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TIBCO iProcess® Modeler
Getting Started
Software Release 11.6
January 2016
Two-Second Advantage®
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TIBCO Software Inc. Confidential Information
| iii
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v
Related Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Other TIBCO Product Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Typographical Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Connecting with TIBCO Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Join TIBCO Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Access TIBCO Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Contact TIBCO Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
xi
xi
xi
xi
Chapter 1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
TIBCO iProcess Modeler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Defining Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Overview of Creating a Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Chapter 2 Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
Displaying Procedure Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Creating a Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Defining the Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Defining a Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Defining the Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Creating a Second Step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Linking Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Deleting a Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Moving Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Saving the Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Closing TIBCO iProcess Modeler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Checking the Procedure Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Testing a Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Releasing a Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Where To Find More Information On Defining Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
iv
| Contents
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
|v
Preface
This guide explains and demonstrates how to create basic iProcess procedures
using a combination of the following products:
•
TIBCO iProcess® Workspace (Windows)
•
TIBCO iProcess Modeler
•
Related Documentation, page vi
•
Typographical Conventions, page viii
•
Connecting with TIBCO Resources, page xi
Topics
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
vi
| Related Documentation
Related Documentation
This section lists documentation resources you may find useful.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Documentation
The following documents form the TIBCO iProcess Modeler and TIBCO iProcess
Workspace (Windows) documentation set, which are supplied with the TIBCO
iProcess Workspace (Windows) software:
•
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Installation Read this manual for
instructions on site preparation and installation.
•
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Release Notes Read the release notes for a
list of new and changed features. This document also contains lists of known
issues and closed issues for this release.
•
TIBCO iProcess Suite Documentation This documentation set contains all the
manuals for TIBCO iProcess Modeler, TIBCO iProcess® Workspace
(Windows), and other TIBCO products in TIBCO iProcess® Suite. The
manuals for TIBCO iProcess Modeler and TIBCO iProcess Workspace
(Windows) are as follows:
— TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) User’s Guide
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Procedure Management
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Basic Design
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Advanced Design
— TIBCO iProcess Modeler Integration Techniques
— TIBCO iProcess Expressions and Functions Reference Guide
— TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) Manager’s Guide
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
Preface vii
|
If you are new to iProcess procedure development, you are advised to follow the
reading path shown next. The documentation road map shows the relationships
between the books and online references in this product’s documentation set.
Getting
Started
Procedure
Management
Advanced
Design
Legend
PDF
Basic Design
Integration
Techniques
HTML
Eclipse help
Eclipse cheat sheet
Other TIBCO Product Documentation
You may find it useful to read the documentation for the following TIBCO
products:
•
TIBCO ActiveMatrix BusinessWorks™
•
TIBCO Business Studio™
•
TIBCO Enterprise Message Service™
•
TIBCO Hawk®
•
TIBCO Rendezvous®
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
viii
| Typographical Conventions
Typographical Conventions
The following typographical conventions are used in this manual.
Table 1 General Typographical Conventions
Convention
Use
SWDIR
TIBCO iProcess Engine installs into a directory. This directory is referenced in
documentation as SWDIR. The value of SWDIR depends on the operating system.
For example,
•
on a Windows server (on the C: drive)
if SWDIR is set to the C:\swserver\staffw_nod1 directory, then the full path
to the swutil command is in the C:\swserver\staffw_nod1\bin\swutil
directory.
•
on a UNIX or Linux server
if SWDIR is set to the /swserver/staffw_nod1 directory, then the full path to
the swutil command is in the /swserver/staffw_nod1/bin/swutil
directory or the $SWDIR/bin/swutil directory.
Note: On a UNIX or Linux system, the environment variable $SWDIR should
be set to point to the iProcess system directory for the root and swadmin users.
code font
Code font identifies commands, code examples, filenames, pathnames, and
output displayed in a command window. For example:
Use MyCommand to start the foo process.
bold code
font
Bold code font is used in the following ways:
•
In procedures, to indicate what a user types. For example: Type admin.
•
In large code samples, to indicate the parts of the sample that are of
particular interest.
•
In command syntax, to indicate the default parameter for a command. For
example, if no parameter is specified, MyCommand is enabled:
MyCommand [enable | disable]
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
Preface ix
|
Table 1 General Typographical Conventions (Cont’d)
Convention
Use
italic font
Italic font is used in the following ways:
Key
combinations
•
To indicate a document title. For example: See TIBCO ActiveMatrix
BusinessWorks Concepts.
•
To introduce new terms. For example: A portal page may contain several
portlets. Portlets are mini-applications that run in a portal.
•
To indicate a variable in a command or code syntax that you must replace.
For example: MyCommand PathName
Key name separated by a plus sign indicate keys pressed simultaneously. For
example: Ctrl+C.
Key names separated by a comma and space indicate keys pressed one after the
other. For example: Esc, Ctrl+Q.
The note icon indicates information that is of special interest or importance, for
example, an additional action required only in certain circumstances.
The tip icon indicates an idea that could be useful, for example, a way to apply
the information provided in the current section to achieve a specific result.
The warning icon indicates the potential for a damaging situation, for example,
data loss or corruption if certain steps are taken or not taken.
Table 2 Syntax Typographical Conventions
Convention
Use
[ ]
An optional item in a command or code syntax.
For example:
MyCommand [optional_parameter] required_parameter
|
A logical OR that separates multiple items of which only one may be chosen.
For example, you can select only one of the following parameters:
MyCommand param1 | param2 | param3
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
x
| Typographical Conventions
Table 2 Syntax Typographical Conventions (Cont’d)
Convention
Use
{ }
A logical group of items in a command. Other syntax notations may appear
within each logical group.
For example, the following command requires two parameters, which can be
either the pair param1 and param2, or the pair param3 and param4.
MyCommand {param1 param2} | {param3 param4}
In the next example, the command requires two parameters. The first parameter
can be either param1 or param2 and the second can be either param3 or param4:
MyCommand {param1 | param2} {param3 | param4}
In the next example, the command can accept either two or three parameters.
The first parameter must be param1. You can optionally include param2 as the
second parameter. And the last parameter is either param3 or param4.
MyCommand param1 [param2] {param3 | param4}
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
Preface xi
|
Connecting with TIBCO Resources
How to Join TIBCO Community
TIBCO Community is an online destination for TIBCO customers, partners, and
resident experts. It is a place to share and access the collective experience of the
TIBCO community. TIBCO Community offers forums, blogs, and access to a
variety of resources. To register, go to the following web address:
https://community.tibco.com
How to Access TIBCO Documentation
Documentation for this and other TIBCO products is available on the TIBCO
Documentation site:
https://docs.tibco.com
Documentation on the TIBCO Documentation site is updated more frequently
than any documentation that might be included with the product. To ensure that
you are accessing the latest available help topics, please visit us at
https://docs.tibco.com.
How to Contact TIBCO Support
For comments or problems with this manual or the software it addresses, contact
TIBCO Support as follows:
•
For an overview of TIBCO Support, and information about getting started
with TIBCO Support, visit this site:
http://www.tibco.com/services/support
•
If you already have a valid maintenance or support contract, visit this site:
https://support.tibco.com
Entry to this site requires a user name and password. If you do not have a user
name, you can request one.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
xii
| Connecting with TIBCO Resources
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
|1
Chapter 1
Introduction
This chapter gives an overview of how to define procedures and explains the
components of iProcess Suite you need to use.
Topics
•
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows), page 2
•
TIBCO iProcess Modeler, page 3
•
Defining Procedures, page 4
•
Overview of Creating a Procedure, page 6
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
2
| Chapter 1
Introduction
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows)
The TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) is the single focal point for defining
and managing procedures. The TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows) consists
of:
•
The Work Queue Manager
•
The Procedure Manager
The Work Queue Manager displays users’ queues and work items and the
Procedure Manager displays all of the procedures currently available. From the
Procedure Manager, you can:
•
create and edit procedures. The TIBCO iProcess Modeler is started from the
TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows).
•
organize and manage your procedures as a hierarchical structure of procedure
libraries, in the same way as, for example, you manage files and directories.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
TIBCO iProcess Modeler 3
|
TIBCO iProcess Modeler
TIBCO iProcess Modeler has one primary objective and that is to make the
analysis and documentation of business processes as simple and intuitive as
possible. It is aimed at a non-technical audience and gives you a visual
representation of your business process that is easy to follow and that can be
enhanced or amended at any time. TIBCO iProcess Modeler builds on the familiar
flowchart metaphor to show in an unambiguous manner, the flow of work for a
particular business process. The rules that you define graphically are stored by
the iProcess Engine node and can then be deployed across a wide ranging
hardware architecture.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler is automatically started by TIBCO iProcess Workspace
(Windows) when you want to create or edit procedures. From TIBCO iProcess
Modeler you can access Step Definer, which enables you to design the forms for
each step in your procedure. The forms are the part of the step seen by the person
who receives the work item in their queue. The forms contain text and fields into
which users can enter information for a particular case, or instance, of a
procedure. Fields can also display information already provided or can hold
information calculated by the procedure.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
4
| Chapter 1
Introduction
Defining Procedures
Procedures are at the very heart of iProcess Suite operations, and, as a
procedure/process definer, your role is vital to the successful use of iProcess
Suite. You are the one who will decide how to translate manual procedures and
paper documents into iProcess procedures and forms. In effect, you will be using
the iProcess Suite to generate custom software applications designed to meet the
specific needs of your organization.
As a procedure definer, you will need to have a basic understanding of how the
iProcess Suite works. Since you will be designing forms for both users and
managers, you will want to know how the iProcess Suite looks from their
perspectives.
In brief, the iProcess Suite works by integrating electronic mail with the
management of text, forms and data. It constructs messages, memos, letters, or
complex documents with text and blanks to be filled in and routes them to the
appropriate individuals according to the rules that you establish.
By definition, an iProcess procedure is a series of steps that accomplish a task.
Each step consists of five possible parts:
•
An addressee (user, group or role)
•
A form the addressee receives
•
An action that takes place after the addressee completes the form
•
A deadline by which the addressee must complete the form
•
The duration between the step being active and released.
The flow of the procedure (from one step to the next) is controlled by a series of
conditions and actions that you specify. An iProcess step could be compared to
sending a blank or partially filled in form, or a memo that requests information;
and then, on the basis of that information, deciding what to do next to accomplish
the overall goal.
As a procedure definer, you will be working closely with the iProcess system
administrator, the person who is responsible for maintaining all central iProcess
data, including users and groups, attributes, roles, lists and tables.
You will use users, groups and roles when you define addressees. You will use
attributes, lists and tables when you define the forms the addressees will receive.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
Defining Procedures 5
|
Regardless of the type of system you use, all work that you do as a procedure
definer will be stored in a special work space set aside for this purpose. You will
be free to create and test procedures in a realistic environment without affecting
the iProcess Suite's normal operations. When you are satisfied that your
procedure accomplishes its goal, you can release the procedure and make it
available to other iProcess users.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
6
| Chapter 1
Introduction
Overview of Creating a Procedure
The process of creating an iProcess procedure can be divided into five steps:
1. Decide where the procedure should be stored in your procedure management
hierarchy. Procedures can be stored in procedure libraries which you can use to
organize your procedure objects.
2. Plan the procedure. This involves studying the manual procedure and breaking
it down into its components. These will be the steps in your iProcess
procedure. This process also involves identifying addressees and designing
forms.
3. Create the steps that make up the procedure. This includes fully defining
addressees, forms, actions, and deadlines.
4. Test and edit the procedure until it accomplishes its goals. During the testing
process, which will emulate actual cases of your procedure, you will be able to
see what your procedure users will see when they access their work queues.
The editing process uses exactly the same options as creating a procedure does
to refine and adjust the new procedure.
5. Release the procedure for general use. Even after you release your procedure you
will remain the procedure owner on record, with the ability to make changes
if necessary and to respond to exceptional cases.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
|7
Chapter 2
Getting Started
This tutorial covers the basics of defining a procedure using Procedure Manager,
iProcess Modeler and Step Definer. It takes approximately one hour to complete.
After completing this tutorial, you will be able to perform the following tasks:
Topics
•
Displaying Procedure Manager, page 8
•
Creating a Procedure, page 9
•
Defining the Procedure, page 10
•
Closing TIBCO iProcess Modeler, page 17
•
Checking the Procedure Status, page 18
•
Testing a Procedure, page 19
•
Releasing a Procedure, page 20
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
8
| Chapter 2
Getting Started
Displaying Procedure Manager
To display Procedure Manager in Work Queue Manager, do one of the following:
•
Click Window > View Procedure Manager to display Procedure Manager in
place of Work Queue Manager.
•
Click Window > Split Left Hand Window to split the left hand window in
Work Queue Manager to display both the work queues list and Procedure
Manager.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
Creating a Procedure 9
|
Creating a Procedure
To create a new procedure, do the following:
1. From the Procedure Manager window, double-click the Procedure
Management library. The list of available libraries is displayed.
2. Navigate to the library where you want to create the new procedure.
3. Click Procedure Management > New Procedure. The New Procedure dialog
is displayed.
4. Type ORDER in the Procedure Name field.
5. Make sure that Main Procedure is selected as the Procedure Type.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
10
| Chapter 2
Getting Started
6. Click OK. A Process Definer window is started.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
Defining the Procedure 11
|
Defining the Procedure
This section describes how to define a simple two step procedure. It covers the
following topics:
•
Defining a Step
•
Defining the Form
•
Creating a Second Step
•
Linking Steps
•
Deleting a Link
•
Moving Steps
•
Saving the Procedure
Defining a Step
This section describes how to define the first step of the procedure.
1. Click the Step tool
on the toolbar to select it, position the pointer where
you want the step to appear (typically, just to the right of the Start icon) and
click to place the step.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
12
| Chapter 2
Getting Started
The Step Definition dialog is displayed. (If you have TIBCO iProcess™ Client
(VBA) installed, the Step Definition dialog includes extra options).
2. Enter the Name you want to call the step.
In this example use the name DETAILS. It doesn’t matter if you use lower or
upper case for the name as iProcess automatically converts it to upper case.
The name can be a maximum of 8 characters with no spaces.
3. Enter the Description, which can be up to 24 characters. Describe this step as
Receive Order Details. The description will remain in lower or upper case
just as you type it.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
Defining the Procedure 13
|
4. Click the Addressees tab. Every step must have an Addressee. An Addressee
is the queue that will receive this step when a case of the procedure is run.
There are three ways to specify who the addressee(s) of a step should be Users, Roles and Fields. These are all covered in depth in “Defining a
Procedure” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Basic Design guide but for this
example you only need the Users column. Under the Users column you can
enter the name of the queue (either a user or group) that will receive this step.
5. Enter your own iProcess user name and click the Definition tab to return to
the Step Definition dialog.
To be designated as an addressee, you must be a valid iProcess user or group.
Users and groups are added in User Manager in TIBCO iProcess
Administrator. See Managing Users in TIBCO iProcess Workspace (Windows)
Manager’s Guide.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
14
| Chapter 2
Getting Started
Defining the Form
The next stage is to design the form for the step. The form is what appears at
run-time when the work item is selected from a queue or, if it is the first step in
the procedure, when a case is started. A form can contain text and also fields
where the user can enter information.
1. Click Edit in the iProcess Form section from the Step Definition dialog. The
Process Step Definer is displayed.
2. Enter the following text on the form:
Defining Fields
As you want the user of the procedure to enter the customer name, you must
define a field that they can type into when they are filling in the form. To do this:
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1. Click Field > Define... The Field Definition dialog is displayed.
2. In the Field Name box, type Customer. This will be the name of your first
field.
Field names can be up to 15 characters long and can contain letters, digits and
underscore characters but they must start with a letter. Field names are
converted to uppercase irrespective of how they are originally entered.
All of the different field types are discussed in detail in “Creating Fields and
Forms” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Basic Design guide.
3. For the Customer field, keep the default field type of Text.
4. To change the field length, click in the Length box at the bottom of the
window and change the value from 20 to 30.
5. Click Add. The field details you entered are saved and you can define another
field.
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6. Define three more fields:
— A text field called Custref with a length of 12.
— A text field called Item with a length of 25.
— A numeric field called Price. The length of Price should be 8 with 2 decimal
places.
The length of a numeric field includes the decimal point and decimal places,
for example, a length of 8 gives us 00000.00.
7. Click OK when you have finished adding fields. You can always add more
fields later if you need to.
Inserting Fields into the Form
You can now place the fields you have defined on the form. To do this:
1. Place the cursor a few spaces after the text Name of Customer:
You can use TAB and SPACE to move the cursor to the position on the line where
you want the field to start.
2. Click Field > Insert. The Mark Field dialog is displayed.
3. Click Customer from the Field list.
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4. Click Required for the field’s Origin.
The Origin of a field defines how the field is going to be used in the form. The
origins are:
Origin
Meaning
Required
The user must fill in this field. If a Required field is not
completed the form cannot be released. In TIBCO iProcess
Workspace (Windows) required fields appear on the form
in red.
Optional
The user can enter information into this field but does not
have to. The form can be released without an optional
field being filled in. Optional fields appear in blue (white
at runtime).
Display
The current value for the field is displayed in the form but
it cannot be changed.
Calculated
A value for the field is calculated and displayed based on
a specified calculation. See “Controlling Data Input on
Forms” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Basic Design guide
for information on using field calculations.
Hidden
A value is calculated but not displayed in the form. See
“Controlling Data Input on Forms” in the TIBCO iProcess
Modeler - Basic Design guide for information on using field
calculations.
Embedded
Displays the value of the field (but not any remaining
spaces up to the length of the field). This origin is often
used in letters as at run-time it appears as part of the form
body rather than a field. See “Controlling Data Input on
Forms” in the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Basic Design guide
for information on using embedded and ampersanded
fields.
5. Click OK. The field is displayed at the cursor position.
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6. Repeat this for the rest of the fields:
Field
Origin
Custref
Optional
Item
Required
Price
Required
Your form should now look like this:
If you can’t see the field names, choose Form > Setup > Show Field names.
Saving the Form
It is important to save your form at regular intervals to ensure that you don’t lose
any of your work in the event of a power failure or other problem:
1. Click Form > Save Changes. The form is saved.
2. Click Form > Exit to close the Step Definer and return to the iProcess
Modeler.
Creating a Second Step
Now that your first step is complete, you can create a second step.
1. Following the steps described in Defining a Step on page 10, create a step
using a step name of CONFIRM and a description of Confirmation of Order.
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For the Addressee, choose the name of a colleague who is a user on the
iProcess system.
2. In the form, enter the following text:
3. Insert the two fields, Item and Price, after the text Item and Price, but this time
choose the origin as Display (see “Creating Fields and Forms” in the TIBCO
iProcess Modeler - Basic Design guide for more information about inserting
fields). Display can be used on this step as the value for these fields will have
been entered in the previous step.
4. Save and close the form to return to the iProcess Modeler.
Linking Steps
Now that you have two steps in your procedure, you need to link them together
to define the order in which iProcess should process them. You must also link the
first step to the Start icon. (See “Defining a Procedure” in the TIBCO iProcess
Modeler - Basic Design guide for more information on linking objects). The link tool
is automatically selected when you move the cursor near an object. The cursor
and description change when you move the cursor to the correct position to add a
link.
1. The simplest way to link the two steps is to click on the right side of the Start
icon and drag the cursor to the left side of the first step, DETAILS, and
release.
2. Click on the right side of the first step, DETAILS, and drag the cursor to the
left side of the second step, CONFIRM, and release.
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Your procedure will now look like this.
When you link two steps in this way, the second one becomes an action that is
carried out when the first step is released.
Deleting a Link
If you create a link in the wrong place, for example, connecting to the top or
bottom of an icon, it can have a different meaning (see “Defining a Procedure” in
the TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Basic Design guide for more information on linking
objects). You can delete any link by selecting the line then pressing the Delete key.
Moving Steps
You can move the steps in your procedure by selecting the step or steps, then
dragging and dropping the objects to a new position on the iProcess Modeler
layout. Any links to other steps will automatically be re-drawn.
Saving the Procedure
You should now save your procedure. To do this:
1. From the iProcess Modeler, click Procedure > Save or click
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Defining the Procedure 21
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2. If the Save Comment dialog is displayed, enter a comment describing the
reason why the procedure has been created.
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Closing TIBCO iProcess Modeler
When you are ready to close iProcess Modeler, click Procedure > Exit. If you have
a procedure open that you have made changes to, you are asked if you want to
save the procedure.
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Checking the Procedure Status
Every procedure has a status depending on its stage of development and working
life. From the Procedure Manager, the Procedure Details list in the right hand side
of the window shows the procedure objects in the currently selected library. By
default the Status of each object in the library is shown. If you navigate to the
library that contains your procedure, you will see that the status of the procedure
is Unreleased.
When you first define a procedure it is only available to you, the procedure
definer, as it is under development. When you run a case of an unreleased
procedure, all work items go to test queues belonging to you. Testing a Procedure
on page 19.
The iProcess Administrator user has access to all procedures irrespective of who
owns them.
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Testing a Procedure
Now that you have a complete two-step procedure, you need to test it to make
sure that it is correct before releasing it for other iProcess users to use.
1. From Work Queue Manager, click the Case Start button.
2. The Case Start dialog is displayed. In the Procedure Type section of the
dialog, select Unreleased. All available procedures of that type are listed
(along with the version number).
3. Click the ORDER procedure and enter a Case Description. The Case
Description is used to identify the case and is usually displayed in the Work
Queue Manager.
4. Click Start.
The form of the first step is displayed for you to complete and release.
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This step will also appear in your work queue in the test queues folder.
You may need to click the Rebuild List button, or click Rebuild Queues List
from the Queues menu, to see your test queue.
Because your procedure is unreleased, all the work items related to the
procedure will go to your test queues. The test queues are named after the
addressee of the step.
Test queues are completely separate from your own work queue containing
work items from released procedures. Test queues are not visible to any other
users.
5. Enter information into the fields in the first step, then release it by double
clicking the release icon
in the lower left corner of the form.
The release icon is not available until you have filled in all required fields.
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6. The Work Queue now shows a second test queue that contains the second
step of your procedure.
You can open the Work Item and release it straight away as there are no input
fields on the form.
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Releasing a Procedure
Once you have tested your procedure and have verified that it works correctly
(for example, that the forms look the way you want them, that the steps go to the
correct addressees, that the information being collected is shown correctly), you
can return to the Procedure Manager and release the procedure.
1. In the Procedure Manager, select the ORDER procedure.
2. Click Procedure Management > Release Procedure. A dialog is displayed
showing the procedures and versions that will be released and withdrawn if
you continue.
3. Enter a Release Comment describing why the procedure is being released.
4. Click Start. The progress meter shows the progress of the operation, and a tick
appears next to the procedure as it is released.
5. Click Close to close the dialog when the procedure has been released.
Your procedure is now available to all iProcess users on this iProcess installation.
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Where To Find More Information On Defining Procedures
You can find more information about defining procedures from the following
guides.
•
The TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Basic Design guide explains basic procedure
design including:
— the types of procedure objects that can be placed in a procedure and how to
link them together.
— creating fields and forms that can be attached to a step.
— performing calculations on fields.
— defining a deadline in a procedure.
— setting up a condition so that a branch in the process flow can be added.
— defining a withdraw action so that a step can be withdrawn from the work
queue if it is no longer required.
— defining a wait in a procedure.
— making procedures easier to follow.
— customizing the Process Definer.
— troubleshooting procedure definitions.
•
The TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Advanced Design guide explains more complex
procedure definition design including:
— defining sub-procedures.
— defining sub-procedure calls.
— the use of array fields which are used in conjunction with dynamic
sub-procedures and graft steps.
— creating templates for use with dynamic sub-procedure calls and graft
steps.
— defining a dynamic call to multiple sub-procedures.
— using scripts.
— using case prediction.
— setting priorities and escalating work items.
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Where To Find More Information On Defining Procedures 29
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•
The TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Procedure Management guide explains how to
manage your libraries and procedures including:
— managing procedures, libraries and shortcuts.
— managing procedure versions.
— setting and/or viewing properties, access controls and status information
for different types of procedure objects.
•
The TIBCO iProcess Modeler - Integration Techniques guide explains how to
integrate your procedure with other external applications such as databases or
custom applications including:
— an introduction to the iProcess Suite’s integration layers and the integration
options available.
— using EAI steps in your procedures to control updates to external systems
and iProcess case data under transactional control.
— how to set up graft steps so that external applications can dynamically start
sub-procedures and “graft” them to the main procedure at run-time.
— how to define public and event steps that can be published by external
applications.
— how to use an external form application in place of the iProcess Modeler’s
own form window for one or more steps of a procedure.
— how to open a form window for any step of a procedure without starting
or accessing a case.
— how to set up event steps so that an action will occur when a particular
event happens.
— how you can create reports on iProcess case data and then view them using
a third party data viewer application.
— the types of command you can use to help integrate iProcess with your
applications. For example, you can use a command to run an external
program.
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
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Index
A
I
Action 4
Addressee 4
Inserting a field in a form 16
L
C
Linking steps 19
Checking procedure status 23
Closing the Process Definer 22
Creating a procedure 6
customer support xi
M
Moving steps 20
D
Deadline 4
Defining
field 14
form 14
procedure 4
step 11
Deleting links 20
Duration 4
P
Procedure 4
creating 6
defining 4
releasing 24
saving 20
status 23
testing 24
F
R
Form 4
defining 14
inserting a field in 16
saving 18
Releasing a procedure 24
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
32
| Index
S
Saving
form 18
procedure 20
Step 4
defining 11
linking 19
moving 20
support, contacting xi
T
technical support xi
Testing a procedure 24
TIBCO iProcess Modeler Getting Started
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