00143

00143
Revised: 4-21-94
.-
SITE
INSPECTION
HEALTH
SITES
CAMP
AND SAFETY
PLAN FOR
A, 12,68,75,76,84,
AND 85
MARINE
CORPS BASE
LEJEUNE,
NORTH
CAROLINA
CONTRACT
TASK
Prepared
ORDER
0193
For:
DEPARTMENT
OF THE NAVY
ATLANTIC
DIVISION
NAVAL
FACILITIES
ENGINEERING
COMMAND
Norfolk, Virginia
Under the:
LANTDIV
Contract
CLEAN
Program
N62470-89-D-4814
Prepared
BAKER
By:
ENVIRONMENTAL,
Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
INC.
,,,
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
Pape
EXECUTIVE
1.0
SUMMARY
INTRODUCTION
....................................................
..........................................................
1.1
Policy
1.2
References
.............................................
1.3
Pre-EntryRequirements
.........................................
2.0
PROJECT
3.0
SITE
3.1
3.2
3.3
4.0
SITE
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
5.0
. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PERSONNEL
AND
RESPONSIBILITIES
.........
.................
ES-1
l-l
l-l
l-1
1-2
2.1
CHARACTERIZATION
........................................
SiteBackground
................................................
3.1.1 Site A . MCAS Officers Housing
............................
3.1.2 Site 12 -Explosive
Ordnance Disposal
.......................
3.1.3 Site68-RifleRangeDump
.................................
3.1.4 Site 75 . MCAS Basketball
Court ............................
Site76-MCASCurtisRoad
3.15
................................
3.1.6 Site 84 -Building
45 Area
..................................
3.1.7 Site 85 . Camp Johnson Battery Dump .......................
SiteWorkPlans
.................................................
..............................................
HazardEvaluation
3.3.1
Task-Specific
Hazards
....................................
3.3.2
ChemicalHazards
........................................
Physical Hazards
3.3.3
.........................................
3.3.4
Environmental
Hazards
..................................
3-1
3-1
3-1
3-l
3-2
3-3
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-9
3-17
3-19
.....................................................
CONTROL
SiteAccess
......................................................
SiteConditions
..................................................
WorkZones
.....................................................
4.3.1 Level B and C Activities
....................................
4.3.2 Level D and D+ Activities
.................................
“Buddy System”
.................................................
Safe Work Practices
.............................................
4.5.1 Heavy Equipment
.........................................
4.5.2 Drilling
Operations
........................................
Sanitation
Procedures/Site
Precautions
............................
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-9
4-9
4-9
4-9
4- 11
4-11
ENVIRONMENTAL
MONITORING
..................................
5.1
Personal Monitoring
.............................................
5.2
Point-Source
Monitoring
.........................................
5.3
Perimeter
Monitoring
............................................
5.4
Site-Specific
Air Monitoring
Equipment
and Frequency
.............
5.5
Equipment
Maintenance
and Calibration
..........................
5.6
Monitoring
Documentation
.......................................
ii
5-l
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-4
Revised: 4-21-94
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
Page
6.0
PERSONAL
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
7.0
DECONTAMINATION
7.1
7.2
7.3
8.0
8.8
8.9
8.10
8.11
8.12
8.13
8.14
8.15
10.0
PROCEDURES
..*...........................
PROCEDURES
REQUIREMENTS
.......................................
REQUIREMENTS
8-l
8-1
8-l
8-2
8-2
8-2
8-11
8-11
8-11
8-11
8-12
8-12
8-13
8-14
8-14
8-14
8-14
8-16
8-16
9-1
9-l
9-3
.....................
10-l
General ........
................................................
Site Specific .....................................................
11.0
HEALTH
AND
12.0
DECLARATION
SAFETY
PLAN
OF HEALTH
APPROVAL
AND
SAFETY
.. .
111
7-1
‘7-2
7-2
8-l
.......................................
SURVEILLANCE
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-3
7-1
General ........................................................
Site-Specific Training ............................................
MEDICAL
10.1
10.2
...........................
Scope ..........................................................
Pre-Emergency Planning
........................................
Emergency Coordinator ..........................................
Communications
................................................
Assembly Area ..................................................
EmergencyHospitalRoute
.......................................
Emergency Medical Treatment
...................................
8.7.1 Emergency Services .......................................
8.7.2 Physical Injury ............................................
87.3 Chemical Injury ...........................................
8.7.4 Snakebite Injury
..........................................
Emergency Decontamination Procedures ..........................
Personal Protection and First-Aid Equipment
......................
Notification
.....................................................
HazardAssessment
..............................................
Security ........................................................
Emergency Alerting
.............................................
Training ........................................................
Spill Containment Procedures ....................................
TRAINING
9.1
9.2
EQUIPMENT
Personnel Decontamination
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . .. . . . . . . . . . .
Effectiveness of Personnel Decontamination
.......................
Equipment Decontamination
.....................................
EMERGENCY
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
8.5
8.6
8.7
9.0
PROTECTIVE
Personal Protection Equipment Selection ..........................
Site-Specific Levels of Protection ..................................
Respiratory Protection ...........................................
6.3.1 LevelB ...................................................
6.3.2 LevelC ...................................................
6.3.3 LevelD ...................................................
Care and Cleaning of Personal Protective Equipment
...............
10-l
10-l
.................,.......
11-l
PLAN
12-1
REVIEW
........
.
,/,
LIST OF TABLES
Number
3-l
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
5-l
Page
Toxicological
Properties
of Chemicals;
Toxicological
Properties
of Chemicals;
Site 12 - Explosive
Ordnance Disposal
Toxicological
Properties
of Chemicals;
Toxicological
Properties
of Chemicals;
Toxicological
Properties
of Chemicals;
Toxicological
Properties
of Chemicals;
Toxicological
Properties
of Chemicals;
Site 85 - Camp Johnson Battery Dump
Site A - MCAS
..
Site
Site
Site
Site
Officers
Housing
.
3-10
.............................
68 - Rifle Range Dump
......
75 - MCAS Basketball
Court
76 - MCAS Curtis Road
.....
84 - Building
45 Area
.......
3-11
3-12
...............................
3-13
3-14
3-15
3-16
Monitoring
Equipment
and Frequency
for Each Task Conducted at
SitesA,12,68,75,76,84,and85
. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5-3
8-1
MCB Camp Lejeune
..................
8-3
9-l
OSHA Training
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .
9-2
10-l
Medical
Emergency
History
Surveillance
Telephone
of Baker
Testing
Numbers
Project Personnel
Parameters
............................
10-Z
LIST OF FIGURES
Page
4-l
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
Site Location Map; Site
Site Location Map; Site
Site Location Map; Site.
Site Location Map; Site
Site Location Map; Site
Site Location Map; Site
Site Location Map; Site
Typical Contamination
8-l
Hospital
Route
A . MCAS Officers Housing
...................
12 . Explosive Ordnance Disposal
.............
68 . Rifle Range Dump ........................
75 . MCAS Basketball
Court
..................
76 . MCAS Curtis Road .......................
84 . Building
45 Area .........................
85 - Camp Johnson Battery Dump
.............
Reduction Zone Layout
.......................
....................................................
LIST OF ATTACHMENTS
A
B
C
Baker Environmental,
Inc. (Baker)
Safety Standard Operating
Procedures
Material
Safety Data Sheets
Emergency Procedures for Exposure to
Hazardous Materials/Waste
iv
(SOPS)
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-10
8-4
EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
The chemical hazards associated with the tasks at this site(s) are expected to include exposure
to varying levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, petroleum products,
polychlorinated biphenyls #‘CBS), and mustard agent.
The U.S. Army Technical Escort Unit 0’EU) will be available on site to assist with the
screening of samples for chemical agents.
Section 2.0 describes the subcontractor’s
responsibilities.
The physical hazards include working around heavy equipment, drill rig and backhoe thermal
stress and the limitations
using personnel protective equipment.
Each of this hazards is
described in Section 3.0.
Section 5.0 describes the environmental
monitoring requirements which consist of using an
HNu with an 11.7 electron volt (eV) bulb and chemical agent monitoring equipment.
Due to the limited amount of information provided by previous investigations
and record
searches, assigned protection levels at this site(s) are conservative in nature. The level of
personal protection assigned for work tasks and other operations will be Levels D, Modified
Level D (D +), Level C and Level B. This information is provided in Section 6.0
Section 8.0 describes emergency procedures which includes Figure 8-1, showing the route to
the nearest public and base hospital; along with first aid procedures, communication
procedures, and other site concerns.
ES-l
1.0
INTRODUCTION
This Site-Specific
Health and Safety Plan (HASP) has been designed
work at Marine Corps Base (MCB), Camp Lejeune, Jacksonville,
North
68,75,76,84,
and 85.
1.1
for site investigation
Carolina,
Sites A, 12,
Policy
It is the policy of Baker Environmental,
Inc. (Baker)
that all on-site hazardous
waste
management
activities
be performed
in conformance
with a Site-Specific
HASP. The HASP is
written
based on the anticipated
hazards and expected work conditions
and applies to
activities
performed
by both Baker
and Baker’s
subcontractors.
The HASP may be
modified/updated
with the approval
of the Project Health
and Safety Officer (PHSO) and
Project Manager.
Proper notification
will be given to the Navy Technical
Representative
(NTR) when signi&ant
changes to the HASP are implemented.
This plan,
(Hazardous
1.2
at a minimum,
meets the requirements
under
Waste Operations
and Emergency Response).
OSHA
Standard
29 CFR 1910.120
References
The following
this HASP.
publications
have been referenced
American
Conference
of Governmental
Limit Values for Chemical
Substances
Indices for 1993-1994.
in the development
Industrial
and Physical
and implementation
Hygienists
(ACGIH),
Agents and Biological
The Center for Labor Education
and Research, Lori P. Andrews,
Protection
During Hazardous Waste Remediation,
Van Nostrand
New York. 1990.
Lewis, Richard
J., Sr. Hazardous
Chemicals
Nostrand Reinhold, New York, New York. 1991.
Desk
of
Threshold
Exposure
P.E., Editor. Worker
Reinhold, New York,
Reference,
3rd
Edition,
Van
National
Institute
for Occupational
Safety and Health/Occupational
Safety and
Health
Administration/U.S.
Coast Guard/U.S.
Environmental
Protection
Agency
(NIOSH/OSHAAJSCG/EPA).
Occupational
Safetv and Health Guidance
Manual
for
Hazardous Waste Site Activities.
October 1985.
Occupational
Safety
and 1926. 1993.
and Health
Administration.
U. S. Coast Guard.
Policv for Response
Pollution Response COMDTINST-ML6465.30.
U.S. Department
Disease Control,
to Hazardous
Regulations.
Chemical
29 CFR 1910
Releases.
USCG
of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers
NIOSH.
NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. June 1990.
U.S. Environmental
Protection
Emergency Response Division.
U.S. Department
Army Regulation
Federal
of the Army.
385-61.
for
Agency, Office of Emergency
and Remedial
Response,
Standard Operating
Safety Guides. June 1992.
The Armv
l-l
Toxic
Chemical
Apent
Safetv
Program,
1.3
l
U.S. Department
of the Army.
Safety
GB, andVX,
AMC Regulation
385-131.
l
Water and Research, Inc. Initial
Assessment
Lejeune, North Carolina.
Prepared
for Naval
Activity
(NEESA).
April 1983.
Pre-Entry
Regulation8
for Chemical
Agents
H, HD, HT,
Study of Marine
Corps Base Camp
Energy and Environmental
Support
Requirements
During
the site mobilization
the Site Health
and Safety Officer (SHSO) will perform
a
reconnaissance
of each site (work areas) as identified
in the Work Plan, establish or confirm
emergency points of contact and procedures,
and review any other issues deemed necessary to
address site safety and health. The SHSO will then conduct a health and safety briefing with
site personnel
(as identified
in Section 2.0) to discuss data obtained from the previous
site
reconnaissance,
provisions
outlined in this HASP, and appropriate
safety and health related
procedures/protocols.
1-2
--_-i
2.0
PROJECT
PERSONNEL
AND
RESPONSIBILITIES
The following
personnel are designated to carry out the stated job functions for both on- and off
site activities.
(Note: One person may carry out more than one job function, and personnel
identified
are subject to change.). The responsibilities
that correspond with each job function
are outlined below.
PROJECT
MANAGER:
Mr. Raymond
Wattras
The project manager is responsible
for assuring that all activities are conducted in accordance
with the HASP.
The Project Manager
has the authority
to suspend field activities
if
employees are in danger of injury or exposure to harmful
agents.
In addition,
the Project
Manager
is responsible
for:
l
Assisting
l
Designating
compliance
a Site Health and Safety Officer
with the HASP.
l
Reviewing
and approving
PROJECT
HEALTH
the PHSO in Site-Specific
AND
HASP development
the information
SAFETY
and other sits personnel
presented
OFFICER
for all phases of the project.
(PHSO):
who will assure
in this HASP.
Mr. Ronald
Krivan,
CSP
The PHSO is responsible
for general development
of the HASP and will be the primary contact
for inquiries
as to the contents of the HASP. The PHSO will be consulted before changes to the
HASP can be approved or implemented.
The PHSO is responsible for:
l
Coordinating
l
Developing
l
Resolving
issues that
arise
implementation
of the HASP.
l
Monitoring
the field program
records, on-site activity audits,
l
Determining
surveillance
SITE MANAGER:
the review,
amendments
evaluation,
and approval
of the HASP.
to the HASP, when applicable.
in
the
field
with
respect
through
a regular
review
or a combination
of both.
that all Baker personnel have received
prior to entry onto the site.
(To be Provided
to
of field
the required
interpretation
health
training
or
and safety
and medical
in Final HASP Submission)
The Site Manager
is responsible
for assuring that all day-to-day
activities
are conducted in
accordance with the HASP. The Site Manager
has the immediate
authority
to suspend field
activities
if employees are subjected to a situation that can be immediately
dangerous to life or
health. The Site Manager’s
responsibilities
include:
l
Assuring
that the appropriate
health
site and that it is properly maintained.
and safety
l
Coordinating
overall
site access and security measures, including
personnel arriving/departing
the site (by name, company and time).
2-1
equipment
and PPE has arrived
documenting
on
all
l
Approving
all on site activities,
and coordinating
site safety and health issues with the
SHSO.
l
Assisting the SHSO in coordinating emergency procedures with the Naval Activity,
emergency medical responders, etc., prior to or during site mobilization activities.
l
Assuring compliance with site sanitation
l
Coordinating
l
Overseeing the decontamination
of field sampling equipment.
l
Serving as the backup/alternate
Emergency Coordinator.
l
Assuming
absence.
as indicated
procedures and site precautions.
activities with Baker and subcontractor personnel.
the responsibilities
2-2
under “Field Team Leader,”
in hisiher
SITE HEALTH
AND SAFETY OFFICER:
(To be Provided in Final HASP Submission)
The SHSO is responsible for site implementation
of the HASP. The SHSO also has the
immediate authority to suspend field activities if the health or safety of site personnel is
endangered; to audit the subcontractor training, fit testing, and medical surveillance records
to verify compliance; and, maintaining these records at the Baker Command Post. The SHSO
is responsible for:
Coordinating
the pre-entry briefing
Assuring that monitoring
equipment
and subsequent briefings.
is properly calibrated and operated.
Assure compliance with the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS) in Attachment
A.
Inform personnel of the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) located in Attachment B
and emergency procedures for exposure to hazardous materials/waste presented in
Attachment C.
Managing health and safety equipment,
that is used in field activities.
including
instruments,
respirators, PPE, etc.,
Confirming emergency response provisions (as necessary) in cooperation with Naval
Activity
Requirements,
emergency medical care, etc., prior to or during site
mobilization activities.
Monitoring conditions during field activities to assure compliance with the HASP and
evaluate the need for work procedure or PPE changes.
Documenting, as necessary, pertinent information such as, accident investigation and
reporting, safety inspections, a record of site conditions, personnel involved in field
activities, and any other relevant health and safety iss*ues
Overseeing the decontamination of personnel and determine safe boundary procedures
for activities requiring Level C or higher protection levels.
Acting
as the Emergency Coordinator
and assuring the availability
of a
communication network and deployment of the HASP and emergency equipment to
field teams.
FIELD TEAM LEADER:
(To be Provided in Final HASP Submission)
The Field Team Leader is responsible for:
l
Safety issues relevant to the tasks under his/her direction.
l
Determining
safe boundary
protection levels.
l
Assuring that PPE is properly maintained.
l
Complying
l
Assuming the responsibility
procedures
for activities
requiring
Level
D or D+
with the conditions as outlined under Field Team Members.
as indicated under “Site Manager”
2-3
-.
-
in their absence.
FIELD
TEAM
(To be Provided
MEMBERS:
The Field Team Members
are responsible
HASP Submission)
for:
l
Familiarity
l
Attending
training
sessions to review
safety and health information.
l
Being alert to identified
and unidentified
to the SHSO and Site Manager.
l
Offering
safety.
l
Complying
l
Conducting
l
Reporting
Subcontractor
in Final
with the HASP.
suggestions,
hazards
ideas, or recommendations
with the contents
site activities
and staying
informed
and reporting
that
of additional
unidentified
may improve
hazards
or enhance
site
of the HASP.
in an orderly
accidents/injuries,
personnel
the HASP,
however
are responsible
with the conditions
and appropriate
minor,
manner.
to the SHSO as soon as possible.
for:
l
Complying
l
Obtaining
the appropriate
training,
fit testing, and medical surveillance
requirements
under 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1910.134 and providing
this documentation
to the Site
Manager prior to or during site mobilization.
l
Complying
with the training
and medical surveillance
requirements
as outlined
Sections 9.0 and 10.0, respectively,
and providing
his/her own PPE that meets
exceeds the level of protection
as outlined in this HASP.
SUBCONTRACTOR
COMPANIES:
Drilling
Operations:
(To
Survey Operations:
(To
Geophysical
Operations:
(To
UXO Clearance:
(To
Analytical
Laboratory:
(To
NAVFACENGCOM
Ms. Katherine
as outlined
be
be
be
be
be
Determined
Determined
Determined
Determined
Determined
REPRESENTATIVES:
Landman (NTR)
under Field Team Members.
per
per
per
per
per
Baker’s
Baker’s
Baker’s
Baker’s
Baker’s
Basic
Basic
Basic
Basic
Basic
Ordering
Ordering
Ordering
Ordering
Ordering
(804) 322-4818
ACTIVITY/BASE
REPRESENTATIVES:
Mr. Neal Paul (CLEJ EMD)
(910) 451-5063
2-4
Agreements)
Agreements)
Agreements)
Agreements)
Agreements)
in
or
FEDERAL/STATE/LOCAL
Ms. Gena Townsend
Mr. Patrick Walters
REPRESENTATIVES:
(USEPA, Region IV)
(NCDEHNR)
INDEPENDENT
REPRESENTATIVE:
U. S. Army Technical Escort Unit
(404)347-3016
(919) 733-2801
SITE
3.0
This section
evaluation.
3.1
CHARACTERIZATION
presents
the site descriptions,
work tasks at each site, and the associated
hazard
Site Background
This subsection
presents site background
Lejeune that are included in this HASP.
3.1.1
Site A - MCAS
Site Location
Officers
information
on the seven
sites at MCI3
Camp
Housing
and Setting
l
Site is located along the bank
Housing, high profile area.
of the New
l
The area is due east approximately
Trotter Street.
River,
375 feet from
adjacent
Longstaff
to the MCAS
Officers
Road at intersection
of
Site History
Site history is unknown;
was discovered during Round 2 sampling,
1986 (ESE). Waste
was noted eroding out of a cut bank along the New River.
Tentatively
identified
hospital wastes, including
needles and vials of white powder (reportedly
chlorinebased substance).
l
Previous
Investipations
Site Summary Report (1990)
) ‘Iwo shallow monitoring
wells installed, 1986
) Two rounds of sampling
December 1986:
2 groundwater
wells. 1 surface water, 1 sediment
March 1987:
2 groundwater
wells
) Analyzed for free chlorine, oil and grease, VOAs
) Findings:
1986:
sediment, 167 pglg oil and grease
1987:
very low concentrations
of oil and grease in groundwater
l
3.1.2
Site 12 - Explosive
Site Location
Ordnance
Disposal
(G4)
and Setting
l
Area is less than two acres.
l
Site located
Tower M .
Site History
approximately
two
miles
northeast
of Sneads
Ferry
Road
and
Fire
.
a
Site is within
an area where
burning or exploding.
l
Operation
initiated
in the early
unserviceable
or defective
1960s and continues
3-1
today.
ordnance
is disposed
of by
l
Site discovered
during operations (1992). A deep (approximately
8 feet bgs) explosion
uncovered
an oily sheen and petroleum odors were noted. Military
personnel notified
EMD.
l
Suspected site (operational)
related
) Ordnance - burned or exploded
) Colored smokes
b White phosphorus
b Heavy metals
l
Probable contaminants
of concern:
) Suspected petroleum/fuel
discovered
than 8 feet below ground surface.
3.1.3
contaminants:
during
demolition
exercises at depths greater
Site 68 - Rifle Range Dump
Site Location
and Setting
l
Suspected
burial
area is less than five acres in size and is estimated
to be
approximately
10 feet deep with a total of approximately
100,000 cubic yards of
material (Site Summary Report, 1990).
l
Site located west of Range Road, about 2,000 feet west of the Rifle
treatment
plant, about 800 feet east of Stone Creek.
Range
water
Site History
l
Operated
l
Used as a disposal area; variety of wastes disposed including
garbage, b*uilding
waste treatment
sludge and approximately
2,000 gallons of waste solvents.
Previous
l
from 1942 through
1972.
debris,
Investigations
Site Summary
Report
(1990)
)
Cited “major
concern”
for groundwater
contamination;
noted appearance
of
organic compounds identified
in the potable supply wells (RR-45, 130 feet deep;
RR-97,200
feet deep), sampled in 1981 (results not provided).
)
Installed
)
Two
-----
)
three shallow
groundwater
monitoring
wells, 1984.
rounds of sampling
1984:
Three monitoring
wells, two supply wells
November
1986:
Two monitoring
wells
Analyzed for VOAs
Findings:
No compounds of concern detected in either
Following
the two rounds of sampling,
ESE proposed
VOAs were either a result of lab artifacts
or minor
solvents in the immediate
vicinity of the wells.
3-2
round.
that previously
detected
quantities
of degreasing
3.1.4
Site 75 - MCAS Basketball
Site Location
Court
and Setting
l
Burial
area is approximately
l
Site located north of Curtis Road to the vicinity of the MCAS
between the railroad tracks and the housing area.
l
Rubber
padded trucks
90 feet by 70 feet.
used for disposal
Basketball
Courts
and is
of 75 to 100 drums (IAS).
Site History
l
Reportedly
l
Possibly
l
Possibly as many as one hundred 55-gallon buried drums containing
chloroacetophene
(tear gas), chloropicrin
(PS), chloroform,
carbon tetrachloride,
and benzene.
l
Drum
Previous
0
3.1.5
a
8 feet of soil covering
contents
reportedly
drum burial
event in the 1950s.
drums.
contained
yellow
and brown
liquids.
Investigations
Site Summary
Report
(1990)
)
Installed
)
Two rounds of sampling
July 1984: Three monitoring
wells, three supply wells
-- November
1984:
Three shallow groundwater
monitoring
wells, three supply
wells
-- Analyzed for VOAs, chloropicrin,
tetrachlorodioxin
Findings:
No compounds of concern detected during these rounds of sampling.
)
Geophysical
survey
conducted
entailing
electromagnetic
“metal-detection
techniques”
on a grid system.
)
No signs of buried
three shallow
groundwater
metallic
monitoring
wells, 1984
objects from geophysical
(EM)
survey.
and Setting
Area is approximately
Site located
adjacent
l/4-acre.
to and north
of Curtis
Road and west of the terminus
Crawford Street.
Site History
l
conductance
Site 76 - MCAS Curtis Road
Site Location
l
used for a one-time
Reportedly
used aa a drum
disposal
area on two occasions in 1949.
3-3
circle
of
l
From twenty-five
to seventy-five
Xi-gallon
buried drums containing
chloroacetophene
(tear gas), chloropicrin
(PS), chioroform,
carbon tetrachloride,
and benzene.
l
Site and suspected
Previous
3.1.6
similar
to Site 75.
in nature
Investigations
Site Summary
l
contamination
)
Installed
)
Two
-*
__
Report
(1990)
two shallow
groundwater
monitoring
wells, 1984
rounds of sampling
July and November
1984: Two wells
Analyzed for VOAs, chloropicrin,
tetrachlorodioxin
Findings:
No compounds of concern detected during
these rounds
)
Geophysical
survey
conducted
entailing
electromagnetic
“metal-detection
techniques”
on a grid system.
)
No signs of buried
Site 84 - Building
Site Location
metallic
objects from geophysical
of sampling.
conductance
(EM)
survey.
45 Area
and Setting
o
Area is approximately
less than l/2-acre.
l
Site is located approximately
200 yards south of Highway
base, near the main gate entrance to MCB Camp Lejeune.
24 at the main
side of the
!
Site History
l
Site is a former
l
One (1) transformer
(June 1992).
l
Additional
transformers
and MW -14.
Previous
electric
substation
where
was discovered
(less than
transformers
during
UST
were used and possibly
investigation
20) were removed
from
by O’Brien
pond adjacent
stored.
and Gere
to MW-13
Investigations
l
Site Assessment,
Tank S781,
O’Brien and Gere. May 1992.
l
Verbal
information
Midway
from Mr. Tom Morris,
contents
and surrounding
Park,
Marine
Corps
)
Transformer
)
Transformers
)
Findings:
-- Transformer
content exhibited high PCB concentrations
-- Soil exhibited low level PCB concentrations
retrieved
from pond were not sampled
3-4
Base,
Camp
Lejeune.
MCB Camp Lejeune
soil sampled
-
..
(three samples)
for PCBs.
for PCBs
3.1.7
Site 85 - Camp
Site Location
Johnson
Battery
Dump
and Setting
l
Area is approximately
less than l/2-acre.
l
Site is located in a wooded
area behind
the vehicle
training
area at Camp Johnson.
Site History
Site used during
Discovered
the 1950s.
during
1992 road grading
Several decomposed batteries
era. In addition, air purifying
Previous
activities.
were identified
and thought
canisters were once identified
to be from the Korean
at the site.
War
Investigations
None
3.2
Site Work Plans
The Work Plan (detailing
the tasks to be performed
at each site), the Sampling
and Analysis
Plan (SAP), and Quality Assurance
Project Plan (QAPP) are bound as separate documents,
and accompany the Health and Safety Plan. A summary of site work tasks include:
Hand excavation
(Site A)
Well installation
(Sites 12,68,84,
and 85)
Groundwater
sampling (Sites A, 12,68,75,76,84,
and 85)
Test pit excavation
(Site A)
Soil sampling (Sites A, 12,68,75,84,
and 85)
Geophysics (Sites 75 and 76)
Soil boring (Sites 12,68,84,
and 85)
Surface water/sediment
samples (Sites 68 and 84)
3.3
Hazard
Evaluation
This subsection presents the hazard evaluation
physical hazard, and environmental
hazard.
3.3.1
Task-Specific
of each task-specific
hazard,
chemical
hazard,
Hazards
The pre-entry
briefing
and subsequent
safety meetings will serve to address the hazards
particular
to the site, (such as sloping
ground,
uneven
terrain,
etc.) that were not
apparent/known
when the HASP was written.
As each of these hazards are identified,
the
SHSO will add them to the HASP in the field along with the date of modification.
Listed below are summaries
for the hazards associated with each of the site tasks. Levels of
protection
were selected based on this task-specific
hazard
identification,
information
obtained from previous
investigations/site
visits, and previous
experience
with similar site
investigations/activities.
Additionally,
site personnel
are expected to follow “safe” work
3-5
practices as described in this HASP.
samples for chemical agents
Sediment/Surface
Water
Sampling
The TEU
will be on hand at Sites A, 75, and 76 to screen
- Sites 68 and 84
Chemical
Potential for contaminated
material to be splashed onto body or in eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated
material from hand to mouth contact.
Inhalation
of volatile constituents
within the sediments or surface water.
Absorption
of constituents through the skin.
l
l
l
l
PhysicaUEnvironmental
l
l
l
l
l
Muscle strain from boring with hand auger.
These operations
must comply
Sampling
operations
that occur from boats.
Baker’s Safety SOP for Safe Boat Operations.
Slips/trips/falls
- sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation
from contactwith
insects and vegetation.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
Geophysical
Investigation
- Sites 75 and 76
Chemical
l
l
Skin contact with potentially
contaminated
soils.
Ingestion of contaminated
material from hand to mouth
contact.
Physical/Environmental
l
l
l
Slips/trips/falls
- sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
Soil Sampling
- Sites A, 12,68,75,84,
and 85
Chemical
l
l
l
Skin contact with potentially
contaminated
soils.
Ingestion of hazardous materials from hand to mouth contact.
Inhalation
of volatile contaminants
or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Physical/Environmental
l
l
l
l
l
Potential contact with unexploded
ordnance (UXO).
Slips/trips/falls
- sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
Muscle strain from boring with hand auger.
3-6
with
Monitoring
Well Installation
- Sites 12,68,84,
and 85
Chemical
Potentially-contaminated
mud, etc. in
Contact with potentially
contaminated
Ingestion of hazardous materials from
Inhalation
of volatile contaminants
or
l
l
l
l
eyes and on skin.,
material.
hand to mouth contact.
volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
PhysicaUEnvironmental
Potential contact with unexploded ordnance (UXO).
Heavy objects landing on foot/tee or head.
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment
operation.
Slips/trips/falls
- sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation.
Overhead
hazards from drill rig operations.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
Contact with underground
utility lines.
Lifting hazards (muscle strain).
Monitoring
Well Development
- Sites 12.68.84,
and 85
Chemical
a
l
0
Potentially-contaminated
groundwater,
etc., in eyes and on skin.
Ingestion of hazardous materials from hand to mouth contact.
Inhalation
of volatile contaminants
or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants,
Physical/Environmental
l
l
l
l
Potential contact with unexploded
ordnance (UXO).
Slips/tripslfalls
- sloped, uneven terrain.
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
Groundwater
Sampling
- Sites A, 12,68,75,76,84,
and 85
Chemical
l
l
l
0
Skin contact with potentially
contaminated
water.
Eye contact from splashing water.
Ingestion of hazardous materials from hand to mouth contact.
Inhalation
of volatile
contaminants
or volatile
fraction of semivolatile
emitting from the well opening.
Physical/Environmental
l
l
l
l
l
l
Potential contact with unexploded
ordnance (UXO).
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation.
Lifting hazards (muscle strain, etc.) while bailing well.
Cuts from using knives to cut bailer rope.
Slips/trips/falls
- sloped, uneven terrain.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
3-7
contaminants
Hand
Excavation
- Site A
Chemical
Inhalation
of volatile contaminants
or volatile fraction of semivolatile
Ingestion of hazardous materials from hand to mouth contact.
Contact with potentially
contaminated
material.
l
l
l
contaminants.
PhysicaUEnvironmental
Slips/trips/falls
- sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
l
l
l
Soil Boring-Sampling
- Sites l&68,84,
and 85
Chemical
l
l
l
0
Potentially-contaminated
mud, etc., in eyes or on skin.
Skin contact with potentially
contaminated
soil.
Ingestion of potentially
contaminated
soils from hand to mouth contact.
Inhalation
of volatile contaminants
or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Physical/Environmental
Potential contact with unexploded ordnance WXO).
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment
operations.
Lifting hazards (muscle strain).
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation.
Contact with underground
utilities.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
Heavy objects landing on foot/toe or head.
Strip&rips/falls
from sloped, uneven terrain.
Test Pit/Trenching
- Site A
Chemical
l
l
l
l
Skin contact with contaminated
soil.
Ingestion of contaminated
soils from hand to mouth contact.
Inhalation
of volatile contaminants
or volatile fraction of semivolatile
Skin contact with potentially
toxic-“pure
product” contaminants.
contaminants.
Physical/Environmental
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
Overhead hazards.
Skin irritation
from contact with insects and vegetation.
Contact with underground
utilities.
High grade slopes that may require shoring according to OSHA Standards.
Interaction
with native and potentially
hostile animal life.
Explosion from contact with explosive/ignitable
materials.
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment operation.
3-8
3.32
Chemical
Exposure
pathways
l
l
l
l
Hazards
to hazardous
include:
chemicals
can occur through
various
pathways
into the body.
These
Inhalation
of vapors, gases, or particulates.
Ingestion of contaminated
particulates
from hand-to-mouth
contact.
Dermal and eye contact from direct, unprotected
contact.
Absorption
through the eye or skin from exposure to concentrations
in the air.
The chemical exposure potential for personnel working at Sites A, 12,68,75,76,84,
and 85 is
expected
to relate
directly
to the chemicals
detected
during
preliminary
sampling
investigations
and reported past disposal practices. Therefore,
Tables 3-1 through 3-7 identify
the chemical/physical
properties
and exposure symptoms/routes
of entry, respectively,
for the
chemicals
detected during
preliminary
sampling
investigations
that present the greatest
hazard.
The following
information
pertains to blister agents and tear agents. Additional
information
regarding
these or other chemicals listed on Tables 3-1 through 3-7 can be reviewed
on the
Material
Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) in Appendix
B. The data presented
in the MSDSs
reflects the chemical and toxicological
properties
of the specific compound
in a pure, nondiluted state. As such, when these compounds are detected in environmental
media (i..e, soil,
groundwater,
sediment,
and surface water), the hazards are anticipated
to be substantially
less than those associated with exposure to “pure” compounds.
The data presented
in the
MSDSs will, therefore,
be utilized as reference
information
when questions arise as to a
constituents’
chemical and toxicological
property or measures for emergency response.
Note:
Procedures
Blister
Agents
to follow
in the event
of a chemical
exposure,
are included
as Attachment
C.
All of the Blister Agents are persistent.
Blister agents damage any tissue that they contact.
They affect the eyes and lungs and blister the skin. They damage the respiratory
tract when
inhaled and cause vomiting
and diarrhea when absorbed.
Mustard
-H, HS or HD (Sulfur
Mustards)
Levinstein
mustard
(H) -H is the original
mustard (gas) of World War I vintage.
During
World War H, HS, signifying
Sulfur Mustard,
was also used as opposed to HN or Nitrogen
Mustard
which had been stockpiled by Germany.
H contains about 30% sulfur impurities,
which give it a pronounced
odor similar to garlic or horseradish.
The impurities
lessen the
effectiveness
of H and lower its freezing point 2-5°F. Other properties
of H are essentially
the
same as those for distilled mustard, which is discussed next.
Distilled
Mustard
@ID) - HD is a purified
form of H and is a colorless to amber colored liquid
with a garlic-like
odor. The effects of HD are usually delayed 46 hours, but 24-hour latency
periods have been observed.
The higher the concentration,
the shorter the interval
of time
from exposure to the first symptoms (i.e., latency period) Mustard
acts first as a cell irritant
Early symptoms
include
and finally
as a .cell poison on all tissue surfaces contacted.
inflammation
of the eyes; inflammation
of the nose, throat, trachea, bronchi, and lung tissue;
and redness of the skin; blistering
or ulceration
may follow.
Effects may include a more “at
ease” attitude, vomiting,
and fever, beginning
about the r;n me time as skin reddening.
3-9
TABLE
3-1
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS
SITE A - MCAS Officers Housing
CHEMICAL
COMPOUND(a)
Calcium
hypochlorite
HAZARD
RATING(b)
HFR
VOL.(c)
102
.
SKIN
ABS0RP.M)
CARC.(e)
No
No
TWA(f)
None
STELM
c(h)
IDLH(i)
IPti)
-
established
MUSTARD
~3
g
GAS:
H
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mg/m3
-
HD
411
0.072
Yes
Ye8
0.003 mglm3
-
m
HS
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mg/m3
-
-
,
-
Notes:
(a) Chemical compound of potential concern obtained from previous investigation.
6) Hazard Rating - based upon Health (H), Fire (F), or Reactivity
(R) hazard from NFPA 704 Standard Rating System (0 = no hazard, 4 = high hazard).
(c) Volatility
Rating - based upon vapor pressure in mm Hg at 68” F, 20” C.
(d) Skin Absorption
- “Yes” indicates potential
exposure through skin and mucous membranes,
either by airborne or, more particularly,
by direct contact ACGIH 1993-1994.
62) Carcinogen
- “Yes” indicates a compound is a confirmed or suspect human carcinogen by the IARC, NIOSH, NTP, EPA or ACGIH.
U-J TWA - Time Weighted
Average
from the 1993-1994
TLV - Threshold
Limit Value of the ACGIH
or OSHA Permissible
Exposure Limits (PEL),
whichever
is lower.
6-t) Short Term Exposure Limit - “STEL” denotes a 15 minute time weighted average which may not be exceeded - ACGIH 1993-1994.
(h) Ceiling Limit - denotes the ceiling concentration
that cannot be exceeded at any time.
(i) IDLH - Immediately
Dangerous
to Life and Health.
W Ionization
Potential - expressed in electron volts (eV).
Note that oil and grease have been identified
chemicals.
on this site.
This
is not expected
to be a concern
because of the protection
levels
established
for the other
TABLE
3-2
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS
SITE 12 - Explosive Ordnance Disposal
HAZARD
[email protected])
HFR
VOL.(c)
SKIN
ABSORP.(d)
Diesel Fuel
020
Cl
No
No
Fuel Oil No. 6
020
0.2 mm
@Zl”C
No
Gasoline
140
Not
Listed
Kerosene
020
5
CHEMICAL
COMPOUND(a)
VOLATILE
TWA(f)
STE L(s)
C(h)
10 mg/m3
(mist)
-
No
5 mglm3
(mist)
-
No
No
300 ppm
500pm
No
No
CARCM
IDLH(i)
IF.9
S:
-
c11.7
<11.7
-
-
< 11.7
< 11.7
Notes:
(8) Chemical compound of potential concern obtained from previous investigation.
(b) Hazard Rating - based upon Health (H), Fire (F), or Reactivity (R) hazard from NFPA 704 Standard Rating System (0 = no hazard, 4 = high hazard).
(c) Volatility Rating - based upon vapor pressure in mm Hg at 68” F, 20” C.
(d) Skin Absorption - “Yes” indicates potential exposure through skin and mucous membranes, either by airborne or, more particularly, by direct contact ACGIH 1993-1994.
(e) Carcinogen - “Yes” indicates a compound is a confirmed or suspect human carcinogen by the IARC, NIOSH, NTP, EPA or ACGIH. .
(f~ TWA - Time Weighted Average from the 1993-1994 TLV - Threshold Limit Value of the ACGIH or OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL),
whichever is lower.
(fi) Short Term Exposure Limit - “STEL” denotes a 15 minute time weighted average which may not be exceeded - ACGIH 1993-1994.
(h) Ceiling Limit - denotes the ceiling concentration that cannot be exceeded at any time.
(i) IDLH - Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health.
ci) Ionization Potential - expressed in electron volts (eV).
TABLE
3-3
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS
Site 68 - Rifle Range Dump
HAZARD
RATINGS)
CHEMICAL
COMPOUND(s)
VOL.(c)
HFR
SKIN
AlE3SORP.63
CARC’w
[email protected]
STEL(s)
C(h)
IDLH(i)
IPO)
7
VOLATILES:
.
Acetone
130
180
No
No
750 ppm
1,OOOppm
-
20,000 ppm
9.69
Benzene
230
75
No
Yes
1 mm
5 pm
-
3,000 ppm
9.25
Chlorobenzene
230
8.8
No
No
75 wm
2,400 ppm
9.07
Methylene
210
350
No
Yes
500 ppm
6,000 ppm
11.32
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
200
6 Torrs
@25”C
Yes
Ye5
1 wm
-
150 ppm
‘11.10
Trichloroethylene
220
58
No
Yes
50 wm
200 ppm
1000 ppm
9.45
Chloride
1,000 ppm
A
Notes:
(8) Chemical compound of potential concern obtained from previous investigation.
(b) Hazard Rating - based upon Health (H), Fire (F), or Reactivity
(R) hazard from NFPA 704 Standard Rating System (0 = no hazard, 4 = high hazard).
(c) Volatility
Rating - based upon vapor pressure in mm Hg at 68” F, 20” C,
, (d) Skin Absorption
- ” Yes” indicates potential exposure through skin and mucous membranes,
either by airborne or, more particularly,
by direct contact ACGIH 1993-1994.
(e) Carcinogen
- “Yes” indicates a compound is a confirmed
or suspect human carcinogen by the IARC, NIOSH, NW, EPA or ACGIH.
(f) TWA - Time Weighted
Average
from the 1993-1994
TLV - Threshold
Limit Value of the ACGIH
or OSHA Permissible
Exposure
Limits (PEL),
whichever
is lower.
(fi) Short Term Exposure Limit - “STEL” denotes a 15 minute time weighted average which may not be exceeded - ACGIH 1993-1994.
(h) Ceiling Limit - denotes the ceiling concentration
that cannot be exceeded at any time.
(i) IDLH - Immediately
Dangerous
to Life and Health.
ti) Ionization
Potential - expressed in electron volts (eV).
TABLE
3-4
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS
Site 75 - MCAS Basketball
Court
CHEMICAL
COMPOUND(a)
HAZARD
SKIN
ABSORP.(d)
TWA(f)
STEL(s)
C(h)
Yes
1 wm
5 mm
*
3,000 ppm
9.25
No
No
0.05 ppm
-
-
100 mglms
9.44
160
No
Yes
2 mm
-
I
1,000 ppm
11.42
403
20
No
No
O.lppm
-
I
4wm
-
300
91
Yes
Yes
5 mm
10 mm
300 ppm
11.47
H
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mg/m3
-
HD
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mglms
-
HS
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mg/ms
-
RATING(b)
HFR
VOL.(c)
Benzene
230
76
No
Chloroacetophene
(tear gas)
210
0.01
Chloroform
200
CARC.(e)
IDLH(i)
IPV
I
Chloropicrin
Carbon
(PS)
Tetrachloride
MUSTARD
25 wm
GAS:
-
-
Notes:
(a) Chemical compound of potential concern obtained from previous investigation.
(b) Hazard Rating - based upon Health (H), Fire (F), or Reactivity
(R) hazard from NFPA 704 Standard Rating System (0 = no hazard, 4 = high hazard).
(c) Volatility
Rating - based upon vapor pressure in mm Hg at 68” F, 20” C.
(d) Skin Absorption
- “Yes” indicates potential
exposure through skin and mucous membranes,
either by airborne
or, more particularly,
by direct contact ACGIH 1993-1994.
(e) Carcinogen
- “Yes” indicates a compound is a confirmed or suspect human carcinogen
by the IARC, NIOSH, N’IP, EPA or ACGIH.
(0 TWA - Time Weighted
Average
from the 1993-1994
TLV - Threshold
Limit Value of the ACGIH
or OSHA Permissible
Exposure Limits (PEL),
whichever
is lower.
(E) Short Term Exposure Limit - “STEL” denotes a 15 minute time weighted average which may not be exceeded - ACGIH
1993-1994.
(h) Ceiling Limit - denotes the ceiling concentration
that cannot be exceeded at any time.
(i) IDLH - Immediately
Dangerous to Life and Health.
ti) Ionization Potential - expressed in electron volts (eV).
,
TABLE
3-6
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS
Site 76 - MCAS Curtis Road
CHEMICAL
COMPOUND(a)
Benzene
Chloroacetophene
(tear gas)
HAZARD
RATING(b)
HFR
VOL.(c)
SKIN
ABSORP.(d)
CARC.(e)
TWA(f)
STEL(z)
C(h)
230
75
No
Yes
1 Pm
5ppm
-
3,000 ppm
9.25
210
0.01
No
No
0.05 ppm
-
-
100 mg/m3
9.44
*
1,000 ppm
11.42
200
160
No
Yes
2 ppm
-
403
20
No
No
0.1 ppm
-
300
91
Yes
Yes
5 mm
10 mm
25 mm
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mglm3
-
-
HD
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mg/ms
-
-
HS
411
0.072
Yes
Yes
0.003 mgJm3
-
*
, Chloroform
Chloropicrin
(PS)
Carbon Tetrachloride
IDLH(i)
IPO’)
4 pm
300 ppm
11.47
MUSTARD:
caH
z
.
Notes:
(0) Chemical compound of potential concern obtained from previous investigation.
(b) Hazard Rating - based upon Health (H), Fire (F), or Reactivity (R) hazard from NFPA 704 Standard Rating System (0 = no hazard, 4’= high hazard).
(c) Volatility Rating - based upon vapor pressure in mm Hg at 68” F, 20” C.
(d) Skin Absorption - ‘Yes” indicates potential exposure through skin and mucous membranes, either by airborne or, more particularly,
by direct contact ACGIH 1993-1994.
(e) Carcinogen - “Yes” indicates a compound is a confirmed or suspect human carcinogen by the IARC, NIOSH, NTP, EPA or ACGIH.
(0 TWA - Time Weighted Average from the 1993-1994 TLV - Threshold Limit Value of the ACGIH or OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL), whichever
is lower.
(fi) Short Term Exposure Limit - ” STEL”denotes a 15 minute time weighted average which may not be exceeded - ACGIH 1993-1994.
(h) Ceiling Limit - denotes the ceiling concentration that cannot be exceeded at any time.
(8 IDLH -Immediately
Dangerous to Life and Health.
ci) Ionization Potential - expressed in electron volta (eV).
-
TABLE
3-6
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS
Site 84 - Building 45 Area
CHEMICAL
COMPOUND(a)
HAZARD
[email protected])
VOL.(c)
HFR
SKIN
ABSORP.(d)
CARC .(e)
[email protected]
Yes
0.6 mg/m3
STEL(s)
IDLH(i)
IPO’)
1
I
PCB
E
C(h)
210
0.005 mm
@ 100” c
No
-
-
Notes:
(a) Chemical compound of potential concern obtained from previous investigation.
(b) Hazard Rating - based upon Health (H), Fire (F), or Reactivity
(R) hazard from NFPA 704 Standard Rating System (0 = no hazard, 4 = high hazard).
(c) Volatility
Rating - based upon vapor pressure in mm Hg at 68” F, 20” C.
(d) Skin Absorption
- ‘Yes” indicates potential
exposure through skin and mucous membranes,
either by airborne or, more particularly,
by direct contact
ACGIH 1993-1994.
(e) Carcinogen
- “Yes” indicates a compound is a confirmed
or suspect human carcinogen
by the IARC, NIOSH, NTP, EPA or ACGIH.
(f~ TWA - Time Weighted Average from the 1993-1994 TLV - Threshold Limit Value of the ACGIH or OSHA Permissible
Exposure Limits (PEL), whichever
is lower.
(z) Short Term Exposure Limit - “STEL” denotes a 15 minute time weighted average which may not be exceeded - ACGIH 1993-1994.
(h) Ceiling Limit - denotes the ceiling concentration
that cannot be exceeded at any time.
(i) IDLH - Immediately
Dangerous
to Life and Health.
li) Ionization
Potential - expressed in electron volts (eV).
-
TABLE
3-7
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS
SITE 85 - Camp Johnson Battery Dump
HAZARD
RATING&)
HFR
VOL.(c)
Cadmium
310
NA
No
Yes
0.05 mglm3
-
*
I
NA
Chromium
NA
NA
No
Yes
0.6 mg/m3
-
-
-
NA
Lead
NA
NA
No
CHEMICAL
COMPOUND(a)
SKIN
ABSORP.(d)
CAFE.(e)
!tWAQ
C(h)
STELW
IDLH(i)
IPU)
METALS:
Yes
I
0.05 mg/m3
I
-
I
I
700 mg/ma
,
NA
I
Notes:
(a) Chemical compound of potential concern obtained from previous investigation.
(b) Hazard Rating - based upon Health (H), Fire (F), or Reactivity
(R) hazard from NFPA 704 Standard Rating System (0 = no hazard, 4 = high hazard).
y (c) Volatility
Rating - based upon vapor pressure in mm Hg at 68” F, 20” C.
o) (d) Skin Absorption
- “Yes” indicates potential
exposure through skin and mucous membranes,
either by airborne
or, more particularly,
by direct contact
ACGIH 1993-1994.
(e) Carcinogen - “Yes” indicates a compound is a confirmed or suspect human carcinogen by the IARC, NIOSH, NTP, EPA or ACGIH.
(0 TWA - Time Weighted Average from the 1993-1994 TLV - Threshold
Limit Value of the ACGIH or OSHA Permissible
Exposure Limits (PEL), whichever
is lower.
(g) Short Term Exposure Limit - “STFL” denotes a 15 minute time weighted
average which may not be exceeded - ACGIH 1993-1994.
(h) Ceiling Limit - denotes the ceiling concentration
that cannot be exceeded at any time.
(i) IDLH - Immediately
Dangerous
to Life and Health.
ci) Ionization Potential
- expressed in electron volts (eV).
c\
I
-
... .
,,, .,,
Nitrogen
Mustard
- HIV-1 or l-IN-3
HN-1 is an oily, colorless to pale yellow with a fishy or musty odor. HN-3 is an oily liquid with
no odor. HN-UHN-3
irritate the eyes in dosages which do not significantly
damage the skin or
respiratory
tract, insofar as single exposures are concerned..
Eye irritation
appears in a
shorter time than that from HD. Mild vapor exposure may result in no skin lesions. After
severe vapor or liquid exposure irritation,
itching and reddening
of the skin may occur. Later
blisters may form on the affected areas. Effects on the respiratory
tract include irritation
of
the nose and throat, hoarseness progressing
to loss of voice, and persistent
cough. Fever,
labored respiration,
and rales (abnormal
sounds) may develop.
Bronchial
pneumonia
may
appear after the first 24 hours. Following
ingestion or systemic absorption,
the agent causes
inhibition
of cell division, resulting
in depression of the blood-forming
mechanism
and injury
to other tissues. Severe diarrhea, which may be accompanied by bleeding, occurs.
Lewisite
- L (Arsenical)
The arsenical
vesicants
are a group of blister
agents in which
arsenic
is the central
element.
Lewisite
(L) is a liquid with an odor similar to geraniums
and very little odor when pure. L
warna of its presence by irritating
the eyes and skin and has a rapid rate of action. Liquid L
causes immediate
burning
sensation
in the eyes and permanent
loss of sight if not
decontaminated
within
one minute with large amounts of water.
It has about the same
blistering
action on the skin as does the Mustard (HD), even though the lethal dosage for L is
much higher.
Skin exposure to L produces an immediate
and strong stinging
sensation;
reddening
of the skin starts within 30 minutes. Blistering
does not appear until after about 13
hours.
Tear Agent
Tear compounds
cause a flow of tears and irritation
of the skin. Because tear compounds
produce only transient
effects, they are widely used for training
and riot control.
Chloroacetophene
- CN
The physical state of Chloroacetophene
odor similar to apple blossoms.
(CN) is a solid powder.
CN is described
as having
an
CN identifies
the riot control agent popularly
known as tear gas or mace. CN quickly irritates
the eyes and upper respiratory
passages. In higher concentrations
it causes copious tearing; a
tingling
sensation,
irritation,
burning
and pain of the nose and throat; and burning
and
itching on tender areas of the skin, especially areas wet by perspiration.
High concentrations
can cause blisters. The effects are similar to those of a sunburn and disappear in a few hours.
3.3.3
3.3.3.1
Physical
Hazards
Confined
Confined
space entry
will not be required.
Space Entry
will
not occur at this site(s), therefore,
3-17
confined
space entry
procedures
3.3.3.2
Thermal Stress
Provisions for monitoring of heat stress and/or cold stress (both are included until mobilization
date is known) are outlined in Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
3.3.3.3
Noise
Elevated noise levels may be produced during drilling and other heavy equipment operations;
therefore, hearing protection devices will be available. The SHSO is responsible for making
this determination
based upon past experience with the type of equipment in use, and the
proximity of personnel to the equipment.
3.3.3.4
Explosion and Fire
In general, the following
closely:
l
items present potential
physical hazards and will be monitored
Explosion and fire resulting from:
) Heavy equipment malfunction
) Penetration into underground utility/service lines (gas, electric, fuel)
) Ignition of trapped flammable vapors
) Vehicular accidents
) Puncturing of drums or containers during test pitting
) Detonation of UXO (Site 12 only)
Provisions for monitoring for potential fire/explosive conditions may include the use of an
oxygen/combustible
gas meter (as indicated in Section 5.2) and the performance of utility
checks prior to conducting intrusive activities.
At Site 12, UXO clearance for sampling
locations will be provided by a qualified subcontractor. As additional concerns are identified,
provisions for making changes to the HASP will be presented by the SHSO, as needed.
3.3.3.5
Utilities
Underground utility clearance must be obtained before any intrusive activities are performed;
this clearance will be provided by a base representative for this project. If underground
utilities are identified in these areas, the ground above the utility lines are to be physically
marked, such as, with spray paint or flags. Baker personnel are to notify the base
representatives
at least three days prior to soil intrusive activities to acquire a utility
clearance. A minimum of a 24 inch tolerance zone must be used for underground utilities.
The generally accepted uniform color code for underground
l
l
l
l
a
l
utilities
is as follows:
Red - Electric power lines, cables, conduit and lighting cables
Yellow - Gas, oil, steam, petroleum, or gaseous materials
Orange - Communication, alarm or signal lines, cables or conduit
Blue -Water, irrigation, and slurry lines
Green - Sewers and drain lines
White - Proposed excavation
Energized overhead electric lines may present a risk of electrocution.
OSHA standards
require that equipment maintain certain distances from power lines. For lines 0 to 50
kilovolts (kV), the minimum distance is 10 feet. Lines carrying over 50 kV require that
equipment maintain 10 feet, plus an additional 0.4 inch for each 1 kV over 50.
3-18
3.3.3.6
Heavy
Equipment
One of the primary
physical hazards on the site is associated
which includes the use of a drill rig. Only operators trained,
permitted
to operati the heavy equipment.
with the use of heavy equipment,
qualified,
and authorized will be
General hazards associated with the drill rig include moving parts, such as, the auger and
cathead.
Personnel
must remain clear of moving parts and must avoid loose fitting clothing
that can become entangled
in the moving parts. Personnel working
near a drill rig must be
aware of the location and operation of the emergency shut off devices. Personnel are to stand
clear of the drill rig immediately
prior to starting the engine.
Noise from the operation
of the heavy equipment
will limit verbal warning
abilities.
signals will be prearranged
between operators and personnel working
in and around
equipment.
Backup alarms must operate properly on the heavy equipment.
Hand
heavy
The drilling
subcontractor
representatives
are to provide any other cautions that need to be
observed when working around this equipment
during the HASP pre-entry briefing.
During
backhoe operations,
a “spotter”
will be in place to direct the backhoe operator.
Other
personnel
in the area, such as those conducting
sampling, are to remain close together and in
the line of sight of the operator.
These personnel can proceed to the trenching
area only when
an “all clear” is given by the spotter and operator.
Caution must be exercised in these work
areas to avoid slips, trips, and falls. Personnel are not permitted
to enter into any trenches.
Samples will be collected from the soil pulled out in the bucket of the backhoe.
3.3.4
3.3.4.1
Environmental
Hazardous
Hazards
Flora
Incidence
of contact by individuals
to poisonous/thorny
plants is high (especially
during
surface water and sediment sampling activities);
therefore,
bare skin should be covered (i.e.,
long pants and shirt, steel toe boots, leather or cotton gloves, safety glasses, and head
protection)
as much as practical
when working
in forested or densely vegetated
areas.
Personnel
should avoid entering
an area in the direct path of known poisonous flora (i.e.,
poison ivy/oak), a secondary route should be selected. Care should also be taken when walking
in such areas as uneven terrain or vines may present a tripping hazard.
While attempting
to cut into dense underbrush,
hazards exist from the sharp machete and
gas-powered
weed cutter,
therefore,
care should be taken when using such devices.
(Note:
Hearing
protection,
steel toe boots, gloves, and safety glasses are required
when using weed
cutters.) All rashes and other injuries will be reported to the SHSO as soon as they are known.
3.3.4.2
Hazardous
Fauna
All animal life must be treated with respect. Without proper training,
personnel
may not be
able to differentiate
between dangerous and nondangerous
varieties.
Therefore
contact with
surface water should be kept to a minimum
and working in wet or swampy areas unprotected
is not permitted.
Mosquitoes
and gnats pose a nuisance and physical hazard to field personnel;
they distract
workers, leading to accidents, and pose a physical threat by transmitting
live microorganisms.
Avoiding
the use of perfumes
and scented deodorants
and donning
light colored clothing
is
3-19
preferable.
The use of Avon’s
provided on the site.
There is
chiggers,
“checks”
in grassy
“Skin
So Soft” or other insect repellent
a potential
to come in contact with other
bees, wasps, hornets, mites, fleas, spiders,
on each other periodically
and at the end
or forested areas. All insect bites must be
is encouraged
and will be
dangerous
insects; these include fire ants,
and ticks. * . All personnel should perform
of the work shift, especially when working
reported to the SHSO.
Poisonous snakes such as the rattlesnake,
copperhead, and cottonmouth
(water moccasin), all
known as pit vipers, are common to the United States. Snakes typically do not attack people
but will bite when provoked,
angered, or accidentally
injured (as when stepped on). When
encountering
a snake, avoid quick/jerky
motions, loud noises, and retreat
slowly; do not
provoke the snake. If bitten, follow procedures outlined in Section 8.7, Emergency
Medical
Treatment.
Prior to initiating
site activities,
each individual
at the site shall be questioned
by the Site
Manager and/or SHSO as to any known sensitivities
to the previously
mentioned
organisms or
agents.
*
Site personnel
have
consultant) regarding
been provided
with a copy of Baker’s policy (per
the signs and symptoms of exposure for Lyme Disease.
3-20
our
medical
SITE
4.0
CONTROL
The following
sections define measures and procedures
for maintaining
control is an essential component in the implementation
of the site health
site control.
Site
and safety program.
Site Access
4.1
0
The Site Manager
is designated
to coordinate
overall
access and security on site.
Perimeters
for activities
to be conducted at Sites A, 12, 68, 75, 76,84, and 85 will be
established
according to the site boundary
procedures
identified
in Section 4.3, local
conditions, and Navy Activity requirements.
0
Personnel
will not be permitted
within
the Work Zone (Exclusion
Zone)
Contamination
Reduction Zone without proper authorization
from the SHSO.
0
All personnel
arriving
l
All activities
Field Log.
on site must be cleared
0
The on-site Command
0
Figures
4-1 through
or departing
the site will be documented
in the field log.
through
the Site Manager
Post will be established
at the site trailer
4-7 identify
the location
of the sites under
or
and documented
in the
in Lot 203.
investigation.
Site Conditions
4.2
0
The prevailing
wind conditions are to be determined
daily. This will be accomplished
with the use of a wind direction
indicator,
such as a wind sock. The wind direction
indicators
are to be provided in areas readily visible to personnel in the area.
4.3
Work Zones
4.3.1
Level B and C Activities
Work Zones for activities
conducted
under Level C or higher protection
levels shall be
established
utilizing
control
boundaries
between
the Work Zone, the Contamination
Reduction
Zone (CRZ), and the Support Zone (Clean Zone). These boundaries
shall be defined
as follows:
l
Work Zone -The
area where the primary
l
Hotline
l
CRZ - The area between the Work Zone and the Support
site investigative
activities).
l
Contamination
0
Support
Zone - The
investigative
activities.
- The boundary
Control
between
site investigation
activity
occurs.
the Work Zone and CRZ.
Line -The
boundary
outermost
area
next
between
to the
Zone (located
upwind
the CRZ and the Support
CRZ
and
upwind
of the
Zone.
of the
site
These boundaries
will be demarcated
using colored boundary tape, cones, or equivalent
for the
Hotline
or the Decontamination
Corridor
of the CRZ, and/or barriers for the Contamination
Control Line such as posted signs and/or barricades.
4-1
m
I
EOO
-TO
DETONATION
SNEADS
AREA
FERRY
ROAD
1 inch
EXPLOSIVE
SITE
MARINE
=
120
ft.
Baker Envtromrental,rp
FIGURE 4-2
SITEI MAP
SITE 12
ORDNANCE
DISPOSAL
INSPECTION
CTO-0193
CORPS
BASE, CAMP
NORTH
CAROLINA
LEJEUNE
AREA
JRCE. IANTDIV. FEB. 1992
I
I
MARINE CORPS BASE, CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
44
AIRPLANE
U
MOCK-UP
a
X
19
' m k & s- L & m \
1 lnch
fiobni
'''cb
IURCE
100 it
LEGEND
-
EXISTING SHALLOW MONITORING WELL
LANTDIV. FEE
1992
I
m e t
bvhmddk
FIGURE 4-4
SITE MAP AND PREVIOUS SAMPLING LOCATIONS
SITE 75
MCAS BASKETBALL COURT
SITE INSPECTION C T O - 0 1 9 3
MARINE CORPS BASE, CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
00I 93 8 03
4-6
47
.-------\
\\
\\
\\
\\
TACTICAL
LANDING
ZONE ( T U )
MALLARD
\\
II
I/
I1
//
//
8 -
LEGEND
FIGURE 4-7
BATTERY DISPOSAL AREA
SITE MAP
SITE 85
CAMP JOHNSON BATTERY DUMP
SITE INSPECTION C T O - 0 1 9 3
2wA
1 inch = 200 ft
SOURCE: LANTDIV. FEE
<
1992
MARINE CORPS BASE. CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
4-8
Refer to Figure
the demarcated
4-8 for a “General Contamination
Reduction Zone Layout.”
Exact locations
zones will be field determined
by the SHSO during site mobilization.
of
Level D and D + Activities
4.3.2
4.3.2.1
Populated
Areas
In populated areas, Work Zones for activities conducted under Level D or D + protection
levels
shall be established
in such a manner as to preclude unauthorized
personnel from entering the
investigative
area. A boundary will be established to separate the Work Zone from the Clean
Zone using available
materials
such as, the Baker Field Vehicle,
natural
boundaries
(buildings,
structures, fences), or signs/placards,
boundary tape, cones, barricades,
etc.
4.3.2.2
Unpopulated/Secluded
Areas
In unpopulated
or secluded areas, the aforementioned
materials
may not be used due to the
exclusive
nature of the site, the short duration
of the activity,
and the low risk to outside
The SHSO an&or
Field Team Leader
is responsible
for making
this
populations.
determination.
“Buddy
4.4
System”
All site activities
that involve
hazards and/or the potential
for contact with hazardous
materials
will be performed
by a work team of no fewer than two people (Buddy System). For
potential
“high-hazard”
activities,
a third person located in the Support Zone will serve as an
observer or to assist with rescue, if needed.
4.5
Safe Work Practices
Routine
safe work
Conducting
Implementing
Conducting
Adherence
Setting up
Minimizing
Establishing
Establishing
4.5.1
practices
may consist of:
operations in a manner to reduce exposure of personnel and equipment.
appropriate
decontamination
procedures.
sampling activities from an upwind location.
to applicable safety regulations
in OSHA Standards 29CFR 1910 and 1926.
barriers to exclude unauthorized
personnel from contaminated
areas.
the number of personnel and equipment at the site (5).
work zones within the site.
control points for ingress to and egress from work zones.
Heavy Equipment
The following
safe work practices
will be adhered
hats will be worn at when working
to during
heavy equipment
l
Hard
l
Heavy
l
Heavy equipment
will not be operated in a manner that will
property nor will the safe operating
speeds or loads be exceeded.
l
Heavy equipment
will be shut down and positive
while repairs or fueling are being performed.
equipment
requiring
in a work zone with
an operator
heavy equipment.
will not be permitted
4-9
operations.
means taken
to run unattended.
endanger
to prevent
persons
its operation
or
\
\
/
\
\
.
/
--
-----
/
/
A’
FIGURE
SCHEMATIC
DIAGRAM
GENERAL
CONTAMINATION
REDUCTION
ZONE LAYOUT
Baker Environmental, k
Subcontractors operating heady equipment shall have a written
Program and follow all applicable OSHA regulations.
0
Personnel, other than the operator, should not ride on equipment.
0
A “spotter” will be used to help direct the heavy equipment operator.
0
Health
and Safety
Personnel are to remain in the field of vision of the operator and remain clear of
moving parts.
Hand signals will be prearranged
heavy equipment.
between operator and personnel working
around the
0
Backup alarms must operate properly on the heavy equipment.
0
Excavations are not to be entered by personnel; these are being dug for exploratory
purposes. Personnel are to remain a safe distance from the excavated area.
Excavated areas are not to be left unattended
0
4.5.2
Utility
clearances must be secured prior to digging (see Section 3.3.3.5).
Drilling
The following
and are to be refilled daily.
Operations
safe work practices will be adhered to during drilling
operations.
l
The subcontracting drilling company’s supervisor is to provide other cautions to be
observed when working around the drill rig during the HASP briefing.
0
Hand signals will be prearranged
drill rig.
0
Personnel are to remain in the field of vision of the operator and remain clear of
moving parts where protective clothing can be entangled, i.e., Tyvek caught in the
auger.
e
Subcontractors operating heavy equipment shall have a written
Program and follow all applicable OSHA regulations.
l
Utility
0
Health
around the
and Safety
clearances must be secured prior to digging (see Section 3.3.3.5).
Personnel working near a drill rig are to be aware of the location and operation of the
emergency shut off devices.
Sanitation
4.6
between operator and personnel working
Provisions
below.
Procedures/Site
for sanitation
Precautions
procedures and site precautions
l
A supply of clearly marked potable water, tightly
l
Single service disposal cups.
4-11
-.
to be followed on site are outlined
closed, and equipped with a tap.
l
Outlets for non-potable
water, clearly marked, for fire fighting
Cross-contamination
of the potable supply shall be prevented.
l
One toilet
combustion,
be required
l
A place for food handling
facilities will be provided
*
Clean wash water will be available
in the decontamination
zone during Level C or B
activities,
and the Baker Field Trailer for all other operations.
Disposable towelettes
will be available
in each Baker Field Vehicle for periodic cleanups.
l
Eating, drinking,
chewing gum or tobacco, smoking, or any practice that increases the
probability
of hand-to-mouth
transfer and ingestion of material
is prohibited
in any
area designated
as contaminated.
Smoking will also not be allowed in areas where
flammable
materials
are present. Hands and face must be thoroughly
washed before
breaking for meals and upon leaving the site. “Contaminated”
work garments are not
to be worn off site.
l
Whenever
decontamination
body should be thoroughly
removed.
l
Contact
l
Facial hair, which interferes
with a satisfactory
permitted
on personnel who are or may be required
l
Contact with contaminated
or potentially-contaminated
surfaces should be avoided.
Wherever
possible, do not walk through puddles, leachate, discolored surfaces, kneel
on ground, lean, sit or place equipment on drums/containers.
l
Medicine
therefore,
qualified
after-hour
and alcohol can potentiate
the effects of exposure
to toxic chemicals,
prescribed
drugs should only be taken by personnel
when approved
by a
physician.
Alcoholic beverage intake should be minimized or avoided during
operations.
l
Alcoholic
beverages
l
All site personnel
will observe
around contaminated
areas.
l
Site personnel
must wear the proper attire while on site. At a minimum,
this will
include steel-toed boots, work pants (e.g., jeans or other durable material),
and work
shirt (e.g., short or long-sleeved,
made of a durable material).
Tank tops, muscle
shirts, and sweat pants are not permitted.
facility
for up to 20 personnel
which is either
or flush, depending on local code requirements.
for greater than 20 personnel,
meeting all applicable
(i.e., nearby restaurants,
or other
purposes.
chemical, recirculating,
Two toilet facilities will
laws or suitable alternatives
food wagons, etc.).
to such
procedures
for outer garments
are in effect, the entire
washed aa soon as possible after the protective
garment is
lenses are not permitted
and firearms
to be worn on site.
are prohibited
any posted
4-12
fit of the mask-to-face
to wear respirators.
seal, is not
on site.
sign, warning,
fence,
or barrier
posted
Revised: 4-21-94
ENVIRONMENTAL
5.0
MONITORING
The following section presents the monitoring to be performed during the work tasks of this
project. This will consist of personal monitoring, point source monitoring, and perimeter
monitoring.
Due to the short duration and variability
of field tasks only realtime air
monitoring (versus integrated air monitoring) will be used to assess action levels. The action
levels for the PID, as specified in Section 5.1 below, are based on a “worst-case” contaminant 8hour TWA-PEL of 1 ppm (i.e., benzene, vinyl chloride, etc.), and are consistent with those
listed by the USEPA in Section 6.9, of the Standard Operating Safety Guides (June, 1992).
Personal
5.1
Monitoring
Personal monitoring
will be accomplished using real time environmental
monitoring
instrumentation
directed at the breathing zone (e.g., the area bordered by the outside of the
shoulders and from the mid-chest to the top of the head) of work party personnel. Breathing
Zone (BZ) monitoring will be performed each time a reading is taken at the point source. The
guidelines below identify the protection levels required according to the concentration
measured in the BZ.
Minicam (Model FM-3000) - To detect chemical warfare agents and stimulants.
used at Site A and possibly Sites 75 and 76.
This will be
Site activities will immediately cease (upon alarm activation) personnel will back off
to safe distance as identified by the TEU. An emergency evaluation with the TEU,
SHSO, and Site Manager will be performed. Emergency decontamination
will be
performed as necessary.
l
P&l) - Various levels of protection
Section 6.2).
l
l
0
l
are being used with different tasks at the sites (refer to
Background (2) = Protection Level specified in Section 6.2.
>1 mu above background in the breathing zone for up to 1 continuous minute =
minimum Level C plus Drriger Tube Monitoring at the point source
>1 mu above background in the breathing zone for up to 15 continuous minutes =
Level B or Stop Work and consult PHSO
Instantaneous peak concentrations >lO mu = Level B or Stop Work and consult
PHSO
(1) PID with 11.7 eV ultraviolet lamp set on the 1 X Scale.
(2) Background is typically 1 to 2 mu (meter units)
Drager Tubes(l) (used to determine if Level C or D + protection levels are adequate for highly
volatile constituents when a PID response meets the level identified above).
l
l
l
Below limits of detection (BLD) to less than the Action Level (l/2 of the [email protected])) =
Level D/D +
Action Level to the TWA = Level C (if adequate NIOSH certified air-purifying
cartridge is available) or Stop Work and consult PHSO
>The TWA = Level B or Stop Work and consult PHSO
(1) Drager Tubes to be used include:
Benzene (67 28561); Chloroform (67 28861)
Carbon tetrachloride (8101021)
5-1
.-
__
-.--
-7
Revised:
(2) Refer to Table
4-21-94
1, Section 3.0, for explanation.
Point Source Monitoring
5.2
Point source monitoring
is defined by this HASP as monitoring
performed at the source of the
sampling/investigative
activity.
Instrumentation
to be used will include a PID and an O&EL
meter. The action levels for the oxygen/combustible
gas meter are identified below.
Oxygen&EL
Oxygen
l
l
Meter(l)
Meter
19.5% to 23.5% = continue working
C19.56 or >23.5% = stop work immediately
and consult the SHSO
LEL Meter
0
l
< 10% of the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) = continue working
> 10% of the LEL = Stop Work immediately
and consult SHSO
(1)Used to evaluate
physical
safety in conjunction
with PID.
As work progresses, the scope of monitoring
may be extended based on monitoring
results,
odor detection, changing
work conditions,
and signs or symptoms of exposure.
Any or all of
these conditions will be immediately
investigated
and acted upon by the SHSO.
Perimeter
5.3
i-
Monitoring
Perimeter
monitoring
(defined aa monitoring
performed
at borders beyond the Support
and often at the “fence line”) for each site will be performed as follows:
5.4
Zone
l
The PID will be used periodically
to scan the perimeter as a means of documenting
any
volatile
releases that may extend past the work zone, when volatile concentrations
exceed 50 mu (2 X Scale) at the point source or 10 mu (1 X Scale) at the BZ.
l
The Drager
Calorimetric
Tubes, where
specified
in Section 5.1, will be used
periodically
to measure any potential
releases when concentrations
exceeding the
TWA are detected at the BZ.
Site-Specific
Air Monitoring
Equipment
and Frequency
Monitoring
equipment
and frequency for each site can be found in Table 5-1. Drager Tubes
are typically
required
when air concentrations
reach a certain level according to an PID
response. Action levels that govern changes in levels of protection can be found in Section 5.1.
5.5
Equipment
Maintenance
and Calibration
Baker’s procedures
for the return
of equipment
to inventory
and for maintenance
of the
equipment
shall be followed
in order to assure that the optimum
level of operation
is
maintained
for the item.
Equipment
calibration
of the monitoring
instruments
will be
completed
daily before each use and calibration
information
entered onto the equipment
5-2
TABLE
MONITORING
EQUIPMENT
AND FREQUENCY
FOR EACH TASK CONDUCTED
SITES A, 12,68,75,76,84,
AND 85
Job Task
Geophysical
Surface
I
PID
I
LEL Meter
I
AT
Minicam*
I
Investigation
Soil Sampling
Monitoring
Well Installation
Monitoring
Well Development
Groundwater
Soil Boring
I&P
Sampling
Sampling
Test Pit/Trenching
I&P
I
I
Hand Excavation
*
Minicam
I
P
C
D
PID
=
=
=
=
Note:
5-l
c
I&P
I
I&P
I
I
I
I&P
c
C
I
I
for use at Sites A, 75, and 76.
Initially
- At start of job task to confirm designated protection
level.
Periodically
- When site condition or set-up changes, or when a new area is entered.
Continuously
- Monitor levels continuously.
At the discretion of the SHSO.
= Photoionization
Detector
As air concentrations
are measured, they should be documented
continuous monitoring,
every 15 to 30 minutes.
in the individual’s
field logbook.
In the case of
Revised: 4-21-94
calibration
form. All forms will be maintained on site for the duration of the project with
copies to be given to the Equipment Manager once the equipment has been returned to the
office. Procedures for equipment maintenance and calibration can be found in the operating
manual provided by the manufacturer (included with each piece of equipment), or in Baker’s
Standard Operating Procedures for Administrative,
Field, and Technical Activities Manual.
5.6
Monitoring
Documentation
As environmental monitoring is performed, documentation of the results will be entered into
the Field Log Book of the SHSO or other personnel performing
the monitoring.
Documentation is to include the date, time, instrument result, general location, and specific
location, such as, point source, breathing zone, or area. Copies of the Field Log Book will be
placed in a binder and remain in the Baker Field Trailer until the end of the field activities,
whereby the log sheets will become part of the permanent file.
5-4
Revised: 4-21-94
6.0
PERSONAL
6.1
Personal
PROTECTIVE
Protective
EQUIPMENT
Equipment
Selection
The personal protective equipment available for the various levels of protection,
below. The assigned item number will be used in Section 6.2 for each field activity.
Item No.
Personal Protective Equipment
1
Chemical-Resistant
Clothing (Polyethylene-coated
2
Chemical-Resistant
Clothing (Saranexa)
3
Uncoated [email protected]/[email protected]
4
Normal Work Clothes or Coveralls
5
Air-Line
6
Self-Contained
7
NIOSH 5-minute Escape Pack (on standby)
8
Full-face Cartridge Respirator
9
Half-face Cartridge Respirator
10
Full-face Cartridge Respirator (on standby)
11
Half-face Cartridge Respirator (on standby)
12
Chemical-Resistant
Gloves (Nitrile
inner-double
layer)
13
Chemical-Resistant
Gloves (Nitrile
inner-single
layer)
14
Chemical-Resistant
Gloves (Rubber/Neoprene
15
Chemical-Resistant
Gloves (Nitrile
16
Work Gloves (outer)
17
Chemical-Resistant
Overboots (with steel toe and shank)
18
Chemical-Resistant
Overboots (w/o steel toe)
19
Steel Toe Boots
20
Safety Glasses
21
Safety Goggles
22
Face Shield
23
Hard Hat
24
Hearing Protection(l)
25
Chest/Hip Waders
26
Safety Vests
Coveralls
Respirator (ALR) with &minute
Breathing
(1) At the discretion of the SHSO.
6-l
Tyvek”)
Apparatus
escape pack
@CBA) for rescue
outer)
outer)
is listed
Revised: 4-21-94
6.2
Site-Specific
Levels
of Protection
Based on an evaluation of potential hazards the levels of protection and corresponding
personal protective equipment have been designated for the following field activities.
Upgrading or downgrading the level of protection will be based on real-time monitoring,
working conditions, and the discretion of the SHSO.
Note: No single combination of protective equipment and clothing is capable of protection
against all hazards. PPE should be used in conjunction with safe work practices, effective
decontamination, and good personal hygiene.
Level of Protection
Test Pit/Trenching
Level C protection is &. for chemical warfare agents. Any indication of chemical warfare
agents will initiate immediate shutdown, evacuation, and evaluation.
6-2
AI,.
i
Revised: 4-21-94
6.3
Respiratory
Protection
Site-specific respiratory protection requirements as outlined
procedures in Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
6.3.1
Level
below will comply with
the
B
The “North” NIOSH-certified
Air Line Respirator (ALR) system (four-person manifold) with
5-minute escape pack will be used at this level. The line-of-site worker will be equipped with
an SCBA on standby for emergency rescue purposes. This individual may also be responsible
for monitoring the supplied air system (comprised of a bank of compressed gas cylinders
containing Grade D breathing air) with the SHSO’s approval.
6.3.2
Level
C
The “North” or “MSA” full-face NIOSH-certified
negative pressure Air-Purifying
Respirator
(APR) with an organic vapor and HEPA filter cartridge is the appropriate cartridge for use
with the detected hazardous materials and the detected contaminant (refer to Work Plan)
concentrations. Upgrades/downgrades
in this level of respiratory protection will be based on
measured real-time air contaminant
concentrations
(see Section 5.7) and the SHSO’s
observations. This level of protection is not suitable for chemical warfare agents. If chemical
warfare agents are detected visually by the TEU or by air monitoring,
personnel will
immediately EVACUATE
the area.
Cartridge
changeover
will occur when one or more of the following
have been
observed: exposure duration greater than eight hours for vapor/gas cartridges; breathing
resistance; a noticeable odor or taste; eye/throat irritation;
and other indicators such as
end-of-service life indicators fat specialty filter cartridges. Records of current respirator fittesting will be maintained at the Baker Command Post.
6.3.3
Level
D +
A NIOSH-certified
negative pressure APR, meeting all the requirements
Level C, will remain on standby at this level.
6.4
Care
and Cleaning
of Personnel
Protective
identified
under
Equipment
Provisions for the care and cleaning of personal protective equipment used on site can be found
in Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
6-3
7.0
DECONTAMINATION
7.1
Personnel
PROCEDURES
Decontamination
Personnel leaving the Work Zone will be thoroughly
decontaminated.
The following
will be used for the decontamination
stations according to levels of protection:
1 12. Equipment
*Optional
- depends on degree of contamination
is required
for Level
Shower trailer (located at Sites A, 75, and 76)
Four small tubs (two sets of wash and rinse water)
Scrub brush
Towels*
Disposable wipes*
Pressurized sprayers for rinsing
Contaminated
clothing disposal bag or drum*
Contaminated
liquids disposal drum
Respirator
cleaning solution
Liquinox
and water as the decontamination
solution
Five (5) percent sodium hypochlorite
solution (specifically
for Level
cleaning
and type of FCPE used.
The following
decontamination
equipment
and recommended
for Level D + protection:
*Minimum
protocol
C and higher
protection
levels
for Sites A, 75, and 76)
D decontamination.
The decontamination
liquids and clothing
defined
in the Sampling
and Analysis
will be contained and disposed according to policy
Plan (SAP).
Emergency
shower and eye wash
7-1
-
capabilities
will be made available
at Sites A, 74, and 75 in the event of suspected chemical
agent contact. See Section 8.7 for further details on emergency decontamination
procedures.
7.2
Effectiveness
of Personnel
Decontamination
The effectiveness
of site decontamination
methods will be evaluated by the SHSO on a periodic
basis. This evaluation
may include the observation
of personnel decontamination,
inspection
of PPE before and after decontamination,
and questioning
site personnel
for signs and
symptoms of exposure.
Additional
measures may also be employed by the SHSO at their
discretion.
7.3
Equipment
Decontamination
The portion of the drilling
and trenching
equipment
that will contact intrusive
materials
(i.e., augers and backhoe bucket) will be decontaminated
prior to and upon completion of work
in each area. Pressurized steam cleaning will be used to clean the equipment.
Field sampling
equipment
will be cleaned using a 5 percent sodium hypochlorite
solution at Sites A, 75,
and 76.
Pressure steam cleaning will be conducted by the subcontractor.
A portable steam cleaning
unit will be used for the cleaning.
Decontamination
will be conducted at specific locations
established
at each site.
7-2
Revised: 4-21-94
8.0
EMERGENCY
8.1
Scope
PROCEDURES
The activities to be conducted under this HASP are not remediation
(cleanup),
but
investigative, therefore the potential for a “release” to air, water or soil is low. However, other
emergencies, such as fire or personnel injury may occur. If so, local emergency response
groups will be called in to handle the incident, as necessary.
Pre-Emergency
8.2
Planning
All applicable Navy/local
emergency response contacts (On-Scene Commander,
Fire
Department, Security, Ambulance, Hospital, etc.) at MCB Camp Lejeune will be contacted
prior to or during site mobilization activities. This notification will be performed by the SHSO
and/or Site Manager. The information discussed may include:
A description of site activities.
Anticipated site hazards.
Hazardous chemicals to be used on site.
Expected length of time on site.
Specific requirements the emergency response facilities may require.
Confirmation of emergency phone numbers.
l
l
l
l
l
l
Specific points of contact, where applicable, will be established and added to the HASP.
requested, Material Safety Data Sheets will be provided at this time.
8.3
Emergency
If
Coordinator
The SHSO acting as the Emergency Coordinator is responsible for field implementation
of
these Emergency Procedures. The Emergency Coordinator is responsible for reacting (not
responding) to emergencies. As the Emergency Coordinator, specific duties include:
l
Familiarizing
all on-site personnel with the emergency procedures and the emergency
coordinator’s authority.
l
Identifying
l
Communicating
site emergency
subcontractor personnel.
l
Specifying the Site Manager as the backup/alternate
l
Controlling
activities
groups, as necessary.
l
Anticipating,
identifying, and assessing, fires, explosions, chemical releases, and other
emergency situations to the best of their abilities, and providing this information to
the off-site emergency groups) responding..
l
Familiarity
the nearest telephone in the event of an emergency.
procedures
of subcontractors
and requirements
to all Baker
and
Emergency Coordinator.
and contacting
the emergency
response
with site personnel trained in emergency first aid and adult CPR.
All on-site personnel, whether
involved in emergency response or not, will be notified of their
responsibilities by the Emergency Coordinator in an emergency. They will be familiar with
the emergency procedures and the Emergency Coordinator’s authority.
8-l
Revised: 4-21-94
8.4
Communications
Internal communications will rely on direct communication (via verbal or two-way radios)
between site personnel. External communications will employ a telephone located in the field
trailer and a cellular (portable) telephone in the investigation areas.
The “Buddy System” will be in effect at all times; any failure of communication
evaluation of whether personnel should discontinue activities.
requires an
Air horns will be used for communication
during emergency
evacuation
of site
personnel.
One long (3 second) air horn blast is the emergency signal to indicate that
all personnel should evacuate the Work Zone.
Hand signals will be used in case of failure
communications are not available:
of radio communications
or when radio
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , - Can’t breathe
(typically Level C/B activities)
Grip partner’s wrist or both hands around waist . . . - Leave area immediately
Hands on top of head . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . - Need assistance
Thumbs up . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - OK, I am all right, I understand
Thumbs down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . - No, I do not understand
Hand gripping throat
Coordination between Baker and subcontractor personnel is the responsibility
of the Site
Manager. The best means for securing the lines of communication will be determined prior to
start-up by on-site project personnel.
Emergency telephone numbers will be posted in the Baker Field Trailer and maintained
each Baker Field Vehicle. The list of emergency phone numbers is presented in Table 8-1.
Assembly
8.5
in
Area
In the event of an emergency personnel will be instructed before the start of operations to meet
upwind of the emergency. Where applicable, personnel will exit the work area through the
contamination reduction zone. At this location, emergency needs will be provided, such as:
l
l
l
0
8.6
Assembly for evacuated personnel
First aid for injured personnel
Decontamination material
Communications.
Emergency
Hospital
Route
An emergency hospital route figure (Figure 8-l) showing the location of the local hospital will
be posted in the Baker Field Trailer and at strategic locations throughout the site. Personnel
will be informed of the location of the figure and the directions to the hospital. The Naval
Hospital will be used for life-threatening
injuries or potential chemical exposure (per prior
civilian humanitarian agreement). Directions to the Base and Public Hospital from each site
are provided below.
8-2
Revised: 4-21-94
TABLE
MCB
CAMP
LEJEUNE
Agency/Facility
8-l
EMERGENCY
TELEPHONE
Telephone Number
Security (Police)
911 or (910) 451-3855
Fire
911
NUMBERS
Contact*
Response Operator
Emergency Services Operator
Ambulance (On-Base)
911 or (910) 451-4554
Ambulance (Off-Base)
(910) 455-9119
Response Operator
Hospital (On-Base)
911 or (910) 451-4840,
4841, and 4842
Response Operator
Hospital (Off-Base)
(Emergency Room)
(910) 577-2240
Emergency Room Physician
Hospital (Off-Base)
(Information)
(910) 577-2345
Onslow County Hospital
Information
Hazardous Materials
Team
On-Scene Commander
911
Emergency Services
Operator/H&l1 Cesse
Emergency Services Operator
911 or (910) 451-5815
Fire Chief Piner
Public Works Department
(Underground Utilities via
EMD Contact)
(910) 451-5068
Neal Paul
Poison Control Center
l-800-672-1697
Response Operator
National
l-800-424-8802
Response Operator
CHEMTREC
l-800-424-9300
Response Operator
Agency for Toxic Substances
and Disease Registry
l-404-639-0615
Response Operator
MCB Camp Lejeune
Directory Assistance
(910) 451-1115
Directory Assistance Operator
Air Station Security
(910) 451-6113
Provost Marshall
Air Station Fire Department
(910) 451-6620
Emergency Services Operator
*
Response Center
Remaining points of contact will be identified
Notes:
prior to the start of activities.
1. When using the portable cellular telephone, in the Jacksonville,
North
Carolina area, dial the appropriate area code (910) f& in addition to the local
phone number.
2. When calling 911 on a non-base phone, ask emergency services operator to
transfer call to Base 911 system and report emergency.
3. When using an on-base phone, first dial extension 99 for local calls or extension
92 for long distance calls.
8-3
FIGURE 8-1
HOSPITAL ROUTE MAP
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
MARINE CORPS BASE, CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
Site A
The following
Figure S-1):
are directions to the base Naval Hospital (Building
1. Leave Site A and follow Long&&Road
2. Turn right
Boulevard).
NH1001 from Site A (refer to
north to Curtis Road west.
and head north on Route 17 until intersecting
3. Turn right onto Route 24 (Lejeune
Boulevard through the main gate.
Boulevard)
with Route 24 (Lejeune
and continue
following
Lejeune
with driveway
to Naval Hospital
4. At traffic light turn right onto Brewster Boulevard.
5. Continue on Brewster Boulevard until intersecting
on right (approximately 0.75 miles).
6. Follow signs for emergency room entrance (bear to right).
Directions to Onslow County Memorial
to Figure S-1).
Hospital
(317 Western Boulevard)
from Site A (refer
1. Leave Site A and follow Longstaff Road north onto Curtis Road west to Camp Geiger
main gate.
2. Turn right
Boulevard).
3. Turn right
Boulevard.
and head north on Route 17 until intersecting
onto Route 24 (Lejeune
Boulevard)
until
with Route 24 (Lejeune
intersecting
with
Western
4. Turn left onto Western Boulevard.
5. Continue on Western Boulevard
left hand side.
to the fifth stop light and the hospital will be on the
6. Follow directions to emergency room entrance.
8-5
_-.
Sites 75 and 76
The following are directions to the base Naval Hospital (Building
76 (refer to Figure 8-l):
NHlOO) from Sites 75 and
1. Turn right onto Curtis Road and head to Camp Geiger main gate.
2. Turn right and head north on Route 17 until intersecting
Boulevard).
3.
Turn right onto Route 24 (Lejeune
Boulevard through the main gate.
4.
At traffic light turn right onto Brewster Boulevard.
5.
Continue on Brewster Boulevard until intersecting
on right (approximately 0.75 miles).
6.
Follow signs for emergency room entrance (bear to right).
Directions to Gnslow County Memorial
76 (refer to Figure 8-l).
Boulevard)
with Route
and continue
24 (Lejeune
following
Lejeune
with driveway to Naval Hospital
Hospital (317 Western Boulevard)
from Sites 75 and
1. Turn right onto Curtis Road and head to Camp Geiger main gate.
2.
Turn right
Boulevard).
and head north on Route 17 until
intersecting
3.
Turn right
Boulevard.
onto Route 24 (Lejeune Boulevard)
4.
Turn left onto Western Boulevard.
5.
Continue on Western Boulevard
left hand side.
6.
Follow directions to emergency room entrance.
until
with Route 24 (Lejeune
intersecting
with
Western
to the fifth stop light and the hospital will be on the
8-6
Site 68
The following
are directions
to Figure 8-l):
to the base Naval
Hospital
1.
Travel
Range Road south to Highway
2.
Travel
Highway
3.
Proceed north
4.
Turn
right
onto Route 24 (Lejeune
Boulevard
through the main gate.
Boulevard)
5.
At trtic
Boulevard.
6.
Continue
on Brewster
on right (approximately
7.
Follow
Directions
to Figure
NHlOO)
from Site 68 (refer
210.
210 west to Route 17.
on Route 17 until
light turn right
County
intersecting
onto Brewster
Boulevard
until
0.75 miles).
signs for emergency
to Onslow
8-l).
(Building
intersecting
room entrance
Memorial
Hospital
1.
Travel
Range Road south to Highway
2.
Travel
Highway
3.
Proceed north
4.
Turn right
Boulevard.
5.
Turn
6.
Continue
on Western
left hand side.
7.
Follow
with Route 24 (Lejeune
and
continue
with
Boulevard).
following
driveway
to Naval
Lejeune
Hospital
(bear to right).
(317 Western
Boulevard)
from Site 68 (refer
210.
210 west to Route 17.
on Route 17 until
onto
Route
left onto Western
directions
intersecting
24 (Lejeune
with Route 24 (Lejeune
Boulevard)
until
Boulevard).
intersecting
with
Western
and the hospital
will
be on the
Boulevard.
Boulevard
to emergency
to the fifth
room entrance.
8-7
stop light
Site 12
The following are directions to the base Naval Hospital (Building
to Figure 8-l):
NHlOO) from Site 12 (refer
1. Travel west on undeveloped dirt road to Sneads Ferry Road.
2. Turn right and travel north on Sneads Ferry Road to Holcomb Boulevard
right at yield sign.
3. Travel north
Boulevard.
on Holcomb Boulevard
to traffic
4. Continue on Brewster Boulevard until intersecting
on right (approximately 0.75 miles).
light
and turn
and bear
left on Brewster
with driveway to Naval Hospital
7. Follow signs for emergency room entrance (bear to right).
Directions to Onslow County Memorial
to Figure 8-l).
Hospital (317 Western Boulevard) from Site 12 (refer
1. Travel west on undeveloped dirt road to Sneads Ferry Road.
2. Turn right and travel north on Sneads Ferry Road to Holcomb Boulevard
right at yield sign.
and bear
3. Travel north on Holcomb Boulevard to traffic light and head straight to main gate.
4. Leave base through the main gate (via Holcomb Boulevard).
5. Take Highway 24 west to Western Boulevard and turn right.
6. Continue on Western Boulevard to the fifth stop light and hospital will be on the left.
7. Follow directions to the emergency room entrance.
_ 8-8
Site 84
The following are directions to the base Naval Hospital (Building
to Figure B-1):
1. Turn right onto Route 24 (Lejeune
Boulevard through the main gate.
Boulevard)
NHlOO) from Site 84 (refer
and continue
following
Lejeune
with driveway
to Naval Hospital
2. At traffic light turn right onto Brewster Boulevard.
3. Continue on Brewster Boulevard until intersecting
on right (approximately 0.75 miles).
4. Follow signs for emergency room entrance (bear to right).
Directions to Onslow County Memorial
to Figure B-1).
1. Turn left
Boulevard.
Hospital (317 Western Boulevard)
onto Route 24 (Lejeune
Boulevard)
until
from Site 84 (refer
intersecting
with
Western
2. Turn right onto Western Boulevard.
3. Continue on Western Boulevard
left hand side.
to the fifth stop light and the hospital will be on the
4. Follow directions to emergency room entrance.
8-9
Site 85
The following
are directions
to Figure 8-l):
to the base Naval
left onto Coolidge
Hospital
(Building
NHlOO)
1.
Turn
Road and left onto the Camp Johnson
2.
Head straight
and turn right onto Route 24 (Lejeune
following
Lejeune Boulevard
through the main gate.
3.
At trafIic
4.
Continue
on Brewster
on right (approximately
5.
Follow
light turn right
onto Brewster
Directions
to Onslow
to Figure 8-l).
County
left onto Coolidge
intersecting
room entrance
Memorial
Hospital
with
(317 Western
2.
Head straight
and turn right onto Route 24 (Lejeune
following
Lejeune Boulevard
through the main gate.
3.
Turn
4.
Continue on Western
left hand side.
5.
Follow
directions
driveway
Boulevard)
Turn
Road and left onto the Camp Geiger
onto Western
Boulevard)
and
continue
to Naval
Hospital
(bear to right).
1.
right
access road.
Boulevard.
Boulevard
until
0.75 miles).
signs for emergency
from Site 85 (refer
from Site 85 (refer
access road.
Boulevard)
and
continue
will
be on the
Boulevard.
Boulevard
to emergency
to the fifth
room entrance.
8-10
stop light
and the hospital
-1
.I
I,,
111,
I
Revised: 4-21-94
8.7
Emergency
Medical
Treatment
If injuries are not serious or life threatening, affected personnel may be transported by other
site personnel to the local medical facility, if necessary.
Emergency medical response
personnel will be contacted in the event of serious or multiple injuries. Medical personnel will
be provided with all available information regarding the nature of the incident, chemicals
involved, etc.
8.7.1
Emergency
Services
The nearest public hospital is Onslow County Memorial Hospital located at 317 Western
Boulevard, Jacksonville, NC, phone No.: (99) 577-2240 (on base) and (919) 577-2240 or 911
(off base).
Note:
For chemical emergencies, personnel must be transported
Hospital).
to Building
NH100 (Naval
Local ambulance service is available from the Naval Ambulance Service at 911 and the City of
Jacksonville at (919) 455-9119. Contact should be made with emergency personnel prior to
the start of activities (See Section 8.1).
There will be a minimum of 2 persons on each site that will be trained in emergency fist aid
and CPR. These personnel will also be familiar with Baker’s program on potential exposure to
Bloodborne Pathogens as outlined in the Baker Safety SOPS in Attachment A.
Instances requiring treatment beyond “first-aid” will be handled at appropriate facilities and
reported to the Project Manager and PHSO within 24 hours. Subcontractors
will be
responsible for securing proper medical attention for their employees. Baker may assist the
subcontractor if necessary.
8.7.2
Physical
Injury
If an employee working in a contaminated area is physically injured, first aid procedures are
to be followed. If the employee can be moved, helshe will be taken to the edge of the work area
and decontaminated,
if necessary (refer to Section 8.7). Depending on the severity of the
injury, emergency medical response from Navy personnel may be sought to stabilize victim for
transport to public hospitals. Emergency first aid may be administered by Baker personnel
prior to transporting to an awaiting ambulance or to a local emergency medical facility, as
appropriate.
8.7.3
Chemical
Injury
If the injury to a worker is chemical in nature (e.g., direct contact/exposure),
aid procedures are to be instituted:
l
first
Eve Exposure - If contaminated solid or liquid gets into the eyes, wash the eyes
immediately at the 15-minute emergency eyewash station (or with the emergency eye
wash bottle when an eye wash station if not available).
Obtain medical attention
immediately.
NOTE:
a
the following
Contact lenses will not be worn while working at the site.
Skin Exposure - If contaminated solid or liquid gets on the skin, promptly wash the
contaminated skin using soap or mild detergent and water. If solids or liquids
8-11
Revised: 4-21-94
penetrate through the clothing, remove the clothing immediately and wash the skin
using soap or mild detergent and water. Obtain medical attention immediately.
l
Swallowing - If contaminated solid or liquid has been swallowed immediately contact
the Poison Control Center at the Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North
Carolina at l-800-672-1697. Do not induce vomiting in an unconscious person. Obtain
medical attention as directed by the Poison Control Center.
l
Breathing - If a person has difficulty breathing, move the exposed person to fresh air at
once. If breathing is not evident, check for pulse and perform appropriate first aid
(either rescue breathing
or CPR) depending on the condition.
Obtain medical
attention immediately.
8.7.4
Snakebite
Injury
In the event of a snakebite injury, the following procedures will be followed.
Look for signs and symptoms such as the characteristic appearance of two small holes, usually
about a half inch apart, with surrounding discoloration, swelling, and pain. Systematic signs
(which may or may not occur) including weakness, sweating, faintness, and signs of shock.
Provide treatment as follows:
1.
Calm the victim and keep affected area still.
2. Contact ambulance if you cannot provide the victim with transportation
medical facility.
to the nearest
3. Wash the wound.
4. Keep the affected area below the level of the heart if bite is on the arm or leg.
5. Treat for shock.
6. Monitor airway, breathing,
and circulation,
7. Obtain physical description of snake, if possible.
8. Provide the emergency medical responder (either the ambulance attendant or the
emergency room at the hospital) with all pertinent information such as: how long ago
the bite occurred, the type of snake (if known), any known allergic conditions (if
known), etc.
9. Inform the SHSO immediately
8.8
Emergency
Decontamination
if a snakebite injury has occurred.
Procedures
In the event of a medical emergency, patients are to be adequately decontaminated before
transfer (if possible) to prevent contamination of the medical transport vehicle and medical
facility. Emergency personnel decontamination will include the following, depending on the
level of protection.*
8-12
Level D
0
0
Level D+
Equipment
drop
Tape, boot, and
glove removal
Coverall removal
0
l
l
0
l
Level C
Equipment
drop
Tape, outer boot, and
glove removal
Coverall removal/
disposal
Inner glove removal/
disposal
0
a
l
0
0
Equipment drop
Tape, outer boot,and
glove removal
Coverall removal/
disposal
Respirator removal
Inner glove removaY
disposal
Level B
l
l
l
0
0
0
Equipment drop
Tape, outer boot, and
glove removal
SCBA or escape tank
removal
Coverall removal/
disposal
SCBA or ALB face
shield removal
Inner glove removal/
diswsal
* If circumstances dictate that contaminated clothing cannot be readily removed, then
remove gross contamination and wrap injured personnel with clean garments/blankets,
to avoid contaminating other personnel or transporting equipment.
If chemical agent exposure suspected, personnel are to wash affected skin area with 5
percent sodium hypochlorite solution and use the shower in the trailer.
A 15-minute
emergency eye wash station will also be available.
All emergency personnel are to be immediately informed of the injured person’s condition
and potential contaminants and provided with all pertinent chemical data,
If necessary, one of the site personnel equipped with appropriate PPE may accompany the
injured worker and perform decontamination with supervision of medical personnel.
Personal
8.9
Protection
and First
Aid Equipment
PPE available for emergency response will include the following:
l
0
l
l
l
a
l
Polyvinyl chloride boots
Saranexe suits
Qvek* suits, polyethylene coated and uncoated
Nitrile gloves (inner and outer)
Neoprene and Nitrile Gloves (outer)
Face shields and goggles
SCBA
PPE and first aid equipment will be available
Baker Site Trailer).
in the support zone (i.e., Baker Field Vehicle or
Emergency and first aid equipment can be found at the following locations:
Fire Extinguisher:
First aid kit:
Emergency eye wash bottle:
Air Horn:
15-minute Emergency Eye
Wash Station:
Baker Site Trailer and Contractor Field Vehicle
Baker Site Trailer and Baker Field Vehicle
Baker Site Trailer and Baker Field Vehicle
With Personnel
Near Area With Greatest Potential for Chemical
Splash/Exposure
8-13
8.10
Notification
If the
spill,
their
NTR
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
Emergency Coordinator
determines that the site has an uncontrolled
situation, such as a
fire, or explosion, that could threaten human health or the environment,
they will report
findings to the Base Fire Department,
the Activity Contact, the Project Manager, and the
as soon as possible. The notification
report will include:
Description
of incident (e.g., release, fire).
Name and telephone number of individual
reporting
the emergency..
Location of incident.
Name and quantity of material (s) involved (if known).
The extent of injuries, and number of casualties.
The possible hazards to human health or the environment.
Assistance that is requested.
Note:
Prior to beginning
ground intrusive
activities
at Site A, the officers housing
be evacuated.
This will be coordinated
through the Base Representative.
8.11
Hazard
area will
Assessment
For the purposes of providing
information
to the Navy On-Scene Commander,
the Emergency
Coordinator
will assess possible hazards to human health or the environment
that may result
from an uncontrolled
situation, to the best of their abilities, incorporating
the following
steps,
as appropriate.
l
l
l
Assess the immediate need to protect human health and safety.
Identify,
where possible, the materials
involved
in the incident including
exposure
and/or release pathways and the quantities
of materials involved.
Inform
appropriate
personnel
as identified
in Section 8.10, who will determine
if
release of material(s)
meets EPA requirements
for reportable
quantities
for spills
under the RCRA or CERCLA.
This assessment may consider both the direct and indirect effects of the chemical release, fire,
explosion,
or severe weather
conditions
(e.g., the effects of any toxic, irritating,
or
asphyxiating
gases that are liberated).
8.12
Security
During
activation
of these Emergency
Procedures,
the Emergency
Coordinator
or his/her
designated representative
will control access to the site and maintain
an incident log until the
appropriate
personnel, such as the Navy On-Scene Commander
arrives and takes control. The
incident log may include:
l
l
Activities
that have occurred since the incident was first reported.
Rescue, response, and PPE used to evacuate personnel.
Emergency
8.13
Personnel
l
Injury.in
Alerting
the Work Zone:
Initiate
a verbal warning
or one long airhorn
blast and move all unaffected
personnel to the support zone (for Level D/D +) or the CR2 (for Level C or higher).
8-14
site
l
Send the rescue team into the Work Zone (if required) to remove the injured person to
the hotline.
l
Have the SHSO and/or Site Manager evaluate the nature of the injury, and assure that
the affected person is decontaminated according to Section 8.8.
l
If required,
contact an ambulance and/or the designated medical facility.
No persons shall reenter the Work Zone until an accident investigation
SHSO and/or the Site Manager.
Personnel
Injury
in the Support
is performed
by the
Zone:
l
The Site Manager and SHSO will assess the nature of the injury; if the cause of the
injury or loss of the injured person does not affect the performance of other site
personnel, operations may continue.
l
If the injury increases the risk to others, a verbal warning or one long airhorn blast
shall be sounded and all remaining site personnel will move to the command post for
further instructions.
l
Activities
on site will stop until the added risk is mitigated.
Fire/Explosion:
l
Initiate a verbal warning or one long airhorn blast and move all site personnel to the
support zone (for Level D/D + ) or the CRZ (for Level C or higher).
l
Alert the fire and security departments and move all nonessential
Baker Command Post to await further instructions.
l
Activities
Personal
personnel to the
will stop until the added risk is mitigated.
Protective
Equipment
Failure:
l
If any site worker experiences difficulty, failure or alteration of protective equipment
that affects the protection factor, that person and his/her buddy shall immediately
cease work activities, leave the Work Zone, and repair or replace the defective
equipment.
l
Reentry will not be permitted until the equipment has been repaired or replaced.
Other Equipment
Failure:
l
If any other equipment on site fails to operate properly, the Field Team Leader shall
notify the Site Manager and SHSO to determine the effect of this failure on site
operations.
l
If the failure affects the safety of site personnel, work with the equipment
until the situation is evaluated and appropriate actions taken.
will cease
In all situations, when an on-site emergency results in evacuation of the Work Zone, personnel
shall not reenter until:
8-15
..-
_--~ -. _
Revised: 4-21-94
1. The conditions resulting in the emergency have been corrected.
2. The hazards have been reassessed.
3. The HASP has been reviewed and, if appropriate, modified.
4. Site personnel have been briefed on any changes in the HASP.
8.14
Training
Site personnel will read the details in the Emergency Procedures prior to the initial HASP
training. The Emergency Procedures will be reviewed by site personnel during the pre-entry
briefing.
8.15
Spill
Containment
Procedures
In the event that a small, easily-controlled
spill of hazardous substances (gasoline, oil, etc.)
occurs during the implementation
of field activities, spill containment will be utilized to
prevent the additional migration of contaminants through the site area. Large, uncontrolled
spills will be handled by qualified response organizations under the direction of the Base
personnel and/or the Navy On-Scene Commander. Any release to soils or surface waters
equaling or exceeding the reportable quantities under the Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or the USEPA Clean Water Act will
immediately be reported to the Base Environmental Management Department.
Specific spill containment procedures will be dependent on the type of materials spilled and
the type of environment affected. Potential spill containment procedures may include diking
with absorbent material/pads, then removal or containment of the contaminated materials.
Spill containment materials will be located within close proximity to the storage area of the
hazardous substances in a manner such that the pathway remains accessible and free of
obstructions. Spill containment materials available on site may include:
l
a
l
l
Absorbent pads
A roll of polyethylene sheeting
Shovels
Minimum of two empty 55-gallon drums
8-16
9.0
Training
9.1
TRAINING
requirements
REQUIREMENTS
for site personnel are outlined in the sections below.
General
All Baker employees, subcontractors, or other personnel entering the site will need to have
received training in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) Standard 29 CFB 1910.120. Baker employees engaged in field activities which
potentially
expose workers to hazardous substances receive a minimum of 40 hours of
instruction off site, and a minimum of three days actual field experience under the direct
supervision of a trained, experienced supervisor. Key points of the 40-hour training include
field demonstrations,
respiratory
fit testing and training, risk assessment, toxicology,
chemical reactivitg, use of monitoring equipment, downrange work procedures, site safety
procedures, levels of protection, protective clothing, decontamination,
and practical field
exercises (which include donning, doffing, and working in personal protective ensembles for
personal protection Levels A, B, and Cl.
In addition to the initial 40-hour training program, Baker requires site employees to receive
an annual &hour refresher training course on the items specified by the 29 CFR 1910.120
standard. The general purpose of the &hour refresher is to ensure that personnel retain the
knowledge necessary to be adequately protected, and stay current with proper site health and
safety procedures.
Baker also requires that personnel involved with on-site employee supervision receive (in
addition to 40 hours initial training and three days of supervised field experience) at least
eight additional hours of specialized training at the time of job assignment. Training topics
include, but are not limited to, the employer’s safety and health program and the associated
employee training
program, personal protective equipment program, spill containment
program, and health hazard monitoring procedures and techniques. The &hour supervisory
training is required to ensure that supervisors have the knowledge necessary to understand
and use the various Health and Safety Programs and to implement the elements of the HASP.
Table 9-l provides the appropriate OSHA Training History for Baker Project Personnel.
9-1
TABLE
OSHA TRAINING
Personnel
HISTORY
9-1
OF BAKER
PROJECT
PERSONNEL*
Training
Title/Role
40-hr. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
a Medical surveillance:
Mr. Raymond Wattras
l
Project Manager
Mr. Ronald Krivan
l
Project Health and Safety Officer
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
‘1
Status
40-hr. training completed:
Supervisory training:
8-hr. refresher completed:
First Aid Training:
CPR Training:
Medical surveillance:
40-hr. training completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
To be Named in the
HASP Final
l
Site Manager
l
To be Named in the
HASP Final
l
Site Health and Safety Officer/
Field Team Leader
l 40-hr. training
completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
To be Named in the
HASP Final
l
Environmental
l 40-hr. training
completed:
0 Supervisory training:
l 8-hr. refresher completed:
l First Aid Training:
l CPR Training:
l Medical surveillance:
Scientist
*Training history for contractor personnel will be maintained
NA -Not Applicable
at the Command Post.
c
4184
9191
10193
NA
NA
7193
I.188
l/89
2193
2193
2193
4193
9.2
Site-Specific
Training
Site-specific
training,
as discussed in Section
briefing on the following
information:
1.3, will
Names
of individuals
responsible
for site
communicating
safety and health concerns.
Roles and responsibilities
Site-specific
health
consist of an initial
health
health
and
and
safety
and safety
methods
of
of site personnel.
and safety hazards.
Use of PPE.
Work practices
by which
Safe use of equipment
of symptoms
Site control
measures.
Emergency
Baker
The SHSO
activities.
risk.
and signs of exposure
to hazardous
materials.
procedures.
procedures.
Hazard
will
can minimize
on site.
Recognition
Decontamination
employees
Communication
conduct
the
initial
Program.
site-speci.f?c
training
prior
to the
initiation
of field
10.0
MEDICAL
10.1
General
SURVEILLANCE
REQUIREMENTS
All personnel,
who may be exposed to materials
having poter$ially
adverse and deleterious
health effects, obtain a medical clearance from Baker’s Board Certified
Occupational
Health
Physician
in accordance
with 29 CFR 1910.120(f)
prior to entry onto any site. Baker’s
corporate
medical surveillance
program
establishes
a medical baseline
and monitors
for
symptoms of overexposure
for individuals
who participate
in Preliminary
Assessments, Site
Inspections,
Remedial Investigations,
Feasibility
Studies, and construction-phase
services at
sites covered by the Department
of Labor, Occupational
Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA), Hazardous Waste Operations
and Emergency
Response Standard,
29 CFR 1910.120.
The program
includes
a medical
and work history
and is intended
to determine
the
individual’s
capability
for performing
on-site work, including
wearing
chemical protective
clothing and respiratory
protective
equipment
in a thermally-stressed
environment.
All Baker employees that will be engaged in site activities
covered by the 29 CFR 1910.120
standard
receive a Group III physical examination
by a licensed physician who is provided
information
on the individuals
sits activities,
and exposure or anticipated
exposure levels.
This exam is received
initially
upon hire, then once every 12 months thereafter.
More
frequent, medical examinations,
consultations,
and/or laboratory
testing will be provided if the
examining
physician
determines
that an increased frequency of examination
is required.
A
complete
Group III medical
exam includes
parameters
such as height,
weight,
vision,
temperature,
blood pressure, and a complete review of occupational
and medical histories.
Other tests in a Group III exam include
chest x-rays, electrocardiogram,
spirometry,
urinalysis,
and blood tests. Table 10-l describes the medical surveillance
testing parameters
performed
annually
on Baker employees.
10.2
Site Specific
Prior to entry onto the site, all personnel, including
subcontractors,
will be required to provide
medical clearance
to the SHSO from their company physician
in accordance with 29 CFR
1910.120(f),
stating that they are physically
capable of performing
the activities
required
of
them. The need for additional
monitoring,
dependent on information
obtained during the site
characterization,
will be evaluated
on a case-by-case basis. However,
in the event that site
employees are injured, receive a health impairment,
develop signs or symptoms which may
have resulted from exposure to hazardous substances resulting from an emergency incident,, or
are exposed during an emergency incident to hazardous substances at concentrations
that are
or may be above the permissible
exposure limits or the published exposure levels without the
necessary
personal
protective
equipment
being
used, medical
examinations
and/or
consultations
shall be performed
ac’cording to the following
schedule:
1.
As soon as possible
symptoms.
2.
At. additional
examinations
Procedures
in Appendix
to follow
C.
following
the emergency
times,
if the examining
or consultations
are medically
in the event of an exposure
10-l
-
incident
physician
necessary.
to a hazardous
or development
determines
material/chemical
of signs
that
follow-up
are provided
or
TABLE
MEDICAL
Group
.
8
a
.
l
.
.
II - Individuals
SURVEILLANCE
Occasionally
10-l
TESTING
PARAMETERS*
in the Field (lo-30 days/year)
Medical History (Physical Exam)
EyeExam
EKG (baseline and for individuals
over 40 years of age)
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 5 years)
Spirometry
CBC with differential
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Group III - Individuals
Frequently
in the Field ( > 30 days/year)
Medical History (Physical Exam)
Eye Exam
EKG (baseline then annually for individuals
over 40 years of age)
Audiometry
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 3 years)
Spirometry
CBC with differential
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Urinalysis
(glucose scan)
Specific Blood and Urine Tests (dependent on field exposure)**
Group III with Asbestos
.
*
**
- Individuals
frequently
Group III testing with the Asbestos
Test (FVCI.o and FEV1.o)
in the field whom also work with asbestos
Medical
Questionnaire
w/Pulmonary
Function
The attending
physician has the right to reduce or expand the medical monitoring
on an
annual basis as he/she deems necessary.
To be performed
for individuals
identified
by the attending
physician as being chronically
exposed to organic compounds.
10-2
11.0
HEALTH
AND
SAFETY
This HASP has been reviewed
Mr. Ronald
Krivan,
CSP
Name
Mr. Raymond
PLAN
APPROVAL
by the following
personnel.
PHSO
Title
Wattras
Proiect Manaper
Name
Title
Mr. Joseph Rozum
QAIQC
Name
Title
Signature
Reviewer
$J&JLkC~~
ture
<
,
DECLARATION
12.0
All site personnel
indicated
Plan for the Site Inspection
Lejeune,
North
.
,,/
I,,
OF HASP REVIEW
below, have reviewed
at Sites A, 12,68,75,76,
and are familiar
with this Health
84 and 85 at Marine
Corps Base Camp
Carolina.
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
KJompany)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
and Safety
r-
Stifety
Attachment
A
Baker Environmental,
Inc.
Standard Operating Procedures
ATTACHMENT
SAFETY
A
BAKER
ENVIRONMENTAL,
STANDARD
OPERATING
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
1 .O
Confined Space Entry Program*
2.0
Respiratory
3.0
Care and Cleaning of Personal Protective Equipment
4.0
Bloodborne Pathogens
5.0
Heat Stress
6.0
Cold Stress
7.0
Safe Boat Operations**
Protection Program
*Not Applicable
**To be provided in the Final HASP.
INC.
PROCEDURES
m
2.0 - RESPIRATORY
PROTECTION
PROGRAM
This Respiratory Protection Program presents the elements necessary for administering
a
successful program. Attached at the end of this program is a copy of the following Baker
Environmental,
Inc. (Baker) forms:
0
0
0
2.1
Qualitative Respirator Fit Test Record
Air-Supplying
Respirator Inspection Form
Air-Purifying
Respirator Inspection Form
PURPOSE
The purpose of the Baker Respiratory Protection Program is to govern the selection and use of
respiratory
protection by Baker personnel.
This program is also designed to meet
requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) standards 29
CFR 1910.134 and 1926.103, “Respiratory Protection.”
2.2
SCOPE
This program applies to Baker SRN personnel who may be involved with potential respiratory
hazards as part of their job duties. This program outlines the procedures to follow when
respiratory equipment is required.
2.3
RESPONSIBILITY
Baker provides the necessary respiratory equipment to protect the safety and health of each
Baker employee. The Baker SRN Project Health and Safety Officer (PHSO) and Project
Manager are responsible for identifying the need for this Respiratory Protection Program at
project sites. The Baker Site Health and Safety Officer (SHSO) and Site Manager are
responsible for implementing
and administering the Respiratory Protection Program in the
field. Baker employees are to use and maintain the respiratory
protection provided in
accordance with training received and instructions outlined in this program.
2.4
HAZARD
ASSESSMENT
The key elements of a respiratory protection program must start with an assessment of the
inhalation and ingestion hazards present in the work area. Because Baker’s services involve a
variety of environmental
and industrial hygiene studies, it is not practical to identify all
possible hazards to which all employees could be exposed within the scope of this document.
Therefore, it is essential that a task specific assessment be conducted prior to the initiation of
any activities on a given project. This task specific assessment shall be part of the site-specific
Health and Safety Plan (HASP).
After a task-specific assessment is completed and it is determined that there is a potential for
airborne exposure concentrations
to exceed the recommended limits, engineering
and
administrative
controls should be implemented. If the exposure cannot be reduced, or it is not
feasible to reduce the airborne exposure below the recommended limits, respirators will be
selected by the PHSO and/or SHSO on the basis of:
Rev.: 3194
0
2.5
Toxicity
Maximum expected concentration
Oxygen levels
Warning properties of the substance(s) involved
Sorbent limitations
Facepiece fit
Mobility requirements
Type of use (routine, escape, or emergency entry)
Possibility of ingestion of toxic materials
Respirator attributes
TRAINING
Each respirator wearer shall be given training,
explanations and discussions of:
0
0
0
by a qualified
individual,
which will include
Opportunity to wear respiratory protection in an uncontaminated environment.
Respirator fit testing (qualitative)
The respiratory hazard(s) and what may occur if the respirator is not used
properly.
The reasons for selecting a particular type of respirator.
The function, capabilities, and limitations of the selected respirator.
The method of donning the respirator and checking its fit and operation.
The proper wearing of the respirator.
Respirator maintenance, repair, and cleaning.
Recognizing and handling emergency situations.
Employees who have attended the 40-hour training in accordance’with
29 CFR 1910.120
(HAZWOPER) will be provided with the basic information necessary to comply with the
OSHA training requirements and will only need to attend a supplementary session provided
by qualified Baker personnel.
The annual HAZWOPER 8-hour refresher will serve to
reinforce these issues on an annual basis. Records of the training and tit-testing will be
maintained for a minimum of 30 years following termination
of employment for each
employee.
2.6
TYPES
OF RESPIRATORS
Baker purchases and provides, as necessary, the following respirators:
0
North Brand half-face (Model 7700) and full-face
respirators
(Model 7600) air-purifying
0
North Brand positive pressure 30-minute
(SCBAs) (Model 800)
0
North Brand positive pressure supplied airline respirators
air cylinders (Model 85500).
0
MSA Ultra Twin full-face respirator (Model 480263)
0
MSA Comfo II half-face respirator (Model 479529)
Self-Contained
Breathing
Apparatus
with 5-minute
escape
Only respiratory equipment certified by the appropriate approval agencies (e.g., NIOSH,
MSHA) according to Title 30, Part II of the Code of Federal Regulations, will be distributed to
Rev.: 3194
4
Baker employees. All Baker employees who regularly perform tasks requiring respiratory
protection will be issued their own half-face and/or full-face respirator, provided the employee
can achieve a proper fit and is medically capable ofwearing the equipment.
Because 30-minute SCBAs, positive pressure supplied airline respirators,
and &minute
escape air cylinders are used less frequently, this equipment will be distributed on an asneeded basis.
2.7
AIR QUALITY
Compressed air used for respiration shall be of high purity. Breathing air shall meet at least
the requirements of the specification for Grade D Breathing Air (or higher) as described in
Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification G-7.1-1966. Breathing air may be
supplied to respirators from cylinders; oxygen must never be used with air-line respirators.
Air cylinders shall be tested and maintained
as prescribed in the Shipping Container
Specification Regulations of the Department of Transportation
(49 CFR Part 178). Air-line
couplings shall be incompatible with outlets for other gas systems to prevent inadvertent
servicing of air-line respirators with nonrespirable gases or oxygen.
Breathing gas containers (air cylinders) shall be marked in accordance with American
National Standard Method of marking Portable Compressed Gas Containers to Identify the
Material Contained, A48.1-1954; Federal Specification BB-A-1034a, June 21, 1968, Air,
Compressed for Breathing Purposes; or Interim Federal Specification GG-B00675b, April 27,
1965, Breathing Apparatus, Self-Contained.
Breathing
air, as supplied .by air compressors, shall be of high purity and meet the
requirements of the specification for Grade D Breathing
air (or higher) as described in
Compressed Gas Association Commodity Specification G-7.1-1966.
The compressor for supplying air shall be equipped with necessary safety and standby devices.
A breathing air-type compressor shall be used. Compressors shall be constructed and situated
so as to avoid entry of contaminated air into the system and suitable in-line air-purifying
sorbent beds and filters installed to further assure breathing air quality.
A receiver of
sufficient capacity to enable the respirator wearer to escape from a contaminated atmosphere
in the event of compressor failure, and alarms to indicate compressor failure and overheating
shall be installed in the system. If an oil-lubricated compressor is used, it shall have a hightemperature or carbon monoxide alarm, or both. If only a high-temperature
alarm is used, the
air from the compressor shall be frequently tested for carbon monoxide to insure that it meets
the specifications outlined above.
2.8
CLEANING
AND MAINTENANCE
Respiratory equipment that is used on an as-needed basis shall be maintained by qualified
personnel. This equipment shall be cleaned/sanitized, then rinsed and air-dried, after each
use.
Respiratory equipment that has been issued to an employee shall be cleaned/sanitized then
rinsed and air-dried by the wearer, (specified by OSHA in 29 CFR 1910.134) which ensures
that it will be maintained in clean and good operating condition.
Inspections shall be
conducted on a regular basis during usage and prior to each project requiring the potential
usage of the equipment.
Rev.: 3/94
AIR-PURIFYING
INSPECTION
HEADSTRAPS
HEADBANDS
FACE PIECE
Type
Clean and
(Full or
Half-Face)
smitid?
*
X=NotOK
=OK
Cracks,
Tears, or
Holes?
Proper Shape
and
Flexibility?
RESPIRATOR
FORM
Air Purifying
Element
Holders
Operate
Correctly?
Proper
Storage
Free From
Heat, Dirt,
Sunlight, etc.?
Sign23 of
Wear or
Tear?
OR
Buckles
Function
Properly?
RESPIRATOR
Foreign
Material
Under
Valve Seat?
INTERIOR
Cracks or
Teara in
Valves or
Valve Bodiea?
Valve Coven3
and Bodiee in
Good Condition
and Installed
Correctly?
Inspected
BY
(Initials)
t
Date
Inspected
Rev.:
3194
AIR-SUPPLYING
INSPECTION
(SCB~eSAR)
Cylinder
Condition
@amagedor
Undamaged)
Cylinder
(Full or MT)
Facepiece
and Hoses
(Damagedor
UIldamaged)
Connections
Apparatus
(Damaged or
Undamaged)
COIqhte
(Yes/No)
RESPIRATOR
FORM
Cleaned
and
Sanitized
(Yea/No)
Remarks
Inspected
BY
(Initials)
Date
Inspected
Rev.: 3194
QUALITATIVE
TEST
SUBJECT
RESPIRATOR
DATE
(initial)
(first)
SOCIAL
SECURITY
SEX (M/F)
NUMBER
DEPARTMENT
RESPIRATOR
MEDICAL
SPECIAL/UNUSUAL
RESPIRATOR
DATE
TRAINING
DATE
CONDITIONS/CONSIDERATIONS:
&SE
•I
0
cl
cl
0
Claustrophobia
Facial hair
Eyeglasses
Contacts
Other:
q
0
q
0
Cl
Cl
0
cl
0
III
q
0
Scars
Broken or crooked nose
Extreme facial dimensions
Wrinkles
RESPIRATOR
I
RECORD
NAME
(last)
&s&
0
FIT TEST
SELECTION
Size
Manufacturer/Model
S -
M-
L -
S -
M __
L -
S-
M __
L -
I
Testing Agent
Qualitative
Style
I
Test
I Half
Half
I
IHalf
I
Yes:
___
No:
__
Irritant
Yes:
__
No:
-
Yes:
Yes:
___
No:
-
Yes:
Other:
Full __
-
IYes: -
Isoamyl Acetate
Smoke
-
Sensitivity
Result
I
I
Fail __
Full -
I Pass Pass -
Full -
-
Fail __
I
IPass
Fail -
I
I
I
Check
No:
-
-
No:
-
-
No:
-
TEST EXERCISES
(Check
Normal Breathing
Deep Breathing
Head, Side to Side
Head, Up and Down
all that apply)
Talking
Bending
Jaw Movements
Rainbow Passage
COMMENTS:
Signed:
Signed:
(Test Subject)
(Technician/Instructor)
Rev.: 3/94
All respirators shall be stored in a plastic bag within a cool/dry location, in a manner that will
protect them against dust, sunlight, heat, extreme cold, excessive moisture, or damaging
chemicals. They shall be stored to prevent distortion of rubber or other elastomer parts.
Cartridges will not be stored while attached to an air-purifying respirator at anytime.
Parts replacement and repairs shall be performed only by appropriate personnel. Equipment
requiring repairs shall be reported to appropriate Baker personnel. Examples of inspection
forms are included at the end of this text.
2.9
INSPECTIONS
At the time of cleaning, and before and after each use, respirators will be inspected.
Deteriorated components will be replaced before the respirator is placed back into service, or
the respirator will be replaced. Repair components must be obtained from the manufacturer of
the respirator to maintain the NIOSH certification.
Emergency-use respirators and selfcontained breathing apparatuses (SCBAs) will be inspected after each use or at a minimum,
once a month. Sample inspection forms for both air-purifying
respirators and air supplying
respirators are attached. These forms are required to be completed each time a respirator is
inspected. However, during field projects in which a field logbook is in use, personnel may
enter the appropriate information into their field logbook as an alternative to the inspection
form. A list of the items to be covered during an inspection are as follows:
l
l
Air-Purifying
Respirator (full or half-face)
b
Face Piece
-- Clean and sanitized?
-- Cracks, tears or holes absent?
-- Proper shape and flexibility retained?
-- Air-purifying
element holders intact?
-- Stored properly, free from heat, dirt, and sunlight?
)
Headstraps or Headbands
-- Signs of wear or tears?
-- Buckles function properly?
)
Respirator Interior
-- Foreign material under valve seat?
-- Cracks or tears in valves/valve bodies?
-- Valve covers/bodies installed properly?
Supplied Air Respirators
) Cylinder undamaged?
) Facepiece and hoses undamaged?
) Connections undamaged?
) Apparatus complete?
) Facemask cleaned and sanitized?
) Hoses and connections cleaned?
Note: The date and the initials
entered into the field logbook.
of the qualified
individual
performing
the inspection must be
Rev.: 3/94
2.10
FIT-TESTING
Each respirator wearer shall be provided with a respirator that can properly form a secure
face-to-mask seal. Each wearer shall be fit-tested prior to issuance of the respirator using
either an irritant smoke or odorous vapor, or other suitable test agent (see example of form at
end of text). Retesting shall be performed, at a minimum, on an annual basis or if a different
model respirator, other than the model the wearer was previously fit-tested for, is to be used.
Air-purifying
respirators fit-tested qualitatively
will be assigned a protection factor of 10
(APF = 10). A copy of Baker’s Fit-Test Form is attached.
Facial hair, which interferes with the normally effective face to mask seal, is prohibited. Each
respirator wearer shall be required to check the seal of the respirator by negative and positive
pressure checks prior to entering a harmful atmosphere.
2.11
MEDICAL
SURVEILLANCE
Personnel who are or may be assigned to tasks requiring use of respirators shall participate in
a medical surveillance program on an annual basis. The medical surveillance program shall
include, but may not be limited to, a history of respiratory disease, work history, a physical
exam, and spirometry conducted by the company’s physician and at the expense of the
company. Test parameters included in Baker’s medical surveillance program are in each sitespecific HASP.
2.12
LIMITATIONS
Wearing any respkator, alone or in conjunction with other types of protective equipment, will
impose some physiological stress on the wearer. Therefore, selection of respiratory protective
devices will be based on the breathing resistance, weight of the respirator, the type and
amount of protection needed as well as the individual’s
tolerance of the given device.
Additional concerns regarding the limitations of different types of PPE and the monitoring
requirements for heat stress/strain will be addressed in the “Heat Stress” SOP.
2.13
SUBCONTRACTOR
REQUIREMENTS
In compliance with Baker’s respiratory protection program, all subcontractors under the
direction of Baker personnel will be expected to comply with pertinent sections of OSHA
Standards 1910.134 and 1926.103. Additionally,
the subcontractor will be asked to:
l
Provide documentation that their employees have been fit-tested on the air-purifying
respirator the employee is expected to use.
a
Provide documentation
respirator.
that their employees have been medically
certified to wear a
Rev.: 3194
3.0 - CARE AND CLEANING
OF PERSONAL
PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
3.1
INTRODUCTION
The following procedures cover the care and cleaning of Levels D, D+, C, and B personal
protective equipment (ppe). Note: These are general procedures that apply to most situations
and are not all inclusive. Procedures are subject to change at the direction of the Site Health
and Safety Officer (SHSO).
3.2
INSPECTION
Proper inspection of personal protective equipment (PPE) features several
inspection depending on articles of PPE and its frequency of use as follows:
a
Inspection and operational
l
Inspection of PPE as it is issued to workers.
l
Inspection after use or training,
l
Periodic inspection of stored equipment.
l
Periodic inspection
selected equipment,
sequences
of
testing of PPE received from the factory or distributor.
and prior to maintenance.
when a question arises concerning the appropriateness
or when problems with similar equipment arise.
of the
The primary inspection of PPE in use for activities at the site will occur prior to immediate
use, will be conducted by the user to ensure that the specific device or article has been checked
out by the user, and that the user is familiar with its use.
3.2.1
Chemical
Resistant
Suit (Levels
D + through
B)
a
Determine if suit is the one specified in the Site Health and Safety Plan (HASP)
l
Before donning, inspect suit for holes or tears; check to see that zippers are operable
and look for signs of suit degradation.
l
When wearing, avoid contact with contaminated material where possible; be aware of
sharp objects that can tear suit; periodically look over suit to check for major rips or
tears.
a
While decontaminating,
remove gross excess of material from suit; remove suit so that
material does not contact inner suit; place clothing in properly labeled disposal
containers.
3.2.2
Inner/Outer
Gloves
(Levels
D t throuph
B)
l
Determine if gloves meet the specifications in the site HASP.
l
Look for rips, tears, or degradation
direction of the SHSO.
of material.
Replace as necessary or at the
Rev.: 3194
3.2.3
Chemically
Resistant
Boots (Levels D + through
B)
0
Determine if boots meet the specifications in the site HASP.
0
Nondisposable boots are to be examined on a daily basis before and after use.
Disposable boots should be examined prior to donning and while in use, and disposed
according to site procedures.
Safety (Steel Toe and/or Shank) Boots (Levels D through
3.2.4
0
3.2.5
l
3.2.6
0
3.2.7
0
3.2.8
0
0
3.3
B)
Examine daily for gouges, open seams, etc., anything that would lessen the integrity
the boot. Replace as boot becomes worn.
Hard Hats (Levels D through
Should be visually
B)
inspected before donning for fit., cracks, and overall condition.
Safety Glasses/Goggles
(Levels D through
C)
Should be visually inspected before donning for cracks, deteriorated
condition. Replace as necessary.
Respirators
(Levels D + through
Procedures for care of respiratory
Respiratory Protection.
Hearing
of
Protection
parts, and overall
B)
protective equipment are covered in Baker’s SOP for
(Levels D through
B)
Disposable - Replace daily, or as material becomes worn or dirty.
Reusable - Inspect before use, clean regularly, replace parts as necessary.
EQUIPMENT
CLEANING
General procedures for cleaning of equipment are listed below. Site-specific concerns will be
addressed by the SHSO prior to and during site activities. Cleaning of respiratory equipment
is covered under the “Respiratory Protection Program” SOP.
3.3.1
Gross Physical
Removal
Remove large amounts of contaminated soil or sediment by scraping off with a tongue
depressor or other suitable instrument, then wipe off using a disposable wipe/paper towel.
3.3.2
Physical/Chemical
Removal
Remove residual contamination with a soft-bristled, long-handled
nonphosphate detergent solution.
brush or equivalent
using a
Rev.: 3194
3.3.3
Rinsing/Dilution
The detergent solution and residual contaminants will be rinsed with distilled/tap
a pressurized sprayer, a tub tilled with clean wash water, or equivalent.
3.4
EQUIPMENT
water using
STORAGE
Storage of ppe is an important aspect to the daily care and cleaning therefore, the following
considerations should be observed:
Different types of ppe shall be stored in a clean and dry environment,
elements that could damage ppe.
free from
PPE shall be stored and labeled so that site personnel can readily select the specified
PPE.
Contaminated,
storage area.
nondisposable
ppe shall be decontaminated
before returning
to the
Contaminated, disposable PPE shall not be returned to the storage trailer,
disposed according to the provisions identified in the Site Work Plans.
Rev.:
but
3194
4.0 - BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
(Safe Handling
of First Aid Incidents)
4.1
PURPOSE
The purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) Bloodborne
Pathogens Standard, Title 29 CFR Part 1910.1030, is to protect workers from bloodborne
pathogens such as the (HIV) and (HBV) by reducing or eliminating workers’ exposure to blood
and other potentially infectious materials. Although HIV and HBV are specifically mentioned
by OSHA, the standard includes any bloodborne pathogen, such as Hepatitis C, malaria, and
syphilis. The standard requires the employer to develop a written exposure control plan that
will reduce or eliminate employee exposure, thus reducing their risk of infection.
The purpose of the Baker Environmental
(Baker) exposure control plan is to minimize the
possibility
of transmission
of bloodborne pathogens in the workplace by establishing
procedures for the safe handling of first aid incidents that may expose personnel to blood or
other potentially infectious materials.
4.2
SCOPE
All Baker SRN personnel who may be exposed to blood or other potentially
infectious
materials as part of their job duties are required to follow the guidelines set forth in this SOP.
The exposure control plan shall be reviewed and updated at least annually, to reflect new or
modified tasks and procedures that affect occupational exposure, and to reflect new or revised
employee positions with occupational exposure.
4.3
RESPONSIBILITY
The Baker Project Health and Safety Office (PHSO) and Project Manager are responsible for
implementing
and administering
this exposure control plan at project sites for their
employees. These individuals will be assisted in the field by the Baker Site Health and Safety
Officer (SHSO) who will be responsible for implementing the exposure control plan.
4.4
DEFINITIONS
Bloodborne Pathopens - Pathogenic microorganisms that may be present in human blood and
has the potential to cause disease in humans. Two examples of bloodborne pathogens include,
hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Contaminated - Means the presence or the reasonably anticipated
potentially infectious materials on an item or surface.
presence of blood or other
Decontamination
- Physically or chemically removing, inactivating, or destroying bloodborne
pathogens on a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting
infectious particles, so that the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.
Exposure Incident - A specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-intact skin, or
parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that result from the
performance of an employee’s duties.
Rev.: 3194
Occupational Exposure - Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mouth, mucous membrane, or
parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from
the performance of an employee’s duties.
Other Potentiallv Infectious Materials - Includes the following human body fluids: semen,
vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial
fluid,
peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly
contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to
differentiate between body fluids; any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a
human; and HIV-containing
cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures,
and HIV- or HBVcontaining culture medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues from
experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.
Parenteral - Piercing of the mucous membranes or the skin barrier
needlesticks, human bites, cuts, and abrasions.
through such events as
Regulated Waste - OSHA defines a regulated waste as a liquid or semi-liquid blood or other
potentially infectious materials; contaminated
items that would release blood or other
potentially infectious materials in a liquid state if compressed; items caked with dried blood or
other potentially infectious materials that are capable of release of these materials during
handling; contaminated sharps; and pathological and microbiological wastes containing blood
or other potentially infectious materials.
4.5
PROCEDURESFOREXPOSURETOBLOODBORNEPATHOGENS
The sections below will discuss the means by which Baker personnel can determine exposure
potential, modes of transmission, methods of compliance, medical monitoring,
and post
exposure procedures.
4.5.1
Exposure
Determination
The exposure determination is based upon the job classifications with occupational
potential, and the activities in which these exposures can occur, as follows.
exposure
Job Classifications
0
l
0
0
Exposure
4.5.2
Site Manager/Site Safety and Health Officer
Environmental Scientists
Geologists
Other Baker Field Personnel
Activities
a
Response to first aid incidents involving
0
Decontamination
of personnel, personal protective equipment, work surfaces,
and equipment potentially
exposed to blood or other potentially
infectious
materials
Modes of Virus Transmission
site personnel
in the Workplace
Modes of virus transmission
are similar for the viruses of concern. Primarily,
virus
transmission occurs as the result of direct blood contact from percutaneous inoculation,
contact with an open wound, non-intact skin (e.g. chapped, abraded, or dermatitis), or mucous
Rev.: 394
w
membranes to blood, blood-contaminated
body fluids, or concentrated virus.
Protective
measures for workers will focus on preventing exposure to blood and other body fluids that can
result from an injury or sudden illness.
4.5.3
Methods
of Compliance
4.5.3.1
Universal
Precautions
The unpredictable and emergent nature of exposures likely to be encountered on a site may
make differentiation
between hazardous body fluids and those that are not hazardous very
difficult.
Thus, all employees will observe “Universal Precautions” to prevent contact with
blood or other potentially infectious materials. These “Universal Precautions” stress that all
blood or other potentially infectious materials will be treated as if they are known to be
infectious.
The universal precautions will include:
(1)
Cover the skin, especially open cuts, scrapes, skin rashes, or other broken skin.
(2)
Don’t touch objects that could be contaminated,
clothing or linens.
(3)
Cover mucous membranes (i.e., mouth, nose, and eyes).
(4)
Prevent direct contact with sharps, such as needles, scalpels, or broken glass that
could pierce or puncture your skin.
(5)
Clean and decontaminate surfaces; containers,
been exposed to blood or other body fluids.
4.5.3.2
Standard
Work
such as blood-covered
and equipment
surfaces,
that may have
Practices
Standard work practices are to be implemented at all times by all employees who may be
exposed to blood or other potentially
infectious materials.
Work practices are defined as
specific policies or procedures whose purpose is to reduce the potential for employee exposure
to bloodborne pathogens. Work practices for use by site personnel are described in the balance
of this section.
Personal
Hygiene
All exposed employees will observe the following hygienic practices:
l
During or immediately after exposure to blood or other potentially
infectious
materials; do not eat, drink, chew gum, chew tobacco, smoke, apply cosmetics,
balms or medications, or any other activity that increases the potential for handto-mouth, mucous membrane, or skin contact.
0
Following exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials, personnel
will wash their hands and any other exposed skin with a disinfectant soap and
water after removal of chemical-protective
gloves or other personal protective
equipment (PPE). This will be performed before eating, urinating, defecating,
applying make-up, smoking or undertaking
any activity that may result in
increased potential for hand to mouth, mucous membrane, or skin contact.
Rev.: 3194
Personal
Protective
Equipment
The basic premise for wearing the appropriate
from exposure to blood and other potentially
available to all site personnel.
PPE is that site personnel must be protected
infectious materials.
Appropriate
PPE is
Responders to a medical emergencies will have access to the appropriate PPE. The PPE will
be present in the site trailer and field vehicles. The PPE should be used in accordance with the
level of exposure encountered. Minor lacerations or small amounts of blood do not merit the
same extent of PPE use as required for massive arterial bleeding. Management of the patient
who is not bleeding, and has no bloody body fluids, should not routinely require the use of PPE.
The following PPE will be present in each Baker Field Vehicle and/or the Baker Site Trailer.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Disposable chemical-protective gloves (i-e, nitrile or latex)
Resuscitation equipment*
Safety glasses, goggles, or faceshields
[email protected] coveralls
*
Resuscitation Equipment - Because the risk of salivary transmission of infectious
disease during artificial ventilation of trauma victims, pocket mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation masks will be present in the first aid kits. The pocket mouth-tomouth resuscitation masks are designed to isolate response personnel from
contact with the victims’ blood and blood-contaminated
saliva, respiratory
secretions, and vomitus.
Decontamination
Handling
procedures will follow those outlined in each site HASP.
Regulated
Wastes
With the exception of contaminated sharps, all other regulated wastes must be placed in
closable, color-coded, labeled containers that prevent leakage of fluids. All applicable federal
and state regulations must be followed for transporting and disposing of the wastes.
Training
and Education
All employees with the potential for occupational exposure will receive initial training on the
safe handling of first aid incidents during first aicK!PR Instruction, and subsequently during
HASP briefings and annual training refreshers.
See Appendix A for the Bloodborne
Pathogens Training Outline.
4.5.4
Medical
Monitoring
All Baker personnel will follow the guidelines
Physician in association with EMR, Inc.
4.5.5
Post-Exposure
Procedures
established by Baker’s Board Certified
and Follow-UP
Health
manapement
The following subsections presents the procedures to follow when a first aid incident occurs
involving the presence of blood or other potentially infectious material; specific steps need to
be taken to safeguard the health of Baker site personnel.
Rev.: 3/94
First Aid Incident
4.5.5.1
Report
If there is a reasonable cause to believe that a potential
exposure to blood or other potentially
infectious materials
has been experienced,
the employee must complete the steps listed below.
These steps are required
when non-HBV
vaccinated
first aid responders
participate
and
regardless of whether an actual “exposure incident” occurred.
1.
Immediately
notify
incident”
occurred.
the SHSO. The SHSO will
determine
2.
Wash area of contamination
and remove
further contamination
will occur.
3.
All parties involved
will complete the Supervisors
Incident Report
incident will be reported to Baker’s Human Resources office.
contaminated
whether
clothing
an “exposure
to ensure
Form
that no
and the
Non-HBV
vaccinated
Baker employees who render first aid where blood or other potentially
infectious materials
are present must be seen by a designated
EMR physician within 24 hours
of the incident.
The employee must take a copy of the Supervisors
Incident Report Form and a
copy of OSHA Standard 1910.1030 to the physician.
Employees
who respond to first aid incidents
involving
the presence
of blood or other
potentially
infectious
materials
where the determination
was made that an “exposure
incident”
occurred, have 90 days following
baseline blood level collection to decide if they wish
to have their blood tested for HIV.
The confidential
medical
evaluation
and follow-up
will include:
1.
The circumstances
2.
If consent has been obtained
determine
HIV and/or HBV
documented
in writing.
testing of the source individual’s
blood in order to
infectivity.
If consent is not obtained this will be
3.
If consent has been obtained,
the exposed employee’s
of the exposure.
blood will be tested.
The occupational
physician will provide the employer with a confidential
written opinion that
includes verification
that the employee has been informed
of the results of the evaluation
and
also includes a recommendation
for further
evaluation
or treatment.
A copy of this written
opinion will be provided within 15 days following
the medical evaluation.
“Good Samaritan”
4.5.5.2
Behavior
The OSHA standard
does not cover “good Samaritan”
behavior.
However,
employees who
provide first aid as “good Samaritans”
should receive the same post incident evaluation
either
through an EMR designated physician or their personal physician.
4.6
REFERENCES
OSHA Title
29 CFR Part 1910.1030
U.S. Department
of Labor, U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services.
Joint Advisory
Notice:
protection
against
occupational
exposure
to Hepatitis
B virus
and human
immunodeficiency
virus. Federal Register 1987; 52:41818-24.
Rev.:
3194
Centers for Disease Control. Update on hepatitis B prevention.
MMWR 1987; 36:353-360,366.
Centers for Disease Control. Update: Acquired immunodeficiency
syndrome and human
immunodeficiency virus infection among health- care workers. MMWR 1988; 37:229-34,239.
OSHA Instruction
CPL 2-2.44, February
13, 1992, Enforcement
Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.
Procedures
for the
Rev.: 3194
~
Appendix
SUGGESTED
I.
II.
III.
BLOODBORNE
A
PATHOGENS
TRAINING
OUTLINE
Introduction
A.
Purpose
B.
Overview:
Bloodborne
Pathogen Standard
Applicability
to Site Personnel
1.
2.
General requirements
3.
Overview
of Baker exposure control
Bloodborne
of the training
29 CFR 1910.1030
plan
Diseases
A.
Types
B.
Modes of Transmission
Baker
program
Exposure
Control
Plan
A.
Purpose
B.
Plan availability
c.
Bloodborne
pathogen hazard recognition
steps
1.
Concept of universal
precautions
Blood and other potentially
infectious materials
2.
D.
Potential
exposure minimization
1.
Work practices
Personal protective
equipment
2.
3.
Hygienic practices
E.
Procedures for decontamination
Personnel
1.
Personal protective
equipment
(PPE)
2.
Tasks and procedures requiring
i:
Location of PPE
Disposal of PPE
3.
iquipment
4.
Work surfaces
PPE
F.
Medical monitoring
Baker medical monitoring
program
1.
Post exposure evaluation
procedures
2.
a.
First aid incident report
b.
HBV and non-HBV vaccinated
responders
C.
Exposure incidents (defined)
e.
Confidential
medical evaluation
G.
Emergency
Preparedness
First aid kits
1.
Personal injury
2.
Rev.:
--
_--__
3194
5.0 - HEAT
STRESS
INTRODUCTION
5.1
Heat stress in the hazardous waste industry usually is a result of protective clothing
decreasing natural body ventilation,
although it may occur at any time work is being
performed at elevated temperatures.
If the body’s physiological processes fail to maintain a
normal body temperature because of excessive heat, a number of physiological reactions can
occur, ranging from mild (such as fatigue, irritability,
anxiety, and decreased concentration,
dexterity, or movement) to fatal.
5.2
CAUSES
AND SYMPTOMS
The following heat stress causes and symptoms are provided for buddy monitoring purposes.
Site personnel must realize that monitoring the physical condition of fellow personnel in
Levels D + through B protective ensembles will be more difficult.
1. Heat rush results from continuous exposure to heat or humid air and chafing clo.thes.
The condition decreases the ability to tolerate heat. Symptoms include a mild red
rash.
are caused by heavy sweating and inadequate fluid intake.
include muscle spasms and pain in the hands, feet, and abdomen.
2.
Heat cramps
3.
Heat exhaustion
Symptoms
occurs when body organs attempt to keep the body cool, due to
inadequate fluid intake and personnel not acclimated to the environment.
Symptoms
include pale, cool, moist skin; heavy sweating; dizziness, headaches, and vomiting.
4. Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat stress. It is a MEDICAL EMERGENCY.
Symptoms are red, hot, dx skin; lack of perspiration; nausea; dizziness and confusion;
strong, rapid pulse rate; and coma.
The need to seek medical attention and the urgency in seeking medical attention depends on
the symptoms and the severity of the symptoms displayed by the affected individual.
If heat
stroke is noted or suspected, medical attention must be sought IMMEDIATELY.
Efforts
should be taken to cool the body to prevent serious injury or death.
5.3
PREVENTION
Because heat stress is one of the most common and potentially serious illnesses at hazardous
waste sites, regular monitoring and other preventive measures are vital. Site workers must
learn to recognize and treat the various forms of heat stress. The best approach is preventive
heat stress management. In general:
l
Monitor for signs of heat stress.
l
Fluid intake should be increased during rest schedules to prevent dehydration.
Drinking cool water (maintained at 50 to 60°F) is satisfactory when light sweating
occurs and temperatures are moderate to cool; however, diluted electrolyte solutions
Rev.: 3194
-.-_
(i.e., Gatorade, Sqwincher, or equivalent) must be used in addition to water under one
or all of the following conditions: continued or heavy sweating, moderate to high
ambient temperatures, or heavy work loads. The intake of coffee during working
hours is discouraged.
0
Acclimate workers to site work conditions by slowly increasing workloads (i.e., do not
begin site work activities with extremely demanding activities).
0
Use cooling devices to aid natural body ventilation.
These devices, however, add
weight and their use should be balanced against worker efficiency. An example of a
cooling aid is a cooling vest that can be worn under clothing, but not against the skin.
l
In extremely hot weather, conduct field activities in the early morning and evening.
0
Ensure that adequate shelter is available to protect personnel against heat that can
decrease physical efficiency and increase the probability of both heat and cold stress.
If possible, set up the command post in a shaded area, and encourage breaks in shaded
areas.
l
In hot weather, rotate shifts of workers wearing impervious clothing.
0
Good hygienic standards must be maintained by frequent changes of clothing and
showering. Clothing should be permitted to dry during rest periods. Persons who
notice skin problems should immediately consult the SHSO.
5.4
MONITORING
Provisions for monitoring for heat stress will be determined by the SHSO and performed as
outlined below. Because the incidence of heat stress depends on a variety of factors, all
workers, even those not wearing protective equipment, should be monitored.
5.4.1
Monitoring
for Permeable
Clothing
For workers wearing permeable clothing (e.g., standard cotton or synthetic work clothes),
follow recommendations for monitoring requirements and suggested work/rest schedules in
the current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists’ (ACGIH) Threshold
Limit Values for Heat Stress. If the actual clothing work differs from the ACGIH standard
ensemble in insulation value and/or wind and vapor permeability,
change the monitoring
requirements and work/rest schedules accordingly.
The guidelines to follow for workers above as determined by the SHSO are as follows:
1. Increased awareness of heat stress symptoms and buddy monitoring.
2. Fluid intake discipline.
3. Self monitoring
4. Attention
of urine output quantities
to prevent dehydration.
to work-rest intervals.
5. Calculate the Heat Exposure Threshold
using the following steps:
Limit
Value (TLV) for work-rest
intervals
Rev.: 3194
a. Determine the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature
Heat Stress Monitor.
b.
(WBGT) Index using
the
[email protected]
Estimate the work load using the following guidelines:
(1) Light work = sitting or standing to control machines, performing
light hand
or arm work.
(2) Moderate
work = walking about with moderated lifting
and pushing.
(3) Heavy work = pick and shovel work.
c. Evaluate the calculations
against the following
Heat Exposure TLVs* in “C or (“F).
Work Load
Work-Rest
Regimen
Light
Moderate
Heavy
30.0 (86)
26.7 (80)
25.0 (77)
75% work - 25% rest, each hour
30.6 (87)
28.0 (82)
25.9 (78)
50% work - 50% rest, each hour
31.4 (89)
29.4 (85)
27.9 (82)
25% work - 75% rest, each hour
32.2 (90)
31.1(88)
30.0 (86)
Continuous
work
l
*
Special
For unacclimated workers, the permissible heat exposure TLV should be
reduced by 2.5”C.
Considerations
l
Acclimatization
- After approximately
to their environment.
l
Fitness - Physically
l
Medication
fit workers will adjust more readily to a change in environment.
- Some medications can predispose individuals
Semipermeable/Impermeable
5.4.2
one to two weeks, workers should be acclimated
Clothing
to heat-induced
illnesses.
Monitoring
For workers wearing semipermeable or impermeable clothing encapsulating ensembles, the
ACGIH standard cannot be used. For these situations, workers should be monitored when the
temperature in the work area is above 70°F (21°C).
To monitor the worker, use one or more of the following
l
methods:
Heart rate. Count the radial pulse during a 30-second period as early as possible in the
rest period.
)
If the heart rate exceeds 110 beats per minute at the beginning of the rest period,
shorten the next work cycle by one-third and keep the rest period the same.
)
Ifthe heart rate still exceeds 110 beats per minute at the next rest period, shorten
the following work cycle by one-third.
Rev.: 3194
a
l
Oral temperature. Use a clinical thermometer (3 minutes under the tongue) or similar
device to measure the oral temperature at the end of the work period (before drinking).
)
If oral temperature exceeds 99.6”F (37,6”C), shorten the next work cycle by onethird without changing the rest period.
)
If oral temperatures still exceeds 99.6”F (37.6”C) at the beginning
period, shorten the following work cycle by one-third.
of the next rest
)
Do not permit a worker to wear a semipermeable or impermeable
his/her oral temperature exceeds 100.6”F (38.1”C).
garment when
Body water loss. Measure weight on a scale accurate to kO.25 pound at the beginning
and end of each work day to see if enough fluids are being taken to prevent
dehydration.
Weights should be taken while the employee wears similar clothing or
preferably in underwear only. The body water loss should not exceed 1.5 percent total
body weight loss in a work day.
Initially, the frequency of physiological monitoring depends on the air temperature adjusted
for solar radiation and the level of physical work. The length of work cycle will be governed by
the frequency of the required physiological monitoring.
5.5
CARING
FOR HEAT-RELATED
To care for heat-related
ILLNESS
illness provide the following:
l
Remove victim from heat.
l
Loosen tight clothing.
l
Apply cool, wet cloths to the skin.
l
Fan the victim.
l
If victim is conscious, give cool water to drink.
l
Call for an ambulance or transport to hospital if heat stroke is suspected, victim
refuses water, vomits, or starts to lose consciousness.
Rev.: 3194
-
6.0 - COLD
STRESS
INTRODUCTION
6.1
The potential exists for either frostbite or hypothermia
to occur when conducting work
activities in an environment where air temperatures may fall below freezing or where windchill factors lower air temperatures below freezing. A brief description of the exposure
symptoms (for both hypothermia and frostbite) and methods of prevention are listed in the
sections below:
CAUSES
6.2
AND
SYMPTOMS
The following cold stress causes and symptoms are provided for buddy monitoring purposes.
Site personnel must realize that monitoring the physical condition of fellow personnel in
Levels D + through B protective ensembles will be more difficult.
6.2.1
Frostbite
Frostbite is a condition in which there is a freezing or partial freezing of some part of the body.
Individuals
previously exposed to frostbite are more susceptible to contracting
it again.
Vasoconstrictors, which include tobacco products, constrict blood vessels, and can accelerate
frostbite. The three stages of frostbite include: (1) frostnip- the beginnings of frostbite
whereby the skin begins to turn white; (2) superficial - similar to frostnip except the skin
begins to turn numb; and (3) deep - the affected area is frozen to the bone, cold, numb, and very
hard.
DO NOT:
l
l
l
a
6.2.2
Rub the frostbitten part.
Use ice, snow, gasoline, or anything cold on the frostbitten area.
Use heat lamps or hot water bottles to rewarm the frostbitten area.
Place the frostbitten area near a hot stove.
Hypothermia
Hypothermia is a condition in which the body loses heat faster than it is produced. At a body
temperature of 95”F, an average man is considered to be hypothermia.
Vasodilators, which
include alcohol and drugs, allow the body to lose heat faster which can accelerate
hypothermia. The five stages of hypothermia include:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
shivering
apathy, listlessness, or sleepiness
unconsciousness, glassy stare, slow pulse or slow respiratory
freezing of the extremities
death
rate
The need to seek medical attention and the urgency in seeking medical attention depends on
the symptoms and the severity of the symptoms displayed by the affected individual.
If the
Rev.: 3/94
~...
-- -
latent conditions of hypothermia or frostbite are noted or suspected, medical attention
sought IMMEDIATELY
to prevent permanent injury or death.
must be
PREVENTION
6.3
To prevent conditions from occurring have personnel:
l
Dress in a minimum of three layers:
(1) a skin layer to absorb moisture and keep skin dry
(2) an insulating layer
(3) an outer layer of nylon/wind-breaking
material or chemical-protective
layer
a
Avoid touching cold surfaces (especially metal) with bare skin, minimize exposed skin
surfaces.
a
Keep active, use warm and dry shelter areas during rest cycles.
l
Maintain
l
Use wind breaks whenever possible.
6.4
body fluids.
CARINGFORCOLD-RELATEDILLNESS
The following lists the general guidelines to care for cold-related injuries:
l
6.5
Start by treating any life-threatening
problems.
l
Call the local emergency number for help or transport
hospital.
the victim
to the nearest
l
Move the victim to a warm place, if possible.
l
Remove any wet clothing and dry the victim.
l
Warm the victim slowly by wrapping in blankets or putting on dry clothing.
a
Apply other sources of heat if they are available
MONITORING
In cold weather, monitor the outdoor temperature and wind speed to determine wind chill
conditions, with work periods adjusted accordingly. The following table (developed by the
U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental
Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts) details the
wind chill effects and relative danger of combined cold and wind conditions.
Rev.: 3194
COOLING
POWER OF WIND ON EXPOSED
FLESH EXPRESSED
(under calm conditions)
Actual
Estimated
Wind Speed
40
50
30
20
10
(in mph)
Temperature
0
Equivalent
AS AN EQUIVALENT
Reading
-10
Chill Temperature
TEMPERATURE
PF)
-20
-30
-40
-50
-60
PF)
calm
50
40
30
20
10
-30
-40
-50
-60
5
48
37
27
16
6
-36
-47
-57
-68
10
40
28
16
4
-9
-58
-83
-95
15
36
22
9
-5
-18
-72
-99
-112
20
32
18
4
-10
-25
-82
-96
-110
-121
25
30
16
0
-15
-29
-44
-59
-74
-88
-104
-118
-133
30
28
13
-2
-18
-33
-48
-63
-79
-94
-109
-125
-140
35
27
11
-4
-20
-35
-51
-67
-82
-98
-113
-129
-145
40
26
10
-6
-21
-37
-53
-69
-85
-100
-116
-132
-148
(Wind speeda greater
than 40 mph have
little additional
effect.)
W’XEASING
DANGER
Danger from freezing
of exposed flesh
within one minute.
LPITLE DANGER
Inchrwithdryskin
Maximum danger of
fahw eense of eecurity.
Trenchfoot
Developed by U.S. Army Research
Institute
of Environmental
Medicine,
and immersion
Natick,
Mk.
GREAT DANGER
Flesh may freeze within
30 eecond%9.
foot may occur at any point on this chart.
,--
Material
.-
Attachment
B
Safety Data Sheets
Material
Genium
Publishing
Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Corporation
One *iurn
I?laza
Schenectady, NY 32304~G90
Sheet No. 300
Acetone
USA
late. bisphenol-k tic
acid (ketene process), mesityl oxide. discetone alcohol, chloroform, iodoform, bromoform),
absorption
explosives. aea-oplsne dopes, rayon. photographic films, isoprene; acetylene gas storage cylindus; in purifying paraffin; in
nail pdisb remova; in the extra&on of various principles fmm animal and plant substances; in hardening and dehydrating
tissues; in cellulose acetate (especially as spinning solvent); as a solvmt for potassium iodide and permanganate; as a
delustexant
for &&lose aceta~ fiben; in them
rubber products.
’ tcdag of vized
Other DeslgnaUonsz CAS No. 67-64-L AI301238. Chevron acetone, dimethylformaldehyde
dimethylketal, dimethyl
ketone, fbketopropaw,
methyl ketone, propanone, 2-w
pymacetic acid, pyroacetic ether.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplia or distributor. consul latest Chunitxf WeekBuyers’ GGuidcF)for a suppliers list.
Cautions: Acetone vapor is a dangerous fire and cxplosioa hxzmd. High vapor umcentrations may produce narcosis (anconsciousness).
prolonged or repeated skin contact causes dryness. i&a&a.
and milddermatitis.
.%. .““..-,..:<<<.:
:.:.:.:+.
&.<.x.:.:.:<,-.
-..
.~~~t~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~?~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
i ...-../ ../..:.:.:....:.:.::.::.>:.>
_..../: .... ........ ,.......L......
-. ... ...y.. ../.......,....
.,.._._,...._
..__
. ...
... .. ...
Acetone, 99.5% plus 0.5% water
1991 OSHA PELS *
8-hrTWA:7SOppm(1800mg/m3)
15min STEL: loo0 ppm (2400 mg/m’)
1990 IDLH Level
2o.ooo ppm
1990 NIOSH REL
TWA: 2.50 ppm‘(590 mg/m’)
1992-93 ACGIH TLVs
TWA: 750 ppn (1780 m&m’)
STEL: loo0 plan (2380mg/m3)
1990 DFG (Getmany\MAK
1OOOppm (2400mghn >
Category Iy: Sabstmces eliciting very we&
effects (MAK >SOO mum’)
Peak: 2000 ppm. 60 min. momentary
value+.
3 peaks/shift
In the cellulose
aosate fiber industry.
enforcement
of the OSHA lWA for “doffers”
9/S/89 until 9/l/9& the OSHA STEL does twf apply to that induay.
t Momentary
value is a level which the mncatration
should never exceed.
$ See NOSH.
RTECS (AL3 K5OOCO),fa additional irritation, mtition. rrpuduaive.
l
was stayed
tfuesholds
recorded
a.~ II range
from
the lowest
10 the high&
../ .... ...
i
30.
PPE*
l sec.s
._.....,.,._
i ;.:...:.:.>x
198586 Toxklty Data *
Human, eye: 500 ppm
Human, inhalation. q:
500 ppm produced olfaction
effec&
mnjunctival
ixitation.
and other changes
involving the lungs. thorax or respiration.
R~L, oral, I.&z 5800 mg/kg altered sleep time and
proddtrunors.
Mammal, inhalation, TL:
31500 pdrn3/Z4 hr
administered to pregnant female from the 1st to 13th
day of gestation produced effects on fertility
@ost-implantation mortality).
and loxicity data.
Boiling Point: 133.2.-F (56.2 ‘C) at 760 mm Hg
Freezing Point: -139.6 ‘F (-95.35 ‘C)
Vapor Pressure: 180 mm Hg at 68 ‘F (20 lC), 400 mm Hg at 103.1 ‘F (395 ‘C)
Saturated Vapor Density (Air = 1.2 kdrn’, 0.075 IWft’): 1.48 kg/m’. X93 lb/ft3
Refmctlve Index: 1.3588 at 20 ‘C
Appearance and Odor: Colorless. highly volatile liquid; sweetish odor.
* Odor
on
.,._... _......_... . ... ..... .... ./ ..,...
YS
Molecular
WeIght:
Specific Gmtity:
58.08
0.7899 at 20 ‘C/4 ‘C
Water Solublllty: Soluble
Other Solubllltlesz Alcohol, benzene, dim&y1 formamide,
chloroform. erher, and most oils.
Odor Threshold: 47.5 mg/m3 (low), 1613.9 mg/m3 (high)*
caa.ntmGon.
Alcott-mist&t
foam. For lar e fz&. use water s ay. fog. or ala&i-resistant
foam. U& wa~iin flooding quantities as fog b&&e
soli &earns
may be ineffective. Unusual If ire or Exploslon IFawards: Acetone is a dangerous fue and explosion hazar& t is a Class Il3 flammable liquid.
Vapors may travel to a source of ignition and flash back. fire-exposed containers may explode, Md a vapor explosion hazard may exist indoors.
outdoors. or in sewers. Special Fire-f&hung
Procedures: Because fite may produce toxic tha-mal decompontion produa wear a self-c~ntaincd
protective clothing
breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece o crated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode. Structural f&fighters’
provides lirmted protection. If feasible, remove all PIre-exposed conraina-s. Otherwise, apply cooling water to sides of containers until well after fue
is extinguished. If the fire becomes uncontrollable or container is exposed to direct flame, consida evacuation of a one-third mile radius. Jn case of
rising sound fTom venting safety deviceor any discoloration of tank during fir% withdraw immediately. For massive cargo fires, use unmanned
hose holder or monitor nozzles. Do not release runoff from tire control methods to sewers or waterwavs.
Stabfllty/Polymerlzatlon:
Acetone is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous
polymerization cannot occur. Chemlca! Incompatlbllltles:
Acetone may form explosive mixtures with hydrogen paoxide, acetic acid. nitric acid,
nitric acid + sulfuric acid, chromic anhydride, chromyl chloride. nitrosyl chloride. hexachloromelamine. nitrosyl pachlorate. nitryl perchlorare,
permonosulfuric acid, thiodiglycol + hydrogen peroxide. Acetone reacts vigorously with oxidizing materials and ignites on contact with activated
carbon, chromium trioxide. dioxygen difluoride + carbon dioxide, and potassiumqerr-butoxide.
Other incompatibles include air. bromoform.
bromine, chloroform + alkalies, trichloromelamine,
and sulfur dichloride. Condltlons to Avold: Keep acetone away from plastic eyeglass frames,
jewelry, pens, pencils, and rayon garments. Hazardous Products of DFomposltlon:
Thermal oxidtive decomposition of actione con produce
CO, and carbon monoxide (CO).
1
.. .. . . :~ .::, .,i :.. :...
.:~,i: ,ISecri*‘~~tl~
~~tzi’ :;.‘i.; ‘: ::’ --‘:, ...
. . ..
Carclnogenklty:
The L4RC.(1u) NTP,(16w and OSHA(‘@) d o not list acetone as a carcinogen. Summary of Risks: Acetone
has bezn placed
among
solvents of comparatively low acute and chronic toxicities. In indusuy.
the most common
effects
reported
e.re headnche
fxom prolonged
vapor inhalation and skm irritation resulting from its dcfaning action. Exposures to less than 1000 ppm acetone vapor produces only slight eye,
?ose. and throat irritation. Acetonedoes not have sufficient warning
pcrties 10 prevent repcared exposures. It is narcotic at high concentrations.
I.e., above 2000 ppm. Concentrations above 12ooO ppm cause loss 0 p”conscIousnCSs.
coldmu on nul page
P-.i_L*,.w.~C...
. ... . . .~------._
~--.
.-, -7
No. 300
Acetone
9/92
Medical Condltlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Norm mooUed. Target Organs: Respiratory and central nervous systems. skin.
Primary Entry Routes?brhalanon,-skin
s&l eye co&~
ingestion. l&id
acetone is sl&wly absorbed thiough the skin. Acute i%cts~ Human
systemic effects by inhalation include eye, nose and throat irritation; nausea and vomiting; changes in Effi (electroencephalogram) and carbohydrate metabolism; muscle weakness; drunken b&vim,
mental contusion and visual disturbance. In extreme cases. breathing high concentrations
may produce coma. Human systemic effects by ingestion inch& gastrointestinal irritation, kidney dama e (often indicati by albumin and red and
white blood cells in the urine), liver damage (iied
by high levels of urobilin and early appearance o Bbilirubin). coma, metabolic changes, and
systemic effects described for inhalation Direct eye contact by liquid acetone may produce painful burning and stinging; watering of eyes;
eonjuctival inflammation; and comeal injury. Skin aurtsct pmduces acold feeling, dryness, and mild irritation.
Chronic Effects: Cases of chronic poisoning resulting from prolonged exposure to low conantrdons
of acetone are rare. Workas exposed to
1000 ppm 3 hrs per day for 7-15 yrr complained of diainers, asthenir (la or loss of strength), and chronic inflammation of the airways.
stomach, and duodenum. prolonged or mpeatal skin conwith liquid acetone may &fat the skin and cause eczematoid dermatitis.
FIRST AID
Eyes: Do not allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediate1 and continuously with flooding amounts of
water until transported to an emergency medical facrlity. Consult a physician immediately. Skin: Hetuck/y remove contaminated clothing. Rinse
with flooding amounts of wates for at least 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap and water. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a physician.
Carefully dispose of contaminated clothing because it may pose a fire hazard. Inbalatloo: Remove exposed person to fresh air. monitor for
respiratory distress, and administer 100% humidi&d s plemental oxygen as needed Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious
or convulsing person. Contact a poison control center. 8 nless the poison control center advises otherwise, have that conscious and cllerl person
drink 1 to 2 glasses of water. then induce vomiting. After flnt ski, get appropriate in-plant, pornmedIc, or community medical sn port.
Note to Physlcians: In symptomatic patients. monitor serum and urine acetone. fluid intake, blood glucose, and arterial pH. Because o Pthe
prolonged elimination half-life of acetone, the symptomatic patient may need medical supervision for many hours (up to 30 hrs). Patients may
develop hyperglycemia and ketosis mimicking acute diabetic coma. The hyperglycemia may persist for several days following acute exposure.
Secti 69 .~~~~~$iii~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.j‘!:! I-i~~~~~~~:~~;-~~~~~~~~~
,, ..:.. ..:..)x;:.;....::.:..;..1... .. ._....,..- ....
,. ... ,(.. ..:
..,
::../.. ..
.. : ::....,.~ .:,, : ...I ... ,. .. .. ..:., ~
..,
,~
Splll/Leok: Notify safety personnel, evacuate all unnecessary personm& remove all heat and ignition sources, and provide adequate ventilation.
Cleanup personnel should protect against inhalation and skin or eye contact- If feasible and without risk, stop leak Use water spray to reduce vapor,
but it may not prevent ignition in closed spaw. For small spills, take up with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material and using nonsparking tools, place into containers for later disposal. For large spills, dike far ahead of liquid spill for later disposal. Do not release to sewers or
waterways. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). EnvIronmental
Toxklty: LC, S&to guirdneri (rainbow trout): 5540 mg/U
96 hr at 54 ‘F (12 l C). L& (oral) Rig-necked pheasantl>40.000 ppm. Environmental
Degradation: Acetone biodegrades when released into the
environment. The biologrcal oxygen demand for 5 days (BOOS) is 4655%. Sol1 AbsorptioalMobility:
Acetone volatilizes, leaches, and biodegrades if released on soil. Disposal: Acetone is a good candidate for fluid&d bed. rotary kiln incineration, or catalytic oxidation. Contact your
supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow appliik
Federal. state, and local regulations.
EPA Deslgnatlons
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (4OCFR 26133): Hazardous Waste No. UOM (Ignitability). (40 CFR 26131): FoO3 (spent solvent)
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 3024): Fiial Reportable Quantity (RQ). 5000 lb (2270 kg) [* per Clean Water Ac& Sec.
I 3ll(b)(4)1
I
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
I
1 OSHA Desienatlons
I
I
._
:
-.Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety- -go&es.
per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because
-contact lens use-in industry ‘B &ntrovenial. establish your own &icy. Resplr&or: Seek sofessional advice prior to respirator selection and use.
Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and. if necessary. wear a MSHA/NIOSH-approved
respirator. Select respirator based on its
suitability to provide adequate worker protection for given working conditions, level of airborne contamination. and presence of sufficient oxygen.
For concentrations c loo0 ppm. wear any chemical cartridge respirator with organic vapor carrridge(s) and wear eye protection to avoid irritation
or damage. For concentrations ~6250 ppm: wear any supplied-air respirator operated in a continuous-flow mode. For concentrations < 12,500 ppm.
wear any air-purifying, full-facepiece respuator (gas mask) with a chin-style, front- or back-mounted organic vapor canister. For concentrations c
20,000 ppm. wear any supplied-air respirator that has a full facepiece and is operated in a pressure-demand or other positive-pressure mode. For
emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks). wear an SCEA. Warning! [email protected]
respirutors & twt
protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmuspheres. If respirators are used. OSHA requires a written respiratory protection program that includes at
least: medical certitication. training. fit-testing. periodic environmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection. cleaning, and convenient sanitary
storage areas. Other: Wear chemically protective gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact. Polyethylene/
ethylene vinyl alcohol, Teflon, or butyl rubber with breakthrough times > 8 hr is recommended for PPE . Ventilation:
Provide general and local
exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below OSHA PELr (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it
prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controIIing it at its source. 003) Safety StatIons: Make available in the work area emergency
eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showas. and washing facilities. Contaminated
Equlpmenl:
Separate contaminated work clothes from street
clothes. Launder before reuse. Remove this mat&l
from your shoes and clean personal protective equipment. Comments: Never eat. drink or
smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material. especially before eating, driig,
smoking, using the toilet. or
auolvine cosmetics.
e Requirements:
Store in closed containers in a cool, dry well-ventilated area away from heat, sparks, flames, and other incompatibles.
Keep large stocks away from inhabited buildings. Use non-sparking tools to open conta.iners. Keep dry chemical or COr extinguishers on hand in
case of fue. Engineering Controls: To reduce potential health hazards. use sufficient dilution or local exhaust ventilatron to control airborne
contaminants and to maintain concentrations at the lowest practical level. To prevent static sparks. electrically ground and bond all containers and
Controls: Consider
I quipment during fluid transfer. For bulk storage rooms, install electrical equipment Class L Grouu D. Admlnlstratlve
preplacement and periodic medical examinatio& with emphasis on the skin&d respiratory tract. Also consider liver and kidney function tests and
urinalysis.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shfppln Name: Acetone
Packaglng Authorizations
Quantity Llmltatlons
Vessel Storage Requirements
DOT Hazard E lass: 3
a) Exceptlons: 173.150
a) Passenger, AIrcraft, or Rallcar: 5L
Vessel Stowage: B
ID No.: UN1090
b) Non-bulk Packaglng: 173.202 b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 60L
Other: DOT Packaging Group: II
c) Bulk Packaglng: 173.242
DOT Label: Flammable Li uid
Snrclal
ProvLslons
-r----- -~----.-.-----I- 1172.10 9 11TR
-MSDS cdtclion
References: 26,73~l~,lOl,t~~
124,126, t27,t32,133. 136,139, t40,148,149~ t53.t59,t63,1&4,t67.t6g.~7l.t74,
176.180 .
Prcoarcd by: MJ Wurrh. BS: Industrlrl Hv&ne Review: PA Rev. MPII. CIH: Medical Reska: AC Dadinatcn. MPH. MD
(
Maierial
Genium
Publishing
1145 calalyn StlWt
SchuKttady.
NY 12303-1836
I--
Safety Dafa Sheets Collection:
Corporation
Sheet No. 316
Benzene
USA
(518)377-8854
f
Issued: 11/78
Revision: E. 8190
enzcnebasbeenbannedas.nn
O&v Deslg&ionsz
CAS Na 007143-2, lxnzol.
-e,
phene. phcnyl hydride. pyd=nmL
Manuhcturer:
contyt your supplier or distriitor.
Cautions:
Baucnc
is a cd-d
with
humn
c&on
Consult Ihe lstcst C&mic&ve&Buyaf
UU&[email protected] by the IARc Chmnic kw-kvd
Guidcc”, for a suppliers
F
liir
O$XXWC mq cause cancer (kukunb)
;
hoto
and bone
tscea
l!W-S6 ToxIcSty Dnta#
Mub oral. IDb: 50 mglkg; no toxic effe noted
MllhiIlhal&~
-150 ppm inhakd intermittently ova
lyrinanumbuo Tcr ‘discRlt,scpuratedoscsaffccts~c
blood (00~
chirnges) and nutritional snd gross metabs
1989-90 ACCM
_
TLV-'IWk1Oppn,32m&n'
(29 CFR 1910.1C00, Tabk Z2)
B-hrlwA:
10 ppm
AuxptabkCeiling
concaulcim25ppm
Accept&k
Maximum PC& 50 ppn (10 min)t
100*&n
mineral naphtha, nitration
firme. It is Ito 1 dnnguous fxc hazard when exposed to heat or flame.
1989 OSHA PELs
(29 CFR X910.1W. Tabk Zl-A)
8-hr TWA: 1 PpR 3 rnfjrn’
15-min SlElz 5 ppm. 15 mdm’
Vapor&ssun:
oil, &al naphlhq cycbh&txi~
[email protected]+=-)
l9ssMOSH
REXA
lWhz 0.1 ppm 03 m&a’
Ceiling. I ppm 3 m$n’
H- St 79 l F (26.1‘C!)
~~nfncc
*
-
2 mg rbnmutcrcd
[email protected]& S&bill*
z?$li&
.(tiisO
SbVolatlle by &me:
%I
Vapor Den.& (Air = 1): 29
Evaporath K ate (Ether = 1): 28
ova 24 hr pduces
severe
g/100 g of H,O af 25 ‘C)
Yko5lty:OA468n1Paat2O'C
Appearance and Odoc A colorkss liiuid with a charactuistic sweet, aromatic odor. Theo&r
matcly 5 ppm (unfatigucd) in air. Odor is fvX an adcqulle warning of hazard.
ruqnition
threshold (100% of panel) is awox&
ince fiic may porhre toxic fumes. wear a xlfcontained
brealhing
qu’
or positive-pressme mode snd full otivc
out of low ueas. Be aware of runoff from Fue control mrarSmroad
06. Do not f&ase to
polymaimion
clnno1
IS t
olxllr.
Cbemkal
Ia.compatlbllltksz
B.enmx cxplodcs,on ~tact wit?~dieane, pumangank scid, bromine pcnkfluoride, peroxodisuWuric acid, and
mdinc hepta.flwridc, and sodium peroxide
~~~u~suUuric
rid. IL &NCS on UY~LX w~lh dtox ~~I.$~~wJcM% di?xygcnyl rtuafluombcntc,
omnq
liquid oxyga.
silver pcrchlcatc,
nitryl ~gcglllll~,
ninic
azenc fomu scnn~vc.cxplosnc rmxtum WI*Ii rtic mnde,
acid lnhlrsalic
pmtailuoride
+ p&&urn
m&oxide
(~pbd~
abOW 30 ‘c). A vipous
or incarxksccn~
reaction occurs w
trifluorick. ura&m hcxdhoride, and hydrogen + Rrncy mckel (above 4 10 ‘F (210 c)]. &nxenc is incomoatible wkb oridiSn~ mawrial~.
Conditions
to Avoid:
Hazardous Products
monoxide.
cog*thoI99occniuoP9w~~
Avoid heat and ignition
sosou~cc~.
of Dccompodtioo:
Thcrrnll oxidativc dacompsiticm
of benzene
..-_.--
can produce
--
toxic gazs and vapors such a,scarbon
No. 3 16
Bcnzme
drying resh (dermatitis).
C$mnr~~eck
Long-m
8/‘&l
cluonic upmure
may result h my
FIRsrAm
EWS: Gaulv lift the tvdids
and fllrrh immodiatelv ud
f&lity. CorLdt a phy&an immediately.
* *
Skin: Otiti
remove IXXUMI~~U& clotb&.LnmeduLefyti
mplirruourly
blood dixm&rs ranging from splsstic anemia (an inability
to form blood cells)
with floodinn amounts of wata until transported to an anagency
with flooding amounts of water for ltlrsst
15 min. For reddad
medical
or bMacd
pcrs0rme.l. edin&&
all fieat and ignition &-ccs, and pvick adequate vaviiation Cleanup puso~~l should protat against vapor inhalation, eye
conliict, zux3 skin dxcapion
Absorb as mu& baucnc as pxsiie with m inut, noncombustible mate&l. For large spills, dike far ahcad of spill
and contain liquid. Use nonsparking tools to place waste &uid or absorbent inlo &sable cohnas
for disposaL Keep wa5t.c out of confmed
spaces such as scwcrs, water&&
and waterways because of explosion danger. FoUow rpplicabk OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Dlsporalr Contact your supplier or a lkuucd ausfad&led
rccommQ1cbtions. Follow appliile
Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Dcskuatlons
tit4
u ZRCRA Hwstr: (40 CFR 26133~ Hlzardou~ W-NO.
uoi9
Listed as a CERCL.A HaLard3us Sukstancc* (40 CFR 3024). Rcporrable Quantity (RQ: 1000 lb (454 kg) [* px Clean Wata Act. Sec. 307 (a).
311 (b)(4), 112; zuxi~c.rRClU.seC.3001)
SARA Extrunely Hazardous Substarrce (40 CFR355): Not Jisial
Listed assARAToxicchemkalf4ocFR372m
OSHA Dcslmaths
Listed as an-& Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000. Tables Z-1-A and 552)
Goggles: Wear prortctive eyeglasses or cbcmkal safety go&
per OSHA cy+ and fac+protoct.ion regulation5 (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respitatoc
Seek aofessional advice &or to xcmimtor sckuiou and use. Follow GSHA rcsoirator reauktions (29 CFR 1910.134) and. if neccs(dexning
ipink reactor VW.+, or storage lanksj.
W&X an
SarY; wear a NIOSZI-approved rcspirak
Fcf a&atcy
rx IJUXOU~TIC 0p.40~~
SCBk %rrring! /tif-jXLlif$llg
re.r#a&rs do nOr ~fofaY workerr in OxJscn-dcjrcienl
[email protected]?~.
Otber: Wear impavious gloves, boots, aprons. and gaur&k to prevent skin conta~
Ventilation:
l+ovidc gene& & local cxpIo&m-proof vcntihtion systems to m2tid.n lirtxxnc conccntratknr
at least below the OSHA PEL5
(SC. 2). Local exhaust ventilation ir pi-era-red since it pcwuts comamhmt dispe&on into the work axea by controlling it at its source~OJ’
Safety Stations: Make avaikbk in the work srca axagency eyewash strtions, s&ty/quick4rench
showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated
Equipment: Never wear contaci 1~
in tbc work arex soft lcnscs may absorb, and all lcnscs concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from your shoes and quiprncnt Launda comam&&
clothing before wearing.
Com~entsz Never eat, drip& cx smoke in work arw. Prauice good -al
hygiax afta using this material,
before eating. drinking.
?oragt Rcqulrementsz Store in [email protected] closed containas in acool. dry, well-ventilated area awry from alI heat and ignition sources and
mco?patiik
materials. Cowi& B,TUOZC vqwr myfm apbsivemimua in air.To prevent static sparks, &ctrically ground and bond all
COIWUWS and quipmcnt us& in shipping. receiving, or transferring operations in p0ducti011and starage IIIUU. What opening OTCIOS~I~
bcnzenc corurdncrs. use norqxking
tcols. Keep fxe [email protected]&n
ruulily avsilabk
EngIneerfag Controls: B~CZUUCOS& spbfiidly
qula~
benzene (29 CFR 1910.1028), C&WC workcn &out its potential harardr snd
d=vp.
Mhhize
all possiMt exposure5 IO carcino guts. Ifpossible. substitule ks toxic solvents for baucnquse thi5 mtiaial with extreme
camon and only if absolutely CSXI&I. Avoid vapor inhslsnon snd skin snd eye contact Use only with sdequeti ventilation and appqx-ia
sonal protdve. gear. Imtimt.e a respiratory ptionpogrm
that incl&
rcgulax training, maintenance, inspection. and evaluation.
T!% gnate regulated llf~ of ti
~J.VC
(see legend in the box below) and label bmxne containers with “DANGER, CONTAINS BENZENE
CANCER HAZARD.”
Other Precautions~ &JV& prtplaccm~t
and p&di~ m&cal c.xsmin&ns with anphrris on II history of blood diswu or previo~ exposure.
Trmtloa
Data (49 CXiR Kr.2,.lOl, .lU2)
DANGER
lM0 Sblpdnn Nnw: Baucnc
I
I
I,,
111
I
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium
Publishing
Corporation
1145 catalyn street
Schenetady,
NY 12303-1836
(518) 377-8854
Sheet No. 68
USA
Calcium Hypochlorite
Issued: 7180
~-, -_._ =---- c--___- __-__-__ __ --.,
Calcium Hypochlorite DescriptSon: Calcium hypo~.~~.
and caustic soda and is dried under vacuum to produce cakiumbypochkuite.
Used as a disinfeuant (for
swimming pots), bleaching agent (paper towels), fimgii
et,
oxidiriq
agent, bac&icii,
and
algicide; in sugar refining and potable water pnrificatian.
Other Deslgnatlons: Calcium oxychloridc (iiropcrfy
called); losantin; hypochlorous acid; calcium salt;
L-H-Ha (high-test hypochlorite); lime chloride; Ca(OCl),; CAS Noo. 7778-54-3.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier of dishiiutor. Consult the latest ChemicuhvezkBu~~$
Guide (Ccnium
ref. 73) for a suppliers list.
OSHA PEL
None established
ACCIH TLV, l988-89
Noue established
NIOSHREL,
l987
None established
Revision:
ii!
A, 1l/89
[email protected]@
“1
Y;
&Gz
ii
20
PPG’
Toxklty Data
Rat. oral. ID+ 850 mg&g
* Chncenbation is usually stated in terms of weight & of available ehloriae (ceeASX4f D2022). ‘Es mataiaf contains 39% cr kss available chfaine. cllcium
!rypochlorite mixture, dry, contaias ma-e thaa 39% rvsikble chlorine. HlX*contaias about 70% available chlorine Solid materials with kss than 39% rvaikbk
tiorinc iodude chloride of lime and bleaching poadcr, wbii coukia amch ehlaida ioa, water, aad possiiy other irupuritiea. for example. Ca(OC3Cb2~0.
?be
prrseoceofmagnesiumh~innuterLldhighavlilrkkchlainekvelmrytaduccitsrubility.
._ ~ ..,.._......_/ .. .... __;i
.~._....
iy.. ......z~~,~~;..
.~~’ ~___,.___.._.
._. .~.6i.;...
.;.;.i ..i. .._...._
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~.~.’:.
_.... .. ..... .% .. ......-.-. . ...1..n ,.....A..........
E.A.,.
A...A....
*......>
.....).. ...... ....~........:.:.~..~.:...:.:.:..:~..
~.::>~~..:-.
..
Boiltng Point: None reported
Specific Gravity ($0 = 1 at 39 7F (4 ‘c)): 2.35
Melting Point: Decomposes at 212 ‘F (100 ‘C)
Water Solubllity: Soluble
Molecular Welgbt: 14298 glmol
Appearance
and Odor: White nonhygroscopic
(doesn’t absorb moisture from the ah) granulea or tablets with a strong chlorine odor.
safe position. Never (LSCa dry chemic& or CO,.
Unusual Flue or Explosion Hazank
When heated in a fm situation, containers can x~pture viokntly! Contaminating or mixing calcium
hypochlorite with foreign materials (combustibles, grease, chemicals, fuels) can cause fires of great intensity. Its solid form is moderately
explosive when heated.
Special Fire-fihtlng
Procedures: Wear a self-contained [email protected] appantus (SCBA) with a full facepibce operand in the pressuredemand or
positive-pressure mode. Full protective clothing is also necessary. Fiiht massive fires using unmanned hose holders. If this is impossible, let fm
bum and withdraw from hazardous areas.
contamination. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibllltles:
Calcium hypochlorite is a pow&l
oxidizing agent that readily ignites combustibles. Violent mactions or explosions can occur, for example, with amines. carbon tetrachloride and heat, carbon or charcoal and heaf, ethyl alcohol, metal oxides, merq~tons,
sulfur, turpentine, strong reducing agents, organic matter, combustible materials, nitromethane, ammonium chloride, N,Ndichloromsthylamine
and heat, acetic acid and potassium cyanide, ethanol, isobutanethiol, methanol, I-pro-paoethiol, and rust Reacts wilh watex or steam to ptoducc
taxic and corrosive fumes or HCI and C1-(Sec. 6). Potentially explosive with sodium carbonate, starch. and sodium hydrogen sulfate. Reaction
with nilsogenous bases or acetylene forms explosive products. Ignites on contact with glycerine algacide and hydroxy compounds (e.g., glycerol,
diethylene glycol monomethyl ether, and phenol), and organic sulfur compounds. Material containing over 60% available chloride ignhes on
contact with lubricating oil (additioo of about 20% or mot-c walcrprtvcnll
this). On contact with acids it forms hypochlomus acid and lit~eratcs
Cl, gas. It forms the highly explosive NCl, with urea.
Hazardous
Products of Decomposltton:
Rapid exothcrmic (heat-producing) decomposition above 347 ‘F(l75 ‘C) rrlcases oxygen and chlorine
When heated to decomposition, calcium hypochlorite emits highly toxic hydrochloric acid (HCl) fumes and explodes. _
~~19890cId.UlPubl~‘Corpon&
No. 68
Calcium
HypocNorite
11189
Sedtibri 6.. Health’. Hazar& Data.
I
..>:::.
.:. :,.:.I’........:,..j :‘:...,:y>.i
:,.. ,j:-’:.;::.;.;;.
..:-:..~..~.~~:-:..~~l~:.:.~:
.Ij-.:-1.::
.1.j:..:..i
:..i.:~:~:~::::::~~:.~:~~~:~~~:~~~?~.::~.;~~~~
.’........._.I.:.:.~“:.:...:.:...:.~...~.~.:.:.:...:..~:
:i~~.:.:.:...~:...:...~.~.*
.:.......,......
,...
:.+:+
.:I-i::‘.I
...y..y&.
:
(.
Carclnogenlclty:
Neither the NTP, IARC, nor OSHA lists calcium hmhlorite
as a carcinogco.
Summary of Risks: This strong oxidizing agent m if&ate and damage all the. tissue it contacts. with the degree of injury depepdi
on the dose.
available chlorine level, and exposure time. The chlorine this compound generates is the prig
toxic agent. Both the powder and solutions
produce chlorine levels corrosive to body tissues. !&[email protected] its vapor is utremely irritating and toxic. Possible injuries include: conjunctivitis,
blepharitis (inflammation of the margins of the. eye!&), ccnocal ukaations, gingivitis, contact dermatitis, sod tooth damage. Mdkd
COMUtlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Repcated contact can severely damage tissue. Target Orgaa~: skin. eyes. respiratory ay~tem,
stomach. Primary Entry: Inhalation, ingestion. Aente EIfeets Skin contact can produce irritation and vesicular eruptions. Dust inh&tioo
irritates tix respiratory tract and may cause pulmoagy edema. !ngatia
irritates the mouth, throat, and stomach, and gastric
acid L’bcratc
hypochlorous acid. Fatalities can result from sevenz.complications of bcal injury, shock, toxemia, hemon;lgc. wall !X!rfntatiot& and [email protected]
Chronic Effects: Eczematoid dermatitis may rcsnlt horn -ted
skin eontac~ Eye contact can cause severe eye damage.
FIRsTAm
.
Eyes: Flush immediately, including under the eye!&, geat!y but thoroughly with flooding amounts of Naming water for at least 15 min.
Skin: After rinsing affected area with flooding amwntz of water, wash it with soap and water. Inhalation:
Remove Urposcd pasoll tn fresh air
and support breathing as needed. Ingestion: Never give anyt!&g by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing penon. !f isgestcd, prOmpt!y riast
mouth of conscious person with water before giving large llmounts of milk or water to drink, followed by mil!t of magnesia.
Aftei first aid, get appropriate In-plant, paramedlq or eommllnfty medical attention and support.
..i_....*~,~:~.~.~~~:~~~~:~:.:..~;~~~~~~:::~~~~~~~~:~?~~~~~~
‘~~~~~~~~~~~~~i.tr:P~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
..... .. . .._...._>>\.d.._._._._.
>._.._,...
\.__,.
i~~~-..I..?~:.1.~~.,. c.. * i.7...?% J..XT >
..:...:....:;.>
...c.....
:.:......-...-F. ... ....7.....I..../-.... ...a../............?
Sp!l!/Leak: Notify safety personnel of&s.
Remove combustibles and ignition sources. Thbse involwzd iti cleanup need pro~iiotl
a&&
contact with the solid and dust inhalation. Prevent dust gencmtinn and prevent direct discharge into sewers or watenvays siacc this ma&ia!, in
low concen&&ions, is toxic to aquatic !ife. Recover uncontaminated so!id mat&a! in clean, dry containers. Cover other spilled materia! with Weak
reducing agents (3M H$O, with bisulfites or fermus salts). slurry it with waler, and then flush it with water to a suitable holding ti
Wph spi!!
site. well with soap &lution containing a weak reducing age&
Disposal: Use reducing agents to destroy available chlorine. Adjust this reduced liquid’s pH to neutral and deeant. Discharge neutral liquid,
diluting with much water. Dispose of neutral sludge (if any) in a !andfiU Contact your supp!ier or a licensed contractor for detai!ed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
OSHA Designations
Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Subpart Z): Not listed
EPA Designations
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
Listi as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance? (40 CFR 302.4);Rcportable Quantity (RQ): 10 lb (4.54 kg) [* per Clean Water AC+ See. 311(b)(4)]
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not Listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not !isted
m::
-.: ... ....\.:.x.:.:(.:x
..,.,. ..I .:..:.:.:.:-:
.. ..:.. ...~
~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,
:.. : ._.,,._,.,_:
.. . .,.,.
;.. .A...:.. ,...,.......,........i.............................../............_,....i.......
Zl.?..<ii’lr..X~.:,._...__
?A.A..r cc.%..?.,
. ...... ....i\.LY>.?>
..________._
l_.>..l.... %.._............,. ..
...... ...?_._ ,_._ ......
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-proteztion regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Follow
OS&4
respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134). For emergency or
Respirator: Wear a NIOSH-approved
respirator if-.
nomoutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vesse!s, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Use a dust respirator as required for dusty conditions.
Warning: Air-purifying respirators do nor protect workers in oxygendeficient atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervious neoprene gloves, boots. aprons. and gauntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact.
Venfflation: Provide general and local explosion-proof vcati!ation systems to maintain airborne concentrations that prOmOte Worker safety and
productivity. Local exhaust ventilation is prefarad since it prevents eon-ant
dispersion into the work arca by eliminating it at its spurge
(Cenium ref. 103).
Safety Stations: Make available in the wok area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Conta&ated
Equipment:
Never wear contact lenses in the work areaz soft lenses may absorb, and a!! lenses concentrate, irritants. Launder
.
contaminated clothing before wearing. Remove this materia! &em your shoes and equipment.
Comments: Never eat, dri& or smoke in work areas. practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet or applying cos&etics.
.~~~~~~~~~~~
c
Storage Requirements.
Store away from combustible and incompatible materials (See. 5) in closed containers in a coo!, dry. well-vcoti!ated
low fire-risk area. Since traces of water may ignite or detonate this material prevent contamination and protect containers from physical
damage. Do not drop, roll, or skid containers.
Englneer!ng Controls: Calcium hypo&lo&,
a pow&
oxidiig
agcnc is a dangerous fut hazard when it contacts organic materials. Mix it
only with water. These water solutions are unstable, but undergo a slow decomposition. Proper storage and shipping are. essential; separate this
material from ammonium compounds and heat souyces.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
DOT Shlpplng Name: Calcium hy-pochlorite mixture, dry
IMO Shlpplng Name: Calcium hypochlorite mixtures, dry,
(containing more than 39% available chlorine)
with more than 39’36, available chlorine (8.8% available oxygen)
DOT Hazard Class: Oxidizer
IMO H-t-d
Classz 5.1
ID No.: UN1748
IMO Label: Oxidizer
DOT Label: Oxidizer
IMDC Packaging Group: 2
DOT Packaging Requirements:
49 CFR 173.217
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 49 CFR X73.153
Genium
Publishing
Material
Corporation
1145 catalyn street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836
(518) 377-8854
Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 410
Carbon Tetrachloride
USA
] Issued: 12/80
Revision:
B, 4/90
;;,:$j. ::,‘l~$;,:;y:~
$~:j$,:,;$: j ;;I:~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
:.... ; :
Carbon Tetrachlorlde
Descrlptiooz A chlorinated hydmeabon daived from interacting carbon disulfide and chlorine in R 1
NFPA
1 4
at 482 ‘FQSO ‘C to 152 ‘F/400 ‘C. Carbon tetrathe presence of iron, or chlorination of me&me es higher w
0
chloride is m
with caustic alkali solution to remove sulfur chloride. Its primary USCis in manufacturing flurocarbon
;;*
3
0
pmpelIants. It is also used in producing of semicooducto~~, chlorinating organic compounds, metal degreasing, refriger*skill
@
ants; as a solvent for oils, fats, resins, rubber waxes, lacquas, and varnishes, and as an agricultural fumigant. This material
absorption
was widely used in the dxy-elcaning industry.
S&t
j~~~~~~.~at~~~~j:~d~Dti
fi~~t~~~~~~~:~:~~~~~~~~‘,:‘:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:iln:~.
ET
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 0056-23-5; Ccl,; carbon chloride; carbon tet; methane tetrachloride; perchlorometbacc;
tetrachlorocarbon; tetmchloromethane.
Manufacturers
Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest C/ranic~we&Buyer.r’GuideC”)
for a suppliers list
OSHA PEL
g-hr TWA: 2 ppm, 12.6 mglm’
ACCIH TLV (Skin), 2989-90
TLV-TWA: 5 ppm. 3 1 mg/m*
NIOSH REL, I987
60-min ceiling: 2 ppm. 12.6 mg/d
i
Toxicity Data*
Rat, oral, LDs+ 2800 mg&g; toxic effects not yet reviewed
Rat, inhalation, L.C,: 8000 ppm over 4 hr; no toxic effect noted
Human, inhalation, TG 20 ppm inhaled produces gastrointestinaf
effects (nausea or vomiting)
Speclflc Gravity (H,O = 1 at 39 ‘F/4 ‘C): 15940 at 68 ‘FRO ‘C
Water Solubillty: Very slightly soluble (800 mgA at 68 ‘FRO ‘c)
Evaporation Rate (Duty1 Acetate = 1): 12.8
Vapor Pressure: 91.3 mm Hg at 68 ‘FQO ‘C
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 5.32
Appearance and Odor. A colorless liquid with a heavy ethereal odor. The high and low odor thresholds are, respectively. 128.4 and 60 rug/m’.
Odor is not an adequate warning sign to prevent overexposure.
s ~i~~~~~‘~~~Fj~~~~~~sa~~i~~~~~,~
‘;::.::$y
;$. ..
... ~f:.jjjI~~:~
/ ,/>:,.\.::...
f:i$$k$<2; ‘. .I..I:ii :.;!.. .:j?: ::Fzc
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:
Flash Point: None reported
1 Autolgnltlon
Temperature:
None reported
1 LEL: None reported
1 UEL: None mportcd
Extlagulshlng
Media: Carbon tetrachlotide is nonflammabIe and will not support combustion. Use extinguishing media appropriate to the
sunoundiig fire. This material was previously used as an extinguishing medium in portable fue extinguishers, but its toxicity and fii decomposition products lead to its replacement with “safeS extinguishing media.
Unusual Fire or- Explo~lon Hazards: Carbon tetrachloside can react violently with hot or burning metals such as aluminum and magnesium
Special Fire-flghtlng
Procedures: Since fuc may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
operated in the pxessure-demand or positive-pressure mode and fully encapsulating suit Use water spray to cool fne-exposed containers. Be
aware of runoff from fire control methods. Do not release to sewm or waterways.
S~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.
,; :.~~~~~~:;
. . .,_
,...../ ..: :: :: :.:O-~:.x-:i.. .. .. .:........ .. .. .. .. :.:./..:.;,.,.,.,:.
:.:.~:;.:.~J..:.:.-.:.:.~ : . . :. ,.;:.. .~.: ::
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..,
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:,;, ,A;; ; ..:
:'
.. '. I.
..
StabUitylPolyxrrerlzatton:
Carbon tetrachloride is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage
and handling
con&ions.
Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatfbilities:
Carbon tetrachloride reacts violently with fluorine gas, alkali metals, and aluminum (see reference 126 for specific
incompatibilities).
Conditions to Avold: This material has caused explosions when used as a fii extinguisher on wax fm and uranium fires. It may also form toxic
phosgene when used to put out electrical fires.
Hazardous Productsof Decomposltlon:
Thermal oxidative decomposition of carbon,tetrachloride can produce toxic phosgene and hydrogen
chloride.
. _..
-.
No. 4 10
suspe~td
Carbon Tetrachlorick
huti
carcinogen,
4/!?0
-
respectively.
Summary of Risks: Carbon tetrachloride is highly toxic and irri.Fyi& by inhalation, ingestion (mean lethal dose is 5 to 10 ml), arxl skin absorp
czssive exposure ma result iu central neaV0u.s
tion. Alcohol’s synergistic effects markedly incmse ccl ‘S toxlclty.
s$tem depmssroq, eardmc
arrhythmias, and gastrointestinal symptoms In humans the majority of fatalities have been x e result of renal injury WI secondary ear&e
failure. Kidney and liver damage can occur from severe acute or dumie exposure. Human liver damage .oc~urS rr~~re often after ingestion of the
liouid than after Ihe inhalation of the vanor.
humans have died
_1 Howeva. after a 30 min to 1 hr CXDOSUR to concentrations of 1000 to 2000 PPUL
frbm acute renal damage.
Medical Condltlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Pmlonged recovay and permanent disability of the liver, kidney. and lungs are
E es: Flush immediately, including under the eyelids, gently but thcuwgbly with flooding amounts of nmnin water for at least 15 min.
S&IX Quit
remove contamif~ated clothin . After rinsing affected skin mth flooding amounts of water, w Jl. it with soap and water.
Inhalation: s emove exposed person to frest alrandsupYa
’
Toceded
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconserous or eonvu ’ g person. Give one to two glasses of water to dilute and induee vomiting,
unless the person shows evidence of deereasing mental frmctioning and awareness.
After first aid, get appropriate In-plant, paramedie, or eommanity medical support
Physlclan’s Note: To mimmize hepatoraral damage, eonsida intravenous zetykysteine. H~aricoxygcoiralso~~forrignifi~texposures. Dialysis has also been su ested in severe eases Give eardiiiratory
support as in cated and carefully momtor fled and electrolytes.
Closely monitor hepatic and ren-3 functions. Avoid epineplnine beeanse of myoeardial sensifizatioa and potenhal for inducing ~edrk~lar
arhythymias.
*
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[email protected][email protected]
[email protected]@&l~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-~.~~.~~~~~~~~~:
: .I.
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t / . ....:.. ..... .
..........-.-... ......./..:......... ...../-... -,. . .. : . :./....:/........:..../ :......: ?..
... .. .......-... . .. ...
SpRYLeak: Notify safety personnel, evacuate
lion and skin and eye contact. Small spills can
For 1 e ills, dike far ahead to contain spill
tiomz9 &R 1910.120).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Fellow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Deslgnatlons
OSHA Designations
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 191O.lCQ0, Tabk 22)
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance 40 CFR 35 * Not listed
L.~~~aS*R*ToxY,,,,C~3~~
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Su stance+ (40 C 302.4). Reportabk Quantity (RQ): 5000 lb (2270 kg) [* per RCRA, See. 3001, per Clean
Water Acf See- 307(a), 3 11 (b)(4)]
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench shoyers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated
Rqulpment: Never wear contact lenses in the work areaz soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from
ur shoes and equipment Launder contaminated clothiig before wearing.
Comments: IT ever eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet. or applying cosmetics.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~:~
~~~~‘~~~~~~~:::,,
;;; ;:-:.: ;;;:~~~~~~~~~
..:.....I......_........ .. ..A
.../-.... .,_...
-.
Storage Requirements:
Store in tightly closed container in a cool, dry, well-veotilatcd, low Fue-risk area away from incompatible matn-ials (See.
5), direct sunlight, and heat Prevent exposure of vapors to high temperature to prevent decomposition to toxic and corrosive gases and vapan.
Engineering Controls: Avoid vapor inhalation and skin or eye cOntact Use only with adequate ventilation and appropriate personal protective
gear. Monitor vapor levels and institute a respiratory protection program which includes bainiig. maintenance, inspection, snd evaluation.
Practice good personal hygiene procedures. When possible, substitute a less hazardous solvent for Ccl,. provide preplaeement and biannual
medical exams, including studies of liver and kidney function. Prevent exposing individuals with liver, kidney, or central ~QYOUS system diseases
or alcoholism. Alcohol’s synergistic effects markedly inerease Ccl,? toxicity.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
DOT Shlpplng Name: Carbon tetrachloride
’
IMO Shlpplng Name: Carbon terrachloride
DOT Hazard C&: ORM-A
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
ID No.: UN1846
IMO Label: Poison
DOT Label: None
IMDG Packaging Croup: II
DOT PackagIng Requirements:
173.620
ID No.: UNlS46
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.505
MSDS CoI&ction References: 7,26.38,53,73.84,85.88,89,
Prepared by: h4.l Allison, BS; Industrial
Hygiene
~-
100. 103, 109, 124,126, 127, 129. 130, 131,134, 136, 137
Review: DI Wilson, CIH; Medical Review: MI Ha&es, MD
Material
No. 603
Safetv Data Sheet
From Genium’s Refeknce Collectior~
2-CHLOROACET~PHEZNONE
Genium
,
Publishing
Corporation
1145 catal
saeet
Schenectady,
NY 1!i% 3-1836 USA
I
OTKER
SP
Issued: Mav 1986
alphaChloroacclopbcn
Chloro Methyl Phenyl Ketone, Mace, l%enH
Chloride,
l’henylchloromethyl
Ketone, F’bez~yl Chlommthyl
Ketone,
CgH7c10, CAS #0532-n-4.
I-k2
I? 1
R: 1
PPE*
-:
Haarmano & Reimer Corp., Aroma Chemical Div., PO Box 175,
111 US Hwy. 22, N. Springfield, NJ 07081;Tekphor~
(201) 686-3132
2-Chlon~cetopbenone,
CAS #X32-27-4
S-hr.TWk
0.05 ppmor
03 rng/m3*
RaS oral DUO:
127 mg/m3
Human, Inhalation, LCLO:
159 mgfm3120 min.
0c
* Current (198586)
ACGM
Appearance and odor. Colorless- “$“y
2-chloroacetetophenone
is 0.1 mg/m .
Rabbit, Eye:
3mgsevere
Melting Point .,
percent Volatile by Volume _. ca 100
Molecular Weight . .. 154.60
crystalline solid with a sharp, irritating, floral odor. The odor threshold for
jis~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~o~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Flash Point and Method
240?(11S’C)CC
UIS~G
m
spray to CobI ta&akontainers
Human, Inhalation, TCLo:
20 mg!m3: kritation
TLV or OSHA F’EL
Vapor Pressure @ 20X!, mm Hg . .. 0.012
Water Solubility @ 2OYZ .._ Insoluble
Vapor Density (Air = 1) - 532
Evaporation Rate ._. Not Found
Rl
I 4
s3
7~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.
;;.; : : ...c(-j m
Autoignition
Temp.
FlammabilityLimits in Air
Not Pound
Not Found
Carbon dioxide, dry chemical, foam, water fog. Water or foam may cause frothing.
exposed to fne
R:
::UppEI
-
Use water
This OSHA cl= IIll combustible liquid is a slight fire h&
when exposed to beat, spar& or open flame. When involved
in a fm, 2-chlomacetophenone
emits toxic sod corrosive vapors.
Fire fighters should use self-c~ntained breathing apparab~ and fully protective clothing when fighting fires involving ti
material.
2-Chloroacetophenone
is stable in closed coat&e&
undergo hazardous poIyme&ation.
at mom temperature under normal storage and handling conditions.
This material is incompatible
It reacts slowly with water or steam, gcoaating
Thermal decomposition
with strung oxidizers.
hydrogen chloride.
or burning produces toxic vapors ;md gases such as carbon monoxide and fumes of chlorine.
It does not
S/86
No. 603
2-CHLOROAClZPHEN~NE
and intensely titating
GET MEDICAL ASSISTANCE
support after first aid
= In plant, paramedic, community.
to the
Get medical help for further treatment, observation, and
ignition. Provide ma&mume&losion-proof
&milation.
Eva&ate the s&l area and limit access to necessary personnel
only. Remove any leaking containers to a safe place, if feast&. Those involved in cleanup need protection against contact
with the solid form and inhalation of dust and vapor (see sect 8).
Scoop, shovel, or vacuum spilled material into closed containers Use caution to avoid generating dust. Flush spill area
water and collect flushings and waste water for disposal. Do not flush waste to a sewer, watershed, or watenvay.
with
Place waste in a suitable container for disposal by a licensed cootractor. dispose of it in a landfii or dissolve it in an
organic solvent aad burn it in an approved inciirator
quipped with an afterburner and a scrubber. Follow all Federal, state,
and local regulations.
Vtil’f
dther electmal sea-me must be
nonsparking and have an explosion-proof design. Exhaust~?~~hav?a
fEnve%it
sat least 100 lfm (liocar feet
per minute). For emergency or nonroutine exposures whem the %V may be exceeded, use an appropriate NIOSH-approved
respirator.
Impervious gloves, face shield, apron, boots, plastic coveralls, and other protective clothing and equipment should be available and
worn as necessary to prevent contact with skin or clothing. Wear safety goggles to prevent any possibility of
2*hloroacetophenone
coming in contact with the eyes. Remove contaminated clothing immediately and do not wear it again
until it has been properly laundered.
Eyewash stations and safety showets should be m
available in use and handling areas.
Contact lenses pose a special hazard; soft lenses may absorb irritants and all lenses concentrate them
~~~:sE~IaN~~~~~~~~~~~~~~I~~~~~~D
; Co~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~.~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
fj.j<;:;;
Store 2-chloroacetophenone in closed containers in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from oxidizing agents, heat, sparks,
and open flame. Storage ama must be suitable for combustible solids. Protect containers from physical damage. Ground and
bond conveying equipment and storage containers when transferring the solid to prevent the possibility of a dust explosion.
Any bulk storage system should have an explosion-relief design. Do not stmke in use or handling arcas. Use only with
adequate ventilation.
Avoid inhalation of dust and vapor and contact with skin, eyes, and clothing. Practice good industrial
hygiene when handling this material. Avoid generating dust Emptied containers retain product residues; handle them
accordingly!
Replacement and periodic physical examina tions should be provided to those who work with this material. Individuals with
histories
of chmnic respiratory, skin, or eye disease may be at increased risk from exposure.
DOT Classification: Irritating Material. DOT.No. UN1697
Data Source(s) Code: 2.4,5,7.8.23.34,47.63,69.75.78,79-82.
J~dgemcnbas lo
m lsasarily
LheNilabirity of inkmatioo hadn for was&s
puqmys
purchardr Irswrsibilitv. Thdm.
akhoueh reasonable cm
CR
Approvals
Copyright
v
0 May
-Qicc~O
1, 1986
-I
Mafetil
Genium
en
Publishing
1 I45 caalyn street
Schenectady. NY X2303-1836
(518)_-377-8854
‘Secti~~,:~~-.
Safely Data Sheefs ColiecGon:
Corporation
USA
Sheet No. 366
Chlorobenzene
] Issued: 11m
Revision:
B, 11190
i. ii.
:: ...:~~~~~~~::‘:
Mdt~~~~;rdenti~~~tion~~..--~~~~~~~~:~’;”
Chlorobenzeae
(C&Cl)
Dexrlptlon:
produoed
by chRuinatiog bcozcoe in the prcse
&a&g;
as a solvent m manufacturing paiots,
adhesives, poliihcs, waxes, diisocyanaks. natural rubbu. sod pharmaccuticals; a chemical intiiatc
for phenol, e, [email protected],
DDT. sod aniIinc; and an intcnncdiatc in manufacming dyestuffs.
phcnyl chloride.
Other Designations: CAS No. 010890-7, bazcoc ohkuidc; chIorobcnz.ol; MCB; mooochlo~;
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or dismtitor. Consult the latest Chemicalwerk Ews’
Gtidtc”, for a suppliers list
I
z
3
s
HMIS
H 2
Cautions: Chlorobcozcnc is a skin and mucous membrane irritant, a fairly strong narcotic, and a c~~~tral IIUVOUS system (CNS) dcprcssant Chronic inhalation may cause IUJI~. fivrt. d&&-y
damage. This material is a dangerous fue hazed when exposed to heat or
flame.
an&@&$
.. .C?%
....i.... :..
l3B OSHA PEL
8-hr TWA: 75 ppm, 350 mgIm’
l990-91 ACGIH ‘PLY*
TWA: 75 ppm, 34 mg/m’
1987 XDLH Level
2400 ppm
1983 NIOSH REL
None established
1985-86 Toxicky Datat
Rat, oral, L.D; 2910 [email protected]; toxic effects not yet reviewed
Rat, inhalation, x:
210 ppm administacd for 6 hr to a
6- to 6day prcgmmt fen.& produces spbcific developmental abnotmaIitics
Point: -50.1 ‘F (-45.6 ‘C)
Molecular Welghk 1 i256
Vapor Presure: 11.8 mm Hg at 77 ‘F (25 ‘C)
SQdfiC
kWity
(20 ‘C/4 ‘c): 1.1058
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 3.88
Water SoIubUIty: InsoIuhk
Appearance and Odor: A clear, colorless, volatile liquid with a faint, almond-like odor. Threshold odor concentration:
021 ppm
Melting
Unusual
Fire or Exploston
Hazards:
Chlorobcnzenc
:
03
PPG*
*sees
is dangerous when exposed to heat or flae.
t
10046 recognition,
Vapor may travel to an ignition
source and
flash back.
Special Fhe-fighting
Procedures: Isolate baz.ard ama and deny entry. Since fuc may produce toxic firmcs, wear a self-contained breathing
apparatus (SCBA) witb a full faccpicce opcratcd ia the pmssum-dcmand or poshive-prcssum mode. Do not extinguish firt unless flow can be
stopped. Be aware of runoff from fm control methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
ard0t.a polymerization
cannot occur.
Chemical 1ncompatibiIitIe.s:
Chlombcnxcoc is incompatible with strong oxidizcrs;contact may CSUSC fUCS and explosions. It reacts violently
with dimethyl sulfoxidc. Silver QCrChlONb2
forms a solvatcd. shock-sensitive salt with chlorobcnzcnc (explosion). Chlorobcnzcnc is potentially
explosive with powdcrcd sodium or [email protected]
trichloridc + sodium.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid all heat and ignition sources and incompatibk materials.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition:
Thermal oxidativc decomposition products of chlorobcnzcnc can include soot, hydrogen chloride,
phosgcnc, and carbon monoxide.
No. 366
Chlorobsnzene
11/90
to the cycs, nasal passagef. and upper resphaiory L&L IL is nxxluatcly toxic by inhalation or ingestion and can bc absorbed slowly through the ”
skin. Short cxposurcs to tquid may cauw’ skin irritation and defatting. while pmlon ed ortopcatcd skin conlact ma result in dermatitis or skin :
burns. Followmg absorption of toxic doses, liver and kidney degeneration arc also & saved. Chlombenzcn~ may a60 cause hemolysis.
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Individuals with skin, liver, kidney. or chronic respiratory disease may be at
increased risk frrxn exposure.
Target 0 art.% Respuato
sysLem, cyq skin, central nuvous sysLcm, and liver.
Routes: I# alation. ingestloo, eye and skin umtacL
Prlmar J &ry
ocean mzand
~purcspi+u’y
tract irritation, dizzia$u, dtuwsiness,
Acute ffectr: Symptoms to be expected fromacutc U
g on e exposucc s coomtra~on
and dumbon. Symptoms of
cyanosis, spastic contractions of ex~t-cmkics, and loss o p”consacntsuq
dcpc
ingestion include allor. cyanosis, and coma, follow& by complete recovery.
uently rcpcatcd contact wilh chlotobcnzcnc may result in skin bums, eye and upper rcs lfatnry tract lrritatlon, headaches,
Chronic E&sets: L
d~~~~;mnolam,
and dyspeptic disorders (iigcstlon).
Chronic inhalation may result in lung, hver. an8. ludncy damage.
Eyes: GcoUy lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding - amountr of water until transpoti
to an emergency medical
fkility. Co~%ll a phySician immcdiakly.
Skin: Ouickf~ nmove contaminated tlothinn. Rinse with floo&z amounts of water for at kast 15 min. For rcddencd or blistered skin, consulL a II
hysic&. Wash affectal area with soap and-water.
needed.
nhalation: Remove cxposcd person Lo fresh air and support brca-thing
Ingestion: Never ivc anything b mouth to an unconscmus or convu - g pson Ifiagcstcd, have that c0Ncio1~ person drink 1 to 2 glasses of
water. Consult a piysician immJ atcly. If vomiting occur& administer mom wata-.
After first aid, get n proprlate In-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
Note to Physicians: pn a cmcious patient, aLtempt to induce vomiting with Syrup of Ipecac. Consider activated charcoal cathartic Administa
charcoal slurry with saline, water, or sorbitol. In an wrconrriouspatient, do gastrlo lavage with suction.
~, *bcyv~i”
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. 2-,.<y..,$q?+x.r;‘
i ‘..-JX.>.F
‘Sexi .,A.
.%...4&
*ou...<,
....*[email protected]?
~~~~~~~~~~~~ir~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
:t&+$
I..\. ___..A. .._~.A..&....h....\.%___..__.___
~...~~..:.a’..,..:-..~~.~~~.~,-<,,&~‘+a%.
~~?..~,ria~~.~,~~~~~~~~.~.
<.I;.
“4 ...+-Aw..s*
..
‘4 d 22
>:..-..:
.,...:vi:.....:...... ...x..c%.x...
... R......h ..........I.....L, ......._..
Splll/L.eak: Dr.si n andpracficz a ch&rW
spill cmtrol and counfu muuvrrpfan (SCCP). No%y snfcty ~KSOM~~, evacuate all UMCSCSsar): perso~e!, e B*ate
all heat and @ition sources, and provide maximum cxplosmn- roof vcntllabtm. Cleanup pe.monnel should pro.tect
agamst va r mhalauon and contact with llquid.Take up illed mataial with a noncom g ustible absorbent material and place MCI contamcrs for
disposal. For large spills, dike far ahcad of spill to contzw~%o cot release runoff to sewers or waterways since chlombenzene is harmful to a uatic
life in very low cooccntrations. Aquatic toxicityt A [email protected] pm coacen~ration of chlorobcnzam administered to bluegill in fresh water during a &lr
Lest c&d is the median tolerance limit (l7m) at wtic*K 50% of the quatic organisms survive Follow applicable OSHA rcgulatioos
(29 CFR
P
19&J).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a liccmcd conwtor
EPA Designations
fop detailed ruommaxlations.
Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
Other: Wear impervious gloves, boots, apronf, and gauntlets (polyvinyl alcohol is recommended) to prevent prolonged or re atrd skin contact
Ventilation:
Provide general and local exploston-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborne conc.enLrations below the 0 .FHA Pw and
~o$~~,~V
(Sec. 2). Local exhaust venulation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispemiin into the work area by contmllmg It at its
Safe&Stations:
Make available in the work arca emergency eyewash stations, safctylquickdrcnch showers, and washing faciliticr
Cont?mInated
Equipment:
Never wear contact lenses in the work arca: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate. initams. Rem& this
matcnal from our shoes and equipment Launder contaminated clothiig before wearing.
d
Comfnentr:
ever cat, drir& or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating. drinkin&
smolXIg, using the toi.lcS or applying cosmetics.
DOT
DOT
IDNo.:
DOT
DOT
DOT
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
Shlppln
Name: Chlombenxenc
IMO Shlpplng Name: Chlorobenzcne
Hazard E lass: Flammable liquid
IMO Hazard Class 3.3
UN1134
ID No.: UN1 134
Label: Flammable liquid
IMO Label: Flammable liquid
Packaging Rxceptlons: 173.118
IMDG Packaglng Croup:-ll
Packaging Requirements:
173.119
Genium
Publishing
Corporation
OneGukiumP+a
Schenectady.NY
123044690
(S18)377-8864
USA
Material
Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 315
Chloroform
1
3
lime with mxt~ne, acetaldehydc. or ethanol. Pm&d by extra&on with cmnocntratai mlfuric acid and rcclificaS 2*
2 0 o
tion. Used in the manufacture of fluomcsrbom (mainly FC-22) for refrigerant in plastics, photographic processing. fire
and resins. 52
extinguishas. insecticides. and dry clesningt as a sobent for fatq oils. waxes, rubbers alkaloids, Gutta-Perch
Used as an anesthetic since 1847 but abandoned within the last few decades because of cardiac arrcst during surgery and
49
abrocpdon
delayed death due to liver injury.
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 67-66-3, Freon-24 m&me
aid-&u&
methenyl chloride, R-20 (re&igaant),
“it
trichlOrof0~
trichloromethane. l-CM. Ilnpqaiy
called ‘fcrmyl chloride’
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Ckmic~
Week Buyas’Cui&o
for a suppliers liq
Cautions: Chloroform is considered one of the most dangerous and volatile chlorinated hydmc&ona
It is a central ncmous
EySkaI (CNS) and cardiac depressans an eye. rldn. aud respirsloy tract i&w& and causes liver and kidney damage from rucute
and chronic exposure.
*Sac8
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Chloroform, ca 99%. Usually contains 0.75% ethanol as a stabilizer. Impurities include bromodichlcromethane,
vinylidene, and dlethyl farbonate.
1991 OSHA PEL
1992-93 ACGIH TLY
1985-86 ToxIcIty Data’
8-hr TWA: 2 ppm (9.78 mgfm’)
TWA: 10 ppm (49 mg/ms)
Human, i&ala&
TCt,,r 10 mg/m3/l year caused MoTuciB. nausea. and
vomiting.
1990 IDLH Level
1990 DFG (Germany) MAE
Ras oral. T&: 13832 m&g given a&nuously
for 2 years caused
1000 ppm
TWA: 10 ppm (50 mg/m))
leukemia.
categoly II: substances wilh
Rat, oral, LlQ !JOS mg/kg caused weight loss or dexxased weight gain,
1990 NIOSH REL
Rat, inhalation. Tc& 30 pp~1/7 hr administered from the 6 to 15 day of
(io ti m:
,2ppm (9.78 mg/&‘)
ps~m~$&?!$~~3~
pregnancy caused fetotoxicity or developmental abnorrru&ties of the
min average value. 4/shift
musculoskeleutl system.
Rabbit, eye: 20 mg/24 hr caused moderate irritation.
* See NIOSH. RT,!XS (Fs910aoooX for additiural inirariee, muti
wve.
tumorizcnie. md toxidtv ti
chlorinated
[email protected] Pointt 143 ‘F (62 ‘C)
Freezing Point: -82 ‘F (-635 ‘C)
Molecular Welght: 119.39
Viscosity: 5.63 mP at 68 ‘F (20 ‘C)
Relative Evaporation Rate (BuAc=l):
11.6
Surface Tension: 27.1 dyne/cm at 68 l F (20 ‘C)
Refraction Index: 1.4422 at 77 ‘F (25 ‘C)
Appearance and Odor: Colorless, volatile liquid with
Des&y: 1.49345 at 59 ‘F (15 ‘C)
Water SolubURy: Nearly insoluble: 05% at 77 ‘F (2.5 l C)
Other Solubilltlesr
Soluble in ethanol, ethyl ether, benzene. acetow carbon disulfide,
and carbon tetrruchloride.
Odor Tluesbold:
85 to 307 ppm (rngcJ?m
combined sowcer)
Vapor Pressure: 160 mm Hg at 68 ‘F (20 l C); 200 mm Hg at 77 ‘F (25 ‘C)
Saturated Vapor Density (Air = 0.075 lb/d or 1.7. kg/m3): 0.136 ll& or 2183 kg/m3
a heavy, ethereal odor.
Extinguishing
Media: Nonflammable
from standard tests in air but will burn on nrolonned exnosure to flame or hieh temoeramre. To fiaht f’r us
extinguishig~gents
suitable for surrounding fire. Do MC scatter material with a l&b-pr&surefwata
stmam. Urn&
Firi or Explosio~Hazat&:
Container may explode in heat of fire. Special Fire-flghtlng Procedures: Because fire may produce toxic thermal decomposition products, wear a
self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full face&co operated in presmre-demand or positivepressure mode. Structural firefighters’
protective clothing is t& effective. Stay away from ends of tanks. Do not release runoff from fire control methods to sewers or watawavs.
Stability/Polymerization:
Chloroform is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous
polymerization cannot occur. It’s pH decreases at prolonged exposure to air and light due to hydmchknic a& (HCl) formzon
The recommended
shelf-life is 2 months for full containas and 2 weeks for partially full containers. Chemical Incompatlbllltles:
Incompatible with acetone, a&&s.
aluminum. disilanq lithium, magnesium. dinitmgen dioxide, nitrogen tetroxide. perchloric acid. phosphorus pentoxide. potassinm. potassium
hydroxide, methyl alcohol, potassium ferr-butoxide, sodiom, sodium hydroxide, sodium methylate. scdium-potassium
alloy. triiqqylphosphine
calcium hydroxide, and fluorine and any strong oxidizem. Coadltlons to Avold: Exposure to light, proIongod heat. and incompatibles. Hazardous
Products of Decomposltlon:
Thermal oxidative dscomposition of CHCI, can produce carbon dioxide and toxic chlorine, HCl. and phosgene gas.
CHClr decomposes at 437 ‘P to formic acid. carbon monoxide, and HCl on prolonged hesting wilh warer.
Cacchto~enlclty:
Chloroform is considered acarcinonen by the IARC ~Class-2B. wssiblv carcinogenic
in humans with limited human and
sufftcien~anim~
evidence)~1641 NTP (Class 2, masonably &icipated &be a cat-c~iogen. kmited himan and sufficient animal evi&nce)j’~
and
NIOSH (Class X, carcinogen defined with no further categorizslion) >‘w DFG (MAK-B. justifiably suspected of having carcinogenic p~tential),(‘~
Cm-cinogenicity tends to be
and ACCXH (Class A2. suspected human carcinogen based on limited epidemiologic evidence or demoMtdOn)(‘5).
organ specific primarily to the liver and kidneys. Summary of Risks: Chloroform is a CNS depressant. eye. skin, and respiratory tract irritant. am
causes damage to the liver and kidneys. Symptoms range from dizziness to cardiac arrythmias resulting in death. Chloroforms’ toxicity is due to its
easy lipid solubility. Avoid exposure during prcgrmncy because CHCl, diffuses readily aaos.r the placenta Almholics se.em to be affected sooner
and more severely than others from chloroform cnposure (alcohol may already have damaged the hva). Ethanol. polybrominated biphcnols.
steroids, and ke&mes potentiate chloroform’s toxicity.
Target Organs: Liver. kidney. &
eyes, skin Prlmary lbtry Routes: Inhalation. ingestion, skin contact/absorption. Medkal Condltlons
Aggravalcd by Long-Term Exposure: Alcoholism. liver, kidney, or nervous system disorders. Acute Effects: Vapor inhalation causes varying
degrees of CNS depression depending on conccntxation and exposure length. Symptoms include headache, nausea. diztiness. dr’unkenncss. progressive
weakness, vomiting, him, delirium. and disorientation. Exposure to 14.OKJ to 16.ooO ppm has causal rapid unconsciousness. Severe acute exposures
can damage the liver and kidney (damage is usually not obsaved for 24 to 48 hr post exposure), respiratory failure. severe cardiac arrythmias (mason
for discontinuation of use as an an&teUc), and death. Apparent recovety horn heavy exposures may result in delayed death due to liver or kidney
failure. Death usually occurs 4 to 5 days post exposure and autopsy shows massive liver necrosis. Vapors cause eye irritation and spasmodic winking.
Direct eye contact with the liquid causes imme&te burning pain and possible cornea) @helium damage. Skin contact with tht liquid produces
burning pain, cryand vesiculation due to &fatting of the skin. Ingestion can cause gastrointestinal irritation. irregukrr heartbeat nausea and ‘.
vomiting, diarrhea (possibly blood-stained). dmwsimss, nnwns5ous1)cy and state of shock. Chronk EflecIs: Prolonged inhalation of chloroform
vapors causes fatigue, digestive disturbances, frequent and burning urination, mental dullness, and CNS and pcripm
neuropethics. Liver (fatty
degeneration and enlargement with hepatitis seen in dogs) and kidney damage may also occur.
FIRST AID Eyes: Do not allow victim to rub or keep eya tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids and flush immcdiitely and continuously with flooding
amounts of water until uamporrcd to an cmcrgency medic-al facility. Consult a physician immediately. Skin: Quicuy remove contaminated clothing.
Rinse. with flooding amounts of water for at kast 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap and water. InhalaUon: Remove exposed person to fresh air
and support breathing as needed. Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an UrrONCiOUS or cmvulsing pemh Contact a poison control centcr
and unless otherwise a&&i,
have that conscious and a&rt person drink 1 to 2 glasses of water, to dilute Do not i.nduce.vomiting because victim may
become obtunded. Gastric lavage may he indicated if patient is comatose or at risk of convulsiig. Note to Physkfans: Because effects may be delayed
(especially kidney and liver problems), keep victim under observation for 24 to 48 l-u. Administration of fluids may help to prevent kidney failure.
Obtain blood glum.
urimJysis. liver function ttsls. chest x-ray, and monitor cardiac function and fluid/electrolyte stati Monitor liver and kidney
function for 4 to 5 days after exposure. Diilfiram
its metabolitcs. and a high carbohydrate diet appear to protect somewhat against chkoroform
toxicity. Do MI give adruralin! Tests may show *haused bilirubii ke$c&, lowerad blood prothrombin, and fibrogen
shouid;Uear fulli encapsulating vapor-pro&&
clorhing. For;mbu spills. 6Le up with ear& sand. vermiculiK or oth&
Cieanup pen00nei
absorbent. noncombustiile
material and place in suitable containers for disposal. For large spills, dike far ahead of spill and contain for later disposal
or reclamation. Spills in water may need to be trapped at the bottom with sand bag barriers and treated with activated carbon and removed by suction
hoses, mechanical lifts, and dredges. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). Ecotoxklty Values: Rainbow Trout (SaLno
goirdnerr). LC, = 203O pg& bluegill (tipwnir macrochirus), I.C s = lOO,OOO pm
hr; largemouth bass (hficropterur whoides)
Id& = 51
ppm196 hr. EnvIronmental
Degtadatloa: If released to land, most chloroform evaporates rapidly (due to high vapor pressure) while some may
leach to groundwater where it remains for a long time on the hottom. If released to water, chloroform evaporates rapidly with estimated half-lifes of
36 hr (river). 40 hr (pond). 9 to 10 days (lake). In air, chloroform photodegrades with a half-life of 80 days. It can he tmm+or&
long distances and
some may return to earth via rain. Disposal: Reclamation is possrble through distillation or sttam stripping. Chloroform is a candidate for liquid
injection. rotary kiln. or fluid&d bed incineration with an acid scrubber. Contact your supplier or a licensed mnuactor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable F&eraL state. and local regulations.
OSHA Deslgnatlons
EPA Dcslgnatlons
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 191O.lOOO. Table Z-1-A)
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 26133): No. UO44
‘listed as a SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355). TPQ: lO,OOO lb
isred as a SARA Toxic Chemical (4OCFR 372.65)
isted as a CERCIA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4): Fhral Reportable Quantity (RQ), 10 lb (4.54 kg) [* per RCRA, Sec. 3001; CWA,
Sec. 311(b)(4). & CWA Sec. 307(a)]
protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because contact le&use in industry is conrrov&ial, establish your ownpc&y. Respirator: Seek
rofessional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary. wear a MSHAf
ROSH-approved respirator. For any &tectable concentration use a supplied-air respirator or SCRA with a full faoepim and operated in pmemand or other positive pressure mode. For emagency or nonroutine opesations (dearring spills, reactor vessels. or storage tanks), wear an SCBA.
faming! Air-puriljling
respirators
do not protect workers in oxygen-dejicient atmospheres. Ifrespirators
are us4 OSHArequires
a written
*spiratory protection program that includes at least: medical certification. training, fit-testing pericdic environmental monitoring. maintenance.
Upaction. cleaning. and convenient sanitary storage areas. Other: Wear chemically protective gloves beok aprons, and gauntlets made of
Dlyvinyl alcohol or Viton (breakthrough times > 1 hr) to prevent skin contact Ventllatlon:
Provide genera) and local exhaust ventilarion systuns to
maintain airborne concentrations below the GSHA PEL (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents contaminant dispetsion
#to the work area by controlling it at its source. (‘ml Safety Statloos: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quickench showers, and washing facilities. Contaminated
EquIpmenU Separate wntaminsted work clothes from street clothes and launder before
use. Remove this material from your shoes and clean personal protective cquipmcnt. Comments: Never w drink. or smoke in work areas.
‘a&c good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating. drinking, smoking, using the toilet, OTapplying cosmetics.
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orage Requirements:
Prevent physical damage to containers. Store in lead-lined or mild steel containers of all-welded construction in a cool (~30
3. dry. well-ventik&ed area away from direct light and incompatibles. Englnecrlng Controls: To reduce potential health w
use su&ient
lution or local exhaust ventilation to control airbome’contaminants
and to mainrain concentrations at the lowest practical level. Isolate operations
roh’ing chloroform. Admlnistratlve
Controk: It is suggested that chloroform use for extractions in labs should be avoided and replaced because
its toxicity and carcinogenic potential. Consider preplacement and periodic medical exams of exposed workcrs.
IT Shlpplng Name: Chloroform
IT Hazard Class: 6.1
No.: UN1888
IT Packing Group: c[
)T Label: Poison
edal ProvIsIons (172.102): N36. T14
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101)
Paclcnglng Authorlzatlons
.
a) Exceptions: None
b) Nonbulk Packaglug: 173.2O2
c) Bulk Packaging: 173.243
QuanUty UmBaUons
a) Passenger Alrcraf? or Rafkar:
b) Cargo Alrcraft Only: 6OL
VeseI Stowage Requirements
a) Vessel Stownge: A
b) Other. 40
XX CdfccP’on References: 26.73. 100, 101. 103, 124. 126. 127.132. 133, 136. 139. 140. 148.153. 159. 163,164. 167. 168.169.171.174.175.176.
Bard by: M Gumon. BA; Industrid Hygknc Revkw: PA Roy. MPH. CIH: MedIcal Revkw W Sih-m~.
MD
_
pidelw-Lbfcbm;,h~;.l.~.h--.&
a-..---,
ISO.
SL
Muterid Safety Dafa Sheets Collection:
Genium
Publishing
1145 catalyn
Corporation
street
Schenectady, NY 12303y1836 USA
Sheet No. 702
Chloropicrin
(518) 377-8854
Chloropkrin
Descrfption: Manufactured f?om nitromethane and alkaline hypochlorite. P&&y
used as a war gas.
UsedasasoilInsecticidc,afumiganSloda~~,iodisinfadiagccnalsand~;tokillweedandgrass~in
soil; and in manufacturing methyl ViokL
Other Dedgnatlons
CAS No. OU76-0&2; CCl$lO~; acqninitc; nibochloroform; ni~chloromcthane;
picfume; &i&lormlitromethanc.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distriitor.
Consult the latest Cue&Buyers’
C&f.&) for a suppliers lit.
R
1
i
K
34
*
N$‘PA
4O3
_
@
ET
F
I
Chloropicrin.
0
ca 100%
OSHA PEL
8-hrTWA: 0.1 ppm, 0.7 mg/m’
ACGIH TLvq I!89-90
TLV-lWAz
0.1 ppm. 0.67 og/rn’
TLva
03 ppm. 20 mg/m’
NIOSH REL, 1987
None established
Toxlclty Data*
Rat, oral, LD,: 250 rug/kg
Rabbit, inhalation, TX&z 800 mg/m’ for 20 min
Human, inhalation, Tt&z 2 mg/mJ
l See NIOSH. RTECS (PB63OXXO), for additimd
mtive, bunuigenie, and toxicity ti
._ __.,.._
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.:::... .... -.
Boiling Potnt: 234 ‘F/112 ‘C
Molecular Wetght: 164.39 g/m01
Meltfng Point: -926 ‘F/-692 ‘C
Spedfk Gravity (II,0 = 1 at 39 ‘F14 ‘C): LQS8 at 68 ‘F/20 l C
Vapor Pressure: 5.7 mm Hg at 32 ‘F/O ‘C
Water Solublllty: lnsohtble
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 5.7
Appearance
and odor:
A colorless, slightly oily liquid with a very intense, penetrating odor. The threshold odor concentration is 1.1 ppm
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~.
:z.:.z.a;
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:.:..* .,.
.:....::-:.:
:.:...‘.:.,/‘.:.“;.::a:.
..~~~..~.~:.::.:~~~:.:..~~:~~.::..~:,.~:::~;~~.’
.A......
.... i/. :.::.:.:.
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~i..~~.~~.:.~~.:.:.~~:~.:.:.-.~...~.~~.:.:.~..~~~.:.:.:...:.:.:.~.:.::.-.:
: .,/ ..~.:.
Flash Point: None reported
1 UEL: None npoti
1 AutoIgnItion Temperature: Nooe reported 1 LEL: None reported
Extinguishlog
Media: Since chloropiain is a noncombustible liquid, use extinguiihing media appropriate to the surrounding fm.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Chloropicrin detonates if heated under confiicment
Special Flre-flghting
Procedures: Since this material is extremely toxic, enter conarw only with a self-contained breathing apparatus
(SCBA) and shipper- or producer-recommended
chemical protective cIothing. Feht fires with hoseholders or unmanned mcniton from an cxplosion-resistant location. Keep fti-exposed containers COOLBe aware of runoff from fm control methods. Do not release to sew~s or waterways.
tions. Hazard&s polymerization
&not occur. Then are reports of phobchemical transformation of chlompicrin into toxic phosgene (&boxy
chloride, COC4).
Chemical Incompatibilities:
This ma&al is incompatible with strong oxidizers. A violent reaction occurs with alcoholic sodium hydroxide,
pmpargyl bromide, sodium melhoxide, and aniline + heat.
Condltlons to Avold: Above a critical volume chloropicrio can be shocked into detonation. Mixtures with %bromopropyne are also shock- and
heat-sensitive explosives.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition:
Thermal oxidative decomposi&oa of chloropicria can produce very toxic fumes of chlorine (Cl-) and
nitrogen oxides (NO,). This material forms a powerful tear gas when heated.
No. 702
r
Chloropicrin
Section 6. Health
4/90
Hazard
Data
..-:; / :
. ... :.:::....:..,
:.:...:
: / ( .:
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Carcinogenlcity:
Neither the NTP, IARC, nor OSHA lists chloropicrin as a carcinogen.
Summary of Risks: Chloropicrio is a severe eye, mucous membrane, lung, and skin irritant. Its IDLH (immcdiatcly, dangerous to fde and health)
level is 4 ppm; 119 ppm for 30 min is lethal for humans. Concentrations of 15 ppm are tolerable no longer than I mm. 4 ppm are temporarily.
disabling due to their irritant effect, and 0.3 to 0.37 ppm causes painful irritation in 3 to 30 sec. Congeshoo, edema, hemorrhage, and mfiltratron of
the lung tissue, particularly the medium and smah bronchi, am the major pathological mamfestatrons 10 the early stages. A l.-ppm~concentration is
a good warning of exposure since it causes a smarting pain in the eyes. When used as a war gas, chloropicr$s intense gastromtesttnal effects
earned it the name “vomiting gas.” Another toxic effect is its interference with oxygen transport by reaction with SH-groups in hemoglobin.
Medical Condltlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: None reported.
Target Organs: Respiratory system, skin, eyes.
Primary Entry Routes: Inhalation.
andAcute Effects: Vapor inhalation causes severe irritation of the eyes and nose, lacrimation, bronchitis and pulmonary edema, skin
- . lmtatton,
’ . ’
nausea, vomiting, colic, diarrhea, and gastrointestinal initation.
Chronic Effects: Neuoses of the kidneys.
. liver. and skeletal muscles am noted in rats in the chronic stage of chloropicrin exposure.
FIRS-I-AID
Eyes: Flush immediately, including under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with flooding amounts of running water for at least 15 min.
Skin: QtuMy renmve contaminated clothing. After rinsing affected skin with flooding amounts of water, wash it with soap and water.
Inhalation:
Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
I;[email protected];uever
give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsiig pcxscm. If ingested, have a conscious person drink 4 to 8 oz of water of
..
.
After first aih, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
PhysIcIan’s Note: Keep victim under close observation for 72 hr since the effects may be delayed. Surveillance after significant acute exposure
should include monitoring of respiratory rate, serial chest X-rays, and arterial gas levels. Maintain supportive care. Consider using steroids for
significant pulmonary inflammation.
personnel, and pr&ide adequate ventilation. Cleanup personnel must wear SCBA and chemical protective clothing to avoid vapor inhalation and
contact with all body surfaces. Cover spilled material with soda ash, mix, and spray with water. Place this material in a container, let it stand in a
well-ventilated area for two hours, and neutralixe with 6M-HCI. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
OSHA Designations
Listed as an AU Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1C00. Table Z-l)
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
. ...:.:.. ...
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--::il : i
’ ._.i” ‘.~ “ :. ~.:i ‘~:i~~ ““‘~~ :,-;:..~~:~~~~~
. ..
.
.
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, Per GSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 Cl% 1910.133).
Respirator: Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134). For concentrations up to the 4-ppm IDLH level, use a gas mask with an
organic vapor canister. For concentrations exceeding the IDLH, wear an SCBA.
Warning: Air-purifying respirators do nof protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervious, neoprene gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent skin contact
Ventilation:
Provide general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborne concennations below the OSHA PEL and
ACGIH TLV (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its
source.(r”n
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quickdrench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated
Equipment:
Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from your shoes and equipment Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet. or applying cosmetics.
~~ciar:Pr~~~~~ns’~~~~:~.
:.: $i:-‘:‘i :; :
...
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.... /.....,..,.,.. .../
Storage Requirements:
Store in tightly closed containers in a cool, dry. well-ventilated area away from all incompatible materials (Sec. 5).
Outside or detached storage is preferred. Protect containers from physical damage or shock Do not use magnesium. aluminum. or their alloys
for handling equipment or containers. One-pound glass bottles in hermetically sealed metal cans am recommended.
Engineering Controls: Since chloropicrin is an extremely toxic material, take precautionary measures before handling. Short exposures may
cause fatal lung diseases. Institute a respiratory protection program which includes training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. Use
chloropictin only with appropriate personal protective gear. Provide preplacement and annual medical examinations which emphasixe the
n~piMory system and skin.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
DOT Shlpping Name: Chloropicrin, liquid
IMO Shlpplng Name: Chloropicrin
DOT Hazard Class: Poison B
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
ID No.: UN1580
IMO Label: Poison
DOT Label: Poison
IhlDG Packa’ging Group: I
DOT Packaging Requirements:
173.357
ID No.: UN1580
DOT Packaging Exceptions: None
hLSDSCollection
References: 38,73.84.85.87,88.89,90.100,103.109.123,124.126.132.134,
136. 138
h
Prepared by: h4J Allison, BS; Industrial
Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CM; Medical
Review: W Silverman,
MD
Material Safety Data Skeets Collection:
Genium
Ae?
P
Publishing
Corporation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836
(518) 3778854
USA
Sheet No. 470
Diesel Fuel Oil No. 2-D
I Issued:
10/8 1
Revision:
Diesel Fuel 011 No. Z-D Description: Diesel fuel is obtained from the middle distillate in petmleum separation; a distillate
oil of low sulfurcontent
It is campared cl&By of nnbranched paraffins. Diesel fuel Is available in various grades, one of
which is synonymous with fuel oil No. 2-D. This diesel f&l oil requites a miniium
Cetaoe No. (efficiency rating for
diesel fuel comparable to octane number ratings for gasoline) of 40 (ASTM D613). Used as a fuel for trucks, ships. and
other automotive engines; as mmquito coatrol (coating on breeding waters); and for driIIing muds.
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 68334-30-5. diesel fuel.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest Chanicalwcek Buyers’ GuidP) for a suppliers list.
A, 1 l/90
R
I
s
K
I
NFPA
2
2
HMIS
F
20
Cautious: Diesel fuel oil No. 2-D is a skin Irritant and ceotml nervous depressant with high mist concentrations. It is an environmental
Fp,t”
hazard and moderate fm risk.
‘Sec.8
./...../ .. ..,
........__,__..._.. -‘~.:.~.~;~..-l.~.:.~~.~...~~.~...:~~.:.~;
._ ...:r-.......i...:.~.~~..;..
_........:?:F... .(....:...-:
... . . .,:.. .. /../..,/.. ..:....
.
I / . /:;:j:
.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~.:-’
,.
,,,,
,, ,. ,.,/,.,..,,.,.,,, ., ..,.,,,,.
~.,..,,i,.,,........~,,,
: ., .,, .:,,:,.;....~..;..,.,_: .,,:,,..:.,.; ::.:
j :..:: ...... .../i....-:-..i ?;‘:...... . gR. ,j......,.._..__._._....?...__.. _.
Diesel fuel oil No. 2-D*
1989 OSHA PEL
1990-91 ACGIH TLV
l9&3 NIOSH REL
1985-86 Toxlcity Data*
None established
Mineral Oil Mist
None established
Rat, oral, LDs,,: 9 g/kg produces gastrointestinal (hypermotility. diarrhea)
‘IWA: 5 mg7mY
effects
STEL 10 mg/m’
* Diesel fuel Na 2-D tends tc be low in arucuatics and high in parafliaics. This fuel oil is complex mkuuc ofz 1) >95% plnftluic, olefiiic. uaphtheuic, and
aromatic hydrocarbons, 2) sulfur (-z&V&). and3) bcmeoc
(<lo0 ppm). (A low bcuaeae level rcducu carclwgeulc rkk Ifiel oils caa be exempted under tbc
benzeue standud (29 CFR 191OXR8)I. Altbargb low iu the fuel itself, bcazew c~uceolratioos arc likely tobe nurcb blgberin pruecssiog areas.
t As sampled by nonvapurcollectlag m&cd.
IS,~~ti~~~#~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~i~~~~~~~~~~~~~~::~~::~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~.~.:~ijii_
.i>:-;
: ..,;.: ,’ :, .; : i
I .:&
Flash PO&Z 125 ‘F (52 ‘c) min.
1 AutoignItion
Temperature:
>SOO ‘F (932 ‘c) 1 LEL: 0.6% v/v
1 UEL: 7.5% v/v
Extinguishlog
Media: Use dry chemical. carbon dioxide, or foam to fight fn-e. Use a water spray to cool fue exposed containers. Do not use a
forced water spray directIy on burning oil since this will scatter the fue. Use a smothe.ring technique for extinguishing fne.
Unusual Flre or Explosion Hazards: Diesel fuel oil No. 2-D is a OSHA Class II combustible liquid- Its volatility is similar to that of gas oil.
Vapors may travel to a source of ignition and flash back.
‘Special Flre-flghtlng
Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry. Since fii may produce toxic fumes. wear a selkontained
breathing
apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and fall protective clothing. If feasible,
remove containers from ftre. Be aware of runoff from fii control methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways due to pollution and fire or
explosion hazard.
tions. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatlbllities:
It is incompatible with strong oxidizing agents; heating greatly increases the fii hazard.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposltlon:
Thermal oxidative decomposition of diesel fuel oil No. 2-D can product various hydrocarbons and
hydrocarbon derivatives, and other partial oxidation products such as carbon dioxide, carbon mowxide, and sulfur dioxide.
;I::
No. 470
Sktion
Diesel Fuel Oil No. 2-D
6. Health
Hazard
1 l/90
Data
.. . / ..:>;
.II
. :,./...
Carcinogenicity:
Althou h the IARC has not assigned an overall cvahration to diesel f&Is& agroup, it has evaluated cccupationai exposures.in
petroleum refining as an HARC probable human carcinogen (Group 2A). it has evaluated distillate (light) diesel oils as not classifiable as human
carcinogens (Group 3).
Summary of Risks: Although diesel fuel’s toxicologic effects should resemble kcrosine’s. they are somewhat more pronounced due to additives
such as sulfurized esters. Excessive inhalation of aerosol or mist can cause respiratory tract imtation, headache, drzzmess, nausea, vomiting. and
loss of coordination, depending on concentration and exposure time. When removed from exposure ana, affected persons usuaUy.recover
completely. If vomiting occurs after ingestion and if oil IS aspirated into the lungs, hemorrh mg and pulmonary edema, progresstog to renal involvement and chemical pneumonitis, may result A comparative ratio of oral to aspirated 1alal doses may be 1 pt vs. 5 ml. Aspiratton may also
result in transient CNS depression or excitement Secondary effects may include hypoxia (imuffiiient oxygen in body cetls). infection, pncumato~rmas,
respuatory arr=esLand CNS toxrctty.
cele formation, and chrome lung dysfunction. Inhalation may result in eu g,c,o
horia, cardiac dysrb
prolonged or repeated skin contact may irritate hair folticks and block SC
us glands,
ucmg a rash of acne pimples and spots, usually on
arms and legs.
Medkal Conditlons A gravated by Len -Term Exposure: None reported.
Target Organs: Ceo tl-3 nervous system, sS& and mucous membranes.
Prhnar
Entry Routes: Inhalation, ingestion.
Acute %ffects: Systemic effects from ingestion include gastrointestinal irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, and in severe cases central nervott~ s stem
depression, progressing to coma or death. Inhalation of aerosols or mists may result in increased rate of respiration, tachycardia (excessive 1y rapid
heart beat), and cyanosis (dark purplish discoloration of the skin and mucous membranes caused by deficient blood oxygenation).
Chronic Effects: Repeated contact with the skin causes dermatitis.
FIRSTAID
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin: Quickl .J.. remove contaminated clothin . Rinse with fkding amounts of water for at least 15 min. If large areas of the body have been
exposed or rmtatioo persists, get medical fl elp mrmediately.
.
Wash affected area with soap and water.
Inhalation:
Remove exposed person to fresh au and support breathi
as needed.
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convu% mg person. If ingested, do nol induce vomifing due to aspiration hazard.
sician immediately. Position to avoid aspiration.
community medical support.
to aspiration hazard. Preferred antidotes are charcoal and milk In cases of severe
gases to ensure adequate ventilation. Observe the patient for 6 hr. if vital signs become
~~~~~~~siizcla!
:..: ‘P.
;J??o&ctlon
..
.Dja’fa .:.-i:,:-:’j:j:~_’ j :‘j= :..I:; I~~~:-;‘--~I~~‘:: . ‘I$$:- ;:~I;-.‘:~:~~:;:~~~--. ..
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Seek rofessiooal advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary, use a NlOS If -approved respirator with a mist filter and organic vapor cartridge. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills,
reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA.Waming!Air-purfiing
re.spirarors do norprotect workers in oqgm-&@eru
atmospheres.
Other: Wear tmpervious gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent skin contact.
Ventilation:
Provide general and local explostoo- roof ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations that promote worker safety and
roductivity. Local exhaust ventilation is prefe l-J- smce it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.(lo~
!i afety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated
Equipment:
Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from
ur shoes and equipment Launder contaminated clothiig before wearing.
Comments: x”ever eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
~~i~~~~~~,~~~~i~~~~~~~~~~~~~~‘~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~.:~~ ~~~~~~~’
i--::..i -”
1.
!.:.
..
i .. . :.;
Storage Requirements:
Use and storage conditions should be suitable for a OSHA CIass II combustible liquid. Store in closed cootainers’in a’
well-ventilated area away from heat and ignition sources and strong oxidizing agents. protect containers from physical damage. To prevent static
SpdS, electrically
ound and bond all containers and equipment used in shipping, receiving, or transferring operations. Use nonsparking tools
and explosion-proo B electrical equipment. No smoking in storage or use areas.
Engtneerlng Controls: Avoid vapor or mist inhalation and prolon ed skin contact Wear protective rubber gloves and chemical safety glasses
where contact with liquid or high mist concentration may occur. A f ditiooal suitable protective clothing may be required depending on working
eoodmons. lnsntute a respiratory protection program that includes regular training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. Practice good
personal hygiene and housekeeping rocedures. Do not wear oil contaminated clothing. At Ieast weekly laundering of work clothes is recommended. Do not put oily rags in pot Eets. When working with this material, wear gloves or use barrier cream.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shipping Name: Fuel oil
DOT Hazard Class: Combustible liquid
ID No.: NA1993
DOT Label: None
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.118a
DOT Packaging Requirements:
None
MSDS Cofkction Rercrenccs: 1.6.7, 12.7584.
101, 103. 126.127.
132.133,
136, 143, 146
97
prepared by: M.J ABison. BS; Industrial
Hygiene
Review:
DJ Wilson. CIH; Mcdlcd Review: AC Dartington, MD; Edited by: JR Stuart, MS
I
Maierial Safety Data Sheets Collection:
P
Genium
Publishing
Corporation
1145 Catalyn StraetSchenectady, NY 12303-1836
(518) 377-8854
Sheet No. 468
Fuel Oil No. 1
USA
Issued: 3t82
s
Fuel oil no. 1 is available for home heating use.
Other Designations: Coal oil, heating fuel, kmscne, kemsine,rangc oil.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distriiutor. Consult the latest C&n&&&
Buyers’ GtidF,
Revision: A, 1l/90
for a suppliers lisl.
K
2
Cautions: Fuel oil No. 1 is a skin, eye, and mucous membrane irritant and central nervous system (CNS) depressant. Ingestion may Icad
LGt
to arpiradbn pnewnonitir. It isfr0mmabf.c when exposed to heat OTflame.
l ..+c
1989 OSHA PEL
None established
1990-91 ACGIH TLV
None established
1988 MOSH REL
None established
1985-86 Toxicity Data*
Rat, oral, LD,: 9 g/kg; produces gastrointestinal
(hypennotility, diarrhea)
R
effects
r Monitor MOSH, RTECS (HZISOOIXD). for future toxicity data
Boiling Range: 302 to 554 l F (150 to 290 ‘C)
Specific Gravity 0.8251 at 59 ‘F (15 ‘C)
Freezlng Point: -40 ‘F (-40 ‘C)
Water Solubillty: Insoluble
Vapor Pressure, 100 ‘F (38 ‘C): ca 5
%Volatlle by Volume: >99
Viscosity: 160 centistoke at 995 ‘F (37.5 ‘C)
Appearance and Odor: Light amber liquid with a mild petroleum odor.
S,~~ti~~:.~~~iFi~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~::~~~~~~~~~~.~~~‘~.~:..
.J
. . . . .._...
.___...._....n_._..
. ...
.:
. .. .
:.,.:.:
.;,.:“
:;.......
:-.-.~P
:.:.::
:.:...
. . .._......._............/
. . . .
./
..
1.1.
: :.:I
:”
. ..
Flash Point: 100 to 162 ‘F (43 to 72 ‘C) 1 Autoignition
Temperature:
410 ‘F (210 ‘C) 1 LEL: 0.7% v/v
1 UEL: 5% v/v
Extinguishing
Media: Use dry chemcial. carbon dioxide, foam, water fog or spray. Do not use a forced water spray directly on burning oil since
this scatters the fire. Use a smothering technique to extinguish fire.
Unusual Fke or Explosion Hazanis: Caution! Vapors may spread to an ignition or heat source and burn with explosive violence.
Special Fire-fighting
Procedures: Since fii may produce toxic fumes, wear a selfiontained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a fall facepiece
operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and full protective clothing. Be aware of runoff from fii control methods. Da not release
to sewers or waterways due to health and fm or explosion hazard.
::
..
,.: :
&g canditioos. Hazardous polymerization
cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatlbllltles:
Fuel oil no. 1 is incompatible with strong oxidizing agents; heating greatly increases fire hazard.
Condltlons to Avoid: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposltlon:
?hermal oxidative decomposition of fuel oil no. 1 can produce carbon dioxide; incomplete combustion
can produce carbon monoxide.
&ctjQn
6,’ H&ZfH’Ha$&d
DatA; ::;,I:;: .”
.-.::1.;‘:I.
CarclnogeGclty:
Although the IARC has not assigned an overall evaluation, in has evaluated occupational exposures in pctrolcum refining 3~
IARC probable human carcinogens (Group 2A).
Summary of Risks: Fuel oil No. 1 is insufficiently volatile to constituti an acute inhalation hazard. Exccssivc inhalation of ouosol or mirl can
Cause respiratory tract irritation, headache, dizziness, nausea, stupor, convulsions, or unconsciousness, depending on concentration and exposure
time. When removed from exposure area, affected penons usually expcriencc complete recovery. Death may occur by asphyxiation due IO
ConrLuv on rcxr pqe
Copyrich0 1990Cctiumpubl~ CorpMliop
No. 46S
Fuel Oil No. 1
1 l/90
S&ion
6.
PUhOflXY
edema and consolidation.
Health
Hazard
Data
coy&ued
.:.. ::~.::..--;..:~.
r:.
: :;:. ‘.
i
:
lAe lunx changes are w(ed in survivors. The charac&&ic
--.
‘.
;
:.y:.::{.:
lunn lesion is an acute, fulminant
.:.:>,j::,
:..
hemorrhaalc
Target Organs: Cen
purplish coloration of skin and. mucous membranes caused by deficient bl&d
~gfc&ffec’s:
Repeated skm contact causes dennatrhs.
oxygenation).
.
amounts of water for at least 15 min. If 1argc~area.sof the body are exposed or
with soap and water.
Rak: Notify safety personnel, evacuate area for large spills, remove all heat and ignition sources, and provide maximum explosion-proof
ventilation. Cleanu Personnel should protect
ainst vapor inhalation and li uid contact Clean up spills promptly to reduce fm or v or hazards.
Use a noncombustt .E It absorbent material to pit% up small spills or residues. 1 or large spills, dike far ahead to contain. Pick up liquid3 or reclamanon or disposaL Do not release to sewers or waterways due to health and fire and/or exploston hazard. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29
I CFR 1910.1201.
Disposal: Con&t your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Desknations
Liited as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 26121): Ignitable waste
CERCXA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4 - Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 C Fb; 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
OSHA Deslgnatlons
Air Contaminant (29 CFR i910.1000, Subpart Z): Not listed
...... .. ...-.-. .. .
~~~~~ti6r;iia’i’~~S~~d~l.-F~~~~~ti~~~~a~~l:~~~~~:si~-~.~~~~~
~;::>~~~ .,-~~~~~~~
??<:i t:;‘r:: ..-j;~~::~.-~
::.)$;“:: j; ..:.:j ;:. .. .:
:
.. ..;:.. ;. ..6
.. . .
., ..,. .,. ........ ... .:. .... .. ....._‘.. . .._.; . . .... : .,./
.,...
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, Per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Seek rofessiooal advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulatioos (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if oecessary, use a NIOS If -approved respirator with mist filter and organic vapor cartridge. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills,
reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Warning! Au-purfiing
respiraors
do not protect workers in oqzen-deficient
amospheres.
Other: Wear mapervious gloves, boots, aprons. and gauntlets to prevent skin contact Nitrile or polyvinyl alcohol gloves are recommended.
Ventilation:
Provide general and local explosion-proof vmtilatioo systems to maintain airborne conceohations that promote worker safety and
roductivity. Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its souru.tLo~
s afety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Cont?mlnated
Equipment:
Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
ma-$ma.l.lf;m
our shoes and equipment, Launder t~~otamin+d clothing before wearing.
: I? ever eat, drink, or smoke 111work areas. Practrce good personal hygtene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking. using the toile< or applying cosmetics.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shipping Name: Fuel oil
DOT Hazard Class: Combustible liquid
ID No.: NA1993
DOT Label: None
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.118a
DOT Packaging Requirements:
None
/
111
I,,
I
Material Safety D5t5 Sheets Collection:
Genium
Publishing
Corporation
Sheet No. 474
Fuel Oil No. 6
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
a
p
(518) 377-8854
Issued: 10181
Revision: A, 1If90
HMIS
H 0
1989 OSHA PEL
None established
+ A complex
No. 6 with
mixture
low
sulfur
1990-91 ACGM TLV
None established
of @tic,
oleftic,
naphthenic,
((12 and 13%) is commctirll~
and
-tic
hydrocarbons,
including
polycyclic
aromatic
hydmcarbonh Sulfur content is ~2-856. A fuel oil
nvailablr
Vapor Pressure: 0.2 mm Hg at 70 ‘F (21 ‘C)
Water Solubiliiy:
Viscosity: 36,000 ceotistoke at 100 ‘F (37.8 ‘C)
Appearance and Odor: Black liquid to heavy paste with a petroleum odor.
. ... .i ..-.
~~?~~i.~~~~~~-i
.. ..... .../
.: : .....y. .._:.. .....,,.,_.,.,j,.....,.,
1985-86 Toxicity Data t
Rat, oral, ID+ 9 g/kg
1988 NIOSH REL
None established
..
Insoluble
:.--~~~i::k’.:.a.,~~:
‘Liy.r::.f5::i ;:;:i i,i : ,~~~~~l.bll..
j.:i. : : -i-l : I:?:L:L.:.I ;,(i ,;.
..:.. .,:::.A
i ::.:...:.,.:.:.:.-.~-.~.
.._.,....,... .): . .:;.>.:.:.:.:.
Flash Point: 150 to 270 ‘F (66 to 132 ‘C)l Autoignition
Temperature:
765 ‘F (407 ‘C) 1 LEL: 3.9% v/v
1 UEL: 20.1% v/v
Extinguishing
Media: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, foam, wata fog. or spray. Do not use a forced water spray directly on burning bil since
this scatters the fin. Use a smothering technique to extinguish fm. Cool fii-exposed containers with water spray.
Unusual Fire or ExpIosion Hazards: Fuel oil No. 6 is an OSHA Class IIIA combustible liquid that exhibits “boil-over” characteristics.
Special Fire-righting
Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry. Since fire may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing
apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and full protective clothing. If feasible, remove
containers from fire hazard area. Be aware of runoff from fire cootI methods. Do not release to sewexs or waterways.
and&ions.
adous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibllttles:
Incompatible with strong oxidizing agems;; heating greatly increases fire hazard.
Conditions to Avold: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition:
Thermal oxidative decomposition of fuel oil No. 6 can produce various hydrocdns
derivatives and partial
oxidation products including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfurdioxide.
Haz-
and hydrocarbon
No. 474
Fuel Oil No. 6
[Section 6.. Health
I l/90
Hazard’ Data
.‘-.
.
:
. ..’
::,.:._
::.:‘I..: :
..
:
,. ‘, ‘.
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin; &ui&
remove contaminated ciothin . Rinse with flooding amounts of w w for at least 15 min. For reddened or blistered skin. consult a
fp
&h
affected area with soap anfwater.
alation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breath& as needed.
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. If ingested, do nil induce vomiring. Consulting a physician
immediately.
After first ald, get ap ropriate in-plant, paramedlq or commnnlty medical support
Note to PhysIciana: cpastnc iavage 1s contraindicated due to aspiration hazard. Preferred antidotes are charcoal and miIk
* EPA (TOSCA) document 8EHQ-Ol81-0377, December, 1980.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~:~.~.~~~~~...~
li:;::::..;..:..._ ..-...:..A.:.. .. _...:.? ~.,.,...................
$......./......
. ............ ,.. ., ......._......./.................
..................... .... ....... .~:... ................ ..j..............
... ... ... .
er or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations.
;i pi;, ;.: . :j.I. :q&$$:
; .;::./ $gzj ; ~:i :$& .;k.;;g
Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
:
Subpart Z): Not iistcd
.... ..,/ .
B~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~d~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.
:%......%...... ... ... ....._!
.,.. ,.,.,.,.........,..................
. ...... .... ...... .. .. . .......... .. .
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shipping Name: Fuel oil
DOT Hazard Class: Combustible liquid
ID No.: NAi993
DOT Label: None
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.llBa
DOT PackagIng Requirements:
None
MSD.SCoUecfion References: 1.6,7.12,73,84.103,
Prepared by: UI Allison. BS; Industrial
.
.
I~~~~~~~~~:.~::~~~~~~~~
“;i .zy;.
.:’ :. .,
...g;;;,;. :
-... .i:.:.:..._.... .
’
126.131.132.133.136.143
98
Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CIH; MedIcsi Revlen: W Silverman, MD; Edited by: JR Stuati. MS
coprlgld
0 1990 by Ocolum Publbhhg
Capontim
Any cemmcrdal
UIC 01 rcpradwlion
vi-t
me pblktds
Ucn~cmliJy
urpuchuc<*
rc-ibilily.AJlhou~hrc~ca.blc
c~chubernutc”
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00 ruporuib!X*
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rm wrLIuics.
m*c,
7.2 ,c;I~Maw3.
d su WC
ptupa
&Id 1S”rnCl
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium
a
p
Publishing
Corporation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836
(518) 377-8854
Sheet No. 467
Automotive
Gasoline,
USA
Issued: 10/8 1
Lead-free
Revision:
A,
9191
-;,
.. .. _...... . =.-.._........
y++-.-.y<.:<. \\&v..:<.:<.,
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_...~ . .. . .“.;,:...:.:.:.~;.:.~:.......:.
:.:(..
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. .. .._
. . _ (.. ..,>.,$.
..x.,..? .,.._..._ r;. . ..>P ,_..,. >.t,,
k...?A..$..W..>.V
.. . c
.s .I .?..a
. . .,
,.,
NFPA
*
paraffms. cycloparaffms, olefw naphthcncs. and aromatics In general, gasolimc is produced
from p~tr~kum, shale oil,
Athabasca tar sar&, and coal. Motor gasolines arc made chiefly by cracking processes. which convert heavier petroleum
fractions into more volatile tractions by thermal or catalytic decomposition. Widely used as fuel in internal combustion
engines of the spark-ignited, reciprocating type.. Automotive gasoline has an octane number of approximately 90. A high
eonteat of aromatic hydrocarbons and a consequent hiih toxicity am also associated with a high octane rating. Some
gasolines sold in the US contain a minor proportion of tctrac.thyBcad. which is added in concentrations not exceeding 3 ml
per gallon to prevent engine -knock-” However, methyl-t&-butyl
ether mE)
bar almost completely replaced
tetraethyllead.
Other Desfgnatlons: CAS No. 8006-61-9, bcnxitr, gasoline. gasolcnc, motor spirits, natural gasoline, p&oL
Manufactnrer:
Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemicul Wrek Buyers Guide”) for a suppliers list
H t*
f;,,”
absorption
FY
L
:
PPGt
tSec.8
Cautions: Inhalation of automotive gasoline vapors can cause intense burning in throat and lungs, central nervous system (CNS)
depression, and possible fatal pulmonary edema. Gasoline is a dangerous fm and explosion haxatd when exposed to heat and flames.
I
, ‘<‘*’ ~,~,~~~,~~.~~~~~~~~...,; ;t; +..s*..
~~~~*~.:~.~...~;.:.~~~~:~~..~~
.....,.%.A
I....yz
~~~~
. ...... >..__<>_, ,~
.
_.. .%
.._ ._,..___...
... i.........Y.....__._...
. ..A.
..%...+\a...>...c.>
(.._.....__.Y___..____
.??L:.:?%
_...,zm.%%~2:~r:...
....?Te.Y...:
.A..(-*,- ..r.‘r?
__._
“.~~..l,~~~.l:,.~~~~.~~~.~.~.~?
r.c+..,.~.s.h..~\\x*:. ,._ n.A. ...........A.......
I..,...
..-.. .. .. .. ..L _. .L.,%
........?........f ........\. .......s0... ... .___...__..._....__..............
Automotive gasoline, lead-free*
1990 OSHA PELs
LX-hrTWA: 300 ppm, 900 mg/d
15-min STEL: 500 ppm. 1500 mg!m’
1990-91 ACGIH TLVs
TWA: 300 ppm, 890 mg/m’
Sl’EL 500 ppm, 1480 mg/m’
1990 NIOSH REL
None established
1985-86 Toxicity Data*
Man, inhalation, TG 900 ppmll ta; toxic effects include sense
organs and special senses (conjunctiva irritation), behavioral
(hallucinations, distorted perceptions), lungs, thorax or
respiration (cough)
Human, eye: 140 ppmll hr; toxic effects include mild irritation
Rat, inhalation, LIZ%: 300 g/r&S min
* A typical modem gasoline composition is SO%pataftins, 14% aromatics. and 6% olefins. The mean benzene cootent is approximately 1%. Other additives include
sulfur, phosphorus, and hITEE.
(60 ‘C); after 50% distilled, 230 ‘F (110 ‘C); after 90% distilled,
338 ‘F (170 ‘C); final boiling point, 399 ‘F (204 ‘C)
Vapor Density (air = 1): 3.0 to 4.0
Appearance
Water Solubllity:
Insoluble
and Odor: A clear (gasoline may be colored with dye), mobile liquid with a characteristic odor recognizable at about 10 ppm in air.
fm, but use water spray to knock down vapors and to cool fue-exposed drums and tanks to prevent pressure rupture. Do not use a solid stream of
water since it may spread the fuel.
Unusual Fire or Ex-plmlon Hazards: Automobile gasoline is au OSHA Class IB flammable liquid and a dangerous fire and explosion hazard
when exposed to heat and flames. Vapors can flow to an ignition source and flash back. Automobile gasoline can also react violently with
oxidizing agents.
Special Fire-fighting
Procedures: Isolate hazard axca and deny entry. Since fm may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing
apparatus @CBA) with a full facepiece operated in pnssuredemand
or positive-pressure mode, and full protective clothing. When the fire is
extinguished, use nonsparking tools for cleaoup. Be awam of runoff from fne control methods. Do not release
to .sewers
. ..i. .,..~.or waterways.
.~.~~. ‘E .. ............:““
. ..z .~ ..... .~..;
...._
vcy
,.......
~,-‘...... ~,,~,~.~~~~~~~
.... ..,................;
_.......,.;
_.............
“~.
.....,,..‘,. .i..
y~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
7,.>.,. .:A.+>,.>:
..,...
P..%
__, ,
~
::.:.:~:~..:.~.:.~.~:~~.~~.~.~~~.~,
:.:.:.:
.,......,.
.*..:.,.:.<c
_ ,....._.,.
..<..r..r
......................<.. .8........<.I....:.>...~~>..>.<..*~
Stability/Polymerization:
Automotive gasoline is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions.
Hazardous polymerization
cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Automotive gasoline can react with oxidizing materials such as peroxides, nitric acid, and perchlorates.
Conditions to Avold: Avoid heat and ignition SOUKWS.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition:
Tbetmal oxidative decomposition of automotive gasoline can produce oxides of carbon and partially
oxidized hydrocarbons.
--
and passive congestion of spleen.
Chronic Effects: Chronic inhalation results in a p&e loss, nausea, weight loss, insomnia, and unusual sensitivity (hyperesthesia) of the distal
extremities followed by motor weakness, muscu Par degeuzration, and diminished tendon reflexes and coordination. Repeated skin exposure can
cause blistering, drying, and lesions.
FIRSTAID
of wata until transported to an emergency medical
. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 tnir~ For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
After first ald, get appropriate
in-plant,
paramedic,
or community
medical support,
&n~l indwze votillg
due 19 aspir$ion hazard.
to dti& Consult a physician tmmedtattly.
Spill/Leak:
Notify safety personnel, evacuate. all u nnecessary -Mel,
remove heat and i ‘tion sources, and provide maximum explosion-pmol
ills with sand or
ventilation. Cleanu personnel should protect against vapor inhalation and liquid c~otact P se nonsparking tools. Take up small
other nonc.ombusU 4’ le adsorbent Dike storage areas to control leaks and spills. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 19T 0.120).
Aquatic Toxicity: Bluegill, frcshwa!er, IX ,8 [email protected] hr.
Dis osal: Contact your supplier or a licensa contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPi Designations
RCRA Hazardous
Waste (40 CFR 261.21): Characteristic of ignitability
CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 37265): Not listed
OSHA Designations
to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact Materials such as neoprene or
tive clothing. Note: Resistance of specific rmaterials can vary from product to
entilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below the OSHA PELs
(Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents Mntaminant dispersion into the work area by cooU~Uog it at ifi source.om)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency e ewash statior~s, safe Iquick-dnoch showers, and washmg facrhties.
Contaminated
Equipment:
Remove this material from your sL
?a under contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: Never eat, dri& or smoke in work areas. Practice goodmsz%$ioe
after using this material, especially &fore eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
Storage Requirements:
Store in closed containers in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from heat and i nition sources and strong oxidizing
agents. Protect containers from physical damage. Avoid direct sunlight. Storage must meet requinzments of % SHA Class IB liquid. Outside or
detached storaee oreferred.
Eogineerlng ~o&ols:
Avoid va r inhalation and skin or eye c~otact Consider a respiratory pmtccti~n
program that includes ngular training,
mamtenance. inspection, and eva p”uahon. Indoor use of this material requires explosion-proof exhaust venbiahon to remove vapors. only use
gasoline as a fuel source due to its volatility and flammable/explosive
nature. Practice good personal hygiene and housekeeping procedures. Wear
clean work clothing daily.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101, -102)
Dt 3T Shippine: Name: Gasoline (including
ca.sin~-head
and na~uraI)
IMO Sblpplog I+
DOT HazardClass:
Flammable liquid
ID No.: UN1203
DOT Label: Flammable liquid
DOT Packaehw Exceotions: 173.118
D(3T Packa&;--m---x Reaiirements:
173.119
~--MSDS ColIt ctioo References: 26.73.89.100.
101.103.124. 126. 127.132 133. 136.138.140.143.146.153.1S9
PreDared bv: M Allison, BS: Ind&&l
&&ne
Review: dJ Wiisoo..CI}lf Medical ReGeew:iv Sik.mk.
MD; Edlted
bg: JR Stuart. hlS
.
-
_-- -_
- _-_.
DATE:
3 Dee l-990
HCSDS NO:
20058A
//POISON\\
\ GAS /
\
/
u-sARMY CHEMICAL
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT“
AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
v
D,
AND THD (See
Addendum
A)
Emergency
Telephone
#s:
CRDEC Safety
Office
301-671-4411
0700-1700
EST After
normal
duty
hours:
301-278-5201
Ask for CRDEC Staff
Duty
Officer
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
.----------------c---------------------------------------------------------SECTION I - GENERAL INFORMATION.
..
.--------------------------------------------------------------------------IANUFACTURER'S
NmEt
FACTURER'S
Department
ADDRESS:
HEMICAL
NUMBER:
the
Army
U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT, MUNITIONS
AND CHEMICAL COMMAND
CHEMICAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
ATTN:
SMCCR-CMS-E
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD 21010-5423
I
AS REGISTRY
of
505-60-2,
39472-40-7,
..
68157-62-O
NAME AND SYNONYMS:
Sulfide,
bis
(2-chloroethyl)
Bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide
Bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide
1-chloro-2(beta-chloroethylthio)ethane
beta,
beta'-dichlorodiethyl
2,2'dichlorodiethyl
sulfide
Di-2-chloroethyl
sulfide
beta,
beta '-dichloroethyl
sulfide
2,2 '-dichloroethyl
sulfide
sulfide
aDE NAME AND SYNONYMS:
)
Senfgas
S-lost
Sulphur
mustard
gas
S-yperite
Yellow
Cross
Liquid
Yperite
llfur
mustard
rit
.mpstoff
"Lost"
*rd
EMICAL
Gas
FAMILY:
RMULA/CHEM~CAL
chlorinated
sTRucTuRE:
sulfur
compound
H
HS
H
H
7
I
1
I
- c -_ c - s - c - c - Cl
I
I
I
I
.H
H
H
H
H
CQ(H8)C12(s)
Cl
'PA 704
SIGNAL:
4
1
1
Health
FlammabilityReactivity-
,
/\
/Cl
(4
A
x1
Y/v
)
V
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
SECTION
II
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
qGREDIENTS
NAME
FORMULA
;zlfur
C4(H8) ClZ'(S)
Mustard
PERCENTAGE
BY WEIGHT
POINT
DEG F (DEG C):
AIRBORNE'
'
EXPOSURE LIMIT
0.003
100
SECTION
OILING
: COMPOSITION
III
422
- PHYSICAL
DEG F
(217
mg/m3
(AEL)
(8 hr-TWA)
DATA
DEG C)
..
APOR PRESSURE (mm Hg):
APOR DENSITY
(AIR=l):
OLUBILITY
IN
etrachloroethane,
PECIFIC
GRAVITY
OLATILITY:
(0.11
Soluble
in
610 mg/m3
920 mg/m3
1.27
c
acetone,
CH3(Cl),
ether.
@ 20 DEG C
@ 20 DEG C
@ 25 DEG C
Water
clear
if pure.
Normally
Slight
garlic
type odor.
The
is 0.0006
mg/m3
SECTION
IV
- FIRE
pale yellow
odor threshold
AND EXPLOSION
-___-----------^----______^_____________------------
(METHOD USED):
LIMITS
mm Hg @ 25 DEG C).
5.5
(H20=1):
------------__
'LAMMABILITY
mm Hg @ 20 DEG C
-WATER:
Negligible.
ethylbenzoate,
and
PPEARANCE AND ODOR:
LASHPOINT
0.072
105 DEG C (ignited
(% by volume):
by large
to
black.
.for
HD
DATA
explosive
charges)
Unknown
;XTINGUISHING
MEDIA:
foam,
C02.
Water,
Avoid
use of extinguishing
fog,
lethods
that
will
splash
or spread
mustard.
il
PECIAL FIRE FIGHTING
PROCEDURES:
All
persons
not engaged
in
extinguishing
.he fire
should
be immediately
evacuated
from the area.
Fires
involving
HD
;hould
be contained
to prevent
contamination
to
uncontrolled
areas.
When
'esponding
to a- fire
alarm
in buildings
or
areas
containing
agents;
fire-
ighting
personnel
should
wear full
firefighter
protective
clothing
(without
3 clothing)
during
chemical
agent
firefighting
and fire
rescue
operations.
spiratory
protection
is
required.
Positive
pressure,
full
facepiece,
xQ"H-approved
self-contained
breathing
apparatus
(SCBA) will
be worn where
: is danger
of oxygen
deficiency
and
4'
when directed
by the fire
chief
or
hL&.ical
accident/incident
(CAI)
operations
officer.
The M9 or Ml7
series
no danger
of oxygen
.ask
be worn
in
lieu
of
SCBA when
there
is
may
cases where firefighters
are responding
to a chemical
acci.eficiency.
In
.ent/incident
for
rescue/reconnaissance
firefighting,
purposes
vice
they
*ill
wear appropriate
levels
of protective
clothing
(see Section
8).
________------------------------------------------------------------
--w----
SECTION V - HEALTH HAZARD DATA
--------------------------------------------------------------------------IRBORNE
EXPOSURE
LIMIT
(AEL):
The AEL for HD is 0.003 mg/&
as proposed
n the USAEHA Technical
Guide No. 173, I' Occupational
Health
Guidelines
for
he Evaluation
and Control
of Occupational-Exposure
to Mustard
Agents
H, HD,
nd
HT".
No individual
should
be intentionally
exposed
to any direct
skin
r eye contact.
:FFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE:
HD is a vesjcant
(causing
blisters)
and alkylating
.gent
producing
cytotoxic
action
on the
hematopoietic
(blood-forming)
.issues
which
are especially
sensitive.
The rate
of detoxification
of HD in
he
body
is
very
slow and repeated
exposures-produce
a cumulative
effect.
fD has
been found
to be a human carcinogen
by the International
Agency
for
:esearch
on Cancer
(IARC).
'-an doses
Ji
(skin)
(skin)
of
HD in
man are:
=
=
=
=
100 mg/kg
2000 mg-min/m3
at 70 - 80 DEG F (humid environment)
1000 mg-min/m3
at 90 DEG F (dry environment)
:Ct50
(eyes)
200 mg-min/m3
1Ct50 (inhalation)
= 1500 mg-min/m3
(Ct unchanged
with
time)
D50 (oral)
= 0.7 mg/kg
:Ct50
Iaximum
KUTE
safe
Ct
for
PHYSIOLOGICAL
skin
ACTION
and
eyes
are
OF HD IS
5 and
CLASSIFIED
2 mg-min/m3,
respectively.
AS LOCAL AND SYSTEMIC.
.
x)CALLY,
HD affects
both the eyes and the skin.
occurs
after
SKIN
damage
lercutaneous
resorption.
Being
lipid
soluble,
HD can be resorbed
into
all
lrgans.
Skin
penetration
is
rapid
without
skin
irritation.
Swelling
blisters)
and
of
the
skin
occurs
after
a latency
reddening
(erythema)
eriod
of 4-24 hours
following
the exposure,
depending
on degree
of exposure
The skin
healing
process
is very
slow.
Tender
nd individual
sensitivity.
kin,
mucous
and perspiration
covered
skin
are more sensitive
to
membrane
he effects
of HD.
HD'S effect
on the skin,
however,
is less
than
on
the
yes.
Local
action
on the eyes produces
severe
necrotic.damage
and loss
of
yesight.
aerosol
produces
lacrimation,
Exposure
of eyes to HD vapor
or
hotophobia,
and inflammation
of the conjunctiva
and cornea.
YSTEMIC
ACTIONS
occur
r or aerosol
is less
inhaled,
the
upper
I- samed
after
a few
oughing,
and
bronchitis,
CPOSure to nearly
lethal
mph
nodes,
and spleen
The HD
primarily
through
inhalation
and ingestion.
form.
than
the
toxic
to the skin,or
eyes
liquid
respiratory
tract
(nose,
throat,
trachea)
is
hours
latency
period,
accompanied
by
sneezing,
loss
of appetite,
diarrhea,
fever,
and apathy.
bone
marrow,
dose of HD can
produce
injury
to
as indicated
by a drop
in WBC count
and, therefore,
-esul.ts
in increased
susceptibility
to
local
:ngestion
of
MD will
severe
stomach
produce
itools
after
a 15-20 minute
latency
period.
:HRONIC EXPOSURE to
Icough,
shortness
Tespiratory
tract,
HD cdn cause
sensitization,
chest
pain),
of breath,
and
leukemia.
skin,
:MERGENCY AND FIRST
AID
:NHALATION.
five
artificial
:eek medical
and
pains,
systemic
vomiting,
infections.
and bloody
chronic
lung
impairment,
and cancer
of the mouth,
throat,
It may also'cause
birth
defects.
PROCEDURES:
If breathing
has
Remove from the source
IMMEDIATELY.
respiration.
If breathing
is difficult,
administer
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
stopped,
oxygen.
:YE CONTACT.
Speed in
decontaminating
the eyes
is
absolutely
essential.
:emove person
from the liquid
source,
flush
the eyes immediately
with
water
)y tilting
the head to the side , pulling
the eyelids
apart
with the
fingers
nd pouring
water
slowly
into
the eyes.
cover
eyes
with
bandages
Do not
but, if necessary,
protect
eyes by means of dark
or opaque goggl&s.
Transier the patient
to a medical
facility
IMMEDIATELY.
XIN CONTACT.
remove victim
Don,respiratory
protective
mask
and gloves;
tram agent
source
immediately.
Flush
skin
and clothes
with
5 percent
soluLion of sodium
hypochlorite
or liquid
household..bleach
within
one minute.
.tit and remove
contaminated
clothing,
flush
contaminated
skin
area
again
rith 5 percent
sodium
hypochlorite
solution,
then
wash
contaminated
skin
rea
If
shower
facilities
are
available,
wash
with
soap
and
water.
:horoughly
and transfer
to medical
facility.
If the
skin
becomes
contamnated
with
material
immediately
a thickened
agent,
blot/wipe
the
off
pith an absorbent
pad/paper
towel
prior
to
using
decontaminating
solution.
=.
t
NGESTION.
Do
ledical
attention
not
induce
IMMEDIATELY.
vomiting.
Give
victim
milk
to
drink.
Seek
-------------------------.--------I---------------------------------------
SECTION VI
--------------------------------------------------------------------------TABILITY:
49 DEG
oisture,
Conditions
steel
at
DECOMPOSITION:
AZARDOUS POLYMEHIZATION:
----------__
DATA
Stable
at ambient
temperatures.
Decomposition
temperature
iS
C to 177 DEG C.
Mustard
is a persistent
agent
depending
on pH and
and has been known to remain
active
for up to three
years
in soil.
NCOMPATIBILITY:
. Will
corrode
AZARDOUS
hiodiglycol.
- REACTIVITY
to avoid.
Rapidly
corrosive
to brass
@ 65 DEG
a rate
of .OOOl in. of steel
per month @ 65 DEG C.
Mustard
Will
not
will
hydrolyze
form
to
HCl
and
occur.
-------,,--,,L,-,,,----------,,-,,,,,,-,-----------------------
- SPILL,
SECTION VII
-------------_--_-______________________-
LEAK,
AND DISPOSAL PROCEDURES
______^_--------------------------
TEPS TO BE TAKEN IN CASE MATERIAL IS RELEASED
n full
protective
clothing
(see Section
8) will
ustard
is spilled.
ECOMMENDED FIELD PROCEDURES:
he mustard
be contained
should
using
OR SPILLED:
be allowed
vermiculite,
in
Only personnel
an area where
dia tomaceous
earth,
i\
..
lay
=
or fine
sand
5.25
percent
and
neutralized
as soon as possible
Sodium
Hypochlorite
solution.
using
amounts
COpiOUS
all
place
in an approved
DOT container.
,aop up
material
and
Cover
the
~r'ynts
of the drum with
decontaminating
solution
as above.
The
exterior
d
.he drum shall
be decontaminated
and
then
labeled
IAW EPA and DOT
agulations.
All
leaking
containers
shall
be overpacked
with
vermiculite
Decontaminate
laced
between
the
and
exterior
containers.
interior
and
abel
IAW
EPA
and
DOT
regulations.
Dispose
of
the
material
IAW waste
dis-
Dispose
of the material
used to decontaminate
osal methods
provided
below.
xterior
of drum .IAW Federal,
state
and local
regulations.
Conduct
general
rea monitoring
with
an approved
monitor
(see Section
8) to confirm
that
the
tmospheric
concentrations
do not exceed the airborne
exposure
limit
(see
ections
2 and 8).
f 5.25
percent
Sodium Hypochlorite
solution
is not available
then
decontaminants
be used
instead
and are listed
in the
may
reference:
Calcium
Hypochlorite,
Decontamination
Solution
No.
nd Super
Tropical
Bleach
Slurry
(STB).
WARNING:
Pure,
undiluted
ypochlorite
(HTH) will
burn on contact
with
liquid
blister.
agent.
owing
the folorder
of
2 (DS2),
Calcium
ECOMMENDED LABORATORY PROCEDURES:
minimum
of 65 grams of decon solution
per gram of HD is allowed
to agitate
or a minimum
of one hour.
Agitation
is not necessary
following
the first
our if a single
phase
is obtained.
At the end of 24 hours,
the resulting
olution
shall
be adjusted
to a pH between
IO aGd 11.
Test
for presence
of
ctive
chlorine
by use of acidic
potassium
iodide
solution
to
give
free
odine
color.
Place
3 ml of the decontaminate
in a test
tube.
Add several
. stals
of
Potassium
Iodine
and
swirl
to dissolve.
Add 3 ml of 50 wt
:ent
Sulfuric
Acid:water
and swirl.
IMMEDIATE
Iodine
color
indicates
r
s..
Tresence
of active
chlorine.
If negative,
add additional
5.25
percent
4
elm Hypochlorite
solution
to the
decontamination
solution,
wait
two
:ours,
Continue
procedure
until
posithen
test-again
for
active
chlorine.
ive
chlorine
is given
by solution.
L 10 wt
percent
:odium Hypochlorite.
:est as described
Calcium
hypochlorite
Use 65 grams of
for Sodium Hypochlorite.
(HTH) mixture
may be substituted
decon per gram of HD and continue
for
the
conicoop up all
material
and place
in approved
DOT containers..
Cover the
:ents
of
the
drum with
decontaminating
solution
as above.
The exterior
pf
:he drum shall
be
decontaminated
and then
labeled
IAW EPA and DOT regula:ions.
be
overpacked
with
vermiculite
placed
All
leaking
containers
shall
IAW
)etween
the interior
and exterior
containers.
Decontaminate
and label
5PA and DOT regulations.
Dispose
of the material
IAW waste disposal
methods
lrovided
below.
Dispose
of the material
used to decontaminate
exterior
of
trum IAW Federal,
Conduct
general
area monitorstate
and local
regulations.
Lng with
an approved
monitor
(see Section
8) to confirm
that
the atmospheric
:oncentrations
do not exceed
the airborne
exposure
limits
(see Section
8).
TOTE:
?volve
Surfaces
sufficient
contaminated
with
mustard
to
.vapor
HD
produce
and
then
rinse-decontaminated
a physiological
response.
may
should
be
collected;
JASTE DISPOSAL METHOD:
All
decontaminated
material
:ontained
and
chemically
decontaminated
or thermally
decomposed
in an EPA
-oved
filter
or scrub
toxic
by-products
from
incinerator,
which
will
.uent
atmosphere.
contaminated
air
before
discharge
to
the
Any
using
bleach
and
)rotective
clothing
HTH or
should
be decontaminated
The
lnalyzed
to
assure
it
is free
of detectable
contamination
(3X)
level.
:lothing
should
then
be sealed
in plastic
bags inside
properly
labeled
drums
-.
nd held
for
point.
material
accordance
utlined
shipment
back to the DA issue
shall
be accomplished
in
above with
the following
exception:
---_
eaction
HD on .laboratory
with
concentrated
r excess
pen pit
D in any
OTE:
aste.
burning
quantity
Some states
or
is
nitric
glassware
acid.
burying
of
prohibited.
define
HD'or
decontaminated
may
items
ESPIRATORY
oxidized
by
containing‘or
surety
--------------------______^_____________----------------------------------SECTION VIII
- SPECIAL
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
be
Decontamination
with
the
Of.wast-e
procedures
its
vigorous
contaminated
material
with
as a RCRA hazardous
PROTECTION
INFORMATION
PROTECTION:
oncentration
v/m3
---a---------
Respiratory
ess
to
Protective
mask not required
provided
that:
(a)
Continuous
real-time
monitoring
(with
alarm capability)
is conducted
in the
work area at the 0.003 mg/m3 level
of
detection.
M9,
Ml7 or M40 mask is available
and
(b)
donned if ceiling
concentrations
exceed
0.003 mg/ln3.
(c)
Exposure
has been limited
to the extent
practicable
by engineering
controls
(remote
operations,
ventilation,
and
process
isolation)
or work practices.
than
or equal
0.003
as an
8-hr
TWA
Protection/Ensemble
Requi'red
-^------------------__________^_________-------
If these
following
conditions
applies:
are
not
met
then
the
chemical
canister,
airFull
facepiece,
purifying
respiratiors.
(The M9, M17, or
.
M40 series
or other
certified
equivalent
masks are acceptable
for this
purpose
in conjunction
with
the M3 toxicological
agent
protective
(TAP) suit
for dennal
protection.)
,eater
than
003 as an
hr TWA
The Demilitarization
Protective
Ensemble
may be used with
prior
(DPEI , 30 mil,
approval
from the AMC Field
Safety
Activity
Use time
for the 30 mil
DPE must be restricted
. to two hours
or less.
When 30 mil DPE is not available
the
NOTE:
M9 or M40 series
mask with
Level
A protective
ensemble
including
impregnated
inner-wear
However,
can be used.
use time
shall
be
restricted
to the extent
operationally
and may not
exceed
one
hour.
feasible,
an additional
the sleeves
and
be taped
to the
As
precaution,
the
legs
gloves
to reduce -aspiration.
the cuffs
of
the M3 suit
shall
and boots respectively
of
k.,fLATION:
ocal
Exhaust.
Mandatory.
Must be filtered
or scrubbed.
pecial.
Chemical
laboratory
hoods shall
have an average
inward
face
elocity
of
100 linear
feet per minute (lfpm)
plus or minus 10% with the
elocity
at any point
not deviating
from the average face velocity
by more
hat
20%.
Laboratory
hoods shall be located
such that cross drafts
do not
xceed 20% of the inward face velocity.
A visual
performance
test utilizing
moke producing
devices
shall
be performed
in assessing
the ability
of
the
ood to contain
agent HD.
ther.
Recirculation
of
air
exhaust
onnection
between agent area and other
s permitted.
Emergency backup power is
emi-annually
or
after
modification
or
hould be performed
20 cm inside
hoods.
ROTECTIVE GLOVES:
M3, M4, gloveset).
:YE PROTECTION:
.azard use goggles
MANDATORY.
As a minimum,
and face-shield.
Butyl
from agent areas is prohibited.
No
areas through the ventilation
system
necessary.
Hoods should'be
tested
maintenance
operations.
Operations
toxicological
chemical
goggles
agent
will
protective
be worn.
gloves
For
splash
Full protective
clothing
will
consist
of the
'? 'R PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT:
t
xlty1
rubber
suit
with
hood,
M2A1 boots,
M3 gloves,
impregnated
tiuerwear,
M9 series
mask
and
coveralls
(if
desired),
or
the
lemilitarization
For general
lab work, gloves
Protective
Ensemble
(DPE).
nd lab coat shall
be worn with M9 or Ml7 mask readily
available.
:n addition,
loot covers,
when handling
contaminated
lab
and head covers are required.
[ONITORING:
Available
monitoring
equipment
or paper,
blue band tube, M256/M256Al
kits,
:Oring System (DAMMS), Automated
Continuous
IAM-Ml, Hydrogen Flame Photometric
Emission
ure Chemical
Agent Monitor
(MINICAM).
animals,
a
daily
clean
smock,
for
agent HD is the M8/M9 detecbubbler,
Depot Area Air MoniAir Monitoring
System
(ACAMS'),
Detector
(HYFED), and the Minia-
---------------_____________________L___-----------------------------------
SECTION
XX - SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS
-----------_________________________L___-----------------------------------
RECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN HANDLING
AND STORING:
uring
handling,
(two-man)
system will
be used.
Containers
the
"buddy"
hould be periodically
inspected
for
leaks,
a
either
visually
or using
etector
work
kit,
and prior
to transfering
the containers
from storage
to
reas.
Stringent
control
over all personnel
handling
HD must be exercised.
hemical
showers,
and personal
cleanliness
facilities
must,
eyewash stations,
rovided.
wash their
hands before meals and shower
Each worker
will
oughly with special
attention
given to hair,
face, neck,
and hands using
- ..'tY
of soap
leaving
at the
end of the work day.
No smoking,
before
ating,
or drinking
is permitted
at the
work site.
Decontaminating
equipent shall
be conveniently
located.
Exits
must
be designed
to permit
rapid
vacuation.
made of glass
-for Research,
HD should
be stored
in
containers
-..--
evelopment,
Evaluation
and
quantities-
Test
ainers
for
large
ight
containers
when
in
Agent
(RDTE) quantities
shall
or one-ton
be double-contained
steel
conin liquid-
storage.
THER PRECAUTIONS:
For additional
information
see AMC-R 385-131,
“Safety
egulations
for Chemical
Agents
H, HD, HT, GB and VX" and USAEHA Technical
uide No.173,
"Occupational
Health
Guidelines
for the Evaluation
and Control
f Occupational
Exposure
to Mustard
Agents H, HD, and HT".
----------------------,--,-^---,,,,,,-^--------------------------------
...
-s--
SECTION X - TRANSPORTATION DATA
--------------------------------------------------------------------------ROPER SHIPPING
NAME:
OT HAZARD CLASS:
OT LABEL:
OT
Poison
MARKING:
OT PLACARD:
Poisonous
Poison
liquid,
n.o.s.
A
Gas
Poisonous
liquid,
n-0-s.
(Sulfide,
bis
2-chloroethyl))
NA 1955
POISON GAS
IV and VlII.
MERGENCYACCIDENT PRECAUTIONS AND PROCEDURES: -.See Sections
Motor vehicles
will
be
RECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN
IN
TRANSPORTATION:
and complete
lacarded
regardless
of quantity.
Driver
shall be given full
AR 50-6
nformation
regarding
shipment and conditions
in case of emergency.
eals specifically
with the shipment
of chemical
agents.
Shipment of agents
ill
be escorted
in accordance
with AR 740-32.
Center,
hile
the
Chemical
Research
Development
and Engineering
are
epartment
of the Army believes
that
the
data
contained
herein
actual
and
expressed
are
th0s.e of qualified
experts
the
opinions
egarding
the results
of the tests
conducted,
the data arewnot to be taken
warranty
or representation
for which the Department of the Army or
iEern:cal
legal
Research
and Engineering
Center
assumes
Development
for
your
consideration,
'esponsibility.
They
are
offered
solely
nvestigation,
Any use of these data and information
must
and verification.
Be determined
by
with applicable
the
user
to
be
in
accordance
'ederal,
State,
and local
laws and regulations.
ADDITIONAL
RADE WME
AND SYNONYMS:
ADDENDUM A
INFORMATION
FOR THICKENED
'Thickened
HD
HD, THD
AZARDDUS INGREDIENTS:
K125 (acryloid
copolymer,
D. K125 is
not
known to be hazardous
except
5%)
in
is
used
to
a finely-divided,
thicken
powder
OlTll.
HYSICAL
iSCosity
DATA:
Essentially
of HV is between
the same as HD except
I.000 and 1200 centistokes
viscosity.
for
@ 25 DEG c..
The
.=-.
.
TRE AND EXPLOSION
_ uTH HAZARD
3,
respiratory
JIATELY.
J
&Laminated
DATA:
as
Same
HD.
:
DATA:
Same
protective
IMMEDIATELY
surface
with
as HD except
.for
skin
mask
arid
remove
scrape
the HV form the
acetone.
Seek medical
contact.
For
skin
contact,
contaminated
clothing
skin
surface,
then wash the
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
PILL,
LEAK,
PROCEDURES:
AND DISPOSAL
If spills
or leaks
of HV occur,
allow
the same procedures
as those
for HD, but dissolve
the THD in
acetone
rior
to
introducing
any decontaminating
solution.
Containment
of THD is
enerally
not necessary.
scraped
Spilled
THD can
be carefully
off
the
ontaminated
surface
and placed
in a fully
removable
head drum with
a high
ensity,
polyethylene
lining.
The THD can then be decontaminated,
after
it
as been
dissolved
in
acetone,
using
same procedures
used for
HD.
the
ontaminated
surfaces
should
be treated
with
acetone,
then
decontaminated
sing the same procedures
as those
used for HD.
3TE:
volve
Surfaces
sufficient
PECIAL
contaminated
mustard
PROTECTION
with
vapor
THD or HD and then rinse-decontaminated
to produce
a physiological
respon$e.
INFORMATION:
may
Same as HD.
PECIAL PRECAUTIONS:
Same as HD with
the following
addition.
Handling
the
HD requires
careful
observation
of the "stringers"
(elastic,
thread-like
ttachments)
formed
when the agents
are
or
dispensed.
These
transferred
tringers
must
be broken
cleanly
before
moving
the contaminating
device
or
ispensing
device
to
another
location,,
:.or
unyanted
contamination
of
a
Lq--'-ing
surface
will
result.
F
'SPORTdTION
DATA:
Same
as
HD.
A-9
_....
-.--
---
Material
Name:
hfEIXyLENE
CHLORIDE
Description (0rlginIKJse.s): Used widely in paint removers, as a solvent for plastics. as a degr=sing
qpd, in pqxllaot
mixturts fcr aemsol sprays, and as a blowing agent in foams.
Other Designations: Dichlommethane;
Freon 3*, Methane Dichloride;
MetbyleDc Dichloride; CH&
CAS No. 0075-09-Z
Methylene Bichloride;
2*0
.s
ii?
R
1
w
NFPA
Manufacturer:
Contact your sqplia or distributcr. Consult the latest edition of the Cknicukek
Buyers’ Guide (Geoium ref. 73) for a list of suppliers.
OSHA PEL
I-Hour TWk
500 ppm
Ceiling: 1000 ppm Acceptable Maximum Peak
above the Ceiling: 2COO ppm for 5 Minutes in
Any 2-Hour Period
Appearance
and Odor:
ACGIH’TLV,
l9Sg-89
TLV-TWA:
so ppm, 175 mglIl+
(Adopted 1988-89)
A clear, colorless, volatile liquid; distinctive,
Toxicity Data*
Ra& Oral, LD; 2136 mg/kg
Human, Inhalation, TC,: 500 ppm (8 Hours)
penetrating, ethereal odor. The odor will not serve as a useful
Form at approximately 212’F (1OOC). Use water spray to cool fm-exposed containers and to flush spills away from exposures. Use
:xtinguishing agents that will put out the surrounding fiie. Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Methylene chloride vapor is heavier
han air and may collect and concentrate in low-lying, confmed spaces. The high vapor pressure of metbylene chloride means that when it
.s spilled, its vapor concentration in air eao increase. rapidly. If this vapor is heated, an explosion hazard is associated with the vapor-air
nixhue. Containers of this ‘material may rupture violently if they arCinvolved in fm. Special Fire-fighting
Procedures
Wear a selfzontaioed breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full faeepiece operated in the pressuredemand or positive-pressure mode.
..
CJE ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
; .;~~:~~:,:~:~~:~~~~~~~::~~~~~~~~~~~,
StabBlty/Polymerizatlon:
Methylene chloride is stable in closed containers during routine operations. Hazardous wlvmerization
cannot
. .
mur. Cbemlcal I.ncompatibBitks:
Methylem
chloride can reset dangerously v&h nitrogen tetroxide. liquid oxygen, potassium. sodium,
tedium-potassium
alloys, lithium, potassium hydroxide with N-methyl-N-nitroso
uma, potassium r-butoxide, and fmely powdered alumisum and magnesium. Conditions to Avold: Avoid all exposure to souses of ignition, heat, and incompatible chemicals. Prolonged
:xposure to water may cause hydrolysis to highly corrosive hydrochloric acid when the temperature is above 140-F (6o’C). In oxygen:nriched atmospheres or when heated (>212’F [lDO’C]), methylme chloride vapor can be readily ignited. Hazardous Products of
Decomposltlon:
Exposure to high temperature (from open flame, hot surfaces, uninsulated steam !ines, welding arcs, etc.) can produce
oxic and corrosive thermal-oxidative
pmducts of decomposition such as hydrogen chloride. carbon monoxide, and evm small quantities of
shosgene gas, which is extremely poisonous.
:
:: ; .:..I -:-~:E~~~~.f;
Methylene chloride is listed as a suspected human eareinogm by the ACGIH (which classifies it as a group AZ,
Carclnogcnlclty:
:arcinogen). Summary of Risk
Accidental contact of liquid methylene chloride with .&in or eyes causes painful irritation and possible
)ums if not promptly removed. Exposun by way of contaminated gloves, clothing, or paint remover formulations can produce these same
irritant effects. Long-term exposure to mild or moderate doses of methylene chloride may cause a delayed (24 to 48 [email protected] onset of
kziiess, headache, mental confusion, slurred speech, double vision, sod sle-splessoess. Medical razo~cry
can be slow. Gverexposure to
mcthylene chloride can cause elevated levels of carboxy hemoglobin in the blood (this same effect nsults from ovauxposure 6 carbon monoxide). Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: None reported. Target Organs: Skin, eyes, [email protected] system, CNS,
liver, kidneys, and blood. Primary Entry: Inhalation, skin contact/absorption. Acute Effects: Headache, giddiness, stupor, irritability,
fatigue, tingling in the limbs, and narcosis that is not usually fatal if the exposure is terminated before anesthetic death occurs. Chronic
Effects: The ACGIH classification of this material as a suspected human carcinogen implies that cancer is a possible effect of chronic
exposure to methylene chloride. FIRST AID: Eyes. Immediately flush eyes, including under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with
soap and water. Inhalation.
Remove the exposed person to fresh air; r&ore and/or support his or her breathing as needed. Have qualified
medical personnel administer oxygen as required. Note to AttendIng Physlclan: Do not administer adrenalin. fngestlon. Unlikely. Should
this type of exposure occur, do not induce vomiting because of the danger of aspiration. If spontaneous vomiting should occur, Position the
exposed person’s head below his or her trunk to resist aspiratioa Get medical help (In plant, paramedic, community) for all exposures.
Seek prompt medical assistance for further treatment, observation, and support after first aid. Note to PhysicIam Absorbed mCthylCnC
chloride is stored In body fat and mctabollzes to carbon monoxide. This produced carbon monoxide increases and sustains C~~~OX)%CXIDglobin levels in the blood, which concommitantly reduces the [email protected] g capacity of the blood. NIOSH advises preplaccment and
annual medical exams that emphasize liver, kidney, eye, skin, CNS, and respiratory system functions and a complete blood count. Simultaneous exposure to tobacco smoke, alcohol, and carbon monoxide, along with heavy manual labor, increases the body burden of a worker as we1
as the toxic haxards of the methylcne chloride. In significant exposures, sc~um rncthylcne chlotide levels am of no clinical importam%.
Neumlogic and hepatic status as well as carboxy hemoglobin should be monitored.
(
explosion-proof v&.ilation.
Cleanup perso~el need pmt&tion against this liquids contact withthe skin or eyes &well as inhalationbf its
vapor. Contain large spills and collect waste or absorb it with an inert material such as sand. earth. or vermiculite. Use n~nsp&ing
tools to
place waste liquid or absorbent into closable containers for disposal. Keep waste out of scwen. watersheds, and waterways. Waste
Dlsposah Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow Federal, state. and local regulatio~~~.
._
OSHA DesIgnatIons
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000 Subpart Z).
EPA Designations (40 CFR 3024)
RCRA Hazardous Wastz NO. UOSO
Goggles: Always wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles. Where splashing is possible, wear a full face shield Follow O&A
eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Respirator:
Use a NIOSH-approved aspirator per GcnIum reference 88 for the
maximum-use wnccntrations and/or exposum limits cited in section 2. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134). For
emergency or nonroutine operations (spills or cleaning reactor vessels and storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Warning: Air-purifying respiratars will nor protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres. Other: Wear impervious neoprene, PVA, or Viton gloves, boots, aprons, and
gauntlets, etc., to prevent any skin contact with liquid methylene chloride. VentIIatlon:
InstalI and operate general and local maximum,
explosion-proof ventilation systems powerful enough to maintain airborne ievels of a&one below the exposure limits cited in section 2.
local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents dispersion of the contaminant into the general work area by eliminating it at its
source. Consult the latest edition of Genium reference 103 for detailed recommendations. Floor or sump ventilation may be neceswy.
Safety Stations: Make emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities available in work areas. Contamlnated Equipment:
Contact lenses pose a special hazard; soft lenses may absorb irritants, and all lenses concentrate them Do not wear
contact lenses in any work area. Remove contaminated clothing and launder it before wearing it again; clean this material from shoes and
equipment. Other: Because the health effects of carbon monoxide and methylenc chloride are additive (see sect 6), workplaces should be
Practice
equipped with automatic sensing equipment that identities workroom atmospheric levels of both of these materials. Comments:
good personal hygiene; always wash thoroughly after using this material and before eating, drinking, smoking, using the toilet, or applying
cosmetics. Keep it off your clothing and equipment. Avoid transfening it from your hands to your mouth while eating, drinking, or smokiug.
I% IW~ C& drink, or smoke in any work area. Do not inhale methylae chloride vapor.
‘~~~~~~~~~~~~.
: :,:.,.< :; g$:i: ,. ,’ .+.p:: ; ,: .,. :_
:g.y :.
s~~~:~~~~~~,~,~~~?:~~.:~~~~~~~~~:~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
. .:....:.I ..., ..I.:...:x.:.:..c.*<$
:
: i..‘. .Yx ...?..
..
(,
Storage&giegatlon:
Stoti m&yleoe chloride in’clo&d, tioisture-proof containers in a cool. dry, well-ventilated area away from
strong oxidixers, caustics, and inccmpatibIe chemicals’(sec sect 5). Protect containers from physical damage.
Special HandIInt#torage:
Prevent moist air from entering storage containers. Provide ventilation at the floor level in storage arw~
because methylene chloride vapor is denser than air. Installation of a dryer and a safety seal on each tank is rccommcndcd. Aluminum is
not recommended for use as a storage material; appropriate storage mate&& Include galvanized iron, black iron, or steel. Engineering
Controls: Make sure all eoginccrlng systems (production, transportation) arc of maximum explosion-proof design. Electrically ground and
bond all containers sod pipelines used in shipping. transferring, reacting, production, and sampling operations to prevent generating static
sparks.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 17X101-2)
0410 Shlpplng Name: Dichloromethaoe
DOT ShIppIng Name: Dichloromethanc or.Methylenc Chloride
DOT Hazard Class: ORM-A
IMO Haxard Class: 6.1
ID No. UN1593
IMO Label: Saint Andrew’s Cross (x)*
DOT Packaglng Requlrementsr
49 CFR 173.605
IMDG Packaglng Group: III
DOT Packaging ExceptIons: 49 CFR 173.505
sources of ignition,
*Harmful-Stow away from Foodstuffs.
References: 1, 26, 38.84-94, 100, 116, 117,120, 122.
JudgmaU L( lo Ihc suitabilily ofinftioll
h&n for plrchac~‘~ purpvscs ZR
naccrtily
fnUXba&c
rapooribility.
‘Ihcrekwe, dthougb rusonable cam ha
bca taken in tbc prepmcion of such iafomutioa,
Gaium Fublishiog Corp.
ukre% DO wunrdia.
make no ~c~~uuIU~~O~S and -mu
no rapoasibilily
as lo lhc rcuncy
or witability of acb infomutioo
for applicalion lo
ourdrassds intcaded -xs
of for cm~ucncet
of its IL-
,
Prepared
by PJ tgoe, BS
Industrial
Hygiene
Medical
Review:
Review:
MJ Hard&.
(.
DJ Wilson,
MD
CIH
/,I
Ma/en-at Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium
Publishing
Corporation
One Gcnium Plaza
Schenectady. NY luoQ-4690
Sheet No. 683
Polychforinated
USA
1Issued: 1l/88
Biphenyls (PCBs)
Revisidn: A. 9/92
Polychlorlnated
Blphenyls [CuH,,Cl.
(n-3,4,5)]
DcscripUon: A class of nonpolarehloririatect hydrocarbont with a
biphenyl nucleus (two benzene nuclei a)nne&d by a singk C-C bond) in which any or all of dte hydrogen atoms have been
replaced by chlorine.
Commercial PCBs are mixtures of chlor&ed
biphcnyl isomers with varying degrees of chlorination.
Prepared industrially by tie chlorination of biphenyl with anhydrous chlorine in the presence of a catalyst such as ferric
chloride or iron filings. Except for limited res&
and dcvelopmenr applications, Pubs have not been produced in the US
since 1977. When large quantities of PcBs were manufacmred in the US, they wae marketed under the tradename Aroclor
(Monsanto) and wae charaueriLcd by four digit numbers. The first rwo digits indicating biihenyls (12). triphe~~yk (54). or
both (25.44); the last two digits indicating the weight w
of chlorine. PUBS’ rhamal stability, nonflammability,
and
high dielectric capability made them vay useful in electrical equipmenr Formaly used as additives in hydraulic fluids, heat
eansfer systems. lubricants. cuuing oils, printer’s ink. fm rctardanl~. asphalt, brake liniigs. automobile body sealants,
plasticizers. adhesives. synthetic rubber, floor tile, wax extcn&rs, dedusting agents, pesticide extendas. and carbonless
reproducing paper. PCBs are still used in ce&l existing elec&al capacitors and transformers that require enhanced
electrical protection to avoid her&g from sustained electric faults.
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 1336-36-3. Arc&r. Clopher~, Chlorextol, chlorinated biphenyk. chlorinated diphenyl,
chlorinated diphenylens chlom biphenyl, chlm-l,l-biphenyl
Dykanol Fen&r, m
Kane&x. Mot-&u, Noflamol.
Phenoclor. Pyralene, Pyranol. Sarttotherm, Sovol, Therminol m-1
R
1
1
4
S
3+
KX
l skin
rbsorpion
NFPA
1
2-o
69
j.&fJs
F
?
FPEto
tSCC8
~ChlUlliC
Effeus
Cautions: PCBs arc potent liver IOX~ILSthawmay be absorbed through skin. Portn&ly.
chnmic or delayed toxicity is signifc~c because KBs
accumulate in fatty tissue and may reasonably &e anticipated to be carcinogens. PCEk are a biiaccum uhtive cnvironmcnraI hazard. When
burned, decomposition produas may be maze hazardous &an the PCBs,
PCBs. contain various levels of polychlorinated
1991 OSHA PELs, Skin
8-hf TWA (ChlomdiphenyL
8-hr TWA (Chlorodiphenyl.
diifinar~
and chlorinated
naphthalcnes = contaminants
1985-86 Toxklty
Data*
Rat, oral.TDz 1250 mglkg administaed
42% chlorine): 1 mg/n?
54% chlorine): 05 mg/n+
interrniaently for 25
week3 prodJlced liva tumors.
Mammal. oral, w
325 mg&g administered to female for
3Odaysp&rtomatingandfromthelsttorhe36thdayof
gestation prodaad effects on newborn (&lb*@;
live birth
index; viability index).
,
1990 NIOSH REL
TWA (Chlaodiphenyl,
42% chlorine): 0.001 rndrn’
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl,
54% chlorine): 0.001 mg/m’
1990 DFG (Germany) MAK, Danger of Cutaneous Absorption
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl,
42% chlorine): 0.1 ppm (I mg/rr?)
Category IIk Substances with systemic effects. onset of effect > 2 hr..
half-life> shift length (strongly cumulative)
Short-tam Levek 1 ppm. 30 min. average value. 1 Per shift
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl,
54% chlorine): 0.05 ppm (05 mglm’)
Category III (see above)
Short-term Level: 0.5 ppm. 30 min.. average value. 1 pa shift
1992-93 ACGIH TLVs, Skin l
TWA (Chlomdiphenyl. 42% chlorine): 1 mglm’
TWA (Chlorodiphenyl, 54% chlorine): 0.5 mg/m’
These guidelinu offer ruwably good pcwxtionrgtin ryrkmic
inmxiarion,butmay nu gnmmlt~
ttut ehlomcne
wm’loccur.
t Set N’IOSH. RTECT ~Q135KOO). for ddiciaul rcpoductivc, tunorigaai~ and toxiciv &rr
.....:.“..$.y.::“.
..:.....:e‘: .:: --..:..
s’~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~b~~~t~~:~.~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~::~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:i
.. .‘...’ ,.,.
.<x...;:j$
’ ..?~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~;?; :;> -.,~,~~~8~~~~~~
* ::.:
9..+.. ... ..’ ....2.~
....:..~.:.~.:.::.:.:.:...:..-...:.:...~.:.:...~.:.:....
,..,. .. .,., / I ,. .>.,.....
I .: -2..., ._ ..,. .. .,,5.,.>,.
>..,. _,.I....>..x
.,.,: .... r.x. . “”:...::..r.
.._...
._ .,.__ ,. ., _
Bolting Point: 644-707 ‘F (340-375 ‘C)
SpecIk Gravity: 13 16 1.8 at 20 l C
Mellin$Poln(:
42%: -2.2 ‘F (-19’C); 54% 14 ‘F (-10 ‘CJ
Water Solublllty: Low solubiliry (0.007 lo 5.9 mg/L)
Vapor ressure: 1 mm Hg at 100 l F(38 ‘C); 1O’j to l(r mm a~ 20 ‘C
Other Solubilltles: Most canmon organic solvents. oils, and fats;
Molecular Weighl: 188.7 to 398.5
slightly soluble in glycerol and glyak
Appearance and Odor: PCBs vary from mobile oily liquids to white crystallime s&is and hard non-stall&
resins. depending upon
chlorine content
l Physical and ebemieal prcputiec vq
widely according (Q degree and u) tbe position of chhlainuica
l
WaGspray &y be ineffactivc &e wa& spmy to cool fii-exposcd con%ncm or trtiformers. Do not &tu
PCBs witt; high:prcssurc iate;
streanis. Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Combustion products (hydrogen chiaide, phosgcne. polychlorinatcd dibenzofurans. and furans)
are more hazardous than the PCEs th4ve.s.
Special Fire-flghtlng
Procedures: Because tire may produce toxic thermal decomposition
products. wear a se-if-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece opaated in pressure-demand or positivepressure mode. Approach fii from upwind to avoid highly toxic decomposition productr. Structural fuef&e.r’s prolective clothing will provide timifcd protection.
Do not &ease runoff from fire control methods to sc~crs
or wuaways. Dike for I~LX disposal.
l
Flash
poinu
shown
UC
l range for vuiour
FCDs.
Some
fom~
do
no( hue fl+h poinu.
-~
sg$ii#e,
..,\ ,..~_ +g:.‘c;.:l’:l
-.‘i”* ” ‘:
.: ” ::‘!.I.,:p:.;
::2;.
..:;,..::, .:.“. I..‘:,
‘.,,.:‘;SY. :
.; .
...e.~ctjvl.fu~Pata:‘:ISSlabllityIPoiymertxatlon:
Pubs are very stable materials but arc subject lo pho&lorina&m
when exposed (0 sunlight or UV (spectral region
above 290 nanometers). Hazardous polymerization cannot occur. Chemical Incomoatlbllltla:
PCBs are chemicallv . inen and resistant IO
oxidation. acids, and bares. Condltlons to Avotd: Avoid hear and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposltlon: Thermal oxidative decomposition [1112-1202 ‘F(6CXk650 ‘C)] of PCBs can produce highly roxic
derivatives, including polychlorinaced dibenzo-paradioxins
(PCDDs).
polychlorinated &bcnzofuran.s (PCDFs). hydrogen chloride. phosgene and
Olhcr
irritanIs.
.r--.-:.\.-.--_..I..
c
-
-
._.
No. 683
Polychlorinated
Section 6. Health
Biphenyls
(PCBs)
9/92
i . .~.““.:.:.
:.;_.
...,.,..r,;
.::.::.
.~~~~~~~~~~
;.,:...:.:::
‘::$$:::@.:g:.
...,.:
..:p:.
. ..’:r:,;
‘..:‘..~...~i.:.~:...‘.:.‘::~~~J..)::.:’.:.~::~:~::..
..
-......_,
-,:,:J
.;--.‘. ..‘i
.: ./- ;C’..
. .. .
HazarCData
Carclnogenlclty:
The L4RC,(“‘l and NTpO* list pubs as an IARC pr+ablc cacinog~n (OVU~JI evaluation is 2A; limited human datl; sufficient
animal data) and MP anticipated carcinogen, respcctjvely. Summaq of Rlsksz PCBs arc potent liver toxins that can be absorbed through
unbroken skin in toxic arn~unts
without immediaic pain dr -titation mr have low acute bxicity, but can accumulate in fatty &sue ana severe
health effects may develop larcr. Generally, toxicity incrcara with a higher chlorine conrcnr; PCB-oxida are more toxic.Thc toxic titian on the
liver al5o increases with simultaneous exposure-to other livel Iox& c& chlorinated solven& alcohol and certain drugs. Pathological pregnan&s
(abnormal pigmentations. abonions, stillbii
and underweight bii)bave
betn associated wilh inaeased PCB serum levels in mothers; PC&
can be pasted in breast milk. PCBr can affect the rqmductivc system of dults.Medkal
Condltlons Aggravaled by Long-Term Exposure:
Skin. liver, and respiratory disease. Target Organs: Sldn. liver, eyu,mucous membranes, aud respiratory tract Primary Entry Routes:
Inhalation. dermal contact. ingestion. Acute Effects: Exposure IO PC3 vapor or mist is severely irritating to Ihe skin, eyes, nose, throat, and upper
respiratory tract Intense acute exposure to high concentrations may result in eye, lung. and liver injury. Systemic effects include nausy vomitmg,
increased blood prasurc. fatigus weight loss. jaundice,
edema and abdominal pairs Cognitive, neurobchavior
and psychomotor impairment and
memory loss have also been seen after acote exposure. Chroak Elfectsz Repeated exposure to PC& can cause ehlomacn~ redness, swelling,
drynus. thickening and darkening of the skin and Mik, swelliig and burning of the eyes, and excessive eye discharge; diitinctive hair follicles;
gastrointestinal disturbances: neurological symptoms including he&&c, dizziness. &pression, nervousness. numbness of the extremities, and
joint and muscle pain: liver cnlargemenc menstrual changes in women; ud chronicbronchitis. Cancer. primarily liver, is also a possible result of
exposure, but data is inconclusiv&
FIRS AID Eyes: Do nor allow victim to rub or keq eyes tightly shherRinsiig eyes with medical oil (olive, mineral) initially may remove PCB
and halt irritation better than water rinsing alone. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until
rransported r0 an emergency medical facility. Consult a Dhvsician ir~-~edia~cl~. skin: (&&#Y remove contaminated clothiia. Rinse with flood&
amotints of wata for ai l&t 15 min. Wash-exposed ar& &I soap and water~,[email protected]%p c&d w&r washings are necers&y. Avoid the use of
organic solvents to clean the skin For redder& or blistered skin. consult a physician.InhalatIon:
Remove exposed person to fresh air and support
breathing rtt needed. IngestIon: In most rzses. accidental KB ingestion will not be ncognized until long after vomiting would be of any value.
Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing ~uson. Vomiting of the pure substance may cause aspiration. Consult a physician.
Note to Physlclans: Monitor patients for increased hepatic mzymcs. chloroacne, and eye, gastmintestinal. and neumlogic symptoms listed above.
Diagnostic tests include blood levels of PC& and altered liver er&ymcr
..
(\
/“
RCRA
SARA
Liitcd
Listed
and
H&r&us
Waste (40 CFR 26133): Nor listed
OSHA Desfgnatlons
Extremely Hazanious Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as M Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000. Table Z-l-A)
es a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 37Z6s)
as a CERCL4 Hazardous Substance+ (40 CFR 3024): Foal Reportable Quantity (RQ). 1 Ib (0.454 kg) [* per CWA. Sec. 31 X(b)(4)
307fa\l
Sectiori,8i:::,S‘jjl~~~ai.~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~”:-::
,.,.
.:-~I:,;.~~::
..
.._. .. ..
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasKs or chemical safety goggles. pa OSHA eye- i face-protection regulations (29 <% 1910.133). Because’
contact lens use in industry is controversial. establish your own policy. Resptratoc Seek professional a&ice prior to respirator selecljon and use.
FoJIowOSHA respirator regulatioru (29 CFR f910.134) end. if nezesuy, wear a MSHA/NIOSH-approved respirator. Select respirator based on iti
surtability to provide adequate worker protection for given working conditions. level of airborne contamination, and presence of sufficient oxygen.
Minimum respirato
protection should include a combination dust-fume-mist and organic vapor cartridge or caniskz or air-su
upon the situation. For emergency or nonmutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels. or storage tanks). wear an SCBA.
qwifring
rupira!or.s
do nolproreu
workers in oct.ygcn-deficht
atmospheres.
If rc$raton
are used. OSHA requires a written respirafory protectton program that includes at least: medical certificatiorr. training. fit-testing. paiodz environmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection. cleaning,
and convenient, sanitary storage areas. Other: Wear chemically protective gloves, boo& aprons. and gaunclecs to prevent all skin contact Butyl
Nbba, neoprene, Teflon, and fluorocarbon rubber have break through times greater than 8 hrs. Yentllatlon: R&de general and local exhaust
ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below the OSHA PEL (Sec. 2). Local exhaustventilation is preferred because it prevents
contaminant dispersion into the work area by conuolliig it at its source .(‘q Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash
stations, safety/quickdrench
showers, and washing facilities. Contaminated Equlpmenb Separate contaminated work clothes fiorn street clothes
and launder before reuse. Segregate contaminated clothing in such a manna so that there is no direct contact by laundry personnel. Implement
quality assurance to ascertain the completeness of the cleaning proceduns. Remove thii ma&al from your shoes and clean PPE. Comments:
Never +. &ink,
or smoke in work areleas.Practice good pasortal hygiene after using thii material. especially before eating. drinking. smoking.
_.
usmg Ihe toilet, or applying cosmetics.
Secti&$:[email protected]&i~igl
&@igj~ti~fis.&*
. .:.;
1” ~“l‘,,l,CllW
-.‘I-: .:i p .:p:pj: .::,:;, ,.
Storage Requireme&&Store
in a closed, labelled, containa in a ventilated area with appropriate &‘&lh&~
c&trol equipment
inglnieriig~
COnlrOlr: To reduce potential health hazards, (:Lsesuffiiient
dilution or local exhaust ventilation to qntrol airborne contaminanu and to maintain
concentrations at the lowest practical level. Admlnlstratlve
Contmb: Inform employees of the adverse health effests associated with PCBs. Limit
~cCWJ to.:I’cI3 work
areas IO authorized personnel. Consider preplaccment and periodic malical examinations with emphasis on he kin liva.
_.
*
mW. ZU-ICIrepnxluclive system. Monitor PCB blood levels. Consider possible effects on the fetus. Keep medical records for the entire length of
Wpbment
and for the following 30 yrs.
Transpwtetlon
Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shlpplng Name: Polychlorinated biphenyls
Packsgln
Authorlzatjons
Quantity Llmltatlons
DOT Hazard Class: 9
a) Except f M: 173.155
a) Passenger Alrcraft or Rallcar: 100 L
ID No.: UN2315
b) Non-bulk Packngln : 173.2&l
b) Cargo Ah-craft Only: 220 L
DOT Pecking Group: II
c) Bulk Psckaglng: 17 9 2.4 1
Vessel Stowage RequIrementi
DOT Label: CLASS 9
a) Bessel Stowage: A
SPeclnl ProvIsIons
(172.102): 9. Ngl
b) Other: 34
~~~~CoUdion
References: 26.73.89.100.101. 103. 124. I?& 127.132. 133.136.163, 164. 168.169.174.175.180
.
kepared by: MJWurtb. BS: lodustrlrl Hygiene Review: PA Roy MPH. UH; Mcdkxl Review: AC D~rling~on. MD
hpyir*OIPPl~CsnivmPvblLhh~Corpart~hn~-rciJ.co.cpodrdo.-'~l~~pUbW~-~~a.~pdib;rd
~=--uJlrhopvchrrSrc-lbJ~.Nova~
=wrubtccMhubanl.lrnin~I”rpr.liurdrch
t--
Ld-”
” .Cznk”.%N:*:.~--
W& .r;~b;ljd~m.&..
h.*:- ,- ‘+ -‘-*‘-
-.
, i:
flush cycs, including under tic eyelids, gc~lly but tbmughly with flood&g ~JIIOUO!J of running water for at Icast 1S minutes. Skin. Rinse
the affcctcd areas with flooding amounts of water, tbcn wash it with soap and water. Inhalation. Rem&c the exposed person to fresh air,
rCttOKC and/or SUppotl his or her bream
as ncedcd Haye qualified medical FSWMd
adminislcr
oxygen
85 Fcquircd.
Kbcp thC CX&KWd
person
warm and at rest until medical help is available Ingestion. Unlikely. Should this type of exposure occur, give the c~poscd ~UXXXI 3
gtasses of water to drink sod induce vomiting then tcpcat this procedure. Get medlcai help (in plant, paiamcdlc, communtty) for all
exposures S-C& prompt medical assistance for further katmept, observation, and support after fit aid. Note to Physkhn:
Workers
exposed to this liquid should be cvaluattd with a fuil ba&sy of tests for the liver, kidneys, and CNS systems, as wcil as the blood.
Spill/Leak:
erly clothed
Vacuum the
or a licensed
(
‘\
Noliry safety pcrsoooci, evacuate unnecessary pcrsonncl, and provide adequate ventilation. Cleanup personnel must be pmpand cquippcd to protect the skin and eyes against any u)atact with the liquid as well as inhalation of its vapor (see sect. 8).
spill& 1.1,2,2-lctrachlometha
and pump it into suitable containers for disposal Waste Disposal: Contact your supplier
contractor for detailed ruommcndatio~~
Foliow F&ml. state. and local regulations.
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1OCO Subpti Z).
EPA Designations (40 CFR 302.4)
RCRA Waste, No. U209
CERCLA Hazardo~ Substany Reportable Quantity: 1 lb (0.454 kg), pa the Clean Water Act (CWA), 5 307 (a); and the Resource
Conservation and Rccovay Act (RCRA), 8 3001.
GoggIesz Always wear protcctivc eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles. Where splashing of this liquid is possible, wear a fuli face
Use a MOSH-apptovcd
respirator per
shield. Folktw OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Respirator.
Gcnium rcfercnce 88 for the maximum-use concentrations an&or the exposure limits c&l in section 2 Follow OSHA respirator rcgnlations (29 CFR 191a134). For cmcrgency or nonroutine opctations (spills or chzmlng reactor vcsscls and storage tanks), wear an SCBA.
Wamlngr
Air-purifying respirators will mprotcct
workers in oxygen-deficient atmosphcns Other: Wear impervious gloves, boots,
Install and operate general and local ventilation systems
apmas. gasmtlcts, etq to prc~cnt skin codact with this liquid. Ventilation:
powerful enough to maintain airborne levels of this mataial below the OSHA PEL stzndard cited in section 2 Local exhanst ventilation
is prcferrcd because it prevents dispa-sioo of the contaminant into the general work area by climinatiog it St its source. Consult the latest
edition of Gcnium rcfcrcncc 103 for detaiicd rccommcndations. Safety Stationsr Make cmagcncy eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench
showers, and washing facilities available in work areas Contaminated Equipment:
Contact lenses pose a special hazard, soft lenses
may absorb irritants, axxl all lenses concentrate them Do ~KX wear contact lenses in any work arch Remove contaminated clothing and
lanrtdcr it hefore wearing it again; clean this mat&al fmm your shoes and quipmcnt
Comments: Practice good personal hygiene;
always wash thoroughly after using this material and before eating, drinking. smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetic+ Keep it off
your clothing and quipmcnt
Avoid transfcning it from your hands to your mouth while eating, drinking, or smoking. Do not eat, drink
or smoke in any work arez Do not inhale 1,1,2,2-tcnachl~c
vapor.
!( -
Storage/Segregation:
Store 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethanc in closed, airtight containers in a cool. dry, well-ventilated arcs away from incompatible chemicals (see sect. 5). Special Handling/Storage:
Provide storage arcz with adquatc ventilation to prevent concentrations of
the vapor from building up beyond the occupational exposure limits cited in section 2.
; Transportation
Data (49 CFR 17X101-2)
DOT Shipping Name: Tetrachloroethanc
DOT Hazard Class: ORMA
~ IDNo.UNx7m
DOT Packaging Requirements:
49 CFR 173.620
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 49 CFR 173505
IMO Shipphg Name: 1,1,2,2-Tctrachlorocthane
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
IMO Label: Poison
IMDG Packaging Group: II
References
Judgm
1.38,84-94, 100,116, 117, 120,122.
u to Lhc~&pbilty of idormatioa
hario.
foe purchds
By
pldnsu’~
cqoasibiIily.liwdo~
been lXk0
I0 lb pccpxdioo
of sub infomufion.
Ulcllds
no wunnlia.
maker
w rcprcwmwionr
m 10 IhC -racy
OrrUitat4lily
ofruch
infomutioa
plrclurbr
IoIcndad
pposa
0I forcooragucnw
-
pqoxs
a~
akhougb
casocablcurc
has
Gcuium
Pdblihisg
Corp.
rod asuma
w rrspoaibility
for applickm
Lo
of iti me
~vk*o19abyocnhnuhbl~‘-*
calmme .se cmnpoducllo. riLb.DJ,OKpMbb.j, pcrmidm h pchhti
Preparch
Indushiai
9
Medical
by: PJ Igoe, BS
Hygiene
Review:
Review:
DJ Wilson,
W Silverman,
MD
CM
(..
/
Cautions: TCE is irritating and toxic to the cam-d nervous system (CNS). Inhalation of high concentrations have lead to death due to
ventriculla fibrillation. Chronic exposure may lead to heatt, liver, and kidney damage. The liquid is absorbed through the skin. Although
it has a relatively low flash point TCE burns with difficuhy.
t-o&>
*k
8
I
Trichloroethylene,
< 100% [contains stabilizers (SK. I)].
- 1991 OSHA PELs
199293 ACGIH TLVs
1985-86 Toxkfty Da&+
8-hr TWA: 50 ppm (270 mg/m3)
TWA: 5Oppm (269 mgfd)
Human, iddar.ion, ‘I-Q
160 ppm/83 min caused
15-min STEL: ao pw UOf30m&3
STEL zoo ppm (mo ~II~~KI’))
hauudnadorrs and dismedperceptiQns.
1990 IDLH Level
Humas lymphocyte: 5 mL+!L caused DNA inhibiion.
1990 DFG (Germauy) MAR
Ceiling 50 ppm (270 mg/m’)
Rabbit shim 500 mg/24 hr caused seven irritation.
lO%vm
categayEsubstanc#
tithsystcmiceffec5
Rabbit, eye: 20 mgL?4 hr caused moderate irritation.
1990NIOSH
L
Half-l&
2 hr to shift length
IO-h.rTwA: i!Y ppm (-135 mgIm3)
Moue ora& lD,:
455 mg& administered
in&tPe&Bxposurefimitz
250ppmfOmin
Lmly
for 78 WeelcJ pmduced liver tumors.
average value; 2 peaks/shift
*S&NIOSH,RTECS~4550000Xfadditiollll~~m~rrpmduaive.~miclsdraxidtybu
....,.
.~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~:~~
~~~:~:~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:..~;~~~~~
k.&.z?<..F:.:.:..
.Q......... .......>..,...
I _...___‘>_ ...................:<z%:
....n~..~...~~..~~.~.~...~~‘~,*.
. , .~~,:..,:.:.:,:.:.i~:~..~~~~~~::.:~~~~~:~~:~.::::~~~.?::.~:.~.~.:.:.~:.~:.~.~:~.:.:.:.~.:~:.:.~.:.~~:~.~~~~~~~:~~.::?::~~~~~~::~~~~~~~~::.~~
BolUng Point: 189 ‘F (87 ‘C)
VnporPressure:58mmHgat68’F(aD’C);100mmH~at32’F(O’C)
Freezing Polnti -121 ‘F (-85 l C)
Saturated Vapor Dens&y (Ah = 0.075 Wn’;
13 kg/m ): 0.0956 lb&$153
kg/m3
Viscosfty: 0.0055 Poise at 77 ‘F (25 ‘C)
Water SolubWty: Vay slightly soluble; 0.1% at 77 ‘F (25 C)
Molecular Weight: 13 1.38
Other SobbWMess Highly soluble in organic solvents (alcohol, acetone. ether. carbon
Density: 1.4649 at 20/4 l C
tetrachloride. & chloroform) and lipids.
Refraction Index: 1.477 at 68 ‘F (20 ‘C/D)
Surface Tenston: 29.3 dyne/cm
Odor Threshold: 82 to 108 ppm (ti un effecfive
wwtig)
I
Appearance
and Odoc Clear, colorleas (sometimes dyed blue), mobile liquid with a sweet chloroform odor.
Flash Polut: 90 ‘F (32 ‘C) CC lAutoignItJon Temperature:
788 l F (420 ‘C!)[LRL: 8% (u l C); 125% (100 ‘C)IUl&:
10$6 (25 l C); m (100 ‘C)
J3~tlnd~hl.n~
Media: A Class 1C Flammable Liiid.
Although it has a flash point of 90 ‘F. ICE bums with difiicubv. For small fires, use drv
chemi&l, ~&XI dioxide, water spray, or regular foam. Hx huge firea, use w&x spray, fog,~&egular foam Uuususd~Fire or Rploskn
H&&is:
Vapor/air mixtures may explode when ignited. Containec may expkde in heat of fix SpedaJ Ffr&bttnp
Procedures: Because fm may prodoce
toxic thmnd ~ition
products, wear a self-ox&ted
breathing apparatns (SCBA) with a &III facepieee operated in pressuredemand or
positive-preasum mode. Structural firefighters’ protective clothing provides only limited protection against‘ICE Apply cooling water to sides of
container until well after fne is out. Stay away from ends of tanks. Do not release runoff fnnn fire contfol methods to sewers or watezways.
~;~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
..i:. .. .. ............,.,
. . ..,
..
‘.:<.:<.:.Y.:...
....x..:...:...* ,....i:.L:...x+:.
^ ..
.,...
..
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,.,.....,...,.............,......,.
i ,.,................
. . .. ...... . .. _ .... .../..........._i,
.:.y.
.... ./,....,,.... ..._;.r __.._...
/ .,.. . ._
__
_
......:..?;._...>..>>>>
,.......~...~>...$~.~..$
. . .. . .. . .??.,...?~~~~.~~.:...r~
..:............
t .. .../. .:.‘.:... :, : _ I ....... .~,...,.) .:... . ..... :...:~~~~~~:~:~.:~::.-...... .,.. . ....~..~.~~~...~..-.
acid. Hazar&us polytnStabWtylPolymerh:
‘ICE slowly decomposea in the pmsenee of light and moisture to form ixxmivchydn3chloric
erization c&ot occur. Chemical In&npaUhWUes:
In&e
alkalis (so&urn hydroxide), chemically active metals (ahuninum, bea-yllik
lithium.
magnesium, sodium, potassium and titanium), epoxidca, and oxidants (nitrogen tetmoxide, per&l&
acid). Contact with I-chlom-2.3epory
propane
or the mono and di 2.3-epoxypropyl etbers of I.6butanediol i
2,2-bis4(2’,3’-epoxypropoxy)-phaxy~
can, in the presence of catalytic
quantities of halide ions, cause dehydrochlorination of ‘ICE to explosive dichlomacetylene
Condltkm
to Avoid: Exposure to light, moisture,
ignition sources, and incompatibles. Hazardous Products d DecomposWun: Thamal oxidative decompc&ion of TCE (above 30 l C) or cxpoeure
to ultraviolet light can produce carbon dioxide (CGJ and toxic dichloto acetylene (expksive), d&he,
hydrogen chlorkk, and phcsgene gas.
Germanf MAK-(Class
suspected of having carcinoge& pot&&l),
&MOSH
(C”ksa X aucinogen defined with no further CatCgnSummary of R&.c TCE vapor is irritating to the eyes, nose, and respirntoty tract and inhalation of high concCnuatiOnrCanleadlowV~
CNS effects such as unconsciousness, ventricular arrymmias, and ti
due to cardiac ancat. Mild liver dysfunction was also seen at levels
high
enough to produce CNS effects. Contact with the liquid is irritating to the skin and can kad to dermatitis by defatting the skin Chronic
toxicity is
observed in the victims incma,+tg intolerance to alcohol characteri& by ‘de-as
flush’. a transient redness of the fiy n-u& and lll~ll~ The
euphoric effac[ of WE ha led ~mving.
and habitual sniffing of its w&x.idon).
No. 3 12
Ttizhloroethylene
9/92
Section 6. Health Hazard
Data, Continued
:
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j-y:.
:..:.
i >;;:_.:‘k,:.i..:
... :
. ...... : ‘. :i.‘j_.>
j:.:~::.::::.~.-::;:..
...::p;:
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TCE crosses th-e placental barrier and thus exposes the ferns (any effects are yet unknown). There are increaSed reports of menstrual disorders in
women workers and decreased libido in males at exposures high enough tocause CNS effects. TCE is eliminated unchanged in expired air and as
metabobtes (nichloroacetic acid & nichlomcthanol) in blood and urine Medlcstl Condltlons Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Disorders of
the nervous system. skin. &
liver, and kidney. Target Organs: Respiratory, central & peripheral nervous. and cardiovascular (heart) systems,
liver, kidney, and skin P&nary Entry Routes: Inhalation. skirt and eye contact. and ingestion (rarely). AcuteEffects: Vapor inhalation can
cause eye, nose. and throat irritation, nausea. blurred vision. ovaexcitement h&he.
drunkenness, memory loss, irregular heartbeat (resulting in
sudden death). unconsciousness, and death due to cardiac failure. Skin contact with the liquid can cause dryness and cracking and prolonged
exposure (generally if the victim is unconscious) can cause blistaing. Eye contact can cause irritation and watering, with comeal epithelium injury
in some cases. Ingestion of the liquid can cause lip, mouth and gastrointesrinal irritation. irregular heartbeat. nausea and v~mih& diarrhea
(possibly blood-stained). drowsiness, and risk of pulmonary edema (fluid in longs). Cbroak Effects: Effects may persist for several weeks or
months after repeated exposure. Symptoms include giddiness. irritability, he&c.be, digestive disturbances, mental confusion, intolernnce to alcohol
(degreasers flush), altered color perception, loss or impairment of sense of smell, double visiin, and peripheral nuvoua system function impairment
including persistent neuritis, temporary loss of sense of touch, amI paralysis of the fingers from direct contact with ‘ICE liquid.
FIRST AID Eyes: Do no1 allow victim to rub or keq eyes tightly shut Gently lift eyelids and flush imrnediate~y and conbnuous1y with flooding
amounts of water until tr‘ansporred to an emergency medical facility. Consult a physician inuttediately. Skin:Quickly remove contam.inated
clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. Wash exposed area with soap and water. Iahalatlon: Remove exposed person to
fresh air and support breathing as needed. Ingestlon: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. Contact a poison
control center and unless otherwise advised, have that conrciow rind u&rf Person drink 1 to 2 glasses of water. then induce vomiting. Do not give
milk as its fat content (TCE is lipid soluble) may inhance gastroint&nal
absorption of TCE. Note to Physlchtn~: ICE elimination seems to be
triphasic with half lives at 20 min. 3 hr. and 30 hr. Some success is seen in treating patients with propranolol, atropine. and disulfii.
Monitor
urine and blood (lethal level = 3 to 110 pg/rnL) metabolites. BEI 2: 100 mp/g crmtinine (trichloroacetic acid) in urine. sumpie ui end ofworkweek
BE1 = 4 m& (ttichloroethanol) in blood, sample or end ofstifi at end oftk workweek. These tests are not10046 accurate indicators of exposure;
monitor TCE in expired air as a confirmatory test
spills. take up with ear&, sand vcrmLt&
or other absorbent. noncombustiblentat&ial
and ph& in suitable contain& for later disposal. For large
spills. flush to containment area where density stratification will form a bottom TCE layer which can be pumped and containerized. Repon any
rclcase in excess of loo0 lbs. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120). Ecotoxklty Values: Bluegill sunfiih. IX, = 44.700 p&/
96 hr; fathead minnow (Pimeph&sprom&s),
LCse = 40.7 m&96
hr. Environmental Degradation: In air, ‘ICE is photooxidized with a half-life
of 5 days and reported to form phosgene. dichloroacetyl chloride, and formyl chloride. In water it evaporates rapidly in minutes to hours. TCE
rapidly evaporates and may leach since it does not absorb to sediment
Soil AbsorpUon/Moblllty:
TCE has a Log K, of 2. indicating high soil
mobility. Dkpusal: WasteTCE can be poured on dry sand and allowed to vaporize in isolated location. purified by distillation. or returned to
[email protected] A potential candidate for rotary kiln incineration at 1508 to 2912 ‘F (820 to 1600 ‘C) with an acid scrubber to remove halo acids. Contact
your supplier oc a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal. state, and local regulations.
EPA Deslgnatlons
OSHA Designations
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000. Table Z-l-A)
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste 140 CFR 26133 & 261.31’1: No. U228 & KKD fsbti soolvenr)
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Sub&an&
(40 CFR 302.4); F&a1 Reportable Quantity ($)J, l& lb (45.4 kg) [* pes RCR& Sac. 3001, CWA Sec.
3 1I (b)(4). & CWA Sec. 307 (a)]
[email protected]: Wear chemical safety goggles (cup-type or rubber framed. equipped with impact-resistant glass), per OSHA eye- and face-protection
regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Because contact lens use in indusrry is controversial, establish your own policy. Respirator: Seek professional
advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, ifnewsary, wear a MSHAINIOSHapproved respirator. At any detectable concentration. wear a SCBA with a full facepiece operated in pressure demand or other positive pressure
mode. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills. reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. WtVnittg! Air-purifying respirarors do nor prorecr workers in oxygen-d.ef7cien.r atmospheres. If respirators are used. OSHA requires a respiratoty protection program that includes
at least medical certift~tion. training, fit-testing. periodic environmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection, cleaning. and convenient. sanitary
storage areas. Other: Wear chemically protective gloves. boots, aprons, and gauntlets made from Viton or Neoprene to prevent skin contact
Do not
use natural rubber or polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Ventllatlon:
Provide general and local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentralions below OSHA PELS (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is prefened because it prevents contaminant dispasion into the work area by comolling it at its SOUPX.~‘~~ Safety StatIons: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing
facilities. Contaminated
Eqttlpment: Separate. contaminated work clothes from street clothes and launder before reuse. Remove this material from
your shoes and clean personal protective equipment. Comments: Never eat. drink. or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene
especially before eating. drinking, smoking using the toilet. or applying cosmetics.
ignition sources. and incompatibles (Sec. 5). Store large quantities in galvanized iron, black iron, or steel contaimn; small amounts in d&k (amber)
colored glass bottles. Ettglneerftt8 Controls: To reduce potential health hazards, use sufficient dilution or local exhaust ventilation to control
airborne contaminants and to maintain concentrations at the lowest practical level. Design processes so that the operator is not directly exposed to
the solvent or its vapor. Do not use open electric heaters. high-temperature processes, am-welding or open flames in TCE atmosphacs. Adminktrntlve Controls: Consider preplacement and periodic medical exams of exposed workers with emphasis on skin. respiratory. cardiac. central and
peripheral nervous systems. and liver and kidney function. Employ air and biological monitoring (BELs). Insuuct employees on safe handling of
-l-/.PTransportation
Date (49 CFR 172101)
DOT Shlppln
Name: Trichloroethylcne
uantlty Llmltatlons
Packagln Authorlzatlons
DOT Hazard E 1ass: 6.1
a) Exceeons: 173.153
Passenger Alrcraft or Railcar: 60L
ID No.: UN1710
b) Non- ulk Packagln : 173.203
b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 22OL
DOT Packln Group: ITI
c) Bulk Packnglng: 179 241
Vessel Stowage Requlremeots
DOT Label: k eep Away From Food
a) Vessel Stowage: A
DOT Special Provlslons (172102): N36. Tl
b) Other:
40
~~D~Collection
References:
hepared
by: M Gmm,
BA:
e
. - ... . ^
- .
26.73,lOO.
Indutirl
-
101. 103. 124. 126, 127. 132. 133, 136.139.
140. 148;149.
153, 159.163.
[email protected]
Revkw:
0 Wilson. c[II:
Medical
Rcvka:
AC [email protected]
MD
l&t.
167.168.
171. 174.175.
176. 190.
./
I,,,
d,‘,
,L
_--
Emergency
Procedures
Hazardous
Attachment
C
for Exposure to
Materials/Waste
ATTACHMENT
C
EMERGENCY
PROCEDURES
FOR EXPOSURE
HAZARDOUS
MATERIALS/WASTE
TO
immediately.
Don’t forget to
1. Call ambulance or transport individual to hospital/clinic
take the HASP with you; it contains information on the contaminants expected to be found
on site and will assist the physician in his/her assessment of the exposure.
2. Fill in Potential
ability.
Exposure Report, answering
each of the questions to the best of
your
3. Contact our physician(s) at EMR as soon as possible. The procedure is as follows:
a. Call EMR at l-800-229-3674!
b.
Ask to speak with:
Dr. David L. Barnes;
Dr. Elaine Theriault; or
Ms. T.J. Wolff, R.N.
Note:
4.
During nonbusiness hours (after 6 p.m.) call l-800-229-3674
paging the aforementioned individuals.
and follow directions
for
Once in contact with any of these individuals,
explain what has happened (they will
review the information on the form with you and may ask you to fax the form to them, if
possible), and allow either of them to speak with the attending physician.
5. When asked about payment (and they will ask), inform the Hospital/Clinic/Physician
that
this is a “work related injury” and have them contact the Benefits Coordinator
at
(412) 269-2744. Have invoices sent to:
Michael Baker Jr. Inc.
Attn: Benefits Coordinator
Airport Office Park, Bldg. 3
Coraopolis, PA 15108
6. Contact the Project Manager and the Project Health
feasible, but wait no longer than 24 hours.
and Safety Officer as soon as it is
--
“-
Page 1 of 2
POTENTIAL
EXPOSURE REPORT
Name:
Date of Exposure:
Social Security
L
No.:
Age:
Exposing Agent
Name of Product
Characteristics
Solid
IL
Sex:
or Chemicals
(if known)
(if the name is not known)
Liquid
G&3
Fume
Mist
Vapor
Dose Determinants
What was individual
doing?
How long did individual
Was protective
work in area before signs/symptoms
developed?
gear being used? If yes, what was the PPE?
Was there skin contact?
Was the exposing agent inhaled?
Were other persons exposed ? If yes, did they experience
Ill.
Signs and Symptoms
Immediately
(check off appropriate
symptoms?
symptoms)
with Exposure:
Cl Burning of eyes, nose, or throat
Cl Tearing
Cl Headache
q Cough
Cl Shortness of breath
El Delirium
Cl
Cl
Cl
0
Cl
Cl
Chest tightness/pressure
Nausea/vomiting
Dizziness
Weakness
Heat flashes
Other
Cl
Cl
Cl
Cl
Cl
Loss of appetite
Abdominal pain
Headache
Numbness/tingling
Other
Delayed Svmptoms:
0 Weakness
q Nausea/vomiting
Cl Shortness of breath
Cl Cough
__
Page 2 of 2
POTENTIAL
l-v.
Present Status of Symptoms (check off appropriate
Cl
0
Cl
Cl
0
Cl
El
Burning of eyes, nose, or throat
Tearing
Headache
Cough
Shortness of breath
Chest tightness/pressure
Cyanosis (bluish skin color)
Have symptoms
symptoms):
‘Ihatment
VI.
response and give duration
Worsened
Remain Unchanged
Self-medicated
Name
(Attending
Hospital/Clinic
Source:
Cl Nausea/vomiting
0 Dizziness
q Weakness
Cl Loss of appetite
Cl Abdominal pain
0 Numbness/tingling
Cl Other
of Symptoms (check off appropriate
None
EMR, Inc.
symptoms)
(please check off appropriate
Improved
v.
EXPOSURE REPORT
physician)
response)
Physician
treated
of
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