v2r1rs6k

v2r1rs6k
RS/6000 Installation
RS/6000 Advanced Technical Support
RS/6000 America's Marketing
August 1999
01/31/00 v2r1rs6k.PRZ
Copyright IBM Corp. 1998 -©
Course
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1
Objectives/Contents
Understanding AIX requirements and prerequisites
Planning the type of Network Station Server
Installing V2R1 Network Station code on AIX.
AIX User, Network and DNS Setup
Migrating V1R3 settings to V2R1
Running AIX applications on the Network Station
Simple problem determination tips
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Network Computer Division 2
Notes
This topic is RS/6000 installation of the Network Station, migration from earlier releases,
and getting started with Version 2 Release 1 (V2R1) code.
The objective of this presentation is to provide information for the system administrator in
planning and installing the IBM Network Station Version 2 Release 1 code on the
RS/6000.
Topics that will be covered in this presentation include
1. "Understanding AIX requirements and prerequisites" for the code including operating
system programs, supporting server code, and disk sizing;
2. "Planning the role of the RS/6000 in serving network configuration, boot code,
authentication, and applications for the Network Station;
3. An overview of the code installation process;
4. Additional AIX setup for supporting the network station, such as configuring normal and
administrative users and setting up network addresses and host names for the Network
Station;
5. Migrating existings settings from version 1 release 3 AIX installations;
6. Suggestions for running AIX applications from the Network Station; and
7. Some hints for determining problems with the installation or when running problems.
This should be considered as an introduction only as we are just beginning to understand
some of the tools and capabilities of the Network Station version 2 code and AIX.
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Network Computer Division 3
Network Station requirements on AIX
Operating System Requirements
AIX 4.2.1 or later server code.
X server (bos.net.tcp.server 4.2.1 or later) required for full installation
bos.iconv (all language sets)
bos.net.nfs.client 4.2.1 or later
Netscape.nav.rte 4.0.4 or later (for NSM)
Web Server Requirements
Lotus Domino GO web server 4.6.2.2 or later for NSM support.
Provided on AIX Network Station installation V2R1 CDROM.
Disk Space Requirements
Server Type Dependent 50-500 Megabytes
Extra 150 Mbytes for coexistance with V1R3
See: http://www.pc.ibm.com/networkstation/support/memrec_data.html
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Network Computer Division 4
Notes
The AIX operating system must be at least at AIX 4.2.1 server code including the TCP/IP,
NFS, and X server code. When using Network Station Manager you will have to install
the bos.iconv filesets for all languages even ones you don't plan to use. Netscape should
also be installed for using Network Station Manager.
When using Network Station Manager, the Lotus Domino GO web server at level 4.6.2.2
or later should be installed. If you plan to use the command line tools, Java JVM 1.1.6 or
later must also be installed. Because the Domino GO server is no longer available from
the download site, it is included on the Network Station code CDROM.
The disk space requirements are depending on the features of the RS/6000 server that will
be used, the models of Network Stations that will be supported, and the applications that
will be used on the Network Station. They range from no additional disk requirement for
use as a DHCP server, to up to 500 megabytes when using mixed models of Network
Stations, coexistance with earlier Network Station Manager code, and all of the
applications are installed.
The latestest information on disk requirements is available at the web site listed on this
slide.
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Network Computer Division 5
RS/6000 Network Station server types
Single full function server
BOOTP or DHCP server
Base-Code server
User-Configuration server
Authentication server
Terminal Configuration server
Application server
DNS server
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Network Computer Division 6
Notes
The RS/6000 server can perform all of the server functions listed on this slide or any one of the functions.
When used as a BOOTP or DHCP server, the RS/6000 provides the IP address to the Network Station
along with the location of the boot code server. The functions performed here require not code to be
installed as they are part of the base AIX code.
As a "base-code server", the RS/6000 uses NFS or TFTP to supply the basic kernel or operating system
to the Network Station. This code installed on the RS/6000 includes the eNetstation.base code, the
based code for the Network Station hardware type, and the messages code. In addition, optional filesets
will usually be installed for the different Network Station applications.
A "terminal-configuration server" provides only the files to configure a particular workstation. It contains
profiles that provide information to the Network Station on how to act on bootup. This server requires
only that the base code and messages be installed, but can include other functions. A base-code server
and authentication server will normally be used in addition to this server.
A "user-configuration server" allows each user to have specific setup parameters defined and is similar in
makeup to a terminal configuration server.
An "authentication server" contains the login daemon and can be used to verify the user and password.
This requires the base code plus the eNetstation.login filesets.
The Network Station Manager code can be installed on the configuration servers to use either web based
configuration tools or the command line interface to configure these servers.
AIX applications can be run from servers with no Network Station code installed using the NC as a
display. AIX also provides an excellent name server for Network Stations.
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Network Computer Division 7
RS/6000 Single Server Installation
eNetstation.base
Model specific base code
eNetstation.S2x00.base*
eNetstation.S300_1000.base*
eNetstation.msg.en_US**
eNetstation.nsm
eNetstation.nsm.EN_US**
eNetstation.login
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Network Computer Division 8
Notes
The filesets shown on this slide are required for a single server setup.
The model specific code need only be installed based on the type of Network Stations. If you have both
the series 300 or 1000 Network Stations as well as the S2 base machines, you will have to install both
sets of code.
In addition to the US messages, other languages can be installed based on your locale.
The NSM code will be needed for configuration servers, while the login code will be a requirement for
authentication.
See the RS/6000 V2R1 guide for fileset requirements for each server type.
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Network Computer Division 9
RS/6000 Optional Filesets
eNetstation.Sxxx.emul
nsterm, 3270 and 5250 capabilites
eNetstation.Sxxx.ica
ICA protocol support
eNetstation.Sxxx.java
eNetstation.Sxxx.netscape
eNetstation.Sxxx.fonts_typ
Only typical fonts
eNetstation.Sxxx.fonts_all
eNetstation.Sxxx.lang
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Network Computer Division10
Notes
The filesets shown on this slide are optional depending on how the Network Station will be used.
The "xxx" in the fileset names designates the series 300/1000 hardware or the new S2 series hardware.
This will be replaced with S2x00 or S300_1000. For example to install the terminal emulation software to
run on the Series 1000 install the eNetstation.S300_1000.emul fileset.
The emulation package contains code for all three terminal emulation modes.
Browser support is loaded separately. For 128-bit encryption in the United States, there is also a 128-bit
version of this code.
Since fonts can take a large amount of space, you can install either the typical set of fonts that uses the
ones needed for the desktop and most applications that run on the Network Station, or you can install all
the available fonts which will provide more fonts for ICA and X applications. Another alternative is to use
an X font server to provide the fonts.
For non-US English installations, you should install both the US english language sets and the desired
local filesets.
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Network Computer Division11
Installing the Network Station Code
Verify the prerequisites are installed
Put the CDROM in the drive or the code in an install directory
Install with "smitty install_all"
Select the CDROM, or type the directory where the code is installed.
Press the "F4" key to get a list of the filesets available.
Select the filesets for the type of server installation using the "F7" key.
Press the enter key to return to the install screen
Change to "PREVIEW only?" to Yes and press enter to test installability
If "OK" is returned, change "PREVIEW only?" to No and proceed.
If "FAILED" is returned, view the log and fix the prerequisites.
Exit smit and use "lslpp -h eNetstation.base.rte" to verify code
Proceed to verification, customization and setup.
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Network Computer Division12
Notes
First verify that the correct AIX level is installed wtih "lslpp -h bos.rte" and make sure you are at level 4.2.1.
Then use the lslpp command to verify the other software levels listed on the prerequisites chart earlier in the
talk. Once the requirments are confirmed proceed with the installation.
Check that you have enough space available using the "df", "lsvg", and "lspv" commands and the charts
provided on the internet.
Software can be obtained from the Network Station Download site or on CDROM.
The software is distributed in standard "INSTALLP" format and can be installed using the "smit install_all"
command.
The first prompt will be for the location of the software. Use F4 to select the CDROM, or enter the name of
the directory where you have placed the software and press the enter key to proceed. Press the F4 key to
select the filesets to install. Select the filesets for the type of functions the server will be used for, and the
languages using the F7 key, and press enter to return to the main install screen.
At this point, I would recommend selecting to "PREVIEW only" and press enter. This will confirm that all the
prerequisites have been installed and that you have enough disk space. If you have met the requirements,
this will return "OK". If not, the log will give you information on additional requirments that need to be met
before you can complete the installation. PREVIEW provides a must faster method of determining
readiness than a failed install attempt.
Once the PREVIEW returns OK, change to no longer preview and press the enter key to complete the
software installation. After installation is complete, the screen should once again show a return of OK. This
should happen in less than 30 minutes and much shorter depending on the system speed and modules
installed. Take a moment to browse though the log window to confirm that the filesets you wanted have
been installed. You can also verify this by looking at the /smit.log file.
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Network Computer Division13
Verifying the installation
Look at the smit.log file to see which filesets were
installed.
Use "df" to see that the /usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase
logical volume was created.
Use "exportfs -v" to verify these filesets are exported:
/usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase -rw
/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase -ro,anon=0
Use "grep V2 /etc/httpd.conf" to verify Web server
configured.
Use "lssrc -s nfsd" to make sure NFS is active.
Verify that nsld is running on authentication server
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Network Computer Division14
Notes
The installation does more than install the filesets, it also sets up certain daemons, exports
the user directory and configures the web server.
The /smit.log file will contain the information from your installation. Verify that there are no
failed components.
The logical volume /usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase should be created when you setup a
NSM or user configuration server. Use the AIX "df" command to display the logical
volumes.
A boot server must export the prodbase directory as read only. When used, the userbase
directory must be exported read/write. You can verify that install has added these to the
export list with the "exportfs -v" command.
When using Network Station Manager for control, the configuration to access NSM will be
added to the /etc/httpd.conf file used by the Domino GO web server. Grep for V2 to verify
that lines have been added to this file. The smit log will also show that the httpd daemon
has been stopped and restarted.
Installation will also start the bootpd, tftpd, and nfsd daemons. Use lssrc to verify that they
are active after installation. If you are not using bootp, you may want to comment out the
bootp deamon from the /etc/inetd.conf file to reduce connections. When the RS/6000 is
used as an authentication server, the Network Station Login Daemon will also be started.
Verify this with "ps -ef | grep nsld".
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Network Computer Division15
AIX User, Network and DNS setup
Add NSM administrator users to the "NSMAdmin" group
Assign a IP address and hostname to each Network
Station
Add to /etc/hosts or the Domain Name Server
Check forward and backward name resolution
host nc01
host 129.24.32.55
Setup NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP to server addresses.
For BOOTP or DHCP you will need the MAC address
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Network Computer Division16
Notes
Using DNS is highly recommended. Check with your network administrator for IP
addresses and host names. If you do not choose to use DNS, you can add the Network
Station names to the /etc/hosts file on AIX. The "host" command can be used to check for
name resolution, however if you are using DNS, I would recommend that you use the
"nslookup" command as this will provide more information if there are name resolution
problems. Name resolution must work in both the forward direction (given the host name,
it will return the address), or the reverse direction (given the ip address, the host name will
be returned).
Once names and addresses have been established, you must choose some way of
assigning the IP address to the Network Station. Most people just starting out or with only
a few Network Stations use the NVRAM setup where the address and boot hosts are
assigned manually on the Network Station. When more Network Stations are added, it
usually becomes more efficient to add them using the BOOTP daemon on AIX which
assignes a hostname and server address based on the MAC address of the Network
Station. For more complex scenerios, where IP addresses are limited and need to be
assigned dynamically, DHCP with DDNS provides an excellent way of managing Network
Station addresses.
For more detail see AIX documentation and the IBM Network Station Manager V2R1
redbook.
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Network Computer Division17
Initial testing
Turn on the Network Station
Does the login screen appear?
Login using an AIX user ID on the authentication server
Does the desktop appear?
Choose "Host Access", and select the "ASCII" emulation client
Can you telnet to the RS/6000 server?
Choose "Advanced Diagnostics"
Type "xhost +"
Type "telnet <aix_server_name>"
Login
Type "xclock -display <network_station_name>:0.0
Does a clock display to the Network Station?
Close the clock and type "exit"
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Network Computer Division18
Notes
This chart shows some of the tests that can be run to verify that the Network Station is working properly
with an RS/6000 server. All of these tests can be run without customizing the Network Station with NSM.
Once the address's have been assigned, simply turning on the Network Station should boot the Network
Station to a login screen. If this doesn't happen, then you will have to move to problem determination
procedures as described later in this talk and in the problem determation presentation.
Verify that you can login to the Network Station, using the user name and password of a normal AIX user
This will be verified using the nsld daemon running on AIX.
Once you are logged into the Network Station and the standard desktop appears, it is time to test AIX as
an application server.
If you are using ASCII text based applications, then start the nsterm application from the hosts menu, enter
the hostname or IP address of the RS/6000 host, login to AIX and run some minimal tests. Some
customization of TERM type and function keys may be necessary to run certain applications.
If you are using X based applications, then to verify that they are working, you can use the advanced
diagnostics shell. Simply enable the Xserver to display from the AIX host, telnet to AIX and start the X
application using the -display flag to point back to the Network Station.
Once you have verified that your Network Station works with AIX, you can move to customization of the
desktop to have the applications start automatically on bootup, or when an ICON is selected.
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Network Computer Division19
Migrating from V1R3 to V2R1
Migration is only provided from Version 1 Release 3 (V1R3).
Both V2R1 and V1R3 can coexist on the same server.
Migration is one way to V2R1.
Migration must be run while both V2R1 and V1R3 are installed.
Use the nsmmigr script to migrate configurations.
You can select to migrate users, system, groups, terminals or all
Only NSM information is migrated.
Manual changes may not be migrated
The migration utility cannot handle client migration
NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP is not changed automatically
Change to /usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase
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Network Computer Division20
Migration is a process that can be run from the AIX command line by a Network Station administrator to
move the configuration information that has been setup in Version 1 release 3 to the new version 2 release
1 platform. It does not apply to any NSM releases prior to V1R3.
Migration requires that you install the new V2R1 software without first removing the V1R3 software. Both
must coexist at the same time on the same server.
You can only migrate configurations to the newer server and not back to the old software.
The script is run using the nsmmigr script and specifying the flag to determine the type of migration that you
want to do. For example to migrate all confingeration preferences you would use: " nsmmigr -P
/usr/netstation/nsm *ALL". To migrate only specific users, use the -U flag followed by the applicable user
names. The -G flag is used for group only migration, while -S specifies the system file migration. For
complete details and syntax, see the RS/6000 guide before starting the migration.
Information that you may have manually entered into pref files or other manual configuration files may not
be migrated except in certain cases. See the advanced information guide for more information. When in
doubt, assume that manual configurations will not be migrated.
When updating the NVRAM, BOOTP and DHCP information, the new kernel name and boot server
directory need to be manually changed.
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Network Computer Division21
Simple trouble shooting tips
Network Station won't boot
Check NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP data
Use tcpdump or iptrace on AIX to look for errors
Run bootpd in debug mode
Use host and nslookup commands to verify hostnames and IP adddresses
Use the Network Station boot monitor
Post boot problems
Use Advanced Diagnostics on Network Station
hostname: shows that name has been assigned to NS and resolved
domainname: shows that a domain name has been assigned.
ping <server_name>: confirms that you have network access to the server
traceroute <server_name>: confirms route to host
netstat -rn: shows Network Station routing table
vmstat 5 5: shows Network Station CPU and memory utilization
Use AIX trace and diagnostic tools
iptrace: shows exact data between AIX and the Network Station
tcpdump: shows packet size and type between AIX and the Network Station
syslog: monitors error activity on the server
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Network Computer Division22
Problem determination can be divided into pre and post bootup type problems.
If the Network Station won't boot, then most of the problem determination will be performed from the
RS/6000 using standard network trace and problem determination tools. Particular importance should be
payed to network connectivity and name resolution. Is the Network Station contacting the AIX host? Does
the file and directory requested match that on the AIX server? Are the nfs and bootp or dhcp daemons
running on AIX?
The Network Station also provides boot monitor diagnostics as described in the problem determination
talk.
Once the Network Station has booted, diagnostic tools can be run on both the client and the server.
From the Network Station side, there is an advanced diagnostic shell with diagnostic commands such as
ping, hostname, and traceroute that should be familiar to the AIX administrator. This shell can even be
accessed from RS/6000 over the network using the telnet command. Many of the features of this shell
are described in the Problem Determination talk on this education CD. From this shell, you can also
enable the Xserver with the "xhost" command and then use rsh or rlogin to start applications on the
RS/6000 server that are displayed back to the Network Station.
From the AIX side, network tracing can help solve problems such as problems starting AIX applications.
Known problems that can cause poor performance are name resolution and poor font resolution. Using a
font server from AIX can often solve many font problems.
The syslog deamon can be setup to keep control of logins, boot, application startup and other events.
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Network Computer Division23
Where to Find Additional Information
SC41-0685
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000 V2R1
SC41-0690
Using IBM Network Station Manager V2R1
SG24-5844 NSM V2R1 redbook
IBM Network Station Advanced Information
on the Network Station home Web site
AIX documentation
http://www.rs6000.ibm.com/doc_link/en_US/a_doc_lib/aixgen/
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Network Computer Division24
Notes
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000 V2R1 provides a more complete
overview of the roles of AIX as a server for the Network Station. It also provides a list of all
the filesets that need to be installed for each type of server and detailed installation
instructions.
Configuring the Network Station with Network Station manager is the same on AIX as on
other server platforms and is covered in Using IBM Network Station Manager V2R1.
The NSM V2R1 redbook gives actual hands on experiences from IBM specialists working
with the Network Station during pre-announcement. This type of information tends to fill
the gaps in standard documentation and often provides more detailed examples.
For administrators who want to stretch the envelope when using Network Stations to
provide kiosk and other non-standard environments, the IBM Network Station Advanced
Information available from the internet provides additional examples and detailed
information.
One of the most important aspects of success with the IBM Network Station with RS/6000
servers is a complete understanding of the AIX operating system and AIX networking. The
URL shown here provides complete manuals for AIX.
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Network Computer Division25
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