Radio_operator_handbook_FM24
FM 24-19
RADIO OPERATOR’S
HANDBOOK
DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Distribution authorized to
U.S. Government agencies and their contractors only to
protect technical or operational information from automatic
dissemination under the International Exchange Program or
by other means. This determination was made on 15 October
1990. Other requests for this document will be referred to
Commander, U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon,
ATTN: ATZH-DHL, Fort Gordon, GA 30905-5075.
DESTRUCTION NOTICE: Destroy by any method that will
prevent disclosure of contents or reconstruction of the
document.
HEADQUARTERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
Field Manual
No 24-19
*FM 24-19
Headquarters,
Department of the Army
Washington, DC, 24 May 1991
DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public
release; distribution is unlimited.
*This publication supersedes TC 24-19, 24 June 1985.
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Preface
Purpose and Scope
This field manual gives the single-channel radio operator
a reference for cabling, operating, remoting, and troubleshooting single-channel radio teletypewriter sets and the
power generating sets used with them. This manual is a
ready reference for some basic radio communications
procedures. It is designed for carrying in the pocket. The
information is detailed only to the extent needed as a quick
reference for day-to-day operations. For more complete
details, refer to the respective TM, ACP, or FM.
User Information
The proponent of this publication is HQ TRADOC. Your
comments on this publication are encouraged. Submit
changes for improving this publication on DA Form 2028
(Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms)
and key them to pages and lines of text to which they apply.
If DA Form 2028 is not available, a letter is acceptable.
Provide reasons for your comments to ensure complete
understanding and proper evaluation. Forward your
comments to Commander, United States Army Signal Center
and Fort Gordon, ATTN: ATZH-DTL, Fort Gordon, Georgia
30905-5075.
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CHAPTER 1
Radio and RadioTeletypewriter Sets
Section I. Radio Set AN/GRC-106
Installation Procedures
Radio Set AN/GRC-106
Prestart Procedures
1-0
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Radio Set AN/GRC-106
Starting Procedures
1-1
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Radio Set AN/GRC-106
Tuning
1-2
Procedures
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1-3
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1 - 4
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NOTE: ANT TUNE and ANT LOAD counter
settings should be logged in the logging
chart aft step 17 is complete.
Radio Set AN/GRC-106
Stopping Procedures
1-5
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1-6
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Section II. Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2
Installation Procedures
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2
Prestart Procedures
1-7
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1-8
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1-9
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1-10
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Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2
Tuning Procedures
1-11
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1-13
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Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2
Stopping Procedures
1-14
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Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2
Simplified Installation Procedures Using TSEC/KW-7
Simplified installation procedures are outlined below for
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2 in a remote configuration
when the set is equipped with AN/UGC-74 communications
terminal and TSEC/KW-7 electronic security encryption
device. This procedure assumes that a spare AN/UGC-74,
1-15
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data cable, and TSEC/KW-7 are not available. If monitoring
the radio teletypewriter set is desired, these items must be
furnished separately. If these items are furnished separately
and monitoring is desired, skip step 1 below.
S T E P 1 . Remove from the RATT set and transport to the
remote site the—
AN/UGC-74.
Data cables.
TSEC/KW-7.
Remote control box.
C-433/GRC remote control unit (P/O
AN/GRA-6).
H-33/PT
handset.
S T E P 2 . Required additional items:
AC power cable for AN/UGC-74.
TTY transmit/receive cable
to remote control box).
(connects
KW-7
S T E P 3 . At the local site (RATT set)–
Install batteries in Local Control C-434/GRC
(P/O AN/GRA-6) and then connect Cable
Assembly W-1 or W-2 to the AUDIO connector
on the AN/VSC-2 control box.
Connect WD-1/TT field wire (pair #l) to the
line terminals on the C-434/GRC.
Connect handset to the AUDIO connector of
the C-434/GRC.
1-16
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Connect WD-1/TT field wire (pair #2) to the
remote TTY terminals on the left side of the
AN/VSC-2 control box.
Install a dummy plug on the DUMMY connector
located on the left of the AN/VSC-2 control
box.
STEP 4. At the remote site–
Install batteries in the Remote Control Unit
C-433/GRC and then connect WD-1/TT field
wire (pair #1) to the line terminals.
Connect the AUDIO cable on the remote
control box to the AUDIO connector of the
C-433/GRC.
Connect handset to the AUDIO connector of
the remote control box.
Connect WD-1/TT field wire (pair #2) to the
TTY binding post of the remote control box.
This is the send/receive line (OWR).
Connect data cable from the AN/UGC-74 to
the LOOP IN and LOOP OUT connectors on
the rear of the TSEC/KW-7. Dummy plugs
must be connected to the unused LOOP IN
and LOOP OUT connectors to prevent an
open circuit.
Connect AC PWR cable to the AN/UGC-74.
This cable is not supplied with the AN/VSC-2.
Connect battery backup cable and battery, if
available. (See note 5 on installation diagram
in Figure l-l.)
1-17
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Install equipment grounds on AN/UGC-74
and TSEC/KW-7. Good equipment grounds
are essential for operation and safety.
CAUTION
Do not attempt to operate equipment without
grounds.
1-18
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19-24
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Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2
Simplified Installation Procedural Using TSEC/KG-84A
a. Simplified installation procedures are outlined below for
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-2 in a remote configuration when
the set is equipped with AN/UGC-74 communications terminal and
TSEC/KG-84A dedicated loop encryption device (DLED). This procedure assumes that a spare AN/UGC-74, data cable, and
TSEC/KG-84A are not available. If monitoring at the radio
teletypewriter set is desired, these items must be furnished
separately. If these items are furnished separately and monitoring
is desired, skip step 1 below.
b. A high level transmit/receive cable for use at the remote site
to connect the J-4024/U and the remote control box is required as an
additional item. This cable is a two-conductor, shielded cable, with
a telephone plug (type PJ-055) on one end and three banana plugs
on the opposite end. (See TM 11-5815-616-13, paragraph 2-7, for
instructions for fabrication of a transmit/receive cable if no other
cable is available.)
STEP 1. Remove from the RATT set and transport to the remote
location the—
AN/UGC-74.
Data cables.
TSEC/KG-84A
(DLED).
J-4024/U interconnecting box.
Remote control box.
AN/GRA-6 control group less the C-434/GRC local
control unit.
LS-166/U loudspeaker.
Cable, high level transmit/receive.
1-20
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STEP 2. At the local site (RATT set)–
Install batteries in Local Control C-434/GRC (P/O
AN/GRA-6) and connect Cable Assembly W-1 or
W-2 to the AUDIO connector on the AN/VSC-2
control box.
Connect WD-1/TT field wire (pair #1) to the line
terminals on the C-434/GRC.
Connect handset to the AUDIO connector of the
C-434/GRC.
c. Connect WD-1/TT field wire (pair #2) to the remote TYY
terminals located on the left side of the AN/VSC-2 control box.
Install a dummy plug on the DUMMY connector
located on the left side of the AN/VSC-2 control box.
If no dummy plug is available, use a short piece of
solid conductor wire as a jumper between pins A and
C.
Place the LOCAL REMOTE switch on the control
box to the REMOTE position.
DANGER
To prevent the possibility of electrical shock, do
this after the OWR line has been connected et the
remote site.
S T E P 3 . At the remote site—
Install batteries in the Remote Control Unit C433/GRC and then connect WD-1/TT field wire (pair
#1) to the line terminals. This is the audio/keying
line.
Connect the audio cable on the remote control box to
the AUDIO connector of the C-433/GRC.
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Connect J-654/G interconnecting box to the AUDIO
connector of the remote control box. Connect the
handset and speaker to the J-654/G.
Connect WD-1/TT field wire (pair #2) to the TTY
binding post of the remote control box. This is the
send-receive line (OWR).
Connect the transmit/receive cable banana plugs to
J-4024/U terminals L1 (send) and L3 (receive). Connect
a jumper wire between terminals L2 and L4. Connect
the banana plug that is attached to the shield wire to
the ground terminal.
Connect the transmit/receive cable telephone plug
to the remote control box terminal J1.
Connect DLED power cable (CX-13315/U) from
TSEC/KG-84A (J1) to J-4024/U (J4).
Connect DLED black cable (CX-13317/U) from
TSEC/KG-84A (J2) to J-4024/U (Jl).
Connect DLED red cable (CX-13316/U) from
TSEC/KG-84A (J3) to J-4024/U (J2).
Connect data cable (SC-D-960024) from the
AN/UGC-74 to the J5 and J7 (TTY 1) connectors on
the J-4024/U.
Connect AC power cable to AN/UGC-74. (This cable
is not supplied with the AN/VSC-2. Requisition
power cable assembly, 5995-00-271-9444, from
TM 11-5815-602-10.)
Connect battery backup cable and battery, if
available. (See note 5 on the installation diagram in
Figure 1-2.)
Install quipment grounds on AN/UGC-74, J-4024/U,
and TSEC/KG-84A. Good equipment grounds are
essential for operation and safety.
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Operational
AN/VSC-2.
procedures
are
the
same
for
the
CAUTION
Do not attempt to operate equipment without grounds.
1-23
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1-24
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Section III. Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-3
Operating Instructions
The following procedures cover local AN/VSC-3 operation
including the Intercommunications Set AN/VIC-l(V).
CAUTION 1
Before applying primary power to the AN/VSC-3, start the M577A1
engine or auxiliary power unit. Failure to do this may cause serious
damage to the radio equipment.
CAUTION 2
When teletypewriter is not transmitting, the auxiliary REC-SEND
switch, the MD-522 (*)/GRC SEND-REC switch, and the remote control
REC-SEND switch must be set to REC to prevent transmitter from being
continuously keyed.
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-3
Prestart Operating Procedures
Before starting any of the equipment, perform the following
procedures:
a. Control Box.
(1) Set main circuit breaker to OFF.
(2) Set inverter circuit breaker to OFF.
b. MX-7778/GRC. Set circuit breakera to OFF.
c. Radio Set AN/GRC-106(*). Set PRIM PWR switch on the
AM-3349/GRC-106 to OFF. Set SERVICE SELECTOR
switch on RT-662/GRC or RT-834/GRC to OFF.
d. Radio Teletypewriter Modem MD-522(*)/GRC. Set ON-OFF
switch to OFF.
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e. Teletypewriter Set TT-98(*)/FG.
(1) Set MOTOR switch to OFF.
(2) Set LIGHT switch to OFF.
(3) Adjust TT-98(*)/FG LINE CURRENT control fully
clockwise (for minimum resistance).
(4) Set LINE SELECTOR switch to 20 MA position.
f. Teletypewriter, Reperforator-Transmitter TT-76(*)/GGC.
(1) Set PWR switch to OFF.
(2) Set MOTOR switch to OFF.
(3) Set LIGHT switch to OFF.
(4) Check the current in the bias circuit by following the
instructions in TM 11-5815-238-10.
(5) Open the TT-76(*)/GGC cover and perform the following
procedures if TTY security equipment is to be installed. If
not, skip (5), (6), and (7).
Ensure a 5600-ohm resistor is connected to the power
supply and terminal unit BIAS TEST MA terminals, in
place of the shorting strap.
Ensure the SIGNAL/BIAS switch on the power supply
and terminal unit is in the 60 MA position (60 MA is the
correct position when using the 5600-ohm resistor in (a)
even though the system is set for 20 MA).
Ensure the plug from the selector magnet cable is in the
socket marked 20 MA.
(6) Close the set cover.
(7) Ensure that Device, Low Level Signaling TT523(*)/GGC is correctly installed on the set behind the
transmitter-distributor. Ensure the plugs are connected
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and the bracket is secured under the binding post on the
side of the set cover.
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-3
Starting Procedures
Start the M577A1 engine or auxiliary power and perform the
procedures below.
a. On the control box, perform the following:
Set the main circuit breakers to ON, and observe that the 27.5
VDC indicator lights and the DC voltmeter indicates 27.5
VDC.
Set the inverter breaker to ON, and observe that the inverter
is operating.
Set the VOICE-CW/TTY switch to TTY.
If the AN\VSC-3 is to be operated in a NONSECURE mode,
set the BLACK-RED switch to BLACK. If the AN/VSC-3 is to
be operated in a SECURE mode, set the BLACK-RED switch
to RED.
Set the LOCAL-REMOTE switch to LOCAL.
b. On the MD-522(*)/GRC, open the control cover to expose
additional controls and complete the following:
Set the ONE-WAY-DUPLEX switch to ONE WAY.
Set the RECEIVE switch to NORM.
Set the METER FUNCTION switch to DC LOOP 1.
Set the DC LOOP 1 switch to 20 MA.
Set the SCOPE INTENSITY control FULLY
COUNTERCLOCKWISE.
Set the BFO control to ita midscale position.
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Set the AUDIO GAIN control FULLY
COUNTERCLOCKWISE.
Set the MODE SELECTOR switch to VOICE.
Set the RCV-SEND switch to RCV.
Set the AUTO MARK HOLD switch to ON.
Set the SQUELCH SENS control to the FULLY
CLOCKWISE position.
Set the ON-OFF switch to ON.
c. Set the MX-7778/GRC circuit breakers to ON.
d. Set the auxiliary RCV-SEND switch (on the shelf) to RCV.
e. On the TT-98(*)/FG, set the MOTOR switch to ON, LIGHT
switch to ON, and SEND-LOCK switch to SEND.
f. On the TT-76(*)/GGC, set the POWER ON/OFF switch to
ON, MOTOR ON/OFF switch to ON, LIGHT ON/OFF
switch to ON, KEYBOARD SEND/LOCK switch to SEND,
and SELECTOR switch to POSITION 1.
g. Send a line of RYs on the TT-98(*)/FG keyboard, and ensure
the TT-98(*)/FG and the TT-76(*)/GGC are printing and
perforating tape in response.
h. Send a line of RYs on the TT-76(*)/GGC keyboard. Ensure the
TT-76(*)/GGC is printing and perforating tape, and the TT98(*)/FG is printing in response.
i. Insert a prepunched tape into the TT-76(*)/GGC transmitterdistributor. Set the transmitter-distributor, and set the
transmitter-distributor START-STOP lever to START. Ensure
the TT-76(*)/GGC is printing and perforating tape, and the
TT-98(*)/FG is printing in response. Set the transmitterdistributor START-STOP lever to STOP.
j. Set the TT-76(*)/GGC SELECTOR switch to position 2. Set
the transmitter-distributor START-STOP switch to START.
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Ensure the TT-76(*)/GGC is not printing and perforating,
and the TT-98(*)/FG is receiving the tape message. Ensure
the TT-76(*)/GGC keyboard can be used to punch and print
local off-line tape.
k. When using the AN/UGC-74A(V)3, follow the procedures
listed below.
NOTE: Before operating the AN/UGC-74A(V)3, the following self
test must be made.
(1) Remove the front cover. Ensure the ON/OFF switch is in
the OFF position.
(2) If a loop back plug (SM-B-91600) is available, disconnect
the clock and data cable from the J1 connector on the rear
panel of the AN/UGC-74A(V)3. Replace the cable with the
loop back plug. If the plug is not available, do not
disconnect the clock and data cable from the J1 connector.
Place a jumper (using banana jacks) from the B to the C
connectors on the Dummy box. This creates a loop back
circuit to the AN/UGC-74A(V)3.
(3) Release the combination case latches, and extend the
terminal out on its slides until the stop locks engage. (Use
caution while doing this because the cables must go
through the case.) The internal controls and switches are
exposed.
(a) Set the internal controls on the interface assembly as
follows.
PARITY switch to ODD.
STATE switch to ICT.
REC MOD switch to LO DATA.
XMIT MOD switch to LO DATA.
BAUD RATE switch to 75.
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CLOCK INT/EXT switch to INT.
CLOCK +/- switch to +.
FIGURE S/J switch to S.
SIGNAL NRZ/DIO switch to NRZ.
STOP BITS switch to 1.
MODE switch to ASCII.
SELF-TEST switch to ON.
(b) Press the stop locks, and return the terminal to the
combination case. Secure the case latches.
(4) Turn the AN/UGC-74A(V)3 PWR switch to ON. COPY
lamps are on, and all other lamps are off. The terminal
will print the following operational state message:
SYSTEM
INITIALIZED
SWITCH STATE = ICT
OPERATIONAL STATE = ICT
OPERATION CAPACITY = FULL
MODE = ASCII
STOP BITS = 1
BAUD RATE = 75
END OF LINE OPTION = OD OD OA
SPACE OPTION = OFF
LINE LENGTH = 80
LINE FEEDS = 1
RECEIVE ENVELOPE
OPTION = 56 5A435A 43: 4E 4E 4E 4E
1-30
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TRANSMIT ENVELOPE
OPTION = 56 5A 43 5A 43:4E 4E 4E 4E
7F 7F 7F 7F 7F 7F 7F 7F 7F
7F 7F 7F
PARITY OPTION = ODD
CAPITOL LETTER OPTION = ON
(5) If at any time a test fails, the system will printout a FAIL
message and cite the assembly being tested at the time of
the failure. When a test fails during self test, all testing
stops. Notify organizational maintenance.
(6) Perform lamp test by pressing and holding PARITY
RESET switch. All indicator lamps will remain lit as long
as the PARITY RESET switch is pressed.
(7) Perform keyboard test by pressing every key on the
keyboard. Ensure the keys do not stick or bind, and the
terminal responds properly for every key depression.
Radio Set AN/GRC-106(*)
Starting and Tuning Procedures
NOTE 1: The AM-3349/GRC-106 HV RESET switch must be in
OPERATE position when the AN/GRC-(*) is turned OFF or ON.
NOTE 2: References to RT-662/GRC apply to RT-834/GRC.
a. Initial preparation for operation.
(1) Ensure the whip antenna is in the operating position,
properly connected, and free of obstructions.
(2) Make sure there are no obstructions blocking the AM3349/GRC-106 air inlet and outlet vents.
(3) Connect the desired audio accessory (handset,
microphone, or telegraph key) to the control AUDIO
connector.
1-31
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(4) Turn the RT-662/GRC SERVICE SELECTOR switch to
OVEN ON. (Allow a minimum of 10 minutes warm-up
time to stabilize equipment.)
(5) Set the RT-662/GRC VOX switch to PUSH-TO-TALK.
(6) Set the RT-662/GRC SQUELCH control to OFF.
(7) Set the NOISE BLANKER switch to OFF. (Used on older
RT-662/GRC only.)
(8) Set the RT-662/GRC BFO control to MID-RANGE.
(9) Set the RT-662/GRC MANUAL RF GAIN control FULLY
CLOCKWISE.
(10) Set the RT-662/GRC AUDIO GAIN control to
MID-RANGE.
(11) Set the RT-662/GRC FREQUENCY VERNIER switch to
OFF.
(12) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 HV RESET switch to
OPERATE.
b. AN/GRC-106(*) starting procedure.
(1) Set the RT-662/GRC SERVICE SELECTOR switch to
STANDBY and the AM-3349/GRC-106 PRIM PWR
switch to ON, and allow 90 seconds for warm-up of the
AM-3349/GRC-106. Observe that the AM-3349/GRC-106
blowers are energized, and that the SIGNAL LEVEL
METER indicator on the RT-662/GRC will return to the
extreme right portion of the meter scale. (If above
indications are abnormal, refer to Table 2-2, item 1,
TM 11-5820-520-20.)
(2) Set the RT-662/GRC SERVICE SELECTOR switch to
SSB-NSK (or any operate mode FSK, AM or CW).
SIGNAL LEVEL meter will return to extreme left portion
of meter scale.
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(3) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 TEST METER switch to PRIM
VOLT. Observe that the TEST METER pointer indicates
within the area of the two dark green wedges (top scale)
when the SERVICE SELECTOR switch is in the SSBNSK, FSK, AM, or CW positions. (If above indication is
abnormal, refer to Table 2-2, item 2, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
c. Final tuning procedures for AN/GRC-106(*).
(1) Set the RT-662/GRC MHz and kHz controls to assigned
operating frequency. The frequency digits are displayed
in the windows directly above the controls.
(2) Note the AM-3349/GRC-106 ANT TUNE and ANT LOAD
predetermined setting on the antenna tuning and loading
chart or the logging chart.
(3) Adjust the AM-3349/GRC-106 ANT TUNE control to
match the numbers on the chart used.
(4) Adjust the AM-3349/GRC-106 ANT LOAD control to
match the numbers on the chart used.
CAUTION
The HV RESET switch should not stay in TUNE position for more than 2
minutes. If more than 2 minutes are required, move the AM-3349/
GRC-106 HV RESET switch to OPERATE and the RT-662/GRC
SERVICE SELECTOR switch to STANDBY for 5 minutes cooling. After
5 minutes cooling, set the SERVICE SELECTOR switch to the previous
position and the HV RESET switch to TUNE, and proceed with the tuning
procedure. ANT TUNE and ANT LOAD controls will interact with each
other. To center their respective meter pointers, rotate them slowly in
the direction opposite that of the indicated error. Be sure the antenna is
attached for proper loading to prevent damage to the equipment while
performing (5) through (12).
(5) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 HV RESET switch to TUNE.
Wait for a deflection on the ANT TUNE and ANT LOAD
meters.
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(6) Adjust the AM-3349/GRC-106 ANT LOAD control for a
center scale reading on the ANT LOAD meter.
(a) Rotate control in the direction the meter pointer is to
move. Adjust the ANT TUNE control for a center scale
reading on the ANT TUNE meter.
(b) Rotate control in the direction that the meter pointer is to
move, keeping the ANT LOAD meter as close to center
scale as possible.
(c) Tuning of the AM-3349/GRC-106 is complete when
simultaneous center scale readings are obtained on the
ANT TUNE and ANT LOAD meters. (If indication is
abnormal, refer to Table 2-2, item 5, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
Place the HV RESET switch of the AM-3349/GRC-106 to
the OPERATE position. Place the TEST METER
FUNCTION switch of the AM-3349/GRC-106 to the
PRIM VOLT position. Place the HV RESET switch on the
AM-3349/GRC-106 to the TUNE position and observe
that the TEST METER pointer indicates within the two
dark green wedges (top scale) of the test meter.
(7) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 TEST METER switch to LOW
VOLT. TEST METER pointer indicates within green
portion of top scale. (For abnormal indication, refer to
Table 2-2, item 3, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
(8) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 TEST METER switch to
HIGH VOLT. TEST METER pointer indicates within
green portion of top scale. (For abnormal indication, refer
to Table 2-2, item 4, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
(9) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 TEST METER switch to
DRIVE CUR. TEST METER pointer indicates within the
two dark green wedges of top scale. (For abnormal
indication, refer to Table 2-2, item 6, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
(10) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 TEST METER switch to GRID
DRIVE. TEST METER pointer indicates just below (to
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FM 24-19
the left of) gray portion of the bottom scale. (For abnormal
indication, refer to Table 2-2, item 6, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
(11) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 TEST METER switch to PA
CUR. TEST METER pointer indicates just below (to the
left of) the gray portion of the bottom scale. (For abnormal
indication, refer to Table 2-2, item 6, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
(12) Set the AM-3349/GRC-106 TEST METER switch to
POWER OUT. TEST METER pointer indicates just below
(to the left of) gray portion of scale. (For abnormal
indication, refer to Table 2-2, item 6, TM 11-5820-520-20.)
CAUTION
The HV RESET switch should not stay in TUNE position for more than
2 minutes.
(13) Turn the AM-3349/GRC-106 HV RESET switch to
OPERATE.
NOTE: ANT TUNE and ANT LOAD counter settings should be logged in
the logging chart with a pencil after (13) above has been completed.
These settings may be used for future tuning references unless ANT
TUNE and ANT LOAD meter pointers indicate in the red (left or right of
center scale) portion of the scale during operation. If the settings cannot
be used, repeat tuning procedures(1) through (13).
Intercommunications Set AN/VIC-1(V)
Starting Procedures
Turn on and prepare the AN/VIC-1(V) for intercommunication
and AN/GRC-106(*) operation as follows:
Set the AM-1780/VRC POWER CRT BKR ON/OFF switch to
ON, and observe that the POWER indicator lights.
Set the AM-1780/VRC MAIN PWR switch to INT ONLY.
Set the AM-1780/VRC INT ACCENT ON/OFF switch to ON.
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Set the AM-1780/VRC RADIO TRANSMISSION switch to
CDR + CREW.
Set the AM-1780/VRC INSTALLATION SWITCH to
OTHER.
Operate each crew box (C-2298/VRC) on interphone to check
AN/VIC-1(V) system.
Intercommunications Set AN/VIC-1(V)
Local Operation
a. Radio Teletypewriter Reception.
NOTE: MD-522(*)/GRC is provided with an automatic MARK
HOLD. With the AUTO MARK HOLD switch in the ON position,
the teletypewriter will not open during the period of no signals or
when signals are too weak for interchangeability.
(1) On the RT-662/GRC, set the SERVICE SELECTOR
switch to SSB/NSK or FSK as required. Set the
MANUAL RF GAIN control fully clockwise and the
AUDIO GAIN control at midposition.
(2) Set the MD-522(*)/GRC MODE SELECTOR switch to
850 Hz, 85 Hz, or 85 Hz DIV, as required.
(3) Set the MD-522(*)/GRC AUDIO GAIN control for a
comfortable level of audio on the incoming tones from the
distant station.
(4) Adjust MD-522(*)/GRC BFO control (on 850 Hz only) for
two clean ellipses on the cathode ray tube when a signal
having proper speed and shift is being received.
(5) When signal is received, set TT-98(*)/FG MOTOR
ON/OFF switch to ON and/or set the TT-76(*)/GGC
SELECTOR switch to position 1, as desired, to receive
message on the respective teletypewriter. Adjust MD522(*)/GRC BFO control (on 850 Hz only) slightly to
eliminate errors in received copy.
1-36
FM 24-19
b. Radio Teletypewriter Transmission.
(1) Set the RCV-SEND switch on MD-522(*)/GRC to SEND.
Set the auxiliary RCV-SEND switch (on the shelf) to
SEND.
(2) Operate the TT-76(*)/GGC or TT-98(*)/FG to send
message.
(3) Immediately after sending message, set the auxiliary
RCV-SEND switch back to RCV.
c. Voice or CW Communications.
(1) On the RT-662/GRC, set the SERVICE SELECTOR
switch to SSB/NSK or CW as required. Set MANUAL RF
GAIN and AUDIO GAIN controls as cited in a (l).
(2) Set the MD-522(*)GRC MODE SELECTOR to VOICE.
(3) Set the MD-522(*)GRC AUDIO GAIN control for a
comfortable level of audio on the incoming voice or CW
signal.
(4) Set the VOICE-CW/TTY switch on the AN/VSC-3 control
box to VOICE-CW. Turn the control box INVERTER
switch to OFF.
(5) Observe that the control box NONSECURE VOICE
indicator lamp is on.
(6) Operate the controls at the appropriate operator position.
(7) When the AN/GRC-106(*) is to be operated in the CW
mode, disconnect cable W21 from the control box AUDIO
connector and connect Telegraph Key KY-116/U to the
connector.
(8) When the AN/GRC-106(*) is to be operated in the VOICE
mode without the AN/VIC-1(V), connect Headset H33/PT or Microphone M-29/U to the control box AUDIO
connector.
1-37
FM 24-19
Intercommunications Set AN/VIC-1(V)
Stopping Procedures
a. Set PWR switches on the AN/VIC-1(V), MD-522(*)/GRC,
TT-76(*)/GGC, and TT-98(*)/FG to OFF.
b. Set the RT-662/GRC or RT-834/GRC SERVICE SELECTOR
switch to STANDBY. Allow 2 minutes for the AN/GRC-106(*)
to cool. Keep the HV RESET switch on the AM-3349/GRC-106
at OPERATE position when AN/GRC-106(*) is turned OFF
or ON. After 2 minutes cooling, set the AM-3349/GRC-106
PRIM PWR switch and the RT-662/GRC or RT-834/GRC
SERVICE SELECTOR switch to OFF.
c. Set the inverter and main circuit breakers on the AN/VSC-3
control box to OFF.
d. Perform the stopping procedures to shut down.
NOTE: For troubleshooting the VSC-3, see troubleshooting charts
on the AN/GRC-122/142. The only difference is the control box
AM-1780.
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/VSC-3(*)
Cabling Diagrams
Basic operation of the radio teletypewriter set is the same as for
the Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-142. For detailed instructions on operation, refer to TM 11-5815-332-15. Figures 1-3 and 1-4
show a cabling diagram for the AN/VSC-3(*).
1-38
FM 24-19
1-39
FM 24-19
1-40
FM 24-19
Section IV. Radio Teletypewriter Set
AN/GRC-122/142
Installation
Procedures
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
Major Power Switches
1-41
FM 24-19
1-42
FM 24-19
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
Prestart Procedures
1-43
FM 24-19
1-44
FM 24-19
1-45
FM 24-19
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
Starting Procedures
1-46
FM 24-19
1-47
FM 24-19
1-48
FM 24-19
1-49
FM 24-19
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
Tuning
1-50
Procedures
FM 24-19
1-51
FM 24-19
1-52
FM 24-19
1-53
FM 24-19
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
Operating Communications Terminal AN/UGC-74
(in the ICT state)
1-54
FM 24-19
1-55
FM 24-19
1-56
FM 24-19
Stopping Procedures
1-57
FM 24-19
1-58
FM 24-19
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
Troubleshooting
a. Troubleshooting the AN/GRC-122 and the AN/GRC-142 is
based on symptoms that appear during normal operation or during
maintenance checks and services. The troubleshooting chart
applies to all models of the AN/GRC-122 and AN/GRC-142 unless
otherwise indicated. It assumes the vehicular generating system is
in good working condition. The troubleshooting chart helps the
operator localize the trouble to a particular unit, such as the
AN/GRC-106 or the MD-522/GRC. If the corrective measures do not
resolve the trouble, refer to a higher level of maintenance.
b. If AN/GRC-122/142(*) radio sets are being operated in the
SECURE mode and the problem is believed to be in the security
equipment, convert the shelter to the NONSECURE mode of
operation. If the malfunction disappears when the shelter is
converted to the NONSECURE mode, the problem may be in the
security equipment.
c. When operating AN/GRC-122(*) radio sets in DUPLEX mode
of operation, turn off duplex equipment to determine the shelter
component related to the problem.
d. All troubleshooting procedures assume the equipment is
preset properly and the radio set is tuned properly. Always check
switch positions to ensure the failure is not caused by improper
switch setting. Use signal cabling diagrams to locate cable
connections between components believed to be malfunctioning
and to aid in signal path and equipment interconnections. (See
Figure 1-5.)
1-59
FM 24-19
1-60
FM 24-19
1-61
FM 24-19
1-62
FM 24-19
1-63
FM 24-19
1-64
FM 24-19
1-65
FM 24-19
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
(Plain and C Models)
Power Distribution Panel
1-66
FM 24-19
NOTE: If fuse continues to blow after being replaced, refer to a
higher level of maintenance. If 28V RECP fuse blows, remove item
plugged into 28-volt convenience outlet.
1-67
FM 24-19
Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-122/142
(A, B, and E Models)
Power Distribution Panel
1-68
FM 24-19
1-69
FM 24-19
1-70
FM 24-19
OWR or DX Inverters
Shelter
1-71
FM 24-19
1-72
FM 24-19
Operation
1-73
FM 24-19
1-74
FM 24-19
1-75
FM 24-19
1-76
FM 24-79
1-77
FM 24-19
1-78
FM 24-19
1-79
FM 24-19
1-80
FM
24-19
1-81
FM 24-19
1-82
F M
2 4 - 1 9
1-83
FM 24-19
1-84
FM 24-19
1-85
FM 24-19
Section V. Radio Set AN/GRC-26D
Installation
Procedures
Radio Set AN/GRC-26D
Prestart Procedures
1-86
FM 24-19
1-87
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/GRC-26D
Starting and Preset Procedures
1-88
FM 24-19
1-89
FM 24-19
1-90
FM 24-19
NOTE: When operating in the 10-20 MHz range, the LOW
FREQUENCY INCREASE control for the 2-10 MHz range must be set to
30.
1-91
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/GRC-26D
Tuning
1-92
Procedures
FM 24-19
1-93
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/GRC-26D
Stopping Procedures
1-94
FM 24-19
1-95
FM 24-19
Section VI. Radio Teletypewriter Set AN/GRC-46
Installation
Radio
Teletypewriter
Preoperational
1-96
Procedures
Set
AN/GRC-46
Procedures
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Set
AN/GRC-46
Prestart Procedures
1-97
FM 24-19
1-98
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Set
AN/GRC-46
Starting Procedures
1-99
FM 24-19
1-100
FM 24-19
1-101
FM 24-19
1-102
FM 24-19
1-103
FM
24-19
1-104
FM 24-19
1-105
FM 24-19
Page Printer and Reperforator-Transmitter
Operation
Transmission on Teletypewriter Set AN/UGC-4
Page Printer and Reperforator-Transmitter
Operation
Punching tape using Teletypewriter Set AN/UGC-4
(no transmission).
1-106
FM 24-19
Page Printer and Reperforator-Transmitter
Operation (continued)
Punching Tape using reperforator-transmitter
keyboard (no transmission).
1-107
FM 24-19
Page Printer and Reperforator-Transmitter
Operation (continued)
Transmitting messages by tape
1-108
FM 24-19
FSK Transmission
1-109
FM 24-19
1-110
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Set
AN/GRC-46
Stopping Procedures
1-111
FM 24-19
Section VII. Radio Set AN/FRC-93
Description
The AN/FRC-93 is an HF commercial single sideband radio set
adapted for military use. It is a continuous tuning radio with 200
kHz bands using the Collins crystal packet. It can operate on either
USB or LSB, and is designed to be used in fixed or semifixed
application. Current tactical speech security equipment is not
compatible with the AN/FRC-93; therefore, secure voice is not a
mode of operation. Major components of the AN/FRC-93 include
the following:
a. Receiver/Transmitter RT-718 (Collins KWM-2/2A).
1-112
FM 24-19
b. Power Supply PP-4151 (Collins 516F2).
c. Power Supply PP-3990 (Collins PM-2).
d. Control Group C-7515 (Collins 312B-5).
e. Amplifier AM-3979 (Collins 30L-1).
f. Crystal Unit Set CK-31 (Collins crystal packet CP-1).
Radio Set AN/FRC-93
Installation Procedures
a. Ensure power is turned off on all pieces of equipment prior to
making interconnections. Extreme high voltage exists within
this equipment, and is interlocked with the amplifier covers.
Make no attempt to put the amplifier into service until all
compartment covers are in place.
b. Determine which configuration applies, and select applicable
figure.
c. Wire and cable equipment to follow diagram.
d. Ground equipment.
e. Erect antenna.
Radio Set AN/FRC-93
Preliminary Checks
1-113
FM 24-19
When S meter falls to zero, read no signal plate current. (Without
linear amplifier, 40 MA; with linear amplifier, 50 MA.) Adjust bias
adjust (bottom rear of power supply) for correct indication.
Radio Set AN/FRC-93
Receiver Tuning
1-114
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/FRC-93
Transmitter Tuning
1-115
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/FRC-93
VOX
1-116
Adjustment
FM 24-19
1-117
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/FRC-93
Amplifier Tuning
Check all antenna and coaxial connections to prevent damage to
the set. Tune and load transceiver as in section on receiver/
transmitter tuning. Amplifier ON-OFF switch is OFF.
1-118
FM 24-19
1-119
FM 24-19
1-120
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/FRC-93
Power Indications
1-121
FM
24-19
1-122
FM 24-19
Section VIII. Radio Set AN/VRC-64
Operating
Procedures
Section IX. Radio Set AN/VRC-12 Series
Installation
Procedures
1-123
FM 24-19
1-124
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/VRC-12 Series
Operating
Procedures
1-125
FM 24-19
Section X. NRI System AN/VRC-12
Installation
Procedures
NOTE: The configuration used in this manual is
used as an example only. Local SOP will dictate
how the NRI system will operate.
1-126
FM 24-19
1-127
FM 24-19
NRI System AN/VRC-12
Prestart Procedures
NRI System AN/VRC-12
Starting and Tuning Procedures
1-128
FM 24-19
NRI System AN/VRC-12
Stopping Procedure
1-129
FM 24-19
Section XI. Radio Set Control Group AN/GRA-6
Installation Procedures (with Radio Set AN/GRC-106)
1-130
FM 24-19
Radio Set Control Group AN/GRA-6
Operating
Procedures
1-131
FM 24-19
Section XII. Radio Set Control Group AN/GRA-39
Installation
1-132
Procedures
FM 24-19
Radio Set Control Group AN/GRA-39
Operating
Procedures
1-133
FM 24-19
NRI
System
AN/VRC-12
Installation Procedures (using the AN/GRA-39,
Receiver/Transmitter RT-524, and Switchboard
SB-22/PT)
1-134
FM 24-19
1-135
FM 24-19
Presets and Adjustments
1-136
FM 24-19
Section XIII. Radio Set AN/PRC-77/25
Operating
Procedures
1-137
FM 24-19
1 - 1 3 8
FM 24-19
Section XIV. Radio Set AN/PRC-104A
Installation and Operating Procedures
a. Transportation and storage. The AN/PRC-104A is an ultra
lightweight, HF, manpack radio. The radio set and its components
are contained, transported and stored in Radio Set Case CY8291/PRC-104 (transit case). The transit case normally should be
kept closed. To unpack the equipment, unfasten the four latches and
remove the transit case cover. Each of the pieces of equipment fits
into a molded space. Upon receiving this radio set, ensure the
equipment is complete. Inspect the equipment for any shipping
damage.
b. The components must be assembled (installed) for operation.
Figure 1-16 shows how the components of the AN/PRC-104A are
assembled to make the set operational.
Press the pressure release valve button to equalize pressure
before unlatching the transit cover. Then unfasten the four
latches securing the cover to the transit case and remove the
cover.
Remove the receiver/transmitter and amplifier/coupler from
the transit case. Ensure the connectors on the two pieces are
completely engaged by pressing the two together from the ends.
Secure the two by using the quick-connect/disconnect latches
on the front and rear of the amplifier/coupler. Tighten the
latches until snug.
Attach the battery pack to the bottom of the receiver/exciter
and the amplifier/coupler. It is critical to ensure the connectors
on the battery pack and the amplifier/coupler are lined up. This
is where the electrical connections are made by the battery.
Secure the assembly by using the two quick-disconnect latches
on the battery pack.
1-139
FM 24-19
c. The Whip Antenna AT-271A/PRC has seven sections (Figure
1-17). Each section fits into the end of a wider section. A stainless
steel, plastic covered cable (or braided plastic cord), under spring
tension, is threaded through the sections to keep them together in
the operating condition. When the sections are folded, the cable
keeps them together as a group and prevents the loss of individual
sections. Spring tension is provided by a spiral spring in the base
section. Spring section, Antenna Base AT-129/PR (Figure 1-17) is
used to keep the antenna stable.
1-140
FM 24-19
Remove antenna shock mount from the transit case.
Screw Antenna Spring Section AB-129/PR into the bottom
section of the whip antenna.
Pull on section 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. Insert section 2 into section 1.
Continue to assemble all sections in this manner.
CAUTION
Do not try to assemble this antenna from the smallest section (7) to the
largest (1). Doing so will put too much strain on the nylon cord inside the
antenna and cause it to break. Start assembly from the largest end(1).
Screw the entire assembly into the antenna socket on the radio
(Figure 1-16).
Connect a handset to the radio set upper AUDIO connector.
The set is now ready to operate.
1-141
FM 24-19
1-142
FM 24-19
1-143
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/PRC-104A
Preoperational
Checks
Radio Set AN/PRC-104A
Presets
1-144
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/PRC-104A
Energizing
Procedures
1-145
FM 24-19
Radio
Set
Tuning
Radio
Set
AN/PRC-104A
Procedures
AN/PRC-104A
Test Procedures
When the radio has concluded its tuning procedure, perform an
operational test on the radio. The test procedures are as follows:
Change frequency by at least 1 kHz; then momentarily press
the handset PTT switch.
Listen for a l-kHz tune tone. (Tuning is brief. It maybe 3 to 12
seconds.)
NOTE: Tune tone should terminate within 12 seconds. This
indicates the automatic antenna tuner is operating normally. A
continuous, rapid beeping sound in the handset indicates the radio
has failed to tune properly (a tuning fault exists).
Transmit using the handset. Press the PTT switch, and
communicate with another radio set on the test frequency. A
sidetone in the handset earpiece indicates transmission is
satisfactory. (For fault tone, refer to the radio troubleshooting
procedure.)
1-146
FM 24-19
Repeat the above procedures for test frequencies spaced
through the 2 to 30 MHz part of the radio spectrum to test the
auto tune feature. Your frequency manager has these
frequencies.
Select a frequency for the time standard broadcast
(multiples of 5 MHz; for example, 5, 10, 15, 20 MHz). For this
test, one frequency may be better than another, depending on
the time of day and station. You may not hear these stations
outside the United States.
Monitor the time standard broadcast and switch sidebands.
Verify no change in the pitch of the audible signals. This
indicates the frequency accuracy of the radio set is within
specifications.
Turn the radio off. The test is complete. The radio set is good.
Radio
Set
AN/PRC-104A
Operating
Procedures
Turn MODE switch to V-TR.
Turn SIDEBAND switch to USB or LSB (see SOI).
Set frequency to your net operating frequency (see SOI).
Turn ANT SEL switch to WHIP ANTENNA.
Turn VOLUME control to desired listening level. Power is
applied at this time through the VOLUME control.
NOTE: If a clicking sound is heard, the battery is a weak (20
volts or less) and needs to be replaced.
Momentarily press and release the handset PTT switch.
1-147
FM 24-19
Listen for l-kHz tune tone. Tuning is brief (3 to 12 seconds).
NOTE: Tune tone should terminate within 12 seconds. This
indicates the radio is tuned and ready for operation. A
continuous, rapid beeping in the handset indicates the radio
has failed to tune properly (a tune fault exists). Refer to the
troubleshooting procedures or to organization maintenance.
To communicate with the AN/PRC-104A, use the handset as
follows:
Press the PTT switch, transmit to another station, and release
the PTT switch to hear (receive) the other station.
Press to transmit, and release to listen.
Listen for sidetone in the handset earpiece. Sidetone indicates
you are transmitting.
Radio
Set
AN/PRC-104A
Modes of Operation
a. Voice.
Turn MODE SELECTOR switch to V-TR.
Adjust OFF/MAX/VOLUME switch to comfortable listening
level.
Press handset PTT switch and talk, release it to receive.
b. CW.
Turn MODE SELECTOR switch to V-TR.
Adjust OFF/MAX/VOLUME switch to comfortable listening
level.
Connect Leg Key KY-872 to upper AUDIO connector.
1-148
FM 24-19
1 - 1 4 9
FM 24-19
e. The Radio Set Control Group AN/GRA-39 controls the remote
operation of the tactical radio set. It includes the Remote
Control Unit C-2328/GRA-39, the Local Control Unit C-2329/
GRA-39, Handset H-189/GR, and carrying Bag CW-598/GRA39 (a bag and a carrying sling).
NOTE: The AN/GRA-39 is not issued with the AN/PRC-104A.
Disconnect the H-250/U handset control cable from the upper
AUDIO connector on the receiver/transmitter.
Connect the control cable of the local unit, the C-2329/GRA-39,
to the upper AUDIO connector of the receiver/transmitter.
Connect the H-250/U control cable to the AUDIO connector on
Local Control Unit C-2329/GRA-39.
The remote unit C-2328/GRA-39 may be up to two miles from
the radio set. It is connected to the line terminals of the local
unit by 600 ohm wire that is connected to the line terminals of
the remote unit.
NOTE: Any wire may be connected to any line terminal on the
local and remote control units.
Connect the control cable of the Handset H-189/GR, supplied
with the AN/GRA-39, to the audio jack of the Remote Control
Unit C-2328/GRA-39.
f. Voice communications can be received and transmitted
through the radio set and can be controlled either locally or at
the option of the operators.
g. The remote unit has a loudspeaker to monitor all received radio
signals. The volume is controlled by the VOLUME control
knob on the receiver/transmitter.
1-150
FM 24-19
Radio
Set
AN/PRC-104A
Stopping Procedures
Turn the OFF/MAX/VOLUME switch to OFF.
Radio
Set
AN/PRC-104A
Disassemble and Transport Procedures
To disassemble and transport the radio set—
Turn power off.
Remove the antenna and antenna shock mount (base) from the
radio set.
Remove the antenna shock mount (base) from the antenna and
place the base in the space provided in the transit case.
Start at the tip (top end), fold the seven-section antenna, and
place it in the transit case.
Remove the handset and place it in the transit case.
Remove the battery pack from the receiver/transmitteramplifier/coupler. Put the battery pack in the transit case.
Remove batteries from the battery case and transport them
separately.
WARNING
Only battery packs that are not activatad may be placed in the
transit casa. An activated battery pack must be transported
and stored separately.
Place the receiver/transmitter-amplifier/coupler combination
into the transit case.
Replace the transit case cover, and fasten the four latches.
NOTE: The radio set is now ready for transport or storage.
1-151
FM 24-19
Radio
Set
AN/PRC-104A
Operator Daily and Weekly PMCS
a. The operator must perform daily and weekly PMCS.
Although it is not specifically a part of daily or weekly PMCS,
the radio set must be cleaned. PMCS keeps the radio set
operational; keeping the radio set clean is just as important.
b. Clean the radio set when needed by—
Removing dirt, dust, grease, or other debris from external
surfaces using a cloth or brush moistened in clear water. Dry
the equipment with a soft, lint-free cloth.
Cleaning any dust or dirt from the connectors and pins with a
soft-bristled brush.
c. Check for corrosion or fungus on the radio set when preparing it
for operation or when you are operating it. During PMCS,
separate the three units if they are installed. Also, check the
exterior surface controls and connectors for signs of corrosion
or fungus. Remove corrosion or fungus with a cloth and/or
brush moistened in cleaning solvent. Repaint any surfaces that
need painting.
d. The following pages discuss the daily and weekly PMCS. The
operator performs daily PMCS when the equipment is
operated. The operator performs weekly PMCS when the
equipment is not operated daily. However, daily PMCS also is
performed whenever weekly PMCS is performed. When
performing PMCS, report items that are broken or damaged
beyond repair to the next higher maintenance level. Any
deficiencies you cannot correct must be reported on
DA Form 2404.
1-152
FM 24-19
NOTE: Perform operator PMCS before, during, and
after operations as appropriate with the checks or
services to be performed. (See Figure 1-19.)
1-153
FM 24-19
1-154
FM 24-19
Section XV. Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Description
a. The AN/GRC-213 is a lightweight (50 pounds), low power
(20-watt) output, HF radio set capable of short- to long-range
communications. It uses the same receiver-transmitter (RT1209/URC) as the AN/PRC-104A, but has no battery pack. It
operates from the vehicle power supply using amplifier/
power supply AM-7152/GRC-213 to filter and condition the
vehicle power for the radio set. The amplifier/power supply
also amplifies and squelches (cut out the rushing noise) the
audio output to drive an external speaker and provides
connection for an AIN/VIC-l.
b. The radio set can be mounted in a wheeled or tracked vehicle,
or installed in a fixed location, such as a building or tent.
When installed in a fixed location, a power supply capable of
providing 24 to 32 volts DC (26.5 VDC nominal) must be used
(for example, Generator Set 3 kW, 29 VDC, or Battery Charger
PP-1451/G or similar power supply). In vehicles equipped
with the Intercommunications Set (Intercom) AN/VIC-1,
automatic retransmission is possible from any single
sideband radio, such as the AN/GRC-213, to any FM radio,
such as the AN/VRC-12 series (Figure 1-20).
1-155
FM
24-19
.
1-156
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Installation
Procedures
a. Before operating Radio Set AN/GRC-213, check to make sure
it is properly installed in the mount. Ensure it is grounded and
has an antenna connected to it.
b. Connections for grounding the radio set to the mount are at
the rear of the radio set. Quick connect ground straps connect
the components together and ground the radio set to the
mount. Make sure the ground straps are connected properly to
provide a proper ground. Do not depend on the metal to metal
contact between the components to ground the radio set.
When operating from a stationary position, connect a ground
strap between the vehicle and a ground rod that has been
driven into the ground. This will prevent electrical shock
when touching the vehicle. (Refer to TC 11-6 for proper
grounding techniques.)
c. The AN/GRC-213 uses any antenna designed for HF
communications. The most common are the 15-foot whip
antenna, the half-wave (doublet) antenna, the quarter-wave
antenna and the NVIS antenna. Refer to Chapter 3 for a list of
the characteristics of these antennas.
d. Before operating your radio, ensure an antenna is installed
and connected to the radio set. Operating a radio with no
antenna may cause serious damage to the equipment. When
using the whip antenna, be sure the correct number of
sections are installed (normally five each, three-foot sections).
1-157
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Operating
Procedures
Turn MODE switch to V-TR.
Turn SIDEBAND switch to USB or LSB (see SOI).
Set FREQUENCY to your net operating frequency (see SOI).
Turn ANT SEL switch to MIDDLE (BNC connector) position.
Turn VOLUME control to desired listening level. Power is
applied at this time through the VOLUME control.
NOTE: A clicking sound indicates low vehicle battery voltage (20
volts or less). The vehicle should be running during operation of the
AN/GRC-213 to prevent draining the vehicle’s battery. Before
starting the vehicle, be sure the radio is off to prevent damage to the
radio.
Momentarily press and release the handset PTT switch.
Listen for a 1-kHz tune tone. Tuning is brief. It may be 3 to 12
seconds.
NOTE: Tune tone should terminate within 12 seconds. This
indicates the radio is tuned and ready for operation. A continuous,
rapid beeping in the handset indicates the radio has failed to tune
properly (a tune fault exists). Refer to the troubleshooting procedures or to organization maintenance.
To communicate with the AN/GRC-213–
Press the handset PTT switch, and speak into the mouthpiece
of the handset. Release the PTT switch to listen (receive) to the
other station.
Press to transmit, and release to listen.
Listen for sidetone in the handset earpiece. Sidetone indicates
you are transmitting.
1-158
FM24-19
Adjust the SQUELCH control on the amplifier/power supply to
allow the distant stations to be heard when they transmit and
to eliminate the background noise.
CAUTION
Always listen before pressing the PTT switch to prevent interfering with
another station that may be transmitting.
Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Preoperational
Checks
DANGER
To prevent electrical shock when operating the radio set while the vehicle is
stationary, the vehicle and radio set must
be grounded IAW procedures in TC 11-6.
1-159
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Presets
1-160
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Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Energizing
Procedures
1-161
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Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Tuning
Procedures
NOTE: Tuning tone will be heard in handset. The
radio set will tune automatically. This will take
about 3 seconds. The radio set is then ready for
operation.
Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Stopping Procedures
1-162
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NOTE: When stopping procedures are implemented and
the radio is to be left unattended, the frequency should
be removed from the radio dial to avoid compromising
the frequency.
Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Modes of Operation
1-163
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NOTE: The procedures for remote operation of Radio Set
AN/GRC-213 are the same as for Radio Set AN/PRC104A. See section on remote operation for Radio Set
AN/PRC-104A in this manual.
1-164
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Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Operator Daily and Weekly PMCS
a. The operator must perform daily and weekly PMCS. Although it
is not specifically a part of daily or weekly PMCS, the radio set must
be cleaned. PMCS keeps the radio set operational; keeping the radio
set clean is just as important.
b. Clean the radio set when needed by—
Removing dirt, dust, grease, or other debris from external
surfaces using a cloth or brush moistened in clear water. Dry
the equipment with a soft, lint-free cloth.
Cleaning any dust or dirt from the connectors and pins with a
soft-bristled brush.
c. Check for corrosion or fungus on the radio set when preparing it
for operation or when you are operating it. During PMCS, separate
the three units if they are installed. Also, check the exterior surface
controls and connectors for signs of corrosion or fungus. Remove
corrosion or fungus with a cloth and/or brush moistened in
cleaning solvent. Repaint any surfaces that need painting.
d. The following pages discuss the daily and weekly PMCS. The
operator performs daily PMCS when the equipment is operated.
The operator performs weekly PMCS when the equipment is not
operated daily. However, daily PMCS also is performed whenever
weekly PMCS is performed. When performing PMCS, report items
that are broken or damaged beyond repair to the next higher maintenance level. Any deficiencies you cannot correct must be reported
on DA Form 2404.
1-165
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Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Operator Daily and Weekly PMCS (continued)
NOTE: Operator PMCS should be performed before,
during, and after operations as appropriate with the
checks or services to be performed.
1-166
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Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Operetor
Troubleshooting
Operator troubleshooting of the radio set is limited to fault
isolation to a replaceable unit or accessory. Use the operational
indicators and audible tones in the handset to isolate faults. The
following table is an equipment performance check (EPC). If a
component is not performing as indicated in the performance test, a
higher level of maintenance is required. Use this performance test
as a troubleshooting guide.
Radio Set AN/GRC-213
Equipment Performance Check (EPC)
Presets
1. FREQUENCY kHz switches to 05,000.0 kHz
or multiple.
2. MODE switch to V-RCV.
3. SB switch to USB.
4. VOLUME control to OFF.
5. ANT SEL switch to middle position for
vehicle whip, or bottom position for dipole
or NVIS.
6. SPEAKER switch to OFF.
7. SQUELCH control to OFF.
1-167
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1-68
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NOTE: Except for steps 1 and 6, this EPC
applies to AN/PRC-104.
Section XVI. Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Description
a. The AN/GRC-193A is a rugged, tactical, vehicular/base
station, HF radio set. The set’s high power (100 to 400 watts) makes
it capable of long-range communications. It uses the same
Receiver/Transmitter RT-1209/URC as the AN/PRC-104A and the
AN/GRC-213. It operates from the vehicle power supply. The
Amplifier/Converter AM-6879 squelches the audio output to drive
an external speaker. The radio set can be mourited in a wheeled or
tracked vehicle; it can also be installed in a fixed location, such as a
building or tent. When installed in a fixed location, a power supply
capable of providing 24 to 32 volts DC (26.5 VDC nominal) must be
used (for example, generator set 3 kW, 28 VDC, or battery charger
PP-1451/G or similar power supply).
1-169
FM 24-19
b. For the most part, the technical characteristics of the radio set
are the same as the AN/PRC-104A and the AN/GRC-213. However,
the AN/GRC-193A has an additional component, Amplifier/
Converter AM-6879/GRC-193A. This component makes it capable
of radio teletypewriter operations. Additional equipment not issued
with the AN/GRC-193A (for example, AN/UGC-74(*) and TSEC/
KG-84A) is needed for radio teletypewriter operations. A tactical
antenna remoting kit enhances the operational flexibility of the
AN/GRC-193A. The kit allows remoting of the Antenna Coupler
CU-2064/193A and the antenna 200 feet from the radio set. For
more information, see TM 11-5820-924-13.
Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Installation
Procedures
a. Before operating Radio Set AN/GRC-193A, ensure it is properly
installed in the mount. Make sure it is grounded and has an
antenna connected to the radio.
b. Attach the ground strap to one of the ground terminals on front
of the antenna coupler. The other end is connected to the mount.
Install a ground rod and attach one end of a ground strap to the
remaining terminal on the antenna coupler and the other end to the
ground rod. This will prevent electrical shock when touching the
vehicle. (See TC 11-6 for proper grounding techniques.)
c. Before operating the AN/GRC-193A, be sure an antenna has
been connected to the radio set. The AN/GRC-193Ais issued with a
15-foot whip antenna and two 50 ohm antenna kits (Doublet
Antenna AN/GRA-50 and NVIS AS-2259/GR Antenna).
DANGER
There are 10,000 volts at the antanna tarminal J4 when ueing
tha whip antenna or J3 terminal when using the 50 ohm
antenna. Do not remove during operation. Extreme caution
must be taken to ensure thase terminals are at least 6 inches
from nearby objects such as cables, guy wires, brackets or
ground leads.
1-170
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Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Operating
Procedures
Make preoperational checks.
Make control presets.
Turn VOLUME control to desired listening level. Power is
applied at this time through the VOLUME control.
NOTE: A clicking sound indicates low vehicle battery voltage
(20 volts or less). Start the vehicle before powering up the radio
set. Leave it running while operating the AN/GRC-193A to
prevent draining the vehicle’s battery power.
Connect a handset to the UPPER audio receptacle of the RT1209/URC or the AM-6545/GRC-193A.
Momentarily press and release the handset PTT switch.
Listen for a 1-kHz tune tone. Tuning is brief. It may be 3 to 12
seconds.
NOTE: Tune tone should terminate within 12 seconds. This
indicates the radio is tuned and ready for operation. A
continuous, rapid beeping in the handset indicates failure of
the radio to properly tune (a tune fault exists). Refer to the
troubleshooting procedures or to organization maintenance.
To communicate with the AN/GRC-193A–
Press the handset PTT switch, and speak into the mouthpiece
of the handset. Release the PTT switch to listen (receive) the
other station.
Press to transmit, and release to listen.
Listen for sidetone in the handset earpiece. Sidetone indicates
you are transmitting.
1-171
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Adjust the SQUELCH control on the amplifier/converter to
allow the distant stations to be heard when they transmit and
to eliminate the background noise.
CAUTION
Always listen before pressing the PTT switch to prevent interfering with
another station that may be transmitting.
Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Preoperational
Checks
DANGER
To prevent electrical shock when operating the radio
set while the vehicle is stationary, ground the vehicle
and radio set IAW procedures in TC 11-6.
1-172
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Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Presets
1-173
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Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Energizing
1-174
Procedures
FM 24-19
NOTE: Green RDY light and Orange TUN light indicate
the radio set is ready to be fine tuned.
Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Tuning
Procedures
1-175
FM 24-19
NOTE 1: After 6 seconds, Green XMIT light goes out, Orange
TUN light goes out, and Green RDY light stays ON. Radio is
ready for VOICE or CW modes of operation.
NOTE 2: Set power amplifier SELECTOR switch to 400W
when tuning with Antenna Coupler CU-2064/l93A.
Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Stopping
1-176
Procedures
FM 24-19
Radio
Set
AN/GRC-193A
Modes of Operation
1-177
FM 24-19
1-178
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NOTE: The procedures for remote operation of Radio Set
AN/GRC-l 93Aarethe same as for RadioSetsAN/PRC104A and AN/GRC-213.
(RADIO SILENCE)
NOTE: The procedures for radio silence are the same for
all the radios. The MODE switch on the receiver/
transmitter is placed in the RCV position. Do not break
radio silence without proper authority.
Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Preventive Maintanance Checks and Sarvices (PMCS)
a. PMCS of the AN/GRC-193A are required to keep the equipment
in good operating condition. They include before operation, during
operation and after operation checks. If the equipment is operated
daily, perform maintenance each day. If the equipment is
1-179
FM 24-19
maintained in a STANDBY condition (not used), perform PMCS
weekly.
DANGER
Before you operate, always keep in mind the cautions and
warnings. This equipment can seriously injure or kill if it is not
operated safely and properly.
b. The PMCS charts do not list routine checks, such as equipment
inventory, cleaning components, checking for frayed and damaged
cables, replacing items not in use, checking for loose hardware and
safety wires, and corrosion or receptacles and connectors. Do these
things any time they need to be done. This is a matter of good
preventive maintenance.
B - Before D - During
1-180
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24-19
B - Before D - During
1-181
FM 24-19
B - Before D - During
WARNING
The following procedure requires the breaking
of radio silence. This manual does not authorize the
breaking of radio silence imposed by any command.
Unauthorized violation of radio silence could result
in court martial or possible death from hostile action.
1-182
FM 24-19
B - Before D - During
NOTE: If your equipment fails to operate, troubleshoot
equipment using the troubleshooting chart that follows
in this section. Report any deficiencies using
DA Form 2404.
Cleaning
Inspect the exterior of the radio set components. The
exterior surfaces should be free of dust, dirt, grease, moisture,
fungus, rust, and corrosion. Remove dust, moisture, and loose
dirt with a clean soft cloth.
DANGER
Trichloroethane fumes are toxic. Provide thorough
ventilation when it ia used. Avoid prolonged or rapeatad
breathing of vapor. Do not uae near an open flama or hot
surface. Trichloroethane is nonflammable, but heat
converts tha fumaa to a highly toxic phoagene gaa.
Inhaling tha gaa could result in serious injury or death.
Prolongad or repeated akin contact with trichloroethana
can causa skin inflammation. When neceaaary, uaa
glovas, sleeves, and aprons the solvent cannot penatrata.
1-183
FM 24-19
Remove grease, fungus, and ground-in dirt from the equipment
covers. Use a dampened cloth (but not wet) with trichloroethane.
Remove dust or dirt from plugs and jacks with a brush.
CAUTION
Do not press the glass of the meter on the AM-6545 or the RT-1209
when cleaning.
Clean the meter, front panels, and control knobs. Use a soft clean
cloth. If dirt is difficult to remove, dampen the cloth with water.
Mild soap may be used for more effective cleaning.
Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Operator
Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting of this equipment is based upon the operational
check in the daily operator PMCS. To troubleshoot the equipment,
perform an operational check. Proceed through this check until an
abnormal condition or result is observed. When an abnormal
condition or result is observed, turn to the troubleshooting procedure on the following pages and determine if there is a similar
condition in the symptom column. If the corrective measures
indicated do not correct the trouble, a higher category of maintenance is required. It is assumed the Amplifier/Converter AM-6879
front panel fuse has been checked by the operator, and the vehicular
generating system or external power source is in working order.
These items are not listed in the check and corrective measure
column of the troubleshooting chart.
1-184
FM 24-19
Radio Set AN/GRC-193A
Operator
Troubleshooting
NOTE: Refer to troubleshooting flowchart in Figure 1-21.
HCM means higher category of maintenance.
1-185
FM 24-19
1-186
FM 24-19
NOTE: Operation at reduced power is still possible, but
the unit should be turned in to HCM for repair at the first
opportunity.
1-187
FM 24-19
NOTE: When normal tempatures are reached, the
units will automatically reset. It will be necessary to go
through warm-up and tuning again.
1-188
FM 24-19
1-189
FM 24-19
1-190
FM 24-19
1-191
FM 24-19
1-192
FM 24-19
1-193
FM 24-19
1-194
FM 24-19
1-195
FM 24-19
Section XVII. Single-Channel Ground and Airborne
Radio System (SINCGARS) and AN/TSC-124
(SCOTT)
SINCGARS
SINCGARS is a new family of VHF-FM combat net radios.
SINCGARS is designed to provide the primary means of command
and control (voice and digital data up to 16 kb/s) for combat,
combat support, and combat service support units. To help the
communications system survive, SINCGARS provides a resistance
to jam (ECCM) capability using single-channel offset or frequency
hopping. SINCGARS also has a built in data adapter to allow
transmission of a wide range of analog and digital data signals.
Figure 1-22 shows a SINCGARS.
1-196
FM 24-19
AN/TSC-124 (SCOTT)
a. The AN/TSC-124 is a single-channel, tactical satellite communications terminal. It provides highly survivable, antijam and
high altitude electromagnetic pulse-protected (HAEMP) satellite
communications for nonstrategic forces, contingency units, special
operations units, and theater forces. It will provide critical command
and control communications and replace existing terrestrial communications nets. The AN/TSC-124 will survive when the enemy
has degraded or destroyed other communications, although voice
communications will be possible. (See Figure 1-23.)
b. The AN/TSC-124–
Consists of the terminal mounted in S-250 shelter, prime mover,
and trailer-mounted power generator. Backup power is
provided by the prime mover.
Accepts up to four datdvoice inputs from UCID 2500 feet away
from the terminal.
Operates in both DAMA and TMDA modes.
Provides electronic ECCM capability.
Can accept over-the-air rekeying of TRANSEC devices.
1-197
FM 24-19
1-198
FM 24-19
Regency Net System
a. The Regency Net System provides survivable HF radio
command, control, and communications which pass messages
accurately and rapidly for US Commander-in-Chief, Europe and
Pacific and internal unit communications within their major
subordinate commands. The Regency Net System includes the force
terminal which is a multichannel terminal housed in a S-280 shelter
and a team terminal which is a single-channel terminal mounted in
a ¼-ton vehicle. For the purpose of this manual, only team terminal
(Figures 1-24 through 1-26) will be discussed.
b. The AN/GRC-215 team terminal—
Consists of a single channel 100-watt HF transceiver which
is vehicular mountable or manportable.
Provides secure data and voice communications to assigned
force terminals.
Is compatible with force terminals in all modes except
radioteletype.
Utilizes three microprocessors at data receipt ports to
control regency net connectivity, provides radio control,
processes messages, and isolates faults.
Has printer port for intirface with either a force terminal
thermal printer or the AN/UGC-144 control terminal.
Operates on the move or at halt utilizing 12/24 V DC vehicle
power.
Possesses active ECCM.
Is interoperable with currently fielded single-channel HF
radios.
1-199
FM 24-19
1-200
FM 24-19
1-201
FM 24-19
1-202
FM 24-19
Chapter 2
Generator Sets
Section I. Generator Set 10 kW (PU-619)
Installation
Procedures
WARNING
Wheels must be blocked, brakes set, and rear lag prop down
in support position before attempting to roll up the tarpaulin
and before starting to set up or assemble the equipment
for operation.
CAUTION
It is extremely important to have free air circulation around the
generator sets at all times. Inadequate ventilation is a major
cause of damage to the equipment.
2-1
FM 24-19
DANGER
Do not operate the generator set without
ground connection. Electrical defects in the
lines, or load equipment can cause
electrocution when contact is made
ungrounded system.
a suitable
unit, load
death by
with an
WARNING 1
Ensure circuit breaker is off before connecting cable.
WARNING 2
The 5- and 10-kW generators are not grounded internally.
They need a jumper between the frame’s grounding lug and
the neutral load terminal. Your generator set TM or TB
43-0125 points out the neutral terminal.
This jumper should be at least 6-AWG wire. Order some NSN
6145-00-652-9058. Without it, the power unit is not
grounded and you risk equipment damage and noisy circuits.
Figure 2-1 shows the proper hookup for an AN/GRC-122/142
radio teletypewriter set.
If you have a different rig, the hookup should be shown in your
operator’s manual. If it is not, see TB 43-0125 for instructions
to connect primary power to your gear.
Remember, L0 is not a ground. You need the jumper wire to
complete the job.
2-2
FM 24-19
2-3
FM 24-19
Generator Set 10 kW (PU-619)
Prestart Procedures
NOTE: For operation below 0°F, refer to the engine TM to
properly set the air intake shutter and oil pan baffle rod
position.
NOTE: Ensure PHASE SELECTOR knob is in the 120-colt,
1-phase position.
2-4
FM 24-19
Generator Set 10 kW (PU-619)
Starting Procedures
NOTE: Engine should be placed at ¼-speed for approximately
5 minutes to allow engine to reach operating temperature.
2-5
FM 24-19
Generator Set 10 kW (PU-619)
Stopping Procedures
NOTE: For emergency stopping, immediately place
EMERGENCY STOP-RUN switch in EMERGENCY STOP
position.
2-6
FM 24-19
Section II. Generator Set 5 kW (PU-620)
Prestart Procedures
NOTE: Follow installation procedures for Generator Set 10
kW (PU-619).
NOTE: For operation below 0°F, refer to the engine TM to
properly set the air intake shutter and oil pan baffle rod
position.
NOTE: Ensure PHASE SELECTOR knob is in the 120-volt,
1 -phase position.
2-7
FM 24-19
Generator Set 5 kW (PU-620)
Prestart
Procedures
(continued)
Generator Set 5 kW (PU-620)
Starting Procedures
NOTE: Engine should be placed at M-speed for approximately
5 minutes to allow engine to reach operating temperature.
2-8
FM 24-19
Generator Set 5 kW (PU-620)
Stopping
Procedures
NOTE: For emergency stopping, immediately place EMERGENCY
STOP-RUN switch in EMERGENCY STOP position.
2-9
FM 24-19
Section III. Generator Set 3 kW (MEP-026A)
Installation
Procedures
WARNING
Wheels must be blocked, brakes set, and rear leg prop down
in support position before attempting to roll up the tarpaulin
and before starting to set up or assemble the equipment
for operation.
2-10
FM 24-19
CAUTION
It is extremely important to have free air circulation around the
generator sets at all times. Inadequate ventilation is a major
cause of damage to the equipment.
DANGER
Do not operate the generator set without
ground connection. Electrical defects in the
lines, or load equipment can cause
electrocution when contact is made
ungrounded system.
a suitable
unit, load
death by
with an
Generator Set 3 kW (MEP-026A)
Prestart Procedures
2-11
FM 24-19
Generator Set 3 kW (MEP-026A)
Electrical Starting Procedures
2-12
FM 24-19
Generator Set 3 kW (MEP-026A)
Manual Starting Procedures
2-13
FM 24-19
Generator Set 3 kW (MEP-026A)
Stopping
2-14
Procedures
FM 24-19
2-15
FM 24-19
Chapter 3
Antennas
One of the most important considerations when operating a
radio is the type of antenna to be used. For good communications
with a radio operating in the HF range (2.000 kHz to 29.999 MHz),
you must consider the—
Type of antenna.
Operating frequency.
Terrain around the radio site.
Time of day.
Location of and distance between radios.
Atmospheric
conditions.
The operator can sometimes control the first four or five factors. The
antenna and frequency are the most important considerations
under his control. Both should be selected to suit the distance
between the radios and the propagation characteristics. The operator will most likely have two or three different frequencies assigned
for the operation or exercise. These will be found in the SOI under
the net in which he is operating.
Section I. Antenna Selection
a. The field environment, tactical situation, and distance
between radio sites determine the type of antenna used. If the radio
set is used while on the move, the whip antenna supplied with the
equipment is normally used. The whip antenna, using the ground
wave, is satisfactory for most short-range missions.
3-0
FM 24-19
b. If the tactical situation permits, a simple half-wave dipole
antenna (doublet) or the NVIS antenna is used to extend the range
of the radio by using the skip phenomenon. Skip means the radio
waves are bounced off the ionosphere and back to earth giving
coverage of 300 miles or more. Figure 3-1 shows the ground wave
and sky wave using the skip phenomenon. The NVIS can be used at
frequencies above 12 MHz but automatic tuning of the radio
(AN/PRC-104A and/or AN/GRC-213) may not be possible at all
frequencies.
c. When using an antenna with directional characteristics,
orient the antenna so that it is most sensitive in the direction of the
other station(s). Figure 3-2 shows the radiation pattern of the
antennas.
d. Standard and optional antennas that can be used with IHFRs
are listed below.
WHIP ANTENNA
Omnidirectional (360-degree
radiation pattern).
Easily and quickly assembled
and erected.
Lightweight and easy to carry.
Limited range (10 miles or less)
over land.
AS-2259/GR
(NVIS)
Omnidirectional.
Requires large clear area (80
feet square) for proper erection.
Long range (0 to 300 miles).
3-1
FM 24-19
HALF-WAVE
DIPOLE
DOUBLET
Bidirectional
(broadside to wire).
Good portability.
Quickly assembled and erected.
Requires two or more vertical
supports (trees, poles).
Extended range (to 300 miles and
beyond).
QUARTERWAVE
SLANT WIRE
Bidirectional (broadside to wire).
Good portability.
Quickly assembled and erected.
Requires only one vertical
support (tree or pole).
Range up to 1,000 miles.
NOTE: These are a few of the antennas that can be used.
Section II. Whip Antenna
a. When using a quarter-wave or whip antenna, ground the
antenna to increase its effectiveness. Using this characteristic of
the ground, an antenna a quarter-wavelength long can be made
into the equivalent of a half-wave antenna. If such an antenna is
erected vertically and its lower end is grounded, the ground takes
the place of the missing quarter-wavelength, and the reflections
supply that part of the radiated energy normally supplied by the
lower half of an ungrounded half-wave antenna.
b. The antenna is grounded by grounding the vehicle itself. Use
a ground stake at least 4 feet long, a hammer, and a ground strap.
3-2
FM 24-19
3-3
FM
3-4
24-19
FM 24-19
You may substitute a steel reinforcing rod, a steel fence poet, or a
metal water or gas pipe cut to the right length for the ground stake.
Ensure paint and rust are removed from such items. Substitutes for
the ground strap include battery cables or any heavy gauge wire. Do
not use Field Wire WD-1 because it does not provide a suitable
ground. Drive the ground stake into the ground until the top of the
stake is 2 to 4 inches above the ground. Attach one end of the ground
strap to the stake and the other end to the vehicle body. Ensure all
paint and rust are removed from connecting point of the vehicle
body to allow a good metal-to-metal contact.
c. When a whip antenna is mounted on a vehicle, the metal of the
vehicle will affect the operation of the antenna. As a result, the
direction in which the vehicle is facing may also affect transmission and reception, particularly of distant or weak signals. A
vehicle with a whip antenna mounted on its left rear side transmits
its strongest signal in a line running diagonally from the antenna
through the right front side of the vehicle. Similarly, an antenna
mounted on the right rear side of the vehicle radiates its strongest
signal in a direction diagonally toward the left front side. In some
cases, the best direction can be determined by driving the vehicle in
a small circle until the best reception is obtained.
Section III. Antenna RC-292
Antenna RC-292 is used to extend the distance range of the old
and new generation of FM field radio sets. The antenna consists of
one vertical radiating element and three ground plane elements.
The lengths of these elements are determined by the operating
frequency of the radio set. Refer to the antenna element selection
chart at Table 3-1. The antenna is elevated on a 30-foot sectional
mast which in turn is held erect by guy ropes and stakes. When the
operating frequency is changed, check the antenna element
selection chart. If the new frequency requires a change in element
length, lower the antenna and add or subtract the required number
of elements.
3-5
FM 24-19
Section IV. Antenna Group OE-254/GRC
Description
Antenna Group OE-254/GRC is used to extend the range of the
old and new generation of FM field radio sets. The antenna consists
of three upward and three downward extended radials. These
radials remain the same length for all frequencies from 30 to 88
MHz. The antenna is elevated on a 30-foot sectional mast held erect
with guy ropes and stakes.
NOTE: No change needs to be made in the number of
radials when a change of frequency is necessary.
3-6
FM 24-19
Antenna Group OE-254/GRC
Installation
CAUTION
Use extreme care in driving the stake with the hammer. The
space between the ears of the stake is barely enough to clear
the hammer. Hitting one of the ears with the hammer will
break it.
NOTE: Make sure the area for the anchors is firm. If the
ground is marshy or sandy, get specific instructions from your
supervisor on how to reinforce the anchors.
3-7
FM 24-19
3-8
FM 24-19
NOTE: If the antenna is not to be raised to its full height,
reduce the number of mast sections. Eliminate the upper mast
sections first. The lower and upper adapter assemblies and the
insulating extension must be used.
3-9
FM 24-19
3-10
FM 24-19
NOTE: Additional weatherproofing of the antenna assembly
may be made at this time by wiping the excess silicone
compound from the antenna assembly and wrapping each
joint with electrical tape.
3-11
FM 24-19
3-12
FM 24-19
3-13
FM 24-19
3-14
FM 24-19
3-15
FM 24-19
WARNING 1
When erecting the antenna, allow only team personnel in
the erecting area.
WARNING 2
Clearly mark all guys with warning flags or signs (supplied
by your unit). In an emergency, use strips of white cloth as
warning streamers.
NOTE: Leave a slight slack in each guy to allow for expansion
and contraction of the mast and guys. Check the tension in the
morning and during the day. Experience with temperature
conditions in the area will determine how tight the guys should
be.
3-16
FM 24-19
WARNING
If the weather in your area can cause ice to form on the
antenna and guys, add extra guys to support the system.
Rope off the area and post it with warning signs, such as
beware of falling ice. Keep a sharp aye on the anchors and
guys. Check them daily and immediately before and after
bad weather.
NOTE: For AN/VRC-12 family FM radios with BNC type
antenna connectors, use the UG-349B/U adapter on the end
of the CG-1886B/U RF cable (Figure 3-12).
3-17
FM 24-19
3-18
FM 24-19
Section V. Doublet Antenna
Determining Doublet Antenna Length
NOTE: This formula does not apply to
antennas longer than
half-wave.
3-19
FM 24-19
Doublet Antenna
Determining Doublet Antenna Height
The height of the doublet antenna above the ground determines
the radiation pattern, or take-off angle. The radiation pattern for a
distance of 0 to 250 miles should be straight up. To determine the
height of your doublet antenna, use OTF. For daytime uses of 4.8 to
9.7 MHz for a distance of 100 miles, use the formula for a quarterwave. For nighttime uses of the same frequency of 4.8 to 9.7 MHz,
use the formula for a tenth of a wave.
3-20
FM 24-19
Doublet Antenna
Orientation
WARNING
When making adjustmants to an antenna, the transmitter on
the radio set must be off.
Doublet
Antenna
Installation Using AB-155A/U
Figure 3-15 shows correct installation of a doublet antenna using
mast assembly AB-155A/U. Pay particular attention to mast
height. For maximum effectiveness, erect a doublet antenna at least
a quarter-wavelength off the ground. Forty-foot masts provide
adequate height in most instances.
3-21
FM 24-19
3-22
FM 24-19
3-23
FM 24-19
Section VI. NVIS Antenna AS-2259/GR
Description
a. The NVIS Antenna AS-2259/GR is a lightweight, sloping
dipole, omnidirectional antenna. It is designed to be used with an
AM radio operating in the HF range of 2 to 30 MHz. It provides high
angle radiation (near vertical incidence) to permit short-range sky
wave propagation over communications circuits varying from 0 to
300 miles. It can be used with tactical HF radio communications
equipment that tunes a 15-foot whip antenna. Examples of such
equipment are the AN/GRC-106 and the IHFRs (AN/PRC-104A and
AN/GRC-213/193A). Figure 3-16 shows an operational AS2259/GR NVIS.
b. An adapter MX-10618/GRC-193A is used to interface the
vehicle’s whip antenna base with the AS-2259/GR. Do not use the
adapter MX-9313/GR provided with some of the earlier antenna
kits with the AN/PRC-104A or AN/GRC-213/193A. It is used to
interface radios with greater output power (AN/MRC83/87). The
antenna weighs about 14.7 pounds and can be erected by two men in
about 5 minutes. The antenna is polarized horizontally and
vertically at the same time, radiating RF energy in all directions at
the same time. It consists of eight lightweight mast sections that
function as the antenna coax feed line and four radiating elements
that also serve as guys supporting the mast.
3-24
FM 24-19
3-25
FM 24-19
NVIS
Antenna
AS-2259/GR
Installation
DANGER
Antennas must be separated from power lines by a
distance equal to twice the height of the antenna.
Antenna contact with power lines may cause serious
injury or even death to the operator. Be sure transmittal
power is off. Contacting the antenna when the
transmittal is keyed will cause electrical burns.
NOTE: Before assembling mast sections, wipe unpainted
surfaces clean of mud or dirt to ensure good electrical contact.
3-26
FM 24-19
NOTE: Do not use the Adapter MX-9313/GR that may be in
earlier models of the AS-2259/GR with any of the IHFR
systems. Use the MX-10618 with IHFR sets.
3-27
FM 24-19
3-28
FM 24-19
3 - 2 9
FM 24-19
3-30
FM 24-19
3-31
FM 24-19
Section VII. Field Expedients for Antennas
a. Antennas are sometimes broken or damaged resulting in
failed or poor communications. If a spare is available, replace the
damaged antenna. When there is no spare, fabricate an emergency
antenna. For more information on how to repair and fabricate
antennas refer to FM 24-18. The following suggest ways to
construct an emergency antenna.
(1) The best wire for antennas is copper or aluminum. In an
emergency, however, use any wire available. WD-1/TT is suitable
for this purpose.
(2) The exact length of many antennas is critical. Therefore, the
length of the emergency antenna should be the same as the length
of the antenna it replaces.
(3) Antennas supported by trees can usually survive heavy
windstorms if the trunk of a tree or a stout limb is used for support.
To keep the antenna taut and to prevent it from breaking or
stretching, attach a spring or a strip of old inner tube to one end of
the antenna, or pass a rope through a pulley or eye hook, attach the
rope to the end of the antenna, and load the rope with a heavy
weight to keep the antenna taut.
(4) Guys used to hold antenna supports are made of rope or wire.
To ensure that wire guys will not affect the operation of the
antenna, cut the wire into several short lengths and connect the
pieces with insulators. Small pieces of dry wood, bottles, or even
suitably shaped stones may be used.
b. An improvised antenna may change the performance of a
radio set. Use either of the two following expedient methods to
determine whether the improvised antenna is operating properly.
(1) The distant receiver may be used to test the antenna. If the
signal received from a station is strong, the antenna is operating
satisfactorily. If the signal is weak, adjust the height and length of
the antenna and transmission line to receive the strongest signal at
3-32
FM 24-19
a given setting of the volume control of the receiver. If your set is
equipped with a power or SWR meter, use this device to adjust your
antenna.
(2) In some radio sets, the transmitter is used to adjust the
antenna. First, set the controls of the transmitter in the proper
position for normal operation; then, tune the system by adjusting
the antenna height, length, and the transmission line length to
obtain the best transmission output.
c. When a whip antenna is broken into two sections, the portion
of the antenna that is broken off can be connected to the portion
attached to the base fitting by joining the sections together. When
both parts of the broken whip are available and usable, connect the
two broken ends together and wrap with wire, ensuring that
wrapping is clean and tight. Lash pole or branch to antenna until
antenna will stand alone. When the portion of whip that is broken is
missing or unusable, add a piece of wire that is nearly the same
length as the broken section. Then, lash a pole the length of the
antenna securely to the base section of the antenna and tie wire to
the top of pole. If possible, solder the connections.
d. Emergency repair of wire antennas can be grouped into two
categories: repair or replacement of the wire used as an antenna or
transmission line; and repair or replacement of the assembly used
to support the antenna wires.
(1) When one or more wires on an antenna are broken, the
antenna can be repaired by reconnecting the broken wires. To do
this, lower the antenna to the ground, clean the surface of the wire,
and twist the wires together. Whenever possible, solder the
connections.
(2) If the antenna is damaged beyond repair, substitute another
antenna. If antenna sections are not available, WD-1 (field wire)
can be used as a substitute. Ensure the length of the wire is the same
length as the original antenna and you have a good wire to antenna
contact.
3-33
FM 24-19
e. Building a good field-expedient vertical half-rhombic antenna
calls for a good resistor, not a dead BA-30 battery or a C-rat can full
of sand and oil. Plan ahead. If you can, lay in a supply of the
600-ohm 2-watt resistors. Since 600-ohms is not a standard resistor
value, you have a choice. Get a 620-ohm, 2-watter with NSN 5905-00407-6167, or wire 2 1200-ohm, l-watt resistors in parallel. Get them
with NSN 5905-00-369-6916. Then, follow the directions on how to
fabricate antennas. Put the resistor on the end nearest your
receiving station. Remember, resistor wattage must beat least half
of the radio’s output wattage. (See Figure 3-21.)
3-34
FM 24-19
Section VIII. Grounding Systems
WARNING
If underground pipes or tanks are used, ensure they do not
contain gasoline, oil, or other flammable liquids or gas.
3-35
FM 24-19
NOTE: Use the “wrap method” if a terminal screw or a ground
clamp is not available. Bind the ground strap to the rod by using
strong, flexible bare wire. Wrap about 24 turns of the wire
around the strap and the rod, then solder the wire and strap to
the rod. If solder is not available, twist the ends of the wire as
tight as you can, then tape the connection to keep out
moisture.
3-36
FM 24-19
Chapter 4
Communications Security Equipment
Section I. TSEC/KY-8
Programming Instructions
TSEC/KY-8
Operating Instructions (with Remote Control Unit)
4-1
FM 24-19
NOTE: If constant beeps sound or red light flashes during any
cipher transmission, repeat all steps. If problem repeats,
switch to plain voice and seek maintenance help.
EMERGENCY
Eliminate key according to local zeroize procedure.
TSEC/KY-8
Operating Instructions (without Remote Control Unit)
4-2
FM 24-19
NOTE: If constant series of beeps are heard, or flashing red
light occurs during any cipher transmission, repeat all steps. If
problem repeats, switch to plain voice and seek maintenance
help.
EMERGENCY
Eliminate key according to local zeroize procedure.
Section II. TSEC/KY-38
Programming Instructions
4-3
FM 24-19
TSEC/KY-38
Operating Instructions
NOTE: If constant series of beeps are heard during any cipher
transmission, repeat entire first start.
EMERGENCY
Turn ZEROIZE switch clockwise (toward direction
of arrow).
4-4
FM 24-19
TSEC/KY-38
Local Remedy for Minor Problems
NOTE: If problem cannot be solved by above remedies, switch
to plain voice.
4-5
FM 24-19
Section III. HYL-3/TSEC
Prestart Operating Procedures (all Modes)
HYL-3/TSEC
Retransmission Procedures
4-6
FM 24-19
Section IV. TSEC/KY-57
Installation in Manpack Operations
CAUTION
Check the safety relief valve on the side of the battery case to
assure proper venting capability.
NOTE: The batteries should be removed if the TSEC/KY-57 is
to be put in long-term storage.
DANGER
Under excessive heat, mercury batteries BA-1372/U
will explode and spread mercury contamination.
Sufficient heat to cause explosion may be generated
by accidental shorting or by incineration. Exercise
caution when using mercury batteries to prevent
accidental shorting. Dispose of mercury batteries by
burying them in nonconductive container.
4-7
FM 24-19
NOTE: Installation procedures of communications security
equipment TSEC/KY-57 for wheeled and tracked operations
are too numerous to be included in this handbook.
TSEC/KY-57
Loading
4-8
Procedures
FM 24-19
CAUTION
When connecting the KYK-13/TSEC to the TSEC/KY-57, the
MODE switch of the KYK-13/TSEC should be in the OFF/
CK position.
CAUTION
Do not press the KYK-13/TSEC INITIATE button.
4-9
FM 24-19
TSEC/KY-57
Operating in the SECURE Mode
4-10
FM 24-19
NOTE: You will be instructed by either your net controller or
commander when to zeroize your equipment.
Section V. TSEC/KY-65
Installation in Manpack Operations
CAUTION
Check the safety relief valve on the side of the battery pack
assembly to ensure proper venting capability.
4-11
FM 24-19
WARNING
Under excessive heat, mercury batteries BA-1372/U will
explode and spread mercury contamination. Sufficient heat
to cause explosion maybe generated by accidental shorting
or by incineration. Exercise care when using mercury
batteries to prevent accidental shorting. Dispose of mercury batteries by burying them in nonconductive
containers.
NOTE: Make sure the battery polarities (as marked on the
battery) are properly matched with the polarity markings on
the battery compartment (+ to +, - to -).
4-12
FM 24-19
TSEC/KY-65
Installation in Vehicle Operations (AN/GRC-193A)
TSEC/KY-65
Installation in Vehicle Operations (AN/GRC-213)
4-13
FM 24-19
TSEC/KY-65
Loading
4-14
Procedures
FM 24-19
NOTE: Prior to FILL operations, the local operator should set
the DELAY OUT/DELAY IN/SIG CLR switch to the SIG CLR
position, transmit to distant station and request that operator
to set his DELAY OUT/DELAY IN/SIG CLR switch to the SIG
CLR position and, using the VOLUME CONTROL, adjust the
volume of the incoming audio signal to obtain a center scale
reading on the meter. Request the distant operator transmit to
local operator and perform the same procedures as above. This
procedure will greatly improve the voice quality of the system.
NOTE: Ensure the rubber grommet is in the KYK-13/TSEC
PI connector and the TSEC/KY-65 is in the CIPHER mode.
4-15
FM 24-19
4-16
FM 24-19
TSEC/KY-65
Operations
NOTE: Amber light on front of TSEC/KY-65 will flash
continuously during receipt of secure voice communications.
Meter on the front of the TSEC/KY-65 will indicate the
receiving and transmitting audio level. After receiving a cipher
test communication, wait until postamble stops before
initiating a transmission.
4-17
FM 24-19
NOTE: Standby setting is used to enable the TSEC/KY-65 to
retain its fill when power to the TSEC/KY-65 from the primary
power source (battery pack or vehicle power supply) has been
disconnected or interrupted. The TSEC/KY-65 must contain
batteries to hold its fill.
Section VI. TSEC/KG-84A
Description
The TSEC/KG-84A is a dedicated loop encryption device
(DLED). It is used to encrypt/decrypt teletypewriter and digital
data traffic on dedicated links. It can be used for local or remote
operations and will operate in the DUPLEX and the HALFDUPLEX modes. Unlike the TSEC\KW-7, which it replaces, the
KG-84A will operate in the DUPLEX mode without an additional
device. It can operate in the TRANSMIT and RECEIVE modes at
the same time.
When used with Radio Teletypewriter Sets AN/GRC-122,
AN/GRC-142, AN/VSC-2, and AN/VSC-3, the Installation Kit
MK-2488/G must first be installed. Interconnecting Box J-4024/U
interfaces the KG-84A with Teletypewriter Sets TT-98/FG, TT76/GGC, TT-122/TG, and TT-4/TG. For complete wiring details of
the KG-84A in radio teletypewriter sets, see appropriate technical
manual. Do not attempt to use the KG-84A without Installation Kit
MK-2488/GR.
4-18
FM 24-19
Chapter 5
Operating Procedures
Section I - Radiotelephone Procedures
Phonetic Alphabet
5-1
FM 24-19
Numerical
Pronunciation
1. To distinguish numerals from words similarly pronounced, the
proword “FIGURES” may be used preceding such numbers.
2. When numerals are transmitted by radiotelephone, the following
rules for their pronunciation will be observed:
5-2
FM 24-19
3. Numbers will be transmitted digit by digit except that exact
multiples of thousands may be spoken as such. However, there are
special cases, such as anti-air warfare reporting procedures, when
the normal pronunciation of numerals is prescribed for example, 17
would then be “seventeen.”
4. The figure “ZERO” is to be written “0,” the figure “ONE” is to be
written “1” and the letter “ZULU” is to be written “Z.”
5. Difficult words may be spelled phonetically using the four-step
method. Abbreviations and isolated letters should be phonetisized
without the proword “I SPELL.”
5-3
FM 24-19
Radiotelephone Procedures
Prowords Listed Alphabetically
5-4
FM 24-19
5 - 5
FM 24-19
5-6
FM
24-19
5 - 7
FM
5 - 8
24-19
FM 24-19
Radiotelephone Procedures
Opening a Net (Nonsecure Voice)
5-9
FM 24-19
Radiotelephone Procedures
Opening a Net (Secure Voice)
NOTE: The last letter of the call sign determines the answering
order. The stations in a net respond alphabetically, for example,
A3D will answer before A2E and A2E will answer before BIF. If two
stations in a net have the same last letter, for instance, A1D and
A2D, the answering order will be determined by numerical
sequence, with the lower number A1D answering first.
Radiotelephone Procedures
Radio Checks
To minimize transmission time, use radio checks sparingly.
Transmit only when you have message traffic.
5-10
FM 24-19
Radio Telephone Procedures
Passing Message Traffic
5-11
FM 24-19
Radiotelephone Procedures
Station Entering Net
Radiotelephone Procedures
Station Leaving Net
5-12
FM 24-19
Radiotelephone Procedures
Closing a Net (Nonsecure Voice)
Radiotelephone Procedures
Closing a Net (Secure Voice)
Radiotelephone Procedures
Radiotelephone Message Format
A radiotelephone message consists of three main parts:
1. Heading.
2. Text.
3. Ending.
5-13
FM 24-19
5-14
FM
24-19
5-15
FM24-19
NOTE 1: Any abbreviated words used in the message must be
transmitted phonetically, for example, 1st is sent as ONE SIERRA
TANGO, or HQ as HOTEL QUEBEC.
NOTE 2: When authorized by proper authority, a classified
message, not to include TOP SECRET, may be sent in the clear on a
nonsecure circuit. The word CLEAR will appear as the first word of
the text. The receiving opera-l mark the message R E C E I V E D
IN THE CLEAR. On secure circuits the word UNCLASSIFIED,
CONFIDENTIAL, or SECRET will be transmitted at the first word
of the text. The operator uses Format Line 14 to record a time group
(4 digits + zone suffix), when no date-time group appears on Format
Line 5. The time group represents the time the operator accepted the
message for transmission, and is used as a reference in future
references to the message.
5-16
FM 24-19
Section II. Radio Teletypewriter Procedures
Prosigns
5-17
FM 24-19
5 - 1 8
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Precedence Prosigns
(Interservice Use)
5-19
FM 24-19
NOTE: For more detailed information on precedence prosigns,
precedence assignments, and handling instructions, see ACP 121.
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Frequently Used Operating Signa1s
5-20
FM 24-19
5-21
FM 24-19
5 - 2 2
FM
24-19
5 - 2 3
FM
24-19
5 - 2 4
FM 24-19
5-25
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Machine Functions
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Establishing Radio Teletypewriter Communications
(Continuous Tuning Sets)
Radio Set AN/GRC-26D & RATT Set AN/GRC-46
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Garbled Transmission Received from E6T
5-26
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Establishing Radio Teletypewriter Communications
(Digital Tuning Sets)
NOTE: ZKB is used in radio teletypewriter communications when
the NCS has not been designatedin the SOI or when alternate NCS
has assumed command of the net. EKB is used in radio teletype
writer communications when the NCS wants to control the net. The
NCS may want to control the net when the net has high message
traffic. Also, if the net has numerous subs, the NCS may control the
net to avoid confusion.
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Opening a Net
5-27
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Opening a Directed Net
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Sequence of Answering
1. Station will answer a net or collective call in alphabetical order.
2. If any station fails to answer in order, the next station waits 5
seconds then answers. we station which failed to answer will
wait until all other stations have answered, then answer.
3. If after all other stations have answered, the station missing its
turn still does not answer, the NCS waita 5 seconds then initiates
a call to that station.
5-28
FM 24-19
4. If the station still fails to answer, the NCS will permit other
stations to transmit their traffic.
(5SP-2CR-lLF) A7W XMT F3D DE B6F R AR (2CR-lLF)
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Station Entering Opened Net
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Closing a Net
5-29
FM 24-19
Teletypewriter Message Format
Radio
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Teletypewriter Repetition Procedures
1. Operators must use the following rules to request repetition in
the heading of a message:
a. Rule 1.
(1) When one element is garbled, request repetition of prosign
before to prosign after the garbled element.
5-30
FM 24-19
Example:
If the originator’s designation is garbled request:
C9L DE A0K IMI FM TO TO K
(2) To respond to a request for a repetition, the operator must
always call the station requesting the IMI, identify what he is
giving, and then give the portion requested.
Example:
A0K DE C9L
FM TO TO
FM CDR FT LEE//ATCP-A//
TO K
b. Rule 2.
(1) When more than one element from a single component is
garbled, request the entire component. (Example assumes two or
more errors in the address component.)
Request:
A0K DE C9L IMI FM TO GRNC K
(2) Response:
C9L DE A0K
FM TO GRNC
FM A0K
TO B9V06
INFO M2N03
DA GRNC K
5-31
FM 24-19
c. Rule 3.
(1) When elements from more than one component are garbled in
the heading, request the entire heading, all before break.
Request:
A0K DE C9L IMI AB BT K
(2) Response.
C9L DE A0K
AB BT
C9L
DE AOK NR1
R 2413002 NOV 83
FM A0K23
TO C9L06
BT K
2 Repetition(s) in the text.
a. If the entire text is garbled, request repetition of all after the BT.
(1) Request:
B9V DE M2N IMI AA BT K
(2) Response:
M2N DE B9V
AA BT
TEXT
BT
13/1030Z
K
5-32
FM 24-19
b. When one single word in a plain language text is garbled,
request repetition using the prosign WB or WA using the shortest
word as reference point.
(1) Request:
M2N DE B9V IMI WB TO K
(2) Response:
B9V DE M2N WB TO MEN K
c. When two or more consecutive words are garbled in the text,
request repetition from the correct word before the garbled portion
to the first correct word after the last part of the garbled portion.
(1) Request:
M2N DE B9V IMI SEND TO HILL K
(2) Response:
B9V DE M2N SEND TO HILL SEND 15 MEN TO HILL K
d. When one single group in a coded text message is garbled,
request repetition using the numerical number which identifies that
particular group.
(1) Request
B9V DE M2N IMI 3 K
(2) Response:
M2N DE B9V 3 DCXEY K
e. When three or more consecutive groups in a coded text message
are garbled, request repetition from the first garbled group to the
last garbled group.
(1) Request:
B9V DE M2N IMI 7 TO 9 K
(2) Response:
M2N DE B9V 7 TO 9 ZBHVE IAKNM GPRMN K
5-33
FM 24-19
f. When the ending of a message is garbled, request repetition of
everything after the last word or coded group in the text.
(1) Request
(Plain language text)
M2N DE B9V IMI AA AN/FGC-25 K
(2) Response:
(Plain language text)
B9V DE M2N
AA AN/FGC-25
BT
CFN AN/FGC-25
13/1630Z
K
(3) Request:
(Coded group text)
M2N DE B9V IMI AA 6 K
(4) Response:
(Coded group text)
B9V DE M2N
AA6
BT
13/1745Z
K
5-34
FM 24-19
Radio
Teletypewriter
Teletypewriter
Procedures
Interrogation
Procedures
1. There are five portions of a message in which the receiving
operator will normally interrogate. Use the prosign INT followed by
the item to be questioned. Interrogate on the basis of what you
believe to be correct.
Examples:
(1) Questioning the date-time group.
B9V DE M2N INT 212205Z K
(2) Questioning the group count.
B9V DE M2N INT GR7 K
(3) Questioning words or groups in the text.
B9V DE M2N INT WA HILL CHARLIE K (Plain language
text)
B9V DE M2N INT 9 XYZCP K (Coded text)
(4) Questioning the filing time.
B9V DE M2N INT 21/2220Z K
2. When the item questioned is correct, the simple response is
_ _ _ _ _ _ D E ______ C K.
3. When the item questioned was interrogated incorrectly, the
______ DE
response must be
______ C (with the correct
version) K.
Example:
B9V DE M2N INT 9 XYZCP K (Group 9 interrogated incorrectly)
M2N DE B9V C 9 XYICB K
5-35
FM 24-19
4. Interrogating the group count of a coded text message, the following separate steps must be taken if the group count is questioned
incorrectly. Use sample message:
Sample Message
M2N
DE B9V NR1
GR6
BT
ASDFG UIOPL ERNBV ZASKQ HGKWE JIQOK
BT
K
Example:
B9V DE M2N INT GR6 K
M2N DE B9V C K
(Group count question correctly)
B9V DE M2N INT GR5 K
M2N DE B9V GR6 BT A U EZH J BT K
Group count was questioned incorrectly. The automatic transmission reply discloses the correct groups are six (GR6) and
requests the receiving operator to check each group received with
the six letter in the automatic transmission to see which group was
missed in receiving coded message. Finding out what group was
missed, the receiving operator must request a repetition (IMI) for
that group before receipting for message. (See Figure 5-l.)
5-36
FM
24-19
5-37
FM 24-19
Section III. Radiotelegraph Procedures
Code Characters
5-38
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Prosigns
a. Prosigns are one or more letters, characters, or combination
thereof, used to facilitate communications by conveying, in a
condensed standard form, certain frequently used orders, instructions, requests, and information relating to communications.
b. The following is a complete list of prosigns authorized for
military use on radiotelegraph circuits. An overscore (a line over
two or more letters) means the overscored letters are transmitted as
a single character; that is, without a pause between letters.
5-39
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Operating Signals
a. Operating signale are three-letter eignale used to expedite
communications. They start with the letter Q or the letter Z and
convey frequently used ordera, requests, and information relating
to communications. Examples are QSA, QSY, ZEV, and ZKJ.
(1) When preceded by the prosign INT, they form a request or
ask a queetion; for example, INT QSA means what is the strength of
my signal?
5-40
FM 24-19
(2) When used alone, they convey an order or make a positive
statement. When giving an answer, advice, or order, an operating
signal may convey a different meaning by changing the suffix
(using QSA); for example, the strength of your signal is–
QSA1
QSA2
QSA3
QSA4
QSA5
- scarcely perceptible
- weak
- fairly good
- good
- very good
b. More commonly used operating signals:
(1) QSY - Change to transmission on another frequency (or
____________________________________________________ frequency).
(2) QTR - Correct time is _____________________________ hours.
(3) ZDK - Following repetition of __________ is made in accordance with your request.
(4) ZEV - Message ________________________ is acknowledged.
(5) ZGE - Send your call sign(s) once (or __________ times) on
this frequency.
(6) ZKA - I am the NCS on this frequency.
(7) ZKB - It is necessary to obtain the permission of the
controlling station before transmitting messages.
(8) ZKD - Take control of net.
(9) ZKE - I report into circuit.
(10) ZKJ1 - Close down ________________ 2. I am closing down.
(11) ZNB - Authentication is ______________________________ .
(12) ZUE - Affirmative (yes).
(13) ZUG - Negative (no).
(14) ZUJ - Stand by.
5-41
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Opening a CW Net Using Authentication
(For digital tuning radio sets such as the
AN/GRC-106 and AN/PRC-70/74)
NOTE: If circuit conditions warrant it (for example, weak or poor
reception), the NCS may have call signs repeated twice. The operating signal ZGE2 will be used for this purpose.
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Tuning Station on a Net
(For continuous tuning radio sets such as the AN/GRC-19,
AN/GRC-46, and AN/GRC-26D)
5-42
FM 24-19
NOTE: After tuning is complete, NCS opens the net using
authentication.
Radiotelegraph
Procedures
Making a Free Net a Directed Net
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Making a Directed Net a Free Net
5-43
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph
Procedures
Closing a CW Net Using Authentication
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Closing a CW Net Using Authentication
(When closing for a certain period of time)
NOTE: In CW operation, the response for authentication is
repeated twice, as in ZNB ___ ___ .
5-44
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph
Procedures
Radiotelegraph Message Format
All message PARTS and a majority of the COMPONENTS and
ELEMENTS have a standard arrangement or sequential order of
appearance. All format lines do not necessarily appear in every
message, however, when used, they will be in the order shown.
5-45
FM 24-19
5-46
FM 24-19
5-47
FM 24-19
5-48
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph
Procedures
Radiotelegraph Message Repetition Procedures
(Identification of Parts or Portions of Messages)
The following rules for identifying the parts or portions of messages
are to be followed:
a. The heading. Identify by—
All before prosign.
All after prosign.
Prosign to prosign.
b. Plain language text. Identify by–
BT to word.
Word to word.
Prosign WA and/or WB.
Prosign AA and/or AB.
NOTE: When a word appears more than once, that word used as
an identity applies to the first appearance. Reference to
subsequent appearance of the word must be further identified by
means of adjacent words.
c. Coded groups. Identify by—
Group number individually.
Group number to group number.
All after group number.
5-49
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Repetition After Receipt
After receipt for a message has been obtained, all requests for
repetition must be in the form of a new message.
REQUEST:
RESPONSE:
(Send entire message)
Radiotelegraph Procedures
Verification
a. Requests for verifications are initiated by addressee.
REQUEST
W6C DE B6F J 241255ZNOV 83 K
b. After verifying with originator.
RESPONSE:
5-50
FM 24-19
Radiotelegraph
Procedures
Acknowledgements
a. Request for acknowledgement is initiated by originator
addressee.
Example:
b. C2S receiving permission from the addressee to acknowledge
the message transmits:
Section IV. NRI Calls
a. Calls originating from a telephone subscriber.
Example:
5-51
FM 24-19
(1) Telephone subscriber rings switchboard.
(2) Switchboard operator connects operator jack to callers
drop and answers with “SHAMROCK, may I help you?”
(3) TS --- “Give me SHAMROCK 134 please.”
(4) SBO --- SHAMROCK connects plug from callers line pack
to line jack marked 134 and rings.
(5) NRI OP --- On handset. “SHAMROCK 134 may I help
you?”
(6) TS --- “This is SHAMROCK 114 I would like to speak to
SHAMROCK 106.”
(7) NRI OP --- “SHAMROCK 114 I will call you back.” Determines call sign and frequency of requested party from SOI and
switches to that frequency.
(8) NRI OP --- “W6T46 this is W6T81 over.”
(9) DS --- “W6T81 this is W6T46 over.”
(10) NRI OP --- “W6T46 this is W6T81 call me on my
frequency.”
(11) DS --- “W6T81 this W6T46 roger out.”
(DISTANT STATION AND NRI OPERATOR CHANGE TO THE
NRI FREQUENCY.)
(12) DS -- “W6T81 this is W6T46 over.”
(13) NRI OP --- “W6T46 this is W6T81 stand by for a call from
W6T71 over.”
(14) DS --- “W6T81 this is W6T46 roger out.”
(NRI OPERATOR SWITCHES FUNCTION SWITCH TO
TELEPHONE R POSITION MOMENTARILY TO RING
SWITCHBOARD.)
5-52
FM
24-19
(15) SBO --- “SHAMROCK, may I help you?”
(16) NRI OP --- “Give me SHAMROCK 114 please.”
(17) SBO --- SHAMROCK connects plug from 134 to 114 and
rings.
(18) TS --- “SHAMROCK 114 may I help you?”
(19) NRI OP --- “This is SHAMROCK 134. I have your call
completed. Your call sign is W6T71. You will be speaking to W6T46.
Use strict radiotelephone procedure at all times. Do you have any
questions?’
(20) TS --- (yes or no. If any questions ask.)
(21) NRI OP --- (If there are questions answer them and ask “are
there any other questions?” When the TS answers “no,” continue
call.)
(22) NRI OP --- “Wait 5 seconds then go ahead with your call.”
(Switch FUNCTION switch to radio T.)
(23) TS --- “W6T46 this is W6T71 over.”
(24) DS --- “W6T71 this is W6T46 over.”
(25) TS --- “W6T46 this is W6T71 roger out.”
(WHEN CALL IS COMPLETED, NRI OPERATOR RINGS OFF
SWITCHBOARD.)
b. Calls originating from a radio station.
(1) DS --- “W6T81 this is W6T46 over.”
(2) NRI OP --- “W6T46 this is W6T81 over.”
(3) DS --- “W6T81 this is W6T46 I would like to speak with
W6T71 over”.
(4) NRI --- “W6T46 this is W6T81 stand by out.”
(5) NRI OP switches FUNCTION switch to TELEPHONE R
and rings switchboard.
5-53
FM 24-19
(6) SBO --- “SHAMROCK, may I help you?”
(7) NRI OP -- “Give me SHAMROCK 114 please.”
(8) SBO --- Connects plug from 134 to 114 and rings.
(9) TS --- “SHAMROCK 114 may I help you?”
(10) NRI OP --- “This is SHAMROCK 134. Standby for an NRI
call from SHAMROCK 106. Your call sign is W6T71. You will be
speaking to W6T46. Use strict radiotelephone procedure at all
times. Do you have any questions? Standby please.”
(11) NRI OP --- If no questions switch FUNCTION switch to
RADIO T.
(12) NRI OP --- “W6T46 this is W6T81 over.”
(13) DS --- “W6T81 this is W6T46 over.”
(14) NRI OP --- “W6T46 this is W6T81 I have your call completed.
Go ahead with your call.”
(15) DS --- “W6T71 this is W6T46 over.”
(16) TS --- “W6T46 this is W6T71 over.”
(17) DS --- “W6T71 this is W6T46 out.”
(WHEN CALL IS COMPLETED, NRI OPERATOR RINGS OFF
SWITCHBOARD.)
5-54
FM
24-19
Section V. Operator Number Sheet and Circuit Log
Operator Number Sheet
5-55
FM 24-19
NOTE: A mistake will not be erased. A horizontal line will be
drawn through the incorrect entry and the number that precedes
the corresponding number in the next series of numbers. A
vertical line will then be drawn down the center of the column
between the horizontal lines and the operator will initial through
it. The corrected entry will be entered on the line that corresponds
to the number on which the incorrect entry was made. (See
Figure 5-2.)
5-56
FM
24-19
Operator Number Sheet and Circuit Log
Circuit Log
5-57
FM 24-19
5-58
FM 24-19
5-59
FM 24-19
Section VI. Electronic Warfare
Jamming
a. Spark jamming. Simplest and most easily produced of all
jamming signals. To the operator, it sounds like a loud burst of noise
of short duration and high intensity, usually repeated at a rapid
rate. Because of the rapid repetition and time required for the
receiver, earphones, and human ear to recover from the loud burst of
noise, the spark jamming signal is very efficient.
b. Random noise jamming. Most effective and dangerous type of
communications jamming, because the operator may mistake it for
receiver or atmospheric noise and fail to report it. This jamming
sounds like normal interference that is heard when the gain of the
receiver is turned up high and the receiver is not tuned to a signal.
c. Sweep-through jamming. A signal that is swept back and
forth across a frequency band at a relatively rapid rate. At low
speeds, sweep-through jqvming sounds like an outboard motor,
and at high speeds it sounds like a piston aircraft engine.
d. Stepped tones jamming. Produced by three to five audio tones
transmitted in a repeated increasing and a decreasing pitch. These
tones sound like a Scottish bagpipe.
e. Random-keyed CW jamming. An unmodulated carrier used
against radio facsimile and C W circuits. Automated equipment
cannot distinguish the random dote and dashes from the desired
message, and CW operators may even find it difficult or impossible
to read.
f. Keyed CW jamming. Actual Morse code characters used primarily against radiotelegraph receiver which cannot distinguish
between the jammed and the desired signal.
g. Beat tones jamming. Notes with continuous or varying pitch
producing a howling sound. A loud, continuous, high-pitched CW
tone is very disruptive on voice circuits and can also be very
irritating to a radio operator.
5-60
FM 24-19
h. Babbled-voice jamming. One form, called cocktail party,
sounds like a crowd of people all talking at the same time. If the
jamming signal’s strength is greater than the desired message, it
makes reception very difficult.
i. Recorded music jamming. May also be used to jam voice
signals. This type of jamming may appear to be an ordinary
broadcast being received on a harmonic to conceal the fact that it is
deliberate.
Electronic Warfare
Implementing ECCM Procedures
1. Disconnect the receiving antenna to ensure the interference is
coming from an external source. Electrical generators, overhead
power lines and friendly equipment located nearby should be
studied as possible causes of interference.
2. Follow antijamming (ECCM) measures:
a. Notify your immediate supervisor of suspected jamming. DO
NOT INDICATE THAT YOU ARE BEING JAMMED OVER THE
RADIO.
b. Reduce transmission speed (CW).
c. Remain calm and continue to operate.
d. Observe radio/net discipline.
e. Adjust fine tuning, gain (or volume) control, bandwidth
selector, crystal filter and/or other controls peculiar to the equipment being used.
f. Increase transmitter power.
g. Reorient or resite your antenna or change antenna polarization.
h. Impose obstacles between your station antenna and the
source of the jamming signals.
5-61
FM 24-19
Electronic Warfare
MIJI Reporting
The radio operator must report all interference, whether jamming or natural interference, immediately to his communications
supervisor. Any attempted or successful enemy deception should be
reported immediately. The communications supervisor will send
the report to higher headquarters for action. Jamming information
should be recorded on the circuit log sheet to facilitate reporting.
Information on jamming should be reported in the following
format:
a. Initial MIJIFEEDER report. This is an abbreviated report
containing only those items of information necessary to inform
headquarters of the incident. The MIJIFEEDER report is
submitted using the USMTF (JINTACCS) voice template (Figures
5-4 and 5-5). The MIJI report should be forwarded using the most
secure means available. When transmitted over a nonsecure net,
the report must be encrypted before transmittal.
(1) Line 1- Unit Identification.
(2) Line 2- Type of Interference.
(3) Line 3- Location (Latitude/Longitude or UTM (Grid
Coordinates)).
(4) Line 4- Start Day-Time-Zone.
(5) Line 5- End Day-Time-Zone.
(6) Line 6- Operations/Equipment Affected.
(7) Line 7- Frequency/Frequency Range.
(8) Line 8- Narrative.
(9) Line 9- Message Hour-Minute-Zone (When Required).
(10) Line 10- Message Authentication IAW JTF Procedures.
5-62
FM 24-19
b. The MIJIFEEDER record message report (MFRMR). This is a
complete report of all the details of the incident. Due to the number
of items that must be encrypted when the report is transmitted over
a nonsecure circuit, the report should be delivered by messenger
whenever possible. Either the operations officer, intelligence
officer, or the electronic warfare officer is responsible for ensuring
that a complete message report of the incident is submitted to the
Joint Electronic Warfare Center (JEWC) as soon as possible following the incident.
c. Reference material. Refer to AR 105-3, FM 24-33, and FM
24-35-1 for a more detailed treatment of MIJIFEEDER and
MIJIFEEDER record message reports.
5-63
FM 24-19
5-64
FM 24-19
5-65
FM 24-19
Section VII. Using the SOI
Encode and Decode Messages Using KTC-600
Tactical Operations Code
1. Encode messages (refer to SOI and KTC-600).
a. Write messages in plain text.
b. Turn to set page and locate set number for effective day.
c. Turn to encode page for effective set.
d. Locate word or phrase to be encoded.
NOTE: Words and phrases located alphabetically.
e. Identify the three letter code group located to left of word or
phrase.
f. Write code group under applicable word or phrase until
message is encoded.
2. Decode messages (refer to SOI and KTC-600).
a. Write down encoded messages.
b. Turn to decode page in effect for that day.
c. Locate code groups and write the word or phrase beneath
applicable group.
Using the SOI
Encrypt/Decrypt Numbers and Grid Zones
For detailed instructions on encrypting/decrypting, see SOI
KAV 1600 Supplement 2.
5-66
FM 24-19
Using the SOI
Authentication Using KTC-1400D
NOTE: If first letter of the challenge is Y indicating last line of
table, the reply is taken from the same column of the A line.
Section VIII. World Time Zone Conversion Chart
a. A time conversion chart is used to convert local time in one
zone to local time in any other zone. To construct your own time
conversion chart, print the letter Z (Zulu), in the center of the next
page in the space provided. However, any blank sheet of paper may
be used for constructing your time conversion chart. To the right of
the letter Z (Zulu), print the letters A (Alpha) through M (Mike),
leaving out the letter J (Juliett). To the left of the letter Z (ZUIU), print
the letters N (November) through Y (Yankee). You now have the 25
time zone suffix letters in the order in which they represent the 25
world time zones. An easy rule to follow in constructing your own
time conversion chart is: NZA (the three letters that appear in the
center of your paper) and leave out the J (the letter of the alphabet
that is not used). Just remember this simple rule: NZA AND
LEAVE OUT THE J.
5-67
FM 24-19
b. When using your time conversion chart, there are two easy
rules to follow: First, you NEVER count the time zone in which you
are located. Second, you add 1 hour for each time zone crossed when
moving to your right, and you subtract 1 hour for each time zone
crossed when moving to your left. In more simple terms, ADD when
going to the RIGHT and SUBTRACT when going to the LEFT. For
example, if you were stationed in C (Charlie) time zone and needed
to convert to Z (Zulu) time, you would start with the letter C. Do not
count the C for this is the zone in which you are stationed. Then
count the B, A and Z zones to your left (three) and subtract 3 hours
from your local time, and the result will be GCT or Z (ZUIU) time. (See
Figure 5-6.)
Section IX. United States Message Text Format
a. The USMTF (JINTACCS) Program provides a series of standard message formats for six discrete mission area segments. These
segments are operations control, fire support air operations,
intelligence, maritime operations, and combat service support. The
major USMTF (JINTACCS) product line consists of the following:
Standardized voice message text formats.
Standardized record MTFs.
Standardized tactical digital information link message
formats.
Standardized interface operating procedures.
Central data base system.
b. Voice messages are designed for ease of preparation and
transmission. Operators fill in the appropriate blanks on the
appropriate message template and then read the message over the
radio or telephone. The receiver, knowing the format, can easily
record the information. Voice messages are normally used when
record traffic devices are inoperative or not available, or when the
tactical situation does not allow adequate time for operators to
format a record message.
5-68
FM 24-19
5-69
FM 24-19
5-70
FM 24-19
c. Record messages are designed to be processed and transmitted by teletype, subscriber terminals, or computer terminals
devices. Figure 5-7 shows a sample joint message form. They can be
read manually and are machine (computer) processed. Machine
processibility is an important characteristic of the
USMTF (JINTACCS) record message because it minimizes human
intervention.
5-71
FM 24-19
5-72
FM 24-19
5-73
FM 24-19
Glossary
Acronyms and Abbreviations
AC
alternating current
adj
adjust
AF
audio frequency
AFC
automatic frequency control
AGC
automatic gain control
ALC
automatic level control
AM
amplitude modulated
amp
ampere
ant
antenna
ASAP
as soon as possible
aud
audio
auto
automatic
aux
auxiliary
bal
balance
bat
battery
bde
brigade
BFO
beat frequency oscillator
bkr
breaker
blo/blwr
blower
bn
battalion
BNC
British National Council (connector)
Glossary-0
FM 24-19
c
celsius
cal
calibrate/calibration
car
carriage
ck
check
cdr
commander
clr
clear
CNV
cryptonet variable
C O
carry operated
COMSEC
communications security
conn
connection
conv
converter
cplr
coupler
cur
current
CVC
combat vehicle crewman
CW
continuous wave
DAMA
demand-assigned multiple access
D C
direct current
del
delete
div
division
DIVARTY
division artillery
DLED
dedicated loop encryption device
D S
distant radio station
d x
direct exchange
ea
each
Glossary-1
FM 24-19
ECCM
electronic counter-countermeasures
EPC
equipment performance check
ext
external
F
Fahrenheit
fil
filter
FM
frequency modulated
freq
frequency
FSK
frequency shift keying
ft
feet
fwd
forward
gen
generator
gnd
ground
HAEMP
high altitude electromagnetic pulse-protected
HCM
higher category of maintenance
HF
high frequency
HV
high voltage
Hz
hertz
IAW
in accordance with
ICT
intelligence communications terminal
IF
intermediate frequency
IHFR
improved high frequency radio
inf
infantry
info
information
int
internal
Glossary-2
FM 24-19
inv
inverter
JEWC
Joint Electronic Warfare Center
JINTACCAS
Joint Interoperability of Tactical Command and
Control System
JTF
joint task force
kb/s
kilobits per second
kHz
kilohertz
kc
kilocycle
kW
kilowatt
lat
latitude
LB
lower band
ld
load
LO
low level operation
long
longitude
LSB
lower sideband
ltrs
letters
m
mile
MA
milliampere
max
maximum
MFRMR
MIJIFEEDER record message report
MHz
megahertz
mic
microphone
MIJI
meaconing, intrusion, jamming, and interference
min
minute
mon
monitor
Glossary-3
FM 24-19
MTF
message text format
norm
normal
NCS
net control station
NRI
net radio interface
NRZ
nonreturn to zero
NSK
narrow shift keying
NVIS
near vertical incidence sky wave (Antenna AS-2259)
op
operator
OWR
one way reversible
PA
power amplifier
ph
phase
PMCS
preventive maintenance checks and services
prim
primary
prosign
procedure sign
proword
procedure word
psi
per square inch
PTT
push-to-talk
pwr
power
qty
quantity
rad
radio
RATT
radio teletypewriter
RCU
remote control unit
rdy
ready
rec/rcv
receive
Glossary-4
FM 24-19
recp
receptacle
rcvr
receiver
rem
remote
ret
return
retrans
retransmission
RF
radio frequency
RPM
revolutions per minute
RT
receiver/transmitter
RTO
radiotelephone operator
SB
sideband
SBO
switchboard operator
SCOTT
single-channel objective tactical terminal
sec
seconds
sel
selector
sens
sensitivity
sig
signal
SINCGARS
Single-Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System
SOI
signal operation instructions (S0I is synonymous
with CEOI)
SOP
standing operating procedure
spkr
speaker
SSB
single sideband
sub
subscriber/substation
sup
support
Glossary-5
FM 24-19
sw
switch
swbd
switchboard
SWR
standing wave ratio
TD
transmitter distributor
tel
telephone
TM
technical manual
TDMA
time-division multiple access
T R A N S E C transmission security
TS
telephone subscriber
TTY
teletypewriter
tun
tune
UCID
user controlled interface device
unclas
unclassified
USB
upper sideband
UTM
Universal Transverse Mercator
USMTF
United States Message Text Format
Glossary-6
FM 24-19
v
volt
VFO
voice frequency oscillator
VHF
very high frequency
vis
visual
VOX
voice operated keying
VSWR
voltage standing wave ratio
WPM
words per minute
xmt/xmit/
tr
transmit
xtal
crystal
ZRO
zero
Glossary-7
FM 24-19
References
Related Publications
Related publications are sources of additional information. They
are not required in order to understand this publication.
Allied Communications Publications (ACP)
121(F)
US SUPP-1
(C) Communication Instructions - General (U)
124(D)
Communication Instructions - Radiotelegraph Procedures
125(D)
Communication Instructions - Radiotelephone Procedures
126(C)
Communication Instructions - Teletypewriter (Teleprinter)
Procedures
131(D)
Communication Instructions - Operating Signals
Army Regulations (AR)
105-3
Reporting Meaconing, Intrusion, Jamming and Interference of
Electromagnetic Systems
Department of Army Pamphlets (DA PAM)
25-7
Joint User Handbook for Message Text Formats (JUH-MTF)
Field Manuals (FM)
24-18
Tactical Single-Channel Radio Communications Techniques
24-33
Communications Techniques: Electronic CounterCountermeasures
Reference-0
FM 24-19
24-35-1
Signal Supplemental Instructions
Forms
DA Form
2404
Equipment Inspection and Maintenance Worksheet
DD Form
173/4
Joint Message Form
Technical Bulletins (TB)
43-0125
Installation of Communications-Electronic Equipment Hookup of Electrical Cables to Mobile Generator Sets on Fielded
Equipment to Meet Electrical Safety Standards
Training Circulars (TC)
11-6
Grounding Techniques
Technical Manuals (TM)
11-5805-201-12
Operator’s and Organizational Maintenance Manual for Telephone Set, TA-312/PT and TA-312A/PT
11-5805-387-15-1
Operator’s, Organizational, Direct Support, General Support,
and Depot Maintenance Manual: Modem, Radio Teletypewriter
MD-522\GRC
11-5805-387-15-2
Operator’s, Organizational, Direct Support, General Support,
and Depot Maintenance Manual: Radio Teletypewriter Modem,
MD-522A/GRC
Reference-1
FM 24-19
11-5815-200-12
Operator’s and Organizational Maintenance Manual:
Teletypewriter Sets, AN/FGC-20, AN/FGC-20X, AN/FGC-21,
AN/FGC-66, AN/FGC-159 and AN/FGC-159X, AN/FGC-160,
AN/FGC-177, AN/UGC-4, AN/UGC-29, AN/UGC-29X and
Teleprinter, TT-259/FG
11-5815-204-10
Operator’s Manual: Radio Teletypewriter Sets, AN/GRC-46
and AN/GRC-46A, AN/GRC-46B, AN/GRC-46C and AN/
VRC-29
11-5815-238-10
Operator’s Manual for Teletypewriter Sets, AN/GGC-3,
AN/GGC-3A, AN/GGC-53, AN/GGC-53A, and Teletypewriter
Reperforator-Transmitters, TT-76/GGC, TT-76A/GGC,
TT-76B/GGC and TT-76C/GGC, TT-699/GGC, TT-699A/GGC,
TT-699B/GGC and TT-699C/GGC
11-5815-331-14
Operator’s, Organizational, Direct Support, and General
Support Maintenance Manual: Radio Teletypewriter Set
AN/VSC-2 and AN/VSC-2A
11-5815-332-15
Operator’s, Organizational, Direct Support, General Support,
and Depot Maintenance Manual: Radio Teletypewriter Set,
AN/VSC-3
11-5815-334-10
Operator’s Manual for Radio Teletypewriter Sets, AN/GRC-122,
AN/GRC-122A, AN/GRC-122B, AN/GRC-122C, AN/GRC122D, AN/GRC-122E, AN/GRC-142, AN/GRC-142A, AN/GRC142B, AN/GRC-142C, AN/GRC-142D and AN/GRC-142E
11-5815-602-10
Operator’s Manual for Terminal, Communications, AN/
UGC-74A(V)3
Reference-2
FM 24-19
11-5815-616-13
Operator’s Organizational and Direct Support Maintenance
Manual Installation Kit, Electronics Equipment MK-2488/G
11-5820-489-10
Operator’s Manual for Control Group, AN/GRA-6
11-5820-489-34
Direct Support and General Support Maintenance Manual,
Control Group AN/GRA-6
11-5820-520-10
Operator’s Manual for Radio Sets, AN/GRC-106 and AN/
GRC-106A
11-5820-520-20
Organizational Maintenance Manual for Radio Sets, AN/GRC106 and AN/GRC-106A
11-5820-919-12
Operator’s and Organizational Maintenance Manual for Radio
Set, AN/PRC-104A
11-5820-923-12
Operator’s and Organizational Maintenance Manual for Radio
Set, AN/GRC-213
11-5820-924-13
Operator’s, Organizational and Direct Support Maintenance
Manual for Radio Set, AN/GRC-193A
11-5985-357-13
Operator’s, Organizational, and Direct Support Maintenance
Manual for Antenna Group, OE-254/GRC
Reference-3
FM 24-19
24 MAY 1991
By Order of the Secretary of the Army:
CARL E. VUONO
General, United States Army
Chief of Staff
Official:
PATRICIA P. HICKERSON
Colonel, United States Army
The Adjutant General
DISTRIBUTION:
Active Army, USAR, and ARNG: To be distributed in accordance with DA Form 12-11E, requirements for FM
24-19, Radio Operator’s Handbook (Qty rqr block no.
1343).
✩ U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1994 0 - 300-421 (82875)
PIN: 033195-000
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