High School Program of Studies

High School Program of Studies
2015–16 High School
Program of Studies
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS____________________________
Students must complete 22.5 credits to receive a high school diploma.
1. English Language Arts (ELA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 credits
Four years of ELA are required including one semester of composition at 11th or 12th grade. To satisfy the composition credit students
must take one of the following: English 11, AP Lit/AP Lang or a composition elective. For Common Core State Standards realignment see
chart on bottom of page. 2. Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 credits
World History, U.S. History, one semester of Alaska Studies, one semester of Economics, one semester of United States Government,
one semester of a Social Studies elective. Students may waive the .5 credit social studies requirement by completion of Level III of
a world language (ASL, Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Latin, Russian, or Spanish); immersion students may waive the .5 social
studies requirement by completion of Japanese for Fluent Speakers I, Vistas Juveniles del Mundo Hispano, or Russian Immersion
Youth and Culture. For Common Core State Standards realignment see chart on bottom of the page.
3. Mathematics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 credits
Six semesters of Mathematics electives. In order to satisfy the algebra requirements, students must complete one of the following
options: Algebra I, semester 1 and 2; or Algebra B, semester 1 and 2; or Algebra Survey, semester 1 and 2; or Credit-by-Choice
Challenge by Examination. Students graduating prior to July 1, 2017 will be required to earn 2.5 credits of Mathematics.
4. Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 credits
Three years (six semesters) of science credit are required. Two semesters must be life science. Two semesters must be physical science.
5. Physical Education/Health Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 credits
Three semesters of physical education graduation requirements can be fulfilled by passing the required Lifetime Personal
Fitness course plus .5 credit from the lifetime activity courses (noted as such in course listings) plus .5 additional credit from
any physical education class. A) Students may obtain a waiver of .25 of the physical education graduation requirement for each full
season of ASAA­-sanctioned sports participation within the Anchorage School District. Elective credit must be earned to replace the
Physical Education/Health Education requirement that is waived. A waiver of the physical education requirement under this section
does not affect the overall minimum requirements of 22.5 credits.
A) Lifetime Personal Fitness can be waived by:
1. successful completion of a fitness and written test administered by Health and Physical Education
Department; or
2. participation in two seasons of ASAA­-sanctioned extracurricular sports within the Anchorage School District and successful completion of the computerized knowledge test administered by the designated high school building personnel.
B) Students may also waive physical education requirements (except Lifetime Personal Fitness) through Credit ­By ­Choice, correspondence, college coursework, or field study programs.
C) A maximum of 1.0 waiver of the physical education requirement is available upon successful completion of 2 years (four semesters) of JROTC.
D) Healthy Life Skills and First Aid are not repeatable upon receiving a passing grade in a previous semester.
6. Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 credits
Fifteen semester courses have not been specified so as to provide students an opportunity to pursue individual educational goals.
Electives may include additional courses in Language Arts, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, Technology, Fine Arts, World
Languages, Physical Education and Career Technology.
Total 22.5 credits
a. A
student may be considered for graduation when he or she has acquired a minimum of 22.5 credits after grade 8 in required and elective subjects.
b. Seniors entering the ASD for the first time may graduate by meeting requirements of their previous school when the ASD requirements create hardship. Timeline for high school Language Arts/Social Studies realignment for Common Core State Standards
2012-13
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
Language Arts
9
English 9*
English I*
English I*
English I*
English I*
10
English 10*
English 10*
English II*
English II*
English II*
11
English 11 or AP
English 11 or AP
English 11 or AP
English III or AP
English III or AP
English Elect or AP
English Elect or AP or English IV
English Elect or AP or English IV
English IV or AP
AK Studies* &
Ancient Civ* or Global
Geography* or Consumer
Econ or Economics
World History* or US History*
AP World History
AK Studies & Economics or AK Studies & Economics
Elective
or Elective
AK Studies* & Ancient
Civ* or Global Geography*
or Consumer Econ or
Economics
World History* or AP World History
US History* or AP US History
AK Studies* & Ancient
Civ* or Global Geography*
or Consumer Econ or
Economics
World History* or AP World History
US History* or AP US History
Government & Elective
Gov’t & Econ or Elective
Gov’t & Econ or Elective
12
English Elect or AP
Social Studies
9
World History*
10
US History*
11
AK Studies & Economics
12
Government & Elective
AK Studies* & Ancient
Civ* or Global Geography*
or Consumer Econ or
Economics
Government & Elective
* Indicates Regular and Honors
Anchorage School District
High School
Program of Studies
This listing contains all courses approved by the
Anchorage School Board as of the date below. Not
all courses are simul­ta­neously offered at every high
school.
Revised June 2015
ASD Non-Discrimination Statement:
The Board is committed to an environment of nondiscrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, economic status, union
affiliation, disability, and other human differences. No person shall be excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, any academic or extracurricular program or educational opportunity or service offered by the District. The District will comply with the applicable statutes, regulations, and executive
orders adopted by Federal, State and Municipal agencies.
Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the District’s Equal Employment Opportunity Director, who also serves as the Title IX Coordinator, ASD
Education Center, 5530 E. Northern Lights Blvd, Anchorage, AK 99504-3135 (907) 742-4132 or to any of the following external agencies: Alaska State
Commission for Human Rights, Anchorage Equal Rights Commission, Director of the Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education, Department of
Health and Human Services.
For information contact:
Anchorage School District Education Center
Secondary Education
5530 E. Northern Lights Blvd.
Anchorage, Alaska 99504-3135
(907) 742-4256
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Graduation requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . inside front cover
Advanced Health Career Pathways. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Advertising, Art & Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
About scheduling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Automotive Maintenance Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Alaska Performance Scholarship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Aviation Maintenance Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Alaska School Activities Association (ASAA)
Aviation Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
eligibility for sports and activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Business Technology & Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Alternative credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv
Career & Work Readiness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Anchorage High Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Carpentry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Course withdrawal procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Collision Repair & Refinishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Credit By Choice program (CBC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Computer Information Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Grading procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Construction Electricity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
High School Alternative Programs/Schools . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Cosmetology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
High School Credit for Middle School Students. . . . . . . . . . x
Culinary Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
High School Four-Year Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . inside back cover
Early Childhood Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Independent study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Electronics and Telecommunications Technology. . . . . . . . 19
National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
Emergency Medical Technology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
eligibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Non-resident tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Film, Audio & Video Production. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Student foreign exchange programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xii
Fire and Rescue Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Tech Prep: college credits/trade organizations. . . . . . . . . . . xiii
Horticulture & Landscape Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Natural Resources Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Career & Technical Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Outdoor Power Equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
English as a Second Language (ESL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Practice and Health for PCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
General Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Public Safety & Security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Geography/Area Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Travel & Tourism. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
History/Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Veterinary Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
International Baccalaureate (West High School). . . . . . . . . 27
Visual Media and Communications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
JROTC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Welding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Language Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
ASD iSchool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Language Arts Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Language Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Math. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Physical Education/Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Social Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Science. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
World Languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Social Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
General Electives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Theatre Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Appendix A – ASD Mathematics Graduation Requirements/
Visual Arts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Lifetime Personal Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
World Languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Appendix B – Conditions for Student Participation (ASAA) . . 99
King Career Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Appendix C – NCAA Eligibility Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Anchorage High Schools
AVAIL, 425 C Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-4930
Bartlett High, 1101 N. Muldoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-1800
Benson Secondary, 4515 Campbell Airstrip Road. . . 742-2050
Chugiak High, 16525 Birchwood Loop Rd., Chugiak . . . . . . . 742-3050
Continuation, 401 International Airport Rd. #27. . . . 742-1170
Dimond High, 2909 W. 88th. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-7000
Eagle River High, 8701 Yosemite Drive . . . . . . . . . . . 742-2700
East High, 4025 E. Northern Lights Blvd.. . . . . . . . . . 742-2100
Family Partnership Charter School,
401 E. Fireweed Lane, Ste. 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-3700
Frontier Charter School,
400 W. Northern Lights Blvd, Ste 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-1180
Highland Tech Charter School,
5530 E. Northern Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-1700
Polaris K–12 School, 6200 Ashwood St.. . . . . . . . . . . 742-8700
King Career Center, 2650 E. Northern Lights . . . . . . 742-8900
SAVE, 410 E. 56th Ave.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-1250
SEARCH, 4515 Campbell Airstrip Road. . . . . . . . . . . 742-2050
Service High, 5577 Abbott Road. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-8100
South Anchorage High, 13400 Elmore Rd. . . . . . . . . 742-6200
Steller Secondary School, 2508 Blueberry . . . . . . . . . 742-4950
West High, 1700 Hillcrest Drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 742-2500
High School Alternative Programs/
Schools
The district has a number of special purpose programs for students with special interests and needs and where individualization
is emphasized. Students earn credits and meet district requirements in a variety of ways and these programs are characterized by
curricular innovation along with basic skills development. A brief
description is included here. If you have any questions, check
with your counselor.
ASD iSchool
Native and American Indian students. CITC teachers emphasize
high expectations for academic excellence while providing students with an encouraging environment in which youth can fulfill
their potential through education. CITC promotes the development of self-confidence, creativity, leadership, and traditional
values by integrating hands-on, culturally responsive content and
innovative practices into their academic classes and after-school
activities.
Bartlett Medical Academy
The Medical Academy at Bartlett will prepare students to
enter the work force or college with preparation in various facets
of the medical field. Classes in Anatomy, Physiology, Forensics,
Medical Terminology, Health Occupations, and Sports Injury
Management will be available to students through the academy.
Students do internships and shadow professionals at the Veterans
Hospital next to the Bartlett campus for real life experience.
Bartlett, Integrated Honors High School (IHHS)
The Integrated Honors Program is a college-preparatory
program designed to emphasize academic writing and analysis
of classic literature. Beginning in 9th grade, students will take
their Honors Language Arts course and Honors History course
with a designated “Honor Team” comprised of one Honors
Language Arts teacher and one Honors/AP History teacher for
each grade level. Experience with the Seminar Method will begin
in 9th grade and continue through the program. Students will
be introduced the Honors Team in 9th grade and continue with
the honors teams through graduation. “Cross connections are so
important to the student’s learning experience, and these connections can be found throughout the curriculum.” In an effort to
enhance student learning, the study of literature and history in
all honors designated courses will be integrated and team-taught.
Benny Benson
The Anchorage Vocational Academic Institute of Learning is
an alternative high school program developed for students who
have dropped out of traditional schools. The school’s purpose is
well matched with the definition of the word “avail,” which means
“to be of use or help.” AVAIL is designed to help students return
to the educational system and obtain skills for employment with
an emphasis on earning a high school diploma.
The SAVE II Program provides specialized high school programs for students who are in 11th and 12th grade and are behind
in credit or have already dropped out of high school. Students
must have a referral from a counselor or administrator. Final recommendation for acceptance into these programs is determined
after a student and parent interview is conducted. These programs
combine teacher-directed instruction, class assignments, and
individualized contracts for the students’ academic development.
Students are evaluated on a monthly system where a minimum
of academic progress is expected. Students are required to hold a
part time job for a minimum of 20 hours per week and/or attend
a class at King Career Center to fulfill their vocational expectation. Work experience and vocational training are counted as
elective credit and serve as half of the student’s educational day.
Students in these programs must meet the same requirements for
state and district standards as the students attending traditional
high schools in the Anchorage School district.
Benny Benson is located at 4515 Campbell Airstrip Road.
Bartlett High, Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC)
Charter Schools
ASD iSchool is the Anchorage School District’s online program. ASD iSchool provides high school students with opportunities to earn credit online. Through ASD iSchool’s online
classes, students have access to courses that may not be available
at their school, that allow students to overcome scheduling challenges, and that meet student needs. Online courses may be taken
as original course attempt, to replace a grade, or for academic
advancement.
AVAIL
Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) provides a spectrum of
core content academic classes at Bartlett High School for Alaska
iv Charter school students, with principal approval, may take
courses at comprehensive high schools or King Career Center.
Chugiak High School Spanish Immersion Program
The district’s K-12 Japanese, Russian and Spanish language
immersion programs have designated feeder middle and high
schools to ensure that students continue their immersion experience in a seamless, articulated sequence of higher level courses. Chugiak High School is the continuation of the Spanish
immersion program from Chugiak Elementary and Mirror Lake
Middle schools. In the high school program there are four-year
upper level courses designed to increase students’ language skills
while learning through content. Spanish courses include Vistas
Juveniles del Mundo Hispano, Perspectivas Literarias, Estudios
Latinoamericanos, and Advanced Placement Spanish Language.
High school immersion courses are designed to be rigorous and
challenging for students while preparing them for upper division
university coursework.
Chugiak, World Discovery Seminar Program (WDS)
The World Discovery Seminar Program is an alternative,
smaller learning community and official ASD school-within-aschool that serves students at Chugiak High School. Rather than
relying on textbooks, the program employs the Paideia methodology, a Socratic–based learning technique focusing on in-depth
understanding of primary texts. With the teacher facilitating the
discovery learning process, students explore, through writing and
discussion, real life questions about literary and historical texts. In
the Paideia seminar process, verbal and written discussion of the
texts is emphasized over answering “end of chapter” questions.
Emphasis is placed on deeper learning, rather than general
content. The basic concept is to assist young people to become
avid, self-motivated learners. Interesting projects and hands-on
activities are also fundamental to the class work. Self-expression
is highlighted through the many varied activities comprising the
World Discovery Seminar approach. Class dialogue allows the
sharing of various opinions and experiences, which encourages
students to draw their own conclusions. This helps all students
develop a greater, more profound understanding of literature,
history, science, mathematics and philosophy.
Continuation Program
The Continuation Program is an individualized online instructional program for middle and high school students expelled and
long-term suspended from the Anchorage School District for
violations of school policy. The program provides students with
core academic instruction designed to meet the requirements
for promotion to the next grade level and/or progress towards
graduation. The program allows a student to continue to receive
academic instruction while he or she is completing requirements
for reinstatement or re-entry to the school district.
Crossroads
Crossroads is the Anchorage School District’s school for
pregnant and parenting teens. Crossroads provides a supportive
instructional environment which allows students to continue
their education while pregnant and/or parenting. A complete program of instruction is provided with an emphasis on core academics. The program utilizes online instruction in conjunction with
traditional coursework to meet the academic needs of students.
Specialized curriculum related to being a pregnant and/or parenting teen is offered and community support contacts are available
for students. The staff at Crossroads is committed to providing
quality instruction in an environment that fosters regular school
attendance and student responsibility for learning.
Dimond High School Japanese Immersion Program
The district’s K-12 Japanese, Russian and Spanish language
immersion programs have designated feeder middle and high
schools to ensure that students continue their immersion experience in a seamless, articulated sequence of higher level courses. Dimond High School is the continuation of the Japanese
immersion program from Sand Lake Elementary and Mears
Middle schools. The Japanese for Fluent Speakers course sequence
includes an “Honors” course in which students are partnered
with members of the local Japanese community in an “adopta-student” program. Advanced Placement Japanese Language
and Culture is part of the course offerings in the High School
Japanese Immersion sequence. High school immersion courses
are designed to be rigorous and challenging for students while
preparing them for upper division university coursework.
Dimond High School Engineering Academy
The DHS Engineering Academy is designed to prepare students for a two-year or a four-year engineering degree program.
Five engineering courses follow the Project Lead the Way (PLTW)
curriculum that may qualify for articulated agreements with
universities in Alaska and across the U. S. Engineering Academy
courses are project-based. Students are connected with engineering professors at UAA and with engineers in businesses that serve
on the Engineering Academy Advisory Council.
Students may enter the Engineering Academy as freshmen
and continue the four-year sequence or they may take individual
courses when space is available.
East High, Elitnaurvik (EWE)
Elitnaurvik-Within-East is designed specifically for Alaska
Native and American Indian students. Elitnaurvik in Yupik
means “a place to learn.”
EWE incorporates Native values and issues, and successfully
addresses different learning styles in its activities, course offerings,
and work components. EWE enjoys widespread support in the
community. The primary emphasis is on building leadership
through group participation, volunteerism, and empowering
students to embrace their cultural heritage. Elitnaurvik provides
culturally-based education, counseling, tutoring, and after-school
activities.
East High, School-Within-A-School (SWS)
School within a school is a cohesive learning community
within East Anchorage High School which provides a unique,
enhanced learning experience for self-directed students with an
emphasis on independent thinking, integrated learning, and
community development. SWS accomplishes this through a partnership of skilled, innovative teachers and staff, a small cohesive
student population, and parental support. SWS offers a wide
range of core and elective classes, including advanced placement
and self-directed study classes. Students take world language,
v
physical education, and vocational and fine arts offerings from the
wide array offered in East High School. SWS students participate
in East High activities that include sports, clubs, drama, dance,
music, and student government. SWS program has 240 students,
in addition to the world exchange students and fills through the
district lottery system. Siblings in SWS and students in the East
High attendance zone will have preference.
Family Partnership Charter School
Family Partnership Charter is a K-12 home-based, home
school program offering small group classes, vendor services and
one-on-one teacher time. Students often decide on a mixture of
home school, online, local university and area high school classes.
Frontier Charter School
Frontier Charter School is a K-12 home school program
featuring a learning profile to map and individualize instruction
through traditional home schooling, online digital platforms,
dual enrollment with neighborhood schools, and/or university
classes.
Highland Tech Charter School
Highland Tech High is a 6th–12th grade standards-based
learning environment that promotes mastery learning across the
curriculum in a multi-aged non-time bound system. Attention
is placed on individual student learning needs through project-based units of study that integrate technology as a key
instructional tool. Student voice and ownership is encouraged
and expected.
King Career Center (KCC)
The Martin Luther King Jr. Career Center offers career,
vocational and technical training in more than 25 occupations
for students primarily in grades 11–12. KCC courses provide
academic and elective credit, and some courses offer concurrent
college credit through Tech Prep or credit toward post-secondary
training programs such as apprenticeships. All KCC courses are
guided by an Advisory Council made up of experts from industry
and post-secondary education, including apprenticeships and
trade organizations. Courses at KCC are delivered through handson learning with the latest technology and equipment. At KCC
students learn skills that will help them in post-secondary education, in a trade organization training program or going directly
to work. Our students tell us that they are better prepared for
life after high school because of the skills and knowledge gained
through their KCC classes.
Students spend the equivalent of three periods at KCC and
earn 1.5 credits for each semester class. Bus transportation is provided from students’ home schools or they may drive. Students
who meet requirements in their second semester may earn credit
by doing on-the-job training with mentors throughout the city.
Students may also earn credit toward graduation for working a
part-time job that relates directly to their KCC course. Please note
that KCC courses, at this time, do not meet NCAA Division I or
Division II entry guidelines.
McLaughlin
McLaughlin Youth Center provides short-term and longvi term residential care for institutionalized delinquent adolescents throughout the State of Alaska. The Anchorage School
District administers a comprehensive educational program for
McLaughlin residents. Students receive instruction in the core
academic areas, as well as physical education, technology, and
vocational studies.
Newcomers’ Center
The Newcomers’ Center offers students in grades 7–12 who
are monolingual speakers of languages other than English an
opportunity to enroll in a two-and-one-half hour block period at
Wendler Middle School. Certificated teachers, with the assistance
of a bilingual tutor and bilingual counselor, provide students with
necessary survival skills in the English language as well as basic
concepts in language arts and social studies.
Polaris K–12 School
Polaris K-12 School is open to students from kindergarten
through twelfth grade. This allows for an integrated curriculum
and multi-age group learning based on student interests, needs,
and developmental levels. Polaris has an evolving program that
creates an environment challenging its students, teachers and parents to personal excellence, lifelong learning and ethical responsibility to self, community and world. This school is for students,
parents and teachers who want an emphasis on self-directed
learning and active participation in education.
Project Puqigtut
Project Puqigtut is a program designed specifically for Alaska
Native and American Indian high school students. Puqigtut in
Cup’ik/Yup’ik means “smart people.”
This online success program helps Native students catchup or get ahead in credits through culturally responsive online
coursework and social service support. Courses are offered in the
subjects of Mathematics, English, Science, and Social Studies.
Courses are taught by Anchorage School District teachers and
there is a face-to-face component.
Students may take a project course in addition to their regular
schedule at their home school, or in some situations in place of a
course. The program operates on a rolling admissions basis, except
during the summer term. Equipment can be provided to students
if needed.
SAVE
SAVE provides specialized high school programs for students
who are in 11th and 12th grade and are behind in credit or have
already dropped out of high school. Students must have a referral
from a counselor or administrator. Final recommendation for
acceptance into these programs is determined after a student and
parent interview is conducted.
These programs combine teacher-directed instruction, class
assignments, and individualized contracts for the students’ academic development. Students are evaluated on a monthly system
where a minimum of academic progress is expected. Students
are required to hold a part time job for a minimum of 20 hours
per week and/or attend a class at King Career Center to fulfill
their vocational expectation. Work experience and vocational
training are counted as elective credit and serve as half of the
student’s educational day. Students in these programs must meet
the same requirements for state and district standards as the students attending traditional high schools in the Anchorage School
District.
SAVE is located at 410 E. 56th Ave.
SEARCH at Benny Benson
The SEARCH program is for eighth, ninth and tenth grade
students who have been unsuccessful at their home school due
to poor attendance, poor academics, social issues, or limited
behavioral situations. Students are admitted at the beginning of
each quarter and are required to stay until the end of the semester.
In the SEARCH program academic and socialization skills are
incorporated into the curriculum. The academic focus is based on
the district grade level expectations. Social and emotional learning
skills are embraced and woven into all aspects of the program. The
social emotional learning aspect of the curriculum is the process
through which students learn to recognize and manage emotions,
make good decisions, behave ethically and responsibly, develop
positive relationships and avoid negative behavior.
Service High, Biomedical Career Academy (BCA)
The Biomedical Career Academy at Service aims to prepare
students for a successful career in the healthcare industry. Classes
within the BCA focus heavily on rigorous academics within a traditional curriculum, integrating healthcare and medically based
activities within the classroom and community. Students have the
option of preparing themselves for a position directly after high
school within a healthcare setting and/or to focus on preparation
for a traditional college degree.
All students are required to be members of HOSA (Health
Occupation Students of America–a nationally recognized student
healthcare organization) and will also be obtaining current firstaid/CPR certification. Students are also required to take Project
Lead The Way Principals of Biomedical Science and Human
Body Systems in the appropriate progression. Seniors, upon the
successful completion of prerequisites, will take a capstone class
which focuses on individual research and hands-on learning.
The BCA students will be interacting with our business partners in the community thus will be held to high standards of
professional conduct and communication.
Service High, The Leadership Academy
The Leadership Academy at Service High School is centered
around the Navy JROTC program and focuses on academic
excellence, community service and academic/practical leadership
training. Each year of participation in the Leadership Academy
counts for one elective credit. Additionally, for each of the first
two years of participation the student will have one-half credit
of Physical Education credit waived. An in-house mentoring
and tutoring program is provided for all Leadership Academy.
The Leadership Academy prides itself on leading technology
integration at Service High, making use of the latest in classroom
technologies.
Service High, The Seminar School (TSS)
The Seminar School serves approximately 250 students and is
characterized by the use of the Socratic seminar method, a strong
sense of community and a learning environment that emphasizes
independence, trust, personal responsibility and an open mind.
The TSS curriculum is built on the consideration of classic texts
that span the history and breadth of human experience. Students
of the Seminar School are diverse in character and ability and
work together in a multi-grade level setting (9–12) for a portion
of their classes. Students can fulfill all language arts and social
studies requirements along with some science and math requirements through TSS classes.
Steller Secondary School
Steller is a school that provides students with opportunities
to be self-directed, independent and responsible learners. Steller
offers a personalized education for grades 7 through 12 where
students can define their own educational goals with the help of
parents and staff. Steller Secondary School fosters an educational
environment based on student responsibility and freedom.
Steller classes focus on educational process and provide opportunities for the development of leadership skills, problem solving
proficiency, self-assessment abilities, decision-making skills and
goal setting. Self-directed learning is a vital part of the Steller
program. Active involvement within both the Steller community
and the community of Anchorage is also important. Steller follows the ASD guidelines for educational content and graduation
requirements.
West High, Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC)
Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) provides a spectrum of core
content academic classes at West High School for Alaska Native
and American Indian students. CITC teachers emphasize high
expectations for academic excellence while providing students
with an encouraging environment in which youth can fulfill
their potential through education. CITC promotes the development of self-confidence, creativity, leadership, and traditional
values by integrating hands-on, culturally responsive content and
innovative practices into their academic classes and after-school
activities.
West High, Highly Gifted Program (HG)
The Highly Gifted Program at West High School is designed
for the 9th–12th grade student whose educational needs cannot
be met within the Honors Programs at the high school level. The
first two years of the program offers a smaller learning community
through clustered core classes. The emphasis on critical thinking
and writing skills encourages depth and breadth of knowledge in
all content areas.
West High, Medical Academy
The Medical Academy at West will prepare students to enter
the work force or college with preparation in various facets of the
medical field. Classes in Anatomy, Physiology, Wellness, Medical
Terminology, Health Occupations, Pharmacy, and Sports Injury
Management will be available to students through the academy.
Students are encouraged to work with community members in
vii
the health care field through guest speaker presentations, visitations, internships and mentorships (through the ASD gifted
program)
West High, Pre-IB
designed to be rigorous and challenging for students while preparing them for upper division university coursework
West High, School Through the Arts
Students in 9th and 10th grade who wish to prepare themselves for the Diploma Program are encouraged to study the
following courses: honors English and honors social studies,
biology/chemistry, algebra/geometry or higher, a world language,
and the arts.
At West High all students can benefit from an arts-based
curriculum. The School Through the Arts is designed to attract a
multi-cultural student body with a variety of learning styles. This
academic program features an enriched course study, binding
language arts and world history with the visual and performing
arts. Students also visit artists, plays and other community events.
West High, International Baccalaureate (IB)
Non-resident tuition
The International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program (DP)
at West Anchorage High School encourages creative inquiry and
critical thinking while helping students develop a global perspective. IB is a challenging two-year (11th-12th) pre-college course
of studies in the tradition of the liberal arts. Diploma candidates
must complete studies in six subject areas: English, a world language, history, science, math, and the arts. Additionally, students
undertake an independent research project; participate in creative, physical, and social service activities; and take a class called
Theory of Knowledge. The IB DP encourages students to develop
independence of thought, creativity, inquiry skills, open-mindedness, and an ability to think critically and reflectively. West High
is the only IB program in the Anchorage School District.
West High School Language Immersion Programs
The district’s K-12 Japanese, Russian and Spanish language
immersion programs have designated feeder middle and high
schools to ensure that students continue their immersion experience in a seamless, articulated sequence of higher level courses.
West High School is the continuation of the Spanish two-way
immersion program from Government Hill Elementary and
Romig Middle schools. The two-way immersion program is
the only one of its kind in Alaska. Students in this program are
both English speakers and native Spanish-speakers who together
become bilingual and biliterate in both Spanish and English.
Native Spanish-speaking students and heritage Spanish speakers with literacy skills in Spanish are encouraged to enroll in
this Spanish two-way immersion program. In the high school
program there are four upper-level courses designed to increase
students’ language skills while learning through content. Spanish
courses include Vistas Juveniles del Mundo Hispano, Perspectivas
Literarias, Estudios Latinoamericanos, and Advanced Placement
Spanish Language. High school immersion courses are designed
to be rigorous and challenging for students while preparing them
for upper-division university coursework.
West High School is also the continuation of the Russian
immersion program from Turnagain Elementary and Romig
Middle schools. At the high school level there are four advanced
Russian classes designed to increase students’ language skills
while learning through content. Courses include Sovremenaya
Molodyoj’ i kul’tura (Contemporary Youth and Culture), Vzgla’d
na Rossiju cherez literaturu i SMI (Perspectives on Russia through
Literature and Media), Rossia i Alyska: Istoricheskiye svyazi
(Russia and Alaska: Historical Connections), and Advanced
Placement Russian Language. High school immersion courses are
viii By state law, all non-resident students attending schools of
this district shall pay in advance the regular school tuition rate.
(AS 9.030) This law pertains to students whose parents are not
residents of the Municipality of Anchorage and who are not in the
custody of a district resident. (ASD Policy Section 431.21) For
more information about non-resident tuition, please contact the
school principal.
About scheduling
Scheduling for the year starts in February with juniors and
continues with sophomores, freshmen and current 8th graders.
A school’s master schedule is developed by taking all student
course requests (from a list of all approved ASD courses) and creating sections to accommodate the maximum number of student
requests.
Some requested courses will not have sufficient demand to
permit the class to be offered so students must be prepared with
alternate requests.
To assure success in scheduling, each student and parent can:
1. Explore careers with a counselor or career resource person
and identify education needs.
2. Plan a four-year program (grades 9–12) that is based on
tentative career choices.
3. Select courses carefully with a counselor. Parents are
encouraged to consult a counselor before helping students
select courses.
a. Be fully aware of course content for each course being
considered.
b. Know the graduation requirements and make a check
list for meeting those requirements.
c. Be aware of the entrance requirements at potential
post-secondary schools and NCAA requirements if athletic participation is contemplated at a Division I or II
college.
d. Have an alternative plan before coming to scheduling.
Alaska Performance Scholarship
The Alaska Performance Scholarship provides an opportunity for Alaska high school students to earn a scholarship to help
cover the cost of an Alaska postsecondary education. Alaska high
school students who take a more rigorous curriculum, get good
grades, and score well on college placement or work ready exams,
can earn an Alaska Performance Scholarship to qualified Alaska
colleges, universities, or vocational/technical programs. For more
information: www.asdk12.org/aps
Course withdrawal procedures
The following are the procedures regarding withdrawing or
changing a course:
1. Once students have selected their courses, there will be no
schedule changes, including withdrawals, after the beginning of the grading period except as determined by the
principal or his/her designee.
2. Any student whose absence is unauthorized for the first
three days of a course may be withdrawn from the course
and will need to reschedule.
3. No record shall be kept on a student who withdraws from
a course with the principal’s permission prior to the end of
the 10th day of the course. Students who, after 10 days in a
course, withdraw with the principal’s permission will have
WF (withdraw failing) recorded on their transcripts. The
WF counts in the calculation of the Grade Point Average
(GPA).
Grading procedures
Reporting periods are nine weeks in length although courses
are taken by semester. In high school, the first report or grade is
a notice of a student’s progress up to the middle of the semester.
The final semester grade is based on the total amount of contribution a student has made to the course during the entire semester
and is the grade recorded on the transcript. In high school, if a
student fails one semester of a full-year course and successfully
completes the other semester of the same course, credit is granted
for the semester successfully completed. Physical education classes
are an exception because they are nine weeks in length and the
quarter grade is recorded on the transcript.
Grading System
“A’’ This mark indicates the student has done work in quality
and quantity far in excess of the standards set forth for a
satisfactory grade in the course.
“B’’ This mark indicates that the student is doing work in
quality and quantity above the standards set forth for a
passing grade in the course.
“C’’ This mark is a satisfactory passing grade. It indicates that
the student is acquiring the necessary information to
proceed in the subject. He/she is meeting the standards
set for a passing grade in the course.
“D” This mark indicates that the student is not effectively
mastering the work assigned but has sufficient understanding of the subject to justify the opinion that more
growth will result from advancement than from repetition of the course.
“F’’ Insufficient progress in the subject to merit granting of
credit in the course.
“WF’’ Student has been withdrawn from the course “failing.’’
“J’’ Audit— Principal approval is required. Indicates a student is auditing a course for his/her benefit. This does
not count towards credit for graduation and must be
approved prior to the 10th day of the course. Students are
still required to complete course work.
Weighted grades
The Anchorage School Board has approved weighted grades
for Advanced Placement (AP) and higher level International
Baccalaureate (IB) courses. While an “A” is normally worth four
points in calculating a student’s grade point average (GPA), a
weighted “A” is worth five points; a weighted “B” is worth four
points; a weighted “C” is worth three points; a weighted “D” is
worth two points and an “F” is worth no points. The Anchorage
School District does not offer weighted grades for college
course work except for the following APU courses: Principles
of Chemistry I, Principles of Chemistry II, General Physics I,
General Physics II, Principles of Biology I, Principles of Biology
II, Calculus I, Calculus II, and Multivariable Calculus.
Transcripts
High school transcripts are legal documents and may not be
amended except to correct errors and enter replacement grades
for repeated courses once courses and grades have been posted to
the transcript. Prior to requesting inclusion of Credit by Choice
grades, including high school credit for courses taken during
middle school, consider the effect these non-weighted grades will
have on class rank.
Honor roll
High school students earning a 3.5 grade average will be eligible for the honor roll. Any “F’’ or “D’’ grade will disqualify a
student for that grading period. A high school student must be
enrolled in a minimum of four subjects and grades in all courses
will be considered.
Anchorage School District academic letter
To earn an ASD academic letter, any student who has fulfilled
the criteria for Honor Roll in two consecutive semesters will be
awarded an Academic Letter. These semesters need not fall in
order of fall and spring semester, but may be considered consecutive if the GPA is earned in the spring semester and the following
fall semester. Any semester the student meets the Honor Roll criteria subsequent to the awarding of the Academic Letter and earns
a 3.5 to 4.0, a silver star is awarded. Any semester the student
meets the Honor Roll criteria subsequent to the awarding of the
Academic Letter and earns a 4.0 or higher, a gold star is awarded.
Honors group
To give recognition for high scholastic achievement, the
Anchorage School District has established standards for the
selection of members of an Honors Group. A student who has a
cumulative GPA of 3.5 by the semester prior to graduation will be
eligible for membership in the Honors Group.
Honors graduates will be given recognition at graduation and
on their transcript in the following manner:
1. Students with a GPA of 3.50 to less than 3.76 will be designated as having graduated Cum Laude;
2. Students with a GPA of 3.76 to 4.0 will be designated as
having graduated Magna Cum Laude;
3. Students with a GPA of greater than 4.0 will be designated
as having graduated Summa Cum Laude.
ix
High school credit for middle school
students
See Program No. 7
Credit By Choice program (CBC)
The Credit by Choice Program is designed to give students
the opportunity to choose enriching learning experiences tailored to their personal educational needs and to have them
recorded on their high school transcript. This program is open
to high school students currently enrolled in the Anchorage
School District.
An overview of each program option is given below. Details
of requirements for each program are attached. While the
Curriculum Assistant Principal and Counselors can respond to
questions, it is the RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT
TO WORK INDEPENDENTLY TO COMPLETE THE
APPLICATION AND CARRY OUT A PROGRAM
ACCORDING TO THE PRESCRIBED GUIDELINES.
General Guidelines
1. Students proposing a Credit by Choice (CBC) Program
must have prior written approval of their parents and the
Principal.
2. A certificated staff person must sponsor and/or supervise
the student’s program. In the case of the waiver, this will
be the Principal.
3. ASD is the accrediting institution and sets standards for
issuing credit/waivers. ASD is not the sponsoring agency
for off-campus programs and is not responsible for the
student’s personal or financial liability. Program expense
is the responsibility of the individual.
4. CBC courses will be titled as such on the student’s transcript. Programs 1 (Educational Travel) and 6 (Community
Service/Field Study) may only be taken for elective credit/waiver. Specific curriculum area credit will be recorded
for Programs 2 (Correspondence Course), 3 (College
Course Work), 4 (Early College Admissions Program), and
5 (Credit by Examination). Credit by Examination may
not be done for Physical Education credit.
5. Since CBC registration is recorded only upon program
completion, CBC is not a course that can be included for
calculating eligibility for full-time student status.
6. The grade received will be incorporated into the student’s
high school grade point average (GPA) and will be counted
to determine class rank and valedictorian. When computing valedictorian status, the ratio of weighted advanced
placement to regular graded classes is significant.
Program No. 1 – Educational Travel
Credit may be earned for a planned learning experience gained
through participation in a travel/study tour. The Curriculum
Assistant Principal must approve both the specific tour and
teacher/sponsor before students may apply. Questions concerning
specific credit requirements during travel/study tours should be
directed to the teacher/sponsor.
• A three-week tour program is eligible for 0.5 unit of credit
and a six-week program may earn 1.0 unit of credit.
x • Travel supervisors must submit a completed application
with supporting materials to the Curriculum Assistant
Principal for approval by April 15. Proposals must outline
the type of educational travel, travel supervisor’s name, past
experience with student travel, name of sponsoring company/affiliation, dates of departure and return, estimated number of student participants, goals and objectives, proposed
itinerary, evaluation criteria, information on liability/medical coverage for participants, parent information forms and
copies of releases. Forward a copy of the approved “Request
for Out-Of-District Travel” (form J – available from the
Activities Office), taking care to specify names of sponsors/
chaperones.
• A student desiring credit for approved educational travel
must complete the Credit by Choice application and submit
it to the Curriculum Assistant Principal in advance of the
trip. Upon completion of the travel, the supervisor must
provide the Curriculum Assistant Principal with grade
reports and submit supporting grade book and legend to the
Registrar.
Program No. 2 – Correspondence Course
The purpose of the correspondence is to meet special needs of
students as approved by the school administration. Paramount
consideration will be given to the student’s record in completing
independent studies. Due consideration will be given to the student’s record in completing independent studies. To be approved,
correspondence programs must be accredited. Courses must be
proctored by certificated staff.
• As of August 2008, approved correspondence programs
include: University of Nebraska, University of North
Dakota and Brigham Young University, and the Native
Heritage Center Advanced Academics. Others may be
considered upon request. Application for approval of other
programs may be done through the Curriculum Assistant
Principal.
• Correspondence courses may be used for both makeup and
acceleration.
• A copy of the correspondence school application must
accompany the Credit by Choice application and must be
received by the Curriculum Assistant Principal prior to the
beginning of the course.
• Upon completion, the student must submit proof of grade
to the Curriculum Assistant Principal.
Program No. 3 – College Course Work – UAA, APU
UAA
This program is designed to give eligible students currently
enrolled in the Anchorage School District the opportunity to
receive credit for certain courses through accredited institutions
of higher education. The course should correlate with the career
needs of the individual. Students must submit applications within
two weeks after the beginning of the class. College courses must
be 100 level and above. Student must register for at least two (2)
semester hours to receive 0.5 high school credit, three (3) or four
(4) semester hours to receive 1.0 high school credit or five (5) or
six (6) semester hours for 1.5 high school credit. When the student has completed his or her college coursework, he or she must
submit proof of grade to the Curriculum Assistant Principal.
Beginning in the 2014-15 school year, the University of Alaska
Anchorage (UAA) will begin partnering with the Anchorage
School District to offer a cohort program for ASD high school
students. Students who apply and are accepted into the cohort
may take pre-approved courses at UAA that will simultaneously
meet specific ASD graduation requirements. Participating students will be expected to agree to terms outlined by UAA and
will be responsible for submitting transcripts to his or her home
school. The following courses have currently been approved:
Content area
UAA course
English
English A111:
Language Arts Introduction to
Composition
(Prerequisites)
Social Studies PS A101: Introduction to
American Government OR
PS A 102: Introduction to
Political Science
Social Studies Econ A201: Principles
of Macroeconomics
(Prerequisites) OR
Econ A202: Principles
of Microeconomics
(Prerequisites)
Science
Biology A102 & Biology
Lab A103 (must be taken
together)
Math
Math 107 (Prerequisites)
ASD
requirement
12th grade
English electives
or English IV
United States
Government
Economics
Biology
Algebra II
APU
The APU Early Honors Program will provide admitted and
qualified students a two-semester program of study that includes
college level coursework which will at the same time satisfy
high school graduation requirements. In consultation with the
Director of the Early Honors Program and the local guidance
counselor, the student will develop an Individual Learning Plan to
assure that district graduation requirements will be met. Students
will be concurrently enrolled in their home high schools. Because
schools will continue to receive federal and state funding for
these students, students are not eligible for federal financial aid at
Alaska Pacific University, although they may be eligible for university-granted financial aid, based on need.
Credits earned at APU will partially fulfill credits needed for
graduation from ASD (3 or 4 credit hour courses at APU equate
to 1.0 units for ASD, 1 or 2 credit hour credits at APU equate
to .5 units for ASD. Principles of Chemistry I, Principles of
Chemistry II, General Physics I, General Physics II, Principles of
Biology I, Principles of Biology II, Calculus I, Calculus II, and
Multi-variable Calculus.
Program No. 4 – Early College Admissions Program
This program would allow outstanding students with a grade
point average of 3.5 or above to leave high school for college work
prior to having the time and credits for graduation. The student
would have the option of receiving his/her high school diploma
after successfully completing the first year of college. ASD graduation requirements must be met in order to receive a high school
diploma. The program would serve the student who has made
definite plans for master and doctoral work.
• To be considered, a student must have maintained at least a
3.5 GPA during the first three years of high school and all
required grade level courses must have been completed prior
to application for this Credit by Choice program.
• Tentative acceptance by a college or university must be
in evidence. It is the student’s responsibility to determine
whether college coursework accepted by the Anchorage
School District will also be accepted for credit by the college.
• Upon completion of 24 undergraduate semester hours of
credit at the college level, the student must furnish a transcript to the Curriculum Assistant Principal so that a high
school diploma may be granted.
Program No. 5 – Credit by Examination
Credit by Examination (SB365.3) is an opportunity for students in grades 7-12 to receive credit through a testing process.
An end-of-course district assessment will be used to challenge
courses in mathematics, language arts, science (including labs),
social studies, and world languages by demonstrating mastery
of course material. All examinations must include a written
assessment.
• The student can apply to challenge a course through examination in August or December or as individually scheduled.
• Upon receipt of an approved application for Credit by
Examination, the Principal (or designee) will appoint an
examiner.
• The examiner is expected to proctor the test, notify the
Principal (or designee) of the results, and submit the test
materials to the Registrar.
• A ninety-percent (90%) score is required to receive an A.
An eighty-percent (80%) score is required to receive a B.
Less than 80% will not receive a credit.
• A student cannot be granted Credit by Examination for a
course in which he or she has previously earned credit nor
may he or she earn credit for a prerequisite course if they are
presently enrolled in or have previously earned credit in an
advanced course.
• If credit is denied, a student may not reapply for a Course
Challenge for the same course.
• Only approved ASD courses can be used for challenging
courses.
Program No. 6 – Community Service and Field Study/
Physical Education Waiver
Credit may be earned through a planned community service
program that provides learning experiences in the community.
Students may also propose field studies in the community,
such as a research project using the community or a unique
xi
educational opportunity, including physical education activities,
available only in the field. One hundred twenty (120) hours of
acceptable service will earn 0.5 unit of credit/waiver. Program
approval may be done at individual school sites, but pre-approved
District programs include the following:
• Anchorage Youth Court
• Johns Hopkins University Institute for the Academic
Advancement of Youth
• LEAP (Learning Enrichment Adventure Program)
• Western Alaska Council/Boy Scouts of America Explorer
Program
• Allegro
• Peer Education Teen Trainers
• RARE-T (Reduce AIDS Risk in Teens) Peer Education
• Anchorage Youth Symphony (pass/fail only, therefore does
not count in GPA calculation)
• Alaska Prudential Youth Leadership Institute (plus
additional hours to total 120)
• Alaska Native Heritage Center courses
• Cook Inlet Tribal Council
• Big Brothers/Big Sisters, High School Bigs Program
• Alaska Theatre of Youth-Summer Conservatory
• Going Places – Alaska Tourism Curriculum
• Trio Talent Search Upward Bound Program/Upward
Bound Summer Program
• Youth Employment in Parks & Recreation Program
• Outdoor Experience, Writing & Leadership (Puqigtut)
• South Central Foundation RAISE Intern Program
• Shiloh Community Development, Inc.
Concordia Language Institute is independently accredited
by North Central Association of Schools as an intensive world
language experience for high school students. Transcripts from
Concordia should be sent to the home school for inclusion of
credit on the student’s transcript.
Physical Education programs will be approved on a case-bycase basis where the program covers four of the six recognized
components of fitness. One hundred twenty (120) hours of
acceptable activity/records will earn an equivalent 0.5 waiver.
Student proposals must include the following information:
student name, coach’s name and contact number, description of
coach’s qualifications, a detailed training outline with goals and
objectives from the coach including a description of how four of
the six components of fitness are addressed. Attach any available
evidence of equivalence to ASD approved high school courses.
• Student desiring a physical education waiver must also submit a journal documenting their work-outs.
• At 60 hours, the journal must be reviewed and signed by the
Curriculum Assistant Principal or the Physical Education
Department Chairperson.
Program No. 7 – High School Credit for Middle School
Courses
MIDDLE SCHOOL MATH: Students may request middle
school course work in math (Algebra I or higher) to be added to
their high school transcript any time after their ninth grade year.
Upon approval, the credit and grade will be added on to the transcript to the first semester of the ninth grade year. Once entered
xii on a high school transcript, grades will not be removed from
this legal document.
MIDDLE SCHOOL WORLD LANGUAGE: Research indicates that the study of another language is most effectively accomplished if it begins at an early age, is sequential and continues for
a long term without interruption. To encourage more students
to begin language study in the middle school and continue into
Level II as ninth graders, the Anchorage School District offers a
World Languages Incentive credit-by-choice option.
The World Languages Incentive Credit is an opportunity for
students who have studied two years of a language at the middle
school (courses 1A and 1B) to earn one graded elective credit.
Students must meet the following requirements in order to
receive the World Languages Incentive Credit:
• Enroll in Level II (same language as in middle school) in the
ninth grade year.
• Complete both semesters of Level II with a “C” or better.
• Request that the incentive credit be added to their high
school transcript in accordance with the ASD Credit-byChoice program.
The World Languages Incentive Credit is one graded credit.
The student’s fourth quarter grade from the eighth grade language
course is the grade posted on the transcript in the ninth grade
year. The graded credit will affect the student’s overall GPA and
class rank. Transcripts are legal documents and will not be
changed once credit is recorded.
Independent study
Senior high school students who have the self-discipline and
interest for working independently may design a course of study
according to their interests, abilities and plans. The course of
study must contain requirements above the expected level of the
regular class. Independent study is available at every high school
but is not intended to duplicate courses already in the master
schedule. Students should contact their counselors for more
information and principal approval.
Student foreign exchange programs
The following information is necessary in order for a student
to go from the Anchorage School District (ASD) to another
country as an exchange student and return with credits that will
count toward the student’s graduation.
A. Prior to leaving for the exchange, a meeting between the
student, parent/guardian and counselor must be initiated
by the parent to prepare and complete the following:
1. Credit Check
2. Official transcript reflecting all courses completed
3. Written plan for completion of graduation requirements upon return to the Anchorage School District
that includes any correspondence courses the student
may be taking during the exchange.
B. During the student’s participation in the exchange program, the following two options are available for awarding
credits:
1. The student is provided an official transcript by the
school they are attending in a foreign country which
lists the course title, credit earned and grade. The stu-
dent will need to provide the Anchorage School District
with a course outline for each course listed on the
transcript as well as a description of the official grading
policies. The course outline will be used by ASD to
determine whether the course meets a core academic
requirement or will be elective credit.
2. If a student is not able to receive an official transcript
with recorded grades, the following must be provided
to the Anchorage School District upon the student’s
return so decisions can be made regarding the awarding
of credit:
a. A list of courses taken with an official course outline.
This needs to be signed by an administrator at the
exchange school for verification. The course outline will be used by ASD to determine whether the
course meets a core academic requirement or will be
elective credit.
b. An official accounting of time spent in each class.
This must include the length of each class, number
of days per week and the number of weeks the class
meets. This must be signed by an administrator at
the exchange school for verification.
C. Evaluation of an exchange student’s transcript when
returning from a foreign country and awarding of credit
will be based upon the following:
1. If the student provides an official transcript with
recorded grades, the student will be able to select either
option “a” or “b” for recording of grades:
a. P = Pass
b. Letter Grade of A (90-100), B (80-89), C (70-79),
D (60-69), F (below 60). Courses not completed
will not be recorded.
2. If the student is not able to provide an official transcript
with recorded grades, an evaluation of the student’s
work will be completed by the principal or designee
and credit awarded based upon the following:
a. 1⁄⁄4 credit = 37 contact hours
b. 1⁄2 credit = 75 contact hours
c. 1 credit = 150 contact hours
The course outlines and accounting of time spent in
each class will be used when making decisions about
whether the course meets a core academic requirement
or will be awarded elective credit. All credits awarded
through an evaluation of course outlines and time spent
in class will be graded on a pass/fail basis.
3. Since there is such a wide variation in school calendars
in foreign countries, it is possible that the student may
receive some grades and credits on an official transcript
and some that are still in progress. The student has the
option of receiving some of the credits through an official transcript from the exchange school as well as some
credits by providing the documentation of time spent
in class and course outlines.
If the student does not comply with the above requirements
and records are either not provided or are incomplete, the student
may risk losing credits needed for graduation. It is also possible
that the student may need to take a correspondence course(s)
while on the exchange in order to complete all of the graduation
requirements.
Alaska School Activities Association
(ASAA) eligibility for sports and
activities
Participation in middle and high school athletics is a privilege. All students are expected to comply with local, state, and
federal laws and the rules and regulations of the Anchorage
School District. Students will be subject to denial of the ability to
participate if they: do not meet eligibility requirements, engage
in behavior that is detrimental to the well being of the team or
school, are in violation of the tobacco rule, are in violation of
the drug and alcohol rule, or commit criminal acts as defined in
the ASD Statement of Students Right and Responsibilities. In all
cases the Superintendent or his/her designee retains the right to
review and revise any disciplinary action. Please refer to Appendix
D for a complete description of the ASAA requirements.
National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) eligibility
See Appendix C – Parents should review the NCAA website
for complete eligibility rules
Tech Prep: college credits/trade
organizations
Tech Prep is an articulation agreement between the Anchorage
School District and post-secondary institutions in the University
of Alaska system and various trade organizations (TO)*. ASD students may earn lower level division college credit when successfully completing high school tech prep courses or other advancements with the trade organizations. With the ASD articulations,
a small registration fee and successful completion of the ASD
course will earn students a credit recorded on their permanent
college transcript. College credits provide a head start towards
a post-secondary certification or degree, may be transferable to
other universities or colleges and activate the services for prospective students provided by the university’s advising and counseling
office. The following courses presently have tech prep agreements:
Advanced Health Career Pathways (KCC) – UAA
Alaska Railroad Tour Guide Program (KCC) – UAF
Automotive Maintenance Technology (KCC) – UAA
Aviation Maintenance Technology (KCC) – UAA
Aviation Technology (KCC) – UAA
Business Logistics 1 – UAA
Carpentry (KCC) – TO*
Certified Nursing Assistant – UAA
Computer-Aided Drafting 3 – UAA
Computer Information Technology (KCC) - UAA
Construction Electricity (KCC) – TO*
Culinary Arts (KCC) – UAA, UAF
Early Childhood Education (KCC) – UAA
Electronics and Telecommunications Technology (KCC) –
Kenai Peninsula College
Emergency Medical Technology (KCC) – UAA
Emergency Trauma Technology – UAA
Essentials of Athletic Injury Management SC – UAA
xiii
Fire & Rescue Service (KCC) – UAA, TO*
Introduction to Pharmacy – UAA
Medical Terminology – UAA
Natural Resources Management (KCC) – UAA, UAF
Process Technology 1 - UAF
ProStart 3 & 4 – UAA
Public Safety & Security (KCC) – UAF
Teaching as a Profession – UAA
Travel & Tourism (KCC) – UAA
Welding (KCC) – UAA, TO*
For more detailed information, please contact Career and
Technology Education, your high school counseling department,
or the instructor in any of the above listed courses.
*The following trade organizations have articulation agreements
with ASD: Alaska Joint Electrical Apprenticeship and Training
Trust; Alaska Operating Engineers/Employers Training Trust;
Associated Builders and Contractors of Alaska, Inc.; Ironworkers
Local Union 751; and Southern Alaska Carpenters Union
Training Center. The following post-secondary schools have articulation agreements with ASD: University of Alaska Anchorage,
University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Kenai Peninsula College.
Alternative credits
The following Career and Technical Education courses can be
taken for alternative academic credit when offered at Anchorage
high schools. Courses taught at King Career Center that provide alternative credits are listed on page 84 (page number will
change).
Applied Technology and Construction
Applied Technology and Engineering
Aviation Science
BioTapp 1 and 2
Child Development and Parenting
Emergency Trauma Technology
Essentials of Athletic Injury SC
Food Science
Health Occupations Essentials
Introduction to Pharmacy
Introduction to Veterinary Science
Material Science 1 and 2
Medical Terminology
Physiology of Wellness
PLTW Biomedical Innovations
PLTW Civil Engineering & Architecture
PLTW Computer Integrated Manufacturing
PLTW Digital Electronics
PLTW Engineering Design & Development
PLTW Human Body Systems
PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design
PLTW Medical Interventions
PLTW Principles of Biomedical Sciences
PLTW Principles of Engineering
Process Technology 1 & 2
Visual Media and Communications
xiv COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS
The following information may aid you in
understanding the course descriptions and other
­information contained in this Program of Studies
planner.
Not all courses listed here are offered in all
schools at any one time.
Materials fee required
Some courses will contain this phrase. Such classes require students to purchase items that are personally consumed or are projects which when completed
are taken home. This requirement is found in most art, family & consumer
science, and career technology courses.
Other requirements
Some courses have unique needs which are the student’s responsibility. For
example, ice hockey requires students to furnish their own skates and music
classes require students to supply their own instruments.
Course length
If a course is a semester in length, credit will be awarded for successful
completion at the end of each semester. If a course is a quarter in length, credit
will be awarded for successful completion at the end of each quarter. Quarter
credit is not given for successfully completing nine weeks of a semester course.
A Roman numeral (I, II, III etc.) following a course title denotes a two-semester
course when there is more than one level of the course offered. An example is
Algebra I and Algebra II. A two-semester course that has only one level offered,
e.g., Geometry, will not have a Roman numeral designation behind it. An
Arabic number (1, 2, 3 etc.) indicates a one-semester course when more than
one level of the course is available. An example would be Computer-Aided
Drafting 1, 2, and 3. A one-semester course that does not have a second or
third level, e.g., Introduction to Marketing, would not have an Arabic number
designation.
Course repeatability
Most courses listed in the Program of Studies have specific content and may
not be repeated for credit. Because of individualized content, some courses may
be repeated for credit and these are noted at the end of the course description.
How to Read A Course Description
Official Course Title
Grade levels.
Requirements for
admission
Course has articu­lation
agreement with post-secondary
institution (Tech Prep, p. xiii)
Length of course
Course number
Accounting 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8508
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Accounting 1.
A course for students wishing to further their
knowledge in the accounting field. Instruction
includes systems for handling cash receipts, payments, purchases
and sales. It also deals with special accounting problems—depreciation, interest, bad debts, petty cash and payroll. Instruction in
the class is individualized and offers further training in computerized accounting.
Course description­
1
CAREER & TECHNICAL
EDUCATION
(courses listed alphabetically)
Accounting 1������������������������������������������������������������ H8508
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
A semester-long course in which students will acquire a
knowledge of accounting concepts using both manual and computerized methods. The course takes the student through the
basic steps in the accounting cycle of a privately-owned service
business.
Accounting 2������������������������������������������������������������ H8509
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Accounting 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
A course for students wishing to further their knowledge in the
accounting field. Instruction includes systems for handling cash
receipts, payments, purchases and sales. It also deals with special
accounting problems—depreciation, interest, bad debts, petty
cash and payroll. Instruction in the class is individualized and
offers further training in computerized accounting.
Accounting 3������������������������������������������������������������ H8510
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Accounting 2.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course is designed for students with an interest in an
accounting or business career who want to broaden and improve
their knowledge and application of computerized and manual
accounting.
Accounting 4�������������������������������������������������������������H8511
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Accounting 3.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This is an individualized program designed for the student
with interest in accounting or business as a career goal. The
emphasis is on departmental accounting.
Applied Technology and Engineering�������������������� H8577
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science.
Applied Technology and Engineering Science is a gateway
course in the Engineering pathway. This hands-on course couples
technology education with introductory engineering exploration.
Included within this course are engineering design using computer aided drafting, engineering principles and processes, worksite
safety, and an introduction to the proper use of hand and power
tools. After completion of this course, students who decide to
continue on the engineering pathway may enroll in pathway
courses at their comprehensive high school or KCC.
Applied Technology and Construction������������������ H8578
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
2 Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science.
Applied Technology/Construction Science is a gateway course
in the Construction Education pathway. This hands-on course
couples technology education with basic woodworking and
construction education exploration. Included within this course
is worksite safety as well as an introduction to the proper use of
hand and power tools. After completion of this course, students
who decide to continue on the construction pathway may enroll
in pathway courses at their comprehensive high school or KCC.
Aviation Science ������������������������������������������������������ H8391
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
This course is recommended for persons interested in light
plane aviation and in passing the FAA ground school test for a
private pilot’s license. The principles of flight, aircraft preflight,
meteorology, navigation, weight and balance, power plants, communication, federal aviation air regulations and survival flight
planning will be covered. Special emphasis is placed on flying
light aircraft in Alaska. This course will fulfill a physical science
or elective credit.
BioTaPP 1������������������������������������������������������������������ H8940
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Biology, and Chemistry or concurrent
enrollment in Chemistry.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
Biotechnology Training and Preparatory Program (BioTaPP),
is a 1-year program designed to give students experience in
fundamental and advanced biotechnological techniques used in
biological research and industry. The program has partnerships
with industry and academia, which review the types of activities
instructed to give students the best possibility of getting a job
right out of high school or a job while attending college. BioTaPP
Is for those students who wish to learn more biotechnological
techniques and want to work independently on a science project
involving laboratory and library research.
BioTaPP 1 is the first course in a sequence of four and concentrates on maintaining the laboratory environment, proper
documentation as well as the basic foundational protocols and
skills used in the biotechnology industry. Upon completion of the
sequence of courses, graduates could seek employment as a laboratory or research technician, or continue to higher educational
opportunities as a research assistant.
BioTaPP 2������������������������������������������������������������������ H8941
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: BioTaPP 1
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
BioTaPP 2 is the second course in a sequence of four and
continues to concentrate on the foundational protocols and techniques of the biotechnology Industry. Protocols and applications
in this course are more advanced than BioTaPP 1 and transition
students into using learned skills into an individual small scope
project with a focus on communication strategies. Upon completion of the sequence of courses, graduates could seek employment
as a laboratory or research technician, or continue to higher educational opportunities as a research assistant.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Business Logistics 1������������������������������������������������ H8551
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course is designed as an introduction to the
principles and practices of logistics and how they
integrate into total supply chain management. The course will
introduce the logic behind this integration and discuss how organizations have gained a sustainable competitive advantage by
implementing programs of total supply chain logistics management into their operations. The course will also look at the critical
role information technology plays in achieving this success. The
customer service role of the logistics function will be examined
from the perspective of both the organization and the consumer.
Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)�������������������������� H8957
Grade level: 11–12 (Must be at least 17 years old).
Course also taught in after-school program at KCC.
Prerequisite: Biology and complete application with teacher
recommendations. Recommend completion of Health Occupation
Essentials and Medical Terminology.
Academic Credit: 1.0 Elective.
Students in this course will gain the knowledge and
skills needed to assist nurses and to be effective
health care team members. Successful students will qualify to sit
for the Alaska State Certification for Nurse Aides and will be eligible for employment in long-term care and acute-care facilities.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of written test
scores, mastery of skills, professionalism, and participation in
clinical opportunities. The clinical experiences consist of 48 hours
of hands-on patient care in a long-term care facility, nursing
home and hospital setting. Clinical experiences are coordinated
by the instructor and will be scheduled to best fit students’
schedules.
Child Development/Parenting �������������������������������� H8370
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Social Studies Elective.
This course is designed to improve the competence of adolescents
in working with young children by increasing their awareness of
child growth and development. Course work includes information about family planning, pregnancy, child growth and development, parenting skills and the family environment. Students
also observe and work with young children either in a class-run
preschool or arranged alternative.
This course will fulfill a social studies graduation requirement
or elective credit.
Computer-Aided Drafting 1�������������������������������������� H8222
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Students will become familiar with the computer equipment used
in computer-aided drafting. A comparison of traditional drafting
tools and CAD 1 will kick off students’ basic understanding of
drawings and the mechanical applications of CAD 1. Students
will also learn the ways that CAD 1 can improve the quality of a
drawing and improve productivity of design drawings. Students
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
will learn the basics of computer use and the advantages and
limitations of CAD 1 software. They will understand the use of
graphic communication as it applies to the fields of construction,
manufacturing, production and design. Students will have both
individual and group problem-solving assignments.
Computer-Aided Drafting 2�������������������������������������� H8223
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Computer-Aided Drafting 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
CAD 2 is an extension of CAD 1, continuing the process of
educating students in the use of computers to assist in graphic
communication. As such, many of the principles learned in CAD
1 are still appropriate, but they are extended to complex drawings
that more closely mirror projects done in the world of work. This
increased amount of work with more complex projects will reinforce learning that has occurred in CAD 1. Students will expand
their computer-aided drafting knowledge through exploration of
architectural and/or engineering drafting. Students will develop
an appreciation for the use of CAD within various trades, such as
architecture, engineering and construction. They will also develop
an appreciation for the use of CAD to create integrated projects.
Computer-Aided Drafting 3�������������������������������������� H8224
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Computer-Aided Drafting 2.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
CAD 3 is an extension of CAD 1, continuing the
process of educating students in the use of computers to assist in graphic communication. As such, many of the
principles learned in CAD 1 are still appropriate, but they are
extended to complex drawings that more closely mirror projects
done in the world of work. This increased amount of work with
more complex projects will reinforce learning that has occurred in
CAD 2. Students will expand their computer-aided drafting
knowledge through exploration of architectural and/or engineering drafting. Students will develop an appreciation for the use of
CAD within various trades, such as architecture, engineering and
construction. They will also develop an appreciation for the use of
CAD to create integrated projects.
Computer Applications 1 ���������������������������������������� H8130
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Recommend basic computer keyboarding skills.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course will introduce students to business and personal
computer applications. The course is designed to provide students with an entry-level experience and will include an understanding of various hardware, software, and operating systems.
Students will demonstrate and apply their knowledge using Word
Processing and One Note software. Students may earn Microsoft
Office Specialist certification for Word and One Note by successfully passing the MOS certification exams.
Computer Applications 2 ���������������������������������������� H8131
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Recommend Computer Applications 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course will introduce students to business and personal
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
3
computer applications. The course is designed to provide students
with an entry-level experience and will include an understanding
of various hardware, software, and operating systems. Students
will demonstrate and apply their knowledge using spreadsheet
and presentation software. Students may earn Microsoft Office
Specialist certification for Excel and PowerPoint by successfully
passing the MOS certification exams.
Computer Fundamentals ���������������������������������������� H8530
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course includes an overview of computer fundamentals,
use of peripherals and an introduction to computer applications.
This course is for the “new to the computer” student.
Computer Science 1 ������������������������������������������������ H8534
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Algebra I or concurrent enrollment in Algebra I.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This introduction to computer programming will develop
good problem-solving and programming skills that can lead to
a career in the information technology field. This class is a great
gateway to more advanced programming classes or as a standalone
elective. Students will learn how to solve problems by writing
software applications in a current programming language. Topics
covered include hardware and history of computing, operating
systems, variables, decision statements, loops and strings, procedures and functions. Students will compete short programs as
exercises and larger final project.
Computer Science 2 ������������������������������������������������ H8535
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 1 or its equivalent or consent of
instructor.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course is a study of the more advanced features of computer programming using a language under common use. This
continuation of CS1 will develop good problem-solving and programming skills that can lead to a career in the information technology field. Students will study more advanced math operations,
arrays, graphics, object oriented design, file saving and opening,
3D graphics, network programming. Student work will consist of
short computer exercises and a large final project.
Computer Science 3 ������������������������������������������������ H8536
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Computer Science 2 or consent of instructor.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Using a computer language appropriate to Object-Oriented
Programming (OOP), students will gain experience in solving
problems with traditional programming algorithms. It is suggested that the language recommended by the College Board for the
AP test be used. The topics studies include sequence, repetition,
conditions, functions, one- and two-dimensional arrays, recursion, and an object-based approach to classes. It is anticipated
that students will be concurrently enrolled in Algebra II. Students
completing CS3 will be able to take the AP Comp Sci A exam.
This course teaches computer programming in a language appro4 priate for the AP computer science test. Students should have
previous computer programming experience to enter this course
(see prerequisites).
Computer Science 4 ������������������������������������������������ H8537
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Completion of Computer Science 3 or consent of
instructor.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
A continuation of Computer Science 3, students will gain
additional practice and work on a major case study. At the
conclusion of the course, students should be prepared for the
AP Computer Science AB test. Students completing Computer
Science 4 will be able to take the AP Comp Sci AB exam which is
more difficult and covers advanced data structures.
Culinary and Hospitality Foundations . . . . . . . . . . H8514
Grade level 9-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Culinary and Hospitality Foundations is a foundational course
where students explore the opportunities in the culinary and
hospitality industries. Students will develop hospitality, service
and career ready practices while mastering safety and sanitation
requirements of the service industry. As the preparatory class for
ProStart, students will develop the fundamental kitchen safety
skills and learn the foundations of cooking and nutrition.
Customer Service ���������������������������������������������������� H8090
Grade Level: 9–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Customer Service is designed to explore the actions of customers and the processes they navigate through their decision-making
processes. Also explored will be the context of the interaction
between the customer and salesperson and what constitutes positive customer service. All students would benefit from this class
no matter what career interests they have.
Digital Business Communications������������������������� H8091
Grade Level: 9–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course is designed to provide the student with opportunities to develop skills using technology-based form of communication found in today’s businesses. Strong emphasis will be placed
on exposing students to a wide variety of digital communications
and their uses. This course will aid students in developing a foundation for success in using digital communications in today’s
global environment.
Emergency Trauma Technology������������������������������ H8949
Grade level 9–12. One Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Health Occupations Essentials recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
Emergency Trauma Technology is a hands-on
course focusing on the assessment and treatment of
medical conditions and traumatic injuries. Students will go
beyond first aid to earn CPR for the Professional Provider and
State of Alaska ETT certifications. Skills will include bandaging,
splinting, the management of head and neck injuries, cold and
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
heat emergencies, respiratory emergencies such as asthma, CPR,
and other medical conditions. Emergency Trauma Technology is
a State of Alaska, Department of Health approved course
designed for students considering careers in emergency services
such as paramedicine, law enforcement, search & rescue, firefighting, flight nursing, sports medicine, guiding, or other careers
where a solid knowledge of medical skills might be needed.
Essentials of Athletic Injury Management—SCI���� H6751
Grade level 12 (11 with instructor approval). One semester.
Prerequisite: Biology & Anatomy and Physiology
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
Note: This class must be taught in collaboration with a local
physical therapy/athletic training office therefore it may not be
offered at all schools. The course must be taught by a science
teacher.
This course introduces students to the profession of
athletic training and related health careers.
Principles of fitness conditioning and nutrition for safe and
healthy participation in sports will provide a basis for examining
proper body mechanics and the faulty mechanics and practices
that lead to injury. A study of common athletic injuries and application of appropriate first aid and CPR procedures are central to a
boarder prevention, treatment, and risk management framework
applicable to a variety of activity settings.
Health Occupations Essentials �������������������������������H8113
Grade level: 9–12. One Semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
Introduction to Health Occupations is designed to familiarize
students with the widely varied careers of the medical, dental,
veterinary and mental health professions. Students will learn skills
necessary for pursuing further education for any healthcare career
pathway. The course is divided into four 20-hour modules including: Introduction to Cardiology and CPR, Health and Fitness
for the Healthcare Professional, First Aid, and Career Planning
for Entering the Medical Profession. The units are designed so
that they can be taught combined as one course, or as separate
modules.
Healthy Families, Healthy Children������������������������ H8122
Grade Level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
ment in Alaska’s construction, mining and transportation industries. Students will have time to explore careers, identify heavy
equipment and uses while understanding safety in construction.
Students will have the opportunity to develop their skills on
simulator-based heavy equipment and will be challenged with
national certifications and performance tests. Students will
develop a resumé and prepare a personal learning career plan to
prepare themselves for work in industry or application to registered apprenticeship or a university construction management
program.
Heavy Equipment Operation 2�������������������������������� H8925
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Heavy Equipment Operation 1 and Algebra I.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Students will continue to develop their skills and knowledge
through detailed classes in earth moving, construction math/
grade checking and construction equipment systems that build
on their experiences gained in HEO 1. In introduction to earthmoving, students will learn how to plan and develop a construction site safely. When completed, they will be able to describe
earthmoving methods and how to select the proper equipment
to accomplish tasks. In construction math, students will apply
algebra, geometry and trigonometry functions to solve problems
found in the construction, mining and transportation industries.
This is an applied math class where students will use blueprints
and the tools of the trade to lay out and measure slope, ratios, volumes, and percentages. In construction equipment systems, students will have the opportunity to understand heavy equipment
systems (engines, powertrains, hydraulic, electric, and pneumatic)
in the classroom, on simulators and on industry equipment.
Students will also see cold weather operations and preventative
maintenance for construction machinery. Students will be challenged with national certifications and performance tests. They
will continue to develop their personal learning career plan and
prepare for work in industry, application to registered apprenticeship or a university construction management program.
Introduction to Business ���������������������������������������� H8731
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Heavy Equipment Operation 1 will present students with
career, industry and safety information. Students will develop
their interest in civil construction and operating heavy equip-
Students will develop skills in human relations related to actual
work experience and explore businesses from the management
point of view. Students study business techniques related to
promotion, advertising, financing, and management. Students
explore business marketing by identifying different industries
and businesses within those industries. Students will also identify
different forms of ownership and personnel management styles
and evaluate the management of assets. Developing components
of a business plan will be emphasized as the final project. Students
will be taught to identify marketing strategies and develop a plan
for financing and managing the small business. They will explore
management and supervisory skills through the school store
or class venture projects if available. Business Professionals of
American and/or DECA are the likely co-curricular organizations
associated with this course.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Healthy Families, Healthy Children is designed to improve
the student’s knowledge in skills for lifelong wellness including
strengthening the family unit, developing healthy relationships,
and prenatal and early childhood nutrition. Students will have
hands-on learning experiences that include a Real Care Baby and
literacy-based lessons.
Heavy Equipment Operation 1���������������������������������H8115
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Material Science and Algebra I.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
5
Introduction to Marketing���������������������������������������� H8660
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Students will be introduced to the principles of the free
enterprise system and will learn about careers in the marketing
and distribution cluster. This course covers introduction to the
nine functions of marketing (distribution, financing, marketing
information management, pricing, product/service planning,
promotion, purchasing, risk management and selling), marketing
math and job interview skills. Students will identify marketing
activities conducted by businesses with which they are familiar.
Students will categorize the marketing activities by the nine marketing functions. Students will learn how to apply for a job, how
to properly complete the related forms and examine the human
relations skills required for keeping a job. Students will also assist
in the merchandising lab (school store) if it is available.
Introduction to Pharmacy���������������������������������������� H8958
Grade Level: 11–12 (10th with teacher recommendation) One
semester.
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Biology. Health Occupations
Essentials, Anatomy/Physiology and 1st semester Chemistry are
recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
This course provides an overview of the practice of
pharmacy and examines the qualifications, operational guidelines, and job duties of a pharmacy technician.
Students will be introduced to the top 100 drugs, drug classification and interactions. This course also examines the legal and
ethical requirements of the field. Students will understand the
steps needed to fulfill all requirements necessary to be certified
and take the national Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam
(PTCE).
Introduction to Veterinary Science ������������������������ H8920
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Biology Recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
In Introduction to Veterinary Science, students will learn a
basic knowledge of veterinary science to include the common
species, health care, diseases and skills necessary for pursuing
further education for veterinary careers. These skills are directly applicable and transferable to all components of the health
career pathway. Topics include: clinical management and client
relations, animal anatomy, disease processes, clinical procedures/
infection control and career investigations.
Marketing Operations & Advertising���������������������� H8610
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Marketing.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Students will gain a basic understanding of business
philosophy, human relations, store organization,
finance, inventory control, business communications
and channels of distribution. They will be introduced
to the psychology, preparation and evaluation of advertisements and displays, methods of promotion and
6 application of sales techniques. Students can exercise
their newly-learned skills by preparing advertising,
displays and sales demonstrations.
Students will identify the various channels of distribution
for the consumer and industrial markets. They will also identify
procedures necessary for inventory control. Through study of
business communications skills, student will learn to demonstrate
proper business communications and etiquette. They will also
explore sales promotion techniques and procedures for marketing products. Students will be able to explain the purposes and
elements of advertising and display, identify parts of an ad layout
and apply them to mass media. Students will use design principles to prepare such merchandise displays as windows, ledges,
islands and points of sale. They will also create an example of
non-personal sales techniques such as use of a button, t-shirt or
point of sale signs. Students will also be able to identify public
relations as it relates to marketing. Students will continue with
the exploration of the psychology of sales promotion techniques.
Students will also identify merchandise display and related risk
management techniques by applying resources, interpersonal
information, systems technology, critical skills and competencies
and critical values.
Material Science 1���������������������������������������������������� H8575
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science.
Material Science and Construction 1 is taught using the
nationally recognized Occupational Skills Standards for the
National Center for Education and Research, known as NCCER.
Material Science & Construction I will cover Core Curriculum
(NCCER) Basic Safety, Introduction to Construction Math,
Introduction to Hand Tools, and Introduction to Power Tools.
Training is accomplished through an introduction to basic residential construction through hands on applications reflecting
current industry standards, safety (OSHA), equipment, and
technologies reflected in Alaska’s Construction Industry. Students
will have the opportunity to become certified in CORE through
NCCER at no cost. The program is considered an early exploratory course leading to additional ASD programs in CAD, and KCC
Construction. Industry partners will provide On-the-job (OJT)
and apprenticeship opportunities to students as well as mentor
training opportunities for instructors. Students with interests in
the architectural, engineering, construction, inspection, or transportation fields will find this class especially informative and helpful. Others will enjoy this class simply from a viewpoint of learning how things work; a key element of understanding technology.
Job entry opportunities: carpentry-residential and commercial,
house framing, interior finish work, exterior finish work, roofing,
material distribution and sales, building maintenance, union and
non-union apprenticeship programs.
Material Science 2���������������������������������������������������� H8576
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Material Science & Construction 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science.
Material Science and Construction 2 is taught using the
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
nationally recognized Occupational Skills Standards for the
National Center for Education and Research, known as NCCER.
Material Science & Construction I will cover Core Curriculum
(NCCER) Introduction to Blueprints, Basic Rigging (optional),
Basic Communication Skills, Basic Employability, Skills Training
is accomplished through an introduction to basic residential
construction through hands on applications reflecting current
industry standards, safety (OSHA), equipment, and technologies
reflected in Alaska’s Construction Industry. Students will have
the opportunity to become certified in CORE through NCCER
at no cost. The program is considered an early exploratory
course leading to additional ASD programs in CAD, and KCC
Construction. Industry partners will provide On-the-job (OJT)
and apprenticeship opportunities to students as well as mentor
training opportunities for instructors. Students with interests in
the architectural, engineering, construction, inspection, or transportation fields will find this class especially informative and helpful. Others will enjoy this class simply from a viewpoint of learning how things work; a key element of understanding technology.
Job entry opportunities: carpentry-residential and commercial,
house framing, interior finish work, exterior finish work, roofing,
material distribution and sales, building maintenance, union and
non-union apprenticeship programs.
Media and Broadcasting Foundations . . . . . . . . . . H8515
Grade level 9-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Media and Broadcasting Foundations is a foundational course
where students will explore the use of multimedia to tell a compelling story. The course will serve as an entry point for both
the Journalism & Broadcasting pathways and the Visual Arts
pathway. Its primary emphasis is on the core skills needed to
communicate a message for any type of organization or endeavor,
be it creative, commercial, or personal. In doing so, students will
experiment with the use of a wide range of modern media types,
discuss the history and ethics of media, and explore related potential careers. Students will learn technical skills needed to operate
digital video and camera equipment and earn industry recognized
certifications.
Medical Terminology������������������������������������������������ H8915
Grade level: 10–12 (9th with Teacher Recommendation). One
semester.
Prerequisite: Biology. Health Occupation Essentials and Anatomy
and Physiology are recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
Students will gain an understanding of basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical
words, and medical terms associated with the body as a whole.
Utilizing a systems approach, the student will define, interpret,
and pronounce medical terms related to structures and function,
pathology diagnosis, clinic procedures, oncology, and pharmacology. In addition to medical terms, common abbreviations applicable to each system will be interpreted.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course is designed to increase student’s nutritional knowledge through all stages of life. Topics covered will include the
study of nutrient sources, functions and deficiencies. Each student will complete a personal dietary analysis. Contemporary
nutritional issues such as eating disorders, fad diets, supplements,
chemical additives and sports nutrition will be discussed.
Office Technology���������������������������������������������������� H8555
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Computer Applications1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course will provide instruction on a variety of electronic
office equipment. Programs will vary as new versions are released.
Students will be provided with hands-on experience in operating
network computers for such activities as electronic calendaring
and electronic mail. Other, more traditional activities include use
of the ten-key calculator and electronic typewriter. It is designed
to prepare students for entry-level positions in the electronic
office. An excellent class for those students who plan either to
work immediately upon graduation from high school or work
their way through college.
Personal Care Assistant������������������������������������������ H8916
Grade Level: 11–12. One semester after-school program at KCC.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Personal Care Assistants provide services to the elderly or to
individuals with disabilities who need help with daily living tasks
such as eating, dressing, grooming, shopping and cleaning. This
course provides training and instruction for students to meet the
competency based standards required for State of Alaska approved
PCAs. Students will learn how to provide support related to an
individual’s daily living activities. Upon successful completion
of the standardized curriculum and final exam, students 18 years
and older will be qualified for jobs as Personal Care Assistants.
Physiology of Wellness�������������������������������������������� H2302
Grade Level: 9–12. One Semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
Physiology of Wellness is a hands-on approach to fundamental
skills necessary for entry level positions in the health and nutrition fields. The class includes, but is not limited to, concepts of
nutrition, weight control, eating disorders, exercise physiology,
depression, the immune system, digestion and infectious disease.
PLTW Biomedical Innovations�������������������������������� H8820
Grade: 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: PLTW Medical Interventions.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science 1st semester, ½ Life Science
2nd semester.
Grade Level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisites: None.
In this capstone course, students apply their knowledge and
skills to answer questions or solve problems related to the biomedical sciences. Students design innovative solutions for the
health challenges of the 21st century as they work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics
such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering,
and public health. South HS only.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Nutrition & Fitness���������������������������������������������������� H8315
7
PLTW Civil Engineering & Architecture������������������ H8000
Grade: 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Algebra I, PLTW Intro to Engineering Design or CAD 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
Civil Engineering and Architecture is a course that provides an
overview of the fields of civil engineering and architecture with an
emphasis on the interrelationship and dependence of both fields
on each other. Students use state of the art software to solve real
world problems and communicate solutions to hands-on projects
and activities. The major focus of the course is a long-term project that involves the development of a local property site. As you
learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture,
you will apply what you learn to the design and development
of this property. There is flexibility for you and your teacher in
developing the property as a simulation or as a real-world experience that civil engineers and architects experience when developing property. The course covers the roles of civil engineers and
architects in project planning, site planning, building design and
project documentation and presentation. Eagle River, Dimond
and South high schools only.
PLTW Computer Integrated Manufacturing�������������H8114
Grade: 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Algebra I.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
Computer Integrated Manufacturing is a course that enhances computer modeling skills by applying principles of robotics
and automation to the creation of models of three-dimensional
designs. This course is part of the PLTW (Project Lead the
Way) Pre-Engineering Program. The purpose of the Computer
Integrated Manufacturing course is to expose students to the
fundamentals of computerized manufacturing technology. The
course is built around several key concepts: Computer Modeling,
CNC Equipment, CAM , Robotics , Flexible Manufacturing
Systems. Eagle River, Dimond and South high schools only.
PLTW Digital Electronics �����������������������������������������H8112
Grade: 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Algebra I.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
Digital Electronics™ is a core course of study in the Project
Lead the Way® (PLTW) program. The purpose of this introductory pre-engineering course is to develop a student’s logical thinking
skills by solving problems and designing control systems. In this
manner students will gain a better understanding of the digital
circuits in microelectronic design, manufacturing, computer
technology, and information systems. Students use computer
simulation to learn about the logic of electrons as they design, test
and construct circuits and devices. Students will use the design
process by applying it to problem-solving activities and projects;
develop critical thinking skills by designing and testing their own
solutions; increase communication skills through design and presentation formats; and develop team building skills by working
collaboratively in groups. Eagle River, Dimond and South high
schools only.
PLTW Engineering Design and Development�������� H8931
Grade: 12. Two semesters.
8 Prerequisite: 3 PLTW courses including PLTW Principles of
Engineering.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
Engineering Design and Development is the capstone course
in the PLTW high school engineering program. It is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to design
and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical
problem by applying the engineering design process. The course
applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and
skills in mathematics, science, and technology.
Students will perform research to choose, validate, and justify a
technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams of
students will design, build, and test their solution. Finally, student
teams will present and defend their original solution to an outside
panel. While progressing through the engineering design process,
students will work closely with experts and will continually hone
their organizational skills, communication and interpersonal
skills, creative and problem solving abilities, and their understanding of the design process.
Engineering Design and Development is a high school level
course that is appropriate for 12th grade students. Since the
projects on which students work can vary with student interest
and the curriculum focuses on problem solving, this course is
appropriate for students who are interested in any technical
career path. It should be taken as the final capstone PLTW course
since it requires application of the knowledge and skills from the
PLTW foundation courses. Eagle River, Dimond and South high
schools only.
PLTW Human Body Systems���������������������������������� H8126
Grade Level 9–12 Two Semesters
Prerequisite: PLTW Principles of Biomedical Science.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science per semester.
Human body systems is a two semester course that examines
the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, projection, and homeostasis.
Students design experiments, investigate the structures and
functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software
to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and
voluntary action, and respiration, Exploring science in action,
students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work
through interesting real world cases and often play the role of
biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. South High
School only.
PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design�������������H8110
Grade level 9. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Algebra I.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
Introduction to Engineering Design is a course that teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process.
Models of product solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. This course
is part of the PLTW (Project Lead the Way) Pre-Engineering
Program. Eagle River, Dimond and South high schools only.
PLTW Medical Interventions������������������������������������ H8821
Grade Level 11-12. Two Semesters.
Prerequisite: PLTW Human Body Systems.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science per semester.
Students investigate the variety of interventions in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the
lives of a fictitious family. The course is a “how-to” manual for
maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body as students explore how to prevent and fight infection; how to screen
and evaluate the code in human DNA; how to prevent, diagnose
and treat cancer; and how to prevail when the organs of the body
begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to
the wide range of interventions related to immunology, surgery,
genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Each
family case scenario will introduce multiple types of interventions
and will reinforce concepts learned in the two previous courses as
well as present new content. Interventions may range from simple
diagnostic tests to treatment of complex diseases and disorders.
Lifestyle choices and preventative measures are emphasized
throughout the course as well as the important role of scientific
thinking and engineering design play in the development of interventions of the future. South High School only.
PLTW Principles of Biomedical Science���������������� H8919
Grade Level: 9–11. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Life science 1st semester, ½ Physical science
2nd semester.
Principles of Biomedical Sciences is a two semester course
that provides an introduction to the biomedical sciences through
exciting hands on projects and problems. Students investigate the
human body systems and various health conditions including
heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia,
and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to
the death of a fictional person and investigate lifestyle choices
and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s
life. The activities and projects introduce the students to human
physiology, medicine, research processes and bioinformatics. Key
biological concepts including homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the
curriculum. Engineering principles including the design process,
feedback loops, and the relationship of structure to function are
also incorporated. This course is designed to provide an overview
of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay
the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. This course is
the first course in the Project Lead the Way Biomedical Sciences
Program. South High School only.
PLTW Principles of Engineering�������������������������������H8116
Grade level 10 –12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Geometry.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
Principles of Engineering is a course that helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology. Exploring
various technology systems and manufacturing processes help
students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science
and technology in an engineering problem solving process to
benefit people. The course also includes concerns about social and
political consequences of technological change. This course is part
of the PLTW (Project Lead the Way) Pre-Engineering Program.
Eagle River, Dimond and South high schools only.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Process Technology 1���������������������������������������������� H8140
Grade level 10-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Minimum of Algebra A and 1 year of high school
science.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
This course is an introduction to process operations
in the Process Technology Industry through an
overview of generation Information, processes, procedures, and
equipment. Processing techniques used in oil and gas, chemical,
mining, power generation, pulp and paper, waste water, food and
beverage, and the pharmaceutical industries will be investigated.
In addition, workplace Information such as safety, quality, and
team building is introduced. Basic processing equipment such as
piping, valves, pumps, compressors, turbines, and motors will be
introduced.
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
ProStart 1������������������������������������������������������������������ H8360
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Culinary Hospitality Foundations recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course introduces students to careers in food service and teaches them the basic skills and knowledge
needed for success in the food service industry. The
ProStart curriculum was developed by the National
Restaurant Association as part of the school-to-career approach to learning. Current best practices are
reviewed every year. Topics covered in first semester
include exploration and career preparation, customer
relations, food safety, prevention of accidents and injury, standardized recipes, cooking methods, food service equipment and nutrition. Materials fee required.
ProStart 2������������������������������������������������������������������ H8361
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Pro Start 1. Culinary Hospitality Foundations
recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course introduces students to careers in food service and
teaches them the basic skills and knowledge needed for success in
the food service industry. The ProStart curriculum was developed
by the National Restaurant Association as part of the school-tocareer approach to learning. Current best practices are reviewed
each year. Topics covered in the second semester include exploration and career preparation, working with people, breakfast foods,
sandwiches, salads and garnishes, fruits and vegetables, business
math and controlling food service costs. Materials fee required.
ProStart 3������������������������������������������������������������������ H8362
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Pro Start 2. Culinary Hospitality Foundations
recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course introduces students to careers in food
service and teaches them the basic skills and knowledge needed for success in the food service industry. The ProStart
curriculum was developed by the National Restaurant Association
as part of the school-to-career approach to learning. Current best
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
9
practices are reviewed each year. Topics covered in the third
semester include exploration and career preparation, the history
of food service, the lodging industry, the art of service, potatoes
and grains, desserts and baked goods and marketing and the
menu. Materials fee required.
ProStart 4������������������������������������������������������������������ H8363
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Pro Start 3. Culinary Hospitality Foundations
recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course introduces students to careers in food
service and teaches them the basic skills and knowledge needed for success in the food service industry. The ProStart
curriculum was developed by the National Restaurant Association
as part of the school-to-career approach to learning. Current best
practices are reviewed each year. Topics covered in the fourth
semester include exploration and career preparation, purchasing
and inventory control, standard accounting practices, tourism
and the retail business, communication with customers, preparing meat, poultry, seafood, stocks, soups and sauces and completing an industry internship. Materials fee required.
Recordkeeping���������������������������������������������������������� H8560
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Robotics Engineering 1�������������������������������������������� H8504
Grade Level 9–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Robots are becoming an engineering staple in our rapidly
developing technological society. From applications on manufacturing lines to robots used in combat, humans are placing robots
in settings where their utility is increasingly evident. Engaging
in robotics engineering, students learn not only how to create a
robot, but also, and more importantly, how to be a productive
member of a collaborative team. Robotics Engineering is a course
that exposes students to the world of design, engineering and
business. Students will learn to be a team player as they plan,
design, fabricate, troubleshoot and compete with a robot which
they build from scratch.
Robotics Engineering 2�������������������������������������������� H8505
This course provides students with many valuable consumer
and vocational skills. Students will learn how to prepare a wide
range of financial records for personal and business use and will
become familiar with the procedures related to personal money
management and major areas of business. This course also emphasizes the development of a business vocabulary and the reinforcement of basic math and reading skills.
Residential Wiring 1 ������������������������������������������������ H8428
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
The first semester of this course covers the first half of the Core
Construction Curriculum established by the National Center
for Construction Education and Research or NCCER. The
first four modules covered include: Basic Safety, Introduction
to Construction Math, Introduction to Hand Tools and
Introduction to Power Tools. Using the Electrical Level 1 Trainee
Guide for NCCER students will also cover Orientation to the
Electrical Trade, Electrical Safety, and Introduction to Electrical
Circuits. This will be reinforced by the use of circuitry board projects that involve building circuits, installing switches, and using
proper wiring techniques.
Residential Wiring 2 ������������������������������������������������ H8429
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Residential Wiring 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Students will finish the Core Construction Curriculum
for NCCER Core Certification including: Introduction to
Blueprints, Basic Rigging (optional), Basic Communications
Skills, and Basic Employability Skills. This will continued to
10 be reinforced by the building of project circuitry boards with
increasing complexity involving circuits, switching and proper
wiring techniques. Using the Electrical Level 1 Trainee Guide for
NCCER students will also cover Electrical Theory, Introduction
to the National Electrical Code, and Device Boxes. Upon successful completion of this second semester a student is eligible to
enroll in second semester KCC Construction Electricity, course
number H8430.
Grade Level: 9–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: Robotics Engineering 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Robotics Engineering 2 is intended to follow Robotics
Engineering 1, and to build upon the skills learned in the introductory course. Some topics will be reviewed and new ideas
will be introduced. Whereas the introductory course relies on
pre-made kits intended for the production of robots, Robotics
Engineering 2 will challenge students to locate their own specific parts and components to meet the more demanding and
specific needs of advanced robotic competition. Game material
limitations are reduced in this course, and students are challenged
to incorporate non game specific parts into the robotic system.
Students program an advanced programmable logic controller
to interact with the mechanical system which they have designed
and fabricated.
School Business Partnerships�������������������������������� H8518
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
In this class students develop career, business, service learning,
and leadership skills while working with the school business partners for their schools. Students will interact with the community
by planning and directing fund-raisers, service learning projects,
and board meetings. Resume and interview skills will be acquired.
Selected students are also given the opportunity to sit on community boards and may be eligible to be nominated for various
service awards.
Sports & Entertainment Marketing�������������������������� H8620
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Textile Technology 2������������������������������������������������ H8330
Surveying, Sketching and Construction Blueprint
Reading �������������������������������������������������������������������� H8991
Textile Technology 2 is a semester course. Students must have
successfully completed Textile 1. This course offers a continuation
of construction/sewing skill development. Textile 2 expands on
historical clothing, construction and career exploration in the textiles and apparel industry. Students will develop skills on equipment such as electronic sewing machines, sergers, embroidery
machines and quilting machines. Students will examine fibers,
textile modification and design principles. Level 2 students will
explore managing apparel dollars; decisions, rights and consumerism. Students will make additions to their comprehensive textile
portfolio.
Sports and Entertainment Marketing I is a specialized course
to help students develop a thorough understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to the fields of sports and
entertainment marketing and management. The areas this course
will cover include basic marketing, target marketing and segmentation, sponsorship, event marketing, promotions, sponsorship
proposals, and implementation of sports marketing plans. This
course will also explore promotion plans, sponsorship proposals,
sports marketing plans, and event evaluation and management
techniques. Students taking sports marketing will have the opportunity to participate in co-curricular DECA activities.
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This class is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of construction planning and management. Construction
sketching will include the fundamentals of freehand drawing and
the use of mechanical drafting tools. Students will learn to sketch
basic geometric shapes, while applying the methodology to draw
site plans, floor plans and multiple view elevations. Surveying
will encompass the use of GPS units for establishing benchmarks
and other specific locations. Prior to any hands-on field surveying, students will be able to understand how to set up surveying
instruments, use various measuring tapes and elevation rods. In
addition, multiple types of hands-on surveys to be completed are:
property surveys, topographical surveys and construction surveys.
Teaching as a Profession���������������������������������������� H8317
Grade Level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course will provide students with an opportunity to examine the teaching profession. Students
will look at education from a historical perspective through modern day education. An introduction to contemporary issues in
education and effective strategies will help students develop a
better understanding of teaching as a career. Field experiences
required.
Textile Technology 1������������������������������������������������ H8329
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Textile Technology is a semester course. Textile 1 is the introductory level of sewing and clothing construction. This course
offers an introduction to fiber composition, fiber utilization
and applications of textiles in daily life. Students will examine
cross-cultural concerns, social-economic influences and resource
availability as they relate historically and in today’s society.
Students will develop an understanding of the elements of color,
sewing equipment and introductory textile construction. Each
student will begin a comprehensive textile portfolio. Career
opportunities available in the textile and apparel industry will be
examined.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisites: Textile Technology 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Textile Technology 3������������������������������������������������ H8331
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Textile Technology 2.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Textile Technology 3 is a semester course. This course offers an
expanded skills development course in construction, fabric repair
and clothing care. Students will combine fiber, color and design
techniques to develop an integrated textile project. Textile 3
students will examine apparel and textile industry careers and
marketing concerns. The course provides a continuation of skill
development on a variety of pieces of textile equipment and integrates a service learning project related to textile.
Textile Technology 4������������������������������������������������ H8332
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisites: Textile Technology 3.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Textile Technology 4 is a semester course. This course offers the
student an opportunity to learn professional embellishing techniques, artistic expression through textiles and advanced textile
construction techniques. Students will participate in independent
work program and complete the textile portfolio.
Transportation 1 ������������������������������������������������������ H8470
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
The course will introduce the many modes of transportation
used today. Instruction will cover propulsion systems, suspension
systems, guidance systems, control systems, structures and support. Economical and social implications will also be addressed.
Students will learn about the historical aspects of transportation
and the impact it has had on technology. Students will be able to
describe the environmental, technical, financial, social and safety
impacts transportation has on the world in which we live. The
spectrum of materials will cover all business areas of transportation plus terrestrial, atmospheric and space.
Transportation 2 ������������������������������������������������������ H8471
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Transportation 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
This course will expand student knowledge of transportation
to include advanced systems of marine, land-based, lighter-than
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
11
air and heavier-than-air forms of transportation. Course content
includes factors that must be considered when developing a transportation system and the associated quality management principles. Course content will also include advanced vehicle guidance
systems and the support concepts of a transportation system. The
course may be taken twice.
Work Experience CTE����������������������������������������������� H8990
Grade level 10-12. Four semesters maximum.
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in a CTE course.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
Students may earn a ½ elective credit for every 112.5 hours
they are employed at a supervised, approved site. During the
summer term, a student can earn 1.0 credit for 225 hours of work
and 1.5 credits for 337.5 hours. Hours are documented with pay
stubs each time the student receives a pay check. Some additional
paperwork and assignments are required.
12 Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
King Career Center
2015-16 Academic Credits, Tech Prep & Certifications
Students can earn 1.5 credits for each KCC course. All sections of each class are offered every semester.
Course
Course #
Academic credit
Advanced Health Career Pathways 1
H8910
.5 P.E. Health and .5 Life Science
and .5 elective
Advanced Health Career Pathways 2
H8911
.5 Life Science and 1 elective
Advanced Health Career Pathways OJT
Advertising, Art & Design 1
Advertising, Art & Design 2
Advertising Art and Design OJT
Automotive Maintenance Technology 1
Automotive Maintenance Technology 2
Automotive Maintenance Technology 3
Automotive Maintenance Technology OJT
Aviation Maintenance Technology 1
H8913
H8422
H8423
H8425
H8409
H8410
H8411
H8412
H8401
Aviation Maintenance Technology 2
H8402
Aviation Maintenance Technology 3
Aviation Maintenance Technology 4
Aviation Maintenance Technology OJT
Aviation Technology 1
Aviation Technology 2
Aviation Technology OJT
Business Technology & Web Design 1
Business Technology & Web Design 2
Business Technology & Web Design OJT
Career & Work Readiness
Carpentry 1
H8403
H8404
H8405
H8406
H8407
H8408
H8548
H8549
H8550
H0012SSP
H3020SP
H9805SP
H8418
1.5 elective
.5 Language Arts and 1.0 elective
.5 Language Arts and 1.0 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Math and .5 Physical Science and .5
elective
.5 Math and .5 Physical Science and .5
elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Physical Science and 1 elective
.5 Physical Science and 1 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Language Arts 9-12
.5 Pre-vocational 9-12
.5 Work Experience 9-12
.5 math and 1 elective
Carpentry 2
Carpentry 3
Carpentry OJT
Collision Repair & Refinishing 1
Collision Repair & Refinishing 2
Collision Repair & Refinishing 3
Collision Repair & Refinishing 4
Collision Repair & Refinishing OJT
Computer Information Technology 1
Computer Information Technology 2
Computer Information Technology OJT
Construction Electricity 1
H8419
H8420
H8421
H8413
H8414
H8415
H8416
H8417
H8541
H8542
H8543
H8430
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Math and 1 elective
.5 Math and 1 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Math and 1.0 elective
Construction Electricity 2
H8431
.5 Math and 1.0 elective
Construction Electricity OJT
Cosmetology 1
Cosmetology 2
Cosmetology 3
Cosmetology OJT
H8432
H8810
H8811
H8812
H8814
1.5 elective
.5 PE/Health and 1 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
Culinary Arts 1
H8311
.5 Physical Science and 1 elective
Culinary Arts 2
Culinary Arts 3
Culinary Arts OJT
H8312
H8313
H8314
.5 Physical Science and 1 elective
.5 Physical Science and 1 elective
1.5 elective
King Career Center
Tech prep &
apprenticeships
Certifications
Blood Borne Pathogens, Medic First Aid/CPR
University of Alaska
Anchorage
National Health Science Assessment
Adobe
UAA
UAA
UAA
Private Pilot’s Ground School, Private Pilot’s
Knowledge Exam
Microsoft Office Specialist
Apprenticeship program
NCCER Core, OSHA 10, Forklift
Certification, Scaffolding & Fall Protection,
North Slope Training Card, SkillsUSA
NCCER Carpentry Level 1
NCCER Carpentry Level 2
UAA
A+, Net+, PC Pro, Network Pro, Security Pro
IBEW Pre-Apprenticeship program
NCCER Core, NCCER Electrical Level 1,
Weatherization Technician, Your Role in the
Green Environment, OSHA 10, SkillsUSA
Residential Electrician, Lockout/Tagout
Hours towards state licensing
UAA & UAF
Municipality of Anchorage Food Handler’s
Card
13
King Career Center
2015-16 Academic Credits, Tech Prep & Certifications
Students can earn 1.5 credits for each KCC course. All sections of each class are offered every semester.
14 Tech prep &
apprenticeships
Course
Course #
Academic credit
Early Childhood Education 1
Early Childhood Education 2
Early Childhood Education OJT
Electronics & Telecommunications 1
H8303
H8304
H8305
H8245
Electronics & Telecommunications 2
H8246
Electronics & Telecommunications 3
Electronics & Telecommunications 4
Electronics & Telecommunications OJT
Emergency Medical Technology 1
H8247
H8248
H8249
H8950
.5 Social Studies elective and 1 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Math, .5 Physical Science and
.5 elective
.5 Math, .5 Physical Science and
.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Life Science and 1 elective
Emergency Medical Technology OJT
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 1
H8953
H8095
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 2
Film, Audio, & Video Production 1
Film, Audio, & Video Production 2
Film, Audio, & Video Production OJT
Fire & Rescue Services 1
H8096
H8855
H8856
H8857
H8129
1.5 elective
.5 Language Arts and .5 Economics and
.5 elective
.5 Language Arts and 1.0 elective
.5 Language Arts and 1 elective
.5 Language Arts and 1 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Physical Science and 1 elective
Fire & Rescue Services OJT
Horticulture & Landscape Design 1
Horticulture & Landscape Design 2
H8128
H8975
H8976
1.5 elective
.5 Life Science and 1 elective credit
.5 Life Science and 1 elective credit
Horticulture & Landscape Design OJT
Natural Resources Management 1
H8977
H8710
Natural Resources Management 2
H8711
1.5 elective
.5 Alaska Studies and .5 Physical Science
and .5 Social Studies elective
.5 Physical Science and 1.0 elective
credit
Natural Resources Management OJT
Outdoor Power Equipment 1
Outdoor Power Equipment 2
Outdoor Power Equipment OJT
Personal Care Assistant: Health and
Practice
Public Safety & Security 1
Public Safety & Security 2
Public Safety & Security OJT
Travel & Tourism 1
H8712
H8460
H8461
H8463
H6020
1.5 elective credit
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 PE/Health and 1.0 elective
H8217
H8218
H8221
H8650
UAF
Travel & Tourism 2
Travel & Tourism OJT
Veterinary Science 1
H8651
H8652
H8921
Veterinary Science 2
Veterinary Science OJT
Visual Media & Communication 1
Visual Media & Communication 2
Visual Media & Communication OJT
Welding 1
Welding 2
Welding 3
Welding OJT
H8923
H8922
H8513
.5 Social Studies and 1 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Alaska Studies and .5 Social Studies
and .5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Life Science and .5 PE/Health and .5
elective
.5 Life Science and 1 elective
1.5 elective
.5 Language Arts elective, 1 elective
H8466
H8467
H8468
H8469
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
1.5 elective
UAA
Certifications
UAA
Pediatric First Aid/CPR, Municipality of
Anchorage Food Handler’s Card
UAA & Kenai Peninsula
College
Electronic Technicians Association, Customer
Service Specialist, PC Pro (A+ equivalent),
Network Pro, D.C. Electronics, Student
Electronics Technician, Digital Electronics
Technician, Computer Service Technician, AC
Electronics Technician
UAA & UAF
Basic Life Support for the Health Care
Professional, Emergency Medical Technician
I
Adobe Premiere Pro Editing
UAA & UAF
Basic Life Support for the Health Care
Professional, Emergency Trauma Technician
Floral Designer- Through American Institute
of Floral Designers, Landscape Industry
Manager, Landscape Industry Technician-Exterior, Landscape Industry Interior Technician,
Landscape Industry Horticultural Technician,
Landscape Industry Lawn Care Technician
UAA & UAF
UAA
OSHA 10 Industrial, Blood Borne Pathogens,
Medic First Aid/CPR,
Career Ready 101, FEMA IS-700 Introduction to National Incident Management
System, NWCG S-130 Wildland Firefighter,
NWCG S-190 Wildland Fire Behavior
State of Alaska Personal Care Assistant
Certification of Completion, CPR/First Aid
Blood Borne Pathogens, Medic First Aid/
CPR/AED
Municipality of Anchorage Food Handler’s
Card; Visit Anchoage; Anchorage Wild
Expert; Alaska Host customer service
Blood Borne Pathogens, Medic First Aid/
CPR/AED
OSHA 10
Horizontal Filet Weld (2F), Vertical Filet Weld
(3F)
King Career Center
Advanced Health Career Pathways 1 KCC . . . . . . H8910
Grade level 11–12. Grade 10 with instructor/counselor approval.
One semester.
Prerequisite: Biology and/or Health Occupations with a “C” or
better. CPR/First Aid certification or concurrent.
Academic Credit: ½ PE/Health, ½ Life Science, ½ Elective.
Advanced Health Career Pathways 2 KCC . . . . . . H8911
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Advanced Health Career
Pathways 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science, 1.0 Elective.
Advanced Health Career Pathways OJT KCC . . . . H8913
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Advanced Health Career
Pathways 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Advanced Health Care Pathways is a challenging
course designed to prepare students for further
education in the medical field. This rigorous academic class is also
a hands-on, skill building program. Many skills necessary for
employment in health care professions will be taught, practiced
and tested. Students will be exposed to the wide variety of careers
in the medical, dental, veterinary and mental health fields. Career
exploration, portfolio building and an individualized education
pathway will be a vital part of this class. Students will also learn
basic skills and knowledge for entry-level health care professions.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of written
work and test scores, mastery of skills, professionalism and participation in health-related community activities. Attendance, teamwork and class participation are vital components for this class.
Second semester students will expand their understanding of
human anatomy and medical terminology. Students will learn
medical assisting skills specific to patient examination, diagnostic
procedures, specimen collection, laboratory procedures, infection
control, medical asepsis and the extensive clerical duties of the
medical office. Job shadowing for highly motivated students and
an opportunity to apply for on-the-job training may be available.
Advertising, Art & Design 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8422
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Language Arts and 1.0 Elective.
Advertising, Art & Design 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8423
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Advertising, Art & Design 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Language Arts and 1.0 Elective.
Advertising, Art & Design OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . H8425
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Advertising, Art & Design 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Advertising, Art & Design is designed for the student interested in acquiring entry-level skills in the commercial art field. In
the first semester, students are introduced to typography, advertising approaches, color and design theory, illustration, magazine
and packaging layout and design, marketing, newspaper layout,
King Career Center
symbols and logo design. Students are also assigned computer
production jobs to complete within the working parameters of
time and standards of quality. In the second semester, students
receive an in-depth study of practices common to a fine art and
an advertising design studio. Students develop advanced layout
and computer graphic skills using Adobe InDesign, iMovie,
Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator programs. All students
will complete a portfolio of assigned projects which demonstrate
a mastery of basic entry skills in one of the following areas: game
design, illustration, advertising, marketing, computer graphics
and desktop publishing, architectural design, and industrial
design using 2D and 3D software. Professionalism is emphasized
every day.
Automotive Maintenance Technology 1 KCC . . . . H8409
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Automotive Maintenance Technology 2 KCC . . . . H8410
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Automotive Maintenance
Technology 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Automotive Maintenance Technology 3 KCC . . . . H8411
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Automotive Maintenance
Technology 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Automotive Maintenance Technology OJT KCC . . H8412
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Automotive Maintenance
Technology 3.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Automotive Maintenance Technology is designed
to acquaint the student with the basic principles,
operation, and maintenance of the automobile through the coordination of classroom and shop activities in which theory and
practical skills are learned. The course includes the study of the
following systems:
• Fuel systems
• Engines
• Suspension & steering
• E ngine performance &
• Electrical systems
tune up
• Brakes
• Engine service & repair
• Cooling & lubrication
These eight automotive systems are taught over the course of
three semesters so that students taking second and third semesters
will be covering new material.
Purchase of safety glasses and coveralls is required.
Aviation Maintenance Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . H8401
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, ½ Math, ½ Elective.
Aviation Maintenance Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . . H8402
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
15
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Maintenance
Technology 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, ½ Math, ½ Elective.
Aviation Maintenance Technology 3 KCC . . . . . . . H8403
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Maintenance
Technology 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Aviation Maintenance Technology 4 KCC . . . . . . . H8404
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Maintenance
Technology 3.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Aviation Maintenance Technology OJT KCC . . . . H8405
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Maintenance
Technology 4.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
This is a 4-semester program taught at the
University of Alaska Aviation Complex at Merrill
Field. Different subject matter is covered each semester. Students
can earn college credits.
AMT students learn repair and maintenance of aircraft in 4
subject areas: welding, bonded structures, sheet metal and engine
theory. Additionally, students will learn about aircraft hardware
and lock wire as well as basic aerodynamics or how aircraft fly.
Students must purchase leather gloves for welding class. All
other supplied safety equipment use is mandatory.
Aviation Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8406
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, 1.0 Elective.
Aviation Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8407
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Technology 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, 1.0 Elective.
Aviation Technology OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8408
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Technology 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 elective.
May be taken 2 times.
This 2-semester program is taught at a satellite location, utilizing the University of Alaska Aviation
Complex at Merrill Field.
Students will focus on knowledge areas required by the FAA
Private Pilot Written Exam. First semesters will include aerodynamics, aircraft systems, flight instruments, performance, weight
and balance, and the FARs. Students will demonstrate acquired
flight skills in a state of the art flight simulator.
Second semester will learn the importance of good communication and teamwork required by Air Traffic Control. They will
learn airspace, weather, and equipment requirements, and experience an advanced air traffic control tower simulator. Students
will learn about lighting, signage and markings required for various types of airports, and will be introduced to the demands of
16 funding, design and construction. Basic navigation, weather and
weather reports, aeronautical decision making and physiology will
also be covered.
Students will develop a scholarship folder, prepare a resumé,
learn job skills and visit a variety of aviation related job sites.
Second semester students may be eligible to participate in
job-shadowing. Community service will be strongly encouraged.
Business Technology & Web Design 1 KCC . . . . . H8548
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Recommend basic computer keyboarding skills.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Business Technology & Web Design 2 KCC . . . . . H8549
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Business Technology & Web
Design 1.
Academic Credit: 1.0 Elective.
Business Technology & Web Design OJT KCC . . H8550
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Business Technology & Web
Design 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
The need for qualified office workers continues to increase
annually. In Business Technology & Web Design students learn
to use network computer systems, various software programs
such as the Microsoft Office Bundle, Adobe Design Premium,
and other office equipment. In addition, they learn to prepare a
resumé, dress professionally, and conduct themselves in a businesslike manner. During the first semester students will become
familiar with Microsoft Office at the entry level as well as learning
photo manipulation and basic web design. Students will certify in
Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) at no cost.
Second semester students may earn 1.5 elective credits to be
applied toward graduation by completing numerous projects,
newsletters, spelling drills and word usage. Students will have
the opportunity to present visually, on hard copy and by audio,
various projects using Microsoft Office programs such as Word,
PowerPoint, Excel and Access. The second semester student will
learn Microsoft Office at the expert level. They will rebuild, edit,
add, and maintain web pages with multimedia capabilities.
Industry certification becomes more important each year.
Business Technology & Web Design is able to test students for
world-recognized certifications at King Career Center for no cost
to students
Career & Work
Readiness KCC . . . . . . . . H0012SSP/H3020SP/H9805SP
Grade level 10–12. One semester .
Prerequisite: Student must have an IEP.
Academic Credit: ½ Language Arts, ½ Social Studies Elective, ½
Elective.
May be repeated with instructor’s permission.
The Work Readiness Program is for students with Individual
Education Plans (IEP) who are ready to begin the process of transition from school to work. Being “work ready” requires preparation, practice, exploration, and work experience in order to be
successful in reaching their employment and vocational goals.
King Career Center
Students have an opportunity for a Formal Vocational Assessment
to help determine their interests and aptitudes. Students will
complete a portfolio with resumé, writing samples, and other
documents necessary for job search, training, scholarships and
future transitional planning.
Students will interview for appropriate placement. This class
is designed to develop an Individual Employment Plan, prepare
to become competitively employed, or seek and apply for training
through college, vocational training, apprenticeship, or on-thejob training programs. Students can achieve basic certifications to
help them obtain employment. Examples include but are not limited to: the Municipality of Anchorage Food Workers card, basic
safety skills and customer service training. Students will become
familiarized with resources and agencies in the community such
as DVR and the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce
Development that can assist them toward obtaining independent
living skills.
Carpentry 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8418
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Math and 1.0 Elective.
Carpentry 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8419
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Carpentry 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Carpentry 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8420
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Carpentry 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Carpentry OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8421
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Carpentry 3.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Carpentry has an industry advisory board to keep
the program relevant to industry standards. First
semester students’ practical training is accomplished through the
construction of a storage shed using residential construction
methods, the latest in equipment, materials, and practices used in
the construction industry.
Second and third semester students will work on major projects, such as a relocatable classroom, which includes professionally drawn blueprints, building permits, Municipality of Anchorage
building inspection adhering to building codes. Students will
learn the latest methods in cold weather construction practices.
After three semester students can earn up to 493 contract hours
which can be applied toward journeyman carpenter after one year
in the union training program.
In addition students can participate after-hours in SkillsUSA,
a program that is a statewide carpentry and cabinet making competition, and can lead to a national competition.
Apprenticeship
Program
Collision Repair & Refinishing 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8413
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
King Career Center
Collision Repair & Refinishing 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8414
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Collision Repair &
Refinishing 1
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Collision Repair & Refinishing 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8415
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Collision Repair &
Refinishing 2
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Collision Repair & Refinishing 4 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8416
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Collision Repair &
Refinishing 3
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Collision Repair & Refinishing OJT KCC . . . . . . . . H8417
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Collision Repair &
Refinishing 4
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Students in this class will learn metal straightening, plastic
filler application, body panel replacement, sectioning, minor
frame repair, auto body alignment and glass replacement. Shop
refinish practices include surface preparation, mixing and applying paint, complete vehicle refinishing and blending. Second
through fourth semester students will be expected to complete
course work and projects at an advanced level and to demonstrate
competencies in skill areas not covered in the previous semesters.
Qualified advanced students may be eligible for OJT in the third
and fourth semesters.
Students must purchase safety glasses.
Computer Information Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . H8541
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Good math skills are necessary.
Academic Credit: ½ Math and 1.0 Elective.
Computer Information Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . H8542
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Computer Information
Technology 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Math and 1.0 Elective.
Computer Information Technology OJT KCC . . . . H8543
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Computer Information
Technology 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
The Computer Information Technology program
gives students the opportunity to develop a broad
range of computer skills. The first semester program provides an
integrated approach to attainment of the nationally recognized
certification known as A+ Certification which incorporates maintaining, troubleshooting and repairing computer hardware and
software.
Second semester students will explore various hardware and
software topics such as Net+ Certification (a nationally recog17
nized certification in networking fundamentals) and beginning
programming. Independent studies can be explored with instructor’s approval. Second semester students should be able to work
independently and be self-motivated to achieve their course goals.
Computer Information Technology has a Tech Prep agreement
with UAA for students to earn college credits.
Construction Electricity 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8430
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Math and 1.0 Elective.
Construction Electricity 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8431
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Construction Electricity 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Math and 1.0 Elective.
Construction Electricity OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8432
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Construction Electricity 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
The Construction Electricity program provides
in-depth instruction in the theories and principles
of electricity. Principles of operation for electrical devices and
equipment, and correct and safe operation of tools are covered.
The student will learn to interpret and apply the requirements of
the National Electrical Code for designing electrical layouts,
installation methods, and the maintenance, troubleshooting, and
repair of electrical circuits and equipment.
During two semesters of study, students will receive instruction and hands-on training in the laboratory for the following
areas of specialization:
• Residential wiring
• Magnetic motor & circuit control
• Raceway systems
• Programmable logic controllers (plcs)
• Lighting systems
• Industrial/commercial wiring
• Alarm systems
• Single & 3-phase electrical power systems
• 1 amp & 3 amp motors
• Photovoltaic installation design, installation, and
maintenance
Application of classroom theory is the emphasis of the lab
work. Students assist in the design and installation of projects
on and off campus. Approximately one-third of lab time is spent
on actual work sites. Students will create completely operational
projects in the lab using PLCs, motor controls, lighting and
power circuits, and process controls.
Apprenticeship
Program
Cosmetology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8810
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. $40 lab fee.
Academic Credit: ½ PE/Health, 1.0 Elective.
Cosmetology 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8811
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Cosmetology 1. $40 lab fee.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
18 Cosmetology 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8812
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Cosmetology 2. $40 lab fee.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Cosmetology OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8814
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Cosmetology 3.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Cosmetology is a job-oriented course of instruction with all
hours accumulated toward the 1,650 hours required for Alaska
state licensing for students who choose to have their hours and
operations documented. The hours and operations earned are
transferable within Alaska.
Students begin to learn about chemicals used in the salon and
will be learning hair coloring, hair lightening, permanent waving,
hair cutting, fingerwaving and salon management. In the second
semester, students focus for the State Board Exams by increasing
their speeds and accuracy on the practical subjects learned in the
first semester.
Hours and operations will be recorded for Alaska State
Certification.
Culinary Arts 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8311
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, 1.0 Elective.
Culinary Arts 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8312
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Culinary Arts 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, 1.0 Elective.
Culinary Arts 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8313
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Culinary Arts 2.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, 1.0 Elective.
Culinary Arts OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8314
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Culinary Arts 3.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
This program is designed to introduce students to the skills necessary
for success in a career in the art of preparing fine cuisine. Cooking
instruction includes American regional, European and Asian cuisines. Students will be instructed on classical culinary skills
including knife skills, station organization, cooking methods and
techniques, soups, stocks and sauces, vegetable, starch, meat and
fish cookery. Baking instruction includes basic, advanced and
classical pastries. Students will become familiar with the use and
care of professional culinary equipment as well as understanding
and adherence to modern kitchen sanitation and safety standards.
Students will prepare and serve lunch daily in the KCC cafeteria
as well as required caterings, and will complete a resumé.
Second and third semester students will continue to hone
their skills and develop leadership skills. On a team or as individuals, students will work on projects addressing world cuisine,
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
King Career Center
restaurant menu development and culinary careers. Students are
required to job shadow and complete a scholarship portfolio.
The Culinary Arts program is a member of SkillsUSA, a
partnership of students, teachers and industry working together
to ensure America has a skilled workforce. SkillsUSA’s mission
is to help its members become world-class workers, leaders and
responsible American citizens.
Early Childhood Education 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8303
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None, however course work in Child Development
and/or Psychology is helpful. Municipal licensing requires all
students to complete paperwork for a background check and
documented health history. In addition, all students disciplinary
records are also reviewed for possible infractions that would
exclude them from working with young children. Professional
dress and attire is required on preschool days including wearing
our uniform polo shirt and no visible tattoos or facial piercings.
Academic Credit: ½ Social Studies Elective, 1.0 Elective.
Early Childhood Education 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8304
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Early Childhood Education 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Early Childhood Education OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8305
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Early Childhood Education 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
The Early Childhood Education Program provides
students an opportunity to work and learn about
young children. Students work in a municipal-licensed preschool
that follows NAEYC Accreditation Standards. They are
supervised by two early childhood instructors. Students are also
required to complete an application for the job of working with
young children and provide three references. Students learn child
development and classroom skills in supervising and teaching
young children ages 3-5 years. The first semester curriculum
includes: health and safety, guidance and parenting. Students
enrolled in the second semester will focus on curriculum
development in a quality early childhood classroom. Second
semester students plan and facilitate activity lessons in all the
curriculum areas from math to art.
Electronics and Telecommunications
Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8245
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Algebra I with a grade of “C” or higher.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, ½ Math, ½ Elective.
Electronics and Telecommunications
Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8246
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Computer Electronics
Technology 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, ½ Math, ½ Elective.
Electronics and Telecommunications
Technology 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8247
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
King Career Center
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Computer Electronics
Technology 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Electronics and Telecommunications
Technology 4 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8428
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Computer Electronics
Technology 3.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Electronics and Telecommunications
Technology OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8429
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Computer Electronics
Technology 4.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
This course integrates extensive
hands-on activities with math and
interactive computer programs to emphasize basic electronics
theory and application. Students can earn college credits and electronics certifications that may be given upon successful course
completion and students may enjoy advanced standing at other
post-secondary institutions.
Each semester the subject matter is different and cumulative.
Electronics & Telecommunications 1 and 2 can be used for science, math, and elective credit.
1st semester: Personnel skills to include careers, business
ethics, and dealing with customers. Basic D.C. electricity which
includes safety, soldering, schematics, series & parallel circuits,
tools, components, cabling and test equipment.
2nd semester: Complex D.C. circuits, digital electronics, intro
to A.C., wireless communication and fiber optics.
3rd semester: Advanced A.C., advanced digital circuits, analog
circuits. Student electronic apprentice certification possible.
4th semester: Usually OJT and/or special advanced projects.
Kenai Peninsula
College
Emergency Medical Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . H8950
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science, 1.0 Elective.
Emergency Medical Technology OJT KCC . . . . . . H8953
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Emergency Medical
Technology 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Emergency Medical Technology students learn to work as part of a professional pre-hospital medical team. This is a State Health
Department approved course in which qualifying students can
test for EMT-1 certification following the course. Students may
earn college credits through the University of Alaska Anchorage
or UAF.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of written
test scores, mastery of skills and professionalism. Students can
also obtain an American Heart Association CPR card as well as
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
19
an Emergency Trauma Technician certification. Must be age 18
within six months of test for state EMT.
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8095
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Economics and ½ Language Arts and
1.0 Elective
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8096
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Entrepreneurship &
Enterprise 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Economics and ½ Language Arts and
1.0 Elective
Students will learn and experience business operations through
a hands-on and problem-based curriculum. The focus in the first
semester class will be on entrepreneurship; students will work in
teams to develop, plan, and sell a product or service at KCC.
Students will learn how fields such as accounting, finance and
marketing fit together in a functioning business. Personal ethics,
business planning, economics, finance, accounting basics, communications, marketing, corporate responsibility and technical
writing will be integrated into the course. By the end of the first
quarter, students will liquidate their businesses, and issue an
annual report and letter to shareholders. They will also produce
balance sheets, cash flow statements and income statements. The
class will then plan a new KCC store that will allow students to
further refine their skills on a larger scale.
Students will hone their portfolios which will demonstrate
proficiency in skills considered essential by the business industry.
The Anchorage Chamber of Commerce will issue an “endorsement” to students who have successfully met its portfolio requirement. Students in the second semester will develop a business
project. This will focus on project management and facilitation,
general business concepts, contracts, technical writing, accounting basics, and project/product presentations. Utilizing industry
partners, students will provide real world solutions to business
problems.
Film, Audio & Video Production 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . H8855
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Language Arts, 1.0 Elective.
Film, Audio & Video Production 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . H8856
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Film, Audio & Video
Production 1 and teacher interview.
Academic Credit: ½ Language Arts, 1.0 Elective.
Film, Audio & Video Production OJT KCC . . . . . . . H8857
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Film, Audio & Video
Production 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
The Film, Audio & Video Production class offers all the skills
and knowledge you need to launch a successful career in film,
radio, video or television. Students complete radio, film and video
20 projects while learning to work as part of a production team. The
curriculum includes individual and multidisciplinary assignments
geared to developing both creative and technical proficiency.
Large studios and modern production equipment support these
goals, enabling students to produce high-quality work. A comprehensive and balanced approach to study includes opportunities
to produce, write, direct, shoot and edit on numerous projects.
There’s a strong commitment to postproduction, and students
gain practical experience on a variety of video and audio workstations. All classes begin with writing assignments and continue
with more writing, reading and oral presentations in front of a
camera or microphone.
To earn the ½ credit of language arts students will be expected
to do outside reporting, Internet research and writing assignments. Because writing and reading are an integral part of this
class, all assignments are directly related to the English Language
Arts Common Core State Standards. Students should be prepared to read and write on various technical and related media
assignments.
Fire and Rescue Services 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8129
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, 1.0 Elective.
Fire and Rescue Services OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . H8128
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Fire and Rescue Services 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
The goal of rescue is to locate and
access injured or trapped victims,
stabilize the emergency situation, and transport the patients to
safety while managing any injuries and avoiding additional risk or
injury to the patients, rescuers or the public. The goal of this
course is to provide the skills and knowledge necessary to participate in a wide variety of fire-rescue operations while insuring
safety. The fire component is an introduction to fire fighting as a
career and includes intense physical skills and agility as well as
basic fire operations.
Types of rescues include water rescue, vehicle crashes, fire
rescues, hazardous materials, rescues from confined spaced and
collapsed structures, and rescues at large scale disaster scenes.
Students will follow guidelines set forth by the International Fire
Service Training Association, OSHA, FEMA, and the National
Incident Management System (NIMS) while training.
Teamwork and professionalism are essential parts of this class.
It is primarily a practical course that emphasizes the importance
of hands-on training and skills. The skills-based learning will be
supplemented by lectures, discussions, and online coursework.
Students can receive three college credits through UAA and
UAF. Job placement assistance and/or advanced training programs is available through the class.
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
Horticulture & Landscape Design 1 KCC . . . . . . . .H8975
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science, 1.0 Elective.
King Career Center
Horticulture & Landscape Design 2 KCC . . . . . . . .H8976
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Horticulture & Landscape
Design 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science, 1.0 Elective.
Horticulture & Landscape Design OJT KCC . . . . . H8977
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Horticulture & Landscape
Design 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Horticulture provides training in the fields of landscaping, floriculture, turf, garden center, nursery and greenhouse operations,
tree service work, and athletic field maintenance. Also included
is plant identification, physiology, propagation and landscape
design. Students will also be responsible for operating and maintaining a commercial greenhouse located on school grounds.
Fall semester students will explore various fields within horticulture, study and explore plant physiology, landscape design
principles, landscape tools and equipment and floral design.
Spring semester students will study plant physiology and reactions to greenhouse environments in-depth, horticulture fields of
personal interest, complete independent projects and experiments
as well as research cultural requirements of crops grown in the
school greenhouse.
Students also visit local sites to gain knowledge in area educational and employment opportunities.
Natural Resources Management 1 KCC . . . . . . . . H8710
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Alaska Studies, ½ Physical Science, ½ Social
Studies Elective.
Natural Resources Management 2 KCC . . . . . . . . H8711
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Natural Resources
Management 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science, 1.0 Elective.
Natural Resources Management OJT KCC . . . . . . H8712
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Natural Resources
Management 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective
May be taken 2 times.
Learn about and experience the
beauty and mystery of Alaska while
exploring careers that manage the natural resources of our state.
Through classroom and outdoor skill building activities students
will examine soil and water conservation, wildlife and fisheries
management, and forestry and recreation in both historical and
contemporary contexts. This course examines the geography, history, political and economic forces that have shaped contemporary Alaska. Course content is organized around five themes of
population, land, resources, governance and cultural landscape.
The NRM program offers career pathways to Alaska resource
development and conservation career fields by offering Tech Prep
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
King Career Center
college credits toward degrees and opportunities for paid summer
natural resource career internships.
This course is an integration of social studies and physical
science with career field exploration. ASD’s Alaska Studies curriculum is taught in the fall. This course includes a review of the
history and the political and economic forces that determine
contemporary Alaska resource development decisions and other
issues confronting the state.
Outdoor Power Equipment 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8460
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Outdoor Power Equipment 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8461
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Small Engines 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Outdoor Power Equipment 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8462
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Outdoor Power Equipment 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Outdoor Power Equipment OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . H8463
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Small Engines 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Small Engines students will learn basic shop safety, tools and
equipment used in the maintenance and repair of various gasoline
engines. Identification of engine parts, construction and the principles of operation will also be studied.
Students will work on 2- and 4-cycle Tecumseh and Briggs &
Stratton 3.5 to 5 horsepower engines used in lawn and garden
equipment. The instruction will include locating the source of
problems, using appropriate measuring instruments, dis-assembling and re-assembling engines. Students will also be expected
to keep and maintain appropriate records, costs of materials and
labor and parts. An exploration of various post-secondary training and careers in the industry will also be covered. Proper shop
clothing and safety glasses must be worn.
Second semester students will be leaders in the area of working safely in the shop and are expected to be role models for first
semester students. They will continue to work on 2- and 4-cycle
engine systems, focusing on carburation, ignition, lubrication
and cooling systems. Piston, piston ring, rod, bearing, crankshaft, valve and cam-shaft service will be extensively covered. The
second semester student will be expected to use most of the test
equipment associated with troubleshooting and repairing gasoline engines used in lawn and garden equipment, small outboard
engines, and snowblowers.
Practice and Health for PCA KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6020
Grade Level: 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Academic Credit: ½ PE/Health and 1.0 Elective
The KCC Personal Care Assistant program course goes beyond
the basics of providing the knowledge base and skill performance
practice to meet the competency-based standards required for
21
State of Alaska Personal Care Assistant certification. Students will
demonstrate proficiency in basic health and personal care skills
that assist elderly clients or clients with disabilities with daily living tasks such as bathing, dressing, grooming, meal preparation,
and maintaining a safe and comfortable home care environment.
Upon successful completion of the PCA course curriculum and
the State of Alaska written examination, students 18 years and
older will be qualified to work as a Personal Care Assistant, one of
the fastest growing occupations in Alaska. All students explore citizenship, leadership, communication skills, alternate populations,
and other placements in which to successfully employ PCA skills.
Public Safety & Security 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8217
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: High reading level and good writing skills
recommended.
Academic Credit: ½ Social Studies Elective, 1.0 Elective.
Public Safety & Security 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8218
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Public Safety & Security 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Public Safety & Security OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8221
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Public Safety & Security 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Public Safety and Security students learn to work as
part of a professional criminal justice team.
Students will study the history of the criminal justice system, the
three components: law enforcement, courts, and corrections, and
how they work together, as well as the various role expectations
within those three components. In addition to legal terminology,
students will also study basic interview techniques, crime scene
investigation including photography, basic fingerprinting techniques, report writing, courtroom presentation and basic firearms
safety.
Second semester students will be learning through scenario-based training in preparation for Skills USA competitions in
Criminal Justice or CSI.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of attendance, professionalism, mastery of skills, written test scores, daily
progress and community work service. Community work service
is a requirement with 20 hours of activities preferably related
to law enforcement, law, corrections or security. Certain class
projects can be used as community work service hours. This class
includes guest speakers and related field trips.
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
Travel & Tourism 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8650
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Alaska Studies, ½ Social Studies Elective,
½ Elective.
Travel & Tourism 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8651
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Travel & Tourism 1.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
22 Travel & Tourism OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8652
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Travel & Tourism 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Tourism in Alaska accounts for one in eight jobs
and is the second-largest private sector employer.
The Travel & Tourism program provides students with the
skills and knowledge necessary for successful careers in this fast
growing industry. Students are prepared for entry level positions
with airlines, airport operations, tour companies, banquet serving/catering, and the cruise and lodging industries.
Some of the topics covered in the training program include
tourism in Alaska, sectors of travel & tourism, personal marketing/job portfolio and customer service/professional communication skills.
Alaska has more mountains, glaciers and wildlife than just
about anywhere else in the world. Students in this course have the
unique opportunity to participate in FAM (familiarization) tours
where they get out of the classroom and experience first-hand the
rich cultures, history and geography of Alaska, and learn about
the many different businesses that make up the industry.
Fall: Hotel/lodging, airlines and the Alaska Railroad. Students
interested in applying for the AKRR Tour Guide Program offered in
the spring are encouraged to take this class.
Spring: Cruise lines, tour companies, meetings and conventions. Students will participate in an industry career fair in March
with a focus on job placement.
Travel and tourism careers appeal to adventurous, outgoing
people adept at customer service. Make this course your first stop
on the path to a successful career!
Veterinary Science 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8921
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Biology.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science, ½ PE/Health, ½ Elective.
Veterinary Science 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8923
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Veterinary Science 1 and
teacher recommendation.
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science, 1.0 Elective.
Veterinary Science OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8922
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Veterinary Science 2.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Veterinary Science is a rigorous course designed to prepare students for careers in veterinary and other health professions. This
class requires both academic and physical participation and skills.
Students will be exposed to the competencies needed to work in
the veterinary and health setting. Students will learn safety and
responsibility, animal anatomy, infection control, canine grooming, first aid and CPR for humans, cats and dogs, restraints,
veterinary terminology, roles and responsibilities of the types of
veterinary workers, ethics, records, scheduling and appointments,
communication and client relations. Career exploration and portfolio building are all a part of this class.
King Career Center
Students will participate in a canine day care, a dog wash and
grooming program. They will be evaluated by written tests, mastery of skills, professionalism, and participation in community
activities. Teamwork and participation are essential components
of success for this class. Excellent attendance is critical for student
success and animal health.
Second semester students will continue their study of veterinary science and develop a deeper understanding of terminology,
lab techniques, surgical assisting, diagnostic procedures and office
duties.
Visual Media and Communications 1 . . . . . . . . . . . H8513
Grade Level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Language Arts and 1.0 Elective.
Visual Media and Communication is a combined visual arts,
digital media, and communication course designed to cohesively
integrate content and context across multiple platforms, such as
print, web, video, audio, and connective (social) media. Students
will focus on communication strategies using original content,
branding, storytelling, advertising, digital identity, and more.
Students will learn to create a unified visual message for a company or individual that is holistically developed and produced across
multiple platforms.
Welding 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8466
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: 1.5 elective.
Welding 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8467
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Welding 1 and fewer than 10
absences.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Welding 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8468
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Welding 2 and fewer than 10
absences.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
Welding OJT KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8469
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Welding 3 and fewer than 10
absences.
Academic Credit: 1.5 Elective.
May be taken 2 times.
Welding provides training in the
fundamentals of welding processes
used to fabricate metal. Instruction is given in the areas of oxy-fuel cutting (OFC), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), MIG and
TIG welding, blueprint reading, fabrication of weldments, welding symbols, plus experience using a plasma arc cutter, grinder,
drill, arc welding machines and other shop-related equipment.
Second and third semester students will be learning advanced
fabrication and welding along with aluminum welding using
the GTAW and GMAW processes. Student assignments will
require the use of all the various welding skills learned during first
semester and these advanced projects are to be completed using
accepted fabrication and welding industry standards. Possible recApprenticeship
Program
King Career Center
ommendation to Ironworkers or Piledrivers and Divers apprenticeships can be earned.
Safety glasses, leather boots and gloves are required. Welding
helmets and cutting goggles are supplied.
After-school KCC courses
Alaska Railroad Tour Guide Program KCC . . . . . . H8656
Grade level 9-12. One semester after-school program at KCC.
Prerequisite: None
Academic Credit: ½ Alaska Studies.
The Alaska Railroad Tour Guide Program is an
introductory course which includes Alaska history,
geography, cultures, economy, flora-fauna and the natural
resources of the state. Public speaking and customer contact skills
are taught as well as an introductory unit into the visitor industry
of Alaska taught by the industry professionals. Field trips to local
tourism businesses and cultural museums and destinations are
also an integral component of the course.
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
Career Cluster Intensive KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9775
Grade Level: 9–12 One semester after-school program at KCC.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Elective.
May be repeated 3 times.
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction and awareness of the variety of career and technology
education programs available at the King Career Center. The
student will choose and then take three different 10-day classes
and earn ½ elective credit.
Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8957
Grade level: 11–12 (Must be at least 17 years old).
Course also taught in after-school program at KCC.
Prerequisite: Biology and complete application with teacher
recommendations. Recommend completion of Health Occupation
Essentials and Medical Terminology.
Academic Credit: 1.0 Elective.
Students in this course will gain the knowledge and skills
needed to assist nurses and to be effective health care team members. Successful students will qualify to sit for the Alaska State
Certification for Nurse Aides and will be eligible for employment
in long-term care and acute-care facilities. Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of written test scores, mastery of
skills, professionalism, and participation in clinical opportunities.
The clinical experiences consist of 48 hours of hands-on patient
care in a long-term care facility, nursing home and hospital setting. Clinical experiences are coordinated by the instructor and
will be scheduled to best fit students’ schedules.
23
ENGLISH AS A SECOND
LANGUAGE (ESL)
advanced level. Students will participate in both oral and written
presentations.
These courses are designed for the high school student who
has been identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. The courses
are aligned with the district curriculum yet adapted to meet the
English proficiency level and academic needs of the ESL student.
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited-English proficient (LEP). Course
restricted to students at Newcomers’ Center.
English I/Newcomer ESL . . . . . . H0120S1NC/H0120S2NC
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP). Course
restricted to students at Newcomers’ Center.
This is an intensive beginning English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students.
Course content includes a variety of types of fiction and non-fiction from world/multicultural literature and writing for different purposes and audiences. Instruction and activities focus on
development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills,
emphasizing comprehension and written expression at the students’ level.
English II/Newcomer ESL . . . . . H0122S1NC/H0122S2NC
This is an intensive beginning English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students. Course
incorporates an integrated approach to the teaching of listening,
reading and writing with exposure to American Literature. Students
will practice both oral and written presentations at their level.
English II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0122EL1
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited-English proficient (LEP).
This is an intensive beginning English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students.
Course incorporates an integrated approach to the teaching of listening, reading and writing with exposure to American Literature.
Students will practice both oral and written presentations at the
beginning level.
English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0120EL1
English II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0122EL2
This is an intensive beginning English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students.
Course content includes a variety of types of fiction and non-fiction from world/multicultural literature and writing for different purposes and audiences. Instruction and activities focus on
development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills,
emphasizing comprehension and written expression at the beginning level.
This is an intensive intermediate English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students.
Course incorporates an integrated approach to the teaching of
listening, reading and writing with focus on American Literature.
Students will participate both oral and written presentations at
the intermediate level.
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0120EL2
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited-English proficient (LEP).
This is an intensive intermediate English as a second language (ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students. Course content includes a variety of types of fiction and
non-fictions based on world/multicultural literature and writing
for different purposes and audiences. Instruction and activities
focus on improving of listening, speaking, reading, and writing
skills, emphasizing comprehension and written expression at the
intermediate level. Students will practice both oral and written
presentations.
English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0120EL3
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This is an intensive advanced English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students.
Course content includes a variety of types of fiction and non-fictions based on world /multicultural literature and writing for different purposes and audiences. Instruction and activities focus on
further development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing
skills, emphasizing comprehension and written expression at the
24 Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
English II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0122EL3
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited-English proficient (LEP).
This is an intensive advanced English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non-English proficient students.
Course incorporates an integrated approach to further development of the listening, reading and writing skills with focus on
American Literature. Students will participate both oral and written presentations at the advanced level.
English III - US Literature H0124EL1/H0124EL2/
H0124EL3
Grade level 11. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None
English III US Literature: This full-year required course
focuses on American literature and how it has helped shape our
nation. Students will explore and study great literary works from
throughout United States’ history including Early American,
Civil War, Great Depression and Civil Rights eras. In addition to
reading a variety of rich fiction and informational texts, students
will improve their writing, critical thinking, speaking, vocabulary,
and grammar skills through lessons aligned to the Common Core
State Standards. Sharpening their skills through performance
tasks such as on demand and extended writing and formal and
informal presentations will prepare students to achieve career and
college readiness.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Grammar and Vocabulary Building/
Beginning ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0150EL1
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
Non-English proficient students enrolled in this course are
developing their English language skills (listening, speaking,
reading, writing, grammar and vocabulary building) at the beginning level. English grammar and academic vocabulary will be an
emphasis in this course.
Grammar and Vocabulary Building/
Intermediate ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0150EL2
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This is an intensive intermediate English as a second language
(ESL) course designed for non- English proficient students.
Course content includes instruction and activities in the basic
skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing with emphasis
on comprehension, phonetic knowledge, academic vocabulary
development, spelling, grammar, handwriting and expression at
the intermediate level.
Grammar and Vocabulary Building/
Advanced ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0150EL3
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
ESL/bilingual students enrolled in this course are continuing
to develop their English language skills (listening, speaking,
reading, writing, grammar and vocabulary building) at a more
advanced level. English grammar and academic vocabulary will
be an emphasis in this course.
Composition/Newcomer ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0210SNC
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP). Course
restricted to students at Newcomers’ Center. Repeatable 1 time for
credit.
This is an intensive beginning English as a second language
course for non- English proficient students. Course content
includes instruction and activities in the basic skills of listening,
speaking, reading and writing with emphasis on written expression at the beginning level, using some conventions of Standard
English.
Individualized Writing/Beginning ESL . . . . . . . H0230EL1
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
The focus of this course will be to develop the non-English
proficient student’s individual writing ability. Instruction and
activities will integrate listening, speaking and reading into the
writing process, using conventions of Standard English. The student will develop the ability to write simple sentences, paragraphs
and short compositions, while learning organization, revision
skills, grammar usage, vocabulary, punctuation and capitalization.
Personal, creative and practical papers of varying lengths will be
included at the beginning level.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
The focus of this course will be to develop the non-English
proficient student’s individual writing ability. Instruction and
activities will integrate listening, speaking and reading into the
writing process. The student will develop the ability to write
various genres of writing such as narrative, expository, etc. The
conventions of standard English will be emphasized.
Individualized Writing/Advanced ESL . . . . . . . H0230EL3
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
The focus of this course will be to develop the advanced ESL
student’s individual writing ability while using the other three
skill areas (listening, speaking and reading) and integrating them
into the writing process. The student will develop the ability to
write various genres of writing such as narrative, expository, etc.
The conventions of standard English will be emphasized.
Alaska Studies/Newcomer ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3110NC
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the student who has been
identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course content is aligned
with the district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s
English proficiency level, academic needs, prior knowledge and
cultural background. The physical, political and cultural geography of Alaska will be investigated and English language skills will
be enhanced and developed.
Area Studies/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3035EL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the junior or senior who
has been identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course
content is aligned with the district curriculum, yet adapted to
meet the student’s English proficiency level, academic needs, prior
knowledge and cultural background. The physical and cultural
geography of selected regions will be investigated and English
language skills will be enhanced and developed. The area studies
may include Alaska, Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Pacific Rim,
the Middle East or another region/area of the world.
Economics/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3080EL
Grade level 12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
Grade level 9–12. 1–2 semesters.
This required course is designed for the junior or senior who
has been identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course
content is aligned with the district curriculum, yet adapted to
meet the student’s English proficiency level, academic needs, prior
knowledge and cultural background.
The course is designed to introduce students to economics
vocabulary, concepts, principles and institutions. Students will
learn to apply economic reasoning to their lives as citizens, consumers, workers and producers as well as develop their English
proficiency.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Individualized Writing/Intermediate ESL . . . . . H0230EL2
25
Global Geography/Newcomer ESL . . . . . . . . . . H3030NC
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the student who has been
identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course content is aligned
with the district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s
English proficiency level, academic needs, prior knowledge and
cultural background. The physical and cultural geography of
selected regions will be investigated and English language skills
will be enhanced and developed.
Social Studies/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3013EL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the junior or senior who
has been identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course
content is aligned with the district curriculum, yet adapted to
meet the student’s English proficiency level, academic needs, prior
knowledge and cultural background.
This course introduces the student to the vocabulary, concepts
and processes of the social sciences and history and relating them
to the student, the student’s school, community and current
events.
World History/Newcomer ESL
(Circa 500 BC-1800 AD) . . . . . . . . . . H3315S1NC/H3315S2NC
Grade level 10. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This course is aligned with the district curriculum, yet adapted
to the student’s English proficiency level, academic needs, and
prior knowledge. This course provides a study of world history.
Included are the geographic regions of Greece, Rome, India, The
Far East; China, Japan, Korea, and Africa. Included in semester two are the geographic regions of the Middle East, ancient
Americas, Byzantium, and Europe. Geography, humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science, and technology are
some of the themes/perspectives by which these areas of the world
will be explored.
World History/ESL (Circa 500 BC-1800AD) . . . . . . . H3315EL
Grade level 10. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This course is aligned with the district curriculum, yet adapted
to the student’s English proficiency level, academic needs, and
prior knowledge. This course provides a study of world history.
Included in semester one are the geographic regions of Greece,
Rome, India, The Far East; China, Japan, Korea, and Africa.
Included in semester two are the geographic regions of the Middle
East, ancient Americas, Byzantium, and Europe. Geography,
humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science, and
technology are some of the themes/perspectives by which these
areas of the world will be explored.
U.S. History/Newcomer ESL . . . H3317S1NC/H3317S2NC
Grade level 11 –12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP). Course
restricted to students at Newcomers’ Center.
26 This required course is designed for the student who has been
identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course content is aligned
with the district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s
English proficiency level and academic needs.
This course provides a study of United States history with
some integration of world history. Geography, economics, government, religion/philosophy, science/technology, sociology
and the humanities will be used as perspectives through which
U.S. history will be explored. The first semester will explore
the American experience through the post WWI era (Roaring
Twenties) and the beginning of the Great Depression. The second
semester will explore the American experience from the Great
Depression through contemporary America.
U.S. History/ESL (Circa 1763-Present) . . . . . . . . . . H3317EL
Grade level 11 –12.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the student who has been
identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course content is aligned
with the district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s
English proficiency level and academic needs.
This course provides a study of United States history with
some integration of world history. Geography, economics, government, religion/philosophy, science/technology, sociology
and the humanities will be used as perspectives through which
U.S. history will be explored. The first semester will explore
the American experience through the post WWI era (Roaring
Twenties) and the beginning of the Great Depression. The second
semester will explore the American experience from the Great
Depression through contemporary America.
United States Government/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3075EL
Grade level: 12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the junior or senior who
has been identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course
content is aligned with the district curriculum, yet adapted to
meet the student’s English proficiency level, academic needs, prior
knowledge and cultural background.
This course is founded on the belief that to become an
informed and active citizen, an understanding of U.S. government is essential. It will feature the structure of government and
the function of politics, as well as theory and practical application
of the following: 1) foundations of U.S. government; 2) institutions and policy making; 3) principles of the U.S. constitution; 4)
roles and responsibilities of the citizen; and 5) political behavior.
Pre-Algebra/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1030EL
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the student who has been
identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course content is aligned
with the district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
English proficiency level, academic needs, prior knowledge and
cultural background.
This is an introductory math course for students who are
developing their English language skills while expanding their
mathematical knowledge. This course will be on continued development of pattern recognition, computational skills, elementary
algebra topics, geometric relationships, problem-solving and the
use of technology.
Algebra/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1352EL
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This required course is designed for the student who has been
identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures. Course content is aligned
with the district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s
English proficiency level, academic needs, prior knowledge and
cultural background.
This course reviews and extends problem solving, data analysis,
the use of technology (i.e., calculator and computer), the theory,
use and understanding of the fundamental operations on real
numbers, expressing quantitative statements in algebraic language,
solving equations and inequalities, polynomials, the use of rational
expressions in equations, the solution of quadratic equations and
related applications, coordinate graphing and irrational numbers.
ESL Tutoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9440EL
Grade level 9–12. Elective. 1–4 semesters; may be repeated as
needed.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This elective course is designed for the student who has been
identified and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state law and district procedures.
Content may include specific ESL needs such as reading, listening comprehension, pronunciation, vocabulary development and
writing skills; study skills such as outlining, test taking, paraphrasing and/or content area tutoring in math, science, social studies or
any other course in which the student needs additional assistance.
Integrated Science 9/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2016EL
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This course is designed for the student who has been identified
and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state
law and district procedures. Course content is aligned with the
district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s English
proficiency level, academic needs, prior knowledge and cultural
background.
It is an integrated, thematic program that explores the natural
sciences, their common principles and relationships, through an
inquiry-based approach. The life, earth and space sciences, as well
as chemistry and physics will be covered. Labs, visual aids, manipulatives and supplemental materials will be used to illustrate and
demonstrate scientific concepts and to increase the student’s
English language development.
Biology I/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2232EL
This course is designed for the student who has been identified
and assessed as being limited English proficient according to state
law and district procedures. Course content is aligned with the
district curriculum, yet adapted to meet the student’s English
proficiency level, academic needs, prior knowledge and cultural
background.
It will provide an introduction to the fields of botany, zoology,
ecology and genetics. Course content will include a study of the
chemical basis of life, such as the cellular processes of respiration,
photosynthesis, diffusion and osmosis as well as cell division,
DNA and enzyme action. Labs, visual aids, manipulatives and
supplemental materials will be used to illustrate and demonstrate
scientific concepts and to increase the student’s English language
development. This course is a prerequisite for all other biology
electives.
Conceptual Chemistry/ESL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2411EL
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None. Physical science.
Provides an opportunity for the student interested in areas
other than science to study the basic concepts in chemistry as
they relate to home and life. Chemical concepts will be used to
explain many of the processes we observe in our daily lives. While
examining these concepts, the student will develop skills in the
laboratory and in problem solving.
INTERNATIONAL
BACCALAUREATE
(West High School)
The IB Diploma Program is a rigorous two-year college preparatory set of classes for juniors and seniors offered at West High
School only. Diploma candidates must take classes in six subject
areas: English, a second language, social studies, science, math, and
the arts. They must also complete the Theory of Knowledge course.
Weighted grades and IB
All IB courses are weighted with the exception of the following: IB Literature and Performance, IB Environmental Systems
and Societies, Intro to IB Math Studies, IB Math Studies, IB
Mathematics Standard Level, and all of the IB Standard Level
world language classes.
IB Literature I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0501IB/H0502IB
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Honors English I and/or II recommended.
Through the study of a wide range of literature, including texts
in translation, the course encourages students to appreciate the
artistry of literature and to develop an ability to reflect critically
on their reading. Works are studied in their literary and cultural
contexts, through close study of individual texts and passages, and
by considering a range of critical approaches.
IB Literature and Performance I & II . . . . . . H0498/H0499
Grade Level 11-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: English I, English II, STTA or instructor permission.
Grade level: 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Identified limited English proficient (LEP).
This course incorporates essential elements of literature and
performance and aims to explore the dynamic relationship
between the two. At the heart of the course is this interaction
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
27
between (i) a conventional literary emphasis on close reading,
critical writing and discussion and (ii) the practical, aesthetic and
symbolic elements of performance. The course as a whole examines literary and dramatic texts and seeks to develop intellect,
imagination and creativity. It encourages intercultural awareness
through a study of texts from more than one culture.
IB History of the Americas I & II . . . . . . . . H3720IB/H3633
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Honors World History or teacher recommendation.
First year: US History credit; Second year: Economics and
Government credit.
This course is designed to develop in students a lasting interest
in and appreciation for the countries in the Western Hemisphere
and includes a comparative study the histories of Canada, United
States and Latin America.
Introduction to IB Math Studies
Grade level 11-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Informal Geometry
This course will introduce students to the topics of linear
relations, quadratic functions, systems of equations, polynomial
functions, probability, statistics and financial mathematics.
IB Mathematics Studies I & II . . . . . . . . . . . H1800/H1802
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Geometry or Informal Geometry
This course will cover linear relations, quadratic functions,
rational and inverse functions, grouping rational functions, systems
of equations, complex number system, polynomial function, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, probability, statistics, financial mathematics and introduction to differential calculus.
IB Mathematics Standard Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1804
Grade level 10-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Algebra II
This course covers logarithmic and exponential functions, analytic geometry, introduction to limits and the derivative, sequences and series, circular and trigonometric functions, graphs, laws,
identities, inverses and their applications, vectors, and complex
numbers. The course prepares students to study calculus and statistics and probability. Students in the course complete a written
project called “mathematical exploration.”
IB Mathematics Higher Level I & II . . . . . . . H1808/H1810
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus
This course covers functions, graphs, limits, derivatives and
integrals by including the study of parametric equation, polar
functions and vector analysis.
IB Further Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1812
Grade level 12. Two semesters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prerequisite: Four semesters higher level math.
This course is designed for students who intend to major in
mathematics at the university level. The course will focus on
different branches of mathematics to encourage the student to
appreciate the diversity of the subject. Students will prepare a
portfolio to demonstrate high proficiency in a chosen field of
mathematics.
28 IB Biology I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2248/H2250
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry strongly recommended.
This course will give students a broad and comprehensive
experience in the experimental subject of biology, a science based
on the use of the scientific method to answer the universal conundrums faced by all living things, with the hope of increasing the
appreciation of and respect for life.
IB Chemistry I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2448/H2450
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Chemistry and Algebra II, Biology strongly
recommended.
This course will give students a broad and comprehensive
experience in the experimental subject of chemistry, a science
based on the use of the scientific method to answer questions
about the composition, structure and properties of all the things
around us.
IB Environmental Systems & Societies . . . . . . . . . H2288
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Chemistry or Conceptual Chemistry strongly
recommended.
This one-year class is an interdisciplinary science course whose
prime intent is to provide students with a coherent and scientific
perspective on the environment, drawing attention to the students’ relationship with their environment and the significance of
choices and decisions they make in their lives.
IB Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2540
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
This course offers a study of the most fundamental of the
experimental sciences and it seeks to explain the universe itself.
Topics covered include physics and physical measurement,
mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism,
atomic and nuclear physics, measurement and uncertainties,
mechanics, thermal physics, wave phenomena, electromagnetism
and quantum and nuclear physics.
IB Physics I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2541IB/H2542IB
Grade level 11-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Algebra II, must take IB Physics I before taking IB
Physics II
This course offers a study of the most fundamental of the
experimental sciences, and it seeks to explain the universe itself.
Topics covered include physical measurement, mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics, measurement and uncertainties, and quantum physics.
IB Theatre Arts I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9641/H9643
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Acting I or Play Production or teacher approval.
Theatre Arts will follow a curriculum emphasizing international themes, styles and literature and will be structured around
the five elements: performing skills, world theatre skills, practical
play analysis, theatre production and individual project. The overriding goal of the program is for students to come away with an
understanding of the nature of theatre, its place and its contributions to societies all over the world and to become lifelong theatre
goers and participants.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
IB Music I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5722/H5724
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Orchestra, Band, or Choir or teacher approval.
Through in-depth analysis of representative works, the study
of genres and styles found around the world and concentrated
effort in solo performance, group performance, or composition,
students will gain an educated insight into music and enhance
their personal skills as musicians.
IB Visual Arts I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5019/H5021
Grade level 11–12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Art Studio or Drawing and Design or teacher
approval.
The overall goal of the course is for students to develop a body
of work, which represents their individual research and development of artistic expression.
IB French Standard Level (SL) I & II
(intermediate low to intermediate high) . . . . . H1844IB/H1845IB
Grade level 9-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: French III or teacher recommendation.
This course focuses on language acquisition through the study
and use of a wide range of written and spoken material (from
everyday oral exchanges to literary texts) related to Frenchspeaking cultures. Students develop the skills and inter-cultural
understanding required to communicate successfully in an
environment where French is spoken, thus moving beyond the
confines of the classroom to expand their awareness of the world.
The course—structured around three core topics (communication
and media, global issues, social relationships) and any two of the
following five options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions,
health, leisure, science and technology)—approaches the acquisition of language through contextual meaning. With this focus
on the core topics and selected options, the course develops students’ receptive skills (understanding authentic written texts and
straightforward oral interactions), productive skills (communicating orally with detail and accuracy and writing texts for a variety
of audiences) and interactive skills (engaging in conversations and
demonstrating inter-cultural engagement).
IB French Higher Level (HL) I & II
(pre-advanced to advanced) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1846IB/H1847IB
Grade level 11-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: IB French SL I, II or teacher recommendation.
As with the IB French SL courses, this course is structured
around three core topics (communication and media, global
issues, social relationships) and any two of the following five
options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure,
science and technology). In terms of receptive skills, students will
work to understand complex authentic written text, including the
study of two works of literature, and complex oral interactions. In
terms of productive skills, students will communicate orally with
detail and accuracy to explain a point of view, to relate experiences and events, and to examine ideas and concept. They will also
produce clear texts appropriately utilizing register, style, rhetorical
devices and structural elements as well as producing convincing
written arguments. In terms of interactive skills, students will
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
learn to participate in spontaneous conversations that are coherent and varied and that demonstrate inter-cultural engagement.
IB German Standard Level (SL) I & II
(intermediate low to intermediate high) . . . . . H1840IB/H1841IB
Grade level 9-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: German III or teacher recommendation.
This course focuses on language acquisition through the study
and use of a wide range of written and spoken material (from
everyday oral exchanges to literary texts) related to Germanspeaking cultures. Students develop the skills and inter-cultural
understanding required to communicate successfully in an
environment where German is spoken, thus moving beyond the
confines of the classroom to expand their awareness of the world.
The course—structured around three core topics (communication
and media, global issues, social relationships) and any two of the
following five options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions,
health, leisure, science and technology)—approaches the acquisition of language through contextual meaning. With this focus
on the core topics and selected options, the course develops students’ receptive skills (understanding authentic written texts and
straightforward oral interactions), productive skills (communicating orally with detail and accuracy and writing texts for a variety
of audiences) and interactive skills (engaging in conversations and
demonstrating inter-cultural engagement).
IB German Higher Level (HL) I & II
(pre-advanced to advanced) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1842IB/H1843IB
Grade level 11-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: IB German SL I, II or teacher recommendation.
As with the IB German SL courses, this course is structured
around three core topics (communication and media, global
issues, social relationships) and any two of the following five
options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure,
science and technology). In terms of receptive skills, students will
work to understand complex authentic written text, including the
study of two works of literature, and complex oral interactions. In
terms of productive skills, students will communicate orally with
detail and accuracy to explain a point of view, to relate experiences and events, and to examine ideas and concept. They will also
produce clear texts appropriately utilizing register, style, rhetorical
devices and structural elements as well as producing convincing
written arguments. In terms of interactive skills, students will
learn to participate in spontaneous conversations that are coherent and varied and that demonstrate inter-cultural engagement.
IB Spanish Standard Level (SL) I & II
(intermediate low to intermediate high) . . . . . H1835IB/H1836IB
Grade level 9-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Spanish III or teacher recommendation.
This course focuses on language acquisition through the study
and use of a wide range of written and spoken material (from
everyday oral exchanges to literary texts) related to Spanishspeaking cultures. Students develop the skills and inter-cultural
understanding required to communicate successfully in an
environment where Spanish is spoken, thus moving beyond the
confines of the classroom to expand their awareness of the world.
The course—structured around three core topics (communication
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
29
and media, global issues, social relationships) and any two of the
following five options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions,
health, leisure, science and technology)—approaches the acquisition of language through contextual meaning. With this focus
on the core topics and selected options, the course develops students’ receptive skills (understanding authentic written texts and
straightforward oral interactions), productive skills (communicating orally with detail and accuracy and writing texts for a variety
of audiences) and interactive skills (engaging in conversations and
demonstrating inter-cultural engagement).
IB Spanish Higher Level (HL) I & II
(pre-advanced to advanced) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1837IB/H1838IB
Grade level 11-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: IB Spanish SL I, II or teacher recommendation.
As with the IB Spanish SL courses, this course is structured
around three core topics (communication and media, global
issues, social relationships) and any two of the following five
options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure,
science and technology). In terms of receptive skills, students will
work to understand complex authentic written text, including the
study of two works of literature, and complex oral interactions. In
terms of productive skills, students will communicate orally with
detail and accuracy to explain a point of view, to relate experiences and events, and to examine ideas and concept. They will also
produce clear texts appropriately utilizing register, style, rhetorical
devices and structural elements as well as producing convincing
written arguments. In terms of interactive skills, students will
learn to participate in spontaneous conversations that are coherent and varied and that demonstrate inter-cultural engagement.
IB Russian Standard Level (SL) I & II
(intermediate low to intermediate high) . . . . . . . H1848IB/H1849IB
Grade level 9-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: Russian III or teacher recommendation.
This course focuses on language acquisition through the study
and use of a wide range of written and spoken material (from
everyday oral exchanges to literary texts) related to Russianspeaking cultures. Students develop the skills and inter-cultural
understanding required to communicate successfully in an
environment where Russian is spoken, thus moving beyond the
confines of the classroom to expand their awareness of the world.
The course—structured around three core topics (communication
and media, global issues, social relationships) and any two of the
following five options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions,
health, leisure, science and technology)—approaches the acquisition of language through contextual meaning. With this focus
on the core topics and selected options, the course develops students’ receptive skills (understanding authentic written texts and
straightforward oral interactions), productive skills (communicating orally with detail and accuracy and writing texts for a variety
of audiences) and interactive skills (engaging in conversations and
demonstrating inter-cultural engagement).
IB Russian Higher Level (HL) I & II
(pre-advanced to advanced) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1850IB/H1851IB
Grade level 11-12. Four semesters.
Prerequisite: IB Russian SL I, II or teacher recommendation.
30 As with the IB Russian SL courses, this course is structured
around three core topics (communication and media, global
issues, social relationships) and any two of the following five
options (cultural diversity, customs and traditions, health, leisure,
science and technology). In terms of receptive skills, students will
work to understand complex authentic written text, including the
study of two works of literature, and complex oral interactions. In
terms of productive skills, students will communicate orally with
detail and accuracy to explain a point of view, to relate experiences and events, and to examine ideas and concept. They will also
produce clear texts appropriately utilizing register, style, rhetorical
devices and structural elements as well as producing convincing
written arguments. In terms of interactive skills, students will
learn to participate in spontaneous conversations that are coherent and varied and that demonstrate inter-cultural engagement.
IB Theory of Knowledge I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . H3811/H3812
Grade level 11–12. Three semesters.
Prerequisite: Enrollment in IB diploma program.
This one-year class will provide a forum for students to critically reflect upon their education. The goal is to help them to
become mindful learners in two important ways: first, to be able
to see the connections between the disparate fields of their six
core subjects and second, to begin to answer for themselves the
questions of epistemology.
JROTC
PE Waiver for JROTC Participation: Upon successful first
semester completion of JROTC, students will receive a ½ elective
credit. Upon successful second semester completion of JROTC,
students will receive a ½ elective and a waiver of ½ credit of their
PE requirement. Upon successful third semester completion of
JROTC, students will receive a ½ elective credit. Upon successful
fourth semester completion of JROTC, students will receive a ½
elective credit and a waiver of ½ credit of their PE requirement.
Upon successful completion of 2 years of JROTC, students will
receive 2 elective credits and a waiver of 1.0 credits of their PE
requirement. PE waivers are allowed by participation in JROTC
programs and are not contingent upon participation in summer
JROTC camps.
AFJROTC I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9752
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Provides the student interested in military academy appointments, ROTC scholarships, enlisted military service after high
school, or civilian aerospace-oriented careers with opportunities
to develop leadership and management skills, communications
techniques and instructional capabilities in the framework of a
role-playing leadership laboratory. Drill and ceremony, military
bearing, citizenship training and patriotism prepare the cadets for
participation in community service opportunities.
AFJROTC II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9754
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: JROTC I.
The student will understand and apply basic principles of
aerodynamics, propulsion and navigation as they relate to the
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
aerospace environment. Cadets assume greater responsibility
in running the corps as assistants to the staff officers during the
second year. Successful completion of the two years of Aerospace
Education entitles a student to the AFJROTC Certificate of
Training with educational and career benefits. One-half science
credit may be earned for the completion of AFJROTC II.
AFJROTC III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9756
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: JROTC I-II (recommended but not required).
Students will understand and be able to interpret the role
of the United States in international space as man expands his
research and travel to other planets. Third year cadets organize
and administer the corps through command and staff assignments. Outstanding cadet leaders receive national recognition
and possible selection for military academies or ROTC scholarships. Selected volunteers may participate in cooperative career
training program at Elmendorf Air Force Base.
AFJROTC IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9758
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: JROTC III.
A survey of the relations between nations of the world, the
elements of national power and the nature and development of
U.S. Air Force doctrine. Also included are instructional units on
the foundations of leadership, communicative skills, survival and
the obligations and opportunities of the military services.
Army JROTC I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9760
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Must be 14 by the end of 9th grade. No record of
conviction by civil court.
First year students are given introduction to leadership development, consisting of introduction to Army JROTC organization, personal hygiene, Red Cross first aid/AED/CPR certification, introduction to map reading, marksmanship safety and basic
marksmanship, U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights, unlocking
your potential, leadership and followership development and drill.
Army JROTC II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9762
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Completion of Army JROTC I.
Second year students are given added instruction in organizational skills. Intermediate marksmanship, intermediate methods
of instruction, leadership development and drill, introduction to
leadership theory, participation in service learning, team building skills, study of character values, intermediate map reading.
Recertification in first aid/CPR/AED and development of communication skills.
Army JROTC III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9764
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Completion of Army JROTC II.
in first aid/CPR/AED, exploration of careers, economics and the
financial planning process.
Army JROTC IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9766
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Completion of Army JROTC I, II, & III.
Fourth year students are given advanced leadership consisting
of conflict resolution and application of leadership principles.
Leadership Lab where fourth-year cadets are required to coordinate and organize a service learning project, practical application
of leadership in the planning and the operation of all unit staff
functions, advanced instruction in written and oral communication, recertification in first aid/CPR/AED and practical application of methods of instruction.
Naval Science/Leadership I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9768
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
An introduction to developing leadership, teamwork and high
standards of personal conduct and appearance. The subject taught
will cover six major areas: history of NJROTC, military drill, citizenship, uniforms, laws-authority-responsibility, military customs
and courtesies.
Naval Science/Leadership II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9770
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
A continuation of leadership development, war at sea, how the
U.S. Navy functions, naval strategy and tactics, maritime geography- oceanography- meteorology-astronomy and aeronautical
science.
Naval Science/Leadership III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9772
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
There is an increased emphasis on leadership responsibilities
by assuming positions of leadership as cadet officers. The subject
taught will emphasize sea power, national security, laws of the sea,
shipboard life, rules of the road, and navigation-time.
Naval Science/Leadership IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9774
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This year culminates the cadets’ leadership roles by having
them be responsible for the direction of the unit. The curriculum will emphasize ethics and morals, case studies, positions of
authority and the responsibility for others.
LANGUAGE ARTS
English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0120
Grade level 9. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Third year students are given applied leadership, consisting of
psychology of leadership, seminar in leadership and management,
seminar in leadership ethics and values, leadership and small unit
leader problems, leadership development and drill, service learning opportunities, applied methods of instruction, recertification
This full-year required course incorporates a thematic approach
with genre studies. The texts, activities, and assessments have been
designed to ensure student growth toward meeting the Common
Core State Standards in the areas of reading literature, reading
informational text, writing, speaking, listening, and language.
Students will read a variety of both world and American literature
with an emphasis on textual analysis, including drawing infer-
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
31
ences, analyzing main ideas, and distinguishing fact and opinion.
Writing, research, vocabulary, and grammar instruction are integrated in every unit.
Honors English I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0120H
Grade level 9. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Language Arts teacher recommendation required.
The Honors English I program is planned for students who
demonstrate academic ability and specific interests in an accelerated curriculum in Language Arts. The course parallels the established curriculum of English I; however, Honors English I covers
material more rapidly and includes additional selections. Students
will read and analyze the classics of world literature and focus on
academic writing techniques.
English I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0120OLS1/H0120OLS2
Grade level 9. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite:. None.
This online course incorporates an integrated approach to
the teaching of reading and writing. Students read a variety of
fiction and nonfiction world literature with an emphasis on literary analysis, including drawing inferences and analyzing main
ideas. Students are taught the writing process and write in varying
modes and for different purposes and audiences throughout the
year. Grammar and vocabulary skills are integrated throughout
each unit.
English II – World Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0122
Grade level 10. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This full-year required course incorporates an integrated
approach to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and writing to meet the Common Core State Standards. Students read a
variety of fiction and nonfiction world literature with an emphasis
on literary analysis, including drawing inferences and analyzing
main ideas; media presentations from a variety of perspectives;
and dramatic interpretations from plays and excerpts. Students
are taught writing process and write in varying modes and for
different purposes and audiences throughout the year. Grammar
and vocabulary skills are integrated throughout each unit. The
fundamentals of formal speech, both to persuade and inform, are
also important elements of this world literature course.
Honors English II – World Literature . . . . . . . . . . H0122H
Grade level 10. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Language Arts teacher recommendation required.
Honors English II is intended for students who demonstrate
academic ability and specific interests in an accelerated curriculum in Language Arts. The course parallels the established curriculum for English II; however, Honors II covers materials more
rapidly and includes additional selections. In-depth study of literary classics and academic writing, research skills, oral expression
and listening will be stressed.
English II –
World Literature Online . . . . . . . H0122OLS1/ H0122OLS2
Grade level 10. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course incorporates an integrated approach to the
32 teaching of reading and writing with a focus on world literature.
This full-year required course incorporates an integrated approach
to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and writing to meet
the Common Core State Standards. Students read a variety of fiction and nonfiction world literature with an emphasis on literary
analysis, including drawing inferences and analyzing main ideas;
media presentations from a variety of perspectives; and dramatic
interpretations from plays and excerpts. Students are taught writing process and write in varying modes and for different purposes
and audiences throughout the year. Grammar and vocabulary
skills are integrated throughout each unit. The fundamentals of
formal speech, both to persuade and inform, are also important
elements of this world literature course.
English III – US Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0124
Grade level 11. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None
English III US Literature: This full-year required course
focuses on American literature and how it has helped shape our
nation. Students will explore and study great literary works from
throughout United States’ history including Early American,
Civil War, Great Depression and Civil Rights eras. In addition to
reading a variety of rich fiction and informational texts, students
will improve their writing, critical thinking, speaking, vocabulary,
and grammar skills through lessons aligned to the Common Core
State Standards. Sharpening their skills through performance
tasks such as on demand and extended writing and formal and
informal presentations will prepare students to achieve career and
college readiness.
English III –
US Literature Online . . . . . . . . . H0124OLS1/H0124OLS2
Grade level 11. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None
English III US Literature: This full-year online required course
focuses on American literature and how it has helped shape our
nation. Students will explore and study great literary works from
throughout United States’ history including Early American,
Civil War, Great Depression and Civil Rights eras. In addition to
reading a variety of rich fiction and informational texts, students
will improve their writing, critical thinking, speaking, vocabulary,
and grammar skills through lessons aligned to the Common Core
State Standards. Sharpening their skills through performance
tasks such as on demand and extended writing and formal and
informal presentations will prepare students to achieve career and
college readiness.
English IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0126
Grade level 12. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None
English IV is a full year, 12th grade thematic course including
four units of study: Morality, Citizenship, Social Justice, and
Nature & Environment. These universal themes are intended
to engage students in the critical thinking they must practice to become active participants in their communities. The
course meets the Common Core State Standards and focuses on
American literature, including seminal U.S. political documents,
and world literature, including Shakespeare and other important
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
authors. As the culminating high school English course, the
primary writing focus is on expository and argumentative writing, including researched arguments, multimedia presentations,
and essays in the major patterns of exposition. Grammar and
vocabulary are integrated with the reading, writing, speaking and
listening content within each thematic unit in order to ensure
instruction of all standards.
English IV Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H0126OLS1/H0126OLS2
Grade level 12. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None
English IV is a full year, 12th grade thematic online course
including four units of study: Morality, Citizenship, Social
Justice, and Nature & Environment. These universal themes are
intended to engage students in the critical thinking they must
practice to become active participants in their communities. The
course meets the Common Core State Standards and focuses on
American literature, including seminal U.S. political documents,
and world literature, including Shakespeare and other important
authors. As the culminating high school English course, the primary writing focus is on expository and argumentative writing,
including researched arguments, multimedia presentations,
and essays in the major patterns of exposition. Grammar and
vocabulary are integrated with the reading, writing, speaking and
listening content within each thematic unit in order to ensure
instruction of all standards.
English 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0102SP
Grade level 9. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
Modified curriculum for English I as required by students’ IEP.
English 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0012LS1
Grade level 9–12. Required. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course teaches functional skills in the areas of listening,
speaking, reading and writing moving toward increased independence. Alternate curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 1
class as required by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
ations. This course offers a thematic approach with genre studies.
Modified curriculum for English I, as required by students’ IEP.
English 9–12 II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0103SP
Grade level 10. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course incorporates an integrated approach to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and writing with a focus on
world literature. World authors representing various literary
genres, themes and areas will be used as a basis for understanding
and appreciating the world at large. Students will participate in
both oral and written presentations. Composition will emphasize
a structured study of expressive and expository writing using a
writing process. Modified curriculum for English II, as required
by students’ IEP.
English 9–12 III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0104SP
Grade level 11 Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This full-year course incorporates an integrated approach to
exploring American and world literature through numerous literary works, both classic and contemporary, with a focus on identified modes of writing in support of quarterly themes. Students
will engage in critical readings, written and spoken responses,
and creative and technical projects using print and web 2.0 tools.
The following themes provide a framework for curriculum that
promote challenge and accessibility while being relevant: Moral
Ambiguity: Good and Evil, Nature: Connections and Conflicts,
Justice: Social and Economic, and Expression: Voice and Vision.
Students will complete a research paper during the second semester. This course fulfills the writing requirement for graduation.
Modified curriculum for English 11, as required by students’ IEP.
English 9–12 IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0105SP
Grade level 12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
Grade level 9–12. Required. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed for students in grade 12 who are on
an IEP and need to develop or improve strategies and skills for
reading and writing technical materials, to learn to read and write
more efficiently in all content areas and to learn how to access and
organize information for successful school-to-career experiences.
Modified curriculum for English 12, as required by students’ IEP.
English 9–12 I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0102SP
Advanced Placement Literature
and Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0146
English 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0012LS2
This course teaches functional skills in the areas of listening,
speaking, reading and writing moving toward increased independence. Alternate curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 1
class as required by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
Grade level 9. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This full-year required course incorporates an integrated
approach to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and
writing. Students are instructed in a process approach to reading
and writing. Individual and group verbal activities are included
to help students work effectively with others. Students practice
reading a variety of types of fiction and nonfiction literature and
writing for different purposes and audiences. Emphasis is on
improving reading and writing skills in practical and creative situNCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
LANGUAGE ARTS
ELECTIVES
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Two semesters of this course will fulfill the composition credit
required for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
Advanced Placement Literature and Composition, a college-level course, provides an in-depth study of several major literary works and prepares students for the AP Exam in Literature
and Composition, a means of obtaining advanced placement in
English at most colleges. Writing is an integral part of the course
and exam, and writing assignments focus on the critical analysis
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
33
of literature and include expository, analytical, and argumentative
essays. Reading in this course is both wide and deep, building
upon the reading done in previous English courses. Students read
works from several genres, including poetry and drama, and periods, from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century.
Advanced Placement Literature
and Composition Online . . . . . . H0146OLS1/H0146OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Two semesters of this course will fulfill the composition credit
required for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Advanced Placement Literature and
Composition, a college level course, provides an in-depth study
of several major literary works and prepares students for the
AP Exam in Literature and Composition, a means of obtaining
advanced placement in English at most colleges. Writing is an
integral part of the course and exam, and writing assignments
focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository,
analytical, and argumentative essays. Reading in this course is
both wide and deep, building upon the reading done in previous
English courses. Students read works from several genres, including poetry and drama, and periods, from the sixteenth to the
twenty-first century.
Advanced Placement Language
and Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0245
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Two semesters of this course will fulfill the composition credit
required for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
Advanced Placement Language and Composition is a college-level course that assists students in becoming skilled readers
of literature and writers who compose for a variety of purposes.
This course also prepares students for the AP Exam in Language
and Composition, a means of obtaining advanced placement in
English at most colleges. An intensive analysis of literature will
develop students’ awareness of the use of language and influence
their writing.
Advanced Placement Language
and Composition Online . . . . . . H0245OLS1/H0245OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Two semesters of this course will fulfill the composition credit
required for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Advanced Placement Language and
Composition is a college level course that assists students in
becoming skilled readers of literature and writers who compose
for a variety of purposes. This course also prepares students for the
AP Exam in Language and Composition, a means of obtaining
advanced placement in English at most colleges. An intensive
analysis of literature will develop students’ awareness of the use of
language and influence their writing.
Bible As Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0395
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course acquaints students of all beliefs with the history,
34 culture, and literature of the Bible. Students will read selections
from the Old Testament that include history, poetry, prophecy, law, and tales. Readings from the New Testament and the
Apocrypha will be included as time permits. Additionally, students will read contemporary literature making references to
Biblical stories and themes. This course will require extensive
reading, writing and discussion.
Children’s Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0450
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Students will explore the history of children’s literature and
critically analyze the changes overtime through awards, popular trends, and style. Students are expected to develop skills in
recognizing the following in children’s literature: genre traits,
characteristics of classics, art forms and illustration, varied formats, literature devices and writer’s craft. This course may also
include the study and practical application of those skills through
performances, projects, and daily written response. Students will
also learn to discern and identify various child developmental
stages and relate to specific genre and/or literature. A variety of
genres and various novels (chapter books), short stories, folk
tales, picture books and poems will be read, discussed and used
for models of writing. Children’s literature websites and author
websites will be online texts that contribute to the richness of this
course. Performance assessments may include but are not limited
to the creation of podcasts, contributions to class blogs or wikis,
and time spent reading to children.
Classical Mythology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0435
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Classical Mythology traces the human quest to understand our
world and mankind’s place in the universe through the exploration of Greek and Roman myths. Students will read ancient texts,
plays, epics, poetry and modern literature containing allusions
to classical mythology. Topics of study will include the historical
and theoretical basis of myths and archetypes, including heroes,
monsters, quests, and cautionary tales. The course serves as a historical foundation for ideas and attitudes of contemporary culture
and explores how references to mythology permeate our modern
world through art, literature and music. Classical Mythology will
include extensive reading, discussion, creative and analytical writing, and oral presentations.
Contemporary Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0411
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Contemporary Literature is a study of representative works
of literature from the last quarter of the twentieth century to the
present. Coursework will include the reading and analysis of multiple contemporary works or genres (e.g. poetry and drama, fiction and nonfiction, print and non-print media) that are teacher
and student selected. Students will also explore the biographical
background, influences and styles of various authors and their
contributions to the changing social and intellectual cultures in
America. In addition to the reading and discussion of multiple
works, students will also write extensively.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Composition, Intermediate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0221
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Intermediate Composition requires students to read and write
around complex literary and informational texts. Students will
compose pieces based on three genres: writing to argue, inform/
explain, and narrate (convey experiences). Students conduct
short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused
questions. Students will learn to integrate and synthesize multiple
print and digital sources. Emphasis will be on identifying and
developing the skills of flexibility, concentration, and fluency in
order to produce quality on-demand and extended compositions.
Intentional focus will be on supporting students on their way to
creating coherent and well-structured texts that contain elements
of structure, detail, and craft to accomplish their communicative
purposes.
Composition, Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0222
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Advanced Composition requires students to read and write
around complex literary and informational texts. Students will
compose texts based on three genres: writing to argue, inform/
explain, and narrate (convey experiences). Students build and
refine research, rhetorical, stylistic, and editing skills. An emphasis is placed on writing for on-demand situations, enhancing the
overall rhetorical power and communicative purposes of texts,
and writing routinely over extended time frames. Skills previously
developed in Intermediate Composition will be directly transferable as students in Advanced Composition will be expected to
independently produce rhetorically powerful, high-quality, firstdraft texts under tight deadlines, as well as independently revisit
and revise writing over multiple drafts
Debate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0520
Grade level 9–12. One semester: This course is offered as English
elective credit for the first semester and general elective credit for
succeeding semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Debate offers students instruction in persuasive techniques one
quarter and formal debate the other quarter. While learning persuasive techniques students study argumentation, rhetoric, and
practical applications such as marketing and advertisement. These
skills may be applied in projects such as mock trials, congressional hearings, newscasts, and various technical presentations. For
formal debate, students will learn about Lincoln-Douglas, policy,
crossfire, or parliamentary debate and participate in a debate
representing either the affirmative or negative side of a case after
preparing for both sides.
movies, podcasts, blogs, electronic surveys, and websites. Essays,
articles, and literature selections are integrated throughout the
unit plans. A critical review of websites (content and design) is
another component of this class, as well as an examination of the
ethical responsibilities of electronic publishers.
Film As Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0396
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Students will develop a critical appreciation of film as a literary genre while exploring how films communicate and affect the
viewer and society. Movies from various genres and time periods
will be viewed and analyzed using conventional literary devices
such as theme, plot, diction, character, mood, setting, and style.
Students will respond to and analyze films through extensive writing, discussion, and projects, including written essays, learning
logs, storyboards, and film writing and production. In addition,
students will build an understanding of visual literacy and the
history of film as a literary genre.
Gothic Literature Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0372OL
Grade level 9–12. One Semester.
Prerequisite: None
From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This online course
will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and
demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader,
a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the
influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference
between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented.
By the time students have completed this course, they will have
gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex
nature of dark fiction.
Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0415
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Humanities students study the nature of being human in a
series of four units: human rights and cultures, art history, innovative ideas, and modes of self-expression. Students participate in
simulations, art and music interpretations, technology projects,
and discussions about human ideas and current world events.
Contributions to humanity are addressed as a culminating event
for the class. This course requires many short reading selections,
written responses and research, performances, and presentations.
Journalism 1: Theory and Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . H0244
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
This course meets the composition requirement for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
The curriculum supports a venue for students to explore and
apply knowledge of digital tools and related resources as a means
for increased media literacy, written expression and publishing.
Students will practice the process and art of composition and then
transform select pieces into one of many electronic forms, such as
Journalism 1 is a reading and writing course for highly motivated students. This course will explore and practice various
writing styles used in a journalism career. Emphasis will be placed
on grammar, usage and style according to the AP Stylebook.
Proofreading and editing skills will be practiced. The class will
develop research, interviewing and documentation skills used
in creating well-written, balanced stories. Readings will include
selected models of journalistic writing, biographies and historically significant publications. Writing may include, but is not
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Digital Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0252
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
This course fulfills the composition requirement for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
35
limited to analysis, news, feature, editorial and sports writing.
Students will have opportunities to submit pieces for publication.
psychological, societal and political organization. Students will
write in various modes using multimedia tools.
Journalism 2: Writing for Publication . . . . . . . . . . H0761
Shakespeare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0460
Grade level 10–12. One semester: This course is offered as English
credit for the first semester and elective credit for succeeding
semesters.
Prerequisite: Completion of Journalism 1 with a grade of “B” or
better and/or instructor’s permission.
Journalism 2 is an advanced reading and writing course for
highly motivated students who wish to continue learning and
practicing journalistic writing. This course is designed to produce
and manage school-wide publications. Students will continue to
improve writing and editing skills learned in Journalism 1 as they
study graphics, layout, web design, desktop publishing and new
trends in journalistic publishing. Students will practice a variety
of journalism skills in this real-world setting such as advertising
sales, layout and design, photography composition, managerial
and editorial skills, investigative reporting and legal ethics and
responsibilities. Readings will include models of journalistic writing, biographies and significant current events and publications.
Grammar, usage, proofreading and editing skills will be emphasized. Assignments will be prepared in AP Stylebook format for
publication. The ability to work responsibly and individually to
meet deadlines is essential and expected. Teamwork is expected.
Students will write in different reporting styles such as news, feature, sports and editorial writing.
Reading 9–12 AC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0015LS
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course provides instruction in functional reading skills
to teach independence in the community. Alternate curriculum
for students enrolled in a Life Skills class as required by their IEP.
English credit up to two times, and unlimited for general elective.
Science Fiction and Fantasy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0455
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Science Fiction and Fantasy is a course that explores the outer
limits of the imagination and the far-reaching possibilities for
the human race and technology through literature. Students will
read and discuss classic as well as contemporary novels and short
stories in these genres. This course emphasizes science fiction and
fantasy genres as vehicles for social criticism and stimulation of
thought about technological development and psychological,
societal and political organization. Students will write in various
modes using multimedia tools.
Science Fiction & Fantasy Online . . . . . . . . . . . H0455OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Science Fiction and Fantasy is an online course that explores
the outer limits of the imagination and the far-reaching possibilities for the human race and technology through literature.
Students will read and discuss classic as well as contemporary
novels and short stories in these genres. This course emphasizes
science fiction and fantasy genres as vehicles for social criticism
and stimulation of thought about technological development and
36 Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course illuminates selected works of Shakespeare and
provides an introduction to the Elizabethan era. When you read
Shakespeare do you think it’s all “Greek to me”? Then don’t
worry; you’re already quoting him (Julius Caesar, III). This course
is a fun, yes fun, introduction to Shakespeare, his work, his times,
and his continuing impact. Students actively engage in producing Shakespeare’s works and creative responses to Shakespeare’s
works. They may write (journals, essays, blogs); discuss/seminar
(in small groups and large, online or in person); recite (sonnets,
speeches); perform (scenes, acts, plays); create (electronic magazines/newspapers, web pages, original scripts and/or poems).
The goal is to help students learn to enjoy Shakespeare (or any
challenging literature) as they learn the skills of critical reading,
listening and writing.
Sports & Mystery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0461
Grade level 11–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This semester course is a rigorous examination of the Sports
and Mystery literary genres. Sports are a catalyst for cultural
change while mysteries require critical thinking and deductive
reasoning. Together, they will be studied as lenses to reveal human
character and values. Selections will incorporate contemporary
and classic novels, short stories, magazine articles, poetry, film,
and other media. Along with reading and discussion, students will
write extensively, both analytically and creatively. Ultimately, this
course explores the complex roles sports literature and mysteries
play in the world of literature.
Strategic Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9686
Grade levels 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is offered as English elective credit for the first
semester and general elective credit for succeeding semesters.
This course fulfills the composition requirement for graduation.
Strategic Writing is designed to address the literacy needs of
students who want to achieve greater writing success in high
school and beyond. Assessment data will identify areas for skill
and strategy development to allow teachers to individualize and
differentiate instruction. Students will write daily to hone skills
and develop fluency. Instruction will focus on the writing process,
including pre-writing, drafting, revision, and editing. Student will
write in various genres and styles; analyze and improve sentence,
paragraph, and essay structure; and work on proper grammar,
spelling, and punctuation. They will read regularly and use technology tools to support the writing process.
Technical Writing in the 21st Century . . . . . . . . . . H0250
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
This course meets the composition requirement for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
This writing course rigorously explores technical writing by
studying the conventions and formats of the genre. Students will
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
learn to write more clearly, concisely, and credibly. There will
be a review of grammar and punctuation, as well as the rules for
sentence construction and document organization. Students will
produce products that are practical, user-friendly, client-driven,
and professional. The writing will be business-oriented and reflective of real world usage.
Teen Issues in Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0375
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Teen Issues in Literature addresses the concerns and curiosities
of teenagers through contemporary literature, media literacy and
current events. Various modes of writing are addressed as response
to literature, experience and group discussion. Students research
and synthesize information on topics such as drug and alcohol
abuse, relationships and self-image to form their own opinions;
they explore and discuss issues that are experienced by other teens
across time, location and culture.
World Mythology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0436
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
World Mythology examines the common elements found
in myths from a variety of cultures, including the Middle East,
Egypt, Africa, Asia, Northern Europe, and the Americas. Students
will read ancient texts, plays, epics, poetry and contemporary literature containing allusions to world myths. Topics of study will
include the historical and theoretical basis of myths and archetypes, including creation, heroes, monsters, tricksters, and quests.
World Mythology will include extensive reading, discussion,
creative and analytical writing, and oral presentations.
World Mythology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0436OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. World Mythology examines the common elements found in myths from a variety of cultures, including the Middle East, Egypt, Africa, Asia, Northern Europe, and
the Americas. Students will read ancient texts, plays, epics, poetry
and contemporary literature containing allusions to world myths.
Topics of study will include the historical and theoretical basis
of myths and archetypes, including creation, heroes, monsters,
tricksters, and quests. World Mythology will include extensive
reading, discussion, creative and analytical writing.
King Career Center academic credit
Advertising, Art and Design 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . H8422
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Core academic credits: ½ Language Arts.
Advertising, Art & Design 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8423
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Advertising, Art & Design 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Language Arts.
Advertising, Art & Design is designed for the student interested in acquiring entry-level skills in the commercial art field. In
the first semester, students are introduced to typography, advertising approaches, color and design theory, illustration, magazine
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
and packaging layout and design, marketing, newspaper layout,
symbols and logo design. Students are also assigned computer
production jobs to complete within the working parameters of
time and standards of quality. In the second semester, students
receive an in-depth study of practices common to a fine art and
an advertising design studio. Students develop advanced layout
and computer graphic skills using Adobe InDesign, iMovie,
Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator programs. All students
will complete a portfolio of assigned projects which demonstrate
a mastery of basic entry skills in one of the following areas: game
design, illustration, advertising, marketing, computer graphics
and desktop publishing, architectural design, and industrial
design using 2D and 3D software. Professionalism is emphasized
every day.
Job entry opportunities:
Interior design, Advertising, Product design, Fine art, Fashion
design, Transportation design, Furniture design, Cartoon illustration, Landscape design, Movie making, Airbrush, Architecture,
Package design, Illustration, Desktop publishing, Art direction.
Career & Work
Readiness KCC . . . . . . . . H0012SSP/H3020SP/H9805SP
Grade level 10-12. Student must have an IEP.
Core credits: ½ Language Arts, ½ Social Studies Elective.
May be repeated with instructor’s permission.
The Work Readiness Program is for students with Individual
Education Plans (IEP) who are ready to begin the process of transition from school to work. Being “work ready” requires preparation, practice, exploration, and work experience in order to be
successful in reaching their employment and vocational goals.
Students have an opportunity for a Formal Vocational Assessment
to help determine their interests and aptitudes. Students will
complete a portfolio with resumé, writing samples, and other
documents necessary for job search, training, scholarships and
future transitional planning.
Students will interview for appropriate placement. This class
is designed to develop an Individual Employment Plan, prepare
to become competitively employed, or seek and apply for training
through college, vocational training, apprenticeship, or on-thejob training programs. Students can achieve basic certifications to
help them obtain employment. Examples include but are not limited to: the Municipality of Anchorage Food Workers card, basic
safety skills and customer service training. Students will become
familiarized with resources and agencies in the community such
as DVR and the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce
Development that can assist them toward obtaining independent
living skills
Job entry opportunities.
Entry level positions in many types of businesses.
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8095
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Economics and ½ Language Arts and
1.0 Elective
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8096
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
37
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Entrepreneurship &
Enterprise 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Economics and ½ Language Arts and
1.0 Elective
Students will learn and experience business operations through
a hands-on and problem-based curriculum. The focus in the first
semester class will be on entrepreneurship; students will work in
teams to develop, plan, and sell a product or service at KCC.
Students will learn how fields such as accounting, finance and
marketing fit together in a functioning business. Personal ethics,
business planning, economics, finance, accounting basics, communications, marketing, corporate responsibility and technical
writing will be integrated into the course. By the end of the first
quarter, students will liquidate their businesses, and issue an
annual report and letter to shareholders. They will also produce
balance sheets, cash flow statements and income statements. The
class will then plan a new KCC store that will allow students to
further refine their skills on a larger scale.
Students will hone their portfolios which will demonstrate
proficiency in skills considered essential by the business industry.
The Anchorage Chamber of Commerce will issue an “endorsement” to students who have successfully met its portfolio requirement. Students in the second semester will develop a business
project. This will focus on project management and facilitation,
general business concepts, contracts, technical writing, accounting basics, and project/product presentations. Utilizing industry
partners, students will provide real world solutions to business
problems.
Film, Audio & Video Production 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . H8855
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Core academic credit: ½ Language Arts.
Film, Audio & Video Production 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . H8856
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Film, Audio & Video
Production 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Language Arts.
The Film, Audio & Video Production class offers all the skills
and knowledge you need to launch a successful career in film,
radio, video or television. Students complete radio, film and video
projects while learning to work as part of a production team. The
curriculum includes individual and multidisciplinary assignments
geared to developing both creative and technical proficiency.
Large studios and modern production equipment support these
goals, enabling students to produce high-quality work. A comprehensive and balanced approach to study includes opportunities
to produce, write, direct, shoot and edit on numerous projects.
There’s a strong commitment to postproduction, and students
gain practical experience on a variety of video and audio workstations. All classes begin with writing assignments and continue
with more writing, reading and oral presentations in front of a
camera or microphone.
To earn the ½ credit of language arts students will be expected
to do outside reporting, Internet research and writing assignments. Because writing and reading are an integral part of this
class, all assignments are directly related to the English Language
38 Arts Common Core State Standards. Students should be prepared to read and write on various technical and related media
assignments.
Job entry opportunities:
TV producer & director, camera operator, video editor, special effects designer, tape operator, disc jockey, record producer,
recording engineer, sound technician, radio producer, radio board
operator, movie production crew member, movie production
assistant, screenwriter, camera or sound operator, actor.
Visual Media and Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . H8513
Grade Level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Language Arts and 1.0 Elective.
Visual Media and Communication is a combined visual arts,
digital media, and communication course designed to cohesively
integrate content and context across multiple platforms, such as
print, web, video, audio, and connective (social) media. Students
will focus on communication strategies using original content,
branding, storytelling, advertising, digital identity, and more.
Students will learn to create a unified visual message for a company or individual that is holistically developed and produced across
multiple platforms.
MATHEMATICS
Algebra A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1345
Grade level 9–11. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “D” or better in 8th grade math.
2. A grade of “D” or better in Pre-Algebra.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Algebra A is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of instructor or math department chairperson. The student can NOT have
earned credit for the first semester of Algebra I, the first semester
of Survey of Algebra, or any higher level math class.
This course reviews and extends problem solving, data analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers. The course covers work
with data, linear equations and functions, graphing linear equations, solving linear equations and inequalities, radicals, connects
algebra with geometry and uses algebra in appropriate related
applications. This course is the equivalent of the first semester of
an Algebra 1 course.
Algebra A Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H1345OLS1/ H1345OLS2
Grade level 9–11. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “D” or better in 8th grade math.
2. A grade of “D” or better in Pre-Algebra.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The student can NOT have earned credit for the first semester of Algebra I, the first semester of Survey of Algebra, or any
higher level math class. The prerequisite for the second semester
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
of Algebra A is the successful completion of the first semester or
consent of instructor or math department chairperson.
This online course reviews and extends problem solving, data
analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers. The course covers work
with data, linear equations and functions, graphing linear equations, solving linear equations and inequalities, radicals, connects
algebra with geometry and uses algebra in appropriate related
applications. This course is the equivalent of the first semester of
an Algebra 1 course.
Algebra A 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1345SP
Grade level 9–11. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP
This course reviews and extends problem solving, data analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer) the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers. The course covers work
with data, linear equations and functions, graphing linear equations, solving linear equations and inequalities, radicals, connects
algebra with geometry and uses algebra in appropriate related
applications. This course is the equivalent of the first semester of
an Algebra 1 course. Modified curriculum for Algebra as required
by student’s IEP.
Algebra B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1347
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “D” or better for second semester of Algebra A.
2. A grade of “D” or better for the first semester of Algebra I.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Algebra B is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of instructor or math department chairperson. The student can NOT have
earned credit for the second semester of Algebra I, the second
semester of Survey of Algebra, or any higher level math class.
This course reviews and extends problem solving, data analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers and linear equations,
graphing linear equations in a variety of forms and work with
data, equations and functions. The course will cover systems of
linear equations, quadratic functions, exponential functions,
polynomial functions, rational functions and discrete math using
appropriate related applications. This course is the equivalent of
the second semester of an Algebra I course.
Algebra B Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H1347OLS1/ H1347OLS2
Grade level 10–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “D” or better for the second both semester of Algebra A.
2. A grade of “D” or better for the first semester of Algebra I.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The student can NOT have earned credit for the second semes-
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
ter of Algebra I, the second semester of Survey of Algebra, or any
higher level math class. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Algebra B is the successful completion of the first semester or
consent of instructor or math department chairperson.
This online course reviews and extends problem solving, data
analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers and linear equations,
graphing linear equations in a variety of forms and work with
data, equations and functions. The course will cover systems of
linear equations, quadratic functions, exponential functions,
polynomial functions, rational functions and discrete math using
appropriate related applications. This course is the equivalent of
the second semester of an Algebra I course.
Algebra B 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1347SP
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP
This course reviews and extends problem solving, data analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers and linear equations,
graphing linear equations in a variety of forms and work with
data, equations and functions. The course will cover systems of
linear equations, quadratic functions, exponential functions,
polynomial functions, rational functions and discrete math using
appropriate related applications. This course is the equivalent of
the second semester of an Algebra I course.
Algebra Readiness Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1344OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: This online course can not be taken by students who
have successfully completed Pre-Algebra, Survey of Algebra or
Algebra A or B, or Algebra I or any higher level math course.
This online course is designed to prepare students for success
in an algebra course. The emphasis will be on continued development of pattern recognition, computational skills, elementary
algebra topics, and the use of technology.
Algebra I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1352
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “C” or better in 8th grade math.
2. A grade of “C” or better in Pre-Algebra.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Algebra I is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of instructor
or math department chairperson. Students who have successfully
completed Algebra B or Survey of Algebra can NOT take Algebra I.
The course reviews and extends problem solving, data analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers, expressing quantitative statements in the language of algebra, solving equations
and inequalities, polynomials, the use of rational expressions in
equations, coordinate graphing, irrational numbers, solution of
quadratic equations and related applications.
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
39
To receive high school credit for this course being taken in
Middle School, the student must earn a grade of C or better.
From Credit by Choice, revised 10/6/10.
Algebra I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1352OLS1/ H1352OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “C” or better in 8th grade math.
2. A grade of “C” or better in Pre-Algebra.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Algebra I is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of instructor
or math department chairperson. Students who have successfully
completed Algebra B or Survey of Algebra can NOT take Algebra I.
This online course reviews and extends problem solving, data
analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers, expressing quantitative statements in the language of algebra, solving equations
and inequalities, polynomials, the use of rational expressions in
equations, coordinate graphing, irrational numbers, solution of
quadratic equations and related applications.
Algebra II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1377
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra I and Geometry
or consent of previous mathematics instructor and/or math
department chairperson. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Algebra II is the successful completion of the first semester or
consent of instructor and/or math department chairperson.
This course includes problem solving, data analysis, the use of
technology (i.e., graphing calculator, computer), basic operations
with polynomials, solving equations and inequalities, sequences
and series, relations and functions, systems of equations in two
and three variables, understanding and operations with matrices,
irrational and complex numbers through the solution of quadratic functions and polynomial functions of higher than first degree,
use and evaluation of the Euler number, and an introduction to
logarithms.
To receive high school credit for this course being taken in
Middle School, the student must earn a grade of C or better.
From Credit by Choice, revised 10/6/10.
Algebra II Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H1377OLS1/ H1377OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra I and Geometry
or consent of previous mathematics instructor and/or math
department chairperson. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Algebra II is the successful completion of the first semester or
consent of instructor and/or math department chairperson.
This online course includes problem solving, data analysis,
the use of technology (i.e., graphing calculator, computer), basic
operations with polynomials, solving equations and inequalities,
sequences and series, relations and functions, systems of equations
in two and three variables, use of and operations on matrices, irrational and complex numbers through the solution of quadratic
functions and polynomial functions of higher than first degree,
40 use and evaluation of the Euler number, and an introduction to
logarithms.
Advanced Algebra, Statistics,
Trigonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1660
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra II or consent of
previous math instructor or math department chairperson. The
second semester prerequisite for this course is the successful
completion of the first semester or consent of instructor or math
dept. chairperson.
This course includes problem solving, data analysis, the use
of technology (graphing calculator, computer), transformations
of functions and data, power, exponential and logarithmic
functions, trigonometric functions, graphs of circular functions,
probability and simulation, sequences, series and combinations,
polynomial functions, binomial and normal distributions, matrices, and trigonometry.
Advanced Placement Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1701
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisites: First semester enrollment requires a grade of “B”
or better in Algebra II. The prerequisite for the second semester
of AP Statistics is the successful completion (“C” or better) of the
first semester or the consent of the instructor or math department
chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful. The
purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions
from data. Students will be expected to be able to use appropriate
technology to interpret data and will be expected to be able to
communicate their results in an understandable form.
Advanced Placement
Statistics Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H1701OLS1/H1701OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires a grade of “B” or
better in Algebra II. The prerequisite for the second semester of
AP Statistics is the successful completion (“C” or better) of the
first semester or the consent of the instructor or math department
chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student
is expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
The purpose of this online course is to introduce students to the
major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing
conclusions from data. Students will be expected to be able to use
appropriate technology to interpret data and will be expected to
be able to communicate their results in an understandable form.
Advanced Placement Calculus AB . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1706
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: “B” or better in Pre-Calculus and Algebra II
or consent of the previous mathematics instructor or math
department chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
This course includes the study of functions and graphs, deriva-
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
tives and their application, analytic geometry, limits and continuity and includes the use of current technology.
Advanced Placement
Calculus AB Online . . . . . . . . . . H1706OLS1/H1706OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: “B” or better in Pre-Calculus and Algebra II
or consent of the previous mathematics instructor or math
department chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student
is expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
This online course includes the study of functions and graphs,
derivatives and their application, analytic geometry, limits and
continuity and includes the use of current technology.
Advanced Placement Calculus BC . . . . . . . . . . . . H1709
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: “B” or better in AP Calculus AB; a 3 or higher on the
AP Calc AB test; or consent of the Calculus BC instructor or math
department chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
This course includes the study of functions and graphs,
derivatives and their application, analytical geometry, limits
and continuity, integrals, parametric equations, polar functions
and vector analysis. Additional techniques and applications for
differentiation and integration will be developed. Polynomial
approximations will be explored through the Maclaurin and
Taylor Series. Convergence and divergence of sequences and series
will be investigated. Appropriate technology will be incorporated
throughout the course.
AP Calculus BC Online . . . . . . . H1709OLS1/H1709OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: “B” or better in AP Calculus AB; a 3 or higher on the
AP Calc AB test; or consent of the Calculus BC instructor or math
department chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this online course is introductory college level material. The
student is expected to meet this college level workload to be successful. This course includes the study of functions and graphs,
derivatives and their application, analytical geometry, limits
and continuity, integrals, parametric equations, polar functions
and vector analysis. Additional techniques and applications for
differentiation and integration will be developed. Polynomial
approximations will be explored through the Maclaurin and
Taylor Series. Convergence and divergence of sequences and series
will be investigated. Appropriate technology will be incorporated
throughout the course.
Advanced Placement Calculus C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1708
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB or simultaneous enrollment in
second semester AP Calculus AB with a grade of A or B, or consent
of Calculus C instructor.
This semester course is designed to enhance a student’s understanding of functions, graphs, limits, derivatives and integrals
by including the study of parametric equation, polar functions
and vector analysis. Additional techniques and applications for
differentiation and integration will be developed. Polynomial
approximations will be explored through the Maclaurin and Taylor
Series. Convergence and divergence of sequences and series will be
determined using geometric series and harmonic series, alternating series, p-series, the integral test and the ratio test. Appropriate
technology will be incorporated throughout the course.
Analyzing and Displaying Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1680
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisites: The successful completion of both semesters of
Algebra B, Algebra I or Survey of Algebra and both semesters of a
Geometry course or consent of math department chair person. The
student can NOT have received a “C” or better in Algebra II or any
higher level math course.
In this course, the student will generate and use data sets to
communicate information, to analyze and communicate the
meaning of data sets and use statistical methods to test conjectures. Problem solving and technology (graphing calculator
and computer) will be incorporated and probability will spiral
throughout the course. Students will design and conduct a study,
gather the data, analyze the results and make a presentation incorporating technology.
Basic Math Skills 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1021SP
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP
This course is designed for the student who needs individualized concentrated work in specific math skills as determined by
the IEP. Assessments will be administered to determine the deficient skill area or areas. The course content will be determined by
the teacher for each individual student and will be based on the
deficient areas. Modified curriculum for Basic Math, as required
by students’ IEP. This course is repeatable.
Basic Math Skills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1021
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: This course can NOT be taken by any student who
has successfully completed Pre-Algebra with a “C” or better or any
higher math course; or consent of math department chairperson.
This course is designed for the student who needs remedial
work in basic math skills. This course covers addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions and
decimals, estimation, percents, solution of word problems and
calculator applications.
Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1502
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra I or consent of
previous mathematics instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Geometry is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of
instructor or math department chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
This course covers the study of plane and three dimensional
geometry with emphasis on clarity and precision of language as
well as the logical development of geometric principles in deductive reasoning and proof. Additionally, students work with points,
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
41
lines, planes, angles, congruent triangles, circles, polygons, and
transformations.
To receive high school credit for this course being taken in
Middle School, the student must earn a grade of C or better.
From Credit by Choice, revised 10/6/10.
probability, statistics, logical reasoning and discrete math. It is
recommended for students with some algebra and geometry credit, who wish to strengthen and improve their math knowledge in
these areas and apply it to career situations.
Geometry Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H1502OLS1/ H1502OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra I or consent of
previous mathematics instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Geometry is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of
instructor or math department chairperson.
This online course covers the study of plane and three dimensional geometry with emphasis on clarity and precision of language as well as the logical development of geometric principles in
deductive reasoning and proof. Additionally, students work with
points, lines, planes, angles, congruent triangles, circles, polygons
and transformations.
Informal Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1504
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Survey of Algebra or
Algebra A/B or minimal competency in Algebra I (credit earned) and
consent of previous mathematics instructor or math department
chairperson. This course can NOT be taken by anyone who has
earned credit for Geometry or any higher level math course. The
prerequisite for the second semester of Informal Geometry is
the successful completion of the first semester or consent of
instructor or math department chairperson.
This course emphasizes concrete experiences and applications
and an inductive/intuitive approach to develop geometric concepts. Priority is on proper vocabulary for the logical unraveling
of developmental principles. Topics include classifications of,
properties of, and relationships between geometric objects. These
objects include points, lines, planes, angles, similar and congruent
triangles, circles, polygons, and polyhedrons. Manual and computer-based measurement, transformations, and constructions of
these objects is also included.
Informal Geometry 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1504SP
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP
This course uses an inductive/intuitive approach to developing
geometric concepts with emphasis on concrete experiences and
applications. The proper vocabulary for the logical procedure
of developmental principles will be stressed. Topics will include
classifications of, properties of and relationships between points,
lines, planes, angles, similar and congruent triangles, circles,
polygons and polyhedrons; measurement; transformations and
constructions.
Integrated Math . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1360
Grade 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisites: The student must have satisfied the Algebra
requirement and passed a Geometry course or consent of the
math department chairperson. The student can NOT have earned
any credit for second semester Algebra II or any higher level math
course.
This course will integrate Algebra 1 and Geometry topics and
present them in the context of applications. It will also include
42 Math 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1170LS1
This course covers addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division of whole numbers, fractions and decimals, estimation,
percents, solution of word problems and calculator applications
that apply to everyday living skills. This is an alternate math
curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 1 class who are
non-diploma track on Alternate Assessment as required by their
IEP. This course is repeatable.
Math 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1170LS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course covers addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division of whole numbers, fractions and decimals, estimation,
percents, solution of word problems and calculator applications
that apply to everyday living skills. This is an alternate curriculum
for students enrolled in a Life Skills 2 class who are non-diploma track on Alternate Assessment as required by their IEP. This
course is repeatable.
Math Skills Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1045
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Consent of previous instructor or math department
chairperson.
This course is designed for the student who needs individualized concentrated work in specific math skills. A diagnostic test
will be administered to determine the deficient skill area or areas.
The course content will be determined by the teacher for each
individual student and will be based on the deficient areas.
Pre-Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1031
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: A knowledge of the basic computational skills. This
course can NOT be taken by students who have successfully
completed Survey of Algebra or Algebra A or B, or Algebra I or any
higher level math course. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Pre-Algebra is successful completion of the first semester or
consent of instructor or math department chairperson.
This course is designed to prepare students for success in an
algebra course. The emphasis will be on continued development
of pattern recognition, computational skills, elementary algebra
topics, geometric relationships, problems solving and the use of
technology.
Pre-Algebra 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1030SP
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed to prepare students for success in an
algebra course. The emphasis will be on continued development
of pattern recognition, computational skills, elementary algebra
topics, geometric relationships, problems solving and the use of
technology. Modified curriculum for Pre-Algebra, as required by
students’ IEP.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Pre-Calculus with Trigonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1662
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisites: A grade of “B” or better in Geometry and Algebra
II or permission of previous mathematics instructor or math
department chairperson. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Pre-Calculus with Trig is the successful completion of the first
semester or consent of instructor or math department chairperson.
This course covers logarithmic and exponential functions, analytic geometry, introduction to limits and the derivative, sequences
and series, circular and trigonometric functions, graphs, laws,
identities, inverses and their applications, vectors and complex
numbers. The emphasis of this course is on the concepts that build
toward understanding calculus. It follows an applications approach
and uses graphing calculators and other appropriate technology.
Pre-Calculus with
Trigonometry Online . . . . . . . . . H1662OLS1/ H1662OLS2
Grade level 10–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: A grade of “B” or better in Geometry and Algebra
II or permission of previous mathematics instructor or math
department chairperson. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Pre-Calculus with Trig is the successful completion of the first
semester or consent of instructor or math department chairperson.
This online course covers logarithmic and exponential functions, analytic geometry, introduction to limits and the derivative, sequences and series, circular and trigonometric functions,
graphs, laws, identities, inverses and their applications, vectors
and complex numbers. The emphasis of this course is on the
concepts that build toward understanding calculus. It follows an
applications approach and uses graphing calculators and other
appropriate technology.
Survey of Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1326
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Algebra or consent of
previous mathematics instructor or math department chairperson.
This course can NOT be taken by a student who has successfully
completed Algebra I, Algebra B or any higher level math course.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Survey of Algebra
is the successful completion (grade of “C” or better) of the first
semester or consent of math department chairperson.
This course provides an introduction to uses and applications
of algebraic concepts including the solution of linear equation,
inequalities and formulas, graphing linear equations and inequalities and the solution of word problems. This course is designed
for the student who will need to apply algebraic concepts in
vocational/career areas, vocational courses, and/or King Career
Center courses.
Survey of Algebra 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1326SP
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course provides an introduction to uses and applications
of algebraic concepts including the solution of linear equation,
inequalities and formulas, graphing linear equations and inequalities and the solution of word problems. This course is designed
for the student who will need to apply algebraic concepts in vocational/career areas, vocational courses, and/or King Career Center
courses. Modified curriculum for Survey of Algebra, as required
by students’ IEP.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
King Career Center academic credit
Aviation Maintenance Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . H8401
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical Science per
semester.
Aviation Maintenance Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . . H8402
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Maintenance
Technology 1.
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical science.
This is a 4-semester program taught at the
University of Alaska Aviation Complex at Merrill
Field. Different subject matter is covered each semester. Students
can earn college credits.
AMT students learn repair and maintenance of aircraft in 4
subject areas: welding, bonded structures, sheet metal and engine
theory. Additionally, students will learn about aircraft hardware
and lock wire as well as basic aerodynamics or how aircraft fly.
Students must purchase leather gloves for welding class. All other
supplied safety equipment use is mandatory.
Job entry opportunities:
Entry level line attendant, baggage handler, mechanics helper
Carpentry 1 KCC������������������������������������������������������ H8418
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Math and 1.0 Elective.
Carpentry has an industry advisory board to keep
the program relevant to industry standards. First
semester students’ practical training is accomplished through the
construction of a storage shed using residential construction
methods, the latest in equipment, materials, and practices used in
the construction industry.
Second and third semester students will work on major projects, such as a relocatable classroom, which includes professionally drawn blueprints, building permits, Municipality of Anchorage
building inspection adhering to building codes. Students will
learn the latest methods in cold weather construction practices.
After three semester students can earn up to 493 contract hours
which can be applied toward journeyman carpenter after one year
in the union training program.
In addition students can participate after-hours in SkillsUSA,
a program that is a statewide carpentry and cabinet making competition, and can lead to a national competition.
Apprenticeship
Program
Computer Electronics Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . H8245
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Algebra I with a grade of “C’’ or better.
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical Science
Computer Electronics Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . . H8246
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C: or better in Computer Electronics
Technology 1.
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical science.
This course integrates extensive hands-on activities
with math and interactive computer programs to
emphasize basic electronics theory and application. Students can
Kenai Peninsula
College
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
43
earn college credits and electronics certifications that may be
given upon successful course completion and students may enjoy
advanced standing at other post-secondary institutions.
Each semester the subject matter is different and cumulative.
Electronics & Telecommunications 1 and 2 can be used for science, math, and elective credit.
1st semester: Personnel skills to include careers, business
ethics, and dealing with customers. Basic D.C. electricity which
includes safety, soldering, schematics, series & parallel circuits,
tools, components, cabling and test equipment.
2nd semester: Complex D.C. circuits, digital electronics, intro
to A.C., wireless communication and fiber optics.
Job entry opportunities:
Cable/satellite TV installer, computer & electronics sales,
personal computer setup and repair, network troubleshooting,
electrical apprenticeship, home security/theatre, customer service
technician, fiber optic technician.
Computer Information Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . H8541
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Good math skills necessary.
Core academic credits: ½ Math.
Computer Information Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . H8542
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Computer Information
Technology 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Math.
The Computer Information Technology program
gives students the opportunity to develop a broad
range of computer skills. The first semester program provides an
integrated approach to attainment of the nationally recognized
certification known as A+ Certification which incorporates maintaining, troubleshooting and repairing computer hardware and
software.
Second semester students will explore various hardware and
software topics such as Net+ Certification (a nationally recognized certification in networking fundamentals) and beginning
programming. Independent studies can be explored with instructor’s approval. Second semester students should be able to work
independently and be self-motivated to achieve their course goals.
Computer Information Technology has a Tech Prep agreement
with UAA for students to earn college credits.
Job entry opportunities:
Help desk support specialist, computer installer and builder,
computer repair specialist, network administrator assistant, web
designer.
equipment, and correct and safe operation of tools are covered.
The student will learn to interpret and apply the requirements of
the National Electrical Code for designing electrical layouts,
installation methods, and the maintenance, troubleshooting, and
repair of electrical circuits and equipment.
During two semesters of study, students will receive instruction and hands-on training in the laboratory for the following
areas of specialization:
• Residential wiring
• Magnetic motor & circuit control
• Raceway systems
• Programmable logic controllers (plcs)
• Lighting systems
• Industrial/commercial wiring
• Alarm systems
• Single & 3-phase electrical power systems
• 1 amp & 3 amp motors
• Photovoltaic installation design, installation, and
maintenance
Application of classroom theory is the emphasis of the lab
work. Students assist in the design and installation of projects
on and off campus. Approximately one-third of lab time is spent
on actual work sites. Students will create completely operational
projects in the lab using PLCs, motor controls, lighting and
power circuits, and process controls.
MUSIC
Band I, Preparatory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5626
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Beginning Band or Director’s approval.
This course is designed to improve student’s technical skills
on their instrument. Students will experience an awareness of
music through theory and history of band music. Students will be
instructed to memorize scales in basic keys. Students will practice
a balance of study books with some standard literature in preparation for advancement into concert band. Performances outside of
class are required. Repeatable unlimited times.
Band II, Concert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5631
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Intermediate Band or Director’s approval.
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I recommended.
Core academic credits: ½ Math per semester.
Students will experience advanced technical training through
group and individualized instruction. Students will increase
individual concepts of tone control, nomenclature and musical
awareness through the study of band literature as well as technique materials drawn from standard study books. This course
provides an increased emphasis on musical style and interpretation. Performances outside of class are required. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Construction Electricity 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8431
Band III, Symphonic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5641
The Construction Electricity program provides
in-depth instruction in the theories and principles
of electricity. Principles of operation for electrical devices and
This music ensemble is a sequel to concert band for those
wishing to perform at an optimum playing level. This is a high
involvement class with an emphasis on performance. Some written work and several evening performances are required during
Construction Electricity 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8430
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Construction Electricity 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Math.
Apprenticeship
Program
44 Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Audition and Director’s approval.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
the year, including major concerts, solo and small ensemble
festivals, large group festivals, area festivals and athletic events.
Performances outside of class are required. Individual study is
highly recommended. Repeatable unlimited times.
Band, Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5651
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Audition, symphonic band performance level and
Director’s approval.
This class offers the advanced student a chance to explore the
big band sound as well as exposure to the theory of improvisation
and chord reading. The group will give the student a chance to
play and perform more modern forms of dance orchestration such
as rock, jazz, ballad, Latin, etc. Performances outside of class are
required. Enrollment is limited to standard stage band instrumentation. Other instruments are possible upon instructor’s approval.
Because the basic concepts of musicianship apply to all styles of
performance, students may be required to enroll in Symphonic
Band in addition to Jazz Band to further their individual abilities.
Repeatable unlimited times.
Choir, Intermediate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5521
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Audition or Director’s approval
A sequel to the concepts of beginning choir for student who
would like experience in increasing vocal and music-reading
techniques through multi-part choral music and studies. Limited
public performances outside of class are required. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Choir, Tenor-Bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5512
Grade Level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
A choral ensemble that will perform music written only in
bass clef (TB, TTBB, etc.). Fundamentals of choral music will be
emphasized to include note-reading, part-singing, interpretation,
individual and group response to direction and basics of vocal
technique. Required performances will include major concerts
and large group festivals as well as optional participation in solo
and ensemble festivals. Repeatable unlimited times.
Choir, Swing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5541
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Audition, concert choir performance level and
Director’s approval.
An ensemble of 12 to 24 select vocalists for the express purpose
of singing various musical styles; may include jazz, madrigals or
contemporary (pop). The group may perform frequently during
the year at school and public functions. For advanced vocal student who is willing to participate in numerous required performances. Repeatable unlimited times.
Music Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5718
Peer Teaching. Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Music Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5718LS
Grade level 9–12 (10–12 for Peer teachers (PT)). One semester.
Prerequisite: None (Peer teachers (PT) must have Instructor’s
approval.)
Fundamentals of choral music will be emphasized to include
note reading, part-singing, interpretation, individual and group
response to direction and basics of vocal technique. Limited
public performances outside of class are required. Opportunity to
prepare for advanced choral classes. Repeatable unlimited times.
This is a class for both Life Skills/Intensive Needs (LS/IN)
students and General Education (GE) students interested in working as Peer Teachers with the LS/IN population. LS/PT Music
Appreciation employs music and music-related activities to reinforce creativity, expression, and appropriate social interaction with
peers and adults. GE students are enrolled as Peer Teachers, and
their role is to work one-on-one and in small groups with the LS/
IN students to reinforce class goals and develop meaningful peer
relationships. The class is one-semester, repeatable unlimited times.
Choir, Concert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5531
Orchestra, String Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5671
A high involvement level class with emphasis on performance
for students of advanced choral ability to include increased
individual musical development. Several required performances
which may include major concerts, solo and small ensemble festivals and large group festivals. Increased individual study encouraged. Repeatable unlimited times.
This course is for students with limited or no previous experience in music. It is for students who wish to learn to play a string
instrument for personal or group experience. Students will learn
basic left and right hand skill on an instrument and learn to read
music notes and symbols. Students will have an opportunity
for group playing as well as some limited individual study. This
course is a brief overview of string instruments of different types
and styles of music. Repeatable unlimited times.
Choir, Mixed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5508
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Audition and Director’s approval.
Choir, Treble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5514
Grade Level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
A choral ensemble that will perform music written only in
treble clef (SA, SSA, SSAA, etc.). Fundamentals of choral music
will be emphasized to include note-reading, part-singing, interpretation, individual and group response to direction and basics
of vocal technique. Required performances will include major
concerts and large group festivals as well as optional participation
in solo and ensemble festivals. Repeatable unlimited times.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Orchestra I, Preparatory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5681
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Middle school experience or Director’s approval.
This course will develop playing skills beyond a beginning level.
Emphasis will be on basic, fundamental techniques of string playing including, but not limited to, development of left-hand technique, introduction of a variety of bowing styles, basic theory, key
signatures, scales and music history. Home practice and some writAPS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
45
ten work is required. Performances outside of class are required.
Individual study is encouraged. Repeatable unlimited times.
ensemble and optional participation in Solo Ensemble Festival.
Repeatable for credit.
Orchestra II, Concert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5683
Music Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5710
This course will develop more advanced technical skills in
string playing. Emphasis will be on left-hand technique, including position work, bowing styles, tone production, basic theory,
key signatures and scales. Students will become acquainted with
rehearsal skills required for participation in large musical groups,
through varied orchestral literature. Home practice, some written
work and several evening performances are required with optional participation in Solo Ensemble Festival. Individual study is
encouraged. Repeatable unlimited times.
This music course is open to all students and is a study of the
lives, experiences and cultural pursuits of people through music.
Comprehensive studies will be done on composers and musical
works. Also included in the course will be many listening activities of music from its beginning to the present.
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Middle school experience or Director’s approval.
Orchestra III, Symphonic Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5691
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Audition and Director’s approval only.
This course is a sequel to Concert Orchestra for those wishing
for an optimum playing level. This is a high-involvement class,
including the educational benefits of preparing for performances.
Command of relevant upper positions, left-hand technique and
advanced bowing skills required. Home practice, some written
work and several evening performances are required, including
major concerts and large group festivals and optional participation in the Solo Ensemble Festival. Individual study is encouraged. Repeatable unlimited times.
Guitar, Beginning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5810
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Introductory course for students who do not read music or have
limited experience with the guitar. Studies include note-reading in
the first position, basic chords, basic music theory, strumming and
fingerstyle pattern accompaniment and an introduction to solo
repertoire. Performance skills will be developed and opportunities
for a recital may be offered. Repeatable for credit.
Guitar, Intermediate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5820
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Beginning Guitar or Director’s approval.
A continuation of Beginning Guitar introducing note-reading
in second position, chord studies including barre chords, music
theory, major and minor scales, bass runs and fingerstyle patterns.
Students will explore contemporary and classical literature and
develop a basic solo repertoire. Performance skills will be stressed
with opportunities for performance in semester recitals and
optional participation in Solo Ensemble Festival. Repeatable for
credit.
Guitar, Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5830
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Intermediate Guitar or Director’s approval.
A continuation of Intermediate Guitar introducing note-reading in the upper positions, music theory, scale studies and classical
technique. Students will acquire a solo repertoire of contemporary and classical guitar pieces. Performance skills will be stressed
with opportunities for performance in semester recitals, guitar
46 Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Music Appreciation Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5710OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This online music course is open to all students and is a study
of the lives, experiences and cultural pursuits of people through
music.
Comprehensive studies will be done on composers and musical works. Also included in the course will be many listening
activities of music from its beginning to the present.
Music Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5715
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Beginning Keyboard teaches keyboard skills to those who have
had limited or no previous experience with a keyboard instrument. Emphasis is placed on using the electronic keyboard as an
accompaniment or as a simple melodic instrument. The class also
includes chord symbols as well as theory as it applies to the instrument. May be taken 2 times.
Music Theory & Composition 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5720
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This class is for the serious music student who might be considering music as a major in college or the interested student
wanting to learn more about fundamentals of music. The class
will deal with the theory of music and apply these fundamentals to the composition of traditional music for instruments of
definite and indefinite pitch. Standard forms and techniques
based primarily on pre-19th Century writing will be utilized.
Introduction to music technology, including computer and
MIDI-assisted composition/transcription, may be explored.
Music Theory & Composition 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5721
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Music Theory and Composition I or Director’s
approval.
A sequel to Music Theory and Composition, with emphasis
on compositional technique. An emphasis may also include
advanced computer-assisted composition, transcribing and
arranging. Student compositions may be arranged for small
instrumental or vocal ensembles.
Advanced Placement Music Theory . . . . . . . . . . . H5730
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation (student must demonstrate
thorough knowledge of music fundamentals, including advanced
aural skills and sight singing abilities).
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
The goal of this course is to prepare each student to take the
annual AP Music Theory Exam. The course is designed according to College Board AP guidelines. As described by the College
Board, “The ultimate goal of an AP Music Theory course is to
develop a student’s ability to recognize, understand and describe
the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of this goal may be best promoted by integrated approaches to the student’s development of:
aural skills, sight-singing skills, written skills, compositional skills
and analytical skills.”
Introduction to Percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5615
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is for students with limited or no previous experience in music. It is for students who wish to learn to play a
percussion instrument for personal or group experience. Music
fundamentals will be taught as students gain experience on
pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments (snare drum,
bells, bass drum, timpani and auxiliary percussion instruments).
Limited public performances outside of class may be required.
May be taken 2 times.
note-reading in the first position, basic chords, basic music theory, strumming and fingerstyle pattern accompaniment and an
introduction to solo repertoire. Performance skills will be developed and opportunities for a recital may be offered. Repeatable
for credit.
Ukulele, Intermediate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5505
Grade Level 9-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Ukulele, Beginning or directors approval.
A continuation of Beginning Ukulele introducing note-reading in fifth position, chord studies including barre chords, music
theory, major and minor scales, accidentals, and new fingerstyle
patterns. Students will explore contemporary and classical literature and develop a basic solo repertoire. Performance skills will be
stressed with opportunities for performance in semester recitals
and optional participation in Solo Ensemble Festival. Repeatable
for credit.
Vocal Technique 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5561
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Vocal Technique 1 and/or Director’s approval.
A continuation of Vocal Technique 1 with increased emphasis
on advanced vocal literature and performance.
Percussion Ensemble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5617
Music Entertainment Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . H5509S
This course is for students with previous percussion experience. Students will learn and perform music written for percussion ensemble while functioning as the percussion section for
their school’s bands. Emphasis will be placed on proper playing
technique for each percussion instrument, snare drum rudiments
and rhythm and pitch reading skills. Performances outside of class
are required. Repeatable unlimited times.
This course will address the creative application of music technology in a culturally relevant manner, exploring common media
production techniques, current in the modern entertainment and
advertising fields. Building upon a foundation of basic piano keyboarding and music theory skills, students will explore the application of GarageBand, iTunes, iPhoto, iDVD, iMovie, Microsoft
Word and Safari programs in the creation of complex, media
presentations. The course also examines the appropriate copyright
and safety implications associated with electronic media.
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Audition or Director’s Approval.
Solo and Small Ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5660
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Director’s approval.
A practical laboratory course best designed for students who
can orient their own course of daily study toward a musical proficiency goal predetermined by them and their instructors. A recital
may be given at the end of the course. Repeatable unlimited
times.
Vocal Technique 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5560
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Vocal Technique 1 offers individualized instruction in voice.
The basic techniques of vocal production and simple art songs
will be introduced. Emphasis on independent study and may
include the preparation of a classroom recital with an invited
audience. Individual material or music will be selected according
to the ability of each student. Course develops “stage presence,’’
builds self-confidence and improves singing technique and ability.
Ukulele, Beginning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5504
Grade Level 9-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Introductory course for students who do not read music
or have limited experience with the ukulele. Studies include
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Grade Level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: none. Repeatable once, with instructor permission
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/
HEALTH
Aerobics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6655
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of
aerobic activities. Aerobic activity is vigorous, oxygenated large
muscle exercise which stimulates heart and lung activity for a
specific period of time while engaging body core stability. As
a result, beneficial changes in the cardiorespiratory system are
seen as well as the individual feels energized. In addition, basic
choreography, music selection and effective group management
skills will be taught. This course will provide students with the
opportunity to increase their individual level of physical fitness,
acquire knowledge of related fitness concepts and demonstrate
an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health,
fitness and physical performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Adventure 101 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6306
Grade level 9–12 Semester
Prerequisite: None
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
47
Students enrolled in this course will have the opportunity to
receive instruction in the technical skills of indoor rock climbing,
challenge courses, belaying and knot tying. In addition, students
will be able to develop the concepts of challenge-by-choice,
cooperation vs. competition, circle-of-comfort, trust, critical
thinking, problem solving and responsibility. In order to successfully attempt the physical challenges of the course, students will
be expected to maintain a proficient level of physical fitness. The
class will include opportunities to develop agility, muscular and
cardiovascular strength, endurance and flexibility. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Badminton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6620
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic
skills and knowledge associated with badminton. By applying
these principles through active participation, students develop
the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue badminton as a
lifetime activity. In addition, this course provides students with
opportunities to improve physical fitness, acquire knowledge of
fitness concepts and practice positive personal and social skills.
Students will gain an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle
affects one’s health, fitness and physical performance. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Basketball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6309
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic
skills and knowledge associated with basketball. By applying these
principles through active participation, students develop the necessary skills and knowledge to play basketball. In addition, this
course provides students with opportunities to improve physical
fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts and practice positive personal and social skills. Students will gain an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical
performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Cross-Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6760
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course is designed to introduce students to cross-training. Cross-training utilizes a variety of activities which involve
varying muscles, intensity and impact on different days. Students
will participate in at least two different aerobic activities and at
least one strength training and/or muscular endurance activity
weekly which utilizes body core stability. Students will acquire
knowledge needed to develop a lifetime fitness plan, as well as
an appreciation of how it feels to be physically fit. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Dance—Introductory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6650
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course is designed as an introduction to movement, dance
elements and the creative aspects of dance. Students explore various styles of dance through a unit approach and collaborate on
a variety of student choreography projects. The development of
48 muscular strength, flexibility, agility, balance, body alignment and
an understanding of rhythm are approached through combined
warm-up and dance technique segments. In addition, students
study health-related fitness concepts and basic nutrition principles as they relate to dance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Dance—Intermediate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6652
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: Dance—Introductory. Lifetime Activity Course.
Intermediate dance enhances the skills and concepts introduced in Introductory Dance. Students are challenged to improve
their existing dance skills in various styles of dance including jazz,
ballet, modern and improvisational dance. Warm-up exercises
continue to promote muscular strength, flexibility, agility and
balance while placing greater emphasis on correct body alignment
and dance technique. Students often work with guest artists in
addition to creating and performing their own choreography.
Students continue their study of health-related fitness concepts
and basic nutrition principles as they relate to dance. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Dance—Multicultural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6653
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course allows students to explore and share their cultural
backgrounds as they are introduced to the traditional dances
of many lands. The development of strength, flexibility, agility,
balance, body alignment and an understanding of rhythm are
approached through combined warm-up and dance technique
segments. Community resource people and guest artists are utilized frequently to enhance understanding of the cultural significance of various dances. In addition, students study health-related
fitness concepts and basic nutrition principles as they relate to
dance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Dance—Contemporary Dance, Repertory . . . . . . . H6651
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: Audition or Instructor Approval. Lifetime Activity
Course.
This course is open to students who have mastered basic dance
skills and have an interest in dance performance. Students will
learn more difficult dance techniques and choreography with
performance as a focus. In addition to experimenting with their
own choreography, students will work with a variety of guest
artists to create a performance repertory which includes various
dance styles. The culmination of this course will be a full-length
dance concert. Students will be involved in all phases of concert
production. Numerous rehearsals and performances outside of
class time are part of course work and are required. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Dance Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6649S
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Director’s approval.
In this course students will be introduced to the study of
Dance Production which involves all aspects of producing a performance. It includes learning about and performing the duties
of the positions in a professional dance company when creating
a performance. These positions include: choreographer, dancer,
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
costume and property designer/constructor, marketer, music
creator/editor, and photographer/videographer. The class is project oriented and will include course work outside of class time.
Student rehearsals will also occur outside class time. Repeatable
up to 8 times.
to setting and working toward personal fitness goals, students will
have opportunities to practice positive social skills as they gain an
understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects the quality of life.
Repeatable unlimited times.
Essentials of Athletic Injury Management – SC . . H6751
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
Grade level 12. (11 with instructor approval) One semester.
Prerequisite: Biology & Anatomy and Physiology Life science or
elective science
NOTE: This class must be taught in collaboration with a local
physical therapy/athletic training office therefore it may not be
offered at all schools. This course MUST be taught by a science
teacher.
Tech Prep UAA
This course introduces students to the profession of
athletic training and related health careers.
Principles of fitness conditioning and nutrition for safe and
healthy participation in sports will provide a basis for examining
proper body mechanics and the faulty mechanics and practices
that lead to injury. A study of common athletic injuries and application of appropriate first aid and CPR procedures are central to a
broader prevention, treatment and risk management framework
applicable to a variety of activity settings.
First Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6007
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course. Not repeatable for
students who received passing grade.
This course is designed to prepare students to assist themselves
and others, in case of injury or sudden illness, when medical and
hospital services are limited or delayed. Emphasis will also be
placed on safety awareness in the home, school, community and
on the streets and highways. The new Red Cross certification will
be given to those students who complete the requirements of this
course.
First Aid 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6007SP
Grade level 9–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP Lifetime Activity Course. Not repeatable for
students who received passing grade.
This course is designed to prepare students to assist themselves
and others, in case of injury or sudden illness, when medical and
hospital services are limited or delayed. Emphasis will also be
placed on safety awareness in the home, school, community and
on the streets and highways. The new Red Cross certification will
be given to those students who complete the requirements of this
course. Modified curriculum for First Aid 9–12, as required by
student’s IEP.
Fitness Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6750
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The course is designed to introduce students to all aspects of
low impact and basic fitness concepts and activities. The primary
class activities will include a variety of health-related fitness activities such as yoga, Pilates and use of pedometers that are appropriate for the participants’ level of fitness. Course content will
include laboratory sessions based on nutritional and fitness concepts, fitness assessment, motivation and self-esteem. In addition
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Flag Football . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6360
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic
skills and knowledge associated with flag football. By applying
these principles through active participation, students develop the
necessary skills and knowledge to play flag football. In addition,
this course provides students with opportunities to improve physical fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts and practice
positive personal and social skills. Students will gain an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and
physical performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Healthy Life Skills 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6052SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course is designed to help students develop healthy habits
and positive behavior patterns. Students are provided with the
knowledge of skills that lead to responsible decision making for
a safe and healthy lifestyle. Topics covered includes nutrition,
fitness, substance abuse, sexuality education and stress management. Modified curriculum for Healthy Life Skills, as required by
students’ IEP.
Health 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6002LS1
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course is designed to help students develop healthy habits
and positive behavior patterns. Students are provided with the
knowledge of skills that lead to responsible decision making for
a safe and healthy lifestyle. Topics covered includes nutrition, fitness, substance abuse, sexuality education and independent living
skills. Alternate curriculum will be used for students enrolled in a
Life Skills 1 class as required by their IEP. Repeat-able unlimited
times.
Health 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6002LS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course is designed to help students develop healthy habits
and positive behavior patterns. Students are provided with the
knowledge of skills that lead to responsible decision making for
a safe and healthy lifestyle. Topics covered includes nutrition, fitness, substance abuse, sexuality education and independent living
skills. Alternate curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 2
class as required by their IEP. Repeatable unlimited times.
Health Opportunities through
Physical Education (HOPE) Online . . . . . . . . . . H6110OL
Grade level 9-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
Not repeatable for students who received a passing grade.
This online course will challenge students to become educated consumers, learn to manage stress, choose nutritious
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
49
foods, make healthy lifestyle choices, be an effective member
of a team and influence others in their community in a positive
way. Students will have the opportunity to experience the many
benefits of regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and sound
decision-making. Topics covered include wellness, mental health,
media literacy/consumer health, fitness components, nutrition,
disease prevention, drug awareness, sexuality education, CPR,
and decision-making skills.
Healthy Relationships/Sexuality Education . . . . . H6770
Grade Level 11–12 Semester
Prerequisite: Parent Permission Required
This course provides information about relationships and sexuality, examines various attitudes and influences on relationships
and sexuality, helps students build interpersonal and relationship
skills and teaches responsibility for health and healthy decision-making. NOT repeatable for credit.
IMPACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9944
Grade level 10-12
One semester (cannot be repeated)
Prerequisite: none
IMPACT (Individuals Making Positive Action Choices Today)
empowers students to understand their behaviors and lifestyle
choices. Through collaboration and community building, students learn about the social, emotional, and physical aspects
of their lives. IMPACT addresses the questions, “Who am I?
Where do I belong? What influences me? What do I contribute?”
Students will explore healthy life choices and the influence of
media; develop leadership and peer education skills; and participate in experiential learning activities (the physical PE component). Active participation and attendance are an integral part of
the collaborative learning process.
Individual Recreational Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H6666
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course will offer students a variety of recreational activities
in which they can participate on an individual basis and learn
skills applicable for a lifetime. Activities may include, but are not
limited to, in-line skating, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing,
frisbee, power walking, ice skating, jogging, orienteering and biking. Safety equipment as well as equipment appropriate for each
activity will be required and must be furnished by each student.
Repeatable unlimited times.
Individual Recreational Activities Online . . . . . H6666OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This online course will offer students a variety of recreational
activities in which they can participate on an individual basis and
learn skills applicable for a lifetime. Activities may include, but
are not limited to, in-line skating, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, frisbee, power walking, ice skating, jogging, orienteering
and biking. Safety equipment as well as equipment appropriate
for each activity will be required and must be furnished by each
student. Repeatable unlimited times.
50 Lifetime Personal Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6380
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Required.
Prerequisite: None.
Repeatable unlimited times.
The purpose of this course is to promote the development
and maintenance of personal fitness. It is conceptually based and
focuses on healthy living and lifestyle choices, with particular
emphasis on the role of exercise and physical activity including
nontraditional and noncompetitive activities. Course content
includes fitness assessment, regular physical activity, laboratory
sessions based on fitness concepts and lectures based on the value
and benefits of exercise in daily living. In addition to setting and
working toward personal fitness goals, students have opportunities to practice positive social skills as they gain an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects the quality of life.
Lifetime Personal Fitness Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H6380OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Repeatable unlimited times.
The purpose of this online course is to promote the development and maintenance of personal fitness. It is conceptually
based and focuses on healthy living and lifestyle choices, with
particular emphasis on the role of exercise and physical activity
including nontraditional and noncompetitive activities. Course
content includes fitness assessment, regular physical activity, and
fitness concepts and lectures based on the value and benefits of
exercise in daily living. In addition to setting and working toward
personal fitness goals, students have opportunities to practice positive social skills as they gain an understanding of how a wellness
lifestyle affects the quality of life.
Lifetime Personal Fitness 9–12 AC . . . . . . . . . . H6380DE
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Required.
Prerequisite: IEP
The purpose of this course is to promote the development and
maintenance of personal fitness. This course focuses on healthy
living and lifestyle choices, with particular emphasis on the role
of exercise and physical activity including nontraditional and
noncompetitive activities. Course content includes fitness assessment, regular physical activity, laboratory sessions based on fitness
concepts and lectures based on the value and benefits of exercise
in daily living. In addition to setting and working toward personal fitness goals, students have opportunities to practice positive
social skills as they gain an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects the quality of life. Alternate curriculum for students
enrolled is Life Skills as required by their IEP.
Native Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6657
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to promote the cultural tradition
of Alaska Native Youth Olympic events as well as other Native
games. In addition to participation in a variety of Native game
activities, this course provides students with opportunities to
improve physical fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts
and practice positive personal and social skills. Students will gain
an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health,
fitness and physical performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
9th Grade Physical Education . . . . . . . . H7046Q/H7046S
Grade level 9. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This is a year-long course divided into four quarter classes.
The courses will include a team activity, individual/dual activity,
aquatics and weight training. The course descriptions for each
class will be the same as listed for each individual course.
Peer Tutor/Fitness Special Populations . . . . . . . . H6305
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Approval of APE specialist on site. Lifetime Activity
Course.
This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to acquire experience with persons with disabilities within the
exercise arena. Students in this course will facilitate the inclusion
of students with disabilities in physical education classes. This
course will include an orientation and structure for peer tutoring.
Physical Education 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6304SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP. Credit for Lifetime Personal Fitness or PE credit.
This is a year-long course divided into four quarter classes.
The courses will include a team activity, individual/dual activity, aquatics and weight training. The course descriptions for
each class will be the same as listed for each individual course.
Modified curriculum for Physical Education, as required by students’ IEP. Repeatable unlimited times.
Physical Education 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6304LS1
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP. Credit for Lifetime Personal Fitness or PE credit.
This is a year-long course divided into four quarter classes.
The courses will include a team activity, individual/dual activity, aquatics and weight training. The course descriptions for
each class will be the same as listed for each individual course.
Alternate curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 1 as
required by students’ IEP. Repeatable unlimited times.
Physical Education 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6304LS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP. Credit for Lifetime Personal Fitness or PE credit.
This is a year-long course divided into four quarter classes.
The courses will include a team activity, individual/dual activity, aquatics and weight training. The course descriptions for
each class will be the same as listed for each individual course.
Alternate curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 2 class
as required by students’ IEP. Repeatable unlimited times.
Pickle Ball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6313
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic
skills and knowledge associated with playing pickle ball. By applying these principles through active participation, students develop
the necessary skills and knowledge to play pickle ball as a lifetime
activity. The course will provide students with the opportunity to
improve their individual level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of all fitness components and demonstrate an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
performance. Students will have the opportunity to practice positive personal and social skills. Repeatable unlimited times.
Pursuing Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H6052
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course. Not repeatable for
students who received passing grade.
This course is designed to help students develop healthy habits
and positive behavior patterns. Students are provided with the
knowledge of skills that lead to responsible decision making for
a safe and healthy lifestyle. Topics covered include nutrition, fitness, substance abuse prevention, sexuality education, and social
and emotional health.
Racquet Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6734
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic
skills and knowledge associated with playing a variety of racquet
sports such as tennis, badminton, table tennis, handball, pickle
ball, etc. The ultimate goal of this class is to provide the students
with the knowledge and skills necessary for them to pursue playing racquet sports as a life-long activity. This course will provide
students with opportunities to develop a satisfactory individual
level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts and
demonstrate an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects
one’s health, fitness and physical performance. This course will
provide an environment for all students to practice positive personal and social skills. Repeatable unlimited times.
Recreational Games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6665
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
The purpose of this course is to offer a variety of activities to
the student who enjoys the fun of games. The games will be recreational in nature. These activities may include: speedball, ultimate
frisbee, floor hockey and non-contact lacrosse. Each activity will
be a maximum of two weeks in length. In addition, this course
will provide opportunities to improve physical fitness, acquire
knowledge of fitness concepts, practice positive personal and
social skills and gain an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle
affects one’s health, fitness and physical performance. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Rugby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6370
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
The purpose of this course is to introduce basic skills and
knowledge associated with playing rugby and to apply these skills
through active participation. This class provides students with
basic understanding and concepts for spectator appreciation as
well as active play. This course will provide students the opportunity to improve physical fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts, practice positive personal and social skills and understand
the importance of fitness. Repeatable unlimited times.
Running, Cross-Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6340
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
51
This course is designed to enhance the development of cardiorespiratory endurance. The primary class activity will involve running. This class will meet the needs of all students and progressive
workouts will begin at low levels of fitness. In addition, this
course will provide students with opportunity to increase their
individual level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of a fitness
component and demonstrate an understanding of how a wellness
lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical performance.
Repeatable unlimited times.
Skating/Hockey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6675
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course will emphasize the acquisition of basic ice skating
skills and the knowledge of incorporating these skills into drills,
routines and game situations. This class will emphasize individual
improvement, as well as safety. Students must provide their own
skates. Other safety equipment may be required. This course will
provide students with the opportunity to improve their individual
level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts
and demonstrate an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle
affects one’s health, fitness and physical performance. Students
will have the opportunity to practice positive personal and social
skills. Studies required to provide their own skates. Repeatable
unlimited times.
Skiing, Cross-Country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6690
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with cross-country skiing. By
applying these principles through active participation, students
develop the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue cross-country skiing as a lifetime activity. The course will provide students
with the opportunity to improve their individual level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of all fitness components and
demonstrate an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects
one’s health, fitness and physical performance. Students will have
the opportunity to practice positive personal and social skills.
Repeatable unlimited times.
Soccer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6389
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with soccer. By applying these
principles through active participation, students develop the
necessary skills and knowledge to play soccer. In addition, this
course provides students with opportunities to improve physical
fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts and practice positive personal and social skills. Students will gain an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical
performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Softball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6410
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with softball. By applying these
52 principles through active participation, students develop the
necessary skills and knowledge to play softball. In addition, this
course provides students with opportunities to improve physical
fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts and practice positive personal and social skills. Students will gain an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical
performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Team Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6021
Grade level: 9-12. Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
The purpose of this course is to offer a variety of team sports to
the student who enjoys goal setting, decision making, interacting
with others directly and simultaneously to achieve an objective.
These sports may include: basketball, volleyball, soccer, flag football and softball. Each sport will be a maximum of two weeks
in length. In addition, this course will provide opportunities to
improve physical fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts,
practice positive personal and social skills and gain an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and
physical performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
Tennis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6735
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with playing tennis. By applying
these principles through active participation, students develop the
necessary skills and knowledge to pursue playing tennis as a lifetime activity. The course will provide students the opportunity to
increase their individual level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of all fitness components and demonstrate an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical
performance. Students will have the opportunity to practice positive personal and social skills. Repeatable unlimited times.
Tennis—Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6720
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with the game of table tennis.
By applying these principles through active participation, students develop the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue the
game of table tennis as a lifetime activity. The course will provide
students the opportunity to increase their individual level of
physical fitness, acquire knowledge of all fitness components and
demonstrate an understanding of how a wellness lifestyle affects
one’s health, fitness and physical performance. Students will have
the opportunity to practice positive personal and social skills.
Repeatable unlimited times.
Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6050
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an experientially-based, student-facilitated course
designed for students transitioning to the school from another
district, school, or state. The course offers important introductory
information about the school, district, community and state that
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
will aid in a successful transition. It will also offer training on
skills instrumental in aiding students with future life transitions.
and willingness to take physical challenges. Repeatable unlimited
times.
Volleyball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6440
Winter Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6674
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with volleyball. By applying these
principles through active participation, students develop the
necessary skills and knowledge to play volleyball. In addition, this
course provides students with opportunities to improve physical
fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness concepts and practice positive personal and social skills. Students will gain an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical
performance. Repeatable unlimited times.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with winter sports. These activities may include cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, ice hockey,
ice skating, sledding, snowboarding and broomball. By applying
these principles through active participation, the student will have
the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue the activities as a lifetime activity. The course will provide students the opportunity to
increase their individual level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of all fitness components and demonstrate an understanding
of how a wellness lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical
performance. Students will have the opportunity to practice positive personal and social skills. Repeatable unlimited times.
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Team activity.
Weight Training—Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H6450
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
The purpose of this course is to promote the development of
muscular strength and endurance and to enjoy the benefits of
regular physical activity. Students learn to identify the major muscle groups and how to increase the performance of each through
weight lifting and how to stabilize the body core. The discussion
and practice of weight lifting techniques and principles guides
students toward the eventual implementation of a personal fitness
program. The primary class activity involves regular conditioning
exercises supported by lecture and discussion. Repeatable unlimited times.
Weight Training—Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6451
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: Weight Training—Basic. Lifetime Activity Course.
This course is designed to build on the concepts introduced in
basic weight training. Students are challenged to improve their
existing level of fitness. Students will design and implement a safe
and effective personal strength program. Students continue their
study of health-related fitness concepts and basic nutrition principles as they relate to weight training. Repeatable unlimited times.
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
Yoga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6761
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Students will practice Hatha Yoga focusing on yoga for
strength, flexibility, and relaxation. The class will also cover techniques for increasing concentration and decreasing anxiety which
leas to stronger academic performance. Breathing exercises and
healthy fitness activities will also be taught.
King Career Center academic credit
Advanced Health Career Pathways 1 KCC . . . . . . H8910
Grade level 11–12. Grade 10 with instructor/counselor approval.
One semester.
Prerequisite: Biology and/or Health Occupations with a “C” or
better. CPR/First Aid certification or concurrent.
Core academic credits: ½ PE/Health and ½ Life Science.
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to basic
skills and knowledge associated with orienteering, hiking, camping, rock climbing, biking, skating, snowshoeing, cross-country
skiing, canoeing, water safety and/or survival. Through active participation, the student will have the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue a variety of lifetime outdoor recreational activities.
The course will provide students the opportunity to increase their
individual level of physical fitness, acquire knowledge of fitness
concepts and demonstrate an understanding of how a wellness
lifestyle affects one’s health, fitness and physical performance.
Students will have the opportunity to practice positive personal
and social skills, as many of the activities involve cooperation
Advanced Health Care Pathways is a challenging
course designed to prepare students for further
education in the medical field. This rigorous academic class is also
a hands-on, skill building program. Many skills necessary for
employment in health care professions will be taught, practiced
and tested. Students will be exposed to the wide variety of careers
in the medical, dental, veterinary and mental health fields. Career
exploration, portfolio building and an individualized education
pathway will be a vital part of this class. Students will also learn
basic skills and knowledge for entry-level health care professions.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of written
work and test scores, mastery of skills, professionalism and participation in health-related community activities. Attendance, teamwork and class participation are vital components for this class.
Second semester students will expand their understanding of
human anatomy and medical terminology. Students will learn
medical assisting skills specific to patient examination, diagnostic
procedures, specimen collection, laboratory procedures, infection
control, medical asepsis and the extensive clerical duties of the
medical office. Job shadowing for highly motivated students and
an opportunity to apply for on-the-job training may be available.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Wilderness Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6740
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
53
Job entry opportunities:
Physician’s office, hospitals, extended care facilities, home
health care, dental clinic, veterinary clinic
Cosmetology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8810
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. $35 lab fee.
Core academic credit: ½ PE/Heath.
Cosmetology is a job-oriented course of instruction with all
hours accumulated toward the 1,650 hours required for Alaska
state licensing for students who choose to have their hours and
operations documented. The hours and operations earned are
transferable within Alaska.
Students begin to learn about chemicals used in the salon and
will be learning hair coloring, hair lightening, permanent waving,
hair cutting, fingerwaving and salon management. In the second
semester, students focus for the State Board Exams by increasing
their speeds and accuracy on the practical subjects learned in the
first semester.
Hours and operations will be recorded for Alaska State
Certification.
Job entry opportunities:
Hairdresser or barber, Make-up technician, Color technician,
Perm specialist, Hair cutting specialist, Esthetician, Manicurist,
Salon receptionist.
Practice & Health for PCA KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H6020
Grade Level: 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Academic Credit: ½ PE/Health and 1.0 Elective
The KCC Personal Care Assistant program course goes beyond
the basics of providing the knowledge base and skill performance
practice to meet the competency-based standards required for
State of Alaska Personal Care Assistant certification. Students will
demonstrate proficiency in basic health and personal care skills
that assist elderly clients or clients with disabilities with daily living tasks such as bathing, dressing, grooming, meal preparation,
and maintaining a safe and comfortable home care environment.
Upon successful completion of the PCA course curriculum and
the State of Alaska written examination, students 18 years and
older will be qualified to work as a Personal Care Assistant, one of
the fastest growing occupations in Alaska. All students explore citizenship, leadership, communication skills, alternate populations,
and other placements in which to successfully employ PCA skills.
Veterinary Science 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8921
Grade Level 11–12. One Semester.
Prerequisite: None
Core academic credits: ½ Life Science and ½ PE/Health per
semester.
Veterinary Science is a rigorous course designed to prepare students for careers in veterinary and other health professions. This
class requires both academic and physical participation and skills.
Students will be exposed to the competencies needed to work in
the veterinary and health setting. Students will learn safety and
responsibility, animal anatomy, infection control, canine grooming, first aid and CPR for humans, cats and dogs, restraints,
veterinary terminology, roles and responsibilities of the types of
54 veterinary workers, ethics, records, scheduling and appointments,
communication and client relations. Career exploration and portfolio building are all a part of this class.
Students will participate in a canine day care, a dog wash and
grooming program. They will be evaluated by written tests, mastery of skills, professionalism, and participation in community
activities. Teamwork and participation are essential components
of success for this class. Excellent attendance is critical for student
success and animal health.
Job entry opportunities.
Kennel assistant, dog walker, pet sitter, veterinary assistant,
veterinary receptionist, dog wash, dog grooming, human medicine entry level positions.
SCIENCE
Advanced Placement
Environmental Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2286
Grade level 11 – 12. Two semesters. Life science or physical
science.
Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
This course is an interdisciplinary course that provides students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies
required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world,
to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and
human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these
problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/
or preventing them.
Applied Technology and Engineering . . . . . . . . . . H8577
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Applied Technology and Engineering Science is a gateway
course in the Engineering pathway. This hands-on course couples
technology education with introductory engineering exploration.
Included within this course are engineering design using computer aided drafting, engineering principles and processes, worksite
safety, and an introduction to the proper use of hand and power
tools. After completion of this course, students who decide to
continue on the engineering pathway may enroll in pathway
courses at their comprehensive high school or KCC.
Applied Technology and Construction . . . . . . . . . H8578
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Physical Science.
Prerequisite: None.
Applied Technology and Construction Science is a gateway
course in the Construction Education pathway. This hands-on
course couples technology education with basic woodworking
and construction education exploration. Included within this
course is worksite safety as well as an introduction to the proper
use of hand and power tools. After completion of this course,
students who decide to continue on the construction pathway
may enroll in pathway courses at their comprehensive high school
or KCC.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Astronomy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2620
Biological Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2210
This course is designed to build a coherent understanding
of the earth-space relationship. Emphasis will be towards the
development of astronomical concepts such as planetary motion,
structure of galaxies and various theories of the formation of
the universe. Course includes the use of various astronomical
instruments.
This is a very basic course in biology that will stress general
biological principles such as the interrelationships of the biotic to
the abiotic world, the place of the human race in the ecological
scheme of life and a basic taxonomic survey of living things. There
will also be some coverage of basic genetics. This course will be
laboratory oriented. Biological Survey cannot be taken after successfully completing one or two semesters of Biology I.
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Astronomy Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2620OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is designed to build a coherent understanding of the earth-space relationship. Emphasis will be towards the
development of astronomical concepts such as planetary motion,
structure of galaxies and various theories of the formation of
the universe. Course includes the use of various astronomical
instruments.
Astronomy: Solar System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2621
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Students investigate the development of astronomy from the
ideas of the ancients to the modern technological exploration
of our solar system. The course focuses on the origin, dynamics
and physical characteristics of members of the solar system (sun,
planets, satellites, meteoroids, asteroids and comets). Through
a study of planetary geology, students will gain an appreciation
for the interdisciplinary nature of astronomy. Class activities will
include planetarium observations, as well as laboratory experiences based on data provided by NASA, Harvard Smithsonian
Micro-Observatory and other astronomy-based facilities.
Astronomy: Universe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2622
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Students investigate astronomy from the stellar and galactic
view. They begin with the physical properties of stars and stellar
evolution (how an astronomer infers a star’s origin and eventual
demise.) They progress to studies of galaxies, using the Milky Way
as the standard for comparison. The universe on a grand scale
then becomes the topic for analysis for discussions on clusters of
galaxies and cosmology (the origin and evolution of the universe).
The planetarium, Micro-Observatory Net and Mt. Wilson 24”
Schmidt will aid laboratory studies, as well as information from
many other NASA sights including the Hubble Telescope.
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: None.
Biology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2232
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters. Life science.
Prerequisite: Grade 10–12: none. Grade 9: 3.5 GPA in 8th grade
core subjects, Algebra I and teacher recommendation.
The basic biology course and prerequisite for all biology electives. This course will include a study of the chemical basis of life
such as the cellular processes of respiration, photosynthesis, diffusion and osmosis. Cell division, DNA and enzyme action will
also be covered. The course also includes an extensive treatment of
introductory botany, zoology, ecology and genetics.
Biology I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2232OLS1/H2232OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each. Life science.
Prerequisite: Grade 10–12: none. Grade 9: 3.5 GPA in 8th grade
core subjects, Algebra I and teacher recommendation.
The basic biology course and prerequisite for all biology electives. This online course will include a study of the chemical basis
of life such as the cellular processes of respiration, photosynthesis,
diffusion and osmosis. Cell division, DNA and enzyme action
will also be covered. The course also includes an extensive treatment of introductory botany, zoology, ecology and genetics.
Biology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2242
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry I.
This course continues the topics introduced in first year
biology. Special emphasis is placed on anatomy and physiology,
genetics, evolution and ecology. The human’s biological evolution
and impact on other biological systems is examined. Course is
structured so the student has more time for independent study
using classroom, library and community facilities.
BioTaPP 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8940
Grade level 11-12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Biology, and Chemistry or concurrent
enrollment in Chemistry.
This course recommended for persons interested in light plane
aviation and in passing the FAA ground school test for a private
pilot’s license. The principles of flight, aircraft preflight, meteorology, navigation, weight and balance, power plants, communication, federal aviation air regulations and survival flight planning
will be covered. Special emphasis is placed on flying light aircraft
in Alaska. This course will fulfill a physical science or elective
credit.
Biotechnology Training and Preparatory Program (BioTaPP),
is a 2-year program designed to give students experience in
fundamental and advanced biotechnological techniques used in
biological research and industry. The program has partnerships
with industry and academia, which review the types of activities
instructed to give students the best possibility of getting a job
right out of high school or a job while attending college. BioTaPP
is for those students who wish to learn more biotechnological
techniques and want to work independently on a science project
involving laboratory and library research.
BioTaPP 1 is the first course in a sequence of four and concentrates on maintaining the laboratory environment, proper
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Aviation Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8391
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None. .
55
documentation as well as the basic foundational protocols and
skills used in the biotechnology industry. Upon completion of the
sequence of courses, graduates could seek employment as a laboratory or research technician, or continue to higher educational
opportunities as a research assistant.
Study of marine life found on shores, in bays, estuaries, intertidal zones and in ocean depths. The commercial and environmental importance of various forms of marine life will also be
examined.
BioTaPP 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8941
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I.
Grade level 11-12. One semester. Life Science.
Prerequisite: BioTaPP 1.
BioTaPP 2 is the second course in a sequence of four and
continues to concentrate on the foundational protocols and techniques of the biotechnology Industry. Protocols and applications
in this course are more advanced than BioTaPP 1 and transition
students into using learned skills into an individual small scope
project with a focus on communication strategies. Upon completion of the sequence of courses, graduates could seek employment
as a laboratory or research technician, or continue to higher educational opportunities as a research assistant.
Biotechnology 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2260
Grade level: 10- 12. Two semesters. Life science.
Prerequisites: Biology 1 (with C or higher).
This is a year-long, lab-based class that introduces students to
biotechnology for the 21st century, highlighting the revolution in
biology. This class is designed to prepare students for post secondary options in Biotechnology. Fundamental lab skills training will
be the focus of this class. Students will be introduced to the foundations of biotechnology; conceptual understanding of benetic
engineering; bioremediation (BP); bioterror and biodefence
(military); medicine; immunology; pharmaceutical applications;
bioethics and careers in biotechnology. The role of genetically
modified organisms will be examined from an ecological perspective. This course will also be supported by local and national
scientists in the field of biotechnology.
Advanced Placement Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2244
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I and Chemistry I.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a
college introductory biology course. Topics include molecules,
cells, genetics, evolution, organisms, and populations.
Biology, Alaska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2220
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I. Not open to students with credit in Natural
Science of Alaska.
Course will consist of an examination of plants and animals
found throughout Alaska. Field work will be required as well
as the study of materials from state and federal agencies. Topics
considered will include habitat, behavior, game management, the
general classification of common plants and animals and their
food value to humans.
Marine Science: Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2305
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I.
56 Marine Science, Biology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2305OL
This online course is a study of marine life found on shores,
in bays, estuaries, intertidal zones and in ocean depths. The
commercial and environmental importance of various forms of
marine life will also be examined.
Marine Science: Oceanography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2306
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Biology I.
Students in the course will study the physical aspects and
interactions with the atmosphere-ocean interface including geology, chemistry, physics, meteorology and pollution of oceans.
Included will be the study of the effects of geology, geochemistry,
geography and physical forces on marine organisms.
Micro Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2320
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I.
Course deals with the techniques of growing and identifying micro-organisms and general microtechnique. Beneficial
and harmless organisms will be grown and discussed. Bacterial
counts and studies will be done of many areas in the school and
community.
Botany . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2270
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I.
Botany is a one semester course exploring the relationships,
classification and development of plants from algae to the flowering plants. Included will be study of the structure and function
of roots, stems, leaves and plant life cycles. The basic functions
of hormones and their relation to plant growth are included.
Students will grow their own plants and also receive an introduction to the field of horticulture.
Conceptual Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2411
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Provides an opportunity for the student interested in areas
other than science to study the basic concepts in chemistry as
they relate to home and life. Chemical concepts will be used to
explain many of the processes we observe in our daily lives. While
examining these concepts, the student will develop skills in the
laboratory and in problem solving.
Chemistry I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2421
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Algebra I.
A beginning course that will include a study of the following
concepts: atomic structure, mole concept, chemical periodicity,
writing formulas and equations, nomenclature of compounds,
chemical bonding, use of symbols, valence, physical and chemical
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
properties, elements, mixtures and compounds, kinetic molecular
theory of solids, liquid and gases.
The second semester will include the additional major concepts: oxidation, reduction, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium,
acids, bases, pH, ionization, stoichiometry, heat of reactions, gas
laws, molar concentrations, solutions and solubilities.
Laboratory skills will include: measure mass and volumes,
measure temperature, measure melting point and boiling point,
filtering and decanting, graphing, interpretation of data, observation, description, recording, measuring pH, titration, pressure of
gases, calorimetry and preparation of solutions.
Chemistry II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2432
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Chemistry I.
Particularly useful for those students interested in science.
This course will prove especially helpful for those students whose
collegiate interests lie in chemistry, biology, molecular biology,
medicine or related fields.
A two-semester program enhancing topics covered in general
chemistry. Areas of emphasis include chemical bonding, molecular geometry, kinetic-molecular theory, phase diagrams, changes
of state, acid-base theories, oxidation-reduction and stoichiometry, equilibrium, reaction kinetics and introduction to organic
chemistry which will include basic nomenclature and synthesis.
Advanced Placement Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2434
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Algebra II.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
This is a college level chemistry course which deals with
advanced concepts in chemistry. Laboratory work and chemical problem-solving make up an integral part of the course.
Topics covered in AP Chemistry will enhance those covered in
Chemistry II with increased laboratory experiences and college
level student expectations.
Earth Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2610
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
A survey of the various branches of sciences concerning the
earth. The student has the opportunity to explore a wide variety of topics such as oceanography, historical geology, rock and
mineral identification, astronomy, physical geology, meteorology,
composition and formation of the formations of the early and
various geological processes of change. This course is not open to
students who have successfully completed Geology I.
tions of the early and various geological processes of change. This
course is not open to students who have successfully completed
Geology I.
Ecology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2280
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I.
A study of the interrelationships of the living and nonliving
environment. Topics will include habitat, population dynamics,
food webs, random sampling techniques, geochemical cycling
and limiting factors. The human effect on the ecosystem will also
be discussed and emphasized. Ecosystems and biomes of Alaska
will be stressed.
Emergency Trauma Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8949
Grade level 9–12. One Semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: None. Health Occupations Essentials recommended.
Emergency Trauma Technology is a hands-on
course focusing on the assessment and treatment of
medical conditions and traumatic injuries. Students will go
beyond first aid to earn CPR for the Professional Provider and
State of Alaska ETT certifications. Skills will include bandaging,
splinting, the management of head and neck injuries, cold and
heat emergencies, respiratory emergencies such as asthma, CPR,
and other medical conditions.
Emergency Trauma Technology is a State of Alaska,
Department of Health approved course designed for students
considering careers in emergency services such as paramedicine,
law enforcement, search & rescue, firefighting, flight nursing,
sports medicine, guiding, or other careers where a solid knowledge of medical skills might be needed.
Environmental Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2285
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Students in this course will study how pollution from man
affects the air, water, land and oceans, using all fields of sciences
to help students form educated opinions and solutions based on
evidence about present and future environmental problems facing
society. This is a lab-based course that will rely heavily on field
work to gather data.
Essentials of Athletic Injury Management—SCI . . H6751
Grade level 12 (11 with instructor approval). One semester.
Prerequisite: Biology & Anatomy and Physiology
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
Note: This class must be taught in collaboration with a local
physical therapy/athletic training office therefore it may not be
offered at all schools. The course must be taught by a science
teacher.
This online course is a survey of the various branches of sciences concerning the earth. The student has the opportunity to
explore a wide variety of topics such as oceanography, historical
geology, rock and mineral identification, astronomy, physical
geology, meteorology, composition and formation of the forma-
This course introduces students to the profession of
athletic training and related health careers.
Principles of fitness conditioning and nutrition for safe and
healthy participation in sports will provide a basis for examining
proper body mechanics and the faulty mechanics and practices
that lead to injury. A study of common athletic injuries and application of appropriate first aid and CPR procedures are central to a
boarder prevention, treatment, and risk management framework
applicable to a variety of activity settings.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Earth Sciences Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2610OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
57
Food Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8327
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: One year of high school science.
This course presents the science of food and its implications
on humans and their well-being. Its approach is that of a science
laboratory, using scientific methodology for understanding food’s
impact on the human body. This is a laboratory course which
uses experimental methods with tools for hands-on learning. This
course will fulfill a science or elective credit.
Forensic Science I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2560
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: Biology I required, Chemistry I recommended.
This course focuses various aspects of forensic science and
modern criminal investigation analysis. It integrates biology,
geology, physics, chemistry, anatomy, medical sciences and critical thinking skills. Topics include structures and functions of
the human body, processing a crime scene, physical evidence,
questioned documents, serology and pathology. In addition, the
course may cover selected topics in toxicology, drug and alcohol
abuse, odontology, entomology, forensic art, terrorist and disaster
response and emergency medical procedures. Laboratory work
and projects will be an integral part of this course.
Forensic Science I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2560OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: Biology I required, Chemistry I recommended.
This online course focuses on various aspects of forensic science and modern criminal investigation analysis. It integrates
biology, geology, physics, chemistry, anatomy, medical sciences
and critical thinking skills. Topics include structures and functions of the human body, processing a crime scene, physical
evidence, questioned documents, serology and pathology. In
addition, the course may cover selected topics in toxicology, drug
and alcohol abuse, odontology, entomology, forensic art, terrorist
and disaster response and emergency medical procedures.
marks and arson investigation. In addition, the course may cover
selected topics in toxicology, drug and alcohol abuse, odontology,
entomology, forensic art, terrorist and disaster response and emergency medical procedures.
Genetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2290
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I.
A basic study of heredity among living organisms. Topics also
will include adaptations to the environment and the process of
natural selection and evolution. Special emphasis will be placed
on human genetic factors and fruit fly genetics.
Geology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2641
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Grade 10–12: none. Grade 9: 3.5 GPA in 8th grade
core subjects, Algebra I and teacher recommendation.
This course deals with the formation and evolution of the
earth’s surface features as revealed by rocks and fossils and of
applications of geology to general interest topics and specific
Alaskan problems. Areas of concentration will be on ancient
plants, animals, as well as evolution and the development of
crustal features. Special emphasis will be placed on the Anchorage
and Alaskan areas. Geologic time, fossils and rock dating will be
applied to the interpretation of earth structures, petroleum exploration and mineral economics.
Geology II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2656
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Geology I.
A two-semester course of advanced work in physical and historical geology with lab and field work. Special work in the fields
of mining, oil and Alaskan geology.
Human Anatomy/Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2300
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology I required, Chemistry I recommended.
Forensic Science II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2570
The study of the structure and function of the various portions
of the human anatomy. This course is recommended for those
students interested in medical/health-related careers.
This course follows Forensic Science I. It focuses on various
aspects of forensic science and modern criminal investigation
analysis. It integrates biology, geology, physics, chemistry, anatomy, medical sciences and critical thinking skills. Topics include
DNA analysis, textiles, trace evidence, firearms, tool marks and
arson investigation. In addition, the course may cover selected
topics in toxicology, drug and alcohol abuse, odontology, entomology, forensic art, terrorist and disaster response and emergency medical procedures. Laboratory work and projects will be an
integral part of this course.
Health Occupations Essentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8113
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: Biology I required, Chemistry I recommended.
Forensic Science II Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2570OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: Biology I required, Chemistry I recommended.
This online course follows Forensic Science I. It focuses on
various aspects of forensic science and modern criminal investigation analysis. It integrates biology, geology, physics, chemistry,
anatomy, medical sciences and critical thinking skills. Topics
include DNA analysis, textiles, trace evidence, firearms, tool
58 Grade level: 9–10. One Semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: None.
Introduction to Health Occupations is designed to familiarize
students with the widely varied careers of the medical, dental,
veterinary and mental health professions. Students will learn
skills necessary for pursuing further education for any healthcare
career pathway. The course is divided into four 20-hour modules
including:
Introduction to Cardiology and CPR, Health and Fitness
for the Healthcare Professional, First Aid, and Career Planning
for Entering the Medical Profession. The units are designed so
that they can be taught combined as one course, or as separate
modules.
Integrated Sciences 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2016
Grade level 9. Two semesters. 1st semester: Physical science. 2nd
semester: Life science.
Prerequisite: None.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
This is an integrated, thematic program that teaches natural
sciences through which common principles operate in relationship to one another. Students explore areas of life science, chemistry, physics, earth and space science as well as integrating technology. Emphasis is placed on scientific thought and reasoning
coordinated with inquiry-based laboratory experience.
Integrated Sciences 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2016SP
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters. 1st semester: Physical science.
2nd semester: Life science.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This is an integrated, thematic program that teaches natural
sciences through which common principles operate in relationship to one another. Students explore areas of life science, chemistry, physics, earth and space science as well as integrating technology. Emphasis is placed on scientific thought and reasoning
coordinated with inquiry-based laboratory experience. Modified
curriculum for Integrated Science, as required by student’s IEP.
Introduction to Pharmacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8958
Grade Level: 11–12 (10th with teacher recommendation) One
semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: Algebra I and Biology. Health Occupations
Essentials, Anatomy/Physiology and 1st semester Chemistry are
recommended
Academic Credit: ½ Life Science.
This course provides an overview of the practice of
pharmacy and examines the qualifications, operational guidelines, and job duties of a pharmacy technician.
Students will be introduced to the top 100 drugs, drug classification and interactions. This course also examines the legal and
ethical requirements of the field. Students will understand the
steps needed to fulfill all requirements necessary to be certified
and take the national Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam
(PTCE).
Introduction to Veterinary Science . . . . . . . . . . . . H8920
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology Recommended.
In Introduction to Veterinary Science, students will learn a
basic knowledge of veterinary science to include the common
species, health care, diseases and skills necessary for pursuing
further education for veterinary careers. These skills are directly applicable and transferable to all components of the health
career pathway. Topics include: clinical management and client
relations, animal anatomy, disease processes, clinical procedures/
infection control and career investigations.
Life Science 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2006SP
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters. Life science.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This is a basic course in life science that will stress general
biological principles. This course will include a study of the
chemical basis of life such as the cellular processes of respiration,
photosynthesis, diffusion and osmosis. Cell division, DNA and
enzyme action will also be covered. The course also includes an
introduction to botany, zoology, ecology and genetics.
Modified curriculum for Life Science, as required by student’s
IEP.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Science 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2002LS1
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This is an integrated, thematic program that teaches natural
sciences through which common principles operate in relationship to one another. Students explore areas of life science,
chemistry, physics, earth and space science as well as integrating
technology. Alternate curriculum for students enrolled in a Life
Skills 1 class as required by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
Science 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2002LS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters. Life science.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This is an integrated, thematic program that teaches natural
sciences through which common principles operate in relationship to one another. Students explore areas of life science,
chemistry, physics, earth and space science as well as integrating
technology. Alternate curriculum for students enrolled in a Life
Skills 2 class as required by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
Material Science 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8575
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Physical science.
Material Science and Construction 1 is taught using the
nationally recognized Occupational Skills Standards for the
National Center for Education and Research, known as NCCER.
Material Science & Construction I will cover Core Curriculum
(NCCER) Basic Safety, Introduction to Construction Math,
Introduction to Hand Tools, and Introduction to Power Tools.
Training is accomplished through an introduction to basic residential construction through hands on applications reflecting
current industry standards, safety (OSHA), equipment, and
technologies reflected in Alaska’s Construction Industry. Students
will have the opportunity to become certified in CORE through
NCCER at no cost. The program is considered an early exploratory course leading to additional ASD programs in CAD, and
KCC-Construction. Industry partners will provide On-the-job
(OJT) and apprenticeship opportunities to students as well as
mentor training opportunities for instructors. Students with
interests in the architectural, engineering, construction, inspection, or transportation fields will find this class especially informative and helpful. Others will enjoy this class simply from a
viewpoint of learning how things work; a key element of understanding technology. Job entry opportunities: carpentry-residential and commercial, house framing, interior finish work, exterior
finish work, roofing, material distribution and sales, building
maintenance, union and non union apprenticeship programs.
Material Science 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8576
Grade level 9–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Material Science & Construction 1.
Material Science and Construction 2 is taught using the
nationally recognized Occupational Skills Standards for the
National Center for Education and Research, known as NCCER.
Material Science & Construction I will cover Core Curriculum
(NCCER) Introduction to Blueprints, Basic Rigging (optional),
Basic Communication Skills, Basic Employability, Skills Training
is accomplished through an introduction to basic residential
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
59
construction through hands on applications reflecting current
industry standards, safety (OSHA), equipment, and technologies
reflected in Alaska’s Construction Industry. Students will have
the opportunity to become certified in CORE through NCCER
at no cost. The program is considered an early exploratory
course leading to additional ASD programs in CAD, and KCCConstruction. Industry partners will provide On-the-job (OJT)
and apprenticeship opportunities to students as well as mentor
training opportunities for instructors. Students with interests in
the architectural, engineering, construction, inspection, or transportation fields will find this class especially informative and helpful. Others will enjoy this class simply from a viewpoint of learning how things work; a key element of understanding technology.
Job entry opportunities: carpentry-residential and commercial,
house framing, interior finish work, exterior finish work, roofing,
material distribution and sales, building maintenance, union and
non union apprenticeship programs.
Medical Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8915
Grade level: 10–12 (9th with Teacher Recommendation). One
semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: Biology. Health Occupation Essentials and Anatomy
and Physiology are recommended.
Students will gain an understanding of basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical
words, and medical terms associated with the body as a whole.
Utilizing a systems approach, the student will define, interpret,
and pronounce medical terms related to structures and function,
pathology diagnosis, clinic procedures, oncology, and pharmacology. In addition to medical terms, common abbreviations applicable to each system will be interpreted.
Physiology of Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2302
Grade Level: 9–12. One Semester. Life science.
Prerequisite: None.
Physiology of Wellness is a hands-on approach to fundamental
skills necessary for entry level positions in the health and nutrition fields. The class includes, but is not limited to, concepts of
nutrition, weight control, eating disorders, exercise physiology,
depression, the immune system, digestion and infectious disease.
Meteorology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2550
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Students in this course will study and learn how meteorologists
monitor the weather using weather maps, satellites, radar and
physical and observational measurements of the atmosphere and
sky. Students will also study the atmosphere’s origin, composition
and structure, solar and terrestrial radiation, heat and temperature, air pressure, humidity, saturation and stability, clouds,
precipitation, wind, air masses, fronts, cyclones, anticyclones,
thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes and weather forecasting
techniques.
Introduction to Natural Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2360
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: Biology or Instructor’s permission.
A field course requiring winter and spring outdoor clothing,
that is a survey of the science, technology, terminology, skills,
60 safety procedures and career implications of natural resources.
This course covers forestry, recreation, wildlife, fisheries management, environmental testing, fire use and fighting and natural
resources technology.
Natural Science of Alaska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2330
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science.
Prerequisite: None. Not open to students with credit in Biology,
Alaska.
A one semester study of geography, major land forms, weather
and plants and animals of Alaska.
Physical Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2615
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
This is a very basic course in physical science that will stress
the general principles of chemistry and physics. The basic physics
section will include emphasis in simple machines, basic electricity
and the various forms of energy. The chemistry section will cover
matter, mixtures and compounds. The student will be presented
with the practical side of physical science that emphasizes the
everyday uses of physics and chemistry.
Physical Sciences Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2615OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is a very basic introduction to physical
science that will stress the general principles of chemistry and
physics. The basic physics section will include emphasis in simple
machines, basic electricity and the various forms of energy. The
chemistry section will cover matter, mixtures and compounds.
The student will be presented with the practical side of physical science that emphasizes the everyday uses of physics and
chemistry.
Physical Science 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2615SP
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This is a very basic course in physical science that will stress
the general principles of chemistry and physics. The basic physics
section will include emphasis in simple machines, basic electricity
and the various forms of energy. The chemistry section will cover
matter, mixtures and compounds. The student will be presented
with the practical side of physical science that emphasizes the
everyday uses of physics and chemistry. Modified curriculum for
Physical Science, as required by student’s IEP.
PLTW Biomedical Innovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8820
Grade: 11–12. Two semesters. ½ Physical science 1st semester, ½
Life science 2nd semester.
Prerequisite: PLTW Medical Interventions.
Academic Credit: ½Physical Science 1st semester, ½ Life Science
2nd semester
In this capstone course, students apply their knowledge and
skills to answer questions or solve problems related to the biomedical sciences. Students design innovative solutions for the
health challenges of the 21st century as they work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics
such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering,
and public health.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
PLTW Civil Engineering & Architecture . . . . . . . . . H8000
Grade: 11–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Algebra I, PLTW Intro to Engineering Design or CAD 1.
Civil Engineering and Architecture is a course that provides an
overview of the fields of civil engineering and architecture with an
emphasis on the interrelationship and dependence of both fields
on each other. Students use state of the art software to solve real
world problems and communicate solutions to hands-on projects
and activities. The major focus of the course is a long-term project that involves the development of a local property site. As you
learn about various aspects of civil engineering and architecture,
you will apply what you learn to the design and development
of this property. There is flexibility for you and your teacher in
developing the property as a simulation or as a real-world experience that civil engineers and architects experience when developing property. The course covers the roles of civil engineers and
architects in project planning, site planning, building design and
project documentation and presentation.
PLTW Computer Integrated Manufacturing . . . . . . H8114
Grade: 11–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Algebra I.
Computer Integrated Manufacturing is a course that enhances computer modeling skills by applying principles of robotics
and automation to the creation of models of three-dimensional
designs. This course is part of the PLTW (Project Lead the
Way) Pre-Engineering Program. The purpose of the Computer
Integrated Manufacturing course is to expose students to the
fundamentals of computerized manufacturing technology. The
course is built around several key concepts: Computer Modeling,
CNC Equipment, CAM, Robotics , Flexible Manufacturing
Systems.
PLTW Digital Electronics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8112
Grade: 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Algebra I.
Digital Electronics™ is a core course of study in the Project
Lead the Way® (PLTW) program. The purpose of this introductory pre-engineering course is to develop a student’s logical thinking
skills by solving problems and designing control systems. In this
manner students will gain a better understanding of the digital
circuits in microelectronic design, manufacturing, computer
technology, and information systems. Students use computer
simulation to learn about the logic of electrons as they design, test
and construct circuits and devices. Students will use the design
process by applying it to problem-solving activities and projects;
develop critical thinking skills by designing and testing their own
solutions; increase communication skills through design and presentation formats; and develop team building skills by working
collaboratively in groups.
and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical
problem by applying the engineering design process. The course
applies and concurrently develops secondary level knowledge and
skills in mathematics, science, and technology.
Students will perform research to choose, validate, and justify a
technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams of
students will design, build, and test their solution. Finally, student
teams will present and defend their original solution to an outside
panel. While progressing through the engineering design process,
students will work closely with experts and will continually hone
their organizational skills, communication and interpersonal
skills, creative and problem solving abilities, and their understanding of the design process.
Engineering Design and Development is a high school level
course that is appropriate for 12th graders. Since the projects on
which student work can vary with student interest and the curriculum focuses on problem solving, this course is appropriate for
students who are interested in any technical career path. It should
be taken as the final capstone PLTW course since it requires application of the knowledge and skills from the PLTW foundation
courses.
PLTW Human Body Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8126
Grade Level 9–12 Two Semesters. Life Science.
Prerequisite: PLTW Principles of Biomedical Science
Human body systems is a two semester course that examines
the interactions of body systems as they explore identity, communication, power, movement, projection, and homeostasis.
Students design experiments, investigate the structures and
functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software
to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and
voluntary action, and respiration, Exploring science in action,
students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work
through interesting real world cases and often play the role of
biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries.
PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design . . . . . . H8110
Grade level 9. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Algebra I.
Introduction to Engineering Design is a course that teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process.
Models of product solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. This course
is part of the PLTW (Project Lead the Way) Pre-Engineering
Program.
PLTW Medical Interventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8821
Grade Level 11-12. Two Semesters. Life science.
Prerequisite: PLTW Human Body Systems.
Prerequisite: 3 PLTW courses including PLTW Principles of
Engineering
Academic Credit: ½ Physical Science per semester.
Engineering Design and Development is the capstone course
in the PLTW high school engineering program. It is an engineering research course in which students work in teams to design
Students investigate the variety of interventions in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the
lives of a fictitious family. The course is a “how-to” manual for
maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body as students explore how to prevent and fight infection; how to screen
and evaluate the code in human DNA; how to prevent, diagnose
and treat cancer; and how to prevail when the organs of the body
begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to
the wide range of interventions related to immunology, surgery,
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
PLTW Engineering Design and Development . . . . H8931
61
genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Each
family case scenario will introduce multiple types of interventions
and will reinforce concepts learned in the two previous courses as
well as present new content. Interventions may range from simple
diagnostic tests to treatment of complex diseases and disorders.
Lifestyle choices and preventative measures are emphasized
throughout the course as well as the important role of scientific
thinking and engineering design play in the development of interventions of the future.
PLTW Principles of Biomedical Science . . . . . . . . H8919
Grade Level: 9–12. Two semesters.
Core Credit: ½ Life science 1st semester, ½ Physical science 2nd
semester
Prerequisite: None.
Principles of Biomedical Sciences is a two semester course
that provides an introduction to the biomedical sciences through
exciting hands on projects and problems. Students investigate the
human body systems and various health conditions including
heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia,
and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to
the death of a fictional person and investigate lifestyle choices
and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s
life. The activities and projects introduce the students to human
physiology, medicine, research processes and bioinformatics. Key
biological concepts including homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the
curriculum. Engineering principles including the design process,
feedback loops, and the relationship of structure to function are
also incorporated. This course is designed to provide an overview
of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the
scientific foundation for subsequent courses.
This course is the first course in the Project Lead the Way
Biomedical Sciences Program.
PLTW Principles of Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8116
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or completion of Algebra I.
Principles of Engineering is a course that helps students understand the field of engineering/engineering technology. Exploring
various technology systems and manufacturing processes help
students learn how engineers and technicians use math, science
and technology in an engineering problem solving process to
benefit people. The course also includes concerns about social and
political consequences of technological change. This course is part
of the PLTW (Project Lead the Way) Pre-Engineering Program.
Conceptual Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2511
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Basic content shall consist of a brief synopsis of classical areas
of physics, i.e., heat, motion, magnetism, mechanics, optics,
energy, light, wave behavior, and electricity. The approach to the
above content areas of physics shall be that of an everyday practical application. Areas of study shall also include an examination
62 of current energy and environmental problems from a physical
science point of view.
AP Physics 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2530
Grade level 11-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Algebra II.
AP Physics 1 is equivalent to a first-semester college course in
algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics
(including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work,
energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also
introduce electric circuits.
AP Physics 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2531
Grade level 11-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: AP Physics 1
AP Physics 2 is the equivalent to a second-semester college
course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; and
atomic and nuclear physics
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2521
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Algebra I concurrent or previous algebra II preferred.
Chemistry preferred.
Designed to give the student an appreciation and understanding of the physical laws of the universe. It is a study of the basic
force of nature. Topics include gravity, electricity, magnetism and
atomic and nuclear forces.
Advanced Placement Physics C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2528
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Physics, completed or currently enrolled in Calculus.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this course is introductory college level material. The student is
expected to meet this college level workload to be successful.
This course is designed to be the equivalent of the first part
of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics
for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering.
Methods of calculus are used wherever appropriate in formulating
physical principles and applying them to physical problems. The
sequence is more intensive and analytic than that in the B course.
The subject matter is mechanics and electricity and magnetism
with approximately equal emphasis on these two areas.
Process Technology 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8140
Grade level 10-12. Two semesters. Physical science.
Prerequisite: Minimum of Algebra A and 1 year of high school
science.
This course is an introduction to process operations
in the Process Technology Industry through an
overview of generation Information, processes, procedures, and
equipment. Processing techniques used in oil and gas, chemical,
mining, power generation, pulp and paper, waste water, food and
beverage, and the pharmaceutical industries will be investigated.
In addition, workplace Information such as safety, quality, and
team building is introduced. Basic processing equipment such as
piping, vales, pumps, compressors, turbines, and motors will be
introduced.
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
King Career Center academic credit
Advanced Health Career Pathways 1 KCC . . . . . . H8910
Grade level 11–12. Grade 10 with instructor/counselor approval.
One semester.
Prerequisite: Biology and/or Health Occupations with a “C” or
better. CPR/First Aid certification or concurrent.
Core academic credits: ½ PE/Health and ½ Life Science.
Advanced Health Career Pathways 2 . . . . . . . . . . . H8911
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Advanced Health Career
Pathways 1.
Core academic credits: ½ Life science.
Advanced Health Care Pathways is a challenging
course designed to prepare students for further
education in the medical field. This rigorous academic class is also
a hands-on, skill building program. Many skills necessary for
employment in health care professions will be taught, practiced
and tested. Students will be exposed to the wide variety of careers
in the medical, dental, veterinary and mental health fields. Career
exploration, portfolio building and an individualized education
pathway will be a vital part of this class. Students will also learn
basic skills and knowledge for entry-level health care professions.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of written
work and test scores, mastery of skills, professionalism and participation in health-related community activities. Attendance, teamwork and class participation are vital components for this class.
Second semester students will expand their understanding of
human anatomy and medical terminology. Students will learn
medical assisting skills specific to patient examination, diagnostic
procedures, specimen collection, laboratory procedures, infection
control, medical asepsis and the extensive clerical duties of the
medical office. Job shadowing for highly motivated students and
an opportunity to apply for on-the-job training may be available.
Job entry opportunities:
Physician’s office, hospitals, extended care facilities, home
health care, dental clinic, veterinary clinic
Aviation Maintenance Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . H8401
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical Science.
Aviation Maintenance Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . . H8402
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Maintenance
Technology 1.
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical science.
This is a 4-semester program taught at the
University of Alaska Aviation Complex at Merrill
Field. Different subject matter is covered each semester. Students
can earn college credits.
AMT students learn repair and maintenance of aircraft in 4
subject areas: welding, bonded structures, sheet metal and engine
theory. Additionally, students will learn about aircraft hardware
and lock wire as well as basic aerodynamics or how aircraft fly.
Students must purchase leather gloves for welding class. All
other supplied safety equipment use is mandatory.
Job entry opportunities:
Entry level line attendant, baggage handler, mechanics helper
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Aviation Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8406
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Physical Science.
Aviation Technology 2 KCC
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Aviation Technology 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Physical science.
This 2-semester program is taught at a satellite location, utilizing the University of Alaska Aviation
Complex at Merrill Field. Different subject matter is covered each
semester.
Students will focus on knowledge areas required by the FAA
Private Pilot Written Exam. First semesters will include aerodynamics, aircraft systems, flight instruments, performance, weight
and balance, and the FARs. Students will demonstrate acquired
flight skills in a state of the art flight simulator.
Second semester will learn the importance of good communication and teamwork required by Air Traffic Control. They will
learn airspace, weather, and equipment requirements, and experience an advanced air traffic control tower simulator. Students
will learn about lighting, signage and markings required for various types of airports, and will be introduced to the demands of
funding, design and construction. Basic navigation, weather and
weather reports, aeronautical decision making and physiology will
also be covered. There is some overlap of information between
semesters.
Students will develop a scholarship folder, prepare a resumé,
learn job skills and visit a variety of aviation related job sites.
Second semester students may be eligible to participate in
job-shadowing. Community service will be strongly encouraged.
Job entry opportunities:
Entry level position/cargo operations, entry level position/
fixed based operations (FBO), line/ramp personnel, customer
service/front desk personnel
Culinary Arts 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8311
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Core academic credits: ½ Physical Science.
Culinary Arts 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8312
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Culinary Arts 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Physical science.
Culinary Arts 3 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8313
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Culinary Arts 2.
Core academic credit: ½ Physical Science.
This program is designed to introduce students to the skills necessary
for success in a career in the art of preparing fine cuisine. Cooking
instruction includes American regional, European and Asian cuisines. Students will be instructed on classical culinary skills
including knife skills, station organization, cooking methods and
techniques, soups, stocks and sauces, vegetable, starch, meat and
fish cookery. Baking instruction includes basic, advanced and
classical pastries. Students will become familiar with the use and
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
63
care of professional culinary equipment as well as understanding
and adherence to modern kitchen sanitation and safety standards.
Students will prepare and serve lunch daily in the KCC cafeteria
as well as required caterings, and will complete a resumé.
Second and third semester students will continue to hone
their skills and develop leadership skills. On a team or as individuals, students will work on projects addressing world cuisine,
restaurant menu development and culinary careers. Students are
required to job shadow and complete a scholarship portfolio.
The Culinary Arts program is a member of SkillsUSA, a
partnership of students, teachers and industry working together
to ensure America has a skilled workforce. SkillsUSA’s mission
is to help its members become world-class workers, leaders and
responsible American citizens.
Job entry opportunities:
Cook, baker, camp/lodge cook, caterer, food server; host/hostess
Electronics &
Telecommunications Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . H8245
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Algebra I with a grade of “C” or better.
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical science.
Electronics &
Telecommunications Technology 2 KCC . . . . . . . . H8246
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C: or better in Computer Electronics
Technology 1.
Core academic credits: ½ Math and ½ Physical science.
This course integrates extensive hands-on activities
with math and interactive computer programs to
emphasize basic electronics theory and application. Students can
earn college credits and electronics certifications that may be
given upon successful course completion and students may enjoy
advanced standing at other post-secondary institutions.
Each semester the subject matter is different and cumulative.
Computer Electronics Technology 1 and 2 can be used for science, math and elective credit.
1st semester: Personnel skills to include careers, business
ethics, and dealing with customers. Basic D.C. electricity which
includes safety, soldering, schematics, series & parallel circuits,
tools, components, cabling and test equipment. Also includes
fiber optics, computer basics, building and troubleshooting.
2nd semester: Complex D.C. circuits, digital electronics, intro
to A.C., home theater and sound systems, robot building and
intro to computer networking.
Job entry opportunities:
Cable/satellite TV installer, computer & electronics sales,
personal computer setup and repair, network troubleshooting,
electrical apprenticeship, home security/theater, customer service
technician.
Kenai Peninsula
College
Emergency Medical Technology 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . H8950
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Life Science.
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
64 Emergency Medical Technology students learn to work as part of a pro-
fessional pre-hospital medical team. This is a State Health
Department approved course in which qualifying students can
test for EMT-1 certification following the course. Students may
earn college credits through the University of Alaska Anchorage
or UAF.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of written
test scores, mastery of skills and professionalism. Students can
also obtain an American Heart Association CPR card as well as
an Emergency Trauma Technician certification. Must be age 18
within six months of test for state EMT.
Job entry opportunities:
Professional ski patrol, EMT private ambulance service, EMT
volunteer fire department, emergency room technician
Fire and Rescue Services 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8129
Grade Level 11–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Physical Science.
The goal of rescue is to locate and
access injured or trapped victims,
stabilize the emergency situation, and transport the patients to
safety while managing any injuries and avoiding additional risk or
injury to the patients, rescuers or the public. The goal of this
course is to provide the skills and knowledge necessary to participate in a wide variety of fire-rescue operations while insuring
safety. The fire component is an introduction to fire fighting as a
career and includes intense physical skills and agility as well as
basic fire operations.
Types of rescues include water rescue, vehicle crashes, fire
rescues, hazardous materials, rescues from confined spaced and
collapsed structures, and rescues at large scale disaster scenes.
Students will follow guidelines set forth by the International Fire
Service Training Association, OSHA, FEMA, and the National
Incident Management System (NIMS) while training.
Teamwork and professionalism are essential parts of this class.
It is primarily a practical course that emphasizes the importance
of hands-on training and skills. The skills-based learning will be
supplemented by lectures, discussions, and online coursework.
Students can receive three college credits through UAA and
UAF. Job placement assistance and/or advanced training programs is available through the class.
Job entry opportunities.
Security personnel, volunteer firefighter, emergency dispatcher.
Apprenticeship
Program
Horticulture & Landscape Design 1 KCC . . . . . . . .H8975
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Life Science.
Horticulture & Landscape Design 2 KCC . . . . . . . .H8976
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Horticulture & Landscape
Design 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Life science.
Horticulture provides training in the fields of landscaping,
floricul­ture, turf, garden center, nursery and greenhouse operations, tree service work, and athletic field maintenance. Also
included is plant identification, physiology, propagation and
landscape design. Students will also be responsible for operating
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
and maintaining a commercial greenhouse located on school
grounds.
Fall semester students will explore various fields within horticulture, study and explore plant physiology, landscape design
principles, landscape tools and equipment and floral design.
Spring semester students will study plant physiology and reactions to greenhouse environments in-depth, horticulture fields of
personal interest, complete independent projects and experiments
as well as research cultural requirements of crops grown in the
school greenhouse.
Students also visit local sites to gain knowledge in area educational and employment opportunities.
Job entry opportunities:
Commercial greenhouse, retail floral shops, landscaping, garden centers, lawn care operations, golf course grounds, tree service companies, snow removal, parks and recreation, commercial
grounds maintenance.
Natural Resources Management 1 KCC . . . . . . . . H8710
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Alaska Studies, ½ Physical Science and
½ Social Studies per semester.
Natural Resources Management 2 KCC . . . . . . . . H8711
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Natural Resources
Management 1.
Core academic credit: ½ Physical science.
Learn about and experience the
beauty and mystery of Alaska while
exploring careers that manage the natural resources of our state.
Through classroom and outdoor skill building activities students
will examine soil and water conservation, wildlife and fisheries
management, and forestry and recreation in both historical and
contemporary contexts. This course examines the geography, history, political and economic forces that have shaped contemporary Alaska. Course content is organized around five themes of
population, land, resources, governance and cultural landscape.
The NRM program offers career pathways to Alaska resource
development and conservation career fields by offering Tech Prep
college credits toward degrees and opportunities for paid summer
natural resource career internships.
This course is an integration of social studies and physical
science with career field exploration. ASD’s Alaska Studies curriculum is taught in the fall. This course includes a review of the
history and the political and economic forces that determine
contemporary Alaska resource development decisions and other
issues confronting the state.
Job entry opportunities:
Summer employment programs, professional mentorships,
landscaping, tree service companies, greenhouse operations, forestry aide, environmental specialist, environmental interpreter,
guide assistant, campground and park aides.
Univ. of Alaska
Fairbanks
Veterinary Science 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8923
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in Veterinary Science 1 and
teacher recommendation.
Core academic credit: ½ Life science.
Veterinary Science is a rigorous course designed to prepare students for careers in veterinary and other health professions. This
class requires both academic and physical participation and skills.
Students will be exposed to the competencies needed to work in
the veterinary and health setting. Students will learn safety and
responsibility, animal anatomy, infection control, canine grooming, first aid and CPR for humans, cats and dogs, restraints,
veterinary terminology, roles and responsibilities of the types of
veterinary workers, ethics, records, scheduling and appointments,
communication and client relations. Career exploration and portfolio building are all a part of this class.
Students will participate in a canine day care, a dog wash and
grooming program. They will be evaluated by written tests, mastery of skills, professionalism, and participation in community
activities. Teamwork and participation are essential components
of success for this class. Excellent attendance is critical for student
success and animal health.
Second semester students will continue their study of veterinary science and develop a deeper understanding of terminology,
lab techniques, surgical assisting, diagnostic procedures and office
duties.
Job entry opportunities.
Kennel assistant, dog walker, pet sitter, veterinary assistant,
veterinary receptionist, dog wash, dog grooming, human medicine entry level positions.
SOCIAL STUDIES
World History (Circa 500 BC–AD 1800) . . . . . . . . . H3315
Grade level 10. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This course provides a study of world history. Included in
the first semester of the ASD world history curriculum are the
geographic regions of Greece, Rome, India, The Far East; China,
Japan, Korea, and Africa. Geography, humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science, and technology are some of
the themes/perspectives by which these areas of the world will be
explored.
Included in the second semester are the geographic regions
of the Middle East, ancient Americas, Byzantium, and Europe.
Geography, humanities, religions, government, economy, society,
science, and technology are some of the themes/perspectives by
which these areas of the world will be explored.
World History Online
(Circa 500 BC-AD 1800) . . . . . . . . . . H3315OLS1/H3315OLS2
Grade level 10. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
Grade Level 11–12 One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Life Science and ½ PE/Health.
This online course provides a study of world history. Included
in the first semester are the geographic regions of Greece, Rome,
India, The Far East, China, Japan, Korea, and Africa. Geography,
humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science,
and technology are some of the themes/perspectives by which
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Veterinary Science 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8921
65
these areas of the world will be explored. Included in the second
semester are the geographic regions of the Middle East, ancient
Americas, Byzantium, and Europe. Geography, humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science, and technology are
some of the themes/perspectives by which these areas of the world
will be explored.
World History 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3315SP
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters, required.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course provides a study of world history. Included in
the 9-1 portion of the ASD world history curriculum are the
geographic regions of Greece, Rome, India, The Far East; China,
Japan, Korea, Africa, Middle East, ancient Americas, Byzantium,
and Europe.. Geography, humanities, religions, government,
economy, society, science, and technology are some of the
themes/perspectives by which these areas of the world will be
explored. Modified curriculum for World History, as required by
student’s IEP.
Honors History: World History
(Circa 500 BC–AD 1800) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3315H
Grade level 10. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Social studies teacher recommendation required.
This course provides an in-depth study of world history.
Extensive reading, writing, research, and project development
will be required on a daily basis outside of class to meet course
expectations. Included in the first semester of the ASD world
history curriculum are the geographic regions of Greece, Rome,
India, The Far East; China, Japan, Korea, and Africa. Geography,
humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science, and
technology are some of the themes/perspectives by which these
areas of the world will be explored.
Included in the second semester are the geographic regions
of the Middle East, Ancient Americas, Byzantium, and Europe.
Geography, humanities, religions, government, economy, society,
science, and technology are some of the themes/perspectives by
which these areas of the world will be explored.
U.S. History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3317
Grade level 11. Required. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This course provides the study of United States history with
some integration of world history. Historiography, geography,
economics, government, humanities, sociology, religions, philosophy, science, and technology are some of the themes/perspectives
by which US history will be examined. The first semester will
investigate/explore the American experience through the post
WW I era (roaring twenties) and the beginning of the Great
Depression. The second semester will investigate/explore the
American experience from the Great Depression through contemporary America.
US History Online . . . . . . . . . . . H3317OLS1/H3317OLS2
Grade level 11. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course provides the study of United States history
66 with some integration of world history. Historiography, geography, economics, government, humanities, sociology, religions,
philosophy, science, and technology are some of the themes/perspectives by which US history will be examined. The first semester
will investigate/explore the American experience through the
post WW I era (roaring twenties) and the beginning of the Great
Depression. The second semester will investigate/explore the
American experience from the Great Depression through contemporary America.
U.S. History 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3317SP
Grade level 9–12. Required.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course provides the study of United States history with
some integration of world history. Historiography, geography,
economics, government, humanities, sociology, religions, philosophy, science, and technology are some of the themes/perspectives
by which US history will be examined. U.S. History will investigate/explore the American experience until the stock market
“crash” in 1929 and the beginning of the Great Depression. It will
also investigate/explore the American experience from the Great
Depression through contemporary America. Modified curriculum for U.S. History, as required by student’s IEP.
Honors History: U.S. History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3317H
Grade level 11. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Social studies teacher recommendation required.
This course provides an in-depth study of United States history
with some integration of world history. Extensive reading, writing, research, and project development will be required on a daily
basis outside of class to meet course expectations. Historiography,
geography, economics, government, humanities, sociology,
religions, philosophy, science, and technology are some of the
themes/perspectives by which US history will be examined. In
the first semester this course will investigate/explore the American
experience through the post WWI ear (roaring twenties) and the
beginning of the Great Depression. In the second semester this
course will investigate/explore the American experience from the
Great Depression through contemporary America.
Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3080
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Students will examine the fundamental principles of economic theory and how they apply to their lives and the world
around them. Students will learn the economic way of thinking
as they study the role of consumers, producers and government
in the economy. They will explore a number of microeconomic
and macroeconomic issues, international markets, and financial
literacy
Economics Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3080OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is designed to teach students economics
concepts and principles and to introduce them to important economic institutions. Students will learn to apply economic reasoning to their lives as citizens, consumers, workers and producers.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Business Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3081
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course focuses on applying basic microeconomic and
macroeconomic issues, international markets, and financial literacy to the creation and operation of a business. Students will
learn the economic way of thinking as they study the role of
consumers, producers and government in the economy. Students
may participate in a student-run business or online simulation as
part of this course.
Consumer Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3082
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course focuses on the economic way of thinking and
application of basic economics with an emphasis on financial
literacy. Students will explore a number of microeconomic and
macroeconomic issues, and global markets as they relate to the
individual in the economic system. They will learn how their
economic choices effect their lives as citizens, consumers, workers
and producers.
Consumer Economics 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3082SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course focuses on the economic way of thinking and
application of basic economics with an emphasis on financial
literacy. Students will explore a number of microeconomic and
macroeconomic issues, and global markets as they relate to the
individual in the economic system. They will learn how their
economic choices effect their lives as citizens, consumers, workers
and producers.
Consumer Economics 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . H3018LS
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed as a transitional skills class for students with an IEP and enrolled in a Life Skills 1 program to
prepare students for financial survival. Areas to be covered will
be a study of sources and procedures necessary for job successes,
which will include payroll deductions, income taxes, benefits
and development of wise spending habits through sound money
management. This course also addresses the skills necessary for
successfully obtaining a job. This course is repeatable 10 times
and may be counted as ½ credit of economics, social studies elective or general elective. Alternate curriculum for students enrolled
in a Life Skills 2 as required by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
successfully obtaining a job. This course is repeatable 10 times
and may be counted as ½ credit of economics, social studies elective or general elective. Alternate curriculum for students enrolled
in a Life Skills as required by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
Advanced Placement Economics;
Micro and Macro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3083 /H3084
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None
One full year meets both the economics and social studies elective
requirement.
This is a college-level course divided into two sections and it
is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement test.
The first section, microeconomics, provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to
the functions of individual decision makers, consumers and producers. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of
product markets and includes the study of factor markets and the
role of government.
Macroeconomics is the second section of the course and provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of
economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. It places
emphasis on the study of national income and price determination and also develops familiarity with economic performance
measures, economic growth and international economics.
Advanced Placement Economics,
Micro Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3083OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Taking both Macro and Micro Economics meets both the
economics and social studies elective requirement.
This is a college-level online course divided into two sections;
it is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement
test.
Microeconomics provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, consumers and producers. It
places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product
markets and includes the study of factor markets and the role of
government.
Advanced Placement Economics,
Macro Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3084OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed as a transitional skills class for students with an IEP and enrolled in a Life Skills 2 program to
prepare students for financial survival. Areas to be covered will
be a study of sources and procedures necessary for job successes,
which will include payroll deductions, income taxes, benefits
and development of wise spending habits through sound money
management. This course also addresses the skills necessary for
Taking both Macro and Micro Economics meets both the economics and social studies elective requirement.
This is a college-level online course divided into two sections;
it is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement
test.
Macroeconomics provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic
system as a whole. It places emphasis on the study of national
income and price determination and also develops familiarity
with economic performance measures, economic growth and
international economics.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Consumer Economics 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . H3018LS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
67
Alaska Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3110
Alaska Studies, Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3110H
Grade level 9–12. One semester, required.
Prerequisite: None.
Alaska Studies is an in-depth exploration of the rich geographic and cultural background of the state and its people from
the early native peoples to the Russian era through statehood to
the present. This course includes examination of the geography,
history and the political and economic forces that have shaped
contemporary Alaska. Content is organized around five themes
of population, land, resource, governance and cultural landscape.
The course seeks to ensure that students have a strong foundation
in the historic and cultural contexts of issues facing the state so
they will develop a broad sense of community and strengthen
skills that will encourage thoughtful consideration of issues and
choices facing Alaska.
Alaska Studies Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3110OL
Grade level 9–12. Required. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Alaska Studies is an online in-depth exploration of the rich
geographic and cultural background of the state and its people
from the early native peoples to the Russian era through statehood to the present. This course includes examination of the
geography, history and the political and economic forces that
have shaped contemporary Alaska. Content is organized around
five themes: population, land, resource, governance and cultural
landscape. The course seeks to ensure that students have a strong
foundation in the historic and cultural contexts of issues facing
the state so they will develop a broad sense of community and
strengthen skills that will encourage thoughtful consideration of
issues and choices facing Alaska.
Alaska Studies 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3110SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester, required.
Prerequisite: None.
Alaska Studies is an in-depth exploration of the rich geographic and cultural background of the state and its people from
the early native peoples to the Russian era through statehood to
the present. This course includes examination of the geography,
history and the political and economic forces that have shaped
contemporary Alaska. Content is organized around five themes
of population, land, resource, governance and cultural landscape.
The course seeks to ensure that students have a strong foundation
in the historic and cultural contexts of issues facing the state so
they will develop a broad sense of community and strengthen
skills that will encourage thoughtful consideration of issues and
choices facing Alaska. Modified curriculum for Alaska Studies, as
required by student’s IEP.
United States Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3075
Grade level 12. One semester, required.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is founded on the belief that to become an
informed and active citizen, an understanding of government is
essential. This course will feature both the structure of government and the function of politics. It will include both theory and
practical application of the following: 1) foundations of United
68 States government, 2) institutions and policy making, 3) principles of the United States Constitution, 4) roles and responsibilities of the citizen, and 5) political culture.
United States Government Online . . . . . . . . . . . H3075OL
Grade level 12. Required. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is founded on the belief that to become an
informed and active citizen, an understanding of government is
essential. This course will feature both the structure of government and the function of politics. It will include both theory and
practical application of the following: 1) foundations of United
States government, 2) institutions and policy making, 3) principles of the United States Constitution, 4) roles and responsibilities of the citizen, and 5) political culture.
United States Government 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3075SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester, required.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is founded on the belief that to become an
informed and active citizen, an understanding of government is
essential. This course will feature both the structure of government and the function of politics. It will include both theory and
practical application of the following: 1) foundations of United
States government, 2) institutions and policy making, 3) principles of the United States Constitution, 4) roles and responsibilities of the citizen, and 5) political culture. Modified curriculum
for United States Government, as required by student’s IEP.
Advanced Placement United States
Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3062
Grade Level 12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Students taking both AP U.S. Government and AP Comparative
Government and Politics meet both the U.S. Govt and the one
semester social studies elective graduation requirements. Taking
one semester of AP U.S. Government meets the government
requirement.
This course is designed for the student who is capable of
doing lower division college work. The AP U.S. Government and
Politics class will address the following topics: 1) constitutional
underpinnings of United States government, 2) political beliefs
and behaviors, 3) political parties and interest groups, 4) the three
branches of national government, 5) public policy making and
6) civil liberties and civil rights. This course will prepare students
for the advanced placement test in U. S. Government and Politics
and will fulfill the requirement for U. S. Government.
Advanced Placement
US Government Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3062OL
Grade level 12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Taking one semester of AP U.S. Government meets the government requirement.
This online course is designed for the student who is capable of
doing lower division college work. The AP U.S. Government class
will address the following topics: 1) constitutional underpinnings
of United States government, 2) political beliefs and behaviors,
3) political parties and interest groups, 4) the three branches of
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
national government, 5) public policy making and 6) civil liberties and civil rights. This course will prepare students for the
advanced placement test in U.S. Government and Politics and
will fulfill the requirement for U. S. Government.
Advanced Placement Comparative
Government and Politics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2901
Grade level 12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Taking one semester of AP Comparative Government and Politics
meets the social studies elective requirement.
This course is designed for the student who is capable of
doing lower division college work. The course provides intensive
study of the different political and economic systems of the following countries: United Kingdom, France, Russia, China and
Mexico, India or Nigeria. This course will prepare students for
the advanced placement test in AP Comparative Government
and Politics.
Advanced Placement European History . . . . . . . . H3441
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
One full year meets the one semester social studies elective
requirement and earns an additional one semester general elective
requirement.
This course offers students an opportunity for a challenging,
in-depth examination of the course of European cultural development from the middle ages to contemporary times. Students will
be prepared for the advanced placement test and will 1) develop
an understanding of some of the principle themes in Modern
European History, 2) learn to read historical material analytically
and critically, 3) weigh historical evidence and interpretations and
arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgments, 4) learn
how to cite sources and credit the ideas and phrases of others, 5)
use proficient expression in correct English, 6) research a subject
carefully before drawing conclusions and gain familiarity with
essay examinations, the use and interpretation of maps and other
graphic materials, note-taking from both printed materials and
lectures and writing short research papers.
Advanced Placement United States History . . . . . H3023
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
One full year meets the one semester social studies elective
requirement and earns an additional one semester general elective
requirement or one full year meets the US History requirement.
This course is designed to challenge the ambitious student who
has the ability and interest in American history and is capable
of doing lower division college level work. The purposes of this
course are to provide a much more intensive study of the United
States history and preparation for the advanced placement test in
this field.
Advanced Placement
US History Online . . . . . . . . . . . H3023OLS1/H3023OLS2
This online course is designed to challenge the ambitious student who has the ability and interest in American history and is
capable of doing lower division college level work. The purposes
of this course are to provide a much more intensive study of the
United States history and preparation for the advanced placement
test in this field.
Advanced Placement World History . . . . . . . . . . . H3313
Grade level 11–12. One year
Prerequisite: Grade 11, 12 or Instructor Approval
AP World History is a college level course based on a global
perspective of the world and human interactions from 8000 BCE
to the present day. The themes for this course will be; The impact
of interaction among and within major societies, The impact
of technology, economics, and demography on people and the
environment, Systems of social structure and gender structure,
Cultural, religious, and intellectual developments, and Changes
in functions and structures of states and in attitudes toward states
and political identities, including the emergence of the nation
state. Students will refine their analytical abilities and critical
thinking skills in order to understand historical and geographical
context, make comparisons across cultures, use primary sources,
and learn to recognize different interpretations and historical
frameworks. Students will become proficient at writing to the various types of essays prompts and answering the multiple-choice
questions that will be on the AP exam.
Advanced Placement Art History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5017
Grade level 11–12. One year
Prerequisite: Grade 11, 12 or Instructor Approval
Art Studio, Art I, Art II, AP Art Studio, World History or European
History helpful
Two-semester course: AP Exam required for AP credit
Material Fee: none
One full year meets the one semester social studies elective
requirement and earns an additional one semester general elective
requirement.
This course is designed for the student who desires to investigate the evolution of art from the Paleolithic to the present
day. Students will be prepared for the advanced placement test
and will: l) Develop an understanding of the elements of art,
fundamental art historical terminology, and technical processes;
2) Analyze how issues such as war events, patronage, gender,
and the function and effect of art create the historical context, in
which art is best understood; 3) Compare and contrast the painting, architecture, sculpture, and other media of art, within the
Western tradition, between historical and stylistic periods, and;
4) Discuss art beyond the European tradition from among the
following cultures: The Ancient Near East, Egypt, Africa beyond
Egypt, Islam, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania.
Advanced Placement
Art History Online . . . . . . . . . . . H5017OLS1/H5017OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
One full year meets the one semester social studies elective
requirement and earns an additional one semester general elective
requirement or one full year meets the US History requirement.
Grade level 11–12, or, by instructor’s approval. Two-semester
course.
Prerequisite: None. It is helpful to have had Art Studio, Art I, Art II,
AP Art Studio, World History and/or European History. AP Exam is
required for AP credit. One full year meets the one semester social
studies elective requirement and earns an additional one semester
general elective requirement.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
69
This online course is designed for the student who desires to
investigate the evolution of art from the Paleolithic to the present
day. Students will be prepared for the advanced placement test
and will: 1) develop an understanding of the elements of art,
fundamental art historical terminology, and technical processes;
2) analyze how issues such as world events, patronage, gender,
and the function and effect of art create the historical context in
which art is best understood; 3) compare and contrast the painting, architecture, sculpture, and other media of art, within the
Western tradition, between historical and stylistic periods; and,
4) discuss art beyond the European tradition from among the
following cultures: the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Africa beyond
Egypt, Islam, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania.
Social Studies 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3013LS1
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed for students to learn about the world
around them and to become informed and active citizens.
Students will learn about the foundations of government, our
own US Constitution, politics and the roles and responsibilities
of being a good citizen. They will also learn about their local community and how they can be contributing members. Alternate
curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 1 class as required
by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
Social Studies 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3013LS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed for students to learn about the world
around them and to become informed and active citizens.
Students will learn about the foundations of government, our
own US Constitution, politics and the roles and responsibilities
of being a good citizen. They will also learn about their local community and how they can be contributing members. Alternate
curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills 2 class as required
by their IEP. This course is repeatable.
SOCIAL STUDIES
ELECTIVES
The specific courses listed below are the courses that meet
the 1⁄2 credit social studies elective graduation requirement.
Although organized into two categories, Geography/Area Studies
and History/Social Sciences, any one course from either category
meets that requirement. These semester-long courses are intended
for juniors and seniors only.
Geography/Area Studies
Geography: Africa Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3430
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Africa studies will focus on the physical geography and the
diverse cultural forces that affect contemporary Africa. In this
course, students will discuss early civilizations, imperialism, colonialism, the rise of nationalism and the emergence of independent
70 African nations. The changing role of African nations in the modern world will be examined.
Geography: Asia Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3415
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Asia studies will focus on the physical geography and cultural
factors that characterize this huge region. Students will examine
the diverse social, political, cultural and economic forces that
affect regions of the world’s most populated continent. Students
will discuss early civilizations, dynasties, religions, beliefs, environmental issues, sub-regions, changing history and the region’s
contributions to the world. Issues facing contemporary Asia will
also be explored.
Contemporary Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3655
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course will focus on the social, political, cultural and geographic forces that have created contemporary world “hot spots.”
Students will discuss the evolution of these issues on the world
stage and the implications of their resolution or non-resolution.
Environmental Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3092
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Environmental Studies emphasizes how the diverse people and
cultures of the world affect the land on which they live. Students
will examine the historical context of how local geography influenced the decisions that a people made. Then, as industrialization
became widespread, how those decisions affected the world’s
geography and environment. The interrelationships existing
between economic development and the environment will also
be explored.
Geography: European Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3638
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Approved by NCAA
European studies will examine the physical geography, cultures, history, economies and diversity of the people in this
region. The course will focus upon an in-depth study of a selected
sub-region or provide a comparative study of several European
nations. Contemporary issues and problems will be examined as
well as the region’s impact upon the world.
Global Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3030
Global Geography, Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3030H
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is ideal for those curious about our world. The
course concentrates on developing geographic skills and concepts
so that students can ask questions about the world and then
gather, organize, analyze and apply the geographic information.
For example, students will study world population growth and
distribution, patterns of migration, how climate affects human
habitation and distribution and how people use resources.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Global Geography 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3030SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is ideal for those curious about our world. The
course concentrates on developing geographic skills and concepts
so that students can ask questions about the world and then gather, organize, analyze and apply the geographic information. For
example, students will study world population growth and distribution, patterns of migration, how climate affects human habitation and distribution and how people use re-sources. Modified
curriculum for Global Geography, as required by student’s IEP.
The course is repeatable 10 times.
International Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3630
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course studies political geography among nations in the
modern world. Emphasis is placed upon the history of United
States foreign policy and how it is determined and implemented.
Contemporary, topical issues will be studied in the context of
their effect on the interests of the United States.
Geography: Latin America Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . H3635
This course will focus upon the physical geography and diverse
cultural elements found within the Pacific Rim region. Major
countries surrounding and within the Pacific region will be the
focus of study in this course. An analysis of the relationships
among Pacific Rim cultures and nations will also be conducted to
examine the impact of the region on the world today.
United Nations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3461
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
United Nations is the study of the physical and cultural geography of selected member states in the organization and their
relationship to key issues being examined by the organization.
Students will also examine the functions and roles of the United
Nations in the contemporary world. Emphasis is placed upon
the process and issues of policy making. Students may participate
in a model United Nations as representatives of a member state.
This participation may require a commitment of time beyond the
regular class schedule.
Geography: U.S. Regional Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . H3637
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course will focus on the physical geography and cultural factors that characterize this region. Latin America includes
Mexico, Caribbean nations and the nations of Central and South
America. Students will study the characteristics which make the
region unique and develop a knowledge of the contemporary
issues. Current issues may include the development of a democracy, economic development, populations and environmental issues
and challenges.
U.S. Regional Studies will focus on the physical geography and
cultural factors that characterize sub-regions in the United States.
In this course, students will examine the geographic, political,
cultural and economic diversity of the United States. Each region
(e.g. Northwest, Southwest) will be examined for its uniqueness
and its influence over other parts of the country. Students will
analyze the evolution of American culture from an agrarian society to a technological-industrial society and investigate how this
evolution has developed regional characteristics in areas such as
foods, clothing, traditions, festivals, vocabulary and dialects
Geography: Middle East Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3455
History/Social Sciences
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Approved by NCAA
This course will focus upon the physical and cultural geography of this important region. The important role of the region in
the global community will be examined. Students will investigate
the relationships existing between the people and nations within
the region. Key themes will address how the region’s religion, terrorism and oil influences the world.
Geography: North America Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . H3636
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course will focus upon the physical and cultural geography of this region or selected sub-regions. An analysis of the
relationships among North American nations and cultures may
be conducted to examine the impact of the region on the world
today. Within that geographic context, the course will focus upon
the cultural and physical forces that affect contemporary North
America.
Affective Skill Development 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . H3135SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed for students with an IEP to assist with
problem solving, anger management, conflict resolution, alternative coping skills and goal setting techniques. Individual needs
and concerns are addressed on a student-by-student basis. This
course is repeatable 10 times for ½ social studies elective credit or
general elective credit.
Ancient Civilizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3470
Ancient Civilizations, Honors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3470H
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is designed to allow an in-depth study of
early worlds from the Americas to China, India, Africa and
Mesopotamia. This course explores why and where early civilizations developed and compares their religion, culture, literature,
science, technological achievements and their economic and
political systems. Sample topics include: pyramids, rise and fall
of great empires, high technology of the day, myths, arts, sports,
foods and leisure of the ancients and great warriors and their
weapons.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Geography: Pacific Rim Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3033
71
Ancient Civilizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3470SP
Grade level 9-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to allow an in-depth study of
early worlds from the Americas to China, India, Africa and
Mesopotamia. This course explores why and where early civilizations developed and compares their religion, culture, literature,
science, technological achievements and their economic and
political systems. Sample topics include: pyramids, rise and fall
of great empires, high technology of the day, myths, arts, sports,
foods and leisure of the ancients and great warriors and their
weapons.
Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3020
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This is a study of humankind around the world and throughout time to seek understanding of human diversity. Students in
this course will explore how the environment, culture, history and
technology affect human development. Learn how old bones and
artifacts can unlock the mystery of humankind. Sample topics
include fieldwork and its methodology, early civilizations and
societies, famous anthropologists and their discoveries, cultures
past and present and how they compare.
Child Development/Parenting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8370
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is designed to improve the competence of adolescents
in working with young children by increasing their awareness of
child growth and development. Course work includes information about family planning, pregnancy, child growth and development, parenting skills and the family environment. Students
also observe and work with young children either in a class-run
preschool or arranged alternative. This course will fulfill a social
studies graduation requirement or elective credit.
Comparative World Religions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3465
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is a study of religions as an integral part of daily
life. Students will investigate the history and beliefs of selected
world religions. The emphasis will be on the practices and principles and how they affect human behavior. How can people of
different cultures cooperate if they do not understand each other’s
underlying belief systems? Sample topics include world religions
and their belief structures; traditions, customs and behaviors; key
historical events and people; the roles of religion and philosophy
in our contemporary world and the impact of religion and philosophy on economic, political and social decisions.
The Constitution and the Bill of Rights . . . . . . . . . H3050
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is a study of the founding principles and ideas
underlying the U.S. political system. Students will examine how
these important principles and ideas have worked throughout
history and in the U.S. today. This class will explore the following
questions: what are the philosophical and historical foundations
72 of the U.S. political system? How did the framers create the
Constitution? How did the values and principles embodied in
the Constitution shape American institutions and practices? How
have the protections of the Bill of Rights been developed and
expanded? What rights does the Bill of Rights protect? What are
the roles of the citizen in U.S. democracy?
Criminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3615
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Criminology is a study in the nature and causes of crime, its
control and related punishment issues. Students will explore why
people become criminals, how do we control criminals and how
crime affects young people. Sample questions include: what are
common crimes? How do juvenile crime patterns compare with
adult? What are the different types of crimes? How do we police?
What is organized crime? How does a citizen become part of the
solution? How are property crime patterns different from violent
crime patterns?
Criminology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3615OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Criminology is a study in the nature and causes of crime, its
control and related punishment issues. Students will explore
online why people become criminals, how we control criminals
and how crime affects young people. Sample questions include:
What are common crimes? How do juvenile crime patterns compare with adult? What are the different types of crimes? How do
we police? What is organized crime? How does a citizen become
part of the solution? How are property crime patterns different
from violent crime patterns?
Dignity in Diversity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3510
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Dignity in Diversity focuses on four primary concepts to
inspire students toward and prepare them for a democratic society. These concepts include democracy/equity, cross-cultural
understanding, interdependence and socio-cultural exchange. The
methodology of the course encourages students to understand
more than one perspective in a dilemma, to place themselves in
the position of other people and to be willing to express ideas
in class without fear of ridicule. Through an interdisciplinary
approach that uses social studies and literature, students have an
opportunity to view the relationship of history to their lives and
to explore the roles and responses of individuals and groups confronting contemporary difficult issues and dilemmas.
The Holocaust and Human Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . H3513
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course allows students to explore, in-depth, one of the
most fascinating yet tragic events of the twentieth century: The
Holocaust. Students will examine the root causes which led to
the rise of the Nazi party and the reaction of Germans—and the
world—to Hitler and his plans of genocide. This course is best
suited for individuals willing to reflect upon their own views of
human behavior and consider the lessons of history. Questions
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
which will be addressed include: what happens when prejudice
and hatred are left unchecked? Can a democratic country produce
a dictator? What did the Nazis believe and did anyone oppose
them? How did Nazis make Germans obey orders? Have there
been any other genocides like the Holocaust? Can individuals
make a difference in the outcome of historic events?
Humanities of Western Civilizations . . . . . . . . . . . H3505
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course will explore the roots of western society from the
rise of Greece through the formation of modern Europe. Students
will examine western history, philosophy, arts and theology. The
contributions of Western culture in the international arena and
the effects of these interactions will also be examined. Students
will investigate the following topics: contributions of the ancient
classical civilizations in Greece and Rome, the role of western
culture in creating democratic traditions, scientific and artistic
advancements that made up the Renaissance, the roles that
Judaism and Christianity have played in shaping the western
world and beyond.
Law Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3625
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Law Studies is the place to discover how the legal system
works. This course aids students in applying legal principles and
procedures through active participation in civil, criminal and
constitutional mock trials. Sample questions that will be examined include: what rights do individuals have? What are the major
types of law? Why do we have an adversarial system? How well
will students do in court? How do we make justice happen? How
is justice carried out in Alaska?
Law Studies Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3625OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Law Studies is the place to discover how the legal system
works. This online course aids students in applying legal principles and procedures. Sample questions that will be examined
include: What rights do individuals have? What are the major
types of law? Why do we have an adversarial system? How well
will students do in court? How do we make justice happen?
Minority Groups and Ethnic Cultures . . . . . . . . . . H3512
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is a study of the social, political, cultural and
economic forces that affect minorities and ethnic cultures in the
U.S. Students explore the customs, behaviors, issues and legacies
of America’s diversity. Sample questions that will be addressed
include: who are the indigenous peoples of the United States?
Who are the minority groups and ethnic cultures of the United
States? What are the important issues facing minority groups and
ethnic cultures in the U.S. today? What has been the progression
of civil liberties for minorities in the U.S.? What have been and
is the political/legal status of minority groups and cultures in the
United States?
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
On Your Own 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3016LS1
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed as a transitional skills class for students
with an IEP and enrolled in a Life Skills 1 program to teach skills
that will help students to successfully live independently in the
future. This course provides opportunity to learn by doing; how
to open a checking account, apply for a job, fill out an apartment
application, create a budget, apply for credit and much more.
Students will take several field trips and have many guest speakers
from the community. Students will improve writing skills and
math skills through practical applications in real life situations.
This course is repeatable 10 times and may be counted as ½ credit
of economics, social studies elective or general elective.
On Your Own 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3016LS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed as a transitional skills class for students
with an IEP and enrolled in a Life Skills 2 program to teach skills
that will help students to successfully live independently in the
future. This course provides opportunity to learn by doing; how
to open a checking account, apply for a job, fill out an apartment
application, create a budget, apply for credit and much more.
Students will take several field trips and have many guest speakers
from the community. Students will improve writing skills and
math skills through practical applications in real life situations.
This course is repeatable 10 times and may be counted as ½ credit
of economics, social studies elective or general elective.
On Your Own 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3016SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is a designed as a transitional skills class for students with an IEP to teach skills that will help students to successfully live independently in the future. This course provides opportunity to learn by doing; how to open a checking account, apply
for a job, fill out an apartment application, create a budget, apply
for credit and much more. Students will take several field trips
and have many guest speakers from the community. Students will
improve writing skills and math skills through practical applications in real life situations. This course is repeatable 10 times and
may be counted as ½ credit of economics, social studies elective
or general elective.
Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3040
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Philosophy is the study of systematic inquiry into basic
questions, thoughts and beliefs regarding the human condition.
Students will use logic and speculative reasoning to explore for
answers and express their understanding of their thoughts and
beliefs. The following questions will be examined: who are the
great philosophers and what were their beliefs? How does one’s
philosophy shape their view of the world around them? What is
the inherent nature of humankind and knowledge? What is the
relationship between philosophy, religion and the supernatural?
What are your beliefs about life and living? How is philosophy
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
73
passed down through time? What is ideal behavior? How does
Eastern philosophy differ from Western philosophy?
Pre-Voc 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3020SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed as a transitional skills class for students
with an IEP to teach skills that will help students successfully get
and keep a job. Students will learn about the job market, how to
look for a job, interviewing skills, career decision making, self-determination skills and more. Students will be able to match their
interests and aptitude with a chosen career path. This course is
repeatable 10 times and may be counted as ½ credit of economics, social studies elective or general elective.
Psychology 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3685
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Psychology is the scientific study of human behavior from early
childhood through old age. Students will explore how an organism’s physical state, mental state and external environment affect
behavior and the mental processes. Sample topics include: how
people learn, think, feel and behave; how developmental stages
are important in the human life cycle; how self-concept is developed through relationships with parents, peers and culture; and
how brain functions are affected by environmental conditions.
Psychology 1 Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3685OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Psychology is the scientific study of
human behavior from early childhood through old age. Students
will explore how an organism’s physical state, mental state and
external environment affect behavior and the mental processes.
Sample topics include: how people learn, think, feel and behave,
how developmental stages are important in the human life cycle,
how self-concept is developed through relationships with parents,
peers and culture, and how brain functions are affected by environmental conditions.
Psychology 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3686
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Psychology 1.
This course continues the study of the human mind and
behavior by shifting the focus to the individual. Students will
investigate the interactions of an individual with other people,
how a person copes with stress, the causes of psychological disorders and the treatments of these disorders.
Advanced Placement Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3687
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This year-long course is designed to introduce the highly
motivated student to the systematic and scientific study of
the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other
animals. Students are introduced to the psychological facts,
principles and phenomenon associated with each of the major
sub-fields within psychology. They also learn about the methods
psychologists use in their science and practice. Topics include: the
74 history of psychology, contemporary approaches to behavior, how
to understand one’s own behavior, strategies for dealing with life
experiences and how to apply psychological principles to society.
Advanced Placement
Psychology Online . . . . . . . . . . H3687OLS1/ H3687OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This year-long online course is designed to introduce the
highly motivated student to the systematic and scientific study
of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other
animals. Students are introduced to the psychological facts,
principles and phenomenon associated with each of the major
sub-fields within psychology. They also learn about the methods
psychologists use in their science and practice. Topics include: the
history of psychology, contemporary approaches to behavior, how
to understand one’s own behavior, strategies for dealing with life
experiences and how to apply psychological principles to society.
Social Skills Development 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . H9909SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed for students with an IEP in learning
a comprehensible approach to generalizing social skills, specifically: requesting, initiating and responding to peers, and/or
adults, across various environments, both school and community
based. Individual needs and concerns will be addressed on a student-by-student basis. This course is repeatable 10 times for ½
social studies credit or general elective credit.
Social Skills Development 9–12 AC . . . . . . . . . . H9909LS
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed for students with an IEP and enrolled
in a Life Skills class in learning a comprehensible approach to
generalizing social skills, specifically: requesting, initiating and
responding to peers, and/or adults, across various environments,
both school and community based. Individual needs and concerns will be addressed on a student-by-student basis. Alternate
curriculum for students enrolled in a Life Skills class. This course
is repeatable 10 times for ½ social studies credit or general elective
credit.
Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3045
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Sociology is a study of how human behavior is shaped by
the groups to which we belong. Students will examine patterns
of social life, make predictions about behavior and investigate
other cultures. Sample questions in Sociology include: what roles
do families play? What role does money play in creating groups
in society? How do schools and other social institutions shape
human behavior? Why do people join gangs?
Sociology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3045OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Sociology is the study of how human behavior is shaped by
the groups to which we belong. In this online course students will
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
examine patterns of social life, make predictions about behavior
and investigate other cultures. Sample questions in Sociology
include: What roles do families play? What role does money play
in creating groups in society? How do schools and other social
institutions shape human behavior? Why do people join gangs?
Twentieth Century American Eras . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3556
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is an in-depth study of specific time periods and
themes in U.S. history over this past century. A major goal of this
course is to understand how life today is related to previous life
experiences. Sample topics in this course include: the Cold War,
the Sixties, the Roaring Twenties, the Depression and the Civil
Rights Era.
United States Military History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3230
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This course will examine the origin and growth of U.S. military forces. Sample topics will include: leaders and strategies,
successes and failures, allies and enemies, women and minorities
and air, sea and ground forces.
Westward Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3235
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Westward Movement is a course that studies the frontier history and geography of the U.S. as a young nation expands from
coast to coast. Sample topics in Westward Movement include:
Native American cultures and histories; life on the Kentucky
frontier (e.g. Daniel Boone, splitting wood and salt pork); men
and women of the frontier; Native American and settlers views of
each other; treatment of Native Americans; Louisiana Purchase
and explorers of the territory; Texas independence, annexation
and the Alamo; cultural diversity in the west; gold rushes, cowboys/girls; cattle drives and cowtowns.
Women’s History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3527
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Women’s History is a course where students explore current
issues of women, their major achievements and the historical
impact women have had on humanity. Sample topics in Women’s
History are: the changing roles of women and their social, marital, economic and legal-political status; the roles of men; the
agendas and accomplishments of selected women leaders; issues
that affect women (e.g. violence, poverty, education, equal opportunity); and challenges and legacies of women throughout history.
King Career Center academic credit
Alaska Railroad Tour Guide Program KCC . . . . . . H8656
Grade level 9-12. One semester after-school program at KCC.
Prerequisite: None
Academic Credit: ½ Alaska Studies.
The Alaska Railroad Tour Guide Program is an
introductory course which includes Alaska history,
geography, cultures, economy, flora-fauna and the natural
resources of the state. Public speaking and customer contact skills
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
are taught as well as an introductory unit into the visitor industry
of Alaska taught by the industry professionals. Field trips to local
tourism businesses and cultural museums and destinations are
also an integral component of the course.
Students will hone their portfolios which will demonstrate
proficiency in skills considered essential by the business
industry. The Anchorage Chamber of Commerce will issue
an “endorsement” to students who have successfully met
its portfolio requirement. Students in the second semester
will develop a business project. This will focus on project
management and facilitation, general business concepts,
contracts, technical writing, accounting basics, and project/
product presentations. Utilizing industry partners, students will
provide real world solutions to business problems.
Career & Work
Readiness KCC . . . . . . . . H0012SSP/H3020SP/H9805SP
Grade level 10–12. One semester .
Prerequisite: Student must have an IEP.
Core Academic Credits: ½ Language Arts and ½ Social Studies
Elective.
May be repeated with instructor’s permission.
The Work Readiness Program is for students with Individual
Education Plans (IEP) who are ready to begin the process of transition from school to work. Being “work ready” requires preparation, practice, exploration, and work experience in order to be
successful in reaching their employment and vocational goals.
Students have an opportunity for a Formal Vocational Assessment
to help determine their interests and aptitudes. Students will
complete a portfolio with resumé, writing samples, and other
documents necessary for job search, training, scholarships and
future transitional planning.
Students will interview for appropriate placement. This class
is designed to develop an Individual Employment Plan, prepare
to become competitively employed, or seek and apply for training
through college, vocational training, apprenticeship, or on-thejob training programs. Students can achieve basic certifications to
help them obtain employment. Examples include but are not limited to: the Municipality of Anchorage Food Workers card, basic
safety skills and customer service training. Students will become
familiarized with resources and agencies in the community such
as DVR and the Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce
Development that can assist them toward obtaining independent
living skills.
Early Childhood Education 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8303
Grade Level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None, however course work in Child Development
and/or Psychology is recommended. Municipal licensing requires
all students to complete paperwork for a background check and
documented health history. In addition, all students disciplinary
records are also reviewed for possible infractions that would
exclude them from working with young children. Professional
dress and attire is required on preschool days including wearing
our uniform polo shirt and no visible tattoos or facial piercings.
Core academic credit: ½ Social Studies elective.
The Early Childhood Education Program provides
students an opportunity to work and learn about
young children. Students work in a municipal-licensed preschool
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
75
that follows NAEYC Accreditation Standards. They are supervised by two early childhood instructors. Students are also
required to complete an application for the job of working with
young children and provide three references. Students learn child
development and classroom skills in supervising and teaching
young children ages 3-5 years. The first semester curriculum
includes: health and safety, guidance and parenting.
Job entry opportunities:
ASD kindergarten teacher assistant, ECE teacher aide, pre-K
teacher aide, special education aide, recreational leader, afterschool program assistant
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8095
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: ½ Economics and ½ Language Arts and
1.0 Elective
Entrepreneurship & Enterprise 2 KCC . . . . . . . . . . H8096
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Entrepreneurship &
Enterprise 1.
Academic Credit: ½ Economics and ½ Language Arts and
1.0 Elective
Students will learn and experience business operations through
a hands-on and problem-based curriculum. The focus in the first
semester class will be on entrepreneurship; students will work in
teams to develop, plan, and sell a product or service at KCC.
Students will learn how fields such as accounting, finance and
marketing fit together in a functioning business. Personal ethics,
business planning, economics, finance, accounting basics, communications, marketing, corporate responsibility and technical
writing will be integrated into the course. By the end of the first
quarter, students will liquidate their businesses, and issue an
annual report and letter to shareholders. They will also produce
balance sheets, cash flow statements and income statements. The
class will then plan a new KCC store that will allow students to
further refine their skills on a larger scale.
Students will hone their portfolios which will demonstrate
proficiency in skills considered essential by the business industry.
The Anchorage Chamber of Commerce will issue an “endorsement” to students who have successfully met its portfolio requirement. Students in the second semester will develop a business
project. This will focus on project management and facilitation,
general business concepts, contracts, technical writing, accounting basics, and project/product presentations. Utilizing industry
partners, students will provide real world solutions to business
problems.
Natural Resources Management 1 KCC . . . . . . . . H8710
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Alaska Studies,½ Physical Science and
½ Social Studies elective per semester.
Learn about and experience the
Fairbanks
beauty and mystery of Alaska while
exploring careers that manage the natural resources of our state.
Through classroom and outdoor skill building activities students
will examine soil and water conservation, wildlife and fisheries
Univ. of Alaska
76 management, and forestry and recreation in both historical and
contemporary contexts. This course examines the geography, history, political and economic forces that have shaped contemporary Alaska. Course content is organized around five themes of
population, land, resources, governance and cultural landscape.
The NRM program offers career pathways to Alaska resource
development and conservation career fields by offering Tech Prep
college credits toward degrees and opportunities for paid summer
natural resource career internships.
This course is an integration of social studies and physical
science with career field exploration. ASD’s Alaska Studies
curriculum is taught when fall and spring semesters are taken
consecutively. This course includes a review of the history and
the political and economic forces that determine contemporary
Alaska resource development decisions and other issues confronting the state.
Job entry opportunities:
Summer employment programs, professional mentorships,
landscaping, tree service companies, greenhouse operations, forestry aide, environmental specialist, environmental interpreter,
guide assistant, campground and park aides.
Public Safety & Security 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8217
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: High reading level and good writing skills
recommended.
Core academic credit: ½ Social Studies Elective.
Public Safety and Security students learn to work as
part of a professional criminal justice team.
Students will study the history of the criminal justice system, the
three components: law enforcement, courts, and corrections, and
how they work together, as well as the various role expectations
within those three components. In addition to legal terminology,
students will also study basic interview techniques, crime scene
investigation including photography, basic fingerprinting techniques, report writing, courtroom presentation and basic firearms
safety.
Second semester students will be learning through scenario-based training in preparation for Skills USA competitions in
Criminal Justice or CSI.
Students in this program are evaluated on the basis of attendance, professionalism, mastery of skills, written test scores, daily
progress and community work service. Community work service
is a requirement with 20 hours of activities preferably related
to law enforcement, law, corrections or security. Certain class
projects can be used as community work service hours. This class
includes guest speakers and related field trips.
Job entry opportunities:
Security: private, corporate, school; military police; police
records clerk; court clerk; Transportation Security Administration;
support staff for any part of the criminal justice system.
University of
Alaska Fairbanks
Travel & Tourism 1 KCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8650
Grade level 11-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Core academic credits: ½ Alaska Studies, ½ Social Studies
Elective.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Tourism in Alaska accounts for one in eight jobs
and is the second-largest private sector employer.
The Travel & Tourism program provides students with the
skills and knowledge necessary for successful careers in this fast
growing industry. Students are prepared for entry level positions
with airlines, airport operations, tour companies, banquet serving/catering, and the cruise and lodging industries.
Some of the topics covered in the training program include
tourism in Alaska, sectors of travel & tourism, personal marketing/job portfolio and customer service/professional communication skills.
Alaska has more mountains, glaciers and wildlife than just
about anywhere else in the world. Students in this course have the
unique opportunity to participate in FAM (familiarization) tours
where they get out of the classroom and experience first-hand the
rich cultures, history and geography of Alaska, and learn about
the many different businesses that make up the industry.
Fall: Hotel/lodging, airlines and the Alaska Railroad. Students
interested in applying for the AKRR Tour Guide Program offered in
the spring are encouraged to take this class.
Spring: Cruise lines, tour companies, meetings and conventions. Students will participate in an industry career fair in March
with a focus on job placement.
Travel and tourism careers appeal to adventurous, outgoing people adept at customer service. Make this course your first stop on
the path to a successful career!
Job entry opportunities.
Hotel guest services, airline customer service, tour guide, host/
hostess, Restaurant–Front of the House Assistant with meeting
and event planning, customer service representative for cruise and
tour companies, retail sales and gift shop operations, car rental
agency–customer service, travel agency receptionist, travel planner or courier.
Play Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9630
THEATRE ARTS
Advanced Art II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5312
Acting I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9610
Grade level 9–12. One semester. No English credit.
Prerequisite: None.
Much of this course will center around the fundamentals of
acting and theatre work. It will include an introduction to improvisation, voice technique, body movement, physical conditioning
and terminology. Role and script examination and interpretation
may also be included for those students who have progressed well.
Performances during school hours will be required. May be taken
8 times.
Acting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9612
Grade level 10–12. One semester. No English credit.
Prerequisite: Acting I or director’s approval.
A sequel to the concepts of Acting I. Students experience
advanced technical training through group and individualized
instruction. Styles of acting, character analysis, audition techniques, text analysis, vocal projection and methods of acting
will be studied in practical application. Performance in class and
during school hours will be required. May be taken 6 times.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Grade level 9–12. One semester. No English credit.
Prerequisite: Director’s approval.
Play Production involves all aspects of producing a play or
musical. The culmination of this course will be theatrical production, which includes student experiences in technical theatre
and/or acting. Performance outside of class time is part of course
work. May be taken 8 times.
Stagecraft I & II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9645 /H9646
Grade level 10–12. One semester each. No English credit.
Prerequisite: None.
Stagecraft is the study of all aspects of technical theater. It will
include set design and construction, lighting and sound design,
costume and property design and construction, marketing the
production and crew and stage managing techniques and responsibilities. May be taken 6 times.
VISUAL ARTS
Students will be expected to perform at a higher level of competency and advancement with each semester enrolled in a course.
Advanced Art I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5311
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Art I and Art II, or instructor approval with portfolio
review.
Materials fee required each semester
The intent of this course is to provide a pathway for artistically
interested, motivated art students who would like to pursue rigorous art studies on a higher level of study. The first two semesters
students will concentrate on a breadth of works. Students electing to advance to AP Art Studio the next year will be prepared
with the breadth of art works, one of three requirements for The
College Board portfolio review. After successfully completing
Advanced Art I, students may elect to enroll in Advanced Art II.
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Advanced Art I
Materials fee required each semester.
The course content concentrates on themes, big ideas, and
portfolio development in preparation for student scholarship
applications, college entrance requirements, employment preparation, and personal growth. Over the course of two years,
Advanced Art I and Advanced Art II, students will be increasing
their artistic skills and expression with a purpose in preparation
for post-secondary studies, scholarships, employable skills, and/or
careers in the visual arts.
Advanced Placement Art Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5015
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Portfolio with minimum of six pieces required for
review by Advanced Placement selection committee established
by the building Art Department staff. Portfolio review required each
time the student elects to take Advanced Placement Art. Students
will select one of the following categories for portfolio review: Art
Studio: 2D, Art Studio; 3D, or Drawing.
Portfolio review by The College Board is required for AP credit.
Materials fee required each semester.
Students will select one of the following categories for their
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
77
portfolio development: Art Studio: 2-D, Art Studio: 3-D, or Art
Studio: Drawing. This program is offered for students pursuing
college level work while enrolled in high school. Highly interested, motivated students accepted into the program are encouraged
to develop a portfolio, which can be submitted in their senior
year to The College Board and reviewed for the granting of college credit. This class is structured in such a way as to encourage
freedom of expression, which allows for a variety of solutions to
artistic visual problems. This course will reflect three major components that are constants in the teaching of art: a sense of quality
in a student’s work, a personal in-depth preoccupation or concentration with a particular mode of working and the student’s need
for a variety of breadth of experiences in the formal technical and
expressive means of the artist. Two-semester course.
Advanced Placement Art History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5017
Grade Levels: 11–12, or, by instructor’s approval.
Two-semester course.
Prerequisites: None. It is helpful to have had Art Studio, Art I, Art
II, AP Art Studio, World History and/or European History. AP exam
required for AP credit. One full year meets the one semester social
studies elective requirement and earns an additional one semester
general electives requirement.
This course is designed for the student who desires to investigate the evolution of art from the Paleolithic to the present day.
Students will be prepared for the advanced placement test and
will: 1) develop an understanding of the elements of art, fundamental art historical terminology, and technical processes; 2) analyze how issues such as world events, patronage, gender, and the
function and effect of art create the historical context in which art
is best understood; 3) compare and contrast the painting, architecture, sculpture, and other media of art, within the Western
tradition, between historical and stylistic periods; and, 4) discuss
art beyond the European tradition from among the following cultures: the Ancient Near East, Egypt, Africa beyond Egypt, Islam,
the Americas, Asia, and Oceania.
Art I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5309
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None. (consecutive semester enrollment
recommended, but not required)
Materials fee required each semester.
This is an integrated study of the visual arts. The major areas
of study are drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture and art
metals. Each quarter is presented in an order to develop design
concepts, use of media, art history, self-expression and criticism.
Art II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5310
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Both semesters of Art I. (consecutive semester
enrollment recommended, but not required)
Materials fee required each semester.
Quarterly activities built on the foundations of study of Art I.
Theming, advanced ideas and problem solving are featured in Art
II.
Art Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5120
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Materials fee required each semester.
78 This is a general exploratory course with a strong emphasis on
the elements and principles of design. A variety of art processes
and media, i.e., drawing, lettering, printmaking, painting, fiber,
layout, jewelry, sculpture, and art appreciation will be introduced.
May be taken 4 times.
Drawing and Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5070
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Materials fee required each semester.
Introductory course to drawing materials (pastels, crayon,
paint and mixed media, pencil, pen and ink, charcoal), drawing
techniques such as contour, gesture, perspective, shading and
design concepts. Studio course emphasizing the principles of
composition, color theory, value and tonal studies. May be taken
4 times.
Jewelry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5325
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Art Studio, Art I or Drawing and Design
recommended.
Materials fee required each semester.
An exploration of fabricated jewelry. Projects will be based
upon designing, sawing, soldering and polishing jewelry made
from flat sheets of metal. The use of natural and man-made
materials to enhance projects will be emphasized. The course may
include simple forging, casting, enameling, etching and stone
setting (equipment dependent). May be taken 4 times.
Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5140
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Art Studio or Drawing and Design.
Materials fee required each semester.
A study of media and techniques in painting, i.e., watercolor,
tempera, acrylic, oil and mixed media will be explored in conjunction with a basic investigation of materials and history of
painting. May be taken 4 times.
Photography 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5452
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: 1/2 Elective.
This course will provide a basic knowledge of how to take
pictures, develop negatives and produce a black and white print.
Students will also explore the role of photography in our lives
today. Basic composition and print finishing techniques will be
covered. Students must furnish their own camera, film and printing paper. A materials fee is required. Many chemicals are used in
the photographic process and students will learn how to put safety
first. Instruction begins with an explanation of Material Safety
Data Sheets, proper chemical handling and safety precautions in
a laboratory setting. Students will learn the proper and safe use of
equipment. Digital photography education and training is also
included at most high schools as part of this course. Some comprehensive high schools provide only digital photography exclusively. Students should check with their individual high school for
more information.
Photography 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5453
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Prerequisite: Photography I.
Academic Credit: 1/2 Elective.
Students will research a professional photographer, read text
materials about advanced photographic information and opportunities and become aware of the advancement of photographic
equipment and career opportunities. Students will gain additional
instruction in Material Safety Data Sheets, proper chemical handling and other safety precautions in the laboratory. Students will
learn about various camera types and be able to perform proper
handling and operations of advanced, standard, digital and
vintage cameras and lenses. Students will perform proper print
making techniques and create or scan digital images on computer.
Students will learn about a variety of composition techniques
using various photographic techniques and use the various composition techniques by performing individual projects.
Multimedia Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5455
Grade level 9–12. One semester segments. Semesters three and
four are designed for advanced students.
Prerequisite: None. Art Studio or Drawing & Design recommended
Materials fee required each semester.
The Multimedia Design course is a merging of traditional art
processes with emerging technology. Students will link together
a variety of media such as graphics, text, audio and visual programs using basic concepts of two- and three-dimensional design.
Through a variety of learning activities, emphasis will be placed
on the creative process, conceptual design, solutions and practical
applications. May be taken 4 times.
Pottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5155
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Art Studio or Drawing and Design
recommended.
Materials fee required each semester.
Beginning students will study media skills, techniques of hand
building with clay, such as pinch, coil and slab and history of clay
as an art form. Clay processes, preparation, experimentation with
texture, surface decoration, sculpture, wheel throwing, glazing
and firing will be explored. Advanced students will calculate and
mix chemicals to create glazing compounds. May be taken 4
times.
Printmaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5630
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Art Studio, Art I or Drawing and Design.
Materials fee required each semester.
Beginning students will be introduced to the various printmaking methods that may include relief printing, intaglio,
lithography, silk screening and embossing processes, depending
on available equipment. Advanced students will create multi-colored images and learn to register multiple prints. May be taken 4
times.
Sculpture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H5175
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Art Studio, Art I or Drawing and Design
recommended.
Materials fee required each semester.
clay, wax, wire, plaster, metal and glass. Additive and subtractive
techniques will be explored. May be taken 4 times.
WORLD LANGUAGES
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
American Sign Language I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4905
Grade level 9-12. Two semesters
Prerequisite: None
The students will develop a vocabulary of approximately 1200
signs. Students will focus on mastering the basics of fingerspelling, numbers, colors, facial grammar, and sentence structure.
Students will also learn conversational/cultural behaviors necessary to hold a beginning-level conversation in ASL, with Deaf
users of the language. A basic understanding of Deaf culture will
also be presented, along with basic ASL literature, to provide students with a broad picture of language and culture.
American Sign Language II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4907
Grade level 9-12. Two semesters
Prerequisite: American Sign Language I or teacher approval.
The students will increase their proficiencies in the skills
which they learned in ASL 1. Students will continue to focus on
fingerspelling, numbers, facial grammar, and sentence structure.
Students will further develop the conversational/cultural behaviors necessary to hold a beginning-level conversation. Mastery of
grammatical concepts and language structures learned in ASL 1
will be emphasized and refined. A more in-depth understanding
of ASL literature will be presented as well as additional cultural
information to aid student development of awareness and appreciation for the unique linguistic relationship between language
and culture among the Deaf who use ASL to communicate.
American Sign Language III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4909
Grade level 9-12. Two semesters
Prerequisite: American Sign Language II or teacher approval.
The students will learn intermediate level vocabulary for
communication with Deaf individuals, learning how to express
abstract concepts in ASL. Students will apply their knowledge
of the linguistic components of ASL in a variety of interactive
situations both receptively and expressively. Knowledge
of English idioms and multiple English synonyms will be
expanded. Culture connotations of common signs and phrases
will be emphasized. Students will understand concepts and issues
related to Deaf culture, Deaf history, and the Deaf community.
Course includes receptive and expressive readiness activities, sign
vocabulary, ASL grammatical structure, receptive and expressive
finger spelling, conversational behaviors and various aspects of
Deaf culture.
American Sign Language IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4910
Prerequisite ASL III & teacher recommendation
This is an introductory course in basic problems of three-dimensional forms using a variety of media: paper, wood, stone,
The students will continue development of expressive and
receptive skills learned in ASL 1, 2, & 3. Students will continue
study and performance of forms of ASL literature and continue to
analyze complex grammatical structures. They will explore concepts of linguistics as it relates to variations in ASL and emphasize
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
79
current research as well as fieldwork. Students will also experience
the language outside the classroom through interaction with the
Deaf community. This course is designed to build student vocabulary, develop greater fluency in expressive signing, and develop
confidence in receptive skills.
FRENCH
French I (novice low) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4421
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Students learn to exchange information in simple terms about
topics relating to themselves, their family and their leisure activities in French. They will be introduced to the culture of Frenchspeaking countries and regions. The emphasis is on vocabulary
development and elementary grammatical structures. The main
goal of this course is to progress toward a novice-level ability in
using French in school and the community.
French I Online (novice low) . . . . H4421OLS1/H4421OLS2
Grade level 9–12. . One semester each.
Prerequisite: None
Students learn to exchange information in simple terms about
topics relating to themselves, their family and their leisure activities in French. They will be introduced to the culture of Frenchspeaking countries and regions. The emphasis is on vocabulary
development and elementary grammatical structures. The main
goal of this course is to progress toward a novice-level ability in
using French in school and the community.
French II (novice mid) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4431
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: French I.
Building on what was learned in Level I, students expand their
ability to speak, read, write and listen in French. The emphasis
is on continued vocabulary development and the acquisition
of additional simple grammatical structure. There will be many
opportunities to converse and write stories in French about
familiar topics. Students begin applying their French language
skills to communicate in basic real-life situations. They also continue to learn about the culture of French-speaking people. The
goal of this course is for students to function at a mid-novice to
high-novice level of proficiency.
French II Online (novice mid) . . . . H4431OLS1/H4431OLS2
Grade level 9–12. . One semester each.
Prerequisite: French I
Building on what was learned in Level I, students expand their
ability to speak, read, write and listen in French. The emphasis
is on continued vocabulary development and the acquisition
of additional simple grammatical structure. There will be many
opportunities to converse and write stories in French about
familiar topics. Students begin applying their French language
skills to communicate in basic real-life situations. They also continue to learn about the culture of French-speaking people. The
goal of this course is for students to function at a mid-novice to
high-novice level of proficiency.
80 French III (novice high to intermediate low) . . . . . . . . . H4441
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: French II
Students exchange information and begin to share opinions
about themselves, their school and community. They expand their
vocabulary and learn increasingly complex grammatical structures
needed for more sophisticated communication. Students use
technology and media to gather cultural information and learn
about current events. This course is tailored to the low-intermediate level of proficiency in French.
French III Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4441OLS1/H4441OLS2
(novice high to intermediate low)
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: French II
Students exchange information and begin to share opinions
about themselves, their school and community in this online
class. They expand their vocabulary and learn increasingly
complex grammatical structures needed for more sophisticated
communication. Students use technology and media to gather
cultural information and learn about current events. This course
is tailored to the low intermediate level of proficiency in French.
French IV (intermediate mid to intermediate high) . . . . . H4451
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: French III.
Building on what was learned in Level III, students work with
an increased number of authentic listening and reading materials.
They learn to describe, explain, summarize and express opinions
in detail. Students can discuss current events and give topical
cultural reports in French. Emphasis will be on learning idiomatic
expressions and more detailed grammatical concepts. The goal for
this course is for students to be able to function at a mid-intermediate to high-intermediate level of proficiency.
French V (Intermediate high to pre-advanced) . . . . . . . . H4461
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: French IV.
Students continue their development of communication skills
through various media, which may include literature, art, music,
film, history or current events. This can be an individualized
course defined by student needs and interest in French. The goal
for this course is to meet the students’ desires to advance in their
acquisition of communication skills, cultural understanding and
personal growth.
Advanced Placement
French Language (pre-advanced) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4471
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: French IV, V, or teacher recommendation.
The goal of this course is to prepare each student to take the
annual AP French Language exam. Designed to provide students
with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a higher level, students
will be challenged with written essays, impromptu and planned
oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and listening and
viewing comprehension of oral texts.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Advanced Placement French Language Online
(pre-advanced) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4471OLS1/H4471OLS2
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: French IV, V, or teacher recommendation.
The goal of this online course is to prepare each student to
take the annual AP French Language exam. Designed to provide
students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in
comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a higher level,
students will be challenged with written essays, impromptu and
planned oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
GERMAN
German I (novice low) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4221
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
An introduction to the German language and culture. The
emphasis is on listening with understanding, speaking with
clarity, reading and writing. Instruction begins with situation dialogues. Deductive analysis is used to lead to grammatical principles, but the emphasis is on vocabulary development. Students in
their course learn to exchange information in simple terms about
every day experiences. Students identify the countries where
German is spoken, as well as current events in those countries.
German I Online (novice low) . . H4221OLS1/H4221OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is an introduction to the German language
and culture. The emphasis is on listening with understanding,
speaking with clarity, reading and writing. Instruction begins
with situation dialogues. Deductive analysis is used to lead to
grammatical principles, but the emphasis is on vocabulary development. Students in their course learn to exchange information
in simple terms about every day experiences. Students identify the
countries where German is spoken, as well as current events in
those countries.
German II (novice low to novice high) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4231
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: German I.
Emphasis is further vocabulary development and includes
increased writing practice. Additional points of grammar are
introduced. Students give oral reports and refine their discussions
of their daily lives. Students continue to learn about the culture
of the German people, which may include famous figures from
history as well as aspects of modern life in Germany, which
could include sports or entertainment personalities and popular pastimes. Current events in the German speaking world are
discussed.
of grammar are introduced. Students give oral reports and refine
their discussions of their daily lives. Students continue to learn
about the culture of the German people, which may include
famous figures from history as well as aspects of modern life in
Germany, which could include sports or entertainment personalities and popular pastimes. Current events in the German speaking
world are discussed.
German III (novice high to intermediate low) . . . . . . . . . H4241
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: German II.
Continues to develop and perfect the four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with more emphasis on
German literature, history and culture. Grammatical elements
are reviewed on a more advanced level and are incorporated into
conversations and compositions on a broad spectrum of topics.
German IV (intermediate mid to intermediate high) . . . . . H4251
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: German III.
Increased emphasis is placed on reading and writing communications. Concentration may be directed toward reading and
discussing German literature from classical material to contemporary works. Main events of German history may be covered as
well as one or more interdisciplinary thematic units.
German V (intermediate low to pre-advanced low) . . . . . H4261
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: German IV.
This is an individualized course designed to strengthen grammatical weaknesses and perfect oral skills. Materials are selected
according to student interest. Advanced placement programs are
possible at this level.
Advanced Placement German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4271
(intermediate to pre-advanced)
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: German IV or teacher recommendation.
The goal of this course is to prepare each student to take the
annual AP German Language Exam. Designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in
comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a much higher
level, students will be challenged with written essays, impromptu
and planned oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and
listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
JAPANESE
Japanese I (novice low to novice mid) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4721
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course emphasizes further vocabulary development and includes increased writing practice. Additional points
The emphasis of this course is on the ability to communicate
orally, emphasizing vocabulary development and basic language
functions. The two kana syllabaries, hiragana and katakana, along
with some basic characters, are taught in this course. Students will
use the language to exchange information about topics relating
to themselves, their families and their leisure activities. A general
introduction to Japanese culture is also integrated throughout this
course.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
German II Online
(novice low to novice high) . . . . H4231OLS1/H4231OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: German I.
81
Japanese II (novice high) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4731
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Japanese I.
This course builds on the study of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures from Japanese I. In the area of written communication, utilization of Kana (hiragana and katakana) continues.
Approximately 25-50 kanji (Chinese characters) are also introduced. Students will use the language to exchange information
about topics relating to geography, friends, weather, seasons and
lifestyles. Students participate in dialogues about familiar situations and use less simple patterns. They read familiar material and
write short, directed compositions. Japanese customs, beliefs and
aspects of contemporary and traditional culture are also integrated throughout this course.
Japanese III (novice high to intermediate low) . . . . . . . . H4741
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Japanese II.
Students continue to develop proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing. They expand their vocabularies and
learn more complex language functions to communicate in more
sophisticated ways. Oral and written tasks will integrate Level I
and Level II topics, with a wider array of communicative topics.
Consistent with all topics, students negotiate conversations,
engage in limited discourse and demonstrate socio-cultural
appropriateness. Students demonstrate an ability to recognize and
produce an additional 25-50 kanji (Chinese characters). Topics
related to Japan’s history, contemporary and traditional culture, as
well as current events are integrated throughout this course.
Japanese IV (intermediate low to intermediate mid) . . . . H4743
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Japanese III.
Students develop more sophisticated communication skills and
refine their reading and writing skills. In writing and reading, the
number of kanji is increased. Students write short compositions
based on individual experiences or reading materials and making
oral or written presentations on assigned topics. Cultural topics,
such as a survey of Japanese history, are integrated throughout
this course.
Japanese V (intermediate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4745
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Japanese IV.
Students continue the study of the Japanese language by completing the study of basic grammar, by learning new vocabulary
and by preparing creative works in writing. They progress to use
more complex sentences using abstract vocabulary. Reading selections of increased difficulty will be incorporated for readings and
discussions. In writing and reading, the number of kanji (Chinese
characters) increases. Cultural topics, such as the relationship
with people with nature, the conduct of business, major historical
events and the ties with the United States, are integrated throughout this course.
82 Advanced Placement Japanese
Language & Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4746AP
(intermediate low to intermediate mid)
Grade level: 11–12
Prerequisite: Japanese II, IV, V, Japanese for Fluent Speakers II, IV
or teacher recommendation.
This course is comparable to a college/university Japanese language course and supports students as they develop the productive, receptive and cultural skills necessary to communicate with
native speakers of Japanese. Students will study Japanese through
content-based themes such as Japanese history, tradition, contemporary culture and social issues. This course prepares students for
the annual Advanced Placement Japanese Language and Culture
Exam and is conducted exclusively in Japanese.
JAPANESE IMMERSION
Japanese for Fluent Speakers I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4790
Grade level 9. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Participation in the Japanese Immersion Program
Grades 1-8, or teacher recommendation.
This course uses students’ broad vocabulary base, proficiency
with basic communicative structures and mastery of the hiragana and katakana syllabaries, as well as several hundred kanji
(Chinese characters) to focus on oral communication. Students
will apply familiar grammar functions to new communicative
tasks, as well as cement proper usage of latent grammar function
skills. Students will use new vocabulary and grammar functions
to learn about and express opinions about topics such as tourism
in Alaska, Japanese vs. American peers and Japanese customs and
beliefs. Both oral and written communication will be conducted
exclusively in Japanese.
Japanese for Fluent Speakers II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4792
Grade level 10. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Japanese for Fluent Speakers I or teacher
recommendation.
This course builds on students’ ability to use the basic communicative structures presented in JFS 1/2. The course emphasizes continued vocabulary development and development of
communicative functions to enhance oral communication skills.
Kanji (Chinese characters) for production and recognition are
increased. The themes of tradition vs. change and comparative
cultures are used to learn about topics such as: images in the
Japanese media, sumo and the role of family. Students use a variety of written and oral resources to learn and express their opinions about various topics. Both oral and written communication
will be conducted exclusively in Japanese.
Japanese for Fluent Speakers III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4794
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Japanese for Fluent Speakers II or teacher
recommendation.
This course builds vocabulary, grammatical structures and
socio-cultural understanding presented in JFS 3/4. This course
emphasizes continued vocabulary development and development
of communicative functions to enhance oral communication
skills. Kanji (Chinese characters) for production and recognition
are increased. Students use Japanese to deepen their understand-
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
ing of Japanese history, with specific focus on the Heian period,
the Maiji period, World War II (the road to war, pearl harbor,
Hiroshima, Japanese Internment, the changing perceptions of
Japan’s war involvement) and modern Japan and its ties with the
U.S. Students use a variety of written and oral resources to learn
and express their opinions about various topics. Both oral and
written communication will be conducted exclusively in Japanese.
Japanese for Fluent Speakers IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4796
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Japanese for Fluent Speakers III or teacher
recommendation.
This course builds the vocabulary, grammatical structures and
socio-cultural understanding presented in JFS 3/III . This course
emphasizes continued vocabulary development and development
of communicative functions to enhance speaking, listening,
reading and writing communication skills. Kanji (Chinese characters) for production and recognition are increased. Students
use Japanese to learn about Japanese business, careers involving
Japanese and current events. This class also helps prepare student
to transition into college-level Japanese courses. Students use a
variety of written and oral resources to learn and express their
opinions about various topics. Both oral and written communication will be conducted exclusively in Japanese.
LATIN
Latin I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4821
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is designed to introduce the beginning student
to the Latin language and Roman culture. The course focuses
on the development of reading comprehension. Vocabulary and
grammar are studied in the context of reading passages into which
cultural information has been integrated. Students learn to pronounce Latin according to accepted convention and simple oral
Latin is used to aid students in comprehension. Students will gain
some understanding of the effect of Roman civilization on the
western world. Word derivations and Latin word elements are also
studied to expand the student’s vocabulary.
Latin I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4821OLS1/H4821OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the Latin language and Roman culture. The course focuses on the development of reading comprehension. Vocabulary
and grammar are studied in the context of reading passages into
which cultural information has been integrated. Students learn to
pronounce Latin according to accepted convention and simple
oral Latin is used to aid students in comprehension. Students will
gain some understanding of the effect of Roman civilization on
the western world. Word derivations and Latin word elements are
also studied to expand the student’s vocabulary.
Prerequisite: Latin I.
The emphasis of Latin II is to continue the development of
reading and comprehension skills and the acquisition of a deeper
understanding of the similarities and differences between the
Roman world and our own. New vocabulary and more grammatical structures are learned as the reading progresses to longer and
more complicated passages. Oral Latin is used to help students
understand reading selections. The study of Latin word elements
continues.
Latin II Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4831OLS1/H4831OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Latin I.
The emphasis of Online Latin II is to continue the development of reading and comprehension skills and the acquisition of
a deeper understanding of the similarities and differences between
the Roman world and our own. New vocabulary and more
grammatical structures are learned as the reading progresses to
longer and more complicated passages. Oral Latin is used to help
students understand reading selections. The study of Latin word
elements continues
Latin III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4841
Grade level: 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Latin I and II.
Students in this course continue to develop reading and comprehension skills, working primarily with authentic Latin texts.
Students are introduced to a variety of genres including histories,
orations, poetry, drama and letters. They become acquainted
with some major Roman writers of the classical period. Students
further refine their understanding of classical mythology and the
influence of the Roman World on contemporary culture. Time
permitting, students may become acquainted with selections from
Medieval Latin.
Latin IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4851
Grade level: 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Latin I, II and III.
Students continue the study of classical Latin using authentic
texts. Students learn to scan Latin poetry, to identify the various tropes and figures of speech used in poetry and oration and
to appreciate the individual styles of the authors studied. The
course may provide students an opportunity to prepare for the
AP Examination in Latin and focuses either on Vergis, Aeneid
or on the poems of Horace, Ovid and Catullus and the speeches
of Cicero. Students may prepare original compositions in Latin
including letters, orations and poems.
Advanced Placement Latin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4856AP
Grade level: 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Latin III or teacher recommendation.
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Students in this course will complete university-level coursework in AP Latin Literature, focusing on selections from The
Aeneid of Vergil and Commentarii de Bello Gallico of Julius
Caesar. Students will critically analyze works for form and content. Students will participate actively in discussions on literary
topics to prepare for the Advanced Placement Latin Exam.
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
Latin II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4831
83
MANDARIN CHINESE
Mandarin Chinese I (novice low to novice mid) . . . . . . H4321
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
The emphasis of this course is on the ability to communicate
orally, emphasizing vocabulary development and basic language
functions. Students will use the language to exchange information about topics relating to themselves, their families and leisure
activities. Students will learn basic radicals and stroke order in
writing and be introduced to Chinese culture.
Mandarin Chinese I Online . . . . H4321OLS1/H4321OLS2
(novice low to novice mid)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
The emphasis of this online course is on the ability to communicate orally, emphasizing vocabulary development and basic
language functions. Students will use the language to exchange
information about topics relating to themselves, their families
and leisure activities. Students will learn basic radicals and stroke
order in writing and be introduced to Chinese culture.
Mandarin Chinese II (novice high) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4323
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I.
This course builds on the study of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures from Chinese I. Students will transfer from
dependence on the romanized system, pinyin, to reading and
writing the Chinese characters. Students will initiate and sustain
short conversations on simple topics in everyday situations, recognize future and past references and speak the language with
increased confidence and clearer articulation. Chinese customs,
beliefs and aspects of contemporary and traditional culture are
also integrated throughout this course.
Mandarin Chinese II Online . . . . H4323OLS1/H4323OLS2
(novice high)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I.
This online course builds on the study of basic vocabulary and
grammatical structures from Chinese I. Students will transfer
from dependence on the romanized system, pinyin, to reading
and writing the Chinese characters. Students will initiate and sustain short conversations on simple topics in everyday situations,
recognize future and past references and speak the language with
increased confidence and clearer articulation. Chinese customs,
beliefs and aspects of contemporary and traditional culture are
also integrated throughout this course.
Mandarin Chinese III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4325
(novice high to intermediate low)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese II.
Students continue to develop communicative proficiency in
Chinese and expand their ability to write in Chinese, from simple words to paragraph descriptions of pictures and short essays.
84 Students will develop a better understanding of the cultural
implications of the Chinese language in communication through
the study of selected readings of authentic Chinese materials.
Mandarin Chinese IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4327
(intermediate low to intermediate mid)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese III.
Students develop more sophisticated communication skills
and refine their reading and writing skills. Students will be
exposed to Chinese television, plays and contemporary Chinese
literature. Students will make oral and/or written presentations
on assigned topics exclusively in the target language.
Mandarin Chinese V (intermediate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4329
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese IV.
Students continue the study of Chinese language through
expanded vocabulary, more complex sentence structures and
authentic reading selections. Students will increase their skills in
creative writing and speaking. Cultural topics related to Chinese
culture and history will be integrated throughout the course.
Advanced Placement Mandarin Chinese
(intermediate to pre-advanced) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4331
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese IV or teacher recommendation.
The goal of this course is to prepare each student to take the
annual AP Mandarin Chinese Language Exam. Designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency
skills in comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a much
higher level, students will be challenged with written essays,
impromptu and planned oral presentations, readings of a variety
of texts and listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
RUSSIAN
Russian I (novice low) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H4621
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Students learn to exchange information in simple terms
about topics relating to themselves and their family in Russian.
They will be introduced to the geography and culture of Russia.
Students will master the Cyrillic alphabet and they will present
short dramatizations of skits, songs, or poetry. The emphasis is on
vocabulary development and simple grammatical structures. The
main goal is for students to progress toward a novice-level ability
in using Russian in school and the community.
Russian II (novice low to novice mid) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4631
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Russian I.
This course builds on the novice level. Students expand their
ability in reading, speaking, writing and listening and extend their
vocabulary on topics of everyday experiences. They continue to
acquire simple grammatical structures as needed for meaningful
communication. Students progress toward a novice-high level of
ability.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Russian III (novice mid to novice high) . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4641
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Russian II.
Students exchange and begin to share opinions about themselves, their school and community. Students use technology to
communicate in Russian. They use Russian media to gather information. They are able to retell traditional Russian stories orally
and in writing. Students begin to work at the low intermediate
ability level in Russian.
Russian IV (novice high to intermediate low) . . . . . . . . . H4651
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Russian III.
Students compare common courtesies and non-verbal cues in
Russian. They learn to describe concerns and express dis/satisfaction with products or services. They exchange information on past
and future plans and experience songs, literature and art enjoyed
by their Russian peers. Students present short plays and skits
and prepare audio or video projects. They continue to progress
through the intermediate level of ability.
Russian V (novice high to intermediate mid) . . . . . . . . . H4653
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Russian IV.
Students define their needs and interests in further study of
Russian. They continue to learn about the culture of Russia in
relation to the situations in which they might find themselves
expected to communicate. This is an individualized course which
continues the work begun in Russian III and IV. Students are
progressing toward an intermediate high level ability in Russian.
language skills and content knowledge through themes that
are aligned with AP and IB. Students will read and write using
authentic literary works and media: advertising, magazines, newspapers, and film. This course is exclusively in Russian.
Russian Immersion:
Rossia I Alyska: Istoricheskiye svyazi
(Russia and Alaska Historical Perspectives) . . . . H4657
(pre-advanced)
Grade level 9-12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Russian Immersion or teacher recommendation.
Through advanced study of Russian, students will explore
three unique aspects of history, and examine the similarities and
connections of the lives, customs, and cultures of northern peoples. The focus is the improve language skills and content knowledge through themes that are aligned with AP and IB courses.
Advanced Placement Russian Language. . . . . . . . H4660
(pre-advanced)
Grade level: 11–12. Two semesters. Prerequisite: Russian V, VI,
immersion, native speaker or teacher recommendation.
The goal of this course is to prepare each student to take the
annual AP Russian Language Exam. Designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in
comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a much higher
level, students will be challenged with written essays, impromptu
and planned oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and
listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
SPANISH
Russian Immersion: Sovremenaya Molodyoj’ i kul’tura
Spanish I (novice low) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .H4021
Современная жизнь и культура . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4654
Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in written
form. They learn to understand and produce simple expressions
and are introduced to the cultures of Spanish speaking countries.
The emphasis is placed on vocabulary development and simple
grammar. Throughout the course students apply language skills to
real-life communication. Students in this course learn to exchange
information in simple terms. The main goal for this course is for
students to progress towards a novice level ability in using Spanish
in school and the community.
(Contemporary Youth and Culture)
(Intermediate low to Intermediate high)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Middle School Russian Immersion or teacher
recommendation
This course is intended for grade 9 Russian immersion students who are continuing from an ASD middle school Russian
immersion program. The focus is to advance students’ language
skills and content knowledge through themes of interest to young
people. Through in-depth thematic study, students will compare
and contrast various aspects of the Russian-speaking world with
their own, and in turn, gain a better understanding of themselves
and the world in which they live. Themes include family life,
youth cultures, leaders and heroes, and multiculturalism and society. This course is conducted exclusively in Russian
Russian Immersion:
Русская литература и СМИ
(Russian Literature and Media) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4655
(intermediate low to intermediate high)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters
Prerequisite: Russian immersion teacher recommendation
This course is intended for Grade 10 Russian immersion
students. It is aligned with themes used in IB/AP Russian curriculum. Study of Russian and its people, improving Russian
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
Spanish I (novice low) Online . . . H4021OLS1/H4021OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in written form. They learn to understand and
produce simple expressions and are introduced to the cultures of
Spanish speaking countries. The emphasis is placed on vocabulary
development and simple grammar. Throughout the course students apply language skills to real-life communication. Students
in this course learn to exchange information in simple terms. The
main goal for this course is for students to progress towards a
novice level ability in using Spanish in school and the community.
Spanish II (novice mid) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4031
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
85
Prerequisite: Spanish I.
Students continue to expand upon oral and written communications through vocabulary building and grammar advancement.
Students in this course learn to understand and produce simple
language related to familiar topics. Students also continue to
learn about the culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples. The goal
of this course is for students to function at a novice-mid to novice-high level of proficiency, depending on their background and
to begin to show signs of intermediate-low level of proficiency.
Spanish II (novice mid) Online . . . H4031OLS1/H4031OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: Spanish I.
Students continue to expand upon oral and written communications through vocabulary building and grammar advancement.
Students in this online course learn to understand and produce
simple language related to familiar topics. Students also continue
to learn about the culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples. The
goal of this course is for students to function at a novice-mid
to novice-high level of proficiency, depending on their background, and to begin to show signs of intermediate-low level of
proficiency.
Spanish III (novice high to intermediate low) . . . . . . . . . H4041
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Spanish II.
Students continue their development of communication skills.
Increased emphasis is placed on responding to written and verbal
input, as well as continued study of Spanish-speaking cultures. In
this course students learn more complex grammar and continue
to expand upon vocabulary acquisition in order to satisfy some
survival needs and courtesy requirements. The main goal of this
course is for students to progress towards an intermediate low
level of proficiency.
Spanish III (novice high to intermediate low)
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4041OLS1/H4041OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: Spanish II.
Students continue their development of communication skills.
Increased emphasis is placed on responding to written and verbal
input, as well as continued study of Spanish-speaking cultures.
In this online course students learn more complex grammar and
continue to expand upon vocabulary acquisition in order to satisfy some survival needs and courtesy requirements. The main goal
of this course is for students to progress towards an intermediate
low level of proficiency.
Spanish IV (intermediate mid to intermediate high) . . . . H4051
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Spanish III.
Students will improve in oral and written communication
through exposure to thematic/interdisciplinary study. Students
will also be introduced to advanced grammar through contextual
relevancy. The goal of this course is for students to be able to
function at an intermediate mid to intermediate high proficiency
level.
86 Spanish V (intermediate high to pre-advanced) . . . . . . . H4061
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Spanish IV.
Students continue their development of communication skills
through various media, which may include literature, art, music,
film, history or current events. The goal of this course is to meet
the students desires to advance in their acquisition of communication skills, cultural understanding and personal growth.
Advanced Placement Spanish Language . . . . . . . H4071
(pre-advanced)
Grade level: 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Spanish V, VI, native speaker or teacher
recommendation.
The goal of this course is to prepare each student to take the
annual AP Spanish Language Exam. Designed to provide students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in
comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a much higher
level, students will be challenged with written essays, impromptu
and planned oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and
listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
AP Spanish Language Online . . H4071OLS1/H4071OLS2
Grade level 11–12. . One semester each.
Prerequisite: Spanish AP, V, VI, native speaker or teacher
recommendation
The goal of this online course is to prepare each student to
take the annual AP Spanish Language Exam. Designed to provide
students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in
comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a much higher
level, students will be challenged with written essays, impromptu
and planned oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and
listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
Spanish for Fluent Speakers I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4090
(pre-advanced)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Native speaker of Spanish.
Students who have already developed a high level of oral/
aural language proficiency in Spanish will have an opportunity
for more concentrated language development in Spanish through
writing, vocabulary expansion and literature. This course will
meet the specific needs of both English-speaking and Spanishspeaking students. Students whose second language is Spanish
will be able to refine their literacy skills and communicate with
native speakers. Students whose first language is Spanish will
strengthen and refine their literacy skills, develop problem-solving skills and increase their self-esteem entirely in their primary
language. The skills they develop will transfer to their acquisition
of English as a second language.
Spanish for Fluent Speakers II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4092
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Spanish for Fluent Speakers I or teacher
recommendation.
This course builds on students’ ability to use the basic communicative structures presented in SFS I. The course emphasizes
continued vocabulary development and development of communicative functions to enhance oral communication skills.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Spanish Immersion:
Vistas Juveniles del Mundo Hispano . . . . . . . . . . . H4094
(Intermediate low to intermediate high)
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Middle School Spanish Immersion or Spanish III or
teacher recommendation.
This course is intended for grade 9 Spanish immersion students who are continuing from an ASD middle school Spanish
immersion program. The focus is to advance students’ language
skills and content knowledge through themes of interest to young
people. Through in-depth thematic study, students will compare
and contrast various aspects of Hispanic culture with their own,
and in turn, gain a better understanding of themselves and the
world in which they live. Themes include families, ecology, immigration, heroes and leaders, myths and legends, and youth. This
course is conducted exclusively in Spanish.
Spanish Immersion:
Perspectivas Literarias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4065
(intermediate low to intermediate high)
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters
Prerequisite: Spanish Immersion: Vistas Juveniles del Mundo
Hispano, Spanish V or teacher recommendation.
This course is intended for students continuing in the Spanish
immersion program and heritage Spanish speakers. Students will
refine their Spanish language with an emphasis on literacy skills.
Students red and discuss current and past authors’ work that
include various genres of literature including letter writing, poetry, drama, biography, autobiography, periodicals, journal writing,
fiction narrative, non-fiction narrative and short story. This course
is conducted exclusively in Spanish.
Spanish Immersion:
Estudios Latinoamericanos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4096
(intermediate mid to pre-advanced)
Grade level 10–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Spanish Immersion: Perspectivas Literarias, AP
Spanish Language or Literature or teacher recommendation.
One elective Spanish or Social Studies credit, not repeatable.
This course is an integrated study of Latin America and the
Spanish language and is intended for students continuing in the
ASD Spanish immersion programs. Students in this course will
study historical and contemporary issues, including geography,
political events, economics, cultural influences, movement and
social change as primary perspectives for studying Latin America,
its language and culture. Students will analyze and process primary source information in Spanish. Students will also reinforce and
expand their skills in Spanish grammar, vocabulary and fluency
through a content-integrated approach. This course is conducted
exclusively in Spanish. This course may be taken for Spanish or
social studies elective credit.
Provides meaningful work experience in the field of education.
A program will be established cooperatively with the student,
the instructor and the department chairperson. The student aide
program also provides experience in the following areas: office,
guidance office, library and IMC, nurse’s office, science labs and
tutoring. The student may select the area of interest provided he
or she has the approval of the appropriate staff member and the
department chairperson. The student may select only one of the
above areas in any given semester and may earn no more than one
credit per year as a student aide.
AVID-Advancement Via
Individual Determination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9981
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: 2.0-3.5 GPA, student/parent contract, one honors or
AP class in schedule or willingness to take class.
The mission of the AVID class is to ensure that all students,
especially the least served student in the middle, will succeed in
a rigorous curriculum, complete a rigorous college preparatory
path, enter mainstream activities of the school, increase their
enrollment in four-year colleges and become educated and
responsible participants and leaders in a democratic society. AVID
students are required to maintain an AVID binder, take Cornell
notes in each class, take one college entrance exam each year, complete all homework assignments, commit to studying outside of
school each day, participate in community service, attend school,
be on time and behave as a good citizen. May be taken 8 times.
Communicate 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9982LS1
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed to support students enrolled in a Life
Skills 1 class using alternate curriculum to teach functional communication skills across settings; within school and community.
Students will improve their academic, social and work related
communication skills as addressed in the IEP. The course is
repeatable for general elective credit.
Communicate 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9982LS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designed to support students enrolled in a Life
Skills 2 class using alternate curriculum to teach functional communication skills across settings; within school and community.
Students will improve their academic, social and work related
communication skills as addressed in the IEP. The course is
repeatable for general elective credit.
Community Involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9960
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Online course, open enrollment.
Prerequisite: Active participation in a community service program,
parental permission and instructor’s approval.
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
This course is designed to promote social and emotional learning for students involved in school-based community service
while further developing their leadership and facilitation skills.
Participating students will be expected to serve 60 hours of community service, attend 20 hours of facilitation training, complete
reading response assignments, participate in a collaborative journaling and design and implement a service learning project. Since this
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
GENERAL ELECTIVES
Aide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9090 (Teacher) H9200 (Office)
H9300 (Library) H9400 (Tutor)
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is an open enrollment course, it is not a course that can be included
for calculating eligibility or full-time student status. Students will
have two consecutive semesters to complete all coursework to be
eligible for a ½ elective credit. May be repeated 4 times.
Independent Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Varies
Grade level 10–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: See Curriculum Principal for specific course numbers
and forms. This applies to all subject areas.
The program in Independent Study is for the student who has
the self-discipline and interest for work. Each student will design
the course of study according to choice, interest, ability and intent
in relation to the school’s philosophy and policies. Independent
Study promotes self-reliance, initiative and intense inquiry without a structured classroom situation. It is available to any student
who can meet the requirements for enrollment. Independent
Study for credit, must be initiated by the student. The student
should decide on a program to follow and write a project proposal
which will include an outline or description of those items included in the Independent Study Course Proposal Form. Student
must work under the direction of an in-house certificated teacher.
Lead Facilitator for Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9413
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Application required.
This is a class where students design and lead experientially-based lessons aimed at helping students who are new to their
schools to transition successfully to their school and learn skills
instrumental in aiding their future life transitions. The course
may be repeated once for elective credit.
Math Peer Tutor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9402
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Must have completed Algebra I and Geometry with a
grade of A or B and must be recommended by their current math
instructor or the math department chair.
The Math Peer Tutor will work under the guidance of the
classroom teacher and work with students during their math class
to help “fill in the gaps” that impede their math progress. The
specific goals for the tutor are to provide the student enrolled in
the math course a means for regaining control of their math performance and learning, encourage the math students to become
intellectually independent and responsible learners and help the
math students see the “big picture.” The course may be repeated
four times for elective credit.
Model Facilitator for Transitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9412
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: Application required. Successful completion of at
least one semester of Lead Facilitator for Transitions class.
The purpose of this course is to provide further training and
facilitation skills to those students who have shown exceptional
leadership skills as Lead Facilitators for the Transitions class.
These students design and lead experientially-based lessons and
provide leadership to their fellow facilitators at a more advanced
level. The course may be repeated once for elective credit.
Mentorship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9965
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisites: Certified gifted.
88 The student is paired with a professional or expert for a set
period of time, to study special interests or to meet a need that
is not provided for in the regular school program. An outline of
activities will be arranged for each individual education plan. May
be taken 8 times and either for pass/fail or a letter grade.
Riflery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9780
Grade level 9–12. Quarter/Semester
Prerequisite: Parental permission
General elective credit ONLY. Repeatable for credit.
National Rifle Association indoor qualification course of fire is
used. Teaches prone, kneeling and standing position using an air
rifle that is provided by the school.
School Government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9701
Grade level 9–12. One year.
Prerequisite: Students who are elected to school government will
be members of the class.
This course deals with the problems of government, specifically school government. The class will cover varied areas of social
studies; government, economics, sociology and psychology. They
will work in the area of establishing a more effective representative
government of student bodies. May be taken 8 times.
Senior Strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8371
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Academic Credit: 1/2 Elective.
The Senior Strategies course prepares students for independent
living and responsibilities. Organizational skills, financial management, and consumer awareness will be developed. Students
will develop portfolios, filing systems, budgets and plan for long
term goals. An introduction to automobile expenses, housing
contracts, healthy food decisions and career related skills will
enhance the skills students will need for independent living as
they leave their secondary schools students will have an opportunity to examine personal relationships, family decisions and the
responsibilities associated in these areas.
Student Technology Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9511
Grade Level 9–12. One semester. Repeatable for credit
Prerequisite: none
GenYES is a student-centered research-based program for
school-wide technology integration. GenYES students work
with teachers in their building to design technology-infused
lessons. The resulting collaboration provides the students with
project-based learning and the teachers with on-site professional
development. The GenYES program includes online tools that
support student and teacher collaboration and a student-run help
desk.
Study Skills 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9920SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designated for students with an IEP. Students
receive direct instruction in study skill strategies and assignments
to reinforce the correct implementation of these skills. Students
will also be offered time each day to work on their content area
class work. This course may be counted for up to 1.0 English elective credit and then counted as general elective credits.
Not all courses in this catalog will be offered at all schools at any one time.
Work Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H8990
Grade level 10–12. Four semesters maximum
Prerequisite: None.
Students may earn a ½ elective credit for every 112.5 hours
they are employed at a supervised, approved site. (During the
summer term, a student can earn 1.0 credit for 225 hours of
work and 1.5 credits for 337.5 hours.) Hours are documented
with pay stubs each time the student receives a pay check. Some
additional paperwork and assignments are required. This is a great
way to earn elective credit in school while you are earning money
at work!
Work Experience 9–12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9805SP
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
school level. Emphasis will be on the vocational areas identified
on the IEP. This course is repeatable for general elective credit.
Work Experience 9–12 AC 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9805LS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designated as a transitional skills class for
students with an IEP and enrolled in a Life Skills 2 program.
Students will participate in individual and group activities
designed to develop and increase vocational skills at the high
school level. Emphasis will be on the vocational areas identified
on the IEP. This course is repeatable for general elective credit.
Work Experience Online
H9805OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Four semesters maximum.
Prerequisite: None.
This course is designated for students with an IEP. The work
experience program will grant special education students credit
for working and learning on the job. The program grants credit
to students that are legally employed and earning a paycheck.
Credit may also be granted to students that volunteer with a legitimate non-profit organization or government office. This course
is repeatable and students can earn ½ general elective for every
112.5 hours worked. Hours are counted in a semester only and
are not carried over from one semester to the next.
Work Experience Online is a course that supports students
who are employed at a supervised, approved site. Students may
earn ½ credit for every 112.5 hours they are employed. 1.0 credit
may be earned for 225 hours and 1.5 credits may be earned for
337.5 hours. Hours are documented with pay stubs. Additional
paperwork and assignments are required.
Work Experience 9–12 AC 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9805LS1
This open elective course provides experience in design,
preparation, production and finance of the school yearbook, with
emphasis on photography, copy writing and layout. This course
demands student responsibility in order to meet publisher’s deadlines. Students should expect to spend time outside class on this
activity. The course may be offered through any department and
does not grant English credit. Students may repeat Yearbook for
general elective credit. May be taken 4 times.
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: IEP.
This course is designated as a transitional skills class for
students with an IEP and enrolled in a Life Skills 1 program.
Students will participate in individual and group activities
designed to develop and increase vocational skills at the high
NCAA approved course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/NCAA
Yearbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9671
Grade level 9–12. One year. No English credit.
Prerequisite: None.
APS eligible course list can be found at: www.asdk12.org/APS
89
ASD iSCHOOL
LANGUAGE ARTS
English I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0120OLS1/H0120OLS2
Grade level 9. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course incorporates an integrated approach to
the teaching of reading and writing. Students read a variety of
fiction and nonfiction world literature with an emphasis on literary analysis, including drawing inferences and analyzing main
ideas. Students are taught the writing process and write in varying
modes and for different purposes and audiences throughout the
year. Grammar and vocabulary skills are integrated throughout
each unit.
English II –
World Literature Online . . . . . . . H0122OLS1/ H0122OLS2
Grade level 10. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course incorporates an integrated approach to the
teaching of reading and writing with a focus on world literature.
This full-year required course incorporates an integrated approach
to the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and writing to meet
the Common Core State Standards. Students read a variety of fiction and nonfiction world literature with an emphasis on literary
analysis, including drawing inferences and analyzing main ideas;
media presentations from a variety of perspectives; and dramatic
interpretations from plays and excerpts. Students are taught writing process and write in varying modes and for different purposes
and audiences throughout the year. Grammar and vocabulary
skills are integrated throughout each unit. The fundamentals of
formal speech, both to persuade and inform, are also important
elements of this world literature course.
English III –
US Literature Online . . . . . . . . . H0124OLS1/H0124OLS2
Grade level 11. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None
English III US Literature: This full-year online required course
focuses on American literature and how it has helped shape our
nation. Students will explore and study great literary works from
throughout United States’ history including Early American,
Civil War, Great Depression and Civil Rights eras. In addition to
reading a variety of rich fiction and informational texts, students
will improve their writing, critical thinking, speaking, vocabulary,
and grammar skills through lessons aligned to the Common Core
State Standards. Sharpening their skills through performance
tasks such as on demand and extended writing and formal and
informal presentations will prepare students to achieve career and
college readiness.
English IV Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H0126OLS1/H0126OLS2
Grade level 12. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None
English IV is a full year, 12th grade thematic online course
including four units of study: Morality, Citizenship, Social
Justice, and Nature & Environment. These universal themes are
90
intended to engage students in the critical thinking they must
practice to become active participants in their communities. The
course meets the Common Core State Standards and focuses on
American literature, including seminal U.S. political documents,
and world literature, including Shakespeare and other important
authors. As the culminating high school English course, the primary writing focus is on expository and argumentative writing,
including researched arguments, multimedia presentations,
and essays in the major patterns of exposition. Grammar and
vocabulary are integrated with the reading, writing, speaking and
listening content within each thematic unit in order to ensure
instruction of all standards.
Advanced Placement Literature
and Composition Online . . . . . . H0146OLS1/H0146OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Two semesters of this course will fulfill the composition credit
required for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Advanced Placement Literature and
Composition, a college level course, provides an in-depth study
of several major literary works and prepares students for the
AP Exam in Literature and Composition, a means of obtaining
advanced placement in English at most colleges. Writing is an
integral part of the course and exam, and writing assignments
focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository,
analytical, and argumentative essays. Reading in this course is
both wide and deep, building upon the reading done in previous
English courses. Students read works from several genres, including poetry and drama, and periods, from the sixteenth to the
twenty-first century.
Advanced Placement Language
and Composition Online . . . . . . H0245OLS1/H0245OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Two semesters of this course will fulfill the composition credit
required for graduation.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Advanced Placement Language
and Composition is a college level course that assists students in
becoming skilled readers of literature and writers who compose
for a variety of purposes. This course also prepares students for the
AP Exam in Language and Composition, a means of obtaining
advanced placement in English at most colleges. An intensive
analysis of literature will develop students’ awareness of the use of
language and influence their writing.
Gothic Literature Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0372OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
From vampires to ghosts, these frightening stories have influenced fiction writers since the 18th century. This online course
will focus on the major themes found in Gothic literature and
demonstrate how the core writing drivers produce, for the reader,
a thrilling psychological environment. Terror versus horror, the
influence of the supernatural, and descriptions of the difference
between good and evil are just a few of the themes presented.
By the time students have completed this course, they will have
ASD iSchool
gained an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex
nature of dark fiction.
World Mythology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H0436OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. World Mythology examines the common elements found in myths from a variety of cultures, including the Middle East, Egypt, Africa, Asia, Northern Europe, and
the Americas. Students will read ancient texts, plays, epics, poetry
and contemporary literature containing allusions to world myths.
Topics of study will include the historical and theoretical basis
of myths and archetypes, including creation, heroes, monsters,
tricksters, and quests. World Mythology will include extensive
reading, discussion, creative and analytical writing.
MATH
Algebra Readiness Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1344OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: This online course can not be taken by students who
have successfully completed Pre-Algebra, Survey of Algebra or
Algebra A or B, or Algebra I or any higher level math course.
This online course is designed to prepare students for success
in an algebra course. The emphasis will be on continued development of pattern recognition, computational skills, elementary
algebra topics, and the use of technology.
Algebra A Online . . . . . . . . . . . H1345OLS1/ H1345OLS2
Grade level 9–11. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “C” or better in 8th grade math.
2. A grade of “C” or better in Pre-Algebra.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The student can NOT have earned credit for the first semester of
Algebra I or any higher level math class. The prerequisite for the
second semester of Algebra A is the successful completion of
the first semester or consent of instructor or math department
chairperson.
This online course reviews and extends problem solving, data
analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers. The course covers work
with data, linear equations and functions, graphing linear equations, solving linear equations and inequalities, radicals, connects
algebra with geometry and uses algebra in appropriate related
applications. This course is the equivalent of the first semester of
an Algebra 1 course.
Algebra B Online . . . . . . . . . . . H1347OLS1/ H1347OLS2
Grade level 10–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “C” or better in 8th grade math.
2. A grade of “C” or better in Pre-Algebra.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The student can NOT have earned credit for the second semester
of Algebra I or any higher level math class. The prerequisite for
the second semester of Algebra B is the successful completion
ASD iSchool
of the first semester or consent of instructor or math department
chairperson.
This online course reviews and extends problem solving, data
analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers and linear equations,
graphing linear equations in a variety of forms and work with
data, equations and functions. The course will cover systems of
linear equations, quadratic functions, exponential functions,
polynomial functions, rational functions and discrete math using
appropriate related applications. This course is the equivalent of
the second semester of an Algebra I course.
Algebra I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1352OLS1/ H1352OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires at least one of the
following:
1. A grade of “C” or better in 8th grade math.
2. A grade of “C” or better in Pre-Algebra.
3. Recommendation or approval of student’s most recent math
instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Algebra I is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of
instructor or math department chairperson. Students who have
successfully completed Algebra B or Survey of Algebra can NOT
take Algebra I.
This online course reviews and extends problem solving, data
analysis, the use of technology (i.e., scientific calculator, graphing
calculator, computer), the theory, use and understanding of the
fundamental operations on real numbers, expressing quantitative statements in the language of algebra, solving equations
and inequalities, polynomials, the use of rational expressions in
equations, coordinate graphing, irrational numbers, solution of
quadratic equations and related applications.
Algebra II Online . . . . . . . . . . . H1377OLS1/ H1377OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra I and Geometry
or consent of previous mathematics instructor and/or math
department chairperson. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Algebra II is the successful completion of the first semester or
consent of instructor and/or math department chairperson.
This online course includes problem solving, data analysis,
the use of technology (i.e., graphing calculator, computer), basic
operations with polynomials, solving equations and inequalities,
sequences and series, relations and functions, systems of equations in two and three variables, matrices, irrational and complex
numbers through the solution of quadratic functions and polynomial functions of higher than first degree and an introduction to
logarithms.
Geometry Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H1502OLS1/ H1502OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Algebra I or consent of
previous mathematics instructor or math department chairperson.
The prerequisite for the second semester of Geometry is the
successful completion of the first semester or consent of
instructor or math department chairperson.
Approved by NCAA
This online course covers the study of plane and three dimensional geometry with emphasis on clarity and precision of
91
language and the logical development of geometric principles
in deductive reasoning and proof including work with points,
lines, planes, angles, congruent triangles, circles, polygons and
transformations.
Pre-Calculus with
Trigonometry Online . . . . . . . . . H1662OLS1/ H1662OLS2
Grade level 10–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: A grade of “B” or better in Geometry and Algebra
II or permission of previous mathematics instructor or math
department chairperson. The prerequisite for the second semester
of Pre-calculus with Trig is the successful completion of the first
semester or consent of instructor or math department chairperson.
This online course covers logarithmic and exponential functions, analytic geometry, introduction to limits and the derivative, sequences and series, circular and trigonometric functions,
graphs, laws, identities, inverses and their applications, vectors
and complex numbers. The emphasis of this course is on the
concepts that build toward understanding calculus. It will follow
an applications approach and use graphing calculators and other
appropriate technology.
AP Computer Science . . . . . . . . H1201OLS1/H1201OLS2
Grade level: 11-12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: Algebra II
This online AP Computer Science is a year-long introductory college-level course which covers the basics of Java in two
semesters and is geared specifically toward high school students
who plan to take the AP Computer Science A exam. This class is
open to 11th and 12th graders who have successfully completed
Algebra II.
Advanced Placement Statistics
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H1701OLS1/H1701OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: First semester enrollment requires a grade of “B” or
better in Algebra II. The prerequisite for the second semester of
AP Statistics is the successful completion (“C” or better) of the
first semester or the consent of the instructor or math department
chairperson.
The purpose of this online course is to introduce students to
the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students will be expected to be able to
use appropriate technology to interpret data and will be expected
to be able to communicate their results in an understandable
form.
Advanced Placement
Calculus AB Online . . . . . . . . . . H1706OLS1/H1706OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: “B” or better in Pre-Calculus and Algebra II
or consent of the previous mathematics instructor or math
department chairperson.
This online course includes the study of functions and graphs,
derivatives and their application, analytic geometry, limits and
continuity and includes the use of current technology.
AP Calculus BC Online . . . . . . . H1709OLS1/H1709OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: “B” or better in AP Calculus AB; a 3 or higher on the
92
AP Calc AB test; or consent of the Calculus BC instructor or math
department chairperson.
As with other courses designated with Advanced Placement,
this online course is introductory college level material. The
student is expected to meet this college level workload to be successful. This course includes the study of functions and graphs,
derivatives and their application, analytical geometry, limits
and continuity, integrals, parametric equations, polar functions
and vector analysis. Additional techniques and applications for
differentiation and integration will be developed. Polynomial
approximations will be explored through the Maclaurin and
Taylor Series. Convergence and divergence of sequences and series
will be investigated. Appropriate technology will be incorporated
throughout the course.
SCIENCE
Astronomy Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2620OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is designed to build a coherent understanding of the earth-space relationship. Emphasis will be towards the
development of astronomical concepts such as planetary motion,
structure of galaxies and various theories of the formation of
the universe. Course includes the use of various astronomical
instruments.
Biology I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2232OLS1/H2232OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each. Life science
Prerequisite: Grade 10-12: none. Grade 9: 3.5 GPA in 8th grade core
subjects, Algebra I and teacher recommendation.
The basic biology course and prerequisite for all biology electives. This online course will include a study of the chemical basis
of life such as the cellular processes of respiration, photosynthesis,
diffusion and osmosis. Cell division, DNA and enzyme action
will also be covered. The course also includes an extensive treatment of introductory botany, zoology, ecology and genetics.
Earth Sciences Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2610OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is a survey of the various branches of sciences concerning the earth. The student has the opportunity to
explore a wide variety of topics such as oceanography, historical
geology, rock and mineral identification, astronomy, physical
geology, meteorology, composition and formation of the formations of the early and various geological processes of change. This
course is not open to students who have successfully completed
Geology I.
Forensic Science I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2560OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science
Prerequisite: Biology I required, Chemistry I recommended.
This online course focuses on various aspects of forensic science and modern criminal investigation analysis. It integrates
biology, geology, physics, chemistry, anatomy, medical sciences
and critical thinking skills. Topics include structures and functions of the human body, processing a crime scene, physical
evidence, questioned documents, serology and pathology. In
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addition, the course may cover selected topics in toxicology, drug
and alcohol abuse, odontology, entomology, forensic art, terrorist
and disaster response and emergency medical procedures.
Forensic Science II Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2570OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life or physical science
Prerequisite: Biology I required, Chemistry I recommended.
This online course follows Forensic Science I. It focuses on
various aspects of forensic science and modern criminal investigation analysis. It integrates biology, geology, physics, chemistry,
anatomy, medical sciences and critical thinking skills. Topics
include DNA analysis, textiles, trace evidence, firearms, tool
marks and arson investigation. In addition, the course may cover
selected topics in toxicology, drug and alcohol abuse, odontology,
entomology, forensic art, terrorist and disaster response and emergency medical procedures.
Marine Science, Biology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . H2305OL
with some integration of world history. Historiography, geography, economics, government, humanities, sociology, religions,
philosophy, science, and technology are some of the themes/perspectives by which US history will be examined. The first semester
will investigate/explore the American experience through the
post WWI era (roaring twenties) and the beginning of the Great
Depression. The second semester will investigate/explore the
American experience from the Great Depression through contemporary America.
Advanced Placement
US History Online . . . . . . . . . . . H3023OLS1/H3023OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
One full year meets the one semester social studies elective
requirement and earns an additional one semester general elective
requirement or one full year meets the US History requirement.
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Life science
Prerequisite: Biology I.
This online course is designed to challenge the ambitious student who has the ability and interest in American history and is
capable of doing lower division college level work. The purposes
of this course are to provide a much more intensive study of the
United States history and preparation for the advanced placement
test in this field.
Physical Sciences Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H2615OL
United States Government Online . . . . . . . . . . H3075OL
This online course is a very basic introduction to physical
science that will stress the general principles of chemistry and
physics. The basic physics section will include emphasis in simple
machines, basic electricity and the various forms of energy. The
chemistry section will cover matter, mixtures and compounds.
The student will be presented with the practical side of physical science that emphasizes the everyday uses of physics and
chemistry.
This online course is founded on the belief that to become an
informed and active citizen, an understanding of government is
essential. This course will feature both the structure of government and the function of politics. It will include both theory and
practical application of the following: 1) foundations of United
States government, 2) institutions and policy making, 3) principles of the United States constitution, 4) roles and responsibilities
of the citizen, and 5) political behavior.
This online course is a study of marine life found on shores,
in bays, estuaries, intertidal zones and in ocean depths. The
commercial and environmental importance of various forms of
marine life will also be examined.
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Physical science.
Prerequisite: None.
Grade level 12. Required. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
SOCIAL STUDIES
Advanced Placement US Government Online H3062OL
World History Online
(Circa 500 BC-AD 1800) . . . . . . . H3315OLS1/H3315OLS2
Grade level 10. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course provides a study of world history. Included
in the first semester are the geographic regions of Greece, Rome,
India, The Far East, China, Japan, Korea, and Africa. Geography,
humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science,
and technology are some of the themes/perspectives by which
these areas of the world will be explored. Included in the second
semester are the geographic regions of the Middle East, ancient
Americas, Byzantium, and Europe. Geography, humanities, religions, government, economy, society, science, and technology are
some of the themes/perspectives by which these areas of the world
will be explored.
US History Online . . . . . . . . . . . H3317OLS1/H3317OLS2
Grade level 11. Required. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course provides the study of United States history
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Grade level 12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Taking one semester of AP U.S. Government meets the government
requirement.
This online course is designed for the student who is capable of
doing lower division college work. The AP U.S. Government class
will address the following topics: 1) constitutional underpinnings
of United States government, 2) political beliefs and behaviors,
3) political parties and interest groups, 4) the three branches of
national government, 5) public policy making and 6) civil liberties and civil rights. This course will prepare students for the
advanced placement test in U.S. Government and Politics and
will fulfill the requirement for U. S. Government.
Economics Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3080OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is designed to teach students economics
concepts and principles and to introduce them to important economic institutions. Students will learn to apply economic reasoning to their lives as citizens, consumers, workers and producers.
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Advanced Placement Economics,
Micro Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3083OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Taking both Macro and Micro Economics meets both the
economics and social studies elective requirement.
This is a college-level online course divided into two sections;
it is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement
test.
Microeconomics provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, consumers and producers. It
places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product
markets and includes the study of factor markets and the role of
government.
Advanced Placement Economics,
Macro Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3084OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
Taking both Macro and Micro Economics meets both the
economics and social studies elective requirement.
This is a college-level online course divided into two sections;
it is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement
test.
Macroeconomics provides students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic
system as a whole. It places emphasis on the study of national
income and price determination and also develops familiarity
with economic performance measures, economic growth and
international economics.
Alaska Studies Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3110OL
Grade level 9–12. Required. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Alaska Studies is an online in-depth exploration of the rich
geographic and cultural background of the state and its people
from the early native peoples to the Russian era through statehood to the present. This course includes examination of the
geography, history and the political and economic forces that
have shaped contemporary Alaska. Content is organized around
five themes: population, land, resource, governance and cultural
landscape. The course seeks to ensure that students have a strong
foundation in the historic and cultural contexts of issues facing
the state so they will develop a broad sense of community and
strengthen skills that will encourage thoughtful consideration of
issues and choices facing Alaska.
SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES
Criminology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3615OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Criminology is a study in the nature and causes of crime, its
control and related punishment issues. Students will explore
online why people become criminals, how we control criminals
and how crime affects young people. Sample questions include:
What are common crimes? How do juvenile crime patterns compare with adult? What are the different types of crimes? How do
94
we police? What is organized crime? How does a citizen become
part of the solution? How are property crime patterns different
from violent crime patterns?
Law Studies Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3625OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Law Studies is the place to discover how the legal system
works. This online course aids students in applying legal principles and procedures. Sample questions that will be examined
include: What rights do individuals have? What are the major
types of law? Why do we have an adversarial system? How well
will students do in court? How do we make justice happen?
Psychology 1 Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3685OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Psychology is the scientific study of
human behavior from early childhood through old age. Students
will explore how an organism’s physical state, mental state and
external environment affect behavior and the mental processes.
Sample topics include: how people learn, think, feel and behave,
how developmental stages are important in the human life cycle,
how self-concept is developed through relationships with parents,
peers and culture, and how brain functions are affected by environmental conditions.
Advanced Placement
Psychology Online . . . . . . . . . . H3687OLS1/ H3687OLS2
Grade level 11–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This year-long online course is designed to introduce the
highly motivated student to the systematic and scientific study
of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other
animals. Students are introduced to the psychological facts,
principles and phenomenon associated with each of the major
sub-fields within psychology. They also learn about the methods
psychologists use in their science and practice. Topics include: the
history of psychology, contemporary approaches to behavior, how
to understand one’s own behavior, strategies for dealing with life
experiences and how to apply psychological principles to society.
Sociology Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H3045OL
Grade level 11–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
Sociology is the study of how human behavior is shaped by
the groups to which we belong. In this online course students will
examine patterns of social life, make predictions about behavior
and investigate other cultures. Sample questions in Sociology
include: What roles do families play? What role does money play
in creating groups in society? How do schools and other social
institutions shape human behavior? Why do people join gangs?
WORLD LANGUAGES
French I (novice low) Online . . . . H4421OLS1/H4421OLS2
Grade level 9–12. . One semester each.
Prerequisite: None
Students learn to exchange information in simple terms about
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topics relating to themselves, their family and their leisure activities in French. They will be introduced to the culture of Frenchspeaking countries and regions. The emphasis is on vocabulary
development and elementary grammatical structures. The main
goal of this course is to progress toward a novice-level ability in
using French in school and the community.
French II (novice mid)
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4431OLS1/H4431OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: French I
Building on what was learned in Level I, students expand their
ability to speak, read, write and listen in French. The emphasis
is on continued vocabulary development and the acquisition
of additional simple grammatical structure. There will be many
opportunities to converse and write stories in French about
familiar topics. Students begin applying their French language
skills to communicate in basic real-life situations. They also continue to learn about the culture of French-speaking people. The
goal of this course is for students to function at a mid-novice to
high-novice level of proficiency.
French III (novice high to intermediate low)
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4441OLS1/H4441OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: French II
Students exchange information and begin to share opinions
about themselves, their school and community in this online
class. They expand their vocabulary and learn increasingly
complex grammatical structures needed for more sophisticated
communication. Students use technology and media to gather
cultural information and learn about current events. This course
is tailored to the low intermediate level of proficiency in French.
Advanced Placement French Language (pre-advanced)
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4471OLS1/H4471OLS2
Grade level 11–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: French IV, V, or teacher recommendation.
The goal of this online course is to prepare each student to
take the annual AP French Language exam. Designed to provide
students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in
comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a higher level,
students will be challenged with written essays, impromptu and
planned oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
German I Online (novice low) . . . H4221OLS1/H4221OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is an introduction to the German language
and culture. The emphasis is on listening with understanding,
speaking with clarity, reading and writing. Instruction begins
with situation dialogues. Deductive analysis is used to lead to
grammatical principles, but the emphasis is on vocabulary development. Students in their course learn to exchange information
in simple terms about every day experiences. Students identify the
countries where German is spoken, as well as current events in
those countries.
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German II (novice low to novice high)
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4231OLS1/H4231OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: German I.
This online course emphasizes further vocabulary development and includes increased writing practice. Additional points
of grammar are introduced. Students give oral reports and refine
their discussions of their daily lives. Students continue to learn
about the culture of the German people, which may include
famous figures from history as well as aspects of modern life in
Germany, which could include sports or entertainment personalities and popular pastimes. Current events in the German speaking
world are discussed.
Latin I Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4821OLS1/H4821OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
This online course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the Latin language and Roman culture. The course focuses on the development of reading comprehension. Vocabulary
and grammar are studied in the context of reading passages into
which cultural information has been integrated. Students learn to
pronounce Latin according to accepted convention and simple
oral Latin is used to aid students in comprehension. Students will
gain some understanding of the effect of Roman civilization on
the western world. Word derivations and Latin word elements are
also studied to expand the student’s vocabulary.
Latin II Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4831OLS1/H4831OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Latin I.
The emphasis of Online Latin II is to continue the development of reading and comprehension skills and the acquisition of
a deeper understanding of the similarities and differences between
the Roman world and our own. New vocabulary and more
grammatical structures are learned as the reading progresses to
longer and more complicated passages. Oral Latin is used to help
students understand reading selections. The study of Latin word
elements continues
Mandarin Chinese I Online
(novice low to novice mid) . . . . H4321OLS1/H4321OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: None.
The emphasis of this online course is on the ability to communicate orally, emphasizing vocabulary development and basic
language functions. Students will use the language to exchange
information about topics relating to themselves, their families
and leisure activities. Students will learn basic radicals and stroke
order in writing and be introduced to Chinese culture.
Mandarin Chinese II
(novice high) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4323OLS1/H4323OLS2
Grade level 9–12. Two semesters.
Prerequisite: Mandarin Chinese I.
This online course builds on the study of basic vocabulary and
grammatical structures from Chinese I. Students will transfer
from dependence on the romanized system, pinyin, to reading
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and writing the Chinese characters. Students will initiate and sustain short conversations on simple topics in everyday situations,
recognize future and past references and speak the language with
increased confidence and clearer articulation. Chinese customs,
beliefs and aspects of contemporary and traditional culture are
also integrated throughout this course.
Spanish I (novice low) Online . . . H4021OLS1/H4021OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: None.
This is an online course. Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in written form. They learn to understand and
produce simple expressions and are introduced to the cultures of
Spanish speaking countries. The emphasis is placed on vocabulary
development and simple grammar. Throughout the course students apply language skills to real-life communication. Students
in this course learn to exchange information in simple terms. The
main goal for this course is for students to progress towards a
novice level ability in using Spanish in school and the community.
Spanish II (novice mid) Online . . . H4031OLS1/H4031OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: Spanish I.
Students continue to expand upon oral and written communications through vocabulary building and grammar advancement.
Students in this online course learn to understand and produce
simple language related to familiar topics. Students also continue
to learn about the culture of the Spanish-speaking peoples. The
goal of this course is for students to function at a novice-mid
to novice-high level of proficiency, depending on their background, and to begin to show signs of intermediate-low level of
proficiency.
Spanish III (novice high to intermediate low)
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4041OLS1/H4041OLS2
Grade level 9–12. One semester each.
Prerequisite: Spanish II.
Students continue their development of communication skills.
Increased emphasis is placed on responding to written and verbal
input, as well as continued study of Spanish-speaking cultures.
In this online course students learn more complex grammar and
continue to expand upon vocabulary acquisition in order to satisfy some survival needs and courtesy requirements. The main goal
of this course is for students to progress towards an intermediate
low level of proficiency.
Advanced Placement Spanish Language
Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H4071OLS1/H4071OLS2
Grade level 11–12. . One semester each.
Prerequisite: Spanish AP, V, VI, native speaker or teacher
recommendation
The goal of this online course is to prepare each student to
take the annual AP Spanish Language Exam. Designed to provide
students with an opportunity to develop their proficiency skills in
comprehension, reading, writing and speaking at a much higher
level, students will be challenged with written essays, impromptu
and planned oral presentations, readings of a variety of texts and
listening and viewing comprehension of oral texts.
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GENERAL ELECTIVES
Health Opportunities Through PE Online . . . . . H6110OL
Grade level 9-12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None
This online course will challenge students to become educated consumers, learn to manage stress, choose nutritious
foods, make healthy lifestyle choices, be an effective member
of a team and influence others in their community in a positive
way. Students will have the opportunity to experience the many
benefits of regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and sound
decision-making. Topics covered include wellness, mental health,
media literacy/consumer health, fitness components, nutrition,
disease prevention, drug awareness, sexuality education, CPR and
decision-making skills.
Individual Recreational Activities Online . . . . H6666OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None. Lifetime Activity Course.
This online course will offer students a variety of recreational
activities in which they can participate on an individual basis and
learn skills applicable for a lifetime. Activities may include, but
are not limited to, in-line skating, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, frisbee, power walking, ice skating, jogging, orienteering
and biking. Safety equipment as well as equipment appropriate
for each activity will be required and must be furnished by each
student. Repeatable unlimited times.
Lifetime Personal Fitness Online . . . . . . . . . . . H6380OL
Grade level 9–12. One semester.
Prerequisite: None.
The purpose of this online course is to promote the development and maintenance of personal fitness. It is conceptually
based and focuses on healthy living and lifestyle choices, with
particular emphasis on the role of exercise and physical activity
including nontraditional and noncompetitive activities. Course
content includes fitness assessment, regular physical activity, and
fitness concepts and lectures based on the value and benefits of
exercise in daily living. In addition to setting and working toward
personal fitness goals, students have opportunities to practice positive social skills as they gain an understanding of how a wellness
lifestyle affects the quality of life.
Work Experience Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H9805OL
Grade level 10–12. One semester. Four semesters maximum.
Prerequisite: None.
Work Experience Online is a course that supports students
who are employed at a supervised, approved site. Students may
earn ½ credit for every 112.5 hours they are employed. 1.0 credit
may be earned for 225 hours and 1.5 credits may be earned for
337.5 hours. Hours are documented with pay stubs. Additional
paperwork and assignments are required.
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Appendix A
Appendix A
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Appendix A
LPF Complete
Test-Out
(Physical and
written
portions)
or
K-Waivers and
Computerized
version of the
written test
taken at H.S.
or
LPF On-line
or
LPF course at
High School
Counselor
provides
student with
registration
packet
Two K-Waivers
(Participation in
two seasons of
ASAA sanctioned
extracurricular
sports within ASD)
to waive the
physical portion
only
Counselor
enrolls
student in
course
Counselor
enrolls
student in
course
Student fills out
Registration
form and hands
it into P.E.
teacher
Student takes
computerized
test at their
High School
Student takes
LPF on-line
Student takes
LPF on site
Student
practices with
P.E. teacher
and studies for
written test
Student brings
signed
Registration
form to TestOut
Fail
Pass
Fail
Pass
Fail
Pass
Student
completes ALL
components of
the physical
and written test
Fail
Partial Pass
Student retakes only the failed portions of the physical test on another TestOut date. Failed written test may be retaken at their HS using the
computerized version.
Pass
Student has
fulfilled LPF
requirement for
graduation
Appendix B
Alaska School Activities Association (www.ASAA.org) Eligibility for Sports and Activities
Participation in high school athletics is a privilege. All students are expected to comply with local, state, and federal laws and the rules and regulations
of the Anchorage School District. Students will be subject to denial of the
ability to participate if they do not meet eligibility requirements, engage in
behavior that is detrimental to the well being of the team or school, are in
violation of the tobacco rule, are in violation of the drug and alcohol rule, or
commit criminal acts as defined in the ASD Statement of Student Rights and
Responsibilities. In all cases the Superintendent or his designee retains the right
to review and revise any disciplinary action.
A student is eligible to participate in the interscholastic activities of only
one member school per year, except as provided under the Transfer/Residency
Rule (Section 9 of ASAA Handbook). That school shall be considered the
School of Eligibility. A student who is simultaneously enrolled at more than
one member school and who wishes to be eligible to participate in the interscholastic activities of one of those schools, must designate that school as the
School of Eligibility. The School of Eligibility must ensure that the student
meets all eligibility requirements before being permitted to participate.
A. To be eligible during a school semester for participation in interscholastic
activities, a student must:
1. Be properly registered in a 9-12 high school program in the ASD, an ASD
charter school, ASD alternative school or program.
a. A student enrolling in an ASD charter school, alternative school or
program during the first semester of ninth grade; and a student transferring from out-of-district who attends an ASD charter school, alternative school or program after the first semester of the ninth grade,
must designate a member school within the district as the School of
Eligibility.
b. The School of Eligibility of a student, other than a first semester freshman, who transfers to an ASD charter school, alternative school or
program from another school within that district, will be the member
school from which the student transferred.
c. A student attending an ASD school, charter school, alternative school
or program who wishes to change his/her School of Eligibility without
a corresponding parent move, will be ineligible for interscholastic
competition at the new School of Eligibility for 180 school days.
2. Have a qualifying G.P.A.:
a. All first semester freshmen are immediately eligible at the beginning
of the school year. At the end of the 1st quarter, they must have a 2.0
GPA to remain eligible for the remainder of the semester.
b. Second-semester freshmen, all sophomores, all juniors, and all seniors
must have an overall 2.0 GPA during the previous semester and
end of first and third quarters. Students who do not meet the GPA
portion of this requirement may regain eligibility during the current
semester by achieving and maintaining an overall 2.0 GPA at the end
of the quarter or semester using the grades earned during the nineweek grading period.
c. Students who did not pass 5 classes the previous semester may regain
eligibility by retaking and completing the course failed prior to the
next grading period. Grades are checked at the beginning of each fall
sports season and at the end of each quarter/semester. For purposes
of this section, academic deficiencies may be made up through correspondence courses or summer school. (Correspondence courses must
be completed and postmarked prior to the eligibility check. Athletes
may begin participation once the final grade is posted.)
3. Be enrolled in the required number of semester classes:
a. All freshmen, all sophomores, all juniors, as well as seniors who are
not on track to graduate must be enrolled in a minimum of five (5)
semester classes that lead to granting of credit toward graduation from
the school district.
b. Seniors who are on track to graduate must be enrolled in a minimum
of four (4) semester classes in the district. Seniors who have a minimum of 17.5 credits at the beginning of their senior year and who
enroll in a minimum of four (4) semester classes the first semester
Appendix B
will be eligible during the second semester as long as enrolled in a
minimum of four (4) classes and enrolled in enough classes to graduate second semester.
c. For purposes of eligibility, “enrolled” means the student has registered
and remains in an approved course requiring regular attendance and/
or coursework. College courses may be used to determine the number
of courses for enrollment if: 1) the student is currently enrolled in the
course, and 2) the course has been approved for ASD credit through
Credit By Choice Program. The following units of credit do not qualify for purposes of determining eligibility: high school credit issued
for middle school courses; the World Languages Incentive Credit;
physical education waiver, and the credit by examination.
d. King Career Center courses will be counted as three(3) semester
classes.
B. Student eligibility is checked on the first day of the fall sports season.
Eligibility will be checked again, the second Monday of each subsequent
quarter. Student’s who were not eligible during a previous quarter/semester,
may practice, but not play, after school on the last day of the quarter, pending the new findings of eligibility.
C. Students who do not meet the eligibility rules of ASD and ASAA to participate in interscholastic activities due to academic deficiency may have the
ability to practice with the team for the remainder of the quarter as long as
all of the required paperwork is submitted to the Activities office. The student will be able to practice only, they will not be issued a uniform to play
in a contest until the end of the next grading period. After the next grading
period, eligibility may be regained.
IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE:
1. A physician’s clearance to play must be on file at the school. This clearance
is good for one year but must not expire during the season of the sport in
which the student is participating.
2. A High School Athletic Activity Participation form must be signed and on
file, and participation guidelines must be acknowledged.
3. Students and parents must comply with the ASAA pre-participation
guidelines.
4. All records must be in order and forms must be on file in the Activity
Office before the student is eligible to participate in any athletic
programs.
5. Students pay an activity fee per ASAA sport or apply for a fee waiver based
on financial hardship through the school activity office.
6. a. All players must have ten (10) separate days of physical practice in the
same sport activity prior to the first day of competition.
b. When a student is participating in a recognized high school sport activity that overlaps the beginning of another recognized sport season, the
AASA Executive Director may waive up to five (5) practices. c. If a student has completed the required practices but has not competed
for whatever reason for less then two weeks, no additional practices are
required before returning to competition with the concurrence of the
coach. If a student misses between 2 and 4 weeks of practice and competition, 5 additional days of practice and the concurrence of the coach
are required before returning to competition. If more than 4 weeks
have been missed, the student must have ten (10) additional days of
practice and concurrence of the coach before returning to competition.
d. Member schools permitting a student to participate in interscholastic
competition without meeting the practice requirements of this section
will be considered to be using an ineligible player and will be subject
to penalty under Article 12, Section 1 of the ASAA handbook.
e. ASAA prohibits students from competing as a member of a non-school
comp. or junior hockey team beginning with the first day of high school
practice until a school team has completed its season. The prohibition
on competing on a non-school team will be lifted during Thanksgiving
and winter break vacations. Although this rule does not restrict practice
on a non-school team during the high school season, no student may
participate in a high school game on a day in which he/she has partici-
99
pated in a “comp” practice.
Conditions of Student Participation
A. ELIGIBILITY RULES
1. Athletes must meet all eligibility requirements of the Anchorage School
district and the Alaska State Activities Association (ASAA).
2. Violation of the eligibility rules shall result in denial of participation.
B. DENIAL OF PARTICIPATION
1. An athlete who is removed from a team for disciplinary reasons will not
be eligible to practice or play another sport during the season of that
sport.
2. An athlete who is suspended from the regular school program for any
reason will not be eligible to practice or play any sport during the period
of suspension. A suspension ends at midnight of the final day of the
suspension.
3. Any sanction imposed under these Conditions of Participation is separate and distinct from any sanction which may be proposed for violation
of any other school disciplinary requirement.
4. During an appeal process the student shall not participate in the group’s
activities until the appeal process is completed.
C. DENIAL OF PARTICIPATION FROM TEAM ACTIVITIES FOR
SPECIFIC CIRCUMSTANCES
1. A student athlete who is truant for one or more classes, or who is in
attendance for less than half of his or her scheduled classes during school
day cannot practice or play on that day without principal permission.
Students in violation will be suspended for two games on the first
offense, removed from the team on the second offense.
2 . Equipment issued to an athlete is his/her responsibility for return or
replacement. If the equipment is not returned, replaced or paid for, no
letter shall be awarded nor shall the student be permitted to participate
in any sport.
3. Denial from participating with the team for a period of time to be determined by coach/principal/and District administrators may result from
the following:
a. Insubordination
b. Obscene gestures; swearing
c. Provocation
d. Fighting
e. Stealing/Theft
f. Hazing/Initiation
g. Other disciplinary situations which may arise
4. With administrative approval, the coach may establish additional participation rules.
D. The complete Tobacco, Alcohol and Controlled Substances (TAD) Polity
follows.
Time period during which policy applies
T
he policy in this section applies to any student who is participating or
has participated in interscholastic activities starting from the students’ first
participation in interscholastic activities, including formal practices which
precede interscholastic competition after the initial signing of the Student/
Parent/Legal Guardian (TAD) Acknowledgment Form, at any ASAA member
school, and continuing until the student graduates from high school.
Students sanctioned under the TAD guidelines must complete ASAA
education component before returning to play. Violations of this policy are
cumulative and progressive throughout a student’s high school years.
TOBACCO RULES-Violations of tobacco rules cumulative throughout
school year. Students who violate the tobacco rules will be subject to the
following sanctions:
a. FIRST OFFENSE FOR POSSESSION OR USE - Suspended from
interscholastic activities and practices for 10 calendar days. Fifty percent of the suspension will be forgiven and the student may return to
practice if the student and parent/guardian complete the First Offense
educational component.
b. SECOND OFFENSE FOR POSSESSION OR USE- Loss of practice
100
and athletic participation for forty-five calendar days.
c. Students who violate the tobacco rules while under school jurisdiction
are subject to suspension in accordance with Anchorage School District
regulations and cannot participate during the length of the suspension.
E.DRUG/ALCOHOL RULES The actual or attempted sale of, use of, possession of tobacco, alcohol, inhalants, illegal drugs, substances designed to look like illegal drugs, substances
purported to be illegal drugs, or drug paraphernalia shall subject the athlete
to loss of practice and athletic participation.
Under School Jurisdiction
Students who violate the drug/alcohol rules will be subject to:
a. FIRST OFFENSE FOR POSSESSION OR USE - Suspension or
expulsion in accordance with Anchorage School District Regulations.
Loss of practice and athletic participation during the suspension or
expulsion, or for ten calendar days, whichever is greater. Fifty percent
of the suspension from athletic participation will be forgiven and the
student may return to practice if the student and parent/guardian complete the ASAA First Offense educational component.
b. SECOND OFFENSE FOR POSSESSION OR USE, OR FIRST
OFFENSE FOR SELLING, DISTRIBUTING, OR ATTEMPTING
TO SELL - Suspension or expulsion in accordance with Anchorage
School District Regulations - Loss of practice and athletic participation
during the suspension or expulsion.
Not Under School Jurisdiction
Students who violate the drug/alcohol rules while not under school
jurisdiction:
a. FIRST OFFENSE FOR POSSESSION OR USE - Loss of practice
and athletic participation for ten calendar days. Fifty percent of the
suspension from athletic participation will be forgiven and the student
may return to practice if the student and parent/guardian complete
the ASAA First Offense educational component.
b. S ECOND OFFENSE FOR POSSESSION OR USE, OR
FIRST OFFENSE FOR SELLING, DISTRIBUTING, OR
ATTEMPTING TO SELL - Loss of practice and athletic participation for a minimum of forty-five calendar days.
c. THIRD OFFENSE FOR POSSESSION OR USE, OR SECOND
OFFENSE FOR SELLING, DISTRIBUTING OR ATTEMPTING
TO SELL - Loss of eligibility for the duration of Anchorage School
District attendance.
F. CRIMINAL ACTS
Students who commit criminal acts as defined in the ASD Statement of
Student’s Rights and Responsibilities will be removed from the team for the
remainder of the season.
1. The school will conduct an investigation independent of the Police.
2. The student may appeal the finding of the investigation to the school
principal.
3. The student shall not participate in the team’s activities until the appeal
process is completed.
This is not a complete list of all eligibility rules and regulations. If
you have questions, please contact your activities principal.
See ASAA manual for definition of a bona fide move of parents or
guardian.
Appendix B
Appendix C
NCAA ELIGIBILITY CENTER
QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
Core Courses


Division I Initial-Eligibility Requirements
NCAA Division I requires 16 core courses. See the charts below for the breakdown of this 16 core-course
requirement.
For students enrolling on or after August 1, 2016, NCAA Division I will require 10 core courses to
be completed prior to the seventh semester (seven of the 10 must be a combination of English, math or
natural or physical science that meet the distribution requirements below). These 10 courses become "locked
in" at the seventh semester and cannot be retaken for grade improvement.
o Beginning August 1, 2016, it will be possible for a Division I college-bound student-athlete to still receive
athletics aid and the ability to practice with the team if he or she fails to meet the 10 course requirement,
but would not be able to compete.
Test Scores




Division I uses a sliding scale to match test scores and core grade-point averages (GPA). The sliding scale for
those requirements is shown on Page No. 2 of this sheet.
The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading and math sections. The writing
section of the SAT is not used.
The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the following four sections: English, mathematics, reading
and science.
When you register for the SAT or ACT, use the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to ensure all
SAT and ACT scores are reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center from the testing agency.
Test scores that appear on transcripts will not be used.
Grade-Point Average





Be sure to look at your high school’s List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center's website
(www.eligibilitycenter.org). Only courses that appear on your school's List of NCAA Courses will be used in the
calculation of the core GPA. Use the list as a guide.
Division I students enrolling full time before August 1, 2016, should use Sliding Scale A to determine
eligibility to receive athletics aid, practice and competition during the first year.
Division I core GPA required to receive athletics aid and practice on or after August 1, 2016, is between
2.000 and 2.299 (corresponding test-score requirements are listed on the Sliding Scale on Page No. 2 of this
sheet).
Division I core GPA required to be eligible for competition on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.300
(corresponding test-score requirements are listed on the Sliding Scale on Page No. 2 of this sheet).
Remember, the core GPA is calculated using the best 16 NCAA core courses only.
DIVISION I
16 Core Courses
4
3
2
1
2
4
Appendix C
years of English.
years of mathematics (Algebra I or
higher).
years of natural/physical science (1 year
of lab if offered by high school).
year of additional English, mathematics
or natural/physical science.
years of social science.
years of additional courses (from any
area above, foreign language or
comparative religion/philosophy).
101
Sliding Scale A
Use for Division I prior to August 1, 2016
NCAA DIVISION I SLIDING SCALE
Core GPA
3.550 & above
3.525
3.500
3.475
3.450
3.425
3.400
3.375
3.350
3.325
3.300
3.275
3.250
3.225
3.200
3.175
3.150
3.125
3.100
3.075
3.050
3.025
3.000
2.975
2.950
2.925
2.900
2.875
2.850
2.825
2.800
2.775
2.750
2.725
2.700
2.675
2.650
2.625
2.600
2.575
2.550
2.525
2.500
2.475
2.450
2.425
2.400
2.375
2.350
2.325
2.300
2.275
2.250
2.225
2.200
2.175
2.150
2.125
2.100
2.075
2.050
2.025
2.000
SAT
Verbal and Math ONLY
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
600
610
620
630
640
650
660
670
680
690
700
710
720
730
730
740-750
760
770
780
790
800
810
820
830
840-850
860
860
870
880
890
900
910
920
930
940
950
960
960
970
980
990
1000
1010
ACT Sum
37
38
39
40
41
41
42
42
43
44
44
45
46
46
47
47
48
49
49
50
50
51
52
52
53
53
54
55
56
56
57
58
59
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
Sliding Scale B
Use for Division I beginning August 1, 2016
NCAA DIVISION I SLIDING SCALE
Core GPA
SAT
ACT Sum
Verbal and Math ONLY
3.550
3.525
3.500
3.475
3.450
3.425
3.400
3.375
3.350
3.325
3.300
3.275
3.250
3.225
3.200
3.175
3.150
3.125
3.100
3.075
3.050
3.025
3.000
2.975
2.950
2.925
2.900
2.875
2.850
2.825
2.800
2.775
2.750
2.725
2.700
2.675
2.650
2.625
2.600
2.575
2.550
2.525
2.500
2.475
2.450
2.425
2.400
2.375
2.350
2.325
2.300
2.299
2.275
2.250
2.225
2.200
2.175
2.150
2.125
2.100
2.075
2.050
2.025
2.000
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
600
610
620
630
640
650
660
670
680
690
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
770
780
790
800
810
820
830
840
850
860
870
880
890
900
910
910
920
930
940
950
960
970
980
990
1000
1010
1020
37
38
39
40
41
41
42
42
43
44
44
45
46
46
47
47
48
49
49
50
50
51
52
52
53
53
54
55
56
56
57
58
59
60
61
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
86
For more information, visit the NCAA Eligibility Center website at www.eligibilitycenter.org or
www.2point3.org.
[Type text]
102
Appendix C
NCAA ELIGIBILITY CENTER
QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
Division II Initial-Eligibility Requirements
Core Courses


Division II currently requires 16 core courses. See the chart below.
Beginning August 1, 2018, to become a full or partial qualifier for Division II, all college-bound
student-athletes must complete the 16 core-course requirement.
Test Scores




Division II currently requires a minimum SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.
Beginning August 1, 2018, Division II will use a sliding scale to match test scores and core-course
grade-point averages (GPA). The sliding scale for those requirements is shown on Page No. 2 of this
sheet.
The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading and math sections. The
writing section of the SAT is not used.
The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the following four sections: English,
mathematics, reading and science.
When you register for the SAT or ACT, use the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to
ensure all SAT and ACT scores are reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center
from the testing agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will not be used.
Grade-Point Average




Be sure to look at your high school’s List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center's website
(www.eligibilitycenter.org). Only courses that appear on your school's approved List of NCAA
Courses will be used in the calculation of the core GPA. Use the list as a guide.
The current Division II core GPA requirement is a minimum of 2.000. Division II core GPA
required to be eligible for competition on or after August 1, 2018, is 2.200 (corresponding testscore requirements are listed on the Sliding Scale on Page No. 2 of this sheet).
The minimum Division II core GPA required to receive athletics aid and practice as a partial
qualifier on or after August 1, 2018, is 2.000 (corresponding test-score requirements are listed
on the Sliding Scale on Page No. 2 of this sheet).
Remember, the NCAA core GPA is calculated using NCAA core courses only.
DIVISION II
16 Core Courses
3
2
2
3
2
4
Appendix C
years of English.
years of mathematics (Algebra I
or higher).
years of natural/physical science
(1 year of lab if offered by high
school).
years of additional English,
mathematics or natural/physical
science.
years of social science.
years of additional courses (from
any area above, foreign language
or comparative
religion/philosophy).
103
DIVISION II
COMPETITION SLIDING SCALE
DIVISION II
PARTIAL QUALIFIER SLIDING SCALE
Use for Division II beginning August 1, 2018
Use for Division II beginning August 1, 2018
Core GPA
3.300 & above
3.275
3.250
3.225
3.200
3.175
3.150
3.125
3.100
3.075
3.050
3.025
3.000
2.975
2.950
2.925
2.900
2.875
2.850
2.825
2.800
2.775
2.750
2.725
2.700
2.675
2.650
2.625
2.600
2.575
2.550
2.525
2.500
2.475
2.450
2.425
2.400
2.375
2.350
2.325
2.300
2.275
2.250
2.225
2.200
SAT
Verbal and Math ONLY
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
600
610
620
630
640
650
660
670
680
690
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
770
780
790
800
810
820
830
840 & above
ACT Sum
37
38
39
40
41
41
42
42
43
44
44
45
46
46
47
47
48
49
49
50
50
51
52
52
53
53
54
55
56
56
57
58
59
60
61
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70 & above
Core GPA
SAT
ACT Sum
Verbal and Math ONLY
3.050 & above
3.025
3.000
2.975
2.950
2.925
2.900
2.875
2.850
2.825
2.800
2.775
2.750
2.725
2.700
2.675
2.650
2.625
2.600
2.575
2.550
2.525
2.500
2.475
2.450
2.425
2.400
2.375
2.350
2.325
2.300
2.275
2.250
2.225
2.200
2.175
2.150
2.125
2.100
2.075
2.050
2.025
2.000
400
410
420
430
440
450
460
470
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
560
570
580
590
600
610
620
630
640
650
660
670
680
690
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
770
780
790
800
810
820 & above
37
38
39
40
41
41
42
42
43
44
44
45
46
46
47
47
48
49
49
50
50
51
52
52
53
53
54
55
56
56
57
58
59
60
61
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68 & above
For more information, visit the NCAA Eligibility Center website at www.eligibilitycenter.org.
104
Appendix C
Title IX
“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subject to discrimination under
any educational programs or activity receiving federal financial assistance”.
—From the preamble to Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972
The Board is committed to an environment of nondiscrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, economic status, union
affiliation, disability, and other human differences. No person shall be excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, any academic or extracurricular
program or educational opportunity offered service offered by the District. The District will comply with the applicable statutes, regulations, and executive
orders adopted by Federal, State, and Municipal agencies.
Title IX applies to all programs in a school (including academics, extracurricular, and athletics) that receives federal financial assistance. It protects all
participants in the academic program from gender discrimination including parents, students and employees.
If a school becomes aware of equal opportunity violations or sexual harassment, the school will take appropriate actions to investigate the situation. For
more information on the student grievance process speak with your principal and/or follow the Student Grievance Process in this handbook. For more information on Title IX or to report any civil rights violation or Title IX violation, contact the EEO Director, who serves as the Title IX Coordinator, at the ASD
Education Center, 5530 E. Northern Lights Blvd, Anchorage, AK 99504-3135 (907) 742-4132.
Concerns may also be reported to any of the following external agencies: Alaska State Commission for Human Rights, Anchorage Equal Rights
Commission, Department of Education and/or the Office of Civil Rights.
Updated 6/2010
High School Four-Year Plan__________________________________
Total:
Total:
Total:
Total:
For graduation requirements see inside front cover
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