Helping Your Child Learn, Kindergarten to Grade 3

Helping Your Child Learn, Kindergarten to Grade 3
A N C H O R A G E
S C H O O L
D I S T R I C T
A Parent’s Guide
Helping Your Child Learn
Kindergarten to Grade 3
Families and Educators Working Together
Your child will be tested using the state and national exams in the areas
of reading, writing, and math in grades 3 through 6.
For more information about the state of Alaska content standards,
please log onto the state web site at
http://www.eed.state.ad.us/contentstandards/home.html
This booklet is the second in a series of books developed by the Anchorage School District
Curriculum and Instructional Support Department and in cooperation with Elementary Education.
The first booklet, “What Your Child Will Learn,” is an introduction to the elementary school curriculum with
student expectations for each grade level, kindergarten through grade six.
Copyright © October 2003
Anchorage School District
Anchorage School District
4600 DeBarr Road
Anchorage, Alaska 99519-6614
(907) 742-4000
We are pleased to recognize the artists featured in this booklet:
Cover art by Clarissa Heath, grade 2, Rogers Park Elementary School
Eric Aasand, grade 6, Trailside Elementary; Katie Anderson-Smith, grade 12, Chugiak High; Megan Birchell, grade 6, Rogers Park Elementary;
Lindsy Cameron, grade 8, Wendler Middle School; Jessica Cavanaugh, grade 2, Kasuun Elementary; Tierra Colon, grade 12, Steller Secondary
School; Megan Corwith, grade 11, Service High; Snan Guidry, grade 12, Dimond High; Bryan Hall, grade 6, Bayshore Elementary; Jonathan
Harrell, grade 3, Fairview Elementary; Amy Hartlieb, grade 11, Service High; Leanne Ives, grade 6, Alpenglow Elementary; Jamie Janko, grade 8,
Romig Middle School; Lynette Myers, grade 5, Williwaw Elementary; Shaun Poirot, grade 7, Girdwood K-8; Brook Powers, grade 3, Northern
Lights ABC; Desirrae Ryan, grade 2, Williwaw Elementary; Hannah Taylor, grade 10, Chugiak High; Jillian Vlahovic, grade 8, Hanshew Middle
School; Sheng Xiong, grade 4, Williwaw Elementary.
Working Committee for “Helping Your Child Learn”:
Carolyn Fuller
Carolyn Crosby
Linda Green
Julia Gibeault
Sally Loudermilk
Mardell Kiesel
Janice Gullickson
Aaron Jansen, Graphic Artist
Pam Butcher, ASD Publications Technician
It is the policy of the Anchorage School District to provide equal educational and employment opportunities, and to provide services and benefits to all students and employees without regard to race, color, religion, disability, national origin, gender, marital status, change in marital status, pregnancy, parenthood or other prohibitions. This policy
of the Anchorage School District is consistent with numerous laws, regulations, and executive orders enforced by various federal, state, and municipal agencies, including but
not limited to Executive Order 11246, Title 41, part 60-1, 60-2, 60-3, 60-20, Title VI and VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972.
Inquiries or complaints may be addressed to the School District Equal Employment Office, the Alaska State Commission for Human Rights, the Anchorage Equal Rights
Commission, or the Director of the Office for Civil Rights, the Department of Education or the Department of Health and Human Services.
A Message from the Superintendent
Dear Parent/Guardian,
The Anchorage School District realizes that success
for students is increased when families and educators work
together. This guidebook, “Helping Your Child Learn,” is a
collection of activities that you can use at home to help your
child successfully master the skills expected for his or her
grade level. Each activity is linked to its corresponding performance standard. This guide was written by experienced
classroom teachers and educators in our curriculum department. It contains reading, writing, oral language and math
performance standards and activities for Kindergarten as
well as first, second, and third grades. This ensures that your child will be prepared for the next grade level and
ultimately for passing the required Alaska High School Graduation Qualifying Exam.
“Helping Your Child Learn” is written with simple directions and examples for all of the activities. Any
necessary materials are easily found around the home. The activities are designed for adults and children to work
together. There are also favorite book choices, suggested websites to help children learn, and additional hints for
parents and guardians.
Anchorage School District students are the featured artists in “Helping Your Child Learn.” These wonderful samples of student expression illustrate that encouragement from and recognition by caring adults are important
parts of the creative process.
Our goal is to provide many opportunities for all students to succeed. This guidebook represents another
avenue in which the home school partnership can be strengthened. Please enjoy the experiences that it provides.
Your child’ s classroom teacher is an excellent source of additional suggestions for parent-child activities.
Sincerely,
Carol Comeau, Superintendent
1
Kindergarten Writing Process
The student will begin to write.
Favorite Books:
• Rosie’s Walk
by Pat Hutchins
•Leo the Late
Bloomer by
Robert Kraus
How can I help my child with the introduction to formation of letters?
Together we
• Look for the letters in our names on stores, restaurants, and other signs. We will find the letters
in our names in signs around us.
• Put magnetic letters on the refrigerator. I can encourage my child to touch and move the letters.
We talk about the shape of each letter.
• Make letters with glue and let them dry, then we feel the shape of each letter.
• Write our names making letters in bubbles on a cookie sheet or in the bathtub.
• Play games where we form letters with our bodies.
How can I help my child write his/her own name?
Together we:
• Make cards and letters for friends and family. My child should try to sign his/her own name.
• Use a capital letter only to start the name (George).
• Write each letter of the child’s name on paper, then cut the letters apart to make a puzzle.
How can I help my child use letter sounds
to spell and write words?
Together we:
• Keep a family message board. I
write simple messages and encourage my child to write replies.
• Share written and/or picture
directions. Example: Feed the dog.
I read the message to my child and
he/she reads it back to me.
• Cut out pictures and glue to paper.
My child writes about the picture.
(This may look like scribbles in the
beginning. Praise any letter
formations.) I ask my child to
“read” the writing to me to tell the
“story” about the picture.
2
“In Kindergarten
and first grade,
many children
convey their
meaning more
easily through
drawing than
through print.”
-Lucy McMormick
Caulkins
Educators Working Together
KINDERGARTEN
Families and
How can I help my child write simple words?
Together we:
• Label our home. Put a label on objects such as door, drawer, etc.
• Set up an area with paper, pencils, crayons, etc. for a home writing center.
• Write a note telling other family members where we are going; example, Mom and
(child's name) went to the post office.
How can I help my child draw pictures, and use sound spelling to write a story?
Together we:
• Use “sound-spelling” to write a story. “Sound-spelling” is writing the sounds you hear.
• Tell stories and then draw pictures to go with the stories.
• Draw a picture and then tell a story to go with the drawing. Add written words as
soon as we are ready. My child can talk and I will write.
• Arrange magnetic refrigerator letters to make words. Use the letters for the sounds
you hear.
3
Kindergarten Oral Language
The student will listen and speak to develop writing skills.
A Rhyming
Book:
• Diez Deditos:
10 Little
Fingers and
Other Play
Rhymes and
Action Songs
form Latin
America by
Jose-Luis
Orozco
How can I help my child listen to stories and poems?
Together we:
• Start a collection of stories and poems on tape.
• Gather and reread favorite books.
• Read a variety of books.
• Read a book and then my child looks at the pictures and tells me the story.
How can I help my child recite poems, rhymes, songs, and stories?
Together we:
• Sing songs and enjoy nursery rhymes as we do everyday activities or drive in the car.
• Read and talk about the stories and pictures.
• Share poems and stories that are part of our family history.
How can I help my child begin to use words to describe people, places, and things?
Together we:
• Ask each other what our favorite color is today. We can play this activity in the car and also
include our favorite movie, flavor of ice cream, song, animal, etc.
• Discuss the color, shape and movement of toys as we play with them.
• Finish these sentences. It smells like____. It tastes like_____. It feels like _______.
• Play a mystery game. I hide an object in a box and give my child clues to discover its identity.
I might say “The object is round and red and you can eat it.” (It is an apple).
• Use position words correctly (on, below, above, under, in front of, behind, etc.) Example: “Put
my bear on the chair. Put my bear behind the door.”
• Discuss what we did yesterday and talk about what we might do tomorrow.
If English is not your
home language...
Tell stories to your child in
your home language.
4
How can I help my child talk to friends, take turns, and listen to
others?
Together we:
• Use a play telephone to practice real phone conversations.
• Talk about topics that we both like.
• Invite other children to play with us indoors and outdoors.
• Talk and listen to other adults.
• Use polite words such as “please,” “thank you,” and “excuse me.”
Rhyming Books:
• Eentsy, Weentsy
Spider by
Joanna Cole
• 5 Little
Monkeys
Jumping on the
Bed by Eileen
Christalow
• Hop on Pop by
Dr. Seuss
Educators Working Together
KINDERGARTEN
Families and
How can I help my child identify words that rhyme?
Together we:
• Find words that rhyme with our names.
• Find household objects that rhyme like “bread” and “thread.”
• Play a game called, “Going on a trip.” I start with an item that I am going to take
and my child repeats that item and names another that rhymes with it. For example,
“I am taking a dog.” Child says, “I am taking a dog and a hog.”
• Play a riddle game. Example: “What rhymes with night and starts with s?” …sight!
• Take turns thinking of words that rhyme. For example, tap rhymes with cap, street
rhymes with meat, and snow rhymes with go.
5
Kindergarten Reading
Wordless
Picture Books:
• Pancakes for
Breakfast by
Tomie de Paola
• Do You Want to
Be My Friend?
by Eric Carle
• School by
Emily McCully
• Tuesday by
David Wiesner
Reading Comprehension: The student will understand what is
read.
How can I help my child make predictions about stories from shared reading?
Together we:
• Stop occasionally while reading and talk about what we think will happen next and why.
• Look at picture books with words on one page and pictures on the other page. First cover the
picture. After reading the words, I’ll ask my child to tell me what the picture will likely include.
Finally, I’ll uncover the picture and talk about what we see and what we thought we’d see.
How can I help my child retell stories in sequence with prompting (hints or questions)?
Together we:
• Read a story. I’ll ask my child to tell how the story started, what happened next, and so on.
• Choose stories to read where it’s easy to tell what happens first, next, and last. Fairy tales such as
The Three Little Pigs or Goldilocks and The Three Bears have a clear beginning, middle and ending.
I’ll praise my child for retelling any part of the story.
How can I help my child show an understanding of stories through art, music, play-acting and writing?
Together we:
• Draw pictures to help us as an aid for retelling a story we just read.
• Act out stories using props, costumes or puppets made from household items.
• Use music or sound effects to add excitement and interest to stories we tell or act out. For example,
snapping fingers may sound like rain, or heavy footsteps may warn of an approaching danger.
How can I help my child follow simple directions?
Together we:
• Play board and card games, like Chutes and Ladders, Candyland, Uno, and Hi-Ho Cherry-Oh!
I start by reading the directions aloud and having my child follow them.
• Cook a simple recipe while my child points out the steps.
• Play “Simon Says” with friends.
6
Websites
www.brobstsystems.com
/kids
Predictable
Books:
• Bringing the
Rain to Kapiti
Plain by Verna
Aardema
• The Three Little
Javelinas by
Susan Lowell
Educators Working Together
KINDERGARTEN
Families and
Reading Phonics/Decoding: The student will use a variety of
decoding strategies.
How can I help my child begin to learn common sight words?
Together we:
• Practice reading my child’s name, as well as the names of other family members.
• Find symbols that represent objects or concepts, such as the symbol of a man on the
restroom door.
• Recognize and learn to read signs, labels, and logos in the environment, such as the
word “EXIT” to show the way out of a location.
• Read and reread favorite books pointing to the words as we read.
• Look for letters, words, or beginning sounds on common household items such as
cereal boxes.
How can I help my child learn the
letters of the alphabet?
Together we:
• Sing the alphabet song while touching
each letter as we sing. We can use our
magnetic letters.
• Play “Match.” Using flash cards or
magnetic letters, we match the capital
letter to the same lower case letter.
• Practice saying, writing, and reading the
letters used in my child’s name, other
family members’ names, pets or anything
else my child wants to learn.
• Find small objects that begin with the
first 12 letters of the alphabet. We put
one letter in the bottom of each section of
an egg carton and then place an object
that begins with that letter in the section.
The next time we play, we may use more
cartons or different letters.
7
Kindergarten Reading
Favorite Books:
• Chicka, Chicka
Boom, Boom
by Bill Martin
Jr. and John
Archabault
• Brown Bear,
Brown Bear by
Bill Martin
• Alaska’s ABC
by Shelley Gill
and Shannon
Cartwright
How can I help my child learn consonant sounds?
Together we:
• Hunt for words that begin with the same consonant letter as my child’s name or other family
members’ names.
• Find letters that represent a particular consonant by its name or the sound it makes. For example,
“Which letter do you need to make the /b/ sound?
• Play a sound matching game. I select a consonant letter sound, say the letter, make the sound,
and give an example of the word using the sound. Example: “My letter is ‘D’. It is the sound
in dad and dog.” Then we think of other words that begin with that sound. I’ll use different
letters and sounds too, including letter combinations such as br, cl, sh, and others
• Which letter do you need to make the sound you hear at the beginning of ball?.
How can I help my child begin to identify some vowel sounds?
Together we:
• Find long vowel sounds in names and other words. Long vowel sounds (a, e, i. o, u) say
their own name.
• Decide if the vowel sound we found in a word, does or does not say its name. For example in the
word “bake” the vowel “a” says its name (long), but in the word “cat” the “a” does not say its name.
How can I help my child recognize rhyming words?
Together we:
• Read and sing poems, songs, and nursery rhymes nearly every day.
• Find the words that an author used to make the rhymes in something we’ve read. In Dr. Seuss’
book Cat in the Hat, cat rhymes with hat.
• Read rhymes putting a finger under each word as we read it. After reading the rhymes, I cover
up the rhyming words and my child guesses the hidden word.
8
The student will know essential mathematics.
Counting Books:
• The Crayon
Counting Book
by Pam Munoz
Ryan
• Anno’s
Counting Book
by Mitsumasa
Anno
• Ten Black Dots
by Donald
Crews
KINDERGARTEN
Kindergarten Math
How can I help my child count 20 or more objects?
Together we:
• Count the steps needed to walk from the sidewalk to the front door. Can it be done
with fewer (or more) steps?
• Practice counting to 100 (start with different numbers).
• Check out counting books from the library and read them.
How can I help my child read and write numbers to 20?
Together we:
• Read numbers from prices in the grocery ads of the newspaper.
• Write numerals on cards. Using small objects (pennies, cereal, dry macaroni), we
choose a card and count that many objects.
How can I help my child read a calendar and tell time to the hour?
Together we:
• Look at a calendar and say “Today is…Yesterday was…Tomorrow will be….” Look
at the days of the week and the number for the day to complete these statements.
• Look at a clock face with numbers and practice telling the hour.
How can I help my child make reasonable estimates of “how many” and “how much?”
Together we:
• Count 2 objects as we put them in a bag. We add 2 more objects and decide how
many are now in the bag. If we take 1 out, how many are still in the bag?
• Make up stories using the terms “1 more” or “1 less.” Use objects like Cheerios or
raisins to pretend. Example: “Mom made 5 cookies.” (Put down 5 objects). “She
gives me 1 more cookie.” (Put down one more object). “How many cookies are
there now?”
• Guess how many raisins are in a mini-box, M & M’s in a small bag, or grapes in a
small bunch. Then count as each piece is eaten.
How can I help my child use objects to identify and describe the fraction 1/2?
Together we:
• Cut a pizza into two equal pieces. We can count the pieces and talk about 1/2 a pizza.
9
Kindergarten Math
Counting Books:
• The Very
Hungry
Caterpillar by
Donald Crews
• The M&M
Counting Book
by Barbara
Barbieri Mcgrath
• The Wheels On
The Bus by Raffi
• 10 Apples on
Top by Dr. Seuss
How can I help my child measure with nonstandard units (paper clips, beans, etc. but not a ruler)?
Together we:
• Arrange cans (boxes and books) in order of sizes. We use comparison words like taller, shorter,
heaviest, lightest, more, less, the same.
• Measure with everyday items (i.e., the table may be 9 shoes long, or a drawer could be
12 erasers wide).
• Measure many things (length, weight, volume, time, or temperature).
How can I help my child identify repeating patterns?
Together we:
• Look at floor tiles, clothing patterns (stripes, plaids), fences, buildings, doors, windows,
wallpaper, and identify repeating patterns.
• Look for objects like buttons, pasta shapes, nuts and bolts that can be arranged in patterns.
(i.e., red button, red button, blue button, red, red, blue, etc.).
How can I help my child learn basic shapes, colors, and sizes?
Together we:
• Play a guessing game like “I Spy.” “I Spy something that is round and has hands on it. What
is it?” (a clock) “I Spy something that is a rectangle with 4 legs. What is it?” (a table)
• Take a “shape” walk looking for shapes (circle, square, rectangle, triangle, oval).
• Cut out red objects from magazines and glue them together on a piece of paper to make a red
collage or picture. Next time we can use a different color. We could do the same things with
different shapes or sizes of objects (i.e. a picture made from all kinds of circles).
• Prepare a snack made up of differently shaped foods (cut cheese into triangles or squares, use
different shapes of crackers). Talk about the shapes as we eat.
How can I help my child sort and organize information into simple graphs?
Together we:
• Sort coins from grown-ups’ pockets into penny, nickel, dime, and quarter piles. We line up the
coins into rows and count the number of each – how many pennies? nickels? dimes? quarters?
Challenge: How much money do we have all together?
• Collect information about something that is easily observed, such as the color of cars parked on
our street or in a parking lot. Guess what color is the most popular, then count to check.
• Sort the laundry into different categories (lights, darks, shirts, pants).
10
Educators Working Together
KINDERGARTEN
Families and
The student will use math knowledge for problem solving.
Helpful Hints
Listen for
repeating
patterns in
stories and
songs.
How can I help my child identify questions and statements that are about math?
Together we:
• Talk about how to solve problems, i.e. “We have 5 people in our family. How many
plates do we need for dinner? If we each use 3 pieces of silverware, count how many
pieces our family will use altogether.”
How can I help my child discuss logical ways to apply math skills to everyday life?
Together we:
• Use math for routines like reading the prices on shelves in the grocery stores. We can
answer questions like, “If we have $2, what can we buy?”
How can I help my child explain
verbally how to solve mathematical
problems?
Together we:
• Solve math problems in everyday life.
For example: “If I have 25 cents and I buy
gum for 15 cents, how much change will I
get back?” (Count up from 15 to 25 to discover you will get 10 cents in change.)
• Talk about combining two groups of
objects and taking some away from a
group. We develop math language by
using the words “add” or “subtract” along
with “ all together” and “take away.”
11
Grade One Writing Process
The student will write.
Websites
www.momsmi
nivan.com/big
kids.html
12
How can I help my child write to communicate ideas?
Together we:
• Write a grocery list, take down a phone message, write a letter, leave notes, etc.
• Put up signs and labels like Do Not Enter, Quiet, Garage Sale, Welcome.
How can I help my child use descriptive words?
Together we:
• Talk about my child’s drawing. Then we try to get more information about the picture by asking
questions like: What color is the bird?
• Talk about his/her writing. I ask for more information and help my child get those describing
words down in writing or into drawings.
Families and
How can I help my child write complete sentences?
Together we:
• Read books and talk about how the writer uses whole sentences. Then we
write sentences.
GRADE ONE
“Then one day, in
his own good
time, Leo
bloomed! He
could read! He
could write!”
-Robert Kraus
Leo the Late
Bloomer
Educators Working Together
How can I help my child use beginning capital letters and end punctuation?
Together we:
• Read a story, point out the punctuation, and tell what it means. Examples: A period
means stop. A question mark means we are asking a question. A comma means
pause. An exclamation point shows excitement. Quotation marks indicate
someone is talking, etc.
• Read a story my child wrote and add the helpful punctuation.
How can I help my child correctly spell frequently used words?
Together we:
• Make word cards with some words we often use when writing. Examples: the,
and, is. If my child is interested in dinosaurs, we have books on hand that can be
used to copy names when writing a story.
How can I help my child share work with others to improve writing?
Together we:
• Take turns reading stories.
• Read the things we write, such as a favorite joke.
If English is not your
home language...
Encourage your child to
converse with you in your
home language.
How can I help my child print legibly to form
words and write sentences?
Together we:
• Write notes to a family member.
• Take turns writing.
13
Grade One Oral Language
The student will listen and speak for various reasons.
“Conversation is
the natural way we
humans think
together.”
-Margaret
Wheatley
How can I help my child listen and respond to stories and information?
Together we:
• Discuss our favorite parts of a story.
• Compare the characters to people we know.
• Think of other situations that are the same.
How can I help my child hear and identify beginning, middle and end sounds in words?
Together we:
• Find words that start with the same letter sounds.
• Cover a small square box with blank paper (tissue boxes work well). We write a different letter
on each side, then roll the cube and think of a word that starts or ends with that letter.
• Make up sentences with words that all begin with the same sound (alliteration). For example,
“Bobby bites bananas.”
• Make up fun tongue twisters. (Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.)
• Say a word chant using names of family and friends.
Example – “My name begins with M and it ends with
ike. Put them together and now say Mike.”
• Read out loud and look for similarities in the way
words look or sound.
How can I help my child rhyme words orally?
Together we:
• Read and reread favorite nursery rhymes to emphasize
the sound patterns and rhythms of language.
• Read rhymes putting a finger under each word as we
read it. After reading the rhymes, I cover the rhyming
words with paper or post-it notes. My child guesses
the hidden word.
• Play a game. My child takes a step each time I say a
rhyming word. When I say a word that does not
rhyme, my child sits down. Example: cat (step), mat
(step), frog (sit). You can start over using a new
pattern like ring (step), sing (step), bring (step), dog
(sit). Reverse roles, play with a group and have fun.
14
Families and
www.ed.gov/
pubs/parents/
readers/index.
html
How can I help my child give and follow 2 or 3 step oral directions?
Together we:
• Put clean silverware away. I’ll ask my child to put away all the spoons and then
the forks.
• Prepare a bowl of cereal. My child follows my directions. First we________,
second we__________, etc.
• Say the directions for simple tasks such as getting ready for bed.
GRADE ONE
Websites
Educators Working Together
How can I help my child talk to peers and adults: take turns, listen to others, and answer
questions?
Together we:
• Set aside 10-15 minutes to talk about our day.
• Talk about topics with the expectation that we will listen to each other and respond.
• Explain reasons for decisions we make. (Example: Why is that a good idea? Tell me
more. Make a guess why… Tell me another way.)
How can I help my child tell and retell stories in a logical order?
Together we:
• Retell a favorite story or favorite part of the story.
• Read a picture book and afterwards use the words first, next, and last to tell what
happened in order.
Helpful Hints
Check out video
games before
you allow your
child to play.
How can I help my child expand speaking vocabulary and speak in complete sentences?
Together we:
• Talk or answer questions using more than one word.
• Give reasons for decisions we make and directions we give.
• Play games with language to increase vocabulary. Take
turns naming a category and the other person names
things that might be in that category. Some categories
If English is not your
might include clothing, and my child responds with
home language...
pants, shirts, socks, etc.
Watch videos and listen to
taped books in your home
language.
15
Grade One Reading
Nonfiction
Books:
• Fire! Fire! by
Gail Gibbons
• There Are No
Polar Bears
Down There by
Trish Hart
• Sharkabet by
Ray Troll
Reading Comprehension: The student will understand what is
read.
How can I help my child predict story events and endings?
Together we:
• Stop occasionally while reading, talk about what we think will happen next and predict the ending.
• Look for details in the pictures that give us clues about future events.
• Read alphabet books (fiction and non-fiction) predicting which letter comes next and what it
will represent.
How can I help my child retell stories in sequence with prompting?
Together we:
• Continue to read stories where it’s easy to tell what happens first, next, and last.
• Read and pause every few pages to remember aloud what has already happened.
• Retell a story we’ve just read by going back and looking at the pictures.
• Act out stories using sound, movement and verbal expression. We might perform the story
using just our voices and bodies, or we may use props, costumes or puppets.
How can I help my child relate stories to personal experiences and to other stories, with prompting?
Together we:
• Go places, visit others, and experience new things. Next, we talk and write or draw pictures
about what we did. Then, we read and share our writing and drawing.
• Talk about the similarities and differences between the characters in books and my child. I can
ask my child, “Has this ever happened to you? How would you feel if you were the character?
Would you like to be the character?”
• Act out or retell the story or parts of it. Sometimes we use props, costumes or puppets, but
many times we use just our bodies and voices.
If English is not your
home language...
Read to your child in your
home language
16
How can I help my child identify fiction and non-fiction?
Together we:
• Look at a book before reading and decide if what we’re going
to read will tell us a story (fiction), play with language (riddles,
poems, songs and rhymes), or offer information (non-fiction).
Families and
How can I help my child identify main ideas, character, and setting in stories?
Together we:
• Ask each other who, what, where (setting), when and why questions about a story
after reading it. I’ll praise correct responses. We may want to read this story again.
• Talk about the main idea (message, moral, or lesson) of a story after reading it.
GRADE ONE
Poetry Books:
• The Random
House Book of
Poetry for
Children
selected by
Jack Prelutsky
• Anna Banana
by Joanna Cole
Educators Working Together
Reading
Phonics/Decoding: The
student will use a variety
of decoding strategies.
How can I help my child build sight
word vocabulary?
Together we:
• Read and reread books with predictable patterns or repeated phrases.
• Label familiar objects in our home or in
my child’s room.
• Practice reading flashcards we’ve
made of common sight words and words
my child wants to know and read.
• Use magnetic or cut-out letters to
form words we’re beginning to read.
• Make a dictionary of “Words I
Know.” We can make a page for each
letter and add new words as they are
learned.
17
Grade One Reading
Favorite Books:
• Alaska’s Three
Bears by
Shannon
Cartwright
• Owl Moon by
Jane Yolen
• Curious George
by H.A. Rey
How can I help my child begin to read out loud with confidence?
Together we:
• Listen to and read along with stories on tape, C.D., or a computer.
• Echo read. I read a sentence, paragraph, or page to my child and she or he reads it back to me
using similar phrasing and voice.
• Take turns reading. I ask my child to read a familiar passage or repeated pattern. For example,
when reading the Three Little Pigs, my child may read the line, “Little Pig, little pig, let me
come in!” with the voice and expression of the Big Bad Wolf.
How can I help my child use decoding strategies to read picture clues, letter cluster, beginning
consonants, and letter sounds?
Together we:
• Try to figure out words we don’t know by using pictures and beginning letters (b, d, dr, sl, etc.)
as clues. Letters like -ack, -at, -ot can help us, too.
How can I help my child use sentence and
story meaning (context) to decode words
(figure out unknown words)?
Together we:
• Read simple stories. When my child is stuck
on a word we read on and come back to it. We
think about what would make sense, and we use
beginning sounds to help us.
18
Grade One Math
Helpful Hints
Count with
objects until
your child
understands the
meaning of
numerals.
GRADE ONE
The student will know essential mathematics.
How can I help my child estimate the results of simple addition and subtraction
problems?
Together we:
• See if an answer makes sense. “If the problem is 10 – 6 = ? (10 minus 6), will the
answer be more or less than 10?”
• Make up number stories that go with a given number sentence, i.e., 4 + 2 = 6.
Example: 4 friends were playing in the park, 2 more came to play. How many
friends are at the park now?
How can I help my child memorize all addition and subtraction facts to 20?
Together we:
• Use flash cards to practice our facts.
• Practice math facts while traveling in the car, while standing in line, or while
waiting for an appointment.
How can I help my child compare numbers to 100?
Together we:
• Play a guessing game. “I am thinking of a number between 70 and 90. Can you
guess it?” When my child suggests a number, give hints by saying higher or
lower; and more or less.
• Play the board game Chute and Ladders which uses numbers to 100.
How can I help my child use objects to compare 1/4, 1/2, and 1/3?
Together we:
• Buy a Hershey candy bar. When we open it, we can count how many rectangles
make a whole candy bar, then count how many rectangles are 1/2, 1/4, and 1/3 of
the bar.
• Look at a clock with hands and numbers to see when the minute hand is half past
the hour (at 9:30, 12:30, etc.)
• Fold several pieces of paper into halves or fourths. Then we can label each
section as a part of the whole piece of paper. (1/2 of the paper, 1/4 of the paper)
19
Grade One Math
Helpful Hints
Know movie
ratings! Monitor
the movies your
child watches.
How can I help my child measure using inches and centimeters, identify temperature, and tell time
to the half hour?
Together we:
• Measure objects around the house in inches and centimeters with an inches/centimeter ruler.
• Check the indoor/outdoor thermometer and count the lines to determine the temperature (two or
three times a week).
• Use a clock face to count around the clock by fives from the 12 to the 6. (30 minutes)
How can I help my child recognize number patterns (2’s, 5’s, 10’s) and find missing addends (6 + ? = 10)?
Together we:
• Count by 2’s, 5’s, or 10’s taking turns saying the numbers once the pattern is established.
• Make up number stories that help us “see” the math equation (i.e., “We have 6 pennies, but we
need 10 pennies to equal a dime. How many more pennies do we need?”).
• Put dried beans into piles of 10 and then count by 10’s. Repeat activity putting beans into piles
of 2’s and 5’s.
How can I help my child draw and build basic shapes?
Together we:
• Use a ruler or straight edge to draw triangles, squares, and rectangles. Color them, cut them
out, and sort them.
• Use drinking straws and “twisty ties” from bread wrappers to construct 3-D shapes. Put each
end of the “twisty tie” into the ends of two different straws – bend to make triangles, squares,
rectangles and other basic shapes.
How can I help my child use simple bar graphs and charts for comparing?
Together we:
• Find a graph in the newspaper.
• Compare the lengths of objects measured around the house by using pieces of string or yarn.
• Make a family pictograph (a graph made of pictures). Choose a family characteristic like hair color
or eye color. Count how many people in the family have the same characteristic. Make a graph to
represent what you have discovered. For example, if five people have brown hair, draw five heads
beside the word brown. If one person has red hair, draw one head beside the word red on the graph.
• Use the “Alaska Weather” page in a local newspaper, i.e., Anchorage Daily News. Look at the
precipitation graph to compare the actual and average amounts of precipitation. Check the
temperature trend and talk about the high and low temperatures compared to the averages. This
information can also be found on the internet.
20
Families and
How can I help my child collect data and make predictions?
Together we:
• Continue to use the “Alaska Weather” page. Look at the “Five-Day Outlook” and
predict what the weather and temperature will be on the sixth day.
• Ask family members to estimate how many glasses of milk (water or juice) they drink
in one day. Predict how many glasses that would be in one week.
GRADE ONE
Websites
www.funbrain.com
Educators Working Together
How can I help my child conduct a survey and tally results?
Together we:
• Survey our family about favorite colors, favorite animals, favorite foods, and then
tally and count the results.
• Ask family members what they prefer for a pretend “take-out” order. Record their
answers. Example: hamburgers - 2, cheeseburgers -3, cokes – 2, etc.,
The student will use math knowledge for problem solving.
How can I help my child make up problems using objects?
Together we:
• Take turns making up and solving problems using common household objects. For
example, “We have 10 cookies on a plate, and if two people want cookies, how many
cookies can each person have?”
How can I help my child use everyday language to explain math thinking?
Together we:
• Explain how we know the answer to a problem like the one suggested above (cookies
on a plate).
• Decide whether a problem requires us to put objects
together or take objects away.
If English is not your
home language...
Measure, count, sort items,
and tell time with your child
using your home language.
How can I help my child explain verbally how to solve
mathematical problems?
Together we:
• Make up addition or subtraction problems using 1-digit
numerals (1-9). Talk about how we figured out the
answers. Example: If we set the table for our family and 3
friends stop by, how many plates do we need now?
21
Grade Two Writing Process
The student will improve writing skills.
Favorite Books:
• Tough Boris by
Mem Fox
• A Caribou
Journey by
Debbie S. Miller
How can I help my child write stories with a beginning, middle, and end?
Together we:
• Talk about the way my child wants to start the story, what does s/he want to have happen in the
middle? How are we going to end it? Next we put the story together.
• Start by telling a story to my child then let him/her write what would happen next. Decide on
an ending together.
• Write a story to go with a wordless picture book. Remember that stories need a beginning,
middle, and end.
• Write a progressive story as a family. One person starts the story, then each person takes turns
adding to the story. This activity encourages reading since your child has to read what others
write so it makes sense.
How can I help my child identify qualities of good writing?
Together we:
• Talk about stories and what we like about them.
• Talk about my child’s favorite author. Talk
about why s/he likes that author.
• Display writing for all to enjoy.
How can I help my child write complete sentences?
Together we:
• Talk about my child’s writing. Ask him/her to
read it to me and ask questions like: “Do you
like the way the sentence sounds? Does it
make sense?”
• Check for nouns (person, place, or thing) and
verbs (action word).
• Start a family journal to record special days,
weekend activities and other significant events.
• Read the journal with family members.
22
Families and
How can I help my child use the basic rules of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling in
written work?
Together we:
• Talk about corrections and concentrate on one type of error at a time.
• Check to be sure that sentences start with a capital letter and end with punctuation.
• Circle words that we think are spelled incorrectly.
GRADE TWO
Favorite Books:
• Do You Want
to Be My
Friend? by Eric
Carle
• A Boy, A Dog,
and A Frog by
Mercer Mayer
Educators Working Together
How can I help my child spell frequently used words and words that are spelled as they
sound, correctly?
Together we:
• Play word games like Scrabble Junior, Word Bingo, and Boggle.
• Make word cards for the words the child uses a lot in writing. Would your story
make more sense in a different order?
How can I help my child begin to revise and edit?
Together we:
• Read my child’s writing out loud, and ask these questions: Are there any words that
you need help spelling? Does your writing make sense? Can my story be in a better
order? etc.
• Use simple picture dictionaries and junior dictionaries.
• Search for words to add descriptions or detail.
23
Grade Two Oral Language
The student will listen and speak for various reasons.
A Poetry Books:
• Pizza the Size
of the Sun
poems by Jack
Prelutsky
How can I help my child participate in group discussions?
Together we:
• Use meal times for discussion and encourage all family members to participate. Ask questions
like “What do you think?”
• Talk about special events or family celebrations.
• Listen and offer polite responses.
How can I help my child give and follow 3-4 step
directions?
Together we:
• Learn to set the table correctly. First, put the
fork on the left side of the plate. Next, put the
knife on the right side of the plate, and then put
the spoon beside the knife.
• Play commercial games such as Guess Who?,
Chutes and Ladders, and Sorry.
• Explain how to do a task such as baiting a hook,
caring for a pet, or planting a seed.
How can I help my child speak to describe and explain?
Together we:
• Talk about experiences like weekly sport
practices or games, birthday parties, and special
school events. We evaluate the experience by
discussing what my child liked or disliked.
• Look around the house to find many different
shapes. When we find them we describe them.
This is a clock and it is round. There is a picture frame and it is square.
• Each take a sheet of aluminum foil and shape it
into an object (animal, piece of jewelry, etc.,)
then describe what we made and its use.
24
Families and
How can I help my child ask important questions?
Together we:
• Read stories and ask “What will happen next?” “Why do you think that?”
• Ask questions about pictures in the newspaper.
• Discuss the news we see on T.V.
GRADE TWO
Helpful Hints
Provide long
periods of time
that are T.V.
free.
Educators Working Together
How can I help my child expand speaking vocabulary?
Together we:
• Include the family in games which provide enjoyment and teach social skills.
Some examples are taking turns, explaining rules to another player, and
congratulating the winner.
• Look for opportunities to learn “left and right” by using those terms in our speech.
For instance, I’ll tell my child to use his/her left hand to touch his/her nose.
• Tell jokes and riddles for enjoyment.
• Give directions to a friend’s house or a familiar, near-by location. I can also ask
my child to explain how to get from his/her bedroom to the kitchen or to some
location in the house.
How can I help my child create oral stories to share with others?
Together we:
• Entertain the family with simple plays, puppet shows or stories.
• Make up stories. I start by saying something like, “I’m going to the store.” My
child adds, “I am going to drive my new car.” The story continues with us taking
turns adding details.
• Call a grandparent or a friend and tell about something exciting or important that has
happened.
If English is not your
home language...
Interview a family member
and create a family book, all
in your home language.
25
Grade Two Reading
Reading Comprehension: The student will understand what is read.
Books in a
Series:
• Frog and Toad
by Arnold
Lobel
• Henry and
Mudge by
Cynthia Rylant
• Nate the Great
by Marjorie
Sharmat
How can I help my child retell stories in sequence?
Together we:
• Read comic strips. Before reading I can cut out the frames from a favorite comic strip and mix
them up. Then I ask my child to put them back together in sequence and retell the events in order.
• Act out story events in the order they happen. We can take turns playing the part of different characters.
• Tell and retell family stories.
• Use transition words such as first, next, and finally while retelling a story.
How can I help my child relate stories to personal experiences and to other stories?
Together we:
• Notice where and when the story takes place and discuss similar settings you know or have read about.
• Make predictions about what may happen in a story based on something that happened to us or
a character we know from another book.
How can I help my child read for understanding in non-fiction texts?
Together we:
• Visit the library and bookstore. We notice how books are organized, and we help each other to
find books on different topics.
• Read the pictures and captions in print material that interest my child, but are too hard for
him/her to read independently.
• Read short, non-fiction articles from children’s magazines, or sections from non-fiction books.
• Share what we already know about the topic before reading about it.
• Stop often to comment on what we’re learning, ask questions, and predict what else we’ll learn.
• Talk about some interesting things we learned and enjoyed. Sometimes we draw, write,
perform, or make something, to show and share what we have learned.
How can I help my child identify the main idea of a story?
Together we:
• Share what we think the author wants us, the readers, to think about or learn from the story.
• Read fables and decide the “moral of the story” before it is given.
• Talk about the “big ideas” in the story.
26
Families and
How can I help my child read and follow directions?
Together we:
• Prepare food by reading and following directions from simple recipes.
• Read and follow signs in our environment that give directions, warnings or information.
• Play board games and card games of all kinds. We read the directions to new games,
and look up the rules when there is a dispute.
GRADE TWO
“There is more
treasure in books
than in all the
pirate’s loot on
Treasure Island.”
-Walt Disney
Educators Working Together
How can I help my child use expression in oral reading?
Together we:
• Enjoy reading aloud, with expression.
• Take turns reading character parts with expressive voices and the attitudes to match
the situation.
• Pay special attention to ending punctuation. We stop at the period (.); show excitement
where there is an exclamation mark (!); and raise the pitch of our voice when there is a
question mark (?).
Reading Decoding/Phonics: The student will continue to use a
variety of strategies to read unknown words.
How can I help my child build sight vocabulary?
Together we:
• Read and reread many books that my child can almost read independently.
• Remind each other where we’ve seen a certain word before.
• Practice reading our weekly spelling words from school.
How can I help my child practice reading to build confidence?
Together we:
• Read to others whenever we get the chance. My child might read to younger children.
• Carefully read along with books and recordings on tape, compact disk, or computer.
• Establish a routine for reading that ensures daily practice.
• Find a special place (box or shelf) to keep books we love and want to keep or reread.
27
Grade Two Reading
Websites
www.kidsource.com/
kidsource/
content/learnmath_index.
html
How can I help my child use prefixes, suffixes, and word roots to decode words?
Together we:
• Talk about the meaning of a prefix, like re — which means “to do again.” Then we’ll list all
the words we can make adding the prefix. We tell each other which “re” words we like the
most and the least. For example, I like to reread, but not rewash.
• Play word games like Boggle and Junior Scrabble. I show my child how to add beginnings and
endings to words to make new words.
• Stop when we’re stuck on a word and try to find the root word so we can try again to figure it
out. For example, in the word “unstoppable” the root word is “stop,” the prefix is “un,” and the
suffix is “able.”
How can I help my child use sentence, story meaning strategies and phonics to decode words?
Together we:
• Read aloud to each other. I ask my child if the sentence makes sense when he or she reads a
word incorrectly.
• Look at the picture on the page for clues.
• Look at the first letter of the word we are stuck on.
• Check to carefully decode a word we’re having trouble reading, based on what it looks like and
the parts we recognize or know how to sound out.
• Try to figure out difficult words. I ask my child, “Does that sound right?” when he or she reads
a word incorrectly.
• Substitute a word that makes sense for the word we’re stuck on. Then we think about the story
and ask each other if the word we’re using makes sense. Does it look right? Does it sound right?
How can I help my child use contractions and compound words?
Together we:
• Learn about contractions; examples are, can’t = cannot, won’t = will not.
• Play contraction match-up. We find about five contractions in our reading. Then, using 10
small rectangles of paper or index cards, we make the word cards for our game. We write the
contraction on one card and the two separate words that make up the contraction on the other.
We lay all the cards face down then take turns turning over two different cards. When a player
turns over the contraction card and its matching words card, she or he gets to keep the cards,
and take another turn. At the end, the player with the most cards at the end wins!
• Find pictures of compound words like football, snowball, etc.
• Draw and label silly pictures to help us remember compound words. What pictures would you
draw for: football, handmade, houseboat, underwear, etc…?
28
Grade Two Math
Websites
www.aplusmath.com/
GRADE TWO
The student will know essential mathematics.
How can I help my child add and subtract to a sum of 100?
Together we:
• Practice addition and subtraction problems orally and in writing.
Example: 21 + 13 = _____. Challenge: 29 + 36 = ______.
• Practice saying addition and subtraction facts quickly.
Example: 7 + 3 = 10, 10 - 7 = 3 etc.
How can I help my child read and write simple fractions?
Together we:
• Talk about a “whole” divided into 2, 3, or 4 parts with one part of each whole equal
to 1/2, 1/3, or 1/4. (Pizza works well for this activity).
• Read a recipe and discuss the fractions in it. “How many 1/3 cups of flour would
we need to get 1 cup of flour?”
How can I help my child use manipulatives to
compare 1/4, 1/2, and 1/3?
Together we:
• Decide which would give us more pizza, 1/2 or 1/3?
• Fold three paper circles or squares, then cut each
one into 2, 3, and 4 equal pieces. We can use paper
plates, coffee filters, or paper towel squares.
Compare sizes.
How can I help my child measure with feet,
yards, and meters?
Together we:
• Use a ruler, a yardstick, and a meter stick (or tape
measure) to measure household objects.
• Determine which of the above “tools” is
appropriate for a variety of objects. For example,
“Would it be easier to measure the kitchen floor with
a 12-inch ruler, or a meter stick?”
29
Grade Two Math
Book Choices:
• Fraction Action
by Loreen
Leedy
• Pancakes! by
Eric Carle
• Shapes,
Shapes, Shapes
by Tana Hoban
• The Greedy
Triangle by
Marilyn Burns
• Counting on
Frank by Rod
Clement
How can I help my child continue number patterns to 100 (by 5’s, by 10’s, etc.)?
Together we:
• Count number patterns aloud, sometimes starting with different numbers
(i.e., 12, 17, 22…, or 23, 33, 43…).
• Make a game out of doubling, tripling, and quadrupling small numbers.
• Count by certain intervals. For example, start at 0 and count by 5’s.
How can I help my child demonstrate symmetry by
completing the mirror image of a pattern block design?
Together we:
• Use pattern block shapes or legos to build symmetrical designs.
These would be designs that are balanced so they are exactly the
same on each side.
How can I help my child write number sentences to solve
problems (8 + 7 = 15)?
Together we:
• Write down an addition or subtraction equation and then think of
a story to go with it. Example: 11 - 6 = 5. If I have 11 sheets of
paper and I write on 6 of them how many blank papers are left?
How can I help my child compare and describe similar
geometric shapes as larger, smaller, or the same?
Together we:
• Look for geometric shapes in household objects and compare
sizes ( i.e., “How does the top of the dining room table compare
to the top of the coffee table in the living room?”)
• Look for shapes in the grocery store and ask questions. Find
shapes that stack easily. Why can you stack them? How many
cones can you find? Which shapes take up a lot of space?
• Compare what is the same and different about a golf ball,
tennis ball and basketball.
30
Families and
How can I help my child collect, record, organize, display, and explain data?
Together we:
• Collect many rocks. Sort them into piles using some characteristic (smooth, rough,
dark, light, etc.), then describe the differences in the piles.
• Organize a home treasure hunt. Some items to look for are: buttons, screws, coins,
old keys, pens, pencils. Sort and classify the treasures. How are they alike? How
are they different?
GRADE TWO
Helpful Hints
Praise your
child. At the
same time
remember
to give
constructive
criticism.
Educators Working Together
The student will use math knowledge for problem solving.
How can I help my child develop and apply strategies to solve a variety of problems?
Together we:
• Work on and discuss math homework.
• Identify the actual value of the digit in each place of a 3-digit number:
679 is 600 + 70 + 9.
• Play a card game. Take out all the face cards and each choose 3 cards. Arrange
the cards to make the largest number. The player who makes the largest number
gets a point.
How can I help my child explain why a prediction, estimation, or solution is reasonable?
Together we:
• Make up number stories involving estimation. Pretend you have $3.00 and want to
buy a pencil marked 65 cents, a notebook marked 99 cents, and an eraser marked
31 cents. Estimate the total to determine if $3.00 is enough money to buy all three.
• Shop for a bag of apples. Guess if the weight will be
more or less than 1 pound. Weigh the bag to find out
the correct weight.
If English is not your
• Decide which container to use when storing leftover
home language...
food. Decide if the container was too big, too small or
just right.
Encourage your child to
converse with you in your
home language.
31
Grade Three Writing Process
The student will begin to write for a reason.
“Wilbur never forgot Charlotte...
She was in a class
by herself. It isn’t
often that someone
comes along who
is a true friend and
a good writer.
Charlotte was
both.”
-E.B. White
Salutations! Wit
and Wisdom from
Charlotte’s Web
How can I help my child write stories, letters, and simple explanations?
Together we:
• Label family photographs and write an explanation of what was happening.
• Write to family and friends in the lower 48 or our home country to find out about our
extended family.
• Write and mail a letter to a favorite author.
• Start a journal to express thought and feelings.
• Write a postcard from Alaska and send it to
someone.
How can I help my child identify the qualities of good
writing?
Together we:
• Read books and find words and phrases that
we really like.
• Listen to stories and try to make pictures in
our minds.
• We write back and forth about what happened
during the day. (You might want to leave this
on the kitchen counter.)
• Read the funny/sad parts of a story aloud.
How can I help my child use the basic rules of
spelling, punctuation, grammar and sentence structure in final works?
Together we:
• Ask the teacher to send home an editing guide
for us to use. Editing is very important for
final work.
• Use the dictionary.
• Learn to use spell check on the computer.
• Learn to use the thesaurus.
32
Favorite Books:
• My Grandma,
My Pen Pal by
Jan Dale
Koutsky
• Charlotte’s
Web by E.B.
White
Educators Working Together
GRADE THREE
Families and
How can I help my child share work with others for revision and editing?
Together we:
• Talk about different types of writing and what makes it enjoyable
(funny characters, clues to a mystery, etc.)
• Talk about something my child has written. What do we like best? Where could
we make it better?
33
Grade Three Oral Language
The student will expand listening and speaking skills.
“The more that
you read, the more
things you will
know. The more
that you learn, the
more places you
will go.”
-Dr. Seuss
How can I help my child participate in group discussions?
Together we:
• Look at newspaper headlines and discuss what the article might be about. What details could
the article include?
• Find a hobby that my child enjoys. Some examples are collecting cards or building models.
My child can explain new additions or creations.
• Talk and listen during dinner.
How can I help my child understand and follow directions?
Together we:
• Read the directions and play board games like Monopoly, Chess, Scrabble, Yahtzee, or put
together puzzles.
• Play a lines and dot game.
Begin by making a grid of
dots on a sheet of paper.
Take turns drawing a line
between the dots and once
you make a complete
square, write your initial
in the middle of the
square. The player with
the most squares after all
the dots are connected
wins the game.
•Follow a recipe or tell how
to make a favorite snack.
•Follow the directions to
put together a Lego
project, or model.
34
“Reading is to the
mind as exercise is
to the body.”
-Richard Steele
Educators Working Together
GRADE THREE
Families and
How can I help my child speak to describe, explain, and inform?
Together we:
• Cut pictures out of a magazine. My child chooses a picture and tells me about it.
I ask questions to get more detail.
• Think of someone or some place we know and take turns describing the person
or place until the other person guesses who or where it is.
• Talk about relationships between words. For example, bicycle, unicycle and
tricycle are all linked by the word “cycle”.
How can I help my child ask important questions?
Together we:
• Think of questions to ask a grandparent. We record their responses to begin an
oral history.
• Play commercial board games involving questioning strategies such as Guess Who?
• Play a discover game. One person hides an object under a cloth. The guesser
can only ask questions answered by “yes” or “no.” Example: Is it round? Can I
eat it? Is it blue?
• Look at newspaper articles and try to tell who, what, when, where, how, and why?
• Practice finding out important details by asking questions, “What time is the
party?” “Did my teacher say to write in cursive?”
How can I help my child
speak clearly, at proper volume and at reasonable rate?
Together we:
• Converse on the telephone.
• Talk in voices appropriate to
our surroundings. For example, talking in a library or
church is in a quiet voice and
talking to one another in a park
is in a louder voice.
35
Grade Three Reading
Fun Books to
Read:
• The Great
Kapok Tree by
Lynne Cherry
• The
Whingdingdilly
by Bill Peet
• Alexander and
the Terrible,
Horrible, No
Good, Very Bad
Day by Judith
Viorst
Reading Comprehension: The student will understand what is read with
increasing proficiency and confidence.
How can I help my child relate personal experiences to text?
Together we:
• Stop while reading and say, “This reminds me…”, then we each take turns saying what the
reading makes us remember.
• Talk about how the setting, location or time in a book we’re reading is like a particular place or
time we know.
How can I help my child read for a purpose; tell fact from opinion, compare different texts,
recognize cause and effect and recognize point of view.
Together we:
• Read from many different sources (magazines, books, websites, newspapers or etc.) on a topic
that interests us.
• Stop during reading to think and talk about how different characters might feel about what is
happening in the story. For example, if we’re reading Cinderella, we might talk about how the
stepsisters felt when Cinderella came to live with them.
• Read for many different reasons. We may want to be silly and have fun with language, so we’ll
read poetry, joke or riddle books. If we need to find specific information we may use the
telephone book, computer, dictionary, table of contents or glossary, etc.
How can I help my child read fluently with expression?
Together we:
• Read aloud with expressive voices to match the mood and attitude of the characters.
• Pay special attention to ending punctuation. We stop at the
period (.); show excitement when there is an exclamation mark (!);
and raise the pitch of our voices when there is a question mark (?).
• Read and act out parts in plays or skits we’ve read or written.
Helpful Hints
• Have fun trying out different voices for the character parts we
Encourage your child to
read aloud.
be active. Do physical
activities together.
36
Books in a
Series:
• Box Car
Children by
Gertrude
Chandler
Warner
• Ramona by
Beverly Cleary
• Cam Jansen by
David Adler
Educators Working Together
GRADE THREE
Families and
How can I help my child begin to summarize.
Together we:
• Retell what happened after reading, and talk more about it.
• Practice what to say to others when they ask about a book we recently read (but we
don’t give away the ending!).
• Tell our favorite part and explain why we liked it.
• Tell in simple terms the who, what, when, where, how, and why in a story.
How can I help my child expand vocabulary?
Together we:
• Read often and talk about what we read. We talk about words we think are beautiful,
silly, interesting, or weird. Ask questions about words or concepts not known.
• Look over the work my child brings home from school. I listen to my child
explain a paper in another subject area, like science, health or social studies. I ask
questions that allow my child to tell me about new words and ideas learned.
• Play Category Addition. I ask my child to add his/her own words that fit into a category I have started. For example: I say or write car, boat and bike. My child may say
or write in response, bus and train – and correctly name the category, transportation.
• Draw pictures to show understanding of new words, and talk about them.
• Read and talk about headlines in the newspaper.
37
Grade Three Reading
Reading Decoding/Word Structure: The student will continue to use a
variety of strategies to read unknown words.
“You know you’ve
read a good book
when you turn the
last page and feel
a little as if you
have lost a friend.”
-Paul Sweeney
How can I help my child recognize possessives (’s), comparatives (er, est), and compound words as
aides to decode new words?
Together we:
• Label things my child owns in his/her room using an apostrophe (’s) to show it belongs to him
or her. For example, Amanda’s drawer, David’s backpack, or boy’s shoes.
• We line up three objects and label them tall, taller, tallest.
How can I help my child use syllable patterns to help decode words?
Together we:
• Look for parts of words we know how to sound out when we are stuck trying to decode a word.
For example, we know a-t-e is “ate.” This helps us decode words like donate, radiate, and concentrate. Other syllable patterns we may know include: ain ack ake ale ame an ank
ap ash at aw ay eat ell est ice ick ide ight ill in line
ing
ink ip ir ock oke ope or ore ot uck ug ump unk tion
• Use the spelling pattern rules we are learning at school to help us decode words.
How can I help my child use context and phonics to decode new
words?
Together we:
• Read aloud to each other when a mistake is made. I ask
my child if the sentence makes sense.
• Try to figure out difficult words. I ask my child, “Does
that sound right?”
• Look at the picture on the page for clues.
• Look at the first letter of the word we are stuck on.
• Substitute a word that makes sense for the word on
which we are stuck. If it makes sense and sounds right,
we read on.
38
The student will know essential mathematics.
Book Choices:
• Anno’s
Mysterious
Multiplying Jar
by Masaichiro
Anno
• One Hundred
Hungry Ants by
Elinor J.
Pinczes
• If You Made a
Million by
David M.
Schwartz
GRADE THREE
Grade Three Math
How can I help my child estimate to the nearest 10, 100, and 1,000?
Together we:
• Use estimation to make predictions about how much or how many you need.
• Practice estimating by asking questions like: Is 35 closer to 30 or 40? (40);
Is 429 closer to 400 or 500? (400); Is 3642 closer to 3000 or 4000? (4000)
• Estimate how much money we need to buy a doughnut for 41 cents and a juice box
for 87 cents. (Round 41 to 40 and 87 to 90, so the estimate would be 130 cents).
• Estimate how many pages we can read in 30 minutes then time actual reading.
How can I help my child add and subtract with regrouping to a sum of 1,000?
Together we:
• Add and subtract often.
• Practice regrouping (also called borrowing & carrying) while adding 2 and 3 digit
numbers (Example: 67 + 129 = 196).
• Practice addition and subtraction fact extensions
(i.e., 26 + 17 = 43; 260 + 170 = 430; 2600 + 1700 = 4300).
How can I help my child learn the process of multiplication and division?
Together we:
• Work on the memorization of multiplication tables. Make or buy flashcards to use.
• Take turns skip counting using 2’s through 9’s. Example: by 2’s = 2, 4, 6, 8….;
by 3’s = 3, 6, 9, 12… etc.; by 7’s = 7, 14, 21, 28, 35...
• Practice adding multiples (the same number over and over) to show multiplying is a
fast way to add (i.e., 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 = 8 which is the same as 4 x 2 = 8).
• Make up questions that involve equal sharing (7 children share 49 pretzels. How
many pretzels does each child get?).
• Provide each other with problems that have missing factors for multiplication
practice (7 times what number equals 21?).
• Ask questions that involve equal groups (Crayons are packaged in boxes of 8.
There are 3 boxes. How many crayons are there?).
39
Grade Three Math
Book Choices:
• How the
Second Grade
Got $8,205.50
to Visit the
Statue of
Liberty by
Nathan
Zimelman
• Grandfather
Tang’s Story by
Ann Tompert
How can I help my child show fractions and decimals using real world examples?
Together we:
• Cut pie, pizza, etc. into equal shares for family members.
• Use dollar bills and coins to help understand the concept of decimals. Practice writing the
amounts of money after counting, making sure the decimal is in the correct place to show “cents.”
• Challenge ourselves - cut up regular shapes into equal parts, then practice putting the parts
together to discover equalities (i.e., 4/8 = 1/2, etc).
• Look at a recipe and find the measuring units needed like 1/2 cup, 1/4 tsp. etc.
How can I help my child explain the addition and subtraction of fractions with common
denominators and decimals that represent money?
Together we:
• Practice making change. If I have $10.00 and the movie costs $5.50, how much change will I get
back?
• Write the following amounts using a dollar sign and decimal point: 3 dollar bills, 2 dimes, and 3
pennies; 3 dimes and 7 pennies; 4 dollar bills and 7 dimes; 6 pennies. Then we make up some
of our own amounts.
• Plan a party and use a budget that we can work out together. Use 1/2 of the money for food,
1/4 of the money for party favors, and 1/4 of the money for decorations.
How can I help my child write number sentences using shapes or letters for missing numbers (y + 4 = 6)?
Together we:
• Pretend the shape or letter is a mystery number and rephrase the problem to discover the mystery
number. What mystery number added to 4 equals 6; or 2 subtracted from what number equals 5?
How can I help my child use patterns to make predictions and solve problems?
Together we:
• Look for number patterns and discuss them.
• Construct patterns (number patterns, shapes patterns, color patterns) for each other and
challenge each other to discover the pattern and continue it. (“What is the rule for my number
pattern? 1, 2, 4, 7, 11, 16… What number comes next? 22).
40
Helpful Hints
Establish a
quiet time to
work together
on projects.
This routine can
lead to homework time as
your child gets
older.
Educators Working Together
GRADE THREE
Families and
How can I help my child identify line segments, mid-point, intersections, parallel, and
perpendicular lines?
Together we:
• Look for parallel lines (railroad tracks), intersecting lines (roads that cross).
• Fold a rope or belt in 1/2 to find the exact middle (mid-point).
• Find examples of line segments (a line segment has a beginning and an end) like
licorice, piece of string, spaghetti, pencils, etc.
How can I help my child identify and create examples of line symmetry?
Together we:
• Draw shapes on paper and fold the paper to see if there are lines of symmetry
(shows the same pattern on two sides of a center line).
The student will use math knowledge for problem solving.
How can I help my child apply mathematical processes to everyday life?
Together we:
• Shop for groceries, read the paper for statistical data, and plan a budget based on a
weekly allowance.
• Follow a recipe. We decide what we need to buy, we shop and estimate how much
money we will spend, then we follow the recipe. We measure the ingredients
carefully and enjoy our treats when done!
• Find the daily temperatures in the newspaper. Compare our temperature to places
where relatives live.
• Add up the minutes we read each day. How many minutes do we read in a week?
How many hours is this?
• Practice writing numbers from dictation.
How can I help my child draw logical conclusions about mathematical situations?
Together we:
• Talk about math in our every day life. How much do we weigh? How far is it to
school? Where are the warmest temperatures in the country? How much of my
allowance should be spent and/or saved?
41
Unity
I dreamed I stood in a studio
And watched two sculptors there
The clay they used was a young child’s mind
And they fashioned it with care
One a parent with a guiding hand
And a gentle heart
One a teacher - the tools he used were
Books and Music and Art
Day after day the teacher toiled
With a touch that was deft and sure
While the parent labored by his side
And polished and smoothed it o’er
And when at last their task was done
They were proud of what they had wrought
For the things they had molded into the child
Could neither be sold or bought
And each agreed he would have failed
If he had worked alone
For behind the parent stood the school
And behind the teacher the home.
-Author Unknown
42
Notes
43
Notes
44
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