Academic/Student Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes

Academic/Student Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes
Minutes
February 18, 2016
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
ROUDEBUSH HALL ROOM 212
OXFORD, OHIO 45056
(513) 529-6225 MAIN
(513) 529-3911 FAX
WWW.MIAMIOH.EDU
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
MIAMI UNIVERSITY
Minutes of the Academic and Student Affairs Committee Meeting
February 18, 2016, 8:00 a.m.
Marcum 110, Miami University, Oxford Campus
The Academic and Student Affairs Committee of the Miami University Board of
Trustees met on February 18, 2016 in room 110, Marcum Conference Center on the
Miami University Oxford campus. The meeting was called to order at 8:00 a.m. by
Committee Chair Bob Shroder, a majority of members were present constituting a
quorum. Attending were Chair Shroder, and Committee members; Trustees David
Budig, Dennis Lieberman and Sharon Mitchell, National Trustees Terry Hershey and
Diane Perlmutter, and Student Trustees Ciara Lawson and Mary Adeline Lewis; along
with Trustees Jagdish Bhati (arrived at 9:30 a.m.), Mark Ridenour, and Steve Wilson, and
National Trustees John Altman, and Robert Coletti.
In addition to the Trustees, Phyllis Callahan, Provost and Executive Vice
President for Academic Affairs; Jayne Brownell, Vice President for Student Affairs; and
Michael Kabbaz, Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success, were
in attendance. Also present to address agenda items or to provide support, were: Deedie
Dowdle, Associate Vice President for Communications and Marketing; Mike Curme,
Dean of Students; Jerome Conley, Dean and University Librarian; Maria Cronley,
Associate Provost; Carolyn Haynes, Associate Provost; Susan Schaurer, Assistant Vice
President and Director of Admission; Brent Shock, Assistant Vice President for
Enrollment Management and Director of Student Financial Services; Yvette Harris,
Professor and Chair of the Senate Executive Committee; Tracy Hughes, Senior Director
of University Marketing; Jane Goettsch, Director, Women’s Center; Scott Sportsman,
Director of Research and Analysis, EMSS; Clair Wagner, Director of University News
and Communication; Becca Getson, Sexual Assault Response Coordinator; Alexander
Cary, ASG Secretary for Academic Affairs; and Ted Pickerill, Secretary to the Board of
Trustees; as well as others attending to observe or assist.
Executive Session
Sharon Mitchell moved, Dennis Lieberman seconded, and by unanimous roll call
vote, with six voting in favor and none opposed, the Board convened to Executive
Session to discuss personnel matters, the promotion of public employees, as provided by
the Open Meetings Act, Ohio Revised Code Section 121.22.
Minutes
Overall Page 1 of 144
Minutes Page 1 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
Public Business Session
Chair Robert Shroder opened the public session and welcomed everyone to the
meeting.
Approval of the Prior Meeting’s Minutes
National Trustee Terry Hershey moved, Trustee David Budig seconded, and by
unanimous voice vote, the minutes of the previous meeting were approved.
Student Trustees
Student Trustee Mary Adeline Lewis relayed the following:
Recently there has been a lot of unique Miami University alumni in the news that
are worth talking about.
-CEO of Taco Bell, Brian Niccol, graduated from Miami University with a
degree in engineering. He recently spearheaded a campaign within Taco
Bell’s innovation team to "spice up” the names of the franchises new
menu items. When asked where he got the idea he replied that he wanted
to replicate the idea of the old place where he had lunch during college,
Bagel and Deli, to name items in catchy and unique ways. His on the spot
idea was, “The After Burner” I am still trying to figure out how something
will provide enjoyable after burn.
-Michael Markesbery and Rithvik Venna started the cold weather clothing
company Oros, and are being praised for their space comparable jackets,
beanies, and gloves. The company uses the material aerogel, a material
used by NASA in space suits to keep astronauts protected from the
elements of other planets. Aerogel is a super-light insulator that lets very
little heat through. A goose down jacket would have to be 40 millimeters
thick to provide the same insulation as 3 millimeters of aerogel. The jacket
can keep the body warm in temperatures as low as -321 degrees.
Miami University’s graphic design program is now ranked 25th among public
graphic design schools and colleges in the U.S. by Animation Career Review (ACR). The
program offers a selection of focus tracks including business, communication, cultural
studies, environmental design, interactive design, studio art, perception and cognition,
and technical communication. Other aspects of the program include paid internships with
leading firms and study abroad opportunities.
The 2016 Young Painters Competition has named a winner. Annie Ewaskio, was
awarded with the $10,000 William and Dorothy Yeck Award. William was a 1936
graduate. Annie’s painting “After the Narwhals” won her this award and will be put in
2
Minutes
Overall Page 2 of 144
Minutes Page 2 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
the young painters collection. Her work has been featured in The New Yorker, The New
York Times, and The Huffington Post
-In addition to Annie and other finalists’ paintings, there is an art exhibit
in Heistand Hall that showcases many Miami university students’
artwork.
- The Miami Art Museum is also featuring an exhibit centered around
Creativity and Innovation, the theme of this year at Miami. The exhibit
features students’ responses to President Hodge’s proclamation that this
year is the year of creativity and innovation at Miami University.
Rod Northcutt’s sculpture students used their class time to winterize mobile
homes last fall. They collaborated with several community groups for a project that
culminated in the winterizing of eight mobile homes at the Miami Mobile Home Park in
Oxford. They also researched poverty and helped connect the services of local
community members to others in need. The winterization project involved 31 volunteers
- 15 students, three faculty and 13 community members - who cut and installed new
skirting for the homes. Students worked with members of the local nonprofit People
United for Self Help (PUSH). The group provides assistance for essential repairs to
eligible homeowners who, without such assistance, would be unable to make the repairs
necessary for them to remain in their homes.
Drones are being used to study and better the Miami University Airport. Sinclair
Community College in partnership with Miami University has received permission from
the Federal Aviation Administration to fly unmanned aircraft systems (UASs or drones)
for research and education purposes over the Miami University airport property. The
point of this project is to explore academic certificate and degree programs that are
mutually beneficial for students at both colleges. “Miami University is proud to be a
partner with Sinclair on this effort,” said Jim Oris, Miami’s associate provost for research
and scholarship and dean of its Graduate School. “Expanding airspace capability for
research and educational projects in the region will enhance collaborations between our
two institutions and will provide access and opportunities for students to be directly
involved in world-class UAS research and development that otherwise would not be
possible.”
In addition to the approval at Miami University Airport, Sinclair is also permitted
for UAS flight operations at Springfield-Beckley Airport, Wilmington Air Park, The
Ohio State University Airport and the National Center for Medical Readiness. Miami is
developing a policy to address use of drones for academic purposes.
Finally, Randi Thomas, Jerome Conley, Dean Jim Oris and Lisa Dankovich will
be taking a group of Miami students with the Office of Institutional Relations to
Washington D.C. for an alternative spring break experience. While in Washington the
students, ranging from political science to hard science concentrations, will study and
practice the confluence between higher education and government. The students will
3
Minutes
Overall Page 3 of 144
Minutes Page 3 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
have the opportunity to experience Washington, meet congressman and senators
interested in learning more about Miami, and give presentations on the research many of
the participants conduct on campus. After the 3 day trip to Washington D.C., the students
will take the same things to Columbus, where they will be able to compare the confluence
at the state level to the national level they saw in D.C. Miami University is the only
university in the state of Ohio to give their students this kind of opportunity.
Student Trustee Ciara Lawson relayed the following:
As we roll into spring semester, university students, faculty, and alumni refuse to
let the cold keep their hard work and passions stuck inside. The year of creativity and
innovation continues to warm the hearts of those in the Miami Community from frigid
southwest Ohio to the more tropical locations students visited during this past January
term.
The Miami University Alumni Association recently continued its tradition of
sending out Valentine’s Day cards to Miami mergers. This sweet gesture reminds an
impressive 14% of alumni of the college that brought them together, whether meeting in
later years or spending undergrad time kissing at midnight under Upham Arch.
Valentines with a unique poem and theme were sent to 13,658 couples across all 50 states
and 16 countries. This romantic tradition has been carried out since 1982.
Miami’s Confucius Institute hosted a successful Chinese New Year Celebration
for the 2016 “Year of the Monkey”. International students had the opportunity to be
reminded of home as colorful costumes, vibrant music, and hot, delicious Chinese food
adorned Macmillan Hall and Hall Auditorium in early February for the beginning of the
15 day celebration. The Institute emphasized the cultural context of tea, as it is often
associated with creating art and music. Many students, both domestic and international
enjoyed the Miami Symphony Orchestra paired with the Chinese Classical Music
Ensemble, followed by several Chinese opera singers, Junshu Zheng, Jason Chen, and the
Institute’s Lion Dance Club. American students had a chance to try out the Kung Fu
inspired dance moves of the Lion Dance as well. These wonderful events for China’s
biggest holiday were a great exchange of traditional Chinese music and culture shared
between our international and domestic students.
The celebrations of art and culture continued as Garden Commons dining hall
hosted a “Mardi Gras” dinner for students. Buffet meal options included authentic New
Orleans cuisine such as traditional Gumbo, Shrimp & Grits, Blackened Tilapia, Fried
Okra, Cajun Baked Catfish, Bread Pudding with Bourbon Sauce, Beignets, Banana Foster
and King Cake, among others. To complete the exciting atmosphere, student musicians
performed jazz pieces, employees wore colorful necklaces, and a mask-decorating station
was open to visitors.
4
Minutes
Overall Page 4 of 144
Minutes Page 4 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
Yet another occasion to celebrate is Miami’s regional campuses officially
achieving a nearly 500 percent increase in undergraduate degrees awarded over the past 7
years. This number leaped from 55 degrees earned in 2008 to 319 in 2015. This is a
spectacular achievement for our Middletown and Hamilton campuses, as it is a reflection
of the expansion of degrees available to students not staying on the main campus while
still keeping a Miami degree affordable. Most schools leave their regional campuses as
“feeder schools” to the main campuses. But with the creation of new departments and
degrees such as Civic and Regional Development, Integrative Studies, and Criminal
Justice, among others, an entirely Middletown or Hamilton undergraduate pathway is
possible.
This week Miami is hosting the Ohio Valley Model Arab League Conference.
Over 16 schools are in attendance for the three day annual conference. The purpose is to
draft resolutions to mirror the real world Arab League to try to solve issues in the Middle
East. This year, student Randi McCaughley is serving as the conference head as Secretary
General.
Geneticists, botanists and conservationists are working on bringing the American
Chestnut tree back from near extinction. A specimen once in populations of billions, has
been diminished by fungal blights spread across the Eastern United States since the early
20th century. This past fall, students and faculty from Miami and the American Chestnut
Foundation worked with the U.S. Forestry Service to plant 1,200 American chestnut
hybrids in Wayne National Forest in Marietta, Ohio. The hybrids contain genes from the
Chinese chestnut tree that are resistant to the fungus. These trees grow up to 120 feet tall,
15 feet wide, and are a species unique to the Appalachian mountain region. As spring
approaches, the Miami volunteers hope to see budding possibilities for a reemergence of
this forest beauty.
This January term, students had the opportunity to explore and gain an
understanding of contemporary Cuba through a Farmer School of Business Study Abroad
program. Following President Obama’s lifting of the embargo against Cuba in
September, Miami has utilized this fresh opportunity for students to study pre and postrevolutionary history, domestic and international politics and economics, Cuban and
Cuban-American literature, film, and music. The students and faculty visited the
University of Havana, various businesses transitioning into capitalism, as well as natural
areas in Varadero and Las Terrazas. This first run of the “Cuba in Transition” program
was an amazing way to experience a country isolated from U.S. visitors for over 50 years.
Although the warmth and sunshine of Havana isn’t all that apparent in today’s
Ohio weather, the memories and knowledge gained from study abroad are brought back
and shared with the rest of Miami. And experiences found within our own community,
whether in a campus dining hall or mentioned in a Miami merger poem, all help to add
such great culture and diversity to the university.
5
Minutes
Overall Page 5 of 144
Minutes Page 5 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
Associated Student Government
Associated Student Government Secretary for Academic Affairs, Alex Cary,
provided an overview of the semester. He highlighted changes to the funding process for
student organizations, the appointment of an ASG Director of Student Disability
Advocacy, and the upcoming housing fair, along with other initiatives.
Mr. Cary’s report is included as Attachment A.
University Senate
Dr. Yvette Harris, Chair of the Executive Committee of the University Senate
updated the Committee, informing them that the Senate had met once this semester, and
were continuing their review of MUPIM changes regarding the dual appointment of
Regional Campus faculty. She also informed the Committee that the new Regional
Campus, Bachelor degrees had been approved by Senate.
A written report is included as Attachment B.
Enrollment Management and Student Success Reports
Vice President’s Report
Vice President Kabbaz spoke of using data, and the coordinated efforts of
Enrollment Management and Student Success, Academic Affairs and Student Affairs to
proactively engage, advise and better serve students. He also stated that they are in the
process of developing a student satisfaction survey.
Vice President Kabbaz also spoke of Career Services and efforts by the Career
Services Advisory Board to review the positioning and integration of Career Services.
The Board if reviewing many students of various majors to determine how Career
Services can better engage students throughout their time at Miami, and to better relate
their Miami experiences to the needs of their future careers.
In addition, he spoke of working with Academic Affairs on an advising tool to
allow predictive analysis, and on the use of Civitas, to utilize personalized, real-time data
to guide decisions.
Admission Update
Assistant Vice President and Director of Admission Susan Schaurer updated the
Committee on admissions. She began with a review of fall 2016 goals, and reviewed the
Travel Impact Report (included with Attachment C).
6
Minutes
Overall Page 6 of 144
Minutes Page 6 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
She then reviewed the application numbers which have grown by over 70% since
2009, but emphasized, that it is not just growth in numbers, but in quality as well, with
the average ACT of applicants also increasing over this period, representing true growth
in the number of students qualified for admission. She also discussed how the gain is
predominately from domestic, non-resident applicants, as the number of graduating high
school students in Ohio has been declining. Applications from foreign students
continued its growth, but at a slower rate. Applications were up across all academic
divisions, and up by over 15% among domestic students of color.
Susan informed the Committee that Miami was shifting to super scoring of the
ACT. Super scoring for the SAT has been in place for several years, but this will be the
first time students’ top ACT categories from multiple tests would be combined into a
single best composite score.
She was asked about identifying economic diversity, and stated that it is done by
high school and through other methods, and that a note from the student’s counselor is all
that is needed to offer such students a waiver of the application fee. Also, Miami had
added an application question to explicitly ask about being a first generation college
student.
She stated that applications for Early Decision are down, which is a national
trend, as fewer students are willing to commit without knowing the proposed scholarship
package. Early Admissions are up, with over 11,000 this year. Domestic student of color
admissions are also up, to over 2,400, with a 28.5 average ACT. 96% of those who
attended Bridges did apply and of those, 94% have been offered admission.
She was asked about those who confirm but do not enroll, she stated that last year
is was 6.9%, which was lower than expected, and contributed to the larger that
anticipated class.
She concluded by telling the Committee that for next year, Admission plans to
bring student search in house, to save over $400,000.
Ms. Schaurer’s presentation is included as Attachment C.
Winter Term
Vice President Kabbaz updated the Committee stating that participation was up
by 10% over last year, and by 50% over the initial year. He shared the results of student
and faculty surveys which show strong levels of satisfaction; 95% among students, 96%
among faculty.
This academic year there were 116 students who met their final requirements for
graduation during the term. Revenue for the term was $12.7 million, and nearly $1
million was provided to students for need-based aid.
7
Minutes
Overall Page 7 of 144
Minutes Page 7 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
Vice President Kabbaz’s presentation is included as Attachment D.
Enrollment Management and Student Success Written Reports
In addition to the presentations, the following written report was provided:
 Enrollment Management and Student Success “Good News” – VP Michael Kabbaz,
Attachment E
Academic Affairs Reports and Resolutions
Provost Update
Regional Campus Naming
Provost Callahan spoke of the Regional Campuses, and the process to determine
the names which are presented in the resolution. She stated surveys were conducted, and
it was an iterative process with near unanimous approval when a vote was eventually
held. She stated the names had been reviewed and approved by COAD, and that
University Senate had reviewed and approved the departments.
Trustee Mitchell then moved, Trustee Lieberman seconded, and by unanimous
voice vote, the Committee recommended approval by the full Board.
RESOLUTION R2016-22
WHEREAS, to continue the process to better enable the Regional Campuses to
rapidly adapt to meet the needs of the regional communities and our students, a Task
Force was appointed in 2014 to explore the options for a new intercampus organizational
model, and thereafter a Regional Process Committee was appointed to develop and
propose a plan for the continuing evolution of the Regional Campuses, and
WHEREAS, the final report of the Process Committee and the advice of Senate
were received by the Board on May 1, 2015, and Resolution 2015-36 was issued,
charging the President and Provost to take such actions as are appropriate and necessary
to continue the evolution of the Regional Campuses as recommended by the Process
Committee into a more distinct, impactful, and fiscally viable, semi-autonomous unit
reporting directly to the Provost and the President; including
-
creating a Regional Campuses unit with a name that encompasses the
locations as well as all of the programs offered there,
whose faculty will be appointed, evaluated, promoted and tenured on the
Regional Campuses (except for those existing faculty whose primary
appointment is in Oxford, who will all be granted dual appointment status),
with opportunities and encouragement for academic affiliation and research
8
Minutes
Overall Page 8 of 144
Minutes Page 8 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
-
collaboration with Oxford campus academic departments, programs and
faculty, and
whose students are offered an increased number of four-year degree programs
that meet their needs and the needs of the region.
NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Regional Campuses shall be
designated:
Miami University
Regionals
College of Liberal Arts and Applied Science
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the Department of Integrative Studies shall be
renamed the Department of Interdisciplinary and Communication Studies, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the Department of Business Technology shall be
renamed the Department of Commerce, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, the following six new Regional Campuses
departments shall be formed:
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Education and Society
Biological Sciences
Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Humanities and Creative Arts
Languages, Literatures, and Writing
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that these aforementioned changes are to become
effective on July 1, 2016.
New Bachelor Degrees
Provost Callahan informed the Committee that three new Bachelor of Art degrees
were being proposed. All three are on the Regional Campuses, and will help in
increasing the Regional’s growing set of four year offerings.
There was a question regarding the revenue estimates, and Provost Callahan
explained a market analysis is normally made. She was also asked about the process to
obtain State approval, and she explained that associate Provost Carolyn Haines works
closely with the State throughout the approval process.
It was agreed the three new degrees would be considered in one vote. National
Trustee Perlmutter then moved, Trustee Mitchell seconded and by unanimous voice vote,
the Committee recommended approval of the three new degrees by the full Board.
9
Minutes
Overall Page 9 of 144
Minutes Page 9 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
RESOLUTION R2016-23
Bachelor of Arts in Psychological Science
BE IT RESOLVED: that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the establishment
of a new bachelor degree program; the Bachelor of Arts in Psychological Science,
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Applied
Science.
RESOLUTION R2016-24
Bachelor of Arts in Community Arts
BE IT RESOLVED: that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the establishment
of a new bachelor degree program; the Bachelor of Arts in Community Arts, Department
of Humanities and Creative Arts, College of Liberal Arts and Applied Science.
RESOLUTION R2016-25
Bachelor of Arts in Applied Communication
BE IT RESOLVED: that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the establishment
of a new bachelor degree program; the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Communication,
Department of Interdisciplinary and Communication Studies, College of Liberal Arts and
Applied Science.
Promotion, Tenure and Continuing Contracts
Provost Callahan praised the faculty and those being considered for promotion,
tenure and continuing contract. She stated that the low number of faculty being
considered for tenure was due to the low hiring rate during the economically challenging
years of the Great Recession.
Trustee Mitchell then moved, Trustee Lieberman seconded and by unanimous
voice vote, the Committee recommended approval by the full Board.
RESOLUTION R2015-21
BE IT RESOLVED: that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the following
faculty for promotion and tenure, effective July 1, 2016:
For Promotion to PROFESSOR:
Helen Androne - English
Susan Baim – Business Technology
Mitchell Balish - Microbiology
S. Burcin Bayram - Physics
Moira Casey - English
Brian Currie - Geology
10
Minutes
Overall Page 10 of 144
Minutes Page 10 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
Madelyn Detloff – English & GIC
Mila Ganeva – German, Russian, Asian & Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures
Megan Gerhardt - Management
Scott Hartley - Chemistry/Biochemistry
Xiaowen Huang - Management
Kathleen Johnson - English
Jane Keiser - Math
Steven Keller – Chemical, Paper, and Biomedical Engineering
Fazeel Khan – Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering
Murali Paranandi - Architecture
David Prytherch - Geography
Joseph Rode – Management
Benjamin Sutcliffe – German, Russian, Asian & Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures
Amy Yousefi - Chemical, Paper, and Biomedical Engineering
For TENURE and PROMOTION to ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR:
Mert Bal – Engineering Technology
Tammy Brown – GIC/ Black World Studies/History
Colin Campbell - Finance
Anna Ghazaryan - Math
Jonathan Grenier - Accounting
Elizabeth Kiel - Psychology
Aaron Luebbe - Psychology
Tory Pearman - English
Byran Smucker - Statistics
Pepper Stetler - Art
Cecilia Suhr – Media, Journalism, and Film
Haosheng Yang – German, Russian, Asian & Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED: that the Board of Trustees hereby approves the
promotion to associate librarian and the awarding of continuing contract, effective
July 1, 2016, to:
Jennifer Bazeley - Library
Ashley Jones - Library
Jessica Long – Library
Academic Affairs Written Reports
In addition to the presentations, the following written report was provided:


Academic Affairs “Good News” – Provost Phyllis Callahan, Attachment F
Honors Program – David Pennock, Honors Program Director, Attachment G
11
Minutes
Overall Page 11 of 144
Minutes Page 11 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
Student Affairs Reports
Vice President’s Report
Vice President Jayne Brownell updated the Committee, relaying the following:
While there are many things I could update you on in Student Affairs this
meeting, including a public service announcement encouraging you wash to your hands
frequently during your visit as norovirus continues to spread across campus this week,
I’m choosing instead to focus on two updates - one about events in the Greek community,
and one about staff changes in Student Affairs.
As you know, the start of spring semester brings fraternity and sorority
recruitment to Miami. While there are always some bumps that are associated with
recruitment and new members education - some bigger than others - we’ve been having a
successful season so far. 1,262 women registered for sorority recruitment, and 1,163
actually began the formal process. In the end, 1,038 women accepted bids from an
organization, or about 90% of those who started the recruitment process.
On the men’s side, 958 registered for recruitment, and of those, 860 participated
in recruitment. In the end, 606 men accepted bids, or 70.5% of those who began the
recruitment process.
As you can see, the sorority side is much more successful at attracting members,
and keeping them through the process, than fraternities are. That has been true for some
time, but worth looking at moving forward.
This weekend, all new Greek officers, which includes both chapter presidents and
council executive board officers, will participate in the Advance retreat. In addition to
personal leadership development opportunities, they’ll talk about shared values and
creating plans to ensure that those values extend to their full membership. They’ve
already spent time talking about some troubling issues related to alcohol that took place
at the start of this spring’s membership cycle, and they want to focus on finding solutions
during this retreat. To help extend that conversation beyond the leadership team, on
Sunday each President will bring in five other people from their chapter to create a larger
planning team of 300. It should be a great weekend.
On a different note, while there are always planned and unplanned situations to
keep us on our toes, Student Affairs has several staff related projects this term that are
going to keep us busier than usual.
First, Gerald Yearwood, the Director of Diversity Affairs who has presented to
you before, will be retiring at the end of June. His associate director, Juanita Tate, also
retired at the end of January. Those are two very key positions in an important and visible
office. At our last meeting I told you about the #MiamiForMissou demonstration that
took place in November and our conversations with a group of students following that
12
Minutes
Overall Page 12 of 144
Minutes Page 12 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
event. Those conversations have continued throughout the past 3 months, with an
emphasis on making Miami as welcoming a place as possible for all of our students.
With the timing of those conversations and these two retirements, you can imagine the
rumors have been flying. But Gerald has been great about helping students work through
his transition, and it’s now all the more important that we attract and hire good people for
these roles. It’s also an opportunity to think differently about this area. Currently the
Women’s Center is a standalone office with two staff members. By creating a director
position that could think about and bring together our support and programming for
students of color, GLBTQ+ students, and women, they can more easily support each
other and collaborate on programs for the office as a whole. Next week we’re doing a
forum with students in ODA to get their feedback about what they’d like to call this new
office, what they see as important for a new director to prioritize, and what a new ODA
might offer than doesn’t currently exist. We hope to complete that search this term.
We’re also ready to hire a permanent director for our office of Community
Engagement and Service. We’ve had an interim director in place for the summer and fall
as we rethought the mission of that office, but are excited to hire a director who could
bring fresh life to that program.
Another search will soon be underway to replace Bob Rusbosin, who will be
retiring in July. Bob is the senior student affairs officer on the regional campuses, and has
been outstanding. I will say how comforting it has been for me knowing that if there is
ever a crisis on a regional campus, I know Bob is there to manage it. That will be another
key role to fill.
Finally, the other staff related work we’re doing is related to program reviews.
Each of our departments goes through a program review process every five years, from
completing a self-study, to having a two day review led by external consultants.
Residence Life and Parent & Family Programs both completed this process in late
spring/early fall, and the Wilks Leadership Institute recently completed their campus visit
and is waiting on their final report. All of these reviews have been extremely useful in
helping offices take the time to reflect on their work, and to think about how they might
change focus (and sometime staffing) to make them more effective and innovative
moving into the next five years. I’m excited to see the results of that work.
So happy spring, and wash your hands!
Sexual Assault Prevention
Dean of Students Mike Curme and Becca Getson, Sexual Assault Response
Coordinator, updated the Committee on sexual assault prevention efforts. They
provided background on national initiatives and the development of a survey taken at
Miami University.
They informed the Committee that the survey’s response rate was 7.5%.
There were asked if the response rate could be broken into groups, such as
13
Minutes
Overall Page 13 of 144
Minutes Page 13 of 14
Minutes
February 18, 2016
Greek/Non-Greek or by class, they answered that yes, they do break it down into
different groups.
They discussed the survey results, reminding the Committee that the results
are a reflection of the experience of the 7.5% who responded, a group whose
demographics do not necessarily match that of the full student population, but for
whom the responses provided absolutely apply. The survey was conducted during
April 2015, and the responses were with regard to the prior year, but not necessarily
exclusively to time on campus; that is, some events referenced might have occurred
while home, or away from campus. The survey does indicate there are problems, as
there are on campuses nationwide, and that efforts to enhance support are critical.
They then addressed a survey from the Ohio Higher Education Commission
which state universities must present. The questions do not fully match those of the prior
questionnaire, so they will look to add customized questions for Miami’s use.
They also presented a list of demands received in a student petition, and
highlighted three primary focus areas for improvement: Victim Support, Education, and
Prevention. They them outlined the efforts being undertaken in each area.
Their report and presentation are included as Attachment H.
Student Affairs Written Reports
In addition to the presentations, the following written reports were provided:
 Student Affairs “Good News” – VP Student Affairs, Attachment I
 Student Housing Occupancy Update (HOME Office Update) – Brian Woodruff,
Director of Housing Options, Meals and Events, Attachment J
 Living Learning Communities - Tresa Barlage Zianno, Associate Director, Office
of Residence Life, Attachment K
Other Items
Adjournment and Tour
With no other business to come before the Committee, the meeting was adjourned
at 11:30 a.m. for a tour of the recently renovated Shideler Hall.
Theodore O. Pickerill II
Secretary to the Board of Trustees
14
Minutes
Overall Page 14 of 144
Minutes Page 14 of 14
ASG Report
Alexander Cary
Attachment A
February 18, 2016
Alexander Cary
Secretary for Academic Affairs
Associated Student Government
[email protected]
TO: Board of Trustees Academic/Student Affairs Committee
FROM: Alexander Cary
DATE SUBMITTED: February 17, 2016
Ladies and Gentlemen of the Board,
The Associated Student Government is excited to be back in Oxford for the spring semester of
the 2015 – 2016 school year. We are looking forward to another productive semester. Some of
the initiatives that ASG has worked on already this semester include:
New Funding Process for Student Organizations
ASG has updated the process by which it funds student organizations on campus. In the past,
student organizations have generally only been funded at the beginning of each semester. This
system forced many organizations to rush planning for events and submit budgets that could vary
from the true costs of events.
In order to aid student organizations in planning for events, ASG has switched to a monthly
funding model. Now, student organizations can come to ASG each month in order to request
funding for events. In essence, this allows organizations to request funds for an event held
during March in March instead of at the beginning of the semester. This new model will help
student organizations to plan more effectively while also helping ASG to allocate resources to
where they are most needed.
Director of Student Disability Advocacy
In order to ensure the representation of the disabled populations on Miami’s campus, the Student
Body President appointed the first Director of Student Disability Advocacy to ASG at the end of
last semester. This semester, the director Rachel Reeves looks forward to working to raise
awareness about the disabled populations on campus. She and ASG are committed to not only
raising awareness of disability issues but also to synthesize ideas on how to better accommodate
these populations on Miami’s Campus.
Upcoming Housing Fair
In the Oxford area, finding off-campus housing can be a source of great anxiety for students. As
a starting point in the search for off-campus housing, ASG will be holding a second housing fair
on February 22nd. This housing fair aims to not only help upperclassmen still trying to find
housing for next year but also aid underclassmen looking to sign two year leases.
Attachment A
Overall Page 15 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 2
Attachment A
ASG Report
Alexander Cary
February 18, 2016
Miscellaneous Initiatives
ASG has also been undertaking other initiatives this semester. The Student Body President
worked closely with the Financial Aid office to create a centralized listing of outside scholarship
opportunities that Miami students can browse online. Additionally, the Student Body President
is working on developing a financial literacy program in order to help students develop good
money management skills once they graduate from Miami University. The Secretary for
Diversity Affairs this semester is developing a subcommittee on the Council on Diversity and
Inclusion to explore the best ways to communicate to those in the Miami University community
the avenues and resources available to them should they feel that they have been mistreated.
These are but a few of the ASG initiatives being worked on this semester.
The Executive Cabinet of ASG as well as the Student Senate look forward to continuing to tackle
these and other important issues addressed last semester.
Thank you for your service to the University, and as always, please let me know if I can ever be
of assistance.
Love and Honor,
Alexander Cary
Secretary for Academic Affairs
Attachment A
Overall Page 16 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 2
Attachment B
Senate Update
February 18, 2016
February 3, 2016
To:
Board of Trustees, Academic and Student Affairs Committee
From: Yvette Harris, Chair, Executive Committee of University Senate
RE:
University Senate Report to Board of Trustees – February 19, 2016 Meeting
The following summarizes items of University Senate Business conducted since the Executive Committee
submitted to the Board of Trustees on February 19, 2016 Meeting.

Revisions to existing degrees and University Documents received on the University Senate
consent calendars:
o
January 25, 2016: BUS – Bachelor of Science in Business

Proposed New Degrees:
o Proposed Bachelor of Arts in Psychological Science (SR 16-04)
o Proposed Bachelor of Arts Degree in Community Arts (SR 16-05)
o Proposed Bachelor of Arts Degree in Applied Communication: Communication Studies
(SR 16-06)

New Business, Specials Reports and Updates delivered at University Senate:
o December 7, 2015, Proposed Revisions to MUPIM: Dual Appointments, Moira Casey,
Regional Associate Dean and John Skillings, Process Coordinator
o January 25, 2016, Presidential Search, Ted Pickerill, Secretary to the Board of Trustees

Senate Resolutions
January 25, 2016, SR 16-04: Proposed Bachelor of Arts in Psychological Science, College of
Professional Studies and Applied Sciences
SR 16-04
January 25, 2016
BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED that University Senate adopt the proposed new degree, Proposed
Bachelor of Arts in Psychological Science, College of Professional Studies and Applied Sciences;
AND FURTHERMORE, that the endorsement by University Senate of the proposed degree will
be forwarded to the Miami University Board of Trustees for consideration
SR 16‐04 carried by voice vote.
Attachment B
Overall Page 17 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 2
Attachment B
Senate Update
February 18, 2016
January 25, 2016, SR 16-05: Proposed Bachelor of Arts Degree in Community Arts, College of
Professional Studies and Applied Sciences
SR 16-05
January 25, 2016
BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED that University Senate adopt the proposed new degree, Bachelor of
Arts Degree in Community Arts, College of Professional Studies and Applied Sciences;
AND FURTHERMORE, that the endorsement by University Senate of the proposed degree will
be forwarded to the Miami University Board of Trustees for consideration
SR 16-05 carried by voice vote.
January 25, 2016, SR 16-06: Proposed Bachelor of Arts Degree in Applied Communication:
Communication Studies, College of Professional Studies and Applied Sciences
SR 16-06
January 25, 2016
BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED that University Senate adopt the proposed new degree, Bachelor of
Arts in Applied Communication: Communication Studies, College of Professional Studies and
Applied Sciences;
AND FURTHERMORE, that the endorsement by University Senate of the proposed degree will
be forwarded to the Miami University Board of Trustees for consideration
SR 16-06 carried by voice vote.
cc:
Provost Phyllis Callahan, Chair, University Senate
Yvette Harris, Chair, Executive Committee of University Senate
Sr. Associate Provost, Maria Cronley, Secretary, University Senate
Prepared by: Stacy Kawamura, Recording Secretary, University Senate
Attachment B
Overall Page 18 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 2
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 19 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 1 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 20 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 2 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 21 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 3 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 22 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 4 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 23 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 5 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 24 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 6 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 25 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 7 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 26 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 8 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Board of Trustees Meeting
February 18, 2016
Susan K. Schaurer
Assistant Vice President for Enrollment Management
and Director of Admission
Attachment C
Overall Page 27 of 144
Attachment Page 9 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Key Enrollment Goals
Fall 2016
First-Year Objectives
»
Meet 3,650 first-year target
»
Manage divisional enrollment targets
»
Maintain quality
»
Increase selectivity
»
Increase non-resident enrollment
»
Increase ethnic/racial diversity
Other Enrollment Objectives
»
Maintain ACE Program enrollment
»
Maintain transfer enrollment
»
Meet Net Tuition Revenue targets
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment C
Overall Page 28 of 144
Attachment Page 10 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Recruitment and Travel
Class of 2020
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment C
Overall Page 29 of 144
Attachment Page 11 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Application and Key Indicator History
Data as of 2.15.2016
Fall 2016
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment C
Overall Page 30 of 144
Attachment Page 12 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
by Residency
2014
2015
2016
∆ 2014 to 2016
∆ 2015 to 2016
14,965
16,823
18,931
26.5%
12.5%
Domestic Non-Resident
11,296
12,281
14,036
24.3%
14.3%
International
3,669
4,542
4,895
33.4%
7.8%
Ohio Resident
10,309
10,537
10,796
4.7%
2.5%
Grand Total
25,274
27,360
29,727
17.6%
8.7%
Non-Resident
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 31 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 13 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
Ohio Residents
Fall 2009 – Fall 2016: 28.7% Increase
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 32 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 14 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
Domestic Non-Residents
Fall 2009 – Fall 2016: 95.4% Increase
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 33 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 15 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
International
Fall 2009 – Fall 2016: 415.8% Increase
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 34 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 16 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
by Division
2014
2015
2016
∆ 2014 to 2016
∆ 2015 to 2016
CAS
10,808
11,412
12,467
15.3%
9.2%
FSB
7,772
8,570
9,092
17.0%
6.1%
CEC
3,328
3,691
4,220
26.8%
14.3%
EHS
2,318
2,623
2,784
20.1%
6.1%
CCA
1,048
1,064
1,164
11.1%
9.4%
Grand Total
25,274
27,360
29,727
17.6%
8.7%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 35 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 17 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
Key Indicators
Applications ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
22,329
26.7
3.62
12.6
54.0%
14.4%
2014
25,274
26.8
3.63
12.9
59.2%
15.2%
2015
27,360
27.0
3.66
13.0
61.5%
14.9%
2016
29,727
27.6
3.72
13.6
63.7%
15.6%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 36 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 18 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
Students of Color
Applications
ACT Best
GPA
Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
2013
3,219
25.3
3.53
12.4
43.9%
2014
3,830
25.5
3.52
12.8
49.0%
2015
4,076
25.7
3.58
13.0
51.3%
2016
4,629
26.2
3.60
13.7
52.9%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 37 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 19 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
ACT 30+
Applications ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
4,573
31.6
3.97
16.6
53.6%
11.6%
2014
5,577
31.7
4.00
16.6
58.4%
12.2%
2015
6,371
31.7
4.01
16.7
60.2%
11.4%
2016
8,514
31.9
4.02
16.8
63.4%
12.8%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 38 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 20 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Applications
Scholarship Bands
2013
2014
2015
2016
32 - 36
2,184
2,726
3,144
4,750
30 - 31
2,389
2,851
3,227
3,764
28 - 29
3,606
4,006
4,357
4,577
26 - 27
4,050
4,553
4,699
4,728
Below 26
7,192
7,815
7,984
7,567
Null
2,908
3,323
3,949
4,341
Total
22,329
25,274
27,360
29,727
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 39 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 21 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
Early Decision
Admits
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
695
25.9
3.58
11.3
28.3%
10.4%
2014
700
26.3
3.58
11.4
29.6%
10.4%
2015
731
26.1
3.61
11.9
30.5%
10.3%
2016
665
26.9
3.61
12.4
34.3%
10.4%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 40 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 22 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
Early Admits
Admits
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
5,620
29.6
4.01
15.6
51.8%
10.2%
2014
6,088
29.8
4.05
16.0
52.5%
12.0%
2015
9,402
29.6
4.00
15.8
53.3%
14.5%
2016
11,518
30.0
4.02
16.0
57.4%
14.9%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 41 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 23 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
Current Admits
Admits
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
13,007
28.0
3.79
14.1
51.1%
13.0%
2014
14,329
28.5
3.83
14.5
56.1%
13.3%
2015
16,056
28.6
3.83
14.5
57.9%
13.4%
2016
17,539
29.2
3.88
15.0
59.4%
14.1%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 42 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 24 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
Students of Color
Admits
ACT Best
GPA
Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
2013
1,693
27.2
3.74
14.2
45.0%
2014
1,910
27.9
3.81
15.3
51.0%
2015
2,146
27.7
3.79
14.6
50.4%
2016
2,472
28.5
3.88
15.6
52.8%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 43 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 25 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
ACT 30+
Admits
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
4,012
31.6
4.00
16.7
53.0%
11.3%
2014
5,078
31.7
4.03
16.9
57.2%
12.2%
2015
5,762
31.7
4.04
16.8
58.2%
11.2%
2016
7,870
31.9
4.04
16.9
61.9%
12.9%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 44 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 26 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
Scholarship Bands
2013
2014
2015
2016
32 - 36
1,949
2,546
2,896
4,437
30 - 31
2,063
2,532
2,866
3,433
28 - 29
2,996
3,424
3,782
3,977
26 - 27
3,082
3,442
3,721
3,407
Below 26
2,743
2,162
2,294
1,928
Null
174
223
497
357
Total
13,007
14,329
16,056
17,539
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 45 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 27 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
Bridges
Admits
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
338
26.6
3.82
14.1
13.3%
81.1%
2014
414
27.4
3.88
14.9
23.7%
73.7%
2015
499
27.3
3.83
14.6
13.4%
65.1%
2016
546
27.6
3.85
14.4
22.5%
69.2%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 46 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 28 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Admits
Summer Scholars
Admits
ACT Best GPA
Curriculum
Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2015
137
29.0
3.94
15.4
43.1%
20.4%
2016
259
28.9
3.90
14.6
45.9%
24.7%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 47 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 29 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Confirmations and Key Indicator History
Fall 2016
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment C
Overall Page 48 of 144
Attachment Page 30 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Confirmations
Key Indicators
Confirms
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
892
26.4
3.63
11.9
28.7%
9.8%
2014
804
26.9
3.65
12.0
31.0%
8.7%
2015
992
26.9
3.69
12.7
30.3%
11.6%
2016
982
27.7
3.70
13.1
34.5%
11.2%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 49 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 31 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Confirmations
Students of Color
Confirms
ACT Best
GPA
Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
2013
87
25.9
3.57
11.7
29.9%
2014
70
26.2
3.55
12.1
24.3%
2015
115
26.0
3.62
12.7
23.5%
2016
110
26.6
3.60
12.5
25.5%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 50 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 32 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Confirmations
ACT 30+
Confirms
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
122
31.2
3.89
15.0
34.4%
7.4%
2014
139
31.2
3.85
14.6
28.1%
7.2%
2015
170
31.3
3.98
16.6
32.4%
8.8%
2016
250
31.4
3.92
15.2
39.6%
7.2%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 51 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 33 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Confirmations
Scholarship Bands
2013
2014
2015
2016
32 - 36
46
51
66
102
30 - 31
76
88
104
148
28 - 29
188
160
194
217
26 - 27
230
255
319
300
Below 26
351
250
308
214
1
1
992
982
Null
1
Total
892
804
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 52 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 34 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Confirmations
Bridges
Confirms
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2013
37
26.1
3.87
13.3
2.7%
64.9%
2014
48
26.1
3.76
12.8
16.7%
62.5%
2015
85
26.8
3.77
13.7
7.1%
57.6%
2016
83
27.7
3.82
13.5
13.3%
50.6%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 53 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 35 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Fall 2016 Confirmations
Summer Scholars
Confirms
ACT Best GPA Curriculum Strength
Non-Resident
Students of Color
2015
34
28.0
3.79
14.1
17.6%
11.8%
2016
64
27.2
3.73
12.9
39.1%
21.9%
Data as of 2.15.2016
Attachment C
Overall Page 54 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 36 of 39
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
February 18, 2016
Early Scholarship Notification Key Indicators
December Awards – All Monies
Fall 2015
Fall 2016
Received
Average
Median
Received
Average
Median
32 - 36
98.4%
$15,665
$16,000
98.6%
$15,002
$15,000
30 - 31
96.9%
$10,739
$10,000
97.6%
$9,775
$10,000
28 - 29
96.5%
$7,227
$7,000
96.6%
$5,212
$4,500
26 - 27
62.4%
$3,061
$2,000
18.5%
$5,788
$4,000
ACT
Data as of 12.21.2015
Attachment C
Overall Page 55 of 144
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment Page 37 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
February 18, 2016
Student Search
Looking Ahead to Fall 2017 and Fall 2018
»
»
»
In collaboration with UCM and
160over90, EMSS brought Student
Search in-house, providing the
University with significant cost
savings.
Series of 6 communications that
utilize mixed media to highly engage
students.
Sent to Prospects and Inquiries
»
Fall 2017: 277,639
»
Fall 2018: 111,540
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment C
Overall Page 56 of 144
Attachment Page 38 of 39
Attachment C
Admission Update
Susan Schaurer
Attachment C
Overall Page 57 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 39 of 39
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Board of Trustees Meeting
February 18, 2016
Michael S. Kabbaz
Vice President for Enrollment Management
Attachment D
Overall Page 58 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Agenda
•
Participation and Performance
•
Student and Faculty Survey
Results
•
Gross Tuition Revenue and
Institutional Aid
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 59 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Agenda
•
Participation and Performance
•
Student and Faculty Survey
Results
•
Gross Tuition Revenue and
Institutional Aid
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 60 of 144
Attachment Page 3 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Participation
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 61 of 144
Attachment Page 4 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Performance
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 62 of 144
Attachment Page 5 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Registrations by Course Type
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 63 of 144
Attachment Page 6 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Registrations by Student’s Division
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 64 of 144
Attachment Page 7 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Winter Term Graduation
2014
2015
2016
Associate
6
7
14
Bachelor
64
70
79
Master
20
21
20
Doctoral
2
0
3
Certificate
3
2
0
Total
96
100
116
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 65 of 144
Attachment Page 8 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Agenda
•
Participation and Performance
•
Student and Faculty Survey
Results
•
Gross Tuition Revenue and
Institutional Aid
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 66 of 144
Attachment Page 9 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Oxford Survey Detail
Both surveys were sent Friday, January 22, 2016
•
1,104 undergraduate students participated, resulting in a 27%
response rate
•
131 faculty participated, resulting in a 51% response rate
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 67 of 144
Attachment Page 10 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Oxford – Student Satisfaction
•
95% were satisfied with their Winter Term experience
•
93% would recommend enrolling in Winter Term to another student
•
97% indicated the Winter Term helped them achieve their
educational goals at Miami
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 68 of 144
Attachment Page 11 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Oxford – Top Reasons for Participating
•
Fit an extra course in my schedule (e.g., add a minor) – 40%
•
Spread my course load/have fewer courses in the spring – 40%
•
Graduate more quickly – 26%
•
Complete an online course while off-campus – 19%
•
Participate in a short-term study abroad/study away – 17%
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 69 of 144
Attachment Page 12 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Oxford – Implications of Participating
•
Likely to graduate with more than 128 credit hours – 78%
•
More likely to participate in an internship, field work, a practicum,
research, or a similar experience over the summer – 65%
•
Likely to take fewer hours during regular semester (fall/spring) – 64%
•
Less likely to take an online course from another school – 61%
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 70 of 144
Attachment Page 13 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Oxford – Faculty Satisfaction
•
96% were satisfied with their Winter Term experience
•
90% would recommend teaching in the winter term to a colleague
•
93% agreed that the Winter Term is a valuable and worthwhile
academic option for students
•
93% agreed students learned the course material well
•
80% were satisfied with the student understanding of workload
related to courses taught in a shorter timeframe
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 71 of 144
Attachment Page 14 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Agenda
•
Participation and Performance
•
Student and Faculty Survey
Results
•
Gross Tuition Revenue and
Institutional Aid
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 72 of 144
Attachment Page 15 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Winter Term 2016
Gross Tuition Revenue
Undergraduate Gross Instructional Revenue
Graduate Gross Instructional Revenue
Total Gross Instructional Revenue
Oxford
Regional
All Campuses
$11,849,126
$472,627
$12,321,753
$383,848
$0
$383,848
$12,232,974
$472,627
$12,705,601
Note: Preliminary data as of 2/16/2016; VOA revenue is included in Oxford GR revenue.
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 73 of 144
Attachment Page 16 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Winter Term 2016
Need-Based Grant by Division
Dollars
Recipients
% Recipients
College of Arts & Science
$385,932
246
38%
Farmer School of Business
$203,454
149
23%
College of Education, Health & Society
$169,849
126
20%
College of Engineering and Computing
$127,646
90
14%
$41,011
28
4%
$927,892
639
100%
Academic Division
College of Creative Arts
Total
Note: Data are as of 2/16/2016.
Attachment D
MiamiOH.edu
Overall Page 74 of 144
Attachment Page 17 of 19
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
February 18, 2016
Winter Term 2016
Need-Based Grant Overview
Dollars
Recipients
% Pell Recipients
Median Family
Income – Winter Aid
Recipients*
Resident
$738,188
532
55%
$60,345
Non-Resident
$189,704
107
48%
$63,111
Residency
Other Facts:
•
•
•
•
•
15% of Oxford enrollees received Winter Term grant (16% Winter 2015)
9% of Oxford Winter Term students were Pell eligible (12% AY)
45% of Oxford Winter Term students completed a FAFSA (53% AY)
Overall median family income of Winter Term grant recipients was $60,791*
Overall median family income of all Winter Term enrollees was $136,570 ($128,575* AY)
*Income derived from those that completed a FAFSA
Note: Data are as of 2/16/2016.
MiamiOH.edu
Attachment D
Overall Page 75 of 144
Attachment Page 18 of 19
Attachment D
Winter Term
VP Kabbaz
Attachment D
Overall Page 76 of 144
February 18, 2016
Attachment Page 19 of 19
Attachment E
EMSS Good News
Michael Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
EMSS Good News to Share
Admission and Enrollment Communication
Key updates included in the presentation.
Career Services
The Spring ICE fair will be held February 10 in Millett Hall. To date, 226 employers have
registered, exceeding last’s year total registrants of 211. The Teacher Fair is scheduled for April
and is expected to attract more than 50 school districts.
Year-to date through January, 3,153 internships and jobs have been posted on Miami Careerlink
(most for multiple positions) and 3,865 interviews have been conducted in Hoyt Hall. Likewise,
over 204 career development programs have been completed and the Career Services website
has received over 209,000 hits.
The State of Ohio completed a desk audit of the OhioMeansInternhips grant the Oxford and
Regional campuses received two years ago. The state is extremely pleased with the
administration of the grant and the outcomes it has achieved for students and statewide
employers. To date, Miami has provided 122 internship stipends (averaging $2,400 each) to
students placed in 62 different businesses. An additional 13 interns are projected to receive
stipends this spring while working with ten different sponsoring employers, and a supplemental
grant will provide at least 19 new internship stipends this summer.
Several career development programs were conducted during the Winter Term. Through the
weeklong Inside Cleveland program, students visited organizations in different industry sectors,
including NASA, the Federal Reserve Bank, EY, KeyBank, and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Each of the visits were hosted by alumni or parents. A weeklong Inside New York Fashion
program allowed fashion students to visit design studios, merchandisers, showrooms, and
interact with alumni in the fashion industry. The trip included the fashion career fair sponsored
by the National Retail Federation. The LEAP New York trip brought a separate group of
students to the city to explore careers in multiple organizations, including the FBI, Ann Taylor,
YEXT, and the New York Botanical Gardens. Each trip represented a collaboration between
career services, the academic divisions, and alumni.
Enrollment Operations and One Stop for Student Success Services
A new feature on the One Stop website was released in December which allows students and
parents/authorized users to login and view personalized content specific to the student. Upon
login, users can view bill or account balances, academic advisor information, and any existing
holds on the student record. Unlike myMiami, the One Stop feature displays content in a format
that is also mobile friendly. Future releases will allow users to view financial aid, course, and
grade information.
Attachment E
Overall Page 77 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 2
Attachment E
EMSS Good News
Michael Kabbaz
February 18, 2016
Research and Analysis
Miami is continuing its partnership with Civitas Learning to enhance the data analytics
capabilities around retention and student success. Civitas’ data science processes will
help identify student success and risk factors as accurately as possible, evaluate outreach
initiatives and policies, and provide a comprehensive picture of how to enhance student learning
and success at Miami. The modeling techniques featured by Civitas are capable of incorporating
Miami’s Canvas and swipe card data, and can optimize student segmentation systematically
to help narrow the identification of the attributes, probabilities, and predictions associated with
success. The Civitas implementation of Miami data is in the process of data reconciliation and
should be ready by March.
Student Financial Services
(Office of Student Financial Assistance & Office of the Bursar)
Student Financial Assistance
This fall and winter, the Office of Student Financial Assistance is participating in a partnership
with the United Way of Cincinnati to promote the completion of the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA) in six urban Cincinnati high schools. The project, called Team FAFSA
brings together nine local colleges, nine community outreach organizations (including the Boys
& Girls Club of Cincinnati and the Urban League), and three VITA sites to collaborate and
provide expert assistance to high school seniors as they and their families complete the FAFSA.
Some estimates indicate nearly 47% of high school seniors fail to complete the FAFSA. This
initiative is the first citywide effort aimed at ensuring students in the Cincinnati area know the
benefits of completing the FAFSA.
Bursar
The Bursar’s office has convened a working group of campus stakeholders to develop, plan, and
test the implementation of Miami’s Tuition Promise. Staff have been meeting every two weeks
and work is progressing smoothly and on time.
Student Success Center
The Student Success Center is creating a centralized process for students withdrawing from
Miami. Students intending to withdraw are being directed to the Student Success Center where
staff conduct an exit interview with each student, allowing for possible intervention and data
collection. A new online process, designed as a Lean project by a team representing offices in
four divisions, is ready for IT implementation and will be accessible via the One Stop website.
University Registrar
Enhancements continue to be made to the class selection process with the development of a new
waitlisting tool. The new enhancement will provide students the ability to add themselves to an
online waitlist if their desired class section is full. A pilot for regional online classes is currently
underway, and campuswide implementation is expected to be available in October 2016 as
students register for Spring 2017.
Attachment E
Overall Page 78 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 2
Attachment F
Academic Affairs Good News
Provost Callahan
February 18, 2016
GOOD NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
December 2015 – January 2016
Miami to award 1,108 diplomas during fall commencement December 11, 2015
12/8/15 - Miami University presented 1,108 diplomas during its fall commencement ceremony on Friday,
December 11, in Millett Hall. President David Hodge will preside over the ceremony. Rose Marie Ward,
professor of kinesiology and health and the 2015 Effective Educator, gave the commencement address.
Brief remarks were made by David Budig ’84, chair of the Miami University board of trustees, and by
Ted Downing’68, president of the Miami University Alumni Association board of directors. Special
remarks were also made by student body president Joey Parizek.
Conferral of diplomas included: 83 associates, 729 bachelor's, 287 master's and 9 doctorates.
Wil Haygood book nominated for NAACP Image Award
12/9/15 - The book Showdown: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court Nomination That Changed
America by Wil Haygood ‘76, Miami University visiting professor and alumnus, has been nominated for
an NAACP Image Award.
Showdown is one of five books contending for the Outstanding Literary Work – Non-Fiction category of
Image Awards. The NAACP’s Image Awards celebrate the accomplishments of people of color in TV,
music, literature and film and honors individuals or groups who promote social justice through creative
endeavors. Winners will be announced Feb. 5.
Haygood’76, the Karl and Helen Wiepking Visiting Distinguished Professor in the department of media,
journalism and film, is a former Washington Post reporter and author of the story that inspired the film
“The Butler.” His newest book was released in September.
Miami’s graphic design program ranks in the top 252 U.S. public schools
12/11/15 - Miami University’s graphic design program is ranked 25th among public graphic design
schools and colleges in the U.S. by Animation Career Review (ACR).
Criteria used for the selection process included:
 Academic reputation.
 Admissions selectivity.
 Depth and breadth of the program faculty.
 Value as it relates to tuition and indebtedness.
The College of Creative Arts is home to the department of art which offers a bachelor’s of fine arts in
graphic design.The program offers a unique selection of focus tracks including business, communication,
cultural studies, environmental design, interactive design, studio art, perception and cognition, and
technical communication. Other highlights include paid internships with leading firms and study abroad
opportunities.
ACR is an information source for aspiring animation, design and gaming professionals seeking schools,
colleges and training programs. It surveyed hundreds of schools that offer programs geared toward
animation or game design.
Other national rankings
In June, Miami’s digital game studies program ranked No. 12 among public universities and colleges in
the U.S. and No. 33 overall by ACR. (Read full story online.)
The digital program also ranked No. 4 among universities and colleges in the Midwest.
1
Attachment F
Overall Page 79 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 5
Attachment F
Academic Affairs Good News
Provost Callahan
February 18, 2016
GOOD NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
December 2015 – January 2016
Miami’s digital game studies program is interdisciplinary, with collaboration among the Armstrong
Institute for Interactive Media Studies (AIMS); the departments of art, English, computer science and
software engineering, and teacher education; and the University Libraries.
In addition, Miami’s graduate program in studio art, within the department of art, ranks in the top 100
nationally.
Miami students receive Gilman scholarships for study abroad
12/14/15 - Dakota Potts, an international studies and Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
double major, recently was awarded a Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to support his study
abroad experience during spring semester.
Potts, a junior with a minor in French, will be in Russia participating in the CIEE Russian Language
Program in St. Petersburg, said Karla Guinigundo, associate director of Global Initiatives.
Potts is the latest Miami recipient of the Gilman scholarship, which is awarded twice a year and funded
by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. The program “aims to
diversify the kinds of students who study and intern abroad and the countries and regions where they go
by offering awards to U.S. undergraduates who might otherwise not participate due to financial
constraints,” according to its website.
Joshua Harrington, a sophomore East Asian Languages and Cultures major, was awarded a Gilman
scholarship last spring. He spent this fall semester in Japan with USAC's Japanese Language, Society and
Culture Studies in Nagasaki program, Guinigundo said.
Miami’s OMA receives designation from state
1/7/16 - Miami University Scripps Gerontology Center’s Opening Minds through Art (OMA) program
was recently designated a Quality Improvement Project by the Ohio Department of Aging (ODA). It’s
one of only eight approved programs to meet the state’s requirement for such designation.
OMA is an intergenerational art program for people with dementia and trains nursing home staff to
collaborate with high schools, colleges and other service organizations to provide a person-centered visual
arts program. The one-on-one art-making sessions are designed to tap the elders’ creativity and
imagination rather than their memory.
“Receiving this designation from ODA strengthens our ability to train aging professionals, artists,
educators and volunteers to provide creative arts opportunities for people with dementia while addressing
ageism issues at the same time,” said Elizabeth “Like” Lokon, founder and director of OMA.
OMA is offered at 29 locations across the United States and Canada, pairing over 400 volunteers with an
equal number of people with dementia annually. Lokon would like to grow the program to include every
nursing home in the state.
“Ohio is committed to ensuring the highest quality of life and care for our neighbors who reside in the
state’s 967 nursing homes,” said Bonnie K. Burman, director of the Ohio Department of Aging.
"We proudly support programs like OMA that help build relationships and lead to the most responsive
care and caring possible.”
Research evidence shows that OMA improves the well-being of people with dementia and contributes to
a positive change in volunteers’ attitudes toward aging and dementia.
2
Attachment F
Overall Page 80 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 5
Attachment F
Academic Affairs Good News
Provost Callahan
February 18, 2016
GOOD NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
December 2015 – January 2016
OMA has received awards and recognition from LeadingAge Ohio, the National Center for Creative
Aging and Generations United.
Miami students get career boost working in startup community
1/14/16 - Miami University is extending its reach into Cincinnati’s startup business community through
an initiative aimed at helping increase internships and job opportunities for students.
Miami launched its Cincinnati Digital Innovation Center (CDI) this fall. The program — a collaboration
among Miami's Armstrong Interactive Media Studies (AIMS) and its Institute for Entrepreneurship —
allows students to spend a semester working at digitally-focused startup companies four days a week
while earning 16 credits for four different courses, including a senior capstone.
The students spend the fifth day visiting local startups and meeting with executives, as well as Miami
alumni who work at startups.
As part of the Miami #StartupCincy initiative, AIMS, the Institute for Entrepreneurship and career
services have leased a shared work space in Union Hall.
The newly renovated, historic building at 1311 Vine St. houses The Brandery, a nationally recognized
startup accelerator; CincyTech, a public-private seed stage investor; and Cintrifuse, an entrepreneurial
support organization that is the overarching organization representing #StartupCincy.
Miami’s entrepreneurship program has been running a summer internship program in the Cincinnati
startup community since 2010.
“We’re now extending it to be year-round in full-time and part-time (internships) so that we can supply
talent that the StartupCincy region needs,” said Mark Lacker, the John W. Altman Clinical Professor of
Entrepreneurship at Miami.
Ohio grant funding a key
The Cincinnati Digital Innovation Center received an $86,511 Ohio Means Internships and Co-Ops
(OMIC) grant that was part of the overall $760,000 in OMIC funding Miami received in 2014.
At least 102 Miami students have secured internships with 49 Ohio companies from spring 2015 to spring
2016 through the OMIC program, according to statistics from career services.
Of those students, 32 have interned with 25 startup companies in Cincinnati.
Hannah Foster, an interactive media studies major who graduated from Miami in December, was one of
them. She spent last semester interning at tech startup Hello Parent, which developed a family scheduling
mobile app. Foster worked as a designer on the app, website, branding and social media presence.
She called her participation in CDI the highlight of her time at Miami and said the opportunity to work for
a tech startup was an invaluable experience.
“Being able to work full time as a designer accelerated my professional skills and, in particular, working
at a startup provided me the chance to challenge myself, dream big and execute on projects that were
crucial to the company,” Foster said.
Miami students are among nearly 2,500 students at Ohio universities, community colleges and technical
centers who benefited from new or expanded co-op and internship programs, thanks to the OMIC
program.
3
Attachment F
Overall Page 81 of 144
Attachment Page 3 of 5
Attachment F
Academic Affairs Good News
Provost Callahan
February 18, 2016
GOOD NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
December 2015 – January 2016
The universities use the grant money to send checks to the employers, reimbursing them 40 percent of the
wages paid to interns, up to $2,400.
Lacker called it a good deal, especially for small startup businesses, which can get “really good talent at a
very affordable price.”
Some internships lead to jobs
Miami students have interned at several technology startups, including Cerkl (pronounced “Circle”),
which automatically creates personalized communication for each member of a client’s audience based on
their interests.
“Tapping into young talent only enhances Cerkl's energetic, innovating culture,” Cerkl co-founder Sara
Jackson said. “At Cerkl, we find that students are willing to learn and our internships satisfy their hunger
to grow in a fast-paced, hands-on environment.” She said the startup also provides interns with “a rich
network of resources and experts to further open doors despite where their career journey will lead.”
Miami sophomore Sam Huber, an interactive media studies major, interned this fall with Cerkl, where
Jackson said his design work was an integral part of its marketing strategies.
“Because of his stellar work, we continue to contract with Sam on design projects,” said Jackson, adding
that the company has employed two Miami interns so far and “based on our positive experience will
continue to seek out quality talent from Miami.”
Catherine Couretas, project manager for CDI, said the program had four students who interned this fall
with area startups and all received offers to remain working with the companies in some capacity.
“There is such high demand in Cincinnati for these smart students who understand digital, who
understand technology,” she said.
Introducing more students to startup community
On Friday, Jan. 15, 20 Miami students will take part in a winter term immersion program introducing
them to the startup community.
They will see two Over-the-Rhine startup businesses — Roadtrippers, a tech company that has developed
a trip-planning website and app; and the Frameri, an eyewear company known for its interchangeable
frame and lens system.
Heather Christman, senior associate director for career development and employer relations at Miami,
said the startup community is “an area where there has been and will continue to be some economic
growth, particularly in Cincinnati.”
As startups become more established, Christman said, “We know they are going to be ramping up the
number of positions they have available, and we want them to think about coming to Miami before
anywhere else.”
Miami in the top 50 of Kiplinger’s Best College Values list
1/21/16 - Miami University is ranked 50th in Kiplinger’s 2016 list of 100 best in-state values nationwide
among public universities.
Miami also ranks 33rd on the best out-of-state values nationwide among public universities.
The new ranking is based on the recently released Best Values in Colleges list by Kiplinger’s Personal
Finance magazine.
4
Attachment F
Overall Page 82 of 144
Attachment Page 4 of 5
Attachment F
Academic Affairs Good News
Provost Callahan
February 18, 2016
GOOD NEWS FROM ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
December 2015 – January 2016
To find the best value in public colleges and universities, Kiplinger looks at measures of academic
quality, including a competitive admission rate, a low student-faculty ratio and a high four-year
graduation rate.
On the financial side, Kiplinger looks for schools with reasonable price tags, solid financial aid for
students who qualify, and a low average debt among students who borrow. Miami has placed in the 100
Best Values list every year since Kiplinger began publishing the rankings in 1998.
For the first time, Kiplinger also included a combined list of the 300 best values in all colleges — private
liberal arts, private universities and public colleges — to show how the top schools in each of the three
categories stack up against each other. Miami ranks 138th among all schools.
$1 million gift supports Farmer School study abroad
1/25/16 - The Farmer School of Business received a $1 million gift to the Roger L. Jenkins International
Scholarship from The Rose-Marie and Jack R. Anderson Foundation.
This gift increases the Andersons' contributions to this scholarship to $3 million, making it the largest
named scholarship at the Farmer School of Business and one of the largest at Miami University.
The scholarship is open to all Farmer School students who are seeking a study abroad experience and will
be awarded based upon academic merit and financial need. Funds may be applied to tuition, travel costs,
room and board and incidental expenses.
"The benefits our students receive from study abroad experiences are life-changing,” said Matt Myers,
Farmer School dean and Mitchell P. Rales Chair of Business Leadership. “Dean Jenkins was dedicated to
making this opportunity financially accessible to all Farmer School students, and we are grateful that his
vision was shared by the Andersons.”
Myers added, “The Farmer School continues to benefit from my predecessor and the legacy of excellence
he created. We are humbled by the thoughtfulness and timeliness of this gift and uplifted by the
knowledge of the impact it will have on our students.”
Anderson graduated from the business school in 1947 with a major in accounting and served as chairman
of the Farmer School’s Business Advisory Council. The Anderson family’s multimillion-dollar
philanthropic support of the Farmer School has spanned nearly three decades and includes the endowment
of two Anderson professorships and the Anderson Distinguished Lecture Series.
The Farmer School is a national leader in study abroad participation. Currently, approximately 60 percent
of its students include an international program as a component of their undergraduate studies.
5
Attachment F
Overall Page 83 of 144
Attachment Page 5 of 5
Honors Program
David Pennock
Attachment G
February 18, 2016
University Honors Program
Report for Board of Trustees, February 2016
Dr. David Pennock, Director
Honors: State of the Program
Current staffing includes
 Interim Director, David Pennock, PhD Washington, 1986, Appointed July 1, 2015.
 Associate Director, Zeb Baker, PhD, Emory 2009.
 Senior Assistant Director, David Sheehan, BA 2008, MS Ed Miami 2014.
 Assistant Director, Elise Yuhas, BA Miami 2012, MS Ed Baylor 2014.
 Academic Advisor, Teresa Radomski-Bomba, BA Truman State 2006, MA Kentucky 2011.
 Academic Advisor, Vanessa Parsons, BA Kentucky 2012, MA Eastern Kentucky 2015.
 Administrative Assistant, Pam Engel, B.I.S. Miami 2012, MS Miami 2014.
In Fall 2014 the University Honors Program (UHP) began the transition from a complex, alternative,
liberal arts degree program into an enrichment program that enhances the Global Miami Plan and
empowers each student to develop an individualized UHP Path that is unique and best supports
his or her own intellectual, academic, creative, personal, or professional growth and development.
Beginning in Fall 2016 with the class of 2020, the UHP will consist of two academic components, a fouryear University Honors Program for all Honors students and the optional University Honors with
Distinction.
University Honors Program
(Years 1-4)
University Honors with Distinction
(Years 3-4)
Honors Experiences #1 and 2, First Year Sequence: Two,
formal honors courses that fulfill major or Global Miami Plan
requirements taken over two semesters.
Honors Experiences #3 and 4, Course Extensions: A course
in which an honors student works with the instructor of a nonhonors course to explore the course material more broadly or
in greater depth. Must be pre-petitioned, and can be
completed any time after the student’s first year.
Honors Experiences #5-8, Additional Honors Experiences:
Formal honors courses, Course Extensions, or pre-petitioned
co-/extracurricular experiences. Can be completed any time
after the student’s first year.
This four-year program empowers students to work with their
honors advisors to develop their own, unique Honors Path,
encourages student/faculty engagement, and is compatible
with all majors in the University.
Significant Project: A student-initiated, faculty-mentored, and
UHP Advisor-approved major project. Creative projects are
encouraged and may include traditional academic theses,
artistic projects or performances, and major service,
experiential, or professional development projects.
This optional experience provides each student the
opportunity to work with their honors advisor and faculty
mentor to develop a major project that supports his or her
own intellectual, academic, creative, personal, or professional
growth and development.
Honors Admission
The UHP partnered closely with the Office of Admission for the Fall 2015 first-year Honors admission cycle.
The application process continued to be administered through Admission, using only existing Miami
1
Attachment G
Overall Page 84 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 3
Attachment G
Honors Program
David Pennock
February 18, 2016
application materials, and maintaining a highly competitive and selective process. This process aligned
with wider enrollment management and admission strategies for high-ability recruitment. The Fall 2015
first-year Honors cohort included 510 students, an 18% yield rate, and a strong academic profile: 4.25
(mean GPA), 31.8 (mean ACT score). The cohort is 63% female, 46% out-of-state, 8% first-generation,
16.9% multicultural, and distributed across divisions: 13% CEC, 7% CEHS, 3% CCA, 30% FSB, and 47%
CAS. Of enrolled students, 30% indicated pre-medical intent and 12% indicated pre-law intent.
Additionally, in partnership with Admission, the UHP developed and implemented a reconsideration
process as well as admission processes for first-year Miami students and for students transferring to Miami
in their first- or second-years. In Spring 2015, 13 first-year and 15 transfer students were added to the
UHP. In Fall 2015, 13 first-year and 14 transfer students were added.
Honors Student Progress
Through intensive advising designed to assist them to meet their Honors-related academic requirements,
Honors students are making consistent progress toward degree completion. The graduating class of 2015,
for example, posted a 73% four-year graduation rate. This figure was an increase over the same rates for
the previous two classes, which both posted a 71% four-year rate. This progress toward graduation begins
with our successful retention of students in their first year. Indeed, our first-year retention rate for the
graduating class of 2018 was 100%, which was the third consecutive year in which we retained all of our
incoming students from their first year to their second. This high retention rate suggests that the academic
support that the program provides Honors students is effective at helping students to develop a sense of
purpose and belonging that sustains their academic progress through to Commencement Day.
Honors Curriculum
University Honors Program
During Summer and Fall 2015, the UHP reviewed the Honors Curriculum to assess its alignment with the
goals of the UHP: To provide a four-year program that 1) empowers each student to develop the unique
Honors Program Path that best supports his or her own intellectual, academic, creative, personal, or
professional growth and development, 2) encourages student/faculty engagement, and 3) is compatible
with all majors in the University. In response to the results of that review, the UHP instituted several
changes in the curriculum. Beginning with the class entering Fall 2016, UHP students will be required to
complete eight Honors Experiences rather than the four experiences required of students in the classes
that entered Fall 2014 and 2015. This change returns the UHP to a four-year program. Students entering
Fall 2016 will also be required to complete a two-course Honors Sequence over two semesters rather than
a two-course Honors Cluster in the first semester. This change provides students greater flexibility in
choosing Honors Experiences during their first year at Miami, which will further enable students to design
the Honors Path best for them and help make the UHP compatible with all majors. Finally, beginning Spring
2016, UHP students will be able to use Course Extensions (See Table on page 1) as Honors Experiences.
This change will provide greater opportunity for students to design their own Honors Path, encourage
student/faculty engagement, and help make the UHP compatible will all majors.
University Honors with Distinction
The Advanced University Honors Plan of Study was also reviewed for alignment with the UHP mission and
revised and renamed as a result. University Honors with Distinction (See Table on page 1) is optional for
Honors students. It empowers students to develop a project that best fits their goals, and it involves
significant student/faculty interaction and engagement. It also is more accessible to students from all
majors.
2
Attachment G
Overall Page 85 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 3
Attachment G
Honors Program
David Pennock
February 18, 2016
Honors Community
National Fellowships & Awards Advising
This year has brought both progress and success in the renewed efforts of the National Fellowship
Committee to assist Miami’s best students in competing for, and winning, national fellowships. Maeva Metz,
a senior Microbiology major, won the Barry Goldwater Scholarship, as well as the Astronaut Foundation
Scholarship, both of which will support her graduate studies. Another student, Blake Razor, earned
Honorable Mention honors from the Goldwater. Four graduating seniors in the Class of 2015 – Anna
Borchers, Graham Bowling, Kimberly Forster, and Nicole Smith – were selected as English Teaching
Assistants in the Fulbright U. S. Student Program. Rebeccca Jorgensen, a junior Economics and Mathematics
double major, became Miami’s first finalist for the Harry S. Truman Scholarship since 2003, competing from
her home state of Wisconsin. Most important, Matthew Meeks, a May 2015 graduate in Zoology, was named
Miami’s first finalist for the Rhodes Scholarship since 2012, competing in Region 10, which includes Ohio.
Community Engagement
The UHP continued its co-curricular efforts to promote engagement within the Honors community. The
UHP held its second Honors Convocation, successfully welcoming the new Honors student cohort to the
UHP, introducing them to the UHP staff, and providing them with an overview of program requirements
and offerings. Within Old Manse, UHP staff collaborated with Honors students to utilize the student
community room to support student programming and learning. The Honors Student Advisory Board
(HSAB) used a designated office and conference room for leadership meetings. This has resulted in an
increased ability for Honors students to gather, study, and socialize alongside UHP staff. Weekly, UHP staff
and HSAB members invite the Honors community to meet for Friday “Round-Up” events.
Honors Student Advisory Board
UHP staff worked closely with HSAB to organize service, leadership, and social activities for Honors
students. HSAB’s accomplishments include: recruiting and retaining a membership of 72 students, piloting
a first-year mentoring program, serving on the Honors Program Advisory Committee (HPAC), and offering
advisory and programming activities to the Honors community, such as an Honors Formal and a kick-off
event. HSAB’s philanthropic successes include leading over 100 students at Make a Difference Day and
donating over $1600 from a 1K benefit walk to the organization Charity: Water.
Future Directions
Student/Faculty Engagement and Experiential Learning
The UHP plans to explore additional ways to increase opportunities for student/faculty engagement and to
look for ways to develop experiential learning opportunities for UHP students.
Articulation Agreements
In concert with the Office of Admission, the UHP continues to develop articulation agreements with honors
programs at community colleges throughout Ohio to increase opportunity for, and representation of, highability students from underrepresented groups. An agreement with Cincinnati State Technical and
Community College is currently being developed.
University Academic Scholars Program
In 2016-2017 the UHP will assume responsibility for administering the University Academic Scholars
Program.
3
Attachment G
Overall Page 86 of 144
Attachment Page 3 of 3
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Prevention
Miami University is committed to maintaining a healthy and safe learning, living, and working
environment and to creating an environment that promotes responsibility, dignity, and respect in
matters of sexual and interpersonal conduct. Over the last year several strategic as well as fortuitous
events helped craft improvements to the sexual and interpersonal violence efforts across Miami
University. These events include: the 2015 campus climate survey; student led “List of Demands;” and
the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s (ODHE) Changing Campus Culture initiative.
2015 Campus Climate Survey
Per the national April 2014 Not Alone report, “The first step in solving a problem is to name it and know
the extent of it – and a campus climate survey is the best way to do that. . . . and we urge schools to show
they’re serious about the problem by conducting the survey [in 2015].” After crafting a survey based
upon national and local expertise, Miami launched a climate survey. In April of 2015, 11,000 randomly
selected students from all academic levels and campuses were asked to complete the survey. A total of
1,655 students responded, a 15% response rate. As with most voluntary response surveys, it should not
be assumed that those responding are randomly selected. Thus, while our results are useful and important
in that they represent the perceptions and experiences of the survey respondents, we would caution
against extrapolating the findings to the broader campus community.
The survey asked students about their perceptions of campus climate; institutional crisis response;
university leadership, policies, and reporting; campus sexual assault procedures and education; bystander
interventions; incidence of actual or attempted sexual assault; and sexual assault myths. We continue to
review these results in an effort to bolster our response and support; enhance our education and
prevention efforts; and improve our processes and procedures related to sexual misconduct. Additional
information regarding the survey can be found in the online report “2015 Sexual Assault Campus Climate
Survey” on the Miami University Sexual and Interpersonal Violence webpage: miamioh.edu/sexualassault.
Student List of Demands
In an effort that began with an on-campus student organization (F-Word), in the late Fall of 2015 a
group of students created a “list of demands” related to Miami’s sexual and interpersonal violence
mitigation efforts. This list was designed to improve the university’s approach to sexual assault support,
education, and prevention and was shared with various administrators and groups across the university.
The list of twelve demands can be categorized into five areas: suggestions related to the It’s On Us
pledge; recommendations related to the sexual assault response website; , questions and concerns
about crime alerts; the need for greater transparency, generally; and an appeal for more resources to
enhance education and hire a sexual assault prevention coordinator.
The Division of Student Affairs Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Prevention/Response Committee met
with representatives of the student group to discuss ways to advance these efforts and come to a
common accord about next steps, actions, and options. This conversation continues as students,
faculty, and staff provide ongoing input, feedback, and ideas on how to improve our institutional efforts.
Attachment H
Overall Page 87 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
ODHE Changing Campus Culture
Fall 2015 also brought the ODHE Changing Campus Culture initiative. As stated by the initiative: “A
single act of sexual violence is one too many. Ohio seeks to strengthen its ability to better respond to,
and ultimately prevent, sexual assault on the state’s college campuses.” The Changing Campus Culture
report provides five recommendations with the goal of every Ohio institution implementing them by the
beginning of the 2016/2017 academic year. These recommendations emphasize: using data to guide
action; empowering staff, faculty, campus law enforcement and students to prevent and respond to
sexual violence through evidence-based training; communicating a culture of shared respect and
responsibility; and developing a comprehensive response policy, and adopt a survivor-centered
response. It is encouraging that Miami has already adopted (at least a degree) most of the specific
recommendations made in the Changing Campus Culture report, but the report also reminds us of the
significant work that still needs to be done in the areas of support, education, and prevention.
Improving our efforts
Response/support
We are committed to supporting survivors of sexual and interpersonal violence, so improving response
is essential. From the campus climate survey, it is evident that there is a gap between the incidents that
occur and the number of reports received. This is true in spite of the fact that the campus climate
survey indicates that the majority of students feel that the university would take a report seriously and
maintain information in a way to limit dissemination of that information. In order to enhance a climate
of safe reporting and victim/survivor support, additional education and awareness regarding how to
report, where to report, confidential resources, and reporting resources is needed.
As part of efforts to enhance response, the Office of the Dean of Students submitted a proposal to the
Ohio Attorney General’s Victims of Crime Act. Awarded at the beginning of 2016, this grant provides
funding to enhance the partnership with Women Helping Women, a local sexual violence advocacy nonprofit. This grant provides funding to assist Women Helping Women staff – working in partnership with
our office -- create an informational video, provide translation services, and produce educational and
promotional materials. The purpose of this grant is to enhance response efforts and increase
victim/survivor advocacy.
The survey responses underscore the need to readily access information in a simple, understandable
way. Enhancements to the website will help facilitate ease of access for victim/survivors, friends, family,
and the community. A critical improvement will be clearer differentiation of confidential resources
versus those with a duty to report. Access to confidential resources can help ease a victim/survivor’s
concern and provides support for safely reporting. Further improvements will include additional
transparency in prevention/education and removing binary gender language wherever possible.
Modifications to victim support also involve improving education regarding how the university responds
to incidents, and other details such as “how to help a friend” and what it means to have a traumainformed response. These modifications will help educate others on appropriate ways to respond if
someone reports to them and provide normalization for common survivor response. Furthermore,
Attachment H
Overall Page 88 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
additional reinforcement is needed regarding the role of alcohol in sexual and interpersonal violence,
and the university’s limited amnesty policy.
Education
Education regarding response is essential, but awareness and additional efforts are required in order to
more fully effect change in our campus climate. Efforts regarding a comprehensive, campus-wide
educational program have been ongoing and continue to be improved upon. Based upon the events of
the last year, we have enhanced efforts regarding Step Up! bystander intervention. Advancements
include adopting the Step Up! training into the Greek new member education program and for all
intercollegiate athletes, along with increasing promotional information and awareness generally.
Per the climate survey, Miami students had concerning reactions while responding to certain myths
related to sexual assault. Based upon these responses, there will be changes in our education
curriculum with an emphasis on consent and scenarios to clarify consent, how to obtain consent, and
when an individual cannot consent.
From prior to the first year and throughout a student’s time at the university, education is ongoing.
Online programming, orientation, letters, fairs, awareness months, and other events all provide an
ongoing educational plan. However, every effort must be made to continue to make this plan
comprehensive for all students, faculty, and staff. Analysis indicates additional areas of need include
information regarding myths, programming during welcome week, and developmentally/geographically
appropriate enhancements for upperclass, graduate, and regional students.
Prevention
Response and awareness education are crucial pieces to ensure students are safely reporting and
responding, yet the ultimate goal is to work to create a culture of respect and prevent future incidents.
The CDC suggests treating violence prevention as a public health problem, which then suggests the
following intervention process: define and monitor the problem, identify risk and protective factors,
develop and test prevention strategies, and assure widespread adoption.
From the campus climate survey, the majority of students indicated that they think sexual violence is a
problem on campus. However, it is important for students, faculty, and staff to work together to
provide options and resources on how to prevent sexual and interpersonal violence. These efforts need
to be multifaceted and widespread so as to assure adoption across the campus, from the individual to
the societal level. Our students recognize the problem, realize it is not just up to the administration to
solve it, and accept some personal responsibility for being part of the solution. These perceptions align
very well with programming to actively engage in being part of the solution, which is the foundation of
the national It’s On Us initiative.
Miami University’s It’s On Us initiative began in the Spring of 2015. Connecting the disparate efforts
across the university, It’s On Us continues to remind us that this is about us and each individual, group,
and community can make a different in contributing to a culture of respect. For love and honor and
respect, It’s On Us to end sexual and interpersonal violence.
Attachment H
Overall Page 89 of 144
Attachment Page 3 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
MIAMIUNIVERSITY
BOARDOFTRUSTEESASAC18FEB16
MIAMIUNIVERSITYCLIMATESURVEY:
RESULTSANDDISCUSSION
Attachment H
Overall Page 90 of 144
Attachment Page 4 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
PRESENTATIONOVERVIEW
MIKE
Surveyimpetus,creation,execution,context,results,andresponse
BECCA
Currentandevolving(datainformed)response/support,educationand
preventionefforts
Attachment H
Overall Page 91 of 144
Attachment Page 5 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
BACKGROUND
MIAMIUNIVERSITYVALUES
MiamiUniversityisascholarlycommunitywhosemembersbelievethata
liberaleducationisgroundedinqualitiesofcharacteraswellasof
intellect.Werespectthedignityofotherpersons,therightsandproperty
ofothers,andtherightofotherstoholdandexpressdisparatebeliefs.We
believeinhonesty,integrity,andtheimportanceofmoralconduct.We
defendthefreedomofinquirythatistheheartoflearningandcombine
thatfreedomwiththeexerciseofjudgmentandtheacceptanceof
personalresponsibility.
ApprovedbytheBoardofTrustees,February8,2002
Attachment H
Overall Page 92 of 144
Attachment Page 6 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
BACKGROUND
MiamiUniversityiscommittedtomaintainingahealthyandsafelearning,
living,andworkingenvironmentandtocreatinganenvironmentthat
promotesresponsibility,dignity,andrespectinmattersofsexualand
interpersonalconduct.Sexualassault,sexualmisconduct,domestic
violence,datingviolence,andstalking(TitleIXoffenses)arestrictly
prohibitedandwillnotbetolerated…on(or)off‐campus,(orinany)
academic,educational,co‐curricular,athletic,studyabroad,(or)other
Universityprogram
MiamiUniversityTitleIXProtocol
Attachment H
Overall Page 93 of 144
Attachment Page 7 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
BACKGROUND
SEXUALANDINTERPERSONALVIOLENCEISA
PERSISTENT,ONGOINGPROBLEM
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
TitleIX(1972)
CleryAct(1990)
“DearColleague”letter(OfficeofCivilRights),April2011
Miami’s2013SexualAssaultResponseTaskForce
Jan22,2014WhiteHouseTaskForce
TaskforcereportApril,2014:NotAlone
OhioDepartmentofHigherEducation:ChangingCampusCulture
(2015)
Attachment H
Overall Page 94 of 144
Attachment Page 8 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
CLIMATESURVEY
“Thefirststepinsolvingaproblemistonameitand
knowtheextentofit– andacampusclimatesurveyis
thebestwaytodothat.Weareprovidingschoolswitha
toolkittoconductasurvey– andweurgeschoolsto
showthey’reseriousabouttheproblembyconducting
thesurveynextyear.”
FromNotAlone,April2014
Attachment H
Overall Page 95 of 144
Attachment Page 9 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
ADHOCGROUP
JayneBrownell,VicePresidentofStudentAffairs
KenyaAsh,DirectorOfficeofEquityandEqualOpportunity
MikeCurme,AVP/DoS
GwenFears,AssociateDoS
BeccaGetson,DeputyTitleIXCoordinatorforStudents;Sexual
AssaultResponseCoordinator
RonScott,AVPInstitutionalDiversity
SusanVaughn,DirectorOfficeofEthicsandStudentConflict
Resolution
RoseMarieWard,DirectorCenterforTeachingExcellence
Attachment H
Overall Page 96 of 144
Attachment Page 10 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
SURVEYDEVELOPMENT
NOTALONEPROVIDEDSIGNIFICANTGUIDANCE
Reviewed,adoptedmostoftheNotAlonetemplatesurvey
• Biggestchangesweretoincidence/prevalencequestions
Adoptedothertaskforcerecommendations
• Samplingversuscensus(11,000;roughlyhalfcensus)
• Highlevelcommitment(invitationfromPresidentHodge)
• IRBandrelatedconfidentiality
• Incentives:decoupledfromsurvey;noBannerlink
Attachment H
Overall Page 97 of 144
Attachment Page 11 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
SURVEYDEVELOPMENT
IMPORTANTCONSIDERATIONS/REQUIREMENTS
•
•
•
•
•
18+only
Informedconsent
Confidentiality
Nomandatoryreporting
Triggerwarning/resources
Attachment H
Overall Page 98 of 144
Attachment Page 12 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
SURVEYQUESTIONS
Section1:Studentinformation(q1‐12)
Section2:GeneralClimate(q13‐27)
Sections3,4:PerceptionsofLeadership,Policies,Reporting(q28‐45)
Section5:Incidencequestions(q46‐66)
Sections6‐10:BystanderAttitudes/Behaviors(q67‐114)
Section11:SamplePerceptionsofSexualAssault(q115‐133)
Attachment H
Overall Page 99 of 144
Attachment Page 13 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
PREVALENCE
TACTICS
NON‐CONSENSUALACTIVITY
Inthelast12monthsorsince
youbeganatMiami,hasanyone:
• Coercion
• Threat
• Force
• Incapacitation
Whenyouindicatedyoudidn’twantto:
• Touch
• Attemptedpenetration
• Penetration
Fiveresultingcategories:unwantedsexualcontact;(attempted)
coercion;(attempted)rape
Attachment H
Overall Page 100 of 144
Attachment Page 14 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
SURVEYLOGISTICS
•
•
•
•
Opendates:4/2/15– 4/23/15
1,655responses,15%responserate
63.8%female;34.8%male
Graduatestudentsoversampled
OursummaryfocusesonOxfordundergraduates(n=1,174)
Attachment H
Overall Page 101 of 144
Attachment Page 15 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
INTERPRETINGRESULTS
CAUTIONINEXTRAPOLATINGRESULTS
• responserate/propensity
• demographicmismatch
• non‐weightingoftheresults
Veryusefulsnapshotbasedof7.5%ofthestudentbody
Attachment H
Overall Page 102 of 144
Attachment Page 16 of 49
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
Attachment H
February 18, 2016
PREVALENCERESULTS
All%
Female%
Male%
n=819
n=521
n=298
Nonvictim
65.8
57.5
80.8
Unwantedsexualcontact
8.5
10.2
5.7
Attemptedcoercion
4.2
5.8
1.3
Coercion
2.6
2.7
2.4
Attemptedrape
6.3
8.5
2.4
Rape
12.6
15.4
7.4
Attachment H
Overall Page 103 of 144
Attachment Page 17 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
MIAMIINCONTEXT
• Miami’sprocessandreportingverysimilartootherschools(AAU)
• Miami’sresultssimilartootherschools
• Fewsurprises,butimportantinsightsfromdata
Attachment H
Overall Page 104 of 144
Attachment Page 18 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
MIAMIINCONTEXT
COMPARISONSTOOTHERSTUDIES
•
•
•
•
•
•
Definitions/timeperiodsmaydiffer
Coercion/attemptedcounted?
Attemptedrapecounted?
Resultsweighted?
Overallorsub‐groupresults?
Movingforward:ODHECCCconsortium?
Attachment H
Overall Page 105 of 144
Attachment Page 19 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
USINGTHEDATA:INSTITUTIONALRESPONSE
• Prototypicalassessmentcycle(plan,do,check,act:repeat)
• Spring2015:Developedsurveyandgoals;launchedsurvey
• Summer2015:Examinedandprocesseddata
• Fall2015:Discussed/interpretedresults;draftedreport;releasedresults
• Spring2016:Collaborateonimprovements;plannextassessmentround
Attachment H
Overall Page 106 of 144
Attachment Page 20 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
NEXTSTEPS:SURVEY
• AAU,ARC3offercollectivesurveyoptions
• OhioHigherEducation:ChangingCampusCulture
• Annual?
• Abilitytocustomize?
• Dynamiclandscape
Attachment H
Overall Page 107 of 144
Attachment Page 21 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
CONTINUOUSIMPROVEMENT
DATAREVEALSWORKWENEEDTODORELATEDTO:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Amnesty
Confidentialreporting
Advocacy
Website
StepUpexpansion
Havenexpansion
OrientationandWelcomeWeek
Attachment H
Overall Page 108 of 144
Attachment Page 22 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
FROMNOTALONE
Climatesurveyscanprovideinformationaboutcommunity
perceptions,knowledgeandattitudes relevanttosexualassault.
Incidentratesassessedviaconfidentialoranonymoussurveyscanbe
anothersourceofdataabouttheextentoftheproblem.Regularly
administeringsurveyscanshowchangesovertime,suchasdecreases
insexualassaultsandincreasesinawarenessorreporting.Surveyscan
provideinformationabouttheprobleminaparticularcampus
community,enablingschoolstotailorpreventionandresponseefforts.
Conductingaclimatesurveycandemonstratetheuniversity’s
commitment toaddressingsexualassaultandbuildtrustwithstudents,
faculty,parents,andothers.
Attachment H
Overall Page 109 of 144
Attachment Page 23 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
CHANGINGCAMPUSCULTURE
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Usedatatoguideaction.
2. Empowerstaff,faculty,campuslawenforcementandstudentsto
preventandrespondtosexualviolencethroughevidence‐based
training.
3. Communicateacultureofsharedrespectandresponsibility.
4. Developacomprehensiveresponsepolicy.
5. Adoptasurvivor‐centeredresponse.
Attachment H
Overall Page 110 of 144
Attachment Page 24 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
LISTOFDEMANDS
CreatedbyanadhocgroupofstudentsledbystudentorganizationF‐
WORD
Listof12demandstheyaremakingtotheuniversityincluding:
• ChangesintheIt’sOnUspledge,website,andcrimealerts
• Modificationstoeducation
• Hireasexualassaultpreventioncoordinator
• Improvetransparency
Attachment H
Overall Page 111 of 144
Attachment Page 25 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
IMPROVMENTS
PRIMARYFOCUSAREAS
1. Victimsupport:datatellusprevalenceissignificantlyhigherthan
reporting;knowledgeofresources
2. Education:dataprovideinsightsintoeffectiveness,extent
3. Prevention:datarevealimpressionsandbehaviorsrelatedto
bystanderinterventions
Attachment H
Overall Page 112 of 144
Attachment Page 26 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
1.VICTIMSUPPORT
FINDINGS
• Gapbetweenincidenceandreports
• Confidentialreporting
• Process/fairnessconcerns
• Advocacyversussupport
RESPONSE
• VOCAGRANT
• Websiteupdates
• Education
Attachment H
Overall Page 113 of 144
Attachment Page 27 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
1.VICTIMSUPPORT
%FEELVERY/MODERATELYLIKELYTHATTHE
UNIVERSITYWOULD
•
•
•
•
•
83%:takeasexualassaultreportseriously
83%:keepreportlimitedtothosewhoneedtoknow
76%:supportthepersonmakingthereport
69%:takecorrectiveaction“againsttheoffender”
65%:addressthefactorsthatmayhaveledtothesexualassault
Attachment H
Overall Page 114 of 144
Attachment Page 28 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
1.VICTIMSUPPORT
%AGREE/STRONGLYAGREE
Knowwheretogethelp
• 65%(70%male;62.5%female)
UnderstandMiami’sformalprocedurestoaddresscomplaintsofsexualassault
• 44%(35%male,48%female)
Attachment H
Overall Page 115 of 144
Attachment Page 29 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
1.VICTIMSUPPORT
VICTIMSOFCRIMEACTGRANT
MiamiUniversityawarded$14,566
Aspectsofthegrant:
• Focusonresponse
• ContractwithWomenHelpingWomentoprovideconfidentialadvocacy
• Informationalvideo
• Handoutsandposters
• Translationcosts
Attachment H
Overall Page 116 of 144
Attachment Page 30 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
1.VICTIMSUPPORT
WEBSITEUPDATES
• Easeofaccess
• Clearerdifferentiationofconfidentialresourcesversusreporting
resources
• Inputfrom“ListofDemands”
• Moreobviouslinkandexplanationregardingprevention/education
efforts
• Removebinarygenderlanguagewherepossible
Attachment H
Overall Page 117 of 144
Attachment Page 31 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
1.VICTIMSUPPORT
EDUCATION
•
•
•
•
•
•
Increaseeducationin“Howtohelpafriend”
Trauma‐informedresponse
ResidentAssistanteducationmodules
Postercampaign(perVOCAgrant)
RoleofAlcohol
LimitedAmnesty
Attachment H
Overall Page 118 of 144
Attachment Page 32 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
2.EDUCATION
FINDINGS
• Widespread
• Generallyeffective
• Gaps/bystanderinformation
RESPONSE
• Haven:Allfirstyearstudents
• StepUp:Greeknewmembereducation;ICA
• It’sonUs:Ongoing
• Comprehensive,campuswidecampaign
Attachment H
Overall Page 119 of 144
Attachment Page 33 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
2.EDUCATION
• 56%(55%)reportreceivingtraining/educationinsexualassaultpolicies
(prevention)
• 6.5%ofthosefeltthatitwas“notusefulatall”
• ~74%foundeducationatleastmoderatelyuseful
• 93%offirst‐yearsororitywomenreporttraining
• Graduatestudentgap
Attachment H
Overall Page 120 of 144
Attachment Page 34 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
2.EDUCATION
RESPONDINGTOMYTHS
• 12+%agree/stronglyagree“Ifapersondoesn’tsay‘no,’theycan'tclaim
rape”
Intervention:Educationonaffirmativeconsentdefinition
• ~20%agree/stronglyagree“Ifsomeoneisrapedwhiletheyaredrunk,
theyareatleastsomewhatresponsibleforwhathappened”
Intervention:Clarificationofalcohol/consentintersection
Attachment H
Overall Page 121 of 144
Attachment Page 35 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
2.EDUCATION
OVERVIEW
Priortothestartofschool:onlineprogramming(EverFi’sHaven)
Orientation:CommunityExpectations(OfficeoftheDeanofStudents)
Orientation:SOULvignettes/discussion
StartofSchool:DeanofStudentsletter,Walkabouts,FireSafetyFair,
CampusSafetyFair,programminguponrequest
• ResidenceHallresources:RAtraining,RAprogramming,posters,boards
• OngoingProgramming:It’sOnUs,IamMiami,StepUp,PeerEducation
• TargetedProgramming:Athletics,GreekNewMembertraining,
Awarenessmonths
•
•
•
•
Attachment H
Overall Page 122 of 144
Attachment Page 36 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
2.EDUCATION
GAPANALYSIS
•
•
•
•
•
Mythsandrealities
WelcomeWeek
Upper‐classstudents
Graduatestudents
Regionalstudents
Attachment H
Overall Page 123 of 144
Attachment Page 37 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
2.EDUCATION
BYSTANDERINTERVENTION
•
•
•
•
GreekNewMember
Athletics
University101
NCAAInnovationGrant
Attachment H
Overall Page 124 of 144
Attachment Page 38 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
FINDINGS
•
•
•
•
Misperceptionsabouttheroleandimpactofalcohol
Theimportanceofbystanders
Perpetratorsasrepeatoffenders
Menaspotentialvictim/survivorsandallies
RESPONSES
•
•
•
PublicHealthApproach
SocialEcologicalModel
It’sOnUs
Attachment H
Overall Page 125 of 144
Attachment Page 39 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
CONCERN
• 69%feelMiamistudentswouldbevery/moderatelylikelyto:
• allowpersonalloyaltiestoaffectreportingofsexualassault
• choosenottoreportsexualassaultoutofconcerntheyorotherswill
bepunishedforinfractions,suchasunderagedrinking
HOPE
• 95%areatleastmoderatelylikelytoconfrontafriendif“Ihearrumors
thathe/sheforcedsexonsomeone”
• 91%indicatedtheywould“reportafriendthatcommittedarape”
Attachment H
Overall Page 126 of 144
Attachment Page 40 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
MEANSSCORES:1(notatalltrue)–6(verymuchtrue)
• 2.7:“Idonotthinksexualviolenceisaproblemonthiscampus”(~28%
responded“notatalltrue”)
• 2.1:“doingsomethingaboutsexualviolenceissolelythejobof‘campus
authorities’”
• 4.0:“IthinkIcandosomethingaboutsexualviolence.”
Attachment H
Overall Page 127 of 144
Attachment Page 41 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
14PERSONALINTERVENTIONSCENARIOS
• 96+%wouldbemoderately/verylikelyto“gethelpandresourcesfora
friendwhotellsmehe/shehasbeenraped”
• Inall14,over60%aremoderately/verylikelytointervenepositively
(weakest:“expressmydiscomfortifsomeonemakesajokeabouta
woman’sbody”)
Attachment H
Overall Page 128 of 144
Attachment Page 42 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
14PERPETRATOR/BYSTANDERQUESTIONS
PERPETRATOR (%moderately/very/extremelylikelyto)
• 99%:stophavingsexif…he/shesaystostop
• 98%:stopsexualactivitywhenaskedto
• 89%:decidenottohavesexwithapartnerif(s)heisdrunk
• 82%:askforconsent…eveninalongtermrelationship
Attachment H
Overall Page 129 of 144
Attachment Page 43 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
14PERPETRATOR/BYSTANDERQUESTIONS
BYSTANDER (%moderately/very/extremelylikelyto)
• 93%:Checkinwithmyfriendwholooksdrunkwhen(s)hegoestoaroom
withsomeoneelseataparty
• 91%:Saysomethingtomyfriendwhoistakingadrunkpersonbackto
his/herroomataparty.
• 80%:Challengeafriendwhousesinsultingwordstodescribegirls
• 72%:Challengeafriendwhomadeasexistjoke
Attachment H
Overall Page 130 of 144
Attachment Page 44 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
REALITYCHECK
• 29%have“observedasituationthatyoubelievewas,orcouldhaveled
to,asexualassault”
• 46%ofthesesaidthatthey“askedthepersonwhoappearedtobeatrisk
iftheyneededhelp”
• 4.5%decidedto“takenoaction”
• Others:steppedin(oraskedanotherto)(17%);confrontedordistracted
(16%)
• StepUp:direct/distract/delegate
Attachment H
Overall Page 131 of 144
Attachment Page 45 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
PUBLICHEALTHAPPROACH
• Focusofpublichealthis
onhealth,safety,and
well‐beingofentire
populations.~CDC
Attachment H
Overall Page 132 of 144
Attachment Page 46 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
SOCIALECOLOGICALMODEL
Attachment H
Overall Page 133 of 144
Attachment Page 47 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
3.PREVENTION
IT’SONUS
•
•
•
•
•
AssociatedStudentGovernmentcommittee
AdHocworkgroup
It’sOnUsweekonceasemester
ChangeinthepledgeattheendofFall2015
Currenteffortsdevotedtowardexpanding“It’sOnUs”fromadevoted
weektobeyond
Attachment H
Overall Page 134 of 144
Attachment Page 48 of 49
Attachment H
Sexual Assault Prevention
Mike Curme and Becca Getson
February 18, 2016
THANKYOU!
Attachment H
Overall Page 135 of 144
Attachment Page 49 of 49
Attachment I
Student Affairs Good News
Jayne Brownell
February 18, 2016
Student Affairs Good News
February 2016
Fall and Winter Highlights (through January 29)
Armstrong Student Center
 During the first two quarters of FY 2016 (summer/fall), Armstrong Student Center was the host location
for 772 events. 632 of these events were organized by student organizations, 129 by university
departments and 11 were non-university clients (employers, conference and weddings). This a 10
percent increase compared to the same time frame in FY 2015.
 In January, the Ford Family Initiative for Spirituality, Meaning and Purpose, held a day and half strategic
planning retreat with campus and community partners to develop learning outcomes and a strategic
plan for interfaith and personal development initiatives related to the objectives of the gift. Work will
continue on this plan throughout the semester.
Community Engagement and Service
 $4,772.84 was collected during Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week in November. Oxford
Community Choice Pantry and the Oxford Homeless Coalition are the benefiting agencies.
 48 America Reads/Counts tutors worked 3,058 hours for the fall 2015 semester with community
partners in College Corner, Hamilton, Middletown and Oxford, Ohio.
 There are 50 Service-Learning courses on the Oxford campus for spring 2016. Total enrollment is 752.
Enrollment in OCES coordinated courses is 295.
Diversity Affairs
 The MLK Celebration was held at the Oxford Community Arts Center for the third time. The theme for
this year's event was "Where are our Children? The Unspoken Dreams of African American Children,"
with keynote speaker Dr. Yvette Harris. Dr. Juanita Tate (recently retired) was honored by the Oxford
NAACP for her countless years of contribution.
 On January 4th – January 11th 2016, ODA staff members, Shevonne Nelson and Yvania Garcia-Pusateri
and SAHE graduate student Bria Howard led the 3rd Annual Office of Diversity Affairs Immersion Trip to
San Francisco. Out of 43 applicants, 8 students were selected to participate to visit San Francisco to
learn about “Asian Fusion” through the lens of the Asian Diaspora and its impact on the culture and
identity of the city. Asian Fusion is defined as art, music, food, theater, film, architecture, photography,
community, law, politics, education, health, technology/social media and tourism, etc. Additionally
students learned about LGBTQ+ history during their time in the city and discussed the intersections
between race/ethnicity and gender identity identity/sexuality. Students also met with 4 alumni to
discuss these intersections and how their work relates as well their time at Miami. The alumni include:
Shefali Razadan Duggal ’93 (Political Activist and Fundraiser)
Hanrui “Hannah” Yang ’15 (Associate at First Republic Bank)
Amol Sogal ’03 (Mobile Product Management, EBATES)
Tony Chang ’02 (Software Engineer, Google)
Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute
 The Wilks Leadership Institute hosted the second of four Wilks Leadership Workshops on November
15th. This workshop, Vision and Innovation, introduced students to the process of developing vision
statements as part of a strategic planning process, challenged students in five different innovation
stations followed by student vision statement presentations and a discussion on a TED Talk about
leveraging limitations instead of being constrained by them.
 The Miami Alpha Sigma Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) held its fall induction ceremony on
December 3rd. In the ceremony, 12 junior/senior students were recognized for their outstanding
1
Attachment I
Overall Page 136 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 5
Attachment I



Student Affairs Good News
Jayne Brownell
February 18, 2016
academic achievement and leadership in the five major phases as defined by ODK. Additionally, one
staff member was inducted for his outstanding leadership and support of students.
The Institute provided a StrengthQuest Workshop for the newly re-formed HOME office. With the
reorganization of several separate offices into the redesigned HOME office, this workshop benefited
them by providing a means to getting to know one another better and to understand roles and
associated talents and help to build the new team.
The Scholar Leader Community along with Marcy Miller (executive director of Miami University Hillel)
collaborated to offer the 2016 Winter Immersion Service Experience (WISE) Trip to St. Louis, Missouri
from January 20th-23rd. The WISE trip is an annual collaborative effort concentrated around the ideas of
power, privilege, and social justice. This year, 27 undergraduates and 3 staff advisers participated in the
trip - ranging from Scholar Leaders, Hillel, and Office of Community Engagement and Service.
Program Highlights of the Fall 2015 term:
o 1,495 students attended a Wilks Leadership Institute Program
o 608 students and staff attended a StrengthsQuest Workshop
o 38 programs were offered by the Wilks Leadership Institute
o 529 students joined Sigma Alpha Pi, the National Society of Leadership and Success
o 73 students attended the Perlmutter Leadership Conference
o 55 students are currently pursuing a co-curricular Leadership Certificate
o 239 new followers on social media - #leadership
New Student Programs
 We’ve just concluded a busy spring orientation season!
Transfer one-day orientations.
For students entering in spring term 2016, New Student Programs (NSP) began collaborating with the
College of Arts and Science (CAS) to expand the transfer advising days to one-day orientation sessions
that introduce transfer students and their families to academic and student life at Miami. Sessions were
capped at 12 students each. Informal feedback from students and families was very positive, and plans
are proceeding to offer 10-15 similar sessions this summer for transfer students from all academic
colleges.
Transfer one-day orientation numbers:
o 5 total transfer orientations, spanning mid-December 2015 to mid-January 2016
o 36 total students attended (all five sessions)
o 31 total family/guests attended (all five sessions)
In addition to CAS, collaborative partners included the HOME Office, One Stop for Student Success
Services, Student Success Center, Study Abroad, Office of Diversity Affairs, Office of Community
Engagement and Service, Off-Campus Outreach & Communication, Office of Parent and Family
Programs, and the Dean of Students Office.
Relocation orientation.
New students who were relocating from one of Miami’s regional campuses were invited to attend an
orientation session designed specifically for relocation students on Tuesday evening, January 19, 2016,
which drew nearly 50 attendees. This attendance hit an all-time high, which reinforced NSP’s decision
from August 2015 to offer relocation orientation separately from orientations for other new students.
Attendees met other new relocation students/families; went on a campus tour; received information on
parking, transportation, and campus navigation; learned Oxford campus acronyms, traditions, and
vocabulary; and participated in a range of workshops and campus visits.
Relocation orientation numbers:
o 27 total students attended
2
Attachment I
Overall Page 137 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 5
Attachment I
o
Student Affairs Good News
Jayne Brownell
February 18, 2016
22 total family/guests attended
Collaborative partners included the One Stop for Student Success Services, Student Success Center, OffCampus Outreach & Communication, CAS Advising, and the Dean of Students Office.
January orientation.
In collaboration with International Student and Scholar Services, NSP concluded our spring term
orientation season with our two-day January orientation, attended by both international and domestic
first-year and transfer students.
January orientation numbers:
o 199 total students attended
 123 international students (44 first-year, 13 transfer, 51 ACE program, 15 exchange)
 76 domestic students (59 transfer, 17 first-year)
o 75 family/guests attended
Off-Campus Outreach & Communication
 Hosted second event in the Commuter Center during finals with about 20 participants
 Met individually with 8 Oxford property managers to better understand their experiences with Miami
students and develop ways to collaborate on creating smoother experiences for students transitioning
to off-campus living.
Parent and Family Programs
 The Parents Council partnered with the Alumni Association to encourage all Miami alumni in
CEO/President/Founder roles of organizations to begin recruiting at Miami for full time and internship
positions.
Residence Life
 Over 280 new applicants applied for the Resident Assistant position for the 2016-17 academic
year. Returner applications close at the end of January. We anticipate over 100 current staff to apply to
return to the position. Group and individual interviews take place in early February.
 Over 30 active Eco Reps served on individual Community Leadership Teams to promote sustainability in
the residence halls and at Miami University. Five Trash Audits were conducted where trash was
weighed before recyclable materials were separated. Results were e-mailed to residents of the halls
audited.
 A new on-line tracking and accountability system was implemented for Resident Assistants to use to
communicate with residents after their 1 on 1 meetings and to make notes at the end of the
semester. Over 4800 individual e-mail messages were sent to residents from their RA. Over 10,800
notes were submitted to the system. In the 2015 Assessment of Living and Learning survey, 91.9% of
respondents (n=3840) responded that they had at least one 1 on 1 meeting with their RA, as compared
to 84.9% in 2014 and 83.0% in 2013.
 In the Fall 2015, ORL staff:
o implemented more than 430 late night and weekend programs to provide students with nonalcoholic activity alternatives. Attendance was over 6000.
o offered more than 1,500 programs/initiatives/events that support the four goals of the
Residential Curriculum (academic success, cultural competency, interpersonal development, and
community development) and Living Learning Community goals.
o conducted 678 meetings with students to talk with them about their conduct in the residence
halls and on campus.
o responded to 262 crisis, emergency and mental health situations.
3
Attachment I
Overall Page 138 of 144
Attachment Page 3 of 5
Attachment I
o
o
o
Student Affairs Good News
Jayne Brownell
February 18, 2016
resolved over 250 roommate conflicts using a variety of tools and strategies including the
Roommate Agreement, mediation, one on one meetings, parent conversations, voluntary
moves, and, in some cases, administrative reassignment of students.
taught 46 course sections including but not limited to EDL301, UNV101, and EDL290.
provided 342 hours of in-hall training to resident assistants on a variety of topics including
cultural competency, crisis management, and community building. The staff also provided 190
hours of in-hall training and development to Community Leadership Team student leaders on
topics including programming skills, time management, and diversity.
Rinella Learning Center
 The Rinella Learning Center (RLC) served 799 students through tutoring and 710 students through
supplemental instruction during fall semester. For both programs the total student visits over the
course of the semester was 6,353.
 For fall semester, the RLC Testing Center proctored 1,436 exams.
 439 students were served through Rinella’s Academic Support Services (Academic Counseling, Coaching,
and/or Study Strategies Course) and 257 students attended one or more of Rinella’s Study Strategies
Workshops.
Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership
 Semester end attendance data from Late Night Miami was compiled and we had a total of 29,404
students at 45 events for the semester. We are excited about our Spring Schedule, which was just
released. We have over 50 Late Night Miami programs planned for spring 2016.
 Sorority Recruitment numbers have increased this year. We have over 100 more women signed up for
recruitment than in the past years.
 Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) has returned to campus and received formal recognition in December of
2015. Sigma Chi Fraternity will be returning to campus Spring of 2016.
 We have created a new program called Catalyst, a one day leadership development program for student
leaders in Greek Life and Miami Activities and Programming (MAP). We have over 100 students
attending that program on January 23rd.
 The HUB, our database and general system for student organization management, has increased users
and total sessions. A total session is the actual times students have accessed the HUB. In 2014 we had
56,287 visits and in 2015 we had 72,091 visits for a 28% increase in visits to the hub.
 MAP and Late Night Miami won 2 awards at the National Campus Activities Association Annual
Conference: Best Advertising Award and Best Themed Publicity Award.
Student Counseling Service
 Solicited and successfully matched with a psychiatric resident from Wright State School of Medicine to
provide 8 hrs/wk of supplemental psychiatric service in exchange for training and supervision.
 Almost 500 students attended Furry Finals sessions in which therapy dogs are available to help calm
students studying for finals.
 Over 1,500 new students completed the at Risk mental health gatekeeper training program on-line as
part of the UNV101 course, educating themselves about how to recognize when they or a peer may be
in need of mental health services and how to refer self or peers for professional assistance.
 Mid-year statistics show that in the Student Counseling Service:
a. The shift from 50 to 30 minute initial consultation (IC) sessions to increase the availability of
brief assessment of service requestors, resulted in:
i. 28% increase in students receiving clinical services over same period last year;
ii. 12% increase in number of individual counseling or psychiatric appointments;
iii. 35% increase in students receiving clinical services for the first time;
iv. 58% decrease in number of emergency sessions required during office hours;
4
Attachment I
Overall Page 139 of 144
Attachment Page 4 of 5
Attachment I
Student Affairs Good News
Jayne Brownell
February 18, 2016
v. Elimination of wait list for initial consultation: all requestors received appointment
within 1-3 days of contact;
vi. Reduction in average wait time for on-going individual counseling from 22 days to 13
days.
b. The intentional shift of resources to significantly increase the variety and number of group
workshops to teach commonly needed basic skills in stress and anxiety management, resiliency,
concentration and focus, and depression response, resulted in:
i. 37% increase in number of group/workshop sessions offered;
ii. 48% increase in number of group/workshop appointments completed.
Women’s Center
 Patron traffic for November-December was 888 (the December BOT Good News Report included patron
traffic for September-October).
 The Women's Center stayed open late (5-9 pm) Monday-Wednesday of finals week; 28 patron visits
were recorded during these hours.
 The Women's Center, Office of Student Wellness, and GLBTQ Services collaborated to sponsor an
observance of World AIDS Day (Dec. 1) with free and confidential HIV testing at the Women's Center (32
students took part) and a panel discussion about HIV/AIDS in the evening (23 students attended).
Staff Achievements and Accomplishments
 Rhonda Jackson from the Women’s Center assumed the co-presidency of the 1809 LGBT Alumni Group
in May 2015.
 Shane Haney and Sharon Kootin-Sanwu, two of Wilks student employees, were selected as recipients of
the 2015 Honor Code Honoree Award through the Farmer School of Business. Twelve students were
award recipients in 2015. This award recognizes exemplary students who embody the three pillars of the
Honor Code: Integrity, Respect, and Responsibility.
 Jenny Levering, Director of Student Activities and the Cliff Alexander Office of Fraternity and Sorority
Life, received the Sue Kraft Fusell Distinguished Service Award for the National Association of Fraternity
and Sorority Advisors in December.
 Graham Arledge, HAWKS Peer Health Educator, presented "The Flourishing Classroom: Nurturing
Positive Mental Health in Our Students and Ourselves", based on the HAWKS #FlourishMiami Initiative,
at the National Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (Annual Convention) in Minneapolis, MN.
Graham adapted the concepts around college students and positive mental health to the high school
classroom for both teachers and students.
 NSP staff (Assistant Director Liz Walsh and Director Buffy Stoll Turton) are serving on the conference
planning committee for the upcoming regional conference of NODA: The Association for Orientation,
Transition & Retention in Higher Education. With support from the MU Family Fund, Liz and Buffy will
attend the conference on February 27 in Indianapolis with three graduate practicum students and two
undergraduate student coordinators.
 NSP Director Buffy Stoll Turton has recently been named to the research committee of NODA: The
Association for Orientation, Transition & Retention in Higher Education. This national group supports
the research mission of NODA as a professional association.
 Nine students and 2 ORL professional staff traveled to the Central Atlantic Association of College and
University Residence Halls (CAACURH) conference in Washington DC. Members of the delegation were
awarded for Outstanding Spirit (2nd place) and two Top-Ten Conference Sessions.
5
Attachment I
Overall Page 140 of 144
Attachment Page 5 of 5
Occupancy Update
Brian Woodruff
Attachment J
February 18, 2016
MIAMI UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING, DINING, RECREATION & BUSINESS SERVICES
Office of Housing Options, Meals & Events (H.O.M.E.)
2015-2016 Occupancy Report #3
1/29/2016
Building Name
Anderson
Beechwoods
Bishop
Brandon (Under Renovation)
Clawson*
Collins*
Dennison
Dodds
Dorsey
Elliott
Emerson
Etheridge
Flower (Under Renovation)
Hahne (Under Renovation)
Hamilton
Havighurst
Hepburn (Under Renovation)
Heritage Commons
Blanchard House
Fisher
Logan
Pines Lodge
Reid
Tallawanda
Hillcrest
MacCracken
Maplestreet Station
Mary Lyon
McBride
McFarland
McKee
Miami Inn
Minnich
Morris
Ogden*
Peabody*
Porter
Richard
Scott*
Stanton
Stoddard
Stonebridge
Swing*
Symmes
Tappan*
Thomson
Wells*
Wilson*
On Campus Total
Leased University Housing
Hawks Landing
Level 27
Miami Preserve
Leased University Housing Total
Grand Totals
One Year Ago
Standard
Capacity
212
266
94
122
143
270
209
210
35
335
237
179
327
-
Residents
72
72
70
72
72
72
270
198
90
81
138
140
76
99
242
363
172
144
216
202
282
229
45
265
231
190
297
198
150
71
7458
70
72
66
69
66
66
254
194
85
80
142
143
83
89
236
362
158
148
215
194
279
232
43
252
227
200
298
205
151
70
7379
97%
100%
94%
96%
92%
92%
94%
98%
94%
99%
103%
102%
109%
90%
98%
100%
92%
103%
100%
96%
99%
101%
96%
95%
98%
105%
100%
104%
101%
99%
99%
2
0
4
3
6
6
16
4
5
0
(4)
(3)
(7)
10
5
1
14
(5)
1
8
3
(3)
2
12
4
(10)
(1)
(7)
(2)
1
73
132
44
140
316
103
36
134
273
78%
82%
96%
86%
29
8
6
43
7774
7533
7652
7411
98%
98%
116
103
219
249
89
123
147
273
211
209
34
334
234
176
332
Occupancy
Vacancies or
Doubles Sold
%
(Beyond Standard)
as Singles
103%
(7)
94%
17
95%
5
101%
(1)
103%
(4)
101%
(3)
101%
(2)
100%
1
97%
1
100%
1
99%
2
1
98%
3
102%
(5)
-
First Year Admissions
Comparison:
Residents in First Year Housing
Less FY ACE Students
(340)
Add Commuters
= Admissions First Year #
New Students Spring
First Year
Transfer
Regional Transfer
Returning Upper-class
Students Who Left Housing
First Year*
Upper-class*
Graduates
1
4,106
68
3,834
2015
2016
105
98
13
58
274
163
67
22
47
299
119
270
10
399
99
275
14
388
New
243
243
249
221
248
254
274
299
Left
410
454
470
469
452
387
399
388
*Withdrawals/Suspensions/Study
Abroad/ Student Teaching/Job
Coop/Contract Releases
1
Spring History
1
1
2008-2009
2009-2010
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
2015-2016
1
6
6
19
Total Occupancy
Increase (Decrease)
7652
241
* Halls Housing Both Upperclass and First Year Students
Attachment J
Overall Page 141 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 1
Attachment K
Living Learning Communities
Tresa Barlage Zianno
February 18, 2016
Living Learning Communities Report
Office of Residence Life
Submitted by:
Tresa Barlage Zianno, Associate Director
History
The first iteration of learning communities at Miami University started in the early 1980s
consisting of themed communities, students interested in wellness, and those participating in
the honors program. In 2001, participation in LLCs was optional and 53% of first year students
and 12% of upper class students chose to participate in these special interest communities. In
the early 2000s, a staff member in the Office of Residence Life had LLC oversight as part of
their position responsibility. By 2006, a designated staff position was created to focus on LLC
development and support. In 2009, the implementation of the second year live-on requirement
coincided with a requirement that ALL residential students be required to participate in an
LLC. This resulted in a significant increase in the number of LLC themes offered and additional
staff needs.
The Office of Residence Life underwent a departmental review at the end of Spring Semester,
2015. The Office of Residence Life is currently preparing for numerous changes as a result of
this review and subsequent recommendations that will start to be enacted for the Fall of 2016 as
outlined in the “Initiatives Moving Forward” portion of this report.
Current Initiatives
For 2015-2016, students had the opportunity to select from 33 different LLC themes, including
four new communities that were introduced (Early Career Exploration, Engineering and
Computing Service Scholars, Entrepreneurship, and Pop Culture). Of these communities, there
are 18 communities that are associated with special interests or co-curricular themes and 15
communities that support student's academic or career interests. Courses are connected
(either required or optional) to 20 of these communities. Some of these communities include
Celebrate the Arts, Courses in Common, Emerging Leaders, Environmental Awareness, First
Year Research Experience, Global Connections, Governmental Relations, Guys in Engineering
and Computing, Honors, Mosaic (social justice), and WiSDEM (Women in Science Disciplines,
Engineering, and Math).
In the 2015-2016 academic year, the UNV 101 course was expanded and connected to more
Living Learning Communities and students across all academic divisions. The following
communities were connected to the UNV 101 course initiative: Compass; Education, Families
and Society; Electronics and Computing Service Scholars; Guys in Engineering and Computing;
Health Related Professions; Redhawk Traditions; and Women in Science Disciplines
Engineering and Math.
Attachment K
Overall Page 142 of 144
Attachment Page 1 of 3
Attachment K
Living Learning Communities
Tresa Barlage Zianno
February 18, 2016
Initiatives Moving Forward
Starting for the entering class of Fall, 2016, The Office of Residence Life will resume the
practice of allowing students the ability to choose to participate in the Living Learning
Communities. This decision was made by using information gathered from a survey of LLC
programs at peer and aspirational schools, material from LLC-related literature, including Greg
Blimling’s Student Learning in College Residence Halls (2015), a review of student comments,
suggestions, and data from the most recent (2014) ORL Assessment of Living and Learning
survey, feedback from the 2014-15 Community Leadership Team LLC representatives obtained
via focus groups, and information from the LLC committee that met during the 2014-15
academic year.
Blimling indicates that “students forced into a living unit who have no real interest in the program
can interfere with the learning experience of other students who are interested” (p.132).
Furthermore, staff and external stakeholders currently connected with LLCs indicate some
students are in these communities for reasons other than LLC interest (e.g., location of
residence hall, amenities in residence halls, roommate preference, etc.). And students who are
invested in LLCs indicate the non-interest of other students dilutes the experience dedicated
students want to experience.
Starting in Fall, 2016, students will have three housing options from which to select when
completing their housing contracts: general student housing, themed communities, and
LLCs. This ends the practice that all students are expected to live in a residential community
designated as a Living Learning Community.
General Student Housing
General Housing is an option for students to be assigned to live in residence halls with students
of either similar or mixed years of experience at Miami. Students can select to be assigned to
General Housing if one of the special communities does not match their academic or cocurricular interests. Programming will be on topics that promote community building, academic
success, cultural competency and intrapersonal development.
Themed Communities
A Theme Community is a group of students who share a common interest, either academic or
co-curricular. Programming will be more focused and complement the community theme and
will also including topics that promote community building, academic success, cultural
competency and intrapersonal development. Some communities will have students enrolled in
a common course to also complement the community theme. A few communities include both
1st and 2nd year students to allow for mentoring among students.
Attachment K
Overall Page 143 of 144
Attachment Page 2 of 3
Living Learning Communities
Tresa Barlage Zianno
Attachment K
February 18, 2016
Living Learning Communities
A Living Learning Community (LLC) is a group of students who live together on a corridor or in a
residence hall that is closely tied to an academic major, university program or
initiative. Through partnerships with a variety of departments, faculty, and staff, students will
have access to activities that tie directly into the theme of their LLC. In an LLC, students will be
co-enrolled into one or more classes, which further support student's transition and academic
success at Miami University. Programming will be closely aligned with the community theme
that often include faculty and staff partners, to assist in community building, academic success,
cultural competency and intrapersonal development. A few communities include both 1st and
2nd year students to allow for mentoring among residents.
The Office of Residence Life staff have put a lot of thought and resources into the development
of our Theme and Living Learning Communities. We have researched many different types of
communities and realize the benefit of offering a variety of choices for students as they enter the
University and continue their residential experience at Miami.
Each of our communities are built around a specific field of study or area of interest and are
structured so students have a high degree of involvement in its formation.
Research by Frazier and Eighmy (2012) found that for a learning community to be successful,
students, faculty and staff all have to be personally invested and develop a sense of ownership
in the program.
Each LLC will:





have a strong commitment from stakeholders
have a strong commitment from students by either being application
based or limiting number of participants
will have a required course for all participants
provide students with clear & concise mission and outcomes for each LLC
complete a community review, expectation and commitment process to
be conducted every two years
Every LLC will have a memorandum of understanding [MOU] between the sponsoring academic
or administrative unit and the Office of Residence Life. The MOU will outline clear expectations
of all stakeholders, including what resources each will provide to ensure a positive student
experience. Furthermore, this MOU will detail (1) a minimum of four signature experiences in
which each student in the LLC will have the opportunity to participate, (2) the plans for both a
welcome event and a closing event, (3) the process for allocation of LLC funds, (4) the
course(s) offered for LLC residents, (5) the process by which applications to live in the LLC are
reviewed, and (5) assessment plans.
Attachment K
Overall Page 144 of 144
Attachment Page 3 of 3
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement