avionics Corp. of Lakeland, Pacific Coast Avionics of
Portland, Ore. and Central Florida Avionics & Instruments of Leesburg. He is also the owner and operator of
Sunstate Realty Investments Corp. and Polk Home Development Corp. He serves on the board of directors at
the Sun ‘n’ Fun Fly-In, vice president of the Florida Aviation Safety Foundation, Chairman of the Florida
Aerospace Resource Banner Center.

Gregory Littleton is president and chief executive officer of Citizens Bank & Trust. He graduated from PSC in
1987. He went on to attend Freed-Hardeman University in Tennessee and graduated in 1989 cum laude. He
has been at Citizens Bank & Trust since 1997 and has been president since 2001. He serves on the board of
the Lake Wales Art Council, Florida School of Preaching, Florida Bank Pac, Government Relations Council
for the Florida Bankers Association, PSC’s Workforce Education Council, the executive board of the Polk
Vision Steering Committee, and is Chair of the Economic Development Foundation. He is the Past President of
the following: Lake Wales Chamber of Commerce, East Polk Committee of 100 and Central Florida
Development Committee. He and his wife, Julie, and their two daughters, Currie Ann and Anna Beth, live in
Winter Haven.

Linda Pilkington is the director of physician, community and government relations at Heart of Florida Regional
Medical Center. She is a registered nurse (retired) and also has extensive experience in marketing and
community relations and has held positions in higher education, healthcare and manufacturing. She currently
chairs the board of the Polk State College Foundation. Her community involvement includes membership on
boards and committees with Polk Vision, Polk Health Care Alliance, Lake Wales Art Council, Haines City
Chamber of Commerce, Main Street Winter Haven, Ridge Career Center and many other organizations. She
is a graduate of Leadership Polk and holds a B.S. in Nursing (University of the Philippines) and M.A. (New
York University).

E.S. “Ernie” Pinner is Chairman/President/CEO of CenterState Banks of Florida, Inc. He is a former member
of the PSC Foundation Board and past Chair of the Heart of Florida Medical Center Board. He is on the
boards of Polk Museum of Art, Heart of Florida Foundation and Polk County Industrial Revenue Authority. He
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 87
is a past member of the Polk Museum of Art Board of Trustees, Imperial Symphony Orchestra Board, Polk
Education Foundation Board, and the Winter Haven Hospital Foundation Board.
88
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Appendix 4
Resumes for
Eileen Holden, Polk State College President
Stephen Hull, Polk State College Lakeland Campus Provost
Sallie Brisbane, Collegiate High School Director
Teresa Martinez, District Board of Trustees Chairperson
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 89
EILEEN HOLDEN, Ed.D.
4025 Palma Ceia Circle
Winter Haven, FL 33884
(863) 297-1098-Work
(863) 514-5702- Cell
[email protected]
QUALIFICATIONS
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
L.
Proven leadership abilities in higher education teaching and administration
Extensive knowledge of Florida College System and legislative process
Experience working with diverse population of faculty, staff and students
Accomplished in establishing community, business and education partnerships
Demonstrated ability in strategic planning
Strong interpersonal and team-building skills
Excellent listening, oral and written communications skills
Responsible budget administrator
Demonstrated experience in fundraising
Creative, energetic, ethical, visionary and perceptive
EMPLOYMENT CHRONOLOGY
President
Polk State College
999 Avenue H, NE
Winter Haven, FL 33881-2006-Present
Polk State College is a two-campus, three-center comprehensive state college in Polk County, Florida. Polk State
College is also authorized to offer certificate, associate and baccalaureate degrees to meet community, regional and
state needs. The College recently purchased land to build a third campus in northeast Polk County. Polk State
College serves over 20,000 credit students and 9,000 non-credit students. The College has approximately 1200 full
and part-time employees. Polk State College offers a broad array of degree and certificate programs and is home to
two high-performing charter high schools, a Corporate College for workforce training, and a nationally accredited
Institute for Public Safety. The college has an annual budget of $77 million dollars. The position reports to a sevenmember Board of Trustees who are appointed by the Governor.


Provide collaborative leadership in all aspects of college operations to ensure Polk State College continues to
grow as a world-class college and Florida’s leader in workforce education.
Guide the Strategic Planning process through setting goals and priorities that address institutional and
community needs.
90
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
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Promote growth and access through program and facilities expansion.
Ensure a high rate of student success in degree and non-degree programs.
Create partnerships with business and industry, government, colleges and universities to encourage
economic growth.
Provide oversight and accountability for the completion of all capital projects.
Secure external funding through fundraising and grants.
Promote the professional development of faculty and staff.
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Technical Education- 2001-2006
Broward Community College
111 East Las Olas Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301
Broward Community College (BCC) is a large, three-campus, three-center comprehensive community college in an
urban setting in southeast Florida serving 52,140 credit/non-credit students plus 14,826 students served by the
Institute for Economic Development. BCC employs 358 full-time faculty (represented by the United Faculty of Florida)
and over 2,000 adjunct faculty each major term. The college has an annual operating budget of $120 million dollars.

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Served as the chief academic officer providing collegewide administrative direction and leadership for all
academic programs including the college transfer program, career and workforce education, health science,
dual enrollment, international education, educational technology, distance learning, developmental
education, honors institute and on-site collegiate high school.
Served as Acting President as needed.
Provided direct leadership for implementation of Education Master Plan and Strategic Priorities.
Promoted the development of a scholarly and diverse faculty college-wide.
Collaborated with Faculty Senate Leaders to promote and maintain academic excellence.
Developed and maintained close relationships with university and secondary school partners.
Established and expanded partnerships with government, business and community agencies.
Acted as the college liaison for instructional programs on a local, state and national basis.
Served on and chaired numerous committees to advance the mission of the college.
Facilitated results-oriented interaction and collaboration among academic, student and business affairs.
Provided direct involvement in capital projects including new construction and renovations.
Assisted the Foundation with fundraising efforts.
Dean for Academic Affairs- 1997-2001
Palm Beach Community College Central Campus
4200 Congress Avenue
Lake Worth, FL 33461
Palm Beach Community College (PBCC) is a large, three-campus, two-center comprehensive community college in
Florida. PBCC serves over 48,000 students enrolled in 100 programs of study including associate in arts, associate in
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 91
science, associate in applied science and certificate areas. PBCC employs 220 full-time faculty and over 1300 adjunct
faculty each major term.
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Served as chief academic officer for largest campus serving over 12,000 credit and college preparatory
courses and over 7,000 students each year in career and technical programs. Provided oversight for all
campus academic programs (Associate in Arts, Associate in Science, Associate in Applied Science and
Certificate), Library Learning Resource Center, Center for Personalized Instruction, Watson B. Duncan III
Theatre, and the Professional Teaching and Learning Center.
Administered academic budget of $16 million supplemented by grants (Carl Perkins, Quantum Foundation,
National Science Foundation) and Staff and Program Development (SPD) funds.
Provided oversight for hiring, supervision and evaluation of 114 full time union faculty including 25
department chairs, over 70 full-time academic staff, and 350 adjunct faculty per major term.
Supervised seven associate deans and library director.
Collaborated with Facilities Department on construction, remodeling and renovation projects; met regularly
with Campus Facilities Supervisor to develop educational specifications for future projects and to monitor
status of existing projects. Central Campus has 30 buildings on a 114-acre site.
Interfaced with community-based business partnership councils for 24 occupational degree (AS/AAS) and 29
postsecondary vocational certificate programs on campus.
Planned and implemented faculty and staff development initiatives designed to enhance teaching and
learning.
Assisted in outreach activities to include dual enrollment, Tech Prep, and off-site offerings.
Served on and chaired numerous campus-based and college-wide committees to include Distance Learning
Steering Committee, Strategic Planning Steering Committee, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
(SACS) Steering Committee and Dual Enrollment Task Force.
Assisted with curriculum development and student advisement.
Assisted Dean of Enrollment Management with college-wide retention efforts.
Division Chair - 1991 - 1997
Palm Beach Community College - Central Campus
4200 Congress Avenue
Lake Worth, FL 33461
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Managed the largest academic unit at PBCC which included the Mathematics Department (intermediate
algebra through calculus), Communications Department (English, Literature, Creative Writing, and
Journalism), the Center for Personalized Instruction (College Preparatory Program, Supplemental Instruction,
individualized study credit courses, CLAST, ESL), and Academic Support Center (open computer laboratory,
campus tutorial program).
Hired, supervised, and evaluated 25 full-time and 125 part-time faculty and staff.
Prepared and administered $4 million budget and $90,000 in grant funds.
Assisted in coordination of faculty development activities.
Developed curriculum, advised students, implemented campus CLAST remediation initiative, and prepared
educational specifications for remodeling and new construction.
Served on district and campus committees including Students with Disabilities Academic Substitution
Committee, District Internet Committee, Enrollment Management Committee, Central Campus Internet
Committee, and Dual Enrollment Task Force.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Program Manager - 1987 - 1991
Palm Beach Community College - Central Campus
4200 Congress Avenue
Lake Worth, Florida 33461

Directed college program that included college preparatory courses, individualized study credit courses,
multi-functional open computer laboratory, and academic support center.
 Supervised faculty and staff, scheduled classes, prepared and administered program budget.
 Developed curriculum and served on college committees.
Instructor/Department Head - 1986 - 1987
Lummi Community College
2522 Kwina Road
Bellingham, Washington 98226
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Staffed, scheduled and taught English and reading basic skills courses.
Managed the Adult Basic Education Program and Learning Assistance Center on the Lummi Indian
Reservation.
 Advised students.
 Developed and implemented a competency-based curriculum for all basic skills courses.
Instructor, Arts and Humanities - 1984 - 1986
Houston Community College
22 Waugh Drive
Houston, Texas 77007
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Taught English and reading college preparatory courses.
Coordinated the flexible entry program that extended college programs to the community by teaching basic
skills courses to police academy cadets, area hospital personnel, and Texas Rehabilitation Commission clients.
 Taught continuing education teacher proficiency courses to Houston Independent School District personnel.
EDUCATION
Ed.D. Nova Southeastern University, 1997
Concentration: Higher Education Administration
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 93
M.Ed. University of Houston, 1983
Teaching Disciplines: English and Reading
B.A. Utica College of Syracuse University, 1977, Summa Cum Laude
Major: Secondary Education Teaching
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
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Past Chair of the Florida College System Activities Association
Past Chair of the Florida College System Council of President
Past Chair of Florida College System Policy & Advocacy Council
Serve on Florida High Tech Corridor Council
Serve on Board of Directors for the Greater Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce (Chair, 2012)
Serve on Board of Directors for the Lake Wales Chamber of Commerce
Serve on Board of Directors for Volunteers in Service to the Elderly (VISTE)
Serve on Board of Directors for Polk Vision (Chair, 2012)
Serve on Board of Directors for Winter Haven EDC
Serve on Board of Directors of United Way of Central Florida (Campaign Chair, 2012)
Serve on Board of Directors of Central Florida Development Council
Serve on Board of Directors of Winter Haven Woman’s Resource Center
Serve on Board of Directors of Polk Works
Serve on Board of Directors of Haines City Economic Development Council
Serve on Board of Directors for Heart of Florida Regional Medical Center
Serve on Board of Directors for Winter Haven Hospital
94
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Stephen E. Hull
Home Address:
28 Brevard Dr. SE
Business Address:
Polk State College
Winter Haven, FL 33884
(863) 325-8280
999 Ave. H, NE
Winter Haven, FL 33881
(863) 297-1094
(863) 669-2331 FAX
[email protected]
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:
1992-Present:
Polk State College
Winter Haven, FL
Provost Lakeland Campus – (2007-Present)

Provide executive direction and leadership for all campus based activities of the college on the PSC
Lakeland Campus and Airside Center including academic affairs, student services, library and
learning services, charter high school, and associated campus services. Teach reading in the
college Development Studies Program.
Dean Workforce and Economic Development – (1996-2007)

Managed all functional aspects of the Workforce and Economic Development Division including
staffing, scheduling, budgeting, and program and staff evaluation for the following program areas:
Accounting Technology, Business Administration and Management, Cardiovascular Technology,
Computer Technologies, Criminal Justice Technology and Training, Diagnostic Medical
Sonography, Engineering Technology, Early Childhood Education, Nursing, Occupational Therapy
Assistant, Office Administration, Physical Therapy Assistant, Radiography, Respiratory Care,
Health Information Management, Emergency Medical Services, the PSC Corporate College and
Collegiate High School.
Continuing Education Manager – (1992-1996)

Managed the Continuing Education Department including budget, staffing, non-credit programs,
selected A.S. degree programs and telecourses. Provided leadership that resulted in
unprecedented enrollment growth. Led an initiative to establish corporate partnerships and contract
training. Worked cooperatively with the Florida Phosphate Council to establish Contractor Safety
Training, a program that still serves in excess of 4,000 students annually.
1988-1992:
Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA)
Coordinator, Educational Delivery & Quality Facilitator
Alcoa Technical Center – (1990-1992)
Alcoa Center, PA
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 95
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Managed all aspects of the Alcoa Distance Education Program. Consulted with all Alcoa domestic
locations to identify need and deliver requested training. Pioneered Alcoa’s entry into broadcasting
education and training via satellite to all domestic locations. Led a corporate benchmarking team to
establish distance education and broadcast standards. Instructed quality and professional
development courses. Served as a quality facilitator.
Training Administrator
Alcoa Davenport Works – (1988-1990)
Davenport, IA

Managed the Davenport Works training and professional development program (total employment:
3,000, including 750 salaried personnel). Promoted to corporate.
1980-1988:
Eastern Iowa Community College District
Associate Dean for Community Education and
Alternative Programming – (1985-1988)
Eastern Iowa Community College District
Scott Community College, Bettendorf, IA

Directed, managed, and evaluated all off-campus A.S. degree programs and non-credit programs
offered in the Scott Community College service area. Served as the lead faculty member for the
Quality Control Technician program and taught in the Business Administration program.
Assistant Director for Trades & Industrial Education,
Community education – (1980-1985)
Eastern Iowa Community College District
Davenport, IA

Planned, developed, managed, and evaluated all A.S. degree programs and non-credit Trade and
Industrial Education programming in the EICCD. Developed, monitored, and managed the Trade
and Industrial Education budget. Increased department enrollments by 45% through innovative,
needs based programming. Wrote grants totaling $450,000 to provide industry-based training.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND GRANT WRITING/MANAGEMENT ACTIVITY:
Quick Response Training Program
QRT is a Workforce Florida, Inc. initiative to fund training costs for new and expanding business
creating high-quality jobs in the State. QRT grant total is $1.75 million.
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QPI
Glendale Protective Tech.
MacMillan Bloedel
Mulberry Ethanol
Ytong
GEICO
GEICO
Pepperidge Farm
Keymark
Maxpak
Mid State Truss
1993
1993
1993
1994
1995
1996
1998
1998
1998
1999
1999
$112,565
$30,639
$99,656
$61,572
$165,270
$100,313
$311,640
$97,125
$97,469
$19,312
$17,850
246 employees trained
50
52
36
115
129
508
40
139
57
22
96
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
 Pepperidge Farm
2000
$65,520
78
 Lockheed Martin
2002
$129,780
103
 USCO
2003
$218,000
590
 Minute Maid
2003
$250,000
150
 Ford Motor Company
2003
$239,784
99
 Pepperidge Farm
2004
$114,240
48
 Rotanis
2005
$82,320
70
 Lockheed Martin
2005
$122,241
100
Capitalization Incentive Grants
 Network Engineering Technology
1998
$250,000
Funds used to start the Network Engineering Technology A.S. program.
 A+/Cisco
1999
$250,000
Funds used to expand the NET program by creating an A+ and Cisco program track.
State Workforce Funding
 Information Technology Training and Certification Grant (2001) $200,000
Participating companies: Pepperidge Farm, Badcock, City of Lakeland, Polk County School Board,
Watkins, Publix, Next Gen Technologies, Lakeland Ledger, Central Florida Development Council, Polk
County Sheriff’s Office, City of Eagle Lake, Micro Business Solutions, BCI Engineers and Scientists,
Inc. 50 participants trained and certified.
 Targeted Industry Sector IT Training Grant (2002) $294,315
Participating companies: IMC, Bunch and Associates, Colorado Boxed Beef, US Agri-Chemicals,
Choice Communications, Inc., MCI, Cargill, Badcock, American Bank and Trust, Publix, U&H
Caretaking, Inc., Ametek, Seal-Krete, Inc., Pepperidge Farm, CF Industries, Data Integrity Services,
Inc., Computer Data Network Partners, Watkins. 50 participants trained and certified.
 Skills Upgrade Challenge Grant (2002) $478,500
To provide insurance licensure training for 810 GEICO employees.
 Step-up Challenge Grant (2000) $109,500
To provide call center training for WIA clients.
 Customer Care/Work and Learn (2002) $122,000
To provide customer service training for WIA clients.
 Child Care Training Grant (2001) $103,678
A DCF grant to provide state mandated training for child-care workers in Polk County.
 Jobs for Florida’s Future Grant (2005) $758,882
A grant to establish the start-up of a Respiratory Care A.S. degree program on the Lakeland campus.
 Succeed Florida Grant (2006) $226,259, (2007) $288,042
A grant to establish the start-up of a Cardiovascular Technology A.S. degree program located at the
Airside Center.
 Succeed Florida Grant (2006) $226,259, (2007) $288,042
A grant to establish the start-up of a Diagnostic Medical Sonography A.S. degree program located at
the Airside Center.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 97
Federal Initiatives
 Department of Education -Tech-Prep Demonstration Grant (2001) $500,000
A partnership with the Polk County School Board to transition high school students into post-secondary
career and technical education programs of study – and to create the PSC Collegiate High School.
 Department of Labor - President’s Community Based Job Training Grant (2007) $2,000,000
A partnership with the Polk County School Board to create a career path for secondary students in
allied health career academies to articulate into the Cardiovascular Technology A.S. degree program.
Local Initiatives
 Polk Works Support Grant (1998) $276,747 annually
To staff the learning assessment center at Polk Works’ Winter Haven and Lakeland one-stop centers.
 PCC Collegiate Charter High School (2003)
The PCC Collegiate High School will begin operations as a charter high school in August, 2004. The
estimated annual revenue for 200 students is $1,500,000.
 A Partnership for Success (2003) $1,322,025
An agreement with LRMC, WHH, Heart of Florida, Bartow Memorial, and LWMC to support the PCC
Nursing Program.
 Cargill Foundation Grant (2003) $100,000
A grant to support program expansion in the Corporate College. $50,000 funded locally, $50,000
funded at the corporate level.
 Progress Energy Foundation Grant (2003) $50,000 annually
To provide teacher education and summer internships for non-education teachers in order to meet
alternative certification.
 Verizon Foundation Grant (2003) $20,000
Funding to enable the Small Business Consortium partners to attend Corporate College training
programs.
 Florida High Tech Corridor Council (2003) $100,000
A grant from the FHTCC to start a Wireless Systems Technology program at Polk Community College.
 Ford Motor Company Skills Enhancement Program (2004) $47,383
A joint project with Ford and the United Auto Workers to establish and operate a training center in their
Polk County facility.
 Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten –VPK (2005) $38,000
A grant to establish PCC as the agency determining the eligibility of potential VPK providers as well as
monitoring performance of established VPK providers.
 Best Employment Solutions in Training – BEST (2005) $371,000
A partnership with Polk Works to provide a summer pre-engineering academy for high school students
and to provide process control and power generation training for local employers.
EDUCATION:
98
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
1984-1986
M.S. Ed., Northern Illinois University
Adult and Continuing Education
1971-1975
A.B., Augustana College
Business Administration
CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS:


Lakeland Chamber of Commerce – Leadership Lakeland
Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce – Leadership Winter Haven
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 99
Sallie C. Brisbane
6796 Canbury Drive
Lakeland, Fl 33809
(863) 668-1541 (cell)
[email protected]
Profile
Education
Solid background in Education Leadership. Experienced in building collaborative
partnerships among all stakeholders. Excellent oral and written communication skills.
Computer literate in diverse software applications.
M.Ed. Education Leadership, University of South Florida
May 1999
B.A. Journalism, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
May 1986
Certifications: School Principal K-12; Education Leadership;
Journalism 6-12
Polk State College, Winter Haven, Florida
2007-Present
Career
History
Director – Collegiate High School


Provide leadership and management of programs and
processes required to provide for delivery of instruction,
personnel management, business management, student
support services, student activities and community
involvement
Read, interpret and enforce State Board Rules, PSC policies
and procedures and appropriate State and Federal statues
Polk County School Board, Polk County, Florida
Principal -East Area Adult School

Implemented marketing strategies to increase enrollment in
adult and community education programs.
Principal – James W. Sikes Elementary School

Responsible for supervising effective teaching, student
achievement and a safe and healthy environment
Assistant Principal – Blake Elementary/Academy (K-8)

Assisted in the development and establishment of school
goals and the planning of the school’s instructional program
Dean of Students – Lake Gibson Middle School

Managed all facets of student discipline and behavior.
Teacher – George Jenkins Senior

Video and Multi-Media Production
1994-2006
10
0
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Nickelodeon Studios, Orlando, Fl
1993-1994
Facilities Supervisor
Black Entertainment Television, Washington, DC
Technical Services Coordinator
1988-1993
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 10
1
Teresa Martínez
5021 Fairfax Drive
Lakeland, Florida 33813-2819
863-646-5141 or 640-1054
863-647-9754 Fax
[email protected]
_____________________________________________________________________________
Highly motivated and goal oriented professional with over 35 years of experience. Excellent communication
skills and a professional demeanor gained through extensive interaction with high-level executives at
multinational corporations. Leadership roles as an educator, interpreter, television and radio producer & host,
with extensive domestic and international travel experiences dealing with dignitaries, royalty, and the general
public. Well known and respected by local and national business associates, as well as governmental officials.
STRENGTHS:
 Spanish Communications
 Corporate Spanish Language and Cultural Training
 Video Training
 Television Production/hosting
 Networking
 Relationship builder
 Planning and scheduling
 Customer Service
 Liaison Services/Bridge Builder
 Recruiter
 Media Relations
 Fundraising
 Excellent writing skills
 International Student Placement and Supervision
 Practical Training Placement/Career Development
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Institute of Spanish Communication, Inc.
1989 to Present
President and CEO
 Provide businesses and individuals with accurate and professional language and cultural instruction,
document translation and oral interpretation, as well as promotional and liaison service, thus insuring
success in dealing with the growing Hispanic market and the global economy. The Institute of Spanish
Communication, Inc. is a bridge between the USA and the Spanish-speaking world.
CLIENTS INCLUDE:
Avon Cosmetics/Lauren Anderson and Associates, Inc.
Lakeland Regional Cancer Center
Bright House Networks
Mancini Packing Company
Celebtech/The Vatican
Marriott Vacation International
Central Florida Development Council
Micromed Cardiovascular, Inc.
Christian Dior Cosmetics
MidFlorida Credit Union
Crestcom International-Trainers to the World
Miss Universe Organization, L.L.P.
Estee Lauder/Prescriptive
Numerous Central Florida Attorneys
Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association
Olax International, Inc.
FMC Corporation
Polk County BoCC
Golf Digest Magazine
Summit
Home Shopping Network
The Long Company
10
2
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
IMC Corporation
Lakeland Regional Medical Center
The Watson Clinic
Univision – Entravision/Tampa
Teresa Martínez

Page 2
Producer and Host of Comunidad Viva
Spanish Talk Show on PGTV – Bright house 622, Comcast 5, and Verizon 20 – Airing daily since November 2004

Producer and Host of Comunidad Viva Radio
Spanish Radio Talk show- La X- 1460 AM – Airing every Sunday and La Raza 1280 AM

Author of the inspirational, bilingual short-story book “Success in Exile – Five Decades of Cuban Stories.”

Producer of “Success in Exile” – Cuban Stories
Educational Documentary
Sponsored by Publix, Exit Realty of Florida, Citrus and Chemical Bank, Lakeland Automall,
Michael Holley Chevrolet, Community National Bank, Colón and López, P.A., DollarMarket.

Coordinator and Presenter of the Annual Conference: Doing Business with the Spanish Speaking Community
Polk Community College, Lakeland Campus

Columnist for Visión Latina
The Ledger/New York Time Publication – Polk County Weekly Spanish Newspaper

Crestcom International – Trainers to the World – Bullet Proof Manager Facilitator,
Motivational Speaker (2003-05)

Lakeland Regional Cancer Center – (on contract January 2006 – June 2006)
Hispanic Outreach Program under the direction of:
Solange Pendas, M.D., Director of Breast Cancer Program and Women’s Health

Personal Spanish-English Interpreter/Travel Manager for the 1999 Miss Universe, Mpule Kwlagobe,
from Botswana, Miss Universe 2000, Indian Supermodel and accomplished film actress, Lara Dutta; and
Spanish Supermodel and accomplished film actress Diana Nogueira,. Traveled to most Spanish speaking
countries as well as Europe and Asia.

National Hispanic Trainer Director for Avon Cosmetics, Inc. Phase I and Phase II Programs in Advanced
Sales Techniques and Professional Image (1999 to 2003)

International Student Coordinator - Develop, Coordinate and Supervise International Student Programs
for high school and college students from Spain, Central and South America, France, Korea, South Africa.
Recruiting and strategic placing over 180 students with caring host families in the Polk County area to
date.

Ambassador to: César Ritz – Hotel Consult SHCC Colleges (1995 – 2000)
Institute Hotelier “Cesar Ritz” Le Bouveret, Switzerland
International College of Hospitality Administration, Brig, Switzerland
International College of Hospitality management, Washington, Conn. USA
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 10
3
International College of Tourism and Hotel management, Sydney, Australia.

Liaison Services for Spanish Speaking Corporations doing trade in Central Florida.
Quemilizer Products & Latel, S.A. Spain
Delta Industries & Latel, S.A. Spain
Tri-Florida Water & Latel S.A. Spain
Florida Schools & Colegios Manyanet, Spai
Teresa Martínez
Page 3
Polk County School Board
Lakeland High School – Educator
Spanish Level I to Advanced Placement
English as a Second Language
Sponsor of the Spanish Club, Spanish Honor Society and the Keyette Club
Gustafson and Associates Advertising, Inc.
Office Manager, Sales Representative dealing with Spanish Clients.
Creative Writer and Media Buyer – Spanish related media.
1984 -1995
1975-1983
EDUCATION
Bachelor of Arts Degree in Secondary Education and Spanish Language - University of
Central Florida
Intensive Spanish Language and Culture Studies - 1983-84 University of Oviedo, Spain
State of Florida Certified Instructor of Spanish and English as a Second Language
Crestcom International Trainers – Bullet Proof Manager Training Series graduate/facilitator
ASSOCIATIONS
Chair of the District Board of Trustees for Polk State College
President of the Hispanic Club of Lakeland
Imperial Symphony Orchestra Board of Directors
Lakeland Area Chamber of Commerce Former Board of Director
Latin Chamber of Commerce of Polk County- Developing Committee
Leadership Lakeland XXII Graduate
The Ledger’s Vision Latina Advisory Board
National Association of Women Business Owners – Diversity Chair - International Vice Chair
Central Florida Speech and Hearing Center – Board of Directors
Polk County Government Efficiency Committee
Polk Community College Presidential Search Committee
Polk Community College Alumni Association
10
4
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
AWARDS AND RECOGNITIONS
Lakeland Area Chamber of Commerce January 2010 Business of the Month Award
Featured on Inside Polk Magazine – December 2010
Alumnus of Distinction Award 2006 – Polk Community College
Governor’s Point of Light Award 2006
th
June 7 , 2006 Proclaimed Teresa Martinez Day by the Board of County Commissioners of Polk County
NAWBO – Woman of Distinction Award 2006
st
The Ledger, New York Times Publication - Selected “21 Women for the 21 Century”
Cover Page of “Hostelería Viva Magazine” – December 2005 in Barcelona, Spain
Featured in the first edition of the “LAKELAND MAGAZINE” 2004
Featured in the first Edition front page of The Ledger - “VISION LATINA”
International Trade Association of Polk County – “1997 International Individual of the Year”
Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 10
5
Appendix 5
Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Job Descriptions
10
6
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Administrative Assistant
Reports to: Department/Program Director or Coordinator
Organizational Unit: Career Staff, Non-Exempt
Salary Range: Level C14
Revision Date: September 2010
I. Basic Purpose of Position:
Performs highly responsible, secretarial and clerical support work in a multiple department division of
the College. Work is generally diversified requiring judgment to apply broader aspects of established
policies, practices and procedures. Individual adapts existing procedures to meet new situations and
works independently toward general results, devising new methods as required.
II. Job Functions:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Essential Non-Essential
A. Assists in the daily operation of the office by answering phones, processing X
correspondence, assisting students, faculty and staff, filing and processing
incoming and outgoing mail.
B. Assists in establishing rapport and open lines of communication with
administrative personnel, senior management and other faculty and staff.
X
C. Uses computer word processing software, excel spreadsheet software and
in some cases department specific software for internal and external
correspondence.
X
D. Investigates and responds to all inquiries regarding invoice payments.
Assists in FY budget prep, accounting processes for departmental budget
including budget amendments and change orders.
X
E. Collect and reviews time sheets, calculates and enters onto spreadsheet,
distributes paychecks.
X
F. Makes appointments, travel arrangements and arranges meetings for
Director and other staff as assigned.
X
G. Issues, collects, reviews all new vendor requests forms, enters into system
and forwards to purchasing.
X
H. Uses Genesis Software for generating reports and inputting data,
determining balance, liquidating and reconciling.
X
I.
Types and Inputs check requests, certificates and purchase requisitions as
required.
X
J.
Assists in the preparation of required Florida State Reports for the Florida
State Board of Education as well as reports required by other government
entities and accreditation agencies as required.
X
K. Tracks and maintains history of all certification and training records in house
and through other computer software as needed.
X
L. Maintains files/records, attends meetings and records minutes.
X
M. Maintains and tabulates confidential records for all staff and students.
X
N. Processes contracts and RPAs for all staff and other personnel paperwork
as assigned
X
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 10
7
O. Maintains regular attendance.
X
P. Monitors and tracks usage of conference room, if applicable.
X
Q. Performs other appropriate duties as may be assigned by the Director
and/or other divisional staff members.
Essential Non-Essential
X
R. Orders educational materials for all classes.
X
S. Maintains inventory supplies and places orders as necessary.
X
T. Assists in contacting agencies regarding postponed or cancelled classes
and other criteria as needed.
X
III. Consulting Tasks:
A. Consults with college senior management as well as faculty, part-time and full-time staff, adjunct instructors.
B. Consults with peers and management staff from other college divisions.
C. Consults with the general public regarding broad spectrum of inquiries concerning the college.
D. Consults with staff of various vendors doing business with the college regarding a broad spectrum of inquiries
and concerns.
IV. Supervises the Following Staff:
None – but does direct the OPS Worker regarding projects.
V. Required Knowledge, Skills and Personal Qualifications:
A. Good organizational skills, with special attention to details.
B. Experience with computer, spreadsheets, word processing, and databases and calculator.
C. Good oral and written communications skills.
D. General office skills.
E. Ability to maintain confidential information.
F. The ability to establish and work well with others
VI. Preferred Experience:
Three years’ experience working as a secretary and computer experience and accounting experience.
VII. Educational Background:
Graduation from a standard high school or equivalent.
VIII.
Working Conditions:
A. Sometimes requires coming in on evenings, weekends, holidays and when the college is scheduled
closed.
B. Must have the ability to work proficiently in busy, multi-office work area.
C. Must be flexible and able to adapt well to changes.
IX.
Physical/Ability Requirements:
In the performance of the ESSENTIAL elements of this Job, the following are required. CHECK ALL THAT
APPLY:
10
8
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Sensory/Mental requirements
Sight
Hearing
Smell
Taste
Good Long-term Memory
Good Short-term Memory
Touch
Ability to concentrate for long
Periods of Time
Ability Requirements:
Speak/Understand English
Basic Level
Professional Level
Public Speaking Skills
Reading English
6 Grade Level
12 Grade Level
College Level
Writing English
Basic Level
Intermediate Level
College Level
Speak a Second language (indicate language)
Operate standard office equipment (please specify equipment)
Must be able to efficiently operate personal computer and word-processing, spreadsheet and database
software, copier, adding machines, telephone and typewriter.
Operate special equipment (Please specify equipment)
Must be able to efficiently operate bindery equipment, and laminating equipment.
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS:
In an eight-hour workday, employee is required to: (Check daily requirement for each activity).
Task
Sit
Stand
Walk
Drive
Data Entry
Read CRT
Lift 5-10 lbs.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Number of Hours Per 8 Hour Work Day
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
<1
Carry 510lbs.
<1
On the job employee is required to use hands for repetitive actions such as:
Right
Left
Simple Grasping
Yes
Yes
Firm Grasping
Yes
Yes
Fine Manipulation
Yes
Yes
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 10
9
The College has reviewed this job description to ensure that essential functions and basic duties have been
included. It is not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all functions, responsibilities, skills and
abilities. Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.
I have read and received a copy of this description, including all attachments.
_______________________________________
Employee Print
_________________________________________________________________________________
Employee Signature
Date
11
0
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Assistant Director- High School (Collegiate or Chain of Lakes)
Reports to: Director of Collegiate or Chain of Lakes High School
Organizational Unit: Professional Technical
Status: Exempt- Salary range: Level P15
Revision Date: March 2012
I. Basic Purpose of Position:
Reporting to the Director of the Collegiate or Chain of Lakes High School, this is a responsible, professional
academic support position. The assistant director has primary oversight of curriculum development and
evaluation, academic support services, classroom services, student activities and community outreach activities.
II. Job Functions:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Essential Non-Essential
A. Maintains Regular Attendance
X
B. Serves as a liaison to various college departments involved in the High School
and supports activities and services related to staff and professional
development, parent relations, school accountability, accreditation, budget
planning, and various reporting and research functions.
X
C. Serves in the place of the director in his/her absence.
X
D. Represents the High School at various area association meetings and
conferences.
X
E. Assists in instructor selection and training.
X
F. Assists in the external marketing and student recruiting activities.
X
G. Responsible for initial disciplinary contact with students as necessary
X
H. Identification & Certification of candidates for high school graduation
X
I.
Responsible for dissemination of high school interim & semester report
cards
X
J.
Maintains/updates weekly informational publication to staff (Viking vitals)
X
K. Creates and maintains the high school master schedule and oversees all X
areas of curriculum development as it pertains to High School Programs.
L. Plans and implements staff development activities.
X
M. Oversees student activities and community outreach and fundraising
activities.
X
III. Consulting Tasks:
A. Requires ability to communicate effectively with a wide variety of individuals from within and outside of
the College. Consultation on problems requires clarity, judgment, and tact, in order to obtain
cooperation or approval of action to be taken.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 11
1
B. Serves with other personnel on committees.
IV. Supervises the Following Staff:
In absence of Director, supervises school staff.
V.
Required Knowledge, Skills and Personal Qualifications:
A. Demonstrated skills in development, implementation and evaluation of high school curriculum,
accelerated mechanisms, performance-based instruction, technology-based instructional delivery and
other creative approaches to secondary education.
B. Requires ability to work independently on broader assignments with the responsibility for the planning
of work. Makes decisions within accepted standards.
C. Ability to work cooperatively with college personnel.
D. Demonstrated proficiency in oral and written communication.
E. Demonstrated commitment to community involvement.
F. Instructional supervision experience in a public education setting.
G. Knowledge of the Florida education system preferred.
H. State of Florida Certification in Educational Leadership required.
VI. Experience:
Minimum of three years full-time teaching experience is required. Experience in a high school setting and/or
previous K-12 administrative experience a plus.
VII. Educational Background:
Graduation from a regionally accredited college or university with a Master’s degree in Education or related
field required. Hold(or be eligible for) the State of Florida Certification in Educational Leadership or an out
of state equivalent.
VIII. Working Conditions:
Normal office working conditions.
IX.
Physical/Ability Requirements:
In the performance of the ESSENTIAL elements of this Job, the following are required. CHECK ALL THAT
APPLY:
Sight
Hearing
Sensory/Mental requirements
Smell
Good Long-term Memory
Taste
Touch
Good Short-term Memory
Ability to concentrate for long
periods of Time
Ability Requirements:
Speak/Understand English
Basic Level
Professional Level
Public Speaking Skills
11
2
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Reading English
6 Grade Level
12 Grade Level
College Level
Writing English
Basic Level
Intermediate Level
College Level
Speak a Second language (indicate language)
Operate standard office equipment (please specify equipment)
Must be able to efficiently operate personal computer and word-processing and spreadsheet software.
Operate special equipment (Please specify equipment)
Drive an automobile/light truck/van or a vehicle requiring special skills or licensing (Please specify)
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS:
In an eight-hour workday, employee is required to: (Check daily requirement for each activity).
Task
Sit
Stand
Walk
Drive
Data Entry
Read CRT
1
1
1
1
1
1
Number of Hours Per 8 Hour Work Day
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
In terms of an 8 hour workday (select the category that applies to each activity):
On the job employees must:
Bend/Stoop
Climb
Reach above Shoulder level
Kneel
Balance
Squat
Crawl
Crouch
The employee must lift:
Usual amount ___ lbs.
Maximum amount ___ lbs.
Not at all
Occasionally
(1/4 - 2.5 hrs)
Frequently
(2.5 - 5.5 hrs)
Continuously
(5.5 - 8 hrs)
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 11
3
The employee must carry:
Usual amount ___ lbs.
Maximum amount ___ lbs.
The employee must push/pull
Usual amount ___ lbs.
Maximum amount ___ lbs.
On the job employee is required to use hands for repetitive actions such as:
Right
Left
Does job require:
Working at heights
Operating machinery
Operating computers or office
machines
Precise manual dexterity
Exposure to marked changes in
temperature or humidity and
the extremes thereof
Exposure to dust, fumes, gases,
chemicals
Simple Grasping
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
X
X
X
Firm Grasping
Fine Manipulation
Yes
Yes
Explain
Computer usage is mandatory including data entry, and
word-processing.
X
X
X
The College has reviewed this job description to ensure that essential functions and basic duties have been
included. It is not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all functions, responsibilities, skills and
abilities. Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.
I have read and received a copy of this description, including all attachments.
________________________________________________________________
Employee Signature
Date
11
4
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Instructor
Reports to: Charter High School Director
Organizational Unit: Faculty - Exempt
Revision Date: November 2011
I. Basic Purpose of Position:
The primary role of this position is to provide college level instruction and instruction-related activities
designed to encourage, support and enable students’ success. This position will be responsible for direct
instruction, assessment of student performance, curriculum design, preparation of course-related
materials, selection of textbooks and other course-related materials, maintenance of class records,
reporting on student performance and other duties typically and traditionally associated with college
faculty positions.
Work requires highly-developed analytical, planning and communicating skills.
II. Job Functions:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Essential Non-Essential
A. Teach courses in accordance with published course descriptions,
schedules, procedures and course outlines furnished students.
X
B. Develop departmental goals and plans of action to achieve them.
X
C. Provide input and work with other faculty and staff to review, produce
and/or select course-related materials.
X
D. Conduct on-going evaluation of student progress and maintain records of
student course/class performance.
X
E. Prepare and submit grade reports and other reports on student
performance as may be scheduled or required.
X
F. Organize class activities, relating them to the overall objectives of the
course.
X
G. Work with the campus dean and other faculty and staff as appropriate to
assess and modify as needed course and program goals, objectives,
methods and content.
X
H. Participate in the shared decision-making processes.
X
I.
In the spirit of professional responsibility, serve on at least one of the
College’s standing committees, or on an officially established work group
or ad hoc committee, each year.
X
J.
Serve as a resource in identification and recruitment of faculty and staff,
both adjunct and full-time.
X
K. Supervise student learning and other activities as assigned and
appropriate in classroom, laboratory, studio, clinical site and/or other
areas such activities may occur.
X
L.
X
Exercise due care that College equipment/materials entrusted to his/her
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 11
5
care is not abused by students, and is used safely and in such fashion as
to constitute no threat to life, health or property.
M. Participate in class schedule development working with other faculty
members, and with others as appropriate.
X
N. Serve as mentor for new or adjunct instructor when appointed.
X
O. Participate in the development, implementation and evaluation of annual
and other strategic plans and documents.
X
P. Serve as resource for advisory committees.
X
Q. Serve as resource for project/grant development implementation and
evaluation.
X
R. Participate in the assessment of personal professional and institutional
effectiveness as prescribed in DBOT Rule and College Procedure.
X
III. Consulting Tasks:
A. Consults with other faculty, the charter school director, and other College administrators and staff as
necessary
B. Consults with current and perspective students
IV. Supervises the Following Staff:
May be assigned supervision of a Lab or Clinical Assistant depending upon field of study.
V. Required Knowledge, Skills and Personal Qualifications:
A. Extensive knowledge of the subject area(s) in which the individual is responsible for instruction.
B. Knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of effective communication and of effective
instruction.
C. Knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of community college students.
D. Knowledge and understanding of principles of curriculum development.
E. Knowledge and understanding of division, College and State rules, regulations, and practices as they
impact faculty, students, and instruction.
F. Ability to communicate effectively in writing, and orally with a variety of audiences in a variety of
settings, as both “sender” and “receiver”.
G. Ability to function independently and as a team member to accept responsibility for completing or
implementing designated tasks or activities.
H. Ability to serve as a mentor for professional peers.
I.
Ability to make and to communicate effectively evaluative judgments about student performance.
J.
Ability to make professional judgments within defined parameters of policy and professional standards.
11
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
K. Ability to use computers, computer software, and other technological aids to instruction.
VI. Preferred Experience:
A minimum of two years college teaching experience is preferred.
VII. Educational Background:
A minimum of a Masters degree with at least eighteen (18) graduate hours in the discipline to be taught is
required. A Doctorate in the field to be taught is preferred.
VIII. Working Conditions:
Normal office and classroom working conditions. Attendance at seminars and conferences is beneficial.
IX.
Physical/Ability Requirements:
In the performance of the ESSENTIAL elements of this Job, the following are required. CHECK ALL THAT
APPLY:
Sight
Hearing
Sensory/Mental requirements
Smell
Good Long-term Memory
Taste
Good Short-term Memory
Touch
Ability to concentrate for long
periods of Time
Ability Requirements:
Speak/Understand English
Basic Level
Professional Level
Public Speaking Skills
Reading English
6 Grade Level
12 Grade Level
College Level
Writing English
Basic Level
Intermediate Level
College Level
Speak a Second language (indicate language)
Operate standard office equipment (please specify equipment)
Must be able to efficiently operate personal computer and word-processing and spreadsheet software.
Operate special equipment (Please specify equipment)
The College has reviewed this job description to ensure that essential functions and basic duties have been
included. It is not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all functions, responsibilities, skills and
abilities. Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.
I have read and received a copy of this description, including all attachments.
________________________________________________________________
Employee Signature
Date
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 11
7
Collegiate High School Guidance Counselor
Reports to: Director of Collegiate or Chain of Lakes High School
Organizational Unit: Professional Technical
Status: Exempt-Salary range: Level P14
Revision Date: September 2010
I. Basic Purpose of Position:
This is a responsible, professional academic support position reporting to the Director of the Collegiate or Chain of
Lakes High School. The Guidance Counselor has primary responsibility of student scheduling and advising,
coordination of testing, academic support services, and acts as a liaison to the student services department of the
college. The Collegiate High School Guidance Counselor coordinates activities and communicates with local high
school staff and students to assure a comprehensive support program for the students.
II. Job Functions:
Essential Non-Essential
A. Maintain Regular Attendance
X
B. Utilize the PSC & Polk County School Board master schedules for student
scheduling and placement.
X
C. Conduct group instruction and counseling sessions relating to study skills, test
anxiety, time management, goals setting, and other college success skills.
X
D. Consult with the Collegiate High School faculty on appropriate academic
resources for use by Collegiate High School students.
X
E. Develop individual profiles and counseling portfolios of participants.
X
F. Assist students in establishing realistic immediate and long-range goals and
refine methods of continuous monitoring and adequate follow-up of student
progress.
X
G. Monitor student graduation progress and eligibility for state scholarships &
develop accountability measures to assure compliance.
X
H. Serve as a liaison to various college departments involved with the Collegiate
High School.
X
I.
Assist in the external marketing of the school and college and with student
recruiting activities.
X
J.
Attend district, state and national guidance in service and training workshops.
X
K. Conduct personal counseling session when needed.
X
L. Serve as initial or as a primary contact for parent inquiries regarding student
academic progress
X
M. Provide academic advising for both high school and college course work.
X
N. Maintain proficiency in state dual enrollment course equivalencies.
X
O. Coordinate and administer national, state and local testing to include PSAT,
FCAT, CELLA and CPT as required.
X
P. Conduct workshops for parents pertaining to college admissions/acceptance,
testing, scholarship and financial aid issues.
X
11
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
III. Consulting Tasks:
B. Consults with the Collegiate High School faculty on appropriate academic resources for the use by
Collegiate High School students.
IV. Supervises the Following Staff:
None
V. Required Knowledge, Skills and Personal Qualifications:
A. Minimum of a master’s degree in Guidance and Counseling.
B. Minimum of four year’s full-time teaching experience in a high school setting or four year’s teaching
in the high school or college setting, at least two years of which are at the high school level.
C. Demonstrated skills in student scheduling and other creative approaches to secondary education.
D. Experience in high school and college scheduling.
E. Experience in counseling at both the high school and college level.
F. Experience in working with Tech-Prep and articulated programs of study.
G. Demonstrated proficiency in oral and written communication.
H. Knowledge of the Florida education system and high school graduation requirements preferred.
I.
Knowledge of college admissions.
J.
Knowledge and experience in dual-enrollment and college scheduling.
K. State of Florida Certification in Guidance required.
VI. Preferred Experience:
Four years experience in education or related field; or, an equivalent combination of training and
experience.
VII. Educational Background:
Graduation from a regionally accredited college or university with a Master’s degree in Guidance and
Counseling or related field.
VIII. Working Conditions:
Normal office working conditions.
IX.
Physical/Ability Requirements:
In the performance of the ESSENTIAL elements of this Job, the following are required. CHECK ALL THAT
APPLY:
Sight
Hearing
Touch
Ability Requirements:
Sensory/Mental requirements
Smell
Good Long-term Memory
Taste
Good Short-term Memory
Ability to concentrate for long
periods of Time
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 11
9
Speak/Understand English
Basic Level
Professional Level
Public Speaking Skills
Reading English
6 Grade Level
12 Grade Level
College Level
Writing English
Basic Level
Intermediate Level
College Level
Speak a Second language (indicate language)
Operate standard office equipment (please specify equipment)
Must be able to efficiently operate personal computer and word-processing and spreadsheet software.
Operate special equipment (Please specify equipment)
Drive an automobile/light truck/van or a vehicle requiring special skills or licensing (Please specify)
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS:
In an eight-hour workday, employee is required to: (Check daily requirement for each activity).
Task
Sit
Stand
Walk
Drive
Data Entry
Read CRT
1
1
1
1
1
1
Number of Hours Per 8 Hour Work Day
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
In terms of an 8 hour workday (select the category that applies to each activity):
On the job employees must:
Bend/Stoop
Climb
Reach above Shoulder level
Kneel
Balance
Squat
Crawl
Crouch
The employee must lift:
Usual amount ___ lbs.
Maximum amount ___ lbs.
Not at all
Occasionally
(1/4 - 2.5 hrs)
Frequently
(2.5 - 5.5 hrs)
Continuously
(5.5 - 8 hrs)
12
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
The employee must carry:
Usual amount _20__ lbs.
Maximum amount 20___ lbs.
The employee must push/pull
Usual amount _20__ lbs.
Maximum amount ___ lbs.
On the job employee is required to use hands for repetitive actions such as:
Right
Left
Does job require:
Working at heights
Operating machinery
Operating computers or office
machines
Precise manual dexterity
Exposure to marked changes in
temperature or humidity and
the extremes thereof
Exposure to dust, fumes, gases,
chemicals
Simple Grasping
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
X
X
X
Firm Grasping
Fine Manipulation
Yes
Yes
Explain
Computer usage is mandatory including data entry, and
word-processing.
X
X
X
The College has reviewed this job description to ensure that essential functions and basic duties have been
included. It is not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all functions, responsibilities, skills and
abilities. Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.
I have read and received a copy of this description, including all attachments.
________________________________________________________________
Employee Signature
Date
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 12
1
Director-High School, Collegiate & Chain of Lakes
Reports to: Campus Provost
Status: Exempt- Salary range: P17
Revision Date: January, 2011
I.
Basic Purpose of Position:
This highly responsible position is charged with providing the vision and leadership necessary to develop and
administer educational programs offered through the Polk State College Collegiate and Chain of Lakes High
Schools. Works to optimize the human and material resources available to create a safe and successful
school for students, staff, parents, and community, while emphasizing the learning process for all students
leading to enhanced student achievement. Requires the planning of various interrelated activities, and the
coordination of multiple projects or functions. Demonstrates ability to make major decisions involving
complex factors that may be difficult to evaluate. Requires the analysis of data and construction of
recommendations that influence decisions on the development of long-term curricula and policies within
the high school.
II. Job Functions:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Essential Non-Essential
A. Provides leadership in developing and establishing high school programs
and policies, as well as assesses high school compliance with PSC rules
and procedures.
x
B. Monitors program adherence to state board rules, state statutes,
legislative mandates, and national accreditation criteria. Implements and
manages all required initiatives. (I.E. Education Accountability System and
Family and School Partnership Act stipulations).
x
C. Provides curricular and co-curricular leadership and coordinates program
evaluation and revision activities.
x
D. Directs the development and preparation of high school’s budget. x
Coordinates the acquisition of ancillary materials from appropriate
vendors. Manages all fiscal processes as related to the Collegiate or
Chain of Lakes High School FEFP, grants and fund raising accounts.
Ensures satisfaction of all fiscal/audit requirements. Oversees
inventory of materials and equipment.
E. Coordinates and compiles all reports required for accreditation, DOE
x
surveys and Annual Report, Accountability Plan, School Improvement
Plan, Professional Development Plan, charter contract and charter
renewal reports.
F. Acts as spokesperson for high school and/or college as needed in
interacting with the Polk County Schools, other charter schools,
community agencies, and state, regional and national organizations.
x
G. Supervises the establishment of policies and processes governing
selection and progression of students from application to high school
x
12
2
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
graduation.
H. Disseminates information to appropriate college personnel, students/
parents as well as appropriate recipients outside the college
(I.E.accreditation or certification agencies, state agencies, School Board
etc.). Appraises program needs and communicates to PSC
administration and charter school governing board (DBOT).
x
I.
Insures continuity of the high school courses so that all graduation
requirements will be satisfied. Certifies high school graduates. Monitors
the development of the high school master schedule, and the scheduling
and advising of student college schedules, and insures the accurate
reporting of both student schedules on the high school and college
management systems.
x
J.
Supervises the maintenance of teacher certification records including
clearance of background checks, highly qualified status, and the
compilation of staff development hours. Monitors the training and
background checks for school volunteers.
x
K. Provides leadership for faculty/staff in the development of strategic goals
and strategies toward attainment of accountability and accreditation
benchmarks.
x
L. Coordinates and supervises the recruitment, acceptance and enrollment
of high school students from student orientation through initial and follow
up scheduling conferences.
x
M. Develops high school calendar activities so that projects are completed
efficiently and in a timely manner. Coordinates the supervision of all
extracurricular and co-curricular school programs and activities as linked
to the High School.
x
N. Directs the maintenance of all student records. Provides for accurate and
timely submission of school reports dealing with student attendance, FTE
program participation, student performance, teacher appraisal, school
safety, and discipline data. Ensures necessary training opportunities for
staff in the above stated areas. Monitors student attendance.
x
O. Assures a safe and orderly learning environment and monitors the
supervision during high school classes and activities, as well as supports
the authority of each teacher and staff member to deal with disobedient,
disrespectful, disruptive students in the high school environment.
x
P. Develops and implements appropriate staff development activities.
Manages the standards of ethical conduct for high school personnel as
outlined in ss 1012.01. Interviews and selects qualified personnel to be
recommended for employment. Assesses performance of personnel, as
well as disciplines assigned employees.
x
Q. Initiates, develops and writes grant proposals and implements projects as
awarded.
x
R. Directs the development of all marketing activities for the high school.
x
S. Serves on committees as needed.
x
T. Maintains regular attendance.
x
U.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 12
3
V.
W.
X.
Y.
Z.
II.
Consulting Tasks:

Requires ability to communicate effectively with a wide variety of individuals from within and outside of
the College. Consultation on problems requires clarity, judgment, and tact, in order to obtain
cooperation or approval of action to be taken.

Serves with other personnel on committees.
Ensure ongoing communication and collaboration among Polk State College, School Board of Polk
County as necessary to implement High School activities.
Provide for staff development, coaching and feedback.
Link students to appropriate services.
Facilitate parent and community involvement.
III.
Supervises the Following Staff:
Faculty and staff of the Collegiate or Chain of Lakes High School
IV. Required Knowledge, Skills and Personal Qualifications:
A. Demonstrated skills in development, implementation and evaluation of high school curriculum,
accelerated mechanisms, performance-based instruction, technology-based instructional delivery and
other creative approaches to secondary education.
B. Requires ability to work independently on broader assignments with the responsibility for the planning
of work. Makes decisions within accepted standards.
C. Ability to work cooperatively with college personnel.
D. Excellent written and oral communications skills.
E. Demonstrated proficiency in oral and written communication.
F. Demonstrated commitment to community involvement.
G. Instructional supervision experience in a public education setting.
H. Knowledge of the Florida education system preferred.
I.
Knowledge of secondary school supervision, curriculum and administration. Ability to supervise and
train personnel. Knowledge about Tech Prep legislation and related initiatives such as Carl Perkins and
School-to-Work legislation preferred. Knowledge about the school-based and work-based components
of the Tech Prep Demonstration grant.
J.
Provide for staff development, coaching and feedback.
12
4
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
K. Link students to appropriate services.
L. Facilitate parent and community involvement.
M. Demonstrated ability to work with the business community and to develop instructional programs in
cooperation with business partners.
VI. Preferred Experience:
Three years of secondary teaching experience, and three years administrative experience, high school
preferred.
Certification as a School Principal or Certification in Educational Leadership, Administration or
Administration/Supervision as in accordance with Florida Statute 231.0861 and Rule 6A-4.0083
preferred.
VII. Educational Background:
Graduation from a regionally accredited college or university with a Masters degree.
VIII. Working Conditions:
Normal office working conditions.
IX.
Physical/Ability Requirements:
In the performance of the ESSENTIAL elements of this Job, the following are required. CHECK ALL THAT
APPLY:
Sight
Hearing
Sensory/Mental requirements
Smell
Good Long-term Memory
Taste
Good Short-term Memory
Touch
Ability to concentrate for long
periods of Time
Ability Requirements:
Speak/Understand English
Basic Level
Professional Level
Public Speaking Skills
Reading English
6 Grade Level
12 Grade Level
College Level
Writing English
Basic Level
Intermediate Level
College Level
Speak a Second language (indicate language)
Operate standard office equipment (please specify equipment)
Must be able to efficiently operate personal computer and word-processing and spreadsheet software.
Operate special equipment (Please specify equipment)
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 12
5
Drive an automobile/light truck/van or a vehicle requiring special skills or licensing (Please specify)
PHYSICAL REQUIREMENTS:
In an eight-hour workday, employee is required to: (Check daily requirement for each activity).
Task
Sit
Stand
Walk
Drive
Data Entry
Read CRT
1
1
1
1
1
1
Number of Hours Per 8 Hour Work Day
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
2
3
4
5
6
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
In terms of an 8 hour workday (select the category that applies to each activity):
On the job employees must:
Not at all
Occasionally
(1/4 - 2.5 hrs)
Frequently
(2.5 - 5.5 hrs)
Continuously
(5.5 - 8 hrs)
Bend/Stoop
Climb
Reach above Shoulder level
Kneel
Balance
Squat
Crawl
Crouch
The employee must lift:
Usual amount _20__ lbs.
Maximum amount _20__ lbs.
The employee must carry:
Usual amount _20__ lbs.
Maximum amount 20___ lbs.
The employee must push/pull
Usual amount ___ lbs.
Maximum amount ___ lbs.
On the job employee is required to use hands for repetitive actions such as:
Right
Left
Simple Grasping
Yes
Yes
Firm Grasping
Fine Manipulation
Yes
Yes
12
6
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Does job require:
Working at heights
Operating machinery
Operating computers or office
machines
Precise manual dexterity
Exposure to marked changes in
temperature or humidity and
the extremes thereof
Exposure to dust, fumes, gases,
chemicals
Yes
No
X
X
X
Explain
Computer usage is mandatory including data entry, and
word-processing.
X
X
X
The College has reviewed this job description to ensure that essential functions and basic duties have been
included. It is not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all functions, responsibilities, skills and
abilities. Additional functions and requirements may be assigned by supervisors as deemed appropriate.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 12
7
Appendix 6
Polk State College Salary Schedule
Charter High School Faculty
12
8
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Collegiate High School Faculty Pay Tables
Effective 01/01/2012
ALPHA
Daily
ALPHA
196 Days
BETA
196 Days
GAMMA
Daily
GAMMA
196 Days
DELTA
Daily
0
1
258.66
50,698.11
235.15
46,089.19
221.84
43,480.37
213.31
41,808.05
262.80
51,509.28
238.91
46,826.62
225.39
44,176.06
216.72
42,476.98
2
267.01
52,333.43
242.73
47,575.85
228.99
44,882.88
220.19
43,156.61
3
271.28
53,170.77
246.62
48,337.06
232.66
45,601.00
223.71
43,847.11
4
275.62
54,021.49
250.56
49,110.45
236.38
46,330.62
227.29
44,548.67
5
280.03
54,885.84
254.57
49,896.22
240.16
47,071.90
230.93
45,261.45
6
284.51
55,764.02
258.65
50,694.56
244.01
47,825.05
234.62
45,985.63
7
289.06
56,656.24
262.78
51,505.67
247.91
48,590.26
238.37
46,721.40
8
293.69
57,562.74
266.99
52,329.77
251.88
49,367.70
242.19
47,468.94
9
298.39
58,483.74
271.26
53,167.04
255.91
50,157.58
246.06
48,228.44
10
303.16
59,419.48
275.60
54,017.72
260.00
50,960.11
250.00
49,000.10
11
308.01
60,370.19
280.01
54,881.99
264.16
51,775.47
254.00
49,784.10
12
312.94
61,336.12
284.49
55,760.11
268.39
52,603.88
258.06
50,580.65
13
317.95
62,317.49
289.04
56,652.27
272.68
53,445.54
262.19
51,389.94
14
323.03
63,314.57
293.67
57,558.71
277.04
54,300.66
266.39
52,212.18
15
328.20
64,327.61
298.37
58,479.64
281.48
55,169.47
270.65
53,047.57
16
333.45
65,356.86
303.14
59,415.32
285.98
56,052.18
274.98
53,896.33
17
338.79
66,402.56
307.99
60,365.96
290.56
56,949.02
279.38
54,758.67
18
344.21
67,465.01
312.92
61,331.82
295.21
57,860.21
283.85
55,634.81
19
349.72
68,544.44
317.92
62,313.13
299.93
58,785.97
288.39
56,524.97
20
355.31
69,641.15
323.01
63,310.14
304.73
59,726.55
293.01
57,429.38
21
361.00
70,755.42
328.18
64,323.10
309.60
60,682.17
297.70
58,348.24
22
366.77
71,887.50
333.43
65,352.27
314.56
61,653.09
302.46
59,281.81
23
372.64
73,037.69
338.76
66,397.91
319.59
62,639.54
307.30
60,230.32
24
378.60
74,206.30
344.19
67,460.28
324.70
63,641.77
312.21
61,194.00
25
384.66
75,393.60
349.69
68,539.64
329.90
64,660.03
317.21
62,173.11
26
390.82
76,599.89
355.29
69,636.27
335.18
65,694.60
322.29
63,167.88
27
397.07
77,825.50
360.97
70,750.46
340.54
66,745.71
327.44
64,178.57
28
403.42
79,070.71
366.75
71,882.46
345.99
67,813.65
332.68
65,205.42
29
409.88
80,335.84
372.62
73,032.58
351.52
68,898.66
338.00
66,248.71
30
416.43
81,621.21
378.58
74,201.10
357.15
70,001.03
343.41
67,308.69
Pay
Level >
Step





BETA
Daily
ALPHA -- level equates to an earned Doctorate degree
BETA -- level equates to an earned Master’s degree plus 30 graduate hours
GAMMA -- level equates to an earned Master’s degree
DELTA -- level equates to an earned Bachelor degree or lesser qualification
Each step is normally equivalent to 1 year of service
DELTA
196 Days
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 12
9
Appendix 7
Polk State College Employee Handbook Contents
(Format may have altered when copied.)
13
0
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Employee Handbook Contents
(Format may have altered when copied.)
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. AN INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................. 4
District Board of Trustees Rules .......................................................................................... 4
Polk State College Procedures ............................................................................................ 4
Changes in Policy....................................................................................................................... 4
Employment Relationship .......................................................................................................... 5
II. EMPLOYMENT POLICIES .............................................................................. 5
Definitions of Employment Status ........................................................................................ 5
Equal Opportunity ....................................................................................................................... 5
Employment of Relatives ........................................................................................................... 6
Orientation Period for New Employees ............................................................................ 6
Personnel Records ..................................................................................................................... 6
Hours of Work; Time Records .............................................................................................. 7
Lunch and Rest Periods ............................................................................................................ 7
Your Position Description ................................................................................................ 7
Performance Appraisals ...................................................................................................... 8
Promotions; Job Posting ............................................................................................................ 8
Resignation ...................................................................................................................... 8
Exit Interviews ............................................................................................................................ 8
III. WAGE AND SALARY POLICIES .................................................................8
Wage and Salary Information............................................................................................... 9
Wage or Salary Increase ...................................................................................................... 9
Overtime Pay.............................................................................................................. 10
Compensatory Leave ......................................................................................................... 10
Shift Differential ........................................................................................................ 10
Payroll Deductions .............................................................................................................. 10
Paydays...................................................................................................................... 10
Payroll Distribution .................................................................................................... 10
IV. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AND SERVICES ................................................. 11
Florida Retirement System ................................................................................................. 11
Group Health Insurance ..................................................................................................... 11
Long-Term Disability ................................................................................................. 11
Retirement Analysis .................................................................................................. 12
Employee Education Fund ................................................................................................. 12
Staff and Program Development (SPD)......................................................................... 12
Social Security .......................................................................................................................... 12
Workers' Compensation ..................................................................................................... 12
Vacations.................................................................................................................... 12
Holidays..................................................................................................................... 13
Leave .................................................................................................................... 13
1. Sick Leave ............................................................................. 13
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 13
1
2.
3.
4.
5.
Compensatory Leave "Comp Time" ................................................. 14
C o n s u l t i n g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Emergency Leave ........................................................................ 14
Family and Medical Leave ........................................................... 14
6. Funeral Leave ........................................................................... 14
7. Jury Duty or Trial Witness Leave ....................................................... 15
8. Military Duty Leave ................................................................. 15
9. Personal Leave with Pay ............................................................ 15
10. Personal Leave wit hout Pay ................................ ............... 15
11. P rof e ssio na l Le a ve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
12. S a b b a t i ca l L e a ve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
13. Temporary Dut y Le ave ................................ ...................... 15
Job Counseling ......................................................................................................................... 15
Automatic Bank Deposit ............................................................................................. 16
Tourist Attraction Discounts ........................................................................................... 16
Student Center ......................................................................................................................... 16
V. EMPLOYEE COMMUNICATIONS .............................................................. 16
Suggestions................................................................................................................ 16
Grievance Procedure.......................................................................................................... 16
VI. EMPLOYEE SAFETY AND HEALTH .......................................................... 16
Accidents .................................................................................................................... 16
Fires and Emergencies........................................................................................................17
Return to Work ......................................................................................................................... 17
VII. STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND CORRECTIVE ACTION ........................ 17
Conflict of Interest ............................................................................................................... 18
Harassment, Including Sexual Harassment................................................................... 19
Attendance Standards ........................................................................................................ 19
Absence Without Notice ..................................................................................................... 19
Solicitation and Distribution ........................................................................................... 19
Alcohol and Drugs .............................................................................................................. 19
Smoking ..................................................................................................................... 19
Dress and Personal Appearance ....................................................................................... 20
Confidentiality............................................................................................................................ 20
VIII. MISCELLANEOUS POLICIES ....................................................... 20
Bookstore ....................................................................................................................... 20
College Credit Card.................................................................................................................. 20
College Keys................................................................................................................................... 20
Employee Identification ............................................................................................................ 20
Parking ..................................................................................................................... 21
Petty Cash ...................................................................................................................... 21
Telephone ................................................................................................................. 21
Travel .................................................................................................................................. 21
HANDBOOK RECEIPT AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT .................................................... 22
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
I. AN INTRODUCTION
This handbook has been prepared to introduce you to your College. It will acquaint you with
the policies, rules, pay and benefits which apply to all employees at Polk State College.
The information contained in this handbook applies to all employees of Polk State College.
It is presented as a matter of information only, and its contents should not be interpreted as a
contract between the College and any of its employees. In the event that there is a conflict
with the information presented in this handbook and the DBOT Rules and Procedures, the
information presented in the DBOT rules and procedures will be considered to be correct.
Please read this handbook carefully and keep it handy for future reference. One of your first
responsibilities is to be familiar with its contents. This handbook is only an unofficial summary of
our policies, however, so please review it with your supervisor or the Human Resources
Department if you have any questions.
This employee handbook supersedes all previous employee handbook and
management memos which may have been issued on subjects covered herein.
District Board of Trustees Rules
The District Board of Trustees (DBOT) has adopted a set of rules governing the operation
of the College and they include rules governing your employment with the College. The only
official copies of the DBOT Rules may be found in the Public Folders using the Outlook Email
program. They are located in a sub folder named Rules.
Polk State College Procedures
The PSC Procedures is a group of working policies, which implements the DBOT Rules.
The official copies of the PSC Procedures may be found in the Public Folders using the
Outlook Email program. They are located in a sub folder named Procedures.
Changes in Policy
We expressly reserve the right to change any of our policies, including those covered here, at
any time. We will place updated polices in the appropriate official Outlook folder as soon as
they are approved. The College will also attempt to notify employees of these changes using
public announces posted in the “News” bulletin board in Outlook and other communications
methods.
Changes will be effective on dates determined by the College, and you may not rely on policies
that have been superseded. No supervisor or manager other than the President of the
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 13
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College has any authority to alter the foregoing. If you are uncertain about any rule, policy or
procedure, please check with your supervisor and/or the administrator responsible for
Human Resources.
Employment Relationship
Your employment with the College is entered into voluntarily, and you are free to resign at any
time, for any reason, with or without notice. Similarly, the College is free to conclude the
employment relationship of any employee not under contract at any time.
II. EMPLOYMENT POLICIES
Definitions of Employment Status
The following terms will be used to describe the classification of employees and their
employment status:
Exempt. Employees whose positions meet specific tests established by the Fair Labor
Standards Act (FLSA) and state law and who are exempt from overtime pay
requirements.
Non-exempt. Employees whose positions do not meet FLSA and state
exemption tests and who are paid a multiple of their regular rate of pay for hours worked
in excess of forty per week.
Full-time. Employees scheduled to work 40 hours or more per week in a single position.
Part-time. Employees scheduled to work less than 40 hours per week. Those
employees working fewer than 30 hours per week are not eligible for college benefits.
Temporary. Employees who are hired for a limited, pre-established period. They
may work a full-time or part-time schedule. They are not eligible for college benefits and
holiday pay under most circumstances.
Temporary Grant Funded. Employees who are hired to work in a grant funded program
for an indefinite period. They are eligible for most College benefits as long as the
employee works at least 30 hours per week. Granted funded temporary employees
may be immediately terminated if the grant funding the employee’s salary is canceled
or otherwise stopped.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
New. Employees with less than 6 months of service who are in the prescribed
orientation period.
Regular. Employees who have completed the 6 month orientation period.
Equal Opportunity
Polk State College maintains a policy of nondiscrimination with regard to employees
and applicants for employment. No aspect of employment with us will be influenced in
any manner by race, color, religion, sex, age, marital status, national origin, disability,
or any other basis prohibited by statute.
Employment of Relatives
We have no general prohibition against hiring relatives. However, a few restrictions have
been established to help prevent problems of safety, security, supervision and morale.
While we will accept and consider applications for employment from relatives, c lose family
members such as parents, grandparents, children, spouses, brothers and sisters, or in-laws
generally will not be hired or transferred into positions where they directly or indirectly supervise
or are supervised by another close family member. Further, such relatives generally will not be
placed in positions where they work with or have access to sensitive information regarding a
close family member or if there is an actual or apparent conflict of interest.
Orientation Period for New Career and Professional/Technical
Employees
The orientation period for new career and professional/technical level employees lasts up to 6
months from date of hire. During this time, you have your first opportunity to evaluate our
College as a place to work, and management has the first opportunity to evaluate you as an
employee. As during your regular employment, you and the College each have the right to
terminate employment without advance notice and without cause.
The orientation period involves evaluation of performance at 2 months and 6 months. Upon
satisfactory completion of the orientation period, you will become a regular employee. All
employees, regardless of classification, status or length of service, are expected to meet and
maintain College standards for job performance and behavior.
Personnel Records
Important events in each employee's history with the College will be recorded and kept in the
employee's personnel file. Regular performance reviews, change of status records,
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commendations, corrective action warnings and educational attainment records are examples
of records maintained.
Your personnel file is available for your inspection in the Human Resources
Department. Contact your supervisor or the Director of Human Resources to make an
appointment.
You are responsible for notifying the Human Resources Department of changes in address,
telephone number, and/or family status (births, marriage, death, divorce, legal separation, etc.),
as income tax status and group insurance may be affected by these changes. This
responsibility includes employees on lay-off status and leaves of absence.
Hours of Work; Time Records
Our normal workweek consists of forty hours, eight hours per day for five consecutive days,
Monday through Friday. College administrative offices are open 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Some offices have expanded hours to meet the needs of students.
If you are an hourly employee, you are responsible for filling out a time sheet throughout the
month. For each day worked, record your hours in the appropriate box. Hourly employees
should report all hours worked on their timesheet, including hours spent working at home on
College business. No supervisor is allowed to ask or require that employees falsify their
timesheet by not reporting hours they actually worked.
If you are an exempt administrative, professional/technical or career employee, you are only
responsible for reporting absences and any leave used during the month.
Whenever you are absent, use the appropriate code letter listed on the time sheet to indicate
the reason for your absence. Each absence, other than official holidays, must also be listed
and approved in the lower left portion of the time sheet.
The Business Office will establish deadlines for submitting time sheets. Consult your
supervisor for appropriate deadlines. When your time sheet is completed, send it to your
supervisor, who verifies it for accuracy and completeness before it is sent to the Payroll
Office.
Lunch and Rest Periods
The normal lunch period is one hour. Supervisors may establish mandatory lunch
schedules which employees must follow in order to ensure that offices are open without
interruption. Employees may take lunch periods that are less than one hour with prior approval
from their department head. Employees may take a fifteen-minute break, as work allows, in
the morning and in the afternoon.
Your Position Description
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
At the College we use job descriptions to aid in staffing, wage and salary administration and in
training. They also help employees and supervisors communicate about position responsibilities.
However, position descriptions are intended to record the major duties and functions of the
position. They are not all inclusive lists of duties and responsibilities; they are only
guidelines and can normally be expected to change over time.
From time to time, employees may be expected to perform duties and handle
responsibilities that are not part of their normal jobs. If, over the months, the new duties and
responsibilities remain a significant part of the assignment, the position description may be
changed.
Performance Appraisals
You will receive a performance appraisal from your supervisor on or near the end of your
second and sixth months of employment. Thereafter, you will receive performance appraisals
once a year during the month of February if you are an administrator and during the month of
April if you are a professional/technical or career employee. The performance appraisal allows
your supervisor to discuss your overall performance and summarize both formal and informal
performance discussions held throughout the review period. It will review your strengths
and also point out ways to improve your performance.
Promotions; Job Posting
College personnel will be selected, retained, and promoted on their ability and
willingness to support the philosophy and objectives of Polk State College. The Board
recognizes that the pursuit of excellence requires personnel of the highest caliber, dedicated
to the belief that all students who enter the college will be given the best education available
in the most favorable environment at a cost consistent with available resources.
Accordingly, the College advertises all regular and grant-funded full and part-time positions and
welcomes applications from both current employees and the general public.
Current job openings are posted on the PSC website under “Human Resources” and on the
PSC News electronic bulletin board.
Resignation
If you decide to leave the College, it is suggested that you advise your supervisor at least
two weeks prior to your date of departure if you are a career employee or 30 days prior to
departure if you belong to one of the other employee groups so that an orderly transition can be
made. This process includes turning in College property, completing required forms, and
having an exit interview. As an incentive to provide proper notice, the College will not pay any
terminal leave benefits to employees who leave without providing the proper notification.
Exit Interviews
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 13
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If you leave the College, before your last day you will have an exit interview with the Director
of Human Resources. This is to document the reasons you are leaving and solicit
constructive feedback to improve the College. You may also request an exit interview with
the President of the College.
III. Notification of Social Security Number
Collection and Usage
In compliance with FL Statute 119.071(5), this document serves to notify you of the purpose
for the collection and usage of your Social Security number.
Polk State College collects and uses your social security number only for the following purposes in
performance of the College’s duties and responsibilities. To protect your identity, PSC will secure
your SS# from unauthorized access, never release your SS# to unauthorized parties, and assign
you a unique employee / student identification number. This unique ID number is used for all
associated employment and educational purposes at PSC.
Human Resources Department
Your SS number is used for legitimate business purposes in compliance with








Completing and processing the Federal I-9 (Department of Homeland Security)
Completing and processing Federal W4, W2, 1099 (Internal Revenue Service)
Completing and processing Federal Social Security taxes (FICA)
Processing and Distributing Federal W2 (Internal Revenue Service)
Completing and processing quarterly Unemployment Reports (FL Dept of Revenue)
Completing and processing Florida Retirement Contribution reports (FL Dept of Revenue)
Workers Comp Claims (FCCRMC and Department of Labor)Completing and
processing Direct Deposit Files (Wachovia Bank, ACH) Completing and processing
403b and 457b contribution reports
Completing and processing group health, life and dental coverage enrollment Completing
and processing various supplemental insurance deduction reports Completing other
required state and federal reports
To ensure accurate information is obtained on criminal background checks
Providing your Social Security number is a condition of employment at PSC.
IV. WAGE AND SALARY POLICIES
Wage and Salary Information
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Information about salaries, including minimum and maximum rates of pay for PSC
employees, is included in the latest Salary Schedule. If you are interested in knowing the
wage or salary range for your position, ask your supervisor to review the Salary Schedule with
you.
Wage or Salary Increase
Salary increases are subject to overall budget considerations and are determined annually
by the District Board of Trustees. Salary increases, if given, are applied to your current
annual base salary if you have received satisfactory performance reviews for the year.
Overtime Pay
All overtime work by non-exempt employees must be authorized in advance by the
employee’s supervisor. Non-exempt employees will be paid time and one-half for
authorized hours worked in excess of forty hours in one week.
Employees should report all hours worked on their timesheet. No supervisor is allowed to ask
employees to falsify their timesheet by not reporting hours they actually worked.
Compensatory Leave
Non-exempt employees may take compensatory leave (time off with pay) in place of overtime
pay. Comp time must be approved by your division director or dean and taken in the same
month or succeeding month. Comp time may not be carried over from one fiscal year to the
next. Comp time that is not used during the period allowed will be paid to the employee on the
next monthly paycheck.
Shift Differential
A five percent shift differential shall be awarded to those full-time employees who, on a regular
basis, have the major portion of their hours scheduled after 5:00 p.m. Inclusion of a shift
differential shall be considered an individual's established rate of pay and shall be used in all
computations of pay (sick leave, vacation, overtime, leave without pay.) The shift differential
shall not be included in the calculation to establish a base for increases.
Payroll Deductions
Various payroll deductions are made each payday to comply with Federal and State laws
pertaining to taxes and insurance. Deductions will be made for the following: Federal
Income Tax Withholding
Social Security (OASD & Medicare)
Court mandated deductions
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 13
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Other items authorized by the employee
At the end of each calendar year, you will be supplied with your Wage and Tax
Statement (W-2) form. This statement summarizes your income and deductions for the year. If
you have any questions regarding these deductions, please contact the Payroll Office.
Paydays
The payroll week runs from Saturday of one week through Friday of the following week.
Employees are paid the last working day of the month.
Payroll Distribution
You must sign for your paycheck at the assigned distribution point. Checks will not be given
to any other individual, unless you have a signed statement on file at the distribution
point.
V. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AND SERVICES
Florida Retirement System
If you are a full-time employee or regular, part-time employee, you are a member of the Florida
Retirement System. This benefit is paid entirely by the College. As of 7/1/2006, the College
pays in 9.85% of the employee’s base salary into their retirement account.
Traditional Retirement Plan:
Employees are vested for retirement benefits after 6 years of creditable service. Full
retirement payments will be made at age 62 or after 30 years with the system. Benefits are
calculated on a formula which takes into consideration average salary and years of creditable
service.
Investment Plan:
Employees are vested in this benefit after one year of creditable service. The money paid on
the employee’s behalf by the College is placed in an investment account managed by the
FRS as directed by the employee. This benefit may be used at age 62 or after 30 years of
service in the system. The total benefit at retirement will depend upon the success of the
employee’s investments over time.
Group Health Insurance
Polk State College participates in several medical insurance plans. The College pays the
insurance premium for each full-time employee. You have the option of adding coverage for
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
your spouse and dependents. The College also pays the premium on a life insurance policy
for every full-time employee equal to their annual salary plus $5,000. Benefits become
effective on the first day of the following month from date of hire.
Long-Term Disability
Polk State College pays the premium cost of long-term disability for all full-time regular
employees working 40 hours per week. New employees are eligible upon completion of 30
days of active employment. Generally benefits begin after 90 days of disability to age 65
with the monthly benefit amount being 66.7% of base salary to a maximum of $6,000 per
month.
No evidence of insurability is required. However, you will not receive benefits for a disability
which occurs during the first 12 months after your effective date for which you received
medical treatment, consultation, care of service, including diagnostic measures, or had
taken prescription drugs or medicines during the three months just prior to your effective date.
Retirement Analysis
We have several companies offering quality products to assist you with your retirement analysis
needs: Fidelity; Life Insurance Company of the Southwest (LSW); and the Variable Annuity
Life Insurance Company (VALIC). Contact the Human Resources Office for additional
information.
Employee Education Fund
Employee Education Funds pay for matriculation, tuition and lab fees for credit courses
presented by Polk State College. All full-time and part-time, benefited employees who have
completed 3 months of full-time employment and their dependents, either spouses or
dependent children (IRS qualified), are eligible.
Staff and Program Development (SPD)
Staff and Program Development funds are available to all part-time and full-time regular
employees to pay for conferences, workshops, and college courses for the development of
skills in your area of responsibility. Contact your supervisor for information.
Social Security
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 14
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All part-time and full-time regular employees are covered by the Federal Social Security Act. A
required percentage of your salary is deducted from your paycheck to pay the employee's
portion of this protection, and the College will match your deduction dollar for dollar.
Workers' Compensation
The College carries insurance to cover the cost of work-incurred injury or illness. Benefits
help pay for your medical treatment and part of any income you may lose while recovering.
Specific benefits are prescribed by law depending on the circumstances of each case. To be
assured of maximum coverage, work-related accidents must be reported immediately to
your supervisor and a Workers' Compensation Accident Report must be submitted to the
Human Resources Office within three working days following the incident.
Vacations
Our vacation plan is designed to provide you with the opportunity to rest and get away from the
everyday routine. PSC employees who are full-time administrators, career or
professional/technical earn vacation time for each month employed at the College
according to the following rates:
Days Per Month
Years of Full-Time Employment
1
1-5
1 1/4
6 - 10
1½
over 10
You must have worked at the College for 6 months to be eligible to take vacation days
accumulated. Vacation must be scheduled in advance with your immediate supervisor. A
maximum of 44 days may be accumulated; days in excess of 44 will be lost on December
31. If you leave PSC, you will be paid for unused vacation time to a maximum of 30
vacation days computed at the rate of pay earned upon separation provided that you give the
suggested amount of notice.
Holidays
Full-time (12 month) employees are eligible for paid holidays and paid non-duty days each
year. The number and dates of these days may change from one year to the next. These
holidays are listed in the College Calendar published by Student Services.
The following paid holidays are normally observed: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King Day,
Memorial Day, Independence Day (if on M-F), Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas
Day.
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
The following paid non-duty days are normally observed: Spring Break (5 days, MondayFriday), Wednesday immediately preceding & Friday following Thanksgiving Day, and
Christmas Eve through New Year’s Eve (any Monday-Friday that is not a paid holiday).
Leave
There are several different types of leaves at PSC. Some may be taken with pa y. Specific
information follows:
1.
Sick Leave
Full-time employees earn one sick leave day each month you are employed at PSC,
provided you work 50% or more of the work days in that month. These paid leave days
are accumulated from one year to the next. Sick leave may be taken for days you are
ill. Sick leave may also be taken for illness or death of a close relative or member of your
household. Sick leave is approved by your immediate supervisor.
When you retire from PSC with at least six years of eligible service you will be paid at
the daily rate of pay for a percentage of your accumulated sick leave as follows:
1. During the first six years of service, the daily rate of pay multiplied by 40 percent
times the number of days of accumulated sick leave.
2. During the next 3 years of service, the daily rate of pay multiplied by 45 percent
times the number of days of accumulated sick leave.
3. During and after the 10th year of service, the daily rate of pay multiplied by 50 percent
times the number of days of accumulated sick leave.
Accumulated sick leave may be transferred to or from another Florida
Community College, the Florida Department of Education, the State University System,
a Florida district school board, or a state agency.
We encourage employees to accumulate sick leave so it is available to help in the
event of a long illness. Time paid for sick leave does not count as time worked in
calculating overtime for the week.
2.
Compensatory Leave "Comp Time"
Non-exempt career employees may take compensatory leave (time off with pay) in
place of overtime pay. Comp time must be approved by the President's Staff member
responsible for your area and taken in the same month or succeeding month. Comp
time may not be carried over from one fiscal year to the next.
3.
Consulting
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Full-time employees of the college, upon recommendation of the President or
designee, may be granted up to five days leave per year without loss of pay for the
purpose of consulting. The five days include travel time. The employee will not be
reimbursed for travel or daily expenses.
4.
Emergency Leave
Emergency situations occur occasionally for which emergency leave may be taken.
Schedule this type of leave with your supervisor as soon as prudently possible.
Personal leave with pay or without pay may be used in an emergency by full-time
employees.
5.
Family and Medical Leave
The Family and Medical Leave Act entitles employees who have worked at least 1250
hours at the College over the last 12 months to take up to 16 weeks of leave to care
for their own serious medical problem or to care for an immediate family member or
for the birth, placement or adoption of a child. We fully endorse and support this
law.
We have posted a notice in Human Resources, as required by law, to help you
understand it.
Polk State College Procedure 6067 sets forth your rights and duties under this law.
Please read this very carefully and feel free to ask your supervisor or the Director of
Human Resources if you have any questions about it.
6.
Funeral Leave
You may take time off to attend funerals for family and friends. Personal leave with
pay or without pay may be used by full-time employees.
7.
Jury Duty or Trial Witness Leave
You will receive your regular pay whenever you are required to serve on a jury or
are called to testify at a trial. Travel pay to the courthouse will not be given.
8.
Military Duty Leave
PSC employees who receive orders for duty with the U.S. Military or Florida National
Guard will be granted military duty leave as provided for by USERRA. For details
please contact the Human Resources Department.
9.
Personal Leave with Pay
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
PSC employees may take four days of personal leave with pay during each fiscal year
(July 1 through the following June 30) of employment. These leave days will be
deducted from the sick leave time you accumulate. Although sick leave accumulates
from one year to the next, personal leave with pay does not carry over to the next
year. You should schedule this leave in advance with your immediate supervisor.
10.
Personal Leave without Pay
Personal leave without pay may be granted for either personal or professional reasons.
This leave may be granted if you can demonstrate you have sufficient reason and the
absence will not adversely affect the operation of the College. Your supervisor must
approve this leave in advance.
11.
Professional Leave
Professional leave may be granted with or without pay to a full-time employee engaged
in activities which will result in professional advancement or benefit. This leave may
be taken to earn college credits or a degree. The President's Staff member
responsible for your area must approve this leave.
12.
Sa bbat ica l Le av e
Sabbatical leave with partial pay may be granted to administrators when the leave
will enhance or improve the College program. This leave is approved by the
President.
13.
Temporary Duty Leave
Employees may be away from their normal duty location on college-related work or
job-related training. This leave must be approved by your immediate supervisor.
Job Counseling
If you are concerned about your job performance, or if you wish to talk about job
prospects in line with your career interests and abilities, you may arrange for a
counseling discussion with the Director of Human Resources or the Vice President for
Administrative and Business Services. Such a discussion will be confidential and will in no
way jeopardize your present position or future with the College.
Automatic Bank Deposit
Many of our employees find it convenient to have their regular paycheck automatically
deposited in their bank account. If you would like to make a similar arrangement, contact
the Human Resources Office.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 14
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Tourist Attraction Discounts
Employees can receive a discount on admission to various tourist attractions by obtaining
discount cards from the Human Resources Department.
Student Center
The Student Centers on the Lakeland and Winter Haven campuses provide cafeteria and
snack bar facilities.
VI. EMPLOYEE COMMUNICATIONS
Suggestions
We encourage you to suggest methods to improve quality and efficiency in the College. Submit
your suggestions in writing to the Director of Human Resources. Your suggestions
should be detailed so that the system or procedure can be adequately evaluated.
Grievance Procedure
Under normal conditions, if you have a job-related problem, question or complaint, you should
discuss it with your supervisor. The simplest, quickest and most satisfactory solution will
often be reached at this level.
When the issue personally involves the supervisor or manager with whom you would ordinarily
discuss a problem, you may bypass that individual and proceed to the next person in authority
without fear of reprisal.
If the discussion with your supervisor does not answer your question or resolve the matter to
your satisfaction, you may then present your complaint in writing following the guidelines of
Employee Grievance Procedure 6013.
VII. EMPLOYEE SAFETY AND HEALTH
Accidents
No matter how insignificant any injury may seem when it occurs, notify your supervisor or the
Director of Human Resources immediately.
Fires and Emergencies
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If you need to report an emergency from a PSC phone, dial 911.
Remember to stay on the line and provide complete information on your location to the Polk
County Emergency 911 operator. The 911 operator can only tell that your call is coming from
either the Lakeland or Winter Haven campus. The 911 operator has no way of knowing from
where on campus you are calling or the phone extension at which you can be located to
provide additional information.
Once you have completed the 911 call, dial campus security at 5059 and give the exact location
of the emergency.
There are fire and emergency alarm systems in buildings on both campuses. Return
to Work
If you are on a disability or medical disability leave of absence, you must return to work when
your physician or a college-appointed physician determines that you are able to resume
normal duties. If you wish to extend your leave beyond this point, you must apply for a
personal leave of absence.
A physician's release may also be required when returning to work from sick leave or other
short-term, medically related absences of three days or more. Your supervisor will advise
you of this requirement, which depends on case-by-case circumstances.
VIII. STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND
CORRECTIVE ACTION
Groups of people who are working together for any purpose require certain guidelines
pertaining to their conduct and relationships. Accordingly, our employees must be aware of
their responsibilities to the College and to co-workers.
Violations of our standards will result in one of the following forms of corrective action:
Discharge, suspension, oral warning, or written warning. In arriving at a decision for proper
action, the following will be considered:



the seriousness of the infraction
the past record of the employee
the circumstances surrounding the matter.
Although there is no way to identify every possible violation of standards of conduct, the following
is a partial list of infractions which will result in correction action:
1. Falsifying employment application, time sheet, or personnel or other college documents
or records.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 14
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2. Unauthorized possession of college property. Damaging or destroying college
property due to careless or willful acts.
3. Gambling, carrying weapons or explosives, or violating criminal laws on college
premises.
4. Fighting, throwing things, horseplay, practical jokes or other disorderly conduct which
may endanger the well-being of any employee on college premises.
5. Engaging in acts of dishonesty, fraud, theft or sabotage. Threatening, intimidating,
coercing, using abusive or vulgar language, or interfering with the performance of other
employees.
6. Insubordination or refusal to comply with instructions or failure to perform reasonable
duties which are assigned.
7. Unauthorized use of college material, time, equipment or property.
8. Conduct which the College feels reflects adversely on the employee or College.
9. Performance which, in the College's opinion, does not meet the requirements
of the position.
10. Negligence in observing fire prevention and safety rules.
11. Engaging in such other practices as the College determines may be inconsistent
with the ordinary and reasonable rules of conduct necessary to the welfare of the
College, its employees, or students.
This list is intended to be representative of the types of activities which may result in
disciplinary action. It is not intended to be comprehensive and does not alter the
employment-at-will relationship between the employee and the College. Additional standards
of conduct are described below.
Conflict of Interest
Employees are expected to devote their best efforts to the interests of the College and the
conduct of its affairs. The College recognizes the right of employees to engage in activities
outside of their employment which are of a private nature and unrelated to our business. Contact
your supervisor or the Director of Human Resources if you have questions regarding a
possible conflict of interest to prevent potential conflicts from arising.
Harassment, Including Sexual Harassment
PSC is interested in preserving human dignity and the protection of our employees from
harassment whether it is based on sexual, racial, ethnic or of some other type of protected
characteristic. Harassment based on a protected characteristic in any form - verbal, physical or
visual - is strictly against College policy and will result in corrective action. Defining sexual
harassment precisely is not easy but it certainly includes slurs, threats, derogatory comments,
unwelcome jokes, teasing or sexual advances, and other similar verbal or physical conduct.
If you believe you have been the victim of harassment, or know of one who has, report it
immediately to your supervisor or the President's Staff member responsible for your area.
Attendance Standards
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Punctuality and regular attendance are essential to the proper operation of the College.
If you are unable to report for work for any reason, if you will arrive late, or must leave early,
you are required to notify your supervisor.
We reserve the right to require a physician's release when an employee returns to work following
a disability of three days or more.
Absence Without Notice
For us to operate our College effectively, we ask that you keep us informed of your status
when you are off work because of illness or accident from any cause. If you fail to notify us
after three days of consecutive absence, we will presume you have resigned, and you will
be removed from the payroll.
Solicitation and Distribution
Soliciting by one employee of another, or collecting from one employee by another, is prohibited
while either employee is on work time. Distributing literature and circulating petitions during
work time or in work areas at any time is also prohibited. Trespassing, soliciting or distributing
literature by anyone outside the College is prohibited on college premises unless prior
approval has been obtained from the Vice President for Administrative and Business
Services.
Alcohol and Drugs
The use, possession, sale, transfer, purchase or being under the influence of alcoholic
beverages, illegal drugs or other intoxicants by employees at any time on college premises
or while on college business is prohibited.
Smoking
All indoor areas at the Lakeland and Winter Haven campuses are non -smoking. Smoking
outdoors on the PSC campuses is limited to areas that have been designated as smoking
areas by signs.
Dress and Personal Appearance
Employees are expected to maintain an appropriate appearance that is businesslike, neat
and clean, as determined by the requirements of the work area. Dress and appearance
should not be offensive to students or other employees.
Confidentiality
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 14
9
During the course of your employment here you will be working with student and college
information that we consider confidential. Protect this information by safeguarding it when in
use, filing it properly when not in use, and discuss it only with those who have a legitimate
business need to know.
IX. MISCELLANEOUS POLICIES
Bookstore
College offices may purchase office supplies from the office supply contractor. Each fiscal
quarter a memorandum signed by the Budget Head is sent to the Business Office indicating the
anticipated dollar amount each department will purchase. This memo should indicate the
names of the individuals who are authorized to sign for supplies. If your name is on file, you
may select supplies and sign for them.
College Credit Card
The College has credit cards for use in paying for pre-approved purchases that do not exceed
$2,500. You must fill out a purchase request form and have prior approval of purchases before
the credit card can be released to you by the Business Office. The credit card and any
receipts should be returned to the Business Office.
College Keys
You may be issued keys for appropriate office doors, desks, filing cabinets, etc. Key request
forms are available from the Facilities Office and should be returned to the Facilities Office
when properly completed. When your keys are ready, your office will be notified and you can
sign for them in the Facilities Office. When keys are no longer needed, or when you leave the
College, you should return them to the Facilities Office.
Employee Identification
All employees are issued I.D. cards by the Facilities Office. You will need your card to sign
out books and other materials from the library. Identification cards will also allow you to
attend many college events free. Because many of the ID cards also contain electronic keys,
employees are required to keep their ID card in a secure place and not give them to other
persons for their use. If your ID card is lost or stolen, you need to report this fact immediately
to facilities.
Polk State College name tags may also be given to employees. These tags are ordered from
the Human Resources Office after the request is approved by the appropriate division
director or President's Staff member.
15
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Parking
Employees must have a permit on their vehicle to park in areas designated for staff. Parking
permit tags may be obtained at the Facilities Office.
Petty Cash
A petty cash fund is maintained by the Business Office for purchases under $50. To receive a
cash advance, take your completed petty cash voucher signed by your Budget Head to the
Business Office in Winter Haven or the cashier in Lakeland. Note: The College does not pay
a sales tax.
Telephone
Rulings governing the use of tax-exempt telephones prohibit personal long distance calls
being charged to college telephones.
Travel
All employees traveling on official college business must have prior approval from their director
or the appropriate President's Staff member. Details for allowed reimbursement are found on
the back of the leave form.
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 15
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Appendix 8
Polk State Lakeland Pathways Budget
Monthly Cash Flow Projection – Year 1
15
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
General Fund Revenue Projection:
Projected Enrollment
2013-2014
100
2014-2015
200
2015-2016
300
100
102
200
204
300
306
$520,386.00
$1,040,749.00
$1,561,134.00
3
5
6
Projected UWFTE
Projected WFTE
FEFP
General Fund Expenditure Projection
Classroom Teacher Units FTE
Classroom Teacher Salary
Classroom Teacher Retirement
Classroom Teacher Social Security
Classroom Teacher Medicare
Classroom Teacher Health Insurance
Classroom Teacher Dental
Classroom Teacher Life Insurance
Classroom Teacher Disability
Classroom Teacher EAP
Total
133,062.48
6,892.64
8,249.87
1,929.41
24,141.00
750.00
316.80
389.25
48.00
175,779.44
228,423.92
11,832.36
14,162.28
3,312.15
41,442.05
1,287.50
543.84
668.21
82.40
301,754.71
282,331.97
14,624.79
17,504.58
4,093.81
51,222.37
1,591.35
672.19
825.91
101.85
372,968.82
Guidance Counselor Units FTE
1
1
1
Guidance Counselor Salary
Guidance Counselor Retirement
Guidance Counselor Social Security
44,624.64
3,529.81
2,766.73
45,963.38
3,635.70
2,849.73
47,342.28
3,744.78
2,935.22
Guidance Counselor Medicare
Guidance Counselor Health Insurance
647.06
8,047.00
666.47
8,288.41
686.47
8,537.06
Guidance Counselor Dental
Guidance Counselor Life Insurance
250.00
86.40
257.50
88.99
265.23
91.66
Guidance Counselor Disability
Guidance Counselor EAP
107.10
16.00
110.31
16.48
113.62
16.97
Total
60,074.74
61,876.98
63,733.29
Assistant Director Units FTE
Assistant Director Salary
Assistant Director Retirement
Assistant Director Social Security
1
63,654.00
5,035.03
3,946.55
1
65,563.62
5,186.08
4,064.95
1
67,530.53
5,341.66
4,186.89
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 15
3
Assistant Director Medicare
Assistant Director Health Insurance
922.98
8,047.00
950.67
8,288.41
979.19
8,537.06
Assistant Director Dental
Assistant Director Life Insurance
250.00
122.88
257.50
126.57
265.23
130.36
Assistant Director Disability
Assistant Director EAP
152.77
16.00
157.35
16.48
162.07
16.97
Total
82,147.21
84,611.63
87,149.98
0.25
0.25
Director Units FTE
0.25
Director Salary
21,347.97
21,988.41
22,648.06
Director Retirement
Director Social Security
Director Medicare
Director Health Insurance
Director Dental
Director Life Insurance
Director Disability
Director EAP
Total
1,688.62
1,323.57
309.55
2,011.75
62.50
41.28
51.24
4.00
26,840.48
1,739.28
1,363.28
318.84
2,072.10
64.38
42.52
52.78
4.12
27,645.69
1,791.46
1,404.18
328.40
2,134.27
66.31
43.79
54.36
4.24
28,475.07
0.25
0.25
0.25
Administrative Assistant Salary
8,696.57
8,957.47
9,226.19
Administrative Assistant Retirement
Administrative Assistant Social Security
687.90
539.19
708.54
555.37
729.79
572.03
Administrative Assistant Medicare
Administrative Assistant Health Insurance
126.10
2,011.75
129.88
2,072.10
133.78
2,134.27
Administrative Dental
Administrative Assistant Life Insurance
62.50
16.80
64.38
17.30
66.31
17.82
Administrative Assistant Disability
Administrative Assistant EAP
20.87
4.00
21.50
4.12
22.14
4.24
Total
12,165.68
12,530.65
12,906.57
Administrative Assistant FTE Units
Resource Specialist FTE Units
1
1
1
Resource Specialist Salary
44,354.16
32,890.26
33,876.97
Resource Specialist Retirement
Resource Specialist Social Security
Resource Specialist Medicare
2,297.55
2,749.96
643.14
2,601.62
2,039.19
476.92
2,679.66
2,100.37
491.23
15
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Resource Specialist Health Insurance
Resource Specialist Dental
8,047.00
250.00
8,288.41
257.50
8,537.06
265.23
Resource Specialist Life Insurance
Resource Specialist Disability
105.60
129.75
63.28
78.94
65.18
81.31
Resource Workers EAP
Total
16.00
58,593.15
16.48
46,712.60
16.97
48,113.98
Travel In-District
Travel Out-of-District
200.00
700.00
300.00
1,000.00
400.00
1,500.00
Travel Out-of-State
Travel Student
Conference Registration Fees
1,000.00
250.00
500.00
1,500.00
300.00
750.00
3,000.00
350.00
1,000.00
Printing
300.00
600.00
900.00
Student Insurance
530.00
1,060.00
1,590.00
Other Services
500.00
500.00
500.00
Institutional Membership
50.00
75.00
100.00
Advertising
100.00
100.00
150.00
Tech Services
200.00
250.00
300.00
Professional Fees/Consultant
2,500.00
3,000.00
4,000.00
Virtual Academy
15,500.00
30,000.00
40,000.00
Auditing Fees
7,000.00
7,000.00
7,000.00
Administrative Fee to the District
26,019.30
52,037.45
65,047.24
Administrative Fee to the College
-
-
300,000.00
Accreditation
200.00
300.00
500.00
Education Materials & Supplies
2,500.00
4,500.00
6,500.00
Office Supplies
2,500.00
750.00
1,000.00
Diplomas & Covers
50.00
75.00
100.00
Computer Materials & Supplies
200.00
300.00
400.00
Testing Supplies
300.00
600.00
900.00
Educational Data Software
300.00
375.00
425.00
Food
Total Expenditures
10,000.00
487,000.00
20,000.00
660,504.71
30,000.00
1,079,009.94
33,386.00
380,244.29
482,124.06
0
33,386.00
413,630.29
33,386.00
33,386.00
26,019.30
380,244.29
413,630.29
53,706.75
482,124.06
895,754.34
98,738.21
Non Staff Expenditures
Excess (Deficit) Revenue over Expenditures
Beginning Fund Balance, July 1
Excess (Deficit) Revenue over Expenditures
Ending Fund Balance, June 30
Minimum Required Fund Balance at 5%
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 15
5
Monthly Cash Flow Projection Worksheet – Year 1
(All figures are represented in dollar ($) amounts)
July
2013
Funds
Available
Aug.
2013
4,689
Sept.
2013
12,241
Oct.
2013
11,223
Nov.
2013
17,280
Dec.
2013
22,912
Jan.
2014
30,844
Feb.
2014
26,426
Mar.
2014
34,533
Apr.
2014
41,265
May
2014
49,372
June
2014
56,054
Total
29,267
Cash flow
from
Operating
Activity
Cash flow
from
Financial Act.
Cash flow
from
Capital/Relat
ed
Activity
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
43,365
520,386
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Net Increase
of
Cash
Equivalent
43,365
48,054
55,606
54,588
60,645
66,277
74,209
69,791
77,898
84,630
92,737
99,419
99,419
Personnel
Salaries and
Benefits
Sub. Teacher
Salaries
Travel
In District
Travel
Out of
District
Travel
Out of State
Conf. Fees/
Registration
Printing
Student
Insurance
Other
Services
Institutional
Membership
Advertising
Technology
Services
Prof. Fees/
Consultant
Virtual Acad.
Services
Auditing
Fees
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
34,633
415,596
600
600
1200
100
100
200
350
350
700
500
500
1000
250
250
500
300
300
530
530
500
50
500
50
100
100
1750
7750
100
100
200
1750
3500
7750
15500
7000
7000
15
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
July
Admin.
Fees to
District
Admin.
To College
Accreditatio
n
Classroom
Supplies/
Material
Office
Supplies
Diplomas
Covers
Computer
Materials
Testing
Supplies
Educational
Software
Food
Total Net
Cash
Used
Funds
Available
End of
Month
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
26,019
26,019
0
200
625
625
625
1250
625
2500
1250
2500
50
50
200
200
300
300
300
300
36,508
35,813
2000
44,383
37,308
2000
37,733
35,433
2000
47,783
35,258
2000
36,633
35,258
2000
36,683
70,152
10000
488,945
4,689
12,241
11,223
17,280
22,912
30,844
26,426
34,533
41,265
49,372
56,054
29,267
29,267
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 15
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Appendix 9
Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Letters of Support
15
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 15
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16
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 16
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 16
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16
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 16
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Appendix 10
Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Transportation Zone, Bus Routes,
Free Transportation Marketing Flyer
16
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 16
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16
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 16
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 17
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17
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Appendix 11
Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Signed Cover Sheet
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 17
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17
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Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School
Appendix 12
Polk State Lakeland Pathways
Signed Statement of Assurances
Polk State College Lakeland Pathways Charter High School 17
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