Armstrong Steam Trap Inverted Bucket Service Guide

Armstrong Steam Trap Inverted Bucket Service Guide
Bulletin 301-M
SERVICE
GUIDE
Armstrong
Inverted Bucket
Steam Traps
A
B
T
T
D
C
Font C
A21755
Table of Contents
Trap Priming_ _______________________________ 2
Installation________________________________ 3-8
Testing__________________________________ 9-10
Inspection & Repair_______________________ 10-14
Trouble Shooting_________________________ 14-18
Optional Accessories______________________ 18-20
Trap Repairs & Change of Operating Pressure_ 20-22
Ordering Repair Parts________________________ 23
Parts Identification___________________________ 24
Orifices & Valves_ ______________________ 24-25
Mechanisms______________________________ 25
Buckets__________________________________ 26
Bodies, Caps, Gaskets______________________ 27
Inlet Tubes_ ______________________________ 28
Definitions_________________________________ 29
Steam Tables_ __________________________ 30-31
Flash Steam_ ___________________________ 31-32
Schedule 40 Pipe Dimensions_ ________________ 33
Recommendations___________________________ 34
Trap Application Assistance_ __________________ 36
Trap Priming
All Inverted Bucket Steam Traps are basically selfpriming on initial start-up and should require no further
priming. Normally, on a cold start-up of the equipment
being trapped, enough condensate reaches the steam
trap body to create the necessary water seal (prime)
before steam reaches it.
Failure to establish this water seal prime results in
live steam loss through the trap. In the rare instance
that the trap fails to initially prime itself turn the steam
off to the trap, wait 5 minutes and then turn the steam
slowly back on. Condensate will collect behind the
closed valve during the shut-off period. Slowly opening
this valve will assure that condensate reaches the
trap body before steam, thus priming the steam
trap. All inverted bucket air traps must be primed
before starting.
Designs and materials are subject to change without notice.
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Installation of
Inverted Bucket Traps
Before Installing
Run pipe to trap. Before installing the trap, clean the
line by blowing down at full steam pressure. (Clean
any strainer screens after this blow-down.)
Trap Location
1.Make the trap easily accessible for inspection and
repair.
2.Install the trap below the drip point whenever possible.
3.Install the trap close to the drip point.
Trap Hookups. For low and medium pressure service,
see Figs. 3-1 through 6-1. Follow the Power Piping
Code for Drips and Drains when installing high pressure
traps.
Test Valve
Plug
Union
Dirt Pocket
Check
Valve
Shut-Off
Valve
Shut-Off
Valve
Fig. 3-1. Standard hookup No. 800-816, 800-883
traps, with shut-off valves to isolate trap during
testing, inspection or repair. Unions should be at
right angles­–not in-line–to facilitate trap removal.
Fig. 3-3. Alternate hookup
for No. 800-816 with inlet at
bottom.
Built-in
Strainer
Fig. 3-2. Hookup No. 211-216 traps.
Strainer
Blow-Off
Valve
Fig. 3-4. No. 880-883 with strainer
blow-down valve.
Fig. 3-2
A21723
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3
Condensate
Return Line
TVS 4000
w/No. 2010 Series
Stainless Steel Trap
Tracer Line
Connection
Vertical
Manifold
Fig. 4-1 Hookup for vertical manifold.
Drip Leg
1810 Trap
1000
Trap
Valve
1800 Trap
Fig. 4-2. Hookup for No. 1800 Series Stainless Steel trap.
Fig. 4-3. Hookup for No. 1000
Series Stainless Steel trap.
Shut-Off Valves ahead of traps are needed when
traps drain steam mains, large water heaters, etc.,
where system cannot be shut down for trap maintenance. They are not needed for small steam heated
machines – laundry presses, for example. Shut-off
valve in steam supply to machine is sufficient.
Shut-off valve in trap discharge line is needed when
trap has a bypass. It is also a good idea when there is
high pressure in the discharge header.
Bypasses (Figs. 5-1 and 5-2). Bypasses are
discouraged, for if left open, they will defeat the
function of the trap. They are shown here for
reference only. If continuous service is absolutely
required, use two traps in parallel, one as a primary,
one as a standby.
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Valve
Valve
Valve
Fig. 5-1. Bypass hookups for No.
800-816 and 880-883 traps.
Fig. 5-2. Bypass hookup
forFig.
No.5-1211-216 traps.
A21729
Dirt Pocket
Unions. If only one is used, it should be on discharge
side of trap. With two unions, avoid horizontal or vertical
in-line installations. The best practice is to install at right
angles as in Figs. 3-1 and 5-1 or parallel as in Fig.
5-2.
Standard Connections. Servicing is simplified by
keeping lengths of inlet and outlet nipples identical for traps of a given size and type. A spare trap
with identical fittings and half unions can be kept in
the storeroom. In the event a trap needs repair it is
a simple matter to break the two unions, remove the
trap, put in the spare and tighten the unions. Repairs
can then be made in the shop and the repaired trap,
with fittings and half unions, placed back in stock.
Test Valves (Fig. 3-1) provide the best means of
checking trap operation. Provide a shut-off valve or a
3-way valve in the discharge line to isolate trap while
testing. For best results, use a valve the same line
size as the test port and use a fully ported valve.
Strainers. Install strainers ahead of small traps when
dirt conditions are bad or where specified. They are
seldom needed with larger size traps.
Traps No. 880-883 have built-in strainers. When
strainer blow-down valve is used, shut off steam
supply valve before opening strainer blow-down
valve. Condensate in trap body will flash back through
strainer screen for thorough cleaning. Open steam
valve slowly to be sure trap regains its prime.
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5
Dirt Pockets (Figs. 3-1 and 5-2) are excellent for
stopping scale and core sand. Clean periodically.
Syphon Installations require a water seal and a
check valve in the trap. Syphon pipe should be one
size smaller than nominal size of trap used but not
less than 1/2” pipe size.
A
Unit
X
C
Internal
Check Valve
Water Seal
B
D
Check Valve
Fig. 6-2. Possible check
valve locations, A, B, C & D.
Fig. 6-1. Trap draining syphon.
Elevating Condensate. Do not over-size the vertical
riser. In fact, one pipe size smaller than normal for the
job will give excellent results. Pipe size should not be
less than 1/2”.
Check Valves prevent backflow of condensate into a
heat exchanger when the control valve closes or the
steam supply is manually shut off.
Discharge Line Check Valves are normally installed at
location B, Fig. 6-2. When the return is elevated and
the trap is exposed to freezing conditions, install the
check valve at location A, Fig. 6-2.
Inlet Line Check Valves prevent loss of water seal
(trap prime) if pressure should drop suddenly or if
trap is above drip point. An Armstrong Stainless
Steel Check Valve in the trap’s body is
recommended. (See location D, Fig. 6-2. Also see
pages 19 and 20.) If swing check valve is used, install
at location C, Fig. 6-2.
Anti-Freeze Precautions
1. Do not over-size steam trap.
2. Keep discharge line very short.
3. Pitch discharge line down for fast gravity drainage.
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4. For maximum freeze protection utilize all stainless
steel 1800, 1000 or 2000 Series traps in a vertical
or horizontal manifolded condensate return system.
NOTE: A long horizontal discharge line invites trouble.
Ice can form at the far end eventually sealing off the
pipe. This prevents the trap from operating. No more
steam can enter the trap, and the water in the trap
body freezes.
Discharge to a return line.
1. Keep discharge line short with a sharp pitch to
header.
2. If return line is overhead, run vertical discharge line
adjacent to drain line to top of return header and
insulate drain line and trap discharge line together.
See Fig. 7-2.
Fig. 7-1. Traps installed with short, well-pitched
discharge lines to prevent freeze-ups. The 1800,
1000 and 2000 Series traps also offer resistance to
freeze-ups.
A
Fig. 7-2. Outdoor installation to permit ground level trap testing and maintenance
when steam supply and return lines are high overhead. Drain line and trap discharge
line are insulated together to prevent freezing. Note location of check valve in discharge line and blow-down valve A that drains the steam main when trap is opened
for cleaning or repair.
Protection Against Freezing. In general, a properly
selected and installed Armstrong Trap will not
freeze as long as steam is coming to the trap. If the
steam supply should be shut off, the trap should
be drained manually or automatically by means
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7
of a Pop Drain. Note: Pop Drains discharge hot
condensate. Be sure this ­discharge does not present a
personnel hazard.
Pop Drains close when increasing line pressure seats
ball valve against the resistance of a stainless steel
spring. They open when decreasing line pressure
allows the spring to push the ball valve off its seat.
Fig. No.
Connection
Pressure
Range
Max. Operating
Temperature
Seat
Type
Opens
Closes
8-4
1/2”
15-600 psi
350°F
“O” Ring
4 psi
6 psi
8-4
3/4”
15-600 psi
350°F
“O” Ring
4 psi
6 psi
Note: Pop Drains may not be used with
inlet tube or check valve. Do not use
Pop Drains in locations where normal
operating pressure could drop below 15
psig.
8
Fig. 8-1.
One Piece
Stainless Steel
Pop Drain
One Piece
Stainless Steel
Pop Drain
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Testing Armstrong Traps
For maximum trap life and steam economy, a regular
schedule should be set up for trap testing and preventive maintenance. Trap size, operating pressure and
importance determine how frequently traps should be
checked.
Operating
Pressure (psig)
0-100
101-250
251-450
451 and above
Suggested Yearly Trap Testing Frequency
Application
Drip
Tracer
Coil
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
4
Process
3
3
4
12
How To Test
Test Valve Method is best. Fig. 3-1 shows correct
hookup, with shut-off valve in return line to isolate trap
from return header.
Here is what to look for when test valve is open.
a.Intermittent discharge–trap is okay.
b.“Flash” steam–do not mistake this for a steam
leak through the trap valve. Condensate under
pressure holds more heat units–btu’s–per pound
than condensate at atmospheric pressure. When
condensate is discharged, these extra heat units
re-evaporate some of the condensate. See page
30.
c.Dribble or semi-continuous discharge–trap is
okay. This type of discharge is caused by air mixed
with steam or a light condensate load.
d.Continuous steam blow­–trouble. Refer to page 16.
e.Continuous condensate flow–trouble. Refer to
page 17.
f. No Flow–­possible trouble. Refer to page 15 Cold
Trap–or page 16 Hot Trap.
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Pyrometer Method of Testing. This method of
testing is still used today, however current research
has shown that information from this method is not as
valid as the ultrasonic stethoscope.
Listening Method of Testing. The ultrasonic
stethoscope is the most accurate and up-to-date
device available for testing traps today. An ultrasonic
stethoscope can be used to listen to the outlet of the
trap and “hear” the flow. It should be remembered
that an ultrasonic stethoscope helps detect the need
for quick preventive maintenance.
Inverted Bucket Air Trap Operation. There is an
intermittent air loss through an inverted bucket trap
draining water from compressed air. This is the air
that passes through the small vent in the top of the
bucket and amounts to approximately 10 cu. ft. of
free air per hour. When the trap has a lot of water to
handle, the air loss is materially reduced. All inverted
bucket air traps must be primed before starting
service on an air system.
Inspection and Repair
Frequency: All repairable traps should be opened at
least once a year to check the operating mechanism.
Valves and Seats. If the valve seat has a sharp
smooth edge, and if there is a narrow bright ring all
the way around the ball valve, chances are that the
valve is tight. Valves and seats which have become
wire drawn or badly grooved from wear should be
replaced. Do not use a new seat with an old valve
or vice versa. Valves and seats are factory-lapped
together in matched sets for perfect fit.
Years of experience have proved that when
valves and seats have worn enough to require
renewal, a new lever and guide pin assembly
should also be installed to get maximum
performance from the new valve parts.
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Valve Seat Installation. When installing valve seats
in Armstrong traps, do NOT use any pipe dope or
lubricant of any kind on the seat threads. The
joint is made, not by the threads, but rather by the
contact between the ground end of the valve seat and
the beveled seating area at the bottom of the tapped
hole. See Fig. 10-1. Make sure that this seating area
is perfectly clean.
Metal to Metal
Joint Made Here
Fig. 10-1. Important! Valve seat seal is made at
point of contact indicated, not by threads. Be sure
to read paragraph above.
Replace Lever and Guide Pin Assembly. When new
valve parts are used with an old lever, bucket travel,
valve opening and trap capacity are reduced. With
used and worn guide pins, the valve is not guided
as closely to its seat. Poor guidance develops leaks
quickly because the valve can strike the side of the
seat instead of the center.
When you install a new mechanism less bucket or
a pressure change assembly, you make the trap as
good as new.
Alignment of Guide Pins. To check the alignment
of the guide pins, hold the lever assembly against
the valve seat with the valve contacting its seat, and
the two fulcrum points resting on the face of the seat.
When the lever is held in this position, the guide pins
should be central in the guide pin holes. See Fig.
12-1. There should be equal side-to-side movement of
lever as shown in Fig. 12-2 and Fig. 12-3. It is a very
simple matter to bend the pins until they are centrally
located. Care should be taken so that the pins will
remain perpendicular to the guide pin plate so that the
lever can drop until it rests on the guide pin hooks.
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Lever
Guide Pin
Valve
Fulcrum
Seat
Fig. 12-1
Fig. 12-2
Fig. 12-3
Fig. 12-4
Fig. 12-5
Fig. 12-1 shows CORRECT ALIGNMENT of guide pins. When correctly aligned, lever
can be moved sideways the same distance to the right (Fig. 12-2) as to the left (Fig.
12-3).
Figs. 12-4 & 12-5 show two examples of INCORRECT ALIGNMENT. Guide pins
should be bent in direction of arrows until they center in holes as shown in Fig. 12-1.
Guide Pin Assembly Installation. Install with guide
pins pointing away from the adjoining gasket surfaces
as shown in Fig. 12-6.
The Lever Assembly is hooked over the guide
pins. In a few sizes of traps, particularly at low
pressures, the valve lever assembly must be slipped
on the guide pins before the guide pin assembly is
fastened into position.
Buckets. Cracked or corroded buckets should be
replaced.
Gasket
Surface
Gasket
Surface
Gasket
Surface
Gasket
Surface
No. 214, 215, 216
No. 314, and larger
No. 814, 815, 816
No. 211, 212, 213
No. 310, 312, 313
No. 411-G, 421, 800, 811,
812, 813, TVS811, TVS812, TVS813
No. 880, 881, 882, 883
Fig. 12-6. Guide Pin Plate Locations. Pins always point away from adjoining Gasket
Surfaces.
Thermic Buckets. Hold over a steam jet or lighted
match to see that disc seats properly when bi-metal
strip is heated.
Dirt in Trap. Remove all sediment and other dirt from
the trap body. The mechanism may require cleaning
by immersing in approved cleaning fluid. Series
1000, 1800 and 2000 Stainless Steel traps may be
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backflushed with compressed air or water under
pressure to clean them. If there is an exceptional
amount of dirt, install a strainer ahead of the trap. The
strainer will have to be blown down or cleaned every
3-6 months, or as conditions warrant.
By-Pass Valve Inspection. If traps are installed
with a by-pass, it is highly important that the by-pass
valve be checked to make sure it is perfectly steam
tight. If the trap can be operated without the by-pass,
by all means remove it. Avoid the practice of opening
by-pass valves and leaving them open.
Internal Check Valve Installation. Since November,
1946, all Armstrong trap bodies have been tapped
on the inside to take Armstrong spring-loaded check
valves. To install one of these check valves after a
trap has been installed in the line, simply remove the
trap cap and the extended inlet tube from the body
and screw the check valve in position, or replace the
inlet tube with a check valve, tube and coupling. This
does not apply to Series 1800, 1000 or 2000
Stainless Steel traps.
Check Valve Inspection. Make sure that check
valves ahead of traps, in traps, or in return lines, are
tight and in good condition.
Pressure Changes. An Armstrong Steam Trap will
operate at any pressure lower than the maximum for
which it is furnished. The maximum pressure depends
upon the diameter of the discharge orifice used in each
size of trap. If it is necessary to change the working
pressure of the trap to obtain greater capacity at lower
pressures, or to enable the trap to work at higher
pressures, a complete pressure change assembly
(PCA) is required. This applies to all Armstrong inverted
bucket traps except the Series 1800, 2000 and 1000
Stainless Steel traps where the complete trap needs to
be replaced. The pressure change assembly (PCA)
­consists of a valve seat, a valve retainer, a valve lever
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13
with valve, guide pin assembly and (2) two screws. The
diameter of the valve seat is stamped on the face of
the seat itself, on the valve lever, and on the guide
pin assembly. Parts having different stampings should
never be used together.
A valve lever and guide pin assembly are matched
with the valve and seat to obtain the maximum
possible leverage and trap capacity. At low pressure
a low leverage is necessary to obtain full opening of
the large orifice. As the orifice size decreases, less
valve travel is required, hence, higher leverages can
be employed. Because of this highly efficient leverage
system, it is usually possible to handle a given job
with an Armstrong Trap having pipe connections one
size smaller than those of other makers.
Fig. 14-1. Diameter of orifice is stamped on valve parts.
How to Order Repair Parts. For all operating
mechanism parts, specify trap number and maximum
operating pressure or orifice size. For gaskets, specify
trap model number. For body and cap, specify trap
model number and size of pipe connections.
Trouble Shooting
The following summary will prove helpful in locating
and correcting nearly all steam trap troubles. Many
of these troubles are in reality system troubles rather
than trap troubles.
Whenever a trap fails to operate and the reason
is not readily apparent, the discharge from the trap
should be observed. If the trap is installed with a test
outlet, this will be a simple matter–otherwise, it will be
necessary to break the discharge connection.
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Cold Trap – No Discharge. If trap fails to discharge
condensate, then:
A. Pressure may be too high.
1. Wrong pressure originally specified.
2. Pressure raised without installing new pressure
change assembly (PCA).
3. P.R.V. out of order.
4. Pressure gage in boiler reads low.
5. Orifice enlarged by normal wear.
B. No water or steam coming to trap.
1. Stopped by plugged strainer ahead of trap – or
plugged screen in integral strainer traps.
2. Broken valve in line to trap.
3. Pipe line or elbows plugged.
C. Worn or defective mechanism. Repair or replace
as required.
D. High Vacuum in return line. Increases pressure
differential beyond which trap may operate. Install
correct pressure change assembly for pressure
differential encountered.
E. Trap body filled with dirt. Install strainer or remove
dirt at source.
F.
Bucket vent filled with dirt.
Prevent by:
1. Installing strainer.
2. Enlarging vent slightly.
3. Using bucket vent scrubbing wire.
Vent Scrubber. If the bucket vent could be closed by
an oil film, either enlarge the vent or install a scrubbing
wire. For vent enlargement, first try a No. 46 drill. If
this is not enough, then use a No. 42 drill. Make
scrubbing wire as shown in Fig. 16-1 to the length
shown in Table 16-1. The hole in the center rib of the
trap should be 5/32’’. Enlarge vent with No. 37 drill.
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Fig. 15-1. Vent scrubbing wire for
use when oil plugs vent. Trap inlet
tube must be removed.
5/32"
3/4"
1/4" R
Form to dotted
line after inserting
hole in rib.
A
.0625" Dia.
Table 15-1
Scrubbing Wire Dimension
Trap Model Number
800, 880
211, 310, 411-G, 421, 811, 881, 981
212, 312, 812, 882
213, 214, 215, 313, 314, 315, 413, 813, 814, 815, 883, 983
216, 316, 816
Length “A”
1Z\x’’
2Z\v’’
3’’
5’’
6Z\x’’
Hot Trap – No Discharge.
A. No water coming to trap.
1. Trap installed above leaky by-pass valve.
2. Broken or damaged syphon pipe in syphon
drained cylinder.
3. Vacuum in heat exchanger coils may prevent
drainage. Install a vacuum breaker between
the heat exchanger and the trap.
Steam Loss. If the trap blows live steam, trouble may
be due to any of the following causes:
A. Valve may fail to seat.
1. Piece of scale lodged in orifice.
2. Worn valve parts.
B. Trap may lose its prime.
1. If the trap is blowing live steam, close the
inlet valve for a few minutes. Then gradually
open. If the trap catches its prime, the chances
are that the trap is all right.
16
2. Prime loss is usually due to sudden or frequent
drops in steam pressure. On such jobs, the
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installation of a check valve is called for –
location D or C in Fig. 6-2. If possible locate
trap well below drip point.
Continuous Flow. If the trap discharges continuously, check the following:
A. Trap too small.
1. A larger trap, or additional traps in parallel
should be installed.
2. High pressure traps have been used for a
low pressure job. Install correct size pressure
change assembly (PCA).
B. Abnormal water conditions.
1. Boiler may foam or prime, throwing large
quantities of water into steam lines. A
separator should be installed or have the feed
water conditions remedied.
Sluggish Heating. When trap operates satisfactorily
but units fail to heat properly:
A. One or more units may be short-circuiting and the
remedy is to install a trap on each unit.
B. Traps may be too small for job even though they
may discharge intermittently. Try next-size-larger
trap.
C. Trap may have insufficient air-handling capacity,
or air may not be reaching trap. In either case,
use auxiliary air vents. Use of thermic buckets
may help. See page 18.
Mysterious Trouble. If trap operates satisfactorily when discharging to atmosphere, but trouble is
encountered when connected with the return line,
check the following:
A. Back Pressure may reduce capacity of trap.
1. Return line too small (trap hot).
2. Other traps may be blowing steam (trap hot).
3. Atmospheric vent in condensate receiver may
be plugged (trap hot or cold).
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17
4. Obstruction in return line (trap hot or cold).
5. Excess vacuum in return line (trap cold).
Imaginary Troubles. If it appears that steam escapes
every time trap discharges, remember: Hot condensate
forms flash steam when released to lower pressure,
but flash steam usually condenses quickly in the
return line.
Optional Accessories
Thermic Vent Buckets
Wherever steam is turned on and off, air will
accumulate in piping and steam equipment during the
off period. A trap with a thermic bucket will discharge
this air 50 to 100 times faster than a standard bucket,
reducing heat-up time remarkably. Thermic vent buckets
are available for Armstrong traps for use at pressures
up to 250 psig.
Where to Use: Single pipe coils; small on-and-off
unit heaters; on-and-off multiple coils; drip points
(particularly at ends of steam distribution mains);
wherever air will pocket and be discharged ahead of
incoming steam.
Installation. Before replacing a standard bucket
with a thermic vent bucket, be sure to remove the
inlet tube from the trap body. If this is not done, the
thermic element will become distorted and trap will not
work.
Fig. 18-1– Thermic bucket operation. At left, thermic vent is open and air “passes”
through. At right, thermic vent is closed and trap operates same as a standard trap.
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Internal Check Valves
When either of the following conditions
exists, check valves are needed
between the trap and the unit drained:
1.Trap is installed above unit being
drained.
Fig. 18-2.
Armstrong stainless
steel internal check
valve.
2.Where sudden pressure drops
may occur in the steam supply to
the unit being drained.
Armstrong spring loaded, stainless steel internal
check valves save fittings, labor and money when
check valves are required. Cast iron traps may use
the check valve screwed directly into the trap inlet
(Fig. 19-2) or into an extended inlet tube having a
pipe coupling at the top (Table 28-2). Trap No. 800T
and 880T cannot use internal check valves in either
manner. All other traps with numbers carrying a “T”
suffix can use only check valves screwed directly into
the trap inlet. Sizes are the same as those indicated
in Table 20-1 for traps without “T” suffixes. Steel traps
should employ the check valve, tube and coupling
combination.
Thermic
Vent
Internal
Check Valve
Fig. 19-2. Internal check
valve installed in trap inlet.
Internal
Check
Valve
Fig. 19-3. Internal check
valve installed in trap
inlet of 200 Series trap.
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19
Table 20-1 Check Valve Sizes To Use With Armstrong Traps
Trap Connection Size
Trap Model Number
1/2’’ 3/4’’
1’’ 1-1/4’’ 1-1/2’’
800, 880, 881, 812,
882, 212. 310, 981
1/2’’ 1/2’’
211
1/2’’
811, TVS811
1/2’’ 1/2’’ 1/2’’
TVS812
3/4’’ 3/4’’
312, 411-G
3/4’’ 3/4’’
213
1/2’’ 3/4’’ 3/4’’
813, TVS813
3/4’’ 3/4’’
883
3/4’’ 3/4’’ 3/4’’
313, 413
3/4’’ 3/4’’ 3/4’’
5133-G
3/4’’ 3/4’’
1’’
983
1’’
1’’
1’’
814, 214
1’’
1’’
314, 6155-G
1’’ 1-1/4’’
215, 315, 415
1’’ 1-1/4’’ 1-1/4’’
815
1-1/2’’
5155-G
1’’
1’’ 1-1/4’’
816
216, 316, 416
1-1/2’’
2’’
2-1/2’’
2’’
2’’
2’’
Trap Repairs and Change
of Operating Pressure
Experience has proved that when valves and seats have
worn enough to require renewal, a new lever and guide
pin assembly should also be installed to get maximum
performance from the new valve parts. When new
valve parts are used with an old lever, bucket travel,
valve opening and trap capacity are reduced. With
used and worn guide pins, the valve is not guided
as closely to its seat. Poor guidance develops leaks
quickly because the valve can strike the side of the
seat instead of in the center. Accordingly, replacement
parts are supplied only in matched sets comprising
the pressure change assembly (PCA).
A Mechanism Less Bucket or Pressure Change
Assembly (PCA) includes: valve seat, valve retainer,
lever with valve and guide pin assembly with
screws. These parts come in matched sets with orifice
size stamping on the lever and guide pin assembly,
as well as on the orifice (seat) itself–see Pressure
Change Assembly (PCA).
20
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A Mechanism Less Bucket — Pressure Change
Assembly (PCA) (no change in operating pressure)
will make an old trap practically as good as new
since the trap bucket is not normally subjected to great
wear. When ordering, specify maximum working
pressure.
Table 21-1 Interchangeability of Parts
Part Name
Trap Size
Interchangeable in:
Cap
800
812
813
880, 811, 881, TVS811
882, TVS812
883, TVS813
Gasket
800
812
813
316
800, 811, 881, TVS811
882, TVS812
883, 983, TVS813
415
Bolts and Nuts
800
211
TVS811
812
TVS812
813
TVS813
814
880, 811, 881
212
882
883
Thimble
800
812
813
880, 811, 881, TVS811
882, TVS812
983, 883, TVS813
Bucket
800
211
212
213
214
215
216
880
811, 881, 310, TVS812
812, 882, TVS812
813, 313, 413, 983, 883, TVS813
814, 314
815
316, 416 (up to 700 lbs), 816
Strainer Screen
880
882
883
881, 981, TVS811
TVS812
TVS813
Buckets for traps with “T” or “LV” suffix are interchangeable only for identical pressures.
A Pressure Change Assembly (PCA) (or
Mechanism Less Bucket) with a smaller orifice will
enable the trap to operate at a higher pressure,
or, with larger orifice will give greater capacity at a
pressure lower than that for which it originally was
ordered. This comprises a valve seat, a valve, valve
retainer, valve lever and guide pin assembly and
screws. The diameter of the valve seat is stamped on
the face of the seat itself, on the valve lever, and
on the guide pin assembly. Parts having different
stampings should never be used together.
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21
A valve lever and guide pin assembly are matched
with the valve and seat to obtain the maximum
possible leverage and trap capacity. At low pressure a
low leverage is necessary to obtain full opening of the
large orifice. As the orifice size decreases, less valve
travel is required, hence, higher leverages can be
employed.
Table 22-1 Maximum Working Pressures for
Pressure Change Assemblies (PCA)
211
811
881
TVS811
310
*400
250
200
125
70
30
Trap Model Numbers
213
813
TVS813
212
313
TVS812
413 214
812
421
883 814
411-G 882 312 983 314
1000
600
250 *600 *1100
200 *450 *950
125 225 *450 *650
70
150 250 *550
90 180 *375
30
60 125 250
40
80
180
15
25
60
125
80
15
30
60
215 216
Size
315 316
Ori- 800
415 416
fice 880
981
815 816 5133-G 5155-G 6155-G
5/64
600
#38 150
325
7/64 125
250
*1500
*2700
1/8 80
175
*1200 *1800 *2500
5/32
85
*1000
*800 *1350 *2000
3/16 20
50
*800
*1400
7/32
*500 *1000
1/4
15
20
*350 *700
9/32
225 *600
5/16
180 *500
11/32
130 *370
3/8
100 250
7/16
60 180
10
1/2
15
30
125
9/16
30 80
5/8
15
60
3/4
15 40
7/8
25
1-1/16
15
*Steel Traps Only
Parts in shaded areas are interchangeable but for different pressures.
22
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Ordering Repair Parts
When ordering replacement parts for repairable
Armstrong inverted bucket traps, please specify the
following information:
For bodies and caps: Trap Model No. and pipe
connection size.
For mechanisms and buckets: Trap Model No. and
maximum working pressure or orifice size.
For all other parts: Trap Model No.
Visual Identification of Mechanism Parts
Fig. 23-1. Guide Pin Assembly
Fig. 23-3. Valve Lever
Fig. 23-2. Valve Seat
Fig. 23-4. Valve
Fig. 23-5. Valve Retainer
Fig. 23-6. Guide pin assembly with post
and notched lever employed in 15 psi
No. 216 and 816 traps only. See adjust­
ment instructions packed with assembly.
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23
Identification of Trap
Parts by Dimensions
The following dimensional data will enable you to identify any Armstrong free-floating lever trap part should
there by any doubt as to the trap size to which it
belongs.
In the case of valves, seats, levers and guide
pin assemblies, parts must be mated by orifice
size. Orifice sizes are stamped on valve levers, valve
seats and guide pin assemblies as shown below.
Fig. 24-1
Orifice
Stamping
Valves and valve seats are factory-lapped together in matched sets to provide a perfect fit and should be
retained in sets. Do not attempt to pair miscellaneous
valves and seats. This could cause a steam leak. The
orifice size dimensions in Table 24-1 will enable you to
determine the orifice size to which a valve belongs.
Table 24-1Dimensional Identification Data,
Orifices and Valves
Dimension
For Orifice
Dimension
D-2, page 25
Size
D-2, page 25
1/8’’
#38 drill size
13/32’’
1/8’’
7/64’’, 5/64’’
1/2’’
5/32’’
1/8’’
9/16’’
3/16’’
5/32’’
21/32’’
7/32’’
3/16’’
23/32’’
9/32’’
7/32’’
13/16’’ (.7962’’)
5/16’’ *
1/4’’
1’’ (.9528’’)
11/32’’
9/32’’
1-1/8’’ (1.071’’)
3/8’’
5/16’’
1-3/8’’ (1.272’’)
*No. 213, 813 and larger have 5/16’’ dimension D-2 for 1/4’’ orifice.
For smaller traps, dimension D-2 is 9/32’’ for 1/4’’ orifice.
24
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For Orifice
Size
11/32’’
3/8’’
7/16’’
1/2’’
9/16’’
5/8’’
3/4’’
7/8’’
1-1/16’’
Table 25-1Dimensional Identification Data,
Valves, Seats, Levers, Retainers, Guide Pin Assemblies
Trap Size
A
B
800, 880, 811, 881, TVS811
310, 211, 411-G, 421, 981
1-1/2’’ 13/16’’
212, 812, 882, TVS812
1-7/8’’ 1-21/32’’
213, 312, 313, 413, 813, 883, 983, TVS813 2-5/16’’ 2-7/64’’
214, 814, 314
2-3/4’’ 2-15/32’’
215, 315, 415, 815
3-1/8’’ 2-11/16’’
216, 316, 416, 816
3-5/8’’ 3-1/2’’
5133-G
2-1/4’’ 2-7/64’’
5155-G
2-3/4’’ 2-11/16’’
6155-G
2-3/4’’ 2-11/16’’
*(w/orifice 1/8” thru 3/8”)
*(w/orifice 7/16” thru 9/16”)
*(w/orifice 5/8” thru 11/16”)
D
D-1
3/16’’
3/16’’
*
*
*
*
1/4’’
1/4’’
1/4’’
1/4”
3/8”
1/2”
1/8’’
1/8’’
*
*
*
*
3/16’’
3/16’’
3/16’’
3/16”
5/16”
3/8”
E
F
1/2’’
3/16’’
5/8’’
3/16’’
7/8’’
1/4’’
1’’
1/4’’
1-1/4’’ 1/4’’
1-1/2’’ 5/16’’
57/64’’ 5/16’’
1-7/64’’ 5/16’’
1-7/64’’ 5/16’’
A
A
Guide pin assemblies,
Cast Iron Traps and
300, 400 series traps.
Valve seat retainer with guide
pins, No. 5133-G, 5155-G,
6155-G traps.
Fig. 25-1
A21741
D-1
D-1
D-2
B
Valve Retainer
Valve retainer
D-2
Valve lever
Valve
F
E
Valve seat, No. 5133-G,
5155-G, 6155-G (left); all
others (right).
Screws for standard guide pin
assemblies (left) and for 5133-G,
Fig. 25-3
5155-G, 6155-G traps only
(right).
A21743
Fig. 25-6
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A21746
25
Fig
A2
Table 26-1Dimensional Identification Data, Buckets
Weight
Clip
of Bucket Length Diameter Length
Trap Model No.
(ounces)
“A”
“B”
“C”
800, 880
1-27/32 1-13/16’’ 2’’
1”
211, 310, 811, 881, TVS811 3-1/4
3’’
2’’
1”
981
4
3-3/4’’
2’’
1”
212, 812, 882, TVS812
7
3-15/16’’ 2-3/4’’ 1-5/16’’
411-G
7-1/2
3-15/16’’ 2-3/4’’ 1’’
312
8-1/16 3-7/8’’
3’’
1-3/4’’
213, 313, 413, 813,
14
5-15/32’’ 3-1/2’’ 1-3/4’’
883, 983, TVS813
5133-G
*
7-3/8’’
3-1/2’’ 1-3/4’’
214, 814, 314
24
6-5/8’’
3-1/2’’ 2’’
215, 815
36
7-11/16’’ 4’’
2-3/16’’
315, 415
36
8’’
4-1/2’’ 2-3/16’’
5155-G
36
8-5/8’’
4-1/2’’ 2-3/16’’
216, 316, 416, 816
66
8-1/2”
5”
2-13/16’’
416
50
8-1/2’’
5’’
2-13/16
(above 700 psi)
6155-G
14-5/8’’
4-1/2’’ 2-3/16’’
*
421
7-45/64” 4-9/32” 2-11/16”
1’’
*Bucket weight varies with orifice size and operating pressure.
NOTE: Consult your Armstrong Representative for information on
“T” or “LV” Bucket Vent sizes.
A
Standard Bucket
Vent Size
.094”
.081”
.081”
0 - 30 PSI - .081”
31 + PSI - .067”
.067”
0 - 40 PSI - .081”
41 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
0 - 60 PSI - .081”
61 + PSI - .067”
A
B
B
C
Fig. 26-1. Bucket
Dimensions.
26
Fig. 26-2. No. 315, 415,
5155-G and 6155-G traps
only.
Fig. 26-3.
Bucket Clip
Dimensions.
Fig. 26-1
A21748
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Fig. 26-2
Table 27-1Dimensional Identification Data,
Bodies, Caps and Gaskets
Diam.
Bolt
Trap
Bolt
Body
Data
Model Circle No. Height
No.
“A” Bolts “B”
“C” “D”
800
3-3/16’’ 6 4-1/8’’ 1/4’’
1”
811
3-3/16’’ 6 5-17/32’’ 1/4’’
1”
TVS811 3-3/16’’ 6 5-13/16’’ M6 20mm
880
3-3/16’’ 6 4-3/4’’ 1/4’’
1”
881
3-3/16’’ 6 4-3/4’’ 1/4’’
1”
211
3-9/16’’ 6 4-3/4’’ 5/16’’ 1-1/4’’
310
3-3/4’’ 6 5-15/16’’ 3/8’’ 1-5/8’’
981
3-3/4’’ 6 6-15/16’’ 3/8’’ 1-5/8’’
212
4-9/16’’ 6 5-7/8’’ 5/16’’ 1-1/4’’
411-G
5-1/4’’ 8 6-7/8’’ 1/2’’ 2-1/2’’
812
4-3/4’’ 6 6-1/4’’ 3/8’’ 1-5/8’’
TVS812 4-3/4’’ 6 7-3/8’’ M10 30mm
882
4-3/4’’ 6 7-5/8’’ 3/8’’ 1-5/8’’
213
5-1/2’’ 6 7-7/8’’ 3/8’’ 1-1/2’’
312
5-5/8’’ 6 7-29/32’’ 1/2’’ 2-1/4”
813
5-3/4’’ 6 9-15/32’’ 1/2’’
2”
TVS813 5-3/4’’ 6
10”
M12 40mm
883
5-3/4’’ 6
9”
1/2’’
2”
983
6”
6 10-3/16’’ 5/8’’ 2-3/8’’
214
6-1/2’’ 8 9-9/16’’ 3/8’’ 1-3/4’’
313
6-5/8’’ 8 9-3/8’’ 5/8’’ 2-3/4’’
5133-G 6-5/8’’ 8 12-1/4’’ 7/8’’ 4-1/4’’
814
6-7/8’’ 8 11-1/16’’ 1/2’’
2”
413
7-1/8’’ 8 9-3/8’’ 3/4’’ 3-3/8’’
314
7-1/8’’ 8 11-1/16’’ 3/4’’ 3-3/8’’
815
7-1/2’’ 8 12-13/16’’ 1/2’’ 2-1/2’’
215
7-1/2’’ 8 10-9/16’’ 1/2’’
2”
315
8”
9 12-7/16’’ 3/4’’ 3-1/2’’
5155-G 8-1/4’’ 10 14-1/8’’ 1”
5”
415
8-3/4’’ 9 12-9/16’’ 1” 3-3/4’’
216
9”
12 12-1/2’’ 1/2’’ 2-1/4’’
6155-G 9-3/8’’ 10 20-3/8’’ 1-1/4’’ 6-3/4’’
316
10”
10 14-3/4’’ 7/8” 3-1/2’’
416
10-1/2’’ 12 14-11/16’’ 1” 4-3/4’’
816
9-1/2’’ 8 16-11/16’’ 5/8’’
3”
421
5-1/4” 8 6-7/8” 1/2” 2-1/2”
3-1/2”
Pipe
Plugs
Gaskets
Thimble
Body Cap I.D.
O.D. Type Diam. Lgth.
1/2’’ 1/4’’ 2-3/8’’ 2-7/8’’
2
3/8’’ 5/16’’
*1/2’’ 1/4’’ 2-3/8’’ 2-7/8’’
2
3/8’’ 5/16’’
3/4’’ 1/4’’ 2-3/8’’ 2-7/8’’
2
3/8’’ 5/16’’
3/8’’ 1/4’’ 2-3/8’’ 2-7/8’’
2
3/8’’ 5/16’’
3/8’’ 1/4’’ 2-3/8’’ 2-7/8’’
2
3/8’’ 5/16’’
—
1/8’’ 2-1/2’’ 2-7/8’’
1
—
—
—
— 2-1/2’’
3”
1
—
—
—
1/2’’ 2-1/2’’ 3-1/4’’
2
1/2’’ 5/16’’
—
3/8’’ 3-3/8’’
4”
1
—
—
—
— 3-3/4” 4-3/8’’
1
—
—
*1/2’’ 1/2’’ 3-3/8’’ 3-7/8’’
2
3/4’’ 3/8’’
*1/2’’ 1/2’’ 3-3/8’’ 3-7/8’’
2
3/4’’ 3/8’’
3/8’’ 1/2’’ 3-3/8’’ 3-7/8’’
2
3/4’’ 3/8’’
—
1/2’’ 4-1/4’’ 5-1/8’’
1
—
—
—
—
4”
4-3/4’’
1
—
—
1/2’’ 3/4’’ 4-1/4’’ 4-7/8’’
2 15/16’’ 7/16’’
1/2’’ 3/4’’ 4-1/4’’ 4-7/8’’
2 15/16’’ 7/16’’
1/2’’ 3/4’’ 4-1/4’’ 4-7/8’’
2 15/16’’ 7/16’’
1/2’’ 3/4’’ 4-1/4’’ 4-7/8’’
2 15/16’’ 7/16’’
—
3/4’’
5”
5-3/4’’
1
—
—
—
— 4-1/4’’
51/8”
1
—
—
—
— 4-21/32’’ 5-15/32’’ 1
—
—
1”
1” 4-7/8’’ 5-5/8’’
2 15/16’’ 7/16’’
—
— 5-1/8’’ 5-1/8’’
1
—
—
—
—
5’’
5-3/4’’
1
—
—
1-1/2’’ 1-1/2’’ 5-5/8’’ 6-3/8’’
3
—
—
—
3/4’’ 5-5/8’’ 6-11/16’’ 1
—
—
—
— 5-5/8’’ 6-11/16’’ 1
—
—
—
— 5-3/4’’ 6-23/32’’ 1
—
—
—
— 5-5/8’’ 6-11/16’’ 1
—
—
—
1”
7”
8-3/8’’
1
—
—
—
— 5-3/4’’ 6-23/32” 1
—
—
—
— 7-5/8’’ 8-3/8’’
1
—
—
—
— 7-5/8’’ 8-3/8’’
1
—
—
2”
2” 7-1/2’’ 8-1/2’’
3
—
—
3/4” 3-3/4” 4-3/8”
1
—
—
*May be 3/4’’
A
Fig. 27-1. Bolt Circle
Type 1
Type 2
Type 3
Fig. 27-2. Gasket Types
B
D
C
Fig. 27-3. Bolt dimensions
Fig. 27-4. Body height
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27
Table 28-1Dimensional Data, Inlet Tubes
Inlet Tube Tube Length
Pipe Size
(Std.)
Trap Model No.
“A”
“B”
800, 880
1/2’’
1-3/8’’
211
1/2’’
1-3/8’’
310, 811, 881, 212, TVS811
1/2’’
1-3/8’’
812, 882, 981, 312 (1/2’’),
1/2’’
2-3/8’’
213 (1/2’’), 411-G (1/2’’)
312 (3/4”), 411-G (3/4”),
3/4”
2-1/2’’
213 (3/4”, 1”), TVS812
983
1”
3-3/4”
313, 413, 813, 883, TVS813
3/4”
3-1/2’’
5133-G (3/4”)
3/4”
6-7/8’’
214
1”
3-3/4”
215 (1”)
1”
5”
814, 314 (1”), 215 (1”)
1”
5”
5133-G (1”)
1”
6-7/8’’
315 (1”), 415 (1”), 5155-G (3/4”, 1”)
1”
7-7/8’’
6155-G (1”)
1”
14”
215 (1-1/4’’)
1-1/4’’
4-1/2’’
314 (1-1/4’’)
1-1/4’’
4-1/2’’
315 (1-1/4’’), 415 (1-1/4’’),
1-1/4’’
7-7/8’’
5155-G (1-1/4’’)
815
1-1/2’’
6-3/4”
6155-G (1-1/4’’)
1-1/4’’
14”
216 (1-1/2’’)
1-1/2’’
6-3/4”
316 (1-1/2’’), 416 (1-1/2’’)
1-1/2’’
8-1/2’’
216, 816 (2”)
2”
6-3/4”
316 (2”), 416 (2”)
2”
8-1/2’’
Tube Length with
Check Valve
“C”
“D”
—
—
1-1/8’’
2-9/16’’
1-1/8’’
2-9/16’’
2-1/2’’
3-15/16’’
2”
3-3/4”
2”
3”
4-1/2’’
3”
3”
4-1/2’’
4-1/2’’
5-1/2’’
12”
3-1/2’’
4”
3-7/8’’
4-3/4”
6-1/4”
4-7/8’’
4-7/8’’
6-3/8’’
6-3/8’’
7-3/8’’
13-7/8’’
5-9/16’’
6-1/16’’
5”
7-1/16’’
3-1/2’’
12”
3-1/2’’
5-1/2’’
3-1/2’’
5-1/2’’
5-9/16’’
14-1/16’
5-9/16’’
7-9/16’’
5-5/8’’
7-5/8’’
Table 28-2
Dimensional Data,
Inlet Tubes for Use with
Thermic Buckets
Trap Model No.
811T, 881T, 212T,
310T, TVS811
812T, 882T,
213T (1/2”)
213T (3/4), TVS812
813T, 883T, TVS813
214T, 983T
215T
814T
815T, 216T
816T
28
Pipe Size
Diameter Length
“A”
“B”
2
/ ”
1
2
8
13/ ”
8
/ ”
23/ ”
/4”
/4”
1”
1”/ 11/4”
1”
11/2”
2”
21/2”
31/2”
33/4”
41/2”
5”
4”
63/4”
1
3
3
Tube with
check valve
and coupling.
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Standard tube
or for use with
thermic bucket.
Definitions
Saturated Steam is pure steam at the temperature
that corresponds to the boiling temperature of water
at the existing pressure.
Absolute and Gage Pressures. Absolute pressure
(psia) is pressure in pounds per square inch above a
perfect vacuum. Gage pressure is pressure in pounds
per square inch above atmospheric pressure which is
14.7 pounds per square inch absolute. Gage pressure
(psig) plus 14.7 equals absolute pressure. Or, absolute pressure minus 14.7 equals gage pressure.
Pressure-Temperature Relationship (Columns 1, 2
and 3 on page 30.) For every pressure of pure steam
there is a corresponding temperature. Example:
Temperature of 250 psig pure steam always is 406°F.
Heat of Saturated Liquid (Column 4 on page 30.)
This is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a pound of water from 32°F. to the boiling
point at the pressure shown. It is expressed in btu’s.
Latent Heat of Heat Evaporation. (Column 5 on
page 30.) This is the amount of heat (expressed in
btu’s) required to change a pound of boiling water to a
pound of steam. This same amount of heat is released
when a pound of steam is condensed back into a pound
of water. This heat quantity is different for every pressure-temperature combination as shown in the steam
table.
Total Heat of Steam (Column 6 on page 30) is the
sum of the Heat of the Saturated Liquid (Column 4)
and Latent Heat (Column 5) in btu’s. It is the total
heat in steam above 32°F.
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29
Steam Tables
Table 30-1Properties of Saturated Steam
psig
Inches of Vacuum
(Abstracted from Keenan and Keyes, THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF STEAM,
by permission of John Wiley & Sons, Inc.)
30
Col. 1
Gauge
Pressure
Col. 2
Absolute
Pressure
(psia)
Col. 3
Steam
Temp.
(°F)
Col. 4
Heat of
Sat. Liquid
(but/lb)
Col. 5
Latent
Heat
(btu/lb)
Col. 6
Total Heat
of Steam
(btu/lb)
Col. 7
Specific
Volume of
Sat. Liquid
(cu ft/lb)
Col. 8
Specific
Volume of
Sat. Steam
(cu ft/lb)
29.743
29.515
27.886
19.742
9.562
7.536
5.490
3.454
1.418
0.08854
0.2
1.0
5.0
10.0
11.0
12.0
13.0
14.0
32.00
53.14
101.74
162.24
193.21
197.75
201.96
205.88
209.56
0.00
21.21
69.70
130.13
161.17
165.73
169.96
173.91
177.61
1075.8
1063.8
1036.3
1001.0
982.1
979.3
976.6
974.2
971.9
1075.8
1085.0
1106.0
1131.0
1143.3
1145.0
1146.6
1148.1
1149.5
0.016022
0.016027
0.016136
0.016407
0.016590
0.016620
0.016647
0.016674
0.016699
3306.00
1526.00
336.60
73.52
38.42
35.14
32.40
30.06
28.04
0.0
1.3
2.3
5.3
10.3
15.3
20.3
25.3
30.3
40.3
50.3
60.3
70.3
80.3
90.3
100.0
110.3
120.3
125.3
130.3
140.3
150.3
160.3
180.3
200.3
225.3
250.3
14.696
16.0
17.0
20.0
25.0
30.0
35.0
40.0
45.0
55.0
65.0
75.0
85.0
95.0
105.0
114.7
125.0
135.0
140.0
145.0
155.0
165.0
175.0
195.0
215.0
240.0
265.0
300.0
400.0
450.0
500.0
600.0
900.0
1200.0
1500.0
1700.0
2000.0
2500.0
2700.0
3206.2
212.00
216.32
219.44
227.96
240.07
250.33
259.28
267.25
274.44
287.07
297.97
307.60
316.25
324.12
331.36
337.90
344.33
350.21
353.02
355.75
360.50
365.99
370.75
379.67
387.89
397.37
406.11
417.33
444.59
456.28
467.01
486.21
531.98
567.22
596.23
613.15
635.82
668.13
679.55
705.40
180.07
184.42
187.56
196.16
208.42
218.82
227.91
236.03
243.36
256.30
267.50
277.43
286.39
294.56
302.10
308.80
315.68
321.85
324.82
327.70
333.24
338.53
343.57
353.10
361.91
372.12
381.60
393.84
424.00
437.20
449.40
471.60
526.60
571.70
611.60
636.60
671.70
730.60
756.20
902.70
970.3
967.6
965.5
960.1
952.1
945.3
939.2
933.7
928.6
919.6
911.6
904.5
897.8
891.7
886.0
880.0
875.4
870.6
868.2
865.8
861.3
857.1
852.8
844.9
837.4
828.5
820.1
809.0
780.5
767.4
755.0
731.6
668.8
611.7
556.3
519.6
463.4
360.5
312.1
0.0
1150.4
1152.0
1153.1
1156.3
1160.6
1164.1
1167.1
1169.7
1172.0
1175.9
1179.1
1181.9
1184.2
1186.2
1188.1
1188.8
1191.1
1192.4
1193.0
1193.5
1194.6
1195.6
1196.5
1198.0
1199.3
1200.6
1201.7
1202.8
1204.5
1204.6
1204.4
1203.2
1195.4
1183.4
1167.9
1155.9
1135.1
1091.1
1068.3
902.7
0.016715
0.016746
0.016768
0.016830
0.016922
0.017004
0.017078
0.017146
0.017209
0.017325
0.017429
0.017524
0.017613
0.017696
0.017775
0.017850
0.017922
0.017991
0.018024
0.018057
0.018121
0.018183
0.018244
0.018360
0.018470
0.018602
0.018728
0.018896
0.019340
0.019547
0.019748
0.02013
0.02123
0.02232
0.02346
0.02428
0.02565
0.02860
0.03027
0.05053
26.80
24.75
23.39
20.09
16.30
13.75
11.90
10.50
9.40
7.79
6.66
5.82
5.17
4.65
4.23
3.88
3.59
3.33
3.22
3.11
2.92
2.75
2.60
2.34
2.13
1.92
1.74
1.54
1.16
1.03
0.93
0.77
0.50
0.36
0.28
0.24
0.19
0.13
0.11
0.05
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Steam Tables
Heat quantities and temperature-pressure relationships
are useful in a wide range of trap application problems. This data is presented in Table 30-1 Properties
of Saturated Steam.
How the Tables Are Used
In addition to determining pressure-temperature relationships, you can compute the amount of steam that
will be condensed by any heating unit of known btu
output. Conversely, the tables can be used to determine
btu output if steam condensing rate is known.
Flash Steam
Flash steam is the steam formed when hot condensate under pressure is released to a lower
pressure. The steam table (page 30) tells why it is
formed. The amount that will be formed can be computed.
For example, condensate at steam temperature and
under 100 psig pressure has a heat content of 308.8
btu’s per pound (see Column 4 in steam table). If this
condensate is discharged to atmospheric pressure (0
psig), its heat content instantly drops to 180 btu’s per
pound. The surplus of 128.8 btu’s re-evaporates or
flashes a portion of the condensate.
The percentage of the condensate that will flash
to steam can be computed as follows: Divide the
difference between the high and low heat contents
(from Column 4) by the latent heat at the lower pressure and multiply by 100. Using the example above
– 308.8 minus 180 = 128.8; 128.8 ÷ by 970.3 (latent
heat at 0 psig from Column 5) = .133; .133 x 100 =
13.3%. Thus 13.3% of the condensate by weight will
flash to steam.
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31
For convenience Chart 32-1 shows the amount of
flash steam that will be formed when discharging
condensate to different pressures.
Chart 32.1 Percentage of Flash Steam Formed When
Discharging Condensate to Reduced Pressure
32
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33
1/8
1/4
3/8
1/2
3/4
1
1-1/4
1-1/2
2
2-1/2
3
3-1/2
4
5
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
24
Size
(in)
0.405
0.540
0.675
0.840
1.050
1.315
1.660
1.900
2.375
2.875
3.500
4.000
4.500
5.563
6.625
8.625
10.750
12.750
14.000
16.000
18.000
20.000
24.000
External
(in)
0.269
0.364
0.493
0.622
0.824
1.049
1.380
1.610
2.067
2.469
3.068
3.548
4.026
5.047
6.065
7.981
10.020
11.938
13.125
15.000
16.874
18.814
22.626
Approximate
Internal
(in)
Diameters
0.068
0.088
0.091
0.109
0.113
0.133
0.140
0.145
0.154
0.203
0.216
0.226
0.237
0.258
0.280
0.322
0.365
0.406
0.437
0.500
0.563
0.593
0.687
Nominal
Thickness
(in)
External
(sq in)
0.129
0.229
0.358
0.554
0.866
1.358
2.164
2.835
4.430
6.492
9.621
12.566
15.904
24.306
34.472
58.426
90.763
127.640
153.940
201.050
254.850
314.150
452.400
Internal
(in)
0.845
1.114
1.549
1.954
2.589
3.296
4.335
5.058
6.494
7.757
9.638
11.146
12.648
15.856
19.054
25.073
31.479
37.669
41.217
47.123
52.998
59.093
71.063
1.272
1.696
2.121
2.639
3.299
4.131
5.215
5.969
7.461
9.032
10.996
12.566
14.137
17.477
20.813
27.096
33.772
40.055
43.982
50.265
56.548
62.831
75.398
Metal
(sq in)
0.072
0.125
0.167
0.250
0.333
0.494
0.669
0.799
1.075
1.704
2.228
2.680
3.174
4.300
5.581
8.399
11.908
15.740
18.640
24.350
30.850
36.150
50.300
Internal
(sq in)
0.057
0.104
0.191
0.304
0.533
0.864
1.495
2.036
3.355
4.788
7.393
9.886
12.730
20.006
28.891
50.027
78.855
111.900
135.300
176.700
224.000
278.000
402.100
Transverse Areas
External
(in)
Circumference
Table 33-1. Schedule 40 Pipe, Standard Dimensions
Feet
2533.775
1383.789
754.360
473.906
270.034
166.618
96.275
70.733
42.913
30.077
19.479
14.565
11.312
7.198
4.984
2.878
1.826
1.288
1.069
0.817
0.643
0.519
0.358
Feet
14.199
10.496
7.747
6.141
4.635
3.641
2.767
2.372
1.847
1.547
1.245
1.076
0.948
0.756
0.629
0.478
0.381
0.318
0.280
0.254
0.226
0.203
0.169
Feet
Internal
Surface
Length
of Pipe
Containing
One Cubic
Foot
9.431
7.073
5.658
4.547
3.637
2.904
2.301
2.010
1.608
1.328
1.091
0.954
0.848
0.686
0.576
0.442
0.355
0.299
0.272
0.238
0.212
0.191
0.159
External
Surface
Length of Pipe
per sq ft
0.244
0.424
0.567
0.850
1.130
1.678
2.272
2.717
3.652
5.793
7.575
9.109
10.790
14.617
18.974
28.554
40.483
53.600
63.000
78.000
105.000
123.000
171.000
Plain
Ends
0.245
0.425
0.568
0.852
1.134
1.684
2.281
2.731
3.678
5.819
7.616
9.202
10.889
14.810
19.185
28.809
41.132
—
—
—
—
—
Threaded
and
Coupled
Nominal Weight
per foot
27
18
18
14
14
11fi
11fi
11fi
11fi
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
—
—
—
—
—
Number
Threads
per Inch
of
Screw
Recommendations
Survey
Armstrong International, Inc. recommends that you
survey your steam traps on a regular schedule. This
steam trap survey will provide information on your
hook-ups, the opportunity to correct problem areas,
reduce maintenance, and provide energy savings.
For more information on how you can optimize your
steam system contact your Armstrong Representative
or Armstrong International, Inc. Ph. (269) 273-1415,
Fax (269) 278-6555 or visit Armstrong’s website at
www.armstronginternational.com.
34
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Products available from Armstrong
International, Inc.
Request Catalog 326
Solution Source for Steam, Air and Hot Water
Systems. 500 page manual which includes
engineering guidelines along with information on
Armstrong steam, air and water related products.
Request Bulletin 320
CD-ROM of all material contained in 500-page
manual described above coupled with Steam-A-Ware,
Sizing and Selection Software.
Humidification
Bulletin 596 = Humidification Solution Source
Refrigerated Purgers
Bulletin 702 = Guide to Refrigeration Purging
Bulletin 705 = Multi-Point Purger
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35
Trap Application Assistance
Trap application assistance is a most important part of the complete
trap service provided by Armstrong International, Inc. Armstrong
Representatives are qualified by factory training and extensive experience
to assist you in any trapping problem. Backing the Representatives are
Armstrong trapping specialists who are available to assist with especially
difficult or unusual requirements.
Limited Warranty and Remedy
Armstrong International, Inc. (“Armstrong”) warrants to the original user of those
products supplied by it and used in the service and in the manner for which they are
intended, that such products shall be free from defects in material and workmanship
for a period of one (1) year from the date of installation, but not longer than 15 months
from the date of shipment from the factory, [unless a Special Warranty Period applies,
as listed below]. This warranty does not extend to any product that has been subject
to misuse, neglect or alteration after shipment from the Armstrong factory. Except
as may be expressly provided in a written agreement between Armstrong and the
user, which is signed by both parties, Armstrong DOES NOT MAKE ANY OTHER
REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING,
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR
ANY IMPLIED WARRANTY OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
The sole and exclusive remedy with respect to the above limited warranty or with
respect to any other claim relating to the products or to defects or any condition or use
of the products supplied by Armstrong, however caused, and whether such claim is
based upon warranty, contract, negligence, strict liability, or any other basis or theory,
is limited to Armstrong’s repair or replacement of the part or product, excluding any
labor or any other cost to remove or install said part or product, or at Armstrong’s
option, to repayment of the purchase price. As a condition of enforcing any rights or
remedies relating to Armstrong products, notice of any warranty or other claim relating
to the products must be given in writing to Armstrong: (i) within 30 days of last day of
the applicable warranty period, or (ii) within 30 days of the date of the manifestation
of the condition or occurrence giving rise to the claim, whichever is earlier. IN NO
EVENT SHALL ARMSTRONG BE LIABLE FOR SPECIAL, DIRECT, INDIRECT,
INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED
TO, LOSS OF USE OR PROFITS OR INTERRUPTION OF BUSINESS. The Limited
Warranty and Remedy terms herein apply notwithstanding any contrary terms in any
purchase order or form submitted or issued by any user, purchaser, or third party and
all such contrary terms shall be deemed rejected by Armstrong.
Special Warranty Periods are as follows:
Stainless Steel Products Series 1000, 1800, 2000 — Three (3) years after
installation, but not longer than 39 months after shipment from Armstrong’s factory;
OR for products operated at a maximum steam pressure of 400 psig/28 barg
saturated service, the warranty shall be Five (5) years after installation, but not longer
than 63 months after shipment from Armstrong’s factory.
© 2011 Armstrong International, Inc.
Armstrong Steam and Condensate Group
816 Maple Street, Three Rivers, Michigan 49093 – USA
Phone: (269) 273-1415 FAX: (269) 278-6555
Bulletin No. 301-M 2/11
Printed in U.S.A.
armstronginternational.com
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