Crown Boiler DG-225 Service manual

Crown Boiler DG-225 Service manual
$30.00 U.S.
MODEL CBR
PACKAGED BOILER
125 through 800 hp
Fuel: Light Oil, Heavy Oil, Gas or Combination
Manual Part No. 750-225
4/07
—
.
Abbreviations
Safety Precautions
It is essential to read and
understand the following safety
precautions before attempting to
operate the equipment. Failure to
follow these precautions may
result in damage to equipment,
serious personal injury, or death.
A complete understanding of this
manual is required before
attempting to start-up, operate or
maintain the equipment. The
equipment should be operated
only by personnel who have a
working knowledge and
understanding of the equipment.
! Important
The following symbols are used
throughout this manual:
! Warning
This symbol indicates a
potentially
hazardous
situation which, if not
avoided, could result in
serious personal injury, or
death.
AC
Alternating Current
AR
Automatic Reset
ASME
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
ASTM
American Society of Testing and Materials
BHP
Boiler Horsepower
Btu
British Thermal Unit
×C
Degrees Celsius
CFH
Cubic Feet per Hour
Cu Ft
Cubic Feet
DC
Direct Current
×F
Degrees Fahrenheit
FM
Factory Mutual
FS
Flame Safeguard
ft
GPM
Hd
Head
HT
Height
HTB
HZ
This symbol indicates a
potentially hazardous situation
which, if not avoided, could
result in damage to the
equipment.
Notice
This symbol indicates
information that is vital to the
operation of this equipment.
High Turndown Burner
Hertz
In H2O Inches of Water
IRI
Industrial Risk Insurance
Lb
Pound
LWCO
! Caution
Feet
Gallons per Minute
M
Low-Water Cut-Off
Million
MFD
Micro-Farad
MR
Manual Reset
NEC
National Electric Code
No.
Number
pH
Measure of the degree of acid or base of a solution
P/N
Part Number
PPM
Parts Per Million
PR
Program Relay
psi
Pounds Per Square Inch
SAE
Society of Automotive Engineers
scfh
Standard Cubic Feet per Hour
T
Temperature
TC
Temperature Control
TI
Temperature Gauge
UL
Underwriter’s Laboratories
V
Volt
WC
Water Column
WSI
Watts Per Square Inch
MODEL CBR
PACKAGED BOILER
—
Operation, Service, and Parts Manual
125 through 800 hp
Fuel: Light Oil, Heavy Oil Gas or Combination
© Cleaver-Brooks 2007
Please direct purchase orders for replacement manuals to your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative.
NOTE: If you have a CB-HAWK-ICS‘ Boiler Management Control System, refer to CBHAWK ICS Installation, Operating and Service Manual No. 750-197 during initial start
up, and when referencing Chapters 5, 6, and 7 in this manual.
Manual Part No. 750-225
4-07
Printed in U.S.A.
—
! WARNING
DANGER
DO NOT OPERATE, SERVICE, OR REPAIR THIS EQUIPMENT UNLESS YOU FULLY UNDERSTAND ALL APPLICABLE SECTIONS OF THIS MANUAL.
DO NOT ALLOW OTHERS TO OPERATE, SERVICE, OR REPAIR THIS EQUIPMENT UNLESS THEY FULLY UNDERSTAND ALL APPLICABLE SECTIONS OF THIS MANUAL.
FAILURE TO FOLLOW ALL APPLICABLE WARNINGS AND INSTRUCTIONS MAY RESULT IN SEVERE PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH.
TO: Owners, Operatrors, and/or Maintenance Personnel
This operating manual presents information that will help to properly operate and care for the equipment. Study its contents
carefully. The unit will provide good service and continued operation if proper operating and maintenance instructions are followed. No attempt should be made to operate the unit until the principles of operation and all of the components are thoroughly
understood. Failure to follow all applicable instructions and warnings may result in severe personal injury or death.
It is the responsibility of the owner to train and advise not only his or her personnel, but the contractors' personnel who are
servicing, repairing or operating the equipment, in all safety aspects.
Cleaver-Brooks equipment is designed and engineered to give long life and excellent service on the job. The electrical and
mechanical devices supplied as part of the unit were chosen because of their known ability to perform; however, proper operating techniques and maintenance procedures must be followed at all times. Although these components afford a high degree
of protection and safety, operation of equipment is not to be considered free from all dangers and hazards inherent in handling
and firing of fuel.
Any “automatic” features included in the design do not relieve the attendant of any responsibility. Such features merely free
him of certain repetitive chores and give him more time to devote to the proper upkeep of equipment.
It is solely the operator’s responsibility to properly operate and maintain the equipment. No amount of written instructions can
replace intelligent thinking and reasoning and this manual is not intended to relieve the operating personnel of the responsibility
for proper operation. On the other hand, a thorough understanding of this manual is required before attempting to operate,
maintain, service, or repair this equipment.
Because of state, local, or other applicable codes, there are a variety of electric controls and safety devices which vary considerably from one boiler to another. This manual contains information designed to show how a basic burner operates.
Operating controls will normally function for long periods of time and we have found that some operators become lax in their
daily or monthly testing, assuming that normal operation will continue indefinitely. Malfunctions of controls lead to uneconomical operation and damage and, in most cases, these conditions can be traced directly to carelessness and deficiencies in
testing and maintenance.
It is recommended that a boiler room log or record be maintained. Recording of daily, weekly, monthly and yearly maintenance
activities and recording of any unusual operation will serve as a valuable guide to any necessary investigation.
Most instances of major boiler damage are the result of operation with low water. We cannot emphasize too strongly the need
for the operator to periodically check his low water controls and to follow good maintenance and testing practices. Cross-connecting piping to low water devices must be internally inspected periodically to guard against any stoppages which could obstruct the free flow of water to the low water devices. Float bowls of these controls must be inspected frequently to check for
the presence of foreign substances that would impede float ball movement.
The waterside condition of the pressure vessel is of extreme importance. Waterside surfaces should be inspected frequently to
check for the presence of any mud, sludge, scale or corrosion.
The services of a qualified water treating company or a water consultant to recommend the proper boiler water treating practices are essential.
The operation of this equipment by the owner and his or her operating personnel must comply with all requirements or regulations of his insurance company and/or other authority having jurisdiction. In the event of any conflict or inconsistency between such requirements and the warnings or instructions contained herein, please contact Cleaver-Brooks before proceeding.
i
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1. BASICS OF FIRETUE OPERTION
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-3
B. THE BOILER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-4
C. CONSTRUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
D. STEAM CONTROLS (ALL FUELS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-5
E. HOT WATER CONTROLS (ALL FUELS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-6
F. IFGR COMPONENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-7
CHAPTER 2. BURNER OPERATION AND CONTROL
A. THE BURNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-3
B. CONTROL AND COMPONENT FUNCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
C. COMPONENTS COMMON TO ALL BOILERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-4
D. CONTROLS FOR GAS FIRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-7
E. CONTROLS COMMON TO OIL-FIRED BOILERS
(INCLUDING COMBINATION) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-8
F. ADDITIONAL CONTROLS FOR HEAVY OIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-12
G. CONTROLS FOR COMBINATION BURNERS ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-15
H. COMBUSTION AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-15
I. AUTOMATIC IGNITION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-15
J. ATOMIZING AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-16
K. OIL FUEL FLOW - LIGHT OIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
LOIL FUEL FLOW - HEAVY OIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-17
M. GAS FUEL FLOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-20
N. MODULATING FIRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
CHAPTER 3. WATERSIDE CARE AND REQUIREMENTS
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-3
B. WATER REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-3
C. WATER TREATMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-8
D.CLEANING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-8
E. BOIL-OUT OF A NEW UNIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-9
F. WASHING OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-11
G. BLOWDOWN STEAM BOILER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-12
H. PERIODIC INSPECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-15
I. PREPARATION FOR EXTENDED LAY-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-16
CHAPTER 4. SEQUENCE OF OPERATION
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. CIRCUIT AND INTERLOCK CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. SEQUENCE OF OPERATION - OIL OR GAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. FLAME LOSS SEQUENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ii
4-3
4-3
4-5
4-7
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CHAPTER 5. STARTING AND OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS
A. GENERAL PREPARATION FOR START-UP, ALL FUELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
B. CONTROL SETTINGS - STEAM AND HOT WATER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
C. GAS PILOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
D. ATOMIZING AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
E. FIRING PREPARATIONS FOR NO. 2 OIL (SERIES 100-200) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
F. FIRING PREPARATION FOR NO. 6 OIL (SERIES 400-600) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
G. FIRING PREPARATIONS FOR GAS (SERIES 200-400-700) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
H. IFGR SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
I. START-UP, OPERATING AND SHUTDOWN - ALL FUELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-14
J. CONTROL OPERATIONAL TEST AND CHECKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
CHAPTER 6. ADJUSTMENT PROCEDURES
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
B. LINKAGE - MODULATING MOTOR AND AIR DAMPER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-3
C. MODULATING MOTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
D. MODULATING MOTOR SWITCHES - LOW FIRE AND HIGH FIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
E. BURNER OPERATING CONTROLS -GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-6
F. MODULATING PRESSURE CONTROL (Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-9
G. OPERATING LIMIT PRESSURE CONTROL (Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-9
H. HIGH LIMIT PRESSURE CONTROL (Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-9
I. MODULATING TEMPERATURE CONTROL (Hot Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-9
J. OPERATING LIMIT TEMPERATURE CONTROL (Hot Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-10
K. HIGH LIMIT TEMPERATURE CONTROL (Hot Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-10
L. LOW WATER CUTOFF DEVICES (Steam and Hot Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-10
M. COMBUSTION AIR PROVING SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-10
N. ATOMIZING AIR PROVING SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-11
O. GAS PILOT FLAME ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-11
P. GAS PRESSURE AND FLOW INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-13
Q. GAS FUEL CONSUMPTION ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-15
R. LOW-GAS-PRESSURE SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19
S. HIGH-GAS-PRESSURE SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19
T. FUEL OIL PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE - GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-19
U. FUEL OIL COMBUSTION ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-20
V. BURNER DRAWER ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-24
W. OIL DRAWER SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-24
X. LOW-OIL-TEMPERATURE SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-24
Y. HIGH OIL TEMPERATURE SWITCH (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-25
Z. LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-25
AA. ELECTRIC OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (400 and 600 Series - Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . .6-25
AB. STEAM OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (No. 6 Oil) (400 and 600 Series - Steam) . . . . . .6-25
AC. HOT WATER OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (400 and 600 Series) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-25
AD. STEAM HEATER PRESSURE REGULATOR (400 and 600 Series - Steam) . . . . . . . . .6-26
iii
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CHAPTER 7. TROUBLE SHOOTING
CHAPTER 8. INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
B. FIRESIDE CLEANING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
C. WATER LEVEL CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
D. WATER GAUGE GLASS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
E. ELECTRICAL CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
F. FLAME SAFETY CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
G. OIL BURNER MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
H. GAS BURNER MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
I. MOTORIZED GAS VALVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
J. SOLENOID VALVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
K. AIR CONTROL DAMPER, LINKAGE AND CAM SPRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
L. FORCED DRAFT FAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
M. FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE REMOVAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
N. INSPECTION AND ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
O. AIRBOX GASKET INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
P. FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
Q. SAFETY VALVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
R. FUEL OIL METERING VALVE, ADJUSTING AND RELIEF VALVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
S. THE AIR PUMP AND LUBRICATING SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-24
T. REFRACTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-28
U. OPENING AND CLOSING REAR DOOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-33
V. LUBRICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-35
W. OIL HEATERS - ELECTRIC, STEAM, HOT WATER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-37
X. COMBUSTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-38
CHAPTER 9. CUSTOMER SERVICE AND PARTS
iv
—
Notes
v
Chapter 1
Basics of Firetube Operation
Contents
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. THE BOILER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. CONSTRUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. STEAM CONTROLS (ALL FUELS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E. HOT WATER CONTROLS (ALL FUELS) . . . . . . . . . . . .
F. IFGR COMPONENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1-3
1-4
1-5
1-5
1-6
1-7
List of Illustrations
Figure 1-1.firetube Cutaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Figure 1-2. Typical Steam Boiler - Light Oil Or Gas Fired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Figure 1-3. Steam Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Figure 1-4. Low Water Cut Off (Lwco) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Figure 1-5.low Water Cut Off Pump Control (Cutaway) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Figure 1-6. Water Column Assembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Figure 1-7 Lwco And Gauge Glass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Figure 1-8. Auxiliary Low Water Cut Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Figure 1-9. Safety Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Figure 1-10. Water Temperature Gauge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Figure 1-11. Hot Water Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Figure 1-12. Low Water Cut Off (Lwco Hot Water) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Figure 1-13. Recommended Steam Relief Valve Piping
(Not Provided By Cleaver-brooks) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Figure 1-14. Induced Flue Gas Recirculation System, General Arrangement . . . . . . 1-9
Figure 1-15.ifgr Damper Linkage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Figure 1-16. Fan / Motor Cassettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-10
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
Front Door
Davit Arm
Air Intake
Pressure Controls
Vent Valve
Blower Motor
Water Column
Rear Door
Davit Arm
Alarm
Surface
Blowoff
Piping
Control Box
Entry Box
Bottom
Blowdown Valves
Air Pump
Nozzle Holder
Base Rails
Burner Drawer
Gas Train
Fuel Oil Controller
Figure 1-1 Typical Steam Boiler - Light oil or Gas Fired
A. GENERAL
Figure 1-2 Rifled Tube
1-2
Firetube boilers are available for low or high pressure steam, or for
hot water applications. Firetube boilers are typically used for
applications ranging from 15 to 800 horsepower. A firetube boiler
is a cylindrical vessel, with horizontal tubes passing through and
connected to the front and rear tube sheets. The vessel contains the
water and absorbs the energy generated from the flame. The front
door and rear door provide the seal to contain the hot combustion
gasses. Baffles designed into the doors serve to redirect the
combustion gasses through the firetubes. The flame originates in
the furnace. As the combustion gasses travel down the furnace and
through the firetubes, heat from the flame and combustion gasses
is transferred to the water. The swirling action caused by the rifled
firetubes provides a much more efficient heat transfer capability.
Transferred energy develops into the required steam or hot water.
The primary purpose of the boiler is to supply energy to the facility’s
operations - for heat, manufacturing process, laundry, kitchen, etc.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
The nature of the facility’s operation will dictate whether a steam or
hot water boiler should be used.
The general information in this manual applies directly to CleaverBrooks Model CB Boilers in sizes ranging from 400 through 800
boiler horsepower for the following fuels:
Series 100
Series 200
Series 400
Series 600
Series 700
Light Oil (No. 2)
Light Oil (No. 2) Or Gas
Heavy Oil (No. 6) Or Gas
Heavy Oil (No. 6) Only
Gas Only
The LE Option (Figure 1-3), available on Cleaver-Brooks Firetube
Boilers, reduces Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions, a major precursor
to ozone pollution (smog). Carbon Monoxide (CO) emissions also
tend to be lower, due to increased turbulence caused by the
addition of the flue gases into the combustion air stream, thereby
improving combustion.
The LE Option is used on Cleaver-Brooks Model CB Firetube boilers
firing either natural gas and/or light oil, and is compatible with both
hot water and steam systems.
The IFGR system mixes a portion of the relatively cool flue gas from
the exit of the fourth-pass tubes with the incoming combustion air
to reduce the furnace flame temperature, thereby reducing NOx
emissions. In this approach, the combustion air fan handles both
the combustion air and the recirculated flue gases. Accordingly, this
method is called Induced Flue Gas Recirculation (IFGR), because
the flue gas is “induced” into the fan inlet.
Notice
If your boiler is equipped with a
HAWK ICS boiler management
control system, refer to HAWKICS Operating, Service and Parts
Manual No. 750-197 for
information regarding Hawk ICS
controls .
Notice
Although the Series 400 or 600
burner is designed and
designated to burn No. 6 oil, the
burner will handle grades 4 and
5 equally well, with some
possible modifications. While the
manual contains pertinent
information on No. 6 fuel oil, all
references to No. 6 fuel should
be considered applicable to all
grades of heavy oil.
The LE Option, with its various levels of IFGR systems, can affect
the selection of the combustion air fan, motor, burner, and other
components. Several different system configurations are available,
depending on the requirements for NOx emissions and the fuels
used. All systems use similar primary components, but may have
different linkage controls, IFGR damper, fan, and motor sizes.
Always order genuine Cleaver-Brooks parts from your local CleaverBrooks authorized representative.
The boiler and related equipment installation are to be in
compliance with the standards of the National Board of Fire
Underwriters. Installation should also conform to state and local
codes governing such equipment. Prior to installation, the proper
authorities having jurisdiction are to be consulted, permits
obtained, etc. All boilers in the above series comply, when equipped
with optional equipment, to Industrial Risk Insurers (IRI), Factory
Mutual (FM), or other insuring underwriters requirements.
B. THE BOILER
The Model CB boiler is a packaged firetube boiler of welded steel
construction and consists of a pressure vessel, burner, burner
controls, forced draft fan, damper, air pump, refractory, and
appropriate boiler trim.
Part No. 750-225
Figure 1-3 Induced Flue Gas
Recurculation (IFGR)
1-3
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
The horsepower rating of the boiler is indicated by the numbers
following the fuel series. Thus, CB700-600 indicates a gas-fired
600 hp boiler.
The firetube construction provides some characteristics that
differentiate it from other boiler types. Because of its vessel size, the
firetube contains a large amount of water, allowing it to respond to
load changes with minimum variation in steam pressure.
Firetube boilers are rated in boiler horsepower (BHP), which should
not be confused with other horsepower measurements.
! Caution
Wa t e r s i d e c a r e i s o f p r i m e
i m p o r t a n c e . Fo r s p e c i f i c
information or assistance with
your
water
treatment
requirements, contact your
Cleaver-Brooks service and parts
representative. Failure to follow
these instructions could result in
equipment damage
Hot water is commonly used in heating applications with the boiler
supplying water to the system at 180 °F to 220 °F. The operating
pressure for hot water heating systems usually is 30 psig to 125
psig.
Steam boilers are designed for low pressure or high pressure
applications. Low pressure boilers are limited to 15 psig design, and
are typically used for heating applications. High pressure boilers are
typically used for process loads and can have an design pressure of
75 to 350psig.
Steam and hot water boilers are defined according to design
pressure and operating pressure. Design pressure is the maximum
pressure used in the design of the boiler for the purpose of
calculating the minimum permissible thickness or physical
characteristics of the pressure vessel parts of the boiler. Typically,
the safety valves are set at or below design pressure. Operating
pressure is the pressure of the boiler at which it normally operates.
The operating pressure usually is maintained at a suitable level
below the setting of the pressure relieving valve(s) to prevent their
frequent opening during normal operation.
The type of service that your boiler is required to provide has an
important bearing on the amount of waterside care it will require.
Feedwater equipment should be checked and ready for use. Be sure
that all valves, piping, boiler feed pumps, and receivers are installed
in accordance with prevailing codes and practices.
Water requirements for both steam and hot water boilers are
essential to boiler life and length of service. Constant attention to
water requirements will pay dividends in the form of longer life, less
down-time, and prevention of costly repairs. Care taken in placing
the pressure vessel into initial service is vital. The waterside of new
boilers and new or remodeled steam or hot water systems may
contain oil, grease or other foreign matter. A method of boiling out
the vessel to remove accumulations is described in Chapter 3.
The operator should be familiar with Chapter 3 before attempting to
place the unit into operation.
C. CONSTRUCTION
Figure 1-4 Safety Valves
1-4
Steam boilers designed for 15 psig and hot water boilers designed
for 250°F at 160 psig or less are constructed in accordance with
Section IV, Heating Boilers, of ASME Code.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
Steam boilers designed for operating pressures exceeding 15 psig
are constructed in accordance with Section I, Power Boilers, of the
ASME Code. Hot water boilers designed for operating temperatures
above 250×F or 160 psi are likewise built to ASME Code.
1
2
3
D. STEAM CONTROLS (ALL FUELS)
1. Operating Limit Pressure Control (Figure 1-5): Breaks a circuit to
stop burner operation on a rise of boiler pressure at a selected
setting. It is adjusted to stop or start the burner at a preselected
pressure setting.
2. High Limit Pressure Control (Figure 1-5): Breaks a circuit to stop
burner operation on a rise of pressure above a selected setting. It is
adjusted to stop the burner at a preselected pressure above the
operating limit control setting. The high limit pressure control is
normally equipped with a manual reset.
3. Modulating Pressure Control (Figure 1-5): Senses changing boiler
pressures and transmits the information to the modulating motor to
change the burner firing rate when the manual-automatic switch is
set on “automatic.”
4. Low-Water Cutoff and Pump Control (Figure 1-6): Float-operated
control responds to the water level in the boiler. It performs two
distinct functions:
• Stops firing of the burner if water level lowers below the safe
operating point. Energizes the low-water light in the control
panel; also causes low-water alarm bell (optional equipment)
to ring. Code requirements of some models require a manual
reset type of low-water cutoff.
1. OPERATING CONTROL
2. HIGH LIMIT CONTROL
3. MODULATING CONTROL
Figure 1-5 Steam Controls
! Caution
Determine that the main and
auxiliary low water cutoffs and
pump control are level af ter
installation and throughout the
equipment’s operating life.
Fa i l u r e t o f o l l o w t h e s e
instructions could result in
equipment damage.
• Starts and stops the feedwater pump (if used) to maintain
water at the proper operating level (Figure 1-6).
5.
Water Column Assembly (Figure 1-6): Houses the low-water cutoff
and pump control and includes the water gauge glass, gauge glass
shutoff cocks.
6.
Water Column Drain Valve (Figure 1-6): Provided so that the water
column and its piping can be flushed regularly to assist in maintaining
cross-connecting piping and in keeping the float bowl clean and free of
sediment. A similar drain valve is furnished with auxiliary low-water
cutoff for the same purpose.
7.
Water Gauge Glass Drain Valve (Figure 1-6): Provided to flush the
gauge glass.
8.
Vent Valve (Figure 1-6): Allows the boiler to be vented during filling,
and facilitates routine boiler inspection as required by ASME Code.
9.
Stack Thermometer (not shown): Indicates stack internal temperature.
10. Safety Valve(s) (Figure 1-4): Prevent buildup over the design pressure
of the pressure vessel. The size, rating and number of valves on a
boiler is determined by the ASME Boiler Code. The safety valves and
the discharge piping are to be installed to conform to the ASME code
requirements. The installation of a valve is of primary importance to its
service life. A valve must be mounted in a vertical position so that
discharge piping and code-required drains can be properly piped to
prevent buildup of back pressure and accumulation of foreign material
around the valve seat area. Apply only a moderate amount of pipe
compound to male threads and avoid overtightening, which can distort
the seats. Use only flat-jawed wrenches on the flats provided. When
installing a flange-connected valve, use a new gasket and draw the
mounting bolts down evenly. Do not install or remove side outlet
valves by using a pipe or wrench in the outlet.
Part No. 750-225
Vent
Valve
Gauge
Glass
Water
Column
Assembly
Gauge
Glass
Drain
Valve
Water
Column
Drain
Valves
Figure 1-6 Level Master Low
Water Cut Off (LWCO)
1-5
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
11. Auxiliary Low-water Cutoff: Breaks the circuit to stop burner operation
in the event boiler water drops below the master low-water cutoff
point. Manual reset type requires manual resetting in order to start the
burner after a low-water condition.
! Warning
Only properly certified personnel such as the safety valve
manufacturer’s certified representative can adjust or repair
the boiler safety valves. Failure to follow these instructions
could result in serious personal injury or death
E. HOT WATER CONTROLS (ALL FUELS)
Figure 1-7 Auxilary Low Water
Cutoff
Figure 1-8 Water Temperature
Gauge
1. Water Temperature Gauge (Figure 1-8): Indicates the boiler water
temperature.
2. Operating Limit Temperature Control (Figure 1-9): Breaks a circuit
to stop burner operation on a rise of boiler temperature at a
selected setting. It is adjusted to stop or start the burner at a
preselected operating temperature.
3. High Limit Temperature Control (Figure 1-9): Breaks a circuit to
stop burner operation on a rise of temperature at a selected setting.
It is adjusted to stop burner at a preselected temperature above the
operating control setting. The high limit temperature control
normally is equipped with a manual reset.
4. Modulating Temperature Control (Figure 1-9): Senses changing
boiler water temperature and transmits the information to the
modulating motor to change the burner firing rate when the
manual-automatic switch is set on “automatic.”
5. Low-Water Cutoff: Breaks the circuit to stop burner operation if the
water level in the boiler drops below safe operating point,
activating low-water light and optional alarm bell if burner is so
equipped.
6. Auxiliary Low-Water Cutoff (Not Shown) (Optional): Breaks the
circuit to stop burner operation if the water level in the boiler drops
below the master low-water cutoff point.
7. Safety Valve(s) (Figure 1-10): Relieves the boiler of pressure higher
than the design pressure or a lower pressure, if designated. Relief
valves and their discharge piping are to be installed to conform to
ASME Code requirements.
Figure 1-9 Hot Water Controls
Figure 1-10 Safety Valves
1-6
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
F. IFGR COMPONENTS
! Warning
Only properly certified personnel such as the relief valve
manufacturer’s certified representative can adjust or repair
the boiler relief valves. Failure to follow these instructions
could result in serious personal injury or death.
Flue Gas Transfer Port, IFGR Damper, and Flange Collar (Figure 111). The flue gas transfer port is a tube that allows the flue gases
to travel from the exit of the fourth-pass tubes to the entrance of the
combustion air fan. The IFGR damper controls the volume of flue
gas induced into the combustion air stream. The damper is located
in the flue gas transfer port and is positioned by the control linkage.
COMBUSTION AIR INLET
FLUE OUTLET
FRONT DOOR
AIRBOX
BACKPLATE GASKET
CASSETTE MOUNTING BOLTS
INSULATED PARTITION
AIRBOX GASKET
CASSETTE LIFTING EYES
FLUE GAS TRANSFER
PORT WITH IFGR DAMPER
FOURTH-PASS TUBES
FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE
DAMPER DRIVE ARM
FLANGE COLLAR
COMBUSTION AIR FAN
OVER-TRAVEL MECHANISM
IFGR DAMPER LINKAGE
QUICK DISCONNECT LINKAGE
THROAT AND LINER TILE
JACKSHAFT ARM
FURNACE
REAR BURNER DRAWER GASKET
GAS SPUDS
BURNER DRAWER
BURNER HOUSING
BURNER DRAWER SUPPORTS
INNER PLATE CLAMPS
INSULATION
(20-30 PPM NOx SYSTEMS)
WINDBOX
FRONT DOOR BOLTS
FLUE GAS FLOW
COMBUSTION AIR FLOW
Figure 1-11 Induced Flue Gas Recirculation System, General Arrangement
8. IFGR Damper Linkage. The IFGR damper is positioned by the
control linkage. The linkage could consist of a single arm, or it
could consist of several arms driven from the jackshaft to provide
modulating control (see Figure 1-11).
Part No. 750-225
1-7
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
9. Over-Travel Mechanism (Figure 1-12). The over-travel mechanism
has two functions. It allows the linkage to pass through the front
door, and it allows jackshaft rotation to exceed (over travel) IFGR
linkage movement. A set of springs allows the linkage to stay in a
fixed position while the jackshaft rotates.
Figure 1-12 Over Travel and
Fuel Change-over Linkage
10. Fuel Change-Over Linkage (Figure 1-12). When a boiler is
equipped to fire either gas or oil (dual-fuel boilers), and the
required NOx levels are below 60 ppm on natural gas, a duallinkage arrangement is used to provide the different recirculation
rates required for each fuel. Two jackshaft drive arms are provided,
one for oil and one for gas. The linkage is manually connected to
the appropriate arm, based on the fuel being used. On dual-fuel
boilers with two jackshaft drive arms, as defined above, a proximity
switch is used to prove that the correct linkage connection is made.
(Refer to the wiring diagram provided with the boiler.)
COME-ALONG
OR
HEAVY TURNBUCKLE
DAVIT ARM
BACK PLATE GASKET
CHAIN
INLET GASKET
FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE
Figure 1-13 Fan / Motor Cassette
Fan/Motor Cassette (Figure 1-13). The fan and motor assemblies
are designed as a cassette so that they can be removed from the
front of the boiler, without opening the front door. The front door
davit arm can be used to remove the assembly.
11. Burner Drawer (Figure 1-11). The gas spudding pattern for the
IFGR system may be different than that of a non-IFGR, High-
1-8
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
Turndown CB Burner of the same horsepower (HP) model
designation.
12. Combustion Air Inlet (Figure 1-13). The combustion air inlets are
located at the top of the front door. Air enters from the rear of the
air inlet shrouds, which reduces the sound level and captures heat
from the boiler and stack flue outlet.
13. Front Door Installation (Figure 1-13). If NOx emissions are below
60 ppm, the front door is insulated inside to control temperature
build up. The insulation is held in place with wire mesh.
DISCHARGE OPENING
MUST BE EQUAL TO OR
LARGER THAN INLET
SUPPORT FROM BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION
TO STEAM
VENT
CAUTION VENT PIPE
MUST NOT
TOUCH
DRIP PAN
EXTENSION
VENT PIPE
DRIP PAN
EXTENSION
DRIP PAN
AND ELBOW
1 1/2”
MIN .
DRIP PAN
DRAIN
DRIP ELL DRAIN
SAFETY
VALVE
WATER LEVEL
NOTICE: BACK-PRESSURE OF STEAM
EXHAUST SYSTEM MUST BE LESS THAN
6% OF SAFETY VALVE SETTING.
OPEN DRAIN
TO WASTE
BOILER SHELL
Figure 1-14 Recommended Steam Relief Valve Piping (Not
Provided by Cleaver-Brooks)
Part No. 750-225
1-9
Chapter 1 — Basics of Firetube Operation
Notes
1-10
Part No. 750-294
Chapter 2
Burner Operation and Control
Contents
A. THE BURNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
B. CONTROL AND COMPONENT FUNCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
C. COMPONENTS COMMON TO ALL BOILERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
D. CONTROLS FOR GAS FIRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
E. CONTROLS COMMON TO OIL-FIRED BOILERS
(INCLUDING COMBINATION) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-8
F. ADDITIONAL CONTROLS FOR HEAVY OIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12
G. CONTROLS FOR COMBINATION BURNERS ONLY . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
H. COMBUSTION AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
I. AUTOMATIC IGNITION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15
J. ATOMIZING AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-16
K. OIL FUEL FLOW - LIGHT OIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
L. OIL FUEL FLOW - HEAVY OIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-17
M. GAS FUEL FLOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-20
N. MODULATING FIRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-21
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
A. THE BURNER
Notice
A Series 100 boiler is usually
equipped with a light oil pilot,
although a gas pilot is also
available.
The oil burner is of the low pressure, air atomizing (nozzle) type. The
gas burner is of the non-premix orifice type. The burners are ignited
by spark ignited gas pilot. The pilot is of the interrupted type and is
extinguished after main flame is established.
Burners equipped to burn oil and gas (combination burners) include
equipment for each distinct fuel. Since the burner uses only one
type of fuel at a time, a gas/oil selector switch is incorporated.
Regardless of which fuel is used, the burner operates with full
modulation (within its rated operating range). The burner returns to
minimum firing position for ignition. High-pressure boilers (above
15 psi) can be wired for both low-pressure and high-pressure
modulation, which enables the boiler to operate at lower pressure
during off-load hours, but at a somewhat reduced steam output,
dependent upon lower steam pressure and steam nozzle sizing.
Figure 2-1 Gas/Oil Selector
Switch
The flame safeguard and program relay include a flame detector to
supervise both oil and gas flames, and to shut the burner down in
the event of loss of flame. The programming portion of the control
provides a pre-purging period, proving of the pilot and main flame,
and a period of continued blower operation to postpurge the boiler
of all unburned fuel vapor. Other safety controls shut down the
burner under low-water conditions, excess steam pressure, or water
temperature.
Safety interlock controls include combustion and atomizing air
proving switches and, depending upon the fuel and insurance
carrier requirements, controls that prove the presence of adequate
fuel pressure, plus temperature proving controls when heated fuel
oil is used.
AIR DAMPER OPEN
The sequence of burner operation from startup through shutdown is
governed by the program relay in conjunction with the operating,
limit and interlock devices. The devices are wired into the circuitry
to provide safe operation and protect against incorrect operating
techniques.
All CB boilers have the burner assembly attached to the front head.
The entire head may be swung open for inspection and maintenance
(Figure 2-3).
AIR DAMPER CLOSED
Figure 2-2 Burner Drawer
Combustion air is provided by a centrifugal blower located in the
front head. Combustion air delivery to the burner is under the
control of the damper motor. The motor also regulates the flow of
fuel through a linkage system connected to the gas butterfly valve
and/or oil through a cam-operated metering valve. Fuel input and
air are thus properly proportioned for most efficient combustion.
Filtered primary air for atomizing fuel oil is furnished independently
of combustion air by an air compressor (Figure 2-7). The burner
control circuit operates on 115 volt, single phase 60 Hz (or 50 Hz
2-2
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
when equipped) alternating current. The forced draft fan motor is
generally operated on 3-phase service at the available main power
supply voltage.
Indicator lights signaling load demand, fuel valve, low water, and
flame failure conditions are standard equipment.
In addition to the standard basic controls supplied, other devices
may be required to meet specific requirements of an insurance
carrier or local code. Refer to the Wiring Diagram (WD) prepared by
Cleaver-Brooks for your specific installation to determine the
specific controls in the burner and limit control circuits. The
function of individual components is outlined in Chapter 2 and the
electrical sequence is covered in Chapter 3.
B. CONTROL AND COMPONENT FUNCTION
Figure 2-3 Front Door Open
The term “control” covers the more important valves and
components, including, but not limited to electrical controls or those
monitored by the program relay. The operator must become familiar
with the individual functioning of all controls before understanding
boiler operation and procedures outlined in this manual.
Before proceeding, identify and locate each item using the callout
in the illustration.
The actual controls furnished with any given boiler will depend upon
the type of fuel for which it is equipped, and whether it is a hot
water or steam boiler. Refer to the applicable group or groups within
Chapter 2 that apply to the particular boiler.
Boilers with optional features may have control components not
listed here.
Figure 2-4 Air Pump for
Atomizing Air
C. COMPONENTS COMMON TO ALL BOILERS
1. Forced Draft Fan Motor (Figure 2-8 and Figure 2-9): Drives
forced draft fan directly to provide combustion air. Also referred
to as a blower motor.
2. Forced Draft Fan Figure 2-9): Provides all air, under pressure,
for combustion of pilot fuel and main fuel, and for purging.
3. Modulating Motor (Figure 2-5): Operates the rotary air damper
and fuel metering valves through a cam and linkage system to
provide proper air/fuel ratios under all boiler load conditions.
4. Modulating Motor Transformer (Figure 2-5) (located in the mod
motor): Reduces control circuit voltage (115 Vac) to required
voltage (24Vac) for operation of the modulating motor.
5. Forced Draft Fan Motor Starter (Figure 2-6): Energizes forced
draft fan (blower) motor.
Figure 2-5 Modulating Motor
6. Ignition Transformer Figure 2-6): Provides high voltage spark for
ignition of gas pilot or light oil pilot.
7. Low Fire Switch (Not Shown, located in the mod motor): An
internal auxiliary switch, cam actuated by the motor shaft,
Part No. 750-225
2-3
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
which must be closed to indicate that the air damper and fuel
metering valve are in the low fire position before an ignition
cycle can occur.
Motor Starter
Forced Draft Fan Motor
FGR Linkage
AccuLink
Jackshaft
Modulating Motor
Fuel Oil
Controller
Continuous
Blowdown
Piping
Air Pump
Module
Ignition
Transformer
Bottom
Blowdown
Valves
Atomized Air
Proving Switch
Figure 2-6 Components and Controls
8. Atomizing Air Proving Switch (Figure 2-6): A pressure-sensitive
switch actuated by air pressure from the Air Pump. Its contacts
close to prove presence of atomizing air. The fuel valves cannot
be energized unless this switch is satisfied.
Figure 2-7 Air Compressor
2-4
9. Manual-Automatic Switch (Figure 2-10): When set at
“automatic,” subsequent operation is at the command of the
modulating control, which governs the position of the
modulating motor in accordance with load demand. When set at
“manual,” the modulating motor, through the manual flame
control, can be positioned at a desired burner firing rate. The
primary purpose of the manual position is for testing and setting
the air/fuel ratio through the entire firing range.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
10. Manual Flame Control (Figure 2-10): A manually operated
potentiometer that permits the positioning of the modulating
motor to a desired burner firing rate when the manual-automatic
switch is set on “manual“. It is used primarily for initial or
subsequent setting of fuel input throughout the firing range. It
has no control over the firing rate when the manual-automatic
switch is set on “automatic.”
11. Burner Switch (Figure 2-10): A manually operated start-stop
switch for directly starting and stopping operation of burner.
12. Flame Detector (not shown): Monitors gas or oil pilot and
energizes the programmer flame relay in response to a flame
signal. It continues to monitor main flame (oil or gas) after
expiration of pilot providing period. A standard equipped boiler
has a lead sulfide (infrared sensitive) detector.
Figure 2-8 Forced Draft Fan
Motor
13. Combustion Air Proving Switch (Figure 2-6): A pressuresensitive switch actuated by air pressure from the forced draft
fan. Its contacts close to prove presence of combustion air. The
fuel valves cannot be energized unless this switch is satisfied.
14. Alarm: Sounds to notify the operator of a condition requiring
attention. The alarm is available as optional equipment.
15. Stack Thermometer: Indicates temperature of vented flue gases.
16. Diffuser (Figure 2-2): A circular plate, located at the furnace
end of the burner drawer, that imparts a rotary swirling motion
to combustion air immediately prior to its entering the flame,
thus providing a thorough and efficient mixture with the fuel.
17. Rotary Air Damper (Figure 2-2): Provides accurate control of
combustion air in proportion to fuel input for various load
demands. It consists of two concentric cylinders with openings.
The outer is stationary. The inner is rotated, under control of the
modulating motor, to vary the effective size of the openings
where they overlap.
Figure 2-9 Forced Draft Fan
18. Indicator Lights (Figure 2-10): Provide visual information of
boiler operation as follows (indicator lights vary with controls
provided):
• Flame Failure
• Load Demand
• Fuel Valve (valve open)
• Low Water
Figure 2-10 Indicator Lights
19. Program Relay and Flame Safeguard Control (Figure 2-6):
Automatically programs each starting, operating and shutdown
period in conjunction with operating limit and interlock devices.
Part No. 750-225
2-5
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
Includes, in a timed and proper sequence, the operation of the
blower motor, ignition system, fuel valve(s), and the damper
motor. The sequence includes air purge periods prior to ignition
and upon burner shutdown.
The flame detector portion of the control monitors both oil and gas
flames and provides protection in the event of loss of a flame signal.
The control recycles automatically during normal operation, or
following a power interruption. It must be manually reset following a
safety shutdown caused by a loss of flame. An internal checking
circuit, effective on every start, prevents burner operation in the event
anything causes the flame relay to hold in during this period.
5
D. CONTROLS FOR GAS FIRING
4
2
1
3
1. GAS PILOT VALVES
2. GAS PILOT VENT VALVE
3. GAS PILOT SHUTOFF COCK
4. GAS PRESSURE GAUGE
5. GAS PRESSURE REGULATING VALVE
Figure 2-11 Pilot Gas Train
Depending upon the requirements of the insurance carrier or other
governing agencies, the gas flow control system, or gas train, may
consist of some, or all, of the following items. Refer to the
Dimension Diagram (DD) prepared by Cleaver-Brooks for your
specified installation.
1. Gas Pilot Valve (Figure 2-11): A solenoid valve that opens
during the ignition period to admit fuel to the pilot. It closes
after main flame is established. The sequence of energizing and
de-energizing is controlled by the programming relay. A second
gas pilot valve may be required by insurance regulations.
2. Gas Pilot Vent Valve: When a second gas pilot valve is required,
a normally open vent valve (optional equipment) is installed
between them. Its purpose is to vent gas to the atmosphere,
should any be present in the pilot line when the pilot valves are
closed. The valve closes when the pilot valves are energized.
3. Gas Pilot Shutoff Cock: For manually opening or closing the gas
supply to gas pilot valve.
4. Gas Pressure Gauge: Indicates gas pressure to pilot.
5. Gas Pressure Regulating Valve: Reduces incoming gas pressure
to suit the pilot.
6. Gas Pilot Aspirator (Figure 2-12): Provides complete mixing of
gas and air to the pilot.
7. Gas Pilot Adjusting Cock: Regulates the size of the gas pilot
flame.
8. Gas Modulating Cam: An assembly, consisting of a quadrant, a
series of adjustable allen-head screws and a contour spring,
provided for adjustment of gas input at any point in the
modulating range.
6. GAS ASPIRATOR
7. GAS PILOT ADJUSTING COCK
Figure 2-12 Burner Drawer Face
2-6
9. Butterfly Gas Valve: The pivoted disc in the valve is actuated by
connecting linkage from the gas modulating cam to regulate the
rate of gas flow to the burner.
10. Main Gas Cock: For manually opening and closing the main fuel
gas supply downstream of the main gas line pressure regulator.
A second shutoff cock, downstream of the main gas valve(s), is
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
installed to provide a means of shutting off the gas line
whenever a test is made for leakage across the main gas valve.
11. Main Gas Valves: Electrically actuated shutoff valves that open
simultaneously to admit gas to the burner. The downstream
valve is equipped with a “proof of closure” switch that is
connected into the pre-ignition interlock circuit.
8
12. Main Gas Vent Valve: A normally open solenoid valve installed
between the two main gas valves to vent gas to the atmosphere
should any be present in the main gas line when the gas valves
are deenergized. The vent valve closes when the gas valves are
energized.
13. Low Gas Pressure Switch: A pressure-actuated switch that is
closed whenever main gas line pressure is above a preselected
pressure. Should the pressure drop below the setting, the switch
contacts open a circuit causing the main gas valve(s) to close, or
prevent the burner from starting. The switch is usually equipped
with a device that must be manually reset after being tripped.
9
Figure 2-13 Gas Modulating
Cam, linkage and Butterfly Valve
14. High Gas Pressure Switch (Not Shown): A pressure actuated
switch that is closed whenever main gas line pressure is below a
preselected pressure. Should the pressure rise above the setting,
the switch contacts will open a circuit causing the main gas
valve(s) to close, or prevent the burner from starting. The switch
is usually equipped with a device that must be manually reset
after being tripped.
15. Leakage Connection (Not Shown): The body of the gas valve has
a plugged opening that is used whenever it is necessary to
conduct a test for possible leakage across the closed valve.
E. CONTROLS COMMON TO OIL-FIRED
BOILERS (INCLUDING COMBINATION)
Main Gas Valves
11
12
13
10
Vent Valve
Low Gas
Pressure Switch
Main Gas Shutoff Cocks
Figure 2-14 Main Gas Train
The following items are applicable to all oil fired or gas and oil fired
boilers. Additional controls for No. 6 oil are listed in Section I.
1. Oil Drawer Switch (Figure 2-15): Opens the limit circuit if oil
drawer burner gun is not latched in the forward position
required for burning oil.
2. Atomizing Air Proving Switch (Figure 2-16): Pressure-actuated
switch whose contacts are closed when sufficient atomizing air
pressure from the air pump is present for oil firing. Oil valve(s)
will not open, or will not remain open, unless switch contacts
are closed.
Part No. 750-225
Figure 2-15 Oil Drawer Switch
2-7
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
3. Atomizing Air Pressure Gauge (Figure 2-16): Indicates the
atomizing air pressure at the burner gun
3
4
2
5
2. Low Oil Pressure Switch
3. Atomizing Air Pressure Gauge
4. Oil Solenoid Valves
5. Fuel Oil Controller
Figure 2-16 Controls for Oil
Firing
4. Oil Solenoid Valve: Opens when energized through contacts in
the programmer and allows fuel oil flow from the oil metering
valve to the burner nozzle. A light oil fired burner uses two
valves operating simultaneously.
5. Fuel Oil Controller (Figure 2-17): An assembly combining into a
single unit the gauges, regulators and valves required for
regulating the flow of fuel oil. All controllers have the following
integral parts. In addition to these, the controller used on a No.
6 oil fired burner has additional components described in
Section I.
A
Oil Metering Valve: Valve metering stem moves to
increase or decrease the orifice area to regulate the supply
of fuel oil to the burner nozzle in accordance with boiler
load variances. Stem movement is controlled by the modulating motor through linkage and the oil metering cam.
B
Oil Modulating Cam: Assembly consisting of a quadrant, a
series of adjustable allen-head screws and a contour
spring provided for adjustment of oil input at any point in
the modulating range.
C
Oil Burner Pressure Gauge: Indicates pressure of the fuel
oil at the metering valve.
D
Oil Pressure Regulator: For adjustment of the pressure of
oil at the metering valve.
E
B
F
C
A
D
A. Oil Metering Valve
B. Oil Modulating Cam
C. Oil Burner Pressure Gauge
D. Oil Pressure Regulator
E. Atomizing Air Proving Switch
F. Low Oil Pressure Switch
6. Oil Relief Valve (Figure 2-18): Maintains a constant oil supply
pressure to the fuel oil controller by bypassing excess fuel oil.
7. Terminal Block (Figure 2-18): Provides the connection for fuel
oil input and return to storage tank.
8. Fuel Oil Strainer: Prevents foreign matter from entering the
burner system.
Figure 2-17 Fuel Oil Controller
9. Air Pump Module Assembly (Figure 2-19): Provides the
compressed air required to atomize the fuel oil for proper
combustion. It is started automatically by the programmer’s
sequence. It includes components described A-H (below).
Figure 2-18 Terminal Block and
Relief Valve
2-8
A
Air Pump Motor: Drives the air pump and an air cooling
fan. The motor is started and stopped simultaneously with
the forced draft fan motor.
B
Air Pump: Provides air for atomization of the fuel oil.
C
Air Filter: The filter cleans the air supply prior to entering
air pump.
D
Check Valve: Prevents lubricating oil and compressed air
from surging back through the pump and air filter when
the pump stops.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
E
Air-Oil Receiver Tank: Holds a supply of oil for lubricating
the air pump. The receiver tank also separates lube oil
from the atomizing air before delivery to nozzle.
F
Lube Oil Level Sight Glass: Indicates the level of lubricating oil in the air-oil receiver tank.
G
Lube Oil Cooling Coil: Cools the lubricating oil before it
enters the air pump. A fan driven by the air pump motor
circulates cooling air over the coil.
H
Lube Oil Fill Pipe and Strainer: Used when adding oil to
the air-oil receiver tank.
10. Low Oil Pressure Switch (Optional): Switch contacts open when
the fuel oil pressure drops below selected pressure. Switch will
interrupt the limit circuit upon loss of sufficient fuel oil pressure
for correct combustion.
11. Fuel Oil Pump (Not Shown): Transfers fuel oil from the storage
tank and delivers it under pressure to the burner system.
2
3
5
1
4
6
1. AIR PUMP MOTOR
2. AIR fILTER
3. AIR-OIL RECEIVER TANK
4. AIR PUMP
7
8
5. LUBE OIL COOLING COIL
6. CHECK VALVE
7. LUBE OIL LEVEL SIGHT GAUGE
8. FILL TUBE
Figure 2-19 Air Pump (Primary Air)
Part No. 750-225
2-9
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
F. ADDITIONAL CONTROLS FOR HEAVY OIL
The oil heater (Figure 2-20 Steam) is provided to heat heavy oil to
the point where it can be effectively atomized and burned. Most
heavy oil heaters utilize an electric heater to reduce the viscosity of
the heavy oil until the point where either steam or hot water is
available. Heavy oil heaters operating with hot water will have
additional controls not represented in Figure 2-20.
Heater Switch (Not Shown): Manually provides power to the oil
heater system.
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
18
1
2
3
4
5
6
1. OIL HEATER (ELECTRIC)
2. OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (STEAM)
3. OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (ELECTRIC)
4. OIL HEATER SHELL
5. OIL RETURN TO TANK
6. OIL INLET FROM TANK
7. CHECK VALVE
8. STEAM TRAP
9. CHECK VALVE
7
8
10. STEAM HEATER PRESSURE REGULATOR
11. STEAM HEATER SOLENOID VALVE
12. STEAM PRESSURE GAUGE
13. OIL RELIEF VALVE
14. LOW OIL TEMPERATURE SWITCH
15. OIL SUPPLY PRESSURE GAUGE
16. OIL RETURNED FROM FUEL OIL CONTROLLER
17. HEATED OIL TO BURNER
18. FUEL OIL STRAINER
Figure 2-20 Oil Heating Assembly (Steam)
1. Oil Heater (Electric): Used for heating sufficient fuel oil for lowfire flow during cold starts before steam or hot water is available
for heating. The heater must be turned off during extended
boiler lay-up, or at any time the fuel oil transfer pump is
stopped.
2. Electric Oil Heater Thermostat: Senses fuel oil temperature and
energizes or deenergizes the electric oil heater to maintain
required temperature of the fuel oil.
3. Steam Oil Heater Thermostat: Senses fuel oil temperature and
controls the opening and closing of the steam heater valve to
maintain the required temperature of the fuel oil.
2-10
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
4. Oil Heater Shell (Steam/Hot Water): Heats fuel oil through
medium of steam or hot water. Electric heater is housed in the
steam heater, but is housed separately on a hot water heater.
Steam oil heaters on 15 psi boilers operate at boiler pressure.
Steam oil heaters furnished on high pressure boilers are to be
operated at less than 15 psi. Operation is accomplished with a
steam pressure regulator valve.
5. Oil Return To Tank: Excess oil returned to the heavy oils supply
tank.
6. Oil Inlet From Supply Tank: Heavy oil inlet from the supply tank.
7. Steam Heater Check Valve: Prevents oil contamination of the
waterside of pressure vessel should any leakage occur in the oil
heater.
8. Steam Trap: Drains condensate and prevents loss of steam from
the steam oil heater. Condensate must be piped to a safe point
of discharge.
9. Check Valve (Steam Heater Discharge): Prevents air entry
during shutdown periods when cooling action may create
vacuum within steam heater.
10. Steam Heater Pressure Regulator: Adjust to provide reduced
(usually less than 15 psi) steam pressure to the heater to
properly maintain the required fuel oil temperature. The
regulator and the pressure gauge are not furnished on 15 psi
units.
11. Steam Heater Solenoid Valve: A normally open solenoid valve
opened by the steam oil heater thermostat to allow flow of
steam to the steam heater to maintain temperature of fuel oil.
12. Steam Pressure Gauge: Indicates steam pressure entering the
heater.
13. Oil Relief Valve: Allows release of excessive pressure to the
return side of the oil line piped to the tank.
14. Low-Oil-Temperature Switch: Thermostatic switch that prevents
burner from starting, or stops burner firing if fuel oil temperature
is lower than required for oil burner operation.
15. Oil Supply Pressure Gauge: Indicates fuel oil pressure in the oil
heater and supply pressure to the fuel oil controller’s pressure
regulator.
In addition to the components of the fuel oil controller mentioned
in Section E, the following are used with a heavy oil fired burner.
A
High-Oil-Temperature Switch (Optional): Switch contacts
open when fuel oil temperature raises above a selected
temperature. Switch will interrupt the limit circuit in the
event fuel oil temperature rises above the selected point.
Part No. 750-225
2-11
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
B
Hot Water Oil Heater Thermostat: Used on a hot water
boiler to sense fuel oil temperature and control the starting
and stopping of the booster water pump.
C
Booster Water Pump: Started and stopped by the hot
water thermostat to regulate the flow of hot water through
the hot water oil heater to maintain temperature of fuel
oil.
D
Fuel Oil Thermometer: Indicates temperature of fuel oil
being supplied to the fuel oil controller.
E
Back Pressure Valve: For adjustment of oil pressure on the
downstream side of the metering valve. Also regulates rate
of return oil flow.
F
Oil Return Pressure Gauge: Indicates oil pressure on the
return side of the fuel oil controller.
G
Manual By-Pass Valve: Provided as a time saver in establishing oil flow. When open, it permits circulation of oil
through the supply and return lines. The valve must be
closed prior to initial light off.
H
Orifice Oil Control Valve: Valve may be opened prior to
start-up to aid in establishing fuel oil flow through the
controller. The valve must be closed prior to initial light
off. Its disc has an orifice to permit a continuous circulation of hot fuel oil through the controller.
I
Air Purge Valve: Solenoid valve opens simultaneously with
closing of oil solenoid valve at burner shutdown, allowing
compressed air to purge oil from the burner nozzle and
adjacent piping. The oil is burned by the diminishing
flame, which continues burning for approximately 4 seconds after the oil solenoid valve closes.
J
Air Purge Orifice Nozzle: Limits purging air to proper
quantity for expelling unburned oil at normal delivery rate.
K
Air Purge Orifice Nozzle Filter: Filters the purging air of
any particles that might plug the air purge orifice nozzle.
L
Air Purge Check Valve: Valve check prevents fuel oil from
entering the atomizing air line.
M
Air Purge Relay: When energized, controls operation of air
purge valve.
G. CONTROLS FOR COMBINATION BURNERS
ONLY
(1) Gas-Oil Switch (Figure 2-21): Burners equipped to burn either
oil or gas include equipment for each fuel. The selector switch
engages the appropriate interlocks and controls for gas or oil
operation. Chapter 4 details the required mechanical functions of
each fuel system.
2-12
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
H. COMBUSTION AIR
Air for combustion of fuel (often referred to as “secondary” air) is
furnished by the forced draft fan (Figure 2-23) mounted in the boiler
head. In operation, air pressure is built up in the entire head and is
forced through a diffuser plate for a thorough mixture with the fuel
for proper combustion. The supply of secondary air to the burner is
governed by automatically throttling the output of the fan by
regulating the rotary air damper. The damper provides the proper
amount of air for correct ratio of air to fuel for efficient combustion
at all firing rates.
I. AUTOMATIC IGNITION
Oil or gas burners are ignited by an interrupted-type pilot. The pilot
flame is ignited automatically by an electric spark.
The series 100 burner usually is equipped with a pilot fired with
light oil fuel. All other burners are equipped with a gas burning pilot.
In the case of a combination burner, the gas pilot is used to ignite
either the main gas flame or the oil flame. Either pilot serves the
same function. Unless exception is taken in the text, the term pilot
is used interchangeably.
At the beginning of the ignition cycle, and governed by the program
relay, the pilot solenoid valve and ignition transformer are
simultaneously energized.
The ignition transformer supplies high voltage current for the
igniting spark. A gas pilot has a single electrode and a spark arcs
between the tip of the electrode and the wall of the tube surrounding
it. A light oil pilot has two electrodes and the arc is between their
tips. The pilot solenoid valve and the transformer are deenergized
after main flame is ignited and established.
Figure 2-21 Control Panel with
Gas/Oil Selector Switch
Fuel for the gas pilot is supplied from the utility’s main, or from a
tank (bottle) supply. Secondary air flows into and mixes with the
pilot gas stream to provide an adequate flame.
Insurance regulations may require two gas pilot solenoid valves with
a normally open vent valve between them. The vent valve closes
when the gas pilot valves open, and opens when the gas pilot valves
shut to vent gas, should any be present in the pilot line during the
deenergized period of the gas pilot valves.
Fuel for a light-oil pilot is provided from the line that supplies oil
under pressure for the main flame. A solenoid actuated valve
controls flow of oil to the pilot nozzle. The valve is energized
simultaneously with the ignition transformer at the beginning of the
ignition cycle and is deenergized after main flame is ignited and
established.
Part No. 750-225
2-13
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
AIR AND OIL
MIXTURE FROM
PUMP
AIR TO NOZZLE
J. ATOMIZING AIR
Air for atomizing the fuel oil (often referred to as “primary air”) is
pumped by the air pump into the air-oil receiver tank and delivered
under pressure through a manifold block to the oil burner nozzle.
The atomizing air mixes with the fuel oil just prior to the oil leaving
the nozzle.
STEEL WOOL
PADS (3)
(COARSE GRADE)
O-RING GASKET
LUBE OIL
SEPARATED OIL
LUBE OIL
TO COOLING COIL
AND PUMP
Figure 2-22 Air-Oil Receiver
Tank
Atomizing air pressure is indicated by the air pressure gauge on the
burner gun.
NOTICE: FAN ROTATION IS
COUNTERCLOCKWISE
WHEN VIEWED FROM
FRONT OF BOILER.
Cleaver
INTAKE
Air pressure from the pump also forces sufficient oil from the tank
to the pump bearings to lubricate them and also to provide a seal
and lubrication for the pump vanes. As a result, the air delivered to
the tank contains some lube oil; however, most of it is recovered
through baffles and filters in the tank before the air passes to the
burner.
Brooks
FAN MOTOR
FORCED
DRAFT FAN
FIRING HEAD
STABILIZER
GAS PILOT
ASSEMBLY
ROTARY
AIR DAMPER
Figure 2-23 Secondary Air Flow
Diagram
2-14
Some of the primary air is also used to assist the oil pressure
regulators of the fuel oil controller. Further explanation is given in
chapter 5.
K. OIL FUEL FLOW - LIGHT OIL
The oil fuel flow system schematic is shown in Figure 2-24. Oil flow
is indicated by arrows and the pertinent controls are called out. Fuel
oil is delivered into the system by a supply pump which delivers part
of its discharge to the oil burner. Excess oil is returned to the oil
storage tank through the fuel oil relief valve and oil return line.
Normally the pump operates only while the burner is in operation,
although a positioning switch is often provided so that either
continuous or automatic pump operation can be obtained.
The oil flows through a fuel oil strainer to prevent any foreign
material from flowing through the control valves and nozzle. The
fuel oil controller contains in a single unit, a metering valve, a
regulator, and a gauge required to regulate the pressure and flow of
oil to the burner. The adjustable regulator controls the pressure. To
assist in the regulation, back pressure is created by an orifice nozzle
located in the oil return line immediately downstream of the fuel oil
controller.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
The programming relay energizes or deenergizes the solenoid oil
valves to permit or cut off oil flow to the burner. Two valves,
operating simultaneously, are used. The valves are closed when
deenergized. They cannot be opened (energized) unless the
combustion air proving switch and the atomizing air proving switch
are closed. The two switches are satisfied, respectively, by sufficient
combustion air pressure from the forced draft fan and pressurized
air from the air pump.
The oil flow to the burner is controlled by the movement of the
metering stem in the oil metering valve, which varies the flow to
meet load demands. The metering valve and the air damper are
controlled simultaneously at all times by the modulating motor to
proportion combustion air and fuel for changes in load demand.
L. OIL FUEL FLOW - HEAVY OIL
The oil fuel flow and circulating system is shown in schematic
diagram form in Figure 2-25. The pertinent controls are called out
and the oil flow is indicated by arrows.
Fuel oil is delivered into the system by the fuel oil supply pump
which delivers part of its discharge to the oil heater. The remainder
of the fuel oil returns to the oil storage tank through a fuel oil relief
valve and oil return line.
The combination electric and steam oil preheater is controlled by
thermostats. The electric oil heater thermostat energizes the electric
heater, which is provided to supply heated oil on cold starts. The
steam heater thermostat controls operation of the steam solenoid
valve to permit a flow of steam to the heater when steam is
available.
A hot water boiler is equipped to heat the oil with hot water from
the boiler, unless other preheating equipment is utilized. The
electric heater, which is housed separately, is sized to provide
heated oil on a cold start. The hot water thermostat controls the
Part No. 750-225
2-15
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
AIR STRAINER
MANIFOLD
BLOCK
NOZZLE AIR
PRESSURE GAUGE
OIL BURNER NOZZLE
SWING CHECK VALVE
ATOMIZING AIR
AIR PUMP
OIL SOLENOID
VALVE
ATOMIZING AIR PRESSURE
FEED BACK CONTROL TUBING
ATOMIZING AIR
PROVING SWITCH
FUEL OIL
CONTROLLER
LUBE OIL
STRAINER
OIL PRESSURE
REGULATOR
OIL BURNER
PRESSURE GAUGE
AIR OIL
RECEIVER TANK
LUBE OIL
OIL METERING
VALVE
OIL MODULATING
CAM
OIL RETURN
BACK PRESSURE ORIFICE
OIL RELIEF
VALVE
FUEL OIL
RETURN
FUEL OIL
STRAINER
OIL SUPPLY
PRESSURE
GAUGE
FUEL OIL
STRAINER
CHECK
VALVE
VACUUM
GAUGE
FUEL OIL
SUPPLY PUMP
PRIMING
TEE
SHUTOFF
VALVE
NOT SUPPLIED
BY CLEAVER BROOKS
FUEL
OIL
INLET
Figure 2-24 Schematic Diagram for Light Oil Flow
2-16
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
AIR STRAINER
NOZZLE AIR
PRESSURE GAUGE
OIL BURNER NOZZLE
MANIFOLD
BLOCK
SWING CHECK VALVE
ATOMIZING AIR
AIR PUMP
ATOMIZING AIR PRESSURE
FEEDBACK CONTROL TUBING
OIL SOLENOID
VALVE
ATOMIZING AIR
PROVING SWITCH
FUEL OIL
CONTROLLER
LUBE OIL
STRAINER
OIL PRESSURE
REGULATOR
AIR PURGE
VALVE
AIR OIL
RECEIVER TANK
FUEL OIL
THERMOMETER
AIR PURGE
CHECK VALVE
OIL METERING
VALVE
LUBE OIL
AIR PURGE
CHECK VALVE
OIL MODULATING
CAM
LOW OIL
TEMPERATURE
SWITCH
PRESSURE
RELIEF VALVE
OIL RETURN
PRESSURE
GAUGE
MANUAL
BY-PASS
VALVE
OIL BURNER
PRESSURE
GAUGE
ORIFICED
VALVE
NOTE: DIAGRAM SHOWS COMPONENTS USED WITH
STEAM GENERATORS. REFER TO FIGURE 1-2 FOR
CORRESPONDING HOT WATER HEATING COMPONENTS.
OIL RELIEF
VALVE
OIL SUPPLY
PRESSURE
GAUGE
OIL HEATER
THERMOSTAT
(ELECTRIC)
FUEL OIL
RETURN
NOTE: CONDENSATE FROM STEAM
TRAP MUST BE WASTED AND PIPED
STEAM HEATER
PRESSURE GAUGE
STEAM HEATER
TO A SAFE POINT OF DISCHARGE.
SOLENOID VALVE
STEAM PRESSURE
REGULATOR
STEAM SHUTOFF
VALVE
FUEL OIL
STRAINER
STEAM INLET
OIL HEATER
SHELL
CHECK VALVE
STEAM STRAINER
VACUUM GAUGE
OIL HEATER
(ELECTRIC)
OIL HEATER
THERMOSTAT
(STEAM)
CHECK
VALVE
STEAM TRAP
CHECK VALVE
SHUTOFF
PRIMING TEE
VALVE
FUEL
OIL
INLET
* THESE ITEMS ARE USED ON HIGH
PRESSURE GENERATORS ONLY
FUEL OIL
SUPPLY PUMP
FUEL OIL
STRAINER
NOT SUPPLIED
BY CLEAVER BROOKS
Figure 2-25 Schematic for N0. 6 Heavy Oil Fils (Steam-Electric Heater)
Part No. 750-225
2-17
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
operation of a pump that supplies hot water to the oil heater when
hot water is available.
The heated oil flows through a fuel oil strainer to prevent any foreign
matter from entering the control valves and nozzle.
The fuel oil controller contains, in a single unit, the necessary
valves, regulators and gauges to regulate the pressure and flow of
oil to the burner.
The program relay energizes or deenergizes the solenoid oil valve to
permit or cut off oil flow to the burner. The oil solenoid is closed
when deenergized. It cannot be opened (energized) unless the
combustion air proving switch, the atomizing air proving switch,
and the low oil-temperature and any pressure switches are closed.
They are satisfied, respectively, by sufficient combustion air
pressure from the forced draft fan, pressurized air from the air pump
and sufficient oil temperature and pressure.
Oil flow to the burner is controlled by the movement of the metering
stem of the oil metering valve, which varies the flow to meet load
demands. The metering valve and the air damper are controlled
simultaneously at all times by the modulating motor to proportion
combustion air and fuel for changes in load demand.
Oil is purged from the burner gun upon each burner shutdown. The
air purge solenoid valve opens as the fuel valve closes, diverting
atomizing air through the oil line. The air assures a clean nozzle and
line for subsequent restart.
M. GAS FUEL FLOW
Metered gas from the utility flows through the pressure regulator at
a reduced pressure suitable to burner requirements, through the
main gas shutoff cock, main gas valve(s), and modulating butterfly
gas valve to the non- premix orifice-type burner.
The main gas valve is of the normally closed type, and is opened
(energized) in proper sequence by the programming relay.
Figure 2-26 Main Gas Train
The butterfly gas valve modulates the flow of gas from low through
high fire settings. The position of the butterfly valve disc is governed
by the gas modulating cam. The butterfly gas valve, and the air
control damper are controlled simultaneously by the modulating
motor to proportion combustion air and fuel for changes in load
demand.
The gas flow rate required for rated burner input depends upon the
heating valve (Btu/cubic foot) of the gas supplied. The gas pressure
regulator adjusts the gas pressure (flow rate) to the entrance of the
gas train. The regulator is not always supplied with the burner, but
may be provided by others.
The main gas valves cannot be energized (opened) unless the
combustion air proving switch is closed to indicate a sufficient
supply of combustion air. The low gas pressure and high gas
pressure switches must be closed to prove sufficient, but not
excessive, gas fuel pressure.
2-18
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
N. MODULATING FIRING
The modulating motor, through a linkage arrangement (Figure 227), controls the air damper and the butterfly gas valve, or the oil
metering valve, to maintain a constant air/fuel ratio throughout the
firing range.
Figure 2-27 Burner Drawer and Fuel Linkage Assembly
During burner operation, the motor is controlled by a modulating
pressure control on a steam boiler, or by a modulating temperature
control on a hot water boiler. A manually operated potentiometer is
provided to permit positioning of the motor at the desired burner
firing rate. The potentiometer is used primarily for initial or
subsequent checking and setting of fuel input. Normal operation
should be with the manual-automatic switch in the “automatic”
position and under the control of the modulating control.
The modulating motor (commonly called a damper motor) is
reversible. It has an internal limit switch that restricts shaft rotation
to 90°. During normal operation the motor will move in either
direction or stop at any position within the range.
The motor potentiometer is electrically connected to a matching
potentiometer in the modulating control. Changing steam pressure
or water temperature alters the electrical resistance of the
modulating controller potentiometer. The change in resistance
compels an integral balancing relay to start, stop, or reverse the
motor rotation. Rotation in either direction continues until the
resistance ratio of the two potentiometers is equal.
When the resistance ratio is equal, the motor stops in a position that
allows the proper fuel and combustion air flow to meet operating
demands.
Part No. 750-225
2-19
Chapter 2 — Burner Operation and Control
A feature designed into the circuitry maintains the modulating motor
in the low-fire position during ignition and keeps it there until the
main flame is established. A low-fire switch, integral to the motor,
is actuated by the rotation of the motor. The switch must be closed
to establish that the damper and fuel metering valves are in the lowfire position before the programmer commences into the ignition
period. During this time, neither the manual flame control nor the
modulating control have any control over the damper motor,
regardless of their setting.
An optionally equipped boiler uses a second integral switch to
establish that the motor has driven the damper to an open position
during the pre-purge period. The second integral switch closes, as
high fire position is approached, to complete an internal circuit in
the programmer to allow continuation of the programming cycle.
2-20
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3
Waterside Care and Requirements
Contents
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
B. WATER REQUIREMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
C. WATER TREATMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
D.CLEANING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
E. BOIL-OUT OF A NEW UNIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
F. WASHING OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11
G. BLOWDOWN STEAM BOILER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
H. PERIODIC INSPECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15
I. PREPARATION FOR EXTENDED LAY-UP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
A. GENERAL
The operator should be familiar with Chapter 3 before attempting to
place the unit into operation.
Although it is of prime importance, the subject of water supply and
treatment cannot adequately be covered in this manual. For specific
information or assistance with your water treatment requirements,
contact your Cleaver-Brooks service and parts representative.
Feedwater equipment should be checked and ready for use. Be sure
that all valves, piping, boiler feed pumps, and receivers are installed
in accordance with prevailing codes and practices.
Water requirements for both steam and hot water boilers are
essential to boiler life and length of service. It is vital care be taken
in placing the pressure vessel into initial service. The waterside of
new boilers and new or remodeled steam or hot water systems may
contain oil, grease or other foreign matter. A method of boiling out
the vessel to remove the accumulations is described later in Chapter
3.
Notice
This manual only covers boilers
using water. Glycol solutions
have different operating
requirements, circulation rates
and temperatures, etc.
Boilers, as a part of a hot water system, require proper water
circulation. The system must be operated as intended by its
designer in order to avoid thermal shock or severe, possibly
damaging, stresses from occurring to the pressure vessel.
B. WATER REQUIREMENTS
1. HOT WATER BOILER
Air Removal
The hot water outlet includes a dip tube which extends 2 to 3 inches
into the boiler. The dip tube reduces the possibility of air, which
may be trapped at the top of the shell, from entering into the
system. Oxygen or air released in the boiler will collect or be trapped
at the top of the boiler shell.
The air vent tapping on the top center line of the boiler should be
piped into the expansion or compression tank. Air trapped at the top
of the boiler will find its way out of the boiler through the tapping.
Minimum Water Temperature - The minimum recommended boiler
water temperature is 170°F. When water temperatures lower than
170°F are used, the combustion gases are reduced in temperature
to a point where water vapor condenses, causing corrosion in the
boiler and possible breeching.
Condensation is more severe on a unit that operates intermittently
and which is greatly oversized for the actual load. Condensation can
be minimized by maintaining boiler water temperatures above
170°F.
A temperature of 170°F is also recommended in order to provide a
sufficient “temperature head” when No. 6 fuel oil is to be heated to
the proper atomizing temperature by the boiler water in a safetytype oil preheater. (The electric preheater on the boiler must provide
3-2
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
additional heat to the oil if boiler water temperature is not
maintained above 200°F.)
Rapid Replacement of Boiler Water - The system layout and
controls should be arranged to prevent the possibility of pumping
large quantities of cold water into a hot boiler, which will cause
shock or thermal stresses. Water temperature in a boiler of 200°F
or 240°F cannot be completely replaced with 80°F water in a few
minutes time without causing thermal stress. The same fact applies
to periods of normal operation, as well as during initial start-up.
The circulating pumps should be interlocked with the burner so that
the burner cannot operate unless the circulating pump is running in
order to avoid damage to the equipment.
When individual zone circul a t i n g p u m p s a r e u se d, i t i s
recommended that they be kept running-even though the heat users
do not require hot water. The relief device or by-pass valve will thus
allow continuous circulation through the boiler and can help prevent
rapid replacement of boiler water with cold zone water.
Notice
If the operating water
temperature going to the system
must be lower than 170°F, the
operating
boiler
water
temperature should be a
minimum of 170°F (200°F if
used to preheat No. 6 oil) and
mixing valves should be used to
avoid damage to the equipment.
Continuous Flow Through the Boiler - The system should be piped
and the controls arranged to allow water circulation through the
boiler under all operating conditions. The operation of three-way
valves and system controls should be checked to be sure that the
boiler will not be by-passed. Constant circulation through the boiler
eliminates the possibility of stratification within the unit and results
in more even water temperatures to the system.
A rule of thumb of 3/4 to 1 gpm per boiler horsepower can be used
to determine the minimum continuous flow rate through the boiler
under all operating conditions. The operator should determine that
a flow of water exists through the boiler before initial firing or refiring
after boiler has been drained.
Water Circulation
The chart in Table 3-1: shows the maximum gpm circulation rate of
boiler water in relation to full boiler output and system temperature
drop.
Multiple Boiler Installations - When multiple boilers are used, care
must be taken to ensure adequate or proportional flow through the
boilers. Proportional flow can best be accomplished by use of
balancing valves and gauges in the supply line from each boiler. If
balancing valves or orifice plates are used, a significant pressure
drop (e.g., 3-5 psi) must be taken across the balancing device to
accomplish the purpose.
If care is not taken to ensure adequate or proportional flow through
the boilers, wide variations in firing rates between the boilers can
result.
In extreme cases, one boiler may be in the high-fire position while
the other boiler or boilers may be at low fire. The net result would
be that the common header water temperature to the system would
not be up to the desired point.
Part No. 750-225
3-3
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
Table 3-1: Maximum Circulating Rate
BOILER
SIZE
(BHP)
BOILER OUTPUT
(1000)
BTU/HR
SYSTEM TEMPERATURE DROP - DEGREES °F
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
MAXIMUM CIRCULATING RATE - GPM
15
500
100
50
33
25
20
17
14
12
11
10
20
670
134
67
45
33
27
22
19
17
15
13
30
1,005
200
100
67
50
40
33
29
25
22
20
40
1,340
268
134
89
67
54
45
38
33
30
27
50
1,675
335
168
112
84
67
56
48
42
37
33
60
2,010
402
201
134
101
80
67
58
50
45
40
70
2,345
470
235
157
118
94
78
67
59
52
47
80
2,680
536
268
179
134
107
90
77
67
60
54
100
3,350
670
335
223
168
134
112
96
84
75
67
125
4,185
836
418
279
209
168
140
120
105
93
84
150
5,025
1,005
503
335
251
201
168
144
126
112
100
200
6,695
1,340
670
447
335
268
224
192
168
149
134
250
8,370
1,675
838
558
419
335
280
240
210
186
167
300
10,045
2,010
1,005
670
503
402
335
287
251
223
201
350
11,720
2,350
1,175
784
587
470
392
336
294
261
235
400
13,400
2,680
1,340
895
670
535
447
383
335
298
268
500
16,740
3,350
1,675
1,120
838
670
558
479
419
372
335
600
20,080
4,020
2,010
1,340
1,005
805
670
575
502
448
402
700
23,430
4,690
2,345
1,565
1,175
940
785
670
585
520
470
800
26,780
5,360
2,680
1,785
1,340
1,075
895
765
670
595
535
Pump Location - It is recommended that the system circulating
pumps take suction from the outlet connection on the boiler, and
that they discharge to the system load. In order to put the boiler and
the expansion tank on the suction side of the pump. The suction
side is preferred because it decreases air entry into the system and
does not impose the system head on the boiler.
It is common practice to install a standby system circulating pump.
The main circulating pumps are usually located adjacent to the
boilers in the boiler room.
Pump Operation - Pumps are normally started and stopped by
manual switches. It is also desirable to interlock the pump with the
burner so that the burner cannot operate unless the circulating
pump is running.
Pressure
The design of the system and usage requirements often dictate the
pressure exerted upon the boiler. Some systems are pressurized
with air, or with an inert gas such as nitrogen. Caution must be
3-4
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
exercised to ensure that the proper relationship of pressure-totemperature exists within the boiler so that all of the boiler’s internal
surfaces are fully wetted at all times. For this reason, the internal
boiler pressure, as indicated on the water pressure gauge, must be
held to the level shown in Figure 3-1.
Figure 3-1 Internal Boiler Pressure
When initially firing a newly installed boiler, or when cutting an
existing boiler into an operating system, the boiler or boilers to be
cut into operation MUST be pressurized equal to the system and/or
other boilers prior to opening the header valves.
It is advisable to have a thermometer installed in the return line to
indicate return water temperature. Knowing the supply water
temperature, the boiler system differential can be established. With
knowledge of the pumping rate, the operator can easily detect any
excessive load condition and take appropriate corrective action.
Special caution must be taken to guard against any condition, or
combination of conditions, that might lead to the transfer of cold
water to a hot boiler or hot water to a cold boiler. It cannot be overemphasized that rapid changes in temperature within the boiler
can, and sometimes do, cause damage.
Part No. 750-225
3-5
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
2. STEAM BOILER
Feed Pump Operation
BEFORE turning on the pump motor be certain that all valves in the
water feed line are open to prevent possible damage to the feed
pump mechanism. After opening the valves, momentarily energize
the feed pump motor to establish correct pump rotation. With the
correct rotation established, close the boiler feed pump entrance
switch. The pump should shut down when the water level reaches
the proper level shown in Figure 3-2.
TYPICAL LOW WATER
CUT-OFF AND PUMP
CONTROL
A. NORMAL LEVEL OF WATER: FEED PUMP TURNS
OFF AT THIS POINT. FILL PRESSURE VESSEL INITIALLY TO THIS HEIGHT.
B. PUMP TURNS ON WHEN WATER LEVEL REACHES B.
DISTANCE A-B IS APPROXIMATELY3/4 INCH.
C. LOW WATER CUT-OFF POINT BURNER WILL SHUT
OFF IF WATER LEVEL LOWERS TO THIS P[OINT.
A
B
C
D
D. FIRST VISIBLE POINT IN THE GAUGE GLASS.
Figure 3-2 Low Water Cut Off Sight Gauge
Notice
Prior to operating the pump,
carefully check the alignment of
the flexible coupling, if one is
used. A properly aligned coupling
will last a long time and provide
trouble-free
mechanical
operation.
Feedwater pumps must have adequate capacity to maintain
required water level under all operating conditions. Check the
feedwater pumps periodically and maintain as necessary to prevent
unexpected breakdowns.
! Warning
The isolation valves and the water column piping must be
locked open during operation. Failure to do so may result in
a low water condition. Failure to follow these instructions
could result in serious personal injury or death
Water Feeder (optional) Operation
Water feeder operation is usually applicable to boilers operating at
15 psi steam or less. It is only necessary to open the water supply
line valve and the water feeder discharge valve.
3-6
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
C. WATER TREATMENT
Properly treated boiler feed water, coupled with good engineering
and operating practices, lead to maximum effectiveness and long
trouble-free life of pressure vessels, at the lowest operating cost.
Contact your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative for
information on how to prevent the presence of unwanted solids and
corrosive gases.
Objectives of water treatment in general are:
• Prevent hard scale deposits or soft sludge deposits, which
reduce heat transfer and can lead to overheated metal and
costly downtime and repairs.
Notice
In the event that water column
isolation valves are provided or
installed, it must be established
that the valves are open and
seated or locked in the open
position. If the valves are
installed, it is illegal to operate
the boiler with closed or
unsealed open valves.
• Eliminate corrosive gases in the supply or boiler water.
• Prevent intercrystalline cracking or caustic embrittlement of
boiler metal.
• Prevent carryover and foaming.
Accomplishment of the above objectives generally requires proper
feedwater treatment before and after introduction of the water into
the boiler. The selection of pre-treatment processes depends upon
the water source, its chemical characteristics, amount of makeup
water needed, plant operating practices, etc. Treating methods
include filtering, softening, de-mineralizing, deaerating, and
preheating. After-treatment involves chemical treatment of the
boiler water.
Because of the variables involved, no single boiler compound can
be considered a “cure-all” nor is it advisable to experiment with
homemade treating methods. Sound recommendations and their
employment should be augmented by a periodic analysis of the
feedwater, boiler water, and condensate.
The internal or waterside surfaces of the pressure vessel should be
inspected with enough frequency to determine the presence of any
contamination, accumulations of foreign matter, or corrosion, and/
or pitting. If any of the conditions are detected, contact your local
Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative for advice on corrective
action.
A properly sized water meter should be installed in the raw water
make-up line in order to accurately determine the amount of raw
water admitted to the boiler (steam or hot water) and to aid in
maintaining proper waterside conditions.
D. CLEANING
1. HOT WATER AND STEAM PIPING
Steam and water piping systems connected to the boiler may
contain oil, grease, or foreign matter. The impurities must be
removed in order to prevent damage to pressure vessel heating
surfaces. On a steam system, the condensate should be wasted
until tests show the elimination of undesirable impurities. During
the period that condensate is wasted, attention must be given to the
treatment of the raw water used as make-up so that an
Part No. 750-225
3-7
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
accumulation of unwanted materials or corrosion does not occur.
For more information, contact your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized
representative.
On a hot water system, chemical cleaning is generally necessary
and the entire system should be drained after treatment. Consult
y o u r l o c a l C l e a v e r- B r oo k s a u t h o r i z e d r e pr e s e n t a ti v e f o r
recommendations, cleaning compounds, and application
procedures.
2. PRESSURE VESSEL
The waterside of the pressure vessel must be kept clean from
grease, sludge, and foreign material. Such deposits, if present, will
shorten the life of the pressure vessel, will interfere with efficient
operation and functioning of control of safety devices, and quite
possibly cause unnecessary and expensive re-work, repairs, and
down-time.
The installation and operating conditions that the boiler will be
subjected to should be considered and cleaning of the waterside of
the pressure vessel should be provided during the course of initial
start-up.
The pressure vessel and the steam and return lines or hot water
piping represent, in effect, a closed system. Although the steam and
return (condensate) lines or the hot water piping system may have
been previously cleaned, it is possible that:
• Cleaning has been inadequate.
• Partial or total old system is involved.
• Conditions may prevent adequate cleaning of piping.
The pressure vessel waterside should be inspected on a periodic
basis. An inspection will reveal true internal conditions and serve as
a check against conditions indicated by chemical analysis of the
boiler water. Inspection should be made three months after initial
starting and at regular 6-, 9-, or 12-month intervals thereafter. The
frequency of further periodic inspections will depend upon the
internal conditions found.
If any unwanted conditions are observed, contact your local CleaverBrooks authorized representative for recommendations.
Notice
Temperature of initial fill of water
for hydrostatic tests, boil-out, or
for normal operation should be as
stated in the ASME Boiler Code.
Any sludge, mud or sediment found will need to be flushed out. If
excessive mud of sludge is noticed during the blowdown the
scheduling or frequency of blowdown may need to be revised. The
need for periodic draining or washout will also be indicated.
Any oil or grease present on the heating surfaces should be removed
promptly by a boil-out with an alkaline detergent solution.
E. BOIL-OUT OF A NEW UNIT
The internal surfaces of a newly installed boiler may have oil, grease
or other protective coatings used in manufacturing. Such coatings
must be removed because they lower the heat transfer rate and
could cause over-heating of a tube. Before boiling out procedures
3-8
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
may begin, the operator must be familiar with the procedure
discussed under “Boiler Operation.”
Your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative will be able to
recommend a cleaning or boil-out procedure. In the event such
ser vice is unavailable or is yet unscheduled, the following
information may be of assistance.
There are several chemicals suitable for boil-out. One combination
often used is soda ash (sodium carbonate) and caustic soda
(sodium hydroxide) at the rate of 3 to 5 pounds each per 1,000
pounds of water, along with a small amount of laundry detergent
added as a wetting agent is.
The suggested general procedure for cleaning a boiler is as follows:
1. Refer to Table 3-2: to determine water capacity. Have sufficient
cleaning material on hand to complete the job.
2. When dissolving chemicals, the following procedure is
suggested. Warm water should be put into a suitable container.
Slowly introduce the dry chemical into the water, stirring it at all
times until the chemical is completely dissolved. Add the
chemical slowly and in small amounts to prevent excessive heat
and turbulence.
! Warning
Use of a suitable face mask,
goggles, rubber gloves, and
protective garments is
strongly recommended when
handling or mixing caustic
chemicals. Do not permit the
dry material or the
concentrated solution to come
in contact with skin or
clothing. Failure to follow
these instructions could result
in serious personal injury or
death
Table 3-2: Water Capacity and Weights
BOILER HP
WATER – GALLONS
WATER - WEIGHT
NORMAL
FLOODED
NORMAL
FLOODED
125
827.3
1295.0
6900
10800
150
827.3
1295.0
6900
10800
200
995.2
1564.7
8300
13050
250
1007.2
1408.9
8400
11750
300
1079.1
1528.8
9000
12750
350
1271.0
1798.6
10600
15000
400
1390.9
2026.4
11600
16900
500
1420.9
2056.4
11850
17150
600
1690.6
2458.0
14100
20500
700
1966.4
2871.7
16400
23950
800
1966.4
2871.7
16400
23950
3. An over-flow pipe should be attached to one of the top boiler
openings and routed to a safe point of discharge. A relief or
safety valve tapping is usually used.
4. Water relief valves and steam safety valves must be removed
before adding the boil-out solution so that neither it nor the
grease which it may carry will contaminate the valves. Use care
in removing and reinstalling the valves.
Part No. 750-225
3-9
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
5. Refer to Chapter 8, Section M for valve installation instructions.
6. All valves in the piping leading to or from the system must be
closed to prevent the cleaning solution from getting into the
system.
7. (Fill the pressure vessel with clean water until the top of the
tubes are covered. Add the cleaning solution and then fill to the
top. The temperature of the water used in the initial fill should
be at ambient temperature.
8. The boiler should then be fired intermittently at a low rate
sufficient to hold solution just at the boiling point. Boil the water
for at least five hours. Do not produce steam pressure. (Allow a
small amount of fresh water to enter the boiler to create a slight
overflow that will carry off surface impurities.
9. Continue the boil and overflow process until the water clears.
Shut the burner down.
10. Let the boiler cool to 120°F or less.
! Warning
Be sure to drain the hot water
to a safe point of discharge to
avoid scalding.Failure to
follow these instructions could
result in serious personal
injury or death
11. Remove handhole plates and wash the waterside surfaces
thoroughly using a high pressure water stream.
12. After closing the handholes and reinstalling the safety or relief
valves, fill the boiler and fire it until the water is heated to at
least 180°F to drive off any dissolved gases, which might
otherwise corrode the metal.
The above procedure may be omitted in the case of a unit previously
used or known to be internally clean. However, consideration must
be given to the possibility of contaminating materials entering the
boiler from the system.
On a steam system, the condensate should be wasted until tests
show the elimination of undesirable impurities. During the period
that condensate is wasted, be sure make-up water is treated to
prevent an accumulation of unwanted materials or corrosion.
On a hot water system, chemical cleaning is generally necessary
and the entire system should be drained after treatment. Consult
y o u r l o c a l C l e a v e r- B r oo k s a u t h o r i z e d r e pr e s e n t a ti v e f o r
recommendations, cleaning compounds, and application
procedures.
F. WASHING OUT
1. HOT WATER BOILER
In theory, a hot water system and boiler that has been initially
cleaned, filled with raw water (and water treated), and with no
make-up water added, will require no further cleaning or treatment.
However, since the system (new or old) can allow entrance of air
and unnoticed or undetected leakage of water, introductions of raw
water make-up or air may lead to pitting, corrosion and formation
of sludge, sediment, scale, etc., on the pressure vessel waterside.
If the operator is absolutely certain that the system is tight, then an
annual waterside inspection may be sufficient. However, if there is
3-10
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
any doubt, the pressure vessel waterside should be inspected no
later than three months after initially placing the boiler into
operation, and periodically thereafter as indicated by conditions
observed during inspections.
2. STEAM BOILER
No later than three months after initially placing the boiler into
operation and starting service, and thereafter as conditions warrant,
the pressure vessel should be drained after being properly cooled to
near ambient temperature. Handhole covers should be removed and
waterside surfaces should be inspected for corrosion, pitting, or
formation of deposits.
Flushing of Pressure Vessel Interior
Upon completion of the inspection, the pressure vessel interior
should be flushed out, as required, with a high pressure hose. If
deposits are not fully removed by flushing, a consultation may be
required with your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative.
In extreme cases, it may be necessary to resort to acid cleaning.
Professional advice is recommended if acid cleaning is required.
The inspections will indicate the effectiveness of the feedwater
treatment. The effectiveness of treatment, the water conditions, and
the amount of fresh water make-up required are all factors to be
considered in establishing frequency of future pressure vessel
washouts. Contact your local Cleaver-brooks authorized
representative for more information.
G. BLOWDOWN STEAM BOILER
Boiler water blowdown is the removal of some of the concentrated
water from the pressure vessel and its replacement with feedwater
so that the lowering of the concentration of solids in the boiler water
occurs.
Solids are brought in by the feedwater even though the water is
treated prior to use through external processes that are designed to
remove unwanted substances which contribute to scale and deposit
formations. However, none of the processes can remove all
substances. Regardless of their high efficiency, some solids will be
present in the boiler feedwater.
Solids become less soluble in the high temperature of the boiler
water and tend to accumulate on heating surfaces. Therefore
blowdown and internal chemical treatment are required to prevent
the solids from forming harmful scale and sludge.
Scale has a low heat transfer value and acts as an insulation barrier.
Scale retards heat transfer, which not only results in lower operating
efficiency, and consequently higher fuel consumption, but more
importantly, can cause overheating of boiler metal. Over heating of
boiler metal can result in tube failures or other pressure vessel metal
damage and lead to boiler down-time and costly repairs.
Scale is caused primarily by calcium and magnesium salts, silica
and oil. Any calcium and magnesium salts in the boiler water are
Part No. 750-225
3-11
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
generally precipitated by the use of sodium phosphate, along with
organic materials, to maintain the precipitates or “sludge” in a fluid
form. The solids such as sodium salts and suspended dirt do not
readily form scale. But as the boiler water boils off as relatively pure
steam, the remaining water is thickened with the solids. If the
concentration is permitted to accumulate, foaming and priming will
occur and the sludge can cause harmful deposits that bring about
overheating of the metal.
The lowering or removal of the concentration requires the use of
boiler water blowdown.
1. TYPES OF BLOWDOWN
There are two principal types of blowdown: intermittent manual
blowdown, and continuous blowdown.
Intermittent Manual Blowdown
Manual or sludge blowdown is necessary for the operation of the
boiler regardless of whether or not continuous blowdown is
employed.
The blowdown tappings are located at the bottom or lowest part of
the boiler in order to lower the dissolved solids in the pressure
vessel water, and to remove a por tion of the sludge that
accumulates in the lower part of the vessel.
Equipment generally consists of a quick opening valve and a shutoff valve. The valves and necessary piping are not normally
furnished with the boiler, but supplied by others. All piping must be
to a safe point of discharge. Piping must be properly supported and
free to expand.
Continuous Blowdown
Continuous blowdown is used in conjunction with a surface blowoff tapping (furnished on units 60" diameter and larger) and is the
continuous removal of concentrated water.
The surface blow-off opening, when furnished, is on the top center
line of the pressure vessel. It is provided with an internal collecting
pipe terminating slightly below the working water level for the
purpose of skimming surface sediment, oil or other impurities from
the surface of the pressure vessel water.
A controlled-orifice valve is used to allow a continual, yet controlled,
flow of concentrated water.
Periodic adjustments are made to the valve setting to increase or
decrease the amount of blowdown in accordance with the test
analysis.
The flow control valve and piping are generally provided by others.
All piping must be to a safe point of discharge.
3-12
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
Frequency of Manual Blowdown
When continuous blowdown is utilized, manual blowdown is
primarily used to remove suspended solids or sludge. The
continuous blowdown removes sediment and oil from the surface of
the water along with a prescribed amount of dissolved solids.
When surface or continuous blowdown is not utilized, manual
blowdown is used to control the dissolved or suspended solids in
addition to the sludge.
In practice, the valve(s) of the bottom blowdown are opened
periodically in accordance with an operating schedule and/or
chemical control tests. From the standpoint of control, economy and
results, frequent short blows are preferred to infrequent lengthy
blows. The length and frequency of the blwdown is particularly
important when the suspended solids content of the water is high.
With the use of frequent short blows a more uniform concentration
of the pressure vessel water is maintained.
In cases where the feedwater is exceptionally pure, or where there
is a high percentage of return condensate, blowdown may be
employed less frequently since less sludge accumulates in the
pressure vessel. When dissolved and/or suspended solids approach
or exceed predetermined limits, manual blowdown to lower the
concentrations is required.
It is generally recommended that a steam boiler be blown down at
least once in every eight-hour period, but frequency may vary
depending upon water and operating conditions. The blowdown
amounts and schedule should be recommended by your local
Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative.
A hot water boiler does not normally include openings for surface
blowdown and bottom blowdown since blowdowns are seldom
practiced. The need remains to be alert to system water losses and
corresponding amount of raw water make-up. A water meter is
recommended for water make-up lines.
Manual Blowdown Procedure
Blowdown is most effective at a point in time when the generation
of steam is at the lowest rate and feedwater input is also low, thus
providing a minimum dilution of the boiler water with low
concentration feedwater.
Be sure the blow-off piping and tank, if used, are in proper operating
condition. Discharge vents should be clear of obstruction, and the
waste should be piped to a point of safe discharge.
Most blow-off lines are provided with two valves, generally a quick
opening valve nearest the boiler and a slow opening globe type valve
downstream. Valves will vary depending upon pressure involved and
make or manufacturer. If seatless valves are installed, follow the
manufacturer’s recommendations.
Part No. 750-225
3-13
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
If a quick opening valve and globe type of slow opening valve are in
combination, the former is normally opened first and closed last
with blow down accomplished with the globe or slow opening valve.
When opening the second or downstream valve, crack it slightly to
allow the lines to warm, then continue opening slowly.
! Caution
Do not pump the lever action
valve open and closed, as water
hammer is apt to break the valve
bodies or pipe fittings. failure to
follow these instructions could
cause damage to the equipment.
The length of each blow should be determined by actual water
analysis. Lowering the water in the gauge glass approximately 1/2”
is often acceptable as a guide to adequate blow. However, lowering
the water 1/2” should not be interpreted as a rule since water
analysis procedures should prevail. If the glass cannot be viewed by
the party operating the valve, another operator should watch the
glass and direct the valve operator.
Close the downstream (slow opening) valve first and as fast as
possible. Then close the valve next to the boiler. Slightly crack the
downstream valve and then close it tightly.
Under no circumstances should a blow-off valve be left open and
the operator should never leave until the blowdown operation is
completed and the valves are closed.
H. PERIODIC INSPECTION
! Warning
To a v o i d t h e h a z a r d o f
electrical
shock,
we
recommend the use of a low
voltage flashlight during an
internal
inspection.
Preferably, inspectors should
work in pairs. Failure to follow
these instructions could result
in serious personal injury or
death
Insurance regulations or local laws will require a periodic inspection
of the pressure vessel by an authorized inspector. Sufficient notice
is generally given to permit removal of the boiler from service and
preparation for inspection.
When shutting down the boiler, the load should be reduced
gradually and the pressure vessel cooled at a rate that avoids
damaging temperature differential that can cause harmful stresses.
Vessels should not normally be drained until all pressure is relieved
- again to prevent uneven contraction and temperature differentials
that can cause expanded tubes to leak. Draining the unit too quickly
may cause the baking of deposits that may be present on the
heating surfaces. Some heat, however, may be desirable to dry out
the interior of the boiler.
If the internal inspection is being made at the request of an
authorized inspector, it is well to ask the inspector observe the
conditions prior to cleaning or flushing of waterside surfaces.
Be certain that a supply of manhole and handhole gaskets is
available, along with any other gaskets or items needed to place the
unit back into operation after inspection.
Have available information on the boiler design, dimensions,
generating capacity, operating pressure or temperature, time in
service, defects found previously, and any repairs or modifications.
Also have available for reference records of previous inspections.
Be prepared to perform any testing required by the inspector
including a hydrostatic test.
After proper cooling and draining of the vessel, flush out the
waterside with a high pressure water hose. Remove any scale or
3-14
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
deposits from the waterside surfaces and check for internal or
external corrosion and leakage.
The fireside surface should also be thoroughly cleaned so that metal
surfaces, welds, joints, tube ends, fittings and any previous repairs
can be readily checked.
Be sure that steam valves, and valves to expansion tank (hot water),
feedwater valves, blow-off valves, all fuel valves, valves to
expansion tank, and electrical switches are shut off prior to opening
handholes, manhole and front or rear doors. Adequately vent the
pressure vessel prior to entry.
Clean out the low-water cutoff piping, the water level controls and
cross-connecting pipes. Replace the water gauge glass and clean
out the water cocks. Also check and clean the drain and the
blowdown valves and piping.
Check all water and steam piping and valves for leaks, wear,
corrosion, and other damage. Replace or repair as required.
I. PREPARATION FOR EXTENDED LAY-UP
Many boilers used for heating or seasonal loads or for stand-by
service may have extended periods of non-use. Special attention
must be given to idle boilers so that neither waterside nor fireside
surfaces are allowed to deteriorate from corrosion.
Too many conditions exist to lay down definite rules. There are two
methods of storage: wet or dr y. Your local Cleaver-Brooks
authorized representative can recommend the better method
depending upon circumstances in the particular installation.
Whichever method is used, common sense dictates a periodic
recheck of fireside and waterside conditions during lay-up to allow
variations from the above methods for special area or job-site
conditions.
Swing open the boiler head at the stack end of the unit to prevent
flow of warm, moist air through the boiler tubes.
Although pollution control regulations may continue to limit the
permissible sulphur content of fuel oils, care must be taken to avoid
corrosion problems that sulphur can cause, especially in a boiler
that is seasonally shut town. Dormant periods, and even frequent
shutdowns, expose the fireside surfaces to condensation below the
dew point during cooling. Moisture and any sulphur residue can
form an acid solution. Under certain conditions, and especially in
areas with high humidity, the corrosive effect of the acid will be
serious enough to eat through or severely damage boiler tubes or
other metal heating surfaces during the time that a boiler is out of
service.
The condition does not generally occur during normal firing
operation, because the high temperature of operation vaporizes any
condensation. However, proper boiler operation must be
maintained, especially with a hot water boiler, to prevent the flue
gases from falling below the dew point.
Part No. 750-225
3-15
Chapter 3 — Waterside Care and Requirements
At the start of lay-up, thoroughly clean the fireside by removing any
soot or other products of combustion from the tubes, tube sheets
and other fireside surfaces. Brushing will generally suffice. Sweep
away or vacuum any accumulation. The fireside surfaces may be
flushed with water. However, all moisture must be eliminated after
flushing and the surface dried by blowing air or applying some form
of heat. It is good practice to protect the cleaned surfaces by coating
them with an anti-corrosive material to prevent rust.
To prevent condensation from forming in the control cabinet, keep
the control circuit energized. For extended lay-up periods, especially
where high humidity or large swings in ambient temperature occur,
the control should be removed and stored in a dry atmosphere.
Dry storage is generally employed when the boiler will be out of
ser vice for a significant period of time, or where freezing
temperatures may exist. In the dry storage method the boiler must
be thoroughly dried because any moisture would cause corrosion.
Both fireside and waterside surfaces must be cleaned of all scale,
deposits, soot, etc. Steps must be taken to eliminate moisture by
placing moisture-absorbing materials such as quick lime (at 2
pounds for 3 cubic feet of volume) or silica gel (at 5 pounds for 30
cubic feet of volume) on trays inside the vessel. Fireside surfaces
may be coated with an anti-corrosive material, or grease or tar
paint. Refractories should be brushed clean and wash-coated. All
openings to the pressure vessel, such as manhole and handholes,
should be shut tightly. Feedwater and steam valves should be
closed. Damper and vents should be closed to prevent air from
reaching fireside surfaces. Periodic inspection should be made and
absorption materials renewed.
Wet storage is generally used for a boiler held in stand-by condition
or in cases where dry storage is not practical. The possibility of
freezing temperatures must be considered. Care must again be
taken to protect metal surfaces. Variables preclude definite
recommendations. However, it is suggested that the pressure vessel
be drained, thoroughly cleaned internally, and re-filled to
overflowing with treated water. If deaerated water is not available,
the unit should be fired to boil the water for a short period of time.
Additional chemicals may be suggested by your local CleaverBrooks authorized representative to minimize corrosion. Internal
water pressure should be maintained at greater than atmospheric
pressure. Nitrogen is often used to pressurize the vessel. Fireside
surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned and refractory should be
wash-coated.
3-16
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 4
Sequence of Operation
Contents
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B. CIRCUIT AND INTERLOCK CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C. SEQUENCE OF OPERATION - OIL OR GAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D. FLAME LOSS SEQUENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
4-3
4-3
4-5
4-7
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
A. GENERAL
Notice
The make or model of the
program relay provided will vary
depending
upon
job
specifications. The following
sequence applies regardless of
the make or model. Please refer to
the Wiring Diagram (WD)
prepared by Cleaver-Brooks for
your specific installation.
Chapter 4 outlines the electrical sequencing of various controls
through the pre-purge, ignition, run, and shutdown cycles of the
burner.
The program relay establishes the sequence of operation and directs
the operation of all other controls and components to provide an
overall operating sequence.
Abbreviations for the various electrical components are listed in
Table 4-1. The sequences outlined in Chapter 4 employ specific
nomenclature to aid in applying the text to the wiring diagram.
The burner and control system are in starting condition when the
following conditions exist:
• Boiler water is up to the correct level, closing the low-water
cutoff switch.
• The low-water light (panel) is off.
• The operating limit pressure control (steam boiler) or the
operating limit temperature control (hot water boiler) and
high limit pressure or temperature control are below their
cutoff setting.
• All applicable limits are correct for burner operation.
• The load demand light glows.
All entrance switches are closed and power is present at the line
terminals of:
• Blower motor starter
• Air compressor motor starter (if provided)
• Oil heater relay (if provided)
• Oil pump motor starter (if provided).
The sequences do not attempt to correlate the action of the fuel
supply system or feedwater system except for the interlock controls
that directly relate to the action of the program relay. Chapters 6
and 7 contain operating instructions and specific information on
setting and adjusting the controls.
B. CIRCUIT AND INTERLOCK CONTROLS
The burner control circuit is a two-wire system designed for 115
Vac, 60 Hz, single-phase power.
The electrical portion of the boiler is made up of individual circuits
with controls that are wired in a manner designed to provide a safe
workable system. The program relay provides connection points for
the interconnection of the various circuits.
The controls used vary depending upon the fuel oil or gas and the
specific requirement of applicable regulatory bodies. Refer to the
boiler wiring diagram to determine the actual controls provided. The
circuits and controls normally used in the circuits follow and are
referred to in the following sequence of operation.
4-2
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
Limit Circuit:
• Burner switch (BS)
• Operating limit control (OLC) - pressure or temperature
• High limit control (HLC) - pressure or temperature
• Low-water cutoff (LWCO)
• Gas-oil selector switch (GOS) - (Combination burner only)
• Oil drawer switch (ODS)-Oil burner
• Low oil temperature switch (LOTS) - (Nos. 5 and 6 oil only)
• Low gas pressures switch (LGPS)
• High gas pressure switch (HGPS)
• LE Proximity switch interlock
• Fuel valve interlock circuit
• Main gas valve auxiliary switch (MGVAS)
• Oil valve auxiliary switch (OVAS)
Blower Motor Starter Circuit
• Blower motor starter (BMS)
• Air compressor motor starter (ACMS) (if provided)
• Air purge valve (APV) (Nos. 5 or 6 oil only)
Running lnterlock Circuit
• Blower motor starter interlock (BMSI)
• Combustion air proving switch (CAPS)
• Atomizing air proving switch (AAPS) (if provided)
Low Fire Proving Circuit
• Low fire switch (LFS)
Pilot Ignition Circuit
• Gas pilot valve (GPV)
• Ignition transformer (IT)
• Gas pilot vent valve (GPVV) (if provided)
Flame Detector Circuit
• Flame detector (FD)
• Main fuel valve circuit
• Main gas valve (MGV)
• Main gas vent valve (MGVV) (if provided)
• Oil valve (OV)
• Main fuel valve light (FVL)
Firing Rate Circuit
Part No. 750-225
4-3
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
• Damper motor transformer (DMT)
• Modulating damper motor (MDM)
• Manual-automatic switch (MAS)
• Manual flame control (MFC)
• Modulating control (MC)
To comply with requirements of insurance underwriters such as
Factory Mutual (FM), Industrial Risk Insurers (IRI) or others,
additional interlock devices may be used in addition to the circuits
mentioned in section B.
High Fire Proving Circuit
• High fire switch (HFS)
Running Interlock and Limit Circuit
• Low oil pressure switch (LOPS)
• High oil pressure switch (HOPS)
• High oil temperature switch (HOTS)
• Auxiliary low-water cutoff (ALWCO)
C. SEQUENCE OF OPERATION - OIL OR GAS
On a combination fuel unit, the gas/oil switch must be set for the
proper fuel.
The following sequence occurs with power present at the program
relay (PR) input terminals and with all other operating conditions
satisfied.
Pre-Purge Cycle - When the burner switch (BS) is turned “on,” and
controls wired in the “limit” and “fuel valve interlock” circuits are
closed and no flame signal is present, the “blower motor start
circuit” is powered energizing the blower motor starter (BMS). The
load demand light (LDL) turns on. When firing oil, the air
compressor motor starter (ACMS) (if provided) is also powered. Air
purge valve (APV) (Nos. 5 and 6 oil only) remains deenergized.
At the same time, the program relay signals the modulating damper
motor (MDM) to open the air damper. The damper begins to open
and drives to its full open or high fire position. Opening the damper
motor allows a flow of purging air through the boiler prior to the
ignition cycle.
On certain boilers the circuitry will include a high fire switch (HFS).
The purpose of the switch is to prove that the modulating damper
motor (MDM) has driven the damper to the open position during the
pre-purge cycle. In this instance, the “high fire proving circuit” is
utilized.
The controls wired into the “running interlock circuit” must be
closed within 10 seconds after the start sequence. In the event any
of the controls are not closed at this time, or if they subsequently
open, the program relay will go into a safety shutdown.
4-4
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
At the completion of the high fire purge period, the program relay
signals the modulating damper motor (MDM) to drive the air
damper to its low fire position.
To assure that the system is in low fire position prior to ignition, the
low fire switch (LFS) must be closed to complete the “low fire
proving circuit.” The sequence will stop and hold until the
modulating damper motor (MDM) has returned to the low fire
position and the contacts of the low fire switch (LFS) are closed.
Once the low fire switch is closed, the sequence is allowed to
continue.
Ignition Cycle - The ignition transformer (IT) and gas pilot valve
(GPV) are energized from the appropriate pilot ignition terminal.
.The pilot flame must be established and proven by the flame
detector (FD) within a 10 second period in order for the ignition
cycle to continue. If for any reason this does not happen, the system
will shut down and safety lockout will occur.
Notice
Notice
The ignition trial cannot be
started if flame or a flame
simulating condition is sensed
during the pre-purge period. A
safety shutdown will occur if
flame is sensed at this time.
Notice
An oil-fired burner may be
equipped with an oil pilot rather
than a gas pilot. The ignition
sequence of both is identical.
Depending upon the requirements of the regulatory body,
insurer or fuel being burned, either the 10 or 15 second
pilot ignition terminal may be used. Both provide the same
function but differ in time interval allowed for proving main
flame ignition. Refer to the boiler wiring diagram.
With a proven pilot, the main fuel valve(s) (OV or MGV) is energized
and the main fuel valve light (FVL) in the panel is lighted. The main
flame is ignited and the trial period for proving the main flame
begins. It lasts 10 seconds for light oil and natural gas, and 15
seconds for heavy oil. At the end of the proving period, if the flame
detector still detects main flame, the ignition transformer and pilot
valve are deenergized and pilot flame is extinguished.
Run Cycle - With main flame established, the program relay
releases the modulating damper motor (MDM) from its low fire
position to control by either the manual flame control (MFC) or the
modulating control (MC), depending upon the position of the
manual-automatic switch (MAS). This allows operation in ranges
above low fire.
With the manual-automatic switch (MAS) set at automatic,
subsequent modulated firing will be at the command of the
modulating control (MC), which governs the position of the
modulating damper motor (MDM). The air damper and fuel valves
are actuated by the motor through a linkage and cam assembly to
provide modulated firing rates.
Part No. 750-225
! Caution
If the main flame does not
light, or stay lit, the fuel valve
will close. The safety switch
will trip to lock out the control.
Refer to flame loss sequence
(section D) for description of
action.
! Warning
The cause for loss of flame or
any other unusual condition
should be investigated and
corrected before attempting to
restart. Failure to follow these
instructions could result in
serious personal injury or
death
4-5
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
Notice
Normal operation of the burner
should be with the switch in the
manual-automatic position and
under the direction of the
modulating control. The manual
position is provided for initial
adjustment of the burner over the
ent ire firing range. When a
shutdown occurs while operating
in the manual position at other
than low fire, the damper will not
be in a closed position, thus
allowing more air than desired to
flow through the boiler. Excess air
flow subjects the pressure vessel
metal and refractor y to
undesirable conditions. The
effectiveness of nozzle purging is
lost on a No. 6 oil burner.
The burner starting cycle is now complete. The (LDL) and (FVL)
lights on the panel remain lit. Demand firing continues as required
by load conditions.
Burner Shudown-Post Purge - The burner will fire until steam
pressure or water temperature in excess of demand is generated.
With modulated firing, the modulating damper motor (MDM) should
return to the low fire position before the operating limit control
(OLC) opens. When the limit control circuit is opened, the following
sequence occurs:
The main fuel valve circuit is deenergized, causing the main fuel
valve (MGV) or (OV) to close. The flame is extinguished. The control
panel lights (LDL) and (FVL) are turned off. The blower motor
continues to run to force air through the boiler for the post purge
period.
On a No. 6 oil burner, the air purge valve (APV) is powered from the
blower motor start circuit via the contacts of the air purge relay
(APR) to provide an air purge of the oil nozzle. The damper motor
returns to the low fire position if it is not already in that position.
The blower motor start circuit is deenergized at the end of the post
purge cycle and the shutdown cycle is complete.
The program relay is now ready for subsequent recycling, and when
steam pressure or water temperature drops to close the contacts of
the operating control, the burner again goes through its normal
starting and operating cycle.
D. FLAME LOSS SEQUENCE
The program relay will recycle automatically each time the
operating control closes, or after a power failure. It will lockout
following a safety shutdown caused by failure to ignite the pilot, or
the main flame, or by loss of flame. Lockout will also occur if flame
or flame simulating condition occurs during the prepurge period.
! Caution
The lockout switch must be
manually reset following a safety
shutdown. The cause for loss of
flame or any unusual condition
should be investigated a nd
corrected before attempting to
restart. Failure to follow these
instructions could cause damage
to the equipment.
The control will prevent start-up or ignition if limit circuit controls or
fuel valve interlocks are open. The control will lock out upon any
abnormal condition affecting air supervisory controls wired in the
running interlock circuit.
1. No pilot flame.
The pilot flame must be ignited and proven within a 10-second
period after the ignition cycle begins. If not proven within this
period, the main fuel valve circuit will not be powered and the
fuel valve(s) will not be energized. The ignition circuit is
immediately deenergized and the pilot valve closes, the reset
switch lights and lockout occurs immediately.
The blower motor will continue to operate. The flame failure light
and the alarm bell (optional) are energized 10 seconds later.
The blower motor will be deenergized. The lockout switch must
be manually reset before operation can be resumed. (Refer to the
previous caution.)
2. Pilot but no main flame.
4-6
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
When the pilot flame is proven, the main fuel valve circuit is
energized. Depending upon the length of the trial-for-ignition
period, the pilot flame will be extinguished 10 or 15 seconds
later. The flame detecting circuit will respond to deenergize the
main fuel valve circuit within 2 to 4 seconds to stop the flow of
fuel. The reset switch lights and lockout occurs immediately. The
blower motor will continue to operate.
The flame failure light and alarm bell (optional) are energized 10
seconds later.
The blower motor will be deenergized. The lockout switch must
be manually reset before operation can be resumed. (Refer to the
previous caution.)
3. Loss of flame.
If a flame outage occurs during normal operation and/or the
flame is no longer sensed by the detector, the flame relay will trip
within 2 to 4 seconds to deenergize the fuel valve circuit and
shut off the fuel flow. The reset switch lights and lockout occurs
immediately. The blower motor continues operation. The flame
failure light and alarm bell (optional) are energized 10 seconds
later.
The blower motor will be deenergized. The lockout switch must
be manually reset before operation can be resumed. (Refer to the
previous caution.)
If the burner will not start, or upon a safety lockout, the trouble
shooting section in the operating manual and the technical
bulletin should be referred to for assistance in pinpointing
problems that may not be readily apparent.
The program relay has the capability to self-diagnose and to
display a code or message that indicates the failure condition.
Refer to the control bulletin for specifics and suggested remedies.
Familiarity with the program relay and other controls in the
system can be obtained by studying the contents of the manual
and this bulletin.
Knowledge of the system and its controls will make
troubleshooting much easier. Costly down time or delays can be
prevented by systematic checks of the actual operation against
the normal sequence to determine the stage at which
performance deviates from normal. Following a routine may
possibly eliminate overlooking an obvious condition, often one
that is relatively simple to correct.
Remember, a safety device, for the most part, is doing its job
when it shuts down or refuses to operate. Never attempt to
circumvent any of the safety features.
Preventive maintenance and scheduled inspection of all
components should be followed. Periodic checking of the relay is
recommended to see that a safety lockout will occur under
conditions of failure to ignite either pilot or main flame, or from
loss of flame.
Part No. 750-225
4-7
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
Table 4-1 Electrical Nomenclature
MNEMONIC
MNEMONIC
A
AAFL
AAFR
AAPL
AAPS
AAPS-B
AAPS-C
AASS
AB
ACCR
ACM
ACMCB
ACMF
ACMS
ACMSI
AH
AI
ALFCO
ALFR
ALWCO
AM
AMS
ANLG COM
AO
AOV
APR
APV
AR
AS
ASR
ASS
ASV
AT
AWCBDS
B
BC
BDCS
BDOS
BDRS
BFPL
BFPM
BFPMCB
BFPMF
BFPMS
BFPS
BFTS
BHS
BIOL
BIOR
BM
BMCB
BMCR
4-8
DESCRIPTION
A
Amber (Color Of Pilot Light)
Atomizing Air Failure Light
Atomizing Air Failure Relay
Atomizing Air Proven Light
Atomizing Air Proving Switch
Atomizing Air Proving Switch- Burner
Atomizing Air Proving Switch- Compressor
Atomizing Air Selector Switch
Alarm Bell
Air Compressor Control Relay
Air Compressor Motor
Air Compressor Motor Circuit Breaker
Air Compressor Motor Fuses
Air Compressor Motor Starter
Air Compressor Motor Starter Interlock
Alarm Horn
Analog Input
Assured Low Fire Cutoff
Assured Low Fire Relay
Auxiliary Low Water Cutoff
Ammeter
Atomizing Media Switch
Analog Common
Analog Output
Auxiliary Oil Valve
Air Purge Relay
Air Purge Valve
Alarm Relay
Auxiliary Switch (Suffix)
Alarm Silencing Relay
Alarm Silencing Switch
Atomizing Steam Valve
Annunciator Transformer
Auxiliary Water Column Blowdown Switch
B
Blue (Color of Pilot Light)
Bias Control
Breeching Damper Closed Switch
Breeching Damper Open Switch
Blowdown/Reset Switch
Boiler Feed Pump Light
Boiler Feed Pump Motor
Boiler Feed Pump Motor Circuit Breaker
Boiler Feed Pump Motor Fuses
Boiler Feed Pump Motor Starter
Boiler Feed Pump Switch
Back Flow Temperature Switch
Boiler - Header Switch
Boiler in Operation Light
Boiler In Operation Relay
Blower Motor
Blower Motor Circuit Breaker
Blower Motor Control Relay
BMF
BMPR
BMPS
BMR
BMS
BMSI
BMSS
BR
BS
BSS
BWPM
BWT
CAFL
CAFR
CAP
CAPS
CCCB
CCF
CCRS
CCT
CFR
CIPL
CL
CLS
COPS
COR
COTD
CPOL
CR
CSSS
CWPM
CWPMCB
CWPMF
CWPMS
CWPMSI
CWPR
CWPS
CWSV
D
DARR
DCVM
DER
DG
DGHPV
DGR
DHWC
DHWL
DHWR
DI
DISC
DLWC
DLWL
DLWR
DM
DESCRIPTION
Blower Motor Fuses
Blower Motor Power Relay
Blower Motor Purge Switch
Blower Motor Relay
Blower Motor Starter
Blower Motor Starter Interlock
Boiler Master Selector Switch
By-Pass Relay
Burner Switch
Boiler Selector Switch
Booster Water Pump Motor
Booster Water Thermostat
C
Combustion Air Failure Light
Combustion Air Failure Relay
Capacitor
Combustion Air Proving Switch
Control Circuit - Circuit Breaker
Control Circuit Fuse
Control Circuit Reset Switch
Control Circuit Transformer
Chemical Feed Relay
Changeover In Progress Light
Canopy Light
Canopy Light Switch
Changeover Pressure Switch
Changeover Relay
Changeover Time Delay
Control Power on Light
Control Relay
Control System Selector Switch
Circulating Water Pump Motor
Circulating Water Pump Motor Circuit Breaker
Circulating Water Pump Motor Fuses
Circulating Water Pump Motor Starter
Circulating Water Pump Motor Starter Interlock
Circulating Water Pump Relay
Circulating Water Pump Switch
Cooling Water Solenoid Valve
D
Denotes Digester Gas Equipment (Prefix)
Deaerator Automatic Recirc Relay
Direct Current Voltmeter
Drive Energized Relay
Draft Gauge
Digester Gas Housing Purge Valve
Digester Gas Relay
Deaerator High Water Control
Deaerator High Water Light
Deaerator High Water Relay
Digital Input
Disconnect (Entrance Switch)
Deaerator Low Water Control
Deaerator Low Water Light
Deaerator Low Water Relay
Damper Motor
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
MNEMONIC
DMT
DNS
DO
DODE
DOE
DPDPS
DPS
DS
EDS
ESS
ETH
ETM
FADM
FARC
FADR
FD
FDJB
FDPS
FFA
FFL
FFR
FGR
FGRCDTD
FGRCPS
FGRFM
FGRFMS
FGRFMSI
FGRMVLS
FGRTD
FORS
FPM
FPMS
FPR
FPS
FRI
FRP
FS
FSS
FSSM
FVEL
FVL
FVR
FWC
FWR
FWVT
G
GBR
GGL
GOL
GOR
GOS
GOR
Part No. 750-225
DESCRIPTION
Damper Motor Transformer
Day-Night Switch
Digital Output
Delay On Deenergization (Timer)
Delay On Energization (Timer)
Deaerator Pump Differential Pressure Switch
Damper Positioning Switch
Door Switch
E
Emergency Door Switch
Emergency Stop Switch
Ethernet
Elapsed Time Meter
F
Fresh Air Damper Motor
Fuel Air Ratio Controller
Fresh Air Damper Relay
Flame Detector
Flame Detector Junction Box
Flow Differential Pressure Switch
Flame Failure Alarm
Flame Failure Light
Flame Failure Relay
Flue Gas Recirculation
Flue Gas Recirculation Cool Down Time Delay
Flue Gas Recirculation Cam Position Switch
Flue Gas Recirculation Fan Motor
Flue Gas Recirculation Fan Motor Starter
Flue Gas Recirculation Fan Motor Starter Interlock
Flue Gas Recirculation Manual Valve Limit
Switch
Flue Gas Recirculation Time Delay
First Out Reset Switch
Feed Pump Motor
Feed Pump Motor Starter
Feed Pump Relay
Feed Pump Switch
Firing Rate Interface
Firing Rate Potentiometer (O2 Trim)
Flow Switch
Fuel Selector Switch
Flame Signal Strength Meter
Fuel Valve Energized Light
Fuel Valve Light
Fuel Valve Relay
Feed Water Control
Feed Water Relay
Feed Water Valve Transformer
G
Green (Color Of Pilot Light)
Gas Booster Relay
Gauge Glass Light
Gas Operation Light
Gas-Oil Relay
Gas-Oil Switch
Gas-Oil Relay
MNEMONIC
GPS
GPV
GPVV
GR
GSL
GSSV
GVEL
GVTS
HATC
HBWTC
HBWTL
HFAV
HFGV
HFL
HFOV
HFPS
HFR
HFS
HFS-A
HGPL
HGPR
HGPS
HHFL
H/LWA
HLC
HLFC
HLPC
HLTC
HMC
HOI
HOPL
HOPR
HOPS
HOLC
HOTL
HOTR
HOTS
HPCO
HSPC
HSPL
HSPR
HSTC
HSTL
HSTS
HWA
HWAR
HWC
HWCO
HWL
HWR
(I.C.)
(I.O.)
IL
INT
IR
DESCRIPTION
Gas Pressure Sensor
Gas Pilot Valve
Gas Pilot Vent Valve
Gas Relay
Green Stack Light
Gas Sensor Solenoid Valve
Gas Valve Energized Light
Gas Valve Test Switch
H
High Ambient Temperature Control
High Boiler Water Temperature Control
High Boiler Water Temperature Light
High Fire Air Valve
High Fire Gas Valve
High Fire Light
High Fire Oil Valve
High Furnace Pressure Switch
High Fire Relay
High Fire Switch
High Fire Switch - Air
High Gas Pressure Light
High Gas Pressure Relay
High Gas Pressure Switch
Header High Fire Light
High Low Water Alarm
High Limit Control
High-Low Fire Control
High Limit Pressure Control
High Limit Temperature Control
Header Modulating Control
Heavy Oil Isolation
High Oil Pressure Light
High Oil Pressure Relay
High Oil Pressure Switch
Header Operating Limit Control
High Oil Temperature Light
High Oil Temperature Relay
High Oil Temperature Switch
High Pressure Cutoff
High Steam Pressure Control
High Steam Pressure Light
High Steam Pressure Relay
High Stack Temperature Control
High Stack Temperature Light
High Stack Temperature Switch
High Water Alarm
High Water Alarm Relay
High Water Control
High Water Cutoff
High Water Light
High Water Relay
I
Instantaneously Closed
Instantaneously Open
Ignition Light
Interval (Timer)
Ignition Relay
4-9
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
MNEMONIC
IT
IVPR
IVPS
JPP
LAMPS
LAPR
LAPS
LASPS
LDL
LDPS
LDS
LFAV
LFGV
LFHTD
LFL
LFOV
LFPS
LFR
LFS
LFS-A
LFS-F
LFS-G
LFS-O
LFTC
LGPL
LGPR
LGPS
LIAPS
LLPC
LLPR
LLR
LLTC
LLTR
LM
LOPL
LOPR
LOPS
LOTL
LOTR
LOTS
LPAPS
LPCO
LPS
LSPAR
LSPC
LSPL
LSPR
LSPS
LTS
LWA
LWAR
LWCO
LWFL
LWL
LWR
4-10
DESCRIPTION
Ignition Transformer
Isolation Valve Proximity Relay
Isolation Valve Proximity Switch
J
Jackshaft Position Potentiometer
L
Low Atomizing Media Pressure Switch
Low Air Pressure Relay
Low Air Pressure Switch
Low Atomizing Steam Pressure Switch
Load Demand Light
Low Differential Pressure Switch
Low Draft Switch
Low Fire Air Valve
Low Fire Gas Valve
Low Fire Hold Time Delay
Low Fire Light
Low Fire Oil Valve
Low Fire Pressure Switch
Low Fire Relay
Low Fire Switch
Low Fire Switch - Air
Low Fire Switch - Fuel
Low Fire Switch - Gas
Low Fire Switch - Oil
Low Fire Temperature Control
Low Gas Pressure Light
Low Gas Pressure Relay
Low Gas Pressure Switch
Low Instrument Air Pressure Switch
Low Limit Pressure Control
Low Limit Pressure Relay
Lead Lag Relay
Low Limit Temperature Control
Low Limit Temperature Relay
Level Master
Low Oil Pressure Light
Low Oil Pressure Relay
Low Oil Pressure Switch
Low Oil Temperature Light
Low Oil Temperature Relay
Low Oil Temperature Switch
Low Plant Air Pressure Switch
Low Pressure Cutoff
Low Pressure Switch
Low Steam Pressure Alarm Relay
Low Steam Pressure Control
Low Steam Pressure Light
Low Steam Pressure Relay
Low Steam Pressure Switch
Lamp Test Switch
Low Water Alarm
Low Water Alarm Relay
Low Water Cutoff
Low Water Flow Light
Low Water Light
Low Water Relay
MNEMONIC
LWRR
MA
MAS
MAM
MC
MCS
MDM
MDMAS
MFC
MFGRTS
MFVL
MFWV
MGV
MGVAS
MGVEL
MGVV
MLC
(MOM)
MOP
MOPS
MOV
MOVAS
MOVEL
MPC
MPCB
MPP
(MR)
MTC
MV
MVA
N
(N.C.)
(N.O.)
NFL
NFR
NGHPV
NGR
NRLR
ODA
ODAS
ODM
ODMAS
ODMT
ODS
OH
OHCB
OHF
OHR
OHS
OHT
OLC
OLPC
OL’S
DESCRIPTION
Low Water Reset Relay
M
Milli-amp
Manual - Automatic Switch
Micrometer
Modulating Control
Manual Control Switch
Modulating Damper Motor
Modulating Damper Motor Auxiliary Switch
Manual Flame Control (Potentiometer)
Minimum Flue Gas Recirculation Temperature
Switch
Main Fuel Valve Light
Motorized Feed Water Valve
Main Gas Valve
Main Gas Valve Auxiliary Switch
Main Gas Valve Energized Light
Main Gas Vent Valve
Modulating Level Control
Momentary
Main Oil Pump
Main Oil Pump Starter
Main Oil Valve
Main Oil Valve Auxiliary Switch
Main Oil Valve Energized Light
Modulating Pressure Control
Main Power Circuit Breaker
Manual Positioning Potentiometer
Manual Reset
Modulating Temperature Control
Motorized Valve
Make-Up Valve Actuator
N
Denotes Natural Gas Equipment (Prefix)
Normally Closed
Normally Open
No Flow Light
No Flow Relay
Natural Gas Housing Purge Valve
Natural Gas Relay
Nonrecycle Limit Relay
O
Outlet Damper Actuator
Outlet Damper Auxiliary Switch
Outlet Damper Motor
Outlet Damper Motor Auxiliary Switch
Outlet Damper Motor Transformer
Oil Drawer Switch
Oil Heater
Oil Heater Circuit Breaker
Oil Heater Fuses
Oil Heater Relay
Oil Heater Switch
Oil Heater Thermostat
Operating Limit Control
Operating Limit Pressure Control
Thermal Overloads
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
MNEMONIC
OLTC
OMPM
OMPMF
OOL
OPM
OPMCB
OPMF
OPMS
OPPM
OPR
OPRL
OPRS
OPS
OPSPM
OPV
OR
ORV
OSOV
OSPS
OSS
OT
OTPR
OTS
OV
OVAS
OVEL
P
PAASV
PAPS
PC
PCL
PCR
PFCC
PFFL
PFFR
PFPS
PHGPS
PIPL
PIS
PLC
PLGPS
POL
POV
PPL
PPR
PR
PRL
PRPTD
PS
PSF
PSS
PSV
PT
PTS
PUCR
PUR
Part No. 750-225
DESCRIPTION
Operating Limit Temperature Control
Oil Metering Pump Motor
Oil Metering Pump Motor Fuse
Oil Operation Light
Oil Pump Motor
Oil Pump Motor Circuit Breaker
Oil Pump Motor Fuses
Oil Pump Motor Starter
Oil Purge Pump Motor
OIl Purge Relay
Oil Pump Running Light
Oil Pressure Sensor
Oil Pump Switch
Oil Pump Supply Pump Motor
Oil Purge Valve
Oil Relay
Oil Return Valve
Oil Shutoff Valve
O2 Set Point Switch
Oil Selector Switch
Outdoor Thermostat
Oil Transfer Pump Relay
Oil Temperature Sensor
Oil Valve
Oil Valve Auxiliary Switch
Oil Valve Energized Light
P
Denotes Propane Gas Equipment (Prefix)
Plant Air Atomizing Solenoid Valve
Purge Air Proving Switch
Pump Control
Purge Complete Light
Pump Control Relay
Power Factor Correction Capacitor
Pilot Flame Failure Light
Pilot Flame Failure Relay
Positive Furnace Pressure Switch
Pilot High Gas Pressure Switch
Purge in Progress Light
Pilot Ignition Switch
Programmable Logic Controller
Pilot Low Gas Pressure Switch
Power On Light
Pilot Oil Valve
Pre-Purging Light
Post Purge Relay
Program Relay
Purge Ready Light
Pre-Purge Time Delay
Power Supply
Power Supply Fuse
Pump Selector Switch
Purge Solenoid Valve
Purge Timer
Pump Transfer Switch
Purge Complete Relay
Purge Relay
MNEMONIC
PV
R
RAR
RATD
RES
RLR
RML
RMR
RS
RSL
RSR
RTD
SBFPL
SBFPM
SBFPMCB
SBFPMF
SBFPMS
SBOV
SBPS
SBR
SC
SCTS
SDHPS
SDL
SDOPS
SER
SHT
SHV
SLCL
SPIR
SPS
SS
SSC
SSL
SSR
SSV
STHWC
STHWL
(T.C.)
(T.O.)
TB
T/C
TC
TCR
TD
TDAS
TFWR
TI
TPCR
TPL
TPM
TPMCB
TPMF
TPMS
DESCRIPTION
Panelview
R
Red (Color of Pilot Light)
Remote Alarm Relay
Remote Alarm Time Delay
Resistor
Recycle Limit Relay
Run Mode Light
Release To Modulate Relay
Range Switch
Red Stack Light
Remote Start Relay
Resistance Temperature Detector
S
Stand By Feed Pump Light
Stand By Feed Pump Motor
Stand By Feed Pump Motor Circuit Breaker
Stand By Feed Pump Motor Fuses
Stand By Feed Pump Motor Starter
Surface Blow Off Valve
Sootblower Pressure Switch
Sootblower Relay
Scanner
Supervisory Cock Test Switch
Stack Damper High Pressure Switch
Steam Demand Light
Stack Damper Open Proving Switch
Serial
Steam Heater Thermostat
Steam Heater Valve
Safety Limits Complete Light
System Pump Interlock Relay
Steam Pressure Sensor
Selector Switch
Sequencing Step Controller
Safety Shutdown Light
Solid State Relay
Span Solenoid Relay
Surge Tank High Water Control
Surge Tank High Water Light
T
Timed Closed
Timed Open
Terminal Block
Thermocouple
Time Clock
Time Clock Relay
Time Delay
Time Delay Auxiliary Switch
Transistorized Feedwater Relay
Thermocouple Input
Transfer Pump Control Relay
Transfer Pump Light
Transfer Pump Motor
Transfer Pump Motor Circuit Breaker
Transfer Pump Motor Fuses
Transfer Pump Motor Starter
4-11
Chapter 4 — Sequence of Operation
MNEMONIC
TPS
TRX
UVFD
V
VDR
VFD
VSR
VSD
W
WC
WCBDS
WF
WFNL
WLC
WO
WTS
Y
YSL
(T.C.)
(T.O.)
4-12
DESCRIPTION
Transfer Pump Switch
Transformer
U
Ultra-Violet Flame Detector
V
Voltmeter
Voltage Differential Relay
Variable Frequency Drive
Variable Speed Drive Relay
Variable Speed Drive
W
White (Color of Pilot Light)
Water Column
Water Column Blow Down Switch
Water Feeder
Water Flow Normal Light
Water Level Control
Denotes Waste Oil Equipment (Prefix)
Water Temperature Sensor
Y
Yellow (Color of Pilot Light)
Yellow Stack Light
T
Timed Closed
Timed Open
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5
Starting and Operating Instructions
Contents
A. GENERAL PREPARATION FOR START-UP, ALL FUELS . . . . . . . 5-3
B. CONTROL SETTINGS - STEAM AND HOT WATER . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
C. GAS PILOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
D. ATOMIZING AIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
E. FIRING PREPARATIONS FOR NO. 2 OIL (SERIES 100-200) . . 5-7
F. FIRING PREPARATION FOR NO. 6 OIL (SERIES 400-600) . . . . 5-8
G. FIRING PREPARATIONS FOR GAS (SERIES 200-400-700) . . 5-10
H. IFGR SETUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
I. START-UP, OPERATING AND SHUTDOWN - ALL FUELS . . . . . 5-14
J. CONTROL OPERATIONAL TEST AND CHECKS . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
Notice
If your boiler is equipped with a
C B - H AW K
ICS
boiler
management control system, refer
to CB -HAWK ICS Operation,
Servicing and Parts Manual No.
750-197 for specific information
procedures described in section
A.
! Warning
It is recommended that the
starting instructions be read
completely until they are
thoroughly understood, before
attempting to operate the
boiler, rather than performing
each operation as it is read for
the first time. Failure to follow
these instructions could result
in serious personal injury or
death
! Warning
Prior to firing a boiler, be sure
that discharge piping from
safety valves or relief valves,
and discharge piping from all
blowdown and drain valves, is
piped to a SAFE point of
discharge, so that emission of
hot water or steam cannot
possibly cause injury. Failure
to follow these instructions
could result in serious
personal injury or death
5-2
A. GENERAL PREPARATION FOR START-UP,
ALL FUELS
Instructions in Chapter 5 are all based upon installation being
complete and all electrical, fuel, water and vent stack connections
are made.
The operator should be familiar with the burner, boiler, and all
controls and components. To quickly locate and identify the various
controls and components mentioned in the following paragraphs,
refer to the illustrations and the contents of Chapters 1, 2 and 3.
Instructions for adjusting major components are given in Chapter 6
this should be reviewed prior to firing. The wiring diagram should
also have been studied, along with the firing sequence outlined in
Chapter 4.
Verify supply of fuel and proper voltage. Check for blown fuses,
open circuit breakers, dropped out overloads, etc. Check reset of all
starters and controls having manual reset features. Check the
lockout switch on the programmer and reset if necessary.
The boiler should be filled with water to the proper operating level
using water of ambient temperature. Be sure that treated feedwater
is available and used. In heating applications, the entire system
should be filled and vented. Refer to Chapter 3 for water
requirements. On a steam boiler, open the test valve (Chapter 1,
Figure 1-7) to vent air displaced during filling. Leave the test valve
open until the escape of steam is noted after the burner is operating.
Check all linkage for full and free movement of the damper and
metering valves and cams. The check can be done by loosening the
linkage at the damper motor connecting arm and manipulating the
linkage by hand.
Check for rotation of all motors by momentarily closing the motor
starter or relay. The blower impeller rotation is counter-clockwise
when viewed from the front of the boiler. The air pump rotation is
clockwise when viewed from its drive end.
Before operating the boiler feed pump or oil supply pump, be sure
all valves in the line are open or properly positioned.
For safety reasons, perform a final pre-startup inspection, especially
checking for any loose or incomplete piping or wiring or any other
situations that might present a hazard.
Notice
The pressure vessel support legs are welded to mounting
skids in front and secured by bolts at the rear of the pressure
vessel. The bolts are tightened for shipment. When the boiler
is installed, and prior to initial firing, the bolts securing the
rear legs to the skid must be loosened to allow for expansion
and contraction caused by differences in temperature
between pressure vessel and skids and to avoid damage to
the equipment.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
FAN MOTOR ROTATION
COUNTERCLOCKWISE
AIR COMPRESSOR ROTATION
CLOCKWISE FROM DRIVE END
Figure 5-2 Air Compressor
Figure 5-1 Fan Motor
B. CONTROL SETTINGS - STEAM AND HOT
WATER
See Chapter 6 for adjustment instructions for the following controls
Inspect the operating limit control for proper setting.
.
1. The pressure control of a steam boiler should be set slightly
above the highest desired steam pressure, but at least 10%
lower than the setting of the safety valve.
2. The temperature control on a hot water boiler should be set
slightly above the highest desired water temperature and within
the limits of the pressure vessel.
Inspect the high limit control for proper setting.
3. On a high pressure steam boiler, the control should be set
approximately 10 psig above the operating limit pressure control
setting, if feasible, or midway between the operating limit
pressure and the safety valve setting. The setting on a low
pressure steam boiler may be 2 o r 3 psig above the operating
limit setting, but must not exceed the safety valve setting.
Figure 5-3 Hot Water Controls
4. On a hot water boiler, the high limit temperature control should
be 5-10°F above the operating limit temperature control setting
but within the limits of the design pressure of the pressure
vessel.
Part No. 750-225
5-3
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
Notice
The settings of all the above
controls may require some
readjustment after the boiler is
started and running for a short
period. The scale settings on the
controls are relatively accurate,
but are principally for use as
guides. Final adjustment should
be based on and agree with the
reading of the steam pressure
gauge or the water temperature
thermometer.
Inspect the modulating control for proper setting. The control must
be set and adjusted so that the modulating motor returns to low fire
position before the operating limit control opens. It is further
desirable to have its low point setting somewhat below the cut-in
setting of the limit control so that the burner operates in low fire
position for a brief period on each start rather than immediately
driving to a high fire position.
Inspect the low-water cutoff and pump control as well as the
auxiliary low-water cutoff (if equipped with this optional device).
Check for freedom of float movement. Float movement can be
verified by observing the level of water in the gauge glass when the
water supply has been cut off either by the stopping of the feed
pump or by the closing of a valve, and the restarting of the pump or
opening of the valve when water is drained from the pressure vessel.
The importance of proper functioning of low-water controls cannot
be over-emphasized. Be sure that the control and the piping is level.
The settings of controls relating to fuel, either oil or gas, are covered
in subsequent sections.
2
1
In the event the boiler is equipped with optional control devices not
listed here, be certain to ascertain that their settings are correct. If
additional information is required, see your local Cleaver-Brooks
authorized representative or contact Cleaver-Brooks.
5
4
3
1. Burner drawer locking pin
2. Flame view port
3. Fuel oil line
4. Atomizing air line
5. Modulating air damper
On initial start-up or whenever the boiler is placed into operation
from a “cold” start, the manual-automatic selector switch should be
set at “manual” and the manual flame control set at “close.” After
the boiler is in operation and thoroughly warmed, the selector
switch should be turned to “automatic,” so that the burner firing
rate may be controlled by the modulating control in accordance with
load demands.
Close all power entrance switches (supplied by others).
C. GAS PILOT
10
8
6
7
9
The gas pilot should be checked for satisfactory performance prior
to initial firing. Follow the pilot flame adjustment instructions given
in Chapter 6.
On initial starting attempts, several efforts might be required to fully
bleed the pilot line. While checking pilot adjustment, observe
whether the pilot flame is extinguished promptly when the burner
switch is opened. A lingering flame indicates a leaking gas pilot
valve, which is a condition requiring correction before proceeding.
D. ATOMIZING AIR
6. Atomizing air pressure gauge
7. Oil drawer switch
8. Oil drawer latch
9. Ignition electrode
10. Scanner
Figure 5-4 Burner Drawer with
Gun Positioned for Oil Firing
5-4
The supply and pressure of the atomizing air on an oil-fired burner
should be checked. Before starting, inspect the oil pump lube oil
level. Add oil if necessary to bring the level to the mid-point or
slightly higher of the sight glass. Use SAE 20 detergent oil of a grade
mentioned in Chapter 8 and fill in accordance with instructions
given there.
Check the oil level of the air intake strainer.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
To verify air flow and pressure, place the burner run/test switch on
the program relay to the test position. If the burner is a combination
fuel burner, be sure that the gas/oil selector switch is set to “oil.”
Turn the burner switch on. The burner will cycle to the low fire prepurge position and stop there.
Observe the reading on the air pressure gauge (Figure 5-4). With no
oil flow, the pressure should be a minimum of 7 psi.
If there is no pressure, determine the cause and correct it before
proceeding. Check for obstructions in the air inlet line, incorrect
rotation (air pump rotation is clockwise), or a loose oil nozzle or
other leaks. If the pressure is much higher without any oil flow,
check for obstruction in the discharge line or at the oil nozzle.
The air pressure will increase when an oil flow exists. At low firing
rate, the air pressure may rise to 12 psi or more. After air flow has
been verified, turn the burner switch off and return the run/test
switch to the run position.
Notice
Abnormally high pressure indicated on the nozzle air pressure
gauge is an indication that the burner nozzle has become
clogged. In the event of clogging, check the nozzle and clean
as necessary.
Notice
The air pressure should not
exceed 35 psi at high fire. Greater
air pressure causes excessive
wear of the air pump, increases
lube oil usage, and can overload
the motor, thus causing damage
to the equipment.
AIR INTAKE STRAINER
OIL LEVEL
Figure 5-5 Atomizing Air Compressor
Part No. 750-225
5-5
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
E. FIRING PREPARATIONS FOR
NO. 2 OIL (SERIES 100-200)
OIL BURNER PRESSURE
GAUGE
Prior to initial firing, oil flow and pressure should be established and
verified. Atomizing air pressure should also be established as
outlined in Section D. The schematic flow diagram (Chapter 2,
Figure 2-23) indicates the flow of fuel and atomizing air.
If the burner is a combination fuel model, be certain that the main
gas shutoff cock is closed and set the gas/oil selector switch to “oil.”
Insert the burner drawer gun into its most forward position and latch
it in place (see Figure 5-7).
Figure 5-6 Oil Piping
Oil Flow - Open all valves in the oil suction and oil return lines.
If the oil supply tank is located above the level of the pump and flow
to the pump is by gravity, then it will usually be necessary to vent
the suction line to allow oil to fill the line. Venting the suction line
can generally be accomplished by cracking a union fitting, or by
opening the cap of the oil strainer using care to prevent spillage of
oil. Tighten the fitting or the cap as soon as oil flow appears.
If the oil supply tank is below the level of the oil pump, it is
MANDATORY that the suction line to the pump be completely filled
with oil prior to starting the pump to avoid the possibility of damage
to the pump gears. Non-lubricating fluids such as kerosene should
not be used for priming.
Figure 5-7 Gun Locked In, Firing
Oil
Prior to priming the suction line and the initial start, check to make
certain that all plugs, connections, etc., have been securely
tightened to prevent leaks.
If the fuel oil supply originates from a pressurized loop, it is
assumed that the pressure of the loop will be at a minimum of 75
psi. Under these conditions, the relief valve at the terminal block
should be adjusted to the point where it becomes inoperative (or
removed and openings plugged). To render inoperative, turn the
adjusting screw in as far as possible.
Figure 5-8 Oil Drawer Closed,
Firing Oil
A standard equipped boiler has a selector switch incorporated in the
oil pump motor starter. Momentarily energize the starter to check
for proper pump rotation. With the rotation verified, operate the
pump to determine that oil circulation exists. Observe the oil burner
pressure gauge for indication that flow is established. If no pressure
shows on the gauge after a few moments, stop the oil pump and reprime. If the supply tank is lower than the pump, it is possible that
the initial priming of the suction line, followed by operation of the
pump, will not establish oil flow. This might be caused by
obstruction in the suction line, excessive lift, inadequate priming,
suction line leaks, etc. If oil flow is not readily established, avoid
prolonged operation of the pump to minimize risk of damage to
internal parts of the pump. If oil flow is not established after a
second or third priming attempt, a full investigation is required to
determine the cause.
A vacuum (or a compound pressure-vacuum) gauge should be
installed at the suction port of the pump and its reading observed
5-6
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
and recorded for future guidance. If a vacuum condition exists, the
reading will reveal the tightness of the system. It is advisable to
maintain the vacuum reading at less than 10" WC. A vacuum in
excess of 10" WC may allow oil to vaporize, causing cavitation, loss
of prime, and unstable firing condition.
Oil Pressure - Oil supply pressure is regulated by adjusting the
pressure relief valve at the oil terminal block (Figure 5-9). A
pressure gauge should be installed in the terminal block and the
relief valve adjusted to obtain a minimum reading of 75 psi when
the burner is firing at maximum rate.
When oil is supplied from a pressurized loop to a multiple boiler
installation, the relief valve in the loop should be properly adjusted
to provide this reading. In this circumstance, the relief valve at the
terminal block should be adjusted to the point when it will be
inoperative (or removed and openings plugged). To render
inoperative, turn the adjusting screw in as far as possible.
Figure 5-9 Terminal Block
Adjustment may also be required to the regulator on the fuel oil
controller (Figure 5-10). The pressure regulating valve is equipped
with tubing that directs and adds atomizing air pressure to the
adjustable spring pressure. Since the air pump is not running at this
time, only tentative adjustment can be made. Without the air
supply, adjust the fuel oil pressure regulator so that the oil burner
gauge registers approximately 35 psi.
PRESSURE
RELIEF
ADJUST
PRESSURE
GAUGE
The pressure gauge will indicate a higher reading when the flame is
present and will increase as the firing rate increases. After the
burner is firing and when the air pump is running, final adjustment
can be made at the fuel oil controller.
Final regulation of oil flow to the nozzle can be done later, if
necessary, by adjusting the metering cam screws as outlined in
Chapter 6.
PRESSURE GAUGE TAP
Figure 5-10 Fuel Oil Controller
Starting - When all the conditions covered above and in Sections A,
B, C and D are assured, the burner is ready for firing. Refer to
Section H of Chapter 5 for further star ting and operating
information.
F. FIRING PREPARATION FOR NO. 6 OIL
(SERIES 400-600)
Prior to initial firing, oil flow, pressure and temperature should be
established and verified. Atomizing air pressure should also be
established as outlined in Section D. The schematic flow diagram
(Chapter 2, Figure 2-24) indicates the flow of fuel and atomizing
air.
If the boiler is a combination fuel model, be certain that the main
gas shutoff cock is closed and set the gas/oil selector switch to “oil.”
Insert the burner drawer gun into its most forward position and latch
it in place (see Figure 5-7, and Figure 5-8).
Part No. 750-225
5-7
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
Oil Flow - Open all valves in the oil suction and oil return lines.
Open the by-pass valve on the fuel oil controller (Figure 5-11) until
oil flow is established. Normally, the orifice valve is left in a closed
position. However, on cold starts, it may be opened for brief periods
to aid in establishing oil flow. The by-pass and orifice valves must
be returned to their closed positions as soon as oil flow is
established as indicated by a reading on the oil supply pressure
gauge (Figure 5-11). Do not attempt to set pressures while valves
are open.
Momentarily energize the fuel oil pump starter to check for proper
pump rotation. With the rotation verified, prime the suction line
strainer with oil and turn the fuel oil pump switch to the “ON”
position. Check the oil supply pressure gauge for indication that oil
flow is established. If no pressure shows on the gauge after a few
moments, stop the oil pump and re-prime. Heavy oil in the storage
tank must be at a temperature to provide oil viscosity to permit flow
through the oil pump and suction line. If oil flow is not established
after several attempts, the conditions preventing oil flow must be
determined and corrected to avoid damage to the pump’s internal
mechanism.
A vacuum gauge should be installed in the oil suction line and its
reading observed and recorded for future guidance.
Figure 5-11 Heavy Oil Fuel
Controller
Oil Pressure - Oil pressure is regulated at several points. The first is
at the relief valve at the oil heater (Chapter 2, Figure 2-19). The
relief valve should be set so that at maximum firing rate a minimum
reading of 75 psi is obtained on the oil supply pressure gauge.
The other pressure adjustments are to the regulators on the fuel oil
controller (Figure 5-10 and Figure 5-11). Both the pressure
regulating and the back pressure relief valves are equipped with
tubing that directs and adds atomizing air pressure to the adjustable
spring pressure. Since the air pump is not running at this time, only
tentative adjustments can be made. Without the air supply, adjust
the fuel oil pressure regulator so that the burner oil gauge registers
approximately 35 psi. Adjust the back pressure relief valve so that
its gauge reads about 10 psi less than the burner gauge.
After the burner is firing, further adjustments can be made, if
necessary, to the valves.
The pressure gauges will indicate higher readings when a flame is
present. The pressure will increase as the firing rate increases. The
pressure reading on the two gauges on the controller will, despite
the fluctuation, retain a nearly constant difference of 10 psi.
5-8
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
Final regulation of oil flow to the nozzle can be done, if necessary,
by adjusting the metering cam screws as outlined in Chapter 6.
Oil Temperature After determining that the heater shell is filled and that fuel oil
circulation exists, turn the oil heater switch to “on.” Adjust the
electric oil heater thermostat (Chapter 2, Figure 2-19) to maintain
oil temperature at approximately 200°F.
The electric heater on burners equipped for No. 6 fuel oil is sized so
that it is capable of supplying heated oil at a rate no greater than
that required for low fire operation and is primarily supplied for
convenience on cold starts. Heating coils utilizing either steam or
hot water are supplied to provide sufficient heat so that higher rates
of firing can be accomplished once steam pressure or hot water is
available. In normal operation, the thermostat governing the electric
heating element is kept at a lower setting than the thermostat
governing admission of steam to the heater, or of hot water
circulation, so that heating is not performed electrically except when
steam or hot water is not available.
Set the steam thermostat (Chapter 2, Figure 2-19) or the hot water
thermostat (Chapter 2, Figure 2-19) to maintain an oil temperature
of 220-230°F. The electric heater will be turned off automatically
as soon as steam or hot water provides heat.
Close the manual by-pass valve after the temperature rise on the
fuel oil controller thermometer is noted. Be certain that hot oil is
moving through the controller. The orifice gate valve must also be
closed. If the temperature drops, open the orifice gate valve until a
rise is noted, then close it.
Once the correct setting of the heater thermostats has been
established, set the low oil temperature switch (Chapter 2, Figure
2-19) at the point approximately 30°F lower than the normal
burning temperature. If the system is equipped with a high oil
temperature switch, it should be set to open at 20 -30°F higher
than normal burning temperature.
Starting - When all the conditions covered above and in Sections A,
B, C and D are assured, the burner is ready for firing. Refer to
Section H of Chapter 5 for further star ting and operating
information.
! Caution
Before turning on the electric oil
heater switch, be certain that the
heater shell is filled with fuel oil
and the flow is established.
Fa i l u r e t o f o l l o w t h e s e
instructions could result in
equipment damage.
Notice
The temperatures listed are
tentative. The composition of the
fuel oil in a given grade can vary,
necessitating a higher or lower
preheating temperature. The
viscosity of the oil at the nozzle
should be less than 300 SSU and
preferably less than 150 SSU.
The actual temperature of the oil
at the burner should be
determined by flame appearance
and good combustion based on a
stack analysis. See Chapter 5 for
additional information.
G. FIRING PREPARATIONS FOR GAS (SERIES
200-400-700)
• Prior to initial starting, check the linkage attached to the gas
butterfly valve to assure that movement is free from binding.
• Verify the presence and availability of gas. On a new
installation, representatives of the gas utility should be
present when gas first flows into the system to supervise
purging of the new gas line, unless they have already done so.
• Determine that the pilot is operating properly, as outlined in
Section C, Chapter 5.
Part No. 750-225
5-9
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
• Determine that sufficient pressure exists at the entrance to
the gas train by installing a test gauge downstream of the
regulator.
• The gas pressure regulator must be adjusted to the proper
pressure level. Since the regulator is generally supplied by
others, adjustment should proceed according to instructions
supplied by its manufacturer.
It is necessary for the operator to know the burner requirements in
gas quantity and pressure. The information can generally be found
on the Dimension Diagram (DD) supplied by Cleaver-Brooks for the
specific installation. Should the information not be readily available,
consult the Cleaver-Brooks Service Department giving the boiler
serial number. Chapter 6 contains additional information along with
standard gas flow and pressure requirements.
• If the burner is a combination fuel model, set the gas/oil
switch to “gas.” Withdraw the oil burner gun and latch it in
its rearward position (Figure 5-12).
Figure 5-12 Oil Gun Locked in
OUT Position
! Warning
Do not repeat unsuccessful
lighting attempts without rechecking the burner and pilot
adjustments. Failure to follow
these instructions could result
in serious personal injury or
death
5-10
• On initial start-up, it is recommended that the main gas
shutoff cock (Chapter 2, Figure 2-14) remains closed until
the programmer has cycled through prepurge and pilot
sequences. When the fuel light on the control panel comes
on, observe the action of the motorized gas valve stem to
determine that it opens when energized. As soon as it is
confirmed, turn the burner switch “OFF” and let programmer
finish its cycle. Check that the gas valve has closed. Again,
turn the burner “ON”. When the fuel valve light glows, slowly
open the main gas cock. Main flame should ignite unless
there is air present in the line. If the flame is not established
within about 5 seconds, turn the burner switch “off” and
allow the programmer to recycle normally for a new lighting
trial. Several efforts may be necessary to “bleed” air from the
line.
The burner and control system is designed to provide a “prepurge”
period of fan operation prior to establishing ignition spark and pilot
flame. Do not attempt to alter the system or to take any action that
might circumvent the feature.
Once the main flame is established, turn the burner switch to the
“OFF” position and observe that the flame is extinguished promptly.
The flame may continue to burn for a second or two after normal
shutdown due to the gas remaining downstream from the fuel valve.
If the flame continues to burn for a longer period or during blower
motor spindown, it could indicate a main gas valve leak.
Immediately turn the burner switch off and close the main gas cock.
Investigate and correct the cause of the valve leakage before
relighting the burner. The main gas valve should provide a tight
seal, provided nothing prevents tight closure. Foreign material may
be present in either the new or renovated gas lines unless adequate
care is taken in cleaning and purging.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
When the conditions covered in Section G and in Sections A, B and
C are assured, the burner is ready for firing. Refer to Section H,
Chapter 5 for further starting and operating information.
H. IFGR SETUP
It is recommended that the final “installed” settings as noted on
Figure 5-13, Figure 5-14 and Figure 5-15 be recorded for future
reference. The settings should be marked on the linkage as well.
Normally, once the system has been set and adjusted, the settings
should not be changed unless conditions (including boiler settings)
change. In that case, it will be necessary to contact your local
Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative for assistance.
Notice
The burner and control system is
designed to provide a “prepurge”
period of fan operation prior to
establishing ignition spark and
pilot flame. Do not attempt to
alter the system or to take any
action that might circumvent the
feature.
After the IFGR system is initially set up, it will start up with the
boiler as an integrated boiler system. After shut down periods in
which maintenance and /or adjustments have been performed on
the fuel cams, fuel and air linkages, or IFGR control linkages, the
recommended approach to start-up is as follows:
1. Set all boiler components to their initial settings as discussed in
the appropriate chapters of this Operation and Maintenance
manual.
2. Check fan impeller and motor rotation. Correct rotation is
counter-clockwise when viewed from the front of the boiler.
3. Verify that all the IFGR components are set to the settings
recorded on the Start Up report or in Figure 5-13, Figure 5-14
and Figure 5-15 (as noted by the Cleaver-Brooks authorized
representative during original set up). Be sure that all linkages
are secure.
4. Start and warm the boiler as described in this Operation and
Maintenance manual.
5. Adjust the boiler components as described in this Operation and
Maintenance manual to achieve proper boiler operation.
Refer to Chapter 8, Figure 8-8 for instructions on cassette removal
and installation.
Part No. 750-225
Notice
Initial IFGR linkage settings
and adjustments must be
established by a CleaverBrooks
authorized
representative. Set up of the LE
Option requires simultaneous
consideration of air-to-fuel
ratios and NOx levels. This can
only be accomplished with
proper combustion emissions
monitoring equipment with
NOx, O2, CO, and smoke spot
measuring capability.
5-11
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
JACKSHAFT LINKAGE ROD
QUICK DISCONNECT LINKAGE
JACKSHAFT LINKAGE ROD POSITION LABEL
GAS JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
OIL JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
PROXIMITY SWITCH AND DRIVE ARM
(COMBINATION GAS & OIL SYSTEMS ONLY)
2”
2-3/4”
JACKSHAFT LINKAGE ROD
GAS JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
THE IFGR SYSTEM CAN BE EQUIPPED WITH
EITHER A SINGLE OR DUAL LINKAGE ARM,
DEPENDING ON THE NUMBER OF FUELS
USED AND THE NOX LEVELS DESIRED. ALL
SINGLE-FUELED BOILERS HAVE A SINGLE
DRIVE ARM. DUAL-FUELED BOILERS MAY
OR MAY NOT HAVE A DUAL ARM, DEPENDING ON THE OPTION PURCHASED.
40∞
OIL JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
20∞
Figure 5-13 Jackshaft Linkage Settings
DOUBLESPRINGS
HOLE#1(FASTOPENINGDAMPER)
HIGH-FIRESTOPSCREW
LOW-FIRESTOPSCREW
EXTERNALARM
“B”
“A”
EXTERNALARM
HOLEPOSITION
HOLE#5
(SLOW-OPENINGDAMPER)
NOTE: RECORD “INSTALLED”
VALUES ON THIS ILLUSTRATION
FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.
HOLE#1
(SLOW-OPENINGDAMPER)
INTERNALARM
HOLE#8
(FASTOPENINGDAMPER)
90°
(SETTINGSHAVETOBEVERIFIEDANDRECORDED
ATTHETIMEOFSTARTUP)
A.______ EXTERNAL ARM HOLE POSITION
B.______ DEGREES
Figure 5-14 Overtravel Linkage Settings
5-12
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
“B”
“D”
LINKAGE CONNECTION POINT
HOLE #1
HOLE #2
NOTE: RECORD “INSTALLED”
VALUES ON THIS ILLUSTRATION
FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.
“C”
A.______ FLANGE COLLAR SETTING
B.______ DAMPER POSITION AT LOW-FIRE
C.______ DAMPER LINKAGE ARM ANGLE (DEGREES)
D.______ HOLE POSITION NUMBER
FLANGE COLLAR
“A”
DAMPER SHOWN IN THE LOW-FIRE POSITION
Figure 5-15 Flange Collar and Damper Settings (Top View)
I. START-UP, OPERATING AND SHUTDOWN ALL FUELS
Depending upon the fuel being burned, the applicable previous
sections in Chapter 5 should be reviewed for preliminar y
instructions.
When firing with oil, be certain that the burner gun is in its most
forward position and latched in place (see Figure 5-7). When firing
with gas, the burner gun should be properly withdrawn and latched
in place. The fuel selector switch should be, accordingly, set to
either oil or gas.
Set the manual-automatic switch (Chapter 2, Figure 2-10) to
“manual” and turn the manual flame control to “close.”
Turn burner switch to “ON.” The load demand light should glow.
The low-water level light should remain out, indicating a safe water
level in the boiler. The programmer is now sequencing. See Chapter
4 for sequence details.
Notice
On an initial starting attempt,
several efforts might be required
to accomplish “bleeding” of fuel
lines, main or pilot. If ignition
does not then occur, do not repeat
unsuccessful attempts without
rechecking the burner and pilot
adjustment.
On ignition failure, the flame failure light will glow and the blower
will purge the boiler of unburned fuel vapors before stopping. After
ignition failure, wait a few moments before re-setting the lockout
switch.
After main flame ignition, the burner should be set on manual
control at its low fire setting (that is, with manual flame control at
“close”) until the boiler is properly warmed. Close the steam header.
Part No. 750-225
5-13
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
In the case of a steam boiler, CLOSE THE TEST VALVE when the
steam begins to appear.
A hot water boiler must have a continuous flow of system water
through the vessel during the warm-up period. The entire water
content of the system and boiler must be warmed prior to increasing
fuel input.
If the flame at low fire provides insufficient heat to reach normal
operating pressure or temperature after 30 minutes, gradually
increase the firing rate by turning the manual flame control in one
point increments to no higher than the third cam screw. Operate at
the increased fuel input rate for a period of time until an increase is
noted in pressure or temperature.
After the boiler is thoroughly warmed, turn the manual flame control
to high fire. At this point a combustion analysis should be made,
with instruments, and fuel flow regulated as required. Refer to the
adjustment procedures in Chapter 6. After making the high-fire
adjustment, manually decrease the firing rate, stopping at each cam
screw to analyze combustion gases, and adjust as required.
To properly perform the testing and adjusting, it is necessary that
the burner be allowed to fire at a maximum rate long enough to
achieve desired results.
Operating - Normal operation of the burner should be with the
switch in the automatic position and under the direction of the
modulating control. The manual position is provided for initial
adjustment of the burner over the entire firing range. When a
shutdown occurs while operating in the manual position at other
than low fire, the damper will not be in a closed position, thus
allowing more air than desired to flow through the boiler. The hot
flame to cool air cycling subjects the pressure vessel metal and
refractory to undesirables conditions.
With the switch set at “auto,” the burner will operate on a
modulating basis according to the load demand.
The burner will continue to operate with modulated firing until the
operating limit pressure or temperature is reached, unless:
1. The burner is manually turned “off.”
2. The low-water condition is detected by low-water level
control.
3. The electrical or fuel supply is interrupted.
4. The combustion air pressure or atomizing air pressure drops
below minimum level.
Notice
Note: There can be other reasons for shutdown such as
motor overload, flame outages, tripped circuit breakers,
blown fuses, or through other interlock devices in the
circuitry.
5-14
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
When the burner is shut down normally, by either the operating
limit control or by manually switching the burner off, the load
demand light no longer glows.
Shutdown through conditions causing safety or interlock controls to
open will actuate the flame failure light (and alarm if so equipped)
and the load demand light will remain lit. The cause of this type of
shutdown will have to be located, investigated, and corrected before
operation can be resumed. Refer to the “trouble-shooting” section
in Chapter 7.
Shutdown - When the operating limit control setting is reached to
open the circuit or if the burner switch is turned “off,” the following
sequence occurs.
The fuel valve is deenergized and the flame is extinguished. The
timer begins operation and the blower motor continues running to
force air through the furnace in the post-purge period.
At the end of the programmed post-purge period, the blower motor
is turned off. The air pump motor of an oil-fired burner is also turned
off. The timer has returned to its original starting position and stops.
The unit is ready to re-start.
! Warning
It is advisable to check for tight shut-off of fuel valves.
Despite precautions and strainers, foreign material in either
new or renovated fuel lines may lodge under a valve seat
and prevent tight closure. The situation is especially true in
new installations. Promptly correct any conditions causing
leakage. Failure to follow these instructions could result in
serious personal injury or death
J. CONTROL OPERATIONAL TEST AND
CHECKS
Proper operation of the various controls should be verified and
tested when the boiler is initially placed into service, or whenever a
control is replaced. Periodic checks should be made thereafter in
accordance with a planned maintenance program.
The operating limit control may be checked by allowing steam
pressure or water temperature to increase until the burner shuts
down. Depending upon the load, it may be necessary to manually
increase the firing rate to raise steam pressure to the burner shut off
point. If the load is heavy, the header valve can be closed or
throttled until the pressure increases. Observe the steam gauge to
check the cut off pressure as the operating limit control shuts the
burner down. Slowly open the header valve to release steam
pressure and check the cut-in setting as the burner restarts. Check
the modulating control for the desired operating pressure range. See
Chapter 6 for instructions on the adjustment of controls.
The water temperature on a hot water boiler that may be operating
at less than full load may be raised by manually increasing the firing
rate until the burner shuts down through the action of the operating
Part No. 750-225
5-15
Chapter 5 — Starting and Operating Instructions
limit control. Observe the thermometer to verify the desired settings
at the point of cut-out and again when the burner restarts. Return
the manual automatic switch to “automatic” and check the
modulating control for the desired temperature range. See Chapter
6 for instructions on the adjustment of the controls.
Check the proper operation and setting of the low-water cutoff (and
pump operating control, if used).
Proper operation of the flame failure device should be checked at
startup and at least once a week thereafter. Refer to Chapter 8 for
information on flame safety checks. Check the program relay’s
annunciation for any system failure. Observe the promptness of
ignition of the pilot flame and the main flame.
Check for tight shut-off of all fuel valves. Despite precautions and
strainers, foreign material may lodge under a valve seat and prevent
tight closure. Promptly correct any conditions that cause leakage.
Refer to the adjustment procedures and maintenance instructions
given in Chapters 6 and 8.
5-16
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6
Adjustment Procedures
Contents
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
B. LINKAGE - MODULATING MOTOR AND AIR DAMPER . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
C. MODULATING MOTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
D. MODULATING MOTOR SWITCHES - LOW FIRE AND HIGH FIRE . . . 6-5
E. BURNER OPERATING CONTROLS -GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6
F. MODULATING PRESSURE CONTROL (Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
G. OPERATING LIMIT PRESSURE CONTROL (Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
H. HIGH LIMIT PRESSURE CONTROL (Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
I. MODULATING TEMPERATURE CONTROL (Hot Water) . . . . . . . . . . . 6-9
J. OPERATING LIMIT TEMPERATURE CONTROL (Hot Water) . . . . . . 6-10
K. HIGH LIMIT TEMPERATURE CONTROL (Hot Water) . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
L. LOW WATER CUTOFF DEVICES (Steam and Hot Water) . . . . . . . . 6-10
M. COMBUSTION AIR PROVING SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10
N. ATOMIZING AIR PROVING SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
O. GAS PILOT FLAME ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
P. GAS PRESSURE AND FLOW INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-13
Q. GAS FUEL CONSUMPTION ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15
R. LOW-GAS-PRESSURE SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
S. HIGH-GAS-PRESSURE SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-19
T. FUEL OIL PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE - GENERAL . . . . . . . . 6-19
U. FUEL OIL COMBUSTION ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-20
V. BURNER DRAWER ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
W. OIL DRAWER SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
X. LOW-OIL-TEMPERATURE SWITCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24
Y. HIGH OIL TEMPERATURE SWITCH (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
Z. LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH (OPTIONAL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
AA. ELECTRIC OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT
(400 and 600 Series - Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
AB. STEAM OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (No. 6 Oil)
(400 and 600 Series - Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25
AC. HOT WATER OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (400 and 600 Series) . . 6-25
AD. STEAM HEATER PRESSURE REGULATOR
(400 and 600 Series - Steam) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-26
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
A. GENERAL
Notice
If your boiler is equipped with a
C B - H AW K
ICS
boiler
management control system, refer
to CB -HAWK ICS Ope ratio n
Maintenance and Parts manual
No. 750-197 for specific
information regarding procedures
described in this section.
Each Cleaver-Brooks boiler is tested for correct operation before
shipment from the factory. However, variable conditions such as
burning characteristics of the fuel and operating load conditions
may require further adjustment after installation to assure
maximum operating efficiency and economy.
A combustion efficiency analysis made during the initial start-up
will help to determine what additional adjustments are required in
a particular installation.
Prior to placing the boiler into service, a complete inspection should
be made of all controls, connecting piping, wiring, and all fastenings
such as nuts, bolts and setscrews to be sure that no damage has
occurred, or that adjustments have not changed during shipment
and installation.
The adjustment procedures in Chapter 6 apply to standard
components furnished on steam or hot water boilers fired with gas
and/or the various grades of oil.
HIGH TURNDOWN BURNER
Notice
Observe that proper air damper
linkage and fuel metering
adjustment procedures are
followed for standard (Series 400
or 600) or HTB (Series 100, 200,
or 700) burners to avoid damage
to the equipment. The burner
series is identified on the boiler
data plate affixed to the front
head of the boiler
In order to reduce stress on boiler components and to improve boiler
operating efficiency, burners have been designed for enhanced fuel
turndown capabilities. A High Turndown Burner (HTB) is installed
on boilers equipped to fire light oil (Series 100), or gas (Series 700),
or both (Series 200). Air and fuel inlets, the diffuser, and the air
damper control linkage have been modified for these burners.
Contact your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative or the
Cleaver-Brooks Service Department for recommendations covering
special controls that are not included in Chapter 6.
B. LINKAGE - MODULATING MOTOR AND AIR
DAMPER
The linkage consists of various arms, connecting rods, and swivel
ball joints that transmit motion from the modulating motor to the
metering cam(s), to the rotary air damper, and to the gas butterfly
valve, if used.
When properly adjusted, a coordinated movement of the damper
and metering cams within the limits of the modulating motor travel
is attained to provide proper fuel-air ratios through the firing range.
In linkage adjustments there are several important factors that must
serve as guides.
1. The modulating motor must be able to complete its full travel
range.
! Caution
Do not restrict the full travel of
the modulating motor. Failure to
follow these instructions could
result in equipment damage.
6-2
2. Initial adjustment should be made with the motor in full closed
position, that is with the shaft on the power end of the motor in
its most counterclockwise position.
3. The closer the connector is to the drive shaft, the less the arm
will travel; the closer the connector is to the driven shaft, the
farther that arm will travel.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
4. Over-travel linkage, where used, should not be required in order
to extend its spring to the fullest stretch.
With the modulating motor in the low fire position, the arm on its
shaft should be at an angle of 45° below the horizontal. The driven
arm on the jack shaft should also be 45° below horizontal. Secure
both arms and fit the connecting linkage rod in place between them.
Refer to Figure 6-1.
OIL MODULATING
CAM
CAM
ADJUSTING
SCREW
GAS MODULATING CAM
ROTARY AIR DAMPER
JACKSHAFT ARM
JACK SHAFT
DRIVING ARM
60
45
OIL MODULATING
CAM FOLLOWER
CAM ADJUSTING
SCREW
GAS MODULATING
CAM FOLLOWER
GAS METERING
VALVE
OIL METERING VALVE
ROTARY AIR
DAMPER
ROD
MODULATING
MOTOR ROD
60
ROTARY AIR
DAMPER ARM
MODULATING MOTOR
MOTOR
BUTTERFLY
GAS VALVE ROD
FUEL OIL
CONTROLLER
The initial settings on a high turndown
burner for the rotary air damper should
be 57° and the connecting jackshaft
arm should be set at 47 1/2°.
OVERTRAVEL LINKAGE
45
MODULATING
MOTOR ARM
ROTARY AIR
DAMPER SHAFT
SPRING LOADED
BUTTERFLY GAS VALVE ARM
BUTTERFLY GAS VALVE
NOTICE:
SETTINGS IN DIAGRAM
INDICATE LOW FIRE
SETTING OF LINKAGE.
Figure 6-1 Complete Linkage Assembly - Combination Gas and Oil
Position the oil and/or gas modulating cams on the jackshaft so that
the cam follower assembly is between the first and second cam
adjusting screws (under the first adjusting screw for High Turndown
Burners). In this position, fuel delivery is at low fire rate. Tighten the
set screws to secure the cams on the jackshaft.
Refer to Figure 6-2. The stop screw in the rotary air damper limits
damper travel at both closed (low fire) and fully opened (high fire)
positions. The screw is provided so that it is possible to tell, even
Part No. 750-225
6-3
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
with the burner in place, whether the damper rotor is in fully opened
or closed position. Rotating the clockwise to the stop screw closes
the damper. Rotating the damper counterclockwise to the stop
screw opens the damper. Normally, the rate of flow of air through
the damper with the rotor in low fire position is about one-third of
maximum for a standard burner or one-sixth for a HTB.
JACK SHAFT
ROTARY AIR
DAMPER ARM
STOP SCREW
DIFFUSER PLATE
ROTARY AIR
DAMPER
DAMPER ARM
Figure 6-2 Rotary Air Damper
The amount of angular movement controlling the rate of air flow is
determined by the location of the ends of the rotary air damper rod
in both the jack shaft arm and the air damper arm.When the air
damper is in low fire position, the jackshaft arm should be at 45°
(47-1/2° for HTB) and the rotary air damper arm should be at an
angle of approximately 60° below the horizontal (Figure 6-1). This
will ensure that the angular movement of the damper starts slowly,
increasing in rate as the high fire position is approached.
Prior to initially firing a boiler it is advisable to check for free
movement of the linkage. The damper motor must be allowed to
complete its full stroke and the damper must move freely from low
to high fire position. Adjustment of linkage connected to a gas
butterfly valve is described in Section Q of Chapter 6.
C. MODULATING MOTOR
The modulating motor has a 90° shaft rotation. The motor
manufacturer also provides a 160° stroke model for other
applications. If a replacement is obtained from someone other than
a Cleaver-Brooks Service or Parts representative, it may have an
incorrect stroke. To prevent damage, determine the 90° stroke prior
to installing a replacement.
1. ADJUST THE LINKAGE TOWARD THE DRIVE
SHAFT FOR LESS MOVEMENT.
2. ADJUST AWAY FROM THE DRIVE SHAFT FOR
MORE LINKAGE MOVEMENT.
Figure 6-3 Modulating Motor
The stroke may be determined by powering the motor and
connecting terminals R-B to actually determine the stroke as motor
drives to an open position.
D. MODULATING MOTOR SWITCHES - LOW
FIRE AND HIGH FIRE
The modulating motor contains either one or two internal switches
depending upon application. The microswitches are actuated by
adjustable cams attached to the motor shaft.
Factory replacement motors have the cams preset. The low fire start
switch is set to make the red and yellow leads at approximately 8°
on motor closing. The high fire purge air proving switch (located in
the modulating motor) is set to make red and blue tracer leads at
approximately 60° the on motor opening. Normally the settings are
left as is, but job conditions may require readjustment. If the cams
require adjustment or resetting, follow the instructions in the
manufacturer’s technical manual.
6-4
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
E. BURNER OPERATING CONTROLS GENERAL
The standard boiler operating control package consists of three
separate controls, the High Limit Control, Operating Limit Control
and the Modulating control.
The High Limit Control senses the hot water temperature or steam
pressure. It is used as a safety limit to turn the burner off in the
event the operating limit control fails. The high limit control should
be set sufficiently above the operating limit control to avoid
nuisance shutdowns.
The Operating Limit Control senses temperature or pressure and
automatically turns the burner on to initiate the start up sequence
when required and turns the burner off to initiate the shutdown
sequence when the demand is satisfied. The control must be set to
initiate startup only at the low fire position.
Notice
Adjustments to the boiler
operating controls should be
made by an authorized CleaverBrooks Service Technician. Refer
to the appropriate boiler
Operation and Maintena nce
manual for specific information on
boiler startup and operation.
The Modulating Control senses changes in the hot water
temperature or steam pressure and signals the modulating motor to
control the flow of fuel and air to the burner. With either steam or
hot water boilers, the modulating control must be set to ensure the
burner is at its minimum low fire position before the operating limit
control either starts or stops the burner.
When adjusting or setting controls, first be sure all control devices
are securely mounted and level. With the temperature sensing
control, make sure the sensing bulb is properly bottomed in its well
and is secured against movement. Be sure the connecting tubing is
not kinked.
Figure 6-4 Steam Operating
Controls
The dial settings are generally accurate; although it is not unusual
to have a slight variation between a scale setting and an actual
pressure gauge or thermometer reading. Always adjust control
setting to agree with pressure gauge or thermometer readings.
Accurate instrument readings are required. When necessary use
auxiliary test equipment to set controls.
Burner controls correctly set to match load demands will provide
operational advantages and achieve the following desirable
objectives:
• The burner will be operating in low fire position prior to shut
down.
• The burner will operate at low fire for a brief period on each
start during normal operation.
Figure 6-5 Hot Water Controls
Eliminates frequent burner on-off cycling.
Separate and independent controls affect modulated firing and
burner on-off cycling. Figure 6-6 depicts a typical setting
relationship of the operating limit control, modulating control and
the high limit control.
Part No. 750-225
6-5
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
100%
D
Increasing
Modulation Control Response
Firing Rate
Operating Limit Control
Response
C
High Limit Control
Safety Shutdown
A
B
Minimum Input
(Low Fire)
Falling Temp.
or Pressure
Modulated Firing
Range
“ON - OFF”
Differential
Rising Temp.
or Pressure
Burner Off
0%
(Burner ON)
(Burner OFF)
Boiler Temp.or Press
(Burner OFF)
Increasing
Figure 6-6 Firing Graph
The burner will be “on” whenever the pressure or temperature is
less than point B and “off” whenever pressure or temperature is
greater than point A. The distance between points A and B
represents the “on-off” differential of the operating limit control.
In normal operation, the burner will shut down whenever the
pressure or temperature rises above setting A. At that point the
switch in the operating limit control will open. As the pressure or
temperature drops back to B, the operating limit control closes and
the burner will restart. The modulating control will signal the
modulating motor to be in a low fire position. If the load demands
exceed the low fire input potential, the modulating control will
increase the firing rate proportionately as pressure or temperature
falls toward point D. The modulating motor will stop at any
intermediate point between C and D whenever the fuel input
balances the load requirement.
As the load requirement changes, the firing rate will change
accordingly. Thus, it is referred to as modulated firing.
Point D represents the maximum firing rate of the burner, or
highfire. In the event pressure or temperature drops while the
burner is firing at highfire, it indicates that the load exceeds the
capacity of the boiler.
6-6
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
The firing graph (Figure 6-6) shows that point B and point C do not
coincide. Extreme load conditions could require the points be
closely matched.
When set as shown, with a time lag between B and C, the burner
will be in a low fire position upon a restart and will fire at that rate
for a short period of time before falling pressure or temperature
requires an increase in the firing rate.
If points B and C overlap when restart occurs, the burner would
drive to a higher firing position immediately after the main flame
was proven.
When firing a cold boiler, it is recommended that the burner be kept
at low fire, under manual flame control, until normal operating
pressure or temperature is reached. If the burner is not under
manual control on a cold start, it will immediately move toward high
fire as soon as the program control releases the circuit that holds
the burner in low fire. The modulating control will be calling for high
fire and the burner will move to that position as rapidly as the
damper motor can complete its travel.
Do not operate the boiler in excess of 90% of the safety valve relief
setting. The closer the operating pressure is to the safety valve relief
pressure, the greater the possibility of valve leakage. Continued
leakage, however slight, will cause erosion and necessitate early
safety valve replacement. The control settings on a hot water boiler
must be within the temperature limits of the boiler.
Ideally, the boiler operating controls should be set under actual load
conditions. Especially under new construction conditions, the boiler
is initially started and set to operate under less than full load
requirements. As soon as possible thereafter, the controls should be
reset to provide maximum utilization of the modulating firing
system. To accomplish maximum utilization, and assuming that air/
fuel combustion ratios have been set, make the required
adjustments to the controls to bring the boiler pressure or
temperature up to meet the load requirements.
To properly set the modulating control, carefully adjust it under load
conditions, until the load is maintained with the burner firing at a
steady rate. The firing rate at that point may be full high fire or
slightly less, depending upon the relationship of the boiler size to
the load.
When the modulating control is set and the burner is in full high fire,
the scale setting of the modulating pressure control on a steam
boiler will indicate the low point of the modulating range. The scale
setting of the modulating temperature control on a hot water boiler
will have a reading that indicates the midpoint of the modulating
range.
Notice
On-Off cycling in excess of 8
cycles per hour will shorten the
life of the combustion air motor
and cause excessive wear on
switch gear and pilot electrodes.
Notice
It is not recommended that the
boiler controls be set so as to
overlap the modulating control
range and operating control
range.
Notice
Rapid heat input can subject the
pressure vessel metal and
refractor y to undesirable
conditions.
The operating limit control should now be adjusted and the
differential established. In an installation that does not require a
very close control of steam pressure or water temperature the
adjustable differential (Figure 6-6 A to B) should be set as wide as
Part No. 750-225
6-7
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
conditions permit, since a wide setting will provide less frequent
burner cycling.
The high limit control provides a safety factor to shut the burner off
in the event the operating limit control should fail. The setting of the
control should be sufficiently above the operating limit control to
avoid nuisance shutdowns. The setting, however, must be within
the limits of the safety valve settings and should not exceed 90% of
the valve setting. The control requires manual resetting after it shuts
off the burner.
In the setting of the controls, consideration must be given to the
time required for a burner restart. Each start, requires a prepurge
period, plus the fixed time required for proving the pilot and main
flame. In addition, approximately one-half minute is required for the
damper motor to travel from low to high fire. The time lag may allow
pressure or temperature to drop below desirable limits.
F. MODULATING PRESSURE CONTROL
(STEAM)
Turn the adjusting screw until the indicator is opposite the low point
of the desired modulating range. Modulated firing will range
between the low point and a higher point equal to the modulating
range of the particular control. In 0-15 psi controls the range is 1/
2 lb; in 5-150 psi controls the range is 5 lbs; in 10-300 psi controls
the range is 12 lbs.
Figure 6-7 Steam Operating
Controls
! Caution
To prevent burner shutdown at
other than low-fire setting,
adjust the modulating pressure
control to modulate to low fire
BEFORE the operating limit
pressure control shuts off the
burner. Failure to follow these
instructions could result in
damage to the equipment
G. OPERATING LIMIT PRESSURE CONTROL
(STEAM)
Set the “cut-out” (burner-off) pressure on the main scale using the
large adjusting screw. Set the differential on the short scale by
turning the small adjusting screw until the indicator points to the
desired difference between cut-out and cut-in pressures. The “cutin” (burner-on) pressure is the cut-out pressure MINUS the
differential. The cut-out pressure should not exceed 90% of the
safety valve setting.
H. HIGH LIMIT PRESSURE CONTROL (STEAM)
Set “cut-out” (burner off) pressure on the main scale using the
adjusting screw. The control will break a circuit when pressure
reaches this point. The setting should be sufficiently above the
operating limit pressure control to avoid shutdowns, and preferably
not exceed 90% of safety valve setting. The control requires manual
resetting after tripping on a pressure increase. To reset, allow
pressure to return to normal and then press the reset button.
I. MODULATING TEMPERATURE CONTROL
(HOT WATER)
Turn the knob on the front of the case until the pointer indicates the
desired setpoint temperature. The desired set point is the center
point of a proportional range. The control has a 3 to 30° differential
and may be adjusted to vary the temperature range within which
6-8
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
modulating action is desired. With the cover off, turn the
adjustment wheel until pointer indicates desired range.
1. MODULATING TEMPERATURE CONTROL
2. OPERATING TEMPERATURE CONTROL
3. HIGH LIMIT TEMPERATURE CONTROL
Figure 6-8 Hot Water Controls
J. OPERATING LIMIT TEMPERATURE
CONTROL (HOT WATER)
Set “cut-out” (burner off) temperature on the scale by inserting a
screwdriver through the cover opening to engage the slotted head
adjusting screw. The “cut-in” (burner on) temperature is the cut-out
temperature MINUS the differential. The differential is adjusted
from 5 to 30° F.
K. HIGH LIMIT TEMPERATURE CONTROL (HOT
WATER)
Set the “cut-out” (burner off) temperature on scale using the
adjusting screw. The control will break the circuit and lock out on a
rise in water temperature above the setting. The setting should be
sufficiently above the operating limit temperature to avoid
unnecessary shutdowns. On a 30 psig hot water boiler, the setting
is not to exceed 240° F. The control requires manual resetting after
tripping on a temperature increase. To reset, allow the water
temperature to drop below the cut-out setting less differential, and
then press the manual reset button.
! Caution
To prevent burner shutdown at
other than low-fire setting, adjust
the modulating pressure control
to modulate to low fire BEFORE
the operating limit pressure
control shuts off the burner.
Fa i l u r e t o f o l l o w t h e s e
instructions could result in
damage to the equipment
L. LOW WATER CUTOFF DEVICES (STEAM AND
HOT WATER)
No adjustment is required since LWCO controls are preset by the
original manufacturer. However, if the water level is not maintained
as shown in Chapter 3, Figure 3-2, inspect the devices immediately
and replace as required.
M. COMBUSTION AIR PROVING SWITCH
Air pressure against the diaphragm actuates the switch which,
when made, completes a circuit to prove the presence of
combustion air. Since the pressure of the combustion air is at its
minimum value when the damper is full open, the switch should be
adjusted under that situation. It should be set slightly below the
minimum pressure, but not too close to that point to cause nuisance
shutdowns.
Part No. 750-225
6-9
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
Notice
O n a n o i l f i r e d b o i l e r, t h e
atomizing air proving switch
(AAPS) must also be closed.
Notice
On a combination fuel fired
burner, the fuel selector switch
could be set at “gas” to eliminate
the atomizing air proving switch
from the circuitry.
The run/test switch on the program relay should be set to TEST.
Turn the burner switch on. The blower will start (provided that all
limit circuits are completed) and the programmer will remain in the
low-fire (damper closed) portion of the prepurge.
To have the modulating damper motor drive to high fire (damper
open), remove the cover from the motor and remove the wire from
terminal W.
Slowly turn down the air switch adjusting screw until it breaks the
circuit. Here the programmer will lock out and must be manually
reset before it can be restarted. Add a half turn or so to the adjusting
screw to remake its circuit.
Recycle the program relay to be sure that normal operation is
obtained. Replace the wire on terminal W and reinstall the cover.
Return the test switch to the RUN position.
N. ATOMIZING AIR PROVING SWITCH
The air pressure against the diaphragm actuates the switch which,
when closed, completes a circuit to prove the presence of atomizing
air. Since the pressure of the atomizing air is at its minimum value
when there is no fuel present at the nozzle, adjustment of the switch
should be done while the unit is running but not firing. The control
should be set slightly below the minimum pressure, but not too
close to that point to cause nuisance shutdowns.
The control adjustment may be made during the prepurge period of
operation by stopping the programmer during the prepurge period
through the use of the TEST switch. Refer to the control instruction
bulletin for details.
The adjustment screw of the atomizing air proving switch can then
be adjusted until it breaks the circuit. Here, the programmer will
lock out and must be manually reset before it can be restarted. Turn
the adjusting screw up a half turn or so to remake the circuit.
Since the adjustment of the air switch may be made either during
the damper closed or damper open position of prepurge, it is also
possible to make the adjustment with the relay stopped in the
damper open position in a similar manner to the adjustment of the
combustion air proving switch described in Section M.
After making the adjustment, recycle the control to be sure that
normal operation is obtained. The TEST switch must be set to RUN
position.
O. GAS PILOT FLAME ADJUSTMENT
The size of the gas pilot flame is regulated by adjusting the gas flow
through the pilot gas regulator and the adjusting cock. The flame
must be sufficient to ignite the main flame and to be seen by the
flame detector. But an extremely large flame is not required. An
overly rich flame can cause sooting or carbon buildup on the flame
detector. Too small a flame can cause ignition problems.
Although it is possible to visibly adjust the size of the pilot flame, it
is preferable to obtain a microamp or voltage reading of the flame
signal.
6-10
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
The correct voltage or microamp readings can be found in the
information supplied with the flame safeguard system.
The program relay used may be of the type that provides message
information that includes a constant flame signal of dc voltage. In
this case a separate dc voltmeter is not required.
To Measure and Adjust Pilot:
1. When making a pilot adjustment, turn the manual-automatic
switch to “manual” and the manual flame control to “close.”
Open both the pilot cutoff cock and the pilot adjusting cock. The
main gas cock should remain closed.
The regulator in the pilot line, if provided, is to reduce the gas
pressure to suit the pilot's requirement of between 5 to 10" WC.
Regulator adjustment is not critical; however, with a lower
pressure the final adjustment of the pilot flame with adjusting
cock is less sensitive.
Notice
On an initial starting attempt,
portions of the fuel lines may be
empty and require “bleeding”
time. It is better to accomplish
this with repeated short lighting
trial periods with inter vening
purge periods than to risk
prolonged fuel introduction. If the
pilot does not light after several
attempts, check all components
of the pilot system
2. Connect the micro-ammeter as outlined earlier.
3. Turn the burner switch on. Let the burner go through the normal
prepurge cycle. When the ignition trial period is signaled, set the
test switch to the TEST position to stop the sequence.
4. If the pilot flame is not established within 10 seconds, turn off
the burner switch. Repeat the lighting attempt.
5. When the pilot flame is established, and with the pilot adjusting
cock wide open, remove the flame detector from the burner
plate. The pilot flame can then be observed through this
opening.
6. To make the final adjustment, slowly close the gas pilot
adjusting cock until the flame can no longer be seen through the
sight tube. Then slowly open the cock until a flame providing
full sight tube coverage is observed.
The adjustment must be accomplished within the time limit of
the safety switch or approximately 30 seconds after the detector
is removed. If the control shuts down, manually reset it. Replace
the detector and repeat the process from step 5.
7. When a suitable flame as indicated in paragraph 6 is obtained,
replace the detector. Observe the reading on the microammeter. The reading should be between 2-1/4 and 5
microamps when using a lead sulfide detector and a standard
amplifier. See the flame signal table in the manufacturer's
bulletin for values of other combinations.
! Warning
Wear a protective shield or
suitable glasses and keep eyes
sufficiently away from the
sight tube opening to avoid
serious personal injury or
death. Never remove the
flame detector while the main
burner is firing. Failure to
follow these instructions could
result in serious personal
injury or death
! Warning
When checking the pilot flame,
be aware the electrode is
energized. Failure to follow
these instructions could result in
serious personal injury
The flame signal indicated on the annunciator type relay should
not be less than 10 Vdc, and may be as high as 20 Vdc or
greater.
The reading must be steady. If the reading fluctuates, recheck
the adjustment. Be sure that the flame detector is properly
seated and that the lens is clean.
8. Return the test switch to the RUN position.
9. If main flame has not been previously established, proceed to do
so in accordance with instructions elsewhere in the manual.
Part No. 750-225
6-11
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
10. The reading of the main flame signal should also be checked.
Observe the flame signal for pilot alone, pilot and main burner
flame together and the main burner flame at high, low, and
intermediate firing rate positions. Readings should be steady
and in the range indicated in paragraph 7. If there are any
deviations, refer to the trouble shooting section in the technical
bulletin.
P. GAS PRESSURE AND FLOW INFORMATION
Because of variables in both the properties of gas and the supply
system, it will be necessary to regulate the pressure of the gas to a
level that produces a steady, dependable flame that yields highest
combustion efficiency at rated performance yet prevents overfiring.
Once the optimum pressure has been established, it should be
recorded and periodic checks made to verify that the regulator is
holding the pressure at this level. Occasional modification in fuel
composition or pressure by the supplier may, at times, require
readjustment to return the burner to peak efficiency. Since the gas
pressure regulator itself is usually furnished by others, detailed
adjustment instructions and adjusting procedures recommended by
the manufacturer should be followed.
Table 6-1 Minimum Required
Gas Pressure at Entrance to
Standard, FM and IRI Gas Trains
(Downstream of Gas Pressure
Regulator)
BOILER HP
STD Pipe Size
(Inches)
Pressure
Requires
(“WC)
125
2-1/2
9
150
2-1/2
11.5
200
2-1/2
16.5
250
3
28
300
3
39
350
3
52
400
4
24
500
4
38
600
4
48
700
4
64
800
4
85
6-12
Pressure
The gas supplied must provide not only the quantity of gas
demanded by the unit, but must also be at a pressure high enough
to overcome the pressure-loss due to the frictional resistance
imposed by the burner system and the control valves.
The pressure required at the entrance to the burner gas train for
rated boiler output is termed “net regulated pressure.” The gas
pressure regulator must be adjusted to achieve the pressure to
assure full input.
The pressure requirement varies with boiler size, altitude, and type
of gas train. Refer to Table 6-1 for pressure require-ments.
The pressures listed are based on 1000 Btu/cu-ft natural gas at
elevations up to 700 feet above sea level. For installation at higher
altitudes, multiply the selected pressure by the proper factor from
Table 6-2.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
Gas Flow
The volume of gas flow is measured in terms of cubic feet and is
determined by a meter reading. The gas flow rate required for
maximum boiler output depends on the heating value (Btu/cu-ft) of
the gas supplied and boiler efficiency. The supplying utility can
provide the information.
Table 6-2 Pressure / Altitude
Correction Factor
ALTITUDE
FEET ABOVE SEA
LEVEL
CORRECTION
FACTOR
1000
1.04
2000
1.07
2500
1.09
3000
1.11
4000
1.16
5000
1.21
6000
1.25
7000
1.30
Pressure Correction
8000
1.35
The flow rate outlined in Section P is based on a “base” pressure,
which is usually atmospheric or 14.7 psia.
9000
1.40
INPUT = OUTPUT x 100%
EFFICIENCY
GAS FLOW =
INPUT
GAS BTU’s/Ft3
=
OUTPUT x 100
EFFICIENCY x GAS BTU’s/Ft3
Pressure Correction Factor
Meters generally measure gas in cubic feet at “line” or supply
pressure. The pressure at which each cubic foot is measured and
the correction factor for the pressure must be known in order to
convert the quantity indicated by the meter into the quantity which
would be measured at “base” pressure.
To express the volume obtained from an actual meter reading into
cubic feet at base pressure, it is necessary to multiply the meter
index reading by the proper pressure factor obtained from Table 6-3.
Conversely:
To determine what the meter index reading should be in order to
provide the volume of gas required for input, divide the desired flow
rate by the proper pressure correction factor. This answer indicates
the number of cubic feet at line pressure which must pass through
the meter to deliver the equivalent number of cubic feet at base
pressure.
As an example:
Assume that a 600 horsepower boiler is installed at 2,000 feet
above sea level; is equipped with a standard gas train and a high
turndown burner; and that 1,000 Btu natural gas is available with
an incoming gas pressure of 3 psig. The pressure and flow
requirements can be determined as follows:
Table 6-3 Pressure Correction
Factor
REGULATOR INLET
PRESSURE (PSIG)
PRESSURE FACTOR
1
1.05
2
1.11
3
1.18
4
1.25
5
1.32
6
1.39
7
1.45
8
1.53
9
1.59
10
1.66
11
1.72
12
1.81
13
1.86
14
1.93
15
2.00
Pressure
Correction for the 2,000 feet altitude must be made since altitude
has a bearing on the net regulated gas pressure. The standard gas
train requires 38.5" WC gas pressure at sea level (Table 6-1). Table
6-2 indicates a correction factor of 1.07 for 2,000 feet. Multiplying
the results in a calculated net regulated gas requirement of
Part No. 750-225
6-13
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
approximately 40.1" WC. This is the initial pressure to which the
regulator should be adjusted. Slight additional adjustment can be
made later, if necessary, to obtain the gas input needed for burner
rating.
Flow
Table 6-4 High Turndown
Burner Required Input
BOILER
HP
HIGH FIRE
INPUT
Btu/hr
LOW FIRE
INPUT
Btu/hr
125
5,230,000
1,307,500
150
6,276,000
1,569,000
200
8,368,000
2,092,000
250
10,460,000
1,046,000
300
12,552,000
1,255,200
350
14,644,000
1,464,400
400
16,750,000
1,675,000
500
20,925,000
2,092,500
600
25,100,000
2,510,000
700
29,300,000
2,930,000
800
33,500,000
3,350,000
Since the gas flow rate is based on standard conditions of flow,
correction must be made for the supply pressure through the meter
of 3 psig. Determine the flow rate by dividing the Btu content of the
gas into the burner input (Table 6-4) and “correct” this answer by
applying the correction factor for 3 psig (Table 6-4).
Btu/hr Input = CFH (Cubic feet/hour)
Btu/cu-ft
OR
25,100,000 = 25,100 CFH (At 14.7 Ib-atmospheric base 1,000
pressure)
THEN
25.100 = 21,271 CFH
1.18
This is the CFH (at line pressure) that must pass through the meter
so that the equivalent full input requirement of 25,100 CFH (at
base pressure) will be delivered.
Checking Gas Flow
Notice
The information given in this
section is for all practical
purposes sufficient to set and
adjust controls for gas input. Your
gas supplier can, if necessary,
furnish exact correction factors
that take into consideration Btu
content, exact base pressure,
specific gravity, temperature,
etc., of the gas used.
Your gas supplier can generally furnish a gas meter flow chart from
which gas flow can be determined. After a short observation period,
the information aids in adjusting the regulator to increase or
decrease flow as required to obtain the rating.
Final adjustment of the gas fuel is carried out by means of the
adjusting screws in the gas modulating cam, while performing a
combustion efficiency analysis. See Section Q for details.
Q. GAS FUEL CONSUMPTION ADJUSTMENT
After operating for a sufficient period of time to assure a warm
boiler, adjustments should be made to obtain efficient combustion.
Burner efficiency is measured by the amount or percentage of O2
present in the flue gas. O2 readings determine the total amount or
excess air in the combustion process, above the point of
stoichiometric combustion or perfect combustion. Stoichiometric
combustion is a term used to describe a condition when there is the
exact amount, molecule for molecule, of air for the fuel attempting
to be burned. This can be accomplished under laborator y
conditions, however it’s not practical to attempt to meet this
condition in a boiler. Stoichiometric combustion however, is the
reference point used when setting fuel/air ratios in a boiler.
There must always be excess air in the combustion process to
account for changes in boiler room temperature and atmospheric
6-14
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
conditions, and to ensure the combustion is on the proper side of
the combustion curve (See Figure 6-8).
12
FIRST VISIBLE TRACE OF STACK HAZE
PER CENT CO2 IN FLUE GAS
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
9
60
8
5
4
7
6
PER CENT O2 IN FLUE GAS
50
20
40
30
PER CENT EXCESS AIR
3
2
15
10
1
0
1
2
3
4
PER CENT CO
5
1/10 of 1% CO = 1,000 PPM
Figure 6-9 Flue Gas Analysis for Natural Gas
Proper setting of the air/fuel ratios at all rates of firing must be
established by the use of a combustion or flue gas analyzer. The
appearance or color of the gas flame is not an indication of its
efficiency, because an efficient gas flame will vary from transparent
blue to translucent yellow.
Most flue gas analyzers in use today measure the content, by
percentage of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) either by
percent or parts per million (ppm). Carbon dioxide (CO2) is not
normally measured with todays flue gas analyzers, but may be
displayed via a calculation.
The O2 levels through the entire firing range of the burner, low fire
to high fire should be tested. The burner manufacture s
recommendations on turndown should also be followed and the
turndown range of the burner should not be exceeded.
It’s important to understand what the readings shown on an
instrument refer to when setting combustion in a boiler. To assist
with this understanding Figure 6-9 shows the relationship between
O2 levels (excess air) and the products of combustion for a typical
flue gas analysis (natural gas).
Part No. 750-225
6-15
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
One of the products of combustion is CO2 (Carbon Dioxide). This is
shown in percentage.
Another product of combustion is CO (carbon monoxide) and is
shown in both percentage and parts per million (ppm). The
maximum CO level standardly allowed is less than 400 ppm.
However, this may change subject to local regulations.
The percent O 2 recorded on an instrument equates to percent
excess air, I.E. 3% O2 is approximately 15% excess air and 4% O2
is approximately 20% excess air. The exact percentage of excess air
is a mathematical calculation based on an ultimate fuel analysis of
the fuel being fired.
It is generally recommended that O2 readings of between 3% to 4%
be attained with less than 400 ppm CO, at high fire.
Using information from Section P of Chapter 6, determine the
standard conditions of gas pressure and flow for the size boiler and
the gas train on it. Calculate the actual pressure and flow through
the use of correction factors that compensate for incoming gas
pressure and altitude.
Basically, gas adjustments are made with a gas pressure regulator,
which controls the pressure and with the butterfly gas valve (Figure
6-10) which directly controls the rate of flow.
TO FOLLOWER OF
GAS MODULATING CAM
HIGH
FIRE
BUTTERFLY GAS
VALVE ROD
OVERRIDE
SPRINGS
BUTTERFLY GAS
VALVE ARM
LOW
FIRE
In initially setting the linkage, back off the low fire stop screw on the
butterfly valve so that the valve is closed. Then run the screw out to
touch the arm, and give it two complete turns. Adjust the
connecting rod so that the override tension is released and so that
the arm is now just touching the stop screw. Tighten the locknuts
on all ball joints. See Figure 6-10.
The low fire setting should be regarded as tentative until the proper
gas pressure for high fire operation is established.
To reach the high fire rate, turn the manual flame control switch
toward “OPEN” in minor increments while monitoring combustion
for overly rich or lean conditions.
At high fire, the gas butterfly valve should be open as wide as
indicated by the slot on the end of the shaft. Set and lock the high
fire stop screw so that it is just touching the valve arm.
LOW FIRE
STOP SCREW
HIGH FIRE
STOP SCREW
Figure 6-10 Butterfly Gas Valve
Determine the actual gas flow from a meter reading. (See section P
of Chapter 6.) With the butterfly valve open and with regulated gas
pressure set at the calculated pressure, the actual flow rate should
be close to the required input. If corrections are necessary, increase
or decrease the gas pressure by adjusting the gas pressure
regulator, following the manufacturer's directions for regulator
adjustment.
When proper gas flow is obtained, take a flue gas reading. The O2
should be between 3% and 4% at high fire.
If the fuel input is correct, but the O2 values do not fall within this
range, the air damper travel may need to be adjusted. Adjustment
of the air damper linkage is described in Section B of Chapter 6.
6-16
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
With the high-fire air/fuel ratio established, the gas pressure
regulator needs no further adjusting.
After being certain that the air control damper and its linkage are
correctly adjusted to provide the proper amount of secondary air,
and after adjusting the gas pressure regulator, final adjustment can
be made, if necessary, to the gas modulating cam to obtain a
constant air/fuel ratio throughout the entire firing range.
Since the input of combustion air is ordinarily fixed at any given
point in the modulating cycle, the flue gas reading is determined by
varying the input of gas fuel at that setting. The adjustment is made
to the metering cam by means of adjusting screws, which are turned
outward (counterclockwise from the hex-socket end) to increase the
flow of fuel, and inward (clockwise from the hex-socket end) to
decrease it. Flow rate is highest when the cam follower assembly is
closest to jackshaft. See Figure 6-11.
Through the manual flame control switch, position the cam so that
the adjusting screw adjacent to the end or high fire screw contacts
the cam follower. Perform a combustion analysis at this point. If an
adjustment is necessary, turn the adjustment screw accordingly to
increase or decrease fuel flow. Take a combustion reading to verify
input. Repeat as necessary until the desired flow is obtained.
Repeat the process, stopping at each adjusting screw, until the low
fire adjusting screw is reached.
ADJUSTING
SCREWS
AND DOGS
DECREASE
FLOW
INCREASE
FLOW
CAM FOLLOWER
ASSEMBLY
HIGH FIRE
LOW FIRE
Figure 6-11 Fuel Modulating
Cam
Standard Burner Low Fire Adjustment
The fuel input should be adjusted using the low fire cam screw, to
approximately 25% of that at high fire (Table 6-3). At low fire the
O2 flue gas reading should be between 6-7%.
It may be necessary to readjust the setting of the low fire stop screw
to obtain the proper air/fuel ratio at the low fire rate. To ensure that
the low fire position of the gas butterfly valve is always the same,
allow one turn of the stop screw for overtravel.
If the air damper needs to be adjusted in order to provide the correct
low fire air/fuel ratio, combustion must be rechecked at higher firing
rates and adjusted as required.
Notice
Do not use any lubricant on the
adjusting setscrews. The set
screws have a nylon locking
insert intended to provide locking
torque and resistance to
loosening and a lubricant could
damage equipment.
If all cam screws are properly adjusted, none will deviate from the
general overall contour of the cam face.
Part No. 750-225
6-17
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
High Turndown Burner Low Fire Adjustment
The fuel input should be adjusted using the low fire cam screw, to
approximately 10% of that at high fire (Table 6-4). At low fire the
O2 flue gas reading should be between 9.5-11%.
It may be necessary to readjust the setting of the low fire stop screw
in order to obtain the proper air/fuel ratio at low fire. To ensure that
the low fire position of the gas butterfly valve is always the same,
allow a half turn of the stop screw for overtravel.
If the air damper must be reset to meet the low fire air/fuel
requirements. combustion at higher firing rates must be rechecked.
2
1
1.
2.
3.
3
HIGH GAS PRESSURE SWITCH
LOW GAS PRESSURE SWITCH
MAIN GAS VALVES
Figure 6-12 Gas Train Pressure
Switches
The second cam adjusting screw may need to be adjusted in order
to maintain a smooth cam profile. If all screws are properly
adjusted, none will deviate from the general overall contour of the
cam face.
R. LOW-GAS-PRESSURE SWITCH
Adjust the scale setting to slightly below the normal burning
pressure. The control circuit will be broken when pressure falls
below this point. Since gas line distribution pressure may decrease
under some conditions, shutdowns may result if the setting is too
close to normal. However, regulations require that the setting may
not be less than 50% of the rated pressure downstream of the
regulator.
Manual resetting is necessary after a pressure drop. Press the reset
lever after pressure is restored. Be sure that the switch equipped
control is level.
S. HIGH-GAS-PRESSURE SWITCH
Adjust the scale setting to slightly above the normal burning
pressure. The control circuit will be broken when pressure exceeds
the normal operating pressure. Unnecessary shutdowns may result
if the setting is too close to normal; however, regulations require
that the setting may not be greater than 150% of rated pressure.
Manual resetting is necessary after a pressure rise. Press the reset
lever after pressure falls. Be sure that the switch equipped control
is level.
T. FUEL OIL PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE GENERAL
Variations in burning characteristics of the fuel oil may occasionally
require adjustments to assure highest combustion efficiency. The
handling and burning characteristics may vary from one delivery of
oil to another. Therefore, it is recommended that the oil system be
inspected from time to time to verify that pressures and viscosity are
at the proper operating levels.
Because of variation in oils, including chemical content, source,
blends, and viscosity characteristics, the temperatures and
pressures listed in Chapter 5, and mentioned in the adjusting of the
controls in the following paragraphs, will vary and thus may be
6-18
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
regarded as tentative and to be changed to provide best firing
conditions. Figure 6-13 is an oil viscosity-temperature chart. It may
be used as a guide, although your oil supplier will be able to give
you more exact information based on an analysis of the oil.
20000
10000
MAXIMUM LIMIT FOR PUMPING
N
MAXIMUM LIMIT FOR ATOMIZATION
O
.6
N
200
150
O
.5
RECOMMENDED LIMIT FOR ATOMIZATION
N
100
80
70
O
.4
60
50
45
N
40
O
.2
Viscosity - Saybolt Universal Seconds
4000
3000
2000
1500
1000
750
500
350
35
33
0
20
40
60
80
100
122
140
160 180
200 220 240 260 280 300
Figure 6-13 Oil Viscosity Chart
Review of the applicable maintenance instructions given in Chapter
8 will aid in maintaining an efficient fuel system.
When the boiler is shut down, or switched over to gas firing, the
pump must operate for a sufficient period of time to cool the oil
heater. Similarly, if an electric, steam, or hot water oil heater is
removed for servicing, the temperature of the heater should be
reduced by circulating oil until it has cooled.
U. FUEL OIL COMBUSTION ADJUSTMENT
After operating for a sufficient period of time to assure a warm
boiler, adjustments should be made to obtain efficient combustion.
Burner efficiency is measured by the amount or percentage of O2
present in the flue gas. O2 readings determine the total amount or
Part No. 750-225
Notice
To prevent oil heater coking, the
fuel oil pump must be in
operation during all times that an
oil heater is in service. During any
time that the oil pump is not
operating, the oil heating system
must be electrically shut down by
manually turning the oil heater
switch to the “off” position.
6-19
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
excess air in the combustion process, above the point of
stoichiometric combustion or perfect combustion. Stoichiometric
combustion however, is the reference point used when setting fuel/
air ratios in a boiler.
3/16Ó
There must always be excess air in the combustion process to
account for changes in boiler room conditions and to ensure the
combustion is on the proper side of the combustion curve (See
Figure 6-9).
3/16Ó
1/4Ó
Figure 6-14 Electrode Setting Oil Pilot
Proper setting of the air/fuel ratios at all rates of firing must be
established by the use of a combustion gas analyzer. Efficient
combustion cannot be solely judged by flame condition or color,
although they may be used in making approximate settings.
Combustion settings should be done so that there is a bright sharp
flame with no visible haze.
Figure 6-15 Burner Drawer with Gas Pilot
6-20
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
STANDARD BURNER
FLAME DETECTOR
SIGHT TUBE
GAS PORTS
DIFFUSER
OIL NOZZLE
(POSITIONED
FOR OIL FIRING)
DIFFUSER SKIRT
POSITIONED 1/4Ó
BEHIND GAS HOLES
GAS PILOT
HIGH TURNDOWN BURNER
OIL NOZZLE
(POSITIONED FOR
OIL FIRING)
GAS SPUDS
DIFFUSER
Figure 6-16 Burner Housing
Most flue gas analyzers in use today measure the content, by
percentage, of oxygen (O 2 ) and in some cases, smoke. Carbon
dioxide (CO2) is not normally measured with modern gas analyzers,
but may be displayed as a calculation.
The O2 levels through the entire firing range of the burner, low fire
to high fire should be tested. The burner manufacture s
recommendations on turndown should also be followed and the
turndown range of the burner should not be exceeded.
It is required to set the burner to operate with a reasonable amount
of excess air to compensate for minor variations in the pressure,
temperature, or burning properties of oil. Fifteen to 20% excess air
is considered reasonable. This would result in an O 2 reading of 3%
to 4%, at high fire.
Final adjustment to fuel input must be made to produce a minimum
of smoke. A maximum smoke spot density of a No. 2 for light oil, or
a No. 4 for heavy oil is acceptable, as measured in conformance to
ASTMD 2156-63T.
Part No. 750-225
6-21
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
Through the use of the manual flame control, slowly bring the unit
to high fire by stages while monitoring combustion for overly rich or
lean conditions. At the high fire position, the air damper should be
fully opened and the air and oil pressure readings should be on the
order of the readings given in Chapter 5.
Take a flue gas analysis reading. If necessary, adjust the fuel oil
controller to increase or decrease oil pressure. Adjustments to the
pressure should be done before attempting to adjust the screws in
the metering cam. Ideally, the cam profile spring should be as close
to the cam casting as practical. It is more desirable to lower the oil
pressure to reduce flow, if necessary, than to extend the adjusting
screws to an extreme position in an effort to cut back flow.
After being certain that the air control damper and its linkage are
operating properly, final adjustment can be made, if necessary, to
the oil modulating cam to obtain a constant fuel/air ratio through
the entire firing range.
Since the input of combustion air is ordinarily fixed at any given
point in the modulating cycle, the flue gas reading is determined by
varying the input of fuel at that setting. The adjustment is made to
the metering cam by means of adjusting screws, which are turned
out (counterclockwise from hex-socket end) to increase the flow of
fuel and in (clockwise from hex-socket end) to decrease it. Flow rate
is highest when the cam follower assembly is closest to the
jackshaft. See Figure 6-11.
If oil pressure, primary air pressure, and linkages are properly
adjusted, the metering cam should require minimal adjustment.
Using the flame control switch, position the cam so that the
adjusting screw adjacent to the end, high-fire screw, contacts the
cam follower. Make a combustion analysis at this point.
If an adjustment is necessar y, turn the adjustment screw
accordingly to increase or decrease fuel flow. Take a combustion
reading to verify input. Repeat as necessary until the desired flow is
obtained. Continue this procedure, stopping at each adjusting
screw, until the low fire position is reached.
Standard Burner Low Fire Adjustment (Heavy Oil)
Notice
Do not use any lubricant on the
adjusting setscrews. These have a
nylon locking insert intended to
provide locking torque and
resistance to loosening and a
lubricant could damage the
equipment.
6-22
The fuel input should be adjusted with the low fire cam screw, to
approximately 25% of that at high fire. At low fire the O2 flue gas
reading should be between 7- 8%.
High Turndown Burner Low Fire Adjustment (Light Oil)
Fuel input at low fire should be approximately 12.5% of that at high
fire. The low fire screw should be adjusted to obtain the necessary
input for the fuel turndown required. At low fire the O2 flue gas
reading should be between 7 - 9%. The second cam adjusting screw
may need to be adjusted in order to maintain a smooth cam profile.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
V. BURNER DRAWER ADJUSTMENT
There are relatively few adjustments that can be made to the
burner; however, a check should be made to assure that all
components are properly located, and that all holding screws are
properly tightened. Figure 6-17 and Figure 6-18 show various views
or portions of the burner.
The diffuser location on gas fired boilers is quite important. There
should be 1/4” distance between the edges of the diffuser fins and
gas outlet tubes ((spuds) (see Figure 6-16). The setting of an oil
fired burner is less exacting and the diffuser should be located with
the skirt approximately 1-1/8” from the end of the burner tube.
When the proper diffuser location is ascertained, the setting of the
nozzle in relation to the diffuser should be checked. This generally
is set at time of manufacture and seldom needs altering. It is most
important that oil spray does not impinge upon the diffuser. The
distance that the nozzle is behind the diffuser has some latitude,
and individual installations may require a slight deviation. The
spacing indicated is 2".
Figure 6-17 Oil Gun In Place, Oil
Drawer Switch Closed
Check the setting of the ignition electrode(s) for proper gap and
position. See Figure 6-15 for the gas pilot electrode and Figure 614 for the light oil pilot. Be sure that the porcelain insulator is not
cracked and that ignition cable connections are tight.
The oil nozzle tip should be seated tightly in the body with the
swirler and the seating spring in place. See Section G in Chapter 8
for additional nozzle tip information.
Check to see that the flame detector sight tube and the gas pilot
tube extend through their respective openings in the diffuser face.
W. OIL DRAWER SWITCH
The integral contacts of the control are closed by proper positioning
and latching of the oil drawer in its forward position (Figure 6-17).
Adjustment of the switch must be such that its contacts open if the
oil drawer is not properly positioned for oil firing. The switch is
electrically removed from the circuit when a combination fuel
burner is fired on gas (Figure 6-18).
Figure 6-18 Oil Gun Locked Out
X. LOW-OIL-TEMPERATURE SWITCH
The L.O.T.S. prevents the burner from starting, or stops its
operation, if the temperature of the oil is below normal operating
temperature.
To adjust the control, insert a screwdriver into the center slot in the
control cover and turn the dial until the fixed (center) pointer is
approximately 30°F lower than the oil heater thermostat setting.
Turn the differential adjusting screw (located above dial) until the
movable indicator is approximately 5° F above the setting on the
main scale.
On a hot water boiler, the low-oil-temperature switch is an integral
part of the electric oil heater. The switch is non-adjustable and is
factory set at approximately 40° F below the maximum operating
temperature of the heater.
Part No. 750-225
6-23
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
Y. HIGH OIL TEMPERATURE SWITCH
(OPTIONAL)
The High Oil Temperature Switch (HOTS) prevents the burner from
starting, or stops its operation, if the temperature of the oil exceeds
the normal operating temperature.
To adjust, turn the dial until the pointer is approximately 25° F
above the normal operating temperature. The controls generally
have a set differential and will close 5° F below the setpoint.
Z. LOW OIL PRESSURE SWITCH (OPTIONAL)
The Low Oil Pressure Switch (LOPS) prevents burner ignition, or
stops its operation, when the oil pressure is below the setpoint.
Adjust the control by turning the screw on top of control case to an
indicated pressure 10 psi below the established primary oil pressure
setting indicated on the oil supply pressure gauge. The switch will
remain in a closed position as long as the oil pressure exceeds this
setting. The control normally used automatically resets when
pressure is restored after a drop.
AA. ELECTRIC OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (400
AND 600 SERIES - STEAM)
The maximum temperature setting of the control is stamped on the
dial. The maximum Temperature setting is attained with the
adjusting knob turned to the “high” end of the scale. Lower settings
are obtained by turning the adjusting knob clockwise using the
thermometer in the fuel oil controller as a guide.
The final setting of this thermostat should be at a temperature
approximately 15° F lower than the steam heater thermostat. This
eliminates the electric heater operation when the steam heater is
functioning. The electric heater is sized to provide sufficient heated
oil for low-fire operation on cold starts before steam is available.
AB. STEAM OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT (NO. 6
OIL) (400 AND 600 SERIES - STEAM)
The maximum temperature setting of the control is stamped on the
dial. The maximum temperature setting is attained with the
adjusting knob turned to the “high” end of the scale. Lower settings
are obtained by turning the adjusting knob clockwise using the
thermometer in the fuel oil controller as a guide.
The final setting of the thermostat should provide oil at a sufficient
temperature for efficient combustion based on flue gas analysis.
There is no need to heat the oil in excess of the temperature.
AC. HOT WATER OIL HEATER THERMOSTAT
(400 AND 600 SERIES)
To adjust the thermostat, insert a screwdriver into the center slot in
the control cover and turn the dial until the pointer is at the desired
temperature level. The control generally has a set differential, and
will close 5°F below the setpoint.
6-24
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
The thermostat contacts close to energize the booster water pump,
which pumps water from the boiler through the heater. On cold
starts, it is normal practice to manually close the valve in the pump
discharge line until the boiler water temperature exceeds the
temperature of fuel oil entering the heater.
The electric oil heater on a hot water boiler burning No. 6 oil and
equipped with a hot water oil heater has a built-in adjustable
thermostat. The maximum temperature setting is stamped on its
dial. The desired temperature can be obtained by turning the
adjusting screw. The thermostat should be set at a temperature
approximately 15 degrees lower than the hot water heater
thermostat. Such a temperature prevents the electric heater from
operation when the water heater is functioning. The electric heater
is sized to provide sufficient heated oil for low-fire operation on cold
starts before hot water is available.
AD. STEAM HEATER PRESSURE REGULATOR
(400 AND 600 SERIES - STEAM)
The regulator is provided on a boiler designed to operate at
pressures above 15 psi and reduces boiler steam pressure to the
level necessary for proper operation of the steam oil heater. The
pressure should be reduced to a point that permits sufficient
temperature to heat the oil, while allowing as continuous a steam
flow as possible. Pressure that is too high will result in frequent
cycling of the steam solenoid valve.
It is best to adjust the regulator under typical flow conditions. To do
so, it is suggested that the globe valve in the steam supply line be
closed so that there is no pressure on the regulator. Turn out the
adjusting screw fully to relieve compression on the regulator spring,
thus closing the regulator. With steam at normal pressure, open the
globe valve and then set the secondary pressure by turning the
adjusting screw or handle until the downstream gauge shows the
desired pressure.
Part No. 750-225
6-25
Chapter 6 — Adjustment Procedures
Notes
6-26
Part No. 750-94
Chapter 7
Trouble Shooting
! Warning
Trouble shooting should be performed only by personnel who are
familiar with the equipment and who have read and understand the
contents of this manual. Failure to follow these instructions could result
in serious personal injury or death
! Warning
Disconnect and lock out the main power supply in order to avoid the
hazard of electrical shock.Failure to follow these instructions could
result in serious personal injury or death
Notice
If your boiler is equipped with a CB-HAWK™ boiler management control
system, refer to CB-HAWK Installation, Operating and Servicing Manual
No. 750-133 for specific information regarding procedures described in
this section
Chapter 7 assumes that the unit has been properly installed and adjusted, and
that it has been running for some time. It is further assumed that the operator
has become thoroughly familiar with both burner and manual by this time. The
points under each heading are set down briefly as possible causes, suggestions
or clues to simplify locating the source of trouble. Methods of correcting the
trouble, once it has been identified, may be found elsewhere in this manual.
If the burner will not start or operate properly, the trouble shooting Chapter
should be referred to for assistance in pinpointing problems that may not be
readily apparent.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 7 — Trouble Shooting
The program relay has the capability to self-diagnose and to display a code or
message that indicates the failure condition. Refer to the control bulletin for
specifics and suggested remedies.
Familiarity with the programmer and other controls in the system may be
obtained by studying the contents of this manual. Knowledge of the system and
its controls will make trouble shooting much easier. Costly down-time or delays
can be prevented by systematic checks of actual operation against the normal
sequence to determine the stage at which performance deviates from normal.
Following a routine may possibly eliminate overlooking an obvious condition,
often one that is relatively simple to correct.
If an obvious condition is not apparent, check the continuity of the circuits with
a voltmeter or test lamp. Each circuit can be checked and the fault isolated and
corrected. Most circuitry checking can be done between appropriate terminals
on the terminal boards in the control cabinet or the entrance box. Refer to the
schematic wiring diagram for terminal identification.
7-2
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 7 — Trouble Shooting
PROBLEM
BURNER DOES NOT
START
SOLUTION
1. No voltage at program relay power input terminals.
A. Main disconnect switch open.
B. Blown control circuit fuse.
C. Loose or broken electrical connection.
2. Program relay safety switch requires resetting.
3. Limit circuit not completed—no voltage at end of limit circuit program relay terminal.
A. Pressure or temperature is above setting of operation control. (Load demand light will
not glow.)
B. Water below required level.
1). Low-water light (and alarm horn)should indicate this condition.
2). Check manual reset button, if provided,on low-water control.
C. Fuel pressure must be within settings of low pressure and high pressure switches.
D. Oil fired unit - burner gun must be in full forward position to close oil drawer switch.
E. ) Heavy oil fired unit - oil temperature below minimum settings.
4. Fuel valve interlock circuit not completed.
A. Fuel valve auxiliary switch not enclosed.
NO IGNITION
1. Lack of spark.
A. Electrode grounded or porcelain cracked.
B. Improper electrode setting.
C. Loose terminal on ignition cable; cable shorted.
D. Inoperative ignition transformer.
E. Insufficient or no voltage at pilot ignition circuit terminal.
2. Spark but no flame.
A. Lack of fuel - no gas pressure, closed valve, empty tank, broken line, etc.
B. Inoperative pilot solenoid.
C. Insufficient or no voltage at pilot ignition circuit terminal.
D. Too much air.
3. Low fire switch open in low fire proving circuit.
A. Damper motor not closed, slipped cam, defective switch.
B. Damper jammed or linkage binding.
4. Running interlock circuit not completed.
A. Combustion or atomizing air proving switches defective or not properly set.
B. Motor starter interlock contact not closed.
5. Flame detector defective, sight tube obstructed, or lens dirty.
Part No. 750-225
7-3
Chapter 7 — Trouble Shooting
PROBLEM
PILOT FLAME, BUT NO
MAIN FLAME
SOLUTION
1. Insufficient pilot flame.
2. Gas Fired Unit.
A. Manual gas cock closed.
B. Main gas valve inoperative.
C. Gas pressure regulator inoperative.
3. Oil fired unit.
A. Oil supply cut off by obstruction, closed valve, or loss of suction.
B. Supply pump inoperative.
C. No fuel.
D. Main oil valve inoperative.
E. Check oil nozzle, gun and lines.
4. Flame detector defective, sight tube obstructed or lens dirty.
5. Insufficient or no voltage at main fuel valve circuit terminal.
BURNER STAYS IN LOW
FIRE
1. Pressure or temperature above modulating control setting.
2. Manual-automatic switch in wrong position.
3. Inoperative modulating motor (see Section F).
4. Defective modulating control.
5. Binding or loose linkage, cams, setscrews, etc.
SHUTDOWN OCCURS
DURING FIRING
1. Loss or stoppage of fuel supply.
2. Defective fuel valve; loose electrical connection.
3. Flame detector weak or defective.
4. Lens dirty or sight tube obstructed.
5. If the programmer lockout switch has not tripped, check the limit circuit for an
opened safety control.
6. If the programmer lockout switch has tripped:
A. Check fuel lines and valves.
B. Check flame detector.
C. Check for open circuit in running interlock circuit.
D. The flame failure light is energized by ignition failure, main flame failure,
inadequate flame signal, or open control in the running interlock circuit.
7-4
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 7 — Trouble Shooting
PROBLEM
PILOT FLAME, BUT NO
MAIN FLAME
SOLUTION
1. Insufficient pilot flame.
2. Gas Fired Unit.
A. Manual gas cock closed.
B. Main gas valve inoperative.
C. Gas pressure regulator inoperative.
3. Oil fired unit.
A. Oil supply cut off by obstruction, closed valve, or loss of suction.
B. Supply pump inoperative.
C. No fuel.
D. Main oil valve inoperative.
E. Check oil nozzle, gun and lines.
4. Flame detector defective, sight tube obstructed or lens dirty.
5. Insufficient or no voltage at main fuel valve circuit terminal.
BURNER STAYS IN LOW
FIRE
1. Pressure or temperature above modulating control setting.
2. Manual-automatic switch in wrong position.
3. Inoperative modulating motor (see Section F).
4. Defective modulating control.
5. Binding or loose linkage, cams, setscrews, etc.
SHUTDOWN OCCURS
DURING FIRING
1. Loss or stoppage of fuel supply.
2. Defective fuel valve; loose electrical connection.
3. Flame detector weak or defective.
4. Lens dirty or sight tube obstructed.
5. If the programmer lockout switch has not tripped, check the limit circuit for an
opened safety control.
6. If the programmer lockout switch has tripped:
A. Check fuel lines and valves.
B. Check flame detector.
C. Check for open circuit in running interlock circuit.
D. The flame failure light is energized by ignition failure, main flame failure,
inadequate flame signal, or open control in the running interlock circuit.
Part No. 750-225
7-5
Chapter 7 — Trouble Shooting
PROBLEM
SHUTDOWN OCCURS
DURING FIRING
SOLUTION
7. Improper air/fuel ratio (lean fire).
A. Slipping linkage.
B. Damper stuck open.
C. Fluctuating fuel supply.
1). Temporary obstruction in fuel line.
2). Temporary drop in gas pressure.
3). Orifice gate valve accidentally opened (heavy oil).
8. Interlock device inoperative or defective.
MODULATING MOTOR
DOES NOT OPERATE
1. Manual-automatic switch in wrong position.
2. Linkage loose or jammed.
3. Motor does not drive to open or close during pre-purge or close on burner
shutdown.
A. Motor defective.
B. Loose electrical connection.
C. Damper motor transformer defective.
4. Motor does not operate on demand.
A. Manual/automatic switch in wrong position.
B. Modulating control improperly set or inoperative.
C. Motor defective.
D. Loose electrical connection.
E. Damper motor transformer defective.
7-6
Part No. 750-94
Chapter 8
Inspection and Maintenance
Contents
A. GENERAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
B. FIRESIDE CLEANING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
C. WATER LEVEL CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
D. WATER GAUGE GLASS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
E. ELECTRICAL CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
F. FLAME SAFETY CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6
G. OIL BURNER MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9
H. GAS BURNER MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
I. MOTORIZED GAS VALVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11
J. SOLENOID VALVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
K. AIR CONTROL DAMPER, LINKAGE AND CAM SPRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12
L. FORCED DRAFT FAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
M. FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE REMOVAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13
N. INSPECTION AND ADJUSTMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-14
O. AIRBOX GASKET INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-17
P. FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-18
Q. SAFETY VALVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
R. FUEL OIL METERING VALVE, ADJUSTING AND RELIEF VALVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-19
S. THE AIR PUMP AND LUBRICATING SYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-24
T. REFRACTORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-28
U. OPENING AND CLOSING REAR DOOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-33
V. LUBRICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-35
W. OIL HEATERS - ELECTRIC, STEAM, HOT WATER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-37
X. COMBUSTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-38
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
A. GENERAL
Notice
For more information on your
flame safeguard system, refer to
the appropriate manual that was
provided with your boiler
! Caution
Inspection and maintenance
should be performed only by
trained personnel who are
familiar with this equipment.
Fa i l u r e t o f o l l o w t h e s e
instructions could result in
equipment damage
A well-planned maintenance program will help avoid unnecessary
down-time or costly repairs, promote safety, and aid boiler
inspectors. An inspection schedule with a listing of procedures
should be established. It is recommended that a boiler room log or
record be maintained. Recording of daily, weekly, monthly, and
yearly maintenance activities provides a valuable guide and aids in
obtaining economical and lengthy service from Cleaver-Brooks
equipment. A boiler inspection schedule is shown in Table 8-5. It is
important to realize that the frequency of inspection will depend on
variable conditions: such as load, fuel, system requirements, boiler
environment (indoor/outdoor) etc.
Good housekeeping helps maintain a professional appearing boiler
room. Only trained and authorized personnel should be permitted to
operate, adjust, or repair the boiler and its related equipment. The
boiler room should be kept free of all material and equipment not
necessary to the operation of the boiler or heating system.
Even though the boiler has electrical and mechanical devices that
make it automatic or semi-automatic in operation, the devices
require systematic and periodic maintenance. Any automatic
feature does not relieve the operator from responsibility, but rather
frees the operator from certain repetitive chores providing time to
devote to upkeep and maintenance.
Alertness in recognizing an unusual noise, improper gauge reading,
leaks, etc., can make the operator aware of a developing
malfunction and permit prompt corrective action that may prevent
extensive repairs or unexpected downtime. Any leaks - fuel, water,
steam, exhaust gas - should be repaired promptly and under
conditions that observe necessary safety precautions. Preventive
maintenance measures, such as regularly checking the tightness of
connections, locknuts, setscrews, packing glands, etc., should be
included in regular maintenance activities.
Periodic Inspection
Insurance regulations and local laws require periodic inspection of
the pressure vessel by an authorized inspector. Section H of Chapter
3 contains information relative to the inspection.
Inspections are usually, though not necessarily, scheduled for
periods of normal boiler down time, such as an off season. This
major inspection can often be used to accomplish maintenance,
replacement or repairs that cannot easily be done at other times.
Inspection also serves as a good basis for establishing a schedule
for annual, monthly, or other periodic maintenance programs.
While the inspection pertains primarily to the waterside and fireside
surfaces of the pressure vessel, it provides the operator an excellent
opportunity for detailed inspection and check of all components of
the boiler including piping, valves, pumps, gaskets, refractory, etc.
Comprehensive cleaning, spot painting or repainting, and the
replacement of expendable items should be planned for and taken
care of during this time. Any major repairs or replacements that may
8-2
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
be required should also, if possible, be coordinated with the period
of boiler shutdown.
Replacement spare parts, if not on hand, should be ordered
sufficiently prior to shutdown.
Cleaver-Brooks boilers are designed, engineered, and built to provide
long life and excellent service. Good operating practices and
conscientious maintenance and care will assure efficiency and
economy from their operation, and will contribute to many years of
performance.
Notice
Cleaver-Brooks genuine parts
should be used to ensure proper
operation.Contact your local
Cleaver-Brooks representative for
parts information and ordering
A total protection plan includes a Planned Maintenance Program that
covers many of the items included in this chapter.
For information regarding a total protection plan, contact your local
Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative.
B. FIRESIDE CLEANING
Soot and non-combustibles are effective insulators, and, if allowed
to accumulate, will reduce heat transfer to the water and increase
fuel consumption. Soot and other deposits can be very moistureabsorbent, and may attract moisture to form corrosive acids that
will deteriorate fireside metal.
Clean-out should be performed at regular and frequent intervals,
depending upon load, type, and quality of fuel, internal boiler
temperature, and combustion efficiency. A stack temperature
thermometer can be used as a guide to clean-out intervals since an
accumulation of soot deposits will raise the flue gas temperature.
Tube cleaning is accomplished by opening the front and rear doors.
Tubes may be brushed from either end. All loose soot and
accumulations should be removed. Any soot, or other deposits,
should be removed from the furnace and tube sheets.
Refer to Section U of Chapter 8 for instructions on properly closing
rear heads.
The flue gas outlet and stack should be inspected annually and
cleaned as necessary. Commercial firms are available to perform the
work. The stack should be inspected for damage and repaired as
required.
The fireside should be thoroughly cleaned prior to any extended layup of the boiler. Depending upon circumstances, a protective
coating may be required. See Section I in Chapter 3.
C. WATER LEVEL CONTROLS
The need to periodically check water level controls and the
waterside of the pressure vessel cannot be overemphasized. Most
instances of major boiler damage are the result of operating with
low water, or the use of untreated (or incorrectly) treated water.
Always be sure of the boiler water level. On steam boilers, the water
column should be blown down daily. Check samples of boiler water
and condensate in accordance with procedures recommended by
Part No. 750-225
8-3
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative. Refer to
Sections G and H in Chapter 3 for blowdown instructions and
internal inspection procedures.
Since low-water cutoff devices are generally set by the original
manufacturer, no attempt should be made to adjust these controls
to alter the point of low-water cutoff or point of pump cut-in or cutout. If a low-water device should become erratic in operation, or if
its setting changes from previously established levels, contact your
local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative.
Steam Boiler
Figure 8-1 is a replica of the low-water cutoff plate attached to a
steam boiler. The instructions should be followed on a definite
schedule.The controls normally function for long periods of time,
which may lead to laxity in testing on the assumption that normal
operation will continue indefinitely.
On a steam boiler, the head mechanism of the low-water cutoff
device(s) should be removed from the bowl at least semi-annually
to check and clean the float ball, the internal moving parts, and the
bowl or water column.
Figure 8-1 Low Water Warning
Plate
Remove the pipe plugs from the tees or crosses and make certain
the cross-connecting piping is clean and free of obstructions.
Controls must be mounted in a plumb position for proper
performance. Determine that piping is vertically aligned after
shipment and installation and throughout life of equipment.
A blowdown of the water controls on a steam boiler should be
performed daily
Hot Water Boiler
It is impractical to blowdown the low-water cutoff devices on a hot
water boiler since the entire water content of the system would
become involved. Many hot water systems are fully closed and any
loss of water will require make-up and additional feedwater
treatment that might not otherwise be necessary. Since the boiler
and system arrangement usually make it impractical to perform
daily and monthly maintenance of the low-water cutoff devices, it is
essential to verify proper operation. Remove the operating
mechanism from the bowl annually or more frequently, if possible,
to check and clean float ball, internal moving parts, and the bowl
housing. Also check the cross-connecting piping to be certain that
it is clean and free of obstruction.
Figure 8-2 Low Water Cutoff Cutaway View
D. WATER GAUGE GLASS
A broken or discolored glass should be replaced at once. Periodic
replacement should be a part of the maintenance program. Always
use new gaskets when replacing a glass. Use a proper size rubber
packing. Do not use loose packing, which could be forced below the
glass and possibly plug the valve opening.
Close the valves when replacing the glass. Slip a packing nut, a
packing washer, and packing ring onto each end of the glass. Insert
8-4
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
one end of the glass into the upper gauge valve body far enough to
allow the lower end to be dropped into the lower body. Slide the
packing nuts onto each valve and tighten.
It is recommended that the boiler is off and cool when the glass is
replaced. However if the glass is replaced while the boiler is in
service, open the blowdown and slowly bring the glass to operating
temperature by opening the gauge valves slightly. After glass is
warmed up, close the blowdown valve and open the gauge valves
completely.
Check try-cocks and gauge cocks for freedom of operation and clean
as required. It is imperative that the gauge cocks are mounted in
exact alignment. If they are not, the glass will be strained and may
fail prematurely.
E. ELECTRICAL CONTROLS
The operating controls should be inspected monthly. Examine
tightness of electrical connections and keep the controls clean.
Remove any dust that accumulates in the interior of the control
using a low pressure air. Take care not to damage the mechanism.
! Warning
Do not attempt to change the
gauge glass while the boiler is
in service. Failure to follow
these instructions could result
in serious personal injury or
death
Examine any mercury tube switches for damage or cracks. Dark
scum over the normally bright surface of the mercury, may lead to
erratic switching action. Be certain that controls are correctly
leveled. The piping leading to the pressure control actuators should
be cleaned, if necessary. Covers should be left on controls at all
times.
Dust and dirt can cause excessive wear and overheating of motor
starter and relay contacts. Use a burnishing tool or a hard surface
paper to clean and polish contacts. Starter contacts are plated with
silver and are not harmed by discoloration and slight pitting.
Replacement of the contacts is necessary only if the silver has worn
thin.
Thermal relay units (overloads) are of the melting-alloy type and,
when tripped, the alloy must be given time to re-solidify before relay
can be reset. If the overloads trip out repeatedly when the motor
current is normal, replace them with new overloads. If the condition
continues after replacement, it will be necessary to determine the
cause of excessive current draw at the overloads.
! Caution
Do not use files or abrasive
materials such as sandpaper on
the contact points. Failure to
follow these instructions could
result in equipment damage.
Power supply to the boiler must be protected with dual element
fuses (fusetrons) or circuit breakers. Similar fuses should be used in
branch circuits. Standard one-shot fuses are not recommended.
Information given in Figure 8-1 is included for guidance to fuse
requirements.
F. FLAME SAFETY CONTROL
The microprocessor based control requires minimal maintenance
because the safety and logic timings are inaccessible. There also are
not any accessible contacts. Check to see that the retaining screw
is securely holding the chassis to the mounting base. Also check to
see that the amplifier and the program module are tightly inserted.
Part No. 750-225
8-5
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Table 8-1 Recommended Maximum “Fusetron” Fuse Sizes
ELECTRICAL LOAD
MOTOR, OIL HEATER, & CCT FUSE SIZING
RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM "FUSETRON" FUSE SIZES
SINGLE PHASE 50/60 HERTZ
THREE PHASE 50/60 HERTZ
1/4 HP MOTOR
110-120 V
FRN-8
220-240 V
FRN-4-1/2
200-208 V
FRN-1-8/10
220-240 V
FRN-1-8/10
1/3 HP MOTOR
1/2 HP MOTOR
FRN-9
FRN-12
FRN-4-1/2
FRN-6-1/4
FRN-1-8/10
FRN-2-8/10
FRN-1-8/10
FRN-2-8/10
3/4 HP MOTOR
1 HP MOTOR
FRN-17-1/2
FRN-20
FRN-9
FRN-10
FRN-4-1/2
FRN-5
1-1/2 HP MOTOR
2 HP MOTOR
3 HP MOTOR
FRN-25
FRN-30
FRN-40
FRN-12
FRN-15
FRN-20
5 HP MOTOR
7-1/2 HP MOTOR
10 HP MOTOR
15 HP MOTOR
20 HP MOTOR
346-416 V
440-480 V
FRS-1
550-660 V
FRS-8/10
FRS-1-8/10
FRS-1
FRS-1-4/10
FRS-8/10
FRS-1
FRN-4-1/2
FRN-5
FRS-2-1/4
FRS-3-2/10
FRS-1-8/10
FRS-2-1/4
FRS-1-4/10
FRS-1-8/10
FRN-7
FRN-9
FRN-12
FRN-7
FRN-9
FRN-12
FRS-4
FRS-5-6/10
FRS-8
FRS-3-2/10
FRS-4-1/2
FRS-6-1/4
FRS-2-1/2
FRS-3-1/2
FRS-5
FRN-35
FRN-50
FRN-20
FRN-30
FRN-20
FRN-30
FRS-12
FRS-17-1/2
FRS-10
FRS-15
FRS-8
FRS-12
FRN-60
FRN-40
FRN-60
FRN-70
FRN-35
FRN-50
FRN-70
FRS-20
FRS-30
FRS-40
FRS-17-1/2
FRS-25
FRS-35
FRS-15
FRS-20
FRS-25
25 HP MOTOR
30 HP MOTOR
FRN-90
FRN-100
FRN-80
FRN-100
FRS-50
FRS-60
FRS-40
FRS-50
FRS-35
FRS-40
40 HP MOTOR
50 HP MOTOR
60 HP MOTOR
FRN-150
FRN-175
FRN-200
FRN-150
FRN-175
FRN-200
FRS-80
FRS-100
FRS-125
FRS-70
FRS-80
FRS-100
FRS-50
FRS-70
FRS-80
75 HP MOTOR
100 HP MOTOR
FRN-250
FRN-350
FRN-250
FRN-300
FRS-150
FRS-125
FRS-150
FRS-100
FRS-125
125 HP MOTOR
150 HP MOTOR
200 HP MOTOR
FRN-450
FRN-500
FRN-400
FRN-450
FRN-600
FRS-200
FRS-225
FRS-300
FRS-150
FRS-200
FRS-250
2 KW HEATER
FRN-20
FRN-12
FRN-7
FRN-7
FRS-4-1/2
FRS-3-2/10
3 KW HEATER
5 KW HEATER
FRN-30
FRN-50
FRN-15
FRN-25
FRN-10
FRN-15
FRN-10
FRN-15
FRS-6-1/4
FRS-10
FRS-5-6/10
FRS-8
FRS-4-1/2
FRS-6-1/4
FRN-25
FRN-30
FRN-45
FRN-25
FRN-30
FRN-45
FRS-15
FRS-25
FRS-35
FRS-12
FRS-17-1/2
FRS-25
FRS-10
FRS-12
FRS-20
7-1/2 KW HEATER
10 KW HEATER
15 KW HEATER
CONTROL CIRCUIT
XFMR VOLTAGE
1/2 KVA.
1 KVA.
1-1/2 KVA.
FRN-7
FRN-4
FRN-3-1/2
FRN-15
FRN-8
FRN-7
FRN-17-1/2
FRN-12
FRN-10
FRN-25
FRN-15
FRN-12
346-416
440-480
FRS-2-8/10
FRS-2-1/2
FRS-4
FRS-3-1/2
FRS-6-1/4
FRS-5-6/10
FRS-8
FRS-7
550-600
FRS-2
FRS-3-1/2
FRS-4-1/2
SECONDARY FUSE
FRN-5-6/10
FRN-12
FRN-15
CONSULT CLEAVER-BROOKS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPT. FOR "FUSETRON" FUSE SIZE
FOR POWER SYSTEMS WITH VOLTAGE, FREQUENCY OR PHASE NOT MENTIONED ABOVE.
! Warning
When replacing a control, be
sure to lock out the main
power supply switch since the
control is “hot” even though
t h e b u r n e r s w i t c h i s o f f.
Fa i l u r e t o f o l l o w t h e s e
instructions could result in
serious personal injury or
death.
8-6
2 KVA.
110-120
200-208
220-240
FRS-5-6/10
FRN-20
The relay's self-diagnostic ability includes advising when it or its
plug-in modules are at fault and require replacement.
Your spare control should be stored in a dry atmosphere and
wrapped in plastic. During an extended shutdown (e.g., seasonal),
the active control should be removed and stored. Moisture can
cause problems with control operation.
It is recommended that service be rotated between the active and a
spare control to assure a working replacement is available.
Be sure the connecting contacts on the control and its base are not
bent out of position.
The flame detector lens should be cleaned as often as operating
conditions demand. Use a soft cloth moistened with detergent to
clean the lens.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
A safety check procedure should be established to test the complete
safeguard system at least once a month, or more often. Tests should
verify safety shutdown and a safety lockout upon failure to ignite the
pilot, upon failure to ignite the main flame, and upon loss of flame.
Each of the conditions should be checked on a scheduled basis.
The following tests should be used to test the complete safeguard
system. If the sequence of events is not as described, then a
problem may exist. Contact your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized
representative for assistance.
Checking Pilot Flame Failure
Close the gas pilot shutoff cock Chapter 2, Figure 2-11). Also shut
off the main fuel supply. Turn the burner switch “on.”
The pilot ignition circuit will be energized at the end of the pre-purge
period. There should be an ignition spark, but no flame. Since there
is no flame to be detected, the program relay will signal the
condition. The ignition circuit will deenergize and the control will
lock out on a safety shutdown. The flame failure light (and optional
alarm) will be activated. The blower motor will run through the postpurge and stop.
Turn the burner switch off. Reset the safety switch. Reopen the gas
pilot shutoff cock and re-establish main fuel supply.
Checking Failure to Light Main Flame
Leave the gas pilot shutoff cock open. Shut off the main burner fuel
supply. Turn the burner switch on. The pilot will light upon
completion of the pre-purge period. The main fuel valve(s) will be
energized, but there should be no main flame.
The fuel valve(s) deenergize within 4 seconds after the main burner
ignition trial ends. The control will lock out on a safety shutdown.
The flame failure light (and optional alarm) will be activated. The
blower motor will run through the post-purge and stop.
Turn the burner switch off. Reset the safety switch. Re-establish
main fuel supply.
Checking Loss of Flame
With the burner in normal operation, shut off the main burner fuel
supply to extinguish main flame.
The fuel valve(s) will be deenergized and the relay will signal the
condition within 4 seconds. The control will then lock out on a
safety shutdown. The flame failure light (and optional alarm) will be
activated. The blower motor will run through the post-purge and
stop.
Turn the burner switch off. Reset the safety switch. Re-establish
main fuel supply.
Part No. 750-225
8-7
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
The flame detector lens should be cleaned as often as operating
conditions demand. Use a soft cloth moistened with detergent if
necessary.
G. OIL BURNER MAINTENANCE
The burner should be inspected for evidence of damage due to
improperly adjusted combustion. Any soot buildup on the diffuser or
the oil nozzle should be removed. The setting of the oil nozzle in
relation to the diffuser and other components is important for proper
firing and should be checked. See Section T in Chapter 6.
Oil Strainers
Oil strainers should be cleaned frequently to maintain a free and full
flow of fuel.
Light Oil Strainers
The fuel oil strainer screen must be removed and cleaned at regular
intervals. It is advisable to remove the screen each month and clean
thoroughly by immersing it in solvent and blowing it dry with
compressed air. To remove, loosen the cover cap screw, being
careful not to lose the copper gasket. If necessary, tap the strainer
cover gently to loosen. Check the cover gasket for damage and
replace if necessary. Slip pliers into the cross on the top of the
strainer and twist counter-clockwise to remove the basket.
Reassemble in reverse order.
Heavy Oil Strainers
Keep the cartridge of the oil strainer clear by regularly giving the
exterior handle one complete turn in either direction. Do so this
often until experience indicates cleaning frequency necessary to
maintain optimum conditions of flow. If the handle turns hard,
rotate the handle back and forward until it can be turned through a
complete revolution. Do not force it with a wrench or other tool.
Drain the sump as often as experience indicates the necessity.
Remove the sump, or the head and cartridge assembly, for thorough
cleaning and inspection at frequent intervals. Exercise care not to
damage the cartridge discs or the cleaner blades. Wash the
cartridge in solvents. Do not attempt to disassemble the cartridge.
Cleaning Oil Nozzle
The design of the burner, together with the oil purge system on a
heavy oil burner, make it unnecessary to clean the oil nozzle during
periods of operation. A routine check and any necessary cleaning
should be made during off periods or when the burner is firing on
gas.
If at any time the burner flame appears “stringy” or “lazy,” it is
possible that the nozzle tip or swirler has become partially clogged
or worn. Any blockage within the tip will cause the air pressure
gauge to increase above its normal value.
8-8
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Disassemble with the power off by unlatching and withdrawing the
burner gun. Insert the nozzle body into the hanger vice and use the
spanner wrench to remove the tip. Carefully remove the swirler and
seating spring being careful not to drop or damage any parts. See
Figure 8-3 and Figure 8-4.
Perform any necessary cleaning with a suitable solvent. Use a soft
fiber brush or pointed piece of soft wood for cleaning. Do not use
wire or a sharp metallic object, which could scratch or deform the
orifices as well as the precision ground surfaces of the swirler and
tip. Inspect for scratches or signs of wear or erosion, which may
make the nozzle unfit for further use. Take the necessar y
precautions in working with solvents.
The tip and swirler are a matched set, which are precision lapped
at the time of assembly. The close fit of the lapped surfaces must
be maintained in order to provide optimum performance. Additional
lapping may be required to provide better atomization for more
efficient combustion. Do not interchange parts if a spare is kept. In
reassembling, be certain that the seating spring is in place and that
it is holding the swirler tightly against the tip. The swirler is
stationary and does not rotate, but rather imparts a swirling motion
to the oil.
NOZZLE BODY
STANDARD NOZZLE
TIP
SPRING
SWIRLER
SPANNER WRENCH
Figure 8-3 Standard Burner
Nozzle Components
See that the plugged hole is at the bottom of the nozzle body when
the gun is installed.
NOZZLE BODY
Cleaning Air Purge Nozzle (No. 6 Oil) and Back Pressure
Orifice Nozzle (No. 2 Oil)
The air purge nozzle and its strainer should be inspected
periodically and cleaned. The nozzle consists of a tip and internal
core. Clean all internal surfaces of the tip and the slotted parts of
the core using a wood splinter to avoid damage from scratching.
Replace the core, setting it tightly but not excessively so.
Clean the strainer screen carefully to remove any foreign matter.
Use suitable solvents in cleaning. Extremely hot water at high
velocity is also helpful in cleaning. Replace strainer by screwing it
into the nozzle body only finger tight. Do not use an orifice of a size
other than originally installed.
HIGH TURNDOWN
NOZZLE TIIP
SPRING
SWIRLER
SPANNER WRENCH
Figure 8-4 High Turndown
Burner Nozzle Components
Ignition System
For best results, maintain the proper gap and dimensions of the
ignition electrode(s). Figures 6-14 and 6-15 (Chapter 6) show the
proper settings.
Inspect the electrode tip for signs of pitting or combustion deposits
and dress as required with a fine file. Inspect the porcelain insulator
(s) for any cracks that might be present. If there are cracks, replace
the electrode since they can cause grounding of the ignition voltage.
Since carbon is an electrical conductor, it is necessary to keep the
insulating portion of electrode(s) wiped clean if any carbon is
present. Ammonia will aid in removing carbon or soot.
Part No. 750-225
8-9
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Check ignition cables for cracks in the insulation. Also see that all
connections between the transformer and the electrodes are tight.
Periodically remove the access plug from the gas pilot aspirator
(Chapter 6, Figure 6-15) and clean out any accumulated lint or
other foreign material.
H. GAS BURNER MAINTENANCE
The gas burner components should be inspected for evidence of
damage due to improperly adjusted combustion. Combustion
adjustments should be checked monthly. See Section T in Chapter
6.
Check periodically for a proper seal between the end of the burner
housing and boiler refractory. Any deterioration of the seal should
be corrected, as an improper or poor seal allows air leaks, which
can cause overheating or burning of the burner housing.
Whenever the burner is removed, the diffuser, gas housing and gas
spuds (HTB model only) should be checked for any deterioration.
Verify that the diffuser skirt conforms to the bore of the burner
housing so as to minimize the amount of combustion air which
bypasses the diffuser. If the burner is a high turndown burner (HTB)
model, check to see that the diffuser is properly located in reference
to the gas spuds. There should be 1/4” between the edge of the
diffuser fins and the gas spuds when the burner is installed. Check
to see that the diffuser fins do not interfere with the gas ports or gas
spuds in the burner housing (see Chapter 6, Figure 6-14). See
Section V in Chapter 6 for more information.
Check the electrode setting for any cracks that might be present on
the porcelain insulator. Replace the electrode if cracking is evident,
since cracking can cause grounding of the ignition voltage. Inspect
the tip of the electrode for signs of pitting, combustion deposits and
wear, and dress as required with a fine file. See Chapter 6, Figure
6-14 & 6-15 for electrode settings.
Periodically remove the access plug from the gas pilot aspirator (see
Chapter 6, Figure 6-16) and clean out any accumulated lint or other
foreign material.
Check the ignition cables for cracks in the insulation. Verify that all
connections between the transformer and the electrode are tight.
I. MOTORIZED GAS VALVE
The motorized gas valve (Hydramotor) operating mechanism is
completely immersed in oil and little maintenance is required
because of the sealed design. However, proper operation should be
checked on a routine periodic basis.
Keep outer parts of the valve clean, especially the stem between the
operator and the valve. A nicked, scored or otherwise damaged
valve stem can cause leakage. Do not remove dust covers if
installed.
8-10
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
The packing gland is of the O-ring type. If oil is noticed around the
operator base or if leakage occurs, repair by replacing any leaking
O-rings and refilling the actuator with oil.
If the actuator is sluggish or fails to operate, even after the oil level
is checked, replace the entire operator portion.
J. SOLENOID VALVES
Foreign matter between the valve seat and seat disc can cause
leakage. Valves are readily disassembled; however, care must be
used during disassembly to be sure that internal parts are not
damaged during the removal and that reassembly is in proper order.
A low hum or buzzing will normally be audible when the coil is
energized. If the valve develops a loud buzzing or chattering noise,
check for proper voltage and clean the plunger assembly and
interior plunger tube thoroughly. Do not use any oil. Be sure that the
plunger tube and solenoid are tight when reassembled. Take care
not to nick, dent, or damage the plunger tube.
Coils may be replaced without removing the valve from the line.
Check coil position and make sure that any insulating washers or
retaining springs are reinstalled in proper order.
K. AIR CONTROL DAMPER, LINKAGE AND CAM
SPRING
The burner air control damper should be checked for free movement
as a part of the monthly inspection. With the burner off and the
jackshaft damper control rod disconnected, the air control damper
should rotate freely through its entire range of movement. Any
resistance to movement or excessive play in the support bearing
should be investigated and corrected before the burner is put back
in operation.
! Warning
Be sure to turn off power to
the valve in order to avoid
electrical shock. Failure to
follow these instructions could
result in serious personal
injury or death.
The overall tightness of the linkage assembly should be checked
monthly. If necessary, tighten the setscrews and the connections at
the uniballs. Check the uniballs for wear and replace if necessary.
The linkage assembly should be tight but should not bind. If the
linkage assembly is binding, determine the cause of the binding and
correct as necessary.
Linkage rod end attachment points should be marked on the
variable displacement linkage arms as an aid in subsequent
reassembly.
Inspection of the air damper and linkage bearings should be
performed on a more frequent basis if the boiler is operating in a
dirty environment.
The fuel cam profile spring should be inspected monthly for wear,
scoring or distortion. If any of the questionable conditions are found,
the spring must be replaced immediately to avoid the possibility of
breakage in service. Use care to avoid damaging the cam or spring
during installation.
! Caution
Combustion should be checked
and readjusted as required
whenever the burner is removed
or any control linkage is
disturbed. Failure to follow these
instructions could result in
equipment damage.
Lubricate occasionally with a non-gumming, dripless, hightemperature lubricant such as graphite or a silicone derivative.
Part No. 750-225
8-11
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
L. FORCED DRAFT FAN
Figure 8-5 illustrates the forced draft fan and motor mounting in
relation to the fan housing. The position of the fan housing and the
clearance between it and the fan (impeller) is extremely important
to the output capacity of the fan.
The following procedures for installing and adjusting are as follows:
1. Bolt the motor securely to the head.
2. Slide the fan onto the shaft, but do not tighten the setscrews.
3. Turn the spacers on the studs until they contact the headplate.
4. Place external tooth lockwashers next to the spacers and install
the fan housing on the studs. Hold the fan housing in place with
nuts and lockwashers. Finger tighten the nuts.
5. Slide the impeller outward until its vanes contact the fan
housing. The housing must be parallel to the impeller. Adjust
the spacers as necessary to align the housing with the impeller.
6. Slide the impeller toward the motor. Use a feeler gauge to
obtain .030-.050” clearance between the impeller and the
housing.
7. Secure the key and then tighten the impeller hub setscrews.
Using a selected vane, rotate the impeller while checking to see
that the clearance between the impeller and the housing
remains constant and within the specified 0.030-0.050"
clearance.
Figure 8-5 Forced Draft Fan
Mounting
8. Install the air duct assembly through the head opening. Tighten
the screws securing the air duct to the fan housing only enough
to create a seal between the neoprene gasket and the housing.
9. After connecting the motor leads, verify that the impeller
rotation is counter-clockwise when viewed from the motor end.
M. FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE REMOVAL
Notice
If the boiler is installed in a dusty
location, check the vanes
occasionally for deposits of dust
or dirt. These buildups can cause
a decrease in air capacity, or lead
to an unbalanced condition or
cause damage to the equipment.
Before the boiler is commissioned at the job site, the IFGR system
should be visually inspected. The fan/motor cassette should be
removed to expose the internal IFGR linkage and damper. Remove
the fan/motor cassette as follows:
! Warning
Disconnect and lock out electrical power to the boiler
before removing the fan/motor cassette. Failure to follow
these instructions can result in electrical shock and serious
personal injury or death.
1. Disconnect and lock out electric power to the boiler.
2. Be sure that the front door is securely bolted to the boiler
8-12
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
! Warning
Do not remove the davit arm assembly without first
ensuring that the front door is securely bolted to the boiler.
Failure to follow these instructions can result in serious
personal injury or death.
3. Release the davit arm by removing the retaining bolt at the top
center of the boiler.
! Warning
When suspending the fan/motor cassette from the davit
arm, all equipment used must be of adequate strength to
safely support the complete cassette. Failure to follow
these instructions can cause injury or death.
! Caution
Chains or other devices used to attach a lifting device to the
fan/motor cassette must be arranged so the cassette does
not rotate or tilt when removed from the front head. Failure
to follow these instructions could result in damage to
attachment.
4. Connect the davit arm to the fan/motor cassette using the
suspension system diagramed in Figure 8-7.
5. Arrange the attaching chains so the lifting point is over the
motor shaft centerline and the center of balance for the fan/
motor cassette. This point is approximately 4-inches from the
motor backplate for 600-800 hp units, and 3-inches for 250500 hp units.
Figure 8-6 IFGR Combustion Air
and Flue Gas Flows
6. Remove the fan/motor cassette fastening nuts (Figure 8-8).
7. Swing the fan/motor cassette to the side and secure it to the
boiler using high strength cord. Do not over extend the motor
wires.
N. INSPECTION AND ADJUSTMENT
NOx levels should be checked periodically to ensure compliance
with all local and federal regulations, as well as to ensure that the
boiler is operating at maximum efficiency. Linkages should be
inspected and free movement (no binding) of the IFGR damper
confirmed.
Part No. 750-225
! Caution
Be sure that the fan motor
wiring and conduit are not
stretched during the fan/motor
cassette removal. Failure to
follow these instructions can
result in damage to the
equipment.
8-13
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
COME-ALONG
OR
HEAVY TURNBUCKLE
DAVIT ARM
CHAIN
BACK PLATE GASKET
INLET GASKET
FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE
NOTE: 96” (400-800 HP) RECOMENDSUSING A 3-POINT DAVIT ATTACHMENT FROM THE DAVIT ARM TO THE FAM / MOTOR CASSETTE
Figure 8-7 Fan / Motor Cassette
Increasing or decreasing NOx levels could indicate incorrect damper
positioning, loose linkages, an improper air-to-fuel ratio, or stack
draft changes. If adjustment is required, or if problems persist,
contact your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative for
further assistance.
As ash and products of combustion pass through the IFGR damper,
there will be some accumulation on the damper, windbox, and other
parts of the IFGR system and burner.
To ensure proper operation of the IFGR system and burner,
inspection and cleaning should be performed at regular intervals,
depending on the load, type of fuel, and combustion temperatures.
1. With the IFGR damper exposed, inspect the internal linkages for
secure connections, and check for free movement of the linkage
arms and the IFGR damper assembly. To check for free
movement of the linkage separate the external linkage from the
jackshaft drive arm(s) and cycling the exterior linkage through
its range of movement.
2. The clearance between the impeller and backplate should be
checked, and adjusted, if required. Impeller clearances must be
as shown in Figure 8-2.
3. The impeller clearance is checked by inserting a long feeler
gauge of the proper thickness between the impeller and the
impeller housing. Impeller clearances should be checked at the
highest fin on the impeller (that fin which is closest to the
impeller housing), and must be checked at each point where the
housing is attached to the motor backplate.
4. If the impeller clearance is not correct at all points, make
adjustments as follows:
8-14
A
Loosen the retaining nuts on both sides of the impeller
housing.
B
Adjust the retainers for the correct impeller clearance at
two housing attachment points 180° apart.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Table 8-2 Impeller Clearances
STANDARD
60 PPM
30 PPM
25 PPM
20 PPM
.040 ±.010
0.050 +.010/–.005
.060 +.005/–.000
C
Adjust the retainers for correct clearance at the housing
attachment points 90° from those initially adjusted.
D
Adjust for correct impeller clearance at the remaining
attachment points.
5. Check and replace any gaskets that have been damaged.
Gaskets that have been in use for one year or more should be
replaced. In particular, inspect the airbox gasket (Figure 8-8) for
damage. If it needs to be replace, refer to Section O for
installation instructions.
COMBUSTION AIR INLET
FLUE OUTLET
FRONT DOOR
BACKPLATE GASKET
CASSETTE MOUNTING BOLTS
AIRBOX GASKET
CASSETTE LIFTING EYES
FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE
FLANGE COLLAR
AIRBOX
INSULATED PARTITION
FLUE GAS TRANSFER
PORT WITH IFGR DAMPER
FOURTH-PASS TUBES
DAMPER DRIVE ARM
COMBUSTION AIR FAN
OVER-TRAVEL MECHANISM
IFGR DAMPER LINKAGE
QUICK DISCONNECT LINKAGE
JACKSHAFT ARM
THROAT AND LINER TILE
FURNACE
REAR BURNER DRAWER GASKET
GAS SPUDS
BURNER DRAWER
BURNER HOUSING
BURNER DRAWER SUPPORTS
INNER PLATE CLAMPS
INSULATION
(20-30 PPM NOx SYSTEMS)
WINDBOX
FRONT DOOR BOLTS
FLUE GAS FLOW
COMBUSTION AIR FLOW
Figure 8-8 Induced Flue Gas Recirculation System, General Arrangement
Part No. 750-225
8-15
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
OVER-TRAVEL MECHANISM
30°*
SINGLE FUEL ARRANGEMENT
JACKSHAFT LINKAGE ROD
IFGR DAMPER CONTROL
GAS JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
60°*
QUICK-DISCONNECT LINKAGE
OIL JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
* NOMINAL: ACTUAL POSITION VARIES
WITH NOx REQUIREMENT
JACKSHAFT
PROXIMITY SWITCH JACKSHAFT ARM
DUAL FUEL ARRANGEMENT
Figure 8-9 IFGR Damper Linkage
O. AIRBOX GASKET INSTALLATION
! Caution
W h e n r e p l a c i n g t h e a i r b ox
gasket, use only Cleaver-Brooks
components. Failure to use
components designed for this
application can result in
improper combustion. Failure to
follow these instructions can
result in equipment damage
8-16
If the fan/motor cassette is opened for any reason after the unit has
been in operation for one year, the airbox gasket should be replaced.
Attach the airbox gasket to the inlet box with high-temperature
silicone adhesive/sealant, using two beads of silicone about 1/4” in
from each side of the gasket (gasket surface is 2" wide).
1. Secure the gasket in position with clamps, using strips of wood
on top of the gasket for a bearing surface.
2. After the silicone has dried (approximately 24 hours), remove
the clamps and strips of wood.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
P. FAN/MOTOR CASSETTE INSTALLATION
The fan/motor cassette can be closed as follows:
1. Check that all adjustment screws are tight, and check the
linkage and IFGR damper for free movement before closing the
unit.
2. Position the cassette into the front door.
3. Slide the cassette into position until it begins to contact the inlet
gasket (Figure 8-8) then measure the clearance between the
cassette flange and the front door mounting face. There must be
clearance of at least 1/4" to provide adequate gasket
compression when the cassette is mounted tightly to the door.
Figure 8-10 Fan / Motor
Cassette
4. Secure the cassette with the fastening nuts.
JACKSHAFT LINKAGE ROD
JACKSHAFT LINKAGE ROD POSITION LABEL
QUICK DISCONNECT LINKAGE
OIL JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
PROXIMITY SWITCH AND DRIVE ARM
(COMBINATION GAS & OIL SYSTEMS ONLY)
GAS JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
2”
2-3/4”
JACKSHAFT LINKAGE ROD
GAS JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
40°
OIL JACKSHAFT DRIVE ARM
20°
THE IFGR SYSTEM CAN BE EQUIPPED WITH
EITHER A SINGLE OR DUAL LINKAGE ARM,
DEPENDING ON THE NUMBER OF FUELS
USED AND THE NOX LEVELS DESIRED. ALL
SINGLE-FUELED BOILERS HAVE A SINGLE
DRIVE ARM/ DUAL-FUELED BOILERS MAY OR
MAY NOT HAVE A DUAL ARM, DEPENDING ON
Figure 8-11 Jackshaft Linkage Settings
! Warning
Do not remove the davit arm assembly from the motor/fan
cassette without first verifying that the cassette is securely
bolted to the boiler. Failure to follow these instructions can
result in serious personal injury or death.
5. After the cassette has been secured to the front head, reconnect
the davit to the front door by screwing in the retaining bolt at the
top centerline.
Part No. 750-225
8-17
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Check occasionally that the fan is securely tightened to the motor
shaft. Check the clearance between the fan vanes and housing as
outlined above.
Q. SAFETY VALVES
The safety valve is a very important safety device and deserves
attention accordingly.
Follow the recommendations of your boiler inspector regarding
valve inspection and testing. The frequency of testing, either by the
use of the lifting lever or by raising the steam pressure, should be
based on the recommendation of your boiler inspector and/or the
valve manufacturer, and in accordance with sections VI and VII of
the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.
Avoid excessive operation of the safety valve; even one opening can
provide a means of leakage. Safety valves should be operated only
often enough to assure that they are in good working order. When a
pop test is required, raise the operating pressure to the set pressure
of the safety valve, allowing it to open and reseat as it would in
normal service.
Do not hand operate the valve with less than 75% of the stamped
set pressure exerted on the underside of the disc. When hand
operating, be sure to hold the valve in an open position long enough
to purge accumulated foreign material from the seat area and then
allow the valve to snap shut.
Frequent usage of the safety valve will cause the seat and disc to
become wire drawn or steam cut. This will cause the valve to leak
and necessitate down time of the boiler for valve repair or
replacement. Repair of a valve must be done only by the
manufacturer or his authorized representative.
Avoid having the operating pressure too near the safety valve set
pressure. A 10% differential is recommended. An even greater
differential is desirable and will assure better seat tightness and
valve longevity.
! Caution
Do not over tighten the
metering valve packing nut.
Excessive tightening of the
packing nut prevents free
movement of the metering
stem. Failure to follow these
instructions can cause
damage to the equipment.
R. FUEL OIL METERING VALVE, ADJUSTING
AND RELIEF VALVES
In the event that a leak occurs in the packing of the metering valve,
the packing nut should be snugged gradually to stop the leak.
If replacement of the metering valve packing is necessary, procure
kit P/N 880-370 and install in accordance with the following
procedure.
1. Shut off the oil flow. Be sure no pressure shows on the gauge.
2. Match-mark the cam hub and drive shaft. Match marking will
enable replacement of the cam in its original position and result
in a minimum of cam adjustment when the burner is refired.
3. Clamp or hold the metering stem in the down position.
8-18
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
FOR
IMPELLER
GROUP
"B"
8
9
SEE SHEET 2 FOR TABLES
AND PROCEDURES.
11
8
11
10
10
NOTE:
USE ITEM #24 ON ALL
STUDS AND NUTS.
FOR
IMPELLER
GROUP
"A"
4
BACK OF ITEM
3
4
2.45" TYP. SPACE (approx)
(adjust to aquire the specified
impeller to impeller housing gap)
2
3
4
5
FGR
N/A PPM
STD 60 PPM
2
16 17
1
16 17
CLEARANCE
.040"±
.010
30 PPM
25 PPM
.050"±
.010
.005
20 PPM
.060"±
.005
.000
15" TYP.
7
12 13 14 15
6
6
90° ± 1/64"/FT.
23
20 19
22
Figure 8-12 Blower Cartridge Assembly (1 of 2)
Part No. 750-225
8-19
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
ITEM
QTY
PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
USED ON
1
1
TABLE
BLOWER MOTER
-
2
1
TABLE
IMPELLER - OPEN TYPE
-
3
1
40-C-602
4
1
003-B-1276
BASE ASSY, MOUNTING-"LE"
4
1
003-1277
BASE ASSY, MOUNTING-"LE"
4
1
003-1278
BASE ASSY, MOUNTING-"LE"
4
1
003-2078
BASE ASSY, MOUNTING-"CBR"
4
1
003-2077
BASE ASSY, MOUNTING-"CBR"
4
1
003-2000
BASE ASSY, MOUNTING-"CBR"
7.5-15 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
7.5-10 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
20-40 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
15-30 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
50-75 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
40-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
7.5-15 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
20-40 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
15-30 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
50-75 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
40-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
1
085-03144
SUPPORT, MOTOR (085-03144)
6
1
085-03120
SUPPORT, MOTOR (085-03120)
6
1
085-03121
SUPPORT, MOTOR
7
1
841-01105
KEY (5/16" SQ. X 2-1/2" LG.)
10-75 MTR H.P.
8
1
077-00102
SPACER- 1/2 THK. (077-B-00432)
10-30 MTR H.P.
FOR IMPELLER 8
1
077-00479
SPACER- 5/16" THK. (077-B-00432)
10-30 MTR H.P.
GROUP "B"
8
FOR IMPELLER 9
1
1
077-00480
077-00479
SPACER- 5/16" THK. (077-B-00432)
SPACER- 5/16" THK. (077-B-00432)
40-75 MTR H.P.
10-30 MTR H.P.
GROUP "A"
GROUP "B"
-
60-75 TEFC MTR H.P.
30-40 ODP MTR H.P.
30 TEFC MTR H.P.
50-75 ODP MTR H.P.
9
1
952-00480
SPACER- 5/16" THK. (077-B-00432)
40-75 MTR H.P.
1
869-00177
NUT,JAMB-RH. SELF LOCK.(1-1/4"-12 UNF)
10-30 MTR H.P.
10
1
869-00180
NUT,JAMB-RH. SELF LOCK.(1-3/8"-12 UNF)
40-75 MTR H.P.
11
1
019-01398
WASHER, (1-1/4" ID X 2" OD)
10-30 MTR H.P.
11
1
019-01362
WASHER, (1-3/8" ID X 2.4" OD)
40-75 MTR H.P.
12
4
952-176
CAPSCREW, HEX, HD. 1/2"-13
13
13
14
4
4
4
4
868-95
869-00015
869-00017
952-00108
CAPSCREW, HEX, HD. 5/8"-11
NUT, HEX, 1/2"-13
NUT, HEX, 5/8"-11
WASHER, 1/2"
14
4
952-00101
WASHER, 5/8"
15
4
952-00094
LOCKWASHER, 1/2"
A7
IA
40-50 TEFC MTR H.P.
10
12
A7
IA
IC
IG
7.5-10 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
5
6
FOR IMPELLER
-
HOUSING - IMPELLER
OPTION
IC
IG
30-40 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
30 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
50-75 MTR H.P. (D.P.)
40-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
30-40 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
30 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
50-75 MTR H.P. (D.P.)
40-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
30-40 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
30 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
50-75 MTR H.P. (D.P.)
40-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
30-40 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
30 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
50-75 MTR H.P. (D.P.)
15
4
952-00084
LOCKWASHER, 5/8"
16
4
869-00015
NUT, HEX, 1/2"
16
4
869-00018
NUT, HEX, 3/4"
17
4
952-00094
LOCKWASHER, 1/2"
17
4
952-00095
LOCKWASHERS, 3/4"
19
8
869-00030
NUT, HEX, 3/8"-16
-
20
8
952-00093
LOCKWASHER, 3/8"
-
22
8
869-00101
NUT, COUPLING, 3/8"-16 X 1-3/4" LG
-
23
8
952-00106
WASHER, FLAT, 3/8" SAE TYPE
-
24
5oz
887-27
LUBRICANT, RUST PREVENTATIVE
-
40-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
0-15 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
0-10 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
20-75 MTR H.P. (D.P.)
15-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
0-15 MTR H.P.(D.P.)
0-10 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
20-75 MTR H.P. (D.P.)
15-75 MTR H.P. (TEFC)
Figure 8-12. Blower Cartridge Assembly (2 of 2)
8-20
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
“B”
“D”
LINKAGE CONNECTION POINT
HOLE #1
HOLE #2
NOTE: RECORD “INSTALLED”
VALUES ON THIS ILLUSTRATION
FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.
“C”
A._____ FLANGE COLLAR SETTING
B._____ DAMPER POSITION AT LOW-FIRE
C._____ DAMPER LINKAGE ARE ANGLE (DEGREES)
D._____ HOLE POSITION NUMBER
FLANGE COLLAR
“A”
DAMPERSHOWN IN THE LOW-FIRE POSITION
Figure 8-13 Flange Collar and Damper Settings (Top View)
DOUBLE SPRINGS
HOLE #1 (FAST OPENING DAMPER)
LOW-FIRE STOP SCREW
HIGH-FIRESTOPSCREW
EXTERNAL ARM
“B”
HOLE#5
(SLOW-OPENINGDAMPER)
HOLE#1
(SLOW-OPENINGDAMPER)
“A”
INTERNALARM
EXTERNALARM
HOLE POSITION
90°
NOTE: RECORD “INSTALLED”
VALUES ON THIS ILLUSTRATION
FOR FUTURE REFERENCE.
HOLE#8
(FAST OPENING DAMPER)
(FACTORYSETTINGANDRECOMMENDED
INITIALSETTINGFORINTERNALARM
INALL CASES)
A._____ EXTERNAL ARM HOLE POSITION
B._____ DEGREES
Figure 8-14 Overtravel Linkage Settings
Part No. 750-225
8-21
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
CAM FOLLOWER
SPRING
PACKING GLAND
GASKET*
GUIDE, BRASS, UPPER*
O-RING*
PACKING, TEFLON*
GUIDE, BRASS*
PACKING, TEFLON*
OIL FLOW
GUIDE, BRASS, W/O-RING*
FUEL OIL
CONTROLLER
ORIFICE
METERING VALVE STEM
ORIFICE RETAINING
SPRING
OIL TO
BURNER
*INCLUDED IN KIT 880-370
Figure 8-15 Metering Valve Packing Sequence
4. Loosen the setscrews in the cam hub and rotate, or move the
cam to a position where it does not interfere with stem removal.
5. Withdraw the metering valve stem and spring. Do not drop or
mishandle. Check for nicks or scratches. Check that the pin
holding the metering portion is not protruding. Back off the
packing gland.
6. Remove the capscrews holding the jack shaft support bracket so
that the bracket can be moved. It may also be necessary to
loosen the supporting bracket on the far end of the shaft.
7. Remove the existing packing and guides. Do not reuse the
packing and guides.
8. Lightly coat the stem with the lubricant provided with the
packing kit. Place the new packing, O-rings and guides onto the
stem in the sequence shown in Figure 8-15. The beveled face of
the guides and the teflon rings must face upward, with the
exception of the upper brass guide which is faced down. Be sure
that the O-rings are properly located.
9. Using the stem as a guide, insert the assembled packing into
the cavity, then withdraw the stem.
10. In the event the packing is too high, remove one teflon packing
from each side of the middle brass guide as needed.
Under no circumstances eliminate the two teflon packings on
only one side of the brass guide.
11. Replace the gasket, put the support in place, and secure all
fastenings.
12. Replace the metering stem and spring. Lightly lubricate the
stem to facilitate insertion and easy movement. Use care when
inserting so that the orifice and the stem are not damaged.
8-22
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
13. Snug the packing gland, but only sufficiently to place slight
tension on the packing. The stem must move freely from the
force of the spring.
14. Work the stem up and down several times to ensure that it is
moves freely.
15. Depress the valve stem and replace the cam. Mate the matchmarks and secure the setscrews. Be sure the cam spring is
centered in the roller.
16. Restore oil flow. Test fire the burner at various firing rates being
certain that the metering stem freely follows the cam.
17. Tighten the packing gland after a period of operation, if
necessary, to maintain proper tension on the packing. Do not
overtighten.
If there are indications that the oil metering valve has become
clogged at its orifice, it will be necessary to disassemble the control
to remove the obstruction. Clean the slotted stem of the oil metering
valve with suitable solvent and blow-dry with an air line. Follow the
procedure outlined above when removing or reinstalling the
metering valve stem. Also check all fuel line strainers.
Should a pressure adjusting or relief valve become clogged,
disassemble by releasing the locknut and backing off the screw to
relieve tension on diaphragm. Remove the valve cover and the
diaphragm to expose any dirt or foreign material which may have
entered the valves. Clean out carefully and reassemble. It is
recommended that the diaphragms be replaced annually.
S. THE AIR PUMP AND LUBRICATING SYSTEM
Air Compressor
The air pump itself requires little maintenance. However, the life of
the pump is dependent upon a sufficient supply of clean cool
lubricating oil. The oil level in the air-oil tank must be observed
closely. Lack of oil will damage the pump making replacement
necessary. Disassembly or field repairs to the pump are not
recommended.
Lubricating Oil
Lubricating oil must be visible in the gauge glass at all times. There
is no specific level required as long as oil is visible. Do not operate
if oil is not visible.
Part No. 750-225
Figure 8-16 Air Compressor
Module
8-23
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
! Caution
Oil must NEVER be added unless
the pump is in operation and the
strainer screen is in place.
Fa i l u r e t o f o l l o w t h e s e
instructions can cause damage to
the equipment.
Oil with proper viscosity must be used. SAE 20 detergent is
recommended, although SAE 10 detergent is also permissible.
When adding oil:
Remove the cover from the fill pipe and add oil through the conical
strainer in the pipe with the unit running.
The oil and its container should be clean. Although there is a
strainer in the lube oil line, its purpose is to remove any unwanted
materials rather than to act as a filter for unclean oil.
Lubricating Oil Strainer and Cooling Coil
Air pressure from the pump forces lubricating oil from the tank
through a cooling coil to the pump. The oil lubricates the pump
bearings and also provides a seal and lubrication for the pump
vanes.
The cooled oil flows to the pump through the strainer in the filler
pipe. It is possible to visually verify oil flow during operation by
removing the filler cap and checking the flow. If necessary, the
strainer may be cleaned during operation.
In the event it is necessary to clean the strainer during operation,
clean it and replace immediately. It can be cleaned by immersing in
solvent and blowing it dry with compressed air. Do not operate
without the strainer any longer than necessary, and never add new
oil unless it is in place. A spare strainer basket can be obtained, if
desired, and used on a rotating basis while the other is serviced.
Air Cleaner
Never operate the air pump without the air cleaner in place. The
cleaner itself must be periodically checked and its element flushed
and cleaned semi-annually.
Air-Oil Tank
Pads of steel wool are used in the air to oil tank as a filtering
medium to separate the lube oil from the compressed air. Figure 817 shows a cross-section of a tank and the location of the steel
wool.
8-24
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
The pads play a very important role and should be replaced semiannually. It is also important that a proper grade of steel wool be
used. Only No. 3 coarse grade American steel wool or equal
(CB919-124) should be used. Three pads are required. When
replacing the wool, insert two pads into the cylinder. Alternate the
grain of the pads. Install the spacer with its stub end toward the
opening and fit one pad over the stub. Be careful not to overly
compress the wool and be sure that it is fluffed out to fill all
available space. Improper packing can cause high oil consumption
After the last pad is in place, slip the retainer screen onto the
cylinder. Be sure to fit an O-ring gasket under the cover so that a
tight seal is obtained.
Follow previous instructions for oil replacement.
Lube Oil Cooling Coil
The fins on the tubing must be kept clean and free of any dust or
dirt that would resist air flow and cause overheating. Use an air
hose to blow away debris. Internal cleaning of the tubes is seldom
required if a good quality lube oil is used.
AIR AND OIL
MIXTURE FROM
PUMP
AIR TO NOZZLE
STEEL WOOL
PADS (3)
(COARSE GRADE)
O-RING GASKET
LUBE OIL
SEPARATED OIL
LUBE OIL
TO COOLING COIL
AND PUMP
Figure 8-17 Air Oil Receiver
Tank
Flexible Coupling Alignment
Alignment of the pump and motor through the flexible coupling is
extremely important for trouble-free operation. Check the coupling
alignment semi-annually and replace the coupling insert as
required. Keep the coupling guard in place.
OFFSET
MISALIGNMENT
The most commonly used tools for checking alignment are a small
straightedge and a thickness gauge (Figure 8-18).
The coupling must be checked for both parallel (offset) alignment
and angular (gap) alignment. Parallel misalignment exists when
shaft axes are parallel but not concentric (see Figure 8-18). Angular
misalignment is the reverse situation - shaft axes concentric, but not
parallel.
ANGULAR
MISALIGNMENT
Figure 8-18 Coupling Alignment
Checking parallel alignment, both horizontal and vertical can be
accomplished, by laying a straightedge across the coupling halves
and checking with a thickness gauge to obtain the amount of
misalignment. The check should be done on the top of the coupling
and at 90 degrees. A useful hint is to hold a flashlight behind the
straightedge so that any gap can readily be seen.
Shim stock of appropriate thickness and area is then used under
either the feet of the pump or the motor to establish parallel
alignment. A tolerance of .008" is a permissible limit.
After parallel alignment is established, check for angular alignment,
which is done by checking the gap between coupling halves. The
coupling should have a minimum gap of 1/16" and a maximum of
3/32".
Set the spacing between the halves at one point by using a
thickness gauge and then rotate the coupling slowly to be sure that
clearance at that point remains the same through 360 degrees of
rotation. Adjust to obtain proper gap by loosening the hold-down
bolts and shifting either the pump or the motor as required.
Part No. 750-225
8-25
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Generally, a slight tapping on either the front or rear legs is all that
is needed to obtain lateral adjustment. Rear legs may require
shimming for vertical correction.
Tighten the hold-down bolts after adjustments are made and
recheck alignment.
Calipers can also be used to check angular alignment. Measure the
overall distance of the outer ends of the coupling halves at 90°
intervals. Shift the pump or motor, as required, so that the ends of
the coupling are the same distance apart at all points. The coupling
will then have proper angular alignment.
Remember that alignment in one direction may alter alignment in
another. Recheck both angular and parallel alignment procedures
after making any alteration.
A properly aligned coupling will last longer and will provide troublefree mechanical operation.
Air Compressor Replacement
Refer to Figure 8-19 and Chapter 9 for identification of various
components and use the following procedures in replacing the
pump. Be sure to tag the motor leads if disconnected to simplify
reconnection.
TUBING TANK
TO COOLING COIL
FRONT CYLINDER
PINS
ORIFICE
AIR CLEANER
FILLER PIPE
AND STRAINER
AIR-OIL RECEIVER TANK
TUBING COIL TO PUMP
OIL LEVEL GAUGE
Figure 8-19 Air Compressor Module
Dismantling
1. Lift out the two front cylinder pins that hold the screen, and
remove the screen.
2. Disconnect the flared nut on tubing the behind the screen and
the lift tubing high enough to prevent drainage of lubricating oil
from the tank.
3. Disconnect the flared nut at the orifice fitting.
4. Remove the two sheet metal screws that hold the cylinder in
place. One screw is located at the top rear of cylinder, the other
is at the bottom front.
5. Remove the entire heat exchange assembly, consisting of the
cylinder, the finned tubing, and the oil line.
8-26
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
6. Remove the fan from the air pump.
7. Disconnect the flexible air line from the lube tank.
8. Remove the coupling guard by pushing in on both sides until it
clears the clamp.
9. Loosen the clamp at the rear of the tank and remove the tank
with copper tubing attached.
10. Leave the rear pump bracket (coupling end) in place to aid in
realignment of the replacement pump. Do this by removing the
two capscrews that extend through the bracket into the pump
housing. Temporarily leave the front bracket attached to the
pump.
11. Remove screws holding the front bracket to the base and lift off
the pump with its attachments. Note the location of the pipe
fittings and brackets prior to removing for installation on the
replacement pump. If piping is dismantled, be sure that the
check valve is reinstalled so that the gate swings towards the
pump.
Reassembly
Reassembly in reverse order of disassembly. With the rear pump
bracket left in place, realignment and spacing between the pump
shaft and the motor shaft is greatly simplified.
There should be approximately 7/8” space between the two shafts.
Place the coupling insert between the coupling halves prior to
reassembly. Check that both shafts rotate freely.
Refer to the previous section on coupling alignment instructions.
If shims were used originally under either pump brackets or motor
feet, be sure that they are correctly reinstalled.
When reinstalling the fan, slide the hub on the pump shaft so that
it is bottomed. Tighten the setscrew and cap screws. If the fan
blades were removed from the hub, be sure that the side of the
blade marked “Blower” faces the hub when reassembling. When
tightening the coupling halves or the fan hub, tighten the setscrews
against the key first, then tighten the setscrew against the shaft.
Clean or remove any dust or grime from the blades prior to
reinstalling.
When replacing the retainer screen, a slight force may be required
to push the cooling coil into the air cylinder so that the pins may be
fitted into place.
Be sure that all piping connections are tight.
If the motor was replaced or if motor leads were disconnected, be
sure that pump rotation is proper before starting operation. The air
pump should rotate in a clockwise direction, as viewed from the
drive shaft end.
Part No. 750-225
8-27
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
General
Keep the motor and other components free from dust and dirt to
prevent overheating and damage. Motor lubrication should follow
manufacturer’s recommendations.
T. REFRACTORY
The boiler is shipped with completely installed refractory. The
refractory consists of the rear head (Figure 8-24), the inner door,
and the furnace liner (Figure 8-25). Normal maintenance requires
little time and expense, and prolongs the operating life of the
refractory.
Preventive maintenance through periodic inspection will keep the
operator informed of the condition of the refractory, and will guard
against unexpected and unwanted downtime and major repairs.
Figure 8-20 Throat Tile
Frequent wash coating of the refractory surfaces is recom-mended.
High-temperature-bonding, air-dry type mortar, diluted with water
to the consistency of light cream, is used for wash coating.
Recoating intervals will vary with operating loads and are best
determined by the operator when the boiler is opened for inspection.
Furnace Liner
Maintenance consists of occasional wash coating of the entire liner.
Face all joints or cracks by applying high temperature bonding
mortar with a trowel or fingertips. Wash coating should be done as
soon as cracks are detected.
Should segments of the liner burn away or fall out, replace the entire
refractory. Any refractory that may break out should be removed as
soon as detected so that it will not fuse to the bottom of the furnace
and obstruct the flame.
Figure 8-21 Liner Tile
8-28
If replacement is necessary, refer to Chapter 9 and order proper
replacement materials. Remove existing refractory. Thoroughly
clean the furnace to remove all old refractory cement or other
foreign material to ensure the new liner seats firmly against the
steel. Inspect the furnace metal.
Depending upon the design pressure of the boiler, the furnace may
be of the corrugated type. It is necessary to fill in the corrugation
valleys under the furnace liner tile from 4 o’clock to 8 o’clock with
insulating cement. The liner tile should be fitted tightly against the
crown of the corrugation.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Throat Tile and Liner Installation
The furnace lining is shown in Figure 8-21. The throat tile (Figure
8-20) must be installed to maintain an approximately 16” inside
diameter, and be centered in the furnace. Since the thickness of the
furnace metal varies with the boiler design pressure, a shim of
appropriate thickness must be used to compensate for the variance.
A layer or two of insulating board or equal, or a bed of refractory
material, may be used to center the ring.
The liner tile can be fitted tightly against the furnace, since the
finished diameter is not critical.
It is recommended that the tile be dry-fitted, match-marked,
removed, and then reinstalled with the proper amount of refractory
cement. Thin joints (less than 1/16”) are desirable. Generally, it will
be necessary to shave a portion from one or more tiles to obtain a
fit. If a fill piece is required, cut it to fit and install the piece at the
bottom of the furnace.When installing the housing, or the tile
against the housing, liberally coat the surface with refractory
cement. Remove any cement that is squeezed out.
Notice
The area between the burner
housing and the throat tile
requires a good seal. An
improper or poor seal allows
air leaks that can cause
overheating and burning of the
burner housing metal. The area
should be inspected semiannually. Contact you local
Cleaver-Brooks representative
for information and service
Allow refractory to air dry as long as possible. If immediate use is
required, fire intermittently at a low rate for several hours to
thoroughly dry the refractory.
For detailed information, request Bulletin C10-5921 from your local
Cleaver-Brooks Representative.
COAT OR FILL THIS AREA
WITH MOTOR AND
INSULATING CEMENT
GASKET
FURNACE
(32-981)
USE 1/4" "CERAFORM" OR EQUAL
AS A FILLER TO OBTAIN 16" ± 1/8"
ID OF THROAT TILE
FURNACE LINER TILE
(94-205)
BURNER
HOUSING
FURNACE
BOILER SHELL
Figure 8-22 Furnace Liner Refractory - 400 to 800 hp
Installation Procedures
The following procedure is typical for all standard 96" diameter
boilers with the exception of Items #6, 7, and 8, not used for any
Part No. 750-225
8-29
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
l.p. (plain furnace) boilers. Disregard any reference to these items
when working w/ l.p. boilers. Refer to Figure 8-23.
1. Install studs, bricking tool, cerafelt, bottom and top arch bricks
as shown on Detail “A” to check for correct fit up. If interference
is present at the arch brick, measure this distance and trim
inside diameter (ID) of all bricks.
2. Install the bottom half of arch bricks as shown on detail “B”.
Notice
The arch bricks must be trimmed to
16" on excessive pressures to
maintain brick ID.
3. Mix the “vee” block to a mortar-like consistency (per
manufacturers instructions) and pack the front (3) valleys of the
furnace corrugations with the mixture, flush with the furnace ID
up to 3 and 9 o'clock from the centerline of the furnace. Install
both pieces of Cerafelt (Item #7) to insulate the tile from the
corrugation) and begin bottom half of first row of tiles as shown
on Detail “C” (see Note F below).
4. To begin top half of arch bricks and tiles, measure off upper half
of furnace arch bricks and tiles w/ templates, mark with chalk,
and determine if a cut brick or cut tile is needed (see Detail
“B”). if cut brick is required, locate below 2 and 10 o'clock
positions (see Note D below). If brick is cut, angle of cut surface
should be the same as original brick.if cut brick or tile measures
less than 1/2 full width, cut two (2) pieces (see Note A below).
5. Install bricking tool as shown on detail “A” and continue
installing upper half by alternating one (1) arch brick and one
(1) corresponding tile behind brick typical (see Notes E, F, and
H).
6. For the last two (2) rows of tiles, pack all remaining valleys of
furnace corrugations (measure 36" from inside surface of arch
bricks) w/ vee block mixture flush w/ furnace ID up to 3 and 9
o'clock centerline of furnace.
7. Install both pieces of Item #8 cerafelt and continue laying
furnace tiles to complete the last two (2) rows (see Note G
below).
8. After joint cement hardens (2 hours approx.), remove bricking
tool, wooden tile supports, and discard cerafelt shims.
9. NOTES:
8-30
A
No Cerafelt, cut bricks, or cut tiles to be installed in upper
120 quadrant of furnace, as shown on Details “B” and
“C”.
B
Pack all bricks and tiles tightly w/ mallet and remove
excess cement - 1/16” typical joint 1/8” max.
C
No cement applied between Cerafelt and bricks, tiles, or
furnace. Only applied between bricks and tiles.
D
Do not cover furnace weld seam with cerafelt. Cut and
space to suit as shown on Details “B” and “C”.
E
Support upper tiles w/ wooden boards to suit at assembly.
Two (2) boards per tile as shown on Detail “C”. For 96"
dia., use 3/4” x 1-1/2” x 38" lg. approximate. For 78"
dia., use 3/4” x 1-1/2” x 28" lg. approximate.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
F
To insure tight fit and maximum ID of arch bricks, cut a 3"
square piece of scrap Cerafelt and use as a shim between
bricking tool OD and ID of upper half of bricks typical (if
necessary).
G
Stagger cemented joints (seams) between all arch bricks
and tiles.
H
After each half course of bricks or tiles is installed, clean
up excessive cement and fill open joint areas where necessary.
I
For 78" dia. boiler use bricking tool #98-d-280 and fasten w/ two (2) 1/2”-13 nuts.for 96" dia. boiler use bricking tool #98-d-279 and fasten w/ two (2) 5/8”-11 nuts.
Figure 8-23 Throat tile and Furnace Liner
Part No. 750-225
8-31
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Rear Door
The rear door is a steel shell containing horizontal baffle tiles and
lined with insulation material and castable refractory (see Figure 824).
Burned or discolored paint on the outer surface of the door does not
necessarily indicate refractory trouble, but may be an indication of
other conditions, such as:
1. Leaking gaskets.
2. Improper seal.
3. Door retaining bolts insufficiently or unevenly tightened.
4. The air line to the rear sight tube may be blocked or loose.
Figure 8-24 Rear Door with Site
Glass Cooling Tube
5. Door was repainted with other than heat resistant paint.
Therefore, before assuming that the refractory requires reworking:
1. Check the condition of the tadpole gasket and rope seal.
2. Check the condition of the insulating cement protecting the
tadpole gasket.
3. Check the horizontal baffle tile for large cracks, breaks, chipped
corners, etc.
4. Check for cracks in the castable refractory at ends of the baffle
tile.
5. Check the tightness of the door bolts.
6. Be sure that the air line to the sight tube is clear, and that the
connections are tight. If necessary, blow the line clear with an
air hose.
Figure 8-25 Rear Door Open
8-32
It is normal for refractories exposed to hot gases to develop thin
“hairline” cracks. It by no means indicates improper design or
workmanship. Since refractory materials expand and contract with
changes in temperature, they should be expected to show minor
cracks due to contraction when examined at low temperatures.
Cracks to approximately 1/8" across may be expected to close at
high temperature. If there are any cracks that are relatively large (1/
8" to 1/4" in width), clean and fill them with high-temperaturebonding mortar. Any gap that may show between the castable
refractory and the baffle tile should be filled in a similar manner.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
After opening the rear door, clean the flange with a scraper or wire
brush. Clean the surface of the refractory carefully with a fiber brush
to avoid damaging the surface. Clean the mating surfaces of the
baffle tile and the boiler shell. Remove all dried sealing material.
Wash-coat the lower half of the rear door refractory prior to closing.
The upper half of the door contains a lightweight insulating
material, similar to that used in the inner door. A thin wash-coat
mixture, applied gently with a brush, is helpful in maintaining a
hard surface.
If the baffle tile or the refractory require replacement, contact your
local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative.
Front Inner Door
The front inner door is lined with a lightweight castable insulation
material. Thin “hairline” cracks may develop after a period of time.
However, the cracks will generally close due to expansion when the
boiler is fired.
A thin wash-coat mixture, applied gently with a brush, is helpful in
maintaining a hard surface.
Figure 8-26 Baffle Construction
Minor repairs can be accomplished by enlarging or cutting out
affected areas, being certain that they are clean, and then patching
as required. Should the entire insulation require replacement,
remove existing material and clean to bare metal. Inspect the
retaining pins and replace if necessary. Reinforcing wire, suitably
attached, may also be used.The recommended insulation is “Vee
Block Mix” and is available in 50 lb bags (Cleaver-Brooks P/N 872162).
Mix the material with water to a troweling consistency. Mixing
should be completely uniform with no portion either wetter or drier
than another. Trowel the mixture into any areas that are being
patched. If replacing complete insulation, begin at the bottom of the
door and apply the mixture to a thickness equal to the protecting
shroud. With a trowel, apply horizontally back and forth across the
door in layers until the required thickness is reached.
Allow to air-dry as long as possible. If immediate use of the boiler
is required, fire as slowly as possible to avoid rapid drying of the
material.
U. OPENING AND CLOSING REAR DOOR
A good seal between the rear door and the pressure vessel is
necessary to prevent leakage of combustion gases, loss of heat, and
to aid in obtaining operating efficiency. Leaks can also cause hot
spots that can lead to premature refractory failure and/or damage to
the door metal.
Part No. 750-225
8-33
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
! Warning
Be certain that the davit arm
is under tension before
opening. Failure to follow
these instructions can result
in serious personal injury or
death.
When opening the door, either for routine maintenance or for an
annual inspection, do not do so when the boiler or the door is hot.
The refractory will hold its temperature for some time and exposure
to ambient temperature or rapid cooling may cause refractory
cracking and/or harm to the boiler and door metal.
Before loosening the door bolts, tighten the nut on the davit stud to
ensure tension on the davit arm. Putting the davit arm under tension
will help eliminate sagging, and will facilitate opening and closing.
The opened door should be supported by blocking or jacking to
eliminate possible deformation of the door.
Prior to closing, check all gaskets and sealing surfaces. If the door
gasket is hard or brittle, it should be replaced. The fiberglass ropes
used for the baffle seal and for the door gasket seal should not be
reused. The door flange and the tube sheet area of the baffle seal
should be clean and free of old sealing material, scale, etc. Be sure
that all of the gasket retaining fasteners are in place.
Remove the old rope and insulating cement from the baffle tile or
refractory. Be careful not to chip or crack the refractory. Refer to
Figure 8-26, which shows the type of baffle construction monolithic or tile - and the location of the rope. The rope is placed
in the groove of the monolithic design and on top of the lip of the
tile baffle type construction.
Notice
A boiler built for high pressure
design, such as 150 psi or
higher steam or for 60 psi or
h i g h e r h o t w a t e r, i s
constructed with a flanged
tube sheet that fits inside the
boiler shell and door flange.
Refer to Figure 8-27
Attach a new length of 1-1/4" diameter fiberglass rope (P/N 853982) to the baffle. Be certain that it is properly positioned and use
a rapid setting adhesive (P/N 872-481) to hold it in place.
The area between the curved portion of the sheet and the flange is
packed with fiberglass rope and covered with cement to fill the void
and to provide a smooth sealing area.
Replacement is not normally necessary, but, if it is, completely
remove the old material. Firmly caulk a layer of 1/2" diameter rope
(P/N 853-996) into the area. Tamp a second layer of 1" diameter
rope (P/N 853-999) over the first layer. Apply a coating of
insulating cement pulp (P/N 872-26) over the ropes to form a
smooth surface. Allow the cement pulp to harden before closing the
door.
Closing and Sealing
Coat the door gasket with an oil and graphite mixture. Apply a small
amount of a pulp mixture, consisting of P/N 872-26 cement and
water around the inner circumference of the gasket. Press rope into
this area. Use 1/2" diameter rope (P/N 853-996) for a boiler of low
pressure design. Use 1" diameter rope (P/N 853-999) for a high
pressure boiler. Refer to Figure 8-26, which shows the type of
construction for each design.
Figure 8-27 Rear Flange, Power
Boiler
8-34
After the rope is installed, the entire rope and gasket area, and the
baffle area, should be liberally coated with the pulp mixture. When
the door is closed, the pulp will compress to protect the tadpole
gasket and form a seal between the refractory surface and the tube
sheet.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Door bolts should be run in snug and tightened evenly to avoid
cocking the door and damaging the gasket. Start tightening at top
center and alternate between the top and bottom bolts until both are
tight. Do not overtighten. Tighten alternate bolts until the door is
secured and gas tight. After the boiler is back in operation, retighten
the bolts to compensate for any expansion. Loosen the nut on the
davit stud to release tension from the davit arm.
Figure 8-28 Rear Door Sealing
V. LUBRICATION
Electric Motors
Manufacturers of electric motors vary in their specifications for
lubrication and care of motor bearings; their specific
recommendations should be followed.
Ball-bearing-equipped motors are pre-lubricated. The length of time
a bearing can run without having grease added will depend upon
many factors, including the rating of the motor, type of motor
enclosure, duty, atmospheric conditions, humidity, and ambient
temperatures.
Part No. 750-225
8-35
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Complete renewal of grease, when necessary, can be accomplished
by forcing out the old grease with the new grease. Thoroughly wipe
those portions of the housing around the filler and drain plugs
(above and below bearings). Remove the drain plug (bottom) and
free the drain hole of any hardened grease which may have
accumulated. With the motor not running, add new grease through
the filler hole until clear grease starts to come out of the drain hole.
Before replacing the drain plug, run the motor for 10 to 20 minutes
to expel any excess grease.The filler and drain plugs should be
thoroughly cleaned before they are replaced.
The lubricant used should be clean and equal to one of the good
commercial grades of grease locally available. Some lubricants that
are distributed nationally are (See also Figure 8-3):
• Gulf Oil - Precision Grease No. 2
• Humble Oil - Andok B
• Texaco - Multifak No. 2
• Phillips - 1B + RB No.2
• Fiske Bros. - Ball Bearing Lubricant
• Standard/Mobil - Mobilux No. 2
Control Linkage
Apply a non-gumming, dripless, high temperature lubricant, such as
graphite or a silicone derivative to all pivot points and moving parts.
Work lubricant in well and wipe excess. Repeat application at
required intervals to maintain freedom of motion of parts.
Solenoid and Motorized Valves
Solenoid valves and motorized valves require no lubrication.
IFGR Lubrication
Motors should be lightly lubricated at startup, using the grease
specified below or equivalent. Lubricate the motor as follows:
Table 8-3 IFGR Maintenance Check List
8-36
Daily
• Check visually for free movement of IFGR linkage.
Quarterly
• Manually check for free movement of IFGR linkage.
• Inspect and clean IFGR damper (oil-fueled system).
• Inspect and clean fan and burner (oil-fueled system).
• Grease fan motor.
Semi-Annual
• Inspect and clean IFGR damper (gas-fueled system).
• Inspect and clean fan and burner (gas-fueled system).
• Open motor/fan cassette to check for free movement
of IFGR linkage and damper assembly.
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Annual
• Inspect fan impeller.
• Check emissions.
• Change inlet gasket.
1. Disconnect and lock out electrical power to the boiler.
2. Wipe clean all grease fittings (fill and drain fittings).
3. Remove the fill and drain plugs from the motor end cap.
4. Free the drain hole of any hard grease. (Use a piece of wire, if
necessary.)
5. Add grease using a low-pressure grease gun.
6. With the fill and drain plugs still removed, apply electric power
to the boiler, start the motor, and let it run for approximately 30
minutes.
! Warning
Disconnect and lock out
electrical power to the boiler
before lubricating the fan
motor. Failure to follow these
instructions can cause injury
or death.
7. Turn boiler off.
8. Disconnect and lock out electrical power to the boiler.
9. Wipe excess grease from the motor, and install the fill and drain
plugs. Motor is ready for operation.
10. Reconnect electrical power.
W. OIL HEATERS - ELECTRIC, STEAM, HOT
WATER
An annual maintenance of the heaters consists primarily of
removing the heating element from the shell and scraping any
accumulation of carbonized oil or sludge deposits that may have
collected on the heat exchanging surfaces.
Notice
The amount and type of grease is
ver y important. Only enough
grease should be added to replace
the grease used by the bearing.
Either too much or too little
grease can be harmful. The
grease cavity should be filled 1/3
to 1/2 full, using Chevron SRI 2
grease or equivalent. Shell
Dolium R is a suitable substitute
lubricant.
Before breaking any of the electrical connections to the electric
heating elements, mark all wires and terminals to assure rapid and
correct replacement of wires.
Finish the cleaning process with a cleaning solvent to cut all
hardened deposits from the heater element. Because of the
insulating effect of carbon and sludge, periodic cleaning is
necessary to prevent overheating of the elements. If operation of the
heater becomes sluggish, examine the elements at once and clean
as required.
Inspect the shell or tank each time the heater is removed. Flush all
accumulated sludge and sediment from the tank before reinstalling
the heater.
The condensate from steam oil heaters must be safely discharged
to waste. The waste should be checked periodically for any traces
of oil that would indicate leaking tubes within the heater.
Part No. 750-225
8-37
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Figure 8-29 Circuit Layout of Hot Water Oil Heater
The hot water oil heater (Figure 8-29) contains a heat transfer
solution. Oil flows through an inner tube while boiler water
surrounds the outer tube. The space between the two tubes is filled
with the heat transfer solution and is connected to an expansion
chamber on the rear of the heater. A visual indicator on the chamber
reveals the presence of any oil if an oil leak occurs.
A 50/50 solution of permanent antifreeze and water is generally
used as the heat transfer solution. If there is no danger of freezing,
plain water may be used as a replenishment if necessary to refill.
Evidence of oil in either the steam heater condensate or in the water
heater indicator demands prompt repairs.
Table 8-4 Typical Windbox Temperature for Natural Gas
60 PPM
130°-140° F
30 PPM
160°-175° F
25 PPM
185°-195° F
20 PPM
195°-210° F
X. COMBUSTION
The frequency of burner adjustments depends upon several factor,
including; type of burner, type of fuel, load conditions, ambient
temperature, climatic variables, and general maintenance practices.
The air-fuel ratio should be checked monthly in order to alert the
operator to losses in efficiency, which do not produce visible flame
change. Any time maintenance is performed on the burner linkage,
the air-fuel ratio should be checked. Readjustment of the burner
may be required due to variations in fuel composition. A combustion
analyzer should be used to adjust air-fuel ratio for maximum
operating efficiency. If your burner requires adjustments, contact
your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized representative for assistance.
8-38
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Table 8-5 Recommended Boiler Inspection Schedule
DAILY
• Check water level
MONTHLY
Notes
• Inspect burner
• Check combustion visually • Inspect for flue gas leak
• Blow down boiler
• Blow down water
column
• Record feedwater
pressure/temperature
• Record flue gas
temperature
• Record oil pressure and
temperature
SEMIANNUALLY
ANNUALY
• Clean low water cutoff
• Clean fireside surfaces
• Clean oil pump strainer, filter
• Clean breeching
• Inspect for hot spots
• Inspect waterside sur• Clean air cleaner and air/oil faces
• Check cams
separator
• Check operation of
• Check for tight closing of fuel • Inspect refractory
safety valves
valve
• Remove and clean oil pre• Check fuel and air linkage
heater
• Check indicating lights and
alarms
• Check air pump coupling
alignment
• Check operating and limit
controls
• Inspect / repair burner housing to refractory seal
• Record gas pressure
• Treat water according to
the established program
• Check safety and interlock
controls
• Check for leaks, noise, vibra• Record atomizing air pres- tion, unusual conditions, etc.
sure
• Check low water cutoff operation
8-39
Part No. 750-94
Chapter 8 — Inspection and Maintenance
Notes
8-40
Part No. 750-94
Chapter 9
Customer Service and Parts
FURNISH COMPLETE INFORMATION WHEN
ORDERING PARTS - When ordering parts or spares,
give description and state quantity of parts desired,
together with the complete nameplate data, including rating, model, and serial number of the motor and all data.
WHERE TO ORDER PARTS - Repair and replacement
parts should be ordered from your local Cleaver-Brooks
authorized representative.
Notice
Contact your local Cleaver-Brooks authorized
representative for prompt supply of replacement
parts.
To fine the closest Cleaver-Brooks Representative
near you, log on to:
www.cbboilers.com
Click on <Find a Rep>
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
www.cleaver-brooks.com
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
Table Of Contents
AIR COMPRESSOR AND PIPING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
AIR COMP. PIPING 50HZ - BELT DRIVE CB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
AIR LINE PIPING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
ALSTROM HEATER H/O HW CB,CB-LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
ALSTROM HEATER H/O HW CB,CB-LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
CONTROL PANEL - CB,CB-LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
CONTROL PANEL - CB,CB-LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
ENTRANCE BOX CB,CB-LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
ENTRANCE BOX - CB,CB-LE,CBW,CBH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
FRONT HEAD LINKAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
FRONT HEAD (ELECTRICAL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13
FRONT HEAD (ELECTRICAL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14
GAS TRAIN EQUIPMENT - CB,CB-LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15
GAS TRAIN EQUIPMENT CB,CB--LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
HEAVY OIL PIPING STEAM CB,CB-LE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
HEAVY OIL PIPING STEAM CB,CB-LE,CBW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
STANDARD IMPELLER, IMPELLER HOUSING & AIR INTAKE . . . . . . . 9-19
PRESSURE CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-20
LIGHT OIL PIPING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-21
OIL/AIR PIPING-FRONT HEAD (LIGHT OIL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-22
OIL/AIR PIPING-FRONT HEAD (LIGHT OIL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-23
TEMPERATURE CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-24
W.C.-MAIN & AUX. CB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-25
W.C.-MAIN & AUX. CB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26
Notes
9-2
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
BASIC BILL OF MATERIAL
96" DIA. 400-800 HP
ITEM QTY
PART NO.
MOTOR TABLE
DESCRIPTION
1
1
505-D-120
COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY
2
2
85-B-2183
SUPPORT COMPRESSOR
3
1
8-A-815
4
1
TABLE
MOTOR
5
1
TABLE
MOTOR HALF
6
1
868-404
7
1
928-45
8
1
952-145
USED
MOTOR
H.P.
400-800 HP
7-1/2
ITEM
200-460 V
575 V
4
894-3384
894-3386
5
819-227
819-227
BRACKET
DIMENSION "A" CB
MODEL
400 HP
500 HP
600 HP
700-800 HP
CAPSCREW
100 & 200
37"
92"
119"
150"
STRAP - PIPE
400 & 600
37"
40"
91"
113-1/2"
WASHER
9
1
952-92
WASHER - LOCK
10
1
869-21
NUT
11
4
868-143
CAPSCREW
12
4
952-114
WASHER - LOCK
13
1
847-426
BUSHING - RED
14
2
859-81
ELBOW
UNION
DIMENSION "A" LE
MODEL
15
2
859-339
16
1
859-25
TEE
17
1
858-83
PLUG, BRASS
400 HP
500 HP
600 HP
700-800 HP
100 & 200
25"
80"
107"
138"
400 & 600
25"
28"
79"
101-1/2"
AIR MANIFOLD
BLOCK
14
30"
3-3/4"
3-3/4"
FOR FRONT HEAD AIR
PIPING REFER TO
DWG. 146-C-107 (LIGHT OIL)
DWG. 146-D-126 (HEAVY OIL)
13
11 12
FRONT ELEVATION
3 6
FRONT SUPPORT
7 8
9 10
14
15
15
1
5
11"
4
2
1/8"
REAR OF BOILER
3/16"
SIDE ELEVATION
16-13/16"
"A"
NOTES:
1. ALL PIPE 3/4" SCH. 40
ASTM A120 WELDED BLACK
STL. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.
2. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE APPROX.
AIR COMPRESSOR AND PIPING
Part No. 750-225
9-3
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
BILL OF MATERIAL
ITEM QTY
PART No.
DESCRIPTION
1
1
505-D-121
2
1
8-2727
BRACKET, COMPRESSOR MTG. (SEE DET. IT. 2)
3
1
8-2730
BRACKET, COMPRESSOR MTG. (SEE DET. IT. 3)
4
1
8-A-815
5
1
6
7
COMPRESSOR ASSEMBLY
BRACKET
SEE TABLE
MOTOR 200/380 VOLT (IF REQUIRED)
4
952-133
WASHER
4
868-144
CAPSCREW
8
1
847-431
BUSHING
9
2
858-965
UNION ELBOW
10
4
869-36
NUT HEX
11
1
868-404
CAPSCREW
12
1
928-45
STRAP, PIPE
13
1
952-145
WASHER"
14
1
952-92
LOCKWASHER
15
1
869-21
NUT HEX.
16
4
952-114
LOCKWASHER
17
1
SEE TABLE
SHEAVE
USED ON
RATING
MOTOR TABLE
400-800 HP
220/380 VOLT
3 PHASE
7-1/2 HP
BORE
ITEM 5
ITEM 17
1-3/8"
894-3390
921-506
AIR MANIFOLD
BLOCK
8
6
FRONT ELEVATION
FRONT SUPPORT
9
7
10 16
14 15
12 13
4
11
9
17
1
3
5
2
REAR
SIDE ELEVATION
AIR COMP. PIPING 50HZ - BELT DRIVE CB
9-4
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
BILL OF MATERIAL
AIR LINE PIPING 96"
ITEM QTY PART NO.
ITEM QTY
DESCRIPTION
PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
9
1
928-107
CONDUIT CLAMP
10
1
868-136
CAP SCR. HEX HD
11
1
869-234
NUT & LOCKWASHER
1
1
550-A-42
CAP, SIGHT HOLE ASSEMBLY
2
2
8-A-2833
BRACKET, AIR LINE
3
1
113-A-36
CONDUIT, FORMED
4
1
113-A-37
CONDUIT, FORMED
5
2
848-498
STRAIGHT CONNECTOR
6
1
827-57
CONDUIT E.M.T. X "A" LG.
7
1
859-122
STREET ELBOW, 4527
"A"
6"
46"
8
2
848-505
STRAIGHT COUPLING
"B"
27"
27"
DIMENSION CB 400
CB 500
CB 700-800
CB 600
112"
78"
24-3/4"
24-3/4"
26"
REAR HEAD
1
5
"B"
3
8
3
"A"
36" REF.
2
6
4"
REF.
A
7
5
A
2
4
SIDE ELEVATION
REAR ELEVATION
AIR LINE PIPING
Part No. 750-225
9-5
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
17
17
3
3
4527
2"
2"
4527
2
18
2"
19
20
21
18
VIEW "B-B"
VIEW "A-A"
22
ALSTROM
HEATER
4
22
VIEW "C-C"
26 25 24 23 16
10
27
15
31
41
RETURN
11
37
36
SUPPLY
28
1"
30 TYP.
29 TYP.
38
36
8
32
40
12
39
35
9
33
OIL RETURN
TO TANK
34
4
SIDE VIEW
13
OIL SUPPLY
TO HEATER
ALSTROM HEATER H/O HW CB,CB-LE
9-6
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
ITEM QTY PART NO.
CL OF BOILER
1
"A"
"B"
5 TYP.
6 TYP.
RIGHT HAND SIDE VIEW
26 25 24 23
14
13
863-260
ALSTROM HEATER
863-261
ALSTROM HEATER
*500 HP
1
863-271
ALSTROM HEATER
*600-800 HP
2
1
901-292
CIRCULATING PUMP
-*
B2
3
2
941-157
VALVE - GATE 2"
-*
B2
4
1
836-72
THERMOSTAT
-*
B2
5
2
8-A-1301
BRACKET
-*
B2
6
2
8-A-144
BRACKET
-*
B2
7
1
851-155
SIGHT GLASS
-*
B2
1
195-B-239
TANK
10kw
1
195-B-240
TANK
OIL HEATER
15kw
-*
TUBING OIL RETURN (SEE NOTE 5)
-*
B2
TUBING OIL SUPPLY (SEE NOTE 5)
-*
B2
VALVE - RELIEF 1/2"
-
B2
*400 HP
B2
B2
9
1
10
1
*
507-B-1268
11
12
1
507-B-1267
1
940-2116
13
2
941-143
VALVE - GLOBE 1-1/4"
-*
B2
14
1
8-A-753
BRACKET
-
B2
15
1
850-61
GAUGE
-*
B2
16
1
8-A-2551
BRACKET
-
B2
17
2
858-62
3000# HALF COUPLING 2"
-
18
19
2
847-453
BUSHING
-
4
868-102
CAPSCRW
-
20
4
869-15
HEX NUT
-
21
4
952-94
LOCKWASHER
-
22
2
847-442
BUSHING
-
23
2
928-44
PIPE STRAP
-
24
2
868-405
CAPSCRW
-
25
2
952-92
LOCKWASHER
-
26
2
869-21
HEX NUT
-
27
2
845-313
ELBOW
-
28
1
847-468
BUSHING
-
29
2
149-769
2" x 2" x 1/4" x 14" ANGLE
-
30
2
841-1140
U-BOLT
-
31
2
847-152
BUSHING
-
32
1
847-430
BUSHING
-
33
1
847-638
COUPLING
-
34
1
859-109
STREET ELBOW
-
35
1
843-255
STRAINER
-
36
2
847-1715
SWIVEL JOINT
-
37
1
LOTS
38
1
HOTS
-*
D3
39
1
LOPS
-*
D3
40
1
HOPS
-*
D3
41
1
COUPLING
-
847-532
B2
B2
B2
B2
*ALL
FRONT VIEW
ALSTROM HEATER H/O HW CB,CB-LE
Part No. 750-225
OPTION
1
8
BOILER
REAR FLANGE
USED ON
1
1
7
DESCRIPTION
9-7
D3
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
CONTROL CABINET (HAWK)
ITEM
QTY
PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
USED ON
OPTION
1
1
119-379
CONTROL CABINET
-
C3
2
1
283-2851
SUB-BASE
-
C3
3
1
881-231
PILOT LIGHT
-
C3
4
1
881-232
LENS, RED
-
C3
5
1
118-644
NAMEPLATE, LOW WATER
-
C3
6
1
836-620
SWITCH, OPERATOR
-
C3
7
1
836-623
SWITCH CONTACT BLOCK
-
C3
8
1
118-1382
NAMEPLATE, BURNER OFF-ON
-
C3
9
1
SEE TABLE 1
PLUG-IN MODULE
-
C3
10
1
SEE TABLE 1
NAMEPLATE, PLUG-IN MODULE -
C3
11
1
833-2415
HAWK CHASSIS
-
C3
12
1
833-2421
HAWK AMPLIFIER
-
C3
13
1
833-2418
HAWK PROGRAM MODULE
-
C3
14
1
833-2419
HAWK KEYBOARD/DISPLAY
-
C3
15
1
118-2462
LABEL,CB HAWK
-
C3
TABLE 1
FUEL SERIES
ITEM
9
10
100
101
-
-
200
985-2
118-754
400
985-4
118-756
600
700
985-6
118-758
-
HAWK
15
1
2
9
DOOR
11 12 13
PANEL
3
HAWK
CB-HAWK
4
5
PLUG-IN
MODULE
NPL
HAWK
DISPLAY
14
9-8
10
TERMINALS
CONTROL PANEL - CB,CB-LE
LOW
WATER
LIGHT
8
BURNER
SWITCH
6
7
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
CONTROL CABINET (NON-HAWK)
ITEM
1
2
QTY
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
NOTES:
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
4
PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
USED ON
D3
D4
D4
D0
D0
D5
D5
C4
C5
C6
833-2292
833-2382
833-2582
833-2204
833-2384
833-2584
833-2383
833-2583
D4
D5
D0
D4
D5
D0
D5
D0
D4
D5
D0
D3
D3
D3
D3
D3
D3
D3
-
PROGRAMMER-CHASSIS
PROGRAMMER-CHASSIS
PROGRAMMER-CHASSIS
PROGRAMMER-AMPLIFIER
PROGRAMMER-AMPLIFIER
PROGRAMMER-AMPLIFIER
PROGRAMMER-MODULE
PROGRAMMER-MODULE
PROGRAMMER-FLAME DETEC CB70
817-1742
PROGRAMMER-FLAME DETEC E100
817-1933
PROGRAMMER-FLAME DETEC CB100
817-2261
SEE TABLE 1 STARTER (SEE NOTE 2)
PLUG-IN MODULE "A"
NAMEPLATE FOR MODULE "A" SEE TABLE 2 PLUG-IN MODULE "B"
NAMEPLATE FOR MODULE "B" RELAY
BASE
SCREW, SELF-TAPPING
841-1483
WITH ITEM 14
SCREW, SELF-TAPPING
841-801
WITH ITEM 8
NUT, SELF-LOCKING
841-89
-
1. STARTER IS IN OWN ENCL. MOUNTED ON THE FR0NT HEAD.
NON-HAWK
13, 14,15
1
2
TABLE 1 - ITEM 8
VOLTAGE
BM HP 200-208V
220-240V 346-416V 440-480V 575-600V
2
3
5
7-1/2
10
15
20
30
40
50
60
SEE NOTE 3
9
STARTER
PLUG-IN
MODULE "A"
PROGRAMMER
NPL
10
4,
5,
6,
7
833-1884
833-1884
833-1885
833-1885
833-1886
833-1197
833-1197
NOTE 1
NOTE 1
NOTE 1
NOTE 1
833-1884
833-1884
833-1885
833-1885
833-1886
833-1886
833-1197
833-1197
NOTE 1
NOTE 1
NOTE 1
833-1884
833-1884
833-1884
833-1885
833-1885
833-1886
833-1886
833-1197
833-1197
833-1197
NOTE 1
833-1884
833-1884
833-1884
833-1885
833-1885
833-1886
833-1886
833-1197
833-1197
833-1197
NOTE 1
833-1884
833-1884
833-1884
833-1885
833-1885
833-1886
833-1886
833-1197
833-1197
833-1197
NOTE 1
PLUG-IN
MODULE "B"
11
TABLE 2
NPL
12
FUEL SERIES
ITEM
TERMINALS
17
3
C7
CB70
E100
CB100
CB70
E100
CB100
E100
CB100
2. OVERLOADS ARE TO BE SUPPLIED BASED ON MOTOR NAMEPLATE
AMP. RATING.
3. FOR NON-HAWK PANEL, MAXIMUM QUANTITY OF RELAYS, TIMERS,
OR COMBINATION OF BOTH IS 8. FOR HAWK PANEL THE MAXIMUM
QUANTITY IS 5.
8, 16
OPTION
CONTROL CABINET (LESS LEDGE)
SUB-BASE
CB70 FUEL 100,101,200,700
SUB-BASE
CB70 FUEL 400,600
CB100 FUEL 100,101,200,700
283-D-2881 SUB-BASE
283-2872
CB100 FUEL 400,600
SUB-BASE (283-D-2804)
283-2882
E100 FUEL 100,101,200,700
SUB-BASE (283-D-2881)
E100 FUEL 400,600
283-D-2804 SUB-BASE
SWITCH LEDGE
283-170
STANDARD
SWITCH LEDGE
283-2609
ANNUNCIATOR
SWITCH LEDGE
283-2965
HIGH STACK TEMP. CONT.
HIGH STACK TEMP. CONT.
SWITCH LEDGE
283-2966
& ANNUNCIATOR
119-313
283-D-2880
283-D-2805
FLAME
LOAD BURNER
MANUAL- FUEL
LOW
FAILURE DEMAND SWITCH
AUTO VALVE WATER
MANUAL
R
R
W
W
FLAME
CONTROL
9
10
11
12
13
14
100
-
101
-
200
985-2
118-754
833-2261
833-2263
400
985-8
118-760
985-4
118-756
833-2261
833-2263
600
985-8
118-760
985-6
118-758
-
700
-
CONTROL PANEL - CB,CB-LE
Part No. 750-225
9-9
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
MOTOR, OIL HEATER, & CCT FUSE SIZING
FUSE PART NO.S
RECOMMENDED MAXIMUM "FUSETRON" FUSE SIZES
ELECTRICAL LOAD
1/4 HP MOTOR
1/3 HP MOTOR
1/2 HP MOTOR
3/4 HP MOTOR
1 HP MOTOR
1-1/2 HP MOTOR
2 HP MOTOR
3 HP MOTOR
5 HP MOTOR
7-1/2 HP MOTOR
10 HP MOTOR
15 HP MOTOR
20 HP MOTOR
25 HP MOTOR
30 HP MOTOR
40 HP MOTOR
50 HP MOTOR
60 HP MOTOR
75 HP MOTOR
100 HP MOTOR
125 HP MOTOR
150 HP MOTOR
200 HP MOTOR
SINGLE PHASE 50/60 HERTZ
110-120 V
220-240 V
FRN-8
FRN-4-1/2
FRN-9
FRN-4-1/2
FRN-12
FRN-6-1/4
FRN-17-1/2
FRN-9
FRN-20
FRN-10
FRN-12
FRN-25
FRN-30
FRN-15
FRN-40
FRN-20
FRN-35
FRN-50
FRN-60
2 KW HEATER
3 KW HEATER
5 KW HEATER
7-1/2 KW HEATER
10 KW HEATER
15 KW HEATER
FRN-20
FRN-30
FRN-50
200-208 V
FRN-1-8/10
FRN-1-8/10
FRN-2-8/10
FRN-4-1/2
FRN-5
FRN-7
FRN-9
FRN-12
FRN-20
FRN-30
FRN-40
FRN-60
FRN-70
FRN-90
FRN-100
FRN-150
FRN-175
FRN-200
FRN-250
FRN-350
FRN-450
FRN-500
FRN-12
FRN-15
FRN-25
THREE PHASE 50/60 HERTZ
220-240 V
346-416 V
440-480 V
FRN-1-8/10
FRS-1
FRS-1
FRN-1-8/10
FRN-2-8/10
FRS-1-8/10
FRS-1-4/10
FRS-1-8/10
FRN-4-1/2
FRS-2-1/4
FRN-5
FRS-3-2/10
FRS-2-1/4
FRS-3-2/10
FRN-7
FRS-4
FRN-9
FRS-5-6/10
FRS-4-1/2
FRN-12
FRS-8
FRS-6-1/4
FRN-20
FRS-12
FRS-10
FRN-30
FRS-17-1/2
FRS-15
FRN-35
FRS-20
FRS-17-1/2
FRN-50
FRS-30
FRS-25
FRN-70
FRS-40
FRS-35
FRN-80
FRS-50
FRS-40
FRN-100
FRS-60
FRS-50
FRN-150
FRS-80
FRS-70
FRN-175
FRS-100
FRS-80
FRS-100
FRN-200
FRS-125
FRN-250
FRS-150
FRS-125
FRS-150
FRN-300
FRN-400
FRS-200
FRS-225
FRN-450
FRN-600
FRS-300
550-660 V
FRS-8/10
FRS-8/10
FRS-1
FRS-1-4/10
FRS-1-8/10
FRS-2-1/2
FRS-3-1/2
FRS-5
FRS-8
FRS-12
FRS-15
FRS-20
FRS-25
FRS-35
FRS-40
FRS-50
FRS-70
FRS-80
FRS-100
FRS-125
FRS-150
FRS-200
FRS-250
FRS-4-1/2
FRS-5-6/10
FRS-8
FRS-12
FRS-17-1/2
FRS-25
FRS-3-2/10
FRS-4-1/2
FRS-6-1/4
FRS-10
FRS-12
FRS-20
FRN-7
FRN-10
FRN-15
FRN-25
FRN-30
FRN-45
FRN-7
FRN-10
FRN-15
FRN-25
FRN-30
FRN-45
FRS-6-1/4
FRS-10
FRS-15
FRS-25
FRS-35
CONTROL CIRCUIT
1/2 KVA.
1 KVA.
1-1/2 KVA.
XFMR VOLTAGE
110-120
FRN-7
FRN-15
FRN-17-1/2
200-208
FRN-4
FRN-8
FRN-12
220-240
FRN-3-1/2
FRN-7
FRN-10
346-416
FRS-2-8/10
FRS-4
FRS-6-1/4
440-480
FRS-2-1/2
FRS-3-1/2
FRS-5-6/10
550-600
FRS-2
FRS-3-1/2
FRS-4-1/2
SECONDARY FUSE
FRN-5-6/10
FRN-12
FRN-15
CONSULT CLEAVER-BROOKS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPT. FOR "FUSETRON" FUSE SIZE
FOR POWER SYSTEMS WITH VOLTAGE, FREQUENCY OR PHASE NOT MENTIONED ABOVE.
STARTER PART NO.S
THREE-PHASE, 120 VAC CONTROL COIL
SQ-D
OPEN TYPE
NEMA 1 ENCL
STARTER
SIZE
00
0
1
2
3
4
5
833-2570
833-1884
833-1360
833-1885
833-970
833-1886
833-929
833-1197
833-1029
833-2098
833-1023
833-2178*
* FULL VOLTAGE 200 V COIL
OPEN TYPE
A-B
833-1362
833-1363
833-1447
833-1544
833-1298
-
2 KVA.
MAIN POWER TERMINAL
BLOCK PART NO.S
NEMA 1 ENCL
833-1979
833-1904
833-1838
833-1626
833-1623
-
AMPS
PART NO.
30
70
125
250
832-780
832-781
832-782
832-964
1/2
3/4
1
1-1/2
2
3
5
7-1/2
10
15
20
25
30
40
50
60
2.5
3.5
4.0
5.5
7.5
11
17
24
31
46
59
75
88
114
143
169
00
00
00
00
0
0
1
1
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
5
2
3
3.5
5
7
9.5
15
22
28
42
54
68
80
104
130
154
00
00
00
00
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
5
00
00
00
00
00
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
1
1.5
2
2.5
3.5
5
7.5
11
14
21
27
34
40
52
65
77
00
00
00
00
00
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
1
1
1.5
2
3
4
6
9
11
17
22
27
32
41
52
62
00
00
00
00
00
0
0
1
1
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
832-480
832-279
832-482
832-460
832-483
832-484
832-662
832-152
832-299
832-485
832-421
832-135
832-402
832-636
832-486
832-136
832-481
832-347
832-137
832-298
832-461
832-627
832-138
832-653
832-139
832-487
832-574
832-140
832-477
832-476
832-488
832-489
832-478
832-490
832-1025
832-621
832-1034
832-1035
832-1036
832-1037
832-1038
832-1039
115
200
230
HORSEPOWER AMPS STARTER AMPS STARTER AMPS STARTER
1/6
1/4
1/3
1/2
3/4
1
1-1/2
2
3
5
4.4
5.8
7.2
9.8
13.8
16
20
24
34
56
00
00
00
0
0
0
1
1
2
3
2.4
3.2
4
5.4
7.6
8.8
11
13.2
18.7
30.8
00
00
00
00
00
0
0
0
1
2
2.2
2.9
3.6
4.9
6.9
8
10
12
17
28
00
00
00
00
00
00
0
0
1
2
CONTROL CIRCUIT TRANSFORMER AMP DRAWS
ENTRANCE BOX CB,CB-LE
9-10
832-491
832-141
832-492
832-493
832-497
832-494
832-495
832-416
832-142
832-433
832-441
832-496
832-442
832-143
832-472
832-498
832-144
832-332
832-366
832-145
832-471
832-146
832-448
832-147
832-148
832-626
832-149
832-499
832-622
832-500
832-1115
832-501
832-502
832-847
832-443
832-1002
832-1026
832-1104
832-1040
832-1033
832-444
832-1041
832-1211
MOTOR AMP DRAWS & STARTER SIZING
AMP DRAWS BASED ON NEC TABLE 430-148.
VOLTAGE-SINGLE PHASE
380
460
600
AMPS STARTER AMPS STARTER AMPS STARTER
1.2
1.7
2.1
3.1
4.1
5.8
9.2
13.3
16.9
25.4
32.6
41.1
48.4
62.9
78.6
93.2
BUSSMAN FRN BUSSMAN FRS
.8
1
1.4
1.8
2
2.25
2.5
2.8
3.2
3.5
4
4.25
4.5
5
5.6
6.25
7
8
9
10
12
15
17.5
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
60
70
80
100
110
125
150
175
200
225
250
300
350
400
450
500
600
FRN-25
FRN-15
FRN-12
FRS-8
FRS-7
FRS-5-6/10
FRN-20
MOTOR AMP DRAWS & STARTER SIZING
AMP DRAWS BASED ON NEC TABLE 430-150.
VOLTAGE-THREE PHASE
HORSE200
230
POWER AMPS STARTER AMPS STARTER
AMP
RATING
KVA
208
VOLTAGE-THREE PHASE
230
380
460
575
1/2
2.4
2.2
1.1
1.3
0.9
1
5
4.3
2.6
2.1
1.7
1-1/2
7.5
6.5
3.9
3.3
2.6
2
10
8.7
5.3
4.3
3.5
WHEN SIZING TOTAL BOILER AMP DRAW USE 125%
OF THE LARGEST LOAD.
OIL HEATER AMP DRAWS
KW
RATING
3
5
7-1/2
10
200
8.3
13.9
20.8
27.8
VOLTAGE-THREE PHASE
230
380
460
600
7.5
12.6
18.8
25.1
4.6
7.6
11.4
15.2
3.8
6.3
9.4
12.6
3
5
7.5
10
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
* = QTY 1 ON VOLTAGE 240, <
QTY 3 OTHERWISE
BILL OF MATERIAL FOR ENT. BOX
OPTION
ITEM
QTY
1
1
434-61
TERMINAL STRIP, 25 TERMS
C8
2
1
118-1865
PLATE, I.D. FOR TERM. STRIP
C8
3
1
884-78
GROUND LUG
C8
4
1
848-223
FUSE BLOCK, CONTROL CIRCUIT
C8
5
1
118-297
NAMEPLATE, DECAL CONTROL CIRCUIT
6
1
832-347
FUSE, FRN-15
-
1
848-1083
ENT. BOX (18 X 15 X 6) (NEMA 1)
FUEL 700
1
848-338
ENT. BOX (24 X 18 X 6) (NEMA 1)
FUEL 100, 101, & 200
1
848-375
ENT. BOX (24 X 24 X 6) (NEMA 1)
FUEL 400 & 600 & "LE"
8
1
SEE TABLE
MAIN POWER TERMINAL BLOCK
9
3
SEE TABLE
BLOWER MOTOR FUSE
10
*
SEE TABLE
BLOWER MOTOR FUSE BLOCK
-
C8
11
3
SEE TABLE
AIR COMPRESSOR MOTOR FUSE
-
C8
12
*
SEE TABLE
AIR COMPRESSOR MOTOR FUSE BLOCK
-
C8
13
1
SEE TABLE
AIR COMPRESSOR MOTOR STARTER
-
C8
14
1
118-1667
AIR COMPRESSOR EMBLEM
W/ ITEMS 11, 12, & 13
C8
15
3
SEE TABLE
OIL HEATER FUSE
-
C8
16
*
SEE TABLE
OIL HEATER FUSE BLOCK
-
C8
17
1
833-2197
OIL HEATER CONTACTOR
W/ ITEMS 15 & 16
C8
18
1
118-299
OIL HEATER EMBLEM
W/ ITEMS 15, 16, & 17
19
1
8-B-3187
BRACKET, 18" X 24" BOX
96"
C8
1
8-B-3165
BRACKET, 24" X 24" BOX
96"
1
8-B-3164
BRACKET, 30" X 30" BOX
96"
1
8-B-3163
BRACKET, 36" X 30" BOX
96"
7
20
PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
USED ON
C8
C8
C8
DETERMINED BY TOTAL AMP LOAD
-
C8
C8
C8
1
8-3186
BRACKET, E-BOX
78"
1
8-3114
BRACKET, E-BOX
96"
BOILERS, LE
1
8-3190
BRACKET, E-BOX
96"
BOILERS, NON-LE
BOILERS
C8
NOTE:
BLOWER MOTORS CALLED FOR ON FRONT HEAD (ELECTRICAL)
AIR COMPRESSOR MOTORS CALLED FOR ON AIR COMPRESSOR ASSY
OIL HEATERS AND OIL PUMPS CALLED FOR ON OIL PIPING ASSY
8
1
2
3
11
12
15
16
CL OF 96" BOILER
ENTRANCE
17
9
10
7
20
CABINET
4
6
13
7
22
5
14
19
FRONT FLANGE
18
SIDE VIEW
19
FRONT VIEW
FOR 96" BOILERS
ENTRANCE BOX - CB,CB-LE,CBW,CBH
Part No. 750-225
9-11
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
BASIC BILL OF MATERIAL
FOR 96 " DIA. BOILER
16, 17, 10,18
ITEM
25, 19
28,3 OR 1, 5
19,25
11
2 9
16,17,10,18
8
20 7
20
8
A
13, 21
12
8
BUTTERFLY VALVE
ON GAS TRAIN
FUEL OIL
CONTROLLER
6
20
1
1
2
3
313-A-5
CAM ASSEMBLY
1
-
1
1
-
295-C-98
85-A-1926
GAS VALVE STEM ASSEMBLY
1
1
-
1
67-530
5
1
1
2
853-454
67-A-156
GASKET
ROD DAMPER LINKAGE
STANDARD
67-A-759
ROD DAMPER LINKAGE
HIGH T.D.
6
1
1
8
16,17,10,18
9
20
22
22
20
FRONT VIEW
14
4
SUPPORT - JACKSHAFT
4
1
20
22
15
WHERE USED
2
7
FRONT HEAD ASSEMBLY
DESCRIPTION
1
AIR
DAMPER ARM
18,10,17,16
A
5 28
1 OR 3
20
8
26, 27
24
9
QUANTITY
PART NO.
GAS OIL CMB
ROD LINKAGE, GAS VALVE (67-B-442)
ROD LINKAGE, MOD. MOTOR (67-B-442)
5
67-474
883-17
BALL JOINT
2
824-21
COLLAR
10
5
1
10-A-288
74-496
BUSHING - BALL JOINT
11
12
1
2-A-47
DRIVE ARM - MODUTROL MOTOR
13
1
BUSHING
14
1
10-A-91
287-A-24
15
1
68-A-32
END ROD LINKAGE
16
5
NUT HEX.
17
5
869-21
869-234
18
5
868-139
BOLT, HEX HD
19
4
20
8
860-101
869-22
NUT HEX.
860-39
SET SCREW
JACKSHAFT
GAS VALVE & ARM DAMPER
NUT & LOCKWASHER
SET SCREW
21
1
22
3
23
1
952-93
2-A-310
DRIVE ARM
1
894-3470
MOD. MOTOR
NON-UL
24
1
MOD. MOTOR
1
894-3471
894-3513
NON-HAWK
HAWK
25
2
2-A-160
26
4
27
4
868-137
952-92
LOCKWASHER 1/4"
28
2
77-371
CAM SPACERS
LOCKWASHER
MOD. MOTOR
HIGH T.D.
DRIVE ARM
BOLT, HEX HD
FUEL 200,
400, 700
20
8
18
17 16
10
RIGHT SIDE VIEW
DETAIL "A-A "
6
AIR DAMPER
ARM
57 FOR 96"
23
JACKSHAFT
47-1/2 FOR 96"
5-1/16" REF. 96"
AIR DAMPER COMPONENTS TO BE
SET AS SHOWN ABOVE.
2-3/16" REF. 96"
FRONT HEAD LINKAGE
9-12
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
BLOWER MOTOR ITEM 1
BOILER
H.P.
ODP (60 HZ)
MOTOR
H.P.
200, 230, & 460V
600V
STARTER BRACKET ASSY. ITEM 16
ODP (50 HZ)
230 & 380V
T.E.F.C. & HI-EFF.
200, 230, & 460V
* 400
10
894-3516
894-3547
894-3537
894-3525
500
15
894-3517
894-3548
894-3538
894-3526
600
20
894-3518
894-3549
894-3539
894-3527
650
30
894-3520
894-3551
894-3541
894-3529
700
30
894-3520
894-3551
894-3541
894-3529
750
40
894-3521
-
-
-
800
50
894-3522
894-3553
894-3543
894-3531
*
QTY
PART NO.
USED WITH ITEM 15 P/N.
1
8-2938
833-970
1
8-2939
833-929
1
8-2943
833-1029
1
8-2707
833-1023
1
-
833-2178
CB ONLY.
(SEE NOTE #4)
BOILER
H.P.
BLOWER MOTOR STARTER ITEM 15
MOTOR
NON-HAWK
230V
CONDUIT DIAMETER
H.P.
HAWK
H.P.
200V
230V
380-600V
* 400
500
10
-
-
-
833-929
833-929
833-970
15
-
-
600
20
-
-
-
833-1029
833-929
833-929
-
833-1029
833-1029
650
30
833-1023
833-929
-
-
833-1023
833-1029
700
30
833-1029
833-1023
-
-
833-1023
833-1029
750
833-1029
40
833-1023
833-1023
-
833-1023
833-1023
800
833-1029
50
833-2178
833-1023
-
833-2178
833-1023
833-1029
380-600V
200V
400
500
"A"
3/4”
1”
"B" 1-1/4” 1-1/4”
600-700 750-800
1-1/4"
1-1/4"
2"
2"
4 5
15 16
34 35
13
14
1
2
3
11
17
31 32
11
12
12
19,20,21,22
8 9 10
18
36 37 38
7
1/2" FLEX
23
10 27
9,10,24,33
12
6
MOD. MOTOR
29
30
28
25 TYP. 2 PLACES
26
FRONT HEAD (ELECTRICAL)
Part No. 750-225
9-13
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
PART NO.
ITEM
QTY
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
SEE TABLE BLOWER MOTOR
ADAPTER RING
255-A-26
CAPS
817-436
CONNECTOR, SQUEEZE TYPE
848-85
CONNECTOR, SQUEEZE TYPE
848-86
CONNECTOR, SQUEEZE TYPE
848-34
CONNECTOR, SQUEEZE TYPE
848-495
WASHER, REDUCING
848-6
WASHER, REDUCING
848-448
COUPLING
848-473
1
1
3
7
2
2
3
1
1
1
113-B-10
928-14
868-136
952-92
848-499
848-37
848-325
848-494
848-33
848-495
CONDUIT, FORMED
PIPE STRAP
CAPSCREW
LOCKWASHER
CONNECTOR, STRAIGHT
CONNECTOR, STRAIGHT
CONNECTOR, STRAIGHT
CONNECTOR, STRAIGHT, SQUEEZE TY
CONNECTOR, STRT, SQUEEZE TYPE
CONNECTOR, STRAIGHT, SQUEEZE TY
750-800 H.P.
400-700 HP
750-800 H.P.
400-700 H.P.
750-800 H.P.
1
1
1
848-34
SEE TABLE
SEE TABLE
CONNECTOR, STRT, SQUEEZE TYPE
STARTER
STARTER BRACKET ASSEMBLY
400-700 H.P.
SEE TABLE
SEE TABLE
1
1
85-C-2953
85-C-2954
MOTOR SUPPORT
MOTOR SUPPORT
650-700 H.P.
750 H.P.
1
1
4
4
4
4
1
1
1
2
85-C-2524
817-1742
841-659
77-A-57
952-114
869-36
113-A-32
113-A-31
848-273
848-16
MOTOR SUPPORT
SCANNER ASSEMBLY
STUD
SPACER
LOCKWASHER
NUT, HEX
CONDUIT, JUNCTION BOX TO PANEL
CONDUIT, JUNCTION BOX TO PANEL
OUTLET BOX
BOX CONNECTOR, SQUEEZE TYPE
800 H.P.
ALL EXCEPT 700
700
ALL EXCEPT 700
-
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
4
4
832-118
832-107
832-286
860-7
292-95
292-66
848-10
869-15
952-94
IGNITION TRANSFORMER
IGNITION TRANSFORMER
IGNITION TRANSFORMER
MACH. SCR. RD. HD
IGNITION WIRE
IGNITION WIRE
CONNECTOR BOX
NUT, HEX
LOCKWASHER
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
DESCRIPTION
USED ON
400-500 H.P. ONLY
400 H.P.
500 H.P.
600 - 700 H.P.
750-800 H.P.
400 H.P. ONLY
650-700 HP. ONLY
-
OIL ONLY 60 HZ
GAS & COMB. 60 HZ
ALL 50 HZ
OIL ONLY
-
1
848-248
OUTLET BOX COVER
4
869-18
NUT, HEX.
4
952-95
LOCKWASHER
1
848-2
CONNECTOR-GREENFIELD
ALL EXCEPT 700
2
848-100
BUSHING
ALL EXCEPT 700
1
827-6
GREENFIELD
ALL EXCEPT 700
NOTES:1. WHEN ITEM #15 (STARTER) IS NOT REQUIRED,
USE ITEMS #4, 5, & CONDUIT AS SHOWN.
2. WHEN ITEM #15 (STARTER) IS REQUIRED,
USE ITEMS #11, 13, 14, 16, & CONDUIT AS SHOWN.
3. WHEN ITEM #15 (STARTER) IS REQUIRED, HOUSING TO BE
ROTATED WITH JUNCTION BOX ON LEFT SIDE & CONDUIT RUN AS SHOWN.
4. MOTOR SIZES BASED ON SEA LEVEL.
FRONT HEAD (ELECTRICAL)
9-14
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
ITEM #2 IS NOT REQUIRED FOR 3" GAS TRAINS 400-800 HP.
* NOTE:
THE ACTUATORS ARE INCLUDED W/ ITEMS #1 & 3 GAS VALVES.
ITEM
1
QTY
TABLE 1
*
2
*
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
P/N
940-4539
940-4540
940-4541
949-385
940-4409
945-139
945-149
940-4544
940-4545
940-4546
949-384
*
940-4451
945-143
945-151
2
941-1947
2
941-129
2
941-130
2
941-131
1
817-774
1
817-789
1
817-751
1
507-6784
1
507-6785
1
507-6786
1
817-1935
1
817-752
(NOTE 4)
2
157-1722
2
157-1723
2
157-1039
2
157-469
(NOTE 4)
TABLE 1
948-2
948-53
948-54
948-55
NOT USED
TABLE 1 157-1043
157-1042
157-1040
157-1041
157-470
157-631
2
8-1002
3
8-1002
2
8-1159
3
8-1159
16
1
1
1
1
1
1
TABLE 1
NOT USED
919-104
919-105
919-99
858-169
858-170
858-171
948-197
17
TABLE 1
948-2
18
19
1
918-356
1
507-593
1
507-1348
1
507-1015
1
507-1299
1
850-109
SCHEM. 825-30
1
845-313
1
845-194
15
20
21
22
23
1
1
1
940-133
940-134
940-165
DESCRIPTION
VALVE (STD)
VALVE (STD)
USED ON
OPTION
2" GTS
2-1/2" GTS
VALVE (STD)
VALVE STD W/ ACTUATOR
VALVE (STD)
ACTUATOR (STD)
3" GTS 250-350 HP
3" GTS 400-800 HP
4" GTS
2",2-1/2",3" GTS 50-350 HP
ACTUATOR (STD)
4" GTS
VALVE (POC)
2" GTS
VALVE (POC)
2-1/2" GTS
VALVE (POC)
3" GTS 250-800 HP
VALVE POC W/ ACTUATOR
3" GTS 400-800 HP
VALVE (POC)
4" GTS
ACTUATOR (POC)
2",2-1/2",3" GTS
ACTUATOR (POC)
4" GTS
LUBRICATED PLUG VALVE
2" GTS
LUBRICATED PLUG VALVE
2-1/2" GTS
LUBRICATED PLUG VALVE
3" GTS
LUBRICATED PLUG VALVE
4" GTS
LOW GAS PRESS. SWITCH
50-250 HP (STD)
LOW GAS PRESS. SWITCH
400 HP (STD)
LOW GAS PRESS. SWITCH
300, 350, 500-800 HP (STD)
GAS PRESS. SENSOR
50-175 HP (HAWK)
GAS PRESS. SENSOR
200-500 HP (HAWK)
GAS PRESS. SENSOR
600-800 HP (HAWK)
HIGH GAS PRESS. SWITCH
50-250 HP (STD)
HIGH GAS PRESS. SWITCH
300-800 HP (STD)
HIGH GAS PRESS. SWITCH
ALL HP (HAWK)
S.O. NIPPLE 1/4"
2" GTS (STD)
S.O. NIPPLE 1/4"
2-1/2" GTS (STD)
S.O. NIPPLE 1/2"
3" GTS
(STD)
S.O. NIPPLE 1/2"
4" GTS
(STD)
S.O. NIPPLE
ALL HP
(HAWK)
MAIN VENT VALVE
3/4" VVS
MAIN VENT VALVE
1" VVS
MAIN VENT VALVE
1-1/4" VVS
MAIN VENT VALVE
2" VVS
NOT USED
S.O. NIPPLE
2" GTS, 1" VVS
S.O. NIPPLE
2-1/2" GTS, 1-1/4" VVS
S.O. NIPPLE
3" GTS, 3/4" VVS
S.O. NIPPLE
3" GTS, 1-1/4" VVS
S.O. NIPPLE
4" GTS, 3/4" VVS
S.O. NIPPLE
4" GTS, 2" VVS
BRACKET
2", 2-1/2", 3" GTS
BRACKET
4" GTS
BRACKET
MAXON 2", 2-1/2", 3" GTS
BRACKET
MAXON 4" GTS
NOT USED
CAPLUG
CAPLUG
CAPLUG
UNION
UNION
UNION
PILOT VALVE
2" GTS
2-1/2" GTS
3" GTS
2" GTS
2-1/2" GTS
3" GTS
-
PILOT VENT VALVE
-
PILOT REGULATOR
PILOT TUBING
PILOT TUBING
PILOT TUBING
PILOT TUBING
PILOT GAUGE
PILOT GAS COCKS
ELBOW
ELBOW
50-125A HP
125-200 HP
250-350 HP
400-800 HP
50-125A HP
125-800 HP
BUTERFLY VALVE 2-1/2"
BUTERFLY VALVE 3"
BUTERFLY VALVE 4"
100-125,125A HP
150-800 HP
4" GTS
14
B3
B3
M1
3"
10"
TYP
TYP
1
3
7
TYP
8
2
M3
4
3
10"
1
C3
B3
10"
15
M2
B3
B3
5
TYP 4
6
TYP
8
B3
B3
MAIN GAS TRAIN
4
3 5
2
9 2
1
M4
11
2
B3
B3
M5
9 4
A
A
1 11
3 37 38
39 40
4 9 4
A
TYP
4 PLACES
B3
M6
B3
A
TYP
37 38
3 39 40 4 PLACES
OVERALL LENGTH
SEE TABLE 1
3 11
B3
B3
B3
B3
B3
B3
B3
GAS TRAIN EQUIPMENT - CB,CB-LE
Part No. 750-225
9-15
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
ITEM QTY P/N
24
1 157-78
1 157-79
1 157-80
1 157-81
1 157-100
25
1
859-85
1
847-561
1
859-86
1
847-714
1
859-87
1
859-89
26
1
858-336
1
858-335
27
1
847-561
1
859-86
1
847-562
1
859-89
28
2
7-75
2
2
3
4
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
32
32
4
5
2
2
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
7-76
7-77
7-78
952-114
952-133
869-36
928-44
952-92
952-145
869-21
868-404
869-17
868-192
853-403
849-274
8A15
868-135
USED ON
50-80 HP
100,125A HP
125 HP
150-800 HP
4" GTS
50-80 HP
100 HP
125A, 125 HP
150-200 HP
250-800 HP
4" GTS
250-800 HP
4" GTS
50-80 HP
100,125A HP
250-800 HP
4" GTS
2" GTS
U-BOLT
U-BOLT
U-BOLT
LOCKWASHER
WASHER
HEX NUT
STRAP
LOCKWASHER
WASHER
HEX NUT
CAPSCREW
NUT, HEX. 5/8"-11
CAPSCREW 5/8-11 X 3" LG
GASKET 4"
FLANGE
GAS PILOT BRACKET
CAPSCREW
2-1/2" GTS
3" GTS
4" GTS
QTY 6 ON 4" GTS
QTY 6 ON 4" GTS
QTY 6 ON 4" GTS
QTY 3 ON 4" GTS
QTY 3 ON 4" GTS
QTY 3 ON 4" GTS
QTY 3 ON 4" GTS
QTY 3 ON 4" GTS
4" GTS
4" GTS
4" GTS
4" GTS
FUEL 101, 600
FUEL 101, 600
27
26
C
23
25
E
B3
B3
B3
B3
1/2" X 1/2"
X 1/4" TYP.
TYP TYP TYP
21 18 20 TYP 19 TYP
1/2" TYP.
16
27
S2
24
22 TYP
P1
24
D
A
B
F
B3
PILOT GAS TRAIN
( SEE NOTES 5 )
STARTER GAS TRAIN
S1
OPTION
DESCRIPTION
ELBOW 2" W/TEST CONN.
ELBOW 2-1/2" W/ TEST CONN.
ELBOW 3" X 2-1/2" W/TEST CONN
ELBOW 3" W/ TEST CONN.
ELBOW 4" W/ TEST CONN.
ELBOW 2"
ELBOW 2-1/2" X 2"
ELBOW 2-1/2"
ELBOW 3" X 2-1/2"
ELBOW 3"
ELBOW 4"
FLANGED UNION 3"
FLANGED UNION 4"
ELBOW 2-1/2" X 2"
ELBOW 2-1/2"
ELBOW 4" X 3"
ELBOW 4"
U-BOLT
21
25 23
S3
P2
24
17
SEE
NOTE
6
P3
25 23
16
21
TABLE 1
BOILER
MAIN GAS TRAIN
HORSEPOWER TRAIN VENT VALVE SIZE
SCHEMATIC
SIZE
STD & FM
IRI
STD FM
IRI
OPTIONAL
STARTER TRAIN
SCHEMATIC
ALL INS.
PILOT TRAIN
SCHEMATIC
STD & FM
IRI
50
2"
-
1"
M1
M2
M4
S2
P1
P2
60-100
2"
-
1"
M2
M2
M4
S2
P1
P2
-
1-1/4"
M3
M3
M5
S2
P1
P2
125A
2-1/2"
125-227
2-1/2"
-
1-1/4"
M3
M3
M5
S3
P1
P2
250
3"
-
1-1/4"
M3
M3
M5
S1
P1
P2
300-800
3"
3/4"
1-1/4"
M5
M6
M5
S1
P1
400-800
4"
3/4"
2"
M5
M6
M5
S1
P1
OVERALL LENGTH
MAIN GAS TRAIN
M1,M2,
48-1/2"
48-1/2"
48-1/2"
73"
M3,M4,M5
M6
65-1/2"
65-1/2"
65-1/2"
73"
P2
-
80"
P2
-
120"
80"
GAS TRAIN EQUIPMENT CB,CB--LE
9-16
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
34
12
6
11
7
6
11
25
31
24
12
10
1-1/4"
3/4"
10
29 36
27
3/4" x 1/2" x 3/4"
TIGHTEN NUTS ONLY ENOUGH
SO THAT CONTACT IS MADE
BETWEEN ELEMENT FLANGE AND
FLAT GASKET.
DETAIL "D"
SECTION "B-B"
9
46
3/4"
33
8-1/2"
3/4" X 3/4" X 1/4"
TYP.
1/4"
43 SEE NOTE 4
28
SECTION "A-A"
1"
8
45
1" X 3/4"" X 3/4"
SECTION "C-C"
44
C
L OF HINGE PIN
35 36
14
3/4"
37 38
15
4
WELD TO
HINGE
39 40 41 17
12
22
12
14-1/4"
1"
MIN.
RETURN
23
3/4" x 1/2"
6
SEE
C
1/2"
NOTE 2
CONTINUED AT
SECTION "C-C"
HEATER
OUTLET
0-15 PSI
26 SEE NOTE 7
6
1/2"
5-1/2"
29"
1" X 3/4" X 3/4"
A
42
3/4"
30
C
SUPPLY
WELD TO
SEE
43 NOTE 4
LEG
34 35 36 37 5 OIL RETURN
TO TANK
3/4"
1-1/4" x 3/4" x 1-1/4"
1-1/4"
B
26
A
3
8-1/2"
2
12"=CB
1/2"=CBLE
SIDE VIEW
1
30-3/4"
B
OIL SUPPLY
TO HEATER
HEAVY OIL PIPING STEAM CB,CB-LE
Part No. 750-225
16-300 PSI
18 32 13
1/2"x1/2"x1/4"
3/4"
14 19
X
15
17 39
20 21
40 41
STEAM PIPING TO HEATER SHALL BE 0 - 15 PSI, 3/4" SCH. 40
16 - 200 PSI, 1/2" SCH. 40
201 -300 PSI, 1/2" SCH. 80
9-17
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
NOTES:
1. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ALL OIL PIPE TO BE
SCH. 40 ASTM A120 WELDED BLACK STL. AND ALL
FITTINGS TO BE 150# M.I..
ITEM QTY
2. SWIVEL JOINTS SHOULD BE LINED UP EVEN
WITH FLANGE RING.
3. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE APPROX.
4. FOR IRI OR F & I INSURANCE SUPPLY ITEM 43.
FOR KEMPER SUPPLY ITEMS 43 & 26.
5. FOR HAWK DO NOT USE ITEM #23,
USE QTY 2 OF ITEM # 22.
6. ITEMS 42, 43, 44, & 45 ARE USED FOR NON-HAWK
ONLY. FOR HAWK USE SOLID STATE SENSOR
7. FOR IRI, F & I, OR FM SUPPLY ITEM 42.
FOR NO INSURANCE,OR KEMPER SUPPLY
ITEMS 42 & 26.
OIL HEATER
BRACKET
-
B2
B2
1
2
8-A-753
847-1715
BRACKET
BARCO JOINTS
-
B2
B2
7
8
1
1
940-2296
843-255
RELIEF VALVE
STRAINER
-
B2
B2
9
10
1
2
850-61
836-A-320
OIL PRESSURE GAUGE
THERMOSTAT (OHT & SHT)
-
B2
B2
11
2
2
832-311
845-313
CAPACITOR
ELBOW 1/2" ODC X 1/2" NPT
-
B2
1
1
5
6
16
17
18
35 36
37 38
4
19
12
6
FRONT VIEW
7"
1"
16
USED ON OPTION
*
8-A-2551
3
4
15
6
DESCRIPTION
B2
B2
14
12
652-B-24
-
1
2
12
13
CL OF HINGE PIN
PART NO.
HEATER TANK
BRACKETS
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8-A-650
SIPHON
16 - 300#
B2
948-227
948-273
VALVE 3/4"
VALVE 1/2"
0-15#
16-300#
B2
940-142
940-135
CHECK VALVE 3/4"
CHECK VALVE 1/2"
0-15#
16-200#
940-458
941-142
CHECK VALVE 1/2"
GLOBE VALVE 3/4"
201-300#
0-15#
941-40
941-605
GLOBE VALVE 1/2"
GLOBE VALVE 1/2"
16-200#
201-300#
B2
8-A-661
850-3
BRACKET
STEAM GAUGE
16-300#
B2
B2
817-260
817-330
REGULATOR, STEAM 1/2"
REGULATOR, STEAM 1/2"
16-150#
151-250#
B2
REGULATOR, STEAM 1/2"
CHECK VALVE 3/4"
251-300#
-
B2
854-11
B2
20
1
918-12
940-142
21
22
1
1
934-256
507-B-1268
STEAM TRAP 3/4"
TUBING OIL RETURN(SEE NOTE 5)
-
B2
B2
23
24
1
1
507-B-1267
32-A-2394
TUBING OIL SUPPLY (SEE NOTE 5)
GASKET
-
B2
B2
25
26
1
*3
853-692
847-466
GASKET, 0-RING
BUSHING 3/4" X 1/2"
-
B2
27
28
2
1
841-1142
847-426
U-BOLT
BUSHING, 1" x 3/4"
-
29
30
8
1
952-92
847-533
LOCKWASHER 1/4"
REDUCING COUPLING 1" x 3/4"
-
31
32
8
1
841-1458
858-311
33
34
4
1
952-94
847-641
LOCKWASHER 1/2"
REDUCING COUPLING 1-1/4" x 3/4"
868-136
869-21
CAPSCRW. HEX HD. 1/4-20 x 3/4"
-
952-145
HEX NUT 1/4-20
FLATWASHER 1/4"
-
STUD
FULL COUPLING 1/4" NPT
16 - 300#
-
35
3
36
37
11
3
38
39
2
1
928-44
868-405
STRAP 1/2"
CAPSCRW. HEX HD. 1/4-20 x 7/8"
-
40
41
1
2
869-234
928-45
NUT LOCKWASHER COMB. 1/4"
PIPE CLAMP 3/4"
-
42
43
1
1
44
45
1
1
46
1
*
*
*
*
847-468
LOTS
HOTS
ALL
LOPS
HOPS
BUSHING, 1" X 1/2"
D3
D3
D3
D3
-
REAR VIEW
STEAM PIPING TO HEATER SHALL BE 0 - 15 PSI, 3/4" SCH. 40
MAT'L.: ASME SA106
16 - 200 PSI, 1/2" SCH. 40
GR. B SMLS.
201 -300 PSI, 1/2" SCH. 80
HEAVY OIL PIPING STEAM CB,CB-LE,CBW
9-18
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
PROCEDURE
1. BOLT MOTOR AND APPLICABLE SPACERS (ITEM #34)
CB
BOILER
SECURELY TO HEAD.
60 HZ.
50 HZ.
H.P.
2. SLIDE SPACER, (ITEM #31), SHIMS (ITEM #32 & #33), AND
ITEM 1
ITEM 1
FAN ONTO SHAFT, BUT DO NOT LIGHTEN NUT.
400 192-C-264 192-C-264
3. PLACE SPACERS, ITEM #5, ON STUDS AND TURN UNTIL END OF
500 192-C-265 192-D-266
SPACER HITS HEAD PLATE.
4. PLACE STAR TYPE (SHAKEPROOF) LOCKWASHER, ITEM #20, ONTO STUD.
600 192-D-266 192-C-268
5. PLACE HOUSING, ITEM #6, ONTO STUDS AND INSTALL WASHERS,
650 192-D-317 192-D-271
ITEM #18, AND NUTS, ITEM #17. TURN NUTS HAND TIGHT.
700 192-C-267 192-D-274
6. ALL BLADES ARE TO BE AGAINST THE HOUSING. IF THEY ARE NOT
750 192-C-269 192-D-277
ADJUST SPACERS, ITEM #5, UNTIL HOUSING IS EVENLY
800 192-D-272 192-D-279
AGAINST BLADES.
7. TIGHTEN NUTS, ITEM #17.
8. SLIDE FAN ON SHAFT AND USE FEELER GAUGE
TO OBTAIN 0.030-0.050 CLEARANCE AS SHOWN.
9. SLIDE SPACER, ITEM #30, WASHER, ITEM #7,
ADHESIVE SIDE
AND KEY, ITEM #2, ONTO SHAFT.
TO AIR DUCT
10. TIGHTEN NUT, ITEM #29, ONTO SHAFT.
10
11. INSTALL DUCT ASSEMBLY, ITEM #3 AS SHOWN.
1-5/16"
12. APPLY ITEM #10 WITH ADHESIVE SIDE TO ITEM #3.
DETAIL "A"
13. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO DRAW ITEM #11 TIGHT
BASIC
BILL
OF
MATERIAL
AGAINST ITEM #6. ONLY ENOUGH TORQUE SHOULD
BE USED SO THERE IS A SEAL CREATED BETWEEN
96" DIA. - 400 THRU 800
ITEMS #6 & #12.
USED ON
ITEM QTY PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
21
22
1
-TABLE
1
IMPELLER - OPEN TYPE
25 26 27
(SEE NOTE 1)
23
24
3
3
10
11
20
1
9
-.04
( .01)
+
8
12
14
16
13
15
14
5
17
18
18 18
19 19
(SEE NOTE 2)
26
27
28
34
6
2
1/4" REF.
29
7
30
(SEE NOTE 3)
32
31
33
407-A-36
ASSEMBLY - MOUNTING FRAME
--
77-A-357
SPACER - FAN HOUSING
--
40-C-418
952-225
952-338
HOUSING - IMPELLER
WASHER, (2.5 OD X 1.3125 ID)
WASHER, (2.75 O.D. X 1.4375 ID)
-10-30 MTR HP
40-75 MTR HP
COVER PLATE ASSEMBLY, AIR HOUSING
--
GASKET, COVER PLATE, AIR HOUSING
--
GASKET, 3/4" WIDE x 1/2" THICK x 97"
CLAMP, BAR, AIR HOUSING
---
841-1105
426-B-244
4
1
5
8
6
1
1
1
8
1
317-A-76
9
1
32-A-2327
10
11
1
8
853-899
15-A-144
12
1
32-A-2328
13
8
868-405
14
16
952-92
15
8
841-1334
16
17
8
8
18
19
GASKET, SEAL, 88-1/2"
--
CAPSCREW, HEX HD. 1/4"-20 x 7/8"
--
LOCKWASHER, 1/4"
--
CAPSCREW, SWAGE FORM, 1/4-20 x 3/4"
--
952-145
869-30
WASHER, FLAT 1/4"
NUT, HEX, 3/8"-16
---
10
952-93
LOCKWASHER, 3/8"
--
4
868-98
CAPSCREW, HEX, HD. 3/8"-16 x 3/4"
--
20
8
952-32
LOCKWASHER, SHAKEPROOF, EXTERNAL, 3/8"
--
21
1
465-C-795
INSULATION, AIR HOOD ASS'Y
--
22
23
2
1
94-228
94-A-229
INSULATION- 2 X 10 X 32
INSULATION BACK, TRANSITION CHAMBER
---
24
15
903-252
CUP HEAD PIN
--
25
4
952-392
WASHER, 1-1/2" OD
--
26
10
952-93
LOCKWASHER, 3/8"
--
27
10
868-98
CAPSCREW, HEX, HD. 3/8"-16 x 3/4" LG
28
6
1
952-298
869-177
FLATWASHER, 3/8"
NUT, JAMB - R.H. SELF-LOCK (1-1/4" - 2 NF)
-10-30 MTR HP
1
869-180
NUT, JAMB - R.H. SELF-LOCK (1-3/8" - 2 NF)
40-75 MTR HP
1
77-432
SPACER, IMPELLER (.375" THK X 1-3/8" ID)
10-30 MTR HP
1
77-434
SPACER, IMPELLER (.375" THK X 1-5/8" ID)
40-75 MTR HP
1
77-436
SPACER, IMPELLER (.125" THK X 1-3/8" ID)
10-30 MTR HP
1
1
77-437
91-149
SPACER, IMPELLER (.125" THK X 1-5/8" ID)
SHIM, (.010" THK X 1-3/8" ID)
40-75 MTR HP
10-30 MTR HP
1
91-150
SHIM, (.010" THK X 1-5/8" ID)
40-75 MTR HP
1
91-78
SHIM, (.005" THK X 1-3/8" ID)
10-30 MTR HP
1
91-85
SHIM, (.005" THK X 1-5/8" ID)
40-75 MTR HP
1
77-464
SPACER, MOTOR
10-15 MTR HP
1
1
77-465
77-466
SPACER, MOTOR
SPACER, MOTOR
20-40 MTR HP
50-75 MTR HP
29
30
31
32
NOTES:
1. USE ITEM 21 AS TEMPLATE
5/16" DRILL, 3/8"-16TAP
6-HOLES.
2. 3/8-16 TAP 4-HOLES
3. ADD OR DELETE SHIMS "C"
OR "D" TO ACHIEVE PROPER
SPECIFIED IMPELLER TO IMPELLER
HOUSING GAP.
---
1
1
7
SEE
DETAIL
"A"
KEY (5/16" SQ. X 2-1/2" LG.)
DUCT ASSEMBLY
2
3
33
34
STANDARD IMPELLER, IMPELLER HOUSING & AIR INTAKE
Part No. 750-225
9-19
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
300 #
151#- 250 #
16#- 150 #
15 #
PART NO.
PART NO.
PART NO.
PART NO.
BILL OF MATERIAL
817-111
817-111
817-110
817-16
817-2096
817-2096
817-2095
817-2094
817-900
817-900
817-109
817-415
817-234
817-234
817-204
817-251
857-726
857-448
857-448
857-448
ITEM QTY
PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
1
SEE TABLE CONTROL PRESSURE (OLC)
1
SEE TABLE SENSOR - PRESSURE
2
1
SEE TABLE CONTROL PRESSURE (HLC)
3
4
1
SEE TABLE CONTROL PRESSURE (MC)
*3
1
SEE TABLE NIPPLE - 1/4" x 1-1/2"
USED ON
CB70/CB100/E100
HAWK
96" CB70/CB100/E100
-
ITEM #4 QTY OF 2 FOR HAWK OR
FOR 15 & 20 H.P. CB70/E100.
*
NOTES:
1. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, PIPE
MAT'L TO BE ASME SA 106 GR B
SMLS. INSTALLATIONS UP TO 150 PSI
CAN USE 3/4" SCHEDULE 40 (MIN)
AND 150 PSI M.I. FITTINGS. GREATER
THAN 150 PSI MUST BE 3/4" SCH.
80 AND 300# M.I FITTINGS.
2. ITEM 4 TO BE BRASS FOR
PSI'S THRU 250 PSI. 300 PSI
REQUIRES SCHEDULE. 80 NIPPLE.
SEE NOTE 2
SEE NOTE 4
TYP. (2) PLACES
1
2
5
4
3/4" X 3/4" X 1/4"
TYP. (2) PLACES
SEE NOTE 4
SEE NOTE 2
TYP. (3) PLACES
1
5
4
2
3
HAWK
NIPPLE NOT REQUIRED
ON 15# STANDARD
CB70
CB100/E100
PRESSURE CONTROLS
9-20
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
QTY
1
2
1
106-B-12
OIL TERMINAL BLOCK
1
8-A-950
BRACKET
3
4
2
1
70-A-55
940-2296
5
6
2
1
847-1715
507-B-1268
JOINT, SWIVEL
TUBING, RETURN (SEE NOTE 6)
96"
7
1
1
507-B-1267
507-B-1267
TUBING, RETURN (SEE NOTE 7)
TUBING, SUPPLY (SEE NOTE 6)
96" LE
96"
8
9
1
1
850-61
843-252
10
4
868-99
CAPSCREW 5/16"
96"
11
12
4
4
869-235
928-45
NUT & LW COMB. 5/16"
PIPE STRAP
96"
96"
13
14
1
1
847-530
847-152
COUPLING 3/4" x 1/2"
BUSHING
15
1
858-1
1/4" PLUG SQ. HEAD
-
16
2
1
845-313
8-A-2551
ELBOW 1/2" NPT X 1/2" ODC
BRACKET
96"
17
PART No.
USED ON
ITEM
DESCRIPTION
96"
SHIM
FULFLO VALVE
-
-
GAUGE, PRESSURE
STRAINER
SEE NOTE 4
-
2
10
10" REF
11
12
13
8
OIL RETURN
SEE
DETAIL
1/2"
OIL SUCTION
C
L HINGE PIN
14
9
1
15
1
OIL INLET
OIL RETURN
LIGHT OIL PIPING
Part No. 750-225
9-21
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
FUEL OIL
CONTROLLER
30
UNION 1/2" NPT
1/4" NPT
3/4" x 1/2" x 1/2"
32
3/4" NPT
1/2" PLUG
15
33-1/2" TO
VERTICAL C L
OF HEAD
(REF.)
HAWK REQUIRMENT
FRONT HEAD
33
34
15
SUPPLY
SEE NOTE 6
RETURN
15
1
TO PILOT
35
7
18
SEE NOTE 5
4
29
17
11
2
5
19
3
8
22
9
10
11
3-1/2"
20
8
27 36
TO BURNER
TO PILOT
37,
6
1/8" NPT
21
38
9"
OIL/AIR PIPING-FRONT HEAD (LIGHT OIL)
9-22
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
BASIC BILL OF MATERIAL
MODELS FOR 100 & 200 CB400-800
QTY
31
ITEM OIL COM PART NO.
1
18
24-87
VALVE STEM (24-A-81)
400 HP
1
24-88
VALVE STEM (24-A-81)
500-700 HP
1
24-89
VALVE STEM (24-A-81)
800 HP
1
739-74
VALVE ASSEMBLY (739-D-73)
400-700 HP
1
739-79
VALVE ASSEMBLY (739-D-73)
800 HP
3
1
948-153
VALVE - SOLENOID 1/4"
MODEL 100
4
1
948-153
VALVE - SOLENOID 1/4"
MODEL 100; IRI ONLY
5
1
941-914
VALVE - GATE 1/4"
MODEL 100; IRI ONLY
6
1
106-A-118
AIR MANIFOLD BLOCK
-
2
12
39
40
1
845-9
ELBOW 1/4"NPT X 1/4"ODC
MODEL 100; IRI INS.
1
845-7
CONNECTOR MALE - 1/4" NPT x 1/4" ODC
MODEL 100; STD/FM INS.
CONNECTOR - SQUEEZE TYPE 3/8" x 9027
ADD QTY. 2 IF FM INS.
BUSHING - ARMORED CABLE 3/8"
ADD QTY. 2 IF FM INS.
GREENFIELD - 3/8" (CUT TO FIT)
ADD QTY. 1 IF FM INS.
SEE NOTE 9
7
DETAIL " B-B "
8
6
4
848-16
9
6
4
848-100
3
2
827-6
NOTES:
11
1. WHEN HAWK IS REQUIRED CHANGE
OIL SUPPLY PIPING BY ADDING
HAWK COMPONENTS (ITEMS 30 AND
32), AND PIPE PER HAWK REQUIRMENT.
USED ON
1
1
DETAIL "A-A"
DESCRIPTION
14
2
845-429
CONNECTOR - MALE 1/4" ODC x 1/8" NPT
-
1
106-A-49
ORIFICE BLOCK
-
1
948-155
VALVE - SOLENOID 1/2"
ALL EXCEPT FM INS.
1
948-155
VALVE - SOLENOID 1/2"
NO INSURANCE
949-183
HYDROMOTOR VALVE 1/2" (SEE NOTE 10)
15
* 1
2
845-313
ELBOW - MALE 1/2" NPT x 1/2" ODC
* FM/IRI INSURANCE
-
2. IF MODEL 100, REMOVE PLUG AND
PROVIDE OIL PILOT PIPING AS SHOWN.
16
1
858-360
COUPLING - FULL 1/2"
-
17
1
859-115
ELBOW - STREET 1/8" x 4527
-
3. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE APPROX.
18
1
82-B-83
SPRING - COMPRESSION
-
TUBING - ASSEMBLY
-
ELBOW - 1/4" ODC x 1/8" NPT
-
COUPLING 1/8"
-
TUBING - ASSEMBLY
-
RETURN LINE PIPING DOES NOT CHANGE.
1
4. USED ONLY ON FM INSURANCE.
5. USED ONLY ON IRI INSURANCE.
6. FOR SUPPLY & RETURN PIPING,
7. FOR AIR COMPRESSOR PIPING TO AIR
MANIFOLD BLOCK
8. ITEMS #33 & 34 ARE NOT USED WITH HAWK.
20
1
845-42
21
1
858-113
1
507-A-2845
23
1
8-B-2204
BRACKET
-
24
1
841-1119
U-BOLT WITH NUTS
-
25
4
952-92
WASHER
-
26
2
868-136
CAPSCREW
-
1
861-436
FLEXIBLE HOSE
-
1
861-439
FLEXIBLE HOSE
-
1
507-A-2072
30
1
817-2098
31
1
36-A-26
CAM BODY GUIDE
32
1
847-419
BUSHING - 1/2" x 1/4"
33
1
817-1264
LOPS (SEE NOTE 8)
-
34
1
817-922
HOPS (SEE NOTE 8)
KEM. ONLY
35
1
507-B-1571
36
1
57-5050
37
1
845-7
9. STAMP NOZZLE SIZE ON FLAT SIDE OF ITEM 12.
ITEMS 12, 39, 40, & 41 STOCKED AS: 277-121
10. * FM INSURANCE REQUIRES 2 MOTORIZED VALVES
W/POC ITEM 14.
17
SEE NOTE 2
11
SEE NOTE 4
8 9 10
24
13
25
14
1/2" NPT
TO BURNER
1-1/2"
16 28
9 10
507-A-1309
ATOMIZING AIR SWITCH
SENSOR - PRESSURE
TUBING, OIL TO PILOT
PIPE, 3/4" X 20-1/2" LG. T.B.E.
HAWK ONLY
HAWK ONLY
MODEL 100
-
CONNECTOR 1/4" NPT X 1/4" ODC.
MODEL 100
TUBING, AIR TO PILOT
MODEL 100
38
1
39
1
899-14
STRAINER, MONARCH #F-80
-
40
1
899-51
NOZZLE, 30, H.V.MON. #F-80, 24 GPH.
-
41
1
157-A-201
COUPLING, STEEL, 1/2" NPT
-
(2)
8 TYP.
PLACES
1/2" NPT
9
10
8
507-A-2847
FRONT HEAD
23
25 26
Part No. 750-225
OIL/AIR PIPING-FRONT HEAD (LIGHT OIL)
9-23
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
HAWK
CB70/CB100/E100
30-125 HW
QTY
P/N
BILL OF MATERIAL
HAWK
HTHW
QTY
P/N
30-125 HW
QTY
P/N
-
8-967
-
8-937
-
8-937
-
8-995
-
8-2933
-
8-2933
-
817-2099
-
817-2100
-
817-1244
-
817-399
-
817-699
-
817-399
-
-
817-1050
-
817-1275
-
817-1050
1
817-378
-
1
817-400
-
9
-
-
ITEM QTY
PART NO.
DESCRIPTION
WHERE USED
1
1
-
BRACKET (8B937)
2
1
-
TEMPERATURE CONTROL (MC)
96"
-
3
2
-
WELL SEPARABLE
-
4
1
-
TEMPERATURE CONTROL (HLC)
-
5
-
-
WELL SEPARABLE
-
6
-
-
TEMPERATURE CONTROL (OLC)
-
7
-
860-4
MACH. SCR. #10-32 x 3/4"
-
-
8
-
847-152
BUSHING RED 3/4" x 1/2"
-
9
-
869-9
NUT MACH. SCR. #10-32
-
10
4
841-571
SHT. MTL. SCR. #10-32 x 5/8"
-
11
1
928-39
STRAP - PIPE
-
12
1
817-641
SOCKET SEPARABLE
-
13
1
937-27
-
-
-
-
6
-
6
-
4
-
3
-
3
-
9
-
6
-
6
-
THERMOMETER
96"
NOTES:
1. INSTALL PER ELECTRICAL SCHEMATIC.
2. ALL UNUSED FITTINGS MUST BE CAPPED.
SEE NOTE #2
8
8
12
3
SEE NOTE #2
8
2
12
CB70
3
8
CB100/E100
HAWK
11
8
8
3
5
11
7
7
9
9
13
13
2
4
10
1
7
9
4
6
7
9
REAR FLANGE
REAR FLANGE
1
10
SEE NOTE 1
TEMPERATURE CONTROLS
9-24
Part No. 750-225
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
PART NO.
M D. M. MAGNETROL
ITEM QTY
1
* SEE NOTE 8
PRESSURE
15# ST
"A"
0"*
150-300# ST
3"
ALL HW
3-1/2"
"B"
ALL
54"
** "C"
ALL
28-1/2"
"D"
ALL
27-1/2"
"E"
150-250# ST
15# ST
28-3/8"
ALL
250 ST
PRESSURE GAUGE
300 ST
1
850-101
TEMPERATURE GAUGE
30 HW
1
850-103
TEMPERATURE GAUGE
125 HW
1
817-95
817-163
LOW WATER CUT-OFF
15 ST
1
817-94
817-163
LOW WATER CUT-OFF
150 ST
1
817-304
817-163
LOW WATER CUT-OFF
200-250 ST
817-1962
LOW WATER CUT-OFF
300 ST
0-160 PSI.
(UP TO 250F) HW
1
817-2305
CONTROL, WATER LEVEL PROBE TYPE, MDL. 750
1
817-2306
REMOTE SENSOR, PROBE HOLDER, MDL. 750
1
817-2307
PROBE EXT., 24"LG, FOR REMOTE SENSOR, MDL. 750
1
941-1790
VALVE, BALL 3/4"
15-200 ST
941-401
VALVE, GLOBE 3/4"
250 ST
VALVE, GLOBE 3/4"
300 ST
941-401
825-31
COCK, UNION, BRASS (1 @ FINAL ASSY.)
2
941-318
15-250 ST
300 ST
CBLE 96"
1
1
8-A-1728
BRACKET, STEAM GAUGE
78" & 96" CB,CBW,CEW
1
8-A-3172
BRACKET, STEAM GAUGE LH MOUNTING
78" & 96" LE
1
8-3181
BRACKET, STEAM GAUGE RH MOUNTING
78" & 96" LE
6
1
825-31
7
8
10
1"
11
12
15
ALL HW
COCK, UNION, BRASS
GAUGE, GLASS
851-44
851-199
851-38
851-38
851-321
GAUGE, GLASS
300 ST
4
912-34
912-34
ROD, GAUGE GLASS
15-150 ST ONLY
4
912-85
912-34
1
1
14
VALVE, GLOBE 1/4", BRASS
47-3/8"
5
4
ABOVE 250F HW
ONLY
1
2
4
PRESSURE
PRESSURE GAUGE
850-172
2
27"
** FOR LE USE DIM "C" TABLE BELOW.
"C"
PRESSURE GAUGE
850-150
LOW WATER CUT-OFF (850-M PROBE)
3
27-5/8"
ALL HW
850-104
1
817-2348
1"
24"
200-300# ST
1
15 ST
150-200 ST/150 HTHW
1 1
1"
150# ST
PRESSURE GAUGE
1
1/2"
ALL HW
15# ST
"F"
REF.
2
USED ON
850-264
1
CB 96"
DESCRIPTION
1
1
825-352
1
15-150 ST
200-250 ST
GAUGE, GLASS
825-357
ROD, GAUGE GLASS
200-250 ST ONLY
SET, GAUGE GLASS
15-250 ST
SET, GAUGE GLASS
300 ST
1
941-55
VALVE, BALL 1/4"
15-200 ST
1
941-318
VALVE, GLOBE, 1/4"
250-300 ST
1
8-A-868
BRACKET, PRESS. CONTROL
15-300 ST
CHAIN SASH
15-300 ST
*
830-28
17
16
1"
"A"
13
VIEW "A - A"
"C"
1-1/4" X 1-1/4" X 1"
ABOVE 250F HW ONLY
27
L.W.C.O. CASTING MARK
2
SEE DETAIL
1
"C-C
"
L.W.C.O.
5
A.L.W.C.O. M D. M.
1" @ 150#
OR LESS
C
L
25
"A"
1" @ 150#
DETAIL "B - B"
L.W.C.O.
CASTING MARK
A.L.W.C.O. MAGNETROL
25
1"
A.L.W.C.O.
CASTING MARK
1"
27
1" ABOVE
15#
"B"
L.W.C.O. CASTING MARK:
@ 15# ST AND HW
1ST. VIS. POINT:
@ 150#-300# ST
@ WASHINGTON D.C. CODE
A.L.W.C.O.
"
"
SEE DETAIL B - B
OR LESS
TOP OF CB
"A"
"E"
+ 1/4"
- 0"
(TOLERANCE)
CL
"F"
REF.
+ 1/4"
- 0" (TOLERANCE)
2
ABOVE
250F
HW ONLY
MEASURE FROM TOP OF
HIGHEST ROW OF TUBES
C
L
28
23
26
3
SEE NOTE 3
6"
6"
W.C.-MAIN & AUX. CB
Part No. 750-225
9-25
Chapter 9 — Customer Service and Parts
LWCO W/ SWITCH FOR MOTORIZED FEED VALVE
158, 193, & 194
OPTIONAL REPLACEMENT FOR ITEM 2
LWCO W/ MODULATING SWITCH 193-7 & 194-7
ITEM QTY
PART NO.
15-150# 200-250#
15-150# ST
817-1307
200-250# ST
817-1211
DESCRIPTION
300#
1
1
857-448
857-726
BRASS NIPPLE, 1/4" x 1-1/2"
-
15
1
858-856
858-768
COUPLING 1/4" R.H. THREAD
-
16
1
859-54
859-32
BRASS TEE 1/4"
-
17
1
857-452
857-676
BRASS NPL. (X-HEAVY) 1/4" x 1-1/2"
-
18
1
869-234
NUT & LOCKWASHER 1/4"
-
19
1
928-44
ONE-HOLE CLAMP
-
20
1
868-136
CAPSCREW HEX. HD. 1/4-20 x 3/4"
-
21
1
22
23
24
847-1687 858-1009 858-1009 COUPLING 1" X 1/4"
-
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 1/4"
1
847-432 847-472
1
847-431
847-471
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 3/4"
ALL ST
2
847-431
847-471
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 3/4"
MAGNETROL
BUSHING 1/2" X 1/4"
MAGNETROL
1
847-612
SEE NOTE 4
ALL ST
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 1"
150# ST
817-1155
817-304
USED ON
14
847-470
817-1161
200-250# ST
13
847-428
15# ST
DETAIL "C - C"
L.W.C.O. M D. M.
1-1/4" x 1-1/4" x 3/4"
4
SEE NOTE 3
21
1-1/4" X 1-1/4"
X 3/4" TEE
5"
2
3/4"
"D"
SEE NOTE 5
SEE NOTE 7
UP TO 250F HW ONLY
SEE NOTE 2
MAGNETROL
8
6
12
7
2
1/4"
18 20
10
19 11
LOCATE & WELD TO SUIT
DETAIL "C - C "
L.W.C.O. MAGNETROL 15 - 250#
4
21
22
SEE NOTE 7
1"
"D"
A.L.W.C.O. M D. M.
25
26
27
28
25
26
27
28
1
817-98
CONTROL, AUX. L.W.C.O. (AUTO RESET)
15#
1
817-97
CONTROL, AUX. L.W.C.O. (MANUAL RESET)
150#
1
817-306
CONTROL, AUX. L.W.C.O. (MANUAL RESET)
1
941-1790
VALVE, BALL 3/4"
15-200#
1
941-401
VALVE, BALL 3/4"
250#
2
847-432
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 1"
15-150# ONLY
200-250#
1
847-431
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 3/4"
15-150#
1
847-471
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 3/4"
200-250#
1
817-301
A.L.W.C.O. MAGNETROL
CONTROL, AUX. L.W.C.O.
15-250#
1
817-1251
CONTROL, AUX. L.W.C.O.
300#
1
941-1790
VALVE, BALL 3/4"
15-200#
1
941-401
VALVE, BALL 3/4"
250-300#
2
847-432
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 1"
15-150#
2
847-472
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 1"
200-300#
1
847-431
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 3/4"
15-150#
1
847-471
BUSHING 1-1/4" x 3/4"
200-300#
2
8
6
12
7
SEE NOTE 2
1/4"
18 20
10
23
19 11
LOCATE & WELD TO SUIT
DETAIL " C - C "
L.W.C.O. MAGNETROL 300#
4
21
SEE NOTE 7
2
"D"
1/2"
23
8
6
12
7
SEE NOTE 2
1/2"
1/4"
24
10
18 20
19 11
LOCATE & WELD TO SUIT
3/4"
3
W.C.-MAIN & AUX. CB
9-26
Part No. 750-225
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