Academic Year 2008-2009

Academic Year 2008-2009
HELP! Guide
Fall 2008/Spring 2009
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Colorado – Boulder
Engineering Center
Room ECEE 1B55
Campus Box 425 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309-0425
http://ece.colorado.edu
Revised July 2, 2008
Table of Contents
Welcome to Electrical & Computer Engineering
Welcome to ECE................................................................................................................................................... 2
Mission and Objectives ......................................................................................................................................... 3
Department Overview .................................................................................................................................. 3
Mission Statement ........................................................................................................................................ 3
Employment Opportunities .......................................................................................................................... 3
Electrical & Computer Engineering Disciplines ................................................................................................... 4
Program Objectives EE ......................................................................................................................................... 5
Program Objectives ECE ...................................................................................................................................... 6
Basic Program Requirements
EE Curriculum ...................................................................................................................................................... 8
ECE Curriculum.................................................................................................................................................. 10
Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites ....................................................................................................................... 12
Choosing theory and electives courses................................................................................................................ 14
Humanities and Social Sciences Requirement .................................................................................................... 15
Herbst Program for Humanities .................................................................................................................. 15
Graduation Requirements ................................................................................................................................... 16
Advising Resources............................................................................................................................................. 17
Program Enrichment Options
Certificate Programs ........................................................................................................................................... 20
Embedded System Design .......................................................................................................................... 20
Software Engineering ................................................................................................................................. 20
International Engineering Certificate in German........................................................................................ 20
Engineering, Science and Society Certificate ............................................................................................. 20
College of Arts and Sciences ...................................................................................................................... 21
ATLAS ....................................................................................................................................................... 21
Biomedical Engineering Option .......................................................................................................................... 21
Study Abroad Program........................................................................................................................................ 22
Semester at Sea ................................................................................................................................................... 22
Concurrent BS/MS Program ............................................................................................................................... 23
Personal Program Notes: ..................................................................................................................................... 24
Other Information
Department Regulations and Useful Information ............................................................................................... 26
Other Important Publications .............................................................................................................................. 29
Miscellaneous Curriculum Notes ........................................................................................................................ 29
Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) ......................................................................................... 30
Appendix
Faculty Directory ....................................................................................................................................................... A-2
Guide to Choosing Theory and Elective Courses ...................................................................................................... A-3
Theory and Lab Combinations Chart....................................................................................................................... A-11
EE Advisor’s Grid ................................................................................................................................................... A-12
ECE Advisor’s Grid................................................................................................................................................. A-13
Index ........................................................................................................................................................................ A-14
Welcome to Electrical & Computer
Engineering
Welcome
Mission and Objectives
Department Overview
Employment Opportunities
Electrical & Computer Engineering Disciplines
Program Objectives for EE
Program Objectives for ECE
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 2
Welcome to the ECE Department!
We are pleased you have chosen the
Electrical and Computer
Engineering department. There are
two baccalaureate degrees offered
by the Department, B.S. in
Electrical Engineering and B.S. in
Electrical and Computer
Engineering. Both are accredited
by ABET (Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology.
This HELP! Guide has been written
to assist you in understanding
Department curriculum
requirements and regulations. You
should also be familiar with the
Advising Guides published by the
Dean’s Office. In some cases, the
rules of the Department differ from
those of the College; the
Department rules supersede in that
case. You are responsible for
knowing both sets of rules.
Because the curriculum is
continually changing, in general you
will be expected to follow the
curriculum in effect when you
entered the program as reflected in
this HELP! Guide. If, for some
reason, that becomes impossible,
you must petition to follow a
different curriculum.
The ECE faculty and staff are here
to help you with whatever problems
you may have along the way. You
should become familiar with the
people listed in the box on this
page.
As a freshman, you should see any
of the freshman advisors or the
Undergraduate Staff Advisor
whenever you have questions. At
the beginning of your sophomore
year, you will be assigned a
permanent faculty advisor for the
remainder of your program.
If you have questions about
curriculum requirements,
department regulations, course
sequences, etc., the Undergraduate
Staff Advisor is the one to contact.
She can perform a degree audit
which will tell you the courses you
have already completed and also
which courses you still need to take
to complete your degree
requirements.
If you have technical questions
about course content or the
desirability of certain courses in the
marketplace see a freshman advisor
or your faculty advisor. Your
faculty advisor may also assist you
with career counseling and other
similar topics.
The semester-by-semester schedule
listed in this Guide is intended as a
guideline; few students find that
they can follow it exactly. When
rearranging courses to fit your
particular needs, be sure to consider
how postponing a course that is a
prerequisite to others will affect the
remainder of your schedule. You
will find that some courses may be
moved without penalty while
postponing others will delay your
graduation by a semester or more.
College is very different from high
school. You are expected to take
much more initiative in such things
as arranging your own schedule,
gathering information, and seeking
help when needed.
If you find you need help – whether
for academic or personal difficulties
– there are many of resources
available on this campus. Please
come see us before a problem
becomes serious. If we can’t help
you solve your problem, we can
certainly refer you to someone who
can help.
Information is also available on the ECE Department web page at:
http://ece.colorado.edu
Check regularly for updated schedules, course information, faculty
office hours and locations, job postings, and much more.
Electrical & Computer Engineering Advisors
Associate Chair and Head of the Undergraduate Program:
Prof. Andrew R. Pleszkun
EE 1B67
303-492-3571
Undergraduate Staff Advisor:
Ms. Valerie Matthews
EE 1B20
303-492-7671
Freshman Advisors:
Prof. James Avery
Prof. Dejan Filipovic
Prof. Thomas Mullis
Prof. Wounjhang Park
OT 240
OT 243
OT 335
EE 248
303-492-6310
303-735-6319
303-492-8718
303-735-3601
Transfer Credit Evaluator:
Prof. Ed Kuester
OT 248
303-492-5173
Academic and Career Advisors:
Your assigned faculty advisor or any ECE faculty member
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 3
Mission and Objectives for the EE/ECE Undergraduate Programs
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Overview
The department was founded in the 1890’s, in the earliest days of the College of Engineering. Today it has 39
tenured and tenure-track professors, 10 professors with secondary appointments to the department, 3 research
professors, and over 10 adjunct professors, instructors, and lecturers.
Two of our faculty are members of the National Academy of Engineering, fourteen are Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellows, three are Optical Society of America Fellows and eight are members of Eta
Kappa Nu, the national Electrical and Computer Engineering honors society.
Our faculty are active in research, with research expenditures totaling about $5.2 million annually. Our research is
concentrated in ten different areas, from biomedical engineering to VLSI/CAD.
Mission Statement
The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder is the premier
undergraduate and graduate EE/ECE program in the state of Colorado and all adjoining states, as measured by
reputation, national rankings, and department size. The primary mission of the ECE department is:
•
•
•
•
To provide relevant and highly-respected undergraduate EE and ECE degree programs to on-campus
students,
To provide excellent graduate degree programs in electrical and computer engineering,
To advance industry in the state of Colorado and the nation, as well as the accumulated knowledge of
humanity, through our high quality research programs, and
To use our on-campus educational activities to provide high-quality continuing education programs for offcampus students.
It is widely acknowledged that an engineering undergraduate education is a strong foundation for a successful career
in many different disciplines including, of course, engineering, but additionally management, business, law,
medicine and even politics. While our primary focus is on engineering careers we are pleased when our graduates
take, into diverse careers, their foundations in analysis, problem solving and understanding of complex systems.
Our curriculum is designed to help our graduates become viable in a globally competitive work environment. Our
graduates are able to establish a portfolio of up-to-date skills, abilities, and accomplishments that distinguish them
from the competition. Further, the core disciplines and intellectual skills they develop form the framework for a
successful career in an environment where the state of practice advances rapidly.
Employment Opportunities
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, electrical, electronics, and computer engineers make up the largest
branch of engineering. They are found in professional, scientific, and technical services firms, government
agencies, manufacturers of computer and electronic products and machinery, wholesale trade, communications, and
utilities firms. On the CU-Boulder campus, recruiters request interviews with electrical engineering and computer
engineering graduates in numbers several times those of other majors, even other engineering majors.
Our graduates go to work for both large engineering companies (Lockheed Martin, IBM, Agilent, Hewlett Packard,
Xilinx, Intel, Northrup Grumman, Ball Aerospace, Maxtor, Seagate, Sun Mircosystems, National Instruments, Texas
Instruments, Apple Computers, Micron) and smaller, local firms such as SpectraLogic and Level 3
Communications. Some of our graduates go on to graduate school and a few of our faculty even graduated from our
program!
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 4
Electrical & Computer Engineering Disciplines
Biomedical Engineering
Biomedical engineering is concerned with the development and manufacture of prostheses, medical devices,
diagnostic devices, drugs, and other therapies. It is more concerned with biological, safety, and regulatory issues
than other disciplines in engineering. Our faculty are currently pursuing research in bioelectromagnetics which
involves the use of electromagnetic fields to probe biological functions, MRI, and other diagnostic tools.
Communications and Signal Processing
Communication engineering and information theory are concerned with the efficient representation and reliable
transmission and/or storage of information. Communications engineers develop: digital audio, pattern recognition,
speech processing and recognition, audio and image compression, medical imaging, digital filtering, and more.
Computer Engineering
A computer engineer is an electrical engineer with a focus on digital logic systems, and less emphasis on radio
frequency or power electronics. From a computer science perspective, a computer engineer is a software architect
with a focus on the interaction between software programs and the underlying hardware components.
Dynamics and Controls
Control techniques are used whenever some quantity, such as speed, temperature, or force must be made to behave
in some desirable way over time. Currently, our dynamics and controls group are working on diverse problems such
as developing controllers for aircraft, spacecraft, information storage systems, human-machine interfaces,
manufacturing processes, and power systems.
Electromagnetics, RF, and Microwaves
This specialty area is concerned with the use of the electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, our faculty focus on
current commercial and military needs such as active circuits, antennas for communications and radar, theoretical
and numerical techniques for analysis of high-frequency circuits and antennas, and artificial electromagnetic
materials.
Nanostructures and Devices
Solid-state devices form the basis of integrated circuits, which have a variety of electronic, optoelectronic, and
magnetic applications. The research in this field is concerned with the design, fabrication, and characterization of
novel materials and devices with sub-micron feature sizes. Their potential applications include very high-speed
devices, optical sources and detectors, optoelectronic components and all-optical devices. The design and
fabrication of devices and integrated circuits are inextricably related to device physics, solid-state materials, and
sophisticated processing techniques.
Optics and Photonics
This area emphasizes the design, fabrication, and characterization of materials, devices and systems for the
generation, transmission, amplification, detection, and processing of light signals. These are enabling and pervasive
technologies applied in fields like communications, sensing, bio-medical instrumentation, consumer electronics and
defense.
Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems
Power electronics is the technology associated with the efficient conversion, control and conditioning of electronic
power by static means from its available input form into the desired electrical output form. In contrast to electronic
systems concerned with transmission and processing of signals and data, in power electronics substantial amounts of
electrical energy are processed.
VLSI/CAD
Very Large Scale Integration – a term applied to most modern integrated circuits which comprise from hundreds to
thousands to millions of individual components. Research in this area works toward developing new algorithms and
design methodologies to efficiently design VLSI integrated circuits.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 5
Program Objectives for a BS Degree in Electrical Engineering (EEEN)
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
EE-1
Graduates will be situated in growing careers involving the design, development or support of
electrical or electronic systems, devices, instruments, or products, or will be successfully
pursuing an advanced degree.
Graduates attaining the EE degree will have comprehensive knowledge and experience in the
concepts and design of electrical and electronic devices, circuits, and systems. This is achieved
through a sequence of required courses in these areas, culminating in a major design project
incorporating realistic engineering constraints. Moreover, graduates will have advanced,
specialized knowledge and skills in elective areas such as communications and digital signal
processing, control systems, analog and digital integrated circuit design, semiconductor devices
and optoelectronics electromagnetics and wireless systems, power electronics and renewable
energy, bioelectronics, and digital systems.
EE graduates will have attained other professional skills that will be useful throughout their
careers, including verbal and written communication and the ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
The EE curriculum is rich in laboratory work. EE graduates will have achieved extensive practical
experience in the laboratory techniques, tools, and skills that provide a bridge between theory and
practice.
EE-2
Graduates will have advanced in professional standing based on their technical
accomplishments, and will have accumulated additional technical expertise to remain globally
competitive.
EE graduates experience a curriculum that contains a broad core of classes focused on
mathematical and physical principles that are fundamental to the field of electrical engineering.
Hence, they understand the physical and mathematical principles underlying electrical and
electronic technology, and are able to analyze and solve electrical engineering problems using this
knowledge. In addition to basic classes in mathematics, science, and computing, the EE
curriculum includes a sequence of courses in analog and digital electronic circuits and systems, and
electromagnetic fields.
EE-3
Graduates will have demonstrated professional and personal leadership and growth.
To lay the foundation for a long career in a rapidly changing field, a broad background of
fundamental knowledge is required. This is achieved in the EE curriculum through a sequence of
required classes in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and he EE core. In addition, the graduate
must be capable of lifelong learning; this is taught through assignments and projects that require
independent research and study.
The curriculum includes a significant component of electives in the humanities and social sciences.
EE graduates will have knowledge of the broader contemporary issues that impact engineering
solutions in a global and societal context. They will have the verbal and written communications
skills necessary for a successful career in industry or academia. Graduates also understand the
meaning and importance of professional and ethical responsibility.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 6
Program Objectives for a BS Degree in Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECEN)
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
ECE-1
Graduates will be situated in growing careers involving the design, development or support of
electrical, electronic, and computer hardware and software systems, software engineering,
devices instruments, or products, or will be successfully pursuing an advanced degree..
Graduates attaining the ECE degree will have comprehensive knowledge and experience in the
concepts and design of electrical, electronic, and computer devices, circuits, and systems. Besides
emphasizing computer hardware and software, the ECE curriculum also emphasizes design,
integration, implementation, and application of computer systems, as well as experience in
software development. This is achieved through a sequence of required courses in these areas,
culminating in a major design project incorporating realistic engineering constraints. The
curriculum also provides opportunities for specialization in areas such as compiler design,
embedded systems, software engineering, and VLSI design, as well as in the electrical engineering
specialties.
ECE graduates will have attained other professional skills that will be useful throughout their
careers, including verbal and written communication and the ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
The ECE curriculum is rich in laboratory work. ECE graduates will have achieved extensive
practical experience in the laboratory techniques, tools, and skills that provide a bridge between
theory and practice.
ECE-2
Graduates will have advanced in professional standing based on their technical
accomplishments and will have accumulated additional technical expertise to remain globally
competitive.
ECE graduates experience a curriculum that contains a broad core of classes focused on
mathematical and physical principles that are fundamental to the fields of electrical and computer
engineering. Hence, they understand the physical and mathematical principles underlying
electrical and electronic technology and computer systems, and are able to analyze and solve
electrical and computer engineering problems using this knowledge. In addition to basic classes in
mathematics, science, and computing, the ECE curriculum includes a sequence of courses in
analog and digital electronic circuits and systems, electromagnetic fields, probability, computer
software, and computer design and architecture.
ECE-3
Graduates will have demonstrated professional and personal leadership and growth.
To lay the foundation of a long career in a rapidly changing field, a broad background of
fundamental knowledge is required. This is achieved in the ECE curriculum through a sequence of
required classes in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and the ECE core. In addition, the graduate
must be capable of lifelong learning; this is taught through assignments and projects that require
independent research and study.
The curriculum includes a significant component of electives in the humanities and social sciences.
ECE graduates will have knowledge of the broader contemporary issues that impact engineering
solutions in a global and societal context. They will have the verbal and written communications
skills necessary for a successful career in industry or academia. Graduates also understand the
meaning and importance of professional and ethical responsibility.
Basic Program Requirements
Electrical Engineering Curriculum
Electrical & Computer Engineering Curriculum
Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites
Choosing Theory and Electives Courses
Are You Graduating?
Advising Resources
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 8
COURSES REQUIRED FOR B.S. IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (128 HOURS)
Math (16 hours)
APPM 1350
APPM 1360
APPM 2350
APPM 2360
4
4
4
4
Calculus 1 for Engineers
Calculus 2 for Engineers
Calculus 3 for Engineers
Linear Algebra & Diff. Equations
Science (12 hours)
CHEN 1211 3
CHEM 1221 2
PHYS 1110
4
PHYS 2130
3
General Chemistry for Engineers
General Chemistry Lab
General Physics 1
General Physics 3
Theory distribution courses (9 hours) - choose
three from at least two different subject areas: †††
Unused ECE Elective from list
ECEN 3703
3 Discrete Math for Comp. Engr. S
ECEN 4106
3 Photonics F
ECEN 4116
3 Intro. to Optical Communication F
ECEN 4138
3 Control System Analysis F
ECEN 4167
3 Energy Conversion 2 S
ECEN 4224
3 High Speed Digital Design S
ECEN 4242
3 Communication Theory F
ECEN 4345
3 Intro. To Solid State S
ECEN 4553
3 Intro. To Compiler Construction F
ECEN 4583
3 Software Systems Development S
ECEN 4593
3 Computer Organization
ECEN 4623
3 Real-Time Embedded Systems
ECEN 4632
3 Digital Filtering S
ECEN 4645
3 Intro. to Optical Electronics S
ECEN 4797
3 Introduction to Power Electronics F
ECEN 4811
3 Neural Sigs & Functional Brain Img. S
ECEN 4821
3 Neural Systems & Physiological Ctrl. S
ECEN 4827
3 Analog IC Design F
ECEN 4831
3 Brains, Minds, & Computers F
Freshman Elective (3-5 hours) - freshmen choose one: †
ECEN 1400
3 Introduction to Digital and Analog
Electronics
GEEN 1400 3 Freshman Projects
CHEM 1131 5 General Chemistry 2
PHYS 1120
4 General Physics 2
EBIO 1210
3 General Biology 1 plus
EBIO 1230
1 General Biology Lab 1
MCDB 1150 3 Intro to Molecular Biology plus
MCDB 1151 1 Intro to Molecular Biology Lab
Introductory freshman course from any engr. Dept.
Capstone Design Lab (3 hours)
ECEN 4610
3 Capstone Laboratory* (take F or S)
Freshman Seminar (1 hour) - freshmen choose one: †
ECEN 1100
1 Freshman Seminar F
GEEN 1500 1 Introduction to Engineering
Introductory freshman seminar from other engr. dept.
Additional Laboratory Courses (4-6 hours) - choose two: ††
ECEN 4375
3 Microstructures Lab S, even years
ECEN 4517
3 Power Electronics Lab S
ECEN 4532
3 Digital Signal Processing Lab S
ECEN 4606
3 Undergrad Optics Lab F
ECEN 4613
3 Embedded System Design
ECEN 4633
3 Hybrid Embedded Systems
ECEN 4634
2 Microwave & RF Lab F
ECEN 4638
2 Controls Lab F
ECEN 4652
2 Communications Lab F
Computer Science (4 hours)
ECEN 1030
4 C Programming for EE/ECE
Electrical Engineering Core (38 hours)*
ECEN 2120
5 Computers as Components
ECEN 2250
5 Circuits/Electronics 1
ECEN 2260
5 Circuits/Electronics 2
ECEN 3100
5 Digital Logic
ECEN 3250
5 Circuits/Electronics 3
ECEN 3300
5 Linear Systems
ECEN 3400
5 Electromagnetic Fields & Waves
ECEN 3810
3 Introduction to Probability** F
** (may substitute MATH 4510 or APPM 3570 only)
ECE Electives (6 hours) - choose two: ††
ECEN 3170
3 Energy Conversion F
ECEN 3320
3 Semiconductor Devices
F
ECEN 3410
3 Electromagnetic Waves & Trans.
*Students are not allowed to register for Capstone
Laboratory until all Electrical Engineering Core
courses are passed with a grade of C- or better.
Humanities & Social Sciences (21 hours)
12 A&S Core Lower division
6 A&S Core Upper division
WRTG 3030
3 Writing on Science & Society or equiv.
(see page 15 for equiv. courses)
Free Electives (6 hours maximum)
Student's choice of courses up to a maximum of 6
semester credit hours.
S
Technical Electives (variable)
3000-level or above of approved engineering, math, or physics
courses or others by petition. Number of hours needed varies
with hours in other categories.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 9
F = fall only; S = spring only
TOTAL HOURS = 128
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 10
Sample Schedule for Electrical Engineering Program
Freshman Year
Fall
Course
PHYS
1110
APPM 1350
ECEN
1030
ECEN
1100
Title
Physics 1
Calculus 1
C Programming for EE/ECE
Freshman Seminar F
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
4
4
4
1
3
16
Course
CHEN
1211
CHEM 1221
APPM
1360
ECEN
1400
Spring
Title
General Chemistry for Engineers
Engineering General Chemistry Lab
Calculus 2
Freshman Elective (fall or spring)
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
3
2
4
3
3
15
Sophomore Year
Fall
Course
APPM 2360
ECEN
2120
ECEN
2250
Title
Linear Algebra/Diff. Eq.
Computers as Components
Circuits/Electronics I
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
4
5
5
3
17
Course
APPM
2350
ECEN
2260
ECEN
3100
Spring
Title
Calculus 3
Circuits/Electronics 2
Digital Logic
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
4
5
5
3
17
Spring
Title
Modern Physics
Circuits/Electronics 3
ECE Elective
Technical Elective
Writing on Science & Society or equiv.
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
3
5
3
3
3
17
Spring
Title
Capstone Laboratory*
Hrs.
3
Junior Year
Fall
Course
ECEN
3300
ECEN
3400
ECEN
3810
Title
Linear Systems
EM Fields
Probability F
Free Elective
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
5
5
3
3
16
Course
PHYS
2130
ECEN
3250
WRTG
????
Senior Year
Fall
Course
ECEN
4610
Title
Capstone Laboratory*
Hrs.
3
ECE Elective
ECE Theory Elective
ECE Theory Elective
ECE Lab Elective
Technical Elective
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Course
ECEN
4610
ECE Theory Elective
ECE Lab Elective
Free Elective
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
*Capstone Laboratory may be taken in fall or spring. It may be taken as soon as EE core courses are
completed with a grade of C- or better. Enrollment during the Capstone semester should be restricted to
a maximum of 15 credit hours.
F = fall only course; S = spring only course
3
2
3
3
14
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 11
COURSES REQUIRED FOR B.S. IN ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING (128 HOURS)
Math (16 hours)
APPM 1350
APPM 1360
APPM 2350
APPM 2360
4
4
4
4
Calculus 1 for Engineers
Calculus 2 for Engineers
Calculus 3 for Engineers
Linear Algebra & Diff. Equations
Science (12 hours)
CHEN 1211
3
CHEM 1221
2
4
PHYS 1110
3
PHYS 2130
General Chemistry for Engineers
General Chemistry Lab
General Physics 1
General Physics 3
Freshman Elective (3-5 hours) - freshmen choose one: †
ECEN 1400
3 Intro to Digital & Analog Elect
GEEN 1400
3 Freshman Projects
CHEM 1131
5 General Chemistry 2
PHYS 1120
4 General Physics 2
EBIO 1210
3 General Biology 1 plus
EBIO 1230
1 General Biology Lab 1
MCDB 1150
3 Intro to Molecular Biology plus
1 Intro to Molecular Biology Lab
MCDB 1151
Introductory freshman course from other engr. dept.
Non-computer Theory Course (3 hours) - choose one: †
ECEN 3170
3 Energy Conversion F
ECEN 3320
3 Semiconductor Devices F
ECEN 3410
3 Electromagnetic Waves & Trans F
3 Photonics F
ECEN 4106
3 Intro. to Optical Communication F
ECEN 4116
3 Control Systems Analysis F
ECEN 4138
3 Energy Conversion 2 S
ECEN 4167
3 High Speed Digital Design S
ECEN 4224
3 Communication Theory F
ECEN 4242
3 Introduction to Solid State S
ECEN 4345
ECEN 4632
3 Digital Filtering S
ECEN 4645
3 Intro to Optical Electronics S
ECEN 4797
3 Introduction to Power Electronics F
ECEN 4811
3 Neural Sigs & Functional Brain Img. S
ECEN 4821
3 Neural Systems & Physiological Ctrl. S
3 Analog IC Design F
ECEN 4827
3 Brains, Minds & Computers F
ECEN 4831
Non-computer Lab Course (2-3 hours) choose one: †
3 Microstructures Lab S, even years
ECEN 4375
3 Power Lab S
ECEN 4517
ECEN 4532
3 Digital Signal Processing Lab S
ECEN 4606
3 Undergrad Optics Lab F
ECEN 4634
2 Microwave & RF Lab F
ECEN 4638
2 Controls Lab F
2 Communication Lab F
ECEN 4652
Freshman Seminar (1 hour) - freshmen choose one: †
ECEN 1100
1 Freshman Seminar F
GEEN 1500
1 Introduction to Engineering
Introductory freshman seminar from any engr. dept.
Computer Science (8 hours)
ECEN 1030
4 C Programming for EE/ECE
CSCI 2270
4 Data Structures
Capstone Design Lab
3
ECEN 4610
Capstone Laboratory* (take F or S)
Software Elective (3-4 hours) choose one: †
ECEN 4553
3 Intro. to Compiler Construction
ECEN 4583
3 Software System Development
CSCI 3287
3 Database & Information Systems
CSCI 3308
3 Software Engr. Methods & Tools
4 Operating Systems
CSCI 3753
CSCI 4273
3 Network Systems
CSCI 4576
4 High-Performance Scientific Comp 1
CSCI 4586
4 High-Performance Scientific Comp 2
CSCI 4753
3 Computer Performance Modeling
Electrical Engineering Core (38 hours)
ECEN 2120
5 Computers as Components
ECEN 2250
5 Circuits/Electronics 1
ECEN 2260
5 Circuits/Electronics 2
ECEN 3100
5 Digital Logic
ECEN 3250
5 Circuits/Electronics Lab 3
ECEN 3300
5 Linear Systems
5 Electromagnetic Fields & Waves
ECEN 3400
ECEN 3810
3 Introduction to Probability** F
** (may substitute MATH 4510 or APPM 3570 only)
Computer Engineering Core (6 hours)
ECEN 3703
3 Discrete Math for Comp. Engr.
ECEN 4593
3 Computer Organization
*Students are not allowed to register for Capstone
Laboratory until all Electrical Engineering Core
courses and ECEN 4593 are passed with a grade of Cor better.
TOTAL HOURS = 128
S
Humanities & Social Sciences (21 hours)
12 A&S Core Lower division
6 A&S Core Upper division
WRTG 3030
3 Writing on Science & Society or equiv.
(see page 15 for equiv. courses)
Free Electives (6 hours maximum)
Student's choice of courses up to a maximum of 6 credit hours.
Technical Electives (variable)
3000-level or above or approved Engineering, Math, or
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 12
Physics courses or others by petition. Number of hours
needed varies with hours in other categories.
F = fall only; S = spring only
Sample Schedule for Electrical and Computer Engineering Program
Freshman Year
Fall
Course
PHYS
1110
APPM 1350
ECEN
1030
ECEN
1100
Title
Physics 1
Calculus 1
C Programming for EE/ECE
Freshman Seminar F
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
4
4
4
1
3
16
Course
CHEN
1211
CHEM 1221
APPM
1360
ECEN
1400
Spring
Title
General Chemistry for Engineers
General Chemistry Lab
Calculus 2
Freshman Elective (fall or spring)
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
3
2
4
3
3
15
Sophomore Year
Fall
Course
APPM 2360
ECEN
2120
ECEN
2250
Title
Linear Algebra/Diff. Eq.
Computers as Components
Circuits/Electronics I
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
4
5
5
3
17
Course
APPM
2350
ECEN
2260
ECEN
3703
Spring
Title
Calculus 3
Circuits/Electronics 2
Discrete Math for Comp. Engr.
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
4
5
3
3
15
Spring
Title
Electromagnetic Fields & Waves
Circuits/Electronics 3
Computer Organization
Writing on Science & Society or equiv.
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
5
5
3
3
16
Spring
Title
Capstone Laboratory*
Hrs.
(3)
Junior Year
Fall
Course
ECEN
3300
ECEN
3100
ECEN
3810
CSCI
2270
Title
Linear Systems
Digital Logic
Probability
F
Data Structures
Total Credit Hours
Hrs.
5
5
3
4
17
Course
ECEN
3400
ECEN
3250
ECEN
4593
WRTG ????
Senior Year
Fall
Course
ECEN
4610
Title
Capstone Laboratory*
PHYS
Modern Physics
Tech Elective
ECE Theory Elective
ECE Lab Elective
Free Elective
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
2130
Hrs.
(3)
3
3
3
2
3
3
17
Course
ECEN
4610
Software Elective
Technical Elective
Free Elective
Humanities & Social Sciences
Total Credit Hours
*Capstone Laboratory may be taken in fall or spring. It may be taken as soon as EE core courses and
ECEN 4593 are completed with a grade of C- or better. Enrollment during the Capstone semester
should be restricted to a maximum of 15 credit hours.
F = fall only course; S = spring only course
3
3
3
3
15
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 13
Prerequisites, Co-Requisites, and Cross Listings
No.
Title
Prerequisites
1100
1400
2120
2250
2260
3100
3170
3250
3300
3320
3400
3410
3703
3810
4106
4116
4138
4167
4/5224
4242
4/5324
4345
4/5375
4/5517
4/5532
4553
4583
4593
4606
4610
Freshman Seminar
Methods & Problems in ECE
Computers as Components
Circuits/Electronics 1
Circuits/Electronics 2
Digital Logic
Energy Conversion 1
Circuits/Electronics 3
Linear Systems
Semiconductor Devices
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
Electromagnetic Waves & Transmission
Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to Probability
Photonics
Intro to Optical Communication
Control Systems Analysis
Energy Conversion 2
High Speed Digital Design
Communication Theory
Microsystem Packaging
Introduction to Solid State
Microstructures Laboratory
Power Laboratory
DSP Laboratory
Introduction to Compiler Construction
Software Systems Development
Computer Organization
Optics Laboratory
Capstone Laboratory
4/5613
Embedded Systems Design
4/5623
Real-Time Embedded Systems
4632
4/5633
4/5634
4638
4645
4652
4/5797
4/5811
Introduction to Digital Filtering
Hybrid Embedded Systems
Microwave & RF Lab
Control Systems Laboratory
Introduction to Optical Electronics
Communication Laboratory
Introduction to Power Electronics
Neural Signals and Functional Brain
Imaging
Neural Systems and Physiological Control
Analog IC Design
Brains, Minds, and Computers
None
APPM 1350 (co-req)
CSCI 1300
APPM 1360, APPM 2360 (co-req)
ECEN 2250, APPM 2360
CSCI 1300
ECEN 3250
ECEN 2260
APPM 2360, ECEN 2260
ECEN 3250
APPM 2350, ECEN 2260, PHYS 1110
ECEN 3400
ECEN 1030 (CSCI 1300), APPM 1360
APPM 2350, APPM 2360
ECEN 3300, PHYS 2130
ECEN 3400
ECEN 3300
ECEN 3170
ECEN 3400
ECEN 3300, ECEN 3810
ECEN 3410 (recommended)
ECEN 3400
ECEN 3320
ECEN 3170 or 4797
ECEN 3300, ECEN 4632 (co-req)
ECEN 2120
CSCI 2270
ECEN 2120, ECEN 3100
ECEN 3400 or PHYS 4510
ECEN 2120, ECEN 2250, ECEN 2260,
ECEN 3100, ECEN 3250, ECEN 3300,
ECEN 3400, ECEN 3810, and ECEN
4593 (ECE majors only)
ECEN 2120, ECEN 3100 (ECEN 3250,
ECEN 4593 recommended)
ECEN 2120, ECEN 3100, (ECEN 4613
recommended)
ECEN 3300
ECEN 2120, ECEN 3100, ECEN 4593
ECEN 3410
ECEN 3300, ECEN 4138(co-req)
ECEN 3410
ECEN 4242 (co-req)
ECEN 3250
ECEN 2260 or equiv.
4/5821
4/5827
4/5831
ECEN 2260 or equiv.
ECEN 3250
ECEN 2260
Cross Listing
CSCI 4555
CSCI 4593
ASEN 4216
ASEN 4426
ASEN 4436
Also, see prerequisite chart on the following page
Note: Courses with numbers beginning 4/5XXX are offered at both undergraduate and graduate levels.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 14
APPM 1350
APPM 1360
APPM 2360
APPM 2350
ECEN 1030
CSCI 2270
PHYS 2130
ECEN 1100
ECEN 1400
ECEN 2120
ECEN 2250
ECEN 2260
ECEN 3100
ECEN 3170
ECEN 3250
ECEN 3300
ECEN 3320
ECEN 3400
ECEN 3410
ECEN 3703
ECEN 3810
ECEN 4106
ECEN 4138
ECEN 4167
ECEN 4242
ECEN 4345
ECEN 4375
ECEN 4517
ECEN 4532
ECEN 4553
ECEN 4583
ECEN 4593
ECEN 4606
ECEN 4610
ECEN 4613
ECEN 4623
ECEN 4632
ECEN 4633
ECEN 4634
ECEN 4638
ECEN 4645
ECEN 4652
ECEN 4797
ECEN 4811
ECEN 4821
ECEN 4827
ECEN 4831
ECEN 4 242
ECEN 4 138
ECEN 4 613
ECEN 4 632
ECEN 4 593
ECEN 3 320
ECEN 3 410
ECEN 3 170
ECEN 3 810
ECEN 3 400
ECEN 3 300
ECEN 3 250
ECEN 3 100
ECEN 2 260
ECEN 2 250
ECEN 2 120
CSCI 2270
ECEN 1 030
PHYS2130
PHYS 1110
APPM 2350
APPM 2360
APPM 1360
Prerequisite
courses
--->
APPM 1350
Prerequisites for ECEN Program Courses
Notes
none
X
X
X
X
X
none
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
none
C
X
X
X
X
X
C
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
R
X
X
R
X
X
R
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
C = corequisite
E = ECE majors only
R = recommended
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
R
X
R
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
R
X
X
X
*1
X
E
R
R
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
C
X
C
X
*2
*2
X
*1 = may sub PHYS 4510 for ECEN 3400
*2 = or equivalent to ECEN 2260 (ECON 3030, MCEN 3017)
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 15
Choosing Theory and Elective Courses
It’s true. The body of knowledge under the umbrella of Electrical Engineering is far too large to be obtained in only
four years of college. And because of the appearance each year of new technologies, new tools, and new
opportunities, the disparity gets ever larger. But this is not a matter of concern; it is merely the inevitable
consequence of healthy growth in the profession.
Since its infancy in the 19th century, Electrical Engineering has provided three legs to hold up modern society:
Communication, Power, and Computation. But we do not rest on our laurels - the future remains bright: Electrical
Engineering is still in its adolescence. In light of where the profession has been and how deeply it has changed
society, to say that maturity is still in the future is a bold assertion. But we make it with complete confidence.
As a student of the profession, you need to have a combination of broad and narrow studies. All Electrical
Engineers share a special vocabulary and a core knowledge of things electrical. But because the range of application
is so large it is necessary for you to sample some areas of specialization. A Guide has been prepared to help you
select upper division (primarily senior level) courses in areas of interest in which you might eventually specialize.
The areas chosen reflect the individual research interests and expertise of our faculty; and faculty members in each
area have written the one-page descriptions.
Should you develop an appetite for further study, or would like to be involved in some independent work, you
should consult one or more of the faculty listed. Finally, be sure to consult the current University Course Catalog
for course descriptions - Graduate courses have not been listed, although there are usually several in each area.
The Guide can be found in the Appendix of this HELP! Guide and is also available as a separate handout.
Following the description pages you will find a table showing in which semester you will find several of the theory
and lab courses. Theory and lab courses are offered in either fall or spring and some are not offered every academic
year. Be sure to check with the academic advisor for course availability.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 16
Humanities and Social Sciences Requirements
Students must complete 18 credit hours in approved courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences and 3 credit
hours in approved, upper division writing courses.
A. Writing: 3 credit hours in one of the following upper division courses: WRTG 3030, WRTG 3035, GEEN
3000, HUEN 3100, or other writing courses as approved by petition.
B.
H&SS: 18 credit hours of approved courses, of which 6 must be at the 3000 level or higher.
Courses approved for the 18 credit-hour H&SS requirement:
1) Any course included in any of the following eight of the eleven categories of courses in the Arts &Sciences
Core found from the A&S Core Curriculum web page and through the PLUS system:
a) Contemporary Societies
b) Critical Thinking
c) Culture & Gender Diversity
d) Foreign Language
e) Historical Context
f) Ideals and Values
g) Literature and the Arts
h) United States Context
Exceptions: Critical Thinking courses taught in the following departments do NOT count for H&SS credit: ASTR,
CHEM, EBIO, MATH, MCDB, PHYS.
2) The College is eager to see meaningful groupings of courses in related subjects and hence will approve H&SS
electives, even if they are not courses in the A&S Core, when they are grouped so as to form a coherent plan of
study. Prior approval is granted for any group of four courses that would count toward a minor field in any of the
following departments in the College of Arts & Sciences: Economics, Ethnic Studies, History, Linguistics,
Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies, or Women’s Studies.
3) All courses taught through the Herbst Program of Humanities for Engineers and have “HUEN” as their prefix are
approved. See the description of the Herbst Program below.
4) Any exceptions must be approved by petition to the department.
For assistance in planning see http://engineering.colorado.edu/homer/
Herbst Program for Humanities
The centerpiece of the Herbst Program is a two-semester sequence open to Juniors and Seniors. These
seminars are limited to 12 students and are devoted to roundtable discussions of original texts, primarily in literature
and philosophy, but with secondary attention to art, music, and architecture. These seminars also help our students
improve their writing skills, gain confidence and skill in civil discourse on controversial issues, see more clearly the
inadequacy of dogmatic responses to complex questions, and develop intellectual rigor on non-technical issues.
Students must apply to participate in the Junior Seminars, which also satisfy the University’s required writing
course.
The Herbst Program also offers courses at other levels. HUEN 1010 is similar to HUEN 3100 in being a
text-based seminar, but it is designed for freshmen. In HUEN 1100, History of Science & Technology, original
source material and textbook readings provide insight into science and technology in changing historical, social, and
political contexts. For Freshmen and Sophomores, Herbst offers Tradition and Identity, HUEN 2010, which explores
the following questions: Why am I who I am, and why do I desire my future to look a certain way? What ways,
both positively and negatively, does tradition determine/influence the possibilities of my individuality?
For a full list of courses and other information, see http://engineering.colorado.edu/herbst/
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 17
ARE YOU GRADUATING?
To be eligible for a Bachelor of Science degree from this Department, you must meet the following requirements:
1.
Successfully complete a minimum of 128 semester credit hours according to the curriculum in effect at the
time the student was officially admitted to the EEEN or ECEN degree program. The last 45 credit hours must
be earned after admission to the College of Engineering and Applied Science as a degree student unless
exempted by prior petition.
2.
Achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better in all courses taken at the University of Colorado
(all campuses) as well as a grade point average of 2.00 or better in all courses taken from, or cross listed in,
the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
3.
Satisfy any outstanding MAPS deficiencies. These deficiencies should have been resolved in the first year or
two of enrollment in the College, but students cannot graduate without having met the basic requirements in
effect at the time of their admission.
4.
Meet with the Undergraduate Staff Advisor the semester prior to the semester of intended graduation for a
comprehensive review and approval of remaining courses needed to satisfy graduation requirements.
5.
Notify the ECE department and the Engineering Dean’s Office of your intent to graduate by filling out an
Application for Diploma Card in the office of the Undergraduate Staff Advisor. This needs to be done at the
beginning of your final semester.
6.
If you are completing a minor, a Minor Completion form must be submitted to the Undergraduate Staff
Advisor’s Office.
7.
A graduation list is posted near the Dean’s Office (AD 110) and the ECE Undergraduate Office (EE 1B51)
about a month after the beginning of each semester. Students intending to graduate should make certain that
their names are listed. Any omissions or changes should be reported to both the Dean’s Office and the ECE
Undergraduate Office as soon as possible.
8.
Obtain the recommendation of the ECEN faculty and the College faculty. This is handled by the department
and college staff. You will be notified if you have not been recommended and the specific reasons.
It is the responsibility of each student to be certain that all degree requirements have been met and to keep the
Department and the Engineering Dean’s Office informed of any change in graduation plans.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 18
Advising Resources
There are a vast number of advising resources available to students at CU-Boulder, but students frequently do not
know about them. Please do not hesitate to contact any of these places for assistance.
Electronic Advising System
The advising system used by the ECE department to track student progress is Degreement by Optioventory. Use
your IdentiKey login to access the system. The web address is https://ece.colorado.edu/gmsas/. This system
provides a degree audit, planning, and more.
College of Engineering Advising Guides
These College guides, published by the Engineering Dean’s office, are a series of individual sheets which cover a
wide range of topics, including everything from academic honesty and ethics to scholarships to descriptions of every
degree program offered in the College. They are located in a wall-mounted display in the front hallway of the
Engineering Center just southeast of the revolving doors. These guides are also available online at
http://engineering.colorado.edu/students/advising.htm.
Engineering Peer Advocates Office
This office provides services which include academic advising, assistance with major selection, tutoring, and test
files as well as providing general information about study skills, test anxiety, resume writing, study abroad
opportunities and much more. The office is staffed by sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have been trained to
answer questions about anything that may affect you as an engineering student. It is located in ECCR 263 (303-4920828), and is open and free to all current and prospective engineering students.
Pre-Professional Advising Center
Located in Old Main, room 1B90 (303-735-3000), the advisors provide support services to all CU-Boulder students
preparing for careers in the medical sciences, health professions, and law.
Career Counseling in Career Services
The professional career counselors can help students and alumni clarify career interests, values and work-related
skills; explore potential careers and employers; and refine job seeking, interviewing, and resume preparation skills.
They host Career Fairs and Internship Fairs, sponsor resume writing workshops, and hold mock interview sessions.
Career Services is located in Willard Hall, Room 34 (303-492-6541), or you may visit their website at
http://www.colorado.edu/careerservices/index.html
Career Services Online (CSO)
Search jobs and internship listings, apply for on-campus interviews, and get weekly e-mail updates about career
events. Sign up at http://careerservices.colorado.edu
Counseling and Psychological Services: A Multicultural Center
This center provides a variety of programs and assistance to address general academic or personal issues. They are
located in Willard Hall, room 134, or call 303-492-6766.
Multicultural Engineering Program (MEP)
The Multicultural Engineering Program is an academic excellence community dedicated to the success of
multicultural and first generation students historically underrepresented in engineering and applied science. The
MEP Resource Center serves as a central meeting place for forming study groups and networking while providing
access to MEP staff, computer stations, and more. The MEP office is located in ECCE 100 (303-492-6606). For
additional information please visit the website: http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/MEP/.
Women In Engineering Program (WIEP)
This program was created to recruit and retain women students in the College of Engineering and Applied Science.
WIEP conducts activities and programs that help make the educational experience rewarding for all students. The
office is located in ECCE 113A (303-492-0083). You can get further information about WIEP
http://engineering.colorado.edu/wiep.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Personal Program Notes:
Page 19
Program Enrichment Options
Certificate Programs
Biomedical Engineering Option
Concurrent BS/MS Program
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 21
Certificate Programs
Certificate programs are similar to minor programs, and upon completion will be identified on the student’s
transcript immediately following the semester in which the certificate was completed. It is possible that course work
used to satisfy the certificate can also be used for free electives, technical electives, or humanities/social sciences
electives. Check with the Undergraduate Advisor to determine how a certificate program fits in with your degree
plans.
Embedded System Design
Commercially available digital systems (microprocessors, microcontrollers, memory chips, interface systems, and
systems that handle image, voice, music, and other types of signals) have experienced explosive growth in the
electronics industry. These devices are increasingly powerful, cheap, and flexible as design components. The
certificate in embedded systems offers students the hardware and software knowledge and skills needed to design
and implement these systems. The curriculum consists of two core courses and one elective course from an
approved list. The two core courses are:
ECEN
ECEN
4613
4623
Embedded System Design
Real-Time Embedded Systems
The list of approved electives is periodically updated and currently includes:
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
ECEN
4610
4033
4633
4583
Capstone Laboratory
Software Engineering of Stand-Alone Programs
Hybrid Embedded Systems
Software Systems Development
Software Engineering
Experienced software professionals work in a field that has maintained a relentlessly rapid rate of change for
decades making it impossible to stay current in all aspects of software engineering. Those with limited experience
find that the challenges of work assignments exceed their preparation from most undergraduate degree programs. In
a typical computer-related undergraduate curriculum, it is not possible to devote enough credit hours specifically to
software engineering to address all of the aspects of engineering complex systems including, for example, design for
maintainability, concurrency, and distributed systems. The professional certificate in software engineering covers
the body of knowledge necessary to develop products more predictably and reliably for stand-alone programs as
well as for software in more complex environments. The curriculum consists of three core courses:
ECEN
4033
ECEN
4583
ECEN
ECEN
4043
4053
Software Engineering of Stand-Alone Programs
or
Software Systems Development
and
Software Engineering of Multi-Program Systems
Software Engineering of Distributed Systems
International Engineering Certificate in German
This is a new undergraduate academic program established at CU-Boulder in 2003. It offers students enrolled in an
engineering degree program the opportunity to obtain an interdisciplinary certificate in International Engineering
and German. The program prepares engineers for a global economy through language, cultural awareness, and
international work experience. Students who have had German language instruction in high school, as well as
students with other language experience who would like to begin studying German may apply. If interested, please
contact the Dean’s Office at 303-492-5071, or visit the website at
http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/academics/german.htm.
Engineering, Science & Society Certificate
This is a new certificate available for College of Engineering students. Check with your advisor.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 22
ATLAS
The Alliance for Technology, Learning, and Society (ATLAS) offers two certificates: Technology, Arts, and Media
(TAM) and Multidisciplinary Applied Technologies (MAT). Both require 18 credit hours. For additional
information, call 303-735-6588 or visit the website: http://www.colorado.edu/ATLAS.
College of Arts and Sciences
Arts and Sciences offers certificate programs in the following areas: Actuarial Studies, British Studies, Central and
Eastern European Studies, Cognitive Sciences, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies, Medieval and
Early Modern Studies, Neurosciences and Behavior, Peace and Conflict Studies, and Western American Studies.
Completion of specified course work in these programs entitles students to a certificate issued by the Dean of Arts &
Sciences. Students interested in these programs should contact the appropriate program.
Biomedical Engineering Option (BMI)
The Biomedical Engineering (BMI) option, available to both electrical and computer engineering majors, focuses on
the application of biophysical and engineering concepts to the improvement and protection of human health.
Successful completion of this option is noted on a student’s transcript and meets most medical school admission
requirements.
Coursework in the Electrical and Computer Engineering curriculum is coupled with specialized courses linking
electrical engineering to biomedical applications such as neural signals and systems, bioeffects of electromagnetic
fields, therapeutic and diagnostic uses of bioelectric phenomena and medical image processing. Undergraduates
may also elect independent study courses in these areas.
Students interested in the BMI option may receive elective credit for two semesters of biology if they also complete
two bioengineering courses from the ECE offerings. One of these ECE courses also may be used to satisfy
distribution requirements. The basic BMI option includes two semesters of biology and two junior or senior
bioengineering courses in the ECE Department taken in lieu of other electives. Several of these BME electives are
also applicable to the Boulder campus Neurosciences Program. ECE Biomedical Engineering courses regularly
offered include:
ECEN
4811/5811
Neural Signals and Functional Brain Imaging
ECEN
4821/5821
Neural Systems and Physiological Control
ECEN
4831/5831
Brains, Minds, and Computers
ECEN
40x1/50x1
Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering
For more information on the content of the BMI-ECE courses and pre-medical studies in ECE contact Professor
Howard Wachtel, [email protected], OT 433. For specific advice on fitting the BMI Option into an existing
ECE program contact the Undergraduate Staff Advisor.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 23
Study Abroad Program
A very special opportunity is
available to engineering students
through the Office of International
Education. Study Abroad
Programs, usually undertaken in
the student’s junior year, have
been established with several
universities around the world
offering technical as well as
elective social science and
humanities courses. In recent
years, ECE students have gone to
Germany, Italy, France, and
England to study. Programs can
be arranged for either one semester
or one academic year.
A formal exchange program
has been established with the
University of East Anglia (UEA)
in Norwich, England, and a
number of students from both CUBoulder and UEA have
participated. Course equivalents
have been established so that,
before they travel, students know
what courses they will be taking
and exactly how the credits will
count. No CU student has lost a
single credit hour by participating
in this particular exchange
program.
In most cases, students going
abroad are “registered” on the
Boulder campus so they maintain
all of the rights of a resident
student, including financial aid.
The exchange agreement with
UEA stipulates that students pay
tuition to their home universities;
all CU-Boulder students pay the
in-state rate. Therefore, even with
travel costs included, it is only
slightly more expensive for instate students to spend a year in
England than in Boulder and
several thousand dollars less
expensive for out-of-state students.
the marketplace of the future.
Students who are able to take
advantage of such opportunities as
studying abroad will have a
distinct head start in the business
world as well as a unique
experience to offer future
employers. The personal
advantages of spending a year in a
different cultural setting are
immeasurable.
The Department strongly
encourages all students to consider
participating in the Study Abroad
Program. All interested ECE
students should contact the ECE
Undergraduate Office prior to
applying to the program. More
information is available at the
Office of International Education,
Environmental Design Building,
Room 92, 492-7741.
An international perspective
will be increasingly important in
Semester at Sea
The semester at sea is a study abroad program designed to incorporate a global semester into your
undergraduate curriculum. Administered through the Office of International Education, and managed by the
University of Pittsburgh’s Institute for Shipboard Education, students explore and learn valuable insights into the
various societies visited and allows students to analyze and discuss their observations in formal classes on the
shipboard campus. Set sail aboard the SS Universe Explorer each semester and summers.
Contact the Office of International Education for more information in the Environmental Design Building,
Room 1B45, (303) 492-7741 or visit their website at http://www.colorado.edu/OIE/StudyAbroad/index.html
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 24
Concurrent BS/MS Program
Students with strong academic records who plan to continue in the Graduate School for a Master’s in the same
discipline usually find it advantageous to apply for admission to the concurrent BS/MS degree program.
Purpose of the Program
The concurrent BS/MS program in Electrical and Computer Engineering enables especially well-qualified students
to be admitted to the MS program during the junior year of their BS program, and to work thereafter towards both
the BS and MS degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering. This program allows for early planning of the MS
portion of the student’s education, taking graduate courses as part of the BS degree, more flexibility in the order in
which courses are taken, and more efficient use of what would otherwise be a final semester with a light credit hour
load. Due to the tighter coordination of courses within the ECE Department than is possible for students who come
to UCB from other institutions to pursue the MS degree, up to six (6) credit hours may be counted toward both the
BS and MS degree programs.
Admission to the Program
Application for admission to the Concurrent BS/MS program in the ECE Department may be made at any time
during or after the student enters his or her junior year. Minimum requirements for admission to the concurrent
program are: (i) completion of the eight core EE courses, (II) a minimum overall GPA of 3.25, (iii) a minimum GPA
of 3.25 in ECE Department courses, and (iv) at least three (3) letters of recommendation must be provided by the
applicant (at least two (2) must be from ECE faculty at UCB). Transfer students in place of requirement (i) above,
must have taken at least two (2) of the core ECE courses at the Boulder campus and have completed coursework at
another institution (or other institutions) which is approved for the transfer credit equivalent to all ECE core courses
not taken on the Boulder campus, and must have completed at least 15 credit hours of total courses at UCB in order
to qualify for admission.
Staying in the Program
The student must maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 over all undergraduate courses taken, and a GPA of at least 3.0 in
all graduate courses taken in order to remain in good standing in the program.
Regulations
Until a student in this program reaches a total of 128 credit hours of courses applicable to the BS or MS degree in
Electrical and Computer Engineering taken and passed (each with a grade of D or better), he/she will be governed
by the rules and regulations applicable to any undergraduate student in the ECE Department, unless specified
otherwise in the regulations described herein. After a student has accumulated a total of 128 applicable credit hours,
he/she will be governed by the rules and regulations applicable to any graduate student in the ECE Department,
unless specified otherwise in the regulations described herein. It is the intention of the department that, as far as
possible, a student in this program is treated on the same bases as any other student in the department at a
comparable stage of their academic career.
Overlapping Credit
With the recommendation of the student’s academic advisor and the approval of the ECE Graduate Coordinator, as
many as six (6) credit hours of ECE Department courses at the 5000 level or above may be counted both toward the
undergraduate degree requirements and the requirements for the MS degree. In theory, therefore, the minimum
number of credits for the Concurrent BS/MS degree will be 152.
Advising
Students in the Concurrent BS/MS program must have a faculty advisor with whom they must consult to compose a
degree plan, including a list of courses to be taken from the senior year through the end of the program. This plan
must be filed with the ECE Department Coordinator for Undergraduate Studies by the end of the third week of the
first semester in which the student has been admitted into the program.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Personal Program Notes:
Page 25
Other Information
Department Regulations and Other Useful Information
Other Important Publications
Miscellaneous Curriculum Notes
Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS)
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 27
Department Regulations and Other Useful Information
Students with questions concerning Departmental regulations and requirements should check with the
Undergraduate Staff Advisor first. In some cases, Department regulations differ from those of the College of
Engineering. Students should make themselves aware of the following regulations as well as the regulations in the
College Advising Guides.
Advanced Placement/College-Level Examination Program
AP and CLEP credit is handled as transfer credit. For students who have taken an advanced placement course
in high school and who make the required score in the College Entrance Examination Board’s Advanced Placement
examination, advanced placement and college credit will be granted if the subject would normally be part of the
student’s curriculum. If the student elects to take the equivalent college course, the credit for that course will
replace the advanced placement credit. All advanced placement credit must be validated by satisfactory
achievement in subsequent courses.
For a listing of AP examinations, score required for credit, and equivalent courses at CU-Boulder, please refer
to the current University of Colorado at Boulder Catalog. You may also find this information at:
http://www.colorado.edu/prospective/freshman/requirements/ap.html
Course Repetition
The University currently has in place a program to give students the opportunity to repeat courses in which
they received a grade of D+ or lower. Once completed, the original grade will be removed from both total credit
hour and GPA computations; however, it will remain on the student’s transcript. Students may use this program for
a maximum of 10 credit hours. Info is at http://registrar.colorado.edu/students/registration/course_forgiveness.html.
This is not available for independent study. A course in which a grade of C- or better has been received may not be
repeated. A student is not permitted to enroll in a course offered by the College when that course has not been
successfully completed on three prior attempts. If it is a course required for the degree, you will be dropped from
the program.
Discovery Learning Apprenticeships
Undergraduate students are encouraged to apply for the opportunity to conduct research via a Discovery
learning apprenticeship. Students can earn an hourly wage while engaging in research with college faculty and
graduate students. Positions are announced in April for the following fall term and spring term. Students must
apply and selection for positions is competitive. For more information, an application and a list of current discovery
learning projects visit http://engineering.colorado.edu/activelearning/discovery.htm.
Double Degrees
It is possible to obtain bachelor’s degrees in two engineering disciplines or one in EE (or ECE) and one in a
second degree. Students must satisfy curricula for both programs and complete a minimum of 30 additional hours
beyond the largest minimum required by either program.
Of the 30 additional semester credit hours, double degree students must complete 24 semester credit hours in
courses offered by the secondary academic department or in courses approved in advance by the department as
substitutes. Transfer students pursuing double degrees must complete a minimum of 75 semester credit hours as a
degree student in the College of Engineering and Applied Science and must satisfy all other stipulations regarding
total hours required and approval of all coursework by both departments concerned.
E-Mail Communication
E-mail is an official means of communication within the CU-Boulder community. Therefore, the University
has the right to send communication to students via e-mail and expect that those communications will be received
and read in a timely fashion. The campus recommends checking e-mail once per week, at minimum, because some
communications may be time critical.
Additionally, the department maintains e-mail lists for communication with its students. You will be
automatically placed on this list when you are accepted into the department. If you wish to be removed from this
list, contact the Undergraduate Staff Advisor.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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Engineering Management Courses
Engineering Management courses equip students with technical management expertise. Areas of technical
management emphasis are in quality and process, research and development, operations, and project management.
Engineering Management courses may be used to satisfy technical elective requirements for a B.S. degree up to a
maximum of 6 credit hours.
Free Electives
The curriculum includes a maximum of 6 credit hours of free electives. Free electives may be any course that
covers different material than other courses the student has taken. For example, a student may not take APPM 1350
Calculus 1 for Engineers and MATH 1300 Analytic Geometry/Calculus and receive credit for both.
Grades
Faculty within this College have the option of awarding grades with a plus (+) or minus (-) designation, except
for A+. Faculty who teach courses have complete authority for calculating and assigning final grades in courses
they teach. A final grade of “D-“ or better in a course is sufficient to satisfy degree requirements unless the course is
a prerequisite for another course in the student’s program (see Prerequisite Requirements).
GPA
In addition to other University requirements, each student must satisfy the following at the time of graduation:
a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all courses taken on any campus at the University of Colorado;
a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in all departmental courses (labeled ECEN xxxx or cross-listed with
ECEN) taken on any campus at the University of Colorado. “Courses taken” means all courses for which a letter
grade has been received, including all grades for repeated courses.
Graduate-Level Courses
Courses at the ECEN or CSCI 5000-level are closed to undergraduates with a GPA of less than 2.85 except by
petition. Other campus departments may have different restrictions. Courses at the 6000-and 7000-level are closed
to all undergraduate students. Graduate level courses applied towards the graduation requirement for the B.S.
degree cannot be used again toward a graduate degree, either here or at another school. The only exception to this
rule is students who are enrolled in the Concurrent BS/MS program. See the section about the Concurrent BS/MS
program for further details.
Graduation Check
Each student should make an appointment with the Undergraduate Staff Advisor one semester prior to the
semester in which he or she plans to graduate to review credits toward graduation. Even though all students are
invited to review credits several times throughout their studies, this final graduation check is mandatory. If a student
has not been through the graduation check and problems are found at graduation, an extra semester may be
necessary.
Graduation Requirements
A complete listing of all requirements for graduating from the department of Electrical and Computer
Engineering is in the section titled “Graduation Requirements” on a separate page in this HELP! Guide.
Honors
Students with cumulative GPA between 3.75 and 3.89 at the end of the semester prior to graduation will be
awarded the designation “With Distinction” on their diploma. A GPA of 3.90 or higher earns the citation “With
High Distinction.” At least 50 hours must have been earned at the Boulder campus and grades earned during the
semester of graduation will not be considered.
Eligible students are also encouraged to participate in the College of Arts and Sciences Honors Program.
Criteria for the designations of cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude are set by the Honors Council
and are recorded on the student’s diploma and in the commencement program. This is a separate program and both
distinction and cum laude can be earned. Interested students should consult with the Director of the Engineering
Honors Program for detailed information.
GPA for cum laude is 3.700, for magna cum laude is 3.800 and for summa cum laude is 3.900.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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Independent Study
Upper division independent study (ECEN 3840/4840) may be used as a technical elective to fulfill graduation
requirements without petitioning. If it is used to fulfill any other requirement, it must be approved ahead of time by
petition. Any Independent Study course sponsored by a faculty member in another department must be approved by
petition and may not be used to fulfill the senior theory or lab requirements.
If interested, an Independent Study Agreement form must be completed and signed by both the student and the
sponsor of the Independent Study or Undergraduate Research. These forms are available from the Undergraduate
Staff Advisor and also on the ECE website. Students should use the faculty list section of this HELP! Guide to
determine what faculty to contact.
No Credit and Pass/Fail
A course taken for no credit or pass/fail cannot be used for fulfilling graduation requirements. Once a course
has been taken for no credit it cannot be repeated for a grade. Students are still subject to course tuition and fee
expenses when registering for a course with the NC option.
Petitions
Any exceptions to department or college rules must have prior approval by petition. All petitions must be
submitted to the Undergraduate Staff Advisor for departmental approval. Petitions involving exceptions to College
rules will then be submitted to the Dean’s Office for approval. It is the student’s responsibility to find out if a
petition has or has not been approved. Blank petition forms are available from the Undergraduate Staff Advisor,
online on the ECE website, and the Dean’s Office (AD 100).
Prerequisite Requirements
The minimum passing grade for a course that is considered a prerequisite for another required course is C-. If
a grade of D+ or lower is received in a course which is prerequisite to another, the student is required to repeat the
course until the minimum acceptable course grade has been earned. However, no course may be repeated more than
thee times. If a student takes the advanced course, it does not remove the obligation to repeat the prerequisite
course, even if the grade earned in the advanced course is a C- or above. The minimum passing grade for a course
that is not specifically a prerequisite for another required course is D-. See the list on page 13 or the chart on page
14 for prerequisite courses. Also see the section on Course Repetition for rules on repeating courses.
ROTC
Students participating in the ROTC program may receive up to twelve (12) semester hours of credit toward
fulfilling ECEN BS degree requirements from approved ROTC coursework (6 hours of Free Elective, 6 hours of
Humanities/Social Science Elective).
Telecommunications Courses
The graduate Telecommunications Program offers special courses, most of which are usually not suitable as
technical electives in the departmental programs. Therefore, a student may use only that Telecommunications
course for which he or she has received prior approval, by petition, in his or her degree program. Only one
approved Telecommunications course may be applied to the B.S. program. A brochure listing courses offered in the
Telecommunications Program may be obtained in the Telecommunications Office (OT 313).
Transfer Credits
The initial transfer credit evaluation is performed by the Office of Admissions upon receiving an official
transcript mailed directly from the institution where the credit was earned. Once the Office of Admissions has
completed their evaluation, the ECEN Transfer Credit Evaluator, Professor Edward Kuester, ECOT 248, can verify
the specific courses that apply to the Department’s curriculum. Just because the Office of Admissions accepted the
credit doesn’t mean ECEN will utilize that credit toward BS degree requirements. The Office of Admissions will
not accept course work in which the student received a grade lower than a C-. Nor will Pass/Fail credit be accepted.
Credits from an Engineering Technology program normally will not transfer, and no academic credit is normally
given for work or co-op experience. Credit received more than 10 years prior to admission will be accepted.
All transfer students should see the Department’s Transfer Credit Evaluator, Professor Edward Kuester, ECOT
248, about acceptance of transfer credits before classes begin. Acceptance of transfer credits is provisional for one
academic year following admission to the ECE Department and until academic competence in subsequent courses
has been established. (Those transferring here from UCD or UCCS are not considered transfer students, but they
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page 30
should review their credits with the Undergraduate Staff Advisor in order to determine how credits received at
another campus will fit into this program.)
Transfer students should understand that all credits received at other universities may not – in fact, most likely
will not –apply toward their ECE program. Transfer credits are first reviewed by the University, which accepts
those it feels are comparable to courses at CU. Then that list of courses is reviewed by the Transfer Credit Evaluator
who approves only those courses which are comparable to courses required by departmental curricula. In most
cases, this is only a fraction of total transfer hours.
The number of credit hours for each course may vary by institution and final grades do not transfer between
institutions. Also, the completion of these courses does not assure the student of acceptance into an engineering
degree program; each institution has its own admission criteria. Lower division courses cannot transfer as upper
division courses between two-year and four-year institutions.
Once the Transfer Credit Evaluator has approved transfer hours, the student should deliver a copy of the signed
sheet to the Undergraduate Staff Advisor in the Undergraduate Office to be made a part of his or her departmental
file.
45-Hour Rule
Students graduating from CU-Boulder must complete their last 45 hours on the Boulder campus or through
CAETE (Center for Advanced Engineering & Technology Education). Courses taken through Continuing
Education or by correspondence, even though registered for in Boulder, are not considered Boulder campus courses.
Any exceptions to the 45-hour rule must be approved by petition in advance before registering or they will not be
counted toward the degree.
OTHER IMPORTANT PUBLICATIONS
University of Colorado Catalog
College Advising Guides
Ralphie’s Guide to Student Life
Degree requirements, academic standards, administrative regulations,
university policies and procedures (dry and dull, but important).
http://www.colorado.edu/catalog/
College of Engineering requirements, rules, regulations (must read).
http://ecadw.colorado.edu/engineering/students/advising.htm
A-Z listing of university resources, facilities, and special programs as well as
rules, regulations, and policies (wealth of well-organized, entertaining
information). http://www.colorado.edu/ralphie/
MISCELLANEOUS CURRICULUM NOTES
•
The curricula listings on pages 7 and 9 are not a misprint: It is highly recommended that you take APPM
2360 (Linear Algebra and Differential Equations) before APPM 2350 (Calculus 3). Material covered in
APPM 2360 will help you with Circuits 1 and must be taken as a co-requisite.
•
WRTG 3035, GEEN 3000, or HUEN 3100 will substitute for WRTG 3030.
•
APPM 2380 plus APPM 2480 will substitute for APPM 2360.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION
STANDARDS (MAPS)
All students entering the University of Colorado who finished high school in the spring of 1988 or thereafter
must meet Minimum Academic Preparation Standards specified by each school or college. The College of
Engineering and Applied Sciences has adopted the following standards for admission. These standards are defined
in high school units. A unit is one academic year of course work.
1. English
2. Mathematics
3. Natural Science
4. Social Science
5. Foreign Language
4 units
4 units (including 2 algebra, 1 geometry, and 1 college prep, eg. trigonometry)
3 units (including 1 unit in chemistry and 1 unit in physics)
2 units
3 units (of the same language) (as of Fall 2007)
Policies Concerning MAPS Deficiencies
Students who are admitted to the College of Engineering with a deficiency in one or more of the above
categories are required to complete the appropriate courses through courses taken at CU-Boulder or other
institutions of higher education or approved credit-by-examination programs prior to their graduation from college.
The policies of the Boulder campus with respect to completing MAPS course work after enrollment are as
follows:
1.
Appropriate missing MAPS course work may be included in the hours for graduation.
2.
All course work taken to fulfill MAPS deficiencies must be taken for a letter grade.
3.
Students are required to enroll in and complete at least one MAPS course each term, beginning in the first term
of enrollment, until all MAPS units are completed. This policy applies to new freshmen, to transfer students,
and to students transferring from other academic units on the Boulder campus and from other campuses of the
University. Failure to comply with this requirement may result in suspension at the end of the term in which
the student ceases taking courses to complete missing MAPS units.
4.
All students who first enroll in one academic college or school at CU-Boulder and who subsequently transfer
to another college or school are required to meet the MAPS specified for the new unit, irrespective of their
completion of MAPS units in their previous college or school.
5.
Students in double-degree programs must meet MAPS requirements of both degree-granting programs.
6.
Students must consult with a CU-Boulder academic advisor (or read their college’s academic survival guide) to
determine which specific courses may be used to meet a MAPS requirement.
7.
Students who graduate from a foreign high school are exempt from MAPS requirements.
Appendix
Faculty Directory
Theory and Elective Areas of Interest Descriptions
Theory and Lab Combinations Chart
EE Advisor’s Grid
ECE Advisor’s Grid
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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Electrical and Computer Engineering Teaching Faculty
Area code 303
Professor
James Avery
Susan Avery
Frank Barnes
Aaron R. Bradley
Timothy Brown
Thompson Brown
Daniel Connors
Ruth Dameron
Robert Erickson
Dejan Filipovic
Ewald Fuchs
Albin Gasiewski
John Hauser
Vincent Heuring
Edward Kuester
Michael Lightner
Eugene Liu
Dragan Maksimovic
Peter Mathys
Linden McClure
Robert McLeod
David Meyer
Francois Meyer
Alan Mickelson
Richard Mihran
Garret Moddel
C.T. Mullis
Todd Murphey
William Newhall
Lucy Pao
Wounjhang Park
Rafael Piestun
Melinda Piket-May
Andrew Pleszkun
Zoya Popovic
Li Shang
Samual Siewert
Fabio Somenzi
Manish Vachharajani
Bart VanZeghbroeck
Mahesh Varanasi
Howard Wachtel
Kelvin Wagner
Regan Zane
Office
OT 240
CIRES 309
OT 250
OT 351
OT 256
EE 1B22
OT 342
OT 435
OT 356
OT 243
OT 340
OT 246
OT 437
EE 1B55
OT 248
EE 1B55
OT 337
OT 346
OT 334
EE 2B37
EE 1B47
OT 438
OT 251
EE 130
OT 436
EE 148
OT 335
OT 332
OT 434
OT 350
EE 248
EE 246
OT 242
EE 1B67
OT 252
OT 358
OT 348
OT 336
EE 1B41
OT 333
OT 433
EE 233
OT 352
Telephone
492-6310
492-7653
492-8225
492-8676
492-1630
492-4190
735-7199
492-7003
735-6319
492-7010
492-9688
492-6496
492-8751
492-5173
492-5180
735-6307
492-4863
492-7733
735-0997
492-7158
492-5470
492-7539
492-8375
492-1889
492-8718
492-1090
735-2287
492-2360
735-3601
735-0894
492-7448
492-3571
492-0374
492-8785
542-2508
492-3466
492-0612
492-2809
492-0258
492-7713
492-4661
735-1560
E-mail
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Area of Interest
Computer Engineering
Remote Sensing
Bioengr, Nanostructures
Computer Engineering
Sig. Proc., Comm.
Capstone Laboratory
Computer Engineering
Computer Engineering
Power Electronics
Electromagnetics
Power Electronics
Electromagnetics
Dynamics & Controls
Computer Engineering
Electromagnetics
VLSI/CAD
Sig. Proc., Comm.
Power Electronics
Sig. Proc., Comm.
Computer Engineering
Optics & Photonics
Dynamics & Controls
Bioengr., Comm.
Optics, EM.
Bioengineering
Nanostructures & Devices
DSP, Communication
Dynamics & Controls
Dynamics & Controls
Nanostructures & Devices
Optics & Photonics
Electromagnetics
Computer Engineering
Electromagnetics
Computer Engineering
Computer Engineering
VLSI/CAD
Computer Engineering
Nanostructures & Devices
Sig. Proc., Comm.
Bioengineering
Optics & Photonics
Power Electronics
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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Guide to Choosing Theory and Elective Courses
COMMUNICATIONS
ECEN 4242 - Communication Theory
ECEN 4652 - Communication Lab
Faculty advisors: E. Liu, P. Mathys, M. Varanasi
One of the most fascinating and important topics in electrical communications is the wireless transmission and
reception of analog and digital signals. Early examples, most of which are still in use today, include wireless
communication using Morse signals and AM (amplitude modulation) and FM (frequency modulation) radio
broadcasts. Modern examples of wireless systems are satellite radio and TV, wireless LANs (local area networks),
and cellular telephones.
All practical communication systems are affected by noise that is picked up during transmission, either by the
communication channel itself or by the front-end of the receiver, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received
signal is a crucial measure for the quality of a communication system. For analog systems quality is synonymous
with high fidelity reproduction of the transmitted signal. For digital systems the main quality measure is the
probability of bit or symbol error. Early on, the common perception was that in order to improve quality more
transmit power was needed. But it is now recognized that putting intelligence in various forms of coding into
communication systems is an energy-conscious and smart alternative. Most modern communication systems use
digital symbols to represent signals, independent of whether the original signal, like speech or music, is analog or,
like computer data, is already digital. Source coding, like MP3, for example, and error-control coding can be applied
easily to digitally represented signals. However, most physical channels require a waveform that is continuous in
time and in amplitude and is restricted to a specific frequency range for efficient signal transmission. Thus,
important topics for the treatment of communication systems are the study of signal processing of both analog and
digital signals and the conversion between analog and digital representations.
Representative Technical Applications
- Wireless and wired transmission of analog and digital data
- Reliable reception of analog and digital data
- Information storage and retrieval
- Telephone network, cell phones, data networks
- Coding for compression, error-control, and secrecy/privacy
- Radio and TV broadcasts
Representative Societal Applications
- Voice and data communication for personal and commercial purposes
- Digital storage of multimedia including audio, images, and movies
- Wireless communication networks for remote areas
- Communications for rescue missions and disaster recovery
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING
ECEN 4632 – Digital Filtering
ECEN 4532 – Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Faculty advisors: F. Meyer, C. T. Mullis, E. Liu
Digital Signal Processing became possible when digital computers came into existence and then became cheap
enough to be considered components. Almost all the classical analog signal processing applications (like
telephones, radio sets, signal generators, and oscilloscopes) can now be done digitally. DSP is done in real time or
offline; it is done on one-dimensional signals like audio, and two-dimensional signals like images. Embedded
processors for doing DSP are found in cell phones, audio players, digital cameras, automobile engines, braking
control systems, and medical instruments. Examples of applications on large computers include seismic exploration,
geophysical mapping, motion picture animation, and medical imaging. The range of application is enormous.
To study Digital Signal Processing, it is necessary to have a good grounding in discrete-time linear systems and
time-frequency transformations. The essential pre-requisite for the senior DSP theory and lab courses is the Linear
Systems Core course. In addition, real-time applications require experience with assembly language code
development. Offline processing requires the use of high-level application languages like MATLAB. DSP is a good
area for those who enjoy the design and development of algorithms, applied mathematics, and applications. Students
who intend to complete degrees in both EE and Music will find the DSP lab course especially interesting.
Representative Technical Applications
Audio generation, coding, reproduction, and enhancement
Image Processing, enhancement, coding, and pattern recognition
Video analysis, coding and decoding
Wireless Communications modulation and demodulation
The Design of dedicated DSP processors
The use of DSP in feedback control
Representative Societal Applications
Aids for human speech and hearing
Aids for human vision
Medical instruments which can see into the body and the brain
Environmental analysis using remote sensing data
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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ELECTROMAGNETICS, RF AND MICROWAVES
ECEN3410 – Electromagnetic Waves and Transmission
ECEN4634 – Transmission Laboratory
Faculty advisors: E. Kuester, Z. Popovic, A. Gasiewski, M. Piket-May, D. Filipovic
The origins of electromagnetics can be traced to the earliest days of human existence. Fear and fascination with
many natural phenomena including lightning lingered for thousands of years until sound physical understandings
were developed. Ancient Greeks noticed that rubbing fur against amber (‘electron’ in Greek language) caused
attraction between the two. The 20th century archeological findings indicate that the first battery was made in old
Iraq in 3rd century BC. Many scientists and free thinking minds over the last 300 years, including Benjamin
Franklin, Michael Faraday, Nikola Tesla, James Clerk Maxwell, Heinrich Hertz and others have contributed to
tremendous advances in electromagnetics, and by application of electromagnetics, to electrical and electronic
engineering as a whole. Try to imagine life without electrical signals, power, and modern electronic materials: radio,
TV, phones, air travel, refrigeration, etc... would be virtually impossible.
The CU Electromagnetics, RF and Microwave focus area provides the necessary foundation for understanding the
phenomena of electricity, magnetism and radio waves, and facilitates the engineering of a wide range of RF and
microwave components, devices, sub-systems, and systems. EM theory, design, measurements and fabrication are
covered on a level that enables a career in industry, government, or further education on a master or doctoral level.
A background in mathematics and elementary circuits are needed. The low-frequency part of this track is the
foundation for circuit theory, while the high-frequency portion merges with the optics track.
Some Technological Problem Areas
Generation, transmission, propagation, and reception of radio waves
Wireless, satellite, and cable communications, including radio and television
Antennas for cell phones, vehicles, space exploration, navigation, and sensing
RF and microwave transmitters and receivers
Microwave transmission lines, amplifiers, oscillators, resonators, and filters
Radar, concealed weapon and buried object detection; stealth design
Remote sensing of Earth and planetary surfaces, oceans, atmospheres, and cryospheres
RF tagging, telemetry, therapeutic and industrial heating
Acoustic sensing and communications; seismic sensing
Some Societal Problem Areas
Wireless communications and networking
Medical instrumentation, diagnostics, treatment and therapeutics
Alternative energy resources – wireless power harvesting
Environment sensing, monitoring, and forecasting
Border control, defense, homeland security
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
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MICROELECTRONICS
ECEN 4797 – Introduction to Power Electronics
ECEN 4517 – Power Electronics Laboratory
ECEN 4827 – Analog IC Design
Faculty advisors: R. Erickson, D. Maksimovic, R. Zane
Although vast majority of electronic signal processing and computing is now performed digitally, signal and power
generation and delivery remain fundamentally analog. Interfaces between sensors such as microphones, temperature,
motion or optical sensors and digital computers involve analog signal conditioning and analog-to-digital conversion.
Similarly, digital computer outputs, such as audio or communication signals must be ultimately converted to realworld analog signals via digital-to-analog converters. All electronic systems require efficient, tightly regulated
power supplies. Advances in power electronics have enabled improved operating life of battery powered electronics,
significant energy savings and reductions in size and cost in all electronic systems, as well as more effective
utilization of renewable energy sources such as wind or solar. Performance of systems ranging from cell phones to
audio or video players, to medical instrumentation, measurement devices, or renewable energy systems is often
determined by the noise, bandwidth or efficiency of analog and power microelectronics.
Basic understanding of transistors and other semiconductor devices, as well as circuit analysis techniques in time
and frequency domains, are necessary to learn about circuit design techniques in microelectronics. ECEN2250,
ECEN2260 and ECEN3250 are therefore essential prerequisites for the senior power electronics and analog
integrated circuit design courses. In the Introduction to Power Electronics and the Power Electronics Laboratory, we
address analysis, modeling and design of switched-mode power conversion circuits capable of supplying arbitrary
tightly regulated voltages and currents at very high efficiencies. The lab culminates with a project where students
design, build and test power electronics for a complete solar power system. Analog Integrated Circuits Design
addresses transistor-level circuit design of current and voltage references, amplifiers, comparators, analog-to-digital
and digital-to-analog converters with numerous applications in audio, video, radio-frequency and sensor interfaces.
Microelectronics is a good area for those who enjoy hands-on circuit design, experimentation, and applications.
Technical areas
Efficient electrical power processing and power management
Signal conditioning, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion
Audio, video, radio-frequency and sensor interfaces
Societal Impact areas
Energy efficiency and energy savings
Effective utilization of renewable energy sources
Computing and communication infrastructure
Sensors and instrumentation: environmental, medical, industrial
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-7
NANOSTRUCTURE MATERIALS & DEVICES TRACK
PHYS 1120 – Physics 2 (Electricity & Magnetism) (recommend spring freshman yr)
ECEN 4345 – Introduction to Solid State (recommend spring junior yr)
ECEN 3320 – Semiconductor Devices (recommend fall senior yr)
ECEN 4375 – Microstructures Laboratory (recommend spring senior yr)
Faculty advisors: F. Barnes, G. Moddel, B. Van Zeghbroeck, W. Park
Materials and device electronics dominated technological advances in the 20th century, and are advancing at an
accelerated rate in the 21st century. Early electronics used the vacuum tube, but about 50 years ago this gave way to
solid state electronics based on semiconductors. This enabled the growth of the microelectronics industry, integrated
circuits, superconductor devices, and more recently practical use of solar cells. Virtually all audio, video,
communications, computing and more recently aerospace and automotive technologies are based on microelectronic
devices. During the last few years, nanostructured materials and nano-scale (below 1 micron) devices have allowed
the fabrication of devices that were not even dreamed of earlier.
Nanostructures is based upon a solid understanding of modern physics as well as a “feel” for physical structures. In
addition to the physics courses required for the EE degree, it would be useful to take PHYS 1120 Physics 2 early.
The stepping-off point to junior and senior-level nanostructures courses is ECEN 3250 Circuits/Electronics 3.
After that ECEN 4345 Intro to Solid State and ECEN 3320 Semiconductor Devices can be taken in any order, but
it may be helpful to take Intro to Solid State first, even though it is currently listed as a 4000-level course.
Semiconductor Devices must be taken before Microstructures Laboratory. ECEN 4375 Microstructures
Laboratory provides hands-on experience with designing and fabricating working microelectronic devices learned
about in Semiconductor Devices.
Some Technological Problem areas
Higher-density computers and memories
Lower-power portable devices
Lasers and solid-state lighting devices
Flat-panel displays
Digital cameras and photodetectors
Some Societal Problem areas
Alternative energy devices
Nano-scale electronic devices for medical implants
Medical imaging, cancer detection and therapeutics
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-8
NEURAL AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
ECEN 4831 –
ECEN 4821 –
ECEN 4811 –
ECEN 480x --
Brains Minds and Computers
Neural Systems and Physiological Control
Signals and Functional Brain Imaging
Special Topics in BME (e.g. Bioelectromagnetics)
Faculty advisors: H.Wachtel, F.Barnes, M.Lightner, F.Meyer, R.Mihran
The roots of electrical engineering and neuroscience both go back to the late 18th century when scientific
debates as to the fundamental nature of electricity and its role in the neural control of muscle activity were raging.
For example, the Italian physiologist and anatomist Luigi Galvani built a sensitive device (subsequently known as a
Galvanometer ) used it to, he claimed, detect electrical activity in active frog muscles. His fellow Italian, physicist
Alessandro Volta, however, disputed this and suggested instead that the electrical potentials (subsequently known as
Voltages) that Galvani registered were due to the interface of metal wires with the muscle tissue. To prove his point
Volta showed that you could generate voltages simply by interfacing metal plates with salt solutions—and in so
doing he invented the battery ! History would prove that both Galvani and Volta were correct in their own context
and ever since progress in electrical and neural sciences has been intrinsically linked.
Today, this strong linkage between ECE and Neural Sciences has re-emerged as a field called Neural
Engineering (or, some say, Neurotechnology) and it is well represented in the course offerings open to junior and
senior (as well as first-year graduate) ECE students. It is also comprises the major didactic component of the
broader program in Biomedical Engineering (BME) that has been available, in several forms, to ECE students for
over 20 years.
BME currently exists as an undergraduate ECE Option wherein elective credit is awarded for a full year of
Biology (and a second semester of chemistry) if the student completes two semesters of the BME (Neural and
otherwise) electives listed above. This BME option is particularly attractive to pre-medical school students or others
who plan to pursue graduate studies (and/or careers) in BME or various biomedical sciences. The NE track
however, would not subsume, or require, any previous coursework in Biology and would be aimed largely at
students who are pursuing the NE track in the context of an ECE education and career trajectory. So, the courses
listed above, which can fulfill either (or both) the NE track and the BME option, are designed to be comprehensible
to engineering students with no prior biological background.
Representative Technical and Scientific Problem Areas
Measurements of Biomedically Important Signals
Algorhythms for Biomedical Signal Processing and Display
Technologies for Imaging Body Anatomy (MRI, CAT, etc.)
Technologies for Imaging neuroelectric Activity Patterns (FMRI, etc.)
Methods for studying the molecular and cellular basis of Bioelectrical phenomena
Applying control theory and signal flow concepts to physiological systems. Quantifying and understanding
the biological effects of electromagnetic fields.
Modeling the genesis and propagation of neuromagnetic fields.
Improving neurosurgical techniques such as Deep Brain Stimulation.
Representative Societal Applications
Improved diagnoses and treatment for cardiac, vascular, and pulmonary diseases.
Improved diagnoses and treatment for neural diseases.
Development of assistive devices for cognitive disabilities
Development of brain controlled prostheses for disabled patients.
Better understanding of health risks (or lack thereof) posed by EMF devices.
Refinement of "artificial intelligence" to be more like actual cognitive function.
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-9
RENEWABLE ENERGY
ECEN 1000 Special Topics Energy 101
ECEN 3170 – Energy Conversion I,
ECEN 4167 – Energy Conversion II
ECEN 4517 – Power Laboratory
Faculty advisors: E.F. Fuchs, F.S. Barnes, M. J. Piket-May, R.W. Erickson, D. Maksimovic
Renewable energy was established as a new field about 20 years ago with the design of wind and photovoltaic
power plants. Although in some areas great progress has been made, it is still insufficient to cover the electric
energy needs of our nation which requires a total installed power capacity of about 800GW with a spinning reserve
of about 80GW. The latter is required because the electricity consumed by residential, commercial and industrial
loads must be generated at the very moment when consummation occurs. This requirement cannot be met by
renewable energies alone because they are intermittent in their energy production and even meteorological forecasts
cannot alleviate this problem. In addition, the change of the wind, for example, may result in the loss of 60MW per
minute. This loss of generation capacity can only be covered either by conventional plants (e.g., natural gas or coalfired plants) or by energy storage facilities, and to a lesser extent by nuclear plants which serve mostly as base load
plants due to the long thermal time constants of the nuclear reactor.
Applications range from the development of new algorithms for the control of distributed systems (DG), load
flow analyses for fundamental and harmonics as required by power system control centers, the development of
emergency operational procedures in case of brown- or blackouts, the interaction of renewable plants with energy
storage plants. From the Dutch experiences one can conclude that renewable energy of 30% of the entire required
power, that is, in our nation’s case 240GW, poses tremendous control problems. Needless to say, the range of
application is enormous.
To study renewable energy systems, it is necessary to have a good grounding in basic laws and theorems of
electrical engineering. The prerequisite for the sophomore, senior, and cross-listed graduate courses is Circuits and
Electronics 1 and 3. In addition, real-time applications require some experience in computer languages such as
Quick Basic, C++, D/D, D/A and A/D converters, and other soft- and hardware. Off-line processing requires the use
of high-level application languages like MATLAB, MATHEMATICA and SPICE. The renewable energy field is a
good area for those who want to contribute to solving the problems of society and who enjoy the design and
development of power system and power electronic components, applied mathematics, and applications.
Representative Technical Applications
• Renewable energy sources such as wind- photovoltaic and co-generation
• Large-scale energy storage to mitigate intermittent nature of renewable sources: design of pumped-storage
hydro plants, compressed air storage plants, emergency and standby power supplies, and uninterruptible power
supplies for data processing equipment
• The design of large-scale machines, rectifiers and inverters
• AC and DC transmission of electrical energy, voltage- and frequency control of systems with distributed
generation
• Energy conservation
• Replacement of internal combustion engine (IC) by electric drives based on either fuel cells or
batteries/supercapacitors
Representative Societal Applications
• Reduction of particulates, sulfur and carbon dioxide emissions
• Providing fuel (electricity from renewable sources) for public and individual transportation
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-10
ROBOTICS AND CONTROL
ECEN 4138 – Control Systems Analysis
ECEN 4638 – Control Systems Laboratory
Faculty advisors: J Hauser, D Meyer, T Murphey, L Pao
Safe airplanes and vehicles, minimally invasive surgery, reliable manufacturing, computer-assisted physical
rehabilitation—these all have automatic control and robotics as core technologies. Automatic control has been a key
technological component since the middle of the 20th century, and with the advent of fast computers, nearly any
device that moves or has dynamics has an embedded digital controller. Moreover, robotic applications have found
their way into more than just automotive manufacturing. We now see robotic devices in medical, defense, and
renewable power industries. Students wishing to pursue these areas will increasingly need expertise in the robotics
and control areas.
To study robotics and control, students need to have taken linear systems (ECEN 3300) and the controls sequence
early. If possible, students should take ECEN 3300 by their Spring sophomore term so that they can take ECEN
4138/4638 in their Fall junior term. This will allow them to take a senior robotics elective. Many students find that
a course in matrix methods (typically offered through the Applied Mathematics Department) is helpful in robotics
and control. Other relevant courses include embedded systems and power electronics, both of which play significant
roles in autonomous, robotic systems.
Some Technological Problem areas
Haptic rendering for minimally-invasive surgery
Motion planning in uncertain environments, such as the NASA Mars rover
Flight control of aggressive aircraft
Reconfigurable manufacturing
Image recognition and autonomous response
Fast and precise control of atomic force & near field scanning optical microscopes
Some Societal Problem areas
Safe transportation
Precise medical treatment and rehabilitation
Efficient energy usage
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-11
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-12
EE Advisor’s Grid
Fall
Spring
Fall
M ath
P H Y S 1110- A P P M 13 504 P hysics 1 4 C alculus 1
E C E/CS
R eq uir ed
D istrib u tion
R eq uir emen ts
Tech n ical
E lectives
Fr ee
Elec tive s
E CE N 1030-4
CS 1:
P rogram ming
E CE N 1100-1
F reshm an
S em
H um an ities
Se m H rs
& S ocial Sc i
H & S S #1 - 3
16
CH E N 1211A P P M 13 60F reshm an
3 C H EM
Elec tive
1221-2 C hem 4 C alculus 2
w / lab
A P P M 23 60- E CE N 2120-5
4 L in
C omp ute r/C o
A lg/D iff E Q
mp
H & SS #2-3
15
H & SS #3-3
17
E CE N 2250-5
Circuits 1
A P P M 23 50- E CE N 2260-5
4 C alculus 3
Circuits 2
Spring
SOPHOMORE
FRESHMAN
P h ys/C h e m
H & SS #4-3
17
E CE N 3100-5
Digital Logic
E CE N 3300-5
L inear
S yste ms
C ourse #1-2
JUNIOR
Fall
E CE N 3400-5
E M F ie lds
15
Spring
E CE N 3810-3
P roba bility
P H Y S 21303 M odern
P hysics
E CE N 3250-5
Circuits 3
C ourse #2-3 W R TG 3030 -3
17
E CE E lective3
Fall
T heory # 1:
E CE N 4____
E CE E lective-3
Course #1-3
or U nused E CE
E lective
H & SS #6-3
SENIOR
T heory # 2:
E CE N 4____
17
Lab #1:
E CE N 4____
Spring
T heory # 3:
E CE N 4____
U pper
D ivision
H & S S #7-3
Course #2-3
Lab #2:
E CE N 4____
14
E CE N 4 610-3
Ca pstone
L aboratory
H o u rs
R e q u ired
12
16
52
16
6
5
21
128
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-13
ECE Advisor’s Grid
Fall
Math
PHY S 1110-4 AP PM 1350-4
Physics 1
Calculus 1
EC E/CS
Required
D istr ibution
Requirement s
Technical
Electives
Fre e
E lectives
ECEN 1030-4
CS1 :
Programming
Humanities
Sem Hrs
& Soc ial Sci
H&SS #1 - 3
16
CHEN 1211-3
AP PM 1360-4
CH EM 1221-2
Calculus 2
Chem w/ lab
F reshman
Elective
H&SS #2-3
AP PM 2360-4 ECEN 2120-5
Lin Alg/Diff Computer /Com
Eq
p
Fall
Spring
ECEN 1100-1
Freshman Sem
15
H&SS #3-3
17
ECEN 2250-5
Circuits 1
AP PM 2350-4 ECEN 2 260-5
Calculus 3
Circuits 2
Spring
SOPHOMORE
FRESHMAN
Phys/Chem
H&SS #4-3
15
ECEN 3703-3
Discrete Ma th
ECEN 3300-5
Linear Systems
Fall
ECEN 3 100-5
D igital L ogic
17
JU NIOR
ECEN 3810-3
Probability
CSCI 2270-4
CS 2: Data
Structu res
Spring
ECEN 3250-5
Circuit s 3
WRTG 3030-3
ECEN 3400-5
EM Fields
16
Fall
ECEN 4593-3
Computer Org
PHY S 2130-3
Modern
Physics
Theory
ECEN 4____
Course #1-3
Course #1- 3
H&SS #6-3
17
SEN IOR
Lab
ECEN 4____
Spring
Software
Electiv e -3
Hours
Required
Courses #2-3
Course #2-3
Upper Division
H&SS #7-3
15
ECEN 4 610-3
Capst one
Laboratory
12
16
62
5
6
6
21
128
Electrical and Computer Engineering HELP! Guide
Page A-14
Index
45-Hour Rule .............................................28
ABET Requirements....................................2
Accreditation ...............................................2
Advising Resources .............................17, 29
Advisors
Academic ................................................2
Associate Chair .......................................2
Freshman Advisor...................................2
Undergraduate Staff Advisor ..................2
Advisor’s Grids
EE .................................................... A-12
ECE ................................................. A-13
Advanced Placement .................................26
Associate Chair ............................................2
Biomedical Engineering Option ................21
Career Counseling .....................................17
Certificate Programs
Embedded Systems Design...................20
Software Engineering ...........................20
International Engineering German........20
Engineering, Science & Society ...........20
College of Arts & Sciences...................21
ATLAS .................................................21
CLEP .........................................................26
Concurrent BS/MS ....................................23
Co-Requisites ......................................12, 13
Counseling and Psychological Svcs. .........17
Course Repetition ......................................26
Curriculum
Electrical Engineering ............................8
Electrical & Computer Engineering .....10
Department Overview..................................3
Discovery Learning ...................................26
Double Degrees .........................................26
Embedded Systems Certificate ..................20
Electronic Advising System ......................17
Engineering Advising Guides ....................17
Electrical Engineering Disciplines...............4
Engineering Management Courses ............27
E-Mail Communication .............................26
Employment Opportunities ..........................3
Faculty Directory .................................... A-2
Free Electives ............................................27
GPA Requirements
BS/MS ..................................................23
Graduate Courses..................................27
Graduation ............................................16
Grades, Minimum ................................27, 28
Graduate Level Courses.............................27
Graduation Check ................................16, 27
Graduation Requirements ....................16, 27
Guide to Choosing Theory & Elective
Courses ............................................. A-3
Herbst Program ..........................................15
Honors .......................................................27
Humanities & Social Sciences ......... 8, 10, 15
Independent Study .....................................28
International Engineering German.............20
Minimum Academic Preparation
Standards (MAPS) ..................................30
Mission Statement .......................................3
Multicultural Engineering Program ...........17
No-Credit Courses .....................................28
Offices and Phone Numbers ..................2, 32
Pass/Fail Courses .......................................28
Peer Advocates Office ...............................17
Petitions .....................................................28
Pre-Medical Options ..................................21
Pre-Professional Advising .........................17
Prerequisites ........................................12, 13
Prerequisite Requirements .........................28
Program Objectives
Electrical Engineering ............................5
Electrical and Computer Engineering .....5
Ralphie’s Guide to Student Life .................29
Repeating Courses .....................................26
ROTC ........................................................28
Sample Schedule
EE ...........................................................9
ECE ......................................................11
Semester at Sea ..........................................22
Software Engineering Certificate...............20
Study Abroad Programs.............................22
Telecommunication Courses .....................28
Theory & Lab Combinations Chart ...... A-11
Transfer Courses
From Other Universities .......................28
From Other CU Campuses....................28
Transfer Credit Evaluator ......................2, 28
Undergrad Staff Advisor .............................2
University of Colorado Catalog ................29
Women In Engineering (WIEP) ................17
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