SKU# 20217 - HSC Electronic Supply

SKU# 20217 - HSC Electronic Supply
SocketModem SF Series
Designer's Guide
(Preliminary)
Order No. 1158
October 28, 1997
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
NOTICE
Information furnished by Rockwell International Corporation is believed to be accurate and reliable. However, no
responsibility is assumed by Rockwell International for its use, nor any infringement of patents or other rights of third parties
which may result from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any patent rights of Rockwell
International other than for circuitry embodied in Rockwell products. Rockwell International reserves the right to change
circuitry at any time without notice. This document is subject to change without notice.
SocketModem, MNP 10EC, and ConfigurACE are trademarks of Rockwell International.
MNP is a trademark of Microcom Systems, Inc.
VoiceView is a registered trademark of Radish Communications, Inc.
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table of Contents
1. INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................................1-1
1.1 SUMMARY.................................................................................................................................................1-1
1.1.1 High Speed.......................................................................................................................................1-1
1.1.2 Low Speed .......................................................................................................................................1-1
1.2 TECHNICAL OVERVIEW ...........................................................................................................................1-2
1.2.1 SUPPORTED INTERFACES.............................................................................................................1-2
Parallel Interface .............................................................................................................................1-3
Serial/Indicator Interface..................................................................................................................1-3
Speaker Interface............................................................................................................................1-3
Line Interface ..................................................................................................................................1-3
European Line Interface ..................................................................................................................1-3
1.3 COMMAND SETS AND S REGISTERS ......................................................................................................1-3
2. HARDWARE INTERFACE............................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1 SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF AND SFV56ACL INTERFACE SIGNALS ...........................................................2-1
2.2 SF224ATF INTERFACE SIGNALS..............................................................................................................2-1
2.3 SIGNAL DESCRIPTIONS ...........................................................................................................................2-1
2.4 FIRMWARE ROM..................................................................................................................................... 2-15
2.5 DAA INTERFACE .....................................................................................................................................2-15
2.5.1 ~PULSE Filter Circuit ...................................................................................................................... 2-19
2.5.2 Audio Interface ............................................................................................................................... 2-20
2.5.3 SFV336ACFW Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Interface .............................................................. 2-21
3. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS ..........................................................................................................................3-1
3.1 PC BOARD LAYOUT GUIDELINES ............................................................................................................3-1
3.1.1 General ............................................................................................................................................3-1
3.1.2 Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Considerations ...........................................................................3-1
3.2 PRODUCT MIGRATION GUIDELINES .......................................................................................................3-3
3.3 OTHER CONSIDERATI ONS .....................................................................................................................3-3
3.4 MANUFACTURING CONSIDERATIONS ....................................................................................................3-3
4. PACKAGE DIMENSIONS................................................................................................................................4-1
5. SOCKETMODEM DESIGN WITH SERIAL INTERFACE ..................................................................................5-1
6. SOCKETMODEM DESIGN WITH PARALLEL INTERFACE ............................................................................6-1
7. EUROPEAN SOCKETMODEM INSTALLATION GUIDELINES........................................................................7-1
7.1 CONSIDERATIONS FOR TELECOM APPROVALS....................................................................................7-1
7.1.1 PSTN Connection .............................................................................................................................7-1
7.2 CONSIDERATIONS FOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY.......................................................................................7-2
7.2.1 Conditions for Maintaining Safety Compliance...................................................................................7-2
7.2.2 Power Supply ...................................................................................................................................7-2
7.2.3 Clearances, Creepage Distances and Distances through Insulation...................................................7-2
7.3 CONSIDERATIONS FOR EMC...................................................................................................................7-3
7.3.1 EMC Compliance ..............................................................................................................................7-3
7.3.2 Installation in Host Systems ............................................................................................. .................7-3
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
List of Figures
Figure 1-1. Typical Serial and Parallel Block Diagrams .......................................................................................................1-2
Figure 2-1. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial TTL Pinout ( ~ indicates active low ).............................2-2
Figure 2-2. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial EIA-232 Pinout ( ~ indicates active low ).......................2-3
Figure 2-3. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL Host Parallel Pinout ( ~ indicates active low ) ................................2-4
Figure 2-4. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DAA and Audio Pinouts .................................................................2-5
Figure 2-5. SF224ATF Serial TTL Pinout ( ~ indicates active low ) ....................................................................................2-6
Figure 2-6. SF224ATF Serial EIA-232 Pinout ( ~ indicates active low ) ...............................................................................2-7
Figure 2-7. SF224ATF Host Parallel Pinout ( ~ indicates active low ).................................................................................2-8
Figure 2-8. Example of DAA Interface for SocketModems with Self-Contained U.S. DAAs (D5 and D6 Options).............. 2-15
Figure 2-9. Example of DAA Interface for SocketModems with Self-Contained U.S. DAAs (D5 and D6 Options)............... 2-16
Figure 2-10. Recommended Telco Interface for European SocketModems (DF, DG, DT, DE and DB Options)................. 2-16
Figure 2-11. External DAA Example.................................................................................................................................2-17
Figure 2-12. ~PULSE Filter Circuit ...................................................................................................................................2-19
Figure 2-13. Sounducer Driver Circuit ..............................................................................................................................2-20
Figure 2-14. Speaker Driver Circuit ..................................................................................................................................2-20
Figure 2-15. Audio Circuitry for Audio and Speaker Phone operation................................................................................ 2-21
Figure 2-16. SFV336ACF Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Interface Circuit.................................................................... 2-23
Figure 2-17. SFV336ACF Telephone Line/Telephone Handset/Audio Interface Circuit: D6 Option .................................... 2-24
Figure 4-1. SocketModem Physical Dimensions - SF224ATF .............................................................................................4-1
Figure 4-2. SocketModem Physical Dimensions - SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL (D5 and D6 Options)............4-1
Figure 4-3. European Socket Modem Physical Dimensions - SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF (DF, DG, DT, DE and DB Options)4-2
Figure 5-1. Serial Interface Example ..................................................................................................................................5-1
Figure 6-1. General-Purpose Parallel Interface ..................................................................................................................6-1
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
List of Tables
Table 2-1. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial TTL Signals...................................................................2-2
Table 2-2. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial EIA-232 Signals ............................................................2-3
Table 2-3. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL Host Parallel Signals .......................................................................2-4
Table 2-4. SF224ATF Serial TTL Signals ...........................................................................................................................2-6
Table 2-5. SF224ATF Serial EIA-232 Signals.....................................................................................................................2-7
Table 2-6. SF224ATF Host Parallel Signals........................................................................................................................2-8
Table 2-7. Signal Descriptions ...........................................................................................................................................2-9
Table 2-8. Digital Electrical Characteristics....................................................................................................................... 2-13
Table 2-9. Analog Electrical Characteristics ..................................................................................................................... 2-14
Table 2-10. External DAA Bill of Materials........................................................................................................................ 2-18
Table 6-1. Parallel Interface Example Bill of Materials ........................................................................................................6-2
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 SUMMARY
The Rockwell SF Series SocketModem™ family of pin-compatible data/fax/voice/audio modem engines provides the OEM
with a complete K56 Flex, V.34/V.17, V.32bis/V.17 or V.22bis/V.29 modem in a compact socket-mountable module.
Several models of the SocketModem are available from Low Speed (V.22bis/V.29) to High Speed (V.34/V.17) + Voice
configurations. These models supply varying functional capabilities, from inexpensive 2400 bps data/9600 bps fax modems,
to 56,000 bps data download/14,400 bps fax/AudioSpan/FDSP/voice/Audio modems with built-in data-compression and
error-correction, while maintaining the same basic pinout interface.
The compact size and high level of integration of the SocketModem minimizes real estate and cost for motherboard and box
modem applications. Its low power consumption makes it ideal for portable applications such as pocket modems or laptop,
notebook and palmtop computers, and for a wide variety of embedded control applications. The pin compatibility between
the full range of SF Series SocketModems allows upgrading and production configurability without hardware changes.
This designer's guide describes the modem hardware. AT commands and S Registers are defined in the AT Command
Reference Manual (Order No. 1048).
1.1.1 High Speed
As a data modem, the High Speed SocketModem operates at line speeds up to 56,000 bps download and up to 33,600 bps
upload (SFV56ACFW), 33,600 bps (SFV336ACF) or 14,400 bps (SFV144ACF). Error correction (V.42/MNP 2-4) and data
compression (V.42bis/MNP 5) maximize data transfer integrity and boost average throughput up to 230.4 kbps
(SFV56ACFW), 115.2 kbps (SFV336ACF) or 57.6 kbps (SFV144ACF). The High Speed SocketModem also operates in nonerror-correcting mode. AutoSync operation is supported in SFV336ACF and SFV144ACF.
As a fax modem, the High Speed SocketModem supports Group 3 send and receive rates up to 14400 bps and supports
Class 1 protocols.
The High Speed SF Series SocketModem with Voice features (SFV56ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV144AFC) uses enhanced
Adaptive Differential Pulse Coded Modulation (ADPCM) coding and decoding to support efficient digital storage of
voice/audio using 2-bit or 4-bit per sample compression and decompression with a 7200 Hz sample rate. This mode also
supports 8-bit monophonic audio encoding at 11.025 kHz or 7200 Hz, digital telephone answering machine (DTAM), voice
annotation, and audio recording and playback applications.
The SFV56ACF, SFV336ACF, and SFV144ACF support position-independent, full-duplex speakerphone (FDSP) operation
using an advanced algorithm that includes both acoustic and line echo cancellation.
The SFV336ACF and SFV144ACF support analog simultaneous audio/voice and data (AudioSpan) operation at data rates
(plus audio) of 4.8 kbps in V.61 mode, 4.8 to 9.6 kbps in ML144 mode, or 4.8 to 14.4 kbps in ML288 mode. The SFV56ACF
supports AudioSpan operation at a data rate of 4.8 kbps plus audio in V.61 mode.
PC-based “ConfigurACE™ II for Windows” software allows MCU firmware to be customized to application requirements.
1.1.2 Low Speed
As a data modem, the Low Speed SocketModem operates at line speeds to 2400 bps (SF224ATF).
Fax modes, controlled by built-in Class 1 command interface (SF224ATF) provide Group 3 transmit functions up to 9600 bps
and receive functions up to 4800 bps.
Full error correction (V.42 LAPM, MNP2–4) and data compression (V.42bis, MNP 5) capabilities are supported in the
SM224ATF through the Rockwell Protocol Interface (RPI) and host communication software supporting the RPI. A list of
communication software supporting RPI can be obtained from your local Rockwell sales representative.
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
1.2 TECHNICAL OVERVIEW
1.2.1 SUPPORTED INTERFACES
The major hardware signal interfaces of the SF Series SocketModem are illustrated in Figure 1-1.
V.24/EIA-232
-orTTL
Serial Interface
Indicator
LEDs
5
3
4
S
o
c
k
e
t
M
o
d
e
m
2
-or9
1
Telco Jack,
MOV and
EMI circuitry
or DAA
Speaker Driver Circuit
a. Serial Interface
Host Parallel
Bus Interface
Host Bus (16)
S
o
c
k
e
t
M
o
d
e
m
2
-or9
1
Telco Jack,
MOV and
EMI circuitry
or DAA
Speaker Driver Circuit
b. Parallel Interface
Figure 1-1. Typical Serial and Parallel Block Diagrams
1-2
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Parallel Interface
A 16450 UART-compatible or 16550A UART-compatible parallel interface is provided. Eight data lines, three address lines,
and five control lines are supported.
Serial/Indicator Interface
A DTE serial interface and indicator outputs are supported.
Serial Interface. A 9-line (8-line for SF224ATF) V.24/EIA-232 or TTL logic serial interface to the DTE is supported.
LED Indicator Interface. Four direct connect LED indicator outputs are supported.
Speaker Interface
A speaker output, controlled by AT commands, is provided for an optional OEM-supplied speaker circuit.
Line Interface
The SocketModem connects to the telephone network in one of two ways:
• Host-based Data Access Arrangement (DAA) (D0 option)
• SocketModem-based DAA (D5, D6, and European options)
European Line Interface
The SFV336ACF and SFV144ACF SocketModem includes configurations for use in five European countries: France,
Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. These SocketModems are fully tested for compliance with their respective
PTT regulations and are certified for use in these countries.
1.3 COMMAND SETS AND S REGISTERS
Modem operation is controlled by AT and S register commands issued by the DTE. The AT command sets differ among the
SocketModem families. Refer to the AT Commands for the RCV56ACx, RCV336ACFx, RCV288ACx, and RCV144ACx
Modems Reference Manual (Order No. 1048), RCVDL56ACFL/SP Modem Designer’s Guide (Order No. 1121),
RCV336ACF/SP Modem Designer’s Guide (Order No. 1046), RCV144ACFx Modem Designer’s Guide (Order No. 1046), and
the RC224AT 2400 bps Single Device Modem with ‘AT’ Commands Designer’s Guide (Order No. 845) for details.
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1-4
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
2. HARDWARE INTERFACE
2.1 SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF AND SFV56ACL INTERFACE SIGNALS
The SFV56ACFW, SFV336ACFW and SFV144ACFW SocketModem pin assignments with DTE serial TTL interface are
shown in Figure 2-1 and are listed in Table 2-1.
The SFV56ACFW, SFV336ACFW and SFV144ACFW SocketModem pin assignments with DTE serial EIA-232 interface are
shown in Figure 2-2 and are listed in Table 2-2.
The SFV56ACFW, SFV336ACFW and SFV144ACFW SocketModem pin assignments with host parallel interface are shown
in Figure 2-3 and are listed in Table 2-3.
The SFV56ACFW, SFV336ACFW and SFV144ACFW SocketModem DAA and Audio pinouts are shown in Figure 2-5.
2.2 SF224ATF INTERFACE SIGNALS
The SF224ATF SocketModem pin assignments with DTE serial TTL interface are shown in Figure 2-5 and are listed in Table
2-4.
The SF224ATF SocketModem pin assignments with DTE serial EIA-232 interface are shown in Figure 2-6 and are listed in
Table 2-5.
The SF224ATF SocketModem pin assignments with host parallel interface are shown in Figure 2-7 and are listed in Table 26.
2.3 SIGNAL DESCRIPTIONS
The SocketModem interface signals are described in Table 2-7.
The digital electrical characteristics are listed in Table 2-8.
The analog electrical characteristics are listed in Table 2-9.
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-1. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial TTL Pinout
( ~ indicates active low )
Table 2-1. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial TTL Signals
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
D0
NC
~OH
NC
RINGD
no pin
NC
TXA1
TXA2
RXA
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
~RDL
~PULSE
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
2-2
D5
TIP
RING
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
~RDL
~PULSE
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
D6
TIP
RING
RDETIN1
RDETIN2
ACOUT1
ACOUT2
XFMR1
XFMR2
RDET/CID
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
~RDL
~PULSE
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
I/O Type
NC, I/O, I/O
Output, I/O, I/O
NC, NC, Input
Input, NC, Input
NC, NC, I/O
INC, NC. /O
Output, NC, I/O
Output, NC, I/O
Input, NC, Input
Input
GND
Input
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Pin
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
D0
~RTSTTL
~RXDTTL
~TXDTTL
~RITTL
~DSRTTL
~CTSTTL
~DCDTTL
~DTRTTL
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VC
~VOICE
~CALLID
LCS
TELOUT
TELIN
MICM
VCC
MICV
AGND
SPKR
D5
~RTSTTL
~RXDTTL
~TXDTTL
~RITTL
~DSRTTL
~CTSTTL
~DCDTTL
~DTRTTL
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VCC
NC
AGND
SPKR
D6
~RTSTTL
~RXDTTL
~TXDTTL
~RITTL
~DSRTTL
~CTSTTL
~DCDTTL
~DTRTTL
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VC
~VOICE
~CALLID
LCS
TELOUT
TELIN
MICM
VCC
MICV
AGND
SPKR
I/O Type
Input
Output
Input
Output
Output
Output
Output
Input
GND
Output, NC, Output
Output, NC, Output
Output, NC, Output
Input, NC, Input
Output, NC, Output
Input, NC, Input
Input, NC, Input
POWER
Input, NC, Input
GND
Output
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SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-2. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial EIA-232 Pinout
( ~ indicates active low )
Table 2-2. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DTE Serial EIA-232 Signals
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
1158
D0
NC
~OH
NC
RINGD
no pin
NC
TXA1
TXA2
RXA
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
~RDL
~PULSE
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
D5
TIP
RING
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
~RDL
~PULSE
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
D6
TIP
RING
RDETIN1
RDETIN2
ACOUT1
ACOUT2
XFMR1
XFMR2
RDET/CID
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
~RDL
~PULSE
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
I/O Type
NC, I/O, I/O
Output, I/O, I/O
NC, NC, Input
Input, NC, Input
NC, NC, I/O
INC, NC. /O
Output, NC, I/O
Output, NC, I/O
Input, NC, Input
Output
GND
Input
Output
Output
Output
Output
Output
Pin
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
D0
RTS232
RXD232
TXD232
RI232
DSR232
CTS232
DCD232
DTR232
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VC
~VOICE
~CALLID
LCS
TELOUT
TELIN
MICM
VCC
MICV
AGND
SPKR
D5
RTS232
RXD232
TXD232
RI232
DSR232
CTS232
DCD232
DTR232
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VCC
NC
AGND
SPKR
D6
RTS232
RXD232
TXD232
RI232
DSR232
CTS232
DCD232
DTR232
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VC
~VOICE
~CALLID
LCS
TELOUT
TELIN
MICM
VCC
MICV
AGND
SPKR
I/O Type
Input
Output
Input
Output
Output
Output
Output
Input
GND
Output, NC, Output
Output, NC, Output
Output, NC, Output
Input, NC, Input
Output, NC, Output
Input, NC, Input
Input, NC, Input
POWER
Input, NC, Input
GND
Output
2-3
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-3. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL Host Parallel Pinout
( ~ indicates active low )
Table 2-3. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL Host Parallel Signals
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
2-4
D0
D5
D6
NC
~OH
NC
RINGD
no pin
NC
TXA1
TXA2
RXA
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
HA1
DGND
HD7
~PULSE
HD2
HINT
HA0
~HWT
TIP
RING
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
HA1
DGND
HD7
~PULSE
HD2
HINT
HA0
~HWT
TIP
RING
RDETIN1
RDETIN2
ACOUT1
ACOUT2
XFMR1
XFMR2
RDET/CID
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
HA1
DGND
HD7
~PULSE
HD2
HINT
HA0
~HWT
I/O Type
NC, I/O, I/O
Output, I/O, I/O
NC, NC, Input
Input, NC, Input
NC, NC, I/O
INC, NC. /O
Output, NC, I/O
Output, NC, I/O
Input, NC, Input
Input
Input
GND
I/O
Output
I/O
Output
Input
Input
Pin
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
D0
~HRD
HA2
HD4
HD5
HD0
HD1
HD3
~HCS
HD6
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VC
~VOICE
~CALLID
LCS
TELOUT
TELIN
MICM
VCC
MICV
AGND
SPKR
D5
~HRD
HA2
HD4
HD5
HD0
HD1
HD3
~HCS
HD6
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VCC
NC
AGND
SPKR
D6
~HRD
HA2
HD4
HD5
HD0
HD1
HD3
~HCS
HD6
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VC
~VOICE
~CALLID
LCS
TELOUT
TELIN
MICM
VCC
MICV
AGND
SPKR
I/O Type
Input
Input
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
Input
I/O
Output, NC, Output
Output, NC, Output
Output, NC, Output
Input, NC, Input
Output, NC, Output
Input, NC, Input
Input, NC, Input
POWER
Input, NC, Input
GND
Output
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-4. SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL DAA and Audio Pinouts
1158
2-5
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-5. SF224ATF Serial TTL Pinout
( ~ indicates active low )
Table 2-4. SF224ATF Serial TTL Signals
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
2-6
D5
TIP
RING
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
NC
no pin
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
I/O Type
I/O
I/O
Input
GND
NC
Output
Output
Output
Output
Pin
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
D5
NC
~RXDTTL
~TXDTTL
~RITTL
~DSRTTL
~CTSTTL
~DCDTTL
~DTRTTL
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VCC
NC
AGND
SPKR
I/O Type
NC
Output
Input
Output
Output
Output
Output
Input
GND
POWER
NC
GND
Output
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-6. SF224ATF Serial EIA-232 Pinout
( ~ indicates active low )
Table 2-5. SF224ATF Serial EIA-232 Signals
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
1158
D5
TIP
RING
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
no pin
DGND
NC
no pin
DCDIND
RXIND
DTRIND
TXIND
I/O Type
I/O
I/O
Input
GND
NC
Output
Output
Output
Output
Pin
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
D5
NC
~RXDTTL
~TXDTTL
~RITTL
~DSRTTL
~CTSTTL
~DCDTTL
~DTRTTL
DGND
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VCC
NC
AGND
SPKR
I/O Type
NC
Output
Input
Output
Output
Output
Output
Input
GND
POWER
NC
GND
Output
2-7
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-7. SF224ATF Host Parallel Pinout
( ~ indicates active low )
Table 2-6. SF224ATF Host Parallel Signals
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
2-8
D5
TIP
RING
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
~RESET
HA1
DGND
HD7
no pin
HD2
HINT
HA0
~HWT
I/O Type
I/O
I/O
Input
Input
GND
I/O
I/O
Output
Input
Input
Pin
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
D5
~HRD
HA2
HD4
HD5
HD0
HD1
HD3
~HCS
HD6
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
no pin
VCC
NC
AGND
SPKR
I/O Type
Input
Input
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
I/O
Input
I/O
POWER
NC
GND
Output
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 2-7. Signal Descriptions
Label
I/O Type
Signal Name /Description
PWR
+5VDC
DGND
GND
Digital Ground. Connect to Digital Ground on the interface circuit.
~RESET
IA
Modem Reset. The Active Low ~RESET input resets the SocketModem logic and returns the AT command
set to the original factory default values and to "stored values" in NVRAM. ~RESET on SocketModem serial
models should not be connected externally; ~RESET is connected to a built-in reset circuit on the
SocketModem.
AGND
GND
Analog Ground. Connect to Analog Ground on the interface circuit. Note that AGND is connected to DGND
on the SocketModem.
TIP
IF
TIP Signal From Telco/PTT. If an on-board DAA is used, this pin is TIP signal from the Telco jack.
RING
IF
RING Signal From Telco/PTT. If an on-board DAA is used, this pin is RING signal from the Telco jack.
RXA
I(DA)
RXA Signal from DAA. If external DAA is used, this pin is the RXA analog receive signal.
TXA2
O(DD)
TXA2. If an external DAA circuit is used, this pin is TXA2. The TXA1 and TXA2 outputs are differential outputs
180 degrees out of phase with each other.
TXA1
O(DD)
TXA1. The TXA1 and TXA2 outputs are differential outputs 180 degrees out of phase with each other.
~CALLID
OD
Caller ID Relay Control. Typically, the ~CALLID output is connected to the normally closed Caller ID relay
(DPDT). When Caller ID is enabled, the modem will assert this output to open the Caller ID relay and close the
Off-hook relay in order to detect Caller ID information between the first and second rings.
~OH
OA
~OH Relay Control. The active low ~OH output can be used to control the normally open off-hook relay. In
this case, ~OH active closes the relay and connects the modem to the line (off-hook).
~VOICE
OA
Voice Relay Control. Typically, the ~VOICE output is connected to the normally open Voice relay (DPDT). In
voice mode, ~VOICE active closes the relay to switch the handset from the telephone line to a current source
to power the handset so it can be used as a microphone and speaker interface to the modem.
VCC
The ~CALLID and ~VOICE output can each directly drive a +5V reed relay coil with a minimum resistance of
360Ω and having a must-operate voltage of no greater than 4.0 Vdc. A clamp diode, such as a 1N4148,
should be installed across the relay coil. An external transistor, such as an MPSA20, can be used to drive
heavier loads (e.g., electro-mechanical relays).
LCS
IA
Line Current Sense. When enabled, the LCS input indicates whether the associated handset is off-hook
(high) or on-hook (low). Bit 4 in Option Flags 1 must be set using ConfigurACE to enable LCS operation.
RINGD
IA
Ring Indicate. A rising edge on the RINGD input initiates an internal ring frequency measurement. The
RINGD input is typically connected to the output of an optoisolator or equivalent. The idle state (no ringing)
output of the ring detect circuit should be low.
If an on-board DAA is used, RNGDI is an active-high ring-indicator output. If an external DAA is used, RINGD
is an active-high ring-indicator input.
~PULSE
OA
~PULSE Relay Control. The active low ~PULSE output can be used to control the normally-open pulse dial
relay. In this case, ~PULSE active closes the relay to effect loop disconnect (pulse) dialing.
SFV336ACFW only: ~PULSE relay control can be enabled using ConfigurACE II for Windows. Use the lowpass filter circuit shown in Figure 2-12 to prevent the NVRAM Data signal from toggling the ~PULSE relay
(refer to the RCV336ACF/SP Designer’s Guide for details).
1158
2-9
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 2-7. Signal Descriptions (Cont’d)
Label
I/O Type
Signal Name /Description
HA0-HA2
IA
Host Bus Address Lines 0-2. During a host read or write operation, HA0-HA2 select an internal 16C450- or
16C550-compatible register. The state of the divisor latch access bit (DLAB) affects the selection of certain
registers.
HD0-HD7
I/O
Host Bus Data Lines 0-7. HD0-HD7 are comprised of eight three-state input/output lines providing bidirectional communication between the host and the SocketModem. Data, control words, and status
information are transferred through HD0-HD7.
~HCS
IA
Host Bus Chip Select. ~HCS input low selects the host bus.
~HRD
IA
Host Bus Read. ~HRD is an active low, read control input. When ~HCS is low, ~HRD low allows the host to
read status information or data from a selected SocketModem register.
~HWT
IA
Host Bus Write. ~HWT is an active low, write control input. When ~HCS is low, ~HWT low allows the host to
write data or control words into a selected SocketModem register.
HINT
OA
Host Bus Interrupt. HINT output is set high when the receiver error flag, received data available, transmitter
holding register empty, or modem status interrupt has an active high condition. HINT is reset low upon the
appropriate interrupt service or master reset operation.
The Serial interface signals are either TTL-level or EIA-232-level signals.
~RTSTTL,
RTS232
IA,
IH
Request To Send (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). ~RTS is used to condition the local modem for
data transmission and, during half-duplex operation, to control the direction of data transmission.
On a full-duplex channel, RTS OFF maintains the modem in a non-transmit mode. A non-transmit mode does
not imply that all line signals have been removed from the telephone line. RTS OFF may be ignored if the
modem is optioned to strap ~CTS ON; this allows the modem to receive from the DTE even though RTS is
OFF.
RTS input ON causes the modem to transmit data on TXD when ~CTS becomes active.
~RXDTTL,
RXD232
OA,
OH
Received Data (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). The modem uses the ~RXD line to send data
received from the telephone line to the DTE and to send modem responses to the DTE. During command
mode, ~RXD data represents the modem responses to the DTE. Modem responses take priority over
incoming data when the two signals are in competition for ~RXD.
~TXDTTL,
TXD232
IA,
IH
Transmitted Data (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). The DTE uses the ~TXD line to send data to the
modem for transmission over the telephone line or to transmit commands to the modem. The DTE should hold
this circuit in the mark state when no data is being transmitted or during intervals between characters.
2-10
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 2-7. Signal Descriptions (Cont’d)
Label
I/O Type
Signal Name /Description
~CTSTTL,
CTS232
OA,
OH
Clear To Send (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). ~CTS is controlled by the modem to indicate
whether or not the modem is ready to transmit data. ~CTS ON, together with the ~RTS ON, ~DSR ON, and
~DTR ON (where implemented), indicates to the DTE that signals presented on TXD will be transmitted to the
telephone line. ~CTS OFF indicates to the DTE that it should not transfer data across the interface on TXD.
~CTS ON is a response to ~DTR ON and ~RTS, delayed as may be appropriate for the modem to establish a
telephone connection. ~CTS output is controlled by the AT&Rn command.
~RITTL,
RI232
OA,
OH
Ring Indicate (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). ~RI output ON (low) indicates the presence of an ON
segment of a ring signal on the telephone line. The modem will not go off-hook when ~RI is active; the modem
waits for ~RI to go inactive before going off-hook.
For US models, ~RI will respond to ring signals in the frequency range of 15.3 Hz to 68 Hz. The ring signal
cycle is typically two seconds ON, four seconds OFF. The OFF (high) condition of the ~RI input should be
maintained during the OFF segment of the ring cycle (between rings) and at all other times when ringing is not
being received.
~DSRTTL,
DSR232
OA,
OH
Data Set Ready (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). ~DSR indicates modem status to the DTE. ~DSR
OFF (high) indicates that the DTE is to disregard all signals appearing on the interchange circuits except Ring
Indicator (~RI). ~DSR output is controlled by the AT&Sn command.
If the AT&S1 option is selected, ~DSR will come ON in the handshaking state when carrier is detected in the
originate mode or when carrier is first sent in the answer mode. In addition, if a test mode is entered (AT&T1,
AT&T3, AT&T6-AT&T8), ~DSR will go off while the test is running. ~DSR goes OFF if ~DTR goes OFF.
If AT&Q0 and AT&S0 are selected, ~DSR will remain on at all times regardless of the modem's current state.
~DCDTTL,
DCD232
OA,
OH
Data Carrier Detect (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). When AT&C0 command is not in effect, ~DCD
output is ON when a carrier is detected on the telephone line or OFF when carrier is not detected.
~DCD can be strapped ON using AT&C0 command.
~DTRTTL,
DTR232
IA,
IH
Data Terminal Ready (TTL Active Low, EIA-232 Active High). The ~DTR input is turned ON (low) by the
DTE when the DTE is ready to transmit or receive data. ~DTR ON prepares the modem to be connected to
the telephone line, and maintains the connection established by the DTE (manual answering) or internally
(automatic answering). ~DTR OFF places the modem in the disconnect state under control of the &Dn and
&Qn commands. The effect of ~DTR ON and ~DTR OFF depends on the &Dn and &Qn commands.
Automatic answer is enabled when ~DTR is ON if the “Answer Ringcount” selectable option is not set to 0.
Regardless of which device is driving ~DTR, the modem will respond to an incoming ring by going off-hook
and beginning the handshake sequence.
The response of the modem to the ~DTR signal is very slow (up to 10 ms) to prevent noise from falsely
causing the modem to disconnect from the telephone line.
GND
1158
GND
Digital Ground.
2-11
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 2-7. Signal Descriptions (Cont’d)
Label
I/O Type
Signal Name /Description
LED driver lines are open-drain inverter-driven (74HCT05) lines with 1.5 KΩ, 1/10W pull-up resistors.
DCDIND
OG
Active High DCD Status.
RXDIND
OG
Active High RXD Status.
DTRIND
OG
Active High DTR Status.
TXDIND
OG
Active High TXD Status.
RDETIN1,
RDETIN2
IF
Ring Detect Input. RDETIN1 and RDETIN2 receive the TIP and RING signals from the telco jack. RDETIN1
and RDETIN2 are typically disconnected from TIP and RING during voice applications.
ACOUT1,
ACOUT2
IO(DX)
DAA Interface. ACOUT1 and ACOUT2 connect to RDET/CID and RDETIN1 when ~CALLID is active.
ACOUT1 and ACOUT2 connect to the XFMR1 and XFMR2 when ~CALLID is inactive.
XFRM1,
XFRM2
IO(DX)
DAA Interface. XFRM1 and XFRM2 are tied directly to the primary windings of the on-board DAA
transformer. XFRM1 and XFRM2 connect to RDET/CID and RDETIN1 when ~CALLID is active and to
ACOUT1 and ACOUT2 when ~CALLID is inactive.
SIGNALS UNIQUE TO THE SFV D6 OPTION
Telephone Handset Interface
TELIN
I(DA)
Telephone Handset Input. TELIN is supported in AudioSpan mode and is the input from the telephone
handset microphone interface circuit.
TELOUT
O(DF)
Telephone Handset Output. TELOUT is supported in AudioSpan mode and is the output to the telephone
handset speaker interface circuit.
Audio/Headset Interface
MICM
I(DA)
Microphone Modem Input. MICM is a single-ended microphone input from the analog switch circuit. The
input impedance is > 70k Ω.
MICV
I(DA)
Microphone Voice Input. MICV is a single-ended microphone input from the analog switch circuit. The input
impedance is > 70k Ω.
SPKR
O(DF)
Speaker Output. SPKV is a single ended-output. SPKV is tied directly to the data pump’s SPKV pin.
Notes:
1. I/O types:
I(DA) = Analog input (see Table 2-9).
O(DD), O(DF) = Analog output (see Table 2-9).
IO (DX) = Analog input/output (see Table 2-9).
2-12
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 2-8. Digital Electrical Characteristics
Parameter
Symbol
Min.
Typ.
Max.
2
0.7 VCC
0.8 VCC
-30
–
–
–
VCC
VCC + 0.3
VCC + 0.3
30
-0.3
–
0.8
–
–
±2.5
Type OA
2.4
–
–
Type OD
–
–
VCC
–
5
–
8
VCC
–
Input High Voltage
V
Type IA
Type IC
Type ID
Type IH
Input Low Voltage
Vdc
IH
I
IN
RESET/
Output High Voltage
V
Type OG
Type OH
Output Low Voltage
V = 0 to VCC
IN
I
= – 100 µA
LOAD
I
= 0 mA
LOAD
Vdc
OL
Type OA
–
–
0.4
Type OB
–
–
0.4
Type OD
–
0.75
–
Type OG
0.5
–
–
-8
-5
–
±10
I
TSI
Vdc
µADC
Vdc
OH
V
Type OH
Three-State (Off) Current
Circuit Type
Type IA
Type IC
Type ID
Type OA
Type OD
Type OG
Type OH
1158
Test Conditions1
V
IL
Type IA, IC, and ID
Input Leakage Current
Notes:
1. Test Conditions:
Units
I
= 1.6 mA
LOAD
I
= 0.8 mA
LOAD
I
= 15 mA
LOAD
I
= 8 mA
LOAD
µADC
V =0V
IN
TTL
CMOS with pull-up
~RES
TTL with 3-state
Relay driver
LED Driver
EIA/TIA-232
VCC = ±5%, TA = 0°C to 70°C,
Output loads: Data bus (D0-D7), address bus (A0-A15), chip selects,
~READ, and ~WRITE loads = 70 pF + one TTL load.
Other = 50 pF + one TTL load.
2-13
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 2-9. Analog Electrical Characteristics
Name
Type
Characteristic
Value
RXA
I (DA)
Input Impedance
AC Input Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
> 70K Ω
1.1 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
TELIN
I (DA)
Input Impedance
AC Input Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
> 70K Ω
1.1 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
TXA1,
TXA2,
TELOUT
O (DD)
Minimum Load
Maximum Capacitive Load
Output Impedance
AC Output Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
DC Offset Voltage
300 Ω
0 µF
10 Ω
2.2 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
± 200 mV
SPKR
O (DF)
Minimum Load
Maximum Capacitive Load
Output Impedance
AC Output Voltage Range
Reference Voltage
DC Offset Voltage
300 Ω
0.01 µF
10 Ω
1.1 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
± 20 mV
MICM,
MICV
I (DA)
Input Impedance
Maximum AC Input Voltage
Reference Voltage
Maximum AC Output Voltage
> 70K Ω
1.7 VP-P
+2.5 VDC
2.7 VP-P
ACOUT1
ACOUT2
XFMR1
XFMR2
IO(DX)
AC Voltage Range
AC Current
Signal Strength
2.0 VP-P
< 500 mA
≤ -9.5 dBm
TIP
IF
Ring Detect Sensitivity
> 38 VRMS
Ring Detect Peak Current
Ring Detect Idle Current
Loop Current
Ring Equivalency Number (REN)
> 100 µV
< 50 nA
< 100 mA
1.0 Bel
RING
2-14
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
2.4 FIRMWARE ROM
SocketModem firmware performs processing of general modem control, command sets, error correction, data compression,
MNP 10, fax Class 1, voice, audio, RPI, and DTE interface functions depending on the modem model. The SocketModem
firmware is programmed into the on-board ROM by Rockwell. On-board flash EEPROM may be reprogrammed via the flashdownload process (except SF224ATF). The ROM onboard is 128Kx8 Flash EEPROM (except SF224ATF).
2.5 DAA INTERFACE
The SocketModem is configured to be an on-board DAA (D5, D6, or European option) or an external, off-board DAA (-D0
option).
When using the on-board DAA, provide the TIP and RING signals from the Telco jack to pins 1 and 2 of the SocketModem.
For D5, and D6 SocketModems, use the appropriate telco interface circuitry to meet the FCC/DOC requirements. This
circuitry shown in Figure 2-8 and Figure 2-9. New FCC surge requirements are pending for PART 68 testing. Figure 2-8
shows the configuration which can be currently used to pass FCC Part 68. When the new surge requirements take affect the
circuitry in Figure 2-9. will be needed to pass FCC Part 68. The FCC has not given a firm date to when the new surge
requirement will take affect.
When using any of the European SFV336ACF SocketModems, (DF, DG, DT, DE, DB), provide TIP and RING signals from
the telco jack to pins 1 and 2 of the SocketModem. Only EMI suppression components may be used. If other components
are used, the PTT certification for these SocketModems will no longer apply, and recertification will be required. The
recommended telco interface for European SFV336ACF SocketModems is shown in Figure 2-10. The same layout for the
U.S. components can be used by removing the MOV, replacing the 18.2 ohm resistors with 0 ohm jumpers and changing the
capacitors to a 3000 volt rating. TIP and RING signal traces are to be no closer than 0.062" from any other traces for U.S.
applications. TIP and RING signal traces are to be no closer than 2.5mm (0.1”) from any other traces for European
applications. 2.5mm spacing must be used if the host board is to support both U.S. and European Socket Modems.
A recommended design of an external DAA suitable for use in the USA or Canada is shown in Figure 2-11. The telco
interface is the standard TIP/RING pair of telephone signals. The SocketModem interface is comprised of RXA, TXA1, and
TXA2 for the data signals, ~RI for the Ring Indicate input, and ~OH and ~PULSE as the Off-Hook and Pulse relay controls.
The DAA bill of materials is listed in Table 2-10.
Figure 2-8. Example of DAA Interface for SocketModems with Self-Contained U.S. DAAs
(D5 and D6 Options)
1158
2-15
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-9. Example of DAA Interface for SocketModems with Self-Contained U.S. DAAs
(D5 and D6 Options)
Figure 2-10. Recommended Telco Interface for European SocketModems
(DF, DG, DT, DE and DB Options)
2-16
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
VCC
R2
VCC
R4
Q2
R1
C5
K2
OFF-HOOK
D4
R14
L1
R15
TIP
D7
Q4
T1
D5
D3
RV1
D9
L2
R7
Q1
RING
R12
R16
D1
R9
C6
R8
C1
D6
R11
C4
C2
R13
D2
C3
VCC
D10
VCC VCC
R3
D12
D11
R10
K1
PULSE
R6
Q3
R5
U1
D8
VCC
Figure 2-11. External DAA Example
1158
2-17
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 2-10. External DAA Bill of Materials
Quantity
2
1
1
1
1
2
7
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
2-18
Reference
C1, C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
D1, D2
D3, D4, D6, D7, D8, D9, D12
D5, D10, D11
J1
K1
K2
L1, L2
Q1
Q2, Q3
Q4
R1
R2
R3
R4, R6
R5
R7
R8
R9
R10
R11, R13
R12, R14
R15
R16
RV1
T1
U1
Part
Capacitor, 1000pF, 10%, 1KV, Ceramic
Capacitor, 0.47uF, 300V, Poly
Capacitor, 1000pF, 20%, 50V, Ceramic
Capacitor, 10uF, 10%, 16V, Tantalum
Capacitor, 6.8uF, 10%, 16V, Electrolytic
Diode, MLL479A, 5%, 4.3V
Diode, LL101A
Diode, LL967AB, 5%, 18V, Zener
Phone Jack, RJ-11
Relay, Pulse
Relay, Off-Hook
Ferrite Bead (as needed for EMI)
Transistor, 2N2102
Transistor, MMDT2907A
Transistor, MMBT2222
Resistor, 5.23KΩ, 1%, 1/8W, Film
Resistor, 3.3KΩ, 5%, 1/8W, Carbon
Resistor, 100KΩ, 5%, 1/8W, Carbon
Resistor, 27KΩ, 5%, 1/8W, Carbon
Resistor, 4.7KΩ, 5%, 1/8W, Carbon
Resistor, 40.2KΩ, 1%, 1/4W, Film
Resistor, 18.7KΩ, 1%, 1/8W, Film
Resistor, 10Ω, 1%, 1/8W
Resistor, 120Ω, 1/2W
Resistor, 15KΩ, 5%, 1/4W
Resistor, 18Ω, 5%, 1/2W, 500V
Resistor, 10.0KΩ, 1/8W
Resistor, 523Ω, 1/8W
Varistor, V250LC4, 250VRMS
Transformer, Midcom 671-8262
Optoisolator, 4N35
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
2.5.1 ~PULSE Filter Circuit
On the SFV SocketModems, the ~PULSE signal required for pulse dialing is available on pin 28 but must be connected to a
low pass filter circuit. The circuit shown in Figure 2-12 shows one filter that satisfactorily filters the ~PULSE line to the
~PULSE relay. Refer to the RCV336ACF/SP Modem Designer’s Guide for details.
This circuit is included in the European SFV336ACF SocketModems.
Vcc
47nF
100K
47K
~PULSE
( Pin 28)
BC807-25
BAV99
BAS16
390
TLP627
RELAY
TERMINAL
DGND
Figure 2-12. ~PULSE Filter Circuit
1158
2-19
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
2.5.2 Audio Interface
Audio output is useful for monitoring the modem’s call-progress tones and modem system debugging, as well as for fullfeatured Voice applications. The two audio amplifier circuits shown below are similar in layout but differ in audio quality. The
Sounducer circuit is suitable for basic call-progress-tone monitoring, while the speaker circuit is appropriate for Voice
applications.
In Figure 2-13, the audio amplifier drives a piezo-electric Sounducer. The SPKR signal from the SocketModem is fed into an
audio amplifier. The 10 µF capacitor between pin 1 and pin 8 of the amplifier bypasses internal circuitry to achieve the
maximum gain. The second 10 µF capacitor, between pin 5 of the amplifier and the Sounducer, is used to keep the 2.5 VDC
bias of the op amplifier from going into the Sounducer.
In Figure 2-14, the audio amplifier drives a 8Ω speaker. In this circuit, the amplifier’s bypass circuit includes a 750 Ω resistor,
and the bias-blocking capacitor changes to 22 µF.
Figure 2-13. Sounducer Driver Circuit
Figure 2-14. Speaker Driver Circuit
2-20
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
2.5.3 SFV336ACFW Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Interface
Figure 2-15 shows the circuitry used on the Socket Modem Demo boards to implement audio and speaker phone functions.
J21
1
J22 1
J23 1
C63 0.1uF
FOR MUSIC ON HOLD BRING EXT CABLE TO J22/J21
FOR TELEPHONE EMULATION CONN J22 TO J23
TP191
CONNECT J26 & J27 FOR SELF AMPLIFIED SPEAKERS.
CONNECT J25 & J26 FOR PASSIVE SPEAKERS.
+12V
C81
0.1uF
C82
C80
10u
TP186
0.1uF
C103
10uF
1 J26
6 1 U19
TP188 J27 1
2
7
5
1
3
LM386
J25
R250
C84 4 8 R272
10
10u
0
TP189
C79
0.047u
VCC
R228
10K
MICM
C85
10u
SPKV
MICV
C68
0.1uF
R227
2.2K
J28 J29
1 1
R251
C67
R267
10
22uF
1K
L7
C59
0.1uF
2
5
3
4
1
CONNECT J28 & J29 FOR SPEAKERS.
DO NOT CONNECT J29 & J30 FOR
HEADPHONE OPERATION.
J19
+1
2
LS1
8 ohm
L31
10uH
C102
0.1uF
L6
R220
C86 0
1000p
2
5
3
4
1
J20
MIC IN
L6 AND R220 ARE EXCLUSIVE OPTIONS. A FERRITE, L6, MAY
NEED TO BE PLACED FOR EMI SUPPRESION OTHERWISE A
0 OHM JUMPER OR DIRECT TRACE CAN BE USED FOR R220
Figure 2-15. Audio Circuitry for Audio and Speaker Phone operation
1158
2-21
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-16 outlines the complete DAA circuit for the SFV Socket Modem configured for the -D6 DAA interface.
Figure 2-17 describes the supporting DAA and audio handset circuitry used on the TE28-D400, TE28-D500 and TE28-D550
SocketModem Evaluation Boards.
The basic DAA portion of the circuit starts with the TXA1 and TXA2 differential-output signals from the RCV336ACF modem
chip, and the RIN single-ended analog input. These signals are impedance-matched to the secondary windings of the
transformer on the SocketModem.
For D6 option Socket Modems, the primary windings of the transformer are routed to the SocketModem pins XFMR1 and
XFMR2 (Pins 7 and 8), where they are connected to the inputs of a DPDT relay controlled by ~CALLID. During normal
operation, and when Caller ID is disabled, XFMR1 and XFMR1 are connected back to the SocketModem on ACOUT1 and
ACOUT2 (Pins 5 and 6). ACOUT1 and ACOUT2 connect to a full-wave bridge, current-holding circuit and off-hook relay, the
output of which goes to TIP and RING (Pins 1 and 2). The off-hook relay is activated when the modem wants to seize the
phone line to either place a call or answer an in-coming call. TIP and RING connect to the phone jack through a pair of
18.2Ω resistors and across a 250 VRMS circuit-protecting varistor. The two 1000 pF capacitors and the ferrite-bead inductor
connected to each RJ-11 phone jack are used for EMI protection only. Depending on how the circuit board is laid out, these
three parts may not even be needed, but places for them should be reserved so that they may be included at assembly time
should EMI test results call for them. If the ferrite beads are not needed, install two zero Ω resistors (jumpers) instead.
If Caller ID is enabled, ~CALLID is activated between the first and second rings of an incoming call and XFMR1 and XFMR2
are routed instead to the RDETIN1 and RDET/CID pins (Pins 3 and 9). XFMR1 is connected to RDETIN1, which is
connected to pin 4 of the Voice relay, and out through pin 3 of the Voice relay to the TIP signal from telephone line. Likewise,
XFMR2 is connected to RDET/CID, through a 0.33 µF capacitor on the SocketModem which performs DC-blocking, goes off
the SocketModem again through RDETIN2 (Pin 4) and over to pin 9 of the Voice relay, then out through pin 10 of the relay
to the RING signal from the phone jack. This circuit completes the TIP/RING-to-XFMR1/XFMR2 connection, using the 0.33
µF capacitor normally used by the ring-detect circuit to provide DC-blocking while preventing drawing sufficient current to
seize the line.
The D6 option Socket Modem can also be configured to be permanently AC coupled to the telephone line. This allows the
Caller ID function to be performed without the need for a relay. To implement permanent AC coupling to the line place a
0.1uF 200V capacitor and 18 ohm resistor in series between the Socket Modem pins 2 and 7. Also place a 0.1uF 200V
capacitor between Socket Modem pins 1 and 8.
Detection of an incoming ring signal is performed by connecting TIP to RDETIN1, and RING to RDETIN2 (Pins 3 and 4 of
the Socket Modem). The ring signal is then rectified and fed into an opto-isolator, which sends the detected ring signal as a
TTL-level waveform to the RINGD pin of the RCV336ACF device.
When a user picks up the handset of a phone plugged into the local-phone jack, current flows from the TIP signal on the
phone-line RJ-11 jack through pin 4 of the Voice relay, through the IL250 opto-isolator and through the local phone, then out
through pin 9 of the Voice relay and out to the RING signal of the phone-line jack. This current through the IL250 optoisolator activates the LCS (Line Current Sense) signal sent to the RCV336ACF, which may then enable or disable certain
modem features depending on its run-time configuration.
The Voice relay, controlled by the ~VOICE signal from the RCV336ACF, is used to provide current generated by the
LM317LM current-source to power a phone plugged into the local-phone jack, and to connect the local phone to the TELIN
(pin 59) and TELOUT (pin 58) signals. TELIN receives audio signals from the local handset’s microphone, and TELOUT
transmits audio signals to the handset’s speaker. ~VOICE is typically activated when the user wants to record and/or listen
to voice prompts from a phone plugged into the modem’s local-phone jack.
2-22
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 2-16. SFV336ACF Telephone Line/Telephone/Audio Interface Circuit
1158
2-23
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
R209
TIP
RING
LM317LM
8
7
6
5
RDETIN1
RDETIN2
R243
20.0K
ACOUT2
K2
4
XFMR2
9
CID
NC IN
OUT
OUT
OUT
OUT
NCADJ
+12V
TP95
R16
75
R210
R247
20.0K
R244
2.2K
D18
BAS16
EC2-5
3
5
1
12
10
8
L4
R234
J16
TELCO4/6
TEL LINE
7
0
4
9
C37
0.1uF
Q13
MMBT2907A
1
3
2
6
4
5
IL250
VCC
U11
R32
20K
R233
TP136
R248
2.2K
1K
0
D17
BAS16
C46
~VOI
VC
1000PF
10%
1KV
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
L5
R216
10.0K
1%
TELIN
1%
R214
19.1K
TP185
C53
C54
10u
10u
R215
R217
20.0K
1%
-12V
C58
0.22uF
R78
20.0K 1%
TP151
604
1%
TELOUT
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
K1
EC2-5
TP160
0
1000PF
10%
1KV
C1
1000PF
10%
1KV
RV1
V250LC4
1
2
3
4
TP159
Q14
C2
18.2
1%
VCC
3
5
1
12
10
8
R172
~CALLID
U13
VCC
ACOUT1
XFMR1
R235
18.2
1%
C47
C56
2
3
U17A
SJ1
1
8
TEL SET
8
1000PF
10%
1KV
R232
0.1uF
4
R218
20.0K
1%
J17
0
SOLDERJUMPER
1458
C57
+12V
0.1uF
LCS
Figure 2-17. SFV336ACF Telephone Line/Telephone Handset/Audio Interface Circuit: D6 Option
2-24
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
3. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS
Good engineering practices must be adhered to when designing a printed circuit board (PCB) containing the SocketModem
module. Suppression of noise is essential to the proper operation and performance of the modem itself and for surrounding
equipment.
Two aspects of noise in an OEM board design containing the SocketModem module must be considered: on-board/off-board
generated noise that can affect analog signal levels and analog-to-digital conversion (ADC)/digital-to-analog conversion
(DAC), and on-board generated noise that can radiate off-board. Both on-board and off-board generated noise that is
coupled on-board can affect interfacing signal levels and quality, especially in low level analog signals. Of particular concern
is noise in frequency ranges affecting modem performance.
On-board generated electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise that can be radiated or conducted off-board is a separate, but
equally important, concern. This noise can affect the operation of surrounding equipment. Most local governing agencies
have stringent certification requirements that must be met for use in specific environments.
Proper PC board layout (component placement, signal routing, trace thickness and geometry, etc.), component selection
(composition, value, and tolerance), interface connections, and shielding are required for the board design to achieve
desired modem performance and to attain EMI certification.
The aspects of proper engineering practices are beyond the scope of this designer's guide. The designer should consult
noise suppression techniques described in technical publications and journals, electronics and electrical engineering text
books, and component supplier application notes. Seminars addressing noise suppression techniques are often offered by
technical and professional associations as well as component suppliers.
3.1 PC BOARD LAYOUT GUIDELINES
3.1.1 General
1.
In a 2-layer design, provide an adequate ground grid in all unused space around and under components (judiciously
near analog components) on both sides of the board, and connect in such a manner as to avoid small islands. A grid is
preferred over a plane to improve solderability. Typically, the grid is composed of .012 in. traces and .012 in. spaces on
a .025 in. grid. Connect each grid to other grids on the same side at several points and to grids on the opposite side
through the board at several points. Connect SocketModem DGND and AGND pins to the ground grid.
2.
In a 4-layer design, provide an adequate ground plane covering the entire board. SocketModem DGND and AGND pins
are tied together on the SocketModem.
3.
As a general rule, route digital signals on the component side of the PCB and the analog signals on the solder side. The
sides may be reversed to match particular OEM requirements. Route the digital traces perpendicular to the analog
traces to minimize signal cross coupling.
4.
Route the modem signals to provide maximum isolation between noise sources and noise sensitive inputs. When layout
requirements necessitate routing these signals together, they should be separated by neutral signals.
5.
All power and ground traces should be at least 0.05 in. wide.
6.
TIP and RING signal traces are to be no closer than 0.062" from any other traces for U.S. applications. TIP and RING
signal traces are to be no closer than 2.5mm (0.1”) from any other traces for European applications. 2.5mm spacing
must be used if the host board is to support both U.S. and European Socket Modems.
3.1.2 Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Considerations
The following guidelines are offered to specifically help minimize EMI generation. Some of these guidelines are the same as,
or similar to, the general guidelines but are mentioned again to reinforce their importance.
In order to minimize the contribution of the SocketModem-based design to EMI, the designer must understand the major
sources of EMI and how to reduce them to acceptable levels.
1.
Keep traces carrying high frequency signals as short as possible.
2.
Provide a good ground plane or grid. In some cases, a multilayer board may be required with full layers for ground and
power distribution.
3.
Decouple power from ground with decoupling capacitors as close to the SocketModem module power pins as possible.
1158
3-1
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
4.
Eliminate ground loops, which are unexpected current return paths to the power source and ground.
5.
Decouple the telephone line cables at the telephone line jacks. Typically, use a combination of series inductors, common
mode chokes, and shunt capacitors. Methods to decouple telephone lines are similar to decoupling power lines,
however, telephone line decoupling may be more difficult and deserves additional attention. A commonly used design
aid is to place footprints for these components and populate as necessary during performance/EMI testing and
certification.
6.
Decouple the power cord at the power cord interface with decoupling capacitors. Methods to decouple power lines are
similar to decoupling telephone lines.
7.
Locate high frequency circuits in a separate area to minimize capacitive coupling to other circuits.
8.
Locate cables and connectors so as to avoid coupling from high frequency circuits.
9.
Lay out the highest frequency signal traces next to the ground grid.
10. If a multilayer board design is used, make no cuts in the ground or power planes and be sure the ground plane covers
all traces.
11. Minimize the number of through-hole connections on traces carrying high frequency signals.
12. Avoid right angle turns on high frequency traces. Forty-five degree corners are good, however, radius turns are better.
13. On 2-layer boards with no ground grid, provide a shadow ground trace on the opposite side of the board to traces
carrying high frequency signals. This will be effective as a high frequency ground return if it is three times the width of
the signal traces.
14. Distribute high frequency signals continuously on a single trace rather than several traces radiating from one point.
3-2
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
3.2 PRODUCT MIGRATION GUIDELINES
The SocketModem products are pin-compatible across families. A host board designed initially for the SF144ACF
HxD5A0P1, for example, can readily support a SF224ATF HxD5A0P1, a SF336ACF HxD5A0P1, or a SF56AFL HxD5A0P1.
•
If planning to migrate from a U.S. D5 option Socket Modem to a European Socket Modem, design the host board to
accommodate for the European option. Pins 54-60 are not present on the U.S. D5 option Socket Modem, but are
located on the European Socket Modem.
3.3 OTHER CONSIDERATI ONS
The pins of all SocketModems are grouped according to function. The DAA interface, Host interface, LED interface, and
Memory interface pins are all conveniently arranged, easing the host board layout design. EIA-232 serial signals, for
example, could be easily routed to a DB-9 connector, or to a smaller form-factor cable connector that leads to a cable with a
DB-9 or a DB-25 connector on the other end.
The DAA designs described in this designer's guide are ‘wet’ DAAs, i.e., they require line current to be present to pass the
signal. If the modem is to be connected back-to-back by cable directly to another modem, the modems will not operate. The
DAAs must be modified to operate dry, i.e., without line current, when used in this environment.
Rockwell has tested each of the European SFV336ACF SocketModems for compliance with their respective country’s PTT
requirements and has received PTT certificates that cover, without additional expense to the user, all applications that use
these SocketModems in their respective countries. The certificates apply only to designs that route TIP and RING (pins 1
and 2) directly to the telco jack. Only specified EMI filtering components are allowed on these two signals as shown in figure
2-10.
3.4 MANUFACTURING CONSIDERATIONS
The Socket Modem has been designed to be mounted onto the host board in one of two ways.
The first method consists of soldering two 32 pin strip sockets to the host board and inserting the Socket Modem into the
sockets. A suggested part number for the 32 pin socket is SamTec SMM-132-01-F-S. In order to pass FCC Part 68 and
DOC voltage surge requirements, it is suggested that the pin at location 10 in the socket be removed between the DAA
section (pins 1-9) of the Socket Modem and the remaining pins of the socket.
The second way is to solder the Socket Modem directly to the host board. The most efficient way to do this is through a
wave solder process. The recommended hole size for the Socket Modem pins is 0.036 in. +/-0.003 in. in diameter. Spacers
can be used to hold the Socket Modem vertically in place during the wave solder process. A spacer should be placed on pin
32 and pin 64 of the Socket Modem. A suggested part number for the spacer is BIVAR 938-0.130 for P1(0.310in) option
Socket Modems. The spacers can be left on permanently and will not effect operation.
The SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL Socket Modems can all be put through a water wash process. The
SF224ATF Socket Modem can not be put through a water wash process.
1158
3-3
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
This page is intentionally blank.
3-4
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
4. PACKAGE DIMENSIONS
Package dimensions are shown in Figure 4-1 (SF224ATF), Figure 4-2 (SF144ACF, SF336ACF and SF56ACL), and Figure 43. (European Socket Modem Physical Dimensions - SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF with DF, DG, DT, DE and DB options).
Figure 4-1. SocketModem Physical Dimensions - SF224ATF
Figure 4-2. SocketModem Physical Dimensions - SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF and SFV56ACL
(D5 and D6 Options)
1158
4-1
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Figure 4-3. European Socket Modem Physical Dimensions - SFV144ACF, SFV336ACF
(DF, DG, DT, DE and DB Options)
4-2
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
5. SOCKETMODEM DESIGN WITH SERIAL INTERFACE
R8
FOR H2 OPTION CONNECT JC'X'C WITH JC'X'B.
FOR H1 OPTION CONNECT JC'X'A WITH JC'X'B AND JC'X'C WITH JC'X'D
0
P2
29
27
26
28
1
14
2
15
3
16
4
17
5
18
6
19
7
20
8
21
9
22
10
23
11
24
12
25
13
1
2
TXD232
3
4
7
RXD232/RXDTTL~
RTS232
5
DSRTTL~
DSR232/DSRTTL~
CTS232
6
CTSTTL~
DSR232
20
CTS232/CTSTTL~
RLSDTTL~
DTR232
8
RLSD232/TTL~
RLSD232
22
JC1A
1
RXDTTL~
RXD232
RITTL~
RI232/RITTL~
RI232
TXDTTL~
TXD232/TXDTTL~
CONNE_DB25
DTRTTL~
DTR232/DTRTTL~
RTSTTL~
BOTTOM SIDE
PIN OUT
D1
D2
D3
D4
DAA
INTERFACE
TXDIND
DTRIND
RXDIND
RLSDIND
~PULSE
~RESET
RDET/CID
XFMR2
XFMR1
ACOUT2
ACOUT1
RDETIN2
RDETIN1
RING
TIP
J32
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
CON32
JC2A
1
JC3A
1
JC4A
1
JC5A
1
JC6A
1
JC7A
1
JC8A
1
RTS232/RTSTTL~
JC1D
JC1C 1
RXD232
1
JC2D
1
JC2C
DSR232
1
JC3D
JC1B
1
JC2B
1
JC7B
1
JC3C 1
CTS232
1
JC4D
JC4C 1
RLSD232
1
JC5D
JC5C 1
RI232
1
JC6D
1
JC6C
TXD232
1
JC7D
1
JC7C
DTR232
1
JC8D
JC8B
1
JC8C 1
1
JC3B
1
JC4B
1
JC5B
1
JC6B
1
DSR232MAX
CTS232MAX
RLSD232MAX
RI232MAX
TXD232MAX
DTR232MAX
RTS232MAX
RTS232
ORIENTATION
J33
RTS232/RTSTTL~
33
RXD232/RXDTTL~
34
TXD232/TXDTTL~
35
RI232/RITTL~
36
DSR232/DSRTTL~
37
CTS232/CTSTTL~
38
RLSD232/TTL~
39
DTR232/DTRTTL~
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
VC
54
~VOI
55
~CALLID
56
LCS
57
TELOUT
58
TELIN
59
MICM
60
61
MICV
62
63
SPKV
64
CON32(33-64)
VCC
U20
C19
AUDIO
INTERFACE
C8
RXDTTL~
DSRTTL~
CTSTTL~
RLSDTTL~
RITTL~
0.1uF
10
C1+
12
13
C1C2+
0.1uF 14
7
6
18
19
21
C2T1IN
T2IN
T3IN
T4IN
T5IN
TXDTTL~
DTRTTL~
RTSTTL~
5
22
17
R1OUT
R2OUT
R3OUT
C43
0.1uF
9
V
C
C
V+
V-
11
15
C7
0.1uF
G
N
D
T1OUT
T2OUT
T3OUT
T4OUT
T5OUT
2
3
1
24
20
RXD232MAX
DSR232MAX
CTS232MAX
RLSD232MAX
RI232MAX
R1IN
R2IN
R3IN
4
23
16
TXD232MAX
DTR232MAX
RTS232MAX
MAX207
8
Figure 5-1. Serial Interface Example
1158
RXD232MAX
5-1
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 5-1. Serial Interface Example Bill of Materials
Quantity
5-2
Reference
4
4
2
C7, C8, C19, C43
D1, D2, D3, D4
J32, J33
1
1
P2
U20
Part
Capacitor, 0.10uF, 25V, 20%, Ceramic
LED
Socket, 32-pin, 2mm SIP
(SamTec SMM-132-01-F-S)
Connector, DB-25; DB-9 can also be used
RS-232 Converter (Maxim MAX207)
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
6. SOCKETMODEM DESIGN WITH PARALLEL INTERFACE
J2
GND
OSC
+5V
BALE
T/C
DACK2_
IRQ3
IRQ4
IRQ5
IRQ6
IRQ7
CLK
REFR_
DRQ1
DACK1_
DRQ3
DACK3_
IOR_
IOW_
SMEMR_
SMEMW_
GND
+12V
0WS
-12V
DRQ2
-5V
IRQ9
+5V
RST
GND
EDGE-CON(B)
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
TP218
USE FOLLOWING TABLE:
OSCI
COMPORT SELECTION:
VCC
COM1
COM2
COM3
COM4
VCC
IRQ3
IRQ4
IRQ5
J3-J4,J7-J6,J12-J9.
J3-J5,J7-J6,J10-J9.
J3-J4,J7-J8,J12-J9.
J3-J5,J7-J8,J10-J9.
1
4
IRQ7
HAEN
3F8-3FF IRQ4
2F8-2FF IRQ3
3E8-3EF IRQ4
2E8-2EF IRQ3
TP58
U4A
2
1
~HRD
~HWT
74HCT04
7
VCC
HA9
HA6
+12V
8
HA5
IRQ9
HRESET
VCC
3
HA8
74HCT30
1
1J3
1
U4B
4
~HCS
7
J41
TP91
U9
5
6
11
12
HA3
-12V
1
4
1
2
3
4
HA7
J51
1
74HCT04
J61
1
U4C
J1
SA0
SA1
SA2
SA3
SA4
SA5
SA6
SA7
SA8
SA9
SA10
SA11
SA12
SA13
SA14
SA15
SA16
SA17
SA18
SA19
AEN
IORDY_
SD0
SD1
SD2
SD3
SD4
SD5
SD6
SD7
IOCK_
EDGE-CON(A)
J81
6
5
HA4
1J7
1
1
74HCT04
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
HA0
HA1
HA2
HA3
HA4
HA5
HA6
HA7
HA8
HA9
HA10
HA11
HA12
HA13
HA14
HA15
HRESET
9
8
U4D
~RESET
74HCT04
J9
J101
IRQ3
1
1
1
1 J12
IRQ4
1
HINT
HINT
HAEN
BOTTOM SIDE
PIN OUT
ORIENTATION
HD0
HD1
HD2
HD3
HD4
HD5
HD6
HD7
~HWT
HA0
HINT
HD2
~PULSE
HD7
HA1
~RESET
DAA
INTERFACE
RDET/CID
XFMR2
XFMR1
ACOUT2
ACOUT1
RDETIN2
RDETIN1
RING
TIP
J32
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
CON32
~HCS
J33
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
CON32(33-64)
~HRD
HA2
HD4
HD5
HD0
HD1
HD3
~HCS
HD6
VCC
VC
~VOI
~CALLID
LCS
TELOUT
TELIN
MICM
MICV
AUDIO
INTERFACE
SPKV
Figure 6-1. General-Purpose Parallel Interface
1158
6-1
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
Table 6-1. Parallel Interface Example Bill of Materials
Quantity
6-2
Reference
2
J32, J33
1
1
U4
U9
Part
Socket, Single Row, 2mm, 32-pin
(SamTec SMM-132-01-F-S)
74ALS04, Hex Inverter
74LS30, 8-Input Positive NAND Gate
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
7. EUROPEAN SOCKETMODEM INSTALLATION GUIDELINES
The European SocketModem module is approved as a host-independent modem card. To maintain type approvals, permits
and/or licenses valid, the guidelines described in this document must be followed.
7.1 CONSIDERATIONS FOR TELECOM APPROVALS
7.1.1 PSTN Connection
The European SocketModem can be connected to the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) either
a)
by using a 2-wire flying cable to connect pins J1 and J2 of the card to an RJ-11 connector which can be assembled
in a suitable location of the host system enclosure,
OR
b)
by providing traces on the host system motherboard for the PSTN connection signals (TIP and RING) between the
card and an RJ-11 connector
If connection option a) is used, the cable and its installation inside the host system must be in accordance with the guidelines
in IEC950/EN60950 (e.g. the insulation material must withstand electric strength tests as described in section 2.3).
If connection option b) is used, NO additional components except those used for EMI filtering (specified in figure 2-10) must
be connected to the TIP and RING signals. Other components not intended for use with this design may affect the network
access characteristics of the modem and may therefore invalidate the type approvals, permits and/or licenses.
In both cases, for the connection between the host and the PSTN wall connector, a cable with RJ-11 modular jack and an
appropriate national plug must be used. Note that in Germany, an F-coded connector/plug must be used (this is one of the
two typical plugs used for PSTN connection in Germany, the other type is called N-coded).
1158
7-1
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
7.2 CONSIDERATIONS FOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY
7.2.1 Conditions for Maintaining Safety Compliance
The European SocketModem has been assessed with respect to electrical safety and has been found to comply with
relevant standards as defined by the European Low Voltage Directive (73/23/EEC). The particular standard is EN
60950:1992 +A1/A2:1993 +A3:1995.
The card is rated as a Class III equipment and it is intended for use in Pollution Degree 2 environments only. Material Group
IIIa or IIIb (Comparative Tracking Index below 400 according to IEC 112, method A) is assumed for any host system PCB
that has traces and/or circuitry with TNV potential.
It is assumed that the modem card will only be assembled in a host system unit that complies with IEC950/EN60950.
Some particular requirements are:
-
the host system must have a compliant fire enclosure (e.g. made of material with flammability class 94V-1 or better).
the power supply unit of the host system must have double or reinforced insulation.
7.2.2 Power Supply
Before installing the European SocketModem in a host system, the installer must ensure that the power drawn by the card,
together with the host and any auxiliary cards drawing power from the host, is within the rating of the host power supply unit.
The European SocketModem’s power consumption is max 2.0 W (+5 Vdc).
7.2.3 Clearances, Creepage Distances and Distances through Insulation
The card must be installed such that with the exception of the connections to the host, clearance and creepage distances
shown in the table below are maintained between
a)
b)
the TNV area of the card (the DAA) and conductive parts of other assemblies inside the host,
if applicable, the PSTN connection traces (TIP and RING) routed through the host system motherboard and any other
conductive area (i.e. traces, through holes, SMD pads, copper areas, etc.) on that motherboard.
which use or generate a voltage shown in the table below:
Clearance (mm)
Creepage (mm)
Voltage used or
Generated by Host or
Other Cards
2.0
2.4 (3.8)
Up to 50 Vrms or Vdc
2.6
3.0 (4.8)
Up to 125 Vrms or Vdc
4.0
5.0 (8.0)
Up to 250 Vrms or Vdc
4.0
6.4 (10.0)
Up to 300 Vrms or Vdc
The larger distances shown in brackets applies for Pollution Degree 3 environments (where the local environment within the
host is subject to conductive pollution or dry non-conductive pollution, which could become conductive due to expected
condensation).
The same clearance and creepage distances also apply between TNV areas of the card and earth connections inside the
host system.
Failure to maintain these minimum distances would invalidate the approval.
NOTE: For a host or other expansion cards fitted in the host using or generating voltages greater than 300 V (rms or dc),
advice from a competent telecommunications safety engineer must be obtained.
If these clearance and creepage distances cannot be provided inside the host due to space limitations, a dielectric material
may be used as a physical insulation barrier. The dielectric material used in this insulation must have a thickness of at least
0.4mm. If thinner dielectric material is used, at least two layers (sheets) must be used with each layer withstanding electric
strength test using 3000 Vac (or 4242 Vdc).
7-2
1158
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
After installation (or implementation) of the European SocketModem inside a host system, it is recommended that a
competent telecommunications safety engineer inspects the complete system to ensure that safety compliance is
maintained.
(TNV = Telecommunications Network Voltages).
7.3 CONSIDERATIONS FOR EMC
7.3.1 EMC Compliance
The European SocketModem has been assessed with respect to emission of and immunity to electromagnetic disturbances
and has been found to comply with the relevant harmonized standards as defined by the European EMC Directive
(89/336/EEC).
These standards are
·
Generic emission standard EN 50081-1:1992, which refers to
·
Generic immunity standard EN 50082-1:1992, which refers to
EN 55022:1994 +A1:1995, Class B
IEC 801-2:1984
Electrostatic discharge requirements
IEC 801-3:1984
Radiated electromagnetic field requirements
EN 61000-4-4:1995
Electrical fast transient/burst requirements
7.3.2 Installation in Host Systems
It is assumed that the European SocketModem will only be assembled in host systems that comply with the EMC Directive.
As per definition of the EMC Directive, the card and its host system will constitute an “installation” similar to e.g. a PC card
modem installed in a personal computer. Therefore, if the host system complies with the EMC Directive, there should be no
need for verifying continued compliance of the complete system.
However, note that it is the responsibility of the professional installer of European SocketModem to ensure that the complete
system placed on the market complies with the Directive.
1158
7-3
SocketModem SF Series Designer’s Guide
This page is intentionally blank.
7-4
1158
INSIDE BACK COVER NOTES
REGIONAL SALES OFFICES
Headquarters
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
4311 Jamboree Road,
P.O. Box C
Newport Beach, CA 92658-8902
Phone: (714) 221-4600
Fax:
(714) 221-6375
European Headquarters
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
S.A.R.L.
Les Taissounieres B1
Route des Dolines
Sophia Antipolis Cedex
06905 Valbonne
France
Phone: (33) 93 00 33 35
Fax:
(33) 93 00 33 03
For more information:
Call 1-800-854-8099
International information:
Call 1-714-833-6996
URL Address:
http://www.nb.rockwell.com
E-Mail Address:
[email protected]
US Southwest Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
5000 Birch Street
Suite 400
Newport Beach, CA 92660
Phone: (714) 222-9119
Fax:
(714) 222-0620
US Southwest Satellite Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
1000 Business Center Circle
Suite 215
Thousand Oaks, CA 91320
Phone: (805) 376-0559
Fax:
(805) 376-8180
US South Central Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
2001 North Collins Blvd
Suite 103
Richardson, TX 75080
Phone: (214) 379-9310
Fax:
(214) 479-9317
US Southeast Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
3500 Parkway Lane, Suite 415
Norcross, GA 30092
Phone: (770) 246-8283
Fax:
(770) 246-0018
US Southeast Satellite Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
One Prestige Place
2600 McCormick Drive
Suite 350
Clearwater, FL 34619
Phone: (813) 799-8406
Fax:
(813) 799-8306
©1997, Rockwell International Corporation
Printed in U.S.A.
All Rights Reserved
US Northwest Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
US Northwest Office
3600 Pruneridge Avenue
Suite 100
Santa Clara, CA 95051
Phone: (408) 249-9696
Fax:
(408) 249-7113
US North Central Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Two Pierce Place
Chancellory Park
Suite 810
Itasca, IL 60143
Phone: (630) 773-3454
Fax:
(630) 773-3907
US Northeast Office
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
239 Littleton Road
Suite 4A
Westford, MA 01886
Phone: (508) 692-7660
Fax:
(508) 692-8185
Australia
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Rockwell Australia Pty Limited
Suite 603, 51 Rawson Street
Epping, NSW 2121
Australia
Phone: (61-2) 9869 4088
Fax:
(61-2) 9869 4077
Europe Mediterranean
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
c/o Rockwell Automation S.r.l.
Via Di Vittorio, 1
20017 Mazzo Di Rho (MI)
Italy
Phone: (39 2) 93179911
Fax
(39 2) 93179913
Europe North
Japan
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems, Ltd. Rockwell Int'l Japan Co., Ltd.
Berkshire Court
Shimomoto Bldg
Western Road
1-46-3 Hatsudai, Shibuya-ku
Bracknell
Tokyo, 151
Berkshire RG12 1RE
Japan
England
Phone: (81-3) 5371 1520
Phone: +44 1344 486 444
Fax:
(81-3) 5371 1501
Fax:
+44 1344 486 555
Korea
Rockwell-Collins Int'l, Inc.
Europe South
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Room No. 1508
S.A.R.L.
Korea Textile Centre Building
Tour GAN
944-31, Daechi-3dong
Cedex 13
Kangnam P.O. Box 2037
92082 Paris La Defense 2
Kangnam-ku
France
Seoul
Phone: (33-1) 49-06-3980
Korea
Fax:
(33-1) 49-06-3990
Phone: (82-2) 565-2880
Fax:
(82-2) 565-1440
Germany
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Singapore
Rockwell Int'l GmbH Germany
Rockwell Semiconductor Systems
Paul-Gerhardt-Allee 50 a
Singapore Branch
81245 Munchen
1 Kim Seng Promenade
Germany
#09-01 Great World City East Tower
Phone: (49-89) 829-1320
Singapore 237994
Fax:
(49-89) 834-2734
Phone: (65) 737-7355
Fax:
(65) 737-9077
Hong Kong
Rockwell Int'l (Asia Pacific) Ltd.
Taiwan
13th Floor, Suites 8-10,
Rockwell Int'l Taiwan Company, Ltd.
Harbour Centre
Room 2808 International Trade Bldg.
25 Harbour Road
333, Keelung Road, Section I
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Hong Kong
Taiwan
Phone: (852) 2 827-0181
10548 ROC
Fax:
(852) 2 827-6488
Phone: (886-2) 720-0282
Fax:
(886-2) 757-6760
SOUD091297
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