qb3art00
Network Station Manager for S/390
To view or print the update, go to:http://www.as400.ibm.com/networkstation/s390
SC31-8546-00
Network Station Manager for S/390
To view or print the update, go to:http://www.as400.ibm.com/networkstation/s390
SC31-8546-00
Note:
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general information under “Notices” on page ix.
This book is also available in a softcopy form that can be viewed with the IBM BookManager READ program.
First Edition (June 1997)
This edition applies to OS/390 (5645-001) and TCP/IP and to TCP/IP Version 2 Release 4 for VM/ESA (5735-FAL). See the
“Summary of Changes” for a description of the changes made in this edition. Make sure you are using the correct edition for the level
of the product.
Order publications through your IBM representative or the IBM branch office serving your locality. Publications are not stocked at the
address below.
IBM welcomes your comments. A form for readers' comments may be at the back of this publication. If the form has been removed,
you may send your comments to the following address:
International Business Machines Corporation
Department CGMD
P.O. Box 12195
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USA
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appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.
Contents
Notices .
Trademarks
ix
ix
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About IBM Network Station Manager for S/390, SC31-8546-00
Who Should use this Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information Available on the World Wide Web . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 1. Introduction to the IBM Network Station Manager
What Does an IBM Network Station Look Like? . . . . . . . . . .
How Does the IBM Network Station Communicate with the Host?
What is Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)? . . . .
What is Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What is Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)?
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What is Time Protocol Daemon (TIMED)? . . . . . . . . . . . .
What is Network Station Login Daemon (NSLD)?
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How Do I Manage the IBM Network Stations? . . . . . . . . . . .
What is the IBM Network Station Manager Program? . . . . .
What is the IBM Setup Utility? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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What Are User Services?
Using the IBM Network Station Roadmap . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
General Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning for DHCP for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning for BOOTP for VM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Information for VM Chart . . . . . . .
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Chapter 3. Installing the Network Station Manager . . . . . . . . . . . .
Product Installation Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing from Tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Downloading and Installing IBM Network Station Products from an IBM Web
Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4. Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390 4-1
Setting the ICS Server Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Specifying the ICS Server User ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Mapping to the URL
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Setting up Basic Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Updating the NLSPATH variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Verifying the ICS Server NLSPATH setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Accessing the IBM Network Station Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Displaying Images of GIF Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Verifying Message Catalog Accessible for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Chapter 5. Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server
for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How Does DHCP Work?
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Acquiring Configuration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Renewing Leases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving a Client Out of its Subnet? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Implementing Changes in the Network? . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up a DHCP Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a Scoped Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Handling Errors in Configuration Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Maintaining the DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring the DHCP Server for the IBM Network Station Client
Multiple Local Subnet Restriction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 6. Configuring the Bootstrap Protocol Server for VM
Setting the BOOTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 7. Configuring the Trivial File Transfer Protocol Server
Considerations for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Considerations for VM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 8. Configuring the Network Station Login Daemon Server
NSLD for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NSLD for VM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Update the NSLD Profile EXEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NSLD Subcommands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager
Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 3270 Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the IBM Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Browser News - What is the Latest? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Browser Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Browser MIME Types:
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IBM Browser URL Types Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About IBM Network Station Browser Functions . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the IBM Browser Encryption Level for Improved Transaction
Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the Navio NC Navigator Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navio NC Navigator Browser News - What is the Latest? . . . . . . . . .
Navio NC Navigator Browser Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navio NC Navigator MIME Types: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Navio NC Navigator URL Types Supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About Navio NC Navigator Browser Functions . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JAVA VM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What Is Java? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What do I do with Java? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What are Java Applications and Applets? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Starting an Applet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where do I find Additional Information on Java?
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Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview . . . . . . . . . .
Who can use the IBM Network Station Manager Program? . . . . . .
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults . . . .
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program using a Browser .
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks Examples
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Hardware Settings - User Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Settings - System Defaults Example . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Startup Settings Example
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Desktop Manager Example
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5250 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3270 Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples . . . . . .
Setting up an AIX Session using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up a Windows NT Session using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Network Station Manager Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 11. Working with User Services
Accessing User Services . . . . . . . . . .
Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
WindowMgr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
Defining Global Values
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Defining Vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Subnets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Subnet Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Additional Options
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Transforming Canonical Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 12. Working with the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility . . . . . . . . . . . .
F2 = View Network Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F3 = View Boot Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F4 = View Hardware Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F5 = Set Network Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F6 = Set Boot Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F7 = Set Monitor Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F8 = Set Language Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
F9 = Verbose Diagnostic Messages (Enabled or Disabled) . . . .
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Defining Clients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Options and an IP Address for a DHCP Client . . .
Configuring Options for a DHCP Client, Allowing Any IP Address
Excluding a Client ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Excluding an IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Excluding a Range of IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reserving Values for a Specific BOOTP Client . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying the Next Bootstrap Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying the Bootfile Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Server and Lease Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining Lease Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checking for Expired Leases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying Offering Hold Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Querying In-use Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Specifying DHCP Server Responses to BOOTP Requests . . .
Specifying DHCP Server Responses to Unregistered Clients . .
Specifying Statistics Snapshots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining DHCP Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Defining the Number of DHCP Log Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DHCP Server Configuration Files
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Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options . . . . .
Configuration File Option Data Formats . . . . . . .
Option Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Base Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 1, Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 2, Time Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 3, Router . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 4, Time Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 5, Name Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 7, Log Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 8, Cookie Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 9, LPR Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 10, Impress Server . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 11, Resource Location Server
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Option 12, Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 13, Boot File Size . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 14, Merit Dump File
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Option 15, Domain Name . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 16, Swap Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 17, Root Path . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 18, Extensions Path . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Layer Parameters per Host Options . . . . . . .
Option 19, IP Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 20, Non-Local Source Routing . . . . . .
Option 21, Policy Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 22, Maximum Datagram Reassembly Size
Option 23, Default IP Time-To-Live . . . . . . . .
Option 24, Path MTU Aging Timeout . . . . . . .
Option 25, Path MTU Plateau Table . . . . . . .
IP Layer Parameters per Interface Options . . . . .
Option 26, Interface MTU
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Option 27, All Subnets are Local . . . . . . . . .
Option 28, Broadcast Address . . . . . . . . . . .
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B-7
B-7
Option 29, Perform Mask Discovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 30, Mask Supplier
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 31, Perform Router Discovery
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 32, Router Solicitation Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 33, Static Route . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Link Layer Parameters per Interface Options . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 34, Trailer Encapsulation
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 35, ARP Cache Timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 36, Ethernet Encapsulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TCP Parameter Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 37, TCP Default TTL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 38, TCP Keep-alive Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 39, TCP Keep-alive Garbage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Application and Service Parameter Options
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Information Service Domain Option 40
. . . . . . . .
Option 41, Network Information Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 42, Network Time Protocol Servers . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 43, Vendor-Specific Information
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 44, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Name Server . . . . . . . . .
Option 45, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Datagram Distribution Server
Option 46, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Node Type . . . . . . . . . .
Option 47, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 48, X Window System Font Server . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 49, X Window System Display Manager . . . . . . . . .
DHCP Extensions Options
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 50, Requested IP Address
Option 51, IP Address Lease Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 58, Renewal (T1) Time Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 59, Rebinding (T2) Time Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 60, Class-Identifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 62, NetWare/IP Domain Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 63, NetWare/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 64, NIS Domain Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 65, NIS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 66, Server Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 67, Boot File Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 68, Home Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 69, SMTP Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 70, POP3 Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 71, NNTP Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 72, WWW Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 73, Finger Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 74, IRC Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 75, StreetTalk Server
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 76, STDA Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 77, User Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 78, Directory Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 79, Service Scope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 80, Naming Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM-Specific Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 200, LPR Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix C. Hardware Types
. . . . . . .
B-7
B-7
B-8
B-8
B-8
B-8
B-8
B-8
B-8
B-9
B-9
B-9
B-9
B-9
B-10
B-10
B-10
B-10
B-10
B-10
B-10
B-11
B-11
B-11
B-11
B-12
B-12
B-12
B-12
B-12
B-13
B-13
B-13
B-13
B-13
B-13
B-14
B-14
B-14
B-14
B-14
B-14
B-14
B-15
B-15
B-15
B-15
B-15
B-15
B-15
B-16
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Contents
vii
Appendix D. Trouble Shooting and Problem Solving
Trouble Shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station . . . . . . . . .
File Transmission and Maximum Transmission Units
Problem Analysis when Running Java . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix E. National Language Support
. . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
D-1
D-5
D-5
D-6
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
E-1
. . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix F. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix G. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped
Environment Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environment Variables for OS/390 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environment Variables for VM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Index
viii
. . .
F-1
. . . . . . .
G-1
G-1
G-1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X-1
Network Station Manager for S/390
. . . . . . .
. . . . . . .
Notices
References in this publication to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply
that IBM intends to make them available in all countries in which IBM operates. Any
reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply
that only that IBM product, program, or service may be used. Subject to IBM's valid
intellectual property or other legally protectable rights, any functionally equivalent
product, program, or service may be used instead of the IBM product, program, or
service. The evaluation and verification of operation in conjunction with other products, except those expressly designated by IBM, are the responsibility of the user.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter
described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any
license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
500 Columbus Avenue
Thornwood, NY 10594
USA
Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for the purpose of
enabling: (i) the exchange of information between independently created programs
and other programs (including this one) and (ii) the mutual use of the information
which has been exchanged, should contact:
Site Counsel
IBM Corporation
P.O. Box 12195
3039 Cornwallis Road
Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2195
USA
Such information may be available, subject to appropriate terms and conditions,
including in some cases, payment of a fee.
The licensed program described in this document and all licensed material available
for it are provided by IBM under terms of the IBM Customer Agreement.
This document is not intended for production use and is furnished as is without any
warranty of any kind, and all warranties are hereby disclaimed including the warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the IBM Corporation in the United States or
other countries or both:
AS/400
IBM
OS/390
OpenEdition
Operating System/2
Notices
ix
OS/2
RS/6000
S/390
System/390
VM/ESA
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries licensed
exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Microsoft, Windows, and the Windows 95 logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries licensed
exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Java, JavaSoft, and HotJava are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Other company, product, and service names, which may be denoted by a double
asterisk (**), may be trademarks or service marks of others.
x
Network Station Manager for S/390
About IBM Network Station Manager for S/390, SC31-8546-00
Who Should use this Guide
This information is for the person who is installing and administering the IBM
Network Station Manager for OS/390 and for VM. This guide refers to you as the
IBM Network Station administrator.
Information Available on the World Wide Web
More of our product information is available on the World Wide Web. You can
access this information from our product home page, which is at the following
uniform resource locator (URL) address:
http://www.as400.ibm.com/networkstation/s390
About IBM Network Station Manager for S/390, SC31-8546-00
xi
xii
Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 1. Introduction to the IBM Network Station Manager
The IBM Network Station Manager is a desktop network computer that provides:
Low cost of ownership
Central management of software and data
Access to the Internet and corporate intranets
Simplicity in installation and administration
Graphical interface with browser-based administration features
About Names: The name of this manual is the IBM Network Station Manager for
S/390. This manual documents the licensed programs of IBM Network
Station Manager for OS/390 and for VM/ESA.
Also discussed in this manual is a program used to administer IBM Network
Stations. This program is the IBM Network Station Manager program. The
name of the licensed program and the name of this administering program
are very similar. When discussing the program that is used for administering
IBM Network Stations, the text will read IBM Network Station Manager
program. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program” on page 10-1 for specific information.
Chapter 1. Introduction to the IBM Network Station Manager
1-1
What Does an IBM Network Station Look Like?
The following diagram shows the components of the IBM Network Stations:
1 Logic unit
2 Logic unit base
3 Power module
4 Keyboard
5 Mouse
6 Cable clamps
7 Monitor
8 Memory SIMM
9 Video memory modules
1-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
How Does the IBM Network Station Communicate with the Host?
The IBM Network Station for S/390 uses:
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) for OS/390
BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) for VM
TFTP (Trivial File Transfer Protocol)
TIMED (Time Protocol) for OS/390
NSLD (Network Station Login Daemon)
What is Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)?
DHCP is a TCP/IP protocol that enables you to centrally locate and dynamically
distribute configuration information including IP addresses.
DHCP is based on the Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) and adds the capability of
automatically allocating reusable network addresses and distributing additional host
configuration options. DHCP clients and servers can use existing BOOTP relay
agents. DHCP and BOOTP clients and servers can generally interoperate with one
another.
See Chapter 5, “Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server for
OS/390” on page 5-1 for more information.
What is Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)?
BOOTP is a TCP/IP protocol that is used to allow a diskless client (IBM Network
Station) to request an IP address and the name of the load file.
When the BOOTP server receives a boot request, the server looks up the MAC
address that is defined for the client. BOOTP then returns a reply with the IP
address and the name and path of the load file that was requested. (The load file is
the file that contains the operating system kernel for the client.) The client then
initiates a TFTP request to the server for the load file.
The BOOTP server stores the IP address of the client and the name of the load file
in a table. This table is called the BOOTP table.
See Chapter 6, “Configuring the Bootstrap Protocol Server for VM” on page 6-1 for
more information.
What is Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)?
TFTP is a TCP/IP protocol that is used to transfer files. TFTP can read or write files
from or to a remote server. On the S/390 system, TFTP is a server that you can
configure with the command line option during TFTP invocation. See Chapter 7,
“Configuring the Trivial File Transfer Protocol Server” on page 7-1 for more information.
Chapter 1. Introduction to the IBM Network Station Manager
1-3
What is Time Protocol Daemon (TIMED)?
TIMED is a TCP/IP daemon that is used to provide the time. TIMED gives the date
and time.
What is Network Station Login Daemon (NSLD)?
NSLD is a TCP/IP daemon that supports a Remote Authentication protocol to
authenticate a user. NSLD provides the location of the user's preference files. See
Chapter 8, “Configuring the Network Station Login Daemon Server” on page 8-1
for more information.
How Do I Manage the IBM Network Stations?
There are several programs that are provided that allow you to manage the IBM
Network Stations on a day-to-day basis. They are:
The IBM Network Station Manager program
The IBM Setup Utility
User Services
What is the IBM Network Station Manager Program?
The IBM Network Station Manager program is a browser-based application that
allows you to set and change settings for:
All or specific IBM Network Station users
All or specific IBM Network Station workstations
User settings can be for application programs (3270 emulation, 5250 emulation,
browser sessions) or hardware settings such as mouse configuration or desktop
background. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program”
on page 10-1 for a more detailed discussion.
What is the IBM Setup Utility?
The IBM Setup Utility on the IBM Network Station allows you to View and then Set
(change) configuration settings on a particular IBM Network Station. For example,
you can view or set the MAC address or monitor resolution settings of any IBM
Network Station.
The system administrator can access the IBM Network Station Setup Utility while
the IBM Network Station is going through the boot-up process. See Chapter 12,
“Working with the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 12-1 for a more
detailed discussion.
What Are User Services?
User services are programs that provide users with tools to manage the IBM
Network Station's operational environment.
Following are some of the user services:
Monitoring messages applicable to a specific IBM Network Station
1-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Locking your screen (with password control)
Monitoring statistics (for example, how much memory is available on a specific
IBM Network Station)
See Chapter 11, “Working with User Services” on page 11-1 for a more detailed
discussion.
Using the IBM Network Station Roadmap
The following diagram represents a roadmap of the tasks you can perform while
working with your IBM Network Stations. Follow the roadmap to facilitate smooth
transition from planning, to installing, to configuring, to using.
Introduction
Chapter 1
Planning
Chapter 2
-IP Addresses
-MAC Addresses
-Network Information
Installing
Chapter 3
-3270 Sessions
-5250 Sessions
-Browsers
-JAVA
-User Preference
-Workstation Preference
-Application Preference
Working with
Applications
Chapter 9
Configurating
Chapter 4, 5,
6, 7, 8
-PTFs
-LPP
-Browsers
-ICS Server
-DHCP Server
-BOOTP Server
-TFTP Server
-NSLD Server
Using the
IBM Network
Station Manager
Chapter 10
-User Services
-IBM Setup Utility
Reference
Information
Appendix A,
B, C, D, E, F, G
-DHCP Configuration File
-DHCP Options
-Hardware Types
-Trouble Shooting
-National Language Support
-Shipped Default Settings
-Shipped Environment Variables
Working with
User Services
Chapter 11, 12
RV4V003-3
Chapter 1. Introduction to the IBM Network Station Manager
1-5
1-6
Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
As system administrator, you need to plan the integration of IBM Network Stations
into your computing environment. A system administrator is a user that has root
authority. A user ID with root authority (UID=0) installs and configures your system
for Network Station use.
You must record some of the planning information that you gather on information
charts. See Table 2-2 on page 2-13 to familiarize yourself with their contents. The
following are the planning task divisions:
General planning
This section is not just for reading! These are tasks that you must complete
before you move to the next planning section.
IBM Network Station planning
Use this information to define your IBM Network Stations.
Follow the configuration steps in the following chapters:
Chapter 4, “Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390” on
page 4-1
Chapter 5, “Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server for
OS/390” on page 5-1 for OS/390
Chapter 6, “Configuring the Bootstrap Protocol Server for VM” on page 6-1 for
VM
Chapter 7, “Configuring the Trivial File Transfer Protocol Server” on page 7-1
Chapter 8, “Configuring the Network Station Login Daemon Server” on
page 8-1.
For additional VM configuration information, use the TCP/IP for VM: Program Directory to configure your servers and your VM Web Server documentation to configure
your Web server.
General Planning
The general planning section contains mostly verification information to ensure that
your host system and IBM Network Stations are ready to receive the software and
hardware that is associated with IBM Network Stations.
1.
Obtain the IBM Network Station Media Access Control (MAC) address
(for VM).
Use the MAC addresses to create BOOTP entries for assigning IP
addresses.
You need to do this step for each IBM Network Station that you will be
adding.
This address is on the box that the IBM Network Station system unit is
packaged in. The following diagram shows the MAC address location on
the box that contains the system unit:
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
2-1
Note: If you no longer have the box that the IBM Network Station system
unit is packaged in, you may also find the MAC address through the
Setup Utility:
a. Boot the Network Station.
b. Press the Escape key after the DRAM memory is tested during
the boot.
c. Press F4 to view the Hardware. You will find the MAC address
here.
2. Familiarize yourself with your TCP/IP network.
We recommend that you have a good working knowledge of your network.
Having a topology map or diagram of your network will help you to more
easily complete the planning tasks. Figure 2-1 on page 2-3 shows a physical rendering of a TCP/IP network with example addresses. Addresses
from your network (similar to these) will be required on planning forms later
in this section.
The following is information that relates to the network map that is presented in Figure 2-1.
System name:
Host Name:
Domain Name:
Line Description:
ETHLINE Line IP Address:
TRLINE Line IP Address:
Device Naming:
Local example name:
Remote example name:
2-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
HOSTTEST
HOSTTEST
MYCOMPANY.STATE.COM
ETHLINE and TRLINE
199.5.9.22
199.5.10.48
L=Local, R=Remote, E=Ethernet, T=Token-Ri
LNSDEV3E
RNSDEV2T
199.5.5.25
Ethernet
Adapter
(ETHLINE
199.5.9.22)
IBM
Network
Station
LNSDEV1E
199.5.5.26
Token Ring
Adapter
(TRLINE
199.5.10.48)
Host
IBM
Network
Station
LNSDEV2E
199.5.5.27
199.5.10.1
IBM
Network
Station
IBM
Network
Station
LNSDEV3E
LNSDEV1T
199.5.10.2
IBM
Network
Station
199.5.10.X
LNSDEV2T
199.5.10.3
199.5.12.22
IBM
Network
Station
199.5.10.76
Router
LNSDEV3T
199.5.10.75
RNSDEV17T
199.5.12.X
199.7.14.19
199.5.12.24
IBM
Network
Station
199.7.14.51
IBM
Network
Station
IBM
Network
Station
199.5.12.63
Router
Remote
Network
Local
Network
199.7.14.X
RNSDEV19T
199.5.12.23
IBM
Network
Station
RNSDEV18T
RNSDEV1T
199.7.14.52
IBM
Network
Station
RNSDEV2T
199.7.14.53
IBM
Network
Station
RNSDEV3T
RV4V004-2
Notes:
1. The host can use the OS/390 or VM operating system. Other software
contained in the the host includes the following:
DHCP (for OS/390) or BOOTP (for VM)
ICS (for OS/390)
NSLD
TFTP
TIMED (for OS/390)
2. IBM Network Stations attached through any port other than the primary Home
port and not attached through a relay agent must be configured using NVRAM settings.
Figure 2-1. Sample TCP/IP Network Map
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
2-3
3.
Verify that you can configure your routers or gateways as DHCP or
BOOTP relay agents.
If your network uses routers or gateways, ensure that you can enable them
to be DHCP or BOOTP relay agents. Enabling the routers or gateways for
DHCP or BOOTP allows you to propagate (send) the DHCP or BOOTP
packets across the network to other LAN segments.
If you can not configure routers to be DHCP or BOOTP relay agents, you
could:
Use a UNIX system or RS/6000 system that has the necessary configuration support to receive limited DHCP or BOOTP broadcasts. Then
forward those broadcasts to the appropriate host server.
Locate the host server on the same LAN segment as the IBM Network
Stations. This would eliminate any need for routers or intermediate
UNIX systems to pass on the broadcast requests of the IBM Network
Stations.
4.
Obtain IP Addresses and a Domain Name for your organization.
Each node on a network is known as a host and has a unique address
called an Internet Protocol (IP) address. This address is a 32-bit integer that
is expressed in the form nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn.
For the networks within your organization, you can assign your own
addresses. However, if you want to connect to the Internet, a central
authority must officially assign the network addresses and domain names.
The authority at the time of this writing is Network Solutions, Inc.. The
address is:
Network Solutions
InterNIC Registration Services
505 Huntmar Park Drive
Herndon, VA 22070
1-703-742-4811
E-mail: [email protected]
WWW: http://rs.internic.net/
Note: If your organization already has a range of IP addresses, you can
use those instead of obtaining new IP addresses. For more information, see the TCP/IP for MVS: Customization and Administration
Guide, SC31-7134 for OS/390 and the TCP/IP for VM: Planning and
Customization, SC31-6082 for VM.
5.
Verify that you have the correct PTF (Program Temporary Fix) media.
As system administrator, you may need to install PTFs on your system.
Check your program directory for the required PTFs.
6.
Verify your Licensed Program Software and correct service for the
IBM Network Station Manager.
Verify that you have the correct licensed program software and correct
service. You will install this software later.
For OS/390
Product Number is 5645-001. FMIDs are JTCP32G and JTCP32N.
2-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Notes:
a. FMID JTCP32G contains the IBM Network Station software.
b. FMID JTCP32N contains the S/390 Host software.
For VM
TCP/IP 2.4.0 with PTFs UQ03096 and UQ03142.
Notes:
a. PTF UQ03096 contains the Server Support (BOOTPD, TFTPD).
b. PTF UQ03142 contains Release 1 of Client Code.
c. PTF which contains Release 2 of Client Code.
VM/ESA 2.1.0 with PTFs UM27709 and PTF UM28330 and APAR
VM61222.
Notes:
a. PTF UM27709 and PTF UM28330 contain the CMS service.
b. APAR VM61222 contains the IBM Network Station Manager
support.
VM/ESA 2.2.0 with PTF UM28331 and APAR VM61222.
Notes:
a. PTF UM28331 contains the CMS service.
b. APAR VM61222 contains the IBM Network Station Manager
support.
7.
Verify the IBM Browser Media.
IBM offers a Web browser product for use on the IBM Network Station. This
Web browser is the IBM Network Station Browser.
There are two versions of the IBM Browser licensed program. Licensed
program 5648-B08 is a 40-bit RC4 encryption version and can be obtained
free of charge. You can download it from an IBM Web page or order it from
your IBM marketing representative.
The other version, 5648-B18, is a 128-bit RC4 encryption version. This
version offers advanced encryption features for secure transactions on the
Internet. You must purchase this version, and it is only available in the
United States and Canada. To order, contact your IBM marketing representative.
8.
Verify the Navio Browser Media.
Another Web browser product for use on the IBM Network Station is the
Navio NC Navigator Browser.
There are two versions of the Navio NC Browser licensed program.
Licensed program 5648-B10 is a 40-bit RC4 encryption version and can be
obtained free of charge. You can download it from an IBM Web page or
order it from your IBM marketing representative.
The other version, 5648-B20, is a 128-bit RC4 encryption version. This
version offers advanced encryption features for secure transactions on the
Internet. You must purchase this version, and it is only available in the
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
2-5
United States and Canada. To order, contact your IBM marketing representative.
9. Verify IBM Network Station Memory Requirements.
Verify that your IBM Network Stations have the amount of memory they will
need to run the applications your users expect.
Each of the applications that are downloaded to the IBM Network Station
requires memory. Use Table 2-1 on page 2-7 as a guide in determining
how much memory each IBM Network Station should have.
Notes:
a. If some users require many different applications and if they will be
using various IBM Network Stations, you will need to ensure each IBM
Network Station has adequate memory to handle the projected applications.
b. Subsequent releases may have increased memory requirements.
2-6
Network Station Manager for S/390
Table 2-1. Network Station Memory Requirements for Downloaded Software
Software
Memory Requirement
Base System, includes the following:
5.35MB
Motif Library
Window Manager
Fonts
IBM Login Utility
5250 Session (1st session)
1.4MB
Additional session
0.3MB
Help viewer
0.3MB
Keyboard remap
0.55MB
Color remap
0.45MB
Miscellaneous preferences
0.35MB
3270 Session (non-graphic)
0.7MB
Additional session (non-graphic)
3270 session (graphics)
0.25MB
1.4MB
Additional 3270 session (graphics)
0.55MB
IBM Network Station Browser
5.6MB
Navio NC Browser
4.5MB
Java VM Session
5.0MB default or 1.3MB in minimal
configuration. Code size of each Java
Applet must be added to either
number.
Note: If you want to run large Java
applications, you should calculate memory requirements
from the default size of
4.2MB.
Video Memory Guidelines (Resolution)
1MB
800 x 600
1MB
1024 x 768
2MB
1280 x 1024
2MB
1360 x 1024
2MB
1600 x 1280
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
2-7
IBM Network Station Planning
This section will help you plan for DHCP for OS/390 and for BOOTP for VM.
Planning for DHCP for OS/390
Before you implement DHCP in your network, there are some decisions that you
need to make:
How many DHCP servers do you need?
Do you already have BOOTP servers in your network?
Do you have hosts with special requirements?
What is a reasonable lease time?
How Many DHCP Servers Do You Need?
The number of servers that you need will depend largely on the number of subnets
you have, the number of DHCP clients you plan to support, whether your routers
are enabled with BOOTP Relay, and the lease time you choose. Keep in mind that
the DHCP protocols do not currently define server-to-server communication. Thus,
they cannot share information, nor can one DHCP server perform as a "hot backup"
in case the other one fails.
DHCP clients send broadcast messages. By design, broadcast messages do not
cross subnets. To allow the client's messages to be forwarded outside its subnet,
your routers must be configured to forward DHCP requests using a BOOTP Relay
agent. Otherwise, you will need to configure a DHCP server on each subnet.
Using a Single DHCP Server: If you choose to use a single DHCP server to
serve hosts on a subnet, consider the effects if the single server fails. Generally,
the failure of a server will affect only DHCP clients that are attempting to join the
network. Typically, DHCP clients already on the network will continue operating
unaffected until their lease expires. However, clients with a short lease time may
lose their network access before the server can be restarted.
Using Multiple DHCP Servers: To avoid a single point of failure, you can configure two or more DHCP servers to serve the same subnet. If one server fails, the
other can continue to serve the subnet. Each of the DHCP servers must be accessible either by direct attachment to the subnet or by using a BOOTP Relay agent.
Because two DHCP servers cannot serve the same addresses, address pools
defined for a subnet must be unique across DHCP servers. Therefore, when using
two or more DHCP servers to serve a particular subnet, the complete list of
addresses for that subnet must be divided among the servers. For example, you
could configure one server with an address pool consisting of 70% of the available
addresses for the subnet and the other server with an address pool consisting of
the remaining 30% of the available addresses.
Using multiple DHCP servers decreases the probability of having a DHCP-related
network access failure, but it does not guarantee against it. If a DHCP server for a
particular subnet fails, the other DHCP server may not be able to service all the
requests from new clients which may, for example, exhaust the server's limited pool
of available addresses.
2-8
Network Station Manager for S/390
However, you can bias which DHCP server exhausts its pool of addresses first.
DHCP clients tend to select the DHCP server offering more options. To bias service
toward the DHCP server with 70% of the available addresses, offer fewer DHCP
options from the server holding 30% of the available addresses for the subnet.
Do You Already Have BOOTP Servers in Your Network?
If you already have BOOTP clients and servers in your network, you may want to
consider replacing your BOOTP servers with DHCP servers. DHCP servers can
optionally serve BOOTP clients the same IP configuration information as current
BOOTP servers.
If you cannot replace your BOOTP servers with DHCP servers and want to have
both serve your network:
Turn off BOOTP support in your DHCP server
Make sure your BOOTP servers and DHCP servers do not give out the same
addresses
Configure the BOOTP relay support in your routers to forward BOOTP broadcasts to both the appropriate BOOTP and DHCP servers
A DHCP server allocates a permanent IP address to a BOOTP client. In the event
that subnets are renumbered in such a way that a BOOTP-assigned address is
unusable, the BOOTP client must restart and obtain a new IP address.
Do You Have Hosts with Special Requirements?
You may have hosts which have individual or special administrative needs, such
as:
A permanent lease
You can assign permanent leases to designated hosts by specifying an infinite
lease time. Also the DHCP server will allocate a permanent lease to BOOTP
clients that explictly request it as long as support for BOOTP clients is enabled.
The DHCP server will also allocate a permanent lease to DHCP hosts that
explicitly request it.
A specific IP address
You can reserve a specific address and configuration parameters for a specific
DHCP (or BOOTP) client host on a particular subnet.
Specific configuration parameters
You can allocate specific configuration information to a client regardless of its
subnet.
Manually-defined workstations
You should explicitly exclude addresses from DHCP subnets for existing hosts
that do not use DHCP or BOOTP for configuring their IP network access.
Although DHCP clients automatically check to see if an IP address is in use
before allocating or using it, they will not be able to detect addresses of
manually-defined hosts that are turned off or temporarily off the network. In that
case, duplicate address problems may occur when a manually-defined host
reaccesses the network, unless its IP address is explicitly excluded.
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
2-9
What Is a Reasonable Lease Time?
The default lease time is 24 hours. The lease time you choose depends largely on
your needs, including:
The number of hosts to support compared to the number of available
addresses. If you have more hosts than addresses, you may want to choose a
short lease time of one to two hours. This will help ensure that unused
addresses are returned to the pool as soon as possible.
Keep in mind that the DHCP lease time you choose can affect your network
operation and performance.
– Short lease times will increase the amount of network traffic due to DHCP
lease renewal requests. For example, if you set a lease time of 5 minutes,
each client sends a renewal request about every 2.5 minutes.
– Lease times that are too long, however, can limit your ability to reuse IP
addresses. Very long lease times also delay configuration changes that
occur when a client restarts or renews a lease.
The time available to make network changes. Hosts receive changes to configuration information when they are restarted or renew their lease. Be sure to
allow a timely and adequate window to make these changes. For example, if
you usually make changes overnight, you might assign a lease time of 12
hours.
The number of DHCP servers that are available. If you have only a few
DHCP servers for a large network, you may want to choose a longer lease time
to minimize the impact of server down-time.
For complex networks that need to support a combination of host leasing requirements, you can use DHCP classing. For more information, see Defining Classes.
Following is the specific information that is needed to identify each IBM Network
Station to your network environment for OS/390. You should record this information. You need to provide the information once for each LAN:
1.
Boot File Name
The Boot File Name is the name of the file that the IBM Network Station will
download and be used to boot the remote device. This is a constant and is
prefilled on your form as kernel.
2.
Boot File Path
The Boot file path is the path name that is used to access the boot file on
the host. This is a constant and has been prefilled on your form as
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard.
Planning for BOOTP for VM
This section will help you record the specific information that is needed to identify
each IBM Network Station to your network environment for VM. You should record
this information in Table 2-2 on page 2-13. Use this information to create a
BOOTP entry for each IBM Network Station.
The information that is contained on this form is LAN-specific. You should fill out a
separate form for each LAN to which you will be attaching IBM Network Stations.
You need to provide the following information only once for each LAN:
2-10
Network Station Manager for S/390
1.
Boot Type
The Boot Type is already prefilled on your form as IBMNSM. This identifies
this network device as an IBM Network Station.
2.
Boot File Name
The Boot File Name is the name of the file that the IBM Network Station will
download and be used to boot the remote device. This is a constant and is
prefilled on your form as kernel.
3.
Boot File Path
The Boot file path is the path name that is used to access the boot file on
the host. This is a constant and has been prefilled on your form as
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation.
4.
Determine the Gateway IP address and Subnet Mask for Remote
LANs
If the LAN that you are attaching IBM Network Stations to is not directly
attached to your host, it is referred to as a remote LAN. You will need to
specify the IP Address of the IP Router/Gateway that your IBM Network
Station will use to reach the host. You will also need to specify the subnet
mask of this router. You should obtain this information from your network
administrator.
5.
Determine the Hardware Type of your IBM Network Stations
Your IBM Network Stations can either attach to a token ring or ethernet
LAN. If you will be attaching this IBM Network Station to a token ring
network, then your IBM Network Station's hardware type is 6. If you will be
attaching this IBM Network Station to a Version 2 (802.2) ethernet network,
then your IBM Network Station's hardware type is 1. For IEEE (802.3)
ethernet networks, the hardware type is 6, which is the same as a token
ring network.
You will also need to complete the following tasks for each IBM Network Station
that you will be adding to this LAN.
1.
Assign a fully qualified host name to the IBM Network Station.
The host name identifies the IBM Network Station as a unique destination
within a TCP/IP environment. The fully qualified host name consists of two
parts, the host name and the domain name. For example,
ABCNSM.MYCOMPANY.STATE.COM is a qualifed host name, where
ABCNSM is the host name and MYCOMPANY.STATE.COM is the domain
name. The host name can be anything that is meaningful to you or the
owner. You should obtain the domain name from your network administrator. For additional information, see the TCP/IP for VM: Planning and
Customization, SC31-6082.
2.
Record the Media Access Control (MAC) Address.
The MAC address is a hardware-specific identifier that is unique to each
IBM Network Station. You can find this address on the outside of the box
that the IBM Network Station was shipped in. You should have captured
this information in Step 1 of “General Planning” on page 2-1.
3.
Assign an IP address to the IBM Network Station.
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
2-11
Each IBM Network Station requires a unique IP address. You will need to
assign a specific address to each IBM Network Station. You should ensure
that the IP address is valid for your organization and that no other device in
the network is using it.
IBM Network Station Information for VM Chart
Use the information in Table 2-2 to install and configure your IBM Network
Stations.
Complete one copy of Table 2-2 for each LAN adapter that has IBM Network
Stations attached to it.
2-12
Network Station Manager for S/390
Table 2-2. IBM Network Station Information Chart
IBM Network Stations
1. Boot Type: IBMNSM
2. Boot File Name: kernel
3. Boot File Path: /QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation
4. Gateway IP address (IBM Network Station side):
5. Router Subnet Mask (IBM Network Station side):
6. Hardware type (Token-Ring (6) or Ethernet (1)):
IBM Network Station Unique Information
1. Host Name
2. MAC Address
3. IP Address
4. Printer Type
(MFRTYPMDL)
Chapter 2. Planning for the IBM Network Station Manager
2-13
2-14
Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 3. Installing the Network Station Manager
The IBM Network Station Manager uses several software products. You must install
the software in the following order:
1. PTFs for S/390
2. IBM Network Station Manager software and corrective service
For OS/390
Product Number 5645-001 FMID JTCP32G and JTCP32N
Notes:
a. FMID JTCP32G contains the IBM Network Station software
b. FMID JTCP32N contains the S/390 Host software
For VM
TCP/IP 2.4.0 with PTFs UQ03096 and UQ03142.
Notes:
a. PTF UQ03096 contains the Server Support (BOOTPD, TFTPD).
b. PTF UQ03142 contains Release 1 of Client Code.
c. PTF which contains Release 2 of Client Code.
VM/ESA 2.1.0 with PTFs UM27709 and PTF UM28330 and APAR
VM61222.
Notes:
a. PTF UM27709 and PTF UM28330 contain the CMS service.
b. APAR VM61222 contains the IBM Network Station Manager support.
VM/ESA 2.2.0 with PTF UM28331 and APAR VM61222.
Notes:
a. PTF UM28331 contains the CMS service.
b. APAR VM61222 contains the IBM Network Station Manager support.
Note: If you delete the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program and then
restore it, you will also have to restore the IBM Network Station Browser
and the Navio NC Navigator Browser licensed programs. The browsers are
separately orderable.
Product Installation Methods
You can install the software products that are associated with the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program in the following ways:
Using media (tape) that you received from IBM
Go to “Installing from Tape” on page 3-2 to begin the process of software
installation from media that you received from IBM.
Downloading the licensed program from an IBM Web site
Chapter 3. Installing the Network Station Manager
3-1
Go to “Downloading and Installing IBM Network Station Products from an IBM
Web Site” on page 3-2 to begin the process of software installation from an
IBM Web site.
Installing from Tape
To install the IBM Network Station Manager for OS/390, you must download the
contents of the Network Station Manager tape. The Network Station Manager
Program Directory that is shipped with the IBM Network Station Manager describes
the procedure for installing the IBM Network Station Manager from the distribution
tape. The Network Station Manager Program Directory contains the following
information:
Basic and optional program materials and documentation
IBM support available
Program and service APARs and PTFs
Installation requirements and considerations
Installation instructions
For OS/390
Use the System Modification Program with Extended (SMP/E) to install the IBM
Network Station Manager. For information on SMP/E, see SMP/E Release 8.1
User's Guide, SC28-1302.
For VM
For VM, use the Virtual Machine Serviceability Enhancements Staged with
Extended (VMSES/E) to install the IBM Network Station Manager APAR. For information on VMSES/E, see VMSES/E Introduction and Reference, SC24-5747.
Downloading and Installing IBM Network Station Products from an IBM
Web Site
You can download IBM Network Station Manager from an IBM Web site. Following
is important product information:
For OS/390
Product Number 5645-001 FMID JTCP32G and JTCP32N
Notes:
1. FMID JTCP32G contains the IBM Network Station software
2. FMID JTCP32N contains the S/390 Host software
For VM
TCP/IP 2.4.0 with PTFs UQ03096 and UQ03142.
3-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Notes:
1. PTF UQ03096 contains the Server Support (BOOTPD, TFTPD).
2. PTF UQ03142 contains Release 1 of Client Code.
3. PTF which contains Release 2 of Client Code.
VM/ESA 2.1.0 with PTFs UM27709 and PTF UM28330 and APAR VM61222.
Notes:
1. PTF UM27709 and PTF UM28330 contain the CMS service.
2. APAR VM61222 contains the IBM Network Station Manager support.
VM/ESA 2.2.0 with PTF UM28331 and APAR VM61222.
Notes:
1. PTF UM28331 contains the CMS service.
2. APAR VM61222 contains the IBM Network Station Manager support.
Using any browser, go to URL:
http://www.as400.ibm.com/networkstation/s390
From the navigation bar at the bottom of the page, select ORDER for additional
product information. From the selection list, select the version of software you want
to order.
or
http://www.ibm.com/nc
From the navigation bar at the top of the page, select DOWNLOADS for additional
product information. From the selection list, select the version of software you want
to order.
Once you reach this Web page, first access the README file. The README file
contains the necessary information for downloading PTFs, IBM Network Station
programs, and other objects that are used to support downloading activities.
Chapter 3. Installing the Network Station Manager
3-3
3-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 4. Configuring the Internet Connection Secure
Server for OS/390
This chapter explains how to configure the Internet Connection Secure (ICS) server
to support the IBM Network Station. To configure your IBM Network Stations, use
the configuration information in this chapter. Refer to the IBM Internet Connection
Server Webmaster's Guide for OS/390, GC31-8490 for additional details for the ICS
server documentation.
Specifically, this chapter describes how to:
Set up the ICS server configuration file
Access the IBM Network Station Manager program
If you use the IBM Network Browser or the Navio NC Browser on the IBM Network
Station Manager and your server has a port number other than the default (80),
refer to “Changing the IBM Network Station Default Port Number” on page 10-18
for details for enabling the new port.
Setting the ICS Server Configuration File
Before you can use the IBM Network Station Manager program, ensure that the
following tasks have been completed:
1. The ICS server is installed.
2. The ICS server is started with root authority.
3. The URL maps to where the IBM Network Station Manager program has been
installed.
4. The ICS server is configured to perform Basic Authentication before the IBM
Network Station Manager program is invoked.
Refer to the ICS server program documentation for detailed instructions on how to
update the ICS server configuration file (httpd.conf) and the syntax of the appropriate statements.
Specifying the ICS Server User ID
To use the IBM Network Station Manager program, the Userid directive in the ICS
server configuration file must specify a valid user ID that has root authority. The
server must be invoked with root authority to validate users requesting services and
to maintain a data base of user preferences (read/write) that can be accessed by
all (read only).
Mapping to the URL
Add the following sample request routing statements to the ICS server configuration
file (httpd.conf):
Chapter 4. Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390
4-1
Exec
Exec
Exec
Pass
/NetworkStation/Admin/*
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/cgi-bin/QYTCMAIN
/NetworkStation/Dump/*
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/cgi-bin/QYTCMDMP
/NetworkStation/cgi-bin/*.PGM /usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/cgi-bin/*
/NetworkStation/*
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/*
Figure 4-1. URL mapping
Notes:
1. The /NetworkStation/Admin/ statement converts the URL which initially invokes
the IBM Network Station Manager program into the specific program which will
be invoked.
The initial URL sets up the initial dialogue with the IBM Network Station
Manager and is specified by users on their browsers as:
http://yourservername:portnumber/NetworkStation/Admin
where:
yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address of the ICS server
portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network
Station program
If you have not changed the default port number for the ICS server (80), you do
not need to specify portnumber.
2. The /NetworkStation/Dump/ statement converts the URL which invokes the
dump formatter.
3. The /NetworkStation/cgi-bin/ statement converts the call to the program contained in the HTML file to the library where the program is stored.
The cgi-bin must be implemented with Basic Authentication which is used to
verify that users are authorized to use the IBM Network Station Manager
program.
4. The /NetworkStation/ statement enables the proper HTML and Image (GIFs)
files to be displayed.
Setting up Basic Authentication
Use Basic Authentication to protect the programs for the IBM Network Station
Manager program. You can perform this authentication in one of the following ways:
Using ICS server function for authentication
Implementing an ICS server Internet Connection Application Programming
Interface (ICAPI).
An ICAPI is a user-written exit that provides a program to verify that the user ID
and password are authorized to use the system.
Refer to ICS server documentation for information on implementing an ICAPI.
4-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Using ICS Server function for authentication
Add the following protection setup directives to the ICS server configuration file.
Protection PROT_NSM {
Userid
%%SERVER%%
PasswdFile
%%SAF%%
PostMask
[email protected](*)
PutMask
[email protected](*)
GetMask
[email protected](*)
Mask
[email protected](*)
AuthType
Basic
ServerId
NetworkStation_Manager
}
Protect /NetworkStation/cgi-bin/* PROT_NSM
Figure 4-2. Protection with ICS Server interfacing to RACF (or equivalent system)
With the protection directives shown in Figure 4-2, the server would activate protection as follows:
The Protect /NetworkStation/cgi-bin/ requests activate protection. The protection
setup is defined on the Protection directive that has a label of PROT_NSM.
The server changes to the OpenEdition user defined on the Userid directive.
This user ID must have root authority.
The text associated with ServerId is displayed by most Browsers on the screen
and enables the user to verify that the user ID and password being entered are
for the Network Station Manager program.
By specifying a unique ServerId for the Network Station Manager program, only
IBM Network Station Manager program requests will be processed by the
authenticated user. Because applications authenticated will be run as superusers , only IBM Network Station Manager program applications should be
installed in the library specified by the URL mapping /NetworkStation/cgi-bin/*.
Updating the NLSPATH variable
The NLSPATH variable for ICS server applications is defined in the file:
/etc/httpd.envvars and may contain the following statements:
NLSPATH=
/usr/lpp/internet/%N.cat:/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N:/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N.c
LANG= en_US
LIBPATH=/usr/lpp/internet/bin
Figure 4-3. Sample /etc/httpd.envvars
In the preceding example, the name associated with the Network Station Manager
program catalog is:
/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N.cat
The results returned for LANG= are substituted for the %L in the NLSPATH
returned string and the %N is replaced with the file name of the file being
Chapter 4. Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390
4-3
requested. This will result in the following file being opened for message catalog
processing:
/usr/lib/nls/msg/en_US/nsmmsg.cat
Note: In the list of files defined for NLSPATH= do not code the real name of the
IBM Network Station Manager program catalog (nsmmsg.cat). The file name
should be represented by %N. Specifying the real file name for the IBM
Network Station Manager message catalog (or any other catalog) may
result in a failure by the application to access the catalog.
Verifying the ICS Server NLSPATH setting
The ICS server may provide a script for displaying environment variables. This
script is stored as
/usr/lpp/internet/ServerRoot/cgi-bin/environ.sh
With a properly configured server, this script can be invoked with the following URL:
http://yourservername:portnumber/cgi-bin/environ.sh
where:
yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address of the ICS server
portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network Station
program
If you have not changed the default port number for the ICS server (80), you do not
need to specify portnumber.
The ICS server provides a list of all environment variables and their current settings. Refer to the IBM Internet Connection Server product documentation for additional information.
If the environment variables script is not available, you can create an executable
file and name it dispvar.scr. Figure 4-4 lists the information that should be placed in
this file.
#! /usr/bin/sh
echo 'HTTP/1.0 200 OK'
echo 'Content-Type: Text/html'
echo ''
echo ''
echo '<HTML><BODY>'
echo 'NLSPATH='
echo $NLSPATH
echo 'LANG='
echo $LANG
echo '</BODY></HTML>'
Figure 4-4. dispvar.scr
Note: OpenEdition for MVS interprets the first line of this script to determine what
script processor to use. This line may vary from installation to installation
and may need to be changed accordingly.
4-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
After making the necessary change, store the script in an executable library accessible by the ICS server. Invoke this script interactively to verify that it works properly. It should echo back the HTML commands and the value of the NLSPATH
should be substituted in place of the $NLSPATH.
If the script cannot be added to an existing library accessible by the ICS server,
add a URL mapping record to the ICS server configuration file (httpd.conf) to
enable the script to be found by the ICS server. A sample mapping record is listed
below based on this file being created in a temporary directory in the /usr/lpp/tcpip
directory structure.
Exec /dispvar/*
/usr/lpp/tcpip/tmp/dispvar.scr
After creating the preceding file, restart the ICS server to enable access to this
script file.
To invoke the script from the browser, enter:
http://yourservername:portnumber/dispvar
where:
yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address of the ICS server
portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network Station
program
If you have not changed the default port number for the ICS server (80), you do not
need to specify portnumber.
The results should be similar to the following:
NLSPATH=
/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N:/usr/lib/nls/msg/%L/%N.cat:
/usr/lib/nls/msg/en_US/%N
LANG= en_US
Figure 4-5. Sample results of dispvar.scr execution
Accessing the IBM Network Station Server
After configuring the ICS server to support the IBM Network Station Manager
program, restart the ICS server to activate the changes. You can take the following
steps to validate that the IBM Network Station Manager program has been configured properly:
1. Display images of GIF files to verify accessibility to HTML and GIF files.
2. Start the IBM Network Station Manager program to verify Basic Authentication
is active and programs can be executed.
3. Verify Message Catalog Accessible to verify that the IBM Network Station
Manager program can access the message catalog.
Chapter 4. Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390
4-5
Displaying Images of GIF Files
Invoke the following URL listed to access the HTML directory and the directory
where the GIF images are stored. A display of all application GIF files will be presented. No authentication should take place as the IBM Network Station Manager
program does not require these directories to be protected.
http://yourservername:portnumber/NetworkStation/en_US/gifs.htm
where:
yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address of the ICS server
portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network Station
program
If you have not changed the default port number for the ICS server (80), you do not
need to specify portnumber.
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program
From a frames-capable browser, start the IBM Network Station Manager program
with the following URL:
http://yourservername:portnumber/NetworkStation/Admin
where:
yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address of the ICS server
portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network Station
program
If you have not changed the default port number for the ICS server (80), you do not
need to specify portnumber.
Log on with a user ID and password that have root authority. This ID will be treated
as a system administrator. You must invoke authentication to ensure that the IBM
Network Station Manager program functions properly.
Possible Failure Conditions
Following are possible failure conditions which may occur if the IBM Network
Station Manager program has not been configured properly:
Browser problems
Authentication error
Authentication error and catalog interface error
Browser Problems: If a request for an executable is made to an object which
cannot be executed, some browsers may hang or present a message, for example,
"Document contains no data". Following are potential causes:
ICS Directive is not mapped to the proper executable.
4-6
Network Station Manager for S/390
Executable does not exist.
Executable is not readable by the ICS server.
Browser is not Java-script enabled.
Browser is not frames-capable.
Executable does not have the"sticky-bit" on.
For OpenEdition, executables which are to be executed from a partitioned data
set must have the "sticky-bit" turned on.
All the executables in /usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/cgi-bin/* for the Network Station
Manager program must have this bit turned on. The contents of this file contains text similar to the following:
This file is not executable.
MVS loads the actual program from the partioned data set
because the stick bit is on.
The library containing the actual Network Station Manager program executables
is not in the link list.
C++ DLL not in Link or LPA List
For systems that do not have the C++ Program Product installed, the C++ DLL
Library is required for the Network Station Manager program to execute.
Correct the problem and retry the application.
Authentication Error
EZZ7354
(User:) Error during authentication for user.
Figure 4-6. Authentication Error
Notes:
1. Basic Authentication is not being performed by the IBM Internet Connection
Server. IBM Network Station Manager program requires that Basic
Authentication be performed before allowing any IBM Network Station Manager
program functions to be performed.
2. This error is caused by the Internet Connection Server returning a null user ID
and is usually caused by errors in the Internet Connection Server configuration
file.
See “Setting up Basic Authentication” on page 4-2 for information on
authentication.
Authentication Error and Catalog Interface Error for OS/390
Chapter 4. Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390
4-7
Retrieval failed for the message
PSA_4_NSM_AUTHENTICATION_ERROR_MSG{1,5}(User:)
Error during authentication for user.
Figure 4-7. Authentication Error and Network Station Manager Program Catalog Interface
Error
The preceding response is the result of two configuration errors.
1. Basic Authentication is not being performed by the IBM Internet Connection
Server. IBM Network Station Manager requires that Basic Authentication be
performed before allowing any IBM Network Station Manager functions to be
performed. There are probably errors in the Internet Connection Server configuration files.
See “Setting up Basic Authentication” on page 4-2 for information on
authentication.
2. IBM Network Station Manager program could not access its catalog to properly
display a message for the authentication failure.
An internal representation of the message identifier is displayed beginning with
PSA_. Sufficient information should be provided to enable the user to identify
the error being reported.
Verify that the IBM Network Station message catalog resides in a library specified by the NLSPATH variable of the ICS server and validate user preferences
(read/write) that can be accessed by all (read only) for this file.
See “Updating the NLSPATH variable” on page 4-3 for information on the
NLSPATH= variable.
Verifying Message Catalog Accessible for OS/390
From the Setup Tasks listed in the frame on the left, select the NSM Error Messages task at the bottom.
This task enables the Administrator to key in a message number and obtain a
message description.
Key in a valid IBM Network Station Manager message number, such as 7350, and
select the Submit key.
You will receive a response indicating if the message was successfully retrieved.
Figure 4-8 shows a successful retrieval.
EZZ7350
(User: <User_name>) Unable to access HTML file <File_Name>
Note: Message has been successfully retrieved.
Figure 4-8. Retrieval successful for the message
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Message Failure
The message in Figure 4-9 indicates that the IBM Network Station Manager
program could not access the message catalog.
Retrieval failed for the message
PSA_0_NSM_NO_TEMPLATE_MSG:{1,1} ...
Note: Message catalog is not properly configured.
Figure 4-9. Retrieval failed for the message
Verify that the message catalog has been placed in a directory which is accessible
by the ICS server and contained in the NLSPATH variable and validate user preferences (read/write) that can be accessed by all (read only) for this file. See
“Updating the NLSPATH variable” on page 4-3 information on setting the
NLSPATH variable.
Chapter 4. Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390
4-9
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 5. Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol Server for OS/390
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) allows clients to obtain IP network
configuration information, including an IP address, from a central DHCP server. The
DHCP serves controls whether the address they provide to clients are allocated
permanently or are leased for a specific period. When a client is allocated a leased
address, it must periodically request that the server revalidate the address and
renew the lease.
The processes of address allocation, leasing, and lease renewal are all handled
dynamically by the DHCP client and server programs and are transparent to you,
the end user.
DHCP defines three IP address allocation policies:
Dynamic
A DHCP server assigns a temporary, leased IP address to a DHCP
client
Static
A DHCP server administrator assigns a static, predefined address
reserved for a specific DHCP client
Permanent A DHCP server administrator assigns a permanent IP address to a
DHCP client. No process of lease renewal is required.
Note: If your network uses routers or gateways, you need to ensure that they can
be enabled as DHCP relay agents. Enabling the routers or gateways for
DHCP allows the DHCP packets to be sent across the network to other
LAN segments.
If you do not have routers that you can configure to be used as DHCP relay
agents, you could:
Use a UNIX system or RS/6000 system that has the necessary code to
be configured to receive limited DHCP broadcasts. Then, forward those
broadcast requests to the appropriate host server.
Use a host server that is located on the same LAN segment as the IBM
Network Stations. This would eliminate any need for routers or intermediate UNIX systems to pass on the broadcast requests of the IBM
Network Stations.
For dynamic address allocation, a DHCP client that does not have a permanent
lease must periodically request the renewal of its lease on its current IP address in
order to keep using it. The process of renewing leased IP addresses occurs
dynamically as part of the DHCP and is transparent to the user.
How Does DHCP Work?
DHCP allows clients to obtain IP network configuration information, including an IP
address, from a central DHCP server. DHCP servers control whether the addresses
they provide to clients are allocated permanently or are "leased" for a specific time
period. When a client receives a leased address, it must periodically request that
the server re-validate the address and renew the lease.
Chapter 5. Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server for OS/390
5-1
The DHCP client and server programs handle the processes of address allocation,
leasing, and lease renewal.
To further explain how DHCP works, let's look at some frequently asked questions:
How is configuration information acquired?
How are leases renewed?
What happens when a client moves out of its subnet?
How are changes implemented in the network?
Acquiring Configuration Information
DHCP allows DHCP clients to obtain an IP address and other configuration information through a request process to a DHCP server. DHCP clients use
RFC-architected messages to accept and use the options served them by the
DHCP server. For example:
1. The client broadcasts a message (containing its client ID) announcing its presence and requesting an IP address (DHCPDISCOVER message) and desired
options such as subnet mask, domain name server, domain name, and static
route.
2. Optionally, if routers on the network are configured to forward DHCP and
BOOTP messages (using BOOTP Relay), the broadcast message is forwarded
to DHCP servers on the attached networks.
3. Each DHCP server that receives the client's DHCPDISCOVER message sends
a DHCPOFFER message to the client offering an IP address.
The server checks the configuration file to see if it should assign a static or
dynamic address to this client.
In the case of a dynamic address, the server selects an address from the
address pool, choosing the least recently used address. An address pool is a
range of IP addresses to be leased to clients. In the case of a static address,
the server uses a Client statement from the DHCP server configuration file to
assign options to the client. Upon making the offer, the IBM DHCP server
reserves the offered address.
4. The client receives the offer message(s) and selects the server it wants to use.
5. The client broadcasts a message indicating which server it selected and
requesting use of the IP address offered by that server (DHCPREQUEST
message).
6. If a server receives a DHCPREQUEST message indicating that the client has
accepted the server's offer, the server marks the address as leased. If the
server receives a DHCPREQUEST message indicating that the client has
accepted an offer from a different server, the server returns the address to the
available pool. If no message is received within a specified time, the server
returns the address to the available pool. The selected server sends an
acknowledgment which contains additional configuration information to the
client (DHCPACK message).
7. The client determines whether the configuration information is valid. Upon
receipt of a DHCPACK message, the IBM DHCP client sends an Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP) request to the supplied IP address to see if it is
already in use. If it receives a response to the ARP request, the client declines
(DHCPDECLINE message) the offer and initiates the process again. Otherwise,
the client accepts the configuration information.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
8. Accepting a valid lease, the client enters a BINDING state with the DHCP
server, and proceeds to use the IP address and options.
To DHCP clients that request options, the DHCP server typically provides options
that include subnet mask, domain name server, domain name, static route, classidentifier (which indicates a particular vendor), user class, and the name and path
of the load image.
However, a DHCP client can request its own, unique set of options. For example,
Windows NT 3.5.1 DHCP clients are required to request options. The default set of
client-requested DHCP options provided by IBM includes subnet mask, domain
name server, domain name, and static route. For option descriptions, see Specifying DHCP Options.
Renewing Leases
The DHCP client keeps track of how much time is remaining on the lease. At a
specified time prior to the expiration of the lease, usually when half of the lease
time has passed, the client sends a renewal request, containing its current IP
address and configuration information, to the leasing server. If the server responds
with a lease offer, the DHCP client's lease is renewed.
If the DHCP server explicitly refuses the request, the DHCP client may continue to
use the IP address until the lease time expires and then initiate the address request
process, including broadcasting the address request. If the server is unreachable,
the client may continue to use the assigned address until the lease expires.
Moving a Client Out of its Subnet?
One benefit of DHCP is the freedom it provides a client host to move from one
subnet to another without having to know ahead of time what IP configuration information it needs on the new subnet. As long as the subnets to which a host relocates have access to a DHCP server, a DHCP client will automatically configure
itself correctly to access those subnets.
For a DHCP client to reconfigure itself to access a new subnet, the client host must
be rebooted. When a host restarts on a new subnet, the DHCP client may try to
renew its old lease with the DHCP server which originally allocated the address.
The server refuses to renew the request since the address is not valid on the new
subnet. Receiving no server response or instructions from the DHCP server, the
client initiates the IP address request process to obtain a new IP address and
access the network.
Implementing Changes in the Network?
With DHCP, you can make changes at the server, re-initialize the server, and distribute the changes to all the appropriate clients. A DHCP client retains DHCP
option values assigned by the DHCP server for the duration of the lease. If you
implement configuration changes at the server while a client is already up and
running, those changes are not processed by the DHCP client until the client
attempts to renew its lease or until it is restarted.
Chapter 5. Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server for OS/390
5-3
Setting Up a DHCP Network
The following sections contain information to help you in setting up your DHCP
system, see:
For planning recommendations, see “Planning for DHCP for OS/390” on
page 2-8.
To create a scoped DHCP network, see “Creating a Scoped Network.”
To start the DHCP server, see “Starting the DHCP Server” on page 5-5.
For tips on maintaining a DHCP server, see “Maintaining the DHCP Server” on
page 5-5.
The IBM DHCP server provides configuration information to clients based on statements contained in the server's configuration file and based on information provided
by the client. The server's configuration file defines the policy for allocating IP
addresses and other configuration parameters. The file is a "map" that the server
uses to determine what information should be provided to the requesting client.
Before you start the DHCP server, create or modify the DHCP server configuration
file.
Once the DHCP server is running, you can also make dynamic changes to the configuration by modifying the configuration file and using the DHCP Server Maintenance program to re-initialize the DHCP server. For more information on DHCP
server initialization, see Re-initializing the Server.
Creating a Scoped Network
You create a hierarchy of configuration parameters for a DHCP network by specifying some configuration values that are served globally to all clients, while other
configuration values are served only to certain clients. Serving different configuration information to clients is often based on network location, equipment vendor, or
user characteristics.
Depending on your configuration, you can specify subnets, classes, vendors, and
clients to provide configuration information to different groups of clients:
When defined globally, client, vendor or class options are available to DHCP
clients regardless of their network location.
Parameters specified for a subnet, class, or client are considered local to the
subnet, class, or client. A client defined within a subnet inherits both the global
options and the options defined for that subnet. If a parameter is specified in
more than one level in the network hierarchy, the lowest level (which is the
most specific) is used.
Use the Subnet statement to specify configuration parameters for one subnet
for a specific location in your network or enterprise.
Use the Class statement to configure DHCP classes to provide unique configuration information from the server to clients that identify themselves as
belonging to that class. For example, a group of clients can all use a shared
printer or load image.
Use a Vendor statement to provide unique configuration information to clients
that identify themselves as using a specific vendor's equipment or software.
Specially-defined options may be served to these clients. For more information
on defining vendors, see Defining Vendors.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Use a Client statement in the DHCP server configuration file to serve specified
options to a specific client or to exclude that client from service. You can also
use a Client statement to exclude IP addresses from service.
For more information on obtaining information for a DHCP client, see Maintaining
the DHCP Server.
Handling Errors in Configuration Files
Configuring the server incorrectly causes few, if any, warning messages. The
DHCP server normally runs even when it encounters errors in the configuration file.
The server may ignore the incorrect data and may optionally post a message to its
log.
For more information on editing the server configuration file, see Appendix A,
“Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File” on page A-1.
Starting the DHCP Server
When you are using Network Station Manager, DHCPSD is installed in the
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/sbin directory.
To start the DHCP server, use the following form of the dhcpsd command:
dhcpsd [-q|-v] [-f configFile]
-q Starts the server in quiet mode, which means that no banner is displayed when
the server starts.
-v Starts the server in verbose mode. Causes messages dealing with client communication to print to screen.
-f configFile
Is the name of the DHCP server configuration file. By default, the server
searches for a file called DHCPSD.CFG in the directory specified by the ETC
environment variable.
or use a start procedure. When starting the DHCP server with a procedure (proc),
the example start proc is found in the DHCP member of the install the partioned
data set SEZAINST.
Maintaining the DHCP Server
When you are using Network Station Manager, DADMIN is installed in the
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/sbin directory.
To maintain a running DHCP server, IBM provides the dadmin command to:
Re-initialize a DHCP server by causing the server to re-read its configuration
file
Delete a lease
Control server tracing
Display client information
Display IP address information
Display server statistics
Chapter 5. Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server for OS/390
5-5
Notes:
1. This DHCP server release does not support earlier versions of dadmin clients.
A new dadmin client that communicates with both previous and current
releases of the DHCP server is provided with this release.
2. Verbose mode provides additional information for debugging purposes.
Verbose mode is allowed on any of the following dadmin command instances.
Verbose is shown as a parameter in those instances where additional, more
detailed information is of particular value.
Displaying dadmin Command Syntax
To display information about the command syntax, enter:
dadmin -?
Re-initializing the Running Server
If you make changes to the configuration file, you will need to re-initialize the
running server to implement the changes. To re-initialize the server, use the following form of the dadmin command:
dadmin [[-h]host] -i [-v]
-h Specifies the host
host
The IP address or host name of the DHCP server. If no server is specified, the
local server is assumed.
-i
Re-initializes the specified server.
-v Executes the command in verbose mode.
Displaying Client Information
To display information for a client ID, use the following form of the dadmin
command:
dadmin -cvalue [-v]
-c Requests information for one or more clients that match this client ID.
value
The client ID is a MAC address. For example, enter 004ac77150fc. Information
is returned for any matching hardware type.
-v Executes the command in verbose mode.
Displaying IP Address Information
To display information for one IP address, use the following form of the dadmin
command:
dadmin -qn.n.n.n [-v]
-q Requests the IP address information.
n.n.n.n
The IP address of the client.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
-v Executes the command in verbose mode.
Querying an Address Pool
To display information for a pool of IP addresses, use the following form of the
dadmin command:
dadmin -pn.n.n.n [-v]
-p Requests the address pool information.
n.n.n.n
The IP address of the address pool.
-v Executes the command in verbose mode.
Controlling Server Tracing
To start and stop tracing on the DHCP server, use the following form of the
dadmin command:
dadmin -tvalue [-v]
-t
Specifies server tracing.
value
The value is ON to start tracing or OFF to stop tracing.
-v Executes the command in verbose mode.
Displaying Server Statistics
To display statistics information about the pool of addresses administered by the
server, use the following form of the dadmin command:
dadmin [[-h]host ] -nvalue [-v]
-h Specifies the host
host
The IP address of the DHCP server. If no host is specified, the local server is
assumed.
-n Requests statistics for the server specified as host.
value
The value is a decimal integer indicating the number of intervals from 0 to 100.
For example, a value of three returns a summary record that includes totals
information, the current interval record, and the 3 most recent history records. A
value of 0 returns a summary record of activity since the last summary.
-v Executes the command in verbose mode.
Statistics include:
Discover packets processed
Discover packets with no response
Offers made
Leases granted
Chapter 5. Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server for OS/390
5-7
Negative acknowledgements (NAKs)
Informs processed, including informs plus acknowledgements (ACKs)
Renewals
Releases
BOOTP clients processed
proxyARec updates attempted
Unsupported packets
Monitor requests processed
For more information on defining statistics snapshots, see Defining Server and
Lease Parameters.
Deleting Leases
If you find that an assigned lease is not being used and you want to make the IP
address available for allocation, you can delete the lease. You can only delete one
lease at a time. You will be prompted to confirm deletion of the lease. To delete the
lease, use the following form of the dadmin command:
dadmin [-f] [-v] [[-h]host]-dip_address
-f
Forces deletion of the lease without prompting.
-v Executes the command in verbose mode.
-h
host
Specifies the IP address of the DHCP server. If no server is specified, the local
server is assumed.
-d Deletes the lease for the specified IP address.
ip_address
The IP address for the lease to be deleted
Configuring the DHCP Server for the IBM Network Station Client
You can configure the DHCP server to be used by an IBM Network Station. The
DHCP server sets up the subnet and specifies the next bootstrap server. The IBM
Network Station client can request information. The DHCP server should be configured to provide options that include subnet mask, router, domain name, and boot
file name.
For option descriptions, see Appendix B, “Specifying DHCP Options” on page B-1.
Multiple Local Subnet Restriction
The DHCP server allocates IP addresses from subnet pools based on information
about the client's subnet determined from the incoming request packet. If no subnet
information is found, the server defaults to allocating an IP address from the local
subnet pool. The problem arises if the serving host machine supports multiple local
subnets as shown in Figure 2-1 on page 2-3. Packets forwarded from a Relay
Agent contain the remote subnet information. Packets arriving from clients on the
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Network Station Manager for S/390
local LAN segments do not. In the current release of the DHCP server, the clients
on the local Ethernet and token ring LAN segments receive the IP address from the
same subnet pool. To avoid this problem, multiple local networks should be reconfigured to be remote with a router running the Relay Agent.
Chapter 5. Configuring the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol Server for OS/390
5-9
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 6. Configuring the Bootstrap Protocol Server for VM
Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP) provides a dynamic method for associating workstations with servers and assigning workstation IP addresses and initial program
load (IPL) sources. BOOTP and TFTP together provide support for the IBM
Network Station for VM.
BOOTP is a TCP/IP protocol used to allow a media-less workstation (client) to
request a file that contains initial code from a server on the network. The BOOTP
server listens on the well-known BOOTP server port 67. When a client request is
received, the server looks up the IP address defined for the client and returns a
reply to the client with the client's IP address and the name of the load file. The
client then initiates a TFTP request to the server for the load file.
You work with the BOOTP server to add or remove BOOTP entries for each IBM
Network Station physically present in your network.
You work with the TCP/IP machine to specify the BOOTP startup parameters.
Setting the BOOTP Server
The information necessary to run the BOOTP server is maintained in two files. The
machine file contains the mapping between the client hardware address and IP
address along with BOOTP data to be passed to the client. The configuration file
contains information about which IP addresses to listen on and what BOOTP forwarding should occur, if any.
The files to be used are specified on the BOOTPD command. As part of the server
initialization, it reads the machine and configuration files and maintains the information internally. You can change the data within the files and reload them while the
server is running using the RELOAD subcommand.
For more information, see the TCP/IP for VM Program Directory and the TCP/IP for
VM Customization and Administration manual.
Chapter 6. Configuring the Bootstrap Protocol Server for VM
6-1
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 7. Configuring the Trivial File Transfer Protocol
Server
You will need to work with the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server to
operate your IBM Network Stations.
The TFTP server enables the transferring of files to and from a remote server.
Considerations for OS/390
When you are using IBM Network Station Manager, TFTP is installed in the
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/sbin/ directory.
CAUTION:
The TFTP server uses well-known port 69. The TFTP server has no user
authentication. Any client that can connect to port 69 on the server has
access to TFTP. If the TFTP server is started without a directory, it allows
access to the entire HFS. To restrict access to the HFS, start the TFTP server
with a list of directories.
You can start the TFTP server one of the following ways:
Using a shell script, nstftpd.
Issuing the tftpd command from the command line.
If you invoke the TFTP server outside the script, be sure to include:
tftpd -a /usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard [/usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard]
where the directory name in brackets ensures that the client code is accessible.
Only specify the directory without the brackets if you are using the tftpd's
command-line directory access control.
To start the TFTP server from the command line, type the tftpd command.
tftpd [-l] [-p port] [-t timeout] [-r maxretries] [-c concurrency_limit]
[-s maxsegsize] [-f file] [-a archive directory [-a ...]]
[directory ...]
Following are the parameters used for the tftpd command:
-l
Logs all the incoming read and write requests and associated information to the system log. Logged information includes the IP address of the
requestor, the file requested, whether the request was successful.
-p port
Uses the specified port. The TFTP server usually receives requests on
well-known port 69. You can specify the port in which requests are to be
received.
-t timeout Sets the packet timeout. The TFTP server usually waits 5 seconds
before presuming that a transmitted packet has been lost. You can
specify a different timeout period in seconds.
Chapter 7. Configuring the Trivial File Transfer Protocol Server
7-1
-r maxretries Sets the retry limit. The TFTP server usually limits the number of
retransmissions it performs because of lost packet to 5. You can specify
a different retry limit.
-c concurrency_limit Sets the concurrency limit. The TFTP server spawns both
threads and processes to handle incoming requests. You can specify
the limit for the number of threads that may be concurrently processing
requests under a single process. When the limit is exceeded, a new
process is spawned to handle requests. The default is 200 threads.
-s maxsegsize Sets the maximum block size that can be negotiated by the TFTP
block size option. The default is 8192.
-f file
Specifies a cache file. You can specify a file containing information on
files to be pre-loaded and cached for transmission. A cache file consists
of one or more entries. For clarity, place each entry on a separate line.
An entry has the form:
a | b <pathname>
where:
a indicates that the specified file is cached in ASCII form. The file is
preconverted to netascii format.
b indicates that the specified file is cached in binary form, with no
conversion.
Following are examples of cache file entries,
a
b
/usr/local/textfile
local/binaryfile
If a relative pathname to the file is specified, the TFTP server searches
the specified directories for the file.
The cached version of a file is only used for requests requiring the specified format. For example, the binary cached version of a file is not used
in satisfying a request for the file in netascii format. If a file is to be
retrieved in both binary and ASCII formats, the user must specify that
two copies of the file be cached with one in binary format, and the other
in netascii format.
Caching is not dynamic. The cache files are read in when the TFTP
server is started and are not updated, even if the file on disk is updated.
To update or refresh the cache, the TFTP server must be recycled.
-a archive directory Specifies an archive directory. The files in this directory and
its subdirectories are treated as binary files for uploading and downloading. This option is useful on EBCDIC machines that act as file
servers for ASCII clients. Multiple -a options can be specified; one directory per -a option. Directories must be specified as absolute
pathnames.
Note: For Network Station Manager, the root of the client code hierarchy (for example, /usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard) should be
specified as an archive directory.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
directory Specifies an absolute path name for a directory. You may specify no
more than 20 directories on the tftpd command line.
If the TFTP server is started without a list of directories, all mounted
directories are considered active.
If a list of directories is specified, only those specified directories are
active. That list is used as a search path for incoming requests that
specify a relative path name for a file.
Activating a directory activates all of its subdirectories.
For a file to be readable by the TFTP server, the file must be in an
active directory and have world ("other") read access enabled. For a file
to be writable by the TFTP server, the file must already exist in an
active directory and have world ("other") write access.
The TFTP server for OS/390 or MVS OpenEdition pre-forks a child process to
handle incoming requests when the concurrency limit is exceeded. Consequently,
immediately after starting the TFTP server, two TFTP processes exist.
In case of a flood of concurrent TFTP requests, the TFTP server may fork additional processes. When the number of concurrent requests being processed drops
below the concurrency limit, the number of TFTP processes is decreased back to
two.
To terminate the TFTP server, send a SIGTERM signal to the oldest existing TFTP
process. This is the process that has a parent process ID of 1. Termination of this
process will cause all of its children to terminate.
Considerations for VM
The TFTP server transfers files between the Byte File System (BFS) and the TFTP
clients. TFTP supports access to files maintained in a BFS directory structure that
is mounted during initialization.
To configure the TFTP server, you must perform the following steps:
Update the TCPIP server configuration file.
Update the TFTPD profile exit.
Review and address additional configuration considerations.
Create the TFTPD PERMLIST data file.
Create the TFTPF USERLISR data file.
For details for configuring the TFTP server and using the TFTPD command and
associated subcommands, see the TCP/IP for VM Program Directory.
Chapter 7. Configuring the Trivial File Transfer Protocol Server
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 8. Configuring the Network Station Login Daemon
Server
You will need to work with the Network Station Login Daemon (NSLD) server to
operate your IBM Network Stations in the OS/390 and VM environments.
The NSLD server performs user authentication and provides data for user configuration.
NSLD for OS/390
The NSLD server responds to Network Station Login client requests for login information about the user ID logging into an IBM Network Station. The NSLD server
first determines if the user ID and password combination passed is valid on this
system. If it is not valid, an error response in sent to the client. If it is valid, the
information passed back to the IBM Network Station includes the user's user ID
and group ID, home directory, and Network Station Manager preference directory.
Note: The nsld code must be installed in an authorized library to determine user
ID and password validity.
When you are using IBM Network Station Manager, NSLD is installed in the
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nsm/sbin/ directory.
To start the NSLD server, type the nsld command from the command line.
nsld [-l] [-p port] [-t timeout] [-c concurrency_limit]
Following are the parameters used for the nsld command:
-l
Logs the requests and replies. Information on each logon request and
reply is logged to the system log. Logged information includes the type
of the request or reply, the success or failure of requests, and the destination of replies. Errors and important events always are logged, even
when this option is not specified.
-p port
Uses the specified port. The NSLD server usually receives requests on
well-known port 256. You can specify the port on which requests are to
be received.
-t timeout Sets the packet timeout. The NSLD server usually waits 5 seconds
before presuming that a transmitted packet has been lost. You can
specify a different timeout period in seconds.
-c concurrency_limit Sets the concurrency limit. The NSLD server spawns both
threads and processes to handle incoming requests. You can specify
the limit for the number of threads that may be concurrently processing
requests under a single process. When the limit is exceeded, a new
process is spawned to handle requests. The default is 200 threads.
The NSLD server for OS/390 or MVS OpenEdition pre-forks a child process to
handle incoming requests when the concurrency limit is exceeded. Consequently,
immediately after starting the NSLD server, two NSLD processes exist.
Chapter 8. Configuring the Network Station Login Daemon Server
8-1
In case of a flood of concurrent NSLD requests, the NSLD server may fork additional processes. When the number of concurrent requests being processed drops
below the concurrency limit, the number of NSLD processes is decreased back to
two.
To terminate the NSLD server, send a SIGTERM signal to the oldest existing NSLD
process. This is the process that has a parent process ID of 1. Termination of this
process causes all of its children to terminate.
NSLD for VM
The NSLD server for VM responds to client requests for login information about a
user ID on the system.
Update the NSLD Profile EXEC
To invoke the NSLD server, add the nsld command to the PROFILE EXEC.
nsld [port] [([STAYUP|TRACE]
Following are the parameters used for the nsld command.
port
Uses the specified port. The NSLD server usually receives requests on
well-known port 256. You can specify the port on which requests are to
be received.
STAYUP Indicates that the NSLD server should continue to operate if subsequent
VM TCP/IP failures occur.
TRACE
Indicates that the NSLD server should display trace information as
requests are processed.
The NSLD server responds to Network Station Login client requests for login information about the user ID logging into an IBM Network Station. The NSLD server
first determines if the user ID and password combination passed is valid on this
system. If it is not valid, an error response in sent to the client. If it is valid, the
information passed back to the IBM Network Station includes the user's user ID
and group ID, home directory, and Network Station Manager preference directory.
Note: The NSLD user ID should have class B privilege class for determining user
ID and password validity.
NSLD Subcommands
You must be logged on to the NSLD server to use the NSLD subcommands. The
NSLD subcommands are listed in Table 8-1 on page 8-3. Table 8-1 on page 8-3
provides the shortest abbreviation, and a description for each NSLD subcommand.
8-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Table 8-1. NSLD Subcommands
Subcommand
Minimum Abbreviations
Description
CMS
CMS
Passes a command to CMS for execution.
EXIT
EXIT
Stop the NSLD server and its processing. EXIT is
equivalent to QUIT and STOP.
HELP
HELP
Displays a summary of NSLD subcommands.
QUIT
QUIT
Stops the NSLD server and its processing . QUIT
is equivalent to EXIT and STOP.
STAYUP
STAYUP
Toggles the STAYUP mode of the NSLD server.
STOP
STOP
Stops the NSLD Server and its processing. Stop is
equivalent to EXIT and QUIT.
Usage Notes
1. Do not issue any CMS command that would take considerable time to execute,
for example, XEDIT. While the CMS command executes, the server does not
respond to requests.
2. The CMS keyword is usually not required because the server will pass any
command string that is not recognized as a NSLD subcommand to CMS. The
CMS keyword is used to identify commands which would normally be interpreted as a subcommand, for example TRACE.
After completion of any command, the following ready prompt is displayed: NSLD
Ready;
Chapter 8. Configuring the Network Station Login Daemon Server
8-3
8-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network
Station Manager Applications
This chapter discusses how to log on to the IBM Network Station and work with
various applications that are supported by the IBM Network Station. Topics are:
Logging on to the IBM Network Station
Working with applications such as:
– 3270 Emulation sessions
– 5250 Emulation sessions
– Browser sessions
– Java applications
– Java applets
Login
After you power-on your IBM Network Station, the following login screen appears:
Figure 9-1. IBM Network Station Login Screen
Figure 9-1 shows the initial IBM Network Station login screen. Type your user
profile name and press Enter. Type your password and press Enter.
The buttons within the menu bar are:
Ok
Clicking Ok sends request to server for processing.
Start Over
Clicking Start Over prompts for userid and password.
Roam
Clicking Roam allows you to specify the network server to log into.
Help
Clicking Help allows you to access Help for the IBM Network Station Manager
program.
Note: The mouse must be inside the window to make the window active.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-1
Figure 9-2 on page 9-2 shows the IBM Network Station menu bar, which contains
the available applications to select. If any applications were specified to autostart by
the IBM Network Station Manager (see Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 10-1 for more information), they will appear on
your screen. If no applications were set to autostart, select any applications that
appear in your menu bar. Additional available application buttons are: 5250, the
IBM Browser, and the Navio NC Browser.
Hide
3270
Figure 9-2. IBM Network Station Menu Bar
The buttons within the menu bar are:
Log Out
Clicking Logout logs you off the IBM Network Station.
Hide
Clicking Hide makes the menu bar float out of view when you move the mouse
pointer off the menu bar. To retrieve the menu bar, move your mouse pointer to
the very bottom of your screen (If you clicked the Move to Top button, go to the
very top of the screen instead) . This is useful if the menu bar covers part of an
application window. Clicking the Hide button changes the button to Show and
keeps the menu bar displayed on the screen.
Move to Top
Clicking Move to Top moves the menu bar to the top of the screen. The button
will read Move to Bottom after the menu bar moves to the top. Clicking the
Move to Bottom button, once the menu bar is located at the top, moves the
menu bar back to the bottom.
Other buttons
Other buttons on the menu bar will be applications available to select and use.
Lock Screen
The Lock Screen button allows you to lock the screen when you leave the
workstation. You will be prompted for a lock screen password.
Working with the 3270 Application
The 3270 application provides access to a System/390. How a 3270 session is presented on the IBM Network Station depends on how you configured the session
using the IBM Network Station Manager program.
If you used the Menu feature of the Startup function (within the IBM Network
Station Manager program) and you added a New 3270 session labeled MY3270,
that Menu button (labeled MY3270) will appear within the menu bar as shown in
Figure 9-3 on page 9-3.
9-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Hide
3270
Figure 9-3. IBM Network Station Menu Bar with NEW3270 Button
If the 3270 session was set to autostart, a 3270 session will appear on the screen
of your IBM Network Station as shown in Figure 9-4.
Figure 9-4. 3270 Session Display
If autostart was not specified, and you click the 3270 button within the IBM Network
Station menu bar, a New 3270 Session window appears as shown in Figure 9-5 on
page 9-4.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-3
Figure 9-5. New 3270 Session Dialog Box
Note: You can use the name of the system or the IP address of the system to log
on. To use a system name, you must set up name translation information
in your TCP/IP configuration.
Depending on the volume of network traffic, you can expect it to take from several
seconds up to a minute to see the Host Login Session screen appear.
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function
3270 emulation provides system users with greater function than they normally
receive if they just use a 3270 nonprogrammable work station(NWS) to access a
System/390. This additional function is available by clicking various pulldown
options from the 3270 menu bar as shown in Figure 9-6 on page 9-5:
9-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
New 3270 Session
Exit 3270
Fonts
APL2
Bracket
Keypad
Auto Action
Block Cursor
Keyboard Remapping
Online Help
for 3270 Topics
Figure 9-6. 3270 Emulation Session with Expanded Pulldowns
As shown in Figure 9-6, pulldowns are available to allow you to quickly access
3270 emulation functions such as font selection by session (Option pulldown) and
online help (Help).
The following list contains some of the 3270 emulation support:
Keyboard remapping1
Graphics support1
Choosing an Enter key location1
Screen size support (for example: 24 x 80, 32 x 80, 43 x 80, and 27 x 132)1
APL character mode support
Pop-up keypad support1
Copy and paste functions
Auto action1
Cursor style options (for example: underscore, block)
Customizable window title1
All the 3270 emulation functions have shipped defaults. Those functions that are
managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also have IBM-supplied
defaults. See Appendix F, “IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page F-1 for a listing of all 3270 emulation defaults controlled by the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
Accessing the 3270 emulation Help (clicking the Help button) will provide more
information on how to make each of these 3270 emulation functions work.
1
The IBM Network Station Manager program controls these 3270 emulation functions. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 10-1 for more information. Also, the online help in the IBM Network Station Manager program
provides more information along with all 3270 emulation default settings.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-5
Accessing Help
You can access help for the 3270 Emulator or your Host session.
For the 3270 emulator, place your mouse pointer in the emulator's menu bar and
click Help. In general, to access help for the 3270 application, place your mouse
pointer inside the Host session window and press F1.
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application
The 5250 application provides access to a host system. How each 5250 session is
presented on the IBM Network Station depends on how you configured the session
using the IBM Network Station Manager program.
If you used the Menu feature of the Startup function (within the IBM Network
Station Manager program), and you added a new 5250 session labeled MY5250,
that menu button (labeled MY5250) will appear within the menu bar as shown in
Figure 9-7.
Hide
MY5250
Figure 9-7. Menu Bar with New 5250 Button - menu5250
If, in the IBM Network Station Manager program, the 5250 session was set to
autostart, a 5250 session will appear running on the screen of your IBM Network
Station as shown in Figure 9-8.
Figure 9-8. 5250 Session Display
If you click the 5250 button within the IBM Network Station menu bar, a New 5250
Session window appears as shown in Figure 9-9 on page 9-7.
9-6
Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 9-9. New 5250 Session Dialog Box
Note: You can use the name of the system or the IP address of the system to
connect to or start a session. To use a system name, you must set up
name translation information in your TCP/IP configuration.
Depending on the volume of network traffic, you can expect it to take from several
seconds up to a minute to see the host sign-on display appear.
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function
5250 emulation provides system users with greater function than they normally
receive if they just use a nonprogrammable work station (NWS) to access the
system. This additional function is available by clicking various pulldown options
from the 5250 menu bar as shown in Figure 9-10:
Figure 9-10. 5250 Emulation Session with Expanded Pulldowns
As shown in Figure 9-10, pulldowns are available to allow you to quickly access
5250 emulation functions such as multi-session support (Command pulldown), font
selection by session (Option pulldown), and online help (Help).
The following list contains additional 5250 emulation support:
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-7
Keyboard remapping2
Color mapping (basic and advanced)2
Record/playback capability2
Autostart of playback file (from the Record/playback function)2
Auto-logon
Enter key location (you can specify your choice of key to be used for the Enter
key)
Multiple screen size support (for example: 24 X 80, 27 X 132)
OV/400 controller text assist
Cut, copy, paste function2
Hotspot support
Cursor style options (for example, block or underscore)
Rule line support
Row and column indicator
Customizable window title2
Column separator function
All the 5250 emulation functions have shipped defaults. Those functions that are
managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also have IBM-supplied
defaults. See Appendix F, “IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page F-1 for a listing of all 5250 emulation defaults controlled by the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
Accessing the online 5250 Emulation Help (by clicking the Help button) will provide
more information on how to make each of these 5250 Emulation functions work.
Accessing Help
You can access help for the 5250 Emulator or your host session.
For the 5250 emulator, place your mouse pointer in the emulator's Menu bar and
click Help. To access help for S/390, sign on to the S/390, place your mouse
pointer in the host session window and press F1.
Working with the IBM Browser
The IBM Browser can provide access to the Internet. It is also used to access the
IBM Network Station Manager program, which is used to manage IBM Network
Station users and workstations. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program” on page 10-1 for more information.
If you used the Menu feature of the Startup function (within the IBM Network
Station Manager program) and you added an IBM Network Station Browser session
labeled IBM Browser, that Menu button (labeled IBM Browser) will appear within the
menu bar as shown in Figure 9-11 on page 9-9.
2
The IBM Network Station Manager program controls these 5250 Emulation functions. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 10-1 for more information. Also, the online help in the IBM Network Station Manager program
provides more information along with all 5250 emulation default settings.
9-8
Network Station Manager for S/390
Hide
3270
Figure 9-11. IBM Network Station Menu Bar with IBM Browser Button
If the IBM Browser session was set to autostart, an IBM Browser session will
appear on the screen of your IBM Network Station as shown in Figure 9-12.
Figure 9-12. IBM Browser Session Display
If autostart was not specified, and you click the IBM Browser button within the
menu bar, an instance of the IBM Browser appears.
Depending on the volume of network traffic, you can expect it to take from several
seconds up to a minute to see the new IBM Browser screen appear.
IBM Browser News - What is the Latest?
To find out the latest information about IBM Browser features and what is new with
this level of the IBM Browser product, click Help on the IBM Browser main page.
Select the HELP Page option from the Help pulldown.
In the Contents frame, scroll to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) or the README
items. Either of these items provide late-breaking information about the IBM
Browser.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-9
IBM Browser Capabilities
Key IBM Browser features that are available in the first release of the browser
include the following:
Ability to display Web pages that contain text, HTML, GIF images (including
animated GIFs), and JPEG images
Javascript 1.1 or compatible
HTML 3.2
Frames
SSL 2 at 128 or 40 bit levels (in separate versions of the product, for US and
Canada, or for export, respectively)
Java applets can be run by the IBM Network Station Java VM
IBM Browser MIME Types:
Table 9-1. IBM Browser MIME Types
TYPE/SUBTYPE
USAGE
Text/plain
Plain text with no HTML tags
Text/HTML
Text with HTML markup tags
Image/gif
GIF images, including animated GIFs
Image/jpeg
JPEG images
Note: No other MIME types are supported (because they require plug-ins or helper
applications).
IBM Browser URL Types Supported
The IBM Browser can handle the following URL types:
Table 9-2. IBM Browser URL Types Supported
9-10
URL TYPE
USAGE
HTTP
Display content using HTTP protocol,
such as any web page with HTML, and
so forth
HTTPS
Same as HTTP, but using SSL security
MAILTO
Start the e-mail editor to create and send
an e-mail message
ABOUT
Display copyright information about the
browser
FTP
Open an FTP session
JAVASCRIPT
Run JavaScript
VIEW SOURCE
Display source file
Network Station Manager for S/390
Learning About IBM Network Station Browser Functions
The IBM Network Station Browser licensed program has many capabilities to help
you manage Internet access and quick connection the IBM Network Station
Manager program.
These functions, and others, are available by clicking various pulldown options from
the IBM Browser menu bar as shown in Figure 9-13:
Figure 9-13. IBM Network Station Browser with Extended Pulldowns
As shown in Figure 9-13, pulldowns are available to allow you to quickly access
IBM Browser functions such as multiple IBM Browser session support (New
Window in the File pulldown), font selection by user (User Preferences in the Edit
pulldown), and online help (Help).
The following list contains some of the IBM Network Station Browser support:
Open URL. . .
Open Local. . .
Opens an ASCII or HTML file.
Close
Save As. . .
Saves a file with user-specified name and file extension.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-11
Print3
View Source. . .
Views the program source for the file in the current IBM Browser session.
User Preferences3
Allows configuration of fonts, colors, printing, caching and so on.
IBM Network Station Manager program preferences. . .
Provides a direct link to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
History. . .
Provides a list of web pages that were visited during the current IBM Browser
session.
Hotlist
A list of frequently visited web pages. Access the web page by clicking the
Hotlist entry.
Tile
Tile allows you to manage how multiple IBM Browser sessions will be presented on the display screen. For example, assume that you want four sessions. You can use the Tile function to specify two side-by-side sessions at the
top of the display followed by two side-by-side sessions at the bottom of the
display.
Cascade
Cascade allows you to manage multiple IBM Browser sessions on the display
screen by layering one over the other. Each new session is slightly lower that
the previous session, thus allowing a user to work with all active IBM Browser
sessions.
Help Page
Allows a user to access Help for the IBM Browser through a Contents listing on
this page. Key topics are the README and the Frequently Asked Questions
(FAQ).
Support Information
Allows a user to view and save IBM Browser support information to a file.
Many of the IBM Browser functions have shipped defaults. Those functions that are
managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also have IBM-supplied
defaults. See Appendix F, “IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page F-1 for a listing of all IBM Browser defaults controlled by the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
3
The IBM Network Station Manager program controls these IBM Browser functions. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 10-1 for more information. Also, the online help in the IBM Network Station Manager program
provides more information along with all IBM Browser default settings.
9-12
Network Station Manager for S/390
Accessing Help
You can access help for the IBM Browser via the Help menu option. The help
includes a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section, and an addendum for lastminute changes.
For IBM Browser help, place your mouse pointer in the IBM Browser Menu bar and
click Help.
Changing the IBM Browser Encryption Level for Improved Transaction
Security
To change the IBM Browser encryption capability, use the IBM Network Station
Manager program. You will need to work with the Internet Setup Task and select
Network. Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on
page 10-1 provides information on using the IBM Network Station Manager
program.
Working with the Navio NC Navigator Browser
Navio NC Navigator Browser can provide access to the Internet. It is also used to
access the IBM Network Station Manager program, which is used to manage IBM
Network Station users and workstations. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 10-1 for more information.
If you used the Menu feature of the Startup function (within the IBM Network
Station Manager program) and you added a new Navio NC Navigator Browser
session labeled Navio Browser, that Menu button (labeled Navio Browser) will
appear within the Menu bar as shown in Figure 9-14.
Hide
3270
Navio Browser
Figure 9-14. IBM Network Station Menu Bar with Navio Button
If the Navio NC Navigator browser session was set to autostart, an Navio NC
Navigator browser session will appear on the screen of your IBM Network Station
as shown in Figure 9-15 on page 9-14.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-13
Figure 9-15. Navio NC Navigator Browser Session Display
If autostart was not specified, and you click the Navio button within the Menu bar,
an instance of the Navio NC Navigator browser appears.
Depending on the volume of network traffic, you can expect it to take from several
seconds up to a minute to see the new Navio NC Navigator browser screen
appear.
Navio NC Navigator Browser News - What is the Latest?
To find out the latest information about Navio NC Navigator browser features and
what is new with this level of the Navio NC Navigator browser product, click Help
on the Navio NC Navigator main page.
Select the HELP for Navio NC Navigator option from the Help pulldown.
In the Contents frame, scroll to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) or the README
items. Either of these items provide late-breaking information about the Navio NC
Navigator browser.
Navio NC Navigator Browser Capabilities
In general, Navio NC Navigator is a compatible subset of the popular Netscape
Navigator 3.01 browser (UNIX version). Key features that are available include the
following:
Ability to display Web pages that contain text, HTML, GIF images (including
animated GIFs), and JPEG images
Javascript 3
HTML Compatible with Navigator 3.01
Frames
SSL 2 and 3 at 128 or 40 bit levels (in separate versions of the product, for US
and Canada, or for export, respectively) with server and client certificates
Java applets can be run by the IBM Network Station Java VM
9-14
Network Station Manager for S/390
Navio NC Navigator MIME Types:
Table 9-3. Navio NC Navigator MIME Types
TYPE/SUBTYPE
USAGE
Text/plain
Plain text with no HTML tags
Text/HTML
Text with HTML markup tags
Image/gif
GIF images, including animated GIFs
Image/jpeg
JPEG images
Note: No other MIME types are supported (because they require plug-ins or helper
applications).
Navio NC Navigator URL Types Supported
The Navio NC Navigator Browser can handle the following URL types:
Table 9-4. Navio NC Navigator URL Types Supported
URL TYPE
USAGE
HTTP
Display content using HTTP protocol,
such as any web page with HTML, and
so forth
HTTPS
Same as HTTP, but using SSL security
MAILTO
Start the e-mail editor to create and send
an e-mail message
ABOUT
Display copyright information about the
browser
FTP
Open an FTP session
JAVASCRIPT
Run JavaScript
VIEW SOURCE
Display source file
Learning About Navio NC Navigator Browser Functions
The Navio NC Navigator browser licensed program has many capabilities to help
you manage Internet access and quick connection to the IBM Network Station
Manager program.
These functions, and others, are available by clicking various pulldown options from
the Navio NC Navigator browser Menu bar as shown in Figure 9-16 on page 9-16:
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-15
Cut
Copy
Paste
Select All
Find...
Find Again
View Source...
User Preferences...
IBM Network Station
Manager
Preferences...
New Window
Open URL...
Open Local...
Close
Save As...
Print
Exit
Back
Forward
Home
History...
Hotlist...
Add current to Hotlist
Load missing Images
Reload
Tile
Cascade
IBM Network
Station Help
NSB Help Page
Support Information
About NSB
Figure 9-16. Navio NC Navigator Browser with Extended Pulldowns
As shown in Figure 9-14 on page 9-13, pulldowns are available to allow you to
quickly access Navio NC Navigator functions such as multiple Navio NC Navigator
browser session support (New Web Browser in the File pulldown), font selection by
user (General Preferences in the Option pulldown), and online help (Help).
The following information presents and describes some of the Navio NC Navigator
browser support.
File Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the File pulldown:
New Web Browser
Provides another session of the Navio NC Navigator browser to appear on your
screen.
New Mail Message
Provides the capability to address and send E-mail to another person. To use
New Mail Message, you must have the Identity tab, located in the Options
pulldown under Mail & News Preferences, completed.
Mail Document
Provides the capability to address and send documents to another person. To
use Mail Document, you must have the Identity tab, located in the Options
pulldown under Mail & News Preferences, completed.
Open Location
Provides the capability to specify a URL address that, when requested, is displayed in the browser window.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Open File
Provides the capability to specify a file that, when requested, is displayed in the
browser window.
Save as. . .
Provides the capability to save (with a different name and file type) a document
or file currently displayed in the browser.
Print
Provides the capability to specify how (paper size, print orientation, font, which
pages, and so on) a document currently displayed in the browser will be
printed.
Close
Provides the capability to close the current browser window. Any other browser
windows remain open.
Exit
Provides the capability to close all browser sessions at once.
Edit Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the Edit pulldown:
Undo
Provides the capability to undo or cancel the previous operation. For example,
if you deleted a word and decided you did not want to, you could click undo
and the word would return.
Cut
Provides the capability to delete specified pieces of a document.
Copy
Provides the capability to copy specified pieces of a document so that it can be
pasted elsewhere.
Paste
Provides the capability to paste (or insert) specified pieces of a document that
had been marked for either copying or cutting (deleting).
Find
Provides the capability to search a document for a specified word or text string.
Find Again
Provides the capability to search a document for multiple occurrences of a word
or text string.
View Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the View pulldown:
Reload
Provides the capability to reload (retrieve) the currently displayed page. You
also have a Reload button in the Tool bar.
Reload Frame
Provides the capability to reload the active frame of a document currently displayed in the browser.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-17
Load Images
Provides the capability to retrieve the images for the document currently displayed in the browser. Load Images only works if the Auto Load Images function (located in the Options pulldown) is off.
Refresh
Provides the capability to retrieve a new copy of the currently displayed document. The new copy is retrieved from cache, not from a server.
Document Source
Provides the capability to view the HTML source of the currently displayed document.
Document Info
Provides the capability to retrieve basic information about the currently displayed document. For example, creation date, date last modified, size, number
of URL links on the page.
Frame Source
Provides the capability to view the HTML source for the active frame currently
displayed in the browser.
Frame Info
Provides the capability to retrieve basic information about the active frame currently displayed in the browser. For example, creation date, date last modified,
size, number of URL links on the page.
Go Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the Go pulldown:
Back
Provides the capability to navigate backwards to previously accessed documents. Back is only active if you have been to one or more documents. A Back
button is also available on the Tool bar.
Forward
Provides the capability to navigate forward to previously visited documents.
Forward is only active if you have been to a document and then navigated (or
moved) backwards. A Forward button is also available on the Tool bar.
Stop
Provides the capability to stop or end the activity of loading a new document to
be displayed in the browser. A Stop button is also available on the Tool bar.
Remainder of Go Pulldown
Entries in the remainder of the Go pulldown represent URL locations that you
have been to in the current browser session. You can access these locations
by clicking on them or by pressing the listed combination of keys (usually Alt +
a number).
Bookmarks Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the Bookmarks
pulldown:
Add Bookmark
Provides the capability of adding the URL of the currently displayed document
to your list of bookmarks. Bookmarks is a list of URLs that a user frequently
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Network Station Manager for S/390
visits. Placing the URL in the Bookmark list gives a user quick access to those
URLs.
Remainder of Bookmarks Pulldown
Entries in the remainder of the Bookmarks pulldown represent URL locations
that can be accessed by clicking them. To change or delete items that you
have added to this list, use the Bookmarks item on the Window pulldown.
Options Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the Options
pulldown:
General Preferences...
Provides the capability to customize browser appearance, browser fonts, and
how images are handled by the browser.
Mail and News Preferences...
Mail and News Preferences consists of the following tabs:
Compose
Provides the capability to specify how E-mail is handled when it is mailed.
Servers
Provides the capability to view the name of the SMTP server.
Identity
Provides the capability of identifying yourself and your organization for the
purpose of using E-mail and the sending of documents.
Network Preferences
Network Preferences consists of the following tabs:
Cache
Provides the capability to clear memory caches and specify how often
cached documents are verified.
Connections
Provides the capability to specify the number of connections to an internet
server and to determine the size of the network buffer (amount of data
Navio NC Navigator can receive in a transmission).
Proxies
Provides the capability to view your proxy configurations. You have to work
with the network administrator to understand or change any proxy configurations.
Protocols
Provides the ability for you to be notified before accepting a cookie from a
remote server. A cookie is a mechanism that allows a server to remember
information about you that the server can use in subsequent sessions.
Languages
Provides the capability to view how Java and JavaScript are configured.
Java and JavaScript are controlled by the IBM Network Station Manager
program. Work with your system administrator if changes need to be made
to the configuration of Java or JavaScript.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
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Security Preferences
Security preferences consist of the following tabs:
General
Provides the capability to set an alert when entering, leaving, viewing, or
submitting a document insecurely. These alerts can also remind you of
when you change levels of security.
Passwords
Provides the capability to specify that a password be required from people
who want to access your computer.
Personal Certificates
Provides validation of who you say you are when attempting to access a
secure server. Personal certificates are password protected (from the password tab). To obtain personal certificates you have to contact companies
that issue personal certificates. If a personal certificate is issued, it is typically downloaded to your computer and accessible through the browser.
You can view or delete personal certificates. However, you can not edit or
modify personal certificates.
Site Certificates
Provides validation that this user, on this machine (the site), is who they
say they are while attempting to access a secure server. Site certificates
can be issued by secure servers. They are typically downloaded to your
computer and accessible through the browser. You can view or delete site
certificates. However, you can not edit or modify site certificates.
Show Menubar
Provides the capability to have the Menu bar displayed or not displayed during
a browser session. The Menu bar contains the File, Edit, View, Go, Bookmarks,
Options, Directory, Window, and Help pulldowns. If you deselect Show
Menubar, the Menu bar immediately disappears from the browser. To retrieve
the Menu bar, press the right mouse button and select Show Menubar.
Show Toolbar
Provides the capability to have the Toolbar displayed or not displayed during a
browser session. The Toolbar provides buttons for Back, Forward, Home,
Reload, Images, Open, Print, Find, and Stop buttons. If you deselect Show
Toolbar, the Toolbar immediately disappears from the browser. To retrieve the
Toolbar, select the Options pulldown and select Show Toolbar.
Show Location
Provides the capability to enter a URL directly from the keyboard and show the
URL for the current document.
Show Directory Buttons
Provides the capability to display or not display directory buttons. Directory
buttons provide users with quick access to specified URLs. Directory buttons
are best used to provide access to certain URLs for all users. Directory buttons
are similar to Bookmarks; however, Bookmarks are generally used for personal
preference rather than for a whole organization. Directory buttons, when specified, appear below the Location field in the browser. Directory buttons are
managed through the IBM Network Station Manager program. No Directory
buttons will be shown unless they have been defined by your installation.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Auto Load Images
Provides the capability to have images loaded automatically or not at all when
a document is requested. You may want to select this option if you are
browsing documents on remote servers. Auto Load Images works in conjunction with the Load Images item in the View pulldown. If Auto Load Images is
disabled, images can be loaded for a particular document by using the Load
Images function under the View pulldown.
Save Options
Provides the capability to immediately save any changes made to any Options.
Directory Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the Directory
pulldown:
Navio's Home
This Directory entry provides a link to Navio's home page.
You must be able to access the Internet to use this item.
IBM Network Computing
This Directory entry provides a link to IBM's Network Computing home page.
You must be able to access the Internet to use this item.
IBM Home Page
This Directory entry provides a link to IBM's corporate home page.
You must be able to access the Internet to use this item.
IBM Network Station Manager for (your system name appears here)
This Directory entry provides a link to the IBM Network Station Manager
program for the server system that your IBM Network Station was loaded from.
This program is used to manage all IBM Network Stations and their users. See
Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 10-1
for more information.
Window Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the Window
pulldown:
Address Book
Provides the capability to compile a book of names and addresses of individuals or groups you correspond with on a regular basis. This item is used for
sending mail.
Search, editing, and filing capabilities are also provided in the Address Book
function.
Bookmarks
Provides the capability to file, edit, and manage your personal lists of
bookmarks.
The Bookmark function activities you perform are reflected in the list of
bookmarks that you can view using the Bookmarks pulldown in the Tool bar.
For example, if you have two bookmarks whose names are very similar, you
could edit one of them and add a text string that more readily identifies the
bookmark when you access the Bookmarks pulldown.
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
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History
Provides the capability to view a list of documents you have accessed during
this session.
From this list you can create bookmarks for documents previously accessed or
go directly to any selected document.
Remainder of Window Pulldown
The remainder of the Window pulldown contains a list of documents you have
accessed during this session. You can access the document by pressing the
push button next to it.
Help Pulldown
The following Navio NC Navigator functions are available from the Help pulldown:
About Navio NC Navigator
Provides the version level and trademarking information about Navio NC
Navigator.
Help for Navio NC Navigator
Provides help information and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).
Navio NC Navigator Handbook
Provides additional information about using the browser.
Many of the Navio NC Navigator browser functions have shipped defaults. Those
functions that are managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also
have IBM-supplied defaults. See Appendix F, “IBM Network Station Manager
Program Shipped Default Settings” on page F-1 for a listing of all Navio NC
Navigator defaults controlled by the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Accessing Help
You can access help for the Navio NC Navigator browser using the Help menu
option. The help includes a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section, and an
addendum for last-minute changes.
For Navio NC Navigator browser help, place your mouse pointer in the Navio NC
Navigator browser Menu bar and click Help.
JAVA VM
You can set up Java applets and applications by using the IBM Network Station
Manager. The applets and applications can be set to either autostart (they appear
running on your workstation when you login) or set as menu items (they appear as
buttons in the menu bar).
Note: Only a single Java application can run within the IBM Network Station and,
if running, also precludes applets from running in both the desktop and in
the browser.
The Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and the supporting class packages that were
installed with the product together provide an environment for programs that were
written and compiled in the Java programming language. The current level of Java
that is supported by the IBM Network Station is equivalent to the 1.0.2 level distribution of the Java Development Kit (JDK) from JavaSoft. You can start and configure Java programs through the IBM Network Station Manager program.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
What Is Java?
Java is an object-oriented programming language. Java is compiled into a byte
code stream which JVM interprets at runtime. Java programs are portable and, in
general, may be run on any computer that supports a JVM. This is one of the
primary attractions of the Java language.
What do I do with Java?
In order to use Java, you must first obtain a program that was written in Java. This
may be a program that you have purchased, downloaded from the Internet, or
written and compiled by yourself. In general, the IBM Network Station is not geared
towards being a development platform; therefore any significant program should be
developed on another platform before loading it on the IBM Network Station.
What are Java Applications and Applets?
There are two kinds of Java programs: those which are intended to be transferred
and run across the Internet (applets), and those which run as programs from the
local file system (applications). The first variety, applets, are designed so that they
utilize a browser to provide windows and graphical layout for the applet. In general,
these applets are not trusted by the browser since they are downloaded across the
Internet and there is no way of knowing the intent of the author. Therefore, the
browser has the ability to restrict applets from reading or writing to local files and
from connecting to machines other than the machine from which they are downloaded. These restrictions are intended to protect the user from malicious programs
and provide a safe environment to examine programs on the Internet.
Starting an Application
An application must be installed on the file system of the server - Hierarchical File
System in the case of the S/390.
Notes:
1. Only a single Java application can run within the IBM Network Station and, if
running, also precludes applets from running in both the desktop and in the
browser.
2. In order to run a Java application, the IBM Network Station Manager program
must be used to either autostart the application or create a button on the IBM
Network Station menu bar.
Starting an Applet
Applets can be installed on the file system of the server that is your boot host, or
downloaded from a remote system by using a Uniform Resource Locator (URL).
The applet to load is specified through tags on an HTML page.
Applets can be run three different ways:
By creating a button on the IBM Network Station menu bar for an applet
By creating a button for a browser URL
By starting a browser then loading an HTML page which contains an applet
Configuration of the applet is managed through parameter tags within the HTML file
(the specific parameter names are determined by the applet vendor). Applets that
Chapter 9. Logging on and Working with IBM Network Station Manager Applications
9-23
load from the file system of your boot host should be well-known and trusted
applets (the source of the applets is reliable). There are no security restrictions
placed on applets that run from the local file system, so the applet may write to files
and communicate with other machines (which may be desirable if you are saving
your spreadsheet, but it would be a problem if a malicious applet decided to erase
your files).
Where do I find Additional Information on Java?
You can find additional information at the following web sites.
JavaSoft home page:
http://www.javasoft.com
IBM Java home page:
http://www.ibm.com/java
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Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
The IBM Network Station Manager program is a browser-based application
program. This application program allows you to perform the setup and management tasks that are associated with one or all of your IBM Network Stations and
IBM Network Station users. Setup Tasks are:
Hardware configuration:
Examples of configurable Hardware settings are: specifying primary mouse
buttons (left or right-handed), mouse pointer speeds, screen savers, desktop
background, and more.
Startup application and program selection
– Programs and menus
Examples of configurable Startup settings are 5250 sessions, 3270 sessions, remote program sessions, Java application or applets, and IBM
Network Station Browser sessions.
– Environment variables
Environment variable settings are also configured under Startup. Environment variables can be used with Startup programs, menus, or any applications that are running on the IBM Network Station.
Desktop Management
Examples of configurable Desktop settings are screen colors for window
frames, Icon placement, Font selection, and specifying how windows on the
workstation are made active.
3270 Session configuration
Examples of configurable settings for 3270 sessions are screen size, key
remapping capability, color customization, and 3270 sessions with graphics
support.
5250 Session configuration
Examples of configurable settings for 5250 sessions are screen size, key
remapping capability, color customization (basic and advanced),
record/playback, and edit/copy/paste functions.
Internet configuration
– Network
Examples of configurable Network settings are E-Mail address, default
home page, proxy settings, and encrypted or non-encrypted version of the
IBM Network Station Browser.
– IBM Browser
Examples of configurable IBM Browser settings are disk caching, auto
loading of images, print headers and footers, and print margins.
– Navio NC Browser
Examples of configurable Navio NC Browser settings are caching, auto
loading of images, and network buffer size.
– Java Applet Viewer
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-1
Examples of configurable Java applet viewer settings are message style,
heap and stack size settings, and defining properties.
This application also allows you to view the error messages generated by the
Network Station Manager program. This facility is limited to the Network Station
Manager administrator only.
This chapter discusses the following IBM Network Station Manager program topics:
IBM Network Station Manager program overview
– Who can use the IBM Network Station Manager program
– Working with IBM Network Station Manager defaults
– Working with settings
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager program. This section discusses:
– Starting the IBM Network Station Manager program from a web browser
– Signing onto the IBM Network Station Manager program
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager program - Examples
Viewing Network Station Manager Error Messages
IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview
Figure 10-1 on page 10-3 provides a graphical view of how the IBM Network
Station Manager program flows. Take a moment to study Figure 10-1 on
page 10-3; it highlights the differences between the defaults and setup tasks that a
system administrator and end user can work with.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 10-1. IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow
Who can use the IBM Network Station Manager Program?
As shown in Figure 10-1, both system administrators and individual end users can
access and use the program.
System Administrators
System administrators are users having root authority and can work at a level that
is either system-wide or specifically for one user or one workstation. For example,
an administrator could specify that all IBM Network Station users will have one
3270 emulation session available and that one particular user could have an additional 3270 emulation session.
For information on how to sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program,
see “Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program using a Browser” on
page 10-8.
Figure 10-2 on page 10-4 shows the screen a system administrator sees after
signing onto the IBM Network Station Manager program. Notice the range of functions presented in the Setup Tasks frame.
Note: This screen can vary in how it appears depending on the web browser you
are using.
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-3
Figure 10-2. System Administrator Level
Compare these functions to the range of functions that are available to individual
end users as shown in Figure 10-3 on page 10-5.
Individual End Users
End users also have access to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
However, the functions that an end user can work with are limited to settings that
pertain only to themselves.
The following diagram shows the screen that an end user would see after signing
onto the IBM Network Station Manager program. Notice the range of functions presented in the Setup Tasks frame.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 10-3. End-user Level
As you can see, the program's flexibility allows broad system-wide settings management by the administrator and individual settings management by the end user.
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults
There are three levels of defaults. They are:
IBM-supplied defaults
IBM-supplied defaults are provided for all settings that are supported by the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
The IBM-supplied defaults can not be changed. They can be overridden using
the IBM Network Station Manager program feature of System defaults or User
level defaults.
See Appendix F, “IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page F-1 for a complete list of all IBM-supplied default values for
the IBM Network Station Manager program.
System defaults
System defaults are used to change settings for all users or all workstations.
System defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults.
User defaults
User defaults are used to change settings for an individual user or individual
workstation.
User defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults and system defaults.
Note: Settings work differently in the Startup function of Setup Tasks. For Programs, Menus, and Environment Variables, the IBM-supplied, Systemspecified, and User-specified, are additive. However, for the same
environment variable, the value set at the user level takes precedence over
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-5
the value set at the system or IBM-supplied levels. (That is, the values for a
given environment variable are not additive.) Any settings that are specified
at the system or user level are added to those that are specified in the
IBM-supplied default settings.
IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults - Example
This example uses the Desktop background setting that is in the Hardware function
of Setup Tasks.
The IBM-supplied setting for Desktop background is the IBM bitmap.
At this point, the administrator determines that all Desktop backgrounds will be set
to dark red. Using the IBM Network Station Manager program, the administrator
applies the change by working through the System Defaults level. This change, to
the color dark red, overrides the IBM-supplied value of the IBM bitmap for Desktop
background.
After viewing the new desktop background color of dark red, a user determines it is
too difficult to look at for long periods of time and requests his Desktop background
color be changed to green. The user can either change the Desktop background
color or request the administrator to do it.
The administrator can make the change by selecting the Hardware Setup Task,
User defaults and specify the user name of the person who is requesting the
change. Scroll to the Desktop background field and specify green. Click Finish to
apply the change. This change, to a User default setting, overrides the
IBM-supplied default and the administrator-set System Default value of dark red.
Notes:
1. If the user changed the Desktop setting, they would go directly to the Hardware
settings panel, bypassing the Default selection panel.
2. To view this change in Desktop settings you would have to log off and then log
on to the workstation.
Working with System-Wide Defaults
Figure 10-4 on page 10-7 is representative of the panel that appears when a
selection is made from the Setup Tasks frame. In this example, the Hardware
Defaults panel is used.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 10-4. Hardware Defaults
As you can see, the Hardware Defaults panel allows you to work with System
defaults for all workstations and users, Workstation defaults for a particular workstation, or User defaults for a particular user. The Hardware Defaults panel is
unique in that it allows you to specify settings for workstations in addition to specific
users. If you want to specify defaults for a particular user, you can click the Browse
button and get a list of users on the system.
System defaults have settings that are not available when working with an individual user or workstation.
Working with Individual User Defaults
User defaults are designed to change settings on a user-by-user basis, one user at
a time. This gives you flexibility in custom tailoring individual sessions.
From any of the Default panels, select User defaults, enter the user name, and
press the Next button.
Working with Settings
Settings are fields that you see after you have selected which defaults (System or
User) you want to work with. For example, Figure 10-5 on page 10-8 shows the
Desktop Manager Settings fields for Screen colors, Icon preferences, Fonts, and
Window focus.
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-7
Figure 10-5. Desktop Manager Settings Fields
In this example, Figure 10-5 represents Desktop settings that are being worked
with from the System Defaults level. That means that any changes to the settings
would be applied to ALL users.
Note: Settings in the Startup function of Setup Tasks work differently than the settings in other Setup Tasks. The difference is that any changes that are
made at the system default level and user default level are added to the
settings that are shipped with the IBM-supplied default settings.
For example, the IBM-supplied default is that all users have one 5250
session. Then, in Setup Tasks, the administrator selects Startup, Menus,
System defaults, 5250 and applies this setting. The result is that all users
would now have two 5250 sessions available to them.
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program using a Browser
To best understand and learn how the IBM Network Station Manager program
works, we recommend that you now sign on and follow the examples in this
chapter.
To start working with the IBM Network Station Manager program, power-on your
IBM Network Station, login, and click IBM Browser from the Menu bar on your IBM
Network Station as shown in Figure 10-6.
Hide
3270
Figure 10-6. IBM Network Station Menu Bar
Note: If you do not have, or have not installed, the IBM Network Station Browser
licensed program, you can use the following web browsers to sign on to the
IBM Network Station Manager program from your workstation:
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Netscape** 3.01
Microsoft Internet Explorer** 3.01
The IBM Network Station Browser appears as shown in Figure 10-7:
Figure 10-7. IBM Network Station Browser Sign on Screen
Click the Edit pulldown and select IBM Network Station Manager Preferences as
shown in Figure 10-8 on page 10-10:
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-9
Figure 10-8. IBM Network Station Browser Sign on Screen with Edit Pulldown
The IBM Network Station Manager program sign-on screen appears:
Figure 10-9. Sign on Screen
Note: An alternative way to reach the IBM Network Station Manager program
sign-on screen is to enter the following case-sensitive URL in the IBM
Browser's URL field:
http://yourservername:portnumber/NetworkStation/Admin
where:
yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address.
portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network
Station program.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
If you have not changed the default port number for the ICS server (80),
you do not need to specify portnumber.
Type your username and password, then click Ok.
The Main Screen of the IBM Network Station Manager appears:
Figure 10-10. System Administrator Level
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks Examples
Note: You must be a system administrator to work with these examples.
As shown in Figure 10-10, setup tasks are represented by icons in the left-most
frame of the screen.
Clicking on any icon presents a panel where you select which set of Defaults you
want to work with.
When working with these examples, select User defaults and use your own user
name. Then, when you are done going through the examples, you will be able to
see the results on your workstation.
In order to see the changes you make using the IBM Network Station Manager
program, you will have to log off and then log on to your workstation. Do not do this
until we have gone through all of the examples that are presented here.
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-11
Notes:
1. When going through the examples, the Main panel and the Default selection
panel will not be presented in this document every time.
2. See “Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples” on
page 10-21 for information on working with remote programs such as AIX sessions and WinCenter Pro for PC applications.
Hardware Settings - User Example
From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware.
Select User defaults, and type in your user name (USER001 in this example) as
shown in Figure 10-11.
Figure 10-11. Hardware Defaults Panel with User Defaults Specified
In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Hardware Settings frame appears as shown (scrolled-down) in Figure 10-12
on page 10-13.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 10-12. Hardware Settings User Example
Scroll to Desktop background and select the Tiles bitmap.
Click Finish to apply the change. Go to the next example.
Hardware Settings - System Defaults Example
From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware.
Select System defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue. The Hardware
Settings - System Defaults panel is displayed.
Scroll forward to the box labeled Update host table and DNS configuration from
server as shown in Figure 10-13 on page 10-14.
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-13
Figure 10-13. Hardware Defaults Panel with System Defaults Specified
The IBM Network Stations take their TCP/IP configuration information (domain
name, name servers, and host table) from the DHCP or BOOTP server. The configuration file, /etc/resolv.conf, contains this information.
Click the IBM Network Station configuration button to change the configuration
information. Any existing name server or domain name configuration data provided
by DHCP or BOOTP server is overridden.
Click the Finish button.
Startup Settings Example
From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Programs, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Programs Settings frame appears as shown in Figure 10-14 on page 10-15.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 10-14. Startup Settings Example
Scroll to 3270 Sessions to Autostart. This setting, when completed, will automatically start a 3270 session for you when you sign on to your workstation. Complete
the following fields:
S/390 system - Type the name or TCP/IP address of the S/390 your workstation boots from.
Session title - Type in a text string that represents your 3270 session. For
example, 3270#2. This text string will appear in the Title bar of your 3270
session. This field is optional and you do not need a value. However, in this
example you might want to try a name (3270#2) so you can see it when we
verify the examples.
For the other settings fields, use the defaults.
Click Finish to apply the change. Go to the next example.
Desktop Manager Example
From the Setup Tasks frame, click Desktop Manager and select User defaults. In
the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Desktop Manager Settings frame appears as shown in Figure 10-15 on
page 10-16.
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-15
Figure 10-15. Desktop Manager Settings Example
Scroll to Icon preferences. In the Icon location field, select Top left.
Click Finish to apply the change. Go to the next example.
5250 Example
From the Setup Tasks frame, click 5250 and select User defaults. In the bottom
frame, click Next to continue.
The 5250 Settings appear as shown in Figure 10-16 on page 10-17.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 10-16. 5250 Setting Example
Scroll to the Allow use of the edit menu field and select No to disable the edit
menu. (The default is Yes, meaning that you can use the edit menu).
By disabling Allow use of the edit menu, your 5250 sessions will not have the Edit
pulldown displayed for use.
Click Finish to apply the change. Go to the next example.
3270 Example
From the Setup Tasks frame, click 3270 and select User defaults. In the bottom
frame, click Next to continue.
The 3270 Settings panel appears as shown in Figure 10-17 on page 10-18.
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-17
Figure 10-17. 3270 Settings Example
Scroll to the Screen size field. Select 24 x 80.
This will change your 3270 session screen size from 32 x 80 (the default) to 24 x
80.
Click Finish to apply the change. Go to the next example.
Internet
Changing the IBM Network Station Default Port Number
The default IBM Internet Connection Secure (ICS) server number is port 80. This
port number is also the default port number used by the IBM Network Station
browsers to access the IBM Network Station Manager program. If the ICS server
configured for use with IBM Network Station Manager program does not use the
default port 80, do the following steps to configure the IBM Network Station
browsers to select the appropriate port.
1. Invoke the IBM Network Station Manager program
http://yourservername:portnumber/NetworkStation/Admin
where:
yourservername is the host name or TCP/IP address of the ICS server
portnumber is the port that is configured for use with the IBM Network
Station Manager program
If you have not changed the default port number for the ICS server (80), you do
not need to specify portnumber.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Enter the URL and log as a system administrator.
2. Access the Internet Network System default panel. The Internet Network
System panel appears as shown in Figure 10-18.
From the 'Setup Tasks' frame on the left, click Internet, click Network, and
select System defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
3. Update the port number.
Scroll to the 'Proxy Section'. At the end of this section, see the following:
Web server port on the boot host:
To the right is a box that indicates 'Use default' or key in the new port number.
Enter the new port number (for example 8080).
Select Finish.
Figure 10-18. IBM Network Station Manager program Internet Network System Defaults
Reboot the IBM Network Station. Do the following to verify the change.
1. Select Edit
2. Select Network Station Manager Program Preferences.
The updated port number appears in the URL.
Changing Other Internet Settings
From the Setup Tasks frame on the left , click Internet, click Network, and select
System defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The IBM Network Station Browser Settings frame appears as shown in
Figure 10-19 on page 10-20.
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-19
Figure 10-19. IBM Network Station Browser Settings Example
Scroll to the Proxy Section heading and select No in the Auto load images field.
Note: Remember that if you apply this change, no images will display when you
are using a browser. After a page loads the text, you can use the browser's
Navigate pulldown menu to load the images. Select the Navigate pulldown,
and then select Load Missing Images.
Click Finish to apply the change. Click Main Screen in the Setup Tasks frame.
Verifying your Setting Changes
After completing the examples, you can verify the settings you specified.You will
need to log off and then log on for the settings to be applied.
Do not forget:: If you do not want any of the settings specified in the example
exercises to remain, you will have to use the IBM Network Station Manager
program to return them to the original settings or some other settings of
your choice.
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education
It is recommended that you provide some hands-on education, similar to what you
just experienced going through the above examples, for your users of the IBM
Network Stations.
Practice choosing and applying settings within the various Setup Tasks to build
skills among your users.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples
Following is a list of additional examples that use the IBM Network Station Manager
program:
Setting up an AIX session on your IBM Network Station by using Remote
Program support
Setting up a Windows NT session on your IBM Network Station by using
Remote Program support
Setting up an AIX Session using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program
Complete the following steps to setup an AIX session by using the IBM Network
Station Manager program:
1. Verify that the user name and password on the host system match the user
name and password on the AIX server.
2. You must create a .rhosts file on the AIX server. This file must contain the IBM
Network Station's name and the name that the user logs into AIX with. This file
resides on the AIX server under the user's directory. An example for a userid of
user001:
Contents of File
Directory Structure:
File name:
IBM Network Station name
Name user signs on with:
/home/user001
.rhosts
MYNWS.mycompany.ABC.com
user001
This file can contain multiple lines. Each line should have one IBM Network
Station name and one user name on it. If a user will be working from more than
one IBM Network Station, create an entry for each IBM Network Station.
3. Sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
4. From Setup Tasks, click Startup.
5. Under Startup, click Menu.
6. From Program Defaults, click User defaults.
If you are setting this up for someone else, type their user name or click
Browse to select their user name if you do not know it.
7. Click Next to continue.
8. Scroll ahead to Remote Programs. Type in the information as shown in
Figure 10-20.
Figure 10-20. Remote Program Example for AIX
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-21
Where:
Menu item label
This text string will appear in the Menu bar on the IBM Network Station.
Remote host
The name or IP address of the AIX server.
Program to run
This identifies the program to run on the AIX server.
Optional parameters
-display is an AIX requirement that causes the program to display on the
IBM Network Station rather than on the remote host. ${IP} is an
IBM-supplied environment variable that gets replaced with the IP address of
the IBM Network Station. -lang C is an AIX requirement that is used by
programs such as Netscape on AIX.
The required parameters for AIX-Session are: -display and ${IP}:0.
9. Click Finish to apply the AIX remote program setting.
10. Log off and then log on your IBM Network Station. In the Menu bar there will
be a button that is labeled AIX-Session, as shown in Figure 10-21.
Show
AIX-Session WinCenter Pro
AIX-Session
Figure 10-21. Menu Button for Remote Program Example for AIX
11. Click AIX-Session and a window will open with your X-station session.
From the Aixterm window, you can run additional programs.
Setting up a Windows NT Session using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program
Complete the following steps to setup a Windows NT session by using the IBM
Network Station Manager program:
1. Verify that you have a Windows NT machine in your network that has the
WinCenter Pro** application loaded on it.
2. Verify that the user has a valid user name and password on the Windows NT
server. When the session from the Windows NT server is requested on the IBM
Network Station, the user will have to sign on.
3. Sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
4. From Setup Tasks, click Startup.
5. Under Startup, click Menu.
6. From Program Defaults, click User defaults.
If you are setting this up for someone else, type their user name or click
Browse to select their user name if you do not know it.
7. Click Next to continue.
8. Scroll ahead to Remote Programs. Type in the information as shown in
Figure 10-22 on page 10-23.
10-22
Network Station Manager for S/390
Figure 10-22. Remote Program Example for Windows NT
Where:
Menu item label
This text string will appear in the Menu bar on the IBM Network Station.
Remote host
The name or IP address of the Windows NT server.
Program to run
This identifies the program to run on the Windows NT server.
Optional parameters
-display is a WinCenter Pro requirement that causes the program to display
on the IBM Network Station rather than on the remote host. ${IP} is an
IBM-supplied environment variable that gets replaced with the IP address of
the IBM Network Station.
The required parameters for WinCenter Pro are: -display and ${IP}:0.
9. Click Finish to apply the WinCenter Pro remote program setting.
10. Log off and then log on your IBM Network Station. In the Menu bar there will
be a button that is labeled WinCenter Pro, as shown in Figure 10-23.
Show
AIX-Session WinCenter Pro
AIX-Session
Figure 10-23. Menu Button for Remote Program Example for NT - EDBAR
11. Click WinCenter Pro and a window will open with your WinCenter session.
Viewing Network Station Manager Error Messages
Only system administrators can view network station manager error message
descriptions online. From the Setup Task frame, click NSM Error Messages. This
will open the window as shown in Figure 10-24 on page 10-24.
Enter the error message number you want to view and click on Submit. You can
enter an error number with or without message prefix.
The corresponding error message will be displayed as shown in Figure 10-25 on
page 10-24. Variable tokens, which are substituted in the messages, are highlighted within brackets ([]).
Chapter 10. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
10-23
Use the back button to go to the previous screen if you want to see another error
message. The Close button will close this new window.
Figure 10-24. Network Station Manager's Error Messages
Figure 10-25. Network Station Manager's Error Message Displayed
10-24
Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 11. Working with User Services
User services are programs that provide users with tools to manage the IBM
Network Station's environment. You can work with User Services whenever you
want, including when an application is running. Following are a list of User Services
(not all User Services are enabled):
Console
Login (not enabled)
Terminals
WindowMgr
Utilities
Setup (not enabled)
Statistics
Accessing User Services
Access User Services by pressing the Ctrl and Pause keys all at the same time.
Figure 11-1 shows the User Services window with all the service programs that are
displayed within the menu bar:
Figure 11-1. User Services Window
Console
This function provides a menu bar option (Console) for handling messages. Click
the button by Messages to display messages that record IBM Network Station
activity. Figure 11-2 shows the tools available through the Console services option:
Terminals
Clear Messages
Rescan Messages
Abort Waiting Fonts
Abort Ringing Bell
Abort Serial Line
Abort Parellel Port
Reboot
Close
Figure 11-2. User Services: Console View
Chapter 11. Working with User Services
11-1
Click Console to change the information displayed on the console.
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function:
Clear Messages
Selecting this option clears all the current messages from the console
display.
Rescan Messages
Selecting this option refreshes the console display with any current messages that are not presently being displayed.
Close
Selecting this option closes the console function of User Services.
Login
The Login services option is disabled. The IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program provides a login capability.
Terminals
Figure 11-3 shows the tools available through the Terminals services option:
Login Terminals
Setup
New Terminal
New Telnet
Figure 11-3. User Services: Terminals View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function:
New Terminal
Selecting this option starts terminal management.
The New Terminal function provides you with the ability to select from a
list of hosts, which allows terminals on the hosts to communicate with
each other.
New Telnet
Selecting this option starts the Telnet manager.
The New Telnet function provides similar capability as the New Terminal
function.
WindowMgr
Figure 11-4 on page 11-3 shows the tools available through the WindowMgr services option:
11-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Terminals
Figure 11-4. User Services: Window Manager View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function:
Builtin Window Manager
Selecting this option starts the Builtin Window Manager (an OSF or
Motif-style). Deselecting this option ends the Builtin Window Manager.
The Builtin Window Manager function provides you with the ability to
size, move, and make active (clicking) all the windows open on your
monitor.
Utilities
Figure 11-5 shows the tools available through the Utilities services option:
Terminals
Figure 11-5. User Services: Utilities View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function:
Refresh Screen
Selecting this option refreshes the active window.
Blank Screen
Selecting this option starts the screen-saver program.
Lock Screen
Selecting this option locks the screen after prompting for a password.
The Lock Screen function keeps anyone without the password from
using the workstation.
Rescan Font Path
Selecting this option refreshes any font changes that are provided by the
system administrator.
For example, if the font currently being used is so large you can't
display an entire 5250 session, you might have the administrator make
available a smaller font. When this is done, you can then select the font
by clicking on the Option pull-down within the tool bar and selecting
fonts.
Another use of fonts would be to make your windows smaller, therefore
enabling several full windows to be displayed at the same time.
Chapter 11. Working with User Services
11-3
Test Network
Selecting this option runs the network test. This would be similar to the
TCP/IP command "PING".
Setup
The Setup services option is disabled.
Statistics
Figure 11-6 shows the tools available through the Statistics services option:
Terminals
Figure 11-6. User Services: Statistics View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function within
the statistics services function:
Show version
Selecting this option displays version numbers and other information
about the current state of the IBM Network Station.
Show Memory
Selecting this option displays information about free and installed
memory in the IBM Network Station.
Show X Connections
Selecting this option displays information about all the current X clients
that are connected to the IBM Network Station.
Show Statistics
Selecting this option displays statistics that pertain to the IBM Network
Station.
11-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Chapter 12. Working with the IBM Network Station Setup
Utility
The system administrator can access the IBM Network Station Setup Utility while
the IBM Network Station is going through the boot-up process.
The primary purpose of the Setup Utility is to allow you to View and then Set
(change) configuration settings on a particular IBM Network Station. Following is a
list that contains the names of configuration settings that can be viewed or set
(changed):
View:
– Network Parameters
– Boot Parameters
– Hardware Configuration
Set (change):
– Network Parameters
– Boot Parameters
– Monitor Parameters
– Language Parameters
– Verbose Diagnostic Messages (Enabled or Disabled)
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
While the IBM Network Station is booting (downloading the file from the boot Host),
press the Escape key.
Then, type in the Administrator password if password control is active. (The password is case-sensitive). The administrator password is specified through the IBM
Network Station Manager program in the Hardware setup tasks. Once the password is accepted, the following display appears:
Notes:
1. If the password has not been set using the IBM Network Station Manager
program, any user can use the configuration settings in the IBM Setup Utility.
2. If you attempt the password three times without success, only the viewing
capability of the IBM Network Station Setup Utility is available to you.
3. If you changed the Administrator password using the IBM Network Station
Manager program, you will have to boot the IBM Network Station system unit
up to the Login window in order for the new Administrator password to be
enabled at the system unit.
Chapter 12. Working with the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
12-1
SCRN002
IBM Network Station
Setup Utility
F2 = View Network Parameters
F3 = View Boot Parameters
F4 = View Hardware Configuration
F5
F6
F7
F8
=
=
=
=
Set
Set
Set
Set
Network Parameters
Boot Parameters
Monitor Parameters
Language Parameters
F9 = Verbose Diagnostic Messages (Disabled or Enabled)
Enter=Reboot
F2 = View Network Parameters
This option lets you view the following Network Parameters for an IBM Network
Station.
IP Addressed from
Whether the IBM Network Station is booted from the Network setting (DHCP for
OS/390 and BOOTP for VM is normal operation for the IBM Network Station),
or if the IBM Network Station is booted from specific parameters stored on the
IBM Network Station (NVRAM setting)
Network Station IP Address
First Boot Host IP Address
Second Boot Host IP Address
Third Boot Host IP Address
Gateway IP Address
Subnet Mask
Broadcast IP Address
F3 = View Boot Parameters
This option lets you view the following Boot Parameters for an IBM Network
Station:
Boot File
TFTP Boot Directory
NFS Boot Directory
Configuration File
Configuration Directory
TFTP Order
NFS Order
MOP Order
LOCAL Order
12-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
F4 = View Hardware Configuration
This option lets you view the following Hardware Configuration parameters for an
IBM Network Station:
Video Memory
DRAM Memory Total
– Slot 1
– Slot 2
Boot Monitor Version
Specifies the level of initial program that runs when the IBM Network Station is
powered on.
Keyboard Controller
Keyboard ID
Keyboard Language
Startup Language
Processor Version
Boot Resolution
This indicates the monitor resolution when the IBM Network Station is powered
on.
Server Resolution
This indicates the monitor resolution when applications are loaded on the IBM
Network Station.
Monitor ID
Token Ring/Ethernet
– MAC Address
This indicates the address of the communication adapter.
– Manufacturer
– Product
– Microcode Version
– Information
PCMCIA Card
– Manufacturer
– Product
– Microcode Version
– Information
F5 = Set Network Parameters
This option lets you Set or Change how this IBM Network Station will determine its
network parameters as specified by IP Addressed from:
Network - IBM Network Station boots from the network
NVRAM - IBM Network Station boots from the parameters stored in this IBM
Network Station.
If the IBM Network Station is booting from the Network setting, the following
Network Parameters are available:
Chapter 12. Working with the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
12-3
Using a Token Ring Connection
Using an Ethernet Connection
IP Addressed from
IP Addressed from
DHCP IP Address order
DHCP IP Address order
BOOTP IP Address order
BOOTP IP Address order
RARP IP Address order
RARP IP Address order
Version 2 IEEE 802.3
If the IBM Network Station is booting from the NVRAM setting, the following
Network Parameters are available:
Network Station IP Address
First Boot Host IP Address
Second Boot Host IP Address
Third Boot Host IP Address
Gateway IP Address
Subnet Mask
Broadcast IP Address
The main use of the Set Network Parameters function is to allow you to select specific TCP/IP parameters for connection to boot hosts to isolate network connection
problems.
F6 = Set Boot Parameters
The main use of this function is to monitor or change the files and location of files
that are used for booting this IBM Network Station.
This parameter lets you Set or Change the following Boot Parameters for an IBM
Network Station:
Boot File
TFTP Boot Directory (path on the boot server to the Boot File)
When using TFTP (see below on this screen), this is the path name the server
uses to locate and download the operating system.
NFS Boot Directory
When using NFS (see below on this screen), this is the path name the server
uses to locate and download the operating system.
Configuration File
This is the name of the configuration file. The configuration file contains the
settings that are used by this IBM Network Station. You can configure these
settings by using the Hardware function of Setup Tasks through the IBM
Network Station Manager. See Chapter 10, “Using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program” on page 10-1, for a high-level description of the Hardware
Setup Tasks. The online help of the IBM Network Station Manager provides the
details about using the Hardware function of Setup Tasks.
Configuration Directory
This is the name the boot server uses to locate the configuration file.
Protocol Order
12-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
You can use the following protocols (that are located near the bottom of the
screen) to perform the software download to the IBM Network Station. You can
assign an order (first, second, and so on) that the system follows when performing the software download.
– TFTP Order
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).
– NFS Order
Network File System (NFS).
– MOP Order
This protocol order is not supported.
– LOCAL Order
This indicates that you have installed, in the IBM Network Station system
unit, a flash card with the operating system on it.
F7 = Set Monitor Parameters
F2 = Set Monitor Resolution The main use of this function is to select a resolution
to use with the monitor that is attached to this IBM Network Station.
We recommended that you test the resolution (pressing Enter allows
you to test the resolution) before selecting and exiting this screen to
ensure the resolution is supported by this monitor. If the grid size fits
your display screen, and the font resolution is acceptable, the resolution
that is selected will work.
CAUTION:
Setting a resolution that is not supported by your monitor can
cause permanent damage to the monitor.
F3 = Monitor Power Management Disabled The main use of this function is to
enable or disable the power management function of the monitor that is
attached to this IBM Network Station system unit.
CAUTION:
Enabling power management for a monitor that does not support
this feature can cause permanent damage to the monitor.
F8 = Set Language Parameters
F2 = Select Keyboard Language The main use of this function is to select a keyboard language to use with this IBM Network Station. Selecting a different language will change the mapping of keys. For example, if the
current mapping results in a $ sign being put on the display when the $
sign key is pressed, changing the keyboard language may result in a
different character being put on the display.
Note: If you change your keyboard language by using the IBM Network
Station Setup Utility, you could have a different keyboard language than what is specified in the IBM Network Station
Manager program. We recommended that you use the IBM
Network Station Manager program to change keyboard languages.
Chapter 12. Working with the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
12-5
F3 = Select Startup Language The main use of this function is to select your language type.
Note: For release 1, English is the only supported language type.
F9 = Verbose Diagnostic Messages (Enabled or Disabled)
The main use of this function is to monitor boot activity from the boot Host. As the
files are loaded, messages are written to a message log or displayed on the
monitor. The default is Verbose disabled. When the boot process is in progress, a
series of periods appears on the monitor.
If Verbose is enabled, all the file loading activity and any error messages are displayed.
12-6
Network Station Manager for S/390
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
You configure the DHCP server by manually editing the DHCP server configuration
file.
Attention: Configuring the server incorrectly causes few, if any, warning messages.
The DHCP server normally runs even when it encounters errors in the configuration
file and typically ignores incorrect data and may optionally post a message to its
log.
The DHCP server defaults to locating the configuration file in \ETC\DHCPSD.CFG.
A sample server configuration file called DHCPSD.CFG is located in the
\usr\lpp\tcpip\nsm\samples\dhcpsd directory.
You can create a hierarchy of configuration parameters by nesting statements
within the DHCP server configuration file. This allows you to specify the scope of
some configuration values that are served to all clients, while other configuration
values are served only to certain clients. The statement used and its position in the
file determines what information is supplied to the clients.
When editing the DHCP server configuration file:
Comments must begin with a pound sign (#).
Class and vendor names that include spaces must be surrounded by quotes
(").
Parameters to the right of a left parenthesis are used only by the DHCP Server
Configuration program graphical interface. A space must precede the left
parenthesis. For example, (alias=mysubnet is used only by the DHCP Server
Configuration program in the following:
subnet 9.67.48.0 255.255.240.0 9.67.48.1-9.67.48.15 (alias=mysubnet
Statement parameters are positionally dependent. If you omit a required parameter and enter a subsequent required parameter in a statement, the server
ignores the missing parameter, writes an error message to a log file, and continues to read the configuration file.
A continuation character \ indicates the information is continued on the next
line. When used within a comment, the character is treated as part of the
comment and is ignored as a continuation character.
Braces are used to specify statements that are scoped within other statements.
If a parameter is specified in more than one place, the lowest level statement
(which is the most specific) is used:
– Statements specified outside braces are considered global and are used for
all addresses served by this server unless the statement is overridden at a
lower-scoped level.
– Parameters specified within braces under a statement such as a Subnet
statement, are considered local and apply only to clients within the subnet.
– Definition of a parameter in a class takes precedence over definition of the
parameter in a subnet.
Vendor statements always have a global scope.
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
A-1
Class statements are not allowed inside Client statements.
Client statements are not allowed inside Option, Vendor, or Class statements.
Subnet statements are not allowed inside Class or Client statements.
Keywords are not case sensitive. Capitalization patterns used in this documentation are not required in the configuration file. This program uses the convention that keywords start with a lower case letter and subsequent "word"
subparts start with a capital letter. For example, a keyword is proxyARec.
Defining Global Values
Assign global values such as Class, Subnet, Option, Client, or Vendor statements
by placing the statement outside any braces.
Defining Vendors
To provide vendor configuration information to the DHCP clients in your network:
At the global level, define a vendor and assign the appropriate configuration
values. Unlike the Class statement, the scope of the Vendor statement cannot
be controlled by its placement in the file. Vendor statements within Subnet,
Class, or Client statements are ignored. Options can be redefined in the vendor
class.
Using the DHCP-BOOTP protocol, the DHCP client identifies itself to the DHCP
server as belonging to a vendor class by sending option 60, Class Identifier,
with a specific vendor name.
The DHCP server recognizes the client has a specific vendor and returns
encapsulated option 43, Vendor-specific Information, containing vendor-specific
DHCP options and option values.
The format of the Vendor statement is:
vendor vendor_name [hex value]
vendor_name
The user-defined label that identifies the vendor. The vendor name is an ASCII
string of up to 255 characters (for example, "IBM"). If the vendor name contains
spaces, it must be surrounded by quotes (").
[hex value]
The value for each option must be specified either as an ASCII string, or as
hexadecimal in the hexadecimal ASCII string construct. For example:
hex"01 02 03"
For more information, see descriptions of option 60, Class-Identifier, in Specifying DHCP Options.
The vendor statement can also be specified in the DHCP server configuration file
as a vendor statement followed by a pair of braces containing the options particular
to this vendor. Within these braces, the usual option value encoding and decoding
rules do not apply:
A-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
vendor vendor_name
{
option x hex "01 02"
option y hex "05 07"
}
Defining Subnets
The Subnet statement specifies configuration parameters for an address pool
administrated by a server. An address pool is a range of IP addresses to be leased
to clients. The task of configuring subnets also allows you to set lease time and
other options for clients using the address pool. Lease time and other options can
be inherited from a global level.
The Subnet statement can be used to define a subnet or a subnet group. The
format of the Subnet statement used to define a subnet is:
subnet subnet_address [subnet_mask] range [(alias=name ]
Note: Parameters to the right of a left parenthesis are used by the DHCP Server
Configuration program. The DHCP server parses statements to the right of
a left parenthesis as comments.
subnet_address
The address of this subnet, specified in dotted-decimal notation (for example,
9.67.48.0).
subnet_mask
The mask for the subnet in dotted decimal notation or in integer format. A
subnet mask divides the subnet address into a subnet portion and a host
portion. If no value is entered for the subnet mask, the default is the class
mask appropriate for an A, B, or C class network.
A subnet mask can be expressed either in dotted-decimal notation, or as an
integer between 8 and 31. For example, enter a subnet mask as a dotted
decimal notation of 255.255.240.0 or an integer format of 20. In subnet
9.67.48.0, a mask of 255.255.240.0 implies an address range from 9.67.48.001
to 9.67.63.254. The value 20 is the total number of 1s in a mask expressed in
binary as 11111111.11111111.11110000.00000000.
Although not required, in most configurations the DHCP server should sned
option 1, subnet mask, to DHCP clients. Client operation may be
unpredicatable if the client receives no subnet maske from the DHCO server
and assumes a subnet mask that is not appropraite for the subnet.
If not specified, the client uses the following default subnet masks:
Class A network - 255.0.0.0
Class B network - 255.255.0.0
Class C network - 255.255.255.0
range
All addresses to be administered to this subnet. Enter the addresses in dotteddecimal notation, beginning with the lower end of the range, followed by a
hyphen, then the upper end of the range, with no spaces in between; for
example, 9.67.48.1-9.67.48.128. Ranges should not overlap.
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
A-3
Notes:
1. In the range of addresses, do not include the address of the subnet and the
address used for broadcast messages. For example, if the subnet address
is 9.67.96.0 and the subnet mask is 255.255.240.0, do not include
9.67.96.0 and 9.67.111.255 in the range of addresses.
2. Use the Client statement to exclude an IP address in the range that the
server should not administer. For example, exclude an address that has
been permanently assigned to a host. For more information on client statements, see Defining Clients.
(alias=name
A symbolic name for ease in identifying a subnet.
The parameter alias=name immediately after a left parenthesis contains the
symbolic name, which appears in the DHCP Server Configuration program
graphic display of the server configuration. If no name is entered, the subnet IP
address is used to identify the subnet in the DHCP Server Configuration
program display.
Defining Subnet Groups
To define a subnet group, use label:value[/priority]] in the Subnet statement:
subnet subnet_address [subnet_mask] range [label:value[/priority]]
The subnet_address, subnet_mask, and range parameters are described in
Defining Subnets. The parameters that define subnet groups include:
label:
Identifies subnets grouped together on the same wire.
value[/priority]
A string of 1 to 64 alphanumeric characters that identifies the subnet, followed
by the priority in which this subnet's address pool is used. No spaces are
allowed in labels. More than one subnet can have the same identifier. Priority is
a positive integer, where 1 is a higher priority than 2. If no priority is specified,
the highest priority is assigned. If two subnets have identical priority, the
subnets within a label are processed based on the physical position in the configuration file.
For example, the following two subnets are on the same wire:
inOrder
subnet 9.67.49.0 255.255.240.0 9.67.49.1-9.67.49.100 label:WIRE1/2
subnet 9.67.48.0 255.255.240.0 9.67.48.1-9.67.48.50 label:WIRE1/1
Using Subnet Group Processing Statements
To specify the policy by which IP addresses are served from multiple subnets, an
inOrder or balance statement is required. Enter the following additional statements
at a global level:
inOrder: labelslist
The labelslist is a list of labels in which each label identifies a subnet group.
Each listed group is processed in order within that group. The subnet address
pool with the highest priority within that group is completely exhausted before
the subnet address pool with the next highest priority is used.
A-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
balance: labelslist
The labelslist is a list of labels in which each label identifies a subnet group.
The server provides the first IP address from the subnet that is first in the priority list, and subsequent IP addresses from each lesser-priority subnet,
repeating the cycle until addresses are exhausted equally from all subnets.
The following is an example of inOrder processing of two subnet groups. Requests
for subnet group WIRE1 exhaust addresses in subnet 9.67.48.0 (WIRE1/1) first, followed by subnet 9.67.49.0 (WIRE1/2). WIRE1 and WIRE3 are not related.
Requests for subnet group WIRE3 exhaust addresses in subnet 9.67.50.0
(WIRE3/1) first, followed by subnet 9.67.51.0 (WIRE3/2) and then 9.67.50.0
(WIRE3/3), which has the same subnet address as WIRE3/1, but specifies a higher
address range:
inOrder: WIRE3 WIRE1
subnet 9.67.49.0 255.255.240.0
subnet 9.67.48.0 255.255.240.0
subnet 9.67.51.0 255.255.240.0
subnet 9.67.50.0 255.255.240.0
subnet 9.67.50.0 255.255.240.0
9.67.49.1-9.67.49.100 label:WIRE1/2
9.67.48.1-9.67.48.50 label:WIRE1/1
9.67.51.1-9.67.51.50 label:WIRE3/2
9.67.50.1-9.67.50.50 label:WIRE3/1
9.67.50.51-9.67.50.100 label:WIRE3/3
The following balance statement exhausts IP addresses equally in WIRE1/3 and
WIRE1/4:
balance: WIRE1
subnet 9.67.49.0 255.255.240.0 9.67.49.101-9.67.49.200 label:WIRE1/3
subnet 9.67.48.0 255.255.240.0 9.67.48.201-9.67.48.300 label:WIRE1/4
A sequence of inOrder or balance statements is cumulative. For example, the
statements:
inOrder: WIRE1
inOrder: WIRE3
have the cumulative effect of the single statement:
inOrder: WIRE1 WIRE3
Note:
To disable multiple subnets, comment out either the balance or inOrder processing
statement or the priority.
Defining Additional Options
To assign additional configuration parameters, use the Option statement. All clients
inherit all globally-defined options. A client defined within a Subnet statement
inherits global options and options defined for that address pool. To assign configuration parameters for all clients in a subnet, follow the Subnet statement with
option statements surrounded by braces. For information about specifying options,
see Specifying DHCP Options.
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
A-5
Transforming Canonical Addresses
For 802.3 clients, use the canonical keyword to instruct the DHCP server to transform MAC addresses to canonical (byte starts with least significant bit) form. In
most cases, you do not want the DHCP server to transform canonical addresses.
MAC addresses of 802.3 clients are normally in canonical format on an 802.3
network. When 802.3 MAC addresses are transmitted across a transparent bridge,
the bridge reformats the bits that identify an 802.3 client MAC address to a noncanonical (byte starts with most significant bit) form. When the bridge returns the
MAC address to an 802.3 network, the bridge again reformats MAC addresses.
To cause the DHCP server to transform MAC addresses, use:
canonical value
value
The value is either NO (the default) or YES. NO prevents the DHCP server
from transforming MAC addresses. YES causes the DHCP server to transform
MAC addresses.
Defining Classes
The Class statement specifies configuration parameters for a user-defined group of
clients administered by a server. The scope of the Class statement is allowed at a
global or subnet level. When the Class statement is specified within a Subnet statement, the server will only serve clients in the class that sre both located in the
specified subnet and request the class.
For example, to create a class called "accounting" so member hosts can use the
LPR server (option 9) at 9.67.123.2:
At the DHCP server, define a class called "accounting" and set the LPR server
for that class to 9.67.123.2
At the client, configure the client to identify itself as belonging to the class
"accounting"
When the client requests configuration information, the server sees that it belongs
to the accounting class and provides configuration information that instructs the
client to use the LPR server at 9.67.123.2. DHCP clients use option 77 to indicate
their class to DHCP servers.
The format of the Class statement is:
class class_name [range]
class_name
The user-defined label that identifies the class. The class name is an ASCII
string of up to 255 characters (for example, accounting). If the class name contains spaces, it must be surrounded by quotes.
range
To specify a range of addresses, enter addresses in dotted-decimal notation,
beginning with the lower end of the range, followed by a hyphen, then the
upper end of the range, with no spaces in between. For example, enter
9.17.32.1-9.17.32.128.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
At a global level, a class cannot have a range. A range is only allowed when a
class is defined within a subnet. The range can be a subset of the subnet
range.
A client that requests an IP address from a class which has exhausted its
range, is offered an IP address from the subnet range, if available. The client is
offered the options associated with the exhausted class.
To assign configuration parameters such as a lease time for all clients in a
class, follow the Class statement with Option statements surrounded by braces.
For more information on options, see Specifying DHCP Options.
Defining Clients
The Client statement is used to:
Specify a unique set of options for a client. You can assign a static address
and configuration parameters, or configuration parameters only.
Exclude an IP address from a range of available IP addresses.
For more information on excluding addresses, see Excluding an IP Address for
a DHCP Client.
Configuring Options and an IP Address for a DHCP Client
To configure options for a specific DHCP client, follow the Client statement with
Option statements surrounded by braces. For a specific client, the following statement reserves the static address 9.67.99.149 and also specifies a lease time
(option 51) of 12 hours (43200 seconds) and a subnet mask (option 1):
client 6 10005aa4b9ab 9.67.99.149
{
option 51 43200
option 1 255.255.255.0
}
Note: Parameters to the right of a left parenthesis are used by the DHCP Server
Configuration program. The DHCP server parses statements to the right of
a left parenthesis as comments.
The format of the Client statement is:
client hw_type clientID ipaddr [(alias=name]
hw_type
The hardware type of the client computer, required to decode the MAC
address. For more information on hardware types, see Hardware Types.
clientID
The hexadecimal MAC address, or a string such as a domain name, or a name
assigned to the client, such as the host name. If you specify a string, you must
enclose it in quotes and specify zero as the hardware type.
ipaddr
The DHCP client's IP address, in dotted-decimal notation. The variable ipaddr
must contain an address if unlisted clients are not supported.
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
A-7
(alias=name
A symbolic name for ease in identifying the client. Enter alias=name immediately after a left parenthesis. This symbolic name appears in the display of
the server configuration. If no name is entered, the MAC address is used.
For more information about DHCP options, see Specifying DHCP Options.
Configuring Options for a DHCP Client, Allowing Any IP Address
To specify options, but allow the DHCP server to choose the address from the
subnet the DHCP client is in, use the ANY parameter. Do not specify an IP
address. For example, to allow any IP address to be assigned to a specific client,
but make sure that the lease time is a specific value such as 12 hours (43200
seconds) and the mask is 255.255.255.0, specify:
client 6 10005aa4b9ab ANY
{
option 51 43200
option 1 255.255.255.0
}
Excluding a Client ID
If you do not want your DHCP server to accept requests from a particular client ID,
you can exclude the client ID from service. The Client statement is allowed at
global, subnet, or class levels. To exclude a client from service, specify the Client
statement as follows:
client hw_type clientID NONE
hw_type
A number representing the hardware type, as defined in RFC 1530. The hardware type is needed to correctly interpret a clientID that is a MAC address.
clientID
Either the hexadecimal MAC address or a name assigned to the client, such as
the host name. If you specify a name, you are required to enclose it in quotes
and specify 0 for the hardware type.
NONE
NONE specifies no IP address and no options are served to the specified client
ID.
For example:
client 6 10005aa4b9ab NONE
Excluding an IP Address
To exclude one or more IP addresses from the pool of addresses available for
lease, specify the Client statement:
client 0 0 9.67.3.123
client 0 0 9.67.3.222
In this case, the hardware type and the client ID are 0. IP addresses 9.67.3.123
and 9.67.3.222 are excluded. Specify a separate statement for each address to be
excluded.
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Excluding a Range of IP Addresses
You can also exclude a range of IP addresses from the pool of addresses available
for lease by specifying many Client statements.
Note: Using the DHCP Server Configuration program, it is recommended that
each range of excluded addresses not contain more than 10 addresses.
Each excluded address results in a separate Client statement in the configuration file. To exclude larger numbers of addresses, define subnets that do
not include the addresses to be excluded. For example, to exclude
addresses 50-75 in subnet 9.67.3.0, specify:
inOrder: WIRE1
subnet 9.67.3.0 255.255.240.0 9.67.3.1-9.67.3.49 label:WIRE1/1
subnet 9.67.3.0 255.255.240.0 9.67.3.1-9.67.3.100 label:WIRE1/2
Reserving Values for a Specific BOOTP Client
Use the Client statement to provide a permanent IP address to BOOTP clients.
Note, however, that only BOOTP options will be served. Any DHCP options specified will be ignored. For example:
client 1 03a5ca4b23cd 9.37.3.415
If you provide IP addresses to BOOTP clients, remember to change the value of
supportBootP from NO (the default) to YES.
Specifying the Next Bootstrap Server
To specify whether the DHCP server specifies a bootstrap server for clients, use:
bootStrapServer value
The value is the IP address of the bootstrap server for the client.
This statement can appear at the global level, or within Subnet, Class, or Client
statements.
Specifying the Bootfile Name
For clients that need a boot or to load images to initialize, the Bootfile option is
provided by the DHCP server. The server specifies DHCP Option 67, Boot File
Name. For additional ifnormation about DHCP options, see Appendix B, “Specifying
DHCP Options” on page B-1. The client downloads the image from the BOOTP
server.
Defining Server and Lease Parameters
At a server level, you can define global parameters, including lease length, which
clients are served, and additional server parameters, such as statistics snapshots
and BOOTP support.
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
A-9
Defining Lease Length
To specify the default lease duration for the leases issued by this server, use:
leaseTimeDefault value
The value is a decimal integer followed by a space and a unit of time, which can be
years, months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, or seconds. The default is minutes.
Default interval: 24 hours (1440 minutes)
Default unit: minute
Minimum:
180 seconds
Maximum:
-1, which is infinity
To apply a global lease time for all addresses issued by this server, specify this
statement outside braces. To override this statement for a set of clients, use option
51 (IP address lease time) for a specific client, a class of clients, a subnet, or at the
global level.
Checking for Expired Leases
To specify the interval at which the lease condition of all addresses in the address
pool is examined, use:
leaseExpireInterval value
The value is a decimal integer optionally followed by a space and a unit of time,
which can be years, months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, or seconds. If the value
is not followed by a unit, minutes are assumed. The value specified should be less
than the value for leaseTimeDefault to ensure that expired leases are returned to
the pool in a timely manner.
Default interval: 1 minute
Default unit: minute
Minimum:
15 seconds
Maximum:
12 hours
Specifying Offering Hold Time
To specify the maximum amount of time the server holds an offered address in
reserve while waiting for a response from the client, use:
reservedTime value
The value is a decimal integer optionally followed by a space and a unit of time,
which can be years, months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, or seconds. If the value
is not followed by a unit, minutes are assumed.
Default interval: 5 minutes
Default unit: minute
A-10
Minimum:
30 seconds
Maximum:
-1, which is infinity
Network Station Manager for S/390
Querying In-use Addresses
Before the server allocates an IP address, it PINGs the address to make sure it is
not already in use by a host on the network. The server places an in-use address
in a special pool and allocates a different address.
To specify the interval a DHCP server holds an in-use address in a special pool
before returning the address to the active pool available for assignment, use:
usedIPAddressExpireInterval value
The value is a decimal integer optionally followed by a space and a unit of time,
which can be years, months, weeks, days, hours, minutes, or seconds. If the value
is not followed by a unit, minutes are assumed.
Default interval: 1000 seconds
Default unit: minute
Minimum:
30 seconds
Maximum:
-1, which is infinity
Specifying DHCP Server Responses to BOOTP Requests
To specify whether the server responds to requests from BOOTP clients, use:
supportBootP [YES | NO]
The default is NO. If this statement is not specified, or if any value other than YES
is specified, the server will not respond to requests from BOOTP clients.
If this server previously supported BOOTP clients and has been reconfigured not to
support BOOTP clients, the address binding for any BOOTP clients that was established before the reconfiguration will be maintained until the BOOTP client sends
another request (when it is restarting). At that time, the server will not respond, and
the binding will be removed.
This statement should be specified outside braces and, therefore, is used for all
addresses issued by this server.
Specifying DHCP Server Responses to Unregistered Clients
To specify whether the server responds to requests from DHCP clients other than
those whose client IDs are specifically listed in this configuration file, use:
supportUnlistedClients [YES | NO]
The default is YES. If you specify NO, the server will respond only to requests from
DHCP clients that are listed (by client ID) in the configuration file.
For example:
client 6 10005aa4b9ab ANY
client 6 10a03ca5a7fb ANY
If this statement is not specified, or if you specify YES, the server will respond to
requests from any DHCP client. This option can be used to limit access to
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
A-11
addresses issued by this DHCP server. Listing the client IDs for all acceptable
clients may be time consuming.
This statement should be specified outside braces and, therefore, is used for all
addresses issued by this server.
Specifying Statistics Snapshots
To specify the number of intervals that expire before the DHCP server takes a
snapshot of statistics, use:
statisticSnapshot value
The length of each interval is determined by the leaseExpireInterval keyword. For
example, a value of 3 will collect statistics after a span of three intervals, where
each interval has a length specified by the leaseExpireInterval keyword. If no value
is specified, the server takes a snapshot of statistics at the end of every lease
expire interval. For more information on server statistics, see Displaying Server Statistics.
Defining DHCP Log Files
To enable logging by the server, all of the following must be specified:
Number of DHCP Log Files
Size of DHCP log files
Names of DHCP log files
At least one information type to log
Defining the Number of DHCP Log Files
Specifiy the number of log files maintained, using:
num_LogFiles value
The value is the maximum number of log files maintained.
Default interval: 1000 seconds
Default unit: minute
Minimum:
30 seconds
Maximum:
-1, which is infinity
DHCP Server Configuration Files
The following files are used to manually configure a DHCP server:
\DHCPSD.CFG
Used for DHCP server configuration. The following configuration provides short
lease intervals, causing rapid lease renewal for test purposes:
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Network Station Manager for S/390
logFileName dhcpsd.log
logFileSize 100
numLogFiles 4
logItem SYSERR
logItem ACNTING
logItem OBJERR
logItem EVENT
logItem PROTERR
logItem WARNING
logItem INFO
logItem TRACE
logItem ACTION
supportBootP yes
supportUnlistedClients true
option 15
raleigh.ibm.com
# Addresses 8.67.112.24 through 8.67.112.25 do not inherit
# options defined for 8.67.112.26 through 8.67.112.30
subnet 8.67.112.0 255.255.255.0 8.67.112.24-8.67.112.25 label:network1/1
(alias=network1
subnet 8.67.112.0 255.255.255.0 8.67.112.26-8.67.112.30 label:network1/2
(alias=network1
{
Option 1 255.255.255.0
Option 3 8.67.112.1
Option 6 8.67.112.10
Option 33 8.0.0.0:8.67.72.1 8.67.112.0:8.67.72.1 8.67.96.0:8.67.72.1 8.
112.9:8.67.72.1 8.67.96.10:8.67.72.1 8.67.112.19:8.67.72.1
}
\DHCPSD.LOG
Used to collect logging information. DHCPSD.LOG is specified by the logFileName
statement in the DHCPSD.CFG file.
Appendix A. Modifying the DHCP Server Configuration File
A-13
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Network Station Manager for S/390
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
DHCP allows you to specify options, also known as BOOTP vendor extensions, to
provide additional configuration information to the client. RFC 2132 defines the
options that you can use. Each option is identified by a numeric code.
Architected options 0 though 127 and option 255 are reserved for definition by the
RFC. The DHCP server, the DHCP client, or both server and client use options in
this set. Some architected options can be modified by the administrator. Other
options are for exclusive use by the client and server, Options which the administrator cannot or should not configure at the DHCP server include:
52, Option overload
53, DHCP message type
54, Server identifier
55, Parameter request list
56, Message
57, Maximum DHCP message size
60, Class identifier
Options 128 through 254 represent non-architected options that can be defined by
administrators to pass information to the DHCP client to implement site-specific
configuration parameters. Additionally, IBM provides a set of IBM-specific options
such as option 192, TXT RR.
The format of user-defined options is:
Option code value
code can be any option code 1 through 254.
value must always be a string. At the server, it can be an ASCII string or a
hexadecimal string. At the client, however, it always appears as a hexadecimal
string as passed to the processing program.
The server passes the specified value to the client. You must, however, create a
program or command file to process the value.
This section describes:
Configuration File Option Data Formats
Option Categories
Configuration File Option Data Formats
RFC 2132 defines the following data formats for DHCP options:
IP Address, which is a single IP address in dotted-decimal notation.
IP Addresses, which is one or more IP addresses in dotted-decimal notation
separated by white spaces.
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-1
IP Address Pair, which is two IP addresses in dotted-decimal notation separated by a single colon.
IP Address Pairs, which is one or more IP address pairs, each pair separated
from another by a white space.
Boolean, which is 0 or 1.
Byte, which is a decimal number between -128 and 127 (inclusive).
Unsigned Byte, which is a decimal number between 0 and 255 (inclusive). You
cannot specify a negative value for an unsigned byte.
List of Unsigned Byte, which is one or more decimal numbers between 0 and
255 (inclusive) separated by white spaces. You cannot specify a negative
number for an unsigned byte.
Short, which is a decimal number between -32768 and 32767 (inclusive).
List of Unsigned Short, which is a decimal number between 0 and 65535
(inclusive). You cannot specify a negative number for an unsigned short.
Unsigned Shorts, which is one or more decimal numbers between 0 and
65535 (inclusive) separated by white spaces. You cannot specify a negative
number for an unsigned short.
Long, which is a decimal value between -2147483648 and 2147483647 (inclusive).
Unsigned Long, which is a decimal value between 0 and 4294967295 (inclusive). You cannot specify a negative number for an unsigned long.
String, which is a string of characters. If embedded spaces are used, the string
must be enclosed in double quotes.
N/A, which indicates no specification is needed because the client generates
this information.
Option Categories
There are 7 option categories:
Base Options
IP Layer Parameters per Host Options
IP Layer Parameters per Interface Options
Link Layer Parameters per Interface Options
TCP Parameter Options
Application and Service Parameter Options
DHCP Extensions Options
Base Options
Following are the base options provided to the client:
1, Subnet Mask
2, Time Offset
3, Router
4, Time Server
5, Name Server
B-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
7, Log Server
8, Cookie Server
9, LPR Server
10, Impress Server
11, Resource Location Server
12, Host Name
13, Boot File Size
14, Merit Dump File
15, Domain Name
16, Swap Server
17, Root Path
18, Extensions Path
Option 1, Subnet Mask
The client's subnet mask, specified in 32-bit dotted decimal notation.
Configuration file format: Unsigned long
Option 2, Time Offset
The offset (in seconds) of the client's subnet from Coordinated Universal Time
(CUT). The offset is a signed 32-bit integer.
Configuration file format: Long
Option 3, Router
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the routers on the client's subnet.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 4, Time Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the time servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 5, Name Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the IEN 116 name servers available to the
client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 7, Log Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the MIT-LCS UDP Log servers available to
the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-3
Option 8, Cookie Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Cookie or quote-of-the-day servers
available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 9, LPR Server
This option can be specified at both the DHCP client and DHCP server. However,
if specified only at the DHCP client, the configuration will be incomplete.
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the line printer servers available to the
client. Option 9 eliminates the need for the client to specify the LPR_SERVER environment variable.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 10, Impress Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Imagen Impress servers available to
the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 11, Resource Location Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Resource Location (RLP) servers available to the client. RLP servers allow clients to locate resources that provide a specified service, such as a domain name server.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 12, Host Name
This option can be specified at both the DHCP client and DHCP server. If the
DHCP client does not provide a host name, the DHCP server does nothing with
option 12.
Host name of the client (which may include the local domain name). The minimum
length for the host name option is 1 octet and the maximum is 32 characters. See
RFC 1035 for character set restrictions.
Configuration file format: String
Option 13, Boot File Size
The length (in 512-octet blocks) of the default boot configuration file for the client.
Configuration file format: Unsigned short
B-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Option 14, Merit Dump File
The path name of the merit dump file in which the client's core image is stored if
the client crashes. The path is formatted as a character string consisting of characters from the Network Virtual Terminal (NVT) ASCII character set. The minimum
length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: String
Option 15, Domain Name
This option can be specified at both the DHCP client and DHCP server. For more
information on the DHCP server appending a domain name if the DHCP client does
not provide a domain name, see Appending Client Domain Names.
Domain name that the client uses when resolving host names using the Domain
Name System. The minimum length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: String
Option 16, Swap Server
IP address of the client's swap server.
Configuration file format: IP address
Option 17, Root Path
Path that contains the client's root disk. The path is formatted as a character string
consisting of characters from the NVT ASCII character set. The minimum length is
1 octet.
Configuration file format: String
Option 18, Extensions Path
The extensions path option allows you to specify a string that can be used to identify a file that is retrievable using Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).
The minimum length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: String
IP Layer Parameters per Host Options
Following are the options that affect the operation of the IP layer on a per host
basis:
19, IP Forwarding
20, Non-Local Source Routing
21, Policy Filter
22, Maximum Datagram Reassembly Size
23, Default IP Time-To-Live
24, Path MTU Aging Timeout
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-5
25, Path MTU Plateau Table
Option 19, IP Forwarding
Enable (1) or disable (0) forwarding by the client of its IP layer packets.
Configuration file format: Boolean
Option 20, Non-Local Source Routing
Enable (1) or disable (0) forwarding by the client of its IP layer datagrams with nonlocal source routes. The length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: Boolean
Option 21, Policy Filter
IP address-net mask pair used to filter datagrams with non-local source routes. Any
datagram whose next hop address does not match one of the filter pairs is discarded by the client. The minimum length for the policy filter option is 8 octets.
Configuration file format: IP address pair
Option 22, Maximum Datagram Reassembly Size
Maximum size datagram the client will reassemble. The minimum value is 576.
Configuration file format: Unsigned short
Option 23, Default IP Time-To-Live
Default time-to-live (TTL) the client uses on outgoing datagrams. TTL is an octet
with a value between 1 and 255.
Format: Unsigned byte
Option 24, Path MTU Aging Timeout
Timeout in seconds used to age Path Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) values
discovered by the mechanism that is described in RFC 1191.
Configuration file format: Unsigned long
Option 25, Path MTU Plateau Table
Table of MTU sizes to use in Path MTU discover as defined in RFC 1191. The
minimum MTU value is 68. The minimum length for the path MTU plateau table
option is 2 octets. The length must be a multiple of 2.
Configuration file format: Unsigned shorts
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Network Station Manager for S/390
IP Layer Parameters per Interface Options
Following are the options that affect the operation of the IP layer on a per interface
basis. The client may issue multiple requests, one per interface, when configuring
interfaces with their specific parameters.
26, Interface MTU
27, All Subnets are Local
28, Broadcast Address
29, Perform Mask Discovery
30, Mask Supplier
31, Perform Router Discovery
32, Router Solicitation Address
33, Static Route
Option 26, Interface MTU
Maximum Transmission Unit (MTU) to use on this interface. The minimum MTU
value is 68.
Configuration file format: Unsigned short
Option 27, All Subnets are Local
Client assumes (1) or does not assume (0) all subnets use the same Maximum
Transmission Unit (MTU). A value of 0 means the client assumes some subnets
have smaller MTUs.
Configuration file format: Boolean
Option 28, Broadcast Address
Broadcast address used on the client's subnet.
Configuration file format: IP address
Option 29, Perform Mask Discovery
Client performs (1) or does not perform (0) subnet mask discovery using Internet
Control Message Protocol (ICMP).
Configuration file format: Boolean
Option 30, Mask Supplier
Client responds (1) or does not respond (0) to subnet mask requests using Internet
Control Message Protocol (ICMP).
Configuration file format: Boolean
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-7
Option 31, Perform Router Discovery
Client solicits (1) or does not solicit (0) routers using router discovery as defined in
RFC 1256.
Configuration file format: Boolean
Option 32, Router Solicitation Address
Address to which a client transmits router solicitation requests.
Configuration file format: IP address
Option 33, Static Route
Static routes (destination address-router pairs in order of preference) the client
installs in its routing cache. The first address is the destination address and the
second address is the router for the destination. Do not specify 0.0.0.0 as a default
route destination.
Configuration file format: IP address pairs
Link Layer Parameters per Interface Options
Following are the options that affect the operation of the data link layer on a perinterface basis:
34, Trailer Encapsulation
35, ARP Cache Timeout
36, Ethernet Encapsulation
Option 34, Trailer Encapsulation
Client negotiates (1) or does not negotiate (0) the use of trailers when using
Address Resolution Protocol (ARP). For more information, see RFC 893.
Configuration file format: Boolean
Option 35, ARP Cache Timeout
Timeout in seconds for Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) cache entries.
Configuration file format: Unsigned long
Option 36, Ethernet Encapsulation
For an Ethernet interface, client uses IEEE 802.3 (1) Ethernet encapsulation
described in RFC 1042 or Ethernet V2 (0) encapsulation described in RFC 894.
Configuration file format: Boolean
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Network Station Manager for S/390
TCP Parameter Options
Following are the options that affect the operation of the TCP layer on a perinterface basis:
37, TCP Default TTL
38, TCP Keep-alive Interval
39, TCP Keep-alive Garbage
Option 37, TCP Default TTL
Default time-to-live (TTL) the client uses for sending TCP segments.
Configuration file format: Unsigned byte
Option 38, TCP Keep-alive Interval
Interval in seconds the client waits before sending a keep-alive message on a TCP
connection. A value of 0 indicates the client does not send keep-alive messages
unless requested by the application.
Configuration file format: Unsigned long
Option 39, TCP Keep-alive Garbage
Client sends (1) or does not send (0) TCP keep-alive messages that contain an
octet of garbage for compatibility with previous implementations.
Configuration file format: Boolean
Application and Service Parameter Options
Following are options that can be used to configure miscellaneous applications and
services:
40, Network Information Service Domain
41, Network Information Servers
42, Network Time Protocol Servers
43, Vendor-Specific Information
44, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Name Server
45, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Datagram Distribution Server
46, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Node Type
47, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Scope
48, X Window System Font Server
49, X Window System Display Manager
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-9
Network Information Service Domain Option 40
The client's Network Information Service (NIS) domain. The domain is formatted as
a character string consisting of characters from the NVT ASCII character set. The
minimum length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: String
Option 41, Network Information Servers
IP addresses (in order of preference) of Network Information Service (NIS) servers
available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 42, Network Time Protocol Servers
IP addresses (in order of preference) of Network Time Protocol (NTP) servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 43, Vendor-Specific Information
Option 43 is specified only at the DHCP server, which returns this option as an
encapsulated packet to a client that sends option 60, Class Identifier.
This information option is used by clients and servers to exchange vendor-specific
information. This option has been added to allow for expansion of the number of
options that can be supported.
Configuration file format: String
Option 44, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Name Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of NetBIOS name servers (NBNS) available
to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 45, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Datagram Distribution Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of NetBIOS datagram distribution (NBDD)
name servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 46, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Node Type
Node type used for NetBIOS over TCP/IP configurable clients as described in RFC
1001 and RFC 1002.
Values to specify client types include:
Value
0x1
0x2
0x4
B-10
Network Station Manager for S/390
Node Type
B-node
P-node
M-node
0x8
H-node
Configuration file format: Unsigned byte
Option 47, NetBIOS over TCP/IP Scope
NetBIOS over TCP/IP scope parameter for the client, as specified in RFC
1001/1002. The minimum length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: Unsigned byte
Option 48, X Window System Font Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of X Window System font servers available to
the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 49, X Window System Display Manager
IP addresses (in order of preference) of systems running X Window System Display
Manager available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
DHCP Extensions Options
Following are the available options that are specific to DHCP.
50, Requested IP Address
51, IP Address Lease Time
58, Renewal (T1) Time Value
59, Rebinding (T2) Time Value
60, Class-Identifier
62, NetWare/IP Domain Name
63, NetWare/IP
64, NIS Domain Name
65, NIS Servers
66, Server Name
67, Boot File Name
68, Home Address
69, SMTP Servers
70, POP3 Server
71, NNTP Server
72, WWW Server
73, Finger Server
74, IRC Server
75, StreetTalk Server
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-11
76, STDA Server
77, User Class
78, Directory Agent
79, Service Scope
80, Naming Authority
Option 50, Requested IP Address
This option is specified only at the DHCP client. The DHCP server can refuse a
DHCP client request for a specific IP address.
Allows the client to request (DHCPDISCOVER) a particular IP address.
Configuration file format: N/A
Option 51, IP Address Lease Time
This option can be specified at both the DHCP client and DHCP server. The DHCP
client can use option 51 to override the defaultLeaseInterval value the DHCP server
offers.
Allows the client to request (DHCPDISCOVER or DHCPREQUEST) a lease time
for an IP address. In a reply (DHCPOFFER), a DHCP server uses this option to
offer a lease time.
This option may be specified in a network, subnet, or class of client definition. Use
0xffffffff to indicate an infinite (permanent) lease.
Configuration file format: Unsigned long
Option 58, Renewal (T1) Time Value
Interval in seconds between the time the server assigns an address and the time
the client transitions to the renewing state.
Configuration file format: Unsigned long
Option 59, Rebinding (T2) Time Value
Interval in seconds between the time the server assigns an address and the time
the client enters the rebinding state.
Configuration file format: Unsigned long
Option 60, Class-Identifier
This option is sent by the DHCP client. This information is generated by the client
and does not have to be specified.
Type and configuration of the client, supplied by the client to the server. For
example, the identifier may encode the client's vendor-specific hardware configuration. The information is a string of n octets, interpreted by servers. For example:
hex"01 02 03"
B-12
Network Station Manager for S/390
Servers not equipped to interpret the class-specific information sent by a client
must ignore it. The minimum length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: N/A
Option 62, NetWare/IP Domain Name
Netware/IP Domain Name.
The minimum length is 1 octet and the maximum length is 255.
Configuration file format: String
Option 63, NetWare/IP
A general purpose option code used to convey all the NetWare/IP related information except for the NetWare/IP domain name. A number of NetWare/IP sub-options
will be conveyed using this option code.
The minimum length is 1 and the maximum length is 255.
Configuration file format: String
Option 64, NIS Domain Name
Network Information Service (NIS)+ V3 client domain name. The domain is formatted as a character string consisting of characters from the NVT ASCII character
set. Its minimum length is 1.
Configuration file format: String
Option 65, NIS Servers
IP addresses (in order of preference) of Network Information Service (NIS)+ V3
servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 66, Server Name
Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server name used when the "sname" field in
the DHCP header has been used for DHCP options
Configuration file format: String
Option 67, Boot File Name
Name of the boot file when the 'file' field in the DHCP header has been used for
DHCP options. The minimum length is 1.
Note: Use this option to pass a boot file name to a DHCP client. The boot file
name is required to contain the fully-qualified path name and be less than
128 characters in length. For example:
option 18 c:\usr\lpp\tcpip\nstation\standard\kernel
This file contains information that can be interpreted in the same way as the
64-octet vendor-extension field within the BOOTP response, with the exception that
the file length is limited to 128 characters by the BOOTP header.
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-13
Configuration file format: String
Option 68, Home Address
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the mobile IP home agents available to the
client. The option enables a mobile host to derive a mobile home address, and
determine the subnet mask for the home network. The usual length will be four
octets, containing a single home agent's home address.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 69, SMTP Servers
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)
servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 70, POP3 Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Post Office Protocol (POP) servers
available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 71, NNTP Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Network News Transfer Protocol
(NNTP) servers available to the client. For example:
option 71 "9.24.112.2"
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 72, WWW Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the World Wide Web (WWW) servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 73, Finger Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Finger servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 74, IRC Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the Internet Relay Chat (IRC) servers available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
B-14
Network Station Manager for S/390
Option 75, StreetTalk Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the StreetTalk servers available to the
client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 76, STDA Server
IP addresses (in order of preference) of the StreetTalk Directory Assistance servers
available to the client.
Configuration file format: IP addresses
Option 77, User Class
DHCP clients use option 77 to indicate to DHCP servers what class the host is a
member of.
Configuration file format: string
Option 78, Directory Agent
The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol provides a framework for passing configuration information to hosts on a TCP/IP network. Entities using the Service
Location Protocol need to find out the address of Directory Agents in order to
transact messages. In certain other instances they may need to discover the
correct scope and naming authority to be used in conjunction with the service attributes and URLS which are exchanged using the Service Location Protocol.
A directory agent has a particular scope, and may have knowledge about schemes
defined by a particular naming authority.
Configuration file format: IP address
Option 79, Service Scope
This extension indicates a scope that should be used by a service agent, when
responding to Service Request messages as specified by the Service Location Protocol.
Configuration file format: string
Option 80, Naming Authority
This extension indicates a naming authority (which specifies the syntax for schemes
that may be used in URLs for use by entities with the Service Location Protocol.
Configuration file format: string
IBM-Specific Options
IBM provides a set of IBM-specific options that fall within non-architected options
128-254 that administrators use to implement site-specific configuration parameters.
Appendix B. Specifying DHCP Options
B-15
Additionally, architected option 43 allows the definition of encapsulated, vendorspecific options. IBM Corporation, for example, has added the following
IBM-specific options, denoted by an IBM-specific file in Option 60.
Options encapsulated as vendor-specific information must be carefully defined and
documented to permit interoperability between clients and servers from different
vendors. Vendors defining vendor-specific information must:
Document those options in the form specified in RFC 2132.
Choose to represent those options either in data types already defined for
DHCP options or in other well-defined data types.
Choose options that can be readily encoded in configuration files for exchange
with servers provided by other vendors.
Be readily supportable by all servers.
Servers not equipped to interpret the vendor-specific information sent by a client
must ignore it.
Clients which do not receive desired vendor-specific information should make an
attempt to operate without it. Refer to RFC 2131 and RFC 2132 for additional information about this option.
Option 200, LPR Printer
Eliminates the need for the client to specify the LPR_PRINTER environment variable, which can be the name of a device such as LPT1 or a printer name (queue
name) such as Printer.
For example:
option 200 "lpt1"
An OS/2 client stores the updated option value in the TCPOS2.INI file.
The length is 1 octet.
Configuration file format: String
B-16
Network Station Manager for S/390
Appendix C. Hardware Types
Possible hardware types are:
Type
Description
0
Unspecified. If you specify a symbolic name for the client ID, specify 0
for the hardware type.
1
Ethernet (100Mb)
6
IEEE 802 Networks (which includes 802.5 Token Ring)
Appendix C. Hardware Types
C-1
C-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Appendix D. Trouble Shooting and Problem Solving
This appendix contains information to help you recover from error situations such
as:
PANIC mode at an IBM Network Station
Problems with monitors
Cursor problems
Java problems
Trouble Shooting
Table D-1 contains potential problem situations, a symptom description, and possible recovery actions you should try.
Table D-1 (Page 1 of 5). Problem Determination Chart
Problem Description Table
Symptom
What you should do
Monitor Problems
Display image too large to fit on
monitor
IBM Network Station may be set to automatically detect which monitor you
are using. For autodetect to work correctly, you must have the monitor
turned on before you boot the IBM Network Station System unit.
BOOTP Problems (for VM)
BOOTP table can not be read
The BOOTP table will have to be restored from a backup copy.
PTF Problems
PTFs not working
If the PTFs being installed are for the IBM Network Station Manager product,
you may have to reboot the IBM Network Station system unit. This causes a
new software download to the system unit to take place. The new downloaded software contains the program fixes for the IBM Network Station
system unit.
No Login Window (for VM)
No Login window on monitor User Services window appears
instead
The most likely cause is an incorrect entry for this IBM Network Station in
the BOOTP table. See Chapter 6, “Configuring the Bootstrap Protocol Server
for VM” on page 6-1 to display the information about this IBM Network
Station.
Another possible cause is that the default configuration file on the server has
been corrupted or deleted. The default configuration file, standard.nsm, is
located in the /configs subdirectory of the directory indicated in the hd tag of
the BOOTP table entry. A reinstallation of the IBM Network Station Manager
for S/390 licensed program may be required.
Java Problems
Java error messages: Can not
find class, too many copies, out
of memory, IO exception.
See “Problem Analysis when Running Java” on page D-6 for more information about recovery when these messages occur.
Text does not appear or is a different style.
Check the font sizes and styles. They may need to be changed to a different
setting. Not all fonts are available on all JVMs.
Appendix D. Trouble Shooting and Problem Solving
D-1
Table D-1 (Page 2 of 5). Problem Determination Chart
Problem Description Table
Data written to a file does not
appear in the file.
Make sure the Java applet or application closes the file to force all data to be
written to the file.
Applet cannot read Properties or
get a Security Exception while
trying to read the System Properties
Applets may only read properties which are explicitly allowed by the system
configuration. A property can be configured to be accessible by defining a
new property of the form .applet and assigning it a value of true. This may
be done through the Network Station Manager in the AppletViewer configuration section. The default properties which may be read by an applet are:
java.vendor
java.version
java.vendor.url
java.class
os.name
os.version
os.arch
file.separator
path.separator
line.separator
If the class sun.applet.AppletViewer is used to view applets, the accessible
property list will differ from above and depend on the property file defined
within the users' home directory.
Cursor does not appear in text
field or Window layout (for
example, button positions)
appears different from the way it
appears when the applet is run
on another platform
The Java Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) is designed to create a development environment independent of the underlying windowing mechanisms.
These classes utilize the native window calls to do the work, but provide a
uniform interface to programmers. However, Java Abstract Window Toolkit
cannot hide all the differences. Thus appearances may change from one
Java Virtual Machine on one platform to another Java Virtual Machine on a
different platform.
Can not close Java error
message box
Scroll to the end of the error message box and click OK.
Environment Variables - Java Applet Viewer
Environment variable not
replaced
Environment variables cannot be used when working with properties in the
Java Applet Viewer section of the IBM Network Station Manager. The property value does not get replaced with the Environment Variable value. For
example, if you declared name=${IP} in the properties box, you might expect
to get the IP address of workstation user. Instead, you get ${IP}.
Panic Appears on your workstation
P A N I C appears on your
workstation
See “PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station” on page D-5 for more information on recovering from a PANIC situation.
Cursor Problems
3270 cursor will not reposition
using mouse
D-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
To reposition the cursor using the mouse, you must first use the mouse to
position the mouse pointer. Then, press the Shift key and click the left
mouse button. The cursor will move to that position.
Table D-1 (Page 3 of 5). Problem Determination Chart
Problem Description Table
Busy cursor (cursor seems busy
trying to perform a task)
The first time you open an application from the workstation menu bar the
cursor stays busy until the application finishes loading. Additional requests
for another session of the same application will show the cursor only being
busy for 3 seconds. Depending on network traffic, the application may take
longer than 3 seconds to appear. The application is loading; however, the
cursor will not show busy for over 3 seconds.
Cursor in wrong position within
an application
When you leave one application to go to another application using the
mouse, the cursor may not be at the same position when you return. The
cursor probably repositioned itself to the place where you clicked the mouse
to re-enter the application. You can reposition the cursor using the directional
arrow keys.
Color Problems
Colors appear incorrectly in
applications
Color capabilities are fixed at 256 available colors. Some applications will
use as many colors as possible, thus leaving no colors for additional applications. Try to start other applications before starting an application that uses a
large number of colors. Applications that do not use 256 colors may have to
be changed to use 256 color support.
Keystrokes
Unwanted keystrokes appearing
in applications
If the screen saver comes on while you are in an application and you press a
key to end the screen saver, that keystroke will appear in your application.
Remove the unwanted keystroke.
Host Unknown or Unknown Host Message
Host Unknown message
appears on workstation
This message could appear if:
a wrong system name or IP address was specified while using the
program or menu functions of Startup Tasks in the IBM Network Station
Manager program
a wrong system name or IP address was specified when opening a 3270
or 5250 session
TCP/IP name resolution is not occurring while using the program or
menu functions of Startup Tasks in the IBM Network Station Manager
program
You should validate the system name or IP address. Also, you should
access the Hardware Setup Task and specify to use the Update host table
and DNS configuration from server field. Updating this field refreshes your
TCP/IP name resolution information for the IBM Network Station. Therefore,
if new systems were integrated into your network, their IP address or system
names would be known. You must log off and log on for the name information to become available.
Screen Flashes
Screen flashing or crackling
sound
Screen flashes, along with some crackling sounds, can occur when you are
logging out of the workstation. The flashing will not harm any hardware or
applications.
IBM Network Station Manager Program
Appendix D. Trouble Shooting and Problem Solving
D-3
Table D-1 (Page 4 of 5). Problem Determination Chart
Problem Description Table
Changed Hardware workstation
settings not being applied
Some changes require the IBM Network Station to be rebooted before they
take effect. If you have rebooted the IBM Network Station and the changes
are still not applied, use the IBM Setup Utility, Select F5 (Set Network
Parameters) and make sure the IP Addressed from parameter value is
Network. If the IP Addressed from parameter value is NVRAM, the IBM
Network Station will not be able to use DHCP or BOOTP to determine the
name of its workstation-specific settings file. It is recommended that the IP
Addressed from parameter be set to Network to use DHCP or BOOTP. See
Chapter 12, “Working with the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on
page 12-1 for more information.
Note: The DHCP or BOOTP server must specify the host name.
Inactive Navigational buttons in
Help
In Help text, the navigational buttons (Back and Next) will not become active
until you have linked to other topics. Once you have moved, by linking other
topics, you establish a history of that movement. The buttons use this history
to determine if the Back and Next buttons can be used.
Pulldown box will not stay open
to accept Hardware setting
changes.
If you are running a browser in a Windows environment, change the screen
size to something other than 640 X 480.
You can also try resizing your current window and then try to open the
pulldown again.
Try scrolling the window to change the position of the pulldown. This may
give pulldowns that contain many items space to display the pulldown items.
Resizing the Netscape window
causes problems
If you resize the Netscape window while the IBM Network Station Manager
program is being loaded into it, Netscape may stop the load and you will not
get a sign-on screen. You will have to close the IBM Network Station
Manager browser window and restart the program; wait until after the logon
screen is displayed before you resize the window.
After signing on, resizing the Netscape window may cause the server name
or name of the user whose defaults you are displaying to disappear. This will
not affect the operation of the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Resizing the Netscape window
when using AIX causes loss of
data input on IBM Network
Station Manager program panels
Do not resize the window after you have entered data. Resizing the window
resets the values.
Microsoft Internet Explorer
windows are displayed behind
the main window
In the IBM Network Station Manager program, if you request help or a list of
users, a popup window is opened to contain the requested information.
Internet Explorer may open the popup window behind the larger main
window from which you made the request. To find the popup, you may need
to move or minimize the larger window.
Changed keyboard setting has
not been applied
Reboot your IBM Network Station in order for the changed keyboard setting
to take effect.
Update of boot monitor has not
been installed.
Reboot your IBM Network Station in order for the updated boot monitor to
take effect.
Changes made to Hardware settings (other than keyboard and
boot monitor), Startup Programs,
Menus or Environment Variables, Desktop Manager, or
Internet Network settings have
not been applied.
Logoff the IBM Network Station, then logon to the IBM Network Station in
order for the changes to take effect.
D-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Table D-1 (Page 5 of 5). Problem Determination Chart
Problem Description Table
Changes made to 5250, 3270,
or IBM Browser have not been
applied.
End your application session and restart a new application session in order
for the changes to take effect.
Changes made to the Applet
Viewer have not been applied.
Logoff the IBM Network Station, then logon to the IBM Network Station in
order for the changes to take effect.
IBM Network Station Manager
program will not start.
This could be because:
The ICS server is not running.
The ICS server is not configured correctly.
Browser Problems
The IBM Network Station
Browser will not start.
This could be because you deleted the IBM Network Station Manager for
S/390 licensed program and then reinstalled it.
In deleting the licensed program, some of the files that support the IBM
Network Station Browser were also deleted.
Reinstall the IBM Network Station Browser licensed program.
Error message 404 - file not
found
Verify the spelling and case sensitivity of the URL you used to access the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
If the spelling and case of the URL are correct, you can check the directives
specified in the ICS server configuration. Directives are statements in the
ICS server configuration that allow access to the ICS server. See Chapter 4,
“Configuring the Internet Connection Secure Server for OS/390” on page 4-1
for more information.
PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station
A panic is an irrecoverable error condition that causes the IBM Network Station
operating system to stop running.
To recover the IBM Network Station from this condition, power off the IBM Network
Station system unit and then power it back on.
To receive assistance on the cause of the error condition, you must upload the
DUMP file to the host system.
To determine the name of the DMP file, add the last 8 digits of the MAC address to
the letters DMP. For example 80964234.DMP.
File Transmission and Maximum Transmission Units
The Token Ring Network Station ships with a Token Ring Maximum Transmission
Unit (MTU) of 1492 bytes. This value is used to determine the size of an MTU, or
frame of data, when the IBM Network Station is sending data to a host. This value
should work well for most network configurations. You should make sure that this
value does not exceed the value of the MTU for token ring in your TCP/IP profile
for an S/390, if specified.
Appendix D. Trouble Shooting and Problem Solving
D-5
Note: Even if the MTU is set to an acceptable value, other components in your
network such as routers and bridges may support (or be configured to
support) a smaller MTU value.
The MTU value set in the IBM Network Station should not exceed the MTU value of
the system or any network component which is part of the communications path
between the IBM Network Station and the system.
The current maximum values for the MTU on the Token Ring line description are
4060 for 4 Mbit Token Ring and 16393 for 16 Mbit Token-Ring. In future releases,
these maximum values may change. Consult your system documentation for
details. You can set the value of the Token Ring MTU on the IBM Network Station.
At the Boot Monitor command entry prompt (">"):
1. Reboot your IBM Network Station.
2. When you see the message NS0500 Search for host system, or while the
status bar is displayed showing the progress of loading the IBM Network
Station kernel, press the Escape key.
3. Press the Ctrl-Alt-Shift-F1 key combination.
4. Enter "TM xxxxx", where xxxxx is the new MTU value (in bytes).
5. Reboot your IBM Network Station.
Problem Analysis when Running Java
If the Java applet or application does not start, examine the messages that are
displayed in the User Services' console. These should give an indication of any
problems that are found by the JVM in running the program. In addition, you can
determine whether the JVM is loaded by noting a change in the amount of memory
currently being used as found in User Services' Statistics. See Chapter 11,
“Working with User Services” on page 11-1 for more information.
Examples of some Java error messages follow:
Cannot find class or class not found
The JVM cannot find the class file requested by the Java applet or application.
If the error is returned while running a Java application, inspect the class path
that is specified in the IBM Network Station Manager Startup programs or
menus. Confirm that the directories which include class files that are associated
with the program are contained within the class path and that they have the
correct format. Also, ensure that the name in the Application (Class) Name field
does not contain the .class file name extension.
If the classes are provided in a zip file, the fully qualified zip file name must
explicitly appear within the class path. In addition, due to differences in file
systems, the classes may not be found since they are referred to in a casesensitive manner. It may be possible to rename the class to the name that is
indicated in the console messages.
For an applet, the codebase portion of the applet tag within the HTML file lists
the locations where classes are found.
Also, check the file access permissions on the directories and files to make
sure that users are allowed to read the files.
D-6
Network Station Manager for S/390
Too many copies are already running
If you already have a Java application that is running, you cannot start another
Java application or a Java applet.
If you have one or more Java applets running (including applets within a
browser), you cannot start a Java application.
Out of memory
The IBM Network Station system unit may not have enough memory to run the
application or applet. Possible causes include:
Other applications are using memory, and not enough memory is left for
the Java application or applet to run.
The stack size and heap size parameters need to be adjusted. The stack
and heap sizes can be set using the IBM Network Station Manager. For
applications, the parameters are set in the Startup Tasks (programs or
menus) section. For an applet, the parameters are set in the Network
Tasks (Applet Viewer section).
IO exception while reading: (a remote server name)
An HTTP address rather than a file system location was passed to the applet
viewer. AppletViewer is essentially a browser that needs to have a defined
proxy server and port before it can load HTTP files. To do this, you need to set
the HTTP proxy or Socks Host parameter by using the IBM Network Station
Manager program. Select the Internet Setup Task and then the Network
section.
If you are loading the applet from your host, you do not need to use an HTTP
address. Instead, you can simply fill in the local path and HTML file name.
IO exception while reading: (a file name)
Ensure that you specified a valid HTML file name as the startup programs or
menus URL name in the IBM Network Station Manager program. Also, ensure
that the file is readable by the user.
Launcher Shutdown Monitor
If your applet does not start and the next message in the console is Launcher
Shutdown Monitor, ensure that you specified a valid HTML file name as the
startup programs or menus URL name in the IBM Network Station Manager
program. Also ensure that the file is readable by the user.
Unusable class name: (name)
Check the name in the field Application (Class) Name field in the startup programs or menus section in the IBM Network Station Manager program. Do not
include a path or the .class file name extension in this field.
Other
If you do not see any messages in the User Services Console window that
explain your problem, set Verbose messages on using the IBM Network Station
Manager program. For applications, Verbose messages can be set in the
Startup Tasks (programs or menus) section. For an applet, Verbose messages
can be set in the Network Tasks (Applet Viewer section). Additional messages
will now be displayed when your application or applet is run.
Appendix D. Trouble Shooting and Problem Solving
D-7
D-8
Network Station Manager for S/390
Appendix E. National Language Support
Only selected S/390 national languages are supported at this time. The following
list contains the software feature number and the language.
2922
2923
2924
2925
2926
2928
2929
2931
2932
2933
2937
2939
2940
2942
2958
2963
2966
2980
2981
2996
Portuguese
Dutch
U.S. English
Finnish
Danish
French
German
Spanish
Italian
Norwegian
Swedish
German MNCS (multinational character set)
French MNCS
Italian MNCS
Icelandic
Belgian Dutch
Belgian French
Brazilian Portuguese
Canadian French
Portuguese MNCS
Notes:
1. IBM Network Station NLV support is ASCII code page 819 (ISO equivalent of
code page 850).
2. Code Page 819 supports all languages supported by the 3270 emulator of the
IBM Network Station by using the configured language that is supplied by IBM
Network Station Manager (or its equivalent function).
3. Software will be NLV-enabled, not translated (U.S. English MRI only).
Appendix E. National Language Support
E-1
E-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Appendix F. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped
Default Settings
The following table contains all the IBM Network Station Manager Program shipped
default settings. The settings are presented in the same order that is found in the
Setup Tasks frame when you open the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Table F-1. IBM Network Station Hardware Default Settings
Hardware Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Mouse settings:
Mouse button configuration
Right-handed
Medium
Mouse pointer speed
Keyboard settings:
Medium
Keyboard Repeat rate
Medium delay
Keyboard Repeat delay
Default from terminal
Keyboard mapping language
Monitor settings:
10
Minutes before screen saver turns on
IBM bitmap
Screen saver
20
Minutes before monitor standby
40
Minutes before monitor suspend
60
Minutes before monitor power down
IBM bitmap
Desktop background
Miscellaneous settings:
On
Parallel printer port
No
Allocate memory to speed window refresh
No update
Update boot monitor from the hardware settings file
Appendix F. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings
F-1
Table F-2. IBM Network Station Desktop Manager Default Settings
Desktop Manager Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Screen colors:
Mint green
Background color for window frame in focus
Gray
Background color for window frame not in focus
Black
Foreground color for window frame not in focus
Icon preferences:
on desktop
Icons placed
bottom left
Icon location
Fonts:
12
Font size for icons and menus
Window focus
Windows become active by
clicking on the window
Table F-3. 5250 Default Settings
5250 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Key remapping capability
Disabled
Default keyboard file for:
None
PC Keyboard (101 keys)
None
PC Keyboard (102 keys)
None
5250 Keyboard (122 keys)
Color Settings:
Basic
Color customization capability
None
Default color scheme
None
Additional color schemes to make available
Record/Playback Settings:
Record/Playback capability
Enabled
None
Playback sequences to make available
Miscellaneous Settings:
Screen size
Disabled
Image/Fax display
Disabled
Column separators
No
Allow use of the pop-up keypad
Yes
Allow use of the control menu
Yes
Allow use of the edit menu
F-2
27 rows, 132 columns
Network Station Manager for S/390
Table F-4. 3270 Default Settings
3270 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Key remapping capability
Disabled
Default keyboard file for:
None
PC Keyboard (101 keys)
None
PC Keyboard (102 keys)
Color Settings:
Basic
Color customization capability
None
Default color scheme
None
Additional color schemes to make available
Miscellaneous Settings:
32 rows, 80 columns
Screen size
No
Allow use of keypad
No
Allow use of graphics
Control key
Key for Enter function
No
Use Auto Action
23
Telnet 3270 port to connect to
Table F-5. Internet Network Default Settings
Internet Network Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Web server port on the boot host
80
Applet launcher port
5555
IBM Network Station browser version
Non-encrypted
Navio NC Navigator browser version
Non-encrypted
Appendix F. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings
F-3
Table F-6. IBM Network Station Browser Defaults
IBM Network Station Browser Defaults
Item:
Default Value:
Allow user to override settings
No
Security Settings:
Yes
Enable JavaScript
Yes
Enable Java Applets
Network Settings:
5000 KB
Disk cache
5
TCP/IP maximum connections
Print headers and footers:
&w
Left header
&p
Right header
&D
Left footer
&t
Right footer
Print margins:
.5 inches
Top margin
.5 inches
Bottom margin
.5 inches
Left margin
.5 inches
Right margin
Letter
Paper size
Miscellaneous:
Yes
Auto load images
Yes
Show toolbar
Table F-7. Java Applet Viewer Settings
Java Applet Viewer Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Verbose mode
off
Verify classes
remote only
Maximum heap size
3 MB
JAVA stack size
256 KB
Native code stack size
32 KB
Garbage collection:
Verbose
Only when needed
off
off (garbage collection runs
as an asynchronous thread
in parallel with other threads)
NOTE: The Java Applet Viewer setting defaults are also the defaults for the Java Applications found on the Startup Programs and Menus screens.
F-4
Network Station Manager for S/390
Appendix G. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped
Environment Variables
The following sections include the environment variables whose values cannot be
altered for OS/390 and VM. These values are set when a user logs onto the IBM
Network Station.
Environment Variables for OS/390
PATH
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard/mods
HOME
/etc/nstation/user/ username
Note: username is the identity of the person that is signed onto the IBM
Network Station.
DISPLAY
:0.0
HOSTNAME
Name of the IBM Network Station terminal
BOOTHOST
The host from which the IBM Network Station was booted
BOOTPATH
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard
USER
User ID of the person logged onto the IBM Network Station
NSM_ADMIN_SYSDEFAULTS
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard/defaults
NSM_PROD_SYSDEFAULTS
/usr/lpp/tcpip/nstation/standard/SysDefaults
NSM_USER_PREFS
/etc/nstation/user/username/nsm
Note:
username is the identity of the person that is signed onto the IBM
Network Station.
Environment Variables for VM
PATH
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/mods
HOME
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/username
Note: username is the identity of the person that is signed onto the IBM
Network Station.
Appendix G. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Environment Variables
G-1
DISPLAY
:0.0
HOSTNAME
Name of the IBM Network Station terminal
BOOTHOST
The host from which the IBM Network Station was booted
BOOTPATH
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation
USER
User ID of the person logged onto the IBM Network Station
NSM_ADMIN_SYSDEFAULTS
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/SysDefaults
NSM_PROD_SYSDEFAULTS
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/SysDefaults
NSM_USER_PREFS
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/username
Note: username is the identity of the person that is signed onto the IBM
Network Station.
G-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
Index
Boot parameters
changing 12-4
displaying 12-2
setting 12-4
Boot type 2-11
BOOTP 1-3
problem determination D-1
BOOTP relay agents 2-4
BOOTP server
configuring 6-1
introduction 6-1
Browser
problem determination D-5
Numerics
3270
cursor problems D-2
default settings F-3
3270 application
working with 9-2
5250
default settings F-2
5250 application
working with 9-6
A
About the IBM Network Station Manager xi
Applets 9-22
problem determination D-1, D-6
application and service parameter options B-9
NetBIOS over TCP/IP datagram distribution server
option B-10
NetBIOS over TCP/IP name server option B-10
NetBIOS over TCP/IP node type option B-10
NetBIOS over TCP/IP scope option B-11
network information servers option B-10
network information service domain option B-10
network time protocol servers option B-10
vendor-specific information option B-10
X window system display manager option B-11
X window system font server option B-11
B
base options B-2
boot file size option B-4
cookie server option B-4
domain name option B-5
extensions path option B-5
host name option B-4
Impress server option B-4
log server option B-3
LPR server option B-4
merit dump file option B-5
name server option B-3
resource location server option
root path option B-5
router option B-3
subnet mask option B-3
swap server option B-5
time offset option B-3
time server option B-3
Boot file name 2-10, 2-11
Boot file path 2-10, 2-11
B-4
C
Color
problem determination D-3
configure TCP/IP BOOTP 6-1
Configuring the ICS server 3-3
Configuring the NSLD server 7-3
Configuring the NSLD server for VM
Configuring the TFTP server 6-1
8-2
D
Default settings F-1
Desktop manager
default settings F-2
DHCP 1-3
DHCP extensions options B-11
boot file name option B-13
class-identifier option B-12
finger server option B-14
home address option B-14
IBM-specific Options B-15
IP address lease time option B-12
IRC server option B-14
LPR printer option 200 B-16
NetWare/IP domain name option B-13
NetWare/IP option B-13
NIS domain name option B-13
NIS servers option B-13
NNTP server option B-14
Option 77 B-15
Option 78 B-15
Option 79 B-15
Option 80 B-15
POP3 server option B-14
rebinding (T2) time value option B-12
renewal (T1) time value option B-12
requested IP address option B-12
Index
X-1
DHCP extensions options (continued)
server name option B-13
SMTP server option B-14
STDA server option B-15
streettalk server option B-15
WWW server option B-14
DHCP relay agents 2-4
DHCP server
multiple local subnet restriction 5-8
starting 5-5
using the DHCP command 5-5
Domain name 2-11
obtaining 2-4
IBM Network Station Setup Utility
accessing 12-1
working with 12-1
ICS server
configuring 3-3
installing
introduction 3-1
methods 3-1
tape 3-1
Web site 3-1
Internet network
default settings F-3
IP address
of IBM Network Station 2-11
of remote LAN (from client side) 2-11
IP addresses
obtaining 2-4
IP layer parameters per host options B-5
default IP time-to-live option B-6
IP forwarding option B-6
maximum datagram reassembly size option B-6
non-local source routing option B-6
path MTU aging timeout option B-6
path MTU plateau table option B-6
policy filter option B-6
IP layer parameters per interface options B-7
all subnets are local option B-7
broadcast address option B-7
interface MTU option B-7
mask supplier option B-7
perform mask discovery option B-7
perform router discovery option B-8
router solicitation address option B-8
static route option B-8
E
Environment variables F-4
problem determination D-2
H
Hardware 1-2
Hardware configuration
displaying 12-3
Hardware default settings F-1
Hardware type
of IBM Network Station 2-11
Help button 9-1
Hide button 9-2
Host name 2-11
I
IBM Browser
default settings F-4
planning 2-5
problem determination D-5
working with 9-8
IBM Network parameters
setting 12-3
IBM Network Station
hardware 1-2
logging on 9-1
planning 1-5
IBM Network Station Manager
default settings F-1
environment variables F-4
introduction 1-1
problem determination D-3
IBM Network Station Manager program
error messages 10-23
overview 10-2
starting 10-8
working with defaults 10-5
IBM Network Station roadmap 1-5
X-2
Network Station Manager for S/390
J
Java
problem determination
Java Applet Viewer
default settings F-4
Java VM 9-22
D-1, D-6
L
10-1
Language parameters
setting 12-5
Licensed Program Product numbers 2-4
link layer parameters per interface options
ARP cache timeout option B-8
ethernet encapsulation option B-8
trailer encapsulation option B-8
Lock Screen button 9-2
Login
to IBM Network Station 9-1
B-8
LPP numbers
2-4
R
Resolution
setting 12-5
Roam button 9-1
M
MAC address 2-11
obtaining 2-1
Memory problems D-7
Memory requirements
for downloaded software 2-7
Monitor
problem determination D-1
Monitor parameters
setting 12-5
Move to Top button 9-2
S
Start Over button 9-1
Subnet mask
of remote LAN (from client side)
T
TCP parameter options B-9
TCP default TTL option B-9
TCP keep-alive garbage option B-9
TCP keep-alive interval option B-9
TCP/IP network
planning 2-2
TFTP 1-3
changing attributes D-5
TFTP server
configuring 6-1
TIMED 1-4
Troubleshooting C-1
N
National Language Support D-7
Navio NC Browser
planning 2-5
Navio NC Navigator (browser)
working with 9-13
Network parameters
changing 12-3
displaying 12-2
NSLD 1-4
NSLD server
configuring 7-3
NSLD server for VM
configuring for VM 8-2
NVRAM
problem determination D-1, D-3
U
User services
accessing 11-1
console 11-1
statistics 11-4
terminals 11-2
utilities 11-3
windowmgr 11-2
working with 11-1
O
Ok button 9-1
operating modes
BOOTP server 6-1
Out of memory errors D-7
V
VM Network Station Manager PTFs
planning 2-4
P
PANIC mode D-2, D-5
planning 2-1
Planning for the IBM Network Station
Printer
gathering information for
Problem determination C-1
Program Temporary Fixes
planning 2-4
PTFs
planning 2-4
problem determination D-1
2-11
1-5
W
Windows NT session
setting up using the IBM Network Station Manager
program 10-22
Index
X-3
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Network Station Manager for S/390
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Publication No. SC31-8546-00
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