SENATE

SENATE
SENATE
Office of the University Secretary
Tel (250) 721-8101, Fax (250) 721-6223
Notice of
Meeting and Agenda
University
of Victoria
The next open meeting of the Senate of the University of Victoria is scheduled for Friday,
January 10, 2014 at 3:30p.m. in the Senate and Board Chambers, University Centre,
Room A180.
·
AGENDA as reviewed by the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance.
1.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
ACTION
2.
MINUTES
ACTION
a. December 6, 2013 (SEN-JAN 10/14-1)
Motion: That the minutes of the open session of the meeting of the
Senate held on December 6, 2013 be approved and that the approved
minutes be circulated in the usual way.
3.
BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES
4.
REMARKS FROM THE CHAIR
a.
INFORMATION
President's Report
b. Naming of Facilities and Physical Assets Policy
-Carmen Charette, Vice-President External Relations has been invited to attend
c.
5.
Other Matters
CORRESPONDENCE
6.
PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM SENATE COMMITTEES
a. Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance- Prof. Jamie Cassels, Chair
i. Annual Report (SEN-JAN 10/14-2)
ACTION
Motion: That Senate receive the 2012/ 13 annual report of the Senate
Committee on Agenda and Governance for information.
ii. Revisions to the Terms of Reference for the Senate Committee on
Continuing Studies and Senate Committee on Curriculum
(SEN-JAN 10/14-3)
ACTION
Motion: That Senate approve the revisions to the terms of reference for
the Senate Committee on Continuing Studies.
Motion: That Senate approve the revisions to the terms of reference for
the Senate Committee on Curriculum.
iii. Appointments to the Non-Academic Misconduct Appeal Board
(SEN-JAN 10/14-4)
ACTION
Motion: That Senate approve the appointments of Lucia Heffelfinger
Orser and Gina Starblanket to the Non-Academic Misconduct Appeal
Board in accordance with the Procedures for Appealing a Decision
Made Under a Non-Academic Misconduct Proceeding, Resolution of
Non-Academic Misconduct Allegations Policy (AC1300) to begin
immediately and end on June 30, 2014.
b. Senate Committee on Awards - Dr. Annalee Lepp, Chair
i. New and Revised Awards
(SEN-JAN 10/13-5)
Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of
Governors that it also approve, the new and revised awards set out in
the attached document:
•
•
•
•
•
Albert Hung Chao Hong Scholarships in International Business
and Entrepreneurship (revised) *
Ryszard Borzuchowski Scholarship (new)*
Shirley M. Dawson Bursary (new) *
Ten Mile Fine Arts Student Assistance Fund (revised)
Gerald G. Few Bursaries (revised) *
ACTION
•
•
Michiko Warkentyne Scholarship in Japanese Studies (new)
Dianne Bourne Memorial Bursary (revised) *
*Administered by the University of Victoria Foundation
c. Senate Committee on Planning - Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair
1.
Renewal of the Centre for Biomedical Research (CBR)
(SEN-JAN 10/14-6)
ACTION
Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of
Governors that it also approve, the renewal of Approved Centre Status
for the Centre on Biomedical Research (CBR) for the five year period
January 1, 2014 through December 31,2018.
ii. Course-Based Master ofNursing (SEN-JAN 10/14-7)
ACTION
Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of
Governors that it also approve, the establishment of a Course-Based
Master ofNursing, as described in the document "Proposal to revised
the Master of Nursing in Advanced Practice Nursing (MN), so that the
MN APL option and MN NUED option become a Course-Based
Master's Program", dated December 4, 2013 , and that this approval be
withdrawn if the program should not be offered within five years of
the granting of approval.
iii. Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society (SEN-JAN 10/14-8)
Motion: That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of
Governors that it also approve, subject to funding, the establishment
of an Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society, as described in
the document "Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society
(IMHS)", dated June 2013 , and that this approval be withdrawn if the
program should not be offered within five years of the granting of
approval. Once Senate and the Board of Governors have approved the
proposal, the proposal must be posted on the Ministry of Advanced
Education website for peer review for a period of 30 days.
ACTION
7.
PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM FACULTIES AND OTHER DIVISIONS
a. Faculty of Law
1.
Governance Rules for Law Faculty Council Amendment
(SEN-JAN 10/14-9)
ACTION
Motion: That Senate approve the revisions to Law Faculty Council
Rules.
8.
PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM THE VICE-PRESIDENT ACADEMIC AND
PROVOST
a.
Report on Quality Exercise
b. Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for
Graduate Students with Disabilities (SEN-JAN 10/14-10)
9.
OTHER BUSINESS
10.
ADJOURNMENT
INFORMATION
INFORMATION
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 1 of 10
DRAFT MINUTES
A meeting of the Senate of the University of Victoria was held on December 6, 2013 at 3:30 p.m.
in the Senate and Board Chambers, University Centre, Room A180.
1.
APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA
Motion: (R. Lipson/M. Purkis)
That the agenda be approved as circulated.
CARRIED
2.
MINUTES
Motion: (R. Burke/J. Aragon)
That the minutes of the open session of the meeting of the Senate held on
November 1, 2013 be approved and that the approved minutes be circulated
in the usual way.
CARRIED
3.
BUSINESS ARISING FROM THE MINUTES
There was none.
4.
REMARKS FROM THE CHAIR
a. University Rankings
Mr. Tony Eder, Director, Institutional Planning and Analysis, provided a presentation on
university rankings. Mr. Eder began by providing some context for the rankings. He noted that
there are a growing number of rankings with varying audiences and ranking methodologies. He
acknowledged that rankings provide an opportunity to draw attention to universities but cautioned
that media outlets often look for news stories within the rankings, which can present a risk. Mr.
Eder reviewed the various audiences for rankings, including universities, students, parents and
prospective faculty members. He reviewed the statistics regarding the importance of rankings to
students when selecting a university, noting that university websites are the most important
resource cited by students.
Mr. Eder reviewed UVic’s results in the following rankings: Maclean’s, Globe and Mail, Research
Infosource, Times Higher Education, QS World University Rankings and Shanghai Jiao Tong. For
each ranking, he reviewed the audience, the data used to formulate the rankings, and the pros and
cons of the particular ranking.
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 2 of 10
Dr. Aragon asked if the Maclean’s ranking tended to have an Eastern Canadian focus. Mr. Eder
confirmed that it did, but commented on the strong presence of BC universities in the rankings.
b. Budget Update
Dr. Tremblay provided a budget update. She said that, as noted in the message circulated from
Prof. Cassels, unless there were significant changes in the budget assumptions, the university
would not be implementing budget reductions for 2014/15.
Dr. Tremblay reported on some budget certainties that had emerged, including the faculty
arbitration settlement, implementation of the provincial grant reduction over three years, and
positive enrolment numbers. She said some budget uncertainties remained, such as how the
provincial grant reduction will be allocated across the sector and ongoing success with
international enrolments.
Dr. Tremblay said the steady state approach being implemented for 2014/15 would give the
university an opportunity to develop a transparent and strengthened process for aligning resources
with priorities. She said priorities were emerging from the campus conversations being undertaken
by Prof. Cassels, and that these would be further explored and developed.
Dr. Tremblay invited members of Senate to attend a budget information session scheduled for the
campus community on December 12, 2013.
c. President’s Report
Prof. Cassels provided a report on the November Convocation ceremonies. He thanked all those
involved in Convocation and, in particular, the installation ceremony.
Prof. Cassels reported on a number of recent and upcoming meetings with provincial Ministers. He
then asked Mr. Eder to provide a report to Senate on the core review.
Mr. Eder provided members of Senate with background information on the core review, noting
that it was a government-wide evaluation of all programs and services. He described the agencies,
Boards and commissions that would be covered by the review, and described how it was being
carried out. Mr. Eder reviewed the letter received by the Chair of the Board of Governors from the
Minister of Advanced Education. He discussed the specific accountabilities for the Minister
coming out of the core review, and reviewed the terms of reference for post-secondary institutions.
Mr. Eder commented that UVic was in a position of strength going into the review because of its
strong enrolment and positive graduate outcomes; robust approach to assessment and quality
improvement; responsiveness; and strong collaboration and impact. He outlined UVic’s response,
noting that Dr. Tremblay would be the institutional lead. She would be supported by a working
group chaired by Dr. Mateer. Mr. Eder reviewed the timeline for carrying out the core review,
stating that implementation was expected by December 2014. He reviewed the types of
information that would be included in UVic’s response, indicating that it would focus both on past
successes and future plans for improvement.
Dr. Stahl noted that Mr. Eder had mentioned a data-driven approach to planning and asked him to
expand on what he meant by this. Mr. Eder said that the university’s plans were already informed
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 3 of 10
by things like enrolment, but that quality, cost and contribution to the university were other data
points that could be considered. Dr. Stahl cautioned that enrolment is just one indicator of what the
university does. Prof. Cassels agreed and said other considerations would be integrated into the
initiative for enhanced planning processes.
Dr. Baer asked for clarification regarding a comment Mr. Eder made about the university meeting
its enrolment targets. Mr. Eder confirmed that, while the overall target was being met, the
university was short of its target for domestic undergraduate students.
Prof. Cassels said the university had engaged in productive discussions with the Ministry during
development of the terms of reference for the core review.
Prof. Cassels acknowledged the loss of two former UVic deans, who had recently passed away –
Jim Provan and Ian MacPherson. He reminded members of Senate that it had approved an
honorary degree for Dr. MacPherson at its last meeting. Prof. Cassels said a decision had been
made to award the honorary degree posthumously at a memorial service scheduled for the new
year.
Prof. Cassels reported that the new campus bike centre had opened on November 19, 2013. He
encouraged members of Senate to visit this exciting initiative.
With respect to the United Way campaign, Prof. Cassels said the university had achieved 90% of
its goal. He added that there was still time for members of the university community to contribute
to the campaign.
Prof. Cassels reported on awards and honours at the university. He said:
− Science student Dylan Collins was named one of Canada’s 11 Rhodes Scholars;
− Dr. Stephanie Willerth was awarded the CRC Chair in Biomedical Engineering;
− Dr. Rebecca Grant received the "Outstanding Volunteer Award" at the Vancouver Island
National Philanthropy Day celebration; and
− Dr. Bonnie Leadbeater was awarded the CIHR Partnership Award for her work on the
WITS anti-bullying program.
5.
CORRESPONDENCE
a.
Campus Planning Committee
i. Semi-annual Report
Motion: (S. Blackstone/M. Purkis)
That Senate receive the 2012/2013 semi-annual report of the Campus
Planning Committee for information.
CARRIED
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 4 of 10
6.
PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM SENATE COMMITTEES
a. Senate Committee on Academic Standards
i.
University of Victoria Grading Patterns Report/Reporting Portal
Dr. Gillis commented on the statistics in the report, noting that they confirmed concerns expressed
the previous year regarding the impact of implementing the new standardized percentage ranges.
She pointed out the impact on grades in the second class (B) range, which had dropped
significantly from previous years. Dr. Gillis expressed concern about such a large shift resulting
simply from a change in percentage ranges.
Dr. Webb said he had also noticed this shift but that it was his understanding it had been expected
when the standardized percentage ranges were implemented. He said instructors were expected to
make adjustments to grading to accommodate the change, and that this expectation had been
communicated during implementation.
Dr. Burke commented that the shift was more pronounced in some faculties than others and
thought this was the result of some faculties using more strict numerical grading systems.
Dr. Kennedy referred to the grading descriptors, stating that the expectation was for most students
to receive grades in the B range. She said the percentage range for B grades was not large enough
for this expectation to be met.
Dr. Gillis suggested that the Senate Committee on Academic Standards review the statistics and
bring a recommendation to Senate. Prof. Cassels added that the percentage grading
implementation group should also be involved.
Prof. Cassels invited Mr. Eder to explain the new grading patterns reporting portal to Senate. Mr.
Eder reminded members of Senate that a large grading patterns report used to be presented to
Senate every two years. He said grading patterns information was now available at the end of each
term through the portal. Mr. Eder walked members of Senate through accessing the portal and
explained how to find information at the institutional, faculty and department level. He also
explained how to find information on grading anomalies.
Dr. Webb commented on the recent jump in grades in the A range, and said this reinforced the
need for the Senate Committee on Academic Standards to review grading patterns.
With respect to the implementation of the standardized percentage ranges, Dr. Beam commented
on the work undertaken by the Senate Committee on Academic Standards to arrive at a
recommendation. She indicated that most universities have B ranges in the 70s and that UVic’s
old system of having a B range in the 60s was a form of grade inflation. Dr. Beam made a further
comment regarding the drop in number of grades in the B range. She noted that she employs a
numerical grading system, which she was required to adjust following the implementation of the
standardized percentage ranges.
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 5 of 10
Motion: (S. Blackstone/M. Purkis)
That Senate receive the 2013 University of Victoria Grading Patterns
Report for information.
CARRIED
ii. Revisions to Grading Scales Working in the Academic Calendar
Dr. Driessen asked if there was a point when GPA would be based on a percentage grade. Dr.
Webb said the implementation plan that was approved maintained the system of calculating GPA
on the 9 point scale.
Motion: (M. Purkis/M. Webb)
That Senate approve, as recommended by the Senate Committee on
Academic Standards, the revisions to the Graduate, Undergraduate
and Law Grading Scales in the academic calendar, effective May 1,
2014, as follows:
“The grading scale for the evaluation of course achievement at the
University of Victoria is a percentage scale that translates to a 9
point GPA/letter grade system. The 9 point GPA system is the sole
basis for the calculation of grade point averages and academic
standing. Standardized percentage ranges have been established as
the basis for the assignment of letter grades. The percentage grades
are displayed on the official and administrative transcripts in order
to provide fine grained course assessment which will be useful to
students particularly in their application to graduate studies and for
external scholarships and funding. Comparative grading information
(average grade (mean) for the class), along with the number of
students in the class, is displayed for each course section for which
percentage grades are assigned.”
CARRIED
iii. Undergraduate Grading Descriptors
Dr. Grant commented on the statement in the descriptors that a minority of students should receive
grades in the A range. She said this did not seem to reflect current practice. Dr. Webb replied that,
at the institutional level, less than 50% of students were receiving A range grades, but that this was
not the case in all faculties. He hoped the Senate Committee on Academic Standards would
address this point.
Dr. Beam commented that the Senate Committee on Academic Standards had considered
removing this statement from the descriptors, but thought it sent an important message about
expectations with respect to grading.
Dr. Smith expressed concern about the high level of A+s required in a course before a grading
anomaly was flagged. Dr. Webb clarified that, in addition to the flag for A+s, a flag could also be
generated by over 50% of grades in the A range.
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 6 of 10
Dr. Tiedje thought it would be useful to provide some explanation of how anomalies were defined
and why they were considered anomalies. He said it would also be useful to provide some
direction to units and faculties regarding what they were expected to do about anomalies. Dr.
Diacu thought it was important to acknowledge that there might be a legitimate reason for
anomalies, citing an example in his department.
Motion: (A. Roudsari/S. Blackstone)
That Senate approve the revised undergraduate grading descriptors
for inclusion in the undergraduate academic calendar, effective May
1, 2014.
CARRIED
b. Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration and Transfer
i.
Proposed changes to Faculty of Humanities Admission Requirements
Motion: (A. Monahan/J. Archibald)
That Senate approve the proposal to remove the requirement of
grade 11 second language course from the admission requirements of
the Faculty of Humanities, effective immediately, as recommended
by the Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration and
Transfer.
And
That Senate approve the proposed change to the Academic Calendar
removing the requirement of a grade 11 second language course
from the admission requirements of the Faculty of Humanities.
CARRIED
c. Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
i.
Emergency Protocol for Senate Operations
Motion: (R. Burke/P. Keller)
That Senate approve the Emergency Protocol for Senate Operations,
effective immediately.
CARRIED
ii. Revisions to the Rules to Govern the Conduct of Senate Procedures
Dr. Baer asked how the confidentiality provisions in the rules would apply in the event a member
of Senate or a Senate committee was subpoenaed to testify in a court action. He asked if there was
anything that could be written in the rules to protect members from this situation. Prof. Cassels
said this question would have to be investigated. Dr. Baer confirmed he was comfortable with
moving forward with consideration of the motion, but that he looked forward to receiving a
response.
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 7 of 10
Motion: (M. Webb/R. Burke)
That Senate approve the revisions to the Rules to Govern the
Conduct of Senate Procedures, effective immediately.
CARRIED
iii. Revisions to the Terms of Reference for the Senate Committees
Prof. Cassels asked members of Senate if they were willing to consider all seven motions
regarding committee terms of reference as one motion. No member of Senate indicated a desire to
consider each motion separately.
Motion: (K. Gillis/R. Burke)
That Senate consider the seven proposed motions regarding Senate
committee terms of reference as one motion.
CARRIED
Dr. Driessen asked for clarification regarding the difference between closed and confidential
committee meetings, outlining his understanding of the distinction. Ms. Andersen explained that
all Senate committee meetings would normally be considered closed, in that only committee
members and invited guests were permitted to attend. She added that, for some committee matters,
there was also an expectation that documents and discussions would be considered confidential.
For other matters, discussion was expected or permitted with colleagues and others outside the
committee.
Motion: (M. Purkis/S. Blackstone)
That Senate approve the terms of reference for the Senate Committee
on Agenda and Governance, the Senate Committee on Appeals, the
Senate Committee on University Budget, the Senate Committee on
Honorary Degrees and Other Forms of Recognition, the Senate
Committee on Academic Standards, the Senate Committee on
Planning and the Senate Committee on Awards.
CARRIED
d. Senate Committee on Awards
i.
New and Revised Awards
Motion: (A. Lepp/S. Blackstone)
That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of Governors that
it also approve, the new and revised awards set out in the attached
document as recommended by the Senate Committee on Awards:
•
•
•
•
•
English Faculty Bursary (revised)*
Kalman Award for International Heritage Studies (new)*
Best Master’s Project in Community Development Scholarship
(new)
Cameron M. Hay Scholarship (new)*
Neena Chappell Scholarship (revised)*
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 8 of 10
•
•
•
Dr. David Chuenyan Lai Scholarship (revised)*
James A. & Laurette Agnew Memorial Scholarship (new)*
Joey Weisbrodt Memorial Basketball Award (new)*
* Administered by the University of Victoria Foundation
CARRIED
e. Senate Committee on Planning
i. Proposal for Addition of Option to an Existing Program: Master of Music
Performance – Emphasis in String Quartet
Prof. Cassels clarified that a new degree was not being proposed. He said students pursuing this
option would receive a Master of Music.
Motion: (A. Roudsari/M. Kennedy)
That Senate approve, and recommend to the Board of Governors that
it also approve, the option of a Master of Music Performance –
Emphasis in String Quartet to be offered by the School of Music.
CARRIED
7.
PROPOSALS AND REPORTS FROM FACULTIES
There were none.
8.
OTHER BUSINESS
There was none.
There being no other business, the meeting was adjourned at 4:50 p.m.
s enate Meeting Decem ber 6, 2013
Name
Carrie Andersen
Janni Aragon
John Archibald
Pavan Arora
Doug Baer
Sikata Banerjee
Rachel Barr
Nav Bassi
Sara Beam
Peter Bell
Jonathan Bengtson
Sarah Blackstone
Howard Brunt
Robert Burke
Jared Burnett-Mccreery
Gillian Calder
Rosaline Canessa
David Capson
Oscar Casiro
Jamie Cassels
Alison Chapman
Lauren Charlton
Carolyn Crippen
Nikolai Dechev
Florin Diacu
Peter Driessen
Jim Dunsdon
Julia Eastman
Murray Farmer
Mark Gillen
Kathryn Gillis
Reuven Gordon
Rebecca Grant
Nadia Hamden
Matthew Hammer
Linda Hannah
Lucia Heffelfinger Orser
Susan Karim
Peter Keller
Mary Kennedy
Saul Klein
Patricia Kostek
Robbyn Lanning
Annalee Lepp
Susan Lewis Hammond
Robert Lipson
Maureen MacDonald
Boweri Macy
Andrew Marton
Catherine Mateer
Cathy Mcintyre
Lianne·McLarty
Kelsey Mech
Ariel Mishkin
Adam Monahan
Yianni Pappas-Acreman
Caura Parisi
L.:eslee Francis Pelton
Mary Ellen Purkis
Ted Riecken
Emily Rogers
Abdul Roudsari
Esther Sangster-Gormley
Brock Smith
Tracie Smith
Ann Stahl
Gina Starblanket
Nick Tang
Thomas Tiedje
Reeta Tremblay
Alicia Ulysses
John Walsh
Michael Webb
Jeremy Webber
Margot Wilson
Victoria Wyatt
In Attendance
~
~
Regrets
D
D
~
D
0
D
D
D
v
D
D
D
iiV_
D
,,6
D
);[\
D
Q
'<;(
~
Jo
X
D
~
\>..~\
D
)I' D
D
~
D
D
D·
D
A
Jt1
D
/
D
D
'ji{
-~
D
X
D
D
D
¥
D
)a(
D
~
-"!x
D
'X
' o
D
' o
")(
o·
~
~·
D
D
D
D
D
',)!(
D
'V"
a
D
X
X
~
v
D
0
~
~/..
(~/
D
D
D
D
)(
'o
D
· D
'8'
D
X
D
D
D
~
D
';Et
D
D
.I
v
/ o
~
D
D
D
D
./
ll("
if
D
D
y
D
D
D
..Jil:.
D
Jq .
D
~ D
D
X
D
~
vi'
lfl
-~
~
~
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
~ D
D
''51(
D
~
D
D
D
'2 (
D
D
D
D
)!!1: .
)1.
,')("
Associate University Secretary
Faculty of Social Sciences
Deari , Faculty of Humanities
Student Senator, Graduate Studies
Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty of Humanities
Student Senator, Social Sciences
Convocation Senator
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Student Senator, Graduate Studies
University Librarian
Dean , Faculty of Fine Arts
Vice-President Research
Faculty of Science
Student Senator, Engineering
Faculty of Law
Faculty of Social Sciences
Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies
Head , Division of Medical Sciences
President and Vice-Chancellor
Faculty of Humanities
Registrar
Faculty of Education
Faculty of Engineering
Faculty of Science
Faculty of Engineering
Associate Vice-President Student Affairs
University Secretary
Chancellor
Faculty of Law
Faculty of Science
Faculty of Engineering
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Student Senator, Social Sciences
Student Senator, Humanities
Convocation Senator
Student Senator·, Humanities
Student Senator, Education
Dean , Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty of Education
Dean, Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Faculty of Fine Arts
Convocation Senator
Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Fine Arts
Dean, Faculty of SCience
Dean, Division of Continuing Studies
Student Senator, Social Sciences
Associate Vice-President International
Associate Vice-President Academic Planning
Convocation Senator
Faculty of Fine Arts
Student Senator, Science
Student Senator, Business
Faculty of Science
Student Senator, Law
Faculty_ of Humanities
Faculty of Education
Dean , Faculty of Human and Social Development
Dean , Faculty of Education
Student Senator, Human and Social Development
Faculty of Human and Social Development
Faculty of Human and Social Development
Peter B. Gustavson School of Business
Librarian
Faculty of Social Sciences
Student Senator, Graduate Studies
Student Senator, Science
Dean , Faculty of Engineering
Vice~President Academic and Provost
Faculty of Humanities
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Faculty of Social Sciences
Dean , Faculty of Law
Faculty of Social Sciences
Faculty of Fine Arts
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page
9 of 10
Position
By Invitation
Elected by the faculty members
Ex officio
Elected by the students
Elected by the faculty members
Elected by the faculty members
Elected by the students
Elected by the convocation
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the students
Ex officio
Ex officio
Ex officio
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the students
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Faculty
Ex officio
Ex officio
Chair of Senate
Elected by the faculty members
By Invitation
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Faculty
By Invitation
Secretary of Senate
Ex officio
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the faculty members
Elected by the faculty members
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the students
Elected by the students
Elected by the convocation
Elected by the students
Elected by the students
Ex officio
Elected by the Faculty
Ex officio
Elected by the Faculty_
Elected by the convocation
Elected by the Faculty
EleCted by the faculty members
Ex officio
Ex officio
Elected by the students
By Invitation
By Invitation
Elected by the convocation
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the students
Elected by the students
Elected by the faculty members
Elected by the students
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the faculty members
Ex officio
Ex officio
Elected by the students
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Professional Librarians
Elected by the faculty members
Elected by the students
Elected by the students
Ex officio
Ex officio
Elected by the Continuing Sessionals
Elected by the Faculty
Elected by the Faculty
Ex officio
Elected by the faculty members
Elected by the faculty_members
SEN-JAN 10/14-1
Page 10 of 10
MEMBERSHIP OF THE SENATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
Effective July 1, 2013
EX OFFICIO MEMBERS- University Act: Section 35 (2) (a-t) MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE FACULTY
Chancellor: Murray Fanner (31112/14)
MEMBERS (continued)
President and Vice-Chancellor: Jamie Cassels, Chair
(30/6/14)
Susan Lewis Hammond-FINE
V.P. Academic & Provost: Reeta Tremblay
(30/6/14)
Adam Monahan - SCIE
V.P. Research: Howard Brunt
(30/6/14)
Leslee Francis Pelton - EDUC
Dean, Peter B. Gustavson School of Business:
(30/6/16)
Saul Klein
Ann Stahl - SOSC
(30/6/16)
Victoria Wyatt- FINE
Dean of Education: Ted Riecken
Margot Wilson- SOSC
Dean of Engineering: Thomas Tiedje
(30/6/15)
Dean of Continuing Studies: Maureen MacDonald
MEMBERS ELECTED FROM THE STUDENT
Dean of Fine Arts: Sarah Blackstone
ASSOCIATION- Section 35 (2) (h)
Dean of Graduate Studies: David Capson
Dean ofHumanities: John Archibald
Pavan Arora (GRAD)
(30/6/14)
Dean ofHSD: Mary Ellen Purkis, Vice-Chair
Rachel Barr (SOSC)
"
Peter Bell (GRAD)
Dean of Law: Jeremy Webber
"
Jared Bumett-Mccreery (ENGR)
Dean of Science: Robert Lipson
"
Nadia Hamdon (SOSC)
Dean of Social Sciences: Peter Keller
"
Matthew Hammer (HUMS)
University Librarian: Jonathan Bengtson
"
Susan Karim (EDUC)
"
Bowen Macy (SOSC)
MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE FACULTIES - Section
"
Kelsey Mech (SC IE)
35 (2) (g)
"
BUSI: Rebecca Grant (30/6/16)
Ariel Mishkin (BUSI)
"
Lucia Heffelfinger Orser (HUMS)
"
Brock Smith (30/6/15)
Yianni Pappas-Acreman (LAW)
"
EDUC: Carolyn Crippen (30/6/16)
Emily
Rogers
(HUMA)
Mary Kennedy (30/6/14)
"
Gina Starblanket
"
ENGR : Peter Driessen (30/6/16)
Nick Tang (SCIE)
"
Nikolai Dechev (30/6/14)
TBA (FINE)
"
FINE: Patricia Kostek (30/6/15)
Lianne McLarty (30/6/16)
MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE CONVOCATION
GRAD: Sara Beam (30/6/16)
-Section 35 (2) (i)
John Walsh (30/6/14)
HUMA: Abdul Roudsari (30/6/15)
(31/12/14)
Nav Bassi
Esther Sangster-Gormley (30/6/16)
(31/12/ 14)
Linda Hannah
HUMS : Annalee Lepp (30/6/16)
Robbyn Lanning
(31/12/14)
Laura Parisi (30/6/15)
(3 1/12/14)
Cathy Mcintyre
LA WF: Gillian Calder (30/6/14)
Mark Gillen (30/6/16)
ADDITIONAL MEMBERS- Section 35 (2) (k)
SCIE: Robert Burke (30/6114)
Head, Division of Medical Sciences: Oscar Casiro
Florin Diacu (30/6/14)
Member elected by the Professional Librarians:
SOSC : Rosaline Canessa (3 0/6/15)
Tracie Smith (30/06/15)
Michael Webb (30/6/14)
Continuing Sessional: Alicia Ulysses (30/06/14)
MEMBERS ELECTED BY THE FACULTY MEMBERS
SECRETARY OF SENATE- Section 64 (2)
- Sections 35 (2) (g)
University Secretary: Julia Eastman
Janni Aragon- SOSC
(30/6/15)
Doug Baer- SOSC
(30/6/14)
BY INVITATION - Seated with specified speaking
(30/6/16)
Sikata Banerjee- HUMS
rights
Alison Chapman - HUMS
(30/6/15)
Assoc. V.P. International- Andrew Marton
Kathryn Gillis- SCIE
(30/6/14)
Assoc. V.P. Student Affairs: Jim Dunsdon
Reuven Gordon - ENGR
(30/6/14)
Assoc. V.P. Academic Planning: Catherine Mateer
Registrar: Lauren Charlton
Associate University Secretary: Carrie Andersen .
LlS1 iipJ;H~d:
l0i25!2()U
SEN-JAN 10/14-2
Page 1 of 3
Senate Committee on
Agenda and Governance
Date:
To:
December 11, 2013
From:
Senate
Re:
2012/13 Annual Report
Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
The Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance met eleven times during 2012/13:
August 29, 2012
October 19, 2012
December 14, 2012
February 15, 2013
March 26, 2013
April 19, 2013
September 21, 2012
November 23, 2012
January 18, 2013
March 22, 2013
March 27, 2013
The nominations sub-committee met three times:
September 21, 2012
October 19, 2012
April 19, 2013
Review of Draft Senate Agenda
At each of its meetings, the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance assisted the Chair in
preparing the Senate agenda and reviewed each of the items proposed for submission to Senate.
Electronic Distribution of Senate Materials
At its August 29, 2012 meeting, the committee received a proposal from the Office of the
University Secretary regarding electronic distribution of Senate materials. Committee members
agreed to proceed with the electronic distribution of materials for the open Senate meetings.
Materials for the closed Senate meetings continue to be circulated in paper format.
Potential Labour Disruptions
Given the potential for a staff union strike, at the August 29, 2012 and September 21, 2012
meetings, the committee discussed the impacts of potential labour disruptions on Senate
operations and academic activities. In particular, committee members considered what
academic issues and regulations might require planning by Senate (e.g. cancellation of classes,
changes to exam dates). No decisions or recommendations to Senate were made as a result of
the preliminary planning discussions undertaken by the committee.
SEN-JAN 10/14-2
Page 2 of 3
Senate Committee Terms of Reference
At the September 21, 2012 meeting, the committee approved revisions to the terms of reference
for the Senate Committee on Planning. The revised terms of reference were approved by Senate
at the October 5, 2012 meeting.
At the April 19, 2013 meeting, the committee approved revisions to the terms of reference for
the Senate Committee on Admission, Re-registration and Transfer. The revised terms of
reference were approved by Senate at the May 3, 2013 meeting.
Senate Committee Evaluations
At its September 21, 2012 meeting, the committee reviewed the results of the 2011/12 Senate
committee evaluations. The evaluation results for each committee were also circulated to that
committee’s Chair.
Complaint Regarding Student Elections to the Board of Governors
At the March 22, 2013 meeting, the committee received a complaint regarding the 2013 student
elections to the Board of Governors. A sub-committee met on March 26, 2013 to carefully
review all materials provided by those involved in the complaint. The committee met again on
March 27, 2013 to review these materials and render a decision. In considering the complaint,
the committee also referred to the Rules to Govern Elections to the Board of Governors and the
Senate, the “Poster and Banners and Campaign Periods and Dates – Elections for Student
Representatives to the Board of Governors and the Senate”, and the “Guidelines for Electronic
Campaigning”. After careful consideration, the committee determined that the election of
student representatives to the Board of Governors should be re-conducted. The candidates who
participated in the original election were permitted to stand for election. The results of the
original election were deemed void and were not released.
Senate Committee Attendance
At the November 23, 2012, January 18, 2013 and April 19, 2013 meetings, the committee
discussed the low attendance rates at Senate committee meetings. Attendance statistics from
2011/12, along with comments in the Senate committee evaluations, were reviewed. At the
April 19, 2013 meeting, the committee approved a strategy to monitor and improve Senate
committee attendance. This strategy included implementation of standard attendance tracking
sheets for each Senate committee and regular reporting on Senate attendance; early
intervention by Senate committee chairs to connect with and support Senate committee
members with low attendance rates; and revisions to the Rules to Govern the Conduct of Senate
Procedures to make attendance rules more stringent.
2012/13 Appointments to Senate Committees
At the September 21, 2012 meeting, the nominations sub-committee approved lists of
appointments to the Senate committees, the Joint Senate Board Retreat Committee and the
Planning and Priorities Committee. These appointments were approved by Senate at the
October 5, 2012 meeting.
SEN-JAN 10/14-2
Page 3 of 3
At the October 19, 2012 meetings, the nominations sub-committee approved appointments to
the Senate committees and the Non-Academic Misconduct Appeal Board. These appointments
were approved by Senate at the November 2, 2012 meeting.
2013/14 Appointments to Senate Committees
At the April 19, 2013 meeting, the nominations sub-committee discussed and approved
nominations for vacancies on the Senate committees for 2013/2014. The appointments were
approved by Senate at the May 3, 2013 meeting.
2013/14 Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
Jamie Cassels, Chair
Peter Bell, student senator
Robert Burke, Science
Julia Eastman, University Secretary
Kathy Gillis, Science
Reuven Gordon, Engineering
Robbyn Lanning, Convocation Senator
Mary Ellen Purkis, Human and Social Development
Tracie Smith, Library
Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost
Michael Webb, Social Sciences
Carrie Andersen (Secretary)
2012/13 Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
David Turpin, Chair
Peter Bell, student senator
Robert Burke, Science
Julia Eastman, University Secretary
Kathy Gillis, Science
Peter Keller, Social Sciences
Robbyn Lanning, Convocation Senator
Micaela Serra, Engineering
Tracie Smith, Library
Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost
Michael Webb, Social Sciences
Carrie Andersen (Secretary)
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 1 of 9
Senate Committee on
Agenda and Governance
Date:
To:
From:
Re:
December 13, 2013
Senate
Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
Revisions to the Terms of Reference for Senate Committee on Continuing
Studies and the Senate Committee on Curriculum
The Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance met on December 13, 2013 to consider revisions
to the terms of reference for the Senate Committee on Continuing Studies and the Senate Committee
on Curriculum. Details of the proposed revisions are set out in the attached documents.
Recommend Motions
That Senate approve the revisions to the terms of reference for the Senate Committee on Continuing
Studies.
That Senate approve the revisions to the terms of reference for the Senate Committee on Curriculum.
Respectfully submitted,
2013/14 Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
Jamie Cassels, Chair
Peter Bell, student senator
Robert Burke, Science
Julia Eastman, University Secretary
Kathy Gillis, Science
Robbyn Lanning, Convocation senator
Reuven Gordon, Engineering
Mary Ellen Purkis, Human and Social Development
Tracie Smith, Library
Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost
Michael Webb, Social Sciences
Carrie Andersen (Secretary)
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 2 of 9
Office of the Dean
Continuing Studies
Room 358
3800 Finnerty Road
Victoria, BC
V8P 5C2
Tel: 250-721-8456
Fax: 250-721-8774
http://www.uvcs.uvic.ca
lewni11y thor >harn•s
1'1/W)'OI!Il/P
December 4, 2013
To:
Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
And to: Carrie Anderson
Associate University Secretary
t
J
!
I
. 7
.
~.·f't::. ,Q_..,·•-"'
From:
Maureen MacDonald, Chair
~t~v~Senate Committee on Continuing Studies
Re:
Terms of Reference
/t·~-
(/
At the Senate Committee on Continuing Studies meeting on November 19, 2013
the motion to revise the Committees terms of reference was passed unanimously.
The motion read:
THAT the Senate Committee an Continuing Studies approve, and recommend
ta Senate Committee an Agenda and Governance that it approve, the revised
terms of reference far the Senate Committee on Continuing Studies.
I have attached the terms of reference approved.
Encl.
Ita
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 3 of 9
Office of the University Secretary
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada
Tel 250-721-8101 Fax 250-721-6223
E-mail [email protected]
Web http://www.uvic.ca/universitysecretary/
Date:
To:
From:
Re:
21 August 2013
Senate Committee on Continuing Studies
Carrie Andersen
Associate University Secretary
Revisions to the Committee Terms of Reference
Until now, the terms of reference of the Senate standing committees have been revised and
presented to Senate for approval on a needs basis. Due to the ad hoc nature of those revisions
over the past years, some of the Senate committee terms of reference are not consistent in
their language, structure and format. Over the summer my office has worked to revise the
terms of reference for each committee in order to standardize the language, structure and
format, where appropriate. The revised terms of reference are attached for consideration
and approval by the committee. Once approved by the committee, the revised terms of
reference will be submitted to the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance for
approval and recommendation to Senate.
Aside from formatting and structural changes, other key changes include:
•
•
The addition of a statement that meetings of Senate standing committees are normally
closed.
The addition of the committee’s composition and voting status of all committee
members.
Recommended motion
THAT the Senate Committee on Continuing Studies approve, and recommend to Senate
Committee on Agenda and Governance that it approve, the revised terms of reference for the
Senate Committee on Continuing Studies.
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 4 of 9
SENATE COMMITTEE ON CONTINUING STUDIES
TERMS OF REFERENCE
The Committee shall:
1.
On behalf of the Senate, the Committee shall rReview and make
recommendations to the Division of Continuing Studies regarding academic
policies and criteria concerning the offering of:
a.
Degree-credit courses and programs, approved by the Senate and the
Board of Governors, at off campus locations and on campus when such
courses or programs are not otherwise administered by the academic
departments;
b.
Non-degree programs and courses.
2.
On behalf of Senate, the Committee shall mMonitor on a regular basis the
Continuing Studies programs and courses offered to ensure adherence to
established academic policies, priorities and criteria.
3.
The Committee shall rReview proposals for new programs and for changes to
existing Continuing Studies programs and shall, at its discretion, make
recommendations respecting such programs to the Senate Committee on Planning.
4.
The Committee shall rReview existing certificate and diploma programs at least
every three years.
Senate standing and ad hoc committee meetings are normally closed. A committee may
determine that the whole or part of any committee discussion or document presented to the
committee shall be held in confidence.
Composition
• 9 faculty members representing the faculties (at least 2 of whom shall be members of
Senate) (voting)
• the Dean of Continuing Studies, Chair (ex officio, voting)
• 3 students including 1 student member of Senate, 1 undergraduate student representative
and 1 graduate student representative (voting)
• 1 student representative from the diploma or certificate program in Continuing Studies
appointed by the Senate (voting)
• 1 Alumni Association representative (voting)
• 1 convocation member of Senate (voting)
• the President or nominee (voting)
Total membership - 17 (17 voting members)
The secretary of the committee is a representative from the Office of the Dean, Division of
Comment [u1]: The composition of the
committee has been added to the TOR.
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 5 of 9
Continuing Studies.
Approved by Senate
Revised October 4, 2000
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 6 of 9
MEMO
Senate Committee on
Curriculum
Date:
December 10th, 2013
To:
Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
From:
Senate Committee on Curriculum
Re:
Revision to the Terms of Reference for the Senate Committee
on Curriculum.
At its meeting on September 11, 2013, the Senate Committee on Curriculum reviewed
proposed changes to the committee’s terms of reference (attached). After discussion, the
committee approved the following motion:
That the revised Senate Committee on Curriculum Terms of Reference subject to the
addition of a voting Dean or designate from the Faculty of Graduate Studies be approved
and forwarded to the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance and Senate.
Respectfully submitted,
2013/14 Senate Committee on Curriculum
Dr. T Haskett, Humanities (Chair)
Dr. L. Francis Pelton (Vice-Chair)
Dr. R. Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost
Dr. D. McCutcheon, Business
Dr. W. Hurren, Education
Dr. L. Jackson, Engineering
Dr. L. Van Luven, Fine Arts
Dr. M. Wilson, Graduate Studies
Dr. V. Pacini-Ketchabaw, Human & Social Development
Dr. E. Adjin-Tettey, Law
Dr. K. Gillis, Science
Dr. M. Webb, Social Sciences
Jill Carruthers (Secretary)
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 7 of 9
Office of the University Secretary
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada
Tel 250-721-8101 Fax 250-721-6223
E-mail [email protected]
Web http://www.uvic.ca/universitysecretary/
Date:
To:
From:
Re:
22 August 2013
Senate Committee on Curriculum
Carrie Andersen
Associate University Secretary
Revisions to the Committee Terms of Reference
Until now, the terms of reference of the Senate standing committees have been revised and
presented to Senate for approval on a needs basis. Due to the ad hoc nature of those revisions
over the past years, some of the Senate committee terms of reference are not consistent in their
language, structure and format. Over the summer my office has worked to revise the terms of
reference for each committee in order to standardize the language, structure and format, where
appropriate.
Significant revisions have also been made to the terms of reference as recommended in the
report from the Ad Hoc Senate Committee to Consider the Curriculum Process, approved by
Senate at the May 2013 meeting. The revised terms of reference are attached for consideration
and approval by the committee. Once approved by the committee, the revised terms of reference
will be submitted to the Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance for approval and
recommendation to Senate.
Aside from formatting, minor wording and structural changes, other key changes include:
•
•
•
•
•
Changes required by recommendations 1, 2, 4, 5 and 9 of the Ad Hoc committee’s report.
The addition of a statement that meetings of Senate standing committees are normally
closed.
The addition of the Director of Coop Education and Career Services as an ex officio, nonvoting position to the composition.
The re-inclusion of the position of President (or nominee) in the composition, as required
in section 6(g) of the Senate Rules to Govern the Conduct of Senate Procedures.
The addition of voting status of all committee members to the membership list.
Recommended motion
THAT the Senate Committee on Curriculum approve, and recommend to Senate Committee on
Agenda and Governance that it approve, the revised terms of reference for the Senate Committee on
Curriculum.
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 8 of 9
SENATE COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM
TERMS OF REFERENCE
Terms of Reference
The committee shall:
1.
To rReview curriculum submissions recommended by the Faculties for
consistency with University policies and strategic goals, to resolve
outstanding issues and to approve curriculum submissions for
recommendation to Senate.
a.
For the purposes of the committee, ‘curriculum’ means all for-credit
academic programs and courses offered by the University, including the
descriptions and requirements of academic programs and courses, as
described in the University Calendar;
2.
To mMake recommendations concerning the Policy on Calendar Submissions
AC1120 and the associated Procedures on Curriculum Submissions.
3.
To cConsult, as required, with other senate committees on non-curricular
issues related to the University Calendar, and make recommendations to
Senate if appropriate.
4.
To mMake recommendations to Senate on the form and frequency in which
the University Calendar is published.
Senate standing and ad hoc committee meetings are normally closed. A committee may
determine that the whole or part of any committee discussion or document presented to
the committee shall be held in confidence.
Composition
• 2 faculty members (both of whom shall be members of Senate but normally not
chairs of their Faculty Curriculum Committees) who will serve as Chair and ViceChair of the committee (voting)
• Vice-President Academic and Provost or designate (ex officio, voting)
• President, or nominee (ex officio, voting)
• the Chairs (9) of Faculty Curriculum Committees (ex officio, voting)
• Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies, or nominee (ex officio, voting)
• the Chair of Senate Committee on Academic Standards (ex officio, voting)
• 1 student member of Senate from the Committee on Academic Standards (ex
officio, voting)
• the Associate University Secretary (ex officio, non-voting)
• the Registrar (ex officio, non-voting)
• the Associate Registrar (ex officio, non-voting)
• the Director, Graduate Admissions and Records (ex officio, non-voting)
• the Calendar Editor (ex officio, non-voting)
Comment [u1]: This position is being
added back into the composition as per the
Senate procedures section 6(g).
SEN-JAN 10/14-3
Page 9 of 9
•
the Director or designate, Co-operative Education and Career Services (ex officio,
non-voting)
Total membership - up to 21 (up to 15 voting) depending on whether the Chair and/or
Vice-Chair are also Chairs of their Faculty Curriculum Committees.
The secretary of the committee is the Coordinator, Curriculum and Calendar, Office of
the Registrar.
Approved by Senate March 6, 1996
Revised May 6, 2011
Revised May 4, 2012
Revised June 4, 2013
Comment [u2]: This is an addition to
the composition
SEN-JAN 10/14-4
Page 1 of 1
Senate Committee on
Agenda and Governance
Date:
December 13, 2013
To:
Senate
From:
Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
Re:
Appointments to the Non-Academic Misconduct Appeal Board
The Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance nominations sub-committee met on December 13,
2013 to consider appointments to the Non-Academic Misconduct Appeal Board.
As members of Senate may recall, the Resolution of Non-Academic Misconduct Allegations Policy
(AC1300) was approved by Senate at its May 2011 meeting. The policy was also approved by the Board
of Governors on May 31, 2011.
Section 4.00 of the Procedures for Appealing a Decision Made Under a Non-Academic Misconduct
Proceeding (established under the policy) calls for the creation of a non-academic misconduct appeal
board to hear appeals of minor sanctions. Membership of the appeal board includes two student
representatives from Senate.
The Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance nominations sub-committee recommends the
appointments of Lucia Heffelfinger and Gina Starblanket to the Appeal Board in accordance with the
appeal procedures of Policy AC1300, Resolution of Non-Academic Misconduct Allegations.
Motion: That Senate approve the appointments of Lucia Heffelfinger
Orser and Gina Starblanket to the Non-Academic Misconduct
Appeal Board in accordance with the Procedures for Appealing a
Decision Made Under a Non-Academic Misconduct Proceeding,
Resolution of Non-Academic Misconduct Allegations Policy
(AC1300) to begin immediately and end on June 30, 2013, as
recommended by the Senate Committee on Agenda and
Governance.
2013/14 Senate Committee on Agenda and Governance
Jamie Cassels, Chair *
Peter Bell, student senator *
Robert Burke, Science
Julia Eastman, University Secretary
Kathy Gillis, Science *
Reuven Gordon, Engineering
Robbyn Lanning, Convocation senator
Mary Ellen Purkis, Human and Social Development*
Tracie Smith, Library
Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost
Michael Webb, Social Sciences *
Carrie Andersen (Secretary) *
*Members of the nominations sub-committee
SEN-JAN 10/14-5
Page 1 of 2
MEMORANDUM
University of Victoria
Student Awards and Financial Aid
Email: [email protected]
Tel: (250) 721-8425
Fax: (250) 721-8757
TO:
Secretary of Senate
University Secretary’s Office
DATE: December 11, 2013
FR:
Lori Nolt, Director, Student Awards and Financial Aid
Secretary, Senate Committee on Awards
RE:
Awards Recommended to Senate for Approval
The Senate Committee on Awards recommends that the Senate approves and recommends to the Board of
Governors the following awards:
*Administered by the University of Victoria Foundation
Additions are underlined
Deletions are struck through
ALBERT HUNG CHAO HONG SCHOLARSHIPS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP* (REVISED)
Two scholarships of $3,000 each, payable at $1,500 per year, are awarded to academically
excellent undergraduate students, one entering the International Business specialization and one
entering the Entrepreneurship specialization in the Faculty of Business. To receive scholarship
renewals, recipients must maintain a grade point average of 7.0 or better. A student whose grade
point average falls between 6.5 and 7.0 may file a written appeal with the Faculty of Business to
seek special consideration for renewal of the scholarship. No renewal is considered if a student’s
grade point average falls below 6.5. This award may be given to a graduating student.
RYSZARD BORZUCHOWSKI SCHOLARSHIP* (NEW)
One or more scholarships are awarded to academically outstanding undergraduate students in the
School of Environmental Studies.
SHIRLEY M. DAWSON BURSARY* (NEW)
One or more bursaries are awarded to undergraduate or graduate female students at the
University of Victoria.
SEN-JAN 10/14-5
Page 2 of 2
TEN MILE FINE ARTS STUDENT ASSISTANCE FUND (REVISED)
This fund is intended to provide assistance to undergraduate and graduate students in the Faculty
of Fine Arts of at least up to $1,000 each, regardless of citizenship, who have demonstrated
financial need. Students may inquire about their eligibility for this fund with Student Awards
and Financial Aid throughout the academic year.
GERALD G. FEW GRADUATE BURSARIES* (REVISED) One or more bursaries are
awarded to undergraduate and graduate students in the biological sciences with a commitment to
the field of Forest Biology. Selection of the recipient(s) will be made by Student Financial Aid
Services upon the recommendation of the Forest Biology Program Committee.
MICHIKO WARKENTYNE SCHOLARSHIP IN JAPANESE STUDIES (NEW)
One or more scholarships of up to $1,000 are awarded to academically outstanding
undergraduate or graduate students who are taking courses on Japan in the Department of Pacific
and Asian Studies.
DIANNE BOURNE MEMORIAL BURSARY* (REVISED)
A bursary is One or more bursaries are offered to a full or part-time students admitted to the
School of Social Work, who is are in or is are planning a career in child welfare practice in
northern British Columbia.
_______________________________
Lori Nolt
2013/2014 Senate Committee on Awards
A. Lepp (Chair), L. Nolt (Secretary), P. Arora, A. Baniasadi, K. Barnes, A. Cirillo,
C. Crippen, L. Charlton, B. Macy, Y. Rondeau, J. Walsh, M. Wilson, J. Wood
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 1 of 15
Associate Vice-President Academic Planning
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada
Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216
E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac
Date:
December 5, 2013
To:
The Secretary of the Senate
From:
Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning
Re:
Renewal of the Centre for Biomedical Research
At its meeting of 4 December 2013, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the Renewal
of the Centre for Biomedical Research. The following motion is recommended:
That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve the renewal of Approved
Centre Status for the Centre on Biomedical Research (CBR) for the five year period January 1, 2014 through
December 31, 2018.
:mam
Committee Membership:
Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair
Ms. Lauren Charlton
Dr. Stan Dosso
Mr. Jason Walters
Dr. Reuven Gordon
Ms. Carrie Anderson
Dr. Howard Brunt
Dr. Maureen MacDonald
Dr. Timothy Iles
Dr. Merwan Engineer
_____________________________________________
Dr. Reeta Tremblay
Dr. David Boag
Dr. Catherine McGregor
Dr. Victoria Wyatt
Dr. Anne Bruce
Dr. Ann Stahl
Ms. Emily Rogers
Ms. Norah McRae
Dr. Sarah Blackstone
Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 2 of 15
MEMORANDUM
Date: To: November 20, 2013 Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair of the Senate Committee on Planning From: Re: Dr. Howard Brunt, Vice‐President Research ‐ Renewal of the Centre for Biomedical Research (CBR) An external review of the CBR was conducted on September 24‐25, 2013 and the appended report was provided by the review panel on November 1, 2013. The review panel report is a thorough and informative assessment of CBR. In particular, the Executive Report is highly positive on both the current activities of CBR and the opportunities for enhanced activity. The summary ends with the following points:  Continue world‐class science communication and education through Café Scientifique, and support of the science outreach activities on campus, along with professional development and outreach experiences for graduate students. Agree. CBR should continue to build on its strengths in these areas.  Utilize the significant international expertise of CBR in science communication and methods for disseminating on‐going collaborative research more broadly, inside and outside the campus. Agree. CBR activities in this area should be further developed in collaboration with the new Research Partnerships Knowledge Mobilization (RPKM) Unit in ORS.  Build on existing CBR seminars and working groups that support trainees by organizing science career panel and career preparation for senior graduate students. Agree.  Enhance collaboration and synergy within the biomedical research community through list of specialized equipment, reagents, and technologies/expertise that can be shared. Agree.  Make the activities of the CBR visible by developing a social network analysis of connections of CBR member networks and collecting short vignettes from faculty and trainees that demonstrate the impact and catalyzing effect of the CBR for future reporting and the CBR website. 1
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 3 of 15
Agree. The short vignettes for faculty can build on the work already done in this area through the faces of UVic. 


Implement tactics to increase the total annual budget, including requesting financial support from the departments served by the Centre and partnering with colleagues within other programs who have a successful track record on fundraising. Agree. It is important that CBR work towards sustainable funding from a diversity of sources to ensure its long term viability. We anticipate more directed support for fundraising for research centre activity when a new AVP Development and Alumni Relations is appointed. Expand the leadership of the Centre by formally appointing one or more assistant directors and assigning specific roles to distribute responsibility for Centre activities. Agreed that it is important to engage others beyond the Director in the leadership of CBR activities. But, it is not evident that adding assistant directors is the best way to build leadership in the CBR. Such leadership can come from other models such as a diverse, active program and / or steering committee – a model that works well in some other centres. Alternatives need to be explored to identify which approach (those noted or other alternatives) would be most effective for CBR. Develop funding mechanisms to provide small seed grants to support inter‐departmental collaborations in “research clusters” or pilot projects that may lead to external funding. The AVPR and AVPRO are initiating a review of the internal research grant program to ensure the funds available are being put to the best use in support of research, new research activities in particular, across the institution. The current and likely future budget constraints at the University means there isn’t the capacity to significantly change the total amount of support available. The comments of the Review Panel will be taken into account in the review of the internal review grants program. Comments on Review Panel’s Specific Recommendations: The Review Panel has organized its recommendations into three categories. Section 4.1 recommends continuing the following successful strategies, already underway within CBR and highly valued by members, trainees, and the University at‐large. These recommendations can be summed up as an endorsement of CBR’s current activity. I agree that these activities are indeed valuable and should be continued. Section 4.2 recommends a number of what the Review Panel characterizes as small investments that would enhance or amplify the capabilities and reach of the CBR:  Use the translational health research pathway as a strategy to map where CBR activities fit with other UVic health research initiatives, from discovery to development through to delivery and outcomes (see figure and references in Appendix) 2
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 4 of 15










Strongly agree with this recommendation. It is critical to fully consider how CBR research activity fits with other health research initiatives to ensure the best overall investment of all resources and to promote a higher level of collaboration where appropriate. Use social network maps (an established social science method) to illustrate impact, connections, and outcomes outside typical metrics Agree. Collect short “vignettes” from all faculty members and students regarding an instance of impact or catalyzing effect of the CBR – and showcase these in progress reports and potentially on the CBR website to create further interest Agree (see note above about Faces of UVic Research). Partner with colleagues within other programs on fundraising efforts and meetings with potential donors (e.g. Division of Medical Sciences) Agree. Negotiate with the Office of the Vice‐President of Research on University requirements for funding for seed grants. Currently, these grants are only available to researchers who have no other external funding. However, funders like the CIHR require preliminary data in grant applications. We recommend that the seed grants be available for new collaborations, even if the researchers are funded for other projects, so they can generate preliminary data to show the feasibility of a new collaborative project prior to submitting a grant See comment on this issue above. This matter will be considered in the context of how best to support all research centres, groups and individual researchers across campus. Offer science communication workshops or short courses (professional skills, career workshops, other soft skills, grant writing, etc.) Organize science career panel and career preparation for senior graduate students Pair each basic science trainee with a clinician for translational science exchange opportunities (modeled after the University of Washington Molecular Medicine Training Program: http://depts.washington.edu/molmed/) Increase faculty lunches or idea exchanges (e.g. lightning talks) to facilitate further collaboration Develop and maintain an online list of equipment and technical resources on campus, to facilitate collaboration and resource utilization Re‐instate grants work‐in‐progress talks (former “chalk talks”) on a regular schedule to facilitate grant development and submissions I agree that the above six recommendations identify suitable activities for CBR to consider in its programming. It is the responsibility of a Centre Director to consider such options and to determine the overall emphasis, mix and balance of activities to be taken on by a centre. Dr. Zehr has provided some initial thoughts in this regard.. 3
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 5 of 15

Formalize or define the relationship of the Knowledge Mobilization office at the University of Victoria with CBR, as part of the “outreach hub” work of CBR Agree (the appropriate office is RPKM in ORS). Section 4.3 of the Review Panel Report states: The CBR connections result in increased success for unit faculty and trainees. The very cross‐unit role that makes CBR successful also renders it resource‐poor. We recommend that academic units with faculty and students active and benefitting from the CBR make direct contributions to the CBR on the order of $10,000/year in order to provide funding for the following:  Increase director FTE and/or provide FTE for one or two assistant directors Comment: See comments on this above. Alternatives need to be explored. Regarding increasing the Director FTE, this has to be considered in the context of the best administrative structure for CBR, the overall activity level in the centre, and the comparison of that activity to other centres and research entities across campus.  Develop a pilot/seed grant program to cultivate collaborations and result in preliminary data (essential for any CIHR grant now). This is in addition to the previous recommended change to the seed grant program through the Office of the Vice‐President of Research. Comment: The distinction from the earlier recommendation is unclear. Dr. Zehr indicates this would require more central funding. The allocation of central funding as internal research grants will be reviewed as noted above. No funds are available to allocate to CBR for this purpose.  Provide small “research cluster” funds to new interdisciplinary collaborations who wish to sponsor a speaker or lunchtime seminar series Comment: I note that Dr. Zehr endorses this recommendation and states it can be done within existing funds. Conclusion and Recommendation The external review panel has provided a positive assessment of CBR and their report concludes with: “The review panel recommends continuation of the CBR, with further recognition for the significant leadership and unique contributions made by both the Centre Director and also the Centre Administrator.” After reviewing the documentation and the Review Panel Report in particular, I recommend that the Senate Committee on Planning approve the following motion: That the Senate Committee on Planning recommends that Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve the renewal of Approved Centre Status for the Centre on Biomedical Research (CBR) for the five year period January 1, 2014 through 4
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 6 of 15
December 31, 2018 . This recommendation is not contingent upon the suggestions in the external review report relating to resources, which are advice to the Vice‐President Research. By copy of this memorandum, I am notifying the CBR through the Director, that the next review of the Centre will include an assessment of the progress CBR has made on the recommendation in sections 4.1 and 4.2 of the Review Panel Report. This does not restrict the Centre from undertaking other initiatives as appropriate. cc: P. Zehr, CBR Director 5
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 7 of 15
University of Victoria Research Centre Review Report
Centre for Biomedical Research
Review Conducted September 24-25, 2013
1. Executive Summary:
The Centre for Biomedical Research (CBR) contributes directly to the University of Victoria
mission of high quality education, research, and outreach. In the primary domains of focus—
promoting high quality research, enhancing training, and research communications—the CBR is
doing remarkable work, particularly in light of the very limited budget and funding support. The
review panel noted considerable assets within the CBR, including (but not limited to): the
Director, the CBR administrator, the graduate students, the CBR space within Biology
Department, the convening function CBR serves for students and faculty, and the significant
public science activities growing throughout the city.
With presence and expertise, the CBR convenes interdisciplinary faculty and students to
promote growth and development in translational health research through sharing of methods,
tools, ideas, and skill sets. The work of CBR could be more visibly integrated into other
University translational health initiatives through a campus-wide adoption of a conceptual model
(see Appendix) that illustrates relationships and contributions of each research group. CBR has
a primary focus in basic biomedical research focusing on discovery and development, and other
centres on campus have expertise in practice-based and community-based research. Taken
together, these research centres, faculty, and research teams comprise a robust critical mass of
translational health research that will distinguish University of Victoria if these activities are
coordinated and more visible within a coherent campus-wide framework.
With that in mind, the review panel has offered specific recommendations to further amplify and
make visible the significant connections and contributions of the CBR.
• Continue world-class science communication and education through Café Scientifique,
and support of the science outreach activities on campus, along with professional
development and outreach experiences for graduate students.
• Utilize the significant international expertise of CBR in science communication and
methods for disseminating on-going collaborative research more broadly, inside and
outside the campus.
• Build on existing CBR seminars and working groups that support trainees by organizing
science career panel and career preparation for senior graduate students.
• Enhance collaboration and synergy within the biomedical research community through a
list of specialized equipment, reagents, and technologies/expertise that can be shared.
• Make the activities of the CBR visible by developing a social network analysis of
connections of CBR member networks and collecting short vignettes from faculty and
trainees that demonstrate the impact and catalyzing effect of the CBR for future
reporting and the CBR website.
• Implement tactics to increase the total annual budget, including requesting financial
support from the departments served by the Centre and partnering with colleagues
within other programs who have a successful track record on fundraising.
• Expand the leadership of the Centre by formally appointing one or more assistant
directors and assigning specific roles to distribute responsibility for Centre activities.
• Develop funding mechanisms to provide small seed grants to support inter-departmental
collaborations in “research clusters” or pilot projects that may lead to external funding.
SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 8 of 15
2. Preamble/Background:
Background on CBR (provided by CBR in self-assessment):
The Centre for Biomedical Research is a multidisciplinary group of scientists and clinicians who
are investigating important scientific problems related to human health, with emphasis on
genetics, molecular biology, neuroscience, and biomedical engineering. The Centre has over 30
members from Biology, Chemistry, Microbiology& Biochemistry, Engineering, Education,
Psychology, Mathematics, Medical Sciences, and Exercise Science, as well as the Vancouver
Island Health Care Authority, the BC Cancer Agency, and the Victoria Heart Institute
Foundation. Within the past five years, a key focus has been on community engagement and
biomedical science communication.
Scope of Review: The review panel was asked to conduct a thorough review of all activities of
the Center. The review comes 3.5 years after the last external review, which recommended a
temporary mandate for the Center with specific guidance to make considerable changes if the
Center were to stay open. In light of this, the review panel was asked by the Associate Vice
President of Research to consider what value the Center adds to the University and to the
community more broadly.
Prior to the review, the panel read the self-study document provided by the CBR director and
the comments of the previous reviewers. They had recommended a two year trial period in
which to address their comments and closure of the Centre if they were not addressed. Initially,
we did not see the responses of the CBR director and the University of Victoria VP of Research,
and we were puzzled about the current status of the Centre and its activities over the past 3.5
years. The panel received further documents during our review, including the CBR response to
the past review and specific goals for the current and future periods. During the two day site
visit, the panel met faculty, graduate students, and science education directors, who all provided
a rich portrayal of the many activities conducted by the Centre and the significant role played by
the director Paul Zehr and his administrative assistant Marjorie Wilder in facilitating them. The
positive impacts of the CBR in fulfilling its own mission and many goals of the University of
Victoria became apparent though the stories of connection, innovation, and opportunity told by
CBR faculty, students, and campus leaders.
Membership of Review Panel:
Kelly Edwards, PhD (Chair)
Associate Dean for Student and Postdoctoral Affairs, UW Graduate School
Associate Professor, Bioethics & Humanities, UW School of Medicine
Senior Faculty, Institute for Translational Health Sciences
University of Washington
Maureen Munn, PhD
Director, Educational Outreach
Department of Genome Sciences
University of Washington
C. Peter Constabel, PhD
Director, Centre for Forest Biology
Professor, Department of Biology
University of Victoria
2 SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 9 of 15
Outline of Review Process: The review panel met with Centre and University leadership, faculty,
staff, and students over a period of two days (September 24-25). The external reviewers also
participated in the Café Scientifique held on September 24 featuring a CBR member speaking
to a capacity audience.
3. Review/Assessment:
3.1 Purposes, Goals, and Objectives
Purpose a: To promote and facilitate collaborative and/or interdisciplinary research and
enhancement of research networking capacity and infrastructure.
Goal: Establish a sense of community and Centre involvement that improves research and day
to day interactions between Centre members and affiliates
Objective: Established Biomedical Bulletins external speakers series, provided networking
opportunities (e.g. Centre meetings, women in biomedical research group) for members
Performance: The CBR faculty interviewed as part of this review reported a high rate of faculty
participation in CBR activities, such as quarterly meetings (typically 20 of 30 members attend
meetings), attendees at the external speakers series, and as presenters at Café Scientifiques.
Several people reflected on the usefulness of the meetings set up by the CBR for networking
with colleagues in different departments and schools. We could witness this occurring during
our faculty lunch, as two researchers from chemistry and biochemistry recognized a common
research interest and made a plan to meet to discuss how they might collaborate. There were
several examples cited in which CBR meetings have led to joint grant applications, sharing of
resources and technologies, and laying the groundwork for future collaboration. The current
reporting structure of faculty-based grants and publications do not make visible the many ways
these connections, collaborations, methods and resource sharing contribute to successful grant
applications or collaborative publications. Some of these interactions may have occurred in the
absence of the CBR, but from stories shared during the site visit it appears that many were a
direct result of the Centre, especially among faculty from different fields or junior faculty.
Students were particularly vocal regarding the technical and resource sharing that occurs
between them. In addition, based on the information provided in the self-assessment document,
there have been 15 Biomedical Bulletin Seminars over the last four years.
Purpose b: To increase and effectively manage the resources and research support for its
members and the wider university community.
Goal: Establish supporting network for research activities, grants, contracts, and administration.
Objective: Implemented open assistance with research accounting and grant support,
contracts, and related research administration, provided information and context for
collaborative research opportunities.
Performance: Two recurrent themes throughout our discussions were the outstanding
leadership of Paul Zehr and the organizational and facilitation skills of Marjorie Wilder. Dr. Zehr
was recognized by several faculty members as a trusted advisor, well versed in University
infrastructure, knowledgeable about the people and research on campus, and generous with his
time in sharing information and making introductions. Several people mentioned that they
consult him on a variety of issues. For example, when Dr. Tom Tiedje, Dean of Engineering,
3 SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 10 of 15
was trying to identify faculty to teach courses within a proposed undergraduate program in
Biomedical Engineering, he contacted Dr. Zehr to discuss possible candidates. Ms. Wilder
provides the infrastructure for faculty and graduate student meetings and assists with grant
applications, updates CVs, and provides other support as requested. This kind of administrative
grant support is critical for busy faculty working to get grants out in a timely manner. She was
frequently cited as the “go-to” person when administrative help was not available through the
home department, and clearly fills an essential gap on campus in promoting success in
competitive grant applications.
Both trainees and faculty acknowledged the valuable asset of the CBR meeting room, which is
in constant use by research teams, seminars, student groups, and generally supports
communication by enabling outlying members to interact with other CBR scientists.
Purpose c: To provide education and training in research and related skills, especially for
graduate and undergraduate students and thereby enhance the academic programs of their
constituent academic units.
Goal: Establish a clear value added above and beyond standard departmental support to
Centre involvement that improves research productivity and sense of community for trainees.
Objective: Established supporting infrastructure for trainee travel awards, research interactions
(research groups), and speaker’s series, improved overall social and research networking.
Performance: In a meeting with seven graduate students from Education, Engineering, the
Division of Medicine, and Biology, we learned about the impact of the CBR in facilitating
interdisciplinary interactions and fostering student-led programs. During a “Meeting of the
Minds” session in spring 2013, 55 trainees met and formed several working groups, including
the Stroke Group. Several students remarked that they get much more support from the CBR
trainees than their peers in their home departments. The trainees discussed the value of the
“Student to Student” seminar series that occurs every two weeks, which allows them to share
their research with their peers in the absence of faculty and has clearly led to a productive
research exchange. Students value being eligible for travel stipends and discussed other
outcomes of their connection through CBR, such as readily sharing techniques and equipment,
and learning other ways to approach a scientific question. The trainees are also developing a
Facebook page to share information about CBR trainee efforts. The students reiterated their
praise and gratitude to Ms. Wilder and Dr. Zehr for the infrastructure and financial support they
provide.
Purpose d: To contribute to the university’s strategic educational and research missions and to
support synergies among research, teaching and learning.
Goal: Establish and run research conferences and training courses for graduate students and
faculty.
Objective: Established “how to talk about science” conference and methodology,
bioinformatics, biomedical engineering conferences.
Performance: The CBR has organized a variety of conferences that benefit its membership and
local community, as well as contribute to national and international visibility for the University of
Victoria, including the Student-based Biomedical Engineering Workshop in July 2013, the
4 SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 11 of 15
exceptional “How to Talk about Science” conference in May 2012, and the “BCCGN Clinical
Genetics - What you need to know” conference in February 2011.
Purpose e: To transfer and mobilize knowledge gained through research for the benefit of
society, via a variety of mechanisms as appropriate.
Goal: Lead the implementation of knowledge translation efforts in biomedical and health
research.
Objective: Engaged all members in Café Scientifique public outreach, mentoring in
communication methodologies, established a home for Let’s Talk Science, provided linkages for
Let’s Talk Science and Science Venture by brokering activities and common space usage.
Performance: The CBR supports three community outreach programs, Café Scientifique, Let’s
Talk Science, and Science Ventures. Although the latter two did not originate with the CBR, Dr.
Zehr identified an opportunity for synergy in science outreach, and introduced their directors to
each other. The CBR provides support to both programs by funding and organizing events,
providing work study undergraduates, recognizing volunteers, organizing CBR member
participation and lab tours, and arranging media coverage. Events include the “Let’s Talk
Science Brain Symposium - The Changing Brain, which was attended by 80 high school
students, and 37 Café Scientifiques in the last 5 years. Dr. Zehr provided space for Let’s Talk
Science in the vacated DNA Sequencing Lab previously managed by CBR, and when that
space was reclaimed by the Biology Department, Dr. Zehr negotiated with the chair of Biology
for alternate space.
Purpose f: To enhance the reputation of its members, the constituent academic units, and the
university through the quality of its work.
Goal: Lead the promotion and dissemination of the cutting edge biomedical research at the
University of Victoria.
Objective: Promoted CBR and biomedical research activities of all members internally and
externally through connection with media (news, radio, tv, web) and surrounding community.
Performance: As detailed in the self-assessment report, the CBR is highly successful in
promoting the activities of Centre members through the media.
3.2 Review Panel Comments
During the two day review we met faculty, graduate students, and science education directors,
who all provided a rich portrayal of the many activities conducted by the Centre and the
significant role played by the director Paul Zehr and his administrative assistant Marjorie Wilder
in facilitating them. The previous reviewers recommended that the CBR focus on two research
clusters instead of the seven cross-cutting clusters that were identified in the 2010 self-study so
the CBR would align with some of the more focused centres on campus. However, the CBR has
maintained its broad research focus under the umbrella of biomedical research and its
widespread participation by members in many departments and schools, including Biology,
Biochemistry, Chemistry, Engineering, Education, and the Division of Medicine. Given the
mission and structure of the CBR, we view this broad participation as a strength because of the
potential to bring together members from disparate fields who share common research interests
and otherwise may not have met. In light of this broad participation, the CBR provides a
5 SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 12 of 15
“neutral” home for hosting events or speakers that expand opportunities for participation rather
than limiting them to activities or research foci that are narrowly owned by one unit. The CBR is
unique among University research centres in fulfilling this central function within biomedical
research collaborations and the CBR administrator plays a key role in maintaining this nexus.
As discussed above, Paul Zehr’ leadership and Marjorie Wilder’ organizational and facilitation
skills are critical factors in determining the success of CBR-sponsored activities. Dr. Zehr also
makes substantial contributions informally in his role as advisor to many Centre faculty. Dr. Zehr
is very modest and altruistic regarding his efforts on behalf of the centre. We recommend that
he and other CBR members be more proactive and creative in documenting CBR activities and
outcomes so their value and impact are recognized throughout campus and by the
administration (discussed further in recommendations).
Faculty had several suggestions for concrete ways that the CBR could support their research,
including restructuring seed grants to facilitate interdisciplinary and novel collaborations to
generate preliminary data, as well as conducting and maintaining an inventory of specialized
equipment that researchers would be willing to share.
It was apparent from our review that the current success of the CBR is the result of the
dedication and hard work of its director and his administrative assistant. The recent addition of
Dr. Leigh Anne Swayne as Assistant Director is an important first step in distributing the
leadership responsibilities of the Centre and providing for succession and back-up. Dr. Swayne
is an exceptional scientist in her own right and a champion of the work of the Centre, making
her an ideal ally and co-lead. In addition to her position, the CBR could be even more effective,
given the very limited FTE and largely volunteer effort involved, if an additional faculty could be
named as Assistant Director, and focus the two Assistants on particular portfolios of
responsibility (e.g student-education programming and external programming). It would be
helpful (and consistent with other research centre structures internationally) to provide a small
FTE for deputy or assistant directors along with the director. These leaders play a key role in
keeping the significant contributions of the director sustainable, and should be recognized as
such. Relying on volunteer effort alone is difficult for consistency and accountability.
3.3 Review of Proposed Future Objectives and Activities
The CBR is making plans based on a severely resource-constrained environment and is
building on areas of strength and opportunity. With that in mind, the review panel endorses the
Centre Director’s proposed purposes, goals, and objectives for 2014-2018, which were provided
as an addendum to the original self-assessment. The six purposes for the Centre remain the
same, but concrete and attainable goals and objectives that build on the progress over the last
five years were described.
4. Recommendations:
We divide our recommendations into three sections. The first set of recommendations
highlights successful activities we endorse continuing. We then highlight elective investments
that would, in our view, shift the CBR “from good to great” with little to modest investment of
personnel resources. These activities are highly recommended and are based on conversations
with University faculty and students and informed by our experience with other translational
health and interdisciplinary research centers, but should not be viewed as mandatory for
success or continuance of the CBR. The final section represents recommendations requiring
6 SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 13 of 15
greater external investment in the centre based on its significant contribution to the campus, the
region, and the individual units which benefit from its activities.
4.1 We recommend continuing the following successful strategies, already underway within
CBR and highly valued by members, trainees, and the University at-large:
-­‐ Build the profile and visibility of the CBR so members of the UVic campus and Victoria
region recognize its many contributions and benefits to members and the community
-­‐ Mobilize and support students (e.g. trainee seminars and working groups)
-­‐ Provide student travel grants
-­‐ Leverage co-sponsorship for guest speakers
-­‐ Utilize assistant director to share leadership and innovation, to provide continuity and
stability in case of study leaves etc.
-­‐ Facilitate faculty meetings to encourage networking and collaborations
-­‐ Provide administrative grant support in the form of research budgeting, CV
management, and signatures
-­‐ Connect faculty on campus to create novel partnerships (e.g. neuroscience and
biomedical engineering)
-­‐ Serve as a hub of outreach efforts on campus by linking existing outreach efforts
-­‐ Organize regular regional or national meetings to raise visibility of research and
communication efforts on campus
4.2 We suggest the following small investments that would enhance or amplify the capabilities
and reach of the CBR:
-­‐ Use the translational health research pathway as a strategy to map where CBR activities
fit with other UVic health research initiatives, from discovery to development through to
delivery and outcomes(see figure and references in Appendix)
-­‐ Use social network maps (an established social science method) to illustrate impact,
connections, and outcomes outside typical metrics
-­‐ Collect short “vignettes” from all faculty members and students regarding an instance of
impact or catalyzing effect of the CBR – and showcase these in progress reports and
potentially on the CBR website to create further interest
-­‐ Partner with colleagues within other programs on fundraising efforts and meetings with
potential donors (e.g. Division of Medical Sciences)
-­‐ Negotiate with the Office of the Vice-President of Research on University requirements
for funding for seed grants. Currently, these grants are only available to researchers who
have no other external funding. However, funders like the CIHR require preliminary data
in grant applications. We recommend that the seed grants be available for new
collaborations, even if the researchers are funded for other projects, so they can
generate preliminary data to show the feasibility of a new collaborative project prior to
submitting a grant
-­‐ Offer science communication workshops or short courses (professional skills, career
workshops, other soft skills, grant writing, etc.)
-­‐ Organize science career panel and career preparation for senior graduate students
-­‐ Pair each basic science trainee with a clinician for translational science exchange
opportunities (modeled after the University of Washington Molecular Medicine Training
Program: http://depts.washington.edu/molmed/)
-­‐ Increase faculty lunches or idea exchanges (e.g. lightning talks) to facilitate further
collaboration
-­‐ Develop and maintain an online list of equipment and technical resources on campus, to
facilitate collaboration and resource utilization
7 SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 14 of 15
-­‐
-­‐
Re-instate grants work-in-progress talks (former “chalk talks”) on a regular schedule to
facilitate grant development and submissions
Formalize or define the relationship of the Knowledge Mobilization office at the
University of Victoria with CBR, as part of the “outreach hub” work of CBR
4.3 The CBR connections result in increased success for unit faculty and trainees. The very
cross-unit role that makes CBR successful also renders it resource-poor. We recommend that
academic units with faculty and students active and benefitting from the CBR make direct
contributions to the CBR on the order of $10,000/year in order to provide funding for the
following:
-­‐ Increase director FTE and/or provide FTE for one or two assistant directors
-­‐ Develop a pilot/seed grant program to cultivate collaborations and result in preliminary
data (essential for any CIHR grant now). This is in addition to the previous
recommended change to the seed grant program through the Office of the VicePresident of Research.
-­‐ Provide small “research cluster” funds to new interdisciplinary collaborations who wish to
sponsor a speaker or lunchtime seminar series
Conclusion: The review panel recommends continuation of the CBR, with further recognition
for the significant leadership and unique contributions made by both the Centre Director and
also the Centre Administrator.
8 SEN-JAN 10/14-6
Page 15 of 15
Appendix: Translational Health Research Cycle1
Translational Cycle
How%do%current%
outcomes%influence%
thinking%about%health/
related%research?!
What%
outcomes%
result?%
T0: Problems &
opportunities
T4: Health
practice &
outcomes
What%determines%
adop9on%of%new%health%
applica9ons%into%
prac9ce%
T3:Delivery
What%health/
related%research%is%
undertaken?%
T1:%Discovery%
T2: Candidate
health
application
How%are%
opportuni9es%
to%improve%
health%
iden9fied%&%
pursued?%
What%determines%
the%transi9on%from%
poten9al%to%actual%
health%applica9on?%
Kelley et al. 2012
1Kelley
M, Edwards K, Starks H, et al. Values in Translation: How Asking the Right Questions Can Move
Translational Science Toward Greater Health Impact. Clinical and Translational Science. 2012; 5: 445–
451. There are several classic articles on this, such as: Woolf SH. The Meaning of Translational
Research and Why It Matters. JAMA. 2008;299(2):211-213. 9 SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 1 of 9
Associate Vice-President Academic Planning
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada
Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216
E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac
Date:
December 5, 2013
To:
The Secretary of the Senate
From:
Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning
Re:
Course Based Master of Nursing
At its meeting of 4 December 2013, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the
Course Based Master of Nursing. The following motion is recommended:
That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve, the establishment of a
Course Based Master of Nursing, as described in the document “Proposal to revise the Master of Nursing in
Advanced Practice Nursing (MN), so that the MN APL option and MN NUED option become a Course-Based
Master’s Program”, dated December 4, 2013, and that this approval be withdrawn if the program should not be
offered within five years of the granting of approval.
:mam
Committee Membership:
Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair
Ms. Lauren Charlton
Dr. Stan Dosso
Mr. Jason Walters
Dr. Reuven Gordon
Ms. Carrie Anderson
Dr. Howard Brunt
Dr. Maureen MacDonald
Dr. Timothy Iles
Dr. Merwan Engineer
_____________________________________________
Dr. Reeta Tremblay
Dr. David Boag
Dr. Catherine McGregor
Dr. Victoria Wyatt
Dr. Anne Bruce
Dr. Ann Stahl
Ms. Emily Rogers
Ms. Norah McRae
Dr. Sarah Blackstone
Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 2 of 9
School of Nursing
HSD Rm A410
PO Box 1700
Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2
Canada
Tel (250) 721-7961 Fax (250) 721-6231
E-mail [email protected]
Web www.uvic.ca/nurs
DATE:
December-4-13
TO:
Senate Committee on Planning
FROM:
Dr. Karen MacKinnon, Associate Professor
School of Nursing
(On behalf of the SON Graduate Education Curriculum Committee)
RE:
Proposal to revise the Master of Nursing in Advanced Practice Nursing (MN), so that the MN-APL and
MN-NUED options become a Course-Based Master’s Program.
After careful consideration our Graduate Education Committee has decided to move forward with a proposal for a
Course-Based Masters of Nursing program, by eliminating the Practice Project in both the APL and NUED streams. We
believe that this change will best meet the needs of the majority of our distance students, many of whom are working
full time as professional nurses. We have consulted with the School of Public Health that offers a Course-Based
Master’s program. Based on this consultation, we believe that we can maintain the academic integrity of these options
without a Practice Project. We also will strengthen our competitiveness by decreasing the unit value by 1.5 units as
explained below.
Background: The School of Nursing has offered a Master of Nursing, Advanced Practice Nursing (MN) degree since
2003 by distance delivery to maximize accessibility for nurses from across Canada. We currently have four options
within the MN program: 1) Advanced Practice Leadership (APL), 2) Nurse Educator (NUED), 3) Nurse Practitioner
(NUNP), and 4) a Double Degree option in Nursing and Health Informatics. This proposal applies only to the APL and
NUED options as the NUNP option is already Course-Based and the Double Degree option has additional program
requirements.
Since 2004, approximately 28 MN students have completed the thesis option, although we have experienced some
challenges with distance delivery for this thesis option (for example, the requirement for multiple research ethics
reviews). The School of Nursing plans to continue a thesis option for exceptional students in the APL or NUED
options with a confirmed thesis supervisor. Students undertaking a thesis will complete the MN program
requirements for the APL or NUED option but with NURS 599 (6.0 units) replacing NURS 598 (3.0 units). A minimum
of one additional approved research course (1.5 units) is required for thesis students only. The total unit value for the
thesis option is unchanged from the current calendar at 22.5 units.
1
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 3 of 9
Overview of Current Curriculum (Faculty of Graduate Studies Calendar 2013-2014).
Master of Nursing, Advanced Practice Nursing: Advanced Practice Leadership Option - by Distributed Learning
(Practice Project Option): Course Requirements
Students are required to complete 19.5 units of study for the Practice Project option of which 12 units are at the 500
level. Students consult with the Graduate Adviser in the School of Nursing to select courses aimed at meeting the
students' particular academic needs.
Practice Project Option (19.5 units):
Required Core APL courses (4.5 units)
NURS 506 (1.5)
Philosophical Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing
NURS 507 (1.5)
Theoretical Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing
NURS 508 (1.5)
Methodological Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing
Required APL Concentration courses (10.5 units)
NURA 516 (1.5)
Leadership in Advanced Practice Nursing I: Nursing Leadership
NURS 514 (1.5)
Nursing Ethics for Leadership and Practice
NURA 517 (1.5)
Nursing Praxis I: Population and Setting of Practice
NURA 518 (1.5)
Nursing Praxis II: Population and Setting of Practice
NURA 519 (1.5)
Leadership in Advanced Practice Nursing II: Systems Leadership and Health Policy
NURS 509 (1.5)
Health Program Evaluation: Theory and Practice
Elective (1.5)
Chosen in consultation with the supervisor
NURS 593 (1.5)
Thesis/Project Seminar
NURS 598 (3.0)
Practice Project
2
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 4 of 9
Master of Nursing, Advanced Practice Nursing: Nurse Educator Option - by Distributed Learning (Projectbased Option): Course Requirements
Students are required to complete 19.5 units of study for the NUED project (project-based option) including an onsite
program orientation prior to program commencement. In addition to completing ten 1.5 unit courses, described
below, students complete a three (3) unit project.
Nurse Educator Project Option (19.5 units):
Required Core APN courses (4.5 units)
NURS 506 (1.5)
Philosophical Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing
NURS 507 (1.5)
Theoretical Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing
NURS 508 (1.5)
Methodological Knowledge and Advanced Practice Nursing
Required NUED courses (7.5 units)
NUED 570 (1.5)
Engaging with Pedagogy: Teaching and Learning in Nursing Education
NUED 571 (1.5)
Critical Analysis of Discourses in Nursing and Nursing Education
NUED 572 (1.5)
Critical Examination of Processes in Nursing Education
NUED 573 (1.5)
Nurse Educator Practice I
NUED 574 (1.5)
Nurse Educator Practice II
NURS 593 (1.5)
Thesis/Project Seminar
NURS 598 (3.0)
Nurse Educator Practice Project
Elective (3.0)
Chosen in consultation with the supervisor
Proposed Change from a Project-Based Masters to a Course-Based Masters
The change to a Course-Based Master’s program is congruent with current trends in professional and nursing
education1. The School of Nursing is requesting review for a Senate approved change from a Project-Based Masters
to a Course-Based Masters and reduction in the total unit value for the APL and NUED options from 19.5 units to 18.0
units. The following factors are put forward for your consideration.

The decrease to 18.0 units for these two options will allow our distance delivery programs to remain competitive
nationally. (We currently exceed the national average for this type of professional graduate nursing program).
1
Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (2012). Nurses Masters Education in Canada: Final Report. Available
from: http://www2.cna-aiic.ca/CNA/documents/pdf/publications/ANP_National_Framework_e.pdf
3
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 5 of 9
This decrease also addresses a long standing concern about the length of time it takes our MN students in the
Project Option to complete their program requirements as most of these students work full time.

The decrease to 18.0 units exceeds the FGS minimum requirements of 15 units with at least 12 units at the
graduate level.

Students would continue to have a supervisor or faculty mentor appointed.

The change to a course-based MN would mean that normally there would not be a supervisory committee;
however the culminating course (NURS 596) will be overseen by a faculty member who is also a member of the
Faculty of Graduate Studies.

The MN program will continue to be comprised of a set of core courses and additional requirements that address
the Canadian competencies for Advanced Nursing Practice2 .

All other standards, requirements, and regulations set forth by the Faculty of Graduate Studies will continue to
apply.

The course-based Masters will culminate in a capstone experience (NURS 596) that will enable students to
demonstrate that they are critical consumers of research and can demonstrate knowledge integration and the
acquisition of competencies related to knowledge dissemination.

This requirement for a capstone experience is consistent with the Faculty of Graduate Studies standards for a
Course-Based Masters, whereby students might complete a capstone course, a comprehensive exam or literature
review demonstrating that they have a broad understanding of the conceptual themes of their program and that
they have acquired the skills necessary to be critical consumers of the type of research generated within their
discipline.

Please refer to the attached details about course requirements and sequencing.
In summary the proposed changes continue to meet the national standards currently required by the Canadian
Nurses Association and are congruent with The Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing (CASN)
recommendations. These changes are also congruent with the policies of the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Thank you
for your consideration of this proposal.
Karen MacKinnon PhD RN
(On behalf of the Graduate Education Curriculum Committee)
2
Canadian Nurses Association (2008). Advanced Nursing Practice: A national framework. Available from:
http://www2.cna-aiic.ca/CNA/documents/pdf/publications/ANP_National_Framework_e.pdf
4
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 6 of 9
Master of Nursing (MN): Advanced Practice Nursing
Advanced Practice Leadership [APL] Option
2 Year Sequence for September 2014 Entry Onward: Course-Based MN: 18.0 units
FIRST YEAR 2014-2015
September December 2014
January-April 2015
May-August 2015
NURS 506
NURS 507
NURS 508
1.5 units
1.5 units
1.5 units
Philosophical Knowledge &
Theoretical Knowledge & Advanced
Methodological Knowledge &
Advanced Practice Nursing
Practice Nursing
Advanced Practice Nursing
NURS 500
1.5 units
Scholarly Writing in Nursing
NURS 594
1.5 units
Scholarly Inquiry: Integrating
Knowledge and Practice
NURA 516
1.5 units
Nursing Leadership I
SECOND YEAR 2015-2016
September December 2015
January-April 2016
NURS 509
NURA 519
1.5 units
1.5 units
NURS 596
Health Program Evaluation
Nursing Leadership II
3.0 units
NURA 517
NURA 518
Nursing Scholarship:
Integration and Dissemination
1.5 units [104 hours]
1.5 units [104 hours]
APL Praxis I
APL Praxis II
Oral Exam
focus: clinical and consultation
focus: leadership, research,
upon completion of all courses
competencies and project planning
May-August 2016
program evaluation and
collaboration
Practice courses: students select a population of focus for the practice courses and work with a Master’s prepared
competencies and practice project
advanced practice nurse as a field guide, usually a Clinical Nurse Specialist
5
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 7 of 9
Master of Nursing (MN): Advanced Practice Nursing
Nurse Educator [NUED] Option
2 Year Sequence for September 2014 Entry Onward: Course-based MN: 18.0 units
FIRST YEAR 2014-2015
September December 2014
January-April 2015
May-August 2015
NURS 506
NURS 507
NURS 508
1.5 units
1.5 units
1.5 units
Philosophical Knowledge &
Theoretical Knowledge & Advanced
Methodological Knowledge &
Advanced Practice Nursing
Practice Nursing
Advanced Practice Nursing
NURS 500
NURS 594
1.5 units
1.5 units
Scholarly Writing in Nursing
Scholarly Inquiry: Integrating
Knowledge and Practice
NUED 570
1.5 units
Engaging with Pedagogy
SECOND YEAR 2015-2016
September December 2015
January-April 2016
NUED 571
NUED 572
1.5 units
1.5 units
Critical Analysis of Discourses in
Critical Examination of Education
Nursing Education
Processes in Nursing Education
NUED 573
1.5 units [104 hours]
Nurse Educator Practice 1
focus: observations with educators
and project planning
NUED 574
May-August 2016
NURS 596
3.0 units
Nursing Scholarship:
Integration and Dissemination
1.5 units [104 hours]
Nurse Educator Practice 2
focus: hands-on teaching
Oral Exam
upon completion of all courses
and practice project
Practice course 573: students select 4-5 educators to observe and discuss teaching and learning philosophy and
encounters with learners. Practice course 574: students select an academic or a clinical setting with a Master’sprepared educator in a hands-on teaching experience
6
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 8 of 9
Appendix 1: Calendar Changes NURS courses
NURS 500: Scholarly Writing in Nursing
Review of academic writing fundamentals and processes. Students select topics relevant to their program foci and
write a summary/critique of scholarly literature, a limited literature review, and an argument paper. Students learn to
participate in peer review and revision to improve their writing.
NURS 594: Scholarly Inquiry: Integrating Knowledge and Practice
Exploration of how scholarly inquiry and knowledge mobilization can promote evidence-informed nursing practice.
Students also explore options for and discuss the process of completing a nursing practice, leadership, or education
project.
Grading: INC, COM, N, F
NURS 596: Nursing Scholarship: Integration & Dissemination (3.0 units)
Exploration of creative ways to disseminate what students have learned from the advanced practice nursing program.
Students will produce a scholarly paper, present their work and respond to questions. This final paper and
presentation will be evaluated by an examining committee comprised of a minimum of two faculty members from the
School of Nursing who are also members of the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Grading: INC, COM, N, F
NURS 509: Evaluation of Health Care (1.5 units) - (name change only)
Exploration of concepts, theories and strategies for evaluating nursing care and health programs/services as applied
to a range of health care settings.
Prerequisites: 508 or permission of the department
7
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-7
Page 9 of 9
Appendix 2: Calendar Changes NURA courses [APL]
NURA 516: Nursing Leadership I
Exploration of advanced practice nursing leadership roles and competencies with a focus on the patient/client and the
nurses /nursing spheres of influence. Collaboration and consultation competencies as they relate to client-centred
care and interprofessional/ intersectoral teams will also be explored.
NURA 519: Nursing Leadership II
Exploration of the influences and effects of contemporary leadership practices related to health systems and
organizations. The impact of current organizational structures and discourses on the delivery of health care,
development of health policy and enactment of advanced practice nursing will be explored.
Pre or co-requisites: 516 or permission of the department
NURA 517: APL Praxis I
Integration of students’ evolving knowledge of Advanced Practice Nursing through practice with a particular
population. Students develop a personalized learning plan that focuses on clinical leadership, consultation,
collaboration and research competencies. In collaboration with field guides, students engage in 104 practice hours
and develop a project plan for NURA 518.
Pre or co-requisites: 516 and NURS 508
Grading: INC, COM, N, F
NURA 518: APL Praxis II
Continuing integration of Advanced Practice Nursing with a particular population. Students develop a personalized
learning plan that focuses on systems leadership and research/evaluation competencies. In collaboration with a field
guide, students engage in a minimum of 104 practice hours and complete a practice project that contributes to the
scholarship of nursing practice.
Pre or co-requisites: 517 and 519
Grading: INC, COM, N, F
Cc:
Dr. Noreen Frisch, School of Nursing
Dr. Mary Ellen Purkis, Dean, Faculty of Human and Social Development
Dr. David Capson, Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies
8
December 4th, 2013| University of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 1 of 25
Associate Vice-President Academic Planning
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada
Tel (250) 721-7012 Fax (250) 721-7216
E-mail [email protected] Web http://www.uvic.ca/vpac
Date:
December 5, 2013
To:
The Secretary of the Senate
From:
Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair, Senate Committee on Planning
Re:
Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society
At its meeting of 4 December 2013, the Senate Committee on Planning discussed and approved the
Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society. The following motion is recommended:
That Senate approve and recommend to the Board of Governors that it also approve, subject to funding, the
establishment of an Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society, as described in the document “Interdisciplinary
Minor in Health and Society (IMHS)”, dated June 2013, and that this approval be withdrawn if the program
should not be offered within five years of the granting of approval. Once Senate and the Board of Governors have
approved the proposal, the proposal must be posted on the Ministry of Advanced Education website for peer review
for a period of 30 days.
:mam
Committee Membership:
Dr. Catherine Mateer, Chair
Ms. Lauren Charlton
Dr. Stan Dosso
Mr. Jason Walters
Dr. Reuven Gordon
Ms. Carrie Anderson
Dr. Howard Brunt
Dr. Maureen MacDonald
Dr. Timothy Iles
Dr. Merwan Engineer
_____________________________________________
Dr. Reeta Tremblay
Dr. David Boag
Dr. Catherine McGregor
Dr. Victoria Wyatt
Dr. Anne Bruce
Dr. Ann Stahl
Ms. Emily Rogers
Ms. Norah McRae
Dr. Sarah Blackstone
Ms. Jess Gelowsky (Secretary)
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 2 of 25
1.
Identification of new program
Name
Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society (IMHS)
Location
Victoria, British Columbia
Academic units offering the new program
Five of the University of Victoria’s ten Faculties (of Social Sciences, Human and Social
Development, Education, Humanities, and Science) will participate in the program,
through course offerings and the involvement of faculty members. The Office of
Interdisciplinary Academic Programs will provide administrative support. Faculty
members from numerous departments and schools will be involved in the program,
though the program itself is independent of those departments and schools. It is
anticipated that participating faculty will come from Anthropology, Political Science,
Geography, Economics, Psychology and Sociology (from Social Sciences); Health and
Community Services, and Health Information Science (from Human and Social
Development); History, Philosophy and Women's Studies (from Humanities);
Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies and Exercise Science, Physical and
Health Education (from Education); and Biology and Biochemistry and Microbiology
from Science. Faculty to teach the core Health Studies courses will be drawn from these
units, and students pursuing the IMHS will for the most part have as their Major one of
these fields.
Anticipated program start date
September 2014
Name, title, phone number and e-mail address of contact person
Michael Hayes
Director of Health Research and Education
(250) 853 3108
[email protected]
2.
History and context of the program
Over the 50 years since its beginnings, the University of Victoria (UVic) has become one
of Canada’s leading research universities. By building a faculty full of high-quality
researchers that enrich the curriculum with their knowledge and skills, UVic has set itself
apart from many other institutions by offering this combination of high-quality education
and student experience in research. The well-established reputation of our undergrad
programs combined with the thriving research and graduate programs along with the
well-respected professional schools and continuing studies offerings provide an excellent
platform on which build further linkages for research collaborations and student
experiences.
1
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 3 of 25
The IMHS will allow students to pursue specialty interests in health-related focus areas
that are strongly represented at the University of Victoria through the various research
centres (Aboriginal Health, Addictions, Aging, Biomedical Research,
Disability/CanAssist, Early Child Research and Policy, Youth in Society) and provide
them with the opportunity to work on projects with internationally renowned researchers
in these areas. Health is an area of great interest to students and educational
programming at UVic includes a variety of courses dealing with a spectrum of healthrelated topics. In part, these courses reflect the considerable depth of health-related
research interests of faculty. Areas of substantive interest at UVic are reflected through
the various research centres, particularly those that are multi-faculty centres. Although
several undergraduates have been involved with health-related research projects through
various centres, there is no formal opportunity for students to obtain specialty
designations on their degrees in these areas of substantive interest. This represents a lost
opportunity for students. It is also a lost opportunity for the University to send students
to other universities for further training, or into the work force, with specialty training in
health that reflects an area of substantial strength at UVic. Offering a minor in health
aligned with research centre foci will help to integrate research and educational activities,
one of the strategic purposes behind creating the position of Director, Health Research
and Education.
3.
Aims, goals and objectives
Distinctive characteristics
The various research centres at UVic create interdisciplinary environments for faculty
and graduate students, and for undergraduates who are eager to explore areas of
substantive interests not neatly contained within traditional academic programs.
Undergraduates involved with research centres benefit greatly from the experience but do
not have this experience formally acknowledged on their transcripts. The University’s
strategic plan embraces the idea of experiential learning. The IMHS will promote
experiential learning and provide formal recognition of this learning. The IMHS will
provide a source of students for interdisciplinary graduate programs at UVic that are
health related (Social Dimensions of Health, Public Health and Social Policy, and
Neurosciences). It will also graduate students who will go to other post-secondary
institutions with formal training in health.
Anticipated contribution to the UVic, Faculty, and academic unit’s strategic plans
The University of Victoria’s Strategic Plan states that “New programs are developed when
there is a demonstrated societal need and value, student demand, faculty expertise, and the
capacity for UVic to become a leader in the field”. The proposed IMHS meets all these
criteria, as explained in other sections of this document. The program is inherently and
necessarily interdisciplinary, reflecting (in the words of the Strategic Plan) “the dynamic
nature of the disciplines and evolving interdisciplinary areas” (p. 25). Emerging
understanding of factors shaping health experiences and outcomes focus on the interplay
between our biology and our social circumstances – everyday life experiences condition our
biological responses in ways that lead to predictable patterns of inequities in health outcomes
2
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 4 of 25
at the level of society, typically measured by socio-economic differences using income,
education, occupation or ethnicity as markers. The socio-ecological model of health now
widely cited requires that we understand the simultaneous operation of these processes.
The proposed program advances the following specific goals of the Strategic Plan:
Objective 13: “To … ensure that the strong research culture at the University of Victoria
is brought into … the classroom”. A central feature of the proposed program is to
involve faculty members from health-related research centres in undergraduate teaching,
including as members of the interdisciplinary team of instructors for HS 200 and as
supervisors of individual students’ research projects in HS 400A.
13c) “focus upper-year programs on research … and provide undergraduate
students with opportunities to engage in research activity as part of their
programs”. The IMHS capstone experience, HS 400A, provides undergraduate
students with an opportunity to engage directly in research under the supervision
of a UVic faculty health researcher.
Objective 18: “To increase … experiential learning opportunities for UVic students”.
The capstone course, either HS 400A or HS 400B, will provide students with experience
either in conducting research or in a volunteer placement in the health field.
Objective 20: “to further enhance internationalization of the university through …
internationalization of the curriculum …” HS 200 will introduce students to crosscultural perspectives on health, and encourage students to take courses on global health
issues to fulfill minor program requirements.
Target audience, student and labour market demand
Student demand for the interdisciplinary minor is expected to be strong. Admissions
criteria for medical schools increasingly emphasize education in social determinants of
health1, which will make this program attractive to students planning a career in
medicine. The BC government predicts that “health care and social assistance” will have
the highest rate of job growth of all major sectors and industries in the near future.2
Expertise and a credential in the societal dimensions of health will help students in a wide
range of disciplines find work in this expanding sector.
Plans for student recruitment, retention, and success
The program does not require a specific recruitment plan, as it is a minor intended to
complement existing major programs. Information about the program will be available in
E. Rosenthal, “Pre-Med’s New Priorities: Heart and Soul and Social Science”, New York Times
Education Life, 13 April 2012.
2 At 2.6% annually, the only other sector with such a high rate of growth is “professional, scientific
and technical services”: Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development,
Challenges and Opportunities: British Columbia’s Labour Market Future, November 2009, p. 12.
1
3
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 5 of 25
the usual sources (the Calendar, a program website linked to the Office of
Interdisciplinary Academic Programs) and the program will participated in the program
fairs planned to accompany the University’s move to earlier program declaration.
Student retention and success will be achieved primarily by maintaining the academic
quality of the core course and the capstone experience. The program director will ensure
the website and the lists of courses offered by other academic units that can be used to
meet IMHS program requirements is kept up-to-date, and will be available to advise
students. The program is not expected to require extensive efforts to retain students or
ensure their success beyond these measures, and will have minimal administrative
capacity to do more.
4.
Admission requirements
The minor program will be open to all undergraduate students at the University of
Victoria, and any student who declares the program will be admitted, consistent with
practice for other programs in the Faculties of Humanities, Science, and Social Sciences.
Admission to elective courses will be determined by requirements in the academic units
in which these courses are offered.
The program will also be open to transfer students on the same basis as students who
begin post-secondary education at UVic. Transfer students who have taken health-related
courses at other post-secondary institutions that are not assigned transfer credit for
specific UVic courses may apply to the program director for transfer credit that can be
used to meet IMHS program requirements, up to a maximum of 4.5 units (a maximum of
3.0u of upper-level transfer credits can be used to meet IMHS program requirements).
Given the specialized nature of this program, students will not receive HS 200 or HS 400
transfer credit for courses taken elsewhere.
5.
Areas of specialization and evidence of adequate faculty complement
The program is designed around areas of specialization that reflect the expertise of UVic
faculty members participating in health-related research centres. Specializations will be
offered only in these areas, which currently include aboriginal health, addictions, aging,
and children and youth. The specializations could change as the research-centre
landscape evolves; for example, a specialization in disability studies could be created if
CanAssist and other disability researchers come together in a research centre.
A list of the faculty members who will participate in the program and each of its
specializations is included in the appendix.
6.
Curriculum design
Program Requirements
Health and Society will be offered as a Minor program that can also be used to meet the
requirements of a General degree. University regulations require a minimum of 9.0 units
of coursework at the 300 or 400 level. As an interdisciplinary program, the IMHS will
require students to complete required upper-level coursework in a variety of departments
4
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 6 of 25
and schools. The IMHS also requires 4.5 units of lower-level courses to provide the
background necessary for upper-level coursework, for a total of 13.5 units of coursework
for the minor or general. Each student will specialize in one of four areas, each of which
corresponds to an area of research expertise represented by one or more of UVic’s healthrelated research centres – aboriginal health, addictions, aging, and children and youth.
The specialization will be recorded on the student’s transcript (normally this kind of
specialization is called a “concentration”) following the title of the minor. Other areas of
concentration may emerge as the IMHS becomes established if appropriate courses and
willing faculty participants are identified.
Program requirements are as follows:
1. 3.0 units of introductory coursework in relevant fields, including social and
biomedical approaches to health – to be chosen from such courses as BIOL 150A;
BIOL 150B; BIOC 102; EPHE 141; EPHE 142; HINF 280; HLTH 250; SOCI
285;
2. HS 200 – “Health and Society” (1.5 units) – gateway course for the minor
program – team-taught by health researchers from participating Faculties and
research centres;
3. 4.5 units of 300 and 400 level courses selected from a list of “theory and method”
electives, consisting of existing courses on particular societal dimensions of
health offered by participating Faculties – see Appendix A for examples;
4. 3.0 units of 300 and 400 level courses selected from a list of elective courses in
the area of the student’s specialization (aboriginal health, addictions, aging,
children and youth) offered by participating Faculties– see Appendix B, which
identifies courses that could be used to meet this requirement in the “aging”
stream;
5. Of the courses used to meet requirements 3 and 4, no more than three units can be
taken in any one department or school;
6. HS 400A, “Experiential learning in Health and Society: Research” or HS 400B,
“Experiential learning in Health and Society: Community Service” – (1.5 units) –
a capstone course, consisting of in-depth independent study of a selected topic
within the student’s chosen specialization, to be offered as either direct
involvement in doing research (400A) or experiential learning in a communitybased setting (400B) supervised by one or more faculty member(s) associated
with the research centre. Normally students could choose only one of 400A or
400B.
All normal University regulations apply to the minor, including the following:
1. No more than 3 units of the 300- and 400-level course work required for the
Minor can be taken elsewhere, and at least 6 of the units required for the Minor
must be completed at UVic.
2. The 9 units of 300- and 400-level course work for the IMHS cannot form part of
the 300- and 400-level department requirements for a student’s Honours or Major
Program (corequisite courses in other programs may be counted toward the
Minor).
5
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 7 of 25
Proposed New Core Courses
HS 200, “Health and Society”. The introductory course on theories of health and health
research will be team taught from several perspectives in the social sciences and
humanities. This overview of the dimensions of health and health research will
focus on the central theoretical frameworks utilized by scholars working in this
diverse field. The aim of the course will be to introduce students to key thinkers
associated with health studies and to develop a comprehensive and critical
understanding of the concepts that these thinkers apply to health related issues.
HS 400A, “Experiential learning in Health and Society: Research”, and HS 400B,
“Experiential learning in Health and Society: Community Service”. The capstone
course provides the opportunity for students to obtain direct experience in the
process of doing health research (400A) or being involved in health-sector activities
(for example, volunteering at a homeless shelter, working with people with
disabilities, or some other activity) (400B).
Delivery methods
The IMHS program will be delivered primarily using face-to-face methods on campus.
Some electives may be available through distributed learning. Once the IMHS is fully
established, and depending on student demand, the program could mount a Summer
Institute in which core courses can be offered to students in a more intensive, on-campus
format.
Linkages between the learning outcomes and the curriculum design
Students in the IMHS program will achieve a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary introduction
to health and society in HS 200. This course will be team-taught and will draw upon
guest speakers with deep backgrounds in health research and/or service delivery, who
will add experiential wisdom to the classroom. This course will emphasize the interplay
between experiences of everyday life and biological responses, as well examining
‘health’ in the context of different cultures. Assignments and tests in these courses will
emphasize the importance of clear analytic thought and written expression. In fulfilling
their electives requirement, students will choose courses from a range of disciplinary and
substantive areas within the compass of health studies, thereby learning to understand and
discuss health issues from multidisciplinary perspectives, including the strengths and
limitations of individual perspectives. The 1.5-unit capstone course, either HS 400A or
HS 400B, will be taught by a single instructor in a mentorship format (as with other
directed studies courses), through which students will engage with health issues in
completing a major project.
Integration of opportunities for experiential learning or other forms of civic
engagement
The new 400-level capstone courses (“Experiential Learning in Health and Society:
Research” and “Experiential Learning in Health and Society: Community Service”) will
allow students the opportunity for experiential learning by participating in research
activities of the various research centres affiliated with the IMHS (400A) or community-
6
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 8 of 25
based settings where related activities are carried out (for example, volunteering at a
homeless shelter, working with people with disabilities, or some other activity) (400B).
Residency requirements and anticipated times to completion
The IMHS will be completed as part of a Bachelor’s degree, with anticipated times to
completion varying depending on individual students’ circumstances (as is the case for all
such undergraduate programs). Completion of this minor could extend the time required
to complete a degree beyond that for a simple majors degree, depending on the student’s
ability to select courses that fulfill the minor and major requirements within the normal
60 unit minimum. This is no different from any other minor program.
Policies on student evaluation
All University of Victoria standards and regulations will be respected in evaluating
student performance in HS courses. Both courses will use the standard percentage-letter
grade scheme (i.e., not pass-fail).
Plans for integration of teaching and research
Integrating undergraduate teaching and faculty research is a central element of the
proposal, evident in the inclusion of faculty researchers as instructors and guest lecturers
in HS200, and the capstone undergraduate research or community-based experience (HS
400A or HS 400B).
Plans to develop international opportunities or perspectives
Cross-cultural perspectives on health will be part of the core course content for the minor.
There may be opportunities for students completing the HS 400A capstone course to be
involved in international research programs, but this is not expected as the norm.
Enrolment plan for the length of the program
We anticipate that enrolment in the minor program will build from an initial base of 10 to
a maximum of 20, within three years of the program’s inception. The fourth-year
capstone course, HS 400A or HS 400B, will be offered first in 2015/16 and will build
from a base of 10 students to 20 students at steady state, which is the projected number of
IMHS graduates each year. HS 200 is expected to enroll approximately 120 students per
year.
7.
Funding plan and administration
IMHS will draw on the extensive existing faculty resources that make the University of
Victoria a favoured institution for this program. New faculty hires are not necessary and
are not part of the proposal. Each of the participating faculties has a complement of
faculty with relevant expertise, and offers a number of courses that will serve well as
electives. The program will also draw on existing administrative resources in the Social
Dimensions of Health graduate program and the Office of Interdisciplinary Academic
Programs. By marshaling existing resources, the new program will require a relatively
modest budget.
7
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 9 of 25
At the same time, however, it would not be appropriate to establish IMHS by diverting
resources from existing programs. Thus, while no new full-time academic or
administrative appointments are required, the work of those administering and teaching in
the program needs to be fully supported. Similarly, there are no space requirements or
library requirements for the program. Since the University of Victoria is already a major
location for research and teaching pertaining to health studies, the McPherson Library
collection is more than adequate to serve undergraduate needs.
8
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 10 of 25
Office of the Dean
Faculty of Human and Social Development
MEMORANDUM
University of Victoria
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada
Tel (250) 721-8050 Fax (250) 721-7067
Email [email protected] .C!!
~ () _
TO:
Katy Mateer- AVP Academic Planning
FROM:
Mary Ellen Purkis- Dean, Faculty of Human & Social
CC:
Michael Hayes - Director of Health Research & Education; Acting Director, School
of Public Health
and Social Policy
·
·
.
.
RE:
Proposed Minor in Health
DATE:
DevelopmentV)'l'(G~
· November 18, 2013
I am very pleased to write a Jetter of strong support for the proposed Interdisciplinary Minor in Health &
Society. This proposal draws together capacity in educational programming as well as research expertise
from across the entire campus. Consultations h~ve taken place over a significant period of time and
these have ensured strong support and buy-in from a variety of units who, together, will contribute to
the design and implementation of a coherent program of studies that will benefit students enrolled at
University of Victoria.
The program builds off of a number of existing and new curriculum and organizational capacities
available on campus~ The Interdisciplinary Studies Office, now lead by Dr. Catherine MacGregor,
provides access for students interested in interdisciplinary studies and this minor program in Health & .
Society is a quintessential interdisciplinary program. That office will provide profiie for the program that
may otherwise be hidden within one of the Faculties. The Interdisciplinary Office can also coordinate the
faculty resources required to sustain a strong and interesting program of studies.
Locally to the Faculty of Human & Social Development, this program of studies will enhance the profile
on our existing strengths and interests in health fields. Over the last five years, th~ Faculty has benefited
from the distribution of resources to establish and implement a new undergraduate program in Health
and Community Services. This program offers specialized courses in Aging, Disabilities and Aboriginal
Health. These are fields of study that the Faculty has specific research expertise that can be offered to
support the new Minor program and, because of the alignment with the Minor program, we can expect
some mutual benefit in terms of increased enrolments in our courses- all of which are available
through distributed education.
Beyond the School of Public Health & Social Policy, courses in the Schools of Health Information Science, ·
Social Work, Child & Youth Care and Nursing can all be used by students to contribute to the minor
program. Each of these programs approaches the field of health studies from a unique perspective,
influenced by discipiinar\t and professional history and traditions. The introduction of int~rdisciplinary
students into these classes creates opportunities for some of those disciplinary views to be questioned
and debated. Equally, interdisciplinary students can learn about the current debates that are occurring
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 11 of 25
with those professional fields that have strong influence over people'sexperiences of health and illness.
Such knowledge will better prepare students for their own lives where they will, inevitably and over
time, encounter challenges associated with their own or their family members' health. It also prepares
· them to participate in wider societal debates about the future of our health care system and how best
to improve it so that it better responds to the broad and diverse needs of the Canadian population.
This minor program will have positive impact on students, on health-related programs within the Faculty
of Human & Social Development and on faculty researchers who are keen to create opportuhities for
undergraduate research capacity building.
On behalf of the Faculty of Human & Social Development, I am pleased to offer this letter of strong
support for the proposal submitted by Dr. Michael Hayes and the academic team that he has been
working with over the last few years to refine this proposal.
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 12 of 25
PO Box 3045 STN CSC
Victoria British Columbia V8W 3P4
Canada
Tel (250) 472-4677 Fax (250) 721-7059
Email [email protected]
University
of Victoria
Faculty of Humanities
Office of the Dean
I
7
, ,--,
_{~ 0 -c r_,_o;;
I am wTiting this letter in support of the Inte1;disciplinary Minor in Health & Society. Given the
impmiance of multidisciplinary approaches to health questions in today's society, and
acknowledging the value that the Humanities can bring to these medical and ethical issues, the
IMHS is a valuable initiative. In reading over the proposed program structure, the Faculty of
Humanities is supportive of having its courses listed as part of the program and we have the
capacity in those courses to meet the need. We are cmTently in negotiation with the Office of
· Interdisciplinruy Programs as to the financial contributions that Humanities makes to the
interdisciplinary programs and the possibility of a lump sum transfer to be used at the discretion .
of the Office (including potentially this new program). While these talks have not been fmalized,
I do not see this as a baiTier to pursue the curricular support of this innovative minor.
Dr. John Archibald
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 13 of 25
Faculty of Social
Sciences
BEC 456
P.O. Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria, BC, Canada
V8W 2Y2
Tel: 250-472-5058
Fax: 250-472-4583
October 3Qth, 2013
Dr. Michael Hayes
Director, Health Education and Research
University of Victoria
Dear Michael:
The Faculty of Social Sciences strongly supports the proposal for an Interdisciplinary Minor
Program in Health and Society. Social Sciences, like a number of other Faculties at the
University of Victoria, has wide-ranging scholarly expertise in health and society. The
proposed minor will enable undergraduate students to benefit from this expertise and, in the
context ofthe program's innovative capstone courses, engage in research or community
engagement under the guidance ofUVic health researchers. The program's focus on
undergraduate research and community engagement align well with the priorities outlined in
UVic's Strategic Plan. We expect students will find this an attractive program both because of
its academic content and the relevance of a credential in health and society to achieving their
career goals. Furthermore, we strongly support the principle of an interdisciplinary approach
to such a critical contemporary issue.
Social Sciences recognizes that participation in this program will require the allocation of some
resources to support new courses and provide administrative support, and appreciates the fact
this proposal keeps the costs modest in relation to the potential benefits. Weare prepared to
make a contribution in conjunction with other Faculties whose courses and faculty members
will be included in the program, and we look forward to working with you and other Faculties
to make the program a reality.
Sincerely,
Dr. Peter Keller, Dean
Faculty of Social Sciences
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 14 of 25
Office of the Dean
Faculty of Education
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria, British Columbia VBW 2Y2 Canada
Tel: (250) 721-7757, Fax: 472-5063
Email: [email protected]
October 30, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
Re: Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society
I am writing in support of the proposal to create an Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and
Society (IMHS). The Faculty of Education has long been involved in health education, health
promotion, and health research through the activities of Faculty in the School of Exercise
Science, Physical, and Health Education. In addition the Department of Educational
Psychology and Leadership Studies houses a long standing graduate program in counseling
psychology that prepares mental health practitioners, and the Department of Curriculum and
Instruction is home to internationally recognized researchers in the area of health literacy.
The creation of an Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society will provide an important
option for students who wish to deepen their knowledge of health and society through further
specialization. I believe this is an important direction for the University of Victoria given that it
simultaneously consolidates existing expertise from across campus, while addressing an
increasingly important dimension of Canadian society.
I have no hesitation in giving this proposal my strongest support.
Ted Riecken, Ed.D.
Dean ofEducation
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 15 of 25
I
! Centre for Aboriginal
1
Health Research
November 18,2013
Dr. Michael Hayes
Director of Health Research and Education
University ofVictoria
RE:
Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society (IMHS) Program
Dear Dr. Hayes,
On behalf of the Centre for Aborigin~l Health Research, I am pleased to offer our s~pport
for your submission of the Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society (IMHS) Program.
The Centre for Aboriginal Health Research (CAHR) is dedicated to promoting and engaging
in research that aims .to improve the health of First Nation, Inuit and .Metis peoples in
Canada; as well as other Indigenous ·populations around the world. CAHR has pursued
research on a wide rarige of Abot'iginal health topics as well as developed interdisciplinary
training, community engaged health research projects, as well as knowledge mobilization
·activities and resources.
CAHR regularly provides oppor~nities for UVIC students to pursue their interests in .
Aboriginal health research thr~ugh a variety of projects. We would be pleased to continue
providing these opportunities in the context of a formal, integrated program of
interdisciplinary spe~iality training. In particular, through a men to ring format, faculty
associated with CAHR will supervise students in the proposed HS 400 "Experiential
Learning in Health. and Society Research" course in a major project (i.e.; directed reading or
independent study) on a topic related to Aborigin<li health.
The faculty and staff of CAHR look forward to supporting the implementation of the
Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society Program. CAHR is uniquely positioned to
move f01ward with this important work that will contribute to culturally grounded and
community relevant training opportunities related to Aboriginal health research.
Sincerely,
Charlotte Reading
Director - CAHR
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
University of Victoria
Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2
Canada
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 16 of 25
Centre for Addictions Research of BC
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Vict oria British Co lumb ia VSW 2Y2 Canada
Tel2 50-472-5445, Fax 250-472-532 1
Em ail [email protected] Web www.carbc.ca
AD ! ICTIONS
RESEARCH OF BC
University
of Victoria
Oct 29, 2013
Dr. Michael V. Hayes
Director of Health Education and Research ·
University of Victoria
·. Victori a, sc vaw 2Y2 ·
Dear Michael
I am writing in support of your initiative to create for an Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and
Society (IMHS) . I understand that two new courses will need to be created namely: HS 200
Health and Society and HS 400 Experiential Learning in H ealth and Society which is essentially
a directed studies course that can either be a research internship or experiential learning in a . .
community-based service or organization. As you know we have many undergraduate students
approach us to volunteer with data· collection for some of our ongoing studies and from time to
time we can provide them with a variety of other research experiences. This would be an ideal
way of recognising their contributions and formal ising the process reinforce and ensure
educational outcomes.
to
.
.
.
.
.
I know that your proposal is also well supported by other facu lty who are affiliated \IIIith the
Centre for Addictions Research of BC.
With best wishes
Tim Stockwell, PhD, FCAHS, MA (Oxon.), M.Sc.
Director, CARBC
Professor, Department of Psychology, University Victoria
.
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 17 of 25
Centre for
Youth & Societ~
~
UVic
PO B01 3060 STII CSC
Victoria, B.C. VIW 3114 Canada
Tel: 250·472·5414 Fax: 250-472·5470
El)llil: [email protected] Web: ~uth.saciety.uvic.ca
November 1 , 2013
Dr. Michael Hayes
University of Victoria
P.O. Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria, BC
V8W 2Y2
Letter in Support of an Undergraduate Minor in Health and Society
I am writing this letter to demonstrate our support for the proposed undergraduate minor
in Health and Society. We believe this program would be a valuable addition to UVic as it
would provide students a unique opportunity to explore approaches to health from a variety
of disciplines and gain experience working with specific populations of their choice.
The Centre for Youth & Society aims to promote the well-being of youth from diverse
social, economic, and ethnic backgrounds, across developmental transitions, and in evolving
societal circumstances. Research Centres are uniquely positioned to work not only with a
wide range of people in the community but also with students across a wide range of
disciplines. Working at Research Centres has been helpful for students to develop a system of
peer-support and encouragement similar to the one that would be created by this new minor
program. We feel that to be offered such an opportunity could be of significant benefit to
students with a particular interest in health-related topics.
The UVic Strategic Plan highlights the need to bring together researchers and students
and emphasizes the value of experiential learning. This program will provide undergraduate
students opportunities to see "research in action" .
We welcome this opportunity for undergraduate students to be exposed to new and
varied ideas about health, to work more closely with UVic Research Centres and to gain
recognition for their specialized interest in particular health-related projects or fields.
Sincerely,
AM~
/1!/tfi(ShJ_,e
E.Anne Marshall, PhD, RPsych
Director
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 18 of 25
University
of Victoria
Centre on Aging
PO BOX 1700, STN CSC
Victoria,.British Co!urnbia
Canada V8"V 2Y2
Phone: (250) 72 1·6369 Fa x: (250) 721-6499
\f\feb: http:/ / \.vvvvv.coag.uvic ca
Dr. Michael Hayes
Director of Health Education and Research
HSD Rm B202E
University of Victoria
Victoria BC V8W 2Y2
18 September 2013 -·
Dear Dr. Hayes:
.
at
.
.
As the Directorof the Centre on Aging University of Victoria, I am pleased to Write this letterof
support for the proposed InterdisCiplinary Minor in Health and Society with flexibility in course selection
so that students can create a program that aligns with a specific research focus (e.g., Health and Aging). ·
As you know, academic programming at the University ofVictoria falls within the jurisdiction of the
Faculties,andtheDepartments and Schools within the Faculties. Research Centres, though encouraged .
to contribute to the academic mandate ofthe university, typiCally do not offered academic programs.
Instead, we work closely with other units on campus to ensure aging research is integrated within existing and emerging academic programs .at both t he graduate and undergraduate levels. Moreover,
we provide students with the opportunity to become involved in the research actiVities of the Centre on
Aging by becoming student affiliates of the Centre.
The proposed Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and SoCiety enhances the opportunities available to us to
showcase, atthe undergraduate level, the strength in aging research at UVic. The opportunity for
undergraduate students to obtain this type of specialty training and designation that aligns with our
Centre's research mandate will promote interdisciplinary, experientii:d learning and generate interest in
the field of aging as a career choice as they enter the work force or pursue further training (e.g.,
graduate studies).
As you know, Canadians are living longer; longer than ever before. A 2010 Statistics Canada report on
births and deaths showed life expectancy at birth reached 80.7 years. Older, healthier adults continue to
contribute to society and engage in a variety of meaningful activities, and more and more of us are
recognizing this new, emerging vision of old age as our own. In response to this societal change, the
scientific study of the biological, psychological, and sociological phenomena associated with aging, has
grown rapidly over the past two decades to identify factors influencing the aging process and the quality
of later life experiences. The impact of this 'longevity revolution' on how we live and understand our
lives has far-reaching implications for individuals and societies. Research on aging is necessarily
.
. interdisciplinary and this is reflected in the research being _conducted through the Centre on Aging {or by
the researchers affiliated with COAG). We are particularly pleased to see that the proposal Minor
program in Health and Society reflects the interdisciplinary focus so crucial to the study of aging and
that the program wil_
l be open to all undergraduate students at Uvic.
It is antiCipated that the Cehtre on Aging will play an active role in supporting arid developing, where
possible, this degree option for students with an interest in aging research. Moreover, it is anticipated
1
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 19 of 25
thC!t researchers affiliated with the Centre will welcome the opportunity to actively engage these
students with their research.
The proposed Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society is a program that will add meaningful
options to the cadre of programs available to undergraduate students at Uvic and, in so doing, enhance
the opportunities for students to connect with and experience world-class health-related research being
conducted at UVic.
As the Director of the Centre on Aging, I strongly support this proposal and look forward to welcoming
students with an interest in aging.
Yours sincerely,
Holly Tuokko, PhD, RPsych
Director, Centre on Aging
2
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 20 of 25
Centre for Biomedical Research
CBR
University of Victoria
PO Box 3020 STN CSC
Victoria BC V8W 2Y2
Canada
Tel (250) 472-4067 Fax (250) 472-4075
Re: Letter of Support for Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society {IMHS)
Please acceptthis letter of support from the Centre for Biomedical Research regarding the
proposed undergraduate InterdisCiplinary Minor in Health and Society (IMHS). This program
will provide identified training in a burgeoning field and will make a worthy and attractive
addition to undergraduate offerings at the University of Victoria. .
.
.
.
· UVic has an emerging strength in Health Research. As clearly articulated in the proposal, this
. strength is well supported by numerous faculties and many faculty members on campus. A
· main role of the Centre for Biomedical Research at UVic is to serve as a supporting nexus for
HealthResearch and assoCiated research scientists, clinicians, students, and thecommunity.
As such the Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society (IMHS) is closely aligned to many of
our activities. Additionally, many members of our centre conduct related work and are keen to
support this new program . .
On behalfof the Centre for .Biomedical Research, I offer enthusiastic support for this program. I
look forward to seeing it expand and thrive into the future.
Yours sincerely,
E. Paul Zehr, PhD
Professor & Director, Centre for Biomedical Research,
Head, Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory,
Division of Medical Sciences and School of Exercise Science, Physical, & Health Education
Qualified Health Researcher, Centre on Aging, University of Victoria
Faculty, Human Discovery Science, ICORD, Vancouver BC
University
of Victoria
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 21 of 25
Tue 15/10/2013 9:43AM
Hi Michael,
The Executive Board of the Centre for Early Childhood Research and Policy met Friday and reviewed your
request for support of the new program, Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society. They have asked me to
contact you to let you know they are supportive of the proposal and to request the program include courses
on early childhood, a key demographic for health and well ness. The courses the Centre offers provide critical
perspectives on this.
They are:
1} Kindergarten and Primary Institute, a conference of distinguished early childhood speakers and a credit
course that is offered·in an attractive, intense format in the summer.
2}Guns and Barbies: the Complexity of Play in Early Childhood, a credit course offered in a weekly, evening
format in the fall with guest lecturers providing multidisciplinary perspective on early childhood.
Course outlines for the recent offerings are included for your consideration.
The board members are happy to meet with you and elaborate on how these courses fit the program's
· mandate- health and society.
Best regards.
Beverly Smith
Beverly Smith, O,Phii.(Oxon) ·
Associate Director
CENTRE FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD RESEARCH AND POLICY
(former: R EAC H : R ESEARCH IN EARLY E DUCATION A ND CHILD H EALTH)
Maclaurin A 321, PO Box 1700, STN CSC
University of Victoria
Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2
(250) 85 3~3 147
uvic.ca/cecrp
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 22 of 25
Hi Michael,
I too am in support ofthe proposed Interdisciplinary Minor in Health and Society.
Cheers,
Cecilia
Cecilia Benoit, PhD
Scientist, Centre for Addictions Research of BC {http://www.ca rbc.ca /) Professor, Department of
Sociology
How are you? I would certainly be interested in this development. As Tim noted, we have been granting
students credit for conducting interviews. Anthropology has been great about this; even allowing
students to registe~ fof'.directed studies when they d~n't have the prereqs. So, what you propose would
be great idea for all concerned. While lam writing, may I please remind you, as you requested, to send
me the notice of the Oct: 28 VIHA meeting agairi, as I still can 't find the original. Thank you, welcome
back, please let me know what I can do to help with this process,
a
Eric ·
Dr. Eric A. Roth
Professor, Department of Anthropology
··
. · .
·.
.
. . .
Scientist, Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia University of Victoria,
Hi Michael
.
.
.
.
Just a note to say I welcome this development. As you know we have many undergraduate students
approach us to volunteer with data collection for some of our ongoing studies and from time to time we
can pro them with a variety of other research experiences.
copying this message to other CARBC
affiliated faculty who may also wish to add their support to this initiative.
Thanks and best wishes ·
Tim
I'm
Dictated by voice recognition- apologies for any errors Tim Stockwell, PhD FCAHS Director, Centre for
Addictions Research of BC Professor, Department of Psychology University of Victoria, BC ·
Good morning, Michael.
Thank you for your note and for the copy of your proposal for an interdisciplinary minor in health and
society. I have now had an opportunity to examine it.
The proposed minor interests me personally. I am asking CECRP's Associate Director, Dr. Bev Smith, to
include your request on the agenda ofthe next meeting of the Executive Committee.
Unlike some of the other multi-faculty centres, CECRP actually offers two credit courses at the present
time: 1) the Kindergarten-Primary Institute and 2) Guns and Barbies {exploration of play for young
children). You may want to include them in your list of potential courses: Feel free to contact Dr. Smith
directly regarding the details of these courses or for any other matter about our Centre.
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 23 of 25
Nice proposal; 2 minor comments :
on p.2 Disability/CariAssist is listed as a research centre whereas on p.4, point 5 it talks about a
specialization in disability studies ... 'if CanAssist and other disability researchers come together
in a research centre'. Is it or isn't it a centre - clarify?
p.8, point 1 talks about a class capacity of 120 for HS 200 but earlier the intake talks about 10 to
start, then a maximum of 20. Again, clarify- you're expecting gobs of non-minor students to
take this course?
... Neena
Neena L. Chappell, PhD, FRSC
Canada Research Chair in Social Gerontology
Professor, Centre on Aging & Dept. of Sociology .·
President, Academy II (Social Sciences}, Royal Society of Canada
Past-president, Canadian Association on Gerontology
University of Victoria
Hi Michael,
This proposal looks pretty thorough . I appreciate the work that has been
do~e
on it.
I wis h it success.
Pamela (Moss)
Hello. Michael and
Holly,
.
.
.
.
.
This looks like a very interesting program . I just wanted to let you know of another capstone course I
have been developing that has just been added to our course roster but I'm not sure when it will first be
offered . It is as follows:
. Geography 491: Health and Place
This seminar style capstone course will facilitate research and writing skills through the
conceptualization and development of a small-scale project culminating in a major paper exploring the .
influence of place on health from a geographical lens. Contemporary topics will explore multiple scales:
from macro (global, societal) to the micro individual-scale and can include topics such as : population
dynamics, mobility, migration, health inequalities, access to care, the geography of ageing, family
dynamics, emotional and embodied geographies and disaster management.
Pre-requisites: lOlA or lOlB and at least one of 346, 366 or 339.
All best wishes,
Denise
Denise Cloutier, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Geography and Centre onAging
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 24 of 25
Health Minor Potential Courses
AGEI
Course Number
470
471
472
473
Course Name
Prerequisites
Health and Community Care Systems in Aging
Elder Care and Family Care Giving
Healthy Ageing
Chronic Disease and Ageing
ANTH
312
355
410
455
Introduction to Medical Anthropology
AIDS in the World
Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology
Advanced Topics in the Anthropology of HIV/AIDS
BIOC
102
Biochemistry and Human Health
BIOL
190A
190B
General Biology I
General Biology II
Bio 12 or 11/150B or 150A and B/Chemistry 11 or 12 strongly recommended
190A OR 210
CYC
166A
166B
250
364
460
461
462
463
470
Lifespan Development (Conception to Late Childhood)
Lifespan Development (Adolescence to Late Adulthood
Introduction to Law in Child and Youth Care Contexts
Disability and Child and Youth Care Practice
Guns and Barbies: the Complexity of play in Early Childhood (also listed as SOSC 390; EDCI 487/591)
Child Life Practice in Hospitals and Community Settings
Perspectives on Substance Use in Child and Youth Care Practice
Substance Use: Prevention and Treatment Approaches in Child and Youth Care Practice
Mental Health and Child and Youth Care Practice
366A
366B
Second year standing or permission form the department
Second-year standing
440
441
442
443
Introduction to Disability Studies
Enabling Technologies
Living with Disability
Activism and Advocacy
317
318
The Economics of Canadian Health Care
Health Economics
419
Introduction to Indigenous Approaches to Helping and Healing
141
142
487
Human Anatomy
Personal Health, Wellness and Potential
Kindergarden and Primary Institute
155
351
355
Introduction to Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies
Community and Population Health
Functional Anatomy
101A
346
366
491
Environment, Society and Sustainability
Geography of Environment and Health
Medical Geography
Health and Place
211, 218
Second-year standing
Geog 101A or 101B and one of 346, 366 or 339
GMST
483
Madness in Literature and Culture
GERS 427
HDCC
200
Introduction to Human Dimensions of Climate Change
HINF
130
140
Introduction to Health Information Technology
Introduction to the Canadian Health Care Systems
DSST
100,250 or 200
250
312
355
Fourth-year standing
Third-year standing
462 or equivalent, third-year standing
Fourth-year standing
103
103
ECON
ED-D
EDCI
EPHE
GEOG
SEN-JAN 10/14-8
Page 25 of 25
Course Number
Course Name
280
Biomedical Fundamentals
381
Epidemiology, Population Health and Public Health
HIST
Prerequisites
Biology 12 or one of EPHE 141, PE 141, BIOC 102, BIOL 150A or B, or 190A.
101C
132
355
447
Epidemics from Black Death to AIDS
Disease, Medicine and Society, 1500-present
Epidemics and Public Health in Modern History
Seminar in the History of Disease and Public Health
250
251
300
301
350
401
480
Current Issues in Health and Community Services
Healthy Sexuality
Determinants of Health and Population Health Promotion
Evolution of Health and Community Services
Introduction to Critical Appraisal of Health Research
Health Policy and Health Governance
Special Topics in Health Studies
372
Indigenous Epistemologies
381
Indigenous Leadership and Governance
450
451
452
455
Culture and Context of Indigenous Health
Indigenous Health Trends and Social Determinants of Health
Traditional Healing in Indigenous Communities
Community Development and Capacity Building in First Nation Communities
460
Foundations in International and Global Health and Human Development
301
Introduction to Pharmacology
321
331
Philosophy of Medicine
Biomedical Ethics
192
332
339
345A
360
385
Introduction to Positive Psychology
Health Psychology
Adult Development and Aging
Drugs and Behaviour: Basic Principles
Psychological Disorders of Adulthood
Motivation and Emotion
215
Social Inequality
285
327
347
382
385
Health over the Life Course
International Perspectives on Inequalities in Health and Health Care
Qualitative Research Methods
Sociology of Sexuality
Sociology of Aging
211
391
472
Indigenous Approaches to Healing and Helping
Social Work Practice in the Field of Addictions
323,311 AND 312
471
390
Selected Topics in Social Sciences
Dependent upon topic being offered
255
Statistics for Life Sciences I
1.5 units of MATH courses numbered 100 or higher
HLTH
IED
IGOV
INGH
INTS
MELDS
PHIL
PSYCH
100A, 100B
100A,100B and either 201 or third-year standing
100A, 100B, 215A
100A, 100B, 201, 215A
100A, 100B
SOCI
Pre- or corequisites: 100A, 100B or second year standing with a GPA in the last
session attended at of least 5.0
Pre- or corequisites: 100A, 100B or second year standing with a GPA in the last
session attended at of least 5.0
SOCW
SOSC
STAT
WS
SEN-JAN 10/14-9
Page 1 of 4
Faculty of Law
Office of the Associate Dean Administration & Research
PO Box 1700 STN CSC
Victoria British Columbia V8W 2Y2 Canada
Tel (250) 721-8182 Fax (250) 721-8146
E-mail:[email protected]
Date:
To:
From:
November 27, 2013
Carrie Andersen, Associate University Secretary
Elizabeth Adjin-Tettey, Associate Dean Administration & Research, Faculty of Law
Re:
Governance Rules for Law Faculty Council Amendment
In February 2013, Senate approved the Governance Rules for Law Faculty Council submitted pursuant to
s. 40 of the University Act. The Governance Rules were approved by Law Faculty Council on November
26, 2012 based on a report and recommendations to Faculty Council prepared by an ad hoc committee
that I chaired.
The Governance Rules allow for one non-academic staff elected by staff to represent staff at Faculty
Council meetings as a voting member. Other staff members may attend Faculty Council meetings but
have no speaking rights under the Governance Rules approved by Senate in February 2013. Speaking
rights can be extended to staff members following a majority vote of eligible voting members present at
the meeting and voting. This procedure has proved difficult to implement. Non-academic staff members
often make valuable contributions to issues under discussion at Faculty Council meetings. There is often
no time and it feels awkward to interrupt the discussions to call for a vote to extend speaking rights to
staff.
As the Chair of the Committee that drafted the current rules, I initiated a motion to amend the Governance
Rules to extend speaking rights to non-academic staff members without the need to go through special
procedures. Below is the proposed motion submitted to Law Faculty Council:
That the Law Faculty Governance Rules be amended as follows:
to add to section 1.3, clause (e): “Any member of the non-academic staff”;
to renumber the existing clause (e) in section 1.3 so that it becomes clause (f);
to delete in section 1.4 clause (b)’
and to renumber the existing clause (c) in section 1.4 so that it becomes clause (b)
The motion was considered at the November 27, 2013 Law Faculty Council meeting and was
unanimously adopted. I am therefore requesting that Senate approve the amended Law Faculty Council
Governance Rules.
E.A-Tettey
Elizabeth Adjin-Tettey
cc. Dean Jeremy Webber
SEN-JAN 10/14-9
Page 2 of 4
LAW FACULTY COUNCIL RULES
Adopted by Law Faculty Council November 28, 2012
Approved by Senate February 2013
Revised: November 2013
1.0 Membership in Faculty Council
1.1 The voting members of Faculty Council are as follows:
a) Regular faculty members in the Faculty of Law, as defined in the Framework Agreement,
including faculty members on Study Leave, but excluding faculty members on sick leave or longterm disability.
b) Six students currently enrolled in the J.D. program. One student from each of the three years of
the J.D. program will be elected by the students registered in that year; three students will be
members of the LSS Executive for the year and will be nominated by the LSS Executive to serve
for that year.
c) One student currently enrolled in either the LL.M. or Ph.D. program of the Faculty of Law. The
graduate student representative will be elected by students in the graduate program.
d) One staff member, elected by and from the non-academic staff who hold continuing
appointments.
1.2 Votes at Faculty Council meetings must be cast in person. For greater certainty, no person not
physically present at the meeting may vote by proxy, email, through links by computer or telephone or
cast a vote by any other means.
1.3 The following persons hold the right to attend and speak at meetings, but do not have the right to
vote:
a) Emeritus Professors;
b) Visiting and adjunct Professors;
c) Sessional instructors currently teaching at least one course at the Faculty of Law;
d) A representative of the Law Society of British Columbia, selected by the Benchers of the Law
Society;
e) Any member of the non-academic staff;
e)f) Other persons who provide unique perspectives on an issue under discussion as determined by
majority vote of eligible voting members who are present and voting.
1.4 The following persons have the right to be present at any open session of Faculty Council:
a) Any student registered in the J.D. or graduate programs offered by the Faculty of Law;
Any member of the non-academic staff;
b) Any alumnus of the Faculty of Law at UVic.
2.0 Agenda and Motions at Faculty Council
2.1 Save for special meetings of Faculty Council including marks meeting, the following rules govern the
setting and adoption of agenda for Faculty Council meetings:
SEN-JAN 10/14-9
Page 3 of 4
a) The Dean, in consultation with the Associate Deans, shall set the agenda for Faculty Council
meetings in accordance with the procedures of this section. The Dean may also consult with
relevant Committee Chairs and student representatives.
b) A call for agenda items shall be sent to voting members of Faculty Council two weeks prior to the
scheduled meeting date.
c) Proposed agenda items should be classified as either:
i)
Items for information only;
ii)
Items for discussion of Faculty Council; or
iii)
Proposed motions.
d) Proposed agenda items and supporting documents must be submitted to the Dean’s office by the
return date and time stated in the call for agenda items. Only items submitted by the due date will
be considered for inclusion in the agenda.
e) Proposed motions should normally have been discussed in the appropriate committee before
being submitted to Faculty Council and, when submitted for inclusion in the agenda, must be
accompanied by supporting documents setting out the rationale for the motion.
f) The Dean, in consultation with the Associate Deans, shall approve all agenda items for Faculty
Council and shall normally circulate the final agenda at least five calendar days prior to the
scheduled meeting date.
2.2 The following rules govern the adoption of and amendments to the agenda at Faculty Council
meetings:
a) Unless a voting member of Faculty Council objects at the meeting, the agenda shall be deemed
adopted as circulated;
b) In the event of objection, the agenda may be amended at the meeting by way of a motion which
may be moved from the floor by any member eligible to vote at the meeting;
c) A proposed motion to amend the agenda must be approved by a simple majority of the members
eligible to vote who are present and voting.
2.3 Motions to be considered at a Faculty Council meeting must be included in the agenda to be
circulated prior to the meeting, subject to the following exceptions:
a) A motion to amend the agenda may be proposed from the floor, as provided for in section 2.2 (b);
b) Motions arising directly from any amendment to the agenda may be moved from the floor;
c) Motions to amend a motion included in the agenda or a motion under 2.3 (b) or motions directly
related to those motions may be moved from the floor;
d) Prior to any other motion from the floor being considered by the meeting, a 2/3 majority of
members eligible to vote who are present and voting must pass a preliminary motion that the
matter is urgent and that there was no opportunity for the motion to have been included in the
agenda circulated prior to the meeting.
3.0 Proceedings at Faculty Council Meetings
3.1 The Dean will normally Chair the meeting and, if the Dean is unavailable, may delegate an Associate
Dean to act as Chair.
3.2 Unless otherwise provided in these rules, a motion must be moved and seconded and, to pass, must
be approved by a simple majority of those members eligible to vote who are present and who vote on
the motion. However, motions to approve the agenda and the minutes of any previous meeting will be
deemed to have been adopted and approved unless a voting member of Faculty Council objects.
3.3 Amendments to motions must be moved and seconded and must be debated and voted upon prior to
consideration of the main motion.
SEN-JAN 10/14-9
Page 4 of 4
3.4 A motion to adjourn does not need to be seconded.
3.5 The Chair of the meeting is counted in the quorum and may vote on any motion, but does not have a
casting vote in case of a tie.
3.6 The quorum for Faculty Council meetings is 17 members who are eligible to vote at the meeting. The
quorum for closed session of Faculty Council meetings is 9.
3.7 If no quorum is present within fifteen minutes of the scheduled starting time of the Faculty Council
meeting, then
a) The Chair shall adjourn the meeting;
b) The Chair shall reschedule the meeting for which no quorum was present for a time not longer
than one week from the date of the adjourned meeting;
c) The agenda for the rescheduled meeting need not be re-circulated; and
d) If, within fifteen minutes of the scheduled starting time of any Faculty Council meeting
rescheduled under this section for want of a quorum, a quorum is still not present, the Chair may
proceed with the meeting and transact all business that is on the agenda.
4.0 Meetings of Faculty Council
4.1 Faculty Council meetings will be designated either “open” or “closed” by the Dean.
a) Subject to s. 4.1 b), only faculty members may attend closed sessions of Faculty Council;
b) A designated staff member may attend a closed session to record the proceedings.
4.2 The following items will only be included in the agenda of a closed session of Faculty Council:
a) Individual student matters such as standing, promotion, probation, etc.;
b) Discussion of grades and approval of grades, except as to matters of general policy;
c) Scholarships and awards, except as to matters of general policy;
d) Examination-related issues, except as to matters of general policy;
e) Election of faculty members to Faculty and University committees;
f) Matters concerning the employment, rights or duties of faculty members or matters that would
affect the privacy of individual faculty members.
4.3 Other business will generally be conducted at open sessions of Faculty Council. However, matters
other than those listed in section 4.2 may be placed upon the agenda of a closed session of Faculty
Council by simple majority of those present and voting at an open session of Faculty Council
4.4 Each year, at an open meeting of Faculty Council scheduled prior to the end of classes in April,
Committees operating in the Faculty will provide an annual report to Faculty Council. The report will
review the work of the Committee over the past year, and, if possible, include issues to be addressed
in the next academic year.
4.5 At an open session of Faculty Council in September of each year, Faculty Council will by resolution
adopt a list of all standing committees in the Faculty.
5.0 Amending the Governance Rules
These rules may be amended, subject to the approval of Senate, by vote of a simple majority of members
eligible to vote who are present and voting.
6.0 Transitional Provision
That the members of Faculty Council agree to conduct the business of Faculty Council for any interim
period between November, 2012 and formal Senate approval of these Governance Rules in accordance
with these rules.
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 1 of 36
DATE:
December 11, 2013
TO:
Senate
FROM:
Dr. Reeta Tremblay, Vice-President Academic and Provost
RE:
Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students with
Disabilities
BACKGROUND
The university policy on Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities (Policy
AC1205) has been in effect since 1997; however, the university currently does not have specific
academic accommodation procedures for graduate students. While Policy AC1205 applies generally to
graduate students, graduate students are not specifically mentioned in the document and there is
minimal direction provided for resolving accommodation issues specific to graduate students. In the fall
of 2011, the university implemented academic accommodation procedures specifically for
undergraduate students.
Issues related to academic accommodation for graduate students continue to expand in scope and
complexity. Often there are fewer obvious academic accommodations and services available as a
student advances in their academic career. Therefore, the need has been identified to create
procedures that help support graduate students and those involved in the provision of academic
accommodations for graduate students. Currently, only one Canadian university has detailed academic
accommodation procedures for graduate students.
Student Affairs and the Faculty of Graduate Studies have led the process to develop comprehensive
draft procedures specific to graduate students. A small working group comprised of the following
individuals was struck to draft these procedures: Joel Lynn, Executive Director Student Services, Dr.
Margot Wilson, Associate Dean Faculty of Graduate Studies, Laurie Keenan, Manager, Resource Centre
for Students with a Disability, and Jonathan Derry, Manager, Policy Development and Judicial Affairs.
The draft procedures are attached to this memo. The procedures have been designed to:
• provide information for individuals with disabilities related to applying for admission to graduate
programs at the university;
• set out options available to encourage reporting in order to facilitate appropriate support to all
individuals involved in the accommodation process (students, faculty and staff);
• address confidentiality issues and highlight how student personal information is protected
throughout the accommodation process;
• include the processes used by the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability (RCSD) including
timelines and documentation requirements for requesting academic accommodation;
• provide general information on academic accommodations that may be available to graduate
students;
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 2 of 36
•
•
clarify the roles and responsibilities of various individuals and areas involved in the academic
accommodation process (e.g., Graduate Students, Faculty of Graduate Studies, faculties
administering graduate programs, graduate supervisors, the RCSD, etc); and
set out processes to assist graduate students and/or faculty members with resolving issues or
difficulties related to the implementation of an academic accommodation plan.
In the development of these procedures, the working group:
• reviewed other North American universities’ related policies, procedures and practices;
• conducted a review of best practices and standards;
• reviewed position papers and research conducted by external organizations, committees and
qualified practitioners;
• developed a combined document that identifies related issues and discusses the intended scope of
the procedures;
• determined which aspects of the existing undergraduate accommodation procedures are also
applicable to graduate students; and
• reviewed privacy and confidentiality issues related to accommodating graduate students.
Consultation Process
The working group also conducted consultations with multiple stakeholders including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Co-operative Education and Career Services
Advisory Committee on Academic Accommodation
and Access for Students with a Disability
Faculty members with specific credentials or
research interests in academic accommodations
Equity and Human Rights Office
Learning and Teaching Centre
Deans’ Council
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Graduate Studies’ Executive Committee
Graduate Studies’ Faculty Council
Graduate Students’ Society Executive Board
Ministry of Advanced Education
the Ombudsperson
Society for Students with a Disability
Graduate students registered with the RCSD
to receive academic accommodations
Senate Committee on Learning and Teaching
The feedback collected during the consultation process has been incorporated into the attached draft
procedures as appropriate.
I would like to bring the draft procedures forward to Senate for information purposes. Following the
January Senate meeting, the working group will review any comments made by Senate, consult as
necessary and finalize the draft procedures with the intent of bringing the procedures forward for
Senate’s approval in Spring, 2014.
Attachments:
Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205)
Draft - Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students (For Information)
Draft - Appendix ‘A’ - Examples of Academic Accommodations Available for Graduate Students (For
Information)
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 3 of 36
DRAFT
PROCEDURES FOR ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION AND ACCESS
FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Procedural Authority: Senate
Procedural Officers: Dean of Graduate Studies and
Associate Vice-President Student Affairs
Parent Policy: Academic Accommodation and Access for Students
with Disabilities (AC1205)
1.00
Effective Date: TBD
Supersedes: New
Last Editorial Change:
PURPOSE
The purpose of these procedures is to assist in implementing the university’s Academic
Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205) for Graduate
Students.
DEFINITIONS
For the purpose of these procedures:
2.00
The definitions contained within the university Academic Accommodation and Access for
Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205), with the exception of the definition of
Student, apply to these procedures. (Note: key definitions in Policy AC1205 include:
Academic Accommodation, Accessibility, Essential Requirements, and Undue Hardship).
3.00
Graduate Student means a student who is registered in an existing graduate program
at the university.
4.00
Prospective Graduate Student means an individual who is currently considering or in
the process of applying to a graduate program at the university.
5.00
Support Person means an individual who provides support or advice to a Graduate
Student during a formal review process under sections 27.00 - 34.00 of these
procedures.
6.00
Unit means academic or administrative areas at the university, including but not limited
to: faculties, divisions, departments, schools, offices and centres.
7.00
8.00
SCOPE
These procedures apply to Academic Accommodation and Access for Graduate Students
only and do not apply to undergraduate students or Continuing Studies students.
These procedures do not apply to Graduate Students’ employment relationships.
Employment accommodations are managed in accordance with applicable collective
agreements, university policies and the university’s regular employment practices.
December 11, 2013
Page 1 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 4 of 36
DRAFT
PROCEDURES
9.00
Protection of Graduate Student Personal Information
The university is committed to protecting all personal information that Graduate
Students with Disabilities disclose. The personal information of Graduate Students with
Disabilities shall be managed and protected in accordance with the BC Human Rights
Code, the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, and the university’s
Protection of Privacy (GV0235) and Records Management (IM7700) policies and
procedures.
Determining Essential Course and Program Requirements
10.00 Academic Units are responsible for identifying and evaluating the program requirements
they consider essential including skills, knowledge and attitudes. Program and course
objectives and learning outcomes should be included in this process.
Accessibility Statement for Course Outline
11.00 It is recommended that instructors include a statement in their Course Outline that:
(a) indicates their willingness to assist in the provision of Academic Accommodations;
(b) informs Graduate Students of the university’s responsibility to provide necessary
Academic Accommodations; and
(c) informs Graduate Students about the role of the Resource Centre for Students with a
Disability (hereinafter referred to as the ‘RCSD’).
11.01 The current statement is available on the Learning and Teaching Centre’s (LTC)
website and will be provided annually by the LTC to Academic Units through
documents and programming pertaining to course outlines and syllabi.
Applications from Students with Disabilities
12.00 The university encourages applications from Prospective Graduate Students with
Disabilities. The university will accept qualified candidates for admission to graduate
programs by examining each Prospective Graduate Student's academic record in
accordance with the Graduate Academic Calendar.
12.01 Prospective Graduate Students with Disabilities who have general questions
about potential Academic Accommodations or other support services available at
the university, or who have encountered barriers in the application process are
encouraged to initially contact the RCSD or the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
13.00 Prospective Graduate Students with Disabilities who are denied admission to the
university who can prove extenuating circumstances or provide information that was not
presented initially may forward a written request for a review of their application to the
Dean of Graduate Studies. The request should include any relevant additional
information combined with any supporting documents. The Dean of Graduate Studies
(or designate) will consider the documentation presented and will make a decision on
the application, subject to review by the Senate Committee on Appeals in accordance
with its terms of reference.
December 11, 2013
Page 2 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 5 of 36
DRAFT
Disclosure and Preliminary Evaluation of Academic Accommodation Arrangements
14.00 Graduate Students seeking Academic Accommodations are encouraged to disclose their
Disability to the RCSD as early as possible in order to ensure:
(a) the appropriate assessment of supporting medical documentation and of requested
Academic Accommodations;
(b) that there is sufficient time to obtain necessary documentation as set out in section
17.00 of these procedures;
(c) that recommendations on Academic Accommodations can be made to the Faculty of
Graduate Studies or the Academic Unit administering the program; and
(d) that Academic Accommodation arrangements can be implemented in a timely
manner.
15.00 Graduate Students with a Disability may, at their discretion, elect:
(a) to disclose their Disability to the RCSD;
(b) to disclose their Disability to the Faculty of Graduate Studies or the Academic Unit
administering the graduate program (e.g., their graduate supervisor); or
(c) not to disclose their Disability to any area of the university.
15.01 If a Graduate Student elects not to disclose his or her Disability, the university
cannot ensure the appropriate evaluation or implementation of any necessary
Academic Accommodations.
15.02 Graduate Students who request Academic Accommodations or services from the
RCSD are required to provide appropriate documentation as set out in section
17.00 - 18.00 of these procedures.
RCSD
Registration with the Resource Centre for Students with a Disability
16.00 Newly admitted Graduate Students who elect to disclose their Disability to the RCSD in
order to request Academic Accommodations should contact the RCSD and register as
early as possible.
16.01 Graduate Students who have recent diagnoses may register with the RCSD at
any time.
Documentation of Disability
17.00 Graduate Students who register with the RCSD for the purpose of requesting Academic
Accommodations must submit documentation of Disability that:
(a) confirms the rationale for reasonable Academic Accommodations;
(b) is from medical professionals with appropriate credentials; and
(c) should indicate:
(I) the diagnosing professional’s name, title, phone number, address, official
stamp or letterhead and signature;
(II) the date of the assessment;
(III) a statement of the nature of the Disability including the impact of medication;
December 11, 2013
Page 3 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 6 of 36
DRAFT
(IV) an explanation of the functional impact of the Disability on the pursuit of a
graduate education; and
(V) advice about measures that the university might consider when developing
and implementing an Academic Accommodation.
17.01 The university is not responsible for the assessment or diagnosis of a Graduate
Student’s Disability and does not cover costs related to medical documentation.
17.02 A diagnosis of Disability alone does not guarantee the provision of Academic
Accommodations.
18.00 Services and accommodations experienced in other institutions or jurisdictions may differ
from what is provided at the University of Victoria. The RCSD will review submitted
documentation with the Graduate Student in order to assess appropriate Academic
Accommodations.
Services Provided by the RCSD
19.00 Graduate Students who are registered with the RCSD may meet with an RCSD advisor in
order to:
(a) receive advice and support;
(b) review the documentation of Disability;
(c) determine eligibility for Academic Accommodations and services on the basis of
documentation and assistance in implementing such Accommodations when
necessary;
(d) receive assistance in obtaining grants and bursaries;
(e) receive referrals to other available resources; and
(f) coordinate accessible learning materials and services with sufficient notice (see
Appendix ‘A’).
Reaching Academic Accommodation
20.00 The nature of graduate courses and programs are varied and complex. A variety of
Academic Accommodations may be available for Graduate Students with Disabilities with
documented disabilities. Examples of Academic Accommodations that may be available
to Graduate Students are included in Appendix ‘A’ of these procedures.
21.00 The provision of an Academic Accommodation provides Graduate Students with a
Disability an alternative means of meeting the Essential Requirements of a course or
program. Fulfilling essential course or program requirements within the established time
limits as set out in the Graduate Academic Calendar remains the Graduate Student’s
responsibility.
22.00 The university will provide an Academic Accommodation to a Graduate Student with a
Disability unless doing so will cause an Undue Hardship. However, in seeking to develop
and implement an Academic Accommodation, the university is not required to continue
to search for an Academic Accommodation once a reasonable Academic Accommodation
has been identified. Undue hardship is defined in the university’s Academic
Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205).
December 11, 2013
Page 4 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 7 of 36
DRAFT
22.01 In some circumstances, the nature and degree of a Graduate Student’s Disability
may mean that no reasonable Academic Accommodation would enable the
Graduate Student to meet the documented Essential Requirements of a course or
program. Where no reasonable Academic Accommodation can be provided, the
university may deny an Academic Accommodation(s) in order to maintain the
academic integrity of a course or program. A Graduate Student cannot be
presumed to be incapable of meeting the Essential Requirements of a course or
program unless reasonable efforts have been made to assess all Academic
Accommodation options.
23.00 All Graduate Students requesting Academic Accommodations are required to:
(a) meet the degree requirements of their program;
(b) acquire and/or demonstrate the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes of their
graduate degree and degree components, in order to successfully meet the Essential
Requirements and the expectations of a graduate course or program; and
(c) participate fully in the process of developing an appropriate Academic
Accommodation plan which may include:
(I)
seeking out the advice and assessment of the RCSD, maintaining contact with
the RCSD as necessary and meeting established timelines;
(II)
actively engaging with RCSD staff, the graduate supervisor, instructors and
others as necessary in their efforts to develop and implement an Academic
Accommodation plan for the Graduate Student; and
(III) providing sufficient detail to the RCSD about the Disability and any impact on
academic activities as a Graduate Student.
23.01 If a Graduate Student with a Disability does not cooperate or fully participate in
the development and implementation of an Academic Accommodation, it may
lead to:
(a) an incomplete or insufficient Academic Accommodation plan; or
(b) the university’s inability to develop or implement an appropriate Academic
Accommodation plan.
24.00 The university strongly encourages early consultation and collaboration between the
Graduate Student, the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the RCSD, the LTC and the graduate
supervisor and/or instructor. Early consultation and collaboration helps ensure that:
(a) accessibility considerations and learning outcomes are reviewed and evaluated; and
(b) Academic Accommodation arrangements can be assessed and implemented in a
timely and appropriate manner.
24.01 At any point in the Academic Accommodation process, the Graduate Student
may, as necessary, confidentially consult with the RCSD, the Faculty of Graduate
December 11, 2013
Page 5 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 8 of 36
DRAFT
Studies, the graduate supervisor and others on appropriate Academic
Accommodations.
24.02 As necessary and with the Graduate Student’s written consent, the Faculty of
Graduate Studies may collaborate with the RCSD and/or the Dean (or designate)
of the Academic Unit administering the program in order to review and initiate
Academic Accommodation arrangements in a timely manner.
24.03 In the event that any issues arise pertaining to the Graduate Student’s ability,
even if reasonably accommodated, to fulfill the Essential Requirements of a
program, such issues should be discussed by the Graduate Student and/or the
graduate supervisor with the Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate).
24.04 The Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) will review the Essential
Requirements of the course or program and collaborate with the Graduate
Student, the pertinent graduate supervisor and the RCSD to determine what, if
any, Academic Accommodations might be reasonable to enable the applicant to
meet the Essential Requirements.
25.00 A Graduate Student who disagrees with the RCSD’s initial Academic Accommodation
recommendations or other proposed Academic Accommodation should consult the
Manager of the RCSD and the Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) to discuss any
concerns.
26.00 A graduate supervisor or instructor who disagrees with the RCSD’s Academic
Accommodation recommendation or other proposed Academic Accommodation should
initially consult the Chair or Dean (or designate) of the Academic Unit administering the
program to discuss any concerns.
26.01 Where necessary, the Dean or Associate Dean (or designate) from the Academic
Unit who disagrees with the RCSD’s initial Academic Accommodation
recommendation or other proposed Academic Accommodation should contact the
Manager of the RCSD and the Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) to
determine whether informal resolution is possible.
27.00 Where further resolution is required, or where there are issues or difficulties surrounding
the implementation of an Academic Accommodation that have not been resolved
informally, the Graduate Student, Dean (or designate) of the Academic Unit or graduate
supervisor may submit a written request to the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs
for formal review.
27.01 The purpose of the formal review is to make recommendations for implementing
appropriate actions to the Dean of Graduate Studies in a timely manner.
28.00 The formal review request should include:
(a) the rationale for the review;
(b) documentation in support of the request; and
December 11, 2013
Page 6 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 9 of 36
DRAFT
(c) the requester’s preferred outcome.
28.01 Prior to the formal review, the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or
designate) may request documentation from the instructor(s); graduate
supervisor; Chair or Dean of the Academic Unit administering the program
summarizing the:
(a) learning outcomes and Essential Requirements for the course or graduate
program; and
(b) issue(s) or difficulties surrounding the implementation of the Academic
Accommodation.
29.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or designate) shall normally conduct the
formal review within ten (10) university business days of receiving the review request.
30.00 The formal review shall include consultation with the individuals involved in the
Academic Accommodation and others who can provide specific expertise in resolving the
implementation of appropriate Academic Accommodations.
30.01 Based on the nature of the Academic Accommodation, the Associate VicePresident Student Affairs shall either:
(a) facilitate a meeting with necessary individuals which may include but is not
limited to:
 the Graduate Student and his or her Support Person;
 representation from the Academic Unit administering the graduate
program (e.g., graduate supervisor, Chair, Associate Dean and/or Dean);
 an Associate Dean from the Faculty of Graduate Studies;
 an individual(s) with expertise in the specific area of Accommodation(s);
 an individual(s) with expertise in the pertinent academic program;
 an Associate Vice-President in the Vice-President Academic and Provost’s
office; and
 the Director of Equity and Human Rights.
(b) individually consult necessary individuals such as those provided in 30.01 (a)
above in instances where there may be confidentiality concerns or other
difficulties in completing the review in a timely manner.
30.02 Prior to taking any action under 30.01, the Associate Vice-President Student
Affairs (or designate) shall consult the Graduate Student regarding the formal
review process and any potential confidentiality issues or other concerns relating
to the individuals that will be consulted during the formal review process.
30.03 Upon request, all materials and aspects of the formal review process will be
provided in an accessible format.
30.04 Individuals involved in the formal review process may submit supporting
materials to the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs for consideration during
December 11, 2013
Page 7 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 10 of 36
DRAFT
the formal review. A summary of submitted materials will be provided to
participants in the formal review process upon request.
31.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs will review all relevant documentation and
submissions. Upon completion of the formal review, the Associate Vice-President
Student Affairs will make recommendations to the Dean of Graduate Studies on an
appropriate Academic Accommodation on the basis of:
(a) the consultation results;
(b) the documented expected learning outcomes and Essential Requirements of the
course or program;
(c) the Graduate Student’s current functional limitations and barriers;
(d) the Academic Accommodations that have been assessed and implemented; and
(e) whether or not there is appropriate evidence and data to support a claim of Undue
Hardship.
32.00 The Dean of Graduate Studies (or designate) will review and determine whether to
implement the recommendation(s) and shall notify the graduate supervisor, Graduate
Student and others as necessary in writing of the decision normally within five (5)
university business days of receiving the recommendation(s). The notification shall
include the rationale for the decision and any alternate resolution as applicable.
33.00 Where the Graduate Student is unsatisfied with the outcome of the formal review or
with the Dean of Graduate Studies’ decision, the Graduate Student may appeal to the
Senate Committee on Appeals in accordance with its Terms of Reference and Procedural
Guidelines.
33.01 The Senate Committee on Appeals has jurisdiction to review decisions on matters
involving the application of academic regulations or requirements. The Senate
Committee on Appeals has no jurisdiction to consider a decision where the sole
question in the Graduate Student’s appeal turns on a question of academic
judgment.
33.02 The Senate Committee on Appeals’ decision is final within the university.
34.00 When a formal review is pending, the Manager of the RCSD, the Dean of Graduate
Studies (or designate) and the graduate supervisor shall review the Academic
Accommodation plan to determine what aspects of the plan, if any, can be immediately
implemented on an interim basis pending the completion of the formal review or appeal
process.
Academic Concessions, Extensions and Leaves of Absence
35.00 A Graduate Student may request academic concession in accordance with the Graduate
Calendar.
36.00 Graduate Students who have reasons to request extensions can request extensions in
accordance with the:
December 11, 2013
Page 8 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 11 of 36
DRAFT
(a) Leaves of Absence and Withdrawal from Graduate Programs section of the academic
calendar;
(b) Leave of Absence with Permission form;
(c) Request for Program Extension form; and/or
(d) Request for Candidacy Extension form.
RELEVANT LEGISLATION
University Act
Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act
BC Human Rights Code
RELATED POLICIES AND DOCUMENTS
Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205)
Protection of Privacy policy (GV0235)
Records Management policy (IM7700)
Employment Accommodation policy (HR6115)
University of Victoria Graduate Studies Academic Calendar
Relevant Faculty of Graduate Studies Policies and Forms
 Leaves of Absence and Withdrawal from Graduate Programs
 Leave of Absence with Permission form;
 Request for program extension form; and/or
 Request for candidacy extension form.
 Responsibilities in the Supervisory Relationship policy
Appendices
Appendix ‘A’ - Examples of Academic Accommodations Available for Graduate Students
December 11, 2013
Page 9 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 12 of 36
DRAFT
APPENDIX ‘A’ - EXAMPLES OF ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONS
AVAILABLE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
Procedural Authority: Vice-President Academic and Provost
Procedural Officer: Dean of Graduate Studies and
Associate Vice-President Student Affairs
Parent Policy: Academic Accommodation and Access for Students
with Disabilities (AC1205)
Effective Date: TBD
Supersedes: New
Last Editorial Change:
1.00
PURPOSE
The purpose of this document is to provide examples of resources and Academic
Accommodations available to instructors and Graduate Students at the University.
2.00
Course and Program Accessibility
Guidance is available for instructors on developing courses that are accessible for all
students through the Learning and Teaching Centre (LTC). For example:
3.00

Universal Instructional Design -Guide on Creating an Accessible Curriculum:
ltc.uvic.ca/servicesprograms/publications/documents/____UVicUIDBook.pdf

Sample Course Outline Accessibility statement:
www.ltc.uvic.ca/servicesprograms/support/index.php

Learning Systems – Instructional Technology Support:
http://elearning.uvic.ca/toolkit
Application and Evaluation Process
Providing accessibility in the application process may include application materials in
alternative format and evaluation of applicants for graduate programs through an
accessibility lens.
Examples of Academic Accommodations
Note: the following appendix provides examples of Academic Accommodations at the
university and is intended to help clarify the type of accommodations that may be
available at the university for Graduate Students. The following section is not intended
to provide an exhaustive list as each Academic Accommodation decision is based on
assessment of pertinent documentation and a Graduate Student’s individual
circumstances.
4.00
The nature of graduate courses and programs is varied and complex. A variety of
Academic Accommodations may be available for supporting Graduate Students with
Disabilities including the following:
December 11, 2013
Page 10 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 13 of 36
DRAFT
(I)
Course and Exam Accommodations:
Course-based Academic Accommodations for students enable access to essential
course content and activities. The need to access lectures, labs, written
assignments, fieldwork, class discussions and technology may require reasonable
accommodations such as notetakers, sign language interpreters, preferential
seating, more flexible attendance requirements, assignment substitutions,
classes in accessible locations and adaptive technology. Some Graduate
Students may require a range of accommodations for various activities in order
to meet learning outcomes.
Graduate Students who are required to write tests and exams may need
adjustments to time, the use of technology, a substitute method of assessment
(such as a paper or short-answer exam instead of a multiple choice exam),
and/or to write in a distraction-reduced environment.
(II)
5.00
(III)
Candidacy - Academic Accommodations surrounding candidacy deadlines are
determined on a case-by-case basis in accordance with Faculty of Graduate
Studies guidelines.
(IV)
Thesis Defense - Academic Accommodations for Graduate Students defending
a thesis may include, but are not limited to: room selection, additional time to
complete the defense in accordance with the established time limits as set out in
the Graduate Academic Calendar.
Work Term Accommodations
The determination of whether a work term accommodation is reasonable is fact specific
to the Graduate Student and the position and involves a process in which the faculty
and the graduate student collaboratively:
(a) identify the impact of the disability on the performance of the essential job functions
and workflow;
(b) explore possible reasonable accommodations to mitigate barriers; and
(c) maintain essential functions and performance standards of the appointment.
5.01
6.00
Thesis Preparation - Academic Accommodations surrounding thesispreparation deadlines are determined on a case-by-case basis in accordance with
Faculty of Graduate Studies guidelines.
Graduate Students should notify the Cooperative Education Program and Career
Services office and their graduate advisor in advance of a work term placement if
a specific accommodation is being sought for the work placement. The
Cooperative Education Program and Career Services office will work
collaboratively with the employer, the grad supervisor, and others, where
appropriate, to support suitable accommodations.
Registration for Academic Accommodations that Require Additional Time to Implement
Examples of Academic Accommodations that require advanced planning and early
registration include but are not limited to:
December 11, 2013
Page 11 of 12
Draft
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 14 of 36
DRAFT
(a) Course or research materials in alternative formats;
(b) Sign language interpreting or transcribing; and
(c) Substantial modifications to a physical environment such as a lab.
December 11, 2013
Page 12 of 12
Draft
CURRENT
ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION AND
ACCESS FOR STUDENTS WITH
DISABILITIES
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 15 of 36
University Policy No.: AC1205
Classification: Academic and Students
Approving Authority: Senate
Effective Date: January/06
Supersedes: June/97
Last Editorial Change: June/11
Mandated Review:
Associated Procedures:
Procedures for Academic Accommodation and Access for Undergraduate Students with
Disabilities
1.
POLICY PURPOSE
In accordance with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the B.C. Human Rights
Code, and the University of Victoria Policy on Human Rights, Equity and Fairness, the
University of Victoria (the “University”) will promote and protect the rights and dignity of students
with disabilities and will create a safe, respectful and supportive environment for all members of
the university community. This policy aims to make the University as accessible as possible so
that students with disabilities can participate in the activities of the University as equal members
of the university community.
2.
POLICY STATEMENT
The University endeavours to provide the best educational experience for all its students. The
academic excellence for which the University strives is unattainable without a commitment to
human rights, equity, fairness and diversity. The provision of reasonable academic
accommodation allows students with disabilities to meet and demonstrate the University’s high
standards in a fair and equitable manner.
This policy is guided by the following principles:
2.1
The University celebrates diversity within its community and welcomes the
contributions, experiences and full participation of persons with disabilities as
valued members of the university community;
2.2
All members of the university community share the responsibility to promote
equality, remove barriers, and create a respectful and inclusive learning
environment. Persons with disabilities will be involved in the development of
policies and programs and in decisions that directly affect them;
2.3
The University will take steps to dispel stereotypes and prejudices about persons
with disabilities and promote an understanding of persons with disabilities as
equal members of the University community;
2.4
An inclusive learning environment may require the provision of suitable individual
academic accommodation for persons with disabilities and the University has a
1
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 16 of 36
legal duty to accommodate students’ needs to the point of undue hardship (see
Appendix 1, Definitions);
2.5
3.
If a suitable academic accommodation cannot be agreed upon, the University
recognizes the right of students to appeal the academic accommodation decision
as described in Sections 4.2 and 4.3 below.
RESPONSIBILITIES
Appropriate academic accommodation entails shared responsibilities and communication
among university staff, faculty, and students.
3.1
The University will provide appropriate mechanisms to implement the provisions
of this policy in a reasonably timely and effective manner.
Specifically, the University will:
(a)
Through the Office of the Vice-President Academic and Provost, appoint
and maintain an Advisory Committee on Academic Accommodation and
Access for Students with Disabilities that will address issues relevant to
the implementation and improvement of this policy. This committee will
provide a report of its activities to Senate on an annual basis;
(b)
Support the operations of the Resource Centre for Students with a
Disability (RCSD) to fulfill its mandate to:
(i)
inform and assist faculty and staff in providing suitable student
academic accommodation and understanding disability issues;
(ii)
offer advice, guidance and support for students requiring
academic accommodation; on the basis of supporting
documentation, make recommendations and decisions regarding
academic accommodation in a timely manner;
(c)
Give persons with disabilities equal consideration for admission to any
program offered by the University for which they are academically
qualified;
(d)
Make its courses or programs accessible to qualified students with
disabilities up to the point of undue hardship and within those limits,
modify course or program components to meet the needs of students;
(e)
Handle personal information concerning students with a disability in
accordance with the requirements of the Freedom of Information and
Protection of Privacy Act;
(f)
Inform and educate its students, staff, instructors, faculty members and
administrators about the provisions of this policy and the means for
appropriately implementing them.
2
CURRENT
3.2
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 17 of 36
Students with disabilities seeking academic accommodation are expected to
contact the RCSD to initiate the process of determining and arranging the
appropriate academic accommodation in individual situations.
Specifically, students with disabilities will:
4.
(a)
Identify their individual needs and provide appropriate documentation of
their disabilities with sufficient notice given to enable the University to
make the necessary academic accommodations;
(b)
Engage in discussions and explorations of appropriate academic
accommodation options that will facilitate their access to university
academic programs or services;
(c)
Where appropriate, take reasonable measures to address their particular
needs and personal requirements relating to the need for academic
accommodation;
(d)
Fulfill their part in implementing the provisions of the academic
accommodation.
REACHING ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION
Ongoing communication and a collaborative working relationship between all parties involved in
the accommodation process are essential to meet the students’ needs for academic
accommodation.
4.1
The RCSD has the responsibility to coordinate the process of reviewing requests
for academic accommodation, make decisions about provisions for academic
accommodation, and communicate relevant information to the student and, as
appropriate, to faculty and staff of the university.
4.2
When a student, instructor or Department Chair is dissatisfied or disagrees with
the academic accommodation, the RCSD Coordinator will review the concerns.
Other experts including advocates who may be helpful in resolving the situation
may also be consulted as a part of an informal review and mediation process.
4.3
If the matter is not resolved through an informal process, the student, instructor or
Department Chair may request a formal review by the Associate Vice-President
Academic and Student Affairs. This office will conduct a timely review, involving
individuals who are knowledgeable about accessibility, academic
accommodation, human rights issues, and the particular issues being
adjudicated. The Associate Vice-President Academic and Student Affairs will
make final recommendations for appropriate action.
4.4
The student may appeal to the Senate Committee on Appeals if the student has
grounds to believe that the decision did not meet the appropriate standards of
procedural fairness.
3
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 18 of 36
APPENDIX 1 – DEFINITIONS
The following definitions are provided as a guideline to clarify the meaning and intent of the
Policy on Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities.
Student
A student is a person who is registered in at least one course in on- or off-campus programs at
the University of Victoria. Prospective students, persons recently enrolled at UVic, or persons
intending to continue from a previous session as a continuing student will also receive
consideration under this policy.
Disability
Disability has traditionally been defined as a physical or mental impairment that substantially
limits one or more major life activities. The social model of disability locates impairment not
within the individual but within the physical, social and attitudinal barriers that exist in society.
For the purposes of this policy, a student with a disability is a person who has a long-term or
recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment.
Accessibility
Accessibility refers to the degree to which university environments, facilities, procedures and
teaching and learning materials are usable by all people, with or without adaptation or special
design. Many barriers to full participation reside in the environment (physical, curricular,
attitudinal, informational, etc.).
Essential Requirement
Essential requirements are those activities which are considered essential to the course of
instruction or program of studies or which are directly related to licensing or field-based
employment requirements.
Academic Accommodation
Academic Accommodation is rooted in the legal concept of “reasonable accommodation”
which refers to reasonable efforts to modify requirements so that people with disabilities are
able to participate in a process or perform an essential function. When university
environments, facilities, procedures, teaching and learning materials and methods of
assessment are not designed in a manner that is accessible to all students, academic
accommodations may be needed.
An academic accommodation is an individualized modification of environments, materials or
requirements which provides the student with an alternative means of meeting essential course
or program requirements.
Academic accommodations are individualized for a particular student and may include (but are
not limited to):
4
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 19 of 36
(a)
adaptation, substitution or deletion of a component of a program, course, assignment
or method of assessment;
(b)
provision of a service.
Undue Hardship
Undue hardship is the test of reasonable accommodation. What constitutes undue hardship will
vary according to the unique circumstances of each situation. The following would likely
constitute undue hardship:
(a)
when accommodation alternatives would result in an essential course or program
requirement being unmet; or
(b)
when the accommodation would result in a risk to public safety or a substantial risk of
personal injury to a student; or
(c)
when financial cost is such that the operations of the university would be
fundamentally diminished, or a program or service would cease to exist due to the
financial burden of the accommodation.
Revised June 97
Reviewed October 1999
Revised June 2000
Revised May 2001
Revised January 2006
AUTHORITIES AND OFFICERS
I.
II.
III.
IV.
Approving Authority: Senate
Designated Executive Officer: Vice-President Academic and Provost
Procedural Authority: Senate
Procedural Officer: Associate Vice-President Student Affairs
5
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 20 of 36
PROCEDURES FOR ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION AND ACCESS FOR
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
Procedural Authority: Senate
Procedural Officer: Associate Vice-President Student Affairs
Parent Policy: Academic Accommodation and Access for Students
with Disabilities (AC1205)
1.00
Effective Date:
September 2011
Supersedes: New
Last Editorial Change:
PURPOSE
The purpose of these procedures is to assist in implementing the university’s Academic
Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities Policy (AC1205) for
undergraduate students.
DEFINITIONS
For the purpose of these procedures:
2.00
Definitions contained in the university’s Academic Accommodation and Access for
Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205), with the exception of the definition of
Student, apply to these procedures.
3.00
Support Person means an individual who provides support or advice to a Student
during an Academic Accommodation process under these procedures.
4.00
Student means a student who is registered as a candidate for a University of Victoria
degree, or in credit courses leading to a University of Victoria diploma or certificate.
5.00
SCOPE
These procedures apply to the Academic Accommodation of undergraduate Students.
These procedures do not apply to Students in non-credit programs in the Division of
Continuing Studies or to Graduate Students.
PROCEDURES
6.00
Confidentiality
The personal information of Students with a disability shall be managed and protected in
accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, and the
university’s Protection of Privacy (GV0235) and Records Management (IM7700) policies
and associated procedures.
6
CURRENT
7.00
8.00
Admissions
The university’s academic calendar and website contain information for Students with
Disabilities applying for admission to the university.
Admission under Special Access Category
If academic achievements have been significantly and adversely affected by health or
Disability, applicants may wish to apply for admission consideration under the Special
Access Category. More information is available at:
http://registrar.uvic.ca/undergrad/admissions/requirements/special.html
8.01
9.00
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 21 of 36
Special Access admission information for the Faculty of Law is available at:
http://www.law.uvic.ca/prospective/jd/special.php
Disclosure
Students are not required to declare a disability when applying for admission to the
university unless applying under the Special Access category referenced above. Students
who request Academic Accommodations or services from the Resource Centre for
Students with a Disability (RCSD) will need to provide appropriate documentation as set
out below.
Transitioning Students
10.00 Services and accommodations experienced at other educational sectors or institutions
(e.g., high school, college) may differ from what is provided at the university. The
university does not assume responsibility for identifying Students with Disabilities, or the
assessment or diagnosis of a Disability.
RCSD
Registration with the RCSD
11.00 Students are advised to register with the RCSD as early as possible to avoid a delay in
service. Newly admitted Students should contact the RCSD and register upon admission.
Requesting Accommodation
12.00 Students requesting Academic Accommodation will meet with an RCSD advisor to
request Accommodations.
Deadlines
13.00 The RCSD has deadlines for requesting exam accommodations and services for Students
as follows:
(a) Registering with the RCSD
The deadline for requesting fall semester Accommodation (via a memo requesting
that the RCSD contact the Student’s instructors) is October 31st. The deadline for
requesting winter semester Accommodation (via a memo requesting that the RCSD
contact the Student’s instructors) is February 28th.
7
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 22 of 36
(b) Midterms
All mid-term exam forms must be returned to the RCSD at least two (2) weeks prior
to the scheduled date of the exam.
(c) Final Exams
The deadline for submitting a final exam form for December finals is two weeks prior
to the first day of the final exam period in December. The deadline for submitting a
final exam form for April finals is two weeks prior to the first day of the final exam
period in April.
(d) Summer Courses
Given the condensed nature of summer course offerings, Students registered in
summer courses should request Academic Accommodations as soon as possible.
Change in Disability Status
14.00 Students who have recent diagnoses or require a change in their Academic
Accommodations may still request Accommodations after the deadlines stated above.
Documentation of Disability
15.00 The university will review documentation to determine appropriate Academic
Accommodation. For the purpose of Academic Accommodation, the documentation of
Disability:
(a) must confirm a rationale for reasonable Academic Accommodations;
(b) must be from professionals with appropriate credentials (see Appendix 3); and
(c) should include the:
 diagnosing professional’s name, title, phone number, address, official stamp or
letterhead and signature;
 date of the assessment;
 statement of the nature of the disability including the impact of medication;
 explanation of the functional impact of the Disability on the pursuit of a postsecondary education; and
 recommendations for Academic Accommodation that will assist in the pursuit of a
post-secondary education, specifically linking the recommended Accommodation
to the impact of the Disability.
15.01 The university does not cover costs related to medical documentation.
15.02 A diagnosis of Disability alone does not guarantee Academic Accommodations.
Note: Appendix 3 contains additional guidance on documentation.
8
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 23 of 36
Services Provided by the RCSD
16.00 After a Student has submitted appropriate documentation and met with the RCSD, the
RCSD will:
(a) review the documentation of Disability;
(b) determine eligibility for Academic Accommodation and services on the basis of
documentation and assist in implementing these Accommodations when necessary
by providing, where appropriate, an initial written recommendation;
(c) explain the operational procedures of the RCSD (see Appendix 1 and Appendix 2);
(d) provide assistance in obtaining grants and bursaries;
(e) provide referrals to other resources on campus; and
(f) with sufficient notice, coordinate sign language interpreting in classrooms and
provide accessible course information.
Determining Essential Course and Program Requirements
17.00 Academic units are responsible for identifying and evaluating program requirements it
considers essential including skills, knowledge, and attitudes. Course objectives and
learning outcomes should be included in this process. Evaluation for a subsequent
purpose such as those of a licensing body or for potential workplace requirements
should not be considered. The focus must be on meeting the requirements of a specific
course or university program.
Accessibility Statement for Course Syllabus
18.00 It is recommended that instructors include a statement in their syllabus indicating their
willingness to assist in the provision of Academic Accommodations and informing the
Student of the role of the RCSD and the university’s responsibility to provide necessary
Academic Accommodation. The current statement is available through the Learning and
Teaching Centre and the RCSD.
Accommodation Programs and Services
19.00 Course-based Academic Accommodations may include, but are not limited to:
(a) sign language interpreting or captioning;
(b) assignment substitution (e.g., substituting an oral for a written report);
(c) overheads, or note taking assistance;
(d) copies of instructor’s notes (as appropriate);
(e) additional time to complete in-class assignments;
(f) transcriptions of course material to alternate formats;
(g) permission to audio record lectures;
(h) the use of FM systems;
(i) wheelchair accessible tables and computer workstations; and/or
(j) preferred seating.
20.00 Exam-based Academic Accommodations may include, but are not limited to:
(a) additional time to complete exams;
(b) provision of a distraction-reduced environment;
(c) supervised rest breaks;
(d) exams in e-text format;
(e) exam questions read aloud with computer software;
9
CURRENT
(f)
(g)
(h)
(i)
(j)
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 24 of 36
voice recognition software;
large print exams or magnification with CCTV;
use of a word processor, spell check, or grammar check;
calculator and/or formula sheet; and/or
visual (sign) language interpreting.
Additional Registration Information
Registration for Accommodations that Require Additional Time to Implement
21.00 Examples of Academic Accommodations that require advanced planning and early
course registration include but are not limited to:
(a) Texts and course packs in alternative formats;
(b) Sign language interpreting or captioning;
(c) Substantial modifications to classroom furniture; and
(d) Lab work requiring an assistant or adaptation of the schedule.
If the RCSD determines eligibility for early registration, an RCSD advisor will notify
Undergraduate Records who will assign the earliest registration date and time specific to
the Student’s year of study and e-mail this information to the Student. For Faculty of
Law Students, the RCSD advisor will notify the Faculty of Law directly for early
registration purposes.
22.00 Requests for early registration, alternative texts or material, or visual language
interpreting should be made by the Student as soon as the Student knows the courses
that he or she will be enrolled in. While some texts and course materials may already
be available in the required format, it may take several weeks for delivery.
Requests for Reduced Course Loads
23.00 Students with Disabilities who have reason to take a reduced course load may request
approval from their respective faculty or academic departments. Student loans,
scholarships, work-study and on-campus housing requiring full-time registration may
also be accessed by a Student who is studying part-time for reasons of Disability.
Students must be registered in a minimum 40% course load.
Academic Advising
24.00 Academic Advisors are available in each faculty for the purpose of assisting decisions
about academic programs and courses. Contact information for the advising centres on
campus can be found at: http://registrar.uvic.ca/summer/adreg/advising.html.
Way-finding on Campus
25.00 Students with visual impairments who require assistance with finding buildings or
classrooms should make that request to the RCSD at least two weeks in advance of
requiring that assistance. If mobility training is required, Students will be directed to
contact the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) for more extensive
navigational training.
Visual Language Interpreting
25.01 Interpreters and captionists are contracted to work with Students on the basis of
the course timetable provided to the RCSD.
10
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 25 of 36
25.02 Interpreters are hired on a contract basis based on experience, education,
suitability and availability.
Student Participation in the Academic Accommodation Process
26.00 Students must participate in the process of developing an Academic Accommodation
plan. This includes working with instructors, Chairs, Directors, Deans and faculties to
develop Academic Accommodations that are appropriate to the requirements of the
course and utilizing available resources and support services provided by the university.
The provision of an Academic Accommodation provides Students with a Disability an
alternative means of meeting essential course or program requirements. Fulfilling
essential course or program requirements remain the Student’s responsibility.
Reaching Academic Accommodation
27.00 An instructor may only deny an Academic Accommodation where the instructor believes
that it will constitute Undue Hardship as defined in the university Academic
Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205).
28.00 An instructor or Student who disagrees with the RCSD’s initial Academic Accommodation
recommendation or other proposed Academic Accommodations should contact the RCSD
advisor/manager to initially discuss the issue.
28.01 Where necessary, further consultation may also occur with:
(a) the pertinent department Chair, Director or Dean (or designate); and
(b) the medical professional who recommended the Academic Accommodation in
the original documentation.
29.00 Where further resolution is required, or where there are issues or difficulties surrounding
the implementation of an Academic Accommodation that have not been resolved
informally, the Student, Instructor, Chair or Director may submit a request to the
Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or designate) for formal review.
29.01 The purpose of the formal review is to make recommendations for implementing
appropriate actions to the pertinent Dean (or designate) in a timely manner.
30.00 The formal review request should include:
(a) the rationale for the review;
(b) documentation in support of the request; and
(c) the requester’s preferred outcome.
30.01 Prior to the formal review, the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs may
request documentation from the instructor(s) outlining the:
(a) learning outcomes and Essential Requirements for the course or program;
and
(b) issue(s) or difficulties surrounding the implementation of the Academic
Accommodation.
11
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 26 of 36
31.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs shall normally conduct the formal review
within five (5) university business days of receiving the review request.
32.00 The formal review shall include consultation with the individuals involved in the
Academic Accommodation and others who can provide specific expertise in resolving the
implementation of appropriate Academic Accommodations.
32.01 Based on the nature of the Academic Accommodation, the Associate VicePresident Student Affairs shall either:
(a) facilitate a meeting with necessary individuals including but not limited to:
 the Student and his or her Support Person;
 the instructor;
 the Chair, director or Dean (or designate);
 an individual(s) with expertise in the specific area of Accommodation(s);
 an Associate Vice-President in the Vice-President Academic and Provost’s
office; and
 the Director of Equity and Human Rights.
(b) individually consult necessary individuals such as those provided in (a) above
in instances where there may be confidentiality concerns or other difficulties
in completing the review in a timely manner.
32.02 Prior to taking any action under 32.01, the Associate Vice-President Student
Affairs (or designate) shall consult the Student regarding the review process and
any potential confidentiality issues or concerns relating to the individuals that will
be consulted during the formal review.
32.03 Individuals involved in the Academic Accommodation may submit supporting
materials to the Associate Vice-President Student Affairs for consideration during
the formal review.
33.00 The Associate Vice-President Student Affairs (or designate) will review all relevant
documentation and submissions. Upon completion of the formal review, the Associate
Vice-President Student Affairs will make a recommendation to the pertinent Dean (or
designate) on an appropriate Academic Accommodation on the basis of the:
(a)
(b)
(c)
consultation results;
Student’s current functional limitations; and
the documented expected learning outcomes of the course or program.
34.00 The Dean (or designate) will review and determine whether to implement the
recommendation(s). The Dean shall notify the instructor and Student in writing of the
determination within two (2) university business days of receiving the recommendation.
The notification shall include the rationale for the decision and any alternate resolution
as applicable.
35.00 Where the Student is unsatisfied with the outcome of the review or with the Dean’s
decision, the Student may appeal to the Senate Committee on Appeals in accordance
12
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 27 of 36
with its Terms of Reference and Procedural Guidelines
http://www.uvic.ca/universitysecretary/senate/committees/appeals.php
35.01 The Senate Committee on Appeals decision is final within the university.
36.00 To assist Students with their coursework when a formal review or appeal is pending, the
RCSD and the instructor(s) shall assess the Academic Accommodation plan to determine
what aspects of the plan, if any, can be immediately implemented on an interim basis
pending the completion of the review or appeal.
Academic Concessions
37.00 Academic concessions are available to Students when medical or other issues are so
severe as to:
(a)
prevent the Student from completing the courses or examinations listed; or
(b)
justify some academic concession as specified by a physician, registered
psychologist or counsellor.
37.01 A Student wishing to initiate an academic concession request shall refer to
information provided by the Registrar:
http://registrar.uvic.ca/undergrad/records/documents/def.html
37.02 A Student with extenuating circumstances may appeal in writing with supporting
documentation to the Fee Reduction Appeals Committee.
http://registrar.uvic.ca/undergrad/records/documents/frac.html
Admission Appeals to the Senate Committee on Admissions, Re-Registration
and Transfer
38.00 Applicants with Disabilities who are denied admission to the university who can prove
extenuating circumstances or provide information that was not presented initially may
forward a written request for a review of their application to the Senate Committee on
Admission, Re-registration and Transfer (SCART). The request should include any
additional information combined with any supporting documents from persons familiar
with the applicant's abilities and circumstances. SCART will consider the documentation
presented and will make a decision on the application, subject to review by the Senate
Committee on Appeals on the grounds of specific procedural error.
Work Term Placements
39.00 Students should notify the Cooperative Education Program and Career Services office in
advance of a work term placement if a specific Accommodation is required for the work
placement. The Cooperative Education Program and Career Services office will work in
consultation with the employer and the faculty, where appropriate, to support suitable
Accommodations.
40.00 Students should notify their faculty in advance of their practicum if a specific
Accommodation is required related to the practicum. The faculty will work with the
employer as appropriate to support suitable Accommodations in the practicum.
Library Assistance
13
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 28 of 36
41.00 Students are advised to contact the loan desk in any of the university’s libraries for
assistance with library related services. Additional information on the Libraries’ services
for Students with a disability is available at
http://library.uvic.ca/site/dept/access/sn.html.
RELATED DOCUMENTS
Academic Accommodation and Access for Students with Disabilities policy (AC1205)
Protection of Privacy policy (GV0235)
Records Management policy (IM7700)
Appendix 1- Notification of Instructors by the RCSD
Appendix 2 - Accommodated Exam Procedure at the RCSD
Appendix 3 - Documentation of Disability
Appendix 4 - Assistive Technology
Appendix 5 - Learning Assistance Services
Appendix 6 - Transportation
14
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 29 of 36
Appendix 1
Notification of Instructors by the RCSD
After registering with the RCSD, the Student completes and
submits a request for “memos to instructors” form to the
RCSD front desk at the beginning of the term.
The RCSD advisor writes a memo to the instructor(s)
named on the form and sends it through the intercampus
mail. This takes approximately 4 days.
The memo notifies the instructor(s) that a student is
registered with the RCSD and requires specific in-class
and/or exam accommodations.
Academic Accommodation memos are released to the individuals named in writing on
the request form. The memo’s collection, protection, retention and disclosure is
governed by provisions of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and
the university’s Protection of Privacy policy (GV0235) and associated procedures.
If the check box at the bottom of the request form indicates the Student would like a
copy, one is left in the Student pickup box at the RCSD.
15
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 30 of 36
Appendix 2
Accommodated Exam Procedure at the RCSD
Students must submit a completed exam arrangement form to the RCSD for each exam
to be written in the RCSD testing centre. This must be done each semester, by the
stated deadline (note: deadlines are provided on the RCSD website, and by hand-out
and email notification).
If exam arrangements are included as an Academic Accommodation on
the memo to instructors requested (steps 1&2 above), the Student takes
an Exam Arrangement Form to the instructor(s) to fill out for each exam.
This should be done as early in the term as possible (i.e. the second
week of class for midterms and quizzes, and when finals dates are
announced).
Ordinarily, one form for each exam is needed, but some instructors may
include multiple exam dates on a single form.
The Student will return completed Exam Arrangement Forms to the RCSD
front desk two weeks prior to mid-terms and tests, and by the stated date
for Final Exam arrangements.
The exam is scheduled by the exam coordinator based on the details of
the completed Exam Arrangement Form and the availability of invigilation
and exam writing space.
Students should then pick up the pink copy of the processed Exam
Arrangement form, which includes instructions for when and where the
exam is to be written.
There is a student pickup box at the RCSD where these forms are left
when completed. The RCSD does not contact or remind Students about
exam arrangements.
16
CURRENT
Exams



SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 31 of 36
locations include the following:
RCSD main office, Campus Services Building
S-Hut Exam Centre
Classrooms during final exams
Exams take place during the following times:
8am to 10pm Monday to Friday
8am to 10pm Monday to Saturday during final exams (December and April)

Instructors can choose to accommodate within their departments.

Only materials and devices that are listed by instructors on exam arrangement forms
may be brought into the testing room.

Students who are unable to complete exams due to illness or other disruptions must
provide evidence from Health Services or other medical professionals to their instructors.

Students who have questions while writing in the RCSD may contact their instructors. In
cases where it is not possible to contact the instructor, the Student may write
question(s) on the exam paper and continue to complete the exam.

Breaks may be taken in cases where this is indicated in the documentation of disability
as an appropriate accommodation and an advisor at the RCSD has approved it.

A staff member of the RCSD will return exams the next day to the department,
requesting a signature.
17
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 32 of 36
Appendix 3
Documentation of Disability
(Adapted from AHEAD website November, 2009)
1. The credentials of the evaluator(s)
Good documentation is provided by a licensed or otherwise properly credentialed health
professional that has undergone appropriate and comprehensive training, has relevant
experience, and has no personal relationship with the individual being evaluated. A good
match between the credentials of the individual making the diagnosis and the condition
being reported is expected (e.g., an orthopedic limitation might be documented by a
physician, but not a licensed psychologist). The health care professional making the
diagnosis should be licensed with a regulatory body within the jurisdiction in which they
practice.
2. A diagnostic statement identifying the disability
Good documentation includes a diagnostic statement that describes how the condition
was diagnosed, provides information on the functional impact, and details the typical
progression or prognosis of the condition. A DSM-IV diagnosis, with a full clinical
description will convey the necessary information.
3. A description of the diagnostic methodology used
Good documentation includes a description of the diagnostic criteria, evaluation
methods, procedures, tests and dates of administration, as well as a clinical narrative,
observation, and specific results. Where appropriate to the nature of the disability,
having both summary data and specific test scores (with the norming population
identified) within the report is important.
Diagnostic methods that are congruent with the particular disability and current
professional practices in the field are recommended. Methods may include formal
instruments, medical examinations, structured interview protocols, performance
observations and unstructured interviews. If results from informal, non-standardized or
less common methods of evaluation are reported, an explanation of their role and
significance in the diagnostic process will strengthen their value in providing useful
information.
4. A description of the current functional limitations
Information on how the disabling condition(s) currently impacts the individual provides
useful information for both establishing a disability and identifying possible
accommodations. A combination of the results of formal evaluation procedures, clinical
narrative, and the individual’s self report is the most comprehensive approach to fully
documenting impact. Good documentation is thorough enough to demonstrate whether
and how a major life activity is substantially limited by providing a clear sense of the
severity, frequency and pervasiveness of the condition(s).
Changing conditions and/or changes in how the condition impacts the individual brought
on by growth and development may warrant more frequent updates in order to provide
an accurate picture.
18
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 33 of 36
5. A description of the expected progression or stability of the disability
It is helpful when documentation provides information on expected changes in the
functional impact of the disability over time and context. Information on the cyclical or
episodic nature of the disability and known or suspected environmental triggers to
episodes provides opportunities to anticipate and plan for varying functional impacts. If
the condition is not stable, information on interventions (including the individual’s own
strategies) for exacerbations and recommended timelines for re-evaluation are most
helpful.
6. A description of current and past accommodations, services and/or
medications
The most comprehensive documentation will include a description of both current and
past medications, auxiliary aids, assistive devices, support services, and
accommodations, including their effectiveness in ameliorating functional impacts of the
disability. A discussion of any significant side effects from current medications or
services that may impact physical, perceptual, behavioral or cognitive performance is
helpful when included in the report. While accommodations provided in another setting
are not binding on the University of Victoria, they may provide insight in making current
decisions.
7. Recommendations for accommodations, adaptive devices, assistive services,
compensatory strategies, and/or collateral support services
Recommendations from professionals with a history of working with the individual
provide valuable information for review and the planning process. It is most helpful
when recommended accommodations and strategies are logically related to functional
limitations; if connections are not obvious, a clear explanation of their relationship can
be useful in decision-making. While the RCSD has no obligation to provide or adopt
recommendations made by outside entities, those that are congruent with the programs
offered may be appropriate. When recommendations go beyond equitable and inclusive
services, they may still be useful in suggesting alternative accommodations and/or
services.
19
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 34 of 36
Appendix 4
Assistive Technology
Three dedicated assistive technology labs are maintained on campus by the RCSD. Keys for
these labs for Students registered with the RCSD can be requested at the RCSD.
The RCSD provides computers with assistive software to Students for the purpose of completing
exams (in RCSD exam centres). Eligibility to use such devices in exams is determined when
Students register for services and accommodations at the RCSD.
The RCSD maintains a small loan bank of assistive technology that can be loaned to Students
registered with the RCSD on a short-term basis. Such equipment is usually loaned to Students
whose equipment is being repaired at critical points in a semester.
The RCSD encourages Students to apply for grants that make such technology available to
eligible Students at no cost.
The RCSD can provide individual technology consultation for you if you are a Student with a
disability currently enrolled at the University of Victoria. Consultation involves:
 identifying areas in which technology may support a Student’s educational goals;
 providing information and demonstrations of technology-based solutions; and
 referral to other agencies as necessary
Training can be provided to Students wishing to learn to use an assistive software application
through the RCSD.
20
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 35 of 36
Appendix 5
Learning Assistance Services
There is a variety of learning assistance services available at the RCSD. There are fees
associated with each type of assistance.
The online Tutor Registry through university Career Services provides a list of current Students
who are willing to tutor a variety of subjects. It is available at:
http://www.careerservices.uvic.ca/tutor/
Some departments and instructors keep a list of tutors with expertise relevant to specific
courses of study. Students should contact departmental offices for further information.
Students eligible for a Canada Study Grant can apply through the grant application at the RCSD
to request funding for tutoring or learning strategists. Students who are not eligible for this
funding pay for the tutoring privately.
The Peer Learning Strategists Program through the RCSD helps eligible Students with learning
disabilities to develop skills and strategies that will address their learning needs and focus on
their strengths.
21
CURRENT
SEN-JAN 10/14-10
Page 36 of 36
Appendix 6
Transportation
UPass (Bus Pass for Students)
http://www.uvss.uvic.ca/sustainability/upass.html
The UPass is a transportation alternative that allows all Students to use the Victoria Regional
Transit System at a significantly reduced rate. All Students registered at the University of
Victoria and taking at least one course are eligible to receive a U-Pass.
Students may have the UPass fees dropped by discussing with an advisor at the RCSD. For
example, legally blind Students who have a CNIB NID card which covers transit fare may
request to have the UPass fees dismissed.
Legally Blind Passengers
http://www.cnib.ca/community/bc-yukon/2005-transit-pass.htm
A CNIB NID is accepted as fare on all BC Transit and TransLink conventional transit systems.
Taxi Saver
http://www.bctransit.com/regions/vic/accessible/taxi_saver.cfm
Students required a handyPASS to use this program. The handyPASS is a picture identification
that allows Students to purchase TaxiSaver coupons. The pass also allows your attendant to
travel free on the regular bus. handyPASS is available only to permanent handyDART users in
the Victoria region.
handyDART
http://www.bctransit.com/regions/vic/accessible/handydart.cfm
handyDART is a door-to-door shared-ride custom transportation service. This service is for
people who are unable to use the regular transit service some or all of the time due to mobility
issues associated with a permanent or temporary physical or cognitive disability. Students must
be registered with handyDART to use the service.
22
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement