UniSA Design Construction Guidelines
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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA
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MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION
SPECIFICATIONS
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Contents
A INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 15
A1
Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 17
A 1.1 Preface .................................................................................................................................................... 17
A 1.2 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 18
A 1.3 Applicability ............................................................................................................................................. 18
A 1.4 University Of South Australia Portfolio ................................................................................................... 18
Adelaide – City East Campus ............................................................................................................................ 18
Adelaide – City West Campus .......................................................................................................................... 18
Magill Campus .................................................................................................................................................. 19
Mawson Lakes Campus .................................................................................................................................... 19
Whyalla Campus ............................................................................................................................................... 19
Mount Gambier Campus .................................................................................................................................. 19
A 1.5 Standards and Reference Documentation .............................................................................................. 19
A 1.6 Variances ................................................................................................................................................. 21
A 1.7 Revision Management ............................................................................................................................ 21
B SAFETY IN DESIGN .................................................................................................................... 22
B 1 Preface ................................................................................................................................................. 24
B 2 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 24
B 3 Safety in Design Reviews ...................................................................................................................... 25
B 4 Project Information .............................................................................................................................. 26
B 5 The Designer ........................................................................................................................................ 26
B 5.1 Designer Responsibilities......................................................................................................................... 26
B 6 Variations ............................................................................................................................................ 26
B 7 Certificate of Compliance ..................................................................................................................... 26
B 8 Work Health and Safety Legislation ...................................................................................................... 27
B 9 University Work, Health and Safety Requirements ................................................................................ 27
B 9.1 Reference Documents ............................................................................................................................. 27
B 9.2 Consultation ............................................................................................................................................ 27
B 9.3 WHS Services ........................................................................................................................................... 27
B 9.4 Contractor Management ......................................................................................................................... 27
C DESIGN CONTROLS .................................................................................................................. 29
C 1 Project Information .............................................................................................................................. 33
C 2 Overarching Design Principles ............................................................................................................... 33
C 2.1 Aesthetic Considerations......................................................................................................................... 33
C 2.2 Amenity & Simplicity ............................................................................................................................... 33
C 2.3 Flexibility ................................................................................................................................................. 34
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 2 of 269
C 2.4 Building Legibility .................................................................................................................................... 34
C 2.5 Efficiency & Economy .............................................................................................................................. 34
C 2.6 Functionality ............................................................................................................................................ 34
C 2.7 Vending Machines ................................................................................................................................... 34
C 2.8 Universal Design ...................................................................................................................................... 35
C 2.9 Safety and security .................................................................................................................................. 35
C 2.10 Wind Control ......................................................................................................................................... 35
C 2.11 Signage .................................................................................................................................................. 35
C 2.12 Building Efficiency ................................................................................................................................. 35
C 2.13 Space Utilisation Factors ....................................................................................................................... 35
C 2.14 Works to Heritage Buildings .................................................................................................................. 36
C 2.15 The Designer.......................................................................................................................................... 36
C 2.15.1 Designer Responsibilities ............................................................................................................... 36
C 2.16 Variations .............................................................................................................................................. 36
C 2.17 Sustainable Buildings............................................................................................................................. 37
C 2.17.1 Passive Design ................................................................................................................................ 37
C 2.17.2 Water Conservation and Quality ................................................................................................... 37
C 3 Work Health & Safety ........................................................................................................................... 38
C 4 Acoustics .............................................................................................................................................. 38
C 4 Thermal Insulation Performance ........................................................................................................... 39
C 5 Animal, Vermin and Pest Infestation ..................................................................................................... 40
C 5.1 Vermin ..................................................................................................................................................... 40
C 5.2 Animal ..................................................................................................................................................... 40
C 5.3 Termite Control ....................................................................................................................................... 40
C 5.4 Pest Control ............................................................................................................................................. 40
C 6 Vandalism (graffiti) ............................................................................................................................... 40
C 7 Design Reports ..................................................................................................................................... 41
C 7.1 Design Report Guidelines ........................................................................................................................ 41
C 7.2 Documentation Standards ...................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.2.1 General............................................................................................................................................. 42
C 7.2.2 Text Document Format .................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.2.3 Drawings Format .............................................................................................................................. 42
C 7.3 Updated Reports ..................................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.4 Issues Register ......................................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.5 Design Report Approval .......................................................................................................................... 43
C 7.6 Report Format ......................................................................................................................................... 43
C 7.7 The Architectural and Engineering Sections............................................................................................ 44
C 7.7.1 Drawings .......................................................................................................................................... 44
C 7.7.2 Schedules ......................................................................................................................................... 44
C 7.7.3 Text .................................................................................................................................................. 44
C 8 Documentation and Drawings .............................................................................................................. 47
C 8.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 47
C 8.2 Conditions of Compliance ....................................................................................................................... 47
C 8.3 Provided Drawings .................................................................................................................................. 47
C 8.4 Drawing Requirements............................................................................................................................ 47
C 8.5 Submission Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 48
C 8.5.1 Specific Requirements – Architectural Drawings ............................................................................. 48
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 3 of 269
C 8.5.2 Specific Requirements – Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Landscape Drawings............... 48
C 8.5.3 Specific Requirement – Engineering Services Drawings .................................................................. 48
C 8.5.4 Specific Requirement – Essential Safety Provisions (ESP) Drawings ................................................ 48
C 8.5.5 Specific Requirement – Survey Drawings ........................................................................................ 49
C 8.6 Space Numbering .................................................................................................................................... 49
C 8.6.1 Numbering Systems ......................................................................................................................... 49
C 8.6.2 Responsibilities for Space Numbering ............................................................................................. 49
C 8.6.3 Numbering Protocols ....................................................................................................................... 50
C 8.7 Asset Numbering Guidelines ................................................................................................................... 50
C 8.7.1 Asset Numbering Goals .................................................................................................................... 50
C 8.7.2 Asset ID ............................................................................................................................................ 50
C 8.7.2.1 Asset Class ................................................................................................................................ 50
C 8.7.2.2 Site/Building Number ............................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.2.3 Asset Category .......................................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.2.4 Sequential Number................................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.2.5 Placeholders ............................................................................................................................. 51
C 8.7.2.6 Layout ....................................................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.3 Assigning Asset ID ............................................................................................................................ 51
C 8.7.4 Barcode ............................................................................................................................................ 52
C 8.7.4.1 Type .......................................................................................................................................... 52
C 8.7.4.2 Application................................................................................................................................ 52
C 8.7.5 General Notes .................................................................................................................................. 52
C 8.7.5.1 Different uses of Asset ID and Barcode .................................................................................... 52
C 8.7.5.2 Asset Relocation and Replacement .......................................................................................... 53
C 8.7.5.3 Asset Relationships ................................................................................................................... 53
C 9 Operation Manuals, Guides, Maintenance and Warranties ................................................................... 54
C 9.1 Disciplines................................................................................................................................................ 54
C 9.2 General Requirements ............................................................................................................................ 55
C 9.2.1 Format.............................................................................................................................................. 55
C 9.3 Submission Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 55
C 9.4 O&M Manual Sections ............................................................................................................................ 56
Table 3 - Asset Register Structure for Services disciplines ...................................................................... 56
Table 4 - Asset Register Structure for Architectural and Landscape disciplines...................................... 56
Table 5 - Maintenance Schedule Example ............................................................................................... 58
Table 6 - Maintenance Frequencies Example .......................................................................................... 58
Table 7 - Maintenance Calendar Schedule Example ............................................................................... 59
Table 8 - Maintenance Tasks Example..................................................................................................... 59
C 9.5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals – specific requirements .............................................................. 61
C 9.5.1 Specific requirements for Essential Safety Provisions Discipline ..................................................... 61
C 9.5.2 Windows and Curtain Walls (Architectural) - Special Information .................................................. 62
C 9.5.3 Door and Window Hardware (Architectural) – Special Information................................................ 63
C 9.5.4 Waterproofing (Architectural) – Special Information ...................................................................... 63
C 9.5.5 Furniture and Fixtures, Fittings and Equipment (Architectural) – Special Information ................... 63
C 9.5.6 Pest Control Systems (Architectural) – Special Information ............................................................ 63
Table 9 - Pest Control Schedule Example ................................................................................................ 63
C 9.5.7 Plantings (Landscape) – Special Information ................................................................................... 63
C 9.5.8 Irrigation (Landscape) – Special Information ................................................................................... 63
C 9.6 Timing of Delivery of O&M Manual information .................................................................................... 64
C 9.6.1 Preliminary O&M Manual information ............................................................................................ 64
C 9.6.2 Draft O&M Manual information ...................................................................................................... 64
C 9.6.3 Final O&M Manual information ....................................................................................................... 64
C 9.6.4 Revisions .......................................................................................................................................... 64
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 4 of 269
C 9.6.5 Information Delivery Checklist ......................................................................................................... 64
Table 10 - O & M Manual Deliverables Checklist .................................................................................... 65
D MECHANICAL SERVICES ........................................................................................................... 66
D 1 General Requirements ......................................................................................................................... 68
D 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 68
D 1.2 Responsibilities ....................................................................................................................................... 68
D 1.3 Standards and Regulations ..................................................................................................................... 69
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations ............................................................................................ 69
D 1.4 Quality ..................................................................................................................................................... 70
D 1.5 Installation Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 70
D 1.6 Preferred Manufacturers ........................................................................................................................ 71
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers............................................................................................... 72
D 1.7 Operation Hours ..................................................................................................................................... 73
D 1.8 Sustainability ........................................................................................................................................... 73
D 1.9 Cost Planning .......................................................................................................................................... 73
D 1.10 Attendance............................................................................................................................................ 74
D 1.11 Plant Rooms and Access ....................................................................................................................... 74
D 1.12 Population Densities ............................................................................................................................. 75
D 1.13 Design Conditions ................................................................................................................................. 75
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions .......................................................................................................... 75
D 2 Equipment ........................................................................................................................................... 77
D 2.1 Air Conditioning Units ............................................................................................................................. 77
D 2.2 Air Handling Units ................................................................................................................................... 77
D 2.3 Chillers .................................................................................................................................................... 77
D 2.4 Boilers ..................................................................................................................................................... 78
D 2.5 Cooling Towers........................................................................................................................................ 78
D 2.6 Pumps ..................................................................................................................................................... 78
D 2.7 Evaporative Units .................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.8 Ventilation and Extraction ...................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.9 Coils ......................................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.10 Humidifiers ............................................................................................................................................ 79
D 2.11 Ductwork ............................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.12 Air Grilles ............................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.13 Filtration ................................................................................................................................................ 79
D 2.14 Piping, Valves and Fittings .................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.15 Water Treatment .................................................................................................................................. 80
D 2.16 Variable Speed Drives ........................................................................................................................... 80
D 2.17 Fume Cupboards ................................................................................................................................... 80
D 2.18 Noise and Vibration .............................................................................................................................. 81
D 3 Automatic Controls .............................................................................................................................. 81
D 4 Design Reports ..................................................................................................................................... 81
Table 4 - Mechanical Services Design Deliverables Matrix:..................................................................... 83
D 4.1 Design Certification ................................................................................................................................. 86
D 5 Mechanical Electrical............................................................................................................................ 86
D 6 Labelling .............................................................................................................................................. 87
Table 5 – List of Labels ................................................................................................................................. 87
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 5 of 269
D 7 Record Drawings .................................................................................................................................. 88
D 8 Operation and Maintenance Manuals .................................................................................................. 88
E ELECTRICAL AND LIGHTING...................................................................................................... 89
E 1 General Requirements .......................................................................................................................... 91
E 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 91
E 1.2 Responsibilities ........................................................................................................................................ 91
E 1.3 Standards and Regulations ...................................................................................................................... 92
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations ............................................................................................ 92
E 1.4 Quality ..................................................................................................................................................... 92
E 1.5 Preferred Manufacturers......................................................................................................................... 93
E 1.6 Safety in Design ....................................................................................................................................... 94
E 1.7 Sustainability ........................................................................................................................................... 94
E 1.8 Cost Planning ........................................................................................................................................... 94
E 1.9 Attendance .............................................................................................................................................. 95
E 1.10 Design Conditions .................................................................................................................................. 96
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions .......................................................................................................... 96
E 2 Performance Criteria ............................................................................................................................ 97
E 2.1 Electrical Systems .................................................................................................................................... 97
E 2.2 Cable Support and Duct Systems........................................................................................................... 101
E 2.3 Low Voltage Power Systems .................................................................................................................. 105
Table 4 – GPO Colours ........................................................................................................................... 105
E 2.4 High Voltage Power Systems ................................................................................................................. 106
E 2.5 Power Generation ................................................................................................................................. 107
E 2.6 Uninterruptable Power Supply .............................................................................................................. 111
E 2.7 Switchboards ......................................................................................................................................... 112
Diagram 1 - Switchboard Separation Diagram ...................................................................................... 112
E 2.8 Power Factor and Harmonic Correction ................................................................................................ 120
E 2.9 Lighting .................................................................................................................................................. 120
E 2.10 Emergency Lighting ............................................................................................................................. 125
E 2.11 Lightning Protection ............................................................................................................................ 126
E 3 Design Reports ....................................................................................................................................127
Table 5 Electrical Services Design Deliverables Matrix:......................................................................... 129
E 3.1 Design Certification ............................................................................................................................... 132
E 4 Record Drawings .................................................................................................................................132
E 5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals ..................................................................................................132
F FIRE PROTECTION AND DETECTION SERVICES ....................................................................... 133
F 1 General Requirements .........................................................................................................................135
F 1.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 135
F 1.2 Standards and Regulations .................................................................................................................... 135
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations .......................................................................................... 135
F 1.3 Quality ................................................................................................................................................... 136
F 1.4 Preferred Manufacturers ....................................................................................................................... 136
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers............................................................................................. 136
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 6 of 269
F 1.5 Safety In Design ..................................................................................................................................... 136
F 1.6 Sustainability ......................................................................................................................................... 137
F 1.7 Cost Planning ......................................................................................................................................... 137
F 1.8 Attendance ............................................................................................................................................ 137
F 1.9 Expansion and Capacity ......................................................................................................................... 138
F 1.10 Ancillary Isolations ............................................................................................................................... 138
F 1.11 Programming ....................................................................................................................................... 138
F 1.12 Scope ................................................................................................................................................... 139
F 1.13 Standards ............................................................................................................................................. 139
F 1.14 Permits, Notices and Inspections ........................................................................................................ 139
F 1.15 Alternative Products ............................................................................................................................ 139
F 1.16 Brigade Connection ............................................................................................................................. 139
F 1.17 Occupant Warning ............................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.18 Smoke Control ..................................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.19 Identification of Detectors................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.20 Retrofitting and Upgrades ................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.21 Temporary Changes to Fire Detectors ................................................................................................. 141
F 1.22 FIP Replacements ................................................................................................................................ 142
F 1.23 Operating and Maintenance Manuals ................................................................................................. 142
F 1.24 Additional As-Built Drawings ............................................................................................................... 142
F 1.25 Fire Alarm Block Plans ......................................................................................................................... 143
F 1.26 Précis of Operation .............................................................................................................................. 143
F 1.27 Essential Safety Provisions................................................................................................................... 143
F 1.28 System Commissioning and Acceptance Testing ................................................................................. 144
F 1.29 Training ................................................................................................................................................ 144
F 2 Technical .............................................................................................................................................144
F 2.1 Design Criteria ....................................................................................................................................... 144
Table 3 – Fire Protection Services Design Criteria ................................................................................. 145
F 2.2 Performance Criteria ............................................................................................................................. 145
F 2.2.1 Fire Water Supply ........................................................................................................................... 145
F 2.2.2 Fire Hydrant System ....................................................................................................................... 145
F 2.2.3 Fire Hose Reel System .................................................................................................................... 145
F 2.2.4 Portable Fire Extinguishers............................................................................................................. 146
F 2.2.5 Automatic Fire Sprinkler System .................................................................................................... 146
F 2.2.6 Automatic Fire Detection System................................................................................................... 146
F 2.2.7 Emergency Warning and Intercommunication System (EWIS) ...................................................... 146
F 2.2.8 Building Fit Out Works ................................................................................................................... 147
F 3 Documentation / Reporting .................................................................................................................148
F 3.1 Design Reports....................................................................................................................................... 148
Table 4 – Fire protection Services Design Deliverables Matrix ............................................................. 149
F 3.2 Design Certification ............................................................................................................................... 151
F 4 Record Drawings..................................................................................................................................151
F 5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals ..................................................................................................151
G PLUMBING ............................................................................................................................. 152
G 1 General Requirements ........................................................................................................................154
G 1.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 154
G 1.2 Responsibilities ..................................................................................................................................... 154
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 7 of 269
G 1.3 Standards and Regulations ................................................................................................................... 155
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations .......................................................................................... 155
G 1.4 Quality ................................................................................................................................................... 156
G 1.5 Preferred Manufacturers ...................................................................................................................... 156
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers............................................................................................. 157
G 1.6 Safety in Design..................................................................................................................................... 158
G 1.7 Sustainability ......................................................................................................................................... 158
G 1.8 Cost Planning ........................................................................................................................................ 158
G 1.9 Attendance............................................................................................................................................ 159
G 1.10 Design Conditions ............................................................................................................................... 161
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions ........................................................................................................ 162
G 1.11 Hydraulic Services Deemed to Satisy (DTS) Solutions ......................................................................... 163
G 2 Performance Criteria ...........................................................................................................................163
G 2.1 Infrastructure Drainage and Water Reticulation Systems .................................................................... 163
G 2.2 Sanitary Drainage Works....................................................................................................................... 164
G 2.3 Trade Waste Drainage .......................................................................................................................... 164
G 2.4 Domestic Water Reticulation ................................................................................................................ 165
G 2.5 Fuel Gas Distribution Systems............................................................................................................... 165
G 2.6 Hot Water Systems ............................................................................................................................... 166
G 2.7 Sanitary Fittings and Fixtures ................................................................................................................ 167
Table 4 – Fixture Flow Rates .................................................................................................................. 167
G 4 Design Reports ....................................................................................................................................167
Table 5 Hydraulic Services Design Deliverables Matrix: ........................................................................ 169
G 4.1 Design Certification ............................................................................................................................... 172
G 5 Record Drawings .................................................................................................................................172
G 6 Operation and Maintenance Manuals .................................................................................................172
H BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ....................................................................................... 173
H 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................175
H 2 Design.................................................................................................................................................176
H 2.1 System Networks .................................................................................................................................. 176
H 2.2 Niagara Server....................................................................................................................................... 176
H 2.3 Work Place Pro Software ...................................................................................................................... 177
H 2.4 Logging Function ................................................................................................................................... 177
H2.5 Site Metering ......................................................................................................................................... 177
H 2.6 Electronic Demand Limiting .................................................................................................................. 177
H 3 General Requirements ........................................................................................................................178
H 3.1 Automatic Controls ............................................................................................................................... 178
F 3.2 Control Equipment ................................................................................................................................ 179
H 4 Metering .............................................................................................................................................180
H 4.1 General.................................................................................................................................................. 180
H 4.2 Responsibilities ..................................................................................................................................... 180
H 4.3 Water Meters ........................................................................................................................................ 180
H 4.4 Gas Meters ............................................................................................................................................ 180
H 4.5 Electrical Meters ................................................................................................................................... 180
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 8 of 269
H 5 Interactive Energy Management System..............................................................................................182
H 5.1 Programming ........................................................................................................................................ 182
H 5.2 Graphic Pages........................................................................................................................................ 182
H 5.3 Meter Graphic Pages............................................................................................................................. 182
H 5.4 Mechanical Graphic Pages .................................................................................................................... 183
H 5.5 Lighting Graphic Pages .......................................................................................................................... 183
H 5.6 Documentation ..................................................................................................................................... 184
I VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION .................................................................................................. 185
I 1 General Requirements ..........................................................................................................................187
I 1.1 Introduction............................................................................................................................................ 187
I 1.2 Standards and Regulations ..................................................................................................................... 187
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations .......................................................................................... 187
I 1.3 Quality .................................................................................................................................................... 187
I 1.4 Preferred Manufacturers ....................................................................................................................... 188
I 1.5 Safety in Design ...................................................................................................................................... 188
I 1.6 Sustainability .......................................................................................................................................... 189
I 1.7 Cost Planning .......................................................................................................................................... 189
I 1.8 Attendance ............................................................................................................................................. 189
I 2 Technical ..............................................................................................................................................190
I 2.1 Passenger Lifts ........................................................................................................................................ 190
I 2.2 Lift Machine Room ................................................................................................................................. 190
I 2.3 Escalators................................................................................................................................................ 190
I 3 Design Reports .....................................................................................................................................191
Table 2 – Vertical Transportation Services Design Deliverables Matrix: ............................................... 192
I 3.1 Design Certification ................................................................................................................................ 195
J SECURITY SYSTEMS ................................................................................................................. 196
J 1 Introduction .........................................................................................................................................199
J 1.1 System Abbreviations and Terminology ................................................................................................ 199
Table 1 – Hardware Components Abbreviations................................................................................... 199
Table 2 – Alarm Monitoring Abbreviations ........................................................................................... 199
Table 3 – Surveillance Equipment Abbreviations .................................................................................. 199
J 3 Gallagher Access Control ......................................................................................................................200
J 3.1 General ................................................................................................................................................... 200
J 3.2 Central Control and System Management Software ............................................................................. 200
J 3.3 IFC’s ........................................................................................................................................................ 200
J 3.4 Power Supplies and Batteries ................................................................................................................ 200
J 3.5 Access Control Readers .......................................................................................................................... 201
J 3.6 Door Control Configurations .................................................................................................................. 202
Table 4 - Door Configurations and Reference Codes............................................................................. 202
J 3.7 Elevator Control and Management ........................................................................................................ 203
J 3.7.1 Hazardous Goods Mode ................................................................................................................. 203
J 3.7.1.1 Method of Operation .............................................................................................................. 203
J 3.7.1.2 Power or System Fails Operation ............................................................................................ 204
J 3.8 Access Cards and Tokens........................................................................................................................ 205
J 3.9 Electrical Strikes ..................................................................................................................................... 205
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 9 of 269
J 3.10 Electromagnetic Locks.......................................................................................................................... 205
J 3.11 Magnetic Door Hold Back Lock ............................................................................................................ 205
J 3.12 Press to Release Button ....................................................................................................................... 206
J 3.13 Emergency Door Release Break Glass Button ...................................................................................... 206
J 3.14 Audio/Visual Indicator Units ................................................................................................................ 206
J 4 Alarm Contacts.....................................................................................................................................207
J 4.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................ 207
J 4.2 Movement Detectors ............................................................................................................................. 207
J 4.3 Door Contacts......................................................................................................................................... 207
J 4.4 IT Workstation Alarm Contacts .............................................................................................................. 207
J 4.5 AV Equipment Alarm Contacts ............................................................................................................... 207
J 5 Electronic Key Cabinets ........................................................................................................................209
J 5.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................ 209
J 5.2 Cabinets.................................................................................................................................................. 209
J 6 Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) ............................................................................................................210
J 6.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................ 210
J 6.2 Video Management Systems.................................................................................................................. 210
J 6.3 Cameras.................................................................................................................................................. 210
J 6.4 Locations ................................................................................................................................................ 210
J 7 Conduit and Cabling .............................................................................................................................211
J 8 Labelling ..............................................................................................................................................211
J 9 Records and Installation Changes .........................................................................................................211
J 10 Documentation ..................................................................................................................................212
J 10.1 General ................................................................................................................................................. 212
J 10.2 Operation and Maintenance Manual ................................................................................................... 212
J 10.3 As Built Drawings ................................................................................................................................. 212
J 11 System Commissioning and Acceptance Testing ..................................................................................212
J 11.1 General ................................................................................................................................................. 212
J 11.2 System Commissioning ........................................................................................................................ 213
J 11.3 Training ................................................................................................................................................ 213
K AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY................................................................................................. 214
K 1 General Requirements .........................................................................................................................216
K 1.1 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 216
K 2 Physical Requirements For Teaching Spaces .........................................................................................216
K 2.1 Equipment Racks ................................................................................................................................... 216
K 2.2 Lecterns And Benches ........................................................................................................................... 217
K 2.3 Ventilation ............................................................................................................................................. 217
K 2.4 Room Layout ......................................................................................................................................... 218
K 2.5 Projection Surfaces................................................................................................................................ 218
K 2.5.1 Single Screen Projection ................................................................................................................ 218
K 2.5.2 Dual Screen Projection ................................................................................................................... 218
K 2.5.3 Painted Projection Surfaces ........................................................................................................... 218
K 2.6 Display Devices ...................................................................................................................................... 219
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 10 of 269
K 2.6.1 Multimedia Projectors ................................................................................................................... 219
K 2.6.2 Multimedia Projector Ceiling Mounts ............................................................................................ 219
K 2.6.3 Flat Panel Displays ......................................................................................................................... 219
K 2.6.4 Flat Panel Display Mounts.............................................................................................................. 219
K 2.6.5 Interactive Whiteboards (IWB) ...................................................................................................... 220
K 2.6.6 Touch Displays ............................................................................................................................... 220
K 2.7 Switching And Control ........................................................................................................................... 220
K 2.7.1 Controllers ..................................................................................................................................... 220
K 2.7.2 Switching ........................................................................................................................................ 220
K 2.7.3 Control System Security ................................................................................................................. 221
K 2.8 Audio And Video Standards................................................................................................................... 221
K 2.8.1 Video Standards ............................................................................................................................. 221
K 2.8.2 Audio Standards ............................................................................................................................. 221
K 2.9 Source Equipment ................................................................................................................................. 222
K 2.10 Video Conferencing ............................................................................................................................. 222
K 2.11 Lighting Standards And Controls ......................................................................................................... 223
K 2.12 Lecture Recording System ................................................................................................................... 223
K 2.13 External AV Input Plates ...................................................................................................................... 223
K 2.14 Electrical Testing And Tagging ............................................................................................................. 223
K 2.15 Physical Security .................................................................................................................................. 223
K 3 Audio Visual Cabling, Installation And Specifications............................................................................225
K 3.1 Cabling Specifications ............................................................................................................................ 225
Table 1 - Cable Preferences ................................................................................................................... 225
K 3.2 Cable Labelling....................................................................................................................................... 226
K 3.3 Hearing Augmentation .......................................................................................................................... 226
K 3.4 AMX Programming ................................................................................................................................ 226
K 3.5 AMX Remote Management Suite (RMS) ............................................................................................... 227
K 3.6 Installation ............................................................................................................................................. 227
K 3.7 Project Documentation ......................................................................................................................... 228
K 3.8 Additional Documentation .................................................................................................................... 228
APPENDIX A: TUTORIAL ROOM TEMPLATE (AV03) .................................................................................... 230
APPENDIX B: LECTURE THEATRE TEMPLATE (AV05) .................................................................................. 230
L TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE .......................................................................... 231
L 1 General................................................................................................................................................234
L 1.1 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... 234
L 1.2 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 234
L 1.3 Applicable Standards ............................................................................................................................. 235
Table 1 – Australian Standards .............................................................................................................. 235
L 1.4 Preferred Manufacturer Solutions......................................................................................................... 235
L 2 Global Requirements ...........................................................................................................................236
L 2.1 Warranty and Certification Requirements............................................................................................. 236
L 2.2 Acceptance Requirements ..................................................................................................................... 236
L 2.2.1 Documentation............................................................................................................................... 236
L 2.2.2 Pre Commissioning and Defect Inspections ................................................................................... 236
L 3 General Requirements .........................................................................................................................237
L 3. 1 Cable Reticulation Inspection and Report ............................................................................................ 237
L 3.2 Pathways and Spaces ............................................................................................................................. 237
L 3.3 Labelling Convention ............................................................................................................................. 237
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 11 of 269
L 3.4 Patch and Fly Leads................................................................................................................................ 237
L 3.5Testing .................................................................................................................................................... 238
L 4 Design Requirements ...........................................................................................................................239
L 4.1 General Requirements ........................................................................................................................... 239
L 4.2 Design Consideration ............................................................................................................................. 239
L 4.3 ISTS Design Requirements ..................................................................................................................... 240
L 4.3.1 UTP Cabling .................................................................................................................................... 240
L 4.4 Fibre Cabling .......................................................................................................................................... 240
L 4.5 Voice & Low Speed Backbone Cabling ................................................................................................... 241
L 4.6 Alternative Structured Cabling Systems ................................................................................................ 241
L 4.7 Wireless Coverage ................................................................................................................................. 242
L 4.8 Pathways and Spaces ............................................................................................................................. 242
L 5 Telecommunications Closets ................................................................................................................243
L 5.1 General .................................................................................................................................................. 243
L 5.2 Telecommunication Closets Spatial Requirement ................................................................................. 243
L 5.3 Heat Dispersion...................................................................................................................................... 243
L 5.4 Clearance ............................................................................................................................................... 243
L 5.5 Security .................................................................................................................................................. 244
L 5.6 Contaminants and Static Control ........................................................................................................... 244
L 5.7 Power and Lighting ................................................................................................................................ 244
L 5.8 Labelling ................................................................................................................................................. 244
L 6 Communications Cabinet .....................................................................................................................245
L 6.1 ISTS Preferred Communication Rack Layout ......................................................................................... 246
Table 2 - Suggested single rack layout, from top down......................................................................... 247
L 7 Patch Cord Management......................................................................................................................248
L 8 Contractor Requirement ......................................................................................................................249
L 8.1 General .................................................................................................................................................. 249
L 8.2 ISTS Preferred Contractors List .............................................................................................................. 249
L 8.3 Preferred Contractor Prerequisite ......................................................................................................... 250
L 9 Installation Requirements ....................................................................................................................251
L 9.1 General .................................................................................................................................................. 251
L 9.2 Pathways and Spaces ............................................................................................................................. 251
L 9.3 Ceiling Spaces ........................................................................................................................................ 251
L 9.4 Wall Cavities .......................................................................................................................................... 252
L 9.5 Risers...................................................................................................................................................... 252
L 9.6 Workstation Furniture ........................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.7 Service Poles .......................................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.8 Catenary Systems................................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.9 Cable Trays and Baskets......................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.10 Conduits and Ducts .............................................................................................................................. 254
L 9.11 Access Pits............................................................................................................................................ 256
L 9.12 Penetrations ........................................................................................................................................ 256
L 9.13 Cabling Installation .............................................................................................................................. 257
L 9.14 Communications Cabinet Cabling ........................................................................................................ 257
L 9.15 Communication Cabinet Earth ............................................................................................................. 258
Table 3 – Cable Size ............................................................................................................................... 258
L 10 Labelling ............................................................................................................................................259
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 12 of 269
L 10.1 Communication Cabinets..................................................................................................................... 259
L 10.2 Fibre Optic Patch Panels ...................................................................................................................... 259
Table 4 – Example- Optical Fibre Cables Labels..................................................................................... 259
L 10.3 Class E Backbone Patch Panels ............................................................................................................ 259
Table 5 – Example- Backbone Cable Labels ........................................................................................... 259
L 10.4 Voice Patch Panels ............................................................................................................................... 260
Table 6 – Example- Backbone Cable Labels ........................................................................................... 260
L 10.5 Horizontal Patch Panels ....................................................................................................................... 260
L 10.6 Telecommunications Outlets ............................................................................................................... 260
Table 7 – Telecommunications Outlets Label ........................................................................................ 260
L 11 Testing ...............................................................................................................................................262
L 11.1 Fibre Optic Testing ............................................................................................................................... 262
L 11.1.1 Optical Attenuation ...................................................................................................................... 262
L 11.1.2 Length ........................................................................................................................................... 262
L 11.1.3 Propagation Delay ........................................................................................................................ 262
L11.1.4 Continuity and maintenance of polarity ....................................................................................... 263
L 11.1.5 OTDR............................................................................................................................................. 263
L 11.2 4-Pair UTP Backbone and Horizontal Testing ...................................................................................... 263
L 12 Project Documentation ......................................................................................................................264
M ARCHITECTURAL ................................................................................................................... 265
M 1 General Requirements .......................................................................................................................267
M 1.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 267
M 2 External Walls & Windows .................................................................................................................267
M 2.1 External Finishes .................................................................................................................................. 267
M 2.2 Avoidance of Façade Staining .............................................................................................................. 267
M 2.3 Window Cleaning ................................................................................................................................. 267
M 3 Internal Walls, Partitions & Finishes ...................................................................................................267
M 3.1 Acoustics .............................................................................................................................................. 267
M 3.2 Fire Rating ............................................................................................................................................ 267
M 3.3 Operable Walls ..................................................................................................................................... 268
M 3.4 Toilets ................................................................................................................................................... 268
M 4 Interior Finishes Guidelines ................................................................................................................268
M 4.1 New Buildings....................................................................................................................................... 268
M 4.2 Refurbishment or Maintenance Projects ............................................................................................. 268
M 4.3 Interior Selections ................................................................................................................................ 268
M 4.4 Readily Available Ranges...................................................................................................................... 269
M 4.5 Interior Finishes Proposals ................................................................................................................... 269
M 4.6 Interior Finishes & Furniture Schedule ................................................................................................ 269
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SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
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DOCUMENT HISTORY: Design and Construction Minimum Level Requirements_V2 0.docx
Document Creator
Manager : Maintenance & Technical Services
Version
Number
V1.0
V2.0
Document Owner
Director Facilities Management
Update Date
Updated By
Brief description of change
Nov 2014
Jan 2016
Brenda Stephens
BKS / AS / WIS / SL
Document creation
Section A – Minor Changes
Section B – Minor Changes
Section C – Minor Changes, Asset Numbering revised
Section D – Minor changes, Design conditions amended
Section E – Minor changes
Section G – Major changes
Section H – Minor changes
Section I – JPS lifts removed, Schneider Lifts added
Section M replaced
Sections N, O & P removed.
Approval Date
Jan 2016


SECTION A – INTRODUCTION

Page 14 of 269

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA



MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


SECTION
x A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
A
INTRODUCTION
Version 2.0 : January 2016
Contents
A1
Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 17
A 1.1 Preface .................................................................................................................................................... 17
A 1.2 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 18
A 1.3 Applicability ............................................................................................................................................. 18
A 1.4 University Of South Australia Portfolio ................................................................................................... 18
Adelaide – City East Campus ............................................................................................................................ 18
Adelaide – City West Campus .......................................................................................................................... 18
Magill Campus .................................................................................................................................................. 19
Mawson Lakes Campus .................................................................................................................................... 19
Whyalla Campus ............................................................................................................................................... 19
Mount Gambier Campus .................................................................................................................................. 19
A 1.5 Standards and Reference Documentation .............................................................................................. 19
A 1.6 Variances ................................................................................................................................................. 21
A 1.7 Revision Management ............................................................................................................................ 21
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 16 of 269
A 1 Introduction
A 1.1 Preface
These specifications have been compiled to provide clear, concise communication of the University
of South Australia’s requirements for the planning, design and construction of new and upgraded
facilities.
The specifications provide direction and guidelines to enable Consultants and Contractors to
effectively translate the University’s requirements into acceptable design solutions. They must be
read in conjunction with the Project Brief and any project specific design requirements provided by
the Contract Supervisor.
The specifications are not intended to replace the level of initiative, competence and care expected
of consultants. Consultants must carefully consider the merits of the Minimum Level Design &
Construction Specifications, in context with the needs of each specific project. If a consultant
considers a particular guideline to not be appropriate, or a more suitable solution is available,
proposals to this effect should be raised through the Contract Supervisor for consideration by the
University.
In the absence of written approval for deviation from these specifications, the University will assume
that the requirements contained in the Design and Construction Specifications have been fully
addressed and incorporated into the proposed design solution and documentation.
Feedback regarding these specifications is actively encouraged as it provides a mechanism for
continuous improvement and allows the Design & Construction Specifications to remain current and
keep pace with industry and technological changes within the buildings infrastructure environment.
The specialist industry knowledge held by the University professional service providers is invaluable
to the success of our current and future projects; as such, your contribution to future editions of
these guidelines will be gratefully accepted.
Any queries in regard to these guidelines or the University requirements on any project should be
directed to the Contracts Supervisor.
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 17 of 269
A 1.2 Purpose
This document has been produced in order to set out the minimum standard requirements for all
building works on new and existing buildings for all University of South Australia campuses.
The University of South Australia will be referred to as ‘the University’ throughout this document.
To allow for ease of use the whole document has been divided into sections. However, in order to
complete any project to the University’s standard, it should be utilised in its entirety, regardless of
responsibilities or discipline.
A 1.3 Applicability
This document should be utilised by those involved with:
•
•
•
•
•
Project briefing
Design, development and preparation of specific project specifications
Project management
Delivery of projects
Maintenance activities
These specifications provide guidelines to the selection of materials, finishes and components for
use within University projects of all sizes. These guidelines are to be adhered to throughout all site
and building works across the University.
Whilst design innovation is encouraged and new materials and products will always be considered,
any variation from the minimum design standard must be approved by the University through the
Contract Supervisor.
A 1.4 University Of South Australia Portfolio
The University was founded in January 1991 when the South Australian Institute of Technology and
the Magill, Salisbury and Underdale campuses of the South Australian College of Advanced
Education were amalgamated.
The University educates professionals and citizens to the highest standards; creates and
disseminates knowledge; and engages with communities to address the major issues of our time.
In order to complete the University’s mission there are numerous campuses which constitute the
University portfolio:
Adelaide – City East Campus
North Terrace and Frome Road
Please note this campus has a heritage listed building on site (Brookman Building).
Adelaide – City West Campus
Western End of North Terrace
Please note this campus has two heritage listed buildings on site (Law Building and 9 Light Square).
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 18 of 269
Magill Campus
St Bernards Road
Magill
Please note this campus has a heritage listed building on site (Murray House).
Mawson Lakes Campus
Mawson Lakes Boulevard
Mawson Lakes
Whyalla Campus
Nicholson Avenue
Whyalla
Mount Gambier Campus
Wireless Road
Mount Gambier
A 1.5 Standards and Reference Documentation
The following details a comprehensive list of applicable standards and the University reference
documents:
•
•
University Standards and Reference Documents
o Relevant University Policies, Procedures & Guidelines, including WHS Policy, Equal
Opportunity Policy
o Asbestos Management Plan
o Campus Signage Manual
o University Contractor’s on-line Induction System
o UniSA Accessibility Guidelines
o UniSA Space Management & Planning Guidelines
o Facilities Management Unit Asset Management Plans
o Facilities Management Unit Risk Management Plans
o University Procurement Policy
o Facilities Management Unit Probity Plan
o University Master Plan Documents (where available)
o University Asset Plans/Strategies
Other Reference Documents
o NATSPEC
o South Australian WHS Act and associated Regulations and Codes of Practice
o Building Code of Australia
o Australian Standards
o Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act
o SA Development Act
o Local Government Development Plans
o SA Water Corporation regulations
o Australian Gas Association Regulations
o SA Fire Services Regulations
o SA Fire Services Regulations
o Work Health and Safety Regulations
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 19 of 269
These Specifications have utilised NATSPEC, which is to be adhered to, including any supplementary
clauses noted.
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 20 of 269
A 1.6 Variances
Any variances from the requirements outlined in this document must be received by the Contracts
Supervisor.
Requests for variances must be submitted in writing and there is no guarantee that variances will be
approved.
A 1.7 Revision Management
This document will be reviewed annually in February with the review requirement captured within
the Facilities Management Unit, Quality Management System.
Should a significant amendment be required before the next scheduled review, an updated version
will be distributed accordingly with changes highlighted.
Comments and suggestions on improvements and amendments to the specifications are encouraged
and should be directed to the Manager: Maintenance and Technical Services within the Facilities
Management Unit.
SECTION A – INTRODUCTION
Page 21 of 269



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA




MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS

B
SAFETY IN DESIGN
SECTION
A Introduction
x B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
Contents
B 1 Preface ................................................................................................................................................. 24
B 2 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 24
B 3 Safety in Design Reviews ...................................................................................................................... 25
B 4 Project Information .............................................................................................................................. 26
B 5 The Designer ........................................................................................................................................ 26
B 5.1 Designer Responsibilities......................................................................................................................... 26
B 6 Variations ............................................................................................................................................ 26
B 7 Certificate of Compliance ..................................................................................................................... 26
B 8 Work Health and Safety Legislation ...................................................................................................... 27
B 9 University Work, Health and Safety Requirements ................................................................................ 27
B 9.1 Reference Documents ............................................................................................................................. 27
B 9.2 Consultation ............................................................................................................................................ 27
B 9.3 WHS Services ........................................................................................................................................... 27
B 9.4 Contractor Management......................................................................................................................... 27
SECTION B – SAFETY IN DESIGN
Page 23 of 269
B 1 Preface
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary University clauses are included, with the Contract Supervisors
approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed inside a blue box and text has been italicised.
B 2 Introduction
Safety in design means the integration of control measures throughout the design process to
eliminate or minimise (where elimination is not reasonably practicable) risks to health and safety
throughout the life of the building or structure being designed. Designers need to consider how
safety can best be achieved in each of the lifecycle phases.
A safe design approach begins in the conceptual and planning phases with an emphasis on making
choices about design, materials used and methods of construction that enhance the safety of the
finished building or structure.
Direct costs associated with unsafe design, including retrofitting costs, workers compensation,
increased insurance levies, environmental clean ups and negligence or liability claims, can be
significant.
‘Eliminating the hazard’ is the most effect risk control measure and is often cheaper and easier to
achieve in the early design phases than when real risks present themselves during construction or
occupation.
SECTION B – SAFETY IN DESIGN
Page 24 of 269
B 3 Safety in Design Reviews
Safety in design reviews should be undertaken for any design where it can be reasonably expected
that people may need to work (either as an end-user or maintainer) within, on or around the
building or structure. As a minimum, safety in design must be included as a specific risk
management function in all design and construction reviews.
Reviews should identify and control hazards and risks related to:
•
All work activities associated with the intended use of the building or structure as a workplace,
including fixtures integral to its use.
•
Any maintenance, repair, service and cleaning activities for the building or structure when it is in
use.
•
Construction of the building or structure.
The responsibilities of designers in this review process include:
•
Identifying and controlling hazards and risks associated with the above activities.
•
Informing the University of any high risks in its design requirements.
•
Recommending design alternatives that will eliminate or reduce risks arising from the original
design.
•
Providing evidence of the process undertaken.
Refer to the University FMU Safety in Design Principles for further information.
SECTION B – SAFETY IN DESIGN
Page 25 of 269
B 4 Project Information
The scope of these Guidelines does not include the following for individual projects:
•
Project Brief.
•
Consultancy Brief, including scope of services and specific roles and responsibilities for the
Principal Consultant and Consultant Team.
•
Contract Documentation, including specific roles and responsibilities for Managing and/or Main
Contractors and Sub-Contractors (where these parties may undertake design activities).
•
Relevant University Policies, Procedures & Guidelines that are stand-alone documents as noted
in these Guidelines.
This information will be provided in separate documentation at the outset of the project.
B 5 The Designer
For the purposes of these ‘Minimum Level Design and Construction Specifications’, ‘The Designer’ is
defined as any individual or group carrying out design activates related to the University’s built
assets, or their constituent elements.
B 5.1 Designer Responsibilities
A key function of these Specifications is to uphold the University's legal obligations and
commitments.
It is the responsibility of the Designer to ensure all legal requirements, standards and obligations
pertaining to building design and/or construction of a facility are diligently met when undertaking
work for the University.
If there is conflict between these Specifications and other legislated requirements then the standard
which provides the highest standard of risk mitigation shall take precedence. Where Australian
Standards are quoted, reference shall always be made to the most recent edition.
In all cases of potential conflict, appropriate consultation with the University must occur with all
issues to be referred to the Contract Supervisor in the first instance.
B 6 Variations
All requests for variations from these Specifications shall be referred to the Contracts Supervisor for
review to ensure potential changes do not increase risk. Final approval for departure from the
guidelines will be reviewed and agreed to by the Director: Facilities Management (or nominee).
B 7 Certificate of Compliance
Where specified in the Project Information, the Designer shall provide a ‘Certificate of Compliance
with these Specifications on the form provided by Contract Supervisor
SECTION B – SAFETY IN DESIGN
Page 26 of 269
B 8 Work Health and Safety Legislation
The following legislative documents and associated subordinate legislation are referred to in this
section for compliance as a minimum, where applicable:
•
•
•
•
Work Health and Safety Act 2012 (SA)
Work Health and Safety Regulations 2012 (SA)
SafeWork SA Policy
Relevant Codes of Practice, Australian Standards and Statutory requirements
B 9 University Work, Health and Safety Requirements
In addition to Work Health and Safety legislative requirements, the University WHS policies and
procedures must be taken into account in the design and construction of new buildings, additions
and refurbishments.
B 9.1 Reference Documents
The following reference documents provide a detailed guide to the design, documentation and
construction and are available on request:
•
University Policy – Health, Safety & Injury Management
•
University WHS Procedure – Confined Spaces / Restricted Spaces
•
University WHS Procedure – Contractor Management.
•
University WHS Procedure – OHSW Consultation.
•
University WHS Procedure – Safe Workplace Design.
•
University FMU Safety in Design Principles.
•
University FMU ‘Working Safely at the University’ online contractor program.
B 9.2 Consultation
Consultation with key stakeholders in relation to WHS issues must be undertaken in accordance with
the University WHS Procedure – Safe Workplace Design. The procedure outlines the design
requirements for prevention of adverse health and safety issues and/or outcomes related to the
design, construction, fit-out, provision of working space for employees, and maintenance of new or
refurbished buildings, owned or leased by the University.
Sufficient time must be allowed in the project program for adequate consultation to be undertaken.
The University WHS Services will be invited to participate during the consultation process as
required under the University FMU Project Management procedures.
B 9.3 WHS Services
The University administers workplace health and safety through WHS Services, a strategic
operational team within Human Resources. The team provides occupational health, safety, welfare
and injury management consultancy and advisory services across the University.
B 9.4 Contractor Management
Prior to commencing work at any the University campus or building location, all contractors must
successfully complete the University's mandatory Online Contractor Program ‘Working Safely at the
SECTION B – SAFETY IN DESIGN
Page 27 of 269
University’. Contractor ID Cards will be issued on successful completion of the online program and
are required for access to the University sites.
Refer to the University WHS Procedure – Contractor Management for further information.
SECTION B – SAFETY IN DESIGN
Page 28 of 269
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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA



MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


C
DESIGN CONTROLS
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
x C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016

Contents
C 1 Project Information .............................................................................................................................. 33
C 2 Overarching Design Principles ............................................................................................................... 33
C 2.1 Aesthetic Considerations......................................................................................................................... 33
C 2.2 Amenity & Simplicity ............................................................................................................................... 33
C 2.3 Flexibility ................................................................................................................................................. 34
C 2.4 Building Legibility .................................................................................................................................... 34
C 2.5 Efficiency & Economy .............................................................................................................................. 34
C 2.6 Functionality ............................................................................................................................................ 34
C 2.7 Vending Machines ................................................................................................................................... 34
C 2.8 Universal Design ...................................................................................................................................... 35
C 2.9 Safety and security .................................................................................................................................. 35
C 2.10 Wind Control ......................................................................................................................................... 35
C 2.11 Signage .................................................................................................................................................. 35
C 2.12 Building Efficiency ................................................................................................................................. 35
C 2.13 Space Utilisation Factors ....................................................................................................................... 35
C 2.14 Works to Heritage Buildings .................................................................................................................. 36
C 2.15 The Designer.......................................................................................................................................... 36
C 2.15.1 Designer Responsibilities ............................................................................................................... 36
C 2.16 Variations .............................................................................................................................................. 36
C 2.17 Sustainable Buildings............................................................................................................................. 37
C 2.17.1 Passive Design ................................................................................................................................ 37
C 2.17.2 Water Conservation and Quality ................................................................................................... 37
C 3 Work Health & Safety ........................................................................................................................... 38
C 4 Acoustics .............................................................................................................................................. 38
C 4 Thermal Insulation Performance ........................................................................................................... 39
C 5 Animal, Vermin and Pest Infestation ..................................................................................................... 40
C 5.1 Vermin ..................................................................................................................................................... 40
C 5.2 Animal ..................................................................................................................................................... 40
C 5.3 Termite Control ....................................................................................................................................... 40
C 5.4 Pest Control ............................................................................................................................................. 40
C 6 Vandalism (graffiti) ............................................................................................................................... 40
C 7 Design Reports ..................................................................................................................................... 41
C 7.1 Design Report Guidelines ........................................................................................................................ 41
C 7.2 Documentation Standards ...................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.2.1 General............................................................................................................................................. 42
C 7.2.2 Text Document Format .................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.2.3 Drawings Format .............................................................................................................................. 42
C 7.3 Updated Reports ..................................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.4 Issues Register ......................................................................................................................................... 42
C 7.5 Design Report Approval .......................................................................................................................... 43
C 7.6 Report Format ......................................................................................................................................... 43
C 7.7 The Architectural and Engineering Sections............................................................................................ 44
C 7.7.1 Drawings .......................................................................................................................................... 44
C 7.7.2 Schedules ......................................................................................................................................... 44
C 7.7.3 Text .................................................................................................................................................. 44
SECTION C – DESIGN CONTROLS
Page 30 of 269
C 8 Documentation and Drawings .............................................................................................................. 47
C 8.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 47
C 8.2 Conditions of Compliance ....................................................................................................................... 47
C 8.3 Provided Drawings .................................................................................................................................. 47
C 8.4 Drawing Requirements............................................................................................................................ 47
C 8.5 Submission Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 48
C 8.5.1 Specific Requirements – Architectural Drawings ............................................................................. 48
C 8.5.2 Specific Requirements – Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Landscape Drawings............... 48
C 8.5.3 Specific Requirement – Engineering Services Drawings .................................................................. 48
C 8.5.4 Specific Requirement – Essential Safety Provisions (ESP) Drawings ................................................ 48
C 8.5.5 Specific Requirement – Survey Drawings ........................................................................................ 49
C 8.6 Space Numbering .................................................................................................................................... 49
C 8.6.1 Numbering Systems ......................................................................................................................... 49
C 8.6.2 Responsibilities for Space Numbering ............................................................................................. 49
C 8.6.3 Numbering Protocols ....................................................................................................................... 50
C 8.7 Asset Numbering Guidelines ................................................................................................................... 50
C 8.7.1 Asset Numbering Goals .................................................................................................................... 50
C 8.7.2 Asset ID ............................................................................................................................................ 50
C 8.7.2.1 Asset Class ................................................................................................................................ 50
C 8.7.2.2 Site/Building Number ............................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.2.3 Asset Category .......................................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.2.4 Sequential Number................................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.2.5 Placeholders ............................................................................................................................. 51
C 8.7.2.6 Layout ....................................................................................................................................... 51
C 8.7.3 Assigning Asset ID ............................................................................................................................ 51
C 8.7.4 Barcode ............................................................................................................................................ 52
C 8.7.4.1 Type .......................................................................................................................................... 52
C 8.7.4.2 Application................................................................................................................................ 52
C 8.7.5 General Notes .................................................................................................................................. 52
C 8.7.5.1 Different uses of Asset ID and Barcode .................................................................................... 52
C 8.7.5.2 Asset Relocation and Replacement .......................................................................................... 53
C 8.7.5.3 Asset Relationships ................................................................................................................... 53
C 9 Operation Manuals, Guides, Maintenance and Warranties ................................................................... 54
C 9.1 Disciplines................................................................................................................................................ 54
C 9.2 General Requirements ............................................................................................................................ 55
C 9.2.1 Format.............................................................................................................................................. 55
C 9.3 Submission Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 55
C 9.4 O&M Manual Sections ............................................................................................................................ 56
Table 3 - Asset Register Structure for Services disciplines ...................................................................... 56
Table 4 - Asset Register Structure for Architectural and Landscape disciplines...................................... 56
Table 5 - Maintenance Schedule Example ............................................................................................... 58
Table 6 - Maintenance Frequencies Example .......................................................................................... 58
Table 7 - Maintenance Calendar Schedule Example ............................................................................... 59
Table 8 - Maintenance Tasks Example..................................................................................................... 59
C 9.5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals – specific requirements .............................................................. 61
C 9.5.1 Specific requirements for Essential Safety Provisions Discipline ..................................................... 61
C 9.5.2 Windows and Curtain Walls (Architectural) - Special Information .................................................. 62
C 9.5.3 Door and Window Hardware (Architectural) – Special Information................................................ 63
C 9.5.4 Waterproofing (Architectural) – Special Information ...................................................................... 63
C 9.5.5 Furniture and Fixtures, Fittings and Equipment (Architectural) – Special Information ................... 63
C 9.5.6 Pest Control Systems (Architectural) – Special Information ............................................................ 63
Table 9 - Pest Control Schedule Example ................................................................................................ 63
SECTION C – DESIGN CONTROLS
Page 31 of 269
C 9.5.7 Plantings (Landscape) – Special Information ................................................................................... 63
C 9.5.8 Irrigation (Landscape) – Special Information ................................................................................... 63
C 9.6 Timing of Delivery of O&M Manual information .................................................................................... 64
C 9.6.1 Preliminary O&M Manual information ............................................................................................ 64
C 9.6.2 Draft O&M Manual information ...................................................................................................... 64
C 9.6.3 Final O&M Manual information ....................................................................................................... 64
C 9.6.4 Revisions .......................................................................................................................................... 64
C 9.6.5 Information Delivery Checklist ......................................................................................................... 64
Table 10 - O & M Manual Deliverables Checklist .................................................................................... 65
SECTION C – DESIGN CONTROLS
Page 32 of 269
C 1 Project Information
All sections must be read in conjunction with all other sections of the Design and Construction
Specifications in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of the University’s requirements.
Along with the following documents:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
University Preliminaries document (including associated Schedules)
University Contractors Induction Kit or Manual
University Health, Safety & Injury Management Policy
University WHS Procedures – see WHS Section Below
University Equal Opportunity Policy
University Evacuation Procedures
University Asbestos Management Policy
University Heritage Buildings Register (details available from Contract Supervisor)
These specifications do not include the following for individual projects:
1. Project Brief
2. Consultancy Brief – including scope of services and specific roles and responsibilities for the
Principal Consultant and Consultancy Team.
3. Contract Documentation – Including specific roles and responsibilities for the Managing
and/or Main Contractors and Sub-Contractors (where these parties may undertake design
activities)
4. Relevant University Policies, Procedures and Guidelines, which are stand-alone documents
as noted in these specifications
This information will be provided in separate documentation at the outset of the project.
C 2 Overarching Design Principles
C 2.1 Aesthetic Considerations
All new buildings, additions and refurbishments are to be designed with reference to their
surrounding environment, function and potential visual impact. Due care must be given to
complementing and enhancing the existing streetscape and environment. Select materials and
finishes to be sympathetic to the surroundings, aesthetically pleasing and functional.
C 2.2 Amenity & Simplicity
Planning solutions should be approached with amenity and simplicity in mind, both in the final
product and in the construction process. Considerations include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Providing an environment within which teaching, learning, research, administration and
recreation can take place successfully and in a sustainable manner.
Providing natural light natural light and ventilation in preference to artificial systems for tutorial
rooms and other teaching spaces.
Avoiding complex articulation and building footprints, as well as minimising building perimeters.
Achieving sensible fenestration design.
Avoiding complex roof forms and junctions.
Minimising buildability issues, including site access, disruption to existing operations and trade
sequencing.
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C 2.3 Flexibility
All planning should seek to provide for the maximum degree of flexibility to ensure that future
alterations can be achieved easily and cost effectively.
Considerations include:
•
•
•
•
•
Use of lightweight internal walls where security and acoustic requirements permit.
Sensible placement of toilets, stairs and plant rooms.
Location of services and fixtures on external (rather than internal) walls wherever possible to
provide maximum flexibility during subsequent refurbishments planning for possible future
expansion, alteration or adaptation to new uses.
Allocation of sufficient space for plant rooms at the design stage. Careful consideration should
be given to providing adequate space for possible future expansion, as well as access for
installation of replacement or additional plant.
Adequate future provision shall be made for both vertical and lateral ducting to accommodate
communications cabling and other services. Ducts shall be easily accessible so that the covers
can easily be removed and reinstated.
C 2.4 Building Legibility
Design consideration must be given early in the design process to the legibility of the building and, in
particular, the ready visual identification of entry points. While this is partly in response to security
considerations, it also relates to the convenience of users and effective way‐finding on each campus.
C 2.5 Efficiency & Economy
UniSA projects should reflect the best value obtainable. Initial construction, operations and life cycle
costs should all be considered. Features of efficient design should include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use of simple, repetitive building structures.
Use of standard rather than purpose made components.
Building levels designed to balance cut and fill in earthworks.
Avoidance of large, non-functional undercroft areas.
Double volume spaces and large circulation areas kept to functional minimum.
Service areas concentrated in central locations.
C 2.6 Functionality
All spaces must be designed to optimise their functionality and usefulness for teaching, research,
administrative and staff support purposes. Careful consideration shall be given to ensure that
undesirable noise from adjoining properties and spaces does not have a detrimental impact on the
functionality of any space.
Foyer size and width of corridors shall be chosen to allow for high use periods, especially during
changeover of lectures or large classes.
Particular care must be taken to avoid glare through windows due to either direct or indirect
sunlight, or reflections from paving, roads or adjacent buildings.
C 2.7 Vending Machines
Consideration shall be given in the design of public external spaces adjoining 24 hour access facilities
such as lecture theatres, libraries, or commercial buildings on UniSA campuses, for the installation by
others of vending machines. Allowance should be made for lighting, power, water supply and
drainage to sewer.
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Vending machines shall only be located in areas approved by UniSA and in all cases must be
aesthetically integrated into the space.
C 2.8 Universal Design
Universal design is the process of designing services and facilities to be used by everyone, to the
greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialised design. The aim is to
provide a solution that can accommodate all people, including people with a disability, to provide
equitable access for all.
UniSA has established Accessibility Guidelines to define overall objectives and strategies for all
projects and programs, as well as to outline the expectations for consultants and contractors
involved in design and construction projects.
C 2.9 Safety and security
UniSA aims to obtain a safe, secure building in the simplest, yet most effective way, involving
practical and cost considerations. All buildings, car parks, walkways, bicycle paths and their
immediate environs shall be designed to achieve a positive working and learning environment,
whilst reducing the opportunity for crimes against UniSA property, staff and students.
C 2.10 Wind Control
Individual buildings or groups of buildings must be designed to avoid the problems associated with
wind turbulence, particularly at building entries and public spaces.
C 2.11 Signage
Allowance should be made in the design of the external entry facade of the building for the
installation of any major signs in conformity with UniSA Branding & Style Guide, as well as the
Campus Signage Manual.
The Campus Signage Manual provides an approved strategy and implementation framework for
wayfinding and signage systems to be implemented throughout all existing and future buildings and
facilities, both on and off campus. Its aim is to ensure all applications meet quality standards of
simplicity, uniformity and aesthetic appeal, while being highly functional in providing clear
wayfinding and appropriate information.
C 2.12 Building Efficiency
Building efficiency (UFA/GFA as percentage) should not be less than the following:
Table: Building Efficiency
Type
Efficiency
Science type
60%
Humanities & Arts type
65%
Administrative
70%
Library
75%
C 2.13 Space Utilisation Factors
Space utilisation factors set out in the table below should be assumed unless otherwise specified in
the Project Brief or directed by the Contract Supervisor.
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Table: Space Utilisation Factors
Type
Room Frequency
Seat Occupancy
Lecture Theatres
75%
75%
Tutorial Rooms
75%
75%
Laboratories
50%
75%
Special Use Rooms
50%
75%
Room frequency factors indicate the proportion the space is occupied within a typical teaching day
(9 am – 5 pm, Monday – Friday). Seat occupancy factors indicate the average proportion of seats
occupied.
C 2.14 Works to Heritage Buildings
Any alterations or restoration works proposed for heritage buildings must be approved by the
relevant authorities. All work shall comply with the ICOMOS Burra Charter, as revised, as well as the
relevant Conservation Plan established for the building. Copies of the Conservation Plans are
available on request.
When alterations are required within these heritage buildings, the Consultant Team must provide
design proposals which are in context with, and sympathetic to, their immediate surroundings and
comply with UniSA’s planning principles. Solutions must not impinge detrimentally on the heritage
elements and spaces of such buildings, and require approval from the Capital Projects Director via
the Contract Supervisor before proceeding.
C 2.15 The Designer
For the purposes of the Minimum Level Design and Construction Specifications, ‘The Designer’ is
defined as any individual or group carrying out any/all design activities related to the University’s
built assets, or their constitutional elements.
C 2.15.1 Designer Responsibilities
It is the Designer’s responsibility to uphold the University’s legal obligations and commitments.
It is the responsibility of the Designer to ensure all obligations pertaining to the building design
and/or construction of facility are diligently met, such as legal requirements and standards, when
any work is undertaken for the University.
Should there be a conflict between these specifications and any other legislative requirements, the
standard which provides the highest standard of risk mitigation must take preference. Where any
Australian Standards are quoted, the reference must always be made to the most recent
edition/update.
In all cases of potential conflict, appropriate consultation with the University must occur with all
issues brought to the attention of the Contracts Supervisor.
C 2.16 Variations
All requests for variations must be referred to the Contracts Supervisor for review, to ensure
potential changes will no increase risk. Final approval for departure from these specifications will be
reviewed and agreed to by the Director: Facilities Management (or nominee)
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C 2.17 Sustainable Buildings
The University has established an Environmental Sustainability Guideline, which has been uploaded
to the Facilities Management Unit section on the University’s website. The guideline can be accessed
here .
C 2.17.1 Passive Design
The University hopes to reduce the need for expensive artificial lighting and mechanical heating and
cooling, as well as providing healthier internal environments.
Passive design utilises natural systems such as passive solar control, day lighting of habitable spaces
and cool breezes to deliver spaces that are more pleasant and comfortable.
Consultants must be knowledgeable on the principles of passive design, noting that the building
orientation, footprint and façade design are critical aspects of passive design.
C 2.17.2 Water Conservation and Quality
Low flow devices, such as showers and taps and dual flush toilets are minimum requirements
Water harvesting and re-use must be considered and provided where feasible and economically
viable.
Landscaping strategies to minimise stormwater run-off must be considered, to retain water and
cleanse run-off prior to entry into stormwater systems.
Air cooled condensers with pre-cooled arrangements are preferable to conventional cooling towers.
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C 3 Work Health & Safety
All Work Health & Safety legislative requirements, including Schedules 1 and 2 of the WHS
Regulations, must be taken into consideration of the design and construction of new buildings,
additions and refurbishments.
Consultation with key stakeholders in relation to WHS issues must be undertaken in accordance with
UniSA OHSW Procedure – Design and Construction of new and refurbished buildings. The
University’s WHS Services will also be invited to participate during the consultation process as
required.
C 4 Acoustics
The ultimate utility and function of teaching, administrative and staff support areas is highly
dependent on the control of external and internal noise. Buildings shall be designed to
recommended Design Sound Levels and Reverberation Times for Building Interiors as set out in AS
2107.
The table below shows design objectives, not absolute minimum requirements. Materials and
construction used shall typically be capable of achieving these figures. A deficit of one or two
decibels when testing in the building may be acceptable. Sound insertion loss is defined as the
difference in sound reduction from room to corridor when the door is wide open and when it is
closed.
Table: Sound Reduction Requirements
Subjective Impression of Sound Reduction 1
Privacy Class
Thru walls & ceilings
Thru doors
Class 1
High degree of privacy.
Lecture theatres.
Voices in next room just audible but not intelligible.
Voice audible
but generally
unintelligible
unless person
close to door.
Meeting rooms.
Nominated offices.
Class 2
Good degree of privacy.
Collaborative teaching
spaces.
Possible to understand some normal conversation
from adjacent space, but generally not distracting.
Tutorial rooms.
Voice audible
but generally
unintelligible
unless person
close to door.
Specialist teaching
spaces.
Enclosed offices
(individual or shared).
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Subjective Impression of Sound Reduction 1
Privacy Class
Thru walls & ceilings
Thru doors
Class 3
Voices audible and conversation intelligible unless
using subdued voices.
Voices audible
and
conversation
intelligible.
Open plan offices.
Libraries.
Low privacy but reduction of general office noise
noticeable.
Laboratories.
The level of ambient sound from air conditioning, ventilation and other mechanical equipment,
traffic noise and other intrusive noise, must be neither so high that it is objectionable, nor so low
that the resulting quiet causes intruding speech and other activity noise to be objectionable.
The Designer must ensure that all requirements of the EPA are met.
The most recent legislation documents can be found here:
http://legislation.sa.gov.au/LZ/C/POL/ENVIRONMENT%20PROTECTION%20(NOISE)%20POLICY%2020
07.aspx The EPA has also issued a guideline to be utilised in understanding this legislation. This can
be found here: http://www.epa.sa.gov.au/xstd_files/Noise/Guideline/guidelines_noise_epp.pdf
C 4 Thermal Insulation Performance
All buildings must maximise opportunities for thermal insulation.
Thermally broken façades and window elements are preferred. Standard window frames must be
thermally broken and window elements are preferred. Standard window frames must be thermally
broken and bespoke designs must be thermally enhanced as a minimum.
Double-glazed windows are a minimum requirement for all new buildings and refurbishments.
Effective building sealing is mandatory to minimise air infiltration.
All main entries must be air locked at the appropriate scale to be effective.
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C 5 Animal, Vermin and Pest Infestation
C 5.1 Vermin
All cavities/apertures must be sealed/closed-off to ensure that rats, mice, possums and the like are
unable to gain access into the internal spaces.
C 5.2 Animal
Façade detailing, should avoid ledges or protrusions, wherever possible, to ensure that birds are
unable to perch, roost or nest.
C 5.3 Termite Control
Anti-termite treatment must be provided to all new buildings. All workmanship and materials must
conform to the requirements of the Australian Standard for the protection of buildings from
subterranean termites. Physical barriers are preferred to chemical treatments that require cyclic
applications.
Consideration must be given to any disruption to adjacent building users where treatments are
required.
All tree roots which have been exposed throughout excavation, including stumps, logs and other
timber must be fully excavated and removed from the building site. Tree roots from adjacent trees
are to be reported to the Contracts Supervisor prior to removal
C 5.4 Pest Control
Exits and other potential entry points must be designed to discourage entry of vermin.
The façades must be designed to discourage pigeon colonies.
C 6 Vandalism (graffiti)
Anti-graffiti coatings must be applied to all vulnerable surfaces as directed by the University.
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C 7 Design Reports
C 7.1 Design Report Guidelines
A project Design Report is required at various stages throughout the development of a project to
allow the University to review the work, and confirm that the evolving design is meeting the
requirements.
The level of reporting required will be confirmed by the Contract Supervisor.
Design Reports are nominally required at the following stages, depending on the size of the project:
•
•
•
•
End of Schematic Design Phase
End of Design Development Phase
50% Documentation Phase
90% Documentation Phase
Additional tech review stages may be undertaken depending on the complexity of the design as
required by stakeholders and the Contract Supervisor.
A Design Report is to be provided at these stages to allow the University to endorse that the work
meets the previously agreed requirements. The University is not responsible for checking design
drawings and specifications – this is the responsibility of the designer.
The University requires the Design Reports to confirm that the design achieves the design achieves
the project brief and statutory requirements and to also provide a record of the design decisions
that are made as the project develops.
Design Reports provide the logic behind design decisions so that concurrence and approval can be
given to these decisions. The document is also a useful reference to be utilised to integrate new
project personnel in to a project and for providing clear understanding of the projects history.
The initial design report at Concept Design stage must address the requirements of the project brief
and demonstrate how those requirements are being achieved. The Design Report must incorporate
a statement of design intent for each element and summarise the major design issues and the
background to their resolution. The report should also detail how the requirements of the project
brief are achieved, the standards adopted and how the requirements of these standards are
satisfied. The report must detail any deviation from the project brief, standards statutory
requirements or other University requirements.
Subsequent Design Reports are to include updated drawings and identification of how issues that
were unresolved at the time of the early report have been addressed.
The report is to be a stand-alone document, which contains sufficient drawings and information
without the need to refer to the actual design or other project information such as the minutes of
the design reviews.
The report must demonstrate how each aspect of the project brief has been addressed and will need
to include drawings and schedules that define the proposed scope of work, and descriptions and
explanations of proposed concepts.
Design Reports are to be presented in both hard and soft format with a copy normally included in
the operating and maintenance manuals.
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C 7.2 Documentation Standards
C 7.2.1 General
The University attaches considerable importance to the provision of proper documentation of the
design and due regard shall therefore be paid to the detail and completeness of such documents.
Documentation must be clear, concise and precise.
C 7.2.2 Text Document Format
The format of the Design Reports will be generally as follows:
•
•
•
•
The page size must be A4 but may A3 where drawings are incorporated
New sections must commence on new pages
MS Word Format
A Revision Box must be included and contain:
o Revision Number
o Author
o Checked
o Approved
o Date
C 7.2.3 Drawings Format
The drawings must be in PDF format and clearly legible when printed on A3 size sheets.
All drawings must be to a professional standards and drawn in accordance with the relevant
Australian, IEC or International (ISO) Standards.
Where appropriate, the drawing scale must be shown. The drawings must also include a graphic
scale to facilitate scaling when a sheet is reproduced at a different size to the original.
All drawings must have a revision box containing:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Revision Number
Designed
Drawn
Checked
Approved
Date
Where the use of non-standard symbols is unavoidable, reference to the symbol(s) must be made in
the form of a legend on the drawing, accompanied by the explanation and description.
C 7.3 Updated Reports
After the initial Concept Design Report has been accepted, each time a Design Report is updated, i.e.
at Design Development and Documentation stages, the Design Report is to provide the current
drawings and identify how all unresolved item from the previous reports have been addressed.
C 7.4 Issues Register
The Design Report must contain an Issues Register as a high level guidance to the Contract
Supervisor on any significant issues that may impact on the project, its budget or its timely
completion. Entries may be made by a stakeholder.
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C 7.5 Design Report Approval
Following the preparation and presentation of the Design Report, the University will review the
document and provide any comments or amendments required which will be incorporated in to an
updated version of the report. This will then be signed off by the Contract Supervisor.
This endorsement will provide acceptance of the Design to that stage.
It is expected that the Design Report will be continually developed throughout the design process in
a regular fashion until completion of the design. Then a Tender Design Report (100% design) is
provided for inclusion in the Operation and Maintenance Information.
It is expected that at Tender Design Report stage there will be nil or negligible unresolved items and
that all items are allocated a cost. The University expects nil or negligible cost difference between
Tender documentation issue and Construction documentation issue.
C 7.6 Report Format
The Design Report format should reflect the format of the project brief and any additional University
requirements. For example:
•
•
•
•
Introduction
Site Planning
Architectural
Building Services
o Mechanical
o Electrical
o Communications
o IT
o Fire
• Security
• Structural and Civil
• Cost Plan
o Comparison to Budget
o Variance Summary
o Assumptions, Risks and Opportunities
• Building Certification and compliance
• Construction Program
• Recommendations
• Issues Register
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C 7.7 The Architectural and Engineering Sections
The report sections addressing the Architectural and Engineering aspects of the project will need to
include:
C 7.7.1 Drawings
•
•
•
•
•
Architectural
Building Services – internal and external, below and above ground
o Electrical
o Mechanical
o Fire
Security
Structure
Civil
C 7.7.2 Schedules
The Contract Supervisor will determine schedules, for example:
•
•
•
•
Comparison of Briefed requirements to design outcome
Materials and finishes
Furniture and equipment
Other Schedules as required
C 7.7.3 Text
The text provided within the Design Report needs to address each of the issues identified in the
project brief.
Indicative sections are given below, however, the exact report structure should reflect the nature
and scale of the project to an appropriate level agreed with the Contract Supervisor:
A
INFRASTRUCTURE DIVISION PHIOLOSPHY AND POLICIES
General
Value for Money
Life Cycle Costs
Planning for Future Expansion
Energy Conservation
Pollution and Waste Control
Access for Disabled
External Environments
Water
Compliance to Standards
Security
Communications
Use of Australian and New Zealand Materials
Rainforest or Heritage Area Timbers
Occupational Health and Safety
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B
GENERAL DESIGN CRITERIA
Building Form Planning
Environmental Management Plan
Energy Use
Asbestos
Lead Based Paint Survey
RFI Shielding
Drawing Standards
Interface with Existing Services
Certification
C
PRIMARY BUILDING ELEMENTS
Design Standards and Criteria
Fire Engineering
D
SECONDARY BUILDING ELEMENTS
General
Insulation
Floor Finishes
Walls
Ceilings
Doors
Door Hardware
Window
E
INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT
Sun Control and Lighting
Acoustic Performance
Floor Finishes
Signage
Fire Protection
F
BUILDING ENGINEERING SERVICES
General Requirements
Mechanical Services
Electrical Services
Hydraulic Services
Fire Detection and Protection
Building Management System
Certification
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G
EXTERNAL WORKS
Pedestrian and Vehicular Movement
Stormwater Management
Engineering Services – electrical reticulation, water, stormwater, sewer, gas
Street Lighting
Fencing
Signage
External Furniture
H
SECURITY
I
COMMUNICATION
J
FURNITURE FITTINGS AND EQUIPMENT
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C 8 Documentation and Drawings
C 8.1 Introduction
CAD drawings supplied to the University must be readily opened and read by the Facilities
Management Unit’s AutoCAD software, without requiring modifications or editing.
The Building Records drawings are published on the Facilities Management Unit website in PDF
format.
C 8.2 Conditions of Compliance
If, in the opinion of the Facilities Management Unit Spatial Information Officer, all or any part of the
electronic drawing(s) provided to the Facilities Management Unit fails to comply with the
requirements, the entire package may be returned for checking and correction before resubmission.
Rectifications and re-submission, and any resultant delays, must be made entirely at the supplier’s
cost.
C 8.3 Provided Drawings
Where the University provides reference drawings to suppliers, it is to be noted that the provided
drawings are indicative only and are subject to change without notice.
All measurements must be checked on site.
The format of architectural base floor plan file names is ACxxPlnn, where A = Architectural, PL = Plan,
C = Campus Number, xx =Building Number, and nn = Building level.
C 8.4 Drawing Requirements
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Architectural as-built floor plans are required regardless of the size of the project or whether
O & M Manuals are provided
All CAD drawings must conform to the highest level of quality and accuracy
The accuracy of the drawing must be maintained using appropriate object snaps
The model must be drawn at a scale of 1 unit = 1mm, that is, real world full scale
The model must be drawn in 2D (no ‘z’ values)
The Colour and Linetype properties of all entities are to be set to ByLayer A descriptive layer
naming convention must be used which logically identifies all drawn entities.
o Numbered, or illogical layer names are not acceptable
The Linetype Scale property of all entities is to be set to 1.0
The drawings are to be fully purged of unreferenced or unused items
CAD programs other than AutoCAD may be used; however, all drawings provided to the
University must be in a format fully compatible with the University’s AutoCAD system
Education versions of Autodesk software must not be used under any circumstances
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C 8.5 Submission Requirements
The drawing package must include the following:
•
•
•
Electronic drawings as specified (both .DWG and .PDF formats)
All associated or referenced drawings (e.g. title block drawings)
All plot style tables (.ctb files), and any font shape files if used
C 8.5.1 Specific Requirements – Architectural Drawings
Architectural Drawings MUST include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Floor Plans, Roof Plan (where applicable), Elevations, Sections and Details
Text clearly showing room name and room number (as previously agreed with the University
– refer to Space Numbering Guidelines)
Fixed joinery fittings, steps, changes in level, lecture theatre tiers, balustrades and handrails
The ceiling height of each room on the floor plans (where the ceiling is raked, maximum and
minimum floor to ceiling heights are required)
The type of floor covering on the floor plans, including the delineation of changes in floor
finish
The various levels vertically within the building, including the roof plan, are to be reflected
by the provision of a separate drawing for each level
An Architectural Site Plan is required to indicate features such as roadways, paths and
paving, signage, carparks, lighting, etc. (where modified or added), if these features are not
indicated on other supplier drawings
C 8.5.2 Specific Requirements – Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Landscape Drawings
Drawings must include any referenced or linked detail drawings and/or related data.
C 8.5.3 Specific Requirement – Engineering Services Drawings
Engineering Services Drawings must include:
•
•
Comprehensive legends of symbols used on the drawings
Schematic Diagrams such as Electrical Line Diagrams
C 8.5.4 Specific Requirement – Essential Safety Provisions (ESP) Drawings
Where “fire block plans” (showing detectors and circuits) are created (new buildings) or modified
(refurbishments to existing buildings), the Contractor must provide three (3) sets of either new or
appropriately marked up hard copy drawings, in colour; two (2) to be placed in the Fire Indicator
Panel’s Fire Alarm Plans folder, the third to be provided to the University’s Project Manager.
Modifications to electronic ESP drawings supplied by the University must follow the provided
structure.
The various Essential Safety Provision (ESP) items that are required to be shown on the other
supplied drawings are listed below. Requirements for each specific project should be confirmed with
the University’s Project Manager.
•
•
•
•
Sprinklers
Exit & Emergency Lighting
Compartmentation details including fire doors
Fire Indicator Panel
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fire hose reels
Egress routes to required exits
Emergency alarm initiating devices (manual call points, break glass alarms)
EWIS
Warden Intercom Points
Evacuation Refuges
Hydrant and Booster details
Emergency lifts
Smoke hazard management
Mechanical air handling systems, associated HVAC control and fire dampers
Access for fire appliances
C 8.5.5 Specific Requirement – Survey Drawings
In addition to the survey drawings created at the surveyor’s scale with z coordinates, a copy of the
electronic drawings at a scale of 1 unit = 1mm and with all z coordinates converted to 0 (zero) must
be provided.
Site surveys will be carried out by the University’s preferred subcontractor.
All survey drawings must be based on the Australian Height Datum (AHD)
The following information must be included:
•
•
•
•
The exact footprint of the new building or building extension in relation to the existing
buildings in the immediate vicinity, including the Reduced Level of the lowest floor slab, and
an agreed main reference point
In-ground services information and associated access pits, including pipe sizes and isolation
valves
Location of all services features such as hydrants and booster pumps
All paths and roads, carparks, signage and lighting
C 8.6 Space Numbering
C 8.6.1 Numbering Systems
The University has numbering systems for buildings, levels, rooms and external spaces. These are
described in the Space Numbering Guidelines which can be provided on request by the Project
Manager. Numbering impacts a number of University management systems, and as such,
numbering should not be changed without review by the Facilities Management Unit.
C 8.6.2 Responsibilities for Space Numbering
The Facilities Management Unit’s Spatial Information Officer is responsible for assigning space
numbers regardless of the size of scope of the project. This applies to new buildings as well as
spaces under refurbishment.
Consultants are responsible for implementing the numbering assigned by the University into
documentation from the end of design development.
Contractors are responsible for integrating the approved numbering system into documentation and
labelling where applicable.
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C 8.6.3 Numbering Protocols
Building number and descriptor, level numbering and room numbering are required to be assigned
by the completion of the design development phase of projects and incorporated into
documentation including floor plans, specifications and schedules. Typically plans are provided to
the Spatial Information Officer at the start of design development for a first pass at room
numbering, with iterations throughout the process as changes are made. Although a formal review
is conducted at the end of design development, there may be subsequent changes to room numbers
if the plans are amended for any reason throughout the documentation and construction process.
All changes must be reviewed and approved by the Spatial Information Officer.
C 8.7 Asset Numbering Guidelines
C 8.7.1 Asset Numbering Goals
Asset numbering is intended to fulfil the following goals:
•
•
Identification of a specific item of equipment / asset (unique number)
To be able to associate relevant information with that unique item (e.g. O&M information,
service reports, condition assessments, etc.)
• To establish a hierarchy to enable “rolling up” into asset classes – for asset management,
budget management, etc.
• To be able to deconstruct the numbering system for meaning (e.g. not simply a series of
numbers with no real-life meaning)
o Assist in locating an asset (campus and building)
o Intuitive reference for users (e.g. for service reports, system search, etc.)
• Labelling on site to confirm working with right asset
• Consistent reference for the life of an asset – from conception (consultant design) to end of
life
• Consistency in numbering across all assets and prevent the use of AHU1 (for example) across
every project
• The asset numbering forms the basis of an Asset Register
• Only items that need to be maintained or otherwise managed will be given an asset number
(e.g. to an appropriate and manageable level of drill-down)
The above goals are achieved through a combination of Asset ID and barcode number.
C 8.7.2 Asset ID
Below is an example of a fictitious asset ID which illustrates each component (colours are for
reference only)
MECH - 507 - AHU 001
Asset Class
Site/
Building
Number
Asset
Category
Sequential
Number
ELEC - 5A - MSB 001
Asset Class
Site/
Building
Number
Asset
Category
Sequential
Number
C 8.7.2.1 Asset Class
Always four characters.
From a defined list – source from the University.
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C 8.7.2.2 Site/Building Number
Typically three numeric digits (for site and buildings). For structures (refer Space Numbering
Guidelines for definition), will be a number followed by one or two letters (e.g. ‘5A’ or ‘5AB’).
Campus site plans show each building and structure number.
Where an asset is not located within / on a building or structure, use the appropriate site number
(e.g. ‘500’ for Mawson Lakes). It may be necessary to refer to the space numbering approved by the
Facilities Management Unit to determine whether the asset should be assigned to a building,
structure or site number.
Assets not located on a particular campus (or within a defined zone of a campus) are identified as
‘Offsite’ and will either be allocated a site number of 200 (where within South Australia) or 800
(where outside South Australia but within Australia).
For portable assets not fixed to any particular campus/location, use ‘000’.
Note that the Mawson Lakes tunnel has a building number (590) – for assets within the tunnel, use
590, not the number of the building above.
Note that the building/structure number relates to where the asset is physically located, not the
area it serves.
C 8.7.2.3 Asset Category
May be anything from 1 to 6 characters.
From a defined list – source from the University.
Asset Category is typically an acronym or other intuitive reference to a type of equipment / asset.
The acronym is not repeated across Asset Classes so can form a unique reference with the
sequential number in its own right (within one building or structure) – refer section 3.
C 8.7.2.4 Sequential Number
Always three digits.
Sequential numbering restarts for each building or structure, therefore currently limited to 999 of
any one Asset Category in one building/structure. If more than 999 is required for a single building
or structure, seek further direction from the Facilities Management Unit.
C 8.7.2.5 Placeholders
Always a single hyphen with no spaces separating the numbering elements of the Asset ID (i.e. “-“).
C 8.7.2.6 Layout
There are no spaces (“ “) to be included in the Asset ID at any point including between placeholders
and elements, between any characters of the ID nor in place of any unallocated characters such as
for Asset Category when the full allowable six digits are not used i.e. “_AHU001” or “AHU_001”. No
fields are to be left unpopulated. This results in a total allowable range for an Asset ID (including the
placeholders) of between 12 and 18 characters.
C 8.7.3 Assigning Asset ID
All new building projects must apply the described Asset ID to all agreed assets (to be confirmed
with the Facilities Management Unit). All documentation references (drawings, specifications,
design calculations, etc.) must use this Asset ID, however note that a shortened form may be used by
dropping the Asset Class – e.g. ‘507-AHU001’ instead of ‘MECH-507-AHU001’.
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For refurbishment projects, all new assets must be assigned an Asset ID in line with the described
asset numbering system. It will be necessary to contact the Facilities Management Unit to
determine the next free sequential number to apply to new assets for each building/structure/site.
All documentation references must use this Asset ID as outlined above. When existing assets are
modified or referenced, where available the current Asset ID should be used in documentation
references in preference to any historic identification.
C 8.7.4 Barcode
C 8.7.4.1 Type
A barcode is applied to all agreed assets (to be confirmed with the Facilities Management Unit). The
barcode is an eight-digit number, i.e. 00000001. Self-adhesive barcode labels are provided by the
Facilities Management Unit.
An example of what the barcode labels look like is shown below:
Figure 1: Example of Facilities Management Unit barcode label
C 8.7.4.2 Application
The University will apply all barcodes to assets. Barcodes will be applied at the time of
commissioning or other suitably agreed upon time throughout the project.
The barcode is to be located on the asset in a position that is readily visible and easily reached for
the purposes of scanning. For curved assets the barcode must be placed so that the lines run in the
same plane to ensure legibility when using a scanner. Where the size, shape or location of an asset
restricts the application of a barcode as prescribed it is recommended to place the barcode in a tag
and attach this to the asset.
C 8.7.5 General Notes
C 8.7.5.1 Different uses of Asset ID and Barcode
The barcode represents the unique identification for the physical item of equipment (asset). The
barcode number is retained for the life of that item of equipment and is not re-used when the
equipment is replaced.
The Asset ID is effectively a ‘placeholder’ for the asset/item of equipment within its operational
network. It is retained even when the physical item of equipment is replaced. For example, when a
switchboard is replaced, it will retain the Asset ID of the previous switchboard in that location, but
will be assigned a new barcode number. This assumes a like-for-like replacement, where the
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replacement item fundamentally serves the same or similar function within the operational network.
The University will determine when a new Asset ID is assigned to an asset.
C 8.7.5.2 Asset Relocation and Replacement
If an asset moves from one building to another (e.g. a room air conditioner), it will be assigned a new
Asset ID but will retain the existing barcode number. If an asset moves to a new location within the
same building or structure, UniSA Facilities Management Unit will determine if a new Asset ID is
required.
Barcode numbers will never be re-used. If an asset is replaced, it will be assigned a new barcode
number.
C 8.7.5.3 Asset Relationships
Where there are relationships between assets (e.g. parent/child), this will be recorded as data within
the Asset Register. Relationships are not reflected within the Asset IDs themselves.
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C 9 Operation Manuals, Guides, Maintenance and Warranties
C 9.1 Disciplines
The Operation and Maintenance Manuals are to be grouped into the following disciplines:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Architectural
Electrical Services
Mechanical Services
Hydraulic Services
Fire Services
Vertical Transportation
Data and Communications
Electronic Security (Cardax)
Audiovisual
BMS (may be included with Mechanical Services)
Essential Safety Provisions
Structural
Civil
Landscape
Survey
Other disciplines may be agreed upon, as required for specific projects.
Within each O&M Manual section, each of these disciplines may be broken down into sub-groups as
required by the project.
For example, Architectural may be broken down into the following sub-groups:
GROUP
Finishes
Furniture and Fixtures, Fittings & Equipment
Windows and Curtain Walls
Doors and Hatches
Door and Window Hardware
Glazing
Cladding
GROUP
Roofing
Waterproofing
Internal Walls and Partitions
Operable Walls
Metal Fixtures
Signage
Pest Control Systems
Landscaping can be divided into the following groups:
GROUP
Planting
Irrigation
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GROUP
Paving
Urban Elements
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C 9.2 General Requirements
The O&M manuals are to provide concise descriptions, technical details, operation and maintenance
instructions and schedules, commissioning records, log books, catalogues, principles of operation,
method of operation and other information that will enable the on-going operation and
maintenance of the fabric, services, plant and equipment.
The comprehensive descriptions are to be accompanied by appropriate diagrams and other
necessary illustrations as required to facilitate knowledge and understanding about the operation of
the plant and equipment. Examples include hydraulic flow diagrams, electric wiring diagrams,
electronic circuit plans and mechanical air flow diagrams, etc.
Ensure the content of the documents is provided by personnel with skill and experience in the
operation and maintenance of the installation and that the content is clear, succinct, accurate and
relevant, the terminology is appropriate and the grammar is correct.
Note that there is no requirement to provide asset details in the O&M Manuals where assets are not
maintainable or operable, however excluded detail is to be provided in the “description” section in
broad detail. This exclusion does not extend to drawings.
C 9.2.1 Format
O&M manuals must be supplied as a quality publication as follows:
•
•
A4 size hard cover D-ring vinyl covered binder
Cover to label manual as detailed below:
Operation and Maintenance Manual
University of South Australia
Project description: Campus – Building - Project name
The University’s Project number
Discipline
Completed year
E.g.:
•
•
Operation and Maintenance Manual
University of South Australia
Mawson Lakes – Building X – Environmental Science Building
Project Number: 10-000
Electrical Services
2011
Durable dividers for each separate section
Loose leaf pages consecutively numbered
C 9.3 Submission Requirements
Provide two (2) complete final copies of each O&M manual, including complete set of drawings.
In addition to the hard copy manuals, provide electronic versions of the information where possible.
At a minimum, this must include all drawings in electronic format as set out in Section C 8
Documentation and Drawings, and electronic Asset Register (as detailed below). Electronic versions
of specifications and schedules, any typed information, and any available pdfs of brochures, etc.
should also be included.
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C 9.4 O&M Manual Sections
Each O&M Manual Discipline is to include the following Sections:
Section 1—Introduction and Contents
• Introduction – introduce the main features of the installation for the discipline
• Contents – provide a comprehensive contents list for all the Sections
• Directory – specific directory of contractor/supplier details for the discipline
Section 2—Asset Register
• Asset Register – A complete list of all equipment/elements used in the installation, as set
out below (note the different asset register structures for Services disciplines and
Architectural and Landscape disciplines). The Asset Register must also be provided
electronically - use the electronic template provided by the University.
• Switchboard legends (for relevant discipline).
Table 3 - Asset Register Structure for Services disciplines
Details
Asset ID No.
Campus
Building / Location
Level / Zone
Room / Grid Ref No.
Location Info
Discipline
Asset Category
Asset Description
Make / Manufacturer
Model No.
Serial No.
Date of Installation
Supplier
Country of origin / manufacture
Warranty details
Warranty expiration date
Estimated life / useful life (years)
Definition
To be sourced from the University
Campus Name
Building / Location Name
Level or Zone number (final)
Room or Grid Ref number (final)
Room name / use or location of asset within room / area
From list set out in this Specification or as agreed for specific project
Sub-category of discipline
Description of the asset
Manufacturer’s name
Model number/details of the asset
Serial number of the asset
Date installed / acquired
Supplier/vendor’s name (contact details must be included in the
discipline directory)
Country of manufacture/origin
Name and type of warranty provided
Date of warranty expiration
Useful life from install given normal wear and tear and treatment
Table 4 - Asset Register Structure for Architectural and Landscape disciplines
Details
Unique ID / Asset Designation
Date of Installation
Quantity
Country of origin / manufacture
Definition
Typically a code as identified on drawings / specifications (e.g. floor
finish type, chair type, etc.)
Indicative location if multiple (e.g. meeting rooms, offices, etc.) or
final room number and room name if individual item
From list set out in this Specification or as agreed for specific project
Sub-category of discipline
Brief description of the asset (e.g. “feature carpet”, “meeting room
chair”, etc.)
Manufacturer’s name
E.g. model number, colour and/or finish, size etc. – all information
required to source the identical product
Date Installed / Acquired
How many of each item or number of square metres
Country of manufacture / origin
Warranty details
Warranty expiration date
Estimated life / useful life (years)
Additional comments
Name and type of warranty provided
Date of warranty expiration
Useful life from install given normal wear and tear and treatment
Any additional comments on the specific asset
Location
Discipline
Asset Category
Asset Description
Make / Manufacturer
Details
Note: the Asset Register for Architectural and Landscape disciplines is expected to include all
finishes, furniture and equipment, joinery units and other fixtures, and all elements such as glazing,
ceiling types, etc.
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Section 3—Drawings
This section must include:
• Drawing Register, clearly listing all drawing numbers, drawing names, drawing content,
version status and version date
• Drawings – full size, to scale
Drawings should include the full documentation set for the discipline. This may include (but is not
limited to): floor plans, FFE plans, ceiling plans, roof plans, elevations, sections, details, site plans,
arrangement plans, shop drawings, schematic diagrams (e.g. wiring diagrams, flow diagrams).
Drawings must represent as-built (with the exception of shop drawings where relevant).
Electronic versions of all drawings must also be provided as set out in Section C 8 Documentation
and Drawings.
Section 4—Specifications & Schedules
Include all Specifications and Schedules that form part of the documentation set for the discipline.
Section 5—Operation / Maintenance / Cleaning
This section should include all information necessary to understand the operation, maintenance
and/or cleaning requirements for each element of the installation.
This will typically include the following (where relevant):
• System Descriptions
o A general description of the installation as required for providing a general
understanding of equipment and its operation, including design principles,
operating principles (including any interfaces and interoperability issues), and any
special features.
o Technical descriptions of each system / installation, written to ensure that they
can be clearly understood by persons not familiar with the installation.
o Performance data detailing the mode of operation of each system.
• Operating Instructions
Manufacturer’s literature or a written precise description of the operation procedure in
plain English. This is typically to include:
o
o
o
o
o
Safe starting, running, operation and shut-down procedures for the equipment,
including a logical step-by-step sequence of instructions for each procedure.
Control sequences and flow diagrams
Legend for colour-coded services
Schedules of the parameter settings of each protective device, including fixed and
adjustable circuit breakers, protective relays, adjustable photoelectric switches,
pressure switches, and any other control and monitoring device as established
during commissioning and maintenance.
Instructions for the proper installation and dismantling of the equipment.
• Technical Data Sheets / Brochures
Where not included in other sections, provide manufacturers or suppliers technical
literature assembled specifically for the project and excluding irrelevant matter. Each
product data sheet must be marked to clearly identify the specific products and
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components used in the installation and the data applicable. Include additional instructions
and illustrations as required to identify any changes to the manufacturer’s data or to
illustrate the function of each component in the installation.
• Maintenance
o Instructions for maintenance, testing, inspection or cleaning, typically including:
 Emergency procedures including emergency services contact numbers
and procedures for fault-finding
 Manufacturers’ technical literature as appropriate
 Detailed recommendations for the frequency of performance of routine
maintenance, testing, inspection or cleaning tasks
 List of procedures and tasks associated with preventive (routine)
maintenance
 Procedures for safe troubleshooting, disassembly, repair and reassembly,
cleaning, alignment, inspection and adjustment, a logical step-by-step
sequence of instructions for each procedure.
o Schedules of maintenance, testing, inspection or cleaning
Schedule of frequency of required or recommended maintenance, testing,
inspection or cleaning for each type of equipment, refer examples below. Note
these examples indicate the type of information expected, they are not
prescriptive templates.
Table 5 - Maintenance Schedule Example
Information/Data Name
Location of the equipment / element
Definition Of Information
Include building name, level number, room number and name
and any other information required for prompt and unequivocal
identification.
Describe the equipment
As attached to each piece of equipment.
Weekly, monthly, 6 monthly, annual, 3 yearly etc.
Description of tasks.
Description of equipment / element
Unique identification label
Inspection type
Maintenance required
Table 6 - Maintenance Frequencies Example
Equipment /
Element
Description
Equipment A
Equipment B
Equipment C
Equipment D
Weekly
Monthly
Bi Monthly
Quarterly
6 Monthly
Annual
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
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X
X
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Table 7 - Maintenance Calendar Schedule Example
Equipment /
Element
description
Equipment A
Equipment B
Equipment C
Equipment D
Qty
X
X
X
X
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
B
C
B
B
B
B
B
B
B
C
B
C
B
B
C
B
B
B
B
C
B
A
B
C
B
C
B
C
B
Table 8 - Maintenance Tasks Example
Building Access And Egress
Service Type
Check and record in log book:
A
B
1
All doors should open freely without the use of a key. If an
▲
▲
automatic-unlocking device has been approved, check that
the door opens freely when the device is actuated.
2
All hold-open devices operate correctly.
▲
▲
3
Treads are stable and non-slip surfaces are in good
▲
condition.
4
All handrails are in good repair.
▲
5
Obstructions above the rail which would tend to break a
▲
handhold.
6
Handrail is continuous between stair landings.
▲
Comments
A = Annual, B = Monthly, C = 3 monthly, D = bi-monthly, E = Weekly
Any concern regarding disability access and egress – check with the appropriate authority
C
D
▲
▲
▲
▲
• Maintenance during Defects Liability Period
All records of maintenance carried out during the Defects Liability Period.
• Tools and testing equipment
List of specialised tools and testing equipment and instructions for the use and
maintenance of the tools and testing equipment.
At Practical Completion, the Contractor must provide the University with two (2) complete
sets of any special, non-generic tools and portable indicating instruments that are not
commercially available and are necessary for operation, maintenance, dismantling or
assembly of plant and equipment provided, together with suitable means of identifying,
storing and securing the tools and instruments.
• Spares and consumables
o Schedule of spares (including bearings) with an expected operation life less than
40,000 hours, including item label, manufacturer name, address and contact
number, catalogue number, name and address of local distributor, and expected
replacement frequency.
o Schedule of spare parts necessary for maintenance.
o Schedule of consumable items (oil, grease, belts, and bearings) to be used during
servicing.
• Imported equipment
Provide a list of all imported equipment, including country of origin and importer details.
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Section 6—Certificates, Warranties and Guarantees
Includes manufacturers’ warranties and guarantees, certificates from authorities, Certificates of
Compliance for electrical and plumbing works. If installation is not by the manufacturer, and product
warranty is conditional on the manufacturer’s approval of the installer, submit the manufacturer’s
approval of the installing firm.
Before, and as a condition of the issue of the Final Certificate, vendors must submit warranties:
•
•
•
In an appropriate form
Executed by contractor and warrantor (or warrantors in case of joint warranties)
For the required warranty period.
Warranty conditions:
•
•
•
Where a warrantor is a subsidiary of another organisation, the warrantor submits that
organisation's guarantee of performance of warranty.
Submit product warranties which are coextensive with or additional to the terms and
warranty period of any manufacturer's published warranty, and do not derogate from any
warranty implied by law.
Where any part of work is required to be repaired or made good under a warranty, the
warranty period:
o Must not terminate until that part has been satisfactorily repaired or made good
o In respect of that part, must recommence from date of completion of repair or
making good.
Section 7—Commissioning and Test data
Records of test results and commissioning data.
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C 9.5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals – specific requirements
C 9.5.1 Specific requirements for Essential Safety Provisions Discipline
All Essential Safety Provisions information is to be contained within the separate Essential Safety
Provisions Discipline.
The following is required for all Essential Safety Provisions:
•
•
•
•
List of equipment identified as being required to satisfy the Essential Safety Provisions of
the Ministers Instruction SA76 and the BCA [Section 2 Asset Register].
A schedule of the type and frequency of required or recommended maintenance, testing
or inspection for each type of equipment classified as Essential Safety Provision [Section 5
Operation/Maintenance/Cleaning].
An Asset Register for each type of Essential Safety Provision equipment [Section 2 Asset
Register].
Unique identification label attached to each piece of equipment.
The ESP maintenance provisions are not to be duplicated in the other maintenance schedules.
Where assets are required to be maintained according to the SA76 requirement, these schedules
and tasks are to be provided under the discipline Essential Safety Provisions. This does not include
the services provided by the mechanical contractor when carrying out collaborative maintenance
with the fire services contractor.
The items of maintenance included in the Essential Safety Provisions section are not to be repeated
elsewhere in the O&M Manual but must be supplemented elsewhere as necessary to ensure that all
systems are comprehensively serviced and maintained.
All ESP commissioning and testing/inspecting data is to be provided progressively throughout the
construction process.
Include only the record of tests and inspections of the Essential Safety Provisions as required by the
South Australian Development Act 1993, Minister’s Specification SA76 and various Australian
Standards and Codes of Practice.
The following documentation is to be provided in addition to that outlined above:
1. BCA assessment statement with particular reference to all fire and lift safety requirements
[Section 1 Introduction and Contents], including:
• Classification
• Structure
• Fire Resistance & Compartmentation
• Access and egress
• Services & Equipment
2. Copy of ESP Form 1 [Section 6 Certificates, Warranties and Guarantees]
3. Copy of ESP Form 2 [Section 6 Certificates, Warranties and Guarantees]
4. Building Occupancy Certificate [Section 6 Certificates, Warranties and Guarantees]
5. Where a fire hydrant or sprinkler system is installed, a current certificate of flow test
[Section 6 Certificates, Warranties and Guarantees]
6. Where a fire alarm system is connected to the Metropolitan Fire Brigade, copies of all
relevant applications and certificate [Section 6 Certificates, Warranties and Guarantees]
7. Where fire extinguishers are installed, provide comprehensive details including all design
analysis and calculations as per the requirements of the BCA to identify selection, type and
location of all installed portable fire protection equipment
[Section 5 Operation/Maintenance/Cleaning (system description)]
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8. Précis of operation for all fire detection and protection systems [Section 5
Operation/Maintenance/Cleaning]
The following drawings are to be provided in addition to the above:
1. Site plan drawn to scale of not less than 1:500 showing any proposed and/or existing
structure erected on the site, the boundaries of the site, the levels of the site, vehicular
access roads within the site, adjoining streets and compass point [Section 3 Drawings].
2. Layout and detail drawings identifying the full extent and design of all relevant fire safety
measures and systems [Section 3 Drawings], including:
• Compartmentation, fire wall/separation and fire/smoke doors and/or windows
• Means of egress, detailing paths of travel
• Signs, including lifts and all signage associate with egress paths, etc.
• Access for fire appliances
• Emergency lifts
• Exit & emergency lighting
• Fire extinguishers & hose reels
• Smoke hazard management
• Mechanical air handling systems, associated HVAC control and fire dampers
• EWIS details and location of warning devices
• Hydrant and booster details,
• Fire Alarm System and detector layout
• Fire Sprinkler System and layout
C 9.5.2 Windows and Curtain Walls (Architectural) - Special Information
Organic film coating warranty
Warrantors must submit paint manufacturer’s warranty for specified coating, including warranty
conditions, if any, applying to conversion coating mass, dry film thickness of paint coatings, and
number of coatings.
Joint product warranties
Warrantors must submit following product warranties with, and as part of, curtain wall warranty:
•
•
•
•
glass manufacturer's warranty
toughened and heat strengthened glass warranty
aluminium framing suite manufacturer’s warranty including non-standard components i.e.
frameless sash windows, if applicable
aluminium finish applicator's warranty—an undertaking by applicator of finish to refinish
or replace aluminium items where:
o finish cracks, peels, or shows pitting or corrosion, discernible from 1500 mm
distance, resulting from atmospheric conditions normal for environment of
installation
o when tested to AS/NZS 1580.481.1.2 a coloured finish discolours in service to a
degree greater than 2 on Rating Scale of Table 1 of that standard, compared to an
unweathered reference sample; or
o colour change in coloured finish of either or both of any two adjacent sections
results in a colour difference between them which exceeds Rating Scale measure
of range of colour variation accepted in contract approved colour sample range.
Drawings
The drawing set must be an “as installed” shop drawing set of the works installed.
Identify site-glazed panels.
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C 9.5.3 Door and Window Hardware (Architectural) – Special Information
Hardware schedule
Where applicable, submit an amended schedule, prepared by the door hardware supplier showing
changes to the contract door hardware schedule caused by:
•
•
•
Approval of hardware samples
Acceptance of an equivalent to a specified proprietary item
Contract variation to a door hardware requirement
C 9.5.4 Waterproofing (Architectural) – Special Information
Waterproofing Warranty
Provide a warranty in respect of manufacture and installation of the waterproofing membrane
against any and every effect or failure which may occur during the warranty period arising out of any
fault of the system, workmanship fabrication, fixing or quality of materials used.
The warrantor’s liability must include cost of removal and replacement of defective materials,
making good any leakage staining or other damage to building caused by any such defect or failure,
and any defect in or failure of the joints or edge sealing and any defects or failure caused by any
inherent property of the waterproofing membrane.
C 9.5.5 Furniture and Fixtures, Fittings and Equipment (Architectural) – Special Information
Submit the manufacturer’s recommendations for demounting and relocation of fixtures, fittings and
equipment, and recommendations for service use, care and maintenance of all furniture and
fixtures, fittings and equipment (including joinery).
C 9.5.6 Pest Control Systems (Architectural) – Special Information
Provide details of all provisions for permanent pest control. For example:
Table 9 - Pest Control Schedule Example
Location
All slab penetrations
All slab control joints and footing/slab joints
Building perimeters – where insufficient clearance
between the slab edge and paving level
Type
Woven stainless steel mesh
Woven stainless steel mesh
Woven stainless steel mesh
C 9.5.7 Plantings (Landscape) – Special Information
Plant Schedule
Provide a list of plants—common name, botanical name, quantity.
Product warranty
Submit the supplier’s written statement certifying that plants are true to the required species and
type, and are free from diseases, pests and weeds.
C 9.5.8 Irrigation (Landscape) – Special Information
As-built drawings
As-built drawings for irrigation installations must be accurate within 500 mm for all irrigation
components installed and detail any changes made during installation from the initial design.
Laminated plan and schedule
Within each irrigation control cabinet must be a laminated plan and an approved laminated
irrigation schedule.
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C 9.6 Timing of Delivery of O&M Manual information
There are a number of versions of asset information expected as the project progresses. Submit
progressive revisions of the manual information throughout the course of the construction project
to ensure the accuracy of content and the familiarisation of the University with the installation.
C 9.6.1 Preliminary O&M Manual information
For equipment put into service during construction and operated by the University only, submit
Preliminary O&M Manual information at least two (2) weeks before handover of responsibility for
equipment operation.
C 9.6.2 Draft O&M Manual information
Submit Draft O&M Manual information, including maintenance records, at least eight (8) weeks
before the Date for Practical Completion for review by the Consultant Team. Include provisional
record drawings and preliminary performance data.
Submit the revised Draft Manuals no later than two (2) weeks before the Date for Practical
Completion for review by the University. If available, include certificates from authorities and
warranties.
C 9.6.3 Final O&M Manual information
On completion of commissioning and within one (1) month after Practical Completion, submit final
O&M Manual information. Incorporate any changes from the Consultant Team, review by the
University and training sessions as set out elsewhere in this section and include any additional
relevant material.
C 9.6.4 Revisions
Within two (2) weeks after completion of the defects liability period and/or maintenance period,
submit amendments incorporating changes and comments.
C 9.6.5 Information Delivery Checklist
The following checklist is intended to provide a guide to the Principal Consultant, Contractors and
University staff, in ensuring that the O&M Manual information has been delivered as per the
specifications provided. The timeline is directed at the provider of the action item, whether it is the
Contractor or Principal Consultant.
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Table 10 - O & M Manual Deliverables Checklist
Action Item
Architectural For
Construction
Drawings
As-Built
Drawings
Timeline
To be provided no later than two (2) weeks before
the date of Practical Completion
Provided By
Contractor
Recipient
The University of
South Australia
Final as-built drawings to be provided within one
(1) month after Practical Completion
The University of
South Australia
Training
Draft Manual
information
To be provided within one (1) month after
Practical Completion
To be provided at Practical Completion. Final
version to be included in relevant O&M Manual
section.
(only for equipment put into service during
construction and operated by the University)
To be provided two (2) weeks before handover of
responsibility.
To be provided eight (8) weeks before Practical
Completion for review by Consultant Team.
Contractor to
Principal
Consultant
Contractor
Revised Draft
Manual
information
Final Manual
information
To be provided two (2) weeks before Practical
Completion for review by the University and use
in training.
To be provided with one (1) month after Practical
Completion.
Tools and
Instruments
ESP Schedules
(preliminary)
To be provided at Practical Completion.
Contractor to
Principal
Consultant
Contractor to
Principal
Consultant
Contractor to
Principal
Consultant
Contractor
To be provided at Practical Completion. Final
version to be included in relevant O&M Manual
section.
Contractor to
Principal
Consultant
Directory of
contacts
(preliminary)
Preliminary
Manual
information
SECTION C – DESIGN CONTROLS
Contractor to
Principal
Consultant
Contractor to
Principal
Consultant
The University of
South Australia
The University of
South Australia
The University of
South Australia
Consultant Team
The University of
South Australia
The University of
South Australia
The University of
South Australia
The University of
South Australia
Page 65 of 269



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA



MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


D
MECHANICAL SERVICES
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
x D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
Contents
D 1 General Requirements ......................................................................................................................... 68
D 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 68
D 1.2 Responsibilities ....................................................................................................................................... 68
D 1.3 Standards and Regulations ..................................................................................................................... 69
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations ............................................................................................ 69
D 1.4 Quality ..................................................................................................................................................... 70
D 1.5 Installation Requirements ....................................................................................................................... 70
D 1.6 Preferred Manufacturers ........................................................................................................................ 71
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers............................................................................................... 72
D 1.7 Operation Hours ..................................................................................................................................... 73
D 1.8 Sustainability ........................................................................................................................................... 73
D 1.9 Cost Planning .......................................................................................................................................... 73
D 1.10 Attendance............................................................................................................................................ 74
D 1.11 Plant Rooms and Access ....................................................................................................................... 74
D 1.12 Population Densities ............................................................................................................................. 75
D 1.13 Design Conditions ................................................................................................................................. 75
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions .......................................................................................................... 75
D 2 Equipment ........................................................................................................................................... 77
D 2.1 Air Conditioning Units ............................................................................................................................. 77
D 2.2 Air Handling Units ................................................................................................................................... 77
D 2.3 Chillers .................................................................................................................................................... 77
D 2.4 Boilers ..................................................................................................................................................... 78
D 2.5 Cooling Towers........................................................................................................................................ 78
D 2.6 Pumps ..................................................................................................................................................... 78
D 2.7 Evaporative Units .................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.8 Ventilation and Extraction ...................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.9 Coils ......................................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.10 Humidifiers ............................................................................................................................................ 79
D 2.11 Ductwork ............................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.12 Air Grilles ............................................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.13 Filtration ................................................................................................................................................ 79
D 2.14 Piping, Valves and Fittings .................................................................................................................... 79
D 2.15 Water Treatment .................................................................................................................................. 80
D 2.16 Variable Speed Drives ........................................................................................................................... 80
D 2.17 Fume Cupboards ................................................................................................................................... 80
D 2.18 Noise and Vibration .............................................................................................................................. 81
D 3 Automatic Controls .............................................................................................................................. 81
D 4 Design Reports ..................................................................................................................................... 81
Table 4 - Mechanical Services Design Deliverables Matrix:..................................................................... 83
D 4.1 Design Certification ................................................................................................................................. 86
D 5 Mechanical Electrical............................................................................................................................ 86
D 6 Labelling .............................................................................................................................................. 87
Table 5 – List of Labels ................................................................................................................................. 87
D 7 Record Drawings .................................................................................................................................. 88
D 8 Operation and Maintenance Manuals .................................................................................................. 88
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 67 of 269
D 1 General Requirements
D 1.1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the relevant NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary the University clauses are included, with the Contract
Supervisors approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed inside a blue box and text has been italicised.
D 1.2 Responsibilities
To be inserted – Clause 1.1 RESPONSIBILITIES – NATSPEC 0701 Mechanical Systems
The scope of works for the mechanical systems include, but are not limited to, the following:
•
•
•
The designer shall insert a bullet point list of the scope of mechanical works
……
…….
The contractor shall determine the full scope of the works from review of this specification and all
associated contract drawings.
The contractor shall attend site to satisfy himself of the existing systems and site conditions.
No claim shall be entertained for lack of knowledge of the contract documentation or of existing
systems which could reasonably have been known from prior investigation
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 68 of 269
D 1.3 Standards and Regulations
The following table details the Standards and Regulations, which are additional to those referred to
in Section C and are specific to the Mechanical Services:
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations
CODE
DESCRIPTION
As 1324.1
Air filters for use in general ventilation and air conditioning – Application
performance and construction
AS/NZS 1668.1
The use of ventilation and airconditioning in building – Fire and Smoke
control in multi-compartment buildings
AS 1668.2
The use of ventilation and airconditioning in buildings - Mechanical
ventilation in buildings
AS 1668:3
The use of ventilation and airconditioning in buildings - Smoke control
systems for large single compartments or smoke reservoirs
AS 1668:4
The use of ventilation and airconditioning in buildings - Natural ventilation
of buildings
AS/NZS 1677.2
Refrigerating Systems – Safety Requirements for fixed applications
AS 1682.2
Fire Dampers – Installation
AS 1940
The storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids
AS/NZS 2243.1
Safety in laboratories – planning and operational aspects
AS/NZS 2243.7
Safety in laboratories – electrical aspects
AS/NZS 2243.8
Safety in laboratories – fume cupboards
AS/NZS 2243.9
Safety in laboratories – recirculating fume cabinets
AS/NZS 2243.10
Safety in laboratories – storage of chemicals
AS/NZS 2982
Laboratory Design and Constructions
AS 2896
Medical gas systems – Installation and testing of non-flammable medical
gas pipeline systems
AS/NZS 3666.1
Air handling and water systems of buildings – Microbial control – design,
installation and commissioning
AS/NZS 3666.2
Air handling and water systems of buildings – Microbial control –
operation and maintenance
AS/NZS 3666.3
Air handling and water systems of buildings – Microbial control –
Performance-based maintenance of cooling water systems
AS 4041
Pressure Piping
AS 4120
Code of Tendering
AS 4122
General conditions of contract for engagement of consultants
AS 4254.1
Ductwork for air handling systems in buildings – flexible duct
AS 4254.2
Ductwork for air handling systems in buildings – rigid duct
AS 4260
High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters – Classification, construction
and performance
AS 4426
Thermal insulation of pipework, ductwork and equipment – Selection,
installation and finish
AS 4580
Thermal Resistance of insulation for ductwork used in building air
conditioning
AS 4552
Gas fired water heaters for hot water supply and/or central heating
AS 4809
Copper pipe and fittings – Installation and commissioning
AS/NZS 5601.1
Gas Installations – General Installations
AS/NZS ISO 9001
Quality Management Systems – Requirements
SAA/SNZ HB 32
Control of microbial growth in air handling and water systems of buildings
SAA HB 40.1
The Australian Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Code of Good Practice,
Reduction of emissions of fluorocarbon refrigerants in commercial and
industrial refrigeration and air conditioning applications
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 69 of 269
CODE
ASHRAE 111
DESCRIPTION
Practices for measurement, testing, adjusting and balancing of building
heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration systems
ICANZ
Industry Code of Practice for the Safe Use of Glasswool and Rockwool
Office of the Gene Technology Regulator Guidelines for Certifications of
Physical Containment Facilities
This above list is not all-inclusive and those associated with the project are responsible for
identifying and complying with all standards relevant to the scope of works.
All Mechanical Services installations must comply with the version as referenced in the BCA,
otherwise the most current version of the standard or code at the time of tender.
To be inserted – Clause 1.5 Standards – NATSPEC 0701 Mechanical Systems
Comply in all respects with the requirements of the current standards applicable to the works in
respect to equipment, materials, workmanship and installation techniques.
Comply with the following standards and regulations:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
National Construction Code
Australian Standards
SA Water Corporation
Australian Gas Association Regulations
SA Fire Services Regulations
SA Government Acts governing the Works
Work Health and Safety Regulations
D 1.4 Quality
All mechanical services design work is required to be carried out via suitably qualified and
experienced designers. the University may request copies of the designer’s calculations in order to
review.
The University may also request changes to the design personnel if there is concern that the
personnel engaged are not at an appropriate level of experience.
All design work must be checked and reviewed by a suitably qualified and experienced peer prior to
issuing for pricing. The designer must have a formal check and review process. the University may
request evidence of the design checking and review process.
On occasion a designer may utilise a third party designer (sub-consultant / specialist contractor /
chiller manufacturer / supplier, etc.) however, the designer retains responsibility for the design and
review process.
Unless specifically directed otherwise, all equipment designed, specified and installed must be new
and of the highest quality.
D 1.5 Installation Requirements
All mechanical services installations must comply with and/or provide the following:
•
•
•
Plant is not to be mounted on the roof, unless otherwise approved by the University
Plant is not to be installed in ceiling spaces, unless otherwise approved by the University
Cables and pipes must be combined in common accessible service ducts and shafts wherever
possible, with sufficient clearance for future replacement, with valves and other equipment
requiring maintenance grouped in accessible locations.
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 70 of 269
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Utilise common and sequential systems of nomenclature, numbering and colour coding of all
service systems complying with the University Asset Numbering Guidelines – as set out in
Section C.
Provide facilities for storage of ready-use spare parts and regeneration chemicals
immediately adjacent to all items of equipment
Install vibration and noise isolation sufficient to prevent transmission or generation of
objectionable effects in occupied areas
Provide washing and cleaning facilities, including floor drainage and bunds for all
appropriate items of plant.
Ensure a distribution switchboard capacity has 30% spare capacity for addition of future
circuits in all cases
Install integration hour meters and/or flow meters on all items of equipment which require
service or maintenance according to these parameters
Provide a completely automatic, unattended operation of all plant and equipment, unless
special permission from the University is granted for plant attendance, excluding normal
daily start/stop and inspection functions.
All equipment must be installed in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations including
associated maintenance access and the requirements of AS 3666. All air handling units or fan coil
units must be installed to provide a minimum fall ratio of 100-1 within one side (highest point), of
the internal drip tray to the opposite external discharge drain pipe (lowest point).
Special consideration must be given to the locations of all plant in relation to accessibility, noise and
vibration and visual impact. The plant must be readily accessible via permanent roadways, corridors
or permanent fixed stairways or ladders complying with statuary requirements.
The location of the plant external to building structures at ground level, must be enclosed in a locked
enclosure to provide restricted access to maintenance staff only. The enclosure must not affect
performance or maintenance of the plant.
D 1.6 Preferred Manufacturers
The University requires that only proven proprietary equipment, with local service availability must
be selected.
Where built-up plant or equipment is required, standards of construction must be no less than
accepted industry standards and must comply with all statutory requirements and designed and
constructed for a life of no less than 20 years, with a minimum service and maintenance
requirements. Particular attention must be given to ease of access to items requiring replacement or
routine maintenance.
It is a requirement that new equipment is compatible with the Legacy systems the University has
implemented:
•
•
•
•
Emergency Lighting Central Test and Monitoring – Stanilite Nexus (LX or RF as applicable)
Building Management System – Modbus LONWorks – Niagara/Invensys central located
server
Automatic Lighting Control – Clipsal C-Bus
Fire Detection and Alarm – Ampac
Whilst the University does not wish to restrict the designer’s ability to select the most appropriate
equipment to meet particular requirements it is the University’s preference that equipment selected
satisfies the following:
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 71 of 269
•
•
•
•
A reputable manufacturer with a proven track record
Local Adelaide representation and support in design and post installation operation
Local Adelaide spare parts availability
Australian manufacturer is preferred.
The following is an indicative list, which the University considers to represent the desired
quality levels:
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers
Equipment / Component
Manufacturer / Supplier
Switchgear and components
Schneider, ABB, NHP
Electrical Accessories
Clipsal, HPM, Legrand
Split DX Air Conditioning Units
Temperzone, Actron Air
VRV Air Conditioning Units
Daikin, Mitsubishi
Package Air Conditioning Units
Temperzone, Actron Air
Evaporative Cooling Units
Bonaire, Braemar
Air Handling Units
Trane, Carrier, Fan Coil Industries, Air Design, GJ Walker
Fans
Fantech, Pacific HVAC, Ziehl-Abegg, Flakt-Woods
Heat Recovery Ventilation Units
Munters, Air Solutions, Daikin, Mitsubishi, Air Change
Chillers
Carrier, Powerpax, Trane, York, McQuay
Boilers
Hunt, Raypak, Maxitherm, Tomlinson, Aira
Pumps
Grundos, KSB, Ajax
Cooling Towers
BAC, Evapco, Aquacool
Fume Cupboards
Dynaflow
Air Filters
Airepure, Camfil Farr, Peregrine Industries
Air Terminal Fittings
Air Grilles, Holyoake, Bradflo, Trox, Krantz
Electric Duct Heaters
General Elements
Variable Volume Boxes
Air Grilles, Holyoake, Celmec, Barcol Air
Fire Dampers
Air Grilles, Bullock, Riley, Trox, Holyoake
Fan Coil Units
Carrier, Air Design, Temperzone, Fan Coil Industries
Heat Exchangers
Alfa Laval, Senior Thermal Engineering
Humidifiers
Munters, CondAir
Variable Speed Drives
Danfoss
The mechanical services designer and contractor are welcome to propose alternatives, however,
they must clearly demonstrate equal or greater technical, cost and/or quality performance.
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 72 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 1.10 Alternative Products – Natspec 0701 Mechanical Systems
All specified items represent a required level of quality and performance.
Unless specifically required to integrate with an existing University of South Australia system the
contractor is at liberty to propose alternatives to the specified items subject to compliance with the
University of South Australia Design and Construction Specifications and written approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
Where alternative equipment to that specified is proposed by the contractor, the contractor shall
provide full details of technical, cost and/or programme benefit to the project with full supporting
documentation (including calculations, modelling, etc.) at the contractors cost. The contractor shall
retain design responsibility for any alternative proposals accepted including any unforseen issues.
Any unapproved products provided shall be removed and replaced with the specified item at no cost
to the University.
D 1.7 Operation Hours
The operation hours shall be reviewed and confirmed with the University for each individual project.
D 1.8 Sustainability
The designer must take into consideration the Environmental Sustainability of the mechanical works
taking into account the whole of life cost and operational benefit.
All Buildings must be designed to suit the local environmental conditions. They must be designed to
optimise the thermal and lighting conditions using minimum non-renewable sources of energy.
The preliminary design phase for all new buildings must include a life cycle costing in accordance
with AS 3595. Elements relating to the commissioning are to be undertaken and must include an
overview or projection of the development of the Campus in ten years hence and assessment of how
any decisions made will impact on future development of the Campus. This must include building
aspect, fabric and services.
Elements that the designer must consider, include, but are not limited to, the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Energy efficiency
Materials selection
Decommissioning / disposal of equipment at end-of-life
Control methodology
Equipment selection
Demand management
The sustainability aspects must be addressed in the Design Reports
D 1.9 Cost Planning
The mechanical services designer must provide input into the project cost planning as required by
the contract.
The mechanical services designer should provide cost planning advice for the supply, installation,
associated works, contingencies, overheads, etc. to indicate a total cost to the University.
Any element specifically excluded must be clearly indicated so that a total cost to the University may
be determined.
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 73 of 269
D 1.10 Attendance
It is incumbent on the mechanical engineer and contractor to make themselves aware of existing
conditions as far as reasonably practicable when designing and/or performing works at the
University. The University reserves the right to hold the designer and/or contractor liable for works
performed that are of a sub-standard or non-compliant nature.
The mechanical services designer must attend design and construction meetings as required by the
contract and outlined below.
The University expects the mechanical services designer, not a delegate to attend at a minimum:•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Technical reviews as directed by the Contract Supervisor
Design team meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one meeting)
Construction phase meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one
meeting), plus any meetings where the Contract Supervisor deems there is significant
mechanical elements that requires the designer’s input
Ongoing site inspections as considered appropriate by the Contract Supervisor (minimum bimonthly)
Mechanical services first fix inspection
Mechanical services final fix inspection
Mechanical services commissioning where required by Contract Supervisor
Mechanical services final / defects inspection prior to Practical Completion
The Mechanical designer must identify his/her proposed meeting site attendance schedule in their
engagement proposal
The mechanical installer must attend meetings as required by the contract and considered necessary
by the Contracts Supervisor
To be inserted – Clause 1.9 PERMITS NOTICES AND INSPECTIONS – NATSPEC 0701 Mechanical
Systems
Make applications, obtain all permits, and arrange testing, all as necessary for the installation and
placing into operation of the works where required by any Authority including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SA Water corporation
Department of Premier and Cabinet – Work Safe SA
The Office of the Technical Regulator
Australian Communications Authority
Site Telecommunications Carrier
SA Power Networks
SA Fire Services
Energy Retailer
Provide all associated documentation required for the applications. Pay all associated fees.
D 1.11 Plant Rooms and Access
Plant rooms must be designed to enable safe and easy access to all equipment for maintenance
purposes. The following minimum criteria must be achieved:
•
•
•
Walkways and equipment layouts to be designed with safe access for maintenance of the
largest equipment in mind. Ease of equipment replacement is to be considered
Plant room lighting to be designed to enable maintenance to be carried out safely
Enclosed spaces (such as large air handling units) must incorporate internal luminaires
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 74 of 269
•
•
Exposed hazards to be appropriately protected – i.e. covers on drains
The University requires that all maintenance can be carried out in a safe manner – the
design of the plant room must facilitate this requirement.
D 1.12 Population Densities
If it is not specified in the Project Brief, or agreed otherwise with the University, the requirements of
AS 1668.2 will apply.
D 1.13 Design Conditions
All air conditioning systems must be designed to meet the following design criteria:
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions
Item
Extreme ambient conditions under which all
plant shall operate – Adelaide Region
External ambient conditions for air conditioning
plant full load performance
Design Criteria
Summer:
46.0⁰C dry bulb maximum
22.0⁰C wet bulb maximum
Full Solar Load
Winter:
0.0⁰C minimum
Summer:
38.0 ⁰C dry bulb maximum.
21.0 ⁰C wet bulb maximum.
Full solar load.
Winter:
4.0 ⁰C dry bulb minimum.
Zero solar load.
Ambient Conditions under which all plan shall
operate – Other Regions
Design Conditions as per AIRAH DA09
Internal Conditions for plant full load
performance
Cooling: 24.0⁰C dry bulb, 50% humidity
Heating: 23.0⁰C dry bulb, 50% humidity
Outside air, supply air, exhaust air, mechanical
smoke venting and infiltration of air in
perimeter areas
To the requirements of the Australian
Standards and the Building Code of Australia
Internal Heat gains – people
70W per person, sensible – general
60W per person, latent – general
Internal Heat gains – lighting
10W/m2 – general
Internal Heat gains – power
25W/m2 – general
Population Densities
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 75 of 269
Item
Maximum Noise levels at adjoining property
boundaries
Ductwork Sizing
Pipework Sizing
Outside Louvers
Design Criteria
As agreed with the University, else to
requirements of AS 1668.2
All areas to the requirement of Australian
Standard 2107 – Acoustics – Recommended
design sound levels and reverberation times for
building interiors. Not to exceed levels in the
Environmental Protection Act
Maximum Pressure Drop:
0.8 Pa/m maximum, all ductwork
0.5 Pa/m maximum, for outside air ductwork
connected to fan coil units
Maximum Velocity, Supply and Exhaust
ductwork:
7.5 m/s maximum, main risers large systems
and kitchen exhaust
6.0 m/s maximum, main horizontal branches
5.0 m/s maximum, minor branch ducts
4.0 m/s maximum, branch ducts to single
outlets
3.0m/s maximum, flexible ductwork
Maximum Velocity, Return air ductwork:
7.0 m/s maximum, main risers large systems
5.0 m/s maximum, main horizontal branches
Pipework under 50mm: 1.2m/s Maximum
velocity
Pipework over 50mm: 200Pa/m Maximum
pressure drop
Maximum 2 m/s velocity through free area
Any changes to the above design conditions for a project or installation must first be approved by
the University.
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 76 of 269
D 2 Equipment
D 2.1 Air Conditioning Units
The units must be of commercial quality, proprietary manufactured off-site, factory assembled and
factory tested.
Each unit must produce no less than the design capacities when operated at the design conditions
specified in the design criteria.
Adequate and safe access must be provided for inspection, testing and maintenance of all items of
the air conditioning plant.
All air conditioning systems must be connected and controlled via the University BMS system.
Split ducted and packaged DX units shall be of digital scroll compressor type.
All split ducted, split ceiling cassette and split under ceiling units shall have integral condensate
pumps.
To be inserted – Clause 3.2 WORK ON EXISTING SYSTEMS – NATSPEC 0701 Mechanical Systems
When de-commissioning air conditioning equipment pump down and reclaim all refrigerant in
accordance with relevant Australian Environmental Protection legislation. Refrigerant shall
remain property of the principal and any credits for recycled refrigerant shall be passed on in full
to the principal.
D 2.2 Air Handling Units
Each unit must produce no less than the design capacities when operated at the design conditions
specified in the design criteria.
D 2.3 Chillers
The complete chiller must comply with the referenced Standards/Codes, and the design and
installation must comply with the pressure vessel regulations, to the approval of the Statutory
Authorities.
Each complete Chiller must be factory assembled, pressure tested and charged. The chiller must
then be factory run and tested, and evidence of the testing to be provided.
Chillers shall be fitted with integral harmonic filters.
Literature and Selection data must be submitted and comprise of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Full description
Manufacturer’s noise levels
Weights and spatial including weights
Services required, including electrical requirements
Ancillary items and additional features/options provided
COP at 100%, 80%, 60%, 40% and 20% of full load and Integrated Part Load Value (IPLV)
Technical data of associated equipment required for the control and satisfactory operation
of the chiller
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 77 of 269
A menu driven, factory installed and wired, microprocessor based chiller management system, must
be provided.
To be inserted – 2.1 General Motors and starters – NATSPEC 0711 Chillers
Provide integrated harmonic suppression filters to limit the harmonics to within the value
prescribed by the electricity distributor
To be inserted – 3.2 Installation General – NATSPEC 0711 Chillers
The fully assembled water chiller must be pressure tested, both refrigerant side and water side, to
the requirements of the applicable Standards/Codes.
All costs associated with testing, certification and pressure vessel registration shall be the
responsibility of the contractor.
D 2.4 Boilers
Condensing boilers shall be used unless approved otherwise.
Each complete boiler must be factory assembled, pressure tested and factory tested for operation of
controls, sequencing and safety devices. Evidence of the hydrostatic pressure testing must be
provided.
Literature and selection data must be submitted and comprise of a complete mechanical and
engineering description of the boiler equipment, upon which the proposal is based, such as type of
equipment, the manufacturer’s guaranteed efficiency levels, surface areas of heat exchangers, water
velocity and friction loss through heat exchanger tubes, details and technical data of associated
equipment required for the control and satisfactory operation of the boiler plant.
D 2.5 Cooling Towers
All materials must be stainless steel.
The spray water circulating pump must be of the end suction, centrifugal type.
The arrangement of the cooling tower must allow for ease of access for the inspection and
maintenance of the fill, drift eliminators, water distribution system or any other wetted
components.
To be inserted – Clause 3.2 Completion – General – NATSPEC – 713 Cooling Towers
The water distribution over the fill pack shall be with overlapping spray patterns
D 2.6 Pumps
The pumps must deliver the scheduled fluid quantity against the resistance of the installed system.
Test curves for each pump marked with the duty point/range must be provided.
Pumps must be selected to operate as close as possible to the maximum efficiency point. Pumps
must be factory assembled units.
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Page 78 of 269
D 2.7 Evaporative Units
Adequate and safe access must be provided for inspection, testing and maintenance of the
evaporative coolers.
D 2.8 Ventilation and Extraction
All fans and motors must be selected to allow an additional increase of 10% in the specified air
quantity with the associated increase in system resistance.
Full calculation of the system static pressure must be used to determine the selection of the fan.
D 2.9 Coils
Face velocity should not exceed 2.5m/s, and shall not have less than 310 or more than 480 fins per
meter. Coils must be circuited for counterflow operation.
D 2.10 Humidifiers
Critical applications must utilize resistive element type steam humidifiers. Steam humidifiers must
be designed to deliver pure and sterile steam into the air stream. The units must be suitable for use
with the specific pressure and quality of water available at each specific site, and analysis of the
water must be obtained in order to select the appropriate units.
Non-critical applications must use evaporative pad humidifiers. Water distribution system must be
configured to allow for appropriate level of control. A minimum of 2 stage control must be used
unless approved otherwise.
D 2.11 Ductwork
All air diffusers and grilles, where practicable, must be connected via duct work via flexible ducts not
exceeding 5m in length, and branches must be fitted with an opposed blade damper.
The dampers must be provided for balancing the system, including to the following:
•
•
•
Each flexible duct connection to a rigid duct
Branch connection to a group of air outlets
Any branch connection
D 2.12 Air Grilles
A detailed air grille schedule must be provided to the University for approval, including make,
type/model, colour, and flow rates. Allowance must be made to provide a sample of each air grille if
required.
D 2.13 Filtration
Air Filters must comply with the requirements of AS1668.1.
The air filters must be dry media disposable type, complying with AS 1324 and installed to comply
with AS 3666.
The air filters must be selected for a minimum average efficiency of 85% to test dust No. 1
Face velocity must not exceed 1.7 m/s for panel filters and 2.5 m/s for bag and extended media
filters. The system must be designed for final pressure drop of 125Pa for panel filters and 250Pa for
bag and extended media filters.
D 2.14 Piping, Valves and Fittings
Chilled and heating water pipe work shall be copper tube to AS 1432 or steel to AS 1074. Rolled
grooved couplings are acceptable provided they meet the specified operating conditions and are
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
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installed in accordance with manufacturer’s recommendations. The use of quick connect fitting shall
not be used, unless authorised by UniSA’s technical reference group. All condenser water pipe work
shall be copper tube to AS 1432 for diameters less than 200mm. For diameters over 200mm, 316
stainless steel or HDPE pipework shall be used.
All pipe work shall have isolating valves/drain points at regular intervals for ease of maintenance.
Isolation valves must be provided in pipe connections to each item of equipment, machinery or
plant. Balancing valves must generally be provided with pumping systems not provided with flow
adjustment.
Where modifications are required to existing water and air distribution systems, e.g. adding new
connections, or deleting existing connections, allowance must be made to check and rebalance all
related water and air systems
Strainers must be provided upstream of equipment, e.g. control valves, pumps etc. and must be
arranged to allow normal operation of systems when being inspected and/or maintained.
Valves and strainers must generally be line sized.
To be inserted – Clause 3.1 Installation – Installation – 0751 Piping
Uniformity of pipework should be maintained through the whole of the installation. Piping must
be supplied in full standard straight lengths, free from defects, and with ends sealed against
ingress of foreign materials during erection
D 2.15 Water Treatment
An approved specialist water treatment company must be engaged prior to construction for
treatment of the following systems:
•
•
•
Condenser water
Chilled water
Heating water
The details of the proposed specialist water treatment company must be provided to the University,
for approval prior to the appointment. The details must include the proposed water treatment
(cleaning chemicals, inhibitors, biocide types, etc.), process (frequency, treatment levels, etc.) and
program.
D 2.16 Variable Speed Drives
Variable Speed Drives (VSD’s) must be provided for all fans and pumps unless otherwise approved by
the University. The VSD’s must be controlled via the University’s BMS control systems. VSD drives
shall be Danfoss or approved equal with high level interface.
D 2.17 Fume Cupboards
Noise levels associated with the fume cupboard in operation, must not exceed NR50 at the
operator’s position in front of the cupboard, with the sash fully open.
Each fume cupboard must be served via a separate exhaust fan and ductwork system. As a general
rule, manifold fume cupboards shall not be accepted unless reviewed and approved by the
University.
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
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The discharge velocity must be between 10m/sec and 15m/sec and must discharge through a flue of
sufficient height to penetrate the building boundary layer in accordance with the referenced
Standards/Codes, to the requirements of the relevant Environmental Protection legislation,
Statutory Authorities and so as not to affect the performance of adjacent exhaust flues.
D 2.18 Noise and Vibration
Each system must be designed to minimise the transmission of noise and vibration. Where
reciprocating or rotating equipment is installed these must be isolated from the structure via
vibration isolators. Special acoustic requirements will be detailed on a project by project basis.
However, in general noise levels must comply with AS 2107 or local government representatives.
D 3 Automatic Controls
Control schematics and fully functional descriptions of the control of each system, must be provided
and include – normal operation, fire mode operations, safety control, fault conditions, and alarming.
The following energy saving controls should be considered in the design process unless otherwise
approved or directed by the University:
•
•
•
Push button after hours control for air conditioning systems and/or zones with adjustable
timer (set to two hours), and green run light indicator
Motion control sensors to control the operation of the air conditioning systems to the
individual rooms or zones
Monitoring of oxygen levels in high occupancy areas to control the amount of outside air
supply.
All control systems must be fully compatible with the University’s BMS control systems.
D 4 Design Reports
The mechanical designer must submit formal Design Report documents as required by the contract
for technical review by the University.
In addition to the specific elements discussed in Section C of this document, the mechanical services
Design Report/s must include, to the extent that they are applicable to the project, but not be
limited to the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Completed Design Certificate relevant to the stage of design
Proposed scope of works and details of the system arrangement
Schedule of applicable regulations, standards, policies and guidance publications on which
the design is based.
Details of deviations of the above
Details of any third party and/or record information upon which the design relies
Assumptions or exclusions
Safety in Design review
Sustainability review
Proposed point of supply for the works including the supply
capacity/characteristics/condition assessment, demonstrating adequate capacity is available
at the point of supply and in the reticulation system
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Detail of any proposed modifications to existing systems or equipment
Heat load calculations for all conditioned areas
Static pressure drop calculations for all HVAC systems
Acoustic calculations for selection of attenuators and other acoustic attenuation
Pumped system calculations for the system resistance and pump selections
Mechanical switchboard locations, design fault level, voltage drop allocation, circuiting
arrangements, earthing arrangements and protection arrangement
Building Monitoring Systems (BMS) functional description of all systems and plant
Manufacturer selection of major equipment
Basis for sizing of major equipment
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
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Table 4 - Mechanical Services Design Deliverables Matrix:
Design Report
Stage
Mechanical Service Design Deliverables
•
General
End of
Schematic
Design
Reporting
Documentation
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
End of Design
Development
Reporting
Drawing
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Preliminary heat loads, ventilation rates, and other main mechanical plant and system sizing estimates based on schedule of
accommodation and reasonable allowances
Determine cost/benefit impact of masterplan options to mechanical services
Advantages/disadvantages of masterplan options
Understanding of mechanical systems requirements
Identify spatial requirements for main mechanical plant and systems
Confirmation of scope of services
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Mark up of masterplan options indicating concept layouts and preliminary spatials
Return design brief including design criteria
Developed heat load estimates, ventilation rates, and other main mechanical plant and systems based on building form and
preliminary information from other services
Preliminary size and location of main mechanical systems including air conditioning units, fans, ductwork, pumps, pipework, chillers,
boilers, mechanical switchboards etc. to inform Architectural building development
Preliminary major service routes
Coordination of preliminary electrical, fire and other services requirements relating to the mechanical plant and systems
Preliminary equipment selection
The University Design and Construction specifications reviewed and assessed
Confirmation of spatials of main mechanical plant and systems
Confirmation of mechanical systems provided to individual facilities / building
Description of system proposals
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Preliminary opinion of cost based on square meter rates
Concept Design Certificate
Preliminary schematic drawings of mechanical systems
Layout drawings showing preliminary locations of major plant i.e. air conditioning units, ductwork, chillers, boilers, pumps, piping,
mechanical switchboards, distribution boards etc.
Updated mechanical services brief
Page 83 of 269
Design Report
Stage
Mechanical Service Design Deliverables
General
50%
Documentation
Phase
Reporting
Documentation
General
Reporting
90%
Documentation
Phase
Documentation
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Mechanical services design to suit approved building form
Final plant and equipment sizes based on design
Defined location and sizes of plantrooms, services risers, etc. to suit designed equipment
Defined size, location and route of all ductwork, piping, electrical routes, and underground services
Defined sizes of major plant
Final Heat load calculations.
Final Confirmation of systems being provided.
Final confirmation/coordination with other services.
Schedule of selected equipment.
Developed opinion of costs including elemental cost for major plant and equipment.
Final minor items requiring clarification.
Final minor items of information required.
Statement of any specialist systems requiring design development responsibility by contractor.
Schematic Design Certificate
Complete schematic drawings of airflow and piping systems with flow rates and sizes.
Layout drawings for air conditioning and pipework mechanical services showing preliminary ductwork and diffuser layouts, mechanical
equipment layouts, pipework layouts, switchboard locations, etc.
Functional control description and control schematics
Preliminary Mechanical Specification
Final coordinated mechanical services design suitable for tender and construction
All systems and equipment fully and clearly defined and specified
Confirmation of all systems fully designed
Statement of any minor outstanding information and/or assumptions
Elemental opinion of cost
Confirmation of any design development of specialist systems by contractor
Complete schematic drawings including schedules of equipment
Complete mechanical, air conditioning and pipework services layout coordinated with building form, ceiling, furniture, joinery and
other services
Functional descriptions and controls details complete
Complete specification for mechanical services
All documentation fully checker, reviewed and signed-off in accordance with contractual Quality Assurance Requirements
Page 84 of 269
Design Report
Stage
Mechanical Service Design Deliverables
•
•
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
Final Services Brief
Detailed Design Certification
Page 85 of 269
D 4.1 Design Certification
The designer must produce a ‘Design Certificate’ identifying which codes and standards the design
have been based on, including the issue date and version of the code or standard, and certifying
compliance with those codes.
The ‘Design Certificate’ must be signed by the designer responsible for the design, not a delegate,
and issued with the documentation issued for pricing.
D 5 Mechanical Electrical
All switchboards must be dead front and fully enclosed to a minimum IP2X.
High current sections (>63A) must have Form 2b separation.
The designer must ensure adequate maintenance access is provided to all sections of the
switchboard.
Unless approved by the Contracts Supervisor external switchboards must not be provided. Where
approved, external switchboards must be provided with a rainproof canopy covering the board and
mandated maintenance space. Switchboards defined as Heavy Current in AS/NZS3000 must not be
located externally under any circumstance.
All main switchboards must be provided with a multi-function digital meter integrated to the the
University BMS system.
All switchboards must be rated to carry the estimated diversified maximum demand plus 25% for
future expansion, and must provide 30% spare physical capacity for future expansion (i.e. 70% full).
The designer must provide the following information for each switchboard on the main single line
diagram:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Number of poles
Fault level in kA
IP rating
Form of separation
Top or bottom entry
Busbar temperature rating
The designer and installer attention is drawn to the specific the University requirement for
switchboard labelling noted in the supplementary NATSPEC details below. The designer and installer
must ensure these requirements are passed on to the switchboard manufacturers.
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
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To be inserted – Clause 3.4 CABLE SYSTEMS – NATSPEC 0781 Mechanical Electrical
General
Provide the following main and submain systems in accordance with NCC and Australian
Standards:
- Main and submain cables in electrical switchrooms and mechanical plant rooms on cable
ladders.
- Submain cables on cable trays or ladders.
Provide the following systems for final sub-circuits:
- Cast concrete slabs: Unsheathed cable in heavy duty UPVC conduit.
- False ceiling spaces: Thermoplastic insulated and sheath (TPS) cables supported by steel catenary
wires
- Accessible roof spaces: Thermoplastic insulated and sheathed cables supported by steel catenary
wires or fixed directly to structural members
- Concealed spaces: unsheathed cable in UPVC conduit
- Plant Rooms: Unsheathed cable in heavy duty UPVC conduit, on spacer blocks
- Plastered or rendered surfaces: Cable in UPVC conduit
- Stud walls without bulk insulation: Thermoplastic insulated and sheathed cables
- Walls with bulk insulation: Cable in UPVC conduit
Buried in ground:
-PVC cables in heavy duty UPVC conduit
D 6 Labelling
Identification labels must be provided to indicate the point of access to in-ceiling or hidden services
requiring maintenance or adjustment, e.g. at access panels, ceiling tiles, etc.
The labels must be round, traffolyte type labels, and colour coded to match the type of hidden
service as follow:
Table 5 – List of Labels
Label Colour
Type
Blue
Mechanical
Black
Untreated Waste / Sewage
Green
Cold water/hot water/recycled water/drinking
water
Yellow
Gasses
Red
Fire
Orange
Electrical Power
White
Electrical Communications
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
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D 7 Record Drawings
To be inserted – Clause 3.17 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Operation and Maintenance
Manuals for additional requirements
D 8 Operation and Maintenance Manuals
To be inserted – Clause 3.18 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Operation and Maintenance
Manuals for additional requirements
SECTION D – MECHANICAL SERVICES
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


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA



MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


E
ELECTRICAL AND LIGHTING
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
x E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
Contents
E 1 General Requirements .......................................................................................................................... 91
E 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................. 91
E 1.2 Responsibilities ........................................................................................................................................ 91
E 1.3 Standards and Regulations ...................................................................................................................... 92
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations ............................................................................................ 92
E 1.4 Quality ..................................................................................................................................................... 92
E 1.5 Preferred Manufacturers......................................................................................................................... 93
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers............................................................................................... 93
E 1.6 Safety in Design ....................................................................................................................................... 94
E 1.7 Sustainability ........................................................................................................................................... 94
E 1.8 Cost Planning ........................................................................................................................................... 94
E 1.9 Attendance .............................................................................................................................................. 95
E 1.10 Design Conditions .................................................................................................................................. 96
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions .......................................................................................................... 96
E 2 Performance Criteria ............................................................................................................................ 97
E 2.1 Electrical Systems .................................................................................................................................... 97
E 2.2 Cable Support and Duct Systems........................................................................................................... 101
E 2.3 Low Voltage Power Systems .................................................................................................................. 105
Table 4 – GPO Colours ........................................................................................................................... 105
E 2.4 High Voltage Power Systems ................................................................................................................. 106
E 2.5 Power Generation ................................................................................................................................. 107
E 2.6 Uninterruptable Power Supply .............................................................................................................. 111
E 2.7 Switchboards ......................................................................................................................................... 112
Diagram 1 - Switchboard Separation Diagram ...................................................................................... 112
E 2.8 Power Factor and Harmonic Correction ................................................................................................ 120
E 2.9 Lighting .................................................................................................................................................. 120
E 2.10 Emergency Lighting ............................................................................................................................. 125
E 2.11 Lightning Protection ............................................................................................................................ 126
E 3 Design Reports ....................................................................................................................................127
Table 5 Electrical Services Design Deliverables Matrix:......................................................................... 129
E 3.1 Design Certification ............................................................................................................................... 132
E 4 Record Drawings .................................................................................................................................132
E 5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals ..................................................................................................132
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
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E 1 General Requirements
E 1.1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary the University clauses are included, with the Contract
Supervisors approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed in a box, with italic text.
E 1.2 Responsibilities
To be inserted – Clause 1.1 RESPONSIBILITIES – NATSPEC 0901 Electrical Systems
The scope of works for the electrical systems include, but are not limited to, the following:
•
•
•
The designer shall insert a bullet point list of the scope of electrical works
……
…….
The contractor shall determine the full scope of the works from review of this specification and all
associated contract drawings.
The contractor shall attend site to satisfy himself of the existing systems and site conditions.
No claim shall be entertained for lack of knowledge of the contract documentation or of existing
systems which could reasonably have been known from prior investigation
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 91 of 269
E 1.3 Standards and Regulations
The following table details the Standards and Regulations, which are additional to those referred to
in Section A and are specific to the Electrical Services:
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations
CODE
DESCRIPTION
AS/NZS 3000
Wiring Rules
AS/NZS 3008
Electrical Installations – Selection of Cables
AS/ACIF S009
Installation Requirements for Customer Cabling
AS/NZS 1680
Interior Lighting
AS/NZS 1158
Lighting for Roads and Public Spaces
AS 2293
Emergency Escape Lighting and Exit Signs for Buildings
AS 2243
Safety in Laboratories
AS 2067
Substations and High Voltage Installations Exceeding 1kV a.c.
AS/NZS 1768
Lighting Protection
HB 13
Electrical Equipment for Hazardous Areas
NCC
National Construction Code
SAPNS
SA Power Networks Service and Installation Rules
This above list is not all-inclusive and those associated with the project are responsible for
identifying and complying with all standards relevant to the scope of works.
All Electrical Services installations must comply with the most current version of the standard or
code at the time of tender.
To be inserted – Clause 1.5 Standards – NATSPEC 0901 Electrical Systems
Comply in all respects with the requirements of the current standards applicable to the works in
respect to equipment, materials, workmanship and installation techniques.
Comply with the following standards and regulations:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
National Construction Code
Australian Standards
SA Water Corporation
Australian Gas Association Regulations
SA Fire Services Regulations
SA Government Acts governing the Works
Work Health and Safety Regulations
SA Power Networks codes and standards
E 1.4 Quality
All electrical services design work is required to be carried out via suitably qualified and experienced
designers. the University may request copies of the designer’s calculations in order to review.
The University may also request changes to the design personnel if there is concern that the
personnel engaged are not at an appropriate level of experience.
All design work must be checked and reviewed by a suitably qualified and experienced peer prior to
issuing for pricing. The designer must have a formal check and review process. The University may
request evidence of the design checking and review process.
On occasion a designer may utilise a third party designer (sub-consultant / specialist contractor /
lighting manufacturer / supplier, etc.) however, the designer retains responsibility for the design and
review process. Unless specifically directed otherwise, all equipment designed, specified and
installed must be new and of the highest quality.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 92 of 269
E 1.5 Preferred Manufacturers
The University requires that only proven proprietary equipment, with local service availability must
be selected.
It is a requirement that new equipment is compatible with the Legacy systems the University has
implemented:
•
•
•
•
•
Emergency Lighting Central Test and Monitoring – Stanilite Nexus (LX or RF as applicable)
Building Management System – Modbus LONWorks – Preferred meters are Crompton
Integra 1534-M-5-M-030 with 282CTMECH CT isolation links and Circutor CVM-MINI-LON
Power Analyser
Automatic Lighting Control – Clipsal C-Bus
Fire Detection and Alarm – Ampac
Emergency Warning and Intercommunication System - Ampac
Whilst the University does not wish to restrict the designer’s ability to select the most appropriate
equipment to meet particular requirements it is the University’s preference that equipment selected
satisfies the following:
•
•
•
•
•
A reputable manufacturer with a proven track record
Local Adelaide representation and support in design and post installation operation
Local Adelaide spare parts availability
Australian manufacturer is preferred.
Unrestricted access to system hardware and licensed software
The following is an indicative list, which the University considers to represent the desired quality
levels:
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers
Equipment / Component
Manufacturer / Supplier
Switchgear and components
Schneider, ABB, NHP
Electrical Accessories
Clipsal, HPM, Legrand
High Voltage Transformers and Components
ABB, Crompton, Reyrolle, Schnieder
General Luminaires
Moonlighting, Phillips Lighting, Pierlite, Eagle
Lighting
Diesel Generators
Caterpillar, Cummins, FG Wilson, Olympian
The electrical services designer and contractor are welcome to propose alternatives, however, they
must clearly demonstrate equal or greater technical, cost and/or quality performance.
To be inserted – Clause 1.10 Alternative Products
All specified items represent a required level of quality and performance.
Unless specifically required to integrate with an existing University of South Australia system the
contractor is at liberty to propose alternatives to the specified items subject to compliance with the
University of South Australia Design and Construction Specifications and written approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
Where alternative equipment to that specified is proposed by the contractor, the contractor shall
provide full details of technical, cost and/or programme benefit to the project with full supporting
documentation (including calculations, modelling, etc.) at the contractors cost. The contractor shall
retain design responsibility for any alternative proposals accepted including any unforseen issues.
Any unapproved products provided shall be removed and replaced with the specified item at no cost
to the University.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
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E 1.6 Safety in Design
Those involved in the design of the electrical services must undertake the necessary Safety in Design
reviews and activities as required by the contract.
The electrical designer should consider the following particular items as part of the Safety in Design,
however they are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
Locations of luminaires and other electrical equipment for maintenance i.e. at height, above
or adjacent to risk areas, proximity to other plant, etc.
Methods of safe isolation for access and maintenance of switchboards and equipment
Satisfactory maintenance space around electrical equipment
Satisfactory space and access to internal components requiring maintenance and/or
replacement
The designer must address the Safety in Design aspects in the Design Reports
The installer of the works must review the Safety in Design documentation throughout the works, to
identify any risks throughout the works and any residual risks to the University on completion.
E 1.7 Sustainability
The designer must take into consideration the Environmental Sustainability of the electrical services
taking into account the whole of life cost and operational benefit.
All Buildings must be designed to suit the local environmental conditions. They must be designed to
optimise the thermal and lighting conditions using minimum non-renewable sources of energy.
Elements that the designer must consider, include, but are not limited to, the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Energy efficiency
Materials selection
Decommissioning / disposal of equipment at end-of-life
Control methodology including automatic controls
Luminaire selection
Demand management
Power factor correction
The sustainability aspects must be addressed in the Design Reports
E 1.8 Cost Planning
The electrical services designer must provide input into the project cost planning as required by the
contract.
The electrical services designer should provide cost planning advice for the supply, installation,
associated works, contingencies, overheads, etc. to indicate a total cost to the University.
Any element specifically excluded must be clearly indicated so that a total cost to the University may
be determined.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 94 of 269
E 1.9 Attendance
It is incumbent on the electrical designer and contractor to make themselves aware of existing
conditions as far as reasonably practicable when designing and/or performing works at the
University. The University reserves the right to hold the designer and/or contractor liable for works
performed that are of a sub-standard or non-compliant nature.
The electrical services designer must attend design and construction meetings as required by the
contract and outlined below.
The University expects the electrical services designer, not a delegate to attend at a minimum:•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Technical reviews as directed by the Contract Supervisor
Design team meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one meeting)
Construction phase meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one
meeting), plus any meetings where the Contract Supervisor deems there is significant
electrical elements that requires the designer’s input
Ongoing site inspections as considered appropriate by the Contract Supervisor (minimum bimonthly)
Electrical services first fix inspection
Electrical services final fix inspection
Electrical services commissioning where required by Contract Supervisor
Electrical services final / defects inspection prior to Practical Completion
The Electrical designer must identify his/her proposed meeting site attendance schedule in their
engagement proposal
The electrical installer must attend meetings as required by the contract and considered necessary
by the Contracts Supervisor
To be inserted – Clause 1.9 PERMITS NOTICES AND INSPECTIONS – NATSPEC 0901 Electrical
Systems
Make applications, obtain all permits, and arrange testing, all as necessary for the installation and
placing into operation of the works where required by any Authority including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SA Water corporation
Department of Premier and Cabinet – Work Safe SA
The Office of the Technical Regulator
Australian Communications Authority
Site Telecommunications Carrier
SA Power Networks
SA Fire Services
Energy Retailer
Provide all associated documentation required for the applications. Pay all associated fees.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
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E 1.10 Design Conditions
All air conditioning systems must be designed to meet the following design criteria:
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions
Item
Design Criteria
• 46.0⁰C dry bulb maximum
Ambient Conditions under
• 22.0⁰C wet bulb maximum
which all plant must operate –
• Full Solar load
Adelaide Region
• 0.0⁰C dry bulb minimum
Ambient Conditions under
which all plant must operate –
• Design Conditions as per AIRAH DA09
Other Regions
Internal conditions for plant full
• Cooling: 24.0⁰C dry bulb, 50% Humidity
load performance
• Heating: 23.0⁰C dry bulb, 50% humidity
Earth resistivity
• 100 ohm – metres nominal
• 24 hour operation
Hours of operation – general
• 7 days
• Not to exceed levels specified for commercial
Maximum noise levels at
properties and residential properties in the
adjoining property boundaries
Environmental Protection Act
Equipment balancing criteria –
• All equipment not to exceed limits set in Australian
maximum allowable vibration
Standard 1359 – Rotating electrical machines – General
levels (maximum peak to peak
requirements and Australian Standard 2625 – Rotating
displacement mm)
and reciprocating machinery – Mechanical vibration
Protective earthing system
• MEN earthing system in accordance with AS/NZS3000
• 400/230 volts, +10%, -6%, 3 phase, 4 wire, 50Hz in
accordance with SA Power Networks Service Rules and
Conditions of Supply
Electricity Supply
• Design and utilise only systems and equipment to be
capable of guaranteed rated performance on both
present and future supply voltages
• Voltage drop at switchboards limited to 2.5%
(maximum) of nominal LV supply voltage of 400 volt, 3
phase.
Voltage Drop
• Voltage drop at final distribution points limited to 5%
(maximum) of nominal LV supply voltage of 400 volt, 3
phase
• Ceiling 70%
Internal Lighting Reflectances
• Walls 50%
• Floors 20%, unless actual finishes reflectances known
Internal lighting maintenance
• 0.8 unless site specific conditions dictate otherwise
factor
• As agreed with the University, else to the requirements
Population Densities
on AS1668.2
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
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E 2 Performance Criteria
E 2.1 Electrical Systems
The designer must calculate the estimated diversified maximum demand of the works. Where
appropriate the designer must make an application to SA Power Networks to identify associated
utility infrastructure works.
The building main switchboards and consumer mains must be sized and rated to accommodate the
estimated total diversified maximum demand.
The sub-main cabling must be sized based on the protective device size. If the protective device is a
moulded case circuit breaker the sub-main cabling must be sized based on the maximum frame size.
The sub-main protective device sizing and volt-drop calculations must be based on the estimated
maximum demand of the sub-board plus 25% spare for future expansion.
The final accessories must be permanently labelled using the manufacturer’s proprietary labelling
system (i.e. Clipsal label window, Legrand Excel Life press stud etc.) or fixed labelling system such as
IPA studs. Adhesive labels must not be used.
The accessory labelling must be fixed to the body of the accessory, not to the removable cover
plates.
Where the accessory is installed in a student accessible area and has a removable cover plate it must
be fixed by a screw or similar requiring a tool for removal.
An example of accessory range considered to satisfy the University requirements is the Legrand
Excel Life Secure Plate series.
Where works are required to existing systems the designer must ensure the scope of works makes
due allowances for out-of-hours working where necessary, temporary works to maintain supplies,
works necessary to maintain existing supplies etc.
Where works detail removal of existing services or making existing services redundant the designer
and installer must ensure that any redundant electrical equipment is safely isolated, disconnected,
removed and disposed of unless specifically directed otherwise by the Contracts Supervisor. This
includes final circuit cabling in ceiling spaces, wall cavities, underground conduits, etc.
When the existing final circuits are made redundant and/or removed, the corresponding circuit
breaker (or fuse carrier) must be removed and handed in to the University for spares, and a pole
filler supplied to clearly show actual spare capacity.
To be inserted – Natspec Clause 2.2 – Electrical Accessories – 0901 Electrical Systems
Quality Assurance
Implement a quality system for the works in accordance with Australian/New Zealand ISO 9000.1 –
Quality management and quality assurance Standards – Guidelines for selection and use and
Australian/New Zealand ISO9001 – Quality Systems – Model for quality assurance in design,
development, production, installation and servicing.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 97 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.3 Accessories, Outlets and Appliances – Natspec 0901 Electrical Services
Provide and install all accessories, outlets, appliances and appliance connections complete with the
final interior design of the space.
Accessory selection and locations require approval to ensure that each item is compatible with the
final interior design of the space.
Provide accessories and outlets as follows:
Accessory flush plates – removable coverplates shall be fixed to the accessory by means of a
screw or similar as per Legrand “Excel Life Secure Plate Series” or equal. Accessory to include
proprietary circuit identification as per Clipsal “Window ID” and Legrand Excel Life series X range
or equal.
– Protected and/or weatherproof accessories - non-corroding metal or polycarbonate enclosures.
– Accessories in plantrooms – Polycarbonate enclosures to min IP53 as per Clipsal “Weathershield”
range or equal
– Isolating switches or direct connected equipment including Mechanical Services plant - "Clipsal
56" or ‘NHP ISO’ series or approved equivalent.
– Isolating switches for fire and life safety plant including Mechanical Services smoke control
systems - "Wilco A" series or approved equivalent.
Switches:
–
Provide 15 A minimum rated rocker switches suitable for fluorescent lighting loads. Light
switches shall include proprietary labelling system and secure coverplate as described above.
– Provide multi switch positions ganged under one cover plate, arranged in ganged boxes similar in
plan to the lighting points controlled. Where more than 6 switches are required at the one
location, install mechanisms on a flush mounted multigang lighting control panel.
Power outlets:
–
–
–
–
Provide combination rocker switched socket outlets, generally flush wall mounted and of
identical manufacture to switches. Mount double outlets under one flush plate. Power outlets
shall include proprietary labelling system and secure coverplates as described above.
Fit neon indicators as an integral part of the flush plate to all laboratory, workshop and cleaners
socket outlets.
Provide three phase outlets of 5 pin (3mm diameter earth and neutral) pattern, housed in noncorroding metal or polycarbonate enclosures, "Wilco A" or "Clipsal 56" series or approved
equivalent. Outlets to be controlled by an integral lockable switch.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 98 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.4 Appliances – Natspec 0901 Electrical Services
General:
–
–
–
–
–
–
Provide all appliances internally wired and complete with control switches, controllers and
connecting links.
Unless stated otherwise provide isolating switch adjacent all direct connected appliances and
equipment.
Connect each three phase appliance with a separate neutral and earth.
Install the final connection to any equipment installed away from, but within 600mm of, a wall or
column in flexible PVC conduit.
Where any equipment is located at greater than 600mm from the wall, provide cabling installed
within concealed conduit, in-floor ducting cast into the slab or service pole.
Check immediately all equipment arriving on site for its electrical loading and phase connections.
Advise the Contract Supervisor in writing where equipment is deemed to be unsuitable for
connection to the designated building supply and await instruction.”
To be inserted – Clause 3.5 Cable Systems – Natspec 0901 Electrical Systems
General
Provide the following main and submain systems in accordance with NCC and Australian Standards:
–
–
Main and submain cables in electrical switchrooms and mechanical plantrooms on cable ladders.
Submain cables on cable trays or ladders.
Provide the following systems for final sub-circuits:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Cast concrete slabs: Unsheathed cable in heavy duty UPVC conduit.
False ceiling spaces: Thermoplastic insulated and sheath (TPS) cables supported by steel
catenary wires.
Accessible roof spaces: Thermoplastic insulated and sheathed cables supported by steel catenary
wires or fixed directly to structural members.
Concealed spaces: Unsheathed cable in UPVC conduit.
Plant rooms: Unsheathed cable in heavy duty UPVC conduit, on spacer blocks.
Plastered or rendered surfaces: Cable in UPVC conduit.
Stud walls without bulk insulation: Thermoplastic insulated and sheathed cables.
Walls with bulk insulation: Cable in UPVC conduit.
Buried in ground:
–
PVC cables in heavy duty UPVC conduit.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 99 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 3.6 Accessories - Natspec 0901 – Electrical Systems
General
Selection: Compatible with the final interior design.
Orientation: Compatible with the final design.
Position: Make allowance for accessories to be relocated within a radius of 2 meters from position
shown on design drawings.
Acoustic separation: Satisfy the project requirements for acoustic separation.
Labelling: Provide proprietary labels, i.e. Clipsal ID mechanisms, Legrand push-in plugs etc., or
engraved traffolyte labels. Printed adhesive labels are not acceptable.
Construction
Face plates: High impact polycarbonate construction or metal.
Protected and weatherproof: Non-corroding metal or polycarbonate enclosures.
Location
Mounting heights: To the centre of the equipment.
Face brickwork or special finish walls: To the nearest brick, panel, tile course and mounted vertically.
Rendered brick or insitu concrete walls: Recessed horizontal in standard metal wall boxes.
Hollow block walls: Fixed direct to the blockwork.
Lightweight stud walls or demountable partitions: Directly on the panelling using proprietary fixing
brackets.
Fixed furniture: Insulated and mechanically protected at the rear.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 100 of 269
E 2.2 Cable Support and Duct Systems
Cable tray must be designed to support all consumer and sub-main cabling and be sized to provide
50% physical spare capacity for future expansion.
Cable trays must be designed to support the final circuit cabling along the main reticulation routes
i.e. along corridors etc. and sized to provide 50% spare physical capacity for future expansion.
Conduits must be designed and sized in accordance with AS/NZS3000 and provide 50% spare
physical capacity for future expansion.
Cable pits must be designed to provide sufficient space to pull and band cables through and making
due allowance for a 50% increase of cabling through the pit.
To be inserted – Clause 2.1 Conduits – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and Duct Systems
Amend the “Sizes” and “Fixings” section as follows:
Sizes
Conduits: ≥ 20 mm.
Underground: ≥ 40 mm.
Conduits for telecommunications: ≥ 25 mm.
Fixings
Surface mounted: Double sided fixed.
In concrete slabs: Tie to structural steel.
Type: Metal saddles are to be double sided. Zinc plated for internal use and hot dipped galvanised for
external use or where exposed.
To be inserted – Clause 2.3 Non- Metallic conduits and fittings – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and
Duct Systems Insert the following to “General” section:
Buried conduit: Heavy Duty: AS/NZS 2053
To be inserted – Clause 2.5 Cable Support Systems – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and Duct
Systems
Insert the following:
“Minimum steel thickness:
–
–
–
–
Trays < 150mm wide: 1 mm.
Trays > 150mm, < 300 mm wide: 1.2 mm.
Trays > 300mm wide: 1.6 mm.
Folded edge > 19mm deep and radiused.
Accessories: Use fish plates or splines for tees, crosses and joints.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 101 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.6 Catenary Systems – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and Duct Systems
Replace the clause with the following:
General
Catenary systems: May be used within suspended ceiling spaces in lieu of cable tray and ladder
systems for support of final circuit wiring only.
Wire: Provide 3mm stainless steel or PVC coated 3mm galvanized cable, couplings and support
fixings for catenary systems.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.7 Cable Pits – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and Duct Systems
Amend “General” section as follows:
General
Location: Provided as indicated on the drawings or at every major change in direction of a pipe duct
and conduit, or at 100 m minimum intervals on long straight duct and conduit routes.
Cable support: Use galvanised iron brackets to separate layers of cables in the pit.
Slack cables: Leave maximum length of slack cables in pits to cater for future alteration.”
Amend “Pit Covers” section as follows:
“Pit covers
General: Provide pit covers to suit expected loads of pedestrian or vehicular traffic in the location in
which it is installed. Fit flush with the top of the pit. Use reinforced concrete or load carrying "Gatic"
type or similar. Provide lid construction in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.8 Columns – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and Duct Systems
Insert the following to “Design” section:
“Footings: To be designed by an accredited structural engineer and independently certified.”
Insert the following:
“Accessory mountings: Provide adjustable mountings, to suit accessories, and with provision for
rigidly clamping each item in position, once adjusted correctly.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 102 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 3.3 – Conduit Systems – Installation – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and
Duct Systems
Insert the following:
“Draw-in boxes
Provide draw-in boxes no greater than 7.5 m apart for vertical lengths of conduit runs.
Conduit saddles and brackets
Space conduit saddles a maximum of 1200 mm apart for metallic conduit and 1000 mm apart for
non-metallic conduit. In areas subject to high ambient temperatures or other severe duty, maximum
saddle spacing for non-metallic conduit 500 mm.
Where two or more conduits are run in parallel they may be grouped. Provide suitable surface
brackets where conduits cannot be fixed.
Conduits in concrete slabs
Conduit boxes: Use deep type conduit boxes in reinforced concrete slabs so that the conduit may be
run above the bottom layer of reinforcement. Terminate metallic conduit in floor slabs in solid cast
metal boxes. Do not use pressed metal boxes.
Expansion joints: Where crossing expansion or construction joints the conduit installation make
Allowance for any movement between the adjacent slabs. Finish the conduit in the first slab poured
to within 90 mm of the joint and provide a 300mm long sleeve of the next largest conduit size
internally greased and fitted over the first conduit. Fit the conduit in the second slab poured similarly
be fitted into the larger conduit leaving a clearance of 100 mm minimum between the conduit ends
for movement. Tape all joints make water proof prior to the concrete being poured.
Conduits and fittings chased in
Route: Do not bury in plastered walls except for switch boxes, lighting boxes, general-purpose
outlets, couplings and junction boxes. Space parallel conduits at least 10 mm apart.
Minimum cover: Where chases are greater than 80 mm in width, provide expanded mesh over the
full width and length of the chase.
Conduit size: 25mm maximum diameter.
Fixing: Fix firmly in position to prevent movement and/or vibration
Prohibited floor slabs and face brickwork
Do not run conduits in the floor slabs of boiler rooms, plant rooms and tank rooms. Chasing will not
be permitted in face brickwork. Install any conduit or wall boxes in such walls on the reverse face.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 103 of 269
to be inserted – Clause 3.5 Catenary Systems – Installation – Natspec 0911 Cable Support and Duct
Systems
Insert following text to “Anchoring” section:
“Do not fix catenary systems to other trades plant, equipment or associated support systems. Provide
anchoring at maximum 3m spacing”
Insert following text to “Fixing” section:
“Cables shall be tied to catenary at maximum 1m spacing using proprietary nylon cable ties.
Maximum deflection for loaded catenaries shall not exceed 150mm”
To be inserted – Clause 3.6 Cables in Trenches – Installation – Natspec 0911 – Cable Support and
Duct Systems Replace clause with the following:
General: Conform to the Service trenching worksection.
Sand bed and surround
Provide at least 150 mm clean sharp sand around cables and conduits installed underground.
Clear the bottom of the trench of all rocks, stones and other hard and sharp materials. Fill the trench
to a depth of 50mm with a layer of selected filling prior to cable placement.
Sealing ducts and conduits
Seal the ends of conduits entering the building with a weak concrete slurry to prevent moisture and
vermin entry. Seal the joints of all conduits or pipes enclosing PVC/PVC and XLPE/PVC wiring with
approved PVC jointing compound.
Draw wires
Arrange so that cables may be drawn out of the duct and conduit in the event of any cable failure.
Install 4 mm² polypropylene draw string or 2.5 mm² galvanised steel wire in conduits for future
installation of cable.
Water proofing: Provide puddle flanges around conduits where they pass into cable pits. Install bell
mouth accessory on end of conduit located within wall of pits and flush with inside surface of pits on
conduits > 100mm dia.
Pipe ducts and conduits
Bedding: 50 mm compacted depth, compacted fill and extending the full width of the trench.
Layout: Avoid sharp bends and locate drawing in points above ground.
Cleaning: Swab clean before installing any cables.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 104 of 269
E 2.3 Low Voltage Power Systems
The electrical designer must calculate the estimated maximum demand of the proposed electrical
works.
The designer must calculate and indicate earthing conductor size.
Where the designer has based the protective device selection using a single manufacturers
cascading to satisfy fault level protection the designer must clearly indicate this in the Design Report
and nominate the manufacturer the design is based on. Should a tendering contractor nominate to
use an alternative manufacturer, it is incumbent on the designer to ensure the alternate design
operates as designed.
Where the designer has used fault current limited fuses to manage fault levels this must be
documented in the Design Report.
The designer must specify and utilise a common manufacturer of protective devices throughout the
system. Where the works are on an existing system the protective device manufacturer must be as
per existing, where practicable.
The designer must clearly indicate where dedicated power supplies are required to be provided to
items of equipment.
Where works are documented to main switchboards and/or modifying sub-main cables the designer
must include for thermoscanning of terminations at load to confirm installation integrity.
Double GPO outlets are generally required to be provided, unless single outlets are
required/applicable to specific items of equipment.
Single gang cleaner’s outlets, on dedicated circuits, must be provided at maximum 20m spacing.
As a guide, two (2) double GPO’s must be provided per workstation, however, the designer must
confirm the actual outlet provision required.
Where socket outlets are provided in internal student accessible communal areas the designer must
allow for the provision of USB charger outlets integrated with the outlet on a common face plate.
Exact provision is to be agreed with the Contract Supervisor as part of the design review process.
The designer must clearly indicate which outlets are to be on cleaners supply, emergency standby
supply, UPS supply and/or supplying dedicated equipment.
GPO’s must be the following colours (unless in medical installations where the requirements of
AS/NZS3003 shall prevail):
Table 4 – GPO Colours
GPO Provided for
Cleaners Outlets
Emergency Standby Supply
UPS Supply
Colour
Beige
Red
Red
Engraving
Cleaners Only
UPS
Unless directed otherwise, final circuit cabling must be designed and arranged in accordance with
the following parameters:
•
•
Maximum sixteen (16) 10A outlets (i.e. 16 singles / 8 doubles) per 20A circuit
Maximum ten (10) 10A outlets (i.e. 10 singles / 5 doubles) per 16A circuit
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 105 of 269
•
•
Maximum 60% load on a lighting final circuit protective device i.e. 6A on a 10A circuit
breaker
Maximum 20 electric ballasts per 30mA RCD
The designer must give due consideration to the provision of dedicated supplies to nominated
equipment and / or specific areas i.e. kitchenettes, laboratories etc. where individual items of
equipment may exceed the capacity of standard GPO circuit arrangements.
The aluminium conductors must not be specified without prior approval from the University.
The designer must consider EMI issues where appropriate to the project i.e. high current, sensitive
equipment, accommodation areas etc. and address in the Design Report
A communication earth cable must be provided to all communication cabinets. Refer to the
University ISTS ‘Telecommunications Infrastructure’ section for requirements.
To be inserted – Clause 2.3 Power Cables – Natspec 0921 Low Voltage Power Systems Amend
“Cable” section as follows:
“Default insulation: X-90.”
“Minimum size: Conform to the following:
- Lighting sub-circuits: 2.5 mm2.
- Power sub-circuits: 2.5 mm2.
- Sub-mains: 6 mm2.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.3 Non- Metallic conduits and fittings – Natspec 0911 Cable Support
and Duct Systems
Insert the following to “Plastic switched socket outlets” section:
“Removable faceplates: Securely fixed with retaining screw mechanism.”
Insert the following:
“Pendant outlets: Suspend at 1800mm above floor level. Enclose sub-circuit support wire PVC flexible
sheath. Use stranded stainless steel support wire.”
E 2.4 High Voltage Power Systems
The only High Voltage power system the University currently has responsibility for is at the Mawson
Lakes campus.
The designer must review and assess the existing system infrastructure and ensure that all
equipment designed and installed is compatible with existing systems.
The design of any works to the high voltage systems must consider spare capacity for future
expansion and this must be specifically identified and addressed in the Design Report.
The University has no particular preference between oil and air cooled transformers however all
transformers must include adjustable tap changing.
All protection relays must incorporate the following, at a minimum:
•
•
•
Time overcurrent
Instant overcurrent
Time earth fault
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 106 of 269
The current equipment types installed at Mawson Lakes are:
•
•
•
•
Circuit Breakers
o Reyrolle Pacific 11kV VD4 – LMT
o PPS Reyrolle LMVP/RPMT/QMRO
Line Switches
o PPS Reyrolle LMVP/RPMT/QMRO
Protection Relays
o Reyrolle/Siemens Argus 7SR11
o Schneider MiCOM P121
Fault trip cabinets
o Magellan 24V Powertronics MCR Series Rectifier 24MCR 005
The designer is at liberty to propose equipment types to suit the project, however, the University
requires vacuum type circuit breakers to be considered due to their lesser maintenance
requirements.
All equipment selections must consider and be accompanied by full details of the required
maintenance due to the inconvenience caused to the University operations to carry out safe
maintenance on the high voltage installation.
The University has a preference to limit the range of manufacture in the installation to reduce the
maintenance burden of carrying various spare parts. The designer must take this into account in
their equipment selection.
All equipment selections must be identified in the Design Report.
E 2.5 Power Generation
Unless specifically directed by the Contracts Supervisor the designer must undertake a risk and
cost/benefit analysis of the works to identify if inclusion of alternative power generation is
appropriate. This must be documented in the Design Report.
Where permanently installed diesel standby generators are agreed to be provided the following
must apply:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The designer must undertake an analysis of the required standby load to be supported. This
must be documented in the Design Report
The generator must be sized to meet the required standby load plus 25% for future
expansion
Unless otherwise directed, the generator must be rated for standby operation
The designer must undertake an acoustic analysis of the generator and make due allowance
for the provision of attenuation as appropriate
The generator must have sufficient fuel capacity to provide 24 hours running at 75% of full
load
The generator must include a self bunded base mounted integral fuel tank. The designer
must advise the Contracts Supervisor if this is not possible.
The electrical designer must carry out all necessary fuel system design to ensure correct
operation of the generator
The designer must allow for the necessary interfaces with the University BMS and Security
systems to transmit the required alarm conditions and ensure they are incorporated
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 107 of 269
•
•
•
•
•
The generator system must be designed with a proprietary control system interfaced with
changeover switch. The generator system must not rely on external control systems (i.e.
BMS) to function correctly
The generator must be located and oriented to ensure that maintenance access and refuelling access is provided
Where an internal generator is proposed the electrical designer must ensure adequate
ventilation and attenuation is provided
Where a generator is provided this must generally not be considered the standby power
source for wet fire systems
The generator must include a facility to connect a test load to allow offline full load testing
without disconnecting the normal supply
To be inserted – Clause 2.3 Engines – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine Driven
Replace “General” section with the following:
“General: Provide plug-in or bolted terminal facility for connection of a temporary test load such that
permanent load remains connected.”
Delete “Resistive test load” section.
To be inserted – Clause 2.4 Diesel Fuel Storage – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine Driven
“Provide an integral double wall self bunded base fuel tank with sufficient capacity to provide
24hours operation at 75% of rated standby load with all necessary piping, controls, indicators and
alarms.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.6 Controls – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine Driven
“Provide manufacturers proprietary control system integrated with manual / auto changeover
switch. The system shall not rely on any third party system i.e. BMS to function correctly.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.7 Control Panels – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine Driven
“Alarm / control signals
General: Provide the following signals for connection to the facility BMS and University Electronic
Security System i.e. Gallagher:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Mains failure – signal from ATS
Generator running and able to accept load
Generator at 80% full load
Fuel level at 20% capacity
Common fault
Mains reinstated / healthy – signal from ATS
Generator switched off, cool down complete and in standby mode
Emergency stop button operated”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 108 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.10 Acoustic Enclosures – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine
Driven
Replace “General” section with the following:
“General
General: Provide weatherproof acoustic enclosures to surround generating sets, including inlet
and outlet sound attenuators to meet the requirements of the acoustic assessment”
Replace “Sound pressure level limit” element with the following:
“Sound pressure level limit
General: Measure at 12 locations 1 m from the enclosure exterior surface, at 1.5 m above floor
or roof levels, with the generating set operating at constant maximum rated full load output,
with doors closed and service penetrations sealed to confirm compliance with acoustic
requirements”
To be inserted – Clause 2.11 Marking – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine Driven
“Signs
Warning: Provide the following on each side of each generating set:
– "WARNING: This set may start at any time without notice."
Lettering: 50 mm high, red on white background.”
To be inserted – Clause 3.2 Permanent Test Load – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine
Driven
Unless specifically directed by the Project Manager, delete requirement for permanent test load.
Generator system to be provided with facility to plug-in or terminals for connection of temporary test
load without need to disconnect permanent connection. –
To be inserted – Clause 3.5 Exhaust System – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine Driven
Insert following to “Exhaust piping” section:
“Locate exhaust more than 5m from pathway, any opening window or door or ventilation system air
intake, and as necessary to comply with AS/NZS1668.2.”
To be inserted – Clause 3.8 Completion – Natspec 0931 Power Generation – Engine Driven
Insert the following:
“Upon completion of all tests fill fuel tank to capacity immediately prior to handover”
To be inserted – Clause 2.2 Photovoltaic Module - Natspec 0933 Power Generation - Photovoltaic
Insert the following to “General” section:
“Photovoltaic modules and inverters must comply with IEC61730 and either IEC61215 or IEC61646, as
detailed in AS/NZS 5033 and shall be an approved product on the Clean Energy Council accreditation
scheme”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 109 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 3.1 Installation – Natspec 0933 Power Generation - Photovoltaic
Replace “Support” section with the following:
“Support
Aluminium support only. Timber support not acceptable.
Roof mounted plant and equipment:
If a horizontal platform is required, or the area of the plant and equipment is extensive, seek the advice
of a professional engineer for the documentation of a suitable platform.
If balustrades or screening are required, seek the advice of a registered architect.
For roof level support circumstances, if any of the following apply, seek the advice of a professional
engineer:
The total load from any unit of plant or equipment exceeds 500 kg.
The load from a unit of plant or equipment to any single support point exceeds 100 kg.
The average loading of plant and equipment over the area extending 1 m on all sides beyond the plant
and equipment exceeds 25 kg/m2.
If the roof slope is greater than 10 degrees, adopt the manufacturers’ documented installation
procedures, or seek the advice of a professional engineer.
In all other cases, under each support point use treated timbers (90 x 45 mm) laid parallel to the span
of the roof sheeting or the roof pitch extending to the first purlin, rafter or batten more than 1 m from
the plant or equipment.
Ground level mounted plant and equipment:
If the ground slope is greater than 15 degrees, or the area of the plant and equipment is extensive,
seek the advice of a professional engineer for the documentation of a suitable slab or platform.
If balustrades or screening are required, seek the advice of a registered architect.
In all other cases, provide proprietary plastic or concrete supports installed with falls that achieve a
raised, impervious and water shedding bearing surface.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 110 of 269
E 2.6 Uninterruptable Power Supply
Unless specifically directed by the Contracts Supervisor the designer must undertake a risk and
cost/benefit analysis of the works to identify if inclusion of permanently installed uninterruptible
power supplies (UPS) is appropriate. This must be documented in the Design Report
Where UPS are agreed to be provided the following must apply:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The designer must undertake an analysis of the load to be supported. This must be
documented in the Design Report
The UPS must be sized to meet the required load plus 25% for future expansion
The designer must nominate the capacity and duty of the unit at full load in the Design
Report
The UPS distribution must be arranged with an external maintenance bypass to allow
removal of the complete unit (including associated batteries)
The designer must allow for the necessary interfaces with the University BMS and Security
systems to transmit the required alarm conditions and ensure they are incorporated
The UPS must be located to ensure that maintenance access is provided
The designer must ensure adequate ventilation and temperature control is provided to
maintain operation
To be inserted – Clause 2.6 Monitoring and Control – Natspec 0937 Uninterruptible Power Supply
Replace “Remote functions” section as follows:
“Remote Functions
General: Connect the following status indicators to the BMS System:
–
–
–
–
Mains healthy
Mains fail
Supply on UPS
Common fault – operation of scheduled alarms
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
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E 2.7 Switchboards
All switchboards must be dead front and fully enclosed to min IP2X
Unless a higher level of separation is required to satisfy the requirements of AS/NZS3000 main
switchboards must generally have Form 2b separation however the incoming supply(s) and
switch(es) sections must be provided with Form 4b separation. Refer following Diagram:
Diagram 1 - Switchboard Separation Diagram
B1
D1
C1
A1
D2
Incoming
B2
C2
C3
D
2
a
D
2
b
D
2
c
D
2
d
C4
B3
C5
Section A
Incoming
Supply
Switches
Form 4b
Section B
Section C
Section D
Form 2b
Separation of busbars from all functional units
+
Terminals separated from busbars
Note: Additional vertical delineations of constructional units (sections) that may be required
are not shown
High current sections (>63A) of trade services switchboards must have Form 2b separation.
Distribution boards and MCB distribution sections of trade services switchboards must be Form 1
and have isolating chassis as per Schneider Isobar or NHP Grizz-Bar or approved equivalent.
Suffix ‘i’ and ‘h’ separation must not be accepted.
The designer must ensure adequate maintenance access is provided to all sections of the
switchboard.
Unless approved by the Contracts Administrator external switchboards must not be provided. Where
approved, external switchboards must be provided with a rain proof canopy covering the board and
the mandated maintenance space.
Switchboards defined as Heavy Current in AS/NZS3000 must not be located externally under any
circumstances.
All main switchboards must be provided with a multi-function digital meter integrated to the
University BMS system.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 112 of 269
All new building main switchboards must at a minimum include capacity for connection of power
factor correction.
All sub and distribution boards must include at a minimum, space for installation of metering for
future connection to the University BMS system.
Sub-metering must be provided as required by the NCC. The designer must identify in the Design
Report the extent of the metering to be provided.
All switchboards must be rated to carry the estimated diversified maximum demand plus 25% for
future expansion.
Main switchboards must provide 30% spare physical capacity for future expansion (i.e. 70% full). The
designer must identify the frame sizes of the spare ways.
Sub and distribution boards must provide 50% spare physical capacity for future expansion (i.e. 50%
full). The designer must nominate the chassis size including spare poles.
Transient overcurrent protection must be provided for the following:
•
•
•
All main switchboards
Sub and distribution boards served by externally run sub-main cabling
Sub and distribution boards serving ISTS equipment
An emergency lighting test switch must be provided to all distribution boards serving emergency
lighting.
The designer must provide the following information for each switchboard on the main single line
diagram:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Number of poles
Fault level in kA
IP rating
Form of separation
Top or bottom entry
Busbar temperature rating
The designer and installer attention is drawn to the University specific requirement for switchboard
labelling noted in the supplementary Natspec sections below. The designer and installer must ensure
the requirements are passed to switchboard manufacturers.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 113 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.1 General – Natspec 0941 Switchboards – Proprietary
Replace “Doors” section with the following:
“Doors
General: Provide lockable hinged doors with a circuit card holder unless enclosed in cupboards or in
an area which is not readily accessible to the public.
Swing: 120 degrees.
Handles: Carbon T-handle
Barrel: Bi Lock GGME coded to the University’s master-key system.”
Insert the following element:
“Gland plates: 3mm aluminium”
To be inserted – Clause 3.1 General – Natspec 0941 Switchboards – Proprietary
“Cable supports
Cable supports: Support or tie mains and submains cables on entry. Provide cable supports suitable
for stresses resulting from short circuit conditions”
To be inserted – Clause 2.1 Custom-built Switchboard Construction– Natspec 0942 Switchboards –
Custom Built
Layout
Locate cable zones and vertical busbar compartments to provide separate access to the zones and
compartments.
Equipment mounting heights above floor to the centre line of the equipment:
•
•
•
•
Toggles and handles of circuit breakers, fused switch units and isolators:
–
Wall mounted assemblies: 500-1900mm.
–
Floor mounted assemblies: 200 - 2000mm
Control switches, indicating lights, meters and instruments on doors:
–
Wall mounted assemblies: 1000 - 1700mm.
–
Floor mounted assemblies: 200 - 1800 mm.
Push button emergency switching devices: 800 - 1600mm.
Cable Terminations: to suit cable size, lug and bending radius.
Arc Chutes
Locate arc chutes and ventilating outlets so that emissions of flame or hot metal particles will not
cause electrical breakdown in adjacent compartments. Direct emissions upwards and away from
operator.
Ventilation
Provide adequate low-level inlet and high-level outlet vents at top, sides or rear of switchboards.
Ventilation openings on front of switchboards are prohibited. Cover ventilation openings using noncombustible and non-corroding 1mm mesh complete with replaceable dust filters (where specified) of
adequate area or provide head temperature rise calculations.
Construction
Wall mounting: Reinforce at bolt holes. For flush or semi-flush assemblies, provide angle trims of the
same material and finish as the enclosure.”
Replace the “Spare Capacity” section with the following:
Spare Capacity
Default spare poles: ≥ 50%.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 114 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.2 Cable Entries – Natspec 0942 Switchboards – Custom Built
Replace the “Materials” section with the following:
“Materials: Conform to the following:
Generally: 3 mm thick aluminium, 5 mm thick composite material or laminated phenolic.
For MIMS cables and cable glands: 6 mm thick brass.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.4 Doors and Covers – Natspec 0942 Switchboards Custom Built
Replace the “Door Layout” section with the following:
“Door layout
Maximum width: 900 mm.
Main switchboard doors – minimum width – 700mm
Minimum swing: At least 120º.
Door stays: Provide stays to outdoor assembly doors.
Adjacent doors: Space adjacent doors to allow both to open to 120º at the same time.”
Insert the following to “Door Construction” section:
“Barrel: Bi Lock GGME coded to the University’s master-key system.”
Replace the “Escutcheon plates” section with the following:
“Escutcheon plates
General: Provide hinged removable covers with neat circuit breaker toggle cut-outs allowing
interchangeability of 1, 2 and 3 pole circuit breakers. Provide corrosion-resistant lifting handles or
knobs. Provide unused circuit breaker toggle cut-outs with firmly fixed blanking in-fill pole covers.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.5 Factory Finishes – Natspec 0942 Switchboards – Custom Built
Replace “Factory finishes schedule” with the following:
Mounting structure (brackets)
To match enclosure
Enclosure - Indoor
Indoor assemblies: Orange X15
Assembly interior: Orange X15
Enclosure - Outdoor
Outdoor assemblies: Orange X15
Assembly interior: Orange X15
Escutcheons
Removable equipment panels:
Internal assemblies: White
External assemblies: White
Doors
To match enclosure
Plinths
Black
To be inserted – Clause 2.6 Busbars – Natspec 0942 Switchboards – Custom Built
Insert the following to the “General” section
“All miniature circuit breaker chassis sections shall be isolating type as Schneider Isobar or NHP
GrizzBar or approved equivalent.”
Insert the following:
“Protection: All unused terminals to be protected and insulated.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 115 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.7 Neutral Links and Earth Bars – Natspec 0942 Switchboards – Custom Built
Replace the “Terminals” section with the following:
“Terminals
General: Provide terminals for future circuits. 2 screw cable tunnels per circuit.
Earth bar: Provide dedicated earth bar for all RCD units.”
To be inserted – Clause 3.2 Assembly Entries – Natspec 0942 Switchboards – Custom Built
Replace “Cable entries” section with the following:
“Cable entries
General: Neatly adapt one or more cable entry plates, if fitted, to accept incoming cable enclosure.
Provide the minimum number of entry plates to leave spare capacity for future cable entries. Do not
run cables into the top of weatherproof assemblies.
Single core cables: Pass separately through non-ferrous gland plates via a propriety cable gland. Do
not use metal saddles”
To be inserted – Clause 3.3 Marking and Labelling – Natspec 0942 Switchboards – Custom Built
Replace the clause with the following:
General
General: Label the switchboard assembly with traffolyte engraved labels in conformance with
AS/NZS 3439.1 including the following minimum information:
Emergency operating procedures.
Switchboard reference
Source of supply
Board bus-bar rating
Form of Separation
Upstream supply protective device rating and type
Supply active size
Supply neutral size
Supply earth size
Fault current level
Manufacturer, date and unique project reference
Minimum text sizes: – Main switchboard designation = 25mm
– Distribution board / sub-distribution board / services switchboard designation = 15mm
– All other details = 6mm
Subcircuits: with IPA studs, colour to match phase, number to match circuit:
Legend cards: with description of final circuit including cable and protective device size”
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
To be inserted – Clause 2.2 Switch-Isolator – Natspec 0943 Switchboard components
“Locking: Provide for padlocking in the "OFF" position.
Handles: Removable only when switch is in open position.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.4 Fuse-Switch Units – Natspec 0943 Switchboard components
Replace “General” section with the following:
“General Operation: Provide an extendable operating handle at least 100 mm above the floor which
remains clear of other equipment over the range of positions.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 116 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.5 Auto-Transfer Switches – Natspec 0943 Switchboard components
“Indication: Provide power available indicator lights for each source and each phase of incoming
supplies.
Manual Operation: Provide control switches to enable manual override and testing of the changeover
transfer operation.
External Control Connections: Provide external control connections as necessary to integrate with
other systems i.e. generator, BMS etc.
External Status Interfaces: Provide external status interfaces as necessary to integrate with other
systems i.e. generator, BMS etc.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.6 Moulded Case and Miniature Circuit Breakers – Natspec 0943 Switchboard
components
Replace with clause with the following:
“General
All circuit breakers to be of common manufacture.
Moulded case breakers: To AS 60947.1, AS 2184 and AS 60947.2.
Miniature circuit breakers: Interrupting capacity classification to AS/NZS 60898.1 or AS/NZS 3111.
-
For general building services: Type C unless otherwise indicated.
-
For motor protection: Type D.
Operation: Independent manual operation including positive ON/OFF indicator.
Trip type: Conform to the following:
-
Moulded case breakers: < 250A. Adjustable thermal, fixed magnetic. ≥ 250A. Provide solid
state protection relay.
-
Miniature circuit breakers: Fixed thermal and fixed magnetic.
Adjustable short circuit trip settings: Set to discriminate with upstream and downstream devices using
Ipscc.
Minimum breaking capacity: – Moulded case circuit breakers: 18kA
– Miniature circuit breakers: 10kA
Isolation facility: Required.
Mounting: Mount circuit breakers so that the ON/OFF and current rating indications are clearly visible
with covers or escutcheons in position. Align operating toggles of each circuit breaker in the same
plane. To permit interchange of single pole and three pole breakers of the same frame size.
Utilisation category: Moulded case breakers:
-
Final subcircuits category: Category A.
-
Mains and submains: Category B.
Trip settings: Set as documented, seal, and label.
Interchangeable trip units: Connect trip units so that trip units are not live when circuit breaker
contacts are open.
Fault current limiting circuit breakers: Select breaker frame sizes from one manufacturer’s tested
range of breakers to give cascade and discrimination protection within the switchboard and
downstream switchboards as required.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 117 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.8 Electrical Indicating Measuring Meters – Natspec 0943 Switchboard
components
Generally all new meters to be digital type. Remove references to analogue operation from
specification.
To be inserted – Clause 2.28 Anti-Condensation Heaters – Natspec 0943 Switchboard components
“General
General: Provide anti-condensation heaters to external switchboards”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 118 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 3.2 Completion Checklist – Natspec 0943 Switchboard components
Insert the following clause:
“3.2 COMPLETION CHECKLIST
General: Upon completion of the works after testing and prior to handover complete the following
checklist:
At Completion
No Yes
Are all cables terminated securely?


Are cable strands escaping from circuit breaker tunnels? If so,
re-terminate.


Is sufficient space available within cable ducts for easy access,
modification to existing wiring systems and installation of
future wiring systems?


Are duct covers fitted without pressing cables?


Are major submain cables labelled at each cable end
identifying the cable size, protection device rating and setting,
distribution board supplied and other information required by
the Electrical Specification?


Are any wiring systems strained? If so, reinstall.


Are cables installed through glands providing a close fit in
accordance with AS/NZS3000? If not, reselect the gland size.


Can the escutcheon be closed without exerting force? If not,
revisit the installation.


Has a completed schedule card been placed in the switchboard
card holder?


Are all redundant materials removed from the switchboard and
surrounding area including debris?


Are all redundant cables removed from the switchboard and for 
the entire length?

Are wiring systems bunched neatly and secured with cable ties
or the like? Are cable tie ends cut to an appropriate length?


Are all sharp edges and burrs removed entirely?


Are spare cable bushes sealed to maintain IP rating?


Is power monitoring devices and other active devices
configured correctly?


Are ELV type wiring systems (such as communications
connections to networkable meters) installed within a conduit
or the like for separation from LV wiring systems?


SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Contractor Comments
Page 119 of 269
E 2.8 Power Factor and Harmonic Correction
The designer must make an assessment of the type of equipment being provided and document in
the Design Report if power factor correction is recommended to achieve a power factor of 0.95
lagging and/or harmonic correction is required to meet SA Power Network requirements.
For major new building projects the designer must make an assessment of the estimated diversified
maximum demand and determine the reactive power necessary to provide an improvement in
power factor from 0.85 lagging to 0.95 lagging.
The designer must make due space and capacity allowance in the new main switchboard and main
switchroom for future installation of the appropriately sized unit.
The designer must make an assessment of the cost of future installation of the power factor
correction unit so the University can allow a contingency following review of actual operation of the
building.
E 2.9 Lighting
Lighting must be designed and installed in accordance with the recommendations from the
AS/NZS1680 unless otherwise directed.
The designer must identify in the Design Report any departures from the AS/NZS1680 recommended
illumination levels.
The designer must identify in the Design Report any instances where the lighting design has been
based on a maintenance factor greater than 0.8.
The designer must consider the ceiling and wall average illuminances in their design with intent to
achieve an average of 30% of the working plane average illumination on the ceiling and walls. The
University acknowledges the challenge to achieving these levels where a fully recessed lighting
solution is proposed and the designer must address this in the Design Report.
The designer must identify the major types and specifications of luminaires in the Design Report. The
University’s preference is to reduce the range of spare parts required for maintenance and the
designer must consider this when selecting the type and size of luminaire and lamp source.
The lighting design must be appropriate to the project requirements and the designer must consider
the following elements as part of the design process and must address in the Design Report:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Appropriate equipment selection
Lighting performance
Energy efficiency
Aesthetic performance
Whole of life cost
Maintainability
The University reserves the right to require the lighting designer to produce calculations, rendered
images, etc. to prove the lighting design.
The University’s preference is for LED luminaires to be certified to the Lighting Council of Australia
SSL Quality Scheme. Where this is not achieved the luminaire must have a minimum 5 year
manufacturer’s warranty and the University reserves the right to require the luminaire manufacturer
to provide evidences of IES LM79 and TM21 testing.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 120 of 269
Low voltage dichroic luminaires must not be specified or provided.
All external luminaires must be appropriately IP rated. Where recessed fittings are proposed to be
mounted externally the complete luminaire must be rated to minimum IP65 above and below the
mounting. External fittings in publicly accessible areas must be fitted with tamper resistant fixings.
The designer must identify the lighting control methodology and technology (i.e. DALI, DSI,
standalone etc.) in the Design Report. The designer must make an assessment of the appropriate
lighting control methodology taking due account of safety, energy performance and cost/benefit.
Generally the University preferred methodology is absence detection i.e. manual switch
on/automatic switch off after a predefined period of inactivity. The default minimum time delay is
30 minutes. Where a standard lighting wiring installation is appropriate (i.e. a non-C-Bus type
automatic control type solution) the University has identified a suitable product able to provide this
functionality – ECS Ex-Or Lightspot. Alternatives providing the same functionality will be considered.
The University acknowledges this approach is not appropriate to all areas and the designer must
make an assessment of the most appropriate solution to each functional area and document in the
Design Report.
Unless otherwise directed automated lighting control must be carried out by using a Distributed
Intelligence C-Bus 2 Automatic Lighting Control System (ALCS) interfaced, where appropriate, with
the site BMS system for time scheduling. Where after hours lighting is required to general areas,
these lighting circuits must also be complete with push button control lighting programmed to allow
for after hour switching (set to 2 hours operation).
Installation, Programming, Testing and Commissioning of the Clipsal C-Bus ALCS, including any
system modifications, must be carried out by one of Clipsal Australia’s Accredited Platinum partners.
An electronic copy of the C-Bus Toolkit project back-up file must be included in O&M Manuals
(where applicable) and emailed to “[email protected]” with the location of the C-Bus
installation clearly identified.
Lighting designs must take into account AV systems in the space to ensure suitable visibility of
projection screens and display devices.
To be inserted – Clause 1.5 Submissions – Natspec 0951 Lighting
Replace “Samples” section with the following:
“Samples
General: Submit samples of all luminaires and accessories complete with lamp, control gear and
three core flex and plug. Obtain approval for sample prior to placing order. Allow sufficient time for
review and approval of long lead time selections.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 121 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.3 Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts – Natspec 0951 Lighting
Replace “Linear and circular lamp types” section with the following:
“Linear and circular lamp types
General: Provide high frequency electronic fluorescent lamp ballasts for fluorescent lamp lighting
systems selected for compatibility with the lamp and control method.”
Insert the following:
“Dimming Lamp Ballasts
High frequency type compatible with dimming control gear and lamp.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.5 ELV Voltage Transformers or ELV Switch Power Supplies – Natspec 0951
Lighting
Replace the whole clause with the following:
General: Electronic type. Maximum 2 lamps per transformer unless noted otherwise.
Standards: To AS/NZS 61046 and AS/NZS 61047.
Label: Indicate maximum rating of lamp that can be connected.
Dimming: Suitable for leading or trailing edge dimming. Compatible with dimming equipment.
Regulation: Output voltage: Not in excess of the nominal rated lamp voltage at a load of 0-100% of
nominal transformer rating”
To be inserted – Clause 2.7 Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDS) Luminaires – Natspec 0951 Lighting
“Selection: The LED luminaire shall be certified to the Lighting Council of Australia SSL Quality Scheme
or shall have a minimum 5 year manufacturer’s warranty. The manufacturer shall provide evidence
of IES LM79 and TM21 testing on request.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.8 Control Gear Enclosure – Natspec 0951 Lighting
Insert the following:
“Remote Ballasts
Where ballasts are not contained within the luminaire, install ballasts in purpose built ballast
enclosures, with same IP rating, remote from the luminaire. Ventilate and provide labels, hinged
doors, plugs and sockets for enclosures. Comply with manufacturer’s recommendations for maximum
cable length between gear and lamp.
Location: Hidden from normal view and accessible.
Gear tray cover
General: Provide propriety screw fixed gear tray cover to all luminaires. Gear tray is to prevent access
to cabling, control gear and terminals”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 122 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 2.10 Lighting Control – Natspec 0951 Lighting
Insert the following: “Dimming Systems
Provide individual dimming systems of the same manufacture for either fluorescent and/or
incandescent systems at an even rate to the eye.
Range: From 0% to 100% light output to the eye.
Noise: To AS 2107
Electromagnetic compatibility: To AS 1044, and AS/NZS 61000. Must not be increased by the use of
dimming equipment compared to luminaires not on dimming control.
Integration: LAN configuration with support protocols – RS232, RS485, LONWorks, BacNet, Modbus
and Ethernet.
Operations; Maintain operations in the event of a backbone cable fault.
Training: Proprietary software training at commissioning, fine tuning and at defects liability
completion.
Lighting Control Panel: To design selection.
Load controllers: Continuous operation at 100% of rated load.
Network Time Clock: 24 hours, 7 days, year calendar. Timed shut off to incorporate dimming or
stage shut off.
User interface: Utilise building layouts.”
To be inserted – Clause 2.11 Accessories – Natspec 0951 Lighting
Replace “Lighting switches” section with the following:
“Lighting switches
General: Provide light switches as documented. Use switches of the rocker type designed for
inductive and fluorescent lighting loads generally flush wall mounted.
Standard: To AS/NZS 3133.
Minimum: 15 A, 230 V a.c.
Multi switch/function: Ganged under one cover plate and arranged similar in plan to the lighting
controlled.
Multiphase: Separate face plates in lightweight stud walls or demountable partitions. Totally
segregate switches in wall boxes by physical barriers
Maintain 150mm clearance or physical barrier between LV and ELV terminations.
Multigang
Where 5 or more switches are located together in cavity walls, install a recess mounted multigang
stainless steel cover plate.
Stainless steel cover plates: Flush mounted finished stainless steel equipped with switch mechanisms,
matching plastic caps and labelled.
Cover plate fixing to a wall box: Use flush head countersunk stainless steel screws.
Adjustment and alignment: Incorporate fixings that enable alignment and adjustment of the cover
plate. ”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 123 of 269
To be inserted – Clause 3.2 Supports – Natspec 0951 Lighting
Replace “Suspended luminaires” section with the following:
“Suspended luminaires
Rods: Steel pipe suspension rods fitted with gimbal joints.
Chains: Electroplated welded link chain. Minimum 4 chains and 4 anchor points (for workshops only).
Levelling wire: Stainless steel. Minimum 4 wires and 4 anchor points.
Levelling: Adjust the suspension system length so that the lighting system is level and even.
Horizontal tolerance: ± 3 mm between luminaires within the one space.”
Replace “Recessed luminaires” section with the following:
“Recessed luminaires
General: Install recessed luminaires in trimmed openings in the suspended ceiling. Diffuser to be
hinged and supported.
T-Bar ceiling: fittings to be inside T-Bar and provided with hinged framed diffusers. Lay in type
diffusers are not accepted.
Fittings in ceiling tile: Where fitting does not completely replace tile provide backing support so that
fitting is supported from T-bar not directly from ceiling
Standard: To AS 2946.”
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 124 of 269
E 2.10 Emergency Lighting
Emergency lighting must be designed and installed in accordance with the requirements of the NCC
and AS2293 to suit the use of the area.
The University currently uses the Stanilite Nexus LX & RF monitoring and testing systems in the
majority of its buildings.
All new emergency lighting systems must be compatible with the Stanilite Nexus RF system. The
University acknowledges the provision of the Nexus LX infrastructure is not exhaustive, and the
University is moving to the wireless Nexus RF platform.
Unless specifically directed otherwise the designer must specify Nexus RF compatible fittings.
All new emergency lighting and illuminated signs must be LED type.
Notwithstanding the connection to the Nexus system, all emergency lighting must be connected via
an emergency lighting test switch. If new lighting is being connected to an existing distribution board
without an emergency lighting test switch the designer and/or installer must advise the Contracts
Supervisor and await instruction.
Where new Nexus routers are required, provide a single data point adjacent to each Nexus server
and ELR, connected to the University’s Building Services VLAN #251. Provide the MAC address for
each of these items. Coordinate with the University ISTS via the Contracts Administrator for
allocation of the static IP addresses.
Whenever a new Nexus RF fitting is provided the electrical contractor must complete the “Nexus RF
SPU Data” matrix and provide a copy with the O&M Manual. The contractor must also complete the
Excel spreadsheet and email a copy to “[email protected]”. The designer must ensure this
requirement is noted on any lighting drawings which include Nexus RF emergency fittings.
Spitfire type emergency luminaires must be min class D32.
The designer must nominate the type of illuminated exit sign (including directional logo) and confirm
with the Contracts Supervisor
To be inserted - Clause 2.2 MONITORING SYSTEM – Natspec 0971 Emergency Evacuation Lighting
Replace “Proprietary systems” section with the following:
“Proprietary systems
General: Provide Stanilite Nexus proprietary systems with full compatibility between the monitoring
system, operating software and the luminaires selected.
Testing facilities: Provide automatic and manual testing facilities for testing lamp condition and for
battery discharge testing“
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 125 of 269
E 2.11 Lightning Protection
For all new building projects the designer must undertake a risk assessment in accordance with
AS/NZS1768.
Where required by the risk assessment a lightning protection system must be designed and installed
in accordance with AS/NZS1768.
The University’s preference is to utilise the metallic structure of buildings as part of the general
building construction for the lightning protection system as described in Section 4.16 “Metal in and
on a structure” of AS/NZS1768.
The designer must make due allowance for the design of connections between the air termination
network (i.e. roofing), down conductors (i.e. structural steel work, reinforcement, etc.) and earth
termination network (i.e. footings, earthing rods, etc.) Particular attention is drawn to the
installation methodology of reinforcing bars in columns to ensure conductivity is maintained from
top to ground level.
The installer must perform tests throughout the construction to prove the electrical continuity of the
system before being ‘built out’.
The University is aware of other non-conventional lightning protection systems that comprise air
terminals that claim enhanced performance. However, as noted in AS/NZS1768 the performance of
such systems is outside the scope of the standard and irrespective of claimed performance
‘traditional’ methods must be used in compliance with AS/NZS1768.
Generally, use of such ‘enhanced performance’ systems will not be accepted.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 126 of 269
E 3 Design Reports
The electrical designer must submit formal Design Report documents as required by the contract for
technical review by the University.
In addition to the specific elements discussed in Section C of this document, the electrical services
Design Report/s must include, to the extent that they are applicable to the project, but not be
limited to the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Completed Design Certificate relevant to the stage of design
Proposed scope of works and details of the system arrangement
Schedule of applicable regulations, standards, policies and guidance publications on which
the design is based.
Details of deviations of the above
Details of any third party and/or record information upon which the design relies
Assumptions or exclusions
Safety in Design review
Sustainability review
Proposed point of supply for the works including the supply
capacity/characteristics/condition assessment, demonstrating adequate capacity is available
at the point of supply and in the reticulation system
Detail of any proposed modifications to existing systems or equipment
Maximum demand assessment and load characteristics
Switchboard location, design fault level, voltage drop allocation, circuiting arrangements,
earthing arrangements and protection arrangement
Metering locations
Standby emergency generator analysis including:
o Risk analysis to determine the requirement for emergency generation
o Cost/benefit analysis of emergency generation
o Detail of the generator and essential reticulation system arrangement including
schedule of systems with emergency generator back-up
o Details of generator noise attenuation requirements
o Standby emergency generator maximum demand assessment and load
characteristics
o Essential switchboard locations and circuiting arrangements, earthing arrangements
and protection arrangement
o Size and duty of proposed generator
Uninterruptable power supply (UPS) analysis including
o Risk analysis to determine requirement for UPS
o Cost/benefit analysis of UPS provision
o Detail of UPS and essentials reticulation system arrangement including schedule of
systems with UPS back-up
o UPS supported maximum demand assessment and load characteristics
o UPS switchboard locations and circuiting arrangements, earthing arrangements and
protection arrangement
o Size and duty of proposed UPS
Power factor and harmonics correction analysis including
o Cost/benefit analysis of PFC and/or harmonics correction
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 127 of 269
Detail of proposed size and arrangement of equipment
Detail of allowances for future installation of PFC and/or harmonics correction
equipment
Lighting system
o Proposed lighting system performance including operational considerations and
levels of illumination for each area (where these differ from AS/NZS1680
recommendations)
o Financial assessment and cost benefit studies to justify the chosen lighting systems
o Detailed description of the control system type and arrangement including
justification of the arrangement chosen and detail on the control interfaces (e.g.
BMS, AV, C-Bus)
o Detailed description of the energy management and energy efficiency initiatives
o Significant luminaire types, manufacture and lamp types
o Maintenance issues
EMI analysis
Lightning protection risk assessment and proposal
Emergency lighting system detailing type of Nexus proposal i.e. LX or RF and works required
to incorporate
Manufacturer selection of major equipment
Basis of sizing of major equipment
Layout drawings and single line diagrams for the proposed arrangement to the level of detail
as per the “Electrical Services Design Deliverable” matrix
o
o
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 128 of 269
Table 5 Electrical Services Design Deliverables Matrix:
Design Report
Stage
Electrical Service Design Deliverables
General
End of
Schematic
Design
Reporting
Documentation
General
End of Design
Development
Reporting
Drawing
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Preliminary load estimate based on schedule of accommodation and reasonable allowance.
Awareness of existing site infrastructure to identify connection points and capacities and to determine cost/benefit impact of
masterplan options to electrical services
Preliminary estimated maximum demand
Feasibility of infrastructure connections
Advantages/disadvantages of masterplan options
Understanding of electrical systems requirements
Identify communication system requirements
Confirmation of scope of services
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Mark up of masterplan options indicating existing infrastructure and possible connection points
Developed load estimate based on building form and preliminary information from other services
Preliminary size and location of main switchboards, distribution cupboards, communications room, etc. to inform architectural building
development
Preliminary major service routes
Preliminary equipment/lighting selections.
Preliminary external services design
The University Design and Construction Specifications reviewed and assessed
Developed load estimate based on proposed facility/building form and services
Confirmation site infrastructure can accommodate estimated electrical demands
Confirmation of standby power requirements i.e. Generator, UPS
Confirmation of electrical systems provided to individual facilities/buildings
Description of system proposals
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Preliminary opinion of cost based on square meter rates
Concept Design Certificate
Preliminary schematic drawings of electrical and communications systems demonstrating connections to infrastructure and nodes
Layout drawings showing preliminary locations of major plant i.e. generator, transformer, main switchboard, distribution boards,
communications cupboards, system operating/control panels.
Layout drawings showing preliminary cable tray / ladder and buried service / conduits
Page 129 of 269
Design Report
Stage
Electrical Service Design Deliverables
General
50%
Documentation
Phase
Reporting
Documentation
General
90%
Documentation
Phase
Reporting
Documentation
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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•
•
•
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Electrical services design to suit approved building form
Final load estimate based on design equipment / services including diversity
Defined location and sizes of switchrooms, cupboards, etc. to suit designed equipment
Defined size, locations and route of cable trays and buried conduits
Defined sizes of major plant
Draft specification of electrical and communication services
Final load estimate
Final confirmation of systems being provided
Final confirmation of connections to existing infrastructure
Schedule of selected luminaires
Developed opinion of cost including elemental cost for major plant and equipment
Final minor items requiring further clarification
Final minor items of information required
Statement of any specialist systems requiring design development responsibility by contractor
Schematic Design Certificate
Compete schematic drawings of electrical and communication systems with cable types and sizes
Layout drawings for power, lighting and communication services showing preliminary outlet locations, lighting arrangements, switching
locations, etc.
Final cable tray / ladder and buried conduit routes with numbers, types and sizes
Control schematics
Preliminary Specification
Final coordinated electrical services design suitable for tender and construction
All systems and equipment fully and clearly defined and specified
Confirmation of all systems fully designed
Statement of any minor outstanding information and/or assumptions
Elemental opinion of cost
Complete specification for electrical and communication services
Confirmation of any design development of specialist systems by contractor
Complete schematic drawings including schedules of equipment
Complete power, lighting and communications services layout drawings with locations of outlets, accessories, luminaires, switches, etc.
coordinated with building form, furniture, joinery and other services
Controls details complete
Page 130 of 269
Design Report
Stage
Electrical Service Design Deliverables
•
•
•
•
Switching and final circuiting complete
Final specification
All documentation fully checked, reviewed and signed-off in accordance with contractual Quality Assurance Requirements
Detailed Design Certification
Where the designer considers an element is not applicable to the project, this must be clearly noted. It is the University’s expectation that there will be
negligible cost impact/difference between 90% Documentation Phase documentation and Construction Issue documentation. Any elements not fully designed /
documented at 90% issues must be clearly identified with an estimate of cost. The University reserves the right to reject the designers 90% Design
Documentation should it consider the documentation not satisfactory.
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 131 of 269
E 3.1 Design Certification
The designer must produce a ‘Design Certificate’ identifying which codes and standards the design
have been based on, including the issue date and version of the code or standard, and certifying
compliance with those codes.
The ‘Design Certificate’ must be signed by the designer responsible for the design, not a delegate,
and issued with the documentation issued for pricing.
E 4 Record Drawings
To be inserted – Clause 3.17 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Documents and Drawings
for additional requirements
E 5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals
To be inserted – Clause 3.18 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Operation and Maintenance
Manuals for additional requirements
SECTION E – ELECTRICAL/LIGHTING
Page 132 of 269



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA


MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


F
FIRE PROTECTION AND DETECTION
SERVICES
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
x F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
SECTION G – PLUMBING
Page 133 of 269
Contents
F 1 General Requirements .........................................................................................................................135
F 1.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 135
F 1.2 Standards and Regulations .................................................................................................................... 135
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations .......................................................................................... 135
F 1.3 Quality ................................................................................................................................................... 136
F 1.4 Preferred Manufacturers ....................................................................................................................... 136
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers............................................................................................. 136
F 1.5 Safety In Design ..................................................................................................................................... 136
F 1.6 Sustainability ......................................................................................................................................... 137
F 1.7 Cost Planning ......................................................................................................................................... 137
F 1.8 Attendance ............................................................................................................................................ 137
F 1.9 Expansion and Capacity ......................................................................................................................... 138
F 1.10 Ancillary Isolations ............................................................................................................................... 138
F 1.11 Programming ....................................................................................................................................... 138
F 1.12 Scope ................................................................................................................................................... 139
F 1.13 Standards ............................................................................................................................................. 139
F 1.14 Permits, Notices and Inspections ........................................................................................................ 139
F 1.15 Alternative Products ............................................................................................................................ 139
F 1.16 Brigade Connection ............................................................................................................................. 139
F 1.17 Occupant Warning ............................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.18 Smoke Control ..................................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.19 Identification of Detectors................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.20 Retrofitting and Upgrades ................................................................................................................... 140
F 1.21 Temporary Changes to Fire Detectors ................................................................................................. 141
F 1.22 FIP Replacements ................................................................................................................................ 142
F 1.23 Operating and Maintenance Manuals ................................................................................................. 142
F 1.24 Additional As-Built Drawings ............................................................................................................... 142
F 1.25 Fire Alarm Block Plans ......................................................................................................................... 143
F 1.26 Précis of Operation .............................................................................................................................. 143
F 1.27 Essential Safety Provisions................................................................................................................... 143
F 1.28 System Commissioning and Acceptance Testing ................................................................................. 144
F 1.29 Training ................................................................................................................................................ 144
F 2 Technical .............................................................................................................................................144
F 2.1 Design Criteria ....................................................................................................................................... 144
Table 3 – Fire Protection Services Design Criteria ................................................................................. 145
F 2.2 Performance Criteria ............................................................................................................................. 145
F 2.2.1 Fire Water Supply ........................................................................................................................... 145
F 2.2.2 Fire Hydrant System ....................................................................................................................... 145
F 2.2.3 Fire Hose Reel System .................................................................................................................... 145
F 2.2.4 Portable Fire Extinguishers............................................................................................................. 146
F 2.2.5 Automatic Fire Sprinkler System .................................................................................................... 146
F 2.2.6 Automatic Fire Detection System................................................................................................... 146
F 2.2.7 Emergency Warning and Intercommunication System (EWIS) ...................................................... 146
F 2.2.8 Building Fit Out Works ................................................................................................................... 147
F 3 Documentation / Reporting .................................................................................................................148
F 3.1 Design Reports....................................................................................................................................... 148
Table 4 – Fire protection Services Design Deliverables Matrix ............................................................. 149
F 3.2 Design Certification ............................................................................................................................... 151
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 134 of 269
F 1 General Requirements
F 1.1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary the University clauses are included, with the Contract
Supervisors approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed inside a blue box and text has been italicised.
F 1.2 Standards and Regulations
Unless specifically stated, all fire protection services must be designed and installed in accordance
with, but not limited to, the following:
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations
CODE
AS 1221.1
AS/NZS 1668.1
AS 1670.1
AS 1670.4
AS 1851
AS 2118
AS 2220.1
AS 2419
AS 2444
AS 2491
AS 4428
AS 7240
AS 14520.1
NCC
DESCRIPTION
Installation of fire hose reels
The use of ventilation and air conditioning in buildings – Fire and smoke control in
multi-compartment buildings
Fire detection, warning, control and intercom systems – System designs,
installation and commissioning – Fire
Fire detection, warning, control and intercom systems – System designs,
installation and commissioning – Sound systems and intercom systems for
emergency purposes
Maintenance of fire protection systems and equipment
Automatic fire sprinkler systems
Emergency warning and intercommunication systems in buildings – Equipment
design and manufacture
Fire Hydrant Installations
Portable fire extinguishers and fire blankets
Fixed fire protection installations – Pump set systems
Fire detection, warning, control and intercom systems – Control and indicating
equipment – All parts
Fire detection and alarm systems – All parts
Gaseous fire extinguishing systems – Physical properties and system design
South Australian Metropolitan Fire Services (SAMFS)
National Construction Code
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 135 of 269
Unless specifically stated by the NCC, or otherwise, the design and installation of the fire protection
services must be based on the current version of the standard or code at the date of tender.
The above list is not exhaustive and the designer and installer must be responsible for identifying
and complying with all standards relevant to the scope of works.
F 1.3 Quality
All fire protection services design works must be carried out by suitably qualified and experienced
designers. The University reserves the right to request copies of calculations from the designer for
review.
The University reserves the right to request changes to the design personnel to ensure personnel of
an appropriate level of experience are engaged.
All fire protection services design works must be checked and reviewed by a suitably qualified and
experienced peer prior to issuing for pricing. The designer must have a formal check and review
process. The University reserves the right to request evidence of design checking and review.
Where a designer utilises a third party designer i.e. sub-consultant / specialist contractor / fire
protection manufacturer / supplier etc. the designer must retain responsibility for the design and
carry out checks and reviews of the design.
F 1.4 Preferred Manufacturers
The University has a number of legacy systems which new equipment must be compatible with:
•
•
Building Management System – Modbus LONWorks. Niagara/Invensys central located server
Fire Detection and Alarm – Ampac
While the University does not wish to restrict the designer’s ability to select the most appropriate
equipment to meet particular project requirements it is the University’s strong preference that
equipment selection satisfies the following:
•
•
•
•
A reputable manufacturer with a proven track record
Local Adelaide representation and support in design and post installation operation
Local Adelaide spare parts availability
Preference for Australian manufacture
The following are an indicative list which the University considers represent the desired quality
levels:
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers
Equipment / Component
Fire Indicator Panel
EWIS Panel
PE smoke detectors
Ionisation smoke detectors
Thermal detectors
Manual call points
Sounder bases
Strobes
Manufacturer / Supplier
AMPAC FIREFINDER
AMPAC EV SERIES
AMPAC XP95
AMPAC XP95
AMPAC XP95
AMPAC XP95
AMPAC XP95
AMPAC XP95
F 1.5 Safety In Design
The designer of the fire protection services must undertake the necessary Safety in Design reviews
and activities as required by the contract.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 136 of 269
Particular items the fire protection designer must consider as part of the Safety in Design review
must include, but not be limited to, the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Locations of all plant and other items requiring maintenance i.e. at height, above or adjacent
to risk areas, proximity to other plant etc.
Methods of safe isolation for access and maintenance of switchboards and equipment
Satisfactory maintenance space around fire protection equipment
Satisfactory space and access to internal components requiring maintenance and/or
replacement
Noise, fumes and vibration issues associated with fire systems plant and equipment e.g.
diesel fire pumps
The Safety in Design aspects must be addressed by the designer in the Design Reports
The installer of the works must review the Safety in Design documentation throughout the works to
identify any risks throughout the works and any residual risks to the University on completion.
F 1.6 Sustainability
The designer must address the Environmental Sustainability of the fire protection services taking
account of the whole of life cost and operational benefit.
Particular elements the designer must consider include, but are not limited to, the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Energy efficiency
Materials Selection
Decommissioning / disposal of equipment at end-of-life
Control Methodology including automatic controls
Equipment selection
Demand management
The Sustainability aspects must be addressed in the Design Reports.
F 1.7 Cost Planning
The fire protection services designer must provide input to project cost planning as required by the
contract.
Where the fire protection services designer is required to provide cost planning advice the cost must
include supply, installation, associated works, contingencies, overheads etc. to indicate a total cost
to the University.
Any element specifically excluded must be clearly indicated so that a total cost to the University can
be determined.
F 1.8 Attendance
It is incumbent on the fire protection designer and contractor to make themselves aware of existing
conditions as far as reasonably practicable when designing or performing works at the University.
The University reserves the right to hold the designer and/or contractor liable for works which may
have been reasonably understood prior to investigation.
The fire protection services designer must attend design and construction meetings as required by
the contract and as outlined below.
The University expects the fire protection services designer, not a delegate, to attend at a minimum:
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 137 of 269
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Technical Review as directed by the Contract Supervisor
Design team meetings appropriate to the size of the works. The fire protection designer, not
a delegate, must attend a minimum of one design team meeting
Construction phase meetings appropriate to the size of the works. The fire protection
designer, not a delegate, must attend a minimum of one construction phase meeting plus
any meetings where the Contracts Supervisor considers there is a significant fire protection
element that requires the designer’s input
Ongoing site inspections as considered appropriate by the Contract Supervisor (minimum bimonthly)
Fire protection services first fix inspection
Fire protection services final fix inspection
Fire protection services commissioning where required by the Contracts Supervisor
Fire protection services final / defect inspection prior to Practical Completion
The fire protection designer must identify his/her proposed meeting and site attendance in their
engagement proposal.
The fire protection installer must attend meetings as required by the contract and considered
necessary by the Contracts Supervisor.
F 1.9 Expansion and Capacity
The fire indicator panel must be supplied to accommodate the ‘As Built’ design load + 30% to
support future expansion.
The evacuation panel must be supplied to accommodate the ‘As Built’ design load + 30% to support
future expansion.
F 1.10 Ancillary Isolations
It is a requirement with every new fire panel installation that, where needed, allowances must be
made for individual key switch isolation facilities to be provided for ancillary functions such as, but
not inclusive of:
•
•
•
•
•
A/C shutdown
Door releases
Gas supply
Plant shutdown
Gas Suppression
F 1.11 Programming
As it is the recommendation of the University that the AMPAC FireFinder brand of fire indicator
panels be used with all new and replacement installations it is also the University’s recommendation
that the AMPAC Config Manager or equal equivalent be used to program each panel. The logic
behind each device and associated functionality must meet with the fundamentals of this software.
All installing contractors must undertake the appropriate configuration program training provided by
AMPAC.
As part of the commissioning process all logic and functionality must be tested in totality using field
generated alarms, without the use of simulation and all programming deficiencies to documented
and rectified. A copy of the configuration program, including key output functionality must be signed
off by the installing contractor upon practical completion as having met the requirements of the
tender specification.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 138 of 269
F 1.12 Scope
The contractor must determine the full scope of the works from review of the project specification
and all associated contract drawings.
The contractor must attend site to satisfy himself of existing systems and site conditions.
No claim must be entertained for lack of knowledge of the contract documentation or of existing
systems which could reasonably have been known from prior investigation.
F 1.13 Standards
Comply in all respects with the requirements of the current standards applicable to the works in
respect to equipment, materials, workmanship and installation techniques.
Comply with the following standards and regulations:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Australian Standards
SA Water Corporation regulations
Australian Gas Association regulations
SA Fire Services Regulations
SA Government Acts governing the works
Work Health and Safety Regulations
F 1.14 Permits, Notices and Inspections
Make applications, obtain all permits, and arrange testing, all as necessary for the installation and
placing into operation of the works where required by any Authority including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SA Water Corporation
Department of Premier and Cabinet – Work Safe SA
The Office of the Technical Regulator
Australian Communications Authority
Site Telecommunications Carrier
SA Fire Services
Energy Retailer
Provide all associated documentation required for the applications. Pay all associated fees.
F 1.15 Alternative Products
All specified items represent a required level of quality and performance.
Unless specifically required to integrate with an existing University of South Australia system the
contractor is at liability to propose alternatives to the specified items subject to the project with full
supporting documentation (including calculations, modelling etc.) at the contractors cost. The
contractor must retain design responsibility for any alternative proposals accepted including any
unforeseen issues.
Any unapproved alternative products provided must be removed and replaced with the specified
item at no cost to the University.
F 1.16 Brigade Connection
Building alarms must be grouped and relayed to the SAMFS utilising an Alarm Signalling Equipment,
(ASE) incorporating both a Telstra PSDN land line and a wireless connection.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 139 of 269
A primary ASE connection must consist of a Telstra PSDN phone line which can be connected to the
SAMFS via the building’s existing MDF and through the campus phone systems. The existing PSDN
and master/slave ASE capacity of a campus should be fully utilised prior to supply and connection of
any additional PSDN lines or master ASE units.
Where a new slave ASE unit is connected to an existing master ASE, the FIP installer is to obtain an
internal phone line connection from the University’s ISTS Help Desk via the Contract Supervisor and
clearly label and document the line and/or MDF details within both the FIP panel and the Operation
and Maintenance Manual.
F 1.17 Occupant Warning
Unless otherwise directed by the Contracts Supervisor an occupant warning system must be
provided. Warning sirens must be designed and installed in corridors and specific areas in
accordance with the NCC to ensure that the signal is audible to all occupants of the building.
Occupant warning must be provided to alert all building occupants to a fire alarm situation.
The warning system must be one of the following:
•
•
A sound system for emergency purposes in accordance with AS 1670.4, initiated by the fire
detection system. The fire alarm system must monitor the sound system for fault signals
required by AS 1670.4.
Electronic sounders, or amplified sound systems producing the evacuation signal (with or
without verbal message). The evacuation signal must operate simultaneously throughout
the building.
F 1.18 Smoke Control
Smoke control systems must be designed and installed where required by the NCC in accordance
with Deemed to Satisfy requirements (alternative engineered solutions may be considered following
review and approval by the University and Building Certifier). Pressurisation systems utilising air
relief openings are preferred to mechanical extraction systems.
F 1.19 Identification of Detectors
Type, circuit number and consecutive device number must identify each installed detector. Manual
call points must also be marked with circuit number and consecutive device number e.g. T 10-3, P84, I31-2, C22-6.
The type of detector information must be permanently inscribed on the detector head as noted
below:
T – Thermal detector, fixed or rate of rise; or
P – Photoelectric smoke detector; or
I – Ionisation smoke detector; or
C – Combustion detector. (CO)
F 1.20 Retrofitting and Upgrades
Alterations to existing installations must be thoroughly designed, installed and tested, including the
re-calculation of power supply requirements, to ensure that there are no detrimental effects to the
existing installation and equipment.
All parts of the installation and equipment, including detectors, must be compatible, only used
within equipment listing limitations and must satisfactorily perform the required functions.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 140 of 269
Consideration must be given to overloading existing circuits with detectors and ancillary devices
particularly with conventional style Fire Indicating Panels. Alternatives must be sought prior to the
installation of any new ancillary device on a detection circuit where the total number of devices on
the circuit will exceed 40.
Alternative may include the rationalisation of existing detectors types and numbers, adding an
additional circuit or adding the new device to a circuit with adequate capacity. All alternative must
include a consultative approach which will ensure system operability, functionality and reliability and
does not compromise the requirements of the NCC or AS1670.
Unless it can be established the existing fire detections within an area being refurbished were
upgraded within the last year, all fire detectors, including those above ceiling must be replaced with
new approved detectors.
If the refurbishment of a building’s floor is greater than 50% of the floor area the entire floor’s
detection must be upgraded to an addressable design. This may include the installation of an
addressable card with the building’s existing fire indicator panel.
Where the building refurbishment results in any updating of building’s fire block plans, the Fire
Engineering Installer must be responsible for producing these drawings and delivering the final ‘as
constructed’ and updated fire block plans. The designer shall issue to the installer AutoCAD
drawings of the building plans and fire services layouts to allow the installer to modify to reflect
actual as-built conditions. Note - hand mark-ups of fire block plans will not be accepted. The installer
shall make due allowance in his tender for production of electronic as built fire block plans.
F 1.21 Temporary Changes to Fire Detectors
The Consultant Team must identify temporary changes to the fire detector circuits in the Contract
Documents as required to minimise the number and extent of circuits affected by the building works
and to provide adequate fire protection to the site and adjacent areas for the duration of the works.
Where there is any likelihood of false alarms being activated from dust generated by continuous
building works, the Contractor must liaise with the Consultant Team and Contract Supervisor to
temporarily replace any smoke detectors with thermal detectors. When smoke detectors are
isolated only, the project scope of works must include the requirement to completely seal all smoke
detectors within the refurbishment area and adjacent construction access areas which may have
been affected by dust migration. All covers must be removed outside of construction working hours
and the detectors de-isolated.
The fire detector block plans must be updated as required to show any temporary alterations, in
order to keep block plans current at all times. All detectors within the site and adjacent areas must
be cleaned by a fire protection subcontractor on completion of the works. Hand mark-ups of
temporary fire block plans are acceptable however on completion an electronic copy of the final as
built layout shall be delivered as noted above.
It is recommended temporary smoke detector replacement and reinstatement be performed by the
existing University Fire Maintenance contractor. All associated costs must be incorporated within the
project scope of works.
Where the failure to comply with this requirement results in a false alarm calling out the SAMFS and
University fire maintenance contractor, all associated costs will be invoiced to the Builder
responsible.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
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F 1.22 FIP Replacements
All FIP replacements must be based on the same criteria as a new installation ensuring compatibility
with all field devices and maintains all existing functionality.
F 1.23 Operating and Maintenance Manuals
The nominated fire contractor must provide to the University’s delegated fire services officer such
comprehensive documentation as to enable effective operation and routine maintenance of the
entire Fire Detection and Protection System. This must include but not be limited to the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Operating handbooks
Operator instruction manuals
Complete hardware description and installation records
Maintenance Logbook
Details of any engineered solutions
Baseline data of all installed fire services must be provided in accordance with As1851-2012
Appendix C
SAMFS sign off
ESP Form 1
ESP Form 2
ESP Form 3
The requirement on an individual project is to update the above documentation for those aspects
directly relating to the individual project. This update information shall be supplied to other trades
for inclusion in their documentation as necessary.
Three (3) printed copies and one (1) electronic copy of the Operating and Maintenance Manuals,
including three (3) full sets and one (1) electronic copy of the As-Built Drawings, must be supplied
prior to practical completion in accordance with the Operating and Maintenance Manual
Requirements detailed in Section C – Design Controls.
To be inserted – Clause 3.17 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Operation and Maintenance
Manuals for additional requirements
F 1.24 Additional As-Built Drawings
In addition to the drawings provided with the Operating and Maintenance Manuals, supply two (2)
printed copies and one (1) electronic copy of as-built drawings to the University Contracts Supervisor
prior to practical completion as set out in the Operating and Maintenance Manual Specification.
Practical Completion will not be granted until such drawings are received, are up to date and
accurately reflect all field changes to the installation and which are true and accurate
representations of the actual installation.
The drawings must include the following:
•
•
Schematic wiring diagrams with correct circuit and termination identification
Final equipment, speaker and detection layouts
To be inserted – Clause 3.18 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Operation and Maintenance
Manuals for additional requirements
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 142 of 269
F 1.25 Fire Alarm Block Plans
The design and delivery of the fire alarm block plans must comply with the requirements of the
SAMFS Built Environment Section Policy 37.
Additional copies will be required to form parts of the Operation and Maintenance Manuals and will
need to satisfy the quantities of both hard and electronic versions. Block plans must be A3 size
unless otherwise approved.
F 1.26 Précis of Operation
A précis of Operation will be created for every new development and will follow the guidelines of
the SAMFS Policy 38.
F 1.27 Essential Safety Provisions
Provision of a separate ESP manual consolidating all documentation and drawings associated with
life and fire safety detailed as in the following subsection. This information should be repeated
within the Operation and Maintenance Manual.
The following documentation must as a minimum be included:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
NCC assessment statement with particular reference to all fire and lift safety requirements
including:
o Classification
o Structure
o Fire Resistance & Compartmentation
o Access and Egress
o Services & Equipment
Copy of ESP Form 1
Copy of ESP Form 2
Building Occupancy Certificate
Baseline data of all installed fire services in accordance with AS1851-2012 Appendix C
Where a fire hydrant or sprinkler system is installed, a current certificate of flow and
hydrostatic tests
Where a fire alarm system is connected to the Metropolitan Fire Brigade, copies of all
relevant applications and certificates
Where fire extinguishers are installed, provide comprehensive details including all design
analysis and calculations as per the requirements of the NCC to identify selection, type and
location of all installed portable fire protection equipment
Précis of operation for all fire detection and protection systems
Site plan drawn to scale of not less than 1:500 showing any proposed and/or existing
structure erected on the site, the boundaries of the site, the levels of the site, vehicular
access roads within the site, adjoining streets and compass point.
Layout and detail drawings of identifying the full extent and design of all relevant fire safety
measures and systems, including:
o Compartmentation, fire wall/separation and fire/smoke doors and/or windows
o Means of egress, detailing paths of travel
o Signs, including lifts and all signage associate with egress paths, etc. access for fire
appliances
o Emergency Lifts
o Emergency and emergency lighting fire extinguishers and hose reels smoke hazard
management
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 143 of 269
o
o
o
o
o
o
Mechanical air handling systems, associated HVAC control and fire dampers
EWIS details and location of warning devices
Hydrant and booster details
Fire Alarm System and detector layout
Fire Sprinkler System and layout
Details of the work to be undertaken (which may be in the form of a specification)
stipulating any Australian Standard or other Code to which the work must comply
F 1.28 System Commissioning and Acceptance Testing
The nominated fire contractor must be responsible for all system commissioning and acceptance
tests and/or the provision of sufficient competent personnel, equipment and test instruments
necessary for the testing and commissioning of the installation to the satisfaction of the Contract
Supervisor
All system commissioning must be carefully pre-planned and scheduled. System commissioning
information must be submitted to the Contract Supervisor for approval not less than two (2) weeks
before commencement of system commissioning. The University may elect contractor’s staff in
undertaken or witnessing the approved system commissioning and any additional system
commissioning deemed necessary by the Contract Supervisor.
All system commissioning must be scheduled to be completed one (1) week prior to practical
completion and will be performed in conjunction with any other interfacing installation contractor
and must be witness and verified by the SAMFS where necessary.
All system commissioning procedures, checking and adjustments must be carried out to
demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Contract Supervisor or Nominee that the system as installed
complies with the specification.
System commissioning must be by exhaustive testing on a point by point basis for each system
function. Each point test may be witnessed by the Contract Supervisor or Nominee and checked off
on a commissioning sheet.
F 1.29 Training
The contractor must include the provision of operator and technical training and instruction in the
correct use, maintenance and operation of all equipment supplied and reconfigured under the
contract as set out in the Operating and Maintenance requirements, as set out in Section C – Design
Requirements.
Responsibility for provision of all instruction and full support resources, including course outlines,
training materials and instruction notes must form part of these works, as must the provision of all
necessary test equipment and incidental materials necessary to conduct the training and any other
item or activity require to properly train the end-users personnel.
The nominated fire contractor is to allow a period of two (2) hours to complete the necessary
training. If additional training time is required by the Contract Supervisor, direct negotiation on costs
are to be between the nominated fire security contractor and the Contract Supervisor.
F 2 Technical
F 2.1 Design Criteria
Design criteria associated with an installation are:
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
Page 144 of 269
Table 3 – Fire Protection Services Design Criteria
Item
Fire Hose Reels
Fire Hydrants
Fire Extinguishers
Fire Detection and alarms
Emergency Warning and Intercommunication
(EWIS)
Design Criteria
To the requirements of the NCC and the
Australian Standards AS 1221
To the requirements of the NCC and the
Australian Standards AS 2419.1
To the requirements of the NCC and the
Australian Standards AS 1841 & 2444
To the requirements of the NCC and the
Australian Standards AS 4262
To the requirements of the NCC and the
Australian Standards
F 2.2 Performance Criteria
F 2.2.1 Fire Water Supply
Water supply to serve any proposed new fire services systems must be connected to and supplied
via a new valved connection at the Fire Water main and installed within a concrete underground
valve pit and cast iron lid.
F 2.2.2 Fire Hydrant System
An external and/or internal fire hydrant system must be designed and installed to suit the proposed
works. The new fire hydrant system must be connected directly to the fire protection services water
supply main.
F 2.2.3 Fire Hose Reel System
The fire hose reel system must be connected directly to the proposed fire service reticulation mains
which must proceed to serve 36m x 19mm type fire hose reels located within four metres of a
required exit.
Fire hose reels are to be recessed off a main circulation space but they are not required to be in a
specific cupboard.
Each fire hose reel must be fitted with a backflow prevention device.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
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F 2.2.4 Portable Fire Extinguishers
Portable fire extinguishers and fire blankets complete with signage must be installed to serve each
particular building to provide a form of fire fighting for use by building occupants only.
Sizes must generally be as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
9L Water 2A
3.5kg Carbon Dioxide 5B: (E)
2.5kg Dry Chemical Powder 2A:30B (E)
9L Foam 3A: 20B
Fire Blankets 1.8m x 1.8m in size
To ensure consistency with all other existing buildings, all new fire extinguishers must be installed
together with disc type identification signage immediately above the extinguisher.
F 2.2.5 Automatic Fire Sprinkler System
An automatic fire sprinkler system of the wet type must be generally required to serve all new
buildings in order to comply with the University’s Insurer Requirements. In all cases this should be
confirmed with the University at the start of any project, including installations/projects for existing
buildings.
F 2.2.6 Automatic Fire Detection System
The automatic fire detection system shall be configured as an addressable type system, where
required.
A single addressable type sub-fire indicator panel must be installed with the main entry to the
building. A combined strobe/sounder light must be fitted externally to the building in a prominent
position to indicate the exact location of the sub-fire indicator panel to the local authorities upon
arrival to the building. The sub-fire indicator panel must be directly interfaced with the sites main
site fire indicator panel.
The automatic fire detection system must be configured such that upon activation of a smoke
detector, thermal detector or manual break glass alarm a signal must be transmitted to the sub-fire
indicator panel located within the building which in turn must issue an alarm signal at the main site
fire indicator panel to alert the local authorities of an on-site emergency.
F 2.2.7 Emergency Warning and Intercommunication System (EWIS)
Unless mandated by the BCA or other legislative authorities, the cascade programming of the EWIS
must be omitted. Unless directed otherwise by the Contract Supervisor an alert tone must not be
provided and the EWIS must provide an immediate evacuation tone throughout the building.
The evacuation signal must trigger a continuous message wording in a female voice:
“Attention, Attention, an emergency exists in the area, please proceed to the nearest exit and
evacuate in an orderly manner.”
Followed by three (3) off ‘whoop’ type evacuation tones and the voice message is repeated. This
cycle of messages and tones continues until the combined evacuation tone/message is cancelled
either by the chief warden or the fire brigade.
Sound systems must comply with the functional requirements of AS 1670.4. Sound levels must be
>65dB in each room with doors closed.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
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An Emergency Warning and Intercommunication System (EWIS) must be installed to serve all new
buildings.
The Control Panel is to be located adjacent to or as part of the Fire Indicator Panel. The system must
be interconnected to the FIP for automatic activation on receipt of a fire alarm and operate as a
general “All Out” alarm or as a “Cascade” sequence to meet the individual building requirements.
The EWIS must predominately consist of recessed ceiling speakers, horn speakers and visual alarm
facilities as required installed throughout the building to provide clear and audible evacuation tones
and messaging at the required sound levels. The EWIS will also have a Public Address facility located
at the panel to provide the ability to produce both Emergency and Non-Emergency paging
throughout all or selected areas of the building. Additional features such as Remote microphones or
Background music facilities must also be adaptable to the EWIS should they be required.
The Emergency Intercommunication System must be incorporated as part of the EWIS panel to
provide intercom capabilities between the Panel and each fire compartment area for direct
communication with field fire wardens. This will be achieved by the installation of warden intercom
point handsets throughout the building and the main handset at the panel. This will provide the
ability for the chief warden to talk one on one or have group style communication with the field fire
wardens.
Commissioning details indicating measured sound pressure levels and speech intelligibility must be
provided for all areas and rooms within a building. Sound levels must be achieved in all rooms with
doors closed. A block plan showing the locations and reference identifier or address of all WIP
phones must be affixed to the EWIS’s front panel.
F 2.2.8 Building Fit Out Works
In the event of building fit-out works, the consultant team must identify temporary changes to the
EWIS zones in the contract documents as required to minimise the number and extent of zones
affected by the building works and to provide adequate warning to the ite and adjacent areas for the
duration of the works. Also ensure any additional equipment will be compatible with the system and
not exceed the output of each individual EWIS zone amplifier or should this be unavoidable
replacement with a larger amplifier that is compatible with the CIE must be sourced.
To be inserted – Clause 2.4 Manual Call Points – NATSPEC 0972 Fire Detection and Alarm
Complete with lift up hinged cover
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
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F 3 Documentation / Reporting
F 3.1 Design Reports
Refer general document ‘Design Reports’
The fire protection designer must submit formal Design Report documents as required by the
contract for University technical review.
In addition to the specific elements discussed in the preceding sections the fire protection services
Design Report(s) must include, but not be limited to the following, to the extent they are applicable
to the project.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Completed Design Certificate relevant to the stage of design
Proposed scope of works and detail of the system arrangement
Schedule of applicable regulations, standards, policies and guidance publications on which
the design is based
Details of any deviations from the above
Details of any third party and/or record information on which the design relies
Assumptions or exclusions
Safety in Design review
Sustainability review
Proposed point of supply for the works including the supply
capacity/characteristics/condition assessment demonstrating adequate capacity is available
at the point of supply and in the reticulation system
Detail of any proposed modifications to existing systems or equipment
Hydraulic calculations and schematics
Pumped systems calculations for the system resistance and pump selections
Switchboard locations, design fault level, voltage drop allocation, circuiting arrangements,
earthing arrangements and protection arrangement
Manufacturer selection of major equipment.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
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Table 4 – Fire protection Services Design Deliverables Matrix
Design Report
Stage
Fire Protection Services Design Deliverables
•
General
End of
Schematic
Design
Reporting
Documentation
•
•
Preliminary flowrates, pumps, tanks and other main fire protection plant and system sizing estimates based on schedule of
accommodation and reasonable allowances
Determine cost / benefit impact of masterplan options to fire protection services
Advantages/disadvantages of masterplan options
Understanding of mechanical systems requirements
Identify spatial requirements for main fire protection plant and systems
Confirmation of scope of services
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Mark up of masterplan options indicating concept layouts and preliminary spatials
Return design brief including design criteria
Developed hydraulic flow rates, and other main fire protection plant and systems based on building form and preliminary information
from other services
Preliminary size and location of main fire protection systems including plantrooms, pumps, tanks, hydrants, hose reels, main pipework
reticulation FIP’s, etc. to inform Architectural building development
Preliminary major service routes
Coordination of preliminary electrical, mechanical, BMS and other services requirements relating to the fire protection plant and
systems
Preliminary equipment selection
The University Design and Construction specifications reviewed and assessed
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Confirmation of spatials of main fire protection plant and systems
Confirmation of fire protection systems provided to individual facilities / buildings
Description of system proposals
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Preliminary opinion of cost based on square meter rates
Concept Design Certificate
Preliminary schematic drawings of fire protection systems
Layout drawings showing preliminary locations of major plant i.e. pumps, tanks FIP’s, main pipework, hydrants, hosereels etc.
Updated fire protection services brief
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
General
End of Design
Development
Reporting
Drawing
SECTION G – PLUMBING
•
•
Page 149 of 269
Design Report
Stage
Fire Protection Services Design Deliverables
General
50%
Documentation
Phase
Reporting
Documentation
General
Reporting
90%
Documentation
Phase
Documentation
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fire protection services design to suit approved building form
Final plant and equipment sizes based on design
Defined location and sizes of plantrooms, services risers, etc. to suit designed equipment
Defined size, location and route of all ductwork, piping, electrical routes, and underground services
Defined sizes of major plant
Final hydraulic calculations
Final Confirmation of systems being provided.
Final confirmation/coordination with other services.
Schedule of selected equipment.
Developed opinion of costs including elemental cost for major plant and equipment.
Final minor items requiring clarification.
Final minor items of information required.
Statement of any specialist systems requiring design development responsibility by contractor.
Schematic Design Certificate
Complete schematic drawings of piping systems with sizes, fire detection systems, EWIS etc.
Layout drawings for fire protection services
Preliminary Fire protection specification
Final coordinated fire protection services design suitable for tender and construction
All systems and equipment fully and clearly defined and specified
Confirmation of all systems fully designed
Statement of any minor outstanding information and/or assumptions
Elemental opinion of cost
Confirmation of any design development of specialist systems by contractor
Complete schematic drawings including schedules of equipment
Complete fire protection services layout coordinated with building form, ceiling, furniture, joinery and other services
Complete specification for fire protection services
All documentation fully checked, reviewed and signed-off in accordance with contractual Quality Assurance Requirements
Final Services Brief
Detailed Design Certification
Where the designer considers an element is not applicable to the project, this must be clearly noted.
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
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F 3.2 Design Certification
The designer must produce a ‘Design Certificate’ identifying which codes and standards the design
has been based on, including the issue date and version of the code or standard, and certifying
compliance with those codes.
The ‘Design Certificate’ must be signed by the designer responsible for the design, not a delegate,
and issued with design documentation issued for pricing.
F 4 Record Drawings
To be inserted – Clause 3.17 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Documents and Drawings
for additional requirements
F 5 Operation and Maintenance Manuals
To be inserted – Clause 3.18 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Operation and Maintenance
Manuals for additional requirements
SECTION F – FIRE DETECTION AND PROTECTION SERVICES
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


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA



MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


G
PLUMBING
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
x G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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Contents
G 1 General Requirements ........................................................................................................................154
G 1.1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 154
G 1.2 Responsibilities ..................................................................................................................................... 154
G 1.3 Standards and Regulations ................................................................................................................... 155
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations .......................................................................................... 155
G 1.4 Quality ................................................................................................................................................... 156
G 1.5 Preferred Manufacturers ...................................................................................................................... 156
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers............................................................................................. 157
G 1.6 Safety in Design..................................................................................................................................... 158
G 1.7 Sustainability ......................................................................................................................................... 158
G 1.8 Cost Planning ........................................................................................................................................ 158
G 1.9 Attendance............................................................................................................................................ 159
G 1.10 Design Conditions ............................................................................................................................... 161
Table 3 – List of Design Conditions ........................................................................................................ 162
G 1.11 Hydraulic Services Deemed to Satisy (DTS) Solutions ......................................................................... 163
G 2 Performance Criteria ...........................................................................................................................163
G 2.1 Infrastructure Drainage and Water Reticulation Systems .................................................................... 163
G 2.2 Sanitary Drainage Works....................................................................................................................... 164
G 2.3 Trade Waste Drainage .......................................................................................................................... 164
G 2.4 Domestic Water Reticulation ................................................................................................................ 165
G 2.5 Fuel Gas Distribution Systems............................................................................................................... 165
G 2.6 Hot Water Systems ............................................................................................................................... 166
G 2.7 Sanitary Fittings and Fixtures ................................................................................................................ 167
Table 4 – Fixture Flow Rates .................................................................................................................. 167
G 4 Design Reports ....................................................................................................................................167
Table 5 Hydraulic Services Design Deliverables Matrix: ........................................................................ 169
G 4.1 Design Certification ............................................................................................................................... 172
G 5 Record Drawings .................................................................................................................................172
G 6 Operation and Maintenance Manuals .................................................................................................172
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G 1 General Requirements
G 1.1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary the University clauses are included, with the Contract
Supervisors approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed in a box, with italic text.
G 1.2 Responsibilities
To be inserted – Clause 1.1 RESPONSIBILITIES – NATSPEC 0801 Hydraulic Systems
The scope of works for the plumbing and hydraulic systems include, but are not limited to, the
following:
•
•
•
The designer shall insert a bullet point list of the scope of hydraulic works
……
…….
The contractor shall determine the full scope of the works from review of this specification and all
associated contract drawings.
The contractor shall attend site to satisfy himself of the existing systems and site conditions.
No claim shall be entertained for lack of knowledge of the contract documentation or of existing
systems which could reasonably have been known from prior investigation
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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G 1.3 Standards and Regulations
The following table details the Standards and Regulations, which are additional to those referred to
in Section C and are specific to the Plumbing Services:
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations
CODE
DESCRIPTION
NCC
National Construction Code
SAA MP52
Manual of authorisation procedures for plumbing and drainage products
HB 230
Rainwater Tank Design and Installation Handbook
AS 1170.4
Structural Design Actions – Earthquake Actions in Australia
AS 1172.1
Water closets (WCs) - Pans
AS 1172.2
Water closets (WCs) - Flushing devices and cistern inlet and outlet valves
AS/NZS 1730
Wash basins
AS 1976
Vitreous china used in sanitary appliances
AS 2200
Design charts for water supply and sewerage
AS 2700
Colour Standards for general purposes
AS/NZS 2712
Solar and heat pump water heaters - Design and construction
AS/NZS 2845.1
Water supply - Backflow prevention devices - Materials, design and
performance requirements
AS/NZS 2845.2
Water supply - Backflow preventions devices - Registered air gaps and
registered break tanks
AS/NZS 2845.3
Water supply - Backflow prevention devices - Field testing and maintenance
of testable devices
AS 5200.000
Technical specification for plumbing and drainage products - Procedures for
certification of plumbing and drainage products
AS 1432
Copper tubes for plumbing, gasfitting and drainage applications
AS 3795
Copper alloy tubes for plumbing and drainage applications
AS/NZS 4130
Polyethylene (PE) pipes for pressure applications
AS/NZS 4129
Fittings for polyethylene (PE) pipes for pressure applications
AS/NZS 2033
Installation of polyethylene pipe systems
AS/NZS 1260
PVC-U pipes and fittings for drain, waste and vent application
AS/NZS 2032
Installation of PVC pipe systems
AS/NZS 4130
Polyethylene (PE) pipes for pressure applications
AS/NZS 4129
Fittings for polyethylene (PE) pipes for pressure applications
AS/NZS 2033
Installation of polyethylene pipe systems
AS/NZS 3000
Electrical installations
AS/NZS 3500.0
Plumbing and drainage - Glossary of terms
AS/NZS 3500.1
Plumbing and drainage - Water services
AS/NZS 3500.2
Plumbing and drainage - Sanitary plumbing and drainage
AS/NZS 3500.3
Plumbing and drainage - Stormwater drainage
AS/NZS 3500.4
Plumbing and drainage - Heated water services
AS/NZS 3666.1
Air-handling and water systems of buildings - Microbial control - Design,
installation and commissioning
HB32
Control of microbial growth in air-handling and water systems of buildings
AS 4041
Pressure piping
AS 4426
Thermal Insulation of pipe work, duct work and equipment – Selection,
installation and finish
AS 5601
Gas installations
AS 1345
Identification of the contents of pipes, conduits and ducts
AS 1482
Electrical equipment for explosive atmospheres – protection by ventilation
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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CODE
AS/NZS 2243
AS 3892
AS/NZS 2982
AS 4267
AS 4289
AS 4332
AS 4343
AS 4484
AS 4706
DESCRIPTION
– type of protection
Safety in laboratories – all volumes
Pressure equipment – Installation
Laboratory design and construction – General requirements
Pressure regulators for use with industrial compressed gas cylinders
Oxygen and acetylene gas reticulation systems
The storage and handling of gas in cylinders
Pressure equipment – hazard levels
Gas cylinders for industrial, scientific, medical and refrigerant use - Labelling
and colour coding
Pressure gauges for regulators used with compressed gas cylinders
Guidelines for the Control of Legionella in Manufactured Water Systems in
South Australia
Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards Act 2005
Office of the Technical regulator Plumbing and Gas divisions (OTR)
standards and requirements
Department of Health guidelines
The above list is not all-inclusive and those associated with the project are responsible for identifying
and complying with all standards relevant to the scope of works.
All Plumbing Services installations must comply with the most current version of the standard or
code at the time of tender.
G 1.4 Quality
All Hydraulic services design work is required to be carried out via suitably qualified and experienced
designers. The University may request copies of the designer’s calculations in order to review. The
University may also request changes to the design personnel if there is concern that the personnel
engaged are not at an appropriate level of experience. All design work must be checked and
reviewed by a suitably qualified and experienced peer prior to issuing for pricing. The designer must
have a formal check and review process. The University may request evidence of the design checking
and review process. On occasion a designer may utilise a third party designer (sub-consultant /
specialist contractor / lighting manufacturer / supplier, etc.) however, the designer retains
responsibility for the design and review process. Unless specifically directed otherwise, all
equipment designed, specified and installed must be new and of the highest quality.
G 1.5 Preferred Manufacturers
The University requires that only proven proprietary equipment, with local service availability must
be selected. It is a requirement that new equipment associated with the hydraulic Systems must be
compatible with systems the University has implemented including:
•
•
•
Building Management System – Modbus LONWorks – Preferred meters are Crompton
Integra 1534-M-5-M-030 with 282CTMECH CT isolation links and Circutor CVM-MINI-LON
Power Analyser
Fire Detection and Alarm – Ampac
Emergency Warning and Intercommunication System - Ampac
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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Whilst the University does not wish to restrict the designer’s ability to select the most appropriate
equipment to meet particular requirements it is the University’s preference that equipment selected
satisfies the following:
•
•
•
•
•
A reputable manufacturer with a proven track record
Local Adelaide representation and support in design and post installation operation
Local Adelaide spare parts availability
Australian manufacturer is preferred.
Unrestricted access to system hardware and licensed software
The following is an indicative list, which the University considers to represent the desired quality
levels:
Table 2 – List of Preferred Manufacturers
Equipment / Component
Chilled water/boiling water units
Switchgear and components
Electrical Accessories
Sanitary Fixtures
Tapware
Gas fittings
Gas Fixtures
Hot water services
Boiling water/chilled water units
Pumps
Flow meters
Isolation and control valves
Manufacturer / Supplier
Billi
Schneider, ABB, NHP
Clipsal, HPM, Legrand
Caroma, Enware
Enware, Galvin, CB Tapware
Enware, Galvin
Rinnai, Bosch
Rheem, Bosch
Billi
Grundfos
ABB
John valves
The hydraulic services designer and contractor are welcome to propose alternatives, however, they
must clearly demonstrate equal or greater technical, cost and/or quality performance.
To be inserted – Clause 1.10 Alternative Products
All specified items represent a required level of quality and performance.
Unless specifically required to integrate with an existing University of South Australia system the
contractor is at liberty to propose alternatives to the specified items subject to compliance with
the University of South Australia Design and Construction Specifications and written approval
from the Contracts Supervisor.
Where alternative equipment to that specified is proposed by the contractor, the contractor shall
provide full details of technical, cost and/or programme benefit to the project with full supporting
documentation (including calculations, modelling, etc.) at the contractors cost. The contractor
shall retain design responsibility for any alternative proposals accepted including any unforseen
issues.
Any unapproved products provided shall be removed and replaced with the specified item at no
cost to the University.
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G 1.6 Safety in Design
Those involved in the design of the Hydraulic services must undertake the necessary Safety in Design
reviews and activities as required by the contract.
The hydraulic designer should consider the following particular items as part of the Safety in Design,
however they are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
Locations of isolators, pump stations, storage tanks, waste water and water pre- treatment
systems, gas, reticulation systems, control devices and other equipment requiring access for
operational or maintenance procedures. Location specifics to be considered include but are
not limited to height, proximity to risk areas, proximity to other plant, proximity to operating
vehicles etc.
Methods of safe isolation for access and maintenance of equipment
Satisfactory maintenance space around services and equipment
Satisfactory space and access to internal components requiring maintenance and/or
replacement
Adequate lighting and ventilation
The designer must address the Safety in Design aspects in the Design Reports
The installer of the works must review the Safety in Design documentation throughout the works, to
identify any risks throughout the works and any residual risks to the University on completion.
G 1.7 Sustainability
The designer must take into consideration the Environmental Sustainability of the Plumbing services
taking into account the whole of life cost and operational benefit.
All Buildings must be designed to suit the local environmental conditions. They must be designed to
optimise operating conditions using minimum water and non-renewable sources of energy.
Elements that the designer must consider, include, but are not limited to, the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Water and energy minimisation through equipment selections, flow regulation and system
design,
Rainwater/Alternate water supplies,
Waste water management and treatment,
Materials selections
Decommissioning / disposal of equipment at end-of-life
Control methodology including automatic controls
Water metering
The sustainability aspects must be addressed in the Design Reports.
G 1.8 Cost Planning
The designer must provide input into the project cost planning as required by the contract.
The designer must provide cost planning advice for the supply, installation, associated works,
contingencies, overheads, etc. to indicate a total cost to the University. Cost planning advice must be
presented as a minimum based upon relevant historical data and project specific measured
quantities.
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Any element specifically excluded must be clearly indicated so that a total cost to the University may
be determined.
Additionally the designer must identify all elements considered to have a risk of accuracy greater
than 25% for any reason along with a description as to how this risk will be addressed.
G 1.9 Attendance
It is incumbent on the Hydraulic designer and contractor to make themselves aware of existing
conditions as far as reasonably practicable when designing and/or performing works at the
University. The University reserves the right to hold the designer and/or contractor liable for works
performed that are of a sub-standard or non-compliant nature.
The designer must attend design and construction meetings as required by the contract and outlined
below.
The University expects the Hydraulic services designer, not a delegate to attend at a minimum:•
•
•
•
•
Technical reviews as directed by the Contract Supervisor
Design team meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one meeting)
Construction phase meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one
meeting), plus any meetings where the Contract Supervisor deems there is significant
hydraulic services elements that requires the designer’s input
Ongoing site inspections as considered appropriate by the Contract Supervisor (minimum bimonthly)
Attendance to a selection of key construction activities in order to set and monitor the
standard of the progressive installation including ;o Hydraulic services drainage inspection,
o Hydraulic services first fix sanitary drainage inspection,
o Hydraulic services first fix reticulation services inspection,
o Hydraulic services specialist services inspection,
o Hydraulic services final fix sanitary ware and tapware inspection,
o Hydraulic services commissioning where required by Contract Supervisor,
o Hydraulic services final / defects inspection prior to Practical Completion.
The Hydraulic designer must identify his/her proposed meeting site attendance schedule in their
engagement proposal.
The Hydraulic Contractor must advise the Designer of the commencement of each of the above
construction activities within adequate time to permit attendance of the designer. Further the
contractor must await the designer and attend meetings to receive approval to continue the works.
The Hydraulic Contractor must attend meetings as required by the contract and considered
necessary by the Contracts Supervisor.
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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To be inserted –NATSPEC 802 Hydraulic Design and Install
Reference the Authority Approvals requirements insert the followingMake applications, obtain all permits, and arrange testing, all as necessary for the installation and
placing into operation of the works where required by any Authority including:
• SA Water corporation
• Department of Premier and Cabinet – Work Safe SA
• The Office of the Technical Regulator
• SA Fire Services
Provide all associated documentation required for the applications. Pay all associated fees.
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To be inserted –NATSPEC 08 Hydraulic 0171 General Requirements
Delete the existing clause 1.7 Inspection requirements insert the followingClause 1.7 Inspection Notice
Inspection: Give notice to the OTR and the Consultant so that inspection may be made of the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
Excavated surfaces.
Concealed services
Underground services
All services positioned under or encased within concrete structures,
Hydraulic services final inspection prior to Practical Completion.
The Hydraulic Contractor must advise the Designer of the commencement construction activities
within adequate time to permit attendance of the designer to key activities. The hydraulic
contractor must hold the progression of these key activities and await the designers approval of
the installation.
Key construction activities considered hold points in order to set and monitor the standard of the
progressive installation include ;•
•
•
•
•
•
•
External drainage installation,
First fix sanitary drainage installation,
First fix reticulation services installation,
Specialist services installation,
Final fix sanitary ware and tapware installation,
Hydraulic services commissioning where required,
Final / defects inspection prior to Practical Completion.
In recognition of reduced inspections by the approving authority and OTR inspectors the Hydraulic
contractor must maintain an Inspection and Testing Plan (ITP). Such plan must record all bookings
numbers and attendance by the approving authority and additionally must be inspected and
signed by the head contractor for each aspect/ phase of the works across the site. This plan must
be reviewed by the consultant during each site attendance.
Failure by the head contractor to inspect and monitor the works undertaken by the contractor
may be considered failure to construct the works correctly in accordance with the brief and the
relevant standards and may be considered a non-compliant installation.
G 1.10 Design Conditions
All hydraulic systems must operate under extreme ambient conditions and must be designed to
meet the following design criteria:
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Table 3 – List of Design Conditions
Item
Design Criteria
Ambient conditions under
which all plant shall
operate – Adelaide Region
46.0⁰C dry bulb maximum
22.0⁰C wet bulb maximum
Full Solar Load
0.0⁰C minimum
Ambient Conditions under
which all plan shall
operate – Other Regions
Design Conditions as per AIRAH DA09
Hours of operation –
general
Acoustic Criteria
Maximum noise levels at
adjoining property
boundaries
Sanitary drainage pipe
grades
As per project brief
As per project brief
Not to exceed levels specified for commercial properties and
residential properties in the Environmental Protection Act
40mm and 50mm branch
80mm branch
1 in 60
100mm main drain
1 in 60
100mm branch drains for 30
metres downstream of the head of
the drain.
1 in 50
100mm branch drain extending to
the man drain of a common
branch drain receiving upstream
discharges from more than two
soil fixtures or three waste
fixtures.
Pressure loss through
plant and equipment
SECTION G – PLUMBING
1 in 40
1 in 50
Larger drains 150mm or greater
Comply with the AS 3500
Backflow Protection
90 kpa
Filtration Systems
100 kpa
Water Reticulation Systems
150 kpa
Gas Reticulation Systems
30% of the initial pressure
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Item
Design Criteria
Water pressure and
temperature requirements
Domestic Cold Water
20° C
Domestic water services serving
emergency wash facilities
Must not exceed 25° C
Domestic Hot water flow
reticulation
65°C
Domestic Hot Water Return piping
Water Pressures
Gas
Water velocity
Cold Water Pipework
Hot water Pipework
Pump Discharge Pipework
Sanitary Drain
60°C
250 kpa min at the outlet
Not to exceed 7.0 kpa with in
buildings generally. Typically 2.75
at type 1 fixtures.
1.0 m/s
1.0 m/s
1.5 m/s
1.0 m/s
G 1.11 Hydraulic Services Deemed to Satisy (DTS) Solutions
The University anticipate that DTS solutions will be adopted. Should the designer wish to depart
from these, the University must be consulted on these proposals. Such consultation must be in
writing and must describe at the very least the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Details of the departure,
Reasons for departure,
Cost implications,
Benefits to the university,
Whole of life calculations,
Examples of where the departure has been successfully adopted,
Warranty conditions,
All known problems and issues encountered, if any.
The designer is to await written acceptance from the University before progressing any alternative
solutions.
G 2 Performance Criteria
G 2.1 Infrastructure Drainage and Water Reticulation Systems
Connect sanitary drainage, stormwater and water systems to the adjacent available public
infrastructure or interconnect with the existing site private drainage/water system. Where
connection is made with an existing drainage/water network assess the current condition and spare
capacity. Consider whether a site survey is required of the existing network in order to determine
existing conditions, capacity, flows, grades, etc.
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The designer is to investigate the existing supply arrangements and discuss and present all options.
These options must be discussed with the authority and their opinion, supporting or otherwise be
presented to the University.
Preference will be given to sanitary drainage and stormwater systems which employ gravity rather
than collection systems which employ pumps and mechanical devices for the transport of drainage
waters.
Preference will be given to water reticulation systems that utilise available water pressures over
systems which employ pumps, tanks etc for the reticulation of waters.
Underground sanitary drainage/stormwater/water pipe work may be PVC-U, DWV class, High
Density Polyethylene or other materials complying with the statutory requirements. Preference is
given to mechanical jointing systems over rubber ring jointing systems. Consideration must be given
to imposed structural loads over piping.
Where ground conditions require provide suitable expansion provisions at the entry/exit of buildings
and at the connection with large structures such as arrestors, manholes etc.
Provide isolation of water networks which permit the isolation of buildings or sections of the site
whilst maintaining supply to other sections and or buildings.
The use of cast iron and or metallic pipes in ground is discouraged. Where employed a suitable
system of protection must be applied and may require inclusion of catholic protection of piping,
valves and fittings.
Provide detectable marker tape over the full length of inground pipe work to identify the services.
Where dissimilar materials are in contact provide suitable isolation to both surfaces.
G 2.2 Sanitary Drainage Works
Generally provide floor wastes to all wet areas, plant rooms and adjacent to all Eye Wash Safety
Showers.
Locate wet areas and plant rooms away from communications and electrical rooms.
Sanitary drainage systems receiving discharge from plant and equipment with seasonal flows
including plant room may suffer water seal loss and resultant odours. Consideration must be given
to designs which maintain passive replenishment solutions rather than the use of trap priming
devices. Double trapping shall be provided in plenums and air handing plantrooms.
Ensure overflow relief gullies are provided and all differential paving levels are maintained.
Ensure all connections of branch drains to the main drain are constructed invert to overt as a
minimum.
All junctions and bends serving soil fixtures must be swept or OB junctions and 45° bends.
Provide spare junctions to all drainage and vent risers to facilitate future flexibility. Demonstrate and
agree with the design team the extent of area which can be connected recognizing other service
restrictions prior to completion of documents.
G 2.3 Trade Waste Drainage
Trade waste drainage systems are to comply with the following:-
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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•
•
•
Requirements of SA Water trade Waste Division and
this specification in respect of drain grades and
Relevant Australian Standards
Trade Waste treatment systems will be provided in response to the data presented with the Room
Data Sheets. The designer is to undertake interviews with the user group and complete the room
data sheets in conjunction with the Design team.
Consult with SA Water for approval of all Trade waste pretreatment systems prior to construction
commencement.
SA Water Corporation may require the preparation and submission of technical data relating to the
discharges along with consultation with the University for Payment of fees. The designer must
engage with all parties and manage these approvals on behalf of the University.
Provide inline sink traps to all commercial kitchen equipment.
G 2.4 Domestic Water Reticulation
Generally conceal all hot and cold water pipes.
Tempering valves or Thermostatic mixing valves will be required to all tap ware serving ablutionary
fixtures.
Provide hose taps to wet areas, plant rooms and nominated external locations.
All tapware must comply with WELS legislation and be a minimum 3 star rating.
All hot water pipe work including branches will be thermally insulated to ensure minimal heat loss
through the system.
All hot water reticulation systems will be designed to minimize the length of any “dead legs” in the
reticulation system with a maximum length of 6 metres. Where this cannot be achieved provide a
hot water flow and return reticulation system.
The maximum length of piping downstream of a temperature controlled device will be designed to
not exceed 3 metres.
Provide spare isolated and capped hotwater flow, return and cold water branches for future
flexibility of the piped network.
Ensure the length of each branch (dead water) between the main supply line and the isolation valve
are no longer than 2X the pipe diameter. Agree the location of each branch.
Deluge safety shower and/or eye and face wash unit must be complete with audible and flashing
alarm and remote alarm indication security.
G 2.5 Fuel Gas Distribution Systems
Connect Natural gas systems to the adjacent available public infrastructure or interconnect with the
existing site private gas reticulation system. Where connection is made with an existing gas network
assess the current condition and spare capacity. Consider whether a site survey is required of the
existing network in order to determine existing conditions, capacity, pressures, etc.
The designer is to investigate the existing supply arrangements, to discuss and present all options.
These options must be discussed with the authority and their opinion, supporting or otherwise be
presented to the University.
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LP Gas cylinders where required will be positioned clear of all ignition sources and will be in close
proximity to roadways to facilitate access for re-filling.
Storm water sumps will not be positioned adjacent LPG storage facilities, gas regulators, meters,
OPSO valves etc. If unavoidable the sumps will be flame proof.
All underground pipework external of building shall be:•
•
fully welded steel construction to AS 1074 and protected from any corrosion by a
proprietary sheathing compatible with the surrounding environment or
polyethylene pressure pipe to AS 4130 joint using electrofusion couplings.
Install all pipe work to the requirements of AS 5601 with marker location requirements as set out
previously for Electrical Services.
Provide detectable marker tape over the full length of pipe work to protect the gas services.
The use of metallic pipes in ground is discouraged. Where employed a suitable system of protection
must be applied and may require inclusion of catholic protection of piping, valves and fittings.
Provide a gas isolation valve that shuts off the gas supply to each building. Preferably this valve is to
be located outside of the building footprint within a covered pit. If this is not possible the valve is to
be included within an exposed gas train as close as possible to the pressure reduction valve.
The location of the isolation valve is to be clearly labelled as per the relevant Standards.
Provide an emergency gas shut-off valve within each building or for each zone as applicable. This
shall be an electrically operated 240v gas shut off solenoid valve in the gas line downstream of the
gas meter. The solenoid valve shall be of the latching type requiring manual resetting. It shall fail
closed and be selected for continuous operation. Provide a continuously charging battery back-up
system to hold the gas solenoid shut off valve open for a minimum of eight (8) hours upon loss of
main electric supply.
The emergency shut off solenoid valve shall be connected to the fire alarm and any other system as
specified in order to shut off the gas supply in an emergency.
G 2.6 Hot Water Systems
Consideration should be given to the installation of gas boosted solar hot water units. Where such
systems are not practical alternatives can be considered. Proposed hot water systems and
reticulation must be confirmed at an early stage.
Where flow and return circulating hot water loops are employed ensure the circulating pumps are
thermally controlled rather than time clock controlled. Do not employ systems which permit
circulating temperatures to drop below 45°C.
Generally hot water systems to laboratories should be separate from all other hot water
requirements to the remainder of the building. The cold water supply to the hot water system
servicing the laboratories must be backflow protected to suit hazard rating of the laboratory.
Allow for sufficient space around the storage hot water units for maintenance removal of elements
and above the unit for the withdrawal of anodes.
Hot water lines should not be directly encased within masonry walls.
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All hot water pipes, fittings and valves must be thermally insulated with approved elastomeric
preformed pipe installation (not fibreglass or mineral fibre) prior to installation within wall.
Insulation must achieve a minimum R rating as follows :•
•
•
•
•
Non circulated hot water main supply and branches piping :- R=0.6
Non circulated hot water branch not exceeding 3 metres total length :- R=0.3
Circulating hot water systems mains :- R=1.0
Circulating hot water systems branches :- R=0.6
Warm water branches not exceeding 3 metres total length :- R=0.3
Where insulation is exposed provide additional mechanical protection.
G 2.7 Sanitary Fittings and Fixtures
Toiler suites and basins shall have stain resistant high gloss enamel finish.
Unless otherwise advised, sanitary and tap ware shall be selected from the Preferred Manufacturers
(refer Table 2). The following fixture flow rates are indicative of minimum selection requirements.
Table 4 – Fixture Flow Rates
Fixture
Hand washing basins
Sinks
Flow
4 L/min – combined total flow.
Where there is concern about the presence of
unequal hot and cold water pressures and/or
where compliance with this flowrate may
compromise the operation of water tempering
devices submit a recommended alternate flow.
6 L/min – combined total flow
Showers
7 L/min – combined total flow
Lab taps
6 L/min – combined total flow
Hose taps
6 L/min – combined total flow
Urinals (wall hung)
Sensor flush 0.8L/flush
Urinals (slab/floor)
Programmable automated flush mechanism to
flush 2 to 4 times daily
Water Closets
4.5L full flush / 3.0Lhalf flush
G 4 Design Reports
The hydraulic designer must submit formal Design Report documents as required by the contract for
technical review by the University.
In addition to the specific elements discussed in Section C of this document, the hydraulic services
Design Report/s must include, to the extent that they are applicable to the project, but not be
limited to the following:
•
Completed Design Certificate relevant to the stage of design
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Proposed scope of works and details of the system arrangement
Schedule of applicable regulations, standards, policies and guidance publications on which
the design is based.
Details of deviations of the above
Details of any third party and/or record information upon which the design relies
Assumptions or exclusions
Safety in Design review
Sustainability review
Proposed point of supply for the works including the supply
capacity/characteristics/condition assessment, demonstrating adequate capacity is available
at the point of supply and in the reticulation system
Detail of any proposed modifications to existing systems or equipment
Major plant and risers location.
Manufacturer selection of major equipment
Basis of sizing of major equipment
Layout drawings and single line diagrams for the proposed arrangement to the level of detail
as per the “Hydraulic Services Design Deliverable” matrix
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Table 5 Hydraulic Services Design Deliverables Matrix:
Design Report
Stage
Electrical Service Design Deliverables
General
End of
Schematic
Design
Reporting
Documentation
General
End of Design
Development
Reporting
SECTION G – PLUMBING
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Preliminary demand estimate based on schedule of accommodation and reasonable allowance.
Awareness of existing site infrastructure to identify connection points and capacities and to determine cost/benefit impact of
masterplan options to Hydraulic services
Preliminary estimated demands for sewer, water and gases
Feasibility and preliminary costs of infrastructure connections
Existing services report and condition assessment
Impact on site infrastructure services and suitability for connection
Advantages/disadvantages of masterplan options
Confirmation of scope of services
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Preliminary Safety Risk matrix
Preliminary Site Risk matrix
Mark up of masterplan options indicating existing infrastructure and possible connection points
Developed demand estimate based on building form and preliminary information from other services
Preliminary size and route of hydraulic services complete with spatial data relating to plant and equipment sufficient to inform
architectural building development
Preliminary major service routes
Preliminary piping and fixture selections.
Preliminary external services design
The University Design and Construction Specifications reviewed and assessed
Developed demand estimate based on proposed facility/building form and services
Confirmation site infrastructure can accommodate estimated hydraulic services demands
Description of system proposals inclusive of Early works necessary to maintain project program (if required)
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Preliminary opinion of cost inclusive of descriptive breakdown based on area or elemental assessment
Preliminary Safety Risk matrix
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Design Report
Stage
Electrical Service Design Deliverables
•
•
•
Drawing
•
•
General
50%
Documentation
Phase
Reporting
Documentation
SECTION G – PLUMBING
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Preliminary Site Risk matrix
Concept Design Certificate
Preliminary schematic drawings of drainage and reticulation systems demonstrating connections to infrastructure and inclusive of early
works (if required)
Layout drawings showing preliminary locations of major plant i.e Hot water generation plant, pumps, Storage tanks, plant room,
tradewaste pre-treatment systems, water conditioning and pre-treatment systems, etc.
Layout drawings showing preliminary drainage and reticulation corridors and spatial data for plant and equipment. Also noting any
special exclusion zones for maintenance or the like.
Hydraulic services design to suit approved building form
Final load estimate based on design equipment / services including diversity
Defined location and sizes of risers, valves and equipment, access panels, etc. to suit designed equipment
Defined size, locations and route of drainage and reticulation services
Defined sizes of plant and equipment
Draft specification of hydraulic services
Evidence of coordination process with other services relating to access for installation during construction and maintenance, services
demands, terminations etc.
Final demand estimates
Final confirmation of systems being provided
Final confirmation of connections and extent of upgrade if required) to existing infrastructure
Schedule of fixtures and equipment
Developed opinion of cost including elemental cost for major plant and equipment
Final minor items requiring further clarification
Final minor items of information required
Statement of any specialist systems requiring design and/or development responsibility by contractor
Developed Safety Risk matrix
Developed Site Risk matrix
Schematic Design Certificate
Sketch demonstrating “zones of influence” for future connections
Compete schematic drawings of Hydraulic systems with sizes
Layout drawings for drainage and reticulation services describing the design approach to each service
System schematics showing termination with other services as required
Clear early works description and drawings
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Design Report
Stage
Electrical Service Design Deliverables
General
Reporting
90%
Documentation
Phase
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Documentation
•
•
•
•
Preliminary Specification
Final coordinated Hydraulic services design suitable for tender and construction
All systems and equipment fully and clearly defined and specified
Evidence of completion of coordination with other services relating to access for installation during construction and maintenance,
services demands, terminations etc.
Confirmation of all systems fully designed
Statement of any minor outstanding information and/or assumptions
Elemental opinion of cost
Complete specification
Confirmation of any design development of specialist systems by contractor
Completed Safety Risk matrix
Completed Site Risk matrix
Complete schematic drawings including schedules of equipment
Complete Hydraulic services layout drawings with locations of outlets, fixtures, equipment, etc. coordinated with building form,
furniture, joinery and other services
Detailed Layout drawings showing locations of major plant i.e Hot water generation plant, pumps, Storage tanks, plant room,
tradewaste pre-treatment systems, water conditioning and pre-treatment systems, etc.
Controls details complete
Final specification
All documentation fully checked, reviewed and signed-off in accordance with contractual Quality Assurance Requirements
Detailed Design Certification
Where the designer considers an element is not applicable to the project, this must be clearly noted. It is the University’s expectation that there will be negligible
cost impact/difference between 90% Documentation Phase documentation and Construction Issue documentation. Any elements not fully designed /
documented at 90% issues must be clearly identified with an estimate of cost. The University reserves the right to reject the designers 90% Design Documentation
should it consider the documentation not satisfactory.
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G 4.1 Design Certification
The designer must produce a ‘Design Certificate’ identifying which codes and standards the design
have been based on, including the issue date and version of the code or standard, and certifying
compliance with those codes.
The ‘Design Certificate’ must be signed by the designer responsible for the design, not a delegate,
and issued with the documentation issued for pricing.
G 5 Record Drawings
To be inserted – Clause 3.17 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Documents and Drawings
for additional requirements
G 6 Operation and Maintenance Manuals
To be inserted – Clause 3.18 Record Drawings – NATSPEC 0171 General Requirements
Refer to the University Design and Construction Specifications, Section C, Operation and Maintenance
Manuals for additional requirements
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
UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA
FACILITIES MANAGEMENT UNIT


MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


H
BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
x H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
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Contents
H 1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................175
H 2 Design.................................................................................................................................................176
H 2.1 System Networks .................................................................................................................................. 176
H 2.2 Niagara Server....................................................................................................................................... 176
H 2.3 Work Place Pro Software ...................................................................................................................... 177
H 2.4 Logging Function ................................................................................................................................... 177
H2.5 Site Metering ......................................................................................................................................... 177
H 2.6 Electronic Demand Limiting .................................................................................................................. 177
H 3 General Requirements ........................................................................................................................178
H 3.1 Automatic Controls ............................................................................................................................... 178
F 3.2 Control Equipment ................................................................................................................................ 179
H 4 Metering .............................................................................................................................................180
H 4.1 General.................................................................................................................................................. 180
H 4.2 Responsibilities ..................................................................................................................................... 180
H 4.3 Water Meters ........................................................................................................................................ 180
H 4.4 Gas Meters ............................................................................................................................................ 180
H 4.5 Electrical Meters ................................................................................................................................... 180
H 5 Interactive Energy Management System..............................................................................................182
H 5.1 Programming ........................................................................................................................................ 182
H 5.2 Graphic Pages........................................................................................................................................ 182
H 5.3 Meter Graphic Pages............................................................................................................................. 182
H 5.4 Mechanical Graphic Pages .................................................................................................................... 183
H 5.5 Lighting Graphic Pages .......................................................................................................................... 183
H 5.6 Documentation ..................................................................................................................................... 184
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H 1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary the University clauses are included, with the Contract
Supervisors approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed inside a blue box and text has been italicised.
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H 2 Design
The upgrade or design and installation of any new Building Management System (BMS) must be fully
compatible with the existing Invensys Building Management System. An overview of the existing
BMS system is provided below.
H 2.1 System Networks
The existing BMS comprises of numerous Invensys Universal Network Controllers (UNC) which
communicate over the University’s data network to each other and to a central Niagara server. The
UNC’s interface the Niagara server with various building management control systems, such as:
•
•
•
•
A Robert Shaw Digital Management System (DMS) together with integrated Microsmart
control systems which communicate over various dedicated data trunks
Daikin BACnet control systems
RS485 (Modbus) data trunks
LON controller networks
These different types of control systems are located throughout the various University campuses
and each has their own individual sub-networks and communication protocols.
An Interactive Energy Management System (IEMS) is installed and comprises of UNC controllers,
which have individual sub-LAN connectors for linking to existing DMS panels. The UNC are designed
to interconnect the new Lon controller networks, BACnet, and Modbus networks and protocol
technologies.
The UNC controllers communicate to other UNC controllers via the data network. The TCP/IP
protocol is used for this data transfer. The University has utilised sub-net with a separate IP range
from their existing ISTS computer WAN for this data transfer to occur.
The UNC’s are self-booting EPROM type based on the Windows NT/XP platform. There are no hard
disks, or graphical user interface in these UNC’s. Each UNC has its own individual static IP address.
There is also a centrally located Enterprise Server workstation at the City East campus. This
workstation also has a static IP address and acts as the supervisor for alarming and logging of data.
All UNC’s have been set up as slaves for logging purposes only to this supervision workstation.
The Enterprise Server workstation and each UNC have their own internal address book. The relevant
IP addresses must be programmed in to these address books to allow any data transfer. The
Enterprise Server workstation has a second network card installed with a dynamically assigned IP
address. This allows for the workstation to send alarms out via the University’s Exchange email
system.
H 2.2 Niagara Server
The main Niagara server is located at City East Campus and comprises a web browser-based
Graphical User Interface (GUI) to enable viewing of data which has been extracted from the various
building management control systems.
The server logs the collected data into a Cloudscape database. The logged data can then be
extracted and viewed graphically or if preferred in html table format. The data can also be exported
into Excel spread sheets for manipulation.
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H 2.3 Work Place Pro Software
As previously mentioned, the UNC”s do not have any graphical user interface (GUI) on-board. The
GUI is located on the centrally located Enterprise Server workstation at City East (BJ 1-01).
The GUI software utilised is Work Place Pro.
H 2.4 Logging Function
Each UNC has the capability of logging data from any of the connected points.
H2.5 Site Metering
Smart Energy metering has been installed across all campuses and the following electrical power
conditions are logged through the IEMS:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Voltage
Current
Maximum demand
Instantaneous KVA and KW
Power factor
Consumption
H 2.6 Electronic Demand Limiting
The IEMS system monitors instantaneous demand.
If the instantaneous demand is at such a level, where the maximum demand may be breached, the
DMS system, automatically:
•
•
•
Raises set points of specific air conditioning systems throughout all campuses
Resets chilled water set point on Mawson Lakes Chillers
Limits power consumption by locking out second stage compressors at City West, to reduce
the connected electrical load.
The designer must identify any proposed Electronic Demand Limiting in the Design Report for
approval by the Contract Supervisor.
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H 3 General Requirements
H 3.1 Automatic Controls
The automatic control system for each building must be a standalone system, interfaced with the
Niagara server to allow remote monitoring and operation of each plant. Exact numbers and types of
points to be monitored by the central system will be agreed during the design phase but as a
minimum it will include the following for each item of plant:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Start/stop function supply
Leaving air temperature sensor
Room temperature sensor
Compressor or fan run signal via a current sensing relay
Set point adjustment
Status indication
Fault indication
Each air conditioner must be controlled automatically start up and stop to provide design conditions
during normal working hours. Each air conditioner control system must have the ability to set
different working hours form other air conditioning system. All air conditioning system must be
interlocked with any outside air/extract systems as appropriate.
All air conditioners used for teaching spaces and selected air conditioners as nominated by Technical
Reference Group must also be fitted with a push button after-hours control switch, connected
through the BMS system to allow operation outside of normal working hours. This control switch
shall stop the air conditioner after a pre-determined time (normally two (2) hours) and allow for
manual restart by pressing the button again. Air conditioning controls can be paralleled if two room
entrances exist.
Push button control to individual rooms are to be provided via a Clipsal switch plate which is made
up of the following components:
•
•
•
•
Flush surround and two gang grid
Switch mechanism 250 V 10 A rocker switch, mechanism has ‘PRESS’ engraved on it (note:
only rocker switches are acceptable)
Neon Indicator 24 VAC to be energised via a separate 24 VAC relay slaved off the air
conditioning unit BMS start relay to prevent the controller being damaged if the relay 1.5
sq./mm twin cable is damaged (i.e. cut or shortened) in the field by building works between
the BMS controller and the push button control.
Flush surround to be engraved with ‘HOLD FOR 7 SECONDS TO STOP'’ above the switch
mechanism.
All automatic controls must fail safe with control and operation of all plant being independent of the
normal control system for fire mode operation. All controls must be located in separate enclosures
mounted in plant rooms or other areas such as electrical switchboard rooms or risers. The location
of BMS system equipment in ceiling spaces or other non-readily accessible locations shall not be
permitted.
Provide a double data point, connected to the University’s Building Services VLAN adjacent to each
BMS Universal Network Controller (UNC) / BACnet Controller, Nexus server and ELR. Coordinate with
the University ISTS via the Contracts Supervisor for allocation of static IP addresses.
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F 3.2 Control Equipment
Where insufficient DMS points are available, provide new LON technology controllers as necessary.
Incorporate a BACnet controller where the Daikin system is used. The controller should be located
adjacent and connected to the UNC. Three data point systems are required if using a BACnet
controller and a new UNC (the third point is for programming purposes via a laptop). Ensure control
systems are wired in the equipment manufacturer’s recommended type and size of data cable.
If using VRV or multi head split A/C systems, individual cassette units must have remote manual
control to stop and start indoor units in conjunction with Afterhours push button and time schedule.
(I.e. if time schedule is commanded on, the unit still requires a start from remote control prior to
starting unless specifically requested).
Supply a new Invensys UNC series controller if no UNC is available for connecting to the new system.
Provide all necessary UNC drivers to interface with the newly connected equipment. UNC locations
are to be approve3d by the Technical Reference Group prior to installation.
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H 4 Metering
H 4.1 General
Meters must be installed on all incoming site services and such services within all buildings. Pulse
rates of connected meters are to be supplied in writing to BMS.
H 4.2 Responsibilities
The relevant services designer must identify and confirm the correct type of meter to ensure it is
compatible with the existing IEMS.
Meters are generally to be supplied wired and connected by the mechanical and electrical
subcontractors. Metering cabling both power and data (RS 485 or Lon) is to be the sole responsibility
of the electrical subcontractor. The BMS contractor is responsible for the commissioning of the BMS
aspect of the meters.
It is the responsibility of the appropriate mechanical or electrical contractor to adjust the required
flow rates, and to ensure current transformers and control voltage cables are terminated with
correct orientation.
The BMS contractor is responsible for termination only of the RS 485 or Lon data cabling at the
designated BMS panel and metering equipment. Installation of the cable is the responsibility of the
relevant electrical or mechanical contractor.
H 4.3 Water Meters
The new incoming water to supply a campus or site shall have a water meter supplied by the Supply
Authority and fitted with a pulsed output for input into the BMS and energy management programs.
Each building and each major water use within a building shall also have a water meter interfacing
with the BMS and energy management programs.
Water supplied to a cafeteria or café kitchen facility or other tenancy shall have a separately
metered and monitored service. The meter shall interface with an energy management program.
H 4.4 Gas Meters
The new incoming gas to supply a campus or site shall have a gas meter supplied by the Supply
Authority or retailer and fitted with a pulsed output for input into the BMS and energy management
programs. Each building shall also have a gas meter interfacing with the BMS and energy
management programs.
Gas supplied to a cafeteria or café kitchen facility or other tenancy shall have a separately metered
and monitored service. The meter shall interface with an energy management program.
Gas supplied to each boiler shall have a separately metered and monitored service.
H 4.5 Electrical Meters
The new incoming electricity to supply a campus or site shall have an electricity meter with dual
output kWh/KVA meter provided by the Supply Authority or Retailer, and shall be one of their
electronic dual output EDMI Mark 6 Smart Meters. The second output is to be Modbus protocol
(RS485) or Lon technology, interfaced to the BMS.
Each building and each floor within a building shall also have an electricity meter interfacing with the
BMS and energy management programs.
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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Power supplied to a cafeteria or café kitchen facility or other tenancy shall have a separately
metered and monitored service. The meter shall interface with an energy management program.
Smart energy meter interface with the Niagara server for logging and data load shedding purposes
shall be provided for all of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Main building switchboard (MSB)
Floor/Level Main Distribution Boards (MDB)
Transport Services Switchboard (TSSB)
Mechanical Services Switchboard (MSSB)
Power supplies to each chiller
Exact provision of metering must be noted in the Design Report and agreed with the Contract
Supervisor.
In existing buildings, EDMI Mark 6 single RS485 output meters shall be used throughout where a
dual output EDMI meter is monitoring the supply. Alternatively Schneider PM500 meters with a
Modbus protocol RS485 output may be used. If alternative brand existing meters are already
connected to specific UNC, the same type of meter may be installed to ensure data integrity of the
Modbus data trunk.
The electrical services designer must confirm the preferred meter type for approval by the Contract
Supervisor.
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H 5 Interactive Energy Management System
H 5.1 Programming
The energy management system shall be capable of load shedding by duty cycling plant and/or
raising temperature set points to remain within the campus agreed maximum demand limit.
Where required, load shedding strategies must be identified in the Design Report and approved by
the Contract Supervisor.
The demand limiting is to have set time limits, and preset set point offsets to ensure reasonable
comfort levels are maintained.
Programming should include, but not be limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Demand control of connected equipment (load shedding)
Adjustable individual Time Schedules via Niagara System
Adjustable Controlling Zone Set Points via Niagara System
Individual start/stop control via Niagara System for all air handling plant, exhaust fans and
ventilation systems
Status of all outside air and exhaust fans, fan coil units, air handling units and compressors
Controlling zone temperature sensors
Temperature sensors for high temperature alarms in all switch rooms and server rooms
Leaving air temperature sensors on each air handling unit
Manual override of modulating valves and dampers via Niagara system
Temperature control of systems via BACnet controllers if using Daikin units
Utilise Lon controllers if using other brand air conditioning units
Pressure control all variable speed drives
H 5.2 Graphic Pages
Graphic pages shall include, but not be limited to, the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
Campus map linked from main IEMS map
Link to each building from the campus map
Link to metering and individual floor plans from each separate building page, including
indication of any equipment in alarm condition
Each floor to display walls, sensor locations, unit locations, room numbers, and room
temperatures. Colour code individual units/zones and link to a separate page displaying the
relevant specific unit information
Link to corresponding item of plant from alarm indicator
Exact extent and content of graphic pages shall be considered in the Design Report and agreed with
the Contract Supervisor.
H 5.3 Meter Graphic Pages
Meter graphic pages to display:
•
•
•
•
•
All sub meters connected downstream
Phase to phase voltage or phase to neutral voltage
Amperage of each phase
CT ratio
Power factor
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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•
•
•
Instantaneous kW
Instantaneous KVA
Total consumption in KWh and KVAh
Meter logging to incorporate:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Average voltage and maximum amperage over the last 10 minute period
Meters to log Peak KVA or KW, maximum demand KVA or KW (depending on tariff)
Meters to log total KWh and KVAh
Graphical representation of peak KVA or KW and relevant maximum demand for periods of
daily, weekly, monthly, bi-annual and annual
Links to archived text logs and to the UNC log buffers
Gas and water meters to display instantaneous consumption and total consumption (gas in
cubic metres and water in Kilolitres)
H 5.4 Mechanical Graphic Pages
Mechanical graphic pages to display:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All temperature sensors connected
Status of all fans, pumps and compressors, including coloured indication – red in fault and
not running / operating as required; amber if in standby and available for operation; green if
running correctly as required
All time schedules, allow for adjusting via web browser
Adjustable set points, allow for adjusting via web browser
All Stop/Start Points, allow for overriding via web browser
All valve and damper positions, allow for manual override of position via web browser
All available information from BACnet system
Variable speed drive Operations parameters, allow for manual override of output and set
point
Alarm status – coloured red if in alarm; coloured green if functioning correctly
H 5.5 Lighting Graphic Pages
Where automated lighting control is approved, it must have its own dedicated graphic pages and be
fully programmed with a separate password access to ensure complete separation from all other air
conditioning controls and their associated graphics.
Graphically represent each lighting circuit with individually block coloured sections to show the areas
illuminated. The ALC circuit names should be initially labelled as shown on the electrical drawings,
with associated connected circuit numbers and distribution boards.
Liaise with the Contract Supervisor to obtain all normal and holiday lighting control time schedules.
Ensure all schedules are programmed as part of the commissioning.
Lighting graphic pages to display:
•
•
Lighting areas served by each time schedule, colour coded separately to limit confusion and
labelled accordingly
Operational status of lighting (where available) i.e. On or Off; Automatic or manual override
control
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H 5.6 Documentation
AutoCAD or DXF format drawings, displaying individual floor layouts, room numbers and equipment
locations to be supplied by the relevant services contractor to BMS contractor for graphic page
creation.
Hard colour copies of this detailed lighting ALC graphic showing areas illuminated shall be provided
to the Contract Supervisor for distribution to Security and user groups. This will enable users to
identify and report faulty ALC lighting circuits or clearly identify lights the occupants may request on
temporary switching schedules. Colour graphic copies of the ALC lighting circuits identified by
individual coloured floor areas shall be included within the O&M Manuals.
SECTION G – PLUMBING
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


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA



MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


I
VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
x I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
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Contents
I 1 General Requirements ..........................................................................................................................187
I 1.1 Introduction............................................................................................................................................ 187
I 1.2 Standards and Regulations ..................................................................................................................... 187
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations .......................................................................................... 187
I 1.3 Quality .................................................................................................................................................... 187
I 1.4 Preferred Manufacturers ....................................................................................................................... 188
I 1.5 Safety in Design ...................................................................................................................................... 188
I 1.6 Sustainability .......................................................................................................................................... 189
I 1.7 Cost Planning .......................................................................................................................................... 189
I 1.8 Attendance ............................................................................................................................................. 189
I 2 Technical ..............................................................................................................................................190
I 2.1 Passenger Lifts ........................................................................................................................................ 190
I 2.2 Lift Machine Room ................................................................................................................................. 190
I 2.3 Escalators................................................................................................................................................ 190
I 3 Design Reports .....................................................................................................................................191
Table 2 – Vertical Transportation Services Design Deliverables Matrix: ............................................... 192
I 3.1 Design Certification ................................................................................................................................ 195
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
Page 186 of 269
I 1 General Requirements
I 1.1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary the University clauses are included, with the Contract
Supervisors approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed inside a blue box and text has been italicised.
I 1.2 Standards and Regulations
The following table details the Standards and Regulations, which are additional to those referred to
in Section A and are specific to Vertical Transportation:
Table 1 – List of Standards and Regulations
CODE
DESCRIPTION
AS/NZS 3000
Wiring Rules
AS 1735
SAA Lift Code
NCC
National Construction Code
Unless specifically stated otherwise, the design and installation of vertical transportation services
must be based on the current version of the standard or code at the date of tender.
The above list is not exhaustive and the designer and installer must be responsible for identifying
and complying with all standards relevant to the scope of works.
I 1.3 Quality
All vertical transportation design work is required to be carried out via suitably qualified and
experienced designers. The University may request copies of the designer’s calculations in order to
review.
The University may also request changes to the design personnel if there is concern that the
personnel engaged are not at an appropriate level of experience.
All design work must be checked and reviewed by a suitably qualified and experienced peer prior to
issuing for pricing. The designer must have a formal check and review process. The University may
request evidence of the design checking and review process.
On occasion a designer may utilise a third party designer (sub-consultant / specialist contractor /
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
Page 187 of 269
lighting manufacturer / supplier, etc.) however, the designer retains responsibility for the design and
review process.
Unless specifically directed otherwise, all equipment designed, specified and installed must be new
and of the highest quality.
I 1.4 Preferred Manufacturers
The University requires that only proven proprietary equipment, with local service availability must
be selected.
In order to maintain consistency with current assets and maintenance strategies the following
manufacturers are designated as the University’s preferred lift suppliers:
•
•
•
Kone
Otis
Schindler
Whilst the University does not wish to restrict the designer’s ability to select the most appropriate
equipment to meet particular requirements it is the University’s preference that equipment selected
satisfies the following:
•
•
•
•
•
A reputable manufacturer with a proven track record
Local Adelaide representation and support in design and post installation operation
Local Adelaide spare parts availability
Australian manufacturer is preferred.
Unrestricted access to system hardware and licensed software
I 1.5 Safety in Design
Those involved in the design of the vertical transportation services must undertake the necessary
Safety in Design reviews and activities as required by the contract.
The vertical transportation designer should consider the following particular items as part of the
Safety in Design, however they are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Size and location of pits
Maintenance accessibility
Interfaces to other trade systems
System alarming and fail safes
Methods of safe isolation for access and maintenance of equipment
Satisfactory maintenance space around equipment
Satisfactory space and access to internal components requiring maintenance and/or
replacement.
The designer must address the Safety in Design aspects in the Design Reports
The installer of the works must review the Safety in Design documentation throughout the works, to
identify any risks throughout the works and any residual risks to the University on completion.
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I 1.6 Sustainability
The designer must take into consideration the Environmental Sustainability of the site infrastructure
and site services taking into account the whole of life cost and operational benefit.
Elements that the designer must consider, include, but are not limited to, the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Energy efficiency
Materials selection
Decommissioning / disposal of equipment at end-of-life
Control methodology including automatic controls
Luminaire selection
The sustainability aspects must be addressed in the Design Reports
I 1.7 Cost Planning
The site infrastructure and site services designer must provide input into the project cost planning as
required by the contract.
The site infrastructure and site services designer should provide cost planning advice for the supply,
installation, associated works, contingencies, overheads, etc. to indicate a total cost to the
University.
Any element specifically excluded must be clearly indicated so that a total cost to the University may
be determined.
I 1.8 Attendance
It is incumbent on the vertical transport designer and contractor to make themselves aware of
existing conditions as far as reasonably practicable when designing and/or performing works at the
University. The University reserves the right to hold the designer and/or contractor liable for works
performed that are of a sub-standard or non-compliant nature.
The vertical transportation services designer must attend design and construction meetings as
required by the contract and outlined below.
The University expects the vertical transportation designer, not a delegate to attend at a minimum:•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Technical reviews as directed by the Contract Supervisor
Design team meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one meeting)
Construction phase meetings appropriate to the size of the works. (Minimum of one
meeting), plus any meetings where the Contract Supervisor deems there is significant
electrical elements that requires the designer’s input
Ongoing site inspections as considered appropriate by the Contract Supervisor (minimum bimonthly)
First fix inspection
Final fix inspection
Commissioning where required by Contract Supervisor
Final / defects inspection prior to Practical Completion
The vertical transportation designer must identify his/her proposed meeting site attendance
schedule in their engagement proposal.
The vertical transportation installer must attend meetings as required by the contract and
considered necessary by the Contracts Supervisor.
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
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I 2 Technical
I 2.1 Passenger Lifts
Machine room-less lifts, with regenerative drives are preferred. Energy efficiency is design priority
and this must be taken into consideration when selecting equipment and control algorithms.
Each lift must incorporate the supply of a protective blanket for the walls of the car. The car interior
must be designed to allow easy installation of the blanket.
Each lift must be connected to a Security monitored telephone.
Lift lighting is to be of LED type, with occupancy detectors used to ensure lighting and ventilation
fans are shut down when the lift is not in use.
I 2.2 Lift Machine Room
Machine room-less lifts are preferred, however, where this is not feasible, the following conditions
must be met:
•
•
The Machine Room is to be fitted with fresh intake and exhaust fans, all fans are to be
controlled by VSD’s and thermostat and connected to the BMS
The Machine Room must be equipped with Emergency Evacuation lighting as detailed in
Section L
I 2.3 Escalators
The installation of escalators must only be considered as a last option, and only if considered
acceptable by the intent of the Project Brief.
If the installation of an escalator is required to satisfy the intent of the Project Brief, the escalator
must maintain compliance with the following standards:
•
•
•
Building Code of Australia
Relevant, Current Standards
Disability Discrimination Act
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
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I 3 Design Reports
The vertical transportation services designer must submit formal Design Report documents as
required by the contract for technical review by the University.
In addition to the specific elements discussed in Section C of this document, the vertical
transportation services Design Report/s must include, to the extent that they are applicable to the
project, but not be limited to the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Completed Design Certificate relevant to the stage of design
Proposed scope of works and details of the system arrangement
Schedule of applicable regulations, standards, policies and guidance publications on which
the design is based.
Details of deviations of the above
Details of any third party and/or record information upon which the design relies
Assumptions or exclusions
Safety in Design review
Sustainability review
Detail of any proposed modifications to existing systems or equipment
Manufacturer selection of major equipment
Basis for sizing of major equipment
Layout drawings and schematic diagrams for the proposed arrangement to the level of detail
as per the “Vertical Transportation Services Design Deliverables” matrix
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Table 2 – Vertical Transportation Services Design Deliverables Matrix:
Design Report
Stage
Mechanical Service Design Deliverables
General
End of
Schematic
Design
Reporting
Documentation
General
End of Design
Development
Reporting
Drawing
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
Preliminary traffic analysis and lift car sizes estimate based on a schedule of accommodation and reasonable allowance.
Awareness of existing site infrastructure to identify connection points and capacities
Determine cost/benefit impact of masterplan options to mechanical services
Preliminary estimated passenger demand
Feasibility of lift locations
Advantages/disadvantages of masterplan options
Understanding of site infrastructure and site system requirements
Confirmation of scope of services
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Mark up of masterplan options indicating existing infrastructure and possible connection points and locations
Developed traffic analysis based on building form and preliminary occupancy levels
Preliminary size and location of lift shafts, motor rooms, lift pits, overruns etc. to inform architectural building and site development
Preliminary major service routes
Preliminary equipment selection
The University Design and Construction specifications reviewed and assessed
Proposed lift call and control methodology
Developed passenger demand, waiting times, car speeds, etc. based on proposed building facility / building form, use and occupancy
levels
Confirmation site infrastructure can accommodate estimated demands
Description of system proposals
Items requiring further clarification
Information required
Preliminary opinion of cost based on square meter rates
Concept Design Certificate
Preliminary schematic drawings control systems, electrical connections, etc.
Layout drawings showing preliminary locations of major plant i.e. lift motors, system operating / control panels.
Layout drawings showing preliminary lift shaft sizes and connection points
Page 192 of 269
Design Report
Stage
Mechanical Service Design Deliverables
General
50%
Documentation
Phase
Reporting
Documentation
General
Reporting
90%
Documentation
Phase
Documentation
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
Vertical transportation services design to suit approved building form
Final traffic analysis based on building form, use and occupancy including diversity.
Defined location and sizes of shafts, motor room, control panels, etc. to suit designed equipment
Defined size of lift cars
Defined sizes of major plant
Draft specification of vertical transportation
Final flow rate estimate
Final confirmation of systems being provided
Final confirmation of connections to existing infrastructure
Schedule of selected lift car finishes
Developed opinion of cost including elemental cost for major plant and equipment.
Final minor items requiring further clarification
Final minor items of information required
Statement of any specialist systems requiring design development responsibility by contractor
Schematic Design Certificate
Complete schematic drawings with material types and sizes
Layout drawings for lift shafts, lift car layouts, call point locations, lift car operating panels
Preliminary Specifications
Final coordinated mechanical services design suitable for tender and construction
All systems and equipment fully and clearly defined and specified
Confirmation of all systems fully designed
Statement of any minor outstanding information and/or assumptions
Elemental opinion of cost
Complete specification for vertical transportation services
Confirmation of any design development of specialist systems by contractor
Complete schematic drawings including schedules of equipment
Complete coordinated layout drawings coordinated with building form and other services
Controls details complete
Final specification
All documentation fully checked, reviewed and signed-off in accordance with contractual Quality Assurance requirements
Detailed Design Certification
Page 193 of 269
Where the designer considers an element is not applicable to the project, this must be clearly noted.
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
Page 194 of 269
I 3.1 Design Certification
The designer must produce a ‘Design Certificate’ identifying which codes and standards the design
have been based on, including the issue date and version of the code or standard, and certifying
compliance with those codes.
The ‘Design Certificate’ must be signed by the designer responsible for the design, not a delegate,
and issued with the documentation issued for pricing.
SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
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


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA


MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


J
SECURITY SYSTEMS
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
x J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016

SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
Page 196 of 269
Contents
J 1 Introduction .........................................................................................................................................199
J 1.1 System Abbreviations and Terminology ................................................................................................ 199
Table 1 – Hardware Components Abbreviations................................................................................... 199
Table 2 – Alarm Monitoring Abbreviations ........................................................................................... 199
Table 3 – Surveillance Equipment Abbreviations .................................................................................. 199
J 3 Gallagher Access Control ......................................................................................................................200
J 3.1 General ................................................................................................................................................... 200
J 3.2 Central Control and System Management Software ............................................................................. 200
J 3.3 IFC’s ........................................................................................................................................................ 200
J 3.4 Power Supplies and Batteries ................................................................................................................ 200
J 3.5 Access Control Readers .......................................................................................................................... 201
J 3.6 Door Control Configurations .................................................................................................................. 202
Table 4 - Door Configurations and Reference Codes............................................................................. 202
J 3.7 Elevator Control and Management ........................................................................................................ 203
J 3.7.1 Hazardous Goods Mode ................................................................................................................. 203
J 3.7.1.1 Method of Operation .............................................................................................................. 203
J 3.7.1.2 Power or System Fails Operation ............................................................................................ 204
J 3.8 Access Cards and Tokens........................................................................................................................ 205
J 3.9 Electrical Strikes ..................................................................................................................................... 205
J 3.10 Electromagnetic Locks.......................................................................................................................... 205
J 3.11 Magnetic Door Hold Back Lock ............................................................................................................ 205
J 3.12 Press to Release Button ....................................................................................................................... 206
J 3.13 Emergency Door Release Break Glass Button ...................................................................................... 206
J 3.14 Audio/Visual Indicator Units ................................................................................................................ 206
J 4 Alarm Contacts.....................................................................................................................................207
J 4.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................ 207
J 4.2 Movement Detectors ............................................................................................................................. 207
J 4.3 Door Contacts......................................................................................................................................... 207
J 4.4 IT Workstation Alarm Contacts .............................................................................................................. 207
J 4.5 AV Equipment Alarm Contacts ............................................................................................................... 207
J 5 Electronic Key Cabinets ........................................................................................................................209
J 5.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................ 209
J 5.2 Cabinets.................................................................................................................................................. 209
J 6 Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) ............................................................................................................210
J 6.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................ 210
J 6.2 Video Management Systems.................................................................................................................. 210
J 6.3 Cameras.................................................................................................................................................. 210
J 6.4 Locations ................................................................................................................................................ 210
J 7 Conduit and Cabling .............................................................................................................................211
J 8 Labelling ..............................................................................................................................................211
J 9 Records and Installation Changes .........................................................................................................211
J 10 Documentation ..................................................................................................................................212
J 10.1 General ................................................................................................................................................. 212
SECTION J – SECURITY SYSTEMS
Page 197 of 269
J 10.2 Operation and Maintenance Manual ................................................................................................... 212
J 10.3 As Built Drawings ................................................................................................................................. 212
J 11 System Commissioning and Acceptance Testing ..................................................................................212
J 11.1 General ................................................................................................................................................. 212
J 11.2 System Commissioning ........................................................................................................................ 213
J 11.3 Training ................................................................................................................................................ 213
SECTION J – SECURITY SYSTEMS
Page 198 of 269
J 1 Introduction
This Section details the University’s requirements with respect to the provision of services related to
Security.
These Security Design and Construction Guidelines should be read in conjunction with the following
reference documents:
•
•
•
•
•
•
NATSPEC Specification
Section B – Safety in Design
Section C – Design Controls
Section E – Electrical and Lighting
Section H – Building Management System
Section L - Telecommunications Infrastructure
J 1.1 System Abbreviations and Terminology
Table 1 – Hardware Components Abbreviations
Abbreviation Terminology
IAS
Intruder Alarm System
IFC’s
Intelligent Field Controllers
LED
Light Emitting Diode
LCD
Liquid Crystal Display
Comms
Communications
PSTN
Public Switched Telephone Network
SNA
System Network Architecture
RS485 LAN
Protocol used for LAN Communications
RS232
Common Interface Standard
LAN
Local Area Network
Table 2 – Alarm Monitoring Abbreviations
Abbreviation Terminology
Area
A separate partition of the system
Input/Point
EOL supervised alarm device or contact
Output
Dry contact relay or 50 mA open collector
Secure
Area is armed
Access
Area is disarmed
Alarm
Input has been activated or there is a system alarm
Unsealed
A condition where an input is activated
Sealed
A condition where the input is in normal mode
EOLM
End of Line Module
Table 3 – Surveillance Equipment Abbreviations
Abbreviation Terminology
CCTV
Closed Circuit Television
IPVS
IP Video System
NVMS
Network Video Management System
NVR
Network Video Recorder
PTZ
Pan Tilt Zoom
RVS
Remove Viewing Software
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J 3 Gallagher Access Control
J 3.1 General
The system architecture is tiered and consists of the following:
•
•
•
Head-end software application Operations on a computer server
Intelligent Field Controllers (IFC’s) managing the system in a distributed intelligence format
Semi-intelligent subunits (outputs, inputs, readers, etc.) which rely on IFC’s to function
The system is a Windows-based user interface with site plans and interactive icons representing the
location and real-time status of Access Control and Alarm Monitoring equipment.
J 3.2 Central Control and System Management Software
The central control and system management software Operations throughout all the University sites
is the Gallagher Command Centre application.
As the system is already embedded as a working platform, programming parameters and system
functionality is already established. All programming and functionality requirements when
commissioning all new works is to be under the direction and supervision of the Contract Supervisor.
J 3.3 IFC’s
The system must incorporate dedicated Gallagher 6000 Series Intelligent Field Controllers (IFC’s),
which communicate with and control following equipment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Card access readers
Reader, Input and Output
Elevator access equipment
Alarm monitoring Input/Output panels and equipment
Remote Alarming Terminals (Codepad)
Alarm response equipment
All systems enclosures are to be equipped and configured to detect tampering and report low supply
voltage conditions. Gallagher enclosures include tamper protection for the front (open door) and the
back (removed from wall) of the panel. Gallagher tamers are optical and mechanical tamper devices
are only to be installed on battery / power supply enclosures.
J 3.4 Power Supplies and Batteries
Each IFC must be equipped with a minimum of two (2) ELV Power Supplies and Back-up Batteries.
Each IFC is to be powered by an independent 12 VDC 2.5 Amp Regulated Power Supply with a 12
VDC 12 A/H Lead Sealed Battery as the back-up power source.
The power supply and back-up battery are to be contained within a purpose designed and
engineered metal enclosure. This power supply is not to the source of power for any other piece of
equipment, including electronic locking devices.
A separate 12 VDC 5 Amp Regulated Power Supply and 12 VDC 24 A/H Lead Sealed
Battery is to be supplied for each IFC to provide the power requirements to associated electronic
locking devices. The Power Supply and Back-up Battery are to be contained in separate metal
enclosures. There may be a need to provide more than a single power and back-up battery for each
IFC due to the individual power drain requirements for the differing type of electronic locking
devices. This would be most prevalent where there is a high number of Electromagnetic Locks on a
SECTION J – SECURITY SYSTEMS
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single IFC. The nominated security contractor is to ensure that sufficient power supplies are
provided for reliable operation.
A double 240 VAC outlet is to be supplied by others at each IFC location. The nominated security
contractor is to be nominate the number and location of each IFC within their tender submission to
ensure due allowance is made by Electrical Contractors.
J 3.5 Access Control Readers
Card Readers to be used throughout the University is Mifare Smart Card Proximity reader (Classic &
Plus) technology and can be specified in two configurations, being:
•
•
Card plus PIN reader – Gallagher T20 dual technology reader (black). For use on all external
and high Security applications (excluding boom gates)
Card only reader – Gallagher T10 dual technology reader (black). For all other applications
Readers with integrated PIN pads provide an ‘Entry under Duress’ function. This function is not to be
disabled.
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J 3.6 Door Control Configurations
The table below shows the typical door configurations and the reference codes used. These should
be reflected in the contract documents.
Cable Transfer
A/V Indicator Unit
Emergency Break Glass
Press to Release Button
Mag Hold Back
Auto Door Release
Output
Mag Lock (Single)
Mag Lock (Double)
Electric Strike
Reed Switch
Card Reader
Table 4 - Door Configurations and Reference Codes
Access and Egress Control to Auto
2 2 1
1 AEAD2
Double Leaf Door
Access Control to Auto Double Leaf
1 2 1
1 1 AAD2
Door
Access and Egress Control to Auto
2 1 1
1 AEAD1
Single Leaf Door
Access Control to Auto Single Leaf
1 1 1
1 1 AAD1
Door
Access and Egress Control to Double
2 2 1 1 1 1 AESD2
Leaf Swing Door
Access Control to Double Leaf Swing
1 2 1 1 1 1 ASD2
Door (Free handle Egress)
Access and Egress Control to Single
2 1 1 1 1 AESD1
Leaf Swing Door
Access and Control to Single Leaf
1 1 1 1 ASD1
Swing Door (Free handle egress)
Access and Egress Control to Double
2 2 1 1 1 AESD2M
Leaf Swing Door ML
Access Control to Double Leaf Wing
1 2 1 1 1 1 ASD2M
Door ML
Access Control to Single Leaf Swing
2 1 1 1 1 AESD1M
Door ML
Fire Door Double Leaf (Outer)
1 1 1 1 1 1 ASD1M
Fire Door Single Leaf (Outer)
2 1 1 1 FD2O
Fire Door Double Leaf (Inner)
1 1 1 1 FD1O
Fire Door Single Leaf (Inner)
2 1 2 1 FD21
Notes:
Additional Emergency Break Glass Buttons may be required on specific doors where emergency exit
traffic flows are required. Any such additions should be indicated in the contract documents.
The above list is indicative only and there may be variations required for specific doors. Any such
variations will be indicated in the contract documents.
All access control doors must be monitored for both door open/closed and door unlocked/locked
using concealed monitor switches appropriate for the door installation.
Contacts on Fire Doors are to be programmed as Type A points and activate the A/V Indicator Unit
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on any door opening event. All such alarm events are also to be communicated to the Monitoring
Station.
J 3.7 Elevator Control and Management
Where elevator control facilities are required for a project, all elevator control access equipment
must communicate with the same central control as the door card readers.
The elevator control architecture must comprise a card reader in each elevator car, reporting to
elevator control interface equipment mounted in or near the elevator motor room. Reader type
must be the same as that used on access control doors.
The elevator control system must be capable of controlling access independently in a number of
elevator shafts simultaneously. Each elevator reader must be independently at the central control by
means of a unique plain language descriptor. Each reader head must be capable of raising an alarm if
it stops communicating with its elevator controller or is removed from the elevator.
The interface between the access system elevator control equipment and the actual elevator
switching control equipment must be via dry relay contacts. Trailing cables and cable interface
between the two controllers are to be responsibility of the lift contractor. Termination at the
security of IFC can be via a termination block with each contact clearly identified.
The elevator control system must provide one relay contact per elevator shaft per level for the
system. This relay contact must be used to interface with elevator switching control equipment.
An input must be provided for each level per elevator to indicate what level the user selected. On
activation of this input all relays return to secure state.
A lift card reader may be required on certain levels of the building. These may not need to replace
the unrestricted lift call button, but work in conjunction with it (time scheduled). Notes within the
contract documents must indicate the lift call requirements.
J 3.7.1 Hazardous Goods Mode
J 3.7.1.1 Method of Operation
Step 1:
An authorised card holder wishing to use the hazardous goods functionality presses the call
button outside the lift to summon the lift car to the required floor.
Step 2:
The lift car arrives and the door opens, as per normal operation, the authorised cardholder
then enters the lift car and badges the in-car reader marked ‘activate’. The red indicator light located
to each unit both within the lift car and on every landing is illuminated red indicating that the
hazardous goods lift operation has been enabled. The authorised cardholder sets the required
destination by pressing the required in-car floor level button on the lift control panel. The above
steps will:
•
•
•
Activate the hazardous goods mode
Isolate all landing call buttons
Lock the lift doors open to facilitate loading
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Step 3:
The authorised car holder then loads the lift with the hazardous goods.
When satisfied that the goods have been loaded and that all persons are clear of the lift area, the
authorised user then proceeds to the landing card readers and badges the ‘send’ reader. The above
steps will:
•
•
•
Close the lift doors
Send the lift car to the required level
Park the lift car on that level with the doors closed.
Step 4:
The authorised card hold then proceeds to the required destination level by alternate
means. When any authorised card holder is ready to receive the hazardous goods at the required
level, proceeds to the hazardous goods lift landing card reader and badges the ‘open’ card reader.
The above step will:
•
Open the doors whilst retaining the hazardous goods mode to enable the authorised card
holder to safely remove the hazardous goods.
Step 5:
With the operation now complete, the authorised car holder enters the lift car and badges
the ‘de-activate’ card reader to return the lift car to normal operation. The above step will:
•
•
•
Release the hazardous goods lift mode
Unlock the call buttons on each floor
Return the lift to normal operation
J 3.7.1.2 Power or System Fails Operation
The goods lift (including hazardous goods functionality) is not fitted with any form of standby power.
In the event of a power failure the goods lift will cease to operate. The Hazardous Good lift mode is
controlled by Proximity card readers connected to the Gallagher Access Control system, and
operated through the presentation of a valid card as described previously. The Gallagher equipment
used to control and operate this lift is backed up by UPS power. Additionally, the Gallagher
equipment is fitted with on-board standby power and back up batteries.
The following is offered to explain how the lift is likely to operate under the following scenarios and
upon return restoration of power following these scenarios:
Scenario 1: – Power Fail to Lift / UPS Operational
In this scenario the lift will cease to function and the Gallagher controller will maintain the selected
mode of operation (i.e. Passenger or Hazardous Goods Mode). Upon restoration of power to the lift,
lift functionality will be restored in the mode selected prior to the power fail.
In summary this scenario will not affect the Gallagher Control equipment, but will effect lift
operation until power is restored.
Scenario 2: - Power Fail to Lift / UPS Fail
In this scenario the lift will cease to function and the Gallagher controller will maintain the selected
mode of operation (i.e. Passenger or Hazardous Goods Mode), whilst the on-board battery backup is
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maintained (up to 12 hours). Upon restoration of power to the lift, lift functionality will be restored
in the mode selected prior to the power fail.
In summary this scenario will not affected the Gallagher Control equipment unless the power outage
and UPS fail exceeds the Gallagher backup battery lift, but will effect lift operation until power is
restored. Should the power and UPS fail exceed the standby battery life the Gallagher Controller will
fail (see below)
Scenario 3: - Gallagher Controller Fail
In this scenario the Gallagher Card readers will not operate and it is likely that the lift will be placed
into Hazardous Goods Mode. The system has been designed for a worst case scenario, namely the
Gallagher Controller failing during Hazardous Goods mode. Should this occur, the Hazardous Goods
Mode will be retained to prevent accidental exposure to hazardous materials by members the
public. Should the lift be in passenger mode, a Gallagher Controller failure is also likely to send the
lift into Hazardous Goods Mode. In the unlikely event that this occurs while passengers are within
the lift car, lift breakdowns procedures are to be observed. Lift car passengers should use the lift car
emergency handset to summons external assistance.
J 3.8 Access Cards and Tokens
Access token technology must incorporate dual token technologies combined into a single Card,
Magnetic Track Swipe and Mifare Plus (classic – Legacy) technology contact-less 4K Smart Card.
Cards must be of standard credit card size, being no larger than CR-80 and must be direct printable
using a dye-sublimation or re transfer print process or be capable of accepting an adhesive label
printed through such a process. All cards must meets ISO standards.
The card number must not be the card serial number, it must be a number specifically coded onto
the card. The encoding of the Card will be the responsibility of the University.
The University also employs I-Key pendants for access control access. When a button on the pendant
is pressed the unique pendant number and site code are sent securely via Radio Frequency to the
receiver to be decoded. Once decoded the code is transferred to Gallagher Access Control system
via the industry standard wiegand protocol.
J 3.9 Electrical Strikes
Electric Strikes (Padde ES9000 Pre-Load Electric Strike) or (Padde EF934 Series Glass Door Strike) are
to be provided for nominated doors (refer to contract documents). The supply, power cable and
strike function are the responsibility of the builder.
J 3.10 Electromagnetic Locks
Electromagnetic Locks are to be Padde Z8D-HR/EML10 for double doors and Padde Z8_HR/EML6 for
single doors. Locks are to operate at 12VDC and be powered by a power supply specifically for this
purpose.
The number of locks to be powered from a single power supply will be dependent on the opening
draw of the lock and the capacity of the power supply. There is always to be 10% pare capacity from
maximum draw calculations.
J 3.11 Magnetic Door Hold Back Lock
Magnetic Door Hold Back Lock mechanisms are predominately employed on fire doors, in various
configuration options. These devices are to operate with 12 VDC power supplies. The same
conditions apply as for electromagnetic locks.
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J 3.12 Press to Release Button
Door release buttons are to be of PCV Clipsal Switch-plate type (white in colour) with the words
‘Door Release’ engraved with black prominent writing. Mullion size door release buttons are only to
be used where it is impracticable to use a standard wall plate size.
J 3.13 Emergency Door Release Break Glass Button
Emergency Door Release break glass switches are to be manufactured for purpose, have manual key
resettable actuator and be green in colour. The words ‘Emergency Door Release’ embossed in white
prominent writing All Emergency break glass buttons installed at the University facilities are to be
double polled, the primary poll for the direct door release and the second poll wired back to the IFC
and commissioned as an alarm input.
J 3.14 Audio/Visual Indicator Units
An Aritech AR638 (or approved equivalent) Audio/Visual Indicator Unit is to be installed above the
head-space of any access controlled door that requires a ‘Door Open Too Long’ local alert. All such
devices are to be programmed for a 30 second local alert only (Stage 1 alarm) followed by a
monitored alert after a further 30 second without a door seal (Stage 2 alarm)
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J 4 Alarm Contacts
J 4.1 Overview
Predominately, all alarm points are to be connected to Gallagher IPC’s on individual input expanders.
The inputs and outputs of the IPC should be left allocated only for access control purposes. This may
vary in some instances where the facility is small or has low expectation of security requirements.
When in doubt, the Contract Supervisor should be contacted to obtain clarification.
J 4.2 Movement Detectors
All movements must be of dual-/tri- technology and selected suitable for volume and range
requirements. Movement detectors are to be capable of LED isolation for periods outside walk
testing requirements. All movement detectors are to be connected with 6 Core multi-strand security
cable.
J 4.3 Door Contacts
Each door (including each leaf of a double door) nominated to be provided with electronic access
control must have commercial grade recessed Reed Switches installed. This is to ensure that both
‘Forced Door’ and ‘Door Open Too Long’ functionality is available. These must be of Sentrol 1078
25mm recessed types (or equivalent) in most occasions. Any deviation to the type of detector needs
to be approved by the Contract Supervisor.
J 4.4 IT Workstation Alarm Contacts
IT workstations in computer pool facilities are connected to a double data outlet, one being for the
actual LAN communications and the other for line resistance monitoring for PC security. These data
points are terminated at a Communications Contractor, separate to the nominated security
contractor’s responsibility.
The nominated security contractor’s works include the following:
•
•
•
Supply and install sufficient twenty four (24) Point Patch Fields (including Cable Tidies) to
account for the number of workstations for the project
Provide sufficient patch leads between the Communications Contractor Patch Field and the
security Patch Field to account for the number of circuits required
Install a 24 pair multi-core stranded cable from the security patch filed to the Gallagher
Input Expander Modules (requires one (1) Gallagher Equipment Enclosures, complete with
five (5) Eight Input Expansion Modules) to be located adjacent to the Gallagher 3000
Controller.
A Gallagher Remote Arming Terminal (RAT) is to be installed within close proximity to the computer
pools area to provide local control and display of alarm points (location to be confirmed with
Contract Supervisor).
A combined Piezo Screamer/Blue Strobe Light Unit is to be installed within close proximity (just
below ceiling height) to provide local alert of a PC Security Alarm (location to be confirmed with
Contract Supervisor).
J 4.5 AV Equipment Alarm Contacts
Data projectors and AMX controlled Audio Visual Equipment must be connected via structured
cabling double outlet, one being for the actual LAN communications and the other for line resistance
monitoring for AV security. These data points are terminated at a Communications Rack (location to
be specified in the contract documents) where the
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LAN and security connections are separated and terminated on separate Patch Fields.
An anti-tamper housing is provided to each data projector and alarm outputs are also provided from
the AMX control system. A combined Piezo Screamer/Blue Strobe Light Unit is installed within close
proximity to provide local alert of an AV Security Alarm (location to be confirmed with Contract
Supervisor).
These works are provided by the Communications Contractor/AV Contractor, separate to the
nominated security contractor’s responsibility.
The nominated security contractor works include the following:
•
•
•
•
Supply and install sufficient twenty four (24) Point Patch Fields (including Cable Tidies) to
account for the number of workstations for the project
Provide sufficient patch leads between the Communications Contractor Patch Field and the
security Patch Field to account for the number of circuits required
Install a 24 pair multi-core stranded cable from the security patch field to the Gallagher Input
Expander Modules (requires one (1) Gallagher Equipment Enclosures, complete with five (5)
Eight Input Expansion Modules) to be located adjacent to the Gallagher 3000 Controller
Install commercial grade surface mount Reed Switches to projector anti-tamper housing.
Any deviation to the type of detector needs to be approved by the Contract Supervisor.
A Gallagher Remote Arming Terminal (RAT) is to be installed within the Communications room to
provide local control and display of alarm points (location to be confirmed with Contract Supervisor).
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J 5 Electronic Key Cabinets
J 5.1 Overview
The Key Watcher by Morse Watchman are the nominated cabinets and will be integrated with our
current Gallagher access control system via a high level interface with as Key Pro Plus.
Key Pro Plus talks directly to the Gallagher Command Centre and extracts database information and
loads it into its tables. As users are added or edited in the Gallagher software the KeyPro Plus
software simultaneously makes the changes. KeyPro Plus manages the physical keys and key
bunches, along with user group profiles. Access groups are created in KeyPro Plus that reflects the
access groups in the Gallagher Command Centre software so that when the information is extracted
the user group and access groups are matched up. KeyPro Plus then sends out the user information
to the Key Watcher hardware, including the card information.
All Key Watcher events and alarms that are collected by the KeyPro Plus software are sent to the
Gallagher Command Centre Software, which all happens in real time and can be monitored by our
security teams. The system can also be programmed at different intervals to generate alarms to
advise of non-returned or overdue key sets via email.
J 5.2 Cabinets
Cabinet size and location must be selected in consultation with the Contracts Supervisor. Only
cabinets in standard portrait orientation are acceptable.
Standard cabinet sizes:
Small Cabinet: (up to 48 keys)
(52cm w x 75cm h x 25cm d)
Large Cabinet: (up to 96 keys)
(70cm w x 75cm h x 25cm d)
Control Box: (51cm w x 12cm h x 28cm d)
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J 6 Closed Circuit Television (CCTV)
J 6.1 Overview
The current authorised CCTV system for use in the University facilities is DVTel’s Latitude Digital
CCTV system and its associated Network Video Management System (NVMS) integrated to the
Gallagher Imaging Interface allowing associated stored video images to be immediately retrieved
when linked to events.
There is legacy Indigo IP Video Systems (IPVS) in place in limited locations.
J 6.2 Video Management Systems
The preferred solution is an IP CCTV video surveillance system which is capable of 3rd party
integration to Gallagher Command Centre (Access Control and Alarms Management System) already
in place at the University.
The integration is a critical component as it will allow a single front end to Access Control and video
management via the Gallagher Command Centre. Allowing Security Officers to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
View live and recorded video of Fixed and PTZ cameras from Latitude NVMS in Gallagher
Interface
Control PTZ cameras
Take snapshots
Add cameras to a site plan. When clicked, the live video of the camera will be displayed
Configure Latitude NVMS actions upon Gallagher events
o E.g. Upon door open event, send a camera to a pre-defined pre-set
Perform Action in Gallagher based on Latitude events
o E.g. Latitude NVMS will request Gallagher to raise an alarm or to lock a door
J 6.3 Cameras
•
•
•
Fixed IP Cameras must be POE internal and external all weather vandal resistant Flexi Dome
HD 1080p/720p Day/Night Camera
Pan Tilt Zoom IP cameras (PTZ) Day/Night PTZ dome camera. When PTZ camera is to be
installed, it is to be fitted with appropriate PTZ Data Converter / PoE (Power over Ethernet)
injector to operate the PTZ drive
All Camera housings must be tamper proofed, rigidly mounted, corrosions proof and
weather proof rate IP66.
J 6.4 Locations
Camera locations are to be individually determined based on risk factors including required field of
view, ease of access for maintenance and difficulty of access for vandal attack purposes. Camera
locations will be as determined by the Contract Supervisor following a risk assessment process.
Examples of locations that will be considered are external approaches to buildings, entry points to
high foot fall afterhours zones, remote sites and areas of security risk.
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J 7 Conduit and Cabling
All cable and conduit is to be installed to meet with the conditions of this specification and meet all
current cabling regulation and standards.
J 8 Labelling
All cables and equipment cabinets must be comprehensively labelled to clearly indicate their
function.
Where cables enter or leave trays, racks, troughs or ducts, cables must be labelled according to the
cable schedule or as directed with stamped aluminium or brass tags attached with nylon straps,
typed Mylar film labels under clear ‘heat shrink’ or other approved means. Nylon straps or ties must
be used to tie together single cables of the one circuit or system, to further assist maintenance
identification.
J 9 Records and Installation Changes
During the progress of the works, all changes to equipment, services, layouts, wiring and any other
items that are incorporated in these works shall be recorded. All changes, which occur during the
construction period, shall be recorded and included on the installation drawings.
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J 10 Documentation
Refer to Section C for general requirements. Specific requirements are covered in the following
subsections.
J 10.1 General
The nominated security contractor must provide to the Contract Supervisor comprehensive
documentation to enable effective operation and routine maintenance of the entire IAS, EACS, EKC
and CCTV systems employed at the University.
This must include at least the following:
•
•
•
•
Operation handbooks
Operator instruction manuals and training manuals
Complete hardware description and installation records
Maintenance handbook
The requirement on an individual project is to update the above documentation for those aspects
directly relating to the individual project. This update information may also need to be supplied to
Builders/Electrical Contractors for inclusion in their documentation. This is to be on a case-by-case
basis.
J 10.2 Operation and Maintenance Manual
Three (3) printed copies and one (1) electronic copy of the Operations and Maintenance Manuals,
including three (3) full sets and one (1) electronic copy of the As-Built Drawings, must be supplied
prior to practical completion in accordance with the Operations and Maintenance Manual
Specification.
The manuals must include a full description of all installations and the functioning of the various
elements involved and instruction to cover every action necessary for the efficient operation and
maintenance of the installation.
J 10.3 As Built Drawings
In addition to the drawings provided with the Operations and Maintenance Manuals, supply two (2)
printed copies and one (1) electronic copy of as-built drawings to the Contract Supervisor prior to
practical completion as set out in the Operations and Maintenance Manual Specification.
Practical Completion must not be granted until such drawings are received, are up to date and
accurately reflect all field changes to the installation and which are a true and accurate
representation of the actual installation. All building equipped with either IAS or EACS components
must be included within this scope (also to include total site schematic).
The drawings must include the following:
•
•
Schematic wiring diagrams with correct circuit and termination identification
Final equipment layouts
J 11 System Commissioning and Acceptance Testing
J 11.1 General
The nominated security contractor must be responsible for all system commissioning and
acceptance test and/or the provision of sufficient competent personnel, equipment and test
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instruments necessary for the testing and commissioning of the installation to the satisfaction of the
Contract Supervisor.
All system commissioning must be carefully pre-planned and scheduled. System commissioning
information must be submitted to the Contract Supervisor for approval not less than two (2) weeks
before commencement of system commissioning. The University may elect contractor’s staff in
undertaking or witnessing the approved system commissioning and any additional system
commissioning deemed necessary by the Contract Supervisor.
All system commissioning must be scheduled to be completed one (1) week prior to practical
completion.
J 11.2 System Commissioning
All system commissioning procedures, checking and adjustments must be carried out to
demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Contract Supervisor that the system as installed complies with
the specification.
System commissioning must be by exhaustive testing on a ‘point by point’ basis for each system
function. Each point test may be witnessed by the Contract Supervisor (or nominee) and checked off
on a commissioning sheet, prepared by the nominated security contractor. The commissioning sheet
must include such information as successful operation, response times, resulting computer
messages, etc.
Each possible system event must be simulated and test must include a –full load test in which all
alarms are simulated at once and simultaneously all card readers are utilised both with authorised
or unauthorised cards.
Should any test fail, cause of failure must be determined and corrected and the test must be
repeated.
J 11.3 Training
The contract must include the provision of operator and technical training and instruction in the
correct use, maintenance and operation of all equipment supplied and reconfigured under the
contract as set out in the Operations and Maintenance Manual Specification. Responsibility for
provision of all instruction and full support resources, including course outlines, training materials
and instruction notes must form part of these works, as shall the provision of all necessary test
equipment and incidental materials necessary to conduct the training and any other item or activity
required to properly train the end-users’ personnel.
The nominated security contractor is to allow a period of two (2) hours to complete the necessary
training. If additional training time is required by the Contract Supervisor, direct negotiation on costs
are to be between the nominated security contractor and the Contract Supervisor.
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



UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA


MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


K
AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
x K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016
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Contents
K 1 General Requirements .........................................................................................................................216
K 1.1 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 216
K 2 Physical Requirements For Teaching Spaces .........................................................................................216
K 2.1 Equipment Racks ................................................................................................................................... 216
K 2.2 Lecterns And Benches ........................................................................................................................... 217
K 2.3 Ventilation ............................................................................................................................................. 217
K 2.4 Room Layout ......................................................................................................................................... 218
K 2.5 Projection Surfaces................................................................................................................................ 218
K 2.5.1 Single Screen Projection ................................................................................................................ 218
K 2.5.2 Dual Screen Projection ................................................................................................................... 218
K 2.5.3 Painted Projection Surfaces ........................................................................................................... 218
K 2.6 Display Devices ...................................................................................................................................... 219
K 2.6.1 Multimedia Projectors ................................................................................................................... 219
K 2.6.2 Multimedia Projector Ceiling Mounts ............................................................................................ 219
K 2.6.3 Flat Panel Displays ......................................................................................................................... 219
K 2.6.4 Flat Panel Display Mounts.............................................................................................................. 219
K 2.6.5 Interactive Whiteboards (IWB) ...................................................................................................... 220
K 2.6.6 Touch Displays ............................................................................................................................... 220
K 2.7 Switching And Control ........................................................................................................................... 220
K 2.7.1 Controllers ..................................................................................................................................... 220
K 2.7.2 Switching ........................................................................................................................................ 220
K 2.7.3 Control System Security ................................................................................................................. 221
K 2.8 Audio And Video Standards................................................................................................................... 221
K 2.8.1 Video Standards ............................................................................................................................. 221
K 2.8.2 Audio Standards ............................................................................................................................. 221
K 2.9 Source Equipment ................................................................................................................................. 222
K 2.10 Video Conferencing ............................................................................................................................. 222
K 2.11 Lighting Standards And Controls ......................................................................................................... 223
K 2.12 Lecture Recording System ................................................................................................................... 223
K 2.13 External AV Input Plates ...................................................................................................................... 223
K 2.14 Electrical Testing And Tagging ............................................................................................................. 223
K 2.15 Physical Security .................................................................................................................................. 223
K 3 Audio Visual Cabling, Installation And Specifications............................................................................225
K 3.1 Cabling Specifications ............................................................................................................................ 225
Table 1 - Cable Preferences ................................................................................................................... 225
K 3.2 Cable Labelling....................................................................................................................................... 226
K 3.3 Hearing Augmentation .......................................................................................................................... 226
K 3.4 AMX Programming ................................................................................................................................ 226
K 3.5 AMX Remote Management Suite (RMS) ............................................................................................... 227
K 3.6 Installation ............................................................................................................................................. 227
K 3.7 Project Documentation ......................................................................................................................... 228
K 3.8 Additional Documentation .................................................................................................................... 228
APPENDIX A: TUTORIAL ROOM TEMPLATE (AV03) .................................................................................... 230
APPENDIX B: LECTURE THEATRE TEMPLATE (AV05) .................................................................................. 230
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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K 1 General Requirements
K 1.1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
The designer is at liberty to amplify the NATSPEC requirements to meet specific project
requirements or to provide increased levels of quality and/or performance with approval from the
Contracts Supervisor.
The designer must not reduce the requirements of NATSPEC and/or the design and construction
specifications clauses without written approval from the Contracts Supervisor.
On smaller projects where the scope of work does not justify a full NATSPEC specification the
designer may propose a “notes on drawing” type of specification, as long as the pertinent elements
of the NATSPEC and supplementary the University clauses are included, with the Contract
Supervisors approval
NATSPEC supplementary clauses which are required to be inserted into the designer’s specifications
have been placed inside a blue box and text has been italicised.
K 2 Physical Requirements For Teaching Spaces
K 2.1 Equipment Racks
Audio-visual equipment is typically mounted in standard 19-inch width racks. the University’s
preferred manufacturer is Rack Technologies. Racks must provide convenient access to the front and
rear of equipment. Racks manufactured by SpeedRacks may be considered where space is limited.
Vendors are to demonstrate that all equipment will fit in any rack provided.
All equipment, where possible, must have rack ears for mounting. If equipment is not suitable for
rack mounting a minimum of 1RU cantilevered shelf must be provided to support each individual
piece of equipment.
A sufficient quantity of 240V AC rack mounted power rails with power overload switches must be
provided as required by the equipment in the rack.
Where racks must be installed in joinery, rear access, in the form of a lockable door is to be
provided. All access points to the rack must be keyed alike and at least two (2) keys for each install
must be provided to ISTS. Where rear access cannot be provided, the joinery must allow the rack to
be easily slid out for servici9ng. There must be no plinth or separate cupboard floor, and there must
be sufficient width and depth (clear of obstructions such as hinges) for the rack and bulky loop of
cables.
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Wall mounted racks must have a support structure to ensure that the weight of the equipment does
not rest on the lock. For racks that are mounted off the floor, castor wheels must be fitted to the
underside to support the weight of the equipment and ease access for support technicians.
K 2.2 Lecterns And Benches
Lecture benches or lecterns must typically be designed and provided by the associated FMU project.
The audio-visual equipment for the presenter is to be mounted in suitable 19” racks within the
lectern assembly and must be determined during the design consultation process.
Speciality spaces may require the lectern to be moveable. In these spaces where the equipment
cannot be wholly located within the lectern, it must be mounted in a Communications Room or
other separate space, with audio and video to be transmitted from the mobile lectern to the rack
equipment.
Typically any lecture bench design must include a lockable enclosed cupboard section and an
opened fronted cupboard section. Any lockable sections must be keyed through FMU Campus
Operation established contracts to restrict unauthorized access. Open sections shall typically be for
user accessible playback equipment or the AVPC and must include some form of physical and/or
electronic security system. Similarly, any equipment located on top of benches must, in consultation
with ISTS, include some form of physical and/or electronic security system.
Suitable cable paths throughout a lecture bench must be provided. Final lecture bench design must
be determined during the design consultation process. All cables that are required for external AV
input (e.g. laptop audio and video) must have retractable cables that are hidden away when not in
use and do not contribute to clutter.
All power and network outlets required for connection to the AV equipment must be provided inside
the lecture bench cupboard space and should where possible be run out of the wall, with the outlets
positioned 300mm AFF: (Above Finished Floor Level). A cable path should be sufficient in capacity to
allow for all of the signal cables and future expansion, typically 2 to 4 x 50mm dia. Conduits.
The minimum internal dimensions are to be: 7500mm (H) x 600mm (W) x 800mm (D).
K 2.3 Ventilation
Regardless of location, there must be sufficient ventilation to prevent unacceptable temperature
rise.
Recommended ventilation is a system of air inlet grilles, covering at least 50% of the available
surface area, at the top and bottom of the front and rear doors and a separate outlet grille in the
cupboard top. Should an outlet grille in the cupboard top not be possible, in consultation with ISTS, a
grille mounted as high as possible on either side of the rack cupboard suitable, with provision for
internal fan extraction should be considered. Rack equipment ventilates from front to back and
should be taken into consideration when designing the ventilation.
For design purposes, a heat load of 100 Watts per RU, or a minimum of 1000w or 293 BTU and a
temperature rise of 10⁰C above ambient (maximum), must be assumed. Any active cooling systems
must have a maximum audio profile of 29 dB (A-weighted) at a distance of 1m from the equipment
rack, so as to not interfere with teaching or audio recordings.
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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K 2.4 Room Layout
The lectern is to be positioned in a suitable location in consultation with ISTS and FMU. Any final
lectern position must allow a gap of 1200mm to 1500mm between the front wall and the lectern, to
comply with AS1428S PART 2 for access.
Alternative room layouts must be considered where appropriate in consultation with ISTS and
determined during the design consultation process.
K 2.5 Projection Surfaces
Fixed projection locations must utilise either a wall painted with projection optimised paint or a
suitable fixed projection screen, to be determined by ISTS and FMU. Where access to the wall
behind a screen is required a motorized screen must be installed, to be controlled via the AMX
control system.
Where a painted wall is used as a screen, warning signs must be mounted to ensure that the
integrity of the screen surface is not compromised by any future works on the wall.
K 2.5.1 Single Screen Projection
The dada projector images/screens are to be centred as close as practically possible to the room
centre line and positioned either flush with ceiling or above the whiteboard assembly. The height of
the screen is to be determined in the design process. As necessary the Contractor is to supply
150mm off the wall mounting brackets to allow for the screen to drop down in front of wall
mounted whiteboards. If mounting the screen on a plasterboard wall, and suitable secure mounting
anchor points cannot be found at the screens bracket mounting locations, the Contractor is to
provide a solid MDF backing board finished in a suitable colour as specified by ISTS with edge
trimming.
Final screen position must be determined during the design consultation process, and any variation
to this will not be accepted unless written consent is supplied by ISTS before installation.
K 2.5.2 Dual Screen Projection
Typically dual-screen projection must have either projection screen mounted as close as practically
possible either side to the room centre line and positioned either flush with ceiling or above the
whiteboard assembly. The height of the screens is to be determined in the design process. As
necessary the contractor is to supply 150mm off the wall mounting brackets to allow for the screen
to drop down in front of wall mounted whiteboards. If mounting the screen on a plasterboard wall,
and suitable secure mounting anchor points cannot be found at the screens bracket mounting
location, the Contractor is to provide a solid MDF backing board finished in a suitable colour as
specified by ISTS with edge trimming.
Final screen position must be determined during the design consultation process, and any variation
to this will not be accepted unless written permission is supplied by ISTS before installation.
K 2.5.3 Painted Projection Surfaces
Painted projection surfaces need to be physically flat and painted with high quality pure white paint,
preferably a purpose made screen paint. The projection surface must be unobstructed, e.g. no
power or network outlets, light switches, etc. in this area. Silver/High Gain cinema style paint is not
acceptable for projection surfaces.
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The final dimensions of any projection area will be determined by ISTS during the design
consultation process.
K 2.6 Display Devices
All display devices must have a minimum native resolution of 1920x1080 and an aspect ratio of 16:9.
An exception is allowed for ultra-short throw projection, which may have a lower resolution of
1280x800. Any display slaved to an ultra-short throw must be of the same aspect ratio.
Display devices must be capable of accepting DVI-I or HDMI and/or AMX DxLink and Extron XTP.
K 2.6.1 Multimedia Projectors
ISTS maintains a list of suitable projector makes and models for various applications. Contact ISTS
Teaching Technologies for the current list of approved projector models. Any variations require
consultation with ISTS prior to commencement of installation, and must meet the same
specifications as the listed standard models. All projectors must support control signals over RS232
and IP.
K 2.6.2 Multimedia Projector Ceiling Mounts
Multimedia projector ceiling mounts must be a suitable high quality professional grade universal
product. Final choice of bracket must be at the direction of ISTS. The provided mount is to have a
powder coat finish of a colour that matches the ceiling. The projector mount’s adjustable settings
are to be firmly tightened.
Projector ceiling brackets must be mounted in accordance with the manufacturer’ specifications.
Electronic security (tamper switches) may be required, which will be specified during the design
consultation process by ISTS. All mounts must be rated for the weight of the projector with an
additional load of 100kg.
K 2.6.3 Flat Panel Displays
All flat panel displays must be a commercial grade LCD product and must support control signals
over RS232 and IP. Plasma display panels are not an acceptable alternative and final panel selection
will be at the discretion of ISTS. Consumer grade LCD panels may only be used where a commercial
panel is deemed to be unsuitable, and requires the approval of ISTS. All flat panel displays must have
a minimum native resolution of 1920x1080 and refresh rates of 60Hz.
K 2.6.4 Flat Panel Display Mounts
Flat panel mounts being either floor, wall or ceiling mounted, must be of a high quality professional
grade product and must be installed as per the manufacturers’ specifications. All mounts for the
displays must be rated for the weight of the display, plus an additional load of 50kg. The brackets
must be secured to the wall plate to ensure that the display cannot be dislodged from the mount
without authorisation.
If mounting the screen on a plasterboard wall, and suitable secure mounting anchor points cannot
be found at the screens mounting bracket location, the Audio Visual Integrator is to provide a solid
MDF backing board, mounted to a structurally sufficient number of studs and finished in a suitable
colour as specified by ISTS with edge trimming. The mounting scheme is subject to approval by FMU.
Mechanical and electronic security may also be required. This will be specified during the design
consultation process by ISTS.
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Final product selection and mounting position must be determined during the design consultation
process and any variation to this will not be accepted unless written permission is supplied to ISTS
before installation.
K 2.6.5 Interactive Whiteboards (IWB)
The University’s preferred manufacturer of Interactive Whiteboards is Smart Technologies
(http://smarttech.com.
For board sizes up to and including 70” (diagonal), ISTS recommends the SMART Board 8000 Series
interactive LCD panel. For sizes over 70” (diagonal), ISTS recommends the SMART Board 800 Series
Interactive whiteboard combined with an ultra-short throw projector.
If a slave display, such as a main projector, is present it is recommended that the interactive LCD
panels be used, regardless of intended screen size. Any IWB that is installed at the University is
required to have an aspect ratio of 16:9 or 16:10. All interactive whiteboards must be mounted in
accordance with DDA and the University Disability Access guidelines.
K 2.6.6 Touch Displays
All touch interfaces must be incorporated into the display unit; overlays are not acceptable for
performing touch interacting. Touch displays are to be specified in the design phase of a project.
K 2.7 Switching And Control
K 2.7.1 Controllers
Control equipment is exclusively AMX, unless otherwise specified by ISTS. Should a design require a
control product not able to be supplied by AMX any variation will not be accepted unless written
permission with the relevant data sheet is supplied to ISTS before installation.
For small tutorial room style spaces ISTS recommends the AMX integrated control pad as the sole
control device. For larger spaces with more complex control requirements ISTS recommends an AMX
NetLink Integrated Controller with either a slave keypad or AMX touch screen panel. The AMX Enova
is suitable as a room control device, as it contains a NetLink Integrated Controller. All AMX
Controllers must be networked and capable of integration with the University’s AMX RMS system
K 2.7.2 Switching
The University utilizes Extron switching equipment for typical spaces, alternatively utilising AMX
Enova all-in-one solutions as required to meet design goals. Any space that has been designated to
be converted from analogue to digital, or any space that is designated to be configured to the output
High Definition, requires the use of a High Definition Digital HDMI switcher/matrix. The switcher
must be capable of:
•
•
•
•
•
•
HDCP compliance with full key management on all inputs and outputs.
EDID management
Scaling/frame rate conversion
HDMI Audio embedding and de-embedding
[email protected]
Colour Space management
Any variations, such as for spaces that require more switching capability that can be provided
through a listed solution, just be approved by ISTS prior to commencement of works.
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K 2.7.3 Control System Security
All AMX controllers must be configured with an additional user account with full administrator
access. The username and password for this account will be provided by ISTS at the commencement
of works, and must be configured before a controller is placed on the University’s network.
The administrator account must be configured with a password of the vendor’s choice to be
provided to ISTS at the completion of works. All user accounts other than the administrator and ISTS
accounts must be disabled.
All touch interfaces must be configured to allow remote access, either through a web console or
another remote access solution such as VNC. Access to these services is to be restricted with a
password, which will be supplied by ISTS before the interface is placed on the University’s network.
K 2.8 Audio And Video Standards
K 2.8.1 Video Standards
Video sources must be DVI or HDMI where possible. VGA, Composite, Component and S-Video must
only be used in circumstances where the source equipment does not support either the DVI or HDMI
standard. DisplayPort may be used with the aid of a DisplayPort to HDMI/DVI adaptor.
Transmission of video signals beyond a distance of 10m must be through purple coloured shielded
twisted pair Category 6A cable. In spaces equipped with AMX Enova All-In-One switchers the use of
DXLink as the transmission format is the standard adopted by the University. Other spaces may be
equipped with either AMX or Extron DVI/HDMI over Twister Pair transmitters and receivers, at the
approval of ISTS. Fibre Optic transmitters and receivers will be considered in circumstances where
the transmission distance is beyond the manufacturer’s maximum specification for Twisted Pair.
All video signals must be transmitted in either 16:9 or 16:10 format, using 12800x800 in spaces
equipped with Interactive Whiteboards, and 1920x1080 in all other spaces. Any deviations must be
approved by ISTS.
K 2.8.2 Audio Standards
Any audio system being either playback, speech reinforcement or a combination of both, must be
individually specified based upon existing designs that are deployed within the University in
consultation with ISTS.
Typically, a space requiring only program playback may have suitable low impedance speakers
installed as close as practically possible at ceiling level either side of the projection screen/surface.
The speakers must be appropriately aimed at the target area and not firing across the ceiling. Should
this not be possible flush mounted ceiling speakers throughout the room may be considered as an
alternative.
Systems capable of program playback and speech reinforcement must consist of suitable front of
house low impedance speakers and may be supplements with delay flush mounted ceiling speakers
suitably positioned throughout the space. Final size and position of all speakers must be determined
in consultation with ISTS during the design process. In spaces where speech reinforcement the
speaker must, wherever possible, be positioned forward of the teaching area, so as to limit any
feedback.
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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Passive speakers must be wired to 100v only when configured as a ceiling array of multiple speakers.
In all other circumstances passive speakers must be wired to 8Ω stereo. The power handing capacity
of passive speakers must meet or exceed that of the amplifier.
Wall mounted speaker brackets must allow speaker adjustment both horizontally and vertically and
allow the speaker to be physically locked into position. Similarly ceiling speakers must be securely
mounted to ceilings and additional support must be provided across ceiling T-bar rails as required.
The number and style of microphones (hardwired or radio), audio processing/mixers including digital
sound processors (DSP) and amplifiers must be at the discretion of ISTS. All products must be
individual specified for each space in consultation with ISTS during the design process.
All line-level cable runs greater than a length of 2m, or running outside the equipment rack, must be
run fully balanced. Unbalanced line-level runs will only be accepted in consultation with ISTS. All
microphone cable must be run fully balanced XLR without exception. All balanced cable runs must
use the same phase, i.e. Pin 2 = hot.
All spaces must have their audio tuned to minimise feedback and provide the best acoustic
conditions possible. Systems equipped with audio DSP hardware must be configured in a manner
suitable for the space, and must be demonstrated to ISTS prior to acceptance. ISTS may provide
sample/template DSP configurations as a guide.
NOTE: special consideration must be given to any venue which may include video conferencing
equipment
K 2.9 Source Equipment
All playback and PC based source equipment must be individual specified for each space in
consultation with ISTS during the design process. Typically these units must be readily and easily
accessible to all users and may require additional mechanical or electronic security measures as
deemed suitable by ISTS.
For spaces that require additional playback of DVD or Blu-ray, an appropriate player must be
provided. The playback unit must support Blu-ray and be backwards compatible with DVD, and will
provide video via HDMI and audio via balanced audio, RCA or HDMI. RS232 or IP are the required
control method and must provide full control of media playback.
K 2.10 Video Conferencing
The University has identified several key aspects that are required for all video conferencing facilities
within the University. These design requirements are based on the unique technical aspects of video
conferencing.
All video conferencing spaces must be designed to use directional spot lights exclusively, fluorescent
lighting produces poor quality when viewed through a camera. Additionally all effort should be made
to remove or restrict any exterior light from entering a video conferencing space. The use of thick
black-out curtains has been identified as an excellent solution.
Special consideration must be made for the microphones that will be used in a video conferencing
space. The room must have a low ambient noise level, with as little plant and background noise as
possible. The placement of microphones must be carefully considered to maximize the pickup of
voices within the room whilst avoiding ambient sources.
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A high quality omnidirectional table microphone equipped with a shock mount is preferred. In rooms
where a table microphone is unsuitable ceiling microphones can be used, however, care must be
taken to keep them physically separated from the air conditioning outlets and lighting fixtures.
Cameras should be mounted as close to the display as possible, preferably at head height at the
horizontal centre point of the display. All effort must be taken to minimize the separation between
the display and the camera. The recommended background colour for video conferencing is dark
blue, as this provides the best contrast between participants and the background, ensuring a high
quality image.
K 2.11 Lighting Standards And Controls
The lighting requirements for each space are under the control of the Facilities Management Unit
(FMU), who will determine the equipment and integration required. For spaces that have projection
equipment, special considerations must be made to ensure that any projection or screen surfaces
maintain a level of visibility that is conductive to their use. This involves careful selection and
placement of lighting systems as well as tight integration into the AV control system. All care must
be taken to prevent incidental light from spilling onto the projection surface.
Integration into existing lighting systems must be determined during the design process and is
generally achieved through the use of C-Bus controllers that are passed commands by the AMX
control system.
K 2.12 Lecture Recording System
Lecture capture facilities are required in many of the University’s teaching spaces. Provision in any
AV systems must include additional video and audio feeds to lecture capture equipment as
determined during the design consultation process. ISTS will supply, install and maintain any Lecture
Recording device deployed to a teaching space.
K 2.13 External AV Input Plates
Suitable AV input plates must be provided as specified by ISTS. The contractor may supply an
alternative manufactured version of this plate type, with approval from ISTS required. All specified
input types on the plate must be engraved in black text.
K 2.14 Electrical Testing And Tagging
The Audio Visual Integrator is to have all supplied AV equipment including power leads, tested and
tagged by a licensed electrical equipment tester as per AS/NZ3760:2003 standards. The contractor
must supply ISTS with the following on a USB memory stick:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Equipment type and serial number
Equipment location i.e. building room and number
Equipment test date
Name of tester
K 2.15 Physical Security
All display devices that are assessed to require a high level of anti-theft security must be equipped
with a magnetic switch that is connected to the centrally monitored security system maintained by
the Facilities Management Unit. Local alarms that do not report to FMU are not acceptable.
The risk assessment for requiring alarms must take into account the value of the equipment, its
location and the means with which it is mounted. LCD Monitors within standing reach in public
thoroughfare areas (such as digital signage players) are considered high risk and thus require an
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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alarm. LCD Monitors in locked meeting rooms may be considered low risk and will not need to be
alarmed.
The assessment of the requirement for alarms must be undertaken by ISTS.
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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K 3 Audio Visual Cabling, Installation And Specifications
K 3.1 Cabling Specifications
The following cables are considered to be acceptable for the University’s audio-visual installations.
Suitable cabling will not be accepted unless written permission with relevant data sheet is supplied
to ISTS before installation.
Table 1 - Cable Preferences
TYPE
VGA (pre-moulded)
DVI
HDMI
Video over Cat6A
2 core + shield
4 core + shield
8 core + shield
RS232
Ethernet
PREFERRED MANUFACTURER
VIDEO
Extron VGA M-M MD
Extron DVID SL Pro
Extron HDMI Pro
CONTROL
Electra EAS7201P
Electra EAS7202P
Electra EAS7204P
AMX CC-232
Unbalanced Line-level Audio
AUDIO
Canare L-2B2AT
Balanced Audio
Canare L-4E6S
Speaker – Constant voltage
Speaker – low impedance
Audio Telex P20241B
Audio Telex ATC8055
DETAIL
Pre-moulded VGA at length to
suit
DVI-D single link
HDMI v1.3
Category 6A Shielded Twisted
Pair
1 pair + shield control cable
2 pair + shield control cable
4 pair + shield control cable
Wired as required as device(s)
Category 6A Shielded Twisted
Pair
2 pair individual shield +
common drain
Star Quad microphone install
cable
Heavy Duty Fig 8
Pro Speaker 2 x 2.5 mm
All cabling must be neat and secure.
Where equipment is mounted on slides, sufficient cable length must be provided to enable the item
to be withdrawn to the limit of the slides while remaining fully operational and without stress on
cables or connectors. Typically cables terminating at the equipment racks or lecterns must have 2m
tails provided. All runs of cable designated to be carrying digital signal (e.g. DVI, HDMI, Cat6A) must
have not more than 4 cable breaks for runs over 30m. Smaller runs may be permitted to have more
than 4 cable breaks, however this must be in consultation with ISTS.
Securing of cabling at racks must be with Velcro or other suitable reusable fixture for the looms and
cables ties are not to be used. Cables terminating at the equipment, i.e. Data projectors, speakers
etc. must have 2m tails provided.
Any in-ceiling cabling must be suspended above ceiling tiles on catenaries or cable tray. At least one
draw cable must be run from the AV bench to the ceiling space for use as a draw cable and/or future
use. A minimum of 2 extra Shielded Twisted Pair Category 6A or higher Ethernet cables must be run
from the equipment rack to any ceiling mounted display equipment to allow for future expansion.
All connections must be to industry standard. Connectors terminated on site are to be of a high
quality and professional standard.
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K 3.2 Cable Labelling
All cables must be labelled within 25mm of the connector with a permanent label indicating where it
is/should be connected, as well as the connection at the far end.
For example, VGA input A of a projector from a switcher should be labelled ‘Near: Projector Input A,
Far: Switcher Output 1’. Conversely the other end of the cable connected to the switcher should be
labelled “Near: Switcher Output1, Far: Projector Input A”.
The preferred method of labelling a cable is to use a large adhesive label with printed text. The
University’s standard colour for labels is either pink or purple. P-Touch labels may only be used if
they are attached to the large adhesive labels. Examples of the University’s labelling standard are
available upon request.
K 3.3 Hearing Augmentation
As specified by ISTS, an Audio Visual Integrator must supply and install an infrared assistive listening
system into teaching spaces that have inbuilt amplification systems. The supply and installation of
any hearing augmentation system into a teaching space is to comply strictly with the following:
•
•
•
Building Code of Australia BCA 2011
Infra-Red receivers with a minimum of 95% coverage
1 receiver for every 25 persons up to 500 persons
The Integrator must test results to ensure the installed system meets or exceeds the current
standards, and provide a detailed documentation of the system, including any hearing loop locations
and a measured plot of the field.
K 3.4 AMX Programming
AMX programming is to be provided to allow for easy and logical operation of any AV system.
Control of the AV system is achieved through either a push button wall panel or an interactive touch
screen, as specified by ISTS. The touch panel layout and graphics/font is to resemble the format
deployed in other spaces within the University, and templates will be provided by ISTS for reference
purposes only.
Any and all code work requested by the University becomes the property of the University at the
completion of the project. All programs, modules and graphic files are to be handed over to the
University in an un-compiled state on a USB memory stick or CD/DVD-ROM at practical completion.
All passwords required to access hardware, software and programming code must also be provided
to the University.
Any Audio Visual Integrator providing quotation for this specified system must meet the following
criteria in regards to AMX product supply and programming:
•
•
•
Be a certified dealer of AMX Control System products
Have at least one qualified in-house AMX programmer within the organisation. The Audio
Visual Integrator is to provide programmers details with suitable reference to past projects
completed and training/certification obtained.
The AMX programmer is to provide references of previously completed audio-visual projects
incorporating AMX integrated control systems. It is required that at least two references
have accompanying contact details for the University to check upon customer satisfaction.
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K 3.5 AMX Remote Management Suite (RMS)
AMX Resource Management Suite is to be incorporated into each Audio Visual System that uses an
AMX controller. The University requires the following system control/diagnostic joins provided:
•
•
•
•
•
•
System On/Off Status – Monitors the current status of the system, such as whether it is
turned on or off. Users can turn the system On or Off via RMS, mimicking the command
structure provided on touch panel or button room controller.
Projector Status – System should report all of the following:
o Power Status
o Error Status
o Source Selection
User to turn Projector On/Off via RMS
Projector Operating Life Status – Monitors Projectors remaining lamp/laser life and
operational time. In spaces fitted with lamp projectors, the filter hours must also be tracked
in RMS
Room Occupancy (if fitted) – Monitors room occupancy from an Audio Visual Integrator
supplied and installed PIR motion sensor. If motion is not detected, a 2-hour countdown will
begin, with the system shutting down at the end of the countdown if no motion is detected.
When motion is detected, the countdown timer will automatically reset.
Power Control – Where a room is equipped with a power controller, controls will enable a
remote user to hard switch power (toggle on/off) devices within the equipment rack. The
system will display the current status and power draw of each port on the power controller.
K 3.6 Installation
The Audio Visual Integrator is to install all equipment for the Audio Visual system as outlined
throughout this scope of works/specification and, if specified, University provided system block line
diagram. All works are to be completed to a high standard with a fully functioning Audio Visual
System handed over at completion of the project.
•
•
•
•
Audio is to be free of any buzz, hum and any other undesired noise. Exact speaker positions
are to be based on a practical determination of what will give the best sound coverage from
the FOH (key decision factors, being careful considerations of room layout, possible sound
obstructions, and dispersion properties of speakers).
Video/Data projection is to be free of any hum bars, shimmer, flicker, ghosting, sparklies,
macro-blocking, drop-out, or any other undesired artefacts, up to the native input resolution
of the projection device.
The projector alignment to the screen must be of the highest quality, without any optical or
digital image distortion. The projector lens must be aligned dead-centre to the vertical
centre line of the projection surface, and the projector must be mounted between 15-50%
below the top of the screen. The projector must be aligned straight and true to the screen
surface, it must not pan or tilt in order to project onto the screen surface. Every effort must
be made by the integrator to ensure perfect optical alignment of the projector to the screen.
Use of lens shift and/or image warping must only be used with the express written approval
of ISTS. Any misalignments must be resolved before a space will be considered acceptable by
the University.
Installed plates, controller, screen, duct or conduit, speaker brackets, projector bracket and
wall equipment cupboard are all to be installed square, flush and level. The mounting
screws/washers/bolts used to fix a specific item are all to be matching for that specific item
type.
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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•
•
•
•
Audio Visual Integrator provided ceiling cut-outs for a projector ceiling mount pole are to be
neatly cut-out with a diameter no greater than 15 mm of that of the pole itself.
Equipment Racks - Refer 2.1
The Audio Visual Integrator is to dispose of any rubbish or refuse that is left over from
installations in an environmentally sustainable way. Any materials that are recycled require
the disposal process to be certified to a standard defined by ISTS.
If required by the design specifications, the Audio Visual Integrator, in consultation with
ISTS, is to provide adequate power to the projector, lectern and any motorised projection
screen. Any installation of power requires the consultation of FMU, to ensure that all
necessary processes are followed. Typically, a ceiling mounted double GPO is to be provided
at the projector with a double GPO provided to the cabled end of the projection screen
(ideally within the ceiling cavity where possible) and two double GPO’s to the lectern. All
circuits for all AV equipment must be linked to a common earth. All electrical works are to
be provided by a licensed electrician and completed to AS/NZS 3000:2000 and any other
relevant Australian Standards. Final number of power outlets to be determined during the
design consultation process.
All projector power switches must have an additional switch located within a secure space,
such as the lectern or communications room, to allow the projector to be power cycled
without the need for a ladder or scaffolding.
K 3.7 Project Documentation
A project folder must be provided by the Audio Visual Integrator at handover of the Project. The
project folder must contain the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Section One: A complete reference list of service contact details for each supplied
equipment component in the system. This list is to also include service contact details for
the Audio Visual Integrator (standard working hours and out of hours service contacts).
Section Two: All equipment manuals, software and warranty details provided from the
Manufacturer
Section Three: A copy of the “As Built” system block line diagram. In most cases, this will be
a simple copy of what the University has already provided to the Audio Visual Integrator,
unless changes have been made to the standard system design during the project with
authorisation from the University in writing.
Section Four: A complete unprotected copy of the AMX workspace (can be provided as a
“Workspace to go” format) is to be supplied on a USB memory stick or CD/DVD ROM. Please
note that all separate equipment control modules used within the program are to be
provided in a separate file folder titled ‘Modules’. All TPDesign touch panel design files must
be provided in a separate file folder titled ‘Touch Panel’
A template of the University’s preferred workplace layout is available from ISTS.
Section Five: A complete list of supplied equipment; make, model, serial number, MAC
address, location of the equipment (e.g. Campus: Mawson Lakes, Room: E1-18, Position: AV
Rack), and function of the equipment. A template spread sheet detailing the required
information is available from ISTS.
K 3.8 Additional Documentation
This document must be used as a minimum general reference guide for any AV installation within
the University of South Australia. As part of any project ISTS may include additional documentation
such as an Audio Visual System Block Line Diagram or equipment template (see Appendices A, B and
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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C). The Audio Visual Integrator is to use this diagram in conjunction with the scope of
works/specification for system configuration reference and instruction. Any variation to this system
design and format will not be accepted without prior written consent form the University’s
authorised delegate.
In order to be considered for any project an integrator must conform and agree to the University’s
Service Level Agreement for AV Works, which is available from ISTS.
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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APPENDIX A: TUTORIAL ROOM TEMPLATE (AV03)
Access the link below to view the latest versions of the associated appendices prior to commencing
detailed design work:
http://w3.unisa.edu.au/ists/new/staff/av/UniSA-AVSpec.pdf
APPENDIX B: LECTURE THEATRE TEMPLATE (AV05)
Access the link below to view the latest versions of the associated appendices prior to commencing
detailed design work:
http://w3.unisa.edu.au/ists/new/staff/av/UniSA-AVSpec.pdf
SECTION K – AUDIO VISUAL TECHNOLOGY
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


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA


MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


L
TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
x L Telecommunications Infrastructure
M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016

SECTION I – VERTICAL TRANSPORTATION
Page 231 of 269
Contents
L 1 General................................................................................................................................................234
L 1.1 Scope ..................................................................................................................................................... 234
L 1.2 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 234
L 1.3 Applicable Standards ............................................................................................................................. 235
Table 1 – Australian Standards .............................................................................................................. 235
L 1.4 Preferred Manufacturer Solutions......................................................................................................... 235
L 2 Global Requirements ...........................................................................................................................236
L 2.1 Warranty and Certification Requirements............................................................................................. 236
L 2.2 Acceptance Requirements ..................................................................................................................... 236
L 2.2.1 Documentation............................................................................................................................... 236
L 2.2.2 Pre Commissioning and Defect Inspections ................................................................................... 236
L 3 General Requirements .........................................................................................................................237
L 3. 1 Cable Reticulation Inspection and Report ............................................................................................ 237
L 3.2 Pathways and Spaces ............................................................................................................................. 237
L 3.3 Labelling Convention ............................................................................................................................. 237
L 3.4 Patch and Fly Leads................................................................................................................................ 237
L 3.5Testing .................................................................................................................................................... 238
L 4 Design Requirements ...........................................................................................................................239
L 4.1 General Requirements ........................................................................................................................... 239
L 4.2 Design Consideration ............................................................................................................................. 239
L 4.3 ISTS Design Requirements ..................................................................................................................... 240
L 4.3.1 UTP Cabling .................................................................................................................................... 240
L 4.4 Fibre Cabling .......................................................................................................................................... 240
L 4.5 Voice & Low Speed Backbone Cabling ................................................................................................... 241
L 4.6 Alternative Structured Cabling Systems ................................................................................................ 241
L 4.7 Wireless Coverage ................................................................................................................................. 242
L 4.8 Pathways and Spaces ............................................................................................................................. 242
L 5 Telecommunications Closets ................................................................................................................243
L 5.1 General .................................................................................................................................................. 243
L 5.2 Telecommunication Closets Spatial Requirement ................................................................................. 243
L 5.3 Heat Dispersion...................................................................................................................................... 243
L 5.4 Clearance ............................................................................................................................................... 243
L 5.5 Security .................................................................................................................................................. 244
L 5.6 Contaminants and Static Control ........................................................................................................... 244
L 5.7 Power and Lighting ................................................................................................................................ 244
L 5.8 Labelling ................................................................................................................................................. 244
L 6 Communications Cabinet .....................................................................................................................245
L 6.1 ISTS Preferred Communication Rack Layout ......................................................................................... 246
Table 2 - Suggested single rack layout, from top down......................................................................... 247
L 7 Patch Cord Management......................................................................................................................248
L 8 Contractor Requirement ......................................................................................................................249
L 8.1 General .................................................................................................................................................. 249
L 8.2 ISTS Preferred Contractors List .............................................................................................................. 249
L 8.3 Preferred Contractor Prerequisite ......................................................................................................... 250
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L 9 Installation Requirements ....................................................................................................................251
L 9.1 General .................................................................................................................................................. 251
L 9.2 Pathways and Spaces ............................................................................................................................. 251
L 9.3 Ceiling Spaces ........................................................................................................................................ 251
L 9.4 Wall Cavities .......................................................................................................................................... 252
L 9.5 Risers...................................................................................................................................................... 252
L 9.6 Workstation Furniture ........................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.7 Service Poles .......................................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.8 Catenary Systems................................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.9 Cable Trays and Baskets......................................................................................................................... 253
L 9.10 Conduits and Ducts .............................................................................................................................. 254
L 9.11 Access Pits............................................................................................................................................ 256
L 9.12 Penetrations ........................................................................................................................................ 256
L 9.13 Cabling Installation .............................................................................................................................. 257
L 9.14 Communications Cabinet Cabling ........................................................................................................ 257
L 9.15 Communication Cabinet Earth ............................................................................................................. 258
Table 3 – Cable Size ............................................................................................................................... 258
L 10 Labelling ............................................................................................................................................259
L 10.1 Communication Cabinets..................................................................................................................... 259
L 10.2 Fibre Optic Patch Panels ...................................................................................................................... 259
Table 4 – Example- Optical Fibre Cables Labels..................................................................................... 259
L 10.3 Class E Backbone Patch Panels ............................................................................................................ 259
Table 5 – Example- Backbone Cable Labels ........................................................................................... 259
L 10.4 Voice Patch Panels ............................................................................................................................... 260
Table 6 – Example- Backbone Cable Labels ........................................................................................... 260
L 10.5 Horizontal Patch Panels ....................................................................................................................... 260
L 10.6 Telecommunications Outlets ............................................................................................................... 260
Table 7 – Telecommunications Outlets Label ........................................................................................ 260
L 11 Testing ...............................................................................................................................................262
L 11.1 Fibre Optic Testing ............................................................................................................................... 262
L 11.1.1 Optical Attenuation ...................................................................................................................... 262
L 11.1.2 Length ........................................................................................................................................... 262
L 11.1.3 Propagation Delay ........................................................................................................................ 262
L11.1.4 Continuity and maintenance of polarity ....................................................................................... 263
L 11.1.5 OTDR............................................................................................................................................. 263
L 11.2 4-Pair UTP Backbone and Horizontal Testing ...................................................................................... 263
L 12 Project Documentation ......................................................................................................................264
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
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L 1 General
This document does not replace the requirement of the Australian Communications and Media
Authority (AMCA). Where this document conflicts with any aspect of mandatory requirements of the
AMCA, the AMCA requirements must take precedence.
L 1.1 Scope
•
•
•
•
•
This document is a generic description of minimum standards and guidelines for all the
University Telecommunication Infrastructure projects.
The standard is not project specific, but is provided by the University to inform consultants
and installers as to the minimum requirements for design, installation, documentation and
quality control as required by the University Information Strategy & Technology Services
(ISTS).
ISTS is responsible for telecommunications infrastructure projects and maintenance within
the University. ISTS reserves the right to carry out (or to appoint a third party organisation to
carry out) random quality inspections before, during and/or after installation of any
telecommunication infrastructure for the University. The cost of these inspections will be
borne by ISTS.
This document is ‘Commercial in Confidence’ and remains the property of the University. It
must not be modified, reproduced or distributed by third parties for any purpose or project
external to the University.
The University reserves the right to provide updated versions of this document on a projectby-project bases. Modification, reproduction or distribution of this document may be
undertaken by third parties that are required to include this information or parts thereof
within project specifications written for the University.
L 1.2 Background
This standard represents the University’s standard voice and data requirements. It is a generic
document, capturing broad voice and data installation requirements. Project and location specific
requirements must be confirmed with the University Contracts Supervisor and the Technical
Reference Group.
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L 1.3 Applicable Standards
The design and installation must at a minimum comply with the most current version of the
applicable Australian Standards, including the following Standards:
Table 1 – Australian Standards
Standard
Description
AS/CA S008
Requirements for Authorised Cabling Products
AS/ACIF S009
Installation Requirements for Customer Cabling (Wiring Rules)
AS/NZX 3080
Telecommunication installations – Integrated telecommunication cabling
systems for commercial premises
AS/NZS 3000
Electrical Installations
AS/NZS IEC 661935.1
Testing of balanced communication cabling in accordance with ISO/IEC 1180
Part 1: Installed Cabling
AS/NZS IEC 61935.2
Testing of balanced communication cabling in accordance with ISO/IEC 1180
Part 2: Patch cords and work area cords
AS/NZS 2967
Optical fibre communications cabling system safety
AS/NZS 2211.1
Laser safety Part 1: Equipment classification, requirement and user’s guide
AS/NZS 2211.2
Laser Safety Part 2: Safety of Optical fibre communication systems
AS/NZS ISO/IEC 14763.3 Telecommunications Installations – Implementation and operation of
customer premises cabling – Part 3: Acceptance testing for optical fibre
cabling
The hierarchy of requirements in relation to regulations and standards are as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
Mandatory regulations
OH&S Safety Standards
Project Specifications
Telecommunications Infrastructure Standard
Nominated Australian Standards for Performance and Design
L 1.4 Preferred Manufacturer Solutions
All ISTS structured communication systems must be on the ISTS Preferred Manufacturers/Suppliers
List. The addition or removal of contracting organisations from the ISTS Preferred
Manufacturers/Suppliers List is at the sole discretion of ISTS.
Standardisation in relation to manufacturer solutions is important to the University, however, we
understand that some products may better suit a particular environment or application. All products
in the list below are acceptable, however, they have been listed in order of preference:
•
•
•
•
•
Krone
Panduit
Molex
AMP
Clipsal
On any existing installation, the same manufacturer’s products must be used if the manufacturer
appears on the ISTS Preferred Manufacturers/Suppliers List. Warranties must be a minimum of 15
years.
It is the responsibility of the preferred manufacturers/suppliers to carry out adequate inspections
during the installation to ensure the certification and warranties can be issued at the end of the
installation.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
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L 2 Global Requirements
L 2.1 Warranty and Certification Requirements
All new cabling installations must be covered by a Manufacturer certification and warranty program
that includes parts and labour within the agreement.
L 2.2 Acceptance Requirements
L 2.2.1 Documentation
No project will be deemed as complete until such time as all project documentation have been
received and accepted by ISTS e.g. as built drawings and test reports. As-built documentation is
fundamental to ISTS’s ongoing role of administering and maintaining the University’s
telecommunication infrastructure and must be supplied prior to the pre-commissioning and defect
inspection process.
As built documentation must include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Plans showing the location of all distributors, backbone pathways, backbone cables,
telecommunication outlets and associated identifiers.
Signed ACMA TCA1 form for the associated work
Vendor warranty documents
All fibre and unshielded twisted pair (UTP) test results including backbone and outlet cabling
A Statement of Compliance from an ISTS-approved NATA inspection body for all associated
test results for:
o All projects over 200 outlets
o All large projects (consult with ISTS for definition of large) containing optical fibre
cabling.
NOTE: ISTS approved NATA inspection body is VTI Services Pty Ltd
VTI Services Pty Ltd
Murray Teale
Telephone: 02 9824 2412
E-mail: [email protected]
L 2.2.2 Pre Commissioning and Defect Inspections
ISTS representation must be included in all Pre Commissioning and defects inspections which include
an ICT component.
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L 3 General Requirements
Clean and safe work practices are required within all the University facilities at all times.
L 3. 1 Cable Reticulation Inspection and Report
Telecommunications consultants must perform cable reticulation inspections at regular intervals
throughout a project and provide a report to the University Project Manager. The inspection must be
against mandatory standards, requirements specified within this document, industry-recognised
installation practices and specified project requirements.
L 3.2 Pathways and Spaces
All concealed communication cabling reticulation through ceiling spaces must be supported by a
purpose-built pathway. All designs must provide a contiguous and independent support route
between the telecommunications systems, distributors and telecommunication outlets through all
internal and external building spaces.
All exposed (surface) cabling must be supported and enclosed in duct or conduit for all of the
exposed route length. Where communication cabling is installed in a public area it must be
protected from accidental or malicious damage.
L 3.3 Labelling Convention
Labelling of the communication cabling system must strictly adhere to the University requirements.
L 3.4 Patch and Fly Leads
LAN patch and fly leads must match or exceed the performance level of the cable system installed.
LAN patch and fly leads must be, as a minimum, blue Category 6 RJ45 to RJ45 patch leads. Analogue
voice patch leads must be constructed using yellow Category 5 RJ45 to RJ45 patch leads. Analogue
telephone fly leads must be RJ45 to RJ11 patch leads. RJ45 to RJ11 cords must be used for all
analogue telephone equipment incorporating RJ11 connections.
RJ11 telephone leads inserted into RJ45 telecommunications outlets affect some vendor warranties
and are not to be used in this manner.
Voice over IP phones must use the same blue patch and fly leads as specified above for data.
All Category 6A patch cords and fly leads used must meet or exceed the requirements of Category
6A when tested in accordance with IEC 61935.2
All Category 6 patch cords and fly leads used must meet or exceed the requirements of Category 6
when tested in accordance with AS/NZS IEC 61935.2.
All Category 5 patch cords and fly leads used must meet or exceed the requirements of Category 5
when tested in accordance to AS/NZS IEC 61935.2
New Building projects must include all fibre and twisted pair patch and fly lead requirements in the
tender specification. ISTS will advise type, lengths and numbers on request during the planning
stages.
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L 3.5Testing
1. All new cabling installations must be 100% tested to the minimum requirements to the
relevant standard as detailed below.
2. All fibre optic cabling must pass the compliance/conformance requirements specified for
permanent links within AS/NZS 3080 Annex B, utilising AS/NZS ISO/IEC 14763-3 test and
reporting methodologies.
3. Unless stipulated within the project specifications, ORL testing does not form part of the
University requirements.
4. Where ORL is required, OTDR testing must be carried out utilising a launch and a tail cable
and the ORL must be determined by the assessment of OTDR traces. ORL Pass/Fail
requirements will be assessed against components only values specified within AS/NZS 3080.
5. All terminated fibre optic cores must be tested in two directions and at two appropriate
wavelengths.
6. All fibre cables that are longer than 100 metres or run underground must additionally be
tested with an OTDR in one direction and at two wavelengths. OTDR test configurations
must include a launch and a tail cable of sufficient length to enable the loss of the first and
last connector to be determined.
7. All 4-pair UTP cabling must pass the compliance/conformance requirements specified for
permanent links within AS/NZS 3080 Annex B utilising an AS/NZS 61935-1 tester with a
compliance level equal to or exceeding that specified for the desired performance level.
8. For Class Ea installations or above, alien crosstalk must be tested against specified sample
sizes specified with the University project specification or as defined in Annex B or AS/NZS
3080 unless one of the following conditions is met:
a. A Statement of Conformity in writing from the cabling vendor that alien crosstalk to
AS/NZS 3080 requirements are met by the design. The Statement of Conformity
must clearly state any conditions that are applicable and should, as a minimum,
stipulate minimum and maximum cable run lengths.
b. The alien crosstalk requirements do not form part of reference or installation
requirements of AS/NZS 3080 Annex B
c. Alien crosstalk is specifically stated as not being required within the University
specification.
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L 4 Design Requirements
L 4.1 General Requirements
All project specifications that are drafted by internal or external telecommunications consultants for
the University must evoke the latest:
1. Applicable Mandatory Standards
2. Requirements Specified within this document or its replacement
3. Applicable Standards specified in Section 1.4
L 4.2 Design Consideration
Design must reflect the consideration of the following issues:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Type, nature and proposed usage of the buildings
Geographical location of the project and buildings
Physical size of the project and buildings
Length of lease/rental agreement for 3rd party owned buildings
Number of users
Future expansion plans
Existing telecommunications infrastructure
Current and future telecommunication and LAN systems that will utilise the structured
cabling system (SCS)
Placement of data points for the provision of Wireless Access Units
Hazardous situations that could affect safety and performance
Environmental issues that may need special consideration
Access to the building for the installation team
Security of telecommunication systems
Redundancy of the SCS
Mission critical nature of the information being carried
Potential problems associated with electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic
compatibility (EMC), i.e. located near power substations, radar facilities, etc.
Ongoing support of the installation
Access and keying that is consistent with all other ISTS campus communication areas
Where potential EMI/EMC issues have been identified, consideration must be given to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Use of fibre optic cabling
Use of shielded cabling
Use of earthed metal duct or conduit
Provision of greater distances between telecommunications cabling and the EMI/EMC
source.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
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L 4.3 ISTS Design Requirements
L 4.3.1 UTP Cabling
1. All 4-pair UTP, data and voice communication cabling and connectivity products must be a
minimum of Category 6 and the associated permanent links must meet the requirements of
a Class E permanent link as specified in AS/NZS 3080. The installed permanent link must
meet or exceed the requirements of a Class E permanent link as defined by AS/NZS 3080
when tested with a Level III tester or greater as defined by AS/NZS IEC 61935.1.
2. All UTP cables must be wired in a T568A wiring sequence. All 4-pair UTP backbone cables
must be terminated on a separate patch panel from horizontal UTP patch cable. Termination
on telecommunication outlet cabling at a distributor must be on eight pin modular outlet
patch panels.
3. Horizontal wiring to telecommunication outlets must be:
a. Category 6, 100 ohm UTP
b. Cable approved by the system vendor and consistent throughout the entire
installation
c. Installed by a SCS contractor utilising a vendor(s) that has a designed and matched
Class E solution for the complete channel, including the outlet, patch panel and
horizontal cable plus LAN patch and fly leads.
4. All telecommunication outlet locations must be serviced by a double telecommunication
outlet unless agreed to by ISTS. All telecommunication outlets must be installed utilising
white unshuttered face plates. The face plates must match the manufacturer of the existing
power outlets.
5. The Contractor must not disconnect legacy active communication cabling without
authorisation from the University Project Manager or ISTS.
6. All redundant/replaced cabling and associated products must be completely removed as
part of any project.
L 4.4 Fibre Cabling
All new fibre optic (FO) backbone cables must be OS2 single mode fibre with optical attenuation of
less than 0.4 dB per Kilometre unless otherwise specified. Where specified by the project Multimode
FO backbone cables that have a proposed route length of 300 metres or less must be of 50/125 um
OM4 Multimode type cable.
FO cores must be terminated using SC connectors. All fibre optic terminations must be terminated
by fusion splicing. SC and ST connectors must be of a type that utilises ceramic ferules. SC
connectors must be used on all new sites and major refurbishments. ST connectors may be used
when adding to existing (legacy) fibre plant. Adapters used for all Single Mode installations must be
blue in colour.
LC connectors are approved by ISTS for use outside of Data Centre’s, for OM4 and OS2; use outside
the Data Centres will require ISTS approval. When LC connectors are used in the University’s Data
Centre’s the point to point channel must be in a cross over configuration – TX to RX and RX to TX. All
LC patch leads for Data Centres must also be cross over cables.
If LC connectors are approved by ISTS for use outside of Data Centre’s, consultation in relation to the
use of a cross over or a straight through configuration will be required.
Fibre patch panels must be telescopic 24 port patch panel units with integral cable support and fibre
core management.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
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Loose tube fibre cables must be terminated with a break-out kit approved by the manufacturer. All
fibre cores must be encased in a protective tube for the complete length from the break out kit into
the fibre connector.
All fibre cores unless specified must be terminated at each end and presented within fibre optic
enclosures on fibre optic couplers.
L 4.5 Voice & Low Speed Backbone Cabling
The University utilises indoor and outdoor voice grade, multi-pair cables within its campuses. Pair
termination sequencing must be compliant with an Australian Standard colour coding
recommendation for terminating multi-pair cables.
New Installations must be designed to terminate voice services from exiting campus distributor
(main distribution frames), building distributor (intermediate distribution frames) and test point
frames into the new communication cabinets to allow all telecommunication outlets to have access
to voice services.
Voice and low speed data backbone cables must be terminated on a 24 port, Category 5 patch panel
at a distributor, or purpose made 50 point voice RJ45 patch panels, one pair must be terminated per
RJ45 port (Pins 4 and 5).
Voice and low speed data backbone cables terminating on traditional voice distributors must be
terminated on Krone LSA, 10 pair disconnect modules or equivalent. In accordance with mandatory
standards, cable records for this frame must be updated and maintained for the cabling work
undertaken. If no record book is available, the Contractor must provide one detailing their work.
Clarification must be sought from ISTS in relation to any Voice Cabling, as the majority of our phones
are now VOIP. Future requirements for voice cabling may be reduced as the only demand for
analogue phones is limited to mainly security phones, faxes and lift phones.
L 4.6 Alternative Structured Cabling Systems
ISTS may consider higher performing Structured Cabling Systems on a project by project basis. ISTS
assessment will be based on a cost benefit analysis and will address criteria such as value for money,
performance, standards compliance, operational impact, compatibility with existing infrastructure
and need.
•
To be considered by ISTS the structured cabling system must utilise components and cables
that meet or exceed published Australian Standards, plus:
o Have a Link and Channel performance that meets or exceeds published Australian
Standards
o Be capable of being tested against a published Australian Standard, this would
include specific Australian Standards for the test equipment
ISTS will not consider any cabling system that is not supported by published standards. Where no
published testing/tester standard is available, draft standards do not meet this requirement.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
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L 4.7 Wireless Coverage
The adoption of new standards and a greater dependence on the provision of wireless services
necessitates full consideration in relation to wireless placement, density, type and location in new
and refurbished areas.
Currently there are three types of units, a ceiling mount, a wall mount and a large industrial unit for
outside use. The ceiling mount is the most common. Placement, type and density will require input
from ISTS during the design stage. The data requirement for each wireless access point will be a
standard double data, there will be no requirement for power (GPO) unless specified by ISTS.
L 4.8 Pathways and Spaces
Cable trays, baskets, conduits, and/or ducts must be dedicated to the purpose of SCS cabling and not
be shared with any hazardous services. All pathways and spaces must be designed to allow for a
minimum of 30% expansion. All cables installed underground must be AMCA approved for
underground use.
Speaker cabling is deemed to be a hazardous service.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
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L 5 Telecommunications Closets
Telecommunication closets (including telecommunication rooms) housing active and passive
telecommunications equipment must meet the following minimum requirements:
L 5.1 General
1. All telecommunications closets must be located centrally to the area they are to serve. They
must be entered via a public thoroughfare and not be restricted by access through an
occupied area. There must be adequate telecommunications closets so that no cabling
exceeds 90 metres in length.
2. Adequate space and clearances must be allowed for in the communications room to allow
access to the interfaces on installed hardware from the front and rear of the equipment.
3. There may need to be a wall area/space allocated for Cardax controllers. These will have a
Socket Outlet (GPO) and double data point requirement.
L 5.2 Telecommunication Closets Spatial Requirement
1. The preferred length to width ration for telecommunications closets is 3 to 4. All
telecommunications closets must allow for 100% expansion. See Communications Rack for
specifications. Closets must have sufficient floor and door space for access and would
generally accommodate two racks. Scaling the space allocated should only be done in
consultation with ISTS Network Services personnel.
2. The door size must be large enough for the specified rack.
L 5.3 Heat Dispersion
1. Telecommunication closets must have adequate ventilation to allow for the dispersion of
heat from equipment that is likely to be housed within it for the life of the installation. To
comply with this clause, the temperature of the room must not exceed 28⁰C under any
circumstances.
2. Where ventilation alone will not disperse adequate heat, one or more of the following must
be provided:
a. Fans and filters installed in-room to improve airflow. The fans must be such as to
provide pressure with the telecommunications room
b. Connection to existing air conditioning
c. A dedicated air-conditioning unit supplied and installed
d. Communications rack fitted with stand-alone air conditioning unit
3. We suggest ventilation and cooling requirements be discussed with the engineering section
of the University Facilities Management Unit to ensure energy efficiency requirements are
met.
L 5.4 Clearance
Telecommunication closets must be laid out in such a way to allow the installation, maintenance and
removal of all active and passive equipment and provide adequate clearances as detailed below:
•
•
All communications/data racks must have a minimum of 800mm clearance front and back
All communications/data racks and active equipment must have adequate clearance so all
doors are capable of opening past 90 degrees
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 243 of 269
L 5.5 Security
Telecommunications closets must be secured by locks or the Cardax security system. All locks must
conform to existing campus keying. The ISTS grouping must be added for access control where
Cardax is used.
L 5.6 Contaminants and Static Control
Telecommunications closet walls, ceiling and floors must be sealed to control air contaminants.
Unless specified, all floors must have anti-static linoleum fitted. Telecommunications closets must
not be open to ceilings or other voids.
L 5.7 Power and Lighting
All communication cabinets housing or intending to house active equipment must have a dedicated
240v circuit with a 15 amp captive outlet along with a double Socket Outlet. There must additionally
be three double Socket Outlets for every 5m2 or part thereof, equally spaced around the
telecommunications closets for test and other equipment.
Each telecommunications closet must have adequate lighting. The lighting for the
telecommunication room or closet must be controlled via a separate switch.
L 5.8 Labelling
The door of each telecommunication closet must be labelled with the words ‘Telecommunications’
and additionally contain the Level, room and Distributor Number.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 244 of 269
L 6 Communications Cabinet
1. All cable must access the cabinet through the cabinet plinth or roof via a suitable sized PVC
duct. If a cable tray/ladder is used then the exposed component of the communication
cabling must be enclosed within a steel (top hat) section.
2. Where additional racks are installed in an existing distributor or telecommunication closet,
racks must be of the same type to effectively facilitate baying of cabinets. There must be
sufficient access around the cabinet to open the front and rear doors, and remove one of
the side covers without impedance.
3. Communication cabinets must have, as a minimum, the following configuration:
a. Keyed metal ventilated front door
b. Keyed metal rear door, ventilated if used, with a preference to a split door to reduce
clearance
c. Vertical cable management – front only
4. ISTS preferred Standard Rack Configuration
a. Please note that because Panduit have moved to a modular specification, the
information below may not be enough to place an order. Consultation with Panduit
through ISTS will be required in determining a complete specification and part
number.
b. The Panduit rack once specified can form the basis for a one or more interconnected
rack configurations with or without doors. ISTS prefers double doors each side of the
rack, a vertical power rail and cable management along each side of the racks front.
Other configurations are at the discretion of ISTs personnel who may allow for a cut
down version after taking into account space and security.
c. Panduit rack part numbers below:
CN1CN
Network Cabinet With Doors and Side Panels, 45 RU, Cage Nut Rails
CN2CN
Network Cabinet with Doors, 45 RU, Cage Nut Rails
CN3CN
Network Cabinet Frame Only, 45 RU, Cage Nut Rails
If you elect to purchase doors and sides separately, the part numbers are:
CNDDE
Dual Hinge Door, Enhanced
CNDS
Cabinet Split Door Perforated
CNPS
Cabinet Side Panel Solid
If you require a vertical power strip you will need a vertical mounting bracket kit
CVPDUB
Cabinet PDU Bracket Kit
Vertical power strip, 20 x Australian Standard power outlets
5. Alternate configurations without doors, this should only be used in a secure location
a. 2 x PANCNPS 6130783478 NET-ACCESS CAB.SIDE PANELS (for one or two joined
racks)
b. 1 or more multiple PANCN3CN-BU 6131164787 CABINET 32”W x 41”D x 84”H OPEN
FRAME
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 245 of 269
6. Below demonstrates basic rack configuration with single door
7. Optional MFB cabinet for existing confined spaces
Supplier Pacific Datacom
1 x MFB0600231 (6130380329) Cabinet Frame only 45RU 800W 19INRED600D
4 x MFB1200805 (6130353085) Rack Angle Type-A-45RU
1 x MFB0331101 (6130759515) Cable minder Duct Kit 100W
1 x MFBE1578-BU 6130816069 6 way Iru horizontal power 15A lead Captive Plug
L 6.1 ISTS Preferred Communication Rack Layout
•
•
•
•
ISTS provides this information as a guide only
ISTS must approve proposed rack layout during the design phase
ISTS will provide advice in relation to small projects and expansion of existing data cabinets
ISTS must be involved in the specification when more than one rack forms the basis of a
communications cabinet.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 246 of 269
Table 2 - Suggested single rack layout, from top down
Fibre optic cabling to the top
Allow for fibre expansion or table management
Start of active equipment
Allow expansion for extra active equipment
Beginning of structured twisted pair (A)
Allow for expansion of twisted pair (A)
Beginning of structured twisted pair (B)
Allow for expansion of twisted pair (B)
Voice expansion 25-48
Voice patch 1-24
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Fabot
EXP
Space for switch
Space for switch
Space for switch
Space for switch
Space for switch
Space for switch
Switch expansion
Switch expansion
A*1-A*24
A*25-A*48
A*49-A*72
A*73-A*96
A*97-A*120
A*121-A*144
A*145-A*168
A*146-A*168
A*169-A*192
A*193-A*216
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
B*1-B*24
B*25-B*48
B*49-B*72
B*73-B*96
B*97-B*120
B*121-B*144
B*145-B*168
B*169-B*192
B*193-B*216
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
EXP
Phone Patch Panel T1-24
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Page 247 of 269
L 7 Patch Cord Management
Minimum horizontal patch cord management is required, ISTS preferred patching method is for
patching from active devices and passive panels to be evenly distributed across the face of the
devices and to side cable management with fingers. Velcro can be used to help bundle patch leads.
See example below:
Figure 1: Example using Panduit Rack
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 248 of 269
L 8 Contractor Requirement
L 8.1 General
1. The contractor must ensure that their onside staff and subcontractors are fully conversant
with the current version of relevant documents including mandatory, ISTS and performance
standards, as well as this document and associated project specifications. Contractors must
ensure that their onsite staff and subcontractors are familiar with the University OHS&W
Policies (available from the University Website) and the University Design and Construction
Minimum Specifications (available from the University Facilities Management Unit or ISTS).
2. No variations will be entered into for not having a full understanding of requirements of this
document, mandatory standards, performance standards and Project Documentation.
3. The contractor must carry out installation, testing and commissioning and obtain an
approved vendor warranty for any installation undertaken. The contractor is directly
responsible for any faults and other identified issues during the defects liability period for
any project or installation work.
4. All installation works must at all times be directly supervised by personnel holding a current
ACMA Open Cabler registration. A current ACMA Open Cabler registration must be held by
50% of personnel carrying out cable reticulations. All personnel terminating cables must
hold a current ACMA Open Cabler registration.
5. ISTS reserves the right to check without notice the registration documentation of
Contractor’s staff and subcontractors on site.
L 8.2 ISTS Preferred Contractors List
Only Contractors that appear on the ISTS Preferred Contractors List must undertake work on the
University sites. Contractors not appearing on the ISTS Preferred Contractors List may contact ISTS to
request inclusion on an individual basis. The addition or removal of Contractors from the ISTS
Preferred Contractors List is at the sole discretion of ISTS.
Contractor
Contact
Access Datacom
Programmed
Electrical
Technologies
Cablelink
Communications
Data & Voice
Communication
Integrated
Cabling Solutions
O’Donnell Griffin
Data
Expert Data
Cabling
Comelec
Administration
Simon
Markwick
Nilsen Electric
Telephone
Number
8268 3777
8406 3400
Facsimile
Number
8268 6422
8406 3401
Email
Office
8202 7377
8202 7366
[email protected]
Administration
8240 1022
8240 3840
[email protected]
Service
8211 8011
8212 1132
[email protected]
Barry Mullett
8340 3270
8346 5600
[email protected]
EDC
8365 8077
8365 7709
[email protected]
Natasha
Brooks
Nilsens
8244 4728
8311 5222
[email protected]
8440 5300
8440 5314
[email protected]
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
[email protected]
[email protected]
m.au
Page 249 of 269
L 8.3 Preferred Contractor Prerequisite
In consideration of existing and new installation contractors for ISTS Preferred Contractors List, the
contractors will be assessed in part on experience, demonstrable systems including OHS&W, number
of ACMA approved cablers, vendor-trained staff and previous performance. It is regarded as an
essential criterion that preferred contractors are specialist communications cabling contractors.
The following table gives installation contractors some indication of required minimum attributes of
ISTS communications cabling contractors.
Attributes
Proven track record of communications cabling installation
Demonstrated understanding of ISTS requirements contained within
Have appropriate UTP test equipment
Have appropriate fibre test equipment if fibre work is to be undertaken
Shall be suitably trained as Vendor partners and able to perform works to
obtain desired ISTS
Shall have demonstrated an effective and documented OH&S policy
Shall have at least $10 million public liability insurance
Have adequate trained staff and project managers to carry out the work
Shall have adequate on-site ACMA licensed or registered staff
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Achieved
Page 250 of 269
L 9 Installation Requirements
L 9.1 General
The Contractor must visit site prior to pricing to become familiar with the access, site conditions, and
the existing installations. Ignorance of the existing conditions or installation will not be accepted as
justification for claims or variations.
The location of equipment shown on the drawings is indicative only, except where dimensions
determining locations are shown. Dimensions must be checked on site. No claims for variations will
be allowed for errors due to scaling of drawings.
The Contractor must determine the final location on site, coordinating this location with all other
services located in the area and having regard to any other restrictions on locations. All equipment
installed must be neatly and accurately aligned. Mounting heights of telecommunication outlets
must match adjacent power outlets unless advised otherwise. All products supplied and installed by
the Contractor must be new and undamaged.
L 9.2 Pathways and Spaces
1. All above ground pathways are to be installed at a suitable height and location to prevent
accidental or malicious damage and unwanted access. All pathways and spaces must be built
to last for the proposed life of the building.
2. Existing pathways and spaces may be used as long as the installed components satisfy the
minimum requirements of this standard and they have enough spare capacity to
accommodate all new and proposed SCS.
3. Special consideration must be given to segregation and separation from hazardous services
when designing pathways and spaces, and to EMC/EMI for pathways and spaces that are in
close proximity and/or parallel to electrical equipment and/or cabling with low and high
voltages (be aware that – high voltage applies to 1000V and above) for extended lengths.
4. Telecommunications outlet cabling must be star wired from the designated communications
room. No 4-pair UTP cable must exceed 90 metres nor be less than 15 metres in length.
5. Cable/tray baskets must be considered for major cabling routes from which catenary
systems can branch from. Ceiling hangers must not be used for fastening SCS. SCS must not
be fastened to the surfaces of other services such as pipes or air-conditioning struts. At no
point must the cabling rest of the topside of the false ceiling or light fittings or any other
services.
L 9.3 Ceiling Spaces
Consideration must be given when designing and installing pathways and spaces through ceiling
spaces to the following:
•
•
•
•
Pathways must be as unobtrusive as possible
All cabling must be reticulated and hidden from view in ceiling spaces where possible
Plaster or solid ceiling space may only be utilised where the ceiling space has sufficient space
for installers to safely enter, reticulate and fasten cabling with adequate provision of
maintenance access hatches or removable roof tiles
SCS cabling may be fastened to major building structures within a ceiling space as long as it
cannot be damaged by installers moving through spaces and upon structures in the future
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 251 of 269
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ceiling spaces that have no current or future access for cabling once built must not be used
unless conduits and draw through boxes with draw wires are installed to access the SCS
cabling and conduit system
SCS cabling may fastened to major building structures within a ceiling space as long as the
additional weight of cabling does not exceed the load bearing capacity of the building
structure
SCS cabling must not be laid directly on top of ceiling surface
Temperature within ceiling spaces does not exceed recommended maximum operating
temperatures of SCS cabling.
Where the temperature within the ceiling space is likely to exceed 40⁰C, the maximum
length of the cable run should not exceed that stipulated within AS/NZS 3080.
SCS cabling must not be supported from other services or from ceiling hangers
L 9.4 Wall Cavities
Consideration must be given when designing and installing pathways and spaces through wall
cavities to the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pathways must be as unobtrusive as possible
All cabling must be reticulated and hidden from view in wall cavities where possible
All cabling that is installed in external wall cavities must be installed in conduit
All cabling that is installed in internal wall cavities must be installed in conduit where it will
run close to electrical cables
Conduits that are used to drop cables in wall cavities must be fastened before the point of
entry into the wall
Cable entry into a wall cavity must be directly above or below the physical location of the
telecommunication outlet
Cable entry holes into the wall cavity must be of an appropriate size to allow for the
minimum bending radius of the cable and for additional cables.
L 9.5 Risers
Consideration must be given when installing pathways and spaces through risers in buildings to the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Risers must be established where SCS cable traverse from one building level to adjacent
levels
Risers must be secures from unauthorised entry and accessed only by using a tool or key
If a riser is established in a trafficable area it must be fully enclosed from floor to ceiling
Risers must not share the same space as hazardous services
Risers must be appropriately sized for the expansion of the SCS
Risers must be appropriately sized for installers to easily carry out additions, moves and
changes to the SCS
Risers must have cable trays/baskets installed from the top to the bottom of the vertical
plane of the wall to facilitate SCS cable reticulation and fastening
Riser cable trays/baskets must be sized for future expansion
Risers must have appropriately sized penetrations through the floor and ceiling where cables
are required to traverse between levels
Fire stopping within the riser must be restored where any penetration has occurred
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 252 of 269
L 9.6 Workstation Furniture
Consideration must be given when designing and installing pathways and spaces through
workstation furniture to the following:
•
•
•
•
Space must be allowed within workstation furniture for cable reticulation and to terminate
telecommunications outlets in compliance with the minimum bending radius of the cable
Where the workstation furniture has no purpose-built pathway, then two compartment PVC
or metallic ducts must be installed to the surface
Separation from communication cabling from electrical and other hazardous services must
be maintained at all times
Penetrations through workstations must be fitted with grommets to prevent damage to
cabling
L 9.7 Service Poles
Consideration must be given when designing and installing pathways and spaces through service
poles to the following:
•
•
•
Service poles must be purpose built for the reticulation and termination of SCS cabling
Service poles must be attached to and perpendicular to the floor
Cables entering and exiting service poles must meet minimum segregation requirement
L 9.8 Catenary Systems
Catenary systems must be used to support all cables contained in ceiling spaces not supported by
trays, baskets, conduits, ducts or ISTS approved fixings.
Catenary Systems must:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Utilise turnbuckles and steel eyelets and must be used to tighten the catenaries
Not support more than 2 x 24 or 4 x 12 4-pair UTP cable bundles
Be constructed of steel wire rope
Where installed adjacent to or on the surface of a wall or floor there must be a building
structure that has the capability of bearing the proposed weight of the SCS cabling
Be anchored at a maximum of 5.0 metre spans along its route length by means of fixing
hardware to permanent building structures that have the capability of bearing the proposed
weight of the SCS cabling
Catenary systems must not be used to reticulate SCS vertically
L 9.9 Cable Trays and Baskets
Cable trays and baskets must be used in the following situations:
•
•
Reticulation Support and cables in riser locations
Reticulation and support of major/common pathways of large amounts of horizontal cabling
Cable trays and baskets should be used to create SCS pathways in the following situations:
•
•
•
New or renovated building projects where a large number of cables are specified or
proposed in the future
Reticulation and support of cables in Telecommunication Closet and distributor locations
Reticulation and support of backbone cables
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 253 of 269
Consideration must be given when designing and installing cable tray and basket reticulation system
to the following:
•
•
•
•
Cable trays/baskets must not be installed where their positioning will be unduly detrimental
to the University’s normal operations
Cable trays/baskets must be designed to accommodate the expansion of the SCS
Cable trays/baskets must be designed to bear the weight of the proposed SCS, as defined by
the manufacturer
When installing cable tray and basket systems, they must meet the following:
o Manufacturer’s recommendations for support and fastening
o Be supported at intervals defined by the manufacturer’s recommendations
o Be fixed to solid and permanent building structures that have the capability to bear
the combined weight of the proposed SCS cabling and cable tray/basket systems
o Utilise cable tray/basket manufacturer bends, tees, crossovers and reducers or by
means approved by the manufacturer
o Support backbone or fibre cables must have visible, legible and durable SCS
identification labels fastened at intervals not exceeding 10 metres along the route
length. The label must contain wording that reflects the service run on the cable tray
or basket
o Where installed to or on the surface of a wall or floor, there must be an adequate
distance between the surfaces to allow for the fastening of the SCS cables to the
Cable tray/basket
o Be installed so that there is enough vertical clearance from the highest point of the
cable tray/basket surface to allow easy access for installers to reticulate and work
upon the SCS cabling
o Contain no fastening hardware or other sharp objects protruding through the SCS
cable bearing surface of the cable tray/basket
o Be adequately bushed to protect cables at entry and exit from trays
L 9.10 Conduits and Ducts
Conduits and ducts must be used in the following situations:
•
•
•
•
•
To provide adequate mechanical protection to SCS cabling from the external environment of
buildings such as ultra-violet light (Sun) temperature, moisture, accidental and malicious
damage
All externally mounted conduits must be UV stabilised and run through shaded areas, where
practical
In the ceiling space of a building where there is limited access to install and maintain the SCS
In a visible location within a building, on the surface of walls where there is no access
through wall cavities
In a visible location within a building where the number of SCS cables does not warrant the
expense of cable trays/baskets
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 254 of 269
Conduit and duct systems must:
•
•
•
•
•
If metallic, be connected to the protective earth system of the building
Have a draw cord left in the conduit if possible
Maintain mechanical continuity through all joints and bends of conduits/ducts
Not be the same colour or labelled as that used by a hazardous service
Be manufactured and installed to comply with the physical and colour requirements
referred to in Mandatory Standards
Consideration must be given when designing and installing pathways and spaces using conduits and
ducts to the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Conduits/ducts must be sized to allow for expansion of the SCS
All University underground WAN ducting must be a minimum 100mm in diameter
In the case of underground WAN ducting, Bore Logs and accurate route information must be
supplied to ISTS
Bore logs and conduit paths must be provided in CAD/KLM (Google Earth) format
All sharp edges must be removed from the internal and external surfaces of conduits/ducts
On extended route lengths, conduits/ducts should have pits or draw through boxes installed
at regular intervals to comply with maximum cable pulling tensions during the reticulation of
cables
Have conduits/ducts draw through boxes and must be appropriately sized to allow for the
minimum bending radius of the cables
If installed externally or underground, conduits/ducts must be continuous and waterproof
with all joints glued to retard the ingress of moisture
Conduits/ducts must be fastened to surfaces at regular intervals using hardware that is
designed to bear the required load
On long runs, conduits/ducts must have expansion joints installed at regular intervals to
allow for changes in the external environment such as ultra-violet radiation and temperature
Where installed in an environment that is open to accidental or malicious damage,
conduits/ducts must be protected by means of conduits that are of metallic construction or
PVC that is also covered with a metallic shroud for the complete length of the area of risk
Use appropriate support and fastening hardware and distances between supports that are
capable of bearing the combined weight of SCS cabling and conduits/ducts
Where spare/unused conduits are installed they must turn up to above ground surface or
within pits and must be capped to stop the ingress of moisture
Conduits/ducts must be buried to a depth that complies with the mandatory requirements
Have SCS identification location tape installed above all underground SCS conduits
Have ground location markers that identify SCS installed at regular intervals above the
location of the conduits/ducts route and must be visible at ground surface level
Conduits/ducts must have at all change of direction in conduits/ducts factory manufactured
bends, elbows, tees or pit
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 255 of 269
L 9.11 Access Pits
Access pits must be used in the following situations:
•
•
•
At each change of direction of underground conduits, factory manufactured bends may be
used where the underground conduit turns up through the ground surface
Long runs of underground conduits must have access pits installed at regular intervals to
comply with maximum cable pulling tensions
When installed access pits must:
o Be sized appropriately to allow for the SCS cable minimum bending radius
o Have access pit lids or covers labelled to identify the access pit contains SCS
o Be constructed and installed to bear the worst case traffic load conditions inherent
with its environment
o Be installed in such a way to allow collected water to dissipate into surrounding
areas
o Have no conduits access to pits at the bottom
o All pit lids and associated support collars must be designed and installed in
accordance with the manufacturers recommendations
L 9.12 Penetrations
Where penetrations are proposed the penetrations must:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Be brought to the attention of the Contract Supervisor or pre-approved by a consulting
engineer
Have spare capacity for future expansion of the SCS
For masonry floors, ceilings and walls – be sleeved with PVC conduit that extends past the
edge of the masonry on each side, except if cable trays/baskets reticulate through the
penetration in a continuous length and provide adequate protection from sharp and
abrasive surfaces
For plastic, plasterboard and metallic objects – be fitted with appropriate bushing to provide
adequate protection from sharp and abrasive surfaces
For fire rate building structures – be fire sealed to a level that matches the designed Fire
Rating of the building structure and additionally must meet any independent fire sealing
assessment requirement of the Building Code of Australia, fire regulations or other statutory
body
Where penetrations are made through building structures that are exposed to the entry of
moisture and gas, the penetration must be sealed from the ingress of water and gas.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 256 of 269
L 9.13 Cabling Installation
1. The SCS and electrical cable must be separated by a minimum distance as specified in the
‘Mandatory Requirements (i.e. AS/ACIF S009). All SCS cables must be labelled at each end
2. Where SCS cable reticulate horizontally on cable trays, ducts or catenary wire they must be
fastened at regular intervals with cable ties or Velcro to Manufacturer’s recommendations
3. Cable ties, if utilised, must be loosely tied so as not to deform the outer sheath of any cables
being attached
4. Where SCS cables are reticulated vertically through different levels of a building the cable
must be lowered rather than raised during installation
5. SCS cables must be installed to meet manufacturer’s requirements and SCS cables must be
reticulated by using constant and controlled force that does not exceed the manufacturer’s
recommended maximum pulling tension. Installers must ensure that when reticulating
cables during installation that the bending radius and pulling tension specified by the cable
manufacturers is not exceeded.
6. Installers must ensure to protect the SCS cable against external sheath damage from sharp
and abrasive edges during installation, Installers must ensure that kinking, twisting or
otherwise damaging the cable sheath and crushing of cables does not occur during
reticulation of the cabling. Installers must leave some spare capacity at each end of the cable
route (2m uncoiled) to allow for future moves and changes or restoration of accidental or
malicious damage
7. Installers must ensure that the SCS cabling is always protected from the following
environmental factors during the reticulation phase:
a. SCS cables must not be left unattended across the floor surface where any form of
personnel or vehicular traffic may come into contact with it
b. SCS cables must not be left in wet situations
i. Where SCS cables are bundled and hanging in a position above the final
termination location for any period of time, care must be taken to ensure
that the minimum bending radius and pulling tension specified for the cable
is not exceeded
c. All fibre, UTP and voice grade cables that is run underground must meet the
requirements of AS/CA S008 for underground cables. Please Note: Not all
indoor/outdoor cables meet this requirement
L 9.14 Communications Cabinet Cabling
Cables emanating from the cabinets must be neatly loomed in the cabinet, on a minimum 150mm
tray (sized appropriately to accommodate horizontal cables) to the ceiling access (or floor access).
Cables within the cabinets must be loomed in such a way as not to obstruct the mounting
equipment in the cabinets. The cable reticulation path within the cabinet must be chosen such that
any future cables may be installed easily without disturbing active equipment.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 257 of 269
L 9.15 Communication Cabinet Earth
All cabinets must be earthed to the communication earth terminal (CET) or protective earth (PE)
system in accordance with AS/ACIF S009. All necessary cable and termination devices must be
supplied and installed to provide a fixed and permanent low impedance earth to the cabinet. The
University does not deem earth created by installing a cabinet power rail connected to a Socket
Outlet as sufficient.
The communication cabinet earth cable sheath must be green and yellow. The earth cable size must
be sized to ensure maximum impedance of 1 ohm. The table below has been provided as a guide
only, and it is the installation contractor’s responsibility that the one ohm requirement is met.
Table 3 – Cable Size
Cable Size
2.5 mm
4.0 mm
6.0 mm
16.0 mm
35.0 mm
Nominal Cable
135 metres
275 metres
324 metres
869 metres
1908 metres
A Licensed Electrical Contractor or an A class Electrical worker must carry out the termination of the
earth cable from the CET into the electrical distribution board. The CET must be installed externally
to the confines of the electrical distribution board.
Installations and terminations of the earth system from the communication cabinet to the CET may
be performed by registered communications cablers who do not hold an electrical licence. The CET
must be labelled ‘Communication Earth Terminal’ using 6mm black letters on whited trifoliate
material
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 258 of 269
L 10 Labelling
L 10.1 Communication Cabinets
The door to the cabinet location must have an engraved label 200mm x 50mm. The labels must be
self-adhesive multi-layered laminated and engraved with 10mm upper case black lettering on a
white background (e.g. P-2 Central). The labels must be located on the front and rear of each rack,
near the top. The labelling convention must indicate distributor and cabinet number.
L 10.2 Fibre Optic Patch Panels
1. Labelling conventions for optical fibre cables must have the format – From / To / Cable Size /
Class – where:
a. From is the local cabinet identifier
b. To is the remote cabinet identifier
c. Cable Size is the number of backbone cores (numbered in ascending order from left
to right above or below each fibre coupler)
d. Class is the grade of fibre either 62.5µm or 50µm for existing fibres, or 50µm OM3 or
OS1 for new installations.
Table 4 – Example- Optical Fibre Cables Labels
From
To
P-2-Central
JB-1-East
1
2
3
4
5
6
Cable Size
12 core
7
8
9
Class
50µm OM3
10
11
12
2. The fibre patch panels can utilise the manufacturer supplied label if it complies with the
above. If not, then clearly labelled using P-Touch or Brother type self-adhesive labels with
4mm upper case black lettering on a white background.
L 10.3 Class E Backbone Patch Panels
1. Labelling conventions for UTP backbone cables must have the format – From / To / Category
/ Class – where:
a. From is the local cabinet identifier
b. To is the remote cabinet identifier
c. Category is the performance level of the backbone cables (numbered in ascending
order from left to right above or below each RJ45 Jack)
d. Class is the grade of 4 pair UTP
Table 5 – Example- Backbone Cable Labels
From
To
P-2-Central
JB-1-East
1
2
3
Category
6
4
Class
5
E
6
2. The UTP backbone patch panels can utilise the manufacturer supplied label if it complies
with the above. If not, then clearly labelled using P-Touch or Brother type self-adhesive
labels with 4mm upper case black lettering on a white background.
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 259 of 269
L 10.4 Voice Patch Panels
1. Labelling conventions for UTP backbone cables must have the format – From / To / Size /
Cable Type – where:
a. From is the local cabinet identifier
b. To is the remote cabinet/CD frame identifier
c. Size is the number of backbone pairs (numbered in ascending order from left to right
above or below each outlet)
d. Class is the grade of multi-pair UTP
Table 6 – Example- Backbone Cable Labels
From
To
P-2-Central
JB-1-East
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
24
13
Size
14
15
16
17
18
Voice
19
20
Cable Type
21
22
23
2. The voice backbone patch panels can utilise the manufacturer supplied label if it complies
with the above. If not, then clearly labelled using P-Touch or Brother type self-adhesive
labels with 4mm upper case black lettering on a white background.
L 10.5 Horizontal Patch Panels
Telecommunication outlets and associated patch panels must be labelled as follows:
•
•
•
Category 5 – 2000 outlets must be prefixed with A or B
Category 5e – 2003 outlets must be prefixed with AA or BB
Category 6 – 2003 outlets must be prefixed with A* or B*
Example: A*24 would typically indicate a Category 6/Class E data outlet, while B*24 would be its
matching Category 6/Class E data outlet which is usually used for analogue voice.
L 10.6 Telecommunications Outlets
Needs to be worded based on cabinet locations.
Example – Each dual outlet must be labelled designating the source cabinet. If there are multiple
cabinets per floor then east/west designation is recommended (Building/Floor/Position) e.g. C3West.L-2-Central. The apertures on each face plate must also be labelled – A*1 (left) and – B*1
(right) and designate the number of the source patch panel port (i.e. A*-1 B*-1). Both – A*1 – B*1
outlets must always have the same number.
Table 7 – Telecommunications Outlets Label
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 260 of 269
24
Additions to existing telecommunication outlets must be clearly labelled using P-Touch or Brother
type self-adhesive labels with 4mm upper case black lettering on a white background unless
otherwise specified.
Labelling in new buildings will require ISTS approval, suggestions are:
•
•
•
Engraving
Custom windowed plates
Other options that are difficult to vandalise
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 261 of 269
L 11 Testing
1. Progressive testing in the initial phases of the installation is highly recommended to ensure
all practices and procedures (e.g. pair terminations) are correct before the job is too far
advanced
2. Final testing must not proceed until all termination hardware and cabling has been
terminated and mounted in the final position with all labelling and documentation
completed so that the test results accurately reflect the actual installed cables and
connectors
3. The test results for all cables, connectors and outlets must be fully documented and
tabulated, identifying each cable and each outlet by its label. All test results must be
included in the as-built and onsite documentation and they must include tests for all cable
types
L 11.1 Fibre Optic Testing
Fibre optic testing must meet or exceed compliance requirements for fibre optic cabling systems as
specified in AS/NZS 3080 and test methodologies with AS/NZS ISO/IEC 14763.3.
L 11.1.1 Optical Attenuation
1. Fibre optic cable testing for Optical Attenuation must be carried out with a power meter and
light source on all fibre cores. Optical loss must be measured at 850 nm and 1300 nm for
multi-mode (OM3) and 1310 nm and 1550 nm for single mode (OS1) cables in two
directions. Each fibre core must be tested and tabulated from both ends of each fibre link,
i.e. A to B and then from B to A.
2. A hard copy summary of the power meter and light source test results is required on an ISTS
standard fibre reporting sheet and additionally, where available, a database version must be
included in the project documentation.
3. Referencing of the power meter and light source must be carried out using a one or three
patch cord method. All test cords (jumpers) must utilise reference connectors. Method used
for zeroing must be included with the test documentation.
4. Light budget must be calculated for all fibre permanent links and test results must be
assessed against the calculated light budget
5. Where the tested optical attenuation exceeds the test value, the installation contractor will
rectify the issue and retest the affected cores.
6. Averaging on power meter and light source test results in unacceptable
7. Launch conditions of the light source and associated test cord must meet the specified
requirement of AS/NZS ISO/IEC 14763.3.
L 11.1.2 Length
The length of the cable under test must be provided and can be confirmed by calculations from
sheath markings or from test equipment.
L 11.1.3 Propagation Delay
Propagation delay must be provided for each fibre cable and can be obtained using a calculation
from length or from test equipment
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 262 of 269
L11.1.4 Continuity and maintenance of polarity
Continuity and maintenance of polarity does not need to be tested if optical attenuation has been
obtained by power meter and light source.
L 11.1.5 OTDR
OTDR testing must only be used to support light source and power meter testing used for
compliance. OTDR results may be included in a project specification.
•
•
•
For underground installations to provide a graphical representation of the cable route and
identify installation issues
Obtain accurate length measurement
Where the fibre cable traverses through public areas
OTDR testing for installed cables must utilise a launch and tail cord.
L 11.2 4-Pair UTP Backbone and Horizontal Testing
1. All telecommunication outlets and 4-pair UTP backbone cables must be tested. They must
meet or exceed compliance/conformance test requirements of AS/NZS 3080 or ISO/IEC
11801 or their replacement.
2. All outlets and 4-pair UTP backbone cables must be tested against permanent link
requirements. The tester must be a University approved tester as detailed:
a. Fluke DTX 1200 and 1800
b. ISTS approved tester
3. Correct adapters must be used for all tests
4. Only results displaying Pass or Pass* (conditional/marginal passes) will be accepted
5. Tests carried out must be to the latest standards. All test results must be provided in the
most detailed format using the cable test report management software inherent to the test
instrument vendor in the electronic database format.
6. All telecommunication outlet test result identifiers (label) must, as a minimum, detail the
distributor that it was fed from along with the outlet number. All backbone cable test results
must, as a minimum, identify the source and destination distributors and the number of the
cable.
7. Testing must be undertaken with the main unit at the equipment rack end and the remote
unit at the outlet end. The Contractor must replace and retest any termination or cable that
is faulty at no additional cost. Any cable not meeting the aforementioned transmissions
standards must be replaced at the expense of the Contractor
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 263 of 269
L 12 Project Documentation
Refer to ‘Section 3 – Standard Submission Requirements’ for general requirements. Project
documentation submissions must include the following information as a minimum (to be provided to
ISTS prior to the commissioning of the building):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Simple line diagram that describes the number of distributors, numbers of
telecommunication outlets (Class) from each distributor, fibre backbone links (Class and core
count) and voice backbone links (pair count)
Drawings (building plans) marked with cabinet and outlet positions with label identifications.
Main cable reticulation and pathway routes
Full test reports for each UTP copper cable in hard copy (summary only) and electronic
database format (full detailed report)
Full test reports for each core of the fibre optic cables in hard copy text format and/or Excel
spreadsheet format and/or electronic database format (full detailed report)
Signed ‘Certificate of Compliance’ to ACMA regulations (TCA1 form)
Signed ‘Certificate of Compliance’ to AS 3000 regulations
Warranty documentation and manufacturer certificates
NATA ‘Statement of Compliance’
SECTION L –TELECOMMUNICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE
Page 264 of 269


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA


MINIMUM LEVEL
DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS


M
ARCHITECTURAL
SECTION
A Introduction
B Safety in Design
C Design Controls
D HVAC/Mechanical
E Electrical and Lighting
F Fire Protection and Detection Services
G Plumbing
H Building Management System
SECTION
I
Vertical Transportation
J Security Systems
K Audio Visual Technology
L Telecommunications Infrastructure
x M Architectural
Version: 2.0 : January 2016

Contents
M 1 General Requirements .......................................................................................................................267
M 1.1 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 267
M 2 External Walls & Windows .................................................................................................................267
M 2.1 External Finishes .................................................................................................................................. 267
M 2.2 Avoidance of Façade Staining .............................................................................................................. 267
M 2.3 Window Cleaning ................................................................................................................................. 267
M 3 Internal Walls, Partitions & Finishes ...................................................................................................267
M 3.1 Acoustics .............................................................................................................................................. 267
M 3.2 Fire Rating ............................................................................................................................................ 267
M 3.3 Operable Walls ..................................................................................................................................... 268
M 3.4 Toilets ................................................................................................................................................... 268
M 4 Interior Finishes Guidelines ................................................................................................................268
M 4.1 New Buildings....................................................................................................................................... 268
M 4.2 Refurbishment or Maintenance Projects ............................................................................................. 268
M 4.3 Interior Selections ................................................................................................................................ 268
M 4.4 Readily Available Ranges...................................................................................................................... 269
M 4.5 Interior Finishes Proposals ................................................................................................................... 269
M 4.6 Interior Finishes & Furniture Schedule ................................................................................................ 269
SECTION M –ARCHITECTURAL
Page 266 of 269
M 1 General Requirements
M 1.1 Introduction
It is expected that this section is read in conjunction with all other sections of the ‘Minimum Level
Design and Construction Specifications’, in order to achieve a fully comprehensive understanding of
the University requirements.
All works undertaken at the University must comply with the requirements of NATSPEC
specifications and the designers must use this, plus the University specific modified clauses as a basis
for their specifications.
M 2 External Walls & Windows
M 2.1 External Finishes
As‐constructed finishes that minimise future maintenance shall be the designer's highest priority.
Paint finishes to external walls may be acceptable but ease of maintenance, particularly ease of
access, must be thoroughly considered and require approval by FMU Maintenance & Technical
Services before paint to external walls may be used.
All materials shall be selected for their likely availability and colour consistency over a 15‐year
building period. All materials and finishes must be approved by Capital Projects Director.
M 2.2 Avoidance of Façade Staining
Facade staining must be avoided by careful design and detailing to shed water clear of the building,
clear of lower projections and clear of pathways. Parapet cappings must be designed to ensure
facade staining is avoided.
M 2.3 Window Cleaning
All external surfaces of glass must be easily accessible for cleaning from pedestrian areas, by
Elevating Work Platform or twin rope access. Details shall be submitted for approval to FM
Maintenance & Technical Services.
M 3 Internal Walls, Partitions & Finishes
M 3.1 Acoustics
Particular attention shall be paid to acoustics and noise transmission (refer Design Controls).
Partitions requiring to be insulated shall only utilise ‘Dacron’ polyester fibre or natural wool batts of
thickness and density, and/or double sheeted on one or both sides as necessary to achieve the
sound transmission loss between spaces.
Details of intersections of partitions, including window and door openings, shall ensure sound
insulation is maintained at that intersection equivalent to the remainder of the partition. Partitions
may extend from floor slab to underside of slab above if necessary. All penetrations shall be
appropriately sealed to maintain the required sound rating.
M 3.2 Fire Rating
Particular attention must be paid to fire-rated partitions to ensure that any penetrations comply
with the manufacturer’s recommendations for tested systems.
All cladding products and systems must meet fire safety requirements as specified under
the Building Code of Australia.
SECTION M –ARCHITECTURAL
Page 267 of 269
M 3.3 Operable Walls
The use of operable walls is not favoured. Operable walls may only be used with the express
approval of the Capital Projects Director.
Operable walls must be a proprietary system (‘Hufcor’ or equal approved) and have an acoustic
rating equal to the other walls of the room.
Structural support of the tracking is to be overdesigned to prevent sagging, distortion and
movement. Consideration is to be given to health and safety risks in the operation of the wall,
including pinch points and manual handling.
M 3.4 Toilets
Toilet cubicle doors must have hold open spring hinges (doors to be in open position when cubicle
not in use). Hinges must allow the ability to remove shut doors (cubicle occupied) in an emergency
where an occupant becomes incapacitated.
Toilet roll holders, paper towel dispensers and soap dispensers are supplied and regularly serviced
by a contractor. In women’s toilets, provision must be made for sanitary disposal units in all
cubicles. The freestanding units are supplied and regularly serviced by a contractor. A shelf must be
provided in wash up areas on which to rest books or bags. Hooks and mirrors must also be provided.
M 4 Interior Finishes Guidelines
M 4.1 New Buildings
Proposals for new interior schemes are to be approved by the Contract Supervisor before final
documentation. New finishes should be compatible with the standards that are already in place on
each campus.
M 4.2 Refurbishment or Maintenance Projects
The interior design and selection of finishes for refurbishment projects is to be guided by the UniSA
Standard Interior Finishes Schedule relevant to the respective building, floor level and campus.
Where a UniSA Standard Interior Finishes Schedule does not exist for a building or floor level, the
following is to guide the approach to interior selections:
For small refurbishment projects, equivalent in size to two offices, interior finishes selections are to
match existing. Where existing products are no longer available, proposed alternatives are to be
approved by the Contract Supervisor.
For substantial refurbishment projects, these Interior Finishes Guidelines are to direct the
development of a new interior finishes scheme.
M 4.3 Interior Selections
Long-term interior elements and finishes are to be timelessly classic in their selection. The
integration of trend setting finishes is to be limited to finishes which will be upgraded within a 5-year
lifespan. All materials, finishes and furniture selected are to be certified as suitable for Heavy Duty
Commercial applications.
The choice of finishes and furniture and the detailing of interior schemes are to take into
consideration cleanability and maintainability. Finishes that are difficult to clean and maintain, or
SECTION M –ARCHITECTURAL
Page 268 of 269
that require a high level of maintenance are not to be selected. The placement of light fittings must
take into consideration the practicality and WHS considerations for lamp replacement.
Highlight / feature / accent interior elements are to be limited to easily and cost effectively
renewable and replaceable interior finishes and elements. For example, the selection of laminates
with a limited fashionable currency / lifecycle is to be strictly avoided.
M 4.4 Readily Available Ranges
All interior selections are to be made from readily available standard ranges, irrespective of the
flexibility that larger projects offer interior design selections. Other than in extenuating
circumstances, UniSA will not accept the selection and specification of special runs or one-off items.
All interior selections will be from locally or nationally available ranges. Items with long lead times
for supply are to not to be specified. Similarly, items with purchasing constraints such as minimum
quantity orders are also to be avoided.
Exceptions to this clause will only be considered when a local alternative cannot be sourced and
when accurate information on availability origin, lead-time and cost implications is submitted to the
Contract Supervisor for consideration and direction. Exceptions to this clause are only to be
specified following receipt of written approval from the Contract Supervisor.
Standard fabrics in general teaching areas so that chairs are easily recognised and replaced to the
correct areas as well as to assist in transferring between campuses and matching in replacements.
M 4.5 Interior Finishes Proposals
Proposals for new interior finishes schemes are to be submitted for approval for all new construction
projects. These are to include:
•
•
•
Interior design concept proposal drawings.
Samples of proposed materials, finishes and colours, with details of their lifecycle and
maintainability assessment. .
Proposed interior finishes schemes are subject to approval by the Contract Supervisor.
M 4.6 Interior Finishes & Furniture Schedule
Within one month of the completion of the project, the final Interior Finishes & Furniture Schedules
are to be submitted to the Contract Supervisor in hard copy and electronic version.
SECTION M –ARCHITECTURAL
Page 269 of 269
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