01759

01759
FINAL
SITE EVALUATION
HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN
OPERABLE UNIT NO. 15 (SITE 88)
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE, NORTH CAROLINA
CONTRACT TASK ORDER 0356
FEBRUARY
21,1997
Prepared For:
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
ATLANTIC DIVISION
NAVAL FACILITIES
ENGINEERING
COMMAND
Norfolk Virginia
Under the:
LANTDIV CLEAN Program
Contract N62470-89-D-4814
Prepared By:
BAKER ENVIRONMENTAL,
INC.
Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
TABLE
EXECUTIVE
1.0
SUMMARY
PROJECT
3.0
SITE
3.3
4.0
SITE
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
5.0
6.0
PERSONNEL
CONTROL
.........................................
...................................
Personal Monitoring ............................................
Point Source Monitoring .........................................
Perimeter Monitoring ...........................................
Specific Air Monitoring Equipment and Frequency ....................
Equipment Maintenance and Calibration ............................
Monitoring Documentation .......................................
PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
..............................
Personal Protective Equipment Selection ............................
Site-Specific Levels of Protection ..................................
ii
3-l
3-1
3- 1
3-l
3- 1
3-2
3-2
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-8
4-l
....................................................
Site Access ....................................................
Site Conditions .................................................
WorkZones ...................................................
4.3.1 Level C Activities (If Needed) ..............................
4.3.2 Level D and D+ Activities .................................
“Buddy System”. ...............................................
Safe Work Practices .............................................
4.5.1 Heavy Equipment ........................................
4.5.2 Drilling Operations .......................................
Sanitation Procedures/Site Precautions ..............................
MONITORING
l-l
l-l
l-l
1-2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-l
Background ...................................................
Description of Area under Investigation .............................
3.2.1 Site 88, Camp Lejeune MWR Dry Cleaners ...................
Hazard Evaluation ..............................................
3.3.1 Chemical Hazards ........................................
3.3.2 Physical Hazards .........................................
3.3.3 Radiation Hazards ........................................
3.3.4 Environmental Hazards ...................................
3.3.5 Task-Specific Hazards ....................................
3.3.6 Summary ...............................................
PERSONAL
6.1
6.2
AND RESPONSIBILITIES
CHARACTERIZATION
ENVIRONMENTAL
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
l-l
Policy.. ......................................................
ProjectPlans ..................................................
References ....................................................
Pre-Entry Requirements ..........................................
2.0
3.1
3.2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ES-1
....................................................
INTRODUCTION
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
OF CONTENTS
4- 1
4-l
4-l
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-6
5-l
5-l
5- 1
5-2
5-2
5-2
5-4
6-l
6- 1
6-l
TABLE
6.3
6.4
OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
Respiratory Protection ...........................................
6.3.1
LevelC ................................................
6.3.2
Level D+ ...............................................
Care and Cleaning of Personnel Protective Equipment
..................
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
7-l
7- 1
7-2
7-2
7-2
7.0
DECONTAMINATION
PROCEDURES
.................................
.......................................
Personnel Decontamination
7.1
.........................
7.2
Effectiveness of Personnel Decontamination
......................................
Equipment Decontamination
7.3
Decontamination
Materials .......................................
7.4
8.0
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-l
EMERGENCY
PROCEDURES
8-l
8.1
Scope ........................................................
8- 1
8.2
Pre-Emergency Planning .........................................
..........................................
8- 1
Emergency
Coordinator
8.3
..............................
8-2
Communications/Telephone
Numbers
8.4
.................................................
8-2
8.5
Assembly Area
8-4
8.6
Emergency Hospital Route .......................................
....................................
8-4
Emergency
Medical
Treatment
8.7
8-4
8.8
Injuries .......................................................
8-7
8.8.1
Physical Injury ..........................................
8-7
8.8.2
Chemical Injury .........................................
.........................................
8-7
8.8.3
Snakebite Injury
8-8
8.8.4
Spider Bite Injury ........................................
8-9
Emergency Decontamination
Procedures ............................
8.9
.........................
8-9
Personal Protection and First Aid Equipment
8.10
8-10
Notification
..................................................
8.11
............................................
810
Hazard Assessment
8.12
8-10
8.13
Security .....................................................
8- 11
Emergency Alerting ............................................
8.14
8-12
Training .....................................................
8.15
....................................
8- 12
Spill Containment Procedures
8.16
9.0
........................................
TRAINING
REQUIREMENTS
General .......................................................
9.1
Site-Specific Training ...........................................
9.2
10.0
MEDICAL
SURVEILLANCE
REQUIREMENTS
General
......................................................
10.1
SiteSpecific..
................................................
10.2
. ..
III
........................
9-l
9-l
9-l
10-l
10-l
10-l
TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
Page
11.0
HEALTH
AND SAFETY PLAN APPROVAL
12.0
DECLARATION
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-l
OF HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN REVIEW*
. . . . . . . . . . 12-1
LIST OF TABLES
3-l
Chemical/Physical Properties of Constituents Detected During Previous
Sampling at Site 88 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
5-l
Monitoring Equipment and Frequency for Each Field Activity Conducted at
OUNO.~~...........................................................
5-3
8-1
Emergency Telephone Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
9-l
OSHA Training History of Baker Project Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
lo- 1
Medical Surveillance Testing Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1O-2
LIST OF FIGURES
4-1
4-2
SiteLocation .........................................................
General Contaminant Reduction Layout Zone ...............................
4-2
4-4
8-l
8-2
Emergency Hospital Route Map .........................................
Directions to Hospital ..................................................
8-5
8-6
iv
EXECUTIVE
SUMMARY
This Health and Safety Plan (HASP) addressesthe Site Evaluation for Operable Unit (OU) No. 15,
(Site 88) Marine Corps Base (MCB), Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Site 88 is the Camp Lejeune
MWR Dry Cleaners, which is located at Building 25 on the mainside area of MCB Camp Lejeune.
The purpose of this SE is to determine the horizontal direction and extent of releases of dry cleaning
fluids waste from OU No. 15. The primary chemical hazardsassociatedwith the tasks at these sites
are expected to include potential exposure to varying levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).
The physical hazards include working around heavy equipment, underground/overhead utilities,
heavy trafftc areas,and heat and cold stress. The environmental hazards are considered to be low,
since Site 88 is located within the industrial area of the base. Each of these hazards is described in
Section 3.O.
Section 5.0 describes the environmental monitoring requirements which consist of using a
photoionization detector (PID) and oxygen/combustible gas meter.
Based on the amount of information provided by the previous investigation, assigned protection
levels at these sites are conservative in nature. The level of personal protection assigned for work
tasks and other operations will be Levels D’, protection upgrades will be dependent on monitoring
results and the Site Health and Safety Officer’s discretion. Section 6.0 describes the persona1
protective equipment to be used.
Section 8.0 describes emergency procedures, which includes Table 8- 1 , identifying the emergency
phone numbers, along with first aid procedures, communication procedures, and other site concerns,
and Figure 8-2 showing the route to the nearest public hospital.
ES-l
1.0
INTRODUCTION
This Health and Safety Plan (HASP) is a Site-Specific HASP for Operable Unit No. 15 (Site 88) at
MCB Camp Lejeune. Field activities to be conducted will include subsurface soil sampling,
groundwater monitoring, temporary well installation and development, and groundwater sampling.
1.1
Policv
It is the policy of Baker Environmental, Inc. (Baker) that all on-site hazardous waste management
activities be performed in conformance with a site-specific HASP. The HASP is written based on
the anticipated hazardsand expected work conditions and applies to field activities to be performed
under this Contract Task Order (CTO). Applicability of this HASP extends to all Baker employees,
Baker’s subcontractors, and visitors entering the site. However, subcontractors are expected to
provide their own HASP and relevant Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS) that pertain to the
activities they are contracted to perform on the site. This information will then become part of the
site HASP. All personnel must review the HASP and sign an agreement to comply with its
provisions prior to commencing any on-site work. The HASP is considered an operational document
which is subject to revisions in response to various site-specific conditions which may be
encountered. However, it may be modified/updated only with the approval of the Project Health and
Safety Officer (PHSO) and Project Manager. Proper notification will be given to the Atlantic
Division (LANTDIV) Naval Facilities Engineering Command Navy Technical Representative
(NTR) when significant changes to the HASP are implemented.
The HASP is based on an outline developed by the United States Coast Guard (USCG) for
responding to hazardous chemical releases(USCG Pollution Response COMDTINST-M16456.30)
and by NIOSH, OSHA, USCG, and USEPA’s recommended health and safety procedures
(Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site Activities). This
HASP, at a minimum, meets the requirements under OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.120 (Hazardous
Waste Operations and Emergency Response).
1.2
Project
Plans
The Work Plan (detailing the tasks to be performed at the site), the Field Sampling and Analysis
Plan (FSAP), and Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) are bound as separate documents, and will
accompany the Health and Safety Plan in the field.
1.3
References
The following publications have been referenced in the development and implementation of this
HASP.
0
American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). 1993.
an
en
Threshold Limit -for
Val
Biological Exposure Indices for 1993-1994.
0
The Center for Labor Education and Research, Lori P. Andrews, P.E., Editor. 1990.
Worker Protection Durin a Hazardous Waste Remediation, Van Nostrand Reinhold,
New York. New York.
l-l
Lewis, Richard J., Sr. 1991. wrdous
Chemicals Desk Reference, 3rd Edition,
Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, New York.
Martin, William
F. and Steven P. Levine. 1994. Protect& Personnel at -dous
.
Waste Sttes,2nd Edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, Stoneham, Massachusetts.
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/Occupational Safety and
Health Administration/U.S. Coast Guard/U.!% Environmental Protection Agency
(NIOSH/OSHA/ USCG/EPA). 1985. Occuptional Safety and Health Guidance
rdous Waste Site Activities. October 1985.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 1993. Title 29 Code of Federal
ions, Parts 1910 and 1926.
United States Coast Guard. 1991. Policy fo Resuonse to Hazardous Chemical
Releases. USCG Pollution Response COMD&NST-M16465.30.
United States Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service,
Centers for Disease Control, NIOSH. 1990. NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical
Hazards. June 1990.
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Offrce of Emergency and
Remedial Response, Emergency Response Division. 1992. Standard Operating
Safety Guides. June 1992.
1.4
Pre-Entry
Requirements
During site mobilization, the Site Health and Safety Officer (SHSO) will perform a reconnaissance
of the site (work area) as identified in the Work Plan to evaluate and determine the chemical,
physical and environmental hazards, establish or confirm emergency points of contact and
procedures, and review any other issuesdeemed necessary to address site safety and health. The
SHSO will then conduct a health and safety briefing with site personnel (as identified in Section 2.0)
to discuss data obtained from the previous site reconnaissance, provisions outlined in this HASP,
and appropriate safety and health related procedures and protocols.
1-2
2.0
PROJECT
PERSONNEL
ANIXRESPONSIBILITIES
The following personnel are designated to carry out the statedjob functions for both project and site
activities. (Note: One person may carry out more than one job function; personnel identified are
subject to change.) The responsibilities that correspond with each job fimction are outlined below.
PROJECT MANAGER:
Matthew Barn
The project manager will be responsible for assuring that all activities are conducted in accordance
with the HASP. The Project Manager has the authority to suspend field activities if employees are
in danger of injury or exposure to harmful agents. In addition, the Project Manager is responsible
for:
0
Assisting the Project Health and Safety Officer (PHSO), as designated below, in
Site-Specific HASP development for all phases of the project.
0
Designating a SHSO and other site personnel who will assure compliance with the
HASP.
l
Reviewing and approving the information presented in this HASP.
Ronald Krivan
PROJECT HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER:
The PHSO will be responsible for general development of the HASP and will be the primary contact
for inquiries as to the contents of the HASP. The PHSO will be consulted before changes to the
HASP can be approved or implemented. The PHSO will also:
0
Develop new protocols or modify the HASP as appropriate and issue amendments.
0
Resolve issues that arise in the field with respect to interpretation or
implementation of the HASP.
0
Monitor the field program through a regular review of field health and safety
records, on-site activity audits, or a combination of both.
0
Determine that all Baker personnel have received the required training and medical
surveillance prior to entry onto a site.
0
Coordinate the review, evaluation, and approval of the HASP.
SITE MANAGER:
To be Determined
The Site Manager will be responsible for assuring that all day-to-day activities are conducted in
accordance with the HASP. The Site Manager has the immediate authority to suspend field
activities if employees are subjected to a situation that can be immediately dangerous to life or
health. The Site Manager’s responsibilities include:
2-l
Assuring that the appropriate health and safety equipment and personal protective
equipment (PPE) has arrived on site and that it is properly maintained.
Coordinating overall site accessand security measures, including documenting all
personnel arriving or departing the site (e.g., name, company and time).
Approving all on site activities, and coordinating site safety and health issues with
the SHSO.
Assisting the SHSO in coordinating emergency procedures with the Naval Activity,
emergency medical responders, etc., prior to or during site mobilization activities.
Assuring compliance with site sanitation procedures and site precautions.
Coordinating activities with Baker and subcontractor personnel.
Overseeing the decontamination of field sampling equipment.
Serving as the backup/alternate Emergency Coordinator.
Assuming the responsibilities as indicated under “Field Team Leader,” in their
absence.
SITE HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER:
To be Determined
The SHSO will be responsible for the on-site implementation of the HASP. The SHSO also has the
immediate authority to suspendfield activities if the health or safety of site personnel is endangered,
and to audit the subcontractor training, fit testing, and medical surveillance records to verify
compliance. These records will be maintained at the Baker Command Post. The SHSO will also:
0
Coordinate the pre-entry briefing and subsequent briefings.
0
Assure that monitoring equipment is properly calibrated and properly operated.
0
Assure compliance with the SOPSin Attachment A.
0
Inform personnel of the material safety data sheets(MSDSs) located in Attachment
B and emergency procedures for exposure to hazardous materials/waste presented
in Attachment C.
0
Manage health and safety equipment, including instruments, respirators, PPE, etc.,
that is used during field activities.
0
Confirm emergency response provisions, as necessary, in cooperation with Naval
Activity, emergency medical care, etc., prior to or during site mobilization
activities.
2-2
0
Monitor conditions during field activities to ensure compliance with the HASP and
evaluate if more stringent procedures or a higher level of PPE should be
implemented, and informing the PHSO and Project Manager.
0
Document, as necessary,pertinent information such as accident investigation and
reporting, designated safety inspections, a record of site conditions, personnel
involved in field activities, and any other relevant health and safety issues. This
information will become part of the official site records.
0
Oversee the decontamination of personnel and determine safe boundary procedures
for activities requiring Level C or higher protection levels.
0
Act as the Emergency Coordinator.
Subcontractor personnel are responsible for:
Complying with the conditions as outlined under Field Team Members.
Complying with all OSHA regulations relevant to their work.
Obtaining the appropriate training, fit testing, and medical surveillance
requirements under 29 CFR 1910.120 and 1910.134 and providing this
documentation to the Site Manager prior to or during site mobilization.
Having a competent safety monitor on site.
Complying with the training and medical surveillance requirements as outlined in
Sections 9.0 and 10.0, respectively, and providing their own PPE that meets or
exceedsthe level of protection as outlined in this HASP.
SUBCONTRACTOR COMPANIES:
Drilling/Analytical Operations: MicroSeeos
Survey Operations:
To be Determined
LANTDIV REPRESENTATIVES:
0
Ms. Katherine Landman (NTR)
(804) 322-4818
ACTIVITY/STATION/BASE
REPRESENTATIVES:
0
Mr. Neal Paul
0
Mr. Thomas Morris
(910) 451-5874
(910) 451-5972
FEDERAL/STATE/LOCAL REPRESENTATIVES:
0
Ms. Gena Townsend (Region IV)
0
Mr. Patrick Watters (NC DEHNR)
2-3
(404) 347-3555
(919) 733-2801
3.0
SITE CHARACTERIZATION
This section provides information on the background, description, and hazard evaluation for each
area under investigation.
3.1
Background
Location:
Marine Corp Base (MCB), Main Side
Start-Up Date:
July, 1996 (Phase I)
November 4 to December 11, 1996 (Phase II)
Investigation Duration: Approximately 10 days (Phase I)
Approximately 3, 1O-day field events (Phase II)
3.2
Description of Area under InvestipatiQn
A description of the site under investigation, including surrounding population, topography, and site
history is provided below.
3.2.1
Site 88, Camp Lejeune MWR Dry Cleaners
The MWR Dry Cleaners Facility (Site 88) also identified as Building 25 is located on the northern
side of Post Lane. Building 25 is a relatively flat area surrounded by barracks, office buildings, and
other occupied structures. The surrounding buildings include Building 37 to the north, Building 43
to the west, Building HP57 to the east, and Building 80 to the south. The New River is the nearest
water body, located approximately 3,000 feet downgradient (west) of the site.
Building 25 is currently operating as the base dry cleaning facility. Five USTs located adjacent to
the building were used to store dry cleaning fluids. The USTs were reportedly installed in the
1940’s,at the time the building was constructed. These USTs were used in conjunction with the dry
cleaning operations until the early 1970’s. During this time, Varsol, a dry cleaning fluid, was stored
in the USTs. Becauseof Varsol’s flammability, its use was discontinued in the 1970’s and replaced
with perchloroethylene (PCE). PCE was stored in 150 gallon aboveground storage tanks outside
Building 25 from the 1970’sto mid- 1980’s. Currently, the dry cleaning machines are equipped with
containment units, eliminating the need for the aboveground tanks. Presently, there are two dry
cleaning units in operation. One unit was brought on-line in December, 1986, and the second in
March, 1995. The USTs mentioned above, were removed in November, 1995.
3.3
Hazard Evaluation
The pre-entry briefing and subsequent safety meetings will serve to address the hazards particular
to the site under investigation, such as underground utilities, and heavy traffic areas, etc. If new
hazardsare identified, the SHSO will then add them to the HASP in the field along with the date of
modification. Additionally, site personnel are expected to follow “safe” work practices as described
in this HASP.
3-l
3.3.1
Chemical
Hazards
Hazardous chemicals can be absorbed into the body through various pathways. ‘These pathways
include:
0
0
0
0
Inhalation of vapors, gases,or particulates.
Ingestion of contaminated particulates from hand-to-mouth contact.
Dermal and eye contact from direct, unprotected contact.
Absorption through the eye or skin from exposure to concentrations in the air.
The chemical exposure potential for personnel working at Operable Unit No. 15, MCB, Camp
Lejeune, is expected to relate directly to the chemicals detected during the previous investigation
at the site. Therefore, Table 3-l identifies the chemical/physical properties for these previously
detected constituents.
The chemicals not included in Table 3-l are those chemicals that did not exceed federal or state
water quality criteria, federal Sediment Screening Values or USEPA Region III Risk-Based
Concentrations for soils.
At site 88, an effort will be made to eliminate or reduce potential routes of exposure through the use
of engineering controls (i.e., performing investigative activities in an upwind location according to
safe sampling techniques), administrative controls (i.e., effective training programs), and PPE (i.e.,
chemical protective clothing, hard hats, etc.).
MSDSs for constituents that were previously identifted at the site have been compiled and are
included as Attachment B. They can be used to identify the symptomology for each of the chemicals
of potential concern. However, the data presented in an MSDS reflects the chemical and
toxicological properties of the specific compound in a pure, non-diluted state. As such, when these
compounds are detected in environmental media (i.e, soil, and groundwater), the hazards are
anticipated to be substantially lessthan those associated with exposure to “pure” compounds. This
information, therefore, will be utilized as a reference, when questions arise as to a constituents’
chemical and toxicological property or measures for emergency response.
3.3.2
Physical
Hazards
Physical hazards that are potential concerns for each site at OU No. 15 are discussed in the
subsections below.
3.3.2.1 Confined uce
Entrv
Confined space entry is not anticipated during activities to be conducted at OU No. 15, therefore,
confined spaceentry procedures have not been provided. However, should circumstances arise that
may require entry into a confined space,the PHSO will be contacted and entry-specific procedures
according to 29 CFR 1910.146 will be provided at that time.
3-2
TABLE 3-l
CHEMICAL/PHYSICAL
Chemical
Volatiles:
Acetone
Methylene Chloride
1,2-Dichloroethane
I-W
I
Trichloroethylene
Perchloroethylene
Semivolatiles:
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
Naohthalene
Inorganics:
Iron
Nickel
PROPERTIES
Source
Soil
Soil
Soil
Groundwater
Groundwater
Soil
L
Groundwater
I
OF CONSTITUENTS
DETECTED
SITE 88
Maximum
Detected
Concentration
Exposure Limit
(EL)(”
83 Pg/k?z
53 Pdkg
9 Ki+g
10,000 ug/L
2,750 ug/L
1,000 ppm
500 ppm
50 wm
50 ppm
50 wm
55MJk
29,200 pg/L
PREVIOUS
N.F.P.A. [email protected]’
H
F
R
Carchogen’c’
SAMPLING
~
AT
IDLHo
I
I
25 mm
25 ppm
1
2
2
2
2
1 2
2
Groundwater
Groundwater
0.624 /Q/L
0.53 w/L
5 mg/m’
10 mm
0
2
Groundwater
Groundwater
10,100 ug/L
10 mg/m’
1 mg/m’
2
2
279 KG
DURING
2,500 ppm
2,300 ppm
100 ppm
100 ppm
2
1 0
1
ionization
Potential
9.69
11.32
11.05
11.05
Yes
(@ EL - Exposure Limit = A time- weighted average concentration for a normal eight- hour work day and 40-hour work week to which nearly all workers
may be repeatedly exposed day after day without expected adverse effect. The EL represents published Exposure Levels according to the following
hierarchical order: (1) OSHA PELs; (2) NIOSH RELs; (3) ACGIH TLVs; and, (4) other recognized sources.
@) National Fire Protection Association rating for Health (H), Flammability (F), and Reactivity (R) from 0 (insignificant) to 4 (highly significant)
cc) Carcinogen = “Yes” indicates a compound as either a confirmed or suspected human carcinogen.
cd) IDLH = Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health
ppm - parts per million (in air)
NA - Not applicable and/or available
I
3.3.2.2 Thermal Stress
Provisions for monitoring of heat and cold stress (for both Phases I and II) are outlined in
Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
3.3.2.3 Noise
Elevated noise levels may be produced during drilling and other heavy equipment operations;
therefore, hearing protection may be required. The SHSO is responsible for making this
determination based on past experience with the type of equipment in use, and the proximity of
personnel to the equipment.
3.3.2.4 Explosion and Fire
In general, the following items present potential explosion or fire hazards and will be monitored
closely as they pertain to each area under investigation:
0
Explosion and fire resulting from:
b
Heavy equipment malfunction
ä
Penetration into underground utility/service lines (gas, electric, fuel)
b
Ignition of trapped flammable vapors
ä
Vehicular accidents
b
Ignition of flammables or combustibles during welding or cutting (To be
conducted during intermediate monitoring well installation, Phase II)
Monitoring for potential fire/explosive conditions include the use of an oxygen/combustible gas
meter (as indicated in Section 5.2) and the performance of utility checks prior to conducting
intrusive activities. Provisions to be followed for welding and cutting operations are outlined in
Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.As additional concerns are identified changes to the HASP will
be presented by the SHSO, as needed.
3.3.2.5 Utilities
Underground utility clearance must be obtained before any intrusive activities are performed; this
clearance will be provided by a representative from the Public Works Department. If underground
utilities are identified in these areas, the ground above the utility lines will be physically marked
(e.g., spray paint or flags). Baker personnel will notify the base representatives at least three days
prior to intrusive activities to acquire a utility clearance. A minimum of a 24-inch tolerance zone
must be used for underground utilities.
The generally accepted uniform color code for underground utilities is as follows:
l
l
l
l
l
l
Red - Electric power lines, cables, conduit and lighting cables
Yellow - Gas, oil, steam, petroleum, or gaseous materials
Orange - Communication, alarm or signal lines, cables or conduit
Blue - Water, irrigation, and slurry lines
Green - Sewers and drain lines
White - Proposed excavation
3-4
Energized overhead electric lines may present a risk of electrocution. OSHA standards require that
equipment maintain certain distances from power lines. For lines 0 to 50 kilovolts (kV), the
minimum distance is 10 feet. Lines carrying over 50 kV require that equipment maintain 10 feet,
.
plus an additional 0.4 inch for each 1 kV over 50. On very hum&lays or duringodes
of rti
these distances will be bubbled.
3.3.2.6 Heavy Em
One of the primary physical hazardson the site is associatedwith the use of heavy equipment, which
includes the use of a direct-push rig (Phase I), and a drill rig (Phase II). Only operators trained,
qualified, and authorized will be permitted to operate the heavy equipment.
General hazardsassociatedwith the direct-push/drill rig include moving parts, such as the hydraulic
hammer, auger, and cathead. Personnel must remain clear of moving parts and must avoid
loose-fitting clothing that can become entangled in the moving parts. Personnel working near a
direct-push/drill rig must be aware of the location and operation of the emergency shut off devices.
Personnel are to stand clear of the direct-push/drill rig immediately prior to starting the engine. The
drilling subcontractor representatives are to provide any other cautions that need to be observed
when working around this equipment during the HASP pre-entry briefing.
Noise from the operation of the heavy equipment will limit verbal warning abilities. Hand signals
will be prearranged between operators and personnel working in and around heavy equipment.
Backup alarms must operate properly on the heavy equipment.
3.3.3
Radiation
Hazards
.
The potential for exposure to radiological wastes or radioisotopes at Site 88 is considered low
(i.e., site history does not indicate the presence/disposal of radioactive materials), therefore, a
radiation survey meter will not be assigned. However, the SHSO can request a radiation survey
meter, should new concerns arise.
3.3.4
Environmental
Hazards
Site 88 is located within an industrialized part of the base. Hazards associated with flora and fauna
at this site are not expected.
3.3.5
Task-Specific
Hazards
Listed below are summaries for the hazards associated with each potential task for an area under
investigation. Levels of protection outlined in Section 6.0 were selected based on this task-specific
hazard identification, information obtained from previous investigations and site visits, and previous
experience with similar investigations or activities.
3-5
3.3.5.1 Task 1 Subsurface
Chemical
l
0
0
0
Potential for contaminated mud, soil, or groundwater to be splashed onto body or
in eyes.
Skin contact with potentially-contaminated soil.
Ingestion of potentially-contaminated soils from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
0
0
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment operations.
Muscle strain from lifting hazards.
Contact with underground utilities.
Heavy objects landing on foot/toe or head.
Slips/trips/falls from sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
3.3.5.2 Task 2 Temporary and Pement
. .
Momtormg Well Installation
Chemical
0
l
0
0
Potentially-contaminated mud, soil, or groundwater to be splashed onto body or in
eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated materials from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Absorption of groundwater through the skin.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
Heavy objects landing on foot/toe or head.
Elevated noise levels from heavy equipment operation.
3.3.5.3 Task 3 Temporary and Permanent Monitorine Well Development
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Potential for groundwater to be splashed onto body or in eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated materials from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Adsorption of groundwater through the skin.
Physical/Environmental
0
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain.
3-6
3.3 5.4 Task 4 Groundwater Sampling
Chemical
0
0
0
0
Potential for contaminated groundwater to be splashed onto body or in eyes.
Ingestion of contaminated materials from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile contaminants
emitting from the well opening.
Adsorption of groundwater through the skin.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
3.3.5.5 Task
Muscle strain from lifting bailers.
Cuts from using knives to cut bailer rope.
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
IDW (Tanker!Roll-Off
Box) Samplinp
Chemical
0
0
0
Skin contact with potentially-contaminated soil or water.
Ingestion of contaminated material from hand-to-mouth contact.
Inhalation of potentially volatile contaminants or volatile fraction of semivolatile
contaminants.
Physical/Environmental
0
0
0
0
0
Slips/trips/falls from elevated heights (i.e., top of roll-off box or tanker) onto
ground.
Falling into potentially-contaminated material in roll-off box.
Cuts, abrasions, or sprains from climbing onto roll-off box or tanker.
Muscle strain when using bailer or hand auger.
Hazards associated with a potential “confined space” situation.
3.3.5.6 Task 6 Land Surveying
Chemical
0
0
Skin contact with potentially-contaminated soil.
Ingestion of contaminated material from hand-to-mouth contact.
Physical{Environmental
l
0
0
0
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Automobile traffic concerns.
Slips/trips/falls - sloped, uneven terrain; crawling over and under obstacles.
Muscle strain from lifting hazards.
3-7
3.3.6
Summary
The information provided in the previous section details the potential hazards associated with OU
No. 15. This information is used to ascertain what levels of protection will be required for each field
activity at each area under investigation. In determining the levels of protection, the following items
are considered:
Quantity of contaminant that is available for absorption
Exposure time that is available for absorption
Frequency with which the exposure occurs
Physical form of the constituents
Presence of other constituents
Toxicity of the constituents
Ventilation, natural or otherwise
Appropriate hygienic practices
Protective equipment in use
HASP training
Based on this section and the information furnished in the previous two sections, levels of protection
will be assigned. Refer to Section 6.2, Site-Specific Levels of Protection.
3-8
4.0
SITE
CONTROL
Measures need to be addressedin the HASP for managing the daily control of the site (i.e., access,
site conditions, etc.). The following subsections provide a discussion of each site control measure
that will be consistent for site activities at OU No. 15.
4.1
Site Access
The Site Manager is designated to coordinate overall access and security at each site under
investigation. Perimeters for activities to be conducted at OU No. 15 will be established according
to the site boundary procedures identified in Section 4.3, local conditions, the items listed below,
and Navy Activity requirements.
4.2
0
Personnel will not be permitted within the Work Zone (i.e., Exclusion Zone) or
Contamination Reduction Zone without proper authorization from the SHSO.
0
All personnel arriving or departing the site will be documented in the site logbook.
0
All activities on site must be cleared through the Site Manager and documented in
the site logbook.
0
The on-site Command Post will be established at Lot 203, and will be in the
Support Zone and oriented upwind and away from all Work Zones.
0
Figure 4- 1 identifies the location of the area under investigation.
Site Conditions
Specific site conditions are as follows:
0
The prevailing wind conditions are from the west; however, easterly winds are
common.
0
Anticipated weather conditions include warm to hot temperatures, 75-90°F during
Phase I.
Anticipated weather conditions include cool to fair temperatures, 35-50°F during Phase II
0
4.3
Work
Site topography: Refer to discussion in Section 3.2.
Zona
To reduce the accidental spread of hazardoussubstancesby workers from a potentially-contaminated
area to a clean area, zones will be delineated to ensure that work activities and contamination are
confined to the appropriate areas, and to keep unauthorized personnel from entering the work zones.
The sections below identify the requirements based on the level of protection in use.
4-l
1 inch
=
100
LEGEND
x
__
x
ft.
\
FENCE
REVISED
MCB
CAMP
LEJEUNE
<
Baker Environmentalha
FIGURE 4- 1
LOCATION
MAP
SITE 88 -MWR
DRY CLEANING
FACILITY
(~~UILDING
25)
CTO-0356
MARINE
SOURCE:
\
BASE
MAP,
1 l/10/89
4-2
CORPS BASE, CAMP
NORTH CAROLINA
LEJEUNE
4.3.1
Level C Activities
(If Needed)
All zones for activities conducted under Level C shall be established utilizing control boundaries
between the Work Zone, the Contamination Reduction Zone (CRZ), and the Support Zone
(i.e., Clean Zone). These boundaries shall be defined as follows:
0
Work Zone - The area where the primary investigation activity occurs.
0
Hotline - The boundary between the Work Zone and CRZ.
0
CRZ - The area between the Work Zone and the Support Zone which is located
upwind of the site investigative activities.
l
Contamination Control Line - The boundary between the CRZ and the Support
Zone.
0
Support Zone - The outermost area next to the CRZ and upwind of the site
investigative activities.
These boundaries will be demarcated using colored boundary tape, cones, or equivalent for the
Hotline or the Decontamination Corridor of the CRZ and/or barriers for the Contamination Control
Line such as posted signs and/or barricades.
Refer to Figure 4-2 for a “General Contamination Reduction Zone Layout.” Exact locations of the
demarcated zones will be field determined by the SHSO during site mobilization.
4.3.2
Level D and D+ Activities
All zones for activities conducted under Levels D or D+ shall be established according to the
guidelines set forth in the subsections below.
4.3.2.1 Populated Areas
In populated areas, Work Zones for activities conducted under Level D or D+ protection levels shall
be established in such a manner as to preclude unauthorized personnel from entering the
investigative area. A boundary will be established to separatethe Work Zone from the Support Zone
using available materials such as the Baker Field Vehicle, natural boundaries (e.g., buildings,
structures, fences), or signs/placards, boundary tape, cones, barricades, etc.
4.4
“Buddv
System”
All site activities that involve hazards and/or the potential for contact with hazardous materials will
be performed by a work team of no fewer than two people (i.e., Buddy System). For potential
“high-hazard” activities, a third person located in the Support Zone will serve as an observer or
rescue person.
4-3
\
/
\
\
\
I
--
-----
/
/
4’
$
i
FIGURE 4-2
SCHEMATIC
DIAGRAM
GENERAL CONTAMINATION
REDUCTION ZONE LAYOUT
4.5
Sa f e Work
Practice,g
Routine safe work practices may consist of:
0
0
0
0
l
0
0
0
4.5.1
Conducting operations in a manner to reduce exposure of personnel and equipment.
Implementing appropriate decontamination procedures.
Conducting sampling activities from an upwind location.
Adherence to applicable safety regulations in OSHA Standards 29CFR 1910 and
1926.
Setting up barriers to exclude unauthorized personnel from contaminated areas.
Minimizing the number of personnel and equipment at each area under
investigation.
Establishing work zones within each area under investigation.
Establishing control points for ingress to and egress from work zones.
Heavy Equipment
The following safe work practices will be adhered to during heavy equipment operations.
Hard hats will be worn at when working in a work zone with heavy equipment.
Heavy equipment requiring an operator will not be permitted to run unattended.
Heavy equipment will not be operated in a manner that will endanger persons or
property nor will the safe operating speeds or loads be exceeded.
Heavy equipment will be shut down and positive means taken to prevent its
operation while repairs or fueling are being performed.
Personnel, other than the operator, should not ride on equipment.
A “spotter” will be used to help direct the heavy equipment operator.
Personnel are to remain in the field of vision of the operator and remain clear of
moving parts.
Hand signals will be prearranged between operator and personnel working around
the heavy equipment.
Backup alarms must operate properly on the heavy equipment.
4.5.2
Drilling
Operations
The following safe work practices will be adhered to during drilling operations.
0
The subcontracting drilling company’s supervisor is to provide other cautions to be
observed when working around the drill rig during the HASP briefing.
4-5
4.6
0
Hand signals will be prearranged between operator and personnel working around
the drill rig.
0
Personnel are to remain in the field of vision of the operator and remain clear of
moving parts where protective clothing can be entangled, i.e., Tyvek caught in the
auger.
0
Utility clearances must be secured prior to drilling.
0
Personnel working near a drill rig are to be aware of the location and operation of
the emergency shut off devices.
0
The drill rig boom is to remain a minimum of 10 feet from power lines (see
Section 3.3.2.5).
&&,&n
ProcedureslSlte
.
Precaum
.
Provisions for sanitation procedures and site precautions to be followed on site are outlined below.
A supply of clearly marked potable water, tightly closed, and equipped with a tap.
Single service disposal cups.
Outlets for non-potable water, clearly marked, for fire fighting or other purposes.
Cross-contamination of the potable supply shall be prevented.
One toilet facility for up to 20 personnel which is either chemical, recirculating,
combustion, or flush, depending on local code requirements.
A place for food handling meeting applicable laws or suitable alternatives to such
facilities will be provided (i.e., nearby restaurants, food wagons, etc.).
Clean wash water will be available in the decontamination zone if Level C activities
are necessary, and the Baker Field Trailer for all other operations. Disposable
towelettes will be available in each Baker Field Vehicle for periodic cleanups.
Eating, drinking, chewing gum or tobacco, smoking, or any practice that increases
the probability of hand-to-mouth transfer and ingestion of material is prohibited in
any area designated as contaminated. Smoking will also not be allowed in areas
where flammable materials are present. Hands and face must be thoroughly washed
before breaking for meals and upon leaving the site. “Contaminated” work
garments are not to be worn off site.
Whenever decontamination procedures for outer garments are in effect, the entire
body should be thoroughly washed as soon as possible after the protective garment
is removed.
4-6
0
Contact lenses are not nermitted to be worn on site.
i
Facial hair, which interferes with a satisfactory fit of the mask-to-face seal, is not
permitted on personnel who are or may be required to wear respirators.
0
Contact with contaminated or potentially-contaminated surfaces should be avoided.
Wherever possible, do not walk through puddles, leachate, discolored surfaces,
kneel on ground, lean, sit or place equipment on drums/containers.
l
Medicine and alcohol can potentiate the effects of exposure to toxic chemicals,
therefore, prescribed drugs should only be taken by personnel when approved by
a qualified physician. Alcoholic beverage intake should be minimized or avoided
during after-hour operations.
0
Alcoholic beverages and firearms are prohibited on site.
a
All site personnel will observe any posted sign, warning, fence, or barrier posted
around contaminated areas.
0
Site personnel must wear the proper attire while on site. At a minimum, this will
include steel-toed boots, work pants (e.g., jeans or other durable material), and work
shirt (e.g., short or long-sleeved, made of a durable material). Tank tops, muscle
shirts, and sweat pants are not permitted.
4-7
5.0
ENVIRONMENTAL
MONITORING
Environmental monitoring will be performed at the area under investigation; the level and degree
of monitoring will be dependent on each field activity. Due to the short duration and variability of
field tasks only realtime air monitoring (versus integrated air monitoring) will be used to assess
action levels. The action levels for the PID, as specified in Section 5.1 below, are based on a
“worst-case” contaminated 8-hour TWA-PEL of 1 ppm (i.e., benzene), and are consistent with those
.
listed by the USEPA in Section 6.9, of the Standard Operatmg Safety Gu ides (June, 1992).
5.1
Personal
Monitoriw
Personal monitoring will be accomplished using realtime environmental monitoring instrumentation
directed at the breathin? zone (BZ) (the area bordered by the outside of the shoulders and from the
mid-chest to the top of the head) of work party personnel. Breathing zone monitoring will be
performed each time a reading is taken at the point source (i.e., after well is opened for groundwater
sampling, after breaking ground for soil sampling, etc.). The guidelines below identify the
protection levels required according to the concentrations measured using each piece of equipment.
0
0
0
0
Background(*) = Level D/D+
>l mu (meter unit) above background for up to 1 continuous minute in the BZ =
Level C
>l mu above background for up to 15 continuous minutes in the BZ = Level B or
stop work and consult the SHSO
Instantaneous peak concentrations > 10 mu in the BZ = Level B or stop work and
consult the SHSO
(‘)PID with 11.7 eV ultraviolet lamp set on the 1X Scale.
(*I Background is typically 1 to 2 mu
5.2
Point
Source Monitoriw
Point source monitoring which is monitoring performed at the source of the sampling/investigative
activity (i.e., borehole, monitoring well, etc.) will comply at the action levels outlined below.
Instrumentation to be used will include a PID, and Oxygen/Combustible Gas Meter.
l
If detecting levels greater than background, immediately measure the BZ levels
following the action levels set forth in Section 5.1.
0
For levels greater than 10 times the background level, retreat upwind, monitor BZ,
and return after allowing source to aerate.
0
For levels that are sustained, contact the SHSO for guidance.
5-l
~en/Combustrble
Gas Meter?)
Oxygen Meter
0
0
19.5% to 23.5% = continue working
-49.5% or >23.5% = Stop Work immediately and consult the SHSO
Combustible Gas Meter(*)
0
0
<20% of the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) = continue working
>20% of the LEL = Stop Work immediately and consult the SHSO
(*) Used to evaluate physical safety in conjunction with PID.
@) Assigned action levels are for non-confined space entry operations .
As work progresses, the scope of monitoring may be extended based on monitoring results, odor
detection, changing work conditions, and signs or symptoms of exposure. Any or all of these
conditions will be immediately investigated and acted upon by the SHSO.
5.3
Perimeter
Monitoring
Perimeter monitoring which is defined as monitoring performed at borders beyond the Support Zone
and often at the “fence line” will be required based on action levels that will remain consistent for
site activities. The PID action levels are outlined below.
0
5.4
The PID will be used periodically to scanthe perimeter as a means of documenting
any volatile releases that may extend past the work zone, when volatile
concentrations exceed 50 mu (2 X Scale) at the point source or 10 mu (1 X Scale)
at the breathing zone.
Suecific Air Monitoring
Eauiument
and Freauency
Monitoring equipment and frequency for each area under investigation can be found in Table 5- 1.
Action levels that govern changes in levels of protection can be found in Section 5.1.
5.5
Eauiument
Maintenance
and CalibratioQ
Baker’s procedures for the return of equipment to inventory and for maintenance of the equipment
shall be followed in order to assurethat the optimum level of operation is maintained for the item.
Equipment calibration under the direction of the SHSO will be completed daily before use and
calibration information entered onto the equipment calibration form. All forms will be maintained
on site for the duration of the project with copies to be given to the Equipment Manager once the
equipment has been returned to the office. Procedures for equipment maintenance and calibration
follow those guidelines found in the operating manual provided by the manufacturer (included with
the equipment) or in Baker’s Standard OperaProcedures for Administrative. Field. and
Technical Activities Manual.
5-2
TABLE
MONITORING
5-l
EQUIPMENT
AND FREQUENCY
FOR EACH
CONDUCTED
AT OU NO. 15
FIELD
ACTIVITY
Wgenl
Field Activity
PIDo)
IDW Sampling
I
I
Combustible Gas
Meter(‘)
I
I
I = Initially - At start of job task to confirm designated protection level.
P = Periodically - When site condition/set-up changes or a new area is entered.
C = Continuously - Monitor levels continuously.
D = At the discretion of the SHSO.
PID = Photoionization Detector
Note:
As air concentrations are measured, they shall be documented in the
individual’s field logbook. In the case of continuous monitoring, every
15 minutes.
(0 Refer to the manufacturer’s operating manual and Baker SOP prior to operation.
5-3
5.6
&lonitoring
Documentation
As environmental monitoring is performed, documentation of the results will be
entered into the Field Log Book of the SHSO or other personnel performing the
monitoring. Documentation is to include the date, time, instrument result,
general location, and specific location such as point source, breathing zone, or
area, and weather conditions during the monitoring time period. Copies of the
Field Log Book will be placed in a binder and remain in the Baker Field Trailer
on site until the end of the field activities, whereby the log sheets will become
part of the permanent tile.
5-4
6.0
PERSONAL
6.1
Personal
PROTECTIVE
Protective
EQUIPMXNT
Equipment
Selectios
The personal protective equipment available for the various levels of protection is listed in the table
below. The assigned item number will correspond to each field activity as defined in Section 6.2.
I
t
6.2
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Site-Suecific
1 Steel Toe Boots
Safety Glasses
Safety Goggles
Face Shield
Hard Hat
Hearing Protection
Chest/Hip Waders (as necessary)
Safety Vests (as necessary)
Levels of Protection
Based on the information provided in Section 3 .O, Site Characterization, the levels of protection and
corresponding personal protective equipment have been designated for the following field activities.
Upgrading or downgrading the level of protection will be based on realtime monitoring,
working
conditions, and the discretion of the SHSO.
Note: No single combination of protective equipment and clothing is capable of protection against
all hazards. PPE should be used in conjunction with safe work practices, effective decontamination,
and good personal hygiene.
6-l
PersonalProtective
Site 88
Site 88
Development
GroundwaterSampling
IDW Sampling
X
X
1,4, 10, 12, 16,20
1,4, 10, 12, 16,20
EXCEPT IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS, CHANGES TO THE SPECIFIED LEVELS OF
PROTECTION SHALL ONLY BE MADE WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE SHSO AND
THE SITE MANAGER, IN CONSULTATION WITH THE PHSO AND PROJECT
MANAGER.
6.3
Resuiratorv
Protectioq
Site-specific respiratory protection requirements as outlined below will comply with the
procedures in Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
6.3.1
Level C
A NIOSH-certified full face negative pressure Air-Purifying Respirator with an organic
vaporiHEPA cartridge is the appropriate cartridge for use with the detected hazardous
materials and the measured contaminant concentrations will be used at this level.
Upgrades/downgrades in this level of respiratory protection will be based on measured
realtime air contaminant concentrations (see Section 5.1) and the SHSO’s observations.
(Note: Baker personnel are issued either a North or MSA Air-Purifying Respirator).
Cartridge changeover will occur when one or more of the following have been observed:
exposure duration greater than eight hours for vapor/gas cartridges; increase in breathing
resistance;a noticeable odor or taste; eye/throat irritation; and other indicators such as end-ofservice life indicators for specialty filter cartridges.
6.3.2
Level D+
A NIOSH-certified negative pressure Air-Purifying Respirator, meeting all the requirements
identified under Level C, will remain on standby at this level.
6.4
Care and Cleaniw
of Personnel
Protective
Equipment
Provisions for the care and cleaning of personal protective equipment used on site can be
found in Attachment A - Baker Safety SOPS.
6-2
7.0
DECONTAMINATION
PROCEDURES
Procedures to follow for the decontamination
materials generated during decontamination,
7.1
of personnel and equipment, as well as handling
are discussed in the following sections.
of
Personnel Decontamination
Personnel leaving the Work Zone will be thoroughly decontaminated.
The following protocol will
be used for the decontamination
stations according to levels of protection assigned to each field
activity:
* Optional
- depends on degree of contamination
The following
recommended
0
0
l
0
l
0
0
decontamination
equipment
for Level D+ protection:
and type of PPE used.
is required for Level C and higher protection
Two small tubs (one set of wash and rinse water)
Scrub brush
Towels*
Disposable wipes*
Pressurized sprayers for rinsing
Contaminated clothing disposal bag or drum*
Contaminated liquids disposal drum
7-1
levels and
0
0
Respirator cleaning solution
Liquinox and water as the decontamination solution
w
*Minimum for Level D decontamination.
The decontamination liquids and clothing will be contained and disposed according to policy
defined in the Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP).
7.2
Effectiveness
of Personnel
Decontamination
The effectiveness of site decontamination methods will be evaluated by the SHSO on a periodic
basis. This evaluation may include the observation of personnel decontamination, inspection of
PPE before and after decontamination, and questioning site personnel for signs and symptoms of
exposure. Additional measures may also be employed by the SHSO at their discretion.
7.3
Eauiument
Decontaminatiou
Provisions for the decontamination of equipment will be based on the size and type of equipment
used. Specific decontamination procedures for each site within OU No. 15 will be found in the
SAP.
7.4
Decontamination
MateriaIS
The protocols outlined in the SAP for the handling of materials used for decontamination such as
packaging, storing, and disposing will be followed to: (1) minimize the risk of off-site exposures
that could endanger public health; and (2) limit the potential for liabilities associatedwith handling,
containment, storage, and transportation of contaminated materials. These protocols comply with
Baker’s SOP on “Handling of Site Investigation-Derived Wastes,” located in the Standard
Operating: Procedures for Administrative. Field. and Technical Activities Manual.
7-2
r’
8.0
EMERGENCY
8.1
Scope
PROCEDURES
The activities to be conducted under this HASP are not remediation (cleanup), but
investigative; therefore the potential for a “release” to air, water, or soil is low. However,
other emergencies, such as fire or personal injury may occur. If so, local emergency response
groups will be called in to handle the incident, as necessary.
8.2
Pre-Emergency
Planning
All applicable Navy/local emergency response contacts (On-Scene Commander, Fire
Department, Security, Ambulance, Hospital, etc.) at mainside MCB Camp Lejeune will be
contacted prior to or during site mobilization activities. This notification will be performed
by the SHSO and/or Site Manager. The information discussed may include:
0
0
0
0
0
a
0
A description of site activities.
Anticipated site hazards.
Hazardous chemicals/materials brought on site.
Expected length of time on site.
Specific requirements the emergency response facilities may require.
Confirmation of emergency phone numbers.
Security measures that must be followed by site personnel.
Specific points of contact, where applicable, will be established and added to the HASP. If
requested, Material Safety Data Sheets for hazardous chemicals/materials brought on site
(which are maintained at the Command Post), will be provided at this time.
8.3
Emewency
Coordinator
The SHSO acting as the Emergency Coordinator is responsible for field implementation of
these Emergency Procedures. The Emergency Coordinator is responsible for reacting (not
responding) to emergencies. As the Emergency Coordinator, specific duties include:
0
Familiarizing all on-site personnel with the emergency procedures and the
emergency coordinator’s authority.
0
Identifying the nearest telephone in the event of an emergency.
0
Communicating site emergency procedures and requirements to all Baker and
subcontractor personnel.
0
Specifying the Site Manager as the backup/alternate Emergency Coordinator.
0
Controlling activities of subcontractors and contacting the emergency
response groups, as necessary.
8-1
0
Anticipating, identifying, and assessingfires, explosions, chemical releases, and
other emergency situations to the best of the coordinator’s ability, and providing
this information to the emergency group(s) responding.
0
Familiarity with site personnel trained in emergency first aid and adult CPR.
All on-site personnel, whether involved in emergency procedures or not, will be notified of their
responsibilities by the Emergency Coordinator in an emergency. They will be familiar with the
emergency procedures and the Emergency Coordinator’s authority.
8.4
Communications/Teleuhone
Numberg
Internal communications will rely on direct communication (via verbal or two-way radios) between
site personnel. External communications will employ a telephone located in the Baker Field Trailer
and various telephones located throughout the Base (near the investigation areas). Telephone
communication at the Command Post (Baker Field Trailer) will be established during site
mobilization. The telephone number is (to be provided) in the Final HASP Submission.
The “Buddy System” will be in effect at all times; any failure of communication requires an
evaluation of whether personnel should discontinue activities.
Air horns will be used for communication
during emergency evacuation of personnel.
One
long (3 second) air horn blast is the emergency signal to indicate that all personnel should
evacuate the Work Zone.
Coordination between Baker and subcontractor personnel is the responsibility of the Site Manager.
The best means for securing the lines of communication will be determined at the pre-entry briefing.
Hand signals, as outlined below, will be used in the event that radio communications fail:
Hand gripping throat
Grip partner’s wrist or both hands around waist Hands on top of head
Thumbs up
Thumbs down
Can’t breathe
(typically Level C/B activities)
Leave area immediately
Need assistance
OK, I am all right, I understand
No, I do not understand
Emergency telephone numbers will be posted in the Baker Field Trailer and maintained in each
Baker Field Vehicle. The list of emergency phone numbers is presented in Table 8-1.
8.5
Assemblv
[email protected]
In the event of an emergency, personnel will be instructed to meet initially at the Baker Field
Vehicle and eventually at the Baker Field Trailer. Where applicable, personnel will exit the work
area through the contamination reduction zone. If either of these locations is inappropriate, an
alternate assembly area will be designated by the Emergency Coordinator in an upwind location
from the site. At this location, emergency needs will be provided such as:
8-2
TABLE
EMERGENCY
8- 1
TELEPHONE
Phone Number
On-Base Phone”)
NUMBERS
Phone Number
Off- Base [email protected])
nvrromnenta
Management Department
@MD)
Public Works
(Underground Utilities via
EMD Contact)
Duke Regional Poison
Control Center
Mr. Tom Morris
5068
(*2) l-800-672-1697
(910) 451-5068
Mr. Neal Paul
Mr. Tom Morris
l-800-672- 1697
Response Operator
National Response Center
I-800-424-8802
l-800-424-8802
Response Operator
CHEMTREC
I-800-424-9300
l-800-424-9300
Response Operator
ATSDR
l-404-639-0615
l-404-639-0615
Response Operator
(I)
The following prefixes apply when using on-base telephones:
*2 - Operator assisted calls including 800 numbers
*8 - Long distance calls
*9 - Local calls
8-3
Assembly for evacuated personnel
First aid for injured personnel
Decontamination
material
Communications
0
0
0
0
8.6
Emergencv
An emergency hospital route map (Figure 8- 1) and written directions to the hospital (Figure 8-2) will
be posted in the Baker Field Trailer and maintained in the Baker Field Vehicle. Personnel will be
informed of the location of the map and the directions to the hospital during the pre-entry briefing.
8.7
Emergencvt
This section provides information
emergency telephone numbers.
Emergency
For chemical
Medical
medical
facility
exposure incidents, the nearest public hospital is:
Name
Address
On-Base Telephone No.
Off-Base Telephone No.
service is available
Name
On-Base Telephone
No.
Off-Base Telephone
No.
Onslow County Memorial Hospital
3 17 Western Boulevard, Jacksonville, NC
(*9) 577-2240
[(*9) 577-2245 - Information]
577-2240
577-2245 - Information]
from:
Naval Ambulance Service or the City of Jacksonville
911 for Naval Ambulance Service or (*9) 455-9119
City of Jacksonville
911 or 455-9119
Contact will be made with emergency personnel prior to the start of activities
8.8
and corresponding
Services
and nonchemical
Local ambulance
on the nearest emergency
for
(see Section 8.2).
Injuries
If injuries are not serious or life threatening, affected personnel may be transported by other site
personnel to the local medical facility, if necessary. Emergency medical response personnel will
be contacted in the event of serious or multiple injuries. Medical personnel will be provided with
all available information regarding the nature of the incident, chemicals involved, etc. Instances
requiring treatment beyond “first aid” will be handled at appropriate facilities and reported to the
Project Manager and PHSO within 24 hours.
There will be a minimum of two persons during each phase of field activities that will be trained in
standard first aid and adult CPR. These personnel will also be familiar with Baker’s program for
potential exposure to bloodborne pathogens as outlined in the Baker Safety SOPS in Attachment A.
Subcontractors will be responsible for securing proper medical attention for their employees. Baker
may assist the subcontractor as necessary.
8-4
FIGURE
DIRECTIONS
S- 2
TO HOSPITAL
Directions to Onslow County Memorial Hospital are as follows:
1.
Proceed north on HoIcomb Boulevard until intersecting with Lejeune Boulevard
(Route 24).
2.
Travel west on Route 24 until intersecting with Western Boulevard.
3.
Turn right onto Western Boulevard and proceed along Western Boulevard until the
fifth stop light.
4.
Hospital is on left hand side.
5.
Follow directions to emergency room entrance.
8-6
8.8.1
Physical
Injury
If an employee working in a contaminated area is physically injured, first aid procedures are to be
followed.
If the employee can be moved, he/she will be taken to the edge of the work area and
decontaminated,
if necessary (refer to Section 8.9). Depending on the severity of the injury,
emergency medical response from the Naval Clinic personnel may be sought to stabilize victim for
transport to public hospitals. Emergency first aid may be administered by Baker personnel prior to
transporting to an awaiting ambulance or to a local emergency medical facility, as appropriate.
8.8.2
Chemical
Injury
If the injury to a worker is chemical
procedures are to be instituted:
0
in nature (e.g., direct contact/exposure),
first aid
Eye ExDosure - If contaminated solid or liquid gets into the eyes, wash the eyes
immediately at the 15-minute emergency eyewash station (or with the personal eye
wash bottle when an eye wash station is not immediately
available).
Obtain
medical attention immediately.
NOTE:
Contact lenses will notbe
while working at any site.
0
Skin Exoosure - If contaminated solid or liquid gets on the skin, promptly wash the
contaminated
skin using soap or mild detergent and water. If solids or liquids
penetrate through the clothing, remove the clothing immediately and wash the skin
using soap or mild detergent and water. Obtain medical attention immediately.
0
Swallowing: - If contaminated solid or liquid has been swallowed, immediately
contact the Duke RePional Poison Control Center at (800) 672-l 697. Do not induce
vomiting in an unconscious person. Obtain medical attention as directed by the
Poison Control Center.
0
Breathing - If a person has difficulty breathing, move the exposed person to fresh
air at once. If breathing is not evident, check for pulse and perform appropriate first
aid, either rescue breathing or CPR, depending on the condition.
Obtain medical
attention immediately.
Procedures to follow in the event of a chemical
8.8.3
the following
Snakebite
exposure are included
in Attachment
C.
Injury
In the event of a snakebite injury, the following
procedures will be followed.
Look for signs and symptoms such as the characteristic appearance of two small holes, usually about
a half inch apart, with surrounding discoloration, swelling, and pain. Systemic signs (which may
or may not occur) include weakness, sweating, faintness, and signs of shock.
8-7
Provide treatment as follows:
8.8.4
1.
Calm the victim and keep affected area still.
2.
Contact ambulance if you cannot provide victim with transportation to the nearest
hospital.
3.
Wash the wound.
4.
Keep the affected area below the level of the heart if bite is on the arm or leg.
5.
Treat for shock.
6.
Monitor airway, breathing, and circulation.
7.
8.
Obtain physical description of snake, if possible.
Provide the emergency medical responder (either the ambulance attendant or the
emergency room at the hospital) with all pertinent information such as how long
ago the bite occurred, the type of snake (if known), any known allergic conditions
(if known), etc.
9.
Inform the SHSO as soon as possible.
Spider Bite Injury
The emergency treatment for the black widow spider bite is basic life support. Sometimes the
individual is not even aware of having been bitten, or where. Apply cold to the site of the bite if it
can be identified. There is a specific antivenin for this spider bite that must be administered by a
physician. It is particularly important to identify the spider, and bring it in, if you can.
The emergency treatment for the brown recluse spider is similar to that for the black widow spider
except that these bites need local surgical treatment and these patients should be brought to the
hospital. If possible, identification of the spider should be carried out.
8-8
8.9
Em
_
r
_
In the event of a medical emergency, patients are to be adequately decontaminated
before transfer
(if possible) to prevent contamination
of the medical transport vehicle and medical facility.
Emergency personnel decontamination
will include the following, depending on the level of
protection.*
Level Di
Level D
Equipment drop
Tape, boot, and glove removal
0 Coverall removal
l
l
l
l
l
l
Equipment drop
Tape, outer boot, and glove
removal
Coverall removal/ disposal
Inner glove removal/ disposal
Level C
l
l
l
l
l
*
Equipment drop
Tape, outer boot, and glove
removal
Coverall removal/ disposal
Respirator removal
Inner glove removal/ disposal
If circumstances dictate that contaminated clothing cannot be readily removed, then remove
gross contamination
and wrap injured personnel with clean garments/blankets
to avoid
contaminating
other personnel or transporting equipment.
All emergency personnel are to be
immediately
informed of the injured person’s condition, potential contaminants, and provided
with all pertinent chemical data.
If necessary, one of the site personnel equipped with appropriate PPE may accompany
worker and perform decontamination
with supervision of medical personnel.
8.10
.
P em On al ProtectIon
PPE available
0
0
0
l
0
0
0
and First Aid Eauipment
for emergency response will include the following:
Polyvinyl chloride boots
[email protected] suits
[email protected] suits, polyethylene coated and uncoated
Nitrile gloves (inner and outer)
Neoprene and Nitrile Gloves (outer)
Face shields and goggles
SCBA
PPE and first aid equipment
Field Trailer).
Emergency
the injured
will be available in the support zone (i.e., Baker Field Vehicle or Baker
and first aid equipment
can be found at the following
Fire Extinguisher:
First aid kit:
Personal eye wash bottle:
Air Horn:
Portable 15-minute Emergency
Eye Wash Station:
locations:
chicle
* ak F’
F’
Baker Field Trailer and Baker Field Vehicle
With Personnel
2 a
ih
r
Exposure
8-9
8.11
Notification
.
.
If the Emergency Coordinator determines that the site has an uncontrolled sttuation such as a spill,
tire, or explosion, that could threaten human health or the environment,
the ioordinator
will
immediately
call the Navy On-Scene Coordinator (Fire Chief), the Activity Contact, the Project
Manager, and the NTR as soon as possible. The notification report will include:
a
Description of incident (e.g., release, fire).
Name and telephone number of individual reporting the emergency.
Location of incident.
Name and quantity of material (s) involved (if known).
The extent of injuries and number of casualties.
The possible hazards to human health or the environment
and recommended
cleanup procedures.
Assistance that is requested.
Bazard
Assessment
0
0
0
0
0
0
8.12
The Emergency Coordinator will assess possible hazards to human health or the environment
may result from an uncontrolled situation, to the best of the individual’s
abilities, incorporating
following steps, as appropriate.
that
the
0
Assess the immediate
need to protect human health and safety.
0
Identify the materials involved in the incident including
pathways and the quantities of materials involved.
0
Inform appropriate personnel, as identified in Section 8.11, who will determine if
release of material(s) meets USEPA requirements for reportable quantities for spills
under the RCRA or CERCLA.
exposure and/or release
This assessment may consider both the direct and indirect effects of the chemical release, fire,
explosion, or severe weather conditions (e.g., the effects of any toxic, irritating, or asphyxiating
gases that are liberated).
8.13
Security
During activation of these Emergency Procedures, the Emergency Coordinator or his/her designated
representative will control access to the site and maintain an incident log until the appropriate
personnel, such as the Navy On-Scene Commander, arrives and takes control. The incident log will
include:
0
l
0
0
Activities that have occurred since the incident was first reported.
Tasks currently being performed and where.
Rescue and response equipment used.
Protective equipment being used.
S-10
8.14
Emergencv
This section outlines
emergency.
Personnel
Injury
the emergency
in the Work
alerting
procedures
according
to the location
and type of
Zone:
0
Initiate a verbal warning or one long airhom blast and move all unaffected site
personnel to the support zone (for Level D/D+) or the CRZ (for Level C or higher).
0
Send the rescue team into the Work Zone (if required) to remove the injured person
to the hotline.
0
Have the SHSO and/or Site Manager evaluate the nature of the injury and assure
that the affected person is decontaminated
according to Section 8.9.
0
If required, contact an ambulance
and/or the designated medical
facility.
In all situations when an on-site emergency results in evacuation of the Work Zone, personnel shall
not reenter until:
The
The
The
Site
The
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Personnel
Injury
conditions resulting in the emergency have been corrected.
hazards have been reassessed.
HASP has been reviewed and, if appropriate, modified.
personnel have been briefed on any changes in the HASP.
SHSO and/or Site Manager has authorized the re-entry.
in the Support
Zone:
0
The Site Manager and SHSO will assess the nature of the injury; if the cause of the
injury or loss of the injured person does not affect the performance of other site
personnel, operations may continue.
0
If the injury increases the risk to others, a verbal warning or one long airhom blast
shall be sounded and all remaining site personnel will move to the command post
for further instructions.
0
Activities
on site will stop until the added risk is mitigated.
Fire/Explosion:
0
Initiate a verbal warning or one long airhom blast and move all site personnel to the
support zone (for Level D/D+) or the CRZ (for Level C or higher).
0
Alert the fire and security departments and move all nonessential
Baker Command Post to await further instructions.
0
Activities
will stop until the added risk is mitigated.
8-11
personnel to the
Personal
Protective
Failure:
0
If any site worker experiences difficulty, failure, or alteration of protective
equipment that affects the protection factor, that person and his/her buddy shall
immediately ceasework activities, leave the Work Zone, and repair or replace the
defective equipment,
0
Reentry will not be permitted until the equipment has been repaired or replaced.
Other Equipment
0
8.15
Equipment
Failure:
If any other equipment on site fails to operate properly, the Field Team Leader shall
notify the Site Manager and SHSO to determine the effect of this failure on site
operations. If the failure affects the safety of site personnel, work with the
equipment will ceaseuntil the situation is evaluated and appropriate actions taken.
Trainin?
Site personnel will read the details in the Emergency Proceduresprior to the pre-entry briefing. The
Emergency Procedures will be reviewed by site personnel during the pre-entry briefing.
8.16
Spill Containment
Procedures
In the event that a small (less than the reportable quantity), easily-controlled spill of hazardous
substances (e.g., gasoline, oil, etc.) occurs during the implementation of field activities, spill
containment will be utilized to prevent the additional migration of contaminants through the site
area. Large, uncontrolled spills will be handled by qualified response organizations under the
direction of qualified Base personnel and/or Navy On-Scene Commander. Any release to soils or
surface waters equaling or exceeding the reportable quantities under the Comprehensive
Environmental Response,Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or the USEPA Clean Water
Act will be reported to the EMD Contact who in turn will report it to the appropriate authorities.
Specific spill containment procedures will be dependent on the type of materials spilled and the type
of environment affected. Potential spill containment procedures may include diking with absorbent
material/pads, then removal or containment of the contaminated materials. Spill containment
materials will be located within close proximity to the storage area of the hazardous substances in
a manner such that the pathway remains accessible and free of obstructions. Spill containment
materials available on site may include:
0
0
0
0
Vermiculite
Ground corn cobs
Dirt or sand
Shovel
8-12
9.0
TRAINING
REQUIREMENTS
Training requirements for site personnel are outlined in the sections below.
9.1
General
All Baker employees, subcontractors, or other personnel entering the site will need to have received
training in compliance with the OSHA Standard 29CFR 1910.120. Baker employees engaged in
field activities which potentially expose workers to hazardous substancesreceive a minimum of
40 hours of instruction off site, and a minimum of three days actual field experience under the
direct supervision of a trained, experienced supervisor. Key points of the 40-hour training include
field demonstrations, respiratory fit testing and training, risk assessment,toxicology, chemical
reactivity, use of monitoring equipment, downrange work procedures, site safety procedures, levels
of protection, protective clothing, decontamination, and practical field exercises (e.g., donning,
doffing, and working in personal protective ensemblesfor personal protection Levels A, B, and C).
In addition to the initial 40-hour training program, Baker requires site employees to receive an
annual 8-hour refresher training course on the items specified by the 29 CFR 1910.120 standard.
The general purpose of the 8-hour refresher is to ensure that personnel retain the knowledge
necessaryto be adequately protected and stay current with proper site health and safety procedures.
Baker also requires that personnel involved with on-site employee supervision receive, in addition
to 40 hours initial training and three days of supervised field experience, at least eight additional
hours of specialized training at the time of job assignment. Training topics include, but are not
limited to, the employer’s safety and health program and the associatedemployee training program,
personal protective equipment program, spill containment program, and health hazard monitoring
procedures and techniques. The 8-hour supervisory training is required to ensure that supervisors
have the knowledge necessaryto understand and use the various Health and Safety Programs and
to implement the elements of the HASP. Table 9-l provides the appropriate OSHA Training
History for Baker Project Personnel.
9.2
Site-SDecific
Training
Site-specific training, as discussedin Section 1.3, will consist of an initial health and safety briefing
on the following information:
0
Names of individuals responsible for site health and safety and methods of
communicating safety and health concerns.
0
Roles and responsibilities of site personnel.
0
Site-specific health and safety hazards.
0
Use of PPE.
0
Work practices by which employees can minimize risk.
0
Safe use of equipment on site.
9-1
TABLE 9-l
OSHA TRAINING
Ronald Krivan
OF BAKER PROJECT
PERSONNEL*
Title/Role
Personnel
Matthew Bartman
HISTORY
l
l
Training
Project Manager
Project Health and Safety Officer
0
0
l
0
0
0
Status
40-hr. training completed:
Supervisory training:
8-hr. refresher completed:
First Aid Training:
CPR Training:
Medical surveillance:
03189
09/91
OS/96
40-hr. training completed:
Supervisory training:
8-hr. refresher completed:
First Aid Training:
CPR Training:
Medical surveillance:
10/91
09191
03196
12196
12193
05195
NA
NA
05195
To be Determined
l
Site Manager
40-hr. training completed:
Supervisory training:
S-lx. refresher completed:
First Aid Training:
CPR Training:
Medical surveillance:
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
To be Determined
l
Site Health and Safety Officer
40-hr. training completed:
Supervisory training:
8- hr. refresher completed:
First Aid Training:
CPR Training:
Medical surveillance:
NA
NA
NA.
NA
NA
NA
* Training and medical surveillance documentation for Baker and subcontractor personnel will be maintained at the Command Post.
NA - Not Applicable
0
Recognition of symptoms and signs of exposure to hazardous materials.
l
Site control measures.
0
Decontamination procedures.
0
Emergency procedures.
The SHSO will conduct the initial site-specific training prior to the initiation of field activities for
each new area under investigation.
9-3
10.0
MEDICAL
10.1
General
SURVEILLANCE
REQUIREMENTS
All personnel who may be exposed to materials having potentially adverse and deleterious health
effects, obtain medical clearance from Baker’s Board Certified Occupational Health Physician in
accordance with 29 CFR 1910.120(f) prior to entry onto any site. Baker’s corporate medical
surveillance program establishesa medical baseline and monitors for symptoms of overexposure for
individuals who participate in Preliminary Assessments,Site Inspections, Remedial Investigations,
Feasibility Studies, and construction-phase services at sites covered by the Department of Labor,
OSHA, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard, 29 CFR 1910.120. The
program will include a medical and work history and is intended to determine the individual’s
capability for performing on-site work, including wearing chemical protective clothing and
respiratory protective equipment in a thermally-stressed environment.
All Baker employees that will be engaged in site activities covered by the 29 CFR 1910.120 standard
receive a Group III physical examination by an occupational health physician who has been provided
information on the individual’s site activities and exposure or anticipated exposure levels. This
exam is received initially upon hire, then once every 12 months thereafter. More frequent medical
examinations, consultations, and/or laboratory testing will be provided if the board-certified
occupational health physician determines that an increased frequency of examination is required.
A complete Group III medical exam includes parameters such as height, weight, vision, temperature,
blood pressure, and a complete review of occupational and medical histories. Other tests in a Group
III exam include chest x-rays, electrocardiogram, spirometry, urinalysis, and blood tests. Table 10-I
describes the medical surveillance testing parameters performed annually on Baker employees. The
need for additional monitoring depending on site conditions will be evaluated on a case-by-case
basis.
10.2
Site SDeciiic
Prior to entry onto the site, all personnel, including subcontractors, will be required to provide
medical clearance to the SHSO from their company physician in accordance with 29 CFR
1910.120(f), stating that they are physically capable of performing the activities required of them.
The need for additional monitoring, dependent on information obtained during the site
characterization, will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. However, in the event that site
employees are injured, receive a health impairment, develop signs or symptoms which may have
resulted from exposure to hazardous substances resulting from an emergency incident, or are
exposed during an emergency incident to hazardous substancesat concentrations that are or may be
above the permissible exposure limits or the published exposure levels without the necessary
personal protective equipment being used, medical examinations and/or consultations shall be
performed according to the following schedule:
1.
As soon as possible following the emergency incident or development of signs or
symptoms.
2.
At additional times, if the examining physician determines that follow-up
examinations or consultations are medically necessary.
10-l
TABLE
MEDICAL
SURVEILLANCE
lo- 1
TESTING
PARAMETERS*
Group II - Individuals Occasionally in the Field (lo- 30 days/year)
0
0
0
l
0
0
0
Medical History (Physical Exam)
Eye Exam
EKG (baseline and for individuals over 40 years of age)
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 5 years)
Spirometry
CBC with differential
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Group III - Individuals Frequently in the Field (>30 days/year)
0
a
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Medical History (Physical Exam)
Eye Exam
EKG (baseline then annually for individuals over 40 years of age)
Audiometry
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 3 years)
Spirometry
CBC with differential
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Urinalysis (glucose scan)
Specific Blood and Urine Tests (dependent on field exposure)**
Group III with Asbestos - Individuals frequently in the field whom also work with asbestos
0
*
**
Group III testing with the Asbestos Medical Questionnaire w/Pulmonary Function
Test (FVC& and FEV,,J
The Board-Certified Occupational Health Physician has the right to reduce or expand the
medical monitoring on an annual basis as he/she deems necessary.
To be performed for individuals identified by the attending physician as being chronically
exposed to organic compounds.
10-2
11.0
HEALTH
AND SAFETY PLAN APPROVAL
This HASP has been reviewed by the following personnel prior to submission to LANTDIV.
Matthew Bartman
Name (print)
Proiect ManaN
Title (print)
Signature
Ronald Krivan
Name (print)
PHSO
Title (print)
Signature
11-l
12.0
DECLARATION
OF HEALTH
AND SAFETY PLAN REVIEW*
All site personnel indicated below have reviewed and are familiar
for Operable Unit No. 15 (Site 88) MCB Camp Lejeune.
(Name-Print)
(Compw)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
Gwv)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
Wmrw9
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
Www)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
Wwwl
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Compw)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date/Time)
*
with this Health and Safety Plan
This page is to be reproduced to accommodate the numbers of personnel who receive training
prior to performing Activities or visiting a site, and is to remain in the Baker Field Trailer (or
Baker Field Vehicle in the absence of a trailer) until demobilization.
Page --
of
12-1
SAFETY
ATTACHMENT
A
BAKER ENVIRONMENTAL,
INC.
STANDARD
OPERATING
PROCEDURES
ATTACHMENT
A
BAKER ENVIRONMENTAL,
INC.
SAFETY STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
Confined
2.0
Respiratory
3.0
Care and Cleaning
4.0
Bloodborne
5.0
Heat Stress
6.0
Cold Stress
7.0
Safe Boat Operations*
8.0
Cutting and Welding
* Not Applicable
Space Entry Program*
Protection
Program
of Personal Protective
Pathogens
Equipment
Revised:
2.0 - RESPIRATORY
PROTECTION
12/l/94
PROGRAM
This Respiratory Protection Program presents the elements necessary for administering a successful
program. Attached at the end of this program is a copy of the following Baker Environmental,
Inc.
(Baker) forms:
0
0
0
2.1
Qualitative Respirator Fit Test Record
Air- Supplying Respirator Inspection Form
Air-Purifying
Respirator Inspection Form
PURPOSE
The purpose of the Baker Respiratory Protection Program is to govern the selection and use of
respiratory protection by Baker personnel. This program is also designed to meet requirements of
the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) standards 29 CFR 1910.134 and
1926.103, “Respiratory Protection.”
2.2
SCOPE
This program applies to Baker SRN personnel including temporarily-assigned
SRI and SII personnel
who may be involved with potential respiratory hazards as part of their job duties. This program
outlines the procedures to follow when respiratory equipment is required.
2.3
RESPONSIEHLITY
Baker provides the necessary respiratory equipment to protect the safety and health of each Baker
employee.
The Baker SRN Project Health and Safety Officer (PHSO) and Project Manager are
responsible for identifying the need for this Respiratory Protection Program at project sites. The
Baker Site Health and Safety Offtcer (SHSO) and Site Manager are responsible for implementing
and administering the Respiratory Protection Program in the field. Baker employees are to use and
maintain the respiratory protection provided in accordance with training received and instructions
outlined in this program.
2.4
HAZARD ASSESSMENT
The key elements of a respiratory protection program must start with an assessment of the inhalation
and ingestion hazards present in the work area. Because Baker’s services involve a variety of
environmental
and industrial hygiene studies, it is not practical to identify all possible hazards to
which all employees could be exposed within the scope of this document. Therefore, it is essential
that a task specific assessment be conducted prior to the initiation of any activities on a given
project. This task specific assessment shall be part of the site-specific Health and Safety Plan
(HASP).
After a task-specific
assessment is completed and it is determined that there is a potential for
airborne exposure concentrations to exceed the recommended limits, engineering and administrative
controls should be implemented.
If the exposure cannot be reduced, or it is not feasible to reduce
Rev.:
12194
the airborne exposure below the recommended
and/or SHSO on the basis of:
limits,
-.
respirators will be selected by the PHSO
Toxicity
Maximum expected concentration
Oxygen levels
Warning properties of the substance(s) involved
Sorbent limitations
Facepiece fit
Mobility requirements
Type of use (routine, escape, or emergency entry)
Possibility of ingestion of toxic materials
Respirator attributes
2.5
TRAINING
Each respirator wearer shall be given training,
explanations and discussions of:
by a qualified
individual,
which will include
Opportunity to wear respiratory protection in an uncontaminated
environment.
Respirator fit testing (qualitative)
The respiratory hazard(s) and what may occur if the respirator is not used properly.
The reasons for selecting a particular type of respirator.
The function, capabilities, and limitations of the selected respirator.
The method of donning the respirator and checking its fit and operation.
The proper wearing of the respirator.
Respirator maintenance, repair, and cleaning.
Recognizing and handling emergency situations.
Employees who have attended the 40-hour training in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.120
(HAZWOPER)
will be provided with the basic information necessary to comply with the OSHA
training requirements and will only need to attend a supplementary session provided by qualified
Baker personnel. The annual HAZWOPER
S-hour refresher will serve to reinforce these issues on
an annual basis. Records of the training and fit-testing
will be maintained for a minimum
of
30 years following termination of employment for each employee.
2.6
TYPES
OF RESPIRATORS
Baker purchases and provides, as necessary, the following
respirators:
0
North half- face (Model 7700) and full- face (Model 7600) air-purifying
l
North positive pressure 30-minute
(Model 800)
Self- Contained Breathing
0
North positive pressure supplied
cylinders (Model SSSOO).
airline
0
MSA Ultra Twin full-face
respirators
respirator (Model
respirators
Apparatus (SCBAs)
with 5-minute
escape air
480263)
Rev.:
12/94
w
0
MSA Comfo II half- face respirator (Model 479529)
Only respiratory equipment certified by the appropriate approval agencies (e.g., NIOSH, MSHA)
according to Title 30, Part II of the Code of Federal Regulations, will be distributed to Baker
employees. All Baker employees who regularly perform tasks requiring respiratory protection will
be issued their own half-face and/or full-face respirator, provided the employee can achieve a
proper fit and is medically capable of wearing the equipment.
Because 30-minute SCBAs, positive pressure supplied airline respirators, and 5-minute escape air
cylinders are used less frequently, this equipment will be distributed on an as-needed basis.
2.7
AIR
QUALITY
Compressed air used for respiration shall be of high purity. Breathing air shall meet at least the
requirements of the specification for Grade D Breathing Air (or higher) as described in Compressed
Gas Association Commodity Specification G-7.1- 1966. Breathing air may be supplied to
respirators from cylinders; oxygen must never be used with air- line respirators.
Air cylinders shall be tested and maintained as prescribed in the Shipping Container Specification
Regulations of the Department of Transportation (49 CFR Part 178). Air- line couplings shall be
incompatible with outlets for other gas systems to prevent inadvertent servicing of air-line
respirators with nonrespirable gases or oxygen.
Breathing gas containers (air cylinders) shall be marked in accordance with American National
Standard Method of marking Portable Compressed Gas Containers to Identify the Material
Contained, A48 l- 1954; Federal Specification BB- A- 1034a, June 2 1, 1968, Air, Compressed for
Breathing Purposes; or Interim Federal Specification GG-B00675b, April 27, 1965, Breathing
.
Apparatus, Self- Contained.
Breathing air, as supplied by air compressors, shall be of high purity and meet the requirements of
the specification for Grade D Breathing air (or higher) as described in Compressed Gas Association
Commodity Specification G-7.1 - 1966.
The compressor for supplying air shall be equipped with necessary safety and standby devices. A
breathing air-type compressor shall be used. Compressors shall be constructed and situated so as
to avoid entry of contaminated air into the system and suitable in-line air-purifying sorbent beds
and filters installed to further assurebreathing air quality. A receiver of sufficient capacity to enable
the respirator wearer to escapefrom a contaminated atmosphere in the event of compressor failure,
and alarms to indicate compressor failure and overheating shall be installed in the system. If an
oil- lubricated compressor is used, it shall have a high- temperature or carbon monoxide alarm, or
both. If only a high-temperature alarm is used, the air from the compressor shall be frequently
tested for carbon monoxide to insure that it meets the specifications outlined above.
2.8
CLEANING
AND
MAINTENANCE
Respiratory equipment that is used on an as-needed basis shall be maintained by qualified
personnel. This equipment shall be cleaned/sanitized, then rinsed and air-dried, after each use.
Rev. : 12194
Respiratory equipment that has been issued to an employee shall be cleaned/sanitized then rinsed
and air-dried by the wearer, (specified by OSI-IA in 29 CFR 1910.134) which ensures that it will
be maintained in clean and good operating condition. Inspections shall be conducted on a regular
basis during usage and prior to each project requiring the potential usage of the equipment.
All respirators shall be stored in a plastic bag within a cool/dry location, in a manner that will protect
them against dust, sunlight, heat, extreme cold, excessive moisture, or damaging chemicals. They
shall be stored to prevent distortion of rubber or other elastomer parts. Cartridges will not be stored
while attached to an air-purifying respirator at anytime.
Parts replacement and repairs shall be performed only by appropriate personnel. Equipment
requiring repairs shall be reported to appropriate Baker personnel. Examples of inspection forms
are included at the end of this text.
2.9
INSPECTIONS
At the time of cleaning, and before and after each use, respirators will be inspected. Deteriorated
components will be replaced before the respirator is placed back into service, or the respirator will
be replaced. Repair components must be obtained from the manufacturer of the respirator to
maintain the NIOSH certification. Emergency-use respirators and self- contained breathing
apparatuses (SCBAs) will be inspected after each use or at a minimum, once a month. Sample
inspection forms for both air-purifying respirators and air supplying respirators are attached. These
forms are required to be completed each time a respirator is inspected. However, during field
projects in which a field logbook is in use, personnel may enter the appropriate information into their
field logbook as an alternative to the inspection form. A list of the items to be covered during an
inspection are as follows:
0
Air- Purifying Respirator (full or half- face)
.
Face Piece
-Clean and sanitized?
-Cracks, tears or holes absent?
-Proper shape and flexibility retained?
-Air- purifying element holders intact?
-Stored properly, free from heat, dirt, and sunlight?
F
Headstraps or Headbands
-Signs of wear or tears?
-Buckles function properly?
b
0
Respirator Interior
-Foreign material under valve seat?
-Cracks or tears in valves/valve bodies?
-Valve covers/bodies installed properly?
Supplied Air Respirators
.
Cylinder undamaged?
.
Facepiece and hoses undamaged?
.
Connections undamaged?
Rev.: 12194
Apparatus complete?
Facemask cleaned and sanitized?
Hoses and connections cleaned?
b
b
b
Note: The date and the initials of the qualified individual performing the inspection must be entered
into the field logbook.
2.10
FIT-TESTING
Each respirator wearer shall be provided with a respirator that can properly form a secure
face- to-mask seal. Each wearer shall be fit- tested prior to issuance of the respirator using either
an irritant smoke or odorous vapor, or other suitable test agent (see example of form at end of text).
Retesting shall be performed, at a minimum, on an annual basis or if a different model respirator,
other than the model the wearer was previously fit-tested for, is to be used. Air-purifying
respirators fit-tested qualitatively will be assigned a protection factor of 10 (APF = 10). A copy of
Baker’s Fit-Test Form is attached.
Facial hair, which interferes with the normally effective face to mask seal, is prohibited. Each
respirator wearer shall be required to check the seal of the respirator by negative and positive
pressure checks prior to entering a harmful atmosphere.
2.11
MEDICAL
SURVEILLANCE
Personnel who are or may be assigned to tasks requiring use of respirators shall participate in a
medical surveillance program on an annual basis. The medical surveillance program shall include,
but may not be limited to, a history of respiratory disease, work history, a physical exam, and
spirometry conducted by the company’s physician and at the expense of the company. These
parameters are conducted prior to fit testing an employee on a negative pressure respirator. Test
parameters included in Baker’s medical surveillance program are in each site- specific HASP.
2.12
LIMITATIONS
Wearing any respirator, alone or in conjunction with other types of protective equipment, will
impose some physiological stress on the wearer. Therefore, selection of respiratory protective
devices will be based on the breathing resistance, weight of the respirator, the type and amount of
protection needed as well as the individual’s tolerance of the given device. Additional concerns
regarding the limitations of different types of PPE and the monitoring requirements for heat
stress/strain will be addressed in the “Heat Stress” SOP.
2.13
SUBCONTRACTOR
REQUIREMENTS
In compliance with Baker’s respiratory protection program, all subcontractors under the direction
of Baker personnel will be expected to comply with pertinent sections of OSHA Standards 1910.134
and 1926.103. Additionally, the subcontractor will be required to:
0
Provide documentation that their employees have been fit-tested
air-purifying respirator the employee is expected to use.
on the
Rev.: 12194
a
Provide documentation
a respirator.
that their employees have been medically
certified to wear
Rev.:
12194
3.1
INTRODUCTION
The following procedures cover the care and cleaning of Levels D, D+, C, and B personal protective
equipment (PPE). Note: These are general procedures that apply to most situations and are not all
inclusive. Procedures are subject to change at the direction of the Site Health and Safety Officer
(SHSO).
3.2
INSPECTION
Proper inspection of personal protective equipment (PPE) features several sequences of inspection
depending on articles of PPE and its frequency of use as follows:
0
Inspection
and operational
0
Inspection
of PPE as it is issued to workers.
0
Inspection
after use or training,
0
Periodic
l
Periodic inspection
selected equipment,
inspection
testing of PPE received from the factory or distributor.
and prior to maintenance.
of stored equipment.
when a question arises concerning the appropriateness
or when problems with similar equipment arise.
of the
The primary inspection of PPE in use for activities at the site will occur prior to immediate use, will
be conducted by the user to ensure that the specific device or article has been checked out by the
user, and that the user is familiar with its use.
3.2.1
Chemical
Resistant
Suit (Levels D+ throwh
B)
0
Determine
if suit is the one specified in the Site Health and Safety Plan (HASP)
0
Before donning, inspect suit for holes or tears; check to see that zippers are operable
and look for signs of suit degradation.
0
When wearing, avoid contact with contaminated material where possible; be aware
of sharp objects that can tear suit; periodically look over suit to check for major rips
or tears.
0
While decontaminating,
remove gross excess of material from suit; remove suit so
that material does not contact inner suit; place clothing in properly labeled disposal
containers.
Rev.: 3194
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
Inner!Outer
Determine
0
Look for rips, tears, or degradation
direction of the SHSO.
Chemi&lv
Boots (Levels D+ through
if boots meet the specifications
Replace as necessary or at the
B)
Nondisposable
boots are to be examined on a daily basis before and after use.
Disposable boots should be examined prior to donning and while in use, and
disposed according to site procedures.
Safetv (Steel Toe and!or
IIard
l
Shank) Boots (Levels D through
Hats (Levels D throqh
B)
B)
Should be visually inspected before donning for fit, cracks, and overall condition.
(Levels D throwh
C>
Should be visually inspected before donning
overall condition. Replace as necessary.
Resnirators
Itearing
in the site HASP.
Examine daily for gouges, open seams, etc., anything that would lessen the integrity
of the boot. Replace as boot becomes worn.
Safety GlasseslGofgles
0
3.3
of material.
0
0
3.2.8
Resistant
in the site HASP.
Determine
0
3.2.7
if gloves meet the specifications
0
0
3.2.6
B)
l
l
3.2.5
Gloves (Levels D+ through
(Levels D+ through
for cracks, deteriorated
B).
Procedures for care of respiratory protective equipment
for Respiratory Protection.
Protection
parts, and
(Levels D through
are covered in Baker’s SOP
B)
Disposable - Replace daily, or as material becomes worn or dirty.
Reusable - Inspect before use, clean regularly, replace parts as necessary.
EQUIPMENT
CLEANING
General procedures for cleaning of equipment are listed below. Site-specific
concerns will be
addressed by the SHSO prior to and during site activities. Cleaning of respiratory equipment is
covered under the “Respiratory Protection Program” SOP.
3.3.1
Gross Phvsical
Removal
Remove large amounts of contaminated soil or sediment by scraping off with a tongue depressor or
other suitable instrument, then wipe off using a disposable wipe/paper towel.
Rev.: 3194
3.3.2
Physical/Chemical
Removal
Remove residual contamination’ with a soft- bristled, long- handled brush or equivalent using a
nonphosphate detergent solution.
3.3.3
Rinsing/Dilution
The detergent solution and residual contaminants will be rinsed with distilled/tap water using a
pressurized sprayer, a tub filled with clean wash water, or equivalent.
3.4
EQUIPMENT
STORAGE
Storage of PPE is an important aspect to the daily care and cleaning therefore, the following
considerations should be observed:
0
Different types of PPE shall be stored in a clean and dry environment, free from
elements that could damage PPE.
0
PPE shall be stored and labeled so that site personnel can readily select the
specified PPE.
0
Contaminated, nondisposable PPE shall be decontaminated before returning to the
storage area.
0
Contaminated, disposable PPE shall not be returned to the storage trailer, but
disposed according to the provisions identified in the Site Work Plans.
Rev.: 3194
4.0 - BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
(Safe Handling
of First Aid Incidents)
4.1
PURPOSE
The purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) Bloodborne Pathogens
Standard, Title 29 CFR Part 1910.1030, is to protect workers from bloodborne pathogens such as
the (HIV) and (HBV) by reducing or eliminating
workers’ exposure to blood and other potentially
infectious materials. Although HIV and HBV are specifically mentioned by OSHA, the standard
includes any bloodborne pathogen, such as Hepatitis C, malaria, and syphilis. The standard requires
the employer to develop a written exposure control plan that will reduce or eliminate employee
exposure, thus reducing their risk of infection.
The purpose of the Baker Environmental (Baker) exposure control plan is to minimize the possibility
of transmission of bloodborne pathogens in the workplace by establishing procedures for the safe
handling of first aid incidents that may expose personnel to blood or other potentially infectious
materials.
4.2
SCOPE
All Baker SRN personnel who may be exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials as
part of their job duties (e.g., those certified in Standard First Aid) are required to follow the
guidelines set forth in this SOP. The exposure control plan shall be reviewed and updated at least
annually, to reflect new or modified tasks and procedures that affect occupational exposure, and to
reflect new or revised employee positions with occupational exposure.
4.3
RESPONSIBILITY
The Baker Project Health and Safety Office (PHSO) and Project Manager are responsible for
providing support and administering
this exposure control plan as necessary, from the corporate
office. The Baker Site Health and Safety Officer and Site Manager are responsible for implementing
this exposure control plan at project sites for their employees.
4.4
DEFINITIONS
Bloodborne Pathogens - Pathogenic microorganisms
that may be present in human blood, having
the potential to cause disease in humans. Two examples of bloodborne pathogens include, hepatitis
B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency
virus (HIV).
Contaminated
- Means the presence or the reasonably
potentially infectious materials on an item or surface.
anticipated
presence of blood or other
Decontamination
- Physically or chemically removing, inactivating, or destroying bloodborne
pathogens on a surface or item to the point where they are no longer capable of transmitting
infectious particles, so that the surface or item is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.
Rev.:
9194
Exnosure Incrdm - A specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non- intact skin, or parenteral
contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that result from the performance of an
employee’s duties.
Occupaposure
- Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mouth, mucous membrane, or
parenteral contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials that may result from the
performance of an employee’s duties.
er Potentiallv Infectious Materials - Includes the following human body fluids: semen, vaginal
secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid,
amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood,
and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body
fluids; any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human; and HIV-containing cell
or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions;
and blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.
Parenteral - Piercing of the mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such events as
needlesticks, human bites, cuts, and abrasions.
Regulated Waste - OSHA defines a regulated waste as a liquid or semi-liquid blood or other
potentially infectious materials; contaminated items that would release blood or other potentially
infectious materials in a liquid stateif compressed;items caked with dried blood or other potentially
infectious materials that are capable of release of these materials during handling; contaminated
sharps; and pathological and microbiological wastes containing blood or other potentially infectious
materials.
4.5
PROCEDURES
FOR EXPOSURE
TO BLOODBORNE
PATHOGENS
The sections below will discuss the means by which Baker personnel can determine exposure
potential, modes of transmission, methods of compliance, medical monitoring, and post exposure
procedures.
4.5.1
ExDosure Determination
The exposure determination is based upon the job classifications with occupational exposure
potential, and the activities in which these exposures can occur, as follows.
Job Classifications
0
0
0
0
Site Manager/Site Safety and Health Officer
Environmental Scientists
Geologists
Other Baker Field Personnel
Rev.: 9194
Exposure
4.5.2
Activities
0
Response to first aid incidents involving site personnel
0
Decontamination of personnel, personal protective equipment, work surfaces, and
equipment potentially exposed to blood or other potentially infectious materials
&lodes of Virus Transwn
. .
in the Workulaa
Modes of virus transmission are similar for the viruses of concern. Primarily, virus transmission
occurs as the result of direct blood contact from percutaneous inoculation, contact with an open
wound, non-intact skin (e.g. chapped, abraded, or dermatitis), or mucous membranes to blood,
blood-contaminated body fluids, or concentrated virus. Protective measuresfor workers will focus
on preventing exposure to blood and other body fluids that can result from an injury or sudden
illness.
4.5.3
Methods
of Compliance
4.5.3.1
Universal
Precautions
The unpredictable and emergent nature of exposures likely to be encountered on a site may make
differentiation between hazardous body fluids and those that are not hazardous very difftcult. Thus,
all employees will observe “Universal Precautions” to prevent contact with blood or other potentially
infectious materials. These “Universal Precautions” stress that all blood or other potentially
infectious materials will be treated as if they are known to be infectious.
The universal precautions will include:
4.5.3.2
(1)
Cover the skin, especially open cuts, scrapes,skin rashes, or other broken skin.
(2)
Don’t touch objects that could be contaminated, such as blood-covered surfaces,
clothing or linens.
(3)
Cover mucous membranes (i.e., mouth, nose, and eyes).
(4)
Prevent direct contact with sharps, such as needles, scalpels, or broken glass that
could pierce or puncture your skin.
(5)
Clean and decontaminate surfaces, containers, and equipment that may have been
exposed to blood or other body fluids.
Standard
Work
Practices
Standard work practices are to be implemented at all times by all employees who may be exposed
to blood or other potentially infectious materials. Work practices are defined as specific policies or
procedures whose purpose is to reduce the potential for employee exposure to bloodborne pathogens.
Work practices for use by site personnel are described in the balance of this section.
Rev.: 9194
Personal HvPiene
All exposed employees will observe the following hygienic practices:
0
During or immediately after exposure to blood or other potentially infectious
materials; do not eat, drink, chew gum, chew tobacco, smoke, apply cosmetics,
balms or medications, or any other activity that increases the potential for
hand- to- mouth, mucous membrane, or skin contact.
0
Following exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials, personnel
will wash their hands and any other exposed skin with a disinfectant soap and water
after removal of chemical-protective gloves or other personal protective equipment
(PPE). This will be performed before eating, urinating, defecating, applying
make-up, smoking or undertaking any activity that may result in increased
potential for hand to mouth, mucous membrane, or skin contact.
Personal
Protective
Eauiument
The basic premise for wearing the appropriate PPE is that site personnel must be protected from
exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials. Appropriate PPE is available to all site
personnel.
Responders to a medical emergencies will have accessto the appropriate PPE. The PPE will be
present in the site trailer and field vehicles. The PPE should be used in accordance with the level
of exposure encountered. Minor lacerations or small amounts of blood do not merit the same extent
of PPE use as required for massive arterial bleeding. Management of the patient who is not
bleeding, and has no bloody body fluids, should not routinely require the use of PPE.
The following PPE will be present in each Baker Field Vehicle and/or the Baker Site Trailer.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Disposable chemical-protective gloves (i.e, nitrile or latex)
Resuscitation equipment*
Safety glasses,goggles, or faceshields
TyvekQ coveralls
*
Resuscitation Equipment - Because the risk of salivary transmission of infectious
disease during artificial ventilation of trauma victims, pocket mouth- to-mouth
resuscitation masks will be present in the first aid kits. The pocket
mouth-to-mouth resuscitation masks are designed to isolate response personnel
from contact with the victims’ blood and blood-contaminated saliva, respiratory
secretions, and vomitus.
Decontamination procedures will follow those outlined in each site HASP.
Handliw
Reswlated
Wastes
With the exception of contaminated sharps, all other regulated wastes must be placed in closable,
color- coded, labeled containers that prevent leakage of fluids. All applicable federal and state
regulations must be followed for transporting and disposing of the wastes.
Rev.: 9194
Training
and Education
All employees with the potential for occupational exposure will receive.initial
training on the safe
handling of first aid incidents during first aid/CPR Instruction, and subsequently during HASP
briefings. See Appendix A for the suggested Bloodborne Pathogens Training Outline.
4.5.4
Medical
Monitorin?
All Baker personnel will follow the guidelines established by Baker’s Board Certified
Health Physician in association with EMR, Inc.
4.5.5
Post-Exuosure
Procedures
and Follow-Up
Occupational
manapement
The following subsections presents the procedures to follow when a first aid incident occurs
involving the presence of blood or other potentially infectious material; specific steps need to be
taken to safeguard the health of Baker site personnel.
4.5.5.1
First Aid Incident
Report
If there is a reasonable cause to believe that a potential exposure to blood or other potentially
infectious materials has been experienced, the employee must complete the steps listed below.
These steps are required when non-HBV vaccinated first aid responders participate and regardless
of whether an actual “exposure incident” occurred.
1.
Immediately
notify the SHSO. The SHSO will determine
incident” occurred.
whether an “exposure
2.
Wash area of contamination
and remove contaminated
further contamination will occur.
3.
All parties involved will complete the Supervisors Incident Report Form and the
incident will be reported to Baker’s Human Resources office.
clothing
to ensure that no
Baker employees who render first aid where blood or other potentially infectious materials are
present must be seen by a designated EMR physician within 24 hours of the incident. The employee
must take a copy of the Supervisors Incident Report Form and a copy of OSHA Standard 19 10.1030
to the physician.
Employees who respond to first aid incidents involving the presence of blood or other potentially
infectious materials where the determination
was made that an “exposure incident” occurred, have
90 days following baseline blood level collection to decide if they wish to have their blood tested
for HIV.
Rev.: 9194
The confidential medical evaluation and follow-up will include:
1.
The circumstances of the exposure.
2.
If consent has been obtained testing of the source individual’s blood in order to
determine HIV and/or HBV infectivity. If consent is not obtained this will be
documented in writing.
3.
If consent has been obtained, the exposed employee’s blood will be tested.
The occupational health physician will provide the employer with a confidential written opinion that
includes verification that the employee has been informed of the results of the evaluation and also
includes a recommendation for further evaluation or treatment. A copy of this written opinion will
be provided within 15 days following the medical evaluation.
4.5.5.2
“Good
Samaritan”
Behavior
The OSHA standard does not cover “good samaritan” behavior. However, employees who provide
first aid as “good samaritans” should receive the same post incident evaluation either through an
EMR designated physician or their personal physician.
4.6
REFERENCES
OSHA Title 29 CFR Part 1910.1030
U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Joint Advisory Notice:
protection against occupational exposure to Hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus.
Federal Register 1987; 52:418 18-24.
Centers for Disease Control. Update on hepatitis B prevention. MMWR 1987; 36:353-360,366.
Centers for Disease Control. Update: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and human
immunodeficiency virus infection among health- care workers. MMWR 1988; 37:229-34, 239.
OSHA Instruction CPL 2-2.44, February 13, 1992, Enforcement Procedures for the Occupational
Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard.
Rev.: 9194
Appendix A
SUGGESTED BLOODBORNE
I.
Purpose of the training program
Overview: Bloodbome Pathogen Standard 29 CFR 19 10.1030
1.
Applicability
to Site Personnel
General requirements
2.
3.
Overview of Baker exposure control plan
Bloodborne Diseases
A.
B.
III.
OUTLINE
Introductioq
A.
B.
II.
PATHOGENS TRAINING
Types
Modes of Transmission
Baker Exuosure Control Plan
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
Purpose
Plan availability
Bloodborne pathogen hazard recognition steps
Concept of universal precautions
1.
2.
Blood and other potentially infectious materials
Potential exposure minimization
Work practices
1.
2.
Personal protective equipment
Hygienic practices
3.
Procedures for decontamination
1.
Personnel
2.
Personal protective equipment (PPE)
Tasks and procedures requiring PPE
;:
Location of PPE
C.
Disposal of PPE
Equipment
3.
4.
Work surfaces
Medical monitoring
Baker medical monitoring program
1.
Post exposure evaluation procedures
2.
First aid incident report
HBV and non- HBV vaccinated responders
it:
Exposure incidents (defined)
C.
Confidential medical evaluation
e.
Emergency Preparedness
1.
First aid kits
2.
Personal injury
Rev.:
9194
5.0 - HEAT STRESS
5.1
INTRODUCTION
Heat stress in the hazardous waste industry usually is a result of protective clothing decreasing
natural body ventilation, although it may occur at any time work is being performed at elevated
temperatures.
If the body’s physiological processes fail to maintain a normal body temperature
because of excessive heat, a number of physiological reactions can occur, ranging from mild (such
as fatigue, irritability,
anxiety, and decreased concentration, dexterity, or movement) to fatal.
5.2
CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS
The following heat stress causes and symptoms are provided for buddy monitoring purposes. Site
personnel must realize that monitoring the physical condition of fellow personnel in Levels D+
through B protective ensembles will be more difficult.
1.
Heat rash results from continuous
clothes. The condition
mild red rash.
2.
exposure to heat or humid air and chafing
decreases the ability to tolerate heat. Symptoms include a
Heat cramps are caused by heavy sweating and inadequate fluid intake. Symptoms
include muscle spasms and pain in the hands, feet, and abdomen.
3.
Heat exhaustion occurs when body organs attempt to keep the body cool, due to
inadequate fluid intake and personnel not acclimated
to the environment.
Symptoms include pale, cool, moist skin; heavy sweating; dizziness, headaches, and
vomiting.
4.
Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat stress.
It is a MEDICAL
EMERGENCY.
Symptoms are red, hot, &y skin; lack of perspiration; nausea;
dizziness and confusion; strong, rapid pulse rate; and coma.
The need to seek medical attention and the urgency in seeking medical attention depends on the
symptoms and the severity of the symptoms displayed by the affected individual.
If heat stroke is
noted or suspected, medical attention must be sought IMMEDIATELY.
Efforts should be taken to
cool the body to prevent serious injury or death.
5.3
PREVENTION
Because heat stress is one of the most common and potentially serious illnesses at hazardous waste
sites, regular monitoring
and other preventive measures are vital. Site workers must learn to
recognize and treat the various forms of heat stress. The best approach is preventive heat stress
management.
In general:
0
Monitor
for signs of heat stress.
Rev.:
3194
5.4
0
Fluid intake should be increased during rest schedules to prevent dehydration.
Drinking cool water (maintained at 50 to 60°F) is satisfactory when light sweating
occurs and temperatures are moderate to cool; however, diluted electrolyte
solutions (i.e., Gatorade, Sqwincher, or equivalent) must be used in addition to
water under one or all of the following conditions: continued or heavy sweating,
moderate to high ambient temperatures, or heavy work loads. The intake of coffee
during working hours is discouraged.
0
Acclimate workers to site work conditions by slowly increasing workloads (i.e., do
not begin site work activities with extremely demanding activities).
0
Use cooling devices to aid natural body ventilation. These devices, however, add
weight and their use should be balanced against worker efficiency. An example of
a cooling aid is a cooling vest that can be worn under clothing, but not against the
skin.
l
In extremely hot weather, conduct field activities in the early morning and evening.
0
Ensure that adequate shelter is available to protect personnel against heat that can
decreasephysical efficiency and increase the threat of heat stress. If possible, set
up the command post in a shaded area, and encourage breaks in shaded areas.
0
In hot weather, rotate shifts of workers wearing impervious clothing.
a
Good hygienic standards must be maintained by frequent changes of clothing and
showering. Clothing should be permitted to dry during rest periods. Persons who
notice skin problems should immediately consult the SHSO.
MONITORING
Provisions for monitoring for heat stresswill be determined by the SHSO and performed as outlined
below. Becausethe incidence of heat stressdepends on a variety of factors, all workers, even those
not wearing protective equipment, should be monitored.
5.4.1
Monitoring
for Permeable
Clothiny
For workers wearing permeable clothing (e.g., standard cotton or synthetic work clothes), follow
recommendations for monitoring requirements and suggested work/rest schedules in the current
American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists’ (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values for
Heat Stress. If the actual clothing work differs from the ACGIH standard ensemble in insulation
value and/or wind and vapor permeability, change the monitoring requirements and work/rest
schedules accordingly.
The guidelines to follow for workers above as determined by the SHSO are as follows:
1.
Increased awareness of heat stresssymptoms and buddy monitoring.
2.
Fluid intake discipline.
Rev.: 3194
3.
Self monitoring of urine output quantities to prevent dehydration.
4.
Attention to work-rest intervals.
5.
Calculate the Heat Exposure Threshold Limit Value (TLV) for work- rest intervals
using the following steps:
a.
Determine the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) Index using the
[email protected] Heat StressMonitor.
b.
Estimate the work load using the following guidelines:
.
Light work = sitting or standing to control machines, performing
(1)
light hand or arm work.
C.
(2)
Moderate work = walking about with moderated lifting and
pushing.
(3)
Heavy work = pick and shovel work.
Evaluate the calculations against the following Heat Exposure TLVs* in “C
or (“F).
Work - Rest Regimen
111
Continuous work
30.0 (86)
26.7 (80)
25.0 (77)
75% work - 25% rest, each hour
30.6 (87)
28.0 (82)
25.9 (78)
50% work - 50% rest, each hour
3 1.4 (89)
29.4 (85)
27.9 (82)
25% work - 75% rest, each hour
32.2 (90) 1 31.1 (88)
1 30.0 (86) 1
Special Considerations
a
Acclimatization - After approximately one to two weeks, workers should be
acclimated to their environment.
0
Fitness - Physically fit workers will adjust more readily to a change in
environment.
0
Medication - Some medications can predispose individuals to heat-induced
illnesses.
Rev.: 3194
54.2
Semipermeable/Impermeable
Clothing Monitoring
For workers wearing semipermeable or impermeable clothing encapsulating ensembles, the ACGIH
standard cannot be used. For these situations, workers should be monitored when the temperature
in the work area is above 70°F (21 “C).
To monitor the worker, use one or more of the following
0
methods:
Heart rate. Count the radial pulse during a 30-second
in the rest period.
period as early as possible
b
If the heart rate exceeds 110 beats per minute at the beginning of the rest
period, shorten the next work cycle by one-third and keep the rest period
the same.
.
If the heart rate still exceeds 110 beats per minute at the next rest period,
shorten the following work cycle by one-third.
Oral temperature.
Use a clinical thermometer (3 minutes under the tongue) or
similar device to measure the oral temperature at the end of the work period (before
drinking).
l
0
.
If oral temperature exceeds 99.6”F (37.6”C), shorten the next work cycle
by one- third without changing the rest period.
b
If oral temperatures still exceeds 99.6”F (37.6”C) at the beginning
next rest period, shorten the following work cycle by one- third.
.
Do not permit a worker to wear a semipermeable or impermeable
when his/her oral temperature exceeds 100.6”F (38.1”(Z).
of the
garment
Body water loss. Measure weight on a scale accurate to kO.25 pound at the
beginning and end of each work day to see if enough fluids are being taken to
prevent dehydration. Weights should be taken while the employee wears similar
clothing or preferably in underwear only. The body water loss should not exceed
1.5 percent total body weight loss in a work day.
Initially, the frequency of physiological monitoring depends on the air temperature adjusted for solar
radiation and the level of physical work. The length of work cycle will be governed by the
frequency of the required physiological monitoring.
5.5
CARING FOR HEAT-RELATED
To care for heat-related
ILLNESS
illness provide the following:
0
Remove victim from heat.
0
Loosen tight clothing.
Rev.:
3194
0
Apply cool, wet cloths to the skin.
0
Fan the victim.
0
If victim
0
Call for an ambulance or transport to hos$al if heat stroke is suspected, victim
refuses water, vomits, or starts to lose consciousness.
is conscious, give cool water to drink.
Rev.:
3194
6.0 - COLD
6.1
STRESS
INTRODUCTION
The potential exists for either frostbite or hypothermia to occur when conducting work activities in
an environment where air temperatures may fall below freezing or where wind-chill factors lower
air temperatures below freezing. A brief description of the exposure symptoms (for both
hypothermia and frostbite) and methods of prevention are listed in the sections below:
6.2
CAUSES
AND SYMPTOMS
The following cold stresscausesand symptoms are provided for buddy monitoring purposes. Site
personnel must realize that monitoring the physical condition of fellow personnel in Levels D+
through B protective ensembles will be more difticult.
6.2.1
Frostbite
Frostbite is a condition in which there is a freezing or partial freezing of some part of the body.
Individuals previously exposed to frostbite are more susceptible to contracting it again.
Vasoconstrictors, which include tobacco products, constrict blood vessels, and can accelerate
frostbite. The three stages of frostbite include: (1) frostnip- the beginnings of frostbite whereby
the skin begins to turn white; (2) superficial - similar to frostnip except the skin begins to turn
numb; and (3) deep - the affected area is frozen to the bone, cold, numb, and very hard.
DO NOT:
0
0
0
l
6.2.2
Rub the frostbitten part.
Use ice, snow, gasoline, or anything cold on the frostbitten area.
Use heat lamps or hot water bottles to rewarm the frostbitten area.
Place the frostbitten area near a hot stove.
Hypothermia
Hypothermia is a condition in which the body loses heat faster than it is produced. At a body
temperature of 95 “F, an average man is considered to be hypothermia. Vasodilators, which include
alcohol and drugs, allow the body to lose heat faster which can accelerate hypothermia, The five
stages of hypothermia include:
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
shivering
apathy, listlessness,or sleepiness
unconsciousness, glassy stare, slow pulse or slow respiratory rate
freezing of the extremities
death
The need to seek medical attention and the urgency in seeking medical attention depends on the
symptoms and the severity of the symptoms displayed by the affected individual. If the latent
Rev.: 9194
conditions of hypothermia or frostbite are noted or suspected; medical
IMMEDIATELY
to prevent permanent injury or death.
6.3
from occurring have personnel:
Dress in a minimum
0
(1)
(2)
(3)
of three layers:
a skin layer to absorb moisture and keep skin dry
an insulating layer
an outer layer of nylon/wind- breaking material or chemical-protective
layer
0
Avoid touching cold surfaces (especially
skin surfaces.
l
Keep active, use warm and dry shelter areas during rest cycles; use wind breaks
whenever possible.
0
Maintain
drinks.
0
Avoid alcohol and medications
reduces tolerance to cold.
CARING
The following
6.5
must be sought
PREVENTION
To prevent conditions
6.4
attention
body fluids by consuming
FOR COLD-RELATED
lists the genera1 guidelines
metal) with bare skin, minimize
warm, sweet, caffeine-free,
that interfere
with normal
exposed
non-alcoholic
body regulation
or
ILLNESS
to care for cold-related
injuries:
0
Start by treating any life- threatening
problems.
0
Call the local emergency
hospital.
0
Move the victim to a warm place, if possible.
0
Remove any wet clothing
0
Warm the victim slowly by wrapping in blankets or putting on dry clothing.
number for help or transport the victim
to the nearest
and dry the victim.
MONITORING
In cold weather, monitor the outdoor temperature and wind speed to determine wind chill conditions,
with work periods adjusted accordingly.
The following table details the wind chill effects and
relative danger of combined cold and wind conditions. It is important to note that the wearing of
PPE in cold environments may introduce the possibility of heat stress; therefore, symptoms of heat
stress should also be considered during monitoring.
Rev.: 9194
WIND CHILL
INDEX(‘)
(under calm conditions)
Actual Thermometer Reading (“F)
Wind Speed
(in mph)
calm
50
5
10
48
40
15
20
25
36
32
Over 40 mph (little
added effect)
(I)
Source:
30
20
10
0
-10
-20
-30
-40
-10
-20
-15
-33
-26
-46
-45
-53
-58
-67
1 -30
-36
-58
-72
-40
-47
-70
-85
-59
-63
-67
-69
-82
-88
-96
-104
-74
-79
-94
-109
-82
-98
-113
-85
-100
-116
GREAT DANGER
(Danger from freezing
of exposed flesh)
Equivalent Chill Temperature c F)
50
30
28
27
26
30
35
40
40
40
37
28
22
30
27
16
9
18
16
4
0
13
11
-2
-4
10
-6
20
16
4
10
6
-9
0
-5
-21
-5
-10
-15
-18
-25
-29
-36
-39
-44
-18
-20
-21
-33
-48
-35
-49
-37
-53
INCREASING
DANGER
(Danger from freezing
of exposed flesh)
LITTLE DANGER
(for properly clothed person)
Fundamentals of Industrial Hygiene, Third Edition. Plog, B.A., G. S. Benjamin, M. A.
Kerwin, National Safety Council, 1988.
Rev.: 9194
8.0 - CUTTING
AND WELDING
Cutting and welding operations are performed routinely. Personnel engaged in these operations
must be highly skilled and understand the importance of using safe work practices to minimize
potential exposure to fire, explosion, or health hazards. No work involving a flame or
spark-producing operation is to be conducted without preparing a Hot Work Permit (attached) and
following the provisions of this procedure.
8.1
SAFETY
RESPONSIBILITY
Both welder and Baker personnel must work together to ensure safe cutting and welding operations.
All personnel, including subcontractors, should understand the potential hazards of the work site,
required use of personal protective equipment, and other safety aspectsprior to initiation of cutting
and welding procedures.
Under no circumstances should work be done in front of or around the open end of piping that has
not been cleaned/purged, then checked using the Oxygen/Lower Explosive Limit Meter.
8.2
EQUIPMENT
It is necessary to keep equipment in good working condition and inspect regularly for defects.
Equipment shall be approved and operated as specified by the manufacturer.
8.2.1
Weldiw
Machines
Carelessnessaround welding machines can lead to serious injury or death. The inspector should be
particularly aware of the following:
8.2.2
0
Never touch live metal parts with bare skin or wet clothing; electrocution can result.
0
Do not attempt to refuel a welding machine while it is in operation.
0
Inspect all machine connections and grounding prior to use.
0
Prevent electrode holders from coming in contact with people, metal objects, fuel
sources, water, or compressed gas cylinders.
0
The welder should not loop or coil the electrode cable around parts of the body.
Compressed
Gas Cylinders
0
Handling and storage of cylinders should be in accordance with approved
governmental practices.
0
Cylinders must always be secured and oxygen cylinders must be stored at least 20
feet from combustible gas cylinders.
Rev.: 5194
8.2.3
Oxyen
Use
0
Do not confuse oxygen with air or use it as a substitute because it supports and
accelerates combustion causing flammable materials to burn violently.
0
Oil or grease in the presence of oxygen may ignite or explode spontaneously.
0
Ensure that regulators used in oxygen service are free of dirt, oil or grease.
0
Never use oxygen to blow out or purge vessels or pipelines previously containing
flammables or to dust off clothing.
8.3
FIRE
8.3.1
Location
8.3.2
8.3.3
AND EXPLOSION
of Combustibles
0
Cutting and welding operations shall be conducted in a designated location free
from combustibles.
0
Use care when welding metal partitions or piping which are adjacent to immovable
combustibles becauseof the possibility of ignition by conduction.
Fire Watch
0
Fire watchers with fire extinguishers or charged hoselines shall be posted.
0
These individuals should be prepared to extinguish fires in the incipient stage or
sound an alarm and should have no other duties at the job site.
0
The fire watch should continue for at least a half hour after completion of the
cutting or welding operation.
Fire Extiwuishers
0
8.3.4
PREVENTION
Prohibited
Welding machines must have a fire extinguisher mounted in an easily accessible
location either on the machine or nearby.
Areas
Cutting and welding operations shall not be conducted when any of the following conditions exist:
0
The area may contain flammable vapors in excessof 10% of the L.E.L.
0
Large quantities of exposed, readily ignitable materials such as bulk sulfur are
stored :In the area.
Rev.: 5194
8.4
PERSONAL
PROTECTION
The following sections present the personal protective equipment such as clothing, eye and face
protection, respiratory protection, and noise protection.
8.4.1
8.4.2
8.4.3
Clothim
0
To protect the skin during cutting or welding operations, wear gauntlet type gloves
and protective aprons. Depending on the job, it may be necessary to also wear
leggings, cape sleeves or shoulder covers, and skull caps under helmets.
a
Sleeves and collars should be buttoned, pockets should be removed from the front
of clothing or buttoned with a flap, and pants should be uncuffed to prevent the
retention of sparks.
0
To prevent patter from getting into shoes, use spats or have pants overlap shoes.
0
Woolen clothing is preferred but cotton material, preferably flame retardant, is
acceptable.
0
Keep outer clothing free from oil or grease.
Eveand
0
Approved eye protection must be worn at all times by welders and their assistants
to protect against flying sparks, radiant energy, ultraviolet, visible and infrared
radiation.
0
Helmets must be designed to protect the face, forehead, neck and ears from radiant
heat.
0
Where exposure to flash exists for the other personnel, a screen should be used.
Remiratorv
Protection
Adequate ventilation (natural or mechanical) is necessary in all cutting and welding operations.
Respiratory protection may also be necessaryto prevent unacceptable exposure levels to toxic fumes
and gases. Avoid breathing the fume plume.
8.4.4
Noise Protection
Engine driven generators, plasma arc cutting, and other processesmay exposepersonnel to excessive
noise. If excessive noise cannot be controlled at the source,the use of ear plugs or muffs is required.
8.5
HOT
WORK
PERMIT
No employee is to begin hot work unless a Hot Work Permit has been obtained. It is the
responsibility of the Site Manager to request this permit. The Hot Work Permit shall be signed by
the Site Manager and Site Health and Safety Officer and explained to each affected employee.
Rev.: S/94
Note:
It is the responsibility of the Site Manager to see that workers comply with all safety
practices of the Hot Work Permit.
The Hot Work Permit will be valid for a single work shift only. On projects requiring more than a
single work shift, a new permit shall be completed at the start of each shift. The permit shall be
displayed at the project site.
At the conclusion of the project, the Hot Work Permits will be forwarded to the Site Manager and
placed in the project file.
Rev.: 5194
r
AIR-PURIFYING
RESPIRATOR
INSPECTION
FORM
HEADSTRAPS OR
HEADBANDS
FACE PIECE
Type
(Full or
-lalf- Face)
Clean and
Sanitized?
Cracks,
Tears, or
Holes?
Proper
Shape and
Flexibility?
Air
Purifying
Element
Holders
Operate
Correctly?
Proper
Storage
Free From
Heat, Dirt,
Sunlight,
etc.?
Signs of
Wear or
Tear?
Buckles
Function
Properly?
RESPIRATOR
Foreign
Material
Under
Valve Seat?
INTERIOR
Cracks or
Tears in
Valves or
Valve
Bodies?
Valve Covers
and Bodies in
Good Condition
and Installed
Correctly?
Inspected
By
(Initials)
Date
Inspectec
J=OK
X=NotOK
Rev.: 12194
AIR-SUPPLYING
RESPIRATOR
INSPECTION
FORM
Type
:SCBA or SAR)
Cylinder
Condition
(Damaged or
Undamaged)
Cylinder
(Full or MT)
Facepiece and
Hoses
(Damaged or
Undamaged)
Connections
(Damaged or
Undamaged)
Apparatus
Complete
(Yes/No)
Cleaned
and
Sanitized
(Yes/No)
Remarks
Inspected
BY
(Initials)
Date
Inspected
* “MT” = Empty
Rev.: 12194
QUALITATIVE
RESPIRATOR
FIT TEST RECORD
TEST SUBJECT NAME
(first)
SOCIAL SECURITY
DATE
SEX (M/F)
AGE
RESPIRATOR
MEDICAL
SPECIAL/UNUSUAL
Y!xiu!2
cl
0
El
q
0
0
0
0
0
0
NUMBER
DEPARTMENT
RESPIRATOR
DATE
TRAINING
DATE
CONDITIONS/CONSIDERATIONS:
x!a
0
0
0
0
Claustrophobia
Facial hair
Eyeglasses
Contacts
Other:
UQ
q
scars
cl
0
0
Broken or crooked nose
Extreme facial dimensions
Wrinkles
RESPIRATOR
I
(initial)
Manufacturer/Model
SELECTION
Size
Style
Result
S_
M_
L_
Half-
Full _
Pass _
Fail _
S_
M_
L_
Half-
Full _
Pass _
Fail _
M-
L-
1 Half-
I
1S _
Testing Agent
Qualitative Test
Full-
1 Pass-
Fail-
Sensitivity Check
Isoamyl Acetate
Yes: -
No: -
Yes: -
No: -
Irritant Smoke
Yes: -
No: -
Yes: -
No: -
Other:
Yes: -
No: -
Yes: -
No: -
TEST EXERCISES
(Check all that apply)
Normal Breathing
Deep Breathing
Head, Side to Side
Head, Up and Down
Talking
Bending
Jaw Movements
Rainbow Passage
COMMENTS:
Signed:
Signed:
(Test Subject)
(Technician/Instructor)
Rev.: 12/94
COOLING
Estimated
Wind Speed
POWER
OF WIND
ON EXPOSED FLESH EXPRESSED
(under calm conditions)
TEMPERATURE
Actual Temperature Reading (“F)
50
40
30
20
10
0
-10
-20
-30
-40
-50
-60
Equivalent Chill Temperature (OF)
(in mph)
calm
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
(Wind speeds
greater than 40 mph
have little additional
effect.1
AS AN EQUIVALENT
20
50
40
30
37
27
16
48
4
40
28
16
22
9
-5
36
-10
32
18
4
-15
30
16
0
13
-2
-18
28
11
-4
-20
27
-21
26
10
-6
LITTLE DANGER
In chr with dry skin
Maximum danger of false
sense of security.
Trenchfoot and immersion
-10
-20 1 -30
-40
-50
. -15 1-26
-36
-47
-57
I
-9
-33
-18
-45
-25
-39
-53
-29
-44
-59
-74
-88
-104
-118
-33
-48
-63
-79
-94
-109
- 125
-35
-51
-67
-82
-98
-113
-129
-37
-53
-69
-85
-100
-116
- 132
INCREASING DANGER
GREAT DANGER
Danger from freezing of
Flesh may freeze within 30 seconds.
exposed flesh within one
minute.
foot may occur at any point on this chart.
10
6
0
-5
Developed by U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA.
-60
-68
- 133
-140
- 145
-148
HOT WORK
DATE:
PERMIT
TIME:
LOCATION:
ISSUED TO:
SITE HEALTH
AND SAFETY OFFICER:
SITE MANAGER:
Do not cut or use other open flame or spark producing equipment until the following precautions have been
taken.
PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
USED:
(Initial Each Item)
The location where the work is to be done has been personally examined?
Any available fire protection systems are in service?
There are no flammable dusts, vapors, liquids or unpurged tanks (empty) in the area?
Explosimeter reading ~10% LEL?
All combustible items have been moved away from the operation, or otherwise
protected with fire curtains or equivalent?
Ample portable fne suppression equipment has been provided?
Arrangements have been made to patrol the area for at least l/2 hour after the work
has been completed?
The phone number for the local Fire Department is
$1)
A fire watch is provided?
(I) Note: For hot work conducted at MCB Camp Lejeune, permission must be obtained from the Fire
Department in advance before initiating the work by dialing (9 10) 45 l-3004. See Attachment A
for a list of telephone numbers in the event that the aforementioned number is not accessible.
(SHSO Signature)
(Site Manager Signature)
ATTACHMENT
FIRE DEPARTMENT
EMERGENCY
ONLY
A
..................................
Fire Chief/Headquarters
................................................
Secretary.............................................................451-581
HeadquartersFAX
...................................................
911
.451-5815
5
..451-597
DeputyFireChief......................................................451-595
6
6
Assistant Chief, Dispatcher #I ............................................
451-5833
Assistant Chief, Dispatcher #2 ............................................
451-0103
Assistant Chief, Training
45 l-33 14
Assistant Chief, Prevention
................................................
.............................................
Fire Prevention Inspector ................................................
Fire Prevention Inspector ................................................
.45 l-3320
45 l-3327
451-0103
FireAlarmOperator....................................................451-300
Fire Station #l, MCAS (New River) .......................................
Fire Station #2, Midway Park (Housing Area) ................................
TruckCo.#2
.......................................................
4
45 l-6620
45 I-2383
..451-238
Fire Station #3, Hadnot Point .............................................
Fire Station #4, Paradise Point (Housing Area) ...............................
451-5856
Fire Station #5, Industrial Area ...........................................
Fire Station #6, Camp Geiger .............................................
451-2131
3
45 l-2 132
451-0538
Fire Station #7, Courthouse Bay ..........................................
Fire Station #8, Camp Johnson (Montford Point) .............................
45 l-0820
Fire Station #IO, Rifle Range .............................................
451-7922
451-7221
MATERIAL
ATTACHMENT
B
SAFETY DATA SHEETS
Sheet No. 420
Acetone Solvent Blend
1145 Catalyn Street
Revision: A. 9/91
~JCCUUII.A. :~vla~naL:~ueI~ullcauwn
::
:
Acetone Solvent Blend Description: A mixture of acetone’and isopropanol. Used as a solvent for fats, oils, waxes,
rubber, plastics, varnishes, gums, resins and rubber cements.
Other Designations: Acetone, CAS No. 0067-64-l; isopropyl alcohol, CAS No. 0067-63-O.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distributor, Consult the latest Chemical WeekBuyers’GuidO for a suppliers
list.
lsopropanol,
1
10 to 30%
1990 OSHA PELs
Acetone: 8-hr TWA: 750 ppm, 1800 mg/m3
15-min STEL: loo0 ppm, 2400 mg/m3
Isopropyl alcohol: S-hr TWA: 400 ppm, 980 mghn)
15-min STELz 500 ppm, 1225 mg/m3
1990-91 ACGM TLVs
Acetone: TWA: 750 ppm, 1,780 mg/ms
STEL: 1000 ppm, 2400 mg/m3
Isopropyl alcohol: TWA: 400 ppm, 985 mg/m3
STELz 500 ppm, 1,230 mg/m3
Calculated
35
R
TLV for Acetone (70%) Isopropanol(30%)
1990 NIOSH RELs
Acetone: TWA: 250 ppm, 590 mg/m3
Isopropyl alcohol: 400ppm,980mg/m3
1985-86 ToxiciQ Data*
Acetone: Man, oral, TD,: 2857 mgkg
Man, inhalation, TD,: 440 pg/m3/6 min
Isopropyl alcohol: Man,oral, LD,: 5272 mg/kg
Human, oral, ID,: 3570 mg/kg; toxic effects include central nervous system,
pulmonary, and gastrointestinal
Mixture:
596 ppm
* See NIOSH, RTECS (AL315OfM0, NTSO50000) for additional toxicity data on acetone and isoaot~vl alcohol. resoectivelv.
Vapor Pressure: ca 225 mm Hg at 77 ‘F (25 ‘C)
Water-Soiubility:
Completely soluble .
Vapor Density (air = 1): ca 2
%VolatiIe by Volume: ca lOO*
Appearance and Odor: A clear, colorless liquid with an acetone odor.
* Acetone solvent blend is a very volatile liquid that iweases fue/explosion risk, especially at elevated temperatures.
Section:~.~:.~ean~“Expi~Sion,~~Qi.’--:
: j,I.i i
i ,i:j: :::I:: i,.!..:iL;.::
:i
Flash Point: 0 to 53 ‘F (-17.8 to 11.7 ‘C), CC ] Autoignition
Temperature:
>750 ‘F (399 ‘C)* 1 LEL: 2.0% v/v
) UEL: 12.0% v/v
Extinguishing
Media: Alcohol foam, dry chemical, or carbon dioxide (CO,). Use smothering effect to extinguish fire. Waterspmy may be
ineffective for extinguishing, but it is useful in cooling fire-exposed containers, in reducing fire intensity, and for diluting and flushing solvent,
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Acetone solvent blend is an OSHA Class 1B liquid. Fii and explosion hazards exist when this material is
exposed to heat or ignition sources. Vapors may travel to an ignition source and flash back.
Special Fire-fighting
Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind. Since fire may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained
breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepieee operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode, and full protective equipment. Be
aware of runoff from fire control methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
* An estimated value.
Se$ibix 5. Reactiidty Data
Stability/Polymerization:
Acetone solvent blend is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Acetone solvent blend is incompatible with strong oxidizing agents, strong acids, and strong alkalies.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition:
Thermal oxidative decomposition of acetone solvent blend can produce carbon monoxide.
%pydgM
0 1991 Gedum
Publishing
CaporaUon
;ection 6. Health Hazard Data
Zarcinogenicity: In 1990 reports, the IARC, NTP, and OSHA do not list acetone solvent blend as a carcinogen.
;ummary of Risks: Excessive vapor inhalation can cause mucous membrane and respiratory tract irritation. Eye contact can cause severe
-&&on. Prolonged or repeated skin contact can defat skin. It may be narcotic in high concentrations.
nedical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: None reported.
Target Organs: Ski, eyes, respiratory system, and central nervous system (CNS).
‘ribnary Entry Routes: Inhalation, skin contact.
tcute Effects: Symptoms include respiratory tract irritation, nasal irritation, conjunctivainitation,
cough, headache, fatigue, dizziness, narcosis,
nd even asphyxiation. Skin contact causes dryness, irritation, and mild dermatitis. Ingestion produces gastrointestinal (GI) tract irritation and
nausea.Injury to the kidneys is associated with ingestion of isopropyl alcohol and could potentially occur with significant ingestions of acetone
olvent blend. Aspiration of vomitus into the lungs is a hazard and can result in severe illness or even death.
konic Effects: None reported.
ilRSTAID
<yes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
acility. Consult a physician immediately.
ikin: Quick& remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
bhysician. Wash affected area with soap and water.
nhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
age&ion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. If a small amount is ingested, have that conscious and alert
man drink 1 to 2 glasses of water. Consult a physician.
Lfter first aid, get appropriate
in-plant, paramedic+ or community medical support,
IJote to Physicians: Accidental or intentional ingestion may result in a state of intoxication difficult to distinguish from ethanol ingestion. Serum
Icetone and alcohol levels may be necessary to diagnose and monitor such a patient’s status. In severe intoxication. arterial blood gases and PH.
>locd electrolytes, liver function studies, a baseline creatinine, blood counts, and urinalysis may be indicated. Watch for deteriorating CNS and
espiratory function.
:,: : :
::
:.~
$&&jjj’~;::sp~~l~~.~~kiiarid,;DI~~~]~~~~~d~~es.~,:~
; j j : ; :. ; .i y ::;;I .. ., 1 : ::.I
SpillLeak: Notify safety personnel of large spills, evacuate all unnecessary personnel, remove all heat and ignition sources, and provide maxinum, explosion-proof ventilation. Cleauup personnel should protect against inhalation and skin or eye contact. For small spills, 1) absorb liquid
tith a noncombustible, absorbent mater&I, and dispose; or 2) absorb on paper and bum. For large spills, dike far ahead to contain and collect for
ecycle or disposal. Use nonsparking tools to place waste liquid or absorbent in closable containers for disposal. Keep waste out of sewers,
watersheds, or waterways. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Environmental Degradation: When released on soil, acetone solvent blend probably both volatilizes and leaches into the ground and probably
&legrades. If released into water, it probably also biodegrades.
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.21): Ignitable Waste
Acetone is listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33)
Acetone is listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ): 5ooO lb (2270 kg) [* per RCRA, Sec. 30011
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Acetone and isopropyl alcohol are listed as SARA Toxic Chemicals (40 CFR 372.65)
DSHA Designations
Acetone and isopropyl alcohol are listed as Air Contaminants (29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-l-A)
saanis,
Sp;@il [email protected]~~l[ra~~~ j : : .I:,) :
w
/ .-;
::
GO&XX Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles where necessary, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR
1910.133). Since contact lens use in industry is controversial, establish your own policy.
Respirator: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if
necessary, wear a NIOSH-approved respirator. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an
SCBA. Warning! Air-purifying respirators do not prefect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervious natural rubber gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent skin contact.
Ventilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below OSHA PELs (Sec.
2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.(io3)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Remove this material from your shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
&$A&JII 9.. Special Precautions-and Comments
Storage Requirements:
Store in a clean, cool, well-ventilated area away from heat and ignition sources, oxidizing agents, strong acids, and
bases. Protect containers from physical damage. Emptied containers may still be hazardous from residual liquid or vapors. Store and handle as an
OSHA Class 1B flammable liquid.
Engineering Controls: Institute a respiratory protection program that includes regular training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. Make
sure all engineering systems are of maximum explosion-proof design. Acetone solvent blend presents a dangerous fire and explosion hazard;
perform all work operations involving it carefully and in a way that prevents exposing liquid or its vapor to ignition sources. To prevent static
sparks, electrically ground and bond all containers and pipelines used in shipping, transferring, reacting, production, and sampling operations.
Consider automatic sprinkler systems for fire protection in work areas
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102): See acetone and isopropyl alcohol (MSDS Collection, Nos. 300 and 324)
MSDS
Cottection
References:
1, 2, 26, 38, 73, 84-94,100,
Prepared
by: M Allison,
BS; Induslrial
Hygiene
Review:
101, 103, 116, 117, 120,
DJ Wilson,
CIH; Medical
122, 124,
Review:
126,132,136,
W Silverman,
138, 143, 146, 148, 159
MD ; Edited
by: JR Sluarl,
MS
8
Materid Safety Data Sheets Collection: .Genium
Publishing
Corporation
.. ‘.:
Sheet No. 100
Aluminum
Metal/Powder
1145 catalyn street
Schenectady,
NY 12303-1836USA
(518)377-8854
. issued: lU81
Revision: B. 4190
MeWPowder
Description:lk
sources
of aluminumsrclheOIU cryolitc andbauxile.Producedby R
electrolysisof bauxitein a bathof moltenayeFte, OTmadesynthetkallyfrom fhorspar.As puremetalor asalloys,
aluminum
is usedfor ahaft, buildingandcoostcuction
mataials,die-castautoparta, highway products, permanent
Almtnun~
magnets. photoengrav’
plates, coKToaion-resistant chemical ~uipment, machinery and =xsmy
uipment, and
electrical conductor$ 3e.s
tu
for ointments, toothpaste, and shavmg cxeam; containers and flexible pa&
ing; in de&l
alloys,manufacturing
prhChginks;I$stkg for gold,arsenic,andmercltry;
the jewelry
industry; as reducers for detamining nitrates and nit4ite.s; for p&pita
copper and coagulating colloidal solutions of arsenic or antimony; and in the
manufacture of aluminum powder for3 ummurn paints, explosives, finworks, flashlights in photography, and for absorb
ing occluded gases in the manufacture
of steet
Other Deslgnationsz CAS No. 7429-90-5; At; alumina fib=; aluminum flake; aluminum dehydrated; metana aluminum
ask
GuiaW’) for a suppliers list
h anufacturer: Contact your supplia or distriiutor. Consult the latest CkmicolwukSuycrS
I
Aluminummetal/powder,
ca
OSHA PELs
8-hrTWA: 5 mg/rn’(rcspirablefraction,pyre powders,
welding fumes)
8-hrTWA: 15mg/m’ (total dust)
ACGIH TX%, 1989-90
TLV-TWk 5 mg/my(pym powdc~~.weldingfumes)
TLV-TWAz
1
NF~A
LYSO
l sGe.s
None established
10 mgIm’ (metal dual)
(Si). and copper (01).
may also be to a mixture of there aad c&r matuiatr
Appeannce and Odor: Silvery-white,metallicsolid,foil, particulate.No odor.
_.... ^.._i
FlashPoint: Nonercportcd
Autolgnition Temperature:1202‘F/650 ‘C (cloud);
LEL: >0.04 otift’
UELz None reported
layer)*
contmllin smallerfinx with sand,talc, or sodium&lorklc.
(Ccl+), &a&n!
A inixtute of aluminum powder and water
1440‘F/760% (dust
E&ingu&lhg Medk If possible,isolateandpermitlargefiresto burnout while
nonsp&q
tools to ring small fire& Do not use w&r, carbon fefrach&ride
slowly forms hydrogen that can be hylc$s
if owfinep.
UnusualFke or JkploslonEItua&.
alummum ts not cqmbu+.ible, but wdued aluminbm can be a severe fm and explosion hazard
when exped to he and ignition sources orb [email protected]+ nzac$n with gawe&oxidizezs.Aluminumformse~mixturesjnair.When
F;tuldst u damp, tt may heat spontaneously. %arhcles SIZ, coatmg, an dispersion in air d&ermine reactivity.
hazard increases with
Specialklre-flghting Procedures:Sincefae mayproducetoxic fumes,weara sclf-containcxl
brea~~p$&fC~Wthg~~gT$=
’
0
in the pressure-demand orpositive-pressure mode. Evacuate all unneccssaq peraonuel upwz
c Fouds and elimmatc drafts. Cool exposed containers with water, but be careful not to get water inside containa. Be awaz of runoff from fue
~contml meth&. Runoff to sewers may cause fim, explosion hazard, or pollution. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
Stablllt$Polymerizatlon: Stable at room temperature in closed containers under rtorm;il storage and handlingconditions, aluminum corrodes
rapidly m contact with other metals since it is strongly electropositive. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
ChemicalIncompatlbllltles:Aluminum is incompatible with rchlorate/ni&aWwater
mixtur& powdered silver chloride, ammonium peroxodisulfate + water, peroxides, halocarbons, halogens. acids, K”ydmgen chloride gas, molten silicon stacls, phosphorus, sulfur, scleoium, interhalogcns, oxidants, perchlorate salts, and chlorates. F’ota~tially explosive reaction with carbon tetmchloridc during ball milling operations wilh
chloroform amidinium nitrate, and sodium acctylide. Violent or explosive ‘t+mitc’.reaction
when heated with metal oxides, oxosalts (nitrates,
sulfates), or sulfides; hot copper oxide worked with an iron or steel tool; or wlfh.aotunony, arsenic! and anitmony trichloride vapor. An explosive
reaction (above 1472 ‘F/600 C) of Al with iron pow&r + watt rclcases explosive hydrogen gas; mteraction with sodium hydroxide also releases
explosive hydrogen gas; and a violent cxotbcrmic reaction occurs above (1112 ‘F/600 ‘C) with sodium diuraoatc. Al reacts with diborane to form
a pyrophoric product BulL Al may undergo dangerous interactions with alcohols. Reaction
with arseneic trioxidc + sodium arsenate + sodium
hydroxide produces tic toxic arsinc gas.
Hazardous Products of Decomposltlon: Inhalation of metallic oxide smoke (AGO,) at 15 [email protected]’ or greater can cause “metal fume fever.”
I
ccpyTi~blOl99oocni”mrubli.hin‘Colponlao.
I
No. lb0
AJuroinum
; -:
490
Znrclnogenlci : Neither the NIP, IARC, nor OSHA lists aluminum as a carcinogen.
iummary of R2; ks: Its powder and dust am the most dangerous forms. Most hazardous expsuns
to aluminum -ur in refining sod str&iog
uocesses. Aluminum dust is a respiratory and eye irritant. Lung fibrosis k reprted in ahmunum
welden
and pohs.hers, alumioum smelting
potroom) workers, and in worken involved in manufacturing alumina abrasrves or explodv~~ fromstamped
alummum
powders.A shrglecase..
HBS
reportedof fibrosisalluring with eoccphalopathy
(altad~~~
of thebrain’sstnrct~n)
after 135 m of.woskmg~lllh fmepowder.Death
esultedfrombronchopneumoma
followingpmgresslve
encephalopathy.
Particlesof aluminumdeposIti in lheeyemaycauseoasis (iocaExed
issuedeath of thecornea.Repeated
alunuoum
contactwith skinhasbeenassociated
wrth skm t$aagiectases
(bl~g loto.thenssues
and
nucoussd acesbecause
of theabnormal
fragility anddilatationof thecapillaryvessels
andarterrol& delayedhypersenpnv’v’fy,
andgranulo~.
4cmanesthesia
ntibness of thefmgas)isreportedin cottonmill opcrahons
wherethereis brig contactwith wet Al dunn bobbinwlnclmg.
bfortalityanalys
L of Al productionworkersshowedmalignant
tumorsof thene.avous
system,cancerOf the pamstas,bronchus,andlung,and
eokemi& cspkiij
in fitroom
warkers.
cough,andshortness
of
tiedical ConditIonaAggravatedb Long-Term Exposure:Symptomsof long-turnovcrcxposur~areweakness,
Breath
with generali& mterstitiaI&sis andemphysema
b&t 0 ans:Respirato &a$, eyes,skjn.
rgyikry Routes:I&no,
matron.
Pcute ffectszSignsandsymptoms
o inhalationof aluminum
powderor dustamdyspnea,cough,lethargy,anorexia,andanincmased
respira_ _
ion rate.
Chronb Effects: Chronicinhalationof aluminum
dustis associated
with ouhnooarvfibrosis.asthma,emphysema,
dyspoca,cough.sodchronic
.-_-- _E es:Flushimmediately,
includimg
undertheeyelids;gentlybut thoroughlywith @odmgamounts
of nmnin [email protected] at least15min.
8. rt Hllthsoapandwatts.For cuts.
clothiu~.After timing affectedskmwith floodmgamounts
of water,was
dhr Quicklyremovecontaminated
dart&e irritationor thermalburns,getmullcalattention.
LnhalatIon:Removeexposed
personto &eshair andsup+ breathin asneeded.
i estlon:Nevergive anythingby mouthto anunomsclous
or coovu‘is
[email protected]
is poorly absorbed
throughthegastrointestin5 hac.4vomitingis seldom
neces However,if largeamounts
of alummum
aremgcsted,contacta physician.
7
After first aid, getappropriatein-p ant, paramedic,or communitymedicalsupport.
physician’sNote:Chronicexposuremayleadto fibrosiswith largeblebformationandriskof spontaneous
pouemothorax.
m’
‘i~‘-~.~‘<
‘.wp:’
” ‘.~$.y.:.:.y*;
‘.Y.’.’ ..~~~~~~~~~~~~~:.~,~,:.:.:.
s’~~~~~ii~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
..,?,,.:.:.n.r.>>
.. ..:..&,:&.:* .,... ... .. %d. ... .. .. <.,.*....i.d.*.r.,: .. .. .. $.. .... .... ..... ...
. . >. . _>.,. x.... .&.. ., ,.. ., d...*..4&. ... ...<vJ
,:.~..,.~,.~~..:.~:.
_:“““-.
_v,......
;.I, 1’. ...
“--=y==:
‘.’ ‘:“‘.-;~;.~.~:~.~-.~.
i’ ...cF
....:;
.*....,..i:
... . _,....
1.
.. ..:.:.:;:::$+;.:.*~
.. .:,. ;..,.:.:.::.:.:.,.$
: : ‘*>y.y.f:.pI
;:,;.y: ., J$<:;p.“~~~~,~,~~,,~
.... ... .._/...
.../. ..,.. .. .:(..*,.:: ,.”
\, ,,,&
$’ R.* y;y&&
+, .V, 3
Spill/Leak:Desiin andpracticeanafwninwn on&r s$l controlundcow~ermuuurcplan
(SCCP). Notify safetypersonnel,
evacuateall
occeauy
pcrso~el
u windandremovealI catandignitionsources.
Cleanuppersoooel
mustUSCrote&on againstairbornedustandthmatof
prSCapproved,roundedvammmcleaners
EL. Promptlycleansp$usingconductive,oo!parkiog scoo andsoftbrushes
with naturalbristles.
ml in final cleanu. lacepowderio closed,prcssurc-ven
taftby, metaleontaioas.Mix d.q sandwith scrapandtigkly scaLFollowapplicable
OS&Aregulations
p29CFR 1910.120).
Dhosak Contactvour SUDD~~CI or alicensed
contractorfor detailcd~recommcodatioos.
FollowaoolicableFcdcral.state.andlocalrc~?ulatioos~
RCRAH&d&?Wastc (40CFR261.33):Notlisted
CERCLAHazardous
Substance
(40 CPR302.4):Not liti
SARA ExtremelyHazardous
Substance40CFR355):Not listed
Listedasa SARA Toxic Chemical(40CLz 372.65)
OSHA Designations
Air Cootamioaot
(29CFR1910.1000,
SubpartZ): Not listed
Goggles:Wear mtectiveeyeglasses
or chemicalsafe
OSHA eye-andfacc-protectlon
regulations
(29 CFR1910.133).
10. 34) and.if nccessarv.
weara NIOSH-aooroved
resoirator.
For emergency
Resnlritor: Fofow OSHAmsoiramrneulations(298%8?s’P”
..
.
I . or
systems
to maintainairbop co~~cptrations
belowtheCSHAPELs?nd .
it preventscontammant
lspersmnmtothework areaby cootrolhngIt atits
SafetyStations:Makeavailable.inthework areaemergency
eyewashstations,safety/quick-drench
showers,
andwashingfacilities.
ContaminatedRqtilpment:Never wearcontactlenses
in thework area:softlenses
may absorb,andaJ1lcosescooceotrate,
hritaots.Launder
c~taminatedclothingbeforeweario . RemovethismataiaJfromyour shoesandequipment.
Commenb:Nevereat,drink,or smo
f* t mwork areas.Practicegoodpersonalhygieneafterusingthismaterial,especiallybeforeeating,drinking,
smoking,usingthetoil& or applyingcostitics.
Stor e [email protected] sealedcontainers
in a dry, low fue risk areaawa from all heatandi nitionsources,
oxidizingagents,combusbb
3 es,acrds.alktdis,halogens,
carbondisulfdc,halogcoakdhydmcarboos.
aociall othermcompatt
%lc mataials(Sec.5). Protectcontainers
from physicaldamage;
excludemoistureandhumidair.
EnghseerlngControls:Avoid generation
of airbornedust.Usegoodhousckeciog to preventdustaccumulation.
Electricall groundandbondal
qutpmcot usedwith aluminum
metalpowder. Give ptecmploymcnt
andpend ICmedtcalexaminations,
withparticularemphasisoo theskin,
eyes,andlungs.
TransportationData (49CFR 172.101)
DOT ShippingName:Aluminummetallic,powder
DOT Hazard Class:Flanunable
solid
ID No.: UN1396
DOT Label: Flammable
solid
DOT PackaglngRequirements:173.232
DOT PackagingExceptions:173.232
Collection
References:
2.4-11. 14-20.26,37,38,41,73,84,85,87,89, 100,103,109.124.126.127.133
Prepared by: h4JAllison, BS; Industrial Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CM; Medical Review: MJ Hardies,MD
MSDS
.
( *w
Genium
Publishing
Corporation
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
i :Sheet No. 296
1145 catalyn street
Arsenic and Cqmpounds
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
(518) 377-8854
R
xsenk Dcscrlption: Obtained from flue dust of copper and lead sm&crs as white arsa& (arsenic tioxide). Reduction
rith c-al
and sublimation in an Ns Emad yieldspure~Metallic~citasedforhardeningcoppa,kad,and
I
E
lloys;asadopingagentin germanium
andsilkon solid-state
products,specialsolders,andmedidne;andto make .
alliumarsenide
for dipolesandotherelectronicdevices.AISC& compounds
areusedin manufacturing
certaintypesof
insecticides
audfungicide&plgmcntproduction,and
lasgixl textilepriutiL& tannin&taxidermy,phannaceuticals,
ntlfoulingpaints;andto controlsludglfondou
in lubricatingoils.Arsenictrioxideis the souxccfor 97%of all arsenic
roducts.
)ther Deslgaatlons:
CAS No. 7440-38-q arsa~;arsadc blaclr; As; gray anemic;metallicarsenic.
aanufacturcr: Contactyour suppliaor distriiutor.ConsultthelatestC&w&fwee~Bqws’ [email protected])for a supplierslist.
1
4
i
Genlum
3=*
s
@
usenicandsolublecompounds,
asAs
NIA PEL
-hr TWA: 05 mglm’,+0.01mg!rnY
NIOSH REL#1987
Ceiling 0.002rug/d
KGLH TLV, 1989-90
ZV-TWA: 0.2mglm’
Toxklty Data+
Man,oral,T&: 76 mg/kgadministered
intermi~tly over a 12-year
paiod affectstheliver (tnmors)andblood(hemorrhage)
Mao, oral:7857mgikgadministered
OVQ 55ytm pvd~ccs
gastrointestinal
(in thestructureor functionof the esophagus),
blood(hemorrhage),
and
skinandappendage
(dermatitis)chaugcs
Rat,oral,TG 605~.~g/kg
administered
to a 35-weekpregnantrat affects
fcxtility @rc-andpost-implantation
mortality)
Organic
compounds.
lnolgalliccunpounds
SeeNlOSH,RTECS
(CGOS25000).
for additional
mutative,
rcpmductivc,
tumorlgenlc,
aadtoxicitydata,
J
lolling Poh& sublii at 1134‘F/612%
rIeltlng POW: 1497‘F1814‘C
lapor Pressure:1mmat 702‘F/372‘C (sublimes)
Atomk Weight: 7492
Den&y: 5.724 at57 ‘F/14 %
Water Solublllty: Insolublet
ippearanceandOdor: A britUc.,q&Uinc, silvery to blackmetalloid.Odorkss.
This data periains to arsenic only.
hscnic is soluble ia nitric acid
2htingulshlngMedia: Usedry chemkal,CO,, waterspray,or foamto fight firts.
UnusualFire or ExplosionHazards: Flammableandslightlyexplosivein theform of dustwhenexposedto heator flame.
jpeclal Fire-fightingProcedures:Sincefm mayproducetoxic fumes,weara self-contained
breathingapparatus
(SCBA) with a full facepiece
operated
in tie pressure-demand
or positive-pressure
mode.Be awareof runoff fromfire controlmethods.Donot releaseto sewersor waterways.
S~blllty/Polymerixatlon: Anenic is stableat xoomtemperature
in closedcontainersu&r normalstorageandhandlingconditions.Hazardous
*
polymerizationCaMOt occur.
ChemicalIncompatibilities:Arseniccanreactvigorouslyon contactwith powerfuloxidiirs suchasbromates.
pcmxides.chlorates.
ioclaks,
lithium,silvernitrate,potassium
nitrate,potassium
pcrmanganatc,
andchromium(VI) oxide.This materialis alsoincompatiblewith halogens,
bromine
azide,palladium,dirubidiumacetylidc,zinc, andplatinum
Hazardous Products of Decomposltlon: Thermal oxidativc decomposition
of ancnicand its compounds
produces
irritating
or poisonousgas=.
No. 296
hrsenic and Compounds
4t90
Spill/Leak: Notify safety personnelof spill, evacuateall unnecessary personnel, remove all heat and i itioo sources, and provide adequate
ventilation. Cleanup personnel should protect against dust inhalation and contact with skin and eyes. lYSCnonsparking tools. With a clean shovel,
scoop material into a clean, dry container and cover. Absorb li uid material with sand or noncombustible inert material andplace in disposal
containers. Do notrelease to sewers, drains, or waterways. Fojow a plicable OSHA re ulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detail
k? recommendations.50 llow applicableFederal, state. and local regulations.
OSHA D&lgnationsS
Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000,Subpart 2): Not listed
112,
* Desinoatioosfor arsenicoolv.
$ L&l asarsenicoqaoic co&ouods (asAs).
I
TLVS, and NIOSH
it at its source.tlo~
Safety Stations: Make availablein the’work areaemergent eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact iensu in tx e work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses cooceokate, jr&ants. Remove this
material from our shoes and equipment.Launder contaminated clothing befon wearing.
Comments: d eva tat, drink, or smoke in work areas.Practice good personal hygiene after using this mat&l, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toil& or applying cosmetics.
‘..‘.:..,-..-...
.... .. .,\. ..
~
- f:“~~~~~~~~~~~~~
d [email protected]~;~ a ~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~,~:.;?.jp.....;...’: ~~;~~~j,:-;~j:
:q.&[email protected]$,g
s~~!!.qE:.>.& _....,..,.
:,,._......,..,.,..:
._..
>,./,.. ...... ..:.. .,.,.
_..: ,,,, .. . .:.......,
,.. .,..........I:..,: .. ,,....
y..-.:.\...,
,.., .: ,.,,.:.:.:.
.:.>,.:..,~
.,.,.,.,.,.
.... <,,d.
,..,.,y...<.__... .:..:..,....
:, > . .: .,
,.,,..:<+..,.~>!&;*.
Storage Requirements: Store in closed, properly labeled,containers in a cool, well-ventilated area away from all incompatible materials (Sec. 5)
and heat and ignition sources. protect containers from physical damage.
Engineering Controls: Avoid inhalation or ingestion of dust and fumes, and skin or eye contacf practice good personal hygiene and ho&keep~ing procedures. Use only with adquate ventilation and appropriate personal protective gear. Institute a respiratory protection program with
training. maintenance.inspection, andevaluation. All engineering systems should be of maximum explosion-proof design and electrically
grounded and bonded.provide preplacementandannual physical examination with emphasis on the skin, respiratory system, and blood.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
DOT Shipping Name: Arsenic, solid
lM0 Shipping Name: Arsenic, metallic
DOT Hazard Class: Poison B
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
ID No.: UN1558
IMO Label: Poison
DOT Label: Poison
IMDG Packaglng Group: II
”
DOT PackagIng Requirements: 173.366
ID No.: UN1558
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:~
Genium
Publishing
..=
Corporation
One Gxium Plaza
Schenectady.NY 123044690 USA
(518)3-n-8854
Sheet No. 22
Calcium Oxide
Issued: 9r78
Revision: D. 9/92
Calcium __
Oxide
(CaO)
D&cd by kiln mastinglimestone
(CaCOJat 27
__ .-_ --Dcscrfptlon:
_carbon dioxide (CU& Used in m.anufsturcof aluminum, magnesium, steel. glass, paper, industrial chcmi&
mortar.
plaster, and chlorinated lime for bleaching, in fungici&s, insecticides, lubricants and flotation of non-ferrous ores; as a
scrubbiig agent to remove sulfur dioxide
emissions from smoke stacks; for clarification of beet and cane sugars, &halting
hides for leather and for water and sewage txeamcd
Other Deslgnatlons: CAS No. 1305-78-8. burnt lime, calcia, calx, lime, pebble lie, quicklime. unslalccd lime.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplia or distribntor. Consult latest Chcmicaf WeekBuyers’ [email protected])
for a suppliers list.
:z
K
1o1
_
0
@
iiT*
ii
Y
Zautlons: Calcium oxide dust is irritating and forms corrosive calcium hydroxide when in ccntnct with moist body surfaccs or with
water. Saious burns or sight loss may result if tmatmem isnotimmcdia&.Thecrystal
fcmllislessreactivcwithwaterthanthepowder
hid can generate ttmpaahuu
as high as 1470 ‘F (so0 lC).
Calcium Oxide, ca 95% impurities include cakium carbonate, cobalt, nidccl, magnesium, iron, aluminum oxide, and crystalline silii
1991 OSHA PEL
B-hr TWA: 5 mg/m’
1990 NIOSH REL
[email protected] TWA: 2 mg/m3
199293 ACCIH
TWA: 2 [email protected]
TLV
1990 DFG (Germany) MAK
TWA: S me/n?
category I: local irritants
1985-86Toxlcky Data*
None reported
NIOSH. RTECS (EW3 lOOOC0).for futamdsu.
. .I....,.* .ii~i .~..F.+..;*..;“.;.
..j3y‘~,..C~.
.i.,3’;x~:’
;“~~~
.~~..,.;r.,
~~.
,.~. .,?.;;;‘..~.,.;“;~~~~~~.~.
:,;u”):.~~‘;‘.~~.iii::
s~~~“i~~~~~z~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~...~.~~.~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
n..,,...A..
. . ........)
..........,/x...........:...(_
*,.$z
.......*..........f.?<
.....)
.......9..~
.’...c..~(
x2..__
....I..C......_._
<.?<yir<.
” \_.
I,,.,_,._,,,,,__,_,,,,
Y.*..+.,
. xv...A....... .. .A.
~Y3x.
t x & .+,: &.z.%.%
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...-.r-:-~
...!..a.~.:.~.:~.:-~~:~~..
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<..sw:
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..>.
..z.Y,.u.
.&G-~
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.,...,.
__
Speclfk Gravity: 337 at 77 ‘F (25 l C)
Bolllng Point: S 162 l F (2850 ‘C)
1 Ma&r
Meltlng Point: 4737 ‘F (2614 ‘C)
Vapor Pressure: -0 mm Hg
pH: 11.7 to 125
.
Molecular Weight: 56.1
Water Solublllty: Reacts exothamicaUy to form caustic calcium
hydroxide solution. 1g dissolves in 835 mL at 77 ‘F (25 ‘C). 18/l 670
mL at 212 ‘F (100 lC)
Other Solubllities: Soluble in acids, glycerol, and sugar solution,
Appearance and Odor: Odorless crystals, white or grayish-white lumps, or granular powder. Commercial brands may have a yellow or brown tint
due to iron content. It becomes incandescent when heatednearits melting point.
Extingulshlng Media: Calcium oxide is noncombustible but in contact with water can generate sufficient heat to ignite other combustibles (violent
ignition of sulfur, straw, gunpowder. and wood rue rqxntcd). To Eght fries use dry chemical. fog, or foam. Do ncf use carbon dioxide or halogenated agents (i.e., Halon). Use water only if there is enough to flood fire and absorb all heat generated by the calcium oxide + water reaction.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Calcium oxide ayst& react slowly with water but the powder can expkde violently. Bulk dust may heat
spontaneously on becoming only slightly damp. Use Water carefully around calcium oxide!
Spcclal Nrc-flghtlng Procedures: Because fire may produce toxic thmal decomposition products, wear a self-contained breathiig apparatus
(SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in pr -and
or positiv~pressure mode. Structural fnefightcs’s protective clothing will provide only
limitcrl protection. Apply cooling water to sides of containers until well after fire is out. Stay away from ends of tanks. Do not release runoff horn
fire control methods to sewers or waterways.
,i.. .... ; y..4
..
. . ... . .~‘.~;~
... .q. ........~.~..2..j.~.~~.,.-,Y~...~
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y ;“,.<.
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..:..~..:~:.:..&;
.;;‘I:’,.y<
i . ~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~..:~.:.~::.~.~...
.:.:
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a :,..f.y.J+>.&,:
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‘..A.;&
....A.
r...%.zdk,:.3?k
......Lx.......A......
*....i.. .::,. ... _...,ti~~~~~s~~~~~~
.Q %3;,
Stabllity/Polymerlxatlon:
Calcium oxide will react with watcz (forming calcium hydroxide) and carbon dioxide [forming calcium carbonate
(chalk)] if exposed to air. Containers can swell and burst if moisture gets in. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical IncompatlbUlUes: Reacts with water to form calcium hydroxide and heat [(up to 1470 l F (800 ‘C)], with carbon dioxide to form
calcium carbonate (chalk). Incompatible with ethanol, boric oxide + calcium chloride, end interhalogens such es boron trifluoride, chlorine
nifluotide, fluorine, hydrofluoric
acid, phosphorus pent&ii
perchlorates, nitrates, end permanganates.
Condltlons to Avoid: Avoid excessive dust generation. exposure to air (water and cerbcn dioxide) and other incompatibles.
Hazardous Products of Decomposltlon: None known.
.‘...::.....:.:.:.::::~.:~.:~~.~.~~.~~~:~:~
:.:~:.:.:i...:.:.~~.~i.:::::~,‘.’.:.
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. : -.+;,c.:.:q-:.:i...;.
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~~~~~~~~~:i~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~;-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~..--:...~~~~~I:~~~d~~~~~~~~~~~
._..,..,_.
_
....:L....:.;:.>:.,
>,.,.,.
:.:.:..
;T.;::.,.,.,.
.-..:.,...,.. ,..
.-../.......:....:,
... .... ..... .-:... .. ....,
., ......._. .. .,...,./.
.A....1..
Carclnogentcity: The L4RCj164) NIP{‘@) and OSHA(‘@) d o not list calcium oxide es a carcinogen. One of calcium oxides’ impurities. crystalline
silica is mmiderd m lARC class A-2 (sufficient animal evidarce. insufficient human evidence) and a NlOSH Class X (carcinogen with no further
classification) carcinogen.
Summary of Rbks: Calcium oxide powder is highly corrosive to moist skin. eyes. and mucous membranes of the digestive and respiratory tracts.
irritant and corrosive effects 81%due tc the formation of alkaline calcium hydroxide when it contacts water/moisture. If treatment is not immediate.
pennancnt damage can result.
Medical Condltlons ~ggravakd
by Long-Term Exposure: Possibly. bronchitis or other chronic respiratory problems. Target Organs: Eyes.
skin, nails, respiratory system. Primary
Entry Routes: inhalation, skin and cyc contact. Acute Eflects: Dust inhalation can cause upper respiratory tract inflammation and irritation (lower respiratory tract is USU~~Y only affected at high concentrations).
C0n1inuz
on nc.n
pa&-L
I‘lo. 22
Calcium
Oxide
9fl2
pneumonia, nasal bcptum perforation. cough. sneezing. and risk ofpulmonarv cdcma (fluid in lungs). Skin antact causes itching and if skin is
moist symptoms inch& d slippery, soapy-feeling, burning, ulccratibn. irmp&ble tissue damage,‘L;d state of shock Ingestion &sa immcdiak
intense burning in the mouth, throat and stomach (white color of mouth mucous membranes). throat swelling. increased salivation and drooliig,
vomiting (coffee grounds like material due to digcstivc hemorrhage). stomach cramps, state of shock diarrhea (possrbly blood stained). risk of
stomach perforation, unconsciousne.ss, and death. Eye contact produces scvcre irritation and burns, watering, eye and lid pcrforstion. eyesight or
eye loss. Chronic Effects: Reputed inhalation of small amounts can came pa-for&n of the nasal rcptum @sue between nostrils). and repeati
skin contruzt can cause dermatitis and ftrsuring with brittlcncss and cracking of the nails.
PIE!XAXD
Eyes: Do MI allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Immcdiitc trcatmcot is nccessrry if only one eye is contaminated but fit aid is not
ifmncdiate, the other eye may be lost 4s well even though the CaO has not contaUcd id Gently lift cyclids and flush immoaiatcly and continuously
with ftooding amounts of water until truuportbd to an emergency medical facility; pay close attention to the conjunctivll Sacs whae CaO tends to
form clumps. Consult an ophthalmologist immediately. Sklnt Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water until
slippery-soapy fccbng disappears (may take ~1 hr). Wash exposed area with soap and water. For rcddoncd or blistcmd rlcin. consult a physician.
Inhalatloa: Remove exposed person to fresh air andsupport breathing as n&cd. IngestIon: Nevcz give anything by mouth to an unconscious or
convulsing person. Contact a poison control carter. Unless the poison control ccnta advises othawisc, have that COIUC~OUS and akrf person drink 1
to 2 glasses of wata or milk to dilute. Do MI induce vomiting.
After first ald, get appropriate la-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
Note to Physlclans: Immediate treatment is nccessaty.
bo used to contml
gmsatc. For amali spilis, do not dry sweep1 Scoop spii into suitable contsina and damp mop residues or vacuum (with 8 high efficiency particulate filter). For large spills, contain mataial - waste lime may be used for ncutralixation of waste acids. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29
CFR 1910.120). Ecotoxicity Values: Mosquito fsh, TLm = 240 pp&4 hr; Sunfish, 100 ppm/3 hr is toxic; vector snail. 300 ppm/24 hr is lethal.,
Disposal: In situ amelioration - neutralii with sodium hydrogen carbonate or carbon dioxide. Con&da using waste lie for neutmlizing facility
acid wastes. Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable F&ml, state, and local regulations.
EPA Deslgnatlons
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 26133): No. DOO3. Chsractcristic of corrosivity
Lied as a Cl3RCL.A Hazardous Substance. “Unlisted Hazardous Waste, Characteristic of corrosivity”* (40 CFR 302.4): Reportable Quantity (lIQ)
100 lb (45.4 ke) (* per CR4, Sec. 30011
SARA Extremely Haxard 3 us Substance (40 CFR 355). TFQ: Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 37265): Not listed
OSHA Deslgaations
contact lens use in industry is controversial. cstablii your own policy. Respirator: Seek professional advii prior to respirator sclcctron and use.
Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary. wear a MSHA/NIOSH-approved
respirator. For c 10 mg/m’, use a dust
mask For < 50 mg/n? use any powered, air purifying respirator with a high efficiency particulate filter or supplied-air respirator (SAR). For < 100
mg/m’, use any SCBA or SAR with a full facepitcc For < 250 mg/m’, USCany SAR operated in prtssurodcmand or other positive pressure mode.
For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks). wear an SCBA. Waving! Air-pur#jGtg’rupiraiors
do
not protect works in uqgudefZent
aim~spheres. Ifrespiraton arc used, OSHA requires a respiratory protection program that includes at least:
medical certification, training. fit-testing. periodic environmental monitoring, maintenance, inspection, cleaning, and convenient, sanitary storage
areas. Other: Wear chemically protective gloves, boots, aprons. and gauntlets to prevent skin contact. Polyvinyl, rubber. or neoprene or suitable
materials for PPE. Veatllation: Provide general and local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne amccntrations below the OSHA PEL
(Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prcvcnts contaminant disp&on into the work area by controlling it at its sourcc.ttos)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area crnorgcncy eyewash stations, safetylquick-dnnch showers, and washiig facilities. Contnmlnated Equipment: Scparatc contaminated work clothes Born street clothes and launckr bcfac reuse. Remove this material Born your shoes and
clean personal protective equipment Comments: Never cat, &ii
or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using thii matcrid, especially before eating. drink&
smoking, using the toil& or applying cosmetics.
Storage Requlrementsr Prevent physical damage to containers. Store in glass rather than plastic containers, in a cool, dry, well-vci~tilatcd area
away from incompatibles (Sec. 5). Periodically w
containers for cracks. Keep CaO containers out of reach from safety showers or sprinkler
systems because of the dangerous reaction that occurs when CaO contacts water. CaO is not combustible but when -contacting water it may genera!
sufficient heat to ignite other combustibles. Thus, keep CaO away f?om combustibles and water sources such as safety showess and sprinkler
systems. Engineering Controls: To reduce potential health hazards, use sufficient dilution or local exhaust ventilation to control airborne contami
nants and to keep levels as low as possible Enclose pmccsscs and a~omufically transfer CaO from drums or other storage containas to process
containers. CaO may be corrosive to some equipment and cause excessive scaling. AdmInIstrative Controls: Cons&r preplacement and periodic
medical exams of exposed workers that emphasize the skin, eyes, and respiratory txact (including lung function tests, FEW & WC!).
DOT Shipping Name: Calcium Oxide
DOT Hazard Class: 8
ID No.: UN1910
DOT Packaging Group: Ul
DOT Label: Corrosive
Spectal Provisions (172.102): -MSDS
Cofkcfion
Rcfcrcnccs: 26.73.89.100.
Prerxwed
by: M Ganncm.
DA: Industrial
Hy&ne
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101)
Packaging Authorizations
a) Exceptions: 173.154
b) Non-bulk Packaging: 173.213
c) Bulk Packaglng: 173.240
Vessel Stowage Requirements
a) Vessel Stowage: A
b) Other: -Quantify LImitsHons
a) Passenger, AIrcraft, or Rallcar: 25 kg
b) Cargo Alrcraft Only: 100 kg
101, 103.124.126. 127,132,133, 136,140.148, 149,153. 159. 163, 164. 167.180
Rcvlew: D Wilson. CIH: MedIcal Rcvlew: AC Darlington. MD
Genium Publishing
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:,-
Corporation
1145 CatalynStreet
Scheneixady,NY 12303-1836USA
(518) 397-8854
No. 5
Chromic Acid and Chromates
Sheet
.
olorcd glass, dyes, bfl!cries, explosives, water trcatmcnt, wood trcxwt
and prwxvativ~,r&ac&&s, appcrstripkg, aluminum anodlwng, photomcchxnical processing, chromium m& pl&n& purifying oil and acetylene, hardening
Riaosc~pi~ pnpv8tioys, and ~ufscturillg
ChronWcd copper rrs~natc; and as a con&on inhibitor, a catalyst, an
bxidiig 8gCIit m organic
chemistry,
and iin etch8nt
for plastics.
)ther.Deslgnaflons: CA! NO. 1333+2-;0; C~XO~C acid; cht~&
acid, solid (JXYQ; chromium anhydride; cb&um (VI) oxide;
i
hrommm tnoxlde; chrormum (6+) tioxldc; monochromium triotie; puratmnic chromium t&x&. chromic &d & fit commonly used f
,ame, auhough
true ChtUlliC
acid (CrHaO,, m NO. 7738-94-5) ~8nn& be isoi8te.d from solution. Chromic 8cid and -mates
as CrO,, CAS No. 744047-3).
fiaaufacturcr: Contact y?kU supplkr.or distributor. Consult latest Chunical WeekBuy~~‘Gu~
for a supplicnl&
:aution: A powerful
OX&=,
C~ID~IC
81% m8y
~~p10de
on contactwith rCau&g agents8ndcduseignitionon con&t with organic tS=8
natuial~.This poisonandhumanega
is comXive to &in andirritatingto mucousmembranes.
EyecontactmaycauseFment
Idhldncss.
1990-91ACGIH TLVs
kilmgz 0.1 mg(CxOJ/m’ TWA: 0.05mg(Crj/n?
Ceiling:0.1 mg/m
1987IDLH Level
10mglm’
1990MOSH REL
TWA:
0.025mg(C!r(VI))/d
Ceiling:0.05mg/m)/[email protected](VI))
l985-86Toxicity Data+
Rat,oral,LD :8Omg/kg
Mouse,oral,tD,,: [email protected]
Human,inhalawm,TG exposedcontinuouslyto 1lo pg ovu 3 yew. Toxic
effectsincludetumoqenic (carcinogenic
by J?TECS Cd~i8);
sense
Ol’gMS
and
SpeCid
SCnSCS
(Olf8CtiOn
tIUIYXS);
hngS,
thorax,
of rtsphtion
(tumors).
izef, chromicacidigniteson contactwith aceticacidandalcohol.It mayreactrapidly
enoughwith organicmateri& to C8USC
ignition.Containersmay CXplOdc
ifitWolVed
in fue
SpecialFire-fighting Procedures:Isolatehazardare8 8nddeny entry. Sii fm mayproducetoxic fumes,weara self-contained
breathing
8pP8IdU
(sf%i) tith a fuu f8CCPicCe
Opcrattd~IIPre.Ssure-dCmand
qr ~O~~+XUIX
mode.Coolfm-CXpoSC.d
cO~~&ICIS
with flooding
anmmts
of Water
sin& thedecomposing
materialmay form a hot,ViscouS
foamthatcaucauseeontaincrs
to ruptureandexplode.Usecaulion
For largetIreq floodareafrom a safedistance,andcoolcontainersfrom the sidewith a wata sprayuntil after fire iswell out. If possiblewithout
risk, movecontainers.Stay awayfrom endsof tanks.Parmassivefire in cargo8rea,USC
monitornozzlestWum8mcd
hoseholder.Be 8w8fc of
conditions.Hazardouspal crizationcannotoccur.
ChemicalIncompatlbilltLiz This materialisincompatiblewith aceticacid,aceticanhydride,acetone,alcohols,alkali metals,ammonia,ancnic,
anthraccne,benzene,brominepentafluorine,butyric acid,camphor,chromoussulfide,diethyl etha, glycerol,hydrogensulfide,methyl alcohol,
naphthalene,
peroxyformicacid,phosphorus,
potassium
hex8cyanofuTate,
pyridine,selenium,Sodium,andturpentine.Chromicacidignitesethyl
alcoholandmanyhydrocarbons.
Conditionsto Avokk Avoid excessheatandcontactwith combustibleor organic materials.
HaxardousProductsof Decomposition:Tham8l oxidativedecomposition
of chromicacidcanpxcd~cecarbondioxide,smoke,andirritaling
Carcinogenldty: The IARC andNTPlist chromicacidtid otherformsof hexavalatt (VI) chromium8shumancarcinogens.
Summary of Risks:chromic acidis 8 poisonand8 powerfulirritant to skin,eyes,8ndrtspiratory tract Skinor lungsensitization(allergic
reactions)may occur.Exposurecancaustdermatitis(skinrash),asthma,pulmonaryedema(fluid in lungs),kidneydamage,a “chromehole,”or 1
edical CondltlonsAggravated by Long-TermExposure:Any CilrOlliC lungor skincondition.
Target Organs: Skin, respiratorytract (including nose,throat,airways.8ndlungs),andkidney.
Primary Entry Routes: Eyes,skincontact,inhalation,andingestion.
Acute Effects: Inhalation may causeirritationor burningof nose.lhroaZandair p8~sages,
cough,wheezing.andshortness
of breath.Higher
exposures may cause pulmonary edema (fluid in lungs). Skin exposure may cause dermatitis (slun rash), irritation, burning, itching, redness, and
ulceration (skin destruction) which may pcuctratc.EyecontactcanCauSC
irritation, buruing, lacrimalion (watering), loss of sight and permanent
blindness if no1 removed quickly.
Chronic Eff’ects: Chronic inhalation of excessive levels may cause epistaxis(noscblccd),
“chrome holes.” nasal congestion, tooth enamel erosior
chest pain, asthma (via allergic sensitization), bronchitis, or rcspiratov tract cancer. Chronic eye exposure may cause conju.nctivitis. Skin contact
Codnne on nal pag
No. 5 Chromic Acid and Chromates
7/9l
FIRST AID
with BoodinSamounts of water until traospoti
rt a physician nnmcdiatcly.
to an cmcrgeocy medical
&n&GFoRow
applicabl~OSHAregulations (29 CFR l910.120).~
Environmental Transport: If allowed contact with soil, chromic acid, solid, lowers H and may leach into water sources, causing an effect
similar to acid rain’s on water sources. This material’s carcinogenicity makes it had ous to the environment in its hexavaleot state.
Environmental Degradation: The recommended disposal means am reduction, precipitation, or ion cxchangc. Landfill disposal is not rccommended since it m&s soil acidity. \
Disposah Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailedrezommcudations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Deslgnatloti
-Listed as a RCRA Haxardous Waste (40 CFR 261.22k Corrosive waste
RCRA Hai%dous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not ti
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance’ (40 Cl% 302.4), Rzrtable Quantity (RQ): 10 lb (4.54-l& [*per Clean Water Act, Sec. 311(b)(4);
SARA ExtremelyHazardous
Substance
(40 CFR3%): Not hs
SARA Toxic Chemical(40 CFR37265):Not listed
OSHA Deslgnatlons
ListedasanAir Contaminant
(29 CFR 1910.1ODO.
TablesZ-l-A andZ-2)
A eye andfacbprotectlonregulations(29Cl
S&k &ofessio~&advicc
_-__------
USC.Follow OSHA rcsolratorronulatkna(29C:FR1910.134)
and,if
~~&&&&a
RIOSH-approved&.$&t&r. ForO.S&? cooccotrations
(ii not fumes),t& anydustandmls~mspirator
exceptsingle-use
an
auartcr-mask
resuirators.
Far 1.~&rn concentrations,
useanynowcredair-purifyingrespiratorwith a high-efficiencyparticulateNtcr. For
2.5-m/m’conceritrations,
useany a‘ii-purlfylngfull ftipiccc r&plmtorwith ahlgh-&ki&cy particulatefilter. For 36-- m’ concentrations,
use
anysuppliedair respiratorwith a full fa&picceandoperated
in a pressure-demand
or otherpositive-pmssurn
mode.Al? conccntratioos
may
mc~uire
eyerm~~~tiou.For cmergcncyor nonroutineoperations
(cleaningspills,mactorvessels.
or storagetanks),wearanSCBA. Warning!Air
StorageRequlremeots:Storein glassbottks,cans.,or drums.Proteotagainstphysicaldamage.Separatefrom combustible,
o anic,or other
easilyoxidizablematerials.Protectfromexcessmorsture
whichcouldcausecontainers
to rust.Do not storeon woodenfloors.?i tomawayfmrr
foodstuffsandflammableliquidsandsolids.
[email protected]:Avoid dustinhalationandskinor eyecontact.Institutearespiratoryprotectlooprogramthat includesregulartraining,
mamtcnance,
inspection,andevaluation.Practicegoodhousekeeping
procedures.
Other Precautions:Institutepreplacemcnt
andperiodicmedicalexamsof exposedworkerswith attentionto the skinandrespiratorytract.
Considerprcplacement
andperiodicchestradiographs.
TransportationData(49CFR 172.101,-102)
DOT ShippingName:Chromicacid,solid
XMOShippin Name:Chromiumtrioxidc, aohydmus
DOT Ha.zardClass:Oxidizer
IMO Hazard5 lass:5.1
ID No.: NA1463
ID No.: UN1463
DOT Label: Oxidizer
lM0 Label: Oxidizer,Corrosive
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.153
IMDG PackagingGroup: 11
DOT Pnckaglng Requirements:
XDS
Cdecfion
Re~crcncc~:
173.164
26.38.73.85.100.
Preparedby: M Cannon.
DA;Industrial
[email protected]
101.103.124.126.127.132,
Review:
DJ Wilson,
CI[I;
133,136,
138,139.
&fcdlcal
Re&w:
MJ
140.143.142.
145,148,159
ap
~chenect:;$?%?~
USA
~~%l~&l&
-
Genium Publishing
Corporation
Issued: 12J84
Revision: A, 1l/90
Di(2-ethylhexyl)pbthalate
(CJ-I,,O,)
Description: Prepared by acid-catalyz+ reaction of 2elhylhexanol with phthalic
anhydride. Used in plasticizing a variety of polymeric materials such natural rubber, synlhetic rubber, nitrocelIuIose, ethyl
cellulose, cellulose acetate butyrate, polymethyl methacrylate, polyvinyl butyral, polyvinylidine chloride, and polystyrene;
as an organic pump fluid; as a testing agent for air filtration systems, a component of dielectric fluids in electical
capacitors, an inert ingredient in pesticide formulations; in liquid soaps, detergents, rubbing alcohol. decorative inks,
lacquers, photographic fii, wire and cable, adhesives, industrial and lubricating oils. munitions, and defoaming agents
used during paper and paperboard manufactures.
Other Designations: CAS No. 0117-W-7, 1,2&enzenedicarboxylic
acid bis(2ethylhexyl)
ester, DEHP, di-sec-octyl
phthalate, dioctyl phthalate, DOP, octyl phthalate.
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest ChemicolweekEuyers’
Guidec7’) for a suppliers list
Cautions: Di(2ethylhexyl)phthalate
is a possible human carcinogen. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
is a mild skin, eye, and
~ mucous membrane irritant. It affects the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.
Di(2ethylhexyl)phthalate.
1989 OSHA PEL
8-hr TWA: 5 mg/m’
ca 100%
1990-91 ACGIH
TWA: 5 mg/m’
STEL 10 mg/m’
TLVs
R
I
i
0
2
f
MFpA
olo
49
HMIS
1985-86 Toxicity Data*
Man, oral, TDL0: 143 mg/kg ingested produces gastrointestinal
Rat, oral, LD,,: 30600 mg/kg
Rabbit, skin, LD,,: 25 gm/kg; toxic effects not yet reviewed
effects
1988 NIOSH REL
Reduce to lowest feasible limit
l See NIOSH,
RTECS (l’IO3SOOOO), for additional
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
::::.:.,,x.:,:;,+:::.:,:.>>y.
,._.i,.i,.,.i_i,_.,_i,.~.~.,’
,.:,
irritative,
mutative,
reproductive,
tumorigenic,
and toxicity
data.
.:.:.:.:.
~~..:
Boiling Point: 446 ‘F (230 ‘C) at 5 mm Hg
Melt&
Point: -58 ‘F (-50 “C)
Vapor Pressure: 1.32 mm Hg at 392 ‘F (200 ‘C)
’
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 16
1 ppm= -15.94 mg/m’
Appearance and Odor: Light colored liquid with a slight odor.
Molecular Weight: 390.54
Specific Gravity (2O’C&O’C): 0.9861
Water Solubility: 4.01% in water at 77 ‘F (25 ‘C)
Viscosity: 81.4 centipoise at 20 ‘C
Pour Point: -50.8 ‘F (-46 ‘C); 8.2 lb/gal at 20 ‘C
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
:*:.:.,:.:.:..+x<
.. .... ..
.
.
.._
.
.
. ..v. < I,.. . . . . . . . . . . _..._. i...
..,......A..........
_.......... . . . . . _...n......
c . . . . i.?..
. . . . . ._C . . . . . ..i_. _.......n
c.> _... 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..i................i...............
< . . . . . . . . . . . I . ...r.......
, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .....................n..
.I ............. >A. ..............i..........l...............................
..... i ..
_.... ../_.. -..
Flash Point: 420 ‘F (215 ‘c),
Autoignition
Temperature:
735 ‘F (390 ‘C) 1 LEL: 0.3% v/v at 474 “F (245 ‘C) 1 UEL: None reported
Extinguishing
Media: Use dry powder, carbon dioxide, or foam to fight a fire involving di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.
Water or foam may cause
frothing.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: This material offers no unusual fii hazards beyond those encountered with ordinary combustible materials.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Since fiie may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
operated in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode. Be aware of runoff from fire control methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
..I.
i...
. ...../..........
... ....
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .
..:..
....
..,...............................,.....,...,...............,.............,.
> ,.......,...i....,.i..j......,.....................,.,.,...,.,.,.,.,.....,.............,.....,.............,...,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,...,...,.,.,...,.,.
.,.
.,.>,.
1)phthalate is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
This OSHA Class III-B combustible liquid is incompatible with strong oxidizing agents.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition:‘Tbermal
oxidative decomposition of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
can produce acrid smoke and fumes
including
carbon dioxide
and carbon monoxide.
1
Carcinogenicity:
Tbe NTP and IARC list di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
as an anticipated human carcinogen and possible human carcinogen (Group
2B), respectively. Experimental studies show that di(2-ethylhexyl)phtbalate
has teratogenic effects in laboratory~animals.
Summary of Risks: Di(2-etbylbexyl)phtbalate
is a mild skin and eye irritant. It affects the human gastrointestinal tract since it is absorbed intact
from the gastrointestinal tract However, when administered either intravenously or orally, it is rapidly metabolized to derivatives excreted mainly
in urine or bile. Central nervous system (CNS) depression may occur, especially with ingestion of large amounts. Skin sensitization does not
occur in .bumans. Inhalation of any significant amount is probably unlikely due to the low vapor pressure. Di(2-etbylbexyl)pbtbalate
has become
an environmental contaminant that may accumulate in the food chain.
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: None reported.
Target Organs: Eyes, upper respiratory system, skin, central nervous system.
Primary Entry Routes: Inhalation. ingestion.
Acute Effects: Symptoms of overexposure include conjunctivitis, ken&is (inflammation of the eye’s cornea), bronchial irritation, eczema, staggering, abdominal cramps, nausea, and diarrhea. CNS depression-lethargy,
drowsiness, staggering, and slcepincss~an
result from absorbing
large amounts.
Chronic Effects: None reported.
FIRST AID
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin: (&i&y remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
physician. Wash affected area with soap and water.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
Ingestion: Never give anything hy mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. If ingested, do nor induce vomiting. Consult a physician
immediately.
After first aid, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
.......... .$..&...
....y .... ....>y....
z’$..,.
,..,....~.~.~..
.. ..... ............. .,..‘..,.“.,..:..,““.......‘“‘..,..
yq.....;..~<
....~~~~;.~;.~;~,~~~~~~~~;~..~,~~~;;..~~~~;.,~..~;
.......~~,<~...^“‘““‘“‘“;‘“‘:
..._.........
7;”
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..*...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
. I
.x....._._..__.__._.__............................
i
.>.*...A,::
............ ,.:x,.2.....
Spill/Leak: Notify safety personnel. Contain and pick up spilled material with some noncombustible absorbent material. For large spills, dike far
ahead to contain. Place in appropriate containers for disposal. Prevent losses into the environment whenever possible. Do not release to sewers or
waterways. This material degrades in fresh water sediments under aerobic conditions; half-life is -14 days. It does not degrade under anaerobic
conditions. It is readily concentrated by aquatic organisms. Clean up trace residues with water and detergent. Follow applicable OSHA regulations
(29 CFR 1910.120).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and !ocal regulations.
EPA Designations
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33); Waste No. UO28
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ): 1 lb (0.45 kg) [* per RCRA. Sec. 30011
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 191O.lOCKl, Table Zl-A)
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-pmtection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary, wear a NIOSH-approved respirator. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an
SCBA. Warning! Air-purifying respirators do not protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervious gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact.
Ventilation: Provide general and local ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations helow the OSHA PEL and ACGIH TLVs (Sec. 2).
Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source!to3)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from your shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
Storage Requirements: Store in closed containers in a well-ventilated area away from oxidizing agents and heat and ignition sources. To prevent
static sparks, electrically ground and bond all containers and equipment used in shipping, receiving, or transferring operations in production and
storage areas.
Engineering Controls: Avoid prolonged or repeated contact with liquid and inhalation of mist or vapors. Institute a respiratory protection
program that includes regular training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. Practice good personal hygiene and housekeeping procedures.
Transportation
Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102): Not listed
MSDS
Prepared
References:
l-12. 14,X3,38,47,73,
by: MJ Allison, BS; Industrial
Hygiene
Collection
101, 103,124, 126, 127,132,133,
136,138, 143,146
Review: DJ Wilson, CIH; Medical Review: AC Darlington,
MD;
Edited
by: JR Stuart, MS
. ..U.I.
.U.
Vb8.Y.J
YUCU
v..uy.
_____-___
__-__
B’I‘H.YLl5N-E.
From-Genium’s Reference Collection
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145 Catalyn Sweet
Schenectadv. NY 12303- 1836 I JSA
ii81
.-
-I
GENIUM
377-8855
-
PUSLISHINO
----
CORP.
L)lCHLOlUDE
(Formerly 1,2-Dichloroethane)
(Revision C)
Issued: November 1978
IRevised: August 1987
intermediate in the manufactme of vinyl chloride, in paint removers. in wetting and penetration agents, in ore flotation
processes, as a fumigant, and as a solvent for fats, oils, waxes, and gums.
OTHER DESIGNATI ONS: 1,2-Dichloroethane; sym-Dichlomethane; Dutch Liquid;Dutch
Oil; EDC;
HMlS
Ethane Dichloride; Ethylene Chloride; 1,2-Ethylene Dichloride; Glycol Dichloride; C,H,Cl+
NIOSH R’ZECSKIO525ooO;
CAS #OlW-06-2
MANUFACTURERS/SUPPLIERS:
Available from several suppliers, including:
R 0
Dow Chemical USA, 2020 Dow Center, Midland, MI 48640; Telephone: (517) 636lCX)B
PPE*
. .
COMMENTS:
Ethylene dichloride is a flammable, toxic liquid.
-
R
F:
s 2
*SeeSect.
K 4
H
Cl-C’
li
1
4
TLV-TWA:
10 ppm, 40 mg/m’
OSHA PEL* 1986-87
8-Hr TWA: 50 ppm;
Ceiig: 100 ppm (15 Min.)
NIOSH REL 1986-87
lO-Hr TWA: 1 ppm
Ceiig: 2 ppm (15 Min.)
Toxicity Data
H
c’
I
a
I:
L’Ihe maximum allowable
concentration (above the ceiling level value)
if eth lene dichloride is 2 e ppm for 5 minutes in any 3-hour period.
: Addrnonal data concerning toxic doses and tumori enic,
7
~&c~~and
mutagenic effects is listed (with references) in c e NIOSH
Cs 1983-84 supplement, pages 865-66.
haporation Rate (n-BuAc = 1) ... Not Listed
Vapor Pressure ... 87 Tour at 77’F (25’C)
Specific Gravity . .. 1.2569 at 69’F (2o’C)
Water Solubility ... Soluble in about 120 Parts Water
Freezing Point . .. -31.9.F (-35.5.C)
Vapor Density (Air = 1) ... 3.4
Molecular Weight ... 98.96 Grams/Mole
Appearance and odor: Colorless, clear liquid. Sweet, chloroform&e
odor is typical of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The recognition
threshold (100% of test panel) for ethylene dichloride is 40 ppm, Odor detection probably indicates an excessive exposure to vapor. High
volatility and flammability, coupled with its toxicity and carcinogenic potential, make this material a major health hazard.
COMMm:
Ethylene dichloride is miscible with alcohol, chloroform, and ether.
Flash Point and Method
Autoignition
Temperature
Flammabiiity
Limits in Air
See Below
775’F (413%)
96 bv Volume
6.2
15.9
-MEDIA:
Use chemical, carbon dioxide, alcohol foam, water spray/fog, or dry sand to tight fires involving ethylene
3ichloride. Direct water sprays may be ineffective extinguishing agents, but they may be successfully used to cool fire-exposed
containers. Use a smothering effect to extinguish fires involving this material.
UNUSUAL FIRE/EXPLOSION
HAZARDS: Ethylene
Jichloride is a dangerous fire and explosion hazard when exposed to sources of ignition such as heat, open flames, sparks, etc. Its vapors
am heavier than air and can flow along surfaces to distant, low-lying sources of ignition and flash back. If it is safe to do so, remove this
material from the fire area. Ethylene dichloride burns with a smoky flame.
G PROCEDUBES: Wear a self-contained breathing apparatus with a full facepiece operated in a pressuredemand or another positive-pressure mode.
COMMENTS:
Flash Point and Method: 56’F (13’C) CC; 65’F (18’C) OC.
OSHA Flammability Class (29 CFR 1910.106): IB. DOT Flammability Class (49 CFR 173.115): Flammable Liquid
,:,.
..../......,.
~~~~~~~~~~~
zthylene dichloride
.,.....,.....,.
is stable. Hazardous polymerization
cannot occur.
CHEMICAL INCOMPATIBILITIES
include strong oxidizing agents. Explosions have occurred with mixtures of this material and
iquid ammonia or dimethylaminopropylamine.
Finely divided aluminum or magnesium metal may be hazardous in contact with
:thylene dichloride.
CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Eliminate sources of ignition such as excessive heat, open flames, or electrical sparks, particularly in lowying areas, because the explosive, heavier-than-air vapors will concentrate there.
?RODUCTS OF HAZARDOUS DECOMPOSITION
can include vinyl chloride, chloride fumes, and phosgene. Phosgene is an
:xtremely poisonous gas. Products of thermal-oxidative degradation (i.e.. fire conditions) must be treated with appropriate caution.
* GET MEDICAL ASSISTANCE = IN PLANT, PARAMEDIC.
treatment, observation, and support after first aid.
COMMUNITY.
Get prompt medical assistance for further
SPILL/LEAK:
Before using ethylene dichloride, it is essential that proper emergency procedures be established and made known to all
Personnel involved in handling it. Notify safety personnel of ethylene dichloride spills or leaks and implement containment procedures.
Remove and eliminate all possible sources of ignition such as heat, sparks, and open flames from the area. Cleanup personnel should use
protectionagainst inhalation of vapors and contact with liquid. Contain spills by using an absorbent material such as dry sand or vermiculite. Use nonsparking tools to mix waste material thoroughly with absorbent and place it in an appropriate container for disposal. Flush
trace residues with large amounts of water. Do not flush waste to sewers or open waterways.
WASTE DXSPOSAL: Consider reclamation, recycling, or destruction rather than disposal in a landfill. Waste may be burned in an
approved incinerator equipped with an afterburner and a scrubber. Follow Federal, state, and local regulations.
Etbvlene dichloride is designated as a hazardous substance bv the EPA (40 CFR 116.4). Ethylene
dichloride is reported in the 1983 EPA
TSCA Inventory.
EPA Hazardous Waste Number (40 CFR 261.33): U077
EPA Reportable Quantity (40 CFR 117.3): 5000 lbs (2270 kgs)
Aquatic Toxicity Rating, TLm 96: loo0 - 100 ppm
GOGGLES: Always wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles. Ethylene dichloride is particularly harmful to the eyes. and
direct contact results in comeal opacity @ermanent clouding of the eye). GLOVES: Wear impervious rubber gloves to prevent skin
contact. -m:
Use a NIOSH-approved respirator per the NIOSH Pocket Guide ro Chemical Hazards (Genium ref. 88) for tbe
maximum-use concentrations and/or the exposure limits cited in section 2. Follow tbe respirator guidelines in 29 CFR 1910.134. Any
detectable concentration of ethylene dicblosde requires an SCEIA, full facepiece, and pre&redemand/positive-pressnre
modes. Warning:
Air-purifying respirators will m protect workers from oxygen-deficient atmospheres. OTHER: Wear rubber boots. aprons, and other
protective clothing suitable for use conditions to prevent skin contact. Remove contaminated clothing and launder it before wearing it
again. Discard contaminated shoes. VENTIl .ATION: Provide maximum explosion-proof local fume exhaust ventilation systems to
maintain the airborne concentrations of ethylene dichloride vapors below tbe exposure limits cited in section 2. Install properly designed
hoods that maintain a minimum face velocity of 100 lfm (linear feet per minute). SAFETY STATIONS: Make eyewash stations, washing
facilities, and saf$y showers available in areas of use and handling..
SPECIAL CON DERATIONS: Vapors am heavier than an and wrll collect in low-lying areas. Eliminate sources of ignition in these areas
and again provide good ventilation there.
COMMENTS:
Practice good personal hygiene. Keep materials off of your clothes and equipment. Avoid transferring this material from
bands to month while eating, drinking, or smoking. Immediately remove ethylene dichloride-saturated clothing to avoid flammability and
health hazards. Contact lenses pose a special hazard; soft lenses may absorb irritants, and all lenses concentrate them.
i
-SEGREGATION:
Store ethylene dichloride in tightly closed containers in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from sources
of ignition. Protect containers from physical damage and from exposure to excessive heat. Avoid direct physical contact with strong acids,
bases, oxidizing agents, and reducing agents. SPECIAL HANDLING/STORAGE:
Use nonsparking tools. Outside or detached storage is
preferred. Store and handle ethylene dichloride in accordance with the regulations concerning OSHA class IB flammable liquids.
ENGINEERING CONTROLS: During transfer operations involving ethylene dichloride, the liquid and its vapors must not be exposed to
nearby sources of ignition from engineering systems that are not explosion proof. Preplan emergency response procedures.
WSPORT(per 49 CFR 172.101-2):
DOT Hazard Class: Flammable Liquid
DOT Shipping Name: Ethylene Dichloride
DOT Label: Flammable Liquid
DOT ID No. UN 1184
IMO Class: 3.2
IMO Label: Flammable Liquid, Poison
IReferences:
1-9, 12, 19,21,26,43,47,73,
87-102. CK
Judgemcnts as to the suitability
of information
herein for purchaser’s
purposw
arc necessarily
purchaser’s
responsibility.
Therefore.
although reasonable
care
has been taken in the preparation
of such information,
Gcnium Publishing
Corp.
extends no warranticq
makes no representations
and assumt~ no responsibility
a8 to the accuraiy or suitability
of such informalion
for application
to
purchasds
intended purpose
or for consqucnccs
of it.5 USC.
I
I
Approvals
1
.ury’
c-c-4..
Indust. Hyglene/-alr;.j
,
Medical Review
/
Copyright
0 August
1,1987
Mamial
Safety Data Sheets Collection;,
Sheet No. 758
vacuum crystallUng, dehydrating, and reducing it at 1472 l F (800 ‘C) to metallic imn (briquettes or powder); or by
thetmal decomposition of iron carbonyl. Solid iron is used to alloy with carbon, manganese, chromium, nickel, andother
elementsto form stceLIts radioisotopes
(Tc and“Fe) arcusedin biologicalm studies.The powderformis usedin
mctalhgy products,magnets,high-ficqucncycores,andaubzarts; andasa catalystin ammoniasynthesis.
Other Deslgnatlons:CAS No. 7439-896,Aucor En 8WlSO. Armcoiron,“carbonyl iron, L.oha,@Suy
B-2”
Manufacturers Contactyour supplicror distributor.ConsultlatestChuniculWeekBuyers’GuidF for a suppliers
list
Cautions:
Iron is moderatelytoxic by ingestion
andinhalationof iron dustsandpowder.The powderform ispyrophoric(ii&s
uooncxnosurcto air andother substances\.
lron.caY1
R 1
12
Sl
Ic
HhUS
H2
F2
1
;p$
‘SeC8
spontaneously
ulYY%
1990OSHA PEL
8-hr TWA: 10mg/m’*
1990-91ACGM TLV
TWA: 5 mg/m’*
1990MOSH REL
5 mglm’+
1985-86Toxkity Datat
Rabbit,iotraperitoneal,LD,: 20 mg/kg;no toxic effect noted
t SeeNIOSH.R?ES (NO4565500),
for additional toxicity data.
Melting Point: 2795 ‘F (1535‘C)
Density/SpeclflcGravity: 7.86at 68 ‘F (20 ‘C)
Vapor Pressure:1 mmHg at 3248‘F (1787‘C)
Water Solubility: Insoluble
Elect&al Resfstlvity: [email protected]!cm at 68 ‘F (20 ‘C)
Appearanceand Odor: hue, solidiron is a silvery-whiteor gray, soft, ductile, malIcable(canberolled,hammered,
or bent),slightly magnetic
(becomingmoresoasit is alloyed;for exzimple,steel)metal.It is availableasingots,wire, sheets,or powder.The powderform is black-gray.
Exthgulshlng Media: For smallfire, usewaterspray,carbondioxide(COz),or regularfoam For largefucs,usewatersprayor rtgular foam
Apply coolingwatersprayto fins-exposedcontainersidesuntil fm is well out. If possiblewith no risk, removecontainersfrom area.
UnusualFire or Explosion Hazards: SincefmIy dividediron powderis pymphoricandignitesuponexposureto air at normaltemperatures,
firts anddustexploiionscau occurin ductsor separators
usedto ftmove thedustduringgrindingandpolishingoperations.
SpecialFire-fighting Procedures:Sincefm mayproducetoxic fumes,weara self-contained
breathingapparatus
(SCBA) with a full facepiece
operatedin pressure-demand
or positive-pressure
mode.Fight fzc fkom as far a distanceaspossible.Be aware!
of runoff kom fue control
mclhods.Do not release to sewa-s or waterways.
+Although no tlash point or autoignition temperature is reported. remember fhat the powder form ispy~~phoric
mdcanignite rpootaneously in air al room
StabUlty/PolymerlzatIon: Iron is stablein dry air, but readilyoxidizesin moistair to form rust.Highly dividedpowder forms arevery unstable
andcanignite spontaneously in air.
ChemicalIncompatfbUltles:Solid or powdered iron ignites or explodes on contactwith etaldchyde, ammonium peroxodisulfate,
chlomformamidinium,
chloric acid,ammonium nitrate, halogens, dinitrogen tetraoxide. nitryl fluoride, polysty-rene, sodium acetylide, potassium
dichmmate, peroxyformic acid, and aitryl fluoride. Hot iron wire burns in chlorine gas and iron with water forms rustCoodltlons to Avoid: Avoid generation of iron dusts and contact wilh the materials listed above.
Hazardous.Productsof Decomposltlon:Thermal oxidative decomposition of iron can produce toxic iron oxide fumes.
No. 758
Iron
7/91
iummary of Risks:Occupational
exposures
u&ally resultfromdustor fumeinhalationduringmin’
..y). oreprtparation,prcdUCti~ andnfi
If the metalandits alloys. Acute andchronictoxicity canoccur.Althoughram,oceuptional
toxerty
y lngcdloa
hasoccumd. Its effectsBIGthe
:amcasthoseby ingestionof largeamountsof iron tablets.
rledlcnl ConditionsAggravated by Long-Term Exposure:Chronicrtspiratorydiscascs.
iratoIy tmcf liver, andpancmas.
h-get Organs:Eyes,
?rlmary Entry Routes:
Y! yes.inhalation,andingestion.
irato7 tract. Eyecontactmaycauseconjunctivitis(inflammationof theeye’slining), and
4cuteEffects: Inhalationmay bc irritating
lc+msition
of ironparticlu cankavc a “rust
mwmshstainon thecorneaIrods acutetoxkity resultsprimarily from accidentalor
g vitaminpills).Initially, thepatientmayhave vomiting, abdominal pain,bloodydiarrhca,
amidal ingestions (e.g., overdose of iron-con
lematcmesis
(vomitingblood),kthargy, andshockAfter severalhorns,the patientmayimprove,but shouldbeobscxvcdcdlly,
astoxkit
na progress
to dcvclopmcntof profoundshock,severeacidosis
(increased
acidityin blood),cyanosis(bluishskindiloration), andfever. 4 wo
o rour daysafterexposure.,
liver damagemay occur.Within severalweelcs
afterexposure,in severalrarecasts.gastrointestinal
fibrosis(scarring)
rasoccmtd with obstruc&on
of thedigestivetract. Iron overdosemaybefataL
ChronicEffects: Chronicinhalationcanproducemottling(spotting)of lungs(side&is). Thisconditionis oftenwithout symptox& andhasbeen
Efarul to as“benignradiopaque
pncumoconiosis.”
In &ion of greaterthanSOto 100mgof iron perdaymayrcsuItin [email protected]& iron
itpositionin body tissues.
Symptomsincludefibrosis$scarring)of thepancreas,
diabetesm&us, andliva cmhosis.Repeated
uon ingestioncau
g$ca&iac
toxicity.
Eyes:Ckntly lift theeyelidsandBushimmediatelyandcontinuouslywith floodingamounts
of wlta until transport&,to anemagencymedical
racility.Consulta physicianimmediately.
;kflc Quit rcxnovecontaminated
clothing.Rinsewith floodingamounts
of waterfor at least15mia For rcddencdor blistaed skin,consulta
>hysician.iv asha&&d areawith soapandwater.
Inhalation:Removeexposedpersonto freshair andsupportbreathingasn&cd.
@e&on: Nevergive anythingby mouthto anunconscious
or convulsingperson.If ingested,havethat conscious
Md afcrf persondrink 1 to 2
#sscs of water,theninducevomiting.Consultpoisoncontrolcenter.
After lirst ald, get appropriate In-plant, paramedic,or communitymedicalsupport.
Noteto Physlclans:Management
of iron poisoningby ingestioniscomplexandbeyondthisMSDS’sscope.Consulta medicaltoxicologist
Disposal: Contactyour supplieror a licensedcontractorfor detailednrommendations.
Followdfptible Federal,state,andlocalregulations.
EPA Dcstgnations
RCRA Hazardous
Waste(40 Cl% 261.33):Not listed
ZERCLAHazardousSubstance
(40 CFX 302.4):Not liitcd
SARA ExtremelyHazardous
Substance
(40 CPR355):Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical(40 CFR372.6): Not listed
/
Goggles:Wearprotectiveeyeglasses
or chemicalsafetygoggles,perOSHA cyt- andface-protection
regulations(29 CFR 1910.133).Sicc
contactlensusein industryiscontroversial,establishyourown policy.
Respirator:Seek fcssionaladviceprior to respiratorselectionanduse.FollowOSHA respiratorregulations(29 w 1910.134)and,if
necessary,
weara k IOSH-approvedrespirator.
Other: Wearimperviousgloves,boots,aprons,andgauntletsto preventany skincontact.
Ventilation: Providegeneralandlocalexhaust vcnblationsystemsto maintainairborneconccnfrations
belowtheOSHA PEY..(Sec.2). Local
exhaustventilationisprcfd sinceit preventscontaminantdiipcrsioninto thework areaby coatrollingit at its s0urce.o~
Safety Stations:Makeavailablein the work areaemergency
eyewashstations,safctylquick&nch showers,
andwashingfacilities.
ContaminatedEquipment: Removethismaterialfromyour shoesandcquipmcnt.Laundercontaminated
clothingbeforewearing.
Comments:Nevereat,drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good pcnonal hygieneafter usingthismaterial,cspcciallybeforeeating,drinking
smoking,usingthetoilet, or applyingcosmetics.
StorageRequlrements:Avoid physicaldamageto containers.
Storein a cool,dry, well-ventilati areaawayfrom flammablegases
or liquids,
oxidizing materials,or organicperoxides(Sec.5).
EngineeringControls: Avoid dustinhalation.Institutea respiratoryprotection.programthat includesregulartraining,maintenance,
insp&ion,
andevaluation.Regularlyservicethe ductingat grindingandpolishingma&incsandfmishmgbeltsto maintainefficiencyof exhaustventilation
andpreventexplosion.Remotecontroloperationsof machiinery
is advisablewhenat all possible.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT ShippingName:Iron massor sponge,notproperIy oxidized
DOT Hazard Class:Flammablesolid
ID No.: NAl383
DOT Label: Flammable
solid
DOT PackagingExceptions:None
DOT PackagingRequirements:173.174
hfSDSCoUech-on
References:
Prepared
by: M Cannon,
BA;
26.73,
Industrial
103,
124. 126. 127. 132.136.138,
Hygiene
Review:
DJ Wilson,
139,143,
14.5, 148, 149, 159
CIH; Medical
Review:
MJ Upbl.
MD,
MPH;
EdIted
by: JR Sluxt.
MS
-
Mate&l
P
Genium
Pubkhlng
1145 cntalyn
stX.tt
Schurcctady,NY12303-1836
1989 OSHA PELS (Lad, hoe
anlc compounds)
f -hr TWA: 50 pg/m’
Action,Lcvel TWA*: 30 pg/m’
Safety Data Sheets Collection:
CorporaUon
USA
L. .--
Sheet No.713
Lead (Inorganic)
(518) 377-8854
l9s%w
ACGM TLV (Lead,
k, fumes and dusts)
TL
‘“$” -TWA: [email protected]’
2’F(lOOO*C)
Vkccslty: 39 cp at 6213 ‘F (327A ‘C)
Appearance and Odw: Bhtish-white. rilvay, gray, very soft metal.
Datat
and liver
10 [email protected]’ affects gastrointestinal tract
Human, omk TD,: 450 mglkg ingested over 6 yr affects
peripheral and central nervous systans
Rat, oral, TD,: 790 mg/kg affects multigeneration
19 CFR 1910.1025 Lead standard
1988 NIOSH REL
1O-hrTwA:<100~&ns
3bodLcEidLcvcl:4opg/loog
‘ACtiOlIkVCl~ppliutOCUlp~cxponvcwitbool~udtO~~w.
t saMosH.RTEcs(oE1525ooo).faddid~~~.rrproduaive,md
1985-86 Toxklty
Human, inhdation,~
mpmductkn
to%icity&u
(2o’cI4’c)t
1134
: Relatively insolubk
in hot or cold wat&
Extlngulshlng Medlz Use
chcmi4 carba~dioxide, warn spray, or foam to extinguish fire.
UnusuI Fire or Expbsbn 2 muds Fkmmabk and mdaatcly explosive in the form of dust what exposed to heat or flame.
Spedal
Flre-flghtiq
ProcedUW
Isolate W
8ru and deny at&y. Sii
fne may groduce toxic fumes. wear a self~ntained
apparatus (SCBA) anth a full facepiece opcmtal in the pnxsure-ckmsnd or positive-pressure mode & full pmtcctive cquipmcnt
runoff from fne control methods. Do not rck-ase to sewers or waterways.
breathing
Be aware of
xi& + trloxanc explode on contact with kad. Lead is inccmpatiik with sodium a&k
xm+ium. diyxliutn~ acctylidc, and oxldsn~~. A vioknt reaction
‘ticat may occur with cancamd
hydrogen peroxide. chlorine triSuoridc.
aalumhmniIruc(bclow
wdcrcd kad). L.cad is attacked by pure water arv.ziweak organic
~&~m~~~~~~pondaodl~~
pmxocc of oxyga~ Lead u rcs+t
to tap water, hydmfluoric
Conditions to Avotdz Xubba glovc.s cantmmg kad xuy ignite in nitric acid.
HazardorrrProductsofDcam
: Tharml oxidative deco
toxic fumes of lead.
Summary of Risks Lead is a pota& systanic poison that affect a variety of organ systans. including the nervous system, kidneys, rqxoductive
system, blood formation, and gastrointcstiual (Cl) system. The most importMt way lead enters tht body is through inhalation, but it can also bt
ingested when kad dust or unwashed hands contaminate food. drink. cx cigarette-s. Much of ingested lead pa~scs through ftccs without
‘on
into the body. Adults may absorb only 5 to 15% of ingested lead; children may absorb a much larger fracbon. Once in the body, lead enters
T
bloodstream and circulates to various organs. Lead concaxtratcs md ramins in tmne for many years. The amount of lead the body stores
incrcsscs as exposure cohucs, with possibly cumulative effects. Depending on tic dose entering the body. lead can be deadly within scvaal
days or affect health after many years. Very high doses can cause brain damage (cnccphalopathy)~
Medical Coodltions Aggravated by w:
Lead may aggravate nervous systan~disordcrs (e.g.. epikpsy. neuropathies). kidney .diseases,
zmci
prcssurc oypertcnslon). mfuthy. and menua Lead-mdd
ancnua and its effect on blood presssure can aggravate car&ovarcula~
--No.713
Lad(lm&ic)
nx Blood. ccnti
8/W
snd peripheral mous
systems. kidneys, mrt gastmintcstinrl (Cl’) trvt
tyes Oedy lift the eyelids Ed flush +mnedi*ly
and cimthmdy
with fbodhg amounts of w&x untii transported to an anagency medical
nkilii. Coxisult n phyrickn - _
.
;kh @j&y remove a&.
Rinse with fboding mnotmu of water for at ksst 15 min. Consult a physician if any health
mplamts develop.
* un&cd.Gmultaphysician.
nhnlatbn: Remove cxposcd pzson to fresh air i&l support br
ing paroh Iflsrge amounts of M wae ingest& ‘mduce vomiting with
mxstbn: Never give anythbg by mouth to an -IOusorwn
+zfi
;pUVLeak: Noti safety pcrxmncl and Eve
all tmncccssary personnel inunediatcly. Cleanup personnel should protect against inbnl&n
of
lusts or fume an 2 contact with skin or eyes. Avoid creating dusty conditions. Water sprays may bc used in large q~sntitks to prc~tnt the formap&a filter) or wet mopping minim&
dust dispersion. Scoop the spilled
ion of du.sL Cksnup methods su& as vacuuming (with an
natcrial into closed containers for disposal
or mclsmat.ior~ ?To ow applicable OSHA re atIon. (29 CFR 1910.120).
state, snd local regulations.
k Contact your supplia or a licensed amtractor for detailed rcc0mmcndations. c llow cpplicable F&r&
:PebnntbLls
;A
!t
~~~lb&ousS~tancc(4O~FR355):No~
Chamcal(4OCFR37265)
3SHA Deslgnatbus
_
&ted as m Air Contammmt (29 CPR 19lO.lCKQ T&k
551-A)
Goggles: wear pmtcctive eye
scs or chemical safety goggles. per OSHA G and face-ptectbn regulations (29 CPR 1910.133).
Rcsolrator: Seek nrofcss’ lorIP advice. uior to rcsnimnx selection and use. Po4 ow OSHA respirator refculations (29 CPR 1910.134) and if mxxsmweu I NIOSk-approved respiratk For ern&gcncy or mm~outine operations (cleaning * ’ r&tor vcsseis, or storage tsnks), we& an
:!%A. Wadng!
Aire-pU.&JQ
rcJphZ!OrS
do nd pm&Zd
W0rkCr-S
in [email protected]
afmOSp. ?I!2 Cs.
~r&W~u~rous
glove+ boots, qrons. snd auntlctr to prevent skm conRotectrve cbthing made of man-made fibas and lacking
~ketsmtamlasdusthom~
Ventllntjw:
Provi
axed and local vmtilahon sysluns lo maintain airbib wncmtrrtjonr below lhe OSHA PELs (Sec. 2). Local exhaust
since it events contrminant dispc&in into the work area by controlling it at its so-.““)
vmtilation is pref
Safety Stntbus: Make ~ailab &- m the work area anagency eyewash st&ms, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing fncilitics.
Contaminated Equlpmcnt: Ncvcr wear wntsct lenses in.the work u.rz soft larscs may absorb, and all lenses wncentratc. irritants. Remove thir
mataialfrom
[email protected]~
Commentsr rr ever eat. dri& or smoke in work ucas. Practice g%$%%~~~~
using this rnstcrial. espe&Jly washing hgl& before
eating. drinking, smoking. using the toikt, or applying cosmetics.
Transportntbn
Data (49 CFR 172.102)
IMO Shlpplng Name: Lead compou..~ds. soluble. n.o.s.
IMO Hazard Clasx 6.1
ID No: UN2291
ml0 Label: St. Andnws cross (Jc. slow away fioln foodstuffs)
IMDG Packaging Group: ID
USLX C&lion
Reftrsca:
26.38.73.84.85.88.89.90,lOO.
Prepared
by: MJ Alhoc~ ES; Imdusbid
Hygkne
Revkvc
.._. -
- . . ^
101.103.109.1~,126.132,133.134.136.138.139.14~
DJ
Wilun, m;
Me&al Revkw: Ml Upfrl, MD. MPH; Editi
.
- ..
143
by: JR slu
MS
Material Sdety Data Sheet
MANGANESE
TETROXIDE
bMerlah
MANGANESE
TJZROXIDE
Description (Orlgln/Uses)z
Pouring and casting of molten ferromanganese generate fumes consisting’largely of
manganese
@.&oxide. Wheneva manganese oxides qe strongly heated in air, mangame t&oxide is produced. In
Fact,X-ray difhwtion analysis has detamined that faromanganese fume consists prim&y of manganese
HMIS
tetroxide.
H
1
Other Deslgnatlons: Manganese Oxide; Trimanganese Tetmoxide; Trimanganesc Tctroxidq Mn,O,;
F
0
CAS No. 1317-35-7
R 0
Manufacturer:
Contact your supplier or distributor. Consultthe latest edition of Clwnicalweck
PPG’
Buyers’Guide (Genium ref. 73) for a list of suppliers.
*SeesectS
0
10
49
Genlum
R
1
s
K
1
in
2
-
Manganese Tctroxide, ca 100%
OSHA PEL
S-hr’lWAz
1 mg/m’* as Mn
ACGM TLVs, 1988-B
TLV-TWA
5 mg/mv as Mn
TLV-TWA:
1 mg/m’* as Mn
TLV-STEL:
3 rndrnv as Mn
NIOSH REL
None Established
Toxldty Data 9
Mouse. Oral, TD,:
23 g/kg
*Defined for fume and compounds by the OSHA.
tJMined for dust and compound4 by the ACGIH.
*Defined specifically for fume by the ACGM.
&See NIOSH, RTECS (OW895C00). for additional data on toxicity with references to reproductive effects.
Melting Point: 2847 ‘F (1564 ‘C)
Molecular Weight: 229 g/m01
Appearance
and Odor:
Solublllty in Water (46): Insoluble*
Speclflc Gravity ClyO = 1): 4.876
A brownish black powdm, odorless.
tSoluble in hydrogen with the evolution of chlorine
Flash Point: *
Autoignition
Temperature:
*
LEL: *
jUEL:*
Extlngulshlng Medla: *Manganese tetroxide is an inorganic salt that is not likely to burn. Occup&mal exposure to it is very likely
to occur as a by-product of cutting, welding, or grinding operations. These operations can generate significant amounts of heat and
exposed workezs must be protected from heat stress. Use extinguishing agents that will put out the surrounding fue.
Unusual Fire or Explosion
Hazards:
None reported.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Wear a selfpressure-demand or positive-Pressure mode.
breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepike operated in the
StabilitylPolymerization:
Manganese tenoxide is a stable inorganic compound that is formed during certain industrial operations. It does
not undergo hazardous polymerization.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Manganese tetroxide may react vigorously with strong reducing agents, acids, or bases.
Conditions to hvold: Welding, cutting, grinding, casting. pouing. or finishing operations are mosl likely lo provide a source of occupational exposure lo manganese tetroxide; perform Ihem carefully with Ihe correct personal prokctive equipment (set secf. 8).
Hazardous
operations
L
Products of Decomposltlon:
Thermal oxidative degradation of manganese metal itself from cutting, grinding, or welding
produces manganese tetroxide fume as welI as other oxides of manganese (40,).
:arclnogenlclty: Manganese teaoxide is not listed as a carcinogen by theNTP, IARC. or OSHA.
lummary of Risk Small manganese tekoxide particles embedded into the skin of workers can cause localized inflammatory reactions.
nhalation of manganese tekoxide fume can cause. metal fume fever, where 4 to 6 hours afta exposure. the patient experiences coughing,
cvcr, chills, and a tight feeling in the chest. These symptoms should subside in less than 24 hours.
kdlcal Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: None reported.
Yarget Organs: Skin, eyes. respiratory system.
klmary Entry: Inhalation, skin contscL
Lcute Effects: Irritation of the skin. eyes. nose, throa4 and respiratory system; pleuritus and/or severe or fatsl pneumonia
konlc Effects: Some manganese salt exposures can cause a Parkinson DiIike
syndrome or psychosis.
;IRS’I’ AID
eyes: Immediately flush eyes, including under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with flooding amounts of running water for at least
5 minutes.
ikln: Rinse the affwted area with flooding amounts of water; wash it with soap and water. Carefully remove any manganese metal or
nanganese tekuxide particles embedded in the skin.
‘nhalatlon: Remove the exposed person to fresh air; restore and/or support his or her breathing as needed. Have qualiied medical
msonncl administer oxygen as required.
Ingestfon: Unlikely to be toxic because it is poorly absorbed.
Zet In-plant, paramedtc, or community medical help for all e&sures. Seek prompt medical assistance for further Irez%.ment,observaion, and support afti first aid.
Spill/Leak: Notify safety personnel and provide adequate ventilation in case of a manganese tekoxide spill. Cleanup personnel must wear
Proper personal protective equipment (see sect- 8) to avoid overexposure.
Waste Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed conkactor for detailed recommendations. Follow Federal, state, and local regulations.
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000 Subpart 2)
EPA Designations
1
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 26133): Not Listed
CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not Listed
SARA Exkemelv Hazardous Substance. (40 CFR 355): Not Listed
Goggles: Always wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles. Follow OX-IA eye and face-protection regulations
(29 CFR 1910.133). Respirator: Work operations that may expose workers to heated by-products of manganese metal should be carefully
evaluated by qualified personnel to determine what protective measureS are necessary to prevent excessive inhalation of airborne manganes
fume, dust, and compounds. Wear a NIOSH-approved respirator per Genium reference 88 for the maxiumum-use concentrations and/or
exposure limits cited in section 2. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134). Other: Wear protective gloves and aprons to
prevent solid manganese metal shavings from coming into contact with your skin. Ventilation:
Install and operate general and local
ventilation systems Powerful enough to maintain airborne concenkations of this matuiaI below the OSHA PEL standard cited in section 2.
Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents diiion
of the contaminant into the generaI work area by eliminating it at its
source. Ccmsuit the latest edition of Genium reference 103 for detailed recommendations. Safety Stations: Make emergency eyewash
stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities available in work areas. Contaminated Equipment: Contact lenses pose a
special hazard; soft lenses may-absorb irritants, and all lenses concenkate them. Do nof wear contact lenses in any work area. Remove
contaminated clothing and launder it before wearing it again, clean this material from shoes and equipment. Comments:- Practice good
personal hygiene; always wash thoroughly after using thii material and before eating, drinking, smoking, using the toilet, or applying
cosmetics. Keep it off your clothing and equipment. Avoid kansferring it from your hands to your mouth while eating. drinking, or smokii
Do not eat. drink, or smoke in work areas.
Comments: Pouring and casting of molten ferromanganese metal are the primary sources for occupational exposure to manganese
tekoxide. Grinding. welding, and cutting may also lead to exposure. A qualified person should evaluate the particular work operation to
make certain that airborne concentrations of manganese compounds, including manganese tetroxide, are not above the exposure &nits cite<
in section 2.
Transportatlon
References:
Data (49 CFR 172.101-2):
1,6.7.84-94,
Not Listed
100, 116. 117. 119. 120. 122
Prepared by: PJ Igoc. BS; Industrial
Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson. CIH; Medical Revlew: W Silvcrmart,
~kO1989byOniumPuMLhinlCopon~.~~-rsW-or~uaionr*hout1hsprb~~~,psrm~'~~pohib'rcdJ~~ulo~*'~Wi~dinlarruli~h~inla~plrdvu
MD
Genium
Publishing
Corp.
Material Safety Data Sheet Collection
One Genium Plaza
Schenectady, NY 123044690.
(518) 377-8854
i..
i..
.:...>
:i..
:,:::::::::: .>
Mercury
-
MSDS No. 26
Date of Preparation: l/77
Revision: D, 6i94
~~~~ifica~~n:.:~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~,~~~~~
.:...,i:‘::i’.i:‘i.~~~~~~~~
‘roduct/Chen&al
Name: Mercury
:bemlcal Formula: Hg
:AS No.: 7439-97-6
iynonyxns: colloidal mercury, hydrargyrum, liquid silver, Quicksilver
derivation: Obtained by roasting cinnabar (mercury sulfide) and purified by distillation, or as a by-product of gold mining.
General Use: Used in agricultural poisons, anti-fouling paint, dental amalgams, mining amalgamation (to remove gold and other
metals from ore), thermometers, barometers, dry cell batteries, chlorine and caustic soda production, electrical apparatus, and a
a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants.
7 r’endors: Consult the latest Chemical Week Buyers’ Guide. @)
F
i.:
j::
Li
I vkmly,
ca 100 Bwt
OSHA PEL
DFG (Germany)
Ceiling: 0.1mg/m3 (vay and inorganic Hg)
8-hr TWA: 0.05 mg/m (vapor), skin; (Vacated 1989 Final
Rule Limit)
TWA: 0.01 ppm (0.1 mg/m3)
Category III: Substances with systemic effects
Onset of Effect: > 2 hr
Half-life: > shift length (strongly cumulative)
ACGIH
TLVs
TWA: 0.025 mg/m3 (inorganic compounds), skin
NIOSH
Peak Exposure
l%K
Limit:
0.1 ppm (1 mg/m3)), 30 min. average value, l/shift
REL
10&r TWA: 0.05 mg/m3 (vapor), skin
IDLH
Level
28 mghn3
AIW+&C(
Emergency Overview $h%CtCt*
Mercury exists as a heavy,odorless, silver-white liquid metal. It is highly toxic by both acute and chronic
exposure. Exposure can cause corrosion of the eyes, shin, and respiratory tract and may result in irreversible
nervous system damage. It readily forms amalgamations with most metals except iron.
Potential Health Effects
1Primary Entry Routes: Inhalation, eye and skin contact/absorption.
r rarget Organs: Central nervous system, eyes, skin, respiratory system, liver, kidneys.
icute Effects
Inhalation: Exposure to high vapor concentrations can cause severe respiratory damage. Other symptoms include
Wilson
Risk
Scale
R 1
I
s
K
4
2*
1
*Skin
absorption
wakefulness, muscle weakness, anorexia, headache, ringing in the ear, headache, diarrhea, liver changes, fever,
H 4*
gingivitis, chest pain, difficulty breathing, cough, inflammation of the mouth (stoma&is>, salivation, bronchitis,
F 0
and pneumonitis. Acrodynia (pink or Swifts disease), characterized by redness and peeling of the skin on the toes
R 0
and fingers, was commonly seen in children in the 1950s and is still infrequently seen in workers.
Qronic
Eye: Irritation and corrosion.
effects
Skin: Skin can become severely irritated if allowed to remain in contact with mercury. Skin absorption will occur
PPEt
at 2.2% of the rate of absorption through the lungs.
tseGf3
Ingestion: Mercury generally passes through the digestive tract uneventfully. However, large amounts may get
caught up in the intestine and require surgical removal. If an abscess or other perforation is present along the digestive tract,
absorption into the blood stream with subsequent mercury poisoning is possible.
Carcinogenicity:
IARC, NTP, and OSHA do not list mercury as a carcinogen.
Medical Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Central nervous system disorders.
Chronic Effects: Chronic exposure appears more common than acute and is primarily associated with central nervous system
damage which can be permanent (ex. paresthesia of the hands, lips, feet). Early signs of toxicity include weakness, fatigue,
anorexia, weight loss, and gastrointestinal disturbances. If exposure levels are high, characteristic tremors of the fingers, eyelid
and lips occur with progression to generalized tremors of the entire body. Psychic disorders are noticeable and characterized by
behavior and personality changes, increased excitability, memory loss, insomnia, and depression. In severe cases, delirium and
hallucinations may occur. Kidney damage is observed with oliguria (decreased urine output) progressing to anuria (urine
cessation) and may require dialysis. The cornea and lens of the eyes may take on a brownish discoloration and the extraocular
muscles may be damaged. This syndrome has been termed Asthenic-Vegefafive Syndrome or Micromercurialism.
Chronic
symptoms occur increasingly with exposures to 0.1 mg/m3 or higher. Muration: Aneuploidy and other chromosomal aberration
blSDS No. 26
Mercury
6194
have been observed in the lymphocytes from whole blood cultures in workers exposed to mercury. Reproductive: Mercury has
been detected in stillborn babies of women treated with mercury for syphilis. In a study of six men acutely exposed
(occupationally) to mercury levels as high as 44 mg/m3, all suffered impaired sexual function. Repeated skin contact may cause
allergic dermatitis in some individuals.
VOTE: Spilled mercury will release sufficient vapor over time to produce chronic poisoning.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed.
Eye Contact: Do not allow victim to rub or keep eyes tightly shut. Gently lift eyelids and flush immediately and continuously
with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin Contact: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water and then wash exposed area with
soap. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a physician.
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. Contact a poison control center. In general,
mercury will pass through the digestive tract uneventfully.
4fterfirst akl, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
Note to Physicians: BEI: blood (15 pg/L), urine: (35 pg/g creatinine). Extremely high urine levels of 0.5 to 0.85 mg Hg/L are
indicative of polyneuropathy. 0.4 to 22 pg/L is reported to be the human lethal blood level. Obtain urinalysis including at a
minimum: albumin, glucose, and a microscopic examination of centrifuged sediment. Use BAL or 2.3~dimercaptosuccinic acid
as chelators. Do not use calcium sodium EDTA because of nephrotoxicity. An electromyograph may determine extent of nerve
dysfunction. It has been noted that exposure to mercury may predispose persons to development of carpal tunnel syndrome.
?lash Point: Nonflammable
iutoignition Temperature:
Genium
0
4
0
Nonflammable
XL: None reported.
LJEL: None reported.
3xtinguishing Media: Use agents suitable for surrounding fire.
49
&usual Fire or Explosion Hazards: None reported.
3azardous Combustion Products: Toxic mercury vapor and mercuric oxide.
?ire-Fighting Instructions:
Do not release runoff from fire control methods to sewers or waterways.
?ire-Fighting Equipment: Because fue may produce toxic thermal decomposition products, wear a self-contained breathing
apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode.
Keep a mercury spill kit readily available in areas where mercury is used. Notify safety personnel,
isolate and ventilate area, deny entry, and stay upwind.
Small and Large Spills: Follow instructions on mercury spill kit. Most kits come with an aspiration-driven vacuum trap with a
mercury “sweeper” (copper or copper-plated brush). Wash spill area with a dilute calcium sulfide or nitric acid solution. If spill
cannot be taken up readily, dust the top of the spill with flowers of sulfur or preferably, calcium polysulfide. This will produce a
surface coating of mercury sulfide which will reduce mercury vapor dispersion into the air.
Regulatory Requirements:
Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Spill /Leak Procedures:
Precautions: Use appropriate PPE when working with mercury. Do not use on porous work surfaces (wood, unsealed
concrete, etc.) to prevent spills from lodging in cracks.
Storage Requirements:
Store in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from heat and incompatibles (Sec. 10). Store on nonporous floors and wash them regularly with a dilute calcium sulfide solution. Because mercury will form amalgamations with
most metals except iron, metal shelves should be painted with a sufficiently thick coating to prevent this from happening.
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Engineering Controls: Wherever possible, enclose processes to prevent mercury vapor dispersion into work area.
Ventilation: Provide general or local exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below OSHA PELs
(Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at
its source.(lo3)
Administrative
Controls: Consider pre-placement and periodic medical exams of exposed workers with emphasis on the skin,
eyes, central nervous system, liver, and kidneys.
Respiratory Protection: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29
CFR1910.134) and, if necessary, wear a MSHA/NIOSH-approved respirator. For I 0.5 mg/m3, use any chemical cartridge
respirator with cartridges providing protection against mercury and equipped with an ESLI (end of service life indicator), any
SCBA, or any SAR (supplied-air respirator). For< 1.25 mg/m3, use any SAR operated in continuous-flow mode, any PAPR
(powered, air-purifying respirator) with an ESLI. For I 2.5 mg/m3, use any SCBA or SAR with a full facepiece, any SAR with a
tight-fitting facepiece and operated in continuous-flow mode, or any chemical cartridge respirator with a full facepiece, chemical
‘4
Mercurv
MSDS No. 26
rtridges providing protection against mercury, and equipped with an ESLI. For 528 mg/m3, use any SAR operated in pressure:mand or other positive-pressure mode. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage
nks), wear an SCBA with full facepiece and operated in pressure-demand or other positive pressure mode. Warning! [email protected] respirators do not profecz workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres. If respirators are used, OSHA requires a written
spiratory protection program that includes at least: medical certification, training, fit-testing, periodic environmental
onitoring, maintenance, inspection, cleaning, and convenient., sanitary storage areas.
&ctive Clothing/Equipment:
Wear chemically protective gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets made of butyl rubber, nitrile
bber, fluorocarbon rubber, neoprene rubber, Polyvinyl chloride, chlorinated polyethylene, or polycarbonate to prevent
,olonged or repeated skin contact. Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection
gulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Contact lenses are not eye protective devices. Appropriate eye protection must be worn instead
; or in conjunction with contact lenses.
YetyStations: Make emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities available in work area.
ntaminated Equipment: Separate contaminated work clothes from street clothes. Launder before reuse. Remove this
aterial from your shoes and clean personal protective equipment.
mments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before
Iting, drinking, smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
‘hysical State: Liquid metal
Lppearance and.Odor: Silvery-white, odorless
r’apor Pressure: 0.0018 mm Hg at 77 “F (25 “C)
formula Weight: 200.59
>ensity ([email protected]=l):
13.534 g/cm3 at 77 “F (25 “C)
loiling Point: 674.09 “F (356.72 “C)
?reezing Point: -37.97 “F (-38.87 “C)
Water Solubility: 0.28 pmol/L at 77 “F (25 “C)
Other Solubilities: Soluble in boiling sulfuric acid, nitric acid
(reacts); slightly in lipids, and 2.7 mg/L in pentane. Insoluble
in alcohol, ether, cold sulfuric acid, hydrogen bromide, and
hydrogen iodide.
Surface Tension: 484 dyne/cm at 77 “F (25 “C)
Critical Temperature:
2664 “F (1462 ‘C)
Critical Pressure: 1587 atm
Gscosity: 15.5 mP at 77 “F (25 “C)
2lectrical Resistivity:
95.76 pohm at 68 “F (20 “C)
Ibility: Mercury does not tarnish at ordinary temperatures but when heated to near its boiling Point, it slowly oxidizes to
mercuricoxide.
lymerization: Hazardous polymerization does not occur.
lemical Incompatibilities:
Mercury forms alloys (amalgamates) with most metals except iron. It is incomptitible with
ltidizers such as bromine, 3-bromopropyne, methylsilane + oxygen, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, nitric acid, or peroxyformic
Id; tetracarbonyl nickel + oxygen, alkynes + silver perchlorate, ethylene oxide, acetylenic compounds (explosive), ammonia
:xplosive), boron phosphodiiodide, methyl azide, nitromethane, and ground sodium carbide.
aditions to Avoid: Exposure to high temperatures, metal surfaces or incompatibles.
zardous Decomposition Products: Thermal oxidative decomposition of mercury can produce mercuric oxide.
Toxicity Data: *
Reproductive:
Acute Inhalation
Rat, inhalation: 890 ng/m3/24 hr for 16 weeks
prior to mating had an effect on spermatogenesis.
Woman, inhalation, TCb : 150 Pg/m3/46 days caused anorexia,
diarrhea, and wakefulness.
Man, inhalation, TCb : 44300 j.tg/m3/8 hr caused muscle weakness,
liver changes, and increased body temperature.
Acute Dermal Toxicity:
Man, skin, TDl,,: 129 mg/kg for 5 continuous
hours caused ringing in the ears, headache, and
allergic dermatitis.
Acute Oral Toxicity:
Chronic
Effects:
Effects:
Rat, inhalation: 1 mg/m3/ 24 hr for 5 continuous weeks caused
proteinuria.
Man, oral, m:
43 mg/kg caused tremor and
jaundice or other liver changes.
ee NOSH,
RTECS (OV455oooO),
for additional
toxicity
data.
Page 3of4
MSDS
No. 26
L,
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C&fish, LC50 = 0.35 mgn/% hr, mollusk (Modiolus carvalhoi), LC5o = 0.19 ppnu96 hrz tadpole (Ram
hexadactyla), LC5o = 0.05 1 ppm/96 hr. Mercury is transformed to methyl mercury by bacteria in the environment and
undergoes bioaccumulation readily. BCF for freshwater fish = 63,ooO, for saltwater fish = 10,ooO; and for marine and
freshwater invertebrates = 100,000.
Environmental Degradation: Mercury is expected to volatilize rapidly when deposited on soil surfaces. Once in the air, it can
be transported long distances before being redeposited on soil or in water. In water, mercury appears to bind to particulates
where it eventually becomes deposited on the bed sediment. In general, mercury entering the environment can be deposited and
revolatilized several times.
Ecotoxicity:
Disposal: Incineration is no? an appropriate disposal method. Wastewater may be treated by addition of chlorine to oxidize the
mercury to its ionic state. The water can then be passed through an absorbent (an activated charcoal concentrate with a sulfur
coating or peanut shell charcoal) to collect the ionic mercury, followed by distillation to recover the mercury. Sodium
borohydride, a reducing agent, can be used to precipitate mercury from waste solutions. Bioremediation, using Pseudomonas
putidu, has also been suggested. Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable
Federal, state, and local regulations.
DOT Transportation
Shipping Name: Mercury
Shipping Symbols: A, W
Hazard Class: 8
ID No.: UN2809
Data (49 CFR 172.101):
Packaging Authorizations
a) Exceptions: 173.164
b) Non-bulk Packaging: 173.164
c) Bulk Packaging: 173.240
Packing Group: III
Label: Corrosive
Special Provisions (172.102): -
Quantity Limitations
a) Passenger, Aircraft, or Railcar:
b) Cargo Aircraft Only: 35 kg
35 kg
Vessel Stowage Requirements
a) Vessel Stowage: B
b) Other: 40,97
EPA Regulations:
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): U151
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4) per RCRA, Sec. 3001; CWA, Sec. 307(a), CAA, Sec. 112
CERCLA Reportable Quantity (RQ), 1 lb (0.454 kg)
SARA 311/312 Codes: 1,2
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
SARA EHS (Extremely Hazardous Substance) (40 CFR 355): Not listed
OSHA Regulations:
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1, Z-l-A)
References:
73,103,124,132,136,148,149,159,167,176,187,189
Prepared By ................................. M Gannon, BA
Industrial Hygiene Review ......... RE Langford, PhD, CM
Medical Review ........................... T Thobum, MD, MPH
Disclaimer: Judgments as to the suitability of information herein for the purchaser’s purposes are necessarily the purchaser’s
responsibility. Although reasonable care has been taken in the preparation of such information, Genium Publishing Corporation
extends no warranties, makes no representations, and assumes no responsibility as to the accuracy or suitability of such
information for application to the purchaser’s intended purpose or for consequences of its use.
EMERGENCY
ATTACHMENT
PROCEDURES FOR EXPOSURE
HAZARDOUS
MATERIALS/WASTE
C
TO
ATTACHMENT
C
EMERGENCY
PROCEDURES
FOR EXPOSURE
HAZARDOUS
MATERIALS/WASTE
TO
1.
Call ambulance or transport individual to hospital/clinic immediately. Monitor airway,
breathing and circulation during trip to hospital or while waiting for the ambulance.
Administer first aid or CPR, as necessary. Don’t forget to take the HASP with you; it
contains information on the contaminants expected to be found on site and will assist the
physician in his/her assessmentof the exposure.
2.
Fill in Potential Exposure Report, answering each of the questions to the best of your ability.
3.
Contact our physician(s) at EMR as soon as possible. The procedure is as follows:
a.
Call EMR
b.
Ask to speak with:
at l- SOO- 229- 3674!
Dr. David L. Barnes;
Dr. Elaine Theriault; or
Ms. T.J. Wolff, R.N.
Note:
During nonbusiness hours (after 6 p.m.) call l-800-229-3674
paging the aforementioned individuals.
and follow directions for
4.
Once in contact with any of these individuals, explain what has happened (they will review
the information on the form with you and may ask you to fax the form to them, if possible),
and allow either of them to speak with the attending physician.
5.
When asked about payment (and they will ask), inform the Hospital/Clinic/Physician that
this is a “work related injury” and have them contact the Benefits Coordinator at
(4 12) 269-2744. Have invoices sent to:
Michael Baker Jr. Inc.
Attn: Benefits Coordinator
Airport Office Park, Bldg. 3
Coraopolis, PA 15108
6.
Contact the Project Manager and the Project Health and Safety Officer as soon as it is
feasible, but wait no longer than 24 hours.
Page 1 of 2
Name:
Date of Exposure:
Social Security No.:
Age:
I.
Exposing
Agent
Name of Product or Chemicals
II.
Sex:
(if known)
Characteristics
(if the name is not known)
Solid
Liquid
Gas
Fume
Mist
Dose Determinants
What was individual
doing?
How long did individual
Was protective
work in area before signs/symptoms
developed?
gear being used? If yes, what was the PPE?
Was there skin contact?
Was the exposing agent inhaled?
Were other persons exposed ? If yes, did they experience symptoms?
III.
Signs and Symptoms
Immediatelv
q
q
q
q
q
q
(check off appropriate
symptoms)
with Exposure:
Burning of eyes, nose, or throat
Tearing
Headache
Cough
Shortness of breath
Delirium
q
q
q
q
q
q
Chest tightness/pressure
Nausea/vomiting
Dizziness
Weakness
Heat flashes
Other
Delaved Symptoms:
q
q
q
q
Weakness
Nausea/vomiting
Shortness of breath
Cough
q
q
q
El
q
Loss of appetite
Abdominal pain
Headache
Numbness/tingling
Other
Vapor
Page 2 of 2
IV.
Present Status of Symptoms
0
q
cl
q
0
cl
cl
(check off appropriate symptoms)
Burning of eyes, nose, or throat
Tearing
Headache
Cough
Shortness of breath
Chest tightness/pressure
Cyanosis (bluish skin color)
0
cl
0
0
cl
cl
cl
Nausea/vomiting
Dizziness
Weakness
Loss of appetite
Abdominal pain
Numbness/tingling
Other
Have symptoms (please check off appropriate response and give duration of symptoms):
Improved
V.
Treatment
None
VI.
Worsened
of Symptoms
(check off appropriate response)
Self-medicated
Name
(Attending physician)
VII.
Hospital/Clinic
Source: EMR, Inc.
Remain Unchanged
Physician treated
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