Press_Manual (Pt 1)

Press_Manual (Pt 1)
Published Manual Number/ECN: MAPMP1AXAE/2007156A
• Publishing System: TPAS
• Access date: 4/13/2007
• Document ECN's: Exact
Service & Mechanical Parts—
MP1A03CL, MP1A03CR,
MP1A03L,MP1A03R
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
POST OFFICE BOX 400, KENNER, LOUISIANA 70063-0400, U.S.A.
Please Read
About the Manual Identifying Information on the Cover—The front cover displays
pertinent identifying information for this manual. Most important, are the published manual
number (part number) /ECN (date code). Generally, when a replacement manual is furnished, it
will have the same published manual number, but the latest available ECN. This provides the user
with the latest information applicable to his machine. Similarly all documents comprising the
manual will be the latest available as of the date the manual was printed, even though older ECN
dates for those documents may be listed in the table of contents.
When communicating with the Milnor factory regarding this manual, please also provide the
other identifying information shown on the cover, including the publishing system, access date,
and whether the document ECN’s are the latest available or exact.
Best Available Information—This manual contains the most accurate and complete
information available when Milnor shipped your machine/software. Products are occasionally
released with the best available documentation, even though the device identification (model
numbers, etc.) on the documentation does not explicitly include the delivered model. In such
cases, use the documentation provided.
Although unlikely, incorrect manuals may have been shipped with your machine. If you believe
you received the wrong manuals, or if you need specific information about any aspect of your
machine not addressed in the provided documentation, contact the Milnor Customer Service
group.
References to Yellow Troubleshooting Pages—This manual may contain references
to “yellow pages.” Although the pages containing trouble-shooting procedures are no longer
printed on yellow paper, troubleshooting instructions, if any, will be contained in the easily
located “Troubleshooting” section. See the table of contents.
Trademarks of Pellerin Milnor Corporation—The following terms, some of which
may be used in this publication, are trademarks of Pellerin Milnor Corporation:
CBW®
E-P Express®
E-P OneTouch®
E-P Plus®
Gear Guardian®
Mentor®
Mildata®
Milnet®
Milnor®
MultiTrac™
Staph-Guard®
Visionex™
Trademarks of Other Companies—The following terms, some of which may be used in
this publication, are trademarks of their respective companies:
Acronis®
Atlas 2000®
IBM®
Microsoft Windows 2000®
Microsoft Office XP®
Microsoft Windows NT®
Yaskawa®
Microsoft Access®
Microsoft Windows XP®
Comments and Suggestions
Help us to improve this manual by sending your comments to:
Pellerin Milnor Corporation
Attn: Technical Publications
P. O. Box 400
Kenner, LA 70063-0400
Fax: (504) 469-1849
Siemens®
Seagate Crystal Reports®
About This Service Manual
BIUUUM02 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060809 / 20060809 / 20060809 Lang: ENG01 Applic: UUU
About This Service Manual
1.
This Is a Two-part Manual
This service manual is divided into two parts—each with its own table of contents:
1.1.
Part 1: Standard Maintenance Procedures—These include:
• Safety procedures and hazard information for service personnel. Read before attempting
any servicing.
• Routine maintenance such as scheduled, preventive maintenance and corrective maintenance
procedures that can arise as a result of normal wear and operational errors.
• Mechanical troubleshooting, testing, and related servicing.
This part is subdivided into numbered sections (topics and sub-topics) that do not necessarily
begin on a new page. The table of contents for Part 1 references section numbers, not page
numbers.
1.2.
Part 2: Mechanical Parts and Repair Procedures—These include:
• Parts documents that depict machine assemblies (sub-systems), identify their components,
and in some cases, show how they are assembled or provide related service instructions.
• Procedures for certain types of repairs that may not be straightforward for the service
technician.
This part is subdivided into sections corresponding to types of machine assemblies (e.g., housing,
pneumatic, etc.) and within each section, documents that always begin on a new page. The table
of contents for Part 2 references page numbers.
2.
Where Other Service Information is Located
This manual provides information on mechanical servicing. Electrical servicing and parts
information is provided in the separate electrical schematic manual. Many service procedures
require service personnel to operate the machine manually. Instructions on manual operation are
provided in the separate reference manual. A complete set of manuals is provided with the
machine, either on CD or in printed form.
3.
Contacting Milnor® [Document BIUUUK06]
Your first contact with any question should be your authorized Milnor dealer, but problems or
special situations encountered in the field may require consultation with the Milnor factory.
Written correspondence can be mailed to this address:
Pellerin Milnor Corporation
Post Office Box 400
Kenner, Louisiana 70063-0400
Telephone: 504-467-9591
http://www.milnor.com
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
About This Service Manual
3.1.
Ordering Replacement Parts—In most cases your authorized Milnor dealer can provide
any necessary parts for equipment you purchased from them. If your dealer is not available or
able to help you acquire parts, contact the Milnor parts group.
Milnor Parts
Telephone: 504-467-2787
Fax: 504-469-9777
E-mail: [email protected]
3.2.
Customer Service and Technical Support—For your technical questions or comments
about Milnor equipment, contact your Milnor dealer first. If your dealer is unable to respond, the
Milnor customer service group has many years of collective experience with our equipment.
These men and women will give you the best possible answer to your question.
Milnor Customer Service
Telephone: 504-464-0163
Fax: 504-469-9777
E-mail: [email protected]
www.milnor.com (Customer Service)
3.3.
Service Seminars—Milnor offers service seminars to help train personnel in the
maintenance and repair of Milnor equipment. These seminars are focused on various machine
types and have been held in many locations. For information about upcoming seminars, contact
the Milnor training group.
Milnor Training
Telephone: 504-712-7725
Fax: 504-469-9777
E-mail: [email protected]
3.4.
Warranty Information—Your Milnor dealer can address most warranty claims. However, if
you have concerns or questions beyond the scope of your dealer, please contact our warranty
group.
Milnor Warranty Administrator
Telephone: 504-712-7735
Fax: 504-469-9777
E-mail: [email protected] (Attention: Warranty)
3.5.
Equipment Manuals—If you have suggestions or questions about any part of this manual or
any other documentation included with your machine, the Milnor technical publications group
can assist you.
Milnor Technical Publications
Telephone: 504-712-7636
Fax: 504-469-1849
E-mail: [email protected]
— End of BIUUUM02 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Part 1
Standard Maintenance
Procedures
A table of contents follows this page. Locate
information by section number, not page number.
BMP060040/2006324A
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Sections
Figures, Tables, and Supplements
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
1.1. Safety—Single Stage Membrane Press (Document BIUUUS27)
1.1.1. General Safety Requirements—Vital Information for
Management Personnel (Document BIUUUS04)
1.1.1.1. Laundry Facility
1.1.1.2. Personnel
1.1.1.3. Safety Devices
1.1.1.4. Hazard Information
1.1.1.5. Maintenance
1.1.2. Safety Alert Messages—Internal Electrical and Mechanical
Hazards (Document BIUUUS11)
1.1.3. Safety Alert Messages—External Mechanical Hazards
(Document BIUUUS12)
1.1.4. Safety Alert Messages—Unsafe Conditions
(Document
BIUUUS14)
1.1.4.1. Damage and Malfunction Hazards
1.1.4.1.1. Hazards Resulting from Inoperative Safety
Devices
1.1.4.1.2. Hazards Resulting from Damaged Mechanical
Devices
1.1.4.2. Careless Use Hazards
1.1.4.2.1. Careless Operation Hazards—Vital Information
for Operator Personnel (see also operator hazards
throughout manual)
1.1.4.2.2. Careless Servicing Hazards—Vital Information
for Service Personnel (see also service hazards
throughout manuals)
1.2. Safe Servicing—Vital Information for Personnel Who
Maintain and Service the Single Stage Press (Document
BIPPMS01)
1.2.1.
1.2.2.
1.2.3.
1.2.4.
1.2.5.
1.2.6.
Automated Laundering System Hazards
Door Interlock Bypass Hazards
Top-of-press Hazards
Hydraulic System Hazards
Risks When Using Manual Mode
Risks from Inattention to Maintenance or Alarms
1.3. SAFETY ALERT for Owner/Managers and Maintenance
Personnel: Using the Door Interlock Bypass Key Switch
Figure 1: Door Interlock Bypass Key
Switch and Safety Placard
(Document BICP1S01)
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Table of Contents
Sections
Figures, Tables, and Supplements
1.4. How To Use the Safety Stands and Safety Bars on Singlestage Press (Document BIUUUS06)
Figure 2: Safety Stands for Single-stage
Press Models
Figure 3: Safety Bars for Single-Stage
Press Models
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.1. Single Stage Press Preventive Maintenance
(Document
BIPPMM05)
2.1.1. Lubricant Specifications
2.1.2. Preventive Maintenance Schedule and Maintenance
Locations
2.1.3. About the Press Hydraulic Oil
2.1.3.1. Inspect Oil
2.1.3.2. Air Leaks In the Hydraulic System
2.1.3.2.1. Symptoms
2.1.3.2.2. Causes
2.1.3.2.3. How to Test for Air Leaks
2.1.3.3. Oil Add and Change Procedure
2.1.4. Testing the Suppressor Pre-charge
2.2. How to Fill and Maintain the Diaphragm
Table 1: Lubricant Specifications
Table 2: Preventive Maintenance Schedule
Figure 4: Primary Hydraulic Gauges
Figure 5: Prefill Pilot Pressure Gauge
Figure 6: Recirculation filter (MP1Axxxx
models)
Figure 7: Miscellaneous hydraulic oil
maintenance items
Figure 8: Breather/Moisture Filter
Figure 9: Discharge door pressure
regulator, gauge
Figure 10: Conveyor maintenance items
Table 3: Assessing Oil Quality
Figure 11: Suppressor Charging and
Pressure Testing Items
(Document
BIPPMM10)
2.2.1. About Diaphragm Water Volume
2.2.1.1. Why Water Replenishment and Monitoring are Critical
2.2.1.2. How To Monitor and Compensate for Excessive Water
Leakage
2.2.1.3. How Often to Fill (Top off) the Diaphragm
2.2.2. Precautions and Preparations
Table 4: Equipment Needed for
Diaphragm Filling Procedure
2.2.3. Diaphragm Filling (topping off) Procedure (Document
BIPPMM14)
2.2.3.1. Step 1: Set Up
2.2.3.2. Step 2: Fill (top off)
2.2.3.3. Step 3: Check
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chart 1: Step 1: Set Up
Chart 2: Step 2: Fill (top off)
Chart 3: Step 3: Check
Table of Contents
Sections
Figures, Tables, and Supplements
2.2.3.4. Step 4: Finish
2.3. B2T2006011.cdr
Chart 4: Step 4: Finish
(Document B2T2006011)
2.4. Installing the Milnor® Diaphragm in the Single Stage Press
(Document BIPPMM03)
2.4.1. Preparations
2.4.1.1. Obtain a diaphragm replacement kit from Milnor.
2.4.1.2. Have the necessary tools on hand.
2.4.1.3. Have two service technicians on hand.
2.4.2. Removing the old diaphragm.
2.4.3. Cleaning the Platen and the New Diaphragm
2.4.4. Aligning the Diaphragm with the Platen
2.4.5. Prepare the platen and diaphragm sealing surfaces
2.4.6. Bolting the Diaphragm
Figure 12: Diaphragm Bolts and Push-off
Hole
Figure 13: Aligning the Diaphragm with
the Platen
Figure 14: Loctite 515 Applied to
Diaphragm Ring
Figure 15: Applying Loctite 242 to Bolts
Figure 16: Typical Bolting and Torque
Pattern
2.4.7. Re-tightening the Diaphragm Bolts After One Week (40
Hours)
2.5. Adjusting Ram Shaft Seal Tightness (and Free Fall Speed)
(Document BIPPMM13)
2.5.1. How the Ram Shaft Seals Work
Table 5: Shims Used on Shaft Seal
Tension Collar
Figure 17: Shaft Seals and Related
Components
Figure 18: Seal Tightness Adjustments
2.5.2. Seal Tightness Adjustment
2.6. Understanding and Setting Press Water Levels
(Document
BIPPMM15)
2.6.1. Required Levels
2.6.2. How to Set the Levels Accurately and Avoid Overflow
2.7. Servicing a Misaligned (“Jammed”) Can Assembly
(Document BIPPMM09)
2.7.1.
2.7.2.
2.7.3.
2.7.4.
Figure 19: Correct Low and High Levels
Figure 20: Level Float Components
Important in Setting Levels
Figure 21: Can-To-Cylinder Rod
Mounting Components
Inspecting the Can After a “Jam”
Dismounting the Can
Replacing Can Cylinder(s), If Required
Remounting and Positioning the Can
2.8. Servicing the Integral Conveyor (Document BIPPMM12)
2.8.1. Conditions Requiring Servicing and Summary of
Procedures
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Table of Contents
Sections
2.8.1.1. Belt Too Tight Causing “Taut Belt...” Error (Tension
Adjustment)
2.8.1.2. Belt Not Centered (Tracking Adjustment)
2.8.1.3. Foreign Material (Goods) Wrapped Around Rollers
2.8.1.4. Belt Worn or Damaged
2.8.1.5. Hardware Deteriorated
2.8.2. Preparing the Press for Safe Conveyor Servicing
Figures, Tables, and Supplements
Figure 22: Conveyor Belt and Rollers
Figure 23: Wood Planks Under Raised Can
Figure 24: Securing the Door
2.8.3. Belt Removal and Installation (for access to rollers or belt
replacement)
2.8.3.1. Facilitating Tension Roller Removal On Older Presses
2.8.3.1.1. Cutting a Slot for Roller Removal
Figure 25: Tank Left Side Wall With Slot
Figure 26: Tank Left Side Wall—Slot
Dimensions
2.8.3.1.2. Performing Additional Disassembly
2.8.3.2. Removing/Replacing the Tension Roller (Current
Figure 27: Left Side, Load End Roller
Design)
Hardware (right side similar)
Figure 28: Tracking Bracket and Related
Components Hanging from Tracking
Roller
Figure 29: Pulling Belt Through Press
from Unload End
2.8.3.3. Partially Removing/Replacing the Drive Roller (for
Figure 30: Components Used in Partially
belt replacement)
Removing Drive Roller (your press
may be opposite hand)
2.8.4. Restoring Proper Belt Tension
Figure 31: Belt Tension Required Settings
2.8.5. Adjusting Belt Tracking On the Load End
Supplement 1: Understanding Left/Right
Terminology
Figure 32: How to Angle the Tracking
Roller to Correct Belt Creeping
Figure 33: Load End Belt Tracking
Adjustments
2.8.6. Adjusting Belt Tracking On the Unload End
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.1. How the Single Stage Press Hydraulic System Works
Figure 34: Major Press Components
(Document BIPPMF01)
3.1.1. The Pumps and Related Components
3.1.2. The Hydraulic System and How It Functions During
Operation
3.1.2.1. Idling (waiting to load)
3.1.2.2. Loading
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Figure 35: Pressure Pump and Related
Control Components
Figure 36: Single Stage Press Hydraulic
Schematic
Figure 37: Ram and Can Proximity
Switches
Table of Contents
Sections
3.1.2.3. Ram “Free-fall”
3.1.2.4. Preparing to press (pre-fill valve closed, bypass valve
permitted to close)
3.1.2.5. Processing (extracting)
3.1.2.6. Discharging
Figures, Tables, and Supplements
Figure 38: Pre-fill Pilot Valve and Pre-fill
Valve
Supplement 2: How the Can Assembly is
Susceptible to Damage
3.2. Onboard Troubleshooting Aids for Digital Outputs and
Inputs (Document BIUUUT04)
3.2.1. How To Use the Troubleshooting Aids
3.2.2. Caveats
Figure 39: Troubleshooting Aids
3.3. About the Ram Proximity Switches, Mounting Post, and
Guide Rod (Document BIPPMM02)
Figure 40: Ram Proximity Switches,
Related Components and Switch
Functions
Figure 41: Installing the Guide Rod and
Switch Mounting Post
3.3.1. Installing the Guide Rod and Switch Mounting Post and
Setting the Switch-to-target Gap
3.3.2. Checking and Setting the Switch Vertical Positions
3.3.3. PXST “Ram full up”
3.3.4. PXSM “Ram inside can” and PXSU “Ram at unload”
3.3.5. PXSL “Ram at low” and PXSB “Ram full down”
3.4. Troubleshooting Ram Malfunctions (Document BIPPMT01)
3.4.1. What You Should Know Before Troubleshooting
3.4.2. Troubleshooting Procedures
3.4.2.1. Ram Will Not Go Down or Goes Down Slowly
3.4.2.2. Ram Will Not Go Up or Goes Up Slowly
Figure 42: Where Ram Should Begin to
Apply Power (PXSM)
Figure 43: Where Ram Should Park for
Unload (PXSU)
Figure 44: PXSL and PXSB With Abutting
Brackets
Figure 45: PXSB Diaphragm-to-Bed
Clearance
Table 6: Ram Symptoms and Causes
Cross-reference
Table 7: Valve Actuation Sequence for
Ram DOWN (observe LED's on
actuators)
Chart 5: Ram Will Not Go Down (two
technicians required)
Chart 6: Ram Goes Down Slowly (two
technicians required)
Table 8: Valve Actuation Sequence for
Ram UP (observe LED's on valve
actuators)
Chart 7: Ram Will Not Go Up (two
technicians required)
Chart 8: Ram Goes Up Slowly (two
technicians required)
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Table of Contents
Sections
3.4.2.3. Ram Drifts Down at Idle
3.4.2.4. Neither the Ram Nor Can Will Move
3.4.2.5. Little or No Extraction
3.4.2.6. Commanded Pressure Not Achieved or Achieved
Slowly
3.4.3. Functional Tests
3.4.3.1. How to Check Electric Valve Actuator Circuits and
Test the Solenoids
3.4.3.2. How to Inspect and Service Hydraulic Valve
Cartridges
3.4.3.3. How to Bench Test Directional Valves
3.4.3.4. How to Test the D/A Board and Proportional (DBET)
Card Analog Output
3.4.3.5. How to Test Pressure Transducer and A/D Board
Analog Input
3.4.3.6. How to Test the Pressure Pump
3.4.3.7. How to Test the Ram Piston Seals
3.4.3.8. How to Test the Pre-fill Valve
3.4.3.9. How to Test the Bypass Valve
3.4.3.10. How to Test for Mid-range Pressure
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Figures, Tables, and Supplements
Table 9: Valve State During Idle
Chart 9: Ram Drifts Down at Idle
Chart 10: Neither the Ram Nor Can Will
Move
Table 10: Valve States During Pressing
(observe LED's on valve actuators)
Chart 11: Little or No Extraction (two
technicians required)
Table 11: Applicable Milnor® Single Stage
Press Models and Pressure Ratings
Supplement 3: About Impaired Pressing
Chart 12: Commanded Pressure Not
Achieved or Achieved Slowly
Figure 46: Ram Electrically Operated
Hydraulic Valves
Table 12: Digital Outputs for Ram
Functions (electric valves)
Figure 47: Pressure Relief Valves and
Regulators
Figure 48: Operating Valve Cartridge
Figure 49: Bench-testing a Directional
Valve
Table 13: Relationships Among Pump
Control Components at Each End of
Range
Chart 13: How to Test the D to A Board
and Proportional (DBET) Card Analog
Output
Table 14: Relationships Among Pressure
Sensing Components at Each End of
Range
Chart 14: How to Test Pressure Transducer
and A/D board Analog Input
Chart 15: Pressure Pump Test
Figure 50: Where to Disconnect Tubing to
Test Ram Piston Seals
Supplement 4: About Ram Piston Seal
Replacement
Figure 51: Bypass Valve: Where to
Disconnect Hose
Table of Contents
Sections
3.5. Setting Single Stage Press Pressures
Figures, Tables, and Supplements
(Document BIPPMT02)
3.5.1. Preparations, Precautions and Tips
3.5.1.1. Two technicians are needed.
3.5.1.2. Be prepared to load goods.
3.5.1.3. Have needed materials on hand.
3.5.1.4. Get the gist of the procedure.
Table 15: List of Adjustments
Table 16: Adjustment Specifications
Figure 52: How Pressure Adjustments Are
Made
Figure 53: Where Most Pressures are Read
3.5.1.5. Adhere to the adjustment order.
3.5.1.6. Ensure minimum ramp rates
3.5.2. Summary of Adjustments
3.5.3. Set Idle Pressure
3.5.4. Set Pump Compensation (Full System) Pressure
3.5.5.
3.5.6.
3.5.7.
3.5.8.
3.5.9.
Chart 16: Ensure Minimum Ramp Rates
Chart 17: Summary of Adjustments
Chart 18: Set Idle Pressure
Chart 19: Set Pump Compensation (Full
System) Pressure
Set 1st Stage Horsepower (amperage draw)
Chart 20: Set 1st Stage Horsepower
(amperage draw)
Set 2nd Stage Horsepower (amperage draw), System Relief Chart 21: Set 2nd Stage Horsepower
Pressure and Pre-fill Pilot Pressure
(amperage draw), System Relief
Pressure and Pre-fill Pilot Relief
Pressure
Set Proportional Valve Maximum Pressure
Chart 22: Set Proportional Valve
Maximum Pressure
Set Ram Relief Pressure
Chart 23: Set Ram Relief Pressure
Set Can Pressure
Chart 24: Set Can Pressure
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
Chapter 1
Safety for Service Personnel
BIUUUS27 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
1.1. Safety—Single Stage Membrane Press
1.1.1.
General Safety Requirements—Vital Information for
Management Personnel [Document BIUUUS04]
Incorrect installation, neglected preventive maintenance, abuse, and/or improper repairs, or
changes to the machine can cause unsafe operation and personal injuries, such as multiple
fractures, amputations, or death. The owner or his selected representative (owner/user) is
responsible for understanding and ensuring the proper operation and maintenance of the machine.
The owner/user must familiarize himself with the contents of all machine instruction manuals.
The owner/user should direct any questions about these instructions to a Milnor® dealer or the
Milnor® Service department.
Most regulatory authorities (including OSHA in the USA and CE in Europe) hold the owner/user
ultimately responsible for maintaining a safe working environment. Therefore, the owner/user
must do or ensure the following:
• recognize all foreseeable safety hazards within his facility and take actions to protect his
personnel, equipment, and facility;
• work equipment is suitable, properly adapted, can be used without risks to health or safety,
and is adequately maintained;
• where specific hazards are likely to be involved, access to the equipment is restricted to those
employees given the task of using it;
• only specifically designated workers carry out repairs, modifications, maintenance, or
servicing;
• information, instruction, and training is provided;
• workers and/or their representatives are consulted.
Work equipment must comply with the requirements listed below. The owner/user must verify
that installation and maintenance of equipment is performed in such a way as to support these
requirements:
• control devices must be visible, identifiable, and marked; be located outside dangerous zones;
and not give rise to a hazard due to unintentional operation;
• control systems must be safe and breakdown/damage must not result in danger;
• work equipment is to be stabilized;
• protection against rupture or disintegration of work equipment;
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
• guarding, to prevent access to danger zones or to stop movements of dangerous parts before
the danger zones are reached. Guards to be robust; not give rise to any additional hazards; not
be easily removed or rendered inoperative; situated at a sufficient distance from the danger
zone; not restrict view of operating cycle; allow fitting, replacing, or maintenance by
restricting access to relevant area and without removal of guard/protection device;
• suitable lighting for working and maintenance areas;
• maintenance to be possible when work equipment is shut down. If not possible, then
protection measures to be carried out outside danger zones;
• work equipment must be appropriate for preventing the risk of fire or overheating; discharges
of gas, dust, liquid, vapor, other substances; explosion of the equipment or substances in it.
1.1.1.1.
Laundry Facility—Provide a supporting floor that is strong and rigid enough to support–with
a reasonable safety factor and without undue or objectionable deflection–the weight of the fully
loaded machine and the forces transmitted by it during operation. Provide sufficient clearance for
machine movement. Provide any safety guards, fences, restraints, devices, and verbal and/or
posted restrictions necessary to prevent personnel, machines, or other moving machinery from
accessing the machine or its path. Provide adequate ventilation to carry away heat and vapors.
Ensure service connections to installed machines meet local and national safety standards,
especially regarding the electrical disconnect (see the National Electric Code). Prominently post
safety information, including signs showing the source of electrical disconnect.
1.1.1.2.
Personnel—Inform personnel about hazard avoidance and the importance of care and
common sense. Provide personnel with the safety and operating instructions that apply to them.
Verify that personnel use proper safety and operating procedures. Verify that personnel
understand and abide by the warnings on the machine and precautions in the instruction manuals.
1.1.1.3.
Safety Devices—Ensure that no one eliminates or disables any safety device on the machine
or in the facility. Do not allow machine to be used with any missing guard, cover, panel or door.
Service any failing or malfunctioning device before operating the machine.
1.1.1.4.
Hazard Information—Important information on hazards is provided on the machine safety
placards, in the Safety Guide, and throughout the other machine manuals. Placards must be kept
clean so that the information is not obscured. They must be replaced immediately if lost or
damaged. The Safety Guide and other machine manuals must be available at all times to
the appropriate personnel. See the machine service manual for safety placard part numbers.
Contact the Milnor Parts department for replacement placards or manuals.
1.1.1.5.
Maintenance—Ensure the machine is inspected and serviced in accordance with the norms of
good practice and with the preventive maintenance schedule. Replace belts, pulleys, brake
shoes/disks, clutch plates/tires, rollers, seals, alignment guides, etc. before they are severely
worn. Immediately investigate any evidence of impending failure and make needed repairs (e.g.,
cylinder, shell, or frame cracks; drive components such as motors, gear boxes, bearings, etc.,
whining, grinding, smoking, or becoming abnormally hot; bending or cracking of cylinder, shell,
frame, etc.; leaking seals, hoses, valves, etc.) Do not permit service or maintenance by
unqualified personnel.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
1.1.2.
Safety Alert Messages—Internal Electrical and Mechanical
Hazards [Document BIUUUS11]
The following are instructions about hazards inside the machine and in electrical enclosures.
WARNING 1 : Electrocution and Electrical Burn Hazards—Contact with electric power
can kill or seriously injure you. Electric power is present inside the cabinetry unless the main
machine power disconnect is off.
• Do not unlock or open electric box doors.
• Do not remove guards, covers, or panels.
• Do not reach into the machine housing or frame.
• Keep yourself and others off of machine.
• Know the location of the main machine disconnect and use it in an emergency to remove
all electric power from the machine.
WARNING 2 : Entangle and Crush Hazards—Contact with moving components normally
isolated by guards, covers, and panels, can entangle and crush your limbs. These components
move automatically.
• Do not remove guards, covers, or panels.
• Do not reach into the machine housing or frame.
• Keep yourself and others off of machine.
• Know the location of all emergency stop switches, pull cords, and/or kick plates and use
them in an emergency to stop machine motion.
CAUTION 3 : Crush and Entrap Hazards—The bell will crush your body or limbs if it
descends while you are under it. Bell can descend with power off or on.
• Do not reach into the machine housing or frame.
• Use the factory supplied gaff-hook to move objects inside the housing.
1.1.3.
Safety Alert Messages—External Mechanical Hazards [Document
BIUUUS12]
The following are instructions about hazards around the front, sides, rear or top of the machine.
CAUTION 4 : Fall, Entangle, and Strike Hazards—Machine motion can cause you to fall
or become entangled in or struck by nearby objects if you stand, walk, or ride on the machine.
Shuttles and conveyor belts move automatically.
• Keep yourself and others off of machine.
1.1.4.
1.1.4.1.
1.1.4.1.1.
Safety Alert Messages—Unsafe Conditions [Document BIUUUS14]
Damage and Malfunction Hazards
Hazards Resulting from Inoperative Safety Devices
WARNING 5 : Multiple Hazards—Operating the machine with an inoperative safety device
can kill or injure personnel, damage or destroy the machine, damage property, and/or void the
warranty.
• Do not tamper with or disable any safety device or operate the machine with a
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
malfunctioning safety device. Request authorized service.
WARNING 6 : Electrocution and Electrical Burn Hazards—Electric box doors—
Operating the machine with any electric box door unlocked can expose high voltage conductors
inside the box.
• Do not unlock or open electric box doors.
WARNING 7 : Entangle and Crush Hazards—Guards, covers, and panels—Operating the
machine with any guard, cover, or panel removed exposes moving components.
• Do not remove guards, covers, or panels.
1.1.4.1.2.
Hazards Resulting from Damaged Mechanical Devices
WARNING 8 : Multiple Hazards—Operating a damaged machine can kill or injure
personnel, further damage or destroy the machine, damage property, and/or void the warranty.
• Do not operate a damaged or malfunctioning machine. Request authorized service.
1.1.4.2.
1.1.4.2.1.
Careless Use Hazards
Careless Operation Hazards—Vital Information for Operator Personnel (see also
operator hazards throughout manual)
WARNING 9 : Multiple Hazards—Careless operator actions can kill or injure personnel,
damage or destroy the machine, damage property, and/or void the warranty.
• Do not tamper with or disable any safety device or operate the machine with a
malfunctioning safety device. Request authorized service.
• Do not operate a damaged or malfunctioning machine. Request authorized service.
• Do not attempt unauthorized servicing, repairs, or modification.
• Do not use the machine in any manner contrary to the factory instructions.
• Use the machine only for its customary and intended purpose.
• Understand the consequences of operating manually.
CAUTION 10 : Goods Damage and Wasted Resources—Entering incorrect cake data
causes improper processing, routing, and accounting of batches.
• Understand the consequences of entering cake data.
1.1.4.2.2.
Careless Servicing Hazards—Vital Information for Service Personnel (see also
service hazards throughout manuals)
WARNING 11 : Electrocution and Electrical Burn Hazards—Contact with electric
power can kill or seriously injure you. Electric power is present inside the cabinetry unless the
main machine power disconnect is off.
• Do not service the machine unless qualified and authorized. You must clearly understand
the hazards and how to avoid them.
• Abide by the current OSHA lockout/tagout standard when lockout/tagout is called for in
the service instructions. Outside the USA, abide by the OSHA standard in the absence of
any other overriding standard.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
WARNING 12 : Entangle and Crush Hazards—Contact with moving components
normally isolated by guards, covers, and panels, can entangle and crush your limbs. These
components move automatically.
• Do not service the machine unless qualified and authorized. You must clearly understand
the hazards and how to avoid them.
• Abide by the current OSHA lockout/tagout standard when lockout/tagout is called for in
the service instructions. Outside the USA, abide by the OSHA standard in the absence of
any other overriding standard.
CAUTION 13 : Crush Hazards—The bell will crush your body or limbs if it descends while
you are under it. Bell can descend with power off or on.
• Secure both red safety stands in accordance with the instructions furnished, then lock out
and tag out power at the main machine disconnect before working under the bell.
— End of BIUUUS27 —
BIPPMS01 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
1.2. Safe Servicing—Vital Information for Personnel Who Maintain
and Service the Single Stage Press
This document supplements document BIUUUS27 “Safety—Single Stage Membrane Press” and
the safety manual for service personnel. It provides important information regarding:
1. the normally guarded hazards that service personnel must protect themselves and others from
in the course of their work and,
2. maintenance issues that can cause costly machine damage and down time.
Do not service the machine until you have read and understand this, and all referenced
safety information.
1.2.1.
Automated Laundering System Hazards
The press, which is part of an automated laundering system, is located within a protected (usually
fenced) area (see safety manual and document BISUUI01 “Proximity Safeguarding for Automatic
Shuttle Conveyers” in the installation manual). This enclosure protects personnel from the shuttle
conveyor strike and crush hazards described in the safety manual. When you enter this area to
perform maintenance, you are responsible to ensure that your work does not compromise the
protections provided by the safety fencing.
1.2.2.
Door Interlock Bypass Hazards
The press is equipped with a guarded key switch that permits you to operate the press with the
normally interlocked access doors open. The bypass procedure, which exposes the normally
guarded ram, can, and internal conveyor, is only for maintenance and must never be used during
operation. Nor must operators be given access to the key. Use this procedure in strict compliance
with document BICP1S01 “SAFETY ALERT for Owner/Managers and Maintenance Personnel:
Using the Door Interlock Bypass Key Switch”, in the reference manual and ensure that all
personnel understand the hazards associated with these powerful, moving components.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
Safety supports are provided for working on the can and ram. Use these safety tools in
accordance with document BIUUUS06 “How to Use the Safety Stands...”
WARNING 14 : Crush and Sever Hazards—The can and ram move independently. During
operation, these components move without warning. These components can also drift down with
power off. Any of several closing gaps will crush or sever body parts.
• Proceed only if a qualified service technician, knowledgeable in press manual operation.
• Use the door interlock bypass key switch in strict compliance with the instructions.
• Install the safety supports and lockout/tagout power before reaching into, or working
under the can or ram.
• Ensure that personnel and equipment are clear of the press before operating the machine.
• Be prepared to use emergency stop switches.
1.2.3.
Top-of-press Hazards
Keep yourself and others off of the press top plate except as stated in the following safety alert
message.
CAUTION 15 : Multiple hazards—Various components above the press top plate move or
become hot or energized. Hydraulic piping may leak. Working area is tight and may be slippery.
When maintenance work necessitates getting on top of the press:
• Ensure only qualified service personnel perform top-of-press work.
• Identify and stand clear of components that move (such as the diaphragm rod) or become
hot (such as the pump and motor).
• Use safe, appropriate equipment for getting on and off of the machine.
• Ensure solid footing and guard against slippery surfaces. Wash surfaces with detergent.
1.2.4.
Hydraulic System Hazards
Milnor single stage presses employ a powerful, high pressure hydraulic system. Because such
systems pose special hazards, only service technicians with an in-depth knowledge of hydraulics
should service this system. Service technicians must be able to read and understand the hydraulic
system explanation and schematic provided in document BIPPMF01 “How the single Stage Press
Hydraulic System Works.”
WARNING 16 : Crush and Machine Damage Hazards—Removing a drain plug or
disconnecting certain piping will release oil and cause an unrestrained ram or can to fall.
• If you do not fully understand the consequences, do not tamper with hydraulic parts.
• Use safety supports.
WARNING 17 : Puncture Wound and Poison Hazards—Oil leaking out under high
pressure can puncture skin causing serious injury, gangrene or death.
• Do not touch hoses, pipes, or fittings, except in accordance with the service procedures.
• If injured, seek emergency medical help. Immediate surgery is required to remove oil.
CAUTION 18 : Risk of costly damage—Hydraulic system servicing requires specialized
knowledge and skills. Inexperienced handling of unanticipated problems can destroy the pressure
pump or other components. Pressure pump must be primed before commissioning and following
certain service work; otherwise, it will quickly burn out.
• Do not service or adjust hydraulic components without appropriate expertise.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
1.2.5.
Risks When Using Manual Mode
Virtually all service procedures require service personnel to operate the press manually. Do not
try to learn manual operation as you go. Thoroughly familiarize yourself with these procedures,
which are explained in the reference manual, so that you will be comfortable with them when
performing press maintenance.
Many procedures require two technicians: one technician operates the controls while the other
performs the servicing. These personnel must be able to clearly communicate and be aware of
each other's activities at all times, to ensure safe working conditions. Manual operation bypasses
certain safeguards.
Notice 19 : For safety and convenience—Avoid manually loading goods.
• If the service procedure must be performed with goods in the machine, permit the press to
accept a load of goods automatically, then take the machine off-line.
• If it becomes necessary to manually load or adjust goods, use extreme caution. Always
follow the published safety precautions (see safety manual).
Notice 20 : Risk of damage and misalignment—Moving the ram through the bottom of
the can will cause the diaphragm to forcefully rub against the can, possibly causing damage. This
does not occur in automatic operation.
• If the maintenance necessitates placing the can up and the ram down: 1) lower the can
onto the press bed, 2) lower the diaphragm onto the press bed, 3) raise the can.
• If goods become jammed between the ram and can, withdraw the ram through the top of
the can. Attempting to push the ram through the bottom will only jam the goods tighter.
1.2.6.
Risks from Inattention to Maintenance or Alarms
The best way to avoid costly machine damage and downtime is to abide by the preventive
maintenance schedule. The next best measure is to address the warning sign of an impending
problem immediately. Educate operator and maintenance personnel to the warning signs
addressed by the following:
CAUTION 21 : Risk of Early Diaphragm Failure—The diaphragm will stretch too much or
tear, reducing service life if it cannot properly conform to the goods. This occurs when it is
contains the wrong amount of water. The diaphragm must be filled at minimum, every 40 hours
of operation, but more often if it shows signs of leaking. See document BIPPMM10 “How to
Fill and Maintain the Diaphragm” and reference card B2T2006011.
Notice 22 : Attend to alarms—The hydraulic system is equipped with temperature, oil level,
and filter pressure alarms
• To avoid damage and preserve the warranty, service machine as soon as an alarm occurs.
Notice 23 : If the receiving chute and can assembly becomes “jammed,” STOP!—
Before returning to normal operation, inspect for, and correct damage and/or misalignment. See
document BIPPMM09 “Servicing a Misaligned ("Jammed") Can Assembly.”
— End of BIPPMS01 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
BICP1S01 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
1.3. SAFETY ALERT for Owner/Managers and Maintenance
Personnel: Using the Door Interlock Bypass Key Switch
The hand-operated access doors on this machine are equipped with safety lockout switches that
disable the machine if a door is opened. The Door Interlock Bypass key switch permits
bypassing this safety feature to allow access to certain moving parts during required maintenance
procedures. This key switch, located inside the low voltage control box, is shown in Figure 1.
DANGER 24 : Crush Hazard—The “Maintenance Only” position bypasses door interlocks
and permits access to moving parts during both manual and automatic operation. To prevent
serious injury or death, comply with, or ensure compliance with the following:
• Never use the machine for normal operation with this switch in the “Maintenance
Only” position.
• Never use this switch to clear faults or for any operational function.
• Use this switch only if you are a trained, authorized service technician, and only when
performing maintenance that requires immediate access to moving parts normally
shielded by the doors.
• Always turn the switch to the “Safe Operation” position and remove the key before
resuming normal operation or stepping away from the machine.
• Keep the Door Interlock Bypass key secured away from machine operators and all other
personnel who do not fully understand the results of using it.
• Keep all electrical and control cabinets closed and securely latched. Keep control cabinet
keys away from untrained employees.
Figure 1: Door Interlock Bypass Key Switch and Safety Placard
— End of BICP1S01 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
BIUUUS06 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
1.4. How To Use the Safety Stands and Safety Bars on Single-stage
Press
These machines are provided with two safety stands and two safety hangar bars (painted red) for
maintenance. After the ram is raised, the hangar bars are connected between the platen and the
press top plate. After the can is raised, the stands are placed under the can (but not under the ram).
Use the safety stands and safety bars to perform maintenance on the machine while the can and
ram are raised. A location is provided on the machine for stowing the safety stands when not in
use.
WARNING 25 : Crush Hazard—The safety stands and bars provide protection against the
un-powered drifting down of the can or ram during maintenance in the event of a leak in the
hydraulic system. They are not intended to restrain the can or ram from coming down under
power.
• Never work under the raised can and ram unless the safety bars and both safety stands are
installed and power is locked out/tagged out. Do not work near the raised can and ram
with power on unless the safety bars and both safety stands are installed, except where
called for in the maintenance instructions.
• Do not attempt to rest the can on the safety stands by lowering it under power. Use care
not to manually command the can or ram down with the stands or bars in place.
• When working near the installed safety stands use care not to knock the stands out of
position.
• Install these safety components using the procedure prescribed in this document.
• Maintain these safety components in good condition.
• When not in use, stow the safety stands in the location provided on the machine and
designate a convenient, secure location to stow the safety bars (see Note 1).
Note 1: You will probably want to designate a single storage area for all loose items supplied with the
press, including the safety bars, the disk used when filling the diaphragm, the fill hoses, and the gaff hook.
Figure 2: Safety Stands for Single-stage Press Models
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 1. Safety for Service Personnel
If the ram is to be secured in the full up position for the maintenance to be performed, do this
first, as follows:
1. At the controls, use the Manual mode to lower the can, if it is up.
2. At the controls, use the Manual mode to raise the ram.
3. The safety bars attach between two eye bolts—one on the platten and one on the press top
plate. Attach the safety bars as shown in Figure 3. Refer to the safety stands parts drawings
for a more detailed depiction of the installed safety bars.
4. Depending on the type of maintenance, it may be necessary to move the can before locking
out power to the press. However, lock out/tag out power before working under the can
and ram.
Figure 3: Safety Bars for Single-Stage Press Models
Install the safety stands as follows:
1. At the controls, use the Manual mode to raise the can.
2. In this step, install the stands through the nearest door; do not reach across the bed. Referring
to the first figure, place the safety stands on opposite sides of the can (180 degrees apart).
Refer to the safety stands parts drawing for a more detailed depiction of the installed stands.
Always use both stands. Do not attempt to rest the can on the safety stands by lowering it
under power (even though it may drift down onto the stands).
3. Lock out/tag out power to the machine.
— End of BIUUUS06 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Chapter 2
Routine Maintenance
BIPPMM05 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
2.1. Single Stage Press Preventive Maintenance
Notice 26 : Understand the press servicing hazards—Before performing press
maintenance, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
2.1.1.
Lubricant Specifications
Lubricants used on the press must adhere to the following:
Table 1: Lubricant Specifications
Component
Hydraulic
system
Bearings
2.1.2.
Lubricant
Approximate Quantity
MP1Axxxx Models
MP16xxxx Models
Shell Tellus 68
Tank Only Entire System Tank Only Entire System
or equivalent
70 gallons (265 98 gallons
115 gallons
55 gallons
(208 liters)
liters)
(371 liters)
(435 liters)
Shell Alvania LP
--
Preventive Maintenance Schedule and Maintenance Locations
Table 2 and the figures following it (referred to in the table) describe the routine maintenance
needed to keep the press functioning properly and to obtain normal service life. Some common
maintenance procedures called for in the schedule are provided in the remainder of this
document. Others are explained throughout the service manual. Some preventive maintenance
must be performed with the machine running. However, any maintenance that reqires access to
normally guarded areas must be performed in compliance with the safety support and
lockout/tagout requirements stated in the safety instructions.
CAUTION 27 : Machine Damage—Failure to perform the maintenance described herein will
cause parts to wear prematurely and may void the warranty on these parts.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Table 2: Preventive Maintenance Schedule
Component
Hydraulic
system
Screens
Oil cooler
air filter
Goods
conveyor
Diaphragm
Receiving
chute and
can assy.
Discharge
door
Prefill pilot
Suppressor
(optional)
Belt brush
Action
See
Check gauges on gauge cluster. See BIPPMT02
“Setting Single Stage Press Pressures” for proper
values (see Note 2 and Note 5).
Check oil level and oil temperature with ram up and
can down: 140 F (60 C) maximum temperature.
Check filter pressure gauge: 25 psi (1.76 Kg/cm sq.)
maximum.
Look at oil condition (see Section 2.1.3 “About the
Press Hydraulic Oil”).
Check hoses and connections for leaks, deterioration.
Change oil filter.
Figure 4
(items 1, 2, 3)
Frequency
Daily
Figure 4
(items 4, 5)
Figure 4 (item
7)
Figure 7
40 oper. hours
Weekly
Figure 4 (item Every 500
6)
operating hours
Every 2000
Have oil sample tested by a reputable testing facility
for: viscosity, the presence of insolubles, acid number
operating hours
and spectrographic wear analysis. Retain or replace
oil as advised by the testing facility.
Replace system oil breather and moisture filter.
Annually
Figure 8
Figure 6
Change recirculation oil filter (MP1Axxxx models
Every 500
only): pn#27E7112B
operating hours
Inspect and clean out press screens.
Figure 10
Daily
Weekly ( Note 4)
Slide filter out and hose filter off. Direct the water
Figure 7
stream opposite the air flow arrow stamped on filter.
Figure 10
Hose off bed with water.
Daily
Figure 10
Inspect belt condition, tension and tracking (see
BIPPMM12 “Servicing the Integral Conveyor”).
Inspect and grease bearing fittings (motor side), as
necessary.
Refill diaphragm via the quick disconnect hoses (see
Every 40
document BIPPMM10 “How to Fill and Maintain the
operating hours
Diaphragm” and reference card B2T2006011).
min. (see Note 3)
Check diaphragm attachment bolts for tightness. ReWeekly
torque as necessary (see BIPPMM03 “Installing the
Milnor Diaphragm...”)
Check for rubbing against can (see next item)
Verify that can descends flat and level on press bed.
Weekly
Adjust if required (see BIPPMM09 “Servicing a
Misaligned (Jammed) Can Assembly”).
Check door pressure gauge: 22—25 Psi (1.54—1.75 Figure 9
Weekly
Kg cm sq.)
Check pressure gauge: 2000 Psi (139.9 Bar)
Figure 5
Check pressure gauge: 2300 Psi (159 Bar). See
Figure 11
Annually
Section 2.1.4 “Testing the Suppressor Pre-charge ”
Hand wipe off lint and debris
Figure 10
Monthly
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Note 2: System pressure is machine model and program-dependent.
Note 3: Diaphragm leaks are difficult to detect and are a leading cause of diaphragm failure. Topping off
the diaphragm every 40 hours (or more frequently, if needed) can prevent premature diaphragm failure.
Note 4: Initially inspect weekly. Adjust cleaning schedule according to laundry lint load.
Note 5: Consult factory before ordering a replacement hydraulic pump from others. Pumps are modified at
the factory for use in single stage presses. These modifications are not recorded on the pump data plate.
Figure 4: Primary Hydraulic Gauges
Gauge cluster
Oil level and temperature
Oil filter and related
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
System pressure gauge
Ram relief gauge
Can relief gauge
Oil level (ram up, can
down)
Oil temperature
Filter (within housing)
Filter pressure gauge
Oil fill connection
.
Figure 5: Prefill Pilot Pressure Gauge
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Figure 6: Recirculation filter (MP1Axxxx models)
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Figure 7: Miscellaneous hydraulic oil maintenance items
Oil view port
Tank drain valve
Oil cooler air filter
Legend
1.
Oil quick disconnect in storage position
.
Figure 8: Breather/Moisture Filter
Figure 9: Discharge door pressure regulator, gauge
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Figure 10: Conveyor maintenance items
Belt grease fitting
Belt brush
Press bed and conveyor belt
Press screens
Legend
1.
Grease fitting
.
2.1.3.
About the Press Hydraulic Oil
Obtaining normal service life from the press hydraulic components depends on maintaining
hydraulic oil quality and quantity.
CAUTION 28 : Burn Hazard—Hot oil can cause serious burns.
• Allow oil to cool before changing oil.
CAUTION 29 : Machine Damage— Mixing different oil types and qualities can cause
bearing and seal damage.
2.1.3.1.
Inspect Oil—Visually inspect oil after the first forty hours of operation. Afterwards, inspect oil
every eighty hours of operation. Evaluate oil quality and take appropriate action, as explained in
Table 3, which follows:
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Table 3: Assessing Oil Quality
Oil Appearance
• Clean and clear with few deposits
• Slightly dark with no sediment
• Very dark with sediment
• Contains floating or settled impurities
• Cloudy and discolored with visible
water separation
• Milky with air bubbles
• Dark with sediment and smells sour
2.1.3.2.
2.1.3.2.1.
Action or Comment
Permissible to extend time between inspections.
Oil is normal. Oil darkens with use.
Filter the oil.
Filter the oil. Clean the system. Inspect the filter(s)
Drain off water. Inspect oil morte frequently.
See Section 2.1.3.2 “Air Leaks In the Hydraulic
System ”
Change oil immediately and clean the system.
Air Leaks In the Hydraulic System
Symptoms—Air leaks in the hydraulic system leads to oil leakage and reduced pump life.
Although milky oil is a primary symptom of air leaks, some other symptoms are:
• Loud noises as the ram lifts after the pressing cycle. These noises can be best described as
“marbles rolling down a pipe” instead of the normal sound of operation.
• Connections loosening and leaking.
2.1.3.2.2.
Causes——Likely causes of air in the hydraulic system are:
A loose or leaking gooseneck pipe plug. Since this plug is on top of the gooseneck, air can be
sucked in during operation without appearing to leak oil. Fix this by removing the plug, coating it
with Loctite 569 ™ thread sealant (or equivalent), and re-installing the plug.
A loose or incorrectly seated gooseneck pre fill flange (machines produced after 5/1/1999 use
back-up plates on the flange for additional clamping force). Loosen the flange bolts, step on the
flange and use your body weight to center the flange, then tighten the bolts to the correct torque.
2.1.3.2.3.
2.1.3.3.
How to Test for Air Leaks—With no air leak, oil will remain in the gooseneck. After a
several hour shutdown, remove the gooseneck pipe plug. If you do not detect a strong suction for
several seconds as the oil drains to the tank, an air leak exists and must be repaired.
Oil Add and Change Procedure
CAUTION 30 : Risk of oil spillage—If oil is “topped off” in the tank with the ram down, far
too much oil will be added and the oil will overflow when the ram is raised.
• Change oil with ram raised and supported by diaphragm safety bars.
• If OIL LEVEL LOW appears during operation, add oil only until the message clears, then
raise the ram and add oil until the tank gauge (Figure 4) indicates proper oil level.
Using the Manual mode, raise the ram and can fully, then install the diaphragm safety bars. After
the ram and can are raised, and safety bars are in position, change the oil as follows:
1. Remove the oil quick disconnect from the oil tank (Figure 7). Use the tank drain valve to
drain oil. Do not loosen hydraulic valves or hoses.
2. If the used oil contains debris, clean oil tank with lint free cloth. Do not use solvents, water,
or soap to clean tank.
3. If the main oil filter is dirty, replace it. All oil added to the tank passes through the oil filter.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
4. Using the provided oil quick disconnect (Figure 7), fill the tank (approximately 55 gallons,
208 liters) to within one inch (25.4 mm) of the top of the sight glass.
5. Reinstall oil quick disconnect on the tank drain. Installing the oil quick disconnect on the tank
drain prevents oil spillage if the drain valve is accidentally opened.
2.1.4.
Testing the Suppressor Pre-charge
The optional suppressor (Figure 11) uses a nitrogen charged screen and diaphragm to suppress
noise and surges. Periodically check the pre-charge gas pressure inside the suppressor as follows:
1. Locate suppressor charging valve (Figure 11).
2. Remove the valve cover from the valve.
3. Prepare the Schrader-type charging valve block for use by removing the charging hose and
installing 1/4" plug in its place. Otherwise, gas will fill the hose during the testing process,
significantly reducing the charge inside of the suppressor.
4. Connect the Schrader-type block to the suppressor charging valve (Figure 11).
5. Make sure the gauge, 1/4" hole plug, bleeder valve and block connections are tight.
6. Turn the swivel hex nut counterclockwise approximately three turns. This opens the internal
poppet.
7. Read the charge on the gauge. Pressure must be approximately 2300 psi (159 bar).
8. If the charge is low, see “Charging the Suppressor...BIPPMI03,” in the installation manual.
9. After reading the charge, turn the swivel hex nut clockwise approximately three turns to close
the internal poppet.
10. Lock swivel hex nut (approximately 50-70 inch/pounds or 5.7-7.9 Newton/meters).
11. Remove the Schrader-type charging valve block and re-install valve cover.
Figure 11: Suppressor Charging and Pressure Testing Items
Optional pump mounted
suppressor
Charging valve
Schrader-type charging block
(also used to test pressure)
4
5
7
6
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Suppressor
Swivel hex nut
Valve cover
2300 Psi (159 bar)
Schrader-type valve block
Bleeder valve
T-handle (not used)
.
— End of BIPPMM05 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
BIPPMM10 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
2.2. How to Fill and Maintain the Diaphragm
This procedure applies to MP1Axxxx single stage press models and to MP16xxxx models
manufactured after date code 99323 (see machine nameplate), which have a brown diaphragm
manufactured by Milnor®. This document supersede previous versions of this document (English
and Spanish), tag # B2T2003005, and the video file Filling the diaphragm_2.wmv.
2.2.1.
About Diaphragm Water Volume
CAUTION 31 : Risk of premature diaphragm failure—Operating with an under-filled or
overfilled diaphragm will cause the diaphragm to quickly deteriorate and fail. Milnor only
warrants the diaphragm against premature failure caused by a manufacturing defect.
• Maintain proper water volume. Do not under-fill or overfill.
2.2.1.1.
Why Water Replenishment and Monitoring are Critical—The diaphragm must
contain the correct amount of water for normal service life. All diaphragms lose some water, but
if it has a puncture or a bad seal, it can become severely under-filled with no obvious indications.
2.2.1.2.
How To Monitor and Compensate for Excessive Water Leakage—A reliable
and simple method, provided as part of the filling (“topping-off”) procedure, is as follows:
Measure how long it takes from when you begin admitting water to when water begins flowing
from the drain hose. If, for example, you measure 10 seconds on a new, but previously filled
diaphragm, and after obtaining roughly the same duration on several subsequent fillings, you
begin to measure 20 seconds, suspect an abnormal leak. In such case, increase filling frequency
until you again, consistently measure the original norm (10 seconds in this example).
2.2.1.3.
How Often to Fill (Top off) the Diaphragm—It is vital to perform the filling procedure
at minimum, every 40 operating hours, to replenish normal water loss and monitor for abnormal
leaking. Increase this frequency as needed to compensate for any increase in water loss.
Notice 32 : Small uneven loads will reduce the life of a diaphragm. In these cases, diaphragm
life can be lengthened by rotating the diaphragm 180° every 300 hours of operation.
2.2.2.
Precautions and Preparations
Table 4: Equipment Needed for Diaphragm Filling Procedure
Description
Qty.
Supplied
with press?
Part Number
MP16xxxx Models MP1A03xx Models
2
Can safety stand
yes
07 30093
07 10385
1
Shaping disk
yes
X7 10055
X7 10055A
2
Fill/drain hose and fittings
yes
See parts document BMP050068
1
Gaff hook
yes
27A900
1
Straight edge
no
--
1
Watch or stop watch (measure fill time)
no
--
DANGER 33 : Crush and Sever Hazards—The can and ram move independently. During
operation, these components move without warning. These components can also drift down with
power off. Any of several closing gaps will crush body parts.
• Proceed only if a qualified service technician, knowledgeable in press manual operation.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
• Use the door interlock bypass key switch in strict compliance with the instructions.
• Install the safety supports and lockout/tagout power before reaching into, or working
under the can or ram.
• Ensure that personnel and equipment are clear of the press before operating the machine.
• Be prepared to use emergency stop switches.
2.2.3.
Diaphragm Filling (topping off) Procedure [Document BIPPMM14]
Tip: Once you are familiar with this procedure, use quick reference card B2T2006011.
2.2.3.1.
Step 1: Set Up
a) Shut down the loading
device (e.g., tunnel),
allow the press to empty,
then access Manual
mode.
If you place the press in Manual mode
(k+m) as soon as it discharges, the
can and ram will both be fully up.
A1:
b) Set the Door Interlock
Bypass key switch to
Maintenance Only, then
open the access doors.
The Door Interlock Bypass key switch
bypasses the press's normal operational
safeguards. Ensure that bystanders cannot
approach the press. See document BICP1S01
“SAFETY ALERT for Owners/Managers and
Maintenance Personnel: Using the Door
Interlock Bypass Key Switch.”
A2:
c) Install the can safety
stands.
If the can is down, raise it using manual mode
03 to raise the can (0, 3, n,
^). Ensure that the can safety stands (not
the ram safety bars) are properly installed and
remain in place for the entire diaphragm filling
procedure. See document BIUUUS06 “How
To Use the Safety Stands and Safety Bars on
Single-stage Press.”
A3:
d) Move the diaphragm
about 6" (25 mm) above
the bed. With gaff hook,
put shaping disk under
center of diaphragm.
Access manual mode 07 (0,7, n)
and move the ram up/down with ^/&.
Do not place body parts under the
diaphragm. Use the gaff hook to push the
shaping disk into position. Use care to center
the disk under the diaphragm.
A4:
e) Lower the ram until
you measure exactly as
shown at right.
Measure vertically from the press bed to the
seam between the rubber diaphragm and metal
platen. The bottom of the diaphragm should be
just touching the bed. Use the dimension
shown at left corresponding to your press
model (see nameplate for model).
Go to “Step 2: Fill”
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.2.3.2.
Step 2: Fill (top off)
With power locked out /
tagged out...
Press must be reliably disabled during this
step.
A1:
a) Connect fill and drain
hoses.
Each hose has a quick disconnect fitting for the
diaphragm connection. Connect the fill hose to
water but do not open the tap yet. Set the end
of the drain hose on top of the platen, as
shown.
A2:
b) Open fill valve, c) open
drain valve, then d) while
timing, run water until it
drains steady and
bubble-free.
Begin timing when you open the water valve.
As soon as water steadly streams from the hose
(bubble-free), shut off the fill water and stop
timing. Record the fill (top-off) time. You will
use this information to determine how often to
perform this procedure.
A3:
e) With water off, f) close
fill valve, then g) when
draining stops, close
drain valve.
After you close the fill valve, allow the
diaphragm to continue draining until you
observe that the flow has almost completely
stopped.
A4:
h) Remove fill and drain
hoses.
Go to “Step 3: Check”
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.2.3.3.
Step 3: Check
Access the Manual mode with k+m.
With power and Manual
mode restored...
A1:
a) Raise the ram until
bottom of diaphragm
barely protrudes from
bottom of can.
A2:
b) Check diaphragm
bottom shape with a
straight edge held on the
sides of, not under the
diaphragm.
A3:
Is the diaphragm
properly shaped?
Use manual mode 07 (0,7,n) to
raise the ram (^)
NO
Repeat procedure
(return to step 1e).
YES
Top two examples, above ([), are
acceptable as long as the indentation does
not exceed about 1" (25 mm), estimated
visually. The bottom example (χ) is
overfilled and the filling procedure must
be repeated.
Go to “Step 4: Finish.”
2.2.3.4.
Step 4: Finish
a) With the gaff hook,
remove shaping disk.
A1:
b) Remove the can safety
stands.
A2:
c) Set the Door Interlock
Bypass switch to Safe
Operation and close the
access doors.
d) Return the press to
serivce.
Do not reach under the diaphragm. Push the
shaping disk out with the gaff hook.
To return to automatic operation, select manual mode 00 (0,0,n).
— End of BIPPMM10 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.3. B2T2006011.cdr
Please see document B2T2006011 , which is inserted behind this page.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
every 40 hours, minimum
Iedere 40 uren minimum
chaque 40 heures, le minimum
Alle 40 Stunden Minimum
ogni 40 ore, il minimo
R
R
1.
a.
d.
c.
b.
Każd& 40 godziny, minimalny
cada 40 horas, el mínimo
40に、
40 ,
e.
MP16xxxx MP1A03xx
7½" (190) 9" (229)
k+m
a
h
c
b
f
2.
55
d
60
50
5
10
5
15
45
40
35
30
e
5
20
25
g
< 1" (25)
3.
a.
b.
4.
a.
b.
c.
d.
B2T2006011/2006212A
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
BIPPMM03 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
2.4. Installing the Milnor® Diaphragm in the Single Stage Press
This document applies to models MP160Axx, MP1604xx, MP1603xx, MP1602xx single stage
presses and any MP1601xx press manufactured after date code 99323 (see the machine
nameplate). These presses are supplied with a brown diaphragm manufactured by Milnor.
MP1601xx models manufactured on or before 99323 are equipped with white diaphragms
manufactured by Passat and require document MSSM0953AE “Installing the Passat Diaphragm
in the MP1601xx Single Stage Press”.
Notice 34 : Understand the press servicing hazards—Before performing press
maintenance, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
WARNING 35 : Crush and Sever Hazards—The can and ram move independently. During
operation, these components move without warning. These components can also drift down with
power off. Any of several closing gaps will crush or sever body parts.
• Proceed only if a qualified service technician, knowledgeable in press manual operation.
• Use the door interlock bypass key switch in strict compliance with the instructions.
• Install the safety supports and lockout/tagout power before reaching into, or working
under the can or ram.
• Ensure that personnel and equipment are clear of the press before operating the machine.
• Be prepared to use emergency stop switches.
2.4.1.
2.4.1.1.
Preparations
Obtain a diaphragm replacement kit from Milnor.—For an MP1601xx, MP1602xx,
MP1603xx, or MP1604xx, you will probably need kit KYSSPMRA01, or for an MP160Axx, kit
KYSSPMRA02. These kits include a new diaphragm, bolts and washers, o-ring, sealant, ScotchBrite™ pads, Loctite thread locker 242™, Loctite® Gasket Eliminator 515 (Loctite 518
optionally), Loctite Cleaner/Degreaser, Loctite Chisel Gasket Remover, Loctite Primer N and
other necessary parts for installation. These kits have the necessary materials for newer style
platens with hex head diaphragm bolts as well as older style platens with 16 recessed socket cap
bolts. Other kits are also available, depending on the specific need. Contact the Milnor Parts
department for more information.
Notice 36 : Use Fresh Materials—Because it is necessary to establish a reliable seal
between the platen and the diaphragm, all cleaning and sealing chemicals (provided with the kit)
must be fresh. Do not obtain these materials far in advance of the work.
2.4.1.2.
Have the necessary tools on hand.—These may include:
• 3/8 - 16 tap (available from Milnor as part number 97C058T)
• 3/8 - 16, extra long pulley tap (available from Milnor as part number 97C058AT)
• Socket wrench set, including a torque wrench for newer style platens with hex head bolts or a
hex head wrench set, including a torque wrench for older style platens with socket cap bolts.
2.4.1.3.
Have two service technicians on hand.—The diaphragm weighs 135 pounds (61.4 kg)
or more, depending on model. It is advisable for two people to handle it. At least one technician
must be familiar with the Manual mode (manual operation) as explained in the reference manual.
Both must understand press safety, as explained in the safety manual and this instruction.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.4.2.
Removing the old diaphragm.
The press must be empty. If the press is operating, allow any goods to transfer out of the machine
automatically, then take the machine off-line. Using the Manual mode (manual operation):
1. Raise the load/unload doors (if so equipped) and secure them in place. Open the side doors
and use the door interlock bypass key switch (in strict compliance with its instructions) to
enable operation with the side doors open.
2. Lower the can first, then the ram onto the press bed. Now raise the can fully. This sequence
minimizes dragging between the can and ram.
3. Raise the diaphragm approximately two to three inches above the press bed. Lockout/tagout
power at the external disconnect switch and install the can safety stands.
4. Making sure fingers are not under the diaphragm, remove all of the diaphragm bolts (Figure
12) and discard them. Two push-off holes that accept a 3/8 - 16 bolt are provided if
diaphragm weight alone does not free the diaphragm from the platen.
5. After the diaphragm is free of the platen, restore power and raise the ram. With the ram fully
up, lockout/tagout power and install the diaphragm safety bars.
6. Pull the old diaphragm free of the bed.
7. If this is the older style platen with recessed socket cap bolts, an o-ring is used between the
platen and diaphragm mating surfaces. The o-ring is held in a channel on the the bottom of
the platen. Remove the old o-ring.
Figure 12: Diaphragm Bolts and Push-off Hole
Looking Down onto Part of Platen
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
Diaphragm bolts (newer
style platen with hex head
bolts shown)
One of two push-off holes
Platen
Diaphragm
.
2.4.3.
Cleaning the Platen and the New Diaphragm
The platen and diaphragm mating surfaces must be clean to form a reliable seal. The bolt holes
must be clear of debris, such as Loctite or rubber.
1. Spray the platen sealing surface with a heavy coat of Loctite Chisel Gasket Remover and
allow to foam for five minutes. Wipe off with a rag. Repeat as necessary. After cleaning,
scrub the platen sealing surfaces and the diaphragm ring with the supplied Scotch-Brite pads
to remove rust and other contaminants.
2. Clean the platen bolt holes of residual Loctite and debris before sliding the new diaphragm
under the platen.
3. If this is an older style platen, install the new o-ring supplied with the kit.
4. Using the 3/8 - 16 tap, clean out the bolt hole threads in the new diaphragm. This will help
prevent diaphragm bolts from seizing or shearing off during installation. Do not run the tap
deeper than 5/8" (16 mm) to avoid damaging the diaphragm material.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.4.4.
Aligning the Diaphragm with the Platen
Tip: Cover the press bed with paper or cardboard to make diaphragm and platen alignment easier.
Referring to Figure 13:
1. Slide the new diaphragm into place. Visually align the platen and the new diaphragm.
Remove diaphragm safety bars and restore power to the machine.
2. Use the Manual mode to slowly lower the platen to within 1" (25 mm) of the diaphragm then
lockout/tagout power to the machine.
3. Insert an all-thread rod (supplied with the kit) through one of the platen bolt holes, as a guide.
Position the diaphragm so that the rod aligns with a bolt hole in the diaphragm and thread the
rod into the diaphragm. Repeat this with the three remaining all-thread rods at quarter points
around the platen.
4. Restore power and use the Manual mode to carefully lower the platen until it makes contact
with the diaphragm.
5. Test-fit all diaphragm bolts (hex head bolts or socket cap bolts), adjusting the diaphragm
position as needed.
6. Remove the diaphragm bolts and rods.
7. Raise the platen, lockout/tagout power and install the diaphragm safety bars.
Figure 13: Aligning the Diaphragm with the Platen
Step 1
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
Step 2
Step 3
At left: Place diaphragm under platen.
Lower left: Lower platen to within 1" of the
diaphragm.
Lower middle: Insert all-thread rods through
platen and thread into diaphragm (four
locations).
Lower right: Lower platen onto diaphragm.
Step 4
.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.4.5.
Prepare the platen and diaphragm sealing surfaces
1. Inspect and check the expiration dates on the supplied Loctite products. Replace any
questionable materials with fresh product to ensure a reliable seal.
2. Spray the bolt areas of the platen and diaphragm with Loctite ODC-Free Cleaner/Degreaser
then wipe off with a clean cloth. Do not touch surfaces after cleaning.
3. Spray the sealing surface on the underside of the platen with Loctite Primer N. Allow primer
to dry for three to five minutes before continuing.
4. Apply a generous bead of Loctite 515 (Loctite 518 optionally) along the metal diaphragm
ring (Figure 14). Do not allow the Loctite 515 to enter bolt holes. Excess Loctite 515 will
squeeze out of the joint as the diaphragm bolts are tightened.
Figure 14: Loctite 515 Applied to Diaphragm Ring
2.4.6.
Bolting the Diaphragm
CAUTION 37 : Risk of Bolt Failure—Use only the new diaphragm bolts provided with the
kit, not the old bolts which have been stressed. In the case of the hex head bolts, the old bolts,
which may be stainless steel, must be replaced with the chrome plated bolts supplied with the kit
to meet the torque requirements herein.
1. Restore power and remove diaphragm safety bars. Using the Manual mode, slowly lower the
platen until it touches the diaphragm, then lockout/tagout power.
2. Referring to Figure 15, apply Loctite 242 (or equivalent) to, and install each new diaphragm
bolt (either the socket cap bolts for the older design or the hex head bolts and flat washers for
the newer design). Add bolts in an alternating pattern such as that shown in Figure 16. Use a
wrench just to fully seat the bolt. If a bolt starts to seize, remove it, clean the bolt hole with
the pulley tap to avoid the risk of breaking, then re-install the bolt. Wipe off excess Loctite.
3. Torque all bolts to 10 foot-pounds using the same alternating pattern as before. Wipe off
excess Loctite.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
4. Re-torque all bolts using the same alternating pattern, as follows:
• Newer platen with hex head bolts—44 foot-pounds
• Older platen with recessed socket cap bolts—30 foot-pounds
5. Insert the plastic buttons provided with the kit in the push-off holes and, if the older platen
with socket cap bolts, the bolt hole recesses.
6. Apply tag B2T2001042 (provided with the kit) to the press as a reminder that the bolts need
to be tightened after one week (40 hours) of operation, and explain this to the operator.
7. Wait one hour before filling the diaphragm. This allows Loctite to cure. Fill the diaphragm as
explained in document BIPPMM10 “How to Fill and Maintain the Diaphragm”, then secure
the press for operation and return the machine to service.
Figure 15: Applying Loctite 242 to Bolts
2.4.7.
Figure 16: Typical Bolting and Torque Pattern
Re-tightening the Diaphragm Bolts After One Week (40 Hours)
CAUTION 38 : Risk of Rapid Diaphragm Wear—Diaphragm bolts may loosen slightly
during the first week of operation, resulting in leakage.
• Check and re-tighten all diaphragm bolts following one week (40 hours) of service.
• Perform the diaphragm filling procedure weekly per the preventive maintenance schedule.
The press must be empty. If the press is operating, allow any goods to transfer out of the machine
automatically, then take the machine off-line. Using Manual mode (manual operation):
1. Raise the load/unload doors (if so equipped) and secure them in place. Open the side doors
and use the door interlock bypass key switch (in strict compliance with its instructions) to
enable operation with the side doors open.
2. Lower the can first, then the ram onto the press bed. Now raise the can fully. This sequence
minimizes dragging between the can and ram.
3. Lockout/tagout power at the external disconnect switch and install the can safety stands.
4. Re-torque all bolts using an alternating pattern like that shown in Figure 16, as follows:
• Newer platen with hex head bolts—44 foot-pounds
• Older platen with recessed socket cap bolts—30 foot-pounds
5. Secure the press for operation and return the machine to service.
— End of BIPPMM03 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
BIPPMM13 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
2.5. Adjusting Ram Shaft Seal Tightness (and Free Fall Speed)
The ram shaft seals affect 1) oil retention, 2) un-powered drifting down of the ram, and 3) ram
free-fall speed. These seals must be tight enough to prevent significant seepage of oil around the
shaft and to minimize the drifting down of the ram when the machine is shut down, but loose
enough that the seals do not impede ram “free-fall” during operation (see document BIPPMF01
“How the Single Stage Press Hydraulic System Works”). Seal tightness is adjusted at the Milnor
factory but the seals tend to loosen over time. So it is likely that the seals will need periodic
tightening. Unless the seals are inadvertently over-tightened when adjusted, they are not likely to
need loosening. Shaft seal tightness can be adjusted with the ram in place. There is no need to
disassemble ram components or drain hydraulic fluid for this adjustment.
Notice 39 : Understand the press servicing hazards—Before performing press
maintenance, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
2.5.1.
How the Ram Shaft Seals Work
Referring to Figure 17, the ram shaft seal assembly consists of a stack of alternating soft and hard
seals that wrap around the shaft at the bottom of the ram cylinder. A seal tension collar bolted to
the bottom of the ram cylinder controls seal tightness. Tightening the collar compacts the seals,
pushing the soft seals against the ram shaft (i.e., a tighter fit).
The collar must be uniformly tight around its entire circumference. To ensure this, the collar is
tightened against shims—not merely against the seals. The same number and thickness of shims
must be used at each bolt location. When tightening is needed, the same thickness shim(s) is
removed from each bolt location. The two shim thicknesses listed in Table 5, are available.
However, the machine is shipped with thick shims only. Thin shims are available from from the
Milnor parts department.
Table 5: Shims Used on Shaft Seal Tension Collar
Type
Milnor Part
Number
Thick 15U314C
Thin 07-10237
Thickness
Inch
Metric
0.073
1.85 mm
0.05
1.27 mm
Figure 17: Shaft Seals and Related Components
Cross-sectional Views
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Ram cylinder
Stack of seals
Tension collar
Tension bolts
Shims
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.5.2.
Seal Tightness Adjustment
CAUTION 40 : Risk of Costly Machine Damage—A nick or dent in the ram shaft will
likely abrade seals and cause the ram to leak oil. The ram shaft may require replacement.
• Use care not to hit the shaft with tools when working close by.
1. Permit the press to empty of goods.
2. use the Manual mode to fully lower the can and ram. With the can and ram (diaphragm)
resting on the bed, lockout/tagout power at the external disconnect switch.
3. Referring to Figure 18, tighten the shaft seals as follows (power locked out / tagged out):
a. Loosen all of the seal tension collar bolts. Do not remove any bolts yet.
b. Using a wooden wedge as shown in Figure 18, tap the seal tension collar downward.
c. Remove one tension bolt, remove a thick shim (see Table 5) from the shim stack above
that bolt, then reinstall the bolt.
d. Repeat Item 3.c , removing one thick shim per stack, until all eight bolts are done.
e. Tighten the bolts using an alternating bolt tightening pattern as shown in Figure 18.
Tighten to the torque specified for this type of bolt in “Fastener Torque Specifications”.
4. Restore power and return to automatic operation. Observe press operation to ensure that ram
“free fall” speed is acceptable. If the ram descends too slowly, It will be necessary to repeat
this procedure, slightly increasing shim thickness. Use whatever combination of thin and
thick shims provides an overall thickness between that before and after the adjustment just
made.
Figure 18: Seal Tightness Adjustments
Loosening the Tension Collar
Typical Alternating Bolt
Tightening Pattern
Legend
.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Tension collar
Tension bolts
Wooden wedge
Shims
Ram cylinder shaft
— End of BIPPMM13 —
BIPPMM15 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
2.6. Understanding and Setting Press Water Levels
A large amount of reusable water is collected by the Milnor® single stage press during transfer
and extraction. The water is held in four water tanks—one on each side and end of the press bed.
The water flows from the bed into the two end tanks and from there to the inter-connected side
tanks. After the initial in-rush of water at each transfer, the water eventually settles to the same
(absolute) level in all four tanks. Water is removed from the tanks through the press return pump,
which pumps it to the tunnel washer. A level float assembly with two level settings (commonly
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
used on Milnor machines) provides input to the microprocessor which controls pump operation to
prevent overflow and prevent the pump from losing its prime. This requires that levels are set as
explained herein when the machine is commissioned. Subsequently, if the tanks overflow, suspect
improper levels. Check and adjust accordingly.
2.6.1.
Required Levels
In current production machines, the pump outlet and the level float are both located on the larger
of the two side tanks. Some older presses have a different arrangement. Although all four tanks
share the same absolute level, the water depth can vary from tank to tank. Regardless of the
machine's vintage, always measure levels in the tank that the pump is connected to. Lift the
tank lid and observe the components shown in Figure 19. Level float components must be
adjusted so that the low and high levels occur in this tank at the positions shown.
Figure 19: Correct Low and High Levels
Cross Section Through Tank (to pump)
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Correct high level = 6.5"
(165 mm). Place a mark
on tank wall.
Correct low level = 3.5"
(89 mm). This is even
with the top of the baffle.
Outlet to pump
Baffle
Screen
Overflow outlet
.
2.6.2.
How to Set the Levels Accurately and Avoid Overflow
CAUTION 41 : Risk of Overflow—If the pump loses its prime during operation, it can take a
minute or more for the pump to self-prime, during which time water entering with an incoming
load will likely overflow the tanks.
• Do not allow the pump to suck air. Maintain the specified low level setting.
It is very difficult to achieve accurate settings unless the water is calm and the level remains
static. For accuracy and to avoid overflow, do not attempt to adjust levels during operation. Shut
the machine down and use a garden hose to fill (or siphon out) the tanks to the specified level.
Figure 20 shows the level float assembly schematically and the relationship between levels,
switches, and clips. With the tanks filled to the specified level (low or high), adjust the position of
the corresponding clip on the float rod so that the switch contacts make (or break) at that level. If
you can hear the switch “click”, adjust levels with power off. Otherwise, run the press at idle but
disable the pump by setting the Press Return Pump switch off. You can then have an assistant
observe the switch inputs on the display (see reference manual) and announce when the input
changes state (the display changes between + and -). This avoids having the level change due to
pump operation. For low level, you should listen for the click (or watch for the display to change)
when the float rod is descending. For high level, it should be when the rod is rising.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Figure 20: Level Float Components Important in Setting Levels
Schematic Side View of Level
Float
Legend
1a.
1b.
2a.
2b.
3.
4.
Top (low level) clip
Bottom (low level) switch
Bottom (high level) clip
Top (high level) switch
Float rod
Never set clips closer
together than 1"
.
Set low level as follows:
1. Fill (or drain) the tanks precisely to low level.
2. Lower the bottom (high level) clip so that is does not interfere with this setting procedure.
3. The setting will be made with the top clip. Set this clip so that it is just high enough on the
float rod to permit the rod to float.
4. Lift the float rod slightly with your finger, then permit it to slowly descend until either the
bottom (low level) switch actuates or the rod floats. If the rod floats before actuating the
switch, lower the clip about 1/16" (2 mm) and try again. Repeat this process until the switch
actuates when the rod descends.
Set high level as follows:
1. Fill the tanks precisely to high level.
2. The setting will be made with the bottom clip. Set this clip so that it is just low enough on the
float rod that the rod floats unrestrained.
3. Push down on float rod (push the float into the water) slightly, then permit it to slowly rise
until either the top (high level) switch actuates or the rod stops rising. If the rod stops rising
before actuating the switch, raise the clip about 1/16" (2 mm) and try again. Repeat this
process until the switch actuates when the rod rises.
— End of BIPPMM15 —
BIPPMM09 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
2.7. Servicing a Misaligned (“Jammed”) Can Assembly
The receiving chute and can assembly (the can) is connected to the can cylinder rods with taper
bushings (see Figure 21) that will slip upward on the rod, reducing the risk of damage, in the
event that goods or other objects obstruct the can's descent and “jam” it out of alignment.
Notice 42 : When the receiving chute and can assembly becomes “ jammed”,
STOP!—Before returning to normal operation, inspect for, and correct damage and/or
misalignment, as explained herein.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Notice 43 : Understand press servicing hazards—Before performing press
maintenance, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
Figure 21: Can-To-Cylinder Rod Mounting Components
Side View (spacer not used)
Exploded View
View From Below (spacer used)
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
.
2.7.1.
9.
10.
11.
Cylinder rod
Hub mounting bolts
Hub
Taper bushing
Shims
Spacer (if used)
Bushing bolts
Large flat washers and rod
end bolt
Bushing-to-hub air gap
Can mounting ear
Push-off holes
Inspecting the Can After a “Jam”
Visually inspect the can and the cylinders and rods for damage and misalignment. If the can
appears operable, use the Manual mode to move the can up and down, observing it carefully.
Referring to Figure 21, some problem signs include:
• The spacer (Item 6. ) or washers (Item 8. ) are no longer pressed against the bottom of the
bushing (Item 4. ), indicating the bushing has slipped upward on the cylinder rod (Item 1. ).
• The lowered can assembly does not rest flat against the press bed.
• The can rubs against the ram or other components or moves with a jerking motion. This may
indicate a bent cylinder rod (Item 1. ).
• Can cylinder(s) leak oil.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
If the can appears in good working order, return the machine to service. Otherwise, continue.
2.7.2.
Dismounting the Can
WARNING 44 : Crush and Strike Hazards—A can assembly that is temporarily twisted as
a result of a “jam” will forcefully spring back to its original shape when bolts are loosened.
• Disassemble cautiously.
1. Using Manual mode, raise the ram and secure it with the safety bars (see safety support
instructions). Leave the safety bars in place until the procedures call for removing them.
2. Lower the can onto the press bed. Lock out/tag out power to the machine.
3. Referring to Figure 21, remove the mounting components on each side of the can as follows:
a. Remove the rod-end bolt and attached shims, spacer and washers (Item 6. and Item 8. ).
b. Observing warning statement 44 , carefully remove all three bushing bolts (Item 7. ).
c. Thread bolts into the three bushing push-off holes (Item 11. ). Observing warning
statement 44 , alternately tighten bolts until the bushing and hub separate.
d. Restore power. Using Manual mode, raise the can cylinder rods until they clear the can
mounting ears. Lockout/tagout power.
e. Unbolt and remove the hub (Item 3. ).
f. Clean the bushing, hub and cylinder rod with Loctite Primer N™ (Milnor P/N 20C006P)
or an equivalent product.
2.7.3.
Replacing Can Cylinder(s), If Required
If a cylinder rod is bent or the cylinder leaks oil, the can cylinder must be replaced with a new or
rebuilt one. If the cylinder to be replaced is directly behind the press discharge door (discharge
left or discharge right), the discharge door must be removed to provide working room. Perform
this work with the ram secured up with the safety bars, the can dismounted and resting on
the press bed, and power locked out/tagged out. Disassembly and re-assembly are
straightforward for the competent technician and not explained here. Refer to the “Receiving
Chute and Can” and “Safety Unload Door Assembly” parts documents for more information.
2.7.4.
Remounting and Positioning the Can
The can must be mounted on the can cylinder rods so that each rod reaches its internal stop just as
the can touches the press bed. The mounting hardware (hub, bushing, bolts, etc.) must be those
specified on the “Receiving Chute and Can” parts document for proper strength and fit.
Note 6: The current design uses a hub manufactured by Milnor, attached with 1/2" x 2-1/2", grade 8,
chrome-plated mounting bolts, stainless steel flat and lock washers. The bushing is purchased by Milnor,
but mounted with 1 3/4" (4.4 cm) flange bolts (not the bolts supplied by the bushing manufacturer).
1. Disconnect the electrical feed to both of the can at bottom (lower) can proximity switches.
2. The can must be resting on the sheet of cardboard on the press bed and positioned so that the
cylinder rods (Item 1. in Figure 21) are directly above the can mounting ears (Item 10. ), so
that they will enter the mounting ears. Restore power to the machine and, using Manual
mode, carefully extend the cylinder rods into the mounting ears fully (until the cylinders
“bottom out”). Lockout/tagout power.
3. Referring to Figure 21, install the mounting components on each side of the can as follows:
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
a. Reinstall the hub. Tighten the mounting bolts only enough to hold the hub snug against
the mounting ear. The bolts will be tightened later, but for now, the hub must be able to
move slightly, from side to side.
b. Install the bushing and torque the bushing bolts to 360 inch-pounds. After tightening, a
gap must exist between the bushing and hub (Item 9. ). If not, replace the hub and
bushing.
Reconnect the electrical feed to the two can at bottom proximity switches.
Restore power then, using Manual mode, move the can up and down, looking for signs of
improper positioning of the can on the cylinder rods, such as:
• The can cylinders fail to “bottom out” as the can touches the bed.
• The can presses into the conveyor belt with enough force to leave an indentation.
• The can twists as it reaches bottom.
• Daylight is visible between the fully lowered can and the press bed.
• An object the thickness of a credit card slides easily under the can. It should be very
difficult or impossible to insert the object anywhere around the can.
If necessary, readjust mounting components (with power locked out/tagged out), as necessary
until the above checks indicate the can is properly positioned.
The rod-end bolt, shims, spacer, and washers must be reinstalled onto the end of each
cylinder rod, which may be slightly inside of, or protruding from the bottom of the bushing.
The bolt, washers and spacer (if used) ensure that the bushing cannot slip off the end of the
rod. The shims ensure that the rod-end bolt can be tightened securely without moving the
position of the bushing on the rod. Referring to Figure 21, install these components on each
side of the can, as follows:
a. If the rod end protrudes from the bushing, install the spacer against the bushing.
Otherwise, the spacer is not needed.
b. Install the number of 1/16" (1.7 mm) shims needed to fill any gap between the rod end
and the bottom of the bushing or spacer.
c. Install the large washers and rod-end bolt. Tighten the bolt.
Remove the safety bars that secure the ram then restore power to machine. Fully lower the
ram into the can. This will ensure that the can is aligned with the ram when the hub bolts are
tightened. Lockout/tagout power to the machine.
Tighten the hub mounting bolts left loose in Item 3.a . Torque bolts to 78 foot-pounds.
Restore power and using Manual mode, raise the ram.
The bushing bolts will normally loosen after operation. Repeat the following tightening
procedure daily, over the next five operating days. An assistant is required for this:
a. Allow a normal load of goods to transfer to the press, or at minimum, place a sufficient
quantity of goods in the can so that the ram will not reach the ram full down proximity
switch, preventing full pressing pressure from being achieved. This requires about 50 to
60 pounds (23 to 27 kilograms) of goods.
b. Using Manual mode, the assistant lowers the ram and maintains ram down pressure by
holding the down button while bolt torque is checked (next step).
c. While full pressing pressure is achieved, torque the bushing bolts (to 360 inch-pounds)
and the hub mounting bolts (to 78 foot-pounds).
d. The assistant raises the ram (not the can).
e. Repeat Item 11.b through Item 11.d two more times.
— End of BIPPMM09 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
BIPPMM12 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
2.8. Servicing the Integral Conveyor
Milnor has continually improved the single stage press integral conveyor to reduce and simplify
maintenance, through the following features (listed from most recent to earliest):
• improved belt material with minimal longitudinal shrinkage due to press pressure
• taut belt switches to sense when the belt is too tight and alert the operator, via the “Taut belt Check belt rollers” error message and the signal lamp.
• a support bracket design that eases removal and replacement of the tension roller
• heftier bearings to help withstand the corrosive environment and severe load conditions
• a plastic scraper on the drive roller that minimizes wrapping of goods around the rollers
This instruction applies to machines that have taut belt switches (presses manufactured after date
code 04436, with software version 20006D/WUMILSSPA or later). However, it also, in large
part, accommodates older presses with only some or none of the above features. This document
supersedes document BIPPMM07 “Installing the Endless, Woven Style Press Belt...” as well as
previous versions of this document (titled “Clearing Taut Belt Errors”).
2.8.1.
Conditions Requiring Servicing and Summary of Procedures
Section 2.8.1.1 through Section 2.8.1.5 describe the problems that are most likely to require
conveyor servicing and summarize their corrective procedures. Detailed instructions follow these
sections. All conveyor servicing described herein must be performed with:
1. the ram up and secured with the safety bars,
2. the can up and secured with wood blocking,
3. the discharge door up and secured with a metal rod such as a screwdriver shaft, and
4. the manually-lifted access doors open.
All servicing except for parts of the tracking adjustments must be performed with power locked
out/tagged out.
2.8.1.1.
Belt Too Tight Causing “Taut Belt...” Error (Tension Adjustment)—The “Taut
Belt...” error indicates that the belt is too tight. The controller only monitors the taut belt switches
when the belt stops moving (to minimize nuisance trips). Typically a taut belt condition is caused
either by goods wrapped around a roller (which the drive roller plastic scraper minimizes) or belt
shrinkage (which the improved belt material minimizes). In the first situation, the belt must be
partially removed, the roller freed of foreign material and the belt re-installed (see Section
2.8.1.3). In both cases, proper belt tension and taut belt detection sensitivity must be restored via
the pre-load and taut belt switch clearance adjustments explained in Section 2.8.4. Once the
problem is resolved, the “Taut Belt...” error clears automatically.
2.8.1.2.
Belt Not Centered (Tracking Adjustment)—On the load end of the conveyor,
pneumatic tracking controls compensate for minor left/right creeping of the belt. However, if
these controls actuate frequently or are ineffective in centering the belt, tracking must be adjusted
via the belt tracking adjustments explained in Section 2.8.5. The preventive maintenance
schedule calls for checking this tracking daily. Selection 10 “Track Belt”, in Manual mode is a
convenient way to observe belt tracking. Belt tension and tracking must also be checked and
adjusted whenever the belt is removed for roller cleaning or the belt is replaced.
There is also a tracking adjustment on the unload end of the conveyor. Once adjusted at the
Milnor factory, this tracking should not need subsequent adjustment unless the setting is
inadvertently changed. In such case, refer to Section 2.8.6.
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Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.8.1.3.
Foreign Material (Goods) Wrapped Around Rollers—If goods wrap around a
conveyor roller, this effectively increases the roller diameter. This can severely increase belt
tension and the load on the roller bearings. If this condition is addressed soon enough, goods can
be cut and unwrapped from the roller fairly easily. But the longer such a problem is left
unresolved, the harder it will be to free the roller of the foreign material, and the more likely that
the belt and roller bearings will be damaged. Correct the problem when it first arises. Milnor is
not responsible for components damaged through neglect.
Referring to Figure 22, goods wrapping is more likely to occur at the drive roller, but it can occur
with any of the four rollers. To gain access to the rollers, the technician first removes the tension
roller (load end of a straight-in press). Then, on the discharge end (drive roller end) of the
machine, he pulls the belt out of the machine, exposing all of the rollers. This procedure is also
used in belt replacement.
Figure 22: Conveyor Belt and Rollers
Schematic Side View
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Drive roller (on discharge end)
Snubber roller
Tracking roller
Tension roller (on load end)
Endless woven belt
Drive motor and gear reducer
Press bed
Flow of goods
.
When cleaning rollers, use care not to damage the roller surface, especially the grip surface on the
drive roller. No other procedures are provided herein for roller cleaning.
2.8.1.4.
Belt Worn or Damaged—As shown in Figure 22, the conveyor uses an endless belt. When
replacement is necessary, the tension roller on the load end of the conveyor (the load end of a
straight-in press) is removed and the drive roller on the discharge end, partially removed. With
the tension roller removed, the old belt is then pulled out of the machine from the discharge end
and slipped off of the partially removed drive roller. The new belt is installed in the reverse order.
Tension roller removal is made easier by the modified tension roller bracket design (see Section
2.8.3.1). The bracket on older presses can be so modified on site without removing it. After
replacement, the new belt must be properly tensioned and the tracking adjusted.
2.8.1.5.
Hardware Deteriorated—All conveyor components are susceptible to deterioration from
the corrosive and high load environment typically present in this application. Whenever the need
arises to remove or replace the belt, the technician may find that related hardware such as bolts,
nuts, bracketry, and bearings have deteriorated to the point where they should not be returned to
service. It is advisable to assess the condition of this hardware before belt removal or replacement
and have any needed replacement parts on hand. Refer to the conveyor parts documents for your
machine for part numbers.
2.8.2.
Preparing the Press for Safe Conveyor Servicing
Notice 45 : Understand the press servicing hazards—Before performing press
maintenance, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
1. Make sure the press is empty of goods and access the Manual mode.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2. Set the door interlock bypass key switch to the Maintenance Only position and open the press
access doors in strict compliance with the safety instructions.
3. Raise the can, then the diaphragm to full up.
4. Secure the raised ram with the safety bars. Remember that the unrestrained ram can drift
down even with power off.
5. Using two, 2 x 6 inch (minimum) wood planks, lay the planks on end, across the top of the
splash guards (Figure 23). Although the can hydraulic cylinders have check valves intended
to prevent the can from drifting down, the wood planks protect against drifting down of the
can resulting from a hydraulic leak.
6. Raise the discharge door.
7. Secure the discharge door up by inserting a screwdriver through the hole provided in the
upper left of the door frame (Figure 24).
8. Shut down the machine and lockout/tagout power at the external disconnect switch.
Figure 23: Wood Planks Under Raised Can
2.8.3.
Figure 24: Securing the Door
Belt Removal and Installation (for access to rollers or belt
replacement)
The major tasks in belt removal and installation are explained under this section. The specific
tasks and the order they are to be done varies with the objective (e.g., belt replacement, roller
cleaning, etc.). Hence, you may need to perform only certain tasks and not necessarily in the
order presented here.
Notice 46 : Malfunction risk—As you work, carefully note the arrangement of all hardware
removed for proper replacement. This is especially important for washers, spacers, shaft collars
and the like, that must be properly positioned for correct roller alignment and functioning. The
conveyor parts documents for your machine will also assist in proper component positioning.
2.8.3.1.
Facilitating Tension Roller Removal On Older Presses—The tension and tracking
rollers and related hardware mount to the side wall of the load-end water tank. The current design
has a slot in the side wall (see Figure 25) through which the roller shaft can be withdrawn
upward. If your machine has this slot, proceed to Section 2.8.3.2. Otherwise, your press has an
older design. You have the choice of cutting a slot similar to the current design (see Section
2.8.3.1.1), or removing the tension roller by performing additional disassembly (see Section
2.8.3.1.2).
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Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2.8.3.1.1.
Cutting a Slot for Roller Removal—Although the current design provides slots on both tank
side walls (both ends of the roller), you need only cut a slot on one side (the most convenient side
for your situation). With hardware removed as needed, cut the slot as shown in Figure 26. Once
this is done, you can follow the instructions in Section 2.8.3.2.
Figure 25: Tank Left Side Wall With Slot
Figure 26: Tank Left Side Wall—Slot Dimensions
2.8.3.1.2.
Performing Additional Disassembly—Step-by-step instructions for removing/replacing the
tension roller on older presses (without the slot) varies somewhat with the age (specific design) of
your press and is not covered here. However, a capable technician should be able to determine
this, observing the following points:
• Although your press may have a hole in the side wall of the tank large enough to withdraw
the roller sideward, you would need to remove the side water tank for clearance. You can
remove the roller upward more easily.
• You will need to loosen/remove the locking collars on both sides of the tension roller. The
ease of roller removal depends on the extent to which you can move the shaft and bearings
(one on each end) within the roller. These components may be corroded.
» If you can completely remove the tension roller shaft and bearings from within the roller,
you should be able to lift the roller out. On older style tension rollers, the roller bearings
(one on each end) are held in with set screws. On the newer style roller, the bearings are
press fit both around the shaft and within the roller. Using care not to damage
components, you should be able to separate these components with a rubber hammer.
» Even if you cannot remove the tension roller bearings, you will still need to slide the
shaft a small amount in and out of the roller as you work. You will also need to remove
the tracking roller to make room for tension roller removal.
• Some aspects of tension roller removal/replacement are the same on older designs as on the
current design explained in Section 2.8.3.2.
2.8.3.2.
Removing/Replacing the Tension Roller (Current Design)—The following are the
steps in order of removal. Replace components in the reverse order.
1. Remove the top and both side cover plates from the load-end water tank.
2. On your machine, identify the components shown in Figure 27.
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Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Figure 27: Left Side, Load End Roller Hardware (right side similar)
Left Side View with Cover Removed
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Tracking roller
Tracking bracket
Bracket retaining nut
Tension adjustment
bracket
Tension bar (channel)
Tension bolt (hex tap bolt)
Bar support channel
Taut belt switch
Locking collar on tension
roller shaft
Air cylinder for automatic
tracking
Tension springs
Tension bolt lock nut
Tension bolt clinch nut
.
3. On both sides of the machine, loosen the tension bolt lock nut (item 12) and relieve belt
tension (turn the tension bolt (item 6) counterclockwise) to the point where you can remove
the clinch nut (item 13) from the bolt.
4. Remove the tension bar (item 5) with its tension springs (item 11).
5. The tension roller and tension adjustment brackets (item 4) move together. Push these toward
the unload end of the conveyor to loosen the belt.
6. Remove the outermost locking collar (item 9) from the tension roller shaft. This is the collar
on the outside of the tank side wall, that is only used on one side of the roller. On the current
design, the two inner locking collars (the ones on the inside of the tank side walls) do not
need to be loosened or removed for roller removal. On re-assembly, don't forget to reinstall this collar.
Tip:
On the current design, the following two steps need only be done on one side of the conveyor
(the most convenient side for your situation).
7. Remove the bracket retaining nuts (item 3) and tracking bracket (item 2) with all connected
components. Let these hang from the end of the tracking roller shaft as shown in Figure 28. It
is not necessary to disconnect the air cylinder pneumatic tubing, but the cut tie wraps from
around the tubing as needed for ease of work.
8. Remove the tension adjustment bracket (Figure 27, item 4), taking note of the number and
position of the bronze washers on the studs the retaining nuts were removed from. On reassembly, don't forget to replace the washers and verify that the tension adjustment
bracket still slides freely after the retaining nuts are tightened.
9. On the free end of the roller, guide the roller shaft upward through the slot in the tank side
wall. When the roller is clear of the side wall, withdraw the roller shaft from its retaining
bracketry on the other side and withdraw the roller from the belt.
10. On the discharge end, pull the belt through the press and clear of the bed (Figure 29).
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Figure 28: Tracking Bracket and Related
Components Hanging from Tracking Roller
Figure 29: Pulling Belt Through Press from Unload
End
If the work was done for roller cleaning, you can clean the rollers (even the drive roller) without
removing the belt completely, provided you use the necessary care not to damage the belt. After
re-installing the belt, adjust belt tension and tracking as explained in Section 2.8.4 and Section
2.8.5. For complete belt replacement, proceed to Section 2.8.3.3.
2.8.3.3.
Partially Removing/Replacing the Drive Roller (for belt replacement)—
Referring to Figure 30, the drive roller is supported by self-aligning flange bearings (item 5)
mounted to the side walls of the unload end water tank. The belt is driven by a motor and gear
reducer, which are braced by a torque arm (item 1). With the torque arm loosened or removed
(see caution statement 47 ) and the bearing on the non-drive end of the drive roller un-mounted,
you can pivot that end of the roller away from the machine enough to slip the belt off or onto the
roller. Normally, no other disassembly is required.
CAUTION 47 : Risk of Injury and Damage—With the torque arm bushing removed, the
weight of the gear box/motor will cause it to swing around the shaft, if not otherwise supported.
• Support the gear box on blocking before disconnecting the torque arm.
• Observe all precautions herein.
Refer to the “Unload End Drive Assembly” parts document for your machine for part
identification and assembly details. The steps in freeing the drive roller for belt replacement
follow. Re-assembly is performed in the reverse order. Refer to Figure 30 for the item numbers
listed in these steps:
1. If your machine has a belt scraper assembly (item 12), remove it for clearance. On reassembly, set the blade-to-belt clearance as shown in item 13.
2. Remove the drive-side photoeye (item 2) to protect it from damage and provide clearance.
3. Place wood blocking under the gear box. This blocking must prevent the gear box from
rotating on the roller shaft once the torque arm is disconnected.
4. Unbolt and remove the torque arm bushing components (item 3), taking note of how they are
assembled (see also your “Unload End Drive Assembly” parts document). Also loosen the
torque arm mounting bolts. This will free the gear reducer and motor to move when the drive
roller is pivoted outward.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Figure 30: Components Used in Partially Removing Drive Roller (your press may be opposite hand)
Drive Side (can be on either side of press)
Scraper Assembly
Non-drive Side (either side of press)
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Torque arm
Photoeye
Torque arm bushing
Fender
Bearing
Tracking adjustment bracket
Adjustment bolt
Nut used to hold adjustment
Outermost nut
Mounting bolt closest to unload end
Spacers—this bolt only
Scraper assembly
Blade-to-belt clearance = 1/16" to 1/8" (2 to
3 mm)
.
Tip:
In the next step, you will free the non-drive end of the drive roller so that this end of the
roller can pivot outward. Two techniques will save time and possible trouble in re-assembly,
if conditions on your machine permit:
1. Do not loosen or remove the bearing, shaft collars or spacers from the roller shaft.
2. Disconnect the roller alignment bracket such that it retains its setting when reassembled
5. On the non-drive end, remove either all three, or only two bearing mounting bolts, depending
on whether your machine has fenders (item 4) at the ends of the drive roller, as follows:
Fenders provided (newer, and retrofitted models)—The bearing mounting bolts also
hold the fenders in place. Remove all three bolts, but on the bolt closest to the unload
end (item 10), be sure to retrieve all spacers. These must be replaced on re-assembly.
No fenders (older models)—Remove only the two bolts farthest from the unload end.
6. If your machine has fenders, remove the fender on this end of the roller.
7. The roller should now be held only by the tracking adjustment bracket (item 6) and its
adjustment bolt (item 7). The adjustment bolt is fastened to a welded bracket with two nuts
whose position on the bolt establishes the alignment setting. Wrap tape around the innermost
of these two nuts (item 8) to hold its position on the bolt, then remove the outermost nut (item
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Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
9) and lock washer. On re-assembly, the adjustment bolt must be reattached such that
this setting is retained. Otherwise, realign the drive roller as explained in Section 2.8.6.
8. Carefully pull the free end of the drive roller only far enough away from the conveyor bed to
be able to slip the belt off of, or onto the roller. As the roller and shaft pivot about the driveside bearing, make sure that nothing restricts the gear reducer and motor from moving the
short distance needed and that they remain supported by the blocking.
9. Remove the old, and install the new belt on the drive roller. If the belt has arrows printed on it
to indicate direction of travel, be sure to orient it properly.
2.8.4.
Restoring Proper Belt Tension
There are two pair of adjustments (each adjustment is done on both sides of the conveyor)
involving belt tension. Each adjustment has a required setting (a specified distance between
components), as shown in Figure 31. Check these measurements and if they have changed,
restore them to the required values. Referring to Figure 31, the adjustments are:
Pre-load—sets the amount of compression of the belt tension springs (belt tension) with no
dynamic load on the conveyor. Measure the horizontal distance between the inside faces of the
tension bar support channel and tension bar channel, as shown in item 1. This is the
compressed spring length. Belt shrinkage will cause this distance to shorten, causing the
springs to compress too much. Regaining the specified dimension restores proper belt tension.
Make the adjustment by loosening the lock nut (item 3) and turning the hex tap bolt (item 2).
Taut belt switch clearance—determines the sensitivity of Taut Belt error detection; it does not
control belt tension. Measure the the gap between the bracket and the switch actuator (item 4).
This is distance the tension roller must travel before the tension roller bracket touches the
switch actuator. The switch bracket has a slotted mounting hole (item 5) for adjusting the
switch position.
Figure 31: Belt Tension Required Settings
Where Adjustments Are Made (on one of two sides)
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Pre-load = 1 5/8" (41 mm)
Hex tap bolt (adjusting
bolt)
Locking nut
Taut belt switch clearance
= 1/16" to 1/8" (1.5 to 3
mm)
Slotted mounting hole in
switch bracket (not seen
in this view)
.
2.8.5.
Adjusting Belt Tracking On the Load End
Ideally, the conveyor belt should remain centered on the press bed during operation.
Pragmatically, it is likely to creep right or left. The pneumatic tracking system assists in keeping
the belt centered. This system consists of a pair of pneumatic switch assemblies (air valve, paddle
actuator and hardware) and air cylinders—one set on each side of the belt. When the belt creeps
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Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
left or right and pushes on a paddle, that air valve opens, actuating the air cylinder, which changes
the angle of the tracking roller slightly, moving the belt away from that side of the bed. If the
tracking system actuates frequently or cannot successfully center the belt, adjust belt tracking as
explained herein.
Supplement 1
Understanding Left/Right Terminology
When this instruction refers to the conveyor's left side or right side, this means when viewed in
the direction of the flow of goods. This would be your left or right if you were standing at the
load end of the conveyor (the end with the tension roller—see Figure 22) and facing the press.
This is physically possible only if you have a left-turning or right-turning press. With a straightthrough press, you would be standing where the loading device (e.g., the tunnel washer) is.
Although it may not be possible to view the conveyor on your press from this vantage point,
imagine it whenever this instruction uses the terms “left” or “right.”
Figure 32 shows how the tracking roller must be angled to compensate for left/right creeping.
Figure 32: How to Angle the Tracking Roller to Correct Belt Creeping
If belt creeps right, angle
tracking roller leftward.
If belt creeps left, angle
tracking roller rightward.
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Tracking roller
Tension roller
Belt
Bed
Flow of Goods
.
Adjustments are made with the components shown in Figure 33. Referring to this figure, adjust
the tracking as follows:
1. Initially, adjust the tracking roller so that it is perpendicular to the press bed. To do so, adjust
the air cylinder bracket lock nuts (item 1), on both sides of the conveyor so that there is 1/2"
(13 mm) of thread behind the last lock nut, as shown in item 2.
2. Restore power to the machine.
3. Using Manual mode and selection 10 “Track Belt”, run the belt and observe how it tracks.
4. Lockout/tagout power to the machine.
5. To reposition the tracking roller, you will use the air cylinder bracket lock nuts (item 1) to
move the air cylinder mounting bracket (item 3) closer to, or farther away from the load end
of the conveyor. Do not loosen the adjusting bolt lock nuts (item 4). Use Step 6a or 6b, as
appropriate, to adjust the angle of the tracking roller in small increments.
6a. If the belt creeps to the right:
1. On the left side of the conveyor, use the air cylinder bracket lock nuts to move the air
cylinder mounting bracket 1/16" (0.4 mm) closer to the load end of the conveyor.
2. On the right side, use the air cylinder bracket lock nuts to move the air cylinder
mounting bracket 1/16" (0.4 mm) farther away from the load end of the conveyor.
6b. If the belt creeps to the left:
1. On the right side of the conveyor, use the air cylinder bracket lock nuts to move the air
cylinder mounting bracket 1/16" (0.4 mm) closer to the load end of the conveyor.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
2. On the left side, use the air cylinder bracket lock nuts to move the air cylinder mounting
bracket 1/16" (0.4 mm) farther away from the load end of the conveyor.
7. The pneumatic switches are properly adjusted when the paddles (item 6) are touching the belt
and the the air valve (item 5) will open if the belt moves 1/8" (3 mm) closer to the switch.
These switches should not need to be removed or adjusted when performing the servicing
described herein. However, if this hardware is removed (as to replace components), adjust the
switch assemblies as follows:
a. Make sure the belt is precisely centered on the bed.
b. With air on and the assembly mounting bolt loose, move the switch assembly toward the
belt just until the air valve opens (as determined by the sound of air flowing), then back
the assembly away from the belt 1/8" (3 mm) and tighten the mounting bolt.
Figure 33: Load End Belt Tracking Adjustments
Tracking Roller Adjustment Components On
Pneumatic Switch Assembly (air valve,
Left Side (right side similar)
paddle (actuator) and mounting hardware)
Legend
1.
2.
.
2.8.6.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Air cylinder bracket lock nuts
Initial setting = 1/2" (13 mm) exposed
thread
Air cylinder mounting bracket
Bracket lock nuts (do not loosen)
Air valve
Paddle (actuator)
Adjusting Belt Tracking On the Unload End
Unload end tracking is set at the Milnor factory and should not need subsequent adjustment.
However, the setting can be lost in the process of belt replacement or other servicing, if not
performed carefully.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 2. Routine Maintenance
Unload end tracking is adjusted by moving the non-drive end of the drive roller in or out with the
adjustment components shown in Figure 30 (items 6 through 9). The unload end adjustment is
correct when the drive roller is exactly perpendicular to the longitudinal centerline of the bed, but
because there is no convenient feature of the bed to measure this from (as, for example, with a
carpenter's square), adjust the tracking as follows:
1. Visually align the roller with the unload-end water tank. This tank may not be perpendicular
to the bed centerline, but it should be close.
2. Run the belt and observe the tracking. If the belt creeps to either side on the unload end, angle
the drive roller so that the end of the roller on the side the belt favors extends farther from the
machine relative to the other end of the roller. Continue observing and adjusting the tracking
until the belt remains centered.
— End of BIPPMM12 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chapter 3
Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
BIPPMF01 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
3.1. How the Single Stage Press Hydraulic System Works
The focus of this document is single stage press hydraulic circuitry and how the hydraulic
components function during the various parts of the operating cycle. Refer to the electrical
schematic manual—particularly the schematics on microprocessor inputs and electrical valves,
and to the programming and operating information in the reference manual for a better
understanding of the control logic.
Notice 48 : Understand the press servicing hazards—Before performing press
maintenance, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
single stage press—a press extractor that squeezes water from successive batches of wet goods at
one pressing position (versus a two stage press that first lightly presses the goods at one
position, then fully presses them at another). Pressing leaves the batch of goods compressed
into a “cake” that must be subsequently broken apart by basket rotation in a dryer.
cake—a load of goods in a batch laundering system (typically a tunnel system) that has been
compacted together by a press extractor into a cake shape. Cakes are moved from the press to
dryers via shuttle conveyors designed especially to move (and possibly store) such cakes.
press code—a programmable sequence of one or more operating steps that the press uses to
process a particular type of goods. Pressing characteristics that can be specified for a step
include pressure, how long the pressure is applied, maximum step duration (regardless of
programmed pressure) and whether the ram rises at the end of a step. The press code also
provides a choice of motions the press will use to dislodge the cake at the end of the cycle.
The major components used to press the goods and shape the cake are shown in Figure 34.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Figure 34: Major Press Components
Viewing Load End of Press
Legend
A.
B.
C.
D.
(E).
Ram—large hydraulic cylinder that provides
the pressing force.
Platen—round plate attached to the ram
cylinder rod.
Diaphragm—flexible, water-filled rubber
membrane attached to the platen. In this
view, the ram, platen and diaphragm are in
the up position.
Receiving chute and can—a metal assembly
that moves down and up hydraulically
(shown in the down position) and is used to
guide the incoming wet goods into the press
and shape the cake.
Not seen are the press bed on which the
cake is formed and integral conveyor,
which moves the cake out of the press once
the can and ram are raised out of the way.
.
3.1.1.
The Pumps and Related Components
The machine uses two hydraulic pumps: a recirculation pump and a pressure pump. The
recirculation pump is part of the oil cooling and filtering system. Pressure for can and ram
operation is provided by the pressure pump. The pressure pump and its related control
components are shown in Figure 35 and include:
variable displacement piston pump (see Notice 49 )—a hydraulic pump with multiple
pumping pistons whose displacement (stroke), and consequently, output, vary with the back
pressure applied to a control port on the pump. This back pressure is determined by the valve
position of the external proportional valve.
proportional valve—an electrically operated, modulating hydraulic valve used to vary the oil
pressure in a small hydraulic line in proportion to a varying voltage. The voltage read by this
valve is produced by a microprocessor controller peripheral board called a DBET card.
DBET card—an electronic circuit board that interprets data from the machine's microprocessor
controller (through a D/A peripheral board) to produce a variable voltage. The microprocessor
controller uses a pressure transducer to monitor actual hydraulic pressure.
pressure transducer—a sensing device that produces variable voltage in proportion to pressure.
This voltage is converted to digital data that the controller interprets as a pressure value.
Notice 49 : Pressure pump should not be field-repaired—Because of its complexity,
service personnel are advised not to attempt internal repairs to the pressure pump. Take the pump
to an authorized service center for your brand of pump (Kawasaki or Rexroth).
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Figure 35: Pressure Pump and Related Control Components
Components on Top of Press
DBET Card in Control Box
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
Pressure pump (variable displacement piston pump)
Proportional valve
Hydraulic line from proportional valve to pump control port
Electrical feed from DBET card
.
3.1.2.
The Hydraulic System and How It Functions During Operation
The single stage press hydraulic schematic is shown in Figure 36. Following the schematic are
descriptions of the various parts of the operating cycle and what the hydraulic system does during
each part. Items referenced in the explanations are those shown on the schematic.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Figure 36: Single Stage Press Hydraulic Schematic
Schematic
Legend
CA. Can hydraulics below top plate: counter-balance valves (CAA) and can cylinders (CAB)—See BMP980017
“Counterbalance Valves and Fittings” and BMP010009 “Receiving Chute and Can” for parts information.
M1. Manifold with ram directional valve (M1A), can directional valve (M1B), system relief valve (A5) and can pressure
regulator (A8)—See BMP010006 “Main Press Manifold” for parts information.
M2. Manifold with poppet valves 1 (M2A) and 2 (M2B) and ram relief valve (A7)—See BMP010006 “Main Manifold.”
M3. Gauge cluster with system pressure gauge (G1), ram pressure gauge (G2) and can pressure gauge (G3).
PF. Pre-fill pilot valve (PFA), pre-fill valve (PFB), bypass valve (PFC), pre-fill pressure regulator (A6) and pre-fill
pressure gauge (G4)—See BMP010004 “Pre-fill Valve Fittings” for parts information.
PP. Pressure pump (PP1), proportional valve (PP2), optional suppressor (PP3) and pump adjustments, including idle
pressure (A1), compensator (A2), stage 1 horsepower (A3) and stage 2 horsepower (A4)—See BMP010003
“Hydraulic Main Pump Assembly” and BMP010001 “Proportional Valve” for parts information.
RP. Recirculation pump (RPA) and oil cooler (RPB)—See BMP010008 “Oil Recirculation Cooler and Fittings.”
RA. Hydraulic ram—See BMP010011 “Hydraulic Ram and Diaphragm” for parts information.
TA. Tank (TAA) and filter (TAB). Additional filter–MP1Axxxx models only (TAC)—See BMP010005 “Hydraulic
Tank Assembly.” for parts information.
T1. To tank (not through filter)
Z1. This piping applies to models with prefix MP16 only.
Z2. This piping applies to models with prefix MP1A only
.
While the machine is running (idling and operating), the recirculation pump (RPA) and oil cooler
(RPB) run to keep the hydraulic oil cool and filtered. The path that oil takes when recirculating
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
varies with model type (MP16xxxx (Z1) or MP1Axxxx (Z2)). This, and the extra oil filter (TAC)
used by MP1Axxxx models, are the only schematic differences between these models.
3.1.2.1.
Idling (waiting to load)—While the press, with power on, is waiting for a load, it remains at
idle pressure (minimum system pressure) with these conditions in effect:
• The pressure pump (PP1) runs, providing approximately 400 psi (28 bar) pressure (idle
pressure) as controlled by the idle pressure adjustment (A1—see caution statement 50 ).
The small volume of oil flowing from the pump returns directly to the tank (TAA) via the
pump's case drain (see Note 7).
• The ram is up (confirmed by the ram full up proximity switch— Figure 37).
• The can rests on the press bed (confirmed by the can at bottom proximity switches— Figure
37), but the can cylinders are not pressurized.
• The can directional valve (M1B) is centered, so no oil flows to the can cylinders, but the ram
directional valve (M1A) is spooled to the raise ram position so that idle pressure will help
hold the ram up.
Note 7: The pressure pump has two oil lines to the tank—a large suction line and a small case drain return.
CAUTION 50 : Risk of machine malfunctions and damage—The various pressure
adjustments (items with prefix “A” in the hydraulic schematic) are set at the Milnor factory.
Indiscriminate changes to these settings will likely result in impaired performance, malfunctions
and/or damage and can void the warranty.
• Do not attempt to change hydraulic pressure settings except in strict compliance with
document BIPPMT02 “Setting Single Stage Press Pressures.”
Figure 37: Ram and Can Proximity Switches
Ram Proximity Switches
Can Proximity Switches
Legend
A.
B.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Proximity switch
mounting post
Ram guide rod (serves as
switch target)
PXST “Ram full up”
PXSM “Ram inside can”
PXSU “Ram at unload”
BXSL “Ram at low”
PXSB “Ram full down”
PXCT “Can at top”
Proximity switch target
One of two switches:
PXCB1 and PXCB2
“Can at bottom”
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.1.2.2.
Loading—The empty press is ready to receive a load when the ram is fully up and the can is
fully down, as in Figure 34. During loading, a batch of goods discharged from the washer slides
down the receiving chute and into the can. Now, and throughout processing, the can must be held
firmly against the bed to prevent the load from causing the can to shift. This occurs as follows:
• The proportional valve opens the amount specified by the can valve setting configure
decision to produce about 800 psi (55 bar) on the pump side of the directional valves.
• The can directional valve (M1B) spools to the can down position (coil B energized),
providing oil to the can cylinders (cap end) and remains in this position throughout
loading and pressing. As pressure on the pump side of the proportional valves rises during
pressing, pressure not exceeding 800 psi is maintained in the can down hydraulic circuit by
the can pressure regulator (A8—see caution statement 50 ). The regulator valve, along with
a check valve within each can counterbalance valve assembly (CAA), also prevents oil
pressure within the can cylinders from escaping back through the can down circuit.
3.1.2.3.
Ram “Free-fall”—Following the configured loading time delay, the ram descends by gravity,
lowering the diaphragm into the can (see Note 9). The following conditions permit this:
• The ram directional valve (M1A) spools to the ram down position (coil B energized),
permitting oil to flow into the ram cylinder (cap end). Although this does not account for the
majority of oil filling the cylinder, some oil is pumped in at this time.
• The pre-fill pilot valve (PFA and Figure 38) energizes (valve opens) providing oil pressure to
the pre-fill valve actuator. This opens the pre-fill valve (PFB), if it was not already pulled
open by suction. The falling ram draws a large volume of oil directly from the tank into the
cylinder by suction, through the pre-fill piping and pre-fill valve (see Figure 38).
• Both electrically operated poppet valves (M2A and M2B—see Note 8) energize, permitting
oil pushed from the rod end of the ram to quickly return to the tank. Poppet valve #2 (M2B)
returns oil through the ram directional valve while valve #1 (M2A) goes directly to the tank.
• The normally open bypass valve (PFC) remains open, acting as a pressure regulator to
prevent ram pressure from exceeding about 200 psi (14 bar) during most of the ram's
descent. This protects against the rare instance when the diaphragm meets with resistance
before it is fully contained by the can (usually the result of an accidental double load).
Note 8: The poppet valves have two positions: When de-energized, the valve permits oil to flow into, but
not from the ram cylinder rod end. When the valve is energized, oil can flow in either direction.
Note 9: For proper “free-fall”, a set of ram cylinder seals must be maintained at the correct tightness, as
explained in BIPPMM13 “Adjusting Ram Shaft Seal Tightness.”
Figure 38: Pre-fill Pilot Valve and Pre-fill Valve
Pre-fill Pilot Valve
Pre-fill Valve (pre-fill piping removed)
Legend
A.
B.
C.
Pre-fill
pilot
valve
Ram
Pre-fill
valve
.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.1.2.4.
Preparing to press (pre-fill valve closed, bypass valve permitted to close)—
The pre-fill valve and bypass valve must both close, as follows, to permit additional pressure:
• When the diaphragm descends below the ram inside can proximity switch (see Figure 37 and
Note 10), this causes the pre-fill pilot valve to close. However, the pre-fill valve is held open
by the flow of oil through it, so it does not necessarily close immediately.
• The pre-fill valve closes when the ram meets resistance from the goods and the flow of oil
into the cylinder slows sufficiently.
• When the diaphragm descends past the ram at unload proximity switch (see Note 10), the
bypass valve is permitted to close. As long as the diaphragm is below ram at unload, this
valve will close when pressing pressure is commanded and open when pressure is released.
Note 10: If the descending ram is jammed by goods that did not slide completely into the can, the ram
inside can proximity switch will not make, and the pre-fill valve will remain open. This protects against
further damage by venting pressure to the tank.
3.1.2.5.
Processing (extracting)—All of the hydraulic valves that enable high pressure in the ram
function according to the press code (see definition at the front of this document and Note 11
below) and the pressure transducer that provides actual pressure data to the microprocessor.
These valves include the proportional valve (PP2), ram directional valve (M1A), bypass valve
(PFC), and poppet valves (M2A and M2B).
Note 11: If the Check for ram at low position? configure decision is affirmed and the ram descends to the
ram at low proximity switch (see Figure 37), the pressure specified in the Max bar at ram low position
configure decision overrides that specified by the press code. If the current press code is not an “empty
load” and the ram descends to the ram full down switch (see Figure 37), pressure ceases and an error occurs.
Maximum system pressure, which varies with model, is limited by the pump compensation
pressure adjustment (A2), the system relief valve (A5) and other factors (see caution statement
50 ). As the ram pressurizes, the diaphragm must distribute the pressure by conforming to the
shape of the goods. During processing, the following conditions exist:
• The pre-fill valve remains closed.
• The can down circuit remains pressurized, holding the can against the bed.
3.1.2.6.
Discharging—During discharge, both the can and the ram eventually rise to fully up (as
confirmed by the can at top and ram full up proximity switches (see Figure 37). How they move
depends on which of two end codes is programmed for the current press code: One end code
moves the can and ram more forcefully to dislodge the cake; the other moves them more gently to
preserve the cake shape, as appropriate for goods type (see reference manual for more on end
codes). The following functions occur at various times, depending on end code:
• The bypass valve, which opened when pressing ceased, remains open, ensuring minimum
pressure in the ram cylinder (cap end).
• The ram directional valve (M1A) spools to the ram up position (coil A energized), permitting
oil to flow through the check valve of de-energized poppet valve #2 (M2B) and into the rod
end of the ram cylinder.
• The pre-fill pilot valve (PFA) energizes (valve opens), providing oil pressure to the pre-fill
valve actuator and opening the pre-fill valve (PFB). This allows a large volume of oil to flow
quickly from the ram through the pre-fill valve and piping, directly to the tank. When this
occurs depends on the end code.
• The can directional valve spools to the can up position (coil A energized) permitting oil to
flow through the counterbalance valves and into the rod end of the can cylinders (see
Supplement 2). Depending on end code, the ram will rise slowly to fully up, or rise quickly to
the ram at unload proximity switch position.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
• The pressure pump and proportional valve function to pressurize the rod end of the ram (ram
up circuit) to a pressure not exceeding 1500 psi (103 bar), as limited by the ram relief valve
(A7—see caution statement 50 ) and the rod end of the can cylinders (can up circuit) to a
pressure not exceeding 800 psi (55 bar), as limited by the can pressure regulator (A8).
Once the can is fully up and the ram is either fully up or at least at the unload position (depending
on end code), the cake is discharged in the following sequence:
1. The discharge door opens.
2. The belt runs forward until the discharge end photo eye is blocked and cleared, plus the
greater of either two seconds or the configured belt run time after discharge value.
3. The discharge door closes.
4. The can is lowered to the bed.
The press is ready for the next load when the can is fully down and the ram is fully up.
Supplement 2
How the Can Assembly is Susceptible to Damage
The can is susceptible to damage primarily from three conditions: 1) some part of the load
chute and can assembly meets an obstruction, 2) the diaphragm is manually lowered through
the raised can, 3) the can cylinders are not functioning in unison.
The first condition typically results when goods become jammed between the can and ram or
between the can and press bed. The machine provides two forms of protection for this:
• If the microprocessor sees more than a three second delay between the two can at bottom
proximity switch inputs, it will stop the machine and issue an error.
• The bushings that connect the load chute and can assembly to the can cylinder rods are
designed to slip on the rod in the event of a severe jam. Should this occur, the bushings
must be re-seated and the bolts properly torqued, as explained in document BIPPMM09
“Servicing a Misaligned (“Jammed”) Can Assembly.”
The second condition, which can also damage the diaphragm, applies to manual operation and
is addressed by the following precaution for operators and service technicians.
Notice 51 : Risk of Damage and Misalignment—Moving the ram through the bottom of
the can will cause the diaphragm to forcefully rub against the can, possibly causing damage.
This does not occur in automatic operation.
• If the maintenance work necessitates placing the can up and the ram down: 1) lower the
can onto the press bed, 2) lower the diaphragm onto the press bed, 3) raise the can.
• If goods become jammed between the ram and can, withdraw the ram through the top of
the can. Attempting to push the ram through the bottom will only jam the goods tighter.
If can misalignment does occur, the corrective action is the same as for condition 1, above.
The counterbalance valves (CAA) address the third condition. These valves are intended to
ensure that the can remains level as it travels. They are adjusted at the factory and do not
normally need subsequent adjustment. However, if the can appears to travel in a jerky, or
uneven motion, and can misalignment, as explained above is ruled out, these valves may need
adjustment. Contact Milnor Technical Support.
— End of BIPPMF01 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
BIUUUT04 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
3.2. Onboard Troubleshooting Aids for Digital Outputs and Inputs
Milnor machines with Mark V microprocessor controllers and 2-line displays provide visual aids
such as those shown in Figure 39, for troubleshooting digital (on/off) output and input circuits.
Milnor machines with other types of controllers and displays provide similar features. These aids
indicate the current on/off state at various locations in the circuit.
Figure 39: Troubleshooting Aids
On/Off State Indicators
Legend
bio.
bi16.
bo.
bo8.
bo24.
ci.
ci1.
co.
co1.
di.
do.
id.
od.
od1.
od2.
od3.
s.
Input/output board. These are designated BIO-1, BIO-2, etc., for the first, second, etc. I/O board on the machine.
Sixteen (16) green LED's (zero (0) through 15)–one per input. LED illuminates when input is made.
Output board. These are designated BO24-1, BO24-2, etc., for the first, second, etc. output board on the machine.
Eight (8) red LED's (zero (0) through 7)–one per output. LED illuminates when output relay is energized.
Twenty four (24) red LED's–one per output on this board. The outputs are numbered zero (0) through 23.
Electrical components that provide input signals (proximity switches shown).
LED on proximity switch–illuminates while switch contacts are made. Only certain components provide an LED.
Electrical component controlled by an output signal (electrically operated valve shown).
LED on electric valve actuator–illuminates while valve is actuated. Only certain components provide an LED.
Direction of input signals.
Direction of output signals
Input display on controller–shows 16 inputs (identified with upper case letters A through P)
Output display on controller–shows 16 outputs (identified with lower case letters a through p)
Display page number. Additional outputs will be on page 1, 2, etc.
Output “a” (on this page)
Output “a” on/off value. A dash (-) means not actuated. A plus sign (+) means actuated.
Yellow serial link light–Must blink when machine is on. Otherwise, board is not communicating with processor.
.
3.2.1.
How To Use the Troubleshooting Aids
Use these aids as a quick check of circuit function and integrity. Observing proper safety
precautions (see safety manual) you can monitor outputs and inputs while the machine is
operating or test outputs in Manual mode. Observe circuit function at the following locations:
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
1. microprocessor display—See the reference manual for instructions on viewing inputs and
outputs, and on testing. When you invoke this capability, data similar to that shown on the
left side of Figure 39 will appear on the display. Confirm that an output occurs at the
expected time. Confirm that an input signal from a component on the machine reaches the
controller (e.g., test for an open) or that an input is not seen at the wrong time (e.g., test for a
short).
2. I/O boards—The boards (center of Figure 39) are typically located in the machine's lowvoltage control cabinet. The machine will have whatever combination of boards is needed to
handle all digital outputs and inputs. Tags inside the cabinet door identify each board and the
circuit functions assigned to the numbered outputs and inputs (numbers printed next to the
LED's) on each board. Confirm that an output signal from the controller actuates the output
relay on the board. Confirm that an input signal from a component on the machine reaches
the board or that an input is not seen at the wrong time. The yellow serial link light is also
very useful. If it ceases to blink, the board has lost serial communication with the processor.
If the machine contains at least two boards of this type, make a note of the board addresses,
as set on the rotary switches on the boards. Then swap the boards, giving each board the
address of the board it replaces. If the problem (the LED that's not blinking) moved with the
board, the board is bad. Otherwise, there is a problem with the board to board connections.
3. electrical components—As shown on the right side of Figure 39, electrical components that
provide input signals to the microprocessor, such as proximity switches, may have an LED on
the component to indicate it's on/off state. Verify that components are functioning. Similarly,
components controlled by digital outputs, such as electrically operated valves, may have an
LED to indicate whether the component is energized. Verify that an output signal from the
controller reaches the component.
3.2.2.
Caveats
These troubleshooting aids have the following characteristics and limitations:
• You cannot determine the position of an output or input on an I/O board from its position on
the controller display, or the reverse. Nor do these positions correlate to circuit connector and
pin numbers, wire numbers, etc. Ensure that you know which display page/position and
board/LED the circuit to be checked corresponds to, as follows:
Display page and position—Tables in the reference manual (usually under
troubleshooting) list outputs and inputs and their positions on these displays.
Board location in card cage—This is shown on a tag inside electric box door (tag also
shown in schematic manual).
Position on board—This is shown on a tag inside electric box door (tag also shown in
schematic manual).
Circuit description—Circuit logic, connector and pin numbers, wire numbers, etc. are
provided in the schematic manual.
• Some input circuits connect to the controller directly on the processor board (direct inputs).
Currently processor boards do not provide LED's for these inputs. If you cannot find an input
listed on the electric box tag that identifies the I/O board positions, suspect that this is a direct
input. Verify this on the electric schematic for this circuit. Any such input will connect to the
processor board via a connector designated 1MTA38 or 1MTA39.
• The troubleshooting aids do not fully replace traditional electrical troubleshooting. For
example, if you suspect there is a problem with a proximity switch, you can quickly deduce
from the LED's that there is an open in the wiring between the switch and the I/O board.
However, you will need to use traditional means to pinpoint the break. “Milnor's Guide to
Basic Troubleshooting” (MXUUUU01) provides guidance on using test equipment.
— End of BIUUUT04 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
BIPPMM02 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
3.3. About the Ram Proximity Switches, Mounting Post, and Guide
Rod
Milnor® single stage press models use several proximity switches to detect and report to the
microprocessor controller, the position of moving components such as the can and ram. The
switch positions are set at the factory and, with the exception of the five proximity switches that
detect ram position, do not normally need to be field checked. The ram proximity switches are
located on a mounting post on top of the machine next to the ram guide rod, which serves as the
switch target (see Figure 40). Both the switch mounting post and the guide rod are removed for
shipment and must be re-installed on site. These components must be properly positioned and the
switches tested to ensure proper function.
In Figure 40, the ram proximity switches (items 1 through 5) are identified by their functional
labels (see “Inputs” in the schematic manual) and the operational conditions they are associated
with.
Figure 40: Ram Proximity Switches, Related Components and Switch Functions
Switches on Mounting Post
Legend
A.
B.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
.
Proximity switch mounting post
Ram guide rod (serves as switch target)
PXST “Ram full up”—The ram is
approximately at its upper mechanical limit
of travel.
PXSM “Ram inside can”—The descending
diaphragm has started to enter the full circle
of the receiving chute where the free-falling
ram must now begin to apply pressing
pressure.
PXSU “Ram at unload”—The diaphragm is
just completely inside the full circle of the
receiving chute. At discharge, the ram parks
at this position so that the discharging cake
has clearance, but if the cake is stuck in the
can, the ram will push it out when the can
rises.
PXSL “Ram at low”—The ram has
descended farther than it could have if the
press had a full load. Hence, the controller
assumes a partial load and reduces pressing
pressure.
PXSB “Ram full down”—The diaphragm is
approximately one inch above the bed; the
lowest position the ram can travel in
automatic operation without risking
component damage.
This procedure uses the Manual mode (manual operation) as explained in the reference manual. It
requires two technicians—one to check and adjust the switch positions and the other to operate
the press controls. Both technicians must understand press safety and be able to clearly
communicate with each other.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.3.1.
Installing the Guide Rod and Switch Mounting Post
and Setting the Switch-to-target Gap
When the guide rod is installed at the factory for testing, it is threaded as far as possible into the
platen. Repeat this on site, as shown in Figure 41, to avoid any change in switch actuation
resulting from the rod protruding slightly farther.
Install the switch mounting post in its bracket (weldment) as shown in Figure 41 and tighten
down. The post has fairly negligible play within the bracket. However, make sure that each
switch horizontally aligns with the target (guide rod) and the switch-to-target gap is
approximately:
PXST, PXSM, and PXSU (larger switches) = 0.2" (5 mm)
PXSL and PXSB (smaller switches) = 0.13" (3 mm)
Figure 41: Installing the Guide Rod and Switch Mounting Post
Guide Rod Seated in Platen
Switch Mounting Post Installed
Switch-to-target Gap
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Guide rod—threaded as
far as possible into platen
Locking nut
Mounting post bracket
(weldment)
Switch mounting post
Switch-to-target gap
Lamp illuminates when
switch is made.
.
3.3.2.
Checking and Setting the Switch Vertical Positions
Whether the press is newly installed or has been in operation, the press must be functional and
have a properly filled diaphragm (see Note 12) before the proximity switch vertical positions can
be checked. These checks and adjustments require two technicians: one works on top of the
machine to make the adjustments and the other operates the controls in Manual mode.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Note 12: Refer to documents BIPPMM03, “Installing the Milnor Diaphragm in the Single Stage Press”
and BIPPMM10 “How to Fill and Maintain the Diaphragm” for diaphragm instructions.
WARNING 52 : Crush and Sever Hazards—The can and ram move independently. During
operation these components move without warning. These components can also drift down with
power off. Any of several closing gaps will crush or sever body parts.
• Proceed only if a qualified service technician, knowledgeable in press manual operation.
• Use the door interlock bypass key switch in strict compliance with the instructions.
• Install the safety supports and lockout/tagout power before reaching into, or working
under the can or ram.
• Ensure that personnel and obstructing equipment are clear of the press before operating it
or returning to manual operation.
• Ensure that personnel and equipment are clear before operating the machine.
• Be prepared to use emergency stop switches.
CAUTION 53 : Multiple Hazards—Various components above the press top plate move or
become hot or energized. Hydraulic piping may leak. Working area is tight and may be slippery.
When maintenance work necessitates getting on top of the press:
• Ensure only qualified service personnel perform top-of-press work.
• Identify and stand clear of components that move (such as the diaphragm rod) or become
hot (such as the pump and motor).
• Use safe, appropriate equipment for getting on and off of the machine.
• Ensure solid footing and guard against slippery surfaces. Wash surfaces with detergent.
Notice 54 : Risk of Damage and Misalignment—Moving the ram through the bottom of
the can will cause the diaphragm to forcefully rub against the can, possibly causing damage. This
does not occur in automatic operation.
• If the maintenance work necessitates placing the can up and the ram down: 1) lower the
can onto the press bed, 2) lower the diaphragm onto the press bed, 3) raise the can.
• If goods become jammed between the ram and can, withdraw the ram through the top of
the can. Attempting to push the ram through the bottom will only jam the goods tighter.
3.3.3.
PXST “Ram full up”
This is the only ram proximity switch that is functional in Manual mode; that is, the switch stops
ram travel even if commanded up manually. The switch is properly set if it stops ram movement
just as the ram reaches it's upper mechanical limit. If this occurs before the upper mechanical
limit is reached, you cannot tell by sound or movement, how far away the ram is from it's
mechanical limit. However, assuming the switch bracket is near the top of the post, it is sufficient
to verify that the ram does not reach its upper mechanical limit without actuating the switch.
Start with the can down and the ram up.
1. Lower the ram a few inches.
2. While one technician observes PXST, the other slowly raises the ram.
3. If the switch lamp illuminates, the switch is properly set. If the ram mechanically stops
without actuating the switch:
a. Move the switch as far up the switch post as possible.
b. While one technician commands the ram up to hold it against its mechanical stop, the
other slowly moves PXST down just until the switch lamp illuminates.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
c. Secure the switch at this position.
3.3.4.
PXSM “Ram inside can” and PXSU “Ram at unload”
These two switches are checked and set is similar fashion. Start with the can down and the ram
up. To adjust PXSM:
1. One technician observes PXSM and signals the other technician when the switch lamp
extinguishes. The other technician slowly lowers the ram and stops when signaled.
2. Observe the diaphragm position. If the bottom edge of the diaphragm is one to two inches (25
to 51 mm) inside the full circle of the receiving chute, as shown in Figure 42, the switch is
properly set. If not:
a. Move the ram to the position shown in Figure 42.
b. Move the switch up on the post then slowly lower it just until the switch lamp
extinguishes.
c. Secure the switch at this position.
Figure 42: Where Ram Should Begin to Apply
Power (PXSM)
Figure 43: Where Ram Should Park for Unload
(PXSU)
Use the same technique to check and set PXSU. The proper diaphragm position is when the
diaphragm is just fully inside the full circle of the receiving chute, as shown in Figure 43.
3.3.5.
PXSL “Ram at low” and PXSB “Ram full down”
PXSL and PXSB are set at the same time because their mounting brackets abut each other, as
shown in Figure 44. PXSB is set first, then PXSL is simply placed above PXSB, with their
brackets touching.
PXSB is properly set if, when the ram descends, this switch de-actuates (switch lamp
extinguishes) when the diaphragm is one inch (25 mm) above the press bed, as shown in Figure
45.
CAUTION 55 : Risk of diaphragm damage and poor extraction—The PXSB (“Ram
full down”) setting and the diaphragm water level, together, greatly affect both diaphragm life
and machine performance. PXSB set too low and/or an overfilled diaphragm is likely to severely
shorten diaphragm life. PXSB set too high and/or an under-filled diaphragm will impede
extraction, especially with partial loads.
• Maintain the specified diaphragm-to-bed clearance.
• Maintain a properly filled diaphragm (see Note 12).
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Start with the can up (safety stands installed) and the ram down.
1. Raise the ram about six inches (about 150 mm).
2. One technician observes PXSB and signals when the switch lamp extinguishes. The other
technician slowly nudges the ram down and stops when signaled.
3. Lockout/tagout power and measure the diaphragm-to-bed gap. If this measures one inch (25
mm) as shown in Figure 45, the switch is properly set. If not:
a. Lower the diaphragm onto the press bed and release the controls.
b. Move PXSL out of the way by raising it about six inches (about 150 mm).
c. Move PXSB to a position exactly one inch (25 mm) above where the top of the guide rod
is currently.
d. Secure the switch at this position.
e. Test this position by repeating Item 1 through Item 3 several times. Adjust the switch
position if necessary.
f. Once PXSB is secured, move PXSL down until the PXSB and PXSL brackets are
touching and secure it in this position.
Figure 44: PXSL and PXSB With Abutting Brackets
Figure 45: PXSB Diaphragm-to-Bed Clearance
— End of BIPPMM02 —
BIPPMT01 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
3.4. Troubleshooting Ram Malfunctions
This document applies to Milnor® single stage press models with prefixes MP1603, MP1604,
MP1A03, and in part, to older MP1601 and MP1602 models. Use this guide if your machine
exhibits one of the following symptoms for no apparent reason (e.g, the problem cannot be
associated with recent servicing):
• Ram will not go down or goes down slowly
• Ram will not go up or goes up slowly
• Ram drifts down at idle
• Neither ram nor can will move
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
• Little or no extraction
• Commanded pressure not achieved or achieved slowly
Notice 56 : Understand the press servicing hazards—Before performing press
troubleshooting, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
3.4.1.
What You Should Know Before Troubleshooting
1. These procedures are intended only for qualified service technicians with a knowledge of
hydraulic systems. For safety and, in most cases, necessity, two technicians are required.
2. If you are not thoroughly familiar with the press hydraulic system, review document
BIPPMF01 “How the Single Stage Press Hydraulic System Works,”.
3. For convenience, kit KYSSTRBLSH is available from Milnor. This provides fittings and
other components for use in the test procedures explained in Section 3.4.3 “Functional
Tests”.
4. The press has several pressure adjustments which are set at the Milnor factory and not
normally readjusted on site. With the few exceptions mentioned herein, pressure adjustments
are not a solution when troubleshooting these symptoms. For those few exceptions, comply
carefully with document BIPPMT02 “Setting Single Stage Press Pressures.”
5. Often, the first indication of a ram problem will be an error condition and accompanying
message such as “E03 Ram Not Fully Raised”. Consult “Troubleshooting” in the reference
manual for more information, such as which proximity switch caused the error.
3.4.2.
Troubleshooting Procedures
For an overview of symptoms, components and possible causes of ram malfunctions, see Table 6
on the next page. Experienced troubleshooters may wish to use this table as a quick reference.
Detailed troubleshooting steps for each symptom follow the table. Some troubleshooting steps
require test procedures to be performed. These tests, which are provided in Section 3.4.3, are also
helpful for general servicing and preventive maintenance.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Table 6: Ram Symptoms and Causes Cross-reference
Symptom
Possible Cause
⇓ ⇓ Stuck valve
Little or no extraction ⇓
⇓ Clogged/dirty
Neither ram nor can will move ⇓
⇓ Worn/leaking
Ram drifts down at idle ⇓
⇓ Open circuit (never on)
Ram goes up slowly ⇓
⇓ Short (never off)
Ram will not go up ⇓
⇓ Internal damage
Ram goes down slowly ⇓
⇓ Mis-adjusted
Ram will not go down ⇓
⇓ Bad coil
Pressure not achieved or achieved slowly
Comments
Functions and Related Components*
Pressurize system
• Pressure pump
o
• Pressure pump motor
o
o
o
o
o
• System relief valve
o
o
o
o
Control pressure
• Proportional valve
o
o
o
o
• Proportional (DBET) card
o
• High resolution D/A board
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
• Pressure transducer
• A/D board
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Sense pressure
o
o
o
Enable ram rod-side flow
• VEPP1 poppet 1 actuator
• Poppet valve 1
• VEPP2 poppet 2 actuator
• Poppet valve 2
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
• Ram relief valve
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Enable ram pressurization
• VERDB bypass actuator
o
• Bypass valve
o
• Ram piston seals
• Ram shaft seals
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Enable ram direction
• VERL lower ram (coil B)
• VERR raise ram (coil A)
• Ram directional valve
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Enable quick fill and exhaust
• VERS pre-fill pilot actuator
o
• Pre-fill pilot valve
o
• Pre-fill valve
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
** This column groups related electrical and mechanical components under the function they collectively perform.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.4.2.1.
Ram Will Not Go Down or Goes Down Slowly —Table 7, referenced in the charts
below it, shows the on/off state of the electrically operated hydraulic valves during ram descent.
Table 7: Valve Actuation Sequence for Ram DOWN (observe LED's on actuators)
VERDB
VERS
VERL
VERR
VEPP1
VEPP2
"ram
down
bypass"*
pre-fill
lower
ram
raise
ram
poppet
#1"
poppet
#2
1. Start (full up)
off
on
on
off
on
on
2. Ram in can (1/2 down)
off
off
on
off
on
on
3. Ram at unload (2/3 down)
on
off
on
off
on
on
4. End (lowest position)
on
off
on
off
on
on
When During Travel
* The ram down bypass valve is open when VERDB is off and closed when on.
Chart 5: Ram Will Not Go Down (two technicians required)
One technician operates the controls while the other observes the LED's. Access
manual mode 07 (0, 7, n), then command the ram down (hold
&) and continue holding while observing LED's. See Figure 46 in Section
3.4.3.1 for VERR location.
While attempting to
manually lower ram, observe VERR (raise ram).
A1:
Is VERR off, as shown in
Table 7?
NO
Troubleshoot the VERR
circuit (Section 3.4.3.1).
VERR is probably shorted, driving ram
up. To confirm, remove VERR electrical
connector and try again.
YES
A2:
A3:
See Figure 46 in Section 3.4.3.1 for VEPP1 and VEPP2 location. Both poppet
valves may be closed, preventing oil from exiting the ram rod end. If the VEPP1
or VEPP2 LED is off, there is most likely, an open in the electrical circuit. If the
LED is on, there may be a mechanical problem with the valve.
Observe VEPP1 and
VEPP2 (poppets).
Are both LED's on, as
shown in Table 7?
NO
Check electrical circuit
of actuator that is off
(see Section 3.4.3.1)
and function of valve
that is on (see Section
3.4.3.3).
See the “Main Press Manifold” parts
document.
YES
A4:
Test the VERL solenoid
(see Section 3.4.3.1).
A5:
Is the solenoid OK?
The VERL solenoid may not be moving the valve spool.
NO
Repair or replace
directional valve.
See the “Main Press Manifold” parts
document.
YES
A6:
Service ram directional
valve (Section 3.4.3.3)
A7:
Is the valve OK?
The directional valve may be mechanically faulty.
NO
Repair or replace
directional valve.
See the “Main Press Manifold” parts
document.
YES
Ram mechanically
restrained.
Examples: Ram shaft seals too tight (see BIPPMM13 “Adjusting Ram Shaft
Seal Tightness”), safety bars installed, obstruction in ram rod-end hydraulic
line, etc.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Perform the following troubleshooting if the ram descends significantly slower than it did
previously, resulting in longer cycle times.
Chart 6: Ram Goes Down Slowly (two technicians required)
If the press is on-line, access the manual mode (k+m), access mode 07
(0, 7, n) and raise the ram fully (^).
Start with the ram up
fully.
A1:
While lowering ram,
observe VEPP1 and
VEPP2 (poppets).
A2:
Are both LED's on, as
shown in Table 7?
One technician operates the controls while the other observes the LED's. Using
manual mode 07, lower the ram (&). See Figure 46 in Section 3.4.3.1 for
VEPP1 and VEPP2 location.
NO
Troubleshoot electrical
circuit of actuator that
is off (see Section
3.4.3.1).
This poppet valve is closed, slowing the
outflow of oil from the ram rod end.
There is most likely an open in the
circuit.
YES
A3:
Test pre-fill valve (see
Section 3.4.3.8).
A4:
Is the pre-fill valve
functioning?
The pre-fill valve may be stuck closed. Normally, when the ram descends,
suction will pull this valve open even if the pre-fill pilot valve is not
functioning.
Repair or replace.
NO
See the “Pre-fill Valve Fittings” parts
document.
YES
A5:
Inspect/service both
poppet valve cartridges
(see Section 3.4.3.2).
A6:
Are both poppets
functioning properly?
A poppet valve may be stuck closed or clogged, slowing the outflow of oil from
the ram rod end.
NO
Replace offending
valve.
See the “Main Press Manifold” parts
document.
YES
Check for other
mechanical problems.
3.4.2.2.
Examples:
• Ram shaft seals too tight (see BIPPMM13 “Adjusting Ram Shaft Seal
Tightness”)
• Obstruction in ram rod-end hydraulic line, probably at cylinder.
Ram Will Not Go Up or Goes Up Slowly—Table 8, referenced in the charts below it,
shows the on/off state of the electrically operated hydraulic valves during ram ascent.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Table 8: Valve Actuation Sequence for Ram UP (observe LED's on valve actuators)
When During Travel
VERS
VERDB
ram down
bypass*
pre-fill
VERL
lower
ram
VERR
raise
ram
VEPP1
poppet
#1***
VEPP2
poppet
#2***
off
on**
off
on
off
off
1. Start (lowest position)
off
on
off
on
off
off
2. Ram at unload (1/3 up)
off
off
off
off
off
off
3. End (full up)
* The ram down bypass valve is open when VERDB is off and closed when on.
** When the ram is manually raised, this valve is on at this time. In automatic operation, the
timing of valve operation depends on the end code used.
*** Although the poppet valves remain off during ram up, they permit oil to enter the ram rod
side because they are always open in this direction.
Chart 7: Ram Will Not Go Up (two technicians required)
One technician operates the controls while the other observes the LED's.
Accewss manual mode 07 (0, 7, n) to command the ram up
(^). and continue holding while observing LED's. See Figure 46 in Section
3.4.3.1 for VERL location.
While attempting to
manually raise ram, observe VERL (lower ram).
A1:
Is VERL off, as shown in
Table 8?
NO
Troubleshoot the VERL
circuit (see Table 12)
VERL is probably shorted, driving the
ram down. To confirm, remove VERL
electrical connector and try again.
YES
A2:
Test the VERR solenoid
(see Section 3.4.3.1).
A3:
Is the solenoid OK?
The VERR solenoid may not be moving the valve spool.
NO
Repair or replace
directional valve.
See the “Main Press Manifold” parts
document.
YES
A4:
Bench-test the ram
directional valve (see
Section 3.4.3.3)
A5:
Is the valve OK?
The directional valve may be mechanically faulty (e.g., stuck).
NO
Repair or replace
directional valve.
YES
A6:
Inspect/service both
poppet valve cartridges.
A7:
Are both poppets
functioning properly?
A poppet valve may be mechanically faulty. Although the poppet valves are not
actuated when the ram is rising, they permit flow into the ram rod end because
they function as check valves.
NO
Replace offending
valve.
See the “Main Press Manifold” parts
document.
YES
Other mechanical fault.
Examples:
• Ram piston seals worn (see Section 3.4.3.7).
• Insufficient pump pressure (see Section 3.4.2.6).
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Perform the following troubleshooting if the ram ascends significantly slower than it did
previously, resulting in longer cycle times.
Chart 8: Ram Goes Up Slowly (two technicians required)
If the press is on-line, access the manual mode (k+m), access mode 07
(0, 7, n) and lower the ram fully (&), if it is up.
Start with the ram down
fully.
A1:
While observing ram
movement, raise the ram.
A2:
Does the ram rise quickly
in Manual mode (problem
only occurs in automatic
operation)?
YES
End code #2 selected
(see reference manual).
An end code must be selected for each
press code. Review programming
instructions.
NO
A3:
Again lower the ram.
Then, while raising the
ram, observe VERS (prefill pilot valve).
A4:
Is the LED on, as shown
in Table 8?
One technician operates the controls while the other observes the LED's. Using
manual mode 07, raise the ram (^). See Figure 46 in Section 3.4.3.1 for
VERS location.
NO
Troubleshoot the VERS
electrical circuit (see
Section 3.4.3.1).
The pre-fill pilot valve is not actuating.
Hence, the pre-fill valve is not opening.
There is probably an open in the VERS
circuit.
YES
A5:
Test the VERS solenoid
(see Section 3.4.3.1).
A6:
Is the solenoid OK?
The VERS solenoid may not be moving the valve spool.
NO
Repair or replace prefill pilot valve.
See “Pre-fill Valve Fittings” parts
document.
YES
A7:
Bench-test pre-fill pilot
valve (see Section
3.4.3.3).
A8:
Is the valve OK?
The valve may be mechanically faulty (e.g., stuck).
NO
Repair or replace prefill pilot valve.
See “Pre-fill Valve Fittings” parts
document.
YES
Other mechanical fault.
3.4.2.3.
Examples:
• Pre-fill valve stuck closed. The pre-fill valve test (Section 3.4.3.8) is
probably not useful here because it depends on observing a change from
slow to fast speed as the ram ascends.
• Ram piston seals worn (see Section 3.4.3.7)
• Insufficient pump pressure (see Section 3.4.2.6)
Ram Drifts Down at Idle—Referring to Table 9, when the press is idling in manual mode,
all ram control valves are off. When it is idling in automatic and “Waiting for Load”, all except
VERR are off. In the latter case, VERR holds the ram directional valve in the “raise ram”
position so that idle pressure will help counteract any tendency to drift down.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Table 9: Valve State During Idle
VERDB
VERS
VERL
VERR
VEPP1
VEPP2
Type of Idle
"ram
down
bypass"*
pre-fill
lower
ram
raise
ram
poppet
#1"
poppet
#2
Automatic ("Waiting for Load")
off
off
off
on
off
off
Manual
off
off
off
off
off
off
* The ram down bypass valve is open whrn VERDB is off and closed when on.
Chart 9: Ram Drifts Down at Idle
The valves that could affect drift down include the ram directional valve (VERL
and VERR) and the poppet valves (VEPP1 and VEPP2). See Figure 46 in
Section 3.4.3.1 for actuator locations.
Observe the ram control
valves during idle, both
while on-line (“Waiting
for Load”) and in manual.
A1:
Do the LED's agree with
Table 9.
To check during automatic, place the press on-line, but with the loading device
disabled so that the press will remain “Waiting for Load”. To check while in
manual, access the manual mode (k+m), but leave at mode 00 Return
to Automatic.
NO
Fix offending circuit
(Section 3.4.3.1)
YES
A2:
Test ram piston seals for
leaks (Section 3.4.3.7).
A3:
Are seals leaking badly
(see Supplement 4in
Section 3.4.3.7)?
If oil is bleeding past the seals from the rod end to the cap end of the ram, a
portion of pump pressure is being used just to counteract this.
Replace seals
Contact Milnor Technical Support or
Milnor dealer for assistance.
YES
NO
A4:
Service both poppet
valves (see Section
3.4.3.3).
A5:
Is a poppet valve
leaking?
Oil may be exhausting from ram rod end through the leaking valve.
YES
Repair or replace
offending valve.
See the “Main Press Manifold” parts
document.
NO
Other mechanical fault.
3.4.2.4.
Examples:
• Ram directional valve faulty, preventing the spool from centering (see
Section 3.4.3.3).
• Ram drain plug loose.
Neither the Ram Nor Can Will Move—When functioning properly, the pressure pump
will begin producing approximately 400 psi as soon as the Start switch (1) is pressed and while
idling. Idle pressure is sufficient to raise/lower the can and ram. If neither the ram nor can can be
made to move in Manual mode (other than ram descent), this likely indicates that the pressure
pump is producing llittle or no pressure.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 10: Neither the Ram Nor Can Will Move
With the press idling in
Manual mode, observe
pressure pump/motor.
A1:
Is the pump motor
running?
NO
Troubleshoot the pump
motor circuitry
YES
A2:
Observe the pressure
pump/motor coupling.
A3:
Is the motor driving the
pump?
Either there is an open (e.g., a tripped
motor overload), or motor is burned out.
See “Motors & Incoming Power” in
schematic manual. See also, manual
MXUUUU01 “Guide to Basic
Troubleshooting,” available from Milnor.
There is an access port on top of the pump-to-motor mounting bracket, through
which you can view the coupling. Carefully remove the plastic cover. Replace
cover when done.
NO
Repair or replace the
coupling?
YES
See Troubleshooting
Chart 11
See the “Hydraulic Main Pump
Assembly” parts document.
YES
A4:
Test pressure pump (see
Section 3.4.3.6)
A5:
Is the pump OK?
NO
Because of its complexity, Milnor recommends against attempting to inspect or
repair the pressure pump on site. Have the pump serviced by an authorized
service center for your brand of pump—Kawasaki or Rexroth.
Repair or replace the
pressure pump.
3.4.2.5.
Little or No Extraction—Perform this troubleshooting if the press cycles successfully, but
extraction substantially does not occur, as indicated by:
• press cycle time increases to maximum, causing tunnel hold time to increase
• drying times increase drastically
• cakes appear wet or can be pulled apart easily and pieces feel wet
Table 10: Valve States During Pressing (observe LED's on valve actuators)
When
VERDB
ram down
bypass*
VERS
pre-fill
VERL
lower
ram
VERR
raise
ram
VEPP1
poppet
#1
on
off
on
off
on
While manually pressing
During automatic operation
off
**
**
**
**
(during production)
* The ram down bypass valve is open when VERDB is off and closed whrn on.
** These valves open and close according to the press code.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
VEPP2
poppet
#2
on
**
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 11: Little or No Extraction (two technicians required)
If the press can achieve mid-range pressure, the pressure pump, proportional
valve and related control circuitry are likely OK.
Test for midrange
pressure (see Section
3.4.3.10)
A1:
Does press achieve midrange pressure?
Go to B1
NO
YES
A2:
While manually pressing
goods, observe VERL.
A3:
Is LED illuminated, as
shown in Table 10?
If the press is empty, allow a load to transfer in. One technician operates the
controls while the other observes the LED's. Access manual mode 09 (0,
9, n) and press the goods (hold &). See Figure 46 in Section
3.4.3.1 for VERL location.
NO
Troubleshoot VERL
circuit (Section 3.4.3.1).
YES
A4:
While manually pressing,
observe VERDB & VERS.
A5:
Is VERDB on and VERS
off, as shown in Table
10?
If yes, pressure is escaping from the ram
down hydraulic circuit. If no, the
pressure pump is producing minimal
pressure.
Ram directional valve is not receiving
signal to move to ram down position.
This will not prevent the ram from
descending, but it will prevent the ram
cylinder from pressurizing.
See Figure 46 in Section 3.4.3.1 for VERDB and VERS locations.
NO
Fix offending circuit
(see Section 3.4.3.1)
If either valve is open, this will vent
pressure, preventing the ram from
achieving high pressure.
YES
A6:
Test the bypass valve
(see Section 3.4.3.9).
A7:
Is the bypass valve
functioning?
If this valve is stuck open, this will prevent pressure from exceeding about 400
psi. Refer to Figure 46. The bypass valve consists of an integral pilot solenoid
and cartridge that operate a larger cartridge within the manifold.
NO
YES
A8:
Test the pre-fill valve
(see Section 3.4.3.8)
A9:
Is the pre-fill valve
functioning?
Service both cartridges
(see Section 3.4.3.2).
See Section 3.4.3.2 and “Pre-Fill Valve
Fittings” parts document.
Note 13: The problem is not a burned out solenoid (see Note 14 below).
If this valve is stuck open, this will prevent pressure from exceeding about 200
psi.
YES
Ram directional valve
probably faulty
Valve internal components stuck or
damaged. See Section 3.4.3.3. and
“Hydraulic Schematic” parts document.
NO
A10:
Bench test the pre-fill
pilot valve (Section
3.4.3.3).
A11:
Is the pre-fill pilot valve
functioning?
Valve internal components may be stuck or damaged.
Note 14: It is not necessary to test the solenoid because the solenoid
holds the valve open against spring pressure. If the solenoid were bad,
this would not cause the valve to remain open.
NO
Repair or replace prefill pilot valve.
See “Pre-Fill Valve Fittings” parts
document.
YES
A12:
Test ram piston seals for
leaks (see Section
3.4.3.7).
If oil is bleeding past the seals from the rod end to the cap end of the ram, a
portion of pump pressure is being used just to counteract this. Another typical
symptom of this problem is drifting down of the ram during idle (see Section
3.4.2.3 “Ram Drifts Down at Idle”)
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 11: Little or No Extraction (two technicians required)
A13:
Are seals leaking badly
(see Supplement 4in
Section 3.4.3.7)
Replace seals.
Contact Milnor Technical Support or
Milnor dealer for assistance.
YES
NO
The pre-fill valve probably stuck. The pre-fill valve is located between the top
of the ram cylinder and the pre-fill (“goose neck”) pipe. See “Pre-Fill Valve
Fittings” parts document.
Pre-fill valve probably
faulty
Part B
B1:
Test pressure pump, if
not already tested (see
Section 3.4.3.6)
B2:
Is the pump OK?
NO
Service the pressure
pump
YES
B3:
Test the D/A Board and
Proportional (DBET)
Card (see Section 3.4.3.4)
B4:
Are both boards
functioning properly?
Because of its complexity, Milnor
recommends against attempting to
inspect or repair the pressure pump on
site. Have the pump serviced by an
authorized service center for your brand
of pump—Kawasaki or Rexroth.
If either board is faulty, the proportional valve, and hence the pressure pump
will not properly respond to a call for high pressure.
NO
Replace offending
board.
See “Board To Board Wiring” and
component parts list in schematic
manual.
YES
B5:
B6:
If the transducer or A/D board is faulty, the controller will not properly
modulate pressure. If it thinks pressure is high when it is not, it will not
command higher output from the pressure pump.
Test the pressure
transducer and A/D
board (see Section
3.4.3.5)
Are these components
OK?
Note 15: Pressure modulation only occurs in automatic operation when
less than maximum pressure is commanded. Manual mode 09 and
programmed maximum pressure always drive the pump to maximum
pressure.
NO
Replace offending
component.
See “Board To Board Wiring” and
component parts list in schematic
manual.
YES
Bad connections
between proportional
card and proportional
valve or faulty
proportional valve.
3.4.2.6.
See “Board-To-Board Wiring” in the schematic manual. For general electrical
troubleshooting help, manual MXUUUU01 “Guide to Basic Troubleshooting”
available from Milnor. Refer to the “Hydraulic Schematic” parts document for
valve identification.
Commanded Pressure Not Achieved or Achieved Slowly—Perform the following
troubleshooting if the press approaches, but cannot achieve the pressure(s) called for by the press
codes (up to rated pressure, as listed in Table 11 below), or takes significnatly longer to achieve
pressure (see also Supplement 3 below). This is usually accompanied by an increase in press
cycle time, which causes tunnel hold time to increase. If pressure is not achieved, drying times
will likely increase.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Table 11: Applicable Milnor® Single Stage Press Models and Pressure Ratings
Model Prefix
MP1603
MP1604
MP1A03
Rated (Maximum System) Pressure - psi (bar)
Pump (Gauge) Pressure
Diaphragm Pressure
4600 (317)
4350 (300)
4600 (317)
508 (35)
725 (50)
580 (40)
Supplement 3
About Impaired Pressing
Impaired pressing—the inability of the press to achieve, or quickly achieve rated pressure.
Impaired pressing should be rectified if it is serious enough to affect the machine's operating
performance (see reference manual) or increase drying times. A small reduction in the
maximum achievable pressure will do neither if the pressures specified in all press codes are
below the pressure at which the problem is evident. If the machine can quickly achieve any
programmed pressure, correcting a minor impairment is not likely to provide useful benefits.
Impaired pressing can only be determined from an accurate pressure reading. Neither reduced
operating performance nor increased drying times necessarily indicate a pressure problem.
These can result from numerous causes such as changes in goods types, load sizes, and/or press
codes, none of which relate to the machine's ability to achieve pressure. Nor is there an error
condition that signals impaired pressing. If the pressure called for by the press code is not
achieved, the step will end at the programmed maximum time (see reference manual) and
processing will continue.
For the most accurate pressure reading, observe the system pressure gauge (top gauge on the
gauge cluster). The three displays that show pressure (normal run display, viewing analog
input..., and manual function 09 Pressurize Ram, which get their data from the pressure
transducer, are approximate, and the first two display diaphragm pressure. Only manual
function 09 displays approximate pump pressure.
Pressing can be impaired by a malfunctioning component or bad pressure setting. If it can be
determined at the outset that a pressure setting is the likely cause, do not perform these
procedures. Instead, refer to document BIPPMT02, “Setting Single Stage Press Pressures.”
Two situations that can cause pressure settings to fall out of adjustment are:
1. “breaking in” a new press—The maximum achievable pressure may gradually decline
during the first few months of operation, as hydraulic components such as seals are “broken
in.” In this instance, adjust the pressure settings to restore full pressing capability.
2. major hydraulic component replacement—This is especially true for the pressure pump.
Four adjustments are located on the pump itself and may be mis-adjusted on the
replacement pump. Always check pressures in accordance with document BIPPMT02
following this type of servicing.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 12: Commanded Pressure Not Achieved or Achieved Slowly
Test pressure pump (see
Section 3.4.3.6)
A1:
Is the pump OK?
NO
Service the pressure
pump.
YES
A2:
Test the D/A board and
proportional (DBET) card
(see Section 3.4.3.4)
A3:
Are both boards
functioning correctly?
Because of its complexity, Milnor
recommends against attempting to
inspect or repair the pressure pump on
site. Have the pump serviced by an
authorized service center for your brand
of pump—Kawasaki or Rexroth.
If either board is faulty, the proportional valve, and hence the pressure pump
will not properly respond to a call for high pressure.
NO
Replace offending
board.
See “Board To Board Wiring” and
component parts list in schematic
manual.
YES
A4:
A5:
If the transducer or A/D board is faulty, the controller will not properly
modulate pressure. If it thinks pressure is high when it is not, it will not
command higher output from the pressure pump.
Test the pressure
transducer and A/D
board (see Section
3.4.3.5)
Are these components
OK?
Note 16: Pressure modulation only occurs in automatic operation when
less than maximum pressure is commanded. Manual mode 09 and
programmed maximum pressure always drive the pump to maximum
pressure.
NO
Replace offending
component.
See “Board To Board Wiring” and
component parts list in schematic
manual.
YES
A6:
Test ram piston seals for
leaks (see Section
3.4.3.7).
A7:
Are seals leaking badly
(see Supplement 4in
Section 3.4.3.7)
If oil is bleeding past the seals from the rod end to the cap end of the ram, a
portion of pump pressure is being used just to counteract this. Another typical
symptom of this problem is drifting down of the ram during idle (see Section
3.4.2.3 “Ram Drifts Down at Idle”)
Replace seals.
Contact Milnor Technical Support or
Milnor dealer for assistance.
YES
NO
Perform pump
adjustments (see
document BIPPMT02)
3.4.3.
3.4.3.1.
If an impairment prevents full pressure, readjusting the pressure compensator
valve and horsepower valves on the pump may compensate for this. Perform
these adjustments exactly as explained in document BIPPMT02 “Setting Single
Stage Press Pressures.”
Functional Tests
How to Check Electric Valve Actuator Circuits and Test the Solenoids—The
six electrically operated, ram hydraulic valves and their actuators are identified in Figure 46.
Useful information about the actuator electrical circuits is provided in Table 12.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Figure 46: Ram Electrically Operated Hydraulic Valves
Ram Directional Valve
Bypass Valve
Legend
1.
1a.
1b.
2.
2a.
Poppet Valves
3.
3a.
3b.
4.
Pre-fill Pilot Valve
4a.
5.
6.
Ram directional valve on
MP16xxxx models.
MP1Axxxx models, use a
similar, electric valve to
hydraulically operate a
larger capacity directional
valve.
VERL actuator (lower
ram)
VERR actuator (raise
ram)
Bypass valve (cartridge)
VERDB actuator (ram
down bypass)
Poppet valves (cartridges)
VEPP1 actuator (poppet1)
VEPP2 actuator (poppet2)
Pre-fill pilot valve
(directional valve)
VERS actuator (pre-fill)
Mechanical actuator
Connector with LED
(typical)
.
Table 12: Digital Outputs for Ram Functions (electric valves)
Function
Output Display
Page
I/O Board
Position Board # LED # Connector
Pins
Controlled Components
Wire
#
Valve
Actuator
Lower ram
0
c
BIO-1
2
1MTA5
17-8
30
VERL
(lower)
Ram directional
valve (coil B)
Raise ram
0
d
BIO-1
3
1MTA5
16-7
31
VERR
(raise)
Ram directional
valve (coil A)
Pre-fill
0
a
BIO-1
0
1MTA5
19-10
28
VERS
Pre-fill pilot valve
Poppet #1*
0
h
BIO-1
7
1MTA5
11-1
37
VEPP1
Poppet valve #1
10
1
38
VEPP2
Poppet valve #2
14-4
27
VERDB
Bypass valve
Poppet #2*
1
b
BO24-1
9
1MTA13
1MTA14
Ram down
bypass
1
f
BO24-1
13
1MTA14
* The poppet valves, which operate simultaneously, open to allow flow into and out of the ram rod end.
Check circuit function by observing the on/off state of any actuator at three locations: the output
displays, the LED's on the I/O boards, and the LED's on the actuator electrical connector (see also
BIUUUT04 “Onboard Troubleshooting Aids for Digital Outputs and Inputs”).
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
All of the electrically operated hydraulic valves except the poppet valves have mechanical
actuators (see Figure 46). Assuming you have determined that the electrical circuit is functioning
properly (the LED on the valve actuator illuminates when it should), use the mechanical actuator
to determine if the problem with a valve is due to a non-functioning solenoid. Observing warning
statement 57 , carefully press the mechanical actuator (with a tool, if necessary) when you see
the LED illuminate. If the valve functions properly, the problem is with the solenoid.
WARNING 57 : Crush Hazards—Hydraulic valve mechanical actuators bypass the safety of
the electrical controls. Depressing a mechanical actuator may cause immediate movement.
• Use extreme caution when operating a hydraulic valve mechanically.
The bypass valve and poppet valves use removable cartridges that can be inspected and serviced
as explained in Section 3.4.3.2, below. The directional valves can be removed and bench tested,
as explained in Section 3.4.3.3.
3.4.3.2.
How to Inspect and Service Hydraulic Valve Cartridges—Several easily
removable hydraulic valve cartridges are used on the press. These are of various designs,
depending on their function: operational valve, pressure relief valve, or pressure regulator. The
pressure relief valves and pressure regulators are identified in Figure 47. A cartridge can
malfunction as a result of contamination (e.g., metal shaving) in the hydraulic fluid, or damage
(e.g., worn seals). Additionally, a relief valve or pressure regulator can be improperly adjusted.
Cartridges are designed to be inspected, cleaned, and seals replaced, but not rebuilt. With care,
pressure relief and pressure regulator cartridges can often be removed, serviced and replaced
without changing their adjustment.
Figure 47: Pressure Relief Valves and Regulators
Can and System Pressure Adjustments
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Ram Relief Valve on Poppet Valve Manifold
Can pressure regulator
System relief valve
Ram relief valve
Pre-fill pilot pressure regulator
Pre-fill pressure gauge
Pre-fill Pilot Valve and Related
.
1. Secure the can and ram by lowering them completely or installing the safety stands/bars.
Then lockout/tagout power.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
2. Each cartridge has a large integral mounting nut. Additionally, pressure relief/regulator
cartridges have a smaller lock nut for locking down the setting and a hex socket (Allen) screw
for adjusting the pressure setting. Remove the cartridge by turning the mounting nut only.
3. Inspect the cartridge for dirt and wear. If components such as seals appear worn or damaged,
Milnor recommends replacing the cartridge. A seal kit may be available from a third party,
but this can be done afterward and the old cartridge retained as a spare. If the cartridge
appears serviceable, clean it as follows:
a. Carefully remove obvious particles then submerge the cartridge in clean mineral spirits.
b. Through the nose of the cartridge, manually operate the working parts several times. Use
a piece of plastic tubing (see Figure 48) to avoid damaging sensitive components such as
screens. If possible, do this with the cartridge submerged in the mineral spirits.
c. Pressure relief/regulators only: If you must back off on the adjustment screw for
effective cleaning, hold the cartridge in a vice, loosen the lock nut, and turn the
adjustment screw with a hex head (Allen) screw. However, once you change the
pressure setting, you will need to reestablish the proper setting using the procedures
in document BIPPMT02 “Setting Single Stage Press Pressures”, after re-installing.
d. Use clean (filtered) compressed air to blow dry the cartridge.
4. Dip the dry cartridge in clean hydraulic oil then reinstall.
Figure 48: Operating Valve Cartridge
3.4.3.3.
Figure 49: Bench-testing a Directional Valve
How to Bench Test Directional Valves—Assuming you have determined that the valve
actuator circuit is functioning properly (the LED on the actuator illuminates when it should), you
can bench test a directional valve as follows:
1. Secure the can and ram by lowering them completely or installing the safety
stands/bars. Then lockout/tagout power.
2. Remove the valve actuator electrical connector(s). Make sure to mark connectors as needed
for proper replacement.
3. Remove the valve housing by removing the four mounting bolts.
4. Allow oil to drain from the valve. Remove any seals or o-rings that might otherwise fall off.
5. Carefully clamp the valve to a bench or hold in a vice for inspection. You can:
• Visually inspect for damage, contaminants, worn seals, etc.
• Check valve functioning. Press the mechanical actuator(s), looking for spool movement.
• Blow air into the “P” port (see Figure 49) and, while depressing the actuator, verify that
the air exits the proper port (“A,” “B,” or “T”), or at least moves from port to port.
6. When re-installing the valve, use care to keep the valve clean, replace all seals, and match up
electrical connectors properly.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.4.3.4.
How to Test the D/A Board and Proportional (DBET) Card Analog Output—
The pressure pump sends oil to the proportional valve via a small hydraulic control line. When
the proportional valve is fully open (maximum oil flow through the control line), the pump
produces minimum pressure; that is, about 400 psi (idle pressure). When the proportional valve
is fully closed (no oil flow through the control line), the pump produces maximum pressure; that
is, full rated pressure as listed in Table 11 in Section 3.4.2.6. As the voltage supplied by the
proportional (DBET) card to the proportional valve increases, the valve closes. The proper
relationship among output board values, valve position and pump output at each end of the range
is summarized in Table 13.
Table 13: Relationships Among Pump Control Components at Each End of Range
D/A Board
(digital counts)
D/A Board
Output (VDC)
Proportional (DBET)
Card Output (millivolts)
Proportional
Valve Position
Pressure Pump Output
0000
0 (zero) VDC
0 (zero) millivolts
fully open
minimum (idle pressure)
4095
10 VDC
16 millivolts
fully closed
maximum (rated pressure)
Chart 13: How to Test the D to A Board and Proportional (DBET) Card Analog Output
If the press is empty, permit aload of goods to transfer in, then access the
manual mode (k+m).
Start with the ram down
and a full load of goods
A1:
While manually pressing
the goods, take voltmeter
reading across DBET
card, pins 28C and 30C.
A2:
9 to 10 VDC?
The proportional (DBET) card is shown at left.
See “Board to Board Wiring” in schematic
manual. Access manual mode 09 (0,
9, n) and apply press pressure (hold
&) while reading voltage.
NO
D to A board or related
circuitry faulty.
YES
A3:
While manually pressing
the goods, take voltmeter
reading across DBET
card, pins 20C and 22C.
A4:
12 to 20 millivolts?
See “Board to Board Wiring” in schematic manual. Access manual mode 09
(0, 9, n) and apply press pressure (hold &) while reading
voltage.
NO
YES
D to A board,
proportional card and
related circuitry OK.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
This is the voltage that must be supplied
by the high resolution D to A board
(BDA-1) to the DBET card (BPC-1)
when full pressure is commanded.
Tip:
Proportional card or
related circuitry faulty.
This is the voltage that must be supplied
by the DBET card to the proportional
valve when full pressure is commanded.
Although 12 to 20 millivolts is an acceptable range, the optimum value is 16 millivolts.
Adjust the maximum pressure potentiometer (labeled GW) on the DBET card to achieve
this value, as explained in BIPPMT02 "Setting Single Stage Press Pressures."
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.4.3.5.
How to Test Pressure Transducer and A/D Board Analog Input—The pressure
transducer data is used by the controller 1) to show pressure on the controller display and 2) to
maintain (modulate) programmed pressure (see Note 17). If you manually press a load of goods
using manual mode 09 Pressurize Ram, displayed pressure should match system gauge pressure.
The proper relationship among transducer, A/D board, and pressure values, at each end of the
range, for the two types of transducers in current use (see Note 18), is shown in Table 14.
Note 17: The pressure transducer is in the ram down circuit so it only supplies data during ram descent and
pressing. Commanding full pressure with manual mode 09, drives the pump to maximum (no modulation).
Note 18: The Pressure Sensor Zero Offset configure decision adjusts for the type transducer installed. Do
not use this configure value to attempt to “calibrate” displayed pressure with gauge pressure.
Table 14: Relationships Among Pressure Sensing Components at Each End of Range
Pressure Transducer Output (VDC)
0 (zero)-based type
0.1 (zero)-based type
System Pressure
A/D Board
(digital counts)
(psi)
0.1 VDC
5.1 VDC
0 VDC
5 VDC
0000
4095
0 (zero) psi
5000 psi
Chart 14: How to Test Pressure Transducer and A/D board Analog Input
Start with the ram down
and a full load of goods
If the press is empty, permit aload of goods to transfer in, then access the
manual mode (k+m).
Access manual mode 09 (0,9,n) and apply press pressure (hold
&) while reading pressures. Take reading when pressure stops rising.
A1:
While manually pressing
goods, compare system
gauge pressure with
pressure on display.
A2:
Does displayed pressure
match gauge pressure?
YES
Transducer and A/D
board are both good.
NO
A3:
While manually pressing
the goods, take voltmeter
reading across A/D
board, pins 85 and 86.
A4:
Approximately 5 VDC?
Expect pressure readings to be within
500 psi of each other. Typically, a bad
pressure transducer will result in a much
greater discrepency.
See “Board to Board Wiring” in schematic manual.
YES
A/D board or related
circuitry is faulty.
This is the voltage that must be supplied
by the pressure transducer to the A/D
board when full pressure is commanded.
NO
A5:
Take voltmeter reading
across pressure
transducer, pins 1 and 4.
A6:
+12 VDC?
See “Board to Board Wiring” in schematic manual.
NO
Check power supplyto-transducer wiring
This is the voltage that must be supplied
to the transducer. Check for an open in
this circuit.
YES
Pressure transducer is
faulty.
See “Hydraulic Schematic” parts document for part identification.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.4.3.6.
How to Test the Pressure Pump—For the press to achieve and maintain commanded
pressure while pressing goods, the pressure pump, along with several other components, must
function properly. Some of the other components are the proportional valve and related
electronics, the pressure transducer and related electronics, and the ram piston seals. Use this
procedure to test the pressure pump independent of all other components.
Chart 15: Pressure Pump Test
Lockout/tagout power.
A1:
Plug the pressure pump
control port.
A2:
Restore power and start
machine (M, 1)
Allow the machine to remain in Manual mode, selection 00 Return to
Automatic. The system should immediately go to full pressure without the need
to press a load.
A3:
Compare system pressure with rated pressure.
Observe the system pressure gauge (top gauge on gauge cluster). See Table 11
“Applicable Milnor® Single Stage Press Models and Pressure Ratings” in
Section 3.4.2.6 for the rated pressure for your machine.
A4:
Is rated pressure
achieved?
The port to be plugged is circled at left. Use a 4 (1/4") o-ring base plug (supplied in kit
KYSSTRBLSH). It is not necessary to cap the
hose end, but tape over it for cleanliness. This
simulates a fully closed proportional valve.
YES
Pump OK. Lockout/
tagout power.
Reconnect hose. Done
NO
A5:
Service the system relief
valve per Section 3.4.3.2
then recheck pressure.
A6:
Is rated pressure
achieved?
This ensures that the system relief valve is functioning properly, in the event
that it is contaminated or damaged. This is very unlikely because, with proper
adjustment, this valve never opens.
YES
Pump OK. Lockout/
tagout power.
Reconnect hose. Done.
NO
A7:
Set system relief valve to
maximum (5000 psi) then
recheck pressure.
A8:
Is rated pressure
achieved?
This ensures that the system relief valve is not venting pressure before the full
pressure is achieved. It is very difficult to open the valve (turn clockwise) under
pressure, but easy to close (turn counterclockwise) under pressure. Stop
machine (0), turn adjustment screw full clockwise, then start machine (1).
See also document BIPPMT02 “Setting Single Stage Press Pressures”.
NO
Pressure pump needs
servicing.
YES
A9:
Reset system relief valve
Pump OK. Lockout/
tagout power. Reconnect
hose. Done
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
With the machine running (1), one person turns the adjustment screw
counterclockwise while another watches the system pressure gauge. Turn just
until pressure falls below rated. With the machine stopped (0), make 1/2
clockwise turn of the adjustment screw then tighten the locking nut.
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.4.3.7.
How to Test the Ram Piston Seals—As the ram begins pressing a load of goods, the
goods compress, and the ram piston moves down slightly, oil in the rod side of the ram exits
through the rod-side tubing. As the goods are compacted and ram movement decreases, this flow
of oil should decrease. If the flow increases, this indicates that a significant amount of oil is
leaking past the piston seals as pressing pressure increases. Test this as follows:
1. Permit a load of goods to transfer into the press, but immediately take the the machine off
line. The can will be down and the ram up.
2. Lower the ram (manual mode 07) just until the diaphragm is resting on the goods.
3. Lockout/tagout power to the machine.
4. Referring to Figure 50, modify piping as follows (cap and hose are provided in kit
KYSSTRBLSH):
a. Disconnect the ram rod-end (ram up) tubing at the poppet valve manifold.
b. Cap the manifold connector.
c. Connect a hose to the disconnected tubing. Run the other end of the hose into a bucket.
5. Restore power and, while observing the flow of oil into the bucket, call for pressure (Manual
mode 09). If flow decreases as the goods are pressed, the piston seals are good. If it increases,
the seals may need to be replaced. However, see Supplement 4.
6. Lockout/tagout power and restore the permanent connections.
Figure 50: Where to Disconnect Tubing to Test Ram Piston Seals
Poppet Valve Manifold
Legend
1.
2.
3.
4.
Hydraulic line to ram
cylinder rod end
Disconnect here.
Cap this side.
Connect hose this side.
.
Supplement 4
About Ram Piston Seal Replacement
A certain amount of seal leakage is normal. Ram piston seal replacement is a major service
procedure requiring expertise and heavy lifting equipment. Before proceeding with this
servicing, evaluate the costs and benefits. As a general rule, avoid this servicing until:
1. all other possible causes are ruled out, and
2. maximum achievable pressing pressure is unacceptable.
3.4.3.8.
How to Test the Pre-fill Valve—In a properly functioning press, when the ram rises, the
pre-fill valve opens to speed ascent by permitting a large volume of oil to exhaust through the
large pre-fill pipe. If the pre-fill valve closes in mid-ascent, the ram will slow down considerably.
The following procedure uses this observation to verify that the prefill valve is working:
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
1. Unscrew the electrical connector for the pre-fill pilot valve actuator (VERS), so that it can be
quickly unplugged, but leave it electrically connected.
2. Lower the ram and can fully if they are up (Manual mode 02).
3. Call for ram up (Manual mode 07).
4. While the ram is rising, unplug the VERS connector. If the ram's speed slows noticeably, the
pre-fill valve, and indeed, the pre-fill hydraulic circuit and the pre-fill pilot valve are working.
If not, there is a problem with this system.
5. Replace and secure the VERS connector.
3.4.3.9.
How to Test the Bypass Valve —The bypass valve remains open except when pressing
pressure is called for to prevent ram pressure from exceeding about 200 psi at all other times. If
this valve is stuck open, the ram cannot pressurize. If you have determined that the bypass valve
electrical circuit is functioning properly by observing the LED on VERDB (VERDB actuates to
close this normally open valve), you can test this valve for a mechanical problem as follows:
1. Lockout/tagout machine power.
2. Disconnect the bypass valve-to-tank return line at the fittings indicated in Figure 51. Cap the
valve side and plug the hose end to simulate a closed bypass valve (cap and plug are provided
in kit KYSSTRBLSH).
3. Restore power. If there are no goods in the press, permit a load of goods to transfer to the
machine then take the machine off line.
4. Attempt to press the goods using Manual Mode 09. If high pressure is achieved (as indicated
by the system pressure gauge), the bypass valve is not functioning properly.
5. Lockout/tagout power and reconnect the permanent hose connection.
Figure 51: Bypass Valve: Where to Disconnect
Hose
3.4.3.10.
How to Test for Mid-range Pressure—This test is part of troubleshooting "Little or No
Extraction (no error)," but may be helpful in other situations as well. If the ram is permitted to
drive against its upper mechanical limit of travel, ram relief pressure (displayed on the middle
gauge on the gauge cluster) should rise to that set on the ram relief valve.
1. Lower the diaphragm onto the press bed.
2. Disconnect the electrical cable to the ram up proximity switch. This is the top switch on the
proximity switch mounting plate (see document BIPPMM02 “About the Ram Proximity
Switches...”)
3. Raise the ram fully and continue to command ram up once the ram stops at its upper limit.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
4. While continuing to command ram up, observe the ram pressure gauge (middle gauge on the
gauge cluster).
5. After reading the pressure, lower the ram (diaphragm to the press bed and reconnect the ream
up proximity switch.
The specified ram relief valve setting is 1500 psi. If a ram pressure gauge reading of 1200 psi or
higher is obtained, it is unlikely that "Little or No Extraction..." is caused by faulty pressure
pump.
— End of BIPPMT01 —
BIPPMT02 (Published) Book specs- Dates: 20060905 / 20060905 / 20060927 Lang: ENG01 Applic: PPM
3.5. Setting Single Stage Press Pressures
This document supersedes document IIFUUC02 for all single stage press models with the
Kawasaki pump (see IIFUUC02 for the older Rexroth pump). Once set at the factory, pressures
do not normally need readjustment unless a major component (e.g., pressure pump) is replaced.
Although these procedures are straightforward, unanticipated problems resulting in costly damage
can arise. Personnel must have an in-depth knowledge of hydraulic systems and be familiar with
manual operation of the press.
Notice 58 : Understand the press servicing hazards—Before performing press
maintenance, review document BIPPMS01 “Safe Servicing...”
Table 15, which follows, describes the components that may need adjusting. Table 16, following
it, specifies the values to be used. The rows in Table 15 correspond to those in Table 16.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Table 15: List of Adjustments
Adjustment Component
Full system pressure (no
single adjustment)
Idle pressure valve
* Pump pressure
compensator valve
1st stage horsepower
valve (torque limiter)
* 2nd stage horsepower
valve (torque limiter)
* System relief valve
Pre-fill pilot pressure
regulator
Ram relief valve
Can pressure regulator
* Proportional valve
maximum pressure pot.
Proportional valve ramp
up potentiometer
Proportional valve ramp
down potentiometer
What It Does
Determines maximum programmable
pressing pressure.
Controls idle (also called standby or
minimum) pressure (system pressure
while the operating press is idle)
Limits system pressure once its set point
(full system pressure) is achieved.
Limits motor amperage draw at predetermined midrange (1st stage) and high
(2nd stage) pressures by adjusting pump
operating characteristics (see Note 19).
Means of Adjusting
See four items with
asterisk (*) below.
Hex socket screw and
locking nut on pump
Hex socket screw and
locking nut on pump
Adjustment nut and
locking nut on pump
Hex socket screw and
locking nut on pump
Bleeds off pressure exceeding permissible Hex socket screw, lockfull system pressure.
ing nut on manifold
Regulates pressure exceeding that
Hex socket screw,
permitted for the pre-fill pilot valve.
locking nut on valve
Hex socket screw, lockBleeds off pressure exceeding that
permitted on rod end of ram cylinder.
ing nut on manifold
Hex socket screw, lockRegulates pressure exceeding that
permitted for can cylinders.
ing nut on manifold
Calibrates the DBET card with proporAdjustable pot on
tional valve to ensure full valve closure.
DBET card
Sets how fast the proportional valve closes Adjustable pot on
(swash plate moves to increase output).
DBET card
Sets how fast the proportional valve opens Adjustable pot on
(swash plate moves to decrease output).
DBET card
Note 19: The horsepower adjustments enable the pump to maintain the maximum permissible load on the
motor (full load amperage) as flow decreases and pressure increases (destroke), to ensure that the motor
does not stall, but full pressure is achieved.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Table 16: Adjustment Specifications
Specification (Kawasaki pump only)
Adjustable
Condition
MP1603 (35 bar)
low flow
high flow
MP1604
(50 bar)
MP1A03
(40 bar)
Full system
4600 psi
4350 psi
4600 psi
4600 psi
pressure
400 psi
Idle pressure
*Pump compen4600 psi
4600 psi
4350 psi
4600 psi
sation pressure
1st stage
Achieve full load amperage rating on motor nameplate
horsepower
(+/- 3%) while ram relief pressure at:
(amperage
1200 1350 625 750 825 985 880 1060
draw)
psi @ psi @ psi @ psi @ psi @ psi @ psi @ psi @
60 Hz 50 Hz 60 Hz 50 Hz 60 Hz 50 Hz 60 Hz 50 Hz
Achieve full load amperage rating on motor nameplate
* 2nd stage
horsepower
(+ 5% / -0%) while system pressure is 300 to 400 psi
(amp. draw)
below rated full system pressure.
Rated full system pressure plus 1/2 clockwise turn of the
* System relief
pressure
adjustment screw
Pre-fill pilot
2000 psi
max. pressure
Ram relief
1500 psi
pressure
Can maximum
800 psi
pressure
* Proport. valve
4600 psi
4350 psi
4600 psi
4600 psi
max. pressure
Proport. valve
minimum setting
ramp up rate
(This control must have no effect
Proport. valve
on valve or pump operation.)
ramp down rate
3.5.1.
3.5.1.1.
Means of Measuring
See four adjustments with
an asterisk (*) below
Observe system pressure
(top) gauge
Ammeter measurement
while ram relief pressure
is lowered to value shown
Ammeter measurement
while system pressure is
lowered to value shown
Observe system pressure
gauge then 1/2 CW turn
Observe pre-fill pressure
gauge (near valve)
Observe ram relief
pressure (middle) gauge
Observe can relief
pressure (bottom) gauge
Observe system pressure
gauge
Measurement not needed
Preparations, Precautions and Tips
Two technicians are needed.—One technician operates the controls and monitors the
pressure gauges. The other performs the adjustments, which are located on top of the machine.
CAUTION 59 : Multiple hazards—Various components above the top plate move or become
hot or energized. Hydraulic piping may leak. Working area is tight and may be slipery. When
maintenance work necessitates getting on top of the press:
• Ensure that only qualified service personnel perform top-of-press work.
• Identify and stand clear of components on top of the machine that move (such as the
diaphragm rod) or become hot (such as the pump and motor).
• Use safe, appropriate equipment for getting on and off of the machine.
• Ensure solid footing and guard against slippery surfaces. Wash surfaces with detergent.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.5.1.2.
Be prepared to load goods.—Several adjustments, starting with the 2nd stage horsepower
adjustment, must be done with a full load of wet goods in the machine. All other adjustments
except for the last (set can pressure), which should be done with the machine empty, may be done
with the machine loaded or empty.
Notice 60 : For safety and convenience—Avoid manually loading goods.
• If the service procedure must be performed with goods in the machine, permit the press to
accept a load of goods automatically, then take the machine off-line.
• If it becomes necessary to manually load or adjust goods, use extreme caution. Always
follow the published safety precautions (see safety manual).
3.5.1.3.
Have needed materials on hand.—Tools will likely include:
•
•
•
•
•
Ammeter and voltmeter
Small, flat blade screwdriver
Hex head (Allen) wrench set
Closed-end wrenches (various sizes)
-4 (1/4") O-ring base plug (for the pump control port)
Notice 61 : Troubleshooting, not covered here, may be required—This procedure
provides minimal troubleshooting and assumes that, aside from the need for adjustment, the press
pressure components are functioning properly. If you encounter problems not covered here, refer
to the detailed troubleshooting procedures, elsewhere, or contact Milnor technical support.
Additional equipment will be needed if more in-depth troubleshooting is required.
Tip: You will need to refer to the pump motor full rated amperage when setting motor horsepower
(amperage draw). Write down this value as stated on the motor nameplate.
3.5.1.4.
Get the gist of the procedure.—The overall procedure is summarized in Section 3.5.2.
Each adjustment is explained in a flow chart. Read the left side of the chart for an overview of the
adjustment steps. The right side provides details.
All pressure adjustment components are similar to those shown in Figure 52 below.
Figure 52: How Pressure Adjustments Are Made
Typical Adjustment Components (idle
pressure (left) and pump compensation
pressure (right) adjustments shown)
Legend
1.
2.
Locking nut—Turn counterclockwise to
unlock before adjustment; turn clockwise to
lock after adjustment.
Adjustment screw (hex socket (Allen)
screw)—Turn counterclockwise to lower
pressure; turn clockwise to raise pressure.
.
Tip: Most pressure adjustments can be made with pressure applied, so that when an adjustment screw
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
is turned, the pressure gauge moves dynamically. An exception is the system pressure relief
valve. This valve can be opened (turn counterclockwise) to lower the pressure with pressure
applied, but it is difficult, if not impossible, to close (turn clockwise) to raise the pressure with
full pressing pressure applied.
All pressures (except pre-fill pilot pressure) are read on the pressure gauges shown in Figure 53.
All pressure specifications are in pounds per square inch (abbreviated psi herein).
Figure 53: Where Most Pressures are Read
Gauge Cluster
Legend
1.
2.
3.
.
System pressure gauge—used in setting
idle pressure, pump compensation pressure,
1st and 2nd stage motor horsepower
(amperage draw), proportional valve
maximum pressure, and system relief
pressure.
Ram relief pressure gauge—used in
setting ram relief pressure and 2nd stage
horsepower (amperage draw)
Can relief pressure gauge—used in setting
can relief pressure
Tip: It is likely that certain components will already be correctly adjusted. Check first for proper
adjustment before changing the adjustment.
3.5.1.5.
Adhere to the adjustment order.—This procedure explains the adjustments in the most
efficient order. Each subsequent adjustment assumes that certain conditions were verfied and
settings were made in previous adjustments. All adjustments should be done, and they should be
performed in the order listed.
Tip: Performing only certain adjustments or changing the adjustment order risks leaving certain
components improperly adjusted. If you must perform the adjustments differently than presented
here, see the prerequisites for each adjustment listed in Section 3.5.2 “Summary of
Adjustments”.
3.5.1.6.
Ensure minimum ramp rates—These are not part of the adjustment procedure, but it is
important to ensure that they are set to the minimum value, as explained below.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 16: Ensure Minimum Ramp Rates
Power on (M). Remain in
Manual.
A1:
Ensure proportional
valve ramp rates are at
minimum (see Table 16).
Done
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
All mechanical adjustments will be performed with the machine in Manual
mode.
The proportional valve ramp up and ramp
down potentiometers on the DBET card, are
circled at left. The adjustment screws have no
mechanical limits of travel. Turn each screw
twenty (20) turns counterclockwise. This
ensures that these controls have no effect on
valve or pump operation.
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.5.2.
Summary of Adjustments
With preparations
completed...
Prerequisites for all adjustments: Pump and motor functioning properly
A1:
Set idle pressure
(Section 3.5.3)
Prerequisites:
1. Proportional valve controls functioning properly or controls bypassed (by
disconnecting the electrical feed to the valve)
2. Proportional valve mechanically functioning (i.e., fully open)
A2:
Set pump compensation
(full) pressure (Section
3.5.4)
Prerequisites:
1. Proportional valve bypassed (by plugging the pump control port)
2. System relief valve temporarily set to maximum pressure (5000 psi)
3. 1st and 2nd stage horsepower (amperage draw) properly set
Notice 62 : The horsepower adjustments are factory-set and not likely to
need major adjustment. On this assumption, pump compensation pressure
is set first. However:
• be aware that if the horsepower settings are significantly out of
adjustment, the motor may quickly stall or overheat, in which
case, it should be shut down immediately.
• the pump compensation pressure and horsepower adjustments
are interdependent and may need to be repeated until the
specified settings are achieved.
A3:
Set 1st stage motor
horsepower (amperage
draw) (Section 3.5.5)
A4:
Set 2nd stage motor
horsepower (amperage
draw), system relief
pressure, and pre-fill
pilot valve relief pressure
(Section 3.5.6)
Prerequisites:
1. Pump compensation pressure already set or attempted.
2. System relief valve remains sey to maximum pressure (5000 psi).
3. Max pressure pot. bypassed (by temporarily adjusting to highest setting).
4. Ram relief pressure temporarily set to the lower, specified pressure at which
1st stage motor horsepower (amperage draw) should be set..
5. Ram up prox switch disabled and ram pressing against upper limit of travel
Prerequisites for all:
1. Max pressure pot. remains bypassed (adjusted to highest setting).
2. Ram relief pressure remains temporarily set to lower pressure.
3. Goods loaded in press and ram pressing against load.
Additional prerequisites for 2nd stage motor horsepower adjustment:
1. Compensator valve bypassed by setting system relief valve lower.
2. 1st stage horsepower already adjusted (because it affects 2nd stage setting).
Additional prerequisite for system relief pressure adjustment: horsepower
properly adjusted.
A5:
Set proportional valve
maximum pressure
(Section 3.5.7)
Prerequisites:
1. Goods loaded in press and ram pressing against load
2. Pump compensation pressure already adjusted
3. 1st and 2nd stage horsepower already adjusted
4. Proportional valve functioning properly
A6:
Set ram relief pressure
(Section 3.5.8)
Prerequisites:
1. Configured ram valve setting bypassed
2. Horsepower already adjusted (to avoid running motor above rated amperage)
3. Ram up prox switch disabled and ram pressing against upper limit of travel
A7:
Set can pressure
(Section 3.5.9)
Prerequisites:
1. Press empty of goods
2. Configured can valve setting bypassed
3. Can up prox switch disabled and can pressing against upper limit of travel
Done
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.5.3.
Set Idle Pressure
In a properly functioning machine, idle pressure is controlled by the idle
pressure valve. However, a malfunctioning proportional valve will typically
prevent the system from falling to idle pressure.
Start the machine (1)
A1:
Is the pump motor
energized (running)?
Go to B1
NO
YES
A2:
Adjust the idle pressure
valve to 400 psi (see
Table 16).
A3:
Is idle pressure
achievable?
The idle pressure valve adjustment, located on
the pump, is circled at left. To adjust, loosen
the locking nut then turn the adjustment screw.
Observe the system pressure gauge to
determine which direction to turn the screw.
YES
Lock down setting.
Stop machine (0). Go
to next adjustment.
To lock down the valve setting, tighten
the locking nut.
NO
A4:
Bypass the proportional
valve electrical controls
by disconnecting the
electrical feed to the
valve. Try again to adjust
the idle pressure valve.
A5:
Is idle pressure
achievable?
Unscrew and remove the proportional valve
electrical connector, as shown at left. In a
properly functioning system, as voltage to the
proportional valve increases (from zero to 16
millivolts), the valve closes and the pump
swash plate tilts away from vertical. Hence,
zero voltage (open circuit) opens the valve
completely, returning the swash plate to
vertical and minimizing pump pressure.
Go to C1
NO
YES
A6:
Troubleshoot
proportional valve
controls.
If a disconnected electrical feed achieves idle pressure, the problem is with the
proportional valve controls. Refer to detailed troubleshooting elsewhere.
Typical problems are:
1. Incorrect wiring between DBET card and valve.
2. Bad DBET card.
Go to A2
Part B
B1:
Troubleshoot the motor
control circuitry.
If the motor does not energize when Start (1) is pressed, a replacement motor
or component of the motor control circuitry was improperly wired or it is bad.
Refer to detailed troubleshooting elsewhere.
Go to A2
Part C
C1:
Troubleshoot the
proportional valve and
motor/pump.
Go to A2
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
If a disconnected electrical feed does not achieve idle pressure, the problem is
probably mechanical. Refer to detailed troubleshooting elsewhere. Some
possible problems are:
1. Stuck proportional valve.
2. Motor running backwards (replacement motor improperly phased in).
3. Malfunctioning pump.
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.5.4.
Set Pump Compensation (Full System) Pressure
This procedure will set the first of four components that affect full pressure:
1. Pump pressure compensator valve—Adjusted here.
2. 2nd stage horsepower valve—Adjusted later, but may affect this setting.
3. System relief valve—Adjusted later. Bypassed here.
4. Proportional valve max. pressure potentiometer—Adjusted later.
Bypassed here.
Lockout/tagout power
A1:
Bypass the proportional
valve by plugging the
pump port that sends oil
to this valve
The port to be plugged is circled at left.
Plugging this port simulates a fully closed
proportional valve (maximum pressure) and
facilitates adjustment of the compensator
valve. It bypasses any possible problems with
the proportional valve and—because it is not
necessary to pressurize the ram cylinder—it
also bypasses any possible problems with the
pre-fill valve and cylinder (e.g., leaking seals).
It is not necessary to plug the hose end, but
tape over it for cleanliness.
A2:
Temporarily set the
system relief valve to
maximum (5000 psi)
A3:
Restore power and start
machine (M, 1)
A4:
Adjust pump
compensation pressure
as needed to achieve
specified full system
pressure (see Table 16)
A5:
Is full system pressure
achievable?
The system relief pressure adjustment is
circled at left. Loosen the locking nut then turn
the adjusting screw full clockwise. This sets
the pressure-limiting effect of this valve far
above any other adjustments it could otherwise
affect.
The system immediately goes to full pressure without the need to press a load.
The pump pressure compensator valve
adjustment, located on the pump, is circled at
left. To adjust, loosen the locking nut then turn
the adjustment screw. Observe the system
pressure gauge to determine which direction to
turn the screw. See Table 16 for the specified
full system pressure value.
NO
Continue at left, but
repeat this adjustment
after setting 2nd stage
horsepower (Section
3.5.6)
Observe the system pressure gauge. If
full pressure is not achieved, 2nd stage
horsepower may be improperly set,
interfering with this setting. These interdependent adjustments must be repeated
until the proper settings are achieved.
YES
A6:
Lock down the
compensator setting
With the compensator valve adjustment screw properly set, tighten the locking
nut.
Lockout/tagout power,
reconnect hose then
restore power. Proceed
to the next adjustment.
Leave the system relief valve set to maximum pressure for the next adjustment.
Notice 63 : Troubleshooting May Be Required—The remaining adjustments will be
made with proportional valve function restored and ram cylinder (or can cylinders) pressurized.
The specified settings can only be achieved if the machine is otherwise, functioning properly.
Some possible impediments to proper adjustment are covered herein. If you encounter a problem
not explained here, refer to detailed troubleshooting elsewhere.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.5.5.
Set 1st Stage Horsepower (amperage draw)
Power off (m)
A1:
Disable the ram up
proximity switch
A2:
Start machine (M, 1).
Bypass the proportional
valve max. pressure pot.
by setting it to maximum
The proportional valve max. pressure
adjustment, located on the DBET card, is
circled at left. The adjustment has no
mechanical limits of rotation. To ensure the
maximum value, turn the screw twenty (20)
clockwise turns.
A3:
Command and maintain
Ram Up
In Manual mode, raise the ram (7, ^). Maintain ram up force by
holding ^ even after the ram reaches its upper mechanical limit, and for
the following adjustment, except where stated otherwise.
A4:
Is system pressure
higher than idle?
This is the top switch on the prox switch
mounting post. Disconnect the screw-type
electrical connector (see at left). This permits
pressure to be sustained as long as the ram is
pressing against its upper mechanical limit.
Go to B1
NO
Observe the system pressure gauge.
System pressure should be substantially
higher than 400 psi (idle pressure).
YES
A5:
While maintaining Ram
Up, set ram relief
pressure as specified for
setting 1st stage horsepower (see Table 16)
The ram relief valve adjustment is circled at
left. Loosen the locking nut then turn the
adjustment screw. Observe the ram relief
pressure gauge (middle gauge on the gauge
plate) to determine which direction to turn the
screw. See Table 16 for the specified value.
Re-tighten locking nut to lock down setting.
A6:
While maintaining Ram
Up, adjust 1st stage
horsepower to the
motor's rated amperage
(see motor and Table 16)
The horsepower adjustment, located on the
pump, is shown at left. Loosen outermost
locking nut 1L then turn adjustment nut 1.
(Items 2 and 2L are for 2nd stage adjustment.)
One person measures the motor amperage
while the other turns the adjustment nut. Retighten locking nut to lock down setting.
A7:
Power off (0, m).
Restore ram up prox
switch function, then
restore power (M).
To restore prox switch function, reconnect the switch wiring.
Leave the proportional valve max. pressure adjustment at maximum and ram
relief pressure at the lower setting.
Proceed to the next
adjustment
Part B
B1:
Release Ram Up and
troubleshoot the
proportional valve
Go to A5
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
If system pressure remains at or near idle pressure, there is a problem with the
proportional valve or related hardware. Some possible problems:
1. Max pressure potentiometer not set properly (to maximum)
2. Incorrect wiring between the DBET card and valve
3. Bad DBET card
4. Proportional valve stuck open
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.5.6.
Set 2nd Stage Horsepower (amperage draw), System Relief
Pressure and Pre-fill Pilot Pressure
Chart 21: Set 2nd Stage Horsepower (amperage draw), System Relief Pressure and Pre-fill Pilot Relief Pressure
Load wet goods (full
load)
Machine safeties will not permit pressing without a load. If the press is not
already loaded, load it now (see Section 3.5.1.2 “Be prepared to load goods.”).
The press must be loaded for most of the remaining procedures.
A1:
Apply and maintain
pressing pressure
In Manual mode, lower the ram (9, &). Maintain pressure by holding
& throughout the following adjustments, except where stated
otherwise.
A2:
Is system pressure at or
near specified full
pressure?
Go to B1
NO
YES
A3:
While pressing, bypass
the pump pressure
compensator valve by
lowering system relief
pressure to 400 psi
below full pressure.
The system relief pressure adjustment, which
was previously set to its highest setting, is
circled at left. For example, if full pressure for
your machine is 4600 psi, lower to 4200 psi
(observe system pressure gauge). Turn the
adjustment screw counterclockwise to lower
pressure. If you overshoot, release pressure,
turn clockwise, then, with pressure applied
(&) continue turning counterclockwise.
A4:
While pressing, adjust
2nd stage horsepower to
the motor's rated
amperage (see motor
nameplate and Table 16)
The horsepower adjustment, located on the
pump, is shown at left. Loosen small locking
nut 2L then turn adjustment screw 2. (Items 1
and 1L are for 1st stage adjustment.) One
person measures motor amperage while the
other turns the adjustment screw. Re-tighten
the locking nut to lock down the setting.
A5:
With pressure released,
return system relief
pressure to maximum
Release &. Loosen the system relief valve locking nut, then turn the
adjustment screw full clockwise.
A6:
While pressing, lower
system relief pressure
just until it matches full
system pressure.
While holding &, slowly open the system pressure relief valve (turn
counterclockwise) just until system pressure begins to drop, then release
pressure. Remember that it is possible to open this valve (turn
counterclockwise) while maintaining pressure, but not to close it.
A7:
With pressure released,
set system relief
pressure 1/2 CW turn
above full pressure (see
Table 16) and lock down.
A8:
While pressing, set prefill pilot pressure to 2000
psi (see Table 16)
Release &. Turn the adjustment screw 1/2 clockwise turn (as specified in
Table 16) then tighten the locking nut.
The pre-fill pilot pressure gauge (1) and
adjustment (2) are shown at left. Loosen the
locking nut then turn the adjustment screw.
Observe the gauge to determine which
direction to turn the screw. Tighten the locking
nut to lock down the setting.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 21: Set 2nd Stage Horsepower (amperage draw), System Relief Pressure and Pre-fill Pilot Relief Pressure
Proceed to the next
adjustment.
Leave the proportional valve max. pressure adjustment at maximum and ram
relief pressure at the lower setting for the next adjustment.
Part B
B1:
Troubleshoot the ram
hydraulic circuitry and
components.
Go to A3
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
If the system does not approach full pressure,
refer to detailed troubleshooting elsewhere.
Some possible problems are:
• Bypass valve not closing. LED on valve
must be illuminated, as shown at left.
• Pre-fill valve stuck open
• Pre-fill pilot valve not functioning.
• Ram cylinder seals leaking.
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
3.5.7.
Set Proportional Valve Maximum Pressure
Goods remain in the machine from the previous procedure. Machine safeties
will not permit pressing without a load. Also, the proportional valve max.
pressure adjustment remains at maximum and ram relief pressure at the lower
setting, from previous procedures.
With the machine
running (1)...
A1:
Apply and maintain
pressing pressure.
A2:
Lower proportional valve
max. pressure just until it
matches full system
pressure (see Table 16).
A3:
Does max. pressure pot
respond to adjustment?
In Manual mode, lower the ram (9, &). Maintain pressure by holding
& throughout the following adjustment, except where stated otherwise.
Previously, the max. pressure pot, circled at
left, was adjusted to its highest setting.
Carefully turn the adjustment screw
counterclockwise just until system pressure
begins falling below full pressure (see Table
16 for the specified value).
YES
Stop machine (0). Go
to next adjustment.
Leave the ram relief pressure at the lower
setting for the next adjustment.
NO
A4:
Look for 16 millivolts
across proportional
valve coil
A5:
Is the proper voltage
achievable?
Separate the electrical connector from the
valve, as shown at left, just enough to provide
a gap for the voltmeter leads. Reading must
be taken with the coil in the circuit. Read
the voltage across the left and right prongs.
Go to B1
NO
YES
Go to C1
Part B
B1:
Troubleshoot valve
electrical controls.
If you cannot achieve 16 millivolts across the coil, the problem is electrical.
Refer to detailed troubleshooting elsewhere. Some possible problems:
• Faulty wiring between the DBET card and the valve.
• Bad DBET card
Go to A3
Part C
C1:
Troubleshoot
proportional valve.
If you read 16 millivolts across the coil, the problem is mechanical. Refer to
detailed troubleshooting elsewhere. Some possible problems:
• Proportional valve seals leaking.
• Proportional valve stuck open.
Go to A3
3.5.8.
Set Ram Relief Pressure
Notice 64 : Goods remain in the machine from the previous procedure. These are not needed
for the remaining adjustments and may be removed. However, if this procedure is being done in
the field, leave the goods in the machine for this adjustment.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 23: Set Ram Relief Pressure
Power off (m)
The ram relief pressure adjustment may be performed with goods in the
machine or with the machine empty.
A1:
Disable the ram up
proximity switch
A2:
Restore power (M.
Record, then bypass the
can and ram valve
configure values by
temporarily setting them
to 4095 (maximum)
In CONFIGURE (this is selection 3 on the Program menu—see reference
manual), go to the CAN VALVE SETTING decision, write down its current
value, then change the value to 4095 (maximum = fully open). Do the same for
the RAM VALVE SETTING decision. These will be returned to their previous
values at the completion of the adjustments. This change bypasses these settings
when making the following adjustments. In normal operation, the configure
values control how fast the can or ram travels.
A3:
Start machine (1).
Command and maintain
Ram Up
In Manual mode, raise the ram (7, ^). Maintain ram up force by
holding ^ even after the ram reaches its upper mechanical limit, and for
the following adjustment.
A4:
While maintaining Ram
Up, adjust ram relief
pressure to 1500 psi (see
Table 16)
A5:
Power off (0, m),
restore ram up prox
switch function, then
restore power (M).
Proceed to the next
adjustment
3.5.9.
This permits pressure to be sustained as long
as the ram is pressing against its upper
mechanical limit of travel. The ram up prox
switch is the top switch on the prox switch
mounting plate. Disconnect the screw-type
electrical connector, as shown at left.
The ram relief pressure adjustment is circled at
left. Loosen the ram relief valve locking nut
then turn the adjustment screw. Previously,
this component was set to a lower pressure and
will probably need to be raised, but observe the
ram relief pressure gauge (middle gauge) to
determine which direction to turn the screw.
Re-tighten the locking nut to lock down the
setting.
To restore prox switch function, reconnect the switch wiring.
Leave the can and ram valve configure values at their temporary settings.
Set Can Pressure
CAUTION 65 : Risk of damage to machine or goods—This adjustment will be done
with the can up. If goods remain in the machine, this will not prevent the can from being raised in
Manual mode, but damage may occur when the can is lowered again.
• Place the machine on-line so that the machine can complete processing of this load. When
this load is discharged from the press and before the next load enters, take the machine
off-line (return to Manual mode) and perform the last adjustment, which follows.
• Never manually lower the can onto a load of goods.
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
Chapter 3. Hydraulic System Troubleshooting
Chart 24: Set Can Pressure
Power off (m)
A1:
Disable the can up
proximity switch
A2:
Restore power and start
machine (M, 1).
Command and maintain
Can Up
A3:
Adjust can pressure to
800 psi (see Table 16)
A4:
Stop the machine and
power off (0, m).
Restore can up prox
switch function, then
restore power (M).
A5:
Restore the can and ram
valve configure values to
their previous settings.
The can pressure adjustment should be performed with the machine empty of
goods.
The can up prox switch, located adjacent to
one of the can cylinders, is shown at left. The
prox switches have screw-type electrical
connectors. Unscrew the connector. This
permits pressure to be sustained as long as the
the can is pressing against its upper mechanical
limit of travel.
In Manual mode, raise the can (3, ^). Maintain can up force by
holding ^ even after the can reaches its upper mechanical limit, and for the
following adjustment.
The can pressure valve adjustment is circled at
left. Loosen the locking nut then turn the
adjustment screw. Observe the can relief
pressure gauge (bottom gauge) to determine
which direction to turn the screw. Re-tighten
the locking nut to lock down the setting.
To restore prox switch function, reconnect the switch wiring.
In Configuration return the CAN VALVE SETTING and RAM VALVE SETTING
configure decisions to their previous values (the values you wrote down).
If this procedure is being performed in the field, the machine may now be
placed on-line (returned to normal, automatic operation).
Done
— End of BIPPMT02 —
PELLERIN MILNOR CORPORATION
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