WinSen Property Sentinel: User manual

WinSen Property Sentinel: User manual
Installation and Operations Manual
WinSen Property Sentinel
TM
Sentinel Systems Corporation
CREDITS
Steve Barker
Bruce Guthals
Alex Russo
Copyright  1996-2000 Sentinel Systems Corporation
All Rights Reserved
Sentinel Systems Corporation
1620 Kipling Street
Lakewood, CO 80215
(800) 456-9955
http://www.SentinelSystems.com
The WinSen Sentinel Installation & Operations Manual is copyrighted and all rights are reserved. No
part of this manual may be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated, or reduced to any electronic
medium or machine readable form without the prior written consent of Sentinel Systems Corporation.
The names of persons and entities referenced in this manual are for illustrative purposes only.
Similarity to any person or entity is unintended and purely coincidental.
Version 2.5
Revised 06/07/2000
Contents at a Glance
Introduction.............................................................................................................. 1
Program Configuration.......................................................................................... 15
Operations.............................................................................................................. 43
Peripheral Operations ........................................................................................... 55
Hardware Installation............................................................................................. 57
Appendices ............................................................................................................ 93
Glossary of Terms ............................................................................................... 135
Index ..................................................................................................................... 137
Table of Contents
Introduction.............................................................................................................. 1
System Overview......................................................................................................................................1
Reports .......................................................................................................................................2
System Equipment Description ................................................................................................................2
Installation from Diskette .........................................................................................................................3
Installation from CD-ROM ......................................................................................................................4
Running the program................................................................................................................................5
Licensing ..................................................................................................................................................5
Organization of the Menus .......................................................................................................................7
Options .......................................................................................................................................7
Maintenance ...............................................................................................................................8
Help............................................................................................................................................8
Password Protection .................................................................................................................................8
How to Make Menu Selections ................................................................................................................9
Data Entry Forms .....................................................................................................................................9
Date Fields in Data Entry Forms..............................................................................................10
Printers and Report Viewing Forms .......................................................................................................11
Select Printer Form ..................................................................................................................11
Report Viewing Form ..............................................................................................................12
Program Configuration.......................................................................................... 15
Overview ................................................................................................................................................15
Site Setup................................................................................................................................................15
Site Information .......................................................................................................................16
Password Maintenance.............................................................................................................16
Password Access Levels...........................................................................................................18
Setups .....................................................................................................................................................19
Holidays .................................................................................................................................................23
Time Zones.............................................................................................................................................24
Keypad Configuration ............................................................................................................................25
Keypad Access Levels............................................................................................................................26
Cardreader Configuration.......................................................................................................................27
Cardreader Access Levels ......................................................................................................................29
Door Status Boards.................................................................................................................................30
Elevator Control .....................................................................................................................................33
ECB Definitions .......................................................................................................................33
Elevator Access Levels ............................................................................................................35
Elevator Access Levels Unit Table ..........................................................................................36
Display Settings......................................................................................................................................37
Workstation Settings ..............................................................................................................................39
Open Gate Hot Key..................................................................................................................40
Sound Effects ...........................................................................................................................40
Visual Effects ...........................................................................................................................42
i
Operations .............................................................................................................. 43
Overview of Daily Operations............................................................................................................... 43
Tenant Operations.................................................................................................................................. 43
If you are using WinSen Property Manager ............................................................................ 43
Unit/Tenant Operations Form.................................................................................................. 43
Start and Stop Communications ............................................................................................................ 49
Open Gate/Door..................................................................................................................................... 49
Display Operation Summary ................................................................................................................. 49
Reports................................................................................................................................................... 50
Backup Database ................................................................................................................................... 51
Regarding backups .................................................................................................................. 53
Restore Database ................................................................................................................................... 53
Peripheral Operations............................................................................................ 55
Keypad Operation.................................................................................................................................. 55
Cardreader Operation ............................................................................................................................ 56
Hardware Installation............................................................................................. 57
Foreword ............................................................................................................................................... 57
A Note to the Electrical Contractor ....................................................................................................... 57
Alarm System Installation Types ............................................................................................ 57
Computer Equipment............................................................................................................................. 58
Multiple outlet strip ................................................................................................................. 58
IBM Compatible PC................................................................................................................ 58
Printer...................................................................................................................................... 58
Communications Interface Module (CIM), Model 430 ......................................................................... 58
Power Supply Unit................................................................................................................................. 59
Access Control System.......................................................................................................................... 59
Conduit Installation ................................................................................................................. 59
Gate Operator and Pedestal (Gooseneck) Stands .................................................................... 59
Gate Installation..................................................................................................................................... 60
Pedestal Stand Installation..................................................................................................................... 60
Keypad Installation................................................................................................................................ 60
Pedestal Mount, Gate Control Application.............................................................................. 61
Wall Mount, Door Control Application .................................................................................. 63
Keypad Programming.............................................................................................................. 64
Cardreader Interface (CRI) and Cardreader Installation........................................................................ 64
CRI Enclosure Installation ...................................................................................................... 64
Cardreader Housing Installation.............................................................................................. 65
CRI and Cardreader Wiring .................................................................................................... 66
Elevator Control Board (ECB) Installation............................................................................................ 67
ECB Enclosure Installation ..................................................................................................... 67
ECB Wiring............................................................................................................................. 68
ECB Programming .................................................................................................................. 69
Alarm Monitoring System Installation .................................................................................................. 69
Conduit Installation ................................................................................................................. 69
Door Status Board (DSB) and Door Switch Installation ......................................................... 70
Interior Installation for New Construction .............................................................................. 70
Exterior Installation for Existing Facilities ............................................................................. 75
Door Switch and DSB Wire Terminating................................................................................ 80
DSB Enclosure Wiring and Terminating, Interior and Exterior Installations.......................... 82
Office Computer Equipment - Wiring and Testing ............................................................................... 84
Communication Cable Terminations....................................................................................... 84
Relay Output Module .............................................................................................................. 85
ii
PIO-12/PIO-24 Installation ......................................................................................................86
Computer..................................................................................................................................86
Peripheral Equipment - Testing..............................................................................................................87
Keypads....................................................................................................................................87
Cardreader Interface (CRI) Boards and Cardreaders ...............................................................88
Elevator Control Boards (ECBs)..............................................................................................88
Door Status Boards ..................................................................................................................88
Alarm Outputs..........................................................................................................................89
Perimeter Beam System ...........................................................................................................89
Area Beam System...................................................................................................................89
Installation Sign-Off...............................................................................................................................91
Installation Check List .............................................................................................................91
Appendices ............................................................................................................ 93
Appendix A- Troubleshooting................................................................................................................93
General Access Control Problems............................................................................................93
Problems Specific to Individual Door Alarm Systems.............................................................96
Appendix B - Keypad Programming ......................................................................................................98
Appendix C - CRI Programming..........................................................................................................100
Appendix D - DSB Programming ........................................................................................................101
Appendix E – ECB Programming ........................................................................................................103
ECB Mode .............................................................................................................................103
ECB Address..........................................................................................................................103
ECB Relay Timeouts..............................................................................................................103
Appendix F - Installation Drawings .....................................................................................................104
Drawing List ..........................................................................................................................104
Drawing 1 – Gate Detail, Slide Gate, Two Keypad ...............................................................105
Drawing 2 – Gate Detail, Dual Barrier Arm, Two Keypad....................................................106
Drawing 3 – Gate Detail, Slide Gate, Two Cardreader ..........................................................107
Drawing 4 – Gate Detail, Dual Barrier Arm, Two Cardreader ..............................................108
Drawing 5 – Pedestal Stand ...................................................................................................109
Drawing 6 – PC and Peripheral Wiring Diagram...................................................................110
Drawing 7 – Keypad Wiring Diagram ...................................................................................111
Drawing 8 – Cardreader Interface Board Wiring Diagram ....................................................112
Drawing 9 – Gate/Door Control Wiring Details ....................................................................113
Drawing 10 – Elevator Control Board Wiring Diagram ........................................................114
Drawing 11 – Wiring Diagram, Doublewide Housing, with Pinhole Camera .......................115
Drawing 15 – Rollup Door Wiring Details (Interior )............................................................116
Drawing 16 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 2 (Interior)..........................................................117
Drawing 17 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 3 (Interior)..........................................................118
Drawing 18 – Swing Door Wiring Details (Interior) .............................................................119
Drawing 19 – Swing Door Wiring Details 2 (Interior) ..........................................................120
Drawing 20 – Rollup Door Wiring Details (Exterior)............................................................121
Drawing 21 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 2 (Exterior).........................................................122
Drawing 22 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 3 (Exterior).........................................................123
Drawing 23 – Swing Door Wiring Details (Exterior) ............................................................124
Drawing 24 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 2 (Exterior).........................................................125
Drawing 25 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 3 (Exterior).........................................................126
Drawing 26 – Door Status Board Wiring Diagram ................................................................127
Drawing 27 – CIM Wiring Diagram ......................................................................................128
Drawing 28 – ERA-01 Relay Module Wiring Diagram.........................................................129
Drawing 29 – Perimeter Beam System Wiring Diagram .......................................................130
Wire List – Door Status Board Enclosure ..............................................................................131
Appendix G – Initialization File Variables...........................................................................................133
iii
Glossary of Terms................................................................................................ 135
Index...................................................................................................................... 137
iv
Introduction
Thank you for purchasing the finest product of its kind available to the Self Storage industry. You
will find your new security control system to be an invaluable tool in managing your facility. You
will also find that your tenants will appreciate the security which it provides them.
This manual will provide the information you will need to:
•
Initially install and setup the Microsoft Windows based WinSen Sentinel Security System.
•
Program the system to match your site and preferred operating procedures.
•
Operate and maintain your system day-to-day.
System Overview
The WinSen Sentinel Access Control & Alarm System consists of several basic components,
including the IBM PC Compatible Computer with Microsoft Windows installed, Keypads,
Communications Interface Module (CIM), Cardreader Interface boards (CRI), and
Cardreaders. If you have purchased an alarm system there will also be one or more Door Status
Boards (DSB).
The heart of the system is the IBM PC Compatible Computer running Microsoft Windows. The PC
performs the overall monitoring and control of the system and provides the operator interface to the
system functions.
Keypads can be connected to the PC to provide access control. A tenant can utilize a keypad to input
his/her chosen code number to gain access to the facility. Keypads are wired in parallel onto a
common, four wire Communication Cable.
Cardreaders are connected to Cardreader Interface boards (CRI’s). CRI’s can support any card reader
with a “Weigand” interface. The CRI’s are in turn wired in parallel onto the communication cable.
The CRI’s communicate with the PC over this cable.
For multi-story storage facilities, Elevator Control Boards (ECB’s) can be utilized to control tenant
access to floors. Thus, if a tenant has rented a unit on a certain floor, WinSen Sentinel can be setup to
allow that tenant access to only that floor.
The collection of peripheral devices interconnected on one communication cable is referred to as the
Communication Chain.
Chapter 1 - Introduction
System Overview • 1
If you have purchased an alarm system: for individual door alarm capability the door inputs are
wired to Door Status Boards (DSB’s). The DSB’s are wired in parallel onto the communication
cable.
Located near each door will be a switch which is wired to a DSB input. The switch serves to signal
the closed or open status of the door to the DSB. A magnet, mounted to the door itself, actuates the
switch to generate a “door closed” status.
Reports
WinSen Sentinel has a powerful report generating capability. You can print reports on tenant activity,
unit status, alarm status, and event descriptions. The reports can then be exported to other
applications such as spreadsheet or database programs, or sent as electronic mail if your system is so
equipped. For details on report generating and exporting capabilities, see “Reports” on page 50.
System Equipment Description
Your system is composed of several pieces of equipment. In your office will be the IBM PC
Compatible Computer. The minimum hardware and software requirements for the PC are as follows:
•
IBM PC or 100% Compatible
•
Pentium processor or higher
•
Microsoft Windows 3.1, 95, 98, NT 4, or 2000
•
32 MB RAM
•
1 GB hard drive
•
40 MB free hard drive space
•
VGA Monitor
•
1 Floppy Disk Drive
•
Windows compatible printer
•
Mouse
•
Two serial ports.
Connected to the PC will be at least three other essential pieces of equipment.
•
An 80 or 120 column, dot matrix or laser printer will display, in hardcopy form, the report
data for your site: comprehensive and single unit activity reports, and tenant reports.
•
The second is the important Communications Interface Module (CIM). This device acts as
a buffer between the remotely mounted peripheral units and the PC serial communication
port. The long lengths of communication cable connecting the peripheral units to the PC are
prone to picking up power surges, particularly during severe electrical storms. Without some
form of protection, these power surges could potentially severely damage the sensitive
electronic components in the PC. The CIM is designed to effectively divert these power
surges to ground before they can cause damage to the PC.
•
The third essential part of the in-office portion of the system is the Power Supply Unit. The
power supply converts the 115 VAC power line voltage to the DC voltage required by the
CIM and peripherals.
2 • System Equipment Description
Chapter 1 - Introduction
The last essential piece of equipment is the user-supplied, power outlet strip with surge suppression.
This device usually consists of six power outlets, and separate power-on and overload indicators.
They can be purchased inexpensively from most computer dealers or retail outlets. The AC line surge
suppressor protects the system from power line surges.
Mounted outside your office will be one or more of the following peripheral devices.
•
Keypads and/or Cardreaders.
•
Cardreader Interface boards (mounted in enclosures).
•
Elevator Control Boards (ECB’s).
•
Door Status Boards (DSB’s), which monitor the status of each unit door that is wired to the
alarm system.
•
A siren which sounds in the event of an unauthorized unit entry.
You will find the operation of the system to be straightforward. Error messages are provided which
will call your attention to missed or incorrect operations. “Context sensitive” help is provided at the
touch of the F1 function key. However, if you are unsure about any procedure, consult this manual.
Installation from Diskette
1. Before installing, we recommend that you close all open applications.
2. If you are planning to make any changes to the standard letters or the reports included with
the system, you should install the 16 bit version of Crystal Reports at this time. If
applicable, install the 16 bit version of Crystal Reports according to the instructions
supplied with the Crystal Reports CD-ROM or diskettes. If you do not plan on making
changes to the standard letters and/or reports, it is unnecessary to install Crystal Reports.
3. Insert the #1 distribution disk into the source floppy drive (this will typically be your A:
drive).
4. Point to the Start button to display the Start Menu. You can also bring up the Start Menu by
pressing <Ctrl+Esc>. From the Start Menu, choose “Run”.
5. You will be presented with a dialog box asking for the “Command Line”. Type A:SETUP
then press ENTER or click on OK. Type B:SETUP instead if you are installing from your
B: drive.
6. An introductory message will be displayed, recommending that you backup your data before
installing an update. If you are installing an update and have not backed up your database, do
so before continuing. Click OK to display the Welcome dialog. After reading the messages
in the Welcome dialog, click Next.
7. The Software License Agreement dialog will be displayed. After reading the Software
License Agreement, click Yes to continue. You must click Yes, indicating your acceptance
of the agreement, to install WinSen.
8. You will then be given the option of Express, Complete, or Custom setup. Express installs
WinSen with the most common options and is recommended for most users. Complete
installs all WinSen programs. Custom allows you to choose which programs to install, the
destination folder, and the start menu folder to place the WinSen icons into. Select your
preferred installation mode and click Next.
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Installation from Diskette • 3
9. The Start Installation dialog will be displayed, showing the programs to be installed, and the
destination folder. Click Next to install the selected WinSen programs. You will be asked
for additional disks as required. If you are installing an update, the installation program will
likely not ask for all of the disks. Only new files are copied, so this is normal and nothing to
be concerned about.
10. The Installation Complete dialog will be displayed. Click the Readme button if you wish to
read the latest WinSen release notes. When you are ready, click Finish.
11. You will now have a new program group called “WinSen” (this may be different if you chose
a custom installation). Within this program group will be icons for the WinSen programs you
installed.
This concludes the diskette program installation.
Installation from CD-ROM
1. Before installing, we recommend that you close all open applications.
2. If you are planning to make any changes to the standard letters or the reports included with
the system, you should install the 16 bit version of Crystal Reports at this time. If
applicable, install the 16 bit version of Crystal Reports according to the instructions
supplied with the Crystal Reports CD-ROM or diskettes. If you do not plan on making
changes to the standard letters and/or reports, it is unnecessary to install Crystal Reports.
3. Insert the WinSen CD into your CD-ROM drive. After a few seconds, the “WinSen
Installation System” will run automatically. Select the “Install WinSen” option to run the
WinSen Setup program.
4. If for some reason the WinSen Installation System does not run automatically, point to the
Start button to display the Start Menu. You can also bring up the Start Menu by pressing
<Ctrl+Esc>. From the Start Menu, choose “Run”, then type D:\Setup and click OK. This
assumes D: is your CD-ROM drive, if this is not the case use the appropriate drive letter. The
WinSen setup program will run.
5. An introductory message will be displayed, recommending that you backup your data before
installing an update. If you are installing an update and have not backed up your database, do
so before continuing. Click OK to display the Welcome dialog. After reading the messages
in the Welcome dialog, click Next.
6. The Software License Agreement dialog will be displayed. After reading the Software
License Agreement, click Yes to continue. You must click Yes, indicating your acceptance
of the agreement, to install WinSen.
7. You will then be given the option of Express, Complete, or Custom setup. Express installs
WinSen with the most common options and is recommended for most users. Complete
installs all WinSen programs. Custom allows you to choose which programs to install, the
destination folder, and the start menu folder to place the WinSen icons into. Select your
preferred installation mode and click Next.
8. The Start Installation dialog will be displayed, showing the programs to be installed, and the
destination folder. Click Next to install the selected WinSen programs.
9. The Installation Complete dialog will be displayed. Click the Readme button if you wish to
read the latest WinSen release notes. When you are ready, click Finish.
4 • Installation from CD-ROM
Chapter 1 - Introduction
10. You will now have a new program group called “WinSen” (this may be different if you chose
a custom installation). Within this program group will be icons for the WinSen programs you
installed.
This concludes the CD-ROM program installation.
Running the program
The following assumes that WinSen Sentinel has already been installed on your system. If you have
not yet installed the software, please refer to the previous section for installation instructions.
Point to the Start button, then Programs, then WinSen. Then select “WinSen Property Sentinel”:
If you are running the trial version of WinSen Sentinel for the first time, it will display an
introductory message saying that the trial period is 30 days. The program will run for 30 days from
the first time it is run. To obtain a license key to enable the full version, please refer to the following
section, “Licensing”.
The WinSen Sentinel window will be displayed:
WinSen Sentinel will then begin communications with the communication chain. You can now
click on the “minimize” button to run WinSen Sentinel as an icon, and go to your favorite word
processor, spreadsheet, or any other application. You must leave WinSen Sentinel running at all
times in order for the keypads and alarm system to function.
We recommend that you start WinSen Sentinel automatically every time you start Windows. To do
this, you can either move or copy this icon to your Windows “Startup” group. To copy the icon, hold
down the Ctrl key, then use your system mouse to drag the icon to your “Startup” group. From then
on, WinSen Sentinel will load automatically every time you start Windows.
Licensing
The WinSen licensing program is used to enter the user registration information, and change the
WinSen licensing options. The WinSen CD-ROM contains all WinSen programs. You can install
any of the programs on the CD, but if a particular program has not been purchased, it becomes a trial
version which will run for 30 days from the date of installation. The WinSen Licensing program
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Running the program • 5
allows you to enter a software key which changes purchased software from trial to fully enabled
versions.
There are two ways to run the WinSen Licensing program. You can either select the Licensing option
from the Help menu, or point to the Start button to display the Start Menu, select the “Run” option,
type in c:\winsen\license, then click OK. The following form will be displayed:
If you do not already have a license key, contact Sentinel Systems (SSC). You will be asked for the
Computer ID number displayed by the Licensing form. Based on the Computer ID and the
software you have purchased, SSC will create a license key consisting of a sequence of characters you
will enter in the License Key field. The key can be received from SSC via telephone, fax, mail, or
electronic mail. When you receive it, write it down in a safe place in case you ever have to reinstall
the software. Note that the key is good only for the original computer; if you need to transfer the
WinSen software to a new computer, contact SSC for a new license key.
The Registered Programs, Options, Unit Limit, and Net Licenses fields show the programs and
options that have been purchased, the number of units allowed in WinSen Property Manager, and the
number of network licenses purchased. These fields are for display only and cannot be directly
changed.
The Trigger Codes fields are used for special situations. For example, if you are running WinSen on
a trial basis, and the trial period has expired, and you would like another 30 day trial period, SSC can
issue a trigger code to accomplish this. In cases like this, contact SSC and give the technician the
Code Entry Number and the Computer ID. You will then be given one or two trigger codes.
In the Name and Company fields, enter the name of the person who owns the software, and the
company name. The Serial Number field cannot be edited; it will be set appropriately by the license
6 • Licensing
Chapter 1 - Introduction
key. Enter the license key or trigger code(s) received from SSC in the appropriate field, then click
OK. All appropriate software options will be enabled according to the entered license key or trigger
code(s), and the Licensing form will close. The changes will not take effect until you close and
reopen WinSen.
Organization of the Menus
Following is a brief explanation of the various menu selections. These selections will be explained in
detail later on in this manual.
Options
Unit/Tenant Operations: If you are using WinSen Sentinel as a standalone program (without
WinSen Property Manager), this selection allows you to perform tenant operations such as moveins,
moveouts, lockouts, and readmits. It is also used to add, edit, and delete units.
Always on Top: When selected, this option will cause WinSen Sentinel to always be visible on your
screen, no matter what application you are running. A “√” mark indicates that the option is selected.
Start Communications: This selection will start communications with the communication chain.
Stop Communications: This selection stops communications with the communication chain.
Open Gate/Door: Allows you to open a specified gate/door from the office.
Event/Display settings: Allows you to specify which information to display in the “Event Window”,
e.g., customer name, unit number, etc.
Workstation settings: This allows various options to be set up, for example your communications
port, logging printer port, sound effects, visual effects, etc.
Display Operation summary: This option shows the current communication status, including the
number of communications errors, if any, that have occurred within the system.
Reports: This option allows various reports to be printed. For example, you can generate a report
detailing the activity for a specific unit. The reports can be saved to a file, viewed on the screen in a
window, or printed.
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Organization of the Menus • 7
Exit: Exits the WinSen Sentinel program. “Alt+F4” will also close the program (this key combination
closes any Windows application).
Maintenance
Setups: Setup various access options, e.g. whether to allow delinquent tenants on-site, anti-passback
options, perimeter beam setups, etc.
Holidays: This selection allows you to define what days of the year are considered to be Holidays.
On a holiday the system can use different access hours if you desire. Please note that we do not ship
the system with any holidays programmed.
Time Zones: Allows you to define the various time zones. For example, time zone 0 can be for
normal access hours while time zone 1 could be for tenants with 24 hour access.
Keypads: Setup how many keypads and what type of keypads are in use at your facility.
Keypad Access Levels: Defines the “access levels” for a particular keypad. Access levels allow you
to give selected tenants access to a particular keypad, while denying others. In this way, you can have
an area of your facility where only designated tenants can gain access.
Cardreaders: Setup how many cardreaders are in use at your facility.
Cardreader Access Levels: Same as “Keypad Access Levels” above, but applies to cardreaders
instead of keypads.
Door Status Boards: This is where you define the door status boards (DSB’s) if you have a door
alarm system. The DSB’s monitor the open or closed status of a tenant’s unit door.
Elevator Control: Configures the elevator control capabilities. If you have a multi-story facility,
elevator control can be used in conjunction with Elevator Control Boards (ECB's) to restrict tenant's
access to floors.
Help
This menu allows you to obtain “on-line” help. You can also press “F1” at any time for contextsensitive help.
Password Protection
WinSen Sentinel is “password protected”. It does not require a password when you first start the
program, but when certain menu items are selected, it will prompt for a password, and will not allow
access unless the proper password is entered.
8 • Password Protection
Chapter 1 - Introduction
As the system comes “out of the box”, three levels of password protection are provided.... Operator,
Manager and Owner. The owner can customize the program as to which password can access which
program functions using the “Configure Access Levels” option under the “Maintenance” menu in
WinSen Property Manager. The program can also be configured to require no passwords at all if
you prefer. For complete details, refer to the WinSen Property Manager manual.
The program initially contains three pre-set passwords as follows:
Operator
XXXXXXX (Seven X’s)
Manager
YYYYYYY (Seven Y’s)
Owner
ZZZZZZZ (Seven Z’s)
To change the preset passwords, see the WinSen Property Manager manual.
How to Make Menu Selections
If WinSen Sentinel is minimized, double click it to restore its previous window size before
continuing.
To display one of the three “Pull-Down” menus, you have two ways to do so: either click once on the
desired menu with your left mouse button, or press the “Alt” key and the underlined letter of the
desired menu at the same time. For example, to bring down the “Maintenance” menu, press
“Alt+M”. Note that each menu selection has an underlined letter, which is the “hot key” to select that
item. Thus, when a menu is displayed, press the underlined letter for the desired option, and the
program will immediately move to that item. You can also select an item by clicking on it with your
mouse, or by using the arrow keys to place the highlight on a selection, then pressing the ENTER
key.
Note that some of the menu selections are followed by 3 periods (...). This means that when you
select this option, you will be presented with a data entry form for further data entry.
Data Entry Forms
Shown below is a typical data entry form. An explanation of the various buttons follows.
Chapter 1 - Introduction
How to Make Menu Selections • 9
Add Button: pressing this button allows you to add a new record. After pressing the “Add” button,
you will note that it changes to an “update” button. Then when you press it, the newly added record
will be saved.
Delete Button: this button will delete the current record.
Cancel Button: press this button to abandon any changes you have made and exit from the form.
Close Button: this button will save any changes you have made, then exit from the form.
Help Button: runs context sensitive help for WinSen Sentinel. “Context sensitive” means that the
help window will be displayed with the topic of whatever function you are in at the time. For
example, if you are configuring keypads, and you press “F1” or the “Help” button, the help window
will be launched displaying the “Keypad configuration” topic.
Data Control Bar: This portion of the form allows you to change the record number currently being
edited. Use your mouse to click the buttons and perform the following actions:
Moves to the last record.
Moves to the next record.
Moves to the previous record.
Moves to the first record.
Date Fields in Data Entry Forms
Several of the forms in WinSen Sentinel have fields for inputting dates. When your cursor is on one
of these fields you can click your right mouse button to display a small calendar:
After the calendar is displayed you can use the following keys to scroll the date:
•
Up Arrow: moves the highlighted day back by one.
•
Down Arrow: moves the highlighted day forward by one.
•
PgDn: moves the month forward by one.
•
PgUp: moves the month backward by one.
You can also use your mouse to scroll the display using the “scroll bar” on the right side of the
calendar.
10 • Data Entry Forms
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Select the desired date by clicking on it with your mouse. This will close the calendar and input the
selected date into the date field on the form.
Printers and Report Viewing Forms
In certain areas of the program, for example when printing reports, you can select to have the report
sent to a different printer, or to a window. In either of these two situations, you will be presented with
a form. Following are instructions on using these forms.
Select Printer Form
When printing a report, you can change the destination printer by choosing the “Printers” button.
When you do this you will see the following form:
All printers that have been set up within your Windows installation will be listed. Select the desired
printer by double clicking on it, or by highlighting it and choosing “OK”.
Setup button
Choose this button to setup the currently highlighted printer. A form similar to the following will
appear:
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Printers and Report Viewing Forms • 11
This form lets you setup printer options such as the resolution, paper size and source, amount of
memory installed, etc. The exact format and options of the form will vary depending on the printer.
For additional help using the Printer Setup form, press <F1> or choose the “Help” button while it is
active, or consult your Windows documentation.
Report Viewing Form
When printing a report, you can choose to have the output sent to a Window. When you do this, the
document will be displayed in a window as follows:
12 • Printers and Report Viewing Forms
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Note the buttons at the top of the report viewing window. These buttons allow you perform various
operations as follows:
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Printers and Report Viewing Forms • 13
Sends the report as electronic mail (if
you have the necessary software).
Zooms in or out.
Prints the report.
Moves to the last page (Ctrl-End).
Stops compiling
the report.
Moves to the next page (Ctrl-PgDn).
Moves to the previous page (Ctrl+PgUp).
Moves to the first page (Ctrl+Home).
14 • Printers and Report Viewing Forms
Chapter 1 - Introduction
Program Configuration
Overview
Before you can use WinSen Sentinel you must configure the various options to match the installation
at your facility. It is assumed that you have already installed the software and the various other
components of your access control/alarm system. If you have not yet installed these items, do so as
detailed in the “Software Installation” and “Hardware Installation” sections at the back of the manual
before proceeding.
Site Setup
Note: the following section only applies if you are using WinSen Sentinel in “standalone” mode
(without WinSen Property Manager).
The Site Setup option is used to configure your site name, address, the manager name, the program
access passwords (not to be confused with tenant passcodes), and the program access levels. To run
Site Setup, point to the Start Button, then Programs, then WinSen, then Site Setup. You will be
asked to enter your password. A manager level or higher password is required. If you enter the
owner level password, all site setup functions are enabled. If the manager level password is entered,
only the site name, address, phone number, and manager name can be changed.
The following form will be displayed:
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Overview • 15
Click the tabs to access the functions as explained in the following sections.
Site Information
This tab is used to enter the site name, address, phone number, and manager name. The site name is
printed on reports; all other fields are unused by WinSen Sentinel but are included on the form for
completeness. Fill in the data as appropriate.
Password Maintenance
This form provides the site with the ability to add, delete, and change the program passwords. The
system will allow you to have up to eight different “password levels”, and as many passwords as you
may need. You can also use no passwords at all if you prefer.
Use the Add button to add a new password record, the Delete button to delete the currently displayed
password record, and the data control bar to navigate from record to record.
16 • Site Setup
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
ID
The system will assign and display a default user ID for each password record. In most cases, the
default user ID should be sufficient, but if you wish, enter a unique user ID number for this password
record.
Name
Enter a name for this password record. For example, the name of the person who will be using this
password.
Level
From the drop down list, choose the level for this password record. The level setting for each
password in the system is used to designate which menu items are accessible to which password (see
“Password Access Levels” on page 18). The choices are:
1. Guest
2. Operator
3. Operator level II
4. Manager
5. Manager level II
6. Area Manager
7. Area Manager level II
8. Owner
Password & Verify Password
These two fields are for entering or changing the password for the currently displayed password
record. Note that the actual password cannot be seen, instead the system will display “*” for each
character in the password for security reasons.
In the Password box, type in the new password. Then type in the same new password in the New
Password box. You must enter the new password twice to verify that the password you typed in is
what you thought you did. If the same password is not entered twice, the system will not allow you to
save your changes.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Site Setup • 17
Password Access Levels
This form of the Site Setup function is used to define which menu items are accessible to which of the
eight password levels available. For example, if a menu selection is defined to be available only to a
password which is Manager Level, a manager level or higher password must be entered to access
that function. A password level which is defined as Guest, Operator, or Operator Level II would not
be allowed access.
In addition to the normal Close, Cancel, and Help buttons, the form has two buttons that perform the
following actions:
Defaults
The Defaults button will set up the password access levels to the “factory defaults”. The factory
defaults are:
•
Manager level or higher password required for Unit/Tenant operations.
•
No password required for Event Display Settings, Workstation Settings, and the Report
Menu.
•
Manager level or higher password required for all maintenance menu selections.
Set All
This button will set all options in the Operation box to the currently highlighted password level. For
example, if Manager is currently highlighted in the Level Required box, and you press the Set All
button, all options would require a Manager level or higher password.
Operation and Level Required
The Operation box shows the various functions available in WinSen Sentinel. To set an access level,
use your mouse to highlight the desired operation. Then choose the password level required to access
that operation in the Level Required box.
Repeat this procedure for each system operation that you wish to be password protected, then press
“Close” to save your changes and exit.
18 • Site Setup
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Setups
This option allows you to setup various access options, e.g. whether to allow delinquent tenants onsite, anti-passback options, perimeter beam setups, etc. Select this option from the maintenance
menu, and the following form will appear:
Delinquent Control Options
This selection controls whether or not to allow delinquent tenants on-site. You can select one or the
other, but not both. Deny Access to delinquent tenants denies them access. The Allow access and
log a message option allows them entry, but logs a message. Select the desired option by clicking on
it with your mouse.
Access Options
Lock In
When checked, this option will not allow tenants to leave if they stay on-site after their gate hours
(the hours specified in their assigned time zone). For example, if a tenants assigned time zone hours
are from 7 am to 11 pm, and they stay on-site until 11:30 pm, the system would not allow them to key
out. SSC does not recommend locking in your tenants after close, however this option is available if
desired.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Setups • 19
Anti-Passback
This option will not allow a tenant to exit the facility if they did not key in, and vice versa, if both the
Anti-Passback and Lock In options are checked. For example, if they have “tailgated” in, the
system would not allow them to exit. Conversely, if they “tailgated” out, they would not be allowed
to enter the next time they attempt access.
If Anti Passback is checked, the system will log “Passback Violation” messages as they occur
regardless of the Lock In option setting. It will only deny access or egress to Passback violators if
both the Anti-Passback and Lock In options are selected.
Tamper Limit
This is the number of “bad passcode” attempts allowed before the alarm goes off. For example, if
you set it to three (3), and a tenant enters 3 bad passcodes in a row, the alarm will go off. Set this
number to 0 if you do not want this feature.
Door Alarm Options
PDA/TDA Status Change Logging
The system has the capability of disabling alarms if necessary (see the WinSen Property Manager
manual for details on how to do this).
This option allows the operator to choose whether door status change logging occurs for alarm
disabled units. If it is checked, “open” and “close” messages are written to disk for permanently
disabled alarms (PDA’s) or for time disabled alarms (TDA’s). Otherwise, door open/close status
changes on units with disabled alarms are ignored by the system and no logging will occur. We
recommend that you check this option.
Automatic Alarm Disable
Situations may occasionally arise which will set off the occurrence of repetitive, nuisance alarms for
certain units. The larger the site, the higher the probability that these false alarms will occur. Wind,
temperature variations, loose wiring, loose door switch mountings, loose doors, vibration, age, poor
installation, etc. can all contribute to upsetting the critical alignment and gapping of the
switch/magnet combination. The result of these false alarms will be constant annunciation at the
computer and possibly in the yard, and many door status change loggings. The constant annunciation
can be very irritating and the excessive status change logging can consume a large amount of hard
disk space.
The usual solution for a constantly cycling false alarm would be to permanently disable the alarm (see
the WinSen Property Manager manual for details on how to do this) and turn PDA/TDA status
change logging off (see above) until the offending alarm point can be serviced. However, if the
nuisance alarm should occur unexpectedly during off hours, this option provides an automatic alarm
disable feature which accomplishes the same purpose. With this option enabled, the system will
detect and disable repetitive alarms. When this occurs, a message similar to the following will be
logged:
Tom Westland, 00101, Disable/A, 01-01-2000, 15:31:25
The recommended setting for this feature is “Yes” (the box is checked).
PIO 12/PIO-24 Address
Enter the decimal address for the PIO-12 (or PIO-24) card, if you are using a perimeter beam and/or
individual door alarm system. Enter 0 if you do not have a PIO-12 card installed. The default
20 • Setups
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
address is 768 and normally will not need to be changed. Contact SSC if you already have a device
that uses this address (such as a network card) and need help selecting an alternative address.
Test Relays
This option allows you to test the interface between the PIO-12 card and the ERA-01 relay output
module, the relays, and the device(s) controlled by the relays. Click this button in the “Door Alarms”
section of the Setups dialog to display the following dialog:
Relays to activate
For each relay on the ERA-01 module there is a checkbox. To test a specific relay and the device
wired to it, check the appropriate box by clicking it with your mouse. When you have selected the
relays you wish to test, click the Test button. WinSen Sentinel will signal the PIO-12 card to close
the relays you have selected. If everything is working properly, the selected relays will close, and
whatever devices are wired to those relays will be activated.
Clear On-Site Tenants/Auto Re-Arm
If this option is enabled, all door alarms will be re-armed at the assigned time zone's stop time (the
start time is irrelevant). For example, if this option is checked, and time zone 1 has been assigned to
it, all tenant on-site statuses will be cleared, and alarms will be re-armed when the stop time for this
time zone arrives.
We suggest that this option be enabled in order to account for tenants who “tailgate” out on exit.
Otherwise, such a tenant’s alarm would not be rearmed.
Place a check mark in the box by clicking on it with your mouse. Then select the desired time zone by
selecting it from the “drop down” list of time zones.
Perimeter Beams
When enabled, the PBS feature controls a relay contact output (from the ERA-01 Relay Module)
which is used to shunt a perimeter beam system alarm contact. A time zone assignment is made to
facilitate PBS control. The relay is unconditionally energized, disabling the PBS, during the time
period between the assigned time zone’s start and stop times.
During beam-on hours, i.e., the time period between the time zone’s stop and start times, the relay is
deenergized, enabling the PBS, unless any tenants are on-site. If tenants are still on-site at the
assigned time zones stop time, the PBS will be enabled one minute after the last tenant has departed.
Keep the following points in mind concerning the PBS options:
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Setups • 21
1. It is highly recommended that the Clear On-Site Tenants/Auto Rearm feature explained
above is checked if you are using a PBS.
2. Enable/disable PBS control by checking/unchecking the box. In the adjacent drop down list
of time zones, choose the time zone that controls the PBS. Be sure the time zone’s start/stop
times have been appropriately defined as explained in “Time Zones” on page 24.
3. For Perimeter Beam System wiring information, refer to drawing 29.
4. Consult the Installation Section of this manual for more information on how to install and
wire the ERA-01 relay module and PIO-12 parallel I/O board.
If you are using a perimeter beam system (PBS), check this box. Then select the time zone from the
“drop down” list that you wish to control the PBS. In the example, time zone 0 has been selected.
This means that when the stop time for time zone 0 arrives, the PBS will be enabled, if no tenants
are on-site.
If tenants are on-site when the stop time for the designated time zone arrives, the PBS will be not be
enabled until 1 minute after all on-site statuses are cleared, either by the last tenant leaving, or by the
auto re-arm feature (see “Clear On-Site Tenants/Auto Re-Arm” on page 21.)
Time Disabled Alarms
If your installation is not a door alarm system, you can skip this section.
This option controls whether or not time disabled alarms (TDA’s) will be disabled at the assigned
time zone’s stop time, and the time zone that controls the TDA’s. Normally, unit alarms are enabled
or disabled by keypad or cardreader access or by operator intervention. In some instances, though, it
may be desirable for certain alarms to be automatically enabled or disabled on the basis of time of
day. For example, building access doors are best alarmed on a timed basis. The system provides a
feature for designating certain units as time disabled alarms (see the WinSen Property Manager
manual for details on how to do this).
Timing is done on the basis of an assigned time zone. If a unit is assigned to be a time disabled alarm
(TDA), it will be disabled during the time zone’s open hours. During the time zone’s closed hours it
will be enabled as long as no one is on-site. Should a tenant enter the site during this time period, all
TDA’s will be disabled. All TDA’s will be re-armed one minute after the last tenant has exited the
site.
It is highly recommended that the auto re-arm feature be enabled when implementing time disabled
alarms (see “Clear On-Site Tenants/Auto Re-Arm” on page 21.)
Check this box if you have any units with TDA’s. Then select the time zone that controls the TDA’s.
Area Beams
This feature allows you to control a beam system with an Access Level instead of a Time Zone. This
feature would be used if you have an area of your facility where only certain tenants are allowed
access (see “Keypad Access Levels” on page 26) and you want to monitor that area with a beam
system.
This option will disable the beam system that is wired to relay #6 on the ERA-01 Relay Module when
a tenant enters the area controlled by the selected Access Level. The beam will be re-enabled when
the last tenant exits the area. Then if anything breaks the beam, an alarm will be activated.
The beam system will be re-enabled 1 minute after the last tenant with the designated access level
leaves the site, or when all on-site statuses are cleared by the Auto re-arm feature.
22 • Setups
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
To use this option, check the Enabled check box with your mouse. Then select the access level that
is to control the beam from the drop down list.
When you have finished setting up the above options, click the “OK” button to save your changes
and exit from the function.
Holidays
This option allows you to define which days of the year are holidays. This is necessary if your
facility has different gate hours (or no gate hours) during holidays than other days. If this does not
apply to your facility, you can skip this section.
To configure your holidays, select that option from the maintenance menu. The following form will
appear:
The Add and Delete buttons at the top of the form are used to add and delete holiday records from the
system. To edit existing holiday records, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate from
record to record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close without saving.
Enter the below information for each holiday you wish to define. There is no limit on the number of
holidays that can be programmed. When you are finished, press the “Close” button to save your
changes and close the form.
Date
Enter the date of the holiday. The year must be included (the holidays are not recurring). Note that
the format of the date display will vary according to the date settings configured in the Windows
control panel. If your cursor is on this field, you can press your right mouse button and a calendar
will appear allowing you to pick the desired holiday:
This is a convenient feature which quickly lets you scroll through the months of the year. Click with
your mouse on the desired holiday, and that date will be assigned.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Holidays • 23
Description
Enter a description for this holiday. In the example, it is “New Year's Day”.
Time Zones
Time zones are used to define what hours your facility may be accessed by your tenants. The system
will allow you to have as many time zones as you may need. After defining the gate hours for your
time zones, you then assign each tenant the appropriate time zone. This lets you assign certain
tenants different gate hours than others. For example, if you charge extra for 24 hour access, you
would set up time zone #0 for normal hours, and time zone #1 for 24 hour access. Tenants with
normal gate access hours would then be assigned time zone #0, while late access tenants would be
assigned time zone #1 (at time of move-in). On the other hand, if all your tenants have the same gate
hours, you would set up time zone #0 with the appropriate hours, then assign that time zone to each
tenant (#0 is the default time zone, so no additional action with respect to the tenants gate hours
would be required).
To setup your time zones, select that option from the maintenance menu. The following form will
appear:
The Add and Delete buttons at the top of the form are used to add and delete time zone records from
the system. To edit existing time zones, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate from
record to record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close without saving.
Enter the below information for each time zone you wish to define. There is no limit on the number
of time zones that can be programmed. When you are finished, press the “Close” button to save your
changes and close the form.
Time Zone
Enter the time zone. In the example, we are editing time zone #0. This means that tenants with this
time zone will be allowed access during the hours that are defined here.
Description
Enter a description for this time zone. In the example, it is “Normal Access Hours”.
24 • Time Zones
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Days of the Week
Note that there is a series of entry boxes, one for each day of the week, and one for “Holiday”. In
these boxes, enter the gate access hours for that day. Note that the “Holiday” hours will be used on
days that you have designated as holidays (see “Holidays” on page 23). In the example, the gate
hours are 7:00 am to 10:00 pm for all the days of the week, and during holidays, no access is allowed.
Note: To setup 24 hour access, use “12:00:00 am - 11:59:00 pm” for the hours. To allow no access,
use “12:00:00 am - 12:00:00 am”.
The time display format will vary according to the time settings configured in the Windows control
panel.
Keypad Configuration
This section applies if you are using Keypads for access to the facility. If you are using Cardreaders
instead, see “Cardreader Configuration” on page 27.
It is necessary to tell WinSen Sentinel how many keypads you are using, the addresses of these
keypads, and the type of keypads.
To configure the keypads: choose “Keypads...” from the “Maintenance” menu. The Keypad
Definitions form will appear:
The Add and Delete buttons at the top of the form are used to add and delete keypad records from the
system. To edit existing keypads, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate from record to
record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close without saving.
Enter the below information for each keypad. When you are finished, press the “Close” button to
save your changes and close the form.
Number of Keypads
In the Number of Keypads box, enter how many keypads you have at your facility.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Keypad Configuration • 25
Keypad Address
Enter the address for this keypad. Keypad addresses should always start at zero. Therefore if you have
two keypads, they will be addressed as 0 and 1. Be sure the keypads have been addressed properly as
detailed in “Appendix B - Keypad Programming” on page 98.
Description
In the “Description” box, enter a description for this keypad. In the example, it is “Main Entry
Keypad”, signifying that Keypad 0 is used to enter the facility.
Keypad Style
In the Keypad Style list box, click on the downward pointing arrow button to display the “drop down”
list of keypad styles. There are two choices: Unit Number/passcode and Passcode only.
If the keypad is a “Unit number/passcode” style, the tenant has to enter their unit number, followed by
the “#” key, then their passcode followed by the “*” key to gain entry. If the keypad is a “Passcode
only” the tenant will enter only their passcode, which could be up to 9 characters. Choose the
appropriate option by clicking on it with your mouse. Please note that to change the keypad style you
must also change the keypad EPROM. For more information, contact SSC.
Keypad Type
To define the Keypad Type for this keypad record, select the appropriate choice from the drop down
list of keypad types. The Keypad types are:
0. Inactive: the keypad is not in use.
1. Enter: the keypad is used to enter the facility.
2. Exit: the keypad is used to exit the facility.
3. Toggling: the keypad is used for both entry and exit.
4. Auto-rearm: this option is used when you have one keypad, used for entering the facility,
and a door alarm system installed. When the tenant keys in, the alarm on their unit door is
disarmed. It will be rearmed when they close the door on their unit rather than when they key
out as with a multiple keypad system.
Select the appropriate keypad type by clicking on it with your mouse, or by moving the highlight with
your arrow keys, then pressing Enter on the desired selection.
Keypad Access Levels
In WinSen Sentinel, each tenant is assigned an “access level”. This option allows you to define
which keypads are accessible to the various access levels. This allows you to designate certain
keypads to be accessible only to certain tenants. For example, if your facility has a separate
controlled access RV storage area, you can specify that only tenants with RV’s parked there are
allowed to enter that area.
To configure your access levels, select that option from the Maintenance menu. The access levels
form will appear:
26 • Keypad Access Levels
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
The Add and Delete buttons at the top of the form are used to add and delete access level records
from the system. To edit existing access levels, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate
from record to record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close without saving.
Enter the below information for each access level needed. When you are finished, press the “Close”
button to save your changes and close the form.
Access Level
Enter the access level. In the example, we are configuring access level #0. This means that tenants
with access level #0 will be allowed access to the keypads checked in “Valid keypad addresses”.
Description
Enter a description for this access level. In the example, it is “Main Entry/Exit”.
Valid Keypad Addresses
Place a check mark by clicking with your mouse on the keypads that tenants with this access level are
allowed to use. In the example, tenants with access level 0 are allowed to access the “Main Entry
Keypad” and the “Main Exit Keypad”, but not the “RV Storage Area” keypad.
Cardreader Configuration
This section applies if you are using cardreaders for access to the facility. Cardreaders are connected
to the system through Cardreader Interface boards (CRI’s), each of which can support up to four
cardreaders.
It is necessary to tell WinSen Sentinel how many Cardreader Interface boards (CRI’s) are being used,
the addresses of these CRI’s, and the number and type of cardreaders.
To configure the cardreaders: choose the “Cardreaders” option from the maintenance menu. The
Cardreader Definitions form will appear:
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Cardreader Configuration • 27
The Add and Delete buttons at the top of the form are used to add and delete CRI records from the
system. To edit existing CRI’s, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate from record to
record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close without saving.
Enter the below information for each CRI. When you are finished, press the “Close” button to save
your changes and close the form.
Total Number of CRI’s
In this box, enter how many CRI’s you have at your facility. Since each CRI can support up to four
cardreaders, this will be one in most cases.
CRI Address
Enter the address for this CRI. CRI addresses should always start at 64. Therefore if you have two
CRI’s, they will be addressed as 64 and 65. Be sure the CRI addresses have been programmed as
detailed in “Appendix C - CRI Programming” on page 100.
Reader Type
The cardreader types are:
0. Inactive: the cardreader is not in use.
1. Enter: the cardreader is used to enter the facility.
2. Exit: the cardreader is used to exit the facility.
3. Toggling: the cardreader is used for both entry and exit.
4. Auto-rearm: this option is used when you have one cardreader, used for entering the facility,
and a door alarm system installed. When the tenant enters, the alarm on their unit door is
disarmed. It will be rearmed when they close the door on their unit, rather than when they exit
as with a multiple cardreader system.
28 • Cardreader Configuration
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Select the appropriate cardreader type by clicking on it with your mouse.
Description
In the “Description” box, enter a description for this cardreader.
Cardreader Access Levels
This option is exactly like the “Keypad Access Levels” section above, except that it applies to
cardreaders instead of keypads.
To configure your cardreader access levels, select that option from the maintenance menu. The
access levels form will appear:
The Add and Delete buttons at the top of the form are used to add and delete cardreader access level
records from the system. To edit existing cardreader access levels, use the data control bar on the
bottom to navigate from record to record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close
without saving.
Enter the below information for each cardreader access level. When you are finished, press the
“Close” button to save your changes and close the form.
Access Level
Enter the access level. In the example, we are configuring access level 0. This means that tenants
with access level #0 will be allowed access to the cardreaders checked in “Valid Cardreaders”.
Description
Enter a description for this access level.
Valid Cardreaders
Place a check mark by clicking with your mouse on the cardreaders that tenants with this access level
are allowed to use. In the example, tenants with access level 0 are allowed to access the “Main entry
cardreader” and the “Main exit cardreader”, but not the “RV Storage area cardreader”.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Cardreader Access Levels • 29
Door Status Boards
If your installation is not a door alarm system, you can skip this section.
The “Door Status Boards” option allows you to setup and define the “door table”. The door table
defines which unit is wired to which door status switch in the alarm system. Thus, if an alarm is
triggered, WinSen Sentinel uses the information in the door table to display which unit is involved.
Initial Door Table Set-up
Construct a door table on paper verifying how each door status switch was physically wired to each
DSB input (see the “Installation” section of the manual and wire lists). The example below depicts a
100 unit facility utilizing high capacity DSB's. We recommend that you make a list similar to this
one for your facility before continuing with the door table programming.
30 • Door Status Boards
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
DSB Addr.
128
129
Input No.
Unit No.
0
101
1
102
2
103
3
104
4
105
(Some entries have been omitted
for brevity)
37
139
38
140
39
141
40
142
41
143
42
0
43
0
44
0
45
0
46
0
47
0
0
144
1
145
2
146
3
147
4
148
(Some entries have been omitted
for brevity)
37
181
38
182
39
183
40
184
41
185
42
0
43
0
44
0
45
0
46
0
47
0
Note that the “0” unit number entries for inputs 42-47 for DSB addresses 128 and 129 indicate unused
inputs which are not connected to a door status switch. The implementation of spare inputs for
possible future use is good practice and should be reflected on your alarm system cable layout
drawings.
Any door may be wired to any input as long as the information in the door table correctly shows
which unit doors are wired to which DSB input.
DSB's should be addressed so that they are numbered in sequential order from DSB 128 up to the
highest DSB address, with no gaps. For example, if you have two DSB’s, they would be addressed as
DSB 128 and DSB 129. It would be incorrect to address them as 128 and 130. In this way,
“Response Failure” alarms will not occur for the non-existent DSB's. The alarm system cable layout
drawings for your site should reflect this procedure.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Door Status Boards • 31
Door Table Data Entry
With the door table now properly constructed on paper, you are ready to program the door table into
the system database.
Choose the “Door Table” option from the Maintenance menu The “Door Status Board Definitions”
form will appear:
The Add and Delete buttons at the top of the form are used to add and delete DSB records from the
system. To edit existing DSB records, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate from record
to record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close without saving.
Enter the below information for each DSB. When you are finished, press the “Close” button to save
your changes and close the form.
Number of DSB’s
Enter the number of DSB’s connected to your system.
Address
Enter the address of this DSB. In the example, we are setting up DSB #1, and it is addressed as #128.
Remember, DSB addresses always start at 128 and continue sequentially.
Description
Enter a description for this DSB.
32 • Door Status Boards
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Type
There are two types of DSB’s: high and low capacity. High capacity DSB’s can support up to 48
doors, while low capacity DSB’s can support up to 16 doors. Select the appropriate type from the
drop down list for this DSB record.
Unit Numbers
Enter the unit number whose door is wired to the appropriate input. In the example, unit 101 is wired
to input #0 on DSB 128, unit 102 is wired to input #1, etc. Each unit number must be entered in its
proper DSB record.
Elevator Control
The Elevator Control function is used to configure Elevator Control Boards (ECB’s) and Elevator
Access Levels. ECB’s and elevator access levels allow you to restrict tenants to certain elevators
and/or floors. For example, if a tenant’s unit is on floor #4 of your building, you can restrict that
tenant’s access so that when they use the elevator, they can only go to the fourth floor.
Select “Elevator Control” from the Maintenance menu to display the elevator control form. The form
contains three tabs where all elevator control options are configured. Click the desired tab with your
mouse to configure Elevator Control as explained in the following sections.
ECB Definitions
The ECB Definitions tab is used to designate how many ECB’s are in use, what type of ECB’s they
are, what floors they control, and what keypad/cardreader is used to access the elevator. The Add
and Delete buttons on the right side of the form are used to add and delete ECB’s from the system.
To edit existing ECB’s, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate from record to record.
WinSen Sentinel can support up to 8 ECB boards with 16 different ECB addresses, ranging from 96
to 111, each of which can control 4 floors. An ECB can be a “single mode” or “double mode” board.
A single mode board has one address and can control 4 floors, while a double mode board has two
addresses and can control 8 floors. ECB modes and addresses are configured using DIP switches on
the ECB as explained in “Appendix E – ECB Programming” on page 103.
The type and mix of ECBs required is dependent upon the number of elevators and the number of
controlled floors per elevator. For example, suppose your eight story facility contains two elevators.
Each elevator will have eight controlled floors. One dual address mode ECB can be used to control
each elevator, requiring two double address mode ECB’s. The example form below shows how the
first ECB would be setup.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Elevator Control • 33
The Add and Delete buttons at the right side of the form are used to add and delete ECB records from
the system. To edit existing ECB records, use the data control bar on the bottom to navigate from
record to record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close without saving.
Enter the below information for each ECB. When you are finished, press the “Close” button to save
your changes and close the form.
Number of ECB’s
Enter the number of physical ECB’s installed.
Address
Enter the address for this ECB. ECB addresses range from 96 to 111 and should be in sequential
order. If the ECB is setup as a dual mode ECB, it will have two addresses but only the first one is
entered; the 2nd ECB address is assumed by the system to be one greater. For example, the dual mode
ECB in the example will have two addresses: 96 and 97. The address for the next physical ECB (if
present) would then be 98.
Description
Enter a description for this ECB. In the example it is “Elevator 1”, denoting that this ECB controls
elevator #1.
Type
Select Single or Double mode. A single mode ECB has one address and can control up to 4 floors. A
double mode ECB has 2 addresses and can control up to eight floors.
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Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Linked Device
This option designates which keypad or cardreader is used to control access to the elevator. When a
tenant uses the selected keypad/cardreader, the elevator/floor combinations designated in that tenant’s
unit elevator access level are enabled.
After choosing the proper linked device (keypad or cardreader), select the proper keypad/cardreader
from the dropdown list.
Floor
This is where you designate which relay on the ECB controls which floor. There are 8 relays on each
ECB. If you are using a single mode ECB, only the first four are used; for double mode ECB’s, all
eight are used. When a tenant uses a keypad/cardreader to access the elevator, WinSen Sentinel will
close the designated relay, enabling that particular floor.
Enter the appropriate floor for each relay.
Elevator Access Levels
This tab is used to designate which elevator/floor combination(s) a tenant with a given elevator access
level is allowed to use. You will need to setup an elevator access level for each elevator/floor
combination for which you wish to control access. Since our example storage facility has eight
floors, we have setup eight elevator access levels. Each access level is then assigned one or more
elevator/floor combinations.
The Add and Delete buttons at the right side of the form are used to add and delete ECB access level
records from the system. To edit existing ECB access level records, use the data control bar on the
bottom to navigate from record to record. Use Close to save your changes and exit; Cancel will close
without saving.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Elevator Control • 35
Enter the below information for each ECB access level. When you are finished, press the “Close”
button to save your changes and close the form.
Access Level
The access level number (used in the Elevator Access Levels Unit Table). You can use any unique
number, however it is suggested that your access levels start with 0 and go up sequentially.
Description
Enter a description for this elevator access level. In the example it is “Floor 8”, denoting that this
access level is for floor #8.
Valid Elevators/Floors
For each elevator/floor combination that tenants with the currently selected access level are allowed
to access, click the corresponding check box. In the example, tenants with access level 8 can access
floor 8 from either of the elevators.
Elevator Access Levels Unit Table
This tab is used to assign elevator access levels to units. Once assigned, the elevator access levels do
not change when a tenant is assigned or moved out; they will only change by editing the data on this
form.
Note how the Add and Delete buttons are greyed out when displaying this tab. This is because you
cannot add or delete any units here; this form is used only for editing the elevator access level
assigned to each unit.
36 • Elevator Control
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Unit Table
For each unit in the WinSen Sentinel database, the table shows the unit number, the interface number,
the elevator access level, and the description of the assigned elevator access level. Only the elevator
access level can be edited. After setting up the ECB’s and the elevator access levels properly, assign
each unit the appropriate elevator access level by typing the access level number in the elevator
access level column.
Display Settings
This function is used to tell WinSen Sentinel what information you want displayed in the event
window and the alarm window when events occur, e.g. alarm, communications failure, entry, exit,
etc.
The fields available for display are as follows:
1. Customer name: The customer name.
2. Unit/Device: The unit and the device associated with the event.
3. Event: A brief description of the event that has occurred.
4. Date: The date of the event.
5. Time: The time of the event.
6. Device: The device associated with the event.
Select “Display Settings” from the options menu. The following form will appear:
Possible and Selected Fields Boxes
Possible Fields box: These are the fields that are not currently chosen to be displayed in the event
window.
Selected Fields box: These are the fields that have been chosen to be displayed in the event window.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Display Settings • 37
To make a selection in one of the boxes, click on it with your mouse. Then select one of the buttons
to perform an operation on that field as explained below.
Action Buttons
Add All button: This button will move all selections from the Possible fields box to the Selected
fields box. Thus, all possible options would be displayed in the event window.
Add button: This button will add the currently highlighted selection in Possible fields to the Selected
fields box. It will be added to the bottom of the list in the Selected fields box.
Move up button: This button will move the currently highlighted selection in Selected fields up one
position in the list. This button and the Move down button allows you to select the order in which the
fields will be printed in the event window.
Move down button: This button will move the currently highlighted selection in Selected fields
down one position in the list.
Remove button: Moves the currently highlighted selection in Selected fields to the Possible fields
box (deselects that option).
Remove all button: This button will move all selections from the Selected fields box to the Possible
fields box. Thus, no events would be displayed in the event or alarm window. However, the events
will always be stored to disk for reporting purposes.
Fonts button
This button allows you to select the font to be used in the event display window. When you select it
you will be presented with the following form:
Font: The font to be used. All fonts installed on your system will be shown in the list box for you to
choose from.
Font Style: You can choose Regular, Italic, Bold, or Bold Italic.
Size: Choose the point size.
38 • Display Settings
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Effects: If desired, choose Strikeout and/or Underline.
Color: This list box allows you to choose the color of messages displayed in the event window.
Choose your desired color from the drop down list.
Sample box: As you make different selections, the sample box will show a sample of your proposed
combination of font, font style, point size, effects, and color.
Cancel: Pressing this button will cancel your changes and close the Fonts form.
OK: When you have made all of your font selections, press OK to save your choices and close the
Fonts form, returning you to the Event Display Settings form.
When you are finished selecting your event display settings, click “OK” to save your choices and
exit from the function. WinSen Sentinel will then reinitialize the event window to the new settings.
Workstation Settings
This function is used to setup various options within WinSen Sentinel such as the COM port where
the keypads/DSB’s are connected to your computer, the message levels, logging printer, sound
effects, and visual effects.
Select “Workstation Settings” from the options menu. The following form will appear:
Com Port
From the drop down list, select the port where the communication chain is connected. For most
systems this will be COM2.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Workstation Settings • 39
Message Level
This setting controls the level of messages that are displayed on your computer screen as site activity
occurs, e.g. tenants entering and exiting, alarms going off, etc. Regardless of this setting, WinSen
Sentinel writes all events to the hard disk for later review if need be. This setting only affects the
messages shown on your screen as these events occur.
There are three choices as follows:
1. All Messages - All activity that occurs will be displayed in a window on your screen.
2. Alarm Messages Only - Only alarm messages will be displayed.
3. No Messages - No activity or alarm messages will be displayed on the screen.
Logging Printer
This option controls whether activities are logged to a printer as they occur. As in “message level”
above, the system will write all activities to disk regardless of this setting.
The drop down list will show all printers that are available within your Windows installation. Choose
your logging printer from the drop down list. If you don’t want to log activities to your printer,
choose “Not Active”.
Open Gate Hot Key
When enabled, this option allows you to open the gate by pressing a “hotkey”. The hotkey can be one
key (for example, the F12 key), or it could be a combination of keys, such as “Ctrl+G”. You can
assign any combination of keys that you desire, but you should not assign key combinations that are
used by other programs or by Windows. For example, “Alt+F4” is used by Windows to close the
active application, so you should not assign this combination to the “Open gate” hotkey. We
recommend the F12 key.
To assign the “Open gate hotkey”, enable the option by checking the “enable” box. Then, place the
cursor in the box next to the “enabled” check box, and press the key or combination of keys that you
want to assign as the hotkey.
After choosing “OK” to close the Workstation Settings form, pressing the configured hotkey will
cause this form to appear:
Select the gate/door you want to open from the drop down list, then click “OK” to open that
gate/door. WinSen Sentinel will signal the appropriate keypad/cardreader to close its relays, opening
the gate or releasing the door controlled by that device.
Sound Effects
This section of the Workstation Settings form lets you configure the sound effects that will happen
when certain events occur, e.g., an alarm is triggered, communications problems, etc. You can select
none, one or more of the following options:
•
Standard Alarm Tone: When an event occurs, the computer speaker will emit a tone for a
specified number of seconds. The number of seconds is specified in Duration as follows:
40 • Workstation Settings
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
•
Duration: The number of seconds for alarms to be enunciated inside should also be set at this
time. This setting also controls the siren, if any.
•
Voice Announcement: When an event occurs, (e.g. entries, exits, door openings and
closings, alarms, etc.) a voice will announce it. Your computer must have a “sound blaster”
card and speech synthesizer software to use this option.
•
Wave file playback: When an event occurs, the computer will play back a “wave file”.
Check this option, then choose “Configure Sounds” to set up the desired wave file/event.
Configure Sounds
When you choose this button, the “Sounds” form will appear:
Note that this is the same form you see when you choose “Sounds” from the Windows “Control Panel”.
Events: Choose the event for which you want to configure a wave file to be played when that event
occurs. When one of the below events occurs, the system will play the wave file continuously until
the problem is acknowledged by either:
•
clicking on the WinSen Sentinel window,
•
or by pressing a key when WinSen Sentinel has “focus” (it is the active window).
There are three events associated with WinSen Sentinel:
1. PS Access Problem: occurs when there is a tenant trying to key in, and they enter an
incorrect passcode too many times, e.g., more than the access tamper limit.
Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Workstation Settings • 41
2. PS Communication Problem: occurs when there is a problem communicating with the
communication chain.
3. PS Door Alarm: occurs when a door alarm goes off.
Click the event that you wish to configure in the “Events” box. Then click the name of the wave file
that you wish to be played when that event occurs. If you want to hear what the wave file sounds
like, click the “Test” button.
When finished, click the “OK” button to close the Sound form and return to Workstation Settings.
Visual Effects
This section of the Workstation Settings form lets you configure the visual effects that will happen
when certain events occur, e.g., an alarm is triggered, a tenant enters the facility, etc. You can select
none, one or more of the following options:
•
Alarm Window, Duration & Number of Lines: When checked, this will cause an “alarm
window” to be displayed when there is an alarm:
After checking the box, select the duration (the amount of time in seconds the alarm window
is to be displayed). Then select the number of activity message lines to be displayed in the
alarm window. For example, if the number of lines is set to 5, the last 5 activities that
occurred will be displayed in the alarm window.
•
Activity Message on Icon: When checked, this will cause activity messages to be displayed
on the WinSen Sentinel icon when it is “minimized”. In the example below, unit 110 has just
exited:
The last activity message will stay on the icon until a new activity message is recorded.
•
Flashing icon for Alarms: When checked, this will cause the “Sentinel” on the minimized
WinSen Sentinel icon to flash when there is an alarm.
Number of messages in event window
This setting controls how many messages will be displayed in the event window. This allows you to
see the most recent activity that has occurred on-site without having to generate an activity report.
Set it to the desired number of messages. The maximum number is 999.
When you are finished setting up your Workstation Settings, choose the "OK" button to save your
changes and exit.
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Chapter 2 - Program Configuration
Operations
Overview of Daily Operations
This section explains the day-to-day operation of the WinSen Sentinel access control/alarm system. It
is assumed that you have already installed the program and all necessary hardware components of
your system. If not, consult the appropriate sections of the manual for these procedures.
In order for your access control/alarm system to function, WinSen Sentinel must be running on your
computer at all times. We recommend that you place the WinSen Sentinel icon in your Windows
“Startup” group (drag it with your mouse to the Startup group). Then it will be automatically run, and
communications with the keypads/cardreaders/DSB’s will be automatically started every time you run
Windows. WinSen Sentinel will come up in whatever mode it was in the last time it was run. For
example, if it was minimized the last time you ran it, it will be minimized the next time it is run.
Now you can work in other Windows applications, such as your favorite word processor or spreadsheet program, while WinSen Sentinel controls the access/alarm system in the background. All
activities that occur on-site such as tenants entering and exiting, and doors opening and closing (if
you have a door alarm system) will be logged to the hard drive. These activities can then be compiled
into a report if desired by the site manager.
Tenant Operations
If you are using WinSen Property Manager
All tenant operations (move-in, move-out, lockout, readmit, time zone and access level assignments,
and change password) are accomplished through the WinSen Property Manager program. When
these activities occur WinSen Property Manager will transmit the transaction to WinSen Sentinel,
negating any “double entry” by the manager.
See the WinSen Property Manager manual for details on accomplishing the above tenant operations.
Unit/Tenant Operations Form
Note: the following sections only apply if you are using WinSen Sentinel in “standalone” mode
(without WinSen Property Manager).
This form is used to add, edit, and delete units. For tenant operations, it is also used to movein,
moveout, lockout, readmit, and change the passcode, card number, timezone, access level, on-site
status, or alarm status.
Chapter 3 - Operations
Overview of Daily Operations • 43
Select Options|Unit/Tenant Operations to display the following form:
Unit/Tenant Form Menu Bar
The Unit/Tenant Operations form contains a menu bar with menus that allow the following operations
(details on the operations are given in the following sections):
File
Exit: closes the Unit/Tenant Operations form. Any changes made are saved automatically.
View
Refresh: use this option to refresh the table. If you have added any new units, it is necessary to use
the refresh option before you can move tenants into the newly added units. You will note that
selecting the refresh option will cause WinSen Sentinel to reload its database if you have made any
changes that require it to do so. For example, changing an interface number, adding a unit, or
deleting a unit. WinSen Sentinel will also reload its database when the Unit/Tenant Operations form
is closed after making any of these types of changes.
Tenant
The tenant menu allows tenants to be moved out, moved in, copied to another unit, locked out, or
readmitted. All of these options are also available on the toolbar (explained below) found on the
form.
Unit
The unit menu allows units to be added or deleted. You can also add or delete units by clicking the
Add or Delete buttons. There is also a find option which allows units to be found by searching on the
44 • Tenant Operations
Chapter 3 - Operations
following fields: unit number, interface number, customer name, customer ID, customer
passcode, or unit status. The find option can be accessed from the toolbar as well.
Sort By
The Sort By menu allows the list of units to be sorted by the following fields: unit number, interface
number, customer name, customer ID, passcode, time zone, access level, or unit status. Select
the desired sort option to cause the table to immediately re-sort the display by the selected criteria. A
check mark next to an option indicates that it is the currently selected sort option. The currently
selected sort option is also displayed in the status line. For example, the status line will show Sort:
Unit Number to indicate that the current sort is by ascending unit number.
If you select an option that is already selected, the sort will be reversed. For example, if the list is
currently sorted by ascending unit number, and you select the unit option from the sort menu, the sort
would then be by descending unit number. The status line will show Sort: –Unit Number to indicate
a descending sort by unit number.
The Toolbar
The toolbar on the Unit/Tenant Operations form allows you to quickly perform the following tenant
operations: Movein, Copy, Moveout, Lock, Unlock, and Find. Simply click the desired button to
perform the action. Note that if a button is not enabled, it is because that operation is not allowed on
the current unit. For example, you cannot do a movein on a rented unit.
Movein a Tenant
After selecting a vacant unit and typing in all relevant information, click the movein button on the
toolbar or select Tenant|Movein to move a tenant into the selected unit.
Copy a Tenant
This option is used when a tenant already has one or more units rented and you wish to rent them
another unit. This will cause the units to be linked together in the database. If you have an alarm
system, the tenant can enter the facility using any of their unit numbers, and the alarm will be
disabled on all of the tenant’s units.
To copy tenant data into another unit, first select one of the tenant’s current units. Then click the
copy button on the toolbar or select Tenant|Copy. The system will then display the “Find” dialog
where you select the new unit to be assigned to the customer. Find the desired new unit, then click
OK. Note that if you select a currently occupied unit, the system will first verify that you really want
to do this, then overwrite the current customer data with the customer data being copied.
All tenant data, including the passcode and card number (if applicable) is copied into the new unit.
The change is effective immediately.
Moveout a Tenant
To moveout a tenant, first select the desired unit. Then click the moveout button on the toolbar, or
select Tenant|Moveout. The tenant is moved out immediately.
Chapter 3 - Operations
Tenant Operations • 45
Lockout a Tenant
To lockout a tenant, first select the desired unit. Then click the lock button on the toolbar, or select
Tenant|Lockout. The tenant’s access to the facility is de-activated.
Unlock a Tenant
To unlock a tenant, first select the desired unit. Then click the unlock button on the toolbar, or select
Tenant|Readmit. The tenant’s access to the facility is re-activated.
Find a Unit/Tenant
This function allows you to find units and/or tenants. Click the find button on the toolbar or select
Unit|Find to display the find unit form.
Field: units can be found by searching on the following fields: unit number, interface number,
customer name, customer ID, customer passcode, or unit status. From the drop down list, select
which field to search.
Operator: from the drop down list, choose the type of search to perform. The choices are:
•
Equal - the data being searched for must be equal to the search entry.
•
Not equal - the data being searched for must not be equal to the search entry.
•
Less than - the data being searched for must be less than the search entry.
•
Less than or equal - the data being searched for must be less than or equal to the search
entry.
•
Greater than - the data being searched for must be greater than the search entry.
•
Greater than or equal - the data being searched for must be greater than or equal to the
search entry.
•
Contains - the data being searched for must contain the search entry. It can be anywhere in
the data, e.g., at the beginning, somewhere in the middle, or at the end.
•
Starts with - the data being searched for must begin with the search entry.
•
Ends with - the data being searched for must end with the search entry.
Note that if you have chosen to look for a name in the Field box, the Operator box will default to a
“Contains” search type, while if you have chosen to look for a unit number, the Operator box
defaults to “Equals”.
Entry: enter the data to look for. For example, enter a portion or all of the customer’s name, or the
unit number to find.
46 • Tenant Operations
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Find Next and Find Previous buttons: press one of these buttons to search for your entered data with
the selected criteria. The “Find Next” button searches your database forward from the current record
number, while the “Find Previous” button will search your data in reverse order.
The system will display the first record it finds that matches your criteria. If that record isn’t the one
you want, press one of the two Find buttons to search again. If your entry is not found, a message
will be displayed to notify you of this.
Unit Number
Enter the unit number in this column of the Unit/Tenant table. The unit number can be up to five
digits. Alpha-numeric unit numbers are supported (e.g., “A101”). After editing the unit number, the
program will automatically pad it to five characters, using leading zeros.
Interface Number
This column of the Unit/Tenant table is the interface number, also called the A.I. (access interface)
number. This is the unit number used by WinSen Sentinel for keypad entry, event logging, and alarm
system purposes. WinSen Sentinel supports alpha-numeric unit numbers, for example “A101”, but
since the tenant normally keys in their unit number and passcode at the keypad, only a numeric unit
number can be used for that purpose. Also, only numeric numbers are supported for alarm system
purposes. Thus, WinSen Sentinel maintains a unit number and an interface number for each unit.
If the unit number does not contain alpha-numerics, the interface number should be exactly the same
as the unit number. If the unit number does contain alpha-numerics, there are two options for
assigning the interface number:
1. The alpha character can be substituted with its numeric position in the alphabet. Thus, unit
A01 would have an interface number of 101, B01 would be 201, D99 would be 499, and so
on.
2. It can be only the numeric portion of the unit number. For example, unit A01 has an interface
number of 1. However if you also have a unit B01 this scheme will not work, because the
interface number for that unit would also be 1, and the interface numbers must be unique.
Enter the appropriate interface number for this unit.
Customer Name
This column of the Unit/Tenant table is for the customer name. It can be typed in all lowercase, and
after pressing Enter, the program will automatically format it to the “propername” format (first letter
of all words is capitalized).
Cust ID
This column of the Unit/Tenant table shows the customer ID. The customer ID is assigned by the
program whenever a new customer is added to the WinSen Sentinel database, and cannot be edited. It
is shown for reference purposes.
Passcode
Use this column of the Unit/Tenant table to view or edit the passcode for the unit. If you are using
the “passcode-only” style keypad, the program will verify that each passcode typed in is unique
(passcode uniqueness is not enforced for customers having more than one unit). If you are using the
“Unit/Passcode” style keypad, password uniqueness is not enforced (because the combo of
Chapter 3 - Operations
Tenant Operations • 47
unit/passcode will always be unique). In the latter case the maximum passcode that can be entered is
65535, in the former it is 999999999.
Card No.
This column will not be visible unless you are using at least one cardreader interface board (CRI).
Use this column of the Unit/Tenant table to view or edit the card number for the unit. The program
will verify that each card number typed in is unique (card number uniqueness is not enforced for
customers having more than one unit).
Time Zone (TZ)
Use this column of the Unit/Tenant table to view or edit the time zone for the selected unit. When
changing the time zone for a unit, the system will verify that the data entered is valid.
Access Level (ACL)
Use this column of the Unit/Tenant table to view or edit the access level for the selected unit. The
system will verify that a valid access level is entered.
Locked
The Locked column indicates whether the tenant in the unit is locked out or not. To lockout or
readmit a tenant, click the Lock or Unlock button on the toolbar, or select Lock/Unlock from the
Tenant menu.
Status
The Status column (not visible in the illustration) indicates the status of the unit. E0 indicates a
vacant unit, R0 means a rented unit, and O0 indicates a delinquent (locked out) unit.
Alarm Status
The Alarm Status section allows you to change the on-site status and alarm status for the currently
selected unit.
•
On Site: a check mark indicates that the tenant in this unit has entered the facility. If
necessary, you can clear the on-site status by clicking it. This would enable the alarm on the
unit if you have an alarm system (as soon as the tenant closes their door). It is normally
unnecessary to change the on-site status for a tenant.
The next two fields only apply if your installation is a door alarm system.
•
Permanently disabled alarm: if checked, the alarm on this unit is a permanently disabled
alarm (PDA). This means the alarm is disabled on this unit until it is re-armed by the system
operator.
•
Timed disabled alarm: if checked, the alarm on this unit is a time disabled alarm (TDA).
Normally, unit alarms are enabled or disabled by keypad or cardreader access or by operator
intervention. In some instances, though, it may be desirable for certain alarms to be
automatically enabled or disabled on the basis of time of day. For example, building access
doors are best alarmed on a timed basis. The system provides a feature for designating
certain units as time disabled alarms. Note that for this option to be functional, it must be
enabled in Options|Setups. For additional information on time disabled alarms, see “Time
Disabled Alarms” on page 22.
48 • Tenant Operations
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Adding/Deleting Units
Click the Add button to add a new unit. The newly added unit will be incremented by 1 from the
highest unit number in the database. If this is not the desired unit number, edit the unit number and
the interface number to suit. The interface number should match the new unit number in the manner
described in “Interface Number” on page 47.
If the Auto Adding checkbox is selected, the system will add a new unit whenever the cursor is on
the last row in the table, and you press the down arrow key.
To delete the currently selected unit, it must first be vacated. Then click the Delete button. If the
Verify Deletes checkbox is checked, the system will verify the deletion, click Yes to permanently
delete the unit. Otherwise the unit is deleted with no further verification.
Start and Stop Communications
To start or stop peripheral communications select the “Communication Start” or “Communication
Stop” options from the Options menu.
Note: Since the system automatically starts peripheral communications on program startup,
you will not normally need to use these options. The Start Communications option would be
used in situations where communication problems have occurred. When the problem has been
resolved, you would then select that option to re-establish communications with the
keypads/cardreaders/DSB’s.
Open Gate/Door
This option is used to open a gate or door controlled by a keypad or cardreader from within the
office. This option is only enabled when communications are in progress. If communications are not
in progress, an error message will be displayed if you try to use this option.
Select this option from the Options menu, and the following form will appear:
Select the gate/door you want to open from the drop down list, then click “OK” to open that
gate/door. WinSen Sentinel will signal the appropriate keypad/cardreader to close its relays, opening
the gate or releasing the door controlled by that device.
Note that you can define a “hotkey” to open a gate/door. See “Open Gate Hot Key” on page 40.
Display Operation Summary
This selection displays a status report on communications with the various devices connected to the
system. When you choose it from the Options menu you will see the following form:
Chapter 3 - Operations
Start and Stop Communications • 49
Values last reset: The last time the values shown have been reset to zero.
Communication Errors: If any communication errors have been detected, the summary box will say
so. In the example, none have occurred.
Device polls and time per poll: The number of times the program has polled the communication
chain, and the amount of time in seconds it takes to perform one polling operation.
Repolls: The number of repolls. A repoll occurs if the system polls a device and that device either
does not respond properly, or not at all. When this happens the system attempts the polling operation
again. It will attempt this up to five times before suspending communications with the offending
device.
Do you wish to reset the summary information?: Choose “Yes” to reset the values to zero, or “No”
if you do not wish to reset the numbers.
The Operations Summary form can be useful for troubleshooting if you are having communications
problems. For troubleshooting suggestions, see “Appendix A- Troubleshooting” on page 93.
Reports
This option allows you to print tenant and activity reports. Select it from the Options menu and the
following form will appear:
Report: From the drop down list, select the report you wish to print. The following reports are
available:
1. Activity: reports on the activity that has occurred for a specific unit or the facility as a whole.
You can also specify a date range for the activity report.
2. Unit Status: provides a list of all tenants and the status of their unit.
50 • Reports
Chapter 3 - Operations
3. Alarm Status: provides a list of the alarm status on each unit, e.g., on-site status of the
tenant, whether the door is currently open or closed, alarm disarmed or armed, and if the unit
is an auto-rearm unit or not.
4. Open Doors: provides a list of the units with open doors.
5. Disabled Alarms: shows all units whose alarm has been disabled.
6. On Site: shows all units whose status is “on-site”(the tenant has keyed in but not out).
7. Door Table: provides a report of which units are wired to which input on the DSB’s.
8. Event Descriptions Report: provides descriptions of the messages displayed by WinSen
Sentinel and the words that will be spoken by the speech synthesizer when one of these
events occurs (if you have the necessary hardware and software to support speech synthesis).
The next two reports are only available if you are using the standalone version (without
WinSen Property Manager).
9. Multiple Units Report: provides a list of tenants who have more than one unit.
10. Locked out: provides a list of tenants who are locked out.
Unit Number: when generating the activity report, you can optionally enter the desired interface
number (the Interface number for the desired unit) in this box. If you don’t enter an interface number,
the activity report will include all units.
Starting & Ending Dates: when generating the activity report, you can optionally enter the desired
start date and ending date for the report. If these are not filled in the report will include all activities
in the system.
Output Options - Select one of the three output options:
1. Printer: The selected report will be sent to the printer. This will normally be the report
printer that is defined in WinSen Property Manager. If you wish to change the printer,
choose the “Printer” button, and you will be allowed to select which printer (if you have more
than one) within your Windows installation you want the report to go to.
2. Window: The selected report will be output to a window for viewing. Further explanation
on this option can be found in “Printers and Report Viewing Forms” on page 11.
3. File: The selected report will be printed to a disk file in a comma delimited format, suitable
for import into a spreadsheet program. The files will be generated in the sub-directory where
the program is installed and will have the following file names:
•
Activity Report: ACTIVITY.CSV
•
Unit Status Report: SECURITY.CSV
•
Alarm Status Report: ALARM.CSV
•
Event Descriptions Report: EVENTDES.CSV
When you have made your selections, choose the “Print Report” button to generate the report.
Backup Database
Note: the following section only applies if you are using WinSen Sentinel in “standalone” mode
(without WinSen Property Manager). If you are using WinSen Property Manager, backups are done
through the End of Period Processing processing option.
Chapter 3 - Operations
Backup Database • 51
At a convenient time each day, you should BACKUP YOUR DATABASE. This step is
EXTREMELY IMPORTANT. The importance of this step cannot be overstated.
To backup your WinSen Sentinel database, point to the Start Button, then Programs, then WinSen,
then click Backup Data. The following form will be displayed:
Backup Path
The drive and optionally, directory, to backup to. You can backup to a floppy disk, a ZIP disk, a
network drive, or a local hard drive. For example, to backup to a directory named \Backup on the c:
drive, type C:\Backup in the backup path.
Files to Include
Type a list of the files to include in the backup. To start a new line, press <Ctrl+Enter>. Wildcards
are supported. For example, to backup all of the database files in the current directory, use *.mdb.
The recommended files to backup are as follows:
•
*.MDB
•
*.SSC
•
c:\windows\winsen.ini
Always erase on removable media backups
Selecting this checkbox will cause the system to erase any files on removable media (floppy or ZIP
disks) before backing up. If you are backing up to floppy disks, it is recommended to check this box.
If you are backing up to ZIP disks, do not check this box. In this case, the system will backup each
day’s work to the ZIP disk with a different filename, until the ZIP disk is full. This allows you to
maintain many days worth of backups on the same disk.
Caution: When using floppy or ZIP disks, the backup disks should not be used for any purpose
other than backing up your WinSen database. All files on all backup disks in a backup set will
be erased if the “always erase” option is checked.
Defaults
Click this button to set the backup destination and files to the factory defaults. The default
destination drive is a:\, and the default files to backup are listed above.
Backup
After selecting the files to be backed up and the backup destination, click the backup button to begin
the backup procedure. If it takes more than one disk to backup, the system will ask you to place
52 • Backup Database
Chapter 3 - Operations
additional disks in the drive as necessary. If it does, be sure you use a different floppy disk, not the
one that was just written to.
Regarding backups
We strongly recommend that multiple sets of diskettes be used for your backups. For example, a set
for even numbered days and a set for odd numbered days. It is even better to have a set of backup
disks for each day of the week, e.g., on Monday you backup on your Monday disks, Tuesday on your
Tuesday disks, and so on. Handling your backups in this manner will give you an extra measure of
protection for this vital information.
You should replace your backup disks about every six months. The cost of new diskettes is small
compared to the cost of potentially having to re-enter your entire database!
Restore Database
This option will restore your database from a set of backup disks. It is the opposite of backing up and
will overwrite the database on the hard disk with the data contained on the diskette(s). It is normally
only done in unusual circumstances, e.g. a hard drive failure.
Place your disk containing your backup data into the source drive. Then point to the Start Button,
Programs, WinSen, then “Restore Database” to display the following dialog:
Source Path / Backup Sets
This is the path to the backup set(s) and the list of backup sets found on that path. If you back up to a
floppy drive, this will normally be A:\. In the example, we have been backing up to the F:\ drive,
which is a ZIP drive. Therefore the list in “Backup Sets” shows 4 different backup sets, from the
previous 4 days. The backup sets are listed in date/time order. Select the backup you wish to restore
from the list. Normally this will be the most recent one.
Automatically overwrite existing files
Select this option to automatically overwrite files on the hard drive with files on the backup set. If
this option is not selected, the system will prompt if you wish to overwrite files during the restore
procedure.
Restore
After selecting the desired source path, backup set, and overwrite option, click the Restore button to
perform the restore procedure.
Chapter 3 - Operations
Restore Database • 53
Test/Fix Zip
This button allows you to test and/or repair the ZIP files on the backup media. It should not normally
be necessary to use this feature. If you suspect a corrupted backup set, highlight the ZIP file in the
backup sets list, then click this button to test the ZIP file. If the system detects that the ZIP file is
damaged, you will be prompted if you wish to try to repair it. First ensure that you have a backup
copy of the file, then select Yes, and the system will attempt to repair the damaged ZIP file. Note that
if a ZIP file has been spanned across floppy disks, the system will not be able to repair it.
Note: When you restore a backup, it will put your database back to the state it was in when you made
the backup. If you accidentally restore an old backup, the current data will be overwritten. This is a
potentially disastrous situation. Therefore, use CAUTION with this option.
Do not confuse this option with the “Backup Database” option. They are opposite processes.
“Backing up” copies the database from your hard disk to a removable diskette as a backup in case of
hard disk failure or similar problem. “Restoring” is the opposite; it will copy the data from the
removable diskette to your hard disk, thus restoring it to the state it was in when the backup was
made.
54 • Restore Database
Chapter 3 - Operations
Peripheral Operations
The following describes the general operations of the keypads and cardreaders.
Keypad Operation
The following instructions will allow your customers to operate the keypads and gain access through
a controlled gate or door. Follow the instructions for your Keypad Type (See “Keypad Types” on
page 26).
For “unit number/passcode” keypad type:
1. Entry must begin with the keypad displaying the initial prompt,
Enter Unit No.:
00000 and #
If necessary, press the “*” key to reset the keypad to this prompt.
2. Enter your unit number (1-5 digit) followed by the “#” key. If you are a multiple-unit tenant,
you can enter the number of any of your units. The keypad will display
Enter Passcode:
00000 and *
3. Enter your passcode (1-5 digit) followed by the “*” key. If you are a multiple-unit tenant,
enter the passcode for the unit number that you entered. The system will process the entry
and if the access is valid, the keypad will display the message
Access Granted
and open the gate or door. If alarm system, the unit's alarm will be disabled or enabled as
appropriate. Multiple-unit tenants will have all doors in their group (primary and secondary)
disabled or enabled.
For “passcode only” keypad type:
1. Entry must begin with the keypad displaying the initial prompt,
Enter Code:
Chapter 4 - Peripheral Operations
Keypad Operation • 55
000000000
If necessary, press the “*” key to reset the keypad to this prompt.
2. Enter your code number (1-9 digit) followed by the “#” key. If you are a multiple-unit
tenant, you can enter your code number from any of your units. The system will process the
entry and if the access is valid, the keypad will display the message
Access Granted
For both keypad types, if the access attempt failed, the keypad will display
Access Denied
followed by a brief error message as to why access was denied. Error messages displayed by
the keypad are explained below.
Keypad Error Messages
Error messages displayed by the keypads are as follows:
•
No Such Unit. The tenant entered a unit number that is not recognized by the system.
•
Bad Passcode. Unit entered was valid, but the passcode was not.
•
Delinquent. The tenant is locked out.
•
Invalid Time. The tenant is trying to enter or exit outside the range of his/her time zone
assignment.
•
Invalid Keypad. The tenant is trying to use a keypad not included in his/her access level
assignment.
•
Passback Viol.. Tenant has attempted two entrances or exits consecutively, and the “Antipassback” feature is on (see “Anti-Passback” on page 20).
Cardreader Operation
The following instructions will allow your customers to operate the cardreaders and gain access
through a controlled gate or door.
1. In the direction of the arrow on the card, lay your card flat on the reader “touchplate” for two
seconds.
2. The system will process your card number, and if access is valid, the green LED will
illuminate and the gate or door will open.
56 •
Chapter 4 - Peripheral Operations
Hardware Installation
Foreword
We trust that you will find the procedures outlined below to be straightforward and comprehensive.
Because each facility is unique in some way, some ingenuity may be required to adapt these
procedures to your particular application. Careful work and attention to detail are important.
Properly installed, the WinSen Sentinel system will operate flawlessly from the moment it is turned
on. However, a careless installation can result in endless hours of rework.
NOTE: Please read all sections applicable to your installation carefully before proceeding with
any step in the installation procedure.
A Note to the Electrical Contractor
You have been asked to install or bid on the installation of all the necessary conduit and wiring for a
sophisticated, computer-based, access control system. This section of the manual is intended to
provide all the information you will need to estimate your costs and complete the installation.
For those installing alarm systems, you should determine which of the following installation types
applies to your facility at this time.
Alarm System Installation Types
For INTERIOR installation of the alarm system in new (unoccupied) facilities, see the following
sections:
•
“Interior Installation for New Construction” beginning on page 70.
•
“Door Switch Terminating, Interior Installations” beginning on page 80.
•
“Trunk Cable Securing, Interior Installations” beginning on page 82.
•
“DSB Enclosure Wiring and Terminating, Interior and Exterior Installations” beginning on
page 82.
For EXTERIOR installation of the alarm system in existing (occupied) facilities, refer to the
following sections:
•
“Exterior Installation for Existing Facilities” beginning on page 75.
•
“Door Switch Terminating, Exterior Installations” beginning on page 81.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Foreword • 57
•
“Trunk Cable Securing, Exterior Installations” beginning on page 82.
•
“DSB Enclosure Wiring and Terminating, Interior and Exterior Installations” beginning on
page 82.
Computer Equipment
The following steps describe the installation of the IBM PC compatible computer and its accessories
in the manager’s office.
Multiple outlet strip
1. Connect the multiple outlet strip to AC power. Be sure it is off during the installation phase.
IBM Compatible PC
1. Setup the computer, monitor, keyboard, hard disk drive, parallel and serial ports, and other
accessories according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Printer
1. Setup the printer and connect the cable according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Communications Interface Module (CIM), Model 430
1. Unpack the module.
2. Locate the module at an inconspicuous location, preferably on a shelf below the countertop or
desk where the PC is located. The module must be located within 6 feet of the PC.
3. Connect the CIM to the PC serial port using the cable provided. Note that one end of the
cable has 2 connectors: 9 and 25 pin. This is the end that connects to the appropriate serial
port on the computer (normally this will be COM2 but COM1 can be used if it is available).
Both connector sizes are provided to accommodate either a 9 or a 25-pin configuration on the
PC. Only one connector at the “two headed” end should be hooked up; the other will be
unused.
4. Referring to “Drawing 27 – CIM Wiring Diagram” on page 128, connect TB1-7 of the CIM
to a cold-water-pipe or structural steel earth ground using 12 AWG, stranded, copper wire. A
ground clamp will be required to secure the lead to the ground electrode. Crimp a #6 stud,
spade lug to the other end of the ground lead for connection to the CIM. The ground lead
should be kept as short as possible (less than 20 ft.).
IMPORTANT NOTE: The installation of the ground lead to a proper ground electrode is
absolutely imperative for the long-term and maintenance-free operation of WinSen Sentinel.
The surge suppression networks employed in the system will not work properly without
connection to a low resistance ground.
Facility grounding grids must conform to National Electrical Code standards. If there is any
doubt concerning the integrity of your facility’s grounding scheme, contact a qualified, licensed
electrician for an on-site evaluation. Also, the SSC Engineering Department can assist in
matters concerning structural grounding, and proper grounding techniques for the system.
58 • Computer Equipment
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Power Supply Unit
1. Unpack the unit from its shipping carton.
2. Connect the two numbered wires from the output cable to TB1-5 and 6 on the CIM,
according to “Drawing 27 – CIM Wiring Diagram” on page 128.
3. Connect the power supply to the power outlet strip.
Access Control System
Conduit Installation
General Considerations: Certain general rules concerning conduit installation should be followed:
•
Any one bend should not exceed 45 degrees. No more than 90 degrees of cumulative bend
angle should occur for any continuous length of conduit. Also, any bend radius should not be
less than 6”. If in doubt, install a pull-box.
•
A very important rule of thumb must be followed in the installation of WinSen Sentinel (and
digital communications systems in general): NO LINE AND LOW MIXING. Low voltage
signal wiring associated with the access units, intercom, etc. may be run together in the same
conduit. Under no circumstances may AC power wiring associated with the gate
operators, etc. be run with the low voltage wiring. Use separate conduits for power
wiring. If PVC conduits are used for the underground conduit, low voltage conduits should
be physically separated from line voltage conduits by a minimum of 12”. Also, it defeats the
purpose of having separate conduits if eventually the conduits terminate to a common
junction box. Low and line voltage conduits must terminate to separate junction boxes
separated by at least 12”.
WARNING: Failure to observe the above wiring guidelines will void the warranty.
1. All underground conduit should be set in place as per the site’s access control system layout
drawings prepared by Sentinel Systems prior to beginning any additional installation. 1”
Schedule 40 PVC conduit will suffice for most runs. However, actual conduit sizing should
be determined on the basis of the standard 50% fill rule. That is, the conduit should be sized
so that the combined cross-sectional area of the contained cables is at most 50% of the inside
cross-sectional area of the conduit.
Gate Operator and Pedestal (Gooseneck) Stands
1. Proper underground conduit runs for gate operators are shown in Drawings 1-4. These are a
series of drawings that show the physical relationships between the locations of the gate
operators and Access Unit pedestal stands and housings. Choose the drawing that most
closely matches your application. While referring to your site layout, install conduit
accordingly.
2. The most common type of installation is the sliding or rolling gate configuration shown in
Drawing 1. This type of installation affords the use of dedicated entrance and exit access
units with one gate operator for optimum traffic control and monitoring capability.
3. At each gate operator and access unit location, conduit should be “stubbed” out of the ground
vertically a minimum of 6”.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Power Supply Unit • 59
Gate Installation
Gates and gate operators are supplied, installed, and wired by others and in accordance with the
manufacturer’s instructions. See Drawings 1-4 for operator placement information.
NOTE: Electromechanical gate operators without built-in relay, contactor, and motor surge
suppression can cause system lockups. Example manufacturers of these types of gate operators
are APE, John Greene, Stanley, etc. Solid-state gate operators generally have built-in surge
supression and generally will not cause lockups. Example manufacturers are Alister, Elite,
Door King, etc. If you choose to utilize an electromechanical operator be advised that
suppression may be required. Contact Sentinel Systems for suppression instructions.
Following are guidelines concerning gate operator wiring:
1. Terminate line voltage conduits to junction boxes located outside the gate operator.
2. Terminate conduits containing low voltage wiring (comm.cable, intercom wiring, etc.) to
junction boxes located outside the gate operator.
3. Line and low voltage junction boxes should be physically separated as far as possible (12
inches minimum).
4. Use 12 AWG, three conductor, shielded cable for the gate operator power.
WARNING: Failure to observe the above suppression and wiring guidelines will void the
warranty.
Pedestal Stand Installation
Refer to Drawings 1-4 for pedestal stand placement information.
1. As part of the concrete pad or island pouring operation, set four 1/2” x 5” L-bolts (supplied
by others) in a 2-7/8” square pattern centered around the conduit stub. See Drawing 5, View
B-B for the correct base hole pattern. The bolts should protrude 1” above the surface of the
concrete.
NOTE: For the mounted stand to be perpendicular, the pad surface must be level and flat.
2. After the concrete has set, place the stand over the conduit stub and mounting bolts. Using
1/2” hex nuts and flat washers (supplied by others), secure the stand base to the mounting
bolts. Use shim washers under the base to correct for any deviation from perpendicular.
Keypad Installation
Keypads are employed in tandem to actuate barrier arm or sliding gates. They are installed and wired
according to Drawings 1, 2, 5-7, and 9. Drawing 6 shows the cable runs required in block diagram
form. Drawing 7 shows the actual wiring interconnections between the communication cable and
keypad assembly mounted to the housing on the pedestal stand. Drawing 9, Fig. 1, shows how gate
operators are normally wired to be triggered open by the keypad.
NOTE: Do not remove the Keypad assemblies from their protective, anti- static bags until they
are ready to be installed.
60 • Gate Installation
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Pedestal Mount, Gate Control Application
Single-Wide Enclosure
The single wide enclosure contains one keypad only.
1. Mount the enclosure to the pedestal stand using four 1/4-20 x 1/2” carriage bolts, hex nuts,
flat washers, and a socket wrench.
2. Three types of cable runs are required to install a keypad. See Drawing 6.
•
One 12 AWG, stranded, wire “bonding” the pedestal stand to the gate operator housing
(not shown on Drawing 6). This wire is necessary so that the stands and the gate operator
will be at the same potential.
•
One or more 18 AWG, four conductor, shielded communication cable runs connecting
the keypad location with the other peripheral devices on the communication chain. These
cables are for data communications withe the computer.
•
One 22 AWG, two conductor, relay cable, run from the keypad to the gate operator. This
cable provides the gate open signal from the keypad relay.
IMPORTANT WARNING: Be aware that ground faults on any of the communication
cable conductors cannot be tolerated. Since the drain wire for the shield is not
insulated, it is most prone to making contact with earth ground potential. Places where
this can occur are inside gate operator or keypad housings, inside underground
conduits, etc.
Ground faults can cause 60 cycle “hum” to be induced into the system thus causing
erroneous data transmission, and can attract surges from lightning strikes making the
system more susceptible to damage. It is suggested that continuity checks using an
ohmmeter are performed for each run of cable to ensure isolation from ground. Proper
isolation from earth ground is absolutely essential to the integrity and performance of
the system.
3. Attach the 12 AWG, bonding wire to gate operator chassis ground and to the keypad housing
mounting bolt. Using an ohmmeter, ensure that continuity exists between the gate operator
housing and the keypad housing.
4. Prepare the communication cable ends by removing 1” of the gray, outer jacket from the
cable to expose the red, black, white, and green wires and the uninsulated drain (shield) wire.
Remove the exposed part of the foil shield and 1/4” of insulation from each conductor end.
Place 1/16” OD heat shrink tubing over the exposed drain wire to prevent it from making
contact with the keypad housing or other conductors.
WARNING: For good noise immunity, the exposed, unshielded length at each
terminated end should be limited to 1” maximum.
5. Connect the incoming comm. cable to TB1 according to Drawing 7. Connect the outgoing
comm. cables to TB2 and TB3 as required.
6. Consult the manufacturer’s installation manual for the gate operator being employed for
wiring details. When running the power wiring to the gate operator, be sure to utilize a
separate, dedicated conduit solely for this purpose. Do not run the power wiring with the
communication cables. Also, be sure to run a dedicated, service ground (green) wire out to
the operator. Connect the power and ground wiring to the operator according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Keypad Installation • 61
7. Wire the keypad relay contacts, TB4-1 (NO) and TB4-2 (C), to the Pulse Open and
Common terminals of the gate operator using the 22 AWG, two conductor relay cable. See
Drawing 7 and Drawing 9, Fig. 1. If any uncertainty exists concerning gate operator wiring,
contact Technical Support for assistance.
NOTE: The keypad relay contacts are rated at 1A @ 120 VAC. Do not exceed the
contact rating. Also, switching 120 VAC line voltage is not recommended for safety
reasons.
8. Mount the keypad faceplate and gasket to the keypad housing assembly using the eight, 6-32
x 3/8” button head screws supplied.
Double-Wide Enclosure
The double-wide keypad enclosure contains one keypad, one Aiphone LE-DA intercom substation,
and optionally, one pinhole camera.
1. Mount the enclosure to the pedestal stand using four 1/4-20 x 1/2” carriage bolts, hex nuts,
flat washers, and a socket wrench.
2. Five types of cable runs are required to install the keypad, intercom substation, and pinhole
camera. See Drawing 6.
a) One 12 AWG, stranded, wire “bonding” the pedestal stand to the gate operator housing
(not shown on Drawing 6). This wire is necessary so that the stands and the gate operator
will be at the same potential.
b) One or more 18 AWG, four conductor, shielded, communication cable runs connecting
the keypad with the other peripheral devices on the communication chain. These cables
are for data communications with the computer.
c) One 22 AWG, two conductor, relay cable run from the keypad to the gate operator. This
cable provides the gate open signal from the keypad relay.
d) One 22 AWG, two conductor, cable, run from the intercom substation to the office. This
cable is connected to the intercom master station located in the office. This cable is not
shown in Drawing 6.
e) One RG-59U, coaxial cable, run from the pinhole camera to the office. This cable is
connected to the CCTV video switcher located in the office. This cable is not shown in
Drawing 6.
3. Attach the 12 AWG, bonding wire to gate operator chassis ground and to the keypad housing
mounting bolt. Using an ohmmeter, ensure that continuity exists between the gate operator
housing and the keypad housing.
4. Prepare the communication cable ends by removing 1” of the gray, outer jacket from the
cable to expose the red, black, and white wires and the uninsulated drain (shield) wire.
Remove the exposed part of the foil shield and 1/4” of insulation from each conductor end.
Place 1/16” OD heat shrink tubing over the exposed drain wire to prevent it from making
contact with the keypad housing or other conductors.
WARNING: For good noise immunity, the exposed, unshielded length at each
terminated end should be limited to 1” maximum.
5. Connect the incoming comm. cable to TB1 according to Drawing 7. Connect the outgoing
comm. cables to TB2 and TB3 as required.
62 • Keypad Installation
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
6. Consult the manufacturer’s installation manual for the gate operator being employed for
wiring details. When running the power wiring to the gate operator, be sure to utilize a
separate, dedicated conduit solely for this purpose. Do not run the power wiring with the
communication cables. Also, be sure to run a dedicated, service ground (green) wire out to
the operator. Connect the power and ground wiring to the operator according to the
manufacturer’s instructions.
7. Wire the keypad relay contacts, TB4-1 (NO) and TB4-2 (C), to the Pulse Open and
Common terminals of the gate operator. See Drawing 7 and Drawing 9, Fig. 1. If any
uncertainty exists concerning gate operator wiring, contact Technical Support for assistance.
8. If a pinhole camera is to be installed, wire the power leads for the camera as follows.
Connect the lead labeled #1 to TB1-1, TB2-1, or TB3-1. Connect the lead labeled #4 to TB14, TB2-4, or TB3-4. Plug the other end into the connector attached to the camera.
9. Mount the keypad faceplate and gasket to the left-hand opening using the eight, 6-32 x 1/4”,
button head, screws supplied.
10. Wire the 22 AWG, two conductor, intercom cable, to the 1 and E terminals of the main
substation unit, along with the shorting link, according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
11. Mount the main substation unit and gasket to the lower, right opening using the two, 6-32 x
3/8”, screws supplied. Attach the front panel to the main unit using the supplied screws.
12. Attach the supplied twist-on BNC connector to the RG-59U coaxial cable according to the
manufacturer’s instructions. Connect the coaxial cable to the pinhole camera’s BNC
connector.
13. Mount the camera plate and gasket to the upper, right opening using the six, 6-32 x 1/4”,
button head, screws supplied.
Wall Mount, Door Control Application
Below is a typical wall-mount installation procedure assuming masonry construction. The door
strikes are assumed to be provided by others and previously installed.
1. Drill a 1 3/8” conduit passage hole through the wall at the point where the keypad housing is
to be mounted. Typically this point would be at a distance of 52” vertically from the ground
and 36” horizontally from the door to be controlled.
2. Run the incoming and outgoing comm. cables to the keypad location.
3. To energize the door strike, run an 18 AWG, two conductor cable from the keypad location to
the door strike. Run another cable to the source of low voltage power (possibly another strike
location). Do NOT power the door strike with the keypad power!
Note: Door strikes are typically powered by a low voltage, 40 VA transformer installed
at each strike location. A larger capacity transformer can be located in the building
electrical distribution panel. A low voltage bus cable (12 AWG, 2 conductor) can then
be run interconnecting all the strike locations in a building.
4. Use a 3/4” PVC terminal adapter, O-ring, bushing, and 6” piece of 3/4” PVC conduit
(supplied by others) to provide a short, watertight conduit through the wall and into the back
of the enclosure.
5. Drill four 3/16” x 3/4” holes into the wall for mounting the housing. All mounting and
conduit passage holes in the wall and in the back of the housing should be properly aligned.
6. Insert #8 x 3/4” plastic anchors (supplied) into the mounting holes in the wall.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Keypad Installation • 63
7. Mount the housing (with conduit stub) to the wall using #8 x 3/4” self-tapping screws, flat
washers and a socket wrench. On the other side of the wall, seal any openings around the
conduit with caulk.
8. Pass the comm. cable and electric strike switching cable through the conduit into the housing.
9. Wire the door strike and low voltage supply cable to TB4 of the keypad according to
Drawing 9, Fig. 2 or 3.
10. Terminate the comm. cables to TB1-3 according to Drawing 7.
11. For single-wide enclosures, mount the keypad faceplate and gasket to the housing using the
eight, 6- 32 x 3/8” button-head screws supplied.
12. For double wide enclosures, perform steps 4-9 from “Double-Wide Enclosure” on page 62.
Keypad Programming
Each keypad must have its address, relay timeouts, and passcode programmed. Set these parameters
by performing the steps outlined in “Appendix B - Keypad Programming” on page 98.
Cardreader Interface (CRI) and Cardreader Installation
Card readers are employed in conjunction with Card Reader Interface (CRI) boards to actuate barrier
arm or sliding gates similar to keypads. They are installed and wired according to Drawings 6, 8, and
9. Drawing 6 shows the cable runs required in block diagram form. Drawing 8 shows the actual
wiring connections between the CRI and the card reader assembly mounted to the housing. Drawing
9, Fig. 1, shows how gate operators are normally wired to be triggered open by the CRI.
Each Card Reader Interface enclosure location can house one CRI circuit board assembly. Each CRI
can monitor up to four card readers.
CRI enclosures are Hoffman 12R106HCR with a customized A-12N10P subpanel. Four standoffs
are added to the subpanel to facilitate mounting of the CRI. To maintain watertightness, cable access
is through the bottom of the enclosure only. Two mounting flanges are present in lieu of mounting
holes in the back of the enclosure. Carlon “Liquidtight” ¾” fittings are utilized for outdoor
installations. Grommets are utilized for indoor installations.
CRI ENCLOSURE
Application
Indoor/Outdoor
Qty.
CRI
1
Max. Qty.
Rdrs.
4
Size
10x12x6
NEMA
Rating
3R
CRI Enclosure Installation
Begin by finding the location for a particular CRI enclosure on the site layout drawings. CRI
enclosures will typically be mounted inside the office, at the gate operator, or on an interior or
exterior building wall close to the cardreaders it will be monitoring. The following outlines CRI
enclosure installation on masonry and sheet metal walls. If the enclosure is to be mounted on
masonry or drywall, follow the steps outlined in the following “Masonry Wall” section. If the
enclosure is to be mounted on sheet metal follow the steps outlined in “Sheet Metal Wall” on page 65.
64 • Cardreader Interface (CRI) and Cardreader Installation
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Masonry Wall
1. Using the Hoffman 12R106HCR Enclosure as a template, drill four 3/16” x ¾” holes into
the wall for mounting.
2. Install four #8 x ¾” plastic anchors into the four mounting holes.
3. Referring to your site layout, remove one, two, or all three of the ¾”-1” knockouts on the
bottom of the enclosure as required.
4. Mount the enclosure to the wall using four #8 x ¾” self-tapping screws.
5. If the enclosure is mounted outdoors, install a Carlon E943E, ¾” terminal adapter,
E943EW O-ring, and E943W locknut at each point where PVC conduit is to attach to the
enclosure. Use Carlon VC9924 cement to make the connection between the conduit and the
terminal adapter.
6. If the enclosure is mounted indoors, install 1-3/8” O.D. grommets into the removed knockout
holes.
7. Install the modified Hoffman A-12N10P Subpanel using the four, supplied machine screws.
8. Install the Hoffman 99411-399 Grounding Kit as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
9. Mount the CRI onto the subpanel standoffs using four 6-32 x 3/8” machine screws. The side
of the board with TB1-TB3 should face toward the left side of the enclosure.
Sheet Metal Wall
1. Referring to your site layout, remove one, two, or all three of the ¾”-1” knockouts on the
bottom of the enclosure as required.
2. Mount the enclosure to the wall using four, #8 x ¾” self-drilling screws.
3. If the enclosure is mounted outdoors, install a Carlon E943E, ¾” terminal adapter,
E943EW O-ring, and E943W locknut at each point where PVC conduit is to attach to the
enclosure. Use Carlon VC9924 cement to make the connection between the conduit and the
terminal adapter.
4. If the enclosure is mounted indoors, install 1-3/8” O.D. grommets into the removed knockout
holes.
5. Install the modified Hoffman A-12N10P Subpanel using the four, supplied machine screws.
6. Install the 99411-399 Grounding Kit as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
7. Mount the CRI onto the subpanel standoffs using four, 6-32 x 3/8” machine screws. The side
of the board with TB1-TB3 should face toward the left side of the enclosure.
Cardreader Housing Installation
Pedestal Mount, Gate Control Application
1. Install the pedestal stand according to the “Pedestal Stand Installation” section on page 60.
2. Mount the housing to the pedestal stand using 1/4-20 x 1/2” carriage bolts, flat washers, hex
nuts, and a socket wrench.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Cardreader Interface (CRI) and Cardreader Installation • 65
Wall Mount, Door Control Application
1. Drill a 1 3/8” conduit passage hole through the wall at the point where the CRI housing is to
be mounted. Typically this point would be at a distance of 52” vertically from the ground
and 36” horizontally from the door to be controlled.
2. Use a 3/4” PVC terminal adapter, O-ring, bushing, and 6” piece of 3/4” PVC conduit
(supplied by others) to provide a short, watertight conduit through the wall and into the back
of the enclosure.
3. Drill four 3/16” x 3/4” holes into the wall for mounting the housing. All mounting and
conduit passage holes in the wall and in the back of the housing should be properly aligned.
4. Insert #8 x 3/4” plastic anchors (supplied) into the mounting holes in the wall.
5. Mount the housing (with conduit stub) to the wall using #8 x 3/4” self-tapping screws, flat
washers and a socket wrench. On the other side of the wall, seal any openings around the
conduit with caulk.
CRI and Cardreader Wiring
Four types of cable runs are required to properly install the CRI and cardreaders. See Drawing 6.
1. One or more 18 AWG, four conductor, shielded, communication cable runs linking the CRI
location with the other peripheral devices on the communication chain.
2. One or more 18 AWG, four conductor, shielded, data cables, run from the CRI location to the
cardreader locations.
3. One or more 18 AWG, 2 conductor, cables run from the CRI location to the gate operators or
door strikes.
4. One 12 AWG, stranded wire “bonding” the pedestal stand to the gate operator housing (not
shown on Drawing 6).
Install the above runs according to your site layout drawings.
IMPORTANT WARNING: Be aware of the fact that ground faults on any of the
communication cable conductors cannot be tolerated. Since the drain wire for the shield is not
insulated, it is most prone to making contact with earth ground potential. Places where this can
occur are inside gate operator or keypad housings, inside underground conduits, etc.
Ground faults can cause 60 cycle “hum” to be induced into the system thus causing erroneous
data transmission, and can attract surges from lightning strikes making the system more
susceptible to damage. It is suggested that continuity checks using an ohmmeter are performed
for each run of cable to ensure isolation from ground. Proper isolation from earth ground is
absolutely essential to the integrity and performance of the system.
CRI Wiring
1. Connect the incoming comm. cable to TB1 according to Drawing 8. Connect the outgoing
comm. cables to TB2 and TB3 as required.
2. Wire the data cables for the appropriate readers.
3. For Reader #0, wire the relay contacts, TB4-7 (NO) and TB4-8 (C), to the Pulse Open and
Common terminals of the gate operator. See drawings 8 and 9, figure1. For Readers 1-3
wire to TB5-TB7 according to Drawing 8.
66 • Cardreader Interface (CRI) and Cardreader Installation
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
CRI Programming
1. Each CRI must have its address and relay timeouts set according to “Appendix C - CRI
Programming” on page 100.
Cardreader Wiring
Refer to Drawing 8 while making these connections.
1. Mount the cardreader to its faceplate.
2. Splice the data cable to the cardreader’s pigtail cable using wire nuts and the following color
code table.
CARD READER
COLOR CODES
Card Rdr.
Pigtail
Data
Cable
Red
Red
Green
Green
White
White
Brown
Black
Black
Drain
Elevator Control Board (ECB) Installation
Elevator Control boards (ECBs) are employed to enable elevator floor selection buttons for access
control. They are installed and wired according to Drawings 6 and 10. Drawing 6 shows the cable
runs required in block diagram form. Drawing 10 shows the wiring connections for communications
with the computer and for control of the elevator floors.
Each Elevator Control board enclosure location can house two ECB assemblies. Each ECB can
control either four (single address mode) or eight floors (dual address mode).
“Liquidtight” ¾” fittings are utilized for outdoor installations. Grommets are utilized for indoor
installations.
ECB ENCLOSURE
Application
Qty.
ECB
Mode
Max. Floors
Controlled
Size
NEMA
Rating
Indoor/Outdoor
1
Single
4
10x12x6
3R
Indoor/Outdoor
1
Double
8
10x12x6
3R
Indoor/Outdoor
2
Single
8
10x12x6
3R
Indoor/Outdoor
2
Double
16
10x12x6
3R
ECB Enclosure Installation
Begin by finding the location for the ECB enclosure on the site layout drawings. ECB enclosures will
typically be mounted inside the elevator control room near the elevator control panel. If the enclosure
is to be mounted on masonry or drywall, follow the steps outlined in Sec. 3.6.1.1 below. If the
enclosure is to be mounted on sheet metal follow the steps outlined in Sec. 3.6.1.2 below.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Elevator Control Board (ECB) Installation • 67
Masonry Walls
1. Follow Steps 1 - 8 in “Masonry Wall” on page 65.
2. Mount the ECB onto the subpanel standoffs using four 6-32 x 3/8” machine screws.
Sheet Metal Walls
1. Follow Steps 1 - 5 in “Sheet Metal Wall” on page 65.
2. Mount the ECB onto the subpanel standoffs using four, 6-32 x 3/8” machine screws.
ECB Wiring
Two types of cable runs are required to properly install ECBs. See Drawing 6.
1. One or more 18 AWG, four conductor, shielded, communication cable runs linking the ECB
location with other peripheral devices and the PC on the communication chain.
2. Multiple 22 AWG, 2 conductor, cables run from the ECB relay outputs to the elevator control
panel.
Install the above runs according to your site layout drawings.
IMPORTANT WARNING: Be aware that ground faults on any of the communication cable
conductors cannot be tolerated. Since the drain wire for the shield is not insulated, it is most
prone to making contact with earth ground potential. Places where this can occur are inside
gate operator or keypad housings, inside underground conduits, etc.
Ground faults can cause 60 cycle “hum” to be induced into the system thus causing erroneous
data transmission, and can attract surges from lightning strikes making the system more
susceptible to damage. It is suggested that continuity checks using an ohmmeter are performed
for each run of cable to ensure isolation from ground. Proper isolation from earth ground is
absolutely essential to the integrity and performance of the system.
Communication Wiring
1. Connect the incoming comm. cable to TB1 according to Drawing 10. Connect the outgoing
comm. cable to TB2 if necessary.
Note: TB1 and TB2 are connected in parallel. There is actually no distinction between “incoming”
and “outgoing”. The labels are merely for convention only and to assist in troubleshooting.
Relay Wiring
Refer to Drawing 10 while making these connections.
1. Complete the ECB Elevator-Floor list below. For each applicable ECB address, record the
mode and the elevator it will be controlling. For each relay K1 - K8, record the floor number
that the relay will be controlling.
Note: For single-address ECBs, only K1 - K4 are applicable. For dual-address ECBs, the first
address is associated with K1 - K4 and the second address is associated with K5 - K8.
ECB Elevator, Floor List
ECB
Mode
Elev. ID
Elev. Descr.
K1(5)
K2(6)
K3(7)
K4(8)
96
97
68 • Elevator Control Board (ECB) Installation
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
An example ECB Elevator-Floor list follows.
ECB Elevator, Floor List
ECB
Mode
Elev. ID
Elev. Descr.
K1(5)
K2(6)
K3(7)
96
Single
1
Bldg. 1, #1
Flr. 2
Flr. 2
Flr. 4
97
Dual
2
Bldg. 2, #1
Flr. 2
Flr. 3
Flr. 4
98
N/A
2
Bldg. 2, #1
Flr. 6
99
Single
3
Bldg. 3, #1
Flr. 2
Flr. 3
Flr. 4
100
Single
4
Bldg. 3, #2
Flr. 2
Flr. 3
Flr. 4
K4(8)
Flr. 5
2. Wire each relay to the appropriate floor input using 22 AWG, two conductor cable.
ECB Programming
Each ECB must have its mode, address, and relay timeouts set according to “Appendix E – ECB
Programming” on page 103.
Alarm Monitoring System Installation
This section applies if you are using individual door alarms. If this does not apply to your
installation, move on to “Office Computer Equipment - Wiring and Testing” on page 84.
Conduit Installation
Drawing 6 outlines how peripheral devices are to be linked together on the communication chain.
The alarm system layout drawings for your facility will show specifically how devices are to be
interconnected on the communication chain and how underground conduit is to be run.
For “interior” installations in newly constructed buildings, underground conduit should be run to a
junction box outside the building then inside the building to a point 10 ft. above ground level. There
it should end. Cables will then run exposed from that point forward.
For “exterior” installations in existing buildings, conduit originating from underground should be run
up the outside walls of buildings to a height of 12”-18” above the door tops. There it should be
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Alarm Monitoring System Installation • 69
turned 90 degrees using a junction box or “elbow” fitting and ran to the nearest outside-mounted DSB
enclosure.
In either case, outside mounted door status board (DSB) enclosures can be employed as junction
boxes for incoming underground conduit if they are located above the point where the conduit exits
the ground. See Drawing 15, for example.
Door Status Board (DSB) and Door Switch Installation
Each Door Status Board enclosure location can house one or two DSB printed circuit board (PCB)
assemblies. Each DSB can monitor up to 24 or 48 doors depending upon whether it is a “half-sized”
or “full-sized” assembly.
We suggest that you wire one DSB enclosure location completely, and then, after gaining a thorough
understanding of the whole process, distribute your labor force to perform all tasks concurrently. For
example, one person can install DSB enclosures while another mounts door switches and two others
pull cable.
DSB enclosures are Hoffman 12R106HCR with a customized A-12N10P subpanel. Four standoffs
are added to the subpanel to facilitate mounting of the DSB. To maintain watertightness, cable access
is through the bottom of the enclosure only. Two mounting flanges are present in lieu of mounting
holes in the back of the enclosure. Carlon “Liquidtight” ¾” fittings and flexible, non-metallic conduit
are utilized for outdoor installations. Grommets are utilized for indoor installations.
DSB ENCLOSURE
Application
Qty. Full
DSBs
Qty. Half
DSBs
Outdoor/Indoor
Outdoor/Indoor
1
0
0
1
Max.
No.
Drs.
48
24
Recommended
No. Drs.
42
21
Size
NEMA
Rating
10x12x6
10x12x6
3R
3R
Several points should be noted:
The recommended “fill” for each DSB enclosure is 7/8 of its maximum capacity. Undersizing allows
for future inputs. The greatest installation economies can usually be realized with two enclosures
mounted side-by-side. However, two-gang locations cannot always be utilized. Each individual site
configuration will determine the quantity and location of DSB enclosures and “half” and “full” DSBs.
Interior Installation for New Construction
New facilities, with unoccupied units, allow for the installation of DSB enclosures, wiring and door
switches on the inside of buildings and units. For buildings without corridors, though, DSB
enclosures must be installed on the outside of buildings for serviceability.
The advantage of this method is that it affords maximum system reliability and security. The
disadvantage is that once the site becomes occupied, with personalized locks on each unit, the door
status switches, magnets, and wiring become somewhat inaccessible.
DSB Enclosure Installation
Begin by finding the location for a particular DSB enclosure on the site layout drawings. The layout
notes will indicate whether the DSB is full-size (48 input) or half-size (24 input). If the enclosure is
to be mounted on masonry or drywall, follow the steps outlined in “Masonry Walls” below. If the
enclosure is to be mounted on sheet metal follow the steps outlined in “Sheet Metal Walls” below.
70 • Alarm Monitoring System Installation
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Masonry Walls
1. Using the Hoffman 12R106HCR Enclosure as a template, drill four 3/16” x ¾” holes into
the wall for mounting.
2. Install four #8 x ¾” plastic anchors into the four mounting holes.
3. Referring to your site layout, remove one, two, or all three of the ¾”-1” knockouts on the
bottom of the enclosure as required. See Drawings 15 and 18.
4. Mount the enclosure to the wall using four #8 x ¾” self-tapping screws.
If the enclosure is mounted outdoors, follow steps 5 through 10 below, then proceed to step 12:
5. For each Carlon LN20, ¾” Liquidtight fitting to be used, determine where the Carlon
15007, ¾”, flexible, non-metallic conduit is to penetrate the wall. Drill a 1-1/16” hole
through the wall at these locations. See Drawings 15 and 18.
6. Attach a piece of flexible conduit to each fitting long enough to penetrate through the wall
(8”–12”).
7. Slide the conduit through the wall and install the fitting in the appropriate knockout.
8. Seal around each wall opening on the outside and on the inside using caulking material.
9. Install a Carlon E943E, ¾” terminal adapter, E943EW O-ring, and E943W locknut at
each point where PVC conduit from underground is to attach to the enclosure. Use Carlon
VC9924 cement to make the connection between the conduit and the terminal adapter.
10. Install a Carlon E943E, ¾” terminal adapter, E943EW O-ring, and E943W locknut at
each point where PVC conduit from underground is to attach to the enclosure. Use Carlon
VC9924 cement to make the connection between the conduit and the terminal adapter.
If the enclosure is mounted indoors, follow steps 11 through 14 below:
11. Install 1-3/8” O.D. grommets into the removed knockout holes.
12. Install the modified Hoffman A-12N10P Subpanel using the four, supplied machine screws.
13. Install the Hoffman 99411-399 Grounding Kit per the manufacturer’s instructions.
14. Mount the appropriate DSB, half-size or full-size, onto the subpanel standoffs using four 6-32
x 3/8” machine screws. The side of the board with TB1-TB3 should face toward the left side
of the enclosure.
Sheet Metal Walls
1. Referring to your site layout, remove one, two, or all three of the ¾”-1” knockouts on the
bottom of the enclosure as required. See Drawings 15 and 18.
2. Mount the enclosure to the wall using four, #8 x ¾” self-drilling screws.
If the enclosure is mounted outdoors, follow steps 3 to 7 below, then proceed to step 9:
3. For each Carlon LN20, ¾” Liquidtight fitting to be used, determine where the Carlon 15007,
¾”, flexible, non-metallic conduit is to penetrate the wall. Drill a 1-1/16” hole through the
wall at these locations. See Drawings 15 and 18.
4. Attach a piece of flexible conduit to each fitting long enough to penetrate through the wall
(8”–12”).
5. Slide the conduit through the wall and install the fitting in the appropriate knockout.
6. Seal around each wall opening on the outside and on the inside using caulking material.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Alarm Monitoring System Installation • 71
7. Install a Carlon E943E, ¾” terminal adapter, E943EW O-ring, and E943W locknut at
each point where PVC conduit from underground is to attach to the enclosure. Use Carlon
VC9924 cement to make the connection between the conduit and the terminal adapter.
If the enclosure is mounted indoors, follow steps 8 through 11 below:
8. Install 1-3/8” O.D. grommets into the removed knockout holes.
9. Install the modified Hoffman A-12N10P Subpanel using the four, supplied machine screws.
10. Install the 99411-399 Grounding Kit per the manufacturer’s instructions.
11. Mount the appropriate DSB, half-size or full-size, onto the subpanel standoffs using four, 632 x 3/8” machine screws. The side of the board with TB1-TB3 should face toward the left
side of the enclosure.
Door Switch Installation
Two types of door switches can be provided. For frame-mounted switch applications (swing doors), a
plastic switch and magnet assembly is provided. For floor-mounted switch applications (roll-up
doors), a metal switch and magnet assembly is provided.
For interior type installations, the switch assembly is mounted on the inside of units adjacent to the
door. Depending on the type of installation, the switch is positioned in a manner whereby a closed or
open door condition can be reliably detected.
Two of the most common types of installations are described below:
Roll-up Door -- Floor-Mounted Switch
This type of switch is floor-mounted near one outside edge of the roll-up door (see Drawings 15-17).
1. Mount the magnet to the lower, outside edge of the door using the aluminum “L” bracket
provided. Start by mounting the magnet to the bracket and the bracket to the door using four,
#8 x 3/4”, self-drilling screws. Position the bracket so that the magnet is suspended 1 1/2”
above the floor when the door is closed.
2. Using the switch as a template, mark two mounting hole locations on the concrete floor.
Position the switch so that it will be directly below and parallel to the magnet when the door
is closed.
3. Drill two 3/16” dia. x 3/4” holes into the marked locations on the concrete floor. Install the
plastic anchors provided into the holes. Mount the switch to the anchors using two, #8 x 3/4”
self-tapping screws.
4. Adjust the bracket so that 1” separates the magnet and switch when the door is closed.
5. Secure the armored cable to the wall, door frame, or other support using cable ties to prepare
for terminating the switch conductors at a later time.
6. Perform the switch testing procedure outlined in “Door Switch Testing” below.
Swing Door
1. Refer to Drawings 18 and 19. Mount the switch to the door frame. Mount the magnet to the
top of the door, carefully positioning it directly below the switch. The door must, of course,
clear the switch. The gap between switch and magnet should not exceed 1”.
2. Perform the switch testing procedure outlined in “Door Switch Testing” below.
72 • Alarm Monitoring System Installation
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Door Switch Testing
After the door switch assembly has been properly installed, perform the following test procedure to
ensure correct operation of the assembly.
1. Open the door. Set a digital multimeter on its resistance scale. Place a meter lead on each
signal lead. The meter should indicate an infinite resistance reading.
2. Close the door and check the meter reading. The meter should read a few tenths of an ohm,
indicating that the switch has closed. Move the door slightly, and ensure that a steady, low
resistance reading is maintained.
3. If any of these tests fail, it may be due to excessive gapping or misalignment between the
switch and magnet, or a defective switch. Perform corrective measures as necessary and
repeat the tests.
Door Switch Cable Installation
For the “interior” method, the door input cable from the door switches to the DSB location is run
primarily inside the unit spaces. The only exception is where the wiring must pass through the wall
into the bottom of an outdoor or hallway mounted DSB enclosure.
There are many cable run variations which may be required to implement to accommodate different
types of construction, unit partitions, elevators, obstructions, etc. that may be encountered during the
installation. Ultimately, you, the installer must determine the best methods for running and securing
wiring.
The roof structure is usually supported by beams or purlins. Generally, the best place to run door
switch wiring is under this support structure. Usually the wiring is attached as close as possible to the
building wall. Care must be taken to avoid door mechanisms such as guide tracks, latches, springs,
etc.
If partitions between units run all the way up to the ceiling and do not allow cables to be run over
them, you will need to drill holes in the partitions to allow wiring to pass between units. If the
partition is sheet metal, use grommets in each hole to avoid damaging the cable.
Once the wiring paths have been established, the plastic cable ties can be installed to mark the paths.
All the cable ties should be mounted before pulling any cables. A cable tie must be located every 5
feet as well as directly over each door switch.
Each cable-tie base has an eyelet for mounting. Use a #8 x 3/4” self-tapping screw alone or in
conjunction with an anchor to mount them. Once mounted, feed the pointed end of the tie-wrap
through the slot in the base and then through the hole at the other end of the tie-wrap to form a large
loop. Leave the large loop in place. It will be closed down later after all the cabling has been routed
through it. When all the cable-ties are in place for the first door wiring cable run, you can begin
running cable.
The specific type of cable employed to wire doors is called 25 pair. It consists of an overall jacket
containing 25 individual twisted pairs. Using this type of cable, 48 doors can be wired to one fullsized DSB with one pair serving as common return.
25-Pair Installation
At the back of this manual note that a DSB wire list template is provided. Locate the first DSB
location from the site alarm system layout. Make a copy of the wire list template.
From the site layout, note the DSB address for the location. Record the address on the wire list.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Alarm Monitoring System Installation • 73
Note from the site layout that each DSB location has one, 25 pair, door cable run associated with it.
Doors are identified on each run using “DSB input” numbers ranging from 0-47. Locate the “input”
columns on the wire list.
If unit numbers are known they can be entered on the wire list next to the appropriate DSB input
number. This information will be used later when programming the “Door Table” (see Operations
Manual).
As mentioned earlier, each DSB can handle up to 24 or 48 inputs. Each input is assigned to a
terminal on the DSB board. In addition, terminals are provided on the board for the common return
wires. As a matter of convention, each common return in a 25 pair cable is assigned to a group of 24
doors. Hence, for a half-sized DSB, only one common return wire from the 25 pair cable is utilized.
Proceed by constructing wire lists for each DSB location shown on the site layout.
You are now ready to run the door wiring for the first DSB enclosure. Place a spool of 25-pair cable
at the DSB location. Starting at the DSB location and proceeding to the left or the right of the DSB
location (as indicated on your site layout), make a straight cable run by each successive door until the
last door input is reached. Be sure to pass the cable through all the cable ties marking the run.
At the DSB location, route the 25 pair cable through the wall, through the conduit fitting or grommet
and into the bottom of the enclosure. Cut the cable so that two feet of slack is left in the enclosure.
WARNING: It is imperative that great care be taken not to abrade the jacket of the 25 pair
cable or the insulation of any of the 50 conductors. Pay particular attention to the possibility of
abrasion when cables pass through or around metal objects such as sheet metal partitions or
supports, door frames, etc.
Remember, NO GROUND FAULTS. Under no circumstances should any conductor be
allowed to make contact with any extraneous metal objects such as grounded DSB enclosures,
sheet metal partitions, building frames, etc. It is suggested that continuity checks using an
ohmmeter are performed for each run of cable to ensure isolation from ground.
DSB Communication Cable Installation
The communication cable is an 18 AWG, four conductor, shielded, jacketed cable used to
interconnect all DSB’s (and other peripherals) with the PC located in the manager’s office. As
indicated on your site layout drawings, many comm. cable runs will share the same paths as the door
wiring. Hence, with some proficiency, it is possible to install communication cable at the same time
as door cable. While installing door cable, make references to your site layout to check for comm.
cable sharing part or all of the same run. For now, the following discussion will address installing
comm. cable separately from door cable.
The first length of comm. cable will run underground from the PC location to the building containing
the first DSB location.
1. Start with the comm. cable spool at the PC. Draw the cable through the appropriate
underground conduit to the first building and into the bottom of the enclosure for the first
DSB location. See Drawings 15 and 18. Leave two feet of slack in the enclosure. Label the
cable end “PC” (source), indicating that the cable originates from the PC.
2. Return to the office and cut the communication cable, leaving an adequate length to reach the
Communications Interface Module (about 20 feet). Label this end “DSB.” indicating that this
cable is for the alarm system communications.
3. Take the spool of cable to the first DSB location. Route the cable through the bottom of the
enclosure, through the wall, through the door wiring cable-ties to the second DSB enclosure
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location. Pull the cable through the wall into the enclosure, leaving 2 feet of slack. Label this
end “DSB 128” (source), for example, indicating that this cable is from the enclosure
containing DSB 128. Return to DSB location 128 and cut the cable. Label the end “DSB
129” (destination) indicating that the cable goes to the DSB enclosure containing DSB 129.
4. Now move the spool of cable to the second DSB location, and repeat the above procedure for
running the comm. cable to the third DSB location. Continue in this manner until all the DSB
enclosures have been cabled. For instances where the chain branches or “tees” in two or
more directions, multiple cable runs will be required to the branched DSB locations.
NOTE: Be sure to always mark the source or destination of each communication cable entering
or exiting a DSB enclosure. This procedure will pay dividends in the future if the communication
chain should require troubleshooting.
WARNING: Again, be aware of the fact that ground faults on any of the communication cable
conductors cannot be tolerated. Since the drain wire for the shield is not insulated, this
conductor is the most apt to make contact with earth ground potential. Places where this can
occur are inside grounded DSB enclosures, on sheet metal partitions, inside underground
conduits, etc.
Ground faults can cause 60 cycle “hum” to be induced into the system thus causing erroneous
data transmission, and can attract surges from lightning making the system more susceptible to
damage. It is suggested that continuity checks using an ohmmeter are performed for each run
of cable to ensure isolation from ground. Proper isolation from earth ground is an absolute
necessity for reliable operation.
Exterior Installation for Existing Facilities
Existing facilities with occupied units will require the DSB communication and door wiring to be run
on the outside of storage unit buildings. The DSB enclosure assemblies will, of course, remain on the
outside of buildings or in hallways as with the “interior” type installation.
Metallic “molding” will be secured over the door wiring for protection. Flexible, non-metallic
conduit provides the interface between the enclosure and the molding-covered door wiring. See
Drawings 20, 22, 23, and 25. The conduit is positioned so that the molding can overlap and conceal
the end of the conduit. Wiring can then be run in a continuous, protected path from the door
switches, through molding, through conduit and into the DSB enclosure.
DSB Enclosure Installation
Begin by finding the location for a particular DSB enclosure on the site layout drawings. The layout
notes will indicate whether the DSB is full-size (48 input) or half-size (24 input). If the enclosure is
to be mounted on masonry or drywall, follow the steps outlined in “Masonry Walls” below. If the
enclosure is to be mounted on sheet metal follow the steps outlined in “Sheet Metal Walls” below.
Masonry Walls
1. Using the Hoffman 12R106HCR Enclosure as a template, drill four 3/16” x ¾” holes into
the wall for mounting.
2. Install four #8 x ¾” plastic anchors into the four mounting holes.
3. Referring to your site layout, remove one, two, or all three of the ¾”-1” knockouts on the
bottom of the enclosure as required. See Drawings 20, 22, 23, and 25.
4. Mount the enclosure to the wall using four #8 x ¾” self-tapping screws.
If the enclosure is mounted outdoors, follow steps 5 through 10 below, then proceed to step 12:
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5. Attach a three foot length of Carlon 15007, ¾”, flexible, non-metallic conduit to one
Carlon LN20, ¾” Liquidtight fitting.
6. Install the fitting into its appropriate knockout on the enclosure. See Drawings 20 and 23.
Typically only one, but possibly two fittings will be required.
7. Route the conduit in an ‘S’ shape from the bottom of the enclosure up to the point where the
open end of the conduit is inline with what will be the door wiring run. See Drawings 20, 22,
23, and 25.
8. Secure the flexible conduit using two or three Carlon E977E, ¾”, non-metallic clamps.
Note: The open end of the conduit should be sealed with silicone to prevent water from
entering.
9. Referring to your site layout drawings, repeat the procedure for a second fitting if necessary.
10. Install a Carlon E943E, ¾” terminal adapter, E943EW O-ring, and E943W locknut at
each point where PVC conduit from underground is to attach to the enclosure. Use Carlon
VC9924 cement to make the connection between the conduit and the terminal adapter.
If the enclosure is mounted indoors, follow steps 11 through 14 below:
11. Install 1-3/8” O.D. grommets into the removed knockout holes.
12. Install the modified Hoffman A-12N10P Subpanel using the four, supplied machine screws.
13. Install the Hoffman 99411-399 Grounding Kit per the manufacturer’s instructions.
14. Mount the appropriate DSB, half-size or full-size, onto the subpanel standoffs using four 6-32
x 3/8” machine screws. The side of the board with TB1-TB3 should face toward the left side
of the enclosure.
Sheet Metal Walls
1. Referring to your site layout, remove one, two, or all three of the ¾”-1” knockouts on the
bottom of the enclosure as required. See Drawings 20 and 23.
2. Mount the enclosure to the wall using four, #8 x ¾” self-drilling screws.
If the enclosure is mounted outdoors, follow steps 3 through 8 below, then proceed to step 10:
3. Attach a three foot length of Carlon 15007, ¾”, flexible, non-metallic conduit to one
Carlon LN20, ¾” Liquidtight fitting.
4. Install the fitting into its appropriate knockout on the enclosure. See Drawings 15 and 18.
Typically only one, but possibly two fittings will be required.
5. Route the conduit in an ‘S’ shape from the bottom of the enclosure up to the point where the
open end of the conduit is inline with what will be the door wiring run. See Drawings 15, 17,
18, and 20.
6. Secure the flexible conduit using two or three Carlon E977E, ¾”, non-metallic clamps.
Note: The open end of the conduit should be sealed with silicone to prevent water from
entering.
7. Referring to your site layout drawings, repeat the procedure for a second fitting if necessary.
8. Install a Carlon E943E, ¾” terminal adapter, E943EW O-ring, and E943W locknut at
each point where PVC conduit from underground is to attach to the enclosure. Use Carlon
VC9924 cement to make the connection between the conduit and the terminal adapter.
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If the enclosure is mounted indoors, follow steps 9 through 12 below:
9. Install 1-3/8” O.D. grommets into the removed knockout holes.
10. Install the modified Hoffman A-12N10P Subpanel using the four, supplied machine screws.
11. Install the Hoffman 99411-399 Grounding Kit as per the manufacturer’s instructions.
12. Mount the appropriate DSB, half-size or full-size, onto the subpanel standoffs using four, 632 x 3/8” machine screws. The side of the board with TB1-TB3 should face toward the left
side of the enclosure.
Door Switch Installation
The door switch assembly utilized for retrofit installations consists of three parts: anti-defeat switch,
magnet, and wide L-bracket for roll-up door applications.
Being an “exterior” installation, the door switch assembly is mounted on the outside of the unit
adjacent to the door. Installation procedures for the two most commonly encountered door types are
discussed below.
Roll-up Door
1. Refer to Drawings 20-22. First attach the switch to the supplied, L-bracket using 6-32 x 3/4”
machine screws and hex nuts. Mount the switch at a point halfway through the bracket
adjustment slots.
2. Position the assembled switch and bracket on the door header with one hand. With the other
hand, position the magnet assembly on the door itself where it will be tentatively mounted.
Move the switch on the header to the point where good alignment and a 1” gap exists
between the switch and magnet. Mark the position of the bracket mounting holes on the door
header halfway through the bracket slots. Using anchors if necessary, mount the bracket to
the door header. Mount the magnet to the door using #8 x 3/4” self-drilling screws.
3. Make final horizontal and vertical adjustments of the switch to optimize alignment and gap.
NOTE: The gap between the switch and magnet must not exceed 1”.
4. After the switch and magnet assemblies have been properly mounted, perform the switch
testing and adjustment procedure outlined below.
Swing Door
1. Mount the switch at the top of the door frame and the magnet on the door itself using the
procedures outlined for “interior” installations in the section above (see Drawings 23-25).
After proper mounting, perform the switch test procedures outlined below.
Door Switch Testing
After the “exterior” door switch and magnet devices have been properly installed, the entire assembly
should be tested for correct operation prior to actually wiring them to the DSB. If the following three
tests are successfully passed, the switch/magnet assembly is operating properly.
Door Closed Test
1. Start by first securing the door in the closed and locked position. Set a digital multimeter to
the “ohms” position. Place the meter leads on the black and green switch leads of the
attached armored cable. The meter should read only a few tenths of an ohm which indicates a
door “closed” condition. To check for door play influences, move the door slightly to
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Alarm Monitoring System Installation • 77
simulate wind-induced movements. The meter reading should not deviate, even
momentarily, from its low resistance reading.
If at any time during the above test an infinite resistance is read, try moving the switch closer to the
magnet, then re-test. If this adjustment doesn’t help, try replacing the switch.
Door Tampered Test
1. Place a second magnet next to the switch. The meter should go from a zero ohm reading to
infinite ohms, indicating a “tampered” condition. If an infinite resistance reading is not
obtained, replace the switch and re-test.
2. Remove the second magnet. The meter reading should return to zero ohms. If not, move the
switch away from the magnet and repeat the test. If the test still fails, try replacing the
switch.
Door Open Test
1. Since we are dealing with existing facilities in this application, it will probably be impractical
to physically open doors to occupied units to perform the “door open” test. The test is
probably best performed by observing an infinite ohms reading for the switch before it has
been installed.
Door Switch Cable Installation
For the “exterior” installation method, all door wiring is run horizontally along the outside wall of the
building at a height of approximately 12”-18” above the door tops.
There are many cable run variations which may be required to accommodate different types of
construction, pillars, drains, gutters, eves, etc. that may be encountered during the installation.
Ultimately, you, the installer, must determine the best methods for running and securing wiring.
For each DSB location, establish the horizontal wiring path above the units. A chalk line or mortar
joint may be used to maintain proper alignment.
Once the wiring path has been established, the Cable Ready CL-075 mounting clips can be
installed. See Drawings 20-25. All the mounting clips should be installed before pulling any cables.
A mounting clip must be located every 4 feet.
For sheet metal walls, use two, #8 x ¾”, self-drilling screws to install each mounting clip. For
masonry walls, use two, #8 x ¾”, self-tapping screws and two, #8 x 3/4” plastic anchors to install
each mounting clip. Once installed, feed the pointed end of the 4” tie-wrap through the hole in the
base and then through the hole at the other end of the tie-wrap to form a large loop. Leave the large
loop in place. It will be closed down later after all the cabling has been routed through it. Repeat for
the second tie-wrap. When all the cable-ties are in place for the first door wiring cable run, you can
begin running cable.
The specific type of cable employed to wire doors is called 25 pair. It consists of an overall jacket
containing 25 individual twisted pairs. Using this type of cable, 48 doors can be wired to one, fullsized DSB with one pair serving as common return.
25-Pair Installation
1. At the back of this manual note that a DSB wire list template is provided. Locate the first
DSB location from the site alarm system layout. Make a copy of the wire list template.
2. From the site layout, note the DSB address for the location. Record the address on the wire
list.
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3. Note from the site layout that each DSB location has one, 25 pair, door cable run associated
with it. Doors are identified on each run using “DSB input” numbers ranging from 0-47.
Locate the “input” columns on the wire list.
4. If unit numbers are known they can be entered on the wire list next to the appropriate DSB
input number. This information will be used later when programming the “Door Table” (see
Operations Manual).
5. As mentioned earlier, each DSB can handle up to 24 or 48 inputs. Each input is assigned to a
terminal on the DSB board. In addition, terminals are provided on the board for the common
return wires. As a matter of convention, each common return in a 25 pair cable is assigned to
a group of 24 doors. Hence, for a half-sized DSB, only one common return wire from the 25
pair cable is utilized.
6. Proceed by constructing wire lists for each DSB location shown on the site layout.
7. You are now ready to run the door wiring for the first DSB enclosure. Place a spool of 25pair cable at the DSB location. Starting at the DSB location and proceeding to the left or the
right of the DSB location (as indicated on your site layout), make a straight cable run by each
successive door until the last door input is reached. Be sure to pass the cable through all the
mounting clips marking the run.
8. At the DSB location, route the 25 pair cable through the ‘S’ shaped flexible conduit through
the conduit fitting and into the bottom of the enclosure. Cut the cable so that two feet slack is
left in the enclosure.
WARNING: It is imperative that great care be taken not to abrade the jacket of the 25 pair
cable or the insulation of any of the 50 conductors. Pay particular attention to the possibility of
abrasion when cables pass through or around metal objects such as sheet metal partitions or
supports, door frames, etc.
Remember: NO GROUND FAULTS. Under no circumstances should any conductor be
allowed to make contact with any extraneous metal objects such as grounded DSB enclosures,
sheet metal partitions, building frames, etc. It is suggested that continuity checks using an
ohmmeter are performed for each run of cable to ensure isolation from ground.
Communication Cable Installation
The communication cable is an 18 AWG, four conductor, shielded, jacketed cable used to
interconnect all DSBs (and other peripherals) with the PC located in the manager's office. As
indicated on your site layout drawings, many comm. cable runs will share the same paths as the door
wiring. Hence, with some proficiency, it is possible to install communication cable at the same time
as door cable. While installing door cable, make references to your site layout to check for comm.
cable sharing part or all of the same run. For now, the following discussion will address installing
comm. cable separately from door cable.
The first length of comm. cable will run underground from the PC location to the building containing
the first DSB location.
1. Start with the comm. cable spool at the PC. Draw the cable through the appropriate
underground conduit to the first building and into the bottom of the enclosure for the first
DSB location. See Drawings 20 and 23. Leave two feet of slack in the enclosure. Label the
cable end “PC” (source), indicating that the cable originates from the PC.
2. Return to the office and cut the communication cable, leaving an adequate length to reach the
Communications Interface Module (about 20 feet). Label this end “DSB.” indicating that this
cable is for the alarm system communications.
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Alarm Monitoring System Installation • 79
3. Take the spool of cable to the first DSB location. Route the cable through the bottom of the
enclosure, through the molding mounting clips to the second DSB enclosure location.
4. Pull the cable through the ‘S’ shaped, flexible conduit, and into the bottom of the enclosure,
leaving 2 feet of slack. Label this end “DSB 128” (source), for example, indicating that this
cable is from the enclosure containing DSB 128. Return to DSB location 128 and cut the
cable. Label the end “DSB 129” (destination) indicating that the cable goes to the DSB
enclosure containing DSB 129.
5. Now move the spool of cable to the second DSB location, and repeat the above procedure for
running the comm. cable to the third DSB location. Continue in this manner until all the DSB
enclosures have been cabled. For instances where the chain branches or “tees” in two or
more directions, multiple cable runs will be required to the branched DSB locations.
NOTE: Be sure to always mark the source or destination of each communication cable entering
or exiting a DSB enclosure. This procedure will pay dividends in the future if the communication
chain should require troubleshooting.
WARNING: Again, be aware of the fact that ground faults on any of the communication cable
conductors cannot be tolerated. Since the drain wire for the shield is not insulated, this
conductor is the most apt to make contact with earth ground potential. Places where this can
occur are inside grounded DSB enclosures, on sheet metal partitions, inside underground
conduits, etc.
Ground faults can cause 60 cycle “hum” to be induced into the system thus causing erroneous
data transmission, and can attract surges from lightning making the system more susceptible to
damage. It is suggested that continuity checks using an ohmmeter are performed for each run
of cable to ensure isolation from ground. Proper isolation from earth ground is an absolute
necessity for reliable operation.
Door Switch and DSB Wire Terminating
Door Switch Terminating, Interior Installations
Herein lies the most challenging part of the 25-pair, door cable installation. With some practice,
though, you will find the following procedures to be straightforward and manageable. Take extra
time initially to thoroughly familiarize yourself with these methods before actually attempting them.
Use scrap 25-pair cable for practice.
Roll-up Door -- Floor Mounted Switch
1. Referring to Drawings 15 and 16, using a coaxial jacket cutter and X-Acto knife, remove a 4”
piece of the 25-pair cable jacket about 6” to the outside of the door guide rail. Be very
careful not to cut any of the conductors inside the cable jacket.
2. With the jacket piece removed, locate the color-coded, input conductor for the door according
to the wire list created for the DSB location. Cut this conductor leaving at least 2” of slack.
3. Locate the common return conductor for the input. Generally, the white with blue stripe
(white/blue) conductor is the common return for DSB inputs 0-23 and the blue with white
stripe (blue/white) is the return for inputs 24-47 (see wire list).
4. Splice a length of Belden 8442, 22 AWG, two conductor cable to the trunk line pair as
shown in Drawings 15 and 16. Use a ScotchLok UR butt connector to connect the red wire
of the 22/2 cable to the color-coded, input conductor of the trunk line. Use a Scotchlok UG
tap connector to connect the black wire of the 22/2 cable to the common return conductor of
the trunk line.
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5. Run the 22/2 cable along the wall next to the roll-up door down to the floor switch armored
cable. Connect the floor switch conductors (black and green) to the 22/2 cable conductors
(black and red) using ScotchLok UR connectors. Securely fasten the armored harness and
22/2 cable to the wall (or other support) using cable ties. This wiring should be made as
inconspicuous and inaccessible as possible to prevent tampering.
Swing Door
1. Referring to Drawings 18 and 19, using a coaxial jacket cutter and X-Acto knife, remove a 4”
piece of the 25-pair cable jacket directly above where the switch is mounted. Be very
careful not to cut any of the conductors inside the cable jacket.
2. With the jacket piece removed, locate the color-coded, input conductor for the door according
to the wire list created for the DSB location. Cut this conductor leaving at least 2” of slack.
3. Locate the common return conductor for the input. Generally, the white with blue stripe
(white/blue) conductor is the common return for DSB inputs 0-23 and the blue with white
stripe (blue/white) is the return for inputs 24-47 (see wire list).
4. Connect the switch pigtail lead directly to the trunk line. Use a ScotchLok UR butt
connector to connect the green wire of the switch’s pigtail cable to the color-coded, input
conductor of the trunk line. Use a Scotchlok UG tap connector to connect the black wire of
the switch’s pigtail cable to the common return conductor of the trunk line.
Door Switch Terminating, Exterior Installations
Roll-up Door -- Header Mounted Switch
1. Referring to Drawings 20 and 21, using a coaxial jacket cutter and X-Acto knife, remove a 4”
piece of the 25-pair cable jacket approximately 12”-18” to the left of where the switch is
mounted. Be very careful not to cut any of the conductors inside the cable jacket.
2. With the jacket piece removed, locate the color-coded, input conductor for the door according
to the wire list created for the DSB location. Cut this conductor leaving at least 2” of slack.
3. Locate the common return conductor for the input. Generally, the white with blue stripe
(white/blue) conductor is the common return for DSB inputs 0-23 and the blue with white
stripe (blue/white) is the return for inputs 24-47 (see wire list).
4. Connect the switch’s armored cable leads directly to the trunk line. Use a ScotchLok UR
butt connector to connect the green wire of the switch’s armored cable to the color-coded,
input conductor of the trunk line. Use a Scotchlok UG tap connector to connect the black
wire of the switch’s armored cable to the common return conductor of the trunk line.
5. Secure the armor cable to the trunk line using a tie wrap so that strain is not placed on the UR
and UG connections.
Swing Door
1. Referring to Drawings 23 and 24, using a coaxial jacket cutter and X-Acto knife, remove a 4”
piece of the 25-pair cable jacket approximately 12”-18” to the left of where the switch is
mounted. Be very careful not to cut any of the conductors inside the cable jacket.
2. With the jacket piece removed, locate the color-coded, input conductor for the door according
to the wire list created for the DSB location. Cut this conductor leaving at least 2” of slack.
3. Locate the common return conductor for the input. Generally, the white with blue stripe
(white/blue) conductor is the common return for DSB inputs 0-23 and the blue with white
stripe (blue/white) is the return for inputs 24-47 (see wire list).
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Alarm Monitoring System Installation • 81
4. Connect the switch’s armored cable leads directly to the trunk line. Use a ScotchLok UR
butt connector to connect the green wire of the switch’s armored cable to the color-coded,
input conductor of the trunk line. Use a Scotchlok UG tap connector to connect the black
wire of the switch’s armored cable to the common return conductor of the trunk line.
5. Secure the armor cable to the trunk line using a tie wrap so that strain is not placed on the UR
and UG connections.
Trunk Cable Securing, Interior Installations
After the door switch wiring has been completed, it will then be time to secure all of the “trunk” cable
wiring. That is, all those runs containing door input (25 pair) and/or comm. cable wiring.
1. Begin by ensuring that excessive slack on the trunk line has been removed. This can best be
accomplished by starting at the end of the door cable at the first DSB location. From there,
proceed along the cable path, pulling cables to eliminate slack, and securing them by
tightening the cable ties as you proceed. Apply adequate but not excessive pressure when
closing down the tie wrap loops. That is, allow for expansion and contraction of the
trunk line with temperature variations. Cut off any excess tie-wrap length.
2. Repeat the procedure for the remainder of the DSB locations.
Trunk Cable Securing, Exterior Installations
After the door switch wiring has been completed, it will then be time to secure all of the “trunk” cable
wiring. That is, all those runs containing door input (25 pair) and/or comm. cable wiring.
1. Begin by ensuring that excessive slack on the trunk line has been removed. This can best be
accomplished by starting at the end of the door cable at the first DSB location. From there,
proceed along the cable path, pulling cables to eliminate slack, and securing them by
tightening the cable ties as you proceed. Apply adequate but not excessive pressure when
closing down the tie wrap loops. That is, allow for expansion and contraction of the
trunk line with temperature variations. Cut off any excess tie-wrap length.
2. After all the wiring from the switches to the “trunk” lines has been properly secured, metallic
molding must be installed over all the trunk line wiring runs.
3. Before installing each section, cut small slots or notches along the bottom side of the molding
to allow for entrance of the switch armored cable. The notches may be cut using tin-snips or
heavy-duty wire cutters. See Drawings 22 and 25.
4. Refer to the manufacturer's instructions for proper installation procedures for the various
section types (e.g., straight runs, inside corners, outside corners, etc). Generally speaking,
molding can be simply snapped over the mounting clips.
5. At the DSB enclosure, be sure the molding overlaps the end of ‘S’-shaped, flexible conduit
by 3”.
6. Repeat the procedure for the remainder of the DSB locations.
DSB Enclosure Wiring and Terminating, Interior and Exterior
Installations
25-Pair Cable Terminating
Refer to Drawing 26 while performing these procedures.
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1. For the 25-pair cable, remove an ample amount of the cable jacket to allow conductors to be
routed from the cable entry point to the farthest DSB input terminal (usually one or two feet).
2. Secure the jacketed portion of the cable to the enclosure near the cable entrance point using a
tie-wrap (with base).
3. Size the length of the white/orange (input 0) conductor by routing it from the cable entrance
port, along the side of the enclosure and up to its appropriate DSB input. In this case, that
would be TB5-1 (see wire list, and Drawing 26). Add another 3/4 inch to this length and cut
the wire. Repeat this procedure for the other conductors that are to be terminated.
4. Coil the remaining conductors that are to remain unconnected. Tape them together and place
the bundle in the bottom of the enclosure. These are your spare input conductors and are to
be saved for future use.
5. For the properly sized conductors, strip 1/4” of insulation from each end. Locate the
white/orange conductor (input 0) and insert it into the wire clamp for position TB5-1.
Complete the connection by tightening down the wire clamp using a small screwdriver.
Locate the first common return for the cable, white/blue, and connect it to position TB6-13.
Locate and connect each of the remaining inputs according to the wire list and Drawing 26.
Conductors to be terminated on the opposite side of the board will need to be routed around
the board to the other side. Note that the terminal blocks are “depluggable” and can be easily
removed from their mating headers.
6. Once all the terminations have been made, the conductor runs should be properly harnessed
and bundled using tie wraps (without bases).
External Communication Cable Terminating
1. Prepare each incoming and outgoing communication cable (two or more cables) by removing
1” of the gray, outer jacket from the cable to expose the red, black, white and green wires and
the uninsulated drain (shield) wire. Remove the exposed part of the foil shield and 1/4” of
insulation from each conductor end. Place 1/16” OD heat shrink tubing over the exposed
drain wire to prevent it from making contact with the DSB enclosure or other conductors.
WARNING: For good noise immunity, the exposed, unshielded length at each terminated end
should not exceed 1”.
2. Communication cables are connected to the 6 position terminal blocks, TB1-TB3, according
to the chart below.
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COMM. CABLE TERMINAL
BLOCK CONNECTIONS
Wire
Color
Terminal
Block
Terminal
No.
Red
TB1-TB3
3
Black
TB1-TB3
4
White
TB1-TB3
5
Green
TB1-TB3
6
Drain
TB1-TB3
2
The chart below outlines a good convention for terminating incoming and outgoing external
communication cables to DSB comm. ports. Incoming cables are those that connect the DSB
enclosure with the PC. Outgoing cables are those that connect the DSB enclosure with other
DSB enclosures further down the chain.
Note: TB1-TB3 are connected in parallel. There is actually no distinction between
“incoming” and “outgoing”. The labels are merely for convention only and to assist in
troubleshooting.
EXTERNAL COMM. CABLES
Connect
Incoming Cable
Connect
Outgoing Cable
TB1
TB2, TB3
DSB Programming
1. Each DSB must be programmed with its address and configuration. Please refer to
“Appendix D - DSB Programming” on page 101 for complete instructions.
Office Computer Equipment - Wiring and Testing
After all the “field” wiring has been completed as outlined in the keypad, cardreader, elevator control,
and DSB installation sections above, you will be ready to make final connections to the computer
equipment located in the manager’s office.
The office computing equipment should have already been installed according to the procedures
outlined starting on page 58.
The following procedures will allow the installer to complete the wiring and initial test of the system.
Before starting, be sure that the power outlet strip is off.
Communication Cable Terminations
1. Be sure all communication chain devices are interconnected according to Drawing 6.
2. Remove 1” of the jacket from the communication cable. Clip off the exposed foil shield.
Remove 3/16” of insulation from each wire end. Properly crimp #6 “spade” lug connectors
(supplied by others) to the red, black, white and green wires. Place 1/16” OD heat shrink
tubing over the uninsulated drain wire before crimping on the connector.
84 • Office Computer Equipment - Wiring and Testing
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3. Referring to Drawing 27, connect the communication cable to the Communications Interface
Module. Place numbered wire markers on each conductor.
Relay Output Module
Relay outputs are provided by means of the Keithley PIO-12 or PIO-24 Parallel I/O board and ERA01 Relay Module. The PIO-24 card comes in both ISA and PCI versions. For the PCI version of the
PIO-24 card (KPCI-PIO24 in Keithley terminology), special driver software must be installed as
detailed in the “PCI PIO-24” section on page 86.
The ERA-01 provides up to eight relay outputs. One SPDT (Form C) contact is provided for each
relay.
Following are the default relay assignments currently being supported by the WinSen Sentinel Access
Control & Alarm System (see Drawing 28). You can change these relay assignments if you need to.
For help changing these relay assignments, call SSC technical support.
Door alarm relays (K1 and K2)
•
In the event of a door alarm, K1 and K2 will energize. They will remain energized until the
alarm times out or is acknowledged. Two relays are provided so that two separate devices
can be driven (for example, a siren and a telephone dialer).
Communications alarm relay (K3)
•
Energizes if there is a communications response failure or response error alarm. It can be
used to provide a “trouble” signal to the central station or to the manager.
Access alarm relay (K4)
Energizes for the following access violations:
•
Deny or catch (if alarm option is selected).
•
Access tamper limit.
•
Passback (if option is selected).
Perimeter beam control relay (K5).
See “Perimeter Beams” on page 21 for a description of PBS control.
Area beam control relay (K6).
See “Area Beams” on page 22 for a description of ABS control.
Relay Output Testing
If the ERA-01 relay module is to be utilized as described above, perform the following test procedure.
1. Set off communication alarms by removing power to the Communications Interface Module.
Response failure messages will trigger K3.
2. Set off an access alarm by intentionally creating an access tamper limit, deny, or passback
violation. K4 will be triggered by these alarms.
3. If any difficulty is encountered, disconnect the device being interfaced to K1-K4, and use an
ohmmeter to verify the proper making and breaking of the contacts.
4. You may also test the operation of the relays and devices controlled by the relays by utilizing
the “Test Relays” option described on page 22.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Office Computer Equipment - Wiring and Testing • 85
PIO-12/PIO-24 Installation
PIO-12 and ISA PIO-24
1. Install the PIO-12 or PIO-24 parallel I/O card into a spare ISA (8-bit) expansion slot in your
PC according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
NOTE: Be sure the board’s address is set to 300 hexadecimal (768 decimal), the default
setting. All other default settings on the PCB are correct as well. Contact SSC if you already
have a device that uses this address and need help selecting an alternative address.
2. Connect the supplied 37 conductor ribbon cable between the PIO-12/PIO-24 and the ERA-01
relay module according to Drawing 28.
3. Wire your output devices to terminal blocks J3 and J2 of the ERA-01 module according to
Drawing 28 and the manufacturer’s instructions for each device to be connected.
NOTE: Do not exceed the maximum current rating of 3A for each relay. Also,
switching 120 VAC line voltage is not recommended, for safety reasons.
PCI PIO-24
The PCI version of the PIO-24 is a “plug and play” device and requires installing the “Driverlinx”
software driver and the “I/O Emulation Driver” software that comes with the card. The Driverlinx
software must be installed prior to installing the PCI PIO-24. There are 2 CD’s included with the PCI
PIO-24. Only the “Driverlinx” CD is necessary to use the PCI PIO-24 with WinSen Sentinel.
Installation instructions are included with the PCI PIO-24 card; refer to those instructions for
complete details. Installation problems should be directed to Keithley-Metrabyte technical support.
The installation is outlined below.
1. Install the Driverlinx software.
2. Shut down the PC by selecting the Shut Down option from the Start Menu.
3. Install the PCI PIO-24 card into an open PCI slot.
4. Turn the PC on again. Windows should detect the PCI PIO-24 card and install necessary
software, then it will require the PC to be rebooted again.
5. When the PC is booted up, the “Driverlinx Wizard” should be displayed. This wizard guides
you through the process of configuring the PCI PIO-24 card. It should be assigned as “device
0”. Then the PC is rebooted again.
6. Install the “I/O Emulation Driver” by going to Control Panel|Add New Hardware|Select From
List|DriverLinx drivers. Then select the “KPCI-PIO24 I/O Emulator”. The default I/O range
for the emulator is 0300-0303 which should be correct. Detailed instructions for installing
the I/O emulator can be found by accessing the Driverlinx help file and searching for the term
“Installing the I/O Emulation Driver” in the index.
7. Reboot the PC.
Computer
1. Turn on the power strip. The computer, printer and Communications Interface Module
(CIM) should now be powered up.
86 • Office Computer Equipment - Wiring and Testing
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
2. Launch the WinSen Sentinel program by “double clicking” on its icon with your mouse. A
message similar to
Communication Start, 1/1/2000, 7:00:00 AM
in the event window indicates that communications with the peripheral devices has begun.
Peripheral Equipment - Testing
Keypads
1. After being successfully “powered up”, the keypads should initiate a self test sequence,
display the version number and ROM checksum, then display the prompt
Enter Unit No.:
00000 and #
If this display does not occur, try cycling the power to the system.
2. On the keypad Printed Circuit Board (PCB) the yellow, “power” LED should now be on.
The red (receive) LED should be flashing steadily and the green (transmit) LED should be
flashing about once every second or two indicating proper communications.
3. If all keypads are being polled properly, no “response failure” or “response error” alarms will
be generated. If communication problems are encountered, see “Appendix ATroubleshooting” on page 93. If problems persist, contact Technical Support for additional
troubleshooting measures.
4. Once correct communications have been established, install a test tenant into the system by
following the steps outlined in the WinSen Property Manager manual (for standalone
WinSen Sentinel, use Unit/Tenant Operations). Then check for proper operation by entering a
valid unit number and passcode for the test tenant. The message
Access Granted
should be displayed by the keypad, the relay should energize for the prescribed amount of
time, and the gate or access door should open or be released as appropriate.
5. Verify the correct keypad type by checking that the appropriate tenant access message, i.e.,
“ENTER” or “EXIT” was displayed in the event window.
6. If you are installing a door alarm system, verify that the tenant’s unit door alarm has been
disabled properly by observing the correct “OPEN” or “CLOSE” activity messages are
logged as the door is opened and closed. Verify that the alarm is re-armed when the tenant
exits.
7. To test for access denial, enter invalid passcodes for a valid unit number and see that the
keypad displays the message
Access Denied
Bad Passcode
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Peripheral Equipment - Testing • 87
and that a “Bad passcode” message is written to the event window.
8. In WinSen Property Manager (for standalone WinSen Sentinel, use Unit/Tenant
Operations), lockout the test tenant as described in the manual and enter the test tenant unit
number and passcode. In “deny” mode, verify that the
Access Denied
Locked Out
message is displayed by the keypad and that a “Deny” message is displayed in the event
window. In “catch” mode, verify that access is granted and a “Catch” message is displayed.
Cardreader Interface (CRI) Boards and Cardreaders
1. Proper communications should be established for the CRI’s similar to keypads as described in
the above section.
2. Install a test tenant in WinSen Property Manager with a valid unit no. and test card no.
Check each cardreader using the test card. The green LED should illuminate and the gate or
access door should open or be released as appropriate.
3. Verify the correct cardreader “type” by checking that the appropriate tenant access message,
i.e., “ENTER” or “EXIT” was displayed for the reader.
4. If you are installing a door alarm system, verify that the tenant’s unit door alarm has been
disabled properly by observing the correct “OPEN” or “CLOSE” activity messages are
logged as the door is opened and closed. Verify that the alarm is re-enabled when the tenant
exits.
5. Lockout the test tenant and attempt to gain access. In “deny” mode, verify that the “DENY”
message is displayed and access is not granted. In “catch” mode, verify that access is granted
and the “CATCH” message is displayed, but the alarm is not disabled (if door alarm system).
Elevator Control Boards (ECBs)
1. Proper communications should be established for the ECBs similar to keypads and CRIs as
described above.
2. Install a test tenant. Enter the test tenant’s unit no. and passcode on the keypad associated
with the elevator. In the elevator, only those floor buttons for which the test tenant is
authorized should be enabled.
3. Verify the correct keypad “type” by checking that the appropriate tenant access message, i.e.,
“ENTER” was displayed for the keypad.
Door Status Boards
1. Communications should be established for the DSB’s similar to keypads, CRIs, and ECBs as
described above. Then each door status input on the site must be tested to see that the proper
“ALARM” and “CLOSE” door activity messages are registered at the computer.
2. When the door check has been completed, run the “Open Doors – list of units with open
doors” report to verify that all doors on the facility are in the closed position. If open doors
are shown on the report that are not truly open, the door switch and/or wiring for that door
should be checked.
88 • Peripheral Equipment - Testing
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Alarm Outputs
If the ERA-01 relay module is to be utilized as described above, perform the following test procedure.
1. Set off communication alarms by removing power to the Communications Interface Module.
Response failure messages will trigger K3.
2. Set off an access alarm by intentionally creating an access tamper limit, deny, or passback
violation. K4 will be triggered by these alarms.
3. If any difficulty is encountered, disconnect the device being interfaced to K1-K4, and use an
ohmmeter to verify the proper making and breaking of the contacts.
Perimeter Beam System
If perimeter beam system control is to be employed, perform the following test procedures.
1. Set up a test time zone where the hours are 0800 to 1700 hours for each day of the week.
2. Enable the clear-on-site-tenants feature using the test time zone. This option is defined in
Setups under the Maintenance menu.
3. In setups under the maintenance menu, enable the PBS feature using the test time zone.
4. Using the Windows Control Panel, set the system time clock to 16:59:00.
5. At 17:02, generate the tenant status report. Verify that no tenants are shown as “on-site”.
6. Verify that relay K5 is off. The PBS is now enabled.
7. Enter a tenant whose time zone extends beyond 1700 hrs.
8. Verify that relay K5 has been energized. The PBS was disabled because a tenant entered the
site.
9. Exit the tenant.
10. After two minutes, verify that K5 has dropped out. The PBS was re- enabled after the last
tenant had left.
11. Advance the system clock to 07:59:00.
12. At 8:02, verify that K5 has turned on. The PBS is disabled during its time zone’s “on” hours.
13. Set the system clock back to the correct date and time.
Area Beam System
If an area beam system control is to be employed, perform the following test procedures.
1. Define an access level to be used for the tenants who have units within the area beam system.
2. In Setups under the Maintenance menu, enable the Area Beam System feature, using the
access level defined above.
3. From the Report Menu, generate the “on-site tenants” report, and use it to verify that no
tenants with the designated access level are “on-site”.
4. Verify that relay K6 is off. The ABS is now enabled.
5. Enter a tenant who has the selected access level.
6. Verify that relay K6 has energized, disabling the ABS.
7. Exit the tenant.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Peripheral Equipment - Testing • 89
8. After about one minute, verify that K6 has de-energized, re-enabling the ABS.
90 • Peripheral Equipment - Testing
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Installation Sign-Off
The installer should perform the checks given on the following page, Installation Check-List. If all
the items are checked, and the list is signed, the system is ready to be turned over for full operation.
Installation Check List
After all the following items have been checked, the installer should sign and date the form. The
system will then be ready to be turned over for full operation.
Bonding Checks
For all gates:
Resistance from gate operator chassis ground to movable portion of gate is zero.
Resistance from gate operator chassis ground to fixed portion of gate is zero.
Resistance from gate operator chassis ground to pedestrian gate should be zero.
For all keypads and card readers:
Resistance from gate operator chassis ground to faceplate mounting screw is zero.
Resistance from faceplate mounting screw to pedestal stand is zero.
Resistance from pedestal stand base to nearest chain-link fence is zero.
Alarm system bonding checks:
For metal buildings, resistances from Bldg. A to Bldg. B, Bldg. B to Bldg. C, Bldg. C to Bldg. D,
etc. is zero.
For brick buildings, resistances from DSB 128 enclosure to DSB 129 enclosure, DSB 129
enclosure to DSB 130 enclosure, DSB 130 enclosure to DSB 131 enclosure, etc. is zero.
Other Checks
Ground Fault Checks:
Disconnect communication cables from CIM. Resistance of green wire to power company
ground is infinite. Resistance of drain wire to power company ground is infinite.
Communication Checks:
Under Maintenance|Keypads, the Keypad Quantity and Keypad Types are correct.
Under Maintenance|Card Readers, the CRI Quantity and Card Reader Types are all correct.
Under Maintenance|Elevator Control, the ECB Quantity, the associated Keypad address, and the
relay Elevator-Floor assignments are all correct.
Perform a Communication Stop. Turn off power to the CIM, and wait ten seconds. Turn power
back on, and perform a Communication Restart. No “Response Failure” or “Response Error”
messages occur.
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Installation Sign-Off • 91
Alarm System Checks (If applicable):
The door table worksheets have been properly filled out and/or a door table report has been
printed. The door table documents have been stored in a safe location for future reference.
Under Maintenance|Door Status Boards, the DSB Quantity is correct.
The door table has been entered correctly in Maintenance|Door Status Boards.
No open doors are listed on the “Open Doors” Report.
____________________________________________________________________________________________
(Authorized representative)
92 • Installation Sign-Off
(Date)
Chapter 5 - Hardware Installation
Appendices
Appendix A- Troubleshooting
Following are some common problems that may occur and suggestions for possible causes and
solutions.
General Access Control Problems
Problem #1: When a code is entered at the keypad it says “Processing” for a time, then “Response
Timeout - See Manager”, and the gate doesn’t open.
Possible cause: This problem indicates that there are no communications between the keypad and the
computer.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check to be sure the CIM power supply is plugged in to the wall and wired to the CIM
properly as detailed in Drawing 27, and the CIM is plugged in to the COM port on the back
of the computer securely. If a “two headed” cable is in use, be sure that only one of the
connectors of the double headed end is connected at the PC, and the other end is connected to
the CIM.
2. In Workstation Settings under the Options menu, be sure the correct COM port is configured.
This must be the same COM port to which the CIM is connected.
3. Check for correct communication cable wiring at the keypads as detailed in Drawing 7.
Check the communication wiring at the CIM.
4. Check the keypad addressing as detailed in “Appendix B - Keypad Programming” on page
98. If the keypads are not addressed properly the system cannot communicate with them.
5. Try a different PC to CIM cable.
6. Try a different COM port. For example, if the CIM is hooked up to COM2 and the program
is also configured for COM2 but there are no communications, connect the CIM to COM1
(this may require an adapter) and change the program setup to COM1. If the system can now
communicate with the peripherals, the problem is with COM2. If you still cannot establish
communications the problem is somewhere in the communication chain.
7. Check the COM port to which the CIM is connected to be sure it is enabled. On newer
computers this is a CMOS setup, on older ones it is generally a jumper setting on the I/O
card.
8. Check for hardware interrupt conflicts on your computer’s COM ports. For example, if the
machine has an internal modem, it must be set up so that it does not conflict with the existing
Appendices
Appendix A- Troubleshooting • 93
COM ports. A typical solution to this problem is to set the modem up for COM3 and IRQ5,
however your communication software must be able to support non-standard IRQ’s for this to
work. Consult your computer and modem documentation for specific information.
9. Briefly power down the communication chain and the PC, then power them back up. To
power down the communication chain unplug the power supply to the CIM (or turn it off if it
is so equipped). Exit from Windows before powering down the PC.
10. After checking the above items, restart communications by choosing the “Restart
Communications” option from the Options menu.
Problem #2: When communications are started a message similar to “Device 0, Response Failure”
is displayed on the screen (the message could say “Device 1, Device 128,” etc. depending on the
configuration of your system).
Possible cause: The system cannot communicate with the device.
Suggested solution(s):
1. If the rest of the communication chain is functioning normally, the problem is with the device
itself or the wiring to the device. If there are no communications at all, see the
troubleshooting steps outlined for Problem #1.
2. If it is a keypad that is not responding, check the keypad addressing as detailed in “Appendix
B - Keypad Programming” on page 98. If the keypad is not addressed properly the system
cannot communicate with it.
3. If it is a CRI that is not responding, check the CRI address as detailed in “Appendix C - CRI
Programming” on page 100.
4. If it is a DSB that is not responding, check the DSB address as detailed in “Appendix D DSB Programming” on page 101.
5. Make sure the correct number of keypads, CRI’s, and DSB’s as applicable to your installation
are setup in the program, and that each configured device is setup properly. For example, if
the DSB quantity specified in the program is incorrect the system may be trying to poll a
DSB that does not exist, or it may not be polling the DSB because it does not know it is there.
6. Check the wiring to the device for loose or miswired connections.
Problem #3: When communications are started a message similar to “Response Error, Device 0,
Response failure Device 1” is displayed on the screen.
Possible cause: Two keypads have the same address.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check the keypad address on each keypad, as detailed in “Appendix B - Keypad
Programming” on page 98. Each keypad must have a unique address. Additionally, keypad
addresses must start with #0 and continue sequentially with no gaps. For example, if you
have two keypads, they must be addressed as #0 and #1.
Problem #4: When communications are started a “Response Error” message is displayed on the
screen for all keypads.
Possible cause: The COM port specified in Workstation Settings under Options is incorrect, or there
is a COM port conflict. This can also occur if two keypads have the same address.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check that the correct COM port is specified in Workstation Settings under Options.
94 • Appendix A- Troubleshooting
Appendices
2. See the suggestions regarding COM ports in Problem #1.
3. Check the keypad address on each keypad, as detailed in “Appendix B - Keypad
Programming” on page 98. Each keypad must have a unique address. Additionally, keypad
addresses must start with #0 and continue sequentially with no gaps. For example, if you
have two keypads, they must be addressed as #0 and #1.
Problem #5: When a code is entered at the keypad, it says “Access Granted” but the gate does not
open.
Possible cause: This indicates a problem with getting the signal from the keypad to the gate operator
to open the gate, or a problem with the gate operator itself.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check the timeout programming for the relays as detailed in “Appendix B - Keypad
Programming” on page 98. The relays must have a value (time in seconds the relays stay
closed) in order to operate the gate. The default value is 1 second but can be changed if
needed.
2. Check that the wires from TB4, 1 & 2 are wired to the correct position on your gate operator
terminal block. These are usually shown as “Momentary open”, “Pulse open” or similar (this
varies depending on the gate operator).
Problem #6: When a code is entered at the keypad it says “Inactive keypad”, and the gate does not
open.
Possible cause: The keypad is designated as inactive in WinSen Sentinel.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check to be sure that the “Keypad type” is set properly in the appropriate keypad record in
Keypads under the Maintenance menu.
Problem #7: When a code is entered at the keypad it says “Invalid keypad”, and the gate does not
open.
Possible cause: The tenant’s assigned access level does not designate this keypad as a valid keypad.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check the access level definitions under the Maintenance menu.
2. Check the tenant’s access level assignment in WinSen Property Manager.
Problem #8: When a code is entered at the keypad it says “Invalid time”, and the gate does not open.
Possible cause: The tenant is trying to access the keypad outside of their assigned gate hours, or the
gate hours are incorrect in Time Zones, or the computer is set to the wrong date and/or time.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check the time zone definitions under the Maintenance menu.
2. In WinSen Property Manager, make sure the tenant has the correct time zone assigned.
3. Make sure the computer date and time is set correctly. Use the Windows control panel to
change the computer date and/or time if necessary.
4. Check Holidays under the Maintenance menu to see if today is designated as a holiday. If it
is, the system will use the gate hours that are defined for Holidays in Time Zones.
Appendices
Appendix A- Troubleshooting • 95
Problem #9: A tenant who is not delinquent attempts to enter or exit, but the keypad says “Passback
violation” and the gate does not open.
Possible cause: The tenant either “tailgated” in or out and the Anti-Passback feature is on. If Antipassback is checked, WinSen Sentinel will not allow a tenant to enter and/or exit if they tailgated in
or out without entering their own code on the proper keypad.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Inform the tenant of the “Anti Passback” feature and have them enter and exit the facility
properly.
2. Turn off the “Anti Passback” feature in Workstation Settings under Options.
Problem #10: Delinquent tenants are allowed access.
Possible cause: The “Deny access to delinquent tenants” option in Setups under Maintenance is not
checked. This option must be checked to deny access to delinquent tenants.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Enable the “Deny access to delinquent tenants” option in Setups under Maintenance.
2. If all delinquent tenants are able to gain access, check the “Days to Overlock” number in
WinSen Property Manager. Normally, WinSen Property Manager will signal WinSen
Sentinel to lock out tenants when they are the number of days late specified in “Days to
Overlock”. For more details, see the WinSen Property Manager manual.
3. If only certain delinquent tenants are able to gain access, check their Late Type in WinSen
Property Manager (the tenant may be designated as exempt from late charges and
overlocking). For more details, see the WinSen Property Manager manual.
Problem #11: Tenants are shown as being “on-site” in the reports that are not on-site.
Possible cause: The tenants have “tailgated” out of the facility. In other words, the tenant keyed in
but did not key out.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check to be sure the Auto Re-Arm feature is on (see “Clear On-Site Tenants/Auto Re-Arm”
on page 21).
Problems Specific to Individual Door Alarm Systems
Problem #12: When a tenant keys in normally and opens their unit, the alarm on a different unit goes
off.
Possible cause: The unit number data in the door table is incorrect.
Suggested solution(s):
1. Check the door table for units that are programmed on a DSB and INPUT other than what
they are wired to. See “Door Status Boards” on page 30.
Problem #13: The reports show “Open Doors” that are not actually open.
Possible cause: This indicates a problem with the door switch, the wiring from the door switch to the
DSB, or with the DSB itself.
Suggested solution(s):
96 • Appendix A- Troubleshooting
Appendices
1. Check for a misaligned magnet, broken or loose wires, or a bad switch. Refer to the
installation section of the manual for methods to check the door switches.
2. Make sure the correct DSB quantity is specified in the Door Status Boards option under
Maintenance.
Appendices
Appendix A- Troubleshooting • 97
Appendix B - Keypad Programming
For proper communications, each keypad in the communication chain must be programmed according
to the following directions.
Keypad addresses should start at 0 and go up sequentially from there, and each keypad must have a
unique address. For example, the entrance keypad is normally addressed as #0 and the exit as #1. If
you have 9 keypads, the highest keypad address would be 8.
To begin, install the keypad and power it up. Then perform the following steps.
1. Determine the keypad firmware version. If the display shows:
Enter Unit No.:
00000 and #
the firmware is 1.50 or greater. Otherwise, it is 1.33 or less.
2. Enter “Programming Mode”. If the keypad firmware version is less than 1.50, this is
accomplished by pressing the asterisk key (*) at the Enter Unit No.: prompt. If the keypad
firmware version is 1.50 or above, this is done by pressing 1, then 4, then 7, then the asterisk
(*) key.
3. The display will show “Programming Mode” briefly. If the keypad firmware version is
1.50 or above, it will then show
Enter Sec. Code:
0000
If the keypad firmware version is 1.33 or less, the keypad will show
Enter Passcode:
0000
4. Please note that the keypad is asking for the passcode required to enter “Programming
Mode”, not any of the access control passcodes. Enter your previously programmed passcode
and press #. The default, factory-set passcode is 0.
Note: if the passcode has been changed from the default and you do not know what it is, press
# and then 1. The keypad will display a number. Subtract the displayed number from 9999.
This is the current passcode. You can enter this calculated passcode now.
5. The keypad display will briefly show “Select Function”. Then it will show:
1. Set Options
2. Set Defaults
6. Press 1. The display will show the current address (represented by aaa in the example below)
and the new address separated by a slash as follows:
1. Keypad Addr.:
aaa/000
98 • Appendix B - Keypad Programming
Appendices
7. Enter the new keypad address, followed by the # key. Valid keypad addresses are 0-63 and
should always start with 0. Thus, if you have two keypads, they should be addressed as 0 and
1. Normally, the entrance keypad will be addressed as 0 and the exit keypad as 1.
Note: If only ‘#’ is pressed, the old address will be retained.
8. Enter relay 0 and 1 on-times (This will be relay 1 and relay 2 if the keypad firmware version
is 1.50 or greater). Valid entries are 0-30 seconds. The default value for relay 0 (relay 1 in
firmware version 1.50 or greater) is 1 second. The default value for relay 1 (relay 2 in
firmware version 1.50 or greater) is 0 seconds. Note that the 2nd relay is normally unused.
9. If necessary, enter the new passcode assignment. This is highly recommended if the current
passcode is 0, to prevent accidental entry into programming mode by tenants.
10. If the keypad firmware version is 1.50 or greater, enter the language. Valid entries are 0
(English) and 4 (Portuguese). The default language is English.
11. Press * to exit programming mode.
12. Repeat steps 1 through 11 for all applicable keypads.
Appendices
Appendix B - Keypad Programming • 99
Appendix C - CRI Programming
Each CRI must have it’s address and relay timeouts set according to the following discussion.
CRI Address: Referring to the chart below and your site layout plans, set the 8-position DIP switch
array (SW1) for the address of each CRI within the enclosure. CRI A will have the lower address.
CRI B will be addressed with the next higher value. Switch settings for example addresses are given
in the chart below. Remember that CRI addresses can range from 64-127. The first CRI should be
addressed as 64 and they should continue sequentially with no gaps.
CRI Address (SW1)
Switch.
No.
Binary
Value
Example
Addr. 64
Example
Addr. 85
1
1
Off
On
2
2
Off
Off
3
4
Off
On
4
8
Off
Off
5
16
Off
On
6
32
Off
Off
7
64
On
On
8
128
Off
Off
Relay Timeouts: Relay timeouts for all four cardreaders are controlled by dipswitch array SW2,
switches 1 and 2. One, four, eight, or twelve second delays are possible depending upon the setting of
the switches (see table below).
CRI Relay Timeout (SW2)
Switch. No.
Setting
Timeout
1
Off
1 sec.
2
Off
1
On
2
Off
1
Off
2
On
1
On
2
On
100 • Appendix C - CRI Programming
4 sec.
8 sec.
12 sec.
Appendices
Appendix D - DSB Programming
Address
Referring to the chart below, your site layout plans, and the wire list for the enclosure location, set the
8-position DIP switch array SW1 for the proper address. Switch settings for example addresses are
shown in the table below. Remember that high capacity DSB addresses can range from 128-169.
DSB Address (SW1)
Sw. No.
(SW1)
Binary
Value
Example
Addr.
128
Example
Addr.
169
1
1
Off
On
2
2
Off
Off
3
4
Off
Off
4
8
Off
On
5
16
Off
Off
6
32
Off
On
7
64
Off
Off
8
128
On
On
Configuration
The DSB configuration is controlled by the DIP switch SW2. Normally, all the switches for this
array are set to off. Two items can be configured for the DSB: door switch contact type and door
hold time.
Note: These configuration settings are only applicable to DSB firmware version V1.11.01 or
higher.
Door Contact Types: typically normally open door contacts are used, and switch 1 of SW2 should
be set to off. If you need to monitor normally closed contacts set switch 1 to on.
Door Contact Type (SW2)
Appendices
Switch No.
Switch Position
Door Switch Contact Type
1
Off
Normally open (default)
1
On
Normally closed
Appendix D - DSB Programming • 101
Door hold time: door hold time is defined to be the time required for a door switch status to hold
before the DSB will report it. For example, if the door hold time is 2 sec., and the door goes from
close to open, it must remain open 2 sec. before the open status will be reported to the computer.
Switches 2 and 3 of SW2 control this time. The default is 0.4 sec. (Switches 2 and 3 off). If you have
loose fitting overhead rollup doors, increased hold time may compensate for status oscillations caused
by wind or vibration. Use this feature with caution. It will effectively slow down the response time
of the system and may cause a breach of security.
Hold Time (SW2)
Switch No.
Switch Position
Hold Time
2
Off
0.4 sec. (default)
3
Off
2
On
3
Off
2
Off
3
On
2
On
3
On
2 sec.
4 sec.
6 sec.
You must complete this procedure for each DSB at the site.
102 • Appendix D - DSB Programming
Appendices
Appendix E – ECB Programming
Each ECB must have its mode, address, and relay timeouts set according to the following sections.
ECB Mode
Single address or dual address mode is controlled by DIP switch, SW1, Switch 1 as shown in the
table below.
ECB Mode Settings (SW1)
Switch
No.
Setting
Mode
1
Off
Single
1
On
Dual
ECB Address
Referring to the chart below and your site layout plans, set the switches for DIP switch SW2 for the
proper address of the ECB. The binary values of each switch that is turned on are added to make up
the actual address. Switch settings for example addresses are given in the chart below to assist you.
Remember that ECB addresses can range from 96-111.
ECB Address Setting (SW2)
Sw. No.
Binary
Value
Example
Adr. 96
Example
Adr. 106
1
1
Off
Off
2
2
Off
On
3
4
Off
Off
4
8
Off
On
5
16
Off
Off
6
32
On
On
7
64
On
On
8
128
Off
Off
ECB Relay Timeouts
Timeouts for all eight relays are controlled by DIP switch SW1, Switches 2 - 4. Delays from 5 - 35
seconds are possible by multiplying the binary value of switches 2 - 4 by five. For example, if the
binary value of switches 2 - 4 is one, then the actual delay is five seconds. If switches 2 - 4 are all off,
the default delay is ten seconds.
ECB Relay Timeout (SW1)
Appendices
Sw. No.
Binary
Value
Example
5 sec.
Example
25 sec.
2
1
On
On
3
2
Off
Off
4
4
Off
On
Appendix E – ECB Programming • 103
Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Drawing List
Drawing Number
Drawing Title
Page Number
1
Gate Detail, Slide Gate, Two Keypad
105
2
Gate Detail, Dual Barrier Arm, Two Keypad
106
3
Gate Detail, Slide Gate, Two Card Reader
107
4
Gate Detail, Dual Barrier Arm, Two Card Reader
108
5
Pedestal Stand, Access Unit
109
6
Block Diagram, PC and Peripheral Wiring
110
7
Wiring Diagram, Keypad
111
8
Wiring Diagram, Cardreader Interface Board
112
9
Gate/Door Control Wiring Details
113
10
Wiring Diagram, Elevator Control Board
114
11
Wiring Diagram, Doublewide Housing, with Pinhole
Camera
115
15-17
Door Wiring Details, Interior, Overhead Roll-up
116, 117, 118
18,19
Door Wiring Details, Interior, Swing
119, 120
20-22
Door Wiring Details, Exterior, Overhead Roll-up
121, 122, 123
23-25
Door Wiring Details, Exterior, Swing
124, 125, 126
26
Wiring Diagram, Door Status Board
127
27
Wiring Diagram, Communications Interface Module
128
28
Wiring Diagram, ERA-01 Relay Module
129
29
Wiring Diagram, Perimeter Beam System
130
Wire List, DSB Enclosure
130
104 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 1 – Gate Detail, Slide Gate, Two Keypad
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 105
Drawing 2 – Gate Detail, Dual Barrier Arm, Two Keypad
106 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 3 – Gate Detail, Slide Gate, Two Cardreader
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 107
Drawing 4 – Gate Detail, Dual Barrier Arm, Two Cardreader
108 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 5 – Pedestal Stand
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 109
Drawing 6 – PC and Peripheral Wiring Diagram
110 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 7 – Keypad Wiring Diagram
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 111
Drawing 8 – Cardreader Interface Board Wiring Diagram
112 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 9 – Gate/Door Control Wiring Details
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 113
Drawing 10 – Elevator Control Board Wiring Diagram
114 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 11 – Wiring Diagram, Doublewide Housing, with Pinhole
Camera
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 115
Drawing 15 – Rollup Door Wiring Details (Interior )
116 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 16 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 2 (Interior)
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 117
Drawing 17 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 3 (Interior)
118 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 18 – Swing Door Wiring Details (Interior)
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 119
Drawing 19 – Swing Door Wiring Details 2 (Interior)
120 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 20 – Rollup Door Wiring Details (Exterior)
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 121
Drawing 21 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 2 (Exterior)
122 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 22 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 3 (Exterior)
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 123
Drawing 23 – Swing Door Wiring Details (Exterior)
124 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 24 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 2 (Exterior)
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 125
Drawing 25 – Rollup Door Wiring Details 3 (Exterior)
126 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 26 – Door Status Board Wiring Diagram
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 127
Drawing 27 – CIM Wiring Diagram
128 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Drawing 28 – ERA-01 Relay Module Wiring Diagram
Appendices
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 129
Drawing 29 – Perimeter Beam System Wiring Diagram
130 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Wire List – Door Status Board Enclosure
Site: __________________________________________
Enclosure No.: _____
Enclosure Location: _____________________________
DSB Address: ______
DSB
Input
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Gnd1
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Appendices
Unit No.
Wire
Color
Wht/Org
Org/Wht
Wht/Grn
Grn/Wht
Wht/Brn
Brn/Wht
Wht/Gry
Gry/Wht
Red/Blu
Blu/Red
Red/Org
Org/Red
Red/Grn
Grn/Red
Red/Brn
Brn/Red
Red/Gry
Gry/Red
Blk/Blu
Blu/Blk
Blk/Org
Org/Blk
Blk/Grn
Grn/Blk
Wht/Blu
Blk/Brn
Brn/Blk
Blk/Gry
Gry/Blk
Yel/Blu
Blu/Yel
Yel/Org
Org/Yel
Yel/Grn
Term.
No.
TB5-1
TB5-2
TB5-3
TB5-4
TB5-5
TB5-6
TB5-7
TB5-8
TB5-9
TB5-10
TB5-11
TB5-12
TB6-1
TB6-2
TB6-3
TB6-4
TB6-5
TB6-6
TB6-7
TB6-8
TB6-9
TB6-10
TB6-11
TB6-12
TB6-13
TB7-1
TB7-2
TB7-3
TB7-4
TB7-5
TB7-6
TB7-7
TB7-8
TB7-9
Date: __________
Comments
Common ground for inputs 00-23
Appendix F - Installation Drawings • 131
Wire List – Door Status Board Enclosure, Continued
DSB
Input
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
Gnd2
Unit No.
Wire
Color
Grn/Yel
Yel/Brn
Brn/Yel
Yel/Gry
Gry/Yel
Vio/Blu
Blu/Vio
Vio/Org
Org/Vio
Vio/Grn
Grn/Vio
Vio/Brn
Brn/Vio
Vio/Gry
Gry/Vio
Blu/Wht
Term.
No.
TB7-10
TB7-11
TB7-12
TB8-1
TB8-2
TB8-3
TB8-4
TB8-5
TB8-6
TB8-7
TB8-8
TB8-9
TB8-10
TB8-11
TB8-12
TB8-13
Comments
Common ground. 2 for inputs 24-47
Note: Half-sized DSBs will only require termination for inputs 00-23, and Gnd1.
132 • Appendix F - Installation Drawings
Appendices
Appendix G – Initialization File Variables
This section is for system administrators and advanced users only.
WinSen Sentinel has a number of options that can only be changed by editing the winsen.ini file. The
winsen.ini file is normally located in your C:\Windows directory (C:\Winnt for Windows NT users).
The file will contain a number of sections, denoted by []. For example, the section used by WinSen
Sentinel to store most of its settings is the [Sentinel] section. Within the sections are variable names
followed by an equals sign, then the value of the variable. For example, the entry ChildWindow=0
means the variable called Childwindow has a value of 0.
The following table lists options supported by WinSen Sentinel that cannot be changed through
normal program operation. The settings are found in the designated section of winsen.ini. If a given
variable is not present, add it to the correct section with the desired value. Before changing anything
in this file, be sure you have a backup copy of it, in case of problems. Do not change any variable not
listed in this table. Before a change takes effect, you must close WinSen Sentinel and reopen it.
Section
Variable
Value
Comments
[Manager]
Backup
Name of program used to
perform database backups.
If set, WinSen Sentinel will use this program to do
backups. Otherwise the built-in backup procedure is
used.
[Sentinel]
ConfigSounds
Any valid program name
When set, the system will use this program to configure
the system sounds. Otherwise the standard control
panel applets are used.
[Sentinel]
ChildWindow
0 or 1
When set to 1, the event window will be positioned in a
child window of the main Sentinel window. The
recommended setting is 0.
[Sentinel]
Redisplay
Any value. “True” is suggested.
When set to any value, Sentinel will redisplay n events
when it is first started, where n is the maximum number
of events in the event window as configured in
Options|Workstation Settings. Otherwise only new
events are displayed.
[Manager]
Restore
Name of program used to
perform database restores.
If set, WinSen Sentinel will use this program to do
restores. Otherwise the built-in restore procedure is
used.
[Sentinel]
Sites
Site number of units to be loaded, This variable should be used when using the multiple
separated by commas.
site version of WinSen Property Manager and not all
units should be loaded by Sentinel. For example,
Sites=1,2 tells Sentinel to only load units from sites 1
and 2.
[Sentinel]
Database
Location of Sentinel.mdb
database file.
Appendices
Use this variable when you have a network, and
multiple copies of WinSen Sentinel, each controlling a
different site. It will cause Sentinel to open it’s
database in this location instead of the folder where it
was installed. Typically this will be a local hard drive
instead of a shared network drive, e.g. “C:\Winsen”.
Appendix G – Initialization File Variables • 133
Glossary of Terms
Access Levels
Access levels allow you to restrict tenant’s access to certain parts of your storage facility. For
example, you can designate that the “RV storage area” is accessible only to certain tenants. Access to
the area must be controlled by a keypad or cardreader.
Cardreader
A device that controls access to a gate/door. When a valid card is placed against it briefly, it
energizes a relay that opens a gate or releases a door.
CRI
“Cardreader Interface Board” - a printed circuit card that provides an interface between the
Cardreader and the rest of the Communication Chain.
Communication Chain
The collection of peripheral devices, e.g., keypads, cardreaders, ECB’s, and door status boards
(DSB’s), connected on one communication cable.
CIM
The “Communications Interface Module” - this unit provides an interface between the computer serial
I/O port and the rest of the Communication Chain, e.g. keypads, cardreaders, and DSB’s.
DSB
Also known as a “Door Status Board” or “Multiplexer”, this printed circuit board is wired to door
switches on each unit, and monitors whether the door is open or closed.
ECB
Elevator Control Board: a printed circuit board used to control elevators. It works in conjunction with
Elevator Access Levels to control access to elevators and/or floors.
Elevator Access Levels
Elevator access levels allow you to designate that only certain elevator/floor combinations are
accessible to a tenant. For example, if a tenant has a unit on the fourth floor, you can designate that
the tenant can only access the fourth floor, even if you have more than one elevator.
Interface Number
The unit number used by WinSen Sentinel for keypad entry, event reports, and for alarm system
purposes.
Glossary of Terms • 135
Keypad
A device with a numeric keypad that controls access to a gate or door. When a valid unit
number/passcode is entered, it energizes a relay that opens a gate or releases a door.
PIO-12 Card
A printed circuit board which provides an interface between the computer and the ERA-01 Relay
Output Module. External devices such as a perimeter beam system and/or a telephone dialer are
then connected to the ERA-01 Relay Output Module. Thus, if an alarm goes off or the perimeter
beam is tripped, the system can activate a siren, dial the alarm company, etc.
PDA
Short for “Permanently Disabled Alarm”. This is an alarm that has been permanently disarmed for
some reason, for example, excessive false alarms due to faulty wiring or door switch, etc.
ERA-01 Relay Output Module
This module interfaces between the PIO-12 Card and various external devices. It provides up to 8
relay outputs for various purposes, e.g., perimeter beam system, siren, autodialer, etc.
Repoll
A repoll occurs when the system polls a device in the communication chain and that device either
does not respond properly, or not at all. When this happens the system attempts the polling operation
again. It will attempt this up to five times before suspending communications with the offending
device.
TDA
Short for “Time Disabled Alarm”. This is an alarm that is disabled according to the stop and start
times of a designated time zone. For example, an alarm that is disarmed at 7 am and rearmed at 11
pm.
Time Zone
Time zones allow you to define your tenants gate hours. The hours for a time zone are specified in
the Time Zones option in the Maintenance menu. Each tenant is assigned a time zone, for example
“Time Zone 0”. That tenant can then access the facility only during the hours specified for time zone
0.
136 • Glossary of Terms
Communications
Start/Stop 49
CRI Programming 100
Index
A
A.I. number 47
Access levels
Password 18
Access Levels 26, 29
Alarm System
Door Table 32
Installation 69
Testing 88
Alarms
Automatic Disable 20
Automatic Re-arm 21
Permanently Disabled (PDA) 20
Time Disabled (TDA) 20, 22
Time Disabled (TDA’s) 48
Timeout 41
Anti-Passback 20, 56
Area Beam System
Configuring 22
Testing 89
Auto Re-arm 21
D
Data control bar 10
Data Entry Forms 9
Database
Backing up 52
Restoring 53
Door Table 32
Drawings 104
DSB’s
Installation 70
Programming (Addressing) 84
E
ECBs
Testing 88
Elevator Control
Access levels 35
ECB Definitions 33
Unit table 37
Event Window
Display Settings 37
Number of Messages 42
F
Find
Unit or tenant 46
Fonts 38
H
Hardware Installation 57
Holidays 23
B
Backups
Performing 52
Recommendations 53
Restoring 53
C
Cardreaders
Access Levels 29
Cardreader Interface (CRI) Addressing 67
Cardreader Interface (CRI) Relay time-out 100
Configuration 27
CRI Address 28
Installation 64
Operation 56
Communication Chain 1, 66, 69
I
Initialization file variables 133
Installation
From CD-ROM 4
From Diskette 3
Installation Drawings 104
Interface number 47
K
Keypads
Access Levels 26
Addressing See Keypads:Programming
Configuration 25
Error Messages 56
Index • 137
Installation 60
Number of 25
Operation 55
Programming 64, 98
Style 26
Type 26
L
Licensing 5
Logging Printer 40
M
Menus
Making selections from 9
Organization of 7
Message Level 40
O
Setups
Access Options 19
Delinquent Tenant Control Options 19
Sound Effects 40
System Overview 1
T
Tamper Limit 20
Tenants
Assigning multiple units to 45
Moving in 45
Time Disabled Alarms (TDA’s) 48
Time Zones 24
Troubleshooting 93
U
Units
Assigning multiple 45
Open Gate Hot Key 40
Open Gate/Door 49
Operation Summary 49
Operations 43
Overview 15
V
P
Workstation Settings 39
Message Level 40
Sound Effects 40
Visual Effects 42
Passwords
Access levels 18
Factory Defaults 8
Perimeter Beam System
Configuring 21
Testing 89
Wiring Diagram 130
Peripheral Operations 55
PIO-12
Installation 86
Operation 85
PIO-12/24 20
PIO-24
Installation 86
Operation 85
R
Relay Output Module (ERA-01) 85
Reports
Activity 50
Alarm Status 50
Unit Status 50
S
Select printer 11
138 • Index
Visual Effects 42
W
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