lien0102annualreport

lien0102annualreport
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
Contents
01. INTRODUCTION
02. MESSAGE FROM MR DERMOT AHERN TD
2
Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources
4
03. THE LARGE INDUSTRY ENERGY NETWORK
7
04. MEMBERSHIP
8
05. NETWORKING & EVENTS
10
06. AWARDS & RECOGNITION
15
COMPANY BY COMPANY REPORTS
17
07. RESULTS & TARGETS 1995 TO 2001–02
18
08. ANALYSIS OF OVERALL RESULTS FOR 2001–02
22
09. MEMBERS’ STATEMENTS
26
10. MEMBER LISTING
62
11. USEFUL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
63
12. THE LARGE INDUSTRY ENERGY NETWORK OBJECTIVES
64
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
3
Fiona Murray
Project Manager, Large Industry Energy Network, Sustainable Energy Ireland
Reflecting its interactive nature and anticipated developments in policies and measures such
as negotiated agreements, emissions trading and IPPC licensing, the Large Industry Energy
Network became the new name in 2002 for the programme previously known as the
Annual Self Audit and Statement of Energy Accounts Scheme. Although its name and logo
have changed, its aim remains as before: to establish and support a core of major players in
Irish industry dedicated to reducing their energy intensity. The 78 member companies committed to this goal report on their 2001 results in this, the fifth Annual Report of its kind.
Continuing the success of previous years, the Network
setting realistic targets. Sharing information and replicating
plays a vital role in helping industry to put in place the struc-
best practice continue to be major benefits of the Large
tures and competencies necessary for developing and
Industry Energy Network (LIEN), which will be developed
implementing comprehensive energy saving plans. This is
further in the future.
important not only at an organisational level, but also in the
context of national efforts to reduce energy use and related
emissions. The need to work towards best international
practice on energy performance is highlighted in the Irish
National Climate Change Strategy, which also provides the
backdrop to Sustainable Energy Ireland’s pilot project on
negotiated energy agreements currently under way, with the
active participation of several members of this network.
With the Sustainable Energy Act becoming law in 2002,
Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI) has emerged as the new
national authority responsible for promoting sustainable
energy throughout all sectors of the economy. This has
resulted in a wider remit for SEI, and a number of staff
changes including those directly involved with the Large
Industry Energy Network. We will continue to assess members’ needs to ensure that the Network develops in
Increases in the price of energy have continued to play a
response to their requirements, against the backdrop of a
major role in influencing members’ decisions on implement-
changing business market. The Large Industry Energy
ing energy related projects. Another recurring theme
Network will remain an important resource for helping mem-
reported by members is the intrinsic difficulty of reporting
bers to remain competitive in the marketplace. The new,
a meaningful energy performance indicator (EPI) when
stronger identity of the Large Industry Energy Network will
faced with a wide and ever changing product mix. Some
serve to promote the energy management efforts of its ded-
sites manufacture hundreds of different products, which
icated members, while assisting them to make informed
makes a comparison with single commodity producers
decisions in energy related areas.
complex. The introduction of new, high added value products also remains an issue, as these often require more
energy intensive processes. For these reasons it is beneficial to draw from the experience of other companies in
related industries, and the Large Industry Energy Network
provides an opportunity for shared approaches to be
adopted for reporting energy performance progress and
Fiona Murray
Project Manager, Large Industry Energy Network
Sustainable Energy Ireland
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
4
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
02. MESSAGE FROM MR DERMOT AHERN TD
5
Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources
Mr Dermot Ahern, TD
Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources
The past year has seen important developments in the Irish energy infrastructure.
Sustainable Energy Ireland, established in 2002 as an independent energy authority, will
play a key role in the years ahead, both in promoting sustainability and in helping to ensure
that Ireland meets its international obligations to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The
government remains firmly committed to ensuring that we meet these obligations, through
the long term programme of actions described in the National Climate Change Strategy.
The ongoing development of the Large Industry Energy
overall reduction during 2001 of 285 GWh of energy con-
Network – represented in the change in its identity which
sumption, and a consequent reduction in emissions
also took place earlier in 2002 – is evidence of the partner-
amounting to 120,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide.
ship between government and industry in working to reduce
energy consumption and energy related emissions.
Progress in this area is important both at a national level and
at the level of the individual enterprise. The partnership
approach embodied in the Large Industry Energy Network
represents the best means of ensuring that energy and
I welcome the publication of this report and congratulate the
members of the Large Industry Energy Network and
Sustainable Energy Ireland for their dedication in maintaining a focus on reducing energy consumption and working
towards best international practice in this field.
emissions reduction objectives are achieved whilst protecting and indeed enhancing our industrial competitiveness.
This Annual Report reflects the changing global trading conditions within which business operated during 2001. In such
an environment, it requires dedicated professionals to maintain an adequate focus on energy efficiency, and it is here
that the Large Industry Energy Network offers real support
to its members. As reported here, their efforts resulted in an
Mr Dermot Ahern, TD
Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
6
Pictured above [from left to right] : David Taylor, Chief Executive, Sustainable Energy Ireland; Dermot Ahern TD, Minister for Communications,
Marine and Natural Resources; Frank Convery, Chairman, Sustainable Energy Ireland.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
7
3
2
4
1
1,4. Energy management workshop at Hewlett-Packard; 2. New brand for the Large Industry Energy Network introduced; 3. LIEN member and
negotiated agreement pilot participant, Aughinish Alumina.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
03. THE LARGE INDUSTRY ENERGY NETWORK
8
2002 has been a year of name changes in the energy arena. The activities of the Irish
Energy Centre have been consolidated and broadened under the Sustainable Energy
Authority of Ireland. The new authority, which was established as a statutory body in May
2002, now operates under the title Sustainable Energy Ireland.
There have also been changes to the government depart-
energy efficiency and environmental obligations across indus-
ment with responsibility for sustainable energy. Previously
try in an equitable way. In the past year, Sustainable Energy
the Department of Public Enterprise, it is now known as the
Ireland has initiated a pilot project on negotiated energy agree-
Department of Communications, Marine and Natural
ments – indeed, a number of LIEN member companies are
Resources, reflecting the transfer of transport into a sepa-
participating in this important project.
rate department.
Against this background, Sustainable Energy Ireland
Driven by an independent agenda, but coinciding with these
believes that the Large Industry Energy Network will have a
changes, the programme at the heart of this report has also
distinct but equally vital part to play in promoting environ-
been re-branded. The Large Industry Energy Network is
mentally responsible and economically competitive energy
the new name for what was formerly known as the Annual
use by Irish industry.
Self Audit and Statement of Energy Accounts Scheme.
The types of negotiated agreements that have been
The guiding principles of the scheme remain unchanged.
adopted internationally are usually binding, and in some
Its key objectives remained focused on the development of a
cases penalties apply if obligations are not met.
core of major players within Irish industry who are publicly
Furthermore, not all agreement structures feature a sup-
and proactively committed to an ongoing voluntary pro-
portive element to help companies meet their target. The
gramme of energy and emissions reduction. Likewise, the
voluntary and supportive nature of the Large Industry
Network will continue to support members in auditing energy
Energy Network helps to encourage openness and remove
use on an annual basis, setting targets for improving per-
barriers to information sharing and networking among com-
formance and identifying strategies to achieve those targets.
panies. It gives individual members the flexibility and inde-
The new brand, however, captures the scheme’s underlying philosophy more accurately and concisely, reflecting the
evolution of the programme since its establishment as a
pendence to plan and choose the energy-saving technologies and practices that they themselves can implement
most conveniently and cost-effectively.
pilot scheme with 10 members back in 1995. Crucially, it
The Large Industry Energy Network’s members are its cen-
highlights the increasing emphasis on the supportive infor-
tral core, and the scheme’s new identity is intended to reflect
mation sharing and networking elements of the programme,
that ethos above all. Members are encouraged to use the
which are designed to help members learn together and
new logo on their company stationery, website and internal
from each other.
communication documents, and more than ever to make
The new name and logo also give the programme an identity
distinct from negotiated agreements, which are now emerging
throughout Europe as an important tool for sharing national
participation in the scheme part of their identity as forwardlooking companies committed to being leaders in sustainable energy use.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
04. MEMBERSHIP
9
The Large Industry Energy Network’s strength is in its members: the knowledge and
experience, commitment and enthusiasm they bring, and their willingness to ask questions
and share information.
Seventy-eight industrial facilities now participate in the
Their participation, together with that of Merck Sharp &
Network, capturing more than 40 per cent of total energy
Dohme and Analog Devices, builds on the strong clusters of
spend by Irish industry. Over the programme’s lifetime,
companies emerging within the scheme in the pharma-
membership has matured to the degree that it reflects the
chem, food and drink, and electronics sectors.
broad spread of Irish industry, from multinationals to indigenous players and from sectors as diverse as textiles and air
transport to food and drink and healthcare.
However, all participants have two things in common. First,
all are high energy users, either by virtue of the sheer size of
their operations or by the energy intensive nature of their
processing activities. To participate, a facility must have an
energy bill of at least €0.6 million per year. In reality, many
members’ annual energy-spend is much higher.
Second, all members are committed to pursuing energy
efficiency as a corporate objective, and to publicly communicating their annual targets and performances in a
transparent manner.
Sustainable Energy Ireland was also delighted to welcome
Masonite as the first representative of the wood processing
industry – an area set to increase in importance as accelerated
investments in forestry come to fruition over the coming years.
Membership losses
Due to the difficult trading climate over the past year and the
continued transformation of the Irish economy from heavy
processing towards knowledge-based industries, three
LIEN members unfortunately suffered company closures:
Irish Glass Bottle, Dublin, and Irish Ispat, Cork, are no
longer trading, and, as a consequence, will not report
on performance in this year’s report.
Irish Fertilizer Industries has also ceased operation, but
New members
The Network’s membership has grown steadily over the past
decade. During the last 12 months, six new members
signed up to the programme:
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals’ Little Island facility in Cork
GlaxoSmithKline’s Dungarvan plant in Waterford
Cadbury Ireland’s facility in Coolock, Dublin
Merck Sharpe & Dohme’s Ballydine plant in Tipperary
The Limerick-based electronics facility Analog Devices BV
Masonite’s wood processing facility in Co. Leitrim
The Cadbury, Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline facilities join other
sites in their corporate groups already participating in the
reports on performance for 2001.
Participation in the Large Industry Energy Network is above
and beyond members’ legislative requirements and, as a
voluntary initiative, members derive benefits only if they are
genuinely committed to energy efficiency and open auditing
and reporting of results.
During the past year, Green Isle Foods became the first
member to leave the Network. Also during the 12 months,
the Charleville food ingredients facility in Cork, formerly run
by Golden Vale but now owned by the Kerry Group, opted
out of the Network. Charleville had been an active member,
having invested in combined heat and power, and having
improved its energy performance index by 7 per cent since
joining the scheme in 1996.
Network, reflecting these members’ positive experiences.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
10
Ownership and name changes
In all three cases, the companies have committed to remain-
Three members have had changes in ownership during
ing within the Network.
2002:
Also during the year, Dawn Meats split into two divisions:
The Whitegate Refinery in Bantry, Co. Cork, previously
Dawn Meats and Western Proteins, with each now report-
owned by Irish Refining was sold to the US oil company
ing energy performance separately. Meanwhile, other mem-
Tosco in 2001 and now forms part of Texas headquar-
bers have also undergone changes in trading names: the
tered ConocoPhillips, as a result of a merger between
new name for De Beers Industrial Diamonds Division is
Phillips and Conoco.
Element Six; the international food company Heinz has been
The Bailieboro infant nutrition production facility, formerly
owned by Golden Vale, has now been bought by
Lakeland Dairies.
re-named HJ Heinz; the Great Northern Brewery is now
known as Dundalk Brewery; and Guinness St James’s Gate
is now refered to as Diageo St James’s Gate.
The former Nestlé plant at Tallaght, Dublin has been
sold to a management buy-in and now trades as
Fruitfield Foods Ltd.
Industry Sectoral Representation within LIEN (2001)
Membership is spread across 13 different sectors, with major clusters now emerging in the pharmachem and healthcare, food and drink, electronics and metal, minerals and engineering sectors, mirroring the importance of these
industries to Ireland’s economy.
Pharm/Chemicals
24
Oil/Gas
2
Food/Drink
21
Textiles
2
Metal/Engineering
6
Mining
2
Non-metallic Minerals
5
Air Transport
1
Healthcare
4
Plastics
1
Electronics
6
Wood/Timber
1
Print/Paper
3
Total
78
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
05. NETWORKING & EVENTS
11
The Large Industry Energy Network is founded on two complementary pillars: annual
auditing of energy use, targets and plans for continuous improvement are supported by
networking and information sharing between energy managers. The largest section of this
report is dedicated to members’ statements, their energy performance indices from
previous audits and their targets for future performance. But the supporting networking and
information sharing elements play at least as important a role in promoting energy
efficiency among members, as reflected in the programme’s new name.
Workshops
In March 2002, Hewlett-Packard in Leixlip hosted a
Workshops are the lifeblood of the Large Industry Energy
workshop focusing on re-invigorating energy manage-
Network, providing a platform for Sustainable Energy Ireland
ment within a company. Pat Kirwin and Alan Ryan, both
to act as a facilitator in establishing an environment for mem-
from HP, took attendees through operations at the
bers to learn from invited speakers and from other energy
Kildare plant and explained how they had succeeded
managers. This open environment of information sharing is
in the difficult task of sustaining momentum for energy
enhanced by the fact that workshops are typically hosted by
management over time. Participants also heard from
a member of the Network, enabling participants to hear
Jonathan Pugsley of Masonite, Martin Corkery of Pfizer,
from their peers how they translate energy efficiency theory
Loughbeg, and Paul Miller of Bristol-Myers Squibb
into practice – what does and does not work, what adapta-
about their experiences in establishing and running
tions or innovations may be required, where the problems
energy management teams.
and challenges lie and how they can be anticipated and surmounted.
In April, SEI responded to members’ requests for information about the role of renewable energy sources in
In November 2001, a workshop aimed at informing
industry. At a workshop in Kilkenny, attendees heard
members about technology energy auditing and imple-
from international experts about the opportunities for
mentation was hosted by Boston Scientific in Galway,
using wind power, heat pumps, solar power and wood
and included a site tour of the facility. The event focused
fuel in industrial facilities. Again, the event was hosted by
on ‘model’ audits in the key technology areas, carried out
a LIEN member – in this case St Francis Abbey Brewery
at the facilities of LIEN members Dairygold, Lakeland
– and the day concluded with chief engineer Denis
Dairies, Carbery Milk Products, Wyeth Medica Ireland,
Barry taking participants on a site tour of the brewery.
and Hewlett-Packard, with support from Sustainable
Energy Ireland. Attendees heard how the audits can be
Sustainable Energy Ireland events
carried out on the targeted technology areas of refrig-
Large Industry Energy Network members are always wel-
eration, compressed air and clean-rooms, taking into
come to attend events not run specifically for the LIEN, but
account existing plant design, current system operation,
with a relevance to energy management in industry. A num-
and performance; and how the audits had been used
ber of such events involved strong participation by mem-
to identify energy efficiency opportunities for improving
bers during the past year.
plant performance.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
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3
4
1
2
5
1,4,5. Renewable Energy workshop at St Francis Abbey Brewery; 2. Energy Auditing workshop at Boston Scientific; 3. Launch of 2000:2001 Annual Report.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
13
Sustainable Energy Ireland’s programmes for energy
power in Ireland in the light of market liberalisation, tech-
efficiency in boiler operations are of strong interest to
nology advances, fuel sources, extension of the gas grid,
many LIEN members. A Boiler Study Tour, which took
and financial incentives. Moreover, it identifies a number of
place in March 2002, focused on best practice in boiler
ways to stimulate the CHP market, such as subsidies, regu-
and combined heat and power operations, and included
lation or legislative changes.
site visits to LIEN members Hewlett-Packard in Kildare,
and Tyco Healthcare and the Guinness Brewery, both
Pilot programmes
in Dublin.
Ireland’s National Climate Change Strategy, published in
In April 2002, an energy awareness training course for
industry was held in Shannon to which LIEN members
were invited. The course took a ‘back-to-basics’
approach to energy management. The aim was to help
participants gain a better understanding of where
energy is used, and to help in identifying areas where
operating costs can be reduced using easy-to-apply
October 2000, identified an important role for negotiated
energy agreements, alongside fiscal measures and appropriate supports, in meeting targets in the industrial and commercial sectors. It envisaged that development of these
agreements would commence in 2002, as part of a rolling
programme to be fully implemented as soon as possible
after 2005.
measures. Participants were reminded of no- and low-
Within the past year, SEI has initiated a pilot project on nego-
cost energy efficiency measures and the potential sav-
tiated energy agreements, and although participation was
ings from electricity tariff analysis.
not restricted to Large Industry Energy Network companies,
The Energy Show 2002, which took place on 15 and 16
May 2002 in the RDS Dublin, combined an exhibition of
sustainable energy technologies and services available
on the Irish market with workshops on a range of topics, including renewable energy, energy auditing, combined heat and power, and motive power and transformers. A number of senior managers from the LIEN
member companies attended the speakers’ dinner,
which was held on the evening of 15 May.
Energy Awareness Week ran from 22 to 28 September
2002, with the slogan ‘Energy Use. The Environment.
And You’. This week is the biggest single promotion
event in the Irish energy calendar, and many LIEN members ran their own on-site awareness campaigns dur-
LIEN members feature strongly among the companies taking
part in the pilot agreements. Sustainable Energy Ireland’s
motivation in initiating the pilot agreements was to prepare
industry for the introduction of negotiated agreements and to
explore suitable frameworks for application in Ireland.
The pilot project involves the development of three different
kinds of draft agreement:
Aughinish Alumina has entered into one of the pilot
agreements as an individual firm whose annual energy
consumption is exceptionally high compared with Irish
industry generally. This agreement will cover key
aspects of energy use within Aughinish that are specific to the firm’s technologies and processes.
ing the seven days. During this year’s Energy Awareness
LIEN
Week, the Large Industry Energy Network formally
Pharmaceutical, Micro Bio, Leo Laboratories, Novartis, Pfizer
members
GlaxoSmithKline
(Cork),
Janssen
became the new name for the Annual Self Audit and
Little Island and Loughbeg and Wyeth Medica are among
Statement of Energy Accounts Scheme.
the sites that have signed up to develop a draft collective
agreement for the pharmachem sector. This agreement will
Studies and analyses
address all of the principal aspects of the energy end-use
Sustainable Energy Ireland studies and analyses, either car-
technologies within the group of participating firms.
ried out in-house or by external consultants, are often of
interest to LIEN members, particularly when they focus on
energy efficiency in large industry.
LIEN members Aer Rianta, Cadbury (Dublin), Dawn
Meats, Glanbia Ballyragget, Hewlett-Packard, Smurfit
Paper Mills, Transitions Optical and Tyco Healthcare,
At the launch of the Large Industry Energy Network annual
Mulhuddart are among a diverse grouping of facilities
report in December 2001, SEI co-launched a report on the
that are assisting in the development of a draft agree-
future potential of CHP in Ireland. Produced on behalf of the
ment on specific energy end-use technologies. This
Department of Communications, Marine and Natural
strand of the project is focusing on thermal energy and
Resources and the Commission for Energy Regulation, the
covers hot water and steam boilers, and heat distribution
report examines the future potential of combined heat and
and recovery.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
14
3
2
4
1
1,4. Launch of 2000:2001 Annual Report; 2. Energy Auditing workshop at Boston Scientific; 3. Renewable Energy workshop at St. FrancisAbbey Brewery.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
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3
2
4
1
Main picture: Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Ringaskiddy – winner of the Definitive Boilerhouse Perpetual Trophy 1. Klinge Pharma receiving
award for overall winners of the "IBEC Environmental Management Award for Sustainable Development" for 2001; 2&3. Plant tour at Boston
Scientific; 4. Launch of report on future potential of CHP in Ireland.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
06. AWARDS & RECOGNITION
16
Members of the Large Industry Energy Network tend to be leaders in their field, dedicated
to best practice and committed to good corporate citizenship. Thus it is no surprise that
during the past year many have achieved recognition outside the LIEN for outstanding
achievements in the areas of sustainable energy use and wider environmental protection.
European recognition
One of the most prestigious awards went to Pat Jackson of
safety engineering, administration and materials, where
Wyeth Medica Ireland, who received the Wyeth Corporation
about 60 per cent of staff are deployed.
2002 European Energy Manager of the Year award. This is a
great achievement, given the scope of Wyeth’s international
operations. Headquartered in Madison, New Jersey, Wyeth
employs 52,000 people worldwide, has annual sales in
excess of US$13.5 billion, and sells into over 140 countries.
2. Communication and openness, aimed at building trust
and co-operation among employees and the public,
through initiatives such as a regular Environment News
publication, updates on environmental performance on
the company website (www.klinge.ie), and a partnership
European recognition for environmental performance also
with Glounaguillagh National School, supporting an
went to two other members of the scheme: Klinge Pharma
environmental study of the local Caragh Lake.
in Co. Kerry and Masonite Ireland in Co. Leitrim.
3. Continuous improvement in all aspects of the opera-
Both companies were nominated for the European
tion. Examples of Klinge’s initiatives in this category
Commission’s European Awards for the Environment, and
include bringing the discharged parameters for waste-
although neither received an overall prize, this was the first
water below the limits specified in its IPC licence, the
time since 1997 that Irish companies had been short-listed
replacement of landfilling of waste sludge with com-
in the top 20 environmental performers across EU and
posting, and the control of volatile organic compound
accession countries. Both Klinge Pharma and Masonite
(VOC) emissions.
were presented Honourable Mention diplomas by the EU
Commissioner for the Environment, Margot Wallström, at an
awards ceremony in Budapest.
In the same awards, Masonite earned the title of Overall
Winner in the Clean Technologies category for the redesign
of a paint coating process. The project involved the instal-
Both companies were also overall category winners in this
lation of new coating booths and the replacement of a ther-
year’s IBEC Environment Awards, an initiative aimed at recog-
moset paint type with a thermoplastic paint material. The
nising and rewarding companies that develop innovative solu-
new set-up, which is effectively a closed loop system, has
tions for the environmental problems faced by industry.
increased coating efficiency to over 97 per cent and led to a
40 per cent reduction in the quantity of waste paint gener-
IBEC Environmental Awards
ated. Moreover, the self-cleaning technology employed
Klinge Pharma was the overall winner in IBEC’s Managing
requires 60 per cent less water to clean the booths, reduc-
for Sustainable Development category. The company
ing water consumption and wastewater production.
earned the award for its integrated approach to environ-
Furthermore, the new paint contains less hazardous chem-
mental management, which is based on three core ele-
icals and 50 per cent less volatile organic compounds, and
ments:
no direct emissions to the atmosphere are generated.
1. Integration of environmental management into all
Other LIEN members among this year’s IBEC Environmental
aspects of operation and all departments, including
Award winners included Glanbia Ingredients Ltd, Merck
support activities such as quality control, environment,
Sharp & Dohme, and Intel Ireland Ltd.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
17
National Boiler Awards
The National Boiler Awards are presented annually by
providing a model of good maintenance, housekeeping,
Sustainable Energy Ireland and sponsored by HDS Energy
and data logging practice in an older plant. The boiler plant,
Group. This competition is intended to highlight and reward
which consists of two 11.33 tonne/hr and two 9.07 tonne/hr
best practice in the use and management of industrial and
boilers, incorporates variable speed drive technology, direct
commercial boiler plant, and the interaction with associ-
digital combustion control, and oxygen trim. In addition,
ated service companies. The aim is to promote the mainte-
two of the boilers have been fitted with economisers, gen-
nance of existing high standards and provide an incentive
erating total fuel savings of 3 per cent.
to boiler users to strive for higher performance.
In an unusual project, carried out between March and July
In the past, LIEN members have featured strongly among the
2001, tallow was used instead of natural gas to fuel the two
prizewinners, and this year’s awards were no exception.
boilers not fitted with economisers, resulting in net savings
The Definitive Boilerhouse Perpetual Trophy went to Pfizer’s
facility in Loughbeg, Co. Cork. The judges deemed this boilerhouse to be an excellent example of the level of perform-
of over €175,000, with the added environmental benefit of
dealing with what could potentially have become a waste
product during this foot and mouth alert period.
ance achievable using modern, well-designed technology.
Boston Scientific Europe’s Galway plant was the overall win-
Combustion efficiencies reach 93 to 93.5 per cent on high
ner in the Hot Water Category. This boilerhouse is equipped
fire, and very low emission levels for oxides of nitrogen
with two low-pressure hot water boilers each rated at 800
(NOx) – of the order of 70 ppm – are obtained without the
kW and fired by low sulphur light fuel oil. Over the past three
use of specialised low-NOx technology. The plant has also
years, these boilers have been fitted with sequence controls,
been designed with a high degree of redundancy to ensure
and a fuel additive has been used to improve performance.
that production is not shut down due to failure of any one
Typical efficiencies are 82% on high fire and 87% on low fire.
piece of equipment. The boilerhouse consists of three nat-
The plant’s hot water distribution system is insulated to a
ural gas-fired 13.6 tonne/hr shell boilers of which a maxi-
very high standard, and every effort has been made to
mum of only two are required at any one time, with the third
reduce standing losses. Key controls are linked to the site
boiler serving as a standby. In addition, the water treatment
building energy management system, and the plant is well
facility at the ‘front-end’ of the boiler plant is duplexed, as is
metered, with all data automatically logged and trended.
the power supply. This set-up has allowed for continuous
steam production 24 hours a day, seven days a week for
the past 24 months without a break.
Gate Power Ltd earned the Large CHP System of the Year
Award for its combined heat and power plant at Diageo’s
St James's Gate Brewery. The plant features three 4.8 MWe
The Boilerperson of the Year Award went to Eamon Roche
gas turbines and four steam boilers each rated at 64,250
of Aughinish Alumina in Askeaton, Co. Limerick. Eamon has
lbs/hr operating at 13 bar. The three waste heat boilers are
worked as a boilerman with Aughinish Alumina for the last
all fitted with economisers, as well as with Saacke burners
17 years, and as part of his on-going career development
for supplementary firing should it be needed. One of the
he has undertaken City & Guilds and Central Electricity
turbines is fitted with a dump facility to cater for situations
Generating
courses.
when supply outstrips demand. The plant is run to high
Responsible for three 220-tonne boilers operating at pres-
Board
boilerhouse
operators
operational and safety standards. It is located outside the
sures of 5,600 kPa, Eamon has a challenging job, requiring
main build facilities and is insulated and weather-proofed
high levels of skill and concentration. During his normal shift,
to a very high standard to meet external conditions.
which lasts 12 hours, Eamon controls up to 250 parameters,
including steam flow throughout the plant and combustion
within the boiler, while at the same time ensuring performance remains within the strict emissions limits set by the
Environmental Protection Agency.
Highly Commended or Commended National Boiler
Awards went to two other Large Industry Energy Network
members: Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart, and Merck Sharp
&
Dohme.
Meanwhile,
Commended
and
Highly
Commended awards also went respectively to Ballyragget
The top award for Large Steam Boilerhouse of the Year went
Power for its combined heat and power plant at Glanbia,
to Lakeland Dairies in Co. Cavan. The boilerhouse has fea-
Ballyragget, and to Co-Gen Ltd for its CHP plant at
tured strongly for many years in the National Boiler Awards,
Dairygold, Mitchelstown, Co. Cork.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
COMPANY BY COMPANY REPORTS
18
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
07. RESULTS & TARGETS 1995 TO 2001–02
19
The result for each company is expressed in the form of an energy performance index (EPI).
This is based on the ratio of annual energy consumption to aggregate product output,
measured in a format developed individually by each company to reflect their unique mix
of products and processes. For a member’s first year of joining the Network , this index is
normalised to 100, and subsequent improvements or deteriorations in energy performance
are reflected in a decrease or increase in EPI.
The results for 2001:2002 are presented as follows:
The table starting on page 19 lists the members of the
An analysis of the factors underlying movements in EPI
Network and highlights their yearly EPI performance
during 2001 is presented on page 22, alongside a brief
since joining the LIEN. In this section, there is a particu-
discussion on the aggregate performance of the
lar emphasis on targets as compared with actual per-
Network as a whole.
formance for 2001:2002, and targets for 2002:2003 are
also highlighted.
For a small number of members, EPI figures for previous
years have been re-calculated to reflect very significant
In the subsequent pages, members’ EPIs and targets
changes in operations or the emergence of relevant new
are again presented, this time in chart form, along with a
data that had been previously unavailable. Such cases are
short statement from each of the companies summaris-
clearly identified in the text.
ing the key elements of their energy management programmes, the factors that have influenced their EPIs and
their plans for the future.
New members are given the choice of providing backdated
information for the year proir to joining the Network, so some
show performance from 2000.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
20
Company
Energy Performance Index (EPI)
1995
Abbott Ireland, Cavan
Aer Rianta, Dublin
100.00
Target
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
100.00
93.28
121.23
120.82
118.69 106.43
105.37
93.68
85.68
91.72
91.86
100.00
100.69
Allergan Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Analog Devices BV
95.80
95.69
98.56
118.94 110.89
110.89
100.00 130.81
128.20
105.23 127.90
124.07
Atlas Aluminium
100.00
99.87
99.90
79.34
99.12
Aughinish Alumina
100.00
97.05
96.33
96.33
95.92
94.74
94.96
94.47
Bausch & Lomb Ireland (Contact Lens Division)
100.00
74.59
46.17
66.19
111.02
91.69
66.35
63.03
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
100.00
97.47
92.24
91.74
92.09
79.79
76.67
74.37
100.00
77.39
71.44
71.44
80.22
57.85
58.43
105.57 122.25
118.58
Boston Scientific Ireland Ltd, Galway
Braun Ireland Ltd
100.00 104.65 105.19
118.95
100.75
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Swords
100.00
99.40
104.24
Buckeye Technologies Ireland Ltd
100.00
71.47
52.29
60.35
57.91
57.91
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
100.00
101.62
103.01
95.96
97.51
96.54
87.26
88.65
86.02
84.68
84.62
83.78
100.00
114.22
108.76
79.27
77.69
77.28
74.60
74.60
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Kerry
100.00
90.78
Cantrell and Cochrane Ireland Ltd
Carbery Milk Products Ltd
100.00
96.53
83.95
86.64
73.69
Cognis Ireland Ltd
100.00
95.42
100.66
94.99
107.94 113.34
107.67
ConocoPhillips, Whitegate Refinery
100.00
96.25
97.30
91.55
98.64 102.18
97.07
Dairygold Co-op Society
100.00 101.31
91.97
90.41
89.79
86.65
83.06
83.06
Dawn Meats, Ballyhaunis
100.00
97.11
91.92
95.76
107.01
99.60
99.60
100.00
72.21
74.78
83.60
87.73
87.73
84.19
86.45
84.82
84.98 109.16
102.61
Elan Pharma Ltd
100.00
100.72
107.18
218.87 227.51
311.68
Element Six
100.00
79.00
67.00
64.00
58.00
56.80
89.30
76.78
76.04
69.43
90.56
89.29
100.00
105.02
138.71 185.58
185.58
Diageo Ireland, St James’s Gate
Dundalk Brewery
Eli Lilly S.A. – Irish Branch
Fruitfield Foods Ltd
100.00
100.00
92.65
85.98
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
21
Company
Energy Performance Index (EPI)
1995
Garrett Engine Boosting Systems
Target
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
100.00
79.84
92.66
51.65
49.07
50.39
47.88
Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia
100.00
95.41
92.04
95.77
99.10
97.49
96.57
96.48
Glanbia Meats, Roscrea
100.00
91.44
81.15
74.07
76.17
77.72
78.86
76.50
Glanbia Meats, Ruskey
100.00
91.70
84.42
82.81
80.68
91.36 106.90
106.90
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
100.00
91.49
94.58
100.40
90.69
75.82
100.00 102.17
111.73
113.89
66.73
60.21
Glanbia Plc, Inch
GlaxoSmithKline, Cork
100.00
62.20
72.53
71.44
106.29 137.42
123.68
51.28
47.21
45.56
100.00
90.00
103.87 100.43
99.43
GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan
Gypsum Industries Ltd
100.00
98.31
92.65
97.57
100.08
HJ Heinz
100.00
89.14
77.29
83.00
80.75
76.72
Hewlett-Packard (Manufacturing) Ltd
100.00
95.06
92.06
69.65
57.72
55.99
100.00
86.53
76.82
73.75
63.64
IBM Technology Campus
Intel Ireland Ltd
92.80
40.22
110.72
73.19
59.16
66.29
100.00 102.94
85.89
93.76
91.90
102.54
89.02
100.00
95.46
92.23
100.26 124.74
92.51
92.93
83.72
83.56
90.69
95.20
82.82
Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
100.00
99.69
98.39
49.34
51.28
38.69
38.30
Klinge Pharma
100.00
79.43
61.14
61.26
61.24
63.32
62.06
Kostal Ireland
100.00
86.35
80.11
105.49
133.60 137.04
137.04
Lakeland Daries, Bailieboro
100.00 101.55
95.59
92.26
93.52
Leo Laboratories
100.00
98.07
98.10
102.03
Irish Fertilizer Industries Ltd
100.00
Irish Shell Ltd
Irish Sugar Ltd
100.00
96.66
96.66
118.05 111.85
117.45
Lisheen Mine
100.00 105.63
105.63
Masonite Ireland
100.00
95.00
100.00
92.04
90.00
76.49
80.00
74.80
92.83 101.40
99.37
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland)
Micro-Bio Ireland Ltd, Fermoy
NEC Semiconductors Ireland Ltd
100.00
95.65
86.21
81.08
100.00 145.09 116.48
95.89
127.95
Large Industry Energy Network
92.82
124.74
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
22
Company
Energy Performance Index (EPI)
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
100.00
60.00
50.39
55.68
42.55
26.51
26.24
100.00 108.35 110.15
107.82
107.80
111.82 126.96
120.61
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
Outokumpu (Tara Mines) Ltd
Target
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Little Island
100.00
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg
100.00 140.30
63.90
60.71
244.26
474.24
406.87 261.64
248.56
200.88
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Ringaskiddy
100.00
93.76
75.89
74.31
73.36
94.51 154.52
Premier Periclase Ltd
100.00
92.95
91.28
92.03
97.65
91.97
96.46
95.50
Pure Fresh Dairies Ltd
100.00
98.71
93.23
93.64
91.73
96.19
86.48
82.16
100.00 101.45 105.98
246.72
272.47
230.78 208.03
199.71
Saehan Media Ireland Ltd
100.00
89.57
92.58
106.67
99.62
Schering-Plough (Avondale) Co.
100.00
81.54
82.48
85.29
146.69
Schering-Plough (Brinny) Co.
100.00
85.35
83.98
81.29
68.70
61.77
72.38
72.38
SerCom Solutions
100.00
97.87
93.26
88.70
80.73
80.43
82.99
78.01
Smurfit Paper Mills Ltd
100.00
93.88
90.48
92.95
90.55
89.55
89.89
88.99
100.00 102.26
106.48
105.33
108.89 126.62
126.62
Roche Ireland Ltd
St Francis Abbey Brewery
Takeda Ireland Ltd
Thermo King Europe
100.00
98.75
92.48
Transitions Optical Ltd
Tyco Healthcare, Athlone
86.01
94.63
91.79
137.03 196.87
190.00
100.00
80.63
56.47
54.78
75.66
77.48
82.14
76.85
75.31
100.00
112.28
130.18 152.70
137.43
100.00
97.49
82.76
91.25
93.22
92.04
91.12
Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart
100.00
89.41
73.54
69.42
75.90
79.73
79.87
79.47
Unifi Textured Yarns Europe Ltd
100.00
81.20
75.09
77.12
81.69
73.11
87.77
86.01
Waterford Crystal Ltd
100.00
81.76
53.96
47.79
32.89
26.94
29.19
29.19
Wellman International Ltd
100.00
98.50 102.70
106.90
109.67
107.11 106.56
104.43
Wessel Energy Cables Ltd
100.00
97.44
81.05
102.69
101.47
83.40
Western Proteins
Wyeth Medica Ireland Ltd
100.00
97.86
81.72
90.44
92.06
Yamanouchi Ireland Co. Ltd
100.00
66.45 101.93
89.67
96.73
Large Industry Energy Network
98.63
96.66
100.00 100.70
95.67
84.88
84.56
84.56
177.57 149.31
141.85
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
08. ANALYSIS OF OVERALL RESULTS FOR 2001-02
In the Large Industry Energy Network, the Energy Performance Index (EPI) is the indicator
used to benchmark a company’s energy performance over time. The EPI is a measure of a
firm’s energy consumption per unit of product output, expressed in the most appropriate
and relevant way for that company – be it weight, volume, or monetary value.
As can be seen from the EPI data presented in the previ-
for a number of members. In this environment, congratula-
ous section, many members made very significant progress
tions would be in order even if LIEN participants had held
in reducing their EPIs during 2001, with resultant saving in
their position. The fact that they have done better than that is
energy costs of a magnitude capable of making a real
a testament to their hard work and commitment and the
impact on profitability.
effectiveness of their energy management programmes.
Abbott Ireland (Cavan), Braun Ireland, Bausch & Lomb,
Had it not been for these initiatives, Sustainable Energy
Cantrell and Cochrane, Hewlett-Packard, IBM Technology
Ireland estimates that total energy consumption by Network
Campus, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Novartis Ringaskiddy,
members would have been almost 286 GWh higher, under a
Pfizer (Little Island and Loughbeg), Roche, and Yamanouchi
‘business as usual’ scenario. This saving translates, in envi-
all improved their EPIs by at least 10 percentage points,
ronmental emission terms, to a saving of around 120,000
and, in some cases, considerably more.
tonnes of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.
Meanwhile, over the 12 months, the aggregate EPI for the
These savings impact directly on members’ profitability and
Network as a whole improved by 1.77 percentage points
are especially important in an era of increasing energy
(see table opposite).
costs and uncertainly about future energy prices. They are
What this means is that members have become more efficient and energy-lean in their processing and production
operations: for every unit of product produced, they are now
also important to Ireland – a net importer of energy products – as we strive to optimise our balance of payments
and reduce our fuel import dependency.
using less fuel and electricity than they did this time last year.
The environmental savings are also vital both on the indi-
As emphasised in previous reports, this is a key objective
vidual company level, and nationally, as Ireland grapples
in the development of a sustainable society.
with the challenge of meeting its commitment made under
Indeed, the 1.77 percentage point improvement is a considerable achievement, given the difficult trading conditions
that a number of LIEN members faced over the 12 months.
The buoyant market conditions, which persisted for much
of the late 1990s and into 2000, had stimulated significant
investment and expansion in facilities among many LIEN
members. And, while overall production output for the
Network continued to increase, a sharp and unexpected
contraction in demand brought about by a combination of
the Kyoto Protocol to stabilise greenhouse gas emissions
at 13 per cent above 1990 levels over the period 2008 to
2012. In fact, a proposed European Commission directive,
which could see participation in emissions trading become
mandatory for certain companies before the end of the
decade, could give energy efficiency a double value: both in
terms of its direct impact on a firm’s energy bill and in avoiding additional costs associated with the generation of
energy-related greenhouse gas emissions.
factors, including the September 11 attacks and global economic slowdown of 2001, caused operational difficulties
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
23
24
Large Industry Energy Network – Overall Performance
Total energy consumption 2001
15,182 GWh
Aggregate EPI for current members of LIEN (2000)
95.98 1
Aggregate EPI for current members of LIEN (2001)
94.21
Improvement in EPI (2000 to 2001)
1.77
Energy decrease from ‘business as usual’ scenario
285.24 GWh
Decrease in CO2 emissions from ‘business as usual’ scenario
119,473 tonnes CO2
1 Note that due to an ongoing examination of members’ approaches to measuring EPI, some individual indices were altered in order to
ensure the most accurate figures possible. Also, the composition of the Network altered somewhat with the addition of new members and
with some members not reporting results for this year. For these reasons, the EPIs reported in the table above, and in the detailed results
pages, are not always directly comparable with the results in the previous annual report.
The underlying factors
Energy-saving initiatives: One thing all the sites that
as important as the technology aspects. Senior manage-
improved their EPI over the past year share is a commit-
ment needs to be on board to secure corporate commit-
ment to identifying and eradicating energy wastage, be that
ment and win approval for major capital projects. Employees
through investment in new technology and equipment, the
using equipment on a daily basis are often best placed to
‘softer’ approaches such as energy management and
identify and implement savings, and simple awareness
awareness building, or a combination of both strategies.
building among all staff on issues such as the importance of
As the panel on page 25 illustrates, boiler and steam utilisation projects were among the main areas identified by
LIEN members as having a positive impact on energy performance. This is hardly surprising given that boilers are one
of the biggest single users of fuel in industry, and that
research by Sustainable Energy Ireland in steam boilerhouses has indicated that boiler fuel savings of about 10 per
cent are possible, mainly through low- or no-cost measures.
Another popular area of focus was on tackling electricity
usage through a range of technology initiatives. These
included the targeting of motive power applications, which
can account for as much as 80 per cent of a company’s electricity bill, but can be cut significantly through informed purchasing policies, the use of variable speed drives and good
housekeeping practices and an emphasis on compressed
air – a versatile but expensive and often abused resource –
and on lighting, which can be optimised with the use of
appropriate fittings, lamps and intelligent control.
Sustainable Energy Ireland also welcomes the increased
role of what traditionally have been less commonplace
approaches to energy savings, such as the targeting of
water utilisation and the increased emphasis on plant control, coupled with the implementation of cleanroom and
cooling and refrigeration projects.
These latter two technologies have been the focus of a
Model Audit project, which engaged a number of LIEN
members. With growing awareness of the potential savings
from these areas, SEI envisages they will play an everincreasing role in energy management.
Of course, the human dimension to energy saving is at least
switching off equipment when not in use can make a significant difference to the annual energy bill. So again, it is not
surprising that members have placed a strong emphasis
on the establishment of energy management teams and the
co-ordination of awareness-raising activities. Elsewhere in
this report, two case studies illustrate the structured and
focused approach adopted by Hewlett-Packard in re-invigorating its energy management team, and by Pfizer,
Loughbeg in establishing an energy awareness campaign
for the first time on site.
Non-production related facilities and environmental projects: A number of members have identified the incorporation
of non-production related activities on site as a negative influence on energy efficiency. This is typically because the new
facilities – be they offices, an R&D centre or previously outsourced warehousing or packaging operations – are consuming energy in the form of heating, lighting, air conditioning etc, but are not adding to production output.
Companies can have similar experiences when they commission a new plant or piece of equipment to achieve environmental compliance or improve environmental performance. Irish Shell, for instance, noted in its statement this year
that the installation of a vapour recovery unit to meet Irish
and European environmental regulations led to a significant
increase in EPI, as it has increased energy consumption
without boosting product output.
This underscores the need for a holistic approach, viewing
energy and environmental goals as complementary rather
than competing objectives, and for a greater emphasis on
lifecycle analysis for evaluating impacts in a ‘cradle-tograve’ manner.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
25
Having said that, environmental upgrades do not neces-
At the same time, for a small number of companies
sarily have a negative impact on energy performance; quite
increased production was cited as having a negative influ-
often the reverse can be true. As a result of a project carried
ence on energy efficiency, and in general this was attribut-
out by LIEN member Schering-Plough (Avondale), volatile
able to plant being run above optimal capacity or extra pro-
organic compounds (VOCs) are removed from wastewater
duction shifts having to be scheduled for periods when the
by a newly installed steam stripper at the plant, and are then
plant would normally be shut down.
fed to a thermal oxidiser, resulting in a significant net energy
reduction with the potential to cut total fuel consumption by
up to 3 per cent.
Sectoral analysis
By international standards, Ireland’s industrial base is small
and, as a consequence, many sectors in reality contain only
Stability in plant operation and output: Over the past
a small number of companies, of varying sizes and
number of years, plant operational stability has emerged
engaged in a diverse set of activities. This is evident from
as a key driver in energy efficiency for LIEN members. As
the Large Industry Energy Network’s membership, in which
can be seen from the panel opposite, plant expansion and
some areas of economic activity – air transport, plastics and
upgrade projects are among the most commonly cited rea-
wood processing – are represented by just a single facility.
sons for companies experiencing deterioration in EPI.
In other areas, however, distinct clusters of activity are now
During construction, there can be disturbance to the site,
emerging, and it can be instructive to look at overall trends
staff resources are sometimes constrained and with com-
for these sectors.
plex processes such as validation energy consumption
begins to increase while output levels remain stable.
Taken as aggregates, the healthcare and pharmaceutical
sectors have both seen a strong improvement in their overall
As production ramps up over time, however, the EPI gener-
EPIs. For the pharmaceutical sector, this can be attributed in
ally tends to correct itself. Thus, it can sometimes be more
part to a lessening of the disturbances of recent years that
instructive to look at trends in a company’s EPI over a num-
were brought about by a period of intense expansion activ-
ber of years, in order to get a clearer picture of how its
ity, with the result that inflated EPIs are now beginning to
energy performance is changing with time. This point is
return to their baseline levels.
made in the statement from Intel, which is currently commissioning its major Fab 24 facility.
A second factor is that global demand and prices have
remained predominantly strong for both the pharmaceuti-
More serious challenges arise for industry when there is an
cal and healthcare sectors, so promoting a ‘virtuous circle’
unanticipated drop in production output due to market con-
of operation, whereby production remains at optimum lev-
ditions or other external factors beyond the company’s con-
els, and adequate capital and human resources are avail-
trol. Some members facing this difficulty find that they have
able for investment in energy management.
certain fixed energy costs associated with items such as the
operation of their HVAC system, which cannot simply be
scaled down in response to reduced output.
However, while the overall EPI trend for these two sectors
has been downward, there have been variations between
companies, with some firms showing increases in EPI either
Conversely, as the panel also indicates, increases in output
due to continued expansion or as a result of difficult trad-
up to optimum design capacity can be an important con-
ing conditions and, as a consequence, a reduction in out-
tributor in enhanced energy efficiency. Increased produc-
put. This highlights the point that whilst operating in the
tion demand, for instance, boosted Bausch & Lomb’s
same broad sector, each company still faces its own unique
energy performance in this way during 2001.
mix of factors affecting energy performance.
Energy Performance Index analysis
Improved aggregrate over 2001
Air Transport
Healthcare
Reduction from 2000
0.11 (1)
11.47 (4)
Disimproved aggregrate over 2001
Electronics
8.20 (6)
Food & Drink
0.71 (21)
0.33 (6)
Non-Metallic Minerals
9.25 (5)
Metal & Engineering
Pharmachem
8.08 (24)
Mining
Plastics
Wood
22.37 (1)
New entrant (1)
Increase from 2000
10.33 (2)
Oil & Gas
3.89 (2)
Printing & Paper
0.34 (3)
Textiles
Large Industry Energy Network
10.33 (2)
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
26
Similar factors apply to the food and drinks sector, which
modify their products, with resultant challenges for energy
experienced a small aggregate deterioration in EPI.
efficiency. Although Hewlett-Packard and IBM significantly
In the drinks sub-sector, for instance, Dundalk Brewery attributed its increase in EPI to substantially reduced product
demand, whereas Diageo St James’s Gate’s increase was
attributed to the continued addition of non-production related
facilities to the site. Likewise, while the EPI for three members of the Glanbia group remained relatively stable, the
cut their EPIs during 2001, the aggregate result for the sector was an increase in EPI. Indeed, this reflects the mixed
economic performance of the electronics sector as a whole
in Ireland during the year, with some companies expanding
and increasing output, whilst others contracted and experienced a reduction in product demand.
Ruskey plant’s energy performance was adversely affected
In contrast, the two members of the oil processing industry
by a serious fire, which took place on the site during 2001.
represented in LIEN (ConocoPhillips and Irish Shell) both
Meanwhile, Glanbia attributed the increase in EPI for its Inch
faced similar challenges during the year, in the form of
plant over the year to staff resources being temporarily drawn
tougher regulatory environmental requirements. In both
away from energy management.
cases, this resulted in increased energy consumption and
As part of a hi-tech, fast-moving, consumer-oriented sector, electronics firms face constant pressures to update and
EPIs, but improved environmental performance in other
areas, again reinforcing the need to consider energy and
environmental impacts in an integrated manner.
Positive and negative influences on energy performance (ranked in decreasing order of frequency reported)
Positive influences
Negative influences
+ Increased production output
– Plant expansion and upgrade projects and commissioning and start-up
+ Boiler and steam utilisation projects
– Reduced production output
+ Staff awareness programmes and energy management teams
– Changes in the product specification, mix or raw materials
+ Initiation or enhancement of monitoring and targeting
– Addition of non-production-related facilities to the site
+ Motive power projects
– Environmental projects
+ Cooling and refrigeration projects
– Increased production output
+ Compressed air projects
– Pressures on staff/management time resources
+ Improved emphasis on plant control and ‘switching things off’
– Unscheduled plant shutdown
+ Water utilisation projects
+ Lighting projects
+ Installation of variable speed drives
+ Use of combined heat and power (CHP) plant
+ Air conditioning/humidification/cleanroom projects
+ Energy audits
+ Change to a less energy-intensive product
+ Maintenance regimes
+ Incorporation of energy efficiency concepts into new plant design
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
09. MEMBERS STATEMENTS
27
Abbott Ireland, Cavan
140
Our success in improving our EPI over the past year is due
105.37
118.69
121.23
in process technology, improved maintenance standards in
106.43
80
93.28
100.00
100
120.82
to action in a number of areas. We made further investments
120
key areas, and installed additional monitoring equipment.
Added to this were the benefits of continuous operation of
the plant during the summer period, compared with our nor-
60
mal practice of shutting down for three weeks. This significantly increased production levels and, as a result,
TARGET
40
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
improved our energy-to-output ratio. But perhaps the most
significant factor in our improved performance was the coming to fruition of groundwork put in over previous years on
a number of longer term energy projects.
98.56
95.69
95.80
91.86
91.72
85.68
80
93.68
100.00
Aer Rianta, Dublin
100
Energy consumption increased by the target amount of
3.5% in 2001, but passenger traffic also increased by
approximately the same amount over the year, which had the
effect of keeping our EPI roughly the same as that for the
previous year.
60
Our continued commitment to energy monitoring and bet40
ter management of energy consumption should allow for a
small decrease in energy consumption in 2002. The continTARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
ued upgrade of our HVAC systems – together with the installation of a third CHP unit of 2.7 MWe – will assist in controlling energy consumption while continued expansion takes
place at Dublin Airport into the future.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
28
Allergan Pharmaceuticals Ltd
80
110.89
118.94
Although we experienced an increase in manufacturing
110.89
100.00
100
100.69
120
costs and total energy consumed during the year, we also
significantly increased our output.
The improvement to our EPI in part reflects this increased
output, but it can also be attributed to efficiency enhance-
60
ments in the production process.
40
TARGET
These included the installation of new energy efficient
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
motors, secondary heating and cooling of process vessels
through a closed-loop system and automation in the form
of less energy intensive technology in filling and packaging
operations.
As to the year ahead, we are exploring the possibility of
replacing gas oil with natural gas, which may become available with the development of the Corrib field.
Analog Devices BV
140
120
128.20
130.81
Analog Devices is committed to using energy responsibly
100
sumption increased due to the addition of new production
tools, an increase in the size of the production area, and
100.00
80
and efficiently throughout the site. During 2001, energy con-
expansions in support service and office space.
The market demand for new technology means that our
60
process must continually grow and change. We continue to
40
TARGET
strive to minimise any impacts on energy by purchasing the
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
most efficient energy equipment, and by application of conservation measures in line with the objectives set out in our
environmental management programme.
Atlas Aluminium
140
60
99.12
energy usage decreased during this period.
The main reason for this performance was a significant and
unexpected reduction in production output, due to a reduction in customer requirements.
79.34
99.90
99.87
80
100.00
100
105.23
120
124.07
127.90
Atlas Aluminium's EPI for 2001 increased, although actual
Atlas is committed to continued energy efficiency and
expects to reduce its EPI to below 1999 levels during 2002.
TARGET
40
20
The main focus will be on improving the energy efficiency
of our furnaces and compressed air system.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
29
94.47
94.96
94.74
95.92
96.33
80
Our energy usage has continually increased over the past
96.33
97.05
100
100.00
Aughinish Alumina
year. However, due to production increases and investment,
the energy efficiency of the plant has remained reasonably
stable.
60
Energy monitoring is carried out through a continuous online process, tracking up to 200 variables in order to deter-
40
mine the optimum operational parameters from an efficiency
perspective.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Further strategic investment is being channelled into the
development of a CHP plant that will boast an efficiency of
close to 80%, as well as contributing to reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.
Bausch & Lomb Ireland (Contact Lens Division)
120
During 2001, there were significant increases in gas prices,
111.02
91.69
2000. However, the negative impact of this increase was off-
63.03
completion of several energy-related continuous improve-
TARGET
the Waterford plant successfully acquiring the sole manu-
20
0
95
96
97
ment projects.
Our output was up by 29% on 2000 production levels due to
46.17
40
set by increased production, together with the successful
66.35
60
which accounted for 38% of the total energy costs from
66.19
74.59
80
100.00
100
98
99
00
01
02
facturing supply of RP3 Soft Contact Lenses for the Bausch
& Lomb corporation, during the first quarter of 2001, and
increasing market share for our Cast Mold Toric lenses.
In addition, utilisation of our CHP plant increased significantly during the year, with electricity imports from the grid
being cut by 80%.
Projects planned for 2002 include the construction of a new
20,000 sq. ft. pharmaceutical facility to manufacture a slow
release drug for the treatment of back of the eye diseases.
The major plant-wide energy-savings initiatives for 2002 are
all related to, and based around, our two-year strategy programme to upgrade our building management system. The
plan incorporates the installation of a new Desigo software
package in the new pharma plant and in three other major
processes, with an eventual rollout to all processes and
services, together with monitoring and targeting.
We expect this project to yield savings of €50,000 for 2002,
and for the project to be completed in full by the end of 2003.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
30
the past number of years is the result of very focused efforts
74.37
60
in the area of energy utilisation and efficiency.
76.67
79.79
92.09
91.74
80
92.24
The downward trend in the EPI for Baxter Healthcare over
97.47
100
100.00
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
The major consumers of energy across the boiler plant,
cooling towers, pumping stations, compressed air plant,
distilled water production and other areas have been evalu-
40
ated for efficiency, and several high-value energy-saving
TARGET
projects have been implemented.
20
The coming years present challenges, as the facility
02
and equipment expansions. During this period, we will
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
expands in footprint, and the focus is on engineering plant
ensure that the emphasis remains on latest technology
installations in the energy field.
Since 1990 Baxter has achieved more than a 40% reduction
in its EPI and, in the current environment of high energy
pricing, we will remain clearly focused on continuing this
downward trend.
01 : Cold Storage
Cold storage at Carbery Milk Products
Carbery Milk Products
expects to make significant
savings from a simple project aimed at reducing
energy consumption in its
cold room facilities.
Carbery processes 320 million litres of milk every year,
and cheese and dairy products make up a large portion of its product portfolio; so cold storage is an
important part of the company’s operations, and a
major element of its energy bill.
The project is focused on replacing a conventional
hanging plastic strip screen, covering a 3 metre x 3
metre entrance to one of the cold rooms. This type of
‘door’ is relatively common in older production facilities, and is favoured due to its low cost and good performance under unchallenging conditions. However,
Carbery’s high production volumes mean that there
is continuous fork-lift traffic into and out of the store
room, and the doors tend to become ripped and damaged over time, resulting in increased heat transfer
into the room and loading of the cooler systems.
To alleviate the problem, a decision has been taken
to install a new automated roller shutter door. This is fitted with a sensor so that when a forklift truck
approaches the cold room door, the plastic sheet rolls
up quickly, and once the truck has entered, it unrolls
again, so reducing the flow of warm area into the cold
room area.
The potential savings achievable were evaluated by
monitoring energy consumption for two days of normal
operation with the main outer cold room door closed,
and comparing this with energy use when the hanging
plastic strip screen is the only barrier to heat transfer.
This indicated that the project would have a payback of
less than two years, which meets the company’s criterion for investment in energy saving projects.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
31
Boston Scientific Ireland Ltd, Galway
Boston Scientific is a committed member of the Large
Industry Energy Network. The company continues to invest
heavily in energy reduction projects, and to date all the projects we have implemented have achieved their desired
results in terms of achieving substantial energy savings with
payback periods of less than two years.
100.00
100
During 2001, we expected our energy consumption to
80
71.44
60
71.44
77.39
increase by between 15 to 20% due to a new building extension and the transfer of production lines from the US.
However, we are pleased to report that the actual energy
increase was under 5%.
40
All energy-saving technologies already installed and validated throughout the plant were included in the design of
TARGET
20
the new building extension, resulting in cost savings.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Braun Ireland Ltd
Over the past year, our EPI has been influenced by
changes in our product mix. The plant is moving from a
device manufacturing operation to a highly automated facility, outputting large numbers of consumable products. So,
although actual energy usage increased by 5.5%, the even
larger increase in plant output has resulted in a substantial
This satisfactory performance is due largely to energy-saving projects implemented in previous years now beginning
80.22
118.95
105.19
improvement in our EPI.
100.75
to reap rewards.
57.85
60
40
58.43
80
100.00
100
104.65
120
Over the past year, we have installed variable speed drives
on our moulding chilled water process pumps, which as well
TARGET
as improving processing conditions will bring moderate
20
energy savings.
02
ing year. However, during the planned installation of a major
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
No major energy saving projects are planned for the comnew production line, we will endeavour to put in place a
system for measuring all energy inputs so that an accurate
picture of energy performance can be obtained for that
section of the plant.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
32
Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Swords
140
Bristol-Myers Squibb is committed to energy conservation
118.58
105.57
104.24
80
99.40
100.00
100
122.25
and has invested substantially in this area over the past four
120
years. It forms an integral part of our environmental policy,
and this commitment is reflected in our strategy aimed at
continuous improvement in energy management.
Energy consumption at the site increased over 1997 base-
60
line figures due to higher production output and continued
40
TARGET
expansion of the plant. However, energy efficiency initiatives
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
have helped minimise potential increases in EPI, due to the
addition of non-production and environment-related activities to the site.
One key project planned for the coming year centres on the
automation of chiller systems using sequence controllers
and variable speed drive distribution pumps.
Buckeye Technologies Ireland Ltd
100
100.00
Buckeye Technologies Ireland Ltd commenced production
in 1997. Since that date, our EPI has been reduced from
80
71.47
71.47 in 1998 to 57.91 in 2001.
57.91
57.91
40
60.35
Our improvement in EPI during 2000, which was achieved
52.29
60
against a backdrop of decreasing product output, is due
to our continued emphasis on energy efficiency.
Currently we are focusing on reducing energy consump-
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
tion through an extensive monitoring and targeting programme using existing equipment. In addition, we have just
authorised an external energy consultancy firm to conduct
an energy audit for the site.
Energy management and reduction is one of the documented programmes of our environmental management
system, ISO14001. As the cost of energy increases, energy
utilisation is a major component of the company's business plan.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
33
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
120
[Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin joined the Large Industry
96.54
97.51
95.96
101.62
100.00
80
103.01
Energy Network within the past year, but they have supplied
100
historical EPI data for all years since 1997.]
Cadbury Dublin is in a dynamic phase at present, investing
in state-of-the-art plant and equipment. In 2002 and 2003,
60
more equipment, aimed at further automation, will be added
to the plant. This will lead to increased energy consumption
40
TARGET
but benefits will accrue through higher efficiencies in pro20
duction.
02
a strategy for achieving savings in energy use over the next
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
During 2002, an energy audit is planned, in order to inform
five years. Meanwhile, a rigorous environmental programme
will help to improve energy performance, and should position the Dublin factory as a flagship for best practice
throughout the Cadbury Schweppes Group.
83.78
84.62
84.68
86.02
88.65
the maintenance of our energy efficient systems and our
87.26
80
Our energy usage target for 2001 was met, due largely to
90.78
100.00
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Kerry
100
large volume of production output.
Our Board is committed to good environmental practice and
60
has charged each site within the group with optimisingenergy usage, in order to reduce emissions of the green-
40
house gas carbon dioxide.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
No new energy-related capital investment projects are
planned for the year ahead. However, an overhaul of the
flash steam recovery system, involving an upgrade of the
safety relief valves and steam traps and the installation of a
sulphuring valve, will allow excess low-pressure steam to be
fed into the low pressure steam system, which should yield
some energy savings for 2003.
Cantrell and Cochrane Ireland Ltd
120
60
77.69
This improved performance is due to growth in the market72.27
80
energy input per litre of product produced.
108.76
100.00
100
114.22
Cantrell and Cochrane has continued to see reductions in its
place and a continuing increase in the use of PET (polyethylene terephthalate) plastic relative to the more energyintensive returnable bottle.
40
TARGET
As we reach full plant capacity, we expect energy efficiency
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
improvements from this source to cease and, as part of our
initiative to further reduce energy usage on site, an on-site
energy-saving team is being established to deliver energy
savings into the future.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
34
74.60
74.60
77.28
60
ment to energy monitoring, analysis and reduction. This can
73.69
86.84
ing target was not quite met despite our continued commit83.95
80
Our EPI improved slightly in 2001, although our energy sav96.53
100
100.00
Carbery Milk Products Ltd
be attributed to non-productive fuel usage during the installation and commissioning of various new facilities, including a 4.7 MW CHP plant and a new cheese production line.
As the CHP plant will generate steam for the site as a by-
40
product of electricity generation, fuel efficiency should
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
almost double over the coming year.
Investment in energy-saving projects will remain a high priority for the Carbery Group. Installation of automatic roller
doors and intelligent lighting systems for our cold stores,
and independent audits of our steam and compressed air
distribution systems, are planned for the coming year.
Cognis Ireland Ltd
120
113.34
tions on the site, such as good plant utilisation, being
107.67
94.99
100.66
80
95.42
100.00
100
107.94
Our EPI has increased during the last year despite condifavourable to a reduction of specific energy consumption.
This can be explained by the fact that over the past number
of years, we have invested in a number of environmental
60
projects. These, by definition, will benefit the environment.
However, they also consume energy without contributing to
40
TARGET
the production output, with an adverse impact on EPI.
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Nevertheless, we remain committed to energy efficiency,
and we will continue to invest in projects to improve energy
performance on the site.
In the year ahead, we plan to implement an energy monitoring and targeting system.
ConocoPhillips, Whitegate Refinery
97.07
98.64
91.55
97.30
96.25
100.00
80
102.18
At ConocoPhillips, we believe that the key to energy man100
agement and, in turn, fuel minimisation is to gain accurate
information about fuel usage. As the process plant is now
controlled by a digital control system, we know exactly the
quality and composition of fuel travelling through the plant
60
and being consumed in the furnaces. Our EPI has deteriorated recently, principally as a result of more severe pro-
40
TARGET
cessing needed to manufacture the cleaner transport fuels
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
for the Irish market. More accurate fuel usage data is now
available and this will enable us to make improvements in
the future.
02
Our capital investments are all environmentally driven, and
from our experience a greater energy input is required to
meet tighter environment limits.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
35
Dairygold Co-op Society
83.06
83.06
mainly due to a series of energy-saving projects imple86.65
89.79
90.41
and the improvement in our EPI of approximately 4% is
91.97
101.31
80
100.00
Energy efficiency continued to be a high priority in 2001,
100
mented during the year.
Key among these was an improved staff energy awareness
60
programme and high levels of commitment from key onsite personnel. Other energy-saving initiatives included
40
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
the installation of energy efficient motors, lighting and
variable speed drives where possible;
ongoing fine-tuning of the refrigeration system;
02
a reduction in water usage and increased use of
recycled water using reverse osmosis;
improvement of production process control measures;
continuous investment in our monitoring and targeting
system.
Significantly, a review of our compressed air system resulted
in a reduction in main pressure by 2 bar, and a programme
focused on repairing air leaks has now become a permanent feature of plant maintenance.
Furthermore, the efficiency of our combined heat and
power plant (CHP) has resulted in significant energy savings
as well as reductions in carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide emissions.
Dawn Meats, Ballyhaunis
120
99.60
due to a number of factors. Less processing of the prod99.60
95.76
91.92
80
97.11
100.00
100
107.01
Energy usage per unit processed has been cut significantly
uct was required in 2001, a monitoring and targeting system
utilised to aid measurement of the key performance indicators has proven successful, and investments in equipment
60
and personnel have also contributed to our performance
improvement.
40
TARGET
We do not expect to be able to achieve an equivalent
20
improvement in 2002. However, we will continue to strive
towards best practice through investments in new technology.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
36
Diageo Ireland, St James’s Gate
60
87.73
83.60
74.78
72.21
80
87.73
Our EPI for the St James’s Gate site disimproved during
100.00
100
2001, and we did not meet our target for the year.
Energy consumption increased, as predicted, with the
planned centralisation of corporate activities and relocation of personnel to St James’s Gate.
Furthermore, the Guinness Storehouse completed its first
40
full year of operation, and these events, combined with
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
changes in production volumes served to adversely affect
the energy ratios for the site.
Our target for the St James’s Gate site for the coming year
is not to exceed usage for 2001.
02 : Transformers
Looking to the next generation in transformer efficiency: Tara Mines
At Tara Mines, there has always been an emphasis
on specifying the most efficient power transformers
available. Transformers are an essential component in
supplying electricity to end-users, enabling voltages
to be raised for transmission over long distances from
distant power stations, and then progressively
reduced to the levels required at point-of-use to run
motors and power equipment. Losses from transformers can be high, but they are often overlooked
as a source of potential savings.
Tara Mines is one of the largest industrial consumers
of electricity in the country, and a significant number
of high efficiency transformers are used at the site.
Tara Mines is now looking to the future and closely
Power is taken directly from the grid at a voltage of
watching the development of the next generation of
110 kV, before being distributing through the plant at
so-called ultra-low-loss transformers. These incorpo-
20 kV and 6.6 kV. All transformers used underground
rate a fundamentally new type of core material –
are of the ‘dry’ type, having no oil cooling arrange-
amorphous iron, produced by cooling molten metal
ments. These systems, typically operating in the 750-
alloy very rapidly – allowing further improvements in
kVA to 1000-kVA range, are used for transforming
efficiency, particularly at low load factors. The com-
from 6.6-kV down to 660-V. Here, high efficiency trans-
pany is currently evaluating their environmental
formers of 97 to 98% have been specified, compared
impact, payback and suitability for the arduous oper-
with a typical efficiency of approximately 95% for a
ating conditions encountered in the mining industry,
standard dry transformer.
where safety considerations are of paramount impor-
This difference of 2 to 3% in performance may seem
small, but because the transformers are in constant
use, it adds up to significant energy savings over time,
resulting in a payback period of as little as two years,
tance. Other considerations will include lower operating temperatures (thus minimising the cooling burden); smaller overall volume, requiring less floor and
room space; and greater overload capacity.
at nominal load factors and average power costs. And
Tara’s conclusions are likely to be of keen interest to
when these savings are considered over the 20-year
other businesses, as the use of sub-distribution
minimum lifetime of a typical transformer, their signifi-
transformers is very widespread within medium to
cance becomes even more apparent.
heavy industries.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
37
Dundalk Brewery
120
84.98
84.82
86.45
84.19
92.65
80
100.00
100
the past year.
102.61
109.16
The Dundalk Brewery’s EPI worsened significantly during
This was due to a combination of factors, including reduced
time availability from senior management to pursue energy
savings; a 30% reduction in total plant throughput over the
60
last two years; and an increased non-productive energy
load as a result of the relocation of non-production functions
40
20
TARGET
onto site.
Because of global over-capacity in the industry, the cost of
02
suppliers eager to supply our markets. Cost has therefore
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
production has come sharply into focus, with third-party
become a central consideration in all future planning.
To that end, the site has identified the contracting out of our
utilities supply operation as an opportunity to reduce costs.
This will be achieved in part by the reduction of 6% in our
energy consumption but also by sharing future savings with
the utility supplier.
Elan Pharma Ltd
311.68
320
280
200
160
227.51
218.87
240
Our EPI deteriorated by 4% over the past year, due in part
to site expansion, which commenced during the year being
reported upon.
This will continue in 2002, with further increases in EPI as a
result of continuing construction and validation of the new
manufacturing facilities.
97
98
99
We remain committed to energy efficiency. The projects
TARGET
107.18
40
100.72
80
100.00
120
0
95
96
00
01
02
completed since 2000 include the commissioning of an
energy management system on the main plant compressed
air dryer, monitoring and targeting (M&T), and the implementation of an energy efficient process chiller project.
Further M&T, energy efficient chillers, and energy efficient
air compressors projects are planned for the future.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
38
Element Six Industrial Diamond Division (Ireland)
100
100.00
Element Six Industrial Diamonds has an active and ongoing energy management strategy, which includes the use
ally monitor energy consumption with a view to reducing
56.80
costs and using energy more efficiently.
58.00
64.00
60
and upkeep of a building management system, to continu67.00
79.00
80
40
The EPI for the site, although not quite meeting the target,
shows a continuous improvement due to the ongoing effort
TARGET
to drive down energy consumption across all aspects of
20
production and processing, the establishment of more effi-
02
continuing upgrade of pumps and motor controls to
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
cient batch sizes to permit maximum use of equipment, and
increase efficiency.
Given the variation in product and the complex nature of the
manufacturing process, we are investigating the possibility
of reducing our EPI through the use of new technologies.
89.29
90.56
and production mix changes, and an increased base
energy load. Commissioning of new facilities, which did not
commence production until late in the year, and the manu-
69.43
60
76.04
76.78
89.30
80
Eli Lilly’s EPI increase is mainly due to production volume
85.98
100.00
Eli Lilly S.A. – Irish Branch
100
facture of a smaller volume of one significant product,
reduced the total volume output for the site. Furthermore,
the introduction of complex new products led to additional
40
resources on site, thereby contributing to an increase in the
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
base energy load.
However, significant energy savings were still achieved from
specific projects that were completed, such as the installation of a high-efficiency chiller plant, and the installation of
energy-efficient motors and lighting on new site facilities.
Fruitfield Foods Ltd
200
160
185.58
185.58
As a new company operating on the former Nestlé Ireland
site, Fruitfield Foods Ltd have stated their commitment to
reducing energy levels in the Tallaght site. The site’s EPI
138.71
has risen over the last few years mainly due to the reloca-
80
tion of our confectionery facility and the introduction of shift
and extended working hours.
105.02
100.00
120
2002 should see a busy schedule for energy saving projects, in particular our boilerhouse project, which should
TARGET
40
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
yield savings in the region of 20%. The completion of our
two year long utilities upgrade is also expected along with
the commissioning of various water saving initiatives, which
are expected to reduce our water usage by 15%.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
39
Garrett Engine Boosting Systems
79.84
80
92.66
Our EPI remained fairly constant during the past year.
100.00
100
Our commitment to energy efficiency has several strands.
On one front, we are completing the linkage of our energy
management systems to newer electrical and gas usage
60
47.88
50.39
40
49.07
51.65
points and to a number of processors throughout the plant.
We also carry out compressed air audits throughout the
plant and maintain a continuous focus on reducing idle consumption by switching off equipment at weekends. In addiTARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
tion, we consider energy efficient criteria when purchasing
new components, and we specify variable speed drives
where their benefits are demonstrable.
Looking to the future, increasing product demand may drive
our energy costs up, as we may have to return to a 6.5-day,
three-shift process.
96.48
96.57
97.49
99.10
95.77
92.04
80
95.41
100.00
Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia
100
Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia, has been a member of the
Large Industry Energy Network (previously Self Audit
Scheme) since 1995, underscoring the company’s commitment to conserving energy and resources. Efficient utilisa-
60
tion of energy throughout the site resulted in an improved
EPI for 2001.
40
A number of energy-saving projects were implemented durTARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
ing the year, including completion of a refrigeration plant
project, initiated in 2000 with the assistance of Sustainable
Energy Ireland.
02
The large increases in energy costs in 2001 mean that
energy utilisation and efficiencies will remain as a key component of the company’s business plan for the future.
Glanbia Meats, Roscrea
Our EPI increased slightly over the past year, and unfortu-
76.50
78.86
77.72
76.17
60
74.07
2001. Our electricity usage was controlled and we met our
81.15
80
nately we were unable to meet our projected figures for
91.44
100.00
100
targets, but due to a very inefficient and obsolete steam
boiler, only 13 years old, our oil and LPG usages were outside our projections.
We have taken corrective action on this issue, installing a
40
new Thompson Cochrane boiler in March of this year.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
We are also currently installing a monitoring and targeting
system, with the assistance of an outside energy consultancy firm. However, the benefits of this project will not be
seen until 2003.
In the year ahead, we may also see further improvements
in energy efficiency due to the new boiler and to anticipated
Previous Target
increases in plant throughput.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
40
Glanbia Meats, Ruskey
Energy performance at our Ruskey site has unavoidably
120
been impacted negatively by a fire in May, which resulted
in the whole pig processing plant being destroyed.
106.90
106.90
91.36
80.68
82.81
84.42
91.70
80
100.00
100
However, the focus on energy saving continues. We have
introduced a ‘Chrysalis Benefits Realisation Programme’
within the meat group, through which we are evaluating a
60
range of energy-saving methods and schemes, and our first
40
TARGET
meeting has already taken place.
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
03 : Lighting
Intelligent lighting: Thermo King
lamps installed in the area. The
system works by automatically
switching the lighting on when
movement is registered within a
specified area and when the
daylight levels are below a set
point; and by switching it off
again after a pre-set delay, once
the movement has stopped. As
an additional safeguard against
energy wastage, each of the PIR sensors is fitted with
a shield so that it will only detect movement in its
immediate vicinity. The result is that a light will only
switch on if someone is working directly underneath it,
as opposed to all of the lights switching on when
Thermo King in Galway has used the introduction of
somebody walks up or down the main aisle.
a new assembly line as an opportunity to incorpo-
The company was able to justify the expenditure on
rate high energy-efficiency lighting into that part of
the project, since new lighting fittings were required in
the plant.
any case. The area had previously been used for stor-
This is Thermo King’s second major lighting project
in the past decade. In the early 1990s, the company
age, and its conversion to a production facility meant
that higher lighting levels were required.
re-lamped the entire factory, achieving savings of 50
Compared with the lighting used elsewhere in the
to 55 per cent on its lighting bill. The possibility of
plant, significant energy savings are being achieved,
replicating that system in the current project was ini-
estimated at over €3,686 annually. A payback period
tially considered. Instead, however, a decision was
of 2.9 years is anticipated. Thermo King believes that
taken to opt for more expensive high-frequency fluo-
this would be even shorter for a company that had
rescent lighting, with a light sensor and a passive
not already undertaken significant upgrades of its
infrared (PIR) motion sensor fitted to each of the 25
lighting in recent years.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
41
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
120
We achieved further improvements in our EPI during 2001,
primarily due to the first full year’s operation of the CHP
plant, which was commissioned in the spring of 2000.
90.69
71.44
60
72.53
Rising fuel prices during 2001 underscored the importance
75.82
100.40
94.58
91.49
80
100.00
100
both of the Large Industry Energy Network and of attention
to energy efficiency at the Ballyraggett site, where energy
is a major component of our cost base.
TARGET
40
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
In 2002, we expect to see some further improvements in
our EPI, as a number of projects and initiatives are planned
in the areas of water conservation and heat recovery.
02
Glanbia Plc, Inch
140
80
106.29
113.89
111.73
100.00
100
102.17
120
department with responsibility for energy management over
123.68
137.42
There have been a number of managerial changes in the
the last two and a half years, which have relegated this area
to a status of lesser importance.
During the last few months, however, the situation has been
rectified. We have commissioned a review of our energy use
60
with the dual objectives of bringing about a reduction in
40
TARGET
energy consumption and of taking an imaginative look at alter-
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
natives for supplying the energy needs of the site for the next
10 to 15 years. In establishing the terms of reference of the
review, we took the view that all possibilities could be adapted
to meet our requirements, to ensure that possible sources of
green energy/renewable energy were not ruled out.
We have now studied the finding of this study and will be
providing capital expenditure to implement those projects
recommended that are compatible with our long-term strategic plan for the site.
We want to look to the future and concentrate on sources of
energy that will not be subjected to punitive energy taxes and,
more importantly, that will have a positive impact on the green
issues impinging on the community in which we operate.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
42
GlaxoSmithKline, Cork
In 2001, our EPI improved well above our targeted expecta-
100.00
100
tions. This can be attributed partially to an increase in reac-
80
tor capacity usage, in parallel with strict monitoring and con-
TARGET
20
45.56
heat from our incinerator for steam generation. This has
47.20
40
utory factor was the installation of a facility to recover waste
51.28
60.21
62.20
66.73
trol of site energy consumption. Another significant contrib60
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
reduced our boiler gas consumption by over 70%, with a
corresponding reduction in boiler carbon dioxide emissions
of over 4,900 tonnes.
In 2002, our focus will increasingly be on improved energy
management, which will include developing a formal energy
strategy, implementing training and awareness programmes, continuous energy monitoring, and regular
energy audits to ensure compliance with stringent targets.
04 : Process Control
Process control and VSD: ConocoPhillips
Over the past year, ConocoPhillips (formerly Irish
database of information is available, which has given
Refining) has undertaken a massive project aimed at
plant operators a more accurate picture of actual fuel
bringing the Whitegate facility under state-of-the-art
usage. In turn, this has facilitated energy monitoring,
control.
allowing the areas of greatest energy use to be iden-
About 80% of the plant has been involved in the
upgrade, which has seen new instruments being
installed and implemented, as part of a digital control
system supplied by Honeywell and designed in part-
tified and targeted for future efficiency improving
upgrades. Moreover, energy wastage has been cut
through overall operation of the plant within tighter
control parameters.
nership with Irish Refining. Temperatures, pressures,
In a separate project also carried out during the year,
and flow-rates across the plant can now be monitored,
variable speed drives (VSDs) were fitted on the fan
controlled and altered with the touch of a screen.
motors of a number of fin-fan heat exchangers. The
The motivation for carrying out the work was to boost
overall efficiency and control, but the project has had
a number of specific energy-related benefits. A huge
idea of VSD control is to allow motor speeds – and
hence electricity usage – to be adjusted in response
to variations in plant load, so tackling inefficiencies
caused by motors running at full speed when plant is
operating at only part load. This is important for operations, since the level of cooling required tends to
vary depending on the external weather conditions.
On hotter days, the fin fans may be required to run at
full speed whereas, on a colder day, the ambient air
temperature will reduce the load on the exchangers,
and they can operate at a lower level to achieve product cooling.
The energy savings from the VSDs are expected to
result in a payback period of between two and three
years, with spin-off benefits in the form of extended
fan life.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
43
GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan
80
GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan is constantly expanding. Over
90.00
100.00
100
the last five years, additional plant and production activity
has increased energy consumption figures by an average
11% annually. 2001 saw greater emphasis being placed on
energy reduction, with an energy management initiative enti-
60
tled ‘Project Helios’ being set up and the site joining the
Large Industry Energy Network. Future plans include the
40
installation of more efficient compressors with sequence
TARGET
20
control, and a feasibility study of more energy efficient lighting throughout the plant.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Gypsum Industries Ltd
120
Gypsum Industries recorded an improvement of 3.44 percentage points in its EPI for 2001. Although no major proj99.43
100.43
103.87
ects were undertaken, this performance can be attributed to
100.08
97.57
92.65
98.31
80
100.00
100
our commitment to energy conservation throughout all
aspects of our day-to-day operations and, in particular, to
the practice of energy monitoring and targeting at the site.
60
TARGET
40
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
HJ Heinz
60
to poor energy efficiency in the first quarter of 2001. However,
76.72
80.75
83.00
in our output profile and the commissioning of new plant led
77.29
80
Our EPI improved slightly over the past 12 months. Changes
89.14
100.00
100
corporate management continues to show a willingness to
invest capital in improving energy efficiency, and we anticipate an improvement of the order of 5% during 2002, based
on increased line efficiencies and future investment.
40
The replacement of one of our cooling sets, in particular, will
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
improve the steam-cycle efficiency by increasing the percentage condensation. Moreover, gas consumption will be
reduced by shortened cooling times.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
44
Hewlett-Packard (Manufacturing) Ltd
beating our target by 11 percentage points.
92.06
80
Hewlett-Packard’s EPI again improved significantly in 2001,
95.06
100.00
100
and the site’s Energy Reduction Team achieving energy sav55.99
60
57.72
69.65
This was due to a significant increase in production output,
40
ings through a monitoring and targeting programme. In particular, we succeeded in reducing non-essential and general
service consumption, and matching energy use to production uptime schedules.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
In 2002, we will continue these initiatives. We are currently
evaluating projects that will optimise site management and
consumption of compressed air, vacuum and chilled water.
We are also carrying out an in-house investigation into the
feasibility of CHP for the site.
IBM Technology Campus
work towards achieving an improvement in energy effi73.75
60
ciency of 4% per year.
76.82
80
At the IBM Technology Campus in Dublin, we continue to
86.53
100.00
100
This target is based on savings we expect to achieve
through planned projects.
Our improvement in EPI for 2001 can be attributed to such
40
projects. These include, but are not restricted to,
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
a focus on staff energy awareness
optimisation of electrical equipment, air conditioning
and boilers.
Into the future, the campus’s Energy Management Team
will continue to identify and implement appropriate energysaving projects across the site.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
45
Intel Ireland Ltd
120
Over the past number of years, Intel Ireland’s investment in
110.72
approximately 200 individual energy efficiency projects has
resulted in a downward trend in EPI compared with our
92.80
base-line performance. We believe that this ‘EPI trend’ aver-
40
TARGET
96
97
output volumes as older technologies are replaced, and as
We forecast that total energy demand for 2002 will increase
02
Fab 24 and of additional ancillary buildings to service the
0
95
to-year EPI variations, because of the frequent changes in
new facilities such as Fab 24 are brought on line.
40.22
20
63.64
aged over a number of years is more meaningful than year66.29
60
59.16
73.19
80
100.00
100
98
99
00
01
due to work associated with the construction and start-up of
enlarged site.
However, these expansions to the site will incorporate
energy-efficient technologies wherever this is possible, and
we will benefit considerably from this when the new facilities are commissioned. This is not due to commence until
2003/2004, and thereafter, the year-on-year EPI is expected
to decline.
Irish Fertilizer Industries Ltd
120
IFI saw a significant improvement in EPI for 2001 but sadly
99
sure of the Cork plant is imminent.
89.02
98
102.54
96
91.90
102.94
95
93.76
100.00
80
85.89
has ceased operation and at the time of going to press clo-
100
60
40
20
0
97
00
01
02
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
46
Irish Shell Ltd
At Irish Shell, we remain firmly committed to decreasing
140
124.74
100.26
92.23
80
95.46
100.00
100
124.74
our energy consumption levels, despite the increase in
120
our EPI in 2001.
The major factor for this decline in energy performance was
the introduction of our polymer modified bitumen plant. Last
year was its first full year in operation, which resulted in an
60
increase in the use of product heating facilities on a continuous basis. It is worth noting, however, that this plant is an
TARGET
40
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
energy efficient plant per cubic tonne produced.
Another factor contributing to our increased EPI was the
installation of a vapour recovery unit on our white oils site in
the fourth quarter of 2000. This was installed in order to
meet EU and Irish environmental regulations. It has had a
major impact on energy performance as it has increased
energy consumption without increasing product throughput.
We are currently assessing the heating facilities on our bitumen site with a view to improving their efficiency. We plan
to replace the existing boilers in 2003, as part of a capital
upgrade of the site. We are also committed to a policy of
fitting all new pumps on site with variable speed drives to
help decrease our energy consumption.
05 : Compressed Air
Energy efficient compressed air generation: Leo Laboratories
Leo Laboratories expects to
period for the project, but it is clear that the new com-
reap significant savings from
pressed air plant will provide energy savings in a num-
the recent replacement of
ber of areas. Firstly, the air ends on the existing com-
aging compressed air plant
pressors had become worn over time, resulting in a
with new technology.
significant drop-off in efficiency. Secondly, compared
Compressed air generation is one of the single
biggest consumers of electricity at the Leo site, being
used in a range of applications, from the dyeing of
vessels after clean in place/steam in place (CIP/SIP)
cycles, to breathing air, to pneumatic uses such as
moving machine arms on packaging equipment.
Prior to the installation of the new 300 kW Ingersol
with the old compressors, which featured on-off control, the new system incorporates variable speed drive
technology and intelligent control, which will result in
savings in motor running speed at part load. Finally,
because the replacement compressor is air-cooled
rather than water-cooled, there will be a reduced load
on the chillers and cooling towers.
Rand compressor, the facility’s compressed air
Commissioning was followed by an overall system
requirements were met by two older Atlas Copco
leak check and repair, thus ensuring efficiency of dis-
compressors, with a combined rating of 280 kW, serv-
tribution as well.
ing two separate areas of the site.
A large part of the motivation for carrying out the
upgrade was that a new nitrogen generator was
planned for the site. By investing slightly more money
in a bigger system, it was envisaged that it would be
possible to meet the compressed air needs of the
nitrogen generation system as well. This makes it difficult to calculate an exact energy-efficiency payback
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
47
95.20
is always a priority when planning investments and process
82.82
90.69
83.56
83.72
92.93
80
Our philosophy at Irish Sugar dictates that energy efficiency
92.51
100
100.00
Irish Sugar Ltd
improvements.
During 2001, energy usage increased as a result of an
60
unplanned process shutdown/restart along with new plant
commissioning, both of which had a negative impact on
40
our EPI.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
The motivation at Janssen Pharmaceutical to reduce energy
98.39
100.00
99.69
Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd
100
costs stems from sound business sense and a willingness to
80
address environmental responsibilities.
During the past year, our EPI improved significantly, illus-
60
20
TARGET 38.30
ing industrial competitiveness.
38.69
43.34
40
51.28
trating the major role that energy policy can have in improv-
This improvement in our EPI is as a result of several initia-
02
cient design, capable of running continuously throughout
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
tives, which have led to substantial reductions in the amount
of energy consumed. These include the replacement of a
desiccant dryer on the breathing air system with a more effithe year, and the installation of a temperature controller on
the hot loop located in our central cleaning building.
Looking to the year ahead, Janssen will remain committed to
continued reduction in energy usage. Plans include optimisation of the Vara unit and compressed air systems. In addition, the commissioning of an automated energy monitoring system is due to be completed by the end of the year.
Klinge Pharma
Our product mix has a significant impact on our energy con-
100.00
100
sumption per unit of output, and current demand trends
80
79.43
indicate a shift from the high-volume bulk pharmaceuticals
62.06
63.32
61.24
61.26
to low volume ingredient products.
61.14
60
This, for a large part, explains our increase in EPI over the
past year and will necessitate the introduction of more strin-
40
gent controls and monitoring of energy usage. We will conTARGET
tinue our programme of continuous improvement, focusing
20
on the elimination of waste during non-productive periods,
02
all forms of energy consumed on site.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
with the goal of attaining an overall reduction of 2% across
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
48
Kostal Ireland
60
137.04
105.49
80
At Kostal Ireland, our EPI increased over the past year. This
was due largely to three factors: more energy intensive technology within new product ranges; the re-introduction inhouse of sub-assembly business that had previously been
subcontracted; and the upgrading of our cleanroom to
80.11
100.00
100
86.35
120
137.04
133.04
140
class 10,000, which led to higher energy costs for a larger
HVAC plant.
40
TARGET
The range of products produced at Kostal varies substan-
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
tially in terms of technical complexity and energy intensity,
and this issue is further complicated by the fact that our
output is not homogeneous.
We plan to devise a more accurate way to express our production levels over the next year and, if necessary, recalculate our EPI since 1995. We feel that our energy performance results for recent years do not accurately reflect our
efforts to minimise energy usage, given that our main
energy input has decreased in 2001 despite the factors
mentioned above.
Lakeland Dairies, Baileboro
120
As a result of upgrading of our drier over a two-month
96.66
96.66
92.82
93.52
92.26
95.59
100.00
80
101.55
period, there was a significant amount of partial process-
100
ing and sales of unprocessed milk to other processors during the past year. This has distorted our EPI figure, which is
based on finished product (butter and powder) and not par-
60
tially processed or evaporated-only product.
40
Aside from this negative impact, two important energy-savTARGET
ing projects were undertaken: the replacement of a two20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
stage vacuum pump with a single-stage pump, and the
improved utilisation of raw water for product-cooling, which
has resulting in reduced refrigeration.
In 2002, the facility – formerly owned by Golden Vale – was
taken over by Lakeland Dairies. This has resulted in uncertainty about the budgeted amount of product to be
processed for the year ahead, which in turn makes the
future EPI difficult to predict.
One negative impact on EPI will come from a new filtration
system installed on the drier exhaust, as this abatement
device will result in increased power consumption. At the
same time, however, improvements are being sought
through enhanced process control, reduced plant downtime, a new metering programme, a revision of targets by
department, and the incorporation of best technologies
into new projects where possible.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
49
Leo Laboratories
117.45
118.05
111.85
98.10
80
98.07
100.00
100
102.03
120
Our EPI for 2001 has fallen by 6% to below our target level.
This was achieved by minimising energy consumption
increases, despite increases in production volumes.
We continue to invest in an energy plan that concentrates on
reducing our energy costs. A number of major projects
60
planned for 2002 include the replacement of our main site
air compressor and the installation of nitrogen generation
40
TARGET
facilities. The energy team has also begun an internal cam20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
paign to highlight the relationship between energy efficiency, overall process efficiency and good maintenance
practices.
We anticipate a slight increase in our EPI in 2002, due to
the construction and validation of an extension to our main
production plant, which will not enter production until 2003.
Lisheen Mine
120
Our energy usage increased during the year due to pro105.63
100.00
80
105.63
duction ramp-up, as reflected in our increased EPI.
100
However, also during that period an energy awareness team
was established to review energy usage throughout the site.
In addition, a number of energy saving projects were suc-
60
cessfully undertaken, including the installation of ‘off’ timers
on underground fans and the implementation of a fan switch-
40
TARGET
ing schedule for main ventilation fans in unoccupied areas.
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Masonite Ireland
80
Masonite is a new member to the Large Industry Energy
95.00
100.00
100
Network (LIEN). One of our corporate goals is the minimisation of environmental impact. Already, our site has the
environmental advantage of producing large thermal
60
energy volumes using biomass wood fuels that have a carbon dioxide- neutral classification.
40
We intend to be an active member of the LIEN to maximise
potential energy saving from initiatives identified. We have
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
carefully considered our position on energy use and documented this in our energy policy statement. In addition, an
energy management team has been created to identify
opportunities to improve energy performance.
In 2002, we intend to reduce our EPI by 5% by monitoring
and targeting electrical energy use in all operations across
the site.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
50
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland)
90.00
80
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland) Ltd was pleased to be
92.04
100.00
100
invited to join the Large Industry Energy Network and
became a member in 2001. The site has been involved with
Sustainable Energy Ireland through the Boiler Awards
60
Scheme since 1999.
In April 2000, Merck & Co launched a campaign to reduce
40
energy consumption at each of its manufacturing sites
TARGET
worldwide. Since then more than 30 sites have agreed to
20
take up the challenge of cutting energy use by at least 2%
02
Tipperary, we responded to this challenge by setting up an
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
each year. At the Merck Sharp & Dohme site in south
energy management team in 2000.
The report from an energy consultant who was commissioned by the team to complete a comprehensive energy
audit of the site has formed the basis for the energy saving
projects currently in progress.
Energy saving projects to date have focused on boiler efficiency, steam distribution systems, compressed air systems,
wastewater treatment plant operations and lighting.
Micro-Bio Ireland Ltd, Fermoy
80.00
resulted in a disimprovement in our EPI. However, energy
74.80
60
76.49
81.08
year as a result of increases in product output. This has
86.21
80
Total energy consumption increased by 11.9% during the
95.65
100.00
100
usage would have been significantly greater if it were not for
the installation of improved technology including our new
electrolysis plant in 1998.
40
During the past year, we undertook a programme of replacing all motors with energy efficient models, based on the
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
findings of a site energy audit, which indicated an average
payback period of 10 months for the project. In addition, all
new motors were specified as energy efficient. Also a new
effluent treatment plant was installed, which contributes to
energy saving as gravity feed is now employed instead of
pumped delivery. In early 2002 we plan to install four variable speed drives to motive systems.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
51
NEC Semiconductors Ireland Ltd
Our anticipated EPI was exceeded during 2001, due to an
140
increase in oil consumption for heating purposes; our elec-
60
tricity costs increased also. Energy-saving projects were con-
99.37
101.40
tinued, but investment in these projects has been reduced in
92.83
100.00
80
116.48
100
95.89
120
127.95
145.09
160
the short term due to the current market situation for our
Application Specific Integrated Circuits products, which are
predominantly used in the European automotive industry.
TARGET
40
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
The EPI for Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd continues to improve.
100.00
100
The main drivers of this improvement were increased
80
demand and change in product mix. There was also a significant reduction in natural gas usage due to increases in
liquid waste incineration.
55.68
An audit of our chilled water system identified opportuni42.55
26.24
20
ties for savings, some of which were also reflected in our
26.51
40
50.39
60.00
60
01
02
improved performance this year. In addition, our Energy
Review Group was refocused to provide support to the site's
major energy customers.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
Our goal for 2002 is a reduction of 1% in carbon dioxide
emission per kilogram produced, in line with our corporate
objectives. Further improvements in the management of
energy demand should come from facilitating the largest
energy customers in assessing their energy use. The key
objective for the Energy Review Group will be to provide
relevant and valuable energy use information and analysis
to the users.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
52
Outokumpu (Tara Mines) Ltd
140
World zinc prices, which had been trending downwards for
some time, reached the point in 2001 where commercial
120.61
126.96
111.82
107.80
110.15
107.82
80
108.35
100
100.00
120
operations at Tara Mines could no longer be sustained, and
a decision was taken to suspend operations for a period
from mid-November 2001. This move was intended to
reduce costs until the markets recovered. However, they
60
also had an obvious negative impact on our EPI for the year.
40
20
TARGET
During this period, three significant capital projects, all having energy saving and efficiency improvement components,
02
commissioned and the third was almost complete.
were progressed and, at the time of reporting, two were
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
A major maintenance upgrade of the entire plant, costing
in the region of €13 million, also commenced, and this too
will have a significant energy saving impact when production
resumes. These measures illustrate the company’s ongoing
positive attitude to energy saving and the environment.
06 : Boiler Efficiency
Boiler efficiency: Wellman International
2000-2001
across the turndown range. Meanwhile, a revamped
2001-2002
condensate return collection system, together with
4
upgraded steam traps throughout the plant, boosts
the feedwater to a temperature of over 90°C.
3
The installation has resulted in energy savings of
GWh 2
7GWh per annum, or 25% of the previous boilers’
consumption. Improved reliability and lower mainte-
1
nance are additional benefits.
0
Jul
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Wellman International has dramatically reduced
energy consumption by replacing two older boilers
with new plant.
The company uses large quantities of high and low
pressure steam in the production of polyester and
nylon staple fibre, and originally this steam was
derived from heavy fuel oil. However, a switch was
made to natural gas when this fuel became locally
available. As a consequence of the conversion the
boiler plant was de-rated, and its inefficiencies
became apparent. After a detailed investigation, a
decision was taken to replace the two old boilers with
a 8,000kg/hr Wellman Robey boiler incorporating a
low-NOx natural gas burner.
The new furnace and tube bank design provides an
efficiency of over 80%, with minimum reduction
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
53
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Little Island
100
100.00
We are experiencing a period of significant change in the
plant, with increasing production volumes and related
80
investment. Thus, it is difficult to produce precise energy
63.90
60.71
reduction figures. However, our declining EPI illustrates our
60
success in keeping energy consumption under control. Our
actual energy usage fell by 19% while production volumes
increased by 27% on the previous year.
40
TARGET
We are confident that the launch of our three-year energy
20
management programme, which will be based on an inte-
02
energy awareness, technology improvements and improved
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
grated approach to energy management and includes
information through a new M&T system will result in continuing reduction in energy consumption and related greenhouse gases.
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg
420
360
Our EPI dramatically improved in 2001 due to the efficiencies gained through increases in production output. Overall
406.87
474.24
480
energy consumption was also reduced due to a focus on
thermal energy reduction initiatives, and both our electrical
300
60
0
95
96
97
Thermal energy consumption is expected to be reduced further in 2002, and there is now a growing commitment to, and
awareness of, the need for management of electrical energy
TARGET
100.00
120
140.30
180
248.56
244.26
261.64
and thermal energy EPIs fell during the year.
240
98
99
00
01
on site.
The site was awarded ISO14001 accreditation during the year.
02
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Ringaskiddy
240
We are firmly committed to the conservation of energy and
resources.
200.88
200
154.52
160
on site, and the measured EPI is expected to remain inflated
TARGET
above past levels until these new facilities are fully commis-
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
2002 are a result of significant expansion of site facilities.
The increase in EPI is due to growth in production capacity
94.51
73.36
74.31
40
75.89
93.76
80
100.00
120
Increased energy usage in 2001 and projected increases in
01
02
sioned and operating to capacity.
In the year ahead, we will continue to investigate opportunities for improved energy efficiencies through the use of new
technologies and practices.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
54
95.50
96.46
Our EPI deteriorated somewhat over the past year. This is
91.97
97.65
92.03
91.28
80
92.95
100.00
Premier Periclase Ltd
100
attributable to major environmental plant which was commissioned early in the year, and slightly reduced production for the year as a whole, both of which had negative influ-
60
ences on energy efficiencies.
The increase in EPI would have been higher, however, had
40
it not been for a reduction in electricity usage as a result of
TARGET
major investment in a new filtration system. In addition, the
20
installation of a petroleum coke system has allowed some
02
icantly in price.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
fuel substitution for natural gas, which has increased signif-
07 : Energy Management
Re-invigorated energy management at Hewlett-Packard
During the past year, HP
has re-invigorated its
energy management team
with the goal of ensuring a
focused approach to driving down energy usage on
the site.
Energy management is now co-ordinated through a
structured process of continuous improvement,
based on data accumulation, and leading on to analysis, planning, implementation, control and monitoring;
through to review and further data collection. The
steps are as follows:
Data on electrical usage is accumulated on a
weekly basis from a kWh reading of the
Powerlogic system, and on a monthly basis from
utility bills. Likewise, data on natural gas usage is
collated both from gas bills and the building management system (BMS) meter readings, and data
on water consumption is gathered from BMS and
mains supply meter readings.
This data is then processed using Pareto and
other forms of analysis in order to gain meaningful information about the major energy users and
their needs. At this stage, any potential barriers to
progress such as time or financial limitations are
also identified.
Next, planning is set in train in order to formulate
policy, gain commitment from financial management, and set objectives and targets.
Monthly brainstorming meetings take place, with
the aim of identifying potential energy saving projects, using materials from Sustainable Energy
Ireland, overseas energy agencies and suppliers
for inspiration. Ideas, along with responsibilities
and actual savings made, are tracked on a project register. Potential projects are divided into
zero, low-to-medium and high cost categories.
Zero-cost projects are set in train immediately,
while other projects form part of an action plan to
be submitted for investment approval. At the meeting, approved projects are scheduled, and an
action plan is drawn up for their completion.
Throughout this process, members of the energy
management team ensure that all the staff members involved are adequately trained, and that the
engagement of those in production and management is sought.
Actual performance is monitored against targets,
checking data against key indicators such as
degree-days. Progress is reviewed on the project
register, and each leader provides an update. New
loads added to or removed from the plant are
reviewed, and a monthly report is presented to
senior management and staff.
This process allows for trends to be established and
month-on-month and year-on-year results to be compared, and this in turn is fed into a yearly management report and review. There is an ongoing focus on
continually investigating new projects and measures,
and on reviewing all of the previous steps.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
55
points, and into the future, Pure Fresh Dairies is committed
82.16
86.48
96.19
91.73
93.64
80
In 2001, we improved our EPI by a significant 10 percentage
93.23
98.71
100
100.00
Pure Fresh Dairies Ltd
to an ongoing emphasis on energy management.
During the past year, we achieved energy savings by reduc-
60
ing the operating pressure of our steam boiler from 7.5 bar
to 5 bar.
40
In the year ahead, we intend to focus on a number of areas,
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
including our electricity supplier’s winter demand reduction
scheme, air compressor output, the use of invertors where
applicable and more energy efficient lighting.
02
Roche Ireland Ltd
280
199.71
160
which also provide a large proportion of our steam needs.
208.03
200
sumption figures for our on-site incineration processes,
230.78
246.72
240
272.47
For the 2001 reporting year, we have included energy con-
eration plant was commissioned to give a more accurate
EPI, thus figures have changed from previous years.
105.98
In 2001, plant throughput increased and we operated
TARGET
101.45
100.00
120
80
These figures have been backdated to 1999 when the incin-
40
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
steadily, observing our established energy management
procedures. This increase in production accounts for most
of the improvement in EPI, and for 2002 we envisage a continuation of this trend.
No major projects were undertaken during the year.
Saehan Media Ireland Ltd
120
During the past year, we re-established our energy-saving
cal people at Saehan Media.
91.79
94.63
86.01
99.62
92.58
89.57
100.00
80
106.67
committee, bringing together both production and techni-
100
Unfortunately, our EPI increased substantially over the year,
due to intensive R&D activities, resulting in significant inter-
60
ruptions to production.
40
TARGET
Our target for 2002 is to increase manufacturing output by
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
5%. Planned energy-saving projects include the installation
of an energy efficient water chiller and the reduction of
steam heating to an ageing tower.
02
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
56
Schering-Plough (Avondale) Co.
increases in staff numbers and associated increases in
accommodation.
Among the energy efficiency projects carried out was the
TARGET
0
96
97
98
sumption. Total energy consumption for the year was up by
ble to a number of factors including facility expansions,
40
95
tion activity, rather than significant increases in energy con6.8%, which although lower than anticipated, was attributa-
85.29
82.48
81.54
80
100.00
120
137.03
146.69
160
Our increased EPI for 2001 reflects a reduction in produc190.00
196.87
200
99
00
01
02
commissioning of a steam stripper. This removes volatile
organic compounds (VOCs) from our wastewater and feeds
them to our thermal oxidiser, reducing supplemental fuel
requirements. This resulted in significant net energy reductions, with the potential of cutting total annual fuel consumption by up to 3%.
Ongoing projects include the conversion of our boiler to
natural gas. This project will incorporate energy efficient
technologies, including the installation of an economiser
and variable speed drives.
Schering-Plough (Brinny) Co.
of our production buildings undergoing a major upgrade,
72.38
61.77
68.70
60
72.38
which lasted for six months.
81.29
83.98
80
Our EPI deteriorated during the past 12 months due to one
85.35
100.00
100
One example of a project carried out during the year
involved the conversion of an older boiler, operating in
standby mode, from heavy fuel oil to diesel fuel. Natural gas
40
has recently been introduced to the site, and this is an
interim measure put in place until the boiler is eventually
TARGET
20
replaced with a new gas-burning model.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
78.01
82.99
80.43
80.73
88.70
80
Over the year, a new warehouse extension increased the
93.26
97.87
100.00
SerCom Solutions
100
overall square footage of the site by 23%, which is reflected
in a slight increase in energy consumption and EPI. However,
this was not to the degree that would have occurred if no
energy conservation measures had been put in place.
60
In fact, over the period March to November 2000, a 31%
40
reduction in maximum electricity demand was achieved
through the implementation of many energy saving projects,
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
including PIR (Passive Infra Red) lighting installations in
three areas – offices, corridors, and production areas, compressed air system improvements, timer installations and
boiler improvements.
SerCom Solutions, a DCC plc company, is very proud of its
progress in 2001, and will continue to implement more
energy saving projects in 2002 in line with the ongoing
energy strategy to which top management are committed.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
57
88.99
89.89
89.55
90.55
92.95
90.48
80
During the past year, our EPI deteriorated slightly due to a
93.88
100
100.00
Smurfit Paper Mills Ltd
number of factors.
Changes to our market and higher quality requirements
necessitated a change to our raw material mix, which
60
required the use of additional cleaning equipment.
Furthermore, higher landfill costs affected the quality of the
40
raw material by introducing higher contaminants, and this
TARGET
in turn meant that additional energy was required for pro20
cessing. Nevertheless, the increase to the EPI was kept to
02
The higher target index for 2002 shows an improvement of
a minimum through improved internal efficiencies.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
just 0.9 percentage points ahead of the 2001 figure, but it
is our intention to improve on this.
St Francis Abbey Brewery
140
126.62
108.89
105.33
80
106.48
100.00
100
102.26
120
126.62
Our EPI increased substantially over the past year due
largely to increased activity in the hygiene preparation of
process plant and equipment, and a reduction in our
throughput volumes.
We are currently undertaking a comprehensive review of
the operation of utilities plant with a view to identifying fur-
60
ther opportunities for making savings in the area of water
40
TARGET
and electricity consumption and effluent production. This
20
report is due to be completed shortly.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Takeda Ireland Ltd
Our production output increased by 86% on the year 2000,
100.00
100
helping to reduce our EPI by over 24 percentage points or
by 30% relative to 2000.
80.63
80
The year ahead will see additional increases in output, and
40
we hope that this will further improve our EPI.
54.78
56.47
60
The projects to be undertaken in 2002 should allow us to
reduce energy consumption and also enable us to identify
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
areas to target for further improvements.
Specifically, we intend to install and commission a utilities
metering system, feeding readings into the existing building management system (BMS) PC in our engineering
office. The services that will be covered include steam,
chilled water, low-pressure hot water, compressed air, mains
water, cold water, hot water, natural gas and nitrogen.
We also hope to install an energy management software
package that will assist us with reporting. We expect this
work to be completed by the end of July 2003.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
58
75.31
77.48
grated into Galway. During the first half of the year, produc76.85
60
82.14
2001. Our Dublin facility was closed and its production inte75.66
80
There were major changes for Thermo King Ireland during
92.48
98.75
100
100.00
Thermo King Europe
tion figures were down substantially, but improved considerably in the latter part of the year.
For 2002, additional product integrations are planned for
40
Galway, and the focus is shifting toward assembly and away
from in-house fabrication.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
A new air compressor incorporating variable speed drive
technology will be installed as the primary compressed air
source, and this is expected to yield savings of approximately
€13,000 annually in energy costs.
Due to the variety of unit types now being produced, we have
changed our output factor for calculating EPI from ‘units of
product’ to ‘thousands of kgs of product’. This will introduce
an element of consistency irrespective of our product mix.
Transitions Optical Ltd
160
80
137.43
130.18
100.00
100
move to manufacturing a lower-volume speciality product.
A significant proportion of Transition Optical’s energy consumption is not directly related to the volume of product
manufactured, as the majority of energy use is for produc-
112.28
120
152.70
Production volumes in our facility have decreased due to our
140
ing cleanroom air at a defined humidity. Consequently, the
decrease in production numbers caused our energy use
60
per unit and our EPI figure to increase.
TARGET
40
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
In absolute terms, however, our total energy use dropped by
8%, and we attribute this to a number of energy savings projects undertaken during the year. Two of the main projects
were the installation of variable speed drives on our larger air
handling units and the initiation of controlled trials on the
effect of increased humidity on the quality of our product.
We also worked on a series of smaller projects, such as
increasing chiller temperature set points and lowering boiler
temperature set points, and reprogrammed our chiller farm
to utilise a duty chiller, which lowered energy consumption.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
59
Tyco Healthcare, Athlone
91.12
92.04
93.22
91.25
82.76
80
Our EPI improved slightly over the past 12 months.
97.49
100.00
100
During 2001, we established an equipment shutdown procedure, which must be verified by the respective manufacturing supervisor signature thus avoiding non-scheduled
60
equipment being left in the running or idling mode.
Other initiatives include the establishment of a monthly plant
40
and equipment check for air leaks. During the period 2001
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
to 2002, we made a commitment to ESB that during winter
maximum demand periods we would run our standby generators if required.
02
During Energy Awareness Week we made information such
as flyers, posters and literature available to our staff, to highlight the importance of energy efficiency within the workplace and within the home.
79.47
79.87
75.90
69.42
60
79.73
Production volumes increased without a significant increase
73.54
80
2001 was a very successful year for the company.
89.41
100.00
Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart
100
in overall energy use on a per unit output basis. Significant
improvements were made in electricity use due to the installation of a higher efficiency aeration system, in the latest
expansion of the wastewater treatment facility. A full survey
of steam traps was also carried out, resulting in a number of
40
improvements to the condensate collection system.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
A full energy audit was performed by an external consultant to indicate the direction for further energy saving investments in the year 2002, and a project team has been set
up to study the best deployment of investment funds to optimise the energy use on site in the years ahead.
Unifi Textured Yarns Europe Ltd
Our EPI has been negatively impacted by a 25% reduction
100.00
86.01
87.77
81.69
73.11
60
77.12
in textured output coupled with the fact that our energy con81.20
80
75.09
100
sumption in the raw material stage has remained constant.
Product mix has also impacted on the EPI, with a 25 tonne
per week reduction in twisting volume in favour of a focus on
higher value-added production of more specialist product,
40
which has a higher energy cost per unit.
TARGET
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
On the positive side, however, we have established an
Energy Monitoring Team and an Action Plan. Furthermore,
initiatives in the area of energy efficient lighting have
amounted to savings of €42,600 per annum, and ongoing
projects include the conversion of compressors to low-pressure generation and the review of product specifications to
reduce air consumption.
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
60
08 : Energy Teams
Targeting no- and low-cost energy saving projects: Pfizer, Little Island
Over the past year, Pfizer Little Island has made annu-
philosophy that when staff members reported a leak
alised energy savings of over €150,000. These sav-
and it was fixed immediately, they would be more likely
ings are all the more remarkable as are they were
to report another leak in the future. Other projects
achieved largely through no- and low-cost projects,
involved assessing how particular requirements had
and they illustrate well the kinds of savings that can be
changed over time, and adjusting controllers accord-
achieved through teamwork.
ingly, temperature control being the focus of one of
The Little Island site spends an average of €2.5 mil-
the projects in this area.
lion per year on energy and water, and energy is its
As well as driving energy savings through technical
sixth biggest cost. The energy team comprises four
projects, the energy team attempted to bring about
members: two from engineering, and two from the
behaviour changes among staff in areas such as
environmental health and safety department. Their
switching off lighting and equipment when not
aim is to reduce site consumption by 5 per cent over
needed. An awareness campaign was run for the first
the next year.
time ever on site, and a high quality newsletter, Energy
The initial emphasis on low- and no-cost measures
was aimed at building up credibility, to gain support
Matters, was distributed, promoting the slogan ‘The
power is in your hands.’
from management for more ambitious energy projects
The majority of the projects involved very little expen-
that might demand significant capital expenditure in
diture, with the costs being in the form of person-
the future, and to raise awareness among all staff of
hours rather than money. The only project involving
the real difference that energy-saving initiatives could
significant capital expenditure was the installation of
make to the bottom line. In total, 34 separate projects
variable speed drives on the boiler feed-water pumps
were carried out over a 12 month period. For example,
and forced draught fan. This investment totalled
the team examined the HVAC system: simple meas-
€15,000, with a payback of 12 to 15 months and addi-
ures, such as cleaning the coils and reducing the
tional advantages in terms of producing a quieter
pressure drop by selecting different filters, allowed the
working environment.
fan running speeds to be reduced from 100% to 80%
of full speed This represents an energy saving of
close to 50% for the same airflow.
The plant currently has an energy monitoring and targeting study in progress, and the aim for the future is
to establish an Energy Accounting Centre for each
Another area of focus was on the cooling water strat-
building, so that responsibility for energy efficiency is
egy for the condensers. Here, flow restrictions were
handed over to the manager of each area.
implemented, forcing the cooling water to flow more
slowly through the system and, as a result, to absorb
more heat. Leaks in the air/water nitrogen systems
were also targeted. The cooling water valves, for
example, were completely overhauled, and the energy
team operated to a prompt turnaround, based on the
All this work has been carried out in the context of a
three-year plan for energy management in the plant.
The plan outlines plant-wide responsibility for energy,
and sets specific targets for savings. It is reviewed
and updated on an annual basis.
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
61
Waterford Crystal Ltd
Due to the events of September 11, the tourist trade took a
100.00
100
rapid downturn. This has resulted in production at Waterford
Crystal being reduced dramatically and accounts for our
81.76
80
increase in EPI.
60
were implemented during this period.
29.19
However, Waterford Crystal continues to pursue existing
29.19
20
26.94
32.89
40
47.79
53.96
As a knock-on effect of these events, no major schemes
01
02
energy management practices, and we are dedicated to
reducing our EPI for 2002.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
Wellman International Ltd
120
despite essential maintenance that necessitated removing
104.43
106.56
107.11
109.67
106.90
98.50
80
100.00
100
102.70
In 2001 we achieved a reduction of about 0.5% in our EPI
insulation from two of our dryers, which had a negative
impact of 2% on our gas consumption. This was more than
compensated for by the completion of a number of energyefficiency projects, resulting in the overall improvement in
60
EPI. A new 8,000 kg/hr high-pressure boiler was commis40
TARGET
sioned, flash steam from condensate was recovered to heat
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
process water, and a new 110 kW (810 CFM) screw compressor was installed. Insulation was applied to a number
of extruder barrels, and the lighting in the sorting department was upgraded. The full benefits of these projects will
be seen in 2002.
Also during 2002, we plan to install a second 100 kW (810
CFM) screw compressor. Additionally, we plan to install an
economiser on the new boiler, insulate the remaining
extruder barrels, re-insulate dryers where necessary, and
introduce a maintenance schedule to combat compressed air leaks.
Wessel Energy Cables Ltd
120
A 10% increase in throughput in 2001 resulted in decreased
96.66
98.63
102.69
81.05
83.40
97.44
100.00
80
101.47
energy usage per km produced, due to fixed energy costs –
100
such as heating and lighting – being spread over a larger
production volume. This is reflected in our improved EPI.
Work on power factor correction has cut electricity usage, and
60
work on building insulation has cut gas heating requirements.
TARGET
40
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Previous Target
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
62
Western Proteins
120
Despite throughput being up, our EPI has increased. The
95.67
100.00
80
100.70
main factors behind this trend were modifications made for
100
environmental reasons, and changes in the processing
conditions driven by customer requirements, which entailed
a greater utilisation of steam energy for heat treatment.
60
During 2002, energy savings will be achieved by the commissioning of condensate recovery equipment and the
40
TARGET
automated control of aeration equipment.
20
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
84.56
84.56
demands have increased, although our EPI has remained
84.88
92.06
90.44
81.72
80
Due to ongoing plant expansions, our overall energy
97.86
100.00
Wyeth Medica Ireland Ltd
100
60
stable. Increases in demand will continue over the next several years, as more expansions are planned.
Following major overhauls, the CHP unit is now performing
satisfactorily, and better results are anticipated in 2002. A
40
sharp gas price increase (65.2%) on January 1, has forced
TARGET
us to shut the unit over the nighttime period, but various
20
options are being examined that may make it viable to run
02
As in recent expansions, energy-efficient lighting (electronic
the unit at night.
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
ballasts) will be installed in all future additions. Selected
areas are also being retrofitted with electronic ballast fittings,
and motion detectors/presence detectors are being
installed to switch off lighting when the building is unoccupied. Additionally, variable speed drives and energy efficient
motors are being specified.
Yamanouchi Ireland Co. Ltd
200
duced having caused a significant reduction in the usage
per tonne of product processed.
Energy remains an important element of the site’s environ-
96.73
mental policy and is reported as part of our EMAS statement.
TARGET
40
89.67
66.45
100.00
80
101.93
120
to variations in the amount and type of pharmaceuticals pro-
141.85
160
149.31
177.57
Our EPI improved strongly over the past year. This was due
0
95
96
97
98
99
00
01
02
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
10. MEMBER LISTING
63
Abbott Ireland, Cavan
Irish Fertilizer Industries Ltd
Aer Rianta, Dublin
Irish Shell Ltd
Allergan Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Irish Sugar Ltd
Analog Devices BV
Janssen Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Atlas Aluminium
Klinge Pharma
Aughinish Alumina
Kostal Ireland
Bausch & Lomb Ireland (Contact Lens Division)
Lakeland Daries, Bailieboro
Baxter Healthcare S.A.
Leo Laboratories
Becton Dickinson Insulin Syringe Ltd
Lisheen Mine
Boston Scientific Ireland Ltd, Galway
Masonite Ireland
Braun Ireland Ltd
Merck Sharp & Dohme (Ireland)
Bristol-Myers Squibb, Swords
Micro-Bio Ireland Ltd, Fermoy
Buckeye Technologies Ireland Ltd
NEC Semiconductors Ireland Ltd
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Dublin
Novartis Ringaskiddy Ltd
Cadbury Ireland Ltd, Kerry
Outokumpu (Tara Mines) Ltd
Cantrell and Cochrane Ireland Ltd
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Little Island
Carbery Milk Products Ltd
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Loughbeg
Cognis Ireland Ltd
Pfizer Ireland Pharmaceuticals, Ringaskiddy
ConocoPhillips, Whitegate Refinery
Premier Periclase Ltd
Dairygold Co-op Society
Pure Fresh Dairies Ltd
Dawn Meats, Ballyhaunis
Roche Ireland Ltd
Diageo Ireland, St James’s Gate
Saehan Media Ireland Ltd
Dundalk Brewery
Schering-Plough (Avondale) Co.
Elan Pharma Ltd
Schering-Plough (Brinny) Co.
Element Six
SerCom Solutions
Eli Lilly S.A. – Irish Branch
Smurfit Paper Mills Ltd
Fruitfield Foods Ltd
St Francis Abbey Brewery
Garrett Engine Boosting Systems
Takeda Ireland Ltd
Glanbia Ingredients, Virginia
Thermo King Europe
Glanbia Meats, Roscrea
Transitions Optical Ltd
Glanbia Meats, Ruskey
Tyco Healthcare, Athlone
Glanbia Plc, Ballyragget
Tyco Healthcare, Mulhuddart
Glanbia Plc, Inch
Unifi Textured Yarns Europe Ltd
GlaxoSmithKline, Cork
Waterford Crystal Ltd
GlaxoSmithKline, Dungarvan
Wellman International Ltd
Gypsum Industries Ltd
Wessel Energy Cables Ltd
HJ Heinz
Western Proteins
Hewlett-Packard (Manufacturing) Ltd
Wyeth Medica Ireland Ltd
IBM Technology Campus
Yamanouchi Ireland Co. Ltd
Intel Ireland Ltd
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
11. USEFUL SOURCES OF INFORMATION
64
Websites:
Action Energy UK
www.actionenergy.co.uk
American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy
www.aceee.org/altsites/index.htm
Bord Gáis Éireann
www.bge.ie
Centre for the Analysis and Dissemination of
Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET)
http://caddet-ee.org/
Cogen Europe
www.cogen.org
Combined Heat and Power Association, UK
www.chpa.co.uk
Commission for Energy Regulation
www.cer.ie
Department of Communications, Marine & Natural Resources
www.marine.gov.ie
Department of the Environment and Local Government
www.environ.ie
EC Cordis database
www.cordis.lu
EC Directorate General for Energy
www.europa.eu.int/comm/dgs/energy _transport/index_en.html
Eirgrid
www.eirgrid.com
Energy Ireland 2002
www.energyireland.net
Energy Star United States Environmental Protection Agency
http://yosemite1.epa.gov/Estar/business.nsf/webmenus/industry
www.energystar.gov/default.shtml
Environmental News Network
www.enn.com/
Environmental Protection Agency
www.epa.ie
ESB Energy Efficiency information
www.esb.ie/main/energy_business/energy_intro.jsp
European Commission Representation in Ireland
www.euireland.ie/news/trans
European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy
www.eceee.org
European Energy Network
www.enr.network.org
IBEC
www.ibec.ie
Index Ireland
www.indexireland.com/business_and_finance/energy
Institute for Global Communications Energy Links
www.igc.org/econet
International Energy Agency (IEA)
www.iea.org
Northern Ireland Centre for Energy, Research & Technology
www.ulst.ac.uk/faculty/science/nicert
Sustainable Energy Development
Authority New South Wales Australia
www.seda.nsw.gov.au
Sustainable Energy Ireland
www.sei.ie
USA Office of Industrial Technologies
www.oit.doe.gov
UK Government Energy Efficiency
Best Practice Programme (EEBPP)
www.energy-efficiency.gov.uk
US Department of Energy
www.eren.doe.gov
World Energy Efficiency Association
www.weea.org/
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
12. THE LARGE INDUSTRY ENERGY NETWORK OBJECTIVES
For the members of the Large Industry Energy Network, the primary objectives are to
adopt a responsible approach to managing energy use, and to minimise their energy bills.
For Sustainable Energy Ireland, the objectives are somewhat broader than that; the principal current objectives of the LIEN include the following:
1
To develop a core of major players within Irish indus-
To engage not less than 33 per cent of the overall
Irish industry spend on energy in active energy man-
ongoing voluntary programme of energy and emis-
agement.
sions reduction.
2
4
try who are publicly and proactively committed to an
5
To achieve overall energy cost savings, within the mem-
To create a network of companies which are willing to
bers of the Network, and to reduce emissions to the
share knowledge and experience with one another in
environment.
order to maximise the energy savings that are possible.
3
To contribute to the competitiveness of Irish industry by
assisting in reducing energy costs to a minimum, using
the most effective means available.
Large Industry Energy Network contacts
Orla Thornton
Membership Support Assistant
Tel: +353 1 808 2087
Email: [email protected]
Fiona Murray
Project Manager
Tel: +353 1 808 2098
Email: [email protected]
Large Industry Energy Network
Annual Report 2001 : 2002
65
t +353 1 8369080
Glasnevin
f +353 1 8372848
Dublin 9
e [email protected]
Ireland
w www.sei.ie
Sustainable Energy Ireland is funded by the
Irish Government under the National
Development Plan 2000-2006 with programmes
part financed by the European Union
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