Miami Bulletin, General Edition 2012 2013

Miami Bulletin, General Edition 2012 2013
MIAMI UNIVERSITY
General Bulletin of
Program Requirements
and Course Descriptions
2012-2013
To All New Students:
This Bulletin contains the requirements that you must meet for graduation as you enter Miami University in 2012 -2013. Miami,
however, reserves the right to make changes to its programs. You are encouraged to check regularly with your academic program adviser
for up-to-date information.
The information contained in this Bulletin is subject to change. No part of this Bulletin should be construed as a contract or offer to
contract. This Bulletin is intended only as an informational guide to Miami University. It is the student’s responsibility to know and follow
current requirements and procedures at the departmental, divisional, and university levels.
Accreditation and Policies
Miami University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association
(www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org or 312-263-0456).
Miami University is approved by the State of Ohio Approving Agency for the training of veterans.
Miami University is authorized under Federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students.
University Statement Asserting Respect for Human Diversity
Miami University is a community dedicated to intellectual engagement. Our campuses consist of students, faculty, and staff from a
variety of backgrounds and cultures. By living, working, studying, and teaching, we bring our unique viewpoints and life expe riences
together for the benefit of all. This inclusive learning environment, based upon an atmosphere of mutual respect and positive engagement,
invites all campus citizens to explore how they think about knowledge, about themselves, and about how they see themselves in relation to
others. Our intellectual and social development and daily educational interactions, whether co-curricular or classroom related, are greatly
enriched by our acceptance of one another as members of the Miami University community. Through valuing our own diversity, an d the
diversity of others, we seek to learn from one another, foster a sense of shared experience, and commit to making the universi ty the
intellectual home for us all.
We recognize that we must uphold and abide by University policies and procedures protecting in dividual rights and guiding
democratic engagement. Any actions disregarding these policies and procedures, particularly those resulting in discrimination ,
harassment, or bigoted acts, will be challenged swiftly and collectively.
All who work, live, study, and teach in the Miami community must be committed to these principles of mutual respect and positive
engagement that are an integral part of Miami's focus, goals, and mission.
University Statement of Non-Discrimination
Miami University is committed to providing equal opportunity and an educational and work environment free from discrimination on
the basis of sex, race, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, military stat us, or veteran status.
Miami shall adhere to all applicable state and federal equal opportunity/affirmative action statutes and regulations.
The University is dedicated to ensuring access and equal opportunity in its education programs, related activities, and emplo yment.
Retaliation against an individual who has raised claims of illegal discrimination or cooperated with an investigation of such claims is
prohibited.
Students and employees should bring questions or concerns to the attention of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Han na
House, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513-529-7157 (V/TTY) and 513-529-7158 (fax). Students and employees with disabilities may
contact the Office of Disability Resources, 19 Campus Avenue Building, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513 -529-1541 (V/TTY) and
513-529-8595 (fax).
Title IX Coordinator- Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 is a federal law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex in
higher education. Sex discrimination includes sexual harassment and sexual violenc e. The University’s Title IX Coordinator is Mr.
Matthew L. Boaz, Director of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Hanna House, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056. M r. Boaz
may be reached at 513-529-7157 or [email protected]
Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics- Ms. Jennifer A. Gilbert, Associate Athletic Director/Senior Woman Administrator/Director
of NCAA Compliance is the University’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator for matters related to equality of treatment and opportun ity in
Intercollegiate Athletics. This includes athletic financial assistance, accommodation of interest and abilities and equity of athletic program
benefits. Ms. Gilbert may be reached at Millett Assembly Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513 -529-3113 or
[email protected]
Sections 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator - Section 504 and the ADA are
federal laws prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability. The University’s Section 504 and ADA Coordinator is Mr. Matthew
L. Boaz, Director of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Hanna House, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056. Mr. Boaz may be
reached at 513-529-7157 or [email protected]
All Miami Campuses are Smoke-Free
All Miami campuses are smoke-free environments. Smoking is prohibited in all Miami University-owned facilities and property. A
designated smoking area is provided for guests at the Marcum Hotel & Conference Center, Simp son-Shade Guest House, Climer Guest
Lodge,
Patterson
Place
and
any
other
location
housing
overnight
guests.
Please
visit
http://www.miami.muohio.edu/about-miami/publications-and-policies/smoke-free-policy.html for the full text of Miami's smoking
policy.
Table of Contents
Miami University Academic Calendar ...................................................................................................... 4
General Information..................................................................................................................................... 5
Undergraduate and Graduate Majors and Degrees .............................................................................. 10
Admission for Undergraduate Students ................................................................................................. 15
Liberal Education at Miami ...................................................................................................................... 22
Other Requirements ................................................................................................................................... 49
Academic Planning .................................................................................................................................... 52
Course Registration and Other Regulations ........................................................................................... 58
Grades .......................................................................................................................................................... 63
Fees and Expenses ...................................................................................................................................... 67
Financial Aid, Awards and Scholarships ................................................................................................ 69
Graduate Awards and Other Financial Assistance for Graduate Students ....................................... 73
Special Opportunities and Programs ...................................................................................................... 76
The College of Arts and Science ............................................................................................................... 82
The Farmer School of Business ............................................................................................................... 143
The School of Creative Arts .................................................................................................................... 155
The School of Education, Health and Society ....................................................................................... 170
The School of Engineering and Applied Science ................................................................................. 186
Miami's Regionals: Hamilton, Middletown and Voice of America Learning Center ..................... 205
The Graduate School ................................................................................................................................ 214
Admission for Graduate Students ......................................................................................................... 216
Degree and Certificate Requirements .................................................................................................... 219
Graduate Fields of Study......................................................................................................................... 223
Courses of Instruction.............................................................................................................................. 263
Awards, Scholarships, and Prizes .......................................................................................................... 436
Graduate Awards ..................................................................................................................................... 441
University Officers, Deans, and Chairs ................................................................................................. 443
Index .......................................................................................................................................................... 447
4/ General Information
Miami University Academic Calendar
Visit the Office of the Registrar Website for the academic calendars containing important dates and deadlines for
classes and registration.
As of this publication date, a revised calendar format is being considered beginning academic year 2013-14.
www.units.muohio.edu/reg/calendars/index.php
General Information /5
General
Information
Introduction
The General Bulletin 2012-2013 is the academic guide for new
students at Miami University.
The Student Handbook contains the official policies of the
University.
This Bulletin contains the requirements that you must meet for
graduation as you enter Miami University in 2012-2013. Miami,
however, reserves the right to make changes to its programs. It is
your responsibility to check regularly with your academic program
adviser for up-to-date information. Consult your academic
division’s advising office for specific information on academic
policies and procedures, degree programs, and requirements.
Mission of Miami University
"The Engaged University"
Miami University, a student-centered public university
founded in 1809, has built its success through an unwavering
commitment to liberal arts undergraduate education and the active
engagement of its students in both curricular and co-curricular life.
It is deeply committed to student success, builds great student and
alumni loyalty, and empowers its students, faculty and staff to
become engaged citizens who use their knowledge and skills with
integrity and compassion to improve the future of our global
society.
Miami provides the opportunities of a major university while
offering the personalized attention found in the best small colleges.
It values teaching and intense engagement of faculty with students
through its teacher-scholar model, by inviting students into the
excitement of research and discovery. Miami's faculty are
nationally prominent scholars and artists who contribute to Miami,
their own disciplines and to society by the creation of new
knowledge and art. The University supports students in a highly
involving residential experience on the Oxford campus and
provides access to students, including those who are time and
place bound, on its regional campuses. Miami provides a strong
foundation in the traditional liberal arts for all students, and it
offers nationally recognized majors in arts and sciences, business,
education, engineering, and fine arts, as well as select graduate
programs of excellence. As an inclusive community, Miami strives
to cultivate an environment where diversity and difference are
appreciated and respected.
Miami instills in its students intellectual depth and curiosity,
the importance of personal values as a measure of character, and a
commitment to life-long learning. Miami emphasizes critical
thinking and independent thought, an appreciation of diverse
views, and a sense of responsibility to our global future.
Miami University Values Statement
Miami University is a scholarly community whose members
believe that a liberal education is grounded in qualities of character
as well as of intellect. We respect the dignity of other persons, the
rights and property of others, and the right of others to hold and
express disparate beliefs. We believe in honesty, integrity, and the
importance of moral conduct. We defend the freedom of inquiry
that is the heart of learning and combine that freedom with the
exercise of judgment and the acceptance of personal responsibility.
Brief History
An act of Congress signed by George Washington in 1792
stipulated that a university be located in the Miami Valley north of
the Ohio River. The official act to establish Miami University was
passed on February 17, 1809. Miami is the tenth oldest public
university in the nation and takes its name from the tribe that once
inhabited the area known as Ohio’s Miami Valley.
Delayed by the War of 1812, instruction began in 1824 with a
president, two faculty, and 20 students. Enrollment grew rapidly,
reaching 250 by 1839.
In the 1830s, William Holmes McGuffey wrote the first of his
Eclectic Readers while a Miami professor. Among the many talented
young students was Benjamin Harrison who graduated in 1852; he
was elected the 23rd president of the United States in 1888.
A few years after the Civil War, with changed conditions and
advancing prices, the income of the university became insufficient
to support its work. Miami closed in 1873, opening 12 years later
when resources had accumulated and the state of Ohio began a
policy of appropriating public funds for support.
Coeducation began in 1888; by 1903 there were more than 100
women on campus—one third of the total enrollment. Our first
African American student, Nelly Craig, graduated in 1905.
Many other milestones have been reached. The concept of
artist-in-residence began here. Beginning in 1835, four national
fraternities were founded here, giving Miami a nickname, "Mother
of Fraternities." Another nickname is "Cradle of Coaches," referring
to the coaching success of so many former players and coaches.
Ohio's first intercollegiate football game was played at Miami in
1888 against the University of Cincinnati.
In the beginning, the course of study at Miami was strictly
classical. Over the years, new academic divisions were added to
meet the changing needs of students and society: education in
1902, business in 1927, fine arts in 1929, graduate programs in 1947,
engineering and applied science in 1959, and interdisciplinary
studies in 1974.
In 1974, Miami acquired the Western College for Women, a
120-year-old private institution adjoining the Oxford campus.
Miami’s Middletown and Hamilton campuses opened in 1966
and 1968, respectively. Also in 1968, Miami opened a European
center, now named John E. Dolibois European Campus, in
Luxembourg. Miami’s Voice of America Learning Center in West
Chester opened in 2009.
A number of campus buildings are listed in the National
Register of Historic Places, including Elliott, Stoddard, and
Peabody halls, and the Western College for Women Historic
District. The McGuffey Museum is a National Historic Landmark.
About Miami
Miami is a public university of Ohio. Approximately 14,900
undergraduates and 2,200 graduate students are enrolled at the
Oxford campus. About 225 of the undergraduates attend one or
two semesters at the John E. Dolibois European Campus in
Differdange, Luxembourg. Two commuter campuses in the nearby
cities of Hamilton and Middletown enroll nearly 5,500 additional
students.
Miami's Voice of America Learning Center in nearby West
Chester, Ohio, opened in January 2009. Serving several hundred
undergraduates and graduate students each session, this
6/ General Information
multipurpose instructional facility offers graduate and
undergraduate courses and programs, as well as customized
training opportunities for business, industry, school districts, and
government agencies.
The Greentree Health Science Academy, a public/private
collaboration connecting students of all ages to health care careers,
opened on the campus of the Atrium Medical Center near I-75 in
Middletown in August 2011. It is home to many of Miami
University's nursing and health science-related courses.
Academic Divisions and Programs
Miami has six academic divisions: College of Arts and Science;
Farmer School of Business; School of Education, Health and
Society; School of Engineering and Applied Science; School of
Creative Arts; and the Graduate School. Programs leading to
associate, bachelor's, master's, Specialist in Education, and doctoral
degrees are offered.
Graduate certificates are also available. Most undergraduate
certificate programs are offered at the regional campuses.
Web-Based Services
myMiami (mymiami.muohio.edu), the university's Web portal,
allows students to register for classes, pay bills, check e-mail,
access course materials, view university announcements, and
much more. Students are encouraged to set myMiami as their
browser's home page.
Student Computers
Miami strongly recommends that all students bring a
computer to campus. Laptop computers are available through the
recommended
Miami
Notebook
Program
(www.muohio.edu/miaminotebook). These laptops are designed and
configured to provide easy access to the Miami network and other
services. On-campus warranty support and other services are
provided free or at a discount for Miami Notebooks. Students who
purchase computers outside of the Miami Notebook Program can
download the basic software required to use Miami’s network
services, at no cost, from https://software.muohio.edu.
Printing
Graduate degree programs are offered by all of the divisions.
A graduate degree is also offered by the Institute for the
Environment and Sustainability. Major areas, degrees, and
certificates are listed beginning later in this section.
Miami provides "Pay-for-Print" printers in many labs and
other locations on campus. Please see the IT Help Knowledge Base
for details. Additionally, IT Services provides walk up and online
digital printing and specialty finishing services via the Print
Center, 513-529-6065, www.muohio.edu/printcenter).
Location
Continuing Education Programs
The central campus of Miami University is located in Oxford,
Ohio, just 35 miles north of Cincinnati and 45 miles southwest of
Dayton. Both Cincinnati and Dayton International airports are
within an hour's drive. U.S. Route 27 and S.R. 73 are the main
highways to Oxford.
Oxford is a classic college town with a population of about
9,000 (excluding students). Uptown, adjacent to campus, are small
shops, a movie theatre, and local eateries.
The university covers more than 2,400 acres in Oxford.
Preservation of nature throughout the campus and community
coupled with Miami’s architectural continuity - modified Georgian
design - explains why the campus is regarded as one of the most
beautiful in the Midwest.
Resources
Computer and Information Technology Services
Information Technology Services (IT Services)
Main office: 302 Hoyt Hall, 513-529-5322
Support Desk: 513-529-7900: [email protected]
ITHelp Knowledge Base: http://ithelp.muohio.edu
myMiami Web portal: http://mymiami.muohio.edu
Print center: 513-529-6065: www.muohio.edu/printcenter
IT Services is the central IT organization at Miami, providing
infrastructure and services to all Miami students, faculty, and staff.
All Miami students have access to computing services that
enhance their academic experience; these services include wired
and wireless network service, Internet access, e-mail, file storage
and Web publishing space, specialized labs, etc. For answers to
frequently asked questions about technology at Miami, please visit
www.muohio.edu/technologyguide.
Technology Support
Students can find technology and support information
around-the-clock via Miami's online IT Help Knowledge Base
(ithelp.muohio.edu). The IT Services Support Desk provides support
via phone (513-529-7900), chat (www.muohio.edu/uit - click the Chat
Now link) or email ([email protected]).
Lifelong Learning (LLL)
127 McGuffey, 513-529-8600
muohio.edu/lifelonglearning
Lifelong Learning administers a broad array of credit and
non-credit programs and services that broaden the traditional
Miami classroom experience.
Credit programs are led by Miami University faculty and
include the university summer session as well as local, online,
domestic and study-abroad credit workshops. Lifelong Learning
also administers the State of Ohio Post Secondary Enrollment
Options Program (PSEOP).
Non-credit opportunities include online courses and serving
as the administrative home for the Institute for Learning in
Retirement
The Lifelong Learning office is an authorized passport
application acceptance agency.
Graduate Student Associations
Graduate School
102 Roudebush Hall, 513-529-3734
www.muohio.edu/graduateschool/
HAVEN: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Allies
Graduate Student Organization provides a space for LGBTQ
graduate students to find community both academically and
socially. It forefronts graduate students' needs by discussing
LGBTQ teaching, mentoring, writing, reading, and film series. The
organization also works in coalition with other LGBTQ groups on
campus (undergraduate, faculty, and staff).
The Graduate Student Association (GSA) represents all
graduate students and promotes their academic, social, and
economic aims. It maintains open channels of communication with
other student organizations and with academic and administrative
units of the university.
The association sponsors a Travel Assistance Fund to
reimburse graduate students for travel expenses to professional
meetings, conventions, conferences, and workshops.
The Graduate Students of Color Association (GSCA) aids
graduate students by sponsoring academic programming, social,
and cultural events from a diverse perspective. It also serves as an
General Information /7
avenue of communication with the Graduate School and as a
liaison between students of color and the university.
The Latin American Graduate Student Association provides
mentorship and support to Latin American graduate students. The
association provides safe, supportive, and enriching social and
cultural experiences and works to increase the Latino graduate
student population. Students involved in the association also
develop programming to educate the local community about the
Latino culture.
Housing
Office of Housing Options, Meals & Events (H.O.M.E.)
111 Shriver Center, 513-529-5000
Limited on-campus housing is available for graduate students.
Single graduate students may also apply to live in a residence hall
or in Heritage Commons; provisions are the same for graduate and
undergraduate students.
Heritage Commons provides apartment-style university
housing for upper-class students. The complex is comprised of 108
fully furnished apartments featuring four private bedrooms, two
bathrooms, a living room, and an equipped kitchen. Exclusive
parking is available for Heritage Commons residents.
Many graduate students rent private apartments in Oxford or
neighboring areas. A list of Oxford rental property is available
through the Office of Off-Campus Affairs at 513-529-2268. The
Oxford Press (513-524-4139), the weekly, local newspaper, also lists
local apartment rentals in the classified ads.
Contract and Deposit
All students living in a residence hall sign a housing contract,
an agreement to pay room rent and board, and pay a $330
University Contract Confirmation deposit.
Dining Facilities
Our residence halls are served by multiple "all you care to eat"
buffets, as well as several à la carte, food service locations managed
by the university.
Howe Center for Writing Excellence
King Library, 513-529-6100
www.muohio.edu/writingcenter
The Howe Center for Writing Excellence’s mission is to help
every Miami student become a highly accomplished writer. We
offer free consultations, workshops, and other assistance to
students in every major at any stage in their writing process,
whether they are first-semester undergraduates, seniors
completing their honors theses, or graduate students preparing
their dissertations. We also celebrate students’ writing
accomplishments as well as encourage and support the writing
they do outside of their courses. Our website provides details
about our programs, services, and activities.
Libraries
services and facilities of interest to graduate students. Each library
specializes in specific academic fields of study, so you can find a
place where you can research, study, meet with students and
colleagues or talk with a librarian who specializes in your area of
study.
Extended hours, including the 24-hour King Library, allow
students to get the information they need any time of day. Our
facilities offer wireless Internet access, laptop computer checkout,
a reading room specifically for graduate students, a coffee shop
and much more!
You can access over 4million books, 156,000 maps, and tens of
thousands of sound recordings, periodicals, videos, and DVDs
many that can be accessed online without having to leave your
home or office.
Research help is available via email, chat, instant messaging or
by just dropping in.
Museums
Art Museum: Patterson Ave., 513-529-2232
The angular limestone and glass Art Museum, designed by
Walter Netsch of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, houses the
university’s permanent collection of more than 16,000 art objects
from all parts of the world by internationally known artists.
Rotating exhibitions, public lectures, gallery talks, performances,
and other special events are offered throughout the year. The
museum is accredited by the American Association of Museums.
Internships and independent studies are available through
several academic departments. You can also volunteer to assist
with events and activities at the museum.
William Holmes McGuffey Museum: 410 E. Spring St., 513-529-8380
William Holmes McGuffey compiled the first four volumes of
the Eclectic Readers while a Miami faculty member from 1826 to
1836. His National Historic Landmark house serves as a teaching
museum for University and regional history, nineteenth-century
domestic architecture and material culture, personal items of the
McGuffey family, a rare collection of McGuffey Readers, and for the
history of literacy, reading and schooling.
Science Museums include:
Karl E. Limper Geology Museum, 8 Shideler Hall, 513-529-3220
Willard Sherman Turrell Herbarium, 79 Upham Hall, 513-529-2755
Robert A. Hefner Zoology Museum, 100 Upham Hall, 513-529-4617
Western College Museum: Patterson Place, Patterson Ave.,
513-529-4400
Western College Museum houses a permanent collection of
paintings, silver, and furnishings. Patterson Place, located on the
northwest corner of the Western College for Women Historic
District, also serves as the office for Western College Alumnae
Association, Inc.
Ohio Writing Project
Department of English
302 Bachelor Hall, 513-529-5245
www.muohio.edu/owp
King Library: 513-529-4141, 513-529-2800
BEST Library: Laws Hall, 513-529-6886
Amos Music Library: 120 Center for Performing Arts, 513-529-2299
Gardner-Harvey Library:
Middletown campus, 513-727-3221, 513-529-4936
Rentschler Library: Hamilton campus, 513-785-3235
Southwest Ohio Regional Depository:
Middletown campus, 513-727-3474
Wertz Art and Architecture Library: 7 Alumni Hall, 513-529-6638
University Archives: Withrow Court, 513-529-6720
Western College Memorial Archives: Peabody Hall, 513-529-9695
The Ohio Writing Project (OWP) is part of the National
Writing Project, a network of 200 sites around the country
designed to train teachers of writing and improve student writing.
The OWP offers summer workshops, oversees the English
Department's Master of Arts in Teaching degree program, and
conducts year-round in-service programs in Ohio's schools.
Miami University Libraries, which include four libraries on
the Oxford campus and one on each regional campus, have many
The Department of Psychology, as part of its doctoral program
in clinical psychology, operates this clinic. Psychotherapy,
Psychology Clinic
Department of Psychology
39 Psychology Bldg., 513-529-2423
8/ General Information
psychological assessment, and other mental health services are
offered. There is a nominal fee. All records are confidential.
Safety
University Police: Police Services Center,
4945 Oxford Trenton Road
Non-Emergency/24 Hours: 513-529-2222
EMERGENCY (police, fire, medical): 911
Lost-and-Found Property: 513-529-8135
Fingerprinting Services: 513-529-2226
Scripps Research Library and Resource Center contains
gerontology publications, audio-visual aids, and curriculum
materials for faculty and graduate student use.
Speech and Hearing Clinic
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology
2 Bachelor Hall (513) 529-2500
www.units.muohio.edu/speechhearingclinic/
Emergency Notification and Response
The Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology operates
this clinic. The Clinic’s mission is to promote excellence in clinical
training of future speech-language-hearing professionals and to
provide comprehensive assessment and treatment services for
individuals with speech, language, or hearing disorders. There is a
fee for services. Patient records are confidential. The clinic
complies with the Health Information and Patient Privacy Act
(HIPPA) regulations regarding patient records.
In the event of an emergency, contact Miami University Police
at 911 to initiate the emergency messaging system.
Student Counseling Service
Miami is committed to maintaining a safe learning
environment for all students and members of the university
community. While Miami's campus is relatively safe, crime does
occur on campus. Each member of the university community has a
responsibility to contribute to the well-being of the community.
Emergency Messaging System—Notification of an Immediate Threat
Miami University maintains multiple systems for alerting the
Miami community about campus emergencies and will use some
or all of those systems, depending on the circumstances. The
Miami Emergency Text Messaging System is available to all Miami
University students, faculty, and staff.
To receive this service, individuals must sign up through the
University
Police
at
www.units.muohio.edu/psf/police/emergencytextmessaging.
Annual Safety and Security Report/Annual Fire Safety Report
Miami publishes an annual report of safety and security
polices and crime statistics in an Annual Safety Report and an
Annual Fire Safety Report.
Miami University Police officers are fully sworn and armed law
enforcement officers, empowered to investigate alleged criminal
activity, search and arrest as authorized by law, and use necessary
and reasonable force to enforce the law and protect persons and
property. They evaluate reported crimes, conduct investigations,
and effect arrests.
Emergency Procedures
Miami University has established emergency procedures for a
number of events that range from chemical spills to severe weather
that involve individual as well as collective action to respond
safely. Information to guide responses to a variety of potential
dangers is available at Emergency Preparedness. For more
information contact Environmental Health and Safety: 55 Hughes
Hall, 513-529-2829.
Scripps Gerontology Center
396 Upham Hall, 513-529-2914
www.scripps.muohio.edu
The mission of the Scripps Gerontology Center, an Ohio
Center of Excellence, is to do work that makes a difference in the
lives of aging individuals, their families and communities, and to
meet the needs of aging societies. We accomplish this mission
through research, education and service.
Current research includes health, disability, and longevity;
long-term care systems and services; workforce issues; caregiving;
and demography. The center assists faculty and students with
research proposals and projects related to aging and awards
several graduate research assistantships each year.
The center provides administrative support to the university's
academic programs in aging and offers a number of special events
each year, including the P.K. Whelpton lecture, Green Tea Day,
invited speakers, and a brown bag discussion series.
195 Health Services Center 529-4634
www.units.muohio.edu/saf/scs/
A staff of licensed psychologists and doctoral level trainees
working under those licenses provides individual and group
counseling and psychotherapy for a wide range of mental health
concerns. The approach to services is typically goal focused and
brief therapy. Psychiatric services are also available. There are
modest fees for services, though no student is denied service due to
inability to pay.
Student Health Services
Health Services
Student Health Services Building
421 S. Campus Ave., 513-529-3000
The Student Health Service (SHS) provides general outpatient
care for registered Miami University Students of all three
campuses. Services provided include examination and treatment
for illness and minor injuries, Women’s Health Care and travel
immunizations. Laboratory, x-ray and pharmacy services are
available when ordered by SHS clinicians. The SHS will submit
claims to the student's insurance company. Please have your
insurance card and Student ID card available when visiting the
SHS.
The Office of Student Wellness offers prevention materials,
student safety information, and substance abuse education for
Miami Students on the Oxford Campus. The Health Advocates for
Wellness, Knowledge and Skills (HAWKS) are a peer education
team that promotes healthy behaviors through campus awareness
campaigns and programs for student groups.
Hospitalization and emergency care is available at
McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital (513-523-2111). Emergency
medical assistance, call 911.
Transportation
Parking and Transportation Services
Campus Avenue Building, Room 128, 513-529-8535
The Department of Parking and Transportation Services
(www.muohio.edu/parking) offers several transportation programs to
students:
 The Miami Metro provides daily bus service, including weekends
and evenings, throughout campus and to off-campus areas in
Oxford. The Miami Metro also provides shuttle service from
Oxford to the MU-Hamilton campus. Call the Bus Information
Hotline at 513-524-2877 for information.
 A medical transport service for students (Access Miami) with
temporary and permanent disabilities is available daily when the
Miami Metro is in operation. Nighttime Door-to-Door (NDD)
provides service to and from campus during evening hours. Call
513-529-2277 for Access Miami and NDD service.
General Information /9


Charter bus service to the Cleveland and Chicago areas during
the fall midterm break, Thanksgiving break, winter recess, and
spring break is available by calling the Parent's Office at
513-529-3436.
Airport transportation to the Dayton and Northern
Kentucky/Cincinnati airports from the Shriver Center is
available for Thanksgiving, winter, and spring breaks. For more
information, call the Shriver Center Box Office at 513-529-3200.
Women's Center
206 MacMillan, 513-529-1510
www.muohio.edu/womenscenter
The Women's Center is a resource and advocacy center that
provides opportunities for student engagement with women’s and
gender issues in a welcoming, safe space for all. Established in
1991, the Women’s Center provides consultation, support and
referral services as well as educational programs and leadership
development opportunities through student employment. The
Center also offers space for study, meetings and relaxing along
with an extensive collection of books available for checkout and
computers with Internet access and printing. Learn more about
Women's Center programs and services by checking out their
website, joining their Facebook group or subscribing to
WOMYNTLK, the Women's Center's weekly electronic posting of
news and events.
For More Information
Except for the regional campuses, all addresses are:
Miami University
Oxford, OH 45056
Phone: 513-529-1809 (general information)
www.muohio.edu
Admission, Undergraduate: Office of Admission, Campus Avenue
Building, 513-529-2531.
Admission, Graduate: Graduate School, 102 Roudebush,
513-529-4125.
Community Service: Office of Community Engagement and Service,
Hannah House, 513-529-2961.
Disability Services: Office of Disability Resources, 19 Campus
Avenue Building, 513-529-1541.
Fees and Expenses: Office of the Bursar, 107 Campus Avenue
Building, 513-529-8700.
Financial Aid, Loans, Grants, Scholarships: Office of Student Financial
Assistance, 121 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-8734.
Hamilton Campus: Miami University Hamilton, 1601 University
Blvd., Hamilton, OH 45011, 513-785-3000 or 513-785-3211.
Honors Program: 96 Bishop, 513-529-3399.
Intercollegiate Athletics: 230 Millett Hall, 513-529-3113.
International Students: Office of International Education, 216
MacMillan, 513-529-5628.
I.T. Services: Support Desk: Hughes Hall, third floor, 513-529-7900.
Liberal Education Office: 313 Laws Hall, 513-529-7135.
Middletown Campus: Miami University Middletown, 4200 N.
University Blvd., Middletown, OH 45042, 513-727-3200 or
513-727-3308.
Minority Affairs: Office of Diversity Affairs, 336 and 377 Shriver
Center, 513-529-6504.
Parking, Motor Vehicle, and Bicycle Regulations: Parking and
Transportation Services, 128 Campus Avenue Building,
513-529-8535
Recreational Sports: Recreational Sports Center, 513-529-6868.
Registration: Office of the Registrar, 118 Campus Avenue Building,
513-529-8703.
Residence and Dining Halls: Housing Dining, and Guest Services,
Cook Place, 513-529-3721; and, Housing and Meal Plan
Services, 111 Shriver Center, 513-529-5000.
Residency: Office of the Registrar, 118 Campus Avenue Building,
513-529-8703.
Student Employment: Department of Human Resources, 15
Roudebush Hall, 513-529-8722.
Student Organizations: Student Activities Office, 356 Shriver Center,
513-529-2266.
Student Responsibility and Regulations: See The Student Handbook,
published online each academic year and available at
www.muohio.edu/handbook.
Veterans Affairs Office: Office of Student Financial Assistance, 121
Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-8734.
Women’s Center: 206 MacMillan, 513-529-1510.
10/ Undergraduate and Graduate Majors and Degrees
Majors and Degrees, Minors, Associate’s Degree Programs, and Certificate Programs
The following charts list all majors and degrees, minors, and certificate programs offered by Miami University. Descriptions appear
elsewhere in this Bulletin. Note: Returning former students whose degree programs have been discontinued should consult with their
academic departments or divisions.
Undergraduate and Graduate Majors and
Degrees
Major
Accountancy
American Studies
Anthropology
Architecture
Art
Art and Architecture History
Art Education
Athletic Training
Biochemistry
Bioengineering
Biological Physics
Biological Sciences
Black World Studies
Botany
Undergraduate Degree(s)
Bachelor of Science in Business
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts in Architecture
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Bachelor of Arts in the History of Art and
Architecture
Bachelor of Science in Art
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Science
—
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science
Business Administration (part-time)
Business-Economics
Cell, Molecular and Structural Biology
(CMSB)
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Chemistry Education
Chinese Education
Classical Humanities
Classical Languages
Computational Science and Engineering
—
Bachelor of Science in Business
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Curriculum and Teacher Leadership
Diplomacy and Global Politics
Early Childhood Education
Earth Science
Earth Science Education
Earth Science/Chemistry Education
Earth Science/Life Science Education
East Asian Language and Cultures
Ecology, Evolution and Environmental
Biology (EEEB)
Economics
Educational Administration
Educational Leadership
Educational Psychology
Electrical Engineering
Elementary Education
Elementary Mathematics Education
Engineering Management
Engineering Physics (pre-professional)
Engineering Technology
English, Composition and Rhetoric
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
—
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts
—
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
—
—
Bachelor of Arts
—
—
—
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
—
—
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Applied Science
—
Graduate Degree(s)
Master of Accountancy
—
—
Master of Architecture
Master of Fine Arts
—
Master of Arts
—
—
—
—
Master of Arts in Teaching
—
Master of Arts, Master of Science,
Doctor of Philosophy
Master of Business Administration
—
Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy
Master of Science in Chemical Engineering
Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy
—
—
—
—
Master of Science in Computational Science and
Engineering
—
Master of Computer Science
Master of Education
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Doctor of Philosophy
Master of Arts
Doctor of Education, Doctor of Philosophy
Master of Education, Master of Science
Master of Education
—
Master of Education
Master of Education
—
—
—
Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy
Undergraduate and Graduate Majors and Degrees /11
Major
English/Creative Writing
English/Literature
Undergraduate Degree(s)
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
English/Professional Writing
Environmental Earth Science
Exercise and Health Studies
Family and Child Studies
Family Studies
Finance
French
French Education
Geography
Geology
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
General Engineering
German
German Education
Gerontology
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts
Graphic Design
Health Information Technology
Health Promotion
History
Instructional Design
Integrated Language Arts Education
Integrated Mathematics Education
Integrated Social Studies Education
Integrative Studies
Interdisciplinary Business Management
Individualized Studies Program
Interior Design
International Studies
Italian Studies
Journalism
Kinesiology
Latin American Latino/a and Caribbean
Studies
Latin Education
Life Science Education
Life Chemistry Education
Life Science/Chemistry Education
Linguistics
Management & Leadership
Management Information Systems
Manufacturing Engineering
Marketing
Mass Communication
Mathematics
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Bachelor of Science in Information Technology
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology & Health
Bachelor of Arts
—
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Integrative Studies
Bachelor of Science in Business
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Bachelor of Arts in International Studies
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology & Health
Bachelor of Arts
Mathematics and Statistics
Mechanical Engineering
Medical Laboratory Science
Microbiology
Middle Childhood Education
Music
Music Education
Music Performance
Nursing
Nutrition
Philosophy
Physical Science/Chemistry Education
Physical Science Education
Physics
Political Science
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts in Music
Bachelor of Music
Bachelor of Music
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology & Health
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Arts
Psychology
Bachelor of Arts
Public Administration
Bachelor of Arts
—
—
Bachelor of Science in Family Studies
Bachelor of Science in Business
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Business
Bachelor of Science in Business
Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Bachelor of Science in Business
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Graduate Degree(s)
Master of Arts
Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching,
Doctor of Philosophy
—
—
Master of Science in Exercise & Health Studies
Master of Science
—
—
Master of Arts
—
Master of Arts
Master of Arts, Master of Science,
Doctor of Philosophy
—
—
—
Master of Gerontological Studies,
Master of Population and Social Gerontology,
Doctor of Philosophy
—
—
Master of Arts
Master of Arts, Master of Education
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Master of Arts
Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching,
Master of Science
—
—
—
Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy
—
—
Master of Music
Master of Music
—
—
Master of Arts
—
—
Master of Science
Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching,
Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Philosophy
(Master of Arts required)
—
12/ Undergraduate and Graduate Majors and Degrees
Major
Quantitative Economics
Reading Education
Religion
Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian
Studies
School Psychology
Secondary Education
Social Gerontology
Social Justice Studies
Social Work
Sociology
Software Engineering
Spanish
Spanish Education
Special Education
Speech Communication
Speech Pathology and Audiology
Sport Leadership and Management
Statistics
Strategic Communication
Supply Chain and Operations
Management
Student Affairs in Higher Education
Theatre
Urban and Regional Planning
Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoology
Undergraduate Degree(s)
Bachelor of Science
—
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
Graduate Degree(s)
—
Master of Education
Master of Arts
—
—
—
—
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Social Work
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Software Engineering
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Science in Education
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology & Health
Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Science in Business
—
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science
Master of Science, Specialist in Education
Master of Education
Doctor of Philosophy
—
—
—
—
Master of Arts
—
Master of Arts, Master of Education
Master of Arts
Master of Arts, Master of Science
Master of Science in Kinesiology
Master of Science in Statistics
—
—
Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy
Master of Arts
—
—
Master of Arts, Master of Science, Doctor of
Philosophy
Minors
Information about these programs is available in the academic division chapters.
Minor
Actuarial Science
Aerospace Studies
Aging and Health
Aging and Policy
American Literature
American Studies
Anthropology
Applied Sociological Research
Arabic
Asian-Asian American Studies
Art and Architectural History
Art, 2-Dimensional Media Studies
Art, 3-Dimensional Media Studies
Art and Architectural History
Arts Management
Bioengineering
Black World Studies
Botany
Business Analytics
Business Legal Studies
Chemical Engineering
Child Studies
Chinese
Classical Humanities
Classical Languages
Coaching
Communication
Community-Based Leadership
Computational Science and Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Crime, Law and Social Justice
Criminology
Digital Game Studies
Disability Studies
Academic Division
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Creative Arts
Creative Arts
Creative Arts
Creative Arts
Business; Creative Arts
Engineering and Applied Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Business
Business
Engineering and Applied Science
Education, Health, and Society
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Education, Health, and Society
Arts and Science
Education, Health, and Society
Engineering and Applied Science
Engineering and Applied Science
Engineering and Applied Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Undergraduate and Graduate Majors and Degrees /13
Minor
East Asian Studies
Economics
Educational Technology
Electrical Engineering
English Literature
Entrepreneurship
Ethics, Society, and Culture
European Area Studies
Family Relationships
Film Studies
Finance
French
Geography
Geology
German
Gerontology
Global Perspectives on Sustainability
History
History of Philosophy
Horticultural Botany
Interactive Media Studies
Interdisciplinary Studies
International Business (business majors only)
Italian
Japanese
Jewish Studies
Landscape Architecture
Latin American Latino/a and Caribbean Studies
Linguistics
Lusophone Studies
Management
Management Information Systems
Management of Information Technologies
Management and Leadership
Manufacturing Engineering
Marketing
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Medieval Studies
Middle East and Islamic Studies
Molecular Biology
Music Composition
Music History
Music Performance
Music Theatre
Naval Science
Neuroscience
Nutrition
Operations Research Methods
Paper Engineering
Physics
Plant Biotechnology
Political Science
Religion
Risk Management and Insurance
Russian
Russian, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies
Social Justice and Inequalities
Sociology
Spanish
Special Education
Sport Management
Statistical Methods
Statistics
Supply Chain Management
Theatre Arts
Urban and Regional Analysis
Urban Design
Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Academic Division
Arts and Science
Arts and Science, Business
Education, Health, and Society
Engineering and Applied Science
Arts and Science
Business
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Education, Health, and Society
Arts and Science
Business
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Business
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Creative Arts
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Business
Business
Business
Business
Engineering and Applied Science
Business
Arts and Science
Engineering and Applied Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Creative Arts
Creative Arts
Creative Arts
Creative Arts
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Education, Health, and Society
Arts and Science
Engineering and Applied Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Business
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Education, Health, and Society
Education, Health, and Society
Arts and Science
Arts and Science
Business
Creative Arts
Arts and Science
Creative Arts
Arts and Science
14/ Undergraduate and Graduate Majors and Degrees
Minor
Writing-Rhetoric
Academic Division
Arts and Science
Associate’s Degree Programs
Except for the Associate in Arts, these programs are available only on the regional campuses in Hamilton and Middletown.
Program
Accounting Technology
Business Management Technology (Real Estate Mgmt. Technology Option)
Business Software Technology
Computer and Information Technology
Computer Technology (continuation option for CSE)
Criminal Justice (Hamilton campus only)
Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology
Marketing Management Technology
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Prekindergarten Education
Technical Study
Associate’s Degree
Associate of Applied Business
Associate of Applied Business
Associate of Applied Business
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Applied Science
Associate of Applied Business
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Applied Science
Associate of Technical Study
Undergraduate Certificate Programs
Programs available on all campuses:
Program
China Business
Design Thinking
Geographic Information Science
Teaching English Language Learners (TELLs)
Academic Division
Business
Creative Arts
Arts and Science
School of Education, Health and Society
Graduate Certificate Programs
Program
Applied Statistics
College Teaching
Ecology
Gerontology
Interactive Media Studies
Molecular biology
Professional Development: String Instrumental Performance
Professional Development: Assessment and Evaluation
Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Studies
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Academic Area
Department of Statistics
Departments of Graduate School and CELTUA
Departments of Botany, Geography, Geology &
Environmental Earth Science,
Microbiology and Zoology
Departments of Sociology and Gerontology;
Scripps Gerontology Center
Department of Interactive Media Studies
Department of Botany, Chemistry, Biochemistry,
Microbiology and Zoology
Department of Music
Department of Educational Psychology
Departments of History, Political Science and Religion
Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Admission for Undergraduate Students /15
Admission for
Undergraduate
Students
Office of Admission
Campus Avenue Building
TTY accessible: 513-529-2531
www.muohio.edu/admission/
About Admission
Miami’s official admission policy is in The Student Handbook,
available online at www.muohio.edu/handbook.
The State of Ohio limits the number of students who can enroll
at the Oxford campus, which means Miami must be selective in
admissions, accepting only a portion of those who apply.
You may apply for admission online, download and print an
application, or request undergraduate application materials from:
Office of Admission
301 S. Campus Ave.
Miami University
Oxford, Ohio 45056-3434
Phone: 513-529-2531 (TTY accessible)
www.muohio.edu/admission/
Admission information for international students and for
Hamilton and Middletown campuses appears later in this chapter.
Freshman Admission Standards
Freshman admission to the Oxford campus is based upon high
school performance (curriculum, grade point average, and class
rank), test scores (ACT and/or SAT Reasoning Test), essay, high
school experience and community activities, and recommendation
of your high school. Personal interviews are not used.
Students who have not graduated from a state-chartered high
school or have not earned a General Educational Development
(GED) certificate must submit descriptions of their curriculum and
educational resources used during the last four years. If sufficient
information to assess academic achievement and ability is not
provided, samples of work in such areas as English, mathematics,
natural science, social studies, foreign language, and fine arts may
be requested.
Special abilities, talents, and achievements, as well as
diversity of the student body, are also considered in making
admission decisions. The university believes that diversity
enhances the quality of education its students receive. Diversity
may include socioeconomic factors, under-enrolled minority group
members, career interests, artistic abilities, geographical
backgrounds, and other special characteristics.
For information, about open admission for freshmen to
Hamilton and Middletown campuses, see that section in this
chapter and the Hamilton and Middletown Campuses section.
High School Preparation
To be admitted to Miami, you must have ordinarily earned a
high school diploma from a state-chartered high school or have a
General Educational Development (GED) certificate. Alternatively
educated students without a GED certificate can be considered for
admission by presenting credentials that demonstrate equivalent
levels of academic achievement, ability, and performance. (Please
contact the appropriate admission office for guidelines.)
All candidates are also expected to have completed:
 four units of college preparatory English
 three units of college preparatory mathematics (at least to
the Algebra II level)
 three units of college preparatory natural science (including
both a physical and a biological science)
 three units of college preparatory social studies (including
one unit of history)
 two units of foreign language, both in the same language
 one unit of fine arts, including art, drama, dance, or music,
either appreciation or performance
Making up Requirements
If you have otherwise qualified for admission, but not fulfilled
these unit prerequisites, you must complete them before you
graduate with a baccalaureate degree from Miami. These regular
courses will count toward graduation, and many of them can fulfill
other university requirements. Normally, students complete these
prerequisites within their first 64 credit hours of college work.
The following courses will fulfill the requirements:
English: Complete the English composition requirement of the
Miami Plan; no additional courses are required.
Natural Science, Social Studies: Complete natural science and social
science requirements of the Miami Plan; no additional courses
are required.
Mathematics: Complete MTH 102 Intermediate Algebra, MTH 104
Precalculus with Algebra, MTH 123 Precalculus, or another
math course of at least three credit hours at the level of MTH
123 or higher. Consult with the chief departmental adviser for
mathematics.
Fine Arts: Complete the fine arts requirement of the Miami Plan; no
additional courses are required.
Foreign Language: Take one year of foreign language selected from
the following beginning level sequences (or higher level
courses):
Arabic 101 and 102
Chinese 101 and 102
French 101 and 102
German 101 and 102
German 111 and 201
Greek 101 and 102
Hebrew 101 and 102
Hindi 101 and 102
Italian 101 and 102
Japanese 101 and 102
Korean 101 and 102
Latin 101 and 102
Portuguese 111
Russian 101 and 102
Spanish 101 and 102
Exceptions
These prerequisites are not required in order to earn a
two-year degree. Students who continue their studies to earn a
baccalaureate degree, however, are required to fulfill these
standards.
16/ Admission for Undergraduate Students
Students graduating from high school prior to 1986 must have
completed 17 units of study; at least 10 of those units must include
any combination of English, speech, mathematics, science, history,
social studies, and foreign language.
Students who qualify for admission by earning the General
Educational Development (GED) certificate must submit a
transcript of completed high school course work to evaluate
fulfillment of these standards. Credentials of alternatively
educated students will be evaluated to determine fulfillment of
these standards.
ACT or SAT Reasoning Test Scores
Miami requires official scores on the ACT or the SAT
Reasoning Test. Exceptions to this are if you have been out of high
school five or more years or have already completed 30 transfer
credits.
You can take either test. These tests must be taken at an
authorized testing center on one of the national or approved state
testing dates. Test scores must be sent by the testing agency.
You can register online or obtain forms at your high school;
you must register several weeks before the test date.
Housing Requirement
First- and second-year students admitted to the Oxford
campus (except those who reside with their parents, legal
guardians, or spouses; are at least 21 years of age; or are married)
must live in university residence halls. For information, about the
housing requirement for transfer students, see “Transfer Student
Admission.”
See more about residence halls in the General Information
section.
Medical and Insurance Requirements
You are required to complete medical forms for the Student
Health Service. Students under age 30 must present proof of
immunity for measles (rubeola). Failure to meet immunization
requirements will prevent course registration. All new
international students are required to have a tuberculosis clearance
done by the Student Health Service before registering for classes.
You must provide proof of health insurance coverage every
year by completing the electronic Health Insurance Waiver form
between June 1st and August 1st. If you are not covered by another
policy, you will be charged for the insurance the university makes
available. The insurance rate is in the Fees and Expenses chapter.
Commuters
Freshmen who live within commuting distance and live in the
home of their parents, legal guardians, or spouses may apply to the
Oxford campus. See Freshmen Admission Standards for
information regarding admission.
The Hamilton and Middletown campuses are commuter
campuses and have an open enrollment policy for freshmen. Local
area residents who are not accepted to the Oxford campus can
begin their Miami studies by commuting to the Hamilton or
Middletown campus. After completing 20 semester hours in good
academic standing at a regional campus, they can continue at the
Oxford campus or complete one of the degrees offered at the
Regional campuses.
International Student Admission
Basic requirements for admission of international students to
undergraduate study include:
 Completion of formal secondary education in a
pre-university curriculum that culminates in the award of a
secondary school diploma or certificate which is generally
recognized as the educational qualification necessary to
gain admission to higher studies in your own country.
 Adequate financial support
 English language ability sufficient for you to undertake a
full course of study. See the following section, “English
Proficiency.”
 SAT or ACT tests scores are required for admission of
international students who are attending U.S. secondary
schools or secondary schools in another country that follow
a U.S. high school curriculum, and those who intend to
participate in the intercollegiate athletic program and need
to comply with NCAA eligibility requirements.
English Proficiency
International applicants (non-immigrants with F-1 or J-1 or
other visa status) whose native language is not English are
required to submit evidence of English proficiency prior to their
admission. In most cases, applicants will need to present
satisfactory scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System
(IELTS). Information concerning these examinations and location
of test centers can be obtained at www.toefl.org or www.ielts.org.
Students admitted through the American Culture and English
(ACE) Program are conditionally admitted to Miami University.
For a student’s status to be changed from conditional admission to
regular enrollment, students must complete the ACE core
curriculum with a B- or higher in each of the required English
language classes (currently ACE 199A and ACE 199B) and with a
passing grade (D- or higher) in AMS/ACE 205. If a student does
not achieve a grade of B- or higher in both ACE 199A and ACE
199B, or fails AMS/ACE 205 in the first semester, the student’s
enrollment status will remain conditional and the student will be
required to retake the pertinent course(s) during the second
semester. If the student does not earn grades of B- or higher in ACE
199A and ACE 199B and does not pass AMS/ACE 205 at the
conclusion of second semester, that student has not met the
requirements of conditional admission and will not be allowed
further enrollment at any Miami University campus.
Undergraduate international students, like all Miami
undergraduates, must satisfy the freshman English requirement. If
you are accepted, you will take a Department of English placement
examination before you register for classes. Students will be placed
in the appropriate English courses based on test scores or other
English proof of proficiency received at the time of admission.
ENG 108 is a pre-freshman level course designed to provide
international students with basic competence in written and oral
English. ENG 108 is followed by 109, similar to ENG 111 except
ENG 109 concentrates on special needs of non-native speakers.
All students who begin in ENG 108 or 109 take ENG 112,
which completes the freshman English requirement. This can be
completed in two semesters or three, depending on whether you
were first placed in ENG 108 or 109.
Non-native English speakers can get additional practice in the
use of written and spoken English at the Bernard B. Rinella Jr.
Learning Center, 23 Campus Avenue Building.
Selective Admission
Student
Admission:
Handbook,
Chapter
1.1.B.2
under
Selective
Admission for Undergraduate Students /17
Conditional Admission
A student who is competitive for admission, but does not meet
the minimum English language proficiency requirement, may be
offered conditional admission. Conditional admission is only
granted through approved English intensive-language programs,
including the Miami University American Culture and English
(ACE) Program. For a student’s status to be changed from
conditional admission to regular enrollment, the student must
complete and fulfill all criteria established by the approved
program.
Information and Application
Information and application forms for prospective
international undergraduate students are available online
(www.muohio.edu/admission/apply/international) and from:
Office of Admission
301 S. Campus Ave.
Miami University
Oxford, Ohio 45056-3434
U.S.A.
Phone: 513-529-2288
Fax: 513-529-1550
E-mail: [email protected]
Transfer Student Admission
If you attended another college after high school and
registered for one or more courses, you must apply for admission
to Miami as a transfer student. Credit earned at another college is
subject to transfer regulations.
Information on transfer admission and services is in the
Transfer Viewbook, available from the Office of Admission.
Admission Requirements
You are required to have earned a high school diploma and
have a minimum of 2.00 GPA on your college courses to be eligible
for transfer admission. Transfer students are responsible for
meeting all requirements that are in effect when they first enroll as
degree candidates.
Admission Prerequisites
If you graduated from high school after 1985, you are required
to complete admission prerequisites to earn a baccalaureate
degree. These are listed under “High School Preparation” in this
chapter. If you did not complete these specific curriculum
standards in high school or at the college(s) you attended, you
must fulfill them in the same manner described for beginning
freshmen.
Transfer and Articulation Policy
The Ohio Board of Regents developed a statewide policy to
facilitate the movement of students and transfer of credits
throughout Ohio’s state-assisted higher education system.
The Transfer Module is a set of core courses that all Ohio
public colleges and universities have agreed will count for credit at
any Ohio school. It contains 54-60 quarter hours or 36-40 semester
hours of specified courses in English composition, mathematics,
fine arts, humanities, social science, behavioral science, natural
science, physical science, and interdisciplinary course work.
If you have successfully completed the Transfer Module at an
Ohio college or university, you will be considered to have fulfilled
the Transfer Module at Miami. Additional Global Miami Plan
requirements that are not included in the Transfer Module,
however, may be required.
The policy encourages preferential consideration for
admission to students who complete the Transfer Module and
either the Associate of Arts or the Associate of Science degree (60
semester hours) with an overall 2.00 GPA Students should
understand, however, that admission to a given institution does
not guarantee admission to all majors, minors, or fields of
concentration. Once admitted, transfer students will be subject to
the same regulations governing applicability of catalog
requirements as all other students. Furthermore, transfer students
will be accorded the same class standing and other privileges as all
other students on the basis of credits earned. All residency
requirements must be successfully completed at the receiving
institution prior to the granting of a degree.
In order to facilitate maximum applicability of transfer credit,
prospective transfer students should plan a course of study that
will meet requirements of a degree program at the receiving
institution. Specifically, students should identify early in their
collegiate studies an institution and major to which they desire to
transfer. Furthermore, students should determine if there are
language requirements or special course requirements that can be
met during the freshman or sophomore year. This will enable
students to plan and pursue a course of study that will articulate
with the receiving institution’s major. Students are encouraged to
seek further information regarding transfer from both their adviser
and the college or university to which they plan to transfer.
Students can appeal through the academic department and a
university committee on the applicability of transfer credit. A
statewide appeals committee considers appeals not satisfied at the
university level.
Transfer Module (TM) for Miami University
Important: Please refer to the Courses of Instruction section for a
full course description and other details.
English
Six (6) hours of English composition:
ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric (3) (MPF) and
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (3) (MPF)
Mathematics and Statistics
Select any three (3) hours from:
MTH 151 Calculus I (3) (MPF, MPT)
MTH 153 Calculus I (3) (MPF, MPT) *
MTH 249 Calculus II (3) (MPF)
STA 261 Statistics (4) (MPF, MPT)
Arts/Humanities
Select at least three (3) hours from:
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3) (MPF)
ARC 221 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3) (MPF)
ARC 222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3) (MPF)
ART 181 Concepts in Art (3) (MPF)
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3) (MPF)
ART 186 China, Korea, and Japan (3) (MPF, MPT)
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric - Gothic (3) (MPF)
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance - Modern (3) (MPF)
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3) (MPF, MPT)
ART 233 Global Perspectives on Dress (3) (MPF)
ART 282 Art and Politics (3) (MPF, MPT)
MUS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Context (3) (MPF, MPT)
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3) (MPF)
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3) (MPF)
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3) (MPF, MPT)
THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (3) (MPF, MPT) and
Select six (6) hours from two different areas:
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3) (MPF, MPT)
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3) (MPF, MPT)
History
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3) (MPF)
HST 111 Survey of American History (3) (MPF)
HST 112 Survey of American History (3) (MPF)
HST 121 Western Civilization (3) (MPF)
HST 122 Western Civilization (3) (MPF)
HST 224 Africa in History (3) (MPF) or
BWS 224 Africa in History (3) (MPF)
Literature
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in Translation (3) (MPF) or
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in Translation (3) (MPF)
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) (MPF, MPT)
ENG 121 Comedy or Tragedy (3) (MPF)
18/ Admission for Undergraduate Students
ENG 122 Popular Literature (3) (MPF)
ENG 123 Introduction to Poetry (3) (MPF)
ENG 124 Introduction to Fiction (3) (MPF)
ENG 125 Introduction to Drama (3) (MPF)
ENG 131 Life and Thought in English Literature (3) (MPF, MPT)
ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature (3) (MPF, MPT)
ENG 133 Life and Thought in English Literature (3) (MPF, MPT)
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (3) (MPF)
ENG 141 Life and Thought in American Literature (3) (MPF)
ENG 142 Life and Thought in American Literature (3) (MPF)
ENG 143 Life and Thought in American Literature (3) (MPF)
ENG 144 Major American Authors (3) (MPF)
ENG 161 Literature and Politics (3) (MPF)
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3) (MPF)
ENG 163 Literature and Travel (3) (MPF)
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3) (MPF)
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Culture in Translation (3) (MPF)
GER 231 Folk and Literary Fairy Tales (3) (MPF, MPT)
GER 251 German Literature in Translation: Changing Concepts of the Self (3) (MPF, MPT)
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3) (MPF, MPT)
RUS 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (3) (MPF,
MPT) or
ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (3)
(MPF, MPT)
Philosophy
PHL 101 Knowledge of World, God, and Morality (3) (MPF, MPT)
PHL 103 Society and the Individual (3) (MPF)
PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (3) (MPF, MPT)
PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (3) (MPF, MPT)
PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (3) (MPF, MPT)
Religion (Comparative Religion)
REL 101 Varieties of Religious Expression (3) (MPF, MPT)
REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (3) (MPF, MPT)
REL 103 Religion, History, and Society (3) (MPF, MPT)
REL 213 Judaism in the Modern World (3) (MPF, MPT)
Take six (6) hours from two different areas:
Social Sciences
ATH 155 Cultures in Context (4) (MPF)
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4) (MPF, MPT)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3) (MPF)
SPA 223 Theories of Language Development (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) (MPF, MPT)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) (MPF, MPT)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3) (MPF)
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (3) (MPF, MPT)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) (MPF, MPT)
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3) (MPF, MPT)
POL 241 American Political System (4)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4) (MPF)
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) (MPF)
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3) (MPF, MPT)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (3) (MPF)
WGS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3) (MPF, MPT)
World Cultures
Take three (3) hours from:
ART 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan () (MPF) or
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3) (MPF)
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3) (MPF, MPT)
GEO 207 Civilization of the Middle East (3) (MPF)
GEO 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) (MPF) or
ITS 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) (MPF) or
POL 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) (MPF) or
SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) (MPF)
BWS 209 Civilization of Africa (3) (MPF) or
GEO 209 Civilization of Africa (3) (MPF) or
HST 209 Civilization of Africa (3) (MPF) or
REL 209 Civilization of Africa (3) (MPF)
CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3) (MPF, MPT)
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3) (MPF, MPT)
BWS 224 Africa in History (3) (MPF) or
HST 224 Africa in History (3) (MPF)
BWS 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3) (MPF) or
HST 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3) (MPF)
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3) (MPF)
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3) (MPF)
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3) (MPF)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) (MPF, MPT)
LAS 207 Latin American Civilization (3) (MPF)
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization (3) (MPF, MPT)
Natural Sciences
Take nine (9) hours. One course must include a laboratory.
Biological Science
Select at least three (3) hours
BOT 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4) (MPF,
LAB) or
MBI 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4) (MPF,
LAB) or
ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4)
(MPF, LAB) or
BOT 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular Biology (3)
(MPF, MPT, LAB) or
MBI 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular Biology
(3) (MPF, MPT, LAB) or
ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular Biology
(3) (MPF, MPT, LAB)
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3) (MPF, MPT)
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3) (MPF, MPT)
BOT 191 General Botany (4) (MPF, MPT, LAB)
MBI 111 Microorganisms and Human Disease (3) (MPF)
MBI 121 The Microbial World (3) (MPF)
MBI 123 Experimenting With Microbes (1) (MPF, LAB)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) (MPF, LAB)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) (MPF, MPT, LAB)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (3) (MPF, MPT)
ZOO 161 Principles of Human Physiology (4) (MPF, LAB)
ZOO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) (MPF, LAB)
Physical Science
Select at least three (3) hours
AER 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3) (MPF) or
PHY 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3) (MPF)
CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (4) (MPF, LAB)
CHM 141 College Chemistry (3) (MPF)
CHM 144 College Chemistry Lab (2) (MPF, LAB)
CHM 153 General Chemistry Laboratory (2) (MPF, LAB)
EDT 181 Physical Science (4) (MPF, LAB)
EDT 182 Physical Science (4) (MPF, LAB)
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environment (4) (MPF, MPT, LAB)
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) (MPF, MPT)
GLG 115L Understanding the Earth (1) (MPF, LAB)
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) (MPF, MPT)
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3) (MPF, MPT)
PHY 101 Physics and Society (3) (MPF)
PHY 103 Concepts in Physics Laboratory (1) (MPF, LAB)
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (3) (MPF, MPT)
PHY 121 Energy and Environment (3) (MPF)
PHY 181 The Physical World (4) (MPF)
PHY 182 The Physical World (4) (MPT)
PHY 183 Physics Laboratory (1) (MPF, LAB)
PHY 184 Physics Laboratory (1) (MPT, LAB)
Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGS)
Transfer Assurance Guides (TAGs) comprise Transfer Module
courses and additional courses required for an academic major. A
TAG is an advising tool to assist Ohio university and community
and technical college students planning specific majors to make
course selections that will ensure comparable, compatible, and
equivalent learning experiences across the state’s higher-education
system. A number of area-specific TAG pathways in the arts,
humanities, business, communication, education, health,
mathematics, science, engineering, engineering technologies, and
the social sciences have been developed by faculty teams.
TAGs empower student to make informed course selection
decisions and plans for their future transfer. Advisors at the
institution to which a student wishes to transfer should also be
consulted during the transfer process. Students may elect to
complete the full TAG or any subset of courses from the TAG.
Because of specific major requirements, early identification of a
student’s intended major is encouraged. More information can be
found
on
the
Ohio
Board
of
Regents
website
http://www.ohiohighered.org/transfer/tag.
Career-Technical Assurance Guides (CTAGS)
Students who successfully complete specified technical
programs are eligible to have technical credit transfer to public
colleges and universities. This transfer of credit is described in
Career Technical Assurance Guides (CTAGs). CTAGs are advising
tools that assist students moving from Ohio secondary and adult
career-technical institutions to Ohio public institutions of higher
education. For more information, visit the Ohio Board of Regents
website http://www.ohiohighered.org/transfer/ct2.
Admission for Undergraduate Students /19
Limited Admission to Programs
Transfer admission to some programs is limited, requiring
perhaps a higher GPA and, in some cases, upper-class standing.
These programs include:
 College of Arts and Science
Journalism: Selective admission based on completion of COM
143 and JRN 101, completion of 18 hours of Miami Plan
Foundation courses, the passing of a grammar and punctuation
proficiency test, and pre-major GPA Contact the journalism
program director for details on applying for admission.
Mass communication:
Selective admission based on
cumulative, pre-major GPA, and qualifying exam after taking
COM 134, COM 135, and COM 142 (or equivalent) and
completing 30 semester hours.
Speech communication:
Selective admission based on
cumulative GPA, pre-major GPA, and qualifying exam after
taking COM 134, COM 135, and COM 142 (or equivalent) and
completing 30 semester hours.
Speech pathology and audiology: Selective admission based on
cumulative GPA (3.00) and pre-major courses GPA (3.00).
Student must complete SPA 127, SPA 316, SPA 222, and SPA 223
before accepted to the major.
Selective admission based on
Strategic communication:
cumulative GPA, pre-major GPA, and qualifying exam after
taking COM 134, COM 135, and COM 142 (or equivalent) and
completing 30 semester hours.
Technical and scientific communication: Completion of ENG 313
(or 215 on the Hamilton campus) and approval by the program
faculty of the student's application, which includes a writing
portfolio. To apply, refer to the Program Booklet or go to
www.muohio.edu/batsc/ for more information and application
form. Students may also consult with the Program Director.
 Farmer School of Business: To be admitted to the Farmer School
of Business, a student must have earned 30 graded credit hours
that apply towards a Bachelor of Science in Business degree.
Typically, students must have also earned an overall GPA of 3.50
or higher in all graded credit hours earned, which must include
MTH 151 and ECO 201 (or equivalent courses unless AP or post
secondary credit was earned). More information is available at:
http://www.fsb.muohio.edu/offices/academic-advising/adm
ission-requirements. Questions may be directed to the FSB
Student Services Office at (513)529-1712.
 School of Creative Arts: Contact the department as soon as
possible for specific requirements.
Architecture: 3.00 GPA; submission of a portfolio; fall semester
admission only. Enrollment is on a space-available basis.
Contact the department as soon as possible for specific
requirements.
Art education: Completion of a minimum of six semester hours
of studio art, enrollment in an additional six hours of studio art,
completion of ART 195 and either ART 295 or 296, and
submission of a portfolio. Enrollment is on a space-available
basis. Contact the department as soon as possible for specific
requirements.
Art: Completion of a minimum of six semester hours of studio
art and be enrolled in another 6 credits of studio art to be
eligible to submit a portfolio. Enrollment is on a space-available
basis. Contact the art department as soon as possible for specific
requirements.
Interior design: 3.00 GPA; submission of a portfolio; fall
semester admission only. Enrollment is on a space-available
basis.
Music and music education: Audition required; enrollment is on
a space-available basis.
 School of Education, Health and Society
Adolescent Young Adult and Foreign Language Education: 45
semester hours with a 2.50 GPA at transfer institution and
completion of courses equivalent to EDL 204, EDP 201, and EDT
190 and equal to 30 semester hours of specific equivalent
content courses required in desired teaching area. Enrollment is

on space-available basis. Science, mathematics, and foreign
language majors are encouraged to apply. Contact the
Department of Teacher Education for specific requirements.
Early Childhood Education: Not available; however, a transfer
student may apply for admission as a pre-major.
Middle Childhood Education: 45 semester hours with 2.50 GPA
at transfer institution and completion of courses equivalent to
EDL 204 and equal to four content courses specifically required
in each of the two desired concentration areas. Enrollment is on
space-available basis. Contact the Department of Teacher
Education for specific requirements.
Social work: Students declare a pre-major in social work and
must apply and be accepted by the social work faculty. For
further information on program requirements, contact the
Department of Family Studies and Social Work.
Special education: Completion of EDP 201, 220, and 256 or the
equivalent from the transfer institution; 30 semester hours or 45
quarter hours with a minimum 2.75 GPA; and 100 hours service
work with persons with exceptionalities. Enrollment is on
space-available basis.
School of Engineering and Applied Science: Contact the dean’s
office. If you have an associate’s degree, special agreements may
apply between the transfer institution and Miami. Note that
engineering technology coursework will generally not apply to
requirements for engineering majors.
Applying a Transfer Course to the Global Miami
Plan
If you believe a course taken at another university or college
satisfies the spirit of the Global Miami Plan for Liberal Education
requirement, but does not correspond to a specific course, you may
petition the Liberal Education Council to apply the course toward
the Global Miami Plan. Obtain a petition from the Office of Liberal
Education or its website. (www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed), request
the chair of the appropriate Miami department to evaluate your
transfer course, and then present the petition to the Office of
Liberal Education. A syllabus of the course must be attached to the
petition.
Capstones are designed to culminate your baccalaureate study
and are rarely taken off-campus or transferred from another
institution. Students who plan to transfer any course to meet the
Capstone requirement must obtain permission from the Office of
Liberal Education before they take the course.
If the English composition requirement (Foundation I) was
waived for you by another school, Miami’s English department
will evaluate your eligibility for a similar waiver. In most cases,
students are asked to submit a portfolio of their writing. Contact
the English department for detailed instructions on preparing your
portfolio. The department will notify the Office of the Registrar
and the Office of Liberal Education of its decision. No petition is
required for this procedure.
Housing Requirement
If you are a freshman or sophomore transfer student who has
registered for nine or more credit hours, you are required to live in
university housing.
You are not required to live on campus if you will commute
from your parents' or legal guardian's home; if you are married; or
if you are at least 21 years of age before the first day of classes.
Credit Evaluations
Undergraduate evaluations are done by the Office of the
Registrar.
Transfer credit is granted for grades of C or better from
regionally accredited institutions. Upon a student's first
matriculation to the university, transfer credit earned at Ohio
institutions will be accepted for grades of D- or better for courses
20/ Admission for Undergraduate Students
taken in fall 2005 or after. Courses taken at Ohio institutions in fall
2009 or after will be accepted regardless of student’s matriculation
date. Courses taken fall term 2010 or after will be accepted for
grades of D- and above from all regionally accredited institutions.
Credit received on a pass/fail or credit/no-credit basis may also be
accepted if it can be verified that the equivalent letter grade earned
was a "C" or better. Transfer credit is posted without grades on
your Miami record and grades earned elsewhere are disregarded
in the computation of your GPA.
Students who have attended U.S. institutions not fully
accredited by a regional accrediting agency must validate their
previous coursework by earning 32 semester credits with a 2.00
cumulative average at Miami. The credit for any grade reported as
a D- or better will be given upon completion of the 32 hours. Credit
earned for any grade reported as a D- or better at two-year
institutions not fully accredited will be accepted on a provisional
basis and must be validated by earning 32 semester credits with a
2.00 cumulative average at Miami. All credits earned at two-year
institutions can transfer only as lower division (100 and 200 level)
credit, except that a course taken at the lower division level which
bears the same title as an upper division course at Miami will be
considered equivalent if validated by the division and/or
department in which the course has applicability.
Students who earn credit at institutions outside the United
States must provide (in addition to their academic records) course
descriptions or course syllabi that include a list of required reading
for the course, number of class hours required in each course, and
the length of the academic term(s) when enrolled. Provide course
description or syllabi in the English language at least 1 month
before the semester begins, if offered admission. Credit can be
transferred only for studies completed at a recognized
degree-granting institution. These credits are evaluated by the
Office of the Registrar in consultation with the Office of Admission
and Academic Divisions.
Students who intend to study abroad are expected to consult
with the Office of International Education in advance of their
departure to make certain that the credits earned will transfer to
Miami University.
Acceptance of extra-institutional or nontraditional credit, such
as credit by examination, extension credit, correspondence credit,
and armed forces credit, is limited to 32 semester hours. Only 20 of
the 32 hours may be in correspondence work and in extension
work from other institutions.
You can receive credit for courses sponsored by the Defense
Activity for Non-Traditional Educational Support (DANTES)
program that are college level and completed with satisfactory
final examinations. Credit earned through non-collegiate
sponsored instruction, evaluated by the American Council on
Education (listed in National Guide to Education Credit for Training
Programs), may be accepted only with approval of the appropriate
academic department.
Whenever
possible,
transfer
credits
are
assigned
corresponding Miami course numbers. The appropriate Miami
department determines where credit applies. Courses that do not
fulfill the Miami Plan for Liberal Education, divisional
requirements, or major requirements transfer as free electives.
Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC)
Miami University is a member of the Servicemembers
Opportunity Colleges (SOC). SOC is a consortium of
military-friendly institutions with flexible policies that allow
mobile servicemembers and their families to complete college
degrees.
Quarter-Semester Conversion
A quarter hour is two-thirds (0.6667) of a semester hour. To
convert to semester hours, multiply the quarter hours by 0.6667.
To convert semester to quarter hours, multiply by 1.50.
Two-Year Colleges
Credits earned at two-year colleges transfer only as freshman
and sophomore level credits. Those courses are considered
equivalent when validated by the appropriate Miami department
and/or division.
If you attended an institution not yet fully accredited by a
regional accrediting agency, you must validate your previous
course work by earning 32 semester hours at Miami with at least a
2.00 cumulative grade point average.
Armed Forces Credit
Credit for courses taken at U.S. military services schools will
be given on the basis of the American Council on Education
publication, "Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in
the Armed Services". To receive transfer credit, you must present
certificates, or form DD295, or DD214 describing your training to
the Registrar’s office. If you were in the U.S. Army, you should
submit an AARTS transcript. Sailors and marines should submit a
SMART transcript. Beginning fall 2012 credit will be awarded for
military training and experience on the basis of the publication,
"Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed
Services". Also, see “Credit Evaluations” earlier in this section.
Recipients of VA education benefits should note that sprint
courses are not considered full semester courses for VA
entitlement (pay) purposes.
Nursing Credit
Graduates of diploma and non-NLNAC accredited associate's
degree programs are required to complete 32 Miami hours and
pass NSG 301, 311, and 313 before their 28 hours of transfer credit
will be validated. Graduates of accredited associate's degree
programs can transfer 28 semester hours of nursing from a
regionally accredited two year college. Additional transfer hours
may be used as elective credit.
If you are a registered nurse with credits from a college
nursing program, your credits are evaluated on the same basis as
other transfer students' credits, described earlier.
See the School of Engineering and Applied Science chapter for
information about degrees in nursing.
Second Semester and Summer
Admission
Freshmen may be admitted for second (spring) semester or for
summer term. Admission to some programs in the School of
Creative Arts is available only in the first semester except by
special permission.
Notification and Acceptance
Dates for notification of admission and your confirmation of
acceptance are listed online (www.muohio.edu/admission/) and in
your admission application packet.
As a member of the National Association of College
Admission Counselors, Miami University supports the Statement of
Principles of Good Practice and “permits candidates to choose,
without penalty, among offers of admission and financial aid until
May 1. Candidates admitted under an early decision program are
recognized exceptions to this provision.” (Section II, B, 3).
Admission for Undergraduate Students /21
exceptions to these requirements must contact the Oxford
divisional office.
Summer Orientation
All first-year students and their families are invited to a one
-and-a-half day orientation program. Held during June, the
program provides an opportunity to learn more about the
university and to register for classes.
Orientation program information is mailed to all incoming
first-year students after they have confirmed their intention to
enroll. Students register online for the program through their
myMiami portal at http://mymiami.muohio.edu.
If you cannot attend a Summer Orientation session in June,
you must attend August Orientation and participate in advising
and registration at that time. If you have questions about
Orientation,
please
call
513-529-9771
or
email
[email protected] Also, visit our website for complete
dates
and
details
about
all
Orientation
programs
(www.muohio.edu/orientation).
Hamilton and Middletown Campuses
The regional campuses in Hamilton and Middletown are
commuter campuses and have an open admission policy for
freshmen. To be admitted, you must have graduated from a
state-chartered high school or have a General Educational
Development (GED) certificate. Alternatively educated students
without a GED certificate can demonstrate academic achievement
by submitting a description of curriculum and educational
resources used during the last four years and other information
necessary to assess ability. ACT or SAT Reasoning Test scores must
be within at least one standard deviation of the average national
norm for the previous three years of test administration for
alternatively educated students without GED certificates.
A beginning freshman or transfer student admitted to a
regional campus may relocate (take the majority of credit hours in
Oxford) as a matriculated Miami University student with at least
20 hours of earned Miami University college-level course work
(not including developmental 00_classes, CLEP, AP and PSEOP
credit), at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average, and an
acceptable conduct record. These requirements will be verified as
of the start of the approved relocation term. Students with
More information is in the chapter about the Hamilton and
Middletown campuses and online. To receive an application
packet for admission to Miami Hamilton or Miami Middletown,
contact:
Office of
Admission and Financial Aid
Miami University Hamilton
1601 University Blvd.
Hamilton, Ohio 45011
Phone: 513-785-3111 (Admission),
513-785-3123 (Financial Aid),
513-785-3211 (TTY)
www.ham.muohio.edu
Office of
Admission and Financial Aid
Miami University Middletown
4200 N. University Blvd.
Middletown, Ohio 45042
Phone: 513-727-3216 (Admission)
866-426-4643,
513-727-3308 (TTY)
www.mid.muohio.edu
Non-degree Student Admission
High school enrollment students (post-secondary enrollment
option): This state program provides opportunity for high school
students (grades 9-12) to earn high school and college graduation
credit through successful completion of college courses. Courses
are open on a space-available basis. Questions regarding eligibility
and admission should be directed to the appropriate admission
office (Hamilton, Middletown, or Oxford). University housing is
not available to students in this program. Prospective students
should consult with their high school guidance counselors.
Senior citizens: Individuals who are 60 years of age or older
and have resided in the state of Ohio for at least one year can audit
any course without charge if permission is granted by the
instructor and facilities are available. Any special course
requirements or fees are the responsibility of the student. Formal
admission and registration are not required.
Transient students: Students who attend another college or
university, have been in attendance at the school during the past 12
months, are in good academic standing, and have permission from
their schools to attend Miami for one semester may enroll at
Miami. Students may not attend for two consecutive semesters as
transient students.
Unclassified students: Students who have bachelor’s degrees
from other colleges or universities and do not want to get an
additional degree from Miami may apply as unclassified students.
Admission is granted as facilities are available.
22/ Liberal Education at Miami
Liberal Education at
Miami
Office of Liberal Education
313 Laws
Phone: 513-529-7135
www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed
The Global Miami Plan for Liberal
Education
Liberal education complements specialized studies in your
major and provides a broadened context for exploring social,
academic, political and professional choices. Most students,
regardless of major, are required to participate in the Global Miami
Plan for Liberal Education. Liberal education course work and
co-curricular programming emphasize four basic goals:
 Thinking Critically. Students learn how to develop critical
thinking skills that enable them to carefully identify problems
worth studying; to examine pros and cons about issues; to
develop skills for examining evidence and counter-arguments; to
analyze research and other information; to explore underlying
assumptions about multiple positions and arguments; and to
draw solid conclusions after examining all sides of an issue or
problem.
 Understanding Contexts. Students learn how to understand
contexts that inform how we make meaning out of issues and
events. They may explore political, social, economic, historical, or
other contexts that surround problems or issues confronted. They
learn that contextual analysis and understanding opens up new
ways of knowing not only about the world in which one lives, but
also about oneself.
 Engaging with Other Learners. The Global Miami Plan is based on
the firm belief that we learn from one another, from people
different than ourselves, and from a wide variety of others. A
healthy exchange of different ideas and viewpoints encourages
rethinking of accepted perspectives. Thus, students learn to think
critically and to understand contexts through in- and out-of-class
activities designed to engage them with other learners: other
students, other faculty or staff, and other learners outside of the
university. Students learn how to work effectively in group
settings, how to listen actively to the ideas of others, and how to
negotiate a shared understanding of complex issues and tasks.
 Reflecting and Acting. Finally, the Global Miami Plan encourages
students to both reflect upon and act on the new knowledge,
understanding, and commitments made. Students learn how to
make decisions about complex intellectual, ethical and personal
issues; to think about the meaning of coursework for themselves,
and to commit to informed action as global citizens.
Requirements of the Global Miami Plan
All students must complete liberal education requirements as
well as courses in the major. The Global Miami Plan has three
parts: Foundation Courses, a Thematic Sequence, and a Capstone
Course.
The Foundation (MP) requirement is met by taking a minimum
of 36 semester hours (33 hours with Study Abroad) of Foundation
courses across five specific areas:
I. English Composition (6 hours)
II. Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science (9 hours)
A. Fine Arts (3 hours)
B. Humanities (3 hours)
C. Social Science (3 hours)
III. Global Perspectives (6 to 9 hours)
A. Study Abroad (6 hours fulfills requirement), or
B. G-Courses (9 hours), or
C. G-Cluster (9 hours)
IV. Natural Science (9 hours, must include one laboratory course)
A. Biological Science (3 hours minimum)
B. Physical Science (3 hours minimum)
V. Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology (3 hours)
Additionally, to complete the Foundation area requirements,
students must complete the following:
Cultures (Cul) requirement - All students must take at least one
Foundation course that presents a cultural perspective. Students
satisfy this requirement by taking an appropriately designated
course in any foundation area. The same course may meet both a
Foundation areas requirement and the cultural and/or historical
perspective requirement.
Historical (H) requirement - All students must take at least one
Foundation course that presents a historical perspective (H).
Students satisfy this requirement by taking an appropriately
designated course in any Foundation area. The same course may
meet both a Foundation area requirement and the historical and/or
the cultural perspective requirement.
The Thematic Sequence (MPT) requirement is met by
completing three related courses (usually nine hours) in an
approved Thematic Sequence outside the student's department of
major.
The Capstone Course (MPC) requirement is met by completing
three hours in an approved Capstone course during a student's
senior year.
The Honors Plan for Liberal Education
A traditional strength of Miami University is its emphasis on
liberal education. In a broad sense, liberal education refers to
education in a variety of disciplines/fields of study that is
designed to help students understand and creatively transform
human culture and society. While most Miami students develop
liberal education skills and abilities by completing the Global
Miami Plan, students in the University Honors Program develop
these key skills and abilities in an alternative way, which is known
as the Honors Plan for Liberal Education. Rather than fulfilling
requirements in specific subject areas (e.g., English), Honors
students meet three sets, or what Honors faculty and staff call
"tiers," of increasingly challenging student learning outcomes.
These outcomes are categorized into seven key competency areas,
which include the following: Written Communication, Inquiry,
Critical and Integrative Thinking, Intercultural Understanding,
Collaboration, Reflection, and Breadth of Learning. These areas of
competence are aligned with the essential learning outcomes of
liberal education that several recent national studies have
identified. Each competency area includes a foundational,
intermediate, and advanced student learning outcome.
Students can meet the Honors student learning outcomes
through any substantive and sustained experience they have
during college. Thus, they can meet outcomes through Honors
courses and Honors co-curricular experiences, non-honors courses
and non-honors co-curricular experiences, courses for major
requirements, courses for divisional requirements, elective
courses, academic research, study abroad, student teaching
experiences, and community engagement experiences. The
competency areas and student learning outcomes allow Honors
Liberal Education at Miami /23
students to think more creatively about and plan more
individually their liberal education. For example, ENG 111, which
is a foundational English Composition course that meets a Global
Miami Plan requirement, may very well allow an Honors student
to achieve the foundational student learning outcome in the
Written Communication competency area, but any course that
involves writing a substantive paper or a co-curricular activity
involving debate might be other ways that an Honors student
could achieve the foundational student learning outcome in the
Written Communication competency area.
Requirements of the Honors Plan
The Honors Plan is an integral part of a student’s curriculum.
Honors students meet the following set of requirements:
 Major Requirements
 School/Divisional Requirements (Arts and Sciences;
Business; Education, Health & Society; Engineering and
Applied Sciences; or Fine Arts)
 Liberal Education Requirements (i.e., Honors Plan, which is
in lieu of the Global Miami Plan)
 128 credit hours to graduate
To complete the University Honors Program and graduate
from the University Honors Program, students must:
Successfully complete an Honors Foundation course (i.e., AMS
180Y, AMS 180Z, or HON 181). These courses are designed to
orient students to the University Honors Program requirements
and philosophy.
a.
Write reflective narratives in your electronic portfolio to address
the three tiers of Honors student learning outcomes. Tier 1 consists
of introductory outcomes, tier 2 is dedicated to intermediate level
outcomes, and tier 3 includes advanced outcomes.
b. Complete a minimum of 9 approved Honors Experiences.* Honors
Experiences are learning opportunities that have gone through an
approval process that ensures they are aligned with the Honors
student learning outcomes. Like outcomes, Honors Experiences
are categorized in three tiers (introductory, intermediate and
advanced). [*Students who are admitted to the University Honors
Program after their first semester of college work with an Honors
adviser to determine the specific number of Honors experiences
they will need to complete.
c. Complete one Honors sequence. A sequence consists of a tier 1,
followed by a tier 2, followed by a tier 3 Honors Experience. The
three Honors Experiences that make up your sequence are part of
the total of 9 Honors Experiences that you need to complete.
d. Submit your Honors electronic portfolio for review and meet with
your honors adviser each year. During your meeting with your
honors adviser, you will record your progress and plan the next
steps in your educational journey.
All students who meet the above requirements will graduate
from the University Honors Program. Students who meet the
above requirements and also attain a cumulative grade point
average of 3.50 or higher when they graduate will also receive a
"University Honors" transcript notation.
Extended Study and Service-Learning in
Global Miami Plan Courses
Students may gain an extra credit hour in any Foundation
course, Thematic Sequence course, or Capstone for extended
academic work and/or Service-Learning activities directly
connected to the content and objectives of these courses. Students
are responsible for initiating the extra-hour proposals. Instructors
will determine whether the proposed work represents an extra
credit hour and if their teaching schedules and related professional
activities will permit them to sponsor and monitor these projects.
The maximum number of hours of extended study or
Service-Learning that can be applied to graduation is four;
students may propose and enroll in such courses no more than
once each semester.
Extended study and/or Plus One Option forms, which must
be completed by students and endorsed by sponsoring instructors
and department chairs, are available from the Office of Community
Engagement and Service. For more information, consult the Office
of Liberal Education, the Office of Community Engagement and
Service or www.muohio.edu/servicelearning.
Course Descriptions and Abbreviations
Foundation courses are listed below according to the area they
satisfy (English composition; fine arts, humanities; etc.). Some
Foundation courses will appear in two or more Foundation areas.
For example, ARC 188 is classified as a course in the fine arts as
well as one in the humanities; it appears, then, in Foundation IIA
(fine arts) and Foundation IIB (humanities). Students who take
such courses may use them to fulfill one Foundation area
requirement only.
I, II, III, IV, V: (Refers to Foundation courses outline.) Course
fulfills a part of one of the five major Foundation area
requirements (for example, I. English Composition).
A, B, or C: (Refers to Foundation courses outline.) Course fulfills a
part of a sub-area of one of the Foundation requirements (for
example: IIA. Fine Arts; IIB. Humanities; IIC. Social Science).
H: Fulfills the historical perspective requirement.
CUL: Fulfills the cultural perspective requirement.
LAB: (all uppercase letters): Fulfills the laboratory course
requirement for the Global Miami Plan.
Note: Other abbreviations and terms are explained in the Registering
for Courses and Courses of Instruction chapters.
Foundation Courses
Foundation I. English Composition (6 hours
minimum)
ENG 109 College Composition for Second-Language Writers (4)
ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (3)
Foundation II. Fine Arts, Humanities, Social
Science (9 semester hours)
IIA. Fine Arts (3 hours minimum)
ARC 107 Global Design (3) IIIB, Cul
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3) IIB, H
ARC 221,222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3) IIB,
H
ART 181 Concepts in Art (3)
ART/AMS 183 Images of America (3) IIB, Cul
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3) IIB, Cul, H
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3) IIB, H
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3) IIB, H
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3) IIB, H
ART 233 Global Perspectives on Dress (3) Cul
ART 256 Design, Perception, and Audience (3)
ART/WGS 282 Art and Politics (3) IIB, H
ART 283 Modern America (3) IIB, Cul
ART 286 China, Korea, and Japan (3) IIB, Cul, H
MUS/AMS 135 Understanding Jazz: Its History & Context (3) Cul, H
MUS 181 Music in our Lives (3)
MUS 184 Opera: Passport to the Liberal Arts (3) IIB, Cul
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul, H
MUS 186 Global Music for the I-Pod (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
MUS 188 The Music of Russia (3)
24/ Liberal Education at Miami
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3) H
MUS 211 History of Western Music (3) Cul, H
MUS/IMS 221 Music Technologies (3) V
MUS 287 Enter the Diva: Women in Music (3) IIB, Cul
SCA 111 Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking (3) V
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3) *
THE 103 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance (1)*
THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (3) H
* must be taken concurrently Language and Culture I
IIB. Humanities (3 hours minimum)
AAA 201 Introduction to Asian/Asian American Studies (3) IIC, IIIB, Cul,
H
AAA/REL 203 Religions of India (3) IIC, IIIB, Cul, H
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3) Cul, H
AMS 207 America - A Global Perspective (3) IIIB, Cul, H
AMS/ENG 247 Appalachian Literature (3) Cul
AMS/ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3) Cul
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3) IIA, H
ARC 221, 222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3) IIA,
H
ART/AMS 183 Images of America (3) IIA, Cul
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3) IIA, Cul, H
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3) IIA, H
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3) IIA, H
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3) IIA, H
ART/JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3) Cul, H
ART/WGS 282 Art and Politics (3) IIA, H
ART 283 Modern America (3) IIA, Cul
ART 286 China, Korea, and Japan (3) IIA, IIB, Cul, H
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian
Studies (3) Cul, H
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation (3) Cul
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3) Cul
CHI/JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3) Cul
CIT/CSE 262 Technology, Ethics, and Global Society (3) IIC
CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3) Cul, H
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) Cul, H
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) H
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM/FST/IDS 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3) Cul
COM/DST 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3) Cul
COM/FST 281 Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and
Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media (3) Cul
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)
ENG 122 Popular Literature (3)
ENG 123 Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENG 124 Introduction to Fiction (3)
ENG 125 Introduction to Drama (3) H
ENG 131, 132, 133 Life and Thought in English Literature (3, 3, 3) H
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
ENG 141, 142, 143 Life and Thought in American Literature (3, 3, 3) H
ENG 144 Major American Writers (3)
ENG 161 Literature and Politics (3)
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3) Cul
ENG 163 Literature and Travel (3) H
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3) H
ENG/DST 169 Disability Identity and the American Imagination (3) Cul
ENG/IMS 171 Humanities and Technology (3)
ENG 202 Varieties of American English: Dialect Diversity & Language
Change (3) Cul
ENG/IMS 238 Narrative & Digital Technology (3)
ENG/AMS 246 Native American Literature (3) Cul
ENG 251, 252 Life and Thought in European Literature (3, 3) H
ENG/LAS 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3) IIIB, Cul
ENG/AMS 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3) Cul, H
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Literature in Translation (3) Cul, H
FRE 202 Critical Analysis of French Culture (3) IIIB, Cul
FRE/GER/RUS 212; HST 211 Secular Jewish Culture From the
Enlightenment to Zionism (3) Cul, H
FRE/FST/GER 255 Visual Representations of the Holocaust (3) Cul, H
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) IIC, IIIB, Cul
GER 151 The German-American Experience (3) Cul, H
GER 231 Folk Fairy Tales and Literary Fairy Tales (3) Cul, H
GER 232 The Holocaust in German Literature, History, and Film (3) IIIB,
Cul, H
GER 251 German Literature in Translation: Changing Concepts of the Self
(3) Cul, H
GER 252 The German-Jewish Experience (3) Cul, H
GER/FST 261 German Film in Global Context (3) IIIB, Cul, H
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe Since 1870 (3) Cul,
H
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking
Europe and the U.S.A. (3) Cul, H
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (3, 3) Cul, H
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (3, 3) Cul, H
HST 197 World History To 1500 (3) IIIB, Cul, H
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3) IIIB, Cul, H
HST/BWS 224 Africa in History (3) Cul, H
HST/BWS 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3) Cul, H
HST 245 Making of Modern Europe, 1450-1750 (3) IIB, Cul, H
HST/LAS 260 Latin America in the United States (3) IIIB, Cul, H
HST 296 World History Since 1945 (3) IIIB, Cul, H
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3) Cul, H
ITL/AMS/FST 222 Italian American Culture (3) Cul
JPN 231 Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3) Cul, H
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
KNH/BWS 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (3)
MUS/AMS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Context (3) Cul, H
MUS 184 Opera: Passport to the Liberal Arts (3) IIB, Cul
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIA, IIIB, Cul, H
MUS 186 Global Music for the I-Pod (3) IIA, IIIB, Cul
MUS 287 Enter the Diva: Women in Music (3) IIA, Cul
PHL 101 Knowledge of World, God, and Morality (3)
PHL 103 Society and the Individual (3) H
PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (3) H
PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (3) H
PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India (4) Cul, H
PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (3)
POR/BWS/FST/LAS/MUS 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular
Music (3) IIIB, Cul
POR/BWS/ENG/WGS/FST 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women
(3) IIIB, Cul
REL 101 American Religious Encounters (3)
REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (3) H
REL 103 Themes in the History of Religion (3) H
REL/RUS 133 Imagining Russia (3) IIIB, Cul, H
REL 175 Introduction to the Critical Study of Biblical Literature (3) H
REL 186 Global Jewish Civilization (3) IIIB, Cul, H
REL 213 Religious and Social History of the Jewish People (3) H
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3) IIB, Cul
RUS/ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English
Translation (3)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
WGS 202 Introduction to GLBT Studies (3) Cul
WST 201 Self and Place (3) Cul
IIC. Social Science (3 hours minimum)
AAA 201 Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies (3) IIB, IIIB,
Cul, H
AAA/SOC 207 China and Globalization (3) IIIB, Cul
ATH 155 Introduction to Anthropology (4)
ATH 175 People of the World (3) IIIB, Cul
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3) IIIB, Cul
ATH 405 Food, Taste, and Desire (3) IIIB, Cul
BWS/GEO/REL 209 Civilization of Africa (3) Cul, H
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4) Cul, H
CIT/CSE 262 Technology, Ethics, and Global Society (3) IIB
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communications (3)
COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
ECO 131 Economic Perspectives on Inequality in America (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)*
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)*
EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational
Contexts (3)
EDP/DST/SOC 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3) Cul
ENG/COM 201 Language Awareness (3)
Liberal Education at Miami /25
FSW 206 Social Welfare: Impact on Diverse Groups (3)
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3) Cul
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3) CUL
GEO 207Civilization of the Middle East (3) Cul, H
GEO/HST/ITS/SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) Cul, H
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking
Europe and the U.S.A. (3) IIB, CUL, H
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3)
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3) Cul
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul, H
KNH 188 Physical Activity and Health (3)
KNH 206 AIDS: Etiology, Prevalence, and Prevention (3)
KNH 242 Personal Health (3)
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (3) H
KNH/BWS/SOC 279 African Americans in Sport (3) H
LAS 207 Latin America before 1910 (3) Cul, H
LAS 208/ATH 206 Introduction to Latin America (3) IIIB, Cul, H
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3)
POL 101 Politics and National Issues (3)
POL 102 Politics and Global Issues (3)
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (3) Cul
POL 159 U.S. Identity Politics (3) Cul
POL 241 American Political System (4)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
PSY 210 Psychology Across Cultures (3) IIIB, Cul
SJS/SOC 165 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3)
SOC 151 Social Relations (4)
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3)
SPA 127 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3)
SPA 211 Deaf Culture and Community (3) Cul
SPA/DST 212 Deaf Culture: Global, National and Local Issues (3) IIIB,
Cul
SPA 223 Theories of Language Development (3)
WGS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3) IIIB, Cul
* ECO 201 and 202 are a year course; the recommended sequence is 201,
202. This course sequence ordinarily should not be taken during the
freshman year.
Foundation III. Global Perspectives (6-9 hours)
IIIA. Study Abroad (6 hours)
Six hours of Foundation credit from any Miami-approved Study Abroad
program.
OR
IIIB. Global Courses (9 hours minimum)
G-Courses are specially designed to have a global perspective and help students develop
the ability to communicate and act respectfully across linguistic and cultural differences.
AAA 201 Introduction to Asian/Asian American Studies (3) IIB, IIC, Cul,
H
AAA/REL 203 Religions of India (3) IIB, Cul, H
AAA/SOC 207 China and Globalization (3) IIB, Cul
AMS 207 America - A Global Perspective (3) IIB, H
ARC 107 Global Design (3) IIA, Cul
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3) IIC, Cul
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3) IIC, Cul
ATH 405 Food, Taste, and Desire (3) IIC, Cul
BWS 156 Introduction to Africa (4) Cul
EAS 266 Metal on Metal: Engineering and Globalization in Heavy Metal
Music (3) V, Cul
ENG 108 U.S. Cultures & Composition for Second-Language Writers (5)
Cul
ENG/LAS 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3) IIB, Cul
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Culture in Translation (3) IIB, Cul, H
FRE 202 Critical Analysis of French Culture (3) IIB, Cul
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) IIC, Cul
GER 232 The Holocaust in German Literature, History, and Film (3) IIB,
Cul, H
GER/FST 261 German Film in Global Context (3) IIB, Cul, H
GTY 260 Global Aging (3) Cul
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3) IIB, Cul, H
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3) IIB, Cul, H
HST 245 Making of Modern Europe, 1450-1750 (3) IIB, Cul, H
HST/LAS 260 Latin America in the United States (3) IIB, H
HST 296 World History Since 1945 (3) IIB, Cul, H
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) IIC, Cul, H
LAS 208/ATH 206 Latin American Civilization (3) IIC, Cul, H
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIA, IIB, Cul, H
MUS 186 Global Music for the I-Pod (3) IIA, IIB, Cul
POR/BWS/FST/LAS/MUS 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular
Music (3) IIB, Cul
POR/BWS/ENG/WGS/FST 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women
(3) IIB, Cul
PSY 210 Psychology Across Cultures (3) IIC, Cul
REL/RUS 133 Imagining Russia (3) IIB, Cul, H
REL 186 Global Jewish Civilization (3) IIB, Cul, H
SJS/SOC 487 Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights (3)
SPA/DST 212 Deaf Culture: Global, National and Local Issues (3) IIC, Cul
WGS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3) IIC, Cul
See the Office of Liberal Education website
http://www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed for updates on courses meeting this requirement.
OR
IIIC. Global Clusters (9 hours minimum)
G-Clusters are predesigned groups of courses focused on a particular global issue or
theme. Thematic Sequences (see below), G-Clusters only fulfill Foundation requirements;
they do not meet Thematic Sequence requirements.
See the Office of Liberal Education website http://www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed for
updates on courses meeting this requirement.
Foundation IV. Natural Science (9 hours, must
include one laboratory course)
IVA. Biological Science (3 hours minimum)
BOT 101 Biotechnology: Coming of Age in the 21st Century (3)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics,
and Diversity (4) LAB
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular,
and Molecular Biology (4) LAB
BOT 121 Evolution: Just a theory? (3)
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3)
BOT 155 Field Botany (3) LAB
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3)
BOT 181 Medicinal and Therapeutic Plants (3)
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) LAB
MBI 111 Microorganisms and Human Diseases (3)
MBI 121 The Microbial World (3)
MBI 123 Experimenting with Microbes (1) LAB
MBI 131 Community Health Perspectives (2)
MBI 143 Laboratory Diagnosis of Disease (1) LAB
MBI 161 Elementary Medical Microbiology (4) LAB
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) LAB
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) LAB
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (3)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (4) LAB
ZOO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) LAB
IVB. Physical Science (3 hours minimum)
AER 101 Introduction to Aeronautics (3)
AER/PHY 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3)
CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (3) LAB
CHM 111L Chemistry in Modern Society Laboratory (1) LAB
CHM 131 Chemistry of Life Processes (4) LAB
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Laboratory (3, 2)
LAB
CHM 141R, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Laboratory (4, 2)
MPF
CHM 141M, 144M College Chemistry for Majors/Laboratory (3, 2) LAB
EDT 181, 182 Physical Science (4, 4) LAB
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environment (4) LAB
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) H
GLG 115L Understanding the Earth (1) LAB
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3)
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3)
26/ Liberal Education at Miami
PHY 101 Physics and Society (3)
PHY 103 Concepts in Physics Laboratory (1) LAB
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (3) H
PHY 121 Energy and Environment (3)
PHY 131 Physics for Music (3)
PHY 141 Physics in Sports (3)
PHY 171,172 College Physics (3, 3)
PHY 173, 174 College Physics Laboratory (1, 1) LAB
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (4, 4)
PHY 183,184 Physics Laboratory (1, 1) LAB
Foundation V. Mathematics, Formal Reasoning,
Technology (3 hours minimum)
ARC 212 Principles of Environmental Systems (3)
ATH 309/ENG 303/GER 309/SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (3)
CSE 151 Computers, Computer Science, and Society (3)
CSE 163 Introduction to Computer Concepts and Programming (3)
EAS 266 Metal on Metal: Engineering and Globalization in Heavy Metal
Music (3) IIIB, Cul
MTH 115 Mathematics for Teachers of Grades P-6 (4)
MTH 121 Finite Mathematical Models (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MUS/IMS 221 Music Technologies (3) IIA
PHL 273 Formal Logic (4)
SCA 111 Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking (3) IIA
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Foundation Courses That Meet the
Cultures (CUL) Requirement
AAA 201 Introduction to Asian/Asian American Studies (3) IIB, IIC, IIIB,
H
AAA/REL 203 Religions of India (3) IIB, IIIB, H
AAA/SOC 207 China and Globalization (3) IIB, IIIB
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3) IIB, H
ARC 107 Global Design (3) IIA, IIIB
ART/AMS 183 Images of America (3) IIA, IIB
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3) IIA, IIB, H
ART 233 Global Perspectives on Dress (3) IIA
ART/JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3) IIB, H
ART 283 Modern America (3) IIA, IIB
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3) IIC, IIIB
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3) IIC, IIIB
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian
Studies (3) IIB, H
ATH 405 Food, Taste, and Desire (3) IIC, IIIB
BWS/GEO/REL 209 Civilization of Africa (3) Cul, H
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4) IIC, H
BWS 156 Introduction to Africa (4) IIIB
CHI 251 Chinese Literature in English Translation (3) IIB
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3) IIB
CHI/JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in Translation (3) IIB
CLS 101 Greek Civilization (3) IIB
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) IIB
COM/DST 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3) IIB
COM/FST 281 Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and
Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media (3) IIB
COM/FST/IDS 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3) IIB
EAS 266 Metal on Metal: Engineering and Globalization in Heavy Metal
Music (3) IIIB, V
EDP 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3) IIB
ENG 108 U.S. Cultures & Composition for Second-Language Writers (5)
IIIB
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3) IIB
ENG/DST 169 Disability Identity (3) IIB
ENG 202 Varieties of English: Dialect Diversity and Language Change (3)
IIB
ENG 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3) IIB, H
ENG/AMS 246 Native American Literature (3) IIB
ENG/AMS 247 Appalachian Literature (3) IIB
ENG/AMS/AAA 248 Asian American Literature (3) IIB
ENG/LAS 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3) IIB, IIIB
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Literature in Translation (3) IIB, IIIB
FRE 202 Critical Analysis of French Culture (3) IIB, IIIB
FRE/GER/RUS 212; HST 211 Secular Jewish Culture From the
Enlightenment to Zionism (3) IIB, H
FRE/FST/GER 255 Visual Representations of the Holocaust (3) IIB, H
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) IIB, IIC, IIIB
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3) IIC
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3) IIC
GEO 207 Civilization of the Middle East (3) IIC, H
GEO/ITS/SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) IIC, H
GER 151 The German-American Experience (3) IIB, H
GER 231 Folk Fairy Tales and Literary Fairy Tales (3) IIB, H
GER 232 The Holocaust in German Literature, History, and Film (3) IIB,
IIIB, H
GER 251 German Literature in Translation: Changing Concepts of the
Self (3) IIB, H
GER 252 Jews and German Culture (3) IIB, H
GER/FST 261 German Film in Global Context (3) IIB, IIIB, H
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe: 1870 to Present (3)
IIB, H
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking
Europe and the U.S. (3) IIB, H
GTY 260 Global Aging (3) IIIB
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (3, 3) IIB, H
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (3, 3) IIB, H
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3) IIB, IIIB, H
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3) IIB, IIIB, H
HST/BWS 224 Africa in History (3) IIB, H
HST/BWS 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3) IIB, H
HST 245 The Making of Modern Europe (3) IIB, IIIB, H
HST/LAS 260 Latin America in the United States (3) IIB, IIIB, H
HST 296 World History Since 1945 (3) IIB, IIIB, H
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3) IIC
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3) IIB, H
ITL/AMS/FST 222 Italian American Culture (3) IIB
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) IIB, IIC, IIIB, H
JPN 231 Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3) IIB, H
LAS 207 Latin America before 1910 (3) IIC, H
LAS 208/ATH 206 Introduction to Latin America (3) IIC, IIIB, H
MUS/AMS 135 Understanding Jazz: Its History and Context (3) IIA, IIB,
IIIB, H
MUS 184 Opera: Passport to the Liberal Arts (3) IIA, IIB
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIA, IIB, IIIB, H
MUS 186 Global Music for the I-Pod (3) IIA, IIB, IIIB
MUS 211 History of Western Music I: Antiquity to Baroque (3) IIA, H
MUS 287 Enter the Diva: Women in Music (3) IIA, IIB
PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India and South Asia (3) IIB, H
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (4) IIC
POL 159 U.S. Identity Politics (3) IIC
POR/BWS/FST/LAS/MUS 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular
Music (3) IIB, IIIB
POR/BWS/ENG/WGS/FST 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women
(3) IIB, IIIB
PSY 210 Psychology Across Cultures (3) IIC, IIIB
REL/RUS 133 Imagining Russia (3) IIB, IIIB, H
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3) IIB, IIIB
REL 186 Global Judaism (3) IIB, IIIB, H
SPA 211 Deaf Culture and Community (3) IIC
SPA/DST 212 Deaf Culture: Global, National and Local Issues (3) IIC, IIIB
WGS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3) IIC, IIIB
WGS 202 Introduction to GLBT Studies (3) IIB
WST 201 Self and Place (3) IIB
Foundation Courses That Meet the
Historical Perspective (H) Requirement
AAA 201 Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies (3) IIB, IIC, IIIB,
Cul
AAA/REL 203 Religions of India (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3) IIB, Cul
AMS 207 America - A Global Perspective (3) IIB, IIIB, H
Liberal Education at Miami /27
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3) IIA, IIB
ARC 221, 222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3) IIA,
IIB
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3) IIA, IIB, Cul
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3) IIA, IIB
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3) IIA, IIB
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3) IIA, IIB
ART/JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3) IIB, Cul
ART 282 Art and Politics (3) IIA, IIB
ART 286 China, Korea, and Japan (3) IIA, IIB, Cul
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian
Studies (3) IIB, Cul
BWS/GEO/REL 209 Civilization of Africa (3) Cul, H
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4) IIC, Cul
CLS 101 Greek Civilization (3) IIB
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) IIB
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) IIB
ENG 125 Introduction to Drama (3) IIB
ENG 131, 132, 133 Life and Thought in English Literature (3, 3, 3) IIB
ENG 141, 142, 143 Life and Thought in American Literature (3, 3, 3) IIB
ENG 163 Literature and Travel (3) IIB
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3) IIB
ENG 251, 252 Life and Thought in European Literature (3, 3) IIB
ENG 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3) IIB, Cul
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Literature in Translation (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
FRE/GER/RUS 212; HST 211 Secular Jewish Culture From the
Enlightenment to Zionism (3) IIB, Cul
FRE/FST/GER 255 Visual Representations of the Holocaust (3) IIB, Cul
GEO 207 Civilization of the Middle East (3) IIC, Cul
GEO/ITS/SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) IIC, Cul
GER 151 The German-American Experience (3) IIB, Cul
GER 231 Folk Fairy Tales and Literary Fairy Tales (3) IIB, Cul
GER 232 The Holocaust in German Literature, History, and Film (3) IIB,
IIIB, Cul
GER 251 German Literature in Translation: Changing Concepts of the Self
(3) IIB, Cul
GER 252 Jews and German Culture (3) IIB, Cul
GER/FST 261 German Film in Global Context (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe: 1870 to Present (3)
IIB, Cul
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking
Europe and the U.S. (3) IIB, Cul
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) IVB
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (3, 3) IIB, Cul
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (3, 3) IIB, Cul
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
HST/BWS 224 Africa in History (3) IIB, Cul
HST/BWS 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3) IIB, Cul
HST 245 The Making of Modern Europe, 1450-1780 (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
HST/LAS 260 Latin America in the United States (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
HST 296 World History Since 1945 (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3) IIB, Cul
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) IIC, IIIB, Cul
JPN 231 Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3) IIB, Cul
KNH 276 The Meaning of Leisure (3) IIC
KNH 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (3) IIB
LAS 207 Latin America before 1910 (3) IIC, Cul
LAS 208/ATH 206 Introduction to Latin America (3) IIC, IIIB, Cul
MUS/AMS 135 Understanding Jazz: Its History and Context (3) IIA, Cul
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIA, IIB, IIIB, Cul
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3) IIA
MUS 211 History of Western Music I: Antiquity to Baroque (3) IIA, Cul
PHL 103 Society and the Individual (3) IIB
PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (3) IIB
PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (3) IIB
PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India and South Asia (3) IIB, Cul
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (3) IVB
REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (3) IIB
REL 103 Religion, History, and Society (3) IIB
REL/RUS 133 Imagining Russia (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
REL 175 Introduction to the Critical Study of Biblical Literature (3) IIB
REL 186 Global Judaism (3) IIB, IIIB, Cul
REL 213 Religious and Social History of the Jewish People (3) IIB
THE 191 Experiencing Theatre (3) IIA
Thematic Sequence (9 hours minimum)
A Thematic Sequence is a series of related courses (usually
three) that focuses on a theme or subject in a developmental way.
Each course builds or expands upon knowledge or perspective
gained from preceding courses, and some sequences prepare
students for Capstone experiences. The first course may be a
Foundation course and may count as hours in both Foundation and
Thematic Sequence requirements. (Should the Thematic Sequence
contain more than one Foundation course, only one of those
courses can be counted for both requirements.) In
interdepartmental Thematic Sequences, students must select those
courses that are offered outside their department of major. For
example, English majors who enroll in a Thematic Sequence
comprised of English and history courses must sign up for the
history courses.
Students must complete at least one Thematic Sequence
outside the department of their major. Exceptions to this
requirement include either students with majors in two different
academic departments or students with minors outside their
department of major. Students should consult divisional
requirements for further restrictions on Thematic Sequences.
Students who wish to meet the Thematic Sequence
requirement through a double major or a minor must complete the
second major or minor outside their department of major. A
student who uses a minor to complete the thematic sequence
requirement must have 9 hours in the minor outside the
department/program of his/her major, and at least 6 hours of
these courses at the 200 level or above.
Typically, you are expected to complete most of your
Foundation courses before beginning a Thematic Sequence. To
enroll in a sequence, contact the department.
The
Office
of
Liberal
Education
website
(www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed) provides a current listing of
Thematic Sequences. Students may propose their own Thematic
Sequences. See the office of Liberal Education website for details.
Thematic Sequences
ACC 1 A Language of Accounting
ACC 2 Financial Accounting and Reporting
AES 1 Air Power and National Security
ARB 1 Developing Language Skills in Arabic
ART 2 Ceramics Studio
ART 3 Metals Studio
ART 4 Sculpture Studio
ART 5 Three-Dimensional Art Studio
ATH 1 Earth, Ecology, and Human Culture
ATH 3 World Cultures
ATH 4 World Cultures, Policy, and Ecology
ATH 5 World Cultures and Social Relations
BLS 1 Law and Commerce
BOT 1 Conservation and the Environment
BOT 2 Molecular Processes: From Cells to Whole Plants
BOT 3 Plant Ecology
BOT 4 Plant Structure and Development
CHI 1 Developing Language Skills in Chinese
CHM 1 Chemistry of Environmental Measurements
CHM 2 Chemistry of Life Processes
CLS 1 Classical Civilization
CLS 2 Classical Literature
CLS 3 The Classical World: Words and Images
CLS 4 The Classical World: Identify and Experience
COM 1 Relational Communication and Development in Modern Society
COM 3 Contexts of Mass Media
COM 4 Communication in Business and Society (offered Summer only)
CPE 1 Chemical Engineering Principles
CSE 2 Computer Systems
CSE 3 Mathematical and Computer Modeling
CSE 4 Website and Game Technology
ECO 1 Economics of Labor Markets
28/ Liberal Education at Miami
ECO 2 Markets, Institutions, and the Role of Government
ECO 3 Business Cycles, Economic Welfare, and Macroeconomic Policy
ECO 4 Exchange, Growth, and Development in the Global Economy
ECO 5 Sustainable Systems
ECO 6 Microeconomic Perspectives
EDL 1 Cultural Studies and Public Life
EDP 1 Developmental, Social, and Educational Patterns in Individuals
with Exceptionalities
EDP 2 Educational Technology and Instructional Design
ENG 1 Victorian Literature and Culture
ENG 2 Women and Literature
ENG 3 American Life and Culture Since World War II
ENG 4 Film in Popular Culture
ENG 5 Language and Literacy
ENG 6 Modernism
ENG 7 The Romantic Era
ENG 8 African American History and Literature
ENG 9 Writing for Specialized Audiences: Print and Online Design and
Composition
ENG 10 Italy and the Renaissance
ESP 1 Entrepreneurship in Different Contexts
FRE 1 French Cultural Studies (with FRE Capstone)
FRE 2 French Cultural Studies (without FRE Capstone)
FRE 3 European Cinema
FSW 1 Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families
(temporarily unavailable on Oxford campus)
FSW 3 Families and Sexuality Across the Life Course
FSW 4 Children in Families
GEO 1 Urban Geography
GEO 2 Earth's Physical Environment: Geographic Patterns and Processes
GEO 3 Geographic Change
GEO 4 Global Forces in Regional Contexts
GER 1 Culture, Literature, and Language of German Speaking Europe
GER 3 Developing Language Skills in German
GLG 1 Oceanography
GLG 2 The Water Planet
GLG 3 Plate Tectonics
GTY 2 Aging in Diverse Contexts
GTY 3 Health and Aging
HST 1 Medieval Studies
HST 2 Women and Gender in History
HST 3 Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (cross-listed with
POL 7)
IMS 4 Perspectives on Interactive Media
ISA 1 Quantitative Concepts for Managerial Decision Making
ISA 2 Applied Business Statistics
ISA 3 Web Mining and Knowledge Management
ISA 4 Applications Integration With Enterprise Systems
ITL 1 Italy in the Renaissance
JPN 1 Developing Language Skills in Japanese
JST 1 Jewish Studies
KNH 1 Biophysical Health Across the Lifespan
LAS 1 Modern Latin American Development
LAS 2 People and Power in the Americas
LED 1 Urban Culture and Service-Learning
MBI 1 Biomedical Science
MBI 2 Molecular Genetics
MGT 1 Dynamics of Human Behavior in Organizations
MKT 5 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing
MTH 1 Axioms, Theorems, and Proof in Geometry and Algebra
MTH 2 Basic Mathematical Tools for Science
MTH 3 Almost Linear Structures: Models for Physical Science
MUS 1 The Performance of Music
MUS 2 Music Composition
MUS 3 African and African-Derived Music in the Western World
NSC 1 Naval Science: History of Warfare
NSC 2 Naval Science: War-An Extension of Politics
NSC 3 The Naval Sciences-An Integrated Study of Naval Engineering,
Navigation, and Piloting
PHL 1 Ethics
PHL 4 Metaphysics and Epistemology
PHL 5 Reasoning
PHY 1 The Physical World: Contemporary Physics
PHY 2 Your Place in the Universe
POL 1 Comparative Analysis of Foreign Policy
POL 3 National Political Institutions
POL 7 Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (cross-listed with
HST 3)
PSY 1 Perspectives on Psychopathology
PSY 2 Patterns in Human Development
PSY 4 Developmental Patterns in Adulthood
PSY 5 Cognition: Understanding and Improving Thought
PSY 6 Applied Leadership and Pedagogy
REL 1 Religion and American Life
REL 2 Historical and Comparative Study of Religion
REL 3 Religion and Philosophy of Buddhist Asia
REL 5 Jewish Civilization Through History
RUS 1 Russia and the Soviet Union
RUS 2 Russian Culture
RUS 3 Developing Language Skills in Russian
SBI 1 Business Institute for Non-Business Students
SCA 1 Experiencing Arts and Culture
SCA 2 Principles in Innovation, Creativity, and Design Thinking
SDT 1 Self Designed Thematic Sequence
SJS 1 Social Justice and Inequalities
SJS 2 Social Justice, Law and Crime
SOC 2 Applied Social Science Methods
SOC 3 Sociological Perspectives on Inequality
SOC 4 Sociological Perspectives on Criminality and Deviance
SOC 5 Gender and Family Issues
SPA 2 Exploring Social, Emotional, and Communication Consequences in
Special Populations
SPN 1 Literature and Culture in Spain
SPN 2 Literature and Culture in Spanish America
SPN 3 Spanish Language and Culture
STA 1 Quality Issues in Contemporary Business and Industry
STA 2 Applied Statistics
THE 1 Modern Theatre and Drama
WGS 1 Women and the World
WGS 2 Scholarly Studies of Gender and Sexuality
WST 1 Lenses and Legacies - Integrating Knowledge
ZOO 1 Concepts in Physiology
ZOO 2 Animal Diversity
Thematic Sequences Available at Dolibois
European Campus in Luxembourg
For information, contact the Oxford campus coordinator
(513-529-5050).
LUX 3 European Culture and Society (Offered during the semester
programs and summer workshop)
Descriptions of Thematic Sequences
ACC 1 A Language of Accounting.
Develops in non-business majors an ability to read and understand
general-purpose external financial statements and internal
managerial accounting reports for businesses and not-for-profit
organizations. As such financial data are widely disseminated across
all contexts in our society, a knowledge of the language of
accounting is useful in a professional career and personal life. The
focus is on using and interpreting, rather than preparing, financial
statements and internal accounting reports.
1. ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3); and
2. ACC 222 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3); and
3. ACC 468 Accounting for Governmental Operations (2); and
4. ACC 469 Accounting for Non-Governmental Not-For-Profit
Organizations (1)
Note: Not open to business majors.
ACC 2 Financial Accounting and Reporting.
Develops in business majors as well as non-business majors an
ability to read and understand general-purpose financial statements
of businesses, ranging from large publicly traded corporations to
small privately held companies. As such financial information is
widely disseminated, an understanding of financial statements is
useful in a professional career and personal life. The sequence
progresses from an introductory level, which focuses on using and
interpreting financial statements, through intermediate and
Liberal Education at Miami /29
advanced levels, which examine the impact of more complex
transactions and events on financial statements.
1. ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3); and
2. ACC 321 Intermediate Financial Accounting (3); and
3. ACC 422 Financial Accounting Research (3)
Note: Not open to business majors.
AES 1 Air Power and National Security.
Provides students opportunity to examine critically the definitions
of national security and how national security policies affect-and are
affected by-the context of international politics. The sequence
examines, in particular, how the United States Air Force plays a
major role in formulating national security policies.
1. POL 271 World Politics (MPF) (4); and
2. AES 221, 222 The Development of Air Power (1, 1); and
3. POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy (3); and
4. AES 431 National Security Forces in Contemporary
American Society (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.
ARB 1 Developing Language Skills in Arabic.
For students who have completed the first two semesters of
college-level Arabic language or the equivalent. This sequence
develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a
variety of materials drawn from textbooks, fiction, the Internet and
journalism as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by
small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may
not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.
1. ARB 201 Intermediate Modern Arabic (3); and
2. ARB 202 Intermediate Modern Arabic (3); and
3. ARB 301 Advanced Arabic (3)
ART 2 Ceramics Studio.
Explores and develops concepts, techniques, materials, methods,
and critical aesthetic thinking as applied to the process of making
utilitarian or sculptural ceramics. Ceramics as a nonverbal visual
language is taught through research, production, viewing,
interaction, and verbal critique with a focus on further development
toward a significant personal expression at the 300 level.
Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102
Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).
1. ART 261 Ceramics I (3); and
2. ART 361 Ceramics II (3); and
3. ART 362 Ceramics III (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.
ART 3 Metals Studio.
Explores and develops concepts, critical aesthetic thinking, methods,
techniques, and materials as applied to the process of designing and
making of jewelry, holloware, as well as functional and
nonfunctional objects in non-precious and precious metals. Metals as
a visual language is taught through research, interaction,
production, and verbal critique with a focus on further development
toward a more significant personal expression at the 300 level.
Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102
Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).
1. ART 264 Jewelry Design and Metals I (3); and
2. ART 364 Jewelry Design and Metals II (3); and
3. ART 365 Jewelry Design and Metals III (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.
ART 4 Sculpture Studio.
Explores concepts and develops critical aesthetic thinking, methods,
techniques, and materials as applied to the process of making
sculpture. Sculpture, as a visual language, is taught through
viewing, research, interaction, production, and verbal critique with
focus on further development toward significant personal
expression at the 300 level.
Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102
Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).
1. ART 271 Introduction to Sculpture I (3); and
2. ART 371 Sculpture II (3); and
3. ART 372 Sculpture III (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.
ART 5 Three-Dimensional Art Studio.
Explores and develops concepts, techniques, materials, methods,
and critical aesthetic thinking as applied to the process of making
three-dimensional objects. Three-dimensional art as a nonverbal
language is taught through research, production, viewing,
interaction, and verbal critique with a focus on further development
toward a significant personal expression. Begins with the
departmental core course then provides a broad experience of
working in three disciplines: metals, ceramics, and sculpture.
Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102
Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).
Courses may be taken in any order:
1. ART 261 Ceramics I (3); and
2. ART 264 Jewelry Design & Metals I (3); and
3. ART 271 Sculpture I (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.
ATH 1 Earth, Ecology, and Human Culture.
Examines some of the complex interrelationships of human culture
with the earth. Because cultural assumptions have roots in religion,
philosophy, politics, and economics, the sequence explores ways in
which basic ideas in these fields influence our understanding of our
relation to the earth, its biosphere, history, and resources.
1. PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4); and
2. Two from the following:
ATH 371 Anthropology of Parks and Protected Areas (3),
or
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3), or
GEO 271 Humans and Natural Resources (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy. Majors in
anthropology or in the departments of Geography or Geology &
Environmental Earth Science must select a minimum of nine hours
outside their department of major.
ATH 3 World Cultures.
Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and how
anthropologists interpret that diversity in marriage and family
patterns, political and economic organizations, and symbol systems.
Acquaints you with various perspectives anthropologists use to
understand human cultural variability. The final course allows you
to pursue cultural diversity in one of the world's major culture areas
or in the relations between culture and one specific aspect of life for
all people, such as personality, environment, or cognition.
1. ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3) (MPF), or
ATH 185 Cultural diversity in the US (3) (MPF); and
2. ATH 231 Perspectives on Culture (3); and
3. ATH 303 Native American Culture (4), or
ATH 304 Native North America: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives
(3), or
ATH 306 Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives
(3), or
ATH 308 South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives (3), or
ATH/BWS/LAS/WGS 325 Identity: Race, Gender, Class
(3), or
ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3), or
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3), or
ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3), or
ATH 335L Multiculturalism in Europe: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 348 Introduction to Medical Anthropology (3), or
ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions (3),
ATH 368 Key Questions in Psychological Anthropology
(3), or
ATH 378 Doctors, Clinics, and Epidemics (3), or
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3), or
ATH 388 Culture, Art, and Artifacts (3), or
ATH 405 Food, Taste, and Desire (3), or
ATH 428 Anthropology of Women's Health (3), or
ATH 434 Anthropology of Democracy & Citizenship (3),
30/ Liberal Education at Miami
or
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
Note: Not open to anthropology majors.
ATH 4 World Cultures, Policy, and Ecology.
Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and envelops
anthropological approaches to understanding diversity in political,
economic and environmental organization and practice.
1. ATH 155 Introduction to Anthropology (4), or
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3), or
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3); and
2. One of the following courses on a World Area:
ATH 303 Native American Cultures (4), or
ATH 304 Native North America: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives
(3), or
ATH 306 Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives
(3), or
ATH 308 South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives (3), or
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3), or
ATH 364 Language and Cultures in Native North
America (3), or
ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions (3); and
3. Take one of the following courses on anthropological topics
in world cultures:
ATH 409 Sustainability: European challenges and
strategies (3), or
ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3), or
ATH 431 Origins of the State (3), or
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
Note: Not open to anthropology majors.
ATH 5 World Cultures and Social Relations.
Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and develops
anthropological approaches to understanding diversity in social and
economic organization, marriage and family patterns, and other
facets and forums for social relations.
1. ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3), or
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3); and
2. One of the following courses on a World Area:
ATH 303 Native American Cultures (4), or
ATH 304 Native North America: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives
(3), or
ATH 306 Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives
(3), or
ATH 308 South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives (3), or
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3), or
ATH 335L Multiculturalism in Europe: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
ATH 364 Language and Cultures in Native North
America (3), or
ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions (3); and
3. One of the following courses on anthropological topics in
world cultures:
ATH/ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3), or
ATH/BWS/LAS/WGS 325 Identity: Race, Gender, Class,
Sexuality (3);
ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3), or
ATH 348 Introduction to Medical Anthropology (3), or
ATH 368 Key Questions in Psychological Anthropology
(3), or
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism (3), or
ATH 388 Culture, Art, and Artifacts (3), or
ATH 403 Anthropology of Religion (3), or
ATH 405 Food, Taste, and Desire (3), or
ATH 428 Anthropology of Women's Health (3), or
ATH 434 Anthropology of Democracy & Citizenship (3)
Note: Not open to anthropology majors.
BLS 1 Law and Commerce.
Examines legal theory, history, and institutions as they relate to
American culture, society and business. Focuses on why and how
"American law" developed, how and why it is applied, how and
why the law is evolving, and how and why it impacts commerce.
Applies legal principles to analyze, identify and solve legal
problems arising in common business activity. Emphasizes in-depth
study of legal rules, rationale, and application in substantive areas of
law and commerce. Acquaints potential law students with legal
thinking and application in substantive areas of law and commerce.
Acquaints potential law students with legal thinking and concepts.
1. BLS 342 Legal Environment of Business (3)*; and
2. BLS 442 Business Associations and Commercial Law (3);
and
3. ECO 385 Government and Business (3), or
BLS 437 Cyberlaw (3), or
BLS 443 Property Law (3), or
BLS 462 Estates, Wills, and Trusts (3), or
BLS 464 International Business Law (3), or
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
* Certain sections of BLS 342 have seats designated for non-business
majors who wish to enroll in the sequence. Please contact Dr. Daniel
Herron, 14 Upham (513-529-1574) for admission to these sections.
Note: Not open to majors in business.
BOT 1 Conservation and the Environment.
Focuses on the challenge of reconciling increasing demands on
resources with limitations on resource availability, and explores
conservation as it pertains to the environment from a biological and
social science perspective, including a historical overview. The first
course, chosen from three options, is also a Foundation course in the
biological science area. The second course integrates ecological,
socioeconomic, and policy perspectives on the use and management
of natural resources. The third course focuses on applied problem
solving.
1. BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3) (MPF), or
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3) (MPF), or
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (3) (MPF); and
2. GEO 271 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource
Conservation (3); and
3. IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental
Science (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography. Majors in
the Department of Botany must select ZOO 121 at the first level;
majors in the Department of Zoology must select a botany course at
the first level.
BOT 2 Molecular Processes: From Cells to Whole Plants.
A contemporary consideration of how plants work mechanistically.
Combines molecular and subcellular structure and function with
physical and chemical measurements of underlying genetic and
physiological controls. Deals with establishment, replication,
maintenance, coordination, and adaptive responses of plants at
organizational levels ranging from molecules to whole plants.
1. BOT 191 General Botany (4) (MPF), or
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure,
Function,
Cellular, and Molecular Biology (4) (MPF); and
2. BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology
(4); and
3. BOT/ZOO 342 Genetics (3), or
BOT 425 Plant Physiology (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Botany. Majors in the
Department of Zoology must take BOT 342 or BOT 425 at the third
level.
BOT 3 Plant Ecology.
Provides an understanding of how plants interact with the
environment, other plants, and other organisms. Included is study of
the evolution of plant traits that are important in these interactions
and factors that influence plant distributions at global and local
Liberal Education at Miami /31
scales. Several levels of organization are covered, including
individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, and landscapes.
1. BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4) (MPF), or
BOT 191 General Botany (4) (MPF); and
2. BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere
(4); and
3. BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3), or
BOT/GEO 431 Global Plant Diversity (3), or
BOT/GEO 432 Ecoregions of North America (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Botany. Majors in the
Departments of Zoology and Microbiology must select a course
outside the department of major at the first level.
BOT 4 Plant Structure and Development.
In order to appreciate the unique role that plants play in the world's
ecosystems, it is important to understand plant structure and
development. This sequence allows students to consider plants from
the molecular and cellular level to the tissue and organ level. It
illustrates how evolutionary forces have resulted in exquisite
adaptations in plant form and function.
1.
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure,
Function (4) (MPF), or
BOT 191 General Botany (4) (MPF); and
2. BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology
(4); and
3. BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (3), or
BOT 402 Plant Anatomy (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Botany. Majors in the
Departments of Zoology and Microbiology must select a course
outside the department of major at the first level.
CHI 1 Developing Language Skills in Chinese.
For students who have completed the first two semesters of
college-level Chinese language or the equivalent. This sequence
develops speaking, listening, reading and writing ability using a
variety of materials drawn from textbooks as well as multimedia.
The courses are characterized by small sections and in-class and
out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no credit
and must be taken in order.
1. CHI 201 Intermediate Chinese I (3); and
2. CHI 202 Intermediate Chinese II (3); and
3. CHI 301 Chinese Conversation, Composition, Reading (3)
CHM 1 Chemistry of Environmental Measurements.
Enhances
theoretical
knowledge
toward
understanding
environmental chemical issues and provides a foundation for
learning followed by systematic investigation of advanced concepts
in chemistry. Allows accomplished students to take alternative
courses.
1. CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry
Laboratory (3, 2), or
CHM 142M, 161 Inorganic Chemistry, Quantitative
Analysis (4, 2); and
2. CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4), or
CHM 241, 244 Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry
Laboratory (3, 2), or
CHM 251, 254 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors,
Laboratory (3, 3); and
3. CHM 363, 364 Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry
Laboratory (3, 2)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry.
CHM 2 Chemistry of Life Processes.
Enhances
theoretical
knowledge
toward
understanding
biochemistry and provides a foundation for learning followed by the
systematic investigation of advanced concepts in chemistry. Allows
accomplished students to take alternative courses.
Prerequisite: CHM 141, 144 or 151, 153 (all Foundation courses);
alternative courses require additional prerequisites.
1. CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry
Laboratory (3, 2), or
CHM 142M, 161 Inorganic Chemistry,
Quantitative Analysis (4, 2); and
2. CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4), or
CHM 241, 244 Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry
Laboratory (3, 2), or
CHM 251, 254 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors,
Laboratory (3, 3); and
3. CHM 332 Outlines in Biochemistry (4), or
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4), or
CHM 433 Biochemistry (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry.
CLS 1 Classical Civilization.
Combines a general introduction to classical civilization and an
in-depth encounter with Greco-Roman civilization, focusing on
elements that provide opportunities for observing differences
between modern and ancient civilization. Uses literature,
monuments, legal documents, art, and sculpture to examine key
examples of social organization, including the status of women, legal
structures, and urban organization.
1. CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
(MPF), or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) (MPF), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) (MPF);
and
2. ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3),or
CLS 210E Eureka: Monumental Discoveries in the Attics
of Antiquity (3), or
CLS 210J Art and Archaeology of Egypt (3),or
CLS 210R Race and Ethnicity in Antiquity (3), or
CLS 235 Women in Antiquity (3); and
3. ART 382 Greek and Roman Painting (3), or
ART 383 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3), or
CLS 310D Democracy and Identity in Ancient Athens (3),
or
CLS 310E Conflict in Greco-Roman Egypt (3), or
CLS 310I Ancient Imperialism (3), or
CLS 310T Arts and Empire in the Classical World and
Russia (3), or
CLS 321 Justice and the Law (3), or
CLS 322 Growing Old in Greece and Rome (3), or
REL 334 Women's Religious Experiences in the Ancient
Mediterranean World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics. Majors in
the departments of Art and Comparative Religion must select a
minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.
CLS 2 Classical Literature.
Provides an overview of Greek or Roman literature, then examines
in detail the historical evolution of specific genres, such as tragedy,
drama, and epic. Attention to historical forces that brought these
genres into existence and those forces that affected their growth and
development.
1. CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
(MPF), or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) (MPF), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) (MPF);
and
2. CLS 210/RUS 250 Classical Tradition in Russian Poetry (3),
or
CLS 211 Greek and Roman Epic (3), or
CLS 212 Greek Tragedy (3), or
CLS 213 Greek and Roman Comedy (3), or
CLS 215 Roman Historians (3); and
3. CLS 310P From the Lair of the Cyclops to the Surface of the
Moon: Travel and Self-Definition in Antiquity (3), or
CLS 310S Egypt in Greco-Roman History and Fiction (3),
or
CLS 310T Arts and Empire in the Classical World and
Russia (3), or
CLS 316 Greek and Roman Lyric Poetry (3), or
CLS 317 Greek and Roman Philosophical Writers (3), or
CLS 331 From Epic to Romance (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics.
32/ Liberal Education at Miami
CLS 3 The Classical World: Words and Images.
Classical antiquity was uniquely creative in producing literary and
visual forms (epic, lyric, tragedy, comedy, history, rhetoric,
philosophic dialogue and the philosophic treatise) by which it
communicated socially rooted visions and ideals. This sequence
fosters students’ grasp of the role form plays in shaping what any
culture expresses at the same time it focuses on the historically
determined values and visions that were thus expressed. Students
will examine ways in which basic forms interact and evolve into new
forms (e.g. epic to novel, public speaking in epic and history to
full-fledged rhetoric) and the subsequent reception of these forms in
other ancient and modern cultures. They will also concentrate on
particular conflicts over the ways in which different forms compete
for ideological supremacy.
1. CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3),
or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3); and
2. CLS 211 Greek and Roman Epic (3), or
CLS 212 Greek and Roman Tragedy (3), or
CLS 213 Greek and Roman Comedy (3), or
CLS 215 Greek and Roman Historians (3), or
CLS 216 Greek and Roman Erotic Poetry
ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3), or
ART 382 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3), or
ART 383 Greek and Roman Painting (3); and
3. CLS 310 A , or
CLS 331 From Epic to Romance (3), or
CLS 323, or
CLS 334 Egypt in Greco-Roman History and Fiction (3), or
ENG 314 Playwriting (4)
CLS 4 The Classical World: Identity and Experience.
Specific to Classical antiquity was a set of deeply influential
institutions, practices, and ideological elaborations that both drew
from and interacted with a wide range of other Mediterranean
cultures in shaping the day-to-day identities and life experiences of
Greeks and Romans as well as the cultures on which they impacted.
In this sequence, students explore some of the most basic issues (e.g.
gender, religion, public entertainments, race and ethnicity, imperial
conquest and domination) associated with these influences and their
more specialized consequences in specific geographical, cultural and
institutional areas (e.g. Egypt, Jews in Antiquity, The Construction
of Age Identities).
1. CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3),
or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3); and
2. CLS 210R Race& Ethnicity in Antiquity (3), or
CLS 235 Women In Antiquity (3), or
CLS 210U Ancient Sexuality, or
CLS 235 Women in Antiquity (3); and
3. CLS 310E Conflict in Greco-Roman Egypt (3),or
CLS 310J Jews Among Greeks & Romans (3), or
CLS 332 Mythology and the Arts (3), or
CLS 333 The Greeks in the Near East and Central Asia (3)
COM 1 Relational Communication and Development in Modern
Society.
Explores how people use verbal and nonverbal communication to
define, negotiate, and change their interpersonal relationships. Seeks
to enhance an appreciation of the importance of context and
diversity by exploring cultural and individual difference variables,
employing a transactional perspective, and examining diverse
relational situations.
1. COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)
(MPF); and
2. COM 336 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3); and
3. COM 428 Communication in Conflict Management (3), or
COM 434 Nonverbal Communication (3), or
FSW/WGS 361 Couple Relationships: Diversity and
Change (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Communication.
Majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work must
select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.
COM 3 Contexts of Mass Media.
Focuses on ways the mass media have developed and the ways
scholars have sought to explain the impact of media on society and
society's impact on media. Explores how the media are historically
situated and how political, economic, social and cultural structures,
and decisions have led to the type of media that have developed in
this country and around the world.
1. COM 143 Introduction to Media (3) (MPF); and
2. COM 215 Media History (3); and
3. COM 212 Media Representation (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Communication.
COM 4 Communication in Business and Society (Offered summer
only).
This unique and intense program is designed to allow students to
gain an understanding of the role of communication in business
contexts, how it establishes relationships, and the influence on
society that evolves from business communication. Communication
is explored in multiple contexts ranging from interpersonal and
small group, to communication within organizations, and
communication with publics outside the organization. Ethics and
diversity issues are considered throughout the sequence of classes.
1. COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)
(MPF); and
2. COM 259 Introduction to Strategic Communication and
Public Relations; and
3. COM 339 Introduction to Organizational Communication
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Communication.
(Offered summer only).
CPE 1 Chemical Engineering Principles.
Provides an understanding of basic chemical engineering principles,
concepts, and methodologies and how they are applied to the design
and performance analysis of industrial processes.
Prerequisite: (CPE 204) grade of C- or better in CHM 141, 142; MTH 151,
251; and CSE 141 or competence in spreadsheets. (CPE/MME 313) grade
of C- or better in PHY 182, and CPE 204. (CPE/MME 403) grade of C- or
better in MME/CPE 313, MTH 245, and MME/CPE 314.
1. CPE 204 Material and Energy Balances (3); and
2. CPE/MME 313 Fluid Mechanics (3); and
3. CPE/MME 403 Heat Transfer (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemical and Paper
Engineering. Majors in the Department Manufacturing Engineering
must take CPE 313 at the second level.
CSE 2 Computer Programming.
Because computer information systems usually are not developed by
single individuals, it is likely that you will participate on a
development team during your professional life. With this sequence,
you are in a unique position to understand, assist, and contribute to
the development of information systems that improve your own and
your colleagues' way of work.
Prerequisite: Ability to program.
1. CSE 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem
Solving (3); and
2. CSE 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3); and
3. CSE 252 Web Application Programming (3), or
CSE 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Computer Science
and Software Engineering.
CSE 3 Mathematical and Computer Modeling.
Enhances your ability to approach applied problems in a
quantitative way. Use your knowledge of calculus, probability,
statistics, and computing to develop quantitative models of problem
situations from a variety of areas. The first course provides an
introduction to quantitative modeling, using calculus. All elements
of the problem situation are represented as constants. The second
course uses probability and statistics to create stochastic models in
which some elements of the problem are represented as random
variables. The third course introduces the use of computers to create
simulation models of the problem situation.
1. CSE 273 Optimization Modeling (3); and
2. CSE 372 Stochastic Modeling (3); and
Liberal Education at Miami /33
3. CSE 471 Simulation (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Computer Science
and Software Engineering.
CSE 4 Website and Game Technology.
Given the prevalence on computing devices, it is important that we
understand what they do and how they do it. The web site and
computer game technology thematic sequence is designed to
provide students with an intuitive understanding of how computer
software is created and designed and how it functions to make
possible common applications such as computer games and the
World Wide Web. After learning the concepts and skills of computer
programming, students will apply this knowledge to design and
create a variety of computer games and web applications.
1. Any one of the following introductory courses:
CSE 153 Introduction to C/C++ Programming, or
CSE 163 Introduction to Computer Concepts and
Programming, or
CSE 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem
Solving; and
2. CSE 251 Computational Modeling and Simulation (3); and
3. CSE 252 Web Application Programming (3)
ECO 1 Economics of Labor Markets.
Provides an understanding of how labor markets work, the impact
and/or need for employment related public policies, and why
employment outcomes (wages, benefits, hours worked, retirement
ages) differ across time and people. Primarily provides
understanding from an economic perspective.
1. ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) (MPF); and
2 ECO 361 Labor Economics (3); and
3. ECO 462 The Economics of Compensation, Discrimination,
and Unionization (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
ECO 2 Markets, Institutions, and the Role of Government.
In some situations, competitive markets fail to allocate resources
efficiently. In some instances, production is concentrated in the
hands of a few firms that may restrain output and raise prices. In
other cases, market prices fail to fully reflect the costs or benefits
associated with the consumption or production of certain goods.
This arises in the case of externalities or government in ensuring
allocative efficiency.
1. ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) (MPF); and
2. Two from the following:
ECO 321 American Industries and Issues (3), or
ECO 385 Government and Business (3), or
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
ECO 3 Business Cycles, Economic Welfare, and Macroeconomic Policy.
Concern for the material well-being of individuals motivates the
study of aggregates since fluctuations in these aggregates and
changes in their growth rates significantly affect welfare. Focuses on
possible government initiatives to influence the behavior of
economic aggregates and enhance welfare. Addresses rationale for
government intervention, practical difficulties associated with actual
implementation of policy, and evaluation of policy. Macroeconomic
history and current policy discussions provide many applications.
Provides understanding of motives, pitfalls, and history of
macroeconomic policy.
1. ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) (MPF); and
2. ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3); and
3. ECO 418 Monetary Theory and Policy (3), or
ECO 419 Business Cycles (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
ECO 4 Exchange, Growth, and Development in the Global Economy.
Evolution of the modern world economy has been influenced not
only by technical and institutional changes within national
economics but also by interactions among them. Substantial
international flows of people, goods, capital, and technology, since
the beginning of the modern era, have helped to set the terms for
development of national patterns of economic growth and
specialization. Introduces formal analysis of international economic
relations in the areas of trade, financial flows, and government
policies, and then encourages examination of international economic
developments in various historical and institutional settings.
1. ECO 344 International Economic Relations (3); and
2. Two from the following:
ECO 341 Economic History of Modern Europe (3), or
ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems (3), or
ECO 347 Economic Development (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
ECO 5 Sustainable Systems.
Sustainability requires that business and resource use be conducted
in ways that meet the needs of the enterprise and its stakeholders
today, while protecting, sustaining, and enhancing human resources
and the environment for the future. Provides scientific, philosophic,
and economic principles necessary to appreciate a sustainable
system. Sequence of four courses.
1. BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and the Environment (3) (MPF),
or
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (4) (MPF), or
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (MPF) (3); and
2. GEO 271 Conservation of Natural Resources (3); and
3. PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4); and
4. ECO 406 Environmental Economics (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Geography or
Philosophy, or in the School of Business. Majors in the departments
of Botany, Zoology, and Geology must select a course outside the
department of their major at the first level.
ECO 6 Microeconomic Perspectives.
Introduces theory and practice of microeconomics and develops,
both intuitively and formally, the prevailing paradigm for
describing decision-making processes of microeconomics agents.
Students see how the “microeconomic way of thinking” can be
applied to a wide variety of topical political and social issues and
discover how it provides a coherent and consistent structure for
understanding, analyzing, and dealing with “real world” problems.
1. ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) (MPF); and
2. ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) (MPF); and
3. ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3); and
4. One of the following:
ECO 321 American Industries and Issues (3), or
ECO 325 Economic Analysis of Law (3), or
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3), or
ECO 332 Health Economics (3), or
ECO 356 Poverty and Income Distribution (3), or
ECO 361 Labor Economics (3), or
ECO 385 Government and Business (3), or
ECO 462 Economics of Compensation (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
EDL 1 Cultural Studies and Public Life.
Assists in understanding how culture helps construct public life
through deliberate and unwitting actions of people; therefore,
reveals one way that you can play an active role in public life of your
society. Cultural studies is concerned with the struggles over
meaning that reshape and define cultures; therefore, this sequence
studies contemporary cultural productions and attempts of people
to participate in public life. Emphasis on mass and popular cultures,
youth subcultures including minority subcultures such as those
associated with African American and Latino cultures. Take these
tiers in order.
1. EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3) (MPF), or
BWS/KNH 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (3) (MPF),
or
COM/FST 205 American Film as Communication (3); and
2. EDL 282 Culture Studies, Power, and Education (3); and
3. EDL 334 Youth Subcultures, Popular Culture, and the
Non-formal Education (3), or
ARC/BWS 427 The American City Since 1940 (3), or
SOC/EDP/DST 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3),
or
COM/WGS 461 Gender, Sexuality and Media (3)
34/ Liberal Education at Miami
Note: Open to all majors. Students must select a minimum of nine
hours outside their department of major.
EDP 1 Cultural Patterns in Education and the Law Affecting Persons
with Disability.
Enhances critical understanding of issues surrounding individuals
who fall outside the "norm." Issues include societal values and
moral practices related to development, identification, socialization,
education, and treatment of these individuals. Explores
exceptionality among individuals from the perspectives of
psychological "disorder," developmental or educational "difference,"
and/or "deviance" from socially defined norms. Explores difference
as a normally occurring phenomenon of the human condition.
Prerequisite: EDP 101: Psychology of the Learner (MPF) (3), or PSY 111:
Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4), or EDP 201: Human Development
and Learning (MPF) (3).
1. EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3); and
2. Two from the following:
EDP 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3)
EDP 478 Consultation and Collaboration in Special
Education (3)
EDP 491 Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate
Disabilities (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Educational
Psychology.
EDP 2 Educational Technology and Instructional Design.
Designed for students interested in the design, creation, and
integration of technology/media for teaching and learning in both
K12 and non-K12 environments (e.g. business, higher education,
government, military, health care, religious organizations, etc.).
Students will learn the processes of designing, developing, and
evaluating the effectiveness of educational/instructional media for
classroom and eLearning environments.
1. EDP 279 Technology + Media Literacy and Learning (3), or
EDP 331 Introduction to Educational Technology (3); and
2. EDP 332 Instructional Design Theory and Models (3); and
3. EDP 333 Evaluation and Assessment for Instructional
Design (3)
Note: EDP 279 is limited to teacher preparation students only.
ENG 1 Victorian Literature and Culture.
Introduces the culture broadly defined as “Victorian” and focuses on
the responses of artists, political leaders, and writers to various
historical events and movements that have helped shape the 20th
and 21st centuries: ideas of progress, democracy, nationalism and
imperialism, religious doubt, theories of evolution and natural
selection, impressionism and post-impressionism.
1. ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1660-1900
(3) (MPF); and
2. Two courses in any order from the following:
ENG 343 Victorian Literature, 1830-1860 (3), or
ENG 344 Victorian Literature, 1860-1900 (3), or
ART 486 Art of the Late 19th Century (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English. Majors in the
Department of Art must select a minimum of nine hours outside
their department of major.
ENG 2 Women and Literature.
Assumes the importance of gender as a category for analyzing
authors and texts. Attention to how various literatures that
constitute “English literature” represent women and the feminine,
how these representations differ, and the various agendas pursued
through these representations. Most important, emphasizes women
as themselves authors and readers. Builds new knowledge of
non-canonical writers and texts; reconsiders canonical writers and
texts by focusing on depictions of women or your relation to
women's writings.
1. WGS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3) (MPF), or
ENG/WGS 368 Feminist Literary Theory and Practice (3);
and
2. ENG/WGS 232 American Women Writers (3), or
ENG/WGS 233 British Women Writers (3); and
3. ENG/AMS 390 Studies in American Regionalism: Women's
Local Color Fiction (3), or
ENG/WGS 468 Gender and Genre (3), or
ENG 490 Special Topics in Literary Study (3)*, or
FRE 350B The Woman-Centered Text (3), or
WGS 180 Minority Women Writers in the U.S. (3), or
WGS 370A Black Women Writers (3), or
WGS 370C Lesbian Fiction (3), or
WGS 370D Gender, Class, and Culture in 20th Century
U.S. (3)
* ENG 490 topics may vary from semester to semester. Consult
the sequence coordinator to see if the topic can be applied.
Note: Open to all majors. English majors must enroll in WGS for
courses cross-listed with ENG.
ENG 3 American Life and Culture Since World War II.
A cross-disciplinary study of the changing forms of American
culture since World War II.
1. ENG 143 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1945 to
Present (3) (MPF), or
MUS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Context (3)
(MPF); and
2. Two courses from the following:
ART 489 Contemporary Art (3), or
BWS/ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3), or
ENG 293 Contemporary American Fiction (3), or
ENG 355 American Literature, 1945-Present (3), or
ENG/BWS 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present
(3), or
HST/AMS 367 The U.S. in the 1960s (3), or
HST 369 U.S. in the Modern Era (3)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department
of major.
ENG 4 Film in Popular Culture.
Introduces cultural studies, specifically the analysis of contemporary
popular culture. One of the central objectives is to develop analytical
tools to examine how film, popular literature, and other mass media
(ordinarily “taken for granted” elements of everyday life) have
shaped our modern sensibility. In its very nature, the study of
popular culture is interdisciplinary, examining both the text and the
context of such cultural creations as mass-market literature and film.
1. FST 201 Introduction to Film History and Criticism (3)
(MPF); and
2. Two courses from among the following:
ENG/FST 220 Literature and Film (3), or
ENG/FST 221 Shakespeare and Film (3), or
ENG/FST 236 Alternative Traditions in Film (3), or
ENG/FST 350A Topics in Film (3),or
ENG/FST/WGS 350B Topics in Film (3), or
ENG/FST 350D The Satiric Film (3), or
ENG/FST 350I The Art Film in Italy (3), or
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English.
ENG 5 Language and Literacy.
Uses formal reasoning skills, research and writing, and ethnographic
case studies to develop a sense of the synchronic structure and
diachronic background of the English language so that you
understand how concepts of literacy have changed through the ages,
how literacy functions in contemporary society, and how societies,
schools, and communication technologies interact to shape our
concepts of literacy, rhetoric, and language standards. Studies
grammatical structure of modern English, social and cultural history
of the language, and either rhetorical theory (COM 239) or
contemporary notions of teaching writing (ENG 304). Although
ENG 301 and 302 are recommended to be taken before ENG 304 or
COM 239, three courses may be taken in any order.
1. ENG 301 History of the English Language (4); and
2. ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4); and
3. ENG 304 Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research
(3), or
COM 239 Theories of Communication (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English. Majors in the
Department of Communication must select ENG 304.
ENG 6 Modernism.
Examines the intellectual and cultural movement of the late 19th and
early 20th centuries commonly called modernism. In the visual arts,
Liberal Education at Miami /35
modernism marks the progression from natural representation to
abstraction, best shown in the transition from the French
impressionists to the cubists. In the literary arts, especially poetry
and fiction, modernism moves from the realists and naturalists to the
symbolists and imagists, and on to the fugitives and ironists. By
taking these courses, you observe the significance of changes in
attitude toward experience that are revealed in the transition from
an external and objective outlook and expression to a more internal
and subjective outlook and expression.
1. ENG 142 Life and Thought in American Literature: Civil
War to World War II (3) (MPF), or
ENG 133 Life and Thought in English Literature: 20th
Century (3) (MPF); and
2. ENG 283 Modern Poetry (3), or
ENG 345 British Modernism (3), or
ENG 354 American Literature, 1914-1945 (3); and
3. ART 486 Art of the Late 19th Century (3), or
ART 487 Art of the Early 20th Century (3), or
HST 332 Age of Dictators: Europe 1914-1945 (3), or
RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in Translation: From
Tolstoy to Nabokov (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English. Majors in the
departments of Art, History, or Russian must select a course outside
their department of major at the third level.
ENG 7 The Romantic Era.
Through methods and perspectives of at least two disciplines,
introduces the culture characterized as “romantic,” which emerged
in the later 18th century, flourished in the early 19th century, became
domesticated in the Victorian era, was repressed by the modernists,
revived by the counterculture of the 1960s, and newly historicized
by post-modernists. Focuses on the response of artists and writers to
economic, political, and social change (particularly change resulting
from industrialism and revolution) and the role of artists and writers
in shaping that change. Begin with ENG 132 or RUS 255, and then
take two of the remaining courses from at least two disciplines.
1. ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1660-1901
(3) (MPF), or
ENG/RUS 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to
Dostoevsky in English Translation (3) (MPF); and
2. Two courses from at least two disciplines from the
following:
ENG 339 Writers: Early Romantic Period (3), or
ENG 342 Writers: Later Romantic Period (3), or
ART 485 Art of the Early 19th Century (3), or
POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department
of major.
ENG 8 African American History and Literature.
Provides a sustained encounter with the African American
experience from the arrival of African Americans to North America
through their contemporary cultural and literary accomplishments.
1. BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4) (MPF); and
2. Two from the following:
BWS/ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3),
or
BWS/ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3),
or
BWS/ENG 338 African American Writing, 1945 to
Present (3), or
BWS/HST 221 African American History (3), or
ENG 355 American Literature, 1945-Present (3)
Note: Not open to majors in black world studies. English and history
majors must complete courses outside their department of major.
ENG 9 Writing for Specialized Audiences: Print and Online Design
and Composition.
Provides an introduction to theory, principles, genres, tools, and
practices for those who wish to increase their expertise in
professional writing. Through practice and community-based
projects, the sequence develops the student’s ability to analyze
audiences, design communications to achieve specific goals, test
these communications with users, and produce the documents in
digital or print media. The first two courses stress visual design and
preparing texts for production; students may then choose 413/513 or
414/514, depending on whether they are interested in genres that
report on past activities, request resources, or document processes.
Take one course from each tier.
1. ENG 411/511 Visual Rhetoric for Technical and Scientific
Communicators (3); and
2.
ENG 412/512 Editing for Technical and Scientific
Communicators (3); and
3. ENG 413/513 Grant and Proposal Writings (3), or
ENG 414/514 Usability and User Experience (3)
ENG 10 Italy and the Renaissance.
Provides students in the Study Abroad program in Florence, Italy,
with an on-site introduction to the arts of the Florentine Renaissance
and situates those arts in the Italian cultures that produced and now
succeed them. Contextualizing experiences include an introduction
to the art form of cinema, with h an emphasis on Italian film to
engage students with the culture around them; and either an
introduction to the Western literatures underlying and embodied in
those arts, or an opportunity to investigate and write about
contemporary Florentine culture.
Take one course from each tier.
1. ART 399I Italy and the Renaissance (2-3); and
2. ENG 350C Topics in Film: The Art Film (3); and
3. JRN 350 Specialized Journalism: Reporting on European
Travel, Culture, and Media (3), or
ENG 251 Life and Thought in European Literature (3)
(MPF)
Note: ART 399, ENG 350, and JRN 350 must be taken in Florence. Only
1 course from Thematic Sequence can count toward a Foundation
requirements: If taken to fulfill your thematic sequence, this sequence
can fulfill up to 3 credits of your study abroad requirement if you
choose to use one of its Florence courses to count toward that
requirement.
ESP 1 Entrepreneurship in Different Contexts.
Emphasizes the application of entrepreneurial attitudes and
behaviors in organizations of all sizes and types. Students explore
the underlying nature of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial
process and develop an appreciation for the unique aspects of
entrepreneurship depending upon the context within which one is
operating. The first course examines the role of creative thinking in
coming up with new, entrepreneurial ideas and solving business
problems; the second explores the interface between
entrepreneurship and a particular functional area; the third is
concerned with entrepreneurship in a larger, established
organizational context.
1. ESP 311 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3); and
2. ESP 366 Imagination and Entrepreneurship (3); and
3. ESP 469 Entrepreneurship in Complex Organizations (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
FRE 1 French Cultural Studies.
Explores cultural questions in a French context and how cultural
productions can preserve or change social institutions. Provides a
continuing analysis of how cultural productions interconnect with
specific contexts: historical, aesthetic, social, political, economic,
ethnic, racial, gender-related.
Prerequisite: FRE 202 Intermediate French (3) (MPF). For students
planning to take the French Capstone.
1. FRE 310 Texts in Context (3); and
2. FRE 411 or FRE 411W French Civilization (4); and
3. FRE 341 or FRE 341W French Conversation and Current
Events (3), or
FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3), or
FRE 366 French Cinema in Translation (3), or
FRE 431 Studies in Contemporary French Thought in
Translation (3), or
FRE 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of French and Italian.
FRE 2 French Cultural Studies.
Students planning to take a Capstone in another department may
take any three of these courses, although FRE 310 (or FRE 301 or the
equivalent) is a prerequisite for FRE 411.
36/ Liberal Education at Miami
FRE 310 Texts in Context (3), or
FRE 341 or FRE 341W French Conversation and Current
Events (3), or
FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3), or
FRE 366 French Cinema in Translation (3), or
FRE 411 or FRE 411W French Civilization (4), or
FRE 431 Studies in Contemporary French Thought in
Translation (3), or
FRE/FST 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of French and Italian.
FRE 3 European Cinema.
Explores, questions, and seeks to provide a cross-cultural
understanding of the historical, ideological, artistic, and social issues
that inform European culture through a critical analysis of the major
films of countries that have played an important role both in the
birth and development of cinematic art and in shaping the modern
world: France, Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union.
1. FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
(MPF), or
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) (MPF)
2. Two from the following:
FRE/FST/GER 265 European Jewish Cinema (3), or
FRE/FST 366 French Cinema in Translation (3), or
FRE/FST 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3), or
FST/ITL 262 Italian Cinema (3), or
FST/RUS 272 Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe:
An Introduction through Literature and Film (3), or
GER/FST 261 German Cinema (3), or
RUS/FST 263 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department
of major.
FSW 1 Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families.
Diversity is increasing among children, youth, families, and their
community contexts. A growing number of people, especially
African American and Hispanic children and their families, are
experiencing the challenges of poverty. Increasing numbers of
children and youth are deemed “at risk” for health, social, or
educational problems. Amidst increasing diversity and confronted
by rapid sociocultural change, existing services and supports are
often ineffective; sometimes they may harm the people they intend
to serve. Sequence provides experiences and opportunities that
facilitate your understanding of children, youth, and families,
including their needs, problems, aspirations, and strengths. Learn
about and evaluate two kinds of services and supports: (1)
educative, promotive, and preventive; and (2) need and
problem-oriented, as well as crisis-responsive. Experiences in social
service, education, and health organizations where you “shadow”
helping professionals are required. As a citizen or future helping
professional, prepares you for informed advocacy on the behalf of
children, youth, and families.
1. FSW/KNH 207 Services and Supports for Children, Youth,
and Families I (4); and
2. FSW/KNH 208 Services and Supports for Children, Youth,
and Families II (5)
Note: Open to all majors. A minimum of nine semester hours must
be taken outside your department of major.
FSW 3 Families and Sexuality Across the Life Course.
The objectives for this thematic sequence are to establish basic
concepts and theoretical understandings of individuals in families
across the life course, to provide a sound background in human
sexuality that may be used as a base to think about underlying issues
related to human sexuality, and to explore issues related to
familial/relationship contexts involving sexuality and sexual
behaviors.
1. FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (4); or
FSW/GTY 466 Later Life Families (3), or
FSW 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families
(3); and
2. FSW 365 Family Life Sexuality Education Across Cultures
(3); and
3. FSW/WGS 361 Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change
(3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and
Social Work. Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies majors must
choose a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.
.
FSW 4 Children in Families.
Students develop an in-depth understanding of child and adolescent
development that affects contemporary families. Examines issues in
contemporary society that affect families with children (e.g., child
and adolescent development and family differences, as well as
change over the life course).
1. FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (4); and
2. FSW 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3);
and
3. FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (3)
(MPF), or
FSW 381 Parent-Child Relations in Diverse Families (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and
Social Work.
GEO 1 Urban Geography.
Applies geographic concepts to develop an understanding of the
patterns, processes, and meanings of change within and among U.S.
urban areas. The sequence first examines the changing distribution
of economic activities and social groups. Second, the sequence is
concerned with underlying processes resulting in distinctive
distributions of people and activities observed in U.S. urban areas.
The sequence also evaluates the problems and consequences for U.S.
cities resulting from changing economic and social geography and
examines practices and policies for the planning of U.S. urban areas.
1. GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3) (MPF); and
2. Two of the following:
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3), or
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3), or
GEO/BWS 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in
America (3), or
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.
GEO 2 Earth's Physical Environment: Patterns and Processes.
Provides an understanding of the geographical patterns that
characterize the Earth's physical environment and the processes
responsible for these geographical patterns. The objectives are to
study Earth's physical environment and their geographical
distribution at global, regional, and local scales; to develop an
understanding of the processes that connect Earth's physical
subsystems, including the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and
atmosphere; and to apply concepts (e.g., systems and budgets) and
geographic tools (e.g., field research, geographic information
systems, and remote sensing) to the geographic analysis of a
particular environment or set of environments.
1. GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environment (4) (MPF); and
2. GEO 221 Regional Physical Environments (3); and
3. BOT/GEO 431 Global Plant Diversity (3), or
BOT/GEO 432 Ecoregions of North America (3), or
GEO 333 Global Perspectives on Natural Disasters (3), or
GEO 421 Climatology (3), or
GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3), or
GEO 426 Watershed Management (3), or
GEO 428 Soil Geography (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.
GEO 3 Geographic Change.
Applies geographic concepts to understand patterns, processes, and
meaning of change in the human landscape at the global scale.
1. GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) (MPF); and
2. GEO 211 Global Change (3); and
3. GEO 401 Sustainable Regions (3), or
GEO/WGS 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment
(3), or
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3), or
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3), or
GEO 476 Global Poverty (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.
Liberal Education at Miami /37
GEO 4 Global Forces in Regional Contexts.
Applies geographic concepts to understanding patterns, processes,
and underlying meaning of changes in a region's landscape.
1. GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) (MPF); and
2. GEO 211 Global Change (3); and
3. GEO/BWS 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4), or
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4), or
GEO 307 Geography of Russia (3), or
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3), or
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3), or
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia)
(3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.
GER 1 Culture, Literature, and Language of German-Speaking Europe.
Explores the way in which culture and language work together as
related systems of expression. Course material will be taken,
wherever possible, from authentic sources.
Prerequisite: GER 202.
1. GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe (3)
(MPF), or
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture:
German-Speaking Europe and U.S. (3) (MPF); and
2. GER 312 Coming of Age in German Life and Thought (3), or
GER 311 Passionate Friendships in German Literature,
Film, and Culture (3) (MPF); and
3. GER 301 German Language Through the Media (3)
Note: Not open to German majors.
GER 3 Developing Language Skills in German.
For students who have completed the first two semesters of
college-level German language or the equivalent. This sequence
develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a
variety of materials drawn from fiction, television, film, the Internet,
journalism, and memoirs. The courses draw on computer-assisted
materials developed by the Miami faculty for Miami students and
are characterized by small sections and substantial in-class and
out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit
and must be taken in order.
1. GER 201 Second Year German (3); and
2. GER 202 Second Year German (3); and
3. GER 301 German Language Through the Media (3)
Note: Not open to German majors.
GLG 1 Oceanography.
Provides an appreciation of the critical importance of the oceans to
the functioning of our planet. Oceans dominate the surface area of
the Earth, and they are critical to the maintenance of a habitable
planet. Examines what we know about the oceans and how the
oceans are an integral part of the Earth's ecology. Explores, first
hand, the ways that we study the oceans.
1. GLG 111 Dynamic Earth (3) (MPF), or
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) (MPF), or
GLG 141 Geology of National Parks (3) (MPF); and
2. GLG 244 Oceanography (3); and
3. GLG/LAS/IES 413 Tropical Marine Ecology (5), or
GLG 414 Coastal Ecology of the Bahamas (5)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science.
GLG 2 The Water Planet.
Provides an introduction to the essential role water plays in
supporting life on Earth, including the origin of water, its
physical/chemical characteristics, how these characteristics combine
to make life possible on the continents and in the oceans, and details
concerning the hydrologic cycle. Introduces the economic, legal, and
political ramifications of water use in the U.S.
1. GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environment (3) (MPF), or
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) (MPF), or
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) (MPF), or
GLG 141 Geology of National Parks (3); and
2. GLG 244 Oceanography (3); and
3. GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3), or
GLG 307 Water and Society (3), or
GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4), or
ZOO 463 Limnology (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science. Majors in the departments of Geography
and Zoology must select a minimum of nine hours outside their
department of major.
GLG 3 Plate Tectonics.
Provides an overview of how plate tectonics shapes the Earth,
including the creation of landforms, natural hazards, and economic
reservoirs. Examines the physical principles underlying movement
of the Earth’s surface and the impact on rock types, chemistry, fabric,
and layering. Also demonstrates how local studies can provide
insight into global processes.
1. GLG 111 Dynamic Earth (3) (MPF), or
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) (MPF), or
GLG 141 Geology of National Parks (3) (MPF); and
2. GLG 261 Geohazards and the Solid Earth (3), or
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4); and
3. GLG 322 Structural Geology (4), or
GLG 461 Geophysics (3), or
GLG 467 Seismology (3), or
GLG 492 Global Tectonics (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science.
GTY 2 Aging in Diverse Contexts.
A significant paradigm shift has occurred within gerontology. The
accumulation of research findings suggests that age alone predicts
very little about the human experience. Instead, the impact of age
and aging is mediated by a range of social and cultural factors. Social
characteristics such as gender, race, and ethnicity, and societal
factors such as economic development and cultural traditions
combine to produce a diverse range of experience and patterns of
aging. This thematic sequence begins with an overview of the social,
cultural, and personal experiences of aging. The second course
provides students with grounding in sociocultural analyses of the
contexts of aging, and the third, an in-depth exploration of the
sources of variation in the aging experience. Students completing
this sequence will understand the ways in which meanings and
experiences of aging are shaped by social and physical location, and
the ways in which diversity among the older population is
produced.
1. GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3) (MPF)*; and
2. GTY 260 Global Aging (3) (MPF)*, or
SOC/GTY 318 Sociology of Aging (3); and
3. ATH/GTY 476 Environment and Aging (3), or
FSW/GTY 466 Later Life Families, or
GTY/SOC/WGS 463 Gender and Aging (3), or
GTY 472 Race, Ethnicity and Aging (3), or
Note: Not open to majors in Sociology or Gerontology.
*Only one foundation course in any Thematic Sequence may count
toward foundation requirements.
GTY 3 Health and Aging.
This thematic sequence explores health and aging. The tier 1 course
provides students with an overview of the process of aging,
especially in the United States. In tier 2, students select one of two
courses, each examining health and aging from a different position
along a continuum that ranges from micro- to macro/meso-level
contexts. The tier 3 courses offer students the opportunity to
integrate academic and applied aspects of health and aging, either
through exploration of moral issues in health care, secondary data
analysis, or a field experience in a health care setting.
1. GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3) (MPF); and
2. GTY 356 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Health and Aging (3),
or
GTY/SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3), or
GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3); and
3. GTY 430 Field Experience in Gerontology (3), or
GTY 478 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Illness (3),
or
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
38/ Liberal Education at Miami
Note: Not open to majors in sociology and gerontology. Philosophy
majors may not enroll in PHL 375.
HST 1 Medieval Studies.
Seeks to enhance your knowledge of and appreciation for the
history, art, and literature of the medieval period, as well as establish
a full cultural context on which you can build an understanding of
more recent history.
1. Select two courses from the following:
ART 313 Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic Art (3), or
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3), or
HST 246 Survey of Medieval History (3);
2. And one course from the following:
ART 480W Feminist Art Histories (3), or
ARC 405G Seminar on Gothic Architecture (3), or
HST 346 Medieval Jewish History (3), or
HST 451 Social History of Medieval Europe (3), or
ENG 440 Major English and American Authors (3)*
* ENG 440 topics may vary from semester to semester. Consult with
the sequence coordinator or the Office of Liberal Education to see if
the topic can be applied.
Note: Majors in architecture, German, art, English, history, and Spanish
must select a minimum of nine hours of courses outside their
department of major.
HST 2 Women and Gender in History.
Studies the construction and nature of gender roles with particular
emphasis on women, in a variety of historical contexts, places,
cultures, and socioeconomic and political conditions. Encourages
thought about whether there are any universal themes and questions
regarding gender roles that transcend particular circumstances.
1. Select three courses from these options:
ART 480M Special Topics in Medieval Art (3), or
ART 480W Feminist Art Histories (3), or
CLS 235 Women in Antiquity (3), or
HST/WGS 381 Women in Pre-industrial Europe (3), or
HST/AMS/WGS 382 Women in American History (3), or
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3), or
HST/AMS 392 Sex and Gender in American Culture (3), or
HST/WGS 450 Topics in Women's History (3), or
REL 334 Women's Religious Experiences in the
Mediterranean World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of History. Majors in the
departments of Art, Classics, and Comparative Religion must select a
minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.
HST 3 Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (cross-listed with
POL 7).
This Thematic Sequence examines Russian, East European and
Eurasian history and politics from a multidisciplinary perspective.
The Sequence allows students to study the history and politics of
Russia and the former Soviet republics, from medieval times to
today. Drawing from a range of disciplines and approaches,
students have the opportunity to explore historical patterns, and
political movements and parties from the 10th century to present. By
considering this interaction, students gain meaningful insights into
the development of this region as well as acquiring useful
perspectives on western society. Because many of these courses are
cross-listed, students from many different majors will be able to take
the sequence by enrolling in the course through a department other
than their major. Take one course from each tier.
1. REL/RUS 133 Imagining Russia (3), or
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian
and Eurasian Studies (3); and
2. ATH/RUS 306 Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History (3), or
HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3), or
HST 375 Russia and the U.S.S.R. from 1855 to the Present
(3), or
HST 428 Russia's War and Peace (3), or
REL 235 Religions of Russia and Eurasia (3), or
POL 331 Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991 (3);
and
3. ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3), or
GEO 307 Geography of Russia (3), or
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia)
(3), or
ITS 402O Transition to Democracy (3), or
HST 436 Havighurst Colloquium (3), or
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3), or
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3), or
POL 334 Politics of Eastern Europe (3)
IMS 4 Perspectives on Interactive Media.
This sequence will develop the student's theoretical and hands-on
understanding of the nature of digital development. Interactive
media expertise requires a broad understanding of the perspective
brought by a variety of disciplines. The courses included in the
sequence are designed to supplement a traditional disciplinary
major for a student interested in how Interactive Media informs their
chosen field.
This sequence allows the student to broaden their Interactive Media
expertise, developing a particular interest and then applying it
through a choice of one of three course "buckets" or tracks.
1. Take one of the following courses:
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3), or
CSE 251 Introduction to Game Programming (3), or
CSE 252 Web Application Programming (3), or
ENG/IMS 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3), or
ENG/IMS 224 Digital Writing and Rhetoric (3), or
ART 256 Design, Perception and Audience (3); and
2. Take two courses in any one of the following Specialization
Tracks:
A. Commercialization
IMS 333 Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3), or
MKT/IMS 419 Digital Branding (4), or
COM 211 Introduction to Video Production (4), or
MGT 311 Project Management (3), or
BLS 437 Cyberlaw (3), or
IMS 390C Topics in IMS: Implementation (4)
B. Interpretation
ENG/IMS 171 Humanities and Technology (3), or
ENG/IMS 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3), or
ENG/IMS 224 Digital Writing and Rhetoric (3), or
ENG 411 Visual Rhetoric (3), or
IMS 390I Topics in IMS: Interpretation (4)
C. Simulation
IMS 319 3D Modeling and Animation (3); or
IMS 445 Game Design (3); or
ARC 404Y Mind and Medium (3); or
IMS 390S Topics in IMS: Simulation (4)
D. Visualization
IMS 356 Flash Animation (3), or
IMS/ART 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3), or
IMS/ART 359 Art and Digital Tools II (3), or
ISA 245 Database Systems (3), or
IMS 390V Topics in IMS: Visualization (4)
Note: IMS-4 is open to all majors, but students must complete 9 hours
of coursework outside their department of major.
ISA 1 Quantitative Concepts for Managerial Decision Making.
Enhances analytical capabilities and provides breadth and depth of
course work in decision science methodology. While its contextual
orientation is business, the techniques and processes discussed and
ways of thinking developed are applicable to every field. The
underlying aim is improved decision making and action through
thought that is informed by statistical and management science
methodologies.
1. ISA 205 Business Statistics (4); and
2. ISA 291 Applied Regression Analysis in Business (3); and
3. ISA 321 Quantitative Analysis of Business Problems (3)
Note: Not open to majors in Business.
ISA 2 Applied Business Statistics.
Enhances analytical capabilities and teaches fundamental concepts
of statistical thinking. Provides breadth and depth of course work in
business statistics methodology. While the academic area of business
forms its contextual orientation, the techniques and processes
discussed and ways of thinking developed are applicable to every
field. The underlying aim is improved decision making and action
through thought that is informed by statistical analysis.
1. ISA 205 Business Statistics (4); and
Liberal Education at Miami /39
2. ISA 291 Applied Regression Analysis in Business (3); and
3. ISA/STA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
ISA 432 Survey Sampling in Business (3), or
ISA 444 Business Forecasting (3), or
ISA 491 Introduction to Data Mining in Business (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the department of Information Systems
and Analytics.
ISA 3 Web Mining and Knowledge Management.
Emphasizes the critical role of information management and
decision-making within a wireless, distributed Internet environment
and enables students to develop a proficiency in knowledge
management, Internet access/retrieval, and web searching/mining
of information and data that promotes and enhances the e-commerce
opportunity and the digital economy. The sequence focuses on
technology management, strategic evaluation, and systems adoption
issues by organizations in order to gain a competitive advantage in
the new Internet society and associated wireless environment. Please
take these courses in order.
1. ISA 235 Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3); and
2. ISA 245 Database Systems and Data Warehousing (3); and
3. ISA 404 Knowledge Management (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
ISA 4 Applications Integration with Enterprise Systems.
Emphasizes the critical role of information resources planning,
management, and/or implementation in the electronic commerce
era. In specific, this sequences enables students to develop a
proficiency in the management of enterprise resources planning
tools, concepts, and/or techniques to increase corporations'
productivity, operational efficiency, and effectiveness. Please take
these courses in order.
1. ISA 235 Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3); and
2. ISA 245 Database Systems and Data Warehousing (3); and
3. ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
ITL 1 Italy in the Renaissance.
Analyzes the vital role Italy has played in the birth and evolution of
modern Western culture in the humanities, arts, sciences, and
political thought. Develops analytical skills by viewing Italian
culture from a variety of disciplinary angles and over a broad span
of time. Promotes a critical understanding of the rich artistic,
literary, and intellectual heritage of the culture that laid the
foundation for the European Renaissance and the modern period.
1. Select three of the following courses in any order:
ART 314 Italian Renaissance (3), or
ENG/ITL 364 From Marco Polo to Machiavelli (3), or
ENG/ITL 401 Dante's Divine Comedy (3), or
HST 315 The Renaissance (3), or
HST 452 Florence in the Time of the Republic 1250-1550 (3)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department
of major.
JPN 1 Developing Language Skills in Japanese.
For students who have completed the first two semesters of
college-level Japanese language or the equivalent. This sequence
develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a
variety of materials drawn from fiction, television, film, the Internet,
journalism, and memoirs. The courses draw on computer-assisted
materials developed by Miami faculty for Miami students and are
characterized by small sections and substantial in-class and
out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit
and must be taken in order.
1. JPN 201 Second Year Japanese (3); and
2. JPN 202 Second Year Japanese (3); and
3. JPN 301 Third Year Japanese (3)
JST 1 Jewish Studies.
Emerging in the ancient Middle East, the Jewish people developed a
distinctive culture and tradition, first as an independent body-politic
and later as a minority population in the Diaspora. Throughout
history, the Jewish people have utilized their ancestral customs – i.e.
Judaism – to maintain a living identity. This Thematic Sequence
focuses on the history of Jewish communities in a variety of contexts
in order to discern how Jews maintained their identity while
partaking of and contributing to the non-Jewish world. These classes
examine secular and religious Jewish cultures in Europe, America,
north Africa and Asia from ca. 600 B.C.E. until today.
A student may take only one of the Foundation course for credit in
the sequence. Thus, only one of the following courses may be taken:
REL 175; REL 211; GER 252 and FRE/GER/RUS 212/HST 211.
1. Ancient and Medieval: One of the following courses:
CLS 310J Jews Among the Greeks and Romans (3), or
HST 346 Medieval Jewish History (3), or
HST 442 Ancient Jewish History, 539 BCE-200CE (3), or
REL 175* Critical Study of Biblical Literature (3), or
REL 211* Introduction to the Religion of Ancient Israel (3), or
REL 311 Archaeology and Biblical Studies (3); and
2. Modern: One of the following courses:
ENG/FST/GER 265 European Jewish Cinema (3), or
ENG/FRE/GER 356 Contemporary Jewish Fiction in Europe
(3), or
FRE/GER/RUS 212/HST 211* Secular Jewish Culture from
Enlightenment to Zionism (3), or
FRE/HST 339 Jews, "Jews," and Modern French Culture (3), or
FST/RUS 272 Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe: An
Introduction Through Literature and Film (3), or
GER 252* The German-Jewish Experience (3), or
HST 472 Germany 1918-1945 (3); and
3. Take one additional course from either 1 or 2.
Note: This sequence is open to all majors, but students must take only
courses outside their department of major.
KNH 1 Biophysical Health Across the Life Span.
As one ages, the body changes in physical appearance, health, and
ability to perform, usually in a negative way. Certain aspects of the
aging body are regulated by factors beyond our control (e.g.,
genetics); however, lifestyle (e.g., nutrition, exercise) from birth to
adulthood influences biophysical health to a large extent. Learn how
biophysical health can be improved, maintained, or impaired by
factors beyond and within one's control over time. Explore reasons
for the systematic patterns of the unequal distribution of health and
health services among persons of different age, gender,
socioeconomic status, and culture.
1. KNH 188 Physical Activity and Health (3) (MPF); and
2. KNH 297 Children's Exercise and Fitness (3), or
KNH 407 Food and Nutrition for the Aging (3), or
KNH 408 Perinatal and Child Nutrition (3); and
3. NSG 441 Health and Aging: Current Perspectives and Issues
(3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Departments of Kinesiology and Health
or Nursing.
LAS 1 Modern Latin American Development.
Focuses on broadly defined development in Latin America from the
19th century forward from a central socio-political perspective, and
allows students to assess the dynamic nature of political and
economic institutions from historical, political, and geographic
perspectives. LAS 208, a broad survey course, is recommended to be
taken first.
1. These courses may be taken in any order as long as nine or
more credit hours are completed:
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization (3) (MPF)
LAS 410 Current Latin American Issues (1)
LAS/IES 414 Latin American Environmental Affairs (3)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department of
major.
LAS 2 People and Power in the Americas.
Provides an interdisciplinary treatment of some of the major social
and political issues confronting the Americas now and in the 21st
century. Examines the relations and differences between the U.S.
and Latin American and Caribbean societies, characterizes and
contrasts world views from various social groups across the
Americas, explores social conflict within and between countries of
the Americas, and addresses such critical issues as human migration
and economic integration.
40/ Liberal Education at Miami
1. Courses are recommended to be taken as listed below;
however, three courses may be taken in any order:
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization After 1825 (3) (MPF)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Policy (3)
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science. Majors
in anthropology or the Department of Geography must select a
minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.
LED 1 Urban Culture and Service-Learning.
Courses selected for the Xavier University/Miami University
collaboration are determined each time it is offered. Courses will
emphasize urban study, drawing from political science, sociology,
economics, geography, architecture, history, education, and
programs in black world studies, urban studies, American studies,
and women's studies. The sequence will have courses grouped in
three interrelated tiers:
1. Practical experience based in Service-Learning; and
2. Theoretical investigation of urban issues and policy; and
3. Special topics that allow for deeper investigations of issues
pertaining to Cincinnati and Over-The-Rhine. Contact:
Tom Dutton in the Department of Architecture
MBI 1 Biomedical Science.
Examines principles and examples of diseases caused by microbial
infections so that the role of microorganisms in the development of
disease in a human host can be understood. Studies the host at
genetic or cell and tissue level to gain an overview of infectious and
noninfectious diseases in populations. Fosters understanding of the
effects of diseases on human communities and provides a
perspective to help evaluate health dilemmas and develop strategies
to solve them.
1. MBI 161 Elementary Medical Microbiology (4) (MPF); and
2. ZOO 232 Human Heredity (3), or
ZOO 325 Pathophysiology (4); and
3. MBI 361 Epidemiology (3)
Note: Offered only on the Hamilton and Middletown campuses. Not
open to majors in the Departments of Microbiology or Zoology.
MBI 2 Molecular Genetics.
Provides an understanding of the basic microbiology principles that
have provided the foundation for the development of the science of
molecular genetics. Shows how the application of molecular genetics
has had a significant impact on health, bioremediation, and
agriculture, to name a few examples.
1.
MBI/BOT/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure,
Function Cellular and Molecular Biology (4) (MPF); and
2. MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4); and
3. MBI 365 Molecular and Cell Biology (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Microbiology.
MGT 1 Dynamics of Human Behavior in Organizations.
Regardless of major, most students apply the knowledge and skills
they acquire at Miami University within an organizational setting.
Organizations form to benefit from collective efforts of individuals
who are striving to accomplish a set of common goals. This sequence
examines ideas, models, and theories that explain human behavior
in organizations. Builds competence in critically analyzing factors
that influence both human behavior and the capacity for the
organization to achieve its objectives; then you are able to influence
work behavior and effectively exercise a leadership role in the
organizations you join.
1. MGT 291 Introduction to Management & Leadership (3);
and
Both of the following, in any order:
2. MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3); and
3. MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
MKT 5 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing.
The objectives of this sequence are to: 1. Introduce students to the
behavioral, sociological, psychological, and economic foundations
behind marketing; 2. Create an understanding of how marketing can
improve the quality of life through enlightened personal selling; and
3. Assist non-marketing majors to apply marketing concepts to a
broad spectrum of personal and professional careers.
1. MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3); and
2. MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (3); and
3. MKT 405 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.
MTH 1 Axioms, Theorems, and Proof in Geometry and Algebra.
Considers algebras and geometries defined by axiomatic systems,
two very active fields in modern mathematics. Surprises are here:
geometrics without parallel lines, geometrics with parallel lines and
no rectangles, and new algebraic operations that can describe the
structure of Rubik's cube and molecules. Develops the roles of
definition, proof, and abstraction gradually until, at the 400 level, a
full scale axiomatic treatment is given. At this level students provide
many of the proofs. You rediscover results from the masters: Gauss,
Hilbert, Galois, Abel, and others. Not an easy sequence, but you
learn about how to read mathematics and solve problems on your
own.
Prerequisite: MTH 151 (5) (MPF) or MTH 153 (4) (MPF) Calculus I.
1. MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3); and
2. MTH 331 Discrete Mathematics (3); and
3. MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3), or
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and
Statistics.
MTH 2 Basic Mathematical Tools for Science.
Scientists today use a variety of mathematical tools, including
calculus, discrete mathematics, and statistics to describe physical,
biological, and social systems. This sequence helps students analyze
problems from several perspectives with increasing sophistication as
they progress from Calculus I through the other courses. The
discrete mathematics, linear algebra, and statistics courses can be
taken in any order, but all have Calculus I as prerequisite.
1. MTH 151 Calculus I (5) (MPF), or
MTH 153 Calculus I (4) (MPF); and
2. MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3), or
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3), or
MTH 222T/331T Linear Algebra/Discrete Mathematics
(Honors) (5); and
3. STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and
Statistics. Business majors will not receive credit for this sequence.
MTH 3 Almost Linear Structures-Models for Physical Science.
The goal is to extend the derivative and anti-derivative ideas from
Calculus I and II by building on the linear function concept from
MTH 222. Scientists use linear functions to model the economy,
atomic structure, chemical reactions, and other phenomena. MTH
252 develops the derivative of a multivariable function as an
approximating linear function, just as the graph of a function of one
variable looks like a line segment near a point where the derivative
exists. This allows the extension of important optimization
techniques to multivariable functions. MTH 347 uses all available
tools to generalize and solve antiderivative problems crucial to
science. This sequence combines theory and practice and is the
traditional path to upper division mathematics. MTH 222 and 252
may be taken in either order or concurrently.
Prerequisite: Calculus I (MPF) and Calculus II.
1. MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3), or
MTH 222T/331T Introduction to Linear Algebra/Discrete
Mathematics (Honors) (3); and
2. MTH 252 Calculus III (4); and
3. MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
Note: Not open to majors in Mathematics and Statistics.
MUS 1 Performance of Music.
Study and apply music performance in solo and ensemble settings in
order to examine and evaluate musical style, emotional and
programmatic aspects of composition in performance, the
interrelationship of instruments in larger contexts, and the
involvement of personal technique, style, and emotional context.
Liberal Education at Miami /41
Prerequisite: Not for beginning performers. Admission only to students
granted “sophomore standing” by the music department after an audition or
semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 142 or 144.
1. Three semesters minimum of private study, including at
least one semester at 300-level with a prerequisite of
“junior standing” granted by the music department after
a semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 242 or
244.
Courses available:
MUS 242, 342 (2)
MUS 244, 344 (3-4)
2. Four hours minimum of ensemble. No more than two hours
per semester may be applied. MUS 100E Marching Band
cannot fulfill this requirement. You are encouraged to be
involved in more than one ensemble for the duration of
the sequence.
3. Juried half-recital (20 minutes of music minimum) given in
your junior or senior year (0). The recital must be a
lecture-recital or must have program notes written by
you.
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.
MUS 2 Music Composition.
Focuses on composing from selected perspectives: (1) strict models
of the receding past (early 19th century), (2) traditions in the
electronic music of the recent past, (3) conventional forms from the
current mass media, and (4) personal models developed by the
student. Students study primarily the music of Western culture and
write their own compositions. Designed for students already having
both experience in performance on an instrument or voice and an
understanding of a basic musical language through conventional
music theory studies. Take all of the following:
1. MUS 301 Counterpoint (3); and
2. MUS 303/IMS 304 Electronic Music (3); and
3. MUS 371 Composition (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.
MUS 3 African and African-Derived Music in the Western World.
Focuses on the development and influence of African-derived music
in the western world, which includes not only North America but
also the Caribbean and South America. The subject is examined from
several historical as well as musical perspectives: (1) African music
in the traditional context and its defining factors on the lives and
culture of Western African societies and people; (2) The Atlantic
slave trade and the development of African-influenced genres in the
West; (3) The impact of the development of and changes in Western
societies (i.e., emancipation, segregation, unemployment, etc.) and
the music that results. At the conclusion of this sequence, students
should be able to integrate the material covered into their knowledge
of American musical and social history and have a deeper
understanding of how societal structures and racial identity have
affected music.
1. MUS/AMS 285 Survey of African Music in the Diaspora (3);
and
2. MUS/AMS 385 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel,
and Soul (3); and
3. MUS/AMS 386 History and Development of Hip-Hop
Culture in America (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.
NSC 1 Naval Science: History of Warfare.
Examines the evolution of strategic principles and the influence of
economic, psychological, moral, political, and technological factors
on strategic thought. Covers the evolution of warfare from 600 B.C.
to present, naval warfare from 1500 to present, and amphibious
warfare from 1800 to present. Through literature, you are exposed to
differing perspectives, including official records of the event,
personal experiences of participants, and post-event analysis by
researchers. Engage in a critical analysis of great captains, military
organizations, and military theorists of history.
1. NSC 311 The Evolution of Warfare (3); and
2. NSC 202 Seapower and Maritime Affairs Seminar (3); and
3. NSC 411 Amphibious Warfare (3)
Note: Open to all majors.
NSC 2 War: An Extension of Politics.
Examines world politics, historical role played by the military in the
outcome of those politics, and possible political methods to avoid
future military action. Explores the complexity of world politics
driven by differences in economics, population, culture, and
philosophy, and studies the historical outcome of incidents where
military action occurred as well as those incidents resolved without
military involvement.
1. POL 271 World Politics (4) (MPF), or
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3), or
HST 219 U.S. Diplomatic History to 1914 (3), or
HST 222 U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1898 (3); and
2. NSC 202 Seapower and Maritime Affairs Seminar (3), or
NSC 311 The Evolution of Warfare (3), or
NSC 411 Amphibious Warfare (3); and
3. POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3), or
POL 374 Foreign Policy Analysis (3), or
POL 381 Global Governance (3), or
POL 382 International Law (3), or
HST 275 20th Century European Diplomacy (3), or
HST/ENG/PSY 360C Interdisciplinary Special Topics:
Alternatives to War (4), or
HST 431 The U.S.-Vietnam War (3)
Note: Students must select a minimum of nine hours outside their
department of major.
NSC 3 The Naval Sciences.
An Integrated Study of Naval Engineering, Navigation, and Piloting.
Going to sea and surviving for extended periods of time require
unique and diverse knowledge in the subject areas. Engages in a
critical examination of naval engineering systems, celestial and
electronic navigation, and the practice of safely piloting a
waterborne vessel.
1. NSC 102 Naval Ship's Systems (3); and
2. NSC 301 Navigation I (4); and
3. NSC 302 Naval Operations and Seamanship (3)
Note: Open to all majors.
PHL 1 Ethics.
Develops insight and expertise in dealing with ethical matters that
you are likely to confront in your personal and professional life
beyond the university.
1. PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (3) (MPF);
and
2. Select two of the following:
PHL 311 Ethical Theory (4), or
PHL 312 Contemporary Moral Problems (4), or
PHL/WGS 355 Feminist Theory (4), or
PHL/ENG/PSY/REL 360A Confronting Death (4), or
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4), or
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy. Students
must select nine hours outside the department of major.
PHL 4 Metaphysics and Epistemology.
Presents a range of philosophical outlooks and methods regarding
the fundamental questions: what is real and how do we know it?
Explores these questions as they are manifested in the history of
philosophy.
1. PHL 101 Knowledge of World, God, and Morality (MPF) (3),
or
PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (3) (MPF), or
PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (3) (MPF); and
2. PHL 221 Problems of Metaphysics and Knowledge (3); and
3. PHL 301 Ancient Philosophy (4), or
PHL 302 Modern Philosophy (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.
PHL 5 Reasoning.
Focuses on the fundamental aspects of logic, as manifested in
thought and language. Shows that reasoning occurs in both formal
and interpretive modes and that principles exist for the analysis and
evaluation of reasoning in these modes. The emphasis is on
42/ Liberal Education at Miami
developing skill in the application of such principles and on an
appreciation of the overall scope of logic.
1. PHL 273 Formal Logic (4) (MPF); and
2. PHL 263 Informal Logic (4); and
3. PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.
PHY 1 The Physical World: Contemporary Physics.
Option One-experimental emphasis, stresses experimental,
hands-on experience in the laboratory. Option Two-theoretical
emphasis, stresses modeling and simulation approaches to problem
solving. Extends the basic foundation in the broad area of physics
developed in “The Physical World.” Provides in-depth
developments of topics in modern and contemporary physical
science. The goal is to provide a level of understanding and skills in
contemporary scientific methodology to enable further study in the
sciences or to provide a substantial technical background for a future
career.
1. PHY 182, 184 The Physical World II and Laboratory (MPF)
(4,1); and
2. PHY 281, 293 Contemporary Physics I and Laboratory (3, 2);
and
3. Experimental Option: PHY 292, 294 Electronic
Instrumentation (3, 2), or
Theoretical Option: PHY 286 Introduction to
Computational Physics (3)
Note: Although laboratory sections are listed as separate courses in this
Bulletin, they are integral co-requisites to the companion courses. Not
open to majors in the Department of Physics.
PHY 2 Your Place In the Universe.
For untold generations, humans have gazed at the stars, planets, and
cosmos, and asked what is it all, and how do I fit in? This sequence
attempts to address this timeless, universal, and totally human
question from the viewpoint of modern science. The Foundation
course provides an overview of our present understanding of the
universe and some insight as to how we came to such an
understanding. The second course addresses the crucial question,
how do we know what we claim to know? Here, the observational
foundation of our theories is examined in detail. The final course
addresses several topics from astronomy that currently are without
explanation.
1. PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (3) (MPF); and
2. PHY 211 Observational Foundations of Astronomy (3); and
3. PHY 311 Contemporary Astronomy (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Physics.
POL 1 Comparative Analysis of Foreign Policy.
Explores the study and substance of foreign policy. The sequence
begins by analyzing the broader international and theoretical
contexts of foreign policy, then moves into finer analysis of
particular issues confronting national governments in the
construction and pursuit of their foreign policy objectives.
Completes the sequence with a country or region-specific course that
examines in greater detail theories, contexts, and issues explored in
earlier courses.
1. POL 271 World Politics (4) (MPF); and
2. POL 374 Foreign Policy Analysis (3), or
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3); and
3. POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3), or
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3), or
POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy (3), or
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.
POL 3 National Political Institutions.
Enables you to understand the political system in which you live,
how it operates or fails to do so, where and how citizen influence is
applied, and how to assess proposals for reform. Take POL 241 first,
then select three additional courses from the options listed. Sequence
of four courses.
1. POL 241 The American Political System (4); and
2. Select three from these:
POL 343 American Presidency (3), or
POL 344 U.S. Congress (3), or
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4), or
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.
POL 7 Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (cross-listed with
HST 3).
This Thematic Sequence examines Russian, East European and
Eurasian history and politics from a multidisciplinary perspective.
The Sequence allows students to study the history and politics of
Russia and the former Soviet republics, from medieval times to
today. Drawing from a range of disciplines and approaches,
students have the opportunity to explore historical patterns, and
political movements and parties from the 10th century to present. By
considering this interaction, students gain meaningful insights into
the development of this region as well as acquiring useful
perspectives on western society. Because many of these courses are
cross-listed, students from many different majors will be able to take
the sequence by enrolling in the course through a department other
than their major. Take one course from each tier.
1. REL/RUS 133 Imagining Russia (3), or
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian
and Eurasian Studies (3); and
2. ATH/RUS 306 Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological
Perspectives (3), or
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History (3), or
HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3), or
HST 375 Russia and the U.S.S.R. from 1855 to the Present
(3), or
HST 428/528 Russia's War and Peace (3), or
REL 235 Religions of Russia and Eurasia (3), or
POL 331 Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991 (3);
and
3. ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3), or
GEO 307 Geography of Russia (3), or
GEO 408/508 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of
Asia) (3), or
HST 436 Havighurst Colloquium (3), or
ITS 402O Transition to Democracy (3), or
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3), or
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3), or
POL 334 Politics of Eastern Europe (3)
PSY 1 Perspectives on Psychopathology.
Uses a psychological perspective to consider the personal and
interpersonal experience of psychopathology and to analyze the
impact of psychopathology on society as a whole. Begins with a
general examination of individual and social psychopathology and
builds toward in-depth exploration of selected specific individual or
social issues related to psychopathology.
Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4) (MPF).
1. PSY 242 Abnormal Psychology (3); and
2. PSY 343 Psychopathology (3); and
3. PSY 345 Childhood Psychopathology & Developmental
Disabilities (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.
PSY 2 Patterns in Human Development.
Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change. How
does our biological makeup interact with our physical and social
surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A scientific
approach to developmental psychology requires us to think critically
in examining theories and research and to understand the contexts
in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and research
are conducted. Engage with other learners as you reflect on ideas
about why we develop the way we do. Such reflection provides an
informed basis for acting on issues affecting children, youth,
families, and elders.
Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4) (MPF), or EDP 101
Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (3) (MPF).
1. PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3); and
The second and third courses must be selected in order of their
position in the life span, as follows:
2. PSY 332 Child Development (3), or
FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (3); and
Liberal Education at Miami /43
3. PSY 333 Adolescent Development (3), or
FSW/EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse
Families (3) OR
1. PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3); and
2. PSY 333 Adolescent Development (3), or
FSW/EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse
Families (3); and
3. PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in
the Department of Educational Psychology and Department of Family
Studies and Social Work must choose a minimum of nine hours outside
their department of major.
PSY 4 Developmental Patterns in Adulthood.
Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change.
Adulthood and aging are a culmination of lifespan development.
How does our biological makeup interact with our physical and
social surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A
scientific approach to the study of aging requires us to think
critically in examining theories and research and to understand the
contexts in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and
research are conducted.
Prerequisite PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4) (MPF), or EDP 101
Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (3) (MPF).
1. PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3); and
2. PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (3); and
3. BWS/GTY 472 Minority Aging (3), or
GTY/FSW 466 The Family in Later Life (3), or
KNH 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (3), or
SOC/GTY/WGS 463 Gender and Aging (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in
the Departments of Educational Psychology, Kinesiology and Health,
and Sociology and Gerontology must select a minimum of nine hours
outside their department of major.
PSY 5 Cognition: Understanding and Improving Thought.
Offers opportunity to reflect upon reasoning, those processes used to
create, maintain, modify, and evaluate beliefs about the world.
Begins by introducing the study of cognition within the discipline of
psychology; the second course emphasizes specific cognitive
processes (e.g., language) and methods and theories associated with
their study; the third course offers an in-depth analysis of current
theories and methods of studying cognition within a circumscribed
topic area.
1. PSY 271 Cognition (3); and
2. PSY 372 Learning and Cognition (4), or
PSY 374 Psychology of Language and Thought (3); and
3. PSY 470 Seminar in Cognition (3); or
PSY 471 Spatial Cognition (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.
PSY 6 Applied Leadership and Pedagogy.
The redesigned introductory psychology (PSY111) course focuses on
developing skills used by psychologists in using evidence to support
their beliefs. Students will be invited to participate in leadership
training (PSY211) that will train them to lead small discussion
groups of introductory psychology students (PSY212) in which the
leaders guide students in practicing their use of these critical
thinking skills. The final course (PSY 313) promotes reflection on
their experience as a discussion leader and provides an opportunity
to engage in a facet of their experience in more depth. These goals
are achieved by pursuing a project designed as part of their
practicum experience in PSY 212, engaging in an additional
pedagogical experience, mentoring new discussion leaders or taking
another course approved by the faculty member teaching PSY 313.
With respect to the subject-matter of how psychologists/scientists
use evidence: Participants in this thematic sequence begin as
students "learning" principles of scientific thinking (PSY 111). The
second course (PSY 211) affords the students more advanced
training in the skills of how scientists use evidence. The third course
(PSY 212) affords students the opportunity to serve as guides for
students in PSY 111 learning the same principles for the first
time. Finally, PSY 313 affords students the opportunity to use their
prior experiences as the basis to guided inquiry into the nature of
learning and pedagogy.
1. PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4); and
2. PSY 211 Psychological Perspectives on Leadership and
Pedagogy in the College Classroom (2), or
PSY 212 Practicum in Leadership and Pedagogy (3); and
3. PSY 470 Seminar in Cognition (3)
REL 1 Religion and American Life.
Acquaints you with fundamental themes in the relationship between
religion and society, as exemplified in the development of American
religious pluralism in theory and practice, as well as in the impact of
religious themes in the development of an American cultural
identity.
1. REL 101 American Religious Encounters (3) (MPF), or
REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (3) (MPF), or
REL 103 Religion, History and Society (3) (MPF); and
2. AMS/REL 241 Religions of the American Peoples (4), or
AMS/REL 242 Religious Pluralism in Modern America
(4), or
AMS/REL/WGS 245 Women, Religion, and Social
Change in America (4); and
3. AMS/REL 341 Protestantism and the Development of
American Culture (4), or
AMS/REL 442 Religion, Society, and Culture in New
England (4), or
REL/BWS 343 African American Religions (4), or
REL/AMS 445 Issues in the Study of Native American
Religions (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.
REL 2 The Historical and Comparative Study of Religion.
Uses the approach of the history of religions to provide perspective
continuity and depends heavily on the study and interpretation of
classical foreign-language texts in English translation, while using
case studies, surveys, and field reports. Unlike some sequences in
the humanities that concentrate on religious ideas and doctrines, this
sequence utilizes categories developed from the field of comparative
religion to acquaint students with the diversity of religious
phenomena. Emphasizes the importance of studying religion in a
comparative and global context; allows a choice of emphasis of
either major Eastern or Western religious traditions, at the second
level.
1. REL 101 American Religious Encounters (3) (MPF); and
2. REL 202 Religions of Asia (3), or
REL 211 Religions of the Hebrew Bible (3); and
3. REL 302 Methods for the Study of Religion (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.
REL 3 Religion and Philosophy of Buddhist Asia.
Note: This thematic sequence was under review at the time of
publication.
Seeks to give students a firm grounding in the patterns of thought,
symbolism, and behavior originating in and associated with
Buddhism. Students follow the path of Buddhism from its birth in
Upanishadic India to its function as a bridge culture knitting
together much of Asia.
1. PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India and South Asia (3)
(MPF); and
2. REL 323 Buddhism in India and South Asia (3); and
3.
Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Philosophy or
Comparative Religion.
REL 5 Jewish Civilization Through History.
Note: This thematic sequence was under review at the time of
publication.
Acquaints students with the history of the Jewish people through
their religious culture, social ideas, and political institutions; helps
students understand the distinctive forms of Jewish ethnic
self-identity as they have developed through history; and helps
students appreciate both the positive and negative aspects of the
interaction of Jews with Christians and Muslims in a variety of
geographical and cultural settings.
44/ Liberal Education at Miami
1. HST 346 Medieval Jewish History (3), or
REL 211 Religions of the Hebrew Bible (3), or
REL 213 Social and Religious History of the Jewish People
(3) (MPF); and
2. Two of the following:
REL 385 The Religious Roots of Anti-Semitism (3), or
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.
RUS 1 Russia and the Soviet Union.
Examines Russian culture, society, and politics from an
interdisciplinary perspective, including major Russian literary
works, historical patterns, and political leaders and parties from the
10th century to the present. By considering this interaction, you gain
meaningful insights into the development of Russia as well as
acquire useful perspectives on Western society.
1. RUS/ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to
Dostoevsky in English Translation (3) (MPF), or
RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation:
From Tolstoy to Nabokov (3); and
2. HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3), or
HST 375 Russia and the USSR from 1855 to the Present
(3), or
HST 470 Topics in Russian History (3), or
HST 475 Images of Russia At Home and Abroad: 16th
Century to Present (3); and
3. POL/HST 230 Topics in Russian Culture and Civilization
(3), or
POL 331 Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991 (3),
or
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3), or
POL 430B Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe
(4)
Note: Not open to Russian majors or majors in the Departments of
History or Political Science.
RUS 2 Russian Culture.
Examines Russian culture from the point of view of artistic media,
including major literary works, films, and varieties of folkloric
expression. Russian folklore, film, and literature often explore some
of the same issues, central to the society they reflect, like rebellion
and revolution, alienation and the creation of a community, and the
intricacies of social and sexual relationships. Through the study of
diverse elite and popular approaches to these topics, you gain an
appreciation of some pervasive Russian attitudes and concerns.
1. RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3) (MPF), or
RUS/ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to
Dostoevsky in English Translation (3) (MPF); and
2. RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation:
Tolstoy to Nabokov (3), or
RUS 257/ENG 267 Russian Literature in English
Translation: Pasternak to Present (3); and
3. FST/RUS 263 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
Note: Not open to Russian majors.
RUS 3 Developing Language Skills in Russian.
For students who have completed the first two semesters of
college-level Russian language or the equivalent. This sequence
develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a
variety of materials drawn from textbooks, fiction, the Internet and
journalism as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by
small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may
not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.
1. RUS 201 Intermediate Russian (3); and
2. RUS 202 Intermediate Russian (3); and
3. RUS 301 Advanced Russian (3)
Note: Not open to Russian majors.
SBI 1 Summer Business Institute for Non-Business Majors/Minors.
Students will acquire a basic understanding of how businesses and
people work together, providing synergy with the student's chosen
major. Six-week program is designed to help talented non-business
students develop a clear advantage in the competitive job market.
The sequence assumes that you have no prior knowledge of business
topics and is intended to make business learning interesting,
accessible, and valuable to students in all majors.
Prerequisite: Students must have 60 hours of college credit and permission
of the instructor.
Take these three courses:
1. BUS 301 Macro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3);
and
2. BUS 302 Micro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3); and
3. BUS 303 Business Process Integration (3)
Note: Not open to students with majors or minors in business.
SCA 1 Experiencing Arts and Culture
Students will travel domestically or abroad to a particular urban
location(s) (e.g. New York, Paris, Milan, Prague, etc.) for an
immersive thematic sequence focused on the global importance and
impact of the integrated creative arts (e.g.: architecture, interior
design, theatre, studio arts, graphic design, music, etc.). This
intensive, experiential program will help a student from any major
develop a general knowledge of cultural history, and an
understanding of the theories and application of various forms of
the creative arts. This sequence assumes no prior knowledge and is
intended to make the creative arts interesting, accessible, and
valuable for all majors. There are no prerequisites, but students need
to have completed 30 hours, or have permission of the instructor.
This will ensure that the sequence builds on the foundational liberal
education knowledge gained in the first year. Instruction will be
provided by a multi-disciplinary team of faculty from the School of
Creative Arts.
1. SCA 121 Introduction to the integrated Arts and Culture (3);
and
2. SCA 221 Immersion in the Integrated Arts and Culture (3);
and
3. SCA 321 Application in the Integrated Arts and Culture (3)
SCA 2 Principles in Innovation, Creativity, and Design Thinking.
Sponsored by the Miami Design Collaborative, a multi-disciplinary
network that brings together faculty and students from throughout
Miami to study and practice principles in innovation and design
process, this sequence: provides multi-disciplinary learning
opportunities
where
students
can
experience
different
problem-solving orientations inherent in various disciplinary
perspectives; offers learning opportunities focused on contemporary
issues; fuses design thinking processes inherent in art, psychology,
entrepreneurship, and interactive media; and balances theory and
practice, allowing students to implement their ideas through
project-based learning.
1. SCA 111 Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking (3)
(MPF)*; and
2. ART 256 Design, Perception & Audience (3) (MPF)*, or
IMS 253 Building Interactive Objects (3), or
PSY 271 Cognitive Psychology (3); and
3. ESP 464 Social Entrepreneurship (3), or
ESP 469 Entrepreneurship in Complex Organizations (3),
or
PSY 453 Human Factors/Ergonomics (4)
Note: *Only one Foundation (FND) course can count toward both a
Foundation requirement and a Thematic Sequence. Since this
sequence includes multiple FND courses, not all of these FND courses
will automatically apply to the sequence. Nevertheless, all courses
listed here are available for this Thematic Sequence.You may add any
omitted courses to your Thematic Sequence by visiting the Office of
Liberal Education for assistance in meeting the allowable
requirements.
SDT 1 Self-Designed Thematic Sequence.
The purpose of the self-designed thematic sequence is to provide
students with the opportunity to design a specialized thematic
sequence beyond those that are currently offered. This sequence
should be based on the student's interests, career, goals, and
intellectual interests. A proposal must be submitted to the Office of
Liberal Education for approval (229 Culler Hall or visit
www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed) before the last 6 hours have been
completed. This is a preapproval process.
SJS 1 Social Justice and Inequalities.
The goal of this sequence is to introduce students to social justice
studies from a sociological perspective, with particular focus on
social inequalities. The objectives of the sequence are: (a) to explain
Liberal Education at Miami /45
how various sociological and philosophical theories of justice
contribute differentially to human rights and social justice-based
policies, programs, and declarations/covenants at both national and
global levels; (b) to evaluate consistencies and disparities between
micro- and macro-level efforts to achieve social justice; (c) to develop
core sociological concepts and theories across the three levels of
courses; (d) to facilitate and guide personal insight and reflection for
acting in a morally just way.
1. SOC/SJS 165 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3); and
2. SOC 205 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization (3),
or
SOC 225 Work and Occupational Justice (3), or
AAA/SOC 207 China and Globalization (3); and
3. SJS/SOC 323 Social Justice and Change (3), or
SOC/BWS 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3), or
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3), or
SJS/SOC 487 Globalization, Human Rights and Social
Justice (3)
SJS 2 Social Justice, Law, and Crime.
The goal of this sequence is to introduce students to social justice
studies from a sociological perspective, with particular focus on law
and crime. The objectives of the sequence are: (a) to explain how
various sociological and philosophical theories of justice contribute
differentially
to
justice-based
policies,
programs
and
declarations/covenants at both national and global levels; (b) to
evaluate consistencies and disparities between micro- and
macro-level efforts to achieve social justice; (c) to link core
sociological concepts and theories across the three levels of courses;
(c) to facilitate personal insights for reflecting and acting in a morally
just way.
1. SJS/SOC 165 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3); and
2. SOC 201 Social Problems (4), or
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4); and
3. SOC 352 Criminology (3), or
SOC 409 Systems of Justice (3), or
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3) , or
SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 2 Applied Social Science Methods.
Emphasizes the applied dimensions of social research, and reviews
the basic methodologies social scientists employ in their research.
Although you receive exposure to the techniques involved,
emphasis is on the thinking processes involved in doing social
research and in applying research findings. Learn how to frame
questions, link them to basic concepts in sociology and
anthropology, how to decide on appropriate methodologies, how to
examine data, and how to link the results of research to theoretical
and applied issues.
Prerequisite: Either SOC 151 (3) (MPF) or SOC 153 (3) (MPF) or ATH
155 (3) (MPF).
1. SOC 262 Research Methods (4); and
2. ATH 265 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (4); and
3. ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology or the Department of Anthropology.
SOC 3 Sociological Perspectives on Inequality.
Uses a sociological perspective to approach the issues of social,
political, and economic inequality in contemporary society, paying
particular attention to inequality as it is determined by class, race,
and gender. Begins with an examination of theories of social
stratification; then follows a sequence of courses that allows you to
develop an in-depth understanding of the major dimensions of
social inequality.
Prerequisite: SOC 151 Social Relations (3) (MPF) or SOC 153 (3) (MPF) or
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4) (MPF).
1. SOC/WGS 203 Sociology of Gender (3); and
2. BWS/SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3), or
BWS/SOC 448 The African American Experience (3); and
3. SOC 372 Social Stratification (3), or
SOC 411 Social Conflict (3), or
SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)
Note: Not open to sociology or gerontology majors.
SOC 4 Sociological Perspectives on Criminality and Deviance.
Students will use the social dynamics of history and a sociological
perspective to understand and critique conformity, crime, deviance,
and the justice system in contemporary society, paying particular
attention to the social construction of legality, normality, and crime
as influenced by various cultural contexts. The sequence begins with
an examination of the basic theories and components of
deviance/conformity, then follows a sequence of courses that allows
them to examine and develop an understanding of the criminology
field and concludes with an advanced course. Students must apply
for this Thematic Sequence; enrollment is limited.
1. SOC 201 Social Problems (4), or
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4); and
2. SOC 352 Criminology (3); and
3. SOC 409 Systems of Justice (3), or
SOC 410 Topics in Criminology (3), or
SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
Note: Not open to sociology or gerontology majors.
SOC 5 Gender and Family Studies.
Sequence exposes students to the major sociological contributions to
gender and family issues and gives them experience in connecting
the substantive content in the courses. Objectives include: 1)
demonstrating how various sociological theories differentially
contribute to our understanding of gender, sexuality, and families; 2)
linking the core concepts sociologists employ across three levels of
courses; 3) highlighting how definitional issues and current research
in gender, sexuality, and family intersect, and 4) deriving personal
insights for reflecting and acting regarding one's position in the
social structure as to gender, sexuality, and family.
1. SOC/WGS 203 Sociology of Gender (3); and
2. SOC/WGS/FSW 221 Human Sexuality (3); and
3. SOC 361/FSW 363 Sociology of Families (3), or
FSW/GTY 466 Later Life Families (3)
Note: Not open to sociology and gerontology majors. Majors in the
Departments of Women's and Gender Studies and Family Studies and
Social Work must complete at least nine hours outside the department
of major.
SPA 2 Exploring Social Emotional and Communication Consequences
in Special Populations.
Offers students the opportunity to develop insight into: (1) the
problems facing physically, mentally, communicatively, culturally,
or socially challenged individuals in our society; (2) the
development of structures and environments needed for such
individuals to communicate effectively, and (3) how these
environmental modifications can be implemented. Provides specific
information on recognizing and treating physical and
communicative disorders, with emphasis placed on those problems
that impact the normal development of speech, hearing, and
language.
1. SPA 127 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3); and
2. EDP 256 Psychology of Learners with Exceptionalities (3); or
SPA 233 Perspectives of the Human Face (3); and
3. SPA 427 Alternative Communication Systems for the
Severely Handicapped (3), or
EDP 491 Teaching Students with Mild and Moderate
Disabilities (3).
Note: Not open to speech pathology and audiology majors. Special
education majors must take all SPA courses (nine hours minimum
outside department of major).
SPN 1 Literature and Culture in Spain.
Focuses on the literature of Spain, exploring the interrelationships
among texts, history, and culture. SPN 313, a Foundation course,
emphasizes skills in the analysis and interpretation of Spanish texts;
SPN 413 explores social and historical circumstances (Christian
reconquest, rise of monarchy, colonialism, tradition, and modernity)
as represented in Spanish literature; SPN 420 engages in an in-depth
exploration of an important cultural theme in Spanish literature,
such as explorations of national identity, medieval and Golden Age
views of love, urban versus rural culture, and the literature of the
Spanish civil war.
Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.
1. SPN 315 Intro to Hispanic Literatures (3); and
2. SPN 351 Cultural History of Spain I (3); and
46/ Liberal Education at Miami
3. SPN 352 Cultural History of Spain II (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and
Portuguese.
SPN 2 Literature and Culture in Spanish America.
Focuses on the literature of Spanish America, exploring the
interrelationships among texts, history, and culture. SPN 315, a
Foundation course, emphasizes skills in the analysis and
interpretation of Spanish American texts; SPN 361 explores social
and historical circumstances (colonialism through national
independence, issues of national development) as represented in
Spanish American literature; SPN 362 continues to focus on cultural
and historical circumstances in Spanish American literature from the
nineteenth to the twenty-first century. All courses taught in Spanish,
and all work is completed in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.
1. SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
2. SPN 361 Cultural History of Spanish America I (3)
3. SPN 362 Cultural History of Spanish America II (3)
SPN 3 Spanish Linguistics and Culture.
Focuses on the study of language as a sign of cultural identity and as
a social marker. Although the focus is on Spanish, the general goal is
to develop the students' ability to think critically about the
connection between language and the social and cultural contexts in
which it develops and exists. Students will learn to collect and
interpret linguistic data, discuss historical events and conditions that
have determined the evolution of Spanish dialects and the
establishment of a standard, and evaluate current linguistic conflicts
in the Spanish-speaking world.
1. SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Language and Linguistics
(3), and
2. SPN 381 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture I (3); and
3. SPN 382 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture II (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and
Portuguese.
STA 1 Quality Issues in Contemporary Business and Industry.
Provides sufficient understanding of the factors influencing quality
and organizational productivity. Upon completion, you should be
able to critically examine work systems and play a leading role in the
improvement of any work process in which you are involved. Key
themes include: data based decision-making, use of statistical tools
for process analysis and quality improvement, measurement of
quality, Total Quality Management, quality leadership, employee
involvement, and the relationship between work processes and
quality improvement systems.
1. ISA 205 Business Statistics (4), or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4); and
2. MGT 302 Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain
Management (3); and
3. ISA/STA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
MME 334 Quality Planning and Control (3); and
4. MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Management. Majors in
the departments of Decision Sciences and Management Information
Systems; Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering; and
Mathematics and Statistics must select a minimum of nine hours from
outside their department of major.
STA 2 Applied Statistics.
Provides a basic understanding of the statistical data analysis
procedures of estimation and hypothesis testing and their use in
data-based decision making. Based primarily on the “classical”
assumptions of random sampling and normal distributions, data
analysis applications range from one and two population problems
to more complex problems of regression and design of experiments.
The first course, chosen from three options, introduces additional
statistical procedures that go beyond the “classical” assumptions.
Considers examples from a variety of disciplines and life
experiences and employs statistical software extensively.
1. STA 261 Statistics (MPF) (4), or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4); and
2. STA 363 Regression and Design of Experiments (3); and
3. STA/ISA 333 Nonparametric Statistics (3), or
STA/ISA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
STA/ISA 432 Survey Sampling in Business (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and
Statistics. Majors in decision science and management information
systems must select a statistics course at the third level.
THE 1 Modern Theatre and Drama.
Study of the influences, backgrounds, playwrights, and theatre
artists that have brought about contemporary theatre production
practice, style, and dramaturgy. The eclecticism of 20th century
theatre reflects the shifting realities of science, culture, politics, and
aesthetics in a way that mirrors our attempts to understand
ourselves and our world. The objective is to reach an integrative
knowledge of the connectedness of art and society to understand
how in creating an image of our lives, in forging new realities, in
exploring new forms and styles, theatre artists have helped define
our response to the world and our experience.
1. THE 101 Theatre Production I: Theory and Analysis (3)
(MPF); and
THE 103 Theatre Production I Laboratory (1) (MPF), or
THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (3) (MPF); and
2. THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic
Literature (3); and
3. One from the following:
THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3), or
THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3), or
THE 395 American Musical I: A History to 1950 (3), or
THE 396 The American Musical II: A Contemporary
History 1950-2005 (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Theatre.
WGS 1 Women and the World.
This sequence focuses on understanding women's historical and
contemporary socio-cultural and political realities from an
international perspective. Students will learn to use gender as a
category of analysis, to understand complex issues and processes
related to an increasingly interconnected world system and the ways
women and gender are implicated in these processes, and to apply
this knowledge to the topical issues of either the environment and
natural resources or the politics of varied forms of cultural
representation and interpretation.
1. WGS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3) (MPF); and
2. WGS/POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3), or
WGS/HST 450 Topics in Women's History (3); and
3. WGS/REL 333 Religion, Dress, and Status (3), or
WGS/GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
Note: Not open to women's studies majors.
WGS 2 Scholarly Studies of Gender and Sexuality.
The thematic sequence in Scholarly Studies of Gender and Sexuality
provides an opportunity for investigating and analyzing the
historical, social, legal, and cultural forces that shape experiences,
expressions, and representations of non-normative genders and
sexualities including, but not necessarily limited to Gay, Lesbian,
Bisexual, Transgendered, Intersex and Queer individuals and
communities. Students will receive a broad, interdisciplinary
introduction to scholarship in GLBTIQ studies in the foundation
course, then focus more specifically on a disciplinary or topical
perspective in tier two, ultimately engaging with the philosophical
and theoretical aspects of investigating sexuality and gender as
meaning-making cultural and social systems.
1. WGS 202 Introduction to GLBT Studies (3) (MPF)*; and
2. BWS 492 African & American Sexualities (3), or
COM/FST 281 Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays,
Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic
Media (3) (MPF)*, or
COM/FST 282 Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays,
Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic
Media (3), or
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3) (MPF)*, or
ENG 237 GLBTQ Literature (3), or
SOC/WGS 203 Sociology of Gender Roles (3), or
SOC/FSW/WGS 221 Human Sexuality (3); and
3. WGS/ENG 435 Queer Theory (3)
Liberal Education at Miami /47
*Only one foundation course in any thematic sequence may count
toward a student's foundation requirements.
Note: Not open to women's studies majors.
WST 1 Lenses and Legacies - Integrating Knowledge.
This thematic sequence explores real world problems through
multiple disciplinary lenses. With a layered, interdisciplinary
approach, students confront various legacies that situate us in the
present moment. The sequencing of the courses allows students to
move through a process of exploring and positioning themselves in
the world, integrating knowledge across disciplines, and then
applying solutions. Engaging different themes such as "Self and
Place," "Hurricane Katrina," "Health and Community," or
"Representing Place and Community, " students understand
knowledge construction and practical experiences using
inquiry-based and integrative methods. We note that the learning
outcomes of the course will remain constant as topics vary.
1. WST 201 Self and Place (3), or
WST 231 Interdisciplinary Inquiry (3; maximum 6)
2. WST 301 Interdisciplinary Problems and Questions (3)
3. WST 322 Developing Interdisciplinary Projects: Using
Analytical and Rhetorical Tools (3)
ZOO 1 Concepts in Physiology.
Provides an understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms
involved in physiological systems. Begins with a Foundation course
then provides more depth to cellular and molecular mechanisms of
action in physiological processes.
1. BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4) (MPF), or
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) (MPF); and
2. ZOO/BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3); and
3. ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Zoology.
ZOO 2 Animal Diversity.
Illustrates the diversity of organisms within the Kingdom Animalia.
This diversity includes variation in body structure and function, life
history traits, and ecological roles. Upon completion, students will
be able to describe major patterns in variation among animal taxa,
understand mechanisms that lead to creation of such variation, and
provide detailed examples of animal diversity.
1. ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) (MPF), or
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4) (MPF); and
2. ZOO/BOT 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3), or
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3); and
3. ZOO 311 Vertebrate Zoology (4), or
ZOO 312 Invertebrate Zoology (4)
Note: Not open to zoology majors.
Thematic Sequences Available at Dolibois
European Center in Luxembourg
For information, contact the Oxford Luxembourg Office, 218
MacMillan Hall (513-529-5050).
LUX 3 European Culture and Society. (Offered during the semester
programs and summer workshop)
This sequence permits students to draw on the variety of
European-focused courses available at the Dolibois European
Center to develop an in-depth understanding of the complexities
of contemporary Europe. Emphasis is on an interdiscisplinary
perspective which links cultural phenomena and socio-political
dynamics. Students must take at least one course form each of the
three groupings for a total of at least nine credit hours. Students
may include only one course from the department of their major in
the sequence.
Capstone Experience (3 hours minimum)
The Capstone Experience, completed near the end of
baccalaureate studies, integrates liberal learning with specialized
knowledge. Each Capstone emphasizes sharing of ideas, synthesis,
and critical, informed reflection as significant precursors to action,
and each includes student initiative in defining and investigating
problems or projects.
Capstones may be completed in or outside students' majors; in
some departments, the Capstone Experience may be a requirement
of the major. All Capstones presume a significant scholarly
background of specialized study in a major as well as in liberal
education course work. In other words, a Capstone does more than
culminate years of baccalaureate study: it culminates a student's
liberal education.
Ordinarily, a Capstone Experience is taken at Miami and
completed in the senior year (minimum of 96 hours registered or
earned). Students who plan to transfer any course to meet the
Capstone requirement must obtain permission from the Office of
Liberal Education before they take the course.
The
Office
of
Liberal
Education
website
(www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed) provides a complete listing of
Capstone Experiences. Please refer to the Courses of Instruction
chapter for course descriptions of the Capstones.
Students may propose their own Senior Capstone Experience.
See
the
Office
of
Liberal
Education
website
(www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed) for details.
Capstone Experience Courses
AES 432 National Security Forces in Contemporary American
Society (3)
AMS 401 Senior Capstone in American Studies (4)
ARC 402C Senior Studio Capstone Experience (6)
ARC 405U/GEO 493 Urban Field Experience (3)
ARC 408 Senior Interior Design Studio Capstone Experience (6)
ARC 426 Architecture and Society (3)
ART 419 Supervised Teaching in Art (16)
ART 452 Senior Degree Project (3)
ART 453 Highwire Brand Studio (4, maximum 8)
ART 492 Professional Artist's Portfolio and Exhibition Experience
(3)
ART 497 Museums as Interpreters of Culture (3)
ART 498 Seminar in the History and Methods of Art and
Architectural History (3)
ATH 421 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3)
ATH 426 Ethnographic Field Research (4-16)
ATH 448 Developing Solutions in Global Health (3)
ATH/ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BIS 401 Senior Integrative Seminar (3)
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, and Business (3)
BOT/ZOO 467 Conservation Biology (3)
BOT 490A Current Advances and Issues in Botany (1) (with
concurrent enrollment in BOT 477) (2)
BOT 490B Research/Internship Capstone in Botany (1) (with
concurrent enrollment in BOT 400 (2) or
BOT 477 (2) for research option; or concurrent enrollment in BOT
340 (2) for internship option)
BOT 490C Departmental Honors Capstone in Botany (1) (plus
concurrent enrollment in BOT 480) (2)
BOT 490D Undergraduate Botany Teaching (1) plus concurrent
enrollment in BOT 477 (2)
BOT 3-2 Program in Forestry/Environmental Management
BOT/GEO 496 Biodiversity of Kenya (5)
BOT 499A Tropical Flora of the Bahamas (4)
BWS/FST/LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution (4)
BWS/WGS 370E Feminism and the Diaspora: Women of Color in
the U.S. (3)
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (3)
CHM 492 Independent Research Capstone in Chemistry (3)
CIT 458 Collaborative System Development and Integration (3)
CLS 401 The Age of Pericles (3)
CLS 402 The Age of Augustus (3)
COM 411 Interactive Media Study Practicum (4)
COM 414 Capstone Pictures: Project in Digital Narrative Film
Production (4)
COM/JRN 415 Practicum in Television Journalism (3)
COM 437 Advocacy in Contemporary America (3)
48/ Liberal Education at Miami
COM 439 Advanced Organizational Communication (3)
COM 440 Practicum: Mass Media Advertising and Public Relations
(4)
COM 445 Seminar in Mass Communication Law (3)
COM 459 Advanced Public Relations (3)
CPE 471, 472 Engineering Design I, II (1, 2)
CSE 481 Technology for Managing Disease and Disability (3)
DST/ENG/SPA/COM/SOC/EDP 494 Disability in Global and
Local Contexts (3)
ECO 405 Managerial Economics (3)
ECO 427 The Great Depression Revisited (3)
EDL 401 Cultural Studies and the Complexity of Empowerment (3)
EDP 460 Action Research/Problem-based Seminar in Exceptional
Education/Developmental Differences (3)
EDP 471 Literacy Seminar: Clinical (3; maximum 6): Practicum (3)
EDT 422 Studies in Educational Issues (3)
EDT 495 Writing Information Books for Children (3)
EDT 499C Comparing Selected U.S. and European Schools (3)
Engineering 3-2 Program
ENG 405 Advanced Linguistics: The Research Program of Noam
Chomsky (3)
ENG 406 Discourse Analysis: Speech Acts in Context (3)
ENG 415 Capstone in Professional Writing (3)
ENG 460 Issues in Creative Writing (3)
ENG 495 Capstone in Literature (3)
ENG 496 English Studies: Reflections on Literature and Language
(3)
ENT 497, 498 Senior Design Project (2, 2)
ESP 461 Small/Emerging Enterprise Consulting (3)
ESP 467 Entrepreneurship: New Ventures (3)
FIN 485 Integrative Concepts in Finance (3)
FRE 410 Senior Seminar (3)
FSW/SOC/WGS 451 Family Violence (3)
FSW 462 Family Policy and Law (3)
FSW 498 Critical Thinking About Family Relationships (4)
GEO 491 Senior Seminar (4)
GEO 492 Geography of the Auto Industry (3)
GER 471 Linguistic Perspectives on Contemporary German (3)
GLG 411 Field Geology (6)
GTY 440G Field Experience in Gerontology (3)
HST 400 Senior Capstone in History (3-6)
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
ITS 402 Senior Capstone in International Studies (3)
JRN 421 Capstone in Journalism (3)
KNH 402 Critical Reflections on Health Care (3)
LAS 410 Current Latin American Issues (3)
MBI 440C Research Problems (2) and MBI 490 Undergraduate
Seminar (1)
MBI 477C Independent Study (2) and
MBI 490 Undergraduate Seminar (1)
MBI 480C Departmental Honors (2) and MBI 490 Undergraduate
Seminar (1)
MBI 487, 488, 489 Medical Laboratory Science Practicum (8, 12, 12
MGT 495 Strategic Management (3)
MKT 442 Highwire Brand Studio (4)
MKT 444H SocietyWise (4)
MKT 495 Marketing Strategy Practicum (4)
MME/ECE/CSE 448, 449 Senior Design Project (2, 1-2)
MTH 407 Mathematical Structures Through Inquiry
MTH 425 Number Theory (3)
MTH 435 Mathematical Modeling Seminar
MTH 482 Great Theorems of Mathematics (3)
MUS 453 Comparisons in the Arts (3)
MUS 475 Senior Practicum in Music Education (3)
MUS 493 Capstone Senior Recital (3)
NSG 435 Challenges in Health Care Delivery (3)
PHL 404 What is Philosophy? (3)
PHL 405 Philosophy for Children (4)
PHY 488A and 488B Research Capstone in Physics (3)
POL 419 Civil Society and Modern Politics (3)
POL 424 Transatlantic Seminar on the European Union (4)
POL 439 North American Politics: Unity and Diversity (3)
POL 459 Capstone Seminar on the American Political System (3)
POL 466 Public Policy Analysis (3)
POL 471 The International System (3)
POL 487 Individual Lives and International Politics (3)
POL 489 Conflict Management in a Divided World (3)
PSY 410 Capstone Seminar in Psychology: Multiple Determinants
of Behavior (3)
PSY 490 Research Apprenticeship in Psychology (3)
REL 402 Basic Structures in the History of Religions (4)
RUS 401 St. Petersburg: History, Literature, Culture (3)
SOC 459 Sociology Capstone (3)
SOC 462 Applied Sociological Research (3)
SPA 413 Senior Seminar in Communication Disorders (3)
SPA 499B Intercultural Workshop in Speech Pathology and
Audiology (3)
SPN 490 Issues in Hispanic Literature (3)
STA 475 Data Analysis Practicum (3)
THE 490 The Theatre and a Cultural Aesthetic (3)
WGS 401 The Role of Women in a Transforming Society (3)
WST 444, 445 Senior Workshop and Project (3, 2)
ZOO 400 Capstone Seminar: Contemporary Issues (3)
ZOO 419R Independent Research in Zoology (3)
ZOO 431 Winter Biology (3)
ZOO 444 Molecular Biology (3)
ZOO 452 Nerve and Muscle Physiology (4)
ZOO 453 Animal Physiological Ecology (4)
ZOO 454 Endocrinology (3)
ZOO 459/469 Methods in Neurophysiology/Neurophysiology (1,
3)
ZOO 462 Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment (4)
ZOO 465 Animal Behavior (4)
ZOO/BOT 467 Conservation Biology (3)
Beyond their liberal education courses, students must
complete work for their major and divisional requirements, and
complete additional hours for minors or electives.
Frequency of Course Offerings
Scheduling information is provided for some courses in the
Courses of Instruction chapter in this Bulletin. Scheduling patterns
are subject to change without notice based, usually, on student
demand, faculty availability, and programmatic priorities.
Changes of Course Offerings
Students enrolled under the Miami Plan previous to the fall
2010 semester may opt to fulfill their liberal education
requirements with the Global Miami Plan. Contact the divisional
advising offices for details.
Other Requirements /49
Other
Requirements
Divisions, Majors, and Minors
Academic Divisions and Departments
Miami University has seven academic divisions: College of
Arts and Science, Farmer School of Business, School of Education,
Health, and Society, School of Engineering and Applied Science,
School of Creative Arts, Regional Campus and Graduate School.
Within the undergraduate divisions are the academic
departments, offering major and minor programs. So, for example,
if your major is software engineering, you are in the School of
Engineering and Applied Science. All majors, minors, degrees, and
certificate programs are listed in the General Information chapter.
For a degree, you must fulfill three sets of requirements: the
Global Miami Plan for Liberal Education or the Honors Plan for
Liberal Education, the requirements of your academic division,
and the requirements of your major. If you have admission
prerequisites to be met, those also must be completed. Often these
requirements overlap; that is, one course may fulfill several
requirements.
Majors
Your major is your primary field of study, such as
architecture, geography, etc. Your major program requirements are
described in your academic division chapter of this Bulletin. For
example, requirements for a degree in geography are listed in the
College of Arts and Science section. All majors are listed in the
General Information chapter.
Although you do not need to choose a major when you enroll,
you are required to choose a division. In most cases, if you use
your first year to take courses that fulfill a part of the Miami Plan
and divisional requirements, you can still complete a major with
no delay. To declare your major, after taking classes for a semester
or more, request a change/declaration of major form from your
divisional office, complete the information, and have your
department chair sign. When you return it to your divisional office,
your program information is transferred to your academic records.
Minors
A minor is a second field of study taken along with a major.
Taking a minor is optional. This is a specific program that may
widen your primary area of interest or increase your career
opportunities. Most minors require fewer hours than majors—all
require at least 18 semester hours in a specified program. Minors
may be offered within one department or across several
departments.
Minors are offered in many fields of study. A list of minors is
in the General Information chapter; requirements for each minor
are included in each division’s chapter.
To earn a minor, these are the minimum requirements (some
minors require more):
 Notify the chief departmental adviser or chair of the
interdepartmental committee that you want to enroll in the
minor.
 You must have a 2.00 grade point average (GPA) for all
courses in a minor. Some minor programs may require a
higher GPA.


All courses taken for the minor must be for a grade, not for
credit/no-credit, unless exceptions are stated.
When you apply for graduation, you must indicate on your
application that you are receiving a certain minor. A minor
can only be awarded with a bachelor’s degree.
You may have more than one minor. All minors you complete
are noted on your academic record. Courses used to satisfy the
requirements for one minor may also be used to satisfy the
requirements for another minor or major. Not all major programs
allow students to record certain minors, and some minors are open
only to certain majors. Check with your adviser for more
information.
Students may use a minor to meet the Global Miami Plan
Thematic Sequence requirement if the minor has 9 hours outside
the department of major and 6 of those 9 hours are at the 200 level
or above. See the Global Miami Plan section for more information.
Changing a Major or Minor
To change your major or minor, go to your divisional dean’s
office and request a change/declaration of major form, fill in the
information, and have your department chair sign it. When you
return the form to your divisional office, your program
information is transferred to your academic record. If you need to
change divisions, go to the new divisional dean’s office to request
the form.
Additional Major, Minor, or Degree
With careful planning, you can complete requirements for
more than one major, minor, and/or more than one degree. Early
in your program, notify your divisional office(s), and departments
involved. Follow change of major process noted in Changing a
Major or Minor above to have your program of study noted on
your academic records and you will have advisers for your
programs.
You must pay a graduation fee for each degree you earn.
If you have already received a bachelor’s degree from another
accredited college or university, you can qualify for a degree from
Miami by earning an additional 32 semester hours and meeting all
requirements for the additional degree.
Miami Plan Thematic Sequence
To enroll in a Thematic Sequence, contact the department in
which the sequence is housed or go to the Office of Liberal
Education Web site (www.miami.muohio.edu/liberal-ed). See the
Liberal Education at Miami section in this Bulletin.
Basic Personal Computer Proficiency
Incoming students are expected to demonstrate a minimum
proficiency with the use of a personal computer and basic software
programs. These minimum proficiencies include:
1. the ability to use the Internet to find and retrieve
information including: locating an Internet site given a
URL; navigating between information sources; doing basic
searches using a major Internet search service; and
submitting information via on-line forms.
2. the ability to use electronic mail as a form of
communication including: sending an e-mail when given
an e-mail address; responding to an e-mail; sending e-mail
to a group of individuals; and sending and receiving
attachments as part of an e-mail.
50/ Other Requirements
3. the ability to use a word processing program to create and
edit documents including: creating a new document;
editing an existing document; changing the format of text;
and changing margins, page orientation, and other
elements of page layout.
4. the ability to use an operating system including copying or
moving a file to or from removable media; finding files or
folders on a local hard drive; and creating a sub-directory
(folder).
Students who have not acquired these skills prior to entering
the university will be provided with training opportunities during
their first semester.
Physical Education
Physical education is optional. No more than 10 semester
hours of physical education (kinesiology and health) courses
numbered KNH 110-170 can count toward a bachelor’s degree; no
more than five semester hours can count toward an associate’s
degree.
Credit More Than 10 Years Old
If your course of study is prolonged beyond 10 years, curricula
changes adopted after your entrance date as a degree candidate
may be required by the university, division, or department.
Students who have earned credits more than 10 years before
their planned graduation date must petition to their divisional
committee of advisers to validate these credits. Students are
responsible for supplying course descriptions or a college catalog
from those colleges previously attended.
Requirements for Graduation
All majors, minors, and degrees are listed in the General
Information chapter.
Associate’s Degree
An associate’s degree, generally offered only on the regional
campuses, requires:
 At least 64 semester hours, including 16 hours from
Hamilton or Middletown campuses (An exception to this is
the Associate in Arts; see below.)
 Fulfillment of the Miami Plan for Liberal Education
appropriate to your associate’s degree
 Six of your last 10 hours must be taken at Miami University
 At least a 2.00 cumulative GPA
 Fulfillment of your program requirements
 Applying for graduation whether or not you plan to attend
the ceremony
If you continue your education past 64 semester hours and
your GPA falls below 2.00, you can still receive an associate’s
degree if your GPA was 2.00 at the time you finished 64 semester
hours and your degree requirements. Your academic record will
show when you have completed the requirements, and your
associate’s degree will be awarded at the next commencement.
Associate in Arts
The Associate in Arts in general studies is available to any
Miami University student. For this degree, 32 of the required 64
semester hours must be from any Miami campus. See the program
requirements in the Miami University Hamilton and Middletown
section.
Bachelor’s Degree
For a bachelor’s degree, basic requirements for graduation
include:
 Fulfillment of the Miami Plan:
Foundation courses
36 semester hours
Thematic Sequence
9 semester hours
Capstone Experience
3 semester hours
Field (major/ courses,
divisional requirements,
electives)
Total
80-86 semester
128 semester hours
OR fulfillment of the Honors Plan (which takes the place of the
Foundation courses, Thematic Sequence, and Capstone
Experience; for more information regarding the Honors Plan
requirements, see p. 23 or contact the Honors Program at
513-529-3399).
 Of the total 128 semester hours, at least 32 must be from
Miami University (any campus), including 12 of the final 20
hours required for the bachelor’s degree.
 At least a 2.00 cumulative GPA.
 If you are enrolled in an arts- professional arrangement
program, in which you transfer to another university after
three years, you must earn 96 Miami hours in the College of
Arts and Science. In all cases, 32 of your last 40 hours must
be from Miami.
 Applying for graduation whether or not you plan to attend
the ceremony.
Application for Graduation
To graduate, whether or not you plan to attend the ceremony,
you must submit an application and pay a fee. If you earn more
than one degree, you must pay a graduation fee for each.
Applications for graduation are available on Bannerweb. After
your application is processed, your account will be assessed the
appropriate fee, and you will be billed by the Bursar’s office.
You are encouraged to apply for graduation at least a semester
in advance. This way, routine checks can be made in time to inform
you of any problems in meeting your degree requirements.
Applications should be received no later than 30 working days
before commencement.
If you apply for graduation and then do not qualify for the
degree, you must notify the Office of the Registrar of the date you
intend to finish your requirements. All deadlines applicable to
first-time applications apply to re-applications.
Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS)
A DAR shows your completed course work and current
registration matched with degree requirements of your declared
major; it identifies deficiencies and lists courses to satisfy specific
requirements. The report assists you, your adviser, and the
university in determining your progress toward completion of
your program requirements and serves as a graduation check.
Your DAR is available online (http://bannerweb.muohio.edu/).
You may also request a DAR at the Office of the Registrar, 118
Campus Avenue Building; a picture I.D. is required.
Other Requirements /51
Student Responsibility
Although all students are offered academic advice throughout
their time here—through freshman advisers, academic
departments, and deans’ offices—please understand that the final
responsibility for meeting all graduation requirements rests with
you, the student.
52/ Academic Planning
Academic Planning
Educational Decisions
Choosing a Major and Making Career Choices
This is never a simple decision. Many students change majors
at least once.
Although you do not need to choose a specific major, you will
need to choose a division when you register. If you are undecided,
you are assigned to the College of Arts and Science for advising
purposes. In most cases, if you use your first year to take courses
that fulfill the Miami Plan and divisional requirements, you can
still complete a major program with no delay. However, to
complete some majors in a four year time period, you must begin
them as a first year student.
To make academic and career choices, you need to consider
your interests and abilities. By now you probably have a strong
sense of your academic strengths and weaknesses. Your interests,
however, are still developing and, like more specific skills, depend
on exposure to various activities and ideas.
Career Services, located at 200 Hoyt Hall on Western Campus,
can also help with your major and/or career search. It has an
extensive Career Resource Center with numerous career-related
books and directories and computer-assisted career guidance
programs. The Career Services website www.muohio.edu/careers/
provides useful career information and links to dozens of other
career-related sites. Career Services offers standardized career
assessments to help you learn about your interests, abilities, and
values and to relate them to your academic and career choices.
Career Assistants can help you work through the decision-making
process and find needed resources. They can also make Career
Advising appointments for you with the professional staff to help
you make career and/or major-related decisions.
A two-credit-hour course, EDL 100 Career Development and
the College Student, provides opportunities to learn more about
selecting a career and appropriate major. It is offered to first- and
second-year students. Call Career Services to inquire about this
(513-529-3831).
If you want help with job search skills (e.g. resume help, job or
internship search strategies) or need information about specific
careers or internships, you can also visit Career Services. This
office hosts 300-350 employers each year for on-campus interviews.
Career and job-search advising is available by appointment and
during specified walk-in hours.
A second two credit hour course, EDL 302 Career Entry
Skills/Post-College Planning is designed to assist students in
making the transition from college to the world-of-work, service
and/or graduate or professional school. This course covers skills
related to attaining career goals, and is offered to juniors and
seniors.
Finally, don't forget to talk with advisers in any academic
division or department; they can advise you on curriculum, career
opportunities within fields, and opportunities for advanced study.
Programs with Special Admission Requirements
Some programs have special requirements that call for careful
planning. For example, you must be admitted to most majors in the
School of Creative Arts or the Department of Nursing (Hamilton &
Middletown campuses only) before you declare the major. Also,
teacher licensure programs and science and technical major
programs require specific courses that are usually taken in order.
It is important to check your major's requirements. Programs
are listed in each division's chapter.
At present, majors with limited or restricted entry include
mass communication, journalism, technical and scientific
communication, nursing, social work, special education, speech
communication, speech pathology and audiology, all licensure
programs in the Department of Teacher Education, strategic
communication, and all programs in the Farmer School of Business
and most majors in the School of Creative Arts.
Academic Advising
Academic advisers are available to help you understand
academic requirements and to address your concerns. They can
provide you with information and resources that will help you
make decisions about your class schedule, course of study, and
future opportunities.
First year advisers serve as the primary academic adviser for
students during their first semester at Miami. First year advisers
are full time and graduate student staff who live and work in the
residence halls. First year commuter students are advised by the
Commuter Center graduate adviser in the Commuter Center,
located in room 100 of Shriver Center.
In addition to the first-year adviser, students in the School of
Creative Arts and the School of Engineering and Applied Science
are assigned a faculty adviser during their first year to further
assist them with academic requirements.
In the second semester of your first year, or when you transfer
to Miami as an upper-class student, you will be assigned a faculty
adviser in your major. For example, if you are a botany major, a
faculty member in that department will be your adviser. If you
change majors, your adviser will also change. Students who are
undecided about their major will be advised by an academic
adviser in the College of Arts and Science advising office.
Freshman Mid-Semester Grade Reports
Midterm grades are available to first year students online
through BannerWeb in mid-October. In the spring semester,
midterm grades are issued only to continuing students who earned
16 or fewer credit hours in their previous semester(s). Midterm
grades provide students the opportunity to assess their academic
performance while there is still time to improve before receiving
official grades. Midterm grades are not recorded on student's
academic records. First year advisers also have access to students'
midterm grades, and they will meet with all students who are
struggling to discuss strategies for improving academic
performance.
Academic Support
Bernard B. Rinella, Jr. Learning Center
14 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-8741
www.muohio.edu/learning
Students experiencing academic difficulty can seek assistance
at the Rinella Learning Center. One-to-one and small group
tutoring is available; tutoring is geared to develop self-confidence
and independence. Peer tutors reinforce course material and help
students to develop strategies to learn class material, prepare for
homework, and take exams. Tutoring is free of charge. Requests for
tutoring can be made on-line at www.muohio.edu/tutoring. Learning
specialists are also available for individual consultations.
Also coordinated in this office are academic support services
for student athletes, students with LD/ADD, students on academic
warning, probation or returning from suspension, and the
scholastic enhancement and supplemental instruction and tutorial
assistance programs.
Academic Planning /53
Office of Disability Resources (ODR)
Instructors' Office Hours
19 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-1541 (TTY accessible)
www.muohio.edu/ODR
For students with physical, medical, psychological and
neurological disabilities, ODR ensures program accessibility and
compliance relative to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973
and the Americans with Disabilities Act. ODR coordinates
accommodations through various campus and state agencies to
provide services including, but not limited to, alternative formats
for textbooks, route training, campus transportation, sign language
interpreters, CART services, modified housing, testing
accommodations,
priority
scheduling,
and
access
to
telecommunications.
Most instructors have regularly scheduled office hours to
meet with students. These are usually posted outside their office
doors and on the course syllabus. To make an appointment for
another time, contact the instructor or department secretary.
Options for Receiving Credit
Note: Transfer credit information is in the Admission chapter.
Advanced Placement Program (AP)
If you took an Advanced Placement (AP) test in high school, you may be able to receive Miami credit for an appropriate score. The
State of Ohio, working through the University System of Ohio, has initiated policies to facilitate the ease of transition fro m high school to
college as well as between and among Ohio's Public colleges and universities.
1. Students obtaining an Advanced Placement (AP) exam score of 3 or above will be awarded the aligned course(s) and credits for the
AP exam area(s) successfully completed.
2. General Education courses and credits received will be applied towards graduation and will satisfy a general education
requirement if the course(s) to which the AP area is equivalent fulfill a requirement.
3. If an equivalent course is not available for the AP exam area completed, elective or area credit will be awarded in the appropriate
academic discipline and will be applied towards graduation where such elective credit options exist within the academic major .
4. Additional courses or credits may be available when a score of 4 or 5 is obtained. Award of credit for higher score values varies
depending on the institution and academic discipline.
5. In academic disciplines containing highly dependent sequences (Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics -STEM)
students are strongly advised to confer with the college/university advising staff to ensure they have the appropriate foundation to
be successful in advanced coursework within the sequence.
AP Subject
AP
Score
3
4 or 5
Course Number
Course Title
Hours Awarded
ART 188
ART 187, 188
3
6
Biology
3, 4 or 5
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116
History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern
History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic
History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern
Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular
and Molecular Biology
Calculus AB
3, 4 or 5
MTH 151
Calculus I
Calculus BC
Chemistry
3, 4 or 5
3
4 or 5
3
MTH 151, 251
CHM 111
CHM 111L
CHM 141,142,144,145
CHI 101, 102
Calculus I, Calculus II
Chemistry in Modern Society
Chemistry in Modern Society Laboratory
College Chemistry, College Chemistry Lab
Elementary Chinese
Computer Science A
4 or 5
3 or 4
5
CHI 201, 202
CSE 174
CSE 174, 271
Macroeconomics
Microeconomics
English Language
3, 4 or 5
3, 4 or 5
3-4
ECO 202
ECO 201
ENG 111
Second Year Chinese
Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving
Fundamentals of Programming and Problem
Solving,
Object-Oriented Programming
Principles of Macroeconomics
Principles of Microeconomics
Composition and Rhetoric
5
ENG 111, 112
3-4
ENG 112
5
ENG 111, 112
Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and
Literature
3
3
ENG 111
ENG 122
Composition and Rhetoric
Popular Literature
Art History
Chinese Language
and Culture
English Literature
Student takes both
exams:
English Language &
English Literature
Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and
Literature
Composition and Literature
4 (for score of 3: students
advised to take course at
college level, if biology major)
5 (for score of 3: students
advised to take course at
college level if going to
Calculus II)
9
4
10
8
6
3
6
3
3
3 (students then take ENG
112)
6
3 (students then take ENG
111)
6
6 (students then take ENG
112)
54/ Academic Planning
English Language
&English Literature
4
3
ENG 111
ENG 122
Composition and Rhetoric
Popular Literature
6 (students then take ENG
112)
English Language &
English Literature
English Language &
English Literature
3
4
4
4
ENG 112
ENG 122
ENG 111
ENG 122
Composition and Literature
Popular Literature
Composition and Rhetoric
Popular Literature
6 (students then take ENG
111)
6 (students then take ENG
112)
Any score of 5 with
any other score
Environmental
Science
European History
French Language
5
*
3, 4 or 5
ENG 111
ENG 112
ZOO 121
Composition and Rhetoric
College Composition & Literature
Environmental Biology
6
3, 4 or 5
3
4 or 5
HST 122
FRE 101, 102
FRE 201, 202
3
8
6
French Literature
3
FRE 101, 102 and 201
4 or 5
FRE 102, 201, 202
3
4 or 5
3, 4 or 5
GER 101, 102
GER 201, 202
POL 102
Western Civilization
Introduction to French Language and Culture
Intermediate French, Critical Analysis of French
Culture
Introduction to French Language and Culture,
Intermediate French
Introduction to French Language and Culture,
Intermediate French, Critical Analysis of French
Culture
Beginning German I, II
Second Year German I, II
Politics and Global Issues
3, 4 or 5
POL 101
Politics and National Issues
3
3, 4 or 5
3
GEO 101
ITL 101, 102
Global Forces, Local Diversity
Beginner's Course
3
8
4 or 5
3
ITL 201, 202
JPN 101, 102
Second Year Italian
First Year Japanese
6
8
Second Year Japanese
Beginning Latin
Intermediate Latin
Beginning Latin
Intermediate Latin
Music Theory I
6
8
6
8
6
3
Sight Singing and Dictation I
College Physics, Physics Laboratory
The Physical World, Physics Laboratory
1
8
5
5
4
8
9
German Language
Comp Government &
Politics
U.S. Government &
Politics
Human Geography
Italian Language and
Culture
Japanese Language
and Culture
Latin Literature
Latin: Vergil
Music Theory
Physics B
Physics C: Electricity
and Magnetism
Physics C: Mechanics
Psychology
Spanish Language
4 or 5
JPN 201, 202
3
LAT 101, 102
4 or 5
LAT 201, 202
3
LAT 101, 102
4 or 5
LAT 201, 202
3, 4 or 5 Non Aural Subscore-MUS
101
Aural Subscore- MUS 151
3, 4 or 5
PHY 171, 172, 183, 184
3, 4 or 5
PHY 182, 184
3, 4 or 5
3, 4 or 5
3
4 or 5
PHY 181, 183
PSY 111
SPN 101, 102
SPN 201, 202, 311
Spanish Literature
3
4 or 5
SPN 101, 102, 201
SPN 102, 201, 202, 311
Statistics
Studio Art: Drawing
Studio Art: 2-D
Design
Studio Art: 3D Design
U.S. History
World History
3, 4 or 5
3, 4 or 5
3, 4 or 5
STA 261
ART 121
ART 111
The Physical World, Physics Laboratory
Introduction to Psychology
Beginner's Course
Beginner's Course, Second Year Spanish
Grammar Review & Introductory Composition
Beginner's Course, Second Year Spanish
Beginner's Course, Second Year Spanish
Grammar Review & Introductory Composition
Statistics
Drawing I
Visual Fundamentals
3, 4 or 5
3, 4 or 5
3, 4 or 5
ART 171
HST 111, 112
HST 197, 198
Visual Fundamentals: 3-D
Survey of American History
World History to 1500, World History Since 1500
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
Contact Miami Hamilton Academic Advising and Retention
Services (102 Rentschler Hall, 513-785-3129) for information about
CLEP.
Credit is given for satisfactory scores on some CLEP Subject
Examinations. Tests are scored by the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey. Because there is a fee for each test (see the
Fees and Expenses section), we encourage you to take them only if
you have had the equivalent of a college course in the subject area.
3
11
10
8
6
3
11
13
4
3
3
3
6
6
Miami's Hamilton campus operates an open CLEP testing
center, which means tests are offered to university students as well
as to members of the community who are not enrolled at Miami
University. Miami's Middletown and Oxford campuses do not
currently offer CLEP testing.
Score requirements or course credit may change, for current
information see: http://www.muohio.edu/saf/testing.html.
American Government: credit for POL 101 (3 hours) for score of 55.
Calculus with Elementary Functions: credit for MTH 151 (5 hours)
for score of 50.
Academic Planning /55
College French, Levels I and II: credit for FRE 201, 202 (6 hours) for
score of 50.
College Level Spanish Language: credit for SPN 201, 202 (6 hours)
for score of 66. For a score above 75, contact the Spanish
Department.
General Chemistry: credit for CHM 141, 142, 144, 145 (10 hours) for
score of 55.
Human Growth and Development: credit for PSY 231 (3 hours) for a
score of 63.
Information Systems & Computer Applications: credit for BTE 284
(3 hours) for score of 50.
Introductory Psychology: credit for PSY 111 (4 hours) for score of 54.
Introduction to Business Law: credit for BTE 108 (3 hours) for score
of 50.
Introductory Sociology: credit for SOC 151 (4 hours) for score of 55.
Principles of Management: credit for BTE111 (3 hours) for score of
50.
Principles of Marketing: credit for BTE105 (3 hours) for score of 50.
International Baccalaureate Program (IB)
Miami awards credit to IB diploma graduates for higher level
subjects passed at a satisfactory level (minimum scores vary 5 to 7
by subject area). Standard levels are not awarded credit.
Departments make the final determinations on credit.
Anthropology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit determined by department.
Biology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for ZOO 116 (4 hours).
Chemistry (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for CHM 141, 142 (6 hours) and CHM 144, 145 (4 hours).
Economics (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for ECO 201 and 202 (6 hours).
English (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit for ENG 111 and 112 (6 hours).
French (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for FRE 101 and FRE 102 (8 hours).
Geography (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for GEO 121 and GEO 201 (7 hours).
History
Credit for HST 296 (3 hours) for score of 5 or better.
Credit awarded on an individual basis for selected upper-level
courses for score of 6 or 7.
Latin (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit determined by department.
Mathematics (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit for MTH 151 (5 hours).
Philosophy (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit determined by department.
Physics (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit for PHY 181,182 (8 hours) and PHY 183, 184 (2 hours).
Psychology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for PSY 111 (4 hours).
Spanish (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit for SPN 201 (3 hours).
Theatre Arts (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for THE 131, 191, and 200 (7 hours).
Visual Art (no credit awarded)
Department Proficiency Examinations
These exams may be offered each semester. Each department
administers its own test, and credit applies toward graduation.
You may take a proficiency examination during any semester or
term in which you are enrolled. Fees are charged per credit hour
after the first hour if the examination is passed. See the Fees and
Expenses chapter for test charges.
To be approved for a proficiency examination, you must
satisfy the department that you have a reasonable chance of
passing it. Normally, these examinations are for courses below the
300 level, but they may be given for advanced courses with
approvals of the department chair and the dean of the division in
which the course is offered.
You may obtain credit or advanced placement, or both, by
examinations in areas in which you have had adequate
preparation. Credit earned is traditional credit and is not counted
in the admissible 32 semester hours of nontraditional credit. No
grades are awarded for proficiency examinations.
See departments listed below for specific information.
Comparative Religion: see department.
English: Submit a writing portfolio to the Composition Program in
the department in the summer before your enrollment. For
details about eligibility, requirements and deadlines refer to
the
Composition
Program
website
at
http:www.units.muohio.edu/portfolio/.
Latin: see department.
Mathematics and Statistics: offered in MTH 151, 222, 251; STA 261.
Contact the MTH or STA department office. A group
proficiency exam in MTH 151 is usually given during the first
week of the first semester.
Speech Pathology and Audiology: offered in SPA 248 American Sign
Language with proficiency exam.
Placement Guides
Designed to help you choose your first course in the fields
below, these guides describe the background necessary to enter
courses at a certain level.
If you find that you have chosen a course that is too difficult,
you can drop it (before the deadline to drop, listed in the Academic
Calendar at www.units.muohio.edu/reg/calendars/index.php)
and begin with an easier course in a later semester.
Chemistry
CHM 111: for non-science majors; no previous chemistry is
necessary; CHM 111 fulfills the MPF natural science
requirement and laboratory requirement.
CHM 141, 141R, 142, 144, 145: lectures and laboratories for
students preparing for careers in health professions and
sciences, engineering, or science teaching. See note below about
math placement scores.
CHM 141 or 141H, and 142H or 142M: lectures for students
majoring in chemistry or biochemistry. CHM 144M or 144H
and 145M or 145H: laboratories students majoring in chemistry
or biochemistry majors. See note below about math placement
scores.
Math placement scores are required for placement into any CHM
14x courses. With a score of 12 or higher on the MP1 test you may
enroll in CHM 141 or 141H. With a score of 8-11 on the MP1 test
you must enroll in CHM 141R (4 credit hours; 3 lecture, 1
recitation). If your MP1 score is 7 or lower you must complete a
math course before enrolling in the CHM 14x series. See an
adviser to choose an appropriate math course.
CHM 147: introductory seminar strongly recommended for all
chemistry and biochemistry majors; one credit hour with
credit/no credit grading.
Foreign Language
Placement is based on: (1) high school preparation (typically,
one year of high school equates to one college semester), and (2)
56/ Academic Planning
results of placement testing administered by Miami
University. You cannot take a foreign language course for credit at
a lower level than you are prepared for. After being placed, you
cannot skip a course in the sequence leading to 202.
If you intend to continue studying the same foreign language
as in high school, you are required to take a placement exam for
that language before you enroll. Placement exams for French,
German, and Spanish are taken by freshmen online prior to
Summer Orientation; transfer students take them during transfer
student advising in the summer. Results are immediately available
at orientation for placement and advising. Continuing students
wishing to enter a language sequence should take the placement
exam and then seek advising before enrolling in a course.
For other languages, placement exams are taken online by
entering freshmen prior to Summer Orientation; transfer students
in Latin and Russian take them prior to transfer student advising.
Examinations are returned to Miami by mail; results are available
at orientation for placement and advising.
There is no award of academic credit with placement tests.
101 LEVEL: for those beginning a new language.
102 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 101. Also
for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not
prepared to enter the second-year level.
111 in German: review course for those whose placement exam
scores indicate they are not prepared to enter second-year
level. After completing 111, students enter 201.
111 in Spanish: intensive first-year course for those whose
placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter
second-year level. After completing 111, students enter 201.
121 LEVEL: intensive review course offered in Latin for those
whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to
enter second-year level. After completing 121, students enter
202.
201 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 102, SPN
111, or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam
score.
202 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 121, 201, or
equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score;
this course fulfills the language requirement for the College of
Arts and Science (CAS-A).
301 LEVEL AND ABOVE: for those who have successfully
completed 202 or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate
placement exam score. Any foreign language course at 300
level or above fulfills the language requirement for the College
of Arts and Science (CAS-A), not including courses in
translation.
Physics
PHY 101, 103, 111, 118, 121, 131, 141: general physics course. PHY
103 has a prerequisite; see course descriptions.
PHY 171, 172, 173, 174: physics sequence for students who have
had mathematics courses that include trigonometry. MTH 151
or equivalent is strongly encouraged but not required as a
prerequisite. PHY 172 is a prerequisite to PHY 171. Concurrent
registration in the laboratory course (173 with 171 and 174 with
172) is required.
PHY 181, 182, 183, 184: calculus co-requisite course recommended
for science, computer science, and engineering majors.
Freshmen should enroll in PHY 181F, 182F. There is no physics
prerequisite for 181, although concurrent registration in, or
completion of, laboratory course PHY 183 is required. See
course descriptions.
Algebra and Trigonometry
(See Mathematics and Statistics at the end of this chapter.)
MTH 102 Intermediate Algebra (3): not usually taken by business
students. Algebra preparation for MTH 123. Students with no
trigonometry background should consider following MTH 102
with MTH 104 despite losing duplicated credits.
MTH 104 Precalculus with Algebra (5): covers intermediate algebra
and precalculus in one semester. Next course is MTH 151.
MTH 123 Precalculus (3): preparation for MTH 151. Intended for
students with three years of college preparatory mathematics
including some trigonometry.
Calculus
(See Mathematics and Statistics at the end of this chapter.)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5): for students who have had little or no high
school calculus. This is the first semester in calculus sequence
MTH 151, 251, 252.
MTH 249 Calculus II (5): primarily for students who have AP credit
for Calculus I. Limited to freshmen. Reviews concepts of limit,
derivative, and integrals from Calculus I, then covers same
content as MTH 251 Calculus II. This is the first semester of
calculus sequence MTH 249, 252 that covers same topics as
MTH 151, 251, 252.
MTH 249H Honors Calculus II (5): Honors version of MTH 249.
Admission requires honors standing or permission of
instructor.
Academic Planning /57
Mathematics and Statistics
Two placement tests are offered to Oxford campus students. (The regional campuses offer other standardized placement tests.) Test
One must be taken before Test Two. Test One (precalculus) helps assess your readiness for calculus if you expect to take a ma thematics or
statistics course. Algebra, trigonometry, functions, and basic geometry are included on the test. Also take Test Two (calculus) if you have
taken a semester or more of calculus, even AP calculus, during high school and expect to take a calculus course. Test Two is based on topics
covered in Calculus I. More information about these tests is online (www.muohio.edu/math stat/place.html) or available from a
departmental adviser.
In the advising table below, I and II refer to Placement Tests One and Two, and I + II denotes the sum of your scores on I an d II.
If you plan to
and you have passed
these high school classes
and have these scores
on I and/or II
then take
Take a calculus course
(a) a year of calculus, including log,
exponential, and trig functions
I + II from 35 to 45 or 4-5 on AP
Calculus AB
MTH 249 or 249H
(b) three and one-half or four years of math
with trig but little or no calculus
I from 16 to 25
MTH 151
(c) three or four years of math including
some trig
(d) less than three years of math
I from 12 to 15
I from 8 to 11
I from 0 to 7
MTH 123
MTH 104
MTH 102
Take a noncalculus course, e.g.
MTH 121 or STA 261
(a) three years of math, including two years I from 12 to 25
of algebra
MTH 121 or STA 261
(b) less than three years of math
I from 0 to 11
MTH 102 or 104
I + II from 35 to 45
MTH 249 or 249H
(b) three and one-half or four years of math
with trig but little or no calculus
I + II from 26 to 34
MTH 153
(c) three or four years of math including
some trig
I from 12 to 15
MTH 123
I from 12 to 25
MTH 115
I from 0 to 11
MTH 102
Seek middle childhood licensure (a) a year of calculus, including log,
with a math concentration
exponential, and trig functions
Seek licensure in early or middle (a) three years of math, including geometry
childhood, not concentrating in
math
(b) less than three years of math
Since recommendations given above or online may not consider all information relevant to your situation, you should contact a
departmental adviser if you have questions. The goal is to place you in a course with students of similar preparations.
To contact a departmental math adviser via e-mail: [email protected]
58/ Course Registration and Other Regulations
Course Registration
and Other
Regulations
summer term. Registering late will limit your available choices
which may prevent you from getting all the required classes you
need.
Office of the Registrar
118 Campus Avenue Building
513-529-8703
www.muohio.edu/registrar/
The maximum number of graduate credit hours that a
graduate student who does not hold an assistantship can register
for in a regular semester is 15. Graduate students not holding an
assistantship are limited to no more than nine credit hours per
single summer session. Students with a need to exceed the
maximum graduate credit hour limits must file a petition with the
Dean of the Graduate School prior to the first week of the semester.
Academic Calendar
Important academic dates and deadlines are published in the
Academic Calendar online at www.muohio.edu/calendar. Dates are
subject to change without notice.
Miami ID Card
University registration includes the issue and validation of
your student identification card. ID cards are issued in 111 Shriver
Center.
Course Offerings
Course offerings and other registration information are
available online through myMiami (www.mymiami.muohio.edu)
(log-in required) and www.muohio.edu/registrar (log-in not
required). Course offerings and availability are subject to change
without notice.
Registering
New undergraduate students are required to meet with an
academic adviser to select their required courses and electives.
First year students register during Summer Orientation in June.
Continuing students are encouraged to contact their advisers for
further academic and career counseling before registering.
You register for classes at Miami University online through
myMiami/BannerWeb (www.mymiami.muohio.edu) and receive
immediate confirmation of your schedule. You can register,
confirm and change your schedule through BannerWeb only on the
assigned days and at the assigned times.
Before you can register, the system will ask you to supply
emergency contact information. The university requires that you
provide emergency contact information so that we may readily
notify a family member or significant other in case of an emergency
or should a critical matter arise.
You are required to provide your local contact information and
the name of a family member/guardian/spouse or another significant
person and their contact information. You will be delayed in
registering for your next semester courses until you enter the
requested information.
The deadline to complete registration and payment is the fifth
(5th) day of fall or spring semester, and the third (3rd) day of each
Registration and Graduate Credit
Before registering for courses, consult your adviser to make
sure that you are meeting your degree requirements.
Minimum and Maximum Registration
Student who are employed full time are strongly encouraged
to keep their enrollment at six credit hours or less during a
semester.
Graduate assistants, doctoral associates, and teaching
associates with duties of 18 to 20 hours per week must register for
at least 9 graduate semester hours and may register for as many as
15 total (undergraduate and graduate) hours per semester.
Modified graduate assistants with duties of eight hours per
week must register for at least 9 graduate credit hours per semester
and may register for as many as 15 total (undergraduate and
graduate) hours.
Grant-in-aid recipients must register for at least 9 graduate
hours during each semester and must register for six graduate
hours in a single summer term or 12 graduate hours in more than
one summer term.
A student holding a dissertation scholarship must register for
at least 9 graduate semester hours and may register for as many as
15 hours of graduate credit per semester.
Change of Status or Program
Any change of graduate standing, such as moving from
non-degree to degree status, must be approved by your major
department or division and the Graduate School. To change from
continuing non-degree graduate status to regular or conditional
standing, you must reapply to the Graduate School.
Students with a grade point average below 3.00 who wish to
change majors and/or degree programs must have approval of the
Student Petitions Committee of the Graduate Council.
Transfer Credit
Credit for grades of B or better earned at other accredited
graduate schools may be applied toward a graduate degree at
Miami University. Transfer credit will not be granted for grades of
B- or less. “Credit” or “pass” grades are accepted only if approved
by the Student Petitions Committee of Graduate Council.
Extension or correspondence work is not accepted for credit.
Transferred courses may not exceed the age limit of five years
for the master’s degree and seven years for the doctorate.
To transfer credit, first obtain an official transcript from your
other institution (if your adviser does not already have one), and
then consult with your adviser. If transfer of credit is
recommended, your adviser will send a memorandum of
recommendation, with your transcript, to the Graduate School. The
dean of the Graduate School will approve your transfer of credit if
the above criteria are met, and the Registrar’s office will post the
transferred credit to your Miami record. Grades of transferred
credit are not posted to a Miami record or counted in a grade point
average.
Course Registration and Other Regulations /59
Changes of Registration
Courses may be changed only in the prescribed time stated in
the University academic calendar. Forms for reporting such
changes may be obtained from the Oxford Office of the Registrar,
Regional/Campus Records and Registration Offices, VOALC
Student Services Office, or online at
http://www.units.muohio.edu;reg/forms/index/php. No change
is official until the change-of-schedule form or registration
transaction is received by those offices.
Adding a Course
In the academic year, no student may enter a course (class or
laboratory) after the close of the first week of instruction. The
instructor may make exceptions with the approval of the
department chair. Any instructor may refuse to accept a student
after the opening of any course if, in his or her judgment, too much
subject matter has already been covered.
Dropping a Course
Dropping a course is a formal administrative procedure;
merely ceasing to attend class is not the same as dropping a course.
Before dropping a course, a student should consult with his or her
instructor and academic adviser. A student may drop a course
during the first 20 percent of the course, in which case no grade or
other designation will appear on the student’s official record.
Students should refer to the Academic Calendar on the Office of
the Registrar website (Academic Calendars) for specific academic
deadline dates. Students are strongly encouraged to contact their
lenders and insurance agents to determine continued eligibility for
loan deferments and insurance coverage before taking an action
that will change their enrollment status to less than full-time.
Withdrawing from a Course
Withdrawing from a course is a formal administrative
procedure; merely ceasing to attend class is not the same as
withdrawing from a course. Before withdrawing from a course, a
student should consult with his or her instructor and academic
adviser. A student may withdraw from a course after the first 20
percent of the course and, ordinarily, before the end of 60 percent
of the course. A grade of W will appear on the student’s official
record. A grade of W is not calculated in the student’s grade point
average, and credit hours graded with W do not count in
enrollment status. Refunds follow University policy, available via
the
Office
of
the
Bursar
website
at
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/. Students should refer to the
Academic Calendar on the Office of the Registrar website for
specific academic deadline dates. Students are strongly
encouraged to contact their lenders and insurance agents to
determine continued eligibility for loan deferments and insurance
coverage before taking an action that will change their enrollment
status to less than full-time.
After the first 20 percent of a course through the end of the
first 60 percent, a student may withdraw from a course with a
signature of acknowledgement from the instructor.
1.
After 60 percent of the course is complete, a student may no longer
withdraw from a course, unless a petition is approved by the
Interdivisional Committee of Advisers. The petition must include the
signatures of the course instructor and the student’s academic or
divisional adviser. The petition must also describe and document the
extenuating circumstances (extraordinary circumstances usually
beyond the student’s control) that form the grounds of the petition. If
the petition for withdrawal is approved, the student will be
withdrawn from the course with a grade of W. If the petition is not
approved, the student will be expected to remain in the course (see
Section 1.3.E). The withdrawal deadline is 5:00 p.m. on the last Friday
of the term’s classes preceding exam week, or if a sprint or accelerated
class, 5:00 p.m. on the last meeting date of that class..
2.
3.
Only in rare circumstances will a petition to withdraw from a course
after 60 percent of the course is complete be approved for reasons of
academic performance alone.
When possible, a student should continue to attend class until the
Interdivisional Committee of Advisers has acted on his or her
petition. Non-attendance does not void financial responsibility or a
grade of F.
If a student is found guilty of academic dishonesty in a class
and withdraws from the class, the student will receive the grade of
F for the class, and a notation of academic dishonesty will be
posted directly beneath the class on the academic record.
Course Section Change
To change sections online, you must drop the section in which
you are currently enrolled, then add the new section. Because
many students may be competing for available space in the same
course, there is a significant risk that you will lose your place in the
course altogether.
Credit Hour Loads for Undergraduate
Students
A full-time undergraduate student must register for at least 12
hours of academic work in a semester and shall be subject to all the
rules, regulations, and fees governing regular Miami University
student. A full-time graduate student must register for at least 9
hours of academic work in a semester.
A part-time undergraduate student, i.e., carrying fewer than
12 credit hours in a semester, must be a resident of Oxford or must
commute from his or her home.
The maximum credit-hour limit for an undergraduate student
is based upon courses taken at all locations of Miami University
and is limited to 20 credit hours in a semester. The limit for all
summer terms combined is 16 credit hours or 1.3 credit hours per
week for overlapping summer sessions. A student who needs to
exceed the maximum credit-hour limits must obtain permission
from the dean of his or her division.
Repeating a Course
Effective First Semester 2012-13, a Course Repeat Policy is
available for courses where the initial enrollment and completion
was fall semester 2012 or thereafter. Degree seeking undergraduate
students who are within their first 64 attempted credit hours at
Miami University may repeat up to eight (8) semester hours and
apply the policy. Degree seeking students with transfer work
earned prior to first attending Miami University must be within
their first 84 earned Miami credit hours. The policy will be applied
to a student’s academic record upon completion of the repeated
course and at the request of the student. Once processed, the
decision is irrevocable. The full Policy can be found in the Student
Handbook.
After the student exceeds the parameter of this policy, the
following repeat policy is in effect. A student may repeat any
course for which no credit has been granted. A student may repeat
only once for credit a course in which credit has previously been
earned. All grades are counted in the cumulative average, but the
credit hours earned in the course will count only once toward
graduation. This rule does not apply to those courses designated
by a department as being repeatable, nor does it supersede Student
Handbook, Section 1.2.H on repetition of credit/no-credit courses.
A student may, with the instructor's permission, audit a course in
which hours have previously been received toward graduation
(see Student Handbook, Section 1.2.I).
60/ Course Registration and Other Regulations
Undergraduate Student Classification
Students who have met entrance requirements are admitted to
freshman rank. Students with at least 30 but less than 64 earned
credit hours are ranked as sophomores. Students with at least 64
but less than 96 earned credit hours are ranked as juniors. Students
with 96 or more earned credit hours are ranked as seniors.
Graduate-Level Courses for Seniors
Seniors at Miami or juniors in the Honors & Scholars program
may apply for permission to take 500/600-level courses, normally
open only to graduate students, for undergraduate or graduate
credit.
To apply for permission, you must have senior status toward a
bachelor’s degree or be a junior in the Honors & Scholars program,
a cumulative grade point average of 2.75, and a grade point
average of 3.00 in the concentration area of the graduate course.
Approval must be granted by your academic adviser, the
instructor for the course, and the Graduate School. Courses at the
700-level are for graduate students only.
You must complete the form “Permission for Undergraduate
Students to Enroll in Graduate Courses,” available at the Graduate
School, and return it no later than Friday of the first week of classes
in the semester.
Up to 10 semester hours may count toward a graduate degree
if the courses are taken for graduate credit. Courses taken for
graduate credit cannot count toward requirements for a bachelor’s
degree.
Greater Cincinnati Consortium
Agreement
Full-time Miami students can take courses through the
Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities during
the academic year and summer. This association can provide
courses that are not generally available at the institution where the
student is enrolled.
Members of the Cincinnati Consortium include the Art
Academy of Cincinnati, Athenaeum of Ohio, Chatfield College,
Cincinnati Christian University, Cincinnati State Technical and
Community College, College of Mount St. Joseph, Hebrew Union
College, Miami University, Northern Kentucky University,
Thomas More College, The Union Institute, University of
Cincinnati, Wilmington College, and Xavier University.
The Office of the Registrar can provide you with additional
information.
Other Regulations
Application for Graduation
To graduate, whether or not you plan to attend the ceremony,
you must submit an application and pay a fee. If you earn more
than one degree, you must pay a graduation fee for each.
(Applications for graduation are available on Bannerweb.) After
your application is processed, your account will be assessed the
appropriate fee, and you will be billed by the Bursar’s office.
You are encouraged to apply for graduation at least a semester
in advance. This way, routine checks can be made in time to inform
you of any problems in meeting your degree requirements.
Applications should be received no later than 30 working days
before commencement.
If you apply for graduation and then do not qualify for the
degree, you must notify the Commencement Office of the date you
intend to finish your requirements. All deadlines applicable to
first-time applications apply to reapplications.
Changes in Policy
For complete information on changes in any academic policy
on student conduct, grievance procedures or petitions consult the
Student Handbook (www.muohio.edu/handbook) updated each year in
August or A Handbook for Graduate Students and Faculty. You are
responsible for knowing about any changes in these policies that
may affect you.
Electronic Directory
Miami’s electronic directory, like those of other institutions, is
accessible worldwide across the Internet. To preserve the privacy
of students, faculty, and staff, the following data is only accessible
within the Miami University community:
 University-supplied data:
Spouse name (staff, faculty; if authorized)
Division (staff, faculty)
Office address (staff, faculty)
Home address and phone number
(students, staff, faculty; if authorized)
School address and phone number (students)
 Optional individual-supplied data:
Pager e-mail address and phone number
Mobile phone number
Office hours
High schools attended
Other colleges attended
FERPA Release and Directory Restriction
Under provisions of the Family Educational Right to Privacy
Act (FERPA, Buckley Amendment), all students are able to request
exclusion from the university's electronic directory.
All first time Miami students are included in the electronic
directory beginning August 1st, but the student can request
exclusion from the electronic directory by filling out a form
available at the Registrar's Office.
Freshmen may do so any time prior to July 15; continuing
students may do so at any time during his/her enrollment at
Miami.
Exclusion requests are reflected in the electronic directory
approximately 24 hours after being processed by the Registrar’s
office. Emergency exclusions, requested by Miami University
Police or the Office of Student Affairs, are processed as soon as
possible by the IT Services.
Right to Privacy and Access: Student Records
Miami University maintains records on all Miami students
that include academic and demographic information. To protect
our students’ privacy, and to ensure that their records are
accessible to them, Miami has designed a policy for maintaining
and administering student records.
Miami’s policy is in compliance with the Family Education
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). The complete policy is
included in the online Student Handbook.
Course Registration and Other Regulations /61
Registration Glossary
Academic action: Academic actions are defined as academic
warning, removal of academic warning, academic probation,
removal of academic probation, academic suspension, and
academic dismissal. Academic actions are taken at the end of
each fall and spring semester, and at the end of the summer
term. Any student with a cumulative GPA of less than 2.00 is
subject to academic action, regardless of the number of hours
taken in any semester or summer term.
Academic record: A record of courses taken, grades received, and
degrees earned by each student while attending Miami. It
includes transfer credit, advanced placement credit, and other
credit awarded or earned.
Accelerated course: See sprint course.
Admission prerequisites: See “High School Preparation” in the
Admission chapter. If you did not complete these units in high
school, you must complete additional courses at Miami. These
courses count toward graduation and many fulfill other
requirements. You must complete these units within your first
64 semester hours (normally, during your first two years).
Questions about prerequisites should be directed to the Office
of Admission.
Associate’s degree: Two-year degree, generally offered only on
regional campuses.
Audit: You attend classes, but do not receive credit or a grade. The
instructor may require you to take exams and participate in
class discussion. Since not all courses can be audited, you must
have the instructor’s written permission to audit. A course can
be changed from credit to audit or audit to credit up to 60
percent of the class meetings. See the Grades chapter for more
detail.
Bachelor’s degree: A four-year degree. Basic requirements include:
(1) at least 128 semester hours—32 must be from Miami; (2) at
least a 2.00 cumulative GPA; (3) fulfillment of the Miami Plan;
(4) fulfillment of divisional and major requirements.
Cancellation: If you do not pay your fees on time, your schedule
will be cancelled. You will need to re-register.
CAS-A, B, etc.: Abbreviations for sections of the College of Arts and
Science requirement. See the College of Arts and Science
chapter.
Certificate program, graduate: A specialization program that
enhances a graduate degree. Available to students who have
been admitted to the Graduate School and have met program
prerequisites.
Certificate program, undergraduate: Program that requires about
half the amount of course work as an associate’s degree.
Change of schedule (or drop/add): Dates and times when you can
make changes in your semester courses. Consult the academic
calendar for specific dates and times.
Class standing: Freshmen have earned 0-29 semester hours;
sophomores have earned 30-63 semester hours; juniors have
earned 64-95 semester hours; seniors have earned 96 or more
semester hours.
Closed class: When maximum enrollment in a course has been met,
no more students can be accommodated.
Concurrent course: A course that must be taken during the same
semester as another course because of linked content.
Concurrent courses are indicated in the General Bulletin course
descriptions.
Co-requisite: A course that must be taken prior to or during the
same semester as another course because of linked content.
Co-requisites are indicated in General Bulletin course
descriptions.
Course level: (See Course number below.) 100-level courses are
generally introductory; 200-level more advanced; 300 and
400-levels for juniors and seniors; 500 and above for graduate
students.
Course modifier: A letter or numeric symbol designating a different
content within a general course.
Course number: Three-digit number that follows a departmental
abbreviation used to identify a course, for example ENG 111.
The course number is an indication of course level.
Course reference number (CRN): A five-digit code used to identify
each section of a course for registration. It is in effect only for
the current term.
Credit/no-credit: No grades are received for these courses. You will
get credit for a C or better; you do not get credit if your grade is
lower. Credit/no-credit courses are not figured in your GPA.
No more than 25 percent of your course work can be taken on a
credit/no-credit basis, and usually you cannot take courses in
your major this way. Freshmen may register for courses on a
credit/no-credit basis, providing they are concurrently
enrolled for 12 semester hours for grades. After 20 percent of
the class meetings, you cannot change from credit/no-credit to
a letter grade or from a letter grade to credit/no-credit. See the
Grades chapter for more detail.
CRN (Course Reference Number):
DAR (Degree Audit Report): A report of your completed course
work and current registration matched with degree
requirements of your declared major; it identifies deficiencies
and lists courses to satisfy specific requirements. DARS are
available online at http://bannerweb.muohio.edu/. You can also
request a DAR at the Registration Service Center in the Campus
Avenue Building.
Division: An academic part of the university with its own
requirements. Miami has seven divisions: College of Arts and
Science, Richard T. Farmer School of Business, School of
Education, Health and Society, School of Engineering and
Applied Science, School of Creative Arts and Graduate School.
Drop/add: See Change of Schedule.
Force-add: Permission to add a course that is closed. A form,
available from department offices, must be signed by the
instructor and chair.
Hour: See Semester credit hour.
Incomplete grade: May be assigned when a student and an
instructor formally agree to a plan to complete unfinished
course work. See Grades section for more detail.
Lab: Laboratory.
Late registration: Late registration is held just before the term begins
for new students who have not registered.
Late start classes: Usually graduate education courses that start
about one week later than normal, therefore they meet less than
a full 15-week term (Fall Semester only).
Lec., Lab.: Lecture and laboratory abbreviations in course
descriptions to indicate credit hours in each (for example, 3
Lec. 1 Lab.).
Major: Your primary field of study, such as botany, economics, etc.
Miami Plan (MPF): Miami’s liberal education requirement. See the
Miami Plan chapter.
MPC: Miami Plan Capstone Experience abbreviation used in course
descriptions. Indicates that the course fulfills that requirement.
MPF: Global Miami Plan Foundation course abbreviation used in
course descriptions. Indicates that the course fulfills a part of
that requirement. Additional abbreviations to MPF (for
example, MPF IIA, IIIB) indicate which foundation area(s) that
course fulfills.
MPT: Miami Plan Thematic Sequence abbreviation used in course
descriptions. Indicates that the course fulfills a part of that
requirement.
MUNet password: By default, your password is the month and day
of your birth and the last four digits of your Social Security
number in the format mmddnnnn. Please include the leading
zero for single digit months and days. For example, a birth date
of March 1 with Social Security number 123-45-6789 would
have a default password of "03016789". For security reasons,
62/ Course Registration and Other Regulations
you will be required to change your default password to another
value the first time you login to myMiami. In addition, to create
a new password, you will have the opportunity to create a
Secret Question/Answer that can be used in the event that you
forget your password. You will then be required to change
your password every six months. To change your password, go
to www.muohio.edu/password. For login problems, contact the IT
Services
Support
Desk
through
myMiami
at
www.mymiami.muohio.edu
myMiami: Miami University's web portal. myMiami contains links
to BannerWeb, the online campus directory, Knowledge Base,
and other Miami services, as well as information about
university offices, activities and news and events. myMiami
can be accessed from anywhere in the world at
www.mymiami.muohio.edu using your Unique ID, MUNet
password, and web browser.
Nontraditional credit: College credit given for a nonacademic
learning experience, such as knowledge you have acquired
from a military service or your own study. For information,
contact the Registrar’s Office.
Open course: One that can accommodate more students. Open
courses
are
available
online
at
myMiami
(www.mymiami.muohio.edu).
Placement exams: Offered in foreign languages, mathematics,
chemistry and physics to help you enroll in an appropriate first
course for your skill level.
Prerequisite: Course(s) you must complete before enrolling in a
more advanced course. This is indicated in a course description
of the Courses of Instruction section of this General Bulletin.
Proficiency exams: Tests used to obtain credit in subjects for which
you have adequate preparation. Each department administers
its own test, and credit applies toward graduation. You must
pass the test with a C or better to earn credit. See the Fees and
Expenses chapter.
Section: One class of a course. Courses with large enrollments are
divided into sections. Sections are identified by letters, for
example ART 171A, ART 171B. Each section has a unique CRN.
Semester credit hour: Unit used to measure course work. The
number of credit hours is usually based on the number of hours
per week the class meets; for example, a three-hour course
typically meets three times a week for 50 minutes each time.
One credit hour is usually assigned for two or three hours in
laboratory and studio courses.
Sprint course standards: Courses that meet for less than the full 15
week term. The sprint parts of term are Q, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z,
13, 12, S1 or S2. Sprint course meeting dates are listed in the
course schedule.
Time conflicts: Registration/Change of Schedule checks for time
conflicts and will not permit you to add courses that meet at
overlapping times.
Transcript: A copy of your academic record.
Unique ID: Every student, faculty, and staff member has been
issued a Unique ID to identify them in the processing of
university information. It consists of the first six letters of the
last name, followed by the first and middle initials. Some
Unique IDs end in a number rather than a middle initial
because common last names and initials mean that a particular
Unique ID is already in use. The Unique ID is not case
sensitive. Both your Unique ID and MUNet password are
required to login to Miami's web portal, myMiami.
Variable credit hours: Range of credit hours for courses (usually
independent study, special topics, thesis hours). Indicated with
cumulative maximum in course description; for example (2-8;
maximum 16).
Grades /63
Grades
Office of the Registrar
118 Campus Avenue Building
Phone: 513-529-8703
www.muohio.edu/registrar
W
=
WP
WF
X
=
=
=
Y
=
Z
=
The Grading System
Grades for all students are reported to the Office of the
Registrar. Grade submission deadlines and dates by which grades
are viewable are listed on the academic calendar
(http://www.units.muohio.edu/reg/calendars/).
Miami
uses
the
following grading structure on a 4.00 scale.
Grade
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
Excellent
Good
Satisfactory
Poor
Failure
Points Per
Semester Hour
4.00
4.00
3.70
3.30
3.00
2.70
2.30
2.00
1.70
1.30
1.00
0.70
0.00
Other grade symbols include:
I
=
Incomplete; calculates as an F in grade point
average (retired).
IG or IGY
=
Incomplete; work at the graduate level; not
included in the calculation of grade point average.
The student has one academic semester following
the recording to complete the academic work.
Check the Academic Calendar for the deadlines per
term. After the deadline has passed with no grade
change being recorded, the "IG" will convert to a
grade of F. The "IGY" will convert to Y (no credit).
IU or IUY
=
Incomplete work at the undergraduate level; not
included in the calculation of grade point average.
The student has one academic semester following
the recording to complete the academic work.
Check the Academic Calendar for the deadlines per
term. After the deadline has passed with no grade
change being recorded, the "IU" will convert to a
grade of F. The "IUY" will convert to Y (no credit).
L
=
Audit; not included in enrollment status hours; not
included in calculation of grade point average.
N
=
No grade submitted by the instructor; not included
in the calculation of grade point average.
P
=
Passing; carries no credit points (used for student
teaching, thesis hours, dissertation hours).
S
=
Satisfactory progress; carries no credit points and
not included in the calculation of grade point
average; (used for courses in research, independent
reading, special topics courses, thesis hours,
dissertation hours, and undergraduate honors);
changes to a final grade when the project is
completed.
U
=
Unsatisfactory progress; carries no credit points;
not included in the calculation of grade point
average; (also used for special projects as above);
changes to a final grade when the project is
completed.
Withdrawal; assigned to a student who officially
withdraws from the University or from a course;
carries no credit points; is not included in the
calculation of grade point average.
Withdrawal passing; (retired).
Withdrawal failing; (retired).
Credit in a course taken credit/no-credit in which a
grade of C or better is earned in an undergraduate
course or in which a grade of B is earned in a
graduate course; carries no credit points; not
included in the calculation of grade point average.
No credit in a course taken credit/no-credit course
in which a grade of C- or less is earned in an
undergraduate course or in which a B- or less was
earned in a graduate course; carries no credit
points; not included in the calculation of grade
point average.
Course grades preceded by Z indicate the Fresh
Start policy has been applied.
Calculating Your Grade Point Average
Add the hours you have attempted for a grade in the semester.
Then figure the point value of your grades by multiplying the
point value of the grade by the number of hours in the course.
Divide the number of points by the number of hours; this is your
term GPA
Course
Hours
ENG 111
3
x
PSY 111
4
x
SPN 101
4
x
ZOO 115
4
x
EDT 110R
2
x
TOTAL
17
51.2 divided by 17 = 3.01 GPA
Grade
C (2.00)
B (3.00)
B (3.00)
B+ (3.30)
A (4.00)
=
=
=
=
=
Points
6.0
12.0
12.0
13.2
8.0
51.2
To figure your cumulative GPA, divide total points for all
terms by the total number of credit hours you attempted for a
grade. Grade point averages are truncated to the second decimal
place.
Auditing Courses
Courses may be audited without credit with the consent of the
instructor and will not be counted under any rules established by
the instructor and may include active registration or enrollment
status. The requirements for auditing a course are established by
the instructor and may include active participation by the student.
Any instructor may drop an auditing student at any time during
the semester if the student is not fulfilling the audit requirements.
Full fees are assessed for auditing a course. Whenever a student is
not fulfilling the audit requirements for a course the instructor may
direct the Office of the Registrar to drop the student. During the
first 20 percent of the course no grade will be recorded; after the
first 20 percent is completed but before 60 percent of the course is
completed, a grade of W will be recorded.
Credit/No-Credit
Warning: Nationwide studies have shown that credit/no-credit grades
on your academic record may be a negative factor in evaluation of your
application for admission or employment by most professional schools
(law, medicine, etc.), by many graduate schools, and by some
employers and undergraduate schools. Before enrolling for courses on
a credit/no-credit basis consider what effect it may have upon your
career goals.
Students should consult with the chief departmental adviser
of their department of major with regard to questions pertaining to
courses that may be taken on a credit/no-credit basis.
64/ Grades
All students not on academic probation may register for
courses on a credit/no-credit basis, except as noted below. Eligible
students may enroll in any course on a credit/no-credit basis
excepting courses used to meet department field of concentration
and major requirements and the core courses at the Dolibois
European Center. However, departments may specify field of
concentration and major requirements that can be met with "credit"
in a specified course. Registration in a course on a credit/no-credit
basis requires the permission of the instructor except in Miami
Plan courses.
Whenever a student is absent from class to such an extent as to
make the student’s work inefficient or to impair the morale of the
class, the instructor may direct the Office of the Registrar to drop
the student. During the first 20 percent of the course no grade will
be recorded; after the first 20 percent is completed but before 60
percent of the course is completed, a grade of W will be recorded.
After 60 percent of the course is completed, a grade of F will be
recorded. The instructor shall notify the student of this action no
later than the time he or she notifies the Office of the Registrar (see
academic calendar for specific dates).
No more than 25 percent of the total hours earned at Miami
may be earned in courses taken on a credit/no-credit basis.
Freshmen may register for courses on a credit/no-credit basis
providing they are concurrently enrolled for 12 hours for grades.
During the summer term, freshmen may register for courses on a
credit/no-credit basis providing they are concurrently enrolled for
four semester hours for grades. If at any time during the semester,
a student drops below 12 hours for grades (four hours for the
summer term), the credit/no-credit status will be removed.
Courses offered only on a credit/no-credit basis are not factored in.
Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may register for one or more
courses per semester on a credit/no-credit basis. Students may not
enroll on a credit/no-credit basis in any course in which they have
previously earned credit. A student may not enroll for grade in any
course for which they have received "credit" on a credit/no-credit
basis. "Credit" (X) will be granted for grades of C or better;
"no-credit" (Y) will be granted for grades of C- or less. The
instructor will record the normal letter grade, which the Office of
the Registrar will convert to the respective credit/no-credit
symbol. Courses taken on a credit/no-credit basis are disregarded
in the computation of grade point averages. A course can be
changed from credit/no-credit to letter grade or from letter grade
to credit/no-credit during the first 20 percent of the course (see the
academic calendar for specific dates).
A department may, at its discretion, drop from a course any
student who is absent from the first class meeting of a semester or
term, unless by the end of the day (11:59 p.m.) of the first class
meeting the student notifies the department or instructor of his or
her intention to take the course. When possible, departments and
instructors should reinstate a student who, for reasons beyond his
or her control, was unable to contact the department or instructor
by this deadline.
The determination of individual class attendance
requirements and their enforcement at the Dolibois European
Center is governed by the attendance policy of the Center.
Incompletes
If you cannot finish the work for a course by the end of a term,
with your instructor’s permission you can take an incomplete. This
is an agreement between you and your instructor that you will
finish your course work.
Grades of incomplete for a graduating student must be
removed by the conclusion of end-of-term processing for the
student's graduation term, approximately 30 days after the date of
graduation. For policies regarding incomplete grades and their
removal, see The Student Handbook.
Class Attendance
Every student is expected to attend every class session for
which the student is duly registered.
It is the prerogative of the individual faculty member to set
attendance policy for each individual course, and it is the
responsibility of the individual faculty member to inform students
of that policy in the course syllabus or other written document
within the first week of the semester.
There are no University-recognized excused absences except
for religious observances that require absence from a class session
and other required class activities. Students must give written
notification to their instructor within the first two weeks of class of
the religious event that prohibits class attendance and the date that
will be missed, if officially known. Instructors will, without
prejudice, provide such students with reasonable accommodations
for completing missed work. However, students are ultimately
responsible for material covered in class, regardless of whether the
student is absent or present.
It is the sense of the University Senate that faculty, student
groups and organizations, and the University athletic coaching
staff be sensitive to the academic needs of students and the need
for students to comply with the attendance policies in their
respective courses. In general, class absence should be avoided
unless absolutely necessary. If a student is involved in activities
that result in class absence (such as intercollegiate athletics, band,
debate, other class activities, etc.), it is the student’s responsibility
to negotiate specific arrangements with individual instructors
about any absences. The Senate also recognizes the fundamental
value of extra- and co-curricular activities and their significance in
students’ overall educational experience. Instructors should
recognize that participation in such activities is an integral part of
students’ education and helps to fulfill the comprehensive mission
of the University. Therefore, instructors are urged to accommodate
student requirements.
Withdrawal from the University
Withdrawing from the University is a formal administrative
procedure; merely ceasing to attend classes will not be considered
an official withdrawal from the University. A student withdrawing
from the University is expected to file in the Oxford Office of the
Registrar or Regional/Campus Records and Registration Office.
The withdrawal form must be signed by the student’s divisional
adviser or the proper University official as indicated on the
withdrawal form. An international student on a non-immigrant
student visa must also obtain the signature of the International
Student Adviser on the withdrawal form. The withdrawal deadline
is 5:00 p.m. on the last Friday of the term’s classes preceding final
exam week. Official withdrawals are noted on a student’s
academic record (transcript). Refunds follow University policy,
available via the Office of the Bursar website at
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/. Students considering withdrawal
from the University are strongly encouraged to contact their
lenders and insurance agents to determine continued eligibility for
loan deferments and insurance coverage.
1.
2.
3.
If a student officially withdraws during the first 20 percent of any
semester, accelerated course or summer term, no grades will be
recorded.
If a student officially withdraws from the University at any point after
20 percent and through the last class day of a semester, accelerated
course or summer term, the Office of the Registrar shall assign a
grade of W in each course for which the student is registered,
excluding accelerated courses completed or not yet begun prior to the
date of withdrawal from the University. Courses in which a final
grade has been assigned remain on the academic record.
If a student officially withdraws from the University after 60 percent
of a semester, accelerated course or summer term, and if the student
wishes to re-enroll, the student must submit a petition for
Grades /65
4.
re-enrollment to the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers. The
petition must include a description of the extenuating circumstances
(extraordinary circumstances usually beyond the student’s control)
that form the grounds of the petition.
If a student obtains a medical withdrawal certified by the Medical
Director of the Student Health Service or Director of the Student
Counseling Service, he or she will be allowed to withdraw from the
University without grades (see Part 4, Voluntary Medical
Withdrawal). If a student obtains a military withdrawal, the
provisions of Section 1.2.E apply.
Unofficial Withdrawal
If a student leaves the University without formally
withdrawing and failing and/or non-completion grades are
recorded, registrations in subsequent terms will be cancelled. The
student may petition the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers to
request consideration of a change in his or her record. If the
petition is approved by the committee, the grades recorded on the
student's academic record for that term shall be identical to those
recorded for official withdrawal, as noted above.
Academic Warning, Probation,
Suspension, and Dismissal
Academic actions are defined as academic warning, removal
of academic warning, academic probation, removal of academic
probation, academic suspension, and academic dismissal.
Academic actions are taken by the Office of the Registrar on the
basis of semester and/or cumulative grade point averages as
computed by the Office of the Registrar. Academic actions during
the summer terms are taken by the Office of the Registrar at the
end of the summer session. Academic actions will be taken on any
student regardless of the number of hours taken in any semester or
summer session. Good academic standing is defined as
maintaining a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00.
Students on academic warning are also considered to be in good
academic standing.
Academic Warning
An undergraduate student who earns a cumulative GPA less
than 2.00 during his or her first semester at Miami University will
be placed on academic warning. Excluding a student's first semester
(per above), in all subsequent semesters an undergraduate student
with fewer than 16 cumulative GPA hours who earns a cumulative
GPA lower than 2.00 is placed or continued on academic warning.
If an undergraduate student on academic warning has a
cumulative average of 2.00 or better, the student is removed from
academic warning.
Academic Probation
An undergraduate student with 16 or more cumulative Miami
grade point average hours is placed on academic probation at the end
of any semester or summer session in which his or her cumulative
average is lower than 2.00. If an undergraduate student's
cumulative average is 2.00 or better, the student is removed from
academic probation.
Continued on Academic Probation
An undergraduate student with 16-29 Miami grade point
average hours who is on academic probation and who has a
cumulative average lower than 2.00 is continued on academic
probation. An undergraduate student with 30 or more Miami grade
point average hours who is on academic probation and who has an
average for a semester or summer session of 2.00 or better, but has
a cumulative average lower than 2.00, is continued on academic
probation.
Academic Suspension
An undergraduate student with 30 or more Miami grade point
average hours who is on academic probation will be suspended if
his or her average for a semester or summer session is lower than
2.00. The period of suspension is two consecutive terms including
summer terms (see Student Handbook, Re-enrollment after Academic
Suspension or Dismissal).
Academic Dismissal
A second academic suspension for low scholarship constitutes
an academic dismissal. The period of academic dismissal is two
calendar years and is usually considered a permanent action (see
Student Handbook, Re-enrollment after Academic Suspension or
Dismissal).
A student may petition for an exception to academic
suspension or academic dismissal. Freshmen should consult their
freshman adviser or commuter adviser about the petitioning
process. Upper-class students can get a petition from their
divisional dean. These petitions are considered by the Committee
of Advisers in your academic division.
All decisions on petitions are reviewed by the Interdivisional
Committee of Advisers, which has the authority to affirm or
reverse the decision.
Scholastic Requirements for Graduate
Students
You must maintain a minimum grade point average (GPA) of
3.00 in both your cumulative GPA and your major field.
Departments may have higher standards.
A graduate student whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.00
(not including incompletes) will receive a warning letter and will
be allowed to register for one semester beyond the term in which
the unsatisfactory GPA resulted. If at the end of the additional
semester, the cumulative GPA remains below 3.00, the student may
not register for any further graduate credit at Miami University.
Appropriate adjustments are made for a student enrolled on a
part-time basis.
Note: To be eligible to take a final examination for any
graduate degree, a graduate student must have a 3.00 GPA or
better and may not have grades of incomplete.
Re-Enrollment
Former students who left the university in good standing may
apply for re-enrollment through the Office of the Registrar.
Students who have been suspended, dismissed, or have a financial,
medical, or disciplinary hold also apply through the Office of the
Registrar. Apply for re-enrollment at least 30 days before the
beginning of the term that you intend to enroll. Information is
available at www.muohio.edu/registrar/.
Returning students whose degree programs have been
discontinued should consult with their academic departments or
divisions.
66/ Grades
Fresh Start Policy
The Fresh Start Policy is designed to help Miami University
students return to good academic standing after an absence of at
least two calendar years. Students who have been academically
suspended or dismissed are eligible for Fresh Start. Other students
who left the University without being suspended or dismissed and
who have a cumulative GPA below 2.00 may petition their
divisional committee of advisers for Fresh Start after a two-year
absence if they believe their past academic record suffered due to
extenuating circumstances. Credit earned from other institutions
during the two-year period, beginning with the student’s first term
of non-enrollment at Miami, will not be accepted for transfer
credit.
When students are suspended or dismissed for academic
reasons, the Office of the Registrar will inform them about
re-enrollment opportunities, including the Fresh Start option. The
Office of the Registrar will inform any suspended or dismissed
student being re-admitted following a two-year continuous
absence that they may apply for Fresh Start status. A request for
Fresh Start status must be submitted to the student’s academic
division within one year of re-enrollment and applies only to
courses taken before re-enrollment.
1.
2.
3.
After Fresh Start status is approved, a notation will be added to the
student’s academic record indicating that all Miami University credit
hours earned prior to re-enrollment will be subject to the following
conditions: Courses taken prior to Fresh Start are excluded from the
cumulative grade point average calculation, and the student starts
with a new cumulative grade point average.
Credit earned at Miami with a grade of less than a C (2.00) is forfeited.
Grades from all coursework taken at Miami University will be used in
calculating eligibility for graduation with honors.
Students choosing to re-enroll under the Fresh Start policy are
subject to the academic regulations in effect at the time of their
re-entry. Fresh Start students must re-declare their major or
majors, or re-apply for admission to the major if admission is
required and must complete all current academic requirements.
Fresh Start status is applicable only to associate and baccalaureate
degrees and may be granted only one time. Following
re-enrollment, students opting for Fresh Start must complete at
Miami a minimum of 50 percent of the total hours required for
their degree program. Fresh Start status will be recorded on the
student’s academic record as follows: "(Date) Fresh Start
Approved. New Grade Point Average Established." Catalog year is
changed to reflect the first term of re-enrollment after the term of
Fresh Start is established.
Fees and Expenses /67
Fees and Expenses
collection costs may also be charged if it becomes necessary to send
a past due account to a third party collection agent.
Office of the Bursar
107 Campus Avenue Building
www.muohio.edu/bursar
The Board of Trustees authorizes the Bursar to restrict any
services, including release of all academic records of a student or
former student (e.g., diploma and transcripts), and registration for
future semesters, until any past due amount owed to the
university, including, but not limited to, fees, tuition, charges,
fines, and loans due to the university, is paid in full. Past due
means unpaid for 60 or more days after the due date, except that an
account paid with a bad check is past due on the day the check is
returned from the bank.
Financial Obligations
Fees and Expenses
Note: All fees and charges are subject to change without notice. For
current information on tuition and fees, visit the Bursar's website at
www.muohio.edu/bursar.
Estimated Fees and Expenses, 2012-2013
Note: 2012-2013 fees will be finalized in July 2012. All fees
and charges are subject to change without notice.
For
complete
www.muohio.edu/bursar/fees.
information,
please
visit
Important: You must be covered by health and accident insurance. Your
Bursar account will automatically be charged on your fall semester
invoice for Basic Coverage Student health and accident insurance
provided by the Maksin Group through the Health Services Center at
513-529-3000. If you do not need the insurance, you can complete a
Waiver Form online and your Bursar account will be credited. You can
purchase additional coverage by enrolling in Maksin's Comprehensive
Plan.
Other Charges
Audit Courses
These courses are charged at the same rate as credit courses.
Automobile Registration/Parking Permits
Automobile registration requirements and parking permit fee
information is available online at the Parking and Transportation
Services Web site (www.muohio.edu/parking/) or at the Student
Handbook Web site (www.muohio.edu/handbook/). A Student Motor
Vehicle and Bicycle Regulations pamphlet, which includes a parking
map, is available at the Parking Office, Campus Avenue Building,
Room 128 (529-8535).
Summer Session
Books and Supplies
Visit the Miami Summer Session website for more details at
www.units.muohio.edu/lifelonglearning/summer
or
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/.
Freshmen
Undergraduate students should estimate at least $1430 ($715
per semester) and Graduate students should estimate at least $960
($480 per semester) for books and supplies. Some programs (e.g.,
art, music, architecture) may require the purchase of additional
supplies.
When you are accepted, you must submit the following fee
and deposit with your housing application:
Chemistry
Admission Fee
University Contract
Confirmation Deposit
Total
Students taking chemistry lab courses are assessed a $25.00
non-refundable breakage fee.
$95.00
$330.00
Examinations (optional)
$425.00
If you attend Miami and fulfill your housing contract
requirements, the University Contract eConfirmation deposit
portion is retroactively applied toward your final term fees; you
will be refunded any remaining credit.
Paying Your Fees
Late payment fee
Late registration fee, per calendar week
$97.00 per test
$35.00 per test
Fee includes the first credit hour; add $35.00 for each
additional credit hour if you pass.
Graduation
Fees are due before the semester begins. You must pay by the
deadline printed on your eBill; otherwise your schedule may be
cancelled and a late payment fee will be assessed.
Late Payment, Late Registration
CLEP (College Level Examination Program)
Proficiency examination
Certificate
Associate, Bachelor, Specialist in education application
Master's degree application
Diploma replacement charge
Doctoral degree application ( includes diploma and
hood)
$10.00
$35.00
$35.00
$29.00
$200.00
$150.00
$27.00
Late Fees on Past Due Accounts
The Miami University Board of Trustees authorizes charging
late fees equal to the then current prime rate plus 3 percent on
charges that are not paid within 90 days of the due date. Full
Miscellaneous
Bad check charge
ID card replacement
$30.00
$35.00
Special fees may be assessed for courses with unusual
instructional expenses.
68/ Fees and Expenses
Refund of Charges
Questions about refunds should be directed to the Office of
the Bursar.
The date when you withdraw or drop below full-time hours is
the date that you officially withdraw or drop at the Office of the
Registrar.
Dropped Workshops
To receive a refund for a workshop, you must drop the
workshop no later than 4:30 p.m. the last business day before the
workshop begins.
Dropped Courses
If a full-time student drops below 12 semester hours within
the first five days of a semester, a full refund for those hours
dropped will be credited. A drop in hours after the fifth day of a
semester does not create a refund.
Drop unwanted courses. Do not assume that you will be
automatically dropped for nonattendance.
Withdrawal from the University
If you withdraw during first or second semester, your fees will
be refunded according to the following schedule.*
Withdrawal
Refund
Before 5 p.m. of the 5th day of the term
100 percent
Before 5 p.m. of the 8th day of the term
90 percent
Before 5 p.m. of the 20th day of the term
50 percent
Before 5 p.m. of the 30th day of the term
35 percent
Before 5 p.m. of the 40th day of the term
25 percent
After the 40th day of the term, you will not receive a refund.
If you withdraw, the room charge will be refunded according
to the guidelines and schedule of refunds listed on the housing
contract. There is no room refund after the fortieth (40 th) class day
of a semester. The meal program assessment fee is refunded on a
prorated basis, and the flexible spending account ending balance is
refunded during if the student withdraws during the semester.
Withdrawals occurring at the end of the semester will result in
remaining flexible spending account balances being automatically
transferred to MUlaa.
If you withdraw during a summer session, your fees will be
refunded as follows.*
Withdraw:
before 5 p.m. of the 3rd day of the term
4th through 8th day of the term
9th through 15th day of the term
Your refund:
100 percent
50 percent
25 percent
After the 15th day of the term, you will not receive a refund.
* When a student withdraws completely from the University during a
semester, the Office of Student Financial Assistance is required to
calculate, using a statutory prorata schedule, the amount of Federal
Title IV financial aid the recipient has earned for the semester. This
schedule is provided by the Department of Education. The amount of
Title IV financial aid earned is based on the amount of time the student
spent in academic attendance. The Office of the Registrar will inform
The Office of Student Financial Assistance the date the student notified
Miami of the intent to withdraw. This date is used to calculate aid
eligibility. If you are thinking about withdrawing, please contact the
Office of Student Financial Assistance for information on how it will
affect your financial aid.
Qualifications for Ohio Residency
Determined by The Ohio Board of
Regents
Intent
It is the intent of the Ohio Board of Regents in promulgating
this rule to exclude from treatment as residents, as that term is
applied here, those persons who are present in the state of Ohio
primarily for the purpose of receiving the benefit of a
state-supported education.
A complete description of the qualifications for Ohio
residency
is
available
online
at
www.muohio.edu/registrar/student/residency.
Financial Aid, Awards and Scholarships /69
Financial Aid,
Awards and
Scholarships
Office of Student Financial Assistance
121 Campus Avenue Building
513-529-8734
www.muohio.edu/financialaid
Financial Aid for Undergraduate
Students
There are many programs of assistance available from private,
state, federal, and university funds. We are committed to helping
students-within the limits of available funds-gain a college
education even if their resources are limited. To receive
consideration for most programs, students and parents must
complete the appropriate forms. All information provided remains
confidential.
Understanding which programs are available to students is
complicated by the many state, federal, and local agencies that set
regulations for the use of the funds. Students, as consumers of
these funds, have the right under law to receive clear, accurate
information concerning aid programs.
For more information, contact the Office of Student Financial
Assistance or check online at www.muohio.edu/financialaid/.
Need-Based Assistance
The Office of Student Financial Assistance can assist students
in obtaining need-based financial aid including: grants, awards
based on financial need that do not require repayment; loans,
awards that require repayment; federal work-study, part-time
employment; and scholarships, for which some consider financial
need as a secondary factor. Any awarded aid is combined to meet a
student's financial need. The total amount of aid a student receives
is based on a family's financial circumstances. To be considered for
all need-based financial aid, new first-year students must complete
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by February
15 (for returning and new transfer students, the deadline is March
15). The FAFSA must be completed every year ( www.fafsa.gov).
A student cannot receive any combination of aid, including
loans, grants, federal work-study, and scholarships that exceeds
the cost of attendance. If the total amount of financial aid exceeds
the cost of attendance, the amount of aid will be reduced.
Grant Programs
Students with a high level of financial need are typically
eligible for grants. Generally, a student receives grant funds in
combination with loans and/or federal work-study. Students with
a disability may also be eligible for grants from the Bureau of
Vocational Rehabilitation.
The following grant programs are awarded on the basis of a
family's financial circumstances; no repayment is required.
Federal Pell Grant - A federal grant for undergraduate
students. The maximum grant in 2011-2012 was $5,550 per year for
full-time students.
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) Federal grant administered by Miami University for high financial
need students who are also eligible for Pell Grants. A limited
number of these grants are given in combination with Pell Grant,
loan, and/or federal work-study.
Federal Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher
Education (TEACH) Grant - Federal grant program awarding up to
$4,000 per year to a student who agrees to serve as a full-time
teacher in a high-need field in a public or private elementary or
secondary school that serves students from low-income families. A
TEACH Grant recipient must teach for at least four academic years
within eight calendar years of completing the program of study for
which the TEACH Grant was received. IMPORTANT: If a student
fails to complete this teaching obligation, all amounts of the TEACH
Grant that were received will be converted to a Federal Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford Loan. This loan and all accrued interest must
be repaid to the U.S. Department of Education. Interest will be
charged from the date the grant(s) was disbursed.
To qualify for a TEACH Grant, a student must have placed
above the 75th percentile of a standardized college admission test
(ACT/SAT/GRE); OR have a high school cumulative 3.25 GPA
and must maintain the 3.25 GPA throughout the student’s
academic program; OR be a current teacher returning to pursue an
advanced degree. The student may be either an undergraduate or
graduate enrolled full or part-time. Award amounts are
proportionally reduced as enrollment level lessens.
A student must complete a TEACH Grant Agreement to Serve
(ATS) each year and complete TEACH Entrance Counseling each
year to receive a TEACH Grant. For information about the
high-need fields and schools serving low-income students,
eligibility requirements, grant conditions, and to obtain the service
agreement, see teach-ats.ed.gov.
You may cancel all or a portion of your TEACH grant after
funds have been credited to your student’s Bursar account by
notifying us in writing within 30 days after the date of your grant
disbursement notice. After 30 days, you will work directly with the
Department of Education.
Ohio College Opportunity Grant (OCOG) - A state grant
program which provides need-based tuition assistance to Ohio
students with financial need attending the Oxford campus.
Students apply for the OCOG by completing the FAFSA by
October 1 each year. For the 2011-2012 academic year, the
maximum award amount for full-time enrollment is $672 for
students with an EFC of less than 2191. Award amounts are
proportionally reduced as enrollment level lessens.
BVR/Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation-Bureau of Services for
the Blind - Federal and state grant program for undergraduate
students with disabilities. Eligibility for funding is determined by
the Rehabilitation Service Commission in the student's state of
residence. Contact the state office in your state capital in order to
begin the agency's application process as early as possible.
Loan Programs
Miami University realizes that managing the cost of education
is a challenge for many families. In addition to grants,
scholarships, and federal work-study funds, several loan options
are available. Loans may make it possible for you and/or your
family to borrow now and defer repayment until after you leave
the university.
Federal Perkins Loan - Eligible undergraduate students filing
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will be
considered for a Federal Perkins Loan. First priority is given to
students who file their FAFSA application by Miami's priority filing
deadline of February 15 for new freshmen and March 15 for returning
students. A Federal Perkins Loan is a subsidized, deferred payment
loan for students with exceptional high financial need. The interest
rate is fixed at 5 percent. Students are required to begin making
payments on their Perkins Loan nine (9) months after they
graduate, leave school, or drop below half-time (6 credit hours)
70/ Financial Aid, Awards and Scholarships
enrollment. The amount borrowed must be repaid within ten (10)
years after the date repayment begins.
Federal Direct Stafford Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student
Loans - Most students who file the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) are eligible for a William D. Ford Federal
Direct Stafford Student Loan. Students may receive a Direct
Subsidized Loan, a Direct Unsubsidized Loan, or a combination of
both for the same academic year.
The Direct Subsidized Loans are awarded based on a student's
financial need. With a Direct Subsidized Loan, the federal
government pays any interest that accrues on the loan during
authorized periods of deferment (postponement of repayment).
The Direct Unsubsidized Loans are awarded based on the cost
of education less any other financial aid received. The federal
government charges interest on the loan from the time the loan is
disbursed until the loan is paid in full.
For 2012-2013 the annual borrowing limits (as defined by
federal needs analysis formulas) for both the Direct Subsidized and
Unsubsidized Loans were $5,500 ($3,500 may be in a subsidized
loan) for freshmen, $6,500 ($4,500 may be in a subsidized loan) for
sophomores, and $7,500 ($5,500 may be in a subsidized loan) for
the remaining years of undergraduate study. Independent
students may also qualify for an additional unsubsidized loan of
$4,000 or $5,000 depending on their undergraduate status.
Aggregate loan limits exist for both undergraduate and graduate
study. The interest rate on both loans is fixed at the time the loan
disburses. New loan interest rates for subsequent years are
adjusted once a year on July 1. See www.muohio.edu/loans for a link
to the current interest rate.
Students are required to begin making payments on their
Direct Loans six (6) months after they graduate, leave school, or
drop below half-time (6 credit hours) enrollment.
Federal Direct PLUS Loans (for parents) - Federal Direct PLUS
loans help parents pay their dependent student's educational
expenses. Parents may borrow up to the cost of attendance minus
any other financial aid that the student receives. The federal
government charges interest from the date of the first
disbursement until the loan is paid in full. The interest rate on the
loan is fixed at the time the loan disburses. New loan interest rates
are adjusted once a year on July 1. See www.muohio.edu/loans for a
link to the current interest rate. The parent is responsible for
repayment of this loan. Parents have the option of beginning
repayment either 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed, or six
months after the student ceases to be enrolled on at least a
half-time basis (6 credit hours). However, interest begins to accrue
60 days after full disbursement and will also accrue during loan
deferment. A FAFSA must be submitted in order to apply for a
PLUS loan. For information on applying, please see
www.muohio.edu/loans.
Private Loans
Miami will certify a private loan from any lender. Terms,
fees, and borrowing limits of private loans differ. The yearly
amount cannot exceed the annual cost of attendance minus other
financial aid and resources. Private loans are not federally
guaranteed and do not require that you file the FAFSA. For more
information
about
obtaining
a
private
loan,
visit
www.muohio.edu/loans.
Student Loan Code of Conduct
The guiding principles for insuring the integrity of the student
aid process and the ethical conduct of employees in regard to
student loan practices are provided in the Miami University
Student Loan Code of Conduct available on the loan web pages at
www.muohio.edu/loans.
Federal Work-Study (FWS) Employment
Federal Work-Study is a federal financial aid program that is
awarded based on financial need computed from information
provided on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA). If a student indicated an interest in work-study on the
FAFSA and is eligible, the student’s award package may include
FWS. A student benefits from having Federal Work-Study because
FWS earnings are not calculated in the Expected Family
Contribution (EFC) on the following year’s FAFSA. Additionally,
employers often prefer hiring FWS students since a portion of the
student's wage is paid with federal funds.
Summer Aid
Starting in April, students will be notified of their eligibility
for summer aid upon registering for summer classes if they have a
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on file with
Miami University and if they have completed all outstanding
financial aid requirements.
Summer financial aid is based on any remaining aid eligibility
the student has from the current academic year. Generally,
students are only eligible for additional federal student loan funds
if they have the number of hours required to advance in grade level
by the end of the spring semester. Further, students cannot use
their Miami scholarships for summer sessions(s) unless the
scholarship was awarded specifically for summer study. If all
federal loan eligibility has been exhausted, the student may want
to consider a federal Direct PLUS loan or a private loan. More
information regarding financial aid can be found at
www.muohio.edu/financialaid.
Aid for Another University or Study Abroad
Program
If you are a degree-seeking student at Miami University and
you wish to obtain aid to attend another university or a study
abroad program during the fall or spring semester or summer
session, or you are simultaneously enrolled at Miami and another
institution, you must complete a Consortium/Contractual
Agreement in order to receive financial aid and scholarships. The
Consortium/Contractual
Agreement
is
available
at
www.muohio.edu/financialaid/forms.
A completed Consortium/Contractual Agreement is needed if
you are studying on a co-sponsored or approved study abroad
program even if you do not intend to take a loan for the current
term. Completing this agreement can be a very long process, and if
at all possible, should be started at least two months prior to
leaving the country. For important study abroad financial aid
information, requirements, and deadlines, select the Current
Students link at www.muohio.edu/financialaid.
Other Sources of Aid
State Assistance for Non-Ohio Residents
Most states have student assistance programs. Contact the
student assistance agency in your state for information on what aid
is available and how to apply.
Assistance for Veterans
Veterans Administration GI Bill information and certification
of attendance forms are available at www.muohio.edu/veterans.
Veterans must immediately report any changes of their program
(adds, drops, or withdrawal) to the Office of Student Financial
Assistance while receiving education benefits from the VA. For
further information about the GI Bill, visit www.gibill.va.gov. To
determine GI Bill eligibility, contact the Department of Veteran
Affairs at 1-888-442-4551.
Additional financial assistance through programs described in
this section is available to most veterans.
Student Employment
The Department of Human Resources coordinates all student
employment and student payroll registration. The two types of
student employment at Miami are Federal Work-Study (FWS) and
Financial Aid, Awards and Scholarships /71
regular wage employment. Job classifications and wage rates are
the same for each, but they are financed differently. University
employers do their own hiring and students are responsible for
finding a job. Current job openings may be found at
www.miamistudentjobs.com. Information about job classifications,
wage rates, and how to apply for jobs is available online at
www.muohio.edu/studentemployment.
Finally, once financial need is determined, the student is
considered initially for grant eligibility, then for loan and federal
work-study, depending on the student's indicated preference on
the FAFSA. Students who submit the FAFSA to the Federal
Processing Center by February 15 for new first-year students and
March 15 for returning students and new transfer students are the
first groups to be awarded aid.
Eligibility for Financial Assistance
Applicants are ranked in order of greatest need and awards
are made on the basis of the amount of financial need.
Programs based on financial need, funded by state and federal
aid programs, are administered by Miami. To be eligible for these
programs, you must:
 Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen as defined on the
FAFSA.*
 Be registered for Selective Service, if required.
 Be working toward a degree or certificate in an eligible
program.
 Be able to demonstrate financial need (except for certain
loans); see Applying for Assistance below.
 Maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) each
academic year.
 Certify that you are not in default on any federal student
loan or owe a refund on a federal grant.
 Have a valid Social Security number (unless you are from
the Republic of Marshall Islands, the Federated States of
Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau).
 Certify that you have not been convicted of an offense
involving either the possession or sale of illegal drugs that
occurred while receiving Title IV federal aid.
 Certify that you are not subject to an involuntary civil
commitment following incarceration for a sexual offense (as
determined under the FBI’s Crime Reporting Program).
 Certify that you will use federal student financial aid only
for educational purposes.
*Note: International students who do not meet citizenship
requirements for federal aid programs should contact the Office
of International Education for information about financial
assistance.
Applying for Assistance
Students must complete the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) each year to be considered for all need-based
scholarships and financial aid. Complete the FASFA online at
www.fafsa.gov. To be considered a priority applicant for all
need-based financial aid, new first-year students must complete
the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by February
15 (for returning students and new transfer students, the deadline
is March 15). The FAFSA must be completed every year.
Determining Your Financial Aid Package
A student's financial aid package is processed in this order:
First, we estimate the student's Cost of Attendance (COA)
based on his or her state of residence, the campus that will be
attended, and the student's enrollment status. The COA includes
instructional and general fees, room and board, fees for
technology, Metro, facilities and include, but are not limited to
books and supplies, transportation, personal expenses, hygiene,
recreation, and entertainment.
Second, after receiving the FAFSA data from the US
Department of Education, we use the reported Expected Family
Contribution (EFC) that reflects the family's ability to contribute to
educational costs to calculate the student's eligibility for
need-based aid. We then subtract the Expected Family
Contribution (EFC) from the Cost of Attendance (COA) to
determine the student's financial need.
Students who are awarded scholarships will be sent a separate
Scholarship Award Notification.
Students with significant changes in family income (death,
loss of job, disability, divorce, or other extreme circumstances)
after filing their FAFSA may request a re-evaluation of their
application. To see if circumstances qualify for review, go to
www.muohio.edu/financialaid/forms and download a Special
Circumstance Appeal form or call our office for more information.
Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress
(SAP)
Basic Requirements
If students receive federal financial aid, they are required to
maintain satisfactory progress toward their degree. Satisfactory
progress is measured with two standards, qualitative, which is
grade-based and quantitative, which is time-related. Download the
Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) which outlines
Miami University’s policy for monitoring a student’s progress at
www.muohio.edu/financialaid/forms.
Change in Enrollment
A student's initial award is typically based on full-time,
full-year enrollment. Students must inform the Office of Financial
Assistance
in
writing
or
via
BannerWeb
on
the
Resources/Additional Information tab if their intended enrollment
is less than full time or less than a full year. Changes in enrollment
could require adjustments to aid before funds can disburse to a
student's Bursar account. Usually, a student must be enrolled for at
least six hours to be eligible for any type of aid.
In the case of students who change their enrollment prior to
the end of the drop/add period, their grant(s), scholarship(s),
and/or loan eligibility will be recalculated. Students will receive a
revised award notification listing any changes in their aid package.
At the end of the last day to drop a course without a grade, the
student's enrollment will be frozen and the financial aid for the
semester will be based on the number of credit hours the student is
enrolled at that time. Students should make sure they are enrolled
for all the classes (including sprint courses) they intend to take for
the 2012-2013 fall semester by close of business on September 10,
2012 and for 2012-2013 spring semester by February 4, 2013.
Withdrawal from the University
The U.S. Department of Education expects that Federal aid
recipients complete all courses attempted and paid for with
Federal aid. Therefore, if students received federal assistance from
any federal aid program (Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct
Stafford Loan, Federal Pell Grant, Federal TEACH Grant, Federal
SEOG, Federal Graduate PLUS Loan, or Federal Parent PLUS
Loan) and withdrew from the University during a semester that
they began attendance, Miami is required to determine the amount
of federal aid that they have earned as of their withdrawal date.
The percentage of the semester completed is determined by
dividing the total number of calendar days in the semester into the
number of calendar days that the student completed as of the
withdrawal date. Scheduled breaks of at least five consecutive days
72/ Financial Aid, Awards and Scholarships
are excluded from the total number of calendar days in the
semester.
If a student notifies the Registrar in writing that they are
withdrawing for any reason, Miami will be required to complete a
withdrawal calculation and a student’s aid may be adjusted for the
semester. The withdrawal date will be the date that official
notification was provided to Miami of the student’s intent to
withdraw. The percent of federal aid that was earned by the
student is equal to the percent of the semester that was completed,
as of the withdrawal date, if this date occurs on or before
completion of 60% of the semester. If the withdrawal date is after
completion of 60% of the semester, the student will have earned
100% of the federal aid and no adjustments will be made to their
federal aid for the semester.
If a student stops attending classes and does not notify the
Registrar’s Office that they are withdrawing, the student is
considered to have unofficially withdrawn. Unofficial withdrawals
are recorded when grades have been posted by the Registrar and
the student record shows that the student received all (or
combination) F, I, N, W and/or Y grades for the semester. A return
of Title IV withdrawal calculation is performed based on the last
known date of attendance provided by the professor. If a date is
not provided by the professor, the withdrawal calculation is based
on the midpoint (50%) of the semester. Once the withdrawal
calculation is performed, a portion of federal aid may be revoked
from the student’s account at Miami and returned to the federal
government. This process typically results in the student owing
money to the Office of the Bursar. When a withdrawal calculation
has been completed and aid has been adjusted, students are
notified in writing by the Office of Student Financial Assistance.
Adjustments may also be made to the student’s state and
university awards if required.
Miami will return all unearned aid to the U.S. Department of
Education for the student. The unearned aid will be credited to the
outstanding balances on federal loans made to the student or on
behalf of the student for the semester in which the return was
required. The order for the return of aid is as follows: Federal
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Federal Direct Subsidized
Stafford Loan, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Graduate
PLUS, Federal Direct PLUS (received on behalf of the student),
Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, and Federal TEACH Grant.
Withdrawing will also affect a student’s Satisfactory
Academic Progress and may jeopardize future federal financial aid
eligibility. To make sure a student understands the possible impact
on financial aid, a student should consult with a financial
assistance counselor prior to withdrawing from the university.
Academic Suspension or Dismissal
Students suspended or dismissed for academic reasons, may
not receive financial aid until they are re-enrolled. When students
apply for re-enrollment, they should contact the Office of Student
Financial Assistance for information about applying for aid.
Scholarships
Administered by the Office of Student Financial Assistance,
scholarship programs are designed to recognize outstanding
undergraduates demonstrating high scholastic aptitude and
attainment. While all scholarships are based on academic merit,
some scholarships also have financial need as a requirement.
Students cannot receive a combination of aid, including loans,
grants, federal work-study, and scholarships, which exceeds their
cost of attendance. If the total amount of financial aid exceeds the
cost of attendance, the amount of aid will be reduced.
All accepted first-year students are automatically considered
for all available university scholarships. No separate scholarship
application is required. Those students filing the FAFSA by the
February 15 deadline will also be considered for need-based
scholarships. Scholarship award determinations will be based on
official testing and high school transcript information received by
Miami University as of March 1.
Current Miami students will be considered for the various
donor and departmental scholarships available for the following
year. To also be considered for need-based scholarships, returning
students must complete the FAFSA by the March 15 deadline. We
will automatically make award determinations by reviewing a
student’s cumulative grade point average (GPA) and the specific
eligibility criteria required for each scholarship. Scholarships are
awarded within the limits of available funds. No separate
scholarship application is required. Returning students will receive
scholarship award notifications prior to July 1.
Renewable scholarships are available for new domestic
transfer students who have demonstrated academic merit and
significant need. A student must have submitted a FAFSA and also
have the scholarship GPA based on 12 or more credit hours from
an accredited school. For Miami transfer scholarship requirements,
please see www.muohio.edu/scholarships. Students enrolled less than
full-time, attending the regional campuses, or that have a previous
Bachelor's degree are not eligible.
For
additional
scholarship
www.muohio.edu/scholarships.
information,
see
Awards
Incoming freshmen are notified of their scholarship awards at
or near the end of March; returning students will be notified prior
to July 1. Awards are normally made for the academic year,
starting with the fall semester.
Graduate Awards and Other Financial Assistance for Graduate Students /73
Graduate Awards
and Other Financial
Assistance for
Graduate Students
Graduate School
102 Roudebush Hall
phone: 513-529-3734
www.muohio.edu/graduate
Office of Student Financial Assistance
121 Campus Avenue Building
phone: 513-529-8734
www.muohio.edu/financialaid
Graduate Awards
Award Information
You must be admitted to the Graduate School with regular
standing to be considered for a graduate award.
If you meet the minimum undergraduate grade point average
required for admission with regular standing, you may be
appointed to a graduate assistantship for one semester with
reappointment contingent upon achievement of a 3.00 graduate
grade point average for that semester and satisfactory performance
of your graduate assistant duties.
You may not hold more than one graduate award for any
given semester or academic year.
A graduate award holder cannot hold any other employment
at Miami University during the term of the graduate award unless
recommended by the department chair and approved by the
graduate dean. International students (those with F-1 and J-1 visas)
are allowed to work a maximum of 20 hours per week while classes
are in session (this includes assistantship/associateship duties). An
international student who holds a modified graduate assistantship
with duties of eight hours per week may request permission to
hold additional employment as long as that employment does not
exceed 12 hours per week.
Award of a graduate appointment for one year involves no
commitment for continued support by the university for
subsequent years.
To Apply for a Graduate Award
To receive a graduate award you must be recommended by
your department following your application and admission by the
Graduate School. Contact the department to which you are
applying for specific application requirements and deadlines. For a
listing of graduate programs, visit the Graduate School website.
More information on graduate awards is available in the "A
Handbook for Graduate Students and Faculty."
Types of Awards
Most award recipients work in departments of their field of
study. Graduate assistantships and doctoral associateships,
however, are also available in other offices, such as the library, the
Bernard B. Rinella Jr. Learning Center, university advancement,
and intercollegiate athletics. Information is available from
Academic Personnel Services, 513-529-6724, and the Graduate
School, 513-529-3734.
Graduate assistantships are for holders of a baccalaureate
degree seeking an advanced degree. These awards carry a stipend
from at least $7,500 to a maximum of $20,342 for half-time duties
for two semesters. Graduate assistants with half-time duties for
two semesters are granted remission of 93% of the graduate
comprehensive fee for the period of appointment and for the
summer session immediately preceding or following the year of
appointment. You will also be required to pay technology, facilities
and metro fees. Total fees paid by graduate assistants are currently
$494.09 per semester for full-time registration of 9 credit hours. Fee
increases for 2012-2013 will be determined at the June 2012 meeting
of the Board of Trustees. For additional information regarding fees,
charges, and regulations regarding refunds see the following link:
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/.
Graduate assistants must carry between 9 to 15 hours of
graduate courses each semester; however, Master of Arts in
Teaching degree candidates in teacher education may carry nine
graduate hours plus at least one undergraduate course each term.
Duties normally occupy 18 to 20 hours per week. Students in music
must pay additional special fees for applied music study.
Modified graduate assistantships are for holders of a
baccalaureate degree seeking an advanced degree. These
assistantships carry a stipend from at least $4,714 to a maximum of
$6,500 for specified duties for two semesters. Graduate assistants
with half-time duties for two semesters are granted remission of
93% of the graduate comprehensive fee for the period of
appointment and for the summer session immediately preceding
or following the year of appointment. You will also be required to
pay technology, facilities and metro fees. Total fees paid by
graduate assistants are currently $494.09 per semester for full-time
registration of 9 credit hours. Fee increases for 2012-2013 will be
determined at the June 2012 meeting of the Board of Trustees. For
additional information regarding fees, charges, and regulations
regarding
refunds
see
the
following
link:
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/. Holders must carry between 9 to
15 graduate hours each semester; however, Master of Arts in
Teaching degree candidates in teacher education may carry 9
graduate hours plus at least one undergraduate course each term.
Duties consist of assisting faculty in instruction or research for an
average of 8 hours per week for each semester of appointment.
Residence hall assistantships, for students who plan careers in
college student personnel work, carry a stipend of $7,500 plus
room and board for part-time duties for two semesters. Graduate
assistants with half-time duties for two semesters are granted
remission of 93% of the graduate comprehensive fee for the period
of appointment and for the summer session immediately preceding
or following the year of appointment. You will also be required to
pay technology, facilities and metro fees. Total fees paid by
graduate assistants are currently $494.09 per semester for full-time
registration of 9 credit hours. Fee increases for 2012-2013 will be
determined at the June 2012 meeting of the Board of Trustees. For
additional information regarding fees, charges, and regulations
regarding
refunds
see
the
following
link:
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/. Holders must carry between 9 to
15 graduate hours each semester and perform duties as a counselor
in a residence hall. Application should be made directly to the
Office of Residence Life at the time of applying for admission to the
Graduate School.
Teaching associateships are for holders of a master’s degree or
equivalent (i.e., 34 graduate semester hours in a doctoral program)
seeking a doctorate or a Specialist in Education degree. These
associateships carry a stipend from at least $16,047 to a maximum
of $20,342 for half-time duties for two semesters. Graduate
74/ Graduate Awards and Other Financial Assistance for Graduate Students
assistants with half-time duties for two semesters are granted
remission of 93% of the graduate comprehensive fee for the period
of appointment and for the summer session immediately preceding
or following the year of appointment. You will also be required to
pay technology, facilities and metro fees. Total fees paid by
graduate assistants are currently $494.09 per semester for full-time
registration of 9 credit hours. Fee increases for 2012-2013 will be
determined at the June 2012 meeting of the Board of Trustees. For
additional information regarding fees, charges, and regulations
regarding
refunds
see
the
following
link:
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/. Teaching associates must carry
between 9 to 15 hours of graduate courses each semester and
perform duties, usually teaching, equivalent to 18 to 20 hours per
week.
Doctoral associateships are for holders of a master’s degree or
equivalent (i.e., 34 graduate semester hours in a doctoral program)
pursuing an approved program leading to a doctorate or a
Specialist in Education degree. Doctoral associates are normally
assigned responsibilities for nonteaching duties in administration.
Stipends and academic responsibilities are the same as those for
teaching associates.
Dissertation scholarships, for doctoral candidates at
dissertation stage, are service free and carry a stipend ranging from
$16,047 to $20,342. Graduate assistants with half-time duties for
two semesters are granted remission of 93% of the graduate
comprehensive fee for the period of appointment and for the
summer session immediately preceding or following the year of
appointment. You will also be required to pay technology, facilities
and metro fees. Total fees paid by graduate assistants are currently
$494.09 per semester for full-time registration of 9 credit hours. Fee
increases for 2012-2013 will be determined at the June 2012 meeting
of the Board of Trustees. For additional information regarding fees,
charges, and regulations regarding refunds see the following link:
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/. Holders must carry the maximum
graduate load during the period of appointment.
Graduate summer scholarships are stipends of two $900
payments made during the summer semester. These stipends are
awarded for a maximum of $1,800 for the summer semester, and
there are no duties attached to the payment of this scholarship. The
awards are given to graduate assistants, research graduate
assistants, modified graduate assistants, residence hall assistants,
teaching associates, graduate associates, and dissertation/doctoral
scholars who hold awards for one or two semesters and meet the
guidelines for these scholarships. Graduate assistants with
half-time duties for two semesters are granted remission of 93% of
the graduate comprehensive fee for the period of appointment and
for the summer session immediately preceding or following the
year of appointment. You will also be required to pay technology,
facilities and metro fees. Total fees paid by graduate assistants are
currently $494.09 per semester for full-time registration of 9 credit
hours. Fee increases for 2012-2013 will be determined at the June
2012 meeting of the Board of Trustees. For additional information
regarding fees, charges, and regulations regarding refunds see the
following
link:
http://www.units.muohio.edu/bur/. Individual
departments will determine what coursework is needed for their
students to qualify for the summer scholarship and tuition/fee
waiver.
Graduate grants-in-aid are waivers of instructional fee and
out-of-state tuition. There is no cash stipend. No duties are
required. These grants are available for one or both semesters
and/or summer terms to U.S. and international students who are
in need of financial assistance, have strong academic records, and
show considerable promise of future attainment. These grants are
for students in continuous full-time study leading to a degree; they
are not available to part-time students, non-degree students, and
students whose full-time study is limited to summer sessions.
Continuance or renewal of a grant is dependent upon satisfactory
progress toward a degree. To apply for this grant, you must submit
an official application form before March 1 for the following
summer term or for the following academic year. You must apply
for this award annually.
Academic Responsibilities
You must maintain satisfactory progress toward your degree
in order to assure continuance as a grant-in-aid holder, graduate
assistant, doctoral associate, or teaching associate. Satisfactory
progress means meeting minimum registration requirements,
maintaining a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.00, and
fulfilling academic requirements for your degree as determined by
your department or program. Failure to achieve such progress may
result in the revocation of the award.
Award Acceptance
The university adheres to the resolution adopted by the
Council of Graduate Schools in the United States. The resolution
provides that if an award recipient accepts an award before April
15, the recipient will have complete freedom through April 15 to
resign in order to accept another appointment. After April 15,
however, the recipient may not accept another award without
obtaining a formal release from the first commitment.
Graduate Students’ Achievement Fund
The Graduate School sponsors this program to recognize
significant achievements in research or creative activities by
graduate students. Achievement is defined as completed research
or other creative activity that has been recognized by an external
organization or selected by an academic department for regional or
national presentation. Contact the Graduate School for more
information.
Other Financial Assistance
In addition to awards administered through the Graduate
School, the Office of Student Financial Assistance offers Federal
Direct Stafford Unsubsidized Loans, Federal Direct Graduate
PLUS Loans, and private loans. Campus employment is also
available. To be considered for all available financial aid, you must
file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Miami's
priority filing deadline for the FAFSA is March 15. The FAFSA is
available at www.fafsa.gov. Miami University's Federal School Code
is 003077.
International students are not generally eligible for federal
student aid.
For additional information contact the Office of Student
Financial Assistance, 121 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-8734
or visit the website at www.muohio.edu/financialaid.
Cost of Attendance and Financial Aid Eligibility
Cost of Attendance (COA) is based on campus, housing
arrangements, residency, and enrollment status including tuition
and fees, room and board, books and supplies, personal expenses,
and transportation. A student may not receive financial aid in
excess of the COA. If a student receives a graduate assistantship,
that amount is considered an additional resource and is used in the
formula to determine financial need. In order to remain compliant
with federal regulations, the amount of a graduate assistantship is
subtracted from the COA to determine the student's remaining
financial aid eligibility. This may result in a decrease in the amount
of your loan eligibility. Example: If your COA is $30,000 and you
have a graduate assistantship for $10,000, you have financial aid
eligibility of $20,000 and can only borrow up to that amount (if you
have no other aid resources). If you have any questions regarding
student loans, please call the Office of Student Financial Assistance
513-529-8734 and ask to speak to a Financial Assistance Counselor.
You may visit the website at wwww.muohio.edu/financialaid.
Graduate Awards and Other Financial Assistance for Graduate Students /75
William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Programs
Eligible students filing the FAFSA will be considered for the
William D. Ford Federal Direct Stafford Loan Programs. Upon
verification of eligibility, completion of a Master Promissory Note,
and Entrance Counseling (if a first time borrower at Miami), the
loan funds will be credited to the student's Bursar account in
accordance with Miami’s disbursement schedule.
Need is not a factor in determining eligibility for a Federal
Direct Stafford Unsubsidized Loan. With a Federal Direct Stafford
Unsubsidized Loan, interest begins to accumulate on the day the
loan is disbursed to a student's account and continues until the
loan is paid in full. Repayment of the interest is deferred while a
student is in school and attending at least 6 graduate credit hours
per semester. Graduate students may borrow up to $12,000 in
unsubsidized loans per academic year.
The maximum total debt aggregate limit for a graduate
student is $138,500 (including undergraduate study and only
$65,500 may be in subsidized loans). For the 2012-2013 academic
year, the interest rate for both subsidized and unsubsidized loans
is fixed at 6.8%.
To be eligible for the Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan, you
must be enrolled at least half-time (5 graduate credit hours per
semester) in a Master's degree or professional program and meet
all general eligibility requirements for Federal Student Aid. In
addition, you must not have an adverse credit history (a credit
check will be done). Interest begins to accumulate on the day the
loan is fully disbursed to a student's account and continues until
the loan is paid in full. While you are enrolled in school, you will
automatically be placed in an in-school deferment status that
allows postponement of payment on the Graduate PLUS loan until
you graduate or drop below 6 graduate credit hours. There are no
set annual or aggregate limits on the PLUS loan amount. However,
you may only borrow up to your cost of attendance (COA) minus
any other financial aid you receive. For the 2012-2013 academic
year, the interest rate for the PLUS loan is fixed at 7.9%.
Private Loans
Miami will certify a private loan from any lender. Terms, fees,
and borrowing limits of private loans differ. The yearly amount
cannot exceed the annual cost of attendance minus other financial
aid and resources. Private loans are not federally guaranteed and
do not require filing the FAFSA. For more information on
obtaining a private loan, visit www.muohio.edu/loans.
Student Loan Code of Conduct
The guiding principles for insuring the integrity of the student
aid process and the ethical conduct of employees in regard to
student loan practices are provided in the Miami University
Student Loan Code of Conduct available on the loan pages at
www.muohio.edu/loans.
Campus Employment
The Department of Human Resources coordinates all student
employment on campus. Graduate student wages may vary
according to skills or responsibilities. You can look for a campus
job at www.muohio.edu/studentemployment.
If you hold an assistantship and want to work on campus any
hours beyond your assistantship duties, you must first obtain
permission from your department and the Graduate School.
Notification of Awards
Students filing their FAFSA by the filing deadline of March 15
should receive their award notification prior to July 1.
You must notify the Office of Student Financial Assistance of
any additional awards you are receiving (e.g., graduate
assistantship, outside scholarships, dissertation scholarships, fee
waiver, tuition assistance, etc.). These additional awards may
impact your Federal Direct Loan eligibility.
If circumstances have changed and your FAFSA does not
accurately represent your financial situation (i.e., divorce, loss of
wages, or other extreme circumstances), you may request a special
circumstance review by contacting the Office of Student Financial
Assistance.
Veterans
Veterans who intend to enroll at Miami should contact the
Veterans Affairs (VA) Administration at 1-888-442-4551 to obtain
their GI Bill eligibility. To apply for benefits, complete the online
application at www.vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp. You also need to
submit your enrollment to the VA Coordinator at Miami, which
can be completed at www.muohio.edu/veterans.
To be assured of advance payment, initial paperwork should
be submitted to the Veterans Affairs Administration 45 days before
classes begin. Veterans receiving education benefits from the VA
must immediately report any changes of program and/or
registered classes (adds, drops, or withdrawal) to the VA
Coordinator in the Office of Student Financial Assistance. For more
information or to contact the VA Coordinator at Miami visit
www.muohio.edu/veterans, email [email protected], or call
1-513-529-8734.
Additional financial assistance is available to most veterans
through programs described in this section.
International Students
International students who do not meet citizenship
requirements for federal aid programs should contact the Graduate
School or the appropriate academic department for information on
the types and amounts of specific aid available for international
students. http://www.muohio.edu/graduate-studies/
76/ Special Opportunities and Programs
Special
Opportunities and
Programs
International Education
Miami University’s policy on international programs and
educational interchange:
It is essential in today’s interdependent world to provide a
clear international perspective in the university’s curriculum.
Citizens of all nations have a growing need to understand their
citizenship in terms of global concerns as well as in terms of issues
of local or national significance. People who have this awareness
are likely not only to recognize and respect the legitimate rights
and needs of other nations but also to realize how their own fate is
ultimately bound to the fate of all peoples.
In this context, Miami University meets its responsibility to its
students and to the state of Ohio by providing educational
opportunities that recognize the plurality of cultures, the existence
of common concerns, and the need for more effective methods of
international and intercultural cooperation. The university is
therefore committed to provide to the student body significant
educational opportunities with international perspective. To this
end, the university encourages the enrollment of foreign students
who lend diversity to the campus community and serve as
educational and cultural resources. It further encourages
specialization
in
subject
areas
that
have
an
international/intercultural dimension, such as the undergraduate
program of International Studies, and informs students and faculty
of overseas study and research opportunities that will enhance
their international experience.
The university encourages international programs on campus
and research and study abroad in a manner consistent with its
policies on academic freedom and nondiscrimination. Believing
generally that the interests of education are best served by access to
all areas of the world, the university also believes that international
education should promote the development of a humane and
cooperative world order including respect for internationally
recognized standards of human rights. The university seeks to
ensure that its exchange programs remain consistent with these
goals through regular review of all such programs. Creation of a
program by Miami University constitutes no expressed or implied
endorsement of the policies of the government of the other
country.
John E. Dolibois European Center at the
Château de Differdange, Luxembourg
Miami's fourth campus, the Dolibois European Center,
founded in 1968, provides students with an opportunity to live and
study in Europe while earning Miami credit. The Center is located
at the historic castle of Differdange, Luxembourg’s third largest
city. Situated in the heart of Western Europe, the Grand Duchy of
Luxembourg retains the charm of its thousand-year heritage while
standing in the vanguard of the European Union, as one of its three
capitals. Both French and German are spoken.
Students pursue an in-depth study of Europe in 30 or more
courses and faculty-led study tours are designed to take advantage
of the European location. All courses apply Miami standards and
offer Miami credit; instruction is in English except in language
courses. Faculty is composed of both European professors and
Miami professors on assignment from the Oxford and regional
campuses. The experience of living with a Luxembourg family and
the opportunity to explore Europe during vacation periods and
weekends are integral parts of the Dolibois European Center
concept.
If students intend to apply, they should plan their academic
program carefully. One of the advantages of studying at the Center
is that students may complete an entire Miami Plan Thematic
Sequence or the Miami Plan Global Perspectives requirements in
one semester or during the seven week summer workshop.
All Miami students with at least a 2.50 cumulative grade point
average and a good conduct record are eligible to apply for study
at the Center during their sophomore, junior, or senior year.
Students from other colleges and universities may also apply,
provided they are admitted to Miami as transfer or transient
students. The first-round application deadline is January 24 for fall
and spring semesters of the following academic year. Rolling
admissions thereafter. For the summer program, the application
deadline is December 7.
For the year and semester programs, tuition and fees are the
same as at the Oxford campus and students may apply their
university scholarships or financial aid. In addition, to offset the
cost of travel, students may be eligible for a Dolibois European
Center scholarship, interest-free loan, and air travel grant. Costs
for the summer program are based on Oxford campus tuition and
fee rates. Honors Program students may be able to use their tuition
waiver. A limited number of general scholarships are available for
summer.
For more information, contact the Dolibois European Center
Oxford Luxembourg Office, 218 MacMillan Hall (513-529-5050) or
review
information
on
the
program’s
website:
www.muohio.edu/luxembourg.
International Agreements
Agreements for the Exchange of Students
Miami has exchange agreements that provide opportunities
for you to enroll directly in academic institutions overseas for a
period of one semester or for a full academic year. You must be
currently enrolled as a full-time student at Miami University to be
eligible for application to a university student exchange program.
In all cases, students maintain their enrollment by paying the full
cost of tuition and fees to Miami, therefore creating a place for an
international student to come here. If you receive financial aid, this
arrangement allows you to maintain your eligibility. Depending on
the terms of the agreement, students may also pay room and board
charges to Miami that will, in turn, provide these same benefits
when studying overseas. Academic credit for successful study at
the overseas institution is guaranteed upon your return. Advance
approval for the transfer of credit must be obtained in consultation
with your academic adviser and with the Office of International
Education, 216 MacMillan Hall (513-529-5628).
Student Exchange Agreements
Aarhus University, Denmark Semester/academic year. Courses
offered in English.
Conservatoire de Musique de la Ville de Luxembourg Semester only.
Application is made to the Department of Music.
International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) Semester/academic
year. Opportunities to choose from more than 100 institutions
in approximately 30 countries. Courses of instruction are
normally offered in the language of the host country, but some
institutions may offer a variety of courses taught in English.
Kansai University of Foreign Studies, Japan Academic year only.
Courses offered in English.
University of Tsukuba, Japan
Semester/academic year
Courses offered in English
University of Glasgow, United Kingdom Academic year only.
Special Opportunities and Programs /77
University of the Americas-Puebla, Mexico
Semester/academic year. Spanish language skills required.
Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration,
Austria
Semester/academic year. German language skills preferred;
business courses available in English.
Agreements of Cooperation
Other agreements with overseas institutions provide a general
framework for cooperation in all areas related to teaching, study,
exchange of scholarship, and joint research. Many of these accords
are based on relationships established by individual departments
or other academic units of the university. Inquiries should be made
to the Office of International Education to determine if
opportunities exist for study abroad. Since agreements with the
institutions listed below do not make specific provision for the
exchange of students on a one-for-one basis, you may be able to
study or conduct research at one of these institutions only by
special arrangement. Miami has agreements of cooperation with
the following institutions:
 Brazil: University of Brasilia, University of Fluminense,
University of Minas Gerais
 China: Fudan University, Jinan University, Zhongshan
University
 Czech Republic: Palacky University
 France: Nantes Atlantique Higher School of Commerce
 Mexico: University of Tamaulipas
Faculty-led Study Abroad
Miami is a national leader in the number and variety of study
abroad learning opportunities, and Miami faculty lead a variety of
education abroad experiences
Faculty-led Education abroad programs are directed by
experienced Miami University faculty. Programs include all levels
of foreign language immersed in host countries and discipline
specific programs focused and engaged in the abroad location.
Programs vary from two weeks during university breaks, or a full
semester, and allow students to fulfill Global Miami Plan
requirements.
Recent programs and locations include the Summer MUDEC
Program in Luxembourg; marketing practice in London;
international business in Russia, Korea, Luxembourg, London, and
the Pacific Rim; ecology and geology in the Bahamas, Belize,
Bermuda, Costa Rica, and Kenya; engineering in Poland and
Korea; and arts, culture, heritage, and archeology in the Bahamas,
the Czech Republic, and Ghana. Language immersion programs
include Italian, German, Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, and French.
Faculty-led study abroad programs are administered by
Lifelong Learning at Miami University. More information
including
program
listings
is
available
online
at
muohio.edu/LLL/study-abroad.
Other Overseas Programs: Transfer Credit
Many American universities sponsor study abroad programs
all over the world. Information is available in the Study Abroad
Library at the Office of International Education, 216 MacMillan
Hall. All students should make certain that the program is
approved and that credits will transfer before studying abroad.
Transfer of your credit may be automatic if the overseas
program is sponsored by an accredited university, but you should
seek confirmation from the study abroad adviser before you apply.
If you choose to enroll directly in an overseas institution, you
should consult with your academic adviser and the study abroad
adviser in the Office of International Programs about transfer
credit (ee Credit Evaluations).
If you are admitted to an overseas program not sponsored by
Miami University, obtain a Study Abroad form at the Office of
International Education, 216 MacMillan Hall (513-529-5628). This
office will determine if the credits earned can be transferred back
to Miami. After the form is completed, it will be submitted to the
Office of the Registrar so that registration can be arranged for the
next applicable semester. No readmission procedure is necessary if
your Study Abroad form is on file at the Office of the Registrar.
Honors
University Honors Program
A select number of students are admitted each year into the
University Honors Program through a special essay-based
application. Most students apply and are admitted to the program
at the same time they are admitted to Miami University. However,
current and transfer students may apply to the program.
A rigorous learning program that attracts and challenges
highly motivated students, the University Honors Program
features the opportunity to design one's own individualized liberal
education plan by engaging in special honors seminars,
independent research, study abroad and other intense learning
while also fulfilling one's degree program requirements.
Students are required to demonstrate mastery of a sequenced
set of learning outcomes through an electronic portfolio. They
must also complete a select number of designated Honors
Experiences (e.g., small seminar classes) based on when they are
admitted to the program. Honors students need to attain a
cumulative GPA of 3.50 or better in order to earn the "University
Honors" transcript notation upon graduation.
All honors students are offered personalized advising and
regular feedback on their progress in the program. Students have
the option of living in the first-year or upper-class honors themed
residence halls and applying for funding for research and other
projects.
Application deadlines for high school seniors and transfer
students coincide with the application deadlines for the Miami
University Application for Admissions. Current Miami students
who did not join the honors program as incoming students have an
opportunity to apply as early as their first semester at Miami.
Applications are considered on a space-available basis only.
Students who are pursuing an Associate’s Degree on
regional campuses also have the opportunity to participate in
University Honors Program; these students should contact
Honors Program directors on the regional campuses
information about the application process.
the
the
the
for
For more information on the University Honors Program,
please contact the Honors Program Office, 513-529-3399, or visit
the program's website at www.honors.muohio.edu.
Departmental Honors
If you are interested in additional study in your major area,
you may enroll in a departmental honors program in most
departments. Consult your chief departmental adviser about
departmental honors; these programs vary from department to
department. You graduate with departmental honors when you
complete the program.
President’s List, Deans’ List
Effective Fall 2012: The President’s List recognizes the top three
percent of undergraduate students within each division registered
for a semester of 12 or more credit hours attempted for grades (A+
through F). The Deans’ Lists recognize the next 17 percent of
undergraduate students within each division registered for a
semester of 12 or more hours attempted for grades (A+ through F).
Miami’s News and Public Information Office notifies the
hometown newspaper of each student eligible for the President’s
78/ Special Opportunities and Programs
or Deans’ Lists. Note that a confidentiality hold on a student’s
record will prevent his or her name from being published in the
hometown newspaper or on the Miami University website. Deans'
and President's lists are considered finalized 30 days after the term
and are not subsequently recalculated.
Graduation with Latin Honors
Effective May 2012, Latin Honors will be calculated at the
divisional rather than the University level. The top two percent of
students in each division may receive summa cum laude honors,
the next five percent, magna cum laude, and the next ten percent,
cum laude. Honors designations are determined annually within
each division based on all graduated students’ grade point
averages over the prior three calendar years. The grade point
averages will be established each June for the next calendar year
and posted to the Office of the Registrar website.
Students who graduate with distinction may wear cords at
commencement based upon final grades of the last semester of
attendance prior to commencement, and the commencement
program will reflect that they may be graduating with distinction.
Actual degree honors will be recalculated to include grades from
your final semester.
For graduation with distinction a student pursuing a
baccalaureate degree must have earned at least 64 credit hours
from Miami University; a student pursuing an associate degree
must have earned at least 32 credit hours from Miami University.
For students who earn fewer than 64 hours from Miami toward a
bachelor’s degree or fewer than 32 hours from Miami toward an
associate degree, the cumulative grade point average used at
graduation to determine eligibility for honors is the lower of the
following averages: (1) the average for all courses taken from
Miami or (2) the combined average calculated using the grades
from all college-level courses.
For students who have exercised the Fresh Start option, grades
from all coursework taken at Miami University will be used in
calculating eligibility for graduation with honors (see Student
Handbook; Re-enrollment of Former Students, Chapter 1).
Academic Opportunities
Undergraduate Associates
Sophomores, juniors, or seniors who are interested in college
teaching or another professional field can become undergraduate
associates. Each associate is sponsored by a faculty member. The
student and the sponsoring faculty member decide what the
associateship should involve. The Undergraduate Associates
Program has special eligibility requirements and an application
process. Students do not need to be members of the University
Honors Program to apply.
Students successfully completing the university-wide
program will receive a notation on their transcript. Additional
information
about
the
program
is
available
online
(http://www.cas.muohio.edu/honors/current/ua.html) or by contacting
the Honors Program main office at 513-529-3399.
Undergraduate Research Programs
These programs are publicized in early fall. For more
information, contact the Office for the Advancement of Research
and Scholarship (OARS) at 513-529-3600. Various program
guidelines, application forms, and deadline dates are available at
www.muohio.edu/undergradresearch.
First Year Research Experience (FYRE) program provides first
year students with opportunities to engage in research and to
establish early contact with faculty mentors. This option requires
students to: register for a 1 credit course to engage in common
seminar/workshop experiences, to work 4-6 hours a week on a
research project and to participate in the spring annual
Undergraduate Research Forum.
Doctoral-Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program
(DUOS) encourages graduate and undergraduate students to
collaborate on a research project under the supervision of a faculty
member in a Ph.D. granting department. Any Miami
undergraduate student and any post-master’s doctoral student in
good standing who agrees to abide by program requirements are
eligible to apply. Either student may initiate the application, but
the undergraduate student will be the primary project author.
The Graduate School provides funding for up to 10 grants of
$700-900 per project.
Undergraduate Research Award Program provides small grants
for students to do independent research or other creative
endeavors in any discipline. Applications are made to the
Undergraduate Research Committee via OARS. Funding for the
grants comes from alumni and friends of Miami. Approximately
$40,000 is available yearly for individual grants distributed twice a
year. Typically, 90 to 100 grants are awarded ranging from $200 to
$800 each.
Undergraduate Summer Scholars Program (USS) This nine-week
summer program enables Miami undergraduates to do research or
other creative activities in the summer with the supervision of an
individual faculty mentor. About 100 awards are available each
summer. You can apply for an award along with a faculty member
as a student-mentor pair. For the student, each award includes a
student fellowship, up to 6 hours of academic credit with waiver of
instructional fees and tuition, and an allowance for supplies,
services, and travel; the faculty mentor receives a modest
allowance.
Science and Engineering Research Semester
Central States Universities, Inc., in conjunction with Argonne
National Laboratory near Chicago, Illinois, sponsors this program.
Qualified majors participate in basic research in physical and life
sciences, mathematics, computer science, and engineering, as well
as in applied research programs relating to coal, conservation,
environmental impact and technology, fission, fusion, and solar
energy.
Students receive a stipend from Argonne National Laboratory,
housing, and reimbursement for travel from Miami University to
Argonne.
To apply for this program, you must have completed your
sophomore year, be a citizen of the United States or a permanent
resident alien, be 18 years of age or older, and have an overall GPA
of 3.00 or better.
For more information, contact the Department of Physics, 133
Culler Hall (513-529-5625) or the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science, 114 Shideler Hall (513-529-3216).
Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
Students can earn commissions as officers in the U.S. Air
Force, Navy, or Marine Corps through the Air Force Reserve
Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) or the Naval Reserve Officers
Training Corps (NROTC).
Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps
(AFROTC)
For information, contact the Air Force Reserve Officers
Training Corps office at 50 Millett Hall (513-529-2031).
AFROTC was established at Miami in 1949 as the Department
of Air Science and Tactics. In 1952, a joint university-Air Force
Special Opportunities and Programs /79
agreement resulted in the unit’s designation as a Senior Reserve
Officer Training Corps and the Department of Aerospace Studies.
Membership Eligibility
All AFROTC classes may be taken by Miami students for
university credit, however only students meeting AFROTC entry
requirements may be considered as cadets working toward an Air
Force office commission.
To be eligible you must:
 be at least 14 years of age. You must be 17 years of age for
enlistment and 18 years of age for commissioning.
 be under the maximum age for commissioning. To compete
for the pilot or navigator categories, a cadet must be able to
complete their bachelor's degree and be commissioned
through Air Force ROTC before they are 29 years old.
Scholarship applicants must be less than 31 years old as of
December 31 of the year they will commission. Tech,
non-tech, and non-rated must be commissioned by age 30
(waiverable up to age 35 in some cases).
 be a United States citizen
 be of good moral character
 meet Department of Defense and Air Force Dependency
Policy requirements
 meet medical entrance requirements
 meet academic requirements and be in good academic
standing (GPA of 2.00 or higher) to compete for an
enrollment allocation
 pass the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT)
 meet weight and physical fitness standards
Veterans with previous honorable active U.S. military service
who wish to enroll in the Professional Officer Course may be
qualified for a waiver for the General Military Course (GMC)
requirement. Veterans who meet all other requirements may be
enrolled at the beginning of their junior year.
Scholarship Program
This AFROTC scholarship program offers highly qualified
high school seniors and college freshmen and sophomores
opportunities to compete for scholarships on a national level.
Awards range from four-year to two-year scholarships which can
cover up to full tuition and provide money for books, fees, and a
monthly tax-free stipend.
semester for a total of sixteen semester hours upon completion of
the POC program.
Leadership Laboratory
The leadership laboratory includes activities designed to
apply the leadership knowledge and skills learned in the
classroom. Activities include demonstration of command, team
projects, problem solving, military customs and courtesies,
effective communication, fitness development, and field training
preparation among other things. POC cadets have the added
responsibility of planning and running leadership laboratory in
order to gain practical application of the leadership principles
learned in the classroom.
Field Training
Applicants for the Professional Officer Course must attend a
summer field training course between their sophomore and junior
years. Those who complete the GMC are assigned to a four-week
training session; however, students who do not complete the entire
GMC must attend an expanded six-week field training session.
Field training is an opportunity to further develop leadership and
team-building skills. Those who successfully complete field
training are eligible to enter the POC. Academic credit may be
obtained for completing field training. The Air Force provides
uniforms, housing, medical care, meals, travel allowance, and pay
while attending field training.
Uniforms and Textbooks
AFROTC provides books to all students enrolled in AFROTC
classes and also provides uniforms for cadets in the program.
Books and uniforms must be returned upon completion of or
withdrawal from the courses.
Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC)
For information, contact the Naval Reserve Officer Training
Corps office at 67 Millett Hall (513-529-3700).
Naval ROTC was founded at Miami in 1946. With satisfactory
completion of naval science and bachelor’s degree requirements,
graduates are commissioned either an Ensign in the United States
Navy, or Second Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps.
All NROTC programs are open to men and women. You may
qualify for the scholarship program, college program, or two-year
program.
Other Scholarships
Scholarship Program
Several other university (i.e., non-government) scholarships
are also available to Miami Air Force ROTC cadets. These privately
funded scholarships vary by amount and eligibility criteria and are
awarded by the professor of aerospace studies.
Students admitted to Miami as midshipmen in the scholarship
program receive a monthly subsistence allowance and an
allowance each semester for the purchase of textbooks. The Navy
pays all registration and general fees, all tuition (in state or out of
state), all instructional fees, provides all naval science textbooks,
and furnishes all uniforms.
Curriculum
The curriculum in aerospace studies is divided into two parts:
the General Military Course (GMC), taken during your freshman
and sophomore years, and the Professional Officer Course (POC),
taken during your junior and senior years.
General Military Course (GMC)
The GMC includes one class (one credit hour) and two
leadership laboratory hours (one credit hour) per week plus
physical fitness training. Class and leadership laboratory comprise
a total of two credit hours each semester.
Professional Officer Course (POC)
The POC includes three classroom hours and two leadership
laboratory hours per week plus physical fitness training. Class and
leadership laboratory comprise a total of four credit hours each
Between academic years, midshipmen participate in summer
training periods held throughout the world. During these training
periods, you are furnished all meals, housing, medical care, travel
expenses, and military pay. Upon commissioning, you serve a
minimum of four years on active duty.
You can major in any field of study leading to a bachelor’s
degree; you can choose Navy option, Navy nurse option, or Marine
Corps option.
Navy scholarship option. You take 31 semester hours of naval
science, one year of calculus, one year of calculus-based physics,
one semester of American military affairs or national security
policy, and one semester of world culture.
Navy nurse scholarship option. This program is for students
seeking a commission in the Navy Nurse Corps. In addition to the
department of nursing requirements, you take 18 semester hours of
naval science.
80/ Special Opportunities and Programs
Marine scholarship option. You take 24 semester hours of
Naval Science; one semester of American military affairs or
national security policy. You must also complete six weeks of
training at the Marine Corps Officer Candidate School in Quantico,
Virginia, during the summer between your junior and senior years.
matches students with a faculty sponsor who engages the student
in a research project.
For more information, contact the Bernard B. Rinella Jr.
Learning Center, 14 Campus Avenue Building (513-529-5528) or
visit www.muohio.edu/learning.
College Program
Selection to this program is made by the professor of naval
science, based on evaluation of the applicant’s potential to serve as
a commissioned officer, ACT or SAT scores, and high school
record. You receive books and materials for all naval science
courses, uniforms, $350 per month during your junior year, and
$400 per month during your senior year.
Freshmen apply during the Summer Orientation Program.
Applications are accepted, however, any time during a student’s
first two years at Miami. Submit applications to the NROTC Unit,
Millett Hall.
Midshipmen participate in one summer training period, held
throughout the world, normally the summer between your junior
and senior years. During training, meals, housing, and medical
care are furnished, and you receive military pay and
reimbursement for cruise travel expenses. After you are
commissioned, you serve a minimum of three years on active duty.
You can compete for Navy and Marine Corps scholarships
throughout your first two years in the NROTC program. You
follow the same requirements as the scholarship students while
competing for those scholarships.
Community Engagement and Service
The Office of Community Engagement and Service (CE&S)
serves as a catalyst for mutually beneficial campus and community
partnerships. Community engagement is a reciprocal, continuous
learning process that builds sustainable partnerships among
campuses and communities to facilitate change. Community
engagement includes Service-Learning, volunteerism, social
advocacy and engaged scholarship.
Service-Learning
Service-Learning combines scholarship and experience
through reflection, to deepen course content and enhance civic
responsibility. At Miami, Service-Learning involves making
connections between academic work and community service. As a
result, you are able to gain real world skills and enhance your
learning while contributing to the community. MU offers courses
that use Service-Learning as an effective teaching approach.
For more information on all programs and services, contact
the office at 513-529-2961 or email [email protected]
Two-Year Program
Programs and Services
Sophomores can apply for the two-year program at the
NROTC Unit, Millett Hall. Selection is based upon your
cumulative grade point average and potential as a commissioned
officer. If you are selected, you must attend the Naval Science
Institute at Newport, Rhode Island, between your sophomore and
junior years. You then enter NROTC as a junior in the scholarship
or college program. You have the same benefits and take the same
naval science courses as other NROTC students.
America Reads and America Counts
Other Information
NROTC midshipmen may change from the Navy to the
Marine Corps option, or vice versa, anytime during their first three
years at Miami provided they are qualified and both services agree.
Scholarship program midshipmen do not incur any obligation
until the beginning of their sophomore year. College program
midshipmen do not incur any obligation until the beginning of
their junior year.
Initial duty assignments depend upon needs of the service and
the individual’s preference, qualifications, and performance. Navy
option midshipmen may choose assignments in naval aviation,
nuclear submarines, or surface warfare. Marine option
midshipmen also choose from a variety of assignments, including
aviation, combat arms, and combat support.
Scholastic Enhancement Program (SEP)
This program provides support to specially admitted students
who show academic promise, but whose academic profiles suggest
the need for academic and personal guidance to ensure completion
of a degree program. Students admitted through SEP are required
to follow an individually developed educational plan provided by
program coordinators that includes: additional assessment of
academic skills, early advising with supervised course selection,
personal counseling, and other scholastic activities to assist in their
adjustment to Miami. SEP also provides a program called
FYRE/URO (Undergraduate Research Option). This program
The America Reads and America Counts programs are
funded through federal work-study. Through extensive training,
tutors develop effective and efficient ways of working to help
children improve their reading and math skills. America Reads
tutors work on basic reading and writing skills with students in
grades K-6. America Counts tutors focus on mathematic skills with
students in grades K-9. The programs primarily serve children in
Butler County.
Students interested in the America Reads or America Counts
programs should complete an online application and will be
interviewed by a student coordinator. Additionally, students must
be eligible for federal work-study. Once hired, tutors are required
to attend a mandatory four-hour training session prior to tutoring
and participate in additional monthly trainings throughout the
semester. For more information contact the office at 513-529-2961
or e-mail [email protected] or [email protected]
Adopt A School
The Adopt A School Program involves more than 500 Miami
students and is an excellent way for students to become better
connected to the local communities and become role models for
area students. Highly coordinated, the Adopt A School program
allows Miami students to volunteer in a way that easily fits their
schedule and the needs of area agencies. The majority of
placements are based in K-12 schools; however, opportunities with
adults and older citizens are also available.
Students interested in the Adopt A School program must
complete an application and attend a one-hour training session
prior to volunteering. For more information about the Adopt A
School Program, contact the office at 513-529-2961 or e-mail
[email protected]
EMPOWER I
EMPOWER I is a nine-week Service-Learning program
intended for students at Miami University who are interested in
expanding their understanding of social issues and their impact on
communities. EMPOWER I is a rewarding, yet intensive, program
that combines service, education, and critical personal
Special Opportunities and Programs /81
investigation to foster social awareness, build community, and
create a deeper understanding of diversity. Students in the Urban
Teaching Cohort and Social Justice Studies Program will
specifically explore the connection between economic and
educational injustices.
Students meet weekly in the Office of Community
Engagement and Service for the seminar portion. Students are
expected to serve in their community a minimum of five times
during the semester. Students and community partners mutually
benefit as service will reinforce what students are learning in the
course. Students will also complete an Urban Plunge, where they
will stay overnight in an inner city to experience the region, and
visit and serve with agencies that address social justice issues
covered in the course. For more information, please contact the
Office of Community Engagement and Service at 513-529-2961.
EMPOWER II
EMPOWER II is for students who have completed the
EMPOWER I program and want to gain a deeper and more focused
understanding of the education system in urban schools.
EMPOWER II also provides students with the opportunity to serve
their community through a minimum of five service experiences
during the semester through similar mutually beneficial
partnerships between students and the community.
EMPOWER II students meet weekly in the Office of
Community Engagement and Service, as well as McGuffey Hall.
Students in EMPOWER II will also complete an Urban Plunge,
where the focus is on local elementary schools and the social justice
issues those schools face on a daily basis. For more information,
please contact the Office of Community Engagement and Service at
513-529-2961.
MU Volunteers ListServ
For students interested in community service or looking for a
way to get involved, the MU Volunteers ListServ provides a
weekly update on service opportunities ranging from one-time
needs to ongoing service experiences. To learn more, visit our
website at www.muohio.edu/servicelearning.
Leadership Development
Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute
The Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute provides curricular
and co-curricular opportunities to develop ethical leadership
capacity and competencies. Participation in Wilks sponsored
programs will enable the development of your leadership style and
philosophy and put you on the path to becoming a
transformational leader. In addition to our programs, the Wilks
Leadership Institute also collaborates closely with other leadership
development programs on campus and can, therefore, assist you in
the identification of programs and opportunities that best fit your
developmental needs and desires. To begin your leadership
journey,
contact
the
Wilks
Leadership
Institute
at
[email protected] or 513-529-0830 or visit our
website at www.muohio.edu/wilks.
LeaderShape
Miami LeaderShape is an intensive, energizing and unique
six-day educational experience designed to develop young adults
to lead with integrity. Each session is comprised of approximately
60 men and women sponsored by various organizations from
diverse ethnic, religious and cultural backgrounds. One of the most
important outcomes of LeaderShape is that participants will work
to establish visions for change that they will seek to achieve
through leadership. Following completion of LeaderShape, the
Staying in Action program will assist you in implementing your
vision. If you have questions about LeaderShape, please contact
[email protected] or 513-529-0830 or check out the
national website at www.leadershape.org.
Peer Education Opportunities
Through peer education programs, students develop
knowledge and skills to educate their peers about important
student issues.
The Office of Health Education (513-529-8544) coordinates the
HAWKS Peer Health Educators (Health Advocates for Wellness
Knowledge and Skills) and addresses issues around student health
such as alcohol and other drug use; sexual health and decision
making; nutrition and wellness; body image and eating disorders;
and relationships.
Career Services
Assistant Program.
(513-529-3831)
coordinates
the
Career
Scholar Leader Program
The Scholar Leader Program is a living-learning program
involving a one-year residence in Elliott or Stoddard Hall, two of
the most historic residence halls in the nation. Endowments for
each room provide scholarships to those students selected to live in
the community. The Scholar Leader community encourages
resident-guided
programming,
academic
involvement,
Service-Learning projects, and the opportunity to explore
leadership through intensive group engagement. Upper-class
students must have a 3.00 cumulative grade point average and be
in good standing with the university. For more information, please
visit
www.muohio.edu/wilks,
or
[email protected], or 513-529-0830.
Emerging Leader LLC
The Emerging Leader LLC is a living-learning community
involving a one-year residence for first-year students who are
dedicated to putting their convictions into action and gain a deeper
understanding about their personal leadership capabilities. The
Emerging Leader LLC is sponsored by the Office of Student
Activities and Leadership, the Wilks Leadership Institute, and the
Office of Community Engagement and Service, and examines
leadership from multiple perspectives. For more information, visit
muohio/saf/reslife/reslife/livingatmiami/LEC/change.php.
82/ The College of Arts and Science
The College of Arts
and Science
Advising Office
146 Upham Hall
Phone: 513-529-3031
www.cas.muohio.edu
Degrees and Majors Offered
Bachelor of Arts in:
American Studies
Anthropology
Biochemistry
Black World Studies
Botany
Chemistry
Classical Humanities
Classical Languages
Diplomacy and Global Politics
Earth Science
Economics
East Asian Languages & Cultures
English
Environmental Earth Science
French
Geography
Geology
German
Gerontology
History
Individualized Studies
Italian Studies
Journalism (requires a second major)
Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies
Linguistics
Mass Communication
Mathematics
Microbiology
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Public Administration
Religion
Russian, East European, & Eurasian Studies
Social Justice Studies
Sociology
Spanish
Speech Communication
Strategic Communication
Urban and Regional Planning
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Zoology
Bachelor of Arts in International Studies
Bachelor of Science in:
Biochemistry
Biological Physics
Botany
Chemistry
Engineering Physics
Geology
Mathematics
Mathematics and Statistics
Medical Laboratory Science
Microbiology
Physics
Quantitative Economics
Speech Pathology and Audiology
Statistics
Zoology
Co-majors in:
Environmental Science
Interactive Media Studies
Sustainability
Associate in Applied Science in:
Criminal Justice
(Refer to Hamilton and Middletown section)
Minors in:
Actuarial Science
Aerospace Studies
Aging and Health
Aging and Public Policy
American Literature
American Studies
Anthropology
Applied Sociological Research
Arabic
Black World Studies
Botany
Chinese
Classical Humanities
Classical Languages
Communication
Crime, Law and Social Justice Studies
Criminology
Digital Game Studies
Disability Studies
East Asian Studies
Economics
English Literature
Ethics, Society, and Culture
European Area Studies
Film Studies
French
Geography
Geology
German
Gerontology
Global Perspectives on Sustainability
History
History of Philosophy
Horticultural Botany
Interactive Media Studies
Interdisciplinary Studies
Italian
Japanese
Jewish Studies
Latin American Latino/a Caribbean Studies
Linguistics
Lusophone Studies
Mathematics
Medieval Studies
Middle East and Islamic Studies
Molecular Biology
Naval Science
Neuroscience
Operations Research Methods
Physics
Plant Biotechnology
Political Science
Religion
Russian
Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
Social Justice and Inequalities
Sociology
Spanish
Statistical Methods
Statistics
Urban and Regional Analysis
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Writing-Rhetoric
The College of Arts and Science /83
General Information
The College of Arts and Science has as its primary purpose
provision for a liberal education, which has been defined
traditionally as one that assures intellectual enlargement through
general study of arts and science. A liberal education should
expand students' awareness of diverse approaches to
understanding and transmitting knowledge and free them from
the narrow perspectives of specialization uninformed by a general
knowledge of the various systems of scientific and humane
thought that have shaped civilizations. This generalized inquiry
provides the basis for a sense of community within the College of
Arts and Science and the understanding necessary to an
enlightened re-evaluation of culture.
The College offers the degrees Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Arts in International Studies, and Bachelor of Science. An
associate's degree is also offered at Middletown campus; this
program is described in the Hamilton and Middletown section.
Accreditation
Departments accredited by professional associations are: the
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry by the American
Chemical Society, the Department of Psychology by the American
Psychological Association, and the Department of Speech
Pathology and Audiology by the American Speech and Hearing
Association.
General Requirements
These are the general requirements of the College of Arts and
Science for graduation:
 Fulfill the Miami Plan for Liberal Education (MP), the
College Requirement (CAS), and the requirements of your
major.
 Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and a 2.00
average in all courses taken in your department(s) of major.
 Earn at least 128 semester hours, 56 must be advanced (at
200 level and above).
If you are a transfer student, you must take a substantial
portion of your major requirements at Miami. You must consult
with the Chief Departmental Adviser of your major department at
the time of transfer.
The College Requirement (CAS)
The divisional requirement in Arts and Science is called the
College Requirement (CAS). If you are working toward the
Bachelor of Arts (A.B.), you must fulfill all sections of the CAS; if
you are working toward the Bachelor of Science (B.S.), you must
fulfill only CAS-A (foreign language), but the B.S. requires more
hours of concentration in your major. In many cases, you can fulfill
sections of the Miami Plan and the College Requirement with the
same course. This is shown in a chart on page 81.
The College Requirement includes:
CAS-A Foreign Language
CAS-B Humanities
CAS-C Social Science
CAS-D Natural Science

CAS-E Formal Reasoning
When you plan your program, keep these important points in
mind:


Although some CAS and Miami Plan courses overlap, you cannot
use all courses that fulfill sections of the Miami Plan to fulfill
sections of the College Requirement. See the chart later in this
section.
Some courses you take for the Miami Plan or the College
Requirement can also help fulfill your major requirements. In
addition, any course cross-listed in two or more departments can
be used to satisfy a requirement appropriate to any of the
departments in which it is listed.
CAS-A Foreign Language
Direct acquisition of a different communication system
facilitates access to a foreign culture. It also promotes
understanding of how language structures human consciousness,
increases the understanding of your own language, and makes
possible a more informed awareness of the interaction between
language and other social institutions.
All foreign languages taught at Miami are applicable for this
requirement. They include Arabic, Chinese, French, German,
Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin,
Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. If you take a course with a
202-level course prerequisite, that course automatically satisfies
CAS-A.
Greek 202 or Latin 202 may fulfill either CAS-A or CAS-B-LIT,
but not both.
Requirement: The foreign language requirement may be met in
any one of the following ways:
 By passing the 202 course (or its equivalent in a program
abroad), or a language course at the 300 level or above.
Other 200-level courses or courses in English translation do
not apply to this requirement.
 By passing the foreign language portion of the Advanced
Placement examination with an appropriate score. This test,
sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board, is
usually administered during the junior or senior year in
high school. Information on Advanced Placement and
acceptable scores is in the Academic Planning chapter of
this Bulletin.
 For Bachelor of Science students only, this section of the
College Requirement may also be met by passing a reading
examination in a foreign language over suitable material
from within your discipline. Information on this
examination is available from any foreign language
department.
 International students whose native language is not English
may use English to satisfy the foreign language
requirement. (See the Associate Director of Admission.)
 Students who are fluent in a language not offered at Miami
University must petition the College of Arts and Science
Committee of Advisers to satisfy this requirement through
another college or university.
 In some language departments admission to language skills
courses may be denied to native or quasi-native speakers
and heritage speakers.
The foreign language placement guide in the Academic
Planning section describes the background necessary to enter a
course at a certain level; this will help you choose your first course.
Placement tests do not award academic credit.
CAS-B Humanities (9 semester hours)
Liberally educated students become familiar with and
understand human values expressed through society. They know
events and ideas that help form ideals, classical and contemporary
literature that expresses beliefs, and religious and philosophical
principles that stand behind actions. They are cognizant of
processes whereby these values and works came into being, of
methods by which they may be examined, and of needs and desires
they express and fulfill.
Requirement: You must complete at least six of the required
nine semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and
84/ The College of Arts and Science
Science in two of the following four categories: history, literature,
philosophy, and religion. These hours may also be used to fulfill
Group II (Fine Arts, Humanities) of the Miami Plan if they are
designated MPF II A or B or Group III (U.S. or World Cultures) if
designated MPF III. The additional three hours may be from other
courses not in the categories listed above as long as they have been
approved by the College of Arts and Science and are designated as
CAS-B in the course descriptions.
“History” includes all courses offered by the Department of
History.
“Literature” includes all literature courses offered by the
departments of Classics; English; French and Italian; German,
Russian, and East Asian Languages; Spanish and Portuguese; and
Theatre. These literature courses are designated CAS-B-LIT in the
Courses of Instruction section. Greek 202 or Latin 202 may fulfill
either CAS-A or CAS-B-LIT, but not both.
“Philosophy” includes all courses offered by the Department
of Philosophy, except PHL 273 or 373, which can only be used to
fulfill CAS-E.
“Religion” includes all courses offered by the Department of
Comparative Religion.
CAS-C Social Science (9 semester hours)
Through study of social science (the systematic study of
human behavior, human institutions, and theoretical models
through which human beings attempt to organize their lives),
liberally educated students become familiar with regularities and
variations in human behavior, with explanations of these
regularities and variations, with methods useful in systematically
and objectively validating propositions concerning these
phenomena, and with potential for analyzing human behavior
objectively.
Requirement: You must complete at least six of the nine
required semester hours from courses within the College of Arts
and Science in two of the following six categories: anthropology;
economics; geography except GEO 121, 424, 431, 432; political
science; psychology; and sociology and gerontology. These hours
may also be used to fulfill Group II (Social Science) of the Miami
Plan if they are designated MPF IIC or Group III (U.S. or World
Cultures) if designated MPF III. The additional three hours may be
from other courses not in the categories above as long as they have
been approved by the College of Arts and Science and are
designated as CAS-C in the course descriptions.
“Anthropology” includes all courses offered under the
anthropology area.
between theories or models used within a given science and
experimental results.
Requirement: You must complete at least 10 semester hours
from courses within the College of Arts and Science natural science
areas, including at least three semester hours in physical science
and three in biological science. One course must be either a
laboratory course or a course that includes laboratory work; these
courses are designated CAS-D/LAB in course descriptions. Nine of
these hours may also fulfill Group IV (Natural Science) of the
Miami Plan if they are designated MPF IV.
Physical science includes all courses offered by the
departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geology &
Environmental Earth Science, and Physics; AER 118; GEO 121, and
GEO 424. (Other geography courses may be used to fulfill CAS-C,
social science.)
Biological science includes all courses offered by the
departments of Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology and GEO 431,
432.
CAS-E Formal Reasoning (3 semester hours)
Liberally educated students enhance their capacity to reason
through the study in inductive and deductive thinking. Disciplines
that employ formalized languages as the means to develop such
thinking include mathematics, statistics, logic, and linguistics.
College courses in formal reasoning explicitly develop the
student's ability to:
 generate conjectures and hypotheses inductively by
examining patterns, trends, and examples and
counter-examples;
 confirm or reject these conjectures by formal deductive
logic;
 recognize that certain types of knowledge are dependent
upon the application of systematic argument based on
specific sets of assumptions; and
 begin to apply skills of formal reasoning and critical
thinking to different sets of assumptions to generate
different systems of knowledge.
Requirement: You must complete at least three semester hours
chosen from the courses listed below. Courses listed below do not
apply for any other sections of the College Requirement (CAS).
These hours may also be used to fulfill Group V (Mathematics,
Formal Reasoning and Technology) of the Miami Plan if they are
designated MPF V.
ENG/SPN 303, GER/ATH 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
“Economics” includes all courses offered by the Department
of Economics.
MTH 121 Finite Mathematical Models (3)
“Geography” includes all courses offered by the Department
of Geography except GEO 121, 424, 431, and 432.
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
“Political Science” includes all courses offered by the
Department of Political Science.
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
“Psychology” includes all courses offered by the Department
of Psychology.
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
“Sociology and Gerontology” includes all courses offered in
the sociology and gerontology areas.
PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)
CAS-D Natural Science (10 semester hours)
The liberally educated student learns to understand natural
phenomena through observations and experimentation. Physical
sciences are involved largely with behavior of energy, particles,
atoms, and molecules. Biological sciences are concerned with
nature, variation, richness, and interactions of phenomena of life.
The natural science requirement introduces you to various aspects
of scientific inquiry as practiced in botany, chemistry, geology,
microbiology, physical geography, physics, and zoology.
Laboratory experience is included to demonstrate the relationship
PHL 273 Formal Logic (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
You should consult the mathematics and statistics placement
guide in the Academic Planning chapter or an adviser in the
department if you are thinking about taking a mathematics course
for this requirement.
Within the College of Arts and Science, there are three
divisions (areas) of major: humanities, social science, and natural
science.
The College of Arts and Science /85
Liberal Education & Divisional Requirements: Arts Bachelor (A.B.) Degree
Miami Plan Foundation (MPF) Fulfills Both (MP & CAS)
I. Composition (6 hrs)
ENG 109/111-112
College of Arts & Science (CAS)
CAS-A Foreign Language:
II. Fine Arts, Humanities, &
Social Science (9 hrs)
A. Fine Arts (3 hrs)
B. Humanities (3 hrs)
C. Social Science (3 hrs)
III. Global Perspectives
(6-9 hrs)
A. Study Abroad
(min 6 hrs)
-ORB. Global Courses (9 hrs)
-ORC. One Global Cluster
(9 hrs)
IV. Natural Science (9 hrs)
(including a lab)
A. Biological Science
(at least 3 hrs)
B. Physical Science
(at least 3 hrs)
MPF Fine Arts courses that also fulfill CAS-B: ARC 188; ART 185,
187, 188, 282 286; MUS 185, 189; THE 101, 191; WGS 282
MPF Humanities courses that also fulfill CAS-A: FRE 202
MPF Humanities courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
1. HST 111, 112, 121, 122, 197, 198, 224, 225, 245, 254, 260, 296;
BWS 224, 225; CLS 101, 102; LAS 260
2. ENG 122, 123, 124,125,131, 132, 133, 134, 141, 142, 143,
144,161,162,163,165, 246, 247, 248, 251, 252, 254, 255, 271; AAA
248; AMS 246, 247, 248, 271; ART 279; CHI 251, 252, 255; CLS 121;
FRE 131; GER 231, 251, 252, 321, 322; JPN 231, 255, 279; LAS 254;
RUS 137, 255; SPN 315
3. PHL 101, 103, 104, 105, 106, 131
4. REL 101, 102, 103, 133, 175, 186, 203, 213, 254; AAA 203; RUS 133
• Pass a course at the 202 level, or higher; NO courses in translation
• Earn required score on CLEP or AP test; see Bulletin for details
CAS-B Humanities (9 hrs)
• Take 6 hours from two of the following four areas in the College:
1. History - any HST course, except 211; CLS 101, 102
2. Literature - any CAS-B Lit course in AMS, ENG, CLS, THE, or
foreign language
3. Philosophy - any PHL course except 273, 373
4. Religion - any REL course
• Take additional 3 hours from any of the areas above or the
following MPF courses: AAA 201; AMS 205, 207, 222; ARC 188;
ART 185, 187, 188, 282, 286; BWS 204, 383; COM 135, 206, 247,
Additional Hours:
281; DST 169, 247; ENG 169, 171, 202, 238, 383; FRE 212, 255; FST
AAA 201; AMS 205, 207, 222; ARC 188; ART 185, 186, 187, 282, 286; 201, 204, 206, 222, 255, 281, 383; GER 151, 212, 232, 255; HST
BWS 204, 383; COM 135, 206, 247, 281; DST 169, 247; ENG 169, 171, 211; IDS 206; ITL 221, 222; IMS 171, 238; JRN 101; LAS 204; MUS
202, 238, 383; FRE 212, 255; FST 201, 204, 206, 222, 255, 281, 383; 185, 189, 204; POR 204, 383; RUS 212; WGS 202, 282, 383; WST
GER 151, 212, 232, 255; HST 211; IDS 206; ITL 221, 222; IMS 171, 238; 201
JRN 101; LAS 204; MUS 185, 204; POR 204, 383; RUS 212; WGS 202,
282, 383; WST 201
MPF Social Science courses that also fulfill CAS-C:
1. ATH 155, 175, 185, 206, 207, 209, 405; LAS 208
CAS-C Social Science (9 hrs)
2. ECO 131, 201, 202; BWS 209; ITS 208
• Take 6 hours from two of the following six areas in the College:
3. GEO 101, 111, 201, 207, 208, 209; ITS 208
1. Anthropology - any ATH course; LAS 208
4. POL 101, 102, 142, 159
2. Economics - any ECO course
5. PSY 111, 210
3. Geography - any GEO (course, except GEO 121, 424, 431, 432);
6. SOC 151, 153, 165, 207, 208, 279; SJS 165; GTY 154; AAA 207;
BWS 209; ITS 208
BWS 279; DST 272; EDP 272; ITS 208;
4. Political Science - any POL course
5. Psychology - any PSY course
Additional Hours:
AAA 201; BWS 151, 156; COM 134, 136, 143; EDP 101, 201; ITS 201, 6. Sociology & Gerontology - any SOC, SJS or GTY course; AAA
207; BWS 279; DST 272; EDP 272; ITS 208
208; LAS 207; KNH 276; SPA 127, 211, 223; WGS 201
• Take additional 3 hours from any of the areas above or the following
MPF courses: AAA 201; BWS 151, 156; COM 134,136,143; EDP
101, 201; ITS 201; KNH 276; LAS 207; SPA 127, 211, 223; WGS 201
MPF Global Courses that also fulfill CAS-A: FRE 202
MPF Global Courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
AAA 201, 203, 207; BWS 204, 383; ENG 254, 383; FRE 131; FST 204, MPF Global Courses that also fulfill CAS-C: AAA 201, 207; ATH
206; GEO 101; GTY 260; ITS 201; LAS 208; PSY 210; SJS 487;
383; GER 232; HST 197, 198, 245, 260, 296; LAS 204, 254, 260; MUS 175,
SOC 207, 487; WGS 201
185, 204; POR 204, 383; REL 133, 186, 203; RUS 133; WGS 383
MPF Natural Science courses that also fulfill CAS-D; courses in
parentheses ( ) are lab courses:
CAS-D Natural Science (10 hrs)
Biological Science:
• Take 3 hours from courses in the College in the biological sciences
BOT 101 (115), (116), 121, 131, (155), 171, 181, (191); MBI 111, (115), (Any course in BOT, MBI, ZOO; or GEO 431, 432)
(116), 121, (123), 131, (143), (161); ZOO (113), (114), (115), (116), 121,
(161), (171)
Physical Science:
• Take 3 hours from courses in the College in the physical sciences
AER 101, 118; CHM 111, (111L), (131), 137, 141,/141M/141R, (144), (Any course in CHM, GLG, PHY; or AER 101, 118; GEO 121, 424)
(153); GEO (121); GLG 111, (115L),121, 141; PHY 101, (103), 111, 118,
• Take additional hours from either category above; one course must
121, 131, 141, 171, 172, (173), (174), 181, 182, (183), (184)
be, or include, a lab designated as CAS-D/LAB in the Bulletin.
V. Mathematics, Formal
Reasoning, and
Technology (3 hrs)
MPF Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, and Technology courses that
CAS-E Formal Reasoning (3 hrs)
also fulfill CAS-E:
ATH 309; ENG 303; GER 309; MTH 121, 151, 153, 249; PHL 273; SPN • Take 3 hours within the College of Arts and Science from the list
303; STA 261
to the left, or PHL 373
Historical and Cultural
Perspective Requirements:
Students satisfy these requirements by taking appropriately designed courses in any foundation area; the same courses may meet both a
foundation requirement and a Historical and/or Cultural Perspective requirement.
Miami Plan Focus:
Focus: ≈12 hours (Thematic Sequence ≈9 hours; Senior Year Capstone
Advanced hours (200 level and above): 56 hours minimum
Hours in the major: 24 hours minimum; some departments require more
TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 128 hours (minimum)
GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 2.00 cumulative; 2.00 average for courses in department of major
86/ The College of Arts and Science
Basic Requirements: Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
Miami Plan (MP)
College of Arts and Science (CAS)
English Composition ......................................................6
Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science ...........................9
Global Perspectives ...................................................6-9
Natural Science..............................................................9
Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology ................3
Perspectives (Historical and Cultural)
Focus ...........................................................................12
CAS-A, Foreign Language ............................................................0-14
(See chart on preceding page.)
In addition, B.S. students only: passing a reading examination in a foreign language over
suitable material from within student's discipline.
Advanced hours (those at 200-level and above)
Hours in the major
56 minimum
24 minimum; some departments require more
TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 128 (minimum)
GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 2.00 cumulative and 2.00 in all courses taken in your department of major
Area of Major
In order for you to understand these areas and how they pertain to the College requirement, we list below all majors in Arts and
Science and which area the major is in:
Humanities
American studies
Black world studies
Classical humanities
Classical languages
East Asian languages and cultures
English (all major programs)
French
German
History
International studies
Italian Studies
Latin American, Latino/and Caribbean
studies
Linguistics
Philosophy
Religion
Russian, East European, and Eurasian
studies
Spanish
Social Science
Anthropology
Diplomacy and Global Politics
Economics
Geography
Gerontology
Journalism
Mass communication
Political science
Psychology
Public administration
Social justice studies
Sociology
Speech communication
Speech pathology and audiology
Strategic communication
Urban and regional planning
Women's, gender and sexuality studies
Interdisciplinary Programs
The College of Arts and Science offers a range of
interdisciplinary programs including specialized degrees, major,
minors, and co-majors. These interdisciplinary programs allow
students to consider a topic, subject, or problem from differing
perspectives and to explore connections between those academic
disciplines. Students pursuing these programs work closely with
professors and advisers to select courses from across the
curriculum that will provide opportunities to identify the
intersections between multiple disciplines.
The College of Arts and Science offers interdisciplinary
programs in the following areas:
Majors:
American Studies
Black World Studies
Natural Science
Biochemistry
Biological Physics
Botany
Chemistry
Earth Science
Engineering physics
Environmental Earth Science
Geology
Mathematics
Medical laboratory science
Microbiology
Physics
Statistics
Zoology
Individualized Studies
International Studies
Italian Studies
Journalism
Linguistics
Latin American Latino/a and Caribbean Studies
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Co-Majors:
Environmental Science
Interactive Media Studies
Sustainability
Minors:
American Studies
Black World Studies
East Asian Studies
Ethics, Society and Culture
European Area Studies
Film Studies
Global Perspectives on Sustainability
Interdisciplinary Studies
The College of Arts and Science /87
Interactive Media Studies
Jewish Studies
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Medieval Studies
Middle East and Islamic Studies
Molecular Biology
Neuroscience
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Departmental Honors
The College offers a program in departmental honors for
students who qualify for and desire independent work in a major
field of study under the guidance of a faculty mentor(s). Students
who successfully complete such an effort graduate with a
departmental honors notation on their transcripts and under their
names in the commencement program.
To qualify for entrance into the departmental honors program,
you must be a senior, a major in the College of Arts and Science,
and have a grade point average of at least 3.50 in the major in
which departmental honors work is desired. You must meet
specific requirements of the department or academic program in
which honors work is to be done; you must consult with the
appropriate department or program director about specific
requirements.
Students, who qualify, register for course 480 (include
department abbreviation; for example, BOT 480): departmental
honors (1-6, maximum 6) for a minimum total of 4 semester hours
and a maximum total of 6 semester hours. These credits may be
taken in one or more semesters of your senior year. Approvals of
the department chair or program director and the faculty mentor of
your honors work are required for registration.
Expectations are rigorous and demanding, but the nature of
projects varies. Projects might involve independent readings,
creative efforts, internships, or research, based in the laboratory,
field, or library. The project must result in a tangible product, such
as an examination, written report, paper or monograph, oral
presentation, work of art, or documentary.
Departmental honors in the College may be coordinated and
integrated with work for Senior Directed Study in the University
Honors Program. A common project may serve both departmental
honors and university honors but separate and distinct
presentations must be made to the department or program and to
the University Honors Program for evaluation to earn both honors
notations.
Notes on Credit Restrictions
Before registering for your courses, you should keep in mind
these restrictions on credit:
 You may not earn credit for a lower-numbered course in a
department if you have already taken a closely related,
higher-numbered course for credit. For example, if you
have passed French 201, 202, you cannot take French 101,
102 and receive credit for them.
 Credit is not given for closely related courses in two or
more divisions.
 You cannot register for more than 20 hours in a semester
except with the approval of the Dean.
Combined Programs
Combined programs require students to transfer to other
institutions to complete professional training programs. These are
also called 3+1 or 4+1 programs (three or four years here, one year
at another institution) or 3-2 programs (three years here, two at
another institution).
Please understand that in most cases we cannot guarantee
your acceptance into a program at another institution.
Medical Laboratory Science
Medical laboratory scientists apply scientific background and
skills to supervision and performance of diagnostic procedures to
determine presence or absence of disease and to monitor response
to treatment.
Miami offers two baccalaureate degree programs that include
a 12-month laboratory "clinical year." In the 3+1 program, you take
three years at Miami followed by an internship to receive a B.S. in
medical laboratory science. In the 4+1 program, you take four
years at Miami to earn an A.B. or B.S. in zoology, chemistry, or
microbiology, and then you enter the clinical year.
After completing either program, you are eligible to take
national registry examinations. Please understand that Miami
cannot guarantee your acceptance into a clinical year site.
3+1 Program
This program requires 96 pre-clinical year semester hours at
Miami, 32 in advanced courses. You take an interdepartmental
sequence of courses in chemistry, microbiology, and zoology.
Specific requirements include: general microbiology, pathogenic
microbiology, and immunology, a year of general chemistry and a
year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and biochemistry),
one year of general biology; a course in mathematics; competency
in computer usage; and completion of a foreign language at
second-year level.
During your junior year, you must file a petition in the dean's
office of the College of Arts and Science to be graduated in this
program. When you apply for a clinical year at a hospital, you
must have a letter of intent from the Registrar of Miami University.
During your clinical year, you will be registered for MBI
487-488-489 at Miami. These courses fulfill the Global Miami Plan
Capstone Experience requirement. Clinical laboratory rotations
and lecture series may include hematology, chemistry,
bacteriology, immunology, virology, parasitology, and mycology
along with electives such as laboratory management and forensics.
After you complete your clinical year and certify this to the Office
of the Registrar, you will be awarded the B.S. in medical laboratory
science.
Affiliated training hospitals for this program include The
Cleveland Clinic; University of Cincinnati Hospital; Wright State
University in Dayton; Southwest General Health Center near
Cleveland; Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron; St.
Elizabeth Medical Center in Covington, Kentucky; Parkview
Memorial Hospital in Fort Wayne, Indiana; and Vanderbilt
University in Nashville, Tennessee; and St. John Health
Laboratories in Michigan.
4+1 Program
For this program, you choose a major in chemistry,
microbiology, or zoology and fulfill all departmental, Arts and
Science, and Miami Plan requirements for the baccalaureate
degree. Pre-clinical year course requirements are: a year of general
chemistry, a year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and
biochemistry), a year of introductory biology, and one course in
mathematics and general microbiology.
During fall semester of your senior year, you apply to enter a
clinical year program at any hospital approved by the National
Accrediting Agency for Medical Laboratory Sciences in the U.S.
For more information about either program in medical
laboratory science, see the program adviser in the Department of
Microbiology.
88/ The College of Arts and Science
Engineering
Environmental Science Co-Major
Students desiring an engineering degree from another school
in addition to a Miami degree may arrange either A.B. or B.S. 3-2
programs with any engineering school.
The environmental science co-major emphasizes earth science
and life science approaches to understanding environmental
patterns and processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide
variety of career paths and post-graduate degrees in
environmental science, especially those with biological and
physical science specializations. The term "co-major" indicates that
students must complete another major at Miami University. The
environmental science co-major complements the primary major,
which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic
discipline. There is no specific degree designation for the co-major,
students receive the degree designation of their primary major.
A.B. requirements for the 3-2 program are in the next section
under Arts-Professional Arrangement. B.S. requirements for the
3-2 program are equivalent to these, except for deletion of the A.B.
College of Arts and Science Requirement sections A through E,
inclusion of the B.S. College of Arts and Science Requirement
section A, and substitution of an appropriate B.S. curriculum
instead of an A.B. curriculum. Completion of the 3-2 engineering
program satisfies the Miami Plan Capstone Experience
requirement.
At Miami, your major requirements must be completed unless
they are continued in engineering school by recommendation of
the major professor and approval of the Committee of Advisers. In
particular, you may wish to major in engineering physics, a
program described in this chapter with the College's major
programs.
Miami has cooperative arrangements with Case Western
Reserve University, Columbia University, and Washington
University (St. Louis), so that any student satisfying the
appropriate 3-2 program requirements will be accepted by Case,
Columbia, or Washington University and will receive the Miami
degree (A.B. or B.S.) upon receiving the engineering bachelor's
degree or sooner.
Environmental Management and Forestry
Miami has a cooperative agreement with Duke University
School of the Environment, which allows students to attend Miami
for three years and Duke for two years. You receive a B.S. in Botany
from Miami and either a Master's in Forestry (M.F.) or a Master's in
Environmental Management (M.E.M.) from Duke.
Miami students accepted by Duke can enter the professional
master's degree programs at the end of the junior year. Your Miami
degree (B.S.) is granted after your first year at Duke when Miami's
requirements are met.
Basic requirements for recommendation to Duke's programs
are 96 semester hours at Miami, including 32 at or above the 200
level, a cumulative grade point average of 2.5, and completion of
both the Miami Plan and College of Arts and Science Requirement
A (foreign language).
In the first semester of your junior year, you must file a
petition with the College of Arts and Science to request a
recommendation for the program, and you must apply to Duke for
admission. Deadline is February 1 for fall admission and October 15
for winter admission. Duke also requires the Graduate Record
Examination (GRE) for admission. You should arrange to take this
test the first semester of your junior year.
Interactive Media Studies Co-Major
The co-major in interactive media studies is an
interdisciplinary major that is designed to complement the
traditional disciplinary-focused major. (It cannot be taken
independently of a disciplinary focus). This co-major includes
courses that span across the breadth of Miami University's
offerings. From art to the humanities to computer science, the IMS
co-major brings the inherently interdisciplinary world of
technology to the traditionally disciplined student. There are four
concentrations within the co-major that allow students to focus
their experience on a particular area of interactive media, and to
better complement their disciplinary area of focus. These
concentrations include:
 Digital Art and Design
 Digital Game Studies
 Digital Humanities and Social Science
 Self-Designed (adviser approval required)
An application and "portfolio" are required for admittance.
There is a minimum 2.50 GPA requirement and a limited number
of students are admitted each year.
Sustainability Co-Major
The sustainability co-major emphasizes human-nature
interaction in understanding environmental patterns and
processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career
paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science,
especially those with management and policy specializations. The
term "co-major" indicates that students must complete another
major at Miami University. The sustainability co-major
complements the primary major, which provides significant depth
and breadth in an academic discipline. There is no specific degree
designation for the co-major; students receive the degree
designation of their primary major.
Arts-Professional Arrangement
Courses required for the three years of study at Miami are:
Departmental Requirements (24 hours, 14 must be advanced hours)
In addition to the combined programs above, we offer the
Arts-Professional Arrangement as another way to earn a
professional degree in less than normal time. This arrangement is
open only to students working for the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.)
degree.
Related Hours
This program allows you to substitute your senior year at
Miami with the first year of an accredited professional school.
Schools include those in business administration, dentistry,
engineering, forestry, law, medicine, nursing, public health, or
theology.
BOT 115 and 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) plus BOT 116 (4) or ZOO 114 (4)
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (4)
ECO 201
MTH 151, 251, or 249
STA 261
Thematic Sequence in chemistry (18 hours)
Recommended Electives
CSE 163, 253, 283
ENG 215, 313
GEO 437, 447, 448
GLG 111, 115L
IES 431, 450
PHY 171, 172, 181, 182
POL 261, 362
The Miami A.B. is usually awarded at commencement
following the first year in professional school. If you have not
earned at least a 2.00 grade point average for your first year of
professional school, your Miami degree will not be awarded until
you have finished the professional degree.
To be graduated under the Arts-Professional Arrangement,
these requirements must be met: you must earn at least 96 Miami
semester hours, including 32 hours at 200 level or above, with a
3.00 grade point average; you must complete the Miami Plan
The College of Arts and Science /89
requirements, the College Requirement, and all requirements of
your major (except those that can be continued in professional
school); and you must file a petition with the College of Arts and
Science by the end of your junior year.
Students transferring to Miami at the end of their freshman
year may petition for a reduction of the 96 Miami hours required
for this program, as long as this reduction does not exceed 32
hours.
For more information, consult an adviser in the College of
Arts and Science.
Geographic Information Science
Certificate
This certificate program focuses on the theory and techniques
of geographic information science (GISci). GISci is a suite of
techniques for collecting, analyzing, and communicating
information about the Earth's surface through technologies such as
geographic information systems, satellite and aerial imaging, and
global positioning systems (GPS).
Program Requirements (18 semester hours)
Complete all of these:
CIT 214 Database Design and Development (3)
GEO 441 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 443 Python Programming for ArcGIS (3)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
ISA 245 Database Systems and Data Warehousing (3)
Select ONE of these:
GEO 340 Internship (min. 3) *
GEO 444 GIScience Techniques in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
Any GEO course focusing on GIS or remote sensing techniques (3)
* With the expectation that the internship involves GIS.
Planning for Law School
Law school is a popular option for Arts and Science majors. In
2010-11, 92% of Miami senior applicants were accepted to law
school, compared to a national average of 77%.
Students interested in law school are encouraged to select a
major that interests them. Regardless of the major you select, you
should take courses that will enhance those skills that are
necessary for success in law school.
According to the Law School Admission Council, "as long as
[students] receive an education including critical analysis, logical
reasoning, and written and oral expression, the range of acceptable
college majors is very broad." To develop these very essential
skills, students should consider taking courses in the humanities,
such as political science or history (critical analysis), philosophy
(logic), communication and English (oral/written communication),
and math and science (analytical reasoning).
Most law schools have high standards for grade point average
(GPA) and Law School Admission Test (LSAT) scores. In fact, the
median GPA for students accepted to the top 25 percent of law
schools exceeds 3.50. Similarly, the median LSAT score for these
schools is 160 (120-180 scale). In addition to success in the
classroom, participation in community service, student activities,
leadership training and experience, and study abroad are a plus.
If you are interested in law school, you should contact a
pre-law adviser in our Pre-Law Center in 159 Upham Hall as early
in your college career as possible.
Planning for Medical, Dental, and
Veterinary Schools
Most medical, dental, and veterinary schools limit admission
requirements to allow for students from a variety of
undergraduate programs. All schools recognize the desirability of
a broad education that includes a strong foundation in natural
sciences, the basis for study and practice of health professions;
communication skills, essential for developing successful
relationships with the public and professionals; and social sciences
and humanities, in order to better understand yourself and others.
Therefore, you should follow an undergraduate program that
is as broad and comprehensive as possible in order to prepare for a
career in a people-oriented profession in a changing society.
Pursuing a double major in sciences is not advised if it is done at
the expense of obtaining a broad education.
Common admission requirements include two years of
chemistry, two years of biology, one year of physics, and one year
of English. However, requirements of schools may vary. You
should therefore consider individual requirements of schools and
plan your curriculum accordingly.
Students who plan to go to professional schools should see an
academic adviser before taking any course on a credit/no-credit
basis. In addition, using AP credit for classes required by
professional schools is not recommended.
Many students planning to attend medical, dental, or
veterinary school major in zoology, microbiology, chemistry or
biochemistry.
A recommended program for your first year is:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
ZOO 113, 114 (4, 4) or
MTH 151, 251 (5, 4)
CHM 141, 142 College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) or
CHM 153, 161 (2, 2)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3)
Electives (applying toward the College Requirement and Miami Plan)
Science courses are demanding and for many freshmen the
first semester is a difficult period. Therefore, your electives should
not be difficult courses for you.
During your sophomore and/or junior year, take organic
chemistry and lab (CHM 241, 242 and 244, 245 or 251, 252 and 254,
255) and physics and lab (PHY 171, 172 and 173, 174 or 181, 182 and
183, 184). A year of biology (BOT/MBI/ZOO 115, 116 or ZOO 113,
114) should be taken sometime during your first two years.
Medical schools require the Medical College Admission Test
(MCAT), dental schools require the Dental Admission Test (DAT),
and most veterinary schools want the Graduate Record Exam. You
are strongly urged to talk with a pre-professional adviser as early
as possible in preparing for one of these careers.
For information, talk with one of our pre-medicine advisers in
zoology or in chemistry and biochemistry, microbiology, physics,
or psychology. Pre-dentistry and pre-veterinary advisers are also
in zoology.
Planning for Optometry School
Typical admission requirements for optometry school include
one year of English, one year of biology, two years of chemistry,
one year of physics, one semester of mathematics (calculus and
statistics), one semester of psychology, one year of social science,
one semester of microbiology, and one or two semesters of
physiology. Since specific requirements vary, you should contact
schools where you may apply, and plan your curriculum
accordingly. Most pre-optometry students major in zoology,
chemistry, or microbiology.
90/ The College of Arts and Science
Optometry schools require the Optometry Admission Test. It
is available only online (www.opted.org/info_oat.cfm).
A recommended program for your first year is:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4)
(3, 3)
CHM 141, 142 College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3)
MTH 151 Calculus (5)
Electives (choose from CAS requirements and Miami Plan Foundation courses)
For more information, consult with the pre-optometry adviser
in the Department of Zoology.
Planning for Pharmacy School
Because the Doctor of Pharmacy is now the only accredited
degree for pharmacy, you should complete a bachelor's degree
(usually in zoology, microbiology, or chemistry), or at least two
years of prerequisite coursework, and apply to a Doctor of
Pharmacy program.
Typical prerequisites for pharmacy school include course
work in calculus; inorganic, organic, and analytical chemistry;
English, microbiology, physics, statistics, and zoology. Since
specific requirements vary, contact schools of interest, and plan
your curriculum accordingly. For more information, consult with
the pre-pharmacy adviser in the Department of Zoology.
ZOO 161 Principles of Human Physiology (4) (meets human physiology
prerequisite)
Other suggested courses include:
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
PHL 131 (3) or PHL 375 (4) or
SOC 357 (3) (one semester of philosophy/medical ethics)
For more information, contact a physical therapy program
adviser in the Department of Zoology or the Department of
Kinesiology and Health.
Special Interest Areas
If you are interested in one of these areas, we suggest you look
into the Arts and Science degree program(s) listed beside it.
Area
Advertising
Archaeology
Bacteriology
Biology
City planning
Creative writing
Criminology
Environmental science
Planning for Physical Therapy School
If you are interested in a career in physical or occupational
therapy, you should take courses that meet the prerequisites for
graduate degree programs in those areas. The Pre-Physical and
Pre-Occupational Therapy Program at Miami is designed to
provide students with the basic science and related courses needed
for background preparation and admission into an accredited
physical or occupational therapy program.
Foreign affairs
The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has
announced that all physical therapy programs must offer doctoral
degrees by 2020. According to the American Occupational Therapy
Association (AOTA), all baccalaureate occupational therapy
programs nationwide are expected to transition to master's degree
granting programs by 2007. Therefore, students interested in
physical or occupational therapy usually complete their bachelor's
degree at Miami and then apply to a master's or doctoral degree
program in physical or occupational therapy at another school.
Journalism
Language
Because there is no standard set of prerequisite courses
required by physical or occupational therapy programs, you must
contact schools for their requirements. Select courses at Miami that
will meet requirements for your program.
The following courses are required prior to admission by most
programs (note that this is only a general guideline):
BOT/MBI/ZOO115 Biological Concepts (4) or
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4) or
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)
CHM 141, 142 (3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) or
CHM 153, 161
ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric (3) or
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (3)
KNH 244, 244L Functional Anatomy and Lab (3, 1)
KNH 381 Biodynamics of Human Activity (4)
KNH 468 Physiology and Biophysics of Human Activity (3)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3)
PHY 173, 174 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
ZOO 201 Comparative Anatomy (4) (meets human anatomy prerequisite)
ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4) or
Forestry
Gerontology
Government work
Neuroscience
Personnel work
Pharmacy
Physical therapy
Public relations
Social work
Statistics
Television and radio
Arts and Science Major
English, mass communication, speech
communication
Anthropology, classics, geology,
religion
Microbiology
Botany, microbiology, zoology
Urban and regional planning
English/creative writing
Sociology, criminology minor
Botany (environmental science
emphasis*), earth science,
environmental earth science,
geography, geology (environmental
science emphasis*), zoology;
environmental science co-major,
sustainability co-major
Diplomacy and global politics,
international studies, foreign languages
Botany; see also “Combined Programs”
Gerontology, sociology
Political science, diplomacy and global
politics, international studies, public
administration, speech communication,
urban and regional planning
Journalism, mass communication
Linguistics, speech pathology and
audiology, foreign languages
Zoology, psychology
Psychology, public administration,
speech communication (organization
communication concentration)
Chemistry, microbiology, zoology
Psychology, zoology
Strategic communication, journalism
Sociology, psychology
Mathematics and statistics, statistics
Mass communication, journalism
* Miami has a graduate degree program in environmental science. See
the Graduate Bulletin for more information
Teacher Licensure
Combining a teacher licensure program with a major in the
College of Arts and Science makes a student eligible for two
degrees: an A.B. or B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Science
and a B.S. in Education degree in the School of Education, Health
and Society. Students who wish to combine licensure with an arts
and science major must observe rules, procedures, and restrictions
pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort.
If you choose to earn two degrees, you must meet all
requirements for the Miami Plan, the College of Arts and Science,
and teacher licensure. Early in your program, you should plan
your schedule with academic advisers from both the College of
Arts and Science and the School of Education, Health and Society.
The College of Arts and Science /91
The following departments offer the possibility of combining
the teacher licensure program with an Arts and Science major:
Botany, Chemistry, Classical Languages, Economics, English,
French, Geography, Geology & Environmental Earth Science,
German, History, Mathematics, Physics, Political Science, Spanish,
and Zoology.
For information, contact the Department of Teacher Education
in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall
(513-529-6443).
Major Requirements: College of Arts and
Science
American Studies- Bachelor of Arts
For more information, contact the Director of American
Studies, 120 McMillan Hall, 513-529-5333.
The Program in American Studies offers an interdisciplinary
major that explores American culture, in all its complexity, from a
variety of intellectual perspectives. In learning to make
connections between a range of fields and disciplines from history
to art, politics to religious studies, mass media to popular culture,
among many others, students gain a multifaceted understanding of
the United States in global context. The program fosters critical and
creative thinking, interdisciplinary research, synthetic analysis,
strong writing and oral presentation, an understanding of and
familiarity with multiple kinds of media and texts, a broad
understanding of social, cultural, and historical contexts, and
intercultural awareness. By working with faculty to define an area
of concentration, students come away with the intellectual skills
and perspective necessary to understand, contextualize, and
critically engage the opportunities and challenges of our complex,
changing, interdependent world.
Program Requirements (34 semester hours)
Core courses (16 hours)
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3)
AMS 206 Approaches to American Studies (3)
AMS 301 Practice in American Studies (3)
AMS 302 Transnational America (3)
AMS 401 Capstone in American Studies (4)
Areas of Concentration (18 hours)
Students must take 18 credit hours with at least 12 hours at the 200 level and above,
incorporating at least three different disciplines from one of the areas of concentration
shown below. A comprehensive list of courses in each of these areas is posted on the AMS
website and is also available in pamphlet form at the Programs Office.
American Institutions, Ideas, and Experiences: This area of concentration focuses on the
core institutions, ideas, and expressions that define America as a nation.
Diversity and Difference: This area of concentration focuses on the diversity of cultures
that come together in the United States, addressing issues of race, gender, class, religion,
ethnicity, sexual identity, and other social categories.
Global Perspectives on American Culture: This area focuses on global perceptions and
analysis of American culture and values, and on the position of the United States in the
global world. AMS 207 is a prerequisite for this concentration and will count toward the 18
hours in concentration requirements. The rest of the credits will be taken from AMS
courses at our partner universities.
Popular Culture, Media, Consumerism: This area of concentration focuses on consumer
culture, popular culture, and mass media.
Public Culture and Civic Engagement: This area of concentration focuses on the practices
and activities of civic engagement, the construction of shared identity and public memory,
and the interpretation, presentation, and preservation of cultural resources.
Student Designed Area of Concentration: (developed in consultation with an adviser) This
area of concentration allows a student to work with a faculty adviser to develop an
individualized area of concentration in American culture. The proposed concentration
needs to be approved by the director of the American Studies Program before course work
is initiated.
Anthropology- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Anthropology, 120
Upham Hall (513-529-8399).
The major in anthropology exposes students to the field as a
whole. At the same time, students have the opportunity to pursue
individual interests.
Anthropology is a holistic, interdisciplinary science of
humanity. It is the study of people: their origins, adaptations and
ecology, distribution, forms of communication, beliefs and values.
Integrating the hard sciences, social sciences and the humanities,
anthropology strives to give students a solid liberal arts
background in conjunction with strong research experience and a
broad perspective on the human condition.
Program Requirements (36 semester hours distributed as follows,
A through C)
A. Core Requirements
All of these:
ATH 212 Introduction to Archaeological Theory and Methods (4)
ATH 231 Perspectives on Culture (3)
ATH 255 Foundations of Biological Anthropology (4)
ATH 265 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (4)
ATH 421 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3)
B. Cluster Requirements
At least one course must be taken in at least three of the following
clusters. A selected course may not be used in more than one
cluster. At least three courses must come from any one cluster. One
course from the cluster requirements must be a designated
Practicum course. To meet the 36-credit hour total for the
Anthropology Major, additional courses may be chosen from any
of the clusters. Students may petition to the CDA to have particular
variable topic courses apply to a particular cluster depending on
the course emphasis of the teaching faculty member.
Engaging the Other:
ATH 235 Imagining and Encountering the Anthropological Other (3)
ATH 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
ATH 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 303 Native American Cultures (4)
ATH 304 Native North America: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 306 Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 308 South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3)
ATH 335L Multiculturalism in Europe: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 366 African Oral Traditions (3)
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3)
ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3)
ATH 425 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
ATH 426 Ethnographic Field Research (4-16)
ATH 484 Beyond the Field Experience: Processing Cultural Adjustments (3)
Ethnography and Culture:
ATH 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 325 Identity, Race, and Gender (3)
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3)
ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3)
ATH 335L Multiculturalism in Europe: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 358 Travelers, Migrants and Refugees (3)
ATH 364 Language and Culture in Native North America (3)
ATH 368 Key Questions in Psychological Anthropology (3)
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3)
ATH 403 Anthropology of Religion (3)
ATH 405 Food, Taste, and Desire (3)
ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3)
ATH 425 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
ATH 426 Ethnographic Field Research (4-16)
ATH 428 Anthropology of Women's Health (3)
ATH 434 Anthropology of Democracy and Citizenship (3)
ATH 461 Language Ideologies & Cultural Identities (3)
The Encultured Body:
ATH 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class (3)
ATH 348 Introduction to Medical Anthropology (3)
ATH 368 Key Questions in Psychological Anthropology (3)
ATH 378 Doctors, Clinics, and Epidemics (3)
ATH 428 Anthropology of Women's Health (3)
92/ The College of Arts and Science
ATH 448 Developing Solutions in Global Health (3)
ATH 497 Socio-Ecology of Primates (3)
ATH 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
Material Worlds:
ATH 351 Archaeological Field Methods (8; no more than 4 to major)
ATH 388 Culture, Art, and Artifact (3)
ATH 405 Food, Taste, and Desire (3)
ATH 409 Sustainability: European challenges and strategies (3)
ATH 415 Caribbean Archaeology Field & Lab Methods (6)
ATH 416 Archaeological Site Analysis (3)
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
Pathways to the Past:
ATH 312 Introduction to North American Archaeology (4)
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archaeology (4)
ATH 314 Old World Archaeology (4)
ATH 351 Archaeological Field Methods (8)
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence for Human Evolution (3)
ATH 388 Culture, Art, and Artifacts (3)
ATH 414 Caribbean Archaeology (3)
ATH 416 Archaeological Site Analysis (3)
ATH 431 Origins of the State (3)
ATH 496 Observing Primate Behavior (4)
Language, Communication & Culture:
ATH 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
ATH 364 Language and Culture in Native North America (3)
ATH 366 African Oral Traditions (3)
ATH 378 Doctors, Clinics, and Epidemics (3)
ATH 461 Language Ideologies & Cultural Identities (3)
ATH 465 Seminar in Linguistic Anthropology (3)
Evolution, Ecology, & Behavior:
ATH 348 Introduction to Medical Anthropology (3)
ATH 355 Fossil Evidence for Human Evolution (3)
ATH 395 Primate Biology and Behavior (3)
ATH 403 Anthropology of Religion (3)
ATH 409 Sustainability: European challenges and strategies (3)
ATH 431 Origins of the State (3)
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
ATH 496 Observing Primate Behavior (4)
ATH 497 Socio-Ecology of Primates (3)
ATH 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
Practicum Courses:
ATH 235 Imagining and Encountering the Anthropological Other (3)
ATH 351 Archaeological Field Methods (8)
ATH 415 Caribbean Archaeology Field and Laboratory Methods (6)
ATH 416 Archaeological Site Analysis (3)
ATH 425 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
ATH 426 Ethnographic Field Research (4-16)
ATH 448 Developing Solutions in Global Health (3)
ATH 496 Observing Primate Behavior (4)
Note: Variable Topic, Honors & Independent Study courses will be placed in the appropriate clusters based on content.
ATH 177, 277, 377, 477 Independent Study (1-5)
ATH 340 Internship (1-20)
ATH 390 Horizons of Anthropology (1-6)
ATH 480 Independent Reading for Departmental Honors (3-6)
ATH 491 Anthropology Practicum (1-4; maximum 8)
C. Other Requirements and Restrictions:
No more than 6 hours in variable content courses (e.g., ATH 377, ATH 390, ATH 477, ATH
480, ATH 491) may count toward the 36 hour requirement. Variable content courses will be
allocated to the appropriate cluster, topic dependent. Students may count one introductory
course (ATH 155, ATH 175, ATH 185 or ATH 235) as an elective toward the major.
Biochemistry- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).
This program is for students interested in a career in the life or
health sciences or biochemistry. Students who anticipate graduate
study in biochemistry should elect the B.S. Biochemistry program.
Chemistry and required related courses cannot be taken on a
credit/no-credit basis.
Program Requirements (35-36 semester hours)
All of these:
CHM 141, 141H or CHM 141R and
CHM 142, 142M or 142H College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 144M or 144H or with approval CHM 144 College Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 145M or 145H or with approval CHM 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and
CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 363 Analytical Chemistry (3)
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 438 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 471, 472 Biophysical Chemistry I II (3, 3)
Related Hours (26-28 required)
All of these:
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181 General Physics (4)
PHY 183 General Physics Laboratory (1)
Choose ONE of the following:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4)
BOT 191 General Botany (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)
Choose ONE of the following:
Any course at the 300 level or above in BOT, MBI, or ZOO
CHM 364 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 417 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)
CHM 426 Spectroscopic Identification of Structure (3)
Additional courses from the above category or PHY 182,184 The Physical World/Physics
Lab (4, 1) to reach 26 hours. Note: pre-medicine students must take PHY 182,184.
Biochemistry- Bachelor of Science
For information, contact the Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).
This major is usually chosen by students who want to enter
the chemical industry or graduate school in chemistry,
biochemistry, or related areas. No chemistry or required related
courses may be taken credit/no-credit.
Program Requirements (40-44 semester hours)
All of these:
CHM 141, 141H or CHM141R and
CHM 142, 142M or 142H College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM144M or144H or with approval CHM 144 College Chemistry Lab(2)
CHM 145M or 145H or with approval CHM 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3)
CHM 254, 255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry Majors (3, 2)
CHM 471, 472 Biophysical Chemistry I, II (3, 3)
CHM 433, 434 Biochemistry (3, 3)
CHM 438 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 454 Instrumental Analysis (3)
One semester hour of laboratory from these: CHM 340U, 418, 455, 477, 490; MBI 465; or
ZOO 443.
Related Hours (40 required)
All of these:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4)
MTH 151, 251, 252 Calculus I, II, III (5, 4, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181, 182 General Physics (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
Choose ONE course from each of these three groups:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3) or
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3) or
MTH 347 Differential Equations (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (4) or
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
BOT 342 Genetics (3) or
MBI 445 Microbial Genetics (2) or
ZOO 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 203 Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4) or
ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3) or
ZOO 443 Cell Biology (4)
Biological Physics- Bachelor of Science
For information, contact the Department of Physics, 133 Culler
Hall (513-529-5625).
A biological physics major explores the physical behavior of
biological and biologically-inspired systems, applying physical
The College of Arts and Science /93
techniques to solve problems in physics, biology, and medicine.
The program is multi-disciplinary, drawing from coursework in
physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics. It combines a broad
science curriculum with physical and mathematical rigor in
preparation for careers in biological physics, biophysics, medical
physics, medicine and biomedical engineering.
Program requirements:
(64-68 Semester hours)
Physics (28)
PHY 181/183 The Physical World and Lab (4, 1)
PHY 182/184 The Physical World and Lab (4, 1)
PHY 281/293 Contemporary Physics I and Lab (3, 1)
PHY 292/294 Electronic Instrumentation and Lab (3, 2)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PHY 421 Molecular and Cellular Biophysics (4) or
PHY 422 Physics for Medicine and Biology (4)
Biology (7)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular
Biology (4) or
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)
BOT/ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3)
Mathematics (15-17)
Calculus sequence ending with MTH 252 Calculus III (12-14)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
Electives: Select FOUR with at least ONE from each category (12-17)
Category 1: PHYSICS
PHY 483 Mathematical Methods in Physics (4)
Any course numbered 400 and above, excluding seminar, research, and independent
study courses (PHY 400, 410, 440, 477, 480, 488) (3-4)
Category 2: NATURAL AND APPLIED SCIENCE
(some courses may have pre- or co-requisites)
BOT 425 Mathematical Methods in Physics (4)
CHM 242/245 Organic Chemistry and Lab (3, 2)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4) or
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4) or
CHM 433 Biochemistry (3)
CHM 471 Biophysical Chemistry I (3)
CHM 472 Biophysical Chemistry II (3)
CPE 418 Biological Transport Phenomena (3)
KNH 468/468L Physiology and Biophysics of Human Activity and Lab (3, 1)
MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4)
ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4)
A course from Physics category (3-4)
Category 3: MATHEMATICS
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
PHY 483 Mathematical Methods in Physics (4)
BiologySee Botany, Microbiology, Zoology
Black World Studies- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the director of Black World Studies,
120 MacMillan Hall (513-529-1235).
Black World Studies (BWS) is an interdisciplinary program
that offers a unique opportunity for all undergraduate students to
gain a better understanding of the historical, social, religious,
cultural political experiences, values and expressions of Africans
and people of African descent in the U.S. and throughout the
world. It focuses on changing constructions of race, class, and
gender in local and global contexts. Moreover, the study of black
people and black experience will better prepare all students to cope
with the ever-increasing demands of a multicultural world. This
program stresses critical thinking, reflection, and informed action.
Program Requirements (38-40 semester hours)
1. Take either one of these:
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4)
BWS 156 Introduction to Africa (4)
2. Take a minimum of two courses from Areas A and B (total of four courses), and a
minimum of one course from area C and one from area D (total of two courses).
3. Choose any four additional courses from across the curriculum.
Area A. African Experiences and Cultures
Choose TWO of the following:
ART 235 The Gods are Here: Spirituality and Text in African Art (3)
ART 480 Seminar in African Art (3)
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3)
BOT 496 Biodiversity of Kenya (5)
BWS/GEO/HST/REL 209 Civilizations of Africa (3)
BWS/HST 224 Africa to 1884 (3)
BWS/HST 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3)
BWS 341 East African History (3)
BWS 342 Africa Since 1942 (3)
BWS/FST 267 National Cinemas: African Film (3)
BWS/GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
BWS/CLS 310E Identity and Cultural Difference in Greco-Roman Egypt (3)
BWS 324/HST 325 Images of Africa (3)
BWS 339 /POL 338 Contemporary African Politics (3)
BWS/ATH 366 African Oral Traditions (3)
BWS 370 Selected Topics: Black World Studies (3)
BWS/POL 370B African Politics and Society Through Literature (3)
BWS/ENG/FST/POR 381 African Lusophone Literature (3)
BWS/ENG 450A Studies in Genre: The African Novel (3)
BWS/HST 495 Modern African Environmental History (3)
HST 444 Ancient Egypt (3)
POL 438 Africa in the Global Economy (3)
Area B. African American Experiences and Cultures
Choose TWO of the following:
BWS/HST 221 African American History (3)
BWS 250C African American Education (3)
BWS/KNH 279 African Americans in Sports (3)
BWS/KNH 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (3)
BWS/ENG 336 African American Writing (3)
BWS/ENG 337 African American Writing 1878-1945 (3)
BWS/ENG 338 African American Writing 1946-Present (3)
BWS/HST 365 Civil War and Reconstruction Era (3)
BWS/HST 395 The American South to 1877 (3)
BWS/SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
ENG 271 Cultures and Literatures of the American South (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
HST 329 Lynching in America 1865-1940
AMS/MUS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Context (3)
AMS/MUS 285 Survey of African Music in the Diaspora (3)
AMS/MUS 385 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel, and Soul (3)
AMS/MUS 386 The History and Development of Hip-Hop Culture in America (3)
REL 343 African American Religions (3)
Area C. Afro-Latin and Afro-Caribbean Experiences
Choose ONE of the following:
BWS/POR 383 By- or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women (3)
BWS/LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
ENG/LAS 254 Latin American Literature (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
GEO 461 Migrants & Diasporas (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
Area D. Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class, and Ethnicity
Choose ONE of the following:
BWS/CLS 222 Race and Ethnicity in Antiquity (3)
BWS/HST 243 Origins of the African Diaspora: A History of European Slavers (3)
BWS/ATH 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class (3)
BWS/SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
BWS/FSW 362 Family and Poverty (3)
BWS/WGS 432 Feminism and Diaspora (3)
BWS 370I/AMS 310I Race & Popular Culture in the US (3)
BWS 380J Black Atlantic: Crosscurrents of Resistance (3)
BWS/HST 386 Race in U.S. Society (3)
BWS/ENG/WGS 437 Black Feminist Theory (3)
BWS/ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
BWS/SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
BWS/GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
BWS 470 Social and Political Activism (3)
BWS/GTY 472 Minority Aging (3)
BWS 492 African and African American Sexuality (3)
KNH 386 African Americans and Health Issues (3)
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (4)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
PSY 325 Psychology of Prejudice and Minority Experience (3)
REL 241 Religions of the American People (4)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC 490 Critical Race Theory
WGS 370A Black Women Writers (3)
94/ The College of Arts and Science
Botany- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Botany, 316
Pearson Hall (513-529-4200).
There are two A.B. degree programs: the Basic Major and the
major with Environmental Science Emphasis.
Program Requirements
(30 semester hours, 18 must be advanced hours)
All of these:
BOT 115 and 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) and
Global Miami Plan Biological Science Foundation Course of 3 or more credit hours
BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3) and
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1) or
BOT 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
Choose at least two (more recommended) of the following:
BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3) and
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
BOT 205 Dendrology (4)
BOT 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4)
BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (4)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
BOT 402 Plant Anatomy (3)
BOT 403 Plant Development (3)
BOT 409 Morphology of Vascular Plants (4)
BOT 421 Advanced Mycology (3)
BOT 425 Environmental Plant Physiology (4)
BOT 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
Note: One course must be at the 300 or 400 level. No more than six hours of BOT 121, 131, 155, 171 or 181 may count
toward the major.
No more than four hours of research/internship may count toward the major.
Related Hours (12 required)
A course in CHM of 3 credit hours or more and other courses from the departments of
Chemistry and Biochemistry, Computer Science and Software Engineering, Geography,
Geology & Environmental Earth Science, Mathematics (151, 251, or 252 recommended),
Physics, or Statistics.
Note: For graduate study in biological sciences, most programs require organic chemistry, many require calculus and/or
statistics, and some require a physics sequence.
Program Requirements: Environmental Science Emphasis
(30 semester hours, 18 must be advanced hours)
All of these:
BOT 115 and 116 Biological Concepts (4,4) (MPF; 116 is also MPT) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) (MPF, MPT) and
any Global Miami Plan Biological Science Foundation Course of 3 or more credit
hours
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4) (MPT)
BOT 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
Choose at least ONE of these recommended courses:
BOT 203 and 203L, 205, 302, 312, 342, 401, 402, 403, 409, 421, or 425.
Required Related Hours:
Students in this major must satisfy the requirements of the Arts and Science Co-Major in
Environmental Science. This co-major also fulfills the Thematic Sequence requirement.
Botany- Bachelor of Science
For information, contact the Department of Botany, 316
Pearson Hall (513-529-4200).
There are three B.S. degree programs: the Basic Major, the
major with Environmental Science Emphasis, and the major with
Plant Biotechnology Emphasis.
Program Requirements: Basic Major
(40 semester hours, 28 must be advanced hours)
Choose ONE group from the following:
BOT 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) and
any Miami Plan Biological Science Course of 3 or more credit hours
All of these:
BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3)
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
Take a minimum of four of the following:
BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4)
BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (4)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
BOT 402 Plant Anatomy (3)
BOT 403 Plant Development (3)
BOT 409 Morphology of Vascular Plants (4)
BOT 421 Advanced Mycology (3)
BOT 425 Environmental Plant Physiology (4)
BOT 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
Any BOT 600-level course
Also required: Other BOT courses to total at least 40 hours
Note: No more than six hours of BOT 131, 155, or 171 may count toward this major. No
more than six hours of research/internship may count toward the major.
Related Hours (32 hours required)
Thematic Sequence in Chemistry (18 hours)
All of these:
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) and PHY 173,174 Physics Laboratory (1, 1) or
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (4, 4) and PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1,
1)
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) or
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
MTH 251 Calculus II (4) or
MTH 252 Calculus III (4) plus
Additional hours from these departments: Computer Science and Software Engineering,
Geography, Geology & Environmental Earth Science, Mathematics, Physics, or Statistics.
Program Requirements: Environmental Science Emphasis
(34 semester hours, 26 must be advanced hours)
All of these:
BOT 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) and
any Miami Plan Biological Science Course of 3 or more credit hours
BOT 203 Introduction Cell Biology (3)
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
BOT 205 Dendrology (4) or
BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4)
BOT 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
BOT 425 Environmental Plant Physiology (4)
BOT 434 Plant Community Ecology Methods (1) or
BOT 437 Field Methods in Population Ecology (1) or
BOT 333 Field Ecology (2)
Other recommended courses to total 34 hours:
BOT 351, 431, 432, 467
Note: No more than six hours of research/internship may count toward the major.
Required Related Hours (37-39 required)
Thematic Sequence in Chemistry (18 hours)
Complete the environmental science co-major.
Note: Most graduate programs in botany or biology require organic chemistry. Many also
require calculus and/or statistics, and some require general physics.
Program Requirements: Plant Biotechnology Emphasis
(34 semester hours, 26 must be advanced hours)
All of these:
BOT 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) and
any Miami Plan Biological Science Course of 3 or more credit hours
BOT 203 Introduction Cell and Biology (3)
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
BOT 255 Introduction to Biotechnology (3)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 415 Techniques in Plant Biotechnology (3)
Other recommended courses to total 34 hours: BOT 424, 425, 466
Required Related Hours (36 Hours)
All of these:
Thematic Sequence in Chemistry (18 hours)
Minor in Molecular Biology (18 hours)
The College of Arts and Science /95
Chemistry- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).
This program is for students interested in a career in the life or
health sciences, physical sciences related to chemistry, or in
teaching chemistry in secondary school. Students who anticipate
graduate study in chemistry should elect the B.S. Chemistry
Program. Chemistry or required related courses cannot be taken on
a credit/no-credit basis.
Program Requirements
(31 semester hours)
CHM 473 Exploring Chemistry With Quantum Methods (3)
Related Hours (29 required)
All of these:
MTH 151, 251, 252 Calculus I, II, III (5, 4, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181, 182 General Physics (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
Choose ONE of the following:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (4)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Two additional credit hours of laboratory at the 200 level or higher in BOT, CHM, CPE,
GLG, MBI, PHY, or ZOO. For lecture/lab courses, only lab credit hours count. May include
undergraduate research, CHM 340U, 477, 490.
All of these:
CHM 141, 141H or CHM141R and
CHM 142, 142M or 142H College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM144M or144H or with approval CHM 144 College Chemistry Lab(2)
CHM 145M or 145H or with approval CHM 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 363 Analytical Chemistry (3)
CHM 364 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 471, 472 Biophysical Chemistry I, II (3, 3)
Related Hours (26-28 required)
All of these:
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or equivalents
PHY 181, 182 General Physics (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
Additional science courses:
Nine credit hours at the 200 level or above in one of the following departments: Botany,
Geology & Environmental Earth Science, Engineering, Microbiology, Mathematics,
Physics, or Zoology. Note: Pre-medicine students must take biological science courses.
Teaching licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts and Science major must
observe the rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure
cohort as outlined in the School of Education and Allied Professions chapter. For
information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of Education, Health and
Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).
Classical Humanities- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Classics, 105 Irvin
Hall (513-529-1480).
Classics is the study of literature, art, history, archaeology,
philosophy, and languages of the ancient Greeks and Romans.
Achievements of Greco-Roman civilization are important to study
for their inherent power and beauty and for the extraordinary
influence they have on cultures that followed. Study of the
Greco-Roman world deepens your understanding of the origins of
Western culture and offers alternatives to social, political, and
cultural values of our world. This major gives you a broad
spectrum of classical culture and civilization without primary
emphasis on study in classical languages.
Graduate work in Classics, Greek, or Latin requires not only
appropriate experience reading Greek and Latin, but a reading
knowledge of French or German as well. Students planning to go
to graduate school should consult with the department as early as
possible to design an appropriate course of study.
Program Requirements
(24 semester hours)
Choose TWO of the following:
Chemistry- Bachelor of Science
For information, contact the Department of Chemistry and
Biochemistry, 160 Hughes Laboratories (513-529-2813).
This program is usually chosen by students who want to enter
the chemical industry or graduate school in chemistry,
biochemistry, or related areas. This program meets certification
requirements of the American Chemical Society. Chemistry or
required related courses cannot be taken on a credit/no-credit
basis.
Program Requirements
(43-46 semester hours)
All of these:
CHM 141, 141H or CHM141R and
CHM 142, 142M or 142H College Chemistry (3, 3)
CHM144M or144H or with approval CHM 144 College Chemistry Lab(2)
CHM 145M or 145H or with approval CHM 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 147 Introductory Seminar (1)
CHM 251, 252 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3)
CHM 254, 255 Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Chemistry Majors (2, 2)
CHM 351, 352 Physical Chemistry for Chemistry Majors (3, 3)
CHM 417 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)
CHM 418 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (2)
CHM 433 Biochemistry (3) or
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 454 Instrumental Analysis (3)
CHM 455 Chemical Measurements I (2)
CHM 456 Chemical Measurements II (2)
Choose ONE of the following:
CHM 426 Spectroscopic Identification of Structure (2)
CHM 434 Biochemistry (3)
CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
CLS 102 Introduction to Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 121 Classical Mythology (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3)
ART 382 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3)
ART 383 Greek and Roman Painting (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
CLS 401 Age of Augustus (3)
CLS 402 Age of Pericles (3)
Choose remaining hours from these:
Any course in classical humanities
Any course in Greek or Latin beyond the first year
Related Hours (16 required)
Choose from such areas as anthropology, architecture, art, history, language, literature,
philosophy, and religion to make up an integrated plan of study in classical humanities.
Eight hours of Greek or Latin at the 100 level may be counted toward this requirement. You
must obtain the written approval of your adviser for any related hours courses.
Knowledge of at least one other foreign language is recommended.
Classical Languages- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Classics, 105 Irvin
Hall (513-529-1480).
This program is an in-depth study of classical culture possible
only through the study of the classical language. The literature of
ancient Greece, which encompasses epic, lyric, drama, history,
rhetoric, and philosophy, established many key genres of literary
expression for many centuries in European cultural tradition. Latin
literature, forged both in imitation of and reaction against the
96/ The College of Arts and Science
riches of Greek culture, was the primary vehicle through which
Europe acquired its notions of culture and many of its most
persistent values.
Graduate work in classics, Greek, or Latin requires not only
appropriate experience reading Greek and Latin, but a reading
knowledge of German and French as well. Students planning to go
to graduate school should consult with the department as early as
possible to design an appropriate course of study.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts
and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and
restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as
outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter.
For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the
School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513)
529-6418.
Program Requirements
(24 semester hours)
Any 24 semester hours in Latin and Greek language and literature at the 200 level or
above. Either Greek 102 or Latin 102 can be counted toward the major provided you have
taken advanced coursework in the other language.
Related Hours (16 required)
CLS courses can count as related hours. Choose remaining hours from such areas as art,
history, language, literature, philosophy and religion with an adviser to make up an
integrated plan of study. You must obtain the written approval of your adviser for any
related hours courses.
Knowledge of at least one other foreign language is recommended.
Communication- Bachelor of Arts
At the time of publication, majors in the Department of
Communication are being revised. For more information, please
see the chair of the department or contact the College of Arts and
Science advising office in 146 Upham Hall.
This department's majors are selective. For information,
contact the appropriate program area of the Department of
Communication, 162 Bachelor Hall (513-529-7472).
Three majors and several context areas within these are
offered:
 Bachelor of Arts, major in mass communication. For more
information, see mass communication later in this chapter
and/or contact that area of the department.
 Bachelor of Arts, major in speech communication. Areas of
focus:
organizational
communication
and
interpersonal/relational
communication.
For
more
information, see speech communication later in this chapter
and/or contact that area of the department.
 Bachelor of Arts, major in strategic communication. For
more information, see strategic communication later in this
chapter and/or contact that area of the department.
Diplomacy and Global Politics- Bachelor
of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Political Science,
218 Harrison Hall (513-529-2000).
This program of concentration is designed primarily for
students interested in understanding more about comparative and
international politics. It is a major appropriate for those interested
in international careers. It is also the kind of broad, liberal arts
program which many pre-law students will want to consider.
Additionally, it provides a solid background for graduate study in
comparative politics and international relations.
Core Requirements (minimum 33 hours)
Core courses (all of these):
POL 221 Modern World Governments (4)
POL 241 American Political System (4)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
Diplomacy and international relations (two of these):
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3)
POL 374 Foreign Policy Analysis (3)
POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
POL 382 International Law (3)
POL 386 Global Competition (3)
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3)
Politics in global regions (at least two courses from two regional clusters
below):
Eurasia and East Asia
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 331 Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991 (3)
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3)
POL 335 Politics of East Asia (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
POL 440 Havighurst Colloquium (4)
Africa, Middle East, and Latin America
POL 336 Politics of the Middle East (3)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
POL 338 Contemporary African Politics (4)
POL 339 Arab Nationalism in World Politics (3)
POL 370B African Politics & Society through Literature (3)
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
POL 438 Africa in the Global Economy (3)
Europe: East and West
POL 321L Comparative European Politics (4)
POL 333 Politics of Western Europe (4)
POL 334 Politics of Eastern Europe (3)
POL 423 European Union: Politics and Policies (4)
POL 425 British and Irish Politics (3)
Note: With approval of advisor, student may apply relevant coursework taken in an approved study abroad program as
substitute for one or two courses on politics in global regions.
Required capstone (Students must complete one of the following):
POL 419 Civil Society and Modern Politics (3)
POL 424 Transatlantic Seminar: Politics of International Business (4-6)
POL 439 North American Politics: Unity and Diversity (3)
POL 471 The International System (3)
POL 487 Individual Lives and International Politics (3)
POL 489 Conflict Management in a Divided World (3)
At least 17 hours earned at Miami; a grade point average of at least 2.00 is required; no
courses taken credit/no-credit can be applied to major.
Related Requirements (minimum 22 hours)
Cognate courses (all of these):
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Advanced foreign language study:
At least 6 semester hours in a foreign language at the 300-level or higher (not in
translation).
Study Abroad:
12 semester hours earned in one or more study-abroad programs approved by the
Department of Political Science (not more than 6 semester hours earned in study abroad
program can be applied to other major requirements).
At least 9 semester hours for Part II requirements must be earned at Miami University; a
grade point average of at least 2.00 is required; no courses taken credit/no-credit can be
applied toward this requirement.
Earth Science- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science, 114 Shideler Hall (513-529-3216).
The Bachelor of Arts in Earth Science is for students who seek
a broad understanding of the earth and how it operates but who do
not necessarily wish to pursue a career as a professional geologist.
It is our most flexible major allowing diverse exploration of earth
systems and processes according to student interests.
The College of Arts and Science /97
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts
(48 semester hours minimum)
Core requirements. (7 semester hours):
Choose ONE of the following:
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) or
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) or
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3) or
GLG 115L Laboratory (1)
Field experience:
Minimum of 3 semester hours of a field based course. May be fulfilled by credit workshops.
Potential course must be approved by GLG CDA. Only 3 hours of this experience will apply
towards the major.
Electives (minimum 44 semester hours of 200-, 300- and 400-level courses with the
following distribution):
Choose up to a maximum of 20 semester hours from any GLG 200-level course
including:
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 204 Survival on an Evolving Planet (4)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (3)
GLG 217 Planetary Geology (3)
GLG 244 Oceanography (3)
GLG 261 Geohazards and the Solid Earth (3)
Choose from any 300-level GLG courses including:
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)
GLG 307 Water and Society (3)
GLG 322 Structural Geology (4)
GLG 335 Ice Age Earth (3)
GLG 354 Geomorphology (3)
GLG 357 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4)
Choose at least 9 semester hours from any 400-level GLG course including:
GLG 401 Global Climate Change (4)
GLG 402 Geomicrobiology (3)
GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 417 Forensic Isotope Geochemistry (3)
GLG 427 Isotope Geology (3)
GLG 428 Groundwater Flow Modeling (4)
GLG 432 X-ray Powder Diffraction and Clay Analysis (3)
GLG 435 Soils and Paleosols (3)
GLG 436 Paleoclimatology (3)
GLG 450 Sedimentary Basin Analysis (3)
GLG 461 Geophysics (3)
GLG 467 Seismology (3)
GLG 474 Paleobotany, Paleoecology, Paleoclimatology (3)
GLG 482 Contaminant Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 491 Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)
GLG 492 Global Tectonics (4)
GLG 496 Isotopes in Environmental Processes (3)
Up to 12 credits of the following courses may substitute for any GLG 200-level
course:
CHM 141, or CHM 141R; CHM 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Laboratory (3 or
4, 2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
MTH 153 Calculus I (4) or
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
PHY 171, 173 College Physics (3) and Physics Laboratory (1) or
PHY 181, 183 The Physical World (4) and Physics Laboratory (1)
East Asian Languages and CulturesBachelor of Arts
Required courses in Japanese (15 semester hours)
JPN 201, 202 Second Year Japanese (3, 3)
JPN 301, 302 Third Year Japanese (3, 3)
JPN 401 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts I (3)
Selected courses (9 semester hours):
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema: Japanese Film and Culture (3)
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
JPN 381 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
JPN 402 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts II (3)
Note: These Selected courses may be used in Related hours if not used as Selected
courses.
Related hours**
15 semester hours from the following including at least one course from the
Japan group:
Japan:
ART 312 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
China:
ART 311 Chinese Painting History (3)
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 253 Three Kingdoms (3)
CHI 254 Modern Chinese Autobiography (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture in English Translation (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1 or 3)
CHI 402 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 4006 Senior Capstone: Asian (3)
HST 434 China and the Silk Road: Patterns of China's Interactions with other Peoples
before 1600 (3)
GEO 410B Regional Analysis of China (3)
East Asia:
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia) (3)
POL 335 Politics of China and Japan (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
Linguistics:
ATH/GER 309 or ENG/SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
* ** The Chinese minor will also satisfy this requirement.
Program Requirements: China Concentration*
(24 semester hours plus 15 related hours)
Required courses in Chinese (15 semester hours)
CHI 201, 202 Second Year Japanese (3, 3)
CHI 301, 302 Third Year Japanese (3, 3)
CHI 311, 312 Business Chinese (3, 3)
CHI 401 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
Notes: CHI401 is required for all China Concentration majors.
These Required courses may be used in Selected or Related hours if not used as Required courses.
Selected courses (9 semester hours):
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 253 Three Kingdoms (3)
CHI 254 Modern Chinese Autobiography (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture in English Translation (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1 or 3)
CHI 402 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
Note: These Selected courses may be used in Related hours if not used as Selected
courses.
This program provides intensive studies in the languages and
cultures of East Asia, focusing on Japan and China. Students can
choose from either the Japan Concentration, the China
Concentration, or a combination.
(15 semester hours from the following including at least one course from the China group):
Related hours which are requirements for the three cases
provide a broadly based background for the three curricula. Study
abroad is encouraged. Credits earned abroad may count toward
the major.
Program Requirements: Japan Concentration*
(24 semester hours plus 15 related hours)
Related hours**
China:
ART 311 Chinese Painting History (3)
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 4006 Senior Capstone: Asian History (3)
HST 434 China and the Silk Road (3)
GEO 410B Regional Analysis of China (3)
Japan:
ART 312 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
98/ The College of Arts and Science
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema: Japanese Film and Culture (3)
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
JPN 381 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
JPN 402 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts II (3)
SOC 408 Contemporary Japanese Society (3)
East Asia:
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia) (3)
POL 335 Politics of China and Japan (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
Linguistics:
ATH/GER 309 or ENG/SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
** The Japanese minor will also satisfy this requirement.
Program Requirements: Japan/China Combination
(27 semester hours plus 12 related hours)
Required courses in Japanese and Chinese (15 semester hours)
CHI 201, 202 Second Year Chinese (3, 3)
JPN 201, 202 Second Year Japanese (3, 3)
One course from:
JPN 301 Third Year Japanese (3)
CHI 301 Third Year Chinese (3)
CHI 311 Business Chinese I (3)
Selected courses (12 semester hours) from
a. Two of these:
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema: Japanese Film and Culture (3)
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
JPN 301 Third Year Japanese (3) *
JPN 302 Third Year Japanese (3)
JPN 381 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
JPN 401 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts I (3)
JPN 402 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts II (3)
b. Two of these:
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 253 Three Kingdoms (3)
CHI 254 Modern Chinese Autobiography (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture in English Translation (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1 or 3)
CHI 301 Third Year Chinese (3) *
CHI 302 Third Year Chinese (3)
CHI 311 Business Chinese I (3) *
CHI 312 Business Chinese II (3)
CHI 401 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
CHI 402 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
Note: These Selected courses may be used in Related hours if not used as Selected
courses.
The courses with * are available if not used as required courses.
Related hours
12 semester hours from the following including at least one course each from the China
and Japan groups:
Japan:
ART 312 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
China:
ART 311 Chinese Painting History (3)
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 4006 Senior Capstone: Asian History (3)
HST 434 China and the Silk Road (3)
GEO 410B Regional Analysis of China (3)
East Asia:
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia) (3)
POL 335 Politics of China and Japan (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
Linguistics:
ATH/GER 309 or ENG/SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
Economics- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of 2054 Farmer
School of Business (513-529-2836).
This is one of three programs Miami offers in economics.
Another is business-economics in the School of Business
Administration. The same core of economics courses is required for
both majors; the difference is the divisional requirements. You
should choose this program if you are interested in a liberal arts
background in addition to your major. The third major is the
Bachelor of Science in Quantitative Economics described below.
Honors in Economics
For details on honors
departmental website.
in
economics
please
see
the
Program Requirements
(30 semester hours)
All of these:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 311 Examining Economic Data and Models (3)
ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3)
ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3)
Fifteen additional hours of advanced (at or above 300 level) in economics, including at
least six hours in courses that require ECO 315 and/or 317 as prerequisite.
At least nine hours of advanced economics (numbered above 300) must be taken at Miami,
including ECO 315 and 317. Up to three hours of Summer Scholar credit can be applied
toward the 15 hours of advanced economics. Any exception to this must be approved by
the director of undergraduate studies.
Related Hours (16 required)
Calculus. Choose ONE of the following:
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
Statistics. Choose ONE of the following:
ISA 205 Statistics (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Choose your remaining hours from accountancy, decision sciences, finance, geography,
history, management information systems, mathematics, philosophy, political science,
psychology, sociology, statistics, or computer science and software engineering.
Mathematics and statistics beyond the minimum requirement is recommended if you are
considering graduate school in economics. See your adviser.
Economics- Bachelor of Science in
Quantitative Economics
For information, contact the Department of Economics 2054
Farmer School of Business (513-529-2836).
This program enables students to undertake a more rigorous
and quantitative course of study, while still completing their
degree work in four years. Additional required courses (including
more quantitative courses), combined with more advanced
mathematics and statistics requirements are an ideal preparation
for graduate training in economics, as well as jobs in business,
industry and government that require the more technical tools of
economic theory and econometrics.
Honors in Economics
For details on honors
departmental website.
Program Requirements
(36 semester hours)
All of these:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
in
economics
please
see
the
The College of Arts and Science /99
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 311 Examining Economic Data and Models (3)
ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3)
ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3)
One of these:
ECO 414 Mathematical Microeconomics (3) or
ECO 465 Game Theory with Economic Applications (3) or
an acceptable alternative economics, mathematics, or statistics course
(alternatives must be approved by the departmental chief adviser, ideally before the
student enrolls in the course).
Eighteen additional hours of advanced (above 300 level) economics, including at least six
hours in courses that require ECO 315 and/or 317 as prerequisite.
At least nine hours of advanced economics (numbered above 300) must be taken at Miami,
including ECO 315 and 317. Up to three hours of Summer Scholar credit can be applied
toward the 15 hours of advanced economics. Any exception to this must be approved by
the director of undergraduate studies.
Related Hours (20 required)
Mathematics - All of these:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5) or
MTH 251 Calculus I (4) or
MTH 257H Honors Calculus (4)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
Choose ONE of the following:
ISA 444 Business Forecasting (3)
ISA 447 Analysis of Multivariate Business Data (3)
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
MTH 422 Matrices and Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (3)
STA 467 Multivariate Analysis (3)
STA 483 Analysis of Forecasting Systems (3)
Statistics - Both of these:
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
Engineering Physics- Bachelor of Science
For information, contact the Department of Physics, 133 Culler
Hall (513-529-5625).
This major prepares students for employment in technical
fields or entry into professional engineering programs at the
undergraduate or graduate level. Students wishing to participate
in the 3-2 combined plan in engineering should choose this major.
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(55-61 semester hours)
All of these (40-44 semester hours):
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or
MTH 153, 251 Calculus I, II (4, 4) or
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World I, II (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PHY 281 Contemporary Physics I (3)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation (2)
PHY 483 Mathematical Methods in Physics (4)
Plus ONE of the following paths:
Path 1:
Complete the 3-2 Binary Engineering Program (see additional notes below)
Path 2:
Complete one of the following minors in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at
Miami:
• electrical engineering (22 semester hours)
• manufacturing engineering (25 semester hours)
• mechanical engineering (18 semester hours)
• computer science (18 semester hours)
• computer engineering (15 semester hours)
Path 3:
Complete one of the following applied physics tracks:
Electro-Optics Track (16 semester hours):
PHY 441 Optics and Laser Physics (4)
PHY 442 Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules (4)
PHY 461 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHY 491 Quantum Mechanics (4)
Electrical/Instrumentation Track (22-24 semester hours):
ECE/MME 303 Computer-Aided Experimentation (3)
PHY 423 Materials Physics (4)
PHY 451 Classical Mechanics (4) or
MME 143 Engineering Design and Computer Graphics (3) and
MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3)
PHY 461 Electricity and Magnetism (4)
PHY 471 Advanced Electronics (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Recommended additional elective: PHY 491 Quantum Mechanics (4)
Materials Track (17-18 semester hours)
CHM 141 or 141R College Chemistry (3, 4)
MME 223 Engineering Materials (3)
MME/CPE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3)
PHY 423 Materials Physics (4)
PHY 437 Intermediate Thermodynamics and Introduction to Statistical Physics (4)
Recommended additional elective: PHY 491 Quantum Mechanics (4)
Biomedical Track (22-29 semester hours)
CHM 141 or 141R College Chemistry (3, 4) and
CHM 144 College Chemistry Lab (2)
CHM 142,145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (5)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry with Lab (for non-premeds) (4) or
CHM 241, 242, 244, 245 Organic Chemistry with Lab (for premeds) (10)
PHY 421 Molecular and Cellular Biophysics (4)
ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology (4)
Recommended additional elective: ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4)
Program Requirements: 3-2 Program
Students planning an engineering degree may arrange a B.S.
3-2 plan with any engineering school. However, Miami has special
cooperative arrangements with Case Western Reserve University,
Columbia University, and Washington University (St. Louis),
whereby, upon completing all requirements, admission to the
engineering program is assured. Students must earn a minimum of
96 hours at Miami (with 32 hours at the 200 level or above) with a
GPA of at least 3.00. All Miami Plan and College of Arts and
Science requirements must be satisfied. Completion of the 3-2
Program will satisfy the Miami Plan Capstone requirement.
Students must file a petition with the College of Arts and Science to
participate in the 3-2 Program. For more information see the
"Combined Programs" and "Arts-Professional Arrangement"
sections that appear elsewhere in the General Bulletin.
Note: It is best to begin academic planning in your first year at
Miami for later participation in the 3-2 Program. Contact the 3-2
Engineering Liaison Adviser, Chief Departmental Adviser, or your
academic adviser in the Department of Physics for more
information. All students planning on participating in the 3-2
Program must take at least one year of chemistry (CHM 141, 144,
142, and 145) and differential equations (MTH 245 or 347) before
transferring to the engineering school. Organic chemistry should
also be taken by students wishing to specialize in chemical or
biomedical engineering. If you plan to apply to Case Western
Reserve University, Columbia University, or Washington
University, you also need to see an adviser in the Department of
Physics for more specific information on the requirements of those
schools.
English- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of English, 356
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).
Three concentrations are offered within the English major:
literature, creative writing, and professional writing. These
concentrations lead to an A.B. The department also offers a major
in linguistics; see Linguistics later in this chapter.
Program Requirements: English/Literature
(42 semester hours)
100/ The College of Arts and Science
Prerequisite introductory course. This one:*
Choose literature courses above to also meet the following group requirements.
ENG 440, 450 and 490 may count when the topic/time period is appropriate.
* Completed first semester of sophomore year at Miami or first semester after declaring the literature major, whichever is
later.
Literature before 1700:
ENG 298 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (3)
Nine Literature courses, including:
Two of these (Both courses cannot focus on Shakespeare):
No more than two 100-level courses:
ENG 122 Popular Literature (3)
ENG 123 Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENG 124 Introduction to Fiction (3)
ENG 125 Introduction to Drama (3)
ENG 131 Life and Thought in English Literature, to 1660 (3)
ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1660-1901 (3)
ENG 133 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1901-Present (3)
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
ENG 141 Life and Thought in American Literature, to 1865 (3)
ENG 142 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1865-1945 (3)
ENG 143 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1945-Present (3)
ENG 144 Major American Writers (3)
ENG 161 Literature and Politics (3)
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3)
ENG 163 Literature and Travel (3)
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3)
ENG 220 Literature and Film (3)
ENG 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
ENG 230J Jewish-American Literature (3)
ENG 231 The Short Story (3)
ENG 232 American Women Writers (3)
ENG 233 British Women Writers (3)
ENG 237 GLBTQ Literature (3)
ENG 246 Native American Literature (3)
ENG 247 Appalachian Literature (3)
ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3)
ENG 251 Life and Thought in European Literature, to 1800 (3)
ENG 252 Life and Thought in European Literature, 1800-Present (3)
ENG 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
ENG 259 The Modern World Novel (3)
ENG 261 Modern Drama (3)
ENG 262 Children’s Literature (3)
ENG 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3)
ENG 281 The English Novel (3)
ENG 282 American Fiction (3)
ENG 283 Modern Poetry (3)
ENG 293 Contemporary American Fiction (3)
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3)
ENG 328 The Renaissance: Non-Dramatic Literature (3)
ENG 331 17th Century Poetry and Prose (3)
ENG 334 English Literature of the Restoration (3)
ENG 335 English Literature of the 18th Century (3)
ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
ENG 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
ENG 339 Writers of the Early Romantic Period (3)
ENG 342 Writers of the Later Romantic Period (3)
ENG 343 Literature of the Early Victorian Period (3)
ENG 344 Literature of the Later Victorian Period (3)
ENG 345 British Modernism (3)
ENG 346 Modern English and American Drama (3)
ENG 347 Postwar/Postcolonial British Literature (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
ENG 349 Colonial and Early National American Literature, to 1810 (3)
ENG 352 American Literature, 1810-1865 (3)
ENG 353 American Literature, 1865-1914 (3)
ENG 354 American Literature, 1914-1945 (3)
ENG 355 American Literature, 1945- Present (3)
ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (3)
ENG 372 Shakespeare’s Principal Plays: The Early Period (3)
ENG 373 Shakespeare’s Principal Plays: The Later Period (3)
ENG 390 Studies in American Regionalism (3)
ENG 131 Life and Thought in English Literature, to 1660 (3)
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
ENG 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3)
ENG 328 The Renaissance: Non-Dramatic Literature (3)
ENG 331 17th Century Poetry and Prose (3)
ENG 334 English Literature of the Restoration (3)
ENG 372 Shakespeare’s Principal Plays: The Early Period (3)
ENG 373 Shakespeare’s Principal Plays: The Later Period (3)
And at least TWO of the following:
Two of these:
ENG 440 Major English and American Writers (3)
ENG 450 Studies in Genre (3)
ENG 468 Gender and Genre (3)
ENG 480 English Honors (3)
ENG 490 Special Topics in Literary Study (3)
Literary, cultural, or other theory.
Choose ONE of the following:
Literature 1700-1860:
Two of these (One must be British and one American):
British literature.
ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature 1660-1901 (3)
ENG 335 English Literature of the 18th Century (3)
ENG 339 Writers of the Early Romantic Period (3)
ENG 342 Writers of the Later Romantic Period (3)
ENG 343 English Literature of the Early Victorian Period, 1830-1860 (3)
American literature.
ENG 141 Life and Thought in American Literature, to 1865 (3)
ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
ENG 349 Colonial and Early National American Literature, to 1810 (3)
ENG 352 American Literature, 1810-1865 (3)
Literature after 1860.
Two of these (Both courses NOT to be chosen from the same national tradition,
e.g. British):
British literature.
ENG 133 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1901-Present (3)
ENG 344 Literature of the Later Victorian Period (3)
ENG 345 British Modernism (3)
ENG 347 Postwar/Postcolonial British Literature (3)
American literature.
ENG 142 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1865-1945 (3)
ENG 143 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1945-Present (3)
ENG 293 Contemporary American Fiction (3)
ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
ENG 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
ENG 353 American Literature, 1865-1914 (3)
ENG 354 American Literature, 1914-1945 (3)
ENG 355 American Literature, 1945- Present (3)
Other Anglophone Traditions.
ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (3)
Ethnic, minority, or women’s literature.
One of these:
ENG 230J Jewish-American Literature (3)
ENG 232 American Women Writers (3)
ENG 233 British Women Writers (3)
ENG 237 GLBTQ Literature (3)
ENG 246 Native American Literature (3)
ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3)
ENG 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
ENG 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (3)
ENG 468 Gender and Genre (3)
Literary Genre.
ENG 231 The Short Story (3)
ENG 259 The Modern World Novel (3)
ENG 261 Modern Drama (3)
ENG 281 The English Novel (3)
ENG 282 American Fiction (3)
ENG 283 Modern Poetry (3)
ENG 450 Studies in Genre (3)
Senior Capstone. One of these:
Optional
An elective course, offered in the English Department, may be taken for credit toward major
hours but not toward any core or distribution requirements. Courses that cannot count
toward major hours include ENG 108, 109, 111, 112. The purpose of this elective is to allow
students to take a course in another English program (e.g. Creative Writing, Linguistics, or
Professional Writing), if desired.
Literature Distributional Requirements
Program Requirements: English/Creative Writing
(42 semester hours)
ENG 368 Feminist Literary Theory (3)
ENG 370 Literary and Cultural Theory (3)
ENG 435 Queer Theory (3)
ENG 470 Topics in Literary Theory (3)
ENG 460 Issues in Creative Writing (3)
ENG 495 Capstone in Literature (3)
The College of Arts and Science /101
Ethnic, minority, or women’s literature.
Introduction to Creative Writing. This one:
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
Note: ENG 226 is the prerequisite for the 300-level creative writing courses.
Introduction to Literary Studies. This one:*
ENG 298 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (3)
* Completed first semester of sophomore year at Miami or first semester after declaring the literature major, whichever is
later.
Contemporary Writing. Choose ONE of the following:
ENG 311 Contemporary Fiction (3)
ENG 312 Contemporary Poetry (3)
Nine additional hours of creative writing at 300- and 400 levels, from these
courses:
ENG 320 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (3; maximum 6)
ENG 321 The Literary Marketplace (3)
ENG 323 Creative Non-Fiction (3)
ENG 330 Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry (3; maximum 6)
ENG 420 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Workshop (3)
ENG 422 Creative Writing: Screenwriting (3)
ENG 430 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop (3)
Note: (1) ENG 320 is the prerequisite for ENG 420; ENG 330 is the
prerequisite for ENG 430. Students must take an intermediate and
advanced course in the same genre, poetry or fiction. (2) Courses may
be taken a second time. Repeat credits WILL NOT count toward the
major requirement of nine (9) hours of creative writing courses, but
will count toward the 128 hours required for a degree.
ONE of these:
ENG 230J Jewish-American Literature (3)
ENG 232 American Women Writers (3)
ENG 233 British Women Writers (3)
ENG 237 GLBTQ Literature (3)
ENG 246 Native American Literature (3)
ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3)
ENG 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
ENG 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (3)
ENG 435 Queer Theory (3)
ENG 468 Gender and Genre (3)
Literary Genre.
One of the following:
ENG 231 The Short Story (3)
ENG 259 The Modern World Novel (3)
ENG 261 Modern Drama (3)
ENG 281 The English Novel (3)
ENG 282 American Fiction (3)
ENG 283 Modern Poetry (3)
ENG 450 Studies in Genre (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
Optional
An elective course, offered in the English Department, may be taken for credit toward major
hours but not toward any core or distribution requirements. Courses that cannot count
toward major hours include ENG 108, 109, 111, 112. The purpose of this elective is to allow
students to take a course in another English program (e.g. Literature, Linguistics,
Professional Writing), if desired.
Literature Requirements
Program Requirements: English/Professional Writing
(42 semester hours)
English Capstone.
ENG 460 Issues in Creative Writing (3)
ENG 495 Capstone in Literature (3)
Choose literature courses above to also meet the following group requirements. No more
than one 100-level course may be used to fulfill distribution requirements. ENG 440, 450
and 490 MAY count when the topic/time period is appropriate.
Literature before 1700.
Two of these (Both courses cannot focus on Shakespeare):
ENG 131 Life and Thought in English Literature, to 1660 (3)
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
ENG 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3)
ENG 328 The Renaissance: Non-Dramatic Literature (3)
ENG 331 17th Century Poetry and Prose (3)
ENG 334 English Literature of the Restoration (3)
ENG 372 Shakespeare’s Principal Plays: The Early Period (3)
ENG 373 Shakespeare’s Principal Plays: The Later Period (3)
Literature 1700-1860.
Two of these (One must be British and one American):
British literature.
ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature 1660-1901 (3)
ENG 335 English Literature of the 18th Century (3)
ENG 339 Writers of the Early Romantic Period (3)
ENG 342 Writers of the Later Romantic Period (3)
ENG 343 English Literature of the Early Victorian Period, 1830-1860 (3)
American literature.
ENG 141 Life and Thought in American Literature, to 1865 (3)
ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
ENG 349 Colonial and Early National American Literature, to 1810 (3)
ENG 352 American Literature, 1810-1865 (3)
Literature after 1860. Two of these (Both courses NOT to be chosen from the same
national tradition, e.g. British):
British literature.
ENG 133 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1901-Present (3)
ENG 344 Literature of the Later Victorian Period (3)
ENG 345 British Modernism (3)
ENG 347 Postwar/Postcolonial British Literature (3)
American literature.
ENG 142 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1865-1945 (3)
ENG 143 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1945-Present (3)
ENG 293 Contemporary American Fiction (3)
ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
ENG 338 African American Writing, 1946-Present (3)
ENG 353 American Literature, 1865-1914 (3)
ENG 354 American Literature, 1914-1945 (3)
ENG 355 American Literature, 1945- Present (3)
Other Anglophone Traditions.
ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (3)
The Bachelor of Arts with a major in Professional Writing is
designed for students who wish to engage with the theory and
practice of writing for various purposes and in different media.
Students may choose one of four tracks: (1) Digital and Technical
Communication, (2) Editing, (3) Public Writing and Rhetoric, and
(4) Self-Design. The major requires 42 hours: 5 core courses ( 15
hours); 5 track courses (one required) (15 hours); and four elective
courses in any 200-level or above course in the English Department
(12 hours).
Core Courses
All of these:
ENG 223 Strategies for Writers (3)
ENG/IMS 224 Digital Writing and Rhetoric: Composing with Words, Images and Sounds
(3)
JRN 201 Reporting and News Writing I (3)
ENG 411/511 Visual Rhetoric (3)
ENG Capstone (choose one):
ENG 415 Capstone in Professional Writing (3) or
ENG 495R Capstone in Rhetoric and Writing (3)
Tracks - Choose ONE of four possible tracks:
Editing in Professional Contexts:
One required course, select from:
ENG 412/512 Editing for Technical and Scientific Communicators (3) or
JRN 316 Editing and Design (3)
Four elective courses from the following list:
ENG/IMS 171 Humanities and Technology (3)
ENG 172 Rhetoric, Persuasion, and Culture (3)
ENG 202 Varieties of English: Dialect Diversity and Language Change (3)
ENG 225 Advanced Composition (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 315 Business Writing (3)
ENG 321 The Literary Marketplace (3)
ENG 340 Internship
ENG 413/513 Grant and Proposal Writing (3)
ENG 481/581 Writing Center Consulting (3)
JRN 350 Specialized Journalism (3)
Public Writing and Rhetoric:
One required course; select from:
ENG 310 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Persuasion (3) or
ENG 413/513 Grant and Proposal Writing (3)
102/ The College of Arts and Science
Four elective courses; select from the following list:
ENG 172 Rhetoric, Persuasion, and Culture (3)
ENG 201 Special Topics in Language Awareness (3)
ENG 222 The Rhetoric of Information and Data Visualization (3)
ENG 225 Advanced Composition (3)
ENG 245/COM/DST 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
ENG 315 Business Writing (3)
ENG 340 Internship
ENG 407/507 Interactive Business Communication (3)
ENG 412/512 Print and Digital Editing (3)
ENG 481/581 Writing Center Consulting (3)
AAA 410/ENG 409 Topics in Asian/Asian American Studies (3)
JRN 312 Public Affairs Reporting (3)
JRN 318 Advanced Storytelling in Journalism (3)
COM 212 Media Representation(3)
COM 301/JRN 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
Digital and Technical Communication:
One required course; select:
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)
Four elective courses; select from the following list:
ENG/IMS 171 Humanities and Technology (3)
ENG 172 Rhetoric, Persuasion, and Culture (3)
ENG 222 The Rhetoric of Information and Data Visualization (3)
ENG/IMS 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
ENG 310 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Persuasion (3)
ENG 340 Internship (1-20)
ENG 407/507 Interactive Business Communication (3)
ENG 412/512 Editing for Technical and Scientific Communicators (3)
ENG 413/513 Grant and Proposal Writing (3)
ENG 414/514 Usability and User Experience (3)
IMS 222 Web and Interaction Design (3)
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
JRN 303 Online Journalism (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Video Production (4)
Field experience.
Minimum of 3 semester hours of a field based course. May be fulfilled by credit workshops.
Potential course must be approved by GLG CDA.
Electives. (Minimum 19 semester hours):
At least 3 courses must be at the 400 level. Only one course may be outside
of the Department of Geology and Environmental Earth Science. Course used
in the Core Requirements may not be used in the Electives.
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 204 Survival on an Evolving Planet (4)
GLG 244 Oceanography (3)
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)
GLG 307 Water and Society (3)
GLG 335 Ice Age Earth (3)
GLG 354 Geomorphology (3)
GLG 401 Global Climate Change (4)
GLG 402 Geomicrobiology (3)
GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 428 Groundwater Flow Modeling (4)
GLG 435 Soils and Paleosols (3)
GLG 436 Paleoclimatology (3)
GLG 474 Paleobotany, Paleoecology, Paleoclimatology (3)
GLG 482 Contaminant Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 491 Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)
GLG 496 Isotopes in Environmental Processes (3)
GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3)
GEO 426 Watershed Management (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
IES 450 Environmental Law (3)
Related Hours (minimum of 12 hours required)
Choose one of the following:
Self-Design:
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (3, 2)
CHM 141 R, 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (4, 2)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (3)
Any one required course and four elective courses selected from the three
tracks above.
Choose one of the following:
In consultation with your adviser and with administrative approval, you may design your
own track.
Open Electives:
Four open electives from any 200-level or above course in the English Department. This
may include 200-level and above ENG courses from the tracks above.
Environmental Earth Science- Bachelor of
Arts
For information, contact the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science, 114 Shideler Hall (513-529-3216).
The Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Earth Science is
designed for those students who are interested in Earth systems
and processes, but who are also interested in applying their
geoscience pursuits to environmental issues, problems and
solutions. This major reflects the fact that most of our faculty are
involved in environmental research and study.
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts
(48 semester hours minimum)
Core requirements. (17 semester hours)
Choose ONE of the following:
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) or
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) or
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3) and
GLG 115L Laboratory (1)
Choose ONE of the following:
GEO 271 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation (3)
IES 274 Environment and Sustainability (3)
IES 275 Principles of Environmental Science (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)
GLG 354 Geomorphology (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
GLG 307 Water and Society (3)
GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 491 Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
Choose one of the following:
PHY 171, 173 College Physics/Physics Lab (3, 1)
PHY 181, 183 The Physical World/Physics Lab (4, 1)
GLG 261 Geohazards and the Solid Earth (3)
Choose one of the following:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4)
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3)
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3)
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (3)
ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
Environmental Science Co-Major
This co-major emphasizes earth science and life science
approaches to understanding environmental patterns and
processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career
paths and post-graduate degrees in environmental science,
especially those with biological and physical science
specializations. The term "co-major" is unique and indicates that
students must be concurrently enrolled in and must complete
another major at Miami University. The co-major complements this
primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an
academic discipline. There is no specific degree designation for the
co-major; students receive the degree designation of their primary
major.
Program Requirements:
(33-39 semester hours)
Complete a major in one of the divisions of the university.
Biological Science - one of these:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4)
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4)
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) (offered at Hamilton/Middletown only)
The College of Arts and Science /103
Physical Science (8 semester hours; one course from group A and one from
B):
Group A
CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (4)
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (3, 2)
CPE 244 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3)
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (GLG majors only) (4)
Group B
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3)
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3)
GLG 131 Geology and Gemstones (3)
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3)
GLG 115L Geology Lab (required with any GLG enrollment) (1)
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (4)
Note: PHY 171/172 or 181/182 strongly recommended.
Statistics (3-4 semester hours)
Choose ONE of the following:
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
STA 462 Inferential Statistics (3)
Geography- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Geography, 216
Shideler Hall (513-529-5010).
Geographers study human (social, economic, political) and
environmental (atmospheric, biologic, geologic) processes that
create diverse global patterns in physical and cultural landscapes.
Geography especially focuses on understanding how people and
societies relate with each other and their environment.
Geographers are positioned to work for positive development
initiatives in local communities and around the world.
Program Requirements
(36 semester hours)
Foundation Courses. Both of these:
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) or
GEO 111 World Regional Geography (3)
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (4)
Social Science (6-7 semester hours):
Core Courses. Both of these:
Choose ONE of the following:
Recommended elective:
This course:
ECO 201 Microeconomics (3), and
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces and Local Diversity (3)
POL 241 American Political System (4)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
Environmental Science (9-11 semester hours):
GEO 211 Global Change (3)
GEO 241 Map Interpretation (3) or
GEO 242 Mapping a Changing World (3)
GEO 395 Scholarship and Practice in Geography (1)
Specialization Paths. At least 12 hours in one of these four paths:
Environmental Change Path
This course:
IES 275 Principles of Environmental Science (3), and
This one:
Choose TWO of the following (both of which must be outside department of
primary major):
Choose at least TWO of the following:
BOT 401, 425, 431, 432, 467
CHM 363/364, 454, 463, 491
CPE 405, 441, 442
GEO 421, 425, 428, 441, 444
GLG 307, 335, 354, 401, 402, 408, 428, 430, 432, 435, 474, 482, 496
MBI 475
PHY 421, 437, 441
STA 333, 363, 401, 462, 475
ZOO 333, 408, 453, 462, 463, 467
Practicum and Synthesis (3-5 semester hours)
Choose ONE of the following:
BOT/ZOO 351 Environmental Education (4)
GEO 436 Women, Gender and the Environment (3)
Field-Based Workshops (See department for available workshops)
Honors Thesis (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3) *
Independent Study 377 (3) or Internship 340 (3)*
* must be approved by IES Director or Co-Major adviser
GEO 221 Regional Physical Environments (3) and
GEO 205 Population and Migration (3)
GEO 271 Humans and Natural Resources (3)
GEO 333 Global Perspectives on Natural Disasters (3)
GEO 354 Geomorphology (4)
GEO 401 Sustainable Regions (3)
GEO 421 Climatology (3)
GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3)
GEO 426 Watershed Management (3)
GEO 428 Soil Geography (4)
GEO 431 Global Plant Diversity (3)
GEO 432 Ecoregions of North America (3)
GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 444 GI Science in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
GEO 496 Biodiversity in Kenya (6)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of adviser.
Global Development Path
Choose at least ONE of the following:
French- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of French and Italian,
207 Irvin Hall (513-529-7508). Students are encouraged to
participate in the Department's summer programs abroad.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts
and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and
restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as
outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter.
For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the
School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall
(513-529-6418).
Program Requirements
(30 semester hours)
After taking FRE 301 (3), take six hours of FRE 302, 303, or 310, in no particular sequence.
Of the remaining 21 hours, take 18 hours at 400 level, including the required three-hour
senior seminar (FRE 410) and the required three-hour writing workshop (FRE 415). No
more than three hours in translation count toward this major. FRE 361 Pronunciation does
not count toward this major.
GEO 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (3)
GEO 307 Geography of Central and Eastern Europe, and Russia (3)
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
GEO 311 Geography of Europe (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
Selected GEO 410 courses with permission of adviser; and
Choose at least TWO of the following:
GEO 205 Population and Migration (3)
GEO 302 Geography and Gender (3)
GEO 309 Native American Women (3)
GEO 378 Political Geography (3)
GEO 385 Media Geographies (3)
GEO 401 Sustainable Regions (3)
GEO 406 Indigenous Peoples and Their Sacred Lands (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (3)
GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 444 GIScience Techniques in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 457 Global Cities (3)
104/ The College of Arts and Science
GEO 461 Migrants & Diasporas (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
GEO 476 Global Poverty (3)
GEO 496 Biodiversity of Kenya (6)
Selected GEO 460 courses with the permission of adviser.
Comparative Urban Economic Path
This one:
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3); and
Choose at least TWO of the following:
GEO 205 Population and Migration (3)
GEO 302 Geography and Gender (3)
GEO 385 Media Geographies (3)
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 444 GIScience Techniques in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 457 Global Cities (3)
GEO 458 Cities of Difference (3)
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 462 Public Space (3)
GEO 467 Land Use, Law, and the State (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
GEO 492 Geography of the Auto Industry (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with the permission of adviser.
Environmental and Society Path
Select courses based on a study plan created in consultation with an adviser.
Required Capstone Course
GEO 491 Senior Seminar (4)
Workshop, internship, or other fieldwork in geography is strongly encouraged and will
count towards required hours (with permission of adviser).
• Additional geography courses to total 36 hours in the major, chosen in consultation with
your adviser.
Geology- Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Science
For information, contact the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science, 114 Shideler Hall (513-529-3216).
Geology is the study of the history of the Earth and processes
that continue to shape the planet today. Geoscientists view the
Earth as a set of intimately connected atmospheric, hydrologic, and
rock systems.
The department offers several majors: Bachelor of Arts in
geology, Bachelor of Arts in earth science, Bachelor of Arts in
environmental earth science, Bachelor of Arts with teacher
licensure in earth science, Bachelor of Science in Geology and
Bachelor of Science in Education in earth science education.
The Bachelor of Science degree is designed to provide more
in-depth study, particularly in preparation for pursuit of a
graduate degree in the geological sciences. As part of this
preparation, students are required to conduct independent
research leading to public presentation of their results.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts
and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and
restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as
outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter.
For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the
School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall
(513-529-6418).
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts
(36 semester hours minimum in GLG; 48 semester hours minimum
including related courses)
Core requirements. All of these (30 semester hours):
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) or
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) or
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3)
GLG 115L Laboratory (1)
GLG 201 Mineralogy (4)
GLG 204 Survival on an Evolving Planet (4)
GLG 301 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy (4)
GLG 322 Structural Geology (4)
GLG 357 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4)
GLG 411A Field Geology (6)
Electives at least one must be at the 400-level (minimum 6 semester hours):
GLG 335 Ice Age Earth (3)
GLG 354 Geomorphology (3)
GLG 401 Global Climate Change (4)
GLG 402 Geomicrobiology (3)
GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 417 Forensic Isotope Geochemistry (3)
GLG 427 Isotope Geology (3)
GLG 428 Groundwater Flow Modeling (4)
GLG 432 X-ray Powder Diffraction and Clay Analysis (3)
GLG 435 Soils and Paleosols (3)
GLG 436 Paleoclimatology (3)
GLG 450 Sedimentary Basin Analysis (3)
GLG 461 Geophysics (3)
GLG 467 Seismology (3)
GLG 474 Paleobotany, Paleoecology, Paleoclimatology (3)
GLG 482 Contaminant Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 491 Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)
GLG 492 Global Tectonics (4)
GLG 496 Isotopes in Environmental Processes (3)
Related Hours (12-16 required)
CHM 141, or CHM 141R; CHM 144 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Laboratory (3 or
4, 2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
MTH 153 Calculus I (4) or
STA 261Statistics (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
PHY 171 College Physics (3) and PHY 173 Physics Laboratory (1) or
PHY 181 The Physical World (4) and PHY 183 Physics Laboratory (1)
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(42 semester hours minimum in GLG; 63 semester hours minimum
including related courses)
Core requirements
All courses required for the Bachelor of Arts degree in geology.
Electives
Same requirements as for the Bachelor of Arts degree in geology plus one additional
400-level course. See complete list above.
Research Project
GLG 377, 477 or 498 or equivalent research project (3)
Public presentation of research project
Related Hours (21-30 required)
Same requirements as for the Bachelor of Arts degree in geology plus:
CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry/College Chemistry Lab (3, 2) or
GLG 211 Chemistry of Earth Systems (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
MTH 251 Calculus II (4) or
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
PHY 172 College Physics (3) and PHY 174 Physics Laboratory (1) or
PHY 182 The Physical World (4) and PHY 184 Physics Laboratory (1)
GLG 261 Geohazards and the Solid Earth (3)
German- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
This program provides students with a solid foundation in
language, literature, and culture. The department offers an
intensive summer program in Europe for students at intermediate
and advanced levels. Students are encouraged to take the
internationally recognized examinations in German/business
German given annually.
Only three semester hours in English translation can be
applied toward the required 27 semester hours. All courses for the
The College of Arts and Science /105
German major must be taken for a grade except courses only
offered as credit/no-credit.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts
and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and
restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as
outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter.
For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the
School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall
(513-529-6418).
Program Requirements
(27 semester hours plus 9 hours of related courses numbered above
GER 202)
Select courses from these areas:
Language skills. This one:
GER 301 Advanced German Composition and Conversation (3)
Literature. Take both of these:
GER 311 Passionate Friendships in German Literature (3)
GER 312 Coming of Age in German Life and Thought (3) (taught in English translation)
Culture. Choose at least THREE semester hours from the following:
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe (3) or
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and
the USA (3)
Advanced study:
GER 471 Linguistic Perspectives in Contemporary German (3)
One additional course, which must be at the 400 level.
Two three-hour German courses at any level taught in translation, except FRE/GER 212;
GER/ATH 309/ENG/SPN 303; GER/ART/ENG/GEO/HBW/HST/POL/PSY/REL 179;
GER/ENG/FRE 356.
Related Hours (9 required)
These may include study of other national literatures, literary theory, comparative literature,
linguistics, or another language. Depending on the subject, another major or minor may
satisfy this requirement. Courses in music, art, history, political science, and other
disciplines qualify on the basis of their content. Related hours must be approved by your
adviser.
Note: Students can count a course from a second major or other area of interest as an
elective for the gerontology major. Some examples are:
KNH 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (3)
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
PHL 475 Justice in Health Care (4)
Note: Gerontology majors are required to take at least one 400 level gerontology course in
addition to GTY 440G. The department occasionally offers GTY 460 (Selected Topics in
Gerontology) which can be included in one of the thematic clusters based on the specific
topic.
History- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of History, 200
Upham Hall (513-529-5121).
The history major provides a specialized undergraduate
program that strengthens a student's ability to read critically;
analyze physical and written evidence; and develop clear, coherent
arguments. These skills allow the student to engage the past with
careful and imaginative questions. As students engage in the
discipline of historical inquiry, they will become adept at
developing written conclusions and oral presentations based on
the systematic evaluation of historical evidence. Students will
grow used to considering an array of cultures, familiar and
unfamiliar, in diverse historical contexts.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts
and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and
restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as
outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter.
For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the
School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall
(513-529-6317).
Program Requirements
(36 semester hours)
HST 206 Introduction to Historical Inquiry (3)
Gerontology- Bachelor of Arts
This major provides students with a multidisciplinary
approach to the study of aging in a social context. Students
examine the varied experiences of physical, psychological and
social aging in an aging society and world. The major draws from
theoretical
work
in
anthropology,
psychology,
social
work/welfare, and sociology. This major prepares students for
careers and further study in a broad range of fields and disciplines
related to individual and societal aging.
Program Requirements
(38 semester hours)
Multidisciplinary Core. All of these:
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3)
GTY/SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
GTY 375 Aging, Self, and Society (3)
GTY 440G Capstone Field Experience in Gerontology (MPC) (1-16, minimum 6)
SOC 262 Research Methods (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Diversity. Choose ONE of the following:
GTY 260 Global Aging (3)
GTY/SOC/WGS 463 Gender and Aging (3)
GTY/BWS 472 Race, Ethnicity, and Aging (3)
Health. Choose ONE of the following:
DST/GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3)
GTY 356 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Health and Aging (3)
GTY/SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
GTY 478 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Illness (4)
Socio-cultural Contexts. Choose ONE of the following:
GTY/FSW 466 The Family in Later Life (3)
GTY 476 Environment and Aging (3)
GTY 485 Long-Term Care in an Aging Society (3)
SOC 257 Population (3)
SOC 435 Sociology of Death (3)
You must take HST 206 within one semester of becoming a History major. You must earn a
C or better in HST 206 in order to graduate as a History major.
At least one History course at the 100 level (3)
At least three History courses at the 200 level (9) (excludes HST 206)
At least six History courses at the 300 level or above (18). At least one of these (3) must
be at the 400 level (excluding HST 400 and independent study work under-taken at the 400
level)
HST 400 Senior Capstone (3)
If you scored 3 or above on an Advanced Placement examination, you may apply 3 credit
hours to the major (100-level course). University credit will be awarded as described below.
U.S. History - HST 111 and 112 (6 credits)
European History - HST 122 (3 credits)
World History - HST 197, 198 (6 credits)
A single course may fulfill both of the following categories (Geographical Diversity and
Pre-modern Period).
Geographical Diversity Requirement (6 hours):
One 100 or 200 level course (3) must be on the history of Africa, the Middle East, Asia,
Latin America, or some combination of those regions. One 300 or 400 level course (3)
must be on the history of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, or some combination
of those regions.
Pre-modern Period Requirement (6 hours):
One 100 or 200 level course must be on the pre-modern period. One 300 or 400 level
course must be on the pre-modern period. At least one of the two courses must be a
pre-1500 course; both must be pre-1800.
Department Honors Option
History majors with a record of high achievement have the
opportunity to participate in the Honors Program in History.
Eligible students will receive invitations to the program no later
than the first semester of their junior year. Participation in the
program is by invitation only and is based in part on the number of
history courses taken to that point and the grade point average in
those courses.
106/ The College of Arts and Science
Students accepted into the Honors Program in History must
complete the following, unless alternative arrangements are made
in advance with the department honors director.
HST 359 Junior Honors Colloquium (3)
Ordinarily taken in the second semester of the junior year. Counts toward upper-level
courses for the History major.
HST 400 Honors Senior Capstone (3)
Ordinarily taken in the first semester of the senior year. Fulfills the departmental and
Miami Plan capstone requirement.
HST 480 Departmental Honors (1-3)
An independent study course ordinarily taken in the second semester of the senior year
with the senior thesis adviser. Counts toward upper-level courses for the History major,
but not for the required 400-level course.
Individualized Studies- Bachelor of Arts
For information,
513-529-2233.
contact
the
Western
Department
The AB in Individualized Studies offers an academic home for
students with multiple interests to develop their own plan of study
by integrating a set of core classes with courses in almost any area
of study. Courses explore diverse subjects but share a strong
interdisciplinary theme. By emphasizing the importance of
studying complex issues from multiple perspectives, these courses
equip students with skills in critical thinking, problem solving, and
objective analysis. The individualized portion of the major is
designed by students in close consultation with faculty and staff
advisers, and draws from courses across the university. The degree
culminates in a student-designed project that positions students
for entry into graduate school or the workplace.
Program requirements
Introductory courses: (7 hours)
WST 201 Self and Place (3)
WST 231 Interdisciplinary Inquiry (3)
WST 251 Individualized Studies Seminar (1)
Core courses in interdisciplinary and integrative studies: (9 hours)
WST 301 Interdisciplinary Problems and Questions (3)
WST 321 Developing Interdisciplinary Projects: Exploring Ways of Knowing (3) or
WST 322 Developing Interdisciplinary Projects: Using Analytical and Rhetorical
Tools (3)
WST 341 Interdisciplinary Synthesis and Action (3)
Individualized coursework component: (24 hours minimum)
Building upon the individualized plan of study completed in
WST 251, students select and complete coursework at the 300-level
or above from around the university to build content knowledge in
specific area(s) of focus. Students might choose to pattern their
individualized plan on an existing multidisciplinary Thematic
Sequence or an interdisciplinary minor within the university, but
will be expected to go well beyond what is already in place at
Miami to flesh out their unique areas of study. Plans of study,
subject to approval by a faculty advisor, may include study
abroad and/or credit-bearing internships as appropriate. The
individualized component forms an important knowledge base for
constructing the senior project.
Senior Project: (7 hours)
WST 421 Senior Project Proposal Workshop (2)
WST 444/445 Senior Workshop and Project (3, 2)
Interactive Media Studies Co-Major
This co-major in Interactive Media Studies is an
interdisciplinary major that is designed to complement the
traditional disciplinary-focused major. It cannot be taken
independently of a disciplinary focus. The co-major includes
courses that span across the breadth of Miami University's
offerings. From art to the humanities to computer science, the IMS
co-major brings the inherently interdisciplinary world of
technology to the traditionally disciplinary student.
Following four foundation courses, students must choose
three courses from two foundation tracks (making and analyzing).
During their third and fourth years, they participate in an
advanced track that is either pre-approved or self-designed.
Third/fourth year requirements also include IMS 452 Senior
Degree Project and IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum.
An application/interview is required for admittance. There is
a minimum 2.50 GPA requirement. A limited number of students
are admitted each year.
Co-major in Interactive Media Studies
(37 semester hours)
Second Year: Foundation (12 hours):
ENG/IMS 224 Digital Writing and Rhetoric: Composing with Words, Images and Sounds
(3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3) (MPT)
IMS 254 Design Principles Applied (3)
IMS 257 Web Interaction Programming (3)
Second and Third Year: Foundation Tracks (9 hours)
Take 2 courses from one list, 1 course from the other list
Making:
ART/IMS 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3)
IMS 212 The Design of Play (3)
IMS 222 Web and Interaction Design (3)
IMS 253 Building Interactive Objects (3)
IMS 356 Interactive Animation (3)
IMS 461 Advanced 3D Visualization and Simulation (3)
Analyzing:
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
ENG/IMS 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
IMS 211 The Analysis of Play (3)
IMS 261 Information and Data Visualization (3)
IMS 413 Usability and Digital Media Design (4)
IMS 414 Web and Social Media Analytics (3)
IMS 419 Digital Branding (4)
Third and Fourth Year: Advanced Track (9 hours)
If a track is pre-approved (below) the student can begin the
track without advisor approval. If a student would like to design
their own track from the list of track courses (and/or other courses
that might be available throughout the university) they are
required to meet with their assigned advisor and get "sign-off" on
the track no later than immediately following completion of the
first course in the track. All/any modifications to pre-approved
tracks and/or self-designed tracks need to be approved by the
Chief Departmental Advisor of AIMS. IMS 390 Special Topics and
IMS 490/590 Advanced Topics can be used with CDA approval.
(Courses from the Making and Analyzing foundation tracks can
also be used in the advanced track, but they must be in addition to
those hours - no double-dipping).
Pre-Approved Tracks (choose three from the list):
Game Design:
IMS 212 The Design of Play (3)
IMS 319 Foundations in 3-D Design (3)
IMS 445 Game Design (3)
IMS 487 Game Prototyping, Pipeline and Production (3)
Game Development:
IMS 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3)
CSE 251 Introduction to Game Programming (3)
IMS 445 Game Design (3)
IMS 487 Game Prototyping, Pipeline and Production (3)
Game Studies:
IMS 211 The Analysis of Play (3)
IMS/EDP 225 Games and Learning (3)
IMS/ENG 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
IMS 487 Game Prototyping, Pipeline and Production (3)
Interactive Business:
IMS 407 Interactive Business Communication (3)
IMS 414 Web and Social Media Analytics (3)
IMS 418 Social Media Marketing and Online Community Management (3)
IMS/MKT 419 Digital Branding (4)
Art and Interaction:
IMS/ART 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3)
IMS 319 Foundations in 3-D Design (3)
IMS/MUS 304 Electronic Music (3) or
IMS/MUS 221 Music Education Technology (1)
The College of Arts and Science /107
ARC 404Y Mind And Medium (3)
• Women in the World
Web Development and Design:
* Take 12 hours from at least two different disciplines
IMS 222 Web and Interaction Design (3)
IMS 356 Interactive Animation (3)
IMS 413 Usability and Digital Media Design (4)
IMS 422 Advanced Web Design (3)
Animation:
IMS/ART 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3)
IMS 319 Foundations in 3-D Design (3)
IMS 356 Interactive Animation (3IMS/ART 359
Comparative Media Studies:
COM 211 Introduction to Video Production (4)
COM 212 Media, Representation, and Society (3) or
COM 355 Media Technology & Culture (3)
CMS 201 Introduction to Comparative Media Studies (4)
CMS 301 Comparative Approaches to Media Studies (3)
Visualization:
IMS 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3)
IMS 261 Information and Data Visualization (3)
IMS 461 Advanced 3D Visualization and Simulation (3)
IMS/JRN/STA 404 Visualizing Information (3)
Third/Fourth Year: Upper-level Requirements (7 hours)
IMS 452 Senior Degree Project (3)
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
Specifically Suggested Electives:
ART/IMS 340 Internship (2)
ART 256 Design, Perception & Audience (3)
IMS/ENG 171 Humanities and Technology (3)
SCA 111 Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking (3)
International Studies- Bachelor of Arts in
International Studies
For information, contact the director of the International
Studies Program, 120 MacMillan Hall (513-529-5333).
This multidisciplinary program is for students desiring a
broad foundation for understanding and analyzing important
issues within an international and multicultural context. Its flexible
curriculum provides a basis for graduate work or careers in
government service, international business, academia, tourism,
public service, cultural relations, and law. Overseas study is
required as a part of this major.
Program Requirements
Interdisciplinary Core Courses (21-22 semester hours)
All of these:
• Russia Eastern Europe and Central Asia
• Western Europe
Italian Studies- Bachelor of Arts
For more information, contact the Department of French and
Italian, 207 Irvin (513-529-7508).
Prerequisite Preparatory Course
(8 semester hours)
ITL 101,102 Beginners Italian (4, 4)* or
ITL 105W Intensive Elementary Italian (eight weeks) (8) ** or equivalent
Generally, two years of language study in high school are the equivalent of one year in
college. It is not necessary to complete the first-year courses before embarking on the
major. They may be take concurrently with major courses, but ideally should be completed
during the student's first two years
*taken at Miami University
**offered at the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Italy
Program Requirements: 30 credit hours
Required Course
(3 semester hours)
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3)
Core Courses
(18-27 semester hours)
Choose at least SIX courses from the following (fewer if choosing ITL 205W or 305W,
which are 8 hours each), for a minimum of 18 hours, up to as many as nine three credit
courses, for a maximum of 27 semester hours:
ART 314 The Renaissance in Italy (3)
ART 484 High Renaissance and Mannerist Art (3)
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 402 The Age of Augustus (3)
HST 315 The Renaissance (3)
HST 328 Italy: Machiavelli to Mussolini
HST 452 Florence in the Time of the Republic 1250-1550 (3)
ITL 201,202 Second-year Italian (3, 3) or
ITL 205W Intensive Intermediate Italian (8) **
ITL/AMS/FST 222 Italian American Culture (3)
ITL/FST 262 Italian Cinema (in English) (3)
ITL 301 Introduction to Italian Literature 13th-19th Centuries (in Italian) (3)
ITL 302 Introduction to Italian Literature 20th-21st Centuries (in Italian) (3)
ITL 305W Intensive Advanced Italian (8) **
ITL/ENG 364 From Marco Polo to Machiavelli (3)
ITL/ENG 401 Dante's Divine Comedy (in English)
ITL 410 Topics in Italian (3)
** offered at the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Italy
ECO 344 International Economics (3) *
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
ITS 402 Policy Taskforce Capstone in International Studies (3) **
Supplementary Courses
(up to 9 semester hours)
* ECO 201 and 202 are prerequisites
Choose remaining hours, if any, from the following:
** Senior year only
Choose ONE of the following:
ITS 302 Problems of Non-Western Societies (3)
ITS 365 Topics in International Studies (3)
Choose THREE of the following:
GEO 378 World Political Geography (3)
HST 198 World History 1500 to present (3)
ITS/ATH 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
Language Requirement (6-12 semester hours)
For French, German, or Spanish: 12 hours at 300 level or above, or a minor (other
languages must complete only 6 hours at 300 level or above).
Approved Study Abroad Experience (at least one semester)
Concentration Requirement (12 semester hours)
Choose between the functional concentration and the regional concentration. You must
take at least 12 credit hours from at least three different disciplines in your chosen
concentration.
Functional Concentrations: Regional Concentrations:
• Conflict, Peace and Diplomacy*
• Africa
• International Development
• South and East Asia
• Global Cultural Relations
• Latin America
• The Global Environment
• Middle East
ARC 405E Renaissance Architecture (3)
ART 316 Baroque Art in Europe (3)
ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3)
ART 382 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3)
ART 383 Greek and Roman Painting (3)
CLS 215 Roman Historians (3)
CLS 332 Classical Mythology and the Arts (3)
HST 448 The Roman Republic (3)
HST 449 The Roman Empire (3)
Concentration in Italian Language and Literature
A notation will be added to the transcripts of students completing at least 18 credits in
courses with an ITL designation, indicating that they have fulfilled the requirements for the
Italian Studies Major with a Concentration in Italian Language and Literature. This
concentration requires at least two years of Italian at the university level. ITL 301 and 302
are strongly recommended, as is participation in the Miami University Summer Language
Institute in Urbino, Italy.
Required Courses
(6 or 8 semester hours)*
ITL 201,202 Second-year Italian (3, 3) or
ITL 205W Intensive Intermediate Italian (8) ** or equivalent
108/ The College of Arts and Science
Strongly Recommended
(3-14 semester hours)
ITL 301 Introduction to Italian Literature 13th-19th Centuries (in Italian) (3)
ITL 302 Introduction to Italian Literature 20th-21st Centuries (in Italian) (3)
ITL 305W Intensive Advanced Italian (8) **
ITL 410 Topics in Italian (3)
Choose remaining hours, if any, from the following:
ITL/AMS/FST 222 Italian American Culture (3)
ITL/FST 262 Italian Cinema (in English) (3)
ITL/ENG 364 From Marco Polo to Machiavelli (3)
ITL/ENG 401 Dante's Divine Comedy (in English)
* eight semester hours if ITL 205W is chosen
** offered at the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Italy
Journalism- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the director of the Journalism
Program, 201 Williams Hall (513-529-7525).
This program provides students with a liberal arts approach to
integrated journalism (print, broadcast, and web) focusing on
proficiency in critical thinking, writing, reporting, and editing.
These skills prepare students for careers in print and broadcast
journalism, new media, related professions, and graduate studies.
The program further emphasizes the importance of acting as
ethical and productive members of the media and the community
at large.
Program Requirements
(40 semester hours)
Core Requirements
These two:
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Video Production (4)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
JRN 201 News Reporting and Writing (3)*
Latin American, Latino/a & Caribbean
Studies - Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the LAS Program, 120 MacMillan
Hall (513-529-4049 or 513-529-5333).
Latin American Latino/a & Caribbean Studies (LAS) offer an
interdisciplinary major and minor based in mutually enriching
perspectives in the humanities, fine arts, social and physical
sciences. Courses examine and analyze Latin American and
Caribbean cultures, economies, social and political systems,
literature, art, music, history, and geography across the
hemisphere. Opportunities to study abroad and to engage with
Latin American communities in Ohio promote the active
application of international knowledge to issues vital to today's
changing world.
Program Requirements
(30 semester hours)
Three semester hours in each of the following two required categories. Additional credits
here are counted toward the core courses requirement.
Introduction to Latin America
LAS 208/ATH 206 Introduction to Latin America (3)
LAS/HST 217 Modern Latin American History (3)
SPN 362 Spanish American Cultural History II (3)
Culmination of Latin American Studies
LAS 410 Current Latin American Issues (3)
LAS/IES 412 Tropical Ecosystems of Costa Rica (5)
LAS/BWS/FST 415 Cuba in Revolution (4)
LAS/IES 416 Connections: Understanding Tropical Ecology and Natural History via Belize,
Central America (5)
LAS 477 Independent Study Project (3-4)*
LAS 499 Study Abroad in Latin America and the Caribbean (3-6)
ATH 426D Culture and Environment in Brazil (3-6)
HST 400G Latin American History (3)
HST/LAS 437 Latin America Environmental History (3)
Language Requirement (complete 1 of the 2 options):
Option 1:
JRN 318 Advanced Storytelling in Journalism (3)
Analytical Courses
FRE 301 Introduction to French Literature and Culture
POR 311 Composition and Conversational Portuguese (3)
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Introductory Composition (3)
Option 2:
Complete SPN 202, POR 211, FRE 202, or their equivalents, and take three credit hours of
a second language selected from SPN, POR, or FRE.
Any TWO of the following:
Core Courses
(*Prerequisite for all JRN 202 and all 300- and 400-level JRN writing/editing courses)
JRN 202 News Reporting and Writing II (3)
JRN 312 Public Affairs Reporting (3)*
(*This course is in the process of being reclassified as a 400-level class).
COM 212 Media, Representation, and Society (3)
COM 355 Media Technology & Culture (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
JRN 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
JRN 333 International Journalism (3)
JRN 427 Inside Washington Semester Experience (4)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
Creative Courses
Any TWO of the following:
JRN 303 Online Journalism (3)
JRN/COM 313 Advanced Electronic Journalism: Audio (3)
JRN/COM 314 Advanced Electronic Journalism: Video (3)
JRN 316 Introduction to News Presentation (3)
JRN 350 Specialized Journalism (3)*
*(This course can be repeated).
Capstone
Choose ONE of the following:
COM/JRN 415 Practicum in Television Journalism (4)
COM/JRN/POL 426 Inside Washington (8)
JRN 421 Capstone in Journalism (3)
Internship (not required, but strongly encouraged for all majors)
JRN 340 Journalism Internship
Second Major
All journalism majors are required to complete a second major that preferably is not in a
media-related field.
At least 18 hours, with at least 6 credits of the Core Course hours coming from LAS
courses or their cross-listed equivalents:
ART 317 The Arts of Colonial Latin America (3)
ATH 303 Native American Culture (4)
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archaeology (4)
ATH/BWS/LAS/WGS 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class (3)
ATH 414 Caribbean Archaeology (3)
ATH 415 Caribbean Archaeology: Field and Laboratory Methods (6)
BUS 399S Doing Business in Costa Rica: Environmental Sustainability and Risk
Management (4)
BUS 420S The Environment of Business in Latin America (2)
BWS/FST/LAS/MUS/WGS 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music (3)
ENG/LAS 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
HST/LAS 243 Origins of the African Diaspora: A History of European Slavers (3)
HST 307 Latin American Civilization (Before 1820) (3)
HST 487 Mexico Since 1810 (3)
LAS 207 Latin America before 1910 (3)
LAS/HST 260 Latin America in the United States (3)
LAS 277,377,477 Independent Study*
LAS 277X Service-Learning (1 credit, taken with any MPF course) **
LAS 300 Special Topics in Latin American Latino/a and Caribbean Studies (3)
LAS 315 Latin American Diaspora Communities and Issues (3)
LAS/HST 319 Revolution in Latin America (3)
LAS/HST/BWS 385 Race, Science, and Disease in the Americas (3)
LAS 390 Variable Content Seminar in Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies (3)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
POR 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women (3)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
SPN 361 Spanish American Cultural History I (3)
SPN 430 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spanish America (3)
SPN 450 Topics in Hispanic Literature and Language (3)
The College of Arts and Science /109
SPN 461 Studies in Spanish American Narrative (3)
SPN 462 Studies in Modern Spanish American Drama (3)
SPN 463 Studies in Spanish American Poetry (3)
SPN 464 Studies in Spanish American Essay (3)
SPN 482 Spanish Dialectology (3)
SPN 490 Issues in Hispanic Literature (3)
(Latin American topic required)
Related Courses (up to three semester hours)
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3)
ATH/ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 312 Introduction to North American Archaeology (4)
BUS 371 International Business (3)
ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems (3)
ECO 344 International Economic Relations (3)
ECO 347 Economic Development (3)
ECO 441 International Trade and Commercial Policy (3)
ECO 442 International Monetary Relations (3)
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)
FSW 206 Social Welfare: Impact on Diverse Groups (4)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3)
GEO 111 World Regional Geography (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
HST 361 History of Colonial America (3)
HST 371 Native American History (3)
IDS 151 Diversity Seminar (1)
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3)
LAS 413/IES 423 Tropical Marine Ecology (5)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ITS 302 Problems of Non-Western Societies (3)
MGT 304 Cross-Cultural Management (3)
MKT 425/471L Global Marketing (4)
MUS 185 World Music (3)
MUS 186 Global Music for the I-Pod (3)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 439 North American Politics: Unity and Diversity (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SPN 482 Spanish Dialectology (3)
* Independent Study: Students who have completed at least three credits of LAS program
requirements or core courses may design an Independent Study in LAS, working with a
member of the LAS Faculty Advisory Committee.
** Service-Learning: Students are encouraged to participate in Service-Learning for 1-3
credits, or as non-credit volunteer work, in Ohio or abroad.
Study Abroad
The LAS Program highly values study abroad in all Latin American contexts and will extend
credit by petition to international study experiences that fulfill program criteria
New courses
New courses, one-time only courses, sections of variable content courses, and other that
relate to Latin America may be recognized by petition for credit toward appropriate
categories.
Linguistics- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Linguistics major adviser, 166
Irvin Hall (513-529-1852).
Program Requirements
(41-44 semester hours)
Core Courses (17 semester hours)
Take all of these:
ENG 202 Varieties of English: Dialect Diversity and Language (3)
ENG 301 History of the English Language (4)
ENG/SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4) or
ATH/GER 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
Take this course:
ENG 201 Language Awareness (3)
ENG 201 is offered frequently, with each offering focusing on a different topic. Students are required to take ENG 201
once as a Core requirement; they may elect to take it up to two more times as a Related I requirement.
Choose ONE of the following:
ENG 405 Advanced Linguistics: The Research Program of Noam Chomsky (3)
ENG 406 Discourse Analysis: Speech Acts in Context (3)*
* Capstone course
Related Courses I (9 semester hours)
No more than TWO courses may be taken from one department.
CIT 154 Personal Computer Concepts and Applications (3)
CSE 151 Computers, Computer Science, and Society (3)
CSE 174 Structured Programming and Computer Algorithms (3)
CSE 274 Data Structures (3)
CSE 283 Data Communication and Networks (3)
CSE 473 Automata, Formal Languages, and Computability (3)
CSE 474 Language, Interface, and Their Processors (3)
CSE 486 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3)
ENG 201 Language Awareness (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3)
ENG 410 Topics in Linguistics (3)
FRE 341 Conversation and Current Events in France (3)
FRE 361 French Pronunciation (3)
GER 471 Linguistic Perspectives on Contemporary German (3)
PSY 374 Psychology of Language and Thought (3)
SPA 223 Language Development (3)
SPA 248 American Sign Language (3)
SPA 334 Phonetics (3)
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Composition (3)
SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3)
SPN 408 Intermediate Spanish Composition (3)
SPN 409 Advanced Spanish Composition (3)
SPN 481 Spanish Phonology and Syntax (3)
SPN 482 Spanish Dialectology (3)
SPN 483 History of the Spanish Language (3)
Related Courses II (9 semester hours)
Group 1
ATH 425 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
COM 262 Empirical Research Methods (3)
SOC 262 Research Methods (4)
SOC 462 Applied Sociological Research (3)
Group 2
ATH 265 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (4)
ATH 465 Seminar in Linguistic Anthropology (3)
COM 335 Rhetorical Theory in Western Thought (3)
COM 434 Non-Verbal Communication (3)
COM 436 Middle Childhood Language Arts (3)
EDT 427 Adolescent Language Arts I (3)
EDT 428 Adolescent Language Arts II (3)
EDT 444 Language Teaching and Learning I (3)
EDT 445 Language Teaching and Learning II (3)
MTH 483 Introduction to Formal Systems and Mathematical Logic (3)
PHL 273 Formal Logic (4)
PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)
PSY 271 Cognitive Psychology (3)
PSY 372 Learning and Cognition (4)
PSY 374 Psychology of Language and Thought (3)
PSY 470 Seminar in Cognition (3)
Concentration in Foreign Language Linguistics (9 semester hours)
Students must take additional elective credit hours or a Concentration in Foreign Language
Linguistics. Take nine semester hours in a single foreign language at the 300 level or
above.
Electives (6 Semester hours)
Take six semester hours, selected from Related I and II.
Note: Foreign language courses taken to fulfill the Related requirements may not count toward the foreign language
concentration.
Mass Communication- Bachelor of Arts
At the time of publication, the Department of Communication
was involved in a significant revision of its curriculum. For more
information, please contact the mass communication area of the
Department of Communication, 120 Williams Hall (513-529-3521).
Mass communication is a field of inquiry that examines the
processes, institutions, and effects of the media as they function in
national and international contexts. The general goals of this
curriculum are threefold: 1. to develop students' competence in the
critique of communication practices, 2. to increase students'
appreciation of the history of media communication, and 3. to
understand its impact on policies, institutions, and culture.
Students study a broad range of media issues, including critical
and cultural studies, communication technology and policy
analysis, international communication, gender and sexuality
issues, ethnic and minority studies, and more. In addition, students
experience how to put this knowledge into practice in various
forms of media production.
110/ The College of Arts and Science
Special Admission Requirements
Elective
Enter the program as a pre-communication major and take
these three courses:
Note: You may count a course in one category only.
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Students may apply for admission to the major (which is
selective) after taking the three pre-major courses and completing
30 hours. Admission is based on cumulative GPA and pre-major
GPA Requirements are subject to change, so check the department
website for current information.
Major Degree Requirements
(49 semester hours)
Program Contexts
This major has three context or focus areas: Media Production, Media Criticism, and Media
Institutions. You must have written approval from your adviser for your specific context
area.
Program Requirements: Media Production
The objective of this context is to impart a broad understanding of the production of media.
This involves understanding the basic principles underlying the use of symbolic codes,
including areas such as composition, editing, lighting, and sound recording and
processing. Areas to be covered include visual and aural aesthetics, writing, scripting, and
planning; executing and evaluating; critical textual analysis; genre and style; and ethical
use of the media.
Pre-Major Courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Mass Communication Theory and Contexts
These two:
COM 146 Media Aesthetics (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Video Production (4)
Choose TWO of the following:
COM 205 American Film as Communication (3)
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 215 Media History (3)
COM 355 Media Technology & Culture (3)
COM 445 Seminar in Mass Communication Law (3)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
Take one additional COM course (3)
Related Hours
Choose NINE hours from the following:
ART 257 Photography (3)
ART 357 Photography II (3)
ART 358 Photography III (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
ENG 320 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (3, maximum 6)
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
FST 220 Literature and Film (3)
FST 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
FST 235 Classics of Film (3)
FST 236 Alternative Traditions in Film (3)
FST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
FST 261 A Survey of German Cinema (3)
FST 262 Italian Cinema (3)
FST 263 Soviet Cinema (3)
FST 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)
FST 350 Topics in Film (3)
FST 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
FST 401 Seminar in Film Study (3)
FST 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
FST 460 Topics in French Cinema (3)
HST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
IMS 410 Digital Development Methods: Theory and Practice (4)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
JRN 202 News Writing and Reporting for Electronic Media (3)
MUS 303/IMS 304 Electronic Music (3)
PHL 241 Philosophy of Art (4)
PHL 470 Advanced Aesthetics (4)
THE 200 Production and Performance Practicum (1, maximum 8)
THE 202 Stagecraft (3)
THE 204 Stagecraft Lab (1)
THE 252 Technical Production (3)
THE 253 Costume Fundamentals (3)
THE 254 Lighting Fundamentals (3)
THE 314 Playwriting (4)
Program Requirements: Media Criticism
Research and Reasoning
Courses in this area are designed to give the student an understanding of how and why the
mass media operate and function as they do. In this program, students develop
competence in criticizing communication practices; understanding media history,
aesthetics, and the social, economic, political and cultural aspects of production. Issues
covered include: critical methods, genres, audiences, effects, and screenwriting. This
theoretical, methodological, and historical course work may be applied to all areas of media
practice. This focus may suit students who desire to go on to advanced work in media
studies or to prepare for graduate work in any number of fields.
Choose ONE of the following:
Pre-Major Courses
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 353 Audience Studies (3)
COM 414 Capstone Pictures: Project in Digital Narrative Film Production (4)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)
All of these:
Culture and Diversity
Mass Communication Theory and Contexts
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
COM 461 Gender, Sexuality and Media (3)
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
These two:
COM 146 Media Aesthetics (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Video Production (4)
Choose TWO of the following:
COM 205 American Film as Communication (3)
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 215 Media History (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
Media Production Context Specialization
Research and Reasoning
Choose THREE of the following:
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 213 Writing for Media (3)
COM 258 Writing for Electronic Media: Copywriting (3)
COM 267 Practicum in Media Production (3)
COM 311 Digital Film Production (3)
COM 312 TV Studio Production (3)
COM 314 Advanced Electronic Journalism (3)
COM 411/IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
COM 414 Capstone Pictures: Project in Digital Narrative Film Production (4)
COM 415 Practicum in Television Journalism: Video (3)
COM 421 Screenwriting Workshop (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (3) (with adviser approval)
COM 467 Practicum in Media Production (4)
JRN 202 News Writing and Reporting for Electronic Media (3)
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 353 Audience Studies (3)
COM 414 Capstone Pictures: Project in Digital Narrative Film Production (4)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)
Culture and Diversity
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
The College of Arts and Science /111
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
COM 461 Gender, Sexuality and Media (3)
Media Criticism Context Specialization
Choose THREE of the following:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 213 Writing for Media (3)
COM 259 Introduction to Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 353 Audience Studies (3)
COM 355 Media Technology & Culture (3)
COM 414 Capstone Pictures: Project in Digital Narrative Film Production (4)
COM 421 Creative Writing: Screenwriting (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval)
COM 461 Gender, Sexuality and Media (3)
Elective
Take one additional COM course (3)
Note: You may count a course in one category only.
Related Hours
Choose NINE hours from the following:
AMS 206 Approaches to American Culture (3)
ART 282 Art and Politics: The Body in Art (3)
EDL 334 Youth Subcultures: Popular Culture and the Non-Formal Education (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
ENG 298 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (3)
ENG 320 Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction (3, maximum 6)
ENG 370 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory (3, maximum 6)
ENG 420 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction Workshop (3, maximum 6)
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
FST 220 Literature and Film (3)
FST 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
FST 235 Classics of Film (3)
FST 236 Alternative Traditions in Film (3)
FST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
FST 261 A Survey of German Cinema (3)
FST 262 Italian Cinema (3)
FST 263 Soviet Cinema (3)
FST 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)
FST 350 Topics in Film (3)
FST 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
FST 401 Seminar in Film Study (3)
FST 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
FST 460 Topics in French Cinema (3)
HST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)
HST 251 Gender and Third World Film (3)
HST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
JRN 202 News Writing and Reporting for Electronic Media (3)
PHL 241 Philosophy of Art (4)
PHL 331 Political Philosophy (4)
PHL 470 Advanced Aesthetics (4)
POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
THE 314 Playwriting (4)
THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)
Program Requirements: Media Institutions
Within this focus, students should gain knowledge of the significance of overall patterns of
media ownership and control within the context of an awareness of other important sources
of power and influence within the media. In this program, students develop expertise in the
determinants of national and international media practice: ownership and control; media
institutions; the state, law and policy; self-regulation by the media; economic determinants;
audience construction and use; media personnel; organization of production practices; and
technology.
Pre-Major Courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Mass Communication Theory and Contexts
These three:
COM 146 Media Aesthetics (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Media Production (4)
COM 215 Media History (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
COM 339 Organizational Communication (3)
COM 443 Media Economics (3)
COM 445 Seminar in Mass Communication Law (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval) (3)
Research and Reasoning
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 353 Audience Studies (3)
COM 414 Capstone Pictures: Project in Digital Narrative Film Production (4)
COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3)
Culture and Diversity
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexuality and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 441 Rhetoric of Religion (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (3) (with adviser approval)
COM 461 Gender, Sexuality and Media (3)
Media Institutions Context Specialization
Choose THREE of the following:
COM 258 Writing for the Electronic Media: Copywriting (3)
COM 259 Introduction to Public Relations (3)
COM 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
COM 353 Audience Studies (3)
COM 355 Media Technology & Culture (3)
COM 411/IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
COM 414 Capstone Pictures: Project in Digital Narrative Film Production (4)
COM 426 Inside Washington (4)
COM 438 Political Communication (3)
COM 443 Media Economics (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
COM 450 Topics in Communication (with adviser approval)
Elective
Take one additional COM course (3)
Note: You may count a course in one category only.
Related Hours
Choose a total of NINE hours from the following:
ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
ACC 222 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
HST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)
HST 252 Representation of History in Film and Video (3)
JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (4)
MKT 435 Branding and Integrated Marketing Communication (4)
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
POL 307 Public Opinion Laboratory (2)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 333 Politics of Western Europe (4)
POL 345 National Issues (3)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 351 Criminal Justice (4)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 353 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (4)
POL 354 Political Parties and the Election Process (3)
POL 355 Public Opinion and Political Behavior (3)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
Notes on Curriculum:
• Students are required to take at least three major courses at 400 level.
• COM 146 is a prerequisite for all production and writing courses
• COM 167 is designed for pre-majors or non-majors as a preview of practicum experience.
Entry is limited.
• COM 177, 277, 340, 377, and 477 may count toward hours needed for graduation, but not
normally toward specific mass communication curriculum requirements.
• COM 167 and 367 may count toward hours needed to graduate, but may not be used to
satisfy theory and context or context specialization requirements.
112/ The College of Arts and Science
Mathematics- Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor
of Science
MTH 437 Game Theory and Related Topics (3)
MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3)
Electives:
For information, contact the Department of Mathematics, 123
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5818) or the Department of Statistics, 311
Upham Hall (513-529-7828).
Additional courses to complete the 28 required hours may be chosen from lists above or
from MTH 331, 410, 420, 425 (MPC), 435 (MPC), 440, 454, 470, 482 (MPC), 492, STA
401, 462. At most, two of the 28 hours may be from 430 or independent studies.
Two degrees are offered: Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of
Science. For the Bachelor of Science, choose one of two majors:
mathematics or mathematics and statistics. The A.B. requires all
sections of the College of Arts and Science Requirement (CAS),
while the B.S. has only the language requirement. Each program
has the related hours requirement. All MTH and STA courses
applied to your program, and all courses in the 12-hour section of
the related hours, should be taken for grades, not credit/no-credit.
In the MTH and STA courses, your GPA must be at least 2.00.
Service courses do not figure into your GPA unless explicitly
approved by the department.
Major in Mathematics and Statistics: Bachelor
of Science
Each degree requires the following introductory courses:
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
MTH 252H Honors Calculus III (4)
Choose ONE of the following:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 222T Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors) (2)
Major in Mathematics: Bachelor of Arts
Program Requirements:
Program Requirements:
The program requires at least 31 semester hours of MTH and
STA courses at 300 level or above with at least 22 hours from MTH
and STA courses at the 400 level.
Mathematics courses. All of these:
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3) or
MTH 451 Introduction to Complex Variables (4)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 436 Combinatorial Designs and Coding Theory (3)
MTH 437 Game Theory and Related Topics (3)
MTH 438 Theory and Applications of Graphs (3)
MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3)
Statistics courses. All of these:
This program requires at least 19 semester hours in MTH or STA courses numbered 300 or
above with at least 16 hours at the 400 level, and must include:
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)
A course chosen from ONE of these three lines:
At least one of these:
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3) or
MTH 451 Introduction to Complex Variables (4)
MTH 491 Introduction to Topology (3)
A course chosen from ONE of these five lines:
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 436 Combinatorial Designs and Coding Theory (3) or
MTH 437 Game Theory and Related Topics (3) or
MTH 438 Theory and Application of Graphs (3) or
MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
At least one more course from the eight previous lines. This course must lie on a line
different from the previous two choices.
Additional courses that count in the 19-advanced hour requirement are those in the above
lists together with MTH 331, 347, 410, 411, 420, 422, 425 (MPC), 435 (MPC), 440, 442,
454, 470, 483, 486, 492; STA 462, 463, 466, 467, 483, 484.
Students in the Bachelor of Science in Education Integrated Mathematics Program who
complete all of MTH 408, MTH 409, and MTH 482 may count three hours toward the 400
level hours required in the AB.
Major in Mathematics: Bachelor of Science
This program requires at least 28 semester hours of MTH and
STA courses at the 300 level or above with at least 22 hours at the
400 level.
Theory courses. Both of these:
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3)
Choose at least TWO of the following:
MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3)
MTH 422 Linear Algebra and Fields (4)
MTH 438 Theory and Application of Graphs (3)
MTH 442 Real Analysis (3)
MTH 451 Introduction to Complex Variables (4)
MTH 483 Introduction to Mathematical Logic (3)
MTH 486 Introduction to Set Theory (3)
MTH 491 Introduction to Topology (3)
Applications courses. Choose at least TWO of the following:
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 436 Combinatorial Designs and Coding Theory (3)
STA 462 Inferential Statistics (3)
STA 466 Experimental Design Methods (4)
Electives:
Additional courses to complete the 31 required hours from lists above or from MTH 331,
410, 411, 420, 422, 425 (MPC), 435 (MPC), 440, 442, 454, 470, 482 (MPC), 483, 486, 491,
492; STA 402, 467, 475 (MPC), 483, 484. At most, two of the 31 hours may be from 430 or
independent studies.
Important Note:
Students with previous credit for STA 261 may not take STA 301 and must take additional
hours from the electives list to complete the 31 required hours.
Related Hours
A program of related courses is intended to provide the
student with opportunities to see and do mathematics or statistics
in the context of other disciplines and, perhaps, enhance the
student's employment prospects. The departmental requirement is
for a program of at least 15 hours. Each program includes:
 A computer programming course, CSE 153, 157, 163, 174, or
any CSE course with one of these as a prerequisite.
 At least 12 semester hours in one subject area with at least
six hours at 300 level or above (200 or above in chemistry,
physics, engineering, or computer science and software
engineering).
You may elect to design your own program of related courses.
Such programs must be approved by the chief departmental
adviser in advance of applying for graduation. For a list of
pre-approved programs of related courses and those that include a
thematic sequence, see the chief departmental adviser.
Students majoring in Mathematics (Bachelor of Arts or
Bachelor of Science) may use statistics as their related area. There is
no restriction on the statistics courses that can count (service
courses are OK), but courses applied to the related area cannot also
be counted towards the requirements of the major. On the other
hand, students majoring in Mathematics and Statistics (Bachelor of
Science) cannot use statistics as their related area.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with a major
in the Department of Mathematics should apply for admission to a
licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and
The College of Arts and Science /113
Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student
Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202
McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).
To earn an A.B. degree in addition to teacher licensure, you
must complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree as
stated earlier, while also satisfying your professional education
course requirements. As a consequence, the following courses (not
all of which apply toward the A.B.) are automatically required to
be in your academic program:
These courses must include:
MTH 331 Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 408 Mathematical Problem Solving With Technology (3)
MTH 409 Secondary Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective (3)
MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3)
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 482 Great Theorems of Mathematics (3)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
One additional course is required for completion of the A.B. degree. See the A.B.
requirements for details about the selection of this course.
To earn a B.S. degree in addition to teacher licensure, you
must complete the requirements for the B.S. in Mathematics or the
B.S. in Mathematics and Statistics. Each of these programs requires
four or five additional courses. See the B.S. requirements for details
about the selection of these courses.
Core Math Courses (4-5):
One of these:
MTH 104 Precalculus with Algebra (5) or
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Practicum/Internship Courses (32 hours):
All of these:
MBI 487, 488, 489 Medical Laboratory Science Practicum (8, 12, 12)
Elective Courses (7 hours minimum):
One of these:
CHM 363 Analytical Chemistry (3)
MBI 435 Medical Mycology (3)
MBI 464 Human Viruses (3)
PHY 171 College Physics (3) and PHY 173 Physics Laboratory (1)
PHY 181 The Physical World (4) and PHY 183 Physics Laboratory (1)
ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3)
One of these:
MBI 405 Medical Microbiology (4)
MBI 415 Immunology Principles and Practice (4)
ZOO 161 Principles of Human Physiology (4)
ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4)
Microbiology- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Microbiology, 32
Pearson Hall (513-529-5422).
Medical Laboratory Science- Bachelor of
Science
For information, contact the Department of Microbiology, 32
Pearson Hall (513-529-5422).
This program is for students who are preparing for the
national examination, including sections on key lab specialties
such as molecular biology, clinical biochemistry, toxicology,
microbiology, parasitology, immunology, immunohematology
(blood bank) and hematology, for certification as Medical
Laboratory Scientists (MLS) by the American Society for Clinical
Pathology (ACP).
Special Curriculum Requirements
This program requires 128 semester hours. Required courses
include a twelve month, 32 credit clinical laboratory internship.
See program description in the Combined Programs section earlier
in this chapter. No pre-internship science or related course may be
taken on a credit/no-credit basis.
Program Requirements
(76-84 semester hours)
The Bachelor of Arts degree is designed for students
interested in a career in microbiology, the life or health sciences, or
environmental sciences. Students who anticipate graduate study
in microbiology should elect the B.S. in Microbiology program.
No course required for the major in microbiology may be
taken on a credit/no-credit basis. All 100-level microbiology that
do not satisfy departmental degree requirements courses cannot be
counted toward the GPA or the 32 hours required for the Bachelor
of Arts major in microbiology.
Program Requirements
(32 semester hours)
Core Courses (15 hours)
All of these:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4)
or
MBI 121 The Microbial World (3) and
MBI 123 Experimenting with Microbes (1)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular
Biology (4) or
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)
MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4)
MBI 365 Molecular and Cellular Biology (3)
Focus Courses (14 hours minimum)
Core Biology Courses (15 hours):
Select courses such that there is:
1) at least 1 course from each of groups A, B and C, and
2) at least 2 four-semester hour courses
All of these:
Group A courses:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular
Biology (4)
MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4)
One of these:
MBI 365 Molecular and Cellular Biology (3) or
ZOO 443 Molecular Cell Biology (3) or
ZOO 444 Molecular Biology (3)
Core Chemistry Courses (18-25 hours):
All of these:
CHM 141, or CHM 141R, 142 College Chemistry (3, 4, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
One of these:
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry
Laboratory (2, 2)
One of these:
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4) or
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4)
MBI 361 Epidemiology (3)
MBI 405 Medical Bacteriology (4)
MBI 414 Immunology Principles (3)
MBI 415 Immunology Principles and Practice (4)
MBI 435 Medical Mycology (3)
MBI 464 Human Viruses (3)
Group B courses:
MBI 465 Microbial and Molecular Genetics Laboratory (2)
MBI 475 Microbial Ecology (4)
MBI 485 Principles of Bioinformatics (3)
MBI 495 Bacterial Cell Biology (3)
Group C courses:
MBI 425 Microbial Physiology (4)
MBI 445 Microbial Genetics (3)
Note: Credit not given for both MBI 414 and MBI 415.
Elective Courses
Select up to an additional three semester hours from Microbiology
at the 200-level or higher (including from additional Focus Courses or
114/ The College of Arts and Science
from the following Elective Courses), or from Botany, Chemistry, or
Zoology (at the 300-level or higher) to complete the 32 required hours.
IES 275 Principles of Environmental Science (3)
MBI 256 Introduction to Programming for the Life Sciences (3)
MBI 333 Field Ecology (3)
MBI 364 Molecular Techniques (2)
MBI 402 Geomicrobiology (3)
MBI 424 Advanced Experimental Techniques in Structural and Functional Genomics (4)
MBI 440 Research Problems (2)
MBI 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
MBI 477 Independent Study (1-4)
MBI 480 Departmental Honors (1-3)
MBI 490 Undergraduate Seminar
Note: Credit not given for both MBI 364 and MBI 465.
Note: MBI 440, 440C, 477, 477C, 480, and 480C have a maximum of four credit hours that can receive a standard grade.
Related Hours (20-25 hours)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4) and
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and
CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) or
STA 261 Statistics (4)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) and
PHY 173, 174 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (4, 4) and
PHY 183, 184 Introduction to Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
to total at least fourteen hours.
Note: Credit not given for both MBI 414 and MBI 415.
Elective Courses
Select from additional Focus Courses or from the following Elective Courses to
complete the 40 required hours:
IES 275 Principles of Environmental Science (3)
MBI 256 Introduction to Programming for the Life Sciences (3)
MBI 333 Field Ecology (3)
MBI 364 Molecular Techniques (2)
MBI 402 Geomicrobiology (3)
MBI 424 Advanced Experimental Techniques in Structural and Functional Genomics (4)
MBI 440 Research Problems (2)
MBI 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
MBI 477 Independent Study (1-4)
MBI 480 Departmental Honors (1-3)
Note: Credit not given for both MBI 364 and MBI 465.
Note: MBI 440, 440C, 477, 477C, 480, and 480C have a maximum of four credit hours that can receive a standard grade.
Related Hours (25-29 hours)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4) and
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and
CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5) and
STA 261 Statistics (4)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) and
PHY 173, 174 Introduction to Physics Laboratory (1, 1) or
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (4, 4) and
PHY 183, 184 Introduction to Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
Microbiology- Bachelor of Science
For more information, contact the
Microbiology, 32 Pearson Hall (513-529-5422).
MBI 495 Bacterial Cellular and Developmental Biology (3)
Department
of
The Bachelor of Science in Microbiology is designed to
provide more in-depth study than the Bachelor of Arts,
particularly in preparation for pursuit of a graduate degree in
microbiology and related fields. As part of this preparation,
students are required to conduct independent research leading to
public presentation of their results.
No course required for the major in microbiology may be
taken on a credit/no-credit basis. All 100-level microbiology
courses that do not satisfy departmental degree requirements
cannot be counted toward the GPA or the 40 hours required for the
Bachelor of Science major in microbiology.
Program Requirements
(40 semester hours)
Philosophy- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Philosophy, 212
Hall Auditorium (513-529-2440).
Program Requirements
(30 semester hours)
Both of these:
PHL 301 Ancient Philosophy (4)
PHL 302 Modern Philosophy (4)
Additional courses in philosophy to total 30 semester hours. No more than two courses
may be at the 100 level, no more than two courses may be at the 200 level, and at least two
courses must be at 400 level (capstones and independent studies excluded). Choose
these courses with your adviser.
Core Courses (23 hours)
All of these:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4) or
MBI 121 Microbial World (3) and
MBI 123 Experimenting with Microbes (1)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular and Molecular
Biology (4) or
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)
MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4)
MBI 365 Molecular and Cellular Biology (3)
MBI 425 Microbial Physiology (4)
MBI 445 Microbial Genetics (3)
MBI 490 Undergraduate Seminar
Focus Courses (14 hours minimum)
Lab requirement: Select at least TWO of the following courses:
MBI 405 Medical Bacteriology (4)
MBI 415 Immunology Principles and Practice (4)
MBI 435 Medical Mycology (3)
MBI 475 Microbial Ecology (4)
MBI 485 Bioinformatics Principles (3)
Physics- Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Science
For information, contact the Department of Physics, 133 Culler
Hall (513-529-5625).
Miami offers both a Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) and a Bachelor of
Science (B.S.) in physics. The A.B. degree is for those students
wishing to acquire a good background in physical science to
complement work in other areas. The A.B. degree is especially well
suited for persons desiring teacher licensure in physics and those
preparing for careers in medicine, law, or business. The B.S. degree
prepares students for graduate study or employment in physics or
physics-related fields. Engineering physics and biological physics
are described earlier in this chapter.
Research requirement:
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts
(46-50 semester hours)
Select at least ONE of these courses:
All of these:
MBI 465 Microbial and Molecular Genetics Laboratory (2)
MBI 477 Independent Study (2)
Select additional Focus Courses, including from:
MBI 361 Epidemiology (3)
MBI 414 Immunology Principles (3)
MBI 464 Human Viruses (3)
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or
MTH 153, 251 Calculus I, II (4, 4) or
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World I, II (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
The College of Arts and Science /115
PHY 281 Contemporary Physics I (3)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation (2)
Three hours of physics courses numbered 300-399 (excluding PHY 311) or above 410 with
written approval of your physics adviser
Political Science Courses (34 semester hours minimum)
Choose political science hours from the following major fields: political theory, comparative
politics, American government, public administration, and international politics, with the
following requirements:
Ten hours of related courses with written approval from your physics adviser
Choose at least TWO of the following:
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts
and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and
restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as
outlined in the School of Education, Health and Society chapter.
For information, contact the Office of Student Services in the
School of Education, Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall
(513-529-6418).
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(63-71 semester hours)
All of these:
MTH 151, 251 Calculus I, II (5, 4) or
MTH 153, 251 Calculus I, II (4, 4) or
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World I, II (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
PHY 281 Contemporary Physics I (3)
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation (2)
PHY 437 Intermediate Thermodynamics and Introduction to Statistical Physics (4)
PHY 451 Classical Mechanics (4)
PHY 461 Electromagnetic Theory (4)
PHY 483 Mathematical Methods in Physics (4)
PHY 491 Introduction to Quantum Physics I (4)
Choose ONE advanced laboratory course from the following:
PHY 420 Advanced Laboratory Physics (4)
PHY 423 Materials Physics (4)
PHY 441 Optics and Laser Physics (4)
PHY 442 Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules (4)
PHY 471 Advanced Electronics (3)
Choose TWO courses from the following:
PHY 421 Molecular and Cellular Biophysics (4)
PHY 422 Physics for Medicine and Biology (4)
PHY 427 Nano-scale Science and Technology (3)
PHY 431 Elementary Particle Physics (3)
PHY 435 Introduction to Astrophysics (4)
PHY 481 Gravitation and Space Time (3)
PHY 488 Research Capstone in Physics (3)
PHY 490S Topics in Physics Seminar (3)
PHY 492 Introduction to Quantum Physics II (3)
Advanced laboratory courses not used to fulfill the advanced laboratory requirement
Advising tracks (recommended, not required):
Atmospheric science: AER 118 (3); MME 313 (3); MTH 347 (3)
Materials: PHY 423 (4), PHY 437 (4); MME 223 (3); CHM 141-145 (10)
Mathematical physics: MTH 347 (3) and two other advanced MTH courses
Optics: PHY 441 (4), PHY 442 (4)
Physics, graduate school: PHY 492 (3)
Political Science- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Political Science,
218 Harrison Hall (513-529-2000).
This major is for liberal arts students interested in the study of
politics and government. For this major, at least 15 of the required
34 major hours and at least nine of the required 18 related hours
must be from Miami. Required political science and related hours
may not be taken on a credit/no-credit basis. A GPA of at least 2.00
is required for political science courses as well as related hours.
Program Requirements
(at least 34 semester hours)
Take this course first:
POL 241 American Political System (4)
POL 201 Political Thinking (4)*
POL 221 Modern World Governments (4)*
POL 261 Public Administration (4)*
POL 271 World Politics (4)*
*Prerequisites for certain 300 and 400-level courses
Advanced courses:
In consultation with your faculty adviser, select at least 19 additional semester hours from
other courses in political science at 300 level or above, with at least one course selected
from two of the five major fields listed above. (Hours may include POL MP Capstone. You
are not required to take a POL capstone, but you may take one.)
Additional courses:
Additional hours from POL courses at the 200-level and higher to complete the 34 hour
requirement (100-level POL courses do NOT apply to the major).
Related Hours (18 required)
1) Take a total of 18 hours from cognate disciplines including:
AMS, ATH, BUS, COM, ECO, GEO, GTY, HST, JRN, PHL, PSY, REL, SOC or
AES 221, 222, 431, 432; BWS 151; ITS 201, 301, 302; LAS 207, 208, 415; NSC 202, 311
or 402; WGS 201,301, 401, 370E or BWS 370E.
2) At least 12 hours must be at the 200 level or higher.
3) A minimum 2.00 GPA in all related hours is required.
Important Note:
Students pursuing another major or minor in the department may not also pursue the
Political Science major. However, students may double major in Diplomacy and Global
Politics and Public Administration. Please note that because these two majors are in the
same department, their completion will not satisfy the thematic sequence requirement of
the Miami Plan.
Psychology- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Psychology, 100
Psychology Building (513-529-2400).
You must have at least a 2.00 cumulative GPA for all
psychology courses attempted and for which a letter grade has
been earned. All courses used to satisfy basic departmental
requirements must be taken for a letter grade.
Departmental Honors
Eligibility for departmental honors, the support of a faculty
advisor and a cumulative and major GPA of 3.25. Departmental
honors candidates complete PSY 480 Independent Reading for
Department Honors (minimum 4; maximum 6), in which they
write and present a thesis. PSY 400 Senior Thesis in Psychology is
recommended.
Recommended Courses of Study
This department offers a single major; all majors are
encouraged to take a variety of courses in psychology. For flexible
career planning, the department suggests courses of study
consistent with your career goals. Choose those courses with your
academic adviser. As long as you fulfill the Basic Departmental
Requirements, your plan of study need not coincide exactly with
any of those specified below.
Program Requirements (36 semester hours)
All of these:
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
PSY 293 Research Design and Analyses in Psychology I (4)
PSY 294 Research Design and Analyses in Psychology II (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Choose at least ONE course from each of the following groups:
Biopsychology: PSY 251 or 351 or 356
Cognitive: PSY 271 or 275 or 372 or 373 or 374 or 375 or 376 or 453 or 470
Developmental: PSY 231 or 331 or 332 or 333 or 334 or 430
Individual: PSY 241 or 242 or 343 or 345
Social: PSY 221 or 324 or 325 or 326 or 327 or 328 or 420
116/ The College of Arts and Science
Additional requirements:
• Minimum of two 300-level or higher and two 400-level or higher courses (one course must
be PSY 410).
• One approved topic sequence (a list of sequences is available through the department).
• Additional courses to make up minimum total of 36 semester hours in psychology
Public Administration- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Political Science,
218 Harrison Hall (513-529-2000).
The Public Administration major is designed for
undergraduates interested in studying and understanding the
issues of governance and management in government and
not-for-profit organizations, and more specifically about the link
between politics and public policy implementation. It is
appropriate for those interested in public service careers in the
federal government, state government, and/or local government
including: city and county management, public finance
administration, public personnel administration, public policy
analysis and program evaluation. This major also prepares
students for continued education in professional and graduate
schools of public administration, public policy analysis, and
related fields. It also serves as a course of pre-legal study.
At least half of the required semester hours in the Public
Administration Core and half of the required semester hours in the
Related Hours must be from Miami. Required hours in the Core
and Related Hours may not be taken credit/no-credit. A GPA of at
least 2.00 is required in the Core as well as in the Related Hours
courses.
Program Requirements
Public Administration Core (At least 40 semester hours)
Public Administration Core (take all 17 hours):
POL 241 American Political System (4)
POL 261 Public Administration (4) *
POL 306 Applied Research Methods for Public Administration (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
* POL 261 is prerequisite for 300/400-level courses in Public Administration.
Core electives (at least 18 hours):
Choose at least 12 hours from this list:
POL 307 Public Opinion Laboratory (2)
POL 351 Criminal Justice (4)
POL 362 Public Management, Leadership, and Administrative Politics (3)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 460 Seminar on Public Administration and Policy Analysis (4)
POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
Not more than 6 hours from the following professional related courses can be
counted**
*** Requires Senior standing, completion of the core requirements and 15 hours from
above.
Internships
Public administration internships (POL 340B) for majors are
coordinated through the Center for Public Management and
Regional Affairs, 2 Harrison Hall. Internships provide an added
dimension to your educational experience. Internship credits do
not fulfill any requirements for the Public Administration major.
For information, consult the director of the center.
Religion- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Comparative
Religion, 164 Upham Hall (513-529-4300).
Program Requirements
(24 semester hours)
REL 302 Methods for the Study of Religion (4)
At least 12 semester hours in religion at 300 level or above (including REL 302)
Additional courses in religion, chosen with your adviser
Note: No more than six semester hours at 100 level can count toward the major. REL 209
does not count toward the major; however, it may count as related hours.
Related Hours (18 required)
These should be chosen with your adviser; 10 of these hours must be 300-level or above.
Russian, East European, and Eurasian
Studies- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
This interdisciplinary major allows students to study the
history, politics, and culture of Russia, Eastern Europe, and
Eurasia, broadly defined as the territory of the former Soviet
republics, from medieval times to today. Drawing from a range of
disciplines and approaches, students have the opportunity to
explore issues of political, social, and regional identity and cultural
diversity, as well as official and popular culture. Students select a
Language, Literature and Culture emphasis or a History and
Politics emphasis.
Proficiency at the level of Russian 202 or above is required.
Students are encouraged to attend the Miami summer Russian
language workshop in Novgorod, Russia, the Miami summer
Havighurst cultural workshop in varying locations in Russia,
Eastern Europe, and Eurasia or an approved academic study
program in Central Asia, the Caucasus, or Eastern Europe.
ACC 468 Accounting for Governmental Organizations (2)
ACC 469 Accounting for Nongovernmental Not-For-Profit Organizations (1)
AMS 302 Transnational America (3)
COM 339 Introduction to Organizational Communication (3)
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
ECO 406 Environmental Economics (3)
ECO 435 Urban and Regional Economics (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
HST 379 U.S. Consumerism, 1890-Present (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)
IES 450 Environmental Law (3)
JRN 312 Public Affairs Reporting (3)
SOC 454 Formal Organization (3)
Program Requirements
(36 semester hours)
** Courses appropriate to the major, but not listed as core electives, may in some cases be
counted toward the major with the written approval of the student’s public administration
adviser.
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3)
RUS 250 Topics in Russian Literature (3; maximum 9)
RUS 255, 256, 257, 258 Russian Literature in English Translation (3, 3, 3, 3)
RUS/FST 263 Soviet & Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
RUS/FST 272 East European Literature and Film (3)
RUS 401 St. Petersburg: History, Literature, Culture (3)
RUS 411, 412 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3, 3)
RUS 450 Topics in Russian Culture (3, max. 9)
RUS 451 Golden Age of Russian Culture (3)
Senior Capstone Seminars (5 hours):
Seniors must take the two capstone courses (concurrently):
POL 406 Public Policy Analysis Lab (2) ***
POL 466 Public Policy Analysis (3) ***
Core requirements:
All of these:
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
RUS 201, 202 Intermediate Russian (3, 3)
Choose one Area of Emphasis:
I. Language, Literature, and Culture Emphasis (27 hours)
All of these:
RUS 301, 302 Advanced Russian (3, 3)
RUS 311 Readings in Russian (3)
Choose THREE of the following:
The College of Arts and Science /117
RUS 480 Departmental Honors (4-6)
Choose THREE of the following:*
ARC 404 Architecture of Russia (3)
ATH/GEO/RUS 306 Peoples and Cultures of Russia and Eurasia (3)
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3)
CLS/RUS 214 Russian Reception of Classical Culture (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (2)
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History (3)
HST/RUS 436/536/POL 440/540 Havighurst Colloquium (4)
HST 360Y Cultural Hist:Cold War US/USSR (3)
HST 374 History of the Russian Empire (3)
HST 375 The Soviet Union and Beyond (3) (3)
HST 428/528 Russia's War and Peace (3)
HST 470 Topics in Russian History (3)
ITS 402O Transition to Democracy in Eastern Europe and the Post-Soviet Region (3)
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 331 Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991 (3)
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3)
POL 334 Politics of Eastern Europe (3)
POL 430B Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe (4)
POL 471 The International System (3)
POL 488 Russia and the Republics (3)
REL 235 Religions of Russia and Eurasia (3)
REL 236 Eastern Christianity (3)
THE 223 Introduction to Czech Travel and Culture (1)
* or appropriate courses substituted with approval from your Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies adviser
II. History and Politics Emphasis (27 hours)
All of these (9 hours):
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
RUS 201, 202 Intermediate Russian (3, 3)
Choose TWO of the following:
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History (3)
HST 374 History of the Russian Empire (3)
HST 375 The Soviet Union and Beyond (3)
HST 428 Russia's War and Peace (3)
HST 470 Topics in Russian History (3)
Choose TWO of the following (6 hours):
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 331 Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991 (3)
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3)
POL 334 Politics of Eastern Europe (3)
POL 420A Gender, Citizenship, and Postcommunism (3)
POL 430B Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe (4)
POL 471 The International Systems (3)
POL 488 Russia and the Republics (3)
ITS 402O Transition to Democracy in Eastern Europe and the Post-Soviet Region (3)
Choose TWO of the following (6 hours):
ATH/GEO/RUS 306 Peoples and Cultures of Russia and Eurasia (3)
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (2)
HST/RUS 436/536/POL 440/540 Havighurst Colloquium (4)
REL 235 Religions of Russia and Eurasia (3)
REL 236 Eastern Christianity (3)
THE 223 Introduction to Czech Travel and Culture (1)
Choose THREE of the following (9 hours):*
ARC 404 Architecture of Russia (3)
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3)
RUS 250 Topics in Russian Literature (3; maximum 9)
RUS 255, 256, 257, 258 Russian Literature in English Translation (3, 3, 3, 3)
RUS/FST 263 Soviet & Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
RUS/FST 272 Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe: An Introduction through Literature
and Film (3)
RUS 301, 302 Advanced Russian (3, 3)
RUS 311 Readings in Russian (3)
RUS 401 St. Petersburg: History, Literature, Culture (3)
RUS 411, 412 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3, 3)
RUS 450 Topics in Russian Culture (3, max. 9)
* or appropriate courses substituted with approval from your Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies adviser
Social Justice Studies- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
The Bachelor of Arts in Social Justice Studies (SJS) offers a
sociologically-based foundation of knowledge and skills to
examine the essential connections between social values,
structured inequalities, and social change. A comprehensive,
integrated curriculum offers two tracks – Social Justice and
Inequalities (Track 1) or Crime, Law and Social Justice (Track 2) –
and a required praxis component.
Note: A student may not declare a double major in SOC and SJS if
he/she is taking Track 1 or Track 2 of the SJS major.
A student may NOT major in SJS Track 2 and minor in Criminology.
Program Requirements: Basic Major
Core Courses: Take ALL of these (17 credit hours):
SJS/SOC 165 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3)
SJS/SOC 323 Social Justice and Change (3)
SJS/SOC 470 Social/Political Activism (3)
SOC 262 Research Methods (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Track 1- Social Justice and Inequalities
SOC LEVEL 1: Take at least 6 credit hours from the following list:
SJS/WST 103 Introduction to Community Service and Learning (2)
SJS/WST 203 Service-Learning: Theory into Action (2)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC/WGS 203 Sociology of Gender Roles (3)
SOC 205 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization (3)
SOC/FSW/WGS 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC 225 Work and Occupational Justice (3)
SOC 260A Internship: An Introduction to Applied Sociology and Human Services
(maximum 4 credit hours counts toward major)
SJS/SOC/BWS/GTY/DST 265 Critical Inquiry: The Penny Lecture Series (2)
SOC/DST/EDP/WGS 278 Women and (Dis)ability: Fictions and Contaminations of Identity
(3)
SOC LEVEL 2: Take at least 9 hours from the following list:
SJS/SOC 487 Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights (3)
SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
SOC/BWS 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC/DST/EDP/WGS 375 (Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and
Pride from Practice (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)
SOC 448 African-American Experience (3)
SOC/GTY/WGS 463 Gender and Aging (3)
WST 341 Interdisciplinary Synthesis and Action (3)
RELATED HOURS: Complete the required 8 hours for the major from the list below:
AMS 301 Practice in American Studies (3)
AMS 302 Transnational America (3)
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3)
ATH 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class (3)
ATH 358 Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees (3)
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4)
BWS 267 National Cinemas: African Film (3)
BWS 370E Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)
CLS 321 Justice and the Law in Antiquity (3)
COM 389 Great Issues in American History: Rhetoric and Reality (3)
DST 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3)
ECO 131 Economic Perspectives on Inequality in America (3)
ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems (3)
ECO 347 Economic Development (3)
ECO 356 Poverty and Income Distribution (3)
ECO 361 Labor Economics (3)
ECO 462 Economics of Compensation (3)
EDL 282 Cultural Studies, Power, and Education (3)
EDL 401 Cultural Studies and the Complexity of Empowerment (3)
EDP 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3)
IES 414 Latin American Environmental Affairs (3)
IES 450 Environmental Law (3)
FSW 206 Social Welfare: Impact on Diverse Groups (4)
FSW 207 Serving and Supporting Children, Youth and Families I (4)
FSW 208 Serving and Supporting Children, Youth and Families II (5)
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (3)
FSW 309 Social Welfare Policy II (3)
FSW 362 Family Poverty (3)
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3)
GEO 211 Global Change (3)
GEO 378 Political Geography (3)
GTY 260 Global Aging (3)
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
GTY 472 Race, Ethnicity and Aging (3)
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
KNH 274 Critical Perspectives on the Body (3)
LAS 207 Latin America Before 1910 (3)
LAS 208 Introduction to Latin America (3)
LAS 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
LAS 260 Latin America in the United States (3)
118/ The College of Arts and Science
LAS 315 Latin American Diaspora: Communities, Conditions and Issues (3)
LAS 319 Revolution in Latin America (3)
LAS 414 Latin American Environmental Affairs (3)
LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (3)
PHL 311 Ethical Theory (4)
PHL 312 Contemporary Moral Problems (4)
PHL 331 Political Philosophy (4)
PHL 335 Philosophy of Law (4)
PHL 355 Feminist Theory (4)
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
PHL 475 Justice in Health Care (4)
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (4)
POL 159 U.S. Identity Politics (3)
POL 201 Political Thinking (4)
POL 302 Classical Political Philosophy (4)
POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 345 National Issues (3)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 347 Women and the Law (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
POL 382 International Law (3)
POL 386 Global Competition (3)
POL 439 North American Politics: Unity and Diversity (3)
PSY 210 Psychology Across Cultures (3)
REL 333 Religion, Dress and Status (3)
SPA 211 Deaf Culture and Community (3)
WGS 201 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3)
WGS 202 Introduction to GLBT Studies (3)
WGS 301 Women and Difference (3)
WGS 436 Women, Gender and the Environment (3)
Students may complete an independent study (SOC 177, 277, 377, 477) if content is
relevant (must be pre-approved by CDA).
Students may complete a special topics course (SOC 410, 490) if content is relevant (must
be pre-approved by CDA).
Track 2: Crime, Law and Social Justice
Note: For students enrolled in Track 2 only, SJS/SOC 470 can be
substituted with SOC/FSW 451: Family Violence.
A student may NOT major in SJS Track 2 and minor in Criminology.
Complete Core requirements as indicated.
SOC LEVEL 1: Take ONE of these (4 credit hours)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)
SOC LEVEL 2: Take FOUR of these (12 or 13 credit hours)
SOC 352 Criminology (3)
SOC 409 Systems of Justice (3)
SOC 410 Topics in Criminology (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 440C Field Experience in Sociology (maximum 4 credit hours counts toward major)
SOC/FSW 451 Family Violence (3) MPC
RELATED HOURS: Complete the required hours for the major from the list below:
AES 431 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty (3)
AES 432 National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty (3)
BLS 342 Legal Environment of Business (3)
BLS 437 Cyberlaw (3)
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, and Business (3)
BTE 108 Introduction to Business Law (3)
CJS 231 Law and Individual Rights (4)
CLS 321 Justice and the Law in Antiquity (3)
COM 445 Electronic Media Policy and Regulation (3)
CSE 262 Technology, Ethics, and Global Society (3)
ECO 325 Economic Analysis of Law (3)
EDL 334 Youth Subcultures, Popular Culture, and Non-Formal Education (3)
FSW 465 Child Maltreatment (2)
HST 329 Lynching in America 1865-1940 (3)
HST 348 Witch Crazes and Other ‘Great Fears’ in Europe and America (3)
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
JRN 301 Journalism Law and Ethics (3)
KNH 205 Understanding Drugs for the Health Promotion Professional (3)
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (3)
PHL 311 Ethical Theory (4)
PHL 312 Contemporary Moral Problems (4)
PHL 331 Political Philosophy (4)
PHL 335 Philosophy of Law (4)
POL 276 Homeland Security and Critical Incident Management (3)
POL 347 Women and the Law (3)
POL 351 Criminal Justice (4)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3)
PSY 242 Abnormal Psychology (3)
PSY 328 Psychology of Stigma and Victimization (3)
Students may complete an independent study (SOC 177, 277, 377, 477) if content is
relevant (must be pre-approved by CDA).
Students may complete a special topics course (SOC 490) if content is relevant (must be
pre-approved by CDA).
Sociology- Bachelor of Arts
For information. contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
This major is for liberal arts students interested in the study of
society, structures, social processes, and human interaction. These
range from two-person interactions to relations between large
social institutions to relations between nations.
All sociology majors must take a minimum of nine semester
hours in sociology on the Oxford campus. Required sociology
courses and related hours (excluding fieldwork) may not be taken
credit/no-credit; however, hours in excess of the required
minimum may be taken credit/no-credit. A GPA of at least 2.00 is
required for this major, and only three hours of independent study
may be included. Not all courses are offered each semester or year;
consult with your sociology adviser before registering each
semester. A sociology capstone class is required for the major. If
you complete more than one sociology capstone class, the hours
from the additional course(s) will count as elective hours.
PLEASE NOTE: A student may not declare a double major in SOC and
SJS if he/she is taking Track 1 or Track 2 of the SJS major.
Program Requirements: Basic Major
(36 semester hours)
Note: All 300 and 400 level sociology courses require SOC 151 or SOC
153 as a prerequisite. Prerequisites may be waived with permission of
instructor. Credit toward the sociology major cannot be granted for
both SOC 151 and SOC 153.
All of these:
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3)
SOC 262 Research Methodology (4)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC 482 Sociological Theory (4)
A Sociology Capstone Course
Select at least ONE of the following:
SOC 459 Sociology Capstone (3)
SOC 462 Applied Sociological Research (3)
SOC 470 Social/Political Activism (3)
SOC 494 Disability in Global and Local Contexts (3)
Related hours
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Note: We recommend taking STA 261 after SOC 262.
Additional hours in sociology to make up the 36 required hours: Elective hours:
At least 9 hours must be at or above the 300 level:
SOC 165 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)
SOC 203 Sociology of Gender (3)
SOC 205 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization (3)
SOC 207 China and Globalization (3)
SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
SOC 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC 225 Work and Occupational Justice (3)
SOC 257 Population (3)
SOC 258 Self and Society (3)
SOC 260A Internship: An Introduction to Applied Sociology and Human Services
SOC 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3)
SOC 278 Women and (Dis)ability: Fictions and Contaminations of Identity (3)
SOC 279 African Americans in Sport (3)
SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
SOC 323 Social Justice and Change (3)
SOC 335 Sociology of Education (4)
SOC 337/338 Directed Research in European Studies (1-4)
SOC 347 Urban Sociology (3)
The College of Arts and Science /119
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 352 Criminology (3)
SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
SOC 358 Sociology of Mental Disorders (3)
SOC 363 Sociology of Families (3)
SOC 375 (Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and Pride from Practice
(3)
SOC 378 Media Illusions: Creations of "The Disabled" Identity (3)
SOC 383 Sociology of Religion (3)
SOC 409/509 Systems of Justice (3)
SOC 410/510 Topics in Criminology (3)
SOC 411 Social Conflict (3)
SOC 412/512 Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 413/513 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 417/517 Economy and Society (3)
SOC 435/535 Sociology of Death (3)
SOC 440A Applied Field Research (1-16)
SOC 440C Field Experience in Sociology (4-16)
SOC 448 African American Experience (3)
SOC 451/551 Family Violence (3)
SOC 454/554 Formal Organizations (3)
SOC 462 Applied Sociological Research (3)
SOC 463/563 Gender and Aging (3)
SOC 470 Social/Political Activism (3)
SOC 480 Independent Reading for Departmental Honors (1-6)
SOC 487 Globalization, Social Justice and Human Rights (3)
SOC 490/590 Horizons in Sociology (1-3; max. 6)
SOC 494 Disability in Global and Local Contexts (3)
Spanish- Bachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Spanish and
Portuguese, 268 Irvin Hall (513-529-4500).
No courses in Spanish may be taken credit/no-credit.
Courses taken cannot fulfill more than one requirement for the
Spanish major.
Program Requirements
(36 semester hours in SPN)
Note: SPN 101, 102 Beginner’s Course, SPN 111 Intensive Basic Spanish, SPN 201, 202
Second Year Spanish, and SPN 211 Intensive Intermediate Spanish, do not count in the
required 36 hours.
Required Courses
This one:
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Introductory Composition (3)
These two:
SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Language/Linguistics (3)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
Choose ONE of the following sequences:
SPN 351, 352 Cultural History of Spain I, II (3, 3)
SPN 361, 362 Spanish American Cultural History I, II (3, 3)
SPN 381, 382 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture I, II (3,3)
Nine semester hours from the following (at least 6 hours at the 400/500 level):
SPN 420 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spain (3)
SPN 430 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spanish America (3)
SPN 440 Selected Topics in Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture (3)
SPN 451/551 Studies in Spanish Narrative (3)
SPN 452/552 Studies in Spanish Poetry (3)
SPN 453/553 Studies in Spanish Theatre (3)
SPN 454/554 Don Quixote (3)
SPN 461/561 Studies in Spanish American Narrative (3)
SPN 462/562 Studies in Modern Spanish American Drama (3)
SPN 463/563 Studies in Spanish American Poetry (3)
SPN 464/564 Studies in the Spanish American Essay (3)
SPN 481/581 Spanish Phonology and Syntax (3)
SPN 482/582 Spanish Dialectology (3)
SPN 483/583 History of the Spanish Language (3)
SPN 484/584 Second Language Acquisition: Spanish (3)
This one:
SPN 490 Senior Seminar/Capstone (3)
Nine semester hours from these:
Choose ONE course from the following:
SPN 316 Intermediate Spanish Composition (3)
SPN 317 Business Spanish (3)
SPN 342 Advanced Conversation (3)
Choose TWO courses from the following:
SPN 351 Cultural History of Spain I (3)
SPN 352 Cultural History of Spain II (3)
SPN 361 Spanish American Cultural History I (3)
SPN 362 Spanish American Cultural History II (3)
SPN 381 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture I (3)
SPN 382 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture II (3)
Related Hours (17 required)
Eight hours of Portuguese:
POR 111 Accelerated Introduction to Portuguese (4)
POR 211 Second Year Portuguese (4)
Nine hours from the following.
May include any courses in another foreign language, ancient or modern, or
any of these:
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archaeology (3)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
HST 307, 308 Latin America from Discovery to the Present (3, 3)
HST 487 Mexico Since 1810 (4)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (3)
POL 378 Latin America: Region and the World (3)
POL 478 Media and Politics in Latin America and the Caribbean (3) (MPC)
REL 317 Religions of Meso-America (3)
THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
THE 491 Theatre History: Classic through Neo-Classic (3)
THE 492 Theatre History: Restoration through Late 19th Century (3)
THE 493 American Theatre (3)
Any Latin American Studies course
Any literature course in the English department
Students with specific needs can work out other plans of related hours with their advisers.
A second major substitutes for the 17 related hours.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with an Arts
and Science major must observe the rules, procedures, and
restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort as
outlined in the School of Education Health and Society chapter. For
information, contact the Office of Student Services in the School of
Education Health and Society, 202 McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).
Speech Communication- Bachelor of Arts
At the time of publication, the Department of Communication
was involved in a significant revision of its curriculum. For more
information, contact the speech communication area of the
Department of Communication, 162 Bachelor Hall (513-529-7472).
Speech communication is the study of how our sense of social
and individual reality is created through human communication
processes. Through in-depth study of communication theories,
methodologies, and contexts, we explore how communication is
included in the development, maintenance, and termination of
relationships in interpersonal, small group, organizational, and
public contexts. Specific focus options are described in Program
Options below.
Special Admission Requirements
Enter the program as a pre-communication major and take
these three courses:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Students may apply for admission to the major (which is
selective) after taking the three pre-major courses and after
completing 30 hours. Admission is based on cumulative GPA and
pre-major GPA Requirements are subject to change, so check the
department website for current information.
Internship
Qualified speech communication majors are encouraged to
participate in internships. Speech communication area faculty
select internship recipients; criteria include, but are not restricted
to, GPA (minimum 2.75 overall and 3.00 in all classes taken for the
major), academic preparation for the particular internship, junior
120/ The College of Arts and Science
or senior standing, and faculty recommendations. Internship
application procedures should be completed by February 12 for
summer, by June 11 for fall semesters, and by October 14 for spring
semester. Speech communication area faculty are not obligated to
provide all students with internships.
Program Options
This major has two areas of focus: interpersonal/relational
communication and organizational communication. Both lead to
the A.B. with a major in speech communication. You must have
written approval from your adviser for your specific area of focus.
Program Requirements: Interpersonal/Relational Communication
The objective of this focus is to create a detailed
understanding of how people use verbal and nonverbal
communication to define, negotiate, and change their
relationships. This focus increases awareness of key variables,
including individual differences (e.g., personality and
demographic factors) and cultural/social influences (e.g., AIDS,
computer technology) on various types of relationships (e.g.,
professional, romantic, family). A thorough, systematic
examination of relevant theory and research regarding
interpersonal/relational communication is offered. This focus is
intended for students planning to enter graduate programs in
speech communication (and related disciplines) and/or to apply
this knowledge to their personal and professional lives.
Major Degree Requirements
(46 semester hours)
Pre-major courses
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Communication theory
COM 239 Theories of Communication (3)
Research Methods
Choose TWO of the following:
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4)* or
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) and
COM 262 Communication Research (3)
FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (3)
FSW 312 Human Behavior in the Social Environment (3)
FSW 361 Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change (3)
FSW 381 Parent/Child Relationships in Diverse Families (3)
FSW 461 Marital Distress and Divorce: Implications for Family Life Professionals (3)
FSW 464 Perspectives on Close Relationships (3)
FSW 466 Later Life Families (3)
FSW 475 Family Theories (3)
FSW 498 Critical Thinking About Family Relationships (4)
GTY 472 Minority Aging (3)
ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MGT 381 Managerial Development Seminar (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
PHL 312 Contemporary Moral Problems (4)
PSY 221 Social Psychology (3)
PSY 241 Personality (3)
PSY 325 Psychology of Prejudice and Minority Experience (3)
PSY 326 Psychology of Women (3)
PSY 328 Psychology of Stigma and Victimization (3)
PSY 344 Analysis of Interpersonal Behavior in Small Groups (3)
SOC 203 Sociology of Gender (3)
SOC 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC 258 Self and Society (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 361 Sociology of Families (3)
SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
SOC 463 Gender and Aging (3)
SPA 233 Perspective of the Human Face (3)
Program Requirements: Organizational Communication
The purpose of this focus is to prepare students to understand,
explain, and predict how communication affects organizational
systems and performance. Students are encouraged to apply
communication theories and methods to a variety of organizational
issues. Students gain a better understanding of how people interact
to perform tasks, how communication can be improved in the
organization, and how the organization can be improved through
communication.
Major Degree Requirements
(46 semester hours)
Pre-major courses
Context Area
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Choose NINE hours from the following:
Communication theory
* Prerequisite for COM 262
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 231 Small Group Communication (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 336 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3)*
COM 339 Introduction to Organizational Communication (3)
COM 428 Communication in Conflict Management (3)
COM 434 Nonverbal Communication (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
* Required course
COM 239 Theories of Communication (3)
Research Methods
Choose TWO of the following:
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4)* or
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) and
COM 262 Communication Research (3)
Culture and Diversity
* Prerequisite for COM 262
Context Area
Choose ONE of the following:
These TWO:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 212 Media Representation (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexualities and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
COM 461 Gender, Sexuality and Media (3)
Elective
Take one additional COM course
Note: You may count a course in one category only.
Related Hours (12 required)*
AMS 392 Sex and Gender in American Culture (3)
ATH 265 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (4)
ATH 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3)
EDL 334 Youth Subcultures, Popular Culture, and the Non-Formal Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3)
EDP 356 Human Development (3)
FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across Life Cycle (3)
FSW 262 Current Controversies (4)
COM 339 Introduction to Organizational Communication (3)
COM 439 Advanced Organizational Communication (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 231 Small Group Communication (3)
COM 259 Introduction to Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
COM 336 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3)
COM 428 Communication in Conflict Management (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 443 Media Economics (3)
Culture and Diversity
Choose ONE of the following:
COM 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities (3)
COM 282 Sexualities and Film (3)
COM 436 Intercultural Communication (3)
COM 446 Media Globalization (3)
COM 461 Gender, Sexuality and Media (3)
The College of Arts and Science /121
Elective
Take one additional COM course
Note: You may count a course in one category only.
Related Hours (12 hours required):
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 385 Government and Business (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3)
EDP 301 Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
EDP 356 Human Development (3)
ENG 315 Business Writing (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
ISA 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
ISA 281 Application Development Tools and Environment (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
MGT 302 Operations Management (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MGT 381 Managerial Communication and Consulting (3)
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
MGT 404 Compensation Management (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MGT 406 Staffing Organizations (3)
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
MGT 416 Organizational Change Management (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
POL 362 Public Management, Leadership, and Administrative Politics (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 381 Global Governance (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
PSY 262 Business Psychology (3)
SOC 205 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization (3)
SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
SOC 335 Sociology of Education (3)
SOC 347 Urban Sociology (3)
SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)
SOC 454 Formal Organization (3)
Speech Pathology and AudiologyBachelor of Science
For information, contact the Department of Speech Pathology
and Audiology, 2 Bachelor Hall (513-529-2500).
Miami offers the Bachelor of Science in speech pathology and
audiology. The State of Ohio requires a series of graduate courses
in order to practice as a speech pathologist or audiologist; you
cannot be licensed in Ohio without the required graduate courses.
More information is available from the Department of Speech
Pathology and Audiology and on the Department's website.
Special Admission Requirements
Enter the program as a pre-speech pathology and audiology
major and take these four courses:
SPA Pre-major courses: (12 hours)
SPA 127 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3)
SPA 222 Anatomy of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (3)
SPA 223 Theories of Language (3)
SPA 225 Neuroscience and Communication Behavior (3)
Students may apply for admission to the major after taking the
four pre-major courses and if they have earned a cumulative GPA
of 3.00 and a 3.00 in the SPA pre-major courses. No tests or
interviews are required for consideration as a major student.
SPA Required major courses: (22 hours)
SPA 316 Introduction to Audiology (3)
SPA 326 Therapy for the Hearing Handicapped (3)
SPA 334 Clinical Phonetics and Articulation Disorders (3)
SPA 393 Junior Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology (1)
SPA 402 Counseling Strategies for Speech Pathologists and Audiologists (3)
SPA 426 Language Disorders (3)
SPA 427 Alternative Communication Systems for the Severely Handicapped (2)
SPA 435 Speech and Hearing Science (3)
SPA 493 Senior Seminar in Speech Pathology and Audiology (1)
SPA Required related courses: (24-25 hours)
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Educational Environments (3) or
EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (3) or
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)
FSW 281 Child Development (4)
PHY 131 Physics for Music (3) or
PHY 101 Physics and Society (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (4)
SPA elective courses:
SPA 211 Deaf Culture and Community (3)
SPA/DST 212 Deaf Culture: Global, National and Local Issues (3)
SPA 233 Perspectives of the Human Face (3)
SPA 248 American Sign Language I (3)
SPA 413 Senior Seminar in Communication Disorders (3)
SPA 416 Research Design (3)
Statistics- Bachelor of Science
For information, contact the Department of Statistics, 311
Upham Hall (513-529-7828).
Two majors are available in the Bachelor of Science degree:
statistics or mathematics and statistics. Each program has the
related hours requirement. All courses taken from the departments
and applied to your program, and all courses in the 12-hour section
of the related hours, should be taken for grades, not
credit/no-credit. In the courses taken from the departments, your
GPA must be at least 2.00. Service courses do not figure into your
GPA unless explicitly approved by the department.
Major in Statistics: Bachelor of Science
The program requires at least 29 hours of STA courses at the 300-level or above.
Statistics courses (all of these):
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
STA 402 Statistical Programming (3)
STA 462 Inferential Statistics (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)
STA 466 Experimental Design Methods (4)
Choose at least THREE of the following:
STA 333 Nonparametric Statistics (3)
STA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3)
STA 432 Survey Sampling in Business (3)
STA 427 Introduction to Bayesian Statistics (3)
STA 467 Multivariate Analysis (3)
STA 475 Data Analysis Practicum (3) MPC
STA 483 Analysis of Forecasting Systems (3)
STA 484 Analysis of Categorical Data (3)
Note: Students with previous credit for STA 261 may not take
STA 301 and must take additional hours from the electives list to
complete the 29 required hours.
Major in Mathematics and Statistics: Bachelor
of Science
The program requires at least 31 semester hours of MTH and
STA courses at 300 level or above with at least 22 hours from MTH
and STA courses at the 400 level.
Mathematics courses. All of these:
MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 441 Real Analysis (3) or
MTH 451 Introduction to Complex Variables (4)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 436 Combinatorial Designs and Coding Theory (3)
MTH 437 Game Theory and Related Topics (3)
MTH 438 Theory and Applications of Graphs (3)
MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3)
Statistics courses. All of these:
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
STA 462 Inferential Statistics (3)
STA 466 Experimental Design Methods (4)
122/ The College of Arts and Science
Electives:
Additional courses to complete the 31 required hours from lists above or from MTH 331,
410, 411, 420, 422, 425 (MPC), 435 (MPC), 440, 442, 454, 470, 482 (MPC), 483, 486, 491,
492; STA 402, 427, 467, 475 (MPC), 483, 484. At most, two of the 31 hours may be from
430 or independent studies.
Important Note:
Students with previous credit for STA 261 may not take STA 301 and must take additional
hours from the electives list to complete the 31 required hours.
Related Hours
A program of related courses is intended to provide the
student with opportunities to see and do mathematics or statistics
in the context of other disciplines and, perhaps, enhance the
student's employment prospects. The departmental requirement is
for a program of at least 15 hours. Each program includes:
 A computer programming course, CSE 153, 157, 163, 174, or
any CSE course with one of these as a prerequisite.
 At least 12 semester hours in one subject area with at least
six hours at 300 level or above (200 or above in chemistry,
physics, engineering, or computer science and software
engineering).
You may elect to design your own program of related courses.
Such programs must be approved by the chief departmental
adviser in advance of applying for graduation. For a list of
pre-approved programs of related courses and those that include a
thematic sequence, see the chief departmental adviser.
Teacher Licensure
Students who wish to combine teacher licensure with a major
in the Department of Mathematics should apply for admission to a
licensure cohort as outlined in the School of Education, Health and
Society chapter. For information, contact the Office of Student
Services in the School of Education, Health and Society, 202
McGuffey Hall (513-529-6418).
To earn an A.B. degree in addition to teacher licensure, you
must complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree as
stated earlier, while also satisfying your professional education
course requirements. As a consequence, the following courses (not
all of which apply toward the A.B.) are automatically required to
be in your academic program:
These courses must include:
MTH 331 Discrete Mathematics (3)
MTH 408 Mathematical Problem Solving With Technology (3)
MTH 409 Secondary Mathematics from an Advanced Perspective (3)
MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3)
MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
MTH 482 Great Theorems of Mathematics (3)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
One additional course is required for completion of the A.B. degree. See the A.B.
requirements for details about the selection of this course.
To earn a B.S. degree in addition to teacher licensure, you
must complete the requirements for the B.S. in Mathematics or the
B.S. in Mathematics and Statistics. Each of these programs requires
four or five additional courses. See the B.S. requirements for details
about the selection of these courses.
Strategic Communication- Bachelor of
Arts
At the time of publication of this Bulletin, majors in the
Department of Communication are being revised. For more
information, please contact the department or the College of Arts
and Science advising office in 146 Upham Hall.
Strategic communication is the study of how organizations
and individuals use communication to negotiate their role in
society. Public relations is a central aspect of strategic
communication and involves the study of how organizations
utilize responsible behavior and two-way communication in order
to influence opinions and behavior of key publics (e.g., employees,
consumers, government, community, media) as well as to respond
and adapt to the concerns of these publics.
Students explore communication contexts, theories, and
processes as a means of understanding and critically analyzing
social influence. In addition, students learn to evaluate challenges
and engage in strategic communication to respond to them. This
degree is for those planning to enter graduate school in
communication and related disciplines, including law school,
and/or to apply this knowledge to their chosen career (e.g.,
corporate, nonprofit, governmental, social issues, public relations,
public affairs, or related areas that call for a strong liberal arts
background).
You are encouraged to join Miami University’s chapter of the
Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), a national
organization for students. PRSSA members learn more about
public relations and strategic communication, network with other
students and professionals across the country, gain practical
hands-on experience through a variety of committee activities and
a student-run public relations firm, locate job and internship
opportunities, serve their community, and develop strong
leadership skills. More information is available in the Department
of Communication office.
Special Admission Requirements
Enter the program as a pre-communication major and take these three courses:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Students may apply for admission to the major (which is
selective) after taking the three pre-major courses and after
completing 30 hours. Admission is based on cumulative GPA and
pre-major GPA Requirements are subject to change, so check the
department website for current information.
Program Requirements
(49 semester hours)
Pre-major courses
All of these:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Communication theory and research courses
All of these:
COM 239 Theories of Communication (3)
COM 259 Introduction to Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
COM 262 Introduction to Quantitative Communication Research (3)
COM 359 Strategic Communication Planning (3)
COM 431 Persuasion Theory and Research (3) or
COM 437 Advocacy in Contemporary America (3)
COM 459 Capstone in Strategic Communication and Public Relations (3)
Six (6) hours of COM electives (mass communication or speech communication courses)
Note: No more than 4 hours of COM 440, Internship and/or Independent Study may be
counted in this category.
Related application courses - statistics, marketing, and journalism
JRN 201 News Reporting and Writing for All Media I (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
Choose ONE course from the following:
COM 258 Copywriting for Electronic Media (3) (Prerequisite: COM 146)
JRN 202 Reporting and News Writing II (3)
JRN 312 Public Affairs Reporting (3)
JRN 316 Editing and Design (3) (3)
JRN 318 Advanced Storytelling in Journalism (3)
Choose THREE hours from the following:
ENG 411 Visual Rhetoric (3) or
three (3) hours from IMS, CSE or ISA
The College of Arts and Science /123
Sustainability Co-Major
The Sustainability Co-major emphasizes human-nature
interaction in understanding environmental patterns and
processes. Students are prepared to pursue a wide variety of career
paths and post-graduate degrees in sustainability, especially those
with design, management, and policy specializations. The term
"co-major" indicates that students must complete another major at
Miami University. The Sustainability Co-major complements the
primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an
academic discipline. There is no specific degree designation for the
co-major; students receive the degree designation of their primary
major.
Program Requirements:
(38-48 semester hours)
Complete a major in one of the divisions of the university.
Introductory Experience (3)
Required:
IES 274 Environment and Sustainability (3)
Foundations to Sustainability (10)
Ecological Dimensions (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3)
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (3)
Physical Dimensions (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (4)
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) and
GLG 115L Understanding the Earth (1)
Social Dimensions (3):
Choose ONE of the following:
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3)
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
ECO 131 Economic Perspectives on Inequality in America (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
ARC 413 Environmental Systems I (3)
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
BWS 495 Modern African Environmental History (3)
ECO 406 Environmental Economics (3)
GEO 401 Sustainable Regions (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
HST 397 American Environmental History (3)
HST/LAS 437 Latin America Environmental History (3)
IES 414 Latin American Environmental Affairs (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)
IES 450 Environmental Law (3)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
POL 362 Public Management, Leadership, and Administrative Politics (3)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
WGS/GEO 406 Indigenous Peoples and Their Sacred Lands (3)
WGS/GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
A workshop or one-time seminar on sustainability may be substituted with permission of
advisor
Environmental Measures & Metrics (3-4)
Choose ONE of the following:
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 444 GIScience Techniques in Landscape Ecology (3)
IES 411 Environmental Protocols (4)
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3)
STA 475 Data Analysis Practicum (3)
Project-Based Synthesis (3)
Required:
IES 474 Sustainability in Practice (3)
Urban and Regional Planning- Bachelor
of Arts
For information, contact the Department of Geography, 216
Shideler Hall (513-529-5010).
This major is for students interested in an integrated view of
urban affairs and an introduction to planning principles.
Integrative Perspectives (21-22)
Program Requirements
(40 semester hours)
Natural Resources & Ecosystems (9)
Planning principles.
Choose ONE of the following:
All of these:
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
BOT/ZOO 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
GEO 271 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation (3)
ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces/Local Diversity (3)
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
Choose TWO of the following (6):
Development issues.
BOT/MBI/ZOO 333 Field Ecology (2)
BOT/GEO 431 Global Plant Diversity (3)
BOT/GEO 432 Ecoregions of North America (3)
BOT/ZOO 351 Environmental Education: Focus on Natural History (4)
BOT/ZOO 467 Conservation Biology (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (3)
GEO 333 Global Perspectives on Natural Disasters (3)
GEO 421 Climatology (3)
GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3)
GEO 428 Soil Geography (4)
GLG 307 Water and Society (3)
GLG 335 Ice Age Earth (3)
GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4)
GLG 428 Groundwater Flow Modeling (4)
GLG 482 Contaminant Hydrogeology (4)
ZOO 462 Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment (4)
ZOO 463 Limnology (4)
A workshop or one-time seminar on sustainability may be substituted with permission of
advisor.
Social Systems & Human Landscape (9)
Choose ONE of the following (3):
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GLG/ZOO 494 Sustainability Perspectives in Resources and Business (3)
Choose TWO of the following (6):
ARC 406B Energy and Sustainability (3)
ARC 406C Sustainable Design (3)
Choose ONE of these:
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GEO 457 Global Cities (3)
GEO 462 Public Space (3)
GEO 467 Land Use, Law, and the State (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 476 Global Poverty (3)
GEO 492 Geography of the Auto Industry (3)
GEO 493 Urban Field Experience (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of primary adviser.
Social issues.
Choose ONE of the following:
AMS 204 Introduction to Public History (3)
ARC 405H Habitat and Human Settlement (3)
ARC 405Q Housing Case Studies (3)
ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
ATH/GTY 476 Environment and Aging
BWS/PSY 325 Identity: Race, Gender, and Class (3)
BWS/SOC 348 American Minority Relations (3)
BWS/FSW 362 Family Poverty (3)
GEO 205 Population and Migration (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 458 Cities of Difference (3)
GEO 462 Public Space (3)
SOC 234 Historic Preservation (3)
SOC 347 Urban Sociology (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of primary adviser.
124/ The College of Arts and Science
Administration and politics.
Choose ONE of the following:
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
ECO 385 Government and Business (3)
ECO 435 Urban and Regional Economics (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
POL 362 Public Management, Leadership, and Administrative Politics (3)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
Program Requirements
(30-31 semester hours)
Core Courses (12-13 semester hours)
Both of these:
WGS 201 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3)
WGS 301 Women and Difference: Intersections of Race, Class, and Sexuality (3)
Choose ONE theory course from the following:
Analytic techniques for planning.
WGS/PHL 355 Feminist Theory (4)
WGS/ENG 368 Feminist Literary Theory and Practice (3)
WGS/ENG 435 Queer Theory (3)
WGS/BWS/ENG 437 Black Feminist Theory (3)
Both of these:
Choose ONE of the following capstones:
Other tools.
Focus Area (18 semester hours)
WGS courses or courses that are cross-listed with WGS courses (i.e. SOC 221 or FSW
221, which are cross-listed with WGS 221, would count toward the WGS major).
GEO 241 Map Interpretation (3) or
GEO 242 Mapping a Changing World (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4)
WGS 401 The Role of Women in a Transforming Society (3)
WGS/BWS/ENG 432 Feminism and Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 444 GIScience in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
Selected GEO 460 courses with permission of primary adviser.
Concentration. Courses in one of these tracks to total 40 hours in your major:
Development track: Courses listed under Development issues above.
Social track: Courses listed under Social issues above.
Analytic track: Courses listed under Analytic techniques above.
General track: Any courses listed above, in consultation with adviser.
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality StudiesBachelor of Arts
For information, contact the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality
Studies Program Office, 126 MacMillan Hall (513-529-4616).
Women’s Studies is an interdisciplinary program that
investigates how our lives are affected by gender race, class, age,
sexuality, religion, (dis)ability, gender identity, and nationality.
Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies emphasizes the
importance of understanding gender as a part of wider social and
political structures of power, knowledge, experience, culture,
embodiedness, intimacy, and labor. Women’s, Gender, and
Sexuality Studies courses are organized around contemporary
feminist research and theory, and focus intersectionally on women,
gender, and sexuality as subjects of inquiry. Our coursework also
focuses on how theory and practice come together. Students may
choose from courses spanning departments, disciplines, divisions
and ideologies. The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
program provides a context in which women's work and women's
issues are explored in-depth, celebrating women's creativity,
women's lives, and women's work. In Women’s, Gender, and
Sexuality Studies, students find an active and supportive
community, close interaction with faculty, opportunities to take on
leadership roles, and an academic program that allows them to
cross the traditional disciplinary boundaries.
Flexibility of the major requirements allows you to design a
program to suit your needs and interests. This major prepares you
for graduate or professional school and for a career in research and
writing, a nonprofit agency, public policy, social services, business,
law, education, or communication.
Departmental Honors
To receive departmental honors you must complete WGS 470
(3 credit hours), register for one additional credit of WGS 470
which entails the completion of a special project, and have a
cumulative GPA of 3.50 in the major. Students must register their
intent to pursue departmental honors and file a proposal for their
project in the WGS program office, 126 MacMillan.
Zoology- Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of
Science
For information, contact the Department of Zoology, 212
Pearson Hall (513-529-3100).
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Arts
(32 semester hours)
Two of these:
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) or
ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) or
ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4)
Advanced courses requirement:
The remaining 24 semester hours must be in courses 200 level or above. No more than
three semester hours of independent study courses (e.g., ZOO 320, 340, 277, 377, 419.R,
477) can be used. Only ZOO 320 and 419R may be taken for a letter grade.
No specific courses are required, but these are recommended:
ZOO 203 Cell Biology (3)
ZOO 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4)
ZOO 342 Genetics (3)
Also recommended, one of the following:
ZOO 311 Vertebrate Zoology (4)
ZOO 312 Invertebrate Zoology (4)
ZOO 361 Patterns in Development (4)
ZOO 401 Entomology (4)
ZOO 408 Ornithology (4)
ZOO 409 Herpetology (4)
ZOO 410 Mammalogy (4)
One 400-level course recommended.
Related Hours (18 required)
One year of chemistry:
CHM 141 or 141R, 142 College Chemistry (3, 4, 3) and
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
Remaining courses may be chosen from botany, chemistry, geography, geology,
mathematics, microbiology, physics, psychology, statistics, and computer science and
software engineering. A year of organic chemistry, a year of physics (with a lab), and a year
of mathematics (including calculus and statistics) are highly recommended.
Program Requirements: Bachelor of Science
(36 semester hours)
All of these:
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) or
ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4)
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) or
ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4)
ZOO 203 Cell Biology (3)
ZOO 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4)
ZOO 342 Genetics (3)
Advanced courses requirement
At least one 400-level course and additional advanced courses (200 level and above) in
zoology to total 36 hours. No more than three hours of independent study courses (e.g.,
The College of Arts and Science /125
ZOO 320, 340, 277, 377, 419R, 477) can be used. Only ZOO 320 and 419R may be taken
for a letter grade.
Related Hours (48 required)
All of these:
CHM 141 or 141R, 142 College Chemistry (4, 3, 4, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4) and
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4) or
CHM 241, 242 Organic Chemistry (3, 3) and
CHM 244, 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3) and PHY 173 and 174 Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World (4, 4) and PHY 183, 184 Introductory Physics
Laboratory (1, 1)
At least eight semester hours of mathematics (including a calculus course and a statistics
course)
An additional 8 to 14 semester hours from: botany, chemistry, geography, geology,
mathematics (advanced hours—200 level or above), microbiology, physics, psychology,
statistics (advanced hours—200 level or above), computer science and software
engineering, and zoology (advanced hours—200 level or above).
Aerospace Studies
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Aerospace
Studies, 50 Millett Hall (513-529-2031).
This minor is an interdisciplinary program open to all majors.
It introduces students to the broad field of air and space service
and provides specific information on the organization and
operation of the United States Air Force.
Courses may not be taken on a credit/no-credit basis. A
minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor. If there
is a specific Political Science (POL) 300 level regional course that a
student would like to substitute for one of the listed POL courses,
they may be substituted with the approval of the Aerospace
Studies Chair.
Program Requirements
Minors
In addition to majors, the College of Arts and Science offers
minors. A minor is a specific program to be taken along with a
major to complement your skills and increase your career
opportunities. Taking a minor is optional.
A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Additional requirements and qualifications are included in the
Other Requirements chapter. Students may use a minor to satisfy
the Thematic Sequence requirement only if the minor is outside the
department of major. Some programs offer certificates to students
who successfully complete the program.
The required semester hours are in parentheses beside each
minor.
Actuarial Science
(25 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Statistics, 311
Upham Hall (513-529-7828).
This minor is designed for students who are preparing for a
possible career as an actuary. Courses in the minor may also be
used to satisfy requirements of a major.
All courses in this minor must be taken for a grade, not
credit/no-credit.
This minor satisfies the Thematic Sequence requirement of the
Miami Plan for students majoring in the Departments of
Mathematics and/or Statistics.
Required sequence (10 semester hours):
AES 121 The Foundations of the United States Air Force (1)
AES 122 The Foundations of the United States Air Force (1)
AES 221 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power (1)
AES 222 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power (1)
AES 332 Air Force Leadership Studies (3)
AES 432 National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society (3)
Note: AES 240 (4) may be taken for AES 121, 122, 221, 222 with permission of instructor.
Choose ONE of the following:
AES 331 Air Force Leadership Studies (3)
MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3)
NSC 211 Leadership and Management (2)
NSC 401 Naval Leadership and Management (2)
At least one course in each of two different departments (min. six semester hours):
AES 431 National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society (3)
GEO 378 Political Geography (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia) (3)
HST 222 U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1898 (3)
POL 221 Modern World Governments (4)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3)
POL 339 Arab Nationalism In World Politics (3)
POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3)
POL 374 Foreign Policy Analysis (3)
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3)
POL 436 Politics of Iraq (3)
Aging and Health
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
Prerequisites:
Calculus, Multivariable Calculus, Linear Algebra. and Introductory Statistics
Students in any major may pursue this multidisciplinary
minor. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in this
minor and only GTY 440G Fieldwork in Gerontology may be taken
on a credit/no-credit basis. Note prerequisites when selecting
courses.
All of these:
Program Requirements
Program Requirements
ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
ACC 222 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
FIN 301 Introduction to Business Finance (3)
STA 401 Probability (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)
STA 483 Analysis of Forecasting Systems (3)
Students are encouraged to select MTH 447 Mathematical Finance as an elective course
that will enhance this program
Students in the Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics may count at most two courses from STA
401, 463, or 483 toward the requirements of the major.
All of these:
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3)
GTY 356 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Health and Aging (3)
GTY 440G Field Experience in Gerontology (Capstone) (4)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
DST/GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3)
GTY/SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
GTY 478 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Illness (4)
GTY 485 Long Term Care in an Aging Society (3)
Additional hours (to reach total of 19) from these:
GTY/SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
GTY/BWS 472 Race, Ethnicity and Aging (3)
KNH 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (3)
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
SOC 435 Sociology of Death (3)
126/ The College of Arts and Science
Aging and Public Policy
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
Students in any major may pursue this multidisciplinary
minor. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in this
minor and only GTY 440G Fieldwork in Gerontology may be taken
on a credit/no-credit basis.
Program Requirements
All of these:
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3)
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
GTY 440G Field Experience in Gerontology (Capstone) (4)
GTY 485 Long Term Care in an Aging Society (3)
understanding of social, cultural, and historical contexts—skills
necessary to succeed in professional work in any field. Students
take three core courses in American Studies and then work with
the program director to develop an area of concentration that
reflects their specific intellectual interests This allows students to
individually tailor the minor to support work they are doing in
their major field.
Program Requirements
All of these:
AMS 205 Introduction to American Studies (3)
AMS 206 Approaches to American Culture (3)
AMS 301 Practice in American Studies (3) or
AMS 302 Transnational America (3)
American Culture Focus:
With the approval from the program director, choose 9 additional semester hours from
AMS courses cross-listed with other departments or courses examining U.S. society and
culture offered by other departments.
Choose TWO of the following:
GTY/SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
DST/GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3)
GTY/SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
GTY/BWS 472 Race, Ethnicity and Aging (3)
GTY 476 Environment and Aging (3)
GTY 478 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Illness (4)
American Literature
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of English, 356
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).
This minor offers students not majoring in English a chance to
use elective hours to satisfy a personal interest, strengthen their
degree, or enhance their career opportunities.
When you begin this minor, you must register with the chief
departmental adviser for English and continue to check your
progress with the adviser at least once a year until you complete
this minor. Courses taken credit/no-credit will not count toward
the 18 semester hours required for this minor. A minimum 2.00
GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
Six semester hours of introduction to American literature (ENG 141, 142, 143).
Three semester hours of theme or genre study in American literature from: ENG 232, 246,
248, 254, 261, 271, 282, 283, 336, 337, 338, 348, when the topic is appropriate 440, 450
and 490.
Three semester hours of period study in American literature from: ENG 349, 352, 353,
354, and 355.
Six additional hours of advanced study from theme, genre, and period courses listed
above. At least one of the advanced courses chosen for these last three categories must
emphasize literature written before World War I: ENG 336, 349, 352, 353 or, when the
topic is appropriate 440, 450 or 490.
American Studies
(18semester hours)
For information, contact the Director of the American Studies
Program (513-529-5333).
This interdisciplinary minor is open to all students and
provides valuable context for majors from across the university
including business, communication, education, fine arts and
science; it also complements well-established liberal arts fields
such as political science, English, history, sociology, and
psychology. Focusing broadly on American culture and society in
global context, the minor fosters critical and creative thinking,
intercultural awareness, interdisciplinary research skills, synthetic
analytical skills, strong writing and oratory skills, an
understanding of multiple kinds of media and texts, and a broad
Anthropology
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Anthropology, 120
Upham Hall (513-529-8399).
This minor combines well with many different majors and is
designed for students who wish to add a cross-cultural dimension
to their education. It is especially appropriate for those who are
planning professional careers in areas such as international studies
and foreign service, international business, medicine, dentistry and
other health fields, and education.
Students planning to take this minor should inform the chief
departmental adviser and formally declare this minor. A minimum
GPA of 2.00 is required for all courses in the minor. These courses
must be taken for a grade, not credit/no-credit. This minor is not
open to an anthropology major.
Program Requirements
This one:
ATH 155 Introduction to Anthropology (4)
Choose TWO of the following:
ATH 212 Introduction to Archaeological Theory and Methods (4)
ATH 231 Perspectives on Culture (3)
ATH 255 Foundations of Biological Anthropology (4)
ATH 265 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (4)
Additional anthropology courses:
300-level or above to total at least 18 semester hours
Note: Only four credits of field method courses (ATH 351, 415, and 426) count toward the
18 hours needed for the minor.
Applied Sociological Research
(18-19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
This minor emphasizes the research aspect of sociology. It is
for students planning research-oriented careers in organizational
settings. Through course work and field experience, students
become familiar with various aspects of research methodology and
organizations.
This minor requires completion of approved courses and
fieldwork placement. A maximum of four semester hours of field
placement can be counted toward this minor; if you take SOC 260A
for the fieldwork course, you must take it for four semester hours.
With the exceptions of SOC 151 and SOC 153, sociology
courses taken for this minor may not be used to fulfill requirements
for the sociology major. The research methods course (SOC 262)
The College of Arts and Science /127
may be used to meet requirements for the major or the minor, but
not both.
Related Courses (6-8 hours):
All courses listed below are prerequisite for a field placement.
A GPA of 2.50 and permission of instructor is required before a
field placement may be taken.
Thematic Cluster A: Comparative Perspective:
AAA/SOC/FSW 363 Sociology of Families (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
HST 434 China along the Silk Road before 1600 (3)
KNH 499P Health and Culture – US and Asia*
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
* This is a summer workshop and it carries 5 credit hours.
Thematic Cluster B: Cultural Analysis and Political Economy:
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 335 Politics of East Asia (4)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
Program Requirements
All of these:
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3)
SOC 262 Research Methods (4)
SOC 417 Economy and Society (3) or
SOC 454 Formal Organizations (3)
SOC 462 Applied Sociological Research (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
SOC 260A Internship: An Introduction to Applied Sociology and Human Services (1-4) or
SOC 440A Applied Field Experience (4-16)
Arabic
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the program adviser in the
Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages, 172
Irvin Hall (513-920-2526).
The Arabic minor provides systematic Arabic language
training in the four modalities (speaking, listening, writing,
reading) as well as cultures of the Arabic speaking world. A
minimum GPA of 2.50 is required for courses taken at Miami.
Courses for the Arabic minor must be taken for a grade (not
credit/no credit). Study abroad in Miami's summer program at
the Jordan University or other program is recommended.
Program requirements:
ARB 201 Intermediate Modern Arabic (3)
ARB 202 Intermediate Modern Arabic (3)
ARB 230 Topics in Arabic Literature in Translation (3)
ARB 301 Advanced Arabic (3)
ARB 302 Advanced Arabic (3)
ARB 311 Media Arabic (3)
Two Courses: Choose one from each of two of the following thematic clusters:
Thematic Cluster C: Transnational & Transcultural Expressions in Art, Literature,
and Religion
AAA/ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature (3)
AAA/ENG 470E Studies in Literary Theory: Food and Power (3)
ENG/AMS 248 Asian American Literature (3)
REL 202 Religions of Asia (3)
WGS/BWS/ENG 432 Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)
Black World Studies
(21 semester hours)
For information, contact the director of Black World Studies,
120 MacMillan Hall (513-529-1235).
Black World Studies (BWS) is an interdisciplinary program
that offers a unique opportunity for all undergraduate students to
gain a better understanding of the historical, social, religious,
cultural political experiences, values and expressions of Africans
and people of African descent in the U.S. and throughout the
world. It focuses on changing constructions of race, class, and
gender in local and global contexts. Moreover, the study of black
people and black experience may better prepare all students to
cope with the ever-increasing demands of a multicultural world.
This program stresses critical thinking, reflection, and informed
action.
A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required for all courses in the
minor.
Asian/Asian American Studies
(18 Semester Hours)
For information contact the Asian/Asian American Studies
Program, 276 Bachelor Hall (513-529-7357).
The Asian/Asian American Studies (AAA) minor provides a
critical understanding of political-economic relations, historical
and socio-cultural formations, ethno-linguistic and religious
practices, and literary and artistic representations regarding Asia
and communities of Asian descent in the U.S. and in the diasporas.
By deploying a transnational and transcultural approach the AAA
minor moves beyond the object-oriented area studies model and
the nationalistic identity politics paradigm. With a focus on issues
of sameness and difference and by paying particular attention to
different forms of discursive expression and political
transformation its innovative course of study brings together the
study of Asia and Asian America through a critical and
comparative lens.
Program Requirements:
Foundation Course (3 hours):
AAA 201 Introduction to Asian/ Asian American Studies (3)
Core Courses (6 hours):
AAA/REL 203 Global Religions of India (3)
AAA/SOC 207 China and Globalization (3)
AAA/ENG 350E Asian/Asian American Cinema (3)
AAA/ENG/WGS 351 Cultural Politics of Gender and Sexuality in Asian/America (3)
Capstone (3 hours):
AAA 410 Topics in Asian/Asian American Studies (3)
Program Requirements
Take either one of these:
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4)
BWS 156 Introduction to Africa (4)
Take a minimum of two courses each from Areas A and B (total of four
courses) and a minimum of one course from Area C or D:
Area A. African Experiences and Cultures
Choose TWO of the following:
ART 235 The Gods Are Here (3)
ART 480 Seminar in African Art (3)
ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3)
BOT 496 Biodiversity of Kenya (5)
BWS/GEO/HST/REL 209 Civilizations of Africa (3)
BWS/HST 224 Africa to 1884 (3)
BWS/HST 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3)
BWS/FST 267 National Cinema: African Film (3)
BWS/GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4)
BWS/CLS 310E Conflict in Greco-Roman Egypt (3)
BWS 324/HST 325 Images of Africa (3)
BWS 339/POL 338 Contemporary African Politics (3)
BWS/ATH 366 African Oral Traditions (3)
BWS 370 Selected Topics: Black World Studies (3)
BWS/POL 370B African Politics and Society Through Literature (3)
BWS/ENG/FST/POR 381 African Lusophone Literature (3)
BWS/ENG 450A Studies in Genre: The African Novel (3)
BWS/HST 495 Modern African Environmental History (3)
BWS/HST 496 Africa in the 20th Century: Decolonization and Independence (3)
HST 444 Ancient Egypt (3)
POL 438 Africa in the Global Economy (3)
Area B. African American Experience and Cultures
Choose TWO of the following:
BWS/HST 221 African American History (3)
BWS 250C African American Education (3)
128/ The College of Arts and Science
BWS/KNH 279 African Americans in Sports (3)
BWS/KNH 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (3)
BWS/ENG 336 African American Writing 1746-1877 (3)
BWS/ENG 337 African American Writing 1878-1945 (3)
BWS/ENG 338 African American Writing 1946-Present (3)
BWS/HST 365 Civil War and Reconstruction Era (3)
BWS/HST 395 The American South to 1877 (3)
BWS/SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
ENG 271 Cultures and Literatures of the American South (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literatures (3)
HST 329 Lynching in America 1865-1940 (3)
AMS/MUS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Context (3)
AMS/MUS 285 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel, and Soul (3)
AMS/MUS 386 The History and Development of Hip Hop Culture in America (3)
REL 343 African American Religions (3)
Area C. Afro-Latin and Afro-Caribbean Experiences
Choose ONE of the following:
BWS/POR 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women (3)
BWS/LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (4)
ENG/LAS 254 Latin American Literature (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
GEO 461 Migrants & Diasporas (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
Area D. Perspectives on Gender, Race, Class, and Ethnicity
Choose ONE of the following:
BWS/CLS 222 Race and Ethnicity in Antiquity (3)
BWS/HST 243 Origins of the African Diaspora: A History of European Slavers (3)
BWS/ATH 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class (3)
BWS 326 Islam in History (3)
BWS/SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
BWS/FWS 362 Family & Poverty (3)
BWS/WGS 432 Feminism and Diaspora (3)
BWS 370I/AMS 310I Race and Popular Culture in the US (3)
BWS 380J Black Atlantic: Crosscurrents of Resistance (3)
BWS/HST 386 Race in U.S. Society (3)
BWS/ENG/WGS 437 Black Feminist Theory (3)
BWS/ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
BWS 433 African American Psychology (3)
BWS/SOC 448 The African American Experience (3)
BWS/GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
BWS 470 Social and Political Activism (3)
BWS/GTY 472 Minority Aging (3)
BWS 492 African and African American Sexuality (3)
KNH 386 African Americans and Health Issues (3)
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (4)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
PSY 325 Psychology of Prejudice and Minority Experience (3)
REL 241 Religions of the American People (4)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC 490 Critical Race Theory
WGS 370A Black Women Writers (3)
Botany
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Botany, 316
Pearson Hall (513-529-4200).
BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (4)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 401 Plant Ecology (3)
BOT 402 Plant Anatomy (3)
BOT 403 Plant Development (3)
BOT 409 Morphology of Vascular Plants (4)
BOT 415 Techniques in Plant Biotechnology (3)
BOT 421 Advanced Mycology (3)
BOT 425 Environmental Plant Physiology (4)
BOT 431 Global Plant Diversity (3)
BOT 432 Ecoregions of North America (3)
BOT 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
BOT 499A Tropical Flora of the Bahamas (4)
Chinese
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
This minor offers students substantial language training and
fundamental cultural understanding. Three years course work or
the equivalent training in language gives students adequate skills
for daily communication and some tools for handling more
sophisticated materials. Literature and culture courses provide
students with knowledge of traditional and modern Chinese world
views and social realities.
Chinese language and culture and literature credits
transferred to Miami from other institutions may be used to fulfill
the requirements. The courses must be passed with a 2.00 GPA.
Courses taken on a credit/no-credit basis may not be applied to the
minor.
Program Requirements
Choose FOUR of the following (12 semester hours):
CHI 201 Second Year Chinese (3)
CHI 202 Second Year Chinese (3)
CHI 301 Third Year Chinese (3)
CHI 302 Third Year Chinese (3)
CHI 311 Business Chinese I (3)
CHI 312 Business Chinese II (3)
CHI 401 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
CHI 402 Fourth Year Chinese (3)
Choose TWO of the following (6 semester hours):
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature (3)
CHI 253 Three Kingdoms (3)
CHI 254 Modern Chinese Autobiography (3)
CHI 255 Drama in China and Japan (3)
CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1 or 3)
CHI 311 Business Chinese I (3)
CHI 312 Business Chinese II (3)
CHI 401,402 Fourth Year Chinese (if not used for language hours) (3, 3)
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
NOTE: Courses listed in both group A and B can be used only once to fulfill any minor’s requirement.
Courses for this minor must be taken for a grade and your
accumulated GPA must be greater than 2.00. Advanced courses
must represent at least 14 hours of the total 18. If you plan to take a
minor in botany, please consult with the chief departmental
adviser.
The Chinese minor satisfies the Thematic Sequence requirement of the Miami Plan.
Program Requirements
(18 semester hours)
These courses:
For information, contact the Department of Classics, 105 Irvin
Hall (513-529-1480).
BOT 115,116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4)
BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3) and
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1) or
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
Select course from the following to total a minimum of ten hours:
BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3) and
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
BOT 205 Dendrology (4)
BOT 209 Fundamentals of Ecology (3)
BOT 255 Introduction to Biotechnology (3)
BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4)
Classical Humanities
This minor offers students the opportunity to become
acquainted with the rich spectrum of classical literature, language,
art, and civilization. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all
courses in the minor. These courses must be taken for a grade, not
credit/no-credit.
Program Requirements
Choose TWO of the following:
CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
The College of Arts and Science /129
CLS 102 Introduction to Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 121 Classical Mythology (3)
Three semester hours of classical literature and language selected from: CLS 211, 212,
213, 214, 215, 316, 317, 331, 333 334; or any other approved course in classical literature;
or any Greek course except GRK 101, 102; any Latin course except LAT 101, 102, 201,
321.
Three hours in classical civilization selected from: CLS 210A, 210R, 216, 232, 235, 244,
310I, 321; ART 381, 382, 383; or any other approved course in classical civilization.
Six additional hours selected from the last two groups.
Classical Languages
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Classics, 105 Irvin
Hall (513-529-1480).
This minor offers students the opportunity to explore the
language and culture of ancient Greece and Rome through the
study of one or both ancient languages. A minimum 2.00 GPA is
required for all courses in the minor. These courses must be taken
for a grade, not credit/no-credit.
Note: Either GRK 102 or LAT 102 may be counted toward the minor, provided you have taken advanced coursework in
the other language.
Program Requirements (18 hours chosen from the following):
LAT 201 Intermediate Latin (3)
LAT 202 Representative Latin Authors (3)
LAT 310 Special Topics in Latin Literature (3; maximum 12; may be repeated when content
changes)
LAT 410 Latin Seminar (3; maximum 12)
LAT 404 Medieval Latin (3)
GRK 201 Homer (3)
GRK 202 Plato (3)
GRK 301 Advanced Readings in Representative Authors (3)
GRK 302 Advanced Readings in Representative Authors (3)
GRK 310 Special Topics in Greek Literature (3; maximum 12; may be repeated when
content changes)
GRK 410 Special Topics in Greek Literature (3; maximum 12; may be repeated when
content changes)
Communication
(18 semester hours)
At the time of publication, minors in the Department of
Communication are being revised. For more information, please
see the chair of the department or contact the College of Arts and
Science advising office in 146 Upham Hall.
The minor in communication is selective and enrollment is
limited. For information
contact the Department of
Communication, 162 Bachelor Hall (513-529-7472).
It offers students the opportunity to learn how human beings
create meaning, develop relationships, achieve goals, and create
community through human communication behavior. The role of
communication in contexts such as interpersonal relationships,
small groups, organizations, the public realm, and media is
explored.
Program Requirements
Required course
COM 143 Introduction to Media (3)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
COM 134 Introduction to Speech Communication (3)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)
Take 12 hours from the following (at least six hours must be at 300/400 level):
COM 215, 231, 239, 247, 259, 262, 281, 282, 332, 335, 336, 339, 341, 353, 354, 355, 389,
417, 426, 428, 431, 434, 436, 437, 438, 439, 443, 445, 446, or 450.
Crime, Law, and Social Justice Studies
(19-20 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
The Minor in Crime, Law & Social Justice Studies (SJS) offers a
sociologically-based foundation of knowledge and skills to
examine the essential connections between social norms, their
transgression, and efforts to maintain justice in the criminal justice
and juridical spheres.
Program Requirements:
All of these:
SJS/SOC 165 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3)
SOC/SJS 323 Social Justice and Change (3)
SOC 352 Criminology (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)
Choose TWO of the following:
SOC/BWS 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 409 Systems of Justice (3)
SOC 410 Topics in Criminology (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
SOC 440C Field Experience in Sociology (4-12)
SOC/FSW 451 Family Violence (3)
Criminology
(19-50 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
This minor focuses on the sociology of crime, adult offenders,
including an orientation to the social scientific study of crime, a
critical examination of institutions in the criminal justice system,
and a consideration of recent trends in the study of crime. A crucial
element of the minor is the completion of an internship in an
agency, program, or institution within the criminal justice system.
Students may major in any field and are encouraged to enroll
regardless of their major course of study.
Program Requirements
Select track one or track two for your program.
Track one: For the non-sociology major (19-20 semester hours)
Required. All of these in this order:
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3)
SOC 352 Criminology (3)
SOC 409 Systems of Justice (3)
SOC 440C Field Experience (4-16)*
* Only 4 semester hours of field placement may count toward the sociology major and/or criminology minor.
Choose ONE of the following:
SOC 410 Topics in Criminology (3)
SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
Electives. Minimum three semester hours from the following:
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC 411 Social Conflict (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)
SOC 451 Family Violence (3)
Track two: For the sociology major (49-50 semester hours)
Complete 36 semester hours of sociology, including required courses for the major and all
of the requirements for the criminology minor listed above. A minimum total of 49-50
semester hours in sociology is required for a combined sociology major and criminology
minor.
130/ The College of Arts and Science
Digital Game Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Interactive Media Studies
Program, 201 Laws Hall (513-529-1637).
The Digital Game Studies Minor has a collaborative series of
courses between the Interactive Media Studies program and the
Departments of English, Art, and Computer Science. The minor
introduces the student to the foundations of game design and
implementations. Courses within the minor are divided into three
major categories designed to introduce the student to the broad
areas of expertise required to produce a state of the art game or
visual simulation. After category 1, students choose a specialty
track in either Game Art and Design, Game Studies or Game
Development.
Program Requirements
Category 1: Complete the following sequence (6 hours)
IMS 211 The Analysis of Play (3)
IMS 212 The Design of Play (3)
Category 2: Complete a single track (9 hours)
Game Art and Design Track
IMS 319 Foundations in Digital 3D Modeling and Animation (3)
IMS/ART 359 Art and Digital Tools II (3)
IMS 487 Game Prototyping, Pipeline and Production (3)
Applied Game Studies Track
IMS 225 Games and Learning (3)
IMS/ENG 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
IMS 487 Game Prototyping, Pipeline and Production (3)
Game Development Track (non-Computer Science majors)
CSE 251 Introduction to Game Programming (3)
IMS 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3)
IMS 487 Game Prototyping, Pipeline and Production (3)
Game Development Track (Computer Science majors)
CSE 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3)
CSE 386 Introduction to Computer Graphics (3)
CSE 487 Game Design and Implementation (3)
Category 3: Complete the following (3 hours):
IMS 445 Game Design (3)
Disability Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
ENG 245 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
DST/EDP/SOC/WGS 278 Women and (Dis)ability: Fictions and Contaminations of Identity
(3)
SPA 211 Deaf Culture and Community (3)
SPA 212 Deaf Culture: Global, National and Local Issues (3)
Remaining hours at the 300-400 level for the DST minor:
DST/ENG 329 Disability Poetics and Narrative Theory (3)
DST/GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3)
DST/EDP/SOC/WGS 375 (Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and
Pride from Practice (3)
COM/DST/EDP/SOC/WGS 378 Media Illusions: Creations of "The Disabled" Identity (3)
East Asian Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the program adviser in the
Department of German, Russian, and East Asian Languages, 172
Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
This interdisciplinary program is open to all majors. It
introduces students to cultures of East Asian countries, including
art, literature, history, geography, religion, sociology, economics,
and political systems.
Program Requirements
Language Proficiency
You must attain a second-year language proficiency in either
Chinese, Japanese or Korean. Completion of CHI 202, JPN 202 or
KOR 202 higher level of courses will fulfill this requirement.
Contact the program adviser for proficiency assessment if
necessary.
Course Requirements
Select courses from Group I and II.
Group I (200 level)
Six semester hours from East Asia (see below)
(or three hours from East Asia and three hours from Related Courses):
ART 286 History of Asian Art, China, Korea, and Japan (3)
ART 278 Text and Image in East Asian Buddhist Art (3)
ART/JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
CHI 251 Chinese Literature to 1800 in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 253 Three Kingdoms (3)
CHI 254 Modern Chinese Autobiography (3)
CHI/JPN 255 Dramas in Japan and China in Translation (3)
CHI/FST 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)
CHI 277W Chinese Culture Live (1 or 3)
GEO/ITS/SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema (3)
REL 202 Religions of Asia (3)
This minor offers a broad liberal arts approach to the study of
disability. It provides students with knowledge of the historical,
social, artistic, literary, legal, educational, philosophical and
political framing of disability. Students develop a strong
interdisciplinary foundation, with emphasis on cultural
constructions of disability, and the intersections of disability, race,
gender, sex, age, class and other markers of diversity and
difference. Students have the opportunity to enhance this
foundation by extending their learning into the community
through the senior capstone internship and/or independent
research requirement.
Related Courses
Program requirements (18 hours total)
ART 311 Chinese Painting History (3)
CHI 301 Third Year Chinese (3)
GEO 410B Regional Analysis of China (1-4)
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization (3)
HST 354 Modern Chinese History (3)
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST 4006 Senior Capstone: Asian History (3)
HST 434 China and the Silk Road (3)
Take the foundation course, no more than two additional courses at the 100-200 level and
the capstone experience.
Both of these:
Foundation course:
DST/EDP/SOC 272 Introduction to Disability Studies (3)
Capstone course:
COM/DST/ENG/SOC/SPA 494 Disability in Global and Local Contexts (3)
EDP 489 Disability in Global and Local Contexts (3)
Choose no more than two 100-200 level courses:
COM/DST 247 Rhetoric of Disability Rights (3)
DST/ENG 169 Disability Identity (3)
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3)
PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India (4)
Group II (300-400 level)
Twelve semester hours from East Asia, China, or Japan; OR from a combination of East
Asia, China, Japan, AND one Related course.
East Asia
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (3)
POL 335 Politics of China and Japan (3)
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3)
China
Japan
ART 312 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
HST 356 Modern Japanese History (3)
JPN 301 Third Year Japanese (3)
The College of Arts and Science /131
Related course:
AAA/ENG 369 Colonial and Post-Colonial Literatures of South Asia (3)
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
REL 323 Buddhism in India and South Asia (3)
Other courses, including one-time offerings, and honors and summer workshop courses
may count toward this minor. For approval, contact the program adviser.
Economics
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Economics, 2054
Farmer School of Business (513-529-2836).
This minor is designed for students who are interested in
exploring how their major area of specialization connects to the
wider world of the workplace and the economy. Students who are
preparing for law school or a master’s degree in business
administration (M.B.A.) program will find this minor valuable.
The 18 hours of Economics must be completed with at least a
2.00 GPA. Either ECO 315 or 317 must be taken at Miami.
Program Requirements
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) or
ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3)
Nine additional hours of advanced economics (300 level or above), which may include the
other intermediate theory course.
English Literature
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of English, 356
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).
This minor offers students not majoring in English a chance to
use their elective hours to satisfy a personal interest, to strengthen
their degree, or to enhance their career opportunities.
When you begin this minor, you must register with the chief
departmental adviser, and you must check your progress with the
adviser at least once a year until you complete the minor. Courses
taken credit/no-credit will not count toward the minor. A
minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
Six semester hours of introduction to English literature (ENG 131, 132, 133).
Three semester hours in the study of a major English author from these:
ENG 372, 373, or 440 (when topic is appropriate).
Three semester hours of theme or genre study in English literature from these:
ENG 233, 281, 283, and 450 and 490 (when topic is appropriate).
Three semester hours of period study in English literature from these:
ENG 327, 328, 331, 334, 335, 339, 342, 343,344, 345, or 347.
Three additional hours of advanced study from the last three categories above.
Ethics, Society, and Culture
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Philosophy, 212
Hall Auditorium (513-529-2440).
This minor offers students not majoring in philosophy an
opportunity to pursue philosophical questions concerning ethics,
culture, and society -- what it means to live in the world with
others. Students wishing to sign up for the minor should register
their interest with the chief departmental advisor. A minimum 2.00
GPA is required for all courses in the minor, and courses must be
taken for a grade, not credit/no credit.
Program Requirements
One of the following:
PHL 103 Society and the Individual (3)
PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (3)
PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (3)
FOUR of the following:
PHL 241 Philosophy of Art (4)
PHL 311 Ethical Theory (4)
PHL 331 Political Philosophy (4)
PHL 335 Philosophy of Law (4)
PHL 355 Feminist Theory (4)
PHL 360A Confronting Death (4)
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
PHL 411 Advanced Ethical Theories (4)
PHL 470 Advanced Aesthetics (4)
European Area Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the European area studies adviser Dr.
Margaret Ziolkowski, 164 Irvin Hall (513-529-1853).
This minor, open to all students in the university, introduces
the European region from multiple perspectives of humanities,
social sciences, and fine arts. It provides students at Miami’s
campuses, including the John E. Dolibois European Center
(MUDEC) in Luxembourg or other European programs, with a
framework for integrating their studies into the overall curriculum
at Miami. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the
minor.
Program Requirements*
Both of these:
HST 122 Western Civilization (3) or
a modern European history course
GEO 311 Geography of Western Europe (4) or
another European geography course
Choose ONE of the following:
POL 333 Politics of Western Europe (4) or
another course in West European politics
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (4) or
another course in Russian or East European politics
ECO 341 Economic History of Modern Europe (3)
One course in each category:
A modern European culture course from literature, art, architecture, music, theatre or
cinema (3)
A modern European language course at the 300- level or above, taught in that language (3)
An additional Europe-focused course to reach a total of 18 semester hours.
The European Studies Adviser must approve all selected courses.
* Appropriate courses taken in European study abroad programs, including MUDEC, may be substituted for above
courses with the approval of the European Area Studies adviser.
Film Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact program adviser in the Department
of GREAL, 144 Irvin Hall (513-529-2515).
This interdepartmental minor integrates courses that treat film
as a major art form or that use film as a specific and unique
analytical device in the study of different aspects of society and
culture, including literature, history, the arts, and national
cultures. It offers a broad introduction to importance and influence
of film, variety of film studies methodologies, and history and
criticism of the modes of cinema across the world.
Program Requirements
These two:
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
FST 401 Seminar in Film Study (3)
132/ The College of Arts and Science
Twelve semester hours from the following:
ENG/COM 422 Creative Writing: Screenwriting (3)
FST/COM 146 Media Aesthetics (3)
FST/BWS/LAS/MUS/POR 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music (3)
FST/COM 205 American Film as Communication (3)
FST/COM/IDS 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
FST/ENG 220 Literature and Film (3; maximum 6)
FST/ENG 221 Shakespeare and Film (3)
FST/AMS/ITL 222 Italian American Culture (3)
FST/ENG 235 Classics of Film (3)
FST/ENG 236 Alternative Traditions in Film (3)
FST/HST 250 History and Popular Culture (3)*
FST/HST 252 Representations of History in Film and Video (3)
FST/FRE/GER 255 Visual Representations of the Holocaust (3)
FST/GER 261 Survey of German Cinema (3)
FST/ITL 262 Italian Cinema (3)
FST/RUS 263 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
FST/CHI 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture (3)
FST/FRE/GER 265 European Jewish Cinema (3)
FST/JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema (3)
FST/RUS 272 Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe: An Introduction through
Literature and Film (3)
FST/COM 281 Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered
Persons and the Electronic Media (3)
FST/COM 282 Sexualities and Film (3)
FST/HST 302 War and European Cinema (3)
FST/ENG 350 Topics in Film (3; maximum 6)
FST/FRE 366 French Cinema (3)
FST/POR/WGS 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women (3)
FST/LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution (3)
FST/FRE 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)
PHL 241 Aesthetics (4)
PHL 410 Special Topics (1-4) *
POL 220 Movies and Politics (2)
* Applies when topic is film-related.
French
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of French and Italian,
207 Irvin Hall (513-529-7508).
This minor provides direction, coherence, and recognition in
French studies for non-majors. It is designed to expand your area
of interest and expertise and to broaden your career options.
Students are encouraged to participate in the Department's
summer programs abroad.
You must accumulate 18 semester hours at 200 level or above
and maintain a 2.50 GPA. No courses in translation count toward
the minor; all courses must be taken for a grade, not
credit/no-credit. You must plan your program with an adviser.
Geography
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Geography, 216
Shideler Hall (513-529-5010).
This minor provides training in the interpretation of
geographic data and geographic (spatial) analytical techniques that
should form a strong complement for students with majors in other
physical and social sciences. We recommend a minor in geography
for students who want to know the world better and want to apply
that broader perspective to effective local action in their special
areas of expertise.
A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
No courses may be taken credit/no-credit. This minor is not
available to majors in geography.
Program Requirements
Select an emphasis from one of these three areas for your program.
Comparative urban-economic emphasis
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3)
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3)
GEO 211 Global change (3)
Tool course (2-4)*
Additional advanced urban-economic geography courses to make up required 18 semester
hours *
Environmental change emphasis
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environments (4)
GEO 211 Global Change (3)
GEO 221 Regional Physical Environments (3)
Tool course (2-4) *
Additional advanced environmental change courses to make up required 18 semester
hours*
Global (international) development emphasis
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) or
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3)
GEO 211 Global Change (3)
Tool course (2-4)
Additional advanced global development courses to make up required 18 semester hours*
* Contact the department for a list of courses that count for each emphasis.
Geology
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Geology &
Environmental Earth Science, 114 Shideler Hall (513-529-3216).
A minimum GPA of 2.25 is required for all courses in the
minor. No courses may be taken credit/no-credit. This minor is not
available to majors in geology, earth science, environmental earth
science or earth science education. Courses must be selected
observing all prerequisites. Substitutions may be made with
approval of department.
Program Requirements
Choose ONE of the following:
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3)
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3)
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3)
This laboratory:
GLG 115L Understanding the Earth Lab (1)
Also required:
Complete the 18 semester hours with courses at 200 level or above. One course must be
at 300 level or above.
German
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
All German courses (except those offered only credit/no
credit) must be taken for a grade. You must coordinate your
program with a department adviser. This minor consists of courses
above the 100 level.
Program Requirements
Choose one course from each group:
Language skill
GER 301 Advanced German Composition and Conversation (3)
Literature
GER 311 Passionate Friendships in German Literature and Culture (3)
GER 312 Coming of Age in German Literature and Thought (3) (taught in English
translation)
Culture
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe (3)
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture:
German-Speaking Europe and the U.S.A. (3)
Advanced Study
One GER course at 400 level or higher (3)
The College of Arts and Science /133
Also required:
One three-hour GER course taught in translation may be taken toward the minor, except
FRE/GER 212; GER/ATH 309/ENG/SPN 303.
Gerontology
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
Advanced courses (minimum of three hours)
ATH 305, 307; BWS 330, 362; GEO 301, 304, 405, 472, 475; HST 495, 496; ITS 302; POL
335, 336, 337, 338, 346, 378, 386; ZOO 467
Field courses or internship (minimum of four hours)
History
(18 semester hours)
Students in any major may pursue this multidisciplinary
minor. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in this
minor, and only GTY 440G Fieldwork in Gerontology may be taken
on a credit/no-credit basis. Note prerequisites when selecting
courses.
For information, contact the Department of History, 200
Upham Hall (513-529-5121).
Program Requirements
A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
These courses must be taken for a grade (not credit/no-credit).
All of these:
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3)
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
GTY 440G Field Experience in Gerontology (Capstone) (4)
Choose ONE of the following:
GTY 260 Global Aging (3)
GTY/SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
GTY/BWS 472 Race, Ethnicity and Aging (3)
Choose TWO of the following:
DST/GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3)
GTY 356 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Health and Aging (3)
GTY/SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
GTY 375 Aging, Self and Society (3)
GTY/SOC/WGS 463 Gender and Aging (3)
GTY/FSW 466 Families in Later Life (3)
GTY 476 Environment and Aging (3)
GTY 485 Long Term Care in an Aging Society (3)
SOC 435 Sociology of Death (3)
Global Perspectives on Sustainability
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Institute for the Environment and
Sustainability, 254 Upham Hall (513-529-5811).
This interdisciplinary minor introduces students to the
foundations of environmental sustainability and its complexities
with an emphasis on the approaches taken by people living under
different geographic and economic conditions. Of special
importance in this minor is increasing student understanding of
the issues and problems faced by the majority of global citizens
who live in less industrial or less economically developed parts of
the world.
Program Requirements
Background courses (take one from each category):
Category I: Natural Science (minimum of three hours)
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and the Environment (3)
GEO 271 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation (3)
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3)
GLG 307 Water and Society (3)
IES 275 Principles of Environmental Science (3)
Category II: Business (minimum of three hours)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ECO 406 Environmental Economics (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
Category III: Political/Social Science (minimum of three hours)
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
POL 270 Current World Problems (3)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
Sustainability and Environmental Foundations (minimum of three hours)
GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Sciences (3)
If you are not majoring in history, this minor is an opportunity
for you to satisfy an interest, strengthen your degree, and enhance
your preparation for a career or further education.
Program Requirements
Six semester hours (two introductory survey courses; need not be in sequence) from
these:
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (3, 3)
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (3, 3)
HST 197, 198 World History (3, 3)
Remaining 12 semester hours must be history courses at the 200 level and above.
History of Philosophy
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Philosophy, 212
Hall Auditorium (513-529-2440).
This minor offers students not majoring in philosophy the
opportunity to explore the history of Western thought from
Ancient philosophy to the present, and allows students to grasp
the origin of fundamental concepts and their historical
transformation. Students wishing to sign up for the minor should
register their interest with the chief departmental advisor. The
department occasionally offers courses in special topics
appropriate to this minor. These may be substituted by petition for
any course listed in the last group.
Program Requirements
One of these:
PHL 103 Society and the Individual (3)
PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (3)
PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (3)
Both of these:
PHL 301 Ancient Philosophy (4)
PHL 302 Modern Philosophy (4)
TWO of the following. At least one must be 400 level:
PHL 390 Existentialism (4)
PHL 402 19th Century Philosophy (4)
PHL 430 Seminar in Ancient or Medieval Philosophy (4)
PHL 440 Seminar in Modern Philosophy (4)
PHL 460 Seminar in Marxism (4)
Horticultural Botany
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Botany, 316
Pearson Hall (513-529-4200).
This minor gives you a general understanding of horticulture
and related fields. It is open to all students; however, for students
working on the A.B. in botany, only BOT 115, 116, or 191 can count
for both the major and this minor, and for students working on the
B.S. in botany, only BOT 115, 116, 191, and 425 can count for both.
134/ The College of Arts and Science
Courses used for this minor cannot be used for the minor in
botany, except for BOT 115, 116, or 191. College chemistry is
recommended for this minor. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for
all courses in the minor; no courses for the minor may be taken
credit/no-credit.
Program Requirements
Choose ONE of the following:
BOT 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4) or
BOT 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology
(4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4)
This one:
BOT 306 Basic Horticulture (3)
Choose FOUR of the following:
BOT 221 Plant Propagation (4)
BOT 241 Botanical Principles in Landscape Gardening (3)
BOT 302 Plant Taxonomy (4) or
BOT 205 Dendrology (4)
BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (4) or
BOT 421 Advanced Mycology (4)
BOT 340 Internship in Botany (1-16)
BOT 415 Techniques in Biotechnology (3)
BOT 425 Environmental Plant Physiology (4)
Interactive Media Studies
(19 semester hours minimum)
For information, contact the director of the Center for
Interactive Media Studies, 2045 FSB (513-529-1637).
The minor in interactive media studies introduces the student
to digital media and allows them to examine their chosen major
from a new perspective. It provides students with a framework for
integrating a broad understanding of interactive media balanced
with a more specific focus on disciplinary tracks. A 3.00 GPA is
required for admittance into the minor.
There are four tracks within the minor that allow students to
focus their experience on a particular area of interactive media, and
to better complement their disciplinary area of focus. These tracks
include commercialization, interpretation, simulation and
visualization. There is also a self-designed option (with adviser
approval).
For a complete list of courses needed to fulfill the
requirements, please contact the director.
Program Requirements
Foundation: Take two of the following (6 hours):
CSE 251 Computational Modeling and Simulation (3)
CSE 252 Web Application Programming (3)
ENG/IMS 224 Digital Writing and Rhetoric: Composing with Words, Images and Sounds
(3)
ENG/IMS 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3)
IMS 254 Design Principles Applied (3)
IMS 257 Web Interaction Programming (3)
Track: Take three courses in any one of the following specialization tracks (9
hours):
Note: Courses completed in the foundation cannot be used to complete a track.
Commercialization
BLS 437 Cyberlaw (3)
COM 211 Introduction to Video Production (4)
IMS 333 Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3)
IMS 355 Principles and Practices of Managing Interactive Projects (3)
IMS 390C Topics in IMS: Commercialization
IMS 413 Usability and Digital Media Design (4)
IMS 414 Web and Social Media Analytics (3)
IMS 418 Social Media Marketing and Online Community Management (3)
IMS /MKT 419 Digital Branding (4)
MGT 311 Project Management (3)
Interpretation
ENG/IMS 171 Humanities and Technology (3)
ENG/IMS 224 Digital Writing and Rhetoric: Composing with Words, Images and Sounds
(3)
ENG/IMS 238 Narrative and Digital Technology (3)
ENG 411 Visual Rhetoric (3)
IMS 211 The Analysis of Play (3)
IMS 212 The Design of Play (3)
IMS 222 Web and Interaction Design (3)
IMS 390I Topics in IMS: Interaction
IMS 407 Interactive Business Communication (3)
JRN/IMS 303 Online Journalism (3)
MUS/IMS 221 Music Technologies (3)
MUS 303/IMS 304 Electronic Music (3)
Simulation
IMS/ARC 404Y Mind and Medium (3)
IMS 211 The Analysis of Play (3)
IMS 212 The Design of Play (3)
IMS 225 Games and Learning (3)
IMS 253 Building Interactive Objects (3)
IMS 319 Foundations in 3D Design (3)
IMS 445 Game Design (3)
IMS 487 Game Prototyping, Pipeline and Production (3)
IMS 390S Topics in IMS: Simulation
Visualization
IMS 222 Interaction Design (3)
IMS 253 Building Interactive Objects (3)
IMS 254 Design Principles Applied (3)
IMS/ART 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3)
IMS 261 Information and Data Visualization (3)
IMS 356 Interactive Animation (3)
IMS/ART 359 Art and Digital Tools II (3)
IMS 390V Topics in IMS: Visualization
IMS 413 Usability and Digital Media Design (4)
IMS/STA/JRN 404 Visualizing Information (3)
IMS 422 Advanced Web Design (3)
IMS 461 3D Visualization & Simulation (3)
MIS 245 Database Systems and Data Warehousing (3)
A Self-designed track can be created with pre-approval of an adviser.
Take the following (4 hours):
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
Interdisciplinary Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Western Program (513-529-2233).
The minor in Interdisciplinary Studies is available to students
in all majors and is designed to broaden their professional
opportunities. It strengthens problem-solving skills, and develops
valuable interdisciplinary perspectives on contemporary issues.
Courses explore diverse subjects but share a strong
interdisciplinary theme. Students learn to integrate knowledge
from a range of different disciplines and gain proficiency in
developing their own interdisciplinary inquiries in areas of
intellectual and social relevance.
Program requirements
All of these:
WST 201 Self and Place (3)
WST 231 Interdisciplinary Inquiry (3)
WST 301 Interdisciplinary Problems and Questions (3)
WST 321 Developing Interdisciplinary Projects: Exploring Ways of Knowing (3) or
WST 322 Developing Interdisciplinary Projects: Using Analytical and Rhetorical
Tools (3)
WST 341 Interdisciplinary Synthesis and Action (3)
Additional 300-level or 400-level course from another interdisciplinary program (3)
Italian
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of French and Italian,
207 Irvin Hall (513-529-7508).
This minor offers certified recognition of proficiency in Italian
language and successful completion of a program in Italian culture
and literature. It increases your understanding of a culture of
major influence.
The College of Arts and Science /135
Requirements include completing at least 18 semester hours of
Italian above the 100 level, including Italian 301 and 302. A
minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Courses must be taken for a grade (not credit/no-credit). Your
program must be planned with an adviser.
Students are encouraged to attend the Miami University
Summer Language Institute in Italy (Urbino).
Japanese
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
This minor provides exposure to literature and culture along
with systematic language training in speaking, listening, reading,
and writing.
Japanese language, culture, and relevant courses transferred
from other institutions may be used to fulfill requirements. A
minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
Select courses from the following:
ATH 309/ENG 303/GER 309/SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
JPN 201, 202 Second Year Japanese (3, 3)
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3)
JPN 260 Topics in Japanese Literature in English Translation (3)
JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema (3)
JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)
JPN 381 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
JPN 301, 302 Third Year Japanese (3, 3)
JPN 401, 402 Japanese Culture and Society in Contemporary Texts (3, 3)
Language
HBW 201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew (3)
HBW 202 Intermediate Modern Hebrew (3)
Literature
ENG/FRE/GER 356 Contemporary Jewish Fiction in Europe (3)
ENG 230J Jewish American Fiction Since 1945 (3)
GER 232 The Holocaust in German Literature, History, and Film (3)
Religion and Thought
REL 213 Social and Religious History of the Jewish People (3)
REL 311 Archaeology and Biblical Studies (3)
REL 334 Women's Religious Experience in the Ancient Mediterranean (3)
REL 385 Religious Roots of Anti-Semitism (3)
REL 440/540 Ancient Near Eastern Literature and Religion (1-4)
REL 475 Judaism in Modern Israel (4)
Latin American Latino/a & Caribbean
Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the LAS Program, 120 MacMillan
Hall (513-529-5333).
Latin American, Latino/a & Caribbean Studies (LAS) offer an
interdisciplinary minor that is open to all students and is a
valuable complement to a wide range of majors. Students may
enroll in the program by declaring intent with an LAS adviser. LAS
minors must complete SPN 202, POR 211 or FRE 202. All students
must complete at least 18 credit hours, with at least 6 credits of the
core course hours coming from LAS courses or their cross-listed
equivalents outside of the student's major or second minor.
Program Requirements
Core courses. At least nine (9) hours required
Ancient and Medieval Core Courses (3 semester hours)
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
LAS 207 Latin American Civilization (3)
LAS 208 Introduction to Latin America (3)
LAS/ENG 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3)
LAS 260 Latin America in the United States (3)
LAS 277,277,477 Independent Study (1-3)
LAS 277X Service-Learning (1)
(concurrent registration in MPF course)
LAS 315 Latin American Diaspora Communities (3)
LAS 319 Revolution in Latin America (3)
LAS 410 Current Latin American Issues (3)
LAS/IES 414 Latin American Environmental Affairs (3)
LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture (MPC) (4)
LAS/HST 437 Latin America Environmental History (3)
LAS/POL 478 Media and Politics in Latin America and the Caribbean (3)
LAS 499 Study Abroad in Latin America and the Caribbean (3-6)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
POL 430E Seminar on Comparative Political Systems: Latin America (4)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
SPN 361, 362 Spanish American Cultural History I, II (3, 3)
SPN 430 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spanish America (3)
SPN 463 Studies in Spanish American Poetry (3)
SPN 464 The Spanish American Essay (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
Related Hours. Up to nine (9) hours can count toward the minor.
Other courses, including one-time offerings, honors courses, etc., may count; contact the
Japanese program adviser.
Jewish Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Director of Jewish Studies, 248
Upham Hall (513-529-5143).
This minor is an interdisciplinary program that encourages
students to pursue their particular interests across a wide range of
disciplines and periods focusing on the critical approaches to
Jewish history, religion, thought, and culture. Jewish Studies
credits may be transferred from other institutions, and experience
in accredited international programs may be applicable. A 2.50
GPA is required to obtain a Jewish Studies minor.
Program Requirements
CLS 310J Jews Among the Greeks and Romans (3)
HST 346 Medieval Jewish History (3)
HST 442 Ancient Jewish History (3)
REL 175 Critical Study of Biblical Literature (3)
REL 211 Introduction to the Religion of the Ancient Israel (3)
Modern Core Course (3 semester hours):
This one:
FRE/GER/RUS 212 Secular Jewish Culture from the Enlightenment to Zionism (3)
Focus Courses
Take 12 semester hours (no more than seven hours may be taken from the Holocaust
Focus); at least six hours must be 300 level or higher. Additional core courses may be
counted within these hours.
Culture History and Society
FRE/FST/GER 265 European Jewish Cinema (3)
GER 252 The German-Jewish Experience (3)
Holocaust
HST 400A Senior Capstone in German History (when on the Holocaust) (3)
HST 472 Germany 1918-1945, from Revolution to Rubble (3)
ATH/LAS 325 Identity: Race, Class, and Gender (3)
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archeology (4)
GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3)
HST 307 Latin American Civilization (Before 1820) (3)
HST 487 Mexico Since 1810 (3)
POR 111 Accelerated Introduction to Portuguese (4)*
POR 211 Intermediate Portuguese (4)*
POR 311 Composition and Conversational Portuguese (3)
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Introductory Composition (3)
SPN 450 Topics in Hispanic Literature and Language (3)
(Spanish American topic required)
SPN 482 Spanish Dialectology (3)
SPN 490 Issues in Hispanic Literature (3)
(Spanish American topic required)
* Students fulfilling the language skills requirement in Spanish can count POR 111 and 211 as credits in category C.
Language Requirement
Complete SPN 202, POR 211, FRE 202, or their equivalents
136/ The College of Arts and Science
Electives. Optional courses containing substantial material, concepts, or applications
relevant to Latin American studies; these can contribute up to 3 credit hours toward the
total of 18.
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3)
ATH/ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3)
ATH 312 Introduction to North American Archaeology (4)
ECO 347 Economic Development (3)
ENG 348 Ethnic American Literature (3)
FRE 202 Critical Analysis of French Culture*
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3)
GEO 111 World Regional Geography (3)
HST 361 Colonial America (3)
HST 371 Native American History (3)
HST 400 Senior Seminar in History (when topic is appropriate)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Politics (3)
POL 439 North American Politics: Unity and Diversity (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
Choose ONE course from the following:
* Students who take Spanish or Portuguese as their language can count this as an elective.
For information, contact the Department of Mathematics, 123
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5818).
Linguistics
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of English, 356
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).
Linguistics is the study of language. Linguists look at how
people use language and try to find the rules that govern that use.
Because linguistics touches so many areas of study, a minor in
linguistics is useful for students majoring in foreign languages,
English, sociology, anthropology, psychology, mathematics,
communication, philosophy, or computer science. A minimum 2.00
GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
This one:
Taught in English:
POR/BWS/ENG/FST 381 African Lusophone Literature (3)
POR/BWS/ENG/FST/WGS 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women (3)
Choose from the following to reach 18 credit hours:
Taught in English:
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
HST 307 Latin American Civilization - Colonial Period (3)
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization (3)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
POR 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music (3)
Mathematics
(21 semester hours)
This minor provides students with an increased
understanding of, and competence in, mathematics. Building on a
base of calculus and linear algebra, already required for many
majors, the program leads students through a theoretical course,
an applications course, and at least one additional elective in
advanced mathematics.
A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
All courses must be taken for a grade, not credit/no-credit. This
minor is not available to majors in mathematics, mathematics and
statistics, or mathematics education.
Program Requirements
Choose ONE of the following:
MTH 249 Calculus II (5) or
MTH 249H Honors Calculus II (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
ENG 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4) or
SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4) or
GER 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4) or
ATH 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
Choose ONE of the following:
These two:
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 222T Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors) (2) and
MTH 331T Discrete Mathematics (Honors) (3)
ENG 405 and 406
At least eight semester hours from the following:
ATH 265, 465; COM 436; ENG 301, 302, 410; FRE 341; MTH 483; PHL 373; PSY 374;
SPN 481, 482.
Note: When initiating the minor, students must register with the Linguistics adviser and thereafter check their progress
with the adviser at least once a year until the minor is complete.
Lusophone Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Spanish and
Portuguese, 268 Irvin Hall (513-529-4500).
A Lusophone studies minor serves to introduce students to
the rich culture of Portuguese-speaking peoples and countries,
especially Brazil. Portuguese is the seventh-most spoken language
in the world. Knowledge of the Lusophone cultures is essential for
understanding the political, economic, and social world with
which the United States has increasing ties.
Program Requirements
Required Courses
POR 111 Accelerated Introduction to Portuguese (4)
POR 211 Second-Year Portuguese (4)
Choose one course from the following:
Taught in Portuguese:
POR 311 Grammar Review and Introductory Composition (3)
POR 315 Introduction to Literary Texts: Lusophone Literature (3)
MTH 252 Calculus III (4) or
MTH 252H Honors Calculus III (4)
Choose ONE of the following:
At least 10 semester hours in mathematics courses at 300 level or above,
including:
At least one of these: MTH 411, 421, 441, or 451
At least one of these: MTH 347, 432, 436, 437, 438, 439, 447, or 453
At least six semester hours at the 400 level
Note: You may count at most one semester hour from MTH 430 or 477 and three semester
hours of PHY 483. MTH 330 and 406 do not count toward the minor. Students who have
taken MTH 245 as a requirement for a major may count one hour of MTH 245 to the 10
hours at the 300 level, and for them, MTH 245 substitutes for MTH 347 in the list of
"applications" courses.
Medieval Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact John M. Jeep, Department of German,
Russian, and East Asian Languages, 152 Irvin Hall (513-529-1952).
This minor provides a basis for understanding and evaluating
Western civilization by showing its roots in the Middle Ages. It
establishes a full cultural context so students can understand and
appreciate medieval literature, history, art, religion, and
philosophy.
The Medieval Studies minor is open to all students, but will
probably be of most interest to majors in art history, classics,
English, French and Italian, German, history, philosophy, religion,
and Spanish.
The College of Arts and Science /137
Program Requirements
Program Requirements
Eighteen semester hours from any of the following:
All of these:
ART 466, 467, 468, and 480W
ENG 371 and 431
FRE 443, 444
GER 260A
HST 313, 321, 345, 346, 353, 381, and 451
ITL 401
LAT 404
PHL 430
REL 232 and 430
SPN 351
Credit for course work at Dolibois European Center and in special seminars and other
infrequently offered courses may also be applied to the minor with the approval of the
Medieval Studies coordinator.
Middle East and Islamic Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the minor adviser, 216 Shideler Hall
(513-529-5010).
This minor offers students a firm interdisciplinary grounding
in the cultures, religious systems, history and politics of the Islamic
world with an emphasis upon the modern Middle East. A
minimum 2.50 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
Six or more semester hours from the following (no more than 6 hours to be
taken in any one department):
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
HST 241 Introduction to Islamic History (3)
HST 242 The History of the Modern Middle East (3)
POL 336 Politics of the Middle East (3)
REL 326 Islam in History (3)
One course in biochemistry (CHM 332, 432, or 433)
One course in cell biology (BOT 203, MBI 201, ZOO 203, or ZOO 443)
One course from three of the four departments (BOT, CHM, MBI, or ZOO)
One laboratory course (BOT 415, BOT/MBI/ZOO 424, CHM 438, MBI 465, or ZOO 464) or
earn at least two credits of directed research in molecular biology.
One course in molecular biology (CHM 434, MBI 365, or ZOO 444)
Other courses to bring total semester hours to 18:
BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3)
BOT 255 Plant Biotechnology (3)
BOT 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 403 Plant Development (3)
BOT 415 Plant Tissue Culture/Plant Biotech Laboratory (4)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 424 Advanced Experimental Techniques in Structural and Functional
Genomics (4)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 485 Bioinformatic Principles (3)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 433 Biochemistry (3)
CHM 434 Biochemistry (3)
CHM 438 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
MBI 201 General Microbiology (4)
MBI 365 Molecular and Cellular Biology (3)
MBI 414 Immunology (3)
MBI 425 Microbial Physiology (4)
MBI 445 Microbial Genetics (3)
MBI 464 Human Viruses (3)
MBI 465 Microbial and Molecular Genetics Laboratory (2)
ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3)
ZOO 342 Genetics (3)
ZOO 361 Patterns in Development (4)
ZOO 442 Mechanisms of Animal Development (3)
ZOO 443 Cell Biology (3)
ZOO 444 Molecular Biology (3)
ZOO 449 Biology of Cancer (3)
ZOO 464 Laboratory in Cell/Molecular Biology (3)
ZOO 471 Molecular Physiology (3)
Twelve or more semester hours from the following:
ARB 201, 202 Intermediate Modern Arabic (3)
ARB 230 Topics in Arabic Literature in Translation (3)
ARB 301, 302 Advanced Arabic (3)
ARB 311 Media Arabic (3)
ART 313 Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic Art (3)
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives (3)
CLS 310E Conflict in Greco-Roman Egypt (3)
CLS 333 The Greeks in the Near East and Central Asia (3)
CLS 334 Egypt in Greco-Roman History and Fiction (3)
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (3)
HST 241 Introduction to Islamic History (3)
HST 242 The History of the Modern Middle East (3)
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History (3)
HST 337 The United States and the Middle East (3)
HST 360R Central Asia: 20th Century (3)
ITS 402N Problems of the Middle East (3)
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia (3)
POL 336 Politics of the Middle East (3)
POL 339 Arab Nationalism In World Politics (3)
REL 326 Islam in History (3)
REL 475 Judaism in Modern Israel (4)
Other relevant courses can be applied with the approval of the minor's advisor.
Naval Science
(22 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Naval Science, 67
Millett Hall (513-529-3700).
This minor is an interdisciplinary program open to all majors.
It introduces students to the broad field of naval service and
provides specific information on the organization and operation of
the United States Navy and Marine Corps. The naval science minor
includes courses in physical and social sciences, formal reasoning,
and computer science.
No courses may be taken credit/no-credit. A minimum 2.00
GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
Core sequence
All of these:
Molecular Biology
(18 semester hours)
For more information, contact the Department of Zoology
(513-529-3100).
The molecular biology minor is offered cooperatively by the
Departments of Botany,
Chemistry and Biochemistry,
Microbiology, and Zoology.
This minor enables students to pursue in-depth a
multidisciplinary study of biological phenomena at the molecular
level. It provides a strong foundation for students planning careers
in biotechnology or advanced work at the graduate level. A
minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
NSC 101 Naval Orientation and Organization (2)
NSC 202 Sea Power and Maritime Affairs Seminar (3)
NSC 211 Leadership and Management (2)
NSC 402 Naval Personnel Management (3)
Choose SIX semester hours from the following:
NSC 102 Naval Ship’s Systems (3)
NSC 201 Naval Mission Systems (3)
NSC 301 Navigation (4)
NSC 302 Naval Operations and Seamanship (3)
NSC 311 The Evolution of Warfare (3)
NSC 320 Tactical Problems Seminar (1)
NSC 377 Independent Studies (1-5)
NSC 411 Amphibious Warfare (3)
One course each from two different departments
Minimum SIX hours from the following:
CSE 141 Fundamentals of Computing (2)
CSE 151 Computers, Computer Science, and Society (3)
CSE 163 Introduction to Computer Systems (3)
138/ The College of Arts and Science
CSE 174 Structured Programming and Computer Algorithms (3)
HST 112 Survey of American History II (3)
HST 219 U.S. Diplomatic History to 1914 (3)
HST 222 U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1898 (3)
HST 369 United States in the Modern Era (3)
HST 431 The U.S.-Vietnam War (3)
ISA 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
MGT 291 Introduction to Management & Leadership (3)
MTH 151 or 153 Calculus I (5)
MTH 249 or 251 Calculus II (4)
PHY 181, 182 General Physics I, II (4, 4)
POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3)
POL 376 United States National Security Policy (3)
POL 382 International Law (3)
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
includes the CSE 3 Thematic Sequence (Mathematical and
Computer Modeling). Majors in CSE typically satisfy the MTH 2
Thematic Sequence (Basic Mathematical Tools for Science).
Program Requirements
All of these:
CSE 273 Optimization Modeling (3)
CSE 372 Stochastic Modeling (3)
CSE 471 Simulation (3)
STA 463 Regression Analysis (4)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
MTH 432 Optimization (3)
MTH 438 Theory and Applications of Graphs (3)
MTH 453 Numerical Analysis (3) and
A second course chosen from the three above or one of the following:
Neuroscience
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Psychology, 100
Psychology Building (513-529-2400) or the Department of Zoology,
212 Pearson Hall (513-529-3100); this minor is offered
cooperatively.
This minor enables students to pursue in depth a
multidisciplinary study of the nervous system. It provides a basic
framework for students planning advanced work at the graduate
level.
A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
Required courses:
PSY 251 Introduction to Biopsychology (3)
ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3)
ZOO 305 Human Physiology (4)
Choose at least 3 courses:*
PSY 351 Advanced Biopsychology (4)
PSY 356 Psychopharmacology (3)
PSY 410A or E Capstone Seminar in Neuroscience (3)
PSY 451 Cognitive Neuroscience (3)
PSY 456 Neurobiology of Learning and Memory (3)
ZOO 454 Endocrinology (3)
ZOO 457 Neuroanatomy (3)
ZOO 458 Neuroanatomical Methods (1)
ZOO 459 Methods in Neurophysiology (1)
ZOO 464 Laboratory in Cell/Molecular Biology (3)
ZOO 465 Animal Behavior (4)
ZOO 469 Neurophysiology (3)
ZOO 471 Molecular Physiology (3)
* At least one course from each department.
Other relevant work:
Course work in calculus, statistics, chemistry, computer science, and philosophy of
science.
An independent research project (with PSY 477 or ZOO 320) is recommended.
Operations Research Methods
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Mathematics, 123
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5818).
Operations research is the use of scientific methods in decision
making. It seeks to observe, understand, and predict the behavior
of human-machine systems through the use of mathematical
models.
This minor is available to all majors. A minimum 2.00 GPA is
required for all courses applicable to the minor. All courses must
be taken for a grade, not credit/no-credit.
To explore the possibility of designing your own program,
contact the adviser for this minor in the Department of
Mathematics. Otherwise, follow the program below, which
MTH 435 Modeling Capstone (3)
MTH 437 Game Theory (3)
MTH 439 Combinatorics (3)
MTH 447 Topics in Mathematical Finance (3)
STA 483 Analysis of Forecasting Systems (3)
Physics
(24-30 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Physics, 133 Culler
Hall (513-529-5625).
This minor provides a foundation in classical and modern
physics together with enhanced skills in electronics or
computational physics. It is not available to majors in physics,
engineering physics, or biological physics. Courses may not be
taken on a credit/no-credit basis.
Program Requirements
All of these:
PHY 181, 182 The Physical World I, II (4, 4)
PHY 183, 184 General Physics Laboratory (1, 1)
PHY 281 Contemporary Physics I (3)
PHY 293 Contemporary Physics Laboratory (2)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5), MTH 251 Calculus II (4) or
MTH 153 Calculus I (4), MTH 251 Calculus II (4) or
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
Either:
PHY 292 Electronic Instrumentation (3) and
PHY 294 Laboratory in Electronic Instrumentation (2), or
PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
Plant Biotechnology
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Botany, 316
Pearson Hall (513-529-4200).
This minor exposes students to the field of plant
biotechnology and related areas, including the tools and methods
used to manipulate living organisms, as well as the ethical and
social implications of these technologies.
All courses for the minor must be taken for a grade and a
minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 must be obtained.
Program requirements:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular
Biology (4) or
BOT 191 Plant Biology (4) or
BOT 101 Biotechnology: Coming of Age in the 21st Century (3)
BOT 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3) or
MBI 365 Molecular and Cell Biology (3)
BOT 203L Plant Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
BOT 255 Introduction to Biotechnology (3)
BOT 415 Techniques in Plant Biotechnology (3)
Additional courses selected from the following (18 hours):
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4)
BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (4)
The College of Arts and Science /139
BOT/ZOO 342 Genetics (3)
BOT 425 Environmental Plant Physiology (4)
BOT/MBI/ZOO/CSE 466 Bioinformatics Computing Skills (3)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 485 Bioinformatics Principles (3)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4)
CHM 433 Biochemistry (3, 3)
CHM 434 Biochemistry (3, 3)
CHM 438 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
Political Science
(21 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Political Science,
218 Harrison Hall (513-529-2000).
If you are not majoring in political science, this minor offers
you an opportunity to satisfy an interest, strengthen your degree,
or enhance your preparation for career or further education.
This minor is not open to students with majors or another
minor in the Department of Political Science.
Program Requirements
Take this course first:
POL 241 American Political System (4)
Take at least one of the following (which are prerequisites to corresponding
300-400 level courses):
Remaining hours from these:
RUS 133, 137, 230, 250, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 263, 401, 412, 450, or 451, 311 or 411 (if
not used as a required course).
Russian, East European, and Eurasian
Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
This interdisciplinary minor allows students to study the
history politics, and culture of Russia, East Europe, and Eurasia,
broadly defined as the territory of the former Soviet republic, from
medieval times to today. Drawing from a range of disciplines and
approaches, students have the opportunity to explore issues of
political, social, and regional identity and cultural diversity, as
well as official and popular culture.
Proficiency in Russian 102 or above is required. Students are
encouraged to attend the Miami summer Russian language
workshop in Novgorod, Russia, the Miami summer Havighurst
cultural workshop in varying locations in Russia, Eastern Europe,
and Eurasia, or an approved academic study program in Central
Asia, the Caucasus, or East Europe.
POL 201 Political Thinking (4)
POL 221 Modern World Governments (4)
POL 261 Public Administration (4)
POL 271 World Politics (4)
Program Requirements
Choose at least nine semester hours from other political science
courses at the 300 level or above. Additional POL hours at the 200
level or above to complete 21 hours. A minimum 2.00 GPA is
required in all POL hours. All courses must be taken for a grade.
Students are encouraged to consult with a faculty adviser when
selecting courses. At least 12 hours applied to the minor must be
taken at Miami.
Core Requirements
Required Course
RUS 102 Beginner's Course in Russian (4)
This one:
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian, East European, and Eurasian
Studies (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
HST 324, 374, 375, 378, 470, 475, 476
Choose ONE of the following:
POL 328, 331, 332, 334, 420, 430B, 488; ITS 402O
Choose ONE of the following:
Religion
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Comparative
Religion, 164 Upham Hall (513-529-4300). This minor is arranged
with a faculty adviser in the department.
Program Requirements
This one:
ATH/GEO/RUS 306; GEO 408; POL 230; HST 436; POL 440; REL 235
Choose TWO additional courses from the following list or those listed above:
ARC 404; CLS/RUS 214; MUS 188; REL/RUS 133; RUS 137, 201, 202, 250, 251, 253,
255, 256, 257, 258, 301, 302, 311, 401, 411, 412, 450; RUS/FST 263, 272.
Social Justice and Inequalities
(18 semester hours)
REL 302 Methods for the Study of Religion (4) and
At least 14 additional semester hours in religion (nine hours must be at 300 level and
above, including 302).
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628).
Note: No more than six hours at 100 level can count toward the minor. REL 209 does not
count toward the minor.
The Minor in Social Justice Studies (SJS) offers a
sociologically-based foundation of knowledge and skills to
examine the essential connections between social values,
structured inequalities, and social change.
Russian
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of German, Russian,
and East Asian Languages, 172 Irvin Hall (513-529-2526).
You must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50 for
courses taken at Miami. Courses for the Russian minor must be
taken for a grade (not credit/no-credit).
Program Requirements
Eighteen semester hours in Russian above 100 level, including these:
RUS 201, 202, 301, 302, and 311 or 411.
Program Requirements:
All of these:
SJS/SOC 165 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3)
SJS/SOC 323 Social Justice and Change (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
SOC/BWS 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
Choose TWO of the following:
SOC/WGS 203 Sociology of Gender Roles (3)
SOC 205 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization (3)
SOC/FSW/WGS 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC 225 Work and Occupational Justice (3)
SOC/DST/EDP/WGS 278 Women and (Dis)ability: Fictions and Contaminations of Identity
(3)
140/ The College of Arts and Science
Choose ONE of the following:
SOC/GTY 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
SOC/DST/EDP/WGS 375 (Dis)Ability Allies: To be or not to be? Developing Identity and
Pride from Practice (3)
SJS/SOC 487 Globalization, Social Justice, and Human Rights (3)
SOC 440A Field Experience-Research (3-4)*
* Must be preapproved by instructor for Social Justice related content.
SOC 205 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization (3)
SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
SOC 411 Social Conflict (3)
Note: The use of independent study hours or SOC 490 must be preapproved by the CDA in Sociology.
OPTION IN SOCIAL SCIENCE
All of these:
Sociology
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Sociology and
Gerontology, 375 Upham Hall (513-529-2628). Applied Sociological
Research and Criminology minors are described earlier.
Program Requirements: Pre-professional Minor
This pre-professional minor is for non-sociology majors
planning careers in law, medicine, dentistry, business, and social
science. Depending on your option, the minor consists of three or
four required courses and additional hours chosen from a set of
electives. Not all courses are offered each semester or year.
You must declare this minor before or during your junior year.
You may pursue only one Pre-professional sociology minor. A
minimum overall GPA of 2.50 is required. All courses for this
minor (excluding fieldwork) must be taken for a grade.
OPTION IN LAW
All of these:
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4) or
SOC 202 Social Deviance (4)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
Choose the remaining hours from the following:
SOC 202, 348, 352, 372, 411, 454
OPTION IN MEDICINE OR DENTISTRY
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 262 Research Methods (4)
SOC 482 Sociological Theory (4)
Any other course in sociology (2-4)
Spanish
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Spanish and
Portuguese, 268 Irvin Hall (513-529-4500).
You must plan your program with your adviser in the
department. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit. This
minor consists of Spanish courses above the 202 level.
Program Requirements
This course:
SPN 311 Grammar Review and Introductory Composition (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Language/Linguistics (3)
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
Choose ONE of the following sequences:
SPN 351, 352 Cultural History of Spain I, II (3, 3)
SPN 361, 362 Spanish American Cultural History I, II (3, 3)
SPN 381, 382 Spanish Language and Hispanic Culture I, II (3, 3)
Two additional courses from any 300 level course (excluding SPN 303 and SPN 341),
or SPN 420, 430, 440, or 481-484. Other 400 level courses may be taken with
permission from the instructor.
All of these:
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3) MPF
SOC 357 Medical Sociology (3)
SOC 372 Social Stratification (3)
Choose at least TWO of the following:
GTY 335 Disability and Aging (3)
GTY 356 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Health and Aging (3)
GTY 478 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Chronic Illness (4)
GTY 485 Long-Term Care in an Aging Society (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 221 Human Sexuality (3)
SOC 257 Population (3)
SOC 260A Internship: An Introduction to Applied Sociology and Human Services (1-4)
SOC 318 Sociology of Aging and the Life Course (3)
SOC 358 The Sociology of Mental Disorders (3)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
Statistical Methods
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Statistics, 311
Upham Hall (513-529-7828).
This minor builds on the statistical methods of estimation and
hypothesis testing introduced in the introductory statistics course.
It includes additional study of the statistical methods involved in
regression analysis and experimental design as well as options for
study of non-parametric, quality control, and/or sampling
methods. A Capstone experience in statistics may also be included
as part of the minor.
KNH 206 AIDS: Etiology, Prevalence, and Prevention (3)
KNH 232 Health Issues of Children and Youth (2)
KNH 243 Women's Health Care: Problems and Practices (3)
KNH 386 African Americans & Health Issues (3)
KNH 462 Health Promotion Program Planning and Evaluation (3)
PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
PHL 475 Justice in Health Care (4)
This minor is not available to students majoring in
mathematics, statistics, or mathematics and statistics.
OPTION IN BUSINESS
Program Requirements
All of these:
All of these:
SOC 151 Social Relations (4) or
SOC 153 Sociology in a Global Context (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
Choose at least TWO of the following:
SOC 225 Work and Occupational Justice (3)
SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)
SOC 454 Formal Organization (3)
Choose at least ONE of the following:
GTY 365 Social Policy and Programs in Gerontology (3)
SOC 203 Sociology of Gender Roles (3)
To complete the minor in statistical methods, you must earn at
least 18 semester hours with at least a 2.00 GPA. A course taken on
a credit/no credit basis does not apply toward the minor.
MTH 151 or MTH 153 or MTH 249
STA 261 or STA 301 or STA 368
STA 363
Choose THREE courses from the following:
STA 333, 365, 402, 404, 432, 475
The College of Arts and Science /141
Statistics
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Statistics, 311
Upham Hall (513-529-7828).
Statistical methods are increasingly in use in decision- making
and data analysis in business and industry. Moreover, basic
research in the biological, management, and social sciences, as well
as in some areas of humanities, is also increasingly statistical in
nature. As a result, demand for persons knowledgeable in the
science of statistics is on the rise. The minor in Statistics provides a
program in statistics suitable for students with good mathematical
abilities.
This minor is not available to students majoring in either
statistics or mathematics and statistics. This minor is available to
students majoring in mathematics.
To complete the minor in Statistics, you must earn at least 18
semester hours with at least a 2.00 GPA. A course taken on a
credit/no credit basis does not apply toward the minor.
Program Requirements
All of these:
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
STA 301, STA 401, STA 463, and STA 466
Choose ONE of the following:
STA 333, 365, 402, 404, 427, 432, 462, 475, 483
Urban and Regional Analysis
(20 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Geography, 216
Shideler Hall (513-529-5010).
Selected GEO 460 courses and other courses may be substituted with permission of your
primary adviser.
Women's, Gender, and Sexuality
Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the director of the Women’s, Gender,
and Sexuality Studies Program, 126 MacMillan Hall (513-529-4616).
The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program is a
dynamic, interdisciplinary program that investigates how our lives
are affected by gender race, class, age, sexuality, religion,
(dis)ability, gender identity, and nationality. Women’s, Gender,
and Sexuality Studies emphasizes the importance of
understanding gender as a part of wider social and political
structures
of
power,
knowledge,
experience,
culture,
embodiedness, intimacy, and labor. Women’s, Gender, and
Sexuality Studies courses are organized around contemporary
feminist research and theory, and focus intersectionally on women,
gender, and sexuality as subjects of inquiry. Our coursework also
focuses on how theory and practice come together. Students may
choose from courses spanning departments, disciplines, divisions
and ideologies. The Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
program provides a context in which women's work and women's
issues are explored in-depth, celebrating women's creativity,
women's lives, and women's work. In Women's, Gender, and
Sexuality Studies, students find an active and supportive
community, close interaction with faculty, opportunities to take on
leadership roles, and an academic program that allows them to
cross the traditional disciplinary boundaries.
This minor may be completed by any student. You are urged
to choose your courses with an adviser. Women’s, Gender, and
Sexuality Studies courses may fulfill other departmental, college,
or Miami Plan requirements.
Urban and regional planners develop programs and policies
to guide future growth and redevelopment of urban, suburban,
and rural communities. They assist elected officials in solving the
social, economic, and environmental problems of their
communities.
A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
This minor fulfills the Miami Plan Thematic Sequence requirement.
This minor is not available to urban and regional planning
majors. All courses must be taken for a grade, not credit/no-credit,
except by permission of the primary adviser. Six courses, or at least
20 semester hours, are required. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required
for all courses in the minor.
WGS 401 The Role of Women in a Transforming Society (3)
BWS/WGS/ENG 432 Feminism and the Diaspora: U.S. Women of Color (3)
Program Requirements
Choose ONE of the following:
Choose ONE of the following:
Program Requirements
WGS/PHL 355 Feminist Theory (4)
WGS/ENG 368 Feminist Literary Theory and Practice (3)
WGS/ENG 435 Queer Theory (3)
WGS/BWS 437 Black Feminist Theory (3)
Feminist theory course approved by the Women’s Studies Advisory Committee
All of these:
Other courses:
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3)
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
Choose TWO or THREE of the following to bring the total to 20 hours:
GEO 241 Map Interpretation (3) or
GEO 242 Mapping a Changing World (3)
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
GEO 442 Advanced GIS (3)
GEO 444 GIScience in Landscape Ecology (3)
GEO 447 Aerial Photo Interpretation (4)
GEO 448 Techniques and Applications of Remote Sensing (3)
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GEO 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 457 Global Cities (3)
GEO 458 Cities of Difference (3)
GEO 462 Public Space (3)
GEO 467 Land Use, Law and the State (3)
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization (3)
GEO 476 Global Poverty (3)
GEO 493 Urban Field Experience (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
WGS 201 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3) is strongly recommended, particularly as a
first course for students considering this minor.
WGS courses and courses cross-listed with Women's, Gender, and
Sexuality Studies to be used for the remaining hours.
Courses, not cross-listed with the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality
Studies Program, may be approved for this minor. Special topics
courses offered by the program and selected honors seminars are
offered most semesters.
142/ The College of Arts and Science
Writing-Rhetoric
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of English, 356
Bachelor Hall (513-529-5221).
This minor provides an understanding of how language and
writing shape actions and attitudes and form persuasive discourse
through study of rhetorical theory for writers, research methods in
writing, and practice in a wide range of writing that
college-educated graduates can be expected to produce in their
civic and professional lives.
Courses taken credit/no-credit will not count toward the
minor. A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the
minor.
Program Requirements
Required courses:
ENG 223 Strategies for Writers (3)
ENG 415 Capstone in Professional Writing (3) or
ENG 495R Capstone in Rhetoric and Writing (3)
Elective courses (12 hours):
ENG/IMS 171 Humanities and Technology (3)
ENG 224 Digital Writing and Rhetoric: Composing with Words, Images and Sounds (3)
ENG 225 Advanced Composition (3)
ENG 226 Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Fiction and Poetry (3)
ENG 298 Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies (3)
ENG 301 History of the English Language (4)
ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4)
ENG 303 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
ENG 304 Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)
ENG 315 Business Writing (3)
ENG 323 Creative Non-Fiction (3)
ENG 411 Visual Rhetoric (3)
ENG 412 Print and Digital Editing (3)
ENG 413 Grant and Proposal Writing (3)
ENG 414 Usability and User Experience (3)
ENG 481 Writing Center Consulting (3)
The Farmer School of Business /143
The Farmer School
of Business
Student Services Office
1022 Farmer School of Business
Phone: 513-529-1712
www.fsb.muohio.edu
Degrees and Majors Offered
Bachelor of Science in Business in:
Accountancy
Business-Economics
Finance
Interdisciplinary Business Management
Management and Leadership
Management Information Systems
Marketing
Supply Chain and Operations Management
Minors in:
Arts Management
Business Analytics
Business Legal Studies
Economics
Entrepreneurship
Finance
International Business
Management
Management and Leadership
Management Information Systems
Management of Information Technologies
Marketing
Risk Management and Insurance
Supply Chain Management
Certificate Programs in:
China Business Certificate
Associate of Applied Business
(Refer to Hamilton and Middletown section)
Mission Statement
The Farmer School of Business is committed to being a
premier business program that provides students with the lifelong
ability to acquire knowledge and translate it into responsible
action in a competitive global environment
General Information
The objective of the Farmer School of Business is to prepare
young men and women of character and intellectual ability for
positions in business, government, and other complex
organizations. Upon graduation, their educational preparation is
such that, with experience and growth, they should progress to
positions of increasing administrative or executive responsibility.
The School offers associate’s (two-year), bachelor’s, and
master’s degree programs. Undergraduate certificate programs are
also available. Master’s degree programs are described in the
Graduate Programs of Study section. Certificate and associate’s
degree programs are described in the Hamilton and Middletown
section.
Bachelor’s degree majors are offered in eight areas:
accountancy, business-economics, finance, interdisciplinary
business management, management and leadership, management
information systems, marketing, and supply chain and operations
management. The flexibility of each program allows a student to
pursue areas of special interests and needs. Minors are available in
arts management, business analytics, business legal studies,
economics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business,
management, management information systems, management of
information technologies, marketing, risk management and
insurance, and supply chain management.
Accreditation
The Farmer School of Business has been accredited by the
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business at the
undergraduate level since 1932 and at the graduate level since
1961. This association is the only agency recognized nationally to
accredit in the area of professional education for business at the
collegiate level. Its standards include an evaluation of faculty
competence, library facilities, physical plant and equipment,
financial support of the institution, and the content and breadth of
both the professional and nonprofessional curricular requirements.
Advisory Committees
The Business Advisory Council is composed of over sixty
leading business executives, many of whom are alumni of the
School. The council meets with the dean, faculty, and students
twice a year to provide counsel on the School’s programs. The
council is very helpful to the School’s continuing efforts to
maintain excellence in education for future business leaders.
The School also meets regularly with several other external
councils who provide feedback on our various programs: Farmer
Board of Visitors, Center for Business Excellence Advisory Board,
I. S. Advisory Council, Finance Advisory Board, Page Center
Advisory Council, and the Department of Accountancy Advisory
Group.
The Business Student Advisory Committee provides excellent
means of communication between students and faculty. Members
of this committee include students from all programs and class
years within the school and representatives from various business
student organizations.
Divisional and Departmental Honors
The Farmer School of Business offers a divisional honors
program for students who qualify and who desire more intensive
work under the guidance of a faculty mentor(s). Additionally, the
Department of Economics offers a separate departmental honors
program (see requirements under that heading). Students who
successfully complete one or both of these programs will graduate
with the appropriate honors notation on their transcript and under
their names in the commencement program.
Students participating in the University Honors Program will
have opportunity to apply to the Farmer School of Business
(divisional) honors program in the fall of the first year (with entry
decisions occurring in the spring).
Both divisional and departmental honors programs in the
School of Business may be coordinated and integrated with the
University Honors Program. A common project may serve
divisional, departmental, and university honors, but separate and
distinct presentations must be made to earn each honors notation.
For more information, contact the Student Services Office at
the Farmer School of Business, 1022 FSB (513-529-1712) or visit the
website: http:/www.fsb.muohio.edu/programs/honors.
Honorary and Professional Organizations
The School seeks to improve the quality of its programs and
provide educational development opportunities for its students
through its honorary and professional organizations.
144/ The Farmer School of Business
Beta Gamma Sigma, the national scholarship society founded
in 1913 to encourage and reward scholarship and accomplishment
among students of business administration, has an active chapter
at Miami University. Eligibility for election is restricted to the
upper 7 percent of the junior class and the upper 10 percent of the
senior class.
Alpha Iota Delta is a national decision sciences honorary that
elects its members on the basis of scholastic achievement. Alpha
Mu Alpha is a national marketing honorary that elects its members
on the basis of scholastic achievement.
Beta Alpha Psi is a national accounting honorary that elects its
members on the basis of scholastic achievement in accountancy
courses. Omicron Delta Epsilon is a national economics honorary
that elects its members on the basis of scholastic achievement in
economics courses.
Students also are encouraged to participate in student
professional organizations, which include: AIESEC in the
international field; Alpha Kappa Psi; Alpha Upsilon chapter of
Delta Sigma Pi, a professional business fraternity; Association for
Information Systems (AIS), Buck Rodgers Business Leadership
Program; Business Student Advisory Committee (BSAC);
China-American Business Organization (CABO); Economics Club;
Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA);
Farmer School Ambassador Program, Miami Business Consulting;
Miami Finance Association; Miami Business Enterprises; Miami
Finance Association; Global Business Brigades; Honors Business
Association; Miami University Investment Banking Club; Miami
University Student and Alumni Credit Union; Miami University
Student Venture Fund; Mu Kappa tau; Multicultural Business
Student Network; Phi Gamma Nu, Pi Sigma Epsilon, a professional
fraternity in marketing, sales management, and selling; Society for
Human Resources Management; Supply Chain Management
Association, Toastmasters, and Women in Business.
Advisers
Upperclass advisers for all business majors are assigned by the
department of major, and the assignment is posted. Each program
also has a chief adviser who coordinates the advising procedures
within a department and represents the department on the
committee that hears student petitions, the Divisional Committee
of Advisers. Divisional advisers are also available to help business
students with special problems. Advising assignments and
information
is
available
at
the
following
website:
http://www.fsb.muohio.edu/offices/academic-advising.
Special Admission Requirements
Admission to the Farmer School of Business is limited, and the
criteria for admission are subject to change as enrollment demands
vary.
Freshman Admission
Admission to the Farmer School of Business
Admission to the Farmer School of Business generally takes
place upon entry as a first year student. The academic
credentials required will vary during each admission cycle and
are determined by the Office of Admission. The review process is
holistic and comprehensive and considers many variables to
establish the context of a student’s achievements and
demonstrated potential to be successful in the rigorous curriculum.
Additional
details are available on the Farmer School
website: http://www.fsb.muohio.edu/prospective-students/undergradu
ate/admission-requirements.
First year students admitted to the University Honors
program will be directly admitted to the Farmer School of
Business.
Transfer Admission
A limited number of seats are available each semester for
students who were not previously offered direct admission or who
may be transferring from other institutions. Entry in any semester
is restricted to the number of seats available and will be allocated
according to the following processes:
Intra-university or a current Miami University student: To be
admitted into the Farmer School of Business, a student must have
earned at least 30 graded credit hours at Miami University that
apply to a Bachelor of Science in Business degree and hold a GPA
of 3.30 or higher in a set of Miami Plan Foundation and/or
business courses taken at Miami University; this set must include
MTH 151 and ECO 201 (or equivalent courses, unless AP or
post-secondary credit was earned). For more information, please
contact the Student Services Office at (513)529-1712.
Inter-university or external transfers from another college or
university: To be admitted into the Farmer School of Business, a
student must have earned at least 30 graded hours that apply
toward the Bachelor of Science in Business degree. Typically,
students must also have an overall GPA of 3.50 or higher in graded
credit hours earned, which must include MTH 151 and ECO 201 (or
equivalent courses, unless AP or post-secondary credit was
earned). Questions can be directed to the FSB Student Services
Office at (513)529-1712.
Relocating students: Students who initially enroll on Miami’s
Hamilton or Middletown campuses may gain entry into the Farmer
School of Business under the same processes described above for
intra-university transfer.
The business technology programs on the regional campuses
do not have these special admission policies.
Credit Hour Limitations
Students may accelerate their programs by registering in
excess of the average 16 hours per semester needed to complete the
program in eight semesters. Registrations of up to 20 hours are
permitted in a regular semester or eight hours in a five- or six-week
summer term. Course loads in excess of these limitations require
permission from the Student Services office. Requests are normally
only considered if the student earned a 3.50 grade point average
for the preceding semester or is a senior who earned a 3.00 the
previous semester.
Division Curriculum Requirements
In addition to the Miami Plan requirements, all business
programs have a core of basic courses in accounting, information
systems,
economics,
finance,
business
law,
statistics,
organizational behavior, marketing, operations, speaking skills,
and calculus. This core is described in detail later. The following
requirements apply to all business majors:
Business Capstone Experience
In addition to completing a Miami Plan Capstone Experience,
all business majors must complete a business Capstone Experience.
You should complete the business core first. The business
Capstones are senior level experiences which are writing and
speaking intensive, provide for multiple skill development, and
integrate the business course work you have already completed.
All business Capstones are also Miami Plan Capstones; you
may fulfill both requirements with one course. You are encouraged
to consider a Capstone from any business department. A complete
list is available on your DAR or in the advising office.
The Farmer School of Business /145
Communication Requirement
Thematic Sequence Requirement
All business programs require COM 135 Public Expression
and Critical Inquiry. In addition, each major incorporates
communication across the curriculum so that writing and speaking
skills are important characteristics of that program.
Business students must complete a thematic sequence from a
department outside the School of Business. The ISA 2 thematic
sequence, however, is permitted for business students.
Alternatively, a nonbusiness minor or a second degree may be
utilized to meet the requirement.
Credit/No-Credit
All business courses, COM 135, MTH 151 or 153, and any
other specifically required course (except freshman English) or
major requirement must be taken for a grade and not
credit/no-credit.
Diversity Perspectives Requirement
Transfer of Course Credit
All transferred course credits intended to apply to specific
course requirements for any business program are subject to
approval of the department concerned. If credit hours earned are
less than Miami’s equivalent courses, they must be validated by
the department. A department may require an examination or
completion of a higher level course to validate transfer credit.
You must complete at least one course that provides an
understanding of diversity perspectives. This course may be
selected from any division and may overlap with your Foundation
courses, Thematic Sequence, major, or electives. A list of approved
courses is available from the academic adviser or the advising
office in 1022 FSB or at the following website:
http://www.fsb.muohio.edu/offices/academic-advising/forms-documents.
The Department of Accountancy requires transfer students
majoring in accountancy to complete at least four required junior
or senior level accountancy courses at Miami University with at
least a 2.00 grade point average.
Grade Point Average
The Department of Finance requires students majoring in
finance to complete at least 12 elective hours of finance (FIN)
courses at Miami.
A minimum 2.00 cumulative grade point average in business
courses is required for graduation.
Mathematics Requirement
All business students must complete MTH 151 or 153 Calculus
I or equivalent. Advanced placement credit for MTH 151 is
accepted toward fulfillment of this requirement.
Non-Business Requirement
All business majors must take at least 50 percent of their hours
required for graduation outside of the business school. You can
include up to nine hours of economics and six hours of statistics
courses (ISA 205, 291, 321, 331, 333, 365 or STA 200-499) toward
meeting this requirement. This means that business majors must
complete at least 64 hours outside of the Farmer School of Business.
Residency Requirement
All business majors must complete at least 50 percent of their
business courses required for their business degree at Miami
University. These courses include the core business classes and the
courses required for a primary major. These required courses
include ISA 205, ECO 201 and 202, but do not include COM 135 or
MTH 151.
Statistics Requirement
You are expected to take ISA 205 Business Statistics. Any other
introductory probability and statistics course is considered
duplicate credit. Students with advanced placement or transferred
hours in probability and statistics should consult with the decision
sciences and management information systems department before
enrolling in ISA 205.
Technology Requirement
Students are expected to take ISA 235 Information
Technology, and the Intelligent Enterprise. The prerequisites for
ISA 235 are CSE 148 and BUS 101, 102. Students who plan to
complete courses in computer science and software engineering
should consult with the decision sciences and management
information systems department before enrolling in ISA 235 or in
computer science and software engineering courses to avoid
duplicate credit.
The Department of Economics requires students to complete
at least nine hours of advanced economics (above 300 level) at
Miami including ECO 315 and ECO 317.
Curriculum Options
You are responsible for completing the curriculum that is in
effect the date of your initial Miami enrollment. However, since
programs offered by the Farmer School of Business change as new
courses are added and programs are modified, you may opt to
complete a revised program in its entirety.
Double Majors
A student who has earned 60 or more semester hours with a
3.50 or higher GPA on the combination of Miami Plan and business
core course work is permitted to declare a second major in
business. Approval of the second major by the academic
department is required.
Basic Requirements: Bachelor of Science
in Business
To graduate from Miami University with a Bachelor of Science
in Business, you must:
 Earn a minimum of 128 semester hours
 Complete the Miami Plan, the common core, and the
required electives
 Complete the requirements of one major field
 Earn at least a 2.00 cumulative GPA in all business courses
attempted
 Complete at least 64 semester hours of course work in
non-business departments
Common Core of Business Courses
(59-60 semester hours)
All of these:
ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
ACC 222 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
BLS 342 Legal Environment of Business (3)
BUS 101 Foundations of Business Decision Making (3)
BUS 102 Writing for Business Decision Making (1)
COM 135 Introduction to Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3) (MPF IIB)
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4)
ISA 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
146/ The Farmer School of Business
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) (MPF IIC)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) (MPF IIC)
FIN 301 Introduction to Business Finance (3)
MGT 291 Introduction to Management and Leadership (3)
MGT 302 Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
MTH 151 (MPF V) or 153 Calculus I (MPF V), or MTH 249 (MPF V) or 251 Calculus II (4-5)
FSB Senior Capstone Experience (3)
Diversity requirement (3)
Suggested Course Pattern:
Typically, coursework at the 100 and 200 level will be
scheduled during the first and second years, 300 level courses will
be taken in the second and third years and 400 level courses will be
taken in the senior year. You will work with your advisors to
schedule your coursework appropriate with your preparation and
academic goals.
Other Electives
You are encouraged to use the remaining hours in your
program to broaden your educational base with courses from other
divisions of the university, especially in the College of Arts and
Science, and/or to supplement your business programs with
additional business courses beyond your major requirements.
Students enrolled in a four-year bachelor’s degree program in
business may apply a maximum of 12 credit hours earned in
business technology courses to the degree. Business technology
courses, however, do not qualify as either professional or
nonprofessional electives.
If you hold an associate’s degree in business technology and
wish to earn credit toward a B.S. in Business, you may want to
inquire about proficiency examinations in subjects covered in your
business technology courses. Consult with the appropriate
business school department on the Oxford campus.
Major Programs: School of Business
Accountancy- Bachelor of Science in
Business
ACC 321 (ACC 321 must have been taken at Miami). Please contact
the department’s Academic Program Coordinator to learn more
about this option.
High achieving students have the option of pursuing a
dual-degree program in which you can earn both your bachelor’s
and master’s degrees in accountancy within four years. After
completing the program, you are qualified to sit for the CPA
examination in the state of Ohio and most other states that have
adopted the 150-hour education requirement.
To be eligible to apply for the dual-degree program, students
must have completed at least 64 credit hours with a minimum GPA
of 3.40 and have earned a B or better in ACC 221, ACC 222, and
ACC 321 (ACC 321 must have been taken at Miami).
Please contact the department’s Academic
Coordinator to learn more about this option.
Program
Special Curriculum Requirements
Students must earn at least a cumulative 2.00 GPA in all
accountancy courses attempted at Miami. Students must also
complete at least four required junior or senior-level accountancy
courses at Miami.
Program Requirements
All of these:
ACC 321 Intermediate Financial Accounting (3)
ACC 333 Managerial Cost Accounting (3)
ACC 343 Federal Income Tax Accounting (3)
ACC 361 Modeling Business Processes in Accounting Information Systems (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
ACC 422 Financial Accounting Research (3)*
ACC 433 Management Accounting for Processes (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
ACC 452 Internal Auditing (3)
ACC 453 Financial Statement Auditing (3)*
Professional electives:
At least six semester hours, all above the 100-level, including at least one course from a
business department other than accountancy.
* Prerequisite for Master of Accountancy program.
Business-Economics- Bachelor of Science
in Business
For information, contact the Department of Accountancy, 3094
FSB (513-529-6200).
For information, contact the Department of Economics, 2054
FSB (513-529-2836).
The department’s mission is to have nationally recognized
bachelor’s and master’s degree programs that provide students
with the lifelong ability to seek and acquire accounting and
business knowledge and translate it into responsible action in a
competitive environment. The Department of Accountancy has
been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools
of Business International since 1984.
This curriculum is for students primarily interested in
economics but who also desire a broad background in business. It
helps you understand objectives and functions of a private
enterprise economy, fundamentals of economic analysis, and how
to integrate economic principles with various areas of business
administration. The program also teaches how to use economic
analysis as a major tool in reaching independent, well-considered
judgments.
The bachelor’s degree program provides a general
understanding of multiple areas of accounting and related skills to
prepare graduates for entry-level positions that require only an
undergraduate degree and graduate programs.
The master’s degree program provides an in-depth
understanding in selected areas of accounting and business and
related skills to prepare graduates for entry-level positions that
require more than a bachelor's degree.
Dual-Degree Option
Course work involves both required theory courses and
electives. Theory courses provide common analytical background
of modern economics and serve to build analytical skills. The
generous number of electives allows you to pursue different fields,
depending on your interests and educational background.
Honors in Economics
For details on honors
departmental website.
in
economics
please
see
the
Students planning to take the CPA exam in Ohio and in most
other states are required to have 150 hours of education with at
least a bachelor’s degree. This requires additional education
beyond the requirements for a bachelor’s degree from Miami.
It is highly recommended that ECO 311 be completed by the
end of your junior year.
To be eligible to apply for the dual-degree program, students
must have completed at least 64 credit hours with a minimum GPA
of 3.40 and have earned a B or better in ACC 221, ACC 222, and
The department requires all economics majors to complete at
least nine hours of advanced economics (above 300 level) at Miami,
including ECO 315 and 317. Any transfer credit exception for these
Special Curriculum Requirements
The Farmer School of Business /147
Electives:
This curriculum is available to the business student whose
career goals require a program that covers the broad area of
business with an interdisciplinary focus. Beyond the business core
taken by all business majors, this major features an advanced core
of classes centered on economic, legal, managerial, and sales
aspects of the business transaction. Students complete the major by
taking added courses in one of three interdisciplinary areas of
business: business legal studies, entrepreneurship, or international
business.
GPA requirement:
This major is appropriate for the student who wishes to
postpone specialization, the student who wants to display a strong
interest in the international dimensions of business, the pre-law
student who wishes to take pre-legal training in business, or the
entrepreneur who plans to organize and operate their own
business.
two courses must be approved by the director of undergraduate
studies in the department.
Program Requirements
All of these:
ECO 311 Examining Economic Data and Models (3)
ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3)
ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3)
Fifteen additional hours in economics, at least six of those hours must be in courses that
require ECO 315 and/or ECO 317 as prerequisite(s).
At least nine hours of advanced economics (300-level and above) as well as ECO 315 and
ECO 317 must be taken at Miami. Up to three hours of Summer Scholar credit can be
applied toward the 15 hours of advanced economics. Exceptions must be approved by the
director of undergraduate studies.
You must achieve at least a 2.00 GPA in all economics courses taken.
Finance- Bachelor of Science in Business
For information, contact the Department of Finance, 2053 FSB
(513-529-1560).
This major teaches theoretical and practical aspects of
financial management. The general objectives are to teach the
principles of finance, to explain how financial techniques can solve
some of society’s most important problems, and to prepare you for
future responsibilities in financial management.
Course offerings prepare you to work in the finance division
of a business firm; to enter the securities field in either a brokerage
or investment analysis capacity; to enter the real estate business in
sales or appraisal; to enter the insurance business in the fields of
financial planning, property, or casualty insurance; or to pursue a
career in estate planning or trust administration. In addition,
non-business students are offered service courses in personal
finance and in law and the legal process.
Upon completion of the appropriate finance courses, and
upon meeting specified non-academic requirements, you may
qualify to sit for examinations for licensing and professional
designations in the areas of insurance, investments, and real estate.
Special Curriculum Requirements
All students majoring in finance must complete at least 12
elective hours of advanced finance (FIN) courses above 301, 302,
and 401. ESP 306 and all Capstone courses cannot be used as
electives. You must achieve at least a 2.00 GPA in all finance
courses taken.
Students interested in Interdisciplinary Business Management
major will meet with an advisor to discuss the program and
officially declare the major.
Program Requirements
All of these:
BLS 442 Commercial Law (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (4)
Select and complete one of the following tracks:
Business Legal Studies
Both of these:
BLS 464 International Business Law (3)
BLS 437 Cyberlaw (3)
Minimum of 8 hours from:
ACC 343 Federal Income Tax Accounting (3)
BLS 443 Property Law (3)
BLS 462 Estates, Wills, and Trusts (3)
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, & Business (3)
BLS 477 Independent Study in Legal Research (3)
ECO 325 Economic Analysis of Law (3)
ECO 385 Government and Business (3)
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
POL/WGS 347 Women and the Law (3) or
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (3) or
POL 353 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (3) or
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
Entrepreneurship
Both of these:
ESP 366 Imagination and Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 467 Entrepreneurship: New Ventures (4)
Minimum 8 Hours from:
Program Requirements
ESP 306 Financial Aspects of Entrepreneurial Ventures (3)
ESP 311 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3)
ESP 461 Small/Emerging Enterprise Consulting (3)
ESP 464 Social Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 469 Entrepreneurship in Complex Organizations (3)
ESP 477 Independent Study in Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 481 Technology, Products, and Ventures (3)
ESP 490 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (1-3; maximum 3)
All of these:
International Business
The Department of Finance requires students majoring in
finance to complete at least 12 elective hours of finance (FIN)
courses at Miami.
ACC 321 Financial Accounting I (3) or
ACC 333 Managerial Cost Accounting (3) or
ACC 343 Federal Income Tax Accounting (3) or
ACC 383 Comparative Accounting (4)
ECO 301 Money and Banking (3)
FIN 302 Intermediate Financial Management (3)
FIN 401 Principles of Investments and Security Markets (3)
Twelve semester hours of finance (FIN) electives (exclusive of ESP 306 and all Capstone
Experience courses).
Interdisciplinary Business ManagementBachelor of Science in Business
For information, contact the Student Services Office 1022 FSB
(513-529-1712).
Both of these:
BUS 371 International Business (3) or
BUS 373 International Business (3)
ECO 344 International Economic Relations (3)
Minimum 8 Hours from:
ACC 383 Comparative Accounting (4)
BLS 464 International Business Law (3) or
BLS 483 Comparative International Law (4)
BUS 420 International Studies Programs (2; maximum 2)
FIN 417 International Business Finance (3)
MGT 304 Cross-Cultural Management (3)
MKT 425 Global Marketing (4)
148/ The Farmer School of Business
Management and Leadership- Bachelor
of Science in Business
For information, contact the Department of Management, 3056
FSB (513-529-4215).
The major in management and leadership prepares graduates
to manage and lead individuals, teams, and projects in a variety of
contexts across all functional areas of business in profit and
not-for-profit environments. The diversified course of study
develops graduates for positions in management, human
resources, management development, training, change leadership,
employee benefits, compensation, cross-cultural management,
public sector management, consulting, small business, and labor
relations. The content, skills, and practices learned in management
and organizations are transferable across many industries,
functions and roles. In addition, students seeking careers
specializing in the human resources function can select courses
that directly specialize their training.
Program Requirements
All of these:
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MGT 304 Cross Cultural Management (3)
MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
MGT 474 Human Capital Metrics (3)
MGT 495 Strategic Management (3)
Required electives. Select three of these:
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
MGT 404 Compensation Management (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 463 Employee Benefits (3)
Management Information SystemsBachelor of Science in Business
For information, contact the Department of Information
Systems and Analytics, 3095 FSB (513-529-4826).
The management information systems (MIS) major provides
graduates with managerial and technical skills critical to directing
and controlling the information resources of an organization.
Graduates of this program learn fundamental information and
communication theories and technologies such as database theory
and management, systems analysis and design, and data
communications as well as contemporary topics such as
internetworking and world wide web-based technologies for
electronic commerce, data and wireless communications,
multimedia, data mining and warehousing, knowledge
management, and enterprise systems. Emphasis is on structuring
and solving business problems by appropriately applying
technological resources and information management skills.
Majors begin careers in the MIS field or related areas in
positions such as systems analyst, information consultant, web
analyst, web designer, information specialist, business consultant,
software specialist, system consultant, programmer analyst,
system designer, microcomputer specialist, database designer,
data communication specialist, and system architect.
Program Requirements
All of these:
ISA 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
ISA 245 Database Systems and Data Warehousing (3)
ISA 281 Building Web-Based Business Applications I (3)
ISA 301 Data Communications in Business (3)
ISA 387 Designing Business Systems (3)
ISA 403 Building Web-Based Business Applications II (3)
ISA 406 IT Project Management (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise(3)
Choose ONE of the following: The course chosen from this list must be different from
that taken to fulfill the requirement above.
CSE 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
ISA 305 Information Risk Management, Security, and Audit (3)
ISA 385 Applications of Electronic Commerce Technology (3)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
ISA 481 Topics in Information Systems (3-4)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
Marketing- Bachelor of Science in
Business
For information, contact the Department of Marketing, 3057
FSB (513-529-3270).
The modern global society is placing an increasing emphasis
on marketing knowledge and related skills. Global and domestic
corporations’ manufacturing, distributing, buying, and selling
significantly shape the standard of living and global economy. This
is true for both products and services as well as for-profit and
not-for-profit institutions and supply chains.
To prepare students for a career in marketing or as part of a
business decision-making team, this program provides courses in:
branding, promotion, supply chain management, consumer
behavior, marketing research, sales management and personal
selling, imagination and creativity, problem solving skills, creating
customer value, global marketing, interactive media studies, and
guerilla marketing.
Program Requirements
All of these:
MKT 292 Careers in Marketing (1)
MKT 301 Creativity, Innovation, and Decision Making in Marketing (4)
MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (4)
MKT 335 Marketing Research (4)
MKT 405 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
MKT 415 Marketing to Organizations (4)
MKT/IMS 419 Digital Branding (4)
MKT 425 Global Marketing (4)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)
MKT 435 Branding and Integrated Marketing Communications (4)
Select one capstone:
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
MKT 442 Highwire Brand Studio (4)
MKT 495 Marketing Practicum (4)
Supply Chain and Operations
Management- Bachelor of Science in
Business
For information, contact the Department of Management, 3056
FSB (513-529-4215).
In recent years companies have worked to connect the
different areas of their businesses to achieve efficient movement of
goods and services to the consumer. Supply chain management
fills the gap that exists between departments and connects trading
partners to create a smooth flow of information, services, and
products through the supply chain.
The supply chain management major combines courses in
accountancy, decision sciences, operations management,
marketing, logistics and purchasing. The integration of these
disciplines allows supply chain management students to
understand the interaction among them and how to produce and
move goods and services in the most economical way. Students
learn practical industry applications with the aid of field trips,
guest speakers, and simulations in the classroom.
The Farmer School of Business /149
Program Requirements
SCA 410 Advanced Topics in Arts Management (3)
All of these:
Program Requirements: For Business Majors (9 hours)
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
MGT 432 Purchasing and Materials Management (3)
MGT 451 Operations Planning and Scheduling (3)
MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)
MKT 415 Marketing to Organizations (3)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)
MGT/MKT 498 Supply Chain Management (3)
Minors
The programs described below are optional minors in
business areas. A minor is a specific program to be taken along
with a major to complement your skills and increase your career
opportunities. More information about minors is in the Other
Requirements chapter.
Admission into most Farmer School of Business minors is
limited and the respective departments are responsible for
managing their enrollments. Some minors are available to students
on a first-come, first-served basis or have other entry restrictions or
requirements. Therefore, to increase the likelihood of gaining entry
into a FSB minor, interested students should contact the
department offering the minor as early as possible in their
academic careers. Questions can be addressed to the Student
Services Office, 1022 FSB (513-529-1712).
The following minors are open only to non-business majors:
finance, management and organizations, operations management,
risk management and insurance.
Several minors are available to both business majors and
non-business majors: arts management, business analytics,
business legal studies, decision science in business, economics,
entrepreneurship, management information systems, management
of information technologies, marketing, and supply chain
management.
The international business minor is open only to business
majors.
A notation about your completed minor will be on your final
grade transcript if you indicate your minor when you apply for
graduation. The required semester hours are in parentheses beside
each minor.
Important Note: Entry into minors in the School of Business is
not guaranteed. Likewise there is no guarantee that courses
required to complete a minor will be available on a timely basis.
Six credit hours from these:
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3) (MPF IIA, IIB, H)
ARC 426 Architecture and Society (3)*
ART 181 Concepts in Art (MPF IIA) (3)
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3) (MPF IIA, IIB, IIIB, H)
ART 186 China, Korea, and Japan (3) (MPF IIA, IIB, IIIB, H)
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric to Gothic (3) (MPF IIA, IIB, H)
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern (3) (MPF IIA, IIB, H)
ART 455 20th Century Design and Culture (3)
MUS 135 Jazz: Its History and Evolution (3) (MPF IIA, IIIA, H)
MUS 185 The Survey of African Music in the Diaspora (3)
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3) (MPF IIA, H)
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3) (MPF IIA)* or
THE 103 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance I (1) (MPF IIA)* or
THE 104 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance II (1)
THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (3) (MPF IIA, H)
THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)
THE 490 Theatre and a Cultural Aesthetic (3)*
At least three credit hours from these:
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals 2-D (3)
ART 121 Beginning Drawing (3)
ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D
Any current music ensemble:
KNH 110A&B Beginning Ballet and Beginning Ballet II (2)
KNH 110G Modern Dance (2)
KNH 110R Jazz (2)
KNH 110S Social Dance - Men (2)
KNH 110T Social Dance - Women (2)
THE 123 Acting for the Non-Major (3)
THE 200 Production and Performance Practicum (1-8)
Program Requirements: For Fine Arts Majors
Complete one of the following series of courses:
Take 3 courses (9 hours) from the following:
ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ESP 201 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3) (MPF IIC)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
or
SBI1 Business Institute for Non-Business Students Thematic Sequence:
BUS 301 Macro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3)
BUS 302 Micro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3)
BUS 303 Business Process Integration (3)
or
**ESP1 Entrepreneurship in Different Contexts Thematic Sequence:
ESP 311 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3)
ESP 366 Imagination and Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 469 Entrepreneurship in Complex Organizations (3)
* Capstone
**Arts management minors who wish to complete the ESP 1 thematic sequence coursework are asked to declare the
thematic sequence through the Page Center for Entrepreneurship.
Arts Management
(18 semester hours)
For entry restrictions and more information contact the
Department of Management, 3056 FSB (513-529-4215).
Increased public interest in the arts has created a need for fine
arts and business professionals who are prepared for management
responsibilities in arts councils, museums, art centers, galleries,
orchestras, and theatres.
This minor has two options: one for business majors and one
for fine arts majors. Business majors must plan an individualized
program with the arts management adviser in the appropriate
department. Fine arts majors must plan courses with the assistance
of their business adviser.
Core Requirements (10 hours)
All of these:
SCA 182 Experiencing the Arts (1, repeatable)
SCA 201 Introduction to Arts Management (3)
SCA 340 Arts Management Internship (3)
Business Analytics
(22 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Information
Systems and Analytics, 3095 FSB (513-529-4826).
The business analytics minor complements many majors
(including all business majors) by providing the managerial,
analytical, and technical skills needed to gather data in real-time,
store and organize the data, analyze the data using quantitative
methods, and use the resulting information to make decisions that
will allow an organization to gain competitive advantage.
Coursework includes fundamental information technology and
statistical concepts, database management and data warehouses,
regression analysis in business, optimization of business systems
using management science models, analysis of large data sets
using data mining and business intelligence techniques.
Course Requirements for the Business Analytics Minor
150/ The Farmer School of Business
Analytics Core Courses required for all tracks:
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4)
ISA 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
ISA 245 Database Systems and Data Warehousing (3)
ISA 291 Applied Regression Analysis in Business (3)
Complete the requirements for one of the following tracks
NOTE: All tracks require at least one of the following advanced core
classes:
ISA 321 Quantitative Analysis of Business Problems (3)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
ISA 491 Introduction to Data Mining in Business (3)
Data Mining Track:
Required:
ISA 321 Quantitative Analysis of Business Problems (3)
ISA 491 Introduction to Data Mining in Business (3)
In addition, choose ONE:
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
STA 402 Statistical Programming (3)
Multidisciplinary Track:
Required:
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
In addition, choose ONE:
ISA 321 Quantitative Analysis of Business Problems (3)
ISA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3)
ISA 444 Business Forecasting (3)
ISA 480 Topics in Decision Sciences (3)
ISA 491 Introduction to Data Mining in Business (3)
STA 402 Statistical Programming (3)
Quantitative Methods Track:
Required:
ISA 321 Quantitative Analysis of Business Problems (3)
In addition, choose ONE:
ISA 333 Nonparametric Statistics (3)
ISA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3)
ISA 432 Survey Sampling in Business (3)
ISA 444 Business Forecasting (3)
ISA 480 Topics in Decision Sciences (3)
ISA 491 Introduction to Data Mining in Business (3)
Business Legal Studies
(21 semester hours)
For information and entry restrictions, contact the Department
of Finance, 2053 FSB (513-529-1560). The business legal studies
minor is open to all university students.
Increased sensitivity to the legal implications of doing
business has created the need for greater managerial
understanding of the legal process and its relationship to the
marketplace. This minor allows the business and non-business
major to develop a greater sensitivity to issues of business liability,
governmental regulation of business, public policy, and the origin
and evolution of law, especially in its interfacing with commercial
activities.
Program Requirements
Both of these (6 semester hours):
BLS 342 Legal Environment of Business (3)*
BLS 442 Business Associations and Commercial Law (3)*
At least two of these (6 semester hours minimum, 15 hours maximum; include one course,
noted with an asterisk (*), to fulfill Thematic Sequence):
ACC 343 Federal Income Tax Accounting (3)
BLS 437 Cyberlaw (3)
BLS 443 Property Law (3)*
BLS 462 Estates, Wills, and Trusts (3)*
BLS 464 International Business Law (3)*
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, and Business (3)**
BLS 483 Comparative International Business Law (4)
ECO 325 Economic Analysis of the Law (3)
ECO 385 Government and Business (3)*
MGT 402 Legal Environment of Personnel and Labor Relations (3)*
* Satisfies Miami Plan Thematic Sequence FIN 1 Law and Commerce.
** Miami Plan Capstone Experience course.
† Students may not receive credit for both BLS 464 and BLS 483
Remaining hours from these:
ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
ECO 406 Environmental Economics (3)
ECO 451 United States Economic History (3)
ECO 462 Economics of Compensation, Unionization, and Discrimination (3)
IES 431 Principles of Environmental Science (3)
IES 450 Environmental Law (3)
HST 362 The Era of the American Revolution (3)
HST 363 The Early American Republic 1783-1815 (3)
HST 368 20th Century America 1900-1933 (3)
HST 369 20th Century America Since 1933 (3)
HST 382 Women in American History (3)
HST 387 U.S. Constitution to 1865 (3)
HST 388 U.S. Constitution Since 1865 (3)
HST 397 American Environmental History (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (3)
PHL 331 Political Philosophy (4)
PHL 335 Philosophy of Law (4)
POL 302 Classical Political Philosophy (4)
POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 353 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (4)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)
POL 382 International Law (3)
SOC 412 Sociology of Law (3)
Economics
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Economics, 2054
FSB (513-529-2836). The economics minor is open to all university
students.
This minor is designed for students who are interested in
exploring how their major area of specialization connects to the
workplace and the economy. Students who are preparing for law
school or a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program
will find this minor valuable.
The 18 hours of economics must be completed with at least a
2.00 GPA. Either ECO 315 or ECO 317 must be taken at Miami.
Program Requirements
All of these (9 semester hours):
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) (MPF IIC)
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) (MPF IIC)
ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3) or
ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3)
Nine additional semester hours of advanced economics (300-level and above), which may
include the other intermediate theory course.
Electives (9 semester hours)
Entrepreneurship
(18 semester hours)
For
information,
contact
the
Page
Entrepreneurship, 2078 FSB (513-529-1221).
Center
for
This interdisciplinary minor exposes students to the mindset
and behavior of successful entrepreneurs as well as the principles
and concepts associated with entrepreneurship in private, social,
and public ventures. The program complements majors in all of
Miami’s academic divisions and promotes the applications of
entrepreneurial concepts in support of each student’s passion,
regardless of major. Upon completion of the minor, students will
be able to: (a) recognize entrepreneurial opportunities; (b) assess
the risk and reward associated with each opportunity; (c) create the
appropriate plans to pursue the opportunity; and (d) appreciate
the role entrepreneurial thinking and behavior plays in their
personal and professional lives, and in society at-large.
The Farmer School of Business /151
The entrepreneurship minor is open to all university students
and can be used to satisfy a Thematic Sequence by non-business
majors.
Program Requirements:
All of these:
ESP 306 Financial Aspects of Entrepreneurial Ventures (3)
ESP 311 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3)
ESP 366 Imagination and Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 467 Entrepreneurship: New Ventures (3)* or
ESP 461 Small/Emerging Enterprise Consulting (3)
Six hours from among the following:
BLS 342 Legal Environment of Business (3)
ESP 201 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 461 Small/Emerging Enterprise Consulting (3)
ESP 464 Social Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 469 Entrepreneurship in Complex Organizations (3)
ESP 477 Independent Study (up to 3 hours)
ESP 481 Technology, Products, and Ventures (3)
ESP 490 Special Topics in Entrepreneurship (up to 3 hours)
IMS 333 Digital Innovation and Entrepreneurship (3)
* Capstone
Finance
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Finance, 2053 FSB
(513-529-1560).
This minor, open to non-business majors only, provides
in-depth study of financial management and introduces financial
topics of current importance. The courses provide financial
management tools and techniques relevant both to corporate
finance and investments. This minor allows you to develop and
integrate numerous skills and techniques relevant to modern
finance.
All 18 semester hours must be taken at Miami University. A
minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
Program Requirements
All of these:
ACC 221 Principles of Financial Accounting (3)
ECO 301 Money and Banking (3)
FIN 301 Introduction to Business Finance (3)*
FIN 401 Principles of Investments (3)**
Six semester hours from these:
FIN 302 Intermediate Financial Management (3)
FIN 402 Fixed-Income Portfolio Management (3)
FIN 403 Portfolio Management (3)
FIN 408 Commercial Bank Management (3)
FIN 417 International Business Finance (3)
FIN 475 Financial Policies of Corporations (3)
* Requires prerequisites: ECO 201, ECO 202, ACC 221, and ACC 222.
** Requires prerequisite: ISA 205.
International Business
(21 semester hours)
For information, contact the Student Services Office, 1022 FSB
(513-529-1712).
This minor, open only to business majors, offers a
concentration of courses providing a foundation for a career in
international business. A core of courses from Farmer School of
Business and electives from other disciplines focus on international
topics. This minor does not fulfill the thematic sequence requirement.
However, courses have been identified in the list of "Acceptable
Elective Courses" for the international business minor that either
fully or partially satisfy a thematic sequence. A minimum of 21
hours, including the core requirements, with at least a C average is
required.
Approved General Electives
You are required to take a minimum of six hours of approved
general electives. The six hours cannot be used to fulfill both the
Miami Plan Foundation requirement and the international
business minor requirements. Electives must be non-business
courses; one may be an upper level language course that focuses on
culture and literature. Language courses that stress conversation
and grammar cannot be used as general electives. The suggested
electives are recommended, but by no means comprise the extent
of courses that would be useful preparation for international
business. Some courses offered on the Luxembourg campus
(MUDEC) may be used as electives.
Students usually design their own concentration of electives; a
list of all approved electives is available in the advising office. If
there is a course(s) you have taken at Miami or another university
that you feel qualifies as an approved general elective, please
petition the International Studies Committee for approval. Forms
are located in the Student Services Office, 1022 FSB.
Language Preparation
This minor requires foreign language skills through the 201
level or above at an accredited American university or a school
associated with an accredited American university. This
requirement may not be met through proficiency or AP credit. The
College of Arts and Science provides courses for preparation in a
variety of foreign languages.
Study Abroad
Miami offers international education at the John E. Dolibois
European Campus in Luxembourg (MUDEC), where programs
have been available since 1968. Students may also participate in the
International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) and choose from
institutions in more than 30 countries. The Farmer School of
Business offers international programs for two-, three-, or six-week
terms. Students study FSB courses and international business in
Europe, Asia, and Latin America, take field trips to other countries,
and meet with business executives and government officials.
Program Requirements
Option A or Below (12)
Foreign language (3)
Approved general electives (6)
Option A
This one:
ECO 344 International Economic Relations (3)
Choose THREE of the following:
ACC 383 Comparative Accounting (4)
BLS 464 International Business Law (3)
BUS 373 International Business in Focus (3)
FIN 417 International Business Finance (3)
MGT 304 Cross Cultural Management (3)
MKT 425 Global Marketing (3)
And/or any business courses, approved in advance by the FSB International Studies
Committee such as those offered at the Dolibois European Campus in Luxembourg or an
approved international summer program (3-6).
Option B
This one:
ECO 441 International Trade (3)
Choose ONE of the following:
ECO 442 International Monetary Relations (3)
FIN 417 International Business Finance (3)
Choose TWO of the following:
ACC 383 Comparative Accounting (4)
BLS 464 International Business Law (3)
BUS 373 International Business in Focus (3)
MGT 304 Cross Cultural Management (3)
MKT 425 Global Marketing (4)
And/or any business courses, approved in advance by the FSB International Studies
Committee such as those offered at the Dolibois European Campus in Luxembourg or an
approved international summer program (3-6).
152/ The Farmer School of Business
Management
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Management, 3056
FSB (513-529-4215).
This minor is available to any non-business major, with the
exception of Engineering Management, and focuses on the
management of human and non-human resources. It is designed
for majors in the College of Arts and Science, the School of
Education, Health, and Society, and the School of Engineering and
Applied Science. It also enables a pre-business student who did not
enter the Farmer School of Business to apply pre-business courses
to a minor. Students can expect to have to take two or three courses
for this minor during the summer.
Program requirements:
All of these:
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4) or
PSY 293 Research Design and Analyses in Psychology I (4) or
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3) or
BUS 101 Foundations of Business Decision Making (3)
MGT 291 Introduction to Management & Leadership (3)
MGT 302 Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management (3)
Choose TWO of the following:
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
MGT 303 Human Resource Management (3)
MGT 304 Cross Cultural Management (3)
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
MGT 404 Compensation Management (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MGT 406 Staffing Organizations (3)
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
MGT 432 Purchasing and Materials Management (3)
MGT 451 Operations Planning and Scheduling (3)
MGT 453 Quality Management Systems (3)
MGT 463 Employee Benefits (3)
Management and Leadership
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Management, 3056
FSB (513-529-4215).
Management of people and organizations is a broadly
transferable skill which will help any major supervise others,
integrate diverse individuals and diverse functions, and develop
successful individuals and teams to meet organizational goals.
To be assured of enrollment into the required courses for this
minor, students should formally declare the minor by obtaining
the appropriate signature from the Department of Management. In
order to guarantee that all declared minors have access to the
courses, the minor has an enrollment limit; therefore early
declaration is advised.
Program Requirements
All of these:
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3) or
BUS 101 Foundations of Business Decision Making (3)
MGT 291 Introduction to Management and Leadership (3)
MGT 303 Human Resources Management (3)
Choose THREE of the following:
MGT 304 Cross Cultural Management (3)
MGT 381 Managerial Communication and Consulting (3)
MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
MGT 404 Compensation Management (3)
MGT 405 Labor Relations and Conflict Management (3)
MGT 406 Staffing Organizations (3)*
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
MGT 463 Employment Benefits (3)
MGT 474 Human Capital Metrics (3)
Management Information Systems
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Management
Information Systems and Analytics, 3095 FSB (513-529-4826).
The management information systems (MIS) minor, open to
all university students, provides students with other majors the
managerial and technical skills critical to understanding, using,
and applying information technology within organizations. The
MIS minor gives students a strong background in information and
communications technologies, database theory and application,
and enterprise systems. Additional coursework may focus on
programming and development skills, project management,
E-commerce and web development, or other current topics such as
data and wireless communications. Emphasis is on structuring and
solving business problems by appropriately applying
technological resources.
A minimum 2.00 GPA is required for all courses in the minor.
You must contact a management information systems advisor in
the department to have the minor noted on your grade transcript
when applying for graduation.
Neither BTE nor IMS courses can be substituted for courses
listed below.
Program Requirements
Required courses: (6 hours)
ISA 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
ISA 245 Database Systems and Data Warehousing (3)
One of the following: (3 hours)
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
Two additional ISA courses from the following:
(the courses chosen from this list must be different from those taken to fulfill the
requirements above) (6 hours)
ISA 281 Building Web-Based Business Applications I (3)
ISA 301 Data Communications in Business (3)
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
ISA 305 Information Technology, Risk Management, Security and Audit (3)
ISA 385 Applications of Electronic Commerce Technology (3)
ISA 387 Designing Business Systems (3)
ISA 403 Building Web-Based Business Applications II (3)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
ISA 406 IT Project Management (3)
ISA 481 Topics in Information Systems (3)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
One additional courses from the following electives:
(the course chosen from this list must be different from those taken to fulfill any of the
requirements above) (3 hours)
ACC 361 Modeling Business Processes in Accounting Information Systems (3)
CSE 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
ENG 313 Technical Writing (3)
GEO 441 Geographic Information Systems (3)
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
ISA 281 Building Web-Based Business Applications I (3)
ISA 301 Data Communications in Business (3)
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
ISA 305 Information Technology, Risk Management, Security and Audit (3)
ISA 385 Applications of Electronic Commerce Technology (3)
ISA 387 Designing Business Systems (3)
ISA 403 Building Web-Based Business Applications II (3)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
ISA 406 IT Project Management (3)
ISA 481 Topics in Information Systems (3-4)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
MGT 416 Organizational Change Management (3)
MGT 474 Human Capital Metrics (3)
MKT/IMS 419 Digital Branding (4)
The Farmer School of Business /153
Management of Information
Technologies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Information
Systems and Analytics, 3095 FSB (513-529-4826).
Modern digital enterprises have created a strong demand for
individuals who understand the contributions of information
technologies to their success in a rapidly changing economic
landscape that is global in scope. This unique minor meets this
demand by addressing the needs of two distinct groups of
students.
The first group consists of students with a strong background
in computing or engineering (non-business majors) who need a
firm grasp of important business concepts and practices. The
business courses they will take have been carefully selected to
provide knowledge in the key aspects of the functions in a business
enterprise. The addition to their technical skills of this insight into
business will enable these students to be capable of filling a broad
array of technical positions in any firm involved with computing,
information, and digital technologies.
The second group comprises business students (students not
in the School of Engineering and Applied Science) who need a
solid foundation in computing or engineering technologies. The
minor provides for courses in these areas along three separate
tracks: a computer science track (for MIS majors only), a computer
engineering track; and an electrical engineering track. These students
can aspire to occupying a wide range of managerial positions that
require knowledge of business processes as well as computing and
digital technologies.
Neither BTE nor IMS courses can be substituted for the MIS
courses listed below.
Program Requirements:
Non-Business Majors (18 Semester Hours)
All of these:
ACC 222 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3)
ISA 235 Information Technology and the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
MGT 302 Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management (3)
Management elective. One of these:
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (23)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (for CSE majors only) (3)
MGT 416 Organizational Change Management (3)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)
Programming elective. One of these:
CSE 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
ISA 281 Building Web-Based Business Applications I (3)
Project Management elective. One of these:
EGM/MGT 311 Project Management (3)
ISA 406 IT Project Management (for CSE majors only) (3)
Students not in the School of Engineering and Applied Science
Computer science track (MIS majors only) (18 semester hours)
All of these:
ACC 361 Modeling Business Processes: Accounting Information Systems (3)
CSE 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSE 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
Computer science elective. One of these:
CSE 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3)
CSE 278 Computer Architecture (3)
CSE 283 Data Communication and Networks (3)
Computer engineering track (18 semester hours)
All of these:
CSE 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
CSE 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3)
ECE 287 Digital System Design (4)
ECE 387 Embedded Systems Design (3)
Management elective. One of these:
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
MGT 416 Organizational Change Management (3)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)
Other business electives. One of these:
ACC 361 Modeling Business Practices: Accounting Information Systems (3)
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, and Business (3)
EGM/MGT 311 Project Management (3)
ESP 481 Technology, Products, and Ventures (3)
ISA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 415 Leadership, Power, and Decision Making (3)
MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)
Electrical engineering track (18 semester hours)
All of these:
CSE 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3)
ECE 205 Electric Circuit Analysis I (4)
ECE 287 Digital System Design (4)
ECE 304 Electronics (3)
Management elective. One of these:
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
ISA 404 Business Intelligence and Knowledge Management (3)
MGT 416 Organizational Change Management (3)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)
Other business electives. One of these:
ACC 361 Modeling Business Practices: Accounting Information Systems (3)
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, and Business (3)
EGM/MGT 311 Project Management (3)
ESP 481 Technology, Products, and Ventures (3)
ISA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 415 Leadership, Power, and Decision Making (3)
MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)
Marketing
(24 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Marketing, 3057
FSB (513-529-3270).
This minor, open to all university students, prepares students
for a career in marketing or as part of a business decision-making
team. The modern global society is placing an increasing emphasis
on marketing knowledge and related skills. Global and domestic
corporations' manufacturing, distribution, and buying and selling
operations significantly shape the standard of living and the global
economy. This is true for both for-profit and not-for-profit
institutions and supply chains.
Program Requirements
Prerequisites
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4) or
STA 261 (MPF V) or STA 368 (4)
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3) (MPF IIC)
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3) (MPF IIC) (non-business majors only)
All of these:
MGT 416 Organizational Change Management (3)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (4)
MKT 405 Creating Consumer Value Through Marketing (3)
Other business electives. One of these:
Choose ONE of the following:
Management elective. One of these:
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, and Business (3)
ESP 481 Technology, Products, and Ventures (3)
ISA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3)
ISA 495 Managing the Intelligent Enterprise (3)
MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3)
MGT 415 Leadership, Power, and Decision Making (3)
MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)
MKT 415 Marketing to Organizations (4)
MKT 425 Global Marketing (4)
MKT 435 Branding and Integrated Marketing Communications (4)
154/ The Farmer School of Business
Risk Management and Insurance
Certificates
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Finance, 2053 FSB
(513-529-1560).
This minor, open only to non-business majors, provides an
in-depth study of the risk management process and operational,
legal, moral, and social issues surrounding life and health,
property, and casualty insurance industries along with the
employee benefits area. The financial consequences of being
exposed to pure risk are explored for individuals and businesses.
Tools for handling these exposures are critically analyzed along
with the process of implementing financial and other strategies to
prepare for possible outcomes.
Program Requirements
All of these:
ACC 221 Principles of Financial Accounting (3)
FIN 301 Introduction to Business Finance (3)
FIN 351 Principles of Insurance (3)*
FIN 451 Risk Management and Insurance (3)*
FIN 452 Advanced Life Insurance and Personal Financial Planning (3)*
FIN/MGT 463 Employee Benefits (3)*
* Finance majors cannot use these courses to satisfy both the finance major and this minor requirements.
Supply Chain Management
(21-22 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Management, 3056
FSB (513-529-4215).
A recent study cited supply chain management (SCM) as one
of the three most important management practices for determining
world class performance. This minor, open to all university
students, provides an understanding of SCM as a key business
strategy, and it develops tools for integrating key functions of
procurement, production, marketing, logistics, accounting, and
MIS, leading to successful operation of the entire SCM process.
You will be exposed to career opportunities in this field.
Program Requirements
Business foundation courses. All of these:
ISA 205 Business Statistics (4) or
STA 261 Statistics (4) or
STA 301 Applied Statistics (3) or
STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
MGT 302 Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management (3)
MGT 432 Purchasing and Materials Management (3)
MGT/MKT 498 Supply Chain Management (3)
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3)
MKT 431 Logistics Management (3)
Focus elective. One of these:
ISA 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
MGT 451 Operations Planning and Scheduling (3)
MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)
MKT 415 Marketing to Organizations (4)
China Business Program
The China Business Program is designed to better prepare
students for entry into an increasingly international workplace by
developing an understanding of the culture and customs of China
through language study, overseas experience and associated
coursework. The program, available to students pursuing and
completing the Bachelor of Science in Business degree, will help
develop students' critical thinking and contextual skills by
allowing students to study and personally experience the rapid
pace of economic development and social change in China and the
Far East. The program is designed for students who wish to pursue
a career in business and who have a strong interest in China and
the Far East.
For the courses taken as part of the China Business Program,
students must earn a GPA of at least 2.00. Students must contact
the China Business Program coordinator in the Farmer School of
Business to have this program certificate noted on their academic
transcript when applying for graduation. The program contains an
embedded Liberal Education Thematic Sequence.
Program requirements
Chinese Language:
Two years or more of Chinese
Note: Students must complete CHI 202 and may choose to take higher levels.
Cultural Experience:
Completion of an approved* thematic sequence or minor related to China:
REL 3 Religion and Philosophy of Buddhist Asia
SDT 1 Self Designed Thematic Sequence (approved by LEC)*
Chinese Minor
East Asian Studies Minor
International Business Minor with approved* electives
Off-shore Experience:
Junior semester in China
Any one of the following:
Two approved* summer study abroad programs, such as the Summer Intensive Chinese
Program or the FSB's Far East or Pacific Rim Summer International program.
One approved* summer program and an approved internship experience. Completion of an
approved, business related internship in China or related to China (BUS 330 Professional
Practice).
A second semester of study in China.
* All items marked (*) for approval must be approved by the Jennifer J. Petters Chair in
Asian Business.
Business Coursework:
Completion of a B.S. in Business and completion of two one-credit China Business
Seminars:
BUS 131 China Business Seminar I (1)
BUS 231 China Business Seminar II (1)
The School of Creative Arts /155
The School of
Creative Arts
Office of the Dean
104 Center for Performing Arts
Phone: 513-529-6010
www.fna.muohio.edu
Degrees and Majors Offered
Bachelor of Arts in Architecture
Bachelor of Arts in the History of Art and Architecture
Bachelor of Arts in Music
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre
Bachelor of Fine Arts in:
Art
Graphic Design
Interior Design
Bachelor of Music in:
Music Education
Music Performance
Bachelor of Science in Art in:
Art Education
Minors:
2D Media Studies
2D Media Studies- for Art Education Majors
3D Media Studies
Art and Architectural History
Arts Management
Landscape Architecture
Music Composition
Music History
Music Performance
Music Theatre
Theatre Arts
Urban Design
Undergraduate Certificate in:
Design Thinking
General Information
The School of Creative Arts offers students opportunity to
develop artistic competence, to prepare for a variety of careers in
the arts, and to gain a broad cultural and academic background.
Programs in the School lead to the following bachelor's degrees:
Bachelor of Arts in Architecture, Bachelor of Arts in History of Art
and Architecture, Bachelor of Arts in Music, Bachelor of Arts in
Theatre, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, and Bachelor of
Science in Art. Graduate degrees offered by the School are
described in the section for the Graduate School.
Accreditation
The Department of Architecture and Interior Design is
accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board and the
Council for Interior Design Accreditation (formerly FIDER). The
Department of Art is accredited by the National Association of
Schools of Art and Design and the Ohio Department of Education.
The Department of Music is an accredited institutional member of
the National Association of Schools of Music and the Ohio
Department of Education, and both departments of Art and Music
are accredited by the National Council of Accreditation for Teacher
Education. The Department of Theatre is accredited by the
National Association of Schools of Theatre.
The Department of Architecture and Interior Design holds
membership in the Association of Collegiate Schools of
Architecture and the Interior Design Educators Council. The
Department of Art holds membership in the College Art
Association. The Department of Theatre holds membership in the
Association for Theatre in Higher Education, Black Theatre
Network, and the United States Institute for Theatre Technology.
Special Admission Requirements
In addition to the requirements for admission to the
University, there are additional requirements that must be fulfilled
in order to declare a major in the School of Creative Arts. Specific
requirements are described in the sections on architecture and
interior design, art, music and theatre. They do not apply to
students in other divisions who wish to register for individual
courses.
Admission into a specific program within the School of
Creative Arts is considered at departmental level and is based on:
(1) scholastic achievement; (2) creative ability and/or achievement
as determined by audition or portfolio review; (3) motivation to
study in a specific fine arts area expressed in a written statement or
interview; (4) recommendation from high school music/theatre
teacher or studio instructor; (5) space availability.
All degree programs in the School of Creative Arts with the
exception of History of Art and Architecture require either a
portfolio review or audition. These reviews are conducted prior to
admission. Please contact the appropriate department for specific
guidelines.
Students in other divisions who wish to participate in
ensembles, productions, and certain activities are also subject to
review and/or audition. Time and format of these proceedings are
determined by the sponsoring department and are not part of the
general admission process.
Course Load
Students in the School of Creative Arts may not register for
more than 20 hours in a semester without approval of the dean.
Global Miami Plan
It is important that you consult with your academic adviser to
be sure that you select courses that also meet requirements for your
major.
Requirements for Graduation
Candidates for degrees must comply with all university
academic regulations and must complete one of the curricula
outlined. A minimum of 128 semester hours is required for
graduation by all departments in the School of Creative Arts.
Miami Plan courses are included in this total.
Please note, in some programs of study it may take longer than
four years to complete the professional requirements for your
bachelor's degree.
No-Major Option
If you are interested in architecture, art, art education, interior
design, or graphic design, but are undecided about making a
commitment to these fields, you can choose one of the no-major
programs. Before choosing this option, however, you must talk with a
School of Creative Arts divisional adviser. Students who choose this
option must fulfill departmental admission requirements before
being admitted as a major. In many programs of study, it will take
156/ The School of Creative Arts
longer than four years to complete the professional requirements for
your bachelor's degree.
The following one-year programs allow you to choose a broad
range of electives and sample fine arts courses on a space-available
basis:
Architecture and Interior Design: No-major option (32 semester hours)
ART 111, 171 Visual Fundamentals (3, 3)
ART 121, 122 Drawing I, II (3, 3)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3) (MPF I)
Miami Plan Foundation II, III, IV, V courses (14)
Art: No-major option (32 semester hours)
ART 111, 171 Visual Fundamentals (3, 3)
ART 121, 122 Drawing I, II (3, 3)
ART 151 What is Graphic Design? (1) (for those students interested in graphic design)
ART 195 The Profession of Art Education (3) (for those students interested in art
education)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3) (MPF I)
Miami Plan Foundation II, III, IV, V courses (14)
The following options do not require a student to declare the no-major option in the
School of Creative Arts, but are suggested plans of study for those students who are
considering a Music or Theatre major.
Music: No-major option (32 semester hours)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (MPF I) (3, 3)
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) (MPF IIA or IIIB)
Applied Music (audition required; see course descriptions) (2, 2)
Miami Plan Foundation III, IV, V courses (16)
Theatre: No-major option (32 semester hours)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3) (MPF I)
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3)*
THE 103 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance I (1) (MPF IIA)
Miami Plan Foundation II, III, IV, V courses (18)
Department of Architecture and Interior
Design
Architecture and Interior Design
Architecture: Bachelor of Arts in Architecture
For information, contact the Department of Architecture and
Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall (513-529-7210).
This preprofessional degree prepares you to enter a
professional graduate program to become a registered/licensed
architect or to enter an architectural field at a preprofessional level.
Miami offers a graduate program, which leads to the professional
degree Master of Architecture.
Freshman and sophomore courses introduce the basics of
architecture and the range of opportunities available in the field.
Junior and senior courses focus on advanced architectural design,
landscape, and urban design. Throughout the program, you are
exposed to the interdisciplinary nature of architecture.
Interior Design: Bachelor of Fine Arts
For information, contact the Department of Architecture and
Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall (513-529-7210).
This is a professional degree program leading to the Bachelor
of Fine Arts degree. Graduates are prepared to enter the interior
design field or to enter a graduate program in interior design,
architecture, or a related discipline.
The curriculum promotes competency in fundamental design,
design process, and visual communication, and an understanding
of interior materials and systems, history and theory, and
professional procedures. Graduates integrate the various aesthetic,
social, technical, and graphic requirements of interior design
problems.
The program balances liberal learning with a comprehensive
professional education. It emphasizes interdisciplinary learning
(reflective of the discipline and of trends in practice) by requiring
several courses outside the major and by emphasizing
interdisciplinary courses and projects. The program promotes
independent, self-directed course work and research, with the
intention of developing in the student a specialized knowledge as a
complement to a broad-based, generalized understanding of the
discipline.
Architecture and Interior Design: Special
Admission Requirements
Admission is possible only in the fall semester. The applicant
must meet all curricular requirements mandated by the university
for entering students. Courses in studio art or other creative areas
(music, drama, creative writing) are strongly encouraged because
they help the student develop creative potential as well as critical
judgment.
Evidence of creative aptitude must be submitted in the form of
a portfolio, due by the same deadline date as other admission
materials. Contact the department for submission guidelines. A
departmental visit is highly recommended. The departmental
admission committee will evaluate your scholastic achievements
and general academic profile in addition to the evidence of
creativity revealed in the portfolio submission. Please contact the
Department of Architecture and Interior Design for further
information about portfolio submission or review requirements at
www.muohio.edu/architecture.
To transfer, you must meet the above criteria (including
portfolio submission) and should have a minimum 3.00 cumulative
GPA Advanced standing for accepted transfer students is
dependent on the strength of the student's academic profile, the
portfolio, and available space. Transfers after the second year are
generally restricted to students coming from other undergraduate
professional or preprofessional architecture and interior design
programs.
National Architectural Accrediting Board
(NAAB) Statement
The following statement is required by the NAAB.
In the United States, most state registration boards require a
degree from an accredited professional degree program as a
prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting
Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S.
professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three
types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of
Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be
granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending
on the extent of its conformance with established educational
standards.
Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree
programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree
and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially,
constitute an accredited professional education. However, the
preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited
degree.
The Department of Architecture and Interior Design at Miami
University offers the following NAAB-accredited degree
programs:
Master of Architecture I (first-professional Bachelor of
Architecture degree + 36 graduate credits)
Master of Architecture II (pre-professional degree + 60
graduate credits)
Master of Architecture III (non-pre-professional degree + 105
graduate credits)
Next accreditation visit for all programs: 2015.
The School of Creative Arts /157
Special Curriculum Requirements
Change of Major Within Department
During the spring semester of the first year majors in
architecture or interior design may apply to the alternate major.
Internal applicants will be given first priority as available spots are
filled.
Advancing to Upper-class Standing
Your work is reviewed at the close of your first, second, and
third years. Regardless of grades in individual courses, the faculty
may deny a student further registration as a major in the
department if they conclude this is in the student’s best interest. In
this event, it may be possible for a student to apply for transfer to
another academic division and, subject to regulations of that
division, continue to register for certain courses in architecture on
an elective basis.
Departmental Honors
You are eligible to graduate with departmental honors if you
meet the following conditions.
1.
2.
Cumulative GPA of 3.50 or better.
Significant contribution to one or more of the following:



Enhancement to department life. This may include assisting
in lower division courses as an undergraduate associate,
serving as an officer in a student organization such as
AIAS, IIDA, or SAC, or working on student-initiated
departmental activities.
Advanced research effort. This may include helping faculty
with research projects or undertaking an independent
research project (e.g., Undergraduate Summer Scholar
program).
Socially responsive volunteering. This may include
assisting organizations such as Habitat for Humanity or
Over-the-Rhine Community Housing, preferably in an
architectural capacity, or collaborating with faculty in
similar efforts beyond minimum classroom requirements.
Admission to Graduate Program
If you intend to continue into the Master of Architecture
program, three of your four junior and senior design studios must
focus on building design, and it is advisable to take support
courses that will be required as prerequisites at the graduate level.
See the Courses of Instruction section in this Bulletin for the Master
of Architecture degree and consult with your adviser.
Program Requirements: Architecture
(128 semester hours minimum)
Freshman year
ARC 101, 102 Beginning Design Studio (5, 5)
ARC 113, 114 Graphic Media I & II (2, 2)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3)*
Global Miami Plan Foundation course electives (6, 6)
Sophomore year
ARC 201, 202 Architecture Studio (5, 5)
ARC 211, 212 Principles of Environmental Systems (3, 3)*
ARC 213, 214 Graphic Media III & IV (2, 2)
ARC 221, 222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3)*
Global Miami Plan Foundation course electives (3)
Global Miami Plan Thematic Sequence (3)
Junior year
ARC 301, 302 Architecture Studio (6, 6)
Required ARC electives (11)
Global Miami Plan Foundation course electives (3)
Global Miami Plan Thematic Sequence (6)
Senior year
ARC 401, 402 Architecture Studio (6, 6)
Required ARC electives (12)
Global Miami Plan Foundation course electives (3)
General electives (5)
* Miami Plan Foundation course
Notes: A pre-approved 6 credit hour summer studio may be substituted for a maximum of
one upper-division studio (ARC 301, 302, 401, or 402). ARC 402C is offered as a Miami
Plan Capstone.
Required ARC electives must be met by a minimum of:
• 9 credit hours of history/theory
• 12 credit hours environmental systems + practice (see adviser for M.Arch
prerequisites)
• 2 credit hours communication process
Program Requirements: Interior Design
(128 semester hours minimum)
Freshman year
ARC 101,102 Beginning Design Studio (5, 5)
ARC 113,114 Graphic Media I & II (2, 2)
ENG 111,112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3,3)*
Global Miami Plan Foundation Course electives (12)
Sophomore year
ARC 203-204 Interior Design Studio (5, 5)
ARC 212 Principles of Environmental Systems (3)*
ARC 213, 214 Graphic Media III & IV (2, 2)
ARC 221*,222* History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3)
ARC 225 Design and Behavior (3)
Global Miami Plan Foundation course elective (3)
Global Miami Plan Thematic Sequence (3)
Junior year
ARC 303 or 304 Interior Design Studio (6)
ARC 309 Furniture Design and Construction (3)
ARC 321 History of Interiors (3)
ARC 414 Environmental Systems (3)
ARC 417 Architectural Materials (3)
ARC 419 Interior Materials (3)
Elective studio (3)
Global Miami Plan Foundation course elective (3)
Business elective (3)
Global Miami Plan Thematic Sequence (6)
Senior year
ARC 403, 408 Interior Design Studio (6, 6)
ARC 444 Professional Practice in Interior Design (3)
ARC 477 Independent Study (3)
Miami Plan Foundation course elective (3)
General electives (7)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Notes:
ARC 303 or 304 is required. Elective studio in an alternate semester must be taken outside
the major or through off-campus study. ARC 408 is offered as a Miami Plan Capstone.
Art and Architecture History- Bachelor of
Arts in the History of Art and
Architecture
This major focuses on the different roles that art, architecture,
and visual culture have played in human development. Emphasis
is placed on how art reflects not only its specific history but the
aesthetic, social, philosophical, and religious values of the culture
that produced it.
Students develop research and writing skills to better
understand and critically evaluate the manifestations of the visual
arts throughout the world. Additionally, they gain experience
through internships and international study opportunities. The
program prepares students for careers in communications and
publishing, at museums, galleries, and historical societies, as well
as in corporations, education, and all areas of the visual arts,
including arts administration.
The History of Art and Architecture is an interdisciplinary
major that includes the departments of Art, Architecture and
Interior Design, and Classics, and the Miami University Art
Museum. For more information, contact the Department of Art, 124
Art Building (513-529-2900) or the Department of Architecture and
Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall (513-529-7210).
158/ The School of Creative Arts
Department of Art
The Department of Art offers these degrees: Bachelor of Arts
in History of Art and Architecture; Bachelor of Fine Arts,
emphasizing studio art; Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design
and Bachelor of Science in Art with Multi-Age Visual Arts
Licensure Program (prekindergarten through grade 12; ages 3-21)
for those preparing to teach in public schools. You can receive a
B.F.A. and a B.S. degree at the same time; this may take additional
time beyond the 128 semester hours required for a degree.
These art programs prepare producing and exhibiting artists,
designers, artists-crafts persons, art and architectural historians,
professionals in related fields, and art teachers for careers in art
and related art fields. Course offerings include basic studio areas,
art education, history of art, and advanced studio disciplines.
The Department of Art also offers minors in the History of Art
and Architecture, 2D Media Studies in Art, 2D Media Studies in
Art for Art Education Majors, and 3D Media Studies.
The department also offers graduate programs leading to
Master of Fine Arts and Master of Arts degrees. More information
on these programs is available in the Graduate Fields of Study
section or from the Graduate School.
Admission Requirements: B.F.A. in Graphic
Design, B.F.A. in Studio Art, and B.S. in Art in
Art Education
Students who are denied admission in their initial attempt
may apply a second time. Students who are denied in their second
attempt are ineligible for further admission consideration.
Bachelor of Science in Art with Multi-Age Visual Arts
Licensure
Students who were not initially admitted from a portfolio
review to the Department of Art or as art education majors, may
seek admission after successfully completing Art 195 and either
ART 295 or 296, which may be taken concurrently. In addition, a
student must have completed at least six hours of studio work and
be enrolled in at least six additional hours of studio classes. An art
education review, which involves a portfolio of art work, a
statement of intent and commitment to the profession, a resume
emphasizing work experience related to children/adolescents, and
a minimum GPA of 2.50, is required. Art education reviews occur
every semester, usually at the end of the fourth week. The Art
Education Retention Policy, as outlined in departmental literature,
requires majors to demonstrate success in progressing toward the
degree and licensure, including professional dispositions. Due to
enrollment constraints, a limited number of transfer students are
accepted each year.
Art and Architecture History- Bachelor of
Arts in the History of Art and
Architecture
The admission process for the B.F.A. (studio, graphic design)
and B.S. (art education) programs within the Department of Art
includes submission of a portfolio of digital images of recent work
for review by the art faculty. The purpose of the review is to assess
artistic potential, to approve admission to the department, and to
award departmental scholarships. Please understand that an
impressive portfolio is a goal to be achieved during study, not a
prerequisite for entrance. Your portfolio should consist of 12 to 15
digital images of recent work. For additional information about the
graphic design program, please see the program description in this
Bulletin. Please see the Department of Art website or contact the
Department of Art for the detailed requirements and format of a
portfolio review.
This major focuses on the different roles that art, architecture,
and visual culture have played in human development. Emphasis
is placed on how art reflects not only its specific history but the
aesthetic, social, philosophical, and religious values of the culture
that produced it.
Transfer Admission Requirements
The History of Art and Architecture is an interdisciplinary
major that includes the departments of Art, Architecture and
Interior Design, and Classics, and the Miami University Art
Museum. For more information, contact the Department of Art, 124
Art Building (513-529-2900) or the Department of Architecture and
Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall (513-529-7210).
Bachelor of Fine Arts
Students from other majors who are enrolled at Hamilton,
Middletown, or Oxford campus who wish to be admitted to the
department must undergo a portfolio review. Portfolios should
include 15 examples of your university art work and a current
grade transcript. Portfolios may be submitted only after you have
successfully completed a minimum of six credit hours of art studio
courses. If only the minimum of six credit hours is completed, you
must also enroll in at least six additional hours of art studio at the
time your portfolio is submitted. Register for a portfolio review in
the departmental office; the department designates a time during
each semester to review portfolios and make admission decisions.
Students planning on transferring into the Department of Art may not
take 300-400 level studio art classes until they have successfully passed
the portfolio review.
Students from other universities and colleges who wish to
transfer to the department must be admitted to Miami University
and submit a portfolio to the Art Department at the time of their
application to the university. Graphic design students from other
institutions are encouraged to contact Miami's graphic design
faculty. Transfer credit (comparable art studio courses taken at
other universities and colleges) may fulfill part or all of the
required prerequisites of art studio courses needed for admission
consideration; however, a portfolio of art work is still required for
admission consideration.
Students develop research and writing skills to better
understand and critically evaluate the manifestations of the visual
arts throughout the world. Additionally, they gain experience
through internships and international study opportunities. The
program prepares students for careers in communications and
publishing, at museums, galleries, and historical societies, as well
as in corporations, education, and all areas of the visual arts,
including arts administration.
Program Requirements
(48 hours, plus 2 years foreign language)
Level One: Introductory Courses, 9 hours
One of these:
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3)*
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3)*
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3)*
ART 189 History of Western Dress
And both of the following:
ARC 107 Global Design (3)*
ART 285 Writing and Research in Art and Architectural History (3)
Level Two: Themed Courses, 9 hours
Thematic, cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary approaches to the history of
art and architecture. Courses at this level include a writing component.
ARC 221,222 History of Environmental Design (3, 3) *
ART 233 Global Perspectives on Dress (3) *
ART 235 The Gods are Here: Spirituality and Text in African Art (3)
ART 278 Text and Image in East Asian Buddhist Art (3)
ART 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (3)*
ART 283 Modern America (3)
ART 286 China, Korea, and Japan (3)
CLS 210A Classical Antiquity through a Lens (3)
CLS 210C Roman Cities (3)
The School of Creative Arts /159
CLS 232 Discoveries in Archaeology (3)
CLS 244 Introduction to Egyptian Art and Archaeology (3)
CLS 332 Classical Mythology and the Arts (3)
At least two years foreign language (completion of 202 or equivalent). Students planning to
pursue graduate studies in the history of art and architecture should discuss additional
language study with an adviser.
Level Three: Area Courses, 15 hours
Transfer Requirements
Courses designed to explore issues of style and how it changes according to
function, context and chronology. Courses at this level have an integrated
lecture component that will include student research and writing significantly
beyond what is expected at the 200 level.
To qualify for admittance to the major, transfer students must
meet with the head of the art history area. All courses for the major
must be taken for a grade.
At least one course must be taken in each of the following areas: **
Departmental Honors
Art of Asia, Africa, or the Americas
To graduate with Departmental Honors, students must
maintain a 3.50 GPA in the major and complete an honors thesis.
Thesis proposals are submitted during the junior year. Successful
applicants earn six upper division hours* for research and writing
(ART 477C), after which the thesis is submitted for approval to the
Departmental Honors committee.
ART 309 The Arts of African Peoples (3)
ART 311 Chinese Painting (3)
ART 312 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
European Art
ART 313 Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic Art (3)
ART 314 The Renaissance in Italy (3)
ART 315 High Renaissance and Mannerism (3)
ART 316 Baroque Art in Europe (3)
ART 317 The Arts of Colonial Latin America (3)
ART 386 Art of the Weimar Republic (3)
ART 485 Art of the Early 19th Century (3)
ART 486 Art of the Late 19th Century (3)
ART 487 Art of the Early 20th Century (3)
ARC 405E Renaissance Architecture (3)
ARC 405G Gothic Architecture (3)
Pre-Modern Art (of any geographic area or areas)
ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3)
ART 382 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3)
ART 383 Greek and Roman Painting (3)
ART 311 Chinese Painting (3)
ART 312 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
ART 313 Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic Art (3)
ART 314 The Renaissance in Italy (3)
ART 315 High Renaissance and Mannerism (3)
ART 316 Baroque Art in Europe (3)
ART 317 The Arts of Colonial Latin America (3)
ART 386 Art of the Weimar Republic (3)
ART 485 Art of the Early 19th Century (3)
ARC 405E Renaissance Architecture (3)
ARC 405G Gothic Architecture (3)
Modern/Postmodern Art
ART 318 Modernism and Modernity (3)
ART 319 Postmodern Art and Theory (3)
ARC 321 History of Interiors (3)
ART 386 Art of the Weimar Republic (3)
ARC 422/522 History of Urbanization (3)
ARC 426/526 Architecture and Society (3)
ARC 427/527 The American City Since 1940 (3)
ARC 451/551 Modern Architecture (3)
ARC 452/552 Recent Architecture Theory (3)
ART 455/555 Design History and Cultural Contexts (3)
ART 486/586 Art of the Late 19th Century (3)
ART 487/587 Art of the Early 20th Century (3)
ART 489/589 Art of the Late 20th Century (3)
** NOTE: A single course may not fill requirements in more than one area.
Level Four: Seminar, 3 hours
Faculty-mentored seminars in which students are responsible for extensive
research on a specified aspect of the course.
ARC 405 Seminar in Architectural History (3)
ART 480 Seminar In Art History (3)
Internship or Field Study, 3 hours
ART 391 Field Study in Art and Architecture History (3)
Restricted to majors who have completed the sophomore year.
Senior Research Methods, 3 hours (in addition to 18 hours above)
ART 498 Capstone: Seminar in History and Methods in Art and Architectural History (3)
(MPC)
Studio Requirement, 6 hours
* These credit hours are in addition to the upper division credits
required for the major.
Art Education- Bachelor of Science in Art
with Multi-Age Visual Arts Licensure
This program prepares the student for licensure as an art
teacher in Ohio Public Schools. It leads to the Bachelor of Science in
Art with Multi-Age Visual Arts License (Prekindergarten through
grade 12, ages 3-21). Accredited by the National Association of
Schools of Art and Design (NASAD), NCATE, and the State of
Ohio Department of Education Teacher Licensure Standards, it is
in compliance with guidelines from Ohio’s Academic Content
Standards K-12 Fine Arts and the National Art Education
Association.
A student must plan a program with an art education adviser
in the Department of Art and demonstrate progress toward
candidacy for licensure by successfully completing key
assessments and indicators and achieving benchmarks to pass
programmatic reviews.
Program Requirements
(128 semester hours)
All of these:
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals (3)
ART 121, 122 Drawing I, Drawing II (3, 3)
ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3)
ART 195 The Profession of Art Education (3)
ART 231 Painting I (3)
ART 241 Printmaking I (3)
ART 261 Ceramics I (3)
ART 264 Jewelry Design and Metals I (3)
ART 271 Sculpture (3)
ART 295 Early Childhood Art Education (3)
ART 296 Middle to Adult Art Education (3)
ART 331 Painting II (3)
ART 395 The Art Teacher (3)
ART 419 Supervised Student Teaching in Art (16) (MPC)
ART 493/593 Art Curriculum in the School (3)
ART 495/595 Art Education Practicum (3)
CSE 151 Computers, Computer Science, and Society (3) or
equivalent technology course
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)*
EDL 318 Educational Leadership (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3)
EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)
EDP 301 Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals, 2-D (3) ***
ART 121,122 Drawing I, II (3, 3)
ART 171 Visual Fundamentals, 3-D (3)
Both of these:
*Miami Plan Foundation course
*** (this course has special computer requirements)
Students also complete courses in either the Global Plan for Liberal Education or the
Honors Plan for Liberal Education.
Upper level art history. One course recommended from these: **
Foreign Language Requirement, 6 upper division hours
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric to Gothic (3) ** *
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern (3) ** *
ART 311 Chinese Painting History (3)
ART 312 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
ART 480 Seminar in Art History (3)
ART 487 Art of the Early 20th Century (3)
ART 489 Contemporary Art (3)
Studio discipline. One of these:
ART 221 Drawing III (3)
160/ The School of Creative Arts
ART 257 Photography (3)
ART 332 Painting III (3)
ART 341 Printmaking II (3)
ART 353 Business of Design (3)
ART 361 Ceramics II (3)
ART 364 Jewelry Design and Metals II (3)
ART 371 Sculpture II (3)
Students must also complete all Global Miami Plan requirements.
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
** See adviser for additional courses.
Graphic Design- Bachelor of Fine Arts
For information, contact the Department of Art, 124 Art
Building (513-529-2900).
This program includes 36 semester hours of studio
requirements plus art and design history requirements in the first
and second years, including five courses specific to graphic design.
Upper-class majors must earn 34 hours in specific graphic design
course work with 20 during the third year and 14 during the fourth
year. Students must choose a Design Focus Track of 12 hours in one
of the following areas: art and architectural history, business,
communication,
cultural
studies,
environmental
design,
interactive design, perception and cognition, studio art and
technical communication. Majors must also take three additional
hours in the history of art with a non-western focus and complete
at least one summer internship.
Portfolio Review
In addition to the entrance portfolio review required by the
Department of Art, students desiring to pursue the graphic design
major must undergo an additional portfolio review. It occurs near
the end of the second semester of the first year. This portfolio and
interview process determines advancement into the degree
program in the second year. A limited number of students are
admitted each year. The portfolio review conducted by the graphic
design program counts as an art department review (see
Department of Art: Transfer Admission Requirements). Transfer
students not admitted to graphic design may be accepted as art
majors in the B.F.A. Studio Art Program as a result of this review.
Transfer Admission
Students who wish to transfer from another institution and
enter this program must satisfy admission requirements of the
graphic design program in addition to those of the art department
and university. For information, contact the art department office
(513-529-2900).
Program Requirements
(128 semester hours minimum)
First year
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals 2-D (3) **
ART 121,122 Drawing I, II (3,3) **
ART 151 What is Graphic Design? (1) **
ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3) **
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3)
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3)
ENG 111, 112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3) *
Global Miami Plan Foundation courses (4, 3)
Second year
ART 221 Drawing 3 (3)
ART 222 Drawing 4 (3) or
ART 259 Art and Digital Tools I (3) or
ART 323 Thematic Studio: Animation (3)
ART 251 Typography (3)
ART 252 Image (3)
ART 254 Kinetic Type (3)
ART 256 Design, Perception and Audience (3) (MPF IIA)*
ART 455 Design History and Cultural Contexts (3)
Global Miami Plan electives (5, 3)
Third year
ART 351 Print Design Systems (3)
ART 352 Identity Systems (3)
ART 353 The Business of Design (3)
ART 354 3-D Design/Interdisciplinary Studio (6)
ART 355 Interactive Design (3)
Summer internship (2)
Design Focus Track, electives (3, 3)
Global Miami Plan, electives (3, 2)
Fourth year
ART 451 The Professional Portfolio (3)
ART 452 Senior Degree Project (3) ***
ART 453 Highwire Brand Studio (4) ***
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4) ***
Non-western art history course (3)
Design Focus Track, electives (3,3)
Global Miami Plan electives (5,5)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
** Course must be completed or in progress for student to be eligible to participate in graphic design portfolio
review in the second semester
*** Capstone
Studio Art - Ceramics, Metals, Painting,
Photography, Printmaking, and
Sculpture- Bachelor of Fine Arts
This program includes 39 semester hours of basic art
requirements in the freshman and sophomore years. Upper-class
students must earn six semester hours in the history of art at 300 or
400 level, six semester hours in advanced drawing, 12 semester
hours in a single studio area with six hours at 300 level and six at
400 level, and 12 semester hours of studio electives taken at any
level.
If you intend to continue into graduate studies in studio art,
you should take a 300- and 400-level course sequence in your
concentration area and additional studies in the history of art.
The program requirements below
requirements in art and the Miami Plan.
incorporate
all
Program Requirements
(128 semester hours minimum)
First year
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals (3)
ART 121,122 Drawing I, II (3, 3)
ART 171 Visual Fundamentals: 3D (3)
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3)*
ART 281 Contemporary Art Forum (1; maximum 3)
Choose one of the following survey courses: (3 total)
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3)*
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3)*
ENG 111,112 Composition and Rhetoric, Composition and Literature (3, 3)*
Global Miami Plan and electives (3, 3)
Second year
ART 221, 222 Drawing III, IV (3, 3)
ART 231 Painting I (3)
Art studio elective (200 level) (3)
Two-dimensional studio. One of these:
ART 241 Printmaking I (3)
ART 257 Photography I (3)
Three-dimensional studio. One of these:
ART 261 Ceramics I (3)
ART 264 Jewelry Design and Metals I (3)
ART 271 Sculpture I (3)
ART 281 Contemporary Art Forum (1; maximum 3)
Select one additional 200 level studio, either 2D or 3D (3)
Global Miami Plan and electives (6, 7)
Note: Studio core must be completed before registering for studio
concentration in the junior year.
Third year
Studio concentration: one 300 level studio in an area of concentration per semester (3, 3)
Studio elective outside concentration (200-300-level): could be a second concentration (3,
3)
ART 321 Drawing V (3)
ART 323 Thematic Studio: Animation (3-4; maximum 7) (repeatable)
The School of Creative Arts /161
ART 496 Theory for Visual Artists (3; maximum 6)
Recital Attendance and Chamber Music Experience
Art History. Select one of the following three:
All music majors must complete seven semesters of MUS 140
and one semester of MUS 139.
ART 318 Modernism, Modernity, and the Visual Arts (3)
ART 319 Postmodern Art and Theory (3)
ART 489 Art of the Late 20th Century (3)
Global Miami Plan and electives (3, 2)
Fourth year
Studio concentration: (one 400 level studio in an area of concentration per semester) (3, 3)
Studio elective outside concentration (200-400 level): could be a second concentration (3,
3)
Global Miami Plan and electives: Art History, Art Capstone, or Studio (10, 10)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Department of Music
The department offers the Bachelor of Music in music
education and music performance and the Bachelor of Arts in
Music. The graduate degree, Master of Music, is offered in music
education and music performance and is described in the Graduate
section of the Bulletin.
The bachelor’s degree programs offer preparation for careers
in public school teaching, performance, and for future study at the
graduate level. It is also the objective of the department to provide
courses in music theory and literature, applied music, and
ensemble for non-music majors. Applied music and ensemble
require audition.
The department's mission and goals are available on the
department Web site: www.muohio.edu/music/.
Special Admission Requirements: Music
Majors
All music majors require audition for admission to the
department. Each applied area (voice, piano, flute, etc.) has its own
requirements for admission. For more information contact the
Department of Music, 109 Presser Hall (513-529-3014).
Special Curriculum Requirements
Applied Music
Music majors, performance minors, and thematic sequence
students who discontinue applied music study at Miami
University for one semester (or more) are required to re-audition in
order to be eligible to resume applied music study. This policy
does not apply to anyone involved in student teaching or a
Miami-sponsored study abroad program. After two semesters at a
given level, music majors and performance minors are required to
take a jury to advance to the next level. Students who fail to
advance to the next level of applied music after two attempts are
not allowed to continue as either a music major or performance
minor.
Functional Piano
All music majors must complete the Functional Piano
Requirement: completing through MUS 261 for music education
and performance, and MUS 161 for Bachelor of Arts in Music, or
take a piano proficiency exam (offered one time in each of the fall
and spring semesters). The proficiency exam is designed for
students who have advanced piano skills (six to eight years of
piano study). The exam may only be attempted during a student's
first year as a music major. Interested students must see the functional
piano coordinator during the first two weeks of Fall semester to receive the
exam requirements.
Students with transfer credit in functional piano must
demonstrate performance competency for the functional piano
coordinator in order to receive credit toward the music degree.
Departmental Honors
Music students may apply for departmental honors at the end
of the junior year. Requirements for the program include a 3.50
cumulative GPA, sponsorship by a member of the music faculty,
and approval of the department chair.
The program includes independent study (MUS 481-482)
taken during the senior year and also requires a thesis, other
scholarly document, or lecture/recital. The student is responsible
for identifying two faculty members, in addition to the faculty
sponsor, who will serve as readers of the thesis or jury members for
the lecture recital. Successful students graduate with departmental
honors.
Music- Bachelor of Arts in Music
For information, contact the Department of Music, 109 Presser
Hall (513-529-3014).
In addition to the professional degrees in music performance
and music education, the Department of Music offers the Bachelor
of Arts degree in Music. This program combines the breadth of a
liberal arts tradition with concentrated studies in music. It is
intended for students who have strong musical abilities and are
preparing for a wide variety of careers, musical and non-musical.
Program Requirements
(128 semester hours minimum)
Complete the Global Miami Plan for Liberal Education or the Honors
Plan for Liberal Education.
Complete Department of Music requirements.
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 151/152 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3)* or
MUS 186 Global Music for the I-Pod (3)*
MUS 201/202 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 211/212 History of Western Music (3, 3)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Two of these:
MUS 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music (3)
MUS 221 Music Technologies (3)
MUS 285 Introduction to African American Music (3)
MUS 287 Enter the Diva: Women in Music (3)
MUS 301 Counterpoint (3)
MUS 302 Analysis (3)
MUS 303 Electronic Music (3)
MUS 371 Composition (3)
MUS 372 Composition (3)
MUS 385 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel and Soul (3)
MUS 386 The History and Development of Hip Hop Culture in America (3)
MUS 404 Wind Band Ensemble Literature (3)
MUS 405 Choral Literature (3)
MUS 427 Music of the 20th Century (3)
MUS 461 American Music (3)
MUS 490 Special Topics in Music (3)
*Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Complete a minimum of seven (7) hours of electives in the
Department of Music.
Achievement of sophomore standing in a major applied area. This
proficiency is established through applied music jury examination.
Usually two semesters of applied music are required to reach
sophomore standing.
Complete the large ensemble requirement: All students enrolled in
the Bachelor of Arts in Music are required to participate in one of the
large ensembles for four semesters in their primary performance
medium. The large ensembles include: University Symphony
Orchestra, Marching Band, Symphony Band, Collegiate Chorale,
162/ The School of Creative Arts
Chamber Singers, Choraliers, Men's Glee Club, and Wind Ensemble.
Entrance to each group is by audition.
Piano majors may fulfill the ensemble requirement through
participation in a vocal ensemble, an instrumental ensemble,
accompanying (MUS 110/120), or chamber music as a pianist.
Complete foreign language requirement: two years are required.
(Completion of 202 in any foreign language offered at Miami
University). Requirement may be met by a university proficiency
exam.
Complete functional piano requirement: MUS 161 or proficiency
exam required.
Seven semesters of recital attendance: MUS 140.
One semester of chamber music experience: MUS 139.
It is the responsibility of the student to check to see that all university
requirements have been fulfilled.
Music Education- Bachelor of Music
For information, contact the Department of Music, 109 Presser
Hall (513-529-3014).
Two programs, both with licensure for age 3 through grade 12,
are offered: choral/general program and instrumental music
program. Both programs include 100 hours of field experiences in
urban, suburban, and rural schools prior to student teaching. With
successful completion of all degree requirements, a candidate
applies for a State of Ohio Provisional License for Teaching Music,
Pre-K through Grade 12. The State of Ohio has reciprocal
agreements with many other states, whereby a person holding
licensure in Ohio, under certain conditions, may receive licensure
in other states that are part of the agreement.
Majors are assigned full-time supervised teaching during first
or second semester of the senior year. During this semester, a
student teacher cannot participate in any ensembles or carry any
other academic work except with special permission of the faculty.
Program Requirements: Choral/General Program
(128 semester hours minimum)
Complete the Global Miami Plan for Liberal Education or the Honors
Miami Plan.
Complete department requirements.
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 112 Lab Choir (1) (enroll for at least two semesters)
MUS 142 Applied Music (2, 2)
MUS 151/152 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 175 Introduction to Music Education (3)
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3)*
MUS 201/202 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 211/212 History of Western Music (3, 3)
MUS 221 Music Technologies (3) *
MUS 222 Music Education Technology (1) (taken concurrently with MUS 221)
MUS 235 Lyric Diction (2)
MUS 242 Applied Music (2, 2)
MUS 249 Classroom Instruments: World Percussion/Guitar (1)
MUS 251/252 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 275 Sophomore Practicum in Music Education (1)
MUS 342 Applied Music (2, 2)
MUS 351 Choral Techniques (3)
MUS 352 Conducting I (2)
MUS 354 Conducting II (2)
MUS 355 General Music Teaching Techniques: Early Childhood and Elementary (3)
MUS 356 Secondary General Music Techniques (2)
MUS 419 Supervised Teaching in Music (12)
MUS 442 Applied Music (2)
MUS 456 Vocal Pedagogy (2)
MUS 475 Senior Practicum in Music Education (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3) *
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3) *
EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)
EDP 301 Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Functional piano requirement: MUS 261.
Minor applied requirement: An applied major in piano or
band/orchestral instrument is required to take four hours of class or
private voice in addition to major applied study.
Seven semesters of recital attendance: MUS 140 (0).
One semester of Chamber Music Experience: MUS 139.
Participation in large choral ensemble each semester except semester
of student teaching. Large choral ensembles are: Collegiate Chorale
(MUS 100A), Choraliers (MUS 100D), Chamber Singers (MUS 100Q),
and Men’s Glee Club (MUS 100B). When meeting this requirement,
students must complete at least 2 semesters in a mixed (SATB)
ensemble (i.e., Collegiate Chorale (MUS 100A) or Chamber Singers
(MUS 100Q).
Piano majors must participate as a singer in choral ensembles at least
3 semesters.
Performance requirement: Half recital in senior year (no credit).
Admission to sophomore courses in music education contingent
upon fulfillment of the following requirements: minimum overall
GPA of 2.25 and minimum GPA of 2.75 in all music courses
(including a maximum of one ensemble per semester).
Admission to junior courses in music education contingent upon
fulfillment of the following requirements: minimum overall GPA of
2.25 and minimum GPA of 2.75 in all music courses (including a
maximum of one ensemble per semester).
Admission to student teaching contingent upon fulfillment of the
following requirements: minimum overall GPA of 2.25, minimum
GPA of 2.80 in all music courses (including a maximum of one
ensemble per semester), an ACT composite score of 21 or better or
total SAT score of 930 or better. (Praxis I scores of 174 in each
category may be substituted for SAT or ACT scores); completion of
the functional piano requirement; and completion of MUS 351, 352,
354, 355 and 356.
Teacher licensure in Ohio and most other states requires completion
of a baccalaureate teacher licensure program, passing a licensure
examination, and a background check. One semester before the
semester you are to graduate, take licensure examination (Praxis II),
start background check, and apply for licensure. All costs are the
responsibility of the applicant. Details are available in 202 McGuffey
Hall.
It is the responsibility of the student to see that all university
requirements are fulfilled.
Program Requirements: Instrumental Music Program
(128 semester hours minimum)
Complete the Global Miami Plan for Liberal Education or the Honors
Plan for Liberal Education.
Complete department requirements; your fourth year semesters are
interchangeable.
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 111 Lab Band (enroll for at least two semesters) (1, 1)
MUS 142 Applied Music (2, 2)
MUS 151/152 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 175 Introduction to Music Education (3)
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3)*
MUS 201/202 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 211/212 History of Western Music (3, 3)
MUS 221 Music Technologies (3)*
MUS 222 Music Education Technology (1) (taken concurrently with MUS 221)
MUS 231 Class Instruments (Brass) (1)
MUS 232A Class Instruments (Woodwinds I) (1)
MUS 232B Class Instruments (Woodwinds II) (1)
MUS 233 Class Instruments (Percussion) (1)**
MUS 234A Class Instruments (Strings I) (1)
MUS 234B Class Instruments (Strings II) (1)
MUS 242 Applied Music (2, 2)
MUS 251/252 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 275 Sophomore Practicum in Music Education (1)
MUS 342 Applied Music (2, 2)
MUS 345 Elementary General Music for Instrumental Music Education Majors (1) or
MUS 355 General Music Teaching Techniques: Early Childhood and Elementary
(3)
MUS 352 Conducting I (2)
MUS 354 Conducting II (2)
MUS 358 Marching Band Techniques (2)***
MUS 359 Instrumental Methods, Elementary and Secondary (4)
MUS 419 Supervised Teaching in Music (12)
The School of Creative Arts /163
MUS 442 Applied Music (2)
MUS 475 Seminar Practicum in Music Education (3)
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)*
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3)*
EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3)
EDP 301 Assessment and Evaluation in Educational Settings (3)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
** Percussion majors substitute one-hour music elective course for MUS 233.
*** String instrument majors substitute MUS 433 String Instrument Pedagogy (1) for MUS
358.
Seven semesters of recital attendance requirement: MUS 140.
One semester of Chamber Music Experience: MUS 139.
Functional piano requirement: MUS 261.
Minor applied requirement: An applied major in piano is required to
take four hours of private lessons in band or orchestral instrument in
addition to major applied study.
Participation in large instrumental ensemble, in their primary
performance medium, each semester except semester of student
teaching. Large instrumental ensembles are Marching Band (MUS
100E), Symphonic Band (MUS 100F), University Orchestra (MUS
100C), and Wind Ensemble (MUS 100G). Entrance to each group is by
audition. Piano majors may fulfill the ensemble requirement through
participation in a vocal ensemble, an instrumental ensemble,
accompanying (MUS 110/120), or chamber music as a pianist.
In addition, instrumental music education students must participate
in a major choral ensemble for one semester (selected from Collegiate
Chorale, MUS 100A; Choraliers, MUS 100D; Chamber Singers, MUS
100Q; and Men’s Glee Club, MUS 100B.) In the event that a student is
not selected for one of these ensembles by audition, Lab Choir, MUS
112, will be approved as a course substitution.
Performance requirement: Half recital in senior year (no credit) while
registered for 400 level applied music.
Marching band requirement: Wind and percussion majors must
participate two semesters.
Admission to sophomore courses in music education contingent
upon fulfillment of the following requirements: minimum overall
GPA of 2.25 and minimum GPA of 2.75 in all music courses
(including a maximum of one ensemble per semester).
Admission to junior courses in music education contingent upon
fulfillment of the following requirements: minimum overall GPA of
2.25 and minimum GPA of 2.75 in all music courses (including a
maximum of one ensemble per semester).
Admission to student teaching contingent upon fulfillment of the
following requirements: minimum overall GPA of 2.25, minimum
GPA of 2.80 in all music courses (including a maximum of one
ensemble per semester), an ACT composite score of 21 or better or
total SAT score of 930 or better. (Praxis I scores of 174 in each
category may be substituted for SAT or ACT scores); completion of
the functional piano requirement; and completion of MUS 352, 354,
358 (except for stringed instrument majors), and 359.
Teacher licensure in Ohio and most other states requires completion
of a baccalaureate teacher licensure program, passing a licensure
examination, and a background check. One semester before the
semester you are to graduate, take licensure examination (Praxis II),
start background check, and apply for licensure. All costs are the
responsibility of the applicant. Details are available in 202 McGuffey
Hall.
It is the responsibility of the student to see that all university
requirements are fulfilled.
Music Performance- Bachelor of Music
For information contact the Department of Music, 119 Center
for Performing Arts (513-529-3014). Two programs are offered: one
for voice majors and one for all majors except voice.
Program Requirements: Voice Major
(128 semester hours minimum)
Complete the Global Miami Plan for Liberal Education or the Honors
Plan for Liberal Education.
Complete department requirements.
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 144A Applied Music (Voice) (3, 3)
MUS 151/152 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3)*
MUS 201/202 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 211/212 History of Western Music (3, 3)
MUS 221 Music Technologies (3)*
MUS 235-236 Lyric Diction (2, 2)
MUS 244A Applied Music (Voice) (3, 3)
MUS 251/252 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 301 Counterpoint (3)
MUS 302 Analysis (3)
MUS 320 Opera Production (2, 2)
MUS 344A Applied Music (Voice) (3,3)
MUS 352 Conducting I (2)
MUS 420 Vocal Coaching (1, 1)
MUS 444A Applied Music (Voice) (3, 3)
MUS 451/452 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 456 Vocal Pedagogy (2)
MUS 493 Capstone Senior Recital (3)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Participation in large choral ensemble each semester. Large choral
ensembles are: Collegiate Chorale (MUS 100A), Choraliers (MUS
100D), Chamber Singers (MUS 100Q), and Men’s Glee Club (MUS
100B). Entrance to each group is by audition.
Seven semesters of recital attendance requirement: MUS 140.
One semester of chamber music experience: MUS 139.
Functional piano requirement: MUS 261.
Language requirement: One year in French, German, or Italian, in
addition to Lyric Diction; may be met by university proficiency exam.
Two years of the language in high school usually fulfills the
requirement.
Performance requirement: Half recital, junior year (no credit); full
recital, MUS 493, senior year.
It is the responsibility of the student to see that all university
requirements are fulfilled.
Program Requirements: All Majors Except Voice
(128 semester hours minimum)
Complete the Global Miami Plan or the Honors Miami Plan.
Complete department requirements.
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 144 Applied Music (3, 3)
MUS 151/152 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 185 The Diverse Worlds of Music (3)*
MUS 201/202 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 211/212 History of Western Music (3, 3)
MUS 221 Music Technologies (3)
MUS 244 Applied Music (3, 3)
MUS 251/252 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 301 Counterpoint (3)
MUS 302 Analysis (3)
MUS 344 Applied Music (3, 3)
MUS 352 Conducting I (2)
MUS 444 Applied Music (3, 3)
MUS 451/452 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 493 Capstone Senior Recital (3)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Participation in a large instrumental ensemble, in their primary
performance medium, each semester. Large instrumental ensembles
are: Marching Band (MUS 100E), Symphonic Band (MUS 100F),
University Orchestra (MUS 100C), and Wind Ensemble (MUS 100G).
Entrance to each group is by audition. Piano majors may fulfill the
ensemble requirement through participation in a vocal ensemble,
accompanying (MUS 110/120), or chamber music as a pianist.
Seven semesters of recital attendance requirement: MUS 140.
One semester of chamber music experience: MUS 139.
Functional piano requirement: MUS 261.
Performance requirement: Half recital, junior year (no credit); full
recital, senior year.
Major instrument requirements:
Piano: MUS 110, 120, or 100I/100J Accompanying or Chamber Music (1,1)
164/ The School of Creative Arts
MUS 430 Piano Pedagogy (2)
MUS 457/458 Piano Literature (3, 3)
Violin: Viola proficiency equivalent to MUS 242P Viola
Strings: MUS 433 String Pedagogy (1)
MUS 100I Chamber Music (1,1)
Percussion: MUS 100M Percussion Ensemble (1, 1)
It is the responsibility of the student to see that all university
requirements are fulfilled.
Department of Theatre
Theatre: Bachelor of Arts in Theatre
For information, contact the Department of Theatre, 119
Center for Performing Arts (513-529-3053). The department offers a
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. The Master of Arts in Theatre is
described in the Graduate Fields of Study section of this Bulletin.
The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre is intended for students who
wish to pursue the field of theatre situated within a liberal arts
tradition. The undergraduate program is committed to developing
creative thinkers with artistic vision through a program that
emphasizes the interplay between critical thinking and artistic
practice. All courses must be taken for a grade.
Special Admission Requirements: Theatre
Majors:
In addition to the general university application, you should
complete a separate departmental application and arrange an
audition/interview with the department. Special admission on the
basis of outstanding talent is available. You can submit a
department application and schedule an on-campus interview at
www.muohio.edu/theatre, or call the department office at
513-529-3053. Interview materials can also be sent in by mail.
At the interview you must present two different examples of
creative work you have done, whether in theatre or other related
disciplines. These may include: stories, plays, creative writing, a
monologue or song, pictures of three dimensional art (ceramics,
sculpture, mixed media), two dimensional art you’ve created
(drawing, painting, photography), biographies of characters
you’ve played on the stage, character journals or process journals
you’ve kept, photos of set pieces, props or costumes you’ve built,
set sketches, models, renderings, drafting or mechanical drawing
(hand or CAD), costume sketches, renderings, light plots and/or
images of lighting you’ve designed, choreography notations, parts
of prompt book, sound recordings of original compositions or
effect manipulation, essays or research papers on theatre or drama,
or any class project relating to theatre, digital movies you've made,
web pages you've built.
At the interview, theatre faculty will discuss your interest in
theatre.
Program Requirements
(128 semester hours)
Please note that courses listed in more than one category may only be used to fulfill ONE
requirement.
Take all of these core courses (21 semester hours):
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3)*
THE 103 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance (1)*
THE 107 The Theatre Major: an Introduction to Theatre Resources and Skills (1)
THE 131 Principles of Acting (3)
THE 251 Visual Communication for the Theatre (3)
THE 291 World Stages and Performances I (3)
THE 292 World Stages and Performances II (3)
THE 301 Professional Practice in Theatre (1)
THE 341 Fundamentals of Directing (3)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Choose four (4) hours in theatre technology:
THE 255 Fundamentals of Scenery Construction and Props (3) and
THE 207 Scenery and Props Lab (1) or
THE 253 Costume Fundamentals (3) and
THE 205 Costume Construction Laboratory (1) or
THE 254 Lighting Fundamentals (3) and
THE 206 Theatre Lighting Laboratory (1) or
THE 258 Scene Painting Fundamentals (3) and
THE 208 Scene Painting Laboratory (1)
Category A: Choose nine (9) hours
THE 151 Stage Makeup (1)
THE 205 Costume Construction Laboratory (1)
THE 206 Theatre Lighting Laboratory (1)
THE 207 Scenery and Props Lab (1)
THE 208 Scene Painting Laboratory (1)
THE 231 Scene Study (3)
THE 238 Playwriting Through Improvisation Techniques (3-4; maximum 4)
THE 243 Movement and Voice for Actors (3)
THE 252 Technical Production (3)
THE 254 Fundamentals of Lighting and Sound (3)
THE 255 Fundamentals of Scenery Construction and Props (3)
THE 258 Scene Painting Fundamentals (3)
THE 314 Playwriting (4)
THE 340 Internship (1-3)
THE 342 Stage Management (2)
THE 343 Speech and Dialects (3)
THE 432/532 Acting Shakespeare (3)
THE 437/537 Auditions (2)
THE 439/539 Special Techniques for the Actor (3; maximum 6)
THE 441/541 Methods/Styles of Play Directing (3)
THE 450/550 Special Topics in Theatre Design and Technology (3)
THE 451/551 Scenic Design (3)
THE 453/553 Costume Design (3)
THE 454/554 Lighting Design (3)
THE 455/555 Tutorial in Advanced Problems (1-6)
THE 456/556 Sound Design (3)
THE 465/565 Collaboration in Theatre Design & Technology (2)
Category B: Choose six (6) hours
THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)
THE 395 The American Musical I (3)
THE 396 The American Musical II (3)
THE 491 Theatre History I (3)
THE 492 Theatre History II (3)
THE 493 American Theatre (3)
THE 494 London Theatre (3)
Complete five (5) experiences of production practicum:
THE 200 Production and Performance Practicum (1; maximum 8)
THE 400 Advanced Production and Performance Practicum (2; maximum 4)
Fine Arts Minors
A minor is a specific program to be taken along with a major
to complement your skills and increase your career opportunities.
Taking a minor is optional. Students may use a minor in lieu of a
Thematic Sequence only if the minor includes three courses outside
the department of major.
A minimum overall 2.00 GPA is required for courses in a
minor. All courses must be taken for a letter grade. Additional
requirements and qualifications for minors are included in the
Other Requirements section. Students who complete a minor
receive a notation on their final transcript if they make application
when they apply for graduation. For information on minors that
include sequences, see the Office of Liberal Education. For further
restrictions see the Thematic Sequence subheading in the Liberal
Education at Miami section of this Bulletin.
Please contact the appropriate department to be assigned an
adviser and to obtain a list of the most recent requirements. The
required semester hours are in parentheses beside each minor.
The School of Creative Arts /165
2D Media Studies
take this minor should consult a faculty advisor in photography,
printmaking, or painting.
(18 hours minimum)
Program requirements
To provide studio access and focus to the university
population (with the exception of B.F.A. in Studio Art majors) to
creatively solve problems using design concepts, materials, and
processes in one or more of the following concentrations:
Photography, Printmaking, and Painting.
Take one of these: (3 hrs. total)
The minor in two dimensional media studies explores art
processes, developing concepts and techniques relevant to the
materials, methods, and critically informed aesthetic thinking
inherent in making visual art in two dimensions.
ART 121 Drawing I (3)
ART 122 Drawing II (3)
Two-dimensional concentrations in the department include
photography, printmaking, and painting. The minor encourages
breadth of exploration balanced with a requirement for a two
course focus in one concentration.
A minimum 2.50 GPA is required for admittance to the minor
and is required for all courses in the minor. Students planning to
take this minor should consult a faculty advisor in photography,
printmaking, or painting.
Program requirements
Take one of these: (3 hrs. total)
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals (3)
ARC 113 Graphic Media I (2)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals (3)
ARC 113 Graphic Media I (2) or
ARC 114 Graphic Media II (2)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
Take one of these: (3 hrs. total)
Take one of these: (3 hrs. total)
ART 231 Painting I (3)
ART 241 Printmaking I (3)
ART 257 Photography (3)
Complete NINE hours from focus tracks, (at least 6 of the 9 hours in one track):
Photography I
ART 357 Photography II (3)
ART 358 Photography III (3)
ART 457 Photography IV (3)
Painting I
ART 332 Painting III (3)
ART 431 Painting IV (3)
ART 390 Supplemental Problems (1-3) or
ART 490 Supplemental Problems (1-3)
Printmaking I
ART 341 Printmaking II (3)
ART 342 Printmaking III (3)
ART 441 Printmaking IV (3)
Take one or two of these in consultation with advisor: (3-6 hrs. total)
ART 121 Drawing I (3)
ART 122 Drawing II (3)
ART 221 Drawing III (3)
ART 222 Drawing IV (3)
ART 350 Illustration (3)
Take three - four courses in Two Dimensional Studio Art Concentrations (9-12
hrs. total)
You must take at least two courses focused in one studio area, with one being
the introductory course.
Photography I
ART 255 Introduction to Digital Imaging (3)
ART 257 Photography (3)
ART 357 Photography II (3)
ART 358 Photography III (3)
Painting I
ART 231 Painting I (3)
ART 331 Painting II (3)
ART 332 Painting III (3)
Printmaking I
ART 241 Printmaking I (3)
ART 341 Printmaking II (3)
ART 342 Printmaking III (3)
3D Media Studies
(18 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Art, 124 Art
Building (513-529-2900).
3-D Media Studies explores and develops concepts,
techniques, materials, methods, and critical aesthetic thinking as
applied to the process of making three-dimensional objects.
Three-dimensional art as a non-verbal language is taught through
research, production, viewing, interaction, and verbal critique with
a focus on further development toward a significant personal
expression through a 400-level studio disciplinary sequence.
There are three tracks within the minor that allow students to
focus their experience on a disciplinary sequence. A minimum 2.50
GPA is required for admittance to the minor and is required for all
courses in this minor. Courses must be taken for a grade (not
credit/no-credit). Students planning to take this minor must
consult with the track professor.
Program requirements:
2D Media Studies- for Art Education
Majors
(18 hours minimum)
To provide 2D media studio depth and focus to Art Education
majors in one or more of the following concentrations:
Photography, Printmaking, and Painting.
The minor in two dimensional media studies explores art
processes, developing concepts and techniques relevant to the
materials, methods, and critically informed aesthetic thinking
inherent in making visual art in two dimensions.
Two-dimensional concentrations in the department include
photography, printmaking, and painting. The minor encourages
breadth of exploration balanced with a requirement for a
two-course focus in one concentration.
A minimum 2.50 GPA is required for admittance to the minor
and is required for all courses in the minor. Students planning to
Take one of the following (three hours total):
ART 171 Visual Fundamentals: 3-D (3)
ARC 102 Beginning Design Studio (5)
EAS 102 Problem Solving and Design (3)
Choose one track (fifteen hours):
Ceramics track
ART 261 Ceramics I (3)
ART 361 Ceramics II (3)
ART 362 Ceramics III (3)
ART 461 Ceramics IV (3)
ART 462 Ceramics V (3)
Metals track
ART 264 Jewelry Design and Metals I (3)
ART 364 Jewelry Design and Metals II (3)
ART 365 Jewelry Design and Metals III (3)
ART 464 Jewelry Design and Metals IV (3 ,3)
Sculpture track
ART 271 Sculpture I (3)
ART 371 Sculpture II (3)
ART 372 Sculpture III (3)
ART 471 Sculpture IV (3)
166/ The School of Creative Arts
ART 472 Sculpture V (3)
THE 490 Theatre and a Cultural Aesthetic (3) **
Select at least three hours from the following:
Art and Architecture History
(24 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Art, 124 Art
Building (513-529-2900) or the Department of Architecture, 101
Alumni Hall (513-529-7210).
A minor in art and architecture history establishes a
foundation for further study in these areas and provides a better
understanding of architecture, art and visual culture in historical
contexts and the contemporary world. Knowledge in these areas is
a valuable complement to any liberal arts, business or science
major.
Program Requirements
Three hours from these:
ARC 107 Global Design (3)
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3)*
ARC 221, 222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3)
Six hours from these:
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3)*
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric - Gothic (3)*
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance - Modern (3)*
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3)
ART 286 China, Korea, and Japan (3)
Fifteen semester hours in upper division art or architecture history courses (200, 300, or
400 level)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
ART 111 Visual Fundamentals 2-D (3)
ART 121 Beginning Drawing (3)
ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3)
KNH 110A,B Beginning Ballet/Beginning Ballet II (2)
KNH 110G Modern Dance (2)
KNH 110R Jazz (2)
KNH 110S Social Dance - Men (2)
KNH 110T Social Dance - Women (2)
Music Ensembles:
MUS 100A Collegiate Chorale (0 or 1)
MUS 100B Men's Glee Club (0 or 1)
MUS 100C Symphony Orchestra (0 or 1)
MUS 100D Choraliers (0 or 1)
MUS 100E Marching Band (0 or 1)
MUS 100F Symphonic Band (0 or 1)
MUS 100G Wind Ensemble (0 or 1)
MUS 100U Basketball/Hockey Band (0 or 1)
MUS 100H Chamber Music Brass (0 or 1)
MUS 100R Chamber Music Winds (0 or 1)
MUS 100S Cello Choir (0 or 1)
MUS 100K Jazz Ensemble (0 or 1)
MUS 100N Steel Drum Ensemble (0 or 1)
MUS 100P Chamber Orchestra (0 or 1)
MUS 100M Percussion Ensemble (0 or 1)
MUS 100X Marching Band Percussion Ensemble (0 or 1)
MUS 100I Chamber Music Strings (0 or 1)
MUS 100T Trumpet Ensemble (0 or 1)
MUS 100Q Chamber Singers (0 or 1)
MUS 320 Opera Production (2)
THE 123 Acting for the Non-Major (3)
THE 200 Production and Performance Practicum (1-8)
Program Requirements: Fine Arts Majors (9 hours)
Option 1
Choose three of the following:
Arts Management
(19 semester hours)
For information, contact the adviser in the School of Creative
Arts, 125 Center for Performing Arts (513-529-1490).
Increased public interest in the arts has created a need for fine
arts and business professionals who are prepared for management
responsibilities in arts councils, museums, art centers, galleries,
orchestras, and theatres.
This minor has two options: one for fine arts majors and one
for business majors. Please meet with the appropriate adviser to
plan your minor.
A minimum overall 2.00 GPA is required for courses in a
minor. All courses, except the internship, must be taken for a grade
(not credit/no-credit).
Core Requirements for Business and Fine Arts Majors (10 hours)
All Arts Management minors must take all of the following:
SCA 182 Experiencing the Arts (1 - repeatable)
SCA 201 Introduction to Arts Management (3)
SCA 340 Arts Management Internship (3)
SCA 410 Advanced Topics in Arts Management (3)
Program Requirements: Business Majors (9 hours)
Select six (6) hours from the following:
ARC 188 Ideas in Architecture (3) *
ARC 426 Architecture and Society (3) **
ART 181 Concepts in Art (3) *
ART 185 India and Southeast Asia (3) *
ART 186 China, Korea, and Japan (3) *
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric to Gothic (3) *
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern (3) *
ART 455 20th Century Design and Culture (3)
MUS 135 History of Jazz (3) *
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) *
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3) *
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3) *
THE 103 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance I (1) *
THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (3) *
THE 393 Cultural, Gender, and Ethnic Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)
ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
ECO 201 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
ESP 201 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3) *
MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3) (ECO 201 is a prerequisite for this course)
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
** Global Miami Plan Capstone course
Option 2 - Students must declare the Entrepreneurship thematic sequence to
have access to this option.
ESP 311 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3)
ESP 366 Imagination and Entrepreneurship (3)
ESP 469 Entrepreneurship in Complex Organizations (3)
Option 3
Summer Business Institute (9):
BUS 301 Macro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3)
BUS 302 Micro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3)
BUS 303 Business Process Integration (3)
Landscape Architecture
(22 semester hours)
Note: The landscape architecture minor is under review. For
current program information, contact the Department of
Architecture and Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall (513-529-7210).
The minor in landscape design serves three primary purposes.
First, it supports the learning of landscape issues within the
disciplines of architecture and interior design. Second, it provides
a directed sequence of interdisciplinary courses in the area of
landscape studies for students who wish to broaden their
knowledge of this subject. Third, it serves as a method of exploring
landscape professions for those students who are considering this
career path or further study at the graduate level.
Students interested in declaring this minor should contact the
Department and arrange to meet with the coordinator of the minor.
The program requires successful completion of 22 semester hours
with a 2.00 GPA. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.
The School of Creative Arts /167
Program Requirements
Required Core - All of these (recommended in this order):
ARC 211 Introduction to Landscape and Urban Design (3)
ARC 335 Landscape: Inquiry and Experience (3)
ARC 435 Theory and History of Landscape Architecture (3)
ARC 430/530 Plants in Design (1-2)
One of these:
BOT 155 Field Botany (3) *
BOT 241 Botanical Principles in Landscape Gardening (3)
MUS 287 Enter the Diva: Women in Music (3)
Choose TWO additional music history courses (3,3) at the 200-level or higher.
The courses should be selected from:
MUS 285 Introduction to African American Music (3)
MUS 287 Enter the Diva: Women in Music (3)
MUS 385 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel and Soul (3)
MUS 386 The History and Development of Hip Hop Culture in America (3)
MUS 461 American Music (3)
MUS490 Special Topics in Music (1-4; maximum 12)
Three of the following (only one course may be at the 100 level):
AMS/HST 397 American Environmental History (3)
ATH 471/571 Ecological Anthropology (3) **
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3) *
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3)*
BOT 431/531/GEO 431/531 Plant Geography (3) **
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3) *
GLG 207 Water and Society (3) **
GEO 221 Regional Physical Environments (3)**
GEO 437 Regional Land Use Capability Analysis (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 454 Race, Urban Change and Conflict in America (3)
GEO 459/559 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)**
IES 431/531 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3) **
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (4) *
* Miami Plan Foundation course
** Miami Plan Thematic Sequence Course
Music Composition
(23 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Music, 109 Presser
Hall (513-529-3014).
This minor is for those who want to complement their
education with creative study in music composition. Open to
music majors and non-majors.
Students interested in pursuing the minor in music
composition must complete MUS 101/102 and 151/152 prior to
admission. Following this coursework, the student should submit
their grades in these courses along with two compositions (either
in score form or MP3 files) to Professor Roger Davis, coordinator of
the composition program.
Program Requirements
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 151/152 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 201 Theory of Music (3)
MUS 221 Music Technologies (3)
MUS 371-372 Composition (3, 3)
Choose ONE of these:
MUS 301 Counterpoint (3)
MUS 303 Electronic Music (3)
Music History
Music Performance
(23 semester hours)
Admission Procedures: An audition is required for this
program. For information, contact the Department of Music, 109
Presser Hall (513-529-3014). This minor is not open to music
performance and music education majors.
Adviser: see the applied music teacher of your instrument. At
this time there is no voice performance minor.
Program Requirements
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 151/152 Sightsinging and Dictation (1, 1)
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3)*
* Global Miami Plan Foundation course
Applied music requirement: 10 semester hours, includes one semester at 342 level. A halfrecital is required for this program.
Ensemble requirement: Four semesters in large ensemble (Chamber Singers, Choraliers,
Collegiate Chorale, Marching Band, Men's Glee Club, Symphony Band, University
Symphony Orchestra, and Wind Ensemble). Entrance to each group is by audition. Piano
performance minors may fulfill the ensemble requirement through participation in a large
vocal ensemble, large instrumental ensemble, accompanying (MUS 110/120), or chamber
music as a pianist.
Music Theatre
(20 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Music, 109 Presser
Hall (513-529-3014) or the Department of Theatre, Center for
Performing Arts (513-529-3053).
This minor offers students the opportunity to pursue the
specialized skills necessary for performance in music theatre:
acting, singing and dancing. Students will complete courses in
these 3 distinct disciplines, as well as integrate them in an
upper-level acting course and through participation in
productions. The minor is designed to enhance the current music
and theatre major curricula. Admission to the minor is open to
Music and Theatre majors by audition only. Students pursuing a
minor in Music Theatre must demonstrate continuance and
satisfactory progress toward their Music or Theatre major. All
courses in the minor must be taken for a grade*; a minimum GPA
of 2.00 is required in a minor.
(24 semester hours)
Core requirements for Music and Theatre Majors (13 hrs)
For information, contact the Department of Music, 109 Presser
Hall (513-529-3014).
All Music Theatre Minors must take the following core classes (11 hours):
Not open to music majors.
Program Requirements
All of these:
MUS 101/102 Theory of Music (3, 3)
MUS 201 Theory of Music (3)
MUS 211-212 History of Western Music (3, 3)
Choose ONE course from the following:
MUS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Context (3)
MUS 186 Global Music for the I-Pod (3)
MUS 188 The Music of Russia (3)
MUS 285 Introduction to African American Music (3)
KNH 110A Beginning Ballet (2)
SCA 231 Dance for the Musical Stage (3)
SCA 331 Acting for the Musical Stage (3)
THE 151 Stage Makeup (1)
THE 395 American Musical I: A History to 1950 (3) or
THE 396 The American Musical II: A Contemporary History 1950-2005 (3)
*KNH 110A is offered credit/no credit only
**Theatre majors may NOT use these courses in their major requirements.
All Music Theatre Minors must participate in two productions, selected from
Musical Theatre, Opera, and Grand Night for Singing (2 hours):
MUS 100 Opera Production (1)
THE 200 Production and Performance Practicum (1)
168/ The School of Creative Arts
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: MUSIC MAJORS -VOICE (7 hrs)
THE 131 Principles of Acting (3)
Choose four (4) hours in Theatre Technology:
THE 255 Fundamentals of Scenery Construction and Props (3) and
THE 207 Scenery and Props Lab (1) or
THE 253 Costume Fundamentals (3) and
THE 206 Theatre Lighting Laboratory (1) or
THE 254 Fundamentals of Lighting and Sound (3) and
THE 206 Theatre Lighting Laboratory (1) or
THE 258 Scene Painting Fundamentals (3) and
THE 208 Scene Painting Laboratory (1)
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: MUSIC MAJORS -INSTRUMENTALISTS (7 hrs)
THE 131 Principles of Acting (3)
MUS 215 Class Voice for Music Theatre (2)
MUS 216 Applied Voice for Music Theatre (1)
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: THEATRE MAJORS (7 hrs)
MUS 119 Introduction to Music Theory (3)
MUS 215 Class Voice for Music Theatre (2)
MUS 216 Applied Voice for Music Theatre (1)
Theatre Arts
(25 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Theatre, Center for
Performing Arts (513-529-3053).
This minor offers students an opportunity to explore theatrical
practice within a liberal arts tradition by providing study of
performance and production in acting, directing, theatre
technology, design arts, and theatre history and analysis. Register
your intent to pursue the minor with the chief departmental
adviser. A minimum GPA of 2.00 is required for all courses in a
minor. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.
Program Requirements
All of these (9 hours):
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3)
THE 103 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance (1)
THE 200 Theatre Production and Performance (1, 1)
THE 251 Visual Communication for the Theatre (3)
Choose one (3 hours):
THE 123 Acting for the Nonmajor (3)
THE 131 Principles of Acting (3)
Choose four (4) hours:
THE 255 Fundamentals of Scenery Construction and Props (3) and
THE 207 Scenery and Props Lab (1) or
THE 253 Costume Fundamentals (3) and
THE 205 Costume Construction Laboratory (1) or
THE 254 Lighting Fundamentals (3) and
THE 206 Theatre Lighting Laboratory (1) or
THE 258 Scene Painting Fundamentals (3) and
THE 208 Scene Painting Laboratory (1)
Category A: Choose three (3) hours
THE 151 Stage Makeup (1)
THE 205 Costume Construction Laboratory (1)
THE 206 Theatre Lighting Laboratory (1)
THE 207 Scenery and Props Lab (1)
THE 208 Scene Painting Laboratory (1)
THE 231 Scene Study (3)
THE 238 Improvising Toward Devising: Creating Theatre Through Performance
Techniques (3-4; maximum 4)
THE 243 Movement and Voice for Actors (3)
THE 252 Technical Production (3)
THE 254 Lighting and Sound Fundamentals (3)
THE 255 Fundamentals of Scenery Construction and Props (3)
THE 258 Scene Painting Fundamentals (3)
THE 314 Playwriting (4)
THE 331 Advanced Scene Study (3)
THE 340 Internship (1-16)
THE 342 Stage Management (2)
THE 343 Speech and Dialects (3)
THE 432/532 Acting Shakespeare (3)
THE 437/537 Auditions (2)
THE 438/538 Professional Qualifications II: Agencies (2)
THE 439/539 Special Techniques for the Actor (3 hours, max. 6 hours)
THE 441/541 Methods/Styles of Play Directing (3)
THE 451/551 Scenic Design (3)
THE 453/553 Costume Design (3)
THE 454/554 Lighting Design (3)
THE 455/555 Tutorial in Advanced Problems (1-6)
THE 456/556 Sound Design (3)
THE 465 Collaboration in Theatre Design & Technology (2)
Choose six (6) hours:
THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)
THE 395 American Musical I: A History to 1950 (3)
THE 396 The American Musical II: A Contemporary History 1950-2005 (3)
THE 490 The Theatre and a Cultural Aesthetic (3)
THE 491 Theatre History I (3)
THE 492 Theatre History II (3)
THE 493 American Theatre (3)
Urban Design
(22 semester hours)
For information, contact the Department of Architecture and
Interior Design, 101 Alumni Hall (513-529-7210).
Urban design is the study of human relationships and their
expression in the physical landscapes that are cities. Urban
environment is a physical manifestation of social values. Relations
that comprise the realm of urban design involve not simply
buildings and their creation, but the infrastructure, politics,
economics, sociology, commerce, and history of cities. Students
planning to pursue careers in government, public administration,
social work, architectural design, planning, etc., find their interests
served by this minor.
You should meet with the coordinator of urban design studies
to work out a program of study. Minimally, your program will
include 22 semester hours completed with a 2.50 GPA. Courses
must be taken for a grade (not credit/no-credit).
Program Requirements
Basic course work. All of these:
ARC 211 Introduction to Landscape and Urban Design (3)
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3) *
POL 261 Public Administration (4)*
Nine semester hours from these:**
ARC 405C Typology and Regionalism (3)
ARC 405Q Housing Case Studies (3)
ARC 422 History Of Urbanization (3)
ARC 426 Architecture and Society (3)
ARC 427 American City Since 1940 (3)
ARC 435 Theory and History of Landscape Architecture (3)
FSW 261 Diverse Families Across the Life Cycle (3) *
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
GEO 458 Cities of Difference (3)
GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
POL 468 Public Personnel Administration (3)
SOC 201 Social Problems (4)
SOC 347 Urban Sociology (3)
Other course work is subject to approval by the coordinator.
* Miami Plan Foundation course
** Architecture majors: six of these nine hours must be from outside architecture; non-architecture majors: six of these
nine hours must be architecture courses.
Three semester hours from the following as approved by coordinator:
Independent Study/Field Study
Municipal Internship
The School of Creative Arts /169
Fine Arts Certificates
Undergraduate Certificate in Design
Thinking
The Design Thinking Certificate is offer by the Miami Design
Collaborative, led by the School of Creative Arts. MDC is a
multi-disciplinary design initiative that brings together students
and faculty from throughout campus to develop expertise in
design thinking and to implement that knowledge through
complex, team-based, problem-solving experiences both inside
and outside of the classroom. MDC offers the Design Thinking
Certificate to students interested in gaining knowledge and a level
of expertise in design process and collaborative problem-solving.
Students must complete the following experiences to receive a
certificate.
Program requirements:
SCA 111 Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking (3)
Take a minimum of two curricular experiences:
Curricular experiences are defined as courses which are officially approved by
the university to receive traditional credit hours and meet graduation
requirements. The following courses are approved:
ART 354 3-Dimensional Design (6)
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
Engineering Capstone (by advisor approval)
Architecture/Interior Design Studio (by advisor approval)
Other courses allowed through MDC advisor approval.
Participate in a minimum of one co-curricular experiences: Co-curricular experiences are
defined as experiences outside of normal classroom activity and may or may not receive
university credit. Such experiences would include identified conferences/symposiums,
ad-hoc design challenges/competitions, service projects, student-organized activities, etc.
(by MDC adviser approval only).
Each student pursuing the certificate will be advised by the MDC Adviser/Director.
At the close of the academic year, each student would be required to present a “portfolio”
representing their progress and their work within the certificate program.
170/ The School of Education, Health and Society
The School of
Education, Health
and Society
Each undergraduate program uses the Miami Plan for Liberal
Education as a base, adds the specialized content of the major, adds
appropriate professional courses, and may integrate experience in
field settings through observation, practicum, and internships.
Office of Student Services
202 McGuffey Hall
Phone: 513-529-6317
The Mission of the School of Education, Health and Society at
Miami University is to prepare transformative leaders. Through
excellence in teaching, scholarship, and community partnerships,
the school provides dynamic and innovative programs that
encourage international perspectives. Our integrated human
experience prepares graduates to generate knowledge, educate,
serve and promote well-being in diverse and global settings
through ethical, democratic practice.
Office of Student Teaching and Field Placement
202 McGuffey Hall
Phone: 513-529-7245
www.muohio.edu/ehs
Degrees and Majors Offered
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
Bachelor of Science in Education in:
Chinese
Chemistry
Early Childhood
Earth Science
Earth Science/Chemistry
Earth Science/Life Science
French
German
Integrated English Language Arts
Integrated Mathematics
Integrated Social Studies
Latin
Life Science
Life Science/Chemistry
Middle Childhood Education
Physical Science
Spanish
Special Education
Bachelor of Science in Family Studies
Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and Health in:
Health Promotion
Kinesiology
Nutrition
Sport Leadership and Management
Bachelor of Science in Social Work
Minors in:
Child Studies
Coaching
Community-Based Leadership
Educational Technology
Family Relationships
Nutrition
Special Education
Sport Management
Certificate Programs in:
Teaching English Language Learners (TELLs)
General Information
The School of Education, Health and Society is comprised of
five
departments:
Educational
Leadership,
Educational
Psychology, Family Studies and Social Work, Kinesiology and
Health, and Teacher Education.
Graduate programs are offered in several fields and lead to a
Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Education,
Master of Science, Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, or
a Doctor of Philosophy. See the Graduate Fields of Study section
for details on those programs.
Mission Statement
Accreditation
Accreditation, which specifies standards for faculty,
curriculum, financial support, equipment, student services, and
facilities, is awarded to the School of Education, Health and Society
by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, National
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, National
Association for the Education of Young Children, American
Dietetic Association, Commission on Accreditation of Athletic
Training Education (CAATE), National Association for School
Psychologists, and State of Ohio Department of Education. The
Council on Social Work Education has accredited the social work
baccalaureate program.
Professional and Honorary Organizations
For professional development, the School of Education ,
Health and Society encourages participation in professional
organizations where students can develop leadership skills,
interact with professionals, and engage in educational activities.
Organizations sponsored by the School include: Miami Council for
the Social Studies, Miami University Council of Teachers of
Mathematics, Miami University Science Educators, Miami
University Student Athletic Trainers Association, Pre-Physical and
Occupational Therapy Club, Student Council for Exceptional
Children, Comparative Education Club, Ohio Student Education
Association (OSEA), Dance Theatre, National Council of Teachers
of English–Student Affiliate of Miami (NCTE-SAM), Student
Dietetic Association, Student National Education Association, and
Family Studies and Social Work Student Organization (FSWSO).
To honor outstanding professional and academic
performance, the School is recognized with chapters of the
following: Delta Psi Kappa, Epsilon Phi Tau, Kappa Delta Epsilon,
Kappa Delta Pi, Kappa Phi Kappa, Phi Delta Kappa, Phi Epsilon
Kappa, and Pi Omega Pi.
Art and Music Education
Art and music education programs, administered through the
School of Creative Arts, are described in that chapter. Students
preparing to teach art must plan their programs with an art
education adviser in the Department of Art. Students interested in
music education should consult an adviser in the Department of
Music.
Advising
Undergraduate academic advising for the School of
Educ