2014-2015 High School Planning Guide

2014-2015 High School Planning Guide
High School
Planning Guide
2014-2015
2
Table of Contents
Academy Information…………………………………………………………...5-6
Graduation Requirements…………………………………………………….....7
Course Selection Planning Sheet………………………………………...8-10
Student Fees…………………………………………………………………………..11
English……………………………………………………………………………….12-15
Math………………………………………………………………………………….16-17
Science……………………………………………………………………………...18-20
Social Science…………………………………………………………………....21-24
World Languages………………………………………………………….…...25-26
PE/Health/Driver Ed/ROTC….…………………………………………….27-29
Fine Arts…………………………………………………………………………...30-36
Career & Technical Education…………………………………………...37-44
Dual Credit: Advance Now Program………………………………….45-47
Renaissance Academy ……………..……………………………….……...48-54
CAPA Academy……………...…………………………………………….…...55-60
Special Education……………………………………………………….……..61-62
Roosevelt Alternative School………………………………….………...63-69
General Information……………………………………………….…….....70-75
Co-curricular Activities (NCAA)…..……………..……….………..…..76-80
Dual Credit: Rock Valley College..………………….………………….81-82
Health Services……………………………………………….………………. 83-85
Bilingual Education Programs ………………………………...….…..86-109
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Rockford Public High Schools
...and the Readiness Rocks!
Auburn High School
5110 Auburn Street
Rockford, IL 61101
815-966-3300
Principal: Devon LaRosa
Auburn Counseling
Staff
Dan Appino
Melinda Cattell*
Nicole Joyner
Jennifer Radzi-Polky
Phone: 966-3320
Barbara Thompson
Amy Velez
Scott Zimmerlee
East High School
East Counseling Staff
Phone: 229-2859
Lynn Buscemi*
Brigitte Coupar
Susan Hammond
Kristen Hunt
Jean Skadeland
2929 Charles Street
Rockford, IL 61108
815-229-2100
Principal: Patrick Enright
Guilford High School
Guilford Counseling Staff
Phone: 654-4870
5620 Spring Creek Road
Rockford, IL 61114
815-654-4870
Principal: Janice Hawkins
Melissa Dolan
Sara Nielsen*
Jacqueline Grygiel
Donna Pauley
Kristen Roberts
Leslie Vining
Jefferson High School
Jefferson Counseling Staff
Phone: 874-9539
Steve Jordan
Nicole Luster*
Barbara Meeks
Evelyn Smith
Kay Trinkle
Elizabeth Ulrick
4145 Samuelson Road
Rockford, IL 61109
815-874-9536
Principal: Don Rundall
Roosevelt Alternative
978 Haskell Avenue
Rockford, IL 61103
815-966-3250
Principal: Heidi Houy
Roosevelt Counseling Staff
Phone: 966-3250x5313
Jennifer Carson*
Marie Kaemmerlen
4
Cassandra Glover
Jeanine Ferger
What is a College and Career Academy?
The Rockford Public School District has launched five new initiatives called Readiness
Rocks to create a school district that is first class in achievement and pride. College and
Career Readiness is the first of those five initiatives to be implemented. Redesigning the
high school experience will help ensure that graduating students are better prepared for
either college or the workforce. The plan involves creating academies or small learning
communities within each high school.
CAPA
RENAISSANCE
Creative And Performing Arts Academy of
Auburn (Audition Required)
Renaissance Gifted Academy of Auburn
(Assessment Proficiency Required)
The CAPA Academy, unlike other Academies, is defined by both students’ core classes using arts integration as the model and accelerated arts electives
designed for interdisciplinary options. CAPA students
take a four-year sequence of CAPA electives in preparation to be competitive for colleges or universities
with emersion in art-related careers.
The Renaissance Academy, unlike other Academies, is
defined by students’ core classes. Renaissance students take a four-year sequence of courses that make
them prepared for and competitive at any college or
university of their choice.
5
How to choose an Academy and Pathway...
Step 1: Identify your interests.
Identifying your personal interests (hobbies and areas of study) will guide you to the best academy for you,
making school and your future career motivating and enjoyable.
Which of the following descriptions best match your interests?
A. I enjoy creative writing, brainstorming new ideas, computer science, learning a new language, drawing,
or visual arts.
B. I enjoy building things, solving puzzles, learning about planes and cars, or working with tools.
C. I enjoy helping others, working with children, playing a musical instrument, and performing on (or
behind) stage.
D. I enjoy science, understanding how the human body works, or caring for others.
If you chose A, BAMIT (Business, Arts, Marketing and Information Technology) may be for you!
If you chose B, EMITT (Engineering, Manufacturing, Industrial and Trades Technology) may be for you!
If you chose C, HPS (Human and Public Services) may be the academy for you!
If you chose D, HS (Health Sciences) may be the academy for you!
Step 2: Review your career pathway options.
BAMIT
EMITT
HPS
Accounting/Finance
Business
Graphic Design/Media Production
Modern World Languages & Communications
Information Technology
Studio Art
Architecture and Construction
Engineering
Manufacturing Operations
Skilled Trades
Transportation Technology
Education and Child Development
Land and Resource Management
Human Services
Law and Public Safety
Performance Production
Performing Arts
HS
RENAISSANCE
CAPA
Fitness and Wellness
Medical and Health Sciences
Health Care Associates
Renaissance students take a fouryear sequence of courses that make
them prepared for and competitive
at any college or university of their
choice.
CAPA students take a four-year sequence of
arts integrated courses along with in-depth
performance based electives that prepares
for a career in the Performing Arts.
Step 3: Select your electives.
In addition to selecting an academy and pathway, most students have room in their schedule for an elective
or two. Students in all academies may choose General Electives from the following areas:

Language Arts (courses such as Creative Writing, Newswriting, and Yearbook)

Science (courses such as AP Chemistry, Environmental Science, and Zoology)

Social Science (Course such as African American History, Criminal Law, Psychology, and World Affairs)

Fine Arts (courses such as Studio Art, Concert Band, Chorus, Acting, and Intro to Tech Theater)

Career and Technical Education (courses such as Child Development, Drafting/CAD, Entrepreneurship,
Information Processing, and Student Leadership)
6
Graduation Requirements
Academic
Area
2015
2016-2018
District 205 Graduation
Requirements
District 205 Graduation
Requirements
Illinois State
Board of Higher
Education
Requirements
Highly Selective
Colleges and
Universities
English
4 years (8 credits)
4 years (8 credits)
4 years
4 years
Math
3 years (6 credits)
3 years (6 credits)
3 years
3-4 years
Algebra, Geometry, and
1yr beyond Geometry
Algebra, Geometry, and
Algebra 2
Algebra and
Geometry
2 years (4 credits)
3 years (6 credits)
2 years
4 years
Biology, Physical
Science/Chemistry/
Earth Science
Biology, Physical Science,
and 1 year additional
Science
Social
Science
3 years (6 credits)
3 years (6 credits)
2 years
4 years
US History, American
Gov’t, Economics, World
History/Geography
US History, American
Gov’t, Economics, World
History/Geography
PE/Health
PE – 3.5 years (7 credits)
PE – 3.5 years (7 credits)
1 Semester
Health - .5 years (1
credit)
Health - .5 years (1
credit)
Fine Arts,
Foreign
Language,
CTE
1 year (2 credits)
2 year (4 credits)
1 Year
Other
Electives
Electives to achieve
total credits required by
Board Policy
At least one AP or Dual
Credit Course in any
subject area is strongly
encouraged.
Electives to achieve total
credits required by
Board Policy
At least one AP or Dual
Credit Course in any
subject area is strongly
encouraged.
Varies
Selective Colleges
and Universities
use a Holistic
Approach to
admissions. There
is not a course
formula that will
ensure admission.
Academic and
non-academic
factors are
considered by the
admissions
committee.
40 Credits
48 Credits
Science
AP
Course/
Dual
Credit
Total
AP or Dual
Credit Courses
area strongly
encouraged.
Classification by Grade Level
Calculated at the beginning of each school year.
Year in School
2015—Earned Credits
2016-18—Earned Credits
Classification
1st
0-9
0-11
Freshmen
2nd
10-19
12-23
Sophomore
3rd
20-29
24-33
Junior
4th
30+
34+
Senior
7
SAMPLE: Four Year High School Plan
Academy Choice _____BAMIT_______
English/LA
Math
Science
Social Science
PE/Health
4 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
4 Years
(8 Credits)
(6 Credits)
(6 Credits)
(6 Credits)
(8 Credits)
College Prep
English 9
Algebra 1
College Prep
Biology
College Prep
World History
PE
Grade
9
Career Pathway __Accounting/Finance__
General
Pathway
Electives
Electives
2 Years
3 Years
Algebra
Foundation
Freshmen
Seminar/
Intro to Art &
Design
Accounting I
10
11
12
Honors English
10
Geometry
Honors English
11
Algebra 2
AP English 12
Post-Secondary
Options
College Prep
Chemistry
College Prep
Physics
Spanish 3
Information
Processing I
(this student has
fulfilled the math
graduation
requirement and
now has some
flexibility in their
schedule to take
another math
course or an
elective)
(this student has
fulfilled the
science
graduation
requirement and
now has some
flexibility in their
schedule to take
another math
course or an
Spanish 1
(Year 1
pathway
elective)
Accounting II
AP US History
PE
Spanish 2
(Year 2
pathway
elective)
Accounting III
African
American
History
On the job training
Military
Certification
Associates Degree
Bachelor Degree
Intro to Acting/
PE/Health Intro to Tech
Theater
Western Illinois University
Advanced Degree
8
PE
Tech Theater 1
(year 3
pathway
elective)
Four Year High School Plan
Academy Choice_________________ Career Pathway____________________
Grade
English/LA
Math
Science
Social Science
PE/Health
4 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
4 Years
(8 Credits)
(6 Credits)
(6 Credits)
(6 Credits)
(8 Credits)
9
10
11
12
Post-Secondary
Options
On the job training
Military
Certification
Associates Degree
Bachelor Degree
Advanced Degree
9
General
Electives
2 Years
(4 Credits)
Pathway
Electives
3 Years
(6 Credits)
Graduation Options
Traditional Diploma
 To receive a traditional diploma at commencement, a student must meet all requirements at the time of
graduation. Students not receiving diplomas are not permitted to participate in the commencement ceremony;
exceptions include foreign exchange students and students receiving special education services (those continuing
school until the day before the 22nd birthday).
 A Rockford Public School student transferring from one RPS high school to another during his or her senior year
must complete the entire last semester of his or her senior year in the “new” school to receive a diploma issued
from that building.
 Students transferring in to a RPS high school without a transcript from a North Central accredited agency must
complete the entire two semesters prior to graduation at a RPS high school to receive a diploma from Rockford
Public Schools.
 Graduation requirements for students receiving special education services are governed by Board of Education
policy 8.13. During the student’s 9th grade annual review, the special education team must determine the
student’s projected year of high school graduation and the plan the student will use to graduate: 1) standard
district graduation plan; 2) modified district graduation plan or 3) alternative graduation plan as per the
individualized educational program.
 Students who complete the graduation requirements during the summer (by August 1) following their graduating
class will be issued a diploma dated June of that year. Students who fulfill requirements after the August 1
deadline will be issued a diploma dated June of the following year.
 Seniors are recognized for valedictory and salutatory distinctions as well as cum laude (3.50 – 3.7499), magna cum
laude (GPA of 3.75 – 3.999) and summa cum laude (GPA of 4.0) based upon the cumulative grade point average of
eight semesters.
 Rockford Public School graduation ceremonies are formal ceremonies; students must adhere to dress and
behavior codes. All fees must be paid, in full, by the established deadline to participate in the commencement
ceremony.
Certification of Attendance
The student has completed his or her fourth year of high school attendance but has not yet earned sufficient credits to
graduate with a diploma and the student’s IEP caseload calls for ongoing special education services, transition
services, and transition planning or related services. The reason for the student not having met the graduation
requirements must be related to his or her disability and not due to a reason for which a student without a disability
would be ineligible to participate in the graduation ceremony. For example, the student with a disability must be in
good standing at the time of the graduation ceremony and/or the failure to have met the graduation requirements
may not be related to lack of attendance unrelated to the student’s disability.
Early Graduation
A student planning to complete graduation requirements before eight semesters may apply for early graduation by
submitting a written rationale and completing an early graduation plan prior to the requested graduation year. The
application must be signed by the student’s parent or guardian, counselor and building principal before submitting to
the superintendent for consideration. Eligible students must meet all credit and course requirements applied to the
four-year senior class. Early graduates will not be considered for distinctions of valedictorian, salutatorian, or top
twenty-five students of the graduating class. The early graduate’s class rank remains at junior status. All early
graduates will be included in senior activities.
Certificate of Completion
RPS #205 will issue a “Certificate of Completion” for students who, due to their age, will age out of special education
programming. Students with disabilities are able to attend school until the day before they turn 22 if they have yet to
meet the requirements of a standard diploma and they continue to have services prescribed by their IEP. In this case,
a student and his or her family may decide to end school the spring semester before the students 22nd birthday, after
extended school year term before the student’s 22nd birthday, or the day before a student turns 22. The Certificate
of Completion will be issued on the student’s last day of attendance.
10
Student Fees
The following fee schedule, as passed by the RPS 205 Board of Education, is subject to change
*Consumable Lab Fee
*Textbook Deposit (refundable)
$25.00
**Athletic Admission Fee
$20.00
**Parking Fee
$60.00
Athletic/Activity Participation Fee
(per activity)
$100.00
Band/Orchestra
$25.00
Art/ CAPA Art
$25.00
Choral/Drama/CAPA Drama
$25.00
CAPA Graphic Design
$25.00
Foreign Language
$12.00
Vocational
$5.00 - $12.00
Vocational (capstone)
$15.00 - $60.00
Driver Education
(Behind the wheel)
Allows attendance to District regular season athletic events.
Required for all students participating in clubs with IHSA
sanctioned events, pom and spirit squads.
$250.00
Musical Instrumental Rental
$30.00
**Summer School Tuition
$170.00
**Night School Classes
$170.00
P.E.
Includes all instructional supplies, materials, and workbooks
for core courses (English, Science, Social Studies, Math &
P.E.), and lock fees.
$100.00
Out of district - $300.00
In District – $320 for 2 classes
Out of District – $250 for 1 class/$425 for 2 classes
Varies per course
CISCO
$40.00
AP Exam
$89.00
Accounting
Varies by course
Virtual Learning Courses
Varies by course
***Dual Enrollment Courses
Varies by course
Fees charged for up to 3 exams
Students are responsible for all registration and student fees.
Depending on the program, students may also be responsible
for tuition and textbooks.
* Required Fees
** Fees cannot be waived
***Dual Enrollment includes but is not limited to RVC Dual Credit, CEANCI: Advance Now, CISCO and
Regional programs.
Capstone – higher level vocational classes (juniors and seniors)
11
English/Language Arts
Course
English 9
9th Grade
10th Grade
11th Grade
12th Grade
x
English 10
x
English 11
x
x
AP Language & Composition
English 12
x
x
AP Literature & Composition
ENGLISH 9 (10100): This is a writing-intensive course designed to develop students’ skills in critical reading and
writing, speaking, and listening. The course is standards-based and thematically organized around a variety of texts
– print and non-print, fiction and nonfiction. Within each unit, students will participate in full-class studies of core
works in addition to opportunities for small group and independent study. Writing instruction will build
foundational skills in argumentation in addition to source-based writing, grammar, mechanics, style, and usage.
Instruction in critical reading will include strategies to engage with text.
HONORS ENGLISH 9 (10103): This writing-intensive course is designed to provide students with an intense and
enriched curriculum of the English language arts: reading literature, reading informational texts, writing, speaking
and listening, and the use of language, including grammar and mechanics. Students will research, write, and
present extensively using sources from multiple types of media. Using a variety of texts and using critical reading
and writing skills, students will be engaged through real-world applications and projects.
ENGLISH 10 (10200): This is a writing-intensive course designed to build on students’ skills in critical reading and
writing, speaking, and listening. The course is standards-based and thematically organized around a variety of texts
– print and non-print, fiction and nonfiction. Within each unit, students will participate in full-class studies of core
works in addition to opportunities for small group and independent study. Writing instruction will continue to
focus on skills in argumentation in addition to source-based writing, grammar, and usage; students will begin to
engage in rhetorical analysis and synthesis. Instruction in critical reading will include strategies to engage with
text.
HONORS ENGLISH 10 (10203): This writing-intensive course is designed to provide students with an intense and
enriched curriculum of the English language arts: reading literature, reading informational texts, writing, speaking
and listening, and the use of language. Students will research, write, and present extensively using sources from
multiple types of media. Using a variety of texts and using critical reading and writing, students will be engaged in
argumentation and source-based writing as preparation for Advanced Placement English 11 Language and
Composition.
12
AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (10306): This writing-intensive course is designed for students
seeking a deeper knowledge of language to become highly skilled readers and writers. The students in this course
will engage in rhetorical analysis, deepening their understanding of rhetorical conventions, audience, purpose,
and use of language, and their impact on writing. Students in Advanced Placement courses will be prepared for
intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year
college courses. Students will prepare for the AP exam in Language and Composition.
ENGLISH 12 (10400): This writing-intensive course is a study of classic and contemporary literature. In addition to
developing an appreciation for a variety of cultures, students will implement critical reading strategies to engage
with increasingly complex texts – both print and non-print, fiction and nonfiction. Students will also learn to write
increasingly sophisticated arguments and informational essays, in addition to furthering their study of language
and usage, speaking and listening, and research.
AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (10406): This course engages students in the careful reading and
critical analysis of world literature. Through close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding
of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for readers. As they read, students
consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative
language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Students in Advanced Placement courses will be prepared for
intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year
college courses. Students will prepare for the AP exam in Literature and Composition.
Electives
MYSTERY (10681): Grade Level: 11-12. One semester. This course explores the reasoning and clinical research of
mystery literary works. Students learn to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate diagnostic data, forensic information,
and geographical elements as they pertain to a specific mystery. The course requires extensive reading, scientific
data inquiry, research, and writing.
POETRY (10682): Grade Level: 11-12. One semester. This elective course is designed for students who want to
gain an appreciation for poetry and have an interest in reading, writing, and publishing poetry. Students will
examine published poetry from various periods, produce their own poetry, critique other’s work, and learn the
steps to submit poems for publication and/or contests.
SPEECH COMMUNICATION (10683): Grade Level: 9-12. One semester. This elective course is designed to provide
students with the valuable tool of successful oral expression. Not only does the possession of this skill provide the
student with an improved means of communication that will be useful in both professional and personal lives, but
also in developing the confidence that will enable the student to present himself successfully. Students will
develop listening skills as well as speaking skills in the area of impromptu, informational, persuasive,
demonstration speeches and oral interpretation.
13
English/Language Arts
ENGLISH 11 (10300): This writing-intensive, standards-based course is a study of the American experience,
spanning from the colonial period to the present. In addition to developing an appreciation for our literary
heritage and understanding our relationship to American history and culture, students will implement critical
reading strategies to engage with increasingly complex texts – both print and non-print, fiction and nonfiction.
Students will also learn to write increasingly sophisticated arguments and informational essays, in addition to
furthering their study of language and usage, speaking and listening, and research.
English/Language Arts
Introduction to Journalism (10613): Grade level 9-11
This course will focus on content and skills in student press law, media responsibility, evaluating newsworthiness,
interviewing and information gathering, copy writing (news, features, editorials, reviews, blogging, headlines,
captions), and copy editing. Students will be able to: evaluate press law and news judgment standards to
generate newsworthy topics, gather and evaluate newsworthy information and content, analyze credibility and
integrity in journalism, write and publish various genres of effective journalistic copy, and edit various genres of
effective journalistic copy for publication. This is an introductory course that can be taken singularly or in addition
to Introduction to Desktop Publishing or Introduction to Photography (see below). Students who aspire to
become editors of the school's publications are encouraged to take all three electives. Students are encouraged
to follow these introductory courses with Yearbook, Newspaper, and/or Graphic Design.
Introduction to Desktop Publishing (10614): Grade level 9-11
This course will give students experience creating publishable documents and materials using computer
technology. The focus is on layout and design concepts using industry standard computer software. Students will
be able to: use visual rhetoric to evaluate and design aesthetic layouts, use textual and graphic elements together
to convey a cohesive, effective message, and use industry standard programs to create and publish various
materials. This is an introductory course that can be taken singularly or in addition to Introduction to Journalism
or Introduction to Photography (see below). Students who aspire to become editors of the school's publications
are encouraged to take all three electives. Students are encouraged to follow these introductory courses with
Yearbook, Newspaper, and/or Graphic Design.
Introduction to Photography (10615): Grade level 9-11
This course will teach skills in various areas of photography, as well as basic photo-editing concepts and ethical
considerations. Student will be able to: apply photography composition standards while taking pictures, take
effective photographs for a variety of purposes: photojournalism, feature photography, event photography,
portrait photography, and candid photography, use digital technology to edit pictures for professional use, and
apply ethical considerations and standards while taking and editing pictures. This is an introductory course that
can be taken singularly or in addition to Introduction to Desktop Publishing or Introduction to Desktop Publishing.
Students who aspire to become editors of the school's publications are encouraged to take all three electives.
Students are encouraged to follow these introductory courses with Yearbook, Newspaper, and/or Graphic
Design.
NEWSPAPER (10610): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab fee required. Students will learn and participate in the actual
process of publishing the school newspaper. Writing, editing and publishing skills are learned and used. Course
must be taken both semesters of the same year and may be repeated.
YEARBOOK (10620): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab fee required. This course must be taken both semesters of the
same year. The objective of the class is to produce a yearbook by using the skills of layout design, copy-writing,
photo shooting and cropping, ad sales, and use of computers to generate yearbook pages. This course may be
repeated. Occasional evening and weekend meetings may be required. The specific objective of this class is to
utilize skills learned in Newswriting to produce a yearbook for the school and community. This course is not a
substitute for traditional English classes.
14
SPEECH II (10643): Grade Level: 10-12. Prerequisite: Speech I or teacher recommendation. Advanced speech
students learn about radio broadcasting and participate in more challenging informational speeches and skits,
culminating in both dramatic and comic performances in the Speech Showcase.
CREATIVE WRITING (10680): Grade Level: 10-12. One semester. Creative writing seeks to move beyond using
language as merely a tool of communication; rather, students will learn to use language as an instrument to express
their unique and individual voices. This semester long elective course is designed for students who love reading and
have an interest in writing poetry and short fiction. As we read published poems and short stories, we’ll work on
exercises to stimulate creativity. We’ll focus first on playing with language and breaking down barriers to writing.
Because writing is a process of revision, we’ll learn how to critique others’ work and accept critiques of our own
work. In so doing, we become not only more critical writers, but also more critical readers.
Support Classes
College Core Literacy-Plugged-in to Reading (10220): Grade Level: 9-10 College Core Literacy
Plugged-In to Reading is an intervention program for students reading below grade level. The program teaches
effective strategies to comprehend textbooks across content areas along with reading and writing in a variety of non
-fiction text types. It is a 3-step instructional model that gradually releases students to become active, engaged and
capable readers. Context/specialized vocabulary, text features and structures, monitoring understanding of what is
read, previewing text, activation of background knowledge, questioning, noting, organizing and retrieving
information from text are practiced learning strategies. This course is to be taken concurrently with an English
course.
College Core Literacy-Read 180 (10223): Grade Level: 9-10 College Core Literacy
Read 180 is a comprehensive system intervention program designed for students to accelerate reading growth and
literacy independence. This program is for students reading below grade level. The academic areas of focus are
reading (including phonological awareness, phonics/word study, comprehension, fluency, expanding vocabulary,
and spelling) and handwriting (including spelling, sentence construction, and planning and revising). Read 180 is
designed to maximize student engagement with technology, text, teacher instruction/modeling and peer reflection.
This course is to be taken concurrently with an English course.
College Core Literacy-System 44 (10226): Grade Level: 9-10 College Core Literacy
System 44 is an intervention program that meets individual student needs through the systematic instruction in
phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, word analysis, spelling and fluency to improve reading skills. Direct
teacher instruction guides and reinforces phonics and word strategies while adaptive technology provides
individualized practice. This course is to be taken concurrently with an English course.
ENGLISH/READING ACT VICTORY (10310): Grade 11 only. Students will be identified and recommended for this
class based on the PLAN scores from grade 10. This is a one semester course designed to increase ACT achievement
using Cambridge Victory Program.
15
English/Language Arts
SPEECH I (10640): Grade Level: 10-12. Students will learn to communicate effectively through informative and
persuasive styles using a wide variety of experiences. Techniques will be taught using informational speeches,
original skits, oral interpretation of literature, interviewing, use of visual aids, debates and other projects. Students
will develop listening skills and learn techniques to deal with stage fright and build confidence. NOTE: This is not a
course in speech correction or a substitute for English.
Math
ALGEBRA 1 (13110): This course is a comprehensive algebra course that lays the foundation for all other high
school math courses. The topics are fully aligned to Common Core and build on quantitative reasoning and
number sense to understanding linear, exponential, and quadratic equations along with statistics, probability,
and an introduction into coordinate geometry.
HONORS ALGEBRA 1(13113): This course extends the learning of the Algebra 1 course by incorporating
mathematical modeling. The topics are fully aligned to Common Core and build on quantitative reasoning and
number sense to understanding linear, exponential, and quadratic equations along with statistics, probability,
and an introduction into coordinate geometry.
GEOMETRY (13120): Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Honors Algebra 1. This course builds on the Algebra 1 skills with
application of geometric principles to the physical world. The topics are fully aligned to Common Core and
include coordinate geometry, plane geometry, along with an emphasis on inductive and numerical reason.
HONORS GEOMETRY (13123): Prerequisite: Algebra 1 or Honors Algebra 1. This course extends the learning of
the Geometry course by incorporating mathematical modeling. This course builds on the Algebra 1 skills with
application of geometric principles to the physical world. The topics are fully aligned to Common Core and
include coordinate geometry, plane geometry, along with an emphasis on inductive and numerical reason.
ALGEBRA 2 (13300): Prerequisite: Algebra 1. This course is a second year algebra course expanding concepts
from Algebra 1 and introducing synthetic division, absolute value equations and inequalities, quadratic
inequalities, determinants and matrices, and conic sections.
COLLEGE ALGEBRA (13400): Prerequisites: Geometry. This course presents a brief review of Algebra including
basic terminology, notations, concepts, and skills. It introduces algebraic proof, complex numbers, absolute
value and quadratic inequalities, determinants and matrices, conic sections, polynomial equations, sequences
and series, math induction, and binomial theorem.
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ALGEBRA 3/TRIGONOMETRY (13410): Prerequisite: Algebra 2. This is a course which extends topics from Algebra
2 and introduces polynomial equations, sequences and series, math induction, and the binomial theorem.
Trigonometry covers right and oblique triangles, logarithms, trigonometric and inverse functions, trigonometric
identities and equations, and radian measure.
PRECALCULUS (13330): Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or College Algebra. A course in the study of algebraic,
exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. It contains investigations of the conic
sections, transformations, parametric equations, and analytic proof along with the study of right and oblique
triangles including identities, equations, radian measure, vectors and polar coordinates.
AP CALCULUS AB (13436): Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus. This is an advanced placement course in calculus. Topics
included are parametric and polar equations, analytic geometry of three dimensions, vectors, partial derivatives,
multiple integrals, vector calculus, and differential equations.
MATH TOPICS (13106): Prerequisites: Algebra 1 and Geometry. This is a full year course that extends and
reinforces Algebra and Geometry skills in an application based format. Students will gain mathematical literacy
by learning how mathematics is applied in everyday life.
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS (13420): Prerequisite: Algebra 1. This course acquaints students with the basic
ideas and language of statistics. It introduces students to the major concepts and tools fro collecting, analyzing
and drawing conclusions from data that is provided or data that students obtain from experiments or surveys.
Students use exploratory methods to identify patterns and make decisions to solve real-life problems.
AP STATISTICS (13426): Prerequisite: College Algebra, Intro to Stats, or Algebra 2w/teacher recommendation.
This is intended for students interested in life science, nursing, social science, or statistics. Students will master
the fundamental skills of statistics such as: interpreting data, applying probability, calculating sample
distributions, and testing hypotheses. Preparation for the AP exam given in May will be part of this course.
Support Courses
ALGEBRA FOUNDATIONS (13116): Students will be identified and assigned to this course based on triangulated
data reports. This course is designed to support students enrolled in Algebra 1 who have been identified with
math deficiencies. The focus is to build on student mastery of 8th grade standards and reinforce high priority
Algebra 1 standards throughout the year.
GEOMETRY FOUNDATIONS (13126): Students will be identified and assigned to this course based on triangulated
data reports. This course is designed to support students enrolled in Geometry who have been identified with
math deficiencies. The focus is to build on student mastery of Algebra standards and reinforce high priority
Geometry standards throughout the year.
MATH ACT VICTORY (13109): Prerequisite: Grade 11 only. Students will be identified and recommended for this
class based on the PLAN scores from grade 10. This is a one semester course designed to increase ACT
achievement using Cambridge Victory Program.
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Math
AP CALCULUS BC (13433): Prerequisite: Calculus AB. Recommended for a 4 year college and majoring in a math
field. An advanced placement course in calculus stressing graphical, numerical and algebraic analysis of the
calculus of single variable functions. In addition to the topics covered in Calc AB the topics of parametric, polar,
and vector functions, their applications, applications of integrals, partial derivatives and polynomial
approximations and series are also covered.
BIOLOGY (14200): Grade Level: 9. This course focuses on the major topics of life science using scientific
inquiry. First semester concentrates on ecology, classification, and cells. Second semester on evolution and
genetics.
HONORS BIOLOGY (14203): Grade Level: 9. This course focuses on the major topics of life science using
scientific inquiry. First semester concentrates on ecology, classification, and cells. Second semester focuses on
genetics, reproduction, change overtime and evolution.
CHEMISTRY (14300): Grade Level 10-12. This course focuses on the study of matter and the changes matter
undergoes, formula writing, equation writing, stoichiometry, and matter-energy relationships. In this course
algebra and geometry are applied to show the mathematical expression of chemical concepts. Laboratory work
is a significant part of the course. A scientific calculator is required.
Science
HONORS CHEMISTRY (14303): Grade Level: 10-11. Honors Chemistry is a one=year college preparatory class
designed to be taken in 10th grade. Emphasis is placed on a rigorous and advanced study of chemical topics
that involves an in-depth mathematical perspective. Development of the major topics of matter and the
changes matter undergoes, formula writing, equation writing, stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical
bonding, kinetics, equilibrium, thermochemistry, and acid base reactions are studied in this class. These topics
are enhanced by using laboratory experimentation, critical thinking, and problem solving activities. Laboratory
work is a significant part of the course. Algebra and geometry are used extensively in this course.
PHYSICS (14400): Grade Level: 11-12. Students must have or purchase a scientific calculator. This course
includes topics such as mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, sound, optics, electricity, and magnetism. Algebraic
and geometric concepts are used extensively in this course. This course in intended for those planning or
majoring in science or a science related field in college. Laboratory work is a significant part of this course.
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (14603): Grade Level: 11-12. This course is focused on the structure and function
of the human body. Some topics covered in this course include levels of organization; support and movement;
integration, coordination, and control; transport; maintenance; and the human life cycle. This is a laboratory
course designed especially for students interested in medical fields.
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MICROBIOLOGY (14209): One semester. Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This course introduces students to
various basic techniques and fundamentals in the field of microbiology. Topics covered include microbial
metabolism proper sterilization processes, bacterial growth, and analysis of population cultures. Students will
apply microbiological concepts in laboratory experiments and develop appropriate aseptic techniques needed to
work in clinical environments. Offered in conjunction with Organic Chemistry.
AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (14510): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee $5.00. The AP Environmental Science
course is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science
that will be taught as a yearlong high school class. The AP Environmental Science course has been developed to
enable students to undertake a more advanced study of topics in environmental science. Suggested completion
of Biology & Chemistry.
HORTICULTURE (14606): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This is a one year elective course in the methods
and procedures of growing plants. Included are topics on house plants, plant preparation, soils, landscaping,
pruning, vegetable gardening, tree and shrub care, flower arranging, plant identification, plant physiology, and
plant morphology.
AP BIOLOGY (14206): Grade Level: 11-12. Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry. Lab Fee $5.00. This is a course for
students interested in a college equivalent Biology course. This course follows the Advanced Placement (AP)
curriculum. Topics addressed in depth include biological systems and interactions, life processes, cell processes,
energy and metabolism, heredity and genetics, ecology, and evolution. Laboratory work and inquiry are
significant parts of this course. Students who successfully pass the AP Biology proficiency exam may receive
college credit for Biology.
AP CHEMISTRY (14306): Grade Level 11-12. Lab Fee $5.00. AP Chemistry is a college chemistry lecture and lab
class. The presentation follows modern quantum mechanical theory. Students will write formulas for
compounds, equations for reactions, and stoichiometric relationships equations. Students will analyze
thermodynamic changes including enthalpy changes, entropy changes, and Gibbs free energy changes. The will
also study acid/base reactions, equilibrium, reactions kinetics, coordination compounds, and oxidation-reduction
reactions. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
ELECTIVES
EARTH SCIENCE-GEOLOGY & OCEANOGRAPHY (14503): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This semester
course consists of an introduction to geology and resource management. Included in this course will be a major
emphasis on cartography, constructive and destructive forces, and Earth’s history. This course will include
environmental issues and laboratory procedures. Offered in conjunction with Earth Science: Astronomy &
Meteorology.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (14500): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This is a course focused on
environmental issues including ecological principles, population dynamics, energy resources, and human
interaction with the environment. This is a project-based course where students will develop and implement a
plan to improve resources in areas adjacent to their school.
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Science
EARTH SCIENCE-ASTRONOMY & METEOROLOGY (14506): Grade 10-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This semester course
focuses on astronomy and meteorology. Topics covered will include an introduction to the cosmos as well as the
Earth’s place in the Universe. Meteorology will include the atmosphere, weather, and climate. Offered in
conjunction with Earth Science: Geology & Oceanography.
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (14312): One semester. Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This course introduces students to various basic techniques and fundamentals in organic chemistry. Topics covered include nomenclature, structure and bonding, and reactions of hydrocarbons with important classes of natural and synthetic organic compounds. Offered in conjunction with Microbiology.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE (14100): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee $5.00. Recovery credit only. Physical Science is a
course which continues the Physics: A First Course program including the topics of electricity, magnetism,
matter and energy. In addition, basic chemistry topics are included such as atomic structure; periodic table;
reactions; formulas and equations; and acids and bases. Laboratory activities are a significant part of the
course.
AP PHYSICS C (14406): Grade Level 11-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This course is for students interested in a college
equivalent Physics course. The Advanced Placement Physics curriculum is followed for this course. Many of the
same topics as those covered in Physics 1 & 2 are covered in more depth with additional topics such as special
relativity, periodic motion, and quantum effects. Laboratory work is a significant part of this course. Students
who successfully pass the AP Physics Proficiency Exam may receive college credit.
ZOOLOGY 1 & 2 (14600): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee $5.00. This is a course designed for students interested
in further study of the invertebrate and vertebrate animal kingdom. Topics include classification, structure/
function, and change/diversity of animals. Laboratory work is a significant part of this course, with a focus on
microscope usage and dissection. Suggested completion of Biology.
Science
AP PHYSICS 1 (14415): Prerequisites: Chemistry, Algebra and Geometry. Concurrent enrollment in Trigonometry is recommended. This course is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics.
The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. Course skills include using
representations and models to solve scientific problems, applying mathematics to science phenomena, engaging in scientific questioning, planning and implementing data collection and analysis, and connecting and relating knowledge across scales, concepts, representations, and domains. Students will prepare for the AP Physics 1 exam at the conclusion of the course.
AP PHYSICS 2 (14418): Prerequisites: Chemistry, Physics 1, Algebra and Geometry. This course is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics. Course skills include using representations and models to solve scientific problems, applying mathematics to science phenomena, engaging in scientific questioning, planning and implementing data collection and analysis, and connecting and relating
knowledge across scales, concepts, representations, and domains. Students will prepare for the AP Physics 2
exam at the conclusion of the course.
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World Geography
World History
AP US History
US History
AP Comparative Government and Politics
AP Macro Economics
AP Micro Economics
AP United States Government and Politics
Economics
United States Government and Politics
African American History
AP European History
AP Human Geography
AP Psychology
AP World History
Criminal Law
Documentary Production
Latin American History
Psychology
Sociology
World Affairs
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WORLD GEOGRAPHY (12100): Grade Level: 9. In this course, students will study different regions and cultures
of the world through global issues, such as population, energy resources, waste disposal and recycling, global
economy, human rights, conflict and urbanization. Students will examine how humans adapt to their
environments and how nations rely on each other, using connections to current events and how technology is
used in geography. This is a reading and writing intensive course that utilizes Document Based Questions as a
form of assessment.
WORLD HISTORY (12100): Grade Level: 9. This is a reading and writing intensive course that utilizes Document
Based Questions as a form of assessment. First semester students will review the cultures, people, events, and
institutions of ancient civilizations and continue with a more in-depth analysis of the Renaissance and
Reformation, the age of exploration and the Enlightenment era. Second semester covers industrialization,
imperialism, the world wars, and the modern world. Both Western and nonwestern traditions will be studied.
Geographic skills will be reinforced.
HONORS WORLD HISTORY (12113): Grade Level: 10. This is a reading and writing intensive course that utilizes
Document Based Questions as a form of assessment. First semester students will review the cultures, people,
events, and institutions of ancient civilizations and continue with a more in depth analysis of the Renaissance
and Reformation, the age of exploration and the Enlightenment era. Second semester covers industrialization,
imperialism, the world wars and the modern world. Both Western and nonwestern traditions will be studied.
Geographic skills will be reinforced. This course is to serve as preparation for students who wish to take Advance
Placement course in the future. Thus, this course will help students develop the skills necessary to arrive at
conclusions based on an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in
essay format.
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Social Science
Course
Social Science
UNITED STATES HISTORY (12120): Grade Level: 11. This is a reading and writing intensive course that utilizes
Document Based Questions as a form of assessment. The course starts with a review of the American Revolution
and westward expansion. The first semester continues with an in depth look at U.S. history through World War I.
Second semester covers events from the 1920’s to the present.
AP U.S. HISTORY (12126): Grade Level: 11. The Advance Placement Program in United States history is designed
to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems
and materials in United States history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college
courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year college courses. Students learn to
assess historical materials, their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance.
Students will also learn to weight the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. This course
should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions based on an informed judgment and to present
reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (12211): Grade Level: 12. One semester. This is a reading and
writing intensive course that utilizes Document Based Questions as a form of assessment. This course will present
America’s political system with an emphasis on the origins of our government, federalism, and three branches of
government, civil rights, and liberties, interest groups, and political behaviors.
AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (12212): Grade Level: 12. One semester. This course will give
students an analytical perspective on government and politics, in the United States. This course includes both the
study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It
also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government
and politics. Students will become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for
various behaviors and outcomes. Students will study the constitutional underpinnings of democracy, political
parties and interest groups, the Congress, the Presidency, the bureaucracy and federal courts, institutions and
policy processes, and civil liberties and civil rights. This course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at
conclusions based on an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay
format. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
ECONOMICS (12221): Grade Level: 12. One semester. This is a reading and writing intensive course that utilizes
Document Based Questions as a form of assessment. This course covers the topics of economic thinking, economic
systems, supply, demand, prices, market structures, business organizations, labor, personal finance,
macroeconomic measures and concerns, monetary and fiscal policy as well as international trade. Document
Based Questions will be used as a form of assessment.
AP MACROECONOMICS (12231): Grade Level: 12. One Semester. The purpose of the AP course in
macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an
economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and pricelevel determination, and also develops students familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial
sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. This course will provide students
with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in a typical introductory economics college course which
requires students to use analytical reading skills along with graphical analysis skills. Students will prepare for the
AP exam.
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ELECTIVES
AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY (12300): Grade Level: 10-12. This is an elective course that will provide positive insights into the achievements of African Americans from the beginnings of the country to the present. Note: This
course is not a substitute for the required United States history course.
CRIMINAL LAW (12500): Grade Level: 10-12. One semester. This course will provide practical information and
problem solving opportunities in the area of criminal law. The course will develop the knowledge and skills needed
to survive in this "law saturated" society, along with a willingness and capability to participate effectively in the
legal and political systems of our community, state, and country.
AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (12215): Grade Level: 12. One semester. The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study
the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of
political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes,
and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes.
DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION (21220): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab fee required. This course has been designed to
integrate America’s history with the process of developing a documentary. Students will develop their personal
voice, based on solid research techniques and synthesis of information from a large variety of sources. Skills, such
as, video shooting techniques, compositional elements, basic production techniques, non-linear editing and creating a coherent story line will be tools used by each student. The course culminates in the development of a video documentary.
AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (12310): Grade Level: 10-12. This is a college level introductory elective course into modern European history that examines the major events, trends, and chronology from 1450 to the present. Students
will examine themes in history and interrelated categories (political, diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social and
economic) as they investigate, using primary and secondary sources, the elites with the experiences of ordinary
people. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (12106): Grade Level: 10-12. The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and
alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social
organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use
in their science and practice. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (12133): Grade Level: 10-12. History of Latin America is an elective course for students
who wish to strengthen and expand their knowledge of Latin American civilizations. This one-year course focuses
on Latin American History beginning with pre-Hispanic cultures and with culminating contemporary issues.
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Social Science
AP MICROECONOMICS (12230): Grade Level: 12. One semester. The purpose of a course in microeconomics is to
give students a through understanding of the principles of economics that applies to the functions of individual
decision maker, both consumers and producers. It places primary emphasis on the nature and function of product
markets, and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government. This course will provide students
with a learning experience equivalent to that obtained in a typical introductory economics college course which
requires students to use analytical readings skills along with graphical analysis skills. Students will prepare for the
AP exam.
Social Science
PSYCHOLOGY (12400): Grade Level: 10-12. This introductory course provides insight and practical information in
the field of psychology. Topics will include learning, memory, the workings of the mind, personality, attitude,
emotions, and abnormal psychology.
AP PSYCHOLOGY (12406): Grade Level: 10-12. This course is designed to introduce students to the systematic
and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are
exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields
within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.
Students will prepare for the AP exam.
SOCIOLOGY (12415): Grade Level: 10-12. One semester. Sociology is the study of human relationships within a
social or group setting. The high school and American society will serve as the focus for such topics as the cultural
impact upon behavior, the process of adopting social norms and values, the identification of social deviants and
the effects of labeling, the causes and reduction of prejudice, and the impact of social class upon life experiences.
Students will engage in a wide variety of activities intended to accommodate differing learning styles.
WORLD AFFAIRS 1 & 2 (12130): Grade Level: 10-12. May be taken as a semester course. World Affairs is
designed to expose students to customs, traditions, and heritage of people from around the globe. Inquiry will be
made into political, economic, and social problems or events perplexing the world today. Students will read,
discuss and compare ideas expressed in a variety of news media including Rockford Register Star, Chicago
Tribune, Newsweek magazine, U.S. News and World Report magazine, Time magazine, ABC, CBS, NBC national
television, CNN and the Internet.
AP WORLD HISTORY (12116): Grade Level: 10-12. The Advanced Placement course in World History is designed
to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with world
problems. Societies will be compared, an emphasis will be placed on the larger processes affecting individual
societies and civilizations, and key time periods will be emphasized. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
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FOREIGN LANGUAGE INTERNSHIP (11530): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisites: Level 4 or AP
Language course. This course involves placing individual students out in the community as foreign language
resources. Emphasis will be on students utilizing their skills and knowledge within their focus foreign language.
Outside hours working will be a part of this course.
FRENCH I (11300): Grade Level: 9–12. This course is an introduction to the language and culture of Frenchspeaking countries. The emphasis is on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will have access to
textbook, workbooks, audio and video programs. Students should be aware that nightly homework is necessary for
acquiring these skills.
FRENCH III (11306): Grade Level: 10–12. Prerequisites: French 1 & 2. Structural rules of French grammar are
stressed to help students further develop and expand upon the four communication skills (listening, speaking,
reading, and writing). Students will research, speak, and write on cultural topics. Interaction with French students
via e-mail is encouraged. The program uses textbooks, workbooks, audio, and video components. Excerpts from
various reading selections will introduce students to French literature. A French-English dictionary is required.
FRENCH IV (11309): Grade Level: 11–12. Prerequisites: French 1, 2, & 3. More complex grammatical structures are
studied. Continuing their study of French history and culture, students will begin to read authentic French novels
and short stories. Creative writing and oral presentations will be emphasized to develop communicative ability.
Interaction with French students via e-mail is encouraged. A French-English dictionary is required.
AP FRENCH LANGUAGE (11315): Grade Level: 11–12. Prerequisite: French 3 and French 4 and the AP teacher’s
recommendation. Students who have not had French 4 must see the AP teacher for diagnostic testing and
placement in the class. This class offers students the chance to prepare for the French Language AP exam, and is
the equivalent of a fifth semester college course. Students will read, discuss, and write about selections from a
variety of sources: print media, books, movies, internet, etc. They will focus on comparing and analyzing different
perspectives on a topic, and will do research and make presentations on selected cultural themes. They will review
grammar and structures as needed to improve their accuracy in using the language. The class will be conducted
entirely in French. A French-English dictionary is needed.
MULTI-LANGUAGE LAB (11520): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab Fee: $25.00: Prerequisites: None. This course will provide
students with a variety of language offerings beyond traditional foreign language offerings through both in
classroom interactive opportunities and online resources. Small group language cohorts will be a part of this
course to assist students in their development of language skills and the areas of Communication, Culture,
Connections, Comparisons, and Communities.
SIGN LANGUAGE I (11500): (East) Grade Level: 9–12. This course is designed for the regular hearing student who
shows an interest in learning sign language. It consists of a sequential curriculum of finger spelling and signs.
Students will learn approximately 900 words over the course of the year.
SIGN LANGUAGE II (11503): (East) Grade Level: 10-12. Prerequisite: Sign Language 1. Fee: $5.00/packets. This
course is developed as a second year sign language class. It consists of a continuation of the vocabulary with
increased focus on American Sign Language and interpreting.
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World Languages
FRENCH II (11303): Grade Level: 9–12. Prerequisite: French 1. This course expands upon the structures and
vocabulary learned in level 1. Students will further develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills with
a continued study of the French culture. The program uses textbook, workbooks, audio, and video programs. As
with level 1, students should be aware that nightly practice and homework are required for acquisition of language
skills.
SIGN LANGUAGE III (11506): (East) Prerequisite: Sign Language 1 and Sign Language 2. The goal of this course is
to increase the student’s pragmatic skills in using sign language, with an increased emphasis on using American
Sign Language (ASL) and distinguishing it from Conceptually Accurate Signed English. The class will also study Deaf
Culture and its impact on sign language.
SIGN LANGUAGE IV (11509): (East) Prerequisite: Sign Language 1, 2, and 3. The goal of this course is to continue
development of the student’s skills using sign language with increased emphasis on American Sign Language and its
differentiation from Conceptually Accurate Signed English. Deaf culture and its impact on sign language will also
continue to be studied.
SPANISH I (11100): Grade Level: 9–12. This course is an introduction to the language, customs, and culture of
Spanish speaking countries. The basic structure of the language is covered with an emphasis on speaking, listening,
reading and writing skills.
SPANISH II (11103): Grade Level: 9-12. Prerequisite: Spanish 1. This course reinforces and expands skills from the
previous year. Emphasis continues to be on building proficiency in the Spanish language. Studies regarding the
customs and culture of the Spanish speaking world continue.
World Languages
SPANISH III (11106): Grade Level: 10–12. Prerequisite: Spanish 1 & 2. Further practice in self expression in Spanish
is provided. Reading and composition skills are developed further. Exposure to Spanish culture and customs
continues.
SPANISH IV (11109): Grade Level: 11–12. Prerequisite: Spanish 1, 2, & 3. Students in this course continue to
develop their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Cultural enrichment is presented in the area of history,
geography, art, music, and literature. Videos, slides, tapes, and other media help the student to advance his/her
study of the Spanish language and culture. The study of the structure of the language is also continued.
AP SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE (11115): Grade Level: 11–12. Prerequisite: Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 and the
AP teacher’s recommendation. Students who have not had Spanish 4 must see the AP teacher for diagnostic
testing and placement in the class. This class offers students the chance to prepare for the Spanish Language AP
exam, and is the equivalent of a fifth semester college course. Students will read, discuss, and write about
selections from a variety of sources; print media, books, movies, internet, etc. They will focus on comparing and
analyzing different perspectives on a topic, and will do research and make presentations on selected cultural
themes. They will review grammar and structures as needed to improve their accuracy in using the language. The
class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. A Spanish-English dictionary is needed.
SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS I (11118): Grade Level: 9–12. This class is designed to meet the needs of Spanish
heritage learners. Hispanic students who already can understand and speak some Spanish should take this course
instead of the regular Spanish sequence. Students will build upon their Spanish language skills, with special
attention to strengthening their reading and writing. Standard Spanish will be used to help prepare students to use
the language appropriately in job settings and to start to prepare for the Spanish Language AP test. Students will
also increase their awareness and understanding of their own cultural heritage and that of the other Spanish
speaking countries in the world.
SPANISH FOR NATIVE SPEAKERS II (11121): Grade Level: 10–12. This class is a continuation of Spanish for Native
Speakers 1 designed to meet the needs of Spanish heritage learners. Hispanic students who already can
understand and speak Spanish should take this course next in the sequence following Spanish for Native Speakers
1. Students will build upon their Spanish language skills, with special attention given to strengthening their reading
and writing. Increasing the awareness and understanding of their own cultural heritage along with that of the other
Spanish speaking countries will be continued as well.
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AQUATICS (16360): Grade Level: 10-12. Aquatics is designed to improve fitness levels through individual and
group aquatic activities. Activities may include, but are not limited to: training and development of all swim
strokes, water polo and related activities, water basketball, diving, and water aerobics/plyometric. Aquatics
includes heavy emphasis on fitness concepts and conditioning and all students enrolled will be assessed using
the FitnessGram test battery which includes (but is not limited to) the mile run, PACER, push up, curl up, and
BMI testing.
FITNESS AND RECREATIONAL DANCE (16400): Grade Level: 10-12. Fitness and Recreational Dance is designed
to increase fitness levels through the use of dance skills and related experiences. Traditional and contemporary
dance styles will be included in the course. Dances may include, but are not limited to: fox trot, swing, polka,
cha-cha, hip hop, waltz, tango, rumba, and line dances. Fitness and Recreational Dance includes heavy emphasis
on fitness concepts and conditioning and all students enrolled will be assessed using the FitnessGram test
battery which includes (but is not limited to) the mile run, PACER, push up, curl up, and BMI testing.
FRESHMAN BOYS PHYSICAL EDUCATION (16120): Grade Level: 9. This course is designed to increase fitness
levels using a variety of exercise modes including, but not limited to: team sports, strength and conditioning,
aquatics, and personal fitness options. Heavy emphasis will be placed on team sports and strength and
conditioning. Students will learn proper movement patterns, determine heart rate and fitness outcomes relative
to each activity, and explore the benefits of teamwork and competition. Students will also learn optimal training
methods for maintaining healthy body composition levels. Students will be required to provide their own
swimsuits and towels. (Boys- lined swim trunks).
GROUP EXERCISE (16350): Grade Level: 10-12. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PE 16111 Freshman
Physical Education. Group Exercise is designed to improve fitness levels through group exercise activities.
Activities may include, but are not limited to: Pilates, yoga, metabolic resistance training circuits, and high
intensity interval training (HIIT). Group Exercise includes heavy emphasis on fitness concepts and conditioning
and all students enrolled will be assessed using the FitnessGram test battery which includes (but is not limited
to) the mile run, PACER, push up, curl up, and BMI testing.
HEALTH (16000): Grade Level: 9-12. Students are required to take one semester of Health during high school.
Health includes the following topics: mental and emotional health, stress management, CPR and first aid,
understanding medicines, tobacco, alcohol, illegal drugs, human growth and reproduction, and health careers/
agencies. Most buildings offer this either freshman or sophomore year. See high school counselor for building
recommendations.
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PE/Health
FRESHMAN GIRLS PHYSICAL EDUCATION (16123): Grade Level: 9. This course is designed to increase fitness
levels using a variety of exercise modes including, but not limited to: personal fitness options (including high
intensity interval training (HIIT), metabolic resistance training, yoga, and Pilates), aquatics, strength and
conditioning, and team sports. Heavy emphasis will be placed on personal fitness options. Students will learn
proper movement patterns, determine heart rate and fitness outcomes relative to each activity, and explore the
benefits of teamwork and competition. Students will also learn optimal training methods for maintaining
healthy body composition levels. Students will be required to provide their own swimsuits and towels. (Girls-1
piece swimsuit).
LG/WSI (16343): Grade Level: 10-12 (9th grade students may enroll with instructor permission). One semester.
$35 Red Cross administration fee. Prerequisite: Successful completion of required competencies AND instructor
approval. Lifeguarding- The purpose of the American Red Cross Lifeguarding course to provide entry-level
lifeguard participants with the knowledge and skills to prevent, recognize and respond to aquatic emergencies
and to provide care for breathing and cardiac emergencies, injuries and sudden illnesses until emergency medical
services personnel take over. Pre-requisite- 300 yd swim using front crawl or breaststroke, 2 minute treading
water, and complete a 1 minute and 40 seconds timed event swimming with a front surface dive into the deep
end to retrieve a 10lb brick. Water Safety Instructor- The purpose of the American Red Cross Swimming and
Water safety program is to teach people how to be safe in, on or around water and to teach individuals of
different ages and abilities how to swim. Pre-requisite: Students have to be able to swim.
PERSONAL FITNESS (16353): Grade Level: 10-12 (9th grade students may enroll with instructor and counselor
approval) Personal Fitness is a semester course designed for students who are interested in increasing their
personal fitness levels, learning how to live a healthy lifestyle and make appropriate choices, and increase their
awareness of community recreational and fitness opportunities. This course is designed for students who want
or need to improve their personal fitness and need a gradual approach. This class is also recommended for any
long term medically excused students. Personal Fitness students will be assessed using the FitnessGram test
battery (or a modified version) which includes (but is not limited to) the mile run, PACER, push up, curl up, and
BMI testing.
STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING (16340): Grade Level 10-12 (9th grade students may enroll with instructor and
coaches’ permission). Prerequisite: Successful completion of PE 16111 Freshman Physical Education or instructor
approval. Strength and Conditioning is a rigorous course designed to improve strength, speed, power and
conditioning levels. The class includes: weightlifting, strength training, plyometric, speed, agility, and
conditioning. Strength and conditioning includes heavy emphasis on performance enhancement and injury
prevention through proper training. All students will be accessed via strength and conditioning testing which
may include strength and power, speed and agility, and conditioning testing.
Subsections (May not be offered at every school)
16370 Football Strength and Conditioning
16373 Basketball Strength and Conditioning
16346 Volleyball Strength and Conditioning
16376 Wrestling Strength and Conditioning
PE/Health
Grade level 10-12 (9th grade students may enroll with instructor and coaches’ permission). All Strength and
Conditioning subsections will include sport specific work that may include offensive and defensive skill work,
walkthrough, film sessions, and practice scenarios. All subsections will require the coach’s permission to enroll.
TEAM SPORTS (16356): Grade Level: 10-12. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshman Physical Education.
Team Sports is designed to increase fitness levels through the use of competitive team games and modified sport
situations. This course may include: basketball, volleyball, softball, soccer, flag football, broomball, speedball,
ultimate Frisbee, rugby, handball and/or additional sports. Team Sports includes heavy emphasis on fitness
concepts and conditioning and all students enrolled will be assessed using the FitnessGram test battery which
includes (but is not limited to) the mile run, PACER, push up, curl up, and BMI testing.
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DRIVER EDUCATION (16203): Grade Level: 9-12.
Prerequisite: 15 years of age. State law requires students to
have received a passing grade in at least eight courses
during the previous two semesters before he/she can be
enrolled in Driver Education. Driver Education Fees: A
$250.00 fee is required payable to RPS 205, plus a $20.00
Illinois State permit fee to be paid to the Secretary of State.
Please note: students that qualify for a district fee waiver
will get the district driver education fee waived not the State
fee. All other students must pay the driver education fee.
Course Description: Students will receive safe instruction in the safe operation of motor vehicles, rules of the
road, and the laws of the State relating to motor vehicles. The course meets the legal requirements of the State
in preparing students to become safe and efficient users of the highway transportation system. To successfully
complete the course, students must be in attendance a minimum of 30 clock hours no exceptions. Driver
Education is taught in two phases (three phases at Auburn or Jefferson): 1) Classroom Instruction (30 hours); 2)
Behind the Wheel Driving (6 hours); and 3) Simulation (if applicable). Students who earn a grade of "B" or
better in all phases of the course may be eligible to take the State of Illinois Driver's Licensing Test with their
Driver Education instructor. Parents are responsible for a minimum of 50 hours of supervised driving (of which
10 hours must be night driving) with their son/daughter and to record this on a document to be turned in when
the student obtains his/her license.
JROTC 9-12 (16500): (Auburn) Grade Level: 9-12. JROTC has
four course levels which all include academics, physical
fitness and practical exercises. The program initially focuses
on character development, teamwork, organizing,
individual responsibility and other life and academic
success skills. As students progress in the program they
assume increasing levels of leadership responsibility and
staff roles during practical exercises to plan, organize and publicize various school activities and community
support events (Labor Day, Open House, Varsity Athletic Meets and Games, Veterans' Day, Christmas Caroling,
Military Ball, Awards Banquet, Memorial Day and Fourth of July). Extra-curricular activities include
interscholastic competition drill, color guard and marksmanship teams. Enrollment is limited.
ROTC/DRIVER EDUCATION (16503): (Auburn) Grade Level: 10 - 12. The student is enrolled in JROTC. Age and
the number of high school credits as required by the State will determine admission into Drivers Education for
the semester.
29
Driver Ed/ROTC
Students must pass the written Driver Education Vehicle Code Permit Test and a vision exam to advance to the
Behind-The-Wheel (BTW) phase. Pending availability of instructors, students are selected in chronological order
by birth date and are given the opportunity to successfully complete the required 6 hours of training. Students
have the option of taking BTW at a later date.
Fine Arts
INTRO TO ART & DESIGN (15155): Grade Level: 9. One semester. Lab Fee: $15.00. This course emphasizes
developing creative ideas and problem-solving skills while providing students with an introduction to the visual
arts. This class will give students the foundation necessary to expand into more specialized art areas. The studio
activities will focus on design and composition while developing skills and an understanding of drawing, painting,
sculpture, and computer imaging. Students will explore a variety of media and techniques as well as deepen their
appreciation of art making through a global and historical perspective. Units are constructed to engage student
learners while helping them see, analyze, create, understand, and articulate their experiences of the visual world.
STUDIO ART FOUNDATIONS (15100): Grade Level: 9–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course is an overview of visual
arts. Students will explore traditional and experimental media. Students will study visual art work from a variety of
cultures and time periods. This is a beginning model for art criticism and the basis for further art study. An
emphasis is placed on learning how to draw, paint and print as well as develop good studio habits, craftsmanship,
and visual art vocabulary.
STUDIO ART I (15103): Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Studio Art Foundations or consent of
instructor. This course is for the interested student to further develop artistic skills. Students will advance and
continue their exploration and development of skills begun in Studio Art Foundations. Students will focus on
mastering basic drawing and painting skills in a variety of media with special emphasis on experimentation,
expression, craftsmanship, and originality. Art history, aesthetics, and critical topics will be presented.
2-D STUDIO ART II (15106): Grade Level: 11–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Studio Art-I or consent of
instructor. This course is designed to allow the advanced level art student an opportunity to continue their
exploration and development of skills. Study is accelerated enabling highly motivated students to engage in
advanced level art production in a variety of 2D media. Emphasis is placed on advanced level technical skills,
experimentation, creative expression and personal interpretation. An additional expense is required for matting
artwork for portfolio presentation and exhibition.
2-D STUDIO ART III (15109): Grade Level: 12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Studio Art-II or consent of instructor.
This course requires portfolio development. A portfolio is a presentation of a body of art work with consistent
quality, related themes, and demonstrates independent work ethic and craftsmanship representing a wide range
of media. This course is for those students interested in college, art school, or visual art employment. An
additional expense is required for matting artwork for portfolio presentation and exhibition.
30
AP STUDIO ART: 2-D DESIGN (15144): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Advanced Art. The AP Studio Art: 2-D Design
course is designed to address two-dimensional (2-D) design issues and media. This course promotes the
investigation of all three aspects of portfolio development - quality, concentration, and breadth. The AP
portfolio’s three-section structure requires the student to show mastery in concept, composition, and execution
of 2-D design through any two-dimensional medium or process, including, but not limited to, graphic design,
digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting, and printmaking. The AP Studio
Art program sets a national standard for performance in the visual arts. Students enrolled in AP Studio Art: 2-D
Design must take the AP exam which is a performance-based exam rather than a written exam requiring the
submission of a digital portfolio for evaluation. Students who successfully pass the AP Studio Art review may
receive college credit. An additional expense is required for matting artwork for portfolio presentation and
exhibition.
3-D STUDIO ART-I (15132): Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Studio Art Foundations. A variety
of methods of working with sculpture will be explored. Projects will emphasize problem solving, experimentation,
expression, craftsmanship and originality. Historical, contemporary and cultural examples will be studied.
3-D STUDIO ART-II (15135): Grade Level: 11–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: 3-D Studio Art-I. This is a third
year course for the serious art student. It provides the opportunity for more in-depth study and experimental
approaches to 3-dimensional forms. An additional expense is required for displaying sculptures for portfolio
presentation and exhibition.
AP STUDIO ART: 3-D DESIGN (15147): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: 3-D Studio Art-I. AP Studio Art: 3-D Design
is designed to address sculptural issues and media. Design involves purposeful decision making about using the
elements and principles of art in an integrative way. This course promotes the investigation of all three aspects of
portfolio development -- quality, concentration, and breadth. The AP portfolio’s three-section structure requires
the student to demonstrate mastery in concept, composition, and execution of 3-D design through any threedimensional approach. The AP Studio Art program sets a national standard for performance in the visual arts.
Students enrolled in AP Studio Art:3-D Design must take the AP exam which is a performance-based exam rather
than a written exam requiring the submission of a digital portfolio for evaluation. Students who successfully pass
the AP Studio Art review may receive college credit. An additional expense is required for preparing and
presenting artwork for exhibition.
AP ART HISTORY (15138): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course surveys the visual arts from
prehistoric to contemporary times. The survey is global and includes an emphasis on social context and
connections between artists, related fine arts, culture and events in the past and today. Students are expected to
view, discuss, research and write about the visual arts. Testing and content are designed to prepare students for
the AP Art History exam.
31
Fine Arts
AP STUDIO ART: DRAWING (15141): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: 2-D Studio Art-II. AP Studio Art: Drawing is
designed to address drawing issues and media. This course promotes the investigation of all three aspects of
portfolio development – quality, concentration, and breadth. The AP portfolio’s three-section structure requires
the student to show mastery in concept, composition, and execution of drawing. The AP Studio Art program sets
a national standard for performance in the visual arts. Students enrolled in AP Studio Art: Drawing must take the
AP exam which is a performance based exam rather than a written exam requiring the submission of a digital
portfolio for evaluation. Students who successfully pass the AP Studio Art review may receive college credit. An
additional expense is required for matting artwork for portfolio presentation and exhibition.
Fine Arts
INTRO TO GRAPHIC DESIGN (15156): Grade Level: 9. One semester. Lab Fee: $15.00. This course is an overview
introducing students to simple image manipulation on the computer. The class will cover the history of computer
graphics and teach industry standard software and procedures. Studio and digital projects will allow students to learn
the elements and principles of art as a basis for good design.
GRAPHIC DESIGN I (15123): Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Studio Art Foundations, Intro to
Graphic Design and/or Business and Technology Concepts. This course helps students become proficient in two
graphic programs currently used by professional designers; Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Skills will be
learned in how technology is used in creating photo-edited images. Design and composition will be taught on the
computer through the use of these programs.
GRAPHIC DESIGN II (15126): Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Graphic Design-I or Intro to Graphic
Design and/or consent of instructor. The intent of this course is to allow students to review and expand on the
knowledge and skills that they have learned in the prerequisite. Students will use graphic programs used by
professional designers: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign. Skills will be used to edit images,
create computer illustrations, and layout designs. Design and composition skills will be emphasized to create
computer graphics suitable for both print and web-based applications. Students will also develop a digital portfolio to
showcase their artwork.
GRAPHIC DESIGN III (15160): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee: $15.00. Prerequisite: Graphic Design II. This course will
build upon the knowledge and skills learned in Graphic Design II. This course is the capstone course at the end of the
Graphic Design Academy Pathway. The course allows students to finish the three year Graphic Design program with a
strong design background and a high level of competency using digital imaging, computer aided drawing, and page
layout programs. Graphic Design III will introduce advanced level software allowing students an exposure to industry
standard certification level coursework. This course allows students to be fully immersed in the field of graphic design
through the use of practical application units which lead to the development of an advanced level portfolio for college
acceptance and/or job placement.
WEB DESIGN (15129): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. This course focuses on the overall production
processes surrounding web site design with particular emphasis on design elements involving layout, navigation and
interactivity. Students will learn using both HTML and Adobe Dreamweaver..
3-D MODELING AND ANIMATION (15113): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisites: Intro to Graphic Design
or Graphic Design-I. This course offers an introduction to the world of computer generated 3-D modeling and
animation. As an introductory course, it provides a basic understanding of the skills and techniques employed by 3-D
designers. In this course, students will explore basic mesh modeling, applying textures and materials to 3-D objects,
lighting, animation and rendering.
MEDIA PRODUCTION I (21206): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I. Designed to
provide students with solid, introductory level experiences in a variety of media forms, including television, radio, film
and the Internet. This course will survey the historical and social significance of the media in our culture. Students will
develop a basic working knowledge of the tools used in the production of media projects. Communication, leadership,
creative problem solving, teaming and interpersonal skills will be of high priority. As both an interdisciplinary course
and a resource for all school departments, the students will have multiple opportunities to engage in creative work
through the use of appropriate and current technology. Five after school studio hours per semester are required.
MEDIA PRODUCTION II (21209): Grade Level: 12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Media Production I. A continuation
of training with an emphasis on placement in the professional community through internships. The focus of
instruction will be on the development of training and industrial films. Fifteen after school studio hours required.
32
BEGINNING ORCHESTRA (15250): Grade Level: 9. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course is designed to develop the
instrumental music skills of the beginning high school student. Students will perform quality literature
representing all time periods, and genres. The emphasis of this performance based group will be placed on skills
and techniques of the instrument by the student, sight reading, and ensemble performing skills. This course may
only be taken once. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
CONCERT ORCHESTRA (15200): Orchestra Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Middle School orchestra or consent of
instructor. Lab Fee: $30.00 if renting a school instrument. The course emphasis is on string techniques, literature
and performance. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
Students may audition for the Advanced Strings Ensemble, an extra-curricular seminar whose rehearsal schedule
will be determined by the instructor and its members. This ensemble will perform at school as well as in the
community. Students may enroll in this course for more than one year.
SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA (15253): Lab Fee: $25.00. Rental Fee: $30.00 instrument rental. Prerequisite:
Audition. This course is an advanced group of musicians who work on advanced techniques, literature, and
performance. The music studied advances performance skills and covers all periods and styles. Concerts will
include playing full orchestra music including wind, brass, and percussion players. This class is offered for
students who are interested in performing advanced orchestral literature. Mandatory outside of class time
performances are part of the assessment for this class. Students are also encouraged to participate in statewide
festivals and competitions. Students will be assigned small ensembles (i.e., trios, quartets) to rehearse in class.
These ensembles will have opportunities to perform at special events at Auburn High School, District 205 and the
community. Students may enroll in this course for more than one year.
BEGINNING BAND (15203): Grade Level: 9-12. Band Fee: $25.00. School Instrument Rental Fee: $30.00. This
course is open to students who have never played a band instrument or current music students who would like
to learn a secondary instrument. This group will study the basics of playing an instrument and music reading.
FRESHMAN BAND (J-Hawk, Knight, E-Rabs, Viking) (15206): Prerequisite: Middle school and or consent of
instructor. Band Fee: $25.00. School Instrument Rental Fee: $30.00. This band is made up of all freshmen
rolling up from the middle school program, developing technical proficiency and musical knowledge. Several
performances throughout the year will be required. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of
the assessment for this class, such as marching at home football games, Memorial Day Parade, playing at home
basketball games and concerts.
CONCERT BAND (15209): Grade Level 10-12. Band Fee: $25.00. School Instrument Rental Fee: $30.00. This
course allows for continuing the development of instrumental musicianship into the 2nd year of high school.
Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class, such as marching at
home football games, Memorial Day Parade, playing at home basketball games and concerts.
WIND ENSEMBLE (15212): Grade Level 11-12. Band Fee: $25.00. School Instrument Rental Fee: $30.00.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The material performed will be of an advanced nature. Several
performances throughout the year will be required. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of
the assessment for this class, such as marching at home football games, Memorial Day Parade, playing at home
basketball games and concerts.
JAZZ ENSEMBLE (15215): Grade Level 10-12. Band Fee: $25.00. School Instrument Rental Fee: $30.00.
Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in another band and consent of instructor. The Jazz Ensemble offers its members
an exposure to jazz and rock music. The group performs at functions outside of school including college jazz
festivals and programs for civic organizations. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the
assessment for this class.
33
Fine Arts
Music
Fine Arts
General & Vocal Music
BEGINNING PIANO KEYBOARD (15224): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course is a group piano class
where students work individually on their own keyboard. Students will improve reading, technical, and
performance skills. Basic skills will be taught including scales, etudes, and music theory. Participants are expected
to perform as an individual and an ensemble throughout the year at various school and community events.
BEGINNING ACOUSTIC GUITAR ENSEMBLE (15221): Grade Level 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Beginning and
intermediate guitar students study the techniques of guitar playing, rhythm section playing, sight reading, various
styles of music and basic musicianship. Guitar techniques include chords, scales, strums and picking
styles. Students must provide their own acoustic guitar. This course may not be repeated.
ADVANCED PIANO KEYBOARD (15227): Grade Level 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Audition. Lab Fee:
$25.00. This is an advanced piano class where students work individually on their own keyboards. Students will
improve reading, technical, and performance skills on the keyboard. Advanced skills will be emphasized including
all major and minor scales, arpeggios, improvisation, and more advanced music theory. Students will also work on
their own compositions with music technology. Participants are expected to perform as an individual and as
ensemble throughout the year at various school and community events.
MUSIC EXPLORATIONS (15240): Grade Level: 9-12. One semester. Lab Fee: $25.00. This beginning level course is
designed as an overview and introduction to music appreciation and exploration, through hands-on lab stations
and presentations. Labs include: piano keyboard, acoustic guitar, voice, rhythm instruments, computer, listening,
reading and writing about music from all over the world and from various time periods.
ARTS AND HUMANITIES (15150): Grade Level: 9-12. One semester. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course is designed to
investigate the cultural impact the arts have had on society over time. The course will look at ancient and
contemporary arts examples to distinguish their relevance and connections to cultural and historical aspects of
each time period.
AP MUSIC THEORY (15228): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $30.00. Prerequisite: Prior musical experience. A one
year course for students interested in a college equivalent Music Theory course. This course follows the Advanced
Placement (AP) curriculum. Topics addressed in depth include musicianship, theory, musical materials, and
procedures. Students who successfully pass the AP Music Theory proficiency exam may receive college credit.
CHORUS (15303): Grade Level: 9. Lab Fee: $25.00. This mixed choir course is designed to develop the choral skills
of the beginning high school singer. Students will perform quality literature representing all time periods, genres,
and languages of choral music. The emphasis of this performance based choir will be placed on vocal production,
sight reading, and aural skills. Chorus may only be taken once. Mandatory outside of class time performances are
part of the assessment for this class.
CONCERT CHORALE (15309): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Audition. This course is designed
to fully develop the chorale/musicianship skills of the advanced high school singer. Students will perform quality
literature representing all time periods, genres, and languages of choral music. Strong emphasis will be placed on
independent musicianship, analysis of text, and interpretation. Students may enroll in Concert Chorale for more
than one year. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
34
Fine Arts
INTRO TO ACTING (15418): Grade Level: 9. One semester. Lab Fee $25.00. This course introduces students to the
complex aspects of Acting in the entertainment business. Students discover the many and varied elements of
acting styles, movement techniques, voice manipulation and characterization application in scene performances.
Also, audition training and skills, along with improvisation techniques, and a brief background in theatre history
are discussed. In addition, this course provides the student with a basic working vocabulary of the business and
an understanding of the necessary techniques and methods that help meld together the creative and acting
elements into one common goal. This course enables the student to explore the variety of acting career
opportunities in the field and lead them towards the option of choosing acting as their pathway in the Human and
Public Services Academy (HPS). This course emphasizes the importance of real world skills such as collaboration,
teamwork, decision-making, the duality of right-brained and left-brained skills, long range and short term
planning, meeting deadlines, critical thinking, and the pride of creating a final scene performance product.
Requirements: attend or be part of a school’s stage production, write an Acting Critique of a live stage production.
ACTING I (15400): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course includes and expands with more in depth
application of Intro to Acting; an overview of the actor’s craft. Students will learn theater terminology,
improvisation, pantomime, and character study. Class members will perform monologues, scenes, and short
plays. Students will learn about theater history, dramatic structure and style, criticism and theater etiquette.
Requirements: attend or be part of a school’s stage production, write an Acting Critique of a live stage production.
ACTING II (15403): Prerequisite: Intro to Acting or Acting-1. Lab Fee: $25.00. Various acting techniques will be
explored through improvisation, monologues, and scene work. Students will also learn the fundamentals of play
direction. Class members may be required to perform in the performance based assessment; a one act play.
ACTING & DIRECTING (15406): Prerequisite: Acting-2. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course is a third level course where
class members may be required to aid in the production of a one-act. Emphasis is on directing and stage
management. Attendance at several current productions is required.
THEATRE SEMINAR (15409): Prerequisite: Acting and Directing. Lab Fee: $25.00. Attendance at several current
productions are required. This course is a fourth level course where students will continue a more in-depth study
of acting, directing, production, and period styles. Students will investigate the development of a production
resulting in a performance.
35
Fine Arts
INTRO TO TECH THEATER (15419): Grade Level: 9. One semester. Lab Fee: $15.00. This course introduces to
the student the complex workings behind the scenes of the entertainment business. Students discover the many
and varied elements of stagecraft that are needed to mount a stage production: scenic, lighting, sound, publicity,
costuming and make up. In addition, this course provides the student with a basic working vocabulary of the
business and an understanding of the necessary procedures and methods that help meld together the creative
and technical elements into one common goal. This course enables the student to explore the variety of career
opportunities in the field and lead them towards the option of choosing Technical Theatre as their Pathway in the
Human and Public Services Academy (HPS). This course emphasizes the importance of real world skills such as
collaboration, teamwork, decision-making, the duality of right-brained and left-brained skills, long range and
short term planning, meeting deadlines, critical thinking, and the pride of creating a final product. Requirements:
5 or more hours of crew work, attend or be part of a school's stage production, write a Technical Critique of a live
stage production.
TECH THEATER I (15412): Grade Level: 9–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course includes and expands in more depth
what happens behind the curtain. Students will learn the basics of set design, lighting, sound, props, makeup, set
construction and costumes. Tech Theater will assist in the production of the all-school plays. Hours outside of
class time are required.
TECH THEATER II (15420): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Intro to Tech or Tech Theater I. This
course is the first full year course offering in the Technical Theatre Pathway in the Human and Public Services
Academy (HPS), and continues the logical process of Technical Theatre methods. The student will gain more indepth training using the theatre facility's equipment and complete projects as proof of their training. The student
will receive advanced training in Scenic Construction, Lighting, Sound, Rigging and Knots, Scenic Painting, Make
Up Application, Costume Design, Drafting and Scene Design, Model-building, and Poster and Playbill Design. The
student will use their training and knowledge to help run the school's Plays and Musical productions as well as
becoming Technical support for other programs held in the Auditorium. Students will use Theatre vocabulary and
language as an efficient and accurate way to communicate their ideas and information. Students will put into
practice the importance of real world skills such as collaboration, teamwork, decision-making, the duality of rightbrained and left-brained skills, long range and short term planning, meeting deadlines, critical thinking, by
majorly contributing to the success of the schools stage plays and musicals. Requirements: 15 or more hours of
crew work, must be part of a school's stage productions as a crew member or a position of Leadership, write a
Technical Critique of each live stage production put on by the Theatre Department, and be a Technical Director
for one of the Theatre Department's one-act plays.
ADVANCED TECHNICAL THEATER (15415): Prerequisite: Tech Theater II. This course is a progressive and
advanced course introducing students to the theory of theater technology. It includes participation in
construction, mounting, and running of school productions. A lab fee and twenty hours outside of class time are
required.
THEATER PRODUCTION (15425): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Advanced Technical Theater. This course is the
capstone of the Tech Theater pathway, focusing on original production designs constructed, mounted and run for
theater productions. Portfolios and resumes development will prepare students for college reviews. Twenty
hours outside of class time are required.
36
(All business classes have a semester lab fee.)
BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY CONCEPTS (21100): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab fee required. Recommended
prerequisite: Beginning Computer Applications. This course is a required course for the BAMIT Academy, Business,
Accounting/ Finance and Information Technology Pathways. Students are introduced to core business concepts and
the role that business plays in the economic well-being of the United States. Topics included are entrepreneurship
opportunities, identifying market needs (global and domestic), financing and managing a business, economics of
business, and the use of technology in the business world. Students will advance their skill level in Microsoft Office
programs.
ADVANCED COMPUTER CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS (21103): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab fee required. Prerequisite:
Beginning Computer Applications or Business Tech Concepts. This course is designed to increase opportunities to
succeed in the work force after graduation or continued education at a community college or university. Students
will master skills in Microsoft Office Beginning Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access. Students successfully
completing the course may elect to test for Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Core Certification.
INFORMATION PROCESSING (21106): Grade Level: 11-12. Prerequisite: Advanced Computer Concepts and
Applications. Lab fee required. This course is designed to increase opportunities to succeed in the work force after
graduation or continued education at a community college or university. Students will master skills in Microsoft
Office Expert, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access (Outlook optional). Students successfully completing the
course may elect to test for Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Expert Certification.
ACCOUNTING I (21130): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab fee required. Recommended prerequisite: Business & Tech
Concepts. A skill level course valuable to students pursuing business, marketing and management programs. This
course provides learning experiences and activities for keeping, summarizing and analyzing financial records. In
addition to stressing fundamental concepts and terminology of accounting, instruction will provide initial
understanding of financial reports, computer applications, development of proper work habits and employability
skills, and exploration of career opportunities. Topics include use of double entry accounting systems, mechanics of
the accounting cycle, recording transactions in a general journal, recording transactions in special journals, posting
to general journal, posting to special journals, and preparing financial statements particularly concepts for
proprietorships and corporations. Additional topics include accounting for special procedures such as cash funds,
receivables, payables, depreciation and inventories particularly concepts and procedures for corporations.
ACCOUNTING II (21133): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: Accounting 1. Accounting 2 is a skill
level course that builds upon the foundation of Accounting 1. In addition to stressing fundamental concepts and
terminology of accounting, this course continues the study of accounting to include the use of special journals and
the posting procedures to special ledgers. Additional topics include accounting for special procedures such as cash
funds, receivables, payables, depreciation and inventories particularly concepts and procedures for partnerships.
37
Career & Technical Education
BEGINNING COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (21218): Grade Level: 9 -12. One semester. Lab fee required. This course
is an introduction to computer applications including keyboarding, basic computer knowledge, and basic computer
operations including word processing and formatting, presentation software, spreadsheets, graphic arts, and
programming. Students will be introduced to basic skills in Microsoft Office.
ACCOUNTING III (21136): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: Accounting 2. This course expands
on topics learned in the first and second year courses while adding new topics about management accounting,
cost accounting, not-for-profit accounting, and financial analysis. The study of a third year of accounting helps
qualify students for higher level accounting positions. This course provides an excellent background and
preparation for college business and accounting majors. In addition the cost, budgeting, and financial analysis
topics are useful tools for the new entrepreneur.
Career & Technical Education
BUSINESS & PERSONAL LAW (2688): Grade Level: 9-12. Business and Personal Law is a course which develops an
understanding of legal rights and responsibilities in personal law and business law with applications applied to
everyday roles as consumers, citizens, and workers. The student will have an understanding of the American
legal system, courts/court procedures, criminal justice system, torts, the civil justice system, oral and written
contracts, sales contracts and warranties, and consumer protection. Legal technology is emphasized.
ENTREPRENEURSHIP (21109): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: Business and Technology
Concepts. Also recommended: a 2nd year computer class and Accounting I. This class will build on Business and
Technology Concepts in the area of business that will include all aspects of business. Areas of study include:
business history, the free enterprise system, what it is to be an entrepreneur, business structures, marketing,
ethics, business law, business management, international business, ecommerce and the art of successful sales.
Students will have an opportunity to work through the process of developing, proposing, and creating a business.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT (21303): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $10.00. This course introduces students to responsible nurturing and basic applications of child development theory. 21st century emphasis is on care providers’ responsibilities for and influences on children. The course content will reinforce students’ skills in communication,
resource management and problem solving. It will also highlight the ways infants, toddlers and preschoolers develop physically, emotionally, socially and intellectually. Activities include field trips, guest speakers, computer
applications for intranet research; problem based learning schemas and tests. The “Baby Think it Over” project is
included.
STUDENT LEADERSHIP (21600): Grade Level: 11-12. Students will have the opportunity to develop leadership
skills and techniques which prepare them for effective one-on-one and group work settings. In addition to leadership skills, the course will focus on interpersonal relationships and the value of role models. The application of
these skills will be to organize community service events to include mentoring to students in their school.
EDUCATION AND CHILD CARE CAREERS (21309): Grade Level 11 – 12. Prerequisite: Child Development. This is a
year-long course designed to introduce students to the wide variety of careers found in education and to expose
them to the licensing and education requirements needed to access careers in education. Students will examine
the historical roots of education and examine the current political, economic, and pedagogical factors which impact our schools. During the second semester of this course, students will develop lessons for instruction based in
a traditional classroom and through online course offerings. This course will combine opportunities to observe
and engage with classrooms, and practice developing, implementing, and assessing curriculum.
38
MEDIA PRODUCTION I (21206): Grade Level: 10 – 12. This course is designed to provide students with solid,
introductory level experiences in a variety of media forms, including television, radio, film, and the Internet. This
course will survey the historical and social significance of the media in our culture. Students will develop a basic
working knowledge of the tools used in the production of media projects. Communication, leadership, creative
problem solving, teaming and interpersonal skills will be of high priority. As both an interdisciplinary course and a
resource for all school departments, the students will have multiple opportunities to engage in creative work through
the use of appropriate and current technology. 5 after school studio hours per semester are required.
MEDIA PRODUCTION II (21209): Grade Level: 11 – 12. A continuation of training with an emphasis on placement in
the professional community through internships. The focus of instruction will be on the development of training and
industrial films. 15 after school studio hours required.
DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTION (21220): Grade Level: 10 – 12. Lab fee required. This course is designed to integrate
America’s history with the process of developing a documentary. Students will develop their personal voice, based on
solid research techniques and synthesis of information from a large variety of sources. Skills, such as, video shooting
techniques, compositional elements, basic production techniques, non-linear editing and creating a coherent story
line will be tools used by each student. The course culminates in the development of a documentary and portfolio.
CISCO NETWORKING ACADEMY I (21212): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab fee required. The first semester in this introductory
course in the CISCO networking Academy is a highly relevant preparation in the information technology field.
Concepts covering the fundamentals of networking, protocols, IP addresses and other concepts leading to cabling
installation will be covered. The second semester will cover routing theory and router technologies. Students will
participate in router configuration exercises and will be introduced to LAN switching. By the end of the class, students
will have the skills necessary to gain internship opportunities in the information technology sector.
CISCO NETWORKING ACADEMY II (21215): Lab fee required. Grade Level: 11-12. In this course students will learn
advanced routing and switching. Students will configure routers and switches using network management techniques
to find and fix network problems. Students will also complete advanced projects in network design and management.
This course will prepare students for the industry certification exam required to achieve the CISCO Networking
Associate Certificate.
AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (13440): Lab fee required. The class will introduce the student to JAVA software
development. Students will write platform-independent, object oriented code for conventional, Internet – and
Intranet-based applications. Topics covered include graphical user interface (GUI) development, multimedia (images,
animation, and audio); graphic strings, exception and security; application portability. A number of programming
assignments will be given to enable the student to build real-world JAVA applications. This is a college level course in
computer science.
39
Career & Technical Education
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (21200): INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: A+ CERTIFICATION: Grade Level: 10-12. Lab
fee required. Worldwide Information Technology Certification. One year course driven by the NCS Real Skills
Compitia A+ certification program and lays a foundation for on-going Information Technology Training. It provides
technical skills, hardware and software knowledge, work readiness skills, and experience in diagnosing and fixing
technical computer problems. These components enable students to launch high-wage, high-skill IT careers. With
certification, the program provides real world experiential learning through an intern program administered by local
resources. Additional courseware begins the next level class in Microsoft Certification in Windows NT 4.0 workstation
and server to become a Microsoft certified professional.
(A $10.00 fee required in all Technology classes unless otherwise noted.)
Career & Technical Education
EXPLORING ENGINEERING (21470): Grade Level: 9. This semester course uses a problem based learning paradigm
and introduces students to the connections between Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM).
Students work in teams to complete hands-on projects in support of creativity and critical thinking. This course
introduces students to the Engineering, Manufacturing, Industrial Trades, and Technology (EMITT) pathways.
INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING(21400): Grade Level: 9-12. This course is a
mandatory first course for most Industrial and Engineering Technology courses It provides the orientation needed
for all skill-level industrial occupation programs. Through numerous “hands-on” activities, including drafting,
electrical wiring, and woodworking, the course will offer introductions to communication technology, energy
utilization, production technology, engineering design, and transportation technology. Each unit will cover the
resources, technological processes, industrial applications, technological impact and possible occupations. Auburn
includes units covering robotics and welding. East includes a unit covering skills necessary in the construction
trades.
INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (Project Lead the Way) (21483): Grade Level: 10 -12. This course
focuses on the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards
and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to
solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers
and members of the professional community.
PRINCIPLES OF AEROSPACE SCIENCE (21403): Grade Level: 10 – 12. Principles of Aerospace Science is designed to
provide the student with a broad-based aviation orientation in flight-related areas. Subjects include historical
developments in aviation and the airline industry, theory of flight, airport operations, aircraft systems and
performance, elements of air navigation, basic meteorology theory, air traffic principles, flight physiology, and
aviation regulations and safety. Unmanned Aircraft Systems is a survey of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS),
emphasizing the military and commercial history, growth, and application of UASs. The course will include basic
acquisition, use, and operation of UASs with an emphasis on operations.
FLIGHT I (21480): Grade Level: 11 – 12. This course develops the aeronautical knowledge required for certification
as a Private Pilot with an Airplane Single Engine Land rating. Topics include: regulations, safety, pre-solo
operations, cross-country planning, airspace, chart use, communications, weather, performance, weight and
balance, aerodynamics, and decision-making.
FABRICATION I (21462): Grade Level: 10-12. Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial Technology and Engineering.
This course is an advanced course in the fabrication of wood and metal projects. It provides the student with
advanced design and fabrication of woodworking projects and introduces the student to simple metal fabrication
skills. This is a skill level class and the students will learn how to safely and effectively operate a large variety of
woodworking machines and will learn additional skills in metalworking, such as tap and die, micrometer, and steel
cutting equipment use. At Auburn, there is an additional welding component in which the students will learn how
to safely and effectively use several advanced types of welding processes in metal fabrication, including MIG, TIG,
and plasma cutting operations
40
FABRICATION II (21464): Grade Level: 11-12. Prerequisite: Fabrication II. This course is an extension of
Fabrication I and will increase the knowledge and skill levels necessary for the fabrication of wood and metal
projects. This course is more intended for students interested in careers in the many different forms of
fabrication. It will build on what was learned in Fabrication I and will include projects that are of an advanced
design and will require more developed skills to complete successfully. The students will set up and safely
operate a large variety of woodworking machines and continue to build knowledge and skills necessary for
metalworking. At Auburn, there is an additional and extensive welding component in which the students will
further develop their knowledge and skills to effectively use several types of welding processes in metal
fabrication, including brazing, oxy-fuel cutting, MIG, TIG, and plasma cutting operations.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY I (21416): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee: $30.00. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better
in Orientation to Transportation. In the first semester, students will study automotive suspension/steering, brake
systems, and vehicle service. Second semester will cover basic engine repair, automatic/manual drive train,
electrical/electronic systems, engine performance, heating/air conditioning, vehicle service. Safety in the use of
automotive hand tools, equipment, and chemicals/oils is also covered.
AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY II (21419): Grade Level: 12. Lab Fee: $30.00. Two hour capstone course.
Prerequisite: Automotive Technology I during the first semester, students will identify and interpret electrical
system problems and will be introduced to the diagnosis and repair of starting, charging, driver information, and
electrical/electronic systems. Second semester will focus on brake systems. Diagnosis and repair of hydraulic and
drum systems, disc brakes, wheel bearings, parking brakes, and power assist units will be covered.
ORIENTATION TO CONSTRUCTION (21465): Grade Level 10 – 12. Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial
Technology and Engineering. This course exposes students to the opportunities available in construction -related
trades, such as carpentry, masonry, air conditioning/refrigeration, plumbing, and so on. Students learn about the
processes involved in construction projects and may engage in a variety of small projects
CONSTRUCTION I (21474): Grade Level: 11-12. 2 credits per semester. Lab Fee: $15.00 plus tools. Prerequisite:
Orientation to Construction. This course is an introductory course in construction, remodeling, and home repair.
Carpentry skills, drywall, concrete, tile, roofing, and siding skills are a few of the areas covered.
CONSTRUCTION II (21477): Grade Level: 12. 2 credits per semester. Lab Fee: $15.00 plus equipment.
Prerequisite: Construction I. This course is a continuation of Construction I. A second-year student is expected to
handle more responsibility and will be put in charge of certain projects or a section of construction.
ORIENTATION TO DRAFTING (21434): Grade Level: 9- 12. This course will introduce the student to the basic
fundamentals of drafting while concentrating on mechanical drafting and its techniques. The content of the
course covers the method of transferring ideas to paper and computer. Drawing and the language of industry are
covered in detail. Typical areas covered may include: planning and organizing activities, preparing sketches,
performing basic layouts, and detailing drawings. Basic introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) will be
presented through the year.
41
Career & Technical Education
ORIENTATION TO TRANSPORTATION (21413): Grade Level: 9 -12. Prerequisite: Introduction to Industrial
Technology and Engineering. First semester is Small Engines, and second semester is Automotive Mechanics.
Small Engines will introduce the student to the 4-cycle engine theory, nomenclature, service and repair
procedures. The student will disassemble, overhaul, and reassemble a lawnmower engine. Automotive Mechanics
will expose the student to the basics of the automobile. Students will become knowledgeable of the various
systems of a modern automobile, and the different skills related to them.
Career & Technical Education
ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING/CAD I (21447): Grade Level: 10-12. Prerequisite: Orientation to Drafting. Course
content includes CAD, architectural drafting concepts, and engineering design concepts. The application of research
skills, math skills, and the language of industry will be stressed. Typical areas covered may include: planning and
organizing activities, researching of information, performing general office procedures, preparing sketches,
performing basic layouts, detailing drawings, performing presentation techniques, using reproduction techniques,
producing mechanical working drawings, using CAD command processes, & producing drawings using CAD.
ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING/CAD II (21486): Grade Level 11 – 12. Prerequisite: Drafting/CAD I. Instruction is
provided in the areas of locating information using computer data files, determination of materials and availability,
project conferences, checking plan dimensions, drawing schematic sketches, preparing scale sketches, producing
drawings from written/verbal instructions, application of coordinate dimensioning standards, creating drawings
using a plotter/printer, producing renderings and/or charts and graphs, and common plan features. Instruction is
also provided in the areas of drawing framing plans, wall sections, fireplace sections, door sections, door and window
schedules, dimensioning structural steel drawings, constructing column detail drawings, preparation of structural
foundation, slab and floor plans, drawing electrical, block, schematic, and electrical connection drawings. Skills
relating to CAD include preparation of a basic CAD drawing, building and editing a data base, developing a 3dimensional drawing and selecting appropriate line work, line weight, and color.
ORIENTATION TO MANUFACTURING (21450): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $5.00. Prerequisite: Introduction to
Industrial Technology and Engineering. This metalworking course provides an introduction to manufacturing
materials, processes, and career opportunities. Students will design and produce projects using individual
craftsmanship, mass production, and automated machining (CNC) techniques. Lab work will involve the safe use of
metalworking hand tools, band saws, drill presses, lathes, and milling machines to produce a variety of metal
projects.
MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY I (21453): Grade Level: 11-12. 2 credits per semester. Prerequisite: Orientation to
Manufacturing. A lab fee covers safety glasses, lock, and materials consumed making class projects. This two hour,
capstone course is for students interested in metalworking/ manufacturing careers. Students will develop
metalworking skills in sheet metal work, bench work, and in the safe operation of saws, drills, lathes, mills, and
grinders while producing a variety of precision metal projects. Instruction will also include the related metalworking
topics of shop math, blueprint reading, precision measurement, metallurgy, and technical communications. Students
will be introduced to computer numerical control (CNC) programming and machining.
MACHINE TOOL TECHNOLOGY II (21456): Grade Level: 12. 2 credits per semester. Prerequisite: Machine Tool
Technology I. A continuation of Machine Tool Technology I, this course is for students with the aptitude and desire to
enter a metalworking career as an apprentice, entry-level technician, or is college oriented toward a manufacturing
degree. Course work will involve mastery of machine tool operation while producing precision tooling projects. The
programming and operation of CNC equipment will be emphasized.
42
HEALTH CARE COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY (21506): Grade Level: 11 – 12. Prerequisite: Orientation to
Health Occupations and Medical Terminology. This is a year-long course designed for students who wish to
further their education in the health sciences. Students will be introduced to a variety of skills that are vital to all
health sciences occupations. A strong focus on communication, technology, career development and
information literacy will prepare students to be strong candidates both for continuing education and
employment. Through this course students will examine topics relating to health informatics, customer service &
servant leadership, business communication, ethics, patient relations, healthcare career development, and media
& information literacy.
MEDICAL SCIENCE I (21500): Prerequisites:




Students must apply and complete an interview.
Must have a minimum grade of a "B" in core courses.
Limited absences and tardies from previous year.
The following medical requirements are necessary:
 Hepatitis B vaccine
 a two-step Mantoux tb test
 a physical
 influenza vaccine
 documentation of current immunization status
Students will need to provide their own uniform. This course is designed for juniors and/or seniors interested in a
health care career. The student spends 2 hours per day, five days a week, at Rockford Health System, learning a
core of knowledge and skills needed for many health care fields. Students will have the opportunity to shadow
various health care professionals such as physical therapists, nurses and x-ray technicians. Students will have the
opportunity to obtain Illinois Nurse Assistant Certification approved by the Illinois Department of Public Health.
In addition, safety, assessment (temperature, pulse, respiration and blood pressure), patient transport, personal
care techniques and other general health care skills are addressed.
43
Career & Technical Education
ORIENTATION TO HEALTH OCCUPATIONS AND MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (21509): Grade Level: 10–12. The
course will expose students to the variety of opportunities available within the health care industry (e.g., such as
nursing, therapy, vision and dental care, administrative services, and lab technology). The main purpose of this
course is to assist students in further development of their self -concept and in matching personal abilities and
interest to a tentative career choice. The course will provide in-depth information into health occupations
careers and trends, the occupational and educational opportunities and the educational, physical, emotional and
attitudinal requirements or working in health care. Students learn how to identify medical terms by analyzing
their components. These courses emphasize defining medical prefixes, root words, suffixes, and abbreviations.
The primary focus is on developing both oral and written skills in the language used to communicate within
health care professions.
Career & Technical Education
FRESHMAN SEMINAR (17204): Grade Level: 9. One semester. All freshmen will be placed in the Freshman
Seminar course. Students taking the Independent Study version of the course need to have reliable access to the
Internet and Microsoft Office Applications. Strong time management skills and self-determination are critical
attributes needed for successful completion of this course as Independent Study. In addition to independent and
online work, students will be required to attend routine meetings with the course instructor. Freshman Seminar
combines career exploration and development with special emphasis on success skills, communication skills,
critical thinking and problem solving skills, and personal qualities (responsibility, self-esteem, self-management,
and integrity).
FRESHMAN SEMINAR - INDEPENDENT STUDY (17205): Grade Level: 9. One semester. Freshman Seminar
combines career exploration and development with special emphasis on success skills, communication skills,
critical thinking and problem solving skills, and personal qualities (responsibility, self-esteem, self-management,
and integrity). Students taking the Independent Study version of the course need to have reliable access to the
Internet and Microsoft Office Applications. Strong time management skills and self-determination are critical
attributes needed for successful completion of this course as Independent Study. In addition to independent and
online work, students will be required to attend routine meetings with the course instructor.
INTERNSHIP (21139): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab fee required. 2 credits per semester. Suggested Prerequisite:
Business & Technology Concepts. This course allows students to experience the benefits of work training while
participating in a classroom with students in numerous other occupational areas. The teacher-coordinator and
training site sponsor develop unique training plans for students based on occupational goals while related
instruction is pertinent for all students enrolled in the class. This class will be offered the last or first two hours of
the day for ease of mainstreaming into industry.
44
CEANCI Dual Credit
Advance Now Program 2014-2015
Course taken at Rock Valley College
RVC
Credits
$0
Accounting – Tax Professional
ATG 110
ATG 110: Financial Accounting (4 Cr)
$15
ATG 120: Microcomputer Spreadsht Applns in Acctg (2 Cr)
ATG 218: Federal Income Tax (4 Cr)
Lab
Fees
ATG 120
12
$0
ATG 123: General Ledger Software Applications in
Accounting (2Cr)
ATG 111
Additional Student Fees:
$15
$850 Textbooks
ATG 123
$30
Automotive Service Technology – Year 1
ATM 105
(1 year program – courses taken in sequence)
ATM 105: Introduction to Brake and Chassis System (3 Cr)
$30
12
ATM 106
ATM 106: Intro to Auto Electrical System/Power Train (3 Cr)
$35
ATM 140: Engine Diagnosis and Repair (6 Cr)
ATM 140
Automotive Service Technology – Year 2
$30
(1 year program – courses taken in sequence)
ATM 107
ATM 107: Automotive Electronic Fundamentals (4 Cr)
ATM 114: Brakes (4 Cr)
$30
16
ATM 114
ATM 221: Steering and Suspension (4 Cr)
$30
Additional Student Fees:
ATM 221
$375 Textbooks
$20
Aviation Maintenance
(1 year program)
AVM 101: Materials and Processes (3Cr)
AVM 101
AVM 102: Basic Electricity (3Cr)
AVM 102
$20
AVM 105: Aircraft Drawing – Weight & Balance (3Cr)
AVM 248: Hydraulic & Pneumatic Cont. Sys. (3Cr)
AVM 250: Assembly & Rigging (3Cr)
$20
15
AVM 105
$20
Additional Student Fees:
AVM 248
$250 Textbooks
$1,228 Materials - purchased by CEANCI, students will use
$20
materials during the program at no cost
AVM 250
$0
Student Success
STU 100: Planning for Success (1Cr)
STU101: Career Planning (2Cr)
STU 100
3
$0
Students must take these courses once as a
component of most CEANCI programs.
STU 101
District 205 Course
56000U: Financial Accounting
1
56001U: Microcomputer Accounting
1
56002U: Managerial Accounting
1
56003U: Ledger Accounting
1
51010U: Automotive Suspension and
Brakes
1
51020U: Automotive Electrical System/
Powertrain
1
51021U: Automotive Engine Diagnosis
2
51000U: Automotive Engine
1
51022U: Automotive Electronics
1
51023U: Automotive Steering/
Suspension
1
57000U: Aviation Materials and Process
1
57006U: Aviation Electricity
1
57002U: Aviation Weight & Balance
1
57003U: Aviation Hydraulic & Pneumatic
1
#####U: Assembly & Rigging
1
#####U: Planning for Success
0.5
#####U: Career Planning
0.5
CEANCI Dual Credit course offerings and fees are subject to change.
Prices listed are estimates.
45
High
School
Credits
CEANCI Dual Credit
Advance Now Program 2014-2015
Course taken at Rock Valley College
RVC
Credits
Lab
Fees
District 205 Course
High
School
Credits
54000U: Emergency Medical Technician
2
55000U: Fire Protection and Tactics
1
55021U: Fire Protection
1
55020U: Rescue Practices
1
55022U: Fire Prevention Principles
1
50100U: Cert Nursing Assistant
2
50111U: Healthcare Terminology
1
50120U: Intro Human Biology
1
53200U: Manufacturing CAD & Print
Reading
1
53205U: Manufacturing Materials
1
53206U: Graphics / CAD II
1
53207U: CNC/CAM Operations I
1
Emergency Medical Technician Certificate
FRE 223: (1 year program)
$12.50
9
FRE 223
Additional Student Fees:
$162 Textbooks
$0
Foundations of Fire Service
FRE 101
(1 year program – courses taken in sequence)
$0
FRE 101: Intro to Fire Protection (3 Cr)
FRE 118
FRE 106: Rescue Practices (3 Cr)
FRE 118: Building Construction-Fire Protection (3 Cr)
12
FRE 208: Fire Prevention Principles (3 Cr)
$0
Additional Student Fees:
$366 Textbooks
FRE 106
$0
FRE 208
$350
NAD101
Health Occupations
NAD 101: Nursing Aide (7 Cr)
HLT 110: Medical Terminology (2Cr)
BIO 100: Introductory Human Biology (3Cr)
Additional Student Fees:
$215 BIO Textbook
$100 HLT Textbook
$0
12
HLT 110
$0
(Flu shot required)
BIO 100
Manufacturing Engineering Technology
$25
MET 100: Introductory CAD and Print Reading (3Cr)
MET 100
MET 133: Graphics/SolidWorks CAD I (3Cr)
MET 233: Graphics/SolidWorks CAD II (3Cr)
$30
18
MET 133
MET 226: CNC/CAM Operations I (3 Cr)
$30
MET 233
Additional Student Fees:
$486 Textbooks
$20
MET 226
CEANCI Dual Credit course offerings and fees are subject to change.
Prices listed are estimates.
46
CEANCI Dual Credit
Advance Now Program 2014-2015
Course taken at Rock Valley College
RVC
Credits
Lab Fees
$30
Web Design
WEB 101: Programming Related to the Internet (4Cr)
WEB 225: Digital Photography (3Cr)
WEB 102: Advanced Programming Related to
the Internet (4Cr)
WEB 111: Introduction to Multimedia (3Cr)
WEB 101
$30
WEB 225
14
$30
WEB 102
$30
Additional Student Fees:
$225 Textbooks
WEB 111
$60
Welding Technology – Year 1
(1 year program – courses taken in sequence)
WLD 100: Introduction to Welding (3Cr)
WLD 153: Arc Welding – Flat (3Cr)
WLD 100
6
$75
WLD 153
$75
Welding Technology – Year 2
(1 year program – courses taken in sequence)
WLD 155: Arc Welding – Horizontal (3 Cr)
WLD 157: M.I.G. Welding (3Cr)
WLD 155
6
$100
WLD 157
Student Success
$0
STU 100: Planning for Success (1Cr)
STU101: Career Planning (2Cr)
STU 100
3
$0
Students must take these courses once as
a component of most CEANCI programs.
STU 101
All RVC Students are also charged the following:
$3 student activity/credit hour
$7 technology fee/credit hour
$1 course fee/course
$2 registration fee/semester
47
District 205 Course
High
School
Credits
58000U: Programming Internet
1
58003U: Digital Phtography
1
58001U: Adv Programming Internet
1
58002U: Intro to Multimedia
1
53120U: Intro to Welding
1
53121U: Welding-Flat
1
53122U: Welding-Horizontal
1
53123U: Welding -M.I.G
1
#####U: Planning for Success
0.5
#####U: Career Planning
0.5
At Auburn High School
Students must participate in eligibility testing in order to attend the Renaissance Gifted Academy. The Renaissance
Academy defines itself by the core subjects taken by students. The smaller learning community that is Renaissance
consists of teachers in the four core subject areas, English, Mathematics, Science, and History and the Social Sciences.
Renaissance students take a four-year sequence of core courses that prepares them to be competitive at any college or
university of their choice.
Mirroring the intense, multifaceted, and nonconformist nature of giftedness, the Renaissance Academy sets forth a
qualitatively differentiated instructional program in content compacted and extended, in teaching strategies of exposition
and inquiry, in assessment balancing logical critique and open-ended creativity. Intellectual development is promoted
through planned activities, which include critical thinking skills, as well as skills that develop the capacity for analysis,
synthesis, and evaluation. It is designed for academically talented, highly motivated students who intend to pursue the
most rigorous, challenging educational programs beyond high school.
Electives may be chosen from Renaissance courses or any other elective offerings at Auburn High School.
Renaissance Academy
Gra
de
English/
Language Arts
Math
(varies due to
student MS
experiences)
Renaissance
Algebra
or
Renaissance
College Algebra
Science
Social Studies
Renaissance
Chemistry
or
Renaissance
Advanced Biology
AP US
Government &
Politics /
AP Comparative
Government &
Politics
AP World History
or
AP Human
Geography
9
Renaissance
English 9
10
Renaissance
English 10 AP
Literature &
Composition
Renaissance
Geometry
or
Renaissance
Trigonometry
Renaissance
Chemistry
or
AP Physics 1
Renaissance
English 11 AP
Language &
Composition
Renaissance
College Algebra
or
Renaissance
Trigonometry
or
AP Calculus AB
or
AP Statistics
AP Physics 1
or
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Physics 2
Renaissance
English 12
Renaissance
Trigonometry
or
AP Calculus AB
or
AP Calculus BC
or
AP Statistics
AP Biology
or
AP Chemistry
or
AP Physics 2
or
AP Physics C
11
12
Renaissance AP
US History
AP Macroeconomics / AP
Micro-economics
PE/ Health
Electives (to
meet
graduation
requirements)
Pathway
Courses
PE 9
Global
Fine Arts
CTE
Foreign
Languages
Renaissanc
e
Freshman
Seminar 1 semester
PE 10(Sem)/
Health (Sem)
Global
Fine Arts
CTE
Foreign
Languages
PE Elective
Global
Fine Arts
CTE
Foreign
Languages
BAMIT
CAPA
EMITT
HPS
HS
Renaissanc
e
Pathway
Elective
PE Elective
Global
Fine Arts
CTE
Foreign
Languages
Students
will
consult
the
Academies
Guide to
choose a
personal 3
-year
course
sequence
pathway.
* Courses are subject to change each year due to graduation requirements, increased offerings, curriculum changes, and student requests.*
48
College and Career Readiness
RENAISSANCE FRESHMAN SEMINAR (61900): One semester. All freshmen will be placed in the Freshman Seminar
course. An on-line version of the Freshman Seminar is available. Renaissance Freshman Seminar pairs an early, in
-depth college preparatory research project with the study skills necessary for success in the Renaissance Gifted
Academy, college, and post-collegiate endeavors. This course includes activities and intensive writing projects
designed to build scholarly success skills, communication skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills, and
personal qualities (responsibility, self-esteem, self-management, and integrity).
English
RENAISSANCE ENGLISH 9 (61001): Freshman Renaissance English furthers the development of the argumentative
writing and rhetorical analysis skills needed for high school and college preparation. This is a writing intensive
course. In addition, students will engage in discussion, analysis, and inquiry of speeches, art, music,
advertisement, short stories, plays, and novels from a range of regions, styles, and time periods. Students will be
introduced to a variety of analytical lenses in both rhetorical and literary fields. Critical thinking is an integral
component to the class discussions, essays, and creative presentation of works studied.
RENAISSANCE AP ENGLISH 11 LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (61007): Junior Renaissance Advanced Placement
English combines enough skill-building and practice to help the student to score successfully in the spring on the
Language and Composition Examination with the Academy emphasis upon both the acceleration and enrichment
suitable for the gifted student. Suitable to philosophical exploration, the course focuses on structures of thought
that lead to abstraction, with an emphasis in reading of non-fiction philosophy and theory. Literature is used
throughout the year as a means by which to practice theory-driven analysis and abstraction. Assessments vary
among shorter and longer written analytical arguments, group teaching of the class, reading quizzes, and creative
presentations. Emphasis falls upon the determinants of good writing, namely conscious control of sentence
structure, logical organizational flow, skillful enunciation of thesis position, and assemblage of rational, concrete
proof for the argumentative stance. Written assignments strive to be open-ended, allowing each student to locate
his own meaningful stance.
RENAISSANCE ENGLISH 12 (61030): Senior Renaissance English leads the student through a conceptual
recapitulation of his or her evolution through distinct stages of linguistic awareness in his or her past while it
concomitantly broadens and deepens skills in close reading of demanding works of prose and poetry and in
written responses to such works from personal, creative, and critical perspectives. The literary offerings allow for
class choice in addition to certain set pieces. A breadth of historical periods, genres, and individual authors of past
and contemporary merit are grounded in enriched supplementation from current related fields, such as fractal
geometry, particle physics, anthropology, psychology, philosophy, history, linguistic studies, etc. Assessments are
varied and open-ended, ranging from individual creative response to more structured writing and close reading.
Quality points will be assigned for this course.
49
Renaissance Academy
RENAISSANCE AP ENGLISH 10 LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (61004): Sophomore Renaissance Advanced
Placement English hones student argumentative writing and literary analysis skills in order to assist student
success in the spring on the Literature and Composition Examination. Students will engage in discussion, analysis,
and inquiry of literature written from 1865 to present from a variety of different genres, styles, and regions. New
Historicism will be applied to the reading of all literature with a particular emphasis on advanced close reading
skills. Assessments vary among shorter and longer written analytical arguments, reading quizzes, group essays,
creative presentations and retired AP Literature and Composition Examinations. Particular attention will be paid
to the development of individual student writing style through sentence patterns and combining; literary analysis
based on self-directed topics; and both formulaic and organic argumentative writing structures. Written
assignments will become increasingly open ended as the year progresses.
Math
RENAISSANCE ALGEBRA (61300): This course presents the fundamental concepts of algebra. Topics included are
integers, signed numbers, algebraic expression, radicals, first and second degree equations, inequalities,
polynomials, factoring, functions, graphing, and system of equations. This course addresses the needs of the
gifted students through problem solving strategies used in real life application. Successful completion of this
course will prepare students for the challenges of Renaissance Geometry.
RENAISSANCE GEOMETRY (61306): Prerequisite: Renaissance Algebra. This course is intended for students
interested in math related fields of study. This is a college preparatory course with emphasis on proof. The
purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for analyzing given data and
drawing conclusions from the data. Topics include geometric vocabulary, properties and relationships, realworld applications, deductive reasoning, coordinate geometry, and transformations. This course develops
problem solving skills as it incorporates geometric concepts such as lines, polygons, Pythagorean Theorem,
circles, area, volume, and constructions.
RENAISSANCE COLLEGE ALGEBRA (61303): Prerequisite: Algebra. This course develops the concept of functions
and its graph, inverse functions, exponential functions, and systems of linear equations as well as the matrix
methods to solve those systems. In addition, sequences and series, the binomial theorem, and mathematical
induction will be included to increase the problem solving capabilities of the academically gifted student.
Graphing calculators will be incorporated into classroom instruction to prepare students for the ACT/SAT exams.
RENAISSANCE TRIGONOMETRY (61309): Prerequisites: Renaissance Geometry and Renaissance College
Algebra. This is a college preparatory course. First semester Trigonometry emphasizes the 6 trigonometric
functions, including their graphs and inverses, the special right triangles, verification of identities, solving
trigonometric equations, and lastly, the law of Sines and the Law of Cosines. Second semester has a precalculus focus and emphasizes vectors, polar equations and graphs, logarithmic and exponential functions,
conics, and the introduction of beginning calculus limits and derivatives.
Renaissance Academy
AP CALCULUS AB (13436): Prerequisite: Trigonometry or Pre-Calculus. This is an advanced placement course in
calculus. Topics included are parametric and polar equations, analytic geometry of three dimensions, vectors,
partial derivatives, multiple integrals, vector calculus, and differential equations.
AP CALCULUS BC (13433): Prerequisite: Trigonometry or Pre-Calculus, or Teacher Recommendation. This is an
advanced placement course in calculus. Topics included are functions, limits, continuity, derivations,
applications of the derivative, integrals, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse functions, applications of
the definite integral, techniques of integration, and infinite series. At the end of this course students will be
encouraged to take the AP Calculus BC exam.
Science
RENAISSANCE ADVANCED BIOLOGY (61220): Grade Level 9. Prerequisite: Renaissance Biology 8. Students will
discover and understand many of the intriguing processes of living organisms. Students will take on the role of
scientific researcher as they design and perform experiments, collect and interpret data, and draw conclusions
based on hypotheses. The knowledge gained and the skills developed will then enable students to critically
analyze current scientific research that is discussed in the media. Content includes the characteristics of life,
organic chemistry functional groups and protein folding, cell biology with an emphasis on cellular respiration,
photosynthesis and cell signaling, cellular transport and division, plant structure and processes with an
emphasis on reproduction and hormones, DNA/RNA/protein synthesis/biotechnology, genetics and
reproduction, evolution with an emphasis on molecular evidence, and the relationship of structure to function
and physiological connections in the human body.
50
RENAISSANCE CHEMISTRY (61206): Renaissance Chemistry examines the building blocks of all matter through
following modern atomic theory. This course is inquiry and lab intensive. This course uses the periodic table to
help simplify the study of elements by grouping those that have common reactions. Writing formulas for
compounds, equations for reactions and stoichiometric relationships (using equations) are key components of this
course. Topics of discussion include energy changes for phase changes, chemical reactions, and nuclear reactions;
acid-base reactions, equilibrium, and reaction rates are analyzed as well. Deductive and inductive reasoning,
problem solving methods, and higher levels of thought are all used extensively in this study.
AP PHYSICS 1 (14415): Prerequisites: Chemistry, Algebra and Geometry. Concurrent enrollment in Trigonometry
is recommended. This course is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The
course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and
power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. Course skills include using
representations and models to solve scientific problems, applying mathematics to science phenomena, engaging
in scientific questioning, planning and implementing data collection and analysis, and connecting and relating
knowledge across scales, concepts, representations, and domains. Students will prepare for the AP Physics 1 exam
at the conclusion of the course.
Social Sciences and History
AP WORLD HISTORY (12116): Grade level: 10. This course is offered to Renaissance sophomores who are ready
for the rigor and accelerated pace of a college level history course. The curriculum is aligned with College Board
standards and is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge to deal critically with
world problems. Societies will be compared with an emphasis on the larger processes affecting societies and
civilizations, and key time periods will be examined. Students will prepare for the AP World History exam at the
conclusion of the course.
AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (12212): Grade level: 9. One semester. This college preparatory
government course will examine the theoretical and practical purpose of Democracy in society. This course
introduces and analyzes various groups, beliefs, and ideas as a method for understanding the United States
Constitution. Students will study the major branches of the government, the legislative, executive, and judicial, in
preparation for the AP exam.
AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (12215): Grade Level: 9. One semester. The AP course in
Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to
study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich
diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, explain differences in processes and policy
outcomes, and communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes.
51
Renaissance Academy
AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (12106): Grade Level: 10-12. The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to
introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use,
and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human
social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers
use in their science and practice. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
RENAISSANCE AP U.S. HISTORY (61126): The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the
analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history.
The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them
equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical
materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the
evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course thus develops the
skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and
evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
AP MACROECONOMICS (12231): One semester. This college preparatory economics course emphasizes a
macroeconomics approach that gives students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that
apply to an economic system as a whole. The study includes national incomes and price determinations along
with money and banking, public finance, and international economics. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
AP MICROECONOMICS (12230): One semester. The purpose of a course in micro economics is to give students
a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that applies to the functions of individual decision
maker, both consumers and producers. It places primary emphasis on the nature and function of product
markets, and includes the study of factor markets and the role of government. Students will prepare for the AP
exam.
Renaissance Academy Electives
College and Career Readiness
RENAISSANCE SENIOR SEMINAR (81403): Grade 12. This elective course is designed to give Renaissance
students university-level experience in independent study, primary and secondary research, seminars on a
variety of research-related topics, and the development and presentation of an original document. The Senior
Seminar follows the dissertation process.
Renaissance Academy
English
RENAISSANCE CREATIVE WRITING (61013): Grade Level 9. One semester. This course is structured as a
writing workshop. Students will engage in writing short fiction using classic and modern literary models. This
course focuses on structural, stylistic, and creative topics during the production and editing of student-directed
fiction. Students will learn to use language as an instrument to express their unique and individual voices.
Students will become more critical readers as they learn how to critique others’ work and accept critiques of
their own work.
RENAISSANCE CREATIVE WRITING (61023): Grade Level 10-12. This full-year course is structured as a writing
workshop to strengthen students’ writing skills and understanding of various creative genres. Students will
engage in writing short and longer fiction pieces, using classic and modern literary models. This course focuses
on structural, stylistic, and creative topics during the production and editing of student-directed fiction.
Students will learn techniques necessary for longer pieces of writing: planning, maintaining cohesiveness and
fluidity, developing dynamic story arcs and characters, using a repetition of symbols, and layering complex
plots and themes. Students will improve their use of language as an instrument to express their unique and
individual voices. It will also demand of students a great deal of writing and editing, mirroring the rigorous,
college-level learning for students in the Renaissance Program.
52
RENAISSANCE SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS (61014): One semester. This elective course is designed to provide
students with the valuable tool of successful oral expression. Not only does the possession of this skill provide the
student with an improved means of communication that will be useful in both professional and personal lives, but
also in developing the confidence that will enable the student to present himself/herself successfully. Students
will develop listening skills as well as speaking skills in the area of debate, impromptu, informational, persuasive,
demonstration speeches and oral interpretation.
Math
AP STATISTICS (13426): This course is designed to provide students with a learning experience equivalent to an
introductory college in statistics. This course is intended for students interested in fields of social sciences, health
sciences, and business. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for
collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. The major themes include: explorations for data,
sampling and experimentations, applying probability, anticipating patterns and statistical inference. Students will
be required to complete a final project in which they incorporate all major concepts of statistics. Students will
prepare for the AP exam.
AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (13440): Lab fee required. This is a college level course in computer science. This
course introduces the student to JAVA software development. Students will write platform-independent, object
oriented code for conventional Internet- and Intranet-based applications. Topics covered include graphical user
interface (GUI) development, multimedia (images, animation, and audio); graphic strings, exception and security;
application portability. A number of programming assignments will be given to enable the student to build realworld JAVA applications. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
Science
AP CHEMISTRY (14306): Lab Fee $5.00. AP Chemistry is a college chemistry lecture and lab class. The
presentation follows modern quantum mechanical theory. Students will write formulas for compounds, equations
for reactions, and stoichiometric relationships equations. Students will analyze thermodynamic changes including
enthalpy changes, entropy changes, and Gibbs free energy changes. The will also study acid/base reactions,
equilibrium, reactions kinetics, coordination compounds, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Students will prepare
for the AP exam.
AP PHYSICS 2 (14418): Prerequisites: Chemistry, Physics 1, Algebra and Geometry. This course is the equivalent to
a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics; thermodynamics;
electricity and magnetism; optics; atomic and nuclear physics. Course skills include using representations and
models to solve scientific problems, applying mathematics to science phenomena, engaging in scientific
questioning, planning and implementing data collection and analysis, and connecting and relating knowledge
across scales, concepts, representations, and domains. Students will prepare for the AP Physics 2 exam at the
conclusion of the course.
53
Renaissance Academy
AP BIOLOGY (14206): Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry. Lab Fee $5.00. This is a course for students interested in a
college equivalent Biology course. This course follows the Advanced Placement (AP) curriculum. Topics addressed
in depth include biological systems and interactions, life processes, cell processes, energy and metabolism,
heredity and genetics, ecology, and evolution. Laboratory work and inquiry are significant parts of this course.
Students who successfully pass the AP Biology proficiency exam may receive college credit for Biology.
AP PHYSICS C (14406): Prerequisites: Chemistry and Physics or AP Physics 1. Concurrent enrollment in AP
Calculus AB is recommended. This is a rigorous, calculus based physics course designed by the College Board.
Two major topics, Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism, are covered. Students will prepare for both AP
Physics C exams: Mechanics and Electricity and Magnetism.
AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (14510): The AP Environmental Science course is designed to be the equivalent
of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science that will be taught as a year-long high
school class. The AP Environmental Science course has been developed to enable students to undertake a more
advanced study of topics in environmental science. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (14312): One semester. Grade Level: 11-12. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry. This
course introduces students to various basic techniques and fundamentals in organic chemistry. Topics covered
include nomenclature, structure and bonding, and reactions of hydrocarbons with important classes of natural
and synthetic organic compounds. Offered in conjunction with Microbiology.
MICROBIOLOGY (14209): One semester. Grade Level: 11-12. Prerequisites: Biology and Chemistry. This course
introduces students to various basic techniques and fundamentals in the field of microbiology. Topics covered
include microbial metabolism, proper sterilization processes, bacterial growth, and analysis of populations’
cultures. Students will apply microbiological concepts in laboratory experiments and develop appropriate
aseptic techniques needed to work in clinical environments. Offered in conjunction with Organic Chemistry.
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY (14603): This course is focused on the structure and function of the human body.
This course covers levels of organization; support and movement; integration, coordination, and control;
transport; maintenance; and the human life cycle. This is a laboratory course designed especially for students
interested in medical fields.
Renaissance Academy
Social Sciences and History
RENAISSANCE WORLD AFFAIRS (61103): Grade level: 9. One semester. Students will research current global
issues, e.g. Endangered Cultures, Global Climate Change, Integration and Multiculturalism, etc. They will read
scholarly journals that reflect on world problems and offer possible solutions. They will take their research and
begin to piece together a cross-curricular picture of the problem through gathering research, cultural
documents (literature, art, speeches, videos, etc). This entire process emulates real-world problem solving by
asking students to determine what information is necessary to fully understand the problem, evaluate potential
solutions, and seek total understanding of a dynamic world issue that directly and indirectly impacts their lives.
Because of the breadth of the materials they will be analyzing, students will read a wide array of materials, write
in multiple modes and with multiple purposes, and think critically about a wide array of topics.
AP EUROPEAN HISTORY (12310): Prerequisite: World History. This is a college level introductory elective course
into modern European history that examines the major events, trends, ideologies, philosophies, and chronology
from 1450 to the present. Students will examine themes in history and interrelated categories (political,
diplomatic, intellectual, cultural, social and economic) as they investigate, using primary and secondary sources,
the elites with the experiences of ordinary people. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
AP PSYCHOLOGY (12406): Advanced Placement Psychology is designed as a college-level class to introduce
students to the systematic and scientific study of the human behavior and mental processes. This course will
help develop independent and critical thinking skills and prepare students for the AP exam. The core concepts
and theories of psychology are explored from a variety of theoretical approaches including the biological,
behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and socio-cultural perspectives. Students are exposed to
facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology. Students will
prepare for the AP exam.
54
INTRODUCTION TO CAPA THEATRE (62100): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite:
CAPA student. An intense immersion into the art form of Theatre. Students
will be expected to hone performing as well as basic technical skills. Portfolio
work, terminology and theatre history will be included. Students will learn the basic
techniques of good critique, and will learn shop safety. Students are required to participate in
a theatre production, and must attend all major Auburn Theatre productions. In addition; 15 CREW
HOURS PER SEMESTER ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE.
CAPA BASIC ACTING STYLES (62103): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student, Introduction to Theatre, or
Drama 1-2 and consent of instructor. Students will focus on developing professional attitudes, continue portfolio
work, create a resume, and study theatre history. Students are required to audition for all theatre productions.
Specialized acting vocabulary, formalized critique formats, and the study of the proscenium stage will be
highlighted. Students are required to audition and participate in the One-Acts, and must attend all major Auburn
Theatre productions. In addition; 20 CREW HOURS PER SEMESTER ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE.
CAPA ADVANCED THEATRE SEMINAR (62109): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student, Basic Acting Styles or
Advanced Technical Theatre, and consent of instructor. Focus is on collaboration, non-proscenium staging,
directing techniques, and exhibiting professional attitudes. Students will collaborate on an original/major
production as well as polish their resumes, which will include a videotaped portion of the individuals work.
Individuals are required to audition and participate in the One-Acts, and must attend all major Auburn Theatre
productions. Senior level students must be prepared to submit their resume and audition at the Illinois High
School Theatre Festival. Additional Crew hours per semester are required.
CAPA MEDIA PRODUCTION II (62121): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Passing 2nd year media class and
recommendation of teacher. A continuation of training with an emphasis on placement in the professional
community through internships. The focus of instruction will be on the development of training and industrial
films. 15 AFTER SCHOOL STUDIO HOURS REQUIRED.
CAPA TECHNICAL THEATRE AND SCENIC DESIGN (62106): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student.
Introduction to Theatre or Technical Theatre 1-2 and consent of instructor. Students will learn construction and
drafting techniques. They will demonstrate proficiency in basic lighting, painting, scenic design, critique forms,
construction methods, crew management and shop safety. Scenic design for the non-proscenium stage, nonrealistic styles and multi-set shows will also be covered as well as theatre history, resumes and student portfolios.
Each student will be required to perform in at least one production crew per semester. Senior level students must
be prepared to submit their resume and audition at the Illinois High School Theatre Festival. Students must attend
all major Auburn Theatre productions and work 25 crew hours per semester.
CAPA ADVANCED TECHNICAL THEATER (62150): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA Student. Technical Theater
and Scenic Design. This course is a progressive, advance course introducing students to the theory of theater
technology. It includes participation in construction, mounting, and running of school productions. Twenty hours
outside of class time are required. Can be repeated.
55
CAPA Academy
MEDIA & THEATRE ARTS
CAPA Academy
VISUAL ARTS
CAPA INTRO TO ART & DESIGN (62255): Grade Level: 9. One semester. Lab Fee:
$15.00. This course emphasizes developing creative ideas and problem-solving skills
while providing students with an introduction to the visual arts. This class will give
students the foundation necessary to expand into more specialized art areas. The
studio activities will focus on design and composition while developing skills and an
understanding of drawing, painting, sculpture, and computer imaging. Students will
explore a variety of media and techniques as well as deepen their appreciation of art
making through a global and historical perspective. Units are constructed to engage
student learners while helping them see, analyze, create, understand, and articulate their experiences of the
visual world.
CAPA STUDIO ART FOUNDATIONS (62200): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student. This
class provides a basic foundation of art concepts experimenting with design, a variety of 2 and 3 D media, and a
focus on art history. The student will learn technical skills in a variety of styles and approaches while also being
able to creatively express him or herself. The need to develop good studio habits and art vocabulary are valued
as basis for following levels.
CAPA STUDIO ART 1 (62203): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student. Portfolio review
and consent of instructor. This class provides a basic foundation of art concepts experimenting with design, a
variety of 2 and 3D media, and a focus on art history. The student will learn technical skills in a variety of styles
and approaches while they explore their creative process. This class will also explore multi-media combinations
as well as contrasting concepts of realism, distortion, and abstraction. Careers applied in the visual arts are
explored. Further development of good studio habits and art vocabulary are stressed with culmination to the
critiquing process.
CAPA INTRO TO GRAPHIC DESIGN (62256): Grade Level: 9. One semester. Lab Fee: $25.00. This course is an
overview introducing students to simple image manipulation on the computer. The class will cover the history of
computer graphics and teach industry standard software and procedures. Studio and digital projects will allow
students to learn the elements and principles of art as a basis for good design.
CAPA GRAPHIC ART & DESIGN (62209): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student, Studio Art Foundations or
Intro to Graphic Design, or consent of instructor. This course explores how technology can be used in creating
photo-edited images. Students will learn design and composition concepts by using industry standard software,
Photoshop, Illustrator and Quark Express. The students will be introduced to commercial art production and
graphic art design. This course will also focus on the principles of basic design used in advertising and marketing.
Students will master design principles regarding typography, color, special effects, video editing and
informational graphics. Fine art principles and elements will be incorporated throughout the graphic design
process.
CAPA 2-D STUDIO ART II (62206): Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student, Studio Art I.
This class provides a unique opportunity for cross-integration of learning experiences, varying from teacherguided projects to individualized self-directed projects. Continued attention is emphasized on; studio practice,
critiquing skills, and knowledge of art history. Inquiry and presentation provide an avenue for honing verbal
communication skills. Professional craftsmanship and presentation of finished work are stressed. Portfolio
development for college/scholarship application and career pursuit are encouraged.
56
CAPA 3-D STUDIO ART I (62232): Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student, Studio Art
Foundations. A variety of methods of working with sculpture will be explored. Projects will emphasize problem
solving, experimentation, expression, craftsmanship and originality. Historical, contemporary and cultural
examples are studied.
CAPA 3-D STUDIO ART II (62235): Grade Level: 11–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student, 3-D Studio Art
-I. This is a third year course for the serious art student. It provides the opportunity for more in-depth study and
experimental approaches to 3-dimensional forms. An additional expense is required for displaying sculptures for
portfolio presentation and exhibition.
AP STUDIO ART: DRAWING (15141): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: 2-D Studio Art II. AP Studio Art: Drawing is
designed to address drawing issues and media. This course promotes the investigation of all three aspects of
portfolio development – quality, concentration, and breadth. The AP portfolio’s three-section structure requires
the student to show mastery in concept, composition, and execution of drawing. The AP Studio Art program sets
a national standard for performance in the visual arts. Students enrolled in AP Studio Art: Drawing must take the
AP exam which is a performance based exam rather than a written exam requiring the submission of a digital
portfolio for evaluation. Students who successfully pass the AP Studio Art review may receive college credit. An
additional expense is required for matting artwork for portfolio presentation and exhibition.
AP STUDIO ART: 2-D DESIGN (15144): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: 2-D Studio Art II. The AP Studio Art: 2-D
Design course is designed to address two-dimensional (2-D) design issues and media. This course promotes the
investigation of all three aspects of portfolio development -- quality, concentration, and breadth. The AP
portfolio’s three-section structure requires the student to show mastery in concept, composition, and execution
of 2-D design through any two-dimensional medium or process, including, but not limited to, graphic design,
digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting, and printmaking. The AP Studio
Art program sets a national standard for performance in the visual arts. Students enrolled in AP Studio Art: 2-D
Design must take the AP exam which is a performance-based exam rather than a written exam requiring the
submission of a digital portfolio for evaluation. Students who successfully pass the AP Studio Art review may
receive college credit. An additional expense is required for matting artwork for portfolio presentation and
exhibition.
AP STUDIO ART: 3-D DESIGN (15147): Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: 3-D Studio Art I. AP Studio Art: 3-D Design is
designed to address sculptural issues and media. Design involves purposeful decision making about using the
elements and principles of art in an integrative way. This course promotes the investigation of all three aspects of
portfolio development -- quality, concentration, and breadth. The AP portfolio’s three-section structure requires
the student to demonstrate mastery in concept, composition, and execution of 3-D design through any threedimensional approach. The AP Studio Art program sets a national standard for performance in the visual arts.
Students enrolled in AP Studio Art:3-D Design must take the AP exam which is a performance-based exam rather
than a written exam requiring the submission of a digital portfolio for evaluation. Students who successfully pass
the AP Studio Art review may receive college credit. An additional expense is required for preparing and
presenting artwork for exhibition.
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CAPA Academy
CAPA 2-D STUDIO ART III (62215): Grade Level: 12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student, Studio Art-I or
consent of instructor. This course requires portfolio development. A portfolio is a presentation of a body of art
work with consistent quality, related themes, and demonstrates independent work ethic and craftsmanship
representing a wide range of media. This course is for those students interested in college, art school, or visual art
employment. An additional expense is required for matting artwork for portfolio presentation and exhibition.
CAPA Academy
VOCAL MUSIC
CAPA CHORUS (62306): Grade Level: 9. Lab Fee: $25.00. This mixed choir course is designed to develop the
choral skills of the beginning yet serious high school singer. Students will perform quality literature representing
all time periods, genres, and languages of choral music. The emphasis of this performance based choir will be
placed on vocal production, sight reading, and aural skills. Chorus may only be taken once. Mandatory outside of
class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
CAPA TREBLE CHOIR (62309): Grade level: 9-10. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student and audition. This
course is a women’s choir with a high level of proficiency and commitment. Student will learn proper singing
techniques. Each student will learn, study and perform a variety of vocal music including examples from the
various stylistic periods of music. Strong emphasis will be placed on independent musicianship, analysis of text,
and interpretation. Students may enroll in this course for more than one year but may also audition for CAPA
Concert Chorale or CAPA Chamber Singers. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the
assessment for this class.
CAPA CHAMBER SINGERS (62300): Grade Level 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student and audition.
This ensemble will be to become familiar with a variety of advanced choral literature including but not restricted
to English part song, Madrigals, Swing and genres of the Jazz idiom. Strong emphasis will be placed on
independent musicianship, analysis of text, and interpretation. Students will be required to prepare solo pieces as
well as perform in various small group ensembles for public and school performance. Extracurricular small group
instruction may be offered weekly. Students may enroll in this course for more than one year. Mandatory outside
of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
CAPA CONCERT CHORUS (62303): Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA Student. This course is
designed to fully develop the choral musicianship skills of the advanced high school singer. This mixed choir will
develop skills taught in beginning and/or treble choral study. Students will perform quality literature representing
all time periods, genres, and languages of choral music. Strong emphasis will be placed on independent
musicianship, analysis of text, and interpretation. Students may enroll in Concert Chorus for more than one year.
Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
CAPA MUSIC APPRECIATION/HISTORY (62250): Grade Level: 10-12. One semester. Lab Fee: $15.00. Prerequisite:
prior musical experience. This course is designed to investigate the cultural impact music has had on society over
time. The course will look at ancient through contemporary music examples to distinguish the relevance and
connections to cultural and historical aspects of each time period.
AP MUSIC THEORY (15228): Grade Level: 10-12. One semester. Lab fee $15.00. Prerequisite: prior musical
experience. A course for students interested in an introduction to a college Music Theory course. This course
follows a similar outline to the Advanced Placement (AP) curriculum. Topics addressed in depth include
musicianship, theory, musical materials, and procedures.
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CAPA ADVANCED JAZZ ENSEMBLE (62503): Grade Level: 9-12. Activity Fee: $25.00. Rental Fee: $30.00
instrument rental. Prerequisite: CAPA student, Jazz Ensemble and/or the consent of instructor, must be a member
of another band. This class will require students to have a working knowledge of the jazz idiom and a basic
knowledge of improvisation and sight reading skills. Advanced Jazz band will study in-depth jazz styles and theory
and composition. Students may enroll in this course for more than one year. This group will perform at various
school and community functions. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for
this class.
CAPA CONCERT BAND (62403): Band Fee: $25.00. Rental Fee: $30.00 instrument rental. Prerequisite: CAPA
Student. Audition. Concert Band is made up of seniors, juniors sophomores enrolled in band. The material
performed varies from marches to popular to classical. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of
the assessment for this class, such as marching at home football games, Labor Day Parade, and playing at home
basketball games.
CAPA ADVANCED WIND ENSEMBLE (62409): Band Fee: $25.00. Rental Fee: $30.00 instrument rental.
Prerequisite: CAPA Student. Audition. Advanced Wind Ensemble is made up of all qualified juniors and seniors in
the band program. The repertoire material will be advanced. Students may enroll in this course for more than one
year. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class, such as marching at
home football games, Labor Day Parade, and playing at home basketball games.
GENERAL MUSIC
CAPA PIANO KEYBOARD LAB (62600): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA Student. Audition.
This is an advanced piano class where students work individually on their own keyboards. Students will improve
reading, technical, and performance skills on the keyboard. Advanced skills will be emphasized including all major
and minor scales, arpeggios, improvisation, and more advanced music theory. Students will also work on their own
compositions with music technology. Participants are expected to perform as an individual and an ensemble
throughout the year at various school and community events.
CAPA ADVANCED PIANO KEYBOARD LAB (62603): Grade Level: 9-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student
and audition. This is an advanced piano class where students work individually on their own keyboards. Students
will improve reading, technical, and performance skills on the keyboard. Advanced skills will be emphasized
including all scales, arpeggios, improvisation, sight-reading, ensemble playing, and advanced music theory.
Students will also work on their own compositions with music technology. Participants are expected to perform as
an individual and an ensemble throughout the year at various school and community events.
CAPA MUSIC COMPOSITION LAB (62606): Grade Level: 10-12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA Student. Piano
Keyboard Lab. This course is designed for students with an intermediate knowledge of music and is interested in
arranging and composing their own pieces. Composition will be created through the use of a technology lab and
utilizing software and online resources to assist in the development of student musical arrangements and
compositions.
STRINGS
CAPA STRING ENSEMBLE (62700): Lab Fee: $25.00. Rental Fee: $30.00 instrument rental. Prerequisite: CAPA
student, audition and some previous experience in a string instrument. This course will primarily be students
looking to develop their technical proficiency and musical knowledge. This year string training will enable students
to advance in their skills. Students will be assigned small ensembles (i.e., trios, quartets) to rehearse in class.
Students may enroll in this course for more than one year. These ensembles will have opportunities to perform at
special events at Auburn High School, District 205 and the community. Mandatory outside of class time
performances are part of the assessment for this class.
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CAPA Academy
INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC
CAPA Academy
CAPA SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA (62703): Activity Fee: $25.00. Rental Fee: $30.00 instrument rental. Prerequisite:
CAPA students, audition. This course is an advanced group of musicians who work on techniques, literature, and
performance. The music studied advances performance skills and covers all periods and styles. Concerts will
include playing full orchestra music including wind, brass, and percussion players. This class is offered for
students who are interested in performing advanced orchestral literature. There will be several concerts
throughout the year where students are expected to participate where performance is part of the assessment for
the class. Students are also encouraged to participate in statewide festivals and competitions. Students will be
assigned small ensembles to rehearse in class. These ensembles will have opportunities to perform at special
events at Auburn High School, District 205 and the community. Students may enroll in this course for more than
one year.
DANCE
BEGINNING CAPA DANCE (62800): Prerequisite: CAPA student. Students begin with the essentials of technique
that combine and isolate movements in simple coordination. This course provides an introduction to all major
dance techniques; through each style, students will accomplish a better sense of musicality and the ability to
perform with others in unison or canon using spatial clarity. Overall, levels of strength flexibility and endurance
will develop through the understanding of a detailed movement vocabulary. Mandatory outside of class time
performances are part of the assessment for this class.
INTERMEDIATE CAPA DANCE (62803): Prerequisite: Beginning CAPA Dance. In this level, students will deepen
their overall technical strength by practicing and improving their precision and clarity of movement. Technical
exploration will become more specific to certain styles of dance including a look at cultural styles of movement.
Within the teacher’s framework, students will structure phrases & sections of dance while analyzing aesthetic
principles of movement. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
ADVANCED CAPA DANCE (62809): Prerequisite: CAPA student, Intermediate CAPA Dance. Students will begin to
find a mastery of specific technical goals; students will analyze how different art forms will combine to create an
interdisciplinary work. They will also learn the importance of recording processes of composition through
journaling and other written forms. This level of dance focuses on the improvement of movement patterns in
relation to spatial elements. Students will examine potential careers in the arts and in dance related fields.
Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
CAPA HISTORY AND CHOREOGRAPHY OF DANCE (62816): Prerequisite: CAPA student. This course is for the
dance and theatre student who seeks an in-depth look at dance history and a greater opportunity to develop his
or her role as a choreographer. Students will learn to connect individual dancers and choreographers to
movement trends and periods of dance history, as well as examine cultural dance. This course will allow students
to experience a deeper awareness of the structuring of dances for musical theatre. It will also provide students
the forum in which they can make artistic decisions regarding accompaniment, theatrical sets, lighting and
costumes. Mandatory outside of class time performances are part of the assessment for this class.
INTERNSHIPS
THEATER (62112)
VISUAL ARTS (62120) MUSIC (62130)
DANCE (62140) MEDIA PRODUCTION (62143)
Lab Fee for each course: $25.00. Prerequisite: CAPA student in any of the arts disciplines- Dance, Music, Theater,
Media Production, or Visual Arts. Any three CAPA courses and instructors consent. Intended as an upper-level
CAPA offering for students from all arts disciplines. This unique offering will give students the opportunity to
collaborate as an interdisciplinary team and create new forms of artistic expression. The second major thread
involves placing individual students out in the community as resource artists. Emphasis will be on how the
different art forms are interdependent and active participation in the community. Outside hours working on class
projects will be required.
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Special Education Career & Technical
Education Training and Placement Programs
COURSES/TRAINING
Special Education CTE Courses: Students are recommended for, and enrolled in, a Special Education CTE program
at the annual I.E.P. conference. They are bused to various school and community sites to attend a special education
CTE class for 2 hours per day (2 credits per semester) where they receive training in one of the following areas:
ORIENTATION TO FOODS 1 (20100): This course introduces careers in food service and the employability skills
which are needed for successful employment in this field. Safety, health, nutrition, and sanitation principles are
introduced. Location: River Bluff. Section 1 A.M. Section 2 Midday.
ORIENTATION TO FOODS 2 - ON THE JOB TRAINING (20100): This course is a continuation of Orientation to Foods
I. Simple food preparation is used to instruct students in measurement, following a recipe, serving, and clean-up.
Included is the proper use and cleaning of equipment, safety practices, and food storage. Location: River Bluff.
Section 1 A.M. Section 2 Midday.
ORIENTATION TO FOODS 3 20103): Students complete an interview with the instructor and tour of Hoffman
House prior to course registration. HOFFMAN HOUSE - Section 1 A.M. Section 2 P.M.
ORIENTATION TO FOODS 4 - ON THE JOB TRAINING (20106): Students complete an interview with the instructor
and tour of Hoffman House prior to course registration. HOFFMAN HOUSE - Section 1 A.M. Section 2 P.M.
MACHINE OPERATOR 1 (20200): This course is a general overview in the use of standard machines such as the drill
press, lathe, surface grinder, mill, band saw, and metal fabricating machine. The student will also receive
instruction in small engine repair and the use of hand tools. ROOSEVELT - Section 1 A.M., Section 2 P.M.
ORIENTATION TO SERVICE OCCUPATIONS (20300): Provides students with training and work experience in day
care centers (AM sessions) and nursing homes (PM sessions). Roosevelt, Section 1 A.M., Section 2 P.M.
GENERAL ORIENTATION TO VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 1 (20400): Students explore a wide range of career
opportunities in a variety of vocational fields as they relate to their interests and abilities. WILSON ASPIRE,
AUBURN, EAST, GUILFORD, JEFFERSON, ROOSEVELT
GENERAL ORIENTATION TO VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 2 (20403): This course is designed to expand on the skills
learned in General Orientation to Vocational Education 1. Students will have the opportunity to increase skill levels.
WILSON ASPIRE, AUBURN, EAST, GUILFORD, JEFFERSON, ROOSEVELT
ORIENTATION TO AUTO SERVICE I (20500): This course is designed to allow students to learn and perform various
auto service tasks which can lead to employment in a variety of auto service related careers. ROOSEVELT - Section
1 A.M., Section 2 P.M.
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Special Education
MACHINE OPERATOR 2 (20203): Prerequisite: Referral of 20200 instructor. Use of machines in an industrial
setting at Rockford Spring. Students complete an interview and tour of Rockford Spring prior to Course
registration. Location: ROOSEVELT - Section 1 A.M.
ORIENTATION TO GENERAL MAINTENANCE 1 (20600): This course will provide the student with an introduction
to building operations, safety procedures, proper cleaning of a building, proper use and maintenance of cleaning
equipment and proper use of commercial cleaning agents. ALANO CLUB - Section 2 P.M.
ORIENTATION TO GENERAL MAINTENANCE 2 - ON THE JOB TRAINING (20700): This course provides the student
with an introduction to basic grounds care, safety procedures, identification, proper use and maintenance of
equipment, as well as continuation of proper cleaning of a building. RIVERFRONT MUSEUM PARK – DISCOVERY
CENTER- Section 1 A.M.
INSTITUTIONAL AND HOME MANAGEMENT (20800): This course includes an overview of housekeeping
occupations and workshop skills. It emphasizes procedures for cleaning the floors, walls, furniture, and a variety of
surfaces in homes and businesses. Special attention given to social and work behaviors. KEN-ROCK COMMUNITY
CENTER Section 1 A.M. Section 2 Midday.
SPECIAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION COOP (20900): . Special Education Cooperative Education provides an
opportunity for students to develop marketable skills and knowledge in an occupation while working on the job.
Work activities designed and supervised by both the employer and the instructor assist the student in developing
marketable skills and work attitudes. AUBURN, EAST, GUILFORD, JEFFERSON, ROOSEVELT, WILSON ASPIRE
COMMUNITY UTILIZATION TRAINING (20404): Community Utilization Training is a team taught, multi-site class.
The class consists of traditional classroom experiences, “on the job” experiences that are provided through
cooperation with private sector entrepreneurs, and assignment of some students to satellite classrooms as
teacher’s helpers in elementary schools in the Rockford School District. EAST, GUILFORD
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION/CONSTRUCTION (21426): The construction classes meet for two (2) hours a day and
are generally held off school grounds at various work sites. The students are transported by bus to the work site.
There they learn skills of painting, carpentry, plumbing, electricity, roofing, dry walling, landscaping, gutters and
siding. EAST
Special Education
JOB PLACEMENT
The overall goal of the training programs is to assist the student in developing work skills and behaviors
appropriate for entry level positions. Two job placement coordinators are responsible for counseling, teaching job
related life skills, developing and supervising job placements, and providing job coaching when needed. The
placement programs are funded through a yearly Job Training Partnership Act Grant from the Rock River Private
Industry Council and through the Department of Rehabilitation Services.
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Roosevelt Alternative High School
ENGLISH 9: This is a writing-intensive course designed to develop students’ skills in critical reading and writing,
speaking, and listening. The course is standards-based and thematically organized around a variety of texts –
print and non-print, fiction and nonfiction. Within each unit, students will participate in full-class studies of core
works in addition to opportunities for small group and independent study. Writing instruction will build
foundational skills in argumentation in addition to source-based writing, grammar, mechanics, style, and usage.
Instruction in critical reading will include strategies to engage with text.
ENGLISH 10: This is a writing-intensive course designed to build on students’ skills in critical reading and
writing, speaking, and listening. The course is standards-based and thematically organized around a variety of
texts – print and non-print, fiction and nonfiction. Within each unit, students will participate in full-class studies
of core works in addition to opportunities for small group and independent study. Writing instruction will
continue to focus on skills in argumentation in addition to source-based writing, grammar, and usage; students
will begin to engage in rhetorical analysis and synthesis. Instruction in critical reading will include strategies to
engage with text.
ENGLISH 11:This writing-intensive, standards-based course is a study of the American experience, spanning
from the colonial period to the present. In addition to developing an appreciation for our literary heritage and
understanding our relationship to American history and culture, students will implement critical reading
strategies to engage with increasingly complex texts – both print and non-print, fiction and nonfiction. Students
will also learn to write increasingly sophisticated arguments and informational essays, in addition to furthering
their study of language and usage, speaking and listening, and research.
ENGLISH 12: This writing-intensive course is
a study of classic and contemporary
literature. In addition to developing an
appreciation for a variety of cultures,
students will implement critical reading
strategies to engage with increasingly
complex texts – both print and non-print,
fiction and nonfiction. Students will also
learn to write increasingly sophisticated
arguments and informational essays, in
addition to furthering their study of
language and usage, speaking and listening,
and research.
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Roosevelt Alternative High School
ENGLISH Required Classes
ENGLISH Elective Classes
ADVENTURES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: This is a junior/senior elective that focuses on some widely accepted
American prose excerpts about Nature, and American Values in Literature. Included in this course is the
presentation of selected "classic" poetry written by widely recognized poets such as Carl Sandburg, Walt
Whitman, Langston Hughes, Stephen Crane, and Edgar Allen Poe. A minimum of one book report on a "Classic"
work from American literature as well as written reactions to other prose and poetry readings will be required.
Roosevelt Alternative High School
AP ENGLISH 11 LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION: Grade Level: 11. This course focuses on non-action reading
combined with a balance of literature and timed writing exercises. The students apply all criticisms and forms of
analysis to all works in order to gain a deeper personal understanding of the literary realm. Through personal
endeavors, the students teach themselves and each other all aspects of literary theory and aid each other in
furthering their appreciation of literature. Students are able to practice for the AP exam in English Language and
Composition.
MYSTERY: This course explores the reasoning and clinical research of mystery literary works. Students learn to
analyze, synthesize, and evaluate diagnostic data, forensic information, and geographical elements as they pertain
to a specific mystery. The course requires extensive reading, scientific data inquiry, research, and writing.
POETRY: Students will learn how to write their own poetry. Students will discover that everyone has the power to
create poetry. This course allows students to write poetry and express their feelings and thoughts in ways that will
satisfy them and make others pay attention.
STRATEGIC LITERACY 9: Strategic Literacy 9 is an intervention program for that will allow students to be given
specific and individualized instruction to improve their reading skills. Skills taught include: phonics and word
analysis, fluency and comprehension, reading decoding, word recognition, and expanding vocabulary. This course
is to be taken concurrently with an English course.
STRATEGIC LITERACY 10: Strategic Literacy 10 is an intervention program for that will allow students to be given
specific and individualized instruction to improve their reading skills. Skills taught include: phonics and word
analysis, fluency and comprehension, reading decoding, word recognition, and expanding vocabulary. This course
is to be taken concurrently with an English course.
SOCIAL STUDIES
AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: Prerequisite: Senior Status. This course will satisfy the
Government graduation requirement. The curriculum will be equivalent to an introductory college course and will
adhere to the recommendations of the College Board. Students will study the constitutional underpinnings of
democracy, political parties and interest groups, the Congress, the Presidency, the bureaucracy and Federal
courts, institutions and policy processes, and civil liberties and civil rights. Students should expect to master facts,
concepts and theories, develop a thorough understanding of typical patterns of political behavior and their
consequences, learn to analyze and interpret simple data and relate it to the U.S. government and its policies, and
write clearly and coherently in support of a thesis. Students will prepare for the AP exam.
ECONOMICS: Prerequisite: Senior status. This course is designed to study the consumer, the market economy,
other systems, money management, credit, insurance and budgeting.
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SOCIOLOGY 1 & 2: Sociology is the study of human relationships within a social or group setting. Both the local
high school and American societies will serve as the focus for such topics as the cultural impact upon behavior and
the process of adopting social norms and values, the identification of social deviants and the effects of labeling,
the causes and reduction of prejudice, and the impact of social class upon life experiences. The student will
engage in a wide variety of activities intended to accommodate differing learning styles. Cooperative learning will
be expected. Students will make applications of course principles to the "real world.”
U.S. HISTORY 1: Prerequisite: Junior status. This course is a study of history in the United States before 1936.
One unit will review history before the Civil War. The main emphasis of this course will be on the period from the
Reconstruction through the New Deal.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS: Prerequisite: Senior status. This course concentrates on the study
of the operation of the government of the United States with an emphasis on the U.S. Constitution. Other areas
studied include the operation of state and local governments, foreign and domestic policy, and comparative
government and economic systems.
WORLD GEOGRAPHY: In this course, students will study different regions and cultures of the world through global
issues, such as population, energy resources, waste disposal and recycling, global economy, human rights, conflict
and urbanization. Students will examine how humans adapt to their environments and how nations rely on each
other, using connections to current events and how technology is used in geography.
WORLD HISTORY 1 & 2: In this survey of world history, the student will explore the cultures, people, events, and
institutions from ancient to modern times. Both the western and nonwestern traditions will be studied.
Geographic skills will be reinforced. A study of world history is recommended by many colleges.
MATHEMATICS
ALGEBRA 1: A comprehensive algebra course covering linear and quadratic topics, problem solving, statistics,
systems of equations, and introductory coordinate geometry.
ALGEBRA 2: Prerequisite: Geometry. This course is a second year algebra course expanding concepts from Algebra
1 and introducing synthetic division, absolute value equations and inequalities, quadratic inequalities,
determinants and matrices, and conic sections.
COLLEGE ALGEBRA: Prerequisite: Geometry or Algebra 2. This course presents a brief review of first year Algebra
including basic terminology, notations, concepts, and skills. It introduces algebraic proof, complex numbers,
absolute value and quadratic inequalities, determinants and matrices, conic sections, polynomial equations,
sequences and series, math induction, and the binomial theorem.
GEOMETRY: Prerequisite: Algebra 1. This geometry course covers geometric vocabulary, properties, and
relationships, as well as thinking skills, and applications of geometric principles to the physical world. This course
places an emphasis on inductive and numerical reasoning.
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS: This course acquaints students with the basic ideas and language of statistics. It
introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data
that is provided or data that students obtain from experiments or surveys. Students use exploratory methods to
identify patterns and make decisions to solve real-life problems.
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Roosevelt Alternative High School
U.S. HISTORY 2: Prerequisite: U.S. History 1. This course is a study of U.S. History from 1933 until the present.
The main topics include World War II, Civil Rights, the Korean War, Cold War, protest and reform, the Vietnam
Era, foreign affairs and domestic affairs.
PRECALCULUS: A course in the study of algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their
graphs. It contains investigations of the conic sections, transformations, parametric equations, and analytic proof
along with the study of right and oblique triangles including identities, equations, radian measure, vectors and
polar coordinates.
TRIGONOMETRY: A full year course. Prerequisite: Geometry and College Algebra. This is a college preparatory
course with emphasis on 6 trigonometric functions. Trigonometry includes verification of identities, graphing the 6
trigonometric functions and their inverses, solving trigonometric equations, the law of sines and cosines and
DeMoivre’s Theorem. Applications of the topics are included.
Roosevelt Alternative High School
SCIENCE
BIOLOGY: This course focuses on the major topics of life science using a Science-Technology- Society (STS)
approach. Biological content including cells, genetics, classification, adaptations, ecology and human systems are
covered through a spiral approach. This course covers approximately twelve units, each of which begins by
presenting a current societal issue. The biological concepts needed to address the issue are introduced and the unit
concludes with a culminating activity of interest to students. Some of the units include "Oh, Deer" on population
ecology, "Risky business" on cells and 57 "Health is Wealth" on digestion and nutrition. Laboratory work is a
significant part of the course.
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: Grade Level: 9-12. This is a course focused on environmental issues including
ecological principles, population dynamics, resources, energy resources and human interaction with the
environment. This is a project-based course where students will develop and implement a plan to improve
resources in areas adjacent to their school.
PHYSICAL SCIENCE: Grade Level: 9. Physical Science is a course which continues the Physics: A First Course program
including the topics of electricity, magnetism, matter and energy. In addition, basic chemistry topics are included
such as atomic structure; periodic table; reactions; formulas and equations; and acids and bases. Laboratory
activities are a significant part of the course.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH
HEALTH: This course is required for graduation. It is a comprehensive curriculum consisting of units which include:
Human Growth & Development, Reproduction, Sexually Transmitted Disease, Prenatal Care & Family
Responsibilities, Nutrition, Aging, Death & Dying, Mental Health & Self Esteem, Physical Fitness & Wellness, Drug &
Alcohol Abuse, Personal Safety & First Aid, and Consumer Issues. Students will demonstrate a level of mastery with
unit tests.
PERSONAL FITNESS 1: This course is a combination of beginning workouts and seven units introducing the
fundamentals of fitness which include videos, vocabulary, worksheets, and activities. Each unit is followed by a
quiz, and there is a final test to complete the course.
PERSONAL FITNESS 2: Prerequisite: Personal Fitness 1. For the student who enjoys the fitness activities and desires
to gain more knowledge, this course is seven additional units which focus on aspects such as nutrition, weight
control, goal setting, and exercise evaluation. This course will also give students the opportunity to extend and
intensify workouts.
PERSONAL FITNESS 3: Prerequisite: Personal Fitness 2 and consent of instructor. This is an independent study
course for those students who wish to continue their workouts to improve fitness. In addition to expanded and
intensified workouts, students will read and summarize at least six fitness-related articles. The summaries will be
organized into a newsletter format using QuarkExpress.
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CAREER/TECHNICAL EDUCATION
ACCOUNTING I: An introduction to accounting designed to provide a basic understanding of the fundamental
concepts, vocabulary, and procedures for the preparation and analysis of financial statements. Topics include the
use of the double entry accounting system, and the mechanics of the accounting cycle. Additional topics include
recording transactions in a general journal, posting to general ledgers, and preparing financial statements.
ACCOUNTING II: This course continues the study of accounting to include partnership and corporate accounting
systems. Topics include the use of special journals, and the posting procedures to special ledgers. Additional topics
include accounting for special procedures such as cash funds, receivables, payables, depreciation, and
inventories.
CAREER AWARENESS: Career Awareness combines career exploration and development with special emphasis on
success skills, communication skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills, and personal qualities
(responsibility, self-esteem, self-management, and integrity).
CHILD DEVELOPMENT 1: Lab fee $10.00 for field trip and/or consumable supplies. This course introduces students
to child development, parenting, and child care concepts. Three areas of focus are Children, Parenting, and You;
Pregnancy and Birth; and The Baby’s First Year.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT 2: Prerequisite: Child Development 1. This course continues to emphasize concepts learned
in Child Development 1. In addition, students learn about infant, toddlers, and special areas related to child care
such as health and safety. Careers associated with child care and development are also reviewed.
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1: Orientation level course that develops an awareness and understanding of how
computers affect the workplace, and personal lives. Students will develop skills in keyboarding word processing,
and spreadsheet software using Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Word, and Microsoft Excel software. *Students
successfully completing the course may elect to test for Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Core Certification.
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 2: Computer Applications 2 is intended for those students who have successfully
completed Computer Application 1, or an equivalent course. Students will develop skills in using Microsoft
PowerPoint presentation software, and Microsoft Access database software. *Students successfully completing
the course may elect to test for Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) Core Certification.
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 3: This course is intended for students who have had prior computer courses, and
want to expand their knowledge of computer technology. Students will complete exercises in advanced word
processing, advanced spreadsheets, database, presentation software, and software integration. *Students
successfully completing the course may elect to test for Microsoft Office Expert Certification.
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 4: This course is a continuation of Computer Applications 3. Students will complete
exercises in advanced word processing, advanced spreadsheets, database, presentation software, and software
integration. *Students successfully completing the course may elect to test for Microsoft Office Expert
Certification. *See course instructor for details on Microsoft Office certification.
DAY CARE AIDE: This course is for students who enjoy teaching and learning about preschool children. Students
will assist in the school’s day care center, including any or all household tasks. Before students can assist in the
day care center, they will need a current TB skill test and a police background check. If the student is 18 years or
older, they will also need to be fingerprinted.
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Roosevelt Alternative High School
BUSINESS AND PERSONAL LAW : Grade Level: 9-12. One year – 2 Credits. This course develops an understanding
of legal rights and responsibilities in personal law and business law with applications to everyday roles as
consumers, workers, and citizens. Students will gain an understanding of the American legal system, oral and
written contracts, sales contracts and warranties, and consumer protection. Legal terminology is emphasized.
ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Grade Level: 11-12. Lab fee required. Prerequisite: Business and Technology Concepts. Also
recommended: a 2nd year computer class and Accounting I. This class will build on Business and Technology
Concepts in the area of business that will include all aspects of business. Areas of study include: business history, the
free enterprise system, what it is to be an entrepreneur, business structures, marketing, ethics, business law,
business management, international business, ecommerce and the art of successful sales. Students will have an
opportunity to work through the process of developing, proposing, and creating a business
Roosevelt Alternative High School
INTRO TO GRAPHIC DESIGN: Grade Level: 9. One semester. Lab Fee: $15.00. This course is an overview introducing
students to simple image manipulation on the computer. The class will cover the history of computer graphics and
teach industry standard software and procedures. Studio and digital projects will allow students to learn the
elements and principles of art as a basis for good design.
GRAPHIC DESIGN I: Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Studio Art Foundations, Intro to Graphic
Design and/or Business and Technology Concepts. This course helps students become proficient in two graphic
programs currently used by professional designers; Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator. Skills will be learned in
how technology is used in creating photo-edited images. Design and composition will be taught on the computer
through the use of these programs.
GRAPHIC DESIGN II: Grade Level: 10–12. Lab Fee: $25.00. Prerequisite: Graphic Design-I or Intro to Graphic Design
and/or consent of instructor. The intent of this course is to allow students to review and expand on the knowledge
and skills that they have learned in the prerequisite. Students will use graphic programs used by professional
designers: Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe InDesign. Skills will be used to edit images, create
computer illustrations, and layout designs. Design and composition skills will be emphasized to create computer
graphics suitable for both print and web-based applications. Students will also develop a digital portfolio to
showcase their artwork.
GRAPHIC DESIGN III: Grade Level: 11-12. Lab Fee: $15.00. Prerequisite: Graphic Design II. This course will build upon
the knowledge and skills learned in Graphic Design II. This course is the capstone course at the end of the Graphic
Design Academy Pathway. The course allows students to finish the three year Graphic Design program with a strong
design background and a high level of competency using digital imaging, computer aided drawing, and page layout
programs. Graphic Design III will introduce advanced level software allowing students an exposure to industry
standard certification level coursework. This course allows students to be fully immersed in the field of graphic
design through the use of practical application units which lead to the development of an advanced level portfolio
for college acceptance and/or job placement.
LEADERSHIP FOR A TECHNOLOGICAL WORLD 1 & 2: The primary focus of this elective class is to have students
develop and refine skills that are necessary for effective leadership in our fast paced and dynamic technological
society. Students will develop skills in the following areas: communication, project development, research-writing,
public speaking, team-building, evaluation, prioritization, organization and knowledge acquisition.
MACHINE OPERATOR: This course is a general overview in the use of standard machines such as the drill press,
lathe, surface grinder, mill, band saw, and metal fabricating machine. The student will also receive instruction in
small machine repair and the use of hand tools. Safety and preventive maintenance are emphasized throughout this
course, as well as work attitudes, attendance, punctuality, and following directions.
MACHINE OPERATOR 2: Prerequisite: Machine 1 or instructor's approval. This course continues with machining
principles as applied in the introductory level of Machine 1. It introduces units in CNC Milling and CNC Turning. A
vertical mill and lathe will be used to provide product simulation. Introduction of welding principles (gas, arc, mig)
will be used to manufacture or remanufacture parts as necessary.
ORIENTATION TO AUTO SERVICE: Prerequisite: Teacher's approval. This course is designed to allow students to learn
and perform various tasks which can lead to employment in a variety of auto service careers. Students will learn
major parts of an automobile, auto safety rules, general repair and maintenance of an automobile and jobs related
to auto service will also be covered.
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WORK STUDY 1: This course is an introduction to the career world. It gives students the opportunity to explore
their areas of interest, create a resume and write a letter of application. Students also do exercises focusing on
keeping a job and money management. Students will also work on consumer cases and the rights and obligations
of the consumer. A significant part of this class will focus on a profiling activity where students will profile a job by
shadowing an employee in a particular career area.
PARENTING: This course is designed for students who want to explore the wonderful and challenging world of
parenting. Students do exercises that will help them make informed decisions about becoming or being a parent.
They also discuss the challenges and theories associated with parenthood.
WORK STUDY 2: Prerequisite: Work Study 1. One semester. 1 hour = 1 credit. This course is designed for students
wishing to continue with their work experience. The classroom will focus on more specific work skills as
articulated by the Department of Labor in the 1991 SCANS 2000 report. Class content will correlate with the work
experience.
ADVANCED ART: Prerequisite: Intermediate Art and consent of instructor. This course is designed to allow the
advanced art student an opportunity to continue their exploration and development of skills. Study is accelerated
enabling highly motivated students to engage in advanced level art.
ART FUNDAMENTALS: This course is an overview of visual arts. Students will explore traditional and experimental
media. Students will study visual art work from a variety of cultures and time periods. This is a beginning model for
art criticism and the basis for further art study. An emphasis is placed on developing good studio techniques,
craftsmanship, and visual art vocabulary.
INTERNSHIP AND INDEPENDENT STUDY: (1 credit for internship and 1 credit for academic work for a total of 2
credits). The Internship program will give the student an opportunity to observe and receive a learning experience
in a real job situation. The supervisor will give the student a variety of experiences so that the hands-on learning
situation will reinforce the classroom curriculum. The employer and teacher will evaluate the student on his/her
work. This evaluation of the internship is based upon 4 weeks experience at the job site as well as academic work
completed at school.
INTERMEDIATE ART: Prerequisite: Art Fundamentals or consent of instructor. This course is for the interested
student to further develop artistic skills. Students will focus on mastering basic drawing and painting skills in a
variety of media with special emphasis on experimentation, expression, craftsmanship, and originality. Art history,
aesthetics, and critical topics will be presented.
TECHNOLOGY IN VISUAL ARTS: This is a visual arts course teaching Art Fundamentals concepts through graphic
design, commercial art production, and introduction to electronic media technology.
MUSIC
GENERAL MUSIC EXPLORATIONS I: This beginning level course is designed as an overview and introduction to
music appreciation and exploration, through hands-on lab stations and presentations. Labs include: Piano
keyboard, acoustic guitar, voice, rhythm instruments, computer, listening, reading and writing about music from
all over the world and from various time periods.
GENERAL MUSIC EXPLORATIONS II: Prerequisite: General Music Explorations I. Intermediate elements of
composition and reading music will be introduced and applied to learning simple songs on keyboards, acoustic
guitar, voice and rhythm instruments. This class will also require experiencing a wide variety of music styles such
as jazz, folk, rock, blues, classical, stage musicals, world and popular music. Beginning and intermediate music
history and familiarity with some well-known composers and performers will also be a part of this course. An
opportunity for performance and hands-on participation will be offered. Students will also listen to music, read
and write about music, and make oral presentations about music.
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Roosevelt Alternative High School
VISUAL ARTS
Add-Drop Policy
The master schedule is developed by the selections students make. Once the master schedule is finalized for a school,
it will not be possible to make any adjustments to student course requests.
1. Once the master schedule has been established, there will be no schedule changes.
2. Every student is required to attend school per School Board policy.
3. Students enrolled in a specialty program (Sign Language, JROTC, Academy, CAPA, Building Trades, or
Machine Tool) are required to adhere to the specific program requirements and the courses of study.
Failure to meet the program requirements will result in an immediate transfer to the high school located in
the student’s residential zone.
Closed Campus Policy
RPS has a “closed campus” policy. Students are not permitted to leave the school campus without permission.
Honor Roll
To qualify for Honor Roll, students must have a GPA of 3.0 for at least five classes and have no failing grades.
Final Examinations
Final examinations are given in all subject areas. Dates and times are announced several weeks prior to the end of each
semester. The final examination may count up to 20% of the semester grade.
Home School
District 205 does not recognize credit earned during home schooling unless a transcript is provided from a North
Central Association approved program.
1. Students entering from home schooling shall be placed in classes that are deemed “age appropriate” as established
by District 205.
2. Parents should provide a transcript of courses from a North Central Association approved program taken during
home schooling.
3. A graduation plan will be created by the student, parent, and counselor. The plan must be approved by the
building principal.
Students must complete their entire senior year at the Rockford Public high school in order to receive a diploma.
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Academic Courses/ Honors Courses

Academic Courses: Academic courses (English, Math, Science, Social Studies) are designed to prepare
students for success in college and career opportunities after high school. Students in these courses
receive curriculum aligned to Common Core Standards. Students who show high levels of success may
be able to move to an Honors / Advanced course level in the future.

Honors / Advanced: Honors / Advanced courses are designed to allow students to participate in collegelevel experiences during high school. Students in Honors / Advanced courses receive the core
curriculum with additional rigor and extra opportunities for enrichment. Course rigor is ensured by
applying an Honors rubric or College Board guidelines to course curricula. Honors courses traditionally
lead into an Advanced Placement course.
Advanced Placement Courses
Advanced Placement (AP) courses are college level classes that are taken in high school. Rockford Public School
District students who enroll in AP courses are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exams that are
administered through the high school and scored by college professors in conjunction with the AP College Board.
Participation in an AP course:
 Prepares students for college success including improved GPAs, more credit hours earned, increased
likelihood of remaining in college after freshman year, and increased likelihood of graduating in 4 years.
 Involves more homework, since class time is more focused on active participation: discussion, labs,
debates, etc.
 May require summer reading or assignments to prepare for starting the course.
The following requirements also apply:
 Students are required to pay the AP exam fees. AP exam fees will be waived for students receiving free
or reduced lunch.
 Students who earn passing grades for AP courses from Rockford Public Schools and complete the
appropriate AP exams will be awarded quality points that contribute to GPA and the decision of class
rank. Quality points are awarded each semester.
 Make-up exams follow AP College Board regulations including a fee for late testing.
Students enrolled in more than 3 AP courses are only required to take 3 AP exams, but students may
take more than 3 exams if they choose.
Good performance on AP exams may earn students one or more of the following:
 Special consideration from colleges/universities to which he/she applies;
 College placement at a more advanced level than usual in the specific subject area of the exam;
 College credits (Each college/university has its own policy on advanced placement and the issuing of
credit).
Dual Credit Courses
Students may take approved courses at select post-secondary institutions to receive college credit and credit toward
high school graduation. Students must meet the college/university entrance requirements. A formal application
must be completed and approved by the student's school counselor and the building principal each semester a
student takes a Dual Credit class. For most dual credit courses, tuition, fees and books are the responsibility of the
student and their family. A transcript from the college/university must be submitted at least ten days before
graduation or within one month of completion of the course, whichever is applicable. Please refer to the Dual Credit
section of this guide, or see your school counselor for a list of dual credit classes.
Correspondence and Virtual Learning Courses
Correspondence and Virtual Learning Courses may be taken for credit recovery, core course overflow or elective
courses. Students may be allowed to take virtual classes from the accredited and approved course list provided by
RPS205. The student’s counselor and principal must approve courses prior to enrollment. Students are responsible
for all charges including fees and proctoring costs.
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Post-Secondary Planning PPARATION
Requirements for college admissions vary from school to school. In addition to specific course requirements, colleges
consider high school grades and college admission test scores (American College Test or Scholastic Aptitude Test).
Many colleges are especially concerned about the student’s senior year. Therefore; seniors should be sure to plan a
challenging program for their final year in high school. To learn the admission requirements of a particular school,
students should work with their school counselor or check the current college website for accurate information about
courses, grades, rank, and recommendation requirements. The personal recommendation required by some colleges
includes input from school personnel on such characteristics as ability, motivation, and responsibility. It also may
include a statement about participation and leadership in extracurricular activities. One of the most heavily weighed
areas of consideration in the college admission process is the rigor of the student’s high school academic record. Close
scrutiny is given in assessing if the student took the most challenging courses possible. Colleges place emphasis on the
high school grades which a student has earned because theses grades are the best predictors of success in college.
Post-Secondary Representatives
Each year admissions representatives from colleges, universities, trade schools, business schools, the military, and
various community organizations visit School Counseling Offices to meet with students and present opportunities that
are available to students after high school. A calendar of all such visits is posted in or near each School Counseling
Office. Students are encouraged to make appointments with representatives to explore post high school options.
Please note: teacher permission is required in order to attend appointments during class time.
National Honor Society
The purpose of the National Honor Society is to recognize and reward enthusiasm for scholarship, development of
character, promotion of leadership, and rendering of service for students of secondary schools. Membership is a
prestigious honor bestowed upon a student. Candidates will be invited to apply if they meet the criteria of the
organization including having a cumulative grade point average of 3.250 and exhibiting outstanding character,
leadership, and service as well as scholarship. Candidates complete a student activity information form. Any faculty
member may offer input. Candidates receiving a majority vote of the faculty and/or appointed faculty representative
committee are inducted into the N.H.S
Work Permits
Work permit forms are available in the Counseling Office or Main Office. Students under 16 must have a 2.0 grade point
average to apply.
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Counseling Services
The Rockford School District’s Counseling Program supports teaching and learning by assuring that all students
achieve academic success and develop life skills through the acquisition of academic, career, and personal/social
competencies, which will prepare them to be contributing members of a diverse and ever-changing society. The
Rockford High School Counseling Program is based on the National Standards for School Counseling Programs and
the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model.
Credentialed school counselors provide comprehensive school counseling programs that incorporate prevention
and intervention activities through school-wide assemblies and activities, classroom lessons, individual counseling,
and collaboration with outside community resources. Counselors also assist students in ensuring they meet high
school graduation requirements. School counseling programs are comprised of three domains:
Academic Development:
· Acquiring the attitudes, knowledge, and skills that contribute to effective learning in school and in life;
· Completing school with the academic preparation essential to choose from a range of post-secondary options;
· Understanding the relationship between academic success and future educational options
Career Development:
· Acquiring the skills to investigate career choices in relation to self-knowledge and current job trends;
· Understanding relationships between personal qualities, educational and training opportunities and careers;
· Learning decision making strategies for future career choices.
Personal/Social Development:
· Acquiring attitudes, knowledge and interpersonal skills to help students understand & respect self and others;
· Making decisions, setting goals and taking necessary action to achieve goals;
· Applying effective problem-solving and conflict resolution skills to make safe and healthy choices.
A student’s right to privacy and confidentiality is the basis for an effective counseling relationship. Confidentiality
ensures that school counselors will not share the student’s disclosures with others except when the student
authorizes it or when there is a clear and present danger to the student and/or to other persons.
Parents and students are encouraged to make use of each school’s counseling services. Students should see
counselors after obtaining a pass from their teacher. Parents should call in advance to make an appointment.
Financial Aid and Scholarships
We encourage families to work with our staff to thoroughly explore all financial aid and scholarship opportunities
available. Financial Aid Information Sessions are planned throughout the school year. Families are strongly
encouraged to attend.
Night School HIGH
Rockford Public Schools offers an evening high school program at Roosevelt Community Education Center. A
student may transfer credits from Night School to their home school to apply them towards graduation. Permission
must be granted by the student's high school principal prior to signing up for a class. There is a charge for tuition.
Please note: availability of a class in night school is subject to enrollment.
Summer School
Students who fail a required class may have the opportunity to make up that course in summer school. Summer
school rules are subject to change. Students are able to make up one or two credits. Information regarding summer
school will be available after spring break. There is a fee for each summer school class taken. Check with your
counselor for information.
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Proficiency Credit
The Superintendent may grant credit proficiency to a student who is proficient in a subject area. Students who
demonstrate competency under this program will receive course credit for the applicable course and will be excused
from any requirement to take the course as a graduation prerequisite. There will be no letter grade given for
purposes of the student’s GPA. Proficiency credit will be offered in the following subject areas:
Consumer Education:
Students must pass the Annual Consumer Education Proficiency Test developed by the State Board of Education.
Foreign Language – Only one year of credit may be awarded:
 Must have graduated from an accredited elementary school and can demonstrate proficiency, according
to District 205 academic criteria, in a language other than English.
 A student who demonstrates proficiency in American Sign Language is deemed proficient in a foreign
language and will receive one year of foreign language credit.
 A student who studied a foreign language in an approved ethnic school program is eligible to receive
appropriate credit according to the level of proficiency reached.
 The student may be required to take a proficiency examination.
Other Proficiency Testing:
The program for granting credit for proficiency, including the amount of proficiency credit may allow, as the
Superintendent deems appropriate, course credit to be awarded on the basis of a local examination to a student who
has achieved the necessary proficiency through independent study or work taken in or through another
institution. Proficiency testing may also be used to determine eligible credit for other subjects whenever students
enter from non-graded schools, non-recognized or non-accredited schools, or were in a home-schooling program.
Retaking a Failed Core Course
Students shall be given one additional opportunity to retake failed core courses that are required for graduation.
Students may retake failed core courses as current allocations allow at the student’s serving school or at Roosevelt.
Seniors will be given first priority. Students who fail required courses shall receive counseling to explore all
appropriate options to recover failed credits. All subsequent attempts to receive credit for the course will be at the
student’s expense through night school, summer school, or virtual learning courses.
Library Services
The library is an extension of the classroom and an area where students and teachers can become information and
technology literate. To become effective users of information, students will have many opportunities to locate,
interpret, analyze, evaluate and communicate information. The classroom teacher and library media specialist work
closely together to identify learning needs of students and support those needs. The following services are available
in the library:
1. Access to Print Resources: the high school library has books, newspapers and magazines available to students.
Students may access the Destiny Online Library catalog from school or home to locate these print resources for
curricular needs or reading enjoyment and may check them out as needed.
2. Electronic Databases: each library has access to online databases through the district web site. These databases
are accessible to students from school or home and the librarian will help students learn how to use these
effectively. They provide scholarly, reliable resources for students to use for research.
3. Instructional Support: Librarians provide materials and resource lists to students and teachers to support
curricular needs of the classroom including books placed on reserve, access to textbooks, and supplemental
readings.
4. Access to Technology: Libraries have computers available for student use during class time and study hall/lunch
periods. All individuals wishing access to computers must have an Authorization for Internet Access (AUP) on file.
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Testing and Assessment Schedule
As part of the Rockford School District’s overall assessment program, all students participate in PLAN at grade 9, a
Practice ACT at grade 10, and the Prairie State Achievement Examination (PSAE) at grade 11. TBE and TPI students also
participate in the ACCESS assessment. PLAN and ACT are the second and third steps in ACT’s Educational Planning and
Assessment System. The first test in this series, EXPLORE, is given in the eighth grade level in order to benefit students
as they enter their high school years. All of these assessments serve the purpose of diagnosing student strengths and
weaknesses, guiding students in their life/career planning, providing information in order to evaluate, providing
information for accountability purposes, and providing data for research and planning purposes.
GRADES 9 – 12: ACCESS
The ACCESS is an English proficiency test that is given to all high school students identified as English Language Learners
even if ELL services have been waived. The assessment measures skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It is
used as a basis to direct classroom instruction and for future placement. Testing takes place in January and February.
GRADE 9: PLAN
This test helps build a solid foundation for future academic and career success. It helps students measure their current
academic development, explore career/training options and make plans for the remaining years of high school and post
-graduate years. It also provides valuable preparation for ACT.
GRADE 10: PRACTICE ACT
This test helps provide valuable preparation for ACT. It allows students, parents, and school personnel an opportunity
to find strengths and weaknesses before the PSAE is given during 11th grade. The Practice ACT that is given by the
district in 10th grade will not be accepted by the NCAA.
GRADES 10 and 11: PSAT
This is the qualifying test for National Merit Scholarships. This is an optional test and is given either on a Wednesday or
Saturday in October. The testing day will be determined by each high school. Since this is not a District mandated test,
there is a charge for students who take it.
GRADE 11: PSAE – REQUIRED BY ILLINOIS LAW FOR GRADUATION. TESTING DATES: APRIL 23-24, 2013. This test is the
most important test students will take during their entire school career. The PSAE incorporates the ACT (accepted at all
four year colleges and universities in the United States as an admissions criteria), two Work Keys tests in Reading for
Information and Applied Mathematics, as well as a state developed science test. Students do not take the Writing
Section of the ACT. Scores from all of these are combined to produce a single Prairie State score which indicates
whether students exceed, meet, or do not meet state standards in Reading, Mathematics, Science, and Writing. For
students this means: Student transcripts will contain PSAE scores and are available to employers if requested and
released by the student. No writing section
Students seeking admission to Illinois institutions of higher education and students seeking employment in all career
pathways must demonstrate competency on these assessments.
The ACT that is given as part of the PSAE will be accepted by the NCAA.
ACT/PLAN Information
Visit www.actstudent.org for information regarding test dates and additional test preparation activities.
Visit www.planstudent.org for information regarding the PLAN test results.
High School CEEB Code Numbers:
Auburn 143-693
East High 143-700
Guilford 143-703
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Jefferson 143-712
Roosevelt 143- 717
NCAA Eligibility
A well-rounded high school education is more than just classroom work. Colleges and employers value students who
have a wide range of school experiences. Rockford High Schools offer a wide range of co-curricular activities: a list is
available at your school. Other groups can be formed with sufficient student interest. All student groups must have a
faculty advisor and the approval of the principal.
SPORTS
Winter Sports
Spring Sports
Fall Sports
Boys Cross Country
Boys Bowling
Baseball
Girls Cross Country
Girls Bowling
Softball
Football
Boys Basketball
Boys Track & Field
Competitive Cheer
Girls Basketball
Girls Track & Field
Girls Swimming/ Diving
Sideline Cheer
Girls Soccer
Girls Golf
Competitive Cheer
Competitive Cheer
Boys Golf
Boys Swimming/ Diving
Boys Volleyball
Boys Soccer
Wrestling
Girls Tennis
Competitive Dance
Girls Volleyball
Sideline Cheer
Competitive Dance
Co-curricular Eligibility
Co-curricular activities include all athletic and non-athletic activities sponsored by the Board of Education in the middle
schools and high schools. Student participation in these activities is encourages provided students first meet certain
academic requirements.
Eligibility
In order to participate in co-curricular activities, students must meet the following requirements:
1. All students in grades seven (7) through twelve (12) participating in co-curricular activities must have received a
passing grade in a minimum of five (5) full credit courses the previous semester.* This does include summer
school, night school, vocational classes, Rock Valley classes, and other accredited courses if available. Meaning
these additional courses may be used to meet the eligibility requirements. Continued participation will require a
student to be passing (5) full credit courses on a weekly basis, with no unexcused classroom absences. Continued
participation will require a student carrying one (1) failing grade to attend mandatory tutoring on a weekly basis.
2. All students in grade six (6) must be passing five (5) full credit courses, with no unexcused absences on a weekly
basis, in order to maintain eligibility. Continued participation will require a student carrying one (1) failing grade to
attend mandatory tutoring on a weekly basis.
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NCAA ELIGIBILITY CENTER
QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE
3. All students in grade nine (9) are automatically deemed eligible to participate in co-curricular activities the
first semester of their 9th grade year. However, once the weekly eligibility program begins, the 9th grade
student must pass a minimum of five (5) full credit courses on a weekly basis, with no unexcused classroom
absences. Continued participation will require a student carrying one (1) failing grade to attend mandatory
tutoring on a weekly basis.
4. For students receiving services under the IDEA or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, their IEP
or 504 plans will be reviewed for proper implementation prior to determining ineligibility.
*A full credit course is defined as a course for which a student receives 1.0 credit.
Ineligibility Period
In accordance with I.H.S.A. policy, the ineligibility period for failing to pass five (5) weekly classes will begin the
following calendar week, Sunday – Saturday. For example, the grade report shows a student is not passing five (5)
courses on Thursday, this student is ineligible to compete the following Sunday-Saturday. The student may continue to
compete for the remainder of the week they become ineligible. While ineligible, student may continue to practice with
their team but may not dress for any co-curricular activity, scrimmage, exhibition match, etc.
Mandatory Lunch tutorial for Ineligible Students
Ineligible students in grades nine (9) through twelve (12) must attend four (4) tutoring sessions during the week of
ineligibility. If a student fails to attend four (4) tutoring sessions during the week of ineligibility, that student remains
ineligible the following week even if the student may be passing five (5) classes.
Ineligible students in grades six (6) through eight (8) must attend three (3) tutoring sessions during the week of
ineligibility. If a student fails to attend three (3) tutoring sessions during the week of ineligibility, that student remains
ineligible the following week even if the student may be passing five (5) classes.
Mandatory Lunch Tutorial for Eligible Students with one (1) F
Students in grades nine (9) through twelve (12) who are passing five (5) classes and carrying a failing grade in a sixth
(6th) class must attend four (4) tutoring sessions during the following week. If a student carrying one (1) F fails to
attend four (4) tutoring sessions during the required week of tutoring, that student becomes ineligible the following
week even if the student may be passing five (5) classes.
Students in grades six (6) through eight (8) who are passing five (5) classes and carrying a failing grade in a sixth (6th)
class must attend three (3) tutoring sessions during the following week. If a student carrying one (1) F fails to attend
three (3) tutoring sessions during the required week of tutoring, that student becomes ineligible the following week
even if the student may be passing five (5) classes
77
Divisions I and II Initial-Eligibility Requirements
Core Courses


NCAA Divisions I and II require 16 core courses. See the charts below.
NCAA Division I will require 10 core courses to be completed prior to the seventh semester
(seven of the 10 must be a combination of English, math or natural or physical science that meet the
distribution requirements below). These 10 courses become "locked in" at the start of the seventh
semester and cannot be retaken for grade improvement.
o Beginning August 1, 2016, it will be possible for a Division I college-bound student-athlete to still
receive athletics aid and the ability to practice with the team if he or she fails to meet the 10 course
requirement, but would not be able to compete.
Test Scores





Division I uses a sliding scale to match test scores and core grade-point averages (GPA). The sliding
scale for those requirements is shown on Page No. 2 of this sheet.
Division II requires a minimum SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.
The SAT score used for NCAA purposes includes only the critical reading and math sections. The writing
section of the SAT is not used.
The ACT score used for NCAA purposes is a sum of the following four sections: English, mathematics,
reading and science.
When you register for the SAT or ACT, use the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to
ensure all SAT and ACT scores are reported directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center from the
testing agency. Test scores that appear on transcripts will not be used.
Grade-Point Average






Be sure to look at your high school’s List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center's website
(www.eligibilitycenter.org). Only courses that appear on your school's List of NCAA Courses will be used
in the calculation of the core GPA. Use the list as a guide.
Division I students enrolling full time before August 1, 2016, should use Sliding Scale A to determine
eligibility to receive athletics aid, practice and competition during the first year.
Division I GPA required to receive athletics aid and practice on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.0002.299 (corresponding test-score requirements are listed on Sliding Scale B on Page No. 2 of this sheet).
Division I GPA required to be eligible for competition on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.300
(corresponding test-score requirements are listed on Sliding Scale B on Page No. 2 of this sheet).
The Division II core GPA requirement is a minimum of 2.000.
Remember, the NCAA GPA is calculated using NCAA core courses only.
78
Sliding Scale A
Use for Division I prior to August 1, 2016
NCAA DIVISION I SLIDING SCALE
SAT
Core GPA
ACT Sum
Verbal and Math
ONLY
3.550 & above
2.875
2.850
2.825
2.800
670
680
690
700
55
56
56
57
2.775
710
58
2.750
2.725
720
59
730
59
2.700
730
60
61
400
37
2.675
3.525
410
38
2.650
740-750
760
3.500
420
39
2.625
770
63
3.475
430
40
2.600
780
64
3.450
440
41
2.575
790
65
3.425
450
41
2.550
800
66
3.400
460
42
2.525
810
3.375
470
42
2.500
820
67
68
3.350
480
43
2.475
830
3.325
490
44
3.300
500
44
3.275
510
45
3.250
520
46
3.225
530
46
2.450
2.425
2.400
2.375
2.350
840-850
860
860
870
880
3.200
540
47
2.325
3.175
550
47
3.150
560
48
3.125
570
49
3.100
580
49
2.300
2.275
2.250
2.225
890
900
910
920
930
78
2.200
940
79
3.075
590
50
2.175
950
80
3.050
600
50
2.150
960
80
3.025
610
51
2.125
960
81
3.000
620
52
2.100
970
82
2.975
630
52
2.075
2.950
640
53
2.925
650
53
2.050
2.025
980
990
1000
84
85
2.900
660
54
2.000
1010
86
79
62
69
70
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
83
Sliding Scale B
Use for Division I beginning August 1, 2016
Core GPA
NCAA DIVISION I SLIDING SCALE
SAT
ACT Sum
Verbal and Math ONLY
3.550
400
37
3.525
410
38
3.500
420
39
3.475
3.450
3.425
3.400
3.375
3.350
3.325
3.300
3.275
3.250
3.225
3.200
3.175
430
440
450
460
470
480
490
500
510
520
530
540
550
40
41
41
42
42
43
44
44
45
46
46
47
47
3.150
560
48
3.125
570
49
3.100
580
49
3.075
590
50
3.050
3.025
3.000
600
610
620
50
51
52
2.975
630
52
2.950
640
53
For more information, visit the NCAA
Eligibility Center website at
www.eligibilitycenter.org.
80
2.925
2.900
2.875
2.850
2.825
2.800
2.775
2.750
2.725
2.700
2.675
2.650
2.625
2.600
650
660
670
680
690
700
710
720
730
740
750
760
770
780
53
54
55
56
56
57
58
59
60
61
61
62
63
64
2.575
2.550
2.525
2.500
790
800
810
820
65
66
2.475
830
2.450
2.425
2.400
2.375
2.350
840
850
860
870
880
69
70
70
71
72
73
2.325
2.300
2.299
2.275
2.250
2.225
2.200
2.175
2.150
2.125
2.100
2.075
2.050
2.025
2.000
890
900
910
910
920
930
940
950
960
970
980
990
1000
1010
1020
74
75
76
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
86
67
68
Rock Valley College Dual Credit
Courses on this list are approved District 205/Rock Valley College Dual Credit courses. If you enroll in and complete the RVC course
(s) listed on the left at Rock Valley College, you will receive high school credit for the corresponding course on the right Students
are responsible for all course tuition, associated fees, and the cost of books. Students should work with their school counselor to
obtain a Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment Agreement form. The signed enrollment packet should be submitted to the RVC High School
Connections Office.
High
RVC
Course taken at Rock Valley College
District 205 Course
School
Credits
Credits
MATH
MTH 120: College Algebra
3
13400U: College Algebra
2
MTH 125: Plane Trigonometry
(prereq MTH 120)
3
13412U: Trigonometry
2
MTH 132: Pre-Calculus
5
13330U: Pre-Calculus
2
MTH 135: Calculus I
(prereq MTH 120 & 125 or 132)
5
13443U: Calculus AB
1*
MTH 235: Calculus II (prereq MTH 135)
4
13431U: Calculus BC
1*
MTH 236: Calculus III (prereq MTH 235)
4
13433U: Calculus 3-4
1*
MTH 220: Elements of Statistics
3
13423U: Elements of Statistics
2
SCIENCE
BIO 103: Introductory Life Sciences
3
14201U:College Prep Biology
1*
BIO 104: Introductory Life Science Lab
1
14202U: College Prep Biology—Lab
CHM120: General Chemistry I
(prereq MTH 120 + HS Chem)
4
#####U: General Chemistry I
2*
PHY 201: Mechanics and Heat (prereq MTH 125)
5
14401U: Physics 1
1*
PHY 202: Waves, Electricity, and Modern Physics
(prereq PHY 201)
5
14403U: Physics 2
1*
PGE 100: Physical Geography
3
14520U: Earth Science: Geology & Oceanography
1
GEL 101: Introduction to Geology
4
14521U: Earth Science: Astronomy & Meteorology
1
BIO 185: Foundations of Anatomy and Physiology
(prereq BIO 103 & CHM 120)
5
14603U: Anatomy & Physiology
2
0.5*
ENGLISH & LANGUAGE ARTS
ENG 101: Composition I
3
10300U: College Prep English 11 OR
10400U: College Prep English 12
2*
SPH 131: Fundamentals of Communication
3
10640U: Speech 1-2
2
SPH 132: Public Speaking
3
10643U: Speech 3-4
2
81
Rock Valley College Dual Credit
Students are responsible for all course tuition, associated fees, and the cost of books.
SOCIAL STUDIES
HST 142: US Pre 1865
3
12124U: College Prep US History 1
1**
HST 143: US Post 1865
3
12125U: College Prep US History 2
1**
ECO 101: Introduction to Economics
3
12220U: College Prep Economics
1
PSC 160: Government
3
12210U: College Prep US Government &
Politics
1
PSY 170: General Psychology
3
12400U: Psychology
2
SOC 190: Introduction to Sociology
3
12410U: Sociology
2
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
FRN 102: Continuation of Beginning French
(prereq FRN 101)
4
11303U: French 2
2
FRN 203: Intermediate French
3
11306U: French 3
2
FRN 204: Continuation of Intermediate French
3
11309U: French 4
2
SPN 102: Continuation of Beginning Spanish
(prereq SPN 101)
4
11103U: Spanish 2
2
SPN 203: Intermediate Spanish
3
11106U: Spanish 3
2
SPN 204: Continuation of Intermed Spanish
3
11109U: Spanish 4
2
GRM 102: Continuation of Beginning German
(prereq GRM 101)
4
11203U: German 2
2
FINE ARTS
ART 115: Introduction to Commercial Arts
4
15123U: Graphic Design
2
ART 251: History of Art I
3
15112U: Art History 1
1*
ART 252: History of Art II
3
15118U: Art History 2
1*
COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY
PCT 120: Cisco Networking I
(prereq CIS 102)
4
21213U: Cisco Networking I
1
PCT 122: Cisco Networking II
4
21214U: Cisco Networking II
1
PCT 124: Cisco Networking III
4
21215U: Cisco Networking III
1
PCT 126: Cisco Networking IV
4
21216U: Cisco Networking IV
1
WEB 101: Programming Related to the Web
(prereq CIS 102)
4
15129U: Fundamentals of Web Design
1
CIS 240: Intro to JAVA Programming (prereq CIS 102)
4
13440U: Computer Science A
1*
* Eligible for Quality Points for the 2014-2015 school year
NOTE: Students are responsible for submitting an official grade report to their home high school upon course
completion to receive high school credit.
** Eligible for Quality Points only when both courses are completed
82
Health Services
Health & Dental Examinations / Immunizations
Rockford School District requires that all children show proof of having had a health examination and required
immunizations PRIOR to the first day of school. (Board Policy 7.100 and 105 ILCS 5/27-8.1).
HEALTH EXAMINATIONS A student must have a physical examination within one year prior to entering:
1) A pre-school program
2) Kindergarten
3) Sixth Grade
4) Ninth Grade
5) Any student new to the school district must meet requirement within 30 days of enrollment
DENTAL EXAMINATIONS All Illinois children in Kindergarten, 2nd, and 6th grades are required to have an oral health
exam by a licensed dentist prior to May 15th of the school year. The examination must have taken place within 18
months prior to May 15th of the school year. Parents may request a dental examination waiver or present an
exemption based on religious grounds, prior to the May 15th deadline, in accordance with the law. (105 ILCS 5/27-8.1,
Section 665.420)
VISION EXAMINATIONS Public Act 95-0671 requires eye exams within one year prior to Kindergarten entry, and for all
students who enter a public, private, or parochial school in Illinois for the first time. The exam must be conducted by a
qualified optometrist or ophthalmologist. Proof of the required eye exam must be submitted by the first day of school.
IMMUNIZATIONS Students must show proof of basic immunization and required boosters for Diphtheria, Tetanus,
Pertussis, Polio, Red Measles, Mumps, Rubella, **Haemophilus Influenza Type B (pre-school), **Hepatitis B (preschool, 5-12th grades) and Varicella.
LEAD SCREENING Students entering pre-school and Kindergarten must show proof of lead screening. The requirement
for children to be tested or assessed applies to children six months through six years of age. Testing is mandatory for
students who reside in ZIP codes 61101, 61102, 61103, and 61104.
OBJECTIONS Children whose parents or legal guardians object to health, dental, vision exams or to the required
immunizations may submit a letter explaining their religious beliefs and request an exemption to the law.
NEW STUDENTS If a student enters the district from out of state, parents or legal guardians have 30 days to comply
with the above requirements, regardless of age.
The required health examinations, immunizations, and lead screening may be obtained at the local health department,
clinic, or doctor’s office of choice.
Hearing & Vision Screening: Hearing screening services shall be provided annually for all children attending
preschool, three years of age or older, Kindergarten, grades one through three; are in any special education class; have
been referred by a teacher; or are transfer students. In lieu of the screening services required, a completed and signed
report form, indicating that the child has had an ear examination by a physician and an audiological evaluation
completed by an audiologist within the previous 12 months, is acceptable. If a hearing examination report or
audiological evaluation is not on file at the school, your child, in the mandated age, grade, or group will be screened.
“The parent or legal guardian of a student may object to hearing screening tests for their children on religious grounds.
(23 Ill.Admin.Code 675.110)
83
Vision screening services shall be provided annually during the school year, as mandated for the following children; preschool, Kindergarten, 2nd to 8th grades and in all special education classes; those students referred by teachers; and
transfer students. If a vision examination report is not on file at the school, your child, in the mandated age, grade, or
group will be screened. “Vision screening is not a substitute for a complete eye and vision evaluation by an eye doctor.
Your child is not required to undergo this vision screening if an optometrist or ophthalmologist has completed and
signed a report form indicating that an examination has been administered within the previous 12 months.” (105 ILCS
27-8.1, Section 685.110) The parent or legal guardian of a student may object to vision screening tests for their child on
religious grounds.
Healthy Students Are Better Learners: Health Services staff encourages the following good hygiene
practices to allow for optimum learning opportunities:
Thorough & frequent hand washing
Eating a nutritious breakfast
8 – 10 hours of sleep each night
Exercise for 30 minutes, 3x/week
If, however, your child is ill, they should not be sent to school. Your child should remain at home for at least 24 hours
after their symptoms have resolved. Please consider contacting your doctor for advice if your child exhibits any of the
following conditions: Severe pain that limits activity
Temperature over 100.4 degrees
Contagious illness or condition
Vomiting or diarrhea
Constant cough
Skin rash
Head Lice - Head lice are tiny insects that gather mostly behind the ears, back of the neck and only live on the human
head. The presence of lice can occur in all levels of income, age, sex, or race. Lice cannot fly or jump, they are passed
along following prolonged, direct head-to-head contact. Head lice do not cause illness nor do they transmit
communicable disease.
Researchers advise treating only the person affected with live lice, using a medicated shampoo, closely following the
package directions. Children under the age of 2 yr or pregnant women should consult with their doctor’s for treatment
recommendations. Treatment is followed by thorough combing of the affected person’s hair daily for 7 -10 days.
Children with live lice will be excluded from school. Mass screenings and notifications have been proven to be
ineffective in controlling this nuisance and in avoiding re-infestation. The health services staff will focus on parent and
staff education, as is recommended by current research.
Growth and Development Presentation for 5th grade students: Fifth grade students shall be provided annually, during
the school year, a growth and development presentation. One of the certified nursing staff, physical education or
health teacher, or other designated health representative will provide a video production on the normal body changes
which occur as children’s bodies mature and grow. A discussion and question/answer period will follow. Parents
wishing to preview the film during normal school hours may do so by contacting the school nurse. Parents wishing to
exclude their child from participating in this presentation may submit a letter of objection to the building nurse. If
there is no letter of objection on file in the Health Office, all 5th grade students will participate in this presentation. RPS
Board policy 6.60, 105 ILCS 5/27
84
Prescription Medication: Medications shall be administered to students by the school nurse or voluntary school
personnel only when absolutely necessary for the critical health and well-being of the student. Medication prescribed
daily, twice, or three times per day should be administered by the parent around school hours. If it is determined that
the student shall receive medication at school, the procedures set forth below shall be followed:
1. The student’s physician shall provide written orders detailing the name of the student, the type of disease
or illness involved, the name of the drug, dosage, time interval in which the medication is to be taken, the
desired benefits of the medication, the side effects, and an emergency number where the physician can be
reached.
2. The student’s parent or legal guardian shall provide to the school nurse a written request authorizing the
administration of the prescribed medication at school including a parent emergency phone number.
3. Medication shall be brought to the school, by the parent or legal guardian, in the original container
appropriately labeled by the pharmacy or physician. Prescription drugs shall display all of the following
information: Student name, prescription number, medication name/dosage, administration route and/or
directions, date and refill, licensed prescriber’s name, pharmacy name, address, and phone number, name or
initials of pharmacist. Non-prescription drugs shall be brought to school and stored with the manufacturer’s
original label indicating the ingredients and the student’s name affixed to the container.
Administration of Approved Discretionary Medication: The School Health Council of the Winnebago County Medical
Association has approved the intermittent administration of certain non-prescription medications, which may be made
available at the school, following appropriate physical assessment, by the registered school nurse: Tylenol or Advil
(generic substitutes allowed). This service is offered to alleviate the child’s minor discomforts and to avoid early
dismissals from school. It is our hope that providing this service improves attendance and enhances academic
performance.
Parent or legal guardian written consent must be obtained before any medication is given to the child. Only the School
Nurse/Registered Nurse may administer these medications in accordance with established protocols. The approved
consent form requires the parent/guardian to select which medication may be made available for their child. The
consent is effective for the current school year.
Approved discretionary medications are intended for occasional use only. If the child requires any prescription
medication or non-prescription medication on a regular basis, the parent or legal guardian must obtain and complete
an “Authorization for Medication” form, a written order from the child’s doctor, and provide a supply of the
medication in the original container.
If a student experiences an extreme allergic reaction during school hours, the school nurse or trained school staff
may administer epinephrine (Epi-pen) in accordance with district protocols. If this occurs, Emergency Medical
Services (EMS) will be called and parent or designated emergency contact will be notified.
85
BILINGUAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS
These programs are offered at selected schools. Please
contact your guidance counselor for more information on
which schools are offering which programs.
Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE):
For Spanish and Arabic speakers:
Students whose first language is Arabic and Spanish and have scored below a 4.2 in reading and writing along with 5.0
Composite on either the state mandated ACCESS test or W-APT screener qualifies for bilingual services. Bilingual students can take two types of academic content area classes: bilingual and sheltered. Bilingual classes are offered in all
academic content classes. Those students scoring below a 2.6 Composite score on the ACCESS test or W-APT screener are placed in these classes. Instruction is primarily given in either Arabic or Spanish, depending on the student’s language, in order to support instruction. Students who score above a 2.6 composite on the WAPT screener or Access are
placed in sheltered classes. These classes utilize the general education materials and the language of instruction is primarily in English. The goal of these classes is to acquire English proficiency through the academic content. In addition,
bilingual students are placed in an English as a Second Language (ESL) class depending on their level of English proficiency level. In ESL classes, students improve their listening, speaking, reading, and writing English skills. Students receive English credit by taking these classes. Once a student reaches a 3.2 Literacy score or above, they are allowed to
take a limited number of regular education classes based on their composite score, teacher recommendations, and other factors.
Transitional Programs of Instruction (TPI):
Students whose first language is other than English, Spanish or Arabic and have scored below a 4.2 in reading and writing, along with a 5.0 composite on either the state mandated ACCESS test or W-APT screener also qualify for bilingual
services. TPI classes are offered in all academic content areas. These classes are sheltered in nature and the teacher
uses ESL techniques to make the content comprehensible. These classes utilize the general education materials and
the language of instruction is primarily in English. The goal of these classes is to acquire English proficiency through the
academic content. In addition, TPI students are placed in an English as a Second Language (ESL) class depending on
their level of English proficiency. In ESL classes, students improve their listening, speaking, reading, and writing English
skills. Students receive English credit by taking these classes. Once a student reaches a 3.2 Literacy score or above,
they are allowed to take a limited number of regular education classes based on their composite-score and teacher recommendation.
Newcomer Program:
The Newcomer Program is offered for English language learners who have recently arrived to the United States
(speakers of Arabic or Spanish enroll in the TBE Program). It is specifically designed for those who have very limited
English skills, limited formal education, and/or limited literacy skills in their native language. Newcomer classes are offered in all academic content areas. These intensive English classes are intended to close the academic gap and help
with the acculturation process. These students remain in the newcomer program for one academic school year and a
session of summer school and are then placed in the TPI program.
Dual Language Program:
Dual Language is the Program for High School Students who have been through 8 years of Dual Language at the primary and intermediate levels, or for students who have been in the Spanish Language Transitional Bilingual Education Program. Students will be screened to determine placement into the program. Bilingual students in the program will take
English as a Second Language (ESL) and a Spanish Language Arts class each year, and content area classes in both
languages. The goal of the program is for students to achieve high levels of academic proficiency in reading, writing,
listening and speaking in both Spanish and English.
86
PROGRAMAS DE EDUCACIÓN BILINGÜE
Estos programas son ofrecidos en escuelas selectas. Por favor consulta con tu consejero
orientador para más información acerca de cuáles escuelas ofrecen estos programas.
Programa de Transición Bilingüe (TBE):
Para estudiantes que hablen español y árabe:
Los estudiantes cuyo idioma materno es el árabe o español y que han sacado un puntaje menor de 4.2 en lectura y escritura junto con un 5.0 compuesto, ya sea en el examen ACCESS o la evaluación W-APT requeridos por el estado, califican para los servicios bilingües. Los estudiantes bilingües pueden tomar dos tipos de clases académicas requeridas
para la graduación: bilingüe o modificada. Las clases bilingües se ofrecen en todas las clases académicas requeridas.
Los estudiantes que sacan un puntaje menor de 2.6 compuesto en el examen ACCESS o la evaluación W-APT son
asignados a estas clases. La instrucción se da principalmente en árabe o español, dependiendo del idioma del estudiante, a fin de apoyar la instrucción. Los estudiantes que obtienen un puntaje mayor de 2.6 compuesto en la evaluación W-APT o ACCESS son asignados a clases modificadas. Estas clases utilizan los materiales de la educación general y el idioma de instrucción es mayormente el inglés. La meta de estas clases es adquirir habilidad en inglés por medio de la materia académica. Además, los estudiantes bilingües son asignados a una clase de Inglés como Segundo
Idioma (ESL) dependiendo de su nivel de habilidad en inglés. En las clases de ESL, los estudiantes mejoran sus destrezas de escucha, habla, lectura y escritura. Los estudiantes reciben créditos en inglés al tomar estas clases. Una vez
que un estudiante alcance un puntaje de 3.2 o mayor en lectoescritura, se le permite tomar una cantidad limitada de
clases de educación regular, basado en su puntaje compuesto, la recomendación de los maestros y otros factores.
Programas de Instrucción para la Transición (TPI):
Los estudiantes cuyo idioma materno no es el inglés, español o árabe y que han sacado un puntaje menor de 4.2 en
lectura y escritura junto con un 5.0 compuesto, ya sea en el examen ACCESS o la evaluación W-APT requeridos por el
estado, califican también para los servicios bilingües. Las clases de TPI se ofrecen en todas las materias académicas
requeridas para la graduación. Estas clases son de naturaleza modificada y el maestro usa técnicas de ESL para que
los conceptos sean comprensibles. Estas clases utilizan materiales de la educación general y el idioma de instrucción
es principalmente el inglés. La meta de estas clases es adquirir habilidad en inglés por medio de la materia académica.
Además, los estudiantes de TPI son asignados a una clase de Inglés como Segundo Idioma (ESL), dependiendo de su
nivel de habilidad en inglés. En las clases de ESL, los estudiantes mejoran sus destrezas de escucha, habla, lectura y
escritura en inglés. Los estudiantes reciben créditos de Inglés al tomar estas clases. Una vez que un estudiante alcance un puntaje de 3.2 o más en lectoescritura, se le permite tomar una cantidad limitada de clases de educación regular,
basado en su puntaje compuesto, la recomendación de los maestros y otros factores.
Programa para los Recién Llegados:
El Programa para los Recién Llegados se ofrece a los estudiantes del idioma inglés que recientemente llegaron a los
Estados Unidos (los que hablan árabe o español se inscriben en el Programa TBE). Está diseñado específicamente
para aquellos que tienen un nivel muy bajo de destreza en inglés, formación académica limitada y/o destrezas de lectoescritura limitadas en su idioma materno. Las clases para los recién llegados se ofrecen en todas las materias académicas. El propósito de estas clases intensivas de inglés es cerrar la brecha académica y ayudarles con el proceso de
aculturación. Estos estudiantes permanecen en el programa para los recién llegados por un año académico y una sesión de la escuela de verano, y luego son asignados al programa TPI.
Programa de Dos Idiomas:
El Programa de Dos Idiomas es para estudiantes de la preparatoria que han estudiado en dos idiomas durante 8 años al
nivel principiante e intermedio, o para estudiantes que han participado en el Programa de Transición Bilingüe en el Idioma Español. Se evaluará a los estudiantes para determinar su colocación en el programa. Los estudiantes bilingües del
programa tomarán Inglés como Segundo Idioma (ESL) y una clase de Artes de Lenguaje en Español cada año, además
de las clases requeridas para la graduación en ambos idiomas. El programa está destinado a que los estudiantes se
desempeñen a los altos niveles de dominio académico en la lectura, escritura, comprensión auditiva y expresión en español e inglés.
87
‫برامج التعليم للناطقين بلغتينبرامج التعليم للناطقين بلغتين‬
‫تتوفر هذه البرامج في بعض المدارس المختارة‪ .‬يرجى االتصال بالمستشار التعليمي للحصول على معلومات أكثر حول أيا“ من المدارس تقدم هذا النوع من‬
‫البرامج‪.‬‬
‫التعليم االنتقالي للناطقين بلغتين‪-‬تي بي إي‬
‫للناطقين باللغتين العربية و االسبانية‬
‫كل الطلبة ممن كانت لغتهم االم العربية او االسبانية و احرزوا اقل من ‪ 4.2‬درجة في اختبار مستوى القدرة على الكتابة و‬
‫القراءة ودرجة ‪ 5.0‬في اختبار االستماع –القراءة‪-‬الكتابة و التحدث في اختبار الوالية للمستوى المطلوب للنجاح‪,‬او اختبار‬
‫الكفاءة باللغة االنكليزية يكونوا مؤهلين لخدمة التعليم باللغتين‪ .‬بامكان الطالب الدارسين بلغتين الحصول على نوعين من‬
‫الدروس المطلوبة للتخرج (الرياضيات‪ ,‬العلوم ‪,‬االجتماعيات ‪,‬االداب) اما بلغتين او باللغة االنكليزية المبسطة‪.‬كل الطلبة‬
‫الذين احرزوا اقل من ‪ 2.6‬في االمتحان المركب(مادتين في إمتحان واحد) او اختبار األكسس باللغة االنكليزية سيكونون‬
‫في هذه الدروس ‪ .‬سيكون التدريس اما باللغة العربية او األسبانية ‪ ,‬اعتمادا" على اللغة االم للطالب وذلك لدعم عملية‬
‫التدريس ‪ .‬اما بالنسبة للطالب اللذين أحرزوا أكثر من ‪ 2.6‬في االمتحان المركب أو امتحان االكسس سيكونون في دروس‬
‫اللغة االنكليزية المبسطة‪ .‬سيتم استخدام نفس المواد والطرق الفنية في المؤسسة التعليمية ولكن باساليب اسهل‬
‫وابسط وبما يالئم معايير قسم الناطقين بلغتين وسيكون التدريس باللغة االنكليزية ‪.‬‬
‫ان الغرض من هذه الدروس هو تطوير اللغة االنكليزية في الدروس المطلوبة للتخرج وهي ‪ :‬الرياضيات ‪ ,‬العلوم ‪,‬‬
‫األجتماعيات واآلداب اضافة" لذلك ‪ ,‬فأن قبول الطلبة في صفوف اللغة االنكليزبة كلغة ثانية يعتمد على مستواهم فيها ‪,‬‬
‫ففي هذه الصفوف يطور الطلبة مهاراتهم في االستماع ‪ ,‬التحدث ‪ ,‬القراءة والكتابة ‪ .‬وعند حصول الطالب على درجة ‪3.2‬‬
‫او اعلى في القراءة والكتابة يكون مؤهال" لتلقي دروس التعليم االعتيادي بشكل محدود إعتمادا“ على نتائجه في‬
‫االمتحان المركب و توصية المدرس و العوامل األخرى‬
‫برنامج الوافدين الجدد‬
‫لقد تم استحداث برنامج الوافدون الجدد لغرض تعليم اللغة االنكليزية للقادمين الى الواليات المتحدة ( الناطقين بالعربية‬
‫واالسبانية المشاركين في برنامج التعليم االنتقالي للناطقين بلغتين ) ‪ ,‬وهو برنامج مصمم خصيصا" للذين اليتقنون اللغة‬
‫االنكليزية ‪ ,‬ذوي التعليم المتدني و ذوي القدرات التعليمية المحدودة باللغة األم و تتوفر صفوف الوافدين الجدد لكل المواد‬
‫المطلوبة للتخرج ( الرياضيات ‪ ,‬العلوم ‪ ,‬االجتماعيات و اآلداب ) ‪.‬هذه الصفوف المكثفة مكرسة لغرض سد الفجوة التعليمية‬
‫واالكاديمية وتسهيل االندماج الثقافي ويقضي الطلبة عام دراسي كامل مع مدرسة صيفية لموسم واحد في هذا البرنامج‬
‫وثم يتم بعد ذلك تحويلهم الى البرنامج االنتقالي للتعليم‬
‫البرنامح االنتقالي للتعليم (تي بي آي)‬
‫كل الطلبة ممن كانت لغتهم األصلية غير اإلنكليزية(العربية أو االسبانية) و أحرزوا أقل من ‪ 4.2‬في القراءة والكتابة‬
‫ودرجة‪ 5.0‬في اختبار االستماع‪-‬القراءة والكتابة و في كال اإلمتحانين ( األكسس) على مستوى الوالية أو إختبار الكفاءة‬
‫يكونوا مؤهلين لتلقي خدمة الناطقين بلغتين تتوفر دروس برامج التعليم اإلنتقالي لكل المواد المطلوبة للتخرج و تكون هذه‬
‫الدروس باللغة االنكليزية المبسطة كما يستخدم المدرس تقنيات مادة االنكليزية كلغة ثانية لجعل الدروس سهلة و قابلة‬
‫للفهم‪ .‬تستخدم مواد التعليم اإلعتيادي في هذه الدروس و اللغة المستخدمة هي اإلنكليزية بشكل أساسي و الغرض‬
‫من هذه الدروس هو إكتساب المهارة باللغة اإلنكليزية بصورة أكاديمية‪ ,‬باالضافة لذلك فإن طلبة برنامج التعلبم االنتقالي‬
‫يتم وضعهم في صفوف االنكليزية كلغة ثانية إعتمادا“ على مستوى إتقانهم للغة االنكليزية‪ .‬في هذه الدروس (االنكليزية‬
‫كلغة ثانية) يقوم الطلبة بتطوير مهاراتهم باالستماع‪ ,‬التحدث‪ ,‬القراءة و الكتابة باللغة االنكليزية‪ .‬كما يحصل هؤالء الطلبة‬
‫على نقاط (كريديتس) باللغة االنكليزية بحضور هذه الدروس و بمجرد أن يحصل الطالب على درجة‪ 3.2‬أو أعلى من ذلك في‬
‫القراءة فبإمكانه الحصول على بعض الدروس االعتيادية و بشكل محدود و إعتمادا“ على الدرجة في االمتحان المركب‪,‬‬
‫توصية المدرس و العوامل األخرى‪.‬‬
‫برنامج اللغة المزدوجة‪:‬يكون هذا البرنامج لطلبة الدراسة االعدادية من الذين قضوا ‪ 8‬سنوات في برنامج اللغة المزدوجة‬
‫في مرحلة الدراسة االبتدائية والمتوسطة او للطلبة ممن كانوا في البرنامج االنتقالي للناطقين بلغتين من الناطقين باللغة‬
‫االسبانية‪.‬سيتم اختبار الطلبة لغرض وضعهم في المكان الصحيح في البرنامج وسيدرس الطلبة الناطقين بلغتين في هذا‬
‫البرنامج اللغة االنكليزية كلغة ثانية (اي أس أل) وسيدرسون فنون اللغة االسبانية في كل عام أما الدروس االعتيادية‬
‫األخرى فسيدرسونها بكال اللغتين‪.‬ان الهدف من البرنامج هو تمكين الطلبة من تحقيق مستويات عالية من الكفاءة‬
‫االكاديمية في القراءة‪,‬الكتابة‪,‬االستماع والمحادثة وفي كال اللغتين االنكليزية واالسبانية‪.‬‬
‫‪88‬‬
Cómo elegir una academia y un camino
Cómo elegir:
Paso 1: Identifica tus intereses.
El identificar tus intereses personales (pasatiempos y materias académicas) te guiará hacia la mejor academia para ti y
causará que sean gratificantes y alentadores tus estudios académicos y profesión futura.
¿Cuál de las siguientes descripciones concuerda mejor con tus intereses?
A. Me gustan la escritura creativa, la lluvia de ideas nuevas, la informática, el aprendizaje de un nuevo idioma, la creación de dibujos o las artes visuales.
B. Me gusta construir cosas, resolver rompecabezas, aprender sobre los aviones y carros o trabajar con herramientas.
C. Me gusta ayudar a otros, trabajar con los niños, tocar un instrumento musical e interpretar en (o detrás de) el escenario.
D. Me gusta la ciencia, la comprensión de cómo funciona el cuerpo humano o el cuidado de otros.
Si escogiste A, podría ser que BAMIT (Negocios, Artes, Mercadotecnia e Informática) sea la academia para ti.
Si escogiste B, podría ser que EMITT (Ingeniería, Fabricación y Tecnología Industrial/Comercial) sea la academia para
ti.
Si escogiste C, podría ser que HPS (Servicios Humanos y Públicos) sea la academia para ti.
Si escogiste D, podría ser que HS (Ciencias de Salud) sea la academia para ti.
Paso 2: Repasa tus opciones en cuanto a los caminos profesionales.
BAMITT
EMITT
HPS
Contabilidad/Finanzas
Arquitectura y diseño
Educación y desarrollo infantil
Negocios
Ingeniería
Sostenibilidad ambiental
Diseño gráfico /Producción de medios de Operaciones de fabricación
comunicación
Obreros Especializados
Estudios internacionales
Tecnología de transporte
Informática
Servicios humanos
HS
RENAISSANCE
CAPA
Salud y bienestar
Los estudiantes de Renaissance
toman una serie de cursos durante un periodo de cuatro años
que les adiestra para ser competitivos en la universidad de su
preferencia.
Los estudiantes de CAPA toman una serie
de cursos de artes integradas durante un
periodo de cuatro años, además de cursos optativos avanzados en base a la interpretación, que adiestra a los estudiantes para una profesión en las artes escénicas.
Ciencias médicas
La ley y seguridad pública
Producción de obras artísticas
Artes escénicas
Paso 3: Selecciona tus cursos optativos.
Además de seleccionar una academia y camino profesional, la mayoría de los estudiantes tienen espacio en su horario
para uno o dos cursos optativos. Los estudiantes en todas las academias pueden elegir cursos optativos generales de
las siguientes áreas:
· Artes de lenguaje (cursos como Escritura creativa, Periodismo y Anuario)
· Ciencias (cursos como Química de nivel avanzado, Ciencias ambientales y Zoología)
· Estudios sociales (cursos como Historia de los afroamericanos, Derecho penal, Psicología y Relaciones internacionales)
· Bellas artes (cursos como Arte de estudio, Banda de concierto, Coro, Actuación e Introducción al teatro técnico)
· Profesiones y educación técnica (cursos como Desarrollo infantil, Dibujo técnico/CAD, Emprendurismo, Sistemas de
información y Liderazgo estudiantil)
89
Requisitos de graduación
Área
académica
2015
2016-2018
Requisitos de
graduación del
Distrito 205
Requisitos de
graduación del
Distrito 205
Programas profesionales en centros de estudios
superiores, Escuelas vocacionales
Universidades de
cuatro años,
Programas de
traslado en centros de estudios
superiores
Universidades
sumamente
selectivas
Inglés
4 años (8 créditos)
4 años (8 créditos)
4 años
4 años
4 años
Matemáticas
3 años (6 créditos)
3 años (6 créditos)
2 años
3 años
3-4 años
Álgebra, Geometría y 1
año después de Geometría
2 años (4 créditos)
Álgebra, Geometría y
Álgebra 2
3 años (6 créditos)
2 años
3 años
4 años
Biología, Ciencias físicas/
Química/ Ciencias de la
tierra
3 años (6 créditos)
Biología, Ciencias
Físicas y 1 año adicional de ciencias
3 años (6 créditos)
2 años
3 años
4 años
Historia de los EE.UU.,
Gobierno de los EE.UU.,
Economía, Historia/
Geografía mundial
Educación física – 3.5
años (7 créditos)
Historia de los
EE.UU., Gobierno de
los EE.UU., Economía,
Historia/ Geografía
mundial
Educación física – 3.5
años (7 créditos)
_
_
_
Salud - .5 años (1 crédito)
1 año (2 créditos)
Salud - .5 años (1 crédito)
2 años (4 créditos)
_
2 años
2-4 años Idioma extranjero
Ciencias
Ciencias
sociales
Educación
física/Salud
Bellas artes,
Idioma extranjero,
CTE
Otros cursos optativos
Cursos optativos suficientes para alcanzar la
cantidad total de créditos requeridos por la
Política de la Junta
Curso de
nivel avanzado/ doble
crédito
Se recomienda un curso
de nivel avanzado o curso de doble crédito en
cualquier materia.
Total
40 créditos
Cursos optativos suficientes para alcanzar
la cantidad total de
créditos requeridos
por la Política de la
Junta
Se recomienda un
curso de nivel avanzado o curso de doble
crédito en cualquier
materia.
48 créditos
Varía
Varía
1 año CTE o
Bellas artes
Varía
_
_
_
Clasificación por grado
Se calcula al principio de cada año escolar.
Año en la escuela
2015—Créditos acumulados
2016-18— Créditos acumulados
Clasificación
1
0-9
0-11
Freshmen
2o
10-19
12-23
Sophomore
3er
20-29
24-33
Junior
30+
34+
Senior
er
o
4
90
Sample Four Year High School Plan
English/LA
Math
Science
Social Science
PE/Health
Global
Pathway
4 Years
3 Years
3 Years
3 Years
4 Years
Elective
Elective
2 Years
3 Years
(4 Credits)
(6 Credits)
(8 Credits)
9
College Prep English 9
Honors English 9
(6 Credits)
Algebra 1
Honors Algebra 1
Geometry
Honors Geometry
(6 Credits)
College Core
Biology
College Core
World Geography
College Prep
Biology
College Prep
World History
Honors Biology
Honors World
History
College Core
Chemistry
General
*Alg Foundation
10 College Prep English 10
Honors English 10
Geometry
Honors Geometry
Algebra 2
College Algebra
(6 Credits)
Elective
College Prep
Chemistry
(8 Credits)
PE
Fine Arts/
Foreign Language/Music/
Other global
Electives
Freshmen
Seminar/
Elective
PE/Health Fine Arts/
Foreign Language/Music/
Other global
Electives
Year 1 pathway
elective
PE
Fine Arts/
Foreign Language/Music/
Other global
Electives
Year 2 pathway
elective
PE
Fine Arts/
Foreign Language/Music/
Other global
Electives
Year 3 pathway
elective
Honors Chemistry
*Geo Foundation
11 College Prep English 11
Honors English 11
Algebra 2
College Core
Physics
College Core US
History
College Prep
Physics
College Prep US
History
AP Physics
AP US History
Math Topics
General
Intro to Stats
Elective
College Core US
Gov’t/Econ
College Algebra
Alg 3/Trig
Pre-Calculus
*ACT Prep
Intro to Stats
AP Stats
12 College Prep English 12
AP English 12
Alg 3/Trig
Pre-Calculus
College Prep US
Gov’t/Econ
AP Statistics
AP US Gov’t/AP
MacroEcon
AP Calculus
AP US Gov’t/AP
91
Opciones de graduación
Diploma tradicional
 Para recibir un diploma tradicional en la ceremonia de graduación, un estudiante debe satisfacer todos los requisitos antes del
momento de la graduación. No se permite que los estudiantes que no reciben diplomas participen en la ceremonia de graduación; las excepciones incluyen estudiantes de intercambio en el extranjero y estudiantes que reciben servicios de educación
especial (los que continúan asistiendo a la escuela hasta el día antes de cumplir 22 años).
 Un estudiante de las Escuelas Públicas de Rockford que se traslada de una escuela preparatoria RPS a otra durante su cuarto
año en la preparatoria debe completar todo el semestre final de su cuarto año de preparatoria en la "nueva" escuela para recibir un diploma expedido de esa escuela.
 Los estudiantes que se trasladan a una escuela preparatoria de RPS sin un certificado analítico de estudios de una agencia
acreditada por North Central debe completar los dos semestres en su totalidad antes de graduarse de una escuela preparatoria de RPS, para recibir un diploma de las Escuelas Públicas de Rockford.
 Los requisitos de graduación para estudiantes que reciben servicios de educación especial los rige la política 8.13 de la Junta de
Educación. Durante la revisión anual del estudiante en 9° grado, el equipo de educación especial debe determinar el año pronosticado en que el estudiante se graduará de la preparatoria y el plan que el estudiante seguirá para graduarse: 1) plan estándar de graduación del distrito; 2) plan modificado de graduación del distrito; o 3) plan alternativo de graduación, según el programa educativo individualizado.
 Los estudiantes que satisfacen los requisitos de graduación durante el verano (antes del 1° de agosto) después de que su promoción se gradúe recibirán un diploma con la fecha de junio de ese año. Los estudiantes que satisfacen los requisitos después
de la fecha límite del 1° de agosto recibirán un diploma con la fecha de junio del siguiente año.
 Los estudiantes de cuarto año reciben reconocimientos por la distinción de graduarse con el primer (valedictorian) y segundo
(salutatorian) promedio académico, por cum laude (3.50 – 3.7499), magna cum laude (GPA de 3.75 – 3.999) y summa cum
laude (GPA de 4.0) en base al promedio cumulativo de las calificaciones de ocho semestres.
 Las ceremonias de graduación de las Escuelas Públicas de Rockford son ceremonias formales; los estudiantes deben conformarse a los códigos de conducta y vestimenta. Todas las cuotas las deben cancelar antes de la fecha límite establecida para
participar en la ceremonia de graduación.
Certificación de asistencia
El estudiante ha terminado su cuarto año de asistencia en la preparatoria, pero todavía no ha acumulado suficientes créditos para
graduarse con un diploma y la cantidad de procesos en el IEP del estudiante exigen la continuación de servicios de educación especial, servicios de transición o servicios relacionados. La razón por la cual el estudiante no ha satisfecho los requisitos de graduación
tiene que estar relacionado a su discapacidad y no debido a alguna razón por la cual un estudiante que no tiene discapacidad no
sería elegible para participar en la ceremonia de graduación. Por ejemplo, el estudiante con una discapacidad debe estar en regla
con la escuela al momento de la ceremonia de graduación; y/o la razón por la que no haya satisfecho los requisitos de graduación
no puede relacionarse con faltas de asistencia que no se deben a la discapacidad del estudiante.
Graduación temprana
Un estudiante que contempla satisfacer los requisitos de graduación antes de los ocho semestres puede solicitar una graduación
temprana al entregar una explicación de sus razones por escrito y cumplir con un plan de graduación temprana previo al año de
graduación deseado. La solicitud debe estar firmada por el padre, madre o tutor del estudiante, su consejero y el director de la
escuela del estudiante antes de someterla a la consideración del superintendente. Los estudiantes elegibles deben satisfacer todos
los requisitos de créditos y cursos que se aplican a la clase de cuatro años. Los estudiantes que se gradúan temprano no serán considerados para reconocimientos por distinción de graduarse con las mejores calificaciones o las segundas mejores calificaciones o
los veinticinco estudiantes con calificaciones más altas en la clase de graduación. La clasificación de graduación de los estudiantes
que se gradúan temprano será la de tercer año. Todos los estudiantes que se gradúan temprano serán incluidos en las actividades
de cuarto año.
Certificado de cumplimiento
RPS 205 emitirá un “Certificado de Cumplimiento” para estudiantes que, debido a su edad, ya no van a ser elegibles para continuar
con el programa de educación especial. Los estudiantes con discapacidades pueden asistir a la escuela hasta el día antes de que
cumplan 22 años si todavía no han satisfecho los requisitos de un diploma estándar y continúan recibiendo servicios prescritos en
su IEP. En tal caso, un estudiante y su familia pueden decidir terminar con la escuela el semestre de primavera antes de que el estudiante cumpla 22 años, después del semestre escolar extendido antes de que el estudiante cumpla 22 años o el día antes de que el
estudiante cumpla 22 años. El Certificado de Cumplimiento se emitirá el último día que el estudiante asiste a la escuela.
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Cuotas estudiantiles
El siguiente programa de cuotas, conforme a lo aprobado por la Junta de Educación de RPS 205, está sujeto a cambios.
*Cuota de consumibles de laboratorio
Incluye todos los útiles de instrucción, materiales y libros de
trabajo para los cursos centrales (Inglés, Ciencias, Estudios
sociales, Matemáticas y Educación física) y cuotas para can-
$100.00
*Depósito para los libros de texto
(reembolsable)
$25.00
**Cuota de admisión atlética
$20.00
**Cuota de estacionamiento
$60.00
Cuota atlética/Participación en actividades (por actividad)
$100.00
Banda/Orquesta
$25.00
Arte/ Arte de CAPA
$25.00
Coro/Drama/Drama de CAPA
$25.00
Diseño gráfico de CAPA
$25.00
Lengua extranjera
$12.00
Autoriza su asistencia en eventos atléticos de temporada
regular.
Requerida para todos los estudiantes que participan en clubes con eventos aprobados por IHSA, porristas que usan
Vocacional
$5.00 - $12.00
Vocacional (remate)
$15.00 - $60.00
Clases de conducir
(Educación práctica)
$250.00
Alquiler de instrumento musical
$30.00
**Cuotas de matrícula para clases de
verano
$170.00
Fuera del distrito - $300.00
**Clases nocturnas
$170.00
Dentro del distrito – $320 por 2 clases
Fuera del distrito – $250 por 1 clase /$425 por 2 clases
Educación física
Varía según el curso
CISCO
$40.00
Examen de cursos de nivel avanzado
$89.00
Se cobra la cuota hasta por 3 exámenes
Contabilidad
Varía según el curso
Cursos de aprendizaje virtual
Varía según el curso
***Cursos de doble inscripción
Varía según el curso
Los estudiantes son responsables de todas las cuotas estudiantiles y de inscripción. Dependiendo del programa, los
estudiantes pueden ser responsables también de las cuotas de
* Cuotas obligatorias
** No se puede eximir a nadie de las cuotas
***La doble inscripción incluye, pero no se limita a RVC Dual Credit, CEANCI: Advance Now, CISCO y programas regionales.
Remate – clases vocacionales de nivel superior (estudiantes de tercer y cuarto año de la preparatoria)
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TRANSITIONAL BILINGUAL EDUCATION (TBE)
TRANSITIONAL PROGRAM OF INSTRUCTION (TPI)
PROGRAMA DE TRANSICIÓN BILINGÜE (TBE)
PROGRAMA DE INSTRUCCIÓN PARA LA TRANSICIÓN (TPI)
(TBE) ‫التعليم االنتقالي للناطقين بلغتين‬
(TPI) ‫البرنامج االنتقالي للتعليم‬
Bilingual Classes
Bilingual classes are taught primarily in Spanish or Arabic for students who speak these languages.
History
30303 Bilingual World History 1 & 2: Grade Level: 9- 10. In this survey of world history, students will explore the cultures, people, events, and institutions from ancient to modern times. Both the western and nonwestern traditions will be
studied. Geographic skills will be reinforced. A study of world history is recommended by many colleges.
30306 Bilingual World Geography: Grade Level 9-10. In this course students will study different regions and cultures
of the world through global issues, such as population, energy resources, waste disposal and recycling, global economy,
human rights, conflict and urbanization. Students will examine how humans adapt to their environments and how nations
rely on each other, using connections to current events and understanding how technology is used in geography.
30309 Bilingual U.S. History: Grade Level: 11. (Meets graduation requirement). Emphasizes U.S. History from the beginning Indian cultures, American colonies, War of Independence, and Civil War to present.
30313 Bilingual Government: Grade Level: 12. (One semester; meets graduation requirement). A basic study of the
American political system at the national, state and local levels. A detailed study of the Constitution and its ramifications
in today’s society is also included. Students must pass the Constitution Test.
30314 Bilingual Economics: Grade Level: 12. (One semester; meets graduation requirement). Students learn how the
American economic system operates. Emphasis is placed on personal economic problems and solutions.
Mathematics
30116 Bilingual Algebra 1 Foundations: Grade Level: 9-11. A year long course. A one year algebra course to address mastery of 8th grade standards and reinforce the first priority Algebra 1 standards.
30406 Bilingual Algebra 1: Grade Level: 9-10. A year long course (Meets graduation requirements). It emphasizes
linear and quadratic topics, radical expressions, statistics, systems of equations, problem solving, and introductory coordinate geometry.
30433 Bilingual Pre-Algebra : (Elective Credit) Grade Level 9-11. A year long course. This course is designed to accelerate skills in math to prepare students to take Bilingual or Sheltered Algebra 1.
30412 Bilingual Algebra 2: A year long course. Prerequisite: Geometry or Sheltered Geometry Foundations. This
course is a second year algebra course expanding concepts from Algebra 1 and introducing synthetic division, absolute
value equations and inequalities, quadratic inequalities, determinants and matrices, and conic sections.
30126 Bilingual Geometry Foundations: A year long course Prerequisite: Bilingual / Sheltered Algebra 1 or Sheltered
Algebra 1 Foundations. It helps students learn geometry standards such as solving real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, volume, measure, surface area, geometrical figures, understanding the Pythagorean
Theorem, etc.
30409 Bilingual Geometry: Grade Level: 10 - 12. A year long course Prerequisite: Algebra 1. A course
covering geometric vocabulary, properties, and relationships, as well as thinking skills, and applications of geometric
principles to the physical world. This course places an emphasis on inductive and numerical reasoning.
30418 Bilingual Introduction To Statistics Through Applications: A year long course. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and
Geometry. This course acquaints students with the basic ideas and the language of statistics. It introduces students to
the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data that is provided or data that
students obtain from experiments or surveys. Students use exploratory methods to identify patterns and make decisions
to solve real-life problems.
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30500 Bilingual Biology: Grade Level: 9-10 year long course. This is a course focusing on the major topics of life science
using scientific inquiry. First semester concentrates on ecology, and cells. Second semester focuses on genetics, reproduction, change over time, classifications, and the human body. Laboratory work is a significant part of the course.
30701 Bilingual Health: A semester long course. (Meets graduation requirement). A study of the basic concepts concerning the human body. Units include chronic and inherited diseases, drugs and alcohol, venereal diseases (AIDS), tobacco,
contagious diseases, cancer, nutrition, and physical fitness and hygiene.
30506 Bilingual Physical Science: Grade Level: 10-12 year long course. Physical Science is a course which continues
the Physics: A First Course program including the topics of electricity, magnetism, matter and energy. In addition, basic
chemistry topics are included such as atomic structure; periodic table; reactions; formulas and equations; and acids and
bases. Laboratory activities are a significant part of the course.
30520 Bilingual Earth Science 1 -Geology & Oceanography: Elective - Grade Level: 10-12. This semester course consists of an introduction to geology and resource management. Included in this course will be a major emphasis on cartography; constructional and destructive forces; rocks and minerals; earth history, and oceanography. This course will include
environmental issues and laboratory procedures. Offered in conjunction with Earth Science-Astronomy & Meteorology.
30521 Bilingual Earth Science 2 -Astronomy & Meteorology: Elective - Grade Level: 10-12. This semester course covers astronomy and meteorology. Included in this course will be a major emphasis on the relationships in space and an
overview of cosmology and meteorology.. Offered in conjunction with Earth Science-Geology & Oceanography.
30510 Bilingual Chemistry: Grade Level: 10-12 year long course. This course focuses on the study of matter. Some topics included are equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction, periodicity of elements, chemical bonding, acids and bases, formula writing, equation writing, stoichiometry and matter-energy relationships. In this course algebra and geometry are applied to show the mathematical expression of chemical concepts. Laboratory work is a significant part of the course. Chemistry 1 & 2 is intended for those planning a career in science or a science-related field.
30600 Bilingual Introduction to Business & Technology Concepts 1-2 year long course: Students will learn to use computers, software and operating systems. Students will also be introduced to the American economy and the role of business.
Career opportunities in business will also be explored. This prepares students to take 2600 Business and Technology Concepts I &II.
30204 Bilingual Freshman Seminar: Grade Level: 9. All freshmen will be placed in the Freshman Seminar course. One
semester. Freshman Seminar combines career exploration and development with special emphasis on success skills, communication skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills, and personal qualities (responsibility, self-esteem, selfmanagement, and integrity).
Sheltered Classes
Sheltered classes are taught in English for students of all language backgrounds.
History
31301 Sheltered World History 1 & 2: Grade Level: 9- 10.
In this survey of world history, students will explore the cultures, people, events, and institutions from ancient to modern
times. Both the western and nonwestern traditions will be studied. Geographic skills will be reinforced. A study of world history is recommended by many colleges.
31306 Sheltered World Geography: Grade Level 9-10. In this course students will study different regions and cultures of
the world through global issues, such as population, energy resources, waste disposal and recycling, global economy, human rights, conflict and urbanization. Students will examine how humans adapt to their environments and how nations rely
on each other, using connections to current
events and understanding how technology is used in geography.
31309 Sheltered U.S. History: Grade Level: 11. (Meets graduation requirement). Emphasizes U.S. History from the beginning Indian cultures, American colonies, War of Independence, and Civil War to present.
31313 Sheltered Government: Grade Level: 12. (One semester; meets graduation requirement). A basic study of the
American political system at the national, state and local levels. A detailed study of the Constitution and its ramifications in
today’s society is also included. Students must pass the Constitution Test.
31314 Sheltered Economics: Grade Level: 12. (One semester; meets graduation requirement). Students learn how the
American economic system operates. Emphasis is placed on personal economic problems and solutions.
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Mathematics
31116 Sheltered Algebra 1 Foundations: Grade Level: 9-11. A one year algebra course to address mastery of 8th
grade standards and reinforce the first priority Algebra 1 standards.
31406 Sheltered Algebra 1: Grade Level: 9-10. A year long course (Meets graduation requirements). It emphasizes
linear and quadratic topics, radical expressions, statistics, systems of equations, problem solving, and introductory coordinate geometry.
30430 Sheltered Pre-Algebra Foundations: Grade Level: 9-10. A year long course. This course focuses on teaching
mathematical and algebraic concepts while enhancing the language of mathematics to help newcomers of high school
age with some exposure to elementary math standards.
31433 Sheltered Pre-Algebra: Grade Level: 9-10. A year long course. This course teaches general mathematical and
algebraic concepts and learning the language of mathematics to help newcomers with some exposure to middle school
math standards.
31412 Sheltered Algebra 2: A year long course. Prerequisite: Geometry or Sheltered Geometry Foundations. This
course is a second year algebra course expanding concepts from Algebra 1 and introducing synthetic division, absolute
value equations and inequalities, quadratic inequalities, determinants and matrices, and conic sections.
31126 Sheltered Geometry Foundations: A year long course Prerequisite: Bilingual/ Sheltered Algebra 1 or Sheltered
Algebra 1 Foundations. It helps students learn geometry standards such as solving real-world and mathematical problems involving area, surface area, volume, measure, surface area, geometrical figures, understanding the Pythagorean
Theorem, etc.
31409 Sheltered Geometry: Grade Level: 10 - 12. A year long course Prerequisite: Algebra 1. A course covering geometric vocabulary, properties, and relationships, as well as thinking skills, and applications of geometric principles to the
physical world. This course places an emphasis on inductive and numerical reasoning.
31418 Sheltered Introduction To Statistics Through Applications: A year long course. Prerequisite: Algebra 1 and
Geometry. This course acquaints students with the basic ideas and the language of statistics. It introduces students to
the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data that is provided or data that
students obtain from experiments or surveys. Students use exploratory methods to identify patterns and make decisions
to solve real-life problems.
Science
31500 Sheltered Biology: Grade Level: 9-10. This is a course focusing on the major topics of life science using scientific inquiry. First semester concentrates on ecology, and cells. Second semester focuses on genetics, reproduction,
change over time, classifications, and the human body. Laboratory work is a significant part of the course.
31701 Sheltered Health: A semester long course. (Meets graduation requirement). A study of the basic concepts concerning the human body. Units include chronic and inherited diseases, drugs and alcohol, venereal diseases (AIDS), tobacco, contagious diseases, cancer, nutrition, and physical fitness and hygiene.
31506 Sheltered Physical Science: Grade Level: 10-12. Physical Science is a course which continues the Physics: A
First Course program including the topics of electricity, magnetism, matter and energy. In addition, basic chemistry topics are included such as atomic structure; periodic table; reactions; formulas and equations; and acids and bases. Laboratory activities are a significant part of the course.
31520 Sheltered Earth Science 1 -Geology & Oceanography: Elective - Grade Level: 10-12. This semester course
consists of an introduction to geology and resource management. Included in this course will be a major emphasis on
cartography; constructional and destructive forces; rocks and minerals; earth history, and oceanography. This course will
include environmental issues and laboratory procedures. Offered in conjunction with Earth Science-Astronomy &
Meteorology.
31521 Sheltered Earth Science 2 -Astronomy & Meteorology: Elective - Grade Level: 10-12. This semester course
covers astronomy and meteorology. Included in this course will be a major emphasis on the relationships in space and
an overview of cosmology and meteorology. Offered in conjunction with Earth Science-Geology & Oceanography.
31510 Sheltered Chemistry: Grade Level: 10-12. This course focuses on the study of matter. Some topics included
are equilibrium, kinetics, oxidation-reduction, periodicity of elements, chemical bonding, acids and bases, formula writing
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equation writing, stoichiometry and matter-energy relationships. In this course algebra and geometry are applied to
show the mathematical expression of chemical concepts.
Laboratory work is a significant part of the course. Chemistry 1 & 2 is intended for those planning a career in science or
a science-related field.
31600 Sheltered Introduction to Business & Technology Concepts 1-2: Students will learn to use computers, software and operating systems. Students will also be introduced to the American economy and the role of business. Career
opportunities in business will also be explored. This prepares students to take 2600 Business and Technology Concepts
I &II.
31204 Sheltered Freshman Seminar: Grade Level: 9. All freshmen will be placed in the Freshman Seminar course.
One semester. Freshman Seminar combines career exploration and development with special emphasis on success
skills, communication skills, critical thinking and problem solving skills, and personal qualities (responsibility, selfesteem, self-management, and integrity).
Language Arts
33127 ESL English 1: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets graduation requirement). This course is aligned to the English Language Development Standards as well as the Common Core. This course is designed to help students who are at the
beginner’s levels of language acquisition. It emphasizes vocabulary, phonics, grammar, reading comprehension and
writing.
33148 ESL English 2—Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets graduation requirement). This course is aligned to the English Language Development Standards as well as the Common Core. It is designed to help students who are at the next level of
language acquisition. It emphasizes vocabulary, phonics, grammar, reading comprehension and writing.
33133 ESL English 3: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets graduation requirement). This course is aligned to the English Language Development Standards as well as the Common Core. This course reinforces reading, speaking, listening and
writing skills. It reinforces grammar structures. It continues to emphasize oral and written communication in English. It
continues to emphasize oral and written communication as well as reading comprehension in English.
33136 ESL English 4: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets graduation requirements). This course is aligned to the English Language Development Standards as well as the Common Core. This course reinforces grammar, conversational and writing skills. It increases the use of reading comprehension strategies and practice.
33139 ESL English 5: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets graduation requirement). This course is aligned to the English Language Development Standards as well as the Common Core. This course encourages oral expression and literary application. It exposes students to short stories from the classics and the study of American writers. It places emphasis on
standard oral and written expression and use of correct grammar structures.
33145 ESL English 6: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets graduation requirement). This course is aligned to the English Language Development Standards as well as the Common Core. This course emphasizes the use of academic vocabulary
and correct grammar structures to compose a variety of writings and engage in conversations on different topics. Students will be engaged in reading a selection of texts including all genres to express their ideas orally or in writing. Students will be able to conduct research papers and do
oral presentations.
30101 Spanish Language Arts 1 – Freshmen only-(meets graduation requirements)
This one year course is taught in Spanish for those students in the bilingual program. This course is a standards-based,
thematically organized study of multi-ethnic works. Within each unit, students will participate in full-class studies of core
works and make independent reading selections from class novel collections. Composition study, including research,
grammar, and usage, will be integrated into the thematic units. Study skills and a variety of texts are used with an emphasis on non-action material. The class emphasizes language arts skills in the Spanish language and is based in the
Spanish Language Arts Standards.
30103 Spanish Language Arts 2 - based on teacher recommendation
(meets graduation requirements) This one year course is taught in Spanish for those students in the bilingual program.
This course is a standards-based, thematically organized study of multi-ethnic works. Within each unit, students will participate in full-class studies of core works and make independent reading selections from class novel collections. Composition study, including research, grammar, and usage, will be integrated into the thematic units. Study skills and a
variety of texts are used with an emphasis on non-action material. The class emphasizes language arts skills in the
Spanish language and is based in the Spanish Language Arts Standards.
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30106 Spanish Language Arts 3 - based on teacher recommendation
(meets graduation requirements) This one year course is taught in Spanish for those students in the bilingual program.
This course is a standards-based, thematically organized study of multi-ethnic works. Within each unit, students will participate in full-class studies of core works and make independent reading selections from class novel collections. Composition study, including research, grammar, and usage, will be integrated into the thematic units. The class emphasizes
language arts skills in the Spanish language and is based in the Spanish Language Arts Standards.
31220 College Core Literacy—Plugged-in to Reading: Grade Level 9&10. College Core Literacy– Plugged-In to
Reading is an intervention Program for students reading below grade level that will allow students to be given specific
and individualized instruction to improve their reading skills. Skills taught include: phonics and word analysis, fluency
and comprehension, reading decoding, word recognition, and expanding vocabulary. This course is to be taken concurrently with an English course.
31223 College Core Literacy—Read 180: Grade Level 9&10. College Core Literacy– Read 180 is an intervention Program that will allow students to be given specific and individualized instruction to improve their reading skills. Skills
taught include: phonics and word analysis, fluency and comprehension, reading decoding, word recognition, and expanding vocabulary. This course is to be taken concurrently with an English course.
31226 College Core Literacy—System44 Grade Level 9&10. College Core Literacy– System44 is an intervention Program that will allow students to be given specific and individualized instruction to improve their reading skills. Skills
taught include: phonics and word analysis, fluency and comprehension, reading decoding, word recognition, and expanding vocabulary. This course is to be taken concurrently with an English course.
NEWCOMER CLASSES
Newcomer classes are for students who are at the beginning level of acquiring English skills and may have little or no
formal education.
Newcomer Language Arts
32133 This WIDA Standards based course is a double-block incorporating language arts and reading. Grade Level: 9 12. (Meets graduation requirement) This course is designed to develop literacy skills for students with low reading skills.
The goal is to increase the reading ability of students enough to enable them to access information from textbooks in
regular classes.
This course addresses the immediate needs of students who are recent arrivals (new to the country). This course presents information to help students navigate the new culture. This includes: high school course sequence, scheduling,
transportation, sports, attendance guidelines, graduation requirements, cultural information, parent- teacher conferences
and intensive survival English in the area of housing, food, clothing, transportation, money, personal information, health
and emergency information. It also introduces resources from the community.
32330 Newcomer Social Studies: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets elective credit) . This course consists of general social
studies concepts and vocabulary. It prepares students to take required social studies courses such as sheltered or regular U.S. History, Government, Economics, World Geography, and World History.
32530 Newcomer Science: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets elective credit) . This course consists of general science topics
and vocabulary. It prepares students to take sheltered or regular science classes such as Biology and Chemistry.
32430 Newcomer Pre-Algebra: Grade Level: 9 - 12. (Meets elective credit) . This course focuses on accelerating skills
in mathematics to be prepared for Algebra 1.
Clases Bilingües
La instrucción en las clases bilingües se da principalmente en español o árabe para estudiantes que hablan estos idiomas.
Historia
30303 Historia Mundial Bilingüe 1 y 2: Grados 9 a 10. En este estudio de la historia mundial, los estudiantes explorarán las culturas, personas, eventos e instituciones desde la antigüedad hasta los tiempos modernos. Estudiaremos
tanto las tradiciones occidentales como las no occidentales. Reforzaremos las destrezas geográficas. Muchas universidades recomiendan el estudio de la historia mundial.
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30306 Geografía Mundial Bilingüe: Grados 9 a 10. En este curso los alumnos estudiarán diferentes regiones y culturas del mundo mediante asuntos globales como la población, recursos de energía, eliminación de basura y reciclaje,
economía global, derechos humanos, conflicto y urbanización. Los estudiantes examinarán cómo los humanos se
adaptan a sus ambientes y cómo las naciones dependen unas de otras, utilizando conexiones a eventos actuales y la
comprensión del modo en que se usa la tecnología en la geografía.
30309 Historia Bilingüe de los EE.UU.: Grado 11. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Hace énfasis en la
historia de los EE.UU. desde el principio de las culturas de los Nativos Americanos, las colonias norteamericanas, la
Guerra de Independencia y la Guerra Civil, hasta la actualidad.
30313 Gobierno Bilingüe: Grado 12. (Un semestre; satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Un estudio básico del
sistema político estadounidense al nivel nacional,estatal y local. Se incluye también un estudio detallado de la constitución y sus ramificaciones en la sociedad de hoy. Los estudiantes deben pasar el Examen de la Constitución.
30314 Economía Bilingüe: Grado 12. (Un semestre; satisface los requisitos para la graduación).
Los estudiantes aprenden cómo opera el sistema económico de los Estados Unidos. Hace énfasis en los problemas
económicos personales y en las soluciones.
Matemáticas
30116 Fundamentos de Algebra 1 Bilingüe: Grados 9-11. Este curso dura un año. Un curso de álgebra de un año
para manejar el dominio de los estándares de 8o grado y reforzar los estándares de primera prioridad en Algebra 1.
30406 Algebra 1 Bilingüe: Grados 9-10. Este curso dura un año. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Hace
énfasis en los temas lineales y cuadráticos, expresiones radicales, estadísticas, sistemas de ecuaciones, resolución de
problemas y una introducción a la geometría de coordenadas.
30430 Fundamentos de Pre-Algebra Bilingüe: Grados 9-10. Este curso dura un año. Se enfoca en la enseñanza de
conceptos matemáticos y algebraicos mientras enriquece el lenguaje de matemáticas para ayudar a los recién llegados
en edad de la preparatoria, al exponerlos a algunos de los estándares básicos de matemáticas.
30412 Algebra 2 Bilingüe: Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito: Geometría o Fundamentos de Geometría Modificada. Este curso del segundo año de álgebra expande los conceptos de Álgebra 1 e introduce la división sintética, ecuaciones de valor absoluto y desigualdades, desigualdades cuadráticas, determinantes y matrices y secciones cónicas.
30126 Fundamentos de Geometría Bilingüe: Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito: Álgebra 1 Bilingüe/Modificada o
Fundamentos de Álgebra 1 Modificada. Ayuda a los estudiantes a aprender los estándares de geometría, como la resolución de problemas matemáticos y de la vida real que tienen que ver con el área, área de la superficie, volumen, medición, figuras geométricas, la comprensión del Teorema de Pitágoras, etc.
30409 Geometría Bilingüe: Grados 10-12. Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito: Álgebra 1. Un curso que cubre vocabulario, propiedades y relaciones geométricas, además de habilidades de razonamiento y la aplicación de principios
geométricos en el mundo físico. Este curso hace énfasis en el razonamiento inductivo y numérico.
30418 Introducción Bilingüe a la Estadística Mediante las Aplicaciones: Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito: Álgebra 1 y Geometría. Este curso familiariza a los estudiantes con las ideas básicas y el lenguaje de estadísticas. Les
introduce a los conceptos y herramientas mayores para reunir, analizar y sacar conclusiones de datos proporcionados o
datos que los estudiantes obtienen de experimentos o encuestas. Los estudiantes usan métodos exploratorios para
identificar patrones y tomar decisiones para resolver problemas de la vida real.
Ciencias
30500 Biología Bilingüe: Grados: 9-10. Este curso se enfoca en los temas mayores de la ciencia de la vida, usando la
investigación científica. El primer semestre se enfoca en la ecología y las células. El segundo semestre se enfoca en la
genética, reproducción, cambios a lo largo del tiempo, clasificaciones y el cuerpo humano. El trabajo de laboratorio es
una parte significativa del curso.
30701 Salud Bilingüe: Este curso dura un semestre. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Un estudio de los
conceptos básicos que tienen que ver con el cuerpo humano. Las unidades incluyen las enfermedades crónicas y heredadas, drogas y alcohol, enfermedades venéreas (SIDA), tabaco, enfermedades contagiosas, cáncer, nutrición, acondicionamiento físico e higiene.
30506 Ciencia Física Bilingüe: Grados 10-12. El curso de Ciencia Física continúa con el programa Física: Un primer
curso, incluyendo los temas de electricidad, magnetismo, materia y energía. Además, se incluyen temas básicos de la
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química, como la estructura atómica, tabla periódica, reacciones, fórmulas y ecuaciones; y ácidos y bases. Las actividades en el laboratorio son una parte significativa del curso.
30520 Ciencia de la Tierra 1 Bilingüe – Geologia Y Oceanografia: Electivo - Grados: 10-12. Este curso de un semestre consiste de una introducción a la geología y el manejo de recursos. En este curso se enfatizará mucho la cartografía, fuerzas constructivas y destructivas, rocas y minerales, historia de la tierra; y oceanografía. Este curso incluirá
asuntos del medioambiente y procedimiento de laboratorio. Se ofrece en conjunto con la Ciencia de la Tierra – Astronomía y Meteorología.
30521 Ciencia de la Tierra2 Bilingüe—Astronomía Y Meteorología: Electivo - Grados: 10-12. Este curso de un semestre cubre la astronomía y meteorología. En este curso se enfatizará mucho las relaciones en el espacio y un resumen de la cosmología y la meteorología. Se ofrece en conjunto con la Ciencia de la Tierra – Geología y Oceanografía.
30510 Química Bilingüe: Grados: 10-12. Este curso se enfoca en el estudio de la materia. Algunos de los temas incluyen el equilibrio, cinética, oxidación y reducción, periodicidad de elementos, enlace químico, ácidos y bases, redacción de fórmulas, este quilométrica y relaciones entre la materia y la energía. En este curso, se utilizan álgebra y geometría para mostrar la expresión matemática de los conceptos químicos. El trabajo de laboratorio es una parte significativa del curso. El curso Química 1 y 2 está diseñado para individuos que planean desarrollar una carrera de ciencia o
de un campo relacionado a la ciencia.
30600 Introducción Bilingüe a los Conceptos de Negocio y Tecnología 1-2: Los estudiantes aprenderán a usar las
computadoras, software y sistemas operativos. También les introduce a la economía de los Estados Unidos y el papel
de los negocios. Además, se explorarán las oportunidades de carrera en los negocios. Esto prepara a los estudiantes
para tomar el curso 2600 Conceptos de Negocio y Tecnología I y II.
30204 Seminario Bilingüe para Estudiantes de Primer Año: Grado 9. Todos los estudiantes de primer año estarán
asignados al curso de Seminario para Estudiantes de Primer Año. Un semestre. El seminario combina la exploración y
el desarrollo de una carrera con énfasis especial en las destrezas triunfadoras, comunicativas, de razonamiento crítico y
de la resolución de problemas; y en características personales (responsabilidad, autoestima, auto-manejo e integridad).
Clases Modificadas
Las clases modificadas se enseñan en inglés para estudiantes que hablan todos los idiomas.
Historia
31301 Historia Mundial 1 y 2 Modificada: Grados 9-10. En este estudio de la historia del mundo, los estudiantes explorarán las culturas, personas, eventos e instituciones de los tiempos antiguos a los tiempos modernos. Se estudiarán
tanto las tradiciones occidentales como las no occidentales. Se reforzarán las destrezas geográficas. Muchas universidades recomiendan un estudio de la historia del mundo.
31306 Geografía Mundial Modificada: Grados 9 a 10. En este curso los alumnos estudiarán diferentes regiones y culturas del mundo mediante asuntos globales como la población, recursos de energía, eliminación de basura y reciclaje,
economía global, derechos humanos, conflicto y urbanización. Los estudiantes examinarán cómo los humanos se
adaptan a sus ambientes y cómo las naciones dependen unas de otras, utilizando conexiones a eventos actuales y la
comprensión del modo en que se usa la tecnología en la geografía.
31309 Historia de los EE.UU. Modificada: Grado 11. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Hace énfasis en la
historia de los EE.UU. desde el principio de las culturas de los Nativos Americanos, las colonias norteamericanas, la
Guerra de Independencia y la Guerra Civil, hasta la actualidad.
31313 Gobierno Modificado: Grado 12. (Un semestre; satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Un estudio básico
del sistema político estadounidense al nivel nacional, estatal y local. Se incluye también un estudio detallado de la
constitución y sus ramificaciones en la sociedad de hoy. Los estudiantes deben pasar el Examen de la Constitución.
31314 Economía Modificada: Grado 12. (Un semestre; satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Los estudiantes
aprenden cómo opera el sistema económico de los Estados Unidos. Hace énfasis en los problemas económicos personales y en las soluciones.
100
Matemáticas
31116 Fundamentos de Algebra 1 Modificada: Grados 9-11. Un curso de álgebra de un año para alcanzar el dominio
de los estándares de 8o grado y reforzar los estándares de primera prioridad en Algebra 1.
31406 Algebra 1 Modificada: Grados 9-10. Este curso dura un año. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Hace énfasis en los temas lineales y cuadráticos, expresiones radicales, estadísticas, sistemas de ecuaciones, resolución
de problemas y una introducción a la geometría de coordenadas.
30433 Fundamentos de Pre-Algebra Modificada: Grados 9-10. Este curso dura un año. Se enfoca en la enseñanza
de conceptos matemáticos y algebraicos mientras enriquece el lenguaje de matemáticas
para ayudar a los recién llegados en edad de la preparatoria, al exponerlos a algunos de los estándares básicos de matemáticas.
31433 Pre-Algebra Modificada: Grados 9-10. Este curso dura un año. Enseña conceptos matemáticos y algebraicos
generales y el aprendizaje del lenguaje de matemáticas para ayudar a los recién llegados con un poco de exposición a
los estándares matemáticos de la secundaria.
31412 Algebra 2 Modificada: Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito: Geometría o Fundamentos de Geometría Modificada. Este curso del segundo año de álgebra expande los conceptos de Álgebra 1 e introduce la división sintética,
ecuaciones de valor absoluto y desigualdades, desigualdades cuadráticas, determinantes y matrices y secciones cónicas.
31126 Fundamentos de Geometría Modificada: Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito: Álgebra 1 Bilingüe/Modificada
o Fundamentos de Álgebra 1 Modificada. Ayuda a los estudiantes a aprender los estándares de geometría, como la
resolución de problemas matemáticos y de la vida real que tienen que ver con el área, área de la superficie, volumen,
medición, figuras geométricas, la comprensión del Teorema de Pitágoras, etc.
31409 Geometría Modificada: Grados 10-12. Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito: Álgebra 1. Un curso que cubre el
vocabulario geométrico, propiedades y relaciones, además de habilidades de razonamiento y la aplicación de principios
geométricos en el mundo físico. Este curso hace énfasis en el razonamiento inductivo y numérico.
31418 Introducción Modificada a la Estadística Mediante las Aplicaciones: Este curso dura un año. Prerrequisito:
Álgebra 1 y Geometría. Este curso familiariza a los estudiantes con las ideas básicas y el lenguaje de estadísticas. Les
introduce a los conceptos y herramientas mayores para reunir, analizar y sacar conclusiones de datos proporcionados o
datos que los estudiantes obtienen de experimentos o encuestas. Los estudiantes usan métodos exploratorios para
identificar patrones y tomar decisiones para resolver problemas de la vida real.
Ciencias
31500 Biologia Modificada: Grados: 9-10. Este curso se enfoca en los temas mayores de la ciencia de la vida, usando
la investigación científica. El primer semestre se enfoca en la ecología y las células. El segundo semestre se enfoca en
la genética, reproducción, cambios a lo largo del tiempo, clasificaciones y el cuerpo humano. El trabajo de laboratorio
es una parte significativa del curso.
31701 Salud Modificada: Este curso dura un semestre. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Un estudio de
los conceptos básicos que tienen que ver con el cuerpo humano. Las unidades incluyen las enfermedades crónicas y
heredadas, drogas y alcohol, enfermedades venéreas (SIDA), tabaco, enfermedades contagiosas, cáncer, nutrición,
acondicionamiento físico e higiene.
31506 Ciencia Física Modificada: Grados 10-12. El curso de Ciencia Física continúa con el programa Física: Un primer curso, incluyendo los temas de electricidad, magnetismo, materia y energía. Además, se incluyen temas básicos
de la química, como la estructura atómica, tabla periódica, reacciones, fórmulas y ecuaciones; y ácidos y bases. Las
actividades en el laboratorio son una parte significativa del curso.
31520 Ciencia de la Tierra 1 Modificada – Geología Y Oceanografía: Electivo - Grados: 10-12. Este curso de un
semestre consiste de una introducción a la geología y el manejo de recursos. En este curso se enfatizará mucho la cartografía, fuerzas constructivas y destructivas, rocas y minerales, historia de la tierra; y oceanografía. Este curso incluirá
asuntos del medioambiente y procedimiento de laboratorio. Se ofrece en conjunto con la Ciencia de la Tierra – Astronomía y Meteorología.
31521 Ciencia de la Tierra 2 Modificada – Astronomía Y Meteorología: Electivo - Grados: 10-12. Este curso de un
semestre cubre la astronomía y meteorología. En este curso se enfatizará mucho las relaciones en el espacio y un resumen de la cosmología y la meteorología. Se ofrece en conjunto con la Ciencia de la Tierra – Geología y Oceanografía.
101
31510 Quimica Modificada: Grados: 10-12. Este curso se enfoca en el estudio de la materia. Algunos de los temas
incluyen el equilibrio, cinética, oxidación y reducción, periodicidad de elementos, enlace químico, ácidos y bases, redacción de fórmulas, estequiometría y relaciones entre la materia y la energía. En este curso, se utilizan álgebra y geometría para mostrar la expresión matemática de los conceptos químicos. El trabajo de laboratorio es una parte significativa
del curso. El curso Química 1 y 2 está diseñado para individuos que planean desarrollar una carrera de ciencia o de un
campo relacionado a la ciencia.
31600 Introducción Modificada a los Conceptos de Negocio y Tecnología 1-2: Los estudiantes aprenderán a usar
las computadoras, software y sistemas operativos. También les introduce a la economía de los Estados Unidos y el
papel de los negocios. Además, se explorarán las oportunidades de carrera en los negocios. Esto prepara a los estudiantes para tomar el curso 2600 Conceptos de Negocio y Tecnología I y II.
31204 Seminario Modificado para Estudiantes de Primer Año: Grado 9. Todos los estudiantes de primer año estarán asignados al curso de Seminario para Estudiantes de Primer Año. Un semestre. El seminario combina la exploración y el desarrollo de una carrera con énfasis especial en las destrezas triunfadoras, comunicativas, de razonamiento
crítico y de la resolución de problemas; y en características personales (responsabilidad, autoestima, auto-manejo e
integridad).
Artes del Lenguaje
33127 ESL Inglés 1: Grados 9-12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Este curso está diseñado para ayudar
a los estudiantes que se encuentran en los niveles de principiantes de la adquisición del idioma. Hace énfasis en el vocabulario, fonética, gramática, comprensión de lectura y escritura.
33148 ESL Inglés 2: Este curso dura un año. Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Este curso
basado en los estándares de WIDA está diseñado para ayudar a los estudiantes que están en el siguiente nivel de la
adquisición del idioma. Hace énfasis en el vocabulario, fonética, gramática, comprensión de lectura y escritura.
33133 ESL Inglés 3: Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Este curso basado en los estándares de WIDA refuerza las destrezas de lectura, habla, escucha y escritura, además de la estructura gramatical. Continúa haciendo énfasis en la comunicación oral y escrita del inglés.
33136 ESL Inglés 4: Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Este curso basado en los estándares
de WIDA refuerza la gramática y las destrezas de escritura y conversación. Incrementa el uso de estrategias de comprensión de lectura y la práctica.
33139 ESL Inglés 5: Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Este curso basado en los estándares de WIDA fomenta la expresión oral y la aplicación literaria. Expone a los estudiantes a cuentos clásicos breves y al
estudio de escritores estadounidenses. Hace énfasis en la expresión estándar oral y escrita y el uso correcto de las
estructuras gramaticales.
33145 ESL Inglés 6: Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación). Este curso basado en los estándares
de WIDA hace énfasis en el uso de vocabulario académico y estructuras gramaticales correctas para componer una
variedad de escritos y entablar conversaciones acerca de varios temas.
Los estudiantes leerán una selección de textos que incluye todos los géneros, para expresar sus ideas oralmente o por
escrito. Los estudiantes podrán redactar ensayos de investigación y dar presentaciones orales.
30101 Artes del Lenguaje en Español 1 – basado a la recomendación del maestro
(Satisface los requisitos para la graduación) Este curso de un año se enseña en español para estudiantes en el programa bilingüe. El curso es un estudio de trabajos multiétnicos organizado temáticamente y basado en los estándares.
Dentro de cada unidad, los estudiantes participarán en estudios de los trabajos centrales con toda la clase y harán selecciones independientes de lectura de las colecciones de novelas en el salón. Se integrará en las unidades temáticas
el estudio de las composiciones, incluyendo su investigación, gramática y uso. Se usan las habilidades de estudio y
una variedad de textos, con un enfoque en los materiales que no son de acción. La clase enfatiza las habilidades del
arte del lenguaje en el idioma español y se basa en los Estándares de las Artes del Lenguaje en Español.
30103 Artes del Lenguaje en Español 2 – basado a la recomendación del maestro
(Satisface los requisitos para la graduación) Este curso de un año se enseña en español para estudiantes en el programa bilingüe. El curso es un estudio de trabajos multiétnicos organizado temáticamente y basado en los estándares.
Dentro de cada unidad, los estudiantes participarán en estudios de los trabajos centrales con toda la clase y harán selecciones independientes de lectura de las colecciones de novelas en el salón. Se integrará en las unidades temáticas
el estudio de las composiciones, incluyendo su investigación, gramática y uso. Se usan las habilidades de estudio y
una variedad de textos, con un enfoque en los materiales que no son de acción. La clase enfatiza las habilidades del
arte del lenguaje en el idioma español y se basa en los Estándares de las Artes del Lenguaje en Español.
102
30106 Artes del Lenguaje en Español 3 – basado a la recomendación del maestro
(Satisface los requisitos para la graduación) Este curso de un año se enseña en español para estudiantes en el programa bilingüe. El curso es un estudio de trabajos multiétnicos organizado temáticamente y basado en los estándares.
Dentro de cada unidad, los estudiantes participarán en estudios de los trabajos centrales con toda la clase y harán selecciones independientes de lectura de las colecciones de novelas en el salón. Se integrará en las unidades temáticas
el estudio de las composiciones, incluyendo su investigación, gramática y uso. Se usan las habilidades de estudio y
una variedad de textos, con un enfoque en los materiales que no son de acción. La clase enfatiza las habilidades del
arte del lenguaje en el idioma español y se basa en los Estándares de las Artes del Lenguaje en Español.
31220 Lectoescritura Esencial para la Universidad – Conectado a la Lectura: Grados 9 y 10. Lectoescritura Esencial para la Universidad – Conectado a la Lectura es un programa de intervención para estudiantes que leen a un nivel
más bajo que el nivel de su grado y que permitirá que los estudiantes reciban instrucción específica e individualizada
para mejorar sus destrezas de lectura. Las destrezas enseñadas incluyen: fonética y análisis de palabras, fluidez y
comprensión, descodificación en la lectura, reconocimiento de palabras y expansión de vocabulario. Este curso se debe tomar en conjunto con un curso de inglés.
31223 Lectoescritura Esencial para la Universidad – Leer 180: Grados 9 y 10. Lectoescritura Esencial para la Universidad – Leer 180 es un programa de intervención que permitirá que los estudiantes reciban instrucción específica e
individualizada para mejorar sus destrezas de lectura. Las destrezas enseñadas incluyen: fonética y análisis de palabras, fluidez y comprensión, descodificación en la lectura, reconocimiento de palabras y expansión de vocabulario. Este
curso se debe tomar en conjunto con un curso de inglés.
31226 Lectoescritura Esencial para la Universidad – Sistema44: Grados 9 y 10. Lectoescritura Esencial para la Universidad – Sistema44 es un programa de intervención que permitirá que los estudiantes reciban instrucción específica e
individualizada para mejorar sus destrezas de lectura. Las destrezas enseñadas incluyen: fonética y análisis de palabras, fluidez y comprensión, descodificación en la lectura, reconocimiento de palabras y expansión de vocabulario. Este
curso se debe tomar en conjunto con un curso de inglés.
CLASES PARA LOS RECIÉN LLEGADOS
Las clases para los recién llegados son para los estudiantes que están al nivel de principiante en la adquisición de destrezas en inglés y que pueden haber recibido poca o ninguna formación académica.
32133 Artes del Lenguaje para los Recién Llegados: Este curso basado en los estándares de WIDA tiene dos partes;
incorpora los artes del lenguaje y la lectura. Grados 9-12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación.) Este curso está
diseñado para desarrollar habilidades en el área de lectoescritura para los estudiantes con un nivel bajo de lectura. La
meta es incrementar la habilidad de lectura de los estudiantes suficientemente para que puedan acceder a la información en los libros de texto y en los salones de clases regulares. Este curso confronta las necesidades inmediatas de los
estudiantes recién llegados (nuevos al país). Este curso presenta información para ayudarles a los estudiantes a navegar la nueva cultura. Esto incluye: la secuencia de cursos de la preparatoria; horarios; transporte; deportes; directrices
de asistencia; requisitos para la graduación; información cultural; conferencias de padres y maestros; e inglés esencial
intensivo en el área de la casa, comida, ropa, transporte, dinero, información personal, salud e información de emergencia. También introduce recursos de la comunidad.
33230 Ciencias Sociales para los Recién Llegados: Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación.) .
Este curso consiste de conceptos y vocabulario generales de las ciencias sociales. Prepara los estudiantes para tomar
cursos requeridos de ciencias sociales, como las clases modificadas o regulares de la Historia de los EE.UU., Gobierno,
Economía, Geografía Mundial e Historia Mundial.
32530 Ciencia para los Recién Llegados: Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación.) . Este curso
consiste de temas y vocabulario generales de la ciencia. Prepara los estudiantes para tomar las clases regulares o modificadas de la ciencia, tales como Biología, Química y Ciencia Física.
32430 Matemáticas para los Recién Llegados: Grados 9 a 12. (Satisface los requisitos para la graduación.) . Este
curso se enfoca en el aprendizaje de conceptos y vocabulario académico generales de las matemáticas. Prepara los
estudiantes para tomar los Fundamentos de Pre-Álgebra Modificada, Fundamentos de Álgebra 1 Modificada o Álgebra 1
Modificada.
103
‫صفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫يكون التدريس في صفوف اللغتين بشكل رئيسي باللغة العربية او االسبانية للطلبة الناطقين باحدى اللغتين‪.‬‬
‫التاريخ‬
‫‪30303‬‬
‫مادة التاريخ العالمي ‪ 2 – 1‬لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين ‪ .‬للمرحلتين ‪11 –9‬‬
‫في هذا االستعراض للتاريخ العالمي سيتعرف الطلبة على الثقافات ‪ ,‬الشعوب ‪ ,‬االحداث والدساتير منذ اقدم العصور حتى الوقت الحاضر وستتم دراسة الثقافات الغربية‬
‫وغير الغربية وستتوسع معلوماتهم الجغرافية ‪ ,‬والجدير بالذكر ان دراسة تاريخ العالم مطلوبة في الكثير من الكليات ‪.‬‬
‫‪30306‬‬
‫مادة الجغرافية العالمية لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين للمرحلتين ‪11 –9‬‬
‫في هذا الفصل الدراسي سيدرس الطلبة مختلف مناطق العالم وثقافاته و قضاياه كالكثافة السكانية ‪ ,‬مصادر الطاقة‪ ,‬طرح النفايات و اعادة التصنيع ‪ ,‬االقتصاد العالمي ‪,‬‬
‫حقوق االنسان‪,‬الصراعات والحياة المدنية ‪ .‬سيتعرف الطالب على كيفية تأقلم البشر مع بيئاتهم المختلفة وكيفية اعتماد األمم والشعوب على بعضها البعض وفي استخدام‬
‫العالقات في االحداث الجارية وفهم كيفية استخدام التكنولوجيا في الجغرافية ‪.‬‬
‫‪30309‬‬
‫مادة تاريخ الواليات المتحدة لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين للمرحلة ‪ , 11‬مطابقة لشروط التخرج‬
‫يركز هذا الدرس على تاريخ الواليات المتحدة بدأ" بثقافات السكان االصليين ‪ ,‬المستعمرات االمريكية ‪ ,‬حرب االستقالل ‪ ,‬الحرب االهلية و حتى الوقت الحالي ‪.‬‬
‫‪30313‬‬
‫مادة الحكومة لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين المرحلة ‪( 12‬فصل دراسي واحد) مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫دراسة النظام السياسي االمريكي على المستوى القومي ومستوى الوالية وصوال" الى المستوى المحلي ‪ ,‬دراسة مفصلة للدستور وتأثيراته على المجتمع حتى الوقت‬
‫الحاضر ‪ .‬يتوجب على الطلبة النجاح في اختبار مادة الدستور ‪.‬‬
‫‪30314‬‬
‫مادة االقتصاد لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين للمرحلة ‪ ( 12‬فصل دراسي واحد) مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫يتعرف الطلبة على كيفية عمل االقتصاد االمريكي ويركز الدرس على المشاكل االقتصادية لالفراد وايجاد الحلول لها‪.‬‬
‫الرياضيات‬
‫‪30116‬‬
‫مادة أساسيات الجبر‪ 1‬لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين للمراحل ‪ .11-9‬مادة لعام دراسي كامل و مطابقة لشروط التخرج‬
‫هي مادة الجبر لعام دراسي كامل تساعد على اتقان معايير المرحلة الثامنة و تؤكد على اولوية اساسيات مادة الجبر‪.-1-‬‬
‫‪30406‬‬
‫مادة الجبر‪ -1-‬لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين للمراحل ‪ 11 –9‬مادة لعام دراسي كامل‪ ,‬مطابقة لشروط التخرج‬
‫درس يركز على مواضيع تربيعية و خطية‪ ,‬تعابير جذرية ‪ ,‬االحصاء ‪ ,‬انظمة المعادالت ‪ ,‬حل المسائل و مقدمة لمادة الهندسة االحداثية ‪.‬‬
‫‪30430‬‬
‫مادة ما قبل الجبر لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫للمراحل الدراسية ‪(11-9‬عالمة اختيارية) مادة لعام دراسي كامل‬
‫تم تصميم هذا الدرس لتسريع المواهب في الرياضيات ولتهيئة الطلبة ألخذ مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬في دروس الناطقين بلغتين او االنكليزية المبسطة‪.‬‬
‫‪30412‬‬
‫مادة الجبر ‪ 2‬لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫مادة لعام دراسي كامل‬
‫يجب انهاء مادة الهندسة او مبادئ الهندسة باالنكليزية المبسطة قبل دراسة هذه المادة‬
‫هذه المادة هي درس الجبر لسنة ثانية لغرض توسيع مفاهيم الجبر في المرحلة االولى واعطاء فكرة عن القسمة المستحدثة (الطرق الجديدة في القسمة)‪ ,‬معادالت القيمة‬
‫المطلقة‪ ,‬المتباينات‪ ,‬المتباينات التربيعية‪ ,‬المحددات‬
‫المصفوفات) و االقسام المخروطية‪).‬‬
‫‪30126‬‬
‫اساسيات مادة الهندسة لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫مادة لمدة عام دراسي كامل‬
‫يجب انهاء مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬باالنكليزية المبسطة او اللغتين او اساسيات مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬باالنكليزية المبسطة‬
‫تساعد هذه المادة الطلبة على تعلم مبادئ الهندسة مثل المسائل الواقعية و الرياضية و التي تشمل المساحة‪ ,‬مساحة السطح‪ ,‬الحجم‪,‬قياس مساحة السطح‪ ,‬االشكال الهندسية و‬
‫فهم نظرية فيثاغورس‪.‬‬
‫‪104‬‬
‫‪30409‬‬
‫مادة الهندسة لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫مادة لعام دراسي كامل للمراحل ‪12 –11‬‬
‫يجب انهاء مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬قبل دراسة هذه المادة‬
‫مادة دراسية تشمل المصطلحات الهندسية‪ ,‬الخصائص‪ ,‬العالقات و مهارات التفكير وتطبيقات المبادئ الهندسية على العالم المادي ويركز هذا الدرس على التفكير االستنباطي‬
‫و العددي او الرقمي‪.‬‬
‫‪30418‬‬
‫مقدمة لمادة االحصاء من خالل التطبيقات لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫مادة لعام دراسي كامل‬
‫يجب انهاء مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬و الهندسة قبل دراسة هذه المادة‬
‫يقدم هذا الدرس صورة للطلبة عن المبادىء االساسية و لغة االحصاء و يعطيهم صورة عن المفاهيم الرئيسية و ادوات الجمع‪ ,‬تحليل المعطيات و المعلومات المستقاة من‬
‫التجارب و عمليات المسح و االستنتاج‪ .‬و يقوم الطلبة باستخدام نظريات استكشافية لفهم االمثلة والتوصل لحلول لمشاكل الحياة اليومية‪.‬‬
‫العلوم‬
‫‪30500‬‬
‫مادة االحياء ‪ 2-1‬لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫مادة لعام دراسي كامل للمراحل ‪11 –9‬‬
‫مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫مدخل لمبادئ االحياء يشمل دراسة الخاليا‪ ,‬النباتات ‪ ,‬الحيوانات و جسم االنسان‪.‬‬
‫‪30701‬‬
‫مادة الصحة العامة لصفوف الناطقين بلغتين‬
‫مادة لفصل دراسي كامل (نصف سنة دراسية)‬
‫مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫دراسة للمفاهيم االساسية فيما يتعلق بجسم االنسان كدراسة االمراض المزمنة و الوراثية‪ ,‬المخدرات و الكحول‪ ,‬االمراض المعدية عن طريق االتصال الجنسي‬
‫( االيدز ) ‪,‬التبوغ ‪ ,‬االمراض المعدية ‪ ,‬السرطان ‪ ,‬التغذية واللياقة البدنية و الصحة العامة‪.‬‬
‫‪30506‬‬
‫مادة العلوم الفيزيائية للناطقين بلغتين ‪2-1‬‬
‫للمرحلة الدراسية ‪( 12 –11‬مادة لعام دراسي كامل)‬
‫مادة العلوم الفيزيائية هي درس لمدة عام واحد و تعتبر مكملة للفيزياء و يشمل الفصل االول منها مواضيع حول الطاقة الكهربائية‪-‬المغناطيسية‪ -‬المادة و الطاقة و تشمل‬
‫ايضا على المواضيع الرئيسية للكيمياء مثل البناء الذري و الجدول الدوري للعناصر الكيميائية‪ ,‬ردات الفعل‪ ,‬الصيغ و المعادالت الحسابية‪ ,‬االحماض و القواعد‪ .‬كما ان‬
‫النشاطات المختبرية تشكل جزءا" مهما" من الدرس‪.‬‬
‫‪30520‬‬
‫علم األرض للناطقين بلغتين‪ :‬علم طبقات األرض و علم البحار‪ ,‬درس إختياري للمراحل ‪12-11‬‬
‫يشمل هذا الدرس الفصلي على مقدمة لعلم طبقات األرض و ادارة المصادر كما يركز بشكل كبير على علم رسم الخرائط و قوى الطبيعة البناءة و الهدامة‪ ,‬الصخور و‬
‫المعادن و تاريخ األرض كما يشتمل هذا الدرس على مسائل البيئة و اإلجراءات المختبرية‪ ,‬يتم إعطاء هذا الدرس بالتزامن مع علم األرض‪ ,‬علم الفلك‪ ,‬علم البحار و علم‬
‫األرصاد الجوية‪.‬‬
‫‪30521‬‬
‫علم األرض للناطقين بلغتين‬
‫علم الفلك و األرصاد الجوية درس إختياري للمراحل ‪11-11‬‬
‫يغطي هذا الدرس الفصلي علم الفلك‪ ,‬األرصاد الجوية و علم البحار‪ ,‬كما سينم التركيز على العالقات في الفضاء الخارجي و إلقاء نظرة عامة على علم االكوان‪ ,‬علم البحار‬
‫و االرصاد الجوية‪ .‬يتم إعطاء هذا الدرس بالتزامن مع علم األرض‪ -‬علم طبقات األرض‪.‬‬
‫‪30510‬‬
‫مادة الكيمياء للناطقين بلغتين ‪-‬للمراحل الدراسية ‪( 12-11‬مادة لعام دراسي كامل)‬
‫يركز هذا الموضوع على دراسة المادة و بعض المواضيع مثل التوازن‪,‬علم الحركيات‪,‬تقليل االكسدة‪,‬الجدول الدوري للعناصر‪,‬الروابط الكيميائية‪,‬االحماض والقواعد ‪,‬كتابة‬
‫الصيغ الكيميائية‪,‬كتابة المعادالت الكيميائية‪,‬الرياضيات الكيميائية و العالقة مابين الطاقة والمادة‪.‬في هذا الدرس يتم استخدام مادتي الجبر والهندسة لبيان التعابير الرياضية‬
‫للمفاهيم الكيميائية‪.‬يعتبر العمل المختبري جزءا“ هاما“ من هذا الدرس‪.‬ان درس الكيمياء ‪ 1-1‬مكرس للطلبة ممن يخططون للعمل في المجال العلمي او في المجاالت‬
‫المتعلقة بهذا الموضوع‪.‬‬
‫‪30600‬‬
‫مقدمة لمفاهيم االعمال و التكنولوجيا ‪ 2-1‬للناطقين بلغتين (مادة لعام دراسي كامل)‬
‫سيتعلم الطلبة على استخدام الحاسبات‪ ,‬البرامجيات و انظمة التشغيل و سيتعرفون كذلك على االقتصاد االمريكي و الدور الذي يلعبه عالم االعمال كما سيتعرفون على‬
‫الفرص المتوفرة في مجال االعمال مما سيهيئهم للتعرف على مفاهيم مادتي االعمال و التقنية(رمز الدرس ‪ )1011‬للمستويين ‪ 1‬و ‪1‬‬
‫‪105‬‬
‫‪30204‬‬
‫حلقات دراسية للطلبة في المرحلة ‪ 9‬للناطقين بلغتين‬
‫كل الطلبة الجدد في هذه المرحلة سيتم اعطائهم حلقة دراسية و لفصل دراسي واحد‪ .‬تشتمل هذه الحلقة الدراسية على التدريب على االستكشاف في مجال فرص العمل و‬
‫تطويرها مع تركيز خاص على‬
‫مهارات النجاح ‪ ,‬التواصل و التفكير النقدي أو‬
‫التحليلي و مهارات حل المشاكل و المزايا الشخصية (المسؤزلية‪ ,‬تقدير الذات‪ ,‬التحكم بالنفس و التعامل بكرامة)‪.‬‬
‫الدروس المبسطة‬
‫يتم تدريس هذه الدروس باللغة االنكليزية لكل الطلبة مهما كانت لغاتهم االصلية‪.‬‬
‫التاريخ‬
‫‪31301‬‬
‫مادة تاريخ العالم ‪ 2-1‬لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمرحلة ‪10-9‬‬
‫في هذا االستعراض للتاريخ العالمي سيتعرف الطلبة على الثقافات ‪ ,‬الشعوب ‪ ,‬االحداث والدساتير منذ اقدم العصور حتى الوقت الحاضر وستتم دراسة الثقافات الغربية‬
‫وغير الغربية وستتوسع معلوماتهم الجغرافية ‪ ,‬والجدير بالذكر ان دراسة تاريخ العالم مطلوبة في الكثير من الكليات ‪.‬‬
‫‪31306‬‬
‫مادة الجغرافية العالمية لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة المرحلة ‪11-9‬‬
‫في هذا الفصل الدراسي سيدرس الطلبة مختلف مناطق العالم وثقافاته و قضاياه كالكثافة السكانية ‪ ,‬مصادر الطاقة‪ ,‬طرح النفايات و اعادة التصنيع ‪ ,‬االقتصاد العالمي ‪,‬‬
‫حقوق االنسان‪,‬الصراعات والحياة المدنية ‪ .‬سيتعرف الطالب على كيفية تأقلم البشر مع بيئاتهم المختلفة وكيفية اعتماد األمم والشعوب على بعضها البعض وفي استخدام‬
‫العالقات في االحداث الجارية وفهم كيفية استخدام التكنولوجيا في الجغرافية ‪.‬‬
‫‪31309‬‬
‫مادة تاريخ الواليات المتحدة لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمرحلة ‪ 11‬مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫يركز هذا الدرس على تاريخ الواليات المتحدة بدأ" بثقافات السكان االصليين ‪ ,‬المستعمرات االمريكية ‪ ,‬حرب االستقالل ‪ ,‬الحرب االهلية و حتى الوقت الحالي ‪.‬‬
‫‪31313‬‬
‫مادة الحكومة لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمرحلة ‪ ,12‬فصل دراسي واحد و مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫دراسة النظام السياسي االمريكي على المستوى القومي ومستوى الوالية وصوال" الى المستوى المحلي ‪ ,‬دراسة مفصلة للدستور وتأثيراته على المجتمع حتى الوقت‬
‫الحاضر ‪ .‬يتوجب على الطلبة النجاح في اختبار مادة الدستور ‪.‬‬
‫‪31314‬‬
‫مادة علم االقتصاد لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمرحلة ‪ ( 12‬فصل دراسي واحد) مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫يتعرف الطلبة على كيفية عمل االقتصاد االمريكي ويركز الدرس على المشاكل االقتصادية لالفراد وايجاد الحلول لها‪.‬‬
‫الرياضيات‬
‫‪31116‬‬
‫مادة أساسيات الجبر ‪ 1‬لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمراحل ‪ .11-9‬مادة لعام دراسي كامل و مطابقة لشروط التخرج‬
‫هي مادة الجبر لعام دراسي كامل تساعد على اتقان معايير المرحلة الثامنة و تؤكد على اولوية اساسيات مادة الجبر‪.-1-‬‬
‫‪31406‬‬
‫مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمراحل ‪ 11 –9‬مادة لعام دراسي كامل‪ ,‬مطابقة لشروط التخرج‬
‫درس يركز على مواضيع تربيعية و خطية‪ ,‬تعابير جذرية ‪ ,‬االحصاء ‪ ,‬انظمة المعادالت ‪ ,‬حل المسائل و مقدمة لمادة الهندسة االحداثية ‪.‬‬
‫‪30430‬‬
‫مادة أساسيات ما قبل الجبر لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمراحل ‪ 11-9‬درس لعام كامل‬
‫تركز هذه المادة على تدريس المفاهيم الرياضية و الجبرية اثناء تطوير لغة الرياضيات و ذلك لمساعدة الوافدين الجدد من هم بعمر الدراسة االعدادية من خالل اعطائهم‬
‫بعض اساسيات رياضيات الدراسة االبتدائية‪.‬‬
‫‪31433‬‬
‫مادة ما قبل الجبر لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمراحل ‪ 11-9‬درس لعام كامل‬
‫يتم تدريس الرياضيات العامة في هذا الدرس و المفاهيم الجبرية و لغة الرياضيات لمساعدة الوافدين الجدد مع بعض المواد من أساسيات رياضيات مرحلة الدراسة‬
‫المتوسطة‬
‫‪106‬‬
‫‪31412‬‬
‫مادة الجبر ‪ 2‬لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة يجب انهاء مادة الهندسة او مبادئ الهندسة باالنكليزية المبسطة قبل دراسة هذه المادة‬
‫هذه المادة هي درس الجبر لسنة ثانية لغرض توسيع مفاهيم الجبر في المرحلة االولى واعطاء فكرة عن القسمة المستحدثة (الطرق الجديدة في القسمة)‪ ,‬معادالت القيمة‬
‫المطلقة‪ ,‬المتباينات‪ ,‬المتباينات التربيعية‪ ,‬المحددات(المصفوفات) و االقسام المخروطية‪.‬‬
‫‪31409‬‬
‫مادة الهندسة لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة مادة لعام دراسي كامل للمراحل ‪12 –11‬‬
‫يجب انهاء مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬قبل دراسة هذه المادة‬
‫مادة دراسية تشمل المصطلحات الهندسية‪ ,‬الخصائص‪ ,‬العالقات و مهارات التفكير وتطبيقات المبادئ الهندسية على العالم المادي ويركز هذا الدرس على التفكير االستنباطي‬
‫و العددي او الرقمي‪.‬‬
‫‪31418‬‬
‫مقدمة لمادة االحصاء من خالل التطبيقات لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة مادة لعام دراسي كامل‬
‫يجب انهاء مادة الجبر ‪ 1‬و الهندسة قبل دراسة هذه المادة‬
‫يقدم هذا الدرس صورة للطلبة عن المبادىء االساسية و لغة االحصاء و يعطيهم صورة عن المفاهيم الرئيسية و ادوات الجمع‪ ,‬تحليل المعطيات و المعلومات المستقاة من‬
‫التجارب و عمليات المسح و االستنتاج‪ .‬و يقوم الطلبة باستخدام نظريات استكشافية لفهم االمثلة والتوصل لحلول لمشاكل الحياة اليومية‪.‬‬
‫العلوم‬
‫‪31500‬‬
‫مادة األحياء ‪ 2-1‬لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة مادة لعام دراسي كامل للمراحل ‪11 –9‬‬
‫مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫مدخل لمبادئ االحياء يشمل دراسة الخاليا‪ ,‬النباتات ‪ ,‬الحيوانات و جسم االنسان‪.‬‬
‫‪31701‬‬
‫مادة الصحة العامة لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة مادة لفصل دراسي كامل (نصف سنة دراسية)‬
‫مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫دراسة للمفاهيم االساسية فيما يتعلق بجسم االنسان كدراسة االمراض المزمنة و الوراثية‪ ,‬المخدرات و الكحول‪ ,‬االمراض المعدية عن طريق االتصال الجنسي‬
‫( االيدز ) ‪,‬التبوغ ‪ ,‬االمراض المعدية‪ ,‬السرطان‪ ,‬التغذية‪ ,‬اللياقة البدنية و الصحة العامة‪.‬‬
‫‪31506‬‬
‫مادة العلوم الفيزيائية ‪ 2-1‬لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمرحلة الدراسية ‪9‬‬
‫مادة العلوم الفيزيائية هي درس لمدة عام واحد و تعتبر مكملة للفيزياء و يشمل الفصل االول منها مواضيع حول الطاقة الكهربائية‪-‬المغناطيسية‪ -‬المادة و الطاقة و تشمل‬
‫ايضا على المواضيع الرئيسية للكيمياء مثل البناء الذري و الجدول الدوري للعناصر الكيميائية‪ ,‬ردات الفعل‪ ,‬الصيغ و المعادالت الحسابية‪ ,‬االحماض و القواعد‪ .‬كما ان‬
‫النشاطات المختبرية تشكل جزءا" مهما" من الدرس‪.‬‬
‫‪31520‬‬
‫مادة علوم طبقات األرض و علوم البحار لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة درس إختياري للمراحل ‪12-11‬‬
‫يشمل هذا الدرس الفصلي على مقدمة لعلم طبقات األرض و ادارة المصادر كما يركز بشكل كبير على علم رسم الخرائط و قوى الطبيعة البناءة و الهدامة‪ ,‬الصخور و‬
‫المعادن و تاريخ األرض كما يشتمل هذا الدرس على مسائل البيئة و اإلجراءات المختبرية‪ ,‬يتم إعطاء هذا الدرس بالتزامن مع علم األرض‪ ,‬علم الفلك‪ ,‬علم البحار و علم‬
‫األرصاد الجوية‪.‬‬
‫‪31521‬‬
‫مادة علوم األرض لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة علم الفلك و األرصاد الجوية درس إختياري للمراحل ‪12-11‬‬
‫يغطي هذا الدرس الفصلي علم الفلك‪ ,‬األرصاد الجوية و علم البحار‪ ,‬كما سينم التركيز على العالقات في الفضاء الخارجي و إلقاء نظرة عامة على علم االكوان‪ ,‬علم البحار‬
‫و االرصاد الجوية‪ .‬يتم إعطاء هذا الدرس بالتزامن مع علم األرض‪ -‬علم طبقات األرض‪.‬‬
‫‪31510‬‬
‫مادة الكيمياء لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمرحلة الدراسية ‪9-10‬‬
‫يركز هذا الموضوع على دراسة المادة و بعض المواضيع مثل التوازن‪,‬علم الحركيات‪,‬تقليل االكسدة‪,‬الجدول الدوري للعناصر‪,‬الروابط الكيميائية‪,‬االحماض والقواعد ‪,‬كتابة‬
‫الصيغ الكيميائية‪,‬كتابة المعادالت الكيميائية‪,‬الرياضيات الكيميائية و العالقة مابين الطاقة والمادة‪.‬في هذا الدرس يتم استخدام مادتي الجبر والهندسة لبيان التعابير الرياضية‬
‫للمفاهيم الكيميائية‪.‬يعتبر العمل المختبري جزءا“ هاما“ من هذا الدرس‪.‬ان درس الكيمياء ‪ 1-1‬مكرس للطلبة ممن يخططون للعمل في المجال العلمي او في المجاالت‬
‫المتعلقة بهذا الموضوع‪.‬‬
‫‪31204‬‬
‫حلقات دراسية للطلبة الجدد لصفوف االنكليزية المبسطة للمرحلة الدراسية ‪9‬‬
‫كل الطلبة الجدد في هذه المرحلة سيتم اعطائهم حلقة دراسية و لفصل دراسي واحد‪ .‬تشتمل هذه الحلقة الدراسية على التدريب على االستكشاف‬
‫‪107‬‬
‫في مجال فرص العمل و تطويرها مع تركيز خاص على مهارات النجاح ‪ ,‬التواصل و التفكير النقدي أو التحليلي و مهارات حل المشاكل و‬
‫المزايا الشخصية (المسؤزلية‪ ,‬تقدير الذات‪ ,‬التحكم بالنفس و التعامل بكرامة)‪.‬‬
‫آداب اللغات‬
‫‪33127‬‬
‫مادة اللغة االنكليزية لصفوف االنكليزية كلغة ثانية ‪ 1‬للصفوف ‪12-9‬‬
‫مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫هذا الدرس موازي للمواصفات القياسية لتطور اللغة االنكليزية كذلك للمواد الرئيسية للتدريس‬
‫صمم هذا الدرس لمساعدة الطلبة ذوي المستوى المبتدئ الكتساب اللغة و يركز على المعاني‪ ,‬االصوات‪ ,‬القواعد و استيعاب القراءة و الكتابة‪.‬‬
‫‪33148‬‬
‫مادة اللغة االنكليزية ‪ 2‬لصفوف االنكليزية كلغة ثانية للصفوف ‪(12-9‬مطابق لشروط التخرج)‬
‫هذا الدرس موازي للمواصفات القياسية لتطور اللغة االنكليزية كذلك للمواد الرئيسية للتدريس‬
‫صمم هذا الدرس لمساعدة الطلبة ذوي المستوى التالي الكتساب اللغة و يركز على المعاني‪ ,‬االصوات‪ ,‬القواعد و استيعاب القراءة و الكتابة‪.‬‬
‫‪33133‬‬
‫مادة اللغة االنكليزية ‪ 3‬لصفوف االنكليزية كلغة ثانية مطابق لشروط التخرج للصفوف ‪12-9‬‬
‫هذا الدرس موازي للمواصفات القياسية لتطور اللغة االنكليزية كذلك للمواد الرئيسية للتدريس ‪.‬يدعم هذا الدرس مهارات القراءة‪,‬التحدث ‪,‬االستماع و الكتابة كما يعزز البناء‬
‫القواعدي ويركز على التواصل الشفوي والتحريري وكذلك القراءة واالستيعاب باللغة االنكليزية‪.‬‬
‫‪33136‬‬
‫مادة اللغة االنكليزية ‪ 4‬لصفوف االنكليزية كلغة ثانية مطابق لشروط التخرج للصفوف ‪12-9‬‬
‫هذا الدرس موازي للمواصفات القياسية لتطور اللغة االنكليزية كذلك للمواد الرئيسية للتدريس ‪.‬يدعم هذا الدرس مهارات القواعد ‪,‬المحادثة والكتابة كما‬
‫يرفع من نسبة استخدام طرق استيعاب القراءة وممارستها‪,‬‬
‫‪33139‬‬
‫مادة اللغة االنكليزية‪ 5‬لصفوف االنكليزية كلغة ثانية للمراحل الدراسية ‪(12-9‬مطابق لشروط التخرج)‬
‫هذا الدرس موازي للمواصفات القياسية لتطور اللغة االنكليزية كذلك للمواد الرئيسية للتدريس‪.‬يشجع هذا الدرس على التعبير الشفوي(الكالم شفاها") و التطبيقات الحرفية‬
‫للغة ‪ ,‬كما تعرض للطالب بعض القصص‬
‫القصيرة من االدب الكالسيكي و دراسة عن االدباء االميركان‪ ,‬كما تؤكد على التعابير المعتمدة اللفظية و المكتوبة و كذلك االستخدام الصحيح لقواعد اللغة االنكليزية‬
‫‪33145‬‬
‫مادة اللغة االنكليزية‪ 6‬لصفوف االنكليزية كلغة ثانية للمراحل الدراسية ‪(12-9‬مطابق لشروط التخرج)‬
‫هذا الدرس موازي للمواصفات القياسية لتطور اللغة االنكليزية كذلك للمواد الرئيسية للتدريس‪ .‬يركز هذا الدرس على استخدام المعاني االكاديمية و البناء القواعدي الصحيح‬
‫لتكوين عدة اشكال من الكتابة و االشتراك في احاديث بمواضيع شتى‪ .‬سيشترك الطلبة في قراءة مواضيع مختلفة منتقاة من الكتب للتعبير عن افكارهم شفويا او كتابة" و‬
‫سيتمكن الطلبة من انجازالبحوث و االداء او التقديم الشفوي‬
‫‪30101‬‬
‫آداب اللغة االسبانية –‪(1‬للطلبة الجدد فقط)‬
‫مطابق لمتطلبات التخرج‬
‫يتم تدريس هذا الموضوع لمدة سنة واحدة باللغة االسبانية لطلبة برنامج الناطقين بلغتين وقد تم تصميمه على اساس دراسة موضوعية لالعراق المختلفة‪.‬‬
‫في كل وحدة من وحدات هذا الموضوع سيشارك الطلبة في دراسات صف كامل لدراسة المادة االصلية و سيكون هنالك مجموعات قصصية يختارون منها ما يشاؤون‬
‫للقراءة‪ .‬اما الدراسة االنشائية و التي تتضمن البحث و القواعد اللغوية و استخدامها فستكون مندمجة مع الوحدات الموضوعية ذات الصلة‪ .‬لقد تم استخدام مهارات الدراسة و‬
‫تنوع النصوص على اساس التركيز على المواد اللغوية‪.‬‬
‫يركز هذا الصف (الموضوع) على مهارات آداب اللغة االسبانية و حسب قواعدها اللغوية‪.‬‬
‫‪30103‬‬
‫آداب اللغة االسبانية –‪( 2‬اعتمادا“ على توصية المدرس)‬
‫مطابق لمتطلبات التخرج‬
‫يتم تدريس هذا الموضوع لمدة سنة واحدة باللغة االسبانية لطلبة برنامج الناطقين بلغتين وقد تم تصميمه على اساس دراسة موضوعية لالعراق المختلفة‪.‬‬
‫في كل وحدة من وحدات هذا الموضوع سيشارك الطلبة في دراسات صف كامل لدراسة المادة االصلية و سيكون هنالك مجموعات قصصية يختارون منها ما يشاؤون‬
‫للقراءة‪ .‬اما الدراسة االنشائية و التي تتضمن البحث و القواعد اللغوية و استخدامها فستكون مندمجة مع الوحدات الموضوعية ذات الصلة‪ .‬لقد تم استخدام مهارات الدراسة و‬
‫تنوع النصوص على اساس التركيز على المواد اللغوية‪.‬‬
‫يركز هذا الصف (الموضوع) على مهارات آداب اللغة االسبانية و حسب قواعدها اللغوية‪.‬‬
‫‪30106‬‬
‫آداب اللغة االسبانية –‪( 3‬اعتمادا“ على توصية المدرس)‬
‫مطابق لمتطلبات التخرج‬
‫يتم تدريس هذا الموضوع لمدة سنة واحدة باللغة االسبانية لطلبة برنامج الناطقين بلغتين وقد تم تصميمه على اساس دراسة موضوعية لالعراق المختلفة‪.‬‬
‫في كل وحدة من وحدات هذا الموضوع سيشارك الطلبة في دراسات صف كامل لدراسة المادة االصلية و سيكون هنالك مجموعات قصصية يختارون منها ما يشاؤون‬
‫‪108‬‬
‫للقراءة‪ .‬اما الدراسة االنشائية و التي تتضمن البحث و القواعد اللغوية و استخدامها فستكون مندمجة مع الوحدات الموضوعية ذات الصلة‪ .‬لقد تم استخدام مهارات الدراسة و‬
‫تنوع النصوص على اساس التركيز على المواد اللغوية‪.‬‬
‫يركز هذا الصف (الموضوع) على مهارات آداب اللغة االسبانية و حسب قواعدها اللغوية‪.‬‬
‫‪31220‬‬
‫مادة القراءة و الكتابة للمستوى المتقدم للمراحل الدراسية ‪11-9‬‬
‫التأهيل للدراسة الجامعية))‬
‫هو برنامج صمم لمساعدة الطالب ممن دون مستوى القراءة مما يساعدهم على تلقي تعليم محدد و بشكل فردي لتطوير مهاراتهم في القراءة‪ .‬يشمل تعليم المهارات على‬
‫األصوات و تحليل الكلمات‪ ,‬الطالقة و االستيعاب‪ ,‬فهم القراءة‪ ,‬تمييز الكلمات و توسيع معرفة المعاني‪ .‬يتم أخذ هذا الدرس بالتزامن مع درس اللغة االنكليزية‪.‬‬
‫‪31223‬‬
‫مادة القراءة و الكتابة للمستوى المتوسط (إقرأ ‪ )181‬للمراحل الدراسية ‪11-9‬‬
‫التأهيل للدراسة الجامعية))‬
‫هو برنامج يمكن الطلبة من تلقي تعليم محدد و فردي لتطوير مهاراتهم بالقراءة‪ .‬يشمل تعليم المهارات على األصوات و تحليل الكلمات‪ ,‬الطالقة و االستيعاب‪ ,‬فهم القراءة‪,‬‬
‫تمييز الكلمات و توسيع معرفة المعاني‪ .‬يتم أخذ هذا الدرس بالتزامن مع درس اللغة االنكليزية‪.‬‬
‫‪31226‬‬
‫مادة القراءة و الكتابة للمستوى اإلبتدائي (النظام ‪ ) 44‬للمراحل ‪10-9‬‬
‫التأهيل للدراسة الجامعية) (‬
‫هو برنامج يمكن الطلبة من تلقي تعليم محدد و فردي لتطوير مهاراتهم بالقراءة‪ .‬يشمل تعليم المهارات على األصوات و تحليل الكلمات‪ ,‬الطالقة و االستيعاب‪ ,‬فهم القراءة‪,‬‬
‫تمييز الكلمات و توسيع معرفة المعاني‪ .‬يتم أخذ هذا الدرس بالتزامن مع درس اللغة االنكليزية‪.‬‬
‫دروس الوافدين الجدد‪:‬‬
‫هذه الدروس هي للطلبة من هم في المراحل اإلبتدائية لمهارات اللغة االنكليزية و من حصلوا على بعض التعليم أو بدون تعليم فعلي‪.‬‬
‫‪32133‬‬
‫مادة آداب اللغات للوافدين الجدد للمراحل الدراسية ‪ 10-9‬مطابق لشروط التخرج‬
‫صمم هذا الدرس لتطوير مهارات القراءة و الكتابة للطلبة ذوي المهارات المتدنية بالقراءة‪ ,‬إن الهدف هو رفع قدرة الطلبة على القراءة و‬
‫بما يسمح لهم بالحصول على المعلومات من المناهج في صفوف التعليم االعتيادي يلبي هذا الدرس المنتقى الحاجات االنية للطلبة الجدد في الواليات‬
‫المتحدة و يقدم بعض المعلومات الى الطلبة للتعرف على الثقافة الجديدة و يشمل‪ -:‬التسلسل الدراسي لمواد المرحلة االعدادية‪ ,‬الجدولة‪ ,‬النقل‪ ,‬النشاطات الرياضية‪ ,‬تعليمات‬
‫الحضور‪ ,‬شروط التخرج‪ ,‬معلومات ثقافية‪ ,‬اجتماعات اولياء امور الطلبة مع المدرسين‪ ,‬كذلك بعض المصطلحات اليومية الضرورية في محل السكن‪ ,‬الطعام‪ ,‬المالبس‪,‬‬
‫النقل‪ ,‬التعامل المالي‪ ,‬المعلومات الشخصية‪ ,‬الصحة و حاالت الطوارئ‪ .‬كذلك يطلعك على ما توفر من مصادر مفيدة في محل سكنك‪.‬‬
‫‪32330‬‬
‫مادة اإلجتماعيات لصفوف الوافدين الجدد للمراحل ‪ (12-9‬مطابق للعالمات االختيارية)‬
‫يشتمل هذا الدرس على مفاهيم و مفردات عامة في مادة االجتماعيات مما يؤهل الطالب لدراسة مادة االجتماعيات المطلوبة مثل التاريخ االميركي في الصفوف اإلعتيادية أو‬
‫صفوف االنكليزية المبسطة ‪ ,‬الحكومة ‪ ,‬االقتصاد‪ ,‬جغرافية و تاريخ العالم‪.‬‬
‫‪32530‬‬
‫مادة العلوم لصفوف الوافدين الجدد للمراحل الدراسية ‪ 12-9‬مطابق للعالمات االختيارية)‬
‫يشتمل هذا الدرس على مواضيع علمية و مفردات عامة في مادة العلوم‪ ,‬و يهيئ الطلبة لالنخراط في دورس العلوم االعتيادية أو صفوف االنكليزية المبسطة في مادة‬
‫االحياء‪,‬الكيمياء‪.‬‬
‫‪32430‬‬
‫مادة ما قبل الجبر للوافدين الجدد للمراحل ‪ 12-9‬مطابق للعالمات االختيارية)‬
‫يركز هذا الدرس على تسريع مهارات الرياضيات لتهيئة الطالب لدرس الجبر ‪.1‬‬
‫‪109‬‬
110
111
501 7th Street, Rockford, IL 61104 (815) 966-3000
http://www2.rps205.com
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