Aastra Voice 6090 Owner's User manual

Aastra Voice 6090 Owner's User manual
US007403768B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
(45) Date of Patent:
Beding?eld, Sr. et a].
(54)
METHOD FOR USING AIN TO DELIVER
CALLER ID TO TEXT/ALPHA-NUMERIC
PAGERS AS WELL AS OTHER WIRELESS
DEVICES, FOR CALLS DELIVERED TO
WIRELESS NETWORK
(56)
US 7,403,768 B2
Jul. 22, 2008
References Cited
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
4,266,098 A
5/1981 Novak
(Continued)
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
(75) Inventors: James C. Beding?eld, Sr., Lilburn, GA
(US); David A. Levine, Atlanta, GA
EP
0821511 A2
(US); Anita Simpson, Decatur, GA (US)
1/1998
(Continued)
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
(73) Assignee: AT&T Delaware Intellectual Property,
Inc., Wilmington, DE (US)
(*)
Notice:
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
U.S.C. 154(b) by 432 days.
Filed:
(57)
Dec. 9, 2004
Related US. Application Data
(60) Provisional application No. 60/312,138, ?led on Aug.
14, 2001.
(51)
(52)
(2006.01)
H04Q 7/22
H04Q 7/38
(2006.01)
(2006.01)
US. Cl. ............ .. 455/414.1;455/412.1;455/412.2;
455/413; 455/414.2; 455/414.3; 455/414.4;
455/415; 455/417; 455/418; 455/419
(58)
Field of Classi?cation Search ............ ..
toring module, and a Wireless terminating trigger used on a
mobile sWitching center. All components are in communica
tion With each other. The remote call noti?cation is transmit
ted to a remote communication device such as a PC, an
interactive pager, and a mobile phone. The call noti?cation
includes a calling number, the name of a calling party, time
and date identi?ers, status identi?ers that provides a real-time
Int. Cl.
H04M 3/42
ABSTRACT
A remote call noti?cation system for incoming calls to a
Wireless telecommunications device. The system includes a
sWitch, a service control point, an intelligent server, a moni
Prior Publication Data
US 2004/0248560 A1
Primary ExamineriDuc Nguyen
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm4Cantor Colburn LLP
Jun. 18, 2002
(65)
(Continued)
Assistant ExamineriMattheW W Genack
(21) App1.No.: 10/174,566
(22)
Talking Caller ID, Smarthome, http://WWW.smarth0me.c0m/5l54.
html Nov. 5, 2001.
455/412.1,
455/412.2, 413, 414.1, 414.2, 414.3, 414.4,
455/415, 417, 418, 419
status of the incoming communication, a disposition identi
?er, and a priority identi?er. A remote call noti?cation
method including detecting an incoming communication to a
subscriber’s Wireless communication device, creating a
remote call noti?cation, assigning an access address associ
ated With a remote communication device, and forwarding
the remote call noti?cation to the remote communication
device.
See application ?le for complete search history.
21 Claims, 3 Drawing Sheets
Whelul Plume
SMS M
IN,
VMS Platform
5B
US 7,403,768 B2
Page2
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US. Patent
Jul. 22, 2008
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US 7,403,768 B2
1
2
METHOD FOR USING AIN TO DELIVER
CALLER ID TO TEXT/ALPHA-NUMERIC
PAGERS AS WELL AS OTHER WIRELESS
DEVICES, FOR CALLS DELIVERED TO
WIRELESS NETWORK
phone, a third phone number assigned to a mobile phone, and
a fourth phone number assigned to a Wireless paging device.
Thus, many users have multiple Wired and Wireless devices
With each device having a different phone number and With
each device connected to different messaging systems and to
different communications netWorks.
When an incoming communication is placed to a particular
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED
APPLICATIONS
communications device, a user typically has no Way of knoW
ing about that incoming communication if the user is aWay
from the communications device. Using a conventional
This application claims priority to US. Provisional Appli
cation Ser. No. 60/312,138, ?led Aug. 14, 2001, entitled
approach, When a message is left on a messaging system
assigned to a particular communication device, the messag
ing system causes the associated communications netWork to
set the message Waiting indicator on the called communica
“METHOD FOR USING AIN TO DELIVER WIRELINE
CALLER ID TO TEXT/ALPHA NUMERIC PAGERS AS
WELL AS OTHER WIRELESS DEVICES.” This applica
tion relates to Ser. No. 09/742,765, ?led Dec. 20, 2000,
tions device; hoWever, it is incapable of setting detailed mes
saging information on the user’s other additional communi
entitled “SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR MONITORING
INCOMING COMMUNICATIONS TO A TELECOMMU
cations devices (Wired and Wireless). For example, When a
message is left on a user’s mobile phone messaging netWork,
the user’s paging device is incapable of providing detailed
NICATIONS DEVICE,” Which is incorporated herein by ref
erence. This application also relates to 60/312,281, ?led the
same day as the present application by Beding?eld, entitled
20
Which is also incorporated herein by reference.
having multiple communication devices is to alloW a user to
maintain constant communication, conventional approaches
fall short by not being able to provide the ability to deliver
25
NOTICE OF COPYRIGHT PROTECTION
A portion of the disclosure of this patent document and its
?gures contain material subject to copyright protection. The
messaging information associated With the message left on
the mobile phone messaging netWork. Since the purpose of
“METHOD FOR USING AIN TO DELIVER CALLER ID
TO TEXT/ALPHA-NUMERIC PAGERS AS WELL AS
OTHER WIRELESS DEVICES, FOR CALLS DELIV
ERED TO LANDLINE NETWORKS” the disclosure of
30
copyright oWner has no objection to the facsimile reproduc
detailed messaging information across all communication
devices. Within the prior art, users have attempted to over
come this de?ciency by utiliZing a feature in voice mail
systems referred to as outbound calling. An outbound calling
feature alloWs a user to designate a telephone number (that
may be assigned to a different communications device) that is
dialed by the voice mail system during a ?xed time period if
a message is Waiting for the user in the voice mail system.
tion by anyone of the patent document or the patent disclo
sure, but otherWise reserves all copyrights Whatsoever.
Using this approach, users have also designated pagers’
phone numbers as the number to be called for the outbound
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
1. Field of the Invention
This invention relates generally to the ?eld of communica
tions. More particularly, this invention manages detailed
information about all incoming communications to and all
outgoing communications from a Wireless communications
device, such as a cellular phone connected to the Cellular
35
calling is that it requires a user to carry both a pager to receive
a general noti?cation and a cellular phone to receive the
40
a landline phone is that the user may not Wish to access or to
be bothered by all detailed message noti?cations.
In addition to receiving real-time information related to
mation to a Wireless communications device, such as an
45
2. Description of the Related Art
The ?eld of telecommunications has experienced explo
sive groWth, and more groWth is planned as telecommunica
messages received and stored in a voice mail system, A user
may also desire to knoW about all incoming communications
to a communications device, such as a cellular telephone. For
example, a user may desire to knoW if an incoming commu
tion access and numerous communication devices improve.
This explosive groWth is revolutioniZing message noti?cation
detailed information. One problem associated With directing
calls from the outbound calling feature to a Wireless phone or
Mobile Telephone NetWork (CMTN), and delivers this infor
alphanumeric pager.
calling, or, have designated the telephone number of a Wire
less or landline telephone. One problem associated With des
ignating a pager as the device to be called by the outbound
nication is being ansWered, if it receives a busy signal, if it is
50
and similar services. For example, US. Pat. No. 6,006,087
terminated, if it is forWarded to a different communications
device (i.e., there currently isn’t any Way for a user to knoW
discloses a method and system for delivering a voice mail
about all incoming communications When a line is ringing,
noti?cation of a voice message left on a user’s Wireless ser
ansWered, busy, etc., With detailed call information).
vice netWork. When a message is left in a user’s mailbox
assigned to the user’s cellular phone, the voice mail system
55
generates a voice mail noti?cation that includes a calling
number, the name of the calling party, and an index listing
various messages so that a user can scroll through the mes
sages and choose a desired message to retrieve and play. The
voice mail noti?cation is forWarded to and displayed by the
cellular phone operated by a user.
In today’s telecommunications World, it is commonplace
for users to have multiple Wired (i.e., landline) and Wireless
communications devices connected to various global tele
60
Users Who miss calls Would like a Way to knoW Who has
called them and Whether or not that caller left a message. A
user can obtain this information in a proactive Way by calling
their voice mail systems/answering machines at Will and
determining Whether there are any messages. HoWever, this
does not provide a complete list of Who has called them, just
Who left a message. Some Customer Premises Equipment
(CPE) is capable of paging a user When an incoming call
arrives, but this is limited to a pre-programmed set of callers
they Wish to be noti?ed about. CPE is used to refer to equip
ment that a customer connects to the telephone system. More
communications netWorks. For example, a user may have a 65 over, CPE does not announce the Calling Name delivery
?rst phone number assigned to a residential landline tele
phone, a second phone number assigned to a business tele
(CNAM) and Caller Identi?cation (ID) because of the
expense involved in doing so. Also, the duration of a call that
US 7,403,768 B2
3
4
does not terminate at the customer’s premises is unknown by
the CPE (for example, the call went to voice mail).
Thus, there is a current need for systems and methods for
?cation is “new” and that a subscriber has not reviewed the
details of the incoming communication. Other examples of
selecting, retrieving, storing, and managing detailed informa
the disposition identi?er include: (a) stored, (b) deleted, (c)
restored, (d) forwarded, and (e) system administration
tion related to all incoming communications to and all out
going communications from a landline communications
device. There is a further need to ef?ciently deliver this infor
remote communications devices to receive the remote call
noti?cation. The remote communications device is any com
mation to a remote communications device in order to pro
munications device capable of delivering remote call noti?
vide real time and quasi-real time detailed message noti?ca
cation to a subscriber, such as, for example, a landline phone,
mobile phone, a cellular phone, a satellite phone, a computer,
This invention assigns an access address to one or more
tion and similar information. There is still a further need to
forward the communication or its equivalent to the remote
communications device. Finally, there is a need to harmoniZe
such information associated with multiple landline commu
a modem, a pager, an interactive pager, a personal digital
assistant (PDA), and an interactive television. An exemplary
embodiment of an access address for a computer may be a
TCP/IP address, an instant messaging screen name, or an
nications devices using different messaging systems.
e-mail address.
BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The access address to be used can be determined using a
number of different methods. For example, the access address
can be selected by a subscriber’s preferences, by a calling
To overcome these problems, the present invention pro
vides easy, reliable, and e?icient methods and systems for
providing detailed call information relating to all incoming
party’s preferences, by a forwarding party’s preferences, by
20
communications to a communications device, such as a wire
less phone, and delivers this information as a remote call
noti?cation to a remote communications device, such as an
interactive pager. Further, this invention includes a system
that manages all detailed call information about all incoming
25
communications to a communications device and manages
how this information is delivered and presented to the remote
communications device. In an embodiment, the remote call
noti?cation is delivered in real-time or in quasi real-time, as
delivery speed to the remote communications device varies
depending upon the delivery medium. The remote call noti
?cation may be automatically forwarded to the remote com
ties of the remote communications device (e.g., a calling
party leave a video clip message and the network forwards it
to a remote communication device capable of displaying the
video clip, such as, for example, a PDA with appropriate
display
After a call is received and an access address is assigned,
the remote call noti?cation is forwarded to the remote com
30
munications device. The remote call noti?cation is presented
to the remote communications device in a subscriber-friendly
format, such as, for example, an audio format, a text format,
a short message service (SMS) format, a video format, or a
munications device upon the arrival or termination of a new
markup language document format. Alternatively, a voice
incoming communication. Alternatively, the remote call noti
?cation may be forwarded to the remote communications
an administrator of the communications network storing the
remote call noti?cation, and by the communication capabili
interface may be created so that a subscriber of a remote
35
device using rules established by a subscriber, a calling party,
a forwarding party, an administrator, and by other constraints
(e. g., availability and load of the communications link to the
remote communications device).
communication device receives a remote call noti?cation and
can retrieve more information about the remote call noti?ca
tion by dialing a phone number.
This invention also allows a subscriber of the remote com
In a preferred embodiment, this invention detects an
incoming communication, such as a phone call, on a commu
nications link to a subscriber’s communications device, such
as a wireless telephone. Once an incoming message is
detected, this invention creates a remote call noti?cation that
40
includes detailed information about the incoming communi
cation. For example, the detailed information may include:
(a) a calling number; (b) a name of a calling party associated
45
munications device to scroll through a plurality of remote call
noti?cations (i.e., a log of remote call noti?cations), to select
a particular remote call noti?cation to retrieve an associated
communications message (e.g., a voice mail associated with
the remote call noti?cation), and to present the communica
tions message on the remote communications device (e.g.,
play the sound annotation of the voice mail).
Further, the log of remote call noti?cations may be
with the calling number; (c) time identi?ers that provide the
accessed by a subscriber or another subscriber (e.g., a calling
times when the incoming communication is ?rst detected and
party that has left a plurality of messages). The log may be
is terminated; (d) a length identi?er that provides the length of
the incoming communication; (e) a date identi?er that pro
vides the date that the incoming communication is received;
50
day, for the previous day, for the last 1000 calls, for a particu
lar calling party, and so on. Alternatively, retrieval of the log
may include a voice interface so that subscribers can retrieve
(f) a status identi?er that provides a real-time status of the
the log of remote call noti?cations by dialing a phone number.
incoming communication; (g) a disposition identi?er; and (e)
a priority identi?er that indicates the importance of the
55
incoming communication.
In one embodiment, the status identi?er indicates a real
time or quasi real-time status of the incoming communication
into the network of the subscriber’s communications device.
For example, if the subscriber’s communications device is a
60
answered, (c) busy, and (f) disconnected.
In one embodiment, the disposition identi?er provides
the disposition identi?er can indicate that a remote call noti
In one embodiment, the remote call noti?cation is deliv
ered quasi-real time to an interactive pager or to a personal
computer in the form of an instant message or data packet that
activates an Internet Call Waiting-like pop-up screen (e.g., a
cellular phone connected to the CMTN, then the terminating
switch in conjunction with the service control point (SCP)
can report the following status identi?er’s: (a) ringing, (b)
information about the remote noti?cation itself. For example,
retrieved in various ways, such as, for example, for the current
65
pop-up web page). Similarly, the remote call log is delivered
to interactive pagers, web pages, e-mail, and phone (e.g., a
phone with a VXML interface). The subscriber is able to
interactively con?gure the remote call noti?cation and remote
call log services through a computer connected to the world
wide communications network, such as, the Internet, intranet,
or extranet. Alternatively, the subscriber can con?gure his/her
remote call noti?cation services through a service represen
tative.
US 7,403,768 B2
5
6
Thus, this invention allows real-time remote call noti?ca
tion that is ?exible to telecommunications subscribers having
machine, a modem, etc. The term “called party” is used herein
multiple communications devices, including multiple Wire
responds to the call or communication. The term “communi
cation” is used herein to include all messages or calls that may
generally to refer to the person or device that ansWers or
less communications device. This invention noti?es a sub
scriber of all incoming communications, provides detailed
be exchanged betWeen a calling party and a called party,
including, voice, video, and data messages. The term “com
munication” is used synonymously herein With the term
information about each incoming cornmunication, alloWs a
subscriber to manage each incoming communication, and
provides an option to retrieve and play each incoming com
“call” unless a distinction is noted. The term “subscriber” is
used herein to generally refer to a subscriber of the described
telecommunications service. The term “Intemet” refers to
both the Internet and an intranet, unless a distinction is noted.
Similarly, the term “Intemet-accessible device” refers to a
data communications device that has the capability to access
munication to a remote communications device.
This invention alloWs a subscriber to alWays knoW about
incoming communications even if the line Was busy, multiple
calls Were received at the same time, and if the caller hung up
before the call Was ansWered. This invention alloWs small
business subscribers to alWays knoW Who called and When.
Further, this service is useful for subscribers that do not like to
check their voicemail often unless they receive an important
the Internet or an intranet.
In one embodiment, the present invention provides a neW
telecommunications service referred to as Call ID AnyWhere
message, especially When calling long distance to check their
(CIDA) (also referred to as Calling Name AnyWhere or
voicemail.
Remote Call ID). In brief, this service alloWs a customer to
To summariZe the primary bene?ts, this invention: (1)
alloWs cellular (Wireless) subscribers to knoW Who calls them
virtually anyWhere; (2) alloWs a subscriber to obtain infor
mation from incoming calls in real-time; (3) alloWs a sub
scriber to access a call log of recent calls; (4) indicates Who
called (name & number) and When (date & time), as Well as
20
certain call dispositions (ansWered, length of call, busy, call
25
abandoned, voicemail left); (5) alloWs a subscriber to receive
information about incoming calls using different devices
(e.g., pagers, mobile phones, Web broWsers, personal com
puters, PDAs, etc.); and (6) alloWs a subscriber to customiZe
useful con?guration options (e.g., priority and ?lter-out num
bers, caller information delivery based on call outcome, etc.).
Log(RCL).
30
nication devices in accordance With an exemplary embodi
ment of the present invention.
FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating the Caller ID Any
Where (CIDA) service system architecture for a Wireless sys
tem in accordance With an exemplary embodiment of the
matically upon the arrival and/or termination of a neW call.
The information about the incoming call can be delivered as
a Web page, as an e-mail, as a Short Messaging Service (SMS)
message, etc. If the information is delivered via an e-mail, the
noti?cation can be sent to an e-mail account, alphanumeric
pager, interactive pager, Personal Digital Assistant (PDA),
and given proper processing to an SMS-capable phone. If the
35
methods and systems for using anAIN to deliver caller ID to
Wireless devices utiliZing landlines are better understood
When the folloWing Detailed Description of the Invention is
read With reference to the accompanying draWings, Wherein:
FIG. 1 is a diagram illustrating call ?oW through commu
In one embodiment, the RCN service delivers information
of an incoming call in quasi real time (delivery speed depend
ing on the delivery medium). The information is sent auto
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
These and other features, aspects, and advantages of the
obtain calling number and name, date & time of call, and call
outcome information aWay from the cellular phone to be
monitored. The service actually consists of tWo main compo
nents: Remote Call Noti?cation (RCN), and Remote Call
40
information is delivered via a Web page, more than one call
state can be reported, e. g., ringing, ansWered, busy, hang up.
The call information consists of the name and number of the
caller (if available), date and time of the call, as Well as
additional information if available.
In one embodiment, the RCL service consists of a log of
recent calls. The information in the call log can be sent to the
subscriber automatically (periodically), but in most cases, the
subscriber retrieves the information as desired. As With the
RCN service, the call log includes essential call information
45
such as the name and number of the caller, as Well as the date
and time of the call. Additional information, such as the
length of each call, can also be included if available. The
delivery methods for the call log information are the same as
With the RCN service. In addition, the RCL service includes
present invention.
FIG. 3 is a How diagram illustrating call ?oW for call
noti?cation in accordance With an exemplary embodiment of
the present invention.
50
a voice interface so that subscribers can retrieve call log
information by dialing a telephone number. Call log informa
DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
tion can be retrieved for the current day, previous day, etc.
As required, detailed embodiments of the present invention
Brie?y, the Caller ID AnyWhere service of the present
are disclosed herein, hoWever, it is to be understood that the
disclosed embodiments are merely exemplary of the inven
tion that may be embodied in various and alternative forms.
Speci?c structural and functional details disclosed herein are
not to be interpreted as limiting, but merely as a basis for the
claims as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the
invention Works in the folloWing Way. For call noti?cation, a
subscriber receives a call to his/her phone. The service checks
art to variously employ the present invention. Conventional
hardWare and systems are shoWn in block diagram form and
process steps are shoWn in ?oWcharts.
The term “calling party” is used herein generally to refer to
55
to determine hoW the customer desires to be noti?ed about the
call, namely, via interactive pager, e-mail, and/or via a page
60
the person or device that initiates a telecommunication. The
calling party may also be referred to herein as “caller.” In
some examples, the calling party may not be a person, but
may be a device such as a facsimile machine, an ansWering
that pops-up in the subscriber’s computer screen. If noti?ca
tion is to occur via interactive pager (e-mail), the service Waits
until the call ends and then sends a page (a specially-format
ted e-mail) to the interactive pager. If noti?cation is to occur
via PC, the service opens a WindoW on the designated PC,
Which the subscriber has designated beforehand. Up to sev
eral PC updates may be sent per call event: one as soon as a
65
neW call is received; another When the phone is ansWered or it
is determined that the line is busy; and one When the call ends,
indicating the ?nal outcome of the call (e.g., voice-mail left or
US 7,403,768 B2
7
8
call length). The PC window may be activated using special
to notify this change. The SCP 42 is provisioned one-time
CIDA client software, or using a java-based browser inter
face.
For call log requests, a subscriber can request call log
information at any time. To retrieve call logs using an inter
with the CIDA server IP address, assuming TCP/IP connec
tivity 52 is used. For each new subscriber, the SCP 42 is
active pager, a subscriber sends a Short Message to a pre
the TAT 50 query. Also, the SCP 42 generates measurements
which may need to be retrieved periodically.
provisioned with the new subscriber number and any perti
nent additional information so that the SCP 42 can respond to
de?ned address. The message contains a command to specify
the record(s) to be retrieved. If a web browser is used, the
subscriber logs into a web page for the service and requests
The CIDA server 44 serves as web host for the CIDA
service, keeping subscriber information as well as all call
records. All call noti?cations originate from the CIDA server
44. The CIDA server 44 also handles and serves all requests
for call log information from subscribers. The CIDA server
44 also communicates with the CSN 48 and receives data
from the voice mail system, over the VMS interface 46. The
CIDA server 44 is the main component of the CIDA service.
In brief, the CIDA server 44 is a data repository, web server,
the desired record(s). A subscriber also has the option of
calling a number and then following instructions for the
retrieval of the call record(s), either by listening to the record
(s), or by requesting that the record(s) be sent to a fax number.
According to one embodiment, the systems of the present
invention utiliZe the intelligent functionality of an Intelligent
Network (IN). An IN is a network which can be used in
conjunction with a conventional telephone network, such as
administration server, CSN server, and e-mail server. The
the Cellular Mobile Telephone Network (CMTN), to provide
enhanced voice and data services and dynamic routing capa
bilities
Referring to FIG. 1, looking at the CIDA service of the
present invention brie?y, the service allows subscribers to
20
know who calls them no matter where the subscriber is
located. The service allows a subscriber to obtain information
regarding incoming calls from a caller device 20 in real-time,
25
or quasi real-time, and have access to a call log of recent calls.
bers for the CIDA subscriptions. Also, depending upon the
subscribers’ preferences, parameters may be provisioned as
certain call dispositions (answered, length of call, busy, call
30
accessed using a number of subscriber devices, such as an
ers, e-mail accounts) in addition to a web browser, and maxi
mum call log capacity if an active subscriber has requested an
architecture in which the CIDA service of the present inven
tion is provided to cellular (wireless) subscribers is shown.
The main hardware/ software components of the CIDA ser
vice include a home Mobile Switching Center (MSC) 40,
Service Control Point (SCP) 42, CIDA server 44, Service
35
Switching Point (SSP) 60, and an Intelligent Peripheral, such
40
The CSN 48 is used to provide an Interactive Voice
CSN 48 allows subscribers of the CIDA service to obtain call
44. The CSN 48 veri?es that the calling party is calling from
the subscribed phone and has the proper Personal Identi?ca
45
subscriber’s cellular service. Upon receiving a call, the TAT
50 ?res and the switch, using the appropriate wireless proto
50
55
by communicating with the subscriber’ s MSC 40, keeps track
60
A subscriber is able to fast forward, skip back or forward, or
even erase call log entries. Call log entries may be erased for
the IVR interface. Erased call log entries may be erased for
convenience for the IVR interface, but may still be available
over the Internet. Up to about 100 caller records may be
retrieved over the IVR interface. The IVR interface also has
an option that allows a subscriber to provide a fax number
where call log information can be sent. Aside from initial
service provider access and load and communication with the
CIDA server 44, no additional provisioning is required.
The VMS interface 46 is attached to theVoice-Mail Service
(VMS) platforms 58 that serve an appropriate region. The
voice mail system, using interface 46, noti?es the CIDA
server 44 when it “sees” that a voice-mail platform 58 is
notifying a home switch to turn on voice-mail waiting noti
?cation for a speci?c subscriber. In summary, the voice mail
change in the status of the call (eg it requests termination
noti?cation). The SCP 42 is also aware of the different pos
sible status of a call, namely, ringing, busy, answer, and dis
tion Number (PIN). The CSN 48 also allows a subscriber to
check the call log or to request that a call log be sent to a fax
number. The CSN 48 asks the subscriber which log is to be
played/sent (e.g., today’s, yesterday’s, or for a speci?c day).
noti?ed about subsequent changes in the call state (i.e., busy,
of call events related to the subscriber’s wireless service, and
noti?es the CIDA server 44 appropriately. The SCP 42
responds to the TAT 50 query with an appropriate termination
instruction, and requests to be noti?ed whenever there is a
log information over the phone. For each session (i.e., for
each call to the CSN 48), the CSN 48 is in constant commu
nication and requests subscriber data from the CIDA server
ger (TAT) 50, or any other suitable terminating trigger, such
answer, disconnect) as soon as these happen. (The availability
of such noti?cations will be dependent on the particular wire
less IN implementation, and potentially on the roaming status
of the subscriber). When a change in the call state occurs, the
home MSC 40 noti?es the SCP 42 immediately
The SCP 42 handles queries from the TAT 50. The SCP 42,
expanded call log.
Response (IVR) or Voice Extensible Markup Language
(VXML) interface for retrieving call log information. The
as a Compact Service Node (CSN) 48.
The home MSC 40 of the subscriber’ s line is equipped with
a WIN, CAMEL, or other wireless termination attempt trig
col, requests instructions from the SCP 42 as to how to pro
ceed with the call. The SCP 42 responds with an authoriZe
termination. The SCP 42 requests from the switch that it is
well when entering a new subscriber, such as devices 54 and
their electronic addresses that are supported for call noti?ca
tion and call log(e.g., SMS service addresses, interactive pag
personal computer 24, an interactive pager 26, a personal
digital assistant (PDA) 28, a landline telephone 30, etc.
Referring to FIG. 2, in one embodiment, call-processing
as a dialed number trigger. The TAT 50 is provisioned on the
functions for subscribers, returns queries for call log infor
mation back to the subscriber with the appropriate data (que
ries in the form of e-mails or queries through a web page), and
noti?es subscribers of pertinent call events according to the
device(s) that are speci?ed by the subscriber. At a minimum,
the CIDA server 44 is provisioned with the telephone num
The service indicates who called (name and number) a sub
scriber telephone 22 and when (date and time), as well as
abandoned, and voice-mail left). The caller information is
CIDA server 44 receives and processes call state updates from
the SCP 42, receives and processes voice-mail noti?cations
from the Voice Mail Interface 46, performs administrative
65
platform communicates new voice mail information (calling
connect. Whenever there is a change in the status of the call,
number, message indicator, length of message, etc.) directly
the SCP 42 sends a message to the associated CIDA server 44
to the CIDA server 44.
US 7,403,768 B2
10
Once the CIDA service of the present invention is provi
main menu may provide a “fax option”. For this option, the
subscriber may enter a phone number, and call log informa
tion is automatically faxed to this number.
sioned on a subscriber’s line, the CIDA server 44 automati
cally begins logging calls to the subscriber’s line. CIDA
functions and options may be initially set to an initial default
Administrative functions for the CIDA service can be per
formed from a Web broWser by accessing a CIDA adminis
level of monitoring. Multiple methods are provided to admin
ister the Whole orparts of the service. Using the service for the
tration page, the IVR/VXML interface (only pertinent to call
?rst time, a subscriber can access a CIDA Web adrministra
tion page, or can call a service representative to set up and
log retrieval through the IVR/VXML interface, including
start the service.
The different interfaces needed for the CIDA service
include RCN and RCL. The RCN interface includes: (1) a
Web or PC client page that noti?es a subscriber of a neW call,
the interface presents data and may offer a number of action
cially formatted e-mails (e-mail-based administration Will
only affect call noti?cation and call log retrieval through the
interactive pager).
buttons; (2) an interactive pager noti?cation for the presenta
tion of data in e-mail; and (3) Web page-based administration
of the service, Which is accomplished using a comprehensive
Well as a PIN. At a minimum, a subscriber Will ?nd the
interface that alloWs the subscriber to control and customiZe
the RCN service. The RCL interface includes: (1) a Web page
“OFF”; (2) the ability to change a PIN; (3) there Will be
columns for each supported device (interactive pager, PC,
e-mail); (4) pull-doWn menus that lists When the service
should be “ON”: e.g. standard (all times), Weekdays only
that provides several options (e. g., numbers to ?lter, time
WindoW, etc.) for the display of call log data; and (2) a touch
tone-based interface for playing call log data using an IVR.
FAX requests), and an interactive pager in the form of spe
In order to access the Web-based administration page, a
subscriber needs to enter the subscribed phone number as
folloWing functions and options available: (1) the ability to
turn the Whole CIDA service “ON” or “OFF”. Default is
20
(Mo-Fr), Weekends only (Sa, Su), noti?cation for particular
The interface also provides an option to request that call
device “OFF” (default); (5) a ?eld that alloWs a subscriber to
records be sent to a fax machine.
change his/her e-mail address; (6) for the interactive pager
Referring to FIG. 3, call ?oWs for call noti?cation, a calling
party ?rst calls a number that subscribes to the CIDA Service
and e-mail columns, the subscriber can set a checkmark so
25
that call noti?cation Will occur depending upon the call event
in Step 100. When call setup reaches the ?nal MSC 40 (the
detected (e.g. ansWered calls, unansWered calls, busy calls,
Wireless sWitch for that subscriber), a TAT 50 for that number
is triggered in Step 102. A query is then sent to the SCP 42 in
and calls that resulted in voice-mail). The default setting is
that all of these boxes Will be checked; (7) for the PC column,
Step 104. In Step 106, the SCP 42 responds to the sWitch
authorizing termination, and in addition, requests an ansWer
and termination noti?cation. In Step 108, the SCP 42 then
sends a message to the CIDA server 44 immediately notifying
30
Ringing, 2) Call AnsWered, 3) Busy detected, 4) Hang up, 5)
Voice-mail detected. The default setting is that all of these
boxes Will be checked; (8) the ability to set “priority num
the server 44 ofa neW call arrival. In Step 110, as soon as the
SCP 42 hears from the MSC about a change in the status of the
call (ansWered, call dropped, disconnect, busy), the SCP 42
bers” for each device. When a call is received from a priority
35
noti?es the CIDA server 44 of a change in status. In Step 112,
When the CIDA server 44 is noti?ed of a neW call, the CIDA
server 44 checks the administration records of the subscriber
to determine if the server 44 is required to notify a device 54
of the neW call arrival. If so, in Step 114, the CIDA server 44
digits, a Wildcard character, such as “*”, canbe assumed at the
40
numbers” for each device. When a call is received from a
?lter-out number, no noti?cation is sent to the device. The
45
Wildcard characters mentioned above can also be applicable
for ?lter-out numbers.
The call log administration page can be accessed through
the call noti?cation administration page. This paragraph pre
sents examples of the controls that are available for subscrib
sends a message to the subscriber’s pre-determined personal
ers that Want the log to be sent to their interactive pager or to
a speci?c e-mail address. At a minimum, the folloWing func
tions and options are available to the subscriber for both the
interactive pager and the speci?c e-mail address: (1) the abil
50
device. These are numbers that are used to ?lter-out the call
calling a phone number that provides an IVR or VXML
connected device generally does not require making a phone
call speci?cally for this purpose. Rather, the subscriber is able
to request data by accessing a Web site and “clicking” for the
desired information, or by sending a request by other means,
55
is operable for aiding a caller in navigating different options
When retrieving call log information. Also, the IVR/VXML
log records before they are sent. Wildcard characters “*” and
“7” can also be used; (3) the ability to set the maximum
number of records that can be sent; (4) the ability to set
“shoW-only number”. When this option is chosen, only
records that contain the “shoW-only number” are sent. Wild
card characters “*” and “7” can also be used; and (5) the
60
e.g., by sending an SMS message With a command to request
this data.
If a subscriber desires to retrieve call log information via
phone, he/she can call a phone number that terminates on a
CSN 48. The CSN 48 includes an IVR/VXML interface that
ity to change the e-mail address (not available for interactive
pagers); (2) the ability to set a “?lter-out number” for each
Web broWser, interactive pager, SMS phone, etc.), or, by
interface for the retrieval of the call log information. The
retrieval of call log information data through an Intemet
number, it overrides the settings in 6 & 7, and the noti?cation
is alloWed. Also, for numbers entered that have less than 10
end of the last digit; and (9) the ability to set “?lter-out
computer 24 so that the computer 24 can open a WindoW
describing the neW call. The changes in status of a call may
result in additional messages being sent by the CIDA server
44. In Step 116, the end of a call can result in a message being
sent to the subscriber’s previously selected device 54 (e.g.,
interactive pager, e-mail, SMS phone, etc.). The CIDA server
44 can also receive messages from the VMS interface 46 in
order to determine if a recently ended call resulted in a voice
mail left for the subscriber.
A subscriber can retrieve call log information by either
accessing an Intemet-connected device (e. g., computer With
the subscriber can set a checkmark so that noti?cations(s) can
occur as soon as the folloWing call events are detected: 1)
ability to set the folloWing delivery options: 1) NoW, 2) Daily
(and time), Weekly (What day Mo-Su and time), and Monthly
(What day and time).
A small number of administration functions are provided
for subscribers that use an IVR/VXML interface, such as
passWord change and fax number change (Where the call log
65
can be sent). Administration functions are also provided to
subscribers that receive call noti?cation and/or call logs
through their pager. The administration functions execute by
US 7,403,768 B2
11
12
sending an e-mail from the registered pager or e-mail address
to the e-mail addresses that delivers the call noti?cations and
the subscriber number. Old call records may be deleted
according to a ?rst-in ?rst-out (FIFO) discipline. Call log
retrieval functions (through either the web, IVR/VXML inter
the call logs, which includes a simple command in the subject
line. For multiple commands, the body of the e-mail may be
used. All commands sent, if properly executed, receive a
face, pager, or e-mail) are not affected by the number of
records stored in the database. The call log displays the ?nal
con?rmation. A sample of commands that can be sent are as
follows:
For Call Noti?cation:
NOTIFICATION [ON, OFF, WEEDAY, WEEKEND] (blank
10
state of the call. The information for each record consists of
the name and number of the caller, (“Private” or “Unknown”
may appear instead when the calling number is blocked or
unknown), the date and time when the call was received, the
date and time when the call ended, and the ?nal outcome of
returns current ON/OFF state of noti?cation service)
call: abandoned, answered, busy, voice-mail, etc. For
FILTEROUT [numbers(s)]
be appended.
CANCEL FILTEROUT [number(s)] (blank will delete all
current ?lter-out numbers)
PRIORITY [numbers(s)]
Calls may be ordered according to the date and time when
the call was received. For calls that are longer than 6 minutes,
for example, a provisional record is created when the call
reaches the 6 minute mark. This record is updated later when
CANCEL PRIORTY [NUMBERS(S)] (blank will delete all
current priority numbers) For Call Log:
the call ends. For call log retrieval through the web, a scrol
lable window with all of the available call records is provided.
LOG LIMIT [number]
answered and voice-mail calls, the total time of the call may
20
SEND LOG [TODAY, YESTERDAY, MM/DD/YY] (blank
(these ?lters are set to OFF by default): (1) call record extrac
tion by date: From mm/dd/yy at hh to mm/dd/yy at hh; (2)
sends current call log up to maximum number of records
speci?ed in LOG LIMIT]
FILTEROUT [number(s)]
show only numbers (wildcard characters “*” and “7” are
25
CANCEL FILTEROUT [number(s)] (blank will delete all
current ?lter-out numbers)
SHOW ONLY [number(s)]
30
allowed); (3) ?lter-out numbers (wildcard characters “*” and
“7” are allowed); and (4) show calls with the following out
come: abandoned, answered, busy, voice-mail, etc.
Subscribers can retrieve call log information by calling a
designated number. The subscriber is able to retrieve the call
log for “Today”, “Yesterday”, or for a speci?c date. The call
log information includes the name and number of the caller
and the date and time of the call. If there is more than one call
from a given number, there is an indication about the number
CANCEL SHOW ONLY [numbers(s)] (blank will delete all
current priority numbers)
When PC-based call noti?cation has been set, a pop-up
window may appear on the screen according to the settings
described above. For a given call, there may be several win
The following ?lter controls are available so that the sub
scriber can narrow the number of records that are displayed
35
dows displayed on the screen, corresponding to: call ringing,
call busy, call answered, call disconnect, voice-mail left. Each
of calls that have been received by this number, and only the
date and the time of the last call is reported. In other words the
behavior is similar to that of a conventional caller ID box. If
the calling number is blocked or unknown, then “Private” or
new screen may replace the previous screen. The noti?cations
“Unknown” is reported to the caller. To save time during
are sent as soon as the call event is detected, so that if possible,
future calls, the subscriber, while listening to the call record,
noti?cations will appear in real-time. Depending upon the
40
is able to “delete” call records. The deletion of these records
call state, the name and number of the caller (“Private” or
only affects the IVR/VXML interface, since the records that
“Unknown” may appear instead when the calling number is
blocked or unknown), the date and time of event, and the call
state (if the call state is “disconnect”, the total call time will be
displayed as well) may be displayed on the screen.
reside in the CIDA server 44 are not affected.
In one embodiment, call log information received through
an interactive pager or e-mail includes the same information
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General controls may also appear under the screen, such as
“Close” which closes the window, “View Log” which opens
web page, “Suspend” which suspends the delivery of call
noti?cation information; this button after pressed may be
replaced with “Resume”, and “Edit” which brings up the call
as the call records that are viewed using a web browser, such
as the name and number of the caller, the date and time when
the call was received, the date and time when the call ended,
and the ?nal outcome of call. Records for busy calls only
include the date and time when the call was received. Call
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logs to a pager or e-mail address can be received automati
noti?cation administration page.
For interactive pager or e-mail noti?cation, only the “last
cally or can be requested, also, certain ?lters can be used to
narrow the amount of call records that are requested.
state” of the call (i.e. busy, disconnect, or voice-mail left) may
While preferred embodiments of the invention have been
described in detail, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art
that the disclosed embodiments may be modi?ed. Therefore,
be reported. In addition to the “last state”, and as described
above, the name and number of the caller as well as the date
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and time of the event is recorded. If the calling number is
the foregoing description is to be considered exemplary rather
blocked or unknown, then “Private” or “Unknown” may
than limiting, and the true scope of the invention is that
appear instead of the calling name and number. For example,
de?ned in the following claims.
for calls which last more than 6 minutes, a noti?cation may be
sent indicating that the length of the call is over 6 minutes.
This description may be used instead of a description of the
last state of the call.
In one embodiment, for each subscriber, an internal data
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means for detecting an incoming communication on a
communications link to a subscriber’s communication
device, wherein the means for detecting the communi
cation is in communication with the communication
base keeps call records. For example, for high call volume
subscribers, the last one thousand or so calls may be recorded
to the subscriber number. For low call volume subscribers, for
example, only about one hundred records may be recorded to
What is claimed is:
1. A remote call noti?cation system, comprising:
65
device by the communication link;
means for monitoring the status of the incoming commu
nication; and
US 7,403,768 B2
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and means for presenting the communications message of the
incoming message on the remote communications device.
intelligent server in communication With means for detect
ing an incoming communication, the intelligent server
originating the remote call noti?cation and automati
cally initiating a communication of the remote call noti
10. A remote call noti?cation method, comprising:
detecting an incoming communication on a communica
tions link to a subscriber’s Wireless communication
?cation to a remote communications device, the remote
call noti?cation comprising (1) a calling number asso
ciated With the incoming communication, (2) a name of
a calling party associated With the calling number, (3) a
?rst time identi?er that provides the time that the incom
ing communication is ?rst detected, (4) a second time
identi?er that provides the time that incoming commu
nication is terminated, (5) a length identi?er that pro
device;
creating a remote call noti?cation, the remote call noti?
cation comprising (l) a calling number associated With
the incoming communication, (2) a name of a calling
party associated With the calling number, (3) a ?rst time
identi?er that provides the time that incoming commu
nication if ?rst detected, (4) a second time identi?er that
vides the length of the incoming communication, (6) a
provides the time that the incoming communication, (6)
date identi?er that provides the date that incoming com
munication is received, (7) a status identi?er that pro
vides a real-time status of the incoming communication,
(8) a disposition identi?er that provides a disposition of
a dated identi?er that provides the date that the incoming
communication is received, (7) a status identi?er that
provides a real-time status of the incoming communica
tion, (8) a disposition identi?er that provides a disposi
tion of the incoming communication, and (9) a priority
identi?er that indicates the importance of the incoming
the incoming communication, and (9) a priority that
indicates the importance of the incoming communica
tion;
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communication;
a module in communication With the intelligent server
determining an access address associated With a remote
operable for monitoring tra?ic in a communication
communication device;
automatically sending the remote call noti?cation through
netWork of voice-mail platforms that serve a service
area of the intelligent server; and
interface means for providing an Interactive Voice
a communications netWork to the access address asso
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presenting the remote call noti?cation to the remote com
munication device in a format, Wherein the format com
prises and audio format, a text format, a short message
Response (IVR) and aVoice Extensible Markup Lan
guage (VXML) interface for retrieving call log infor
mation, Wherein the interface means alloWs the sub
scriber to check the call log and to request that the call
log be sent to a fax number, and Wherein the sub
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scriber can erase one or more call log entries on the
retrieving call log information Wherein the interface
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device speci?ed by the subscriber.
3. The system of claim 1, further comprising: means for
presenting the remote call noti?cation to the remote commu
nications device in a format, Wherein the format comprises an
audio format, a text format, a short message format, a video
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format, and a markup language format.
4. The system of claim 1, Wherein the remote communica
tions device comprises a Wireless telephone, a cellular tele
phone, a computer, a pager, and a personal digital assistant.
5. The system of claim 1, Wherein the remote call noti?ca
munication device using Wireless communication signals.
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15. The method of claim 10, the disposition identi?er com
prising a description of a disposition of the remote noti?ca
tions device using Wireless communication signals.
55
call state of the communications device, the call state com
prising idle, ringing, ansWered, busy, and disconnected.
tion, the disposition comprising neW, stored, deleted,
restored, forWarded, and system administration.
16. The method of claim 10, Wherein the communications
7. The system of claim 1, the disposition identi?er com
netWork comprises a celestial communications netWork and a
prising neW, stored, deleted, restored, and forWarded.
terrestrial communications netWork.
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netWork comprises a celestial communications netWork and a
terrestrial communications netWork.
9. The system of claim 1, further comprising: means for
scrolling through a plurality of the remote call noti?cations
presented on the remote communications device; means for
14. The method of claim 10, the status identi?er compris
ing a call state of the communications device, the call state
comprising idle, ringing, ansWered, busy, and disconnected.
to an access address associated With the remote communica
8. The system of claim 1, Wherein the communications
erased call log entries are still available over the Internet
via the VXML interface.
11. The method of claim 10, Wherein the remote commu
nication device comprises a Wireless phone, a cellular phone,
a computer, a pager, and a personal digital assistant.
12. The method of claim 11, the pager comprises an inter
active pager, the interactive pager communicating the remote
call noti?cation.
13. The method of claim 10, Wherein the remote call noti
?cation is communicated through the communications net
Work to the access address associated With the remote com
tion is communicated through the communications network
6. The system of claim 1, the status identi?er comprising a
means alloWs the subscriber to check the call log and to
request that the call log be sent to a fax number, and
Wherein the subscriber can erase one or more call log
entries on the IVR interface such that the one or more
updating the module, performing administrative functions for
the subscriber, returning queries for the call log information
With appropriate data, and notifying the subscriber of perti
nent call events according to the remote communications
service format, a video format, and a markup formats
and
providing an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) and a Voice
Extensible Markup Language (VXML) interface for
IVR interface such that the one or more erased call log
entries are still available over the Internet via the
VXML interface.
2. The system of claim 1, the intelligent server further
serving subscriber requests for information of a call log,
ciated With the remote communication device;
17. The method of claim 10, further comprising: associat
ing the access address With a plurality of communications
devices.
18. The method of claim 10, further comprising: scrolling
through a plurality of the remote call noti?cations presented
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on the remote communication device; selecting one of the
selecting one of the remote call noti?cations to retrieve a
remote call noti?cations to retrieve a communications mes
communications message of the incoming communication;
sage of the incoming communication; and presenting the
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communications message of the incoming message on the
remote communication device.
less terminating trigger communicating With the mobile
19. The method of claim 10, further comprising: creating a
call log associated With the remote call noti?cation; and
retrieving the call log; Wherein retrieving the call log com
sWitching center to detect the incoming communication to the
subscriber’s communications device, the subscriber’s com
munications device comprising a Wireless communications
device.
prises one of the following: retrieval via a Web page, retrieval
21. The method of claim 10, the step of detecting the
via Wireless, retrieval via Interactive Voice Response (IVR),
incoming communication on the communications link to the
and retrieval via FAX.
subscriber’s communication device further compromising
detecting and ansWered communications link With the sub
20. The system of claim 1, the means for detecting the
incoming communication on the communications link to the 10 scriber’s communication device.
subscriber’s communication device comprising a Wireless
terminating trigger used on mobile sWitching center, the Wire
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