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PREFACE
This Sampling
Analysis
and Analysis
Plan (Section
Plan
(SAP) consists of two sections:
I) and a Quality
Assurance
plans have been prepared for field investigation
(Site 2) at Marine
Project
activities
Corps Base (MCB), Camp Lejeune,
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Sampling
II).
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Jacksonville,
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TABLE
OF CONTENTS
Page
1.0
INTRODUCTION
...................................................
1.1
Site Description and Setting
.....................................
1.1.1
Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune
........................
1.1.2
Site 2 - Former Nursery/Day Care Center ..................
1.2
Site Background - Site 2 .........................................
1.2.1
Types and Volumes of Waste Present ......................
1.2.2
Potential Transport and Exposure Pathways ...............
1.2.3
Present Database Limitations
............................
l-l
l-2
l-2
l-10
1-13
1-13
1-13
1-15
2.0
DATA QUALITY
OBJECTIVES
.....................................
2.1
Stage 1 - Identification
of Decision Types .........................
2.2
Stage 2 - Identification
of Data Needs .............................
2.3
Stage 3 - Design Data Collection Program
.........................
2-1
2-l
2-5
2-9
3.0
SAMPLING
LOCATIONS
AND FREQUENCY
......................
3.1
Site 2 - Former Nursery Day Care Center .........................
3.1.1
Geophysical Investigation
................................
3.1.2
Soil Investigation
.......................................
3.1.3
Concrete Pad Sampling
..................................
3.1.4
Groundwater Investigation
..............................
3.1.5
Surface Water/Sediment
Investigation
....................
3.2
QAIQC Samples ................................................
3-l
3-1
3-l
3-l
3-8
3-9
3-13
3-17
4.0
SAMPLE
4-l
5.0
INVESTIGATIVE
PROCEDURES
..................................
5.1
Soil Sample Collection
..........................................
5.1.1
Soil Borings Advanced by Hand Auger ....................
5.1.2
Soil Borings and Monitoring
Well Boreholes
...............
5.2
Monitoring
Well Installation
....................................
5.2.1
Shallow Monitoring
Wells ................................
5.2.2
Deep Monitoring
Wells
..................................
5.2.3
Well Development
.......................................
5.3
Groundwater
Sample Collection
.................................
5.3.1
Groundwater Samples Collected from Monitoring
Wells
5.4
Surface Water Sample Collection
................................
5.5
Sediment Sample Collection
.....................................
5.6
Decontamination
Procedures
....................................
5.6.1
Field Measurement
Sampling Equipment
.................
5.6.2
Large Machinery and Equipment
.........................
5.7
Geophysical Investigation
.......................................
5.7.1
Electromagnetic
Terrain Profiling
........................
5.7.2
Ground Penetrating
Radar ...............................
5.8
Surveying
.....................................................
/-
DESIGNATION
..........................................
ii
.....
5-l
5-1
5-l
5-2
5-4
5-4
5-8
5-8
5-10
5-10
5-11
5-13
5-15
5-15
5-19
5-21
5-21
5-22
5-24
‘I
TABLE
OF CONTENTS
(CONTINUED)
5.9
5.10
6.0
SAMPLE
HANDLING
6.1
Sample Program
6.2
6.3
6.4
7.0
Handling of Site Investigation
Generated Wastes ..................
5.9.1
Responsibilities
.........................................
............
5.9.2
Sources of Investigation
Derived Wastes (IDW)
5.9.3
Designation of Potentially
Hazardous and
Nonhazardous IDW
.....................................
5.9.4
Labeling
...............................................
5.9.5
Container Log ..........................................
5.9.6
Container Storage .......................................
59.7
Container Disposition
...................................
5.9.8
Disposal of Contaminated
Materials
......................
.....................................
Water Level Measurements
SITE MANAGEMENT
7.1
7.2
AND
ANALYSIS
.............................
Operations
.....................................
Chain-of-Custody
...............................................
Logbooks and Field Forms .......................................
Sample Logbook ................................................
..............................................
Field Team Responsibilities
Reporting Requirements
.....................................
........................................
. ..
111
5-24
5-24
5-25
5-26
5-27
5-28
5-28
5-29
5-29
5-30
6-1
6-l
6-l
6-l
6-9
7-l
7-l
7-l
LIST
OF TABLES
Number
a
2-l
2-2
Conceptual Site Model and RI/FS Objectives for Site 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Summary of Data Types and Data Quality Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . .
2-2
2-7
3-1
Summary
of Sampling
and Analytical
Programs
at Site 2 . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-4
6-1
Summary
of Sampling
and Analytical
Programs
at Site 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6-2
LIST
OF FIGURES
Number
h
l-l
l-2
l-3
l-4
l-5
MCB Camp Lejeune Vicinity Map ......................................
Geologic and Hydrogeologic
Units in the Coastal Plan of North Carolina
Generalized Hydrogeologic
Cross-Section
...............................
Hydrogeologic
Cross-Section at Site 2 ...................................
Site 2 Study Area .....................................................
3-l
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
Site
Soil
Site
Site
Site
5-l
5-2
Typical
Typical
6-l
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
COC Record ..........................................................
CustodySeal
.........................................................
Sample Label
........................................................
Test Boring Record ...................................................
Test Boring/Well
Construction
.........................................
Sample Log ..........................................................
...
l-3
l-5
l-6
1-8
1-11
:2 Soil Sampling Locations
.........................................
Gas Survey Sampling Locations ....................................
2 - Groundwater Sampling Locations
...............................
2 - Surface Water/Sediment
Sampling Locations, Site 2 Area .........
2 - Surface Water/Sediment
Sampling Locations, North of Site 2 ......
Shallow Groundwater
Shallow Groundwater
Monitoring
Monitoring
Well Construction
Well Construction
iv
Diagram
Diagram
....
....
3-3
3-10
3-11
3-14
3-15
5-7
5-9
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-10
6-11
6-12
1.0
INTRODUCTION
Marine
Corps Base (MCB)
Response, Compensation,
November
Camp Lejeune
and Liability
4, 1989 (54 Federal
was placed on the Comprehensive
Act (CERCLA)
Register
National
41015, October 4, 1989).
the United
States Environmental
Protection
Department
of Environment,
Department
of the Navy (DON) entered into a Federal
Health
Priorities
Agency (EPA)
and Natural
Environmental
List (NPL) effective
Subsequent
RegionIV,
the North
Resources (DEHNR),
Facilities
to this listing,
Carolina
and the United
Agreement
States
(FFA) for MCB
Camp Lejeune.
The scope of the FFA included
study (RI/F8
the implementation
at 23 sites throughout
MCB
prepared for Site 2 (Former Nursery/Day
This Field Sampling
and Analysis
detail
tasks identified
1992). The guidance
are’ carried
Support Activity
sufficient
various
(NEESA)
quantity
media,
technologies
estimate
portion
number
EPA Region
to evaluate
health
Objectives)
programs
and types of samples,
in the RI/F’S Work
Locations
numbering
scheme to be followed for identifying
procedures
(e.g., drilling,
5.0 (Investigative
groundwater
Procedures).
are of
of contamination
and to evaluate
and setting
the Data Quality
and the frequency
and Frequency).
and Environmental
in
potential
media.
identifies
described
field
activities
the field investigation
risks,
in
Work Plan for Site 2
and magnitude
and environmental
of contaminated
the various
Energy
during
that
by describing
and data collection
IV and Naval
the nature
(Sampling
Section
Study (RI/FSl
of this section presents the background
Section 2.0 (Data Quality
the field sampling
with
human
has been
Carolina.
to be used to implement
practices so that data obtained
for remediation
The remaining
methods
also helps to ensure that sampling
and quality
Plan
for all field activities
Investigation/Feasibility
out in accordance
Work
Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North
and data collection
in the Remedial
An RI/FS
Care Center).
purpose of the FSAP is to provide guidance
the sampling
(Baker,
Camp Lejeune.
investigation/feasibility
Plan (FSAP) describes the proposed RI field activities
are to be conducted at Site 2 at Marine
The primary
of a remedial
Plan
Sample
l-l
1992).
are discussed
The media,
in Section
3.0
describes the sample
the samples.
decontamination,
handling
(D&OS) for each of
(Baker,
Designation)
and tracking
sampling,
Objectives
of sampling
Section 4.0 (Sample
of each of the sites.
The investigative
etc.) are presented
and analysis
is described
in
in
Section 6.0 (Sample
organization
1.1
Handling
and responsibilities
Site Description
This section
description
and Analysis).
briefly
of personnel
describes
the description
of each site is provided
focuses on the
associated with the field sampling
events.
and setting
of the sites.
A more
in Section 2.0 in the RI/F’S Work Plan (Baker,
Base Camp
This section provides
an overview
Marine
7.0 (Site Management)
and Setting
Corps
1.1.1
Section
detailed
1992).
Lejeune
of the physical
features
associated
with
MCB
Camp
County,
North
Lejeune.
1.1.1.1
Marine
Location
and Setting
Corps Base Camp Lejeune
Carolina.
The facility
covers
is located within
approximately
River, which flows in a southeasterly
Atlantic
the coastal plain in.Onslow
170 square miles
direction
and forms a large estuary
Ocean. The eastern border of Camp Lejeune
and northwestern
Jacksonville,
boundaries
North Carolina,
and is bisected
is the Atlantic
are U.S. 17 and State Route
borders Camp Lejeune
before entering
shoreline.
24, respectively.
to the north.
by the New
the
The western
The City
of
The MCB Camp Lejeune
is
depicted in Figure l-l.
1.1.1.2
History
Construction
of the base started
base are centered.
geographical
Development
in 1941 at Hadnot
at the Camp
Point,
Lejeune
locations
under
the jurisdiction
Camp Geiger, Montford
Point,
Courthouse
located in the Mainside
(Water and Air Research, 1983).
1.1.1.3
Topography
The generally
North Carolina
where the major functions
complex
of the Base Command.
Bay, Mainside,
is primarily
of the
in five
These areas include
and the Rifle Range Area.
Site 2 is
and Surface Drainage
flat topography
coastal plain.
of MCB Camp Lejeune
Elevations
is typical
of the seaward portions
of the
on the base vary from sea level to 72 feet above mean
1-2
FIGURE 1-1
OPERABLE UNITS AND SITE LOCATIONS AT
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
&aCE U.S.G.S. WATER-RESOURCES
SVESTICATlows REPORT 89-4096
JACKSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
sea level (msl); however, the elevation
of most of Camp Lejeune
is between 20 and 40 feet
above msl.
Drainage
at Camp Lejeune is generally
which drain
natural
into the Atlantic
drainage
toward the New River, except for areas near the coast,
Ocean via the Intracoastal
has been altered by asphalt,
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Waterway.
In developed
storm sewers, and drainage
has mapped the limits
areas,
ditches.
of the loo-year
floodplain
at Camp
Lejeune at 7.0 feet above msl in the upper reaches of the New River (Water and Air Research,
1983).
The elevation
of the loo-year
floodplain
increases
near the coastal area (Water and Air Research,
1.1.1.4
MCB
Regional
of the Atlantic
Coastal Plain
and limestone.
lenses that gently dip and thicken
and nine confining
pre-Cretaceous
These sediments
to the southeast
units which overlie
age. These sediments
United
column
upper
approximately
1.1.1.5
Regional
The following
in marine
time.
Castle Hayne,
The combined
Less permeable
clays,
in interfingering
Figure
beds and
they comprise
basement
or near-marine
10
rocks of
environments
1-2 presents a generalized
hydrogeologic
indicate
by confining
Beaufort,
that the Base
units of silt and clay.
Peedee, Black
thickness
of these
clay and silt beds function
units which separate the aquifers
A generalized
sands, clays, calcareous
are layered
aquifers separated
Cape Fear aquifers.
aquifers.
The
Survey (USGS) studies at MCB Camp Lejeune
1,500 feet.
semiconfining
province.
igneous and metamorphic
to Quaternary
the water table (surficial),
and lower
physiographic
(ESE, 1991). Regionally,
were deposited
by seven sand and limestone
These include
Plain
for this area (ESE, 1991).
States Geological
is underlain
Coastal
consist of interbedded
and range in age from early Cretaceous
stratigraphic
1983).
is located in the Atlantic
shell beds, sandstone,
aquifers
to 11 feet above msl
Geology
Camp Lejeune
sediments
downstream
Creek, and
sediments
as confining
and impede the flow of groundwater
cross-section
of this area is presented
in Figure
is
units
or
between
l-3.
Hvdropeoloay
summary
of regional
hydrogeology
(1989).
l-4
was originally
presented
in Harned
et al.
FIGURE
l-2
GEOLOGIC
AND HYDROGEOLOGIC
THE COASTAL
PLAIN
OF NORTH
UNITS
CAROLINA
IN
Castle Hayne aquifer
Oligocene
River Bend Formation
Eocene
Paleocene
Castle Hayne Formation
Beaufort
Upper Cretaceous
Black Creek and
Middendorf Formations
Cape Fear Formation
Lower Cretaceou&)
Pre-Cretaceous
basement
Unnamed
deposits(r)
--
rocks
confining
aquifer
[email protected])
Formation
Peedee Formation
Cretaceous
Beaufort
Beaufort
Peedee confining unit
Peedee aquifer
Black Creek confining
Black Creek aquifer
Upper
Upper
Lower
Lower
Lower
Lower
Cape Fear
Cape Fear
Cape Fear
Cape Fear
Cretaceous
Cretaceous
confining unit
aquifer
confining unit
aquifer
confining uni
aquifer(l)
--
(1) Geologic and hydrologic units probably not present beneath Camp Lejeune.
(2) Constitutes part of the surficial aquifer and Castle Hayne confining unit in the study area.
(3) Estimated to be confined to deposits of Paleocene age in the study area.
Source:
Harned
et al., 1989
1-5
unit
APPROXIMATE
OF HADNOT
NORTH
LOCATlON
POINT INDUSTRIAL
AREA
otm.ow~couKTY
Jc+4Eacoucry
FEEr
200
1
SA LEva
200
400
600
800
1.000
1,200
1,400
1.600
VERTICAL
SECTION
1,800
SCALE
GREATLY
LOCATED
EXAGGERATED
IN FIGURE
4
2,000
SOURCE:
ESE,
1991
Baker EnYlrormentrl*r
FIGURE 1-3
GENERALIZED
HYDROGEOLOGIC
JONES AND ONSLOW COUNTIES,
MARINE
CORPS
JACKSONVILLE.
CROSS-SECTION
NORTH CAROLINA
BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
The surficial
aquifer is a series of sediments,
to depths of 50 to 100 feet. No laterally
in this interval
during
previous
primarily
extensive
clay confining
subsurface investigations
water supply in this part of the Base. The principal
series of sand and limestone
series of sediments
sand and clay,which
commonly
extend
units have been encountered
in the area. This unit is not used for
water-supply
aquifer
for the Base is the
beds that occur between 50 and 300 feet below land surface. This
generally
is known as the Castle Hayne aquifer.
is about 150 to 350 feet thick in the area and is the most productive
The Castle Hayne aquifer
aquifer in North
Carolina.
Figure 1-4 is a geologic cross section of the subsurface near Site 2.
The aquifers
Although
that lie below the Castle Hayne
levels in wells tapping
or is transpired
generally
the surficial
aquifer
vary seasonally.
in the winter than in the summer
by plants
is highest
1.1.1.6
they
in the Camp Lejeune area.
receives more recharge
aquifer
when much of the water evaporates
before it can reach the water table.
in the winter months
The surticial
and lowest in summer
Therefore,
the water table
or early fall.
Surface Water Hvdroloav
The following
Assessment
summary
drainage
of surface water hydrology
was originally
presented
in the Initial
Study (Water and Air Research, Inc., 1983).
The dominant
surface water feature
at MCB
Camp Lejeune
is the New River.
It receives
from most of the base. The New River is short, with a course of approximately
miles on the central
coastal plain
flows in a southerly
direction
Inlet.
sequence of sand and clay.
some of these aquifers are used for water supply elsewhere in the Coastal Plain,
contain saltwater
Water
consist of a thick
of North
Carolina.
and empties
At MCB Camp Lejeune,
into the Atlantic
Ocean through
50
the New River
the New River
Several small coastal creeks drain the area of MCB Camp Lejeune that is not drained
the New River and its tributaries.
connected to the Atlantic
These creeks flow into the Intracoastal
Ocean by Bear Inlet,
Brown’s Inlet,
Waterway,
and the New River Inlet.
by
which is
(Water
and Air Research, 19831.
Water quality
15 of the North
criteria
Carolina
into two classifications,
shellfishing)
for surface waters in North
Administrative
SC (estuarine
and SA (estuarine
Carolina
have been published
Code. At MCB Camp Lejeune,
under Title
the New River falls
waters not suited for body contact sports or commercial
waters
suited
1-7
for commercial
shellfishing).
The
SC
(SITE 2 )
SOUTH
u
CI
Route 24
50
J
Quaternary
and Miocen
FEET
7
w
q
rux
u
Ia o2
HP-704
BREWSTER BLVD.
OW-3
HP-645
1
$-ru
5
T-7
de
HOLCOMB BLVD.
T-4 OW-4 T-5
1
I"
.-.
SEA LEVEL
-
50
-
100 .
150
'
-.-.
200
250
300
350
400
450
.-.
Middle Eocene
POTENTIAL CONFINING UNIT
(LATERAL EXTENT UNCERTAIN)
T-2
- .
HP-642
classification
Hadnot
applies to three areas of the New River at MCB Camp Lejeune
Point
classification
1.1.1.7
Marine
The rest of the New River
area.
Camp
Lejeune
falls
into
the
the SA
(ESE, 1991).
Climatology
Corps Base Camp Lejeune experiences
average yearly rainfall
region
at MCB
including
is greater
mild winters
than 50 inches, and the potential
varies from 34 inches to 36 inches of rainfall
summer
seasons usually
equivalent
receive the most precipitation.
be 33°F to 53°F in the winter (i.e., January)
are generally
and hot and humid
south-southwesterly
The
evapotranspiration
per year.
Temperature
and north-northwest
in the
The winter
and
ranges are reported
and 71°F to 88°F in the summer
in the summer
summers.
to
(i.e., July).
Winds
in the winter
(Water
and Air Research, 1983).
1.1.1.8
Natural
The following
Resources and Ecolotical
summary
of natural
Features
resources and ecological
features
was obtained
from the
IAS Report (Water and Air Research, 1983).
Approximately
60,000 of the 112,000 acres of Camp Lejeune
Forest management,
natural
beauty,
soil protection,
species. Upland
quail,
turkey,
management
Aquatic
provides wood production,
prevention
game species including
and migratory
are under forestry
increased wildlife
populations,
of stream pollution,
black bear, whitetail
waterfowl
are abundant
management.
enhancement
and protection
of endangered
deer, gray squirrel,
and are considered
of
fox squirrel,
in the wildlife
programs.
ecosystems
on MCB
numerous
tributaries,
freshwater
and saltwater
produce optimum
Camp Lejeune
consist of small
creeks, and part of the Intracoastal
Waterway.
fish species exist here. Freshwater
yields and ensure continued
lakes, the New River
variety
of
ponds are under management
to
harvest of desirable
A wide
estuary,
fish species (Water
and Air
Research, 1983).
Wetland
ecosystems
at MCB Camp Lejeune
pine or pocosin; sweet gum/water
oak/cypress
can be categorized
and tupelo;
maple; tidal marshes; and coastal beaches.
l-9
into five habitat
sweet bay/swamp
types:
pond
black gum and red
The Natural
Resources and Environmental
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
have entered
might
into an agreement
inhabit
and protection
management
is designated
for the protection
Habitats
programs.
plans to prevent
or mitigate
15 miles of Camp Lejeune
are three publicly
Hofmann
Forest; and Camp Davis Forest.
primarily
used for agriculture.
(Water and Air Research,
1.1.1.9
species that
for the
the base’s forest
to such species and critical
and
habitat
adverse effects of base activities.
osprey, bald eagles, cougars,
(Water and Air Research, 1983).
owned forests: Croatan
The remaining
crops include
land surrounding
soybeans, small
National
Forest;
Camp Lejeune
grains,
is
and tobacco
19831.
Land Use
Camp Lejeune
civilian
presently
population
a training
facility
area to prepare
during
Marine
Division.
here as tenant
Marines
60,000.
conflicts,
Fleet Marine
Military
and
World War II, Camp Lejeune was used as
This has been a continuing
function
of the
and the recent Gulf War (i.e., Desert Storm).
as a home base for the Second
Force (FMF) units also have been stationed
commands.
Nursery/Day
Care Center
section addresses the background
An environmental
photographic
for this site by the USEPA.
1992).
1.1.2.1
and Setting
Site Location
and setting
interpretation
of Site
2 (Former
center (EPIC)
Site specific results of this study are included
RI/FS Work Plan (Baker,
Site 2 is located approximately
(Figure
170 square miles.
War II, the camp was designated
Since that time,
Site 2 - Former
Center).
During
for combat.
the Korean and Vietnam
the end of World
1.1.2
covers an area of approximately
is approximately
Toward
This
Typical
Commission
at MCB Camp Lejeune
of alligators,
woodpeckers
Resource
and threatened
species through
is provided
dusky seaside sparrows, and red-cockaded
Within
are maintained
and sightings
of MCB Camp Lejeune,
Wildlife
of endangered
Full protection
is placed on habitat
Division
Carolina
of rare and endangered
in management
Special emphasis
(NREA)
and the North
MCB Camp Lejeune.
preservation
wildlife
Service,
Affairs
Nursery/Day
Care
study was conducted
in Appendix
A of the
3 miles east of the New River and 0.5 miles south of Route 24
l-1). The site is depicted in Figure
l-5. The study area for this site includes
l-10
two areas
FIGURE 1-5
STUDY AREA
SITE 2
SOURCE UNTDN. OCT. 1991
MARINE CORPS EASE CAMP LEJEUNE
JACKSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
A
/ d Q /D!A Z
.\/
of concern:
the Building
712 area and the Former Storage Area. The entire site is bounded
woodlands
to the north and south, and by Holcomb
which trend northwest
make
to southeast,
up the eastern boundary
Boulevard
run through
of the Building
to the west.
by
Railroad
tracks,
the center of Site 2. The railroad
tracks
‘712 area and the western
boundary
of the
Former Storage Area.
Building
712 was previously
concrete
mixing/washing
encompasses
1.1.2.2
pads are located
approximately
remainder
storage,
behind
handling
and mixing
(to the east of) Building
area.
712.
Two
Site
2
2 acres.
Site Topography
The topography
used as a pesticide
and Drainage
of Site 2 is fiat.
There is a gravel parking
lot to the east of the building.
The
of the site is a grass lawn.
There are two drainage
drainage,
ditches which run parallel
from the mixing/wash
west side of the railroad
tracks.
to both sides of the railroad
aerial photos included
Surface drainage
from the Former
Site History
Building
712 is currently
was used for the storing,
The Former
A potential
tracks.
drainage
being used as a personnel
to the west was identified
in
handling,
and dispensing
From 1945 to 1958 this building
of pesticides.
The building
day care center (ESE, 1990). On-site day care activities
Storage Area was reportedly
located in the southeastern
information
available
1.1.2.4
Site Geology and Hvdrogeolonv
regarding
underlies
was later used
ceased in 1982.
portion
is no longer present.
of the site (ESE,
There is limited
the previous uses of this area.
geologiclhydrogeologic
sands reportedly
Area is into the
Water in the ditch appears to flow
pathway
of&e..
1990). This area is now vacant and the storage structure
Site-specific
Storage
in the EPIC study.
1.1.2.3
as a children’s
Surface
pad area of the site, is into the ditch which runs along the
ditch which runs along the east side of the railroad
to the north, toward Overs Creek.
tracks.
the site.
information
is limited.
The water table
1-12
A sequence of clays, silts,
was measured
and
at 7 to 20 feet below
ground surface (bgs). Well locations
are shown on Figure 1-5. Groundwater
flow is generally
to the southeast (ESE, 1990).
1.2
Site Background
This section
summarizes
transport
and exposure
assessing
human
information
Limited
pathways,
information
Organochlorine
soil
samples
pesticides
and xylene
Fuel-related
further
evaluation
number
Transport
Based on the evaluation
transport
Transport
of pesticide
the sites,
summary
materials
volatile
compounds
organic
compounds
(VOCs)
such as naphthalene
such as
were
corner of the study
the extent of soil, groundwater,
at. Site 2, an estimation
of the vertical
at this site cannot be made; therefore,
with the existing
the volume
data.
Pathways
conditions
at, Site 2, the following
potential
contaminant
have been identified:
Pathways
l
Surface soil runoff from the Pesticide
l
Surface soil runoff from the Former
l
Sediment.
in drainage
and
at Site 2.
and Exposure
and exposure pathways
migration
of
at this
surface water, sediment
of soil samples collected
of existing
handled
in groundwater,
is needed to determine
extent of soil contamination
Potential
This
near the former storage area in the southwestern
of waste present. at the site cannot be estimated
1.2.2
to characterizing
objectives (D&OS) in Section 2.0.
and semivolatile
and surface water contamination
and horizontal
at each site, probable
alternatives.
the volume
were detected
toluene,
Based on the limited
related
and evaluating
regarding
on site.
In general,
wastes
of Waste Present
is available
detected in groundwater
sediment
risks,
collected
ethylbenzene,
of known
and data limitations
and ecological
and Volumes
site.
area.
the types and volume
will be used to define the data quality
Types
1.2.1
- Site 2
Mixing/Wash
Pads to the drainage
Storage Area to the drainage
ditch to Overs Creek.
1-13
ditch.
ditch.
Leaching
of sediment
Migration/leaching
contaminants
to surface water.
of contaminants
in the concrete mixing
and washing
pads to the
soil.
Migration/leaching
Groundwater
Exposure
of soil contaminants
infiltration
to groundwater.
from the shallow aquifer to the deep aquifer.
Pathwavs
Wildlife
exposure to contaminants
Wildlife
(e.g. burrowing
animals)
due to incidental
dermal
sediment
exposure
and soil ingestion.
to contaminants
in soil and
sediment.
Human
exposure to contaminants
dermal
exposure.
Human
exposure ,to contaminants
contaminated
Potential
concrete mixing
human
due to incidental
soil and sediment
due to incidental
dermal
exposure
ingestion
and
to potentially
and wash pads.
exposure from future
potential
groundwater
ingestion
(the shallow
aquifer is not used as a potable water supply).
Potential
Human
human
dermal
exposure to VOCs due to volatilization
exposure to contaminations
from groundwater.
due to future potential
groundwater.
l
Potential
human
exposure due to ingestion
l-14
of contaminated
wildlife.
direct contact with
1.2.3
Present
Database
Limitations
The purpose of this section is to define data limitations
the site, assessing
technologies.
health
and environmental
With the exception
methods
investigations
at the site are not available
human
and the level of QA/QC
data is not reliable
health
or ecological
risks.
sampling
potential
and analysis
documented.
characterize
A summary
characterizing
19921,
for previous
Consequently,
the site or to make
of media-specific
feasible
(Baker,
to which they were subjected
or adequately
to fully
or evaluating
risks,
of recent groundwater
the analytical
the existing
with respect to either
much of
an assessment
data limitations
of
is presented
below.
The results of previous
sampling
the presence of pesticide
efforts
(August
contaminants
in the soil.
three feet of soil. In addition,
the specific sampling
was limited
pesticide
to organochlorine
overall data quality
soil contamination,
remedial
Sample
collection
locations
and herbicide
1986) at Site 2 indicate
was limited
are unknown.
parameters.
to the top
Sample
analysis
The level of QA/QC
and
are unknown,
Based on the review of existing
ecological
1984 and November
information,
approximately
risks, evaluate
data will be required
delineate
to more fully characterize
areas of concern,
the extent of soil runoff to the drainage
assess human
health
ditch, and evaluate
and
potential
technologies.
Groundwater
Five shallow monitoring
samples
(Building
wells were installed
were also collected
646, Building
in December
616, Building
The water supply well locations
1,000
(Building
feet north
(Building
645) of the site.
No detection
volatile
organochlorine
(Building
1-15
Four water supply
They average
6161, east (Building
The monitoring
organics (1986 only).
1982.
l-4.
of any contaminants
herbicides,
in July 1984. Groundwater
645) were also sampled
are not shown on Figure
6461, south
pesticides,
1986 and March
647 and Building
water supply well samples (ESE, 1990).
organochlorine
on site and sampled
wells
in July 1984.
approximately
647),
and west
of concern was reported
for the
and supply wells were analyzed
tetrachlorodioxin
(1986
only)
for
and
During
previous
investigations,
pesticides
(DDD,
DDE, DDT) were detected
wells 2GWl
and 2GW3.
Volatile
monitoring
well 2GW3.
The level of QA/QC protocols
collected during
the previous investigations
Because of the limited
(2GW2,2GW3
analyzed
organic compounds
groundwater
(ethylbenzene,
and overall
Compound
data quality
information
List (TCL) organic
in July ,1992.
and Target
Analyte
in accordance with CLP protocols and Level IV data quality.
Pesticides
were not detected
detected
toluene)
in 2GW3.
in the samples
and a semivolatile
This
well
for samples
to scope the RI, three of the monitoring
parameters
(ethylbenzene,
were detected in
are unknown.
and 2GW5) were sampled by Baker personnel
for Target
toluene)
in monitoring
collected.
organic
Volatile
compound
also exhibited
volatile
concentrations
were detected
wells
The samples were
List (TAL) inorganic
organic
compounds
(naphthalene)
contamination
were only
during
previous
investigations.
Elevated
levels of total
Arsenic, cadmium,
metals
personnel
from a previous
large amount
Dissolved
investigation
of silt.
plumes,
Water Quality
During
purging
assess human
well contained
Contaminant
During,sampling,
a large amount
of silt.
A bailer
the well recharged
a
very slowly.
were below Federal MCL and NCWQS.
in order to more fully
in the vicinity-
health and ecological
(NCWQS).
2GW2.
well. The bailer also contained
(prior to sampling)
data are required
(particularly
Standard
had been left in the monitoring
metals concentrations
analytical
contamination
Carolina
noted that this monitoring
(filtered)
Additional
well
and lead were detected in levels above the Federal Maximum
Level (MCL) and/or the North
Baker
in monitoring
of 2GW31,
characterize
approximately
risks, and evaluate
groundwater
delineate
remedial
potential
technologies.
Sediment
The results of previous
the’ presence of pesticide
the surface
herbicides
quality
sediment.
sampling
efforts (August
1984 and December
(DDD, DDE, DDT) and herbicide
Sample
and tetrachlorodioxin
analysis
was limited
(1986 only).
1986) at Site 2 indicate
(2,4-D and 2,4,5-T) contaminants
to organochlorine
The level of QA/QC protocols
are unknown.
l-16
in
pesticides
and
and overall
data
Based on the review of existing
the extent
of sediment
approximately
evaluate
delineate
remedial
established
information,
contamination
data will be required
in the ditch
towards
areas of concern, assess human
technologies.
since pest control
In addition,
activities
its outlet
health
background
to more fully characterize
and ecological
pesticide
have been documented
at Overs
levels
throughout
Creek,
risks
and
need
to be
MCB
Camp
Lejeune .
Surface Water
The results of previous
pesticide
sampling
efforts (December,
(DDD, DDT) in the surface water.
pesticides,
organochlorine
herbicides,
protocols and overall data quality
Based on the review of existing
water quality
to evaluate
Concrete Pesticide
be required
nonhazardous
analysis
tetrachlorodioxin
was limited
and VOCs.
the presence of
to organochlorine
The level
of QAlQC
are unknown.
information,
potential
human
Mixing/Wash
No samples have been collected
Sample
1986) at Site 2 indicate
additional
data will be required
health and ecological
to assess surface
risks.
Pads
from the concrete mixing
to assess contaminant
nature of the material
levels
and wash pads at Site 2. Data will
in the concrete
for disposal purposes.
1-17
to evaluate
the hazardous
or
DATA
2.0
Data Quality
QUALITY
Objectives
OBJECTIVES
(D&OS) are qualitative
data of known and appropriate
quality
are obtained
remedial
decisions (EPA, 1987). Data Quality
program
are discussed and presented
using the following
and quantitative
Objectives
in this Section.
Stage 1 - Identify
decision types
l
Stage 2 - Identify
data needs
l
Stage 3 - Design data collection
of existing
identify
contaminant
further
data collection
information,
transport
associated with each field collection
Data Quality
Objectives
the scoping of the RI/FS.
development
of a conceptual
and exposure pathways,
were developed
This stage involves
model
for the site to
and the development
of objectives
for
efforts.
Stage 2 of the DQO process involves
to meet the objectives
Stage 3 involves
the RI and FS and will support
program
Stage 1 of the DQO process takes place during
required
that ensure that
three stage process:
l
the evaluation
during
statements
definition
established
of the quality
and quantity
of data that will be
in Stage 1.
design of a data collection
program
to meet the requirements
identified
in
Stage 2.
The remaining
portions
of this Section document
the establishment
of DQOs for the RUFS at
Site 2.
2.1
Stage 1 - Identification
of Decision
Tvpes
As part of the Stage 1 DQO process, available
and other sources (e.g., USGS) were reviewed
evaluate
in Section
From
existing
potential
2.0 of the RI/F’S Work
and evaluation,
the potential
receptors.
the conceptual
from previous
contaminant
Plan and summarized
a conceptual
sources of contamination,
A conceptual
site investigations
in order to describe the current
data, and assess the adequacy of the data.
this review
identifying
information
This review has been documented
in Section
site model
1.1 and 1.2 of this FSAP.
was developed
the contaminant
site model for each site is presented
transport/migration
site conditions,
migration
for each site by
pathways,
in Table 2-l.
and
Based on
model for each site, specific RI/FS objectives
2-l
1 1 lof3
TABLE
CONCEPTUAL
Site
2
_
SITE MODEL AND RI/FS OBJECTIVES
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE,
NORTH CAROLINA
Area of Concern
Building
‘712
2-1
Potential
l
Migration
FOR SITE
and Exposure Pathways
Surface soil runoff from Site 2 to drainage
ditch.
Site-Specific
l
l
l
Leaching of sediment
surface water.
l
Migration/leaching
of contaminants at the
concrete mixing and washing pad areas to
the soil.
Migration/leaching
of soil contaminants
in
the wash pad area to groundwater.
l
contaminants
to
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
2
Direct contact with surface soil by humans
and animals.
Direct contact with surface water/sediment
by humans and animals.
l
Direct contact with subsurface soils by
burrowing animals.
Direct contact with contaminated
concrete at
mixing and wash pads.
Human exposure from future potential
groundwater ingestion or dermal contact.
l
l
l
l
RI/FS Objectives
Assess the horizontal extent of surface soil
contamination
in this portion of Site 2.
Determine nature and extent of contamination in surface water/sediments in the
drainage ditch.
Determine the nature and extent of contamination in surface water/sediments in the
drainage ditch.
Determine the nature and extent of soil
contamination
under the concrete pads.
Assess the vertical extent of soil
contamination
within this portion of Site 2.
Assess the nature and extent of contamination in the shallow aquifer near this
portion of Site.
Assess the level and nature of contamination
in surface soils near this portion of Site 2.
Assess the level and nature of contamination
in surface water/sediment
near this portion
of Site 2.
Assess the level and nature of contamination
in subsurface soils near this portion of Site 2.
Assess the level and nature of contamination
in concrete at mixing and wash pads.
Assess the nature and extent of
contamination
in the shallow aquifer near
this portion of Site 2.
P
TABLE
CONCEPTUAL
Site
2 (Cont.)
Building
712
Former Storage Area
Potential
l
l
Migration
FOR SITE 2
and Exposure Pathways
Human exposure due to ingestion of
contaminated
wildlife.
Surface soil runoff from the Former Storage
Area to drainage ditch.
Site-Specific RI/FS Objectives
l
Qualify potential
l
Assess the horizontal extent of surface soil
contamination
in this portion of Site 2.
Determine the nature and extent of contamination in surface water/sediments in the
drainage ditch,
Determine nature and extent of contamination in surface water/sediments in the
drainage ditch.
Assess the vertical extent of soil contamination within this portion of Site 2.
Assess the nature and extent of contamination in the shallow aquifer near this
portion of Site 2.
Evaluate groundwater quality in the deep
aquifer (if contamination
is detected in the
shallow aquifer).
Assess the level and nature of contamination
in surface soils near this portion of Site 2.
Assess the level and nature of contamination
in surface water/sediment
near this portion
of Site 2.
Assess the level and nature of contamination
in subsurface soils near this portion of Site 2.
Assess the nature and extent of
contamination
in the shallow aquifer near
this portion of Site 2.
l
0
l
Leaching of sediment
surface water.
l
Migration/leaching
groundwater.
contaminants
to
of soil contaminants
l
to
l
l
l
Vertical groundwater
aquifer.
l
Direct contact with surface soil by humans
and animals.
Direct contact with surface water/sediment
by humans and animals.
l
Direct contact with subsurface soils by
burrowing animals.
Human exposure from future potential
groundwater ingestion or dermal contact.
l
l
a
a
of3
2-1 (Continued)
SITE MODEL AND RI/FS OBJECTIVES
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE,
NORTH
CAROLINA
Area of Concern
1
migration
to the deep
l
l
l
impacts/stresses
to wildlife.
11
TABLE
CONCEPTUAL
I
Site
I
Storage Area
Potential
Migration
),- 3of3
2-1 (Continued)
SITE MODEL AND RUFS OBJECTIVES
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE,
NORTH CAROLINA
Area of Concern
..
FOR SITE 2
Site-Specific RI/FS Objectives
and Exposure Pathways
l
Human exposure to VOCs due to
volatilization
from groundwater.
l
Human exposure due to ingestion
contaminated
wildlife.
l
of
l
Assess the nature and extent of
contamination
in the shallow aquifer near
this portion of Site 2.
Evaluate potential impact/stresses to
wildlife.
I
have been developed
potential
to (1) assess the nature
release of hazardous
and (3) identify
and evaluate
which are also presented
collection
of sufficient
The following
substances,
remedial
and extent of the threat
(2) assess human
alternatives.
health
posed by the release or
and environmental
The identification
risks,
of these objectives
in Table 2-1, is the first step toward the development
of a program
for
data for decision making.
section
identifies
the data
requirements
to meet
the site-specific
RI/FS
objectives.
2.2
Stage 2 - Identification
of Data Needs
In Stage 2 of the DQO process, the data quality
objectives
developed
during
Stage 1 are identified.
will be used for: human
and ecological
evaluating
and remedial
alternatives;
design.
The extent
required
to support the RI&S
Data collected during
risk assessment;
in the previous section, data will be required
l
and quantity
the RI/ES
site characterization;
With respect to the RIPS
for Site 2
screening
objectives
and
identified
to address the following:
of surface and subsurface
soil contamination
within
reported
disposal
areas.
l
The extent of surface soil contamination
l
The physical
properties
due to surface runoff.
of the soil to evaluate
migration
potentials
and remedial
technologies.
l
The
chemical
environmental
l
The chemical
properties
of the
risks, and to evaluate
properties
soil
to assess potential
remedial
human
health
and
technologies.
associated with disposal and treatment
requirements.
Groundwater
l
The extent and nature
of on site and off-site groundwater
and/or deep aquifers.
2-5
contamination
in shallow
l
The flow direction
and discharge
patterns
of the aquifers.
l
The chemical
properties
needed to assess potential
l
The chemical
properties
needed to evaluate
human
compliance
health risks.
with State or Federal drinking
water standards.
The chemical/physical
l
properties
that may affect the treatability
of the groundwater.
Sediments
The extent and nature of sediment
l
impacted
by site runoff or groundwater
The chemical
l
contamination
properties
in surface water bodies potentially
discharge.
to assess human
health
and environmental
of surface
potentially
risks
due to
exposure.
Surface Water
l
l
The extent
and nature
groundwater
discharge.
The chemical
properties
Concrete Pesticide
l
to assess human
Mixing/Wash
The hazardous
quality
are generally
contamination,
evaluating
health and environmental
nature
of the former
of data to meet the criteria
or
risks.
pesticide
mixing
pads to assess
listed above are summarized
levels differ with respect to the end use of the data.
required
in risk assessments,
characterizing
and to support the record of decision.
treatment
by site runoff
requirements.
The type of data and the quality
Table 2-2. The data quality
impacted
Pads
or nonhazardous
disposal and treatment
water
alternatives.
Level II data quality
2-6
the nature
Level III data quality
is appropriate
on
Level IV data
and extent
of
is appropriate
for
for field screening
(i.e.,
TABLE
SUMMARY
2-2
OF DATA TYPES AND DATA QUALITY
SITE 2, MCB CAMP LEJEUNE
Media
Sampling
Soil
Determine extent of surface and subsurface soil contamination
reported disposal areas
Determine
extent of surface soil contamination
Determine physical properties
remedial technologies
Groundwater
Criteria/Purpose
Data Types
within
due to surface runoff
of soil to evaluate migration
LEVELS
potentials
and
Determine chemical properties of soil to assess potential human health and
environmental
risks, and to evaluate remedial technologies
Determine chemical properties associated with disposal and treatment
requirements
Determine extent and nature of onsite and offsite groundwater
contamination
in shallow and/or deep aquifers
Determine physical properties of the aquifers and their physical relationship
between one another
Data Quality
Level
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Subsurface Features
(Geophysical Methods)
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Grain Size
Moisture Density
Total Organic Carbon
Chloride
Total Fluoride
Organic Nitrogen
Alkalinity
(total)
Total TCLP
IV
IV
II
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Total TCLP
Full RCRA Characterization
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Surface Features
(lithologic samples)
Water Level Elevations
(static and pumping)
Hydraulic Conductivity
Transmissivity
IV
IV
III
III
IV
IV
IV
IV
III
III
III
III
III
III
III
III
II
::
II
1
.I’
SUMMARY
Media
Groundwater
(Continued)
Sampling
Determine
Determine
flow direction
OF DATA TYPES AND DATA QUALITY
SITE 2, MCB CAMP LEJEUNE
Criteria/Purpose
chemical properties to assess potential
human health risks
Determine chemical properties to evaluate compliance with State or Federal
drinking water standards
Determine chemical/physical
properties that may affect treatment
Sediment
Surface Water
LEVELS
Data Types
and discharge patterns of the aquifers
Determine extent and nature of sediment contamination
in surface water
bodies potentially
impacted by site runoff, groundwater discharge, or tidal
effects
Determine chemical properties to assess human health and environmental
risks due to exposure
Determine extent and nature of surface water potentially impacted by site
runoff, groundwater discharge, or tidal effects
Determine chemical properties to assess human health and environmental
risks
Determine physic&chemical
properties to assess potential impacts to
aquatic life
-3I 2of2
Surface Features
(lithologic samples)
Water Level Elevations
(static and pumping)
Hydraulic Conductivity
Transmissivity
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Total Suspended Solids
Total Volatile Solids
Biological Oxygen Demand
Chemical Oxygen Demand
Total Organic Carbon
Total Dissolved Solids
Temperature
Specific Conductance
PH
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Total Organic Carbon
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Dissolved Oxygen
Specific Conductance
Temperature
pH
Data Quality
Level
II
II
II
II
IV
IV
IV
IV
III
III
III
III
III
I
:
IV
IV
IV
IV
III
IV
IV
IV
IV
:
I
I
geophysical
investigations,
soil gas). Level I data is appropriate
as dissolved oxygen, temperature,
The analytical
method
specific conductance,
it will be necessary to obtain
(e.g., EPA Method
used when applicable
The quantity
characterize
lower detection
8020).
of samples
collected
is based on obtaining
the nature and extent of contamination,
the two sites, the number
visual
of
Federal or State standards,
levels for selected parameters
EPA Methods
For purposes
such as volatile
and CLP protocols
will be
unless a method or protocol does not exist.
risks, and develop and evaluate
estimates,
levels against
For this RIIFS,
such
and pH.
also differs with respect to the end use of the data.
assessing health risks and to compare contaminant
organics
for field measurements
remedial
and location
evaluation
a representative
assess human
alternatives.
to
and environmental
For the various field investigations
of samples was determined
of the sites,
health
measure
and a review
at
based on best engineering
and evaluation
of background
information.
2.3
Stage 3 - Desipn
The data collection
Table
Data Collection
program
for Site 2 have been designed to meet the objectives
2-1. Section 5.4 of the RIiFS
sampling
programs
Program
Work Plan provides
for the four sites.
specific details of these sampling
Sections
programs.
2-9
a general
3.0 through
description
5.0 of this FSAP
identified
in
of the various
provide
the
3.0
SAMPLING
LOCATIONS
AND
This section of the FSAP identifies
FREQUENCY
each sample matrix
to be collected
and the constituents
to
be analyzed.
3.1
Site 2 - Former
Nursery
Day
Care Center
There are two areas of concern at Site 2: the Building
of pesticides)
and the Former
groundwater).
Samples
and investigation
Pad Sampling;
3.1.1
A geophysical
evaluate
include:
Groundwater
and mixing
contaminants
present
in shallow
from both areas of concern.
Geophysical
Investigation;
investigation
Investigation;
The various
sampling
Soil Investigation;
Surface Water/Sediment
will be conducted
an underground
storage
radar (GPR) or electromagnetic
define subsurface
(VOC
handling
Concrete
Investigation.
Investigation
whether
penetrating
Area
will .be collected
programs
Geophysical
Storage
712 area (storing,
conditions
results of the geophysical
(including
investigation
at the Former
tank
Storage Area section of Site 2 to
was or is present
terrain
profiling
in this
(EM) techniques
the presence of an underground
will be used to finalize
area.
Ground
will be used to
storage tank).
The
soil boring and monitoring
well
locations.
3.1.2
Soil Investigation
The following
Building
subsections
712 and Former
rig) at each location
describe the soil sampling
locations
and analytical
requirements
Storage Area at Site 2. Soil borings will be advanced (by a drilling
to collect surface and subsurface
soil samples.
Soil boring
locations
analytical
parameters
have been selected on the basis of the results of the EPIC
historical
information
and available
assessment
purposes,
at
a minimum
information
of 10 percent
regarding
of all soil samples
concern will be analyzed for full TCL organic and TAL inorganic
3-1
soil quality
parameters.
study, other
on site.
collected
and
For risk
at each area of
3.1.2.1
Buildinp
712
Soil boring
locations
at Building
analytical
requirements,
712 are presented
data quality
on Figure
level and analytical
3-l.
The number
turnaround
time
of samples,
are included
in
Table 3-1.
Nineteen
location
soil borings
(Figure
continuously
collected
3-l).
Split-spoon
by a drilling
soil samples
from the surface to groundwater
from the 0 to 6 inch interval
Subsurface
submitted
will be advanced
will
will be collected
(estimated
One representative
EngineeringIFS
ASTM
Method
to the laboratory
1586
Samples
for analysis.
(to the depth of groundwater)
will also be
for analysis.
composite
parameters
using
to be 7 to 20 feet bgs)
be submitted
soil samples selected at 5 foot intervals
to the laboratory
rig using hollow stem augers at each
soil sample,
from
and waste disposal
a single
parameters
borehole,
(Table
will
3-l).
be analyzed
for
These parameters
include:
0
Grain Size
0
Moisture
0
Chloride
0
Total Fluorine
0
Organic
0
Alkalinity
0
Total Organic
0
Toxicity
0
Reactivity
0
Corrosivity
0
Ignitability
3.1.2.2
Density
Nitrogen
Carbon (TOC)
Characteristic
Leaching
Procedure
(pesticides
and metals)
Former Storage Area
Soil sampling
locations
samples,
analytical
included
in Table 3-1.
at the Old Storage Area are presented
requirements,
data quality
3-2
on Figure
level and analytical
3-1. The number
turnaround
time
of
are
m
7
s
f
m
1 inch = 80
ft
FIGURE 3-1
SOIL SAMPLING LOCATIONS
SITE 2
SOURCE UNTDIV. OCT. 1991
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
JACKSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
i
I
3
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
Site 2
Bldg. 712
Area
Investigation
Soil
Soil
AND ANALYTICAL
LEJEUNE,
NORTH
Baseline No. of Samples
19 Soil Borings
l
26-39 Samples (13 Borings)
l
Site 2
Mixing Pads
Area
OF SAMPLING
MCB CAMP
3-1
12-18 Samples
(6 Borings)
25 Soil Borings
l
40-60 Samples (20 Borings)
l
lo-15 Samples
l
1 Composite
(5 Borings)
Sample
PROGRAMS
CAROLINA
4
3
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
Routine
Routine
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
I,2,3
6
Routine
Routine
Engineering
III
7
Routine
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
Routine
III
7
Routine
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
IV
4
3
7
14 days
14 days
14 days
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganic
IV
IV
1,2,3
7
Routine
Routine
Parameters
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Site 2
Bldg. 712
Concrete Pads
4 Concrete Chip Samples
TCLP Pesticides,
and Herbicides
10 Samples Total
l
6 Samples
0
4 Samples
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
IV
IV
2 Samples Total
Surface Water
Analytical
Method
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
Soil
Site 2
Bldg. 712
Drainage
Ditches (RR
hacks)
Data Quality
Level
Analysis
Background
Soil
4 Soil Samples from Beneath Concrete
Pads
AT SITE 2
Metals,
..
‘)
>
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
Site 2
Bldg. 712
Drainage
Ditches (RR
Tracks)
Investigation
Sediment
10 Locations/20 Samples Total
l
12 Samples (includes 1
background)
Surface Water
Site 2
Holcomb
Boulevard
Drainage
Ditch
Sediment
Overs Creek
Surface Water
8 Samples
3-l
AND ANALYTICAL
LEJEUNE,
NORTH
Baseline No. of Samples
0
Site 2
Holcomb
Boulevard
Drainage
Ditch
OF SAMPLING
MCB CAMP
) ,
PROGRAMS
CAROLINA
Analysis
AT SITE 2
Data Quality
Level
Analytical
Method
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
IV
IV
III
4
3
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
TOC
IV
IV
III
1,2,3
6
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
IV
IV
III
4
3
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
Routine
Routine
2 Samples Total
2 Locations/4
Samples Total
3 Samples Total
0
1 Sample
0
2 Samples
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
hers Creek
site 2
pormer
;torage Area
Investigation
Sediment
Soil
Gte 2
donitoring
Yell
soreholes
Soil
iite 2
?ormer
jtorage Area
3rainage
3itches
Surface Water
OF SAMPLING
MCB CAMP
3-1
AND ANALYTICAL
LEJEUNE,
NORTH
Baseline No. of Samples
3 Locations/6
PROGRAMS
CAROLINA
Analysis
AT SITE
2
Data Quality
Level
Analytical
Method
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
Samples Total
0
2 Samples
0
4 Samples
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
IV
IV
III
4
3
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
TOC
IV
IV
III
1,2,3
6
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
13 Borings
l
16-24 Samples (8 borings)
BTBX
III
5
14 days
l
lo-15 Samples (5 borings)
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
14 days
14 days
0
1 Composite
Engineering/I%
III
7
Routine
TCL Organics
IV
1,2,3
Routine
TAL Inorganics
IV
6
Routine
5 Monitoring
l
Sample
Well Test Borings
10 Samples (2/borehole)
Parameters
9 Samples Total
(includes 1 background)
0
5 Samples
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
0
4 Samples
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
14 days
14 days
,
>
>
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
Site 2
Former
Storage Area
Drainage
Ditch
Investigation
Sediment
Groundwater
AN-D ANALYTICAL
LEJEUNE,
NORTH
Baseline No. of Samples
9 Locations/l8 Samples Total
0 10 Samples
0
Site 2
OF SAMPLING
MCB CAMP
3-1
8 Samples
5 Existing Wells and 5 New Wells
11 Samples Total (2 Background)
PROGRAMS
CAROLINA
Analysis
AT SITE 2
Data Quality
Level
Analytical
Method
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
IV
IV
III
4
3
8
Routine
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
TOC
IV
IV
III
I,2,3
6
7
14 days
14 days
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
Engineering Parameters
IV
IV
III
1,2,3
6
I
Routine
Routine
Routine
SUMMARY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
OF SAMPLING
MCB CAMP
Purgeable Organic Compounds
Base/Neutral and Acid Extractables
Pesticides and PCBs
Chlorinated Herbicides
Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylenes (BTEX)
TAL Inorganics
Aluminum
EPA 3OlO/EPA 200.7
Antimony
EPA 301O/EPA ZOO.7
Arsenic
EPA 3020/EPA 206
Barium
EPA 3010/EPA 200.7
Beryllium
EPA 3010/EPA 200.7
Cadmium
EPA 3010/EPA 200.7
Calcium
EPA 3010/EPA 200.7
Chromium
EPA 3010EPA 200.7
Engineering/F% Parameters - Soil
Grain Size
ASTM D422
Moisture Density
ASTM D698
Total TCLP
40 CFR 261
Chloride
SW 9251
Total Fluoride
SM 4500-F
Nitrogen (Organic)
EPA 350.2
Alkalinity
(Total)
SM 2320-B
TOC
EPA 415.1
Engineering/FS
Parameters
Biological Oxygen Demand
Chemical Oxygen Demand
Total Suspended Solids
Total Dissolved Solids
Total Volatile Solids
Total Organic Carbon
- Water
SM 5210
EPA 410.1
EPA 160.2
EPA 160.1
EPA 160.4
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
TABLE 3-1
AND ANALYTICAL
LEJEUNE,
NORTH
824OEPA 624
3510/3550
3510/3550
8150
8020
PROGRAMS
CAROLINA
AT SITE
2
EPA 625
EPA 608
Calcium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Iron
Lead
Magnesium
Manganese
Mercury
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
3OlO/EPA
3OlO/EPA
3010/EPA
3010IEPA
301O/EPA
3020/EPA
3010/EPA
3010/EPA
3OlO/EPA
Reactivity
Corrosivity
Ignitability
40 CFR 261
40 CFR 261
40 CFR 261
200.7
200.7
200.7
200.7
200.7
234
200.7
200.7
245.1
Nickel
Potassium
Selenium
Silver
Thallium
Vanadium
Zinc
Cyanide
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
3010/EPA
3CilOlEPA
3020fEPA
3010lEPA
3020/EPA
3010/EPA
3010/EPA
30YIO/EPA
200.7
200.7
270
200.7
279
200
200.7
335
Thirteen
soil borings
will be advanced
vicinity
of the Former
Storage
results of the geophysical
and at &foot intervals
Soil boring
Area.
investigation.
to groundwater
borings will be analyzed
(by a drilling
for BTEX.
Engineering/FS
composite
parameters
locations
augers)
may be modified
in the
based on the
Samples will be collected from the 0 to 6 inch interval
in each boring.
Samples collected
from eight of the test
Soil samples collected from the remaining
will be analyzed for full TCL organics/TAL
One representative
rig using hollow-stem
five test borings
inorganics.
soil sample,
from
and waste disposal
a single
parameters
borehole,
(Table
will
3-1).
be analyzed
for
These parameters
include:
Grain Size
Moisture
Density
Chloride
Total Fluorine
Organic
Nitrogen
Alkalinity
Total Organic
Toxicity
Carbon (TO0
Characteristic
Leaching
Procedure
(pesticides and metals)
Reactivity
Corrosivity
Ignitability
3.1.2.3
Monitoring
Five monitoring
chemical
Well Test Borings
wells will be installed
analysis from each well borehole.
the soil/water
table interface,
at Site 2. Two soil samples
3.1l2.4
Soil Qualitv
for purposes of establishing
shall be collected
background
6 inches using a decontaminated
stainless
zone. All soil
(see Table 3-l).
from the lawn of a nearby administration
levels.
The soil samples shall be collected
steel hand auger.
for full TCL organics and TAL inorganics.
3-8
for
from just above
and just below the water table in the saturated
for full TCL organics and TAL inorganics
Two surface soil samples
be collected
The soil samples shall be collected
samples will be analyzed
Background
will
Both samples
building
from 0 to
shall be analyzed
3.1.3
Concrete
Concrete
Pad Sampling
pads, reportedly
equipment,
samples
used for mixing
are present in the Building
will be collected
The number
turnaround
time are included
a soil boring
4 foot intervals
spraying
Two concrete
of contaminants
requirements,
chip
which
data quality
level
in Table 3-l.
will be advanced
concrete has been cut through).
pesticide
3-l).
the leachability
of samples , analytical
The samples will be analyzed for TCLP pesticides
Additionally,
and washing
712 area of Site 2 (Figure
from each pad to determine
may be in the concrete.
and analytical
pesticides
and metals.
beneath
each pad (with a hand auger, after the
Soil samples will be collected
from the 0 to 6 inch and 2 to
below the pad. These soil samples will be analyzed for chlorinated
herbicides
and TCL pesticides.
3.1.4
Groundwater
The following
Investigation
subsections
requirements
at Building
locations
and analytical
regarding
groundwater
describe
the groundwater
712 and the Former
parameters
quality
sampling
locations
and analytical
Storage Area at Site 2. Groundwater
have been selected on the basis of available
sampling
information
on site. A soil gas survey will also be conducted in the wooded
area south of the former storage area. Results of the soil gas survey will also be used to select
monitoring
Figure
well locations.
The proposed
soil gas survey
sampling
grid is presented
on
3-2.
For risk assessment
purposes, a minimum
at each area of concern will be analyzed
Building
3.1.4.1
Existing
monitoring
(Figure
3-3).
Groundwater
samples
for full TCL organic and TAL inorganic
collected
parameters.
712
wells near Building
A background
monitoring
samples will be collected
will be analyzed
of 10 percent of all groundwater
712 include:
well will
2GW1,
2GW2,
be installed
from each of these monitoring
for TCL organic and TAL Inorganic
3-9
parameters
north
2GW4
of Building
wells.
(Table 3-l).
and 2GW5
712.
These samples
I
NOTE: NEW MONITORING WELL LOCATIONS WILL BE SELECTED BASED ON THE RESULTS OF THE SOIL GAS SURVEY.
m
1 Inch = 80
I-
ft.
Baker
lyvhrkn
FIGURE 3-3
GROUNDWATER SAMPLING LOCATIONS
SITE 2
SOURCE UNTDIV. OCT. 1991
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
JACKSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
Ol4Bb Poh v
A groundwater
sample
from
(Table 3-l). The parameters
well 2GWl
Biological
Oxygen Demand
(BOD)
l
Chemical
Oxygen Demand
(COD)
l
Total Suspended Solids (TSS)
l
Total Dissolved
l
Total Volatile
In addition
were collected
to collection
from monitoring
(July 1992).
parameters.
will be measured
No contaminants
of groundwater
to delineate
groundwater
parameters
Sampling
in shallow groundwater
be installed
(Figure
in this area, four additional
3-3).
Groundwater
and four additional
monitoring
organic
and TAL
parameters.
inorganic
for Engineering
Three of the newly installed
parameters
wells.
The deep monitoring
well will be installed
of 2GW3.
Analytical
quality
VOC contaminants
results
were the only
wells (3 shallow,
will be analyzed
sample
1 deep) will
from the existing
well
for full TCL
from well 2GW3
wells will be shallow (approximately
100 feet bgs) monitoring
vicinity
inorganic
will
be
(Table 3-1).
deep (approximately
degree of groundwater
The samples
the
the extent of contaminants
will be collected
A groundwater
monitoring
greatest
monitoring
samples
and TAL
and xylene (total)
In order to more fully delineate
(2GW3)
area.
Ethylbenzene
of the Former
from this well during
1992) and analyzed. for TCL organic
of concern detected.
and
well in the vicinity
sample was collected
in accordance with CLP protocols.
contaminants
analyzed
monitoring
A groundwater
(July
for TCL organic
flow direction.
well 2GW3 is the only existing
Pre-Investigation
the
samples, at least two rounds of static water elevations
Monitoring
3-2).
during
of concern were detected in these samples.
Former Storage Area
Area (Figure
wells 2GW2 and 2GW5
These samples were analyzed
3.1.4.2
Storage
parameters
Solids (TVS)
Sampling
TAL inorganic
for Engineering
Solids (TDS)
samples
Pre-Investigation
be analyzed
include:
l
Groundwater
will
25 feet bgs). One
well will also be installed.
in the vicinity
degradation.
of the shallow well that exhibits
It is expected that this will be in the
have been detected in the shallow groundwater
of groundwater
samples
3-12
the
collected
from this well will
in this
be used to
evaluate
if groundwater
contaminants
have migrated
from the shallow portion
of the aquifer
to the deeper portion of the aquifer
In addition
to collection
of groundwater
will be measured to delineate
3.1.5
Surface
analytical
subsections
flow direction.
Investigation
describe
requirements
the surface
at Building
water/sediment
sampling
of the results
of the EPIC
regarding
groundwater
Water/Sediment
The following
samples, at least two rounds of static water elevations
locations
and analytical
quality
Drainage
Surface water/sediment
which runs parallel
locations
collected
and available
to the railroad
tracks
east of Building
level and analytical
within
712 (Figure
3-5). The number
turnaround
time
TAL inorganics.
from the remaining
Surface water samples collected
and location-specific
Go
sediment
The sediment
analytical
the drainage
ditch
3-4). This includes
of samples, analytical
are included
will be analyzed
for full TCL pesticides/herbicides.
Elevations
712
Surface water samples collected from four locations
analyzed
purposes, a minimum
at Site 2.
samples will be collected from 10 locations
data quality
information
at each area of concern will be
are obtained
north of the site toward Overs Creek (Figure
requirements,
Surface
Area.
parameters.
measurements
Ditch East of Building
and
have been selected on the basis
information
samples
locations
in Overs Creek to measure surface water elevations.
will be recorded when groundwater
3.1.5.1
Storage
on site. For risk assessment
for full TCL organic and TAL inorganic
A staff gauge will be installed
parameters
historical
of 10 percent of all surface water/sediment
analyzed
sampling
‘712 and the Former
study, other
surface water/sediment
water/sediment
in Table
3-1.
for full TCL organics and
(six) locations
Figures 3-4 and 3-5 depict the sampling
will be
locations
requirements.
samples will be collected
samples will be collected
from the same location
as the surface water sample.
from the 0 to 6 inches and from 6 to 12 inches in depth.
3-13
LACKGRO
1 inch = 80
it.
9 ker
IoMImF
FIGURE 3-4
SURFACE WATER/SEDIMENT SAMPLING LOCATIONS
SITE 2 AREA
SOURCE UNTDIV. OCT. 1991
MARINE CORPS EASE CAMP LEJEUNE
JACKSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
I
FIGURE 3-5
SURFACE WATER/SEDIMENT SAMPLING
LOCATIONS NORTH OF SITE 2 AREA
>URCE: LANTDN. OCT. 1991
MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
JACKSONVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA
A I L/ P!* D
r/
3.1.5.2
Drainape
Ditch West of Former Storage Area
Surface water/sediment
samples
ditch which runs parallel
to the railroad
The
number
of samples,
turnaround
locations
time
will be collected
tracks, next to the Former
analytical
are included
requirements,
in Table
3-l.
data
Surface
(see Figures 3-4 and 3-5) shall be analyzed
Surface water samples collected
from nine locations
from the remaining
within
the drainage
Storage Area (Figure
quality
level
water samples
3-4).
and analytical
collected
from
three
for full TCL organics and TAL inorganics.
(five) locations
shall only be analyzed
for
full TCL pesticides/herbicides.
Two sediment
samples will be collected
The sediment
samples will be collected from 0 to 6 inches and from 6 to 12 inches in depth.
3.1.5.3
from the same location
Overs Creek
Three sampling
locations
surface water sample
have been identified
will be collected
sample,
collected
just downstream
in Overs Creek, as shown on Figure
at 4each location.
Figure 3-5 and Table 3-l) will be analyzed
third
as the surface water sample.
Two of the three
for full TCL organics
of the Camp
Lejeune
3-5. One
samples
and TAL inorganics.
railroad
tracks,
(see
The
will only be
analyzed for full TCL pesticides/herbicides.
Sediment
samples will be collected at each location.
the surface (top six inches) and subsurface
Sediment
samples
shall be analyzed
Sediment
samples shall be obtained
(six to twelve inches) for a total
for the same parameters
from
of six samples.
as the corresponding
surface
water sample (see Figure 3-5 and Table 3-l).
3.1.5.4
Holcomb
As shown on Figure
Building
712 property.
Boulevard
Drainage
3-4, a drainage
Ditch
ditch is present parallel
Two surface water/sediment
sampling
to Holcomb
locations
Boulevard
and*the
have been identified
in this ditch.
One surface water and two sediment
samples
(top six inches and six to twelve
inches)
be collected
samples
will
shall
at each location.
All
pesticides/herbicides.
3-16
be analyzed
for full
TCL
3.2
&A/&C
QA/QC
requirements
Plan (QAPP).
Samples
for this investigation
The following
are presented
in the Quality
Assurance
QA/QC samples will be collected during field sampling
Project
activities:
Trip Blanks
l
Trip blanks
are defined as samples which originate
taken from the laboratory
volatile
organic
containing
volatile
l
(VOA)
site and returned
One trip
samples.
samples for volatile
blank
organic analysis.
should
deionized
to the laboratory
accompany
water
with the
each cooler
Trip blanks will only be analyzed
for
organics.
Equipment
Rinsates
Equipment
rinsates
decontamination
analytes
event.
pertinent
be analyzed.
methods.
are the final organic-free
procedures.
each sampling
Equipment
Initially,
deionized
rinsate
water rinse from equipment
blanks will be collected
the remaining
The results from the blanks will be used to evaluate
This comparison
daily during
samples from every other day should be analyzed.
to the project are found in the rinsate,
for the same parameters
l
to the sampling
from organic-free
is made during
data validation.
If
samples must
the decontamination
The rinsates
are analyzed
as the related samples.
Field Blanks
Field
blanks
procedures.
consist
of the source
At a minimum,
water
one field blank
used in equipment
decontamination
form each event and each source of water
must be collected and analyzed for the same parameters
as the related samples.
One field blank per source per event will be collected.
l
Field Duplicates/Split
Field duplicates
split.
Samples
(or split samples)
All samples
but select segments
for soil samples
except VOCs are homogenized
and split.
of soil are taken from the length
3-17
are collected,
homogenized,
Volatiles
and
are not mixed,
of the core and placed in 40-ml.
glass vials. The duplicates
for water samples should be collected
simultaneously.
The
water samples will not be cornposited.
Field duplicates
l
Matrix
MS/MSD
will be collected at an appropriate
Spike/Matrix
Spike Duplicates
samples are to evaluate
methodology.
A matrix
MS/MSD
l
of 10 percent.
(MS/MSD)
the matrix
spike and matrix
group of samples of a similar
frequency
effect of the sample
spike duplicate
upon the analytical
must be performed
for each
matrix.
samples will be collected at a frequency of 5 percent.
Preservative
Blanks
Preservative
blanks
container
is submitted
are prepared
and preserving
organic-free
the sample with the appropriate
to the laboratory
be collected at the beginning
by putting
for full TCL/TAL
analysis.
and end of this investigation.
3-18
deionized
preservative.
One preservative
water
in a
This sample
blank
will
4.0
SAMPLE
DESIGNATION
All samples collected
with a unique
within
number.
during
this investigation,
The number
the site, the sample
media,
including
QA/QC samples,
will serve to identify
the investigation,
sampling
location,
will be designated
the site, the area
the depth (soil) or round (groundwater)
of sample, and QA/QC qualifiers.
The sample designation
format is as follows:
Site # - Media
An explanation
- Location
of each of these identifiers
- Depth/Round
(QAIQC)
is given below.
Site #
This investigation
includes Site 2.
Media
SB = Soil Boring (soil sample from a boring)
GW = Groundwater
SW = Surface Water
SD = Sediment
CC = Concrete Chip
WT = Waste
Location
The location numbers identify the sampling
location.
This would
include station number for soil location or monitoring
well number for
groundwater.
Each grid station will be identified
with a unique
identification
number.
Depth/Round
Depth indicators will be used for soil samples. The number
For example:
to the depth of the top of the sampled interval.
will refer
00 = top of sample at ground surface
01 = top of sample is 1 foot below surface
0’7 = top of sample is 7 feet below surface
Round indicator
round two).
QMQC
(FB)
CD)
(TB)
(ER)
(PB)
will be used for groundwater
= Field Blank
= Duplicate Sample
= Trip Blank
= Equipment
Rinsate
= Preservative
Blank
4-1
samples (round one and
Under this sample designation
format the sample number
2-GW-3-1D
Site 2
2--GIJ-3-1D
Groundwater
2-GW-&lD
Monitoring
2-GW-3-ID
Round 1
2-GW-3-1D
Duplicate
This sample designation
format
2-GW-3-1D
refers to:
sample
well #3
(QA/QC)
sample
will be followed throughout
to this format in response to field conditions
the project.
will be documented.
4-2
Required
deviations
5.0
INVESTIGATIVE
5.1
Soil Sample
Soil samples
samples.
Collection
will be collected
The majority
hand auger.
during
PROCEDURES
throughout
the site including
of the soil samples
will be collected
Soil samples will also be collected
the installation
of monitoring
wells.
both
surface
and subsurface
from soil borings
from boreholes
advanced
advanced
by a drilling
Some soil samples will be collected
by a
rig and
from test pits
excavated by a backhoe.
Procedures
for collecting
the various
types of soil samples
are provided
in the subsections
which follow.
All hand auger or soil boring (including
monitoring
well borings) locations
the field by the Field Team Leader or Site Manager.
Activity
personnel
5.1.1
Hand
Typically,
Advanced
augers with cutting
depth of investigation
In this investigation
shall be obtained
well borehole
in
from
locations.
Auger
manual
as the buckets are tilled.
The practical
sampled.
by Hand
is the most common
4-inch bucket
and removed
clearance
for all hand augers, soil boring and monitoring
Soil Borings
augering
Utility
will be identified
method
used to collect
subsurface
heads are pushed and twisted
The auger holes are advanced
using a hand auger is related
samples.
into the ground
one bucket
at a time.
to the material
, hand augers will be used to collect discrete
being
grab samples of
soil from the 0 to 6 inches and 2 to 4 foot intervals.
When a vertical
sampling
interval
has been established,
the auger hole to the first desired
collected
to characterize
extension
should
immediately
be removed
sample from fall-in
decontaminated
each depth,
prior
depth.
a new bucket
to collecting
from the bucket
of material
sampling
one auger bucket is used to advance
‘Since discrete
The top several
inches of soil
the chances of cross-contamination
from the upper portions
between samples and sampling
locations
5-1
are to be
will be placed on the end of the auger
the next sample.
to minimize
grab samples
of the hole.
as outlined
The bucket
of the
auger will be
in Section 5.7.
5.1.2
Soil Borings
and Monitoring
Soil samples from soil borings
sampler.
A split-spoon
together
by threaded
unconsolidated
spoon sampler
collars
providing
20-inch
long samples,
samples
Selected
internal
Split
continuously
Soil borings
samples collected
will be advanced
the O-6 in. interval
The following
to the Unified
samples
1.
will
for laboratory
be submitted
analysis.
of the first split-spoon
longitudinal
clearance
Penetration
for collecting
falling
Test.
in two common
for obtaining
spoons capable of obtaining
from the ground
18-
24-inch
long
Only
surface to the ground
into monitoring
The physical
The soil in the sampler
System (USCS).
to the laboratory
Soil sample
immediately
split-spoon
for analysis
health
risk assessment
with
purposes, only
for analysis.
will be used:
the split-spoon
in accordance
If the
sample, selected by the geologist
soil samples in split-spoons
by driving
including
above the water table.
sample (0 to 2 feet) will be submitted
30 inches
wells
notebook.
For human
The surface sample will be collected
pound hammer
split-
spoon is available
Soil Classification
at the surface and the interval
procedures
rig. A standard
10 feet below the water table.
water table is deeper than 10 feet, an additional
will be submitted
into
Tests) is two inches outer diameter
that will be converted
will be recorded in the field geologist’s
split-spoon
can be driven
this investigation.
will be collected
according
using a split-spoon
with the halves held
device
of the samples will be described by the site geologist.
will be classified
descriptions
This
This standard
respectively.
during
well boreholes)
characteristics
Penetration
(I.D.).
or 26-inch
water table in each soil boring.
(monitoring
end of the tube.
Standard
inner diameter
samples will be utilized
Split-spoon
at either
using a drive weight connected to the drilling
either
inch or 24-inch
rig will be collected
is a steel tube, split in half lengthwise,
(used for performing
(OD) and 1-3/S-inches
lengths
advanced by a drilling
sampler
materials
Well Boreholes
ASTM
the top 6 inches will be submitted
with blows from a 140D1586-84,
Standard
to the laboratory
for
analyses.
2.
Advance
techniques.
the borehole
to the desired
The split-spoon
depth
using
hollow
will be lowered into the borehole
auger (this will insure that undisturbed
material
not be containerized.
5-2
stem
auger
drilling
inside the hollow stem
will be sampled).
Soil cuttings
will
3.
Drive the split-spoon
4.
Repeat
this operation
Split-spoon
5.
using procedures outlined
until
the borehole
penetration
or fraction
penetration
the number
thereof.
The sum of the number
is termed
one foot penetrated.)
6-inch
Bring
resistance
is encountered.
to effect each six inches of
to be a seating drive.
for the second and third
N. If the sampler
resistance,
six inches
of
is driven less than
is that for the last one foot of penetration.
the logs shall state the number
increments
(If less
of blows and the fraction
will be used to calculate
the penetration
of the SPT will be noted as 50 blows over an interval
the sampler
of
resistance.
equal to or less than
driven will be noted with the blow count.)
to the surface and remove both ends and one half of the split-spoon
such that the soil recovered
recovery
groundwater
depth.
In cases where samples are driven 24 inches, the sum of second
6 inches; the interval
6.
to the selected
The first six inches is considered
the penetration
than one foot is penetrated,
until
of blows required
of blows required
18 inches, the penetration
(Refusal
has been advanced
samples will be collected continuously
Record in the field logbook
and third
in 1 above.
(length),
rests in the remaining
composition,
structure,
half of the barrel.
consistency,
Describe
color, condition,
the
etc., of the
recovered soil; then put into sample jars.
7.
Split-spoon
samplers
shall be decontaminated
use at a site according
The following
procedures
1. After sample
laboratory
to procedures
containers
in Section 5.7.
are to be used for soil samples submitted
collection,
remove
containers,
for volatile
for volatile
head space remaining
2. Record all pertinent
should
is as representative
organic
compounds
organic compounds
in the container
sampling
to the laboratory:
the soil from the split-spoon
the soil sample
ensure that the sample
samples
outlined
after each use and prior to the initial
5-3
Prior
thoroughly
should
not be mixed.
to filling
as possible
as possible of the sample
interval.
to
Soil
Further,
sample
analyses should be filled completely
without
to minimize
information
be mixed
sampler.
volatilization.
such as soil description,
sample
depth,
sample number,
addition,
3.
sample location,
and time of sample collection
label, tag, and number
Pack the samples for shipping.
Forms and Sample
Request
in the field logbook.
the sample bottle(s) as outlined
Attach seal to the shipping
Forms will be properly
In
in Section 6.0.
package.
Chain-of-Custody
filled out and enclosed or attached
(Section 6.0).
4.
Decontaminate
the split-spoon
sample as described
latex gloves between sample stations
5.2
Monitoring
5.2.1
Shallow
cross-contamination
of samples.
Well Installation
Monitoring
Shallow
monitoring
aquifer.
It is estimated
Procedures
to prevent
in Section 5.6. Replace disposable
Wells
wells will be installed
at each site to monitor
the shallow
(water table)
that these wells will be 25 feet bgs.
for the installation
and construction
of shallow
monitoring
wells are presented
below:
l
Activity
personnel
free of underground
l
A borehole
or overhead
will be advanced
will be nominal
a
will approve all monitoring
utility
well locations.
will be
lines.
by a drilling
rig using hollow stem augers.
The augers
6 inch I.D.
Soil (split spoon) samples will be collected continuously
Samples will be collected
submittal
These locations
to the laboratory
according
to the procedures
for analysis
(Table
during
outlined
borehole
advancement.
in Section 5.1.2. Sample
3-1) will follow the criteria
outlined
in
Section 5.1.2.
l
l
Upon completion
of the borehole
to the desired
materials
will be installed
A six-inch
layer of sand will be installed
depth, monitoring
well construction
(inside the hollow stem augers).
at the bottom
serve to provide firm footing for the monitoring
5-4
of the borehole.
well screen and riser.
This layer will
l
PVC is the material
selected for monitoring
well construction.
basis of its low cost, ease of use and flexibility.
using PVC.
existing
Attachment
groundwater
EPA Region IV requires justification
A is a project-specific
quality
It was selected on the
information)
justification
presented
of
for use of PVC (based on
in the EPA Region
IV required
format.
l
Ten feet of 4-inch I.D., Schedule
be installed.
40, #lO slot (0.010 inch) screen with bottom
The screen will be connected
to threaded,
riser will extend to 3 feet above the surface.
span the water table surface.
flush-joint,
The screened interval
cap will
PVC riser.
The
will be selected to
A PVC slip-cap vented to the atmosphere,
will be placed
at the top of the riser.
l
The annular
space around the screen will be backfilled
coarse-grained
borehole.
siliceous
sand as the hollow-stem
medium
augers are being withdrawn
to
from the
Sand shall be placed from the bottom of the boring to approximately
above the top of the screened interval.
interval
with a well-rounded
two feet
A lesser distance above the top of the screened
may be packed with sand if the well is very shallow to allow for placement
of
sealing materials.
l
A sodium bentonite
bentonite
shall
recommended
seal .at least Z-foot thick will be placed above the sand pack.
be allowed
hydration
to hydrate
time,
The
for at least 8 hours (or the manufacturer‘s
whichever
is longer)
before further
completion
of the
well.
l
The annular
space above the bentonite
grout consisting
seal will be backfilled
of five to ten percent
bentonite
powder (by dry weight1 and seven
gallons of potable water per 94 pound bag of portland
l
well will be installed
potential
layer (e.g., clay layer) is encountered
portion
l
cement.
A deep monitoring
confining
with a cement-bentonite
at Site 2 in the Former
during
Storage
drilling,
Area.
the shallow
of the aquifer will be cased off to prevent possible aquifer cross contamination.
Fluid rotary drilling
techniques
may be utilized
5-5
for deep well drilling.
If a
The depth intervals
l
measuring
materials
wells will be completed
PVC riser pipe will be protected
casing (with locking
by installation
frost heaving.
For very shallow
be used, as space permits.
penetrate
of a 6-inch diameter,
cap and lock) seated into the cement
the ground surface, as space permits,
the bentonite
with an inverted
The protective
of the
may
steel casing must not in any event fully
foot long steel pipes into a concrete
apron.
of four, 3-inch diameter,
5-
The steel pipes will be embedded
minimum
depth of 2.5 feet in 3,000 psi concrete.
concrete.
A concrete apron approximately
to a
Each pipe will also be filled
5 feet by 5 feet by 0.5-feet thick
The protective
with
will be
casing and steel pipes
with day-glo yellow paint, or equivalent.
If necessary, in high-traffic
areas, the monitoring
using a “flush”
type cover.
man-hole
the well will be finished
well will be completed
If the well is installed
space will be grouted
with
a concrete collar.
apron made of 3,000 psi concrete.
crowned to meet the finished
grade of the surrounding
appropriate,
the vault
the buried
surrounding
soil and a watertight
All wells will have a locking
wellhead
by construction
5-6
or
pavement,
as required.
casing.
well construction
of a 5-
The concrete will be
cover.
monitoring
a paved
will have a water drain
cap connected to the protective
shallow groundwater
through
If the well has not been installed
foot by 5-foot by 0.5-foot thick
around
at the surface
to a depth of at least 2.5-feet and’
a paved or concrete surface, the well will be completed
Figure 5-1 is a typical
The bottom
seal.
concrete surface, the annular
l
5-foot long steel
wells, a steel casing of less than 5 feet in length
with the installation
will be painted
grout.
section of the
taper to protect the casing from
The top of each well will be protected
through
a weighted
of 2-l/2, but not more than 3-l/2 feet below
placed at the same time the pipes are installed.
l
with
at the surface. The aboveground
surface casing will be placed at a minimum
l
are to be measured
tape to the nearest 0.1 foot and recorded in the field logbook.
The monitoring
l
of all backfill
diagram.
If
to the
r
PROTECTIVE
STEEL-i
SLEEVE WITH
LOCKING
CAP
GRO UND
SURFACE
CONCRETE
PAD
3 PROTECTIVE
STEEL
BOLLARDS
(TYP.)
7
7?!+--
CEMENT/BENTONITE
BENTONITE
THREADED
PVC
PELLET
.
::*..
-.
‘d..
.
..
,.
. . . .
GROUND
WATER
LEVEL
FILTER
PACK
SAND
-THREADED
PVC
SCREEN-W/O.01
‘THREADED
PVC
BOTTOM
OF
BOREHOLE
FIGURE 5-l
TYPICAL SHALLOW GROUNDWATER
MONITORING
WELL CONSTRUCTION
DIAGRAM
MARINE
CORPS
JACKSONVILLE,
BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
WELL
IN. SLOT
WELL
PLUG
5.2.2
Deep Monitoring
A deep monitoring
Wells
well will be installed
in this area. It is estimated
at Site 2 to monitor
the deeper portion
that this well will be 50 feet bgs.
The procedures for installing
or constructing
the deep monitoring
the shallow wells (Section 5.2.1), with the following
techniques
well are similar
Mud rotary drilling
borehole.
may be utilized
l
If a significant
(greater than six inches thick) low hydraulic
(clay) is encountered during drilling,
a six-inch casing will
lithology and will be grouted in place. This will prevent induced
contaminants
from the shallow aquifer into the deeper portions
l
The grout will be permitted
the casing).
the deep monitoring
monitoring
well construction
well
conductivity
lithology
be installed
into this
migration of potential
of the aquifer.
of drilling
(through
diagram.
Well Development
All monitoring
wells will be developed
have been installed.
permeability
The purpose
of the filter
24 hours after the surface pad and protective
of well development
pack around
which may have been reduced by the drilling
materials
that may have entered
the well development
installation
details,
method
the well or filter
typically
will not be initiated
weil completion.
This time
developed using bailers,
period
low-yield
pack during
a minimum
pumping,
installation.
Well development
and increase
the permeability
the
of the
and to remove fine-grained
installation.
methods,
The selection
well construction
of
and
of 24 hours has elapsed subsequent
will allow the cement
device will be dependent
casing
of the formation.
until
development
tanks (with containment
operations,
is based on drilling
and the characteristics
Well development
is to stabilize
the well screen, to restore
formation
holding
for drilling
to set for 12 hours prior to resumption
Figure 5-2 is a typical deep groundwater
to those for
exceptions:
l
5.2.3
of the aquifer
or surging
Wells typically
are
with a surge block or air. Selection
of a
encountered
well
on conditions
grout to set.
water shall be containerized
basins), or steel tankers
5-8
to
during
in either
monitoring
55-gallon
(see Section 5.9).
drums,
steel
1o~obsF
LOCKABLE
CONCRETE
CAP
PAD
3 PROTECTIVE
STEEL
BOLLARDS
(TYP.)
GROUND
OUTER
BOREHOLE
SURFACE
WALL
OUTER THREADED
PVC CASING
BENTONITE
PELLET
THREADED
PVC
SCREEN-W/O.01
THREADED
PVC
N. T. S.
FIGURE 5-2
TYPICAL DEEP GROUNDWATER
MONITORING
WELL CONSTRUCTION
DIAGRAM
MARINE
CORPS
JACKSONVILLE,
BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
NORTH CAROLINA
WELL
IN. SLOT
WELL
PLUG
m
mwwroanaar
All wells shall be developed
until
well water runs relatively
clear of fine-grained
Note that the water in some wells does not clear with continued
placed on well development
may include
development.
materials.
Typical
limits
any one of the following:
l
Clarity
of water based on visual determination.
l
A maximum
time period (typically
one hour for shallow wells).
l
A maximum
well volume (typically
three to five well volumes).
l
Stability
of specific conductance
and temperature
measurements
(typically
less than
10 percent change between three successive measurements).
Clarity
l
based on turbidity
A record of the well development
Usually,
a minimum
period
measurements
(typically
shall be completed
to document
of one to two weeks should
development
and the first sampling
groundwater
unaffected
event
by the installation
less than 50 NTU).
for a well.
the development
elapse between
This
process.
the end of initial
equilibration
period
of the well to occupy the vicinity
allows
of the screened
interval.
5.3
Groundwater
Groundwater
Sample
Collection
samples will be collected
from existing
and newly installed
monitoring
wells on
site.
The collection
of a groundwater
sample includes the following
1. First, open the well cap and use volatile
the escaping
organic detection
gases at the well head to determine
This task is usually
performed
steps:
equipment
the need for respiratory
by the Field Team Leader, Health
other designee.
5-10
(HNu
or OVA) on
protection.
and Safety Officer, or
2. When proper respiratory
3.
protection
has been donned,
and water level (decontaminated
equipment)
logbook.
in the well.
Calculate
Lower purging
distance
the fluid volume
equipment
(bailer
sound the well for total depth
and record
or submersible
these data
pump)
into
below the water level and begin water removal.
purged water and dispose of it in an acceptable
manner
in the field
the well to a short
If necessary,
(e.g., DOT-approved
collect the
%-gallon
drum).
4.
Measure the rate of discharge.
5.
Purge a minimum
of three to five well volumes
strata (i.e., if the well is pumped
before sampling.
to dryness), one volume
recharge as necessary, but preferably
In low permeability
will suffice. Allow the well to
to 70 percent of the static water level, and then
sample.
6.
Record measurements
of specific conductance,
ensure the groundwater
stabilizes.
temperature,
Generally,
and pH during
these measurements
purging
to
are made after
three, four, and five well volumes.
7.
Lower the bailer
groundwater
8.
Samples
into the well, submerge
from the bailer into the laboratory-supplied
for VOC analysis
will be collected
same order for all monitoring
Sample preservation
5.4
Surface
The following
into the groundwater,
handling
Water
procedures
Sample
first.
and retrieve.
Pour
sample bottles.
Sample
bottles
will be filled
in the
wells.
procedures are outlined
in Section 6.
Collection
will be used for the collection
of surface water samples
at stations
located at Site 2.
At each station,
samples will be collected
at the approximate
water body. Care will be taken to ensure that the sampler
sediments,
while still being relatively
mid-vertical
does not contact and/or stir up the
close to the sediment-water
5-11
point of the surface
interface.
The surface water samples will be collected by dipping
directly
into the water.
sampling
water
station.
Clean
PVC gloves will be worn by sampling
For those sample bottles that contain
will be collected
transferred
the laboratory-supplied
in a clean, decontaminated
into the appropriate
sampling
laboratory-supplied
downstream
next upstream
minimize
station
sediment
disturbance
All sample containers
samples
water into sample bottles containing
Care will be taken when collecting
In addition,
preservatives
samples for analysis
Water
samples at
samples taken at the
after the water
samples
at each sampling
used to transfer
organics compounds
to
the
location
(VOCs)
VOC samples will be collected
the other parameters.
and dissolved
pH, specific conductance,
container
of volatile
that could result in loss of VOCs.
Temperature,
Sample bottles will
oxygen of the surface water
(at each sampling
depth),
will
be
immediately
sample collection.
The sampling
location
will be marked
the nearest bank or shore.
stake. In addition,
by placing
The sampling
a wooden stake and bright
location
will be marked
the distance from the shore and the approximate
using triangulation
granted,
slowly
will be rinsed once with sample water.
stations.
following
at each station.
the sampling
of the samples for analysis.of
in the field
and then
will be rinsed at least once with the sample
be filled in the same order at all sampling
measured
acid), the
container,
will be collected
preservative
water prior to final sample collection.
prior to the collection
(e.g., sulfuric
and suspension.
not containing
to avoid excessive agitation
at each
will be collected first, with subsequent
Sediment
station(s).
personnel
sample bottle.
The water samples will be collected from near mid-stream
the furthest
preservative
sample bottles
methods,
photographs
location.
The following
information
l
Project location,
l
Weather
with indelible
location
and recorded and sketched in the field log book.
will be taken to document
the sampling
colored flagging
the physical
will be recorded in the field logbook:
date and time
5-12
and biological
at
ink on the
will be estimated
If permission
characteristics
is
of
l
Sample location,
number,
l
Flow conditions
0
On site water quality
l
Visual description
l
Sketch of sampling
location
including
(and depth), relative
position
with respect to the site, location
Names of sampling
l
Sampling
5.5
Sediment
The following
number
(i.e., high, low, in flood, etc.)
l
measurements
of water (i.e., clear, cloudy, muddy, etc.)
boundaries
of the water body, sample
location
of wood identifier
stake
personnel
technique,
Sample preservation
and identification
procedure,
and handling
Sample
and equipment
used
procedures are outlined
in Section 6.
Collection
procedures will be used for the collection
of sediment
samples at stations
located
at Site 2.
At each station,
surface and near surface sediment
inches and 6 to 12 inches.
hand-held
eggshell
coring
These intervals
instrument.
samples will be collected at a depth of 0 to 6
of sediment
A decontaminated
stainless
refusal, whichever
la-inch
using a stainless
steel liner
tube, fitted
steel
with
an
catcher to prevent sample loss, will be used at each station.
The coring device will be pushed into the sediments
until
will be collected
interval
containers.
is encountered
will be extruded
first. The sediments
with a decontaminated
If less than twelve inches of sediments
placed in the 0 to B-inch container,
to a minimum
and the remaining
depth of fifteen inches, or
in the 0 to 6-inch interval
extruder
into the appropriate
are obtained,
sediment
and 6 to
sample
the first six inches will be
will be placed into the 6 to 12-
inch container.
The sampling
1.
procedures for using the hand-held
coring instrument
are outlined
below:
Inspect and prepare the corer:
a.
Inspect the core tube and, if one is being used, the core liner.
Core tube and core
liner
its length.
must be firmly
in place, free of obstruction
throughout
Bottom
edge of core tube, or of the nose piece, should be sharp and free of nicks or dents.
5-13
b.
Check the flutter
valve for ease of movement.
c.
Check the flutter
valve seat to make sure it is clear of any obstruction
that could
prevent a tight closure.
d.
Attach a line securely tot he core sampler.
worn sections, and sufficiently
2.
Get in position
obtain
samples
area to be sampled
-- keeping
operation
fauna or stratified
in mind that, if the purpose is to
sediments,
disturbance
of the bottom
should be avoided.
3. Line up the sampler,
4.
long to reach bottom.
for the sampling
containing
The line should be free of any frayed or
aiming
Push the core sampler,
into the sediments
it vertically
for the point where the sample is to be taken.
in a smooth and continuous
-- increasing
the thrust
movement,
through
as necessary to obtain
the water and
the penetration
desired.
5.
If the corer has not been completely
press it shut while the sample
submerged,
is retrieved.
close the flutter
Warning:
the flutter
valve by hand and
valve must be kept
very wet if it is to seal properly.
6.
Lift the core sampler
clear of the water, keeping
handle the sample according
7.
Secure and identify
to 12 inch interval
interval
into another
and place it in a sample jar.
sample jar.
Seal all sample jars tightly.
9.
Label all samples.
and
Unscrew the nose cone. Pull the liner out. Push
(greater than 12 inches).
8.
as possible,
to the type of core tube.
the new sample.
out any extra sediments
it as nearly vertical
5-14
Push out the sediments
within
the 6
Push out the 0 to 6 inch sediment
5.6
Decontamination
Equipment
Procedures
and materials
utilized
during
this investigation
that will require
decontamination
fall into two broad categories:
Field measurement
l
and sampling
bottles, hand corers, hydropunch
Large machinery
l
The following
Procedures
5.6.1
tool, etc.
and equipment:
decontamination
water level meters, bailers, cornpositing
drilling
procedures
rigs and drilling
are taken
equipment,
from USEPA
backhoes,
IV Standard
Measurement
Operating
Sampling
Equipment
Cleaning Procedures for [email protected] or Glass Field Sampling Equipment
used for the
Collection of Samples for Trace Organic Compounds and/or Metals Analvses
1. Equipment
will be washed thoroughly
a brush to remove any particulate
2. The equipment
with laboratory
matter
will be rinsed thoroughly
detergent
and hot water using
or surface film.
with hot tap water.
3.
Rinse equipment
with at least a 10 percent nitric
4.
Rinse equipment
thoroughly
6.
Rinse equipment
twice with solvent and allow to air dry for at least 24 hours.
7.
Wrap equipment
in one layer of aluminum
for easy removal.
Seal the foil wrapped equipment
8.
etc.
(1991).
Field
5.6.1.1
equipment:
with deionized
Rinse the [email protected] or glass sampling
water.
foil. Roll edges of foil into a “tab” to allow
equipment
as soon as possible after use.
5-15
acid solution.
in plastic and date.
thoroughly
with tap water in the field
When this sampling
hard to remove
pesticide-grade
extreme
equipment
materials,
is used to collect samples
that contain
oil, grease, or other
it may be necessary to rinse the equipment
acetone or hexane to remove the materials
cannot
be cleaned
utilizing
times
with
with Step 1. In
before proceeding
cases, it may be necessary to steam clean the field equipment
Step 1. If the field equipment
several
before proceeding
these procedures,
with
it should
be
discarded.
Small
and awkward equipment
in the nitric
acid solution
instead
prepared for each cleaning
5.6.1.2
such as vacuum
bottle inserts and well bailers
of being rinsed with it. Fresh nitric
may be soaked
acid solution
session.
Cleaninv Procedures for Stainless Steel or Metal Sampling
Equipment
used for
the Collection of Samples for Trace Organic Compounds and/or Metals Analvses
1. Wash equipment
thoroughly
remove any particulate
with laboratory
matter
detergent
and hot water using a brush to
or surface film.
2.
Rinse equipment
thoroughly
with hot tap water.
3.
Rinse equipment
thoroughly
with deionized
4.
Rinse equipment
twice with solvent and allow to air dry for at least 24 hours.
5.
Wrap equipment
in one layer of aluminum
for easy removal.
Seal the foil wrapped equipment
6.
should be
Rinse the stainless
steel or metal
water.
foil.
sampling
Roll edges of foil into a “tab” to allow
in plastic and date.
equipment
thoroughly
with tap water in
the field as soon as possible after use.
When this sampling
hard to remove
pesticide-grade
equipment
materials,
it may be necessary
cases, when equipment
difficult
to remove,
is painted,
that contain
to rinse the equipment
acetone or hexane to remove the materials
extreme
before proceeding
is used to collect samples
badly rusted,
oil, grease, or other
several
before proceeding
sampling
or coated with materials
these procedures should be discarded.
5-16
equipment
with
with Step 1. In
it may be necessary to steam clean, wire brush, or sandblast
with Step 1. Any metal
times
that are
equipment
that eannot be cleaned using
Reusable
5.6.1.3
Glass Composite
1. Wash containers
Sample
thoroughly
with hot tap water and laboratory
bottle brush to remove particulate
2.
Rinse containers
Containers
thoroughly
matter
4.
Rinse containers
thoroughly
with tap water.
5.
Rinse containers
thoroughly
with deionized
6.
Rinse twice with solvent and allow to air dry for at least 24 hours.
7.
Cap with aluminum
8.
After using,
remove
rinse with tap water in the field, seal with aluminum
wet, and return
acetone, the container
should
collect samples at pesticide,
compounds
conclusion
of sampling
containers
used to collect
after sampling.
remaining
after this cleaning
Plastic
herbicide,
Reusable
Glass reusable
or other chemical
shall be properly
Composite
1. Proceed with the cleaning
cannot
composite
that
samples
with
used to
that produce
at the
Also, glass composite
at industrial
film,
containers
at the facility)
for cleaning.
have a visible
with pesticide-
be removed
facilities
disposed of (preferably
wastewater
Any bottles
procedure
several times
manufacturing
and shall not be returned
in-process
oil, grease, or other hard to
Step 1. If these materials
be discarded.
activities
discarded
5.6.1.4
that contain
it may be necessary to rinse the container
with
foil to keep the
to the laboratory.
are used to collect samples
grade acetone before proceeding
toxic or noxious
water.
foil or [email protected] film.
of the container
materials,
a
with hot tap water.
with at least 10 percent nitric acid.
When these containers
using
and surface film.
3. Rinse containers
interior
detergent,
facilities
shall
be
scale, or discoloration
shall also be discarded.
Sample
procedures
Containers
as outlined
rinse.
5-17
in Section 5.6.2 but omit the solvent
Plastic
reusable sample containers
noxious
compounds
or are used to collect
facilities
will be properly
sampling
activities
in-process
disposed (preferably
and will not be returned
containers
that have a visible
procedure
will be discarded.
5.6.1.5
used to collect samples from facilities
waste stream
at the facility)
for cleaning.
film, scale, or other discoloration
that produce toxic or
samples
at industrial
of at the conclusion
Any plastic
remaining
of the
composite
sample
after this cleaning
Well Sounders or Tapes Used to Measure Ground Water Levels
1. Wash with laboratory
detergent
2.
Rinse with tap water.
3.
Rinse with deionized water.
4.
Allow to air dry overnight.
5.
Wrap equipment
in aluminum
and tap water.
foil (with tab for easy removal),
seal in plastic,
and
date.
5.6.1.6
1.
Submersible
Using
Pumps and Hoses Used to Purge Ground Water Wells
a brush, scrub the exterior
of the contaminated
hose and pump
with
soapy
water
A
2.
Rinse the soap from the outside of pump and hose with tap water.
3.
Rinse the tap water residue from the outside of pump and hose with deionized
4.
Equipment
should be placed in a polyethylene
to prevent contamination
during
bag or wrapped with polyethylene
storage or transit.
5-18
water.
film
5.6.2
Large
Machinery
All drilling
rigs,
equipment
involved
and Equipment
drilling
and sampling
in the drilling
equipment,
backhoes,
and sampling
before entering
before entering
the site to ensure that there are no fluids leaking
contaminants
All drilling
the potential
all drilling
equipment
shall be thoroughly
adhered to on all drilling
buckets,
entering
a site shall be clean of any
hazardous
waste site, thereby
activities
are initiated,
at the designated
and procedures
are to be strictly
platform,
hoist or chain pulldowns,
spindles,
bar or mast, backhoe
cathead,
etc.) shall be steam
on the site to remove all rust, soil and other material
have come from other hazardous
waste sites. The drill rig and/or other equipment
with the drilling
activities
and sampling
shall be inspected
fluid, etc., have been removed,
being used over the borehole
stems have a tendency
threads.
to tighten
during
drill
sample medium
equipment
or in the borehole
drilling,
without
EPA approval.
each borehole.
that will come into contact with the downhole
1. Clean with tap water and laboratory
particulate
by the following
with the brush.
grade, phosphate-free
matter
Hollow-stem
hollow or have holes that transmit
inside and outside.
detergent,
and surface films.
augers, drill
water or drilling
Steam
In addition,
equipment
all
and
using a brush, if
cleaning
and/or
that is difficult
to
rods, Shelby tubes, etc., that are
fluids,
shall be cleaned
a pressure of at least 2500 PSI and producing
steam (200°F plus).
Rinse thoroughly
stem
on the
The steam cleaner and/or high pressure hot water washer shall be
capable of generating
2.
If drill
procedures.
high pressure hot water washing may be necessary to remove matter
remove
all oil, grease,
[email protected] string can be used on the drill
shall be cleaned and decontaminated
necessary, to remove
associated
stem threads or any other drilling
The drill rig(s) shall be steam cleaned prior to drilling
downhole sampling
to insure that
which may
and all seals and gaskets are intact and there are no
fluid leaks. No oils or grease shall be used to lubricate
equipment
and
activities.
cleaned before being brought
hydraulic
and
should be inspected
of the drill rig, backhoe, etc., that is over the borehole (kelly
drilling
be cleaned
and decontaminated
requirements
associated
and that all gaskets
Before site drilling
cleaned
area. The following
shall
All equipment
from another
for cross-contamination.
cleaning/decontamination
site.
and associated equipment
that may have been transported
minimizing
Any portion
drill
activities
decontaminated
seals are intact.
the designated
and all other
with tap water (potable).
5-19
hot water and/or
NOTE:
Tap water (potable)
decontamination
may be applied
liquids
with
a pump
(D.I. water, organic-free
be applied
water,
however,
must
containers
shall be made of glass, [email protected], or stainless
the decontamination
site geologist
with
sprayer.
non-interferring
other
responsible
other
and solvents),
containers.
procedures used by the driller
and/or
All
These
steel. This aspect of
will be inspected by the
person
prior
to beginning
of
operations.
3.
Rinse thoroughly
4.
Rinse twice with solvent (pesticide
5.
Rinse thoroughly
deionized
with deionized
water and allow to air dry.
Do not rinse with
water.
water
can be processed
deionization-organic
filtration
to leave off the organic-free
Wrap with aluminum
on site by purchasing
or leasing
a mobile
system.
In some cases when no organic-free
6.
grade isopropanol).
with organic-free
or distilled
Organic-free
water.
water is available,
it is permissible
water rinse and allow the equipment
foil, if appropriate,
going to be stored or transported.
to prevent
Clean plastic
(with approval)
air dry before use.
contamination
if equipment
can be used to wrap augers,
is
drill
stems, casings, etc., if they have been air dried.
7.
All downhole
drilling
and sampling
equipment
Step #l if painted,
and/or if there is a buildup
cannot be removed
by steam and/or high pressure cleaning.
performed
8.
augering,
prior to arrival
All well casing, tremie
them
shall be removed
remove
materials
the printing
without
shall be sandblasted
of rust, hard or caked matter,
All sandblasting
before
etc., that
shall be
on site.
tubing,
etc., that arrive on site with printing
before Step #l.
and/or
the printing
writing.
Emery
Most
and/or writing
5-20
and/or writing
on
cloth or sand paper can be used to
well material.
suppliers
can supply
if specified when materials
are ordered.
9.
Well casing, tremie
rinsed during
tubing,
the cleaning
etc., that are made of plastic
and decontamination
cannot be cleaned are not acceptable
Cleaning
and decontamination
downgradient,
of drill
rods, auger flights,
sheeting
shall occur at a designated
from the clean equipment
means.
activities,
the pit shall be backfilled
Manager,
but only after the pit has been sampled,
granted.
5.7
drums.
Geophysical
collecting
will be utilized
Geophysical
Electromagnetic
terrain
geophysical
techniques
profiling
For an EM induction
during
this
subsurface
this investigation
Radar (GPR).
are
Procedures
for
Profiling
survey, a regular
Typically,
to provide
below.
pattern
of survey stations
will provide
use of a grid spacing which is approximately
results.
coverage of the
equal to the size of
response for the depth of
Specific needs for local detail,
however, may require
The chosen spacing will be site and target specific.
(e.g., operator facing north and facing east) will be collected
anomalous
is
for proper disposal.
during
Penetrating
The Geonics EM-31 will be used to conduct the EM survey.
In conducting
water has been pumped
investigation
that will be employed
(EM) and Ground
Terrain
will produce satisfactory
a refined coverage.
by the Site
will be placed in the pit unless prior approval
the target sought by the survey, and a coil spacing with a maximum
interest
of the drilling
designated
and the waste/rinse
data in the field are presented
Electromagnetic
area in question.
above the plastic
Investigation
techniques
information.
5.7.1
material
All solvent rinsates shall be collected in separate containers
Geophysical
area on the site,
At the completion
with the appropriate
No solvent rinsates
that
drying and storage area. All cleaning
well screen and casing, etc., will be conducted
using saw horses or other appropriate
into 55gallon
process. Used plastic materials
and shall be discarded.
of all equipment
and downwind
(PVC) shall not be solvent
an EM survey, the field operator
(noise) conductivity
Two perpendicular
measurement
at each station.
must avoid or note any potential
values such as power lines, buildings,
fences, buried
sources of
pipelines
or any other large metal objects. Noise sources should be noted on the profiles or contour maps
so that anomalies
due to these known sources can be accounted for.
5-21
Important
information
conductivity
locations
that should
be known
assumed
hydrogeologic
survey are:
and migration
depths of interest.
resolution)
paths, characteristics
The level of detail
determines
for planning
the number
characteristics
necessary
the following
At a minimum
information
substance
(size of object
of lines and station
instrument,
all data (strip chart, digital
source
of interest,
of interest
spacings of readings
recording
an EM
of the site, potential
of the hazardous
EM data, if not recorded on a strip chart or digital
the field logbook.
and before conducting
and
and detail
of
required.
should be recorded in
disks, or logbook)
should have
listed:
Projectisite location identification
Company
Date and time
Operators name
Instrument
make, model
Coil spacings and configuration
Line and station numbers
Instrument
reading scales
Weather conditions/temperature
5.72
Ground
Penetrating
Radar
A GPR system consists of:
AC/DC power supply
Control unit (pulse transmitter)
Antenna(s)
Graphic recorder
Digital recorder (optional)
Magnetic tape recorder (optional)
Coaxial cable which connects the control unit to the antenna
l
0
l
l
l
a
l
Typically,
unit.
radar antennas
contain
Once a radar impulse
records reflected
amplitude
both the transmitter
is transmitted,
radar impulses.
of reflected signals.
the antenna
and receiver
antennas
an amplifier
(transmitter-receiver
coverage of larger areas with one pass, and multi-receiver
one fiberglass
switches to the receiver
The pulse receiver contains
Bistatic
within
mode and
which increase the
are separate) allow the
combinations
allow the “stacking”
of radar data which increases the signal to noise ratio.
Field data are generally
magnetic
tape or diskette.
printed
by a graphic
recorder and simultaneously
The 8.7-5 6/10/E% graphic
5-22
recorder
can be stored on
produces a continuous
time
(vertical)
versus distance
qualitative
(horizontal)
Radar
interpretations.
graphic
recorder,
producing
signal.
Because the antenna
antenna
position.
pattern
of reflective
opportunity
of the subsurface
for field quality
impulses
are synchronized
with
a dark band proportional
is moving,
Gradually,
emerges.
printing
is dictated
high frequency
a larger,
lower frequency
antennas
are commercially
that resolution
antenna
of the survey.
antenna
a slightly
stylus,
tape allows
of data.
characteristics.
Selection
If high resolution,
is used; if the survey requires
available).
deeper probing,
The drawback
for penetration.
of using the lower frequency antennas
Also, the low frequency
noise and spurious
reflections
from passing cars. The 900 and 1,000 MHz antennas
almost
for short penetration
The majority
of time
limited
involved
proportional
them susceptible
with
any GPR survey
of penetration.
estimating
6/10/E% a soil velocity
on the GPR record a thick,
reflections
window
and desired
a grid spacing
of exploration
and a target
dark
beneath
it. Once a certain
survey is conducted
by slowly pulling
confidence
the antenna
5-23
be made
Assuming
that is buried
calibration
by
8.7-6
10 feet below
of the radar system.
is by burying
slowly along the survey line.
band, parabolic
should
is needed.
the GPR system to specific settings
the antenna
for the anticipated
depth of penetration.
of the depth to any layer requires
depth, and moving
lines
can be easily located and
unit should be adjusted
time window of 50 nanoseconds
easiest way of calibrating
are used
survey
coverage, while maintaining
of 0.4 times the speed of light
Accurate determination
measured
of the time
of the medium
ground surface, a minimum
power line
target dimensions.
Adjustments
the velocity
(less
of rebar in concrete, as
is spent establishing
so that detected anomalies
At the onset of any GPR survey the radar control
depth
is
to 2 to 3 feet.
Survey lines should be set to maximize
to the presumed
to overhead
projects such as the detection
(Section 5.91 in the area of investigation
excavated.
making
antennas
not shielded,
is generally
of
near-surface
than 250 MHz) are generally
their penetration
a
is used (SO, 120, 250, 300, 400, 500, 900, and 1,000 MHz
of data is sacrificed
exclusively
radar
different
the moving
or magnetic
and
type
of reflected
processing for the refinement
of various electrical
by the requirements
data is desired, a small,
of data on diskette
and/or computer
Radar systems are designed to use antennas
the antenna
to the amplitude
paper advances under
Storage
control
the swept-stylus
each pass of the stylus represents
as the recorder
interfaces
of additional
profile
or flat
in shape,
level is attained
a plate
at a
The plate will produce
with
many
multiple
from depth calibration,
along survey lines.
The
A slow walking
the
pace
increases the horizontal
from the bottom
investigations
resolution
of the antenna.
as radar signals
A slow walking
reflector,
in a 15 to 45 degree cone
pace is recommended
as targets are better defined and easier to resolve.
towed from the back of a car or truck
continuous
are propagated
at speeds up to 10 miles
for hazardous
waste
The radar antenna
can be
an hour if the “target”
is a
such as the water table.
Surveying
5.8
All surveying
activities
will be conducted
the State of North Carolina.
l
Surveying
l
Surveying
Surveying
sampling
sampling
wells will be surveyed.
the horizontal
accuracy
State Plane
The 1929 msl datum
(monitoring
wells,
test
pits,
surface
a wooden stake and will be numbered
The vertical
0.1 foot.
Coordinate
control
other
within
sampling
stations
1 foot accuracy.
System.
all locations
of Site Investigation
Responsibilities
LANTDIV
- LANTDIV
or the facility
of site wastes. As such, a LANTDIV
stations
Control
(surface
will be
control points near the site that are tied into the
If control
will be used as a reference for the vertical
5.9.1
by the
accuracy shall be surveyed to 0.01 feet and
In addition,
and vertical
of surface water sampling
Handling
in
the following:
points
cannot
will be surveyed from the closest USGS (or equivalent)
field team will estimate
5.9
with
will be surveyed for horizontal
benchmarks/monuments
Surveying
within
by use of horizontal
Carolina
licensed
number.
All monitoring
North
points
will be marked
surveyor with a unique location
established
will include
subcontractor
locations).
All grid intersections
water/sediment)
activities
surveying
grid for soil investigation.
nongrid
water/sediment
by a qualified
may be difficult,
must ultimately
representative
5-24
two
benchmarks.
elevation.
especially
and mark them on a field map during
Generated
be located,
in deep water.
The
sampling.
Wastes
be responsible
for the final disposition
will sign waste disposal manifests
as the
generator
of the material,
in the event off-site disposal
responsibility
of Baker,
depending
investigation
to provide
assistance
preparing
on the contingency
to LANTDIV
is required.
However,
discussions
during
in arranging
it may be the
execution
for final
of the
disposition
and
the manifests.
Baker Proiect Manager
LANTDIV-EIC
in determining
Project Manager
or associated
appropriate
- It is the responsibility
the final disposition
of site investigation
will relay the results and implications
material,
of the material.
that field personnel
involved
with the procedures to be implemented
requirements
The Baker
The Baker
analysis
of the waste
and prudent
measures
Project Manager
in site investigation
to work with the
wastes.
of the chemical
and advise on the regulatory
to the disposition
for ensuring
of the Baker Project Manager
also is responsible
waste handling
in the field, and that all required
are familiar
field documentation
has been completed.
Baker Field Team Leader - The Field Team Leader is responsible
the waste handling
also is responsible
procedures
during’the
for ensuring
that
site investigations.
all
other
field
for the on site supervision
of
The Baker Field Team Leader
personnel
are familiar
with
these
procedures.
Sources
5.9.2
Field
investigation
contaminated
of Investigation
activities
materials
that
Derived
often result
must
Wastes (IDW)
in the generation
be properly
environment,
as well as to meet legal requirements.
nonhazardous
in nature.
The nature
how the wastes will be handled
The sources of waste material
types of activities
waste material
during
and monitoring
l
Monitoring
depend on the site activities
l
Groundwater
l
Aquifer
l
Heavy equipment
sampling
or nonhazardous)
planned
of site investigations,
for a project.
may result
handled:
well construction
well development
the public
and the
or
will determine
the field investigation.
which must be properly
Drilling
to protect
of potentially
These wastes may be either hazardous
of the waste (hazardous
(or sources), typical
l
managed
and handling
(drill
(development
cuttings)
water)
(purge water)
pump tests (potentially
decontamination
contaminated
groundwater)
(decontamination
5-25
fluids)
The following
in the generation
of
l
Sampling
l
Personal protective
equipment
l
Mud rotary drilling
(contaminated
5.9.3
equipment
Designation
Wastes generated
hazardous
during
the field
or nonhazardous
subsequent
handling
5.9.3.1
Drill
cuttings
boreholes,
(decontamination
(health
investigation
cuttings
during
will be containerized
with an HNu photoionization
and soil samples
with a cement-bentonite
be kept
separate
characteristics
Monitoring
All development
containers.
the nature
of the waste,
of test borings
in 55gallon
how the
and the
waste.
collected,
appearance
from
the Site Geologist
or organic
those
vapor readings,
cuttings
which
for purposes of subsequent
the
In addition,
the
the soil borings
will
do not exhibit
treatment
treatment
5.9.3.3
Decontamination
Fluids
Equipment
and personal
decontamination
“contaminated”
or
and/or disposal.
in tankers,
water that exhibits
from purge/development
for purposes of subsequent
appear to be contaminated
and Purge Water
purge/development
or large (250-gallon)
elevated
water that does not exhibit
HNu
readings
elevated
levels
and/or disposal.
fluids
The fluids shall be collected from the decomwash
to decon the heavy equipment,
will monitor
(PID) unit for organic vapors.
and purge waters shall be containerized
should be kept separate
well
grout.
Well Development
Groundwater
and monitoring
drums or in lined roll-off boxes.
will describe the soils in a field log book. Upon completion,
which, by their
5.9.3.2
potentially
of such wastes will determine
the augering
cuttings/samples
“hazardous”
as either
of the waste is described below for each type of investigative
is augered,
should
can be categorized
for determining
As the borehole
Cuttings
IDW
Cuttings
All drill
be backfilled
and Nonhazardous
The designation
The criteria
will be .generated
Site Geologist
and safety disposables)
Hazardous
in nature.
fluids)
mud)
of Potentially
wastes will be handled.
Drill
decontamination
no collection
shall be containerized
pads, If military
of these wastewaters
5-26
in 55-gallon
drums.
vehicle wash racks are used
will be necessary since the
decontamination
waters will be treated
(depending
upon the location
5.9.3.4
Investigation
For each tanker
at one of the Camp
Lejeune
treatment
of the vehicle wash racks).
Derived
or container
Waste Sampling
and Analvsis
of development/purge
water, a sample
shall be obtained
TCL organic and TAL inorganic
analysis.
In addition,
the sample shall be analyzed
hazardous waste characteristics
including
corrosivity,
reactivity,
For each roll-off box of drill
cuttings,
full TCL organic and TAL inorganic
hazardous waste characteristics
Decontamination
facilities
a composite
analysis,
full TCLP
(corrosivity,
fluids collected
during
sample
reactivity,
for full
for RCRA
and ignitability.
shall be collected
and analyzed
(organics and inorganics),
for
and RCRA
and ignitability).
the investigation
shall be sampled
and analyzed
for
full TCL organics and TAL inorganics.
5.9.3.4
Personal
All personal
Protective
protective
Eauiument
equipment
(tyvek,
gloves, and other health
shall be placed in the dump box, which will be provided
dispose of these materials
Labeling
If 55-gallon
drums are used to containerize
numbered
and labeled
be legible
and of an indelible
include,
by Camp Lejeune.
Camp Lejeune
will
when the box is full.
5.9.4
Information
and safety disposables)
drill cuttings,
by the field team during
medium
the site investigation.
(waterproof
shall be recorded both on the container
at a minimum:
l
LANTDIV
0
Project name
l
Drum number
l
Boring or well number
a
Date
the containers
CT0 (number)
5-27
marker,
paint
will be consequently
Container
stick,
lid and its side.
labels shall
or similar
Container
means).
labels shall
l
source
0
Contents
If laboratory
analysis
reveals that containerized
additional
labeling
LANTDIV
in additional
from the facility.
material
procedures,
labeling
EPA regulations
Container
A container
procedures
or contain
management
after departure
PC%,
will
assist
of the field team
will be based upon the identification
to labeling
hazardous
and PCB
of
wastes are
and 761.
Log
log shall be maintained
same information
if necessary,
applicable
in 40 CFR Parts 261,262
5.9.5
additional
labeling
are hazardous
The project
may be required.
These additional
present;
contained
of containers
materials
in the site log book.
as the container
information
The container
label plus any additional
may include
the identification
remarks
number
log shall contain
or information.
of a representative
the
Such
laboratory
sample.
5.9.6
Container
Containers
of site investigation
that is managed
is determined.
containers
Storage
wastes shall be stored in a specially
by the Camp Lejeune
An area within
Environmental
analysis
reveal
security
may
investigation
team, these will be the responsibility
in devising
drums being staged on wooden pallets
hazardous
All
or PCB
waste,
absence
of the
in the
of LANTDIV
or the facility,
temporary
storage area may also be required.
of the containers
in the storage
precipitation
easy access.
and proper
requirements,
or other structures
staged to provide
whatever
disposition
from weather.
be implemented;
the storage
and being
accumulate
until
as confirmed
discussions.
will assist LANTDIV
integrity
hold
secure area
would be appropriate.
to provide protection
the containers
required
Baker
storage
that
additionally
by the contingency
Division
Lot 203 or Storage Lot 140 (HPIA)
shall be covered with plastic sheeting
If the laboratory
Management
designated,
Weekly
inspections
container
labeling.
may include
personnel
of the
may assess the structural
Also, precipitation
These weekly
that
inspections
is necessary shall be recorded in the site logbook.
5-28
the
contact with the ground
by facility
These inspections
area may need to be removed.
removal
to prevent
which
may
and
Container
5.9.7
The disposition
LANTDIV,
quantity
Disposition
of containers
of site investigation
generated
with the assistance of Baker, as necessary.
of materials,
types of materials,
materials
may be collected
disposition.
Typically,
container
applicable
analytical
results;
completion
of the filed investigation
5.9.8
Disposal
Actual
disposal methods
Container
and analytical
of contained
identify
disposition
these results
not be addressed
materials
disturbed
substances:
so forth.
must be determined
for disposal
addressing
to generating,
in 40 CFR Parts 262,263
the method
whether the disposal can be incorporated
treatment/disposal
site
or treatment
investigation
with other site materials.
shall be evaluated
such as drainage
control,
security
and agreed upon by all involved
and transporting
of contaminated
structure
may
storage.
5-29
is
For example,
is expected, contaminated
be stored
and soil types must be considered
storage.
materials
site cleanup activities.
In this case, the initial
for use as long-term
However,
and 761.
of disposal
into subsequent
on-site disposal
other containers)
and
PCB or
wastes are contained
the
treatment,
storing
hazardous
during
landfilling,
are
shall be
applicable
generated
incineration,
a site investigation
state and local regulations
EPA regulations
in selecting
during
Federal,
observed.
materials
after
to conduct the disposal.
used, all applicable
of a suitable
long
of
retained
of the mechanism
if construction
until
receipt
specialist
regardless
consideration
after
this contingency.
The usual course will be a contractor
Another
until
may affect
Materials
for contaminated
negotiations
which
not available
the same as for other PCB or hazardous
parties during
shall be based on
If necessary, specific samples
characteristics
are usually
by
at the facility.
of Contaminated
The responsibility
disposition
results.
further
will
wastes shall be determined
at the
containment
site
for
(drums or
Also, other site conditions,
in order to provide proper
5.10
Water
Water
Measurements
level measurements
will be collected
Static
water levels will
monitoring
we+.
decontaminated
Water
Level
electronic
levels in monitoring
water level indicator
from soil borings
be measured
drilling),
to the nearest
test pits and
0.01 foot with
a
(E-tape).
wells will be measured
other water level measurements
(during
from the top of the PVC casing riser.
will be taken from ground surface.
,-
5-30
‘All
ATTACHMENT
JUSTIFICATION
CRITERIA
TO SECTION
5.0
FOR USE OF PVC AS WELL
CASING
MATERIAL
The following
is USEPA
IV minimum
of PVC as an alternate
justification
seven point information
casing material
for groundwater
samples
Analytical
parameters
wells.
the use
If requested,
each of the following
of groundwater
samples collected
have been selected to characterize
of contamination
and to assess any associated risks to human
The anticipated
(organic)
compounds
to justify
items:
to be collected.
Level IV DQOs will be used for analyses
2.
monitoring
of the use of PVC should be developed by addressing
1. The DQOs for the groundwater
project.
requirements
and their
during
this
the presence or absence
health or the environment.
concentration
ranges.
Site 2
Ethylbenzene
Xylene (total)
190
1,800
yg/L
pg/L
Site 74
Groundwater
sample
analytical
there are no contaminants
The concentrations
necessarily
results
of concern in groundwater
listed above represent
maximums
present in all wells at a site. Overall
There are two primary
under these conditions.
concerns regarding
onto the PVC. Either
It is important
for groundwater
that
concentrations
are not
are low.
sample bias associated with use of PVC well casing
will leach from the PVC well casing.
that may be present in the groundwater
all stagnant
before sample collection.
wells) indicate
at each site. These compounds
of these could result in biased analytical
to note that
than that required
monitoring
at this site.
One is that organic contaminants
The other is that organic contaminants
immediately
(from existing
water
from
The time required
sampling
results.
inside
the well casing
is purged
to do this is expected to be much less
bias phenomena
A-5-1
would adsorb
(adsorbing/leaching)
to develop.
3.
The
anticipated
residence
time
of the sample
in the well
and
the aquifer’s
productivity.
Samples collected immediately
Aquifer
productivity:
conductivity
Subsurface
is estimated
sample)
before any sorbing/leaching
O’Brien
and Gere (1988) provided
The reasons
particularly
organic
5.
fine
sand.
The wells should recharge
can occur.
of the following
Aquifer
Hydraulic
(enough
tests conducted
to
by
aquifer characteristics:
wells.
quality
the PVC
PVC is lighter
on the adsorption
materials.
steel and teflon casing materials
groundwater
from/onto
analysis.
Literature
casing
monitoring
Existing
materials
are mostly
500 gpd/ft.
3mm
19-22 ft.
300-400 ft.
in 4-inch
groundwater
of organics
with use of stainless
investigation.
samples
information
for not using other
Costs associated
soil
(i.e “fresh” from the aquifer);
at 0.0001 to 0.01 cm/set.
transmissivity:
well yield:
saturated thickness:
radius of influence:
4.
after purging
will
PVC
strength
data
indicate
be sufficient,
that
not be extensive
and more flexible
characteristics
will
are prohibitive,
for this
leaching/sorbing
enough
than stainless
of the compounds
of
to bias future
steel.
and elements
of
interest.
The following
was originally
presented
in National
Water
Well
Association
(NWWA,
1989):
Miller
(1982) conducted
potential
contaminants
a study to determine
from solution.
sorb to PVC.
Reynolds
sorb to PVC.
The sorption
significant
and Gillham
if PVC exhibited
Trichloroethene
(1985) found that
and 1,1,2-Trichloroethane
l,l,Z,Z,Tetrachloroethane
was slow enough that groundwater
if well development
(purging
the well of stagnant
take place in the same day.
A-5-2
any tendency
sampling
to sorb
did not.
could
bias would not be
water) and sampling
were to
6.
Whether
the wall
thickness
space when compared
It will not.
diameter
7.
Hollow
of the PVC
casing
to other well construction
stem augers used during
for installation
interfere
that
the PVC
being
This material
References for Attachment
Miller,
Restoration
annular
be of sufficient
monitored
manufacturers
specifications,
mask,
within
react
the limits
specifications
and
or otherwise
of the D&OS.
and assurances regarding
to Baker by the drilling
subcontractor.
A:
of Ground-Water
G.D., 1982, Uptake
svnthetic
will
the manufacturers
will be supplied
Water Well Association,
and Installation
operations
to be used does not leach,
Baker will request the appropriate
National
a larger
of the PVC casing.
with the contaminants
this requirement.
require
materials.
drilling
The type of PVC to be used and, if available,
an assurance
would
well casings,
1989, Handbook
Monitoring
Wells, Dublin,
of lead, chromium
Proceedings
and Ground-Water
of Suggested
Practices
Ohio, 398 pp.
and trace level volatile
of the Second
Monitoring,
National
National
Water
for the Design
organics
Symposium
Well
exposed to
on Aquifer
Association,
Dublin,
Ohio, pp. 236-245.
Reynolds,
G.W.
and Robert
compounds
bv polvmer
materials
of the Second CanadianlAmerican
Association,
Dublin,
W. Gillham,
commonly
1985, Absorption
used in ground-water
Conference
Ohio, pp. 125-132.
A-5-3
on Hydrogeology,
of halogenated
organic
monitors,
Proceedings
National
Water
Well
6.0
SAMPLE
6.1
Sample
Field
Program
activities
Compliance
HANDLING
Operations
will be conducted
Branch
(February
AND ANALYSIS
Standard
to the guidance
Operating
Procedures
of USEPA
IV Environmental
and Quality
Assurance
Manual
data quality
level and
1,1991).
The number
laboratory
of samples (including
turnaround
requirements
times
and holding
QA/QC samples), analytical
are included
times
QA/QC samples are outlined
6.2
according
in Table
are included
6-l.
in Table
method,
Preservation
6-l.
requirements,
Collection
procedures
bottle
for field
in Section 3.3.
Chain-of-Custody
Chain-of-custody
measurement
procedures
results
and the sample/parameter
intended
to provide a legally
To track
sample
documented
will be followed to ensure a documented,
custody
that they represent.
acceptable.record
transfers
of sample preparation,
before ultimate
using the chain-of-custody
traceable
These procedures
sample
6-l.
A chain-of-custody
mechanism
for documenting
form will be completed
The shipping
containers
will usually
packaged,
the coolers will be sealed and prepared
are
will
be
seal is
a master logbook
will
project activities.
for each container
shipped.
custody
A chain-of-custody
shown in Figure 6-2. A sample label is shown in Figure 6-3. In addition,
be used as a centralized
between
storage and analysis.
disposition,
form shown in Figure
link
be coolers.
in which
After
for shipment.
the samples
the samples
Custody
on the outside of the coolers to ensure that the samples are not disturbed
are
are properly
seals will be placed
prior to reaching
the
laboratory.
A field notebook,
6.3
Field
Logbooks
notebooks
information.
containing
a master sample log, will be maintained
and Field
and a master
Field notebooks
for the site.
Forms
sample
log will be used to record
will be bound, field survey books.
6-l
sampling
Notebooks
activities
and
will be copied and
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
Site 2
Bldg. 712
Area
Investigation
Soil
Baseline No. of Samples
19 Soil Borings
l
26-39 Samples (13 Borings)
a
Site 2
Mixing Pads
Area
Soil
OF SAMPLING
MCB CAMP
12-18 Samples (6 Borings)
25 Soil Borings
l
40-60 Samples (20 Borings)
l
0
lo-15 Samples (5 Borings)
1 Composite Sample
G-1
AND ANALYTICAL
LEJEUNE,
NORTH
PROGRAMS
CAROLINA
Analysis
AT SITE
Data Quality
Level
2
Analytical
Method
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
Field QAQ
[email protected]
Field
Duplicates
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
3-4
3-4
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
I,2,3
6
Routine
Routine
1
1
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
4-6
4-6
TCL Organ&
TAL Inorganics
IV
Iv
123
6
Routine
Routine
l-2
1-2
Engineering
III
7
Routine
-_
Parameters
Background
Soil
Soil
2 Samples Total
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
Routine
1
1
Site 2
Bldg. 712
Concrete Pads
4 Concrete Chip Samples
‘IUP Pesticides, Metals,
and Herbicides
III
7
Routine
‘1
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
IV
4
3
7
14 days
14 days
14days
1
1
1
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
2
2
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganic
Iv
IV
1,2,3
7
Routine
Routine
1
1
4 Soil Samples from Beneath Concrete
Pads
We 2
Bldg. 712
Drainage
Ditches (RR
I’racksl
Surface Water
10 Samples Total
a 6 Samples
0
4 Samples
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
Site 2
Bldg. 712
Drainage
Ditches (RR
Tracks)
Inve’stigation
Sediment
Site 2
Holcomb
Boulevard
Drainage
Ditch
Surface Water
Site 2
Holcomb
Boulevard
Drainage
Ditch
Sediment
Overs Creek
Surface Water
OF SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL
PROGRAMS
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE, NORTH CAROLINA
Baseline No. of Samples
10 Locations/20 Samples Total
l
12 Samples (includes 1
background)
a
G-1
8 Samples
Analysis
AT SITE 2
Data Quality
Level
Analytical
Method
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
Field QAlQC
Samples(sJ
Field
Duplicates
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
IV
IV
III
4
3
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
2
2
TCL Organ&
TAL Inorganics
Tot
IV
IV
III
1,2,3
6
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
1
1
__
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
1
1
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
Iv
Iv
III
4
3
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
1
1
_.
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
1
1
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
~2~3
(i
Routine
Routine
2 Samples Total
2 Locations/4 Samples Total
3 Samples Total
l
1 Sample
l
2 Samples
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
Overs Creek
Site 2
Former
Storage Area
Investigation
Sediment
Soil
m
Ib
Site 2
Monitoring
Well
Boreholes
Soil
6-1
OF SAMPLING
AND ANALYTICAL
PROGRAMS
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE, NORTH CAROLINA
Baseline No. of Samples
Analysis
AT SITE 2
Data Quality
Level
Analytical
Method
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
Field QA/QC
Samples(s)
Field
Duplicates
3 Locations/6 Samples Total
0
2 Samples
l
4Samples
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
IV
IV
III
4
3
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganic6
TOC
IV
IV
III
I,2,3
6
7
Routine
Routine
Routine
1
1
__
13 Borings
l
16-24 Samples (8 borings)
BTEX
III
5
14 days
l-2
l
lo-15 Samples (5 borings)
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
14 days
14 days
2-3
2-3
0
1 Composite Sample
Engineering/l%
III
7
Routine
__
TCL Organic5
IV
1,2,3
Routine
TAL Inorganics
IV
6
Routine
5 Monitoring
l
Well Test Borings
10 Samples (2/borehole)
Parameters
TABLE
SUMMARY
Study Area
slite 2
Investigation
Surface Water
F‘ormer
sltorage Area
1jrainage
1htches
Slite 2
F‘ormer
Sitorage Area
bainage
zbitch
Sediment
OF’ SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL
PROGRAMS
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE, NORTH CAROLINA
Baseline No. of Samples
Data Quality
Level
Analytical
Method
Laboratory
Turnaround
Time
Field QA/QC
Samples(s)
Field
Duplicates
0
5 Samples
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
IV
IV
4
3
Routine
Routine
1
1
l
4Samples
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
IV
IV
1,2,3
6
14 days
14 days
1
1
Chlorinated Herbicides
TCL Pesticides
TOC
IV
IV
III
4
3
8
Routine
Routine
Routine
1
1
-_
TCL Organics
TAL Inorganics
TOC
IV
IV
III
1,2,3
6
7
14days
14 days
Routine
1
1
__
TCL Organ&
TAL Inorganics
Engineering Parameters
Iv
1,2,3
G
I
Routine
Routine
Routine
2
2
--
9 Locations/l8 Samples Total
0 10 Samples
0
Groundwater
Analysis
AT SITE 2
9 Samples Total
(includes 1 background)
8 Samples
?
CTI
Site 2
G-l
5 Existing Wells and 5 New Wells
11 Samples Total (2 Background)
TABLE
SUMMARY
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Purgeable Organic Compounds
Base/Neutral and Acid Extractables
Pesticides and PCBs
Chlorinated Herbicides
Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, Xylenes (BTEX)
TAL Inorganics
Aluminum
EPA 3010/EPA 200.7
Antimony
EPA 3OlO/EPA 200.7
Arsenic
EPA 302O/EPA 206
Barium
EPA 3OlO/EPA 200.7
Beryllium
EPA 3OlOlEPA 200.7
Cadmium
EPA 30101EPA 200.7
Calcium
EPA 3010lEPA 200.7
Chromium
EPA 3010/EPA 200.7
7.
Engineering/l?S Parameters - Soil
Grain Size
ASTM D422
Moisture Density
ASTM D698
Total TCLP
4OCFR261
Chloride
SW 9251
Total Fluoride
SM 4500-F
Nitrogen (Organic)
EPA 350.2
Alkalinity (Total)
SM 2320-B
TOC
EPA 415.1
8.
Engineering/J% Parameters-Water
Biological Oxygen Demand
Chemical Oxygen Demand
Total Suspended Solids
Total Dissolved Solids
Total Volatile Solids
9.
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
OF SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL
PROGRAMS
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE, NORTH CAROLINA
8240lEPA 624
351013550
3510/3550
8150
8020
Calcium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Iron
Lead
Magnesium
Manganese
Mercury
SM 5210
EPA 410.1
EPA 160.2
EPA 160.1
EPA 160.4
Other Field QA/QC samples are:
Trip Blank - 1 per cooler (VOCs only)
Field Blank - 1 per source, per area, per event
Equipment Rim&e - 1 per day for each parameter sampled
Matrix Spike/Matrix Spike Duplicate - 1 per 20 samples
6-1
AT SITE 2
EPA 625
EPA 608
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
3OlO/EPA
3OlO/EPA
3OlO/EPA
3OlO/EPA
3OlO/EPA
302OlEPA
30101EPA
301O/EPA
30101EPA
200.7
200.7
200.7
200.7
200.7
234
200.7
200.7
245.1
Nickel
Potassium
Selenium
Silver
Thallium
Vanadium
Zinc
Cyanide
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
EPA
3010/EPA
30101EPA
302O/EPA
30101EPA
3020EPA
3OlO/EPA
3OlO/EPA
30101EPA
200.7
200.7
270
200.7
279
200
200.7
335
PTfLT-TTRB
LW
“x*&A
I
CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY
R-1
v-x
-
Sheet
Sampler:
RECORD
(Print)
BAKER ENVIRONMENTAL,
INC.
Airport
Office Park - Bldg No. 3
420 Rouser Road
Coraopoiis,
PA 15108
(412) 269-6000
Signature:
P-Y
ct Name:
S. U. Number:
Sample
Storage
and Preservation
Details*
Other
Cooling
Baker
Sample
I.D.
No.
General
Sampled
Sample
Date
We
Time
No. of
Contnr.
HNO,
Type/
Volume
Contnr.
Remarks:
Reiinguished
Received
By (Sign):
Time:
Type/
Volume
Contnr.
No.of
Contnr.
VW
Volume
Contnr.
Received
By (Sign):
Time:
By (Sign):
Date:
Time:
Date:
Remarks:
Time:
Remarks:
Shipment/Transportation
Details:
Received
By (Sign):
Date:
Date:
Time:
Remarks:
Remarks:
4”“nipment/Transportation
Distribution:
Original
- Sent with samples
Copy - Retained
by sampling
Details:
to lab (return
with lab results
personnel
for filing
to Project
Manager
6-6
for filing)
No.of
Contnr.
Record type of container
used with
abbreviation
P (plastic) or G (glass)
Record volume
of containers
in leters
Details:
By (Sign):
Other
Cooling
Remarks:
Shipmentllransportation
Relinguished
HzS04
Date:
Remarks:
Relinguished
No. of
Contnr.
*NOTES:
Date:
of -
By (Sign):
Time:
VW
Volume
Contnr.
No. of
Contnr.
Typel
Volume
Contnr.
FIGURE
EXAMPLE
--Date
I
CUSTODY
I
SEAL
--Date
Signature
CUSTODY
6-2
I
I
Signature
SEAL
CUSTODY
6-7
SEAL
FIGURE
EXAMPLE
6-3
SAMPLE
LABEL
Baker Environmental
Inc.
Airport Office Park, Bldg. 3
420 Rouser Road
Coraopolis,
PA 15108
CT0 No.:
Project:
Sample
Date:
Description:
1
I--.
Sampler:
Time:
Preservation:
Analysis:
Project
Sample
No.:
6-8
submitted
to the field sampling
task leader, for filing
upon completion
The
of the assignment.
cover of each logbook will contain:
l
The name of the person to whom the book is assigned
l
The book number
l
The project name
l
Entry start date
l
Entry completion
Entries
date
will include general sampling
The beginning
conditions,
of each entry
field personnel
and purpose
conditions
might
problems
will
include
so that site activities
the date,
sampling
present and level of personal
would be names
which
information
of any visitors
impact
with the sampling
equipment.
site,
protection.
to the vicinity
the interpretation
may be reconstructed.
start
Other
time,
weather
possible
entries
during
sampling,
unusual
of the subsequent
sampling
data,
All entries will be in ink with no erasures.
or
Incorrect
entries will be crossed out with a single strike and initialed.
A master sample log will be maintained
sample, its origin and its condition
Field forms used in association
on site for all samples taken.
will be included
6.4
Sample
is a three-ring
collected.
log sheet (Figure
A sample
This form records vital
sample
contents
information
and field measurements,
The sample
log sheets are numbered
number
Field Test Boring
Record (Figure
6-
Record (Figure 6-5).
Logbook
The sample logbook
conditions
of the
in the master log entry.
with the logbooks include:
41, and Test Boring and Well Construction
A full description
binder
which contains
6-6) is filled
concerning
sample
log sheets for each sample
out for each and every sample
the sample
source, sampling
and is used for sample validation
are recorded
sheets (which is placed at the front of the sample
access.
6-9
on the sample
logbook)
sample
and report preparation.
in order when placed in the sample
and log sheet page number
methods,
collected.
logbook,
and the
logbook
table
for easy reference
of
and
FIGURE
6-4
FIELD TEST BORING
PROJECT:
CT0 NO.:
COORDINATES:
EAST:
ELEVATION:
SURFACE:
RECORD
BORING NO.:
NORTH:
TOP OF STEEL CASING:
,
RIG:
SPLIT
SPOON
CASING
AUGERS
CORE
BARREL
DATE
PROGRESS
F-0
WEATHER
WATER
OEPTH
W-1
TIME
SIZE (0t~M.j
LENGTH
TYPE
HAMMER
WT.
FALL
‘
STICK UP
REMARKS:
I
DRILL
5
0
I
I.
3mpl
ID
mNo.
R
0
C
K
l-
RECORD
:N =
No
amp.
imp.
:ec.
1%.
&
‘/o)
SPT
lows
Per
DS
IQ0
Ft.
:X)
Lab.
lass
Pen
ab.
LC.
K
VISUAL
DESCRIPTION
CC,nsist.
Classification
(Grain Sire. Principal
Constituents,
Etc.)
Or
olor
r
ClassifKa Lion
(Name. Grain Size. Principal
Constituents.
Etc)
0 ensity
Moisture
Content,
OrganicContent,
Plasticity, and
Other
ardness
I
5
0
I
L
Observations
Wea thering, Bedding.
Fracturing,
and Other
Observations
s
C
K
l234S6789-
I
IODRILLING
DRILLER:
CO.:
BAKER
REP.:
UORING
NO.:
SHEET
-OC-.-
Figure 6-5
-ES-r BORING
AND
WELL CONSTRUCTION
PROJECT: BuildinK
P-64
5.0. NO.: 19010-51-SRN
COORDINATES:
EAST:
ELEVATION:
SURFACE:
13.94
RIG: Mobile
13.66
B-57
SPLI7SPOON
SIZE (DIAM.)
l-3/8”
LENGTH
TYPE
HAMMER
BORlNG NO.: MW-1
NORTH:
TOP OF PVC CASING:
RECORD
WT.
CASING
AUGERS
ID
6-l/4”
CORE
BARREL
[D
2.0’
5.0’
STD
HSA
WATER
DEPTH
(FT)
DATE
PROGRESS
(FJ-)
5/29/9 1
14.0
sunny, 70”-80” F
---
5/30/9 1
---
sunny, 80”-90” F
6.64
WEATHER
TIME
___
24 hrs.
140 lb.
30”
FALL
STICK UP
Advanced boring
REMARKS:
to 14 ft. taking
continyous
2-foot
split-spoon
samples;
monitoring
well installed
at 14.35 ft.
lSAMPLE
lTPE
A
W
C
P
= Split Spoon
,sb”“sR
0
= Shelby
Tube
=’ air Rotary
=
. .
Oeniron
WELL
INFORMATION
= Auger
= Wash
= Core
= Piston
DIAM
..
I
N = NoSample
TOP
DEPTH
(FT)
TYPE
Well Casing
2-
Sch. 40 PVC, fluah-jointed .
Well Screen
2”
Sch. 40 PVC. flush-joiikd
i
-+
.T-
Sam1
amPJe
rYPe
and
No.
Oepth
(Jw
Ret
Ft.
&
%
1.2
zz
60%
S-I
Or
IQC
PI0
I:PPc
3.8
3.8
13.9
Visuaf
I
Well
Installation
Oetail
Oescription
Pen.
Rate
Elevation
Ft.
MSC
SAND, fill material, trace gravel;
brown-gray; medium dense; dry
16
12
6
- s
iAND, fill material trace carbon
rags; brown-gray-black; loose: dry
a
a
a
-
0.28
I
lab.
Class.
iPT
x
BOl-fOM
OEPTH
(FYJ
10:94’
3
-
9.94’
1
I
1
1
- 7.30’
-
i-j
6.94’
-
/‘U
10 0
t-
-
I
ORlLLJNG
CO..
OR~Ll.Elt-
41
ATEC
ilillcr ----
BAKER
Associ:lCcs
_-__---_
UORl,vG
6-11
REP
NO
:
ft.
:
f~onclli-
Lt ‘AL
I
itlEEr
I
or
-.
,
Figure 6-6
SAMPLE
I.
smpfx
MC
SHEET
IDENTIFJC~
PFiOJECT SITE
NAME:
SITE
ShEPLE
L~~xTIo~J/DEPTH
SAHPLE
MATRIX:
J
-
SURFACE WATER
-GROtTtmWER
-
UhSTE
-
BY:
J
/
TYPE:
-
CRAB
-
SEDxmNT
I HAZARDQUS
(PRINT}
SAMPLE
/
TIME:
HRS
-
COMPOSITE
__
SOIL
amER (SPECIFY)
I ENVIROtMENTALSAMPLE
SAHPLED
11.
DATE
MAKE/lWXBER:
SuwLxtic
WAGER:
SAHPLE
(SIGNATURE)
SOURCE
-WE=
-
OUTFALL
-LEACHATE
-
DRUX
-
OTHER
__
BORING
-
RIVER/'STREAX
__
__
TEST
-
IHPOUNDHENT
-.-TM
PIT/TRENCH
BLDG/STRWlWRE
(SPECIFY)
SOURCE DESCRIPTION
III.
FIELD
OBSERVATXONS/KEASUREMENTS
APPEAPthNCE/COL.QR:
VOLATILE
ORGANIC
VOA READINGS:
LEL/02/H2S
ANALYSIS
(VOA):
EQJU
7
OFF SAMPLE
-OTHER
-OVA
RESIPRATORY
ZONE
READINGS:
RADIOACTIVITY
(mR/hr):
pH:
CQNOUCTIVITY:
TEMPERATURE:
OTHER:
SALINITY:
OBSERVATIONS:
IV.
SAMPLE
DISPOSITION
PRESERVATION:
LABORATORY
NAME:
LABORATORY
LOCATION:
__
FORWARDED TO LABORATORY:
V.
ADD~TlON&L
RFMARKS
- ON-SIT&
OATE
/
/
OFF-SITE
.
.TIKE:
HRS
SITE
7.0
MANAGEMENT
This section outlines
the responsibilities
7.1
Responsibilities
Field Team
The field portion
coordinated
of this project
will
and reporting
requirements
consist of one field team.
of on site personnel.
All field activities
will
be
by a Site Manager.
The Field Team will employ
rig will be supervised
a drilling
rig for soil boring and monitory
by a Baker geologist.
Two sampling
well installation.
technicians
The
will be assigned to the
field team.
A Site Manager
Site Manager
(or Field Team Leader)
will ensure that all field activities
plans (the Work Plan,
this Field Sampling
Plan, and the Health
7.2
will be assigned
will report a summary
or his/her designee.
Plan, the Quality
Assurance
Project
or telefax.
to the Project
The Site Manager
Manager
will include,
in his/her daily report:
l
Baker personnel
on site.
l
Other personnel
on site.
l
Major activities
of the day.
l
Subcontractor
l
Samples collected.
l
Problems
‘o
Planned
become available
in accordance with the project
of each day’s field activities
This may be done by telephone
the following
of the investigation.
and Analysis
The
Requirements
The Site Manager
The Site Manager
are conducted
all field activities.
and Safety Plan).
Reporting
at a minimum,
to manage
quantities
(e.g., drilling
footages).
encountered.
activities.
will receive direction
from the Project Manager
This will be especially
since additional
critical
sample locations
7-l
regarding
as the rapid-turnaround
changes in scope
laboratory
may be added to the program.
results
).
I
’
,’
:
,’
,
F‘\,
,:,_
,’
.
_
.
,’
’
,
/,
.~
-SECTION
.
II
’
FINAL
I
I
’
P
II,
.;‘.
f
’ REMEDIAL
INVE$TIGATIQN/.
FEASIBILITY
STUDY
QUALFiYASSURANCE
PROJECT
PLAN
,FOR OPERABLE
UNIT.NO.
5 (SITE 2)
MARINE
CORPS BASE
: CAMP LEJEUNE,
NORTH
CAROLINA
“_
‘,
,CONTRACT
T&K
ORDER
‘,. j
,’
’
’
’ ’ ,
‘, .,
.‘.
0106
”
,.
,
Prepard
For:
:
._ -
DEPARTMENT
OF THE NAVY
ATLANTIC
tiIVIfiION
.NA.V;ALFACILITIES
ENGINEERING
CO$&AND
Norfolk, Vir&nia
I’
\
’
I
..
‘_
j’
UTPdi?r:
.
LANTDIV
,’ Contract
‘/
,fl
-.
‘_’
I
CLEAN
Program
N62470-89-D-4814.
.,’
Prepared
by:
‘BA,KER.ENVIi%ONMENTAL,
Coraopolis, Peansjlvania
_,
“MARCH
11,1993
,
INC.
”
’
..
.. ”
TABLE
[email protected]
OF CONTENTS
Paffe
Section
,F--
1.0
INTRODUCTION
...................................................
2.0
SCOPE
3.0
PROJECT
DESCRIPTION
4.0
PROJECT
ORGANIZATION
5.0
QUALITY
ASSURANCE
6.0
SAMPLING
7.0
SAMPLE
8.0
CALIBRATION
9.0
ANALYTICAL
10.0
DATA
11.0’
INTERNAL
12.0
PERFORMANCE
13.0
PREVENTIVE
14.0
DATA
15.0
CORRECTIVE
16.0
QUALITY
OF QUALITY
ASSURANCE
PROJECT
PLAN
..............
..........................................
OBJECTIVES
PROCEDURES
AND SYSTEM
............
................
AND REPORTING
CHECKS
............
........................
PROCEDURES
8-1
10-l
12-1
13-1
............
............................................
REPORTING
7-1
11-l
....................................
ASSESSMENT
5-1
9-1
...........................
AUDITS
MAINTENANCE
ACTION
PROCEDURES
.....................................
CONTROL
MEASUREMENT
MEASUREMENT
6-1
AND FREQUENCY
VALIDATION,
QUALITY
FOR DATA
CUSTODY
PROCEDURES
REDUCTION,
4-1
........................................
AND DOCUMENT
2-1
3-1
........................................
PROCEDURES
ASSURANCE
l-l
14-1
15-1
PROCEDURES
.............
16-1
APPENDIX
A
FIELD
WATER
QUALITY
INSTRUMENTS
......................
A-l
LIST
OF FIGURES
h
Number
4-1
PROJECT
ORGANIZATION
CHART
LIST
. .. .. . . .. .. . . .. .. . . ,. . . .. . . .. . .. . .
OF TABLES
Number
Ps
5-l
DEFINITIONS
7-l
9-l
SUMMARY
OF CONTAINERS,
PRESERVATION,
AND HOLDING
TIMES
FOR WATER SAMPLES
.. . . . .. . . .. . .. . .. . ,.. . ., . .. . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . ..
SUMMARY
OF CONTAINERS,
PRESERVATION,
AND HOLDING
TIMES
FOR SOIL/SEDIMENT
SAMPLES
.. . . .. .. . . . ... . . . .. .. . . .. . . .. . . . .. .. .
METHOD PERFORMANCE
LIMITS
. . .. ,. . . . .. .. . . .. .. . . , .. . . .. . .. . . ..
11-1
11-2
QC ANALYSIS
FREQUENCY
QA/QC SAMPLE FREQUENCY
12-l
SYSTEM
7-2
4-2
AUDIT
OF DATA QUALITY
CHECKLIST
INDICATORS
. . .. .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . ..
.. .
111
OFFICE
‘7-2
‘7-3
9-2
11-3
11-8
........................................
.......................................
- PROJECT
5-3
....................
12-2
1.0
INTRODUCTION
This Quality
Assurance
the following
site at Marine
The preparation
CLEAN
subsidiary
of this QAPP,
Contract
for the field investigation
Baker
of
North Carolina:
Care Center
and other related
Task Order
of the Michael
has been developed
Corps Base Camp Lejeune, Jacksonville,
Site 2 - Former Nursery/Day
0
Navy
Project Plan (QAPP)
0106.
Corporation,
project plans, is being performed
Baker
Environmental,
Inc.,
is the prime contractor
under the
a wholly
owned
for the implementation
of this project.
This QAPP addresses the quality
be administered
for the sample
Detailed
information
Sections
6.0 and 9.0, respectively.
Sampling
and Analysis
regarding
assurance and quality
collection
sample
and analysis
handling
Sample
1-l
for this Remedial
and analytical
collection
Plan (FSAP).
control steps and procedures
procedures
methods
that will
Investigation
are provided
are provided
(RI).
in
in the Field
2.0
SCOPE
OF QUALITY
This Quality
conducted
Assurance
ASSURANCE
Project Plan (QAPP)
for the field investigation
has been developed
Protection
Agency
procedures,
including
PROJECT
addresses sample
collection
of Site 2 of Camp Lejeune,
for the Department
(USEPA)
PLAN
North
and analysis
Carolina.
to be
The QAPP
of Navy (DON) in accordance with U. S. Environmental
guidelines.
chain-of-custody
Contractors
procedures,
will
follow
while conducting
QA/QC
practices
and
all sample collection
and
analysis activities.
In order to provide adequate
QAJQC, this investigation
1.
Use of a NEESA-certified
2.
Use of accepted
Sampling
constituents
analytical
analytical
and Analysis
laboratory;
methods
Plan
parameters
will require:
for the samples
(FSAP).
Analysis
will be performed
l
“Statement
of Work for Organic
l
“Statement
of Work
outlined
of samples
using the following
Analysis,”
for Inorganic
USEPA,
Analysis,”
in the Field
for hazardous
documents:
OLM01.6,
USEPA,
June 1991;
ILMO2.0,
March
1990;
l
“Methods
for Chemical
Analysis
of Water
and Waste,”
USEPA,
1979,
Revised March 1983;
:l
“Environmental
Analysis
l
l
Protection
of Pollutants,”
“Test Methods
Agency
USEPA,
for Evaluating
3rd Edition;
and
“Hazardous
Waste
Management
Hazardous
Waste;
Toxicity
USEPA,
52 FR 26886.
2-l
Regulations
on Test Procedures
for
40 CFR 136;
Solid
Waste,”
System;
Characteristics
USEPA,
Identification
Revisions;
November
1986,
and Listing
Final
Rule,”
of
3.
Field audit(s) during
performed
The structure
initial
sampling
activities
to verify that sampling
according to the Plan.
of this QAPP and the QA elements
0
Title Page
0
Table of Contents
0
Introduction
0
QAPP Scope
0
Project Description
0
Project Organization
0
QA Objectives
0
Sampling
0
Sample and Document
a
Calibration
0
Analytical
0
Data Reduction,Validation,
0
Internal
0
Performance
l
Preventive
0
Data Measurement
0
Corrective
0
QA Reports to Management
addressed are:
for Data Measurement
Procedures
Procedures
Custody
and Frequency
Procedures
and Reporting
QC Checks
and System Audits
Maintenance
Assessment
Procedures
Action
2-2
is being
3.0
PROJECT
An introduction
DESCRIPTION
to the field investigation
of Site 2 describing
the project objectives
and scope
are given in Sections 4.0 and 5.0 of the RI/FS Work Plan.
These sections discuss the objectives
of the RI, and the various
programs.
the field investigations,
frequency,
field sampling
including
sample
is presented in Sections 3.0,4.0,
and analytical
location
and designation,
and 5.0 of the FSAP.
3-l
A detailed
sampling
description
procedures
of
and
4.0
PROJECT
Technical
responsible
ORGANIZATION
performance
of the investigation
for quality
assurance throughout
RUFS Work Plan.
data validation,
Specific
The contractor
drilling
subcontractors
organization,
will utilize
and monitoring
its duration
identified.
to perform
ordnance
Figure
and support personnel/organizations.
4-1
Lejeune
are described
subcontractors
well installation,
have not yet been
lines of authority,
of Site 2 at Camp
and key personnel
in Section 6.0 of the
laboratory
clearance,
4-l
analysis,
and surveying.
shows
the project
FIGURE
4-1
PROJECT
ORGANIZATION
RI/I% AT SITE 2
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE,
NORTH
CAROLINA
Byron Brant
LANTDIV
EIC
Raymond P. Wattras
MCB Camp Lejeune Activity Coordinator
I
Donald C. Shields
Project Manager
Daniel Bonk
QMQC
- William D. Trimbath
John W. Mentz
Technical
Advisors
I
Coreen Casadei
Project Engineer
Treatability
Subcontractor
Drilling
Subcontractors
7
I
_
I
I
Site Engineer
S. Charles Caruso
Laboratory
Coordinator
Analytical
Subcontractors
I
1
Environmental
Scientists
Validation
Subcontractors
I
I
I
I
Chemist
8
Relations
L
4
I-
uxo
Contractor
I
t-
5.0
QUALITY
ASSURANCE
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of a QA Program
is to establish
requirements
performed
5.1
and to provide
an internal
is of the highest professional
Project
Quality
Assurance
FOR
DATA
policies
MEASUREMENT
for the implementation
means for control
and review
of regulatory
so that
the work
standards.
Obiectives
Project QA objectives are:
0
Scientific
data will be of a quality
0
Data will be gathered/developed
the intended
0
and comparability
categorized
0
Prevention
in accordance
precision,
as required
mechanisms
as prevention,
Assessment
and legal scrutiny;
with procedures
appropriate
for
accuracy, completeness,
that will be employed
assessment,
to achieve these quality
goals can be
and correction:
of errors through
of all quality
representativeness,
by the project.
planning,
and careful selection and training
a
to meet scientific
use of the data; and
Data will be of acceptable
The fundamental
sufficient
documented
of skilled,
assurance
instructions
qualified
sampling
and procedures,
personnel;
reports furnished
by the contract
laboratory;
0
0
Assessment
of data through
laboratory
and field audits; and
Correction
for prevention
This QAPP,
prepared
in direct
implemented
and the quality
data
validation,
of reoccurrence
and of procedures
of conditions
response to these goals, describes
control (QC) procedures
the course of the project.
5-1
through
adverse to quality.
the QA Program
to be followed by the laboratory
to be
during
This QAPP presents the project organization
documentation
requirements,
sample
custody requirements,
provisions
to be applied
program.
This QAPP has been prepared
in “Interim
to provide
Guidelines
and specifies or references technical
confidence
audit,
that all activities
procedures,
and corrective
meet the intent
in accordance with U.S. EPA guidance
and Specifications
for Preparing
Quality
Assurance
action
of the QA
as presented
Project
Plans,”
QAMS-005180.
The procedures contained
or referred to herein have been taken from:
“Statement
of Work for Organic Analysis,”
“Statement
of Work for Inorganic
“Methods
for Chemical
USEPA
Analysis,”
Analysis
of Water
, OLM01.6,
USEPA
June 1991;
, ILMO2.0,
and Waste,”
March 1990;
USEPA,
1979, Revised
March 1983;
“Environmental
Protection
of Pollutants,”
USEPA,
“Test Methods
Agency Regulations
on Test Procedures
for Analysis
40 CFR 136;
for Evaluating
Solid
Waste,”
USEPA,
November
1986, 3rd
Edition;
“Hazardous
Waste Management
Waste; Toxicity
System; Identification
Characteristics
Revisions;
Final
Rule,”
and Listing
of Hazardous
USEPA,
52 FR 26886;
and
“Interim
Guidelines
Plans,” USEPA,
5.2
Data Qualits
Data quality
and Specifications
representativeness,
Assurance
Project
Objectives
objectives
a specific
Quality
(QAMS 005/80).
(D&OS) are qualitative
data users to specify the quality
support
for Preparing
decision.
or quantitative
statements
of data needed from a particular
The D&OS
completeness,
are expressed
and comparability.
for the more general term uncertainty,
in terms
Definitions
are given in Table 5-1.
5-2
developed
data collection
of precision,
by the
activity
to
accuracy,
for these terms, as well as
TABLE
DEFINITIONS
OF DATA
5-l
QUALITY
INDICATORS
PRECISION
- A measure of mutual agreement among individual
measurements
of
the same property,
usually under prescribed
similar
conditions.
Precision
is
expressed in terms of the standard deviation.
Comparison of replicate values is best
expressed as the relative percent difference (RPD). Various measures of precision
exist depending upon the “prescribed similar conditions”.
ACCURACY - The degree of agreement of a measurement
(or an average of replicate
measurements),
X, with an accepted reference or true value, T, expressed as the
difference between the two values, X-T. Accuracy is a measure of the bias in a
system.
REPRESENTATIVENESS
- Expresses the degree to which data accurately
precisely represent a characteristic
of a population,
parameter
variations
sampling point, a process condition, or an environmental
concern.
COMPLETENESS
- A measure
measurement
system compared
conditions.
of the amount
to the amount
COMPARABILITY
- Expresses
compared with another.
the confidence
UNCERTAINTY
decision.
- The likelihood
of the valid data obtained
that was expected under
with
which
one data
of all types of errors associated
5-3
and
at a
from the
“normal”
set can be
with a particular
The Project Manager,
in conjunction
with the Navy Engineer-in-Charge
for defining
the DQOs.
The intended
use of the data, analytical
availability
of resources are integral
uncertainty
in the data that is acceptable
in development
includes both field sampling
zero uncertainty
is the goal; however, the variables
contribute
to a degree of uncertainty
to keep the total uncertainty
of the data.
limits,
within
criteria
DQOs define
during
error and analytical
an acceptable
associated
and the
the level
instrument
error.
with sampling
range, so as not to hinder
requirements
sample representativeness,
of
the investigation.
Ideally,
and analysis
It is an overall program
specific data quality
for accuracy and precision,
data completeness
of DQOs.
in any data generated.
To achieve this objective,
measurements,
for each specific activity
This uncertainty
(EIC), is responsible
objective
the intended
use
such as detection
data comparability,
and
have been specified.
The data collected during
the course of the site investigation
a
To assess potential
human
0
To monitor
health
and safety conditions
0
To identify
releases or suspected releases of hazardous waste and/or constituents;
0
To characterize
0
To screen from further
human
All samples
selecting
data. Samples
health
field activities;
and/or managed;
investigation
and,
those areas which do not pose a threat
the site, assessing human
will be analyzed
collected to evaluate
health
and reported
and environmental
to
by the laboratory
risks, or
as Level IV
process options (e.g., TOC, TSS, etc.) will be analyzed
as Level III data quality.
(aqueous only) and specific conductance
studies are conducted,
during
risks;
or environment.
alternatives
reported by the laboratory
and environmental
the wastes contained
for characterizing
remedial
health
will be used:
Field parameters
will be Level I data quality.
sample analyses will be Level III or IV quality.
5-4
including
and
temperature
In the event treatability
6.0
SAMPLING
Descriptions
PROCEDURES
of the procedures
to be used for sampling
sediment
and soil at the site are provided
sampling
locations,
and sampling
rationale
the groundwater,
in Section 5.0 of the FSAP.
surface
The number
of samples,
by media also are presented in the FSAP.
6-l
water,
7.0
SAMPLE
AND DOCUMENT
CUSTODY
PROCEDURES
Sample custody procedures outlined
in this section have been developed
from “User’s Guide to
the Contract
December
No. 9240.0-01.
procedures
revised
Laboratory
Program,”
are in accordance with “EPA
November
Preparing
handling
is to outline
to be used during
procedures
is to deliver
requested
parameters
from the point of collection
Samplinv
or glass bottles containing
for sample
collection.
7-2 for summaries
soil/sediment
7.2
and sample
documentation
The objective
of the sample
for analysis.
times;
The
analysis
and (2) document
of the
the sample
the proper preservatives
In addition
metal
of containers,
to the chemical
or sturdy plastic
preservation,
will be provided
preservatives,
cooler, if required
and holding
times
samples
by the
will be
(see Tables
7-l
for water
and
respectively).
Chain-of-Custody
Procedures
A sample is considered to be in an individual’s
a
handling
to the final data report.
stored on ice at 4°C in a waterproof
through
for
1980, QAMS-005/80.
are to: (11 ensure complete
turnaround
May 1978,
and Specifications
samples to the laboratories
procedures
the required
Manual,”
These
Handling
New polyethylene
laboratory
Guidelines
of the FSAP.
representative
of the sample documentation
within
the sample
Directive
and Procedure
and “Interim
implementation
objectives
7.1
Policies
Assurance Project Plans,” December
The purpose of this section
procedures
NEIC
1984, EPA 330-78-001-R
Quality
1988, OSWR
It is in the sampler’s
possession if:
possession or it is in the sampler’s
view after being in his or
her possession;
l
It was in the sampler’s
tampering;
l
possession
or
It is in a secure area.
7-l
and then
locked
or sealed
to prevent
‘)
TABLE
SUMMARY
OF CONTAINERS,
PRESERVATION,
Parameter
TCL Volatiles
3
7-1
AND HOLDING
Container
TIMES
Preservation
Two 40-ml vials with teflon
septum caps
FOR WATER
SAMPLES
Holding
Time
Cool, 4°C
HCl pH <2
14 days
(7 days if unpreserved)
TCL Semivolatiles
l-liter
amber glass bottle with
teflon caps
Cool, 4°C
7 days to extraction;
40 days from extraction to analysis
TCL Pesticides/PCBs
l-liter
amber glass bottle with
teflon caps
Cool, 4°C
7 days to extraction;
40 days after extraction for analysis
TAL Metals
l-500 ml polyethylene
bottle
HNOspH<2
6 months;
Mercury 28 days
TAL Cyanide
l-liter
polyethylene
bottle
NaOH pH> 12
Cool, 4°C
14 days
TOC
l-liter
polyethylene
bottle
Cool to 4°C
HCl or H$304 to pH < 2
28 days
TSS
l-liter
polyethylene
bottle
__
7 days
TVS
l-liter
polyethylene
bottle
_-
7 days
TDS
l-liter
polyethylene
bottle
--
7 days
BOD
l-liter
polyethylene
bottle
Cool, 4°C
48 hours
COD
l-liter
polyethylene
bottle
Cool, 4°C
[email protected] pH C 2
28 days
TCL - Target Contaminant
List
TAL - Target Analyte List
TOC - Total Organic Carbon
TSS - Total Suspended Solids
TVS
TDS
BOD
COD
- Total Volatile Solids
- Total Dissolved Solids
- Biological Oxygen Demand
- Chemical Oxygen Demand
TABLE7-2
SUMMARYOFCONTAINERS,PRESERVATION,ANDHOLDINGTIMESFOR
SOIL,SEDIMENT,ANDCONCRETESAMPLES
Y
w
Parameter
I
TCL Volatiles
Two $-ounce wide-mouth
glass jars
Cool, 4°C
10 days
(7 days if unpreserved)
TCL Semivolatiles
One &ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
7 days to extraction;
40 days from extraction to analysis
TCL PesticidesE’CBs
One 8-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
7 days to extraction;
40 days after extraction for analysis
TAL Metals
One 8-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
6 months;
Mercury, 28 days
TAL Cyanide
One S-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
14 days
Total TCLP
Two &ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4%
14 days
Chloride
One 8-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
mm
Fluoride
One 8-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
None
28 days
Alkalinity
One 8-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
14 days
TOC
One 8-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
28 days
Corrosivity
One 4-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
28 days
Ignitability
One 4-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
28 days
Reactivity
One 4-ounce wide-mouth
glass jar
Cool, 4°C
NA
NOTE:
Container
Preservation
Samples to be tested for TCLP should undergo minimal
TCL - Target Contaminant
TAL - Target Analyte List
List
TCLP - Toxicity Characteristic
TOC -Total Organic Carbon
disturbance
Leaching
prior to analysis.
Procedure
Holding
Time
Analyze immediately
Five kinds of documentation
will be used in tracking
0
Field log book;
0
Sample labels;
0
Chain-of-Custody
0
Custody seals; and
l
Commercial
At a minimum,
and shipping
the analytical
samples:
(COC) records;
carrier airbills.
the label for each sample bottle will contain
0
Site name;
0
Sample number;
0
Date and time of collection;
l
Sample type (grab or composite);
l
Matrix;
0
Sampler’s
the following
information:
and
The sample information,
initials.
as well as the analysis
in the field log book for each sampling
point.
to be performed
Additionally,
on the sample,
the following
will be entered
items will be entered:
Dates and times of entry;
Names of field personnel
on site;
Names of visitors on site;
Field conditions;
Description
Sampling
of activities;
remarks
and observations;
QA/QC samples collected;
List of photographs
taken; and
Sketch of site conditions.
Custody of the samples will be maintained
the time they are forwarded
The sample
will complete
to the analytical
custody is documented
Chemical
reagents
from the time of sampling
until
laboratory.
using Chain-of-Custody
a COC record, in waterproof
site to the laboratory.
by field personnel
ink, to accompany
(COC) records.
each cooler forwarded
used to preserve the samples
7-4
Field
personnel
from the
will be recorded on the
COC record.
through
Any errors on the COC records will not be erased; instead,
the error and initialed
placed in a sealable
by the person completing
the form.
plastic bag and put inside the appropriate
a line will be drawn
The original
copy will be
cooler, secured to the cooler’s
lid.
If the sample cooler is to be shipped by commercial
air carrier,
custody seals so that the seals would be broken
carrier
is not required
the cooler must be secured with
if the cooler was opened.
The commercial
to sign the COC record as long as the custody seals remain
the COC record stays in the cooler.
The only other documentation
required
intact
and
is the completed
airbill.
If the sample shipment
laboratory
sample
personnel
custodian,
air carrier
original
or his/her
designee accepting
or the field personnel,
for maintaining
by field personnel
the sample shipment,
or retrieved
whether
along with the final data report.
log books and records that
it is from the
The laboratory
provide
by
The laboratory
signs and dates the COC record upon sample receipt.
internal
sample preparation
Laboratory
to the laboratory
at the site, then the custody seals are not necessary.
COC record will be returned
responsible
during
is hand delivered
a custody
The
will be
record
and analysis.
Chain-of-Custody
Procedures
Upon sample receipt the steps below are performed.
Samples
are received
bottle integrity
Samples
and unpacked
(loose caps, broken bottles,
are verified
with
bottle and stabilizer.
Information
sampling,
0
Samples
incoming
The paperwork
concerning
and observation)
in the laboratory
where the staff checks for
etc.).
paperwork
(packing
is either signed or initialed.
the sample (from the sampling
is recorded
slip, etc.) by type of
along with
parameters
record, Chain-of-Custody,
to be analyzed,
date of
and date the sample is received in the laboratory.
are placed
in an appropriate
until analysis.
7-5
secured storage
area, e.g. refrigeration,
When
0
analysis
is complete,
samples
are stored
for a 30-day
period
unless
otherwise specified.
If collected
the following
samples
arrive without
Chain-of-Custody
or incorrect
Chain-of-Custody
steps are taken:
0
The laboratory
0
The site supervisor
l
If the missing
prepares a nonconformance
and Project Manager
information
form stating
are notified;
the problem;
and
cannot be reconstructed
by the Project
field staff, the samples affected are removed from the sampling
Primary
records,
considerations
Manager
or
program.
for sample storage are:
a
Secured storage;
0
Maintain
prescribed
temperature,
if required,
which is typically
four degrees
Celsius; and
0
Extract
and/or
parameters
7.3
Document
analyze
samples
within
the prescribed
Custody
necessary, and to furnish
evidence of quality.
documentary
upon the proper
procedures
for the
Procedures
the validity
Therefore,
time
of interest.
Project records are necessary to support
dependent
holding
maintenance
are established
of the work, to allow it to be recreated
and retrieval
The evidentiary
of quality
to assure that all documents
value of data is
assurance
attesting
if
records.
to the validity
of
work are accounted for when the work is completed.
Records are legible,
involved.
filled
out completely,
Records are considered
valid
and adequately
only if initialed,
personnel.
copies. Records submitted
to the files, with the exception
secured for filing.
7-6
as to the item or activity
signed, or otherwise
These records may either
and dated by authorized
in folders or binders, or otherwise
identified
be originals
of correspondence,
authenticated
or reproduced
are bound, placed
Following
receipt of information
from external
sources, completion
of reports
or other transmittals,
associated
records are submitted
to the proper
file.
protected
and loss during
transfer
addition,
records transmitted
(e.g, hand carrying
The following
or making
documents
project: calculations
are adequately
will be transferred
and checkprints;
to the proper
outgoing
letters, memoranda,
and telephone
and laboratory
In
to the Project
Manager.
staffs of the resulting
the course of this
correspondence
copies of proposals,
including
incoming
and
records; and reference material.
on the project staff are responsible
information
files during
reports and other data transmittals;
orders for project services, and contracts;
related
from damage
and issuance
copies prior to shipment).
purchase
All individuals
of analyses,
for reporting
obsolete or superseded project-
In turn, the Project Manager
notifies
status change in project documents,
the project
such as drawings
and project procedures.
In general,
Manager
outdated
drawings
and other documents
may request the copies be destroyed.
are marked
are marked
not been formally
contribute
“preliminary”
However,
One copy of void documents
the project files with the reasons for, and date of voiding
Documents
“void.”
to final project information.
7-7
is maintained
in
clearly indicated.
to denote calculations
checked, or based on information
the Project
which
and other material
has not been checked,
which have
or do not
8.0
CALIBIiATION
8.1
Field
PROCEDURES
Instruments
One field instrument
will be used for health and safety monitoring:
photoionizer.
These
manufacturer’s
instructions
start of site sampling.
procedures
AND FREQUENCY
instruments
will
in addition
The calibration
for the calibration
be calibrated
the I-INu System portable
on site
to the factory calibration
standards
of water quality
daily
according
to the
it will receive prior to the
will be recorded in the field log book. Specific
instruments
are given in Appendix
A of this
document.
A pH meter and a conductivity
samples.
Procedures
November
1986,3rd
calibration
of water quality
8.2
Laboratory
The laboratory’s
meter will be used to analyze
from “Test Methods
Edition
for Evaluating
will be used to calibrate
instruments
groundwater
Solid Waste,”
these meters.
are given in Appendix
and surface water
USEPA,
SW-846,
Specific procedures
for the
A of this document
Instruments
procedures
for calibration
accordance with the protocols presented
and related
in the following
“Statement
of Work for Organic Analysis,”
“Statement
of Work for Inorganic
“Methods
for Organic
Wastewater,”
“Methods
March
USEPA,
for Chemical
quality
measures
are to be in
documents:
USEPA,
Analysis,”
Chemical
control
USEPA,
Analysis
OLM01.6,
ILMO2.0,
June 1991;
March
1990;
and
Industrial
of Municipal
July 1982;
Analysis
of Water
and Waste,”
USEPA,
1979, Revised
1983;
“Environmental
of Pollutants,”
Protection
USEPA,
Agency Regulations
40 CFR 136;
8-l
on Test Procedures
for Analysis
“Test Methods
l
Edition;
Waste Management
Waste; Toxicity
Formal
calibration
personnel
All calibrations
dedicated
or external
and properly
All
agencies using standard
calibration
The following
actual readings,
1986,
instrument
3rd
equipment
and instrumentation
not meeting
whenever
and equipment
functioning.
These procedures
calibrations
number,
are performed
by
vendor forms or in
the date,
and the analyst’s
initials.
performed.
and instrumentation
the specified calibration
possible.
52 FR 26886.
reference materials.
identification
Only properly
and operating
of Hazardous
data are recorded for all calibrations:
upon the calibration
calibrated
and Listing
forms or instrument
Other data may be recorded depending
active equipment
November
Final Rule,” USEPA,
quantities.
are recorded on in-house
target readings,
USEPA,
to ensure that instrumentation
calibrated
and equipment
bound notebooks.
Revisions;
are established
are accurately
to all instruments
laboratory
Waste,”
System; Identification
Characteristics
procedures
used for sample analysis
apply
Solid
and
“Hazardous
0
for Evaluating
Such equipment
are used. Equipment
criteria
are to be segregated
is repaired
and recalibrated
from
before
reuse.
All equipment
is uniquely
to allow traceability
(ASTM,
8.2.1
USEPA,
Method
Method
either by serial number
equipment
and calibration
procedures)
or internal
records.
are used for calibration
calibration
number,
Recognized
procedures
whenever available.
Calibration
is performed
Calibration
across the appropriate
reagents
between
or manufacturer’s
calibration
curves, tuning).
identified,
or standards
as part of the laboratory
curves are prepared
range of analysis.
are prepared
using five standards
New calibration
or yearly, whichever
8-2
analytical
procedure
in graduated
curves are prepared
is more frequent.
(calibration
amounts
whenever
new
8.2.2
GUMS
System
This
section
outlines
determination
Calibration
Procedure
the requirements
of organic
compounds.
for the calibration
The following
of GC/MS
operations
systems
are performed
for the
in support
of
these requirements:
0
Documentation
of GC/MS mass calibration
0
Documentation
of GC/MS response factor stability;
0
Internal
standard
response and retention
and abundance
pattern;
and
time monitoring.
Tuning: and Mass Calibration
It is necessary to establish
abundance
criteria
analysis
prior
that
a given
to initiating
(DFTPP)
before any blanks,
(BFB)
for semivolatile
standards,
nanograms
blank
(volatile
compounds)
These criteria
if required,
subtraction,
background
ions.
This
compounds.
mass spectral
is accomplished
compounds
through
the
or decafluorotri-
The BFB or DFTPP
criteria
are met.
or samples are analyzed.
is tuned to meet the criteria
(semivolatile
The analysis
to eliminate
separately
column
specified for
for an injection
bleed
of 50
from standard
every 12 hours of operation.
forward
documentation
compounds)
is performed
are demonstrated
is straight
Calibration
analysis
or DFTPP
(ng) of BFB or DFTPP.
analysis.
meets the standard
for volatile
A GC/MS system used for organic compound
BFB analysis
system
data collection.
of p-bromofluorobenzene
phenylphosphine
GC/MS
or
Background
or instrument
is in the form of a bar graph spectrum
and a
mass listing.
GCLMS Svstem Calibration
After
tuning
initially
criteria
calibrated
th& linearity
standard.
l
have been met and prior
at five concentrations
of response.
Standards
Internal
are analyzed
utilizing
and surrogate
to sample
analysis,
the compounds
standards
under the same conditions
to be analyzed
is
to determine
are used with each calibration
as the samples.
Relative
Response Factor (RRF) Calculation
standard
to be used on a compound-by-compound
8-3
the GCYMS system
- The USEPA
specifies the internal
basis for quantification.
The
relative
response
concentration
0
Calibration
semivolatile
or volatile
performed.
compounds
calibration
The continuing
Calibration
The following
of analyses.
the continuing
0
standard
The criteria
check.
is determined
containing
all
is run each 12 hours
of
are the same as
A calibration
check is also
for each CCC.
The system
must be met before sample analysis
is recorded on the continuing
for the calibration
operations
calibration
can be
forms.
concentration
of GC systems for the determination
are performed
are used to verify
The analyses of instrument
and the mid-point
at each
Procedure
of pesticides/PCBs.
performance.
system performance
calibration
the requirements
types
check is performed.
check criteria
This section outlines
Three
check
for each CCC must be less than or equal to 25.0 percent.
check and calibration
GC System
for each compound
and surrogates
The percent difference
The percent Difference
8.2.3
is calculated
- A calibration
A system performance
for the initial
performed.
(RRF)
level.
Continuing
analysis.
performance
factor
in support of these requirements:
the calibration
blanks,
Performance
of the the individual
and evaluate
Evaluation
standard
mixtures
instrument
mixtures
(PEMs),
A and B constitute
calibration.
It is necessary to establish
Mixture
resolution
criteria
by performing
a Resolution
Check
where the depth of the valley of two adjacent peaks must be greater
than
or equal to 60.0 percent of the height of the shorter peak.
0
The breakdown
of DDT and Endrin
percent and the combined
percent.
in both of the PEMs must be less than 20.0
breakdown
of DDT and Endrin
All peaks in both the Performance
Evaluation
must be less than 30.0
Mixtures
must be 100
percent resolved on both columns.
0
The absolute
retention
times
of each of the single
surrogates
in both of the PEMs
must be within
determined
from the three point initial
8-4
calibration.
component
the retention
pesticides
time
and
windows
The relative
0
percent difference
each of the single component
be less than or equivalent
pesticides
concentrations
amount
and surrogates
and the true amount
for
in both of the PEMs must
to 25.0 percent.
At least one chromatogram
l
of the calculated
between
of Individual
any two adjacent
Standard
Mixtures
peaks in the midpoint
A and B in the initial
calibration
must be greater than or equal to 90.0 percent.
8.2.4
System
Calibration
The system
must
concentration
Procedure
be calibrated
for GC Purgable
daily
by external
levels, of each parameter,
calibration
curve must be verified
calibration
standards.
is used to prepare
on each working
ten percent,
and Aromatics
calibration.
A minimum
a calibration
of three
curve.
day by the measurement
If the response for any parameter
more than plus or minus
Halocarbons
The working
of one or more
varies from the predicted
the test must be repeated
response by
using a fresh calibration
standard.
The laboratory
continuing
must spike and analyze
laboratory
Prior to analysis,
conditions
the system must be demonstrated
time
measurements
of ten percent of all samples
to monitor
performance.
of the analysis,
The retention
a minimum
by running
window
used
of actual retention
a laboratory
to make
under the
reagent blank.
the identification
time variations
If the response peak exceeds the working
to be free from contamination,
of standards
should
be based
upon
over the course of the day.
range of the system, prepare a dilution
of the sample
with reagent water and reanalyze.
8.2.5
System
This section
Inductively
performed
l
Calibration
outlines
Procedure
the requirements
Coupled Plasma
for Metals
Analysis
for the calibration
(ICP) systems for the determination
in support of these requirements:
Documentation
of standard
response; and
8-5
of atomic
absorption
of metals.
(AA)
and
The following
are
Correlation
0
coefficient
The AA system utilized
calibration
monitoring.
for direct aspiration
blank and five calibration
as follows.
One standard
technique
standards.
analysis
The standard
is at a concentration
near, but above,
correspond to the expected range of concentrations
This five-point
calibration
The AA system utilized
calibration
blank
determined
as follows.
Limit
(CRDL).
for graphite
and three
and discarded
concentrations
This
linearity
correspond
is performed
The other
found in the actual samples.
standards
initially
In addition,
with a
concentrations
Required
are
Detection
daily.
fresh each time an analysis
contain
the same reagents
is to be
at the same
preparation.
with a calibration
daily.
calibrated
at the Contract
is performed
are prepared
The standards
is initially
to the expected range of concentrations
calibration
as will result in the samples following
calibration
are determined
the MDL.
The standard
is at a concentration
after use.
The ICP system is calibrated
analysis
standards.
This three-point
For AA systems, the calibration
performed
furnace technique
The other concentrations
found in the actual samples.
with a
daily.
calibration
One standard
calibrated
concentrations
concentrations
is performed
is initially
blank
and one calibration
ICP systems
must
undergo
standards
are utilized
standard.
quarterly
checks.
Correlation
Coefficient
Calculation
The data points of the blank
slope, the intercept,
correlation
coefficient
correlation
coefficient
Calibration
Verification
The initial
and the correlation
coefficient
must be achieved
before sample
of the best fit line.
analysis
to calculate
the
An acceptable
may begin.
An acceptable
is > 0.995 for AA analyses and > 0.995 for ICP analysis.
calibration
range calibration
and the five calibration
curve is verified
standard.
on each working
The calibration
verification
day by the measurement
acceptance criterion
0
ICEP/GFAA
- 90 to 110 percent of true value; and
l
Cold Vapor AA - 80 to 120 percent of true value.
8-6
of one mid-
is as follows:
When
measurements
exceed the control
corrected, the instrument
8.2.6
System
Calibration
This section outlines
analyses
recalibrated,
the analysis
and the calibration
Procedure
for Inorganic
the requirements
of inorganic
limits,
is terminated,
reverified.
Analyses
that are used for calibration
parameters.
the problem
The following
of calorimetric
are performed
systems for
in support
of these
standards.
Standard
requirements:
l
Documentation
0
Correlation
The system is initially
of standard
coefficient
monitoring.
calibrated
with
concentrations
are one standard
concentrations
corresponding
Standards
following
contain
at a concentration
and five calibration
near, but above, the MDL with additional
to the expected range of concentrations
the same reagents at the same concentrations
Coefficient
Data points
achieved
a blank
found in actual samples.
as will be present in samples
preparation.
Correlation
intercept,
response; and
Calculation
of the blank
and correlation
and five calibration
coefficient
before sample analysis
standards
of a best tit line.
may begin.
are utilized
An acceptable
An acceptable
correlation
to calculate
correlation
slope,
coefficient
coefficient
is
is >0.995
for all systems.
Calibration
Verification
The initial
calibration
curve is verified
calibration
standards.
One standard
curve and one standard
verification
standards
on each working
is at a concentration
is at the high end of the curve.
is within
and calibration
analysis
of two
near the low end of the calibration
The acceptance criteria
for recovery of
15 percent of the expected recovery for cyanide analyses and
10 percent of the expected recovery for other inorganic
control limits,
day by the measurement
is terminated,
the problem
is reverified.
8-7
analyses.
When measurements
is corrected, the instrument
exceed
is recalibrated,
8.2.7
Periodic
Periodic
Calibration
calibration
calibrated
includes
is performed
on equipment
as part of the analytical
methodology.
ovens, refrigerators,
forms or in bound notebooks.
and the frequency
and balances.
are calibrated
The pH Meter
in analyses
Equipment
The calibration
meter
but not
that falls within
is recorded either
Discussed below are the equipment,
at which the calibration
Balances
required
routinely
this category
on specified
the calibration
performed,
is performed.
weekly with class S weights.
is calibrated
daily
with pH 4 and 7 buffer
solutions
and
checked with pH 10 buffer solution.
The temperatures
All
liquid
certified
of the refrigerators
in glass thermometers
thermometer.
The N.B.S. Certified
The following
are recorded daily.
equipment
Dial thermometers
Thermometer
must maintain
l
Sample Storage
0
Water Bath, Mercury
are calibrated
and Refrigerators
- within
are calibrated
is checked annually
the following
- within
annually
the N.B.S.
quarterly.
at the ice point.
temperatures:
2 degrees of 4 degrees Celsius; and
2 degrees of 95 degrees Celsius.
8-8
with
9.0
ANALYTICAL
9.1
Field
PROCEDURES
Analysis
An HNu PI-101
will be used to analyze ambient
as to screen soil during
instruments
and specific conductivity
These analyses
Sample Preservation
9.2
Laboratory
will be obtained
listed in Table
as well
detects total organic vapor.
This
instructions.
of aqueous samples also will be measured
in accordance
of Water and Wastewater,”
with “Handbook
September
for Sampling
1982, EPA/600/4-82-029.
in
and
-
Analysis
The samples that will be collected
Compounds
The HNu PI-101
and safety monitoring,
will be operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s
The pH, temperature,
the field.
the soil sampling.
air for health
9-l.
Parameters
and the corresponding
during
the investigation
will be analyzed
method
using EPA methods
performance
9-l
will be analyzed
limits
for constituents
as noted in Table
also are listed in Table 9-1
9-l.
METHOD
TABLE
9-1
PERFORMANCE
LIMITS
(1) Contract Required Quantitation
Limit, taken from “Statement
of Work for Organic
Analysis,” USEPA Contract Laboratory Program, OLM01.6, June 1991.
(2) Extraction method based on USEPA Method 8240, “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,3rd Edition.
9-2
TABLE
9-1 (Continued)
METHOD
PERFORMANCE
Compound
Water
CRQL(o
(i%fl)
LIMITS
Soil/Sediment
CRQL(u
&A$
10
5
10
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Xylenes (total)
5
5
Semivolatiles
Phenol
10
330
2-Hexanone
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
1,1,2,%Tetrachloroethane
Chlorobenzene
Ethyl Benzene
Styrene
Method
CLP protocols
624)
(EPA Method
CLP protocols
625)(z)
(EPA Method
bis(2-Chloroethyl)
ether
2-Chlorophenol
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
Benzyl alcohol
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
2-Methylphenol
bis(2-ChloroisopropyBether
4-Methylphenol
N-Nitroso-di-n-dipropylamine
Hexachloroethane
Nitrobenzene
Isophorone
2-Nitrophenol
2,4-Dimethylphenol
Benzoic acid
bis(2Chloroethoxyl)methane
2,4-Dichlorophenol
10
10
330
330
10
10
10
330
330
330
10
10
10
330
330
330
10
10
10
10
330
330
330
330
10
10
10
330
330
330
50
10
10
1600
330
330
(1) Contract Required Quantitation
Limit, taken from “Statement of Work for Organic
Analysis,” USEPA Contract Laboratory Program, OLM01.6, June 1991.
(2) Extraction method based on USEPA Method 8240, “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,3rd Edition.
9-3
TABLE
METHOD
9-l (Continued)
PERFORMANCE
Water
CRQL(1)
Q-Efl)
Compound
LIMITS
Soil/Sediment
CRQL(l)
wh)
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
Naphthalene
10
10
330
330
4Chloroaniline
Hexachlorobutadiene
4-Chloro-3-methylphenol
chloro-meta-cresol)
2-Methylnaphthalene
10
10
10
330
330
330
10
330
10
330
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
(para-
Method
CLP protocols
(EPA Method 625)(2)
(1) Contract Required Quantitation
Limit, taken from “Statement
of Work for Organic
Analysis,” USEPA Contract Laboratory Program, OLM01.6, June 1991.
(2) Extraction method based on USEPA Method 8240, “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,3rd Edition.
9-4
METHOD
Compound
TABLE
9-l (Continued)
PERFORMANCE
Water
CRQL(1)
h-w)
LIMITS
Soil/Sediment
CRQL(l)
ww
Phenanthrene
10
330
Anthracene
Di-n-butylphthalate
Fluoranthene
Py rene
Butylbenzylphthalate
10
10
10
330
3,3’-Dichlorobenzidine
Benzo(a)anthracene
Chrysene
bis(2-Ethylhexyl)phthalate
Di-n-octylphthalate
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Indeno(l,2,3-cdlpyrene
Dibenz(a,hlanthracene
Benzo(g,h,i)perylene
10
10
20
330
330
660
330
10
10
330
330
10
10
10
LO
10
10
330
330
330
330
330
330
Pesticides/PCBs
alpha-BHC
0.05
8.0
beta-BHC
delta-BHC
gamma-BHC
0.05
0.05
0.05
0.05
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
0.05
0.05
0.05
8.0
8.0
8.0
0.10
0.10
0.10
16.0
16.0
16.0
0.10
16.0
Heptachlor
Aldrin
Heptachlor
Endosulfan
Dieldrin
4,4’-DDE
Endrin
Endosulfan
epoxide
I
II
CLP protocols
625)(2)
(EPA Method
330
330
10
10
(Lindane)
Method
330
(1) Contract
CLP protocols
(EPA Method 608)(2)
Required Quantitation
Limit, taken from “Statement
of Work for Organic
Analysis,“USEPA
Contract Laboratory Program, OLM01.6, June 1991.
(2) Extraction method based on USEPA Method 8240, “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,3rd Edition.
9-5
TABLE
METHOD
Water
CRQL(1)
Wl)
Compound
4,4’-DDD
Endosulfan
4,4’-DDT
9-1 (Continued)
PERFORMANCE
0.5
0.10
0.5
gamma-Chlordane
Toxanhene
0.5
1.0
0.5
I Aroclor-1248
Aroclor-1254
1 Aroclor-1260
16.0
16.0
16.0
0.10
0.10
Methoxychlor
Endrin ketone
alpha-Chlordane
1Aroclor-1016
1 Aroclor-1221
Aroclor-1232
Aroclor-1242
Soil/Sediment
CRQL(1)
ww
0.10
sulfate
I
1
0.5
0.5
0.5
I
I
0.5
1.0
1.0
I
!
I
Method
CLP protocols
(EPA Method 608)(z)
80.0
16.0
80.0
80.0
160.0
I
I
LIMITS
.
!
I
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
80.0
160.0
160.0
(1) Contract Required Quantitation
Limit, taken from “Statement
of Work for Organic
Analysis,” USEPA Contract Laboratory Program, OLM01.6, June 1991.
(2) Extraction method based on USEPA Method 8240, “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,3rd Edition.
9-6
METHOD
Analyte
Method
Number(l)
Gminum
TABLE
9-1 (Continued)
PERFORMANCE
CRQL(2)
([email protected])
LIMITS
Method
Description
200
200.7
intimony
Inductively
Coupled
Plasma
60
200.7
204.2
tisenic
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
10
200.7
206.2
3arium
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
200
Inductively
200.7
Coupled Plasma
5
3eryllium
200.7
210.2
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
5
:admium
200.7
213.2
Zalcium
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
5000
200.7
215.1
Xromium
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Direct Aspiration
10
200.7
218.2
>obalt
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
50
200.7
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Inductively
Coupled
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
25
Copper
200.7
b-on
Plasma
100
200.7
Lead
3
200.7
239.2
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
(1) Methods taken from “Statement
of Work for Inorganic Analysis,” USEPA Contract
Laboratory Program, ILMO2.0, March 1990.
(21 Contract Required Quantitation
Limit.
(3) Extraction method for arsenic, lead, selenium, and thallium
taken from USEPA
Method 3020, “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,
3rd Edition.
(4) Extraction method for all other metals taken from USEPA Method 3010, “Test
Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,3rdEdition.
9-7
--
TABLE
9-l (Continued)
METHOD
PERFORMANCE
Analyte
Method
Number(l)
CRQL(2)
I (pgm
LIMITS
Method
Description
Magnesium
200.7
242.1
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Direct Aspiration
Manganese
15
200.7
Inductively
Mercury
Coupled Plasma
0.2
245.1
245.2
245.5
Nickel
I
I
Water by manual cold vapor technique
Water by automated cold vapor technique
Soil/sediment
by manual cold vapor technique
40
200.7
Inductively
Potassium
Coupled Plasma
5000
200.7
258.1
Selenium
200.7
270.2
I
I
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Direct Aspiration
5
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
I
Silver
10
200.7
272.2
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
Sodium
5000
200.7
273.1
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Absorption, Direct Aspiration
Atomic
Thallium
10
200.7
279.2
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
Vanadium
50
200.7
I
20
200.7
335.2
1
lo
Zinc
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Titrimetric,
Spectrophotometric
Cyanide
(1) Methods taken from “Statement
of Work for Inorganic Analysis,” USEPA Contract
Laboratory Program, ILMO2.0, March 1990.
(2) Contract Required Quantitation
Limit.
(3) Extraction method for arsenic, lead, selenium, and thallium
taken from USEPA
Method 3020, “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,
3rd Edition.
(4) Extraction method for all other metals taken from USEPA Method 3010, “Test
Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,” USEPA, November 1986,3rd Edition.
9-8
TABLE
9-l (Continued)
METHOD
PERFORMANCE
Parameter
Water
Performance
Limit
LIMITS
Soil
Performance
Limit
Method
Herbicides
2,4-D
2,4,5-TP
12 (pg/l)(l)
EPA Method
8150
1.7 (ug/l)(l)
800 (pg/kg)(l)
110 @g/kg)(l)
Benzene
2.0 (pg/l)Cl)
2.0 (mg/kg)(l)
EPA Method
8020
Toluene
Ethylbenzene
Xylene
2.0 (pg/lW
2.0 (pg/lP
2.0 (,g/l)(l)
2.0 (mg/kg)(l)
2.0 (mg/kg)(l)
N/A (1)
15mg/l(z)
N/A (1)
15 (2)
EPA 352.1
EPA 375.1
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
EPA 410.1
EPA 405.1
EPA 160.2
N/A
N/A
N/A
EPA 160.1
EPA 160.4
EPA 415.1
N/A
N/A
SW 9251
SM 2320-B
N/A
N/A
N/A
EPA 351.4
SM 4500-F’
ASTM D422
ASTM D698
(Silvex)
BTEX
Engineering/FS
2.0 (mg/kg)(l)
Parameters
Nitrate
Sulfate
Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD)
Biological Oxygen Demand (BbD>
Total Suspended Solids (TSS)
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS)
Total Volatile Solids (TVS)
N/A
N/A
Total Organic Carbon (TOC)
Chloride
Alkalinity
(Total)
Nitrogen, Organic (as N)
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total Fluoride
Grain Size
Moisture Density
N/A
NIA
N/A
N/A
(1) Practical Quantitation
Limit taken from “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,”
USEPA, November 1986.
(2) Method Detection Limit taken from “Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and
Wastes,“ USEPA, 1979, Revised March 1983.
N/A - Not Applicable
Note:
These methods will be used to analyze the Toxicity Characteristic
Leading Procedure
(TCLP) extract. The extract will be prepared using Method 1311, described in
“Hazardous Waste Management
System; Identification
and Listing of Hazardous
Waste; Toxicity Characteristics
Revisions; Final Rule,” USEPA, 52FR 26886.
9-9
TABLE
9-l (Continued)
METHOD
PERFORMANCE
I
LIMITS
Water
PQL(1)
17.,/l\
I
Soil/
Sediment
PQL( 1)
0.14
1
9.4
Method
Pesticides
I
Chlordane
1
I
Endrin
0.06
4.0
I
I
Heptachor
(and its hydroxide)
I
Lindane
I
0.04
I
Methoxychlor
(1) Practical
USEPA,
I
Quantitation
Limit
November 1986.
2.0)
2.7
120
1.8
II
Toxaphene
Note:
0.03
II
2.4
I
taken from “Test Methods
160
for Evaluating
35501
8080
35501
8080
35501
8080
_
35501
8080
35501
8080
35501
8080
Solid Waste,”
These methods will be used to analyze the Toxicity Characteristic
Leading Procedure
extract. The extract will be prepared using Method 1311, described in
“Hazardous Waste Management
System; Identification
and Listing of Hazardous
Waste; Toxicity Characteristics
Revisions; Final Rule,” USEPA, 52FR 26886.
(TCLP)
9-10
TABLE
9-1 (Continued)
METHOD
PERFORMANCE
Analyte
Water
PQL(l)
([email protected])
LIMITS
Soil/
“$&(yt
Method
Method
Description
(mgkg)
r
Metals
Arsenic
10
30
6010
7060
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
1
Cadmium
20
1
2
Chromium
20
4
Lead
10
2
Inductively
.Coupled
Inductively
Coupled
Atomic Absorption,
Inductively
Coupled
Atomic Absorption,
Inductively
Coupled
Atomic Absorption,
Mercury
2
0.002
6010
6010
7131
6010
7191
6010
7421
7470
Selenium
20
40
6010
7740
2
4
6010
7760
Barium
Silver
(1) Practical Quantitation
Limit,
USEPA, November 1986.
Note:
Plasma
_
Plasma
Furnace Technique
Plasma
Furnace Technique
Plasma
Furnace Technique
Water by manual cold vapor technique
Water by automated cold vapor
technique
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
Inductively
Coupled Plasma
Atomic Absorption, Furnace Technique
taken from “Test Methods for Evaluating
Solid Waste,”
These methods will be used to analyze the Toxicity Characteristic
Leading Procedure
(TCLP) extract. The extract will be prepared using Method 1311, described in
“Hazardous Waste Management
System; Identification
and Listing of Hazardous
Waste; Toxicity Characteristics
Revisions; Final Rule,” USEPA, 52FR 26886.
9-11
10.0
DATA
10.1
Field
REDUCTION,
VALIDATION
AND REPORTING
Data Procedures
Data validation
practices as described by “Laboratory
for Evaluating
Inorganic
Functional
Guidelines
Analyses,”
for Evaluating
USEPA,
reduction.
Organic
Analyses
Appropriate
information
initials
sampling
on sample collection
will be entered
(bottom
A rigorous
methodology,
to reconstruct
program
will insure
photographs,
computer
records will be retained
10.2
of sample, date and time
and sampler’s
disks, and reports.
for the investigations
include
items
records, analytical
The project manager
documents
are
such as log
reports,
is responsible
will be inventoried.
data
for
The project
for a period of three years after project close-out; then the files will be
to the Navy.
instrument
calibrations,
member
Manager
documents
chain-of-custody
All the field data, such as those generated
team
the use of
event, including:
and observations,
that all documents
a project tile in which all accountable
forwarded
for those
will be entered in indelible
brief description
Accountable
books, field data records, correspondence,
maintaining
will include
the sampling
field measurements
for when they are completed.
packages,
June 1991 will be
of each page, and dated).
data control
accounted
Data Validation
USEPA,
of sample collection
site name (top of each page), sample identification,
of collection,
- Draft,”
Guidelines
and that an audit trail is developed
The documentation
bound field log books in which all information
ink.
Functional
June 1988, and “Laboratory
followed to insure that raw data are not altered
data which require
Data Validation
will be entered
will be responsible
during
field measurements,
directly
for proofing
observations
into a bound field notebook.
all data transfers
made,
and field
Each project
and the Project
or his designee will proof at least ten percent of all data transfers.
Laboratory
The’ following
reduction,
procedures
validation,
documented
and complete
Data Procedures
summarize
and reporting.
and subjected to quality
enough to permit
the practices routinely
Numerical
analyses,
control review.
reconstruction
used by laboratory
including
manual
Records of numerical
of the work by a qualified
the originator.
10-l
staff for data
calculations,
are
analyses are legible
individual
other than
Laboratory
Data
Data validation
Validation
begins with data reduction
and continues
Data processing is checked by an individual
processing.
through
other than the analyst
Utilization
0
Correctness of numerical
0
Correctness
0
Correct interpretation
who performed
the data
of the proper equations;
input;
of computations;
and
of raw data (chromatographs,
The checking process is thorough
enough to verify the results.
All entries made in benchbooks,
data sheets, computation
in ink. No entry will be rendered
unreadable.
strip charts, etc.).
-
sheets, input sheets, etc. are made
Reports
The items listed below are required
0
of data.
The checker reviews the data for the following:
0
Analytical
to the reporting
Data is presented
0
Analytical
0
The following
report
number,
of analytical
in a tabular
reports.
format.
reports are approved by appropriate
information
date, sample
date, analysis
project number,
0
The sample numbers
0
The parameters
0
Method,
0
Matrix
is included
personnel.
client
name and address,
of samples,
purchase
and project type. All pages are numbered.
laboratory
numbers
are identified.
report units, and values are identified.
trip, and field blank
spike, matrix
on the report:
dates, number
and corresponding
analyzed,
laboratory
results are reported.
spike duplicate,
10-2
and replicate
recoveries are reported.
order
0
Calibration
summaries
are reported.
0
Surrogate
l
Holding
0
The detection
0
Consistent
significant
a
Referenced
footnotes are used when applicable,
0
A letter
recoveries are reported.
times and sample analysis
limit
dates are reported.
of the procedure
of transmittal
is identified.
figures are used.
accompanies
the report
with the data. The letter specifies these anomalies.
10-3
if any anomalies
are associated
11.0
INTERNAL
11.1
Field
Field
Internal
internal
duplicates,
QUALITY
quality
equipment
Quality
Control
control
checks
rinsates,
from the field quality
overall quality
CONTROL
control
CHECKS
Checks
to be used during
field blanks, preservation
samples
this
blanks,
investigation
include
and trip blanks.
will be used by the data validator
field
The results
to determine
the
of the data.
Types of QC Samples
11.2
Documentation
laboratory
of the analyses
bench notebooks
of the following
types of QC samples
is maintained
in the
and/or the specific client or project files.
Field Duplicates
Duplicates
for soil samples are collected,
homogenized,
and split.
Volatiles
homogenized,
of the core and placed in 40 ml glass vials.
laboratory
for subsampling
should
frequency
primary
laboratory
responsible
Equipment
Field
for analysis.
should
for water
be collected
sample,
matrix
at a
should be sent to the
The same samples used for field duplicates
and used by the laboratory
and the laboratory
duplicates
The duplicate
for levels D and C. All the duplicates
This means that for the duplicate
the field duplicate,
Cores may be sealed and shipped to the
deems this appropriate.
simultaneously.
of 10% per sample matrix
be split by the laboratory
spike.
if the project
be collected
All samples except VOCs are
are not mixed, but select segments of the soil are taken from
the length
samples
and split.
as the laboratory
duplicate
shall
or matrix
there will be analyses of the normal
sample,
spike/duplicate.
Rinsates
Equipment
rinsates are the final organic-free
collected
daily during
analyzed.
If analytes
must be analyzed.
the samples.
a sampling
pertinent
as the related
Initially,
water rinse from equipment
samples
cleaning
from every other day should be
to the project are found in the rinsate,
The results of the blanks
This comparison
same parameters
event.
deionized
the remaining
samples
will be used to flag or assess levels of analytes
is made during
validation.
samples.
11-l
The rinsates
are analyzed
in
for the
Field
Blanks
Field blanks consist of the source water used in decontamination,
At a minimum,
analyzed
steam cleaning,
and drilling.
one field blank from each vent and each source of water must be collected
for the same parameters
as the related
taken to the field in sealed containers
predesignated
locations.
samples.
Organic-free
and poured into the appropriate
This is done to determine
deionized
and
water is
sample containers
if any contaminants
present
at
in the area
may have an affect on the sample integrity.
Preservation
Blank
To determine
if the preservative
preservative
deionized
blanks
used prior and during
are prepared.
These
water in the container
samples
field operations
are prepared
and then preserving
was contaminated,
by putting
the sample
with
organic-free
the appropriate
preservative.
Trip
Blank
Analysis
of trip blanks
is performed
to monitor
possible contamination
collection
of samples.
Trip blanks
are initiated
in the laboratory
sample packs. A corresponding
volatile
trip blank
is prepared
during
shipment
and
prior to the shipping
of
for each set of samples to be analyzed
for
organic compounds.
Trip blank
samples are prepared
then filling
the container
accompany
the samples through
the laboratory,
by adding
with organic-free
shipment
four drops of concentrated
deionized
water (ASTM
hydrochloric
Type II).
acid and
The trip blanks
to the sample site, sample collection,
shipment
to
and storage of the samples.
If the analyses indicate
contamination
If the extent and nature
of the trip blank,
of the contamination
the sample sources may be resampled.
does not warrant
such actions, the data will be
accepted as valid.
Method
Analysis
Blank
of method
contamination
blanks
is performed
to verify
that
method
in reagents, glassware, solvents, etc. are minimized
1 l-2
interferences
and known.
caused by
Method
blanks
are initiated
sample set. A method
sample volume
be analyzed
by the analyst
blank
consists of a volume
which is carried through
by GC/MS,
the method
equal to the sample weight.
very least, daily.
Sample
Replicate
sample
is analyzed
procedure.
water equal to the
For solid samples to
solid matrix
approximately
with each set of samples
data of the method blank
indicates
The samples
or at the
excessive contamination,
may be re-analyzed
or the data
upon the nature and extent of the contamination.
is performed
interlaboratory
replicate
carried
the entire
analysis for each analyte
Spike
blank
deionized
of the
Analysis
analysis
through
of organic-free
consists of a purified
will be determined.
may be processed as is depending
Replicate
blank
and/or analysis
to the preparation
the entire analytical
A method
If the analytical
the source of contaminant
prior
sample
to demonstrate
is initiated
analytical
by the analyst
procedure.
is summarized
the precision
of an analysis.
An
prior to sample preparation
and
The frequency
of interlaboratory
replicate
in Table 11-l.
Analysis
Spike analysis
is performed
to demonstrate
the spike prior to sample preparation
a sample.
the accuracy of an analysis.
and analysis
The spike sample is carried through
of spike analysis
Surrogate
for each analyte(s)
by adding a known amount
the entire analytical
is summarized
The analyst
procedure.
initiates
of analyte(s)
to
The frequency
in Table 11-1.
Standards
Surrogate
standard
All samples
analysis
and blanks
prior to extraction
Intixnal
Standards
Internal
standard
purging,
internal
is performed
analyzed
to monitor
by GUMS
the preparation
are fortified
and analyses of samples.
with a surrogate
spiking
solution
or purging.
analyses are performed
standards
to monitor
are added to all blanks
Section 5.1.1.).
11-3
system stability.
and samples analyzed
Prior
to injection
by GUMS
or
(refer to
TABLE
QC ANALYSIS
5%
5%
5%
5%
Metals
Liquids by flame AA or ICP
Solids by flame AA or ICP
All analyses by furnace AA
5%
5%
5%
10%
General Chemistry
Cyanide
Nitrate
Sulfide
5%
5%
5%
and Matrix
spike is an aliquot
of specific compounds
appropriateness
duplicate
Spike
Organic
All analyses by GC/MS
All analyses by GC
Spikes
A matrix
FREQUENCY
Replicate
Parameter
Matrix
11-l
Spike
5%
10%
5%
5%
5%
Duplicates
of a matrix
(water or soil) fortified
and subjected to the entire analytical
of the method
is a second aliquot
for the matrix
of the same matrix
as the matrix
the precision
performed
at a frequency of 1 per 20 samples for organics.
Laboratory
Control
limits
limits
samples are determined
Whenever
the
spike
spike that is spiked in order to
spike and matrix
spike duplicate
duplicates,
blanks,
spikes,
and duplicates
associated
with
Control
for spikes,
duplicates,
are adopted.
internally
an out-of-control
A matrix
recovery.
for QC checks (spikes,
standards
analyses
A matrix
in order to indicate
will be
Limits
are established
for surrogate
Pesticide/PCB
Control
procedure
by measuring
determine
11.3
of the method.
(spiked) with known quantities
situation
through
limits
statistical
11-4
GUMS
CLP control
analyses
and
and reference
analysis.
occurs, the cause is determined.
actions are taken.
etc.).
Any needed corrective
Method
Blanks
For metals analyses, the criteria
below are used for method blank
If the concentration
0
of the method blank
level, no correction
0
of the blank
samples
with a particular
associated
with the least concentrated
blank
concentration
method
0
analyte
must
holding
the concentration
of the sample
must be ten times the blank concentration.
with the blank
and less than ten times the
(reprepared)
and reanalyzed,
cannot be reprepared
and reanalyzed
if
within
The sample value is not corrected for the blank value.
blank
the detection
solvents
level for any group of
times, the flagged sample result and the blank result are both
GC analyses, the criteria
A method
blank,
be redigested
If the affected samples
to be reported.
For GUMS,
is above the detection
all samples associated
possible.
is less than or equal to the detection
of sample results is performed.
If the concentration
Otherwise,
analysis.
below are used for method blank
for volatiles
limit
are:
analysis
of common
methylene
must contain
laboratory
chloride,
analysis.
no greater
solvents
acetone,
than five times
(common
toluene,
laboratory
Z-butanone,
and
chloroform).
0
A method
blank
times the detection
a
for semivolatiles
limit
of common
For all other compounds
than the detection
criteria,
limit
the analytical
the contamination
a method
reextracted/repurged
phthalate
system is considered
blank
that
sample result
is out of control
corrective
and reanalyzed
less
within
The source of
measures
are
All samples processed
contaminated),
are
If the affected samples
method
holding
result are both to be reported.
sample value is not corrected for the blank value.
11-5
(i.e.,
when possible.
and the blank
must contain
to be out of control.
and appropriate
and reanalyzed,
than five
If a method blank exceeds the
before sample analysis proceeds.
blank
no greater
esters.
of any single compound.
cannot be reextractearepurged
the flagged
must contain
not listed above, the method
is investigated
taken and documented
with
analysis
times,
The
0
No positive
result
concentration
0
A method
of the compound
blank
the detection
Surrogate
for pesticides/PCBs
be reported
exceeds five times the amount
for pesticides/PCBs
limit
should
must contain
unless
the
in the blank.
no greater
than five times
for any pesticides/PCBs.
Standards
For method
conditions
blank
surrogate
standard
analysis,
corrective
action is taken
if any one of the
below exist.
0
Recovery of any one surrogate
required
0
surrogate
Recovery of any one surrogate
surrogate
Corrective
standard
action will include
0
standard
in the volatile
fraction
is outside the
recovery limit.
compound
in the semivolatile
fraction
is outside
recovery limits.
steps listed below.
A check of: the calculations
spiking
compound
solutions
for errors; the internal
for degradation,
standard
contamination,
and surrogate
etc.; and instrument
performance.
0
Recalculation
corrective
l
b
and reanalysis
corrective
of the blank.
or extract
Recovery of any one surrogate
Recovery
fraction
For sample
if the above
surrogate
action is taken if any one of the following
outside the surrogate
b
of the blank
actions fail to solve the problem,
Reextraction
analysis,
or reinjectionlrepurging
compounds
conditions
in the volatile
exist:
fraction
spike recovery limits;
of any one surrogate
is below ten percent; or
1 l-6
standard
compound,
in either
semivolatile
is
b
Corrective
Recoveries
of two or more
semivolatile
fraction
action will include
0
compounds
are outside surrogate
in either
spike recovery limits.
the steps listed below.
A check of: the calculations
spiking
surrogate
solutions
for errors; of the internal
for degradation,
contamination,
standard
and surrogate
etc.; and of instrument
performance.
0
Recalculating
or reanalysis
the sample or extract if the above corrective
action
fails to solve the problem.
0
11.4
Prior
Quality
Reextraction
and reanalysis
Assurance
to issuance of a final
Manager,
or a designated
Review
report,
of Reports,
it is reviewed
representative.
The report
regulatory
Assumptions
of the sample if none of the above are a problem.
satisfies
Plans,
by senior-level
the scope of work,
client
are clearly stated, justified,
requirements,
and pertinent
and documented;
utilized
in report preparation
that was
outside the project;
and accurately
and figures
approved according
The report
staff, the Project
requirements;
The report correctly
The tables
program
This review addresses whether:
A reference is cited for any information
originated
and Specifications
presented
presents the results obtained
by the work;
in the report
checked,
are prepared,
and
to requirements;
figures-are
signed and dated by the appropriate
project staff and project management;
11-7
and
members
of the
The
l
typed
capitalization,
11.5
Laboratory
Field Quality
has
been
and spelling
proofread
and
grammar,
are correct.
Assurance
quality
trip blanks,
assurance/quality
equipment
rinsates,
control
field blanks,
samples
in Table 11-2.
A summary
of the number
of environmental
for analysis is given in the FSAP.
11-8
will
be submitted
and field duplicates.
by type of sample with which the QA/QC samples will be submitted
submitted
punctuation,
Assurance
Four types of field
laboratory:
Quality
report
A breakdown
to the laboratories
and QA/QC
to the
samples
is given
to be
TABLE
QA/QC
SAMPLE
Equipment
FREQUENCY
NA1
One per cooler or one per
shipping day
One per day
One per day
only)
Rinsatez
I
One per source per events
1Field Duplicate4
10%
Preservation
Blank
Organic
Metal
Type of Sample
Trip Blank
(for volatiles
11-2
I 10%
Two per event (prior to sampling
sampling event)
and near the end of the
-
Not Applicable
-
Samples are collected daily; however, only samples from every other day are analyzed.
Other samples are held and analyzed only if evidence of contamination
exists.
-
Source water includes water used in decontamination,
-
The duplicate must be taken from the same sample which will become the laboratory
matrix spike/matrix
spike duplicate for organics or for the sample used as a duplicate
in inorganic analysis.
11-9
steam cleaning,
and drilling.
12.0
PERFORMANCE
AND SYSTEM
A field audit will be conducted during
performed
according
to the plan.
completion
of the audit.
Manager
table (Table
or Program
the field investigation
A report
Serious deficiencies
discovery of the deficiency,
The following
AUDITS
including
will be submitted
will be reported
to verify that sampling
within
within
30 calendar
is being
days of
24 hours of the time of
actions taken or to be taken to correct such deficiencies.
12-1) is used for audits.
At the appropriate
QA/QC designee will conduct field audits.
12-1
time,
the Project
TABLE
SYSTEM
AUDIT
12-1
CHECKLIST
- FIELD
OPERATIONS
Project No.
Date
Project Name &
Location
Name & Signature
of Auditor
Team Members
Name & Signature
Field Team
of
Yes
No-----
1.
Is there a set of accountable
the Site Manager?
Comments:
Yes
No-
2.
Is the transfer of field operations from the Site Manager
field participants
documented in a log book?
Comments:
Yes
No-.-..-
3.
Is there a written
descriptions?
Comments:
Yes
No-
4.
Are samples collected as stated in the project
directed by the Site Manager?
Comments:
Yes
No----
5.
Are samples collected in the type of container specified
the project plan or as directed by the Site Manager?
Comments:
Yes
No-
6.
Are samples preserved as specified in the project plan or as
directed by the Site Manager?
Comments:
12-2
list
field documents
of sampling
checked out to
locations
to
and
plan or as
in
TABLE
12-1
SYSTEM
AUDIT
PAGE TWO
CHECKLIST
- FIELD
OPERATIONS
Yes
No-
7.
Are the number, frequency and type of samples collected as
specified in the project plan or as directed by the Site
Manager?
Comments:
Yes
No-
8.
Are the number, frequency and type of measurements
taken as specified in the project plan or as directed by the
Site Manager?
Comments:
Yes
No-
9.
Are samples identified
Comments:
Yes
No----
10.
Are blank and duplicate
Comments:
Yes
No-
11.
Are sample and serial numbers for samples split with
other organizations
recorded in a log book or on a chain-ofcustody record?
Comments:
Yes
No-
12.
Are samples listed on a chain-of-custody
Comments:
Yes
No-
13.
Is chain-of-custody
Comments:
Yes
No-
14.
Are quality
-Comments:
with sample labels?
samples properly
documented
record?
and maintained?
assurance checks performed
12-3
identified?
as directed?
TABLE 12-1
SYSTEM AUDIT
PAGE THREE
CHECKLIST
- FIELD
OPERATIONS
Yes
No----
15.
Are photographs
Comments:
Yes
No--e
16.
Are all documents
Comments:
Yes
No----
17.
Have any documents
Comments:
12-4
documented
in logbooks as required?
accounted for?
been voided or destroyed?
13.0
PREVENTIVE
13.1
Field
MAINTENANCE
Maintenance
The HNu PI-101 is to be used in site characterization
the manufacturer’s
sampling
13.2
instructions.
will be maintained
Laboratory
and will be maintained
The pH and specific conductance
according
to Appendix
as described by
meters to be used during
A, Field Water Quality
Instruments.
Maintenance
Preventive
maintenance
equipment
from failing
is an organized
during
program
of actions
use and to maintain
instruments.
A comprehensive
preventive
the reliability
of the measurement
proper performance
maintenance
system.
to prevent
program
The preventive
instruments
and
of equipment
and
is implemented
maintenance
to increase
program
addresses
the following:
Schedules of important
l
downtime;
The laboratory
Trouble
described
spare parts that are available
maintains
shooting,
Instruments
maintenance
tasks that are carried out to minimize
and
Lists of critical
l
preventive
histories,
maintenance,
and equipment
in individual
in instrument/equipment
and spare parts
are maintained
analytical
to minimize
methods,
downtime.
logs, of all major
inventory
periodically
are recorded
in accordance
manufacturer’s
equipment.
in the logs.
with
recommendation,
procedures
and/or service
contracts.
The modern
therefore,
analytical
cleaning
production
and preventive
of satisfactory
instrumentation
Special
equipment
eliminate
depends heavily
maintenance
Specific
data.
and equipment
some general guidelines
l
laboratory
precautions
are taken
and instrumentation
are primary
requirements
are contained
are considered,
upon instrumentation
and equipment;
considerations
for proper
in the manufacturer’s
in the sustained
care of laboratory
instructions;
however,
and are listed below.
to avoid spillage
of corrosive
chemicals
not only to extend the life of the item,
contamination.
13-1
on or around
but also to
l
Where available,
l
Instrument
covers are placed on instrumentation
parts are cleaned as required
13-2
(i.e., mirrors,
when not in use.
probes, detector cells).
14.0
DATA
14.1
Overall
Overall
MEASUREMENT
Prqiect
data quality
objectives
ASSESSMENT
Assessment
will be assessed by a thorough
which are stated during
thorough
documentation
and laboratory
audits, thoroughly
reviewing
and providing
laboratory,
data accuracy, precision,
Field
Quality
appropriate
feedback
appropriate
procedures
indications
be instituted
14.3
are being
a thorough
of the data quality.
Data
for each parameter
data generated
by the
or at the
will be closely monitored.
and correctly,
during
with
specific written
by the Project
the investigation
instructions
Manager.
to document
respect to sample
(and blank)
The
that the
collection.
review of the field books used by the project personnel
as specified
in the instructions.
The field audits
to
will
to be assessed with regard to the field operations.
If a problem
Quality
Assessment
QA/QC
program,
that is analyzed.
are reviewed
and evaluated
are method and matrix
and other field QC samples will provide definitive
that can be isolated
arises, corrective
actions can
Method
Blank
characteristic
Evaluation
the laboratory
applies
When analysis
of a sample set is completed,
to ensure
acceptance
precision
criteria
and accuracy
are met.
QC
These
specific.
QAIQC data review is based on the following
l
field
for future field efforts.
As part of the analytical
criteria
followed
(data review) of field blanks,
Laboratory
criteria
field audit(s)
enable the data quality
The evaluation
arise in the field
in field data acquisition
that all tasks were performed
necessarily
performing
data as they are generated
as problems
and completeness
involved
will perform
These audits will include
insure
By maintaining
Assessment
will be issued to all personnel
Manager
of the data quality
each phase of sampling,
the analytical
To assure that all field data are collected accurately
Project
understanding
the design phase of the investigation.
of all decisions made during
laboratory,
14.2
PROCEDURES
criteria:
- The method
of background
blank results are evaluated
contamination.
14-l
If high
blank
for high readings
values
are observed,
laboratory
future
glassware and reagents
samples
background
halted
until
are checked for contamination
the system
is defined as a background
value sufficient
sample values, if not corrected, greater
l
known to be valid.
A method
parameter
detection
limit
Trip Blank
Evaluation
can be brought
under
than or equal to the smallest
blank
must
contain
no greater
- Trip blank
results are evaluated
to result in a difference
shipment,
significant
in the
digit
two times
the
for high readings
trip blanks exhibit
significant
is probably
the laboratory.
similar
are encountered
to
(i.e. a
in sample values, if not corrected, greater than
digit
and laboratory
within
A high
significant
than
of
for most parameters.
or equal to the smallest
collection,
control.
to result in a difference
the method blanks described above. If high trip blank readings
value sufficient
and the analysis
known
analysis
background
to be valid),
are reviewed.
for sample
If both the method
contamination,
Ambient
procedures
and the
the source of contamination
air in the laboratory
and reagents
are
checked as possible sources of contamination.
l
Standard
Calibration
calibration
standard
through
Curve
Verification
(check standard)
is evaluated
If the curve is not linear,
response factors are used to calculate
on a daily
basis.
accomplished
Verification
of calibration
response
curves
and response
for any parameter
Duplicate
Sample
precision
of the analytical
method
sample
analyses
for the sample
precision
exceeds the control limit,
Precision
l
Reference
limits
matrix.
Sample
Analvses
is reanalyzed
- The results
and the percent
is required
following
14-2
the
the
Two types of duplicate
Duplicate
results are
duplicate
for the parameter
sample
analysis
recovery of the reference sample
that the corrective
from
is
values
in question.
review of data.
of reference
(excessive or inadequate
to demonstrate
varies
If interlaboratory
the sample set are reanalyzed
are updated periodically
with true values,
correction
as defined by the RPD.
factors
are used to determine
samples are analyzed for this project, field, and interlaboratory.
used to calculate
If average
these factors are verified
response by less than ranges specified in Section 7.0.
- Duplicate
curve linearity
sample values are corrected.
calibrated
Analvses
or midpoint
the range defined by the low
sample concentrations,
when the evaluated
curve
daily to determine
its full range and that sample values are within
and high standards.
a
- The c.alibration
are compared
is calculated.
percent recovery), the reference sample
action has been successful.
If
l
Surropate
Standard
Analyses
- Surrogate
all samples and blanks for GUMS
surrogate
spiking
compounds
analysis of samples.
not met, corrective
standard
analyses.
are performed
All samples and blanks
before purging
Recoveries
determinations
or extraction
are fortified
with
preparation
and
to monitor
must meet specific criteria.
on
If acceptance criteria
action is taken to correct the problem
are
and the affected sample
is
reanalyzed.
l
Matrix
Spike Analyses
- The observed recovery
recovery is used to calculate
accuracy value
exceeds the control
laboratory
personnel
reanalyzed
for the parameter
For completeness,
accuracy
notified
as defined
limit
and corrective
reextracted,
Data representativeness
sampling
14.4
within
data generated
the use of appropriate
of the data.
in past or future
set is
characterization
criteria
To
will be
analytical
procedures,
times.
By using standard
investigations
methods
for
will be comparable
Data Validation
A preliminary
to verify all necessary paperwork
reports, and laboratory
will
personnel
assurance
review
qualitative
and quantitative
be performed
reliability
and deliverables
by a data
validation
of the data presented.
all data generated
which will be used by experienced
data validation
established
judgment.
and professional
review will be performed
(e.g., chain-of-custodies,
signatures)
review and interpretation,of
criteria,
proposed for chemical
the allowed holding
characteristic
Review of analyses will be performed.
detailed
action is taken before the sample
data.
Laboratory
manager
the appropriate
or reanalyzed.
is a qualitative
with this investigation
If the
for at least 95 percent of all sample data.
will be ensured through
and analyses,
recovery.
goal, sample data that does not meet the established
and analysis of samples performed
Comparability
by the percent
spike
in question.
of the samples will meet QC acceptance criteria
recollected,
versus theoretical
for the given parameter,
it is expected that the methodology
ensure this completeness
of spike
14-3
traffic reports,
are present.
analytical
A detailed
subcontractor
quality
to verify
This review
by the laboratory.
personnel
by the project
will
include
The primary
will be guidance
the
a
tools
documents,
A quality
analytical
assurance
stating
followed by qualifying
analytical
results
applicable
guidance,
statements
to be best utilized.
format,
and quantitative
reliability
This report will consist of a general
that should
The report
be taken
will
reference
introduction
into consideration
NEESA
of the
for the
20.2-047B
for
and standards.
the data review, a data support
provide the back-up information
quality
the qualitative
data will be prepared for NEESA.
section,
During
report
documentation
that will accompany
assurance review.
14-4
package will be prepared
all qualifying
statements
which will
present in the
15.0
CORRECTIVE
Corrective
ACTION
action is taken whenever
a nonconformance
as an event which is beyond the limits
Nonconformances
procedures,
established
can occur in a number
sample
receipt,
sample
occurs.
for a particular
of activities.
storage,
A nonconformance
operation
Such activities
sample
is defined
analysis,
by the plan.
include
data
sampling
reporting,
and
computations.
The following
l
personnel
are responsible
Project Staff - during
testing
for detecting
and preparation
and reporting
nonconformances:
and verification
of numerical
analyses;
and
l
Laboratory
Staff - during
procedures, calibration
Corrective
15.1
Nonconformances
the preparation
of equipment,
for analyses,
and quality
performance
of analytical
control activities.
Action
are documented
by the person originating
or identifying
it. Documentation
includes the following:
l
Identification
of the individual(s)
l
Description
of the nonconformance;
l
Any required
l
Corrective
action taken; and
l
Corrective
action completion
The NEESA
notified
contract
approval
signatures
representative
of a nonconformance
originating
or identifying
the nonconformance;
(initials);
date.
(NCR),
and corrective
along with the contract
project director.
action taken, if one of the following
l
A nonconformance
causes a delay in work beyond the schedule completion
l
A nonconformance
affects information
already reported;
l
A nonconformance
affects the validity
of the data.
15-1
and
is true:
date;
will be
15.2
Limits
The limits
of Operation
of operation
that
are used to identify
contents of the plan and by control limits
nonconformances
produced by statistical
15-2
are established
analyses.
by the
,- “.._”.,_._-.
QUALITY
16.0
The Project
systems
Manager
and data
maintained
assessment
significant
problem
The Project
informal,
quality
related
Manager
PROCEDURES
for assessing
to the field
the performance
investigation.
of laboratory
QC reports
precision,
and completeness;
data accuracy,
and any significant
REPORTING
will be responsible
of: the results
measurement,
QA/QC
ASSURANCE
QA problems
section.
and recommended
Also,
a QAlQC
A written
and other
solutions.
assessment
of measurement
periodic
performance
record
will
be
assessments
of
and system audits;
Each deliverable
will
be performed
will contain
a
any time
a
is identified.
will
keep in contact
-
with
the Navy
verbal reports during the project as well as through
16-1
Engineer-in-Charge
monthly
progress reports.
through
“___ -_--.-
APPENDIX
FIELD
A.
Calibration
Activity
Field
and Preventive
Before
to be used
conductance/thermistor
thermometer
Maintenance
during
sampling,
and precision
certified
by the contractor
KC1 solutions
by the National
laboratory
to be used to field calibrate
on each of the containers
to be taken
with the instrument,
facilitate
manager.
immediate
All equipment
operating
Bureau
In addition,
into
the field.
pH
and
laboratory
to
will be checked against
a
These activities
buffer solutions
will be
and standard
meters will be laboratory
solutions
A log which
will be clearly
documents
measures taken, battery replacement
and thermometer
specific
meters
of Standards.
date of standard
new batteries
replacement,
to be utilized
condition.
instructions
Appropriate
the contractor
the pH and conductivity
corrective
used and by whom for each meter
the
Thermometers
manager.
The preparation
laboratory
specifically
response.
tested to insure accuracy.
experienced
INSTRUMENTS
meters will be checked against
insure proper calibration
performed
QUALITY
Site Visit
meters
precision
WATER
A
will be maintained
marked
problems
dates, when
by the contractor’s
will be purchased and kept with the meters to
when necessary in the field.
during
the field sampling
This includes
checking
with each instrument
will be examined
the manufacturer’s
to certify that it is in
operating
to ensure that all maintenance
manuals
and the
items are being observed.
spare electrode will be sent with each pH meter that is to be used for field measurements.
thermometers
including
Activity
will be sent to each field site where measurement
those sites where a specific conductance/thermistor
of temperature
A
Two
is required,
meter is required.
at Site
The pH meter must be calibrated
buffer solutions
a minimum
of twice each day using at least two different
expected to bracket the pH range of field samples.
between buffer measurements
with distilled
pH reading
the sample.
by measuring
If the reading
is completed.
were used. When the meter is moved, check
the pH value of the buffer solution
deviates
Rinse the probe thoroughly
water and again after calibration
Record in the field log book what buffer solutions
closest to the expected range of
from the known value by more than 0.1 standard
A-L
pH
units,
-
recalibrate
the instrument
the operating
manual
as described
for remedial
within
dependent
conductivity
and, therefore,
the standard
meter
daily checks against
the expected
solution.
Thoroughly
readings
must also be checked daily.
Before use, visually
column.
to daily
If there is a break, visually
by taking
is all contained
in the bulb.
of
in the mercury
the break is corrected.
will be obtained
in accordance
with “Handbook
This may be
Methods
All field measurements
Preservation
procedures
reading
If both thermometers
the mercury
Methods
in KC1
thermometer.
to assure there is no break
inspect the spare thermometer.
of
the thermistor
a temperature
done by cooling the bulb until
Sample
is temperature-
readings,
neither
Analvtical
be chosen to be
water after immersing
probe and a mercury
can be used until
and
to reflect the temperature
checks of the conductivity
the thermometer
fluctuations
conductance
must be adjusted
This is accomplished
random
have a break in the mercury,
B.
still occur, consult
which should
Note that specific
with both the conductivity
inspect
to exhibit
rinse the probe with distilled
solution.
solution
deviations
a known KC1 solution,
range.
standard
the KC1 standard
is less likely
the meter readings
In addition
If unacceptable
course of action.
The specific conductance/thermistor
will only require
above.
of Water and Wastewater,”
for Evaluating
Solid Wastes,”
for field analysis and equipment
SW-846,
EPA-60014-82-029,
November
are detailed
A-2
1986.
for Sampling
September
The quality
in these documents
cited.
and
1982 or “Test
assurance
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