01482

01482
FiNAL
REMEDIAL
INVESTIGATION/
FEASIBILITY
STUDY
HEALTH
AND SAFETY
PLAN
FOR
SITES t&9,48, AND 69
MARINE-CORPS
BASE CAMP LEJEUNE
JACKSONVILLE,
NORTH CAROLINA
F-=-W
CONTRACT
TASK
ORDER
0024
Prepared For:
DEPARTMENT
OF THE NAVY
ATLANTIC
DIVISION
NAVAL
FACILITIES
ENGINEERING
COMMAND
Norfolk, Virginia
Under:
LANTDIV
Contract
CLEAN Program
N62470-89-D-4814
.
Prepared
BAKER
“=+.
By:
ENVIRONMENTAL,
Coraopolis, Pennsylvania
_ JULY
9,1992
INC.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
,
1
1
1
3
3
s4
1.0
....................................................
INTRODUCTION
Background .....................................................
1.1
::-....; .................
1.2
Policy ..................................
Medical Surveillance Requirements ...............................
1.3
1.4
Training Requirements ..........................................
1.5
Pre-Entry Requirements .........................................
2.0
SITE DESCRIPTION
3.0
SITE ENTRY OBJECTIVES
4.0
SITE ORGANIZATION
6.0
SITE
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
6.0
............................................
HAZARD EVALUATION
6.1
Preliminary Evaluation ..........................................
6.2
ChemicalHazards
...............................................
6.3
Physical Hazards ................................................
6.3.1 Confined Space Entry ......................................
................
6.3.2 Heat Stress ...............................
6.3.3 Explosion and Fire ........................................
6.3.4 Site Specific Safety Hazards ................................
6.4
Radiation Hazards ...............................................
..........................................
6.5
EnvironmentalHazards
I3
113
113
x3
I3
21
23
23
24
25
7.0
...........................
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
.....................
7.1
Levels of Protection .........................
..........................
7.2
Respiratory Protection .................
7.3
Care and Cleaning of Personal Protective Equipment ...............
27
27
29
30
8.0
SITE WORK PLANS/SITE
9.0
COMMUNICATION
10.0
DECONTAMINATION
PROCEDURES
..............................
10.1 Site Decontamination
............................................
10.2 Emergency Decontamination Stations .............................
10.3 Equipment Decontamination
.....................................
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..o........
6
.. .... ... ... .. ......... ... ... .... .... ... .
8
......................
9
AND COORDINATION
.....................................................
CONTROL
General Requirements ...........................................
Site Conditions ..................................................
Site Boundaries .................................................
Sanitation/Site Precautions ......................................
.............................
31
.................................
32
PERSONNEL
PROCEDURES
ii
10
:10
:I0
10
112
33
33
34
34
TABLE OF CONTENTS
(Continued)
Page
11.0
1
SITE SAFETY AND HEALTH ........................................
11.1
11.1
Responsibilities
...............................
..................
11.2 Environme
Environmental Monitoring ..................
:. .... ................
11.2.1 Point-Source
..............................
...............
11.2.2 Perimeter Monitoring
................
.....................
11.3 Personal Monitoring
.............................
................
11.4 Equipment Maintenance and Calibration
.......
...............
11.5 Monitoring Documentation ............
.::. ...... : 1. ..............
:35
:35
:35
35
40
41
41
41
12.0
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
.......................................
12.1 Pre-Emergency Planning
............................
............
12.2 Emergency Coordinator ....................................
......
12.3 Communications
.....................................
...........
12.4 Assembly Area ................................
..................
12.5 Emergency Hospital Route .......................................
12.6 Emergency Medical Treatment ...................................
12.7 Emergency Decontamination Procedures ..........................
12.8 Personal Protection and First Aid Equipment ......................
12.9 Notification
.....................................
................
12.10 Hazard Assessment ..............................................
12.11 Security ..................................
............
..........
12.12 Emergency Alerting
............................
.................
12.13 Training ........................................................
42
42
42
43
44
44
46
48
49
49
fi0
51
51
Ii3
13.0
SPILL CONTAINMENT
fi4
14.0
WASTE HANDLING
15.0
DECLARATION
PROCEDURE&
PROCEDURES
OF HEALTH
.............................
.................................
AND SAFETY PLAN REVIEW
...
111
65
........
56
LIST OF TABLES
F’age
Table 6-l
Table 6-2
Table 6-3
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
6-4
11-l
1 l-2
11-3
11-4
Toxicological Properties of Compounds Detected During
Preliminary Sampling at Sites 6,9,48, and 69 . . . . . . . . . . . ..-........
Exposure Symptoms for Substances Detected During
Preliminary Sampling at Sites 6,9,48, and 69 .............o........
Toxicological Properties of Potentially Hazardous Materials Visible
atSites6and9
. ..i......r.......................................
Supplemental List of Chemicals (not otherwise mentioned) . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Equipment and Frequency for Site 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Equipment and Frequency for Site 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Equipment and Frequency for Site 48 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Equipment and Frequency for Site 69 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
14
17
19
20
36
37
38
39
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Site Location Map ...............................................
Typical Contamination Reduction Zone Layout .....................
Emergency Hospital Route (to be posted at site) ....................
LIST OF ATTACHMENTS
Attachment A - Medical Surveillance Testing Parameters
Attachment B - OSHA Training History of Project Personnel
Attachment C - Chemical/Material Safety Data Sheets
Attachment D - Baker Environmental, Inc. (Baker)
Safety Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS)
Attachment E - Environmental Hazards Specialists International,
(EHS) Standard Operating Procedures
iv
Inc.
‘2
11
,45
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1.1
Background
Baker Environmental,
Inc. (Baker) will perform a Remedial Investigation/Feasibilit;y
(RI/F’S) to investigate
potentially
contaminated
groundwater,
surface water, sedime.nts, and
soil associated with burial or disposal of potential hazardous‘materials
at Sites 6 (Lots 201 and
203), 9,48, and 69 at the Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
include soil borings, drum sampling, well installations,
Study
aquatic/ecological
This study will
surveys at adjacent
rivers and streams, and associated sampling and analyses. Specific activities associated with
Sites 6,9,48, and 69 can be found in the corresponding
Final RI/l33 Work Plan (Baker, May
1992). The site locations are shown on Figure 1.
1.2
Policy
It is the policy of Baker that all on-site hazardous waste management activities be performed
in conformance with a Site-Specific
activities
Health and Safety Plan (HASP). The HASP applies to
performed by both Baker and Subcontractor
the surveillance
and training
requirements
personnel including
as outlined in the following
compliance
with
sections. However,
the Subcontractor personnel are required to provide their own personal protective equipment
(PPE) that meets or exceeds the level of protection as outlined in this HASP. The Site Health
and Safety Officer
surveillance
(SHSO) will audit subcontractor
records to verify
compliance
with
and training requirements.
The SHSO, or qualified designee, will be responsible for continually
site and ensuring
evaluating
safet,y at the
adherence to the HASP. The SHSO or designee, in addition
to the Site
Manager, is directly
responsible for safety issues relevant to the site, and the SHSO has the
immediate authority
to modify the existing HASP as site conditions warrant.
Modifications
are to be documented and changes made to the HASP after review with the Project Manager
and the Navy’s Engineer-in-Charge
(EIC). The SHSO, or designee, will be responsible for the
preparation of a daily report (in the field log book) as necessary which may include all rlelevant
health and safety events; recordkeeping
accident
investigation
and reporting;
of all personnel and site monitoring
daily safety talks and inspections;
relevant health and safety issues. The HASP may be modified/updated
information;
and an:y other
with the approval of
the Project Health and Safety Officer (PHSO) and Project Manager. Proper notification
given to the Navy EIC when such changes to the plan are implemented.
1
will be
FIGURE 1
SITE LOCATION MAP
MCB CAMP LEJEUNE
2
1.3
Medical
Surveillance
Requirements
This site-specific HASP will require that project personnel, who may be exposed to materials
having potentially
qualified
adverse and deleterious
physician
to perform
corporate medical surveillance
health effects, are deemed medically
the tasks required
fit by a
prior to entry onto the site. Baker’s
program has been developed to establish a medical baseline
and to monitor for symptoms of overexposure for individuals
Assessments, Site Inspections, Remedial Investigations,
who participate
Feasibility
in Preliminary
Studies, and construction-
phase services at sites covered by the Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health
Administration
(OSHA), Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Standard,
29 CFR 1910.120.
capability
Additionally,
the program is intended
the individual’s
for performing on-site work, including wearing respiratory protective equipment.
All Baker employees that will be engaged in site activities
receive a Group III physical
examination
then once every twelve months thereafter.
standard
parameters
review
spirometry,
and medical
A Group III medical exam includes
urinalysis,
histories
Attachment
blood pressure, and a
in addition
to chest x-rays,
and blood tests. Baker’s company physician will
then review the results of the testing and determine
work required.
This exam is received
such as height, weight, vision, temperature,
of occupational
electrocardiogram,
covered by the 1910.120 standard
by a licensed physician.
initially,
complete
to determine
the employee’s ability
A describes the medical surveillance
to perform the
testing
parameters
performed annually on Baker employees.
Prior to entry onto the site, all personnel, including subcontractors, will be required to ,provide
information
from their company physician
stating
that they are physically
capable of
performing the activities required.
1.4
Training
Requirements
Baker assures that all personnel who work on site will be initially
safety training
requirements
supervisory
course, meeting
--,
outlined
in 29CFR 1910.120.
These
state: “General site workers (such as equipment operators, general laborers and
personnel)
expose or potentially
a minimum
the requirements
trained at a health and
engaged in hazardous substance removal or other activities
which
expose workers to hazardous substances and health hazards shall receive
of 40 hours of instruction
off the site, and a minimum
3
of three days actual field
experience
under the direct supervision
generally
&day (40-hour)
demonstrations,
reactivity,
courses.
respiratory
use of monitoring
of a trained, experienced
Key points of the 40-hour
fit testing and training,
supervisor.”
training
These are
include
field
risk assessment, toxicology, chemical
equipment, downrange work procedures, site safety procedures,
levels of protection, protective clothing, decontamination,
and practical field exercises (which
include donning, doffing, and working in personal protective ensembles for personal protection
Levels A, B, and C).
In addition
to the initial
40-hour training
program, OSHA requires general site workers to
receive an annual B-hour refresher training
standard.
course on the items specified by the 1910.120
The general purpose of the B-hour refresher is to ensure that personnel retain the
knowledge necessary to be adequately protected, and stay current with proper site health and
safety procedures.
OSHA also requires
that personnel
involved
with on-site management
and supervisors
directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in hazardous waste operations,
shall receive (in addition
to 40 hours initial
training
and three days of supervised
field
experience) at least eight additional hours of specialized training at the time of job assignment
on such topics as, but not limited
associated
containment
supervisory
employee training
to, the employer’s
program,
personal protective
program, and health hazard monitoring
training
safety and health program and the
equipment
program,
procedures and techniques.
spill
The B-hour
is required to ensure that supervisors have the knowledge necessary to
understand and use the various Health and Safety Programs, and to implement the elements
of the HASP. Attachment
History
B provides the appropriate
for Baker Project Personnel.
Training
“OSHA” Health and Safety Training
records for Subcontractor
personnel will be
accumulated prior to site startup and maintained at the on-site command post.
1.5
During
Pre-Entry
Requirements
the initiation
reconnaissance
of site activities
(site mobilization),
the SHSO will perform
a
of the on-site and off-site sampling areas, establish or confirm emergency
points of contact and procedures, and review any other issues deemed necessary to address site
safety and health.
At this point, the SHSO will call a meeting with Baker on-site personnel
and the subcontractor’s personnel. Site-specific safety and health hazards, data obtained from
a previous site reconnaissance, provisions outlined in this HASP, and appropriate safety and
health related procedures/protocols will be reviewed by the SHSO.
i-Y
4
After this initial
with personnel
discussed
briefing with all site personnel, information
specifically
may include
troubleshooting
designated to use monitoring
equipment
maintenance,
will be provided and discussed
equipment
calibration,
on site. Information
response
time and
procedures, and the review of definitions for breathing zone, point source, etc.,
with respect to the use of each piece of monitoring
Other pertinent
equipment.
information
may also be discussed at this time.
Prior to each phase of site operation (new sampling task, new site operation), the SHSO will
brief the appropriate
site workers on the health and safety hazards and protection strategies.
The SHSO will be available to address potential emergencies, unforeseen circumstances, and
implement appropriate changes to the HASP.
All Baker employees and subcontractor personnel will be responsible for familiarity
requirements
and provisions
of the HASP including
modifications.
with the
Any modifications
that
affect site personnel or site operations will be discussed with site personnel via daily or weekly
briefings or sooner, if necessary.
Baker believes that the development of a HASP is necessary to ensure adequate protection for
on-site personnel.
The following
HASP has been based on an outline
developed by the
U.S. Coast Guard for responding to hazardous chemical releases (U.S.C.G. Pollution Response
COMDTINST-ML6456-30)
and safety procedures
Waste Site Activities).
and by NIOSH, OSHA, USCG, and EPA’s recommended health
(Occupational
Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous
This plan, at a minimum,
meets the requirements
under OSHA
Standard 29 CFR 1910.120 (Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response:). This
plan has been designed as a Site-Specific HASP for activities
to be conducted at Sites 6,9,48,
and 69 at the Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
5
SITE DESCRIPTION
Submittal Date:
S.O.# 1902450-SRN
Location:
July 9.1992
Camp Leieune, North Carolina
Hazards:
l
Potentially
contaminated
soils [(chemical wastes, mercury wastes, and Une:xploded
Ordnance (UXO)l.
l
Potentially
contaminated groundwater (chemical wastes).
l
Potentially
contaminated surface water and sediment (chemical wastes).
l
Potential
hazards
associated
with drilling
around
utilities
and potentially
contaminated soil and water.
l
Inhalation
of vapors and/or particulates.
l
Ingestion of particulates
l
Dermal
contact
via a hand to mouth pathway.
and eye contact via hand to mouth and absorption
pathways,
respectively.
Area affected:
l
Site 6 - Lots 201 and 203
l
Site 9 - Fire Fighting Training Pit
l
Site 48 - Building 804 lawn to edge of New-River
l
Site 69 - Rifle Range Chemical Dump
Surrounding
l
population:
Site 6 - One Military
(approximately
l
Building
at Lot 201 (approximately
46 acres), no buildings.
25 acres) and at Lot 203
Site is fenced.
Site 9 - Two-acre site bordered by local streets to the east and west. Several buildings
within the immediate area but none within the site boundaries. Site is fenced.
l
Site 48 - One Military
Building - Site area is approximately
l
Site 69 - Indigenous
vegetation
Site is fenced.
- no structures
20,000 square feet.
- Site area is approximately
6 acres.
Topography:
l
Most study areas are flat. The wooded portions of Site 6 and Site 69 slope slightly.
Anticipated
weather conditions:
I\
l
Hot temperatures
ranging from 70’ to 85°F (work expected to take place in July or
August 1992 for a period up to three months).
Additional
l
information:
Site 6 is located on Holcomb Boulevard
previously
between Wallace and Bear Head Creeks;
used to dispose or store hazardous waste. Lot 201 is actively used <tostore
materials and vehicles. Lot 203 is inactive,and is littered with construction debris and
drums.
l
Site 9 is located between Piney Green Road and Holcomb Boulevard
southern border of Site 6. Bear Head Creek is located approximately
along the
500 feet to the
north of the site. This two-acre site is bordered by local streets to the east and west.
An asphalt-lined
extinguishing
aboveground
pit on the site is currently
fires, An oil/water
used to conduct training
separator is located just south of the pit. Three
storage tanks are located just west northwest
could potentially
exercises for
of the training
pit that
contain jet fuel (JP-4 and JP-5) based on markings noted on these
tanks.
l
Site 48 is located on Longstaff Road next to Building
extends from Building
804 (former Photolab). Tlhe area
Mercury
804 to the New River.
from radar units were
reportedly disposed behind building.
l
Site 69 - Rifle Range Chemical Dump is located approximately
intersection
(approximately
of Range Road and Sneads Ferry
6 acres), The site was reportedly
9,000 feet east of the
Road, north
utilized
of Everett
Creek
as a disposal area for
chemical wastes and other hazardous materials.
Wastes included various pesticides,
PCBs, gas cylinders,
chemical warfare agents, chemical
drums containing
training
agent test kits for chemical warfare agents, and miscellaneous hazardous materials
generated/used on base.
7
3.0
SITE ENTRY OBJECTIVES
The long-term
(vertical
objective of the initial
entry is to characterize
and areal) of soil, groundwater,
the degree, type and extent
sediment, and surface water contamination
(where
applicable) for each site. This study will include the following activities:
s
l
Site 6 (Lot 201) - Sediment and surface water sampling, Aquatic/Ecological
Survey at
Bear Head Creek, surface and subsurface (borings) soil sampling, monitoring
l
installations,
groundwater sampling, aquifer testing, and surveying.
Site
203) - Geophysics,
6 (Lot
Aquatic/Ecological
sampling, monitoring
sediment
and surface
water
well
sam.pling,
Survey at Wallace Creek, surface and subsurface (borings) soil
well installations,
groundwater
sampling, surveying, test pits,
aquifer testing, drum sampling, and Ordnance Survey.
l
Site 6 (Wooded Areas) - Surface and subsurface (borings) soil sampling, surveying,
groundwater sampling, and monitoring well installations.
l
Site 9 - Surface and subsurface (borings) soil sampling, groundwater sampling, aquifer
testing, monitoring well installations,
l
and surveying.
_
Site 48 - Geophysics, surface and subsurface (borings) soil sampling, monitormg well
installations,
surveying,
groundwater
sampling,
sediment
and surface water sampling,
aquifer testing, and an Aquatic/Ecological
Survey in the adjacent New
River area.
l
Site 69 - Surveying,
geophysics, groundwater
sampling,
hydropunch
groundwater
sampling (off-site - downgradient),
surface and subsurface (borings) soil samplmg (off-
site-downgradient),
and surface water sampling,
installation
sediment
(off-site-downgradient),
New River and Everett Creek area.
and Aquatic/Ecological
monitoring
well
Survey in the adjacent
4.0
SITE ORGANIZATION
The following
AND COORDINATION
personnel are designated to carry out the stated job functions for both on- and
off-site activities.
(Note: One person may carry out more than one job function.)
~\
Ravmond Wattras
PROJECT MANAGER
Barbara Cummings/Ronald Krivan
PROJECT HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER
Donald Shields
SITE MANAGER
Peter Monday
SITE HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER
Peter Monday
FIELD TEAM LEADER
FIELD TEAM MEMBERS
Richard Dabal
Mathew Bartman
Michael Smith
Ken Martin
Thomas Trebilcock
NAVFACENGCOM
REPRESENTATIVES
Mr. Byron Brant, P.E., (EIC)
ACTIVITY/BASE
(804) 445-2931
REPRESENTATIVES
Mr. George Radford (CLEJ EMD)
FEDERAL/STATE/LOCAL
_
(919) 451-6872
REPRESENTATIVES
Ms. Michele Glenn (EPA)
Mr. Jack Butler (N.C. DEHNR)
CONTRACTOR(S)
Driller:
(to be determined Per Baker’s Basic Ordering Agreements)
Surveyor:
(to be determined per Baker’s Basic Ordering Agreements)
Geophysics:
(to be determined per Baker’s Basic Ordering Agreements)
uxo:
Environmental
All personnel
activities
arriving
or departing
Hazards Specialist International,
the site will be documented
on site must be cleared through
the Site Manager.
9
Inc. (EHSL
in the field Log. All
6.0
SITE CONTROL
6.1
General Requirements
The Field Team Leader is designated to coordinate access control and security on Sites 6,9,48,
and 69. A safe perimeter will be established for all planned%ampling
sites requiring
Level C
and higher protection levels, according to Site Boundary procedures identified in Section 5.3.
Unauthorized
personnel
are not permitted
within
these areas.
Site Conditions
6.2
The prevailing
wind conditions for Sites 6,9,48, and 69 are from the south, southwest.
The Command Post for Sites 6,9,48, and 69 has been established at the Baker field trailer,
which will be located off site, near the Hadnot Point Industrial
Area (HPIA).
Work Zones
5.3
Work Zones shall be established
utilizing
control boundaries
(Work Area) the Contamination
Reduction Zone (CRZ), and the Support Zone (clea:n area).
These boundaries shall be defined as follows:
between the Exclusion
Zone
_
l
Exclusion Zone (Work Area) - A radius of at least 25 feet (barring obstructions)
Site Investigative Activities.
from
l
Hotline - The boundary between the Exclusion Zone and CRZ.*
l
CRZ* - The area between the Exclusion Zone and the Support Zone (located upwind of
the Site Investigative Activities).
l
Contamination
l
Support Zone - The outermost
Investigative Activities.
Control Line - The boundary between the CRZ and the Support Zone.
* Note: A CRZ is required
levels.
area next to the CRZ and upwind
for activities
Refer to Figure 2 for a “Typical Contamination
in Level C protection
and higher
Reduction Zone Layout.”
10
of the Site
protection
Estimated boundary
-
s- - _-
--*
-
Command Post
Prevailing wind direction
Support Zone
.q-_
@
. -.
.
. .
III
Access Control Points.
KII
Contamination
Reduction
Corridor.
Contamination
Reduction
Zone (CRZI.
Exclusion Zona
Note: Area dimensions
not to scale. Distances between
TYPICAL
FIGURE
2
CONTAMINATION
REDUCTION
ZONE
11
LAYOUT
points may vary.
These boundaries will be demarcated using:
l
Colored Boundary Tape, Cones, or equivalent for the Hotline.
l
Colored Boundary Tape, Cones, or equivalent for the Decontamination
Corridor of the
CRZ.
l
Colored Boundary Tape, barriers for the Contamination
signs indicating
As site investigation
Control Line including posted
“Work Area, ” “Authorized Personnel Only”, or equivalent.
locations
vary throughout
the project, adjustments
will be made
accordingly.
Note: Due to the large number of sampling
locations
(over 100) a site map has n.ot been
included in the HASP. However, site maps are provided in the Work Plan.
5.4
Sanitation/Site
Precautions
Standard provisions for sanitation
Attachment
Building
and other precautions to be followed on site are located in
D - Baker Safety SOPS. Specific sanitation facilities for each site will co:nsist of:
804 facilities for Site 48, portable facilities for Site 69, and portable facilities near the
Baker Field Trailer
(within
the HPIA) for Sites 6 and 9. Responsibility
for compliance with
these provisions lies with the Site Manager, Field Team Leader, and SHSO.
12
6.0
HAZARD
6.1
Preliminars
EVALUATION
Evaluation
Research into the history of each of the four sites under investigation
(Sites 6,9,48, and 69)
indicates potential site hazards. A summary of the potential chemical and physical hazards at
each site can be found in Sections 6.2 and 6.3, respectively.
Chemical
6.2
Hazards
The toxicological
properties
sampling investigations
of chemicals/substances
detected during
preli,minary
at Sites 6,9,48, and 69 are identified in Table 6-l.
Exposure Symptoms for substances detected during preliminary
sampling at Sites, 6,9,
48, and 69 are identified in Table 6-2.
The toxicological
properties of potentially
hazardous materials visible at Sites 6 (Lot 203)
and 9 are identified in Table 6-3.
A supplemental
list of chemicals
suspected of being disposed at sites 6 and 69 are
identified in Table 6-4.
Chemical/Material
Safety Data Sheets for the contaminants
identified in Tables 6-3 and
6-4 are included as Attachment C.
6.3
Physical
Hazards
6.3.1
Confined
Space Entry
It is not anticipated
that there will be a need for a confined space entry procedure during the
Remedial Investigation
activities.
However, should this condition
occur, procedures for
entering a confined space are outlined in Attachment D - Baker Safety SOPS.
13
TABLE 6- 1
TOXICOLOGICAL
Detected Analytes
Location
OF CHEMCIALWSUBSTANCES
DETECTED
Source
TLV
(ACGIH)
PEL
(OSHA)
IDLH
DURING
PRELIMINARY
SAMPLING
Routes of Exposure
Ionization
Potential
Acetone
Site 6
GW and SW
750 ppm
750 ppm
20,000 ppm
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
9.69 eV
Barium (as Barium)
Site 6
GW
0.5 mg/ma
0.5 mgfma
1,100 mg/m3
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
NA
Benzene
Site 6
Site 69
GW
GW andSW
10 mm
1 mm
3,000 ppm
BHC,B*
BHC,D
:as BHC, G)
Site 69
GW and SW
0.5 mg/ms
(skin)
0.5 mg/ms
(skin)
Cadmium (as dust)
Site 6
Site 43
Site 69
GW
SD
SD
0.05 mg/m3
,
0.2 mgfms
C - 0.6 mg/ma
Carbon Disulfide
*
PROPERTIES
W4
(CA)
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, SkinlEye Contact
1,000 mgYms Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
50 mg/ms
Inhalation,
Ingestion
9.24 eV
NG
NA
Inhalation, Absorption,
Assumes original chemical to be a technical grade of benzene hexachloride (64.0% alpha, 10.0% beta, 13.0% gamma, and 9.0% delta). The gamma
isomer of BHC is the only regulated isomer and has a PEL of 0.5 mg/ma.
/
/
:
)
TABLE 6-1 (Continued)
TOXICOLOGICAL
Detected Analytes
PROPERTIES
Location
OF CHEMICALS/SUBSTANCES
Source
DETECTED
TLV
(ACGIH)
PEL
(OSHA)
IDLH
DURING
PRELIMINARY
SAMPLING
Routes of Exposure
Ionization
Potential
DDD top’ & pp? (1)
Site 6
Site 69
SL
SD
1 mglms
1 mg/m3
(skin)
CA)
Inhalation,Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NA
DDE (TDE)
COP’& PP? (1)
Site 6
Site 69
SD and SL
SD
1 mg/m3
1 mg/ms
(skin)
(CA)
Inhalation,Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NA
DDT top’ tk pp?
Site 6
SD and SL
1 mglms
1 mg/ma
&in)
(CA)
Inhalation,Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NA
1,2-Dibromoethane
(ethylene dibromide)
Site 9
Site 69
GW
GW
(A21
20 PPm
C-30ppm
400 ppm
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
9.45 eV
(skin)
1,2-Dichloroethane
(ethylene dichloride)
Site 69
GW and SW
10 mm
1 mm
4,000 ppm
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
11.05 eV
1,1-Dichloroethylene
(vinylidene chloride)
Site 69
GW
5wm
1 mm
Unknown
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
Unknown
Ethyl benzene
Site 69
SW
100 ppm
100 ppm
2,000 ppm
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
,
3.76 eV
Lead (as lead)
Site 6
Site 9
Site 69
GW and SW
GW
GW and SD
0.05 m&m3
0.05 mg/ms
700 mg/ma
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
NA
Manganese
Site 6
Site 48
Site 69
GW, SW & SD
SD
GW, SW, & SD
5 mg/ms
5 mg/ms
NG
Inhalation, Ingestion
NA
Mercury (as mercury
vapor)
Site 46
Site 69
SL and SD
GW and SW
0.01 mglma
(skin)
0.05 mg/m3
(skin)
23 mgims
Inhalation, Absorption,
Skin/Eye Contact
NG
Pentachlorophenol
Site 69
SW and SD
0.5 mg/ms
(skin)
0.5 mg/ms
150 mg/m3
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NA
,
TABLE 6-1 (Continued)
TOXICOLOGICAL
PROPERTIES
OF CHEMICALS/SUBSTANCES
DETECTED
DURING
PRELIMINARY
SAMPLING
I
Detected Analytes
Phenols
Location
I
PEL
(OSHA)
Source
I
IDLH
Routes of Exposure
I
Ionization
Potential
Site 9
GW
5 pm
(skin)
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
8.50 eV
Tetrachloroethene
(Perchloroethylene)
Site 6
Site 69
GW
GW
50 mm
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
9.32 eV
I
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Site 6
Site 69
GW
GW and SW
1 ppm (skin)
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
I
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Site 69
SW
10 ppm (skin)
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Ski.n/lXye Contact
I
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
I
1 ppm (skim)
10 mm
150 ppm (CA)
500 ppm (CA)
+
Trichloroethene
(trichloroethylene)
Site 6
Site 69
GW and SW
GW and SW
50 mm
Trans-1,2dichloroethene (1,2-dichloroethylene)
Site 6
Site 69
GW and SW
GW and SW
200 ppm,
200 ppm
4,000 ppm
Toluene
Site 69
GW and SW
100 ppm
100 ppm
2,000 ppm
Vinyl chloride
Site 6
Site 69
GW and SW
GW and SW
5 mm (Al)
50 mm
1,000 ppm
CA)
‘“”
11.10 eV
11.00 eV
9.45 eV
Inhalation
9.99 eV
I
(1) TLVs and PELs for DDD and DDE were not published; therefore, the levels and subsequent information provided for DDT was substituted.
SD
SW
GW
NA
TLV
-
Sediment Sample
Surface Water Sample
Groundwater Sample
Not Appiicabie
Time-weighted average (TWA)
concentration published by the ACGIH
SL
Skin
CA
Al
PEL
ppm
-
Soil Sample
Potential for dermal absorption
Potential human carcinogen
Confirmed human carcinogen
TWA concentration published by OSHA
parts per million (in air)
Unknown
C
NG
A2
IDLH
mg/ma -
- IDLH is unknown
Ceiling concentration, not to be exceeded
Not Given
Suspected human carcinogen
Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health
milligrams per cubic meter (in air)
TABLE 6-2
DETECTED
EXPOSURE SYMPTOMS FOR SUBSTANCES
DURING PRELIMINARY
SAMPLING AT SITES 6,9,46, AND 69
Exposure Symptoms
Detected Analytes
Acetone
Eye, nose and throat irritation;
Barium (as Barium)
Upper respiratory irritation;
pulse; eye and skin irritation
Benzene
Eye, nose and respiratory irritation; nausea and staggered walk;
dermatitis; bone marrow depressant; (carcinogen)
BHC,B
BHC,D
(as BHC, G)
Eye, nose and throat irritant; headache; nausea; respiratory
difficulty; skin irritation ; muscle spasms
Cadmium (as dust)
Pulmonary edema; dyspnea; cough, headache; chills, muscle aches,
nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mild anemia; (carcinogen)
Carbon Disulfide
Dizziness, headache, poor sleep, anorexia/low weight; eye and skin
burns, dermatitis
Chlorobenzene
Skin, eye and nose irritation;
Chloroform
Dizziness, mental dullness, nausea, disorientation, headache,
fatigue, anesthesia; skin and eye irritant; (carcinogen)
Chloromethane
(methyl chloride)
dizziness; dermatitis
gastroenteritis;
and burning
muscle spasms; slow
drowsiness; uncoordination
Dizziness, nausea, vomiting, visual disturbance, stagger, slurred
speech, convulsions, frostbite (carcinogen)
Chromium (as metal)
Histologic fibrosis of lungs
DDD (op’ & pp’) (1)
Lips, tongue and face paresthesia; tremors, apprehension, dizziness,
confusion, malaise, headache, fatigue, vomiting, eye and skin
irritant. (carcinogen)
DDE (TDE)
bp’ 8zpp9 (1)
Lips, tongue and face paresthesia; tremors, apprehension, Gzziness,
confusion, malaise, headache, fatigue, vomiting, eye and skin
irritant. (carcinogen)
DDT top’ 8z pp3
Lips, tongue and face paresthesia; tremors, apprehension, dizziness,
confusion, malaise, headache, fatigue, vomiting, eye and skin
irritant. (carcinogen)
1,2-Dibromoethane
(ethylene dibromide)
Eye and respiratory irritant;
1,2-Dichloroethane
(ethylene dichloride)
CNS depression; nausea, vomiting, dermatitis, irritated eyes with
cornea1 opacity (carcinogen)
1,1-Dichloroethylene
(vinylidene chloride)
CNS depression
Ethyl benzene
Eye and mucus membrane irritant,
(1) Symptoms of Exposure and First Aid Instructions
provided for DDT.
dermatitis with vesiculation
dermatitis, narcosis, coma
for DDD and DDE were copied from the information
17
,..\
TABLE 6-2 (Continued)
DETECTED
EXPOSURE SYMPTOMS FOR SUBSTANCES
DURING PRELIMINARY
SAMPLING AT SITES 6,9,48, AND 69
Symptoms of Exposure
Detected Analytes
,z
,’ \
_..\
Lead (as lead)
Weakness, lassitude, insomnia. Facial pallor, malnutrition,
constipation, abdomen pain. wrist and ankle paralysis, eye irritant,
hypotension
Manganese
Parkinson’s, insomnia, mental confusion, metal fume fever, dry
throat, cough, tight chest, flu-like fever, low back pain, vomiting,
malaise, fatigue
Mercury (as mercury vapor)
Cough, chest pain, tremor, insomnia, irritability,
indecision,
headache, fatigue, anorexia, eye and skin irritant
Pentachlorophenol
Eye, nose and throat irritation; sneezing, coughing, weakness,
anorexia, sweating, headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, chest
pain, high fever, dermatitis
Phenols
Eye, nose and throat irritation; weakness; muscle aches; dark urine;
cyanosis; skin burns; dermatitis; convulsions
Tetrachloroethene
(Pentachloroethylene)
Eye, nose and throat irritant; flushing of face and neck; vertigo,
dizziness, incoordination, headache (carcinogen)
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Nausea, vomiting, abdomen pain, tremor in fmgers, jaundice,
dermatitis
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Eye and nose irritant,
Trichloroethene
(trichloroethylene)
Headache, vertigo, visual disturbance, tremors, nausea, vomiting,
eye irritation, dermatitis (carcinogen)
Trans-1,2dichloro-ethene
(1,2dichloroethylene)
Eye and respiratory irritant,
Toluene
Fatigue, weakness, confusion, euphoria, dizziness, headache, dilated
pupils, muscle fatigue, dermatitis
Vinyl chloride
Weakness, abdomen pain, GI bleeding, cyanosis of extremities
(carcinogen)
.
18
CNS depression (carcinogen)
CNS depression
TABLE 6-3
TOXICOLOGICAL
I
Chemical
PROPERTIES
OF POTENTIALLY
I
IDLH
Location
I
I
Site 6
(Lot 203)
Drums
Site 6
I (Lot 203)
Above Ground
Tank
I
Site 6
(Lot 203)
Above Ground
Tank
Kerosene
(Fuel Oil No. 1)
Site 6
I (Lot 203)
Above Ground
Tank
Lubricants
1Site 6
Drums
Diesel Fuel Oil
(Fuel Oil No. 2)
II
Drums
Freon (as Freon 10 - carbon
Jet Fuels
(JP-4 and JP-5)
NG Skin CA
A2
TLV PEL IDLH PPm mg/ma
MATERIALS
VISIBLE
AT SITES 6 AND 9
Routes of Exposure
I
Tricresyl-phosphate
(Triorthocrespylphosphate)
I
HAZARDOUS
Site 9
I
Above Ground
Tank
I
I
0.1 mg/m3
(skin)
40 mgfma
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NG
NG
NG
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NG
NG
Inhalation, Ingestion,
Skin/Eye Contact
NG
NG
NG
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NG
NG
NG
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
NG
5 mm (@id
A2
2 mm
300 ppm (CA)
Inhalation, Absorption,
Ingestion, Skin/Eye Contact
11.47 eV
NG
NG
NG
I
I
I
0.1 mg/m3
(skin)
Ionization
Potential
NG
300 ppm
NG
NG
I
Not Given
Potential for dermal absorption
Potential human carcinogen
Suspected human carcinogen
Time-weighted Average (TWA) concentration published by the ACGIH
TWA concentration published by OSHA
Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health
parts per million (in air)
- milligrams per cubic meter (in air)
Inhalation, Absorption,
Skin/Eye Contact
NG
TABLE 6-4
SUPPLEMENTAL
LIST OF CHEMICALS
(not otherwise mentioned)
Chemicals suspected as being disposed at Sites 6 and 69: (1)
(1)
Chemical
Site Location(s)
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
Pentachlorophenol
Malathion
Parathion
Diazinon
HTH (calcium hypochlorite)
Chloroacetophenone (CN)
Chemical Warfare Agent Training
Kits
(contain surety agent simulants)
*HD (Mustard Gas)
*GB (Sari4
*vx
*HT (Vesicant)
6 (Lot 201) and 69
69
69
69
69
69
69
/ \
69
69
69
69
69
The possibility for direct contact with the pure form of chemicals identified at Site 69 is not
anticipated since only offsite investigations are being conducted at this time.
*Low probability for these chemicals to be found on site however, “MSDS’s” are provided in
Attachment C.
20
6.3.2
Heat Stress
i’-.
Monitoring
Provisions for monitoring
\
for heat stress will be determined by the SHSO and performed as
I I
outlined below.
Heat stress monitoring
protective
outerwear
is required for personnel wearing semipermeable
when there is an ambient air temperature
or impermeable
greater than 70°F. One or
more of the following procedures will be implemented when this condition exists:
1. Increased awareness of heat stress symptoms and buddy monitoring.
2. Fluid intake discipline.
3. Self monitoring of urine output quantities to prevent dehydration.
4. Work-rest intervals.
5. Calculate the Heat Exposure Threshold
using the following steps:
Limit Value (TLV) for work-rest intervals
a. Calculate the WBGT (Wet Bulb Globe Temperature) Index using the Queslte Heat
Stress Monitor
b. Estimate the work load using the following guidelines:
(1) Light work = sitting or standing to control machines, performing light hand
or arm work.
(2) Moderate work = walking about with moderated lifting and pushing.
(3) Heavy work = pick and shovel work.
c.
Evaluate the calculations against the following Heat Exposure TLVs in “C or “F.
Work - Rest Regimen
Work Load
Light
Moderate
75% work - 25%
Continuous
workrest, each hour
50% work - 50% rest, each hour
30.6
(87)
30.0 (86)
31.4 (89)
28.0 (80)
(82)
26.7
29.4 (85)
25.9 (77)
(78) -I
25.0
27.9 (82)
25% work - 75% rest, each hour
32.2 (90)
31.1(88)
30.0 (86) i
-.
*
For unacclimatized
by 25°C.
Heavy
\
workers, the permissible heat exposure TLV should be reduced
21
Special considerations
o
Clothing
clothing.
- Subtract
2 from the TLV to compensate for the use of semipermeable
l
Acclimatization
- After approximately
themselves to their environment.
a week, workers should have acclimated
~\
l
Fitness - Physically fit workers will adjust more readily to a change in environment.
l
Medication - Some medications can predispose individuals
to heat-induced illnesses.
Causes and Symptoms
The following
Site personnel
heat stress causes and symptoms are provided for buddy monitoring
must realize that monitoring
the physical condition
purposes.
of fellow personnel in
Level B and C protective ensembles will be difficult.
1. Heat rash results from continuous exposure to heat or humid air.
2. Heat cramps are caused by heavy sweating and inadequate fluid intake.
Symptoms
include muscle spasms and pain in the hands, feet, and abdomen.
3. Heat exhaustion
occurs when body organs attempt
to keep the body cool, due to
inadequate fluid intake and personnel not acclimated to the environment.
Symptoms
include pale, cool, moist skin; heavy sweating; and dizziness.
4. Heat stroke is the most serious form of heat stress. It is a MEDICAL EMERGENCY.
Symptoms are red, hot, h
skin; lack of perspiration;
nausea; dizziness and confusion;
strong, rapid pulse rate; and coma.
The need to seek medical attention
and the urgency in seeking medical attention depends on
the symptoms and the severity of the symptoms displayed by the affected individual.
stroke is noted or suspected, medical attention
must be sought IMMEDIATELY.
should be taken to cool the body to prevent serious injury
cause hypothermia
and should be avoided.
22
If heat
IEfforts
or death. Excessive cooli.ng can
Prevention
Fluid intake should be increased during rest schedules to prevent dehydration.
water is best; however, diluted
substituted
electrolyte
for water. Each individual
solutions
Drinking
(i.e., Gatorade or equivalent)
cool
can be
should monitor their urine output and adjust their
fluid intake to ensure that urine output and urine color are close to normal. Additiona. means
for preventing
heat-induced illnesses may include providing shelter or cooling devices, such as
vests and showers.
6.3.3
Explosion
and Fire
In general, the following
items present potential
physical hazards and will be monitored
closely:
l
Explosion and fire resulting from:
)
heavy equipment malfunction.
)
penetration into underground utility/service
)
ignition of trapped flammable vapors.
)
vehicular accidents
)
puncturing
Provisions
combustible
of drums during test pitting
for monitoring
for potential
fire/explosive
conditions
will include the use of a
gas meter (as indicated in Section 11.2.1) and the performance of utility
and geophysical surveys prior to conducting intrusive
identified,
lines (gas, electric, fuel).
provisions
activities.
As additional
checks
concerns are
for making changes to the HASP will be presented by the SHSO, as
needed.
6.3.4
Site-Specific
Safety Hazards
It is expected that the following
additional
safety hazards may be present at each of the
respective sites.
Site 6 (Lot 201)
0
Military
vehicular traffic
23
Site 6 (Lot 203)*
l
Exposure to deteriorating debris such as:
) Empty drums
) Sheet metal
) Above ground tanks
) Shredded tires
) Cables
) Barbed wire
) Empty crates/disposal bins
) Wooden pallets
b Glass
) Spent ammunition
l
Unsecured compressed gas cylinders
Sites 9 and 48
l
None apparent
Site 69*
l
l
*
Unsecured compressed gas cylinders
Fired and unfired rifle cartridges
All identification/management
of ammunition,
UXO, etc. will be controlled by the
subcontractor (EHS). Removal of live UXO will be handled by military personnel at Camp
Lejeune. Baker personnel are not to be directly involved with these types of hazards.
Applicable EHS Standard Operating Procedures are provided in Attachment E.
Provisions
for the monitoring
of hazards particular
to the specific site activities
(such as
slippery ground, uneven terrain, overhead equipment, electrical lines, etc.) shall be addressed
at the pre-entry brief-
by the SHSO and Site Manager. All personnel are expected to adhere
to all applicable compliance regulations
such as, but not limited to, OSHA standards 29 CFR
1910 and 1926.
6.4
Radiation
Although
anticipated,
Hazards
the presence of a radiological
a radiation
survey meter will be used as a standard operating procedure (Section
11.4 identifies the monitoring
Monitoring
wastes or radioisotopes at Sites 6,9,48 and 69 is not
requirements).
at the work site with a radiation
survey meter (Victoreen Model 450 ionization
chamber) will determine gamma ray exposure rates and serve as an indicator for the presence
of beta and alpha particles.
If the monitoring
shows a level greater than 1 mR/hr, work will
24
stop and not resume until the SHSO and PHSO have been notified and additional
measures are instituted
such as, retreating
protective
a safe distance from the source and employing
shielding measures (if necessary).
A brief discussion of the different types of ionizing radiation, for the benefit of site personnel,
\
is as follows:
Alpha particles,
0
potential
because of their relatively
but the lowest penetrating
large mass, have the highest ionizing
quality of all forms of ionizing radiation,,
Alpha
particles travel no more than 10 centimeters in air and can be shielded completely with
paper.
Adverse health affects from alpha particles
inhalation,
0
via
ingestion, or a break in the skin.
Beta particles
penetrating.
have a lower ionizing
Beta particles
potential
than alpha particles
can be shielded with aluminum
absorbed into the human body via inhalation,
0
are caused by absorption
Gamma rays are the most penetrating
or Lucite.
They can be
ingestion, or skin penetration.
form of ionizing radiation.
gamma rays but not completely eliminate
but are more
Shielding can reduce
them. They can be absorbed via inh.alation
and ingestion of radioactive material, or can penetrate intact skin.
Any questions regarding
the different types of ionizing radiation,
should be directed to the
SHSO.
6.5
Environmental
Hazards
Hazardous Flora
Incidence of contact by individuals
to poisonous/thorny
plants is a real threat.
Bare skin
should be covered as much as practical when working in forested areas (i.e., long pants and
shirt, steel toe boots, leather or cotton gloves, safety glasses, and head protection).
Personnel
should avoid entering an area in the direct path of known poisonous flora (i.e., poison ivy/oak),
a secondary route should be selected. Care should also be taken when walking in such areas as
uneven terrain or vines may present a tripping hazard.
25
While attempting
to cut into dense underbrush,
hazards exist from the sharp machete, gas-
powered weed eater, etc. Care should be taken when using such devices. All rashes and other
injuries will be reported to the SHSO.
Hazardous Fauna
All animal life must be treated with respect. Without proper training,
able to differentiate
between dangerous and nondangerous
personnel may not be
varieties.
Working
in wet or
swampy areas unprotected will not be allowed. Contact with surface water will be k.ept to a
minimum.
Mosquitoes
pose a nuisance and physical
hazard to field personnel.
As a nuisance,
they
distract workers, leading to accidents. Mosquitoes also pose a physical threat by injecting live
microorganisms
into their victim.
Perfumes and scented deodorants should be avoided.
Donning light colored clothing is preferable, as mosquitoes are not attracted to lighter c;olors.
There is a potential
to come in contact with other dangerous insects. These include fi:re ants,
chiggers, bees, wasps, hornets, mites, fleas, spiders, and ticks.* All personnel should perform
“checks” on each other periodically
and at the end of the work shift. All insect bites must be
reported to the SHSO.
Poisonous snakes such as the rattlesnake,
copperhead, and cottonmouth (water moccasin), all
known as pit vipers, are common to the United States. Snakes, as a general rule, are timid
creatures.
They typically
do not attack people but will bite when provoked, angered, or
accidentally
injured (as when stepped on). When encountering
a snake(s), avoid quick/jerky
motions, loud noises, and retreat slowly; do not provoke the snake(s). Cover bare skin as much
as practical (i.e., long pants and shirt, steel toe boots, leather gloves, safety glasses and head
protection)
when working in forested/swampy
areas. If bitten, follow procedures outl.ined in
Section 12.6, Emergency Medical Treatment.
Prior to initiating
sensitivities
*
site activities,
each individual
shall be questioned
as to any known
to the previously mentioned organisms or agents.
Site personnel have been provided with a copy of Baker’s policy (per our medical
consultant) regarding the signs andsymptoms of exposure for Lyme Disease.
26
7.0
7.1
PERSONAL
PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
Levels of Protection
Based on an evaluation
of potential
site hazards, the following
levels of personal protection
have been designated for the applicable work areas or tasks. Upgrading or downgrading
level of protection will be based on real time monitoring
the Levels of Protection will be the responsibility
Location
Sites 6,48 & 69
Sites 6,9,48 & 69
Sites 6 (Lot 2031,
48&69
Sites 6,9,48 & 69
and working conditions.
the
Changes in
of the SHSO.
Job Task
Sediment/ Surface Water [email protected])
Surveying
Non-intrusive Geophysics
X
X
~Surface Soil Sampling (3)
X
Sites 6,9.48 & 69 ,Monitoring Well Installation (3)
I
Sites 6,9,48 & 69 ~Groundwater Sampling
(Monitoring Well)@
I
iGroundwater Sampling (Hydropuuch) (3)
Site 69
~Drum Sampling (4)
Site 6 (Lot 2031
Test Pits
Site 6 (Lot 203)
I
Sites 6,48 & 69
Sites 6 (Lot 203)
&69
Sites 6,9,48 Zz 69
Sites 6,9 & 48
I
1 XC3 1 x(6, 1 c+
I
I
I
ID+
X
X
1x1
I
t
I
(1) The identification
of unexploded ordnance (UXO) will be performed solely by 13aker’s
subcontractor (EHS) per the subcontractor’s standard operating procedures (SOPS).
Additional levels of protection specific to this type of work beyond the levels specified for
the aforementioned
tasks, are to be determined by the subcontractor.
Should the
subcontractor be present during the performance of the other job tasks listed above, he/she
shall be required to meet the level of protection specified for that task.
(2) For Site 48 only. Respiratory protection to include an MSA half-face cartridge respirator
with approved Mercury Vapor/HEPA
Cartridge and goggles, if a proper fit can be
achieved. Otherwise, Level B protection.
(3) Only offsite soil and groundwater sampling are proposed at Site 69.
(4) Drum sampling will be performed according to Drum Sampling Procedures outl.ined in
Attachment D.
(5) Removal of live UXO will be performed by Camp Lejeune military personnel.
(6) For Site 9 only.
(7) For Site 6 (Lot 203 only).
27
Based on the known or suspected contaminants
indicated
at each site, protection Levels B through D, as
in Section 7-1, are believed to be the appropriate
and/or periodic
monitoring
(Tables 11-l through
in the breathing
levels of protection.
zone with OVAs/HNus
Continuous
and detector tubes
11-4) will be conducted to evaluate this level of protection.
greater
than those discussed in Section 11.2.1 will require
_\
including the likelihood of protection upgrades.
investigation
Levels
by the SHSO,
Specific protective equipment for each level of protection is as follows:
Level B
Chemical Resistant Clothing (1)
Air Line Res irator ALR) with 5-minute
escape pack &CBAE!l
SCBA
Chemical Resistant Gloves (2)
(Inner-Disposable)
Chemical Resistant Gloves (Outer) (3)
Safety Shoes/Boots
Boots (Chemical Resistant - Overboots)
Hard Hat
2-Way Communications
Hearing Protection (Optional)*
Level D +
Chemical Resistant Clothing (1) or uncoated
Tyveke Coveralls
StFs/Boots with Chemical Resistant
85;;
Lo
Two-way Communications
Hard Hat (Optional)*
Chemical-Resistant Gloves (2)
(Inner-Disposable)
Chemical-Resistant Gloves (Outer) (3)
Hearing Protection (Optional)*
Safety Glasses/Goggles
Full-face Cartridge Respirator on Standby
(1) Polyethylene-coated
(2) Nitrile or Latex
(3) Neoprene or Nitrile
Level C
Chemical Resistant Clothing (1)
Full-Face Cartridge Respirator
Chemical-Resistant Gloves (2)
(Inner-Disposable)
Two-way Communications
Chemical-Resistant Gloves (Outer) (3)
Hearing Protection (Optional)*
Safety Shoes/Boots
Boots (Chemical Resistant - Overboots)
Hard Hat
Level D
Normal Work Clothes with Long Sleeve Shirt
orCoveralls
Safety Shoes/Boots
Boots (Chemical Resistant Overboots)
(Optional)
Two-way Communications
Hard Hat (Optional)*
Gloves (Outer)
Hearing Protection (Optional)*
Safety Glasses/Goggles
Tyveke or Saranexe
* The need for hearing protection and hard hat protection will be determined by the SHSO,
however, hearing protection and hard hat protection is required during drilling operations.
CHANGES TO THE SPECIFIED LEVELS OF PROTECTION SHALL ONLY BE MADE
WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE SITE HEALTH AND SAFETY OFFICER AND THE SITE
MANAGER. APPROPRIATE NOTIFICATION
WILL BE MADE TO THE NAVY E:IC, AS
NECESSARY.
28
Respiratory
7.2
Protection
Level B
Respiratory Protection will include a combination (Cperson manifold) “North” Brand Air Line
Respirator
(ALR) System with &minute
escape pack. The rescue worker(s) will be equipped
with a “North”
Brand Self-Contained
This individual
may also be responsible for monitoring the supplied air system as long as there
is clear visibility
Breathing Apparatus @CBA) for emergency purposes.
between the workers and the ALR system.
Level C
A “North or MSA” Brand full-face NIOSH certified air-purifying
with a combination
organic vapor, acid gases, andhighly
appropriate
cartridge
contaminant
concentrations.
toxic particulates
for use with the detected hazardous materials
Upgrade/downgrade
based on measured “realtime”
changeover
cartridge respirator equipped
or protection
air contaminant
cartridge”,
is the
and the measured
in the level of respiratory protection. will be
concentrations
(see Section 11.2). Cartridge
upgrade will occur when one or more of the following
warning
properties have been observed: PID/FID concentrations in the breathing zone greater than or
equal to 100 ppm for vapor/gas cartridges;
vapor/gas
cartridges;
breakthrough
breathing
exposure duration
resistance
greater than eight ho,urs for
due to overloaded
particulate
filters;
odor
due to overloaded vapor/gas cartridges; and other warning properties,, where
appropriate, for specialty filter cartridges (i.e., end of service life indicators).
*
For Site 48, a half-face
NIOSH approved MSA cartridge
respirator
equipped with a
mercury vapor/HEPA cartridge, with end of service life indicator, is the only air-purifying
cartridge respirator system allowed for this site.
Level D +
A NIOSH certified air-purifying
cartridge respirator meeting all the requirements
identified
under Level C, on standby.
Criteria
for using this type of respiratory
protection has been determined by qualified Baker
personnel in compliance with Attachment D - Baker Safety SOPS.
29
7.3
Care and Cleaning: of Personal Protective
Eauipment
Provisions for the care and cleaning of personal protective equipment used on site can be found
in Attachment
D - Baker Safety SOPS. Responsibility
lies with the Site Manager and/or Field Team Leader.
30
for compliance with these provisions
8.0
SITE WORK PLANS/SITE
A Work Plan, Field Sampling
PERSONNEL
and Analysis
Plan, and Quality
Assurance
Project Plan
detailing the tasks to be performed at each of the four sites have been bound separately, due to
their size. However, copies of these documents will accompany the HASP.
Work party(s) consisting of two to six personnel will perform the following functions:
Function
Name*
Donald Shields
Site Manager/Project Geologist
Peter Monday
Site Health and Safety Officer/Field Team Lealder
Richard Dabal
Environmental
Scientist
Michael Smith
Environmental
Scientist
Thomas Trebilcock
Environmental
Scientist
Mathew Bartman
Environmental
Scientist
Ken Martin
Environmental
Scientist
Drilling
Drilling
Contractor
Activities
Geophysics Contractor
Geophysics Activities
Survey Contractor
Site Survey Activities
EHS
UXO.and Surety Identification
* Note:
At the time of the Health and Safety Plan Publication, specific-site personnel and
contractors had not been fully determined. Personnel identification to be provided
prior to beginning site activities.
31
9.0
COMMUNICATION
PROCEDURES
The “Buddy System” (two-person teams) will be employed during all site activities,
in the Exclusion Zone (Work Zone) should remain in constant communication
of the Site Manager, or his/her representative.
Personnel
or within sight
Any failure of communication
requires an
evaluation of whether personnel should discontinue Activities;
Radio communications
will be employed by site teams to remain in constant contact with the
Site Manager, SHSO, and other field teams.
Air horns
will
be used for communication
personnel
during
Level C or B operations.
blast is the emergency
signal to indicate
during
emergency
evacuation
of site
One long (3 second) or continuous
that emergency
air horn
assistance is required.
The following standard hand signals will be used in case of failure of radio communicattions or
when radio communications
Hand gripping throat
are ineffective during Level C or B operations:
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - Out of air, can’t breathe
Grip partner‘s wrist or both hands around waist . . . - Leave area immediately
Hands on top of head
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ._.. .<.. . . . . - Need assistance
Thumbs up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - OK, I am all right, I understand
Thumbs down
Coordination
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - No, negative
between Baker and Contractor
Personnel
is the responsibility
Manager. The best means for securing the lines of communication
of t;he Site
will be determined prior to
start-up by on-site project personnel.
Telephone communication
during mobilization
*
activities.
at the Baker Site Trailer
The phone number is*
To be determined just prior to site arrival.
32
(Command Post) will be established
.
i
,-,
I
10.0
DECONTAMINATION
10.1
Site Decontamination
Personnel
and equipment
decontaminated.
PROCEDURES
leaving
The following
the Exclusion
Zone (Work Area) shall be thoroughly
protocol shall be used for the decontamination
stations
according to levels of protection:
Level D +
Level D
1.
2.
I
3.
4.
Level C
Equipment drop
Outer boot and glove
wash
1.
2.
3.
6.
Outer boot and glove
rinse
Outer boot and glove
removal
Coverall
removal/disnosal
Inner glove
Equipment drop
1.
Boot and glove gross 2.
contamination
removal*
I
Boot and glove
3.
wash*
Boot and glove
4.
5.
7.
Hand/Face wash
7.
Hand/face wash
8.
Equipment wipe
down
8.
Equipment cleaning
Equipment drop
Outer boot and glove
wash
Level B
1.
2.
6.
I
Outer boot and glove 3.
rinse
Outer boot and glove 4.
removal
I
Coverall
16.
removal/disposal
Respirator removal
6.
9,
9.
4.
5.
Respirator
cleaning/sanitizing
10. Equipment cleaning
Equipment drop-I
Outer boot and glove
wash
I
Outer boot and glove
rinse
Outer boot and glove
removal
SCBAor air linr
removal
Coverall
-removal/disposal
Hand/face wash
10. Respiratory
*Optional - depends on degree of contamination and type of PPE used.
The following decontamination
equipment is required for Level C and higher protection levels
and recommended for Levels D and D + protection:
Two small tubs (one set of wash and rinse water)
Scrub brush
Towels
Disposable wipes
Pressurized sprayers for rinsing
Contaminated clothing disposal bag or drum
Respirator cleaning solution
Liquinox and water as the decontamination
33
solution.
Y.
The decontamination
liquids
and clothing
will be contained and disposed according to the
policy defined in the Field Sampling and Analysis Plan (FSAP)(Baker, 1992).
I
10.2
Emergency
Decontamination
Stations
-.\
Emergency personnel decontamination
Level D
Equipment drop, boot
and glove removal*,
and coverall removal*.
will include the following stations*:
LevelD+
LevelC
Equipment drop, outer
boot and glove removal,
coverall removal/disposal.
and inner glove removal/
disposal.
Equipment drop, outer
boot and glove removal,
coverall removal/disposal,
respirator removal, and
inner glove removal/
disposal.
Level B
Equipment drop, outer
boot and glove removal,
SCBA or escape tank
removal, coverall removal/
disposal, SCBA or ALR
face shield removal, and
inner glove removal/
* If circumstances dictate that contaminated clothing cannot be readily removed, then
remove gross contamination and wrap injured personnel with clean garments/blankets,
to avoid contaminating other personnel or transporting equipment.
All emergency medical personnel are to be immediately informed of the injured person’s
condition and potential contaminants and provided with all pertinent chemical data.
10.3
Equipment
Provisions
Decontamination
for the decontamination
of equipment
equipment used. Specific decontamination
will be based on the size and type of
procedures for Sites 6,9,48, and 69 can be found in
the Final Field Sampling and Analysis Plan (FSAP)(Baker, 1992).
34
11.0
SITE SAFETY AND HEALTH
11.1
Responsibilities
The SHSO, as identified
requirements
responsible
for safety andl health
on site.
Environmental
11.2
in Section 4.0, is directly
The following
Monitoring
environmental
monitoring
instruments
shall be used on site at the specified
intervals.
11.2.1 Point Source
Point source monitoring
activity.
However,
is defined by this HASP as monitoring
the action levels presented below are based on levels detected in the
breathing
zone (bz) of the work party personnel.
performed
at each site has been outlined
required when air concentrations
certain situations,
performed at the source of the
required for the tasks being
in Tables 11-l through
11-4. Drager tubes are
reach a certain level according to an HNu/OVA response. In
however, Driiger
real time instrumentation.
Monitoring
tubes are specified for use in the same manner as other
Refer to Tables 11-1 through 11-4 for frequencies of use.
The action levels, given the concentration measured by real time instruments,
are as follows:
*HNulOVA
0
0
0
0
Background to 5 ppm - Level D protection
> 5 ppm to 7 ppm for greater than 5 continuous minutes = Level C plus Drager
tube monitoring
> 7 ppm for up to 15 continuous minutes = Level B or stop work and consult
SHSO
Instantaneous peak concentrations >70 ppm = Level B or stop work and consult
SHSO
*HNu with 11.7 eV probe or Foxboro OVA 128.
Driiger Tubes
0
0
0
Below limits of detection (BLD) to less than the PEL/TLV* - Level D
>PEL to 5 times the PEWTLV = Level C (if adequate NIOSH certified airpurifying cartridge is available -- otherwise Level B -- or stop work and consult
SHSO)
> 5 times the PEL/TLV = Level B or stop work and consult SHSO
*Whichever is lower.
35
MONITORING
TABLE 11-l
EQUIPMENT AND FREQUENCY
Drager Calorimetric
FOR SITE 6
Tubes(l)
HNu
Job Task
0;:
+
(67 26061)
Vinyl
Chloride
(67 28661)
Benzene
Combustible
Gas [email protected])
Radiation
Survey
[email protected])
3edimentiSurface Water Sampling
Surveying
Yen-intrusive
Geophysics
Surface Soil Sampling
!Aonitoring Well Installation
Zlroundwater Sampling
Drum Sampling (Lot 203 only)
4quatic./Ecological Survey
JXO Identification*
(Lot 203 only)
3ubsurface (Boring) Soil Sampling
rest Pitting (Lot 203 only)
4quifer Test
*
k
D
This task is performed by the subcontractor prior to Baker personnel enterin the site and then on a standb basis as
other tasks are erformed. The subcontractor is solely responsible for Ident’ lf ying UXO according to their BOPs refer
to Attachment E ) and informing Baker and other contractor personnel of the appropriate measures to be taken. L ive
UXO will be handled by military personnel at Camp Lejeune.
= Initially
= Periodically
= Continuously
= Discretionary
Note:
-
At start of job task to confirm level of protection
When site condition or set-up changes or when a new area is entered
Monitor levels continuous1
At the discretion of the SHJO
As air concentrations are measured, they should be documented. In the case of continuous monitoring every 15 to
30 minutes.
(1) Dra er tubes to be used at this site are subject to change, based on site concerns.
(2) Conf inuous Monitorin is re uired when combustible gas readings are between 10% and 20%.
(3) The Victoreen Model 46 0 Ra 1.lation Survey Meter measures amma radiation and detects the presence of beta and
alpha articles when the mylar screen is e sed. Alpha par 4icle detection is possible only when the mylar screen is
very cPose (< 3 mm) to the surface being tesTOed. The meter will be held at the survey location for 9 seconds for a
complete response.
+ An OVA will be used during all intrusive activities where methane gas is anticipated (i.e., landfills)
TABLE 11-2
MONITORING
EQUIPMENT
Dr$iger
Calorimetric
Tubes(l)
HNu
Job Task
AND FREQUENCY
FOR SITE 9
Combustible
Gas [email protected])
Radiation
Survey [email protected])
I&P
I&D
I&D
C
C
c
0;:
+
(67 28561)
Benzene
Surface Soil Sampling
Monitoring Well Installation
Groundwater Sampling
Subsurface (Boring) Soil Sampling
Surveying
Aquifer Test
I
P
C
D
= Initially
= Periodically
= Continuously.
= Discretionary
Note:
-
Immediately prior to start of job task to establish levels, confirming level of protection
When site condition or set-up changes or when a new area is entered
Monitor levels continuously
At the discretion of the SHSO
As air concentrations are measured, they should be documented. In the case of continuous monitoring every 15 to 30
minutes.
(1) Drager tubes to be used at this site are subject to change, based on site concerns.
(2) Continuous monitoring is required when combustible gas readings are between 10% and 20%
(3) The Victoreen Model 450 Radiation Survey Meter measures gamma radiation and detects the presence of beta and alpha
narticles when the mylar screen is exposed, Alpha particle detection is possible only when the mylar screen is very close
i < 3 mm) to the surface being tested. The meter will be held at the survey location for 9 seconds for a complete response.
+ An OVA will be used during all intrusive activities where methane gas is anticipated (i.e., landfills)
I
i
TABLE 11-3
MONITORING
EQUIPMENT
I
I
I
Job Task
Sediment/Surface Water Sampling
Surface Soil Sampling
I
I&P
Monitoring Well Installation
C
Aquatic/Ecological Survey
I&D
Subsurface (Boring) Soil Sampling
Groundwater Sampling
C
I&P
--
I
HNu
ov3.
I=
AND FREQUENCY
+
FOR SITE 48
lcury Vapor
(CH 23181)
Driiger Tube
Badge
I
C
Combustible
Gas Meter(l)
Radiation
Survey [email protected])
I
I
C
I&D
I&p
~
C
(,......I.........................::::.:,.,.,,.
C
::::::~~:::~:::.‘:::::::::::::::::::::::;::~::::::::.:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::~:::::::
.....
i..
i,.
.
..m
.
.A....
.
.
.
.
..,.,
.
.,.,.
.,.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
..~.~
,:,:,:,:,
.,.,.,.,.......,...........,.
.(.
.
.
.
.
.
z>:.:.:.:
.,.,.,.,.
.
.
:...?:Q:.:.
..‘,....v.:.:.
~
:.:.:.:.,.,;...,.,.
.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:
.
:.:i
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
>..>
.........,,,_.,,,
....
““‘.‘.:.~~:,:,:,:,~.~,~.~,~.~.~.~.~.~.~.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.~~:.~:,~,~,~,~,~
‘.‘.r..;.:.:.:.~.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.~~~~~~~~:.~:.:.:::::
..,_.
~:I::,:::::~::::~::~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~:~~:~:~~~~~:
‘.‘.‘Q
.. .ii..,.,
:.:.:
.ii...,...(.(._.,.,
....i...........
.:.:.:
,..,_,.....(...(.
C
.,.,..
.....~~~~~:
..,...
...~~~~:,:,~:.:.:.:.:..
.._..................
.~:.:.~:.~~::~:,:,:,:,.
,.i..
,.,..
‘,‘.‘.‘,‘,:.:,:,:.:.:.:,:.:,:
,,.,
.,.,.,.,.,...,.,.,.,,,,,..,
.:.:,:.~~:,:.:,:,:.:.~.~,~.~.~.~.~.~.:
.....I..
..i....
..(......,..
.....,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.,.
..v.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:
:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:,:,:.:::::~:,:,~:,:,:,:~~::::::::::::::::::.:.:.:,:,:,:.:.:,:.
.,.(._._.
.,,(,,,,.,.,_.,.
....L.........................
.A....
.......(,..(,/l.....................
........._,
..,:.
‘:‘:‘.........~~~~~~~..~...
.....~~:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.~.~.~.~.:.:.:.~.:.:.
“.i...
.‘..‘.“““‘“~
‘:‘:.:..“.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:...:.:.:
‘,‘,‘,‘:‘;::
::::::f::.._.,.i..,...,.,
....,...
.,.
>..>:.:.:.:.:.:.:
.,..:.:.
_:,:,:,:,:,:,
:::::::::::::::::.:.:.:
I&P
C
C
:,:,.,.
.!I’IPil;‘f’i~~:
...::::,~~
:::
““““,~,““~,.;‘;~‘~:.:.:.:.:~:.:~:’:~:~:p
..,:,...
.,. .,. .,_
I
C
I
I&D
Non-intrusive Geophysics
Surveying
I
P
C
D
=
=
=
=
Note:
Initially
Periodically
Continuously
Discretionary
-
Immediately prior to start of job task to establish levels, confirming level of protection
When site condition or set-up changes or when a new area is entered
Monitor levels continuously
At the discretion of the SHSO
As air concentrations are measured, they should be documented. In the case of continuous monitoring every 15 to 30 minutes.
(1) Continuous monitoring is required when combustible gas readings are between 10% and 20%.
(2) The Victoreen Model 450 Radiation Survey Meter measures gamma radiation and detects the presence of beta and alpha particles
when the mylar screen is exposed. Alpha particle detection is possible only when the mylar screen is very close (X3 mm) to the surface
being tested. The meter will be held at the survey location for 9 seconds until the instrument responds.
+ An OVA will be used during all intrusive activities where methane gas is anticipated (i.e., landfills)
TABLE 11-4
MONITORING
EQUIPMENT
Drlger
HNu
Job Task
AND FREQUENCY
Calorimetric
FOR SITE 69
Tube&
I
I
(67 28061)
Vinyl
Chloride
‘fe;fi;)
(67 28461)
(Phosphoric)
Acid Ester
(CH 23101)
Mercury
Vapor
Radiation
Survey
[email protected])
I
I
Combustible
Gas Meter(s)
Sediment/Surface Water
Sampling
Surveying
Non-intrusive
Geophysics
Aquatic/Ecological
Survey
Groundwater Sampling
(Hydropunch)
Surface Soil Sampling
Monitoring Well
Installation (offsite)
Soil Boring Sampling
(offsite)
= Continuously
:: = Initially
pD = PeriodiFally
= Dlscretlonary
Note:
-
Monitor levels continuously
Immediately prior to start ofjob task to establish levels, confirming level of protection
When site condition or set-up changes or when a new area is entered
At the discretion of the SHSO
As air concentrations are measured, they
&odd
be documented. in the case of continuous monitoring every 15 to 30 minutes.
(1) Dr$iger tubes to be used at this site are subject to change, based on site concerns.
(2) The Victoreen Model 450 Radiation Survey Meter measures gamma radiation and detects the presence of beta and alpha particles when
the m lar screen is ex sed. Alpha particle detection is possible only when the mylar screen is very close (< 3 mm) to the surface being
teste B. The meter wil p”be held at the survey location for 9 seconds until the instrument responds.
(3) Continuous monitoring required when combustible gas readings are between 10% and 20%.
+ An OVA will be used during all intrusive activites where methane gas is anticipated (i.e., landfills)
Combustible Gas Meter
< 10% of the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) = continue work
10% to 20% of the LEL* = continue work with extreme caution, and use nonsparking tools
> 20% of the LEL* = stop work immediately and consult PHSO
0
0
l
*Continuous monitoring
is required until levels drop below this range.
Radiation Survey Meter (Victoreen Model 450)
0
l
0
Background (typically 0.02 to 0.04 mRJh.r) to 0.5 mR/hr = Continue work
0.5 mRJhr to 1 mR/hr = Continue work, monitor levels closely
>lmRJhr=
Leave work area and consult PHSO
Vapor Badge (Mercury)
l
The mercury vapor badge indicator works as a color change from tan to grey. A dark
grey indicates levels at or above the PEL, while a medium grey indicates levels at or
below the PEL. No color change should be interpreted as a low concentration
of
mercury vapor. Interferences include carbon monoxide; therefore, when con.ditions
indicate above normal levels of CO, the badge is rendered useless. Hence, smoking or
combustion eauipment will not be permitted within 25 feet of a vapor badge in. use, at
anv time.
l
Vapor badge is to be worn by personnel in the breathing zone (bz) at all times while
working at Site 48. Vapor badge is to be replaced daily, at a minimum.
11.2.2 Perimeter
Monitoring
Perimeter monitoring
is defined as monitoring
and often at the “fenceline”.
are expected to be minimal.
monitoring
l
performed at borders beyond the Support Zone
Releases occurring during these types of investigative
Therefore,
it is anticipated
activities
that the type and frequency
of
required for each of the three sites will be as follows:
The OVA/HNu may be used periodically
documenting
to scan the downwind perimeter as a m.eans of
any volatile releases that may extend past the work zone when volatile
concentrations exceeding 5 ppm are detected at the breathing zone.
l
Drtiger Calorimetric
when concentrations
Tubes may be used periodically
to measure any potential releases
exceeding the PELPTLV are detected at the breathing
zone.
Refer to Tables 11-l through 11-4 to determine the specific tubes required for each
task by site.
40
l
The Radiation Survey Meter will be used to determine a safe distance from the source,
if a radiation level exceeding 1mRJhr is detected.
It is not anticipated that there will be a need for any additional monitoring.
However, as work
progresses, additions to the scope of monitoring will be investigated by the SHSO.
11.3
Personal
Monitoring
The following personal monitoring will be in effect on site:
l
Personal exposure monitoring,
as outlined
in Section 11.2.1, should be sufficient
according to the work activities
and hazards already presented.
progresses, additions to the scope of monitoring
However, .as work
may be extended based on monitoring
results, odor detection, changing work conditions and signs or symptoms of exposure.
Any or all of these conditions will be immediately
investigated
and acted upon by the
SHSO.
11.4
Equipment
Maintenance
and Calibration
Procedures for the return of equipment to inventory
and for maintenance
of the equipment
shall be followed in order to assure that the optimum level of operation is maintained
for the
item, Personnel using equipment shall complete a field equipment usage form which will be
reviewed
by the PHSO. Equipment
calibration
under the direction
completed daily and entered into the equipment calibration
maintenance
and calibration
manufacturer
(included
Procedures for Administrative,
11.5
Monitoring
As environmental
log. Procedures for equipment
can be found in the operating
with each piece of equipment)
of the SHSO will be
manual
provided
by the
or in Baker’s Standard Operating
Field, and Technical Activities Manual.
Documentation
monitoring
is performed, documentation
of the results will be ente:red into
the Field Log Book of the SHSO or other personnel performing
each day, these values will be entered onto an air monitoring
the monitoring.
At the end of
log sheet. The log sheets will be
placed in a binder and remain on site till the end of the field activities,
whereby the log sheets
will become part of the permanent file. A complete copy of the log sheets will also be filed with
the Project Health and Safety Officer.
41
12.0
EMERGENCY
12.1
Pre-EmerPency
All Navy/local
Department,
PROCEDURES
Planning
emergency
response contacts (On-Scene Coordinator
(Fire Chief), Fire
Security, Ambulance, Hospital, etc.) at Camp <Lejeune will be contacted during
site mobilization
activities.
Manager. The information
This notification
will be performed by the SHSO and/or Site
discussed may include:
l
A description of site activities.
l
Anticipated
l
Hazardous chemicals to be used on site.
l
Expected length of time on site.
l
Specific requirements the emergency response facilities may require.
l
Confirmation
site hazards.
of emergency phone numbers.
Specific points of contact, where applicable,
requested, Chemical/Material
12.2
Emergency
will be established and added to the HASP. If
Safety Data Sheets will be provided at this time.
Coordinator
The SHSO acting as the Emergency Coordinator is responsible for field implementation
of the
Emergency Plan. As the Emergency Coordinator, specific duties include:
Familiarizing
all on-site personnel with the emergency procedures and the Emergency
Coordinator’s authority.
Identifying
the nearest telephone in the event of an emergency.
Communicating
site emergency
procedures
and requirements
to all Baker and
subcontractor personnel.
Specifying a backup/alternate
Controlling
activities
Emergency Coordinator.
of subcontractors
Coordinator (Fire Chief) and Environmental
42
and contacting
the Navy On-Scene
Management Department (EMD).
a
Anticipating,
identifying
and assessing, fires, explosions, chemical releases, and other
emergency situations to the best of his/her abilities.
12.3
Communications
The primary internal
communication
system will rely on direct communication
two-way radios) between site personnel.
located in the site trailer.
External
communications
(via verbal or
will employ a telephone
Refer to section 9.0 for an outline of the Communication Procedures.
Emergency telephone numbers will be place at strategic locations (i.e., Baker Field ‘Trailer,
Baker Field Vehicles,
etc.) throughout
the site. The list of emergency phone numbers is
presented below.
Agency/Facility
Security (Police)
Phone Number
Contact*
911 or (919) 451-4555
Fire
911
Emergency Services Operator
Ambulance (On-Base)
911
Emergency Services Operator
Ambulance (Off-Base)
(919) 455-9119
Hospital (On-Base)
911 or (919) 451-4551
Hospital (Off-Base)
(Emergency Room)
(919) 577-2240
_
(919) 577-2345
Hospital (Off-Base)
(Information)
Onslow County Hospital
Information
Hazardous Materials Team
911
Emergency Services Operator
Emergency
911
Emergency Services Operator
On-Scene Coordinator
911
Fire Chief
Public Works Department
(Underground Utilities via
EMR Contact)
(9191451-5872
George Radford
Poison Control Center
l-800-672-1697
Response Operator
National Response Center
l-800-4248802
Response Operator
CHEMTREC
l-800-4249300
Response Operator
Agency for Toxic Substances
and Disease Registry
l-404639-0615
Response Operator
*
Remaining points of contact will be identified prior to the start of activities,
Note:
When calling 911 on a non-base phone, ask emergency services operator to transfer
call to Base 911 system and report emergency.
43
12.4
Assembly
Area
In the event of an emergency, personnel
personnel
will meet at the Baker Site Trailer.
will exit the work area through
inappropriate,
the decontamination
If possible,
zone. If the trailer
is
an alternate assembly area will be designated by the Emergency Coordinator
in an upwind location from the site before the start of operations. At this location, emergency
needs will be provided, such as:
l
Assembly for evacuated personnel
l
First aid for injured personnel
l
Decontamination
0
Communications.
12.5
Emewency
material
Hospital
Route
An emergency hospital route map showing the location of the local hospitals will be posted at
strategic locations throughout
the site. Personnel will be informed of the location of the map
and directions to the hospital.
The following are directions to the Base Naval Hospital (Building
(refer to Figure 3):
NH1001 from Sites 6 and 9
1.
Proceed up Holcomb Boulevard (north) approximately
2.25 miles.
2.
Turn left on to Brewster Boulevard (west).
3.
Continue on Brewster Boulevard until intersecting
Hospital on right (approximately 0.75 miles).
4.
Proceed on driveway until intersecting with the Naval Hospital.
with driveway
to Naval
The following are directions to Onslow County Memorial Hospital (317 Western Boulevard)
from Sites 48 and 69 (refer to Figure 3):
1.
Leave Base through Main Gate.
2.
Take Highway 24 east to Western Boulevard and turn left (north).
3.
Continue on Western Boulevard to the fifth stop light and Hospital will be on the
left.
44
i ,-,
#
45
LU
I--
Emergency
12.6
Medical Treatment
Emergency Services
The emergency
B
.-\
I
is the Naval
phone no.: (919) 451-4551 (or 9ll)for
317 Western Boulevard
I
I
hospital
Base Hospital,
located
in Buildinp
NHlOO,
Sites 6 and 9; and, Onslow County Memorial located at
in Jacksonville,
North Carolina
at phone no.: (919) 577-2240 for
Sites 48 and 69.
/--\
Local ambulance
service is available
in emergency situations
Service (at 911) or from the Citv of Jacksonville
from the Base Ambulance
at phone no.: 1919) 455-9119. Contact will be
made with emergency personnel prior to the start of activities (See Section 12.1).
Physical Injury
If an employee working in a contaminated area is physically
injured, first-aid procedures are
to be followed. Depending on the severity of the injury, emergency medical response from base
personnel may be sought to stabilize victims for transport to public hospitals. If the employee
can be moved, he/she will be taken to the edge of the work area and decontaminated
necessary, (refer to section 10.2). Then, ifcircumstances
if
permit, administered emergency first
aid and transported to an awaiting ambulance, or to a local emergency medical facility.
Chemical Injury
If the injury
to a worker is chemical in nature (e.g., overexposure),
the following
first-aid
procedures are to be instituted:
l
Eye Exposure
immediately
lifting
- If contaminated
solid or liquid
gets into the eyes, wash the eyes
at the emergency eyewash station using large amounts of water and
the lower and upper lids occasionally.
Obtain medical attention immediately.
Contact lenses will not be worn when working.
l
Skin Exposure - If contaminated
contaminated
I
I
^..
solid or liquid gets on the skin, promptly
skin using soap or mild detergent
and water.
penetrate through the clothing, remove the clothing immediately
w;ash the
If solids or liquids
and wash the skin
using soap or mild detergent and water. Obtain medical attention immediately.
46
if--
Swallowing - If contaminated
solid or liquid has been swallowed immediately
contact
the North Carolina Duke Regional Poison Control Center at l-800-672-1697.
Do not
make an unconscious person vomit.
l
Breathing-
If a person has difficulty
breathing, move the exposed person to fresh air at
once. If breathing has stopped, perform artificial
respiration.
Keep the affected person
warm and at rest. Obtain medical attention as soon as possible.
Snakebite Injury
In the event of a snakebite injury, the following procedures will be followed.
Look for signs and symptoms such as the characteristic
about a half inch apart, with surrounding
discoloration,
appearance of two small holes, usually
swelling, and pain. Systematic signs
(which may or may not occur) including weakness, sweating, faintness, and signs of shock.
Provide treatment as follows:
1. Calm and reassure the victim; have the victim sit in a comfortable position and remain
quiet.
2. Keep the affected area below the level of the heart.
3. Cool the bite area using an ice pack or similar device. Take care not to induce frostbite.
4. Transport victim to the nearest medical facility or contact an ambulance to transport the
victim.
5. Provide
the emergency
medical responder
(either
the ambulance
emergency room at the hospital) with all pertinent information
attendant
or the
such as: how long ago the
bite occurred, the type of snake (if known), any known allergic conditions (if known), etc.
Inform the SHSO immediately
if a snakebite has occurred. The SHSO will in turn, inform the
PHSO, as soon as possible.
47
If injuries are not serious or life threatening,
site personnel
to the local medical facility,
affected personnel may be transported by other
if necessary.
Emergency
personnel will be contacted in the event of serious or multiple injuries.
be provided with all available information
medical response
Medical personnel will
regarding the nature of the incident and chlemicals
involved.
Decontamination
If on-site decontamination
will provide polyethylene
of injured employee(s) is not possible, the Emergency Coordinator
sheeting for a stretcher,
employee equipped with appropriate
injured
and ambulance.
If necessary, a site
protective equipment and clothing will accompiany the
employee and will perform decontamination
under the supervision
of emergency
medical personnel.
Instances requiring
treatment beyond “first aid” will be handled at appropriate facilities
and
reported to the Project Manager and PHSO within 24 hours.
Emergency
12.7
Decontamination
Procedures
In the event of a medical emergency, patients are to be adequately decontaminated. before
transfer,
if possible. This is to prevent contamination
of the medical transport vehicle and
medical facility.
At a minimum, the patient should have the following removed before transport:
l
Protective outer clothing
0
Protective boots
0
Protective gloves
o
Other protective equipment.
If necessary, one of the site personnel equipped with appropriate
injured worker and perform decontamination
PPE may accompany the
with supervision of medical personnel.
48
12.8
Personal
Protection
and F’irst-Aid
Equipment
PPE available for emergency response will include the following:
Polyvinyl
chloride and neoprene boots
~\
Saranexe suits
Tyvek* suits, polyethylene coated and uncoated
Nitrile
gloves (inner and outer)
Neoprene and nitrile gloves (outer)
Face shields and goggles
SCBA
PPE, first-aid
equipment,
and the first-aid
kits will be available
in the support zone (i.e.,
Baker Field Vehicle or Baker Site Trailer).
_‘\
Emergency and first aid equipment can be found at the following locations:
Fire Extinguisher:
Baker Site Trailer and Subcontractor Field Vehi&
First aid kit:
Baker Site Trailer and Baker Field Vehicle
-
Emergency eye wash bottle:
Baker Site Trailer and Baker Field Vehicle
-
Air Horn:
With Personnel
Portable Emergency Eye
Near Area With Greatest Potential for
Chemical Splash/Exposure
Wash Station:
12.9
Notification
--.
If the Emergency Coordinator determines that the site has an uncontrolled situation, such as a
spill, fire, or explosion,
report their findings
-.
Management
that could threaten human health or the environment,
to the Fire Chief (Navy On-Scene Coordinator)
Department
(EMR).
he/she will
and Environmental
The Fire Chief will then respond to the incident
and
determine the appropriate action to be taken. If necessary the Fire Chief may contact EMR to
provide additional services.
49
The notification
t
report will be made from the Baker Field Trailer or other base locations and
will include:
li
F\
l
Description of incident (e.g., release, fire).
l
Name and telephone number of individual
l
Location of incident.
l
Name and quantity of material (s) involved.
l
The extent of injuries, and number of casualties.
l
The possible hazards to human health or the environment and cleanup procedures.
l
Assistance that is requested.
reporting the emergency.
_>
i
12.10
Hazard Assessment
The Emergency Coordinator will assess possible hazards to human health or the environment
that may result from a chemical release, fire, explosion, or severe weather conditi0n.s to the
best of his/her abilities, incorporating
the following steps, as appropriate:
l
Assess the immediate need to protect human health and safety.
l
Identify the materials involved in the incident.
l
Identify exposure and/or release pathways and the quantities of materials involved.
l
Determine
the potential
effects of the exposure/release
and appropriate
safety
precautions.
0
Determine if release of materials meets EPA requirements
for spills
under
the RCRA or the Comprehensive
Compensation, and Liability
l
for reportable quantities
Environmental
Response,
Act (CERCLA).
Inform appropriate personnel as identified in Section 12.9.
This assessment will consider both the direct and indirect effects of the chemical relea:se, fire,
explosion,
asphyxiating
or severe weather
conditions
(e.g., the effects of any toxic, irritating,
or
gases that are generated or the effects of any hazardous surface water runoff
from water or chemical agents used to control f-e and heat-induced explosions).
50
12.11
Security
During
activation
representative
I
Plan, the Emergency
Coordinator
or his designated
will control access to the site and maintain an incident log until the Fire Chief
(Navy On-Scene Coordinator) arrives. The incident log will include:
0
l
i
of the Emergency
l
l
l
l
l
12.12
Time of entry.
Expected exit time.
Use of team or “buddy” system.
Task being performed.
Location of task.
Rescue and response equipment used.
Protective equipment being used.
Emergencv
Personnel
Iniurv
Alertine:
in the Exclusion
Zone (Work Area):
Upon notification
of an injury in
the Exclusion Zone, the designated emergency signal (verbal) warning and/or one long airhorn
blast shall be sounded. All site personnel shall assemble at the decontamination
(for Level D or D i-1 or the CRZ (for Level C or higher).
Exclusion Zone (if required) to remove the injuredperson
Manager
will evaluate
decontaminated
ambulance,
Exclusion
the nature of the injury,
according
and assure that
medical facility.
Zone until an accident investigation
The rescue team will en.ter the
to the hotline. The SHSO andi/or Site
to Section 10.2. If required,
and/or with the designated
control line
the affected person is
contact will be made with an
No persons shall reenter the
is performed by the SHSO and/or the Site
Manager.
Personnel
Iniurs
in the Support
Zone (Clean Area): Upon notification
of any injury in the
Support Zone, the Site Manager and SHSO will assess the nature of the injury.
If the cause of
the injury or loss of the injured person does not affect the performance of other site personnel,
operations may continue.
If the injury increases the risk to others, the designated emergency
signal (verbal) warning and/or one long airhorn blast shall be sounded, and all remaining site
personnel will move to the support zone for further instructions.
until the added risk is mitigated.
51
Activities
on site will stop
Fire/Explosion:
Upon notification
of a fire or explosion on site, the designated emergency
signal (verbal) warning and/or one long airhorn blast shall be sounded and all site personnel
will report to the assembly area (for Level D or D +) or the CRZ (for Level C or higher).
fire and security departments
from the involved
will be alerted and all personnel will move to a safe distance
area for further
instructions.
Activities
will stop until the added risk is
~1
mitigated.
Personal
The
Protective
or alteration
Equipment
Failure:
If any site worker experiences difficulty,
failure
of protective equipment that affects the protection factor, that person and his/her
buddy shall immediately
cease work activities, leave the Exclusion Zone, and repair or replace
the defective equipment.
Reentry will not be permitted until the equipment has been repaired
or replaced.
Other Equipment
Failure:
If any other equipment on site fails to operate properly, the Site
Manager and/or the Field Team Leader and SHSO shall be notified to determine the effect of
this failure on continuing
operations on site. If the failure affects the safety of site personnel,
work with the equipment will cease until the situation
is evaluated and appropriate actions
taken.
Accident/injury
reports will be completed for any accidents no matter how minor the injury.
All injuries resulting
in treatment other than first aid will be reported to the Project M:anager
and PHSO within 24 hours. Records on equipment failure will also be completed.
In all situations,
when an on-site emergency results in evacuation
of the Exclusion
Zone,
personnel shall not reenter until:
1.
2.
3.
4.
12.13
The
The
The
Site
conditions resulting in the emergency have been corrected.
hazards have been reassessed.
HASP has been reviewed and, if appropriate, modified.
personnel have been briefed on any changes in the HASP.
Training
Site personnel
training.
will be informed of the details in the Emergency Plan during initial
The Emergency Plan will be reviewed/rehearsed
or when elements of the plan change.
52
HASP
by site personnel at least monthly
13.0
SPILL CONTAINMENT
PROCEDURES
In the event that a spill (incidental
during the implementation
additional
migration
release) of hazardous substances (gasoline, oil, etc.) occurs
of field activities,
of contaminants
spill containment will be utilized to prevent the
through
the site area. Specific spill containment
procedures will be dependent on the type of materials
spilled and the type of environment
affected. Potential spill containment procedures may include diking with absorbent/adsorbent
material/pads,
containment
then removal
materials
or containment
will be located within
of the contaminated
close proximity
materials.
Spill
to the storage area of the
hazardous substances in a manner such that the pathway remains accessible and free of
obstructions.
Appropriate
Coordinator/Commander
Navy Activity
Personnel including
Navy/Marine
will be notified, should a spill require additional
Corps On-Scene
measures beyond
those already discussed.
Note:
The amount and/or concentration
to be minimal.
Therefore,
of the hazardous substances on this site is expected
extensive
spill containment
implemented.
53
procedures
will not be
14.0
WASTE HANDLING
The protocols outlined
contaminated
materials
could endanger
in the FSAP for the handling,
packaging,
storing, and disposing of
must be followed to: (1) minimize the risk of off-site exposures that
public health;
handling, containment,
PROCEDURES
and (2) limit
the potential
storage, and transportation
54
for liabilities
of contaminated materials.
associated with
15.0
DECLARATION
OF HASP REVIEW
All site personnel indicated below, have reviewed and are familiar with this Health and Safety
Plan.
Site personnel
were briefed on the contents of this HASP on
at --
a.m./p.m.
1.
t
I--
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
-
D
3.
t
,r\
I
4.
(Name-Sign)
5.
(Date>
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
55
-
Declaration of Health and Safety Plan Review (Cont’d)
(Name-Print)
8.
9.
12.
(Com&ny)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Comp&)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
13.
56
Declaration of Health and Safety Plan Review (Cont’d)
14.
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
(Name-Print)
(Company)
(Name-Sign)
(Date)
15.
-
-
16.
17.
HASP Amendment Briefings:
pa&e
Time
57
A.M./P.M.
-
-
ATTACHMENT
MEDICAL
Group I - Individuals
l
l
l
l
l
l
l
0
l
l
BASELINE
TESTING
PARAMETERS*
Rarely in the Field ( < 10 days/year)
Medical History and Physical
EyeExam
EKG (baseline and for individuals
CBC with differential
Group II - Individuals
l
SURVEILLANCE
A
over 40 yrs.)
Occasionally in the Field (lo-30 days/year)
Medical History and Physical
Eye Exam
EKG (baseline and for individuals over 40 yrs.)
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 5 years)
Spirometry
CBC with difYerentia1
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Group III - Individuals
Frequently in the Field (> 30 days/year)
Medical History and Physical
Eye Exam
EKG (baseline and for individuals over 40 years)
Audiometry
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 3 years))
Spirome try
CBC with differential
SMA 12 or 26 (liver enzyme scan)
Urinalysis (glucose scan)
Specific Blood and Urine Tests (dependent on field exposure)
Group III with Asbestos - Individuals
l
Group III testing with the Asbestos Medical Questionnaire
Group IV - Individuals
l
l
l
l
0
l
l
*
frequently in the Field and also associated with asbestos
associated with Asbestos
Medical history and physical
Eye Exam
Chest X-ray (baseline then every 5 years)
Pulmonary Function Test @‘VCl.o and FEVl.0)
Urinalysis
Audiometry
Asbestos Medical Questionnaire
The attending physician has the right to reduce or expand the medical monitoring on an
annual basis as he/she deems necessary.
** Rare and expensive - to be performed only for individuals identified by the attending
physician as being chronically exposed to organic compounds.
OSHA Training
History
Attachment B
of Project Personnel
ATTACHMENT
OSHA TRAINING
Anticipated
Personnel
t
/-.
HISTORY
OF BAKER PROJECT
Site Activities
Phase I
Project Manager
Ray Wattras
l
Barbara Cummings
l
I
B
Training
l
l
0
l
0
0
I /-\
1
Donald Shields
l
Peter Monday
l
Richard Dabal
l
Site Manager/Project
Geologist
Site Health and Safety
Offmer/Field Team
Leader
Environmental
Scientist
l
0
0
0
0
l
0
0
0
0
l
0
0
0
l
Matthew Bartman
l
Environmental
Scientist
0
l
0
0
0
Ken Martin
l
Environmental
Scientist
0
0
l
0
0
l
*
Training
40-hr. training completed: 94/84
Supervisory training: Yes
8-hr. refresher completed: 04/92
First Aid/CPR Training: No
Medical surveillance:
Yes’
40-hr. training completed: IO/91
Supervisory training: Yes
&hr. refresher completed: NA
First AitiCPR Training: 1l/91
Medical surveillance:
Yes
40-hr. training completed: 02/88
Supervisory training: Yes
8-hr. refresher completed: 03/92
First Aid/CPR Training: No
Medical surveillance:
Yes
40-hr. training completed: 03/90
Supervisory training: Yes
8-hr. refresher completed: 03/92
First Aid Training: lo/90
Medical surveillance:
Yes
40-hr. training completed: 10/89
Supervisory training: Yes
8-hr. refresher completed: 03/92
11191
First Aid/CPR Training:
Medical surveillance:
Yes
40-hr. training completed: 08/87
Supervisory training:
No
8-hr. refresher completed: 04/92
First Aid/CPR Training:
No
Medical surveillance:
Yes
40-hr. training completed: 03/89
Supervisory training: Yes
8-hr. refresher completed: 05/92
First Aid Training: 11/90
CPRTraining: 12/91
Medical surveillance:
Yes
history for contractor personnel will be attached.
NA - Not Applicable
Status
\
0
0
0
0
Project Health and Safety
Officer
PERSONNEL*
ATTACHMENT
OSHA TRAINING
Personnel
HISTORY
Anticipated
B
OF BAKER PROJECT
Site Activities
Phase I
Michael Smith
l
Environmental
Scientist
Thomas Trebilcock
l
Environmental
Scientist
Training
0
o
l
l
Training
40-hr. training completed: 06/92
Supervisory training:
No
8-hr. refresher completed: :NA
107/92
First Aid/CPR Training:
Medical Surveillance: Yes
history for contractor personnel will be attached.
NA - Not Applicable
Status
0 ’ 49&r. training completed: 09/91
l
Supervisory training: Yes
l
8-hr. refresher completed: NA
l
First AiVCPR Training:
No
l
Medical surveillance:
Yes
l
*
PERSONNEL*
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145 catalyn street
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836
(518) 377-8854
USA
Material Safe0 Data Sheets Collection:
SheetNo. 332
Tricresyl Phosphate
Revision: B, 8flO
NFPAt
fricresyl Phosphate [(C C$ ,PO J De5criptioU: Exists in three isomexic forms: orZh0, me&, vu. Tbe commercial r
i
>roduct is a mixture of the%rr’ ec arms with as little of the highly toxic art/to-isomer as possible. The mera- and para1
Somers are rel!ativeiy inactive. Altbougb the three symmetrical isomers are difficult and costly tn separate. tricresyl
2
0
lhosphate should contain no more than 3% ocres~l. Tticresyl phosphate is derived frop cresol and phosphorus oxychlo- ii* skin:*
ide. phosphoric acid, or perttachloride. Used as a plasticizer for chlorinated rubber, vinyl plastics, and polystyrene,
49
sbsorplion
t Trionhccre~lyacrylic. and polymefhacxyli~
esters;
as a solvent and biida
in rt.itrctceII~I~se
and various natural resins to improve
syl phosphate
oughness, elasticity, and polishing properties of coafings; as an additive to synthetic lubricants and gasoline (to counteract
he harmful effects of lead deposits): as an adjuvant in milling of pigment pastes; as an hydrauric fluid and a fue retardant;
Ys2
urd in phenol recovery in coke-oven waste waters.
F
I
3ther Designations: CAS No. 1330-78-5; CcUuflex”; Kronitex “; [email protected]; phosphoric acid, tritolyl ester, TCP; tritolyl
Jhosphate.
PRPGF
IYiorthocresyl Phosphate [(CH,C~HQO,]:
CAS No. 0078-30-S. oaesyl phosphate, TCCP. tricresyl phosphate, tri 2$Sec.l
nethylphenyl phosphate.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distriiutor. Consult the latest ClwJcalwMkBuyers’
Gtidem) for a supplietx list
Cautions: This very toxic ortho-isoma is excluded from TCP as much as possible. TOCP is poiso~us by ingestion and skin
~enerration. TCP is combustible when exposed to heat or flame.
1989 OSHA PEL
None established
1989-90 ACGIH TLV
None established
1988 MOSH REL
None established
biorthocresyl phosphatet
1989 OSHA PEL (Skin)
B-hr TWA: 0.1 mg/m’
1989-90 ACGM (Skin)
TLV-TWA: 0.1 mglm’
1988 NIOSH REL
None established
I987 IDLH Level
$0 mg/m’
1985-86 Toxicity Data*
Rabbit. eye: 500 mg administered for 24 hr produces mild
irritation
Woman, oraL TD,: 70 mg/kg ingested over 14 days
produces flaccid paralysis without anesthesia, changes in
motor activity, and muscle weakness
1985-86 Toxicity Data$
Rabbit, oral, LDb: 100 mg,&g ingested produces behavioral (muscle weakness); gastrointestinal (hypermotility,
diarrhea); and kidney, ureter, bladder (interstitial nephritis) charlges
’ SeeMOSH, /KECS t37lOlWCXlO).for dditional titativc. rcpmductive. and toxicity dau
t Orfh-cresyI isomer content is 1% mu of the ti cruyl isancr contentof [email protected] SYN-O-AIYa esters.
f Set NIOSH. R7-ECSQ-DO35~). for l ddiional toxicity data.
Boiling Point: 510 l F (265 l C)* at 10 mm Hg
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 12.7
M&ular
W&ht: 368:4
770 ‘F (410 ‘C)t at 760 mm Hg
I
Melting Point: -13 ‘F (-25 ‘C)?
Specific Gravity : 1.16 to 1.18
Vapor Pressure: 10 mm Hg (1.33 [email protected] Pa) at 198 ‘Ct
Water Solubility: Sparingly soluble
Appearance and Odor: Pale yellow to colorless, oily, odorless liquid.
’ Tricmyl phosphaa
t Triorthocresyl phosphate.
.
.
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AutoIgnition Temperature: None reported
LEL: None reported
Flash Polnt: 770 l F (410 ‘C). CC*
iJI& None reported
437 ‘F (225 ‘C)t
Extinguishing Media: Use CO, or dry chemical to fight fire.
Unusual Fire or Explmion
Hazards: Tricresyl phosphate is combustible when exposed to heat or flame. However, the high flash point reduces
LSfire hazard, and it tends to stop burning when the ignition source is removed.
jpecial Fire-fiibting
Procedures: Since fire may produce toxic fumes. wear a self-c~ntaind breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
)peratcd in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and a fully encapsulating suit. Fight fire aLa maximum distance. RemoveTCP
:ontainers from fire area if you can do it without risk. Be aware of runoff from fire control methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
Tricmyl phosphate
l
S~bilit~/Pul~merization:
Trinesyl phosphate is stable at room temperature in closed containers under notmd storage ad handling condiliol;s.
It hydrolyzes :lowly at room temperarure under wet alkaline conditions. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Tricresyl phosphate GUI reaCt with oxidizing materials, especially when heated. TCP is inert to common mc&.
Hazardous. Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of tricrcsyl phosphate can emit highly toxic fume of phosphorus.
oxides (PO‘).
ccph01590Gaiumpubl~~
cmmazcdwa~aiolri~lrbcplbl~~pamiriol~pmhiid
No. 332 Tticrcsyl
Phosphate
S/5X--
Eyes: Flush immediately. including under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with flooding amounts of nmning water for at least 15 min.
Ski: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. After rinsii affected skin wrth flooding amounts of wateT. wash thoroughly with soap and water.
Get medical attention.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support brea ’ as needed.
mouth to an unconscious or convu
mgra
In estion: Never give anything
7.
If ingested. induce vomiting.
A Pter first aid, get approprlate % -plant, paramedic, or community me ‘cal support.
Physician’s Note: Conside! gastric lavage d patients are comatose.or at risk of convulsing. Since prolonged diarrhea may occur, avo:id cathartic
admuustratlon. Avoid admmtstrauon of atropme and 2-PAM chlonde (protopam) since these agents are meffective. If a worker is disposed for
chronic poisoning, remove from exposure and treat for polyneuritis. Experimental cholinestaase reactivators used for therapeutic use:m TCP
poisoning show encouraging results. Observe all exposures for delayed peripheral neuropathies, particularly the axonal type.
S ill/Leak: Notify safe personnel, evacuate all unnecessary personnel: remove all heat and ignition sources. and provide adequate ventilation.
CPeanup personnel sho2 d protect a8ainsL skin cuntsct and vapor inhalauon. Absorb ill with sand or other noncombustibly absorbent material
maten3 mto clean, dry containers with covers for later disposal.
and place into containers for later &sposal. With a clean shovel, place spilled
Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local re8uIations.
EPA Deslgnations
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
OSHA Designations
Air Contaniinant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Subpart’& Not listed
r..
Goggles: Wear rotective eyeglasses or chemical safe
o les. per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFX 1910.133).
Respirator: Fof ow OSHA respirator regulations (29 2iiFJ 10.134) and, if necessary. wear a NIOSH-approved respirator. For emergency or
nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear gn SCBA. Warning! Air-purifying respirators do notprotect workers
in oxygen-dejiiienl atmasphe&.
Other: Wear impervious gloves. boots, apron+ and gauntlets to prevent skin contact Neoprene and Buna-N are TCP resistant
Ventilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airtime concentrations below the OSHA PEL, and ACGM
TLV (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.(‘03)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work.area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from our shoes and equipment Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: x ever eaL drink. or smoke in work areas. Practice good Fnal
hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking. usinrr the toilet. or awIving cosmetics.
-.
Monitor blood cholinestaase
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.102)
IMO Shipping Name: Tricresylphosphate, with more than 3% or&+-isomer
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
FM0 Label: Poison
$I):
PTNka lng Group: 11
.:
2554
-.
MSDS Cot&crion Rererences: 26.38,73.84.85.100.
101.103.124.126.127.132.133.136.138,
139
Prepared by: hU Allison, BS; hdustrinl Hy+~e Review: DJ Wilson, CM. Medkal Revkw: MI Hmdics. MD, Edited by: JR Stuarr, MS
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Genium Publishing Corporation
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1145Catalyn Street
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836 USA
@
Materid Safety Data Sheets Cdlection.:
Sheet No. 469
Fuel Oil No. 2
(518) 377-8854
1Issued: lo/81
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Revision: A, 1l/90
?uel 011 No. 2 Description: A mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons; a distillate of low sulfur content. Fuel oil no. 2
R
csembles kemsine. Used as a general-purpose domestic or commercial fuel in atomizing-type burners; as a fuel for trucks,
ihips and other automotive engines; as mosquito control (coating on breeding waters); and for drilling muds.
Xher Designations: CAS No. 68476-30-2, diesel oil.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest CticaIweek
Buyers’GuidP) for a suppliers list.
1
33
NFPA
HMIS
Cautions: Fuel oil No. 2 is a skin irritant and central nervous system depressant with high mist concentrations. It is an environmental
hazard and a dangerous fire hazard when exposed to heat, flame, or oxidizers.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~r~~~~,‘l~~~~s:~~,~,
I
**
I
.‘i
4.
,-.
s-.
Juel oil No. 2*
1989OSHA PEL
(one established
1990-91 ACGIH TLV
None established
..,.: ..>,.: :;:‘::,::: ::,.. .,..* e .:.::i-‘
I;.rmts;i:
1988 NIOSH REL
None established
.::.,. .: ,;:, :,.,..:,
,.... ...l~..:..:...
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; :
l
Sec.8
:. :
; II
1985-86 Toxlcfty Datat
Rat, oral, LD,: 9 g/kg; produces gastrointestinal effects
(hypermotility, diarrhea)
k A complex mixture (~95%) of pamftinic, olefinic, aaphlhenic,and aromatic hymns;
sulfur contenf(<0.X%);and benzene(cl00 ppm). [A, low benzenelevel
-educescarcinogenic risk. Fuel oils can be.exemptedunderthe benzenestaodard(29 CFR 1910.1028)].
t Monitor MOSH, R?XCS (HZ1800000),for future toxicity data.
S~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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...‘. i :;::~ :::.; ;;::;,;: ;::;: $1 $1.:
Water
Solubillty:
Insoluble
Boiling
Pour Point:* c21 ‘F (-6 ‘C)
Vlscoslty: 268 ceatistoke at 100 ‘F (37.8 ‘C)
Specific Gravity: 0.8654 at 59 ‘F (15 'C)
Appearance and Odor: Brown, slightly viscous liquid.
*Pour point is tie lowest temperatureat which a liquid flows from an inverted test container.
m: .:.;: >:)
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1 Autoignition Temperature: 494 ‘F (257 ‘C) 1
1 UEL: 7.5% Y/V
Flash Point: 100 ‘F (38 l C) min.
ExtinguIshlug Media: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, foam, water fog or spray. Do not use a forced water spray directly on burning oil since
this scatters the fire. Use a smothering technique to extinguish fire.
Unusual Flre or Explosion Hazards: Vapors may travel to an ignition source and flash back. This fuel oil’s volatility is similar to gasolinc’s.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry. Since fue may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-conwined breathing
apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and full protective clothing. if feasible, remove
containers from fire. Be aware of runoff from fiie control methods. Do not release to sewers or walerways due to health and fiie or explosion
hazard.
se~~~~~~~Bi.~~~~~~~~~,~~~~::~:~~~.~.~:,:~:..~:.;,:;:;:,I’: .,y: ,;:
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Stabllity/Polymerizatlon:
F&l Al“&: 2 is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. HZardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Incompatible with slrong oxidizing agents; heating greatly increases fire hazard.
Conditions to Avold: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of fuel oil no. 2 yields various hydrocarbons
and hydrocafion
.
dcrivativcs and partial oxidation products including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide.
\
No. 469
Fuel Oil No. 2
1 l/90
Section
6. Healthy :H~~~d,.~ !Dgta. ,,;: : :
.. .
: : : ::A,.‘-,.j::i::~,ii::::i.i::..il:i
~ii,~~~.:p.:i,l::I,~,.i,~i::i
:. ; .i~.i:-:..:i~‘~ :k:: ,:: .‘i:“ii~.~~~.::.:~~:;lii~~
Carcinorenlcitv: Althoueh it has not assiened an overall evaluation to fuel oil No. 2. the IARC has evaluated distillate flieht) fuel oils as not
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin: Quickly remove contaminated clothin Rinse with floodin amounts of water for at least 15 min. If large areas of the body are exposed or
if irritation persists, get medical help imme cf.lately. Wash affect t%farea with soap and water.
Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathin as needed.
Ingestion: Never give anythin by mouth to an unconscious or convu K.mg person. If ingested, do not induce vomiting due to aspiration hazard.
Contact a physician immediate f y.
After first aid, get ap ropriate in-plant, paramedic, or commun!ty medical support.
Note to Physicians: c! astrrc lavage 1scontraindicated due to aspiratron hazard. Preferred antidotes are charcoal and milk. In cases of severe
aspiration pneumonitis, consider monitoring arterial blood gases to ensure adequate ventilation. Observe the patient for 6 hr. If vital signs.become
Spill/Leak: Notify safety personnel, evacuate area for large spills, remove all heat and ignition sources, and provide maximum explosion- roof
ventilation. Cleanup personnel should protect against vapor inhalation and liquid contact Clean up spills promptly to reduce fire or vapor Kazards.
Use noncombustible absorbent material to pick up small spills or residues. For large spills, die far ahead to contain, Pick u liquid for reclamation or disposal. Do not release to sewers or waterways due to health and fire and/or explosion hazard. Follow applicable 0 8 HA regulations (29
CFR 1910.120). Fuel oil no. 2 is an environmental hazard. Report large spills.
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.21): Ignitable waste
CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
OSHA Designations
Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Subpart Z): Not listed
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::........
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lasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if neces-approved respirator with mist filter and organic vapor cartridge. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning sp.ills,
do not protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Wurnin ! Air-purifying
Other: Wear unpervious gloves, boots, aprons, and gaun if ets to prevent skin contact.
Ventilation: Provide eneral and local exploston- roof ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations that promote worker safety and
mductivity. Local exa aust ventilation is preferr e5 smce it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlhng it at its source.(““)
!i afety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in.the work ar.ea:soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
tntnzllzrn
our shoes and equtpmen$ Launder contammated clothmg before weanng.
: I?ever eat, drmlc, or smoke m work areas. Prachce good Personal hygrene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
respirators
wear gloves or use barrier cream.
Transportatlon Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shlpping Name: Fuel oil
DOT Hazard Class: Combustible liquid
ID No.: NA1993
DOT Label: None
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.118a
DOT Packaging Requirements: None
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145 Catalyn Street
Schenectady,~NY12303-1836 USA
a
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 467
Automotive Gasoline, Lead-free
(518) 377-8854
p
Revision: A, 9191
_.--_paraffins, cycloparaffiis, olefins, naphthenes, and aromatics. In general,gasoline is produced from peholeum, shale oic3
Athabasca tar sands, and coal. Motor gasolines are made chiefly by cracking proceases. which convert heavier petroleum
f, 42’
1 0
fractions into more volatile fractions by thermal or catalytic decomposition. Widely used as fuel in internal combustion
+LSkiin
engines of the spark-ignited, reciprocating type. Automotive gasoline has an octane number of approximately 90. A high
a’bsorption @
content of aromatic hydrocarbons and a consequent high toxicity are also associated with a high octane rating. Some
HMIS
gasolines sold in the US contain a minor proportion of tetraethyllead, which is added in concentrations not exceeding 3 ml
PH
f.
per gallon to prevent engine “knock.” However, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) has almost completely replaced
tetraethyllead.
Other Des&rations: CAS No. 8006-61-9, benzin, gasoline, gasolene, motor spirits, natural gasoline, petrol.
tSec.8
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult latest Chemical Week Buyers’[email protected]) for a suppliers list.
ho;
Cautions: Inhalation of automotive gasoline vapors can cause intense burning in throat and lungs, central nervous system (CNS)
depression, and possible fatal pulmonary edema. Gasoline is a dangerous fii and explosion hazard when exposed to heat and flames.
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Automotive gasoline, lead-free*
1990 OSHA PELs
1990-91 ACCIH TLVs
198586 Toxicity Data*
8-hr TWA: 300 ppm, 900 mg/m’
TWA: 300 ppm, 890 mg/m’
Man, inhalation, TCb: 900 ppm/l hr; toxic effects include sense
Srnin STEZ 500 ppm, 1500 mg/m’
STEL 500 ppm, 1480 mg/m’
organs and special senses (conjunctiva irritation), behavioral
(halhtcinations, distorted perceptions), lungs,, thorax, or
1990 MOSH REL
respiration (cough)
None established
Human, eye: 140 ppmlll k toxic effects include mild irritation
Rat, inhalation, I&,: 300 g/m’/5 min
* A typical modem gasoline composition is 80% paraftks, 14% aromatics,and 6% oleftris. The meanbenzenecoatent is approximately 1%. oUw.radditives ir&de
sulfur, phosphorus.and MTBE.
Bolllng Point: Initially, 102 “F (39 ‘C); after 10% distilled, 140 ‘F
(60 ‘C); after 50% distilled, 230 ‘F (110 ‘C); after 90% disti.Ued,
338 “F (170 “C); final boiling point, 399 “F (204 ‘C!)
Vapor Density (air = 1): 3.0 to 4.0
Density/Specific Gravity: 0.72 to 0.76 at 60 “F (15.6 ‘C)
Water Solubility: Insoluble
Appearance and Odor: A clear (gasoline may be colored with dye), mobile liquid with a characteristic odor recognizable at atbout 10 ppm in air.
‘\
Extinguishlug Media: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, or alcohol foam as extinguishing media. Use of water may be ineffective to extinguish
fire, but use water spray to knock down vapors and to cool fine-exposed drums and tanks to prevent pressure rupture. Do not use a solid stream of
water since it may spread the fuel.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Automobile gasoline is an OSHA Class IB flammable liquid and a dangerous fire and explosion hazard
when exposed to heat and flames. Vapors can flow to an ignition source and flash back. Automobile gasoline can also react violently with
oxidizing agents.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry. Since fire may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing
apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode, and full protective clothing. When the fm is
extinnuished. use nonsnarkina tools for cleanuo. Be aware of runoff from fire control methods. Do not release to sewers or watenvavs.
Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Automotive gasoline can react with oxidizing materials such as peroxides, nitric acid, and perchlorates.
Conditions to Avold: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of automotive gasoline can produce oxides of carbon and partially
oxidized hydrocarbons.
Ccpyrigbt
Any
0
commercial
1591
Chiumhblkhing
use
OI reproduction
Cnrparatiion
without
the
publisher’s
pcrmisioo
is prohibited.
No. 467
Automotive
Gasoline, Lead-free
9/91
mndpassive congestion of spleen.
Xronfc Effects: Chronic Inhalation results in a petite loss, nausea, weight loss, insomnia, and unusual sensitivity (hyperesthesia) of the distal
:xtremities followed by motor weakness, muscuPar degeneration, and diminished tendon reflexes and coordination. Repeated skin exposure can
:ause blistering, drying, and lesions.
TRSTAID
Zyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
‘acility. Consult a physician immediately.
;kin: Quickl remove contaminated clothin Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
)hysician. d ash affected area with soap anf water.
inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathin as needed.
lngestiou: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscrous or convu K*mg person. If in ested, do e induce vomiting due to aspiraJion hazard.
;ive conscious victim a mixture of 2 tablespoons of activated charcoal rmxed in 8 oz o Pwater to drink. Consult a phystctan nnmedtately.
4fter first aid, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.21): Characteristic of ignitability
CERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Zl-A)
<::::.
*::>
3:
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Since
contact lens use in industry 1scontroversial, establish your OW[~policy.
Respirator: Seek rofessional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and?if
necessary wear a6 IOSH - approved respirator. There are no specific NIOSH recommendations. However, for vapor concentrattons not unmediately dangerous to life or health,. use chemical cartridge respirator equipped with organic vapor cartridge s), or a supplied-air respuator. For
respirators do not
:mergency or nonroutine operahons (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. rs arnbtg! Au-purijjkg
wotect workers in oxygen-deJZmt atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervtous gloves, boots, aprons, and auntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact Materials such as neoprene or
polyvinyl alcohol provide excellent/good resistance Bor protective clothing. Note: Resistance of specific mater& can vary from product to
roiluct:
eentilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof exhaust ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations below the OSHA PELs
(Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling It at 1.esoun:e!*os
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency e ewash stations, safe /quick-drench showers, and washmg facrlittes.
Contaminated Equipment: Remove this material from your sIi oes and equipment. z under contaminated clothing before weanng.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
.i.::
:::::;::
.:.:.:..
detached stora e preferred.
Engineering 8 ontrols: Avoid vapor inhalation and skin or eye contact. Consider a respiratory protection program that includes reeula r training,
namtenance, inspection, and evaluation. Indoor use of thts matenal rec.mires exnlosion%oof exhaust ventilation to remove vapors~C)nly use
_ ..D =‘-----‘--‘
_- r
and housekeepisp
nmr.p.d~res-Weal
Iasoline as a fuel source due to its volatility and flammable/explosive nature. gactice good persorIal hygiene
._
clean work clothing daily.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
IMO Shipping Name: Gasoline
DOT Shipping Name: Gasoline (in&ding carirfg-head and natural)
IMO Hazard Class: 3.1
DOT Hazard Class: Flammable liquid
ID No.: UN1203
ID No.: UN1203
IMO Label: FIamrnable liquid
DOT Label: Flammable liquid
IMDG Packaging Group: II
DOT
Packaging
Exceptions:
173.118
_.--.
.?.,. ..,.
DU’I’ PaCltaging Kequlremenrs: I I5.lIY
MSDS Coffeclon References: 26,73,89,100, 101, 103,124,126, 127,132, 133, 136,138, 140,143,146.153. 159
Prepared by: M Allison, BS; Industrial Hygiene Revtew: DJ Wilson, CIH; Medical Review.. W Silverman. MD; Edited by: JR Stuart, MS
9s
.
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145Catalyn Street
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836 USA
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 468
Fuel Oil No. 1
(518) 377-8854
c&atjog
..:
:;1;.. .M~t~ci~~:~X~~~~i,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~;~~~~~~~~~:~,~~
,.,....
Fuel Oil No. 1 Description: A kerosine-like mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons; a d
Fuel oil no. 1 is availablefor home heating use.
Other
Coal oil, heating fuel, kerosene,- kerosine,
~~ range oil.
__Designations:
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest Chemicalw~k Buyers’ GuidP)
for a suppliers list.
K
2
HMIS
FH x
R 0
Cautions: Fuel oil No. 1 is a skin, eye, and mucous membrane irritant and central nervous system (CNS) depressant. Ingestion may lead ppG*
Loaspiration pnewnonitk. It isflammable when exposed to heat or flame.
*scc.8
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. ._.
Fuel oil No. 1, ca 100%
1989 OSHA PEL
1990-91 ACGM TLV
1985-86 Toxicity Data*
1988 NIOSH REL
Vane established
None established
None established
Rat, oral, LD,: 9 g/kg; produces gastrointestinal effects
(hypetmotiiity, diarrhea)
’ Monitor NIOSH, RTECS (HZl8OOOOO),
for future toxicity data.
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Boiling Range: 302 to 554 ‘F (150 to 290 ‘C)
Freezing Point: -40 “F (-40 ‘C)
Water Soiubiiity: insoluble
Vapor Pressure, 100 ‘F (38 ‘C): ca 5
%Voiatiie by Volume: >99
Viscosity: 160 centistoke at 99.5 “F (37.5 ‘C)
.
Appearance and Odor: Light amber liquid with a mild petroleum odor.
.
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Flash Point: 100 to 162 “F (43 to 72 ‘C) 1 Autoignition Temperature: 410 ‘F (210 lC) 1 LEL: 0.7% v/v
1 UEL: 5% v/v
Extinguishing Media: Use dry chemcial, carbon dioxide, foam, water fog or spray. Do not use a forced water spray directly on burning oil since
this scatters the fm. Use a smothering technique to extinguish fire.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: CautionI Vapors may spread to an ignition or heat source and burn with explosive violence.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Since fire may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full faccpiece
operated in pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and full protective clothing. Be aware of runoff from fire control methods. Do not rcleasc
to sewers or waterways due to health and fm or explosion hazard.
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osed containers under normal storag&&andiing
conditions. Haz-
StabiiitylPoiymerization:
Fuel oil no. 1 is stable at
ardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibiiities:
Fuel oil no. 1 is incompatible with strong oxidizing agents; heating greatly increases fire hazard.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid heat and ignition sources.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of fuel oil no. 1 can produce carbon dioxide; incomplete combustion
can produce carbon monoxide.
Sectjon
6; ::Healt~i’IIH~~~~i’:~~~~:~~~:i.l::ii::’
~~..‘i-“;.~~‘::,--;i-il:.I:~,::il~,:i:’~:I’:::-B:j;‘:il’:.:
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: : ;’ ,/,: ,‘. :> j:,( ..‘:‘: : .: :I:,.:
Carcinogenicity: Although the IARC has not assigned an overall evaluation, it has evaluated occupational exposures in pctrolcum refining as
IARC probable human carcinogens (Group 2A).
Summary of Risks: Fuel oil No. 1 is insufficiently volatile to constitute an acute inhalation hazard. Excessive inhalation of aer~osolor mist can
cause respiratory tract irritation, headache, dizziness, nausea, stupor, convulsions, or unconsciousness, depending on concentration and exposure
time. When removed from exposure area, affected persons usually experience complete recovery. Death may occur by asphyxia,tion due to
Continue on next page
No. 468
Fuel
Oil No. 1
IV90
F;pa:O
ans: Centrdnervous sy$km, s$n, and micous membrane’s.
d &ry Routes: Inhalahon, mgeshon.
Acute ffects: S stemic effects from ingestion include GI irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, and.,in severe cases, CNS depression, progressing to
:oma and death. f nhalation of aerosol or mists may result in increased respiration, tachycardla (exkessively rapid heart beat), and cyanosis (dark
>urplish coloration of skin and. mucous membranes [email protected] by deficient blood oxygenation).
~~~c&ffec’s:
Repeated skm contact causes dermahti.
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
Facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin: Quictiy remove contaminated clothin . Rinse with floodin amounts of water for at least 15 min. If large areas of the body are exposed or
if irritation persists, get medical help imrne f lately. Wash affec te2 area with soap and water.
[nhnlation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathin as needed.
Ingestion: Never gl\le anything by mouth to an unconscious or convuFis.
mg person. If ingested, do not induce. vomiting due to aspiration hazard.
zontact a physician lmmedlately.
After first ald, get ap ropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support.
vote to Physicians: 2 astnc lavage 1scontraindicated due to aspiration hazard. Preferred antidotes are charcoal and milk. In cases of severe
aspiration pneumonitis, consider monitoring arterial blood gases to ensure adequate ventilation. Observe the patient for 6 hr. If vital signs become
abnormal or symptoms develop, obtain a chest x-ray.
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.21): Ignitable waste
CERCL.A Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
OSHA Designations
Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Subpart Z): Not listed
,....-_::.:...:.
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Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Seek rofessional advice prior to respirator selection and,use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary, use a NIOS HP-approved respirator with mist filter and organic vapor cartridge. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills,
reactor vessels. or storage tanksL wear an SCBA. Warning! Au-uurifvinp remirators do not orotect workers in oxvnen-deficient atmosheres.
Other: Wear &pervious gloves; boots, aprons. and gaudaets to’pre&?.kin*contacL
NitriIe’or polyvinyl alcohol i‘ioves &e recommeided.
Ventilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations that promote worker safety and
roductivity. Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.(*“q
Hafety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from our shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: x ever eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101)
DOT Shipping Ntime: Fuel oil
DOT Hazard Class: Combustible liquid
ID No.: NA1993
DOT Label: None
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.118a
DOT Packaging Requirements: None
MSDS
Colkfion
References: 1,6,7,12,73,84,
103, 126, 131, 132, 133,136, 143
prepared by: UT Allison, BS; Industrial Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CIH; Medical Review: W Silverman, MD; Edited by: JR Stuart, MS
9
OILS, MISCELLANEOUS:
LUBRICATING
I
OLB
t
OILS, MISCELLANEOUS:
OLB
6ANAATED
Temperatwe
(degrF)
50
52
54
56
56
M)
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
76
60
62
84
LUBRlCAilNG
I
12.17
LmulD
DENSTY
POUndsperCUbiC
toot (astirnate)
56.160
56.180
56.166
56.180
56.180
56.160
56.160
56.160
56.166
56.160
56.180
56.160
56.190
56.160
56.160
56.166
56.160
56.160
21
N WATER
Poundspsr100
pounds of water
N
S
0
L
U
I3
L
E
T
lJQul0
12.10
HEAT CAPACITY
LIQUID
THERMAl.
12.10
CDNDUCTIVITY
Temperature
(degrees 0
50
52
54
56
55
60
62
64
66
68
70
72
74
76
76
60
62
El4
86
a0
w)
92
94
96
90
100
SANRATED
Temperature
(degrees F)
70
75
80
05
90
95
100
105
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
145
150
155
160
165
170
175
160
165
190
195
[email protected]
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
100
105
110
115
120
.460
A61
.462
.463
.464
A65
466
.467
4%
.469
.470
.471
.472
.473
.474
.475
.476
.477
.470
.479
.400
Aal
.482
A83
A84
A85
12.22
VAWR
PRESSURE
SANRATED
.920
.919
-910
.917
.916
.915
.914
.913
.912
.911
.910
909
308
.9Q7
306
905
304
903
&tit
Temperat&
@w-s
F)
Potmds per square
inch (estimate)
.042
.049
.057
.065
.076
.067
.lOO
.114
.131
,149
.170
.193
,216
.247
.279
.314
352
.395
A43
.495
.552
.615
563
.756
.041
.930
L
L
DENSITY
100.42
IDEAL
275.ooo
12.24
QAS HEAT CAPACITY
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
Genium Publishing Corporation
Sheet No. 410
Carbon Tetrachloride
1145Catalyn Street
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836 USA
.
(518) 377-8854
I
Issued: 1280
Revision: El, 4/90
.
:,::y.>..,i!-;.i,-l~~~:.~rii’.~~~~~
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~$jj+$+$
sli;j
iii:~.,‘l.:~~~~:iB~:~~:.~~
S&i(@~&$ ~~~~~~~~~CJ&$j~
jfi&ti([email protected]$::;::;:,f 23:ii1,.
‘:~.j,.ij I<.,,,; .(jj,,:j : .::,ii:>.;:.
Carbon Tetracblorlde Description: A chlorinated hydrocarbon derived from interacting carbon disulfide and chlorine in
the presence of iron, or chlorination of methane or higher hydrocarbons at 482 ‘F/250 “C to 752 “F/400 ‘C. Carbon t&achloride is treated with caustic alkali solution to remove sulfur chloride. Its primary use is in manufacturing flurocarbon
propellants. It is also used in producing of semiconductors, chlorinating organic compounds, metal degreasing, refrigerants; as a solvent for oils, fats, resins, rubber waxes, lacquers, and varnishes; and as an agricu&ural fumigant. This material
was widely used in the dry-cleaning industry.
Otber Designations: CAS No. 0056-23-5; Ccl,; carbon chloride; carbon tet; methane tetrachloride; perchloromethane;
tetrachlorocarbon; tetrachloromethane.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest Chemicalweek Buyers Guidfl) for a suppliers list.
R
1
1
4
NFPA
;
;*
3-O
*‘kin
absorption
0
a
HMIS
H 3
ii 00
PPGt
Cartx~~tetrachloride, ca 1004b
OSHA PEL
8-hr TWA: 2 ppm, 12.6 mg/m3
Toxicity Data*
Rat, oral, LDso: 2800 rug&g; toxic effects not yet reviewed
Rat, inhalation, L.C,: 8000 ppm over 4 hr. no toxic effect noted
Human, inhalation, TC;o: 20 ppm inhaled produces gastrointestinal
effects (nausea or vomiting)
ACGIH TLV (Skin), 1989-90
TLV-TWA: 5 ppm, 31 mglm’
NIOSH REL, 1987
60&n
ceiling: 2 ppm, 12.6 mg/m’
k See NIOSH, RTECS ([email protected]), for additional irritative, mutative, tumorigenic, and toxicity data.
Specific Gravity (Hz0 = 18; 39 ‘F/4 ‘C): 1.5940 at 68 ‘F/20 ‘C
Water Solubility: Very slightly soluble (800 mg/l at 68 l Ff20 ‘C)
Evaporation Rate (Butyl Acetate = 1): 12.8
Melting Point: -9.4 ‘F/-23 ‘C
Vapor Pressure: 91.3 mm Hg at 68 “F/20 ‘C
Vapor Density (Ah = 1): 5.32
Appearance and Odor: A colorless liquid with a heavy ethereal odor. The high and low odor thresholds are, respectively, 128.4 and 60 mg/m3.
Odor is not an adequate warning sign to prevent overexposure.
Extinguishing Media: Carbon teeachloride is nonflammable and will not support combustion. Use extinguishing media appropriate to the
surrounding fire. This material was previously usedas an extinguishing medium in portable fire extinguishers, but its toxicity and fii decomposition products lead to its replacement with “safer” extinguishing media.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Carbon tetrachloride can react violently with hot or burning metals such as aluminum and magnesium.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Since fii may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
operated in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and fully encapsulating suit. Use water spray to cool fire-exposed containers. Be
aware of runoff from fii control methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
:..
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:.:,‘:;.,
Stability/Polymerization:
Carbon tetrachloride is stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handlinE conditions.
Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Carbon tetrachloride reacts violently with fluorine gas, alkali metals, and aluminum (see reference 126 for specific
incompatibilities).
Conditions to Avoid: This material has caused explosions when used as a fire extinguisher on wax fires and uranium fiis. It may also form toxic
phosgene when used to put out electrical fires.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of carbon, tebachloride can produce toxic phosgene and hydrogen
chloride.
: ,:, I .(;::::)::,.::,.:
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No: 4 10
Carbon Tetrachloride
4/90
Summary of Risks: C&&XI btr&hloridi ishighly toxic and @@in by inhalation, ingestion (mean lethal dose is 5 to 10 ml), and s&n a&o?
tlon. Alcohol’s synergntic effects markedly mcrease CC1 ‘S toxicity. ii xcessive exposure ma result in central nervous s stem depression, c&l%
arrhythmias, and gastrointestinal symptoms. In humans tile majority of fatalities have been x e result of renal injury WI-x secondary cardiac
failure. Kidney and liver dpage can occur from severe acute or chronic exposure. Human,liver damage occurs mon often after ingestion of the
liquid than after the mhaiatxon of the vapor. However, after a 30 min to 1 hr exposure to concentrations of 1000 to 2000 ppm, hum-; have died
from acute renal damage.
Mo;;i;;l Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: mionged recovery and permanent disability of the liver, kidney, and llangs are
Central nervous system, eyes, skin, liver, kidne s lungs.
f arget Organs:
*
Prlmar Entry Routes: Inhalation, percutaneous (through the s&I ).
+cu.te d ffects: Acute exposure symptoms include eye, nose, skin, and throat irritation; cough, dy&&ea, cyanosis, cardiac arrhythmias, headaches,
dlwness, men? confuslon, nausea, vomiting,abdon+l
pain, and [email protected] Jaundice and abnormal liver enlargement accompanied Iby oliguria
(reduced excretion of urine), protemuria (protem in unne), and hematuna (blood in urine) may occur even after several days delay.
Chronic Effects: Chronic exposure symptoms include defatting dermatitis, headaches, dizziness, mental confusio;, apathy, anorexia, nausea,
vomiting, abdominal pain, weight loss, narrowing of visual field! o tic nerve damage with possible blindness, hearmg loss, and renal ;andhepatic
decom ensation (loss of these organs’ ability to correct dysfunctmn‘I . Chronic exposure may result in the development of aplastic anemia.
FIRsl%D
E es: Flush immediately, including under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with flooding amounts of runnin water for at least 15 min.
din: Quick% remove contaminated clothm . After nnsing affected skin with flooding amounts of water, w a&* It with soap and water.
Inhalation: R)emove exposed person to fresE*ap and supprt breathin as needed.
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convuL mg person. Give one to two glasses of water to dilute and induce vomiting,
unless the person shows evidence of decreasing mental functioning and awareness.
After flrst aid, get appropriate ln-piant, paramedic, or community medical support.
Physician’s Note: To mimmizc hepatorenal damage, consider intravenous acetyicysteine. .Hprbaric
oxygen is also $lized.for significantexposures. Dialysis has also been suggested in severe cases. Give cardiorespiratory support as m cated and carefully momtor flmd and electrolytes.
Closely monitor hepatic and renal functions. Avoid epinephrine because of myocardial sensitization and potcnhal for inducing ventricular
arhyth)mias.
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Splltiak:
Notify safety personnel, evacuate area, and provide maximum exhaust ventilation. Cleanup personnel should rot& against inha&
tion and skin and eye contact. Small spills can be absorbed on paper or some noncombustible, inert ingredient and allow $toevapprateinahocd.
For 1 e spills, dike far ahead to contain spill for disposal. Prevent release of Ccl, to surface water or sewers. Follow applicable SHA regulations YC 9 CFR 1910.1201.
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
EPA Designations
OSHA Designations
Listed as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33
Listed as an Au Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-2)
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance 40 C$y2\S 2): Not listed
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CL
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (4dC 2 R 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ): SOOQlb (227Okg) [* per RCRA, Sec. 3001, per Clean
Water Act, Sec. 307(a), 311 (b)(4)]
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safe 0 les, per OS)Lf\ eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Follow 0!3HA respirator regulations (29 &i5 1 10.134 Bpd,GFyA
wear a NIOSH-approved respuator. For emev,ency or
nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tads *W
.
Warnin : Air-purifying respir%rs do not protect workers in oxygendeficient atmos heres.
Other: 9: ear impervious gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent skin contact. s [email protected] alcohol protective gear is rec~rnmendtd
Ventllatlon: Provide eneral and local expioslon-proof ventilation systems to maintain azborne concentmtions below the OSHA PEL, ACGIH
TLV, and NIOSH RE & (Sec. 2). Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it
at its source.(‘03)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safetylquickdrench shoyers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from our shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: r.7ever eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eat&& drinking,
smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics.
. .:.,.,__
.,....... .,.,.,..,.,.:
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.,:~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~
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..... ..,.........
.,,., ,...
.. . ...\...i....A_
...-.... ...i.-.... .. ...... .......A. ...... .. .... ..,....
Storage Requirements: Store in tightly closed container in a cool, dry, well-ventilated, low tie-risk area away from incompatible materials (Sec.
5). direct sunlight, and heat. Prevent exposure of vapors to high temperature to prevent decomposition to toxic and corrosive gases and.vapors.
Engineering Controls: Avoid vapor inhalation and skin or eye contact. Use only with adequate ventilation and appropriate personal protective
gear, Monitor vapor levels and institute a respiratory protection program which includes trainmg, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation.
Practice good personal hygiene procedures. When possible, substitute a less hazardous solvent for Ccl,. Provide pnplacement and biannual
medical exams, including studies of liver and kidney function. Prevent exposing individuals with liver, kidney, or central nervous system diseases,
or alcoholism. Alcohol’s synergistic effects markedly increase CCl,‘s toxicity.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
IMO Shipping Name: Carbon tetrachloride
DOT Shipping Name: Carbon tetrachloride
IMO Hazard Ciasg: 6.1
DOT Hazard Class: ORM-A
IMO Label: Poison
ID No.: UN1846
KMDG Packaging Group: II
DOT Label: None
ID No.: UN1846
DOT Packaging Requirements: 173.620
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 173.505
Geniqm Publishing Corporation
1145catalyn street
Schemctady.NY X2303-1836USA
6P
Material [email protected] Data Sheets Collection:
Sheet No. 298
Jet FueIs
(518)377-8854
Cautions: Jet fuel is volatile. combmtible, and thus, a dangerou fire hazard. It is a skin,‘e&,‘and respiratory
tract irritant. Ingestion can be [email protected], even fd.
F
R
2
0
ii
03
[a) Id A and Jet A-l (combuaible) andJF’-5(flammableto com&tibk).
PFq
PW
fSec.8
@) Jet B (dangeroustire hazard) andJp-4 (&mgcmur fin hazardandmoderateexplosion hazrudin the form of vapor).
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let fuel ca loo96
1989 OSHA PEL
191E9-90ACGIH TLV
1988 NIOSH REL
1985-86 ToxkSty Data+
None established
None established
None established
Rat, oral, LD+ 40 mg/kg
Rat, inhalation, LC,: 23 ppm/4 hr
Rat, skin, LD,: 317 mg/kg
* 7hese toxicity data. pettain tojet fuel HIP-3. SeeMOSH, RTECS(MH542SlUO),for additional toxicity data.
Vapor Pressure: 0.1 mm Hg at 20 l C
Viscosity: 1.0 to 2.0 cSt at 72 ‘F (40 ‘C)
Water Solubili&:
Negligible
Appearance and Odor: A clear liquid with a hydrocarbon odor.
* physical datawry withfueltype.thesedatapenainto kcrosinejet fuels in general.
Jet A and Jet A-l: 110 to 150 ‘F (43.4 to 65.6 ‘C) I
Jet B: -16 to -30 ‘F (-26.7 to -34.5 ‘C)
JF’P-1:
95 to 145 l F (35.0 to 62.8 ‘C!)
JP-1: 442 ‘F (228 ‘C)
JP-4t: -10 to 30 ‘F (-23.4 to -1.1 ‘C)
JP&468'~Q42'C)
JP-5:475T(246
lC)
JP-5: 95 to 145 ‘F (35.0 tc 62.8 ‘C)
JP4:1.3%vb
JP4:8.O%v/v
Extinguishing Median For large fire, use water spray, fog, or foam. For small fires, use dry chemical or CO,. Water may be ineffective in fighting
fues involving materials with low flash points. Apply in the form of a spray.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: Jet fuel is volatile and combustible.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Since fire may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece
operated in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and full protective equipment. Be aware of runoff Tom fire control methods. Dc not
release to sewers or waterways.
*A higher kerosenecut than JP-4 witi fewer impurities.
t 65% gasoline and 35% light pctmlcum dirtillate.
Stability/Polymerization:
Jet fuels are stable at room temperature in closed containers under normal storage and handling conditions. Hazardous
plymeAzaliott cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities
A violent reaction occurs with fluorine (F,). Jet fuels are also incompatible with halogens, strong acids, alkalines,
and oxidizers.
Conditions to AvoM: Avoid heat, sparks, flame, and buiid up of static electricity.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of jet fuel can produce carbon monoxide from incomplete. combus-
! /,
No. 298 Jet Fuels 8190
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hAmgenicity:
The NTP. INK!, ad OSHA do not list jet fuels as a carcinogen.
iummary of Risks: Jet fuel is a moderate skin, eye. and respiratory irritant Ingestion may be harmful or fatal. The most serious toxic effect
Ollowing ingestion is aspiration pneumonitis.
rIedica1 Conditions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Individuals with chronic pulmonary disease should not be exposed to jet fuel vapor.
iarget Organs: Central rie~ous system respiratory tract.
‘rlmary Entry Routes: Inhalation, ingestion
icute Effects: Systemic exposure through the respiratory or gastrointestinal (GI) tract may result in increasing levels of central nervous system
lepression, manifest by a staggering gait. slurred speech, or mental confusion These symptoms could progress to unconsciousness, corna, and
leath from respiratory faihrre. Exposure of lung tissue through aspiration of liquid jet fuel causes an immediate. irritant and destructive reaction.
The inflammatory lung changes cause a chemical pneumonitis. pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs), an&r blecdiig in the lung tissue. Seconlary infection as a result of the injury, and scarring may occur with resultant permanent lung damage. The immediate clinical effects are.incrcasng shortness of breath, coughing, bloody sputum, and chest pain. These symptoms may worsen over the following hours to days. Ingestion
:ausesirritation to the GI tract characterized by vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Gther organs possibly injured through systemic exposure
nclude parenchyma of the liver, kidney, pancreas, and spleen. Exposure to high mist concentrations may irritate the mucous membrane.
Chronic Effects: Chronic lung dysfunction may result from aspiration into the lungs. Prolonged or repeated skin contact can cause dermatitis.
msTAID
Syes: Gently lit the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
‘acility. Consult a physician immediately.
;kin: Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
lhysician. Wash affected area with soap and water.
nhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air and support breathing as needed
Ingestion: Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person If ingested. do nil induce vomiting. If the victim is nauseated,
m&ion head lower than knees to prevent aspiration. Administer vegetable oil and call a physician immediately.
4fter first aid, get appropriate in-plant, paramedic, or community medical support
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<pill/Leak: Design undpractice (I jetjid spill con&o1 Md countermeasure program (SCCP). Notify safety personnel, isolate hazard area and
lcny entry, remove all heat and ignition sour~s. and provide maximum explosion-proof ventilation. Cleanup personnel should protect against
rapor inhalation and direct contact with skin or eyes. Immediately absorb spilled jet fuel with noncombustible, inert material such as Fire:-retardent
reatcd sawdust or diatomaceous earth. Using nonsparking tools, immediately shovel spilled material in appropriate containers for disposal. After
:ompleting material pickup, ventilate area and wash spill site. Follow applicable OSHA regulations (29 CFR 1910.120).
Disposal: Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
OSHA Designations
EPA Designations
Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000. Subpart 2): Not listed
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
“ERCLA Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 302.4): Not listed
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Seek professional advice prior to respirator selection and use. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR 1910.134) and, if necessary. wear a NIOSH-approved respirator. For emergency or nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an
SCBA. Warning! Air-purfiing respirators do not protect workers in oxygen-def~ient atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervious gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact Wear nonsparking shoes (rubber,
cord or sewn leather soles).
Ventilation: Provide general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborne concentrations that promote worker safety and
productivity. Local exhaust ventilation is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by controlling it at its source.(ro3)
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. Remove this
material from your shoes and equipment. Launder contaminated clothing before wearing.
Comments: Never ea& drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, driig,
smoking, using the toilet. or applying cosmetics.
Storage Requirements: Store in tightly closed containers in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area away from all heat and ignition sources and
incompatible materials (Sec. 5). Outside or detached storage is preferred.
Engineermg Controls: Avoid vapor inhalation and skin or eye contact. Use with appropriate personal protective gear. Institute a respiratory
protection program that includes regular training, maintenance, inspection, and evaluation. Jet fuel’s greatest hazard is its Fire potential. Train all
employees to use Fireextinguishing equipment Perform Fire driil exercises periodically. Take all measures to prevent static electricity: electrically
ground and bond all containers and equipment used in shipping, receiving. or transferring operations in production and storage areas. Maintain
and test grounding and bonding connections. De not use drag chains or cables on fueling vehicles. After filling jet fuel storage tanks, wait 30 min
before opening hatches to permit the relaxation of any static charges generated during Filling or hauling. Empty containers or drums retaining
residue (liquid and/or vapor) can be dangerous. Do not expose to heat or ignition sources. All drums should be completely drained, properly
bunged, and promptly disposed of pa local regulations. Practice good personal hygiene and housekeeping procedures. Take care in handling
hoses, cans, and funnels wet with jet fuel. Before touching with bare hands, carefully wipe jet fuel containers. Properly dispose of wet rags per
EPA harardous waste requirements. Avoid contamination of jet fuel with water, rust, scale, dirt and other petroleum products. Use commercial
kits (Hydrokit+ Aqua-Glo. or “Clear and Bright”) to detect water and dirt, respectively.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102): Not liitcd
MSDS Collection References:
I, 73,84.103.126,132.133.136
Prepared by: h4J AIlison, BS; Industrial
Hygiene Rev&v:
-
DJ Wiism,
CIH;
Medical Review: W
Silvemm.
MD;
Edited
by: JR Stuart, MS
Material
Safety
Data
from Genium’s Reference Collection
Genium Publishing Corporation
I
f
I ‘--
.ri-,
I
It
WBs)
Schenectady, NY 12303-1836 USA
(S18~377-X8Sc,
GENIUU
PUl3UStUNG
CORP.
Issued: November 1988
BIPHENYLS (PCBs)
20
Description (Orlgln/Uses): Commercial PCBs are mixtures that were once widely manufactured by combining chlorine
gas, iron filings, and bipheayls. Their high stability contributes to their intended commercial applications sad their accidental,
49
long-term adverse environmental and health effects. PCBs are useful as insulators in electrical equipment because they
Genium
are electrically nonconductive. Their distribution has been limited since 1976. The Aroclor PCB codes identify PCBs by
type. The first two digits of a eode indicate whether the PCB contains chlorinated bipheayls (12), chlorinated texphenyls, (54), or
both (25.44); the last two digits indicate the approximate percentage of chlorine. Found ia insulating liquid, synthetic rubber, pls.&&rs,
flame retardants, floor tile, printer’s ink, paper and fabric coatings, brake linings, paints, automobile body sealants, asphalt, adhesives,
electrical capacitors, electrical transformers, vacuum pumps, gas-transmission turbines, heat-transfer fluids, hydraulic fluids, lubricating sad
cutting oil, copying paper, carbonless copying paper, and fluorescent light ballasts.
Synonym: Chlorodipheayls
Other Designations (Producer, Trade Name, Nation): Monsanto, Aroclop (USA, Great Britain); Bayer, Clophen* (German Democratic
Republic); Prodelec, Pheaoclop, Pyralent (France); Kaaegafuchi, Kaaechlof; Mitsubishi, [email protected](Japan); Caffaro, FeacloP (Italy).
Trade Name
Aroclors
Aroclor 1016
Aroclor 1221
Aroclor 1232
I,
’(
- -
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS
114.5Catalyn Street
Material Name: PQLYCHLORINATBD
t
No. 683
Sheet
CAS No.
01336-36-3
12674-11-2
11104-28-2
11141-16-5
RTECS No.
TQ13.50000
TQ1351000
TQ1352000
TO1354000
Trade Name
CAS No.
Aroclor 1242 53469-21-9
At-o&r 1248 12672-29-6
Amclor 1254 11097-69-l
Aroclor 1260 110g6+82-5
PCB-42% Chlorlne/Aroclor 1242
CAS No. 53469-21-9
OSHA PEL (Skin*)
8-Hr TWA: 1 mg/m’
ACGM TLV (Skin*), 1988-89
TLV-TWA: 1 mg/m’
RTECS No.
TQ1356000
TQ1358000
TQ1360000
TQ 1362000
PCB-54% ChlorinelAroclor 1254
CAS No. 11097-69-l
OSHA PEL (Skin*)
8-HrTWA: 0.5 mg/m’
ACGM TLV (Skin*), 198889
TLV-TWA: 0.5 mglm
HMIS
Hl
Fl
RO
PPG*
Rl
I3
sl
K 1
All PCBs/Aroelors
CAS No. 1336-36-3
NIOSH REL 1977
lo-Hour TWA: 0.0Dlmg/m3
Toxicity Data**
Mouse, Oral, LD,: 1900 [email protected]
*This material caa be absorbed through intact skia, which contributes to overall exposure.
**See NIOSH, RTECS (Genium ref. 90), at the locations specified ia section 1 for additional data with references to tumorigeaic,
reproductive, mutagenic, aad irritative effects.
Boiling Point: Ranges from 527°F (275’C) to 725-F (385°C)
Solubllity in Water (8): Insoluble
Pour Point: Ranges from -3 1‘F (-3X!) to 87.8”F (3 1‘C)
% Volatile by Volume: Ranges from 1.2 to 1.6
Molecular Weight (Average): Aroclor 1242: 258 Gtams/Mole
Amclor 1254: 326 Grams/Mole
Appearance and Odor: Clear to light yellow mobile oil to a sticky resin; a sweet “aromatic” odor. As the percentage of chlorine increases,
the PCB becomes thicker aad heavier; e.g., Aroclor 1254 is more viscous than Aroclor 1242.
; .:~I~~~~~
SEfT~I(Q,J
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$.~~~“.::~‘;_: : -y’-:ii’ .;” :, i j i-:;:;zj::i: ‘..;:;$,‘.r.‘,:CE;’
,-x
1 Autoignition Temperature: Not Found
Flash Point*
1 LEL: Not Found
1UEL: Not Found
Extinguishing Media: Use water spray/fog, carbon dioxide (COJ dry chemical, or “alcohol” foam to extinguish fires that involve polychlorinated biphenyls. Although it is very difficult to ignite PCBs, they are often mixed with more flammable materials (oils, solvents, etc.)
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: If a transformer containing PCBs is involved in a fire, its owner may be required to :report the incident
to appropriate authorities. Consult and follow all pertinent Federal, state, and local regulations. Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Wear
a self-contained breathing apparatus @CBA) with a full facepiece operated in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode; fire fighters
must also wear a complete set of protective clothing. Comments: The hazards of PCB fires are associated with the possibility of their being
released into the environment where they and their products of degeneration can pose serious long-term health risks. These Ipotential
problems are heightened by the PCBs’ resistance to biological aad chemical degradation sad by the possibility that they will contaminate
underground water systems (see sect. 5)
*Ranges from 284°F (14o’C) to 392-F (ZOOC).
Polychlorinated biphenyls are very stable materials. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Stability/Polymerization:
PCBs caa react dangerously with sodium or potassium. These reactions are pert of an industrial process used
Chemical Incompatibilities:
to destroy PCBs; however, people have been killed by explosions at PCB treatment, storage, and disposal sites. Conditions to
Avoid: Limit human exposure to PCBs to the lowest possible level; especially avoid contact with skin. Hazardous Products of Decompositou: Thermal-oxidative degradation of PCBs can produce toxic gases such as carbon monoxide, chlorine, chlorinated aromatic fragmeats, phenolics, aldehydes, sad hydrogen chloride. Incomplete combustion of PCBs produces toxic compounds such as polychlorinated
dibenzofuran (PCDF, the major product of combustion), and polychlorinated dihenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD or dioxin).
No. 683 POLYCHLORINATE D BIPHENYLS (PCBs) 1l/88
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Carciaogealclty:
The EPA lists PCBs as carcinogens, and the IARC classifies them as probable human c~c~ogens (group 29).
Summary of Risks: Effects of accidental exposure to PCBs include acneform eruptions; eye discharge; swelling of the upper eyelids aad
hyperemia of the coajuactiva; hyperpigmentatioa of skin, nails, and mucous membrane; chloroacne; dist.&Gve hair follicles; fever; hearing
difficulties; limb spasms; headache; vomiting; and diarrhea. FCBs are potent liver toxins that can be absorbed through unbroken skin in
hazardous amounts without immediately discernible pain or discomfort. Severe health effects can develop lam. In experimental animals,
prolonged or repeated exposure to PCBs by any route results in liver damage at levels that are less than those reported to have caused (cancer
in rodents. Medical Coadltions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: None reported. Target Organs: Skin, eyes, eyelids, blood,, liver.
Primary Entry: Inhalation, skin contact/absorption. Acute Effects: Skin and eye irritation, acneform dermatitis, nausea, vo&,iag,
abdominal pain, jaundice, liver damage. Chroalc Effects: Possible cancer (evidence of this is inconclusive); reproductive effects (jaundice,
excessive secretion of tears, dermal chromopexy); and hepatitis. FIRST AID: Eyes. Immediately flush eyes, including under the eyelids,
gently but thoroughly with flooding amounts of running water for 15 minutes. Skin. Rinse expose4 skin with flooding amounts of water;
wash with soap and water. Inhalation. Remove the exposed person to fresh air; restore and/or supp&t breathing as needed. Have qualified
medical personnel administer oxygen as required. Iag&loa. Induce vomiting by sticking your finger to the back of the exposed person’s
throat. Have him or her drink 1 to 2 glasses of milk or water. Get medical help (in plant, paramedic, community) for all exposures.
Seek prompt medical assistance for further treatment, observation, and support after fmt aid. Note to Physician: PCBs are poorly metabolized, soluble in lipids, and they accumulate in tissues or organs rich in lipids. Liver function tests can help to determine the extent of body
damage in exposed persons. If electrical equipment containing PCBs arcs over, the PCBs or other hydrocarbon dielectric fluids may
decompose and give off hydrochloric acid @ICI), a potent respiratory irritant.
SECTr(jN,;
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~.;::i-,i:i:s;;g..~~~~
:;.: ::‘:j ;:‘, ;;: :); +:‘;:i j ; .: :,.;:~
PCBs as an emergency. An SPCCP (spill-prevention control and countermeasure plan) nz
SpllVLeak: Treat any accidental release of
formulated
before spills or leaks occur. PCBs are resistant to biodegradation, soluble in lipids, and chemically stable; as such they have
become significant contaminants of global ecosystems. Releases of PCBs require immediate, competent, professional response from trained
personnel. Each re&ase situation is unique and requires a specifically designed cleanup respome. General recommendations include idhering to Federal regulations (40 CFR Part 761). Notify safety personnel, evacuate nonessential personnel, ventilate the spill area, and contain
the PCBs. All wastes, residues, and contaminated cleanup equipment from the incident are subject to EPA requirements (40 CFR 761).
Consult your attorney or appropriate regulatory officials for information about reporting requirements and disposal procedures. Waste
Disposal: Contact your hazardous waste disposal firm or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendations, especially when PCBs are
unexpectedly discovered. Follow Federal, state, and local regulations. PCBs are biomagaified in the food chain; i.e., their concentration
increases at each link. The disposal of PCBs or of PCB-contaminated materials is strictly regulated; violations of applicable laws can result
in fines, lawsuits, and negative publicity. Warning: Accidental spills of PCBs that may affect water supplies must be reported to Coast
Guard personnel at the National Response Center, telephone (202) 426-2675.
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000 Subpart Z).
EPA Designations (40 CFR 302.4)
CERCLA Hazardous Substance, Reportable Quantity: i0 lbs (4.54 kg), per the Clean Water Act (CWA). $8 31 I (b) (4) and 307 (a).
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Goggles: Always wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles. Where splashing of PCBs is possible, wear a full face shield..
Follow OSHA eye- and face-protections regulations (29 CFR 1910.133). Resph-ator: Wear a NIOSH-approved respirator per Genium
reference 88 for the maximum-use concentrations and/or exposure limits cited in section 2. Follow OSHA respirator regulations (29 CFR
1910.134). For emergency or nonroutine operations (leaks or cleaning reactor vessels and storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Warning: Airpurifying respirators will not protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres. Other: Wear impervious gloves, boots, aprons, and
gauntlets, etc., to prevent any contact of PCBs with your skin. Ventilation: Install and operate general and local maximum, explosion-proof
ventilation systems powerful enough to maintain airborne levels of this material below the OSHA PEL standards cited in section 2. Local
exhaust ventilation is preferred because it prevents dispersion of the contamination into the general work area by eliminating it at its source.
Consult the latest edition of Geaium reference 103 for detailed recommendations. Safety Stations: Make emergency eyewash station:;,
safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities available in work areas. Contaminated Equipment: Contact leases pose a special
ham; soft lenses may absorb irritants. and all lenses concentrate them. Do not wear contact lenses in any work area. Remove contaminated
clothing and launder it before wearing it again; clean this material from your shoes and equipment. Heavily soiled clothing must be properly
discarded in a manner consistent with applicable regulations. Comments: Practice good personal hygiene; always wash thoroughly after
using this material and before eating, drinking, smoking, using the toilet, or applying cosmetics. Keep it off your clothing and equipment
Avoid transferring it from your hands to your mouth while eating, drinking, or smoking. Do not eat, drink, or smoke in work areas.
si,~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~:
‘~~~ba~~.~E~~~t:~~~.~
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Storage Segregation: Store PCBs in closed containers in a cool, dry, well-ventilated area. Protect containers from physical damage.
Special HaadlIaglStorage:
All storage facilities must have adequate containment systems (dikes; elevated, nonporous holding platforms;
retaining walls) to prevent any major release of PCBs into the environment. Carefully design and implement these extra precautions now; do
not wait until you have to respond to an accidental release of this material.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101-2; PCBs were the first materials to be directly regulated by Congress by way of TSCA in 1976.)
IMO Shipping Name: Polychlorinated Bipheayls
DOT ShippIng Name: Polychlorinated Biphenyls
IMO Hazard Class:-9
DOT Hazard Class: ORM-E
IMDG Packaging Group: II
ID No. UN 23 115
DOT Packaging Requirements: 49 CFR 173.510
References: 1,6,26, 38, 84-94, 100, 101, 116, 117, 120, 122.
Prepared by PJ Igoe, BS; Industrial
Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CIH; Medical Review: W Silverman, MD
Technical Review: Northeast Analytical, Inc. (PCB and VOC Specialists), Schenectady, New York, Telephone: (518) 346-4592
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Genium Publishing Corporation
1145Catalyn Street
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836 USA
Material Safety Data Sheets Collection:
.i
Sheet No. 517
Pentachlorophenol
(5 18) 377-8854
Issued: lo/83
Revision: A, 1l/90
‘:...,; ;;;:;: : :
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‘R’. 1
Pentachloronhenol KSHCL0) Descrlntlon: Derived bv chlorination of ohenol in the
oresence of
..~ I-------- a- catal;;;
--._ _._
NFPA
Used as a fu<gicide, i b”acte&ile. a mohuscicide, an alglcidei an ix&&&&f&&e
control) and herbicide (pre- i- 3
.A
Ll
narvest defoliant); 10 sodium peotachloropheoate; in wood preservation (tele hone poles, pilings, etc.), wood
Troducts, starches, dextrios, and glues. Other registered industrial uses ioclu If e boat and building construction;
reatment of cable coverings, canvas beltio4, nets, and construction lumber and poles; mold control in petroleum
irilling and production; incorporation in pamts, pulp, pulp stock, pa r, cooling tower water, and hardboard and
particle board. Registered homeowner uses include maintenance of 8”oats, trailers, station wagons, siding, fences,
HMIS
HMIS
and outdoor furniture.
Other Designations: CAS No. 0087-86-5, chlorophen, PCP, penchlorol, penta.
:
;
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest Chemicalweek Buyers’ Guid.8’) for a
suppliers list.
Cautions: Pentachloropheool is highly toxic by skin absorption, ingestion, and inhalation The agent is highly
$-SeC.8
titatiog. General metabolism, the heart, the circulatory system, the liver, and the kidneys may be affected.
t PCPis freely soluble in alcohol, ether.and benzene.Dependinp.on medium. PCP’shealth and flammabilitv hazardsincreasein solution with suchmedia.
8-hr TWA (skin): 0.5 mg/m3
1990-91 ACGIH TLV
TWA (skin): 0.5 mglm’
1987 IDLH Level
150 mg/m3
1988 NIOSH REL
None established
1989 OSHi
PEL
198.5-86 Toxicit Data?
Rat, ora& LD, 4 7 mg/kg ingested affects the vascular (blood cessure elevation),
endocnne (hyperglycemia), nutritional, and gross metabolic Pbody temperature
increase) systems
Rat, inhalation, L.C : 355 mg/m3 inhaled affects behavior (excitement; muscle
contraction or spa&city) and respiration (shortness of breath)
* ‘Technicalgradepentachlorophenolcontainstracesof hexa, hepta,and octachlorodibenzq-dioxins; hexa. hepta,and oetachlorcdibenzofurans;andhexaehlo.
mbenzene.
i’ SeeNIOSH.
(SM63OCCKXX
for additional irritative, mutative. reuroductive.and toxic&v data.
RTECS
Molecular Weight: 266.35
Bolilng Point: 588 to 590 ‘F (309 to 310 ‘C),* 592 ‘F (311 ‘C) (decomposes)t
Meltin Point: 374 ‘F (190 ‘C),* 374 “F f;190 ‘C)t
S ecific Gravity (22 “C/4 YJ): 1.978
4 ater Solubility: 14 me/l at 20 ‘C
Vaporkessure:
0.00011 mm Hg at 77 ’ (25 ‘C)
Vapor Density (Air = 1): 9.2
Appearance and Odor: Light brown or tan flake or solid with a phenolic ado; and pungent taste. Odor detection is at 1.6 mg/l..
* Pentachlorophenolsolution
t Drv Dentachlomohenol
$~~~.-~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~t~~~:jI:-,
j jj ::;l;sgi pG&$ ;I;;,:;i;;;:j:.l;~; f y,I ‘;Ij ;:I.: : ..::;.!:!.;,j.;::ii:‘j:
,:j
.:.;j:.‘.:;.;: ;:I,,; ;; ;:; ‘.: ; i j, ‘. ‘:.
,, .:.:...:.:.,..:.. ....... ... .... ..:..:.>
..... .... ,.. . .,..,.,., ..,... . .. .. .. .,......... . ..
1 UEL: No&&;t&
.:
1 Autoignition Temperature: No&&orted
Flash Point: None reported
( LEL: None reported
Extinguishing Media: Since pentachloropheool is noncombustible, use extinguishing media appropriate to the surrounding file: dry chemical,
water Spra &bon dioxide, o? foam. Use the water spray to
fire-exposed cootaisers.
- Unusual Ey”
ee or Explosion Hazards: When involved in a fiie: pentachlorophenol emits toxic fumes. Wood treated with 5% peotachloropheool
solution or pentachlorophenol in petroleum solvents such as mmeral spirits or kerosine are combustible.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry. Since fire may produce toxic fumes, wear a self-contained breathio
apparatus (SCBA) with a full facepiece operated in the pressure-demand or positive-pressure mode and full protective equipment, Avoid s&in
contact. If feasible, remove containers from fire area. Be aware of runoff from fire control methods. Do not release to sewers or waterways.
cool
:
i
:.:.
.. . . .
:,y+
;. :g
.:
;:j:.
j
,,. . . ,. .:. :i ,_
StabilitylPolymeri~tipn:
Peotachlorophenol is stable at room temperatufe in closed cpntainers under normal
Hazardous polymenzatloo cannot occur. Pentachlorophenol soluhons subjected to sunbght or ultraviolet light
storage
undergo
and handling conditions,
phokXhe~ca1
&g&a-
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Peotachlorophenol is incompatible with strong oxidizers and alkalies.
Conditions to Avoid: Avoid contact with heat and ignition sources (open flame, electric arcs, or hot surfaces) which can cause thermat decomposition.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Thermal oxidative decomposition of pentachlorophenol can produce hydrogen chlodide, chlorine, and
chlorinated hydrocarbons. Prolonged heating above 392 ‘F (200 ‘C) produces traces of octachlorodibeozo-para-dioxin.
Carcinogenicity: Thcrc is animal evidence of an increase in liver and endocrine tumorS in some research studies, but not in others. Also, PCP
shares some structural similarity to other carcinogens. However, NTP, IARC, and OSHA do not list PCP as a carcinogen. It may be toxic to the
fetus, especial1 during early pregnancy.
Summary of Fli&s: Airborne exposure is irritating to the eyes, ski?, throat, and lungs, and may cause acute and possibly chrouic effects (see
below). Levels above 1 mg/m’ may cause cough, sneezing, and teanng of the eyes, especially in unacclimated workers. Skin contact is also
irritating and provides an efficient way for the chemical to enter the body and cause s stemic poisoning. Skin rashes (dermatitis) including
chloracne (a severe and persistent cystic form of acne characterized by blackheads, w h.lteheads, and yellow cysts) may result from rcpeatcd or
prolonged contact with even dilute solutions (e.g., 1%). Ingestion may cause severe systemic poisoning.
Continue on serf pagl
Copyright
Any
0
commercial
IWO
Ocnium
Publishing
USC or rqmductim
Corporalion
withcutthc
plblishcr’s
permission
is prchibilcd.
t
I
r-\
No. 5 17 Pentachlorophenol 1l/90
outes: Inhalation, skin absorption, ingestion, eye contact.
osures arc irritating and may cause tachycardia (ra id heartbeat), tachypnea (rapid breathing), hypertension (high blood
pressure), fevers, must
weakness, anorexia (loss of appetite), sweating, tf ~zziness, and nausea. Very high doses may cause unconsciousness,
seizures (convulsions), or death due to cardiac arrest. The risk of acute potsoning ma increase in hot weather.
Chronic Effects: Absorption of PCP and/or its contaminants may cause chloracne. B ronchitis and weight loss may develop. Animal studies
su est that liver and kidney damage may occur.
I?# STAID
Eyes: Gently lift the eyelids and flush immediately and continuously with flooding amounts of water until transported to an emergency medical
facility. Consult a physician immediately.
Skin; @i&i
remove contaminated clothing. Rinse with flooding amounts of water for at least 15 min. For reddened or blistered skin, consult a
ph;lslclan. &h
affected arearth soap and water.
n alation: Remove exposed erson to fresh au and support breathing with artificial res iration, CPR if necessary, and oxygen if available.
Ingestion: Call a physician or oison Control Center immediately. Never give anything Ii y mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. If
ingested, have that conscious person drink 1 to 2 glasses of water, then induce vomiting. If ossible, induce vomiting under medical supervision.
Do not mstill milk or other materials containing vegetable or animal fats since they ate like Py to enhance absorption.
After t&t aid, get a propriate in-plant, paramedic, or.community medica! sup or$
evere systemic poisoning results primarily from uncouplmg oF rmtochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with ensuing
aggressively manage h erthermia with ph sical methods. Antipyre& (m&ding aspirin), atropine. and
Force diuresis to reduce30 dy burden. Care it lly follow and treat fluid/electrolyte and acid/base alterations.
t-eat supportively and reduce anxiety. Diagnostic testing should mclude rectal temperature, PCP urine or plasma levels, blood chemistries
(including electrolytes, LFTs, BUN, creatinine), and CBC. Treat ingestion with emesis, gastric lavage, and saline cathartic.
,., ,.,.,......
.,
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?.:
SpllFLeak: Notify safety personnel, evacuate all unnecessary personnel, provide adequate: ventilation, and remove all heat and ignition sources.
vapor inhalation and contact with solution or solid. ‘Cdllectdry spilled material in a metal container
collect with an absorbent sohd and place in a metal container for dlsposaL For large liquid spills, dike
ills from entering sewers, streams, and open waters. Pantachloroapplicable
Federal, state, and local regulations.
__
:Pk Designations
isted as a RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 26 1.33), RCRA Waste No. U242
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ): 10 lb (4.54 kg) [* per Clean Water Act, Sec. 311(b)(4),
Sec. 307(a). and er RCRA, Sec. 30011
SARA Extremely i; azardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
Listed as a SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65)
OSHA Designations
Listed as an Air Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Table Z-1-A)
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye-
Storage Requirements: Store in proper1 labeled and closed containers in a cool, dry, well-ventilated, low fire hazard area awa from heat and
ignition sources and combustible maten*a& . Protect containers from physical damage. Outside or detached storage is preferred. 1 ccumulated
sludge at the bottom of di ing tanks may concentrate toxic i urines at much higher levels than ori inal product Do not reuse drums. (Clean
empty drums, liners, and BPock wrappings in accordance with “g4 CFR 261.7(b)(3) prior to returning Bor reconditioning, recycling, or other
disposal.
Engineering Controls: Educate workers about pentachlorophenol’s hazards. Avoid skin contact and vapor or dust inhalation. Use only with
adecuate ventilation and aupropriate personal protective gear. Institute a respirators protection program that includes regular training.
-. maintenance, ins e&ion, and evahiatibn. Pr&tice good personachygiene and housekeeping rocedure‘s. Medical J urveillance: Preplacement and eriodtc medical evaluations should inclu 2e a complete history and physical examination and .a
biochemical refile (includmg LFTs, BU Is , creatinine, and electsol tes). Consider baseline pulmon
functiontests. Perform biologic monitoring
Y lections are more accurate than spot testing.
for.PCP leve Ii at the end of work shifts (plasma) and toward end o Yworkweek (urine). 24-hr urine co
Transnortation Data (49 CFR 172.102)
IMO Shipping Name: Chlorophenols, solid
IMO Shipping Name: Chlorophenols,%quid
IMO Hazard Class: 6.1
-IMCI
_.__ Hazard
_----_- Clam
-_---. 6.1
_._
ID No.: UN2020
ID No.: UN2021
IMO Label: St. Andrews Cross
IMO Label: St. Andrews Cross
IMDG Packaging Group: Ill
IMDG Packaging Group: Ill
MSDSCo&ction
References: 1,38,73,84,85,88.89,
100,101,103,124.126,127.132,133,136,138,140,143,
146
Prepared by: MJ Allison, BS; Industrial Hygiene Review: DJ Wilson, CIH, Medical Review: MJ Upfal, MD, MPH; Edited by: JR Stuart, MS
I
I
I .’f
MALATHION
I
1
/
I i’
MALATHION
MLT
A
i
SATURATED
12.17
LIOUID
DENSl-lY
PLlUOdSperarMc
foot (eltlmate)
,.-.
77
78
70
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
02
93
04
95
Q6
97
98
99
100
101
102
77.089
77.009
77.089
77.089
77.080
77.0%9
77.080
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.009
77.080
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.089
77.080
12.11
LIQUIOHUTCAPACITY
Temperature
(degrees F)
85
90
95
:z
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
145
150
UQUID
Bdtishthemalunit
wwndf
380
384
.389
.303
.398
,402
Aa6
.411
.415
.42O
-424
.42Q
.433
A38
12.w
THERMALCONOUCTlVlTY
LIQUID
\
fMt&holeimal
mlt-lndrperhcurlqwre loot-F
IN
0
T
:
R
T
I
N
E
N
T
-
70
72
74
76
78
80
62
84
86
80
00
92
04
Q6
98
loo
102
104
106
108
110
112
114
116
118
120
kTY
-
-
45270
42.680
40.260
37.000
35.870
33.880
32.020
30.270
28.62-O
27.080
25.630
24270
22.2890
21.780
20.650
:19.580
'18.!XO
l7.630
'16.740
zxoo
'15.100
ll4.350
13.650
ll2.980
112.350
II 1.750
--.
.-
(
SOLUSlLll
12
Y
&RES!iURE
iFgi%!z
.014
:
T
P
E
R
T
I
N
E
N
T
i -?
4
%I DENSITY
24
d CAPACITY
*
\
.
-.
PARATHION
I
I2
121
122
IU
12.4
1U
IU
1210
1221
1212
121a
a14
121s
11%
lU4
1224
IUT
i_
PTO
t
i
PARATHION
PTO
L
I.
;--.
i
SANRATED
1217
UaUlO
OENSKV
uaulo
HEA
,lQ
CONOUCTIVITV
.ld
CAPACKV
l3titlahthelmalunit
wpoundf
\
I
8
I- .
65
70
75
60
85
90
95
loo
105
110
115
120
125
79.379
79%X
79.049
78.879
78.719
78.559
78.400
78.240
78.080
77.929
77.770
77.820
77.459
.x38
23339
341
343
345
347
2349
.35o
352
.354
356
.358
959
36361
65
70
75
80
85
s-3
95
loo
105
110
115
120
125
130
80
z.
63
z66
Fmhhltb3m.d
ti+?3Ev
7 ealfllate)
I
967
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
967
967
.Q67
967
967
.Q67
.Q67
.Q67
.Q67
.Q67
.Q67
.Q67
xl67
.Q67
967
M7
$67
Temperature
mw0
65
70
75
a0
85
90
95
100
105
110
115
lx)
125 -
20.340
18.290
16.480
14.880
13.460
12.2co
11.070
10.070
9.173
8.370
7.649
7.001
6.417
. -\
,- 7.
I
-’
\
SCLlJ6ILtl-Y
12.21
IN WATER
R
E
c
T
S
s
k
W
L
Y
TSATURATED T
Vi%
PRESSURE
SANRATEOk%&DEUSITY
IOEALGAS
12.24
HEAT
CAPACITY
,
0
I
I
DIAZINON
’L
I.
Wk..,.,.
I
I
-‘z
L
I
1 .
t
--.
Flm
Exporure
/ ,.
(.
Water
POilUtlOil
tuBa
21
2s
Ll
u
u
u’
u
6.7
4.4
LA
&la
211
cakoowcla
ckaml-
DIAZINON
DZN
SANRA’IEO
52
54
56
58
60
62
64
86
68
70
72
74
76
78
80
82
84
86
I
UOUIO
POGd3perCUUC
foot (estimate)
Temperature
WlFF)
51
52
70.280
70.209
70.139
70.070
7o.oQo
69.929
69.860
69.790
69.730
89.660
69.589
69.520
89.450
69.379
69.309
69240
69.169
89.099
i-i
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
82
63
64
65
66
67
68
89
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
T
SOlJJti&~
SANRATEO
WATER
12.19
LlQUl0THERMALCONOUCTlVl'l-f
12.16
HEAT CAPACrrY
oENsll-Y
::o
7
Brltl.dlthemlafunll
perpowrbF
(esthete)
Ax
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
4x3
A00
.4w
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
A00
12.22.
VAPOR PRESSURE
Temperature
wwF)
51
52
53
54
55
58
57
58
59
60
61
82
63
64
85
66
67
68
89
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
SANRATEO
UQUl0
1
UliG!Zze fooI-f
“r”f dillW*)
51
52
53
64
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
88
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
I.048
1.048
I.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.648
1.048
1.048
1.048
I.046
1.048
1.048
1.048
1.048
~~ROENSTY
IDEAL
-
4.664
4.005
3.948
3.892
3.836
3.782
3.729
3.877
3.625
3.575
3.525
3.478
3.428
3.381
3.335
32Qo
3.245
3.201
3.158
3.116
3.074
3.033
2993
.2.954
.2915
2.877
‘\
12.24
GAS HEAT CAPACITY
PourKJs per
square ldl
.004
z
T
-A.--
N
E
N
T
‘\
E
N
T
.
Maderid Sqfe& Data Shee&sCollection:
Genium Publishing Corporation
1145 catalyn
street
Schenectady,NY 12303-1836 USA
.,
Sheet No. 68
Calcium Hypochlorite~
(518) 377-8854
Other Deslgnatlons: Calcium oxychloride (improperly called); losantin; hypochlorous acid; calcium salt;
HTH” (high-test hypochlorite); lime chloride; Ca(OCI),; CAS No. 7778-54-3.
Manufacturer: Contact your supplier or distributor. Consult the latest ChemicalweekBuyers Guide (Genium
-ef. 73) for a suppliers list.
*Sec.8
._...,
.. .,..
..n..
........../_.
,....
.....:..._
~~a~:~~l~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,
... .......:.;.;.;.y,y.y
...:,.,~.:~.:.:.!.:;.i.~.:.~.~.:~..:.~.:.~~.:
,:.:
:+::.:.:.:
::.i~:~:::::::~:::~i’;“;.:,:,
::
..... ... .. .... . .. ......._A.......... . ..........._..
., ... .i .... . .... ... n. ... i..............
I,...
............i....
_...........,_...........
-..:...:_:.:
Xcium hypochlorite+
ACGIH TLV, 1988-89
None established
OSHA PEL
None established
NIOSH REL, 1987
None established
Toxicity Data
R4 wal, LD%:850mg/kg
1Concentrationis usually statedin termsof weight 96of available chlorine (seeASIA D2022).This material co&as 39% or lessavailable chlorine.Calcium
lypocfilorite mixture, dry. containsmore than 39% available cbloriae. HTH*contains about70% available cNoriac. Solid materialswith lesstbaa 39% available
?be
:Norine include chloride of lime and bleacbiig powder,which containmuch chloride ion, water, and possibly other impurities, for example, cCa(OCl)Cl=2H,O.
xesence of magnesium hypocNorite in material of high available chlorine level may teduceits stability.
._.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~i,i:,
:
::.::::‘~i.x.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:-:.~..~.:~.:.:.~.:.:.:.:.....~
_,.,.,,~..,_,.:
.,..,..
:.., ..,’
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.,..,
.-......,~.:.:.)
:.:.:
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:‘.‘i...~
.:.:
:::a:.:...:.:
...:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:
.,......
.,.......
......,.,. ... .. .. ,. _.,_,.. .. ..:.:.:.:.>
Boikg Point: None reported
Spedfic Gravity (Et0 = 1 at 39 ‘F (4 ‘C)): 2.35
Melting Point: Decomposes at 212 “F (100 ‘c)
Water Solublll&S~luble
Molecular Weight: 142.98 g/m01
Appearance and Odor: White nonhygroscopic (doesn’t absorb moisture fiop~ the air) granules or tablets with a strong chlorine odor.
... ..,..:
.::::y::::
::::.~:::::::~::::;:~~
...::::..:~:i:j:‘::::::::::.::::::.::.:.:.::::::.:.~~
../.:.:;i::.:
....... ._...........
::;:.A\:
Flash Point: None reported
1 Autoignitlon Temperature: None reported
1 LEL: None sported
1UELz None reported
Extingnishing Media: Use a water spray to COOIfire-exposed contaiuer~ of this material and drench the area with large amounts of water from a
safe position. Never use a dry chemical or CO,.
Unusual Fire or Explosion Hazards: When heated in a fm situation, containers can rupture violently! Contaminating or mixing calcium
hypochlorite with foreign materials (combustibles. grease, chemicals, tiers> can cause fires of great intensity. its solid form is moderately
explosive when heated.
Special Fire-fighting Procedures: Wear a self-contained bnzathing apparatus (SCBA) with a Nl facepiece operated in the pn&uredemand or
positive-pressure mode. Full protective clothing is also necessary. Fight massive fires using unmanned hose holders. If this is impossible, let fire
bum and withdraw from hazardous areas.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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~ :.:......,. $ .:.,...: ,... :: I’.
. . . .. . . . . . .. . .._ :::::: ._.....(.,(....i.....
,., . . ,,__,,,,,
,_ ,,._,(, . . . ,,. .. ,,,. . (,. . 0 .. ,,,::,.
. . . ..I. ..I....
. . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . ..,$.,. . . . .,,. .
Stability/Polymerization:
Calcium hypochlorite is stable at room temperature in suitable closed containers when kept dry and free from
contamination. Hazardous polymerization cannot occur.
Chemical Incompatibilities:
Calcium hypochlorite is a powerful oxidizing agent that readily ignites combustibles. Violent tea&ions or explosions can occur, for example, with amines, carbon tetrachloride and heat, carbon or charcoal and heat, ethyl alcohol, metal oxides, mercapt.ons,
sulfur, turpentine, strong reducing agents, organic matter, combustible materials, nitromethane, ammonium chloride, N,N$ichlkxomethylaminc
and heat, acetic acid and potassium cyanide, ethanol, isobutanethiol, methanol, l-pro-panethiol, and rust. Reacts with water or :stcamto produce
toxic and corrosive fumes or HCl and CI- (Sec. 6). Potentially explosive with sodium carbonate, starch, and sodium hydrogen sulfate. Reaction
with nitrogenous bases or acetylene forms explosive products. Ignites on contact with glycerine algacide and hydroxy c~mpouods (e.g., glycerol,
diethylene glycol monomethyl ether, and phenol), and organic sulfur compounds. Material containing over 60% available chlorine ignites on
contact with lubricating oil (addition of about 20% or mOre water prevents this). On contact with acids it forms hypochlorous acid and liberates
Cl gas. It forms the highly explosive NCI, with urea.
Hazardous Products of Decomposition: Rapid exothermic (heat-producing) decomposition above 347 l F(l75 ‘C) releases oxygen and chlorine.
When heated to decomposition, calcium hypochlorite emits highly toxic hydrochloric acid (HCI) fumes and explodes.
CqyrigblO1P89OedumF'ubllshIngCapondaL
No. 68
Calcium Hypochlorite
1l/89
Zarclnogenlcity: Neither the NTP, IARC, nor OSHA lists calcium hypochlorite as a carcinogen.
iummary of Risks: This strong oxidizing agent can irritate and damage all the tissue it contacts, with the degree of injury depeuding on the dose,
.vailable chlorine level, and exposure time. The chlorine this compound generates is the primary toxic agent. Both the powder and solutioos
bmducechlorine levels corrosive to body tissues. Inhaling its vapor is extremely irritating and toxic. Possible injuries include: conjunctivitis,
blepharitis (inflammation of the margins of the eyelids), comeal ulcerations,gingivitis, contact dermatitis, and tooth damage. Medical Condlions Aggravated by Long-Term Exposure: Repeated contact can severely damage tissut. Target Organs: Skin, eyes, respiratory system,
tomach. Primary Entry: Inhalation, ingestion. Acute Effectsz Skin contact can produce irritatioo and vesicular eruptions. Dust inhalation
rritates the respiratory tract and may cause pulmonary edema. Ingestion irritates the mouth, throat, and stomach, and gastric acid libcrites
~ypochlorous acid, Fatalities can result from severe complications of local injury, shock, toxemia, hemorrage, wall perforation. and [email protected]
Chronic Effects: Eczematoid dermatitis may result from repeated skin contact. Eye contact can cause severe eye damage.
TRSTAID
%yes:Flush immediately, including under the eyelids, gently but thoroughly with flooding amom& bf running water for at least 15 mio.
ikln: After rinsing affected area with floodioE amounts of water, wash it with soap and water. Inhalation: Remove exposed person to fresh air
md support breaGog as needed. Ingestion: flever give anythiog by mouth to an unconscious or convulsing person. If ingest& pmmptly rinse
~011thof conscious person with water before giving large amounts of milk or water to drink, followed by milk of magnesia,
ifter first aid, get appropriate ln-plant, paramedic, or community medical attention and support.
.
. .,.....,
.,.,.,..
.,.,.
,.,..,,,,.,..,.,
._.,.,.,.,.,
,.,
?..‘,,,:’
d.>,.:.:.,:...
,~c;t*~~~~.ii.:j;S,~~~~.~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~.~~~~~~.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~
,. ,.,..,.,.,..,.,.,.
.,.,.,..,., ,.... ......?
L.......
i......
i........
t .... :::.......: i ...... i..
..... i ......14.... ...... .. .:..............i..
......... ...l..(i..
.......
..
...
. .!
;pUVLeak: Notify safety personnel of spills. Remove combustibles and ignition sources. ThOse involved iri cleanup need protection against
:ootact with the solid and dust inhalation. Prevent dust generation and prevent direct discharge into sewers or waterways since this material, in
ow concentrations, is toxic to aquatic life. Recover uncontaminated solid material in Glean, dry cootainers. Cover other spilled material with weak
Educing agents (3M $SO, with bisufites or fenous salts), slurry it with water, and then flush it with water to a suitable holding tank. Wash spill
;ite well with soap solution containing a weak reducing agent.
Disposal: Use reducing agents to destroy available chlorine. Adjust this reduced liquid’s pH to neutral and decant. Discharge neutral liquid,
iiluting with much water. Dispose of neutral sludge (if any) in a landfii. Contact your supplier or a licensed contractor for detailed recommendaions. Follow applicable Federal, state, and local regulations.
DSHA Designations
4ir Contaminant (29 CFR 1910.1000, Subpart Z): Not listed
EPA Designations
RCRA Hazardous Waste (40 CFR 261.33): Not listed
Listed as a CERCLA Hazardous Substance* (40 CFR 302.4), Reportable Quantity (RQ: 10 lb (4.41 kg) [* per Clean Water Act, Sec. 311(b)(4)]
SARA Extremely Hazardous Substance (40 CFR 355): Not listed
SARA Toxic Chemical (40 CFR 372.65): Not listed
... ... .;_:.;:.:.,.
,. _._........
....
.. ._...
... ..:.
,.,‘,“...:,...‘~:~:.:~:-:~::\’
-:‘.:.:.:.::.:“.:.::.j:
.w .,.,.;
f&g&$
;ig ~~~~~l~~~~~~t~:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,~~~~~~~~:;:::::i.‘::::,;~
~~:.i::~~~~~~.;:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Goggles: Wear protective eyeglasses or chemical safety goggles, per OSHA eye- and face-protection regulations (29 CFR 1910.133).
Respirator: Wear a NIOSH-approved respirator if necessary. Follow OSHA respirator reguIations (29 CFR 1910.134). For emergency
or
nonroutine operations (cleaning spills, reactor vessels, or storage tanks), wear an SCBA. Use a dust respirator as required for dusty c~oditioos.
Warning: Air-purifying respirators do not protect workers in oxygen-deficient atmospheres.
Other: Wear impervious neoprene gloves, boots, aprons, and gauntlets to prevent prolonged or repeated skin contact.
Ventllation: Provide general and local explosion-proof ventilation systems to maintain airborne cooceolrations that promote worker s:afety and
productivity. Local exhaust ventilatioo is preferred since it prevents contaminant dispersion into the work area by eliminating it at its source
(Geoium ref. 103).
Safety Stations: Make available in the work area emergency eyewash stations, safety/quick-drench showers, and washing facilities.
Contaminated Equipment: Never wear contact lenses in the work area: soft lenses may absorb, and all lenses concentrate, irritants. ILaunder
contaminated clothing before wearing. Remove this material from your shoes and equipment.
Comments: Never eat, drink, or smoke in work areas. Practice good personal hygiene after using this material, especially before eating, d&king,
low f&-risk-area Since traces of water may ignite or detonate this material, prevent cootaminatioo and protect containers from physical
damage. Do not drop, roll, or skid containers.
Englneerlng Controls: Calcium hypochlorite. a powerful oxidizing agent, is a dangerous fire hazard when it contacts organic materials. Mix it
only with water. These water solutions are unstable. but undergo a slow decomposition. Proper storage and shipping axe essential; separate this
material from ammonium compouods and heat sources.
Transportation Data (49 CFR 172.101, .102)
DOT Shlpplng Name: Calcium hypochlorite mixture, dry
IMO Shlpplng Name: Calcium hypochlorite mixtures, dxy,
(containing more than 39% available chlorine)
with more than 39%, available chlorine (8.8% available oxygen)
DOT Hazard Class: Oxidizer
IMO
Hazard
Class:
5.1
ID No.: UN1748
IMO Label: Oxidizer
IMDG Packaging Group: 2
DOT Label: Oxidizer
DOT Packaging Requirements: 49 CFR 173.217
DOT Packaging Exceptions: 49 CFR 173.153
.
Material Safety Data Sheet
From Genium’s Reference Cdlection
Geniuxn Publishing Corporation
1145 catal street
Schenectady,NY 1!?303-1836 USA
j :,;:“&.‘:‘::,:,:
[email protected]$#[email protected]$X$
ap
~~~~~-a~.
2-CHLGROACETOPHENONE
1m
aIpha-Chloroacetophenone,
i w-SIGN&IX&&
(3hloro Methyl Phenyl Ketone, Mace, PhenacylChloride,
1~heoylchloromethylKetone, Phenyl Chloromethyl Ketone,
(:8H7C10, CAS #OS32-274.
~%
2-Chloroacetophenone,CAS #OS32-274
:ITj::~:‘:‘i,ii:i~:,,:‘i.::,~‘..:,,.
:::::::i:.::.::~‘.::::~.::::::.:,.~::
:,.::
$.I?’
:::::.
.q-. 1,
HMIS
H: 2
F:l
R:l
PPE*
ofIaarmann & Reimer Corp., Aroma Chemical Div., PO Box 175,
I111US Hwy. 22, N. Springfield, NJ 07081;Telephone: (201) 6863132
7P.....
;::;,s
L
.
GENIIJM
PUBUsHtG
CORP.
Cal00
Rl
I 4
s3
8-hr. TWA: 0.O.Tppm or
0.3 mgfm3*
Rat, OraI, LDso:
127ms/m3
Human, Inhalation, LCLO:
159 mglm3i20 min.
t
i?
1
Human, Inhalation, TCLo:
20 mg/m3: Irritation
* Cum% (1985-86)ACGIH TLV or OSHA PEL.
Rabbit, Eye:
3 mg,Severe
t
‘~s~~~~~,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:.::-I.i:--;:
Boiling Point, 1 atm ... 477’F (247’C)
Vapor [email protected] 20°C mm Hg ... 0.012
Water Solubiity @ 2o’C ... insoluble
Vapor Density (Air = 1) .” 5.32
Evaporation Rate ... Not Found
Specific Gravity (H20 = 1) ... 1.324
MeltingPoiut... 138-F(S9’C)
PercentVolatile by Volume ... ca 100
Molecular Weight ... 154.60
Appearanceand odor Colorless-to-vy crystahine solid with a sharp,irritating floral odor. The odor thresholdfor
2-chIoroacetetophenoneis 0.1 mg/m .
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Flash Point and Method
2WFQ18”C)CC
Autoignition Temp.
Flammability Limits in Air
Not Found
Not Found
NGrLlSfBNG MEDra; Carbondioxide, dry chemicaI,foam, water fog. Water or foam may causefrothing. Use Water
spy to Cooltankskootaiuers
exposedto fire.
This OSHA classBIB combustibleliquid is a slight fue hazardwhen exposedto heat, sparks,or open flame. When involved
io a fire, 2-chlomacetophenooeemits toxic andcorrosive vapors.
Fire fighters should useself-containedbreathing apparatusand fully protective clothing when fighting fires involving this
material.
~~;E~I~~i:‘-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~-:
2Chloroacetopheooneis stablein closedcontainersat mom temperatureunder normal storageand handling conditions. It doesoot
undergohazardous
polymerization.
This material is incompatible with strong oxidizers. It reactsslowly with water or steam,generatinghydrogenchloride.
Thermal decompositionor burning producestoxic vaporsand gasessuch ascarbon monoxide and fumesof chlorine.
‘;i :;
No. 603
5186
2-CXLOROACETOPI-IENONE
r
GET MEDICAL ASSISTANCE = In plant, paramedic,community. Get medical help for further treatment,observation,and
supportafter fust aid.
~:(sE~~~~l~~~
Ig&
J&&2 : ‘! :.ii-:
..,,:Gm:,
.,, j:: Si:?v
,I)LSPr~.~~~~~~Q~ECI~~~~~:~~~~~~ii;:!j:iilli~~~~:‘l~,~:i:fii:1;4~~~~~~~~
SPILT/I EEA& Notify safetypersonnelof large 2chloroacetophenonespills or leaks. Removeall sourcesof heat and
ignition. Provide maximum explosion-proof ventilation. Evacuatethe spill areaand limit accessto necessarypersonnel
only. Removeany leaking containersto a safeplace, if feasible. Those involved in cleanupneedprotection againstcontact
with the solid form and inhalation of dust and vapor (seesect.8).
Scoop,shovel, or vacuum spilled material into closedcontainers. Usecaution to avoid generatingdust. Flush spill areawith
or waterway.
water and collect flushings and wastewater for disposal. Do not flush wasteto a sewer,watershed,
Placewastein a suitable container for disposalby a licensedcontractor,disposeof it in a landfill, or dissolve it in an
organic solvent and burn it in an approvedincinerator equipped with an afterburnerand a scrubber. Follow all Federal,state,
and local regulations.
~~~~E.~~~~~~i’~~E~~~~~~~~.~~~I~~~~~~:~~~~~~~~~~~~i~_-i-~i;;l:~~~i:I-I_-,:‘i:i.lf.ilii:---:~-i_:~
Provide general and local exhaustvent&&on to meetTLV requn-ements.Ventiahon fans and other electrical servicemust be
nonsparkingand have an explosion-proof design. Exhausthoods should have a face velocity of at least 100 lfm (linear feet
per minute). For emergencyor nonroutine exposureswhere the TLV may be exceeded,use an appropriateNIOSH-approved
respirator.
Impervious gloves, face shield, apron, boots,plastic coveralls, and other protectiveclothing and equipment should be available and
worn asnecessruyto prevent contact with skin or clothing. Wear safetygogglesto prevent any possibility of
2chloroacetophenonecoming in contactwith the eyes. Removecontaminatedclothing immediately and do not wear it again
until it hasbeenproperly laundered.
Eyewashstationsand safety showersshould bew
available in use andhandling areas.
Contactlensesposea specialhazard;soft lensesmay absorbirritants andall lensesconcentratethem
j :~~~~IQN::,~~~~~~EC~~~~~~~~~~I~~~~~~~D.i~~Q;~~:~$iiii.P.si.i:.;i::‘:~
Store2chloroacetophenone in closedcontainersin a cool, dry, well-ventilated areaaway from oxidizing agents,heat,sparks,
and open flame. Storageareamust be suitable for combustible solids. Protectcontainersfrom physical damage. Ground and
bond conveying equipment and storagecontainerswhen transferring the solid to prevent the possibility of a dust explosion.
Any bulk storagesystemshould have an explosion-relief design. Do not smokein useor handling areas. Use only with
adequateventilation. Avoid inhalation of dust and vapor and contact with skin, eyes,and clothing. Practicegood industrial
hygiene when handling this material. Avoid generatingdust. Emptied containersretain product residues;handle them
accordingly!
Preplacementand periodic physical examinationsshould be.provided to thosewho work with thii material. Individuals with
histories of chronic respiratory, skin, or eye diseasemay be at increasedrisk from exposure.
DOT Classification: Irritating Material. DOT No. UN1697
DataSource Code: 2.4.5.7.8,23.34.47,63,69,75.78,79-82.
Judgemenlsas to thekkbilily
of information herein for pmrch~t’s p~uposcs
are necessarilypurchaser’sresponsibility. Therefore. although reasonablecare
has beentaken m (he prephon of such information. GemumPublishing Corp.
extendsno wiaraoties, makes no represezdaIionsand assao
CR
respm.shility
BE Indust.
Hygiene/Safety
1
1
L
I
c
i
I
k
.’:
/
/
4
\
DATE:
3 Dee 1990
HCSDS NO:
20058A
\
U.S. ARMY CHEMICAL
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT
AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
/POISON
\\GAS , >
Emergency
Telephone
#s:
CRDEC Safety
{Office
301-671-4411
0700-1700
EST After
normal
duty
hours:
301-278-5201
Ask for CRDEC Staff
Duty Officer
\\/'
I'.
HD, AND THD (See
Addendum
\
A)
MATERIAL
SAFETY DATA SHEET
-------------------------------------------------------------------------~-SECTION I - GENERAL INFORMATION
________________________________________-------------------------------MANUFACTURER'S
NAME:
MANUFACTURER'S
ADDRESS:
Department
--.
I
CHEMICAL
NUMBER:
the
Army
U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT, MUNITIONS AND CHEMICAL COMMAND
CHEMICAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
ATTN:
SMCCR-CMS-E
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD 21010-5423
1
CAS REGISTRY
of
505-60-2,
39472-40-7,
68157-62-O
NAME AND SYNONYMS:
Sulfide,
bis
(2-chloroethyl)
Bis(beta-chloroethyl)sulfide
Bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide
1-chloro-2(beta-chloroethylthio)ethane
beta,
beta'-dichlorodiethyl
2,2'dichlorodiethyl
sulfide
Di-2-chloroethyl
sulfide
beta,
beta'-dichloroethyl
2,2'-dichloroethyl
sulfide
_
sulfide
sulfide
TRADE NAME AND SYNONYMS:
HD
Sulfur
mustard
Iprit
Kampstoff
"Lost"
Lost
Mustard
Gas
CHEMICAL
Senfgas
S-lost
Sulphur
S-yperite
Yellow
Yperite
FAMILY:
chlorinated
FORMULA/CHEMICAL
STRUCTURE:
C4(H8)C12(S)
..
,
T1
NFPA 704
SIGNAL:
sulfur
Health
FlammabilityReactivity-
mustard
Cross
gas
Liquid
compound
Cl-C-C-S-C-~-Cl
I
I
H
H
4
1
1
H
HS
I
H
I
H
I ,--.
(4 )(1 )
\I\ )1
\/
I
f
I
________________-----------------------------------------------------------
SECTION II - COMPOSITION
_________-__-----_--____________________------------------------
____
, -1
i
I
I
I -..
I
INGREDIENTS
NAME
FORMULA
Sulfur
C4(H8)C12(S)
Mustard
AIRBORNE
EXPOSURE LIMIT
100
0.003
SECTION III
- PHYSICAL
________________________________________-----------------------------------POINT
DEG F (DEG C):
VAPOR PRESSURE
VAPOR DENSITY
?
/
mg/m3
(AEL)
(8 hr-TWA)
____________________--------------------------------------------------------
BOILING
t
PERCENTAGE
BY WEIGHT
(mm Hg):
422
0.072
(AIR=l):
DEG F
SPECIFIC
(H20=1):
610 mg/m3
920 mg/m3
APPEARANCE AND ODOR:
(0.11
mm Hg @ 25 DEG C)
5.5
WATER:
Negligible.
ethylbenzoate,
and
VOLATILITY:
DEG C)
mm Hg @ 20 DEG C
SOLUBILITY
IN
tetrachloroethane,
GRAVITY
(217
DATA
1.27
ether.
Soluble
in
acetone,
CH3(Cl),
@ 20 DEG C
@ 20 DEG C
@ 25 DEG C
Water
clear
if pure.
Normally
Slight
garlic
type odor.
The
is 0.0006
mg/m3
pale yellow
odor threshold
to
black.
for HD
________________________________________------------------------------------
SECTION
IV
- FIRE
________________________________________------------------------------------
FLASHPOINT
FLAMMABILITY
(METHOD ,USED):
LIMITS
105
AND EXPLOSION
DEG C (ignited
(% by volume):
by
large
DATA
explosive
charges)
Unknown
EXTINGUISHING
MEDIA:
Water,
foam,
co2.
Avoid
use of extinguishing
fog,
methods
that
will
splash
or spread
mustard.
SPECIAL FIRE FIGHTING
PROCEDURES:
All
persons
not engaged
in
extinguishing
the fire
should
be immediately
evacuated
from the area.
Fires
involving
HD
should
be contained
to prevent
contamination
to
uncontrolled
areas.
When
responding
to a fire
alarm
in buildings
or
areas
containing
agents,
firefighting
personnel
should
wear full
firefighter
protective
clothing
(without
TAlf clothing)
during
chemical
agent
firefighting
and fire
rescue
operations.
Respiratory
protection
is
required.
Positive
pressure,
full
facepiece,
NIOSH-approved
self-contained
breathing
apparatus
(SCBA) will
be worn where
'there
is danger
of oxygen
deficiency
and
when directed
by the fire
chief
or
chemical
accident/incident
(CAI)
operations
officer.
The M9 or Ml7
series
mask
may
be worn
in
lieu
of
SCBA when
there
is
no danger
of oxygen
deficiency.
In
cases
where
firefighters
are responding
to a cheimical
accident/incident
for rescue/reconnaissance
purposes
vice
firefigh:ting,
they
.
will
&ear
appropriate
levels
___------------------
of
protective
dlothing
(see
Section
8).
_----_------------------------------------------------
SECTION V - HEALTH HAZARD DATA
______________-____--------------------------------------------------------AIRBORNE
EXPOSURE
LIMIT
(AEL):
The AEL for HD is 0.003
mg/m3 as proposed
in the USAEHA Technical
Guide
No. 173, " Occupational
Health
Guidelines
for
the Evaluation
and Control
of Occupational
Exposure
to Mustard
Agents
H, HD,
No individual
should
be intentionally~exposed
to any direct
and
HT".
skin
or eye contact.
t
^h
I
)
HD is a vesicant
(causing
blisters)
and alkylating
EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE:
agent
producing
cytotoxic
action
on
the
hematopoietic
(blood-forming)
The rate
of detoxification
of HD in
tissues
which
are especially
sensitive.
very
slow
and
repeated
exposures
produce
a
cumulative
effect.
the
body
is
been found
to be a human carcinogen
by the International
Agency
for
HD has
Research
on Cancer
(IARC).
Median
LD50
ICtSO
doses
HD in
man are:
100 mg/kg
environment)
2000 mg-min/m3
at 70 - 80 DEG F (humid
1000 mg-min/m3
at 90 DEG F (dry
environment)
200 mg-min/m3
ICtSO (eyes)
= 1500 mg-min/m3
(Ct unchanged
with
time)
ICt50
(inhalation)
= 0.7 mg/kg
LD50 (oral)
t
aximum
(skin)
(skin)
of
safe
=
=
=
=
Ct
for
ACUTE PHYSIOLOGICAL
skin
and
ACTION
eyes
are
OF HD IS
5 and
2 mg-min/m3,
CLASSIFIED
respectively.
AS LOCAL AND SYSTEMIC.
SKIN
damage
occurs
after
LOCALLY,
HD affects
both
the eyes and the skin.
Being
lipid
soluble,
HD can be resorbed
into
all
percutaneous
resorption.
Skin
penetration
is
rapid
without
skin
irritation.
organs.
Swelling
(blisters)
and
reddening
(erythema)
of
the
skin
occurs
after
a latency
depending
on degree
of exposure
period
of 4-24 hours
following
the exposure,
The skin
healing
process
is very
slow.
Tender
and individual
sensitivity.
and perspiration
covered
skin
are more sensitive
to
mucous
membrane
skin,
HD's effect
on the skin,
however,
is less
than
on
the
the effects
of HD.
Local
action
on the eyes produces
severe
necrotic
damage and loss
of
eyes.
aerosol
produces
lacrimation,
Exposure
of eyes to HD vapor
or
eyesight.
and inflammation
of the conjunctiva
and cornea.
photophobia,
/-.
r.
SYSTEMIC
ACTIONS
occur
primarily
through
inhalation
and ingestion.
The HD
than
the
liquid
form.
vapor
or aerosol
is less
toxic
to the skin
or eyes
respiratory
tract
(nose,
throat,
trachea)
is
When
inhaled,
the
upper
latency
period,
accompanied
inflamed
after
a few
hours
by
sneezing,
loss
of appetite,
diarrhea,
fever,
and apathy.
coughing,
and
bronchitis,
Exposure
to nearly
lethal
dose of HD can
produce
injury
to
bone
marrow,
and spleen
as indicated-by
a drop
in WBC cqunt
and, therefore,
lymph
nodes,
infections.
susceptibility
to
local
and.
systemic
in increased
results
severe
stomach
pains,
vomiting,
and bloody
produce
Ingestion
of
HD will
stools
after
a 15-20
minute
latency
period.
CHRONIC EXPOSURE to
shortness
(cough,
respiratory
tract,
HD can cause
sensitization,
chest
pain),
of breath,
leukemia.
skin,
and
EMERGENCY AND FIRST
AID
PROCEDURES:
chronic
lung
impairment,
and cancer
of the mouth,
throat,
It may also
cause birth
defects.
.
INHALATION.
artificial
give
Seek medical
Remove from the source
IMMEDIATELY.
If breathing
has
respiration.
If breathing
is difficult,
administer
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
stopped,
oxygen.
EYE CONTACT.
Speed in
decontaminating
the eyes
is
absolutely
essential.
Remove person
from the liquid
source,
flush
the eyes immediately
with
water
by tilting
the head to the side,
.pulling
the eyelids
apart
with
the
fingers
and pouring
water
slowly
into
the eyes.
Do not
cover
eyes
with
bandages
but,
if necessary,
protect
eyes by means of dark,
or opaque
goggles.
Transfer the patient
to a medical
facility
IMMEDIATELY.
Don respiratory
protective
mask
SKIN CONTACT.
and
gloves;
remove victim
from agent
source
immediately.
Flush
skin
and clothes
with
5 percent
solution
of sodium
hypochlorite
or liquid
household
bleach
within
o'ne
minute.
Cut and remove
contaminated
clothing,
flush
contaminated
skin
area
again
with
5 percent
sodium
hypochlorite
solution,
then
wash
contaminated
skin
area
with
and
water.
soap
If
shower
facilities
are
available,
wash
thoroughly
and transfer
to medical
facility.
If the
skin
becomes
contama thickened
agent,
blot/wipe
inated
with
the
material
off
immediately
with
an absorbent
pad/paper
towel
prior
to
using
decontaminating
solution.
INGESTION.
Do
medical
attention
vomiting.
induce
not
IMMEDIATELY.
Give
victim
---------------------------------------------------------------------------SECTION VI - REACTIVITY
--------------------_I__________________-----------------------------------STABILITY:
149
DEG
moisture,
to
drink.
Seek
DATA
Stable
at ambient
temperatures.
Decomposition
temperature
is
C to 177 DEG C.
Mustard
is a persistent
agent
depending
on pH and
and has been known to remain
active
for up to three
years
in soil.
INCOMPATIBILITY:
Will
corrode
C.
HAZARDOUS
thiodiglycol.
milk
Conditions
steel
at
DECOMPOSITION:
HAZARDOUS POLYMERIZATION:
to
a rate
avoid.
Rapidly
corrosive
to brass
@ 65 DEG
of .OOOl in.
of steel
per month @ 65 DEG C.
Mustard
Will
not
----------------------------------------------------------------~----------SECTION VII
- SPILL,
---------------------------------------------------------------------------STEPS TO BE TAKEN
in full
protective
mustard
is spilled.
will
hydrolyze
to
form
HCl
and
occur.
LEAK,
AND DISPOSAL
IN CASE MATERIAL
IS RELEASED
clothing
(see Section
8) will
PROCEDURES
OR SPILLED:
be allowed
RECOMMENDED FIELD PROCEDURES:
should
be contained
using
vermiculite,
The
mustard
clay
or fine
sand and neutralized
as soon as possible
of
5.25
percent
Sodium
'Hypochlorite
solution.
in
Only personnel
an area where
diatomaczeous
using
copious
earth,
amounts
scoop up
material
and
place
in an approved
DOT container.
all
Cover the
contents
of the drum with
decontaminating
solution
as above.
The
exterior
the drum shall
be
decontaminated
and
then
of
labeled
IAW EPA and DOT
regulations.
~11 leaking
containers
shall
be overpacked
with
vermiculite
placed
between
the
interior
and
exterior
containers.
Decontaminate
and
label
IAW EPA and DOT regulations.
Dispose
of the material
IAW waste
dis-
posal'methods
provided
below..
Dispose
of the material
used to decontaminate
exterior
of drum IAW Federal,
state
and local
regulations.
Conduct
general
area monitoring
with
an approved
monitor
(see Section
8) to confirm
that
the
&mospheric
concentrations
do
not exceed
the airborne
exposure
limit
(see
Sections
2 and 8).
If 5.25 percent
Sodium
Hypochlorite
solution
is not available
then
lowing
decontaminants
may
be
used
instead
and are listed
in the
preference:
Calcium
Hypochlorite,
Decontamination
Solution
No.
and
Super Tropical
Bleach
Slurry
(STB).
WARNING:
Pure,
undiluted
Hypochlorite
(HTH) will
burn on contact
with
liquid
blister
agent.
the folorder
of
2 (DS2),
Calcium
RECOMMENDED LABORATORY PROCEDURES:
A minimum of 65 grams of decon
solution
per gram of HD is allowed
to agitate
for a minimum
of one hour.
Agitation
is not necessary
following
the first
hour if a single
phase
is obtained.
At the end of 24 hours,
the resulting
solution
shall
be adjusted
to a pH between
10 and 11.
Test
for presence
of
active
chlorine
by use of acidic
potassium
iodide
solution
to
give
free
Place
3 ml of the decontaminate
in a test
tube.
iodine
color.
Add several
Potassium
Iodine
and
swirl
crystals
of
to dissolve.
Add 3 ml of 50 wt
percent
Sulfuric
Acid:water
and swirl.
IMMEDIATE
Iodine
color
indicates
If negative,
the presence
of active
chlorine.
add additional
5.25
percent
solution
to the
decontamination
solution,
wait
two
Sodium
Hypochlorite
then
test
again
for
active
chlorine.
hours,
Continue
procedure
until
positive
chlorine
is given
by solution.
A 10 wt
percent
Sodium Hypochlorite.
test
as described
Calcium
hypochlorite
Use 65 grams of
for
Sodium
Hypochlorite.
(HTH) mixture
decon per gram
may be substituted
of HD and continue
for
the
Scoop up all
material
and place
in approved
DOT containers.
Cover the
conthe
drum with
decontaminating
solution
as above.
tents
of
The exterior
of
the drum shall
be
decontaminated
and then labeled
IAW EPA and DOT regulaAll
leaking
containers
shall
tions.
be
overpacked
with
vermiculite
placed
between
the interior
and exterior
containers.
Decontaminate
and label
IAW
Dispose
of the material
IAW waste
disposal
methods
EPA and DOT regulations.
provided
below.
Dispose
of the material
used to decontaminate
exterior
of
state
and local
regulations.
drum IAW Federal,
Conduct
general
area monitoring with
an approved
monitor
(see Section
8) to confirm
that
the atmospheric
concentrations
do not exceed
the airborne
exposure
limits
(see Sec:tion
8).
NOTE:
evolve
Surfaces
sufficient
contaminated
mustard
vapor
with
HD
to produce
and
then rinse-decontaminated
a physiological
response.
may
All
decontaminated
material
WASTE DISPOSAL METHOD:
should
be
collected,
contained
and
chemically
decontaminated
or thermally
decomposed
in an EPA
approved
incinerator,
which
will
filter
or scrub
toxic
by-products
from
effluent
before
discharge
to
the
atmosphere.
air
Any
contaminated
protective
clothing
should
be
decontaminated
using
HTH or
bleach
and.
analyzed
to
assure
it
is free
of detectable
contamination
(3X) ILevel.
The
clothing
should
then
be sealed
in plastic
bags inside
properly
labeled
drums
and held
for
shipment
back to the DA issue
point.
Decontamination
of waste
or excess
material
shall
be accomplished
in accordance
with
the procedures
outlined
above with
the following
exception:
---reaction
Open pit
HD in any
laboratory
HD on
with
concentrated
burning
quantity
or
is
nitric
burying
prohibited.
glassware
acid.
of
HD or
may
items
be
oxidized
containing
by
or
its
contaminated
vigorous
with
c?
NOTE:
-uaste.
Some states
define
decontaminated
surety
i
'?
as a RCRA hazardous
____-_---__-____---------------------------------------------~----------
SECTION VIII
- SPECIAL
____---------------------------------------------------------~----------
/-I
1
material
RESPIRATORY
PROTECTION
INFORMATION
PROTECTION:
Concentration
mg/m3
--------------
Respiratory
Protection/Ensemble
Required
Less
to
Protective
mask not required
provided
that:
(a)
Continuous
real-time
monitoring
(with
alarm
capability)
is conducted
in the
work area at the 0.003
mg/m3 level
of
detection.
(b)
M9, Ml7 or M40 mask is available
and
donned
if ceiling
concentrations
exceed
0.003 mg/m3.
(c)
Exposure
has been limited
to the extent
practicable
by engineering
controls
(remote
operations,
ventilation,
and
process
isolation)
or work practices.
-------------------------------------.----------
than or equal
0.003
as an
8-hr
TWA
If these
following
conditions
applies:
are
not
met
then
the
Full
facepiece,
chemical
canister,
airpurifying
respiratiors.
(The M9, 1617, or
M40 series
or other
certified
equivalent
masks are acceptable
for this
purpose
in conjunction
with
the M3 toxicological
agent
protective
(TAP) suit
for dermal
protection.)
\
Greater
than
0.003
as an
8-hr TWA
The Demilitarization
Protective
Ensemble
(DPE),
30 mil,
may be used with
prior
approval
from the AMC Field
Safety
Activity
Use time for the 30 mil DPE must be restricted
to two hours
or less.
the
NOTE:
When 30 mi.1 DPE is not available
M9 or M40 series
mask with
Level
A protective
ensemble
including
impregnated
innerwear
can be used.
However,
use time shall
be
restricted
to the extent
operationally
feasible,
and may not exceed
one hour.
As an additional
precaution,
the cuffs
of
the sleeves
and the legs
of the M3 suit
shall
be taped
to the gloves
and boots
respectively
to reduce
aspiration.
\
t. "
\
VENTILATION:
Local
Exhaust.
Mandatory.
Must
be filtered
or
scrubbed.
.
/ f‘1
Special.
Chemical
laboratory
shall
have
an
hoods
average
inward
face
velocity
of
100
linear
feet
per minute
(lfpm)
plus
or minus
10% with
the
velocity
at any point
not deviating
from the average
face velocity
by
more
Laboratory
hoods
shall
be located
such that
cross
drafts
do not
:hat
20%.
exceed
20% of the inward
A visual
performance
test
utilizing
face velocity.
smoke producing
devices
shall
be performed
in assessing
the ability
of
the
hood to contain
agent
HD.
Other.
Recirculation
of
exhaust
air
from agent
areas
is prohibited.
No
connection
between
agent
area and other
areas
through
the ventilation
system
Emergency
backup
power
is necessary.
is permitted.
Hoods should
be
tested
semi-annually
or
after
modification
or maintenance
operations.
Operations
should
be performed
20 cm inside
hoods.
.‘\
PROTECTIVE GLOVES:
(M3, M4, gloveset).
EYE PROTECTION:
hazard
use goggles
MANDATORY.
Butyl
As a minimum,
and face-shield.
toxicological
chemical
agent
goggles
will
protective
be worn.
gloves
For
splash
OTHER PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT:
Full
protective
clothing
will
consist
of the
suit
with
hood,
M2Al
boots,
M3 butyl
rubber
M3 gloves,
impregnated
and
underwear,
M9 series
mask
coveralls
(if
desired),
or
the
Demilitarization
Protective
Ensemble
(DPE).
For general
lab work,
gloves
and lab coat
shall
be worn with
M9 or Ml7 mask readily
available.
In addition,
.,_\
foot
covers,
,.
(. MONITORING:
‘1
when handling
contaminated
and head covers
are required.
lab
Available
monitoring
equipment
tor paper,
blue
band tube,
M256/M256Al
kits,
toring
System
(DAMMS),
Automated
Continuous
CAM-Ml,
Hydrogen
Flame Photometric
Emission
ture
Chemical
Agent
Monitor
(MINICAM).
animals,
a
daily
clean
smock,
for
agent
HD is the M:8/M9 detecbubbler,
Depot Area Air MoniAir Monitoring
System
(A-S),
Detector
(HYFED),
and the Minia-
_________---_---------------------------------------------------~-----------
SECTION IX - SPECIAL
_______-----_----------------------------------------------------,-----------
r-1
,--7,’
PRECAUTIONS
PRECAUTIONS
TO BE TAKEN
IN
HANDLING
AND STORING:
the
During
handling,
"buddy"
(two-man)
system
will
be used.
Containers
should
be periodically
inspected
for
leaks,
either
visually
or
using
a
kit,
and prior
to transfering
the containers
from storage
to
work
detector
Stringent
control
over
all
personnel
handling
HD must be
areas.
exercised.
Chemical
showers,
eyewash
stations,
and personal
cleanliness
facilities
must
be provided.
Each
worker
will
wash
their
hands before
meals and shower
thoroughly
with
special
attention
given
to hair,
face,
neck,
and hands using
plenty
of soap
before
leaving
at
the
end of the work day.
No smoking,
eating,
or drinking
is permitted
at the
work site.
Decontaminalting
equipment shall
be conveniently
located.
Exits
must
be designed
to permit
rapid
HD should.be
stored
in
evacuation.
containers
made of glass
for Research,
Development,
Test
and
Evaluatjlbn
(RDTE) quantities
or one-ton
steel
conquantities.
tainers
for
large
Agent
shall
be double-contained
in liquidtight
containers
when in storage.
For additional
OTHER PRECAUTIONS:
Regulations
for Chemical
Agents
H,
"Occupational
Health
Guide No.173,
of Occupational
Exposure
to Mustard
information
see
AMC-R
385-131,
"Safety
HD, HT, GB and VX" and
USAEHA Technical
Guidelines
for the Evaluation
and Control
Agents
H, HD, and HT".
--w--
___--_-__-________--________I___________--------------------.-----------
SECTION X - TRANSPORTATION
______________--------------------------------------------,-----------
___
PROPER SHIPPING
NAME:
DOT HAZARD CLASS:
DOT LABEL:
DOT
Poison
Poison
MARKING:
DOT PLACARD:
Poisonous
n.o.s.
A
Gas
Poisonous
POISON
EMERGENCY ACCIDENT
liquid,
DATA
liquid,
n.o.s.
(Sulfide,
\
bis
2-chloroethyl))
NA 195:
GAS
PRECAUTIONS
AND PROCEDURES:
See Sections
IV
and
PRECAUTIONS
TO BE TAKEN
IN
TRANSPORTATION:
Motor
vehicles
placarded
regardless
of quantity.
Driver
shall
be given
full
and
information
regarding
shipment
and conditions
in case of emergency.
deals
specifically
with
the shipment
of chemical
agents.
Shipment
will
be escorted
in accordance
with
AR 740-32.
VIII.
will
be
complete
AR 50-6
of agents
the
Chemical
Research
Development
While
and
Engineering
Center,
that
the
Department
of the Army believes
data
contained
hserein
are
the
opinions
expressed
factual
and
are
those
of qualified
experts
regarding
the results
of the tests
conducted,
the data
are not to
be
taken
representation
for which
the Department
of the Army or
as a warranty
or
Development
and
Research
Engineering
Center
assumes
Chemical
legal
They
offered
solely
responsibility.
are
for
consideration,
your
investigation,
and verification.
Any use-of
these
data
and information
must
be determined
by
the
user
to
be
in
accordance
with
applicable
Federal,
State,
and local
laws and regulations.
ADDENDUM A
INFORMATION FOR THICKENED
ADDITIONAL
TRADE NAME AND SYNONYMS:
Thickened
H125
HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS:
not
known
to
I-ID. K125
is
form.
PHYSICAL
viscosity
FIRE
Essentially
DATA:
of HV is between
AND EXPLOSION
DATA:
HD,
HD
THD
(acryloid
copolymer,
be hazardous
except
5%)
is
used
in a finely-divided,
the same
as
HD except
1000 and 1200 centistokes
to
for
viscosity.
@ 25 DEG C.
thicken
powder
The
Same as HD.
Same as HD except
for skin
contact.
HEALTH HAZARD DATA:
For skin
contact,
and
don
mask
remove
respiratory
protective
clothing
contaminated
IMMEDIATELY
scrape
the HV form the skin
surface,
then wash the
IMMEDIATELY.
contaminated
surface
with
acetone.
Seek medical
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
SPILL,
follow
LEAK,
AND
DISPOSAL
the same procedures
as
PROCEDURES:
those
for HD,
If
but
spills
dissolve
or
leaks
aIf HV occur,
the THD in
acetone
..
prior
to
introducing
any decontaminating
generally
not necessary.
Spilled
THD can
contaminated
surface
and placed
in a fully
density,
polyethylene
lining.
The THD can
has
been
dissolved
in
acetone,
using
Contaminated
surfaces
should
be treated
with
using
the same procedures
as those
used for
NOTE:
evolve
SPECIAL
Surfaces
sufficient
contaminated
mustard
PROTECTION
with
vapor
solution.
Containment
of THD is
be
carefully
scraped
the
_ off a high
removable
head drum with
then be decontaminated,
after
it
the
same procedures
used for HD.
acetone,
then
decontaminated
HD.
THD or HD and then rinse-decontaminated
to produce
a physiological
response.
INFORMATION:
...
may
Same as HD.
SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS:
Same as HD with
the following
addition.
H:andling
the
THD requires
careful
observation
of the "stringers"
(elastic,
thread-like
attachments)
formed
when the agents
are
transferred
or
dispensed.
These
must
be broken
cleanly
before
moving
the contaminating
device
or
stringers
dispensing
device
to
another
location,
or
unwanted
contamination
of
a
working
surface
will
result.
TRANSPORTATION
DATA:
Same as HD.
i
.I\
/ /’ ’ \
/ POISON
\
GAS
\
DATE:
U.S. ARMY CHEMICAL
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT
AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
\
MATERIAL
SAFETY
3 Dee 1990
Emergency
Tele,phone
#s:
CRDEC, Safety
(Office
301-671-4411
0700-1700
EST After
normal
duty
hours:
301-278-5201
j > Ask for CRDEC Staff
Duty Officer
DATA SHEET
LETHAL NERVE AGENT (GB)
____________-__------------------------------------------------------------SECTION I - GENERAL INFORMATION
___-__---------------------------------------------------------------------MANUFACTURER'S
NAME:
MANUFACTURER'S
ADDRESS:
CAS REGISTRY
CHEMICAL
Department
NUMBER:
of
the
Army
U.S.0 ARMY ARMAMENTRESEARCHAND
DEVELOPMENTCOMMAND
CHEMICAL RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
ATTN:
SMCCR-CMS
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD 21010-5423
107-44-8
or
50642-23-4
NAME AND SYNONYMS:
Phosphonofluoridic
Phosphonofluoridic
acid,
acid,
ALTERNATE
NAMES:
CHEMICAL
methyl-,
r&ethyl-,
isopropyl
I-methylethyl
Isopropyl
methylphosphonofluoridate
Isopropyl
ester
of methylphosphonofluoridic
Methylisopropoxfluorophosphine
oxide
Isopropyl
Methylfluorophosphonate
O-Isopropyl
Methylisopropoxfluorophosphine
O-Isopropyl
Methylphosphonofluoridate
Methylfluorophosphonic
acid,
isopropyl
Isopropoxymethylphosphonyl
fluoride
ester
ester
acid
oxide
ester
TRADE NAME AND SYNONYMS:
GB
Zarin
CHEMICAL
Sarin
FAMILY:
FORMULA/CHEMICAL
Fluorinated
organophosphorous
compound
STRUCTURE:
C4 HlO
F02
P
CH3
\
0
II
CH-O-P--F
/
\
CH3
CH3
NFPA 704
SIGNAL:
Health
-
4
I\
I -.
FlammabilityReactivity-
1
1
I
-----------------------------------------------------------------~---------
I
t /-I
I
I
t
,f--
t
I
k
'--.
SECTION II - COMPOSITION
-----------------------------------------------------------------~--------PERCENTAGE
INGREDIENTS
FORMULA
BY WEIGHT
NAME
C4 HlO
GB
BOILING
POINT
VAPOR PRESSURE
I
VAPOR DENSITY
' $'
100
P
------------------------------------------------------------------.---------SECTION III
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
I
r-,
F02
SOLUBILITY
'PECIFIC
DEG
2.9
(AIR=l):
4.86
IN WATER:
Complete
GRAVITY
Colorless
Odorless
- PHYSICAL
FLAMMABLE
Not
LOWER EMPLOSIVE
LIMIT:
Not
available
UPPER EXPLOSIVE
LIMIT:
Not
available
MEDIA:
DATA
@ 25 DEG C
liquid
in pure
LIMIT:
EXTINGUISHING
mg/m3
(158)
for&
SECTION IV - FIRE
-----------------------------------------------------------------~-----------Did not flash
FLASH POINT (METHOD USED):
--.
.OOOl
(AEL)
@ 25 DEG C
1.0887
(H20=1):
APPEARANCE AND ODOR:
316
F (DEG C):
(mm Hg):
AIRBORNE
EXPOSURE LIMIT
AND EXPLOSION
to
280
DATA
DEG F
applicable
Water
mist,
methods
that
GB.
fog,
will
foam,
CO2 - Avoid
cause
splashing
using
extinguishing
or spreading
of the
FIGHTING
PROCEDURES:
GB will
react
with
steam or water
to
SPECIAL
FIRE
vapors.
All
persons
not engaged
in extinguishing
produce
toxic
& corrosive
the
fire
should
be
evacuated.
Fires
involving
GB should
be contained
to
ST prevent
contamination
to uncontrolled
areas.
When responding
to a fire
acontaining
agents,
firefighting
personnel
larm
in
buildings
or
areas
agent
firefighting
and fire
clothing
(without
TAP clothing)
during
chemical
f
is required.
Respiratory
protection
Positive
pressure,
:escue operations.
self-contained
breathing
apparatus
(SCBA)
full
facepiece,
NIOSH-approved
will
be worn where
there
is danger
of oxygen
deficiency
and when directed
by
/'* the fire
The
chief
or chemical
accident/incident
(CAI)
operations
off:icer.
of SCBA when there
is no danger
of
M9 or Ml7 series
mask may be worn in lieu
In cases
where
firefighters
are responding
to a chemical
oxygen
deficiency.
*
I
‘
accident/incident
for
will
wear appropriate
,.'
I
1T
iUSUAL FIRE
(
rescue/reconnaissance
levels
of protective
AND EXPLOSION
purposes
clothing
Hydrogen
HAZARDS:
vide
firefighting,
(see Section
8).
they
may be present.
--------------I-------------
---_____-----------------------------------------
SECTION
-_--_-___--------------------------
V - HEALTH HAZARD DATA
------_------------------------.----------
The suggested
permissible
airborne
exposure
AIRBORNE
EXPOSURE
LIMIT
(AEL):
concentration
for GB for an 8-hour
workday
or a 40 hour work week is
an
8This value
is
hour
time weight
average
(TWA) of 0.0001
mg/m3 (2X10-S
ppm).
based on the TWA of GB as proposed
in
the
USAEHA Technical
Guide
No. 169,
"Occupational
Health
Guidelines
for the Evaluation
and Control
of Occupational Exposure
to Nenre
Agents
GA, GB, GD, and VX".
To date,
however,
the Occu',~., pational
Safety
and Health
Administration
(OSHA) has not promulgated
permis1 sible
exposure
concentration
for GB.
e-h
'
I
,
EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE:
It is a lethal
anticholinergic
agent
LDSO (Skin)
= 24 mg/kg
= 8000 mg-min/m3
- ICtSO (Skin)
= 70 mg-min/m3
LCtSO (inhalation)
I
+a.
One to several
minutes
acute
symptoms
appear:
,...
\,(
(1)
Local
tightness
days,
Miosis
(constriction
behind
the eyes.
dose
min)
overexposure
l-15
in
man being:
(inhalation)
to
airborne
GB,
with
dose):
increases
of
Rhinorrhea
salivation,
inhalation:
By
chest,
wheezing,
b.
in
median
(t=O.S-2
after
(lasting
On eyes:
in and
a.
and heaviness
\
effects
with
pupils);
@MY
nausea,
the
following
redness,
nose),
vomiting.
nasal
pressure
congestion,
(2)
Systemic
effects
(increases
with
dose):
By inhalation
excessive
salivation
and sweating;
difficulty;
coughing/breathing
secretion
causing
involuntary
urination/defecation;
stomach
cramps;
vomiting,
diarrhea;
muscle
twitching/muscle
cramps;
CNS depression
including
anxi-1- generalized
excessive
dreaming
and nightmares.
giddiness,
insomnia,
restlessness,
ety;
concentration
With more severe
exposure,
also
headache,
tremor,
drowsiness,
standing
or
confusion,
unsteadiness
on
impairment,
difficulty,
memory
walking.
-”
b.
After
overexposure
(1)
Local
a.
b.
i-7
al
cramps,
.i.
C.
(2)
y airborn
C.
liquid
GB,
the
following
acute
symptoms
appear:
Effects:
On eyes;
Miosis,
pressure
redness,
sensation
on eyes..
Salivation,
anorexia,
nausea,
By-ingestion:
involuntary
defecation,
heartburn.
diarrhea,
Sweating,
On skin:
Systemic
GB.
-Chronic
to
Similar
Effects:
overexposure
muscle
to
GB causes
to
vomiting,
abdomin-
twitching.
generalized
forgetfulness,
effects
thinking
from
exposure
difficulty,
to
.
.
4.
Sision
disturbances,
muscular
pesticides
have been shown to
lot
been documented
in carefully
3.
aches/pains.
be teratogenic
controlled
GB is not listed
by the International
American
Conference
of Governmental
tional
Safety
and Health
Administration
gram (NTP) as a carcinogen.
**
See addendum
A for
*EMERGENCY AND FIRST
detailed
AID
Although
certain
organophosphate
in animals,
these
effects
have
toxicological
evaluations
for
Agency
for Research
Industrial
Hygienists
(OSHA),
or National
information.
on
Cancer
(ACGIH),
Toxicology
P=q,
OccupaPro-
~
**
PROCEDURES:
Hold breath
until
INHALATION:
respiratory
protective
mask is donned.
If severe
signs
of agent
exposure
appear
(chest
tightens,
pupil
constriction,
incoordination,
etc.),
immediately
administer,
in
rapid
succession,
all
three
Nerve Agent
Antidote
Kit(s),
Mark I injectors
(or atropine
if directed
by the local
physician).
Injections
using
the Mark1
kit
injectors
may be
5 to 20 minute
intervals
if signs
and symptoms
are progressing
repeated
at
until
three
series
of injections
have been administered.
No more injections
will,
be
given
unless
directed
by medical
personnel.
In addition,
a record
will
be maintained
of all
injections
given.
If breathing
has stopped,
give
artificial
respiration.
Mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation
should
be
used when
mask-bag
or oxygen
delivery
systems
are not available.
approved
Do not use
mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation
when facial
contamination
exists.
If breathing
is
difficult,
administer
oxygen.
Seek medical
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
EYE CONTACT: Immediately
flush
eyes with
water
for
lo-15
minutes,
then
respiratory
protective
.on
mask.
Although
miosis
(pinpointing
of the pupils)
may be an early
sign
of
agent
exposure,
an injection
will
not be administered
when
miosis
is the only
sign present.
Instead,
the individual
will
be taken
IMMEDIATELY
to the medical
treatment
facility
for observation.
SKIN CONTACT:
Don
respiratory
protective
mask and remove cgontaminated
clothing.
Immediately
wash contaminated
skin
with
copious
amounts
of
soap
and
water,
10% sodium
carbonate
solution,
or 5% liquid
household
bleach.
Rinse well
with
water
to remove
decontaminant.
Administer
an
intramuscular
injection
with
the
MARK I kit
injectors
only
if local
sweating
and muscular
twitching
symptoms
are observed.
SEEK MEDICAL ATTENTION
IMMEDIATELY.
INGESTION:
Do not induce
vomiting.
gastronintestinal.
Immediately
administer
MARK I kit
auto-injectors.
SEEK MEDICAL
**
See
addendum
B for
detailed
First
symptoms
are likely
an intramuscular
injection
ATTENTION
IMMEDIATELY.
instructions.
**
--------------------___________I________-----------------------------------SECTION VI - REACTIVITY
---------------------------------------------------------------------------STABILITY:
Stable
.INCOMPATIBILITY:
UIIIS.
Slight
steel,
Inconel
Hydrolyzes
under
basic
when
DATA
.
pure.
Attacks
tin,
attack
on copper,
& K-monel.
to form HF.under
conditions.
to be
of the
acid
magnesium,
cadmium
plated
brass,
lead,
practically
conditions
and
isopropyl
steel,
some alumino attack
on
1020
alcohol
& polymers
.
.
1.
_____------_-----------------------------------------------
_----------------
-------.v---_____
SECTION VII
- SPILL,
LEAJS AND DISPOSAL
------------------------------------------------~---------
PROCEDURES
IN
CASE MATERIAL
IS RELEASED
OR SPILLED:
If leak or
STEPS TO BE TAKEN
only
personnel
in full
protective
clothing
(see
section
8 )
spills
occur,
In
case
of personnel
contamination
see Section
v
remain
in
area.
will
"Emergency
and First
Aid Instructions".
-7
must be
contained
by
Spills
covering
with
RECOMMENDED FIELD PROCEDURES:
sponges,
and paper
or cloth
vermiculite,
diatomaceous
earth
clay,
fine
sand,
amounts
of
with
copious
aqueous
Sodium Hydroxide
Decontaminate
towels.
all
material
and place
in a
scoop
up
solution
(a minimum
10 wt percent).
head
drum
with
a high density
polyethylene
liner.
Cover
fully
removable
decontaminating
solution
as
above
before
the contents
of the drum
with
After
sealing
the head,
the exterior
of the drum
affixing
the drum head.
IAW EPA and DOT regulations.
All
shall
be decontaminated
and then
labeled
vermiculite
placed
between
the
leaking
containers
shall
be overpacked
with
Decontaminate
and label
IAW EPA and DOT
interior
and exterior
containers.
disposal
methods
provided
Dispose
of the material
IAW waste
regulations.
to
decontaminate
exterior
of
drum
IAW
used
Dispose
of material
below.
Conduct
general
area
monitoring
with
state
and local
regulations.
Federal,
atmospheric
concenan approved
monitor
(see Section
8) to confirm
that
the
trations
do not exceed
the airborne
exposure
limit
(see Sections
2 and 8).
If 10 wt
following
preference:
>ertropical
---\
/(
percent
aqueous
decontaminants
Decontamination
Bleach
Slurry
Sodium
Hydroxide
solution
is not
may be used instead
and are listed
Solution
No. 2 (DS2),
Sodium
(STB).
availab:Le
in the
Carbonate,
then
order
and
the
of
Su-
A minimum of 56 grams of decon
solution
RECOMMENDED LABORATORY PROCEDURES:
allowed
Decontaniinant/agent
solution
is
is required
for
each gram of GB.
Agitation
is
not
necessary
following
to agitate
for
a minimum
of one hour.
the resulting
solution
should
At the end of the one hour,
the
first
hour.
NaOH
If
the
pH
is
below
1.1.5,
be adjusted
to a pH greater
than
11.5.
should
be added until
a pH above
11.5 can be maintained
for 60 minutes.
‘-,
An alternate
solution
for
the decontamination
of GB is 10 wt perclent
Sodium
ConCarbonate
in place
of the 10 percent
Sodium Hydroxide
solution
above.
Agitate
for.one
hour
but
tinue
with
56 grams
of decon
to 1 gram of agent.
The final
pH should
be aedjusted
to
allow
three
(3) hours
for
the reaction.
It is also
permitted
to substitute
5.25% Sodium Hypochlorite
or
above
10.
(MEA) for the 10% Sodium Hydroxide
solution
Monoethylamine
25 wt
percent
dissolved
in water
prior
to addition
of the
above.
MEA must be completely
for
each gram of GB.and provide
Continue
with
56 grams
of
decon
agent.
Continue
with
same ratios
and time stipulations.
agitation
for one hour.
Scoop up all
material
and place
in a fully
removable
head drum with
a high
Cover
the contents
of the drum.with
decontamidensity
polyethylene
liner.
After
sealing
the
drum
head.
affixing
nating
solution
as above before
the head,
the exterior
of the drum shall
be decontaminated
and then labeled
containers
shall
be
overAll
leaking
IAW EPA and
DOT regulations.
vermiculite
placed
between
the
interior
and exterior
conpacked
with
Dispose
of
Decontaminate
and label
IAW EPA and DOT regulations.
tainers.
Dispose
of
disposal
methods
provided
below.
IAW waste
;he material
material
used to decontaminate
exterior
of drum IAW Federal,
state
and
loConduct
general
area monitoring
with
an approved
monitor
cal
regulations.
atmospheric
concentrations
do not
that
the
confirm
(see Section
8)
to
exceed
the airborne
exposure
limit
(see Sections
2 and 8).
I
,-.
‘...
,
1
I
,L
I
, -.
I
I
.
pit
burning
or burying
of GB or items
conMETHOD:
Open
WASTE' DISPOSAL
taining
or contaminated
with
GB in any quantity
is prohibited.
The
detox'fied
GB using
procedures
above)
can be thermally
destroyed
by incineration
appropriate
provisions
with
.n an EPA approved
incinerator
in accordance
and local
RCRA regulations.
state
of Federal,
Some states
NOTE:
waste.
I
define
"
c .OOOl
L
,-I
.OOOl
to
material
as a RCRA Hazardous
SECTION
VIII
- SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION
-------------------------------------------
PROTECTION:
Concentration
-------------
I
surety
--------------------________I___________-----
RESPIRATORY
1
decontaminated
-___----_----------------------
______--___----------------------
I
:
Respiratory
Protective
------------------------------,--
,
M9,
this
mg/m3
0.2
mg/m3
/
M17, or
purpose.
M40 series
mask
M9, or M40 series
mask with
ensemble
(see AMCR 385-131
appropriate
level).
Demilitarization
Protective
Toxicological
Agent
Protective
used with
Contained
(TAPES),
AMC Field
Safety
Activity.
,.
' (
> 0.2 mg/m3
or unknown
DPE or TAPES used with
prior
AMC Field
Safety
Activity.
Equipment
shall
be available
Level
A or Level
for determination
B
of
Ensemble
(DPE),
or
Ensemble
Selfprior
approval
from
approval
from
When DPE or TAPES is not availab:Le
the
NOTE:
M9 or M4O series
mask with
Level
A protective
However,
use time shall
ensemble
can be used.
be restricted
to the extent
operationally
feasible,
and may not exceed
one
hour.
As an additional
precaution,
the cuffs
of
sleeves
and the legs
of the M3 suit
shall
taped
to the gloves
and boots
respectively
to reduce
aspiration.
-i
,-\
?
,'!
'\
VENTILATION:
Local
concentration
exit
Mandatory
Exhaust:
to < . 0001 mg/m3
must be filtered
averaged
over
the
be
or scrubbed
to
8 hr/day
indefinitely.
limit
hoods
shall
have
an
average
inward
face
Chemical
laboratory
SPECIAL:
100
linear
feet
per minute
(lfpm)
plus
or minus
10% with
the
velocity
of
velocity
at any point
not deviating
from the average
face velocity
by
more
Laboratory
hoods
shall
be located
such that
cross
drafts
do not
than
20%.
A visual
performance
test
exceed. 20 percent
of the inward
face velocity.
devices
shall
be
performed
in
the
assessment
of
smoke
producing
utilizing
Emergency
backup
power
necessary.
the hood's
ability
to contain
agent
GB.
maintenance
modification
or
.Ioods should
be tested
semi-annually
or after
Operations
should
be performed
20 cm inside
hood face.
operations.
Other:
Recirculation
connection
is allowed
tion
system.
of exhaust
air
agent
between
from agent
areas
and
areas
is
other
areas
prohibited.
through
ventila.
No
PROTECTIVE
,i;,l1
GLOVES:
ButYl
Glove
M3 and M4
Norton,
Chemical
Protective
Chemical
EYE PROTECTION:
faceshield.
goggles.
Glove
For
splash
Set
hazards
use
goggles
EQUIPMENT:
Full
protective
clothing
will
consist
OTHER PROTECTIVE
suit
M3 Butyl
rubber
M2Al boots,
M3 gloves,
coveralls,
with
hood,
tigues,
or similar
(with
drawers
and undershirt)
,and socks,
M9 mask
For general
lab
work,
Demilitarization
Protective
Ensemble
(DPE).
and lab coat
shall
be worn with
M9 or Ml7 mask readily
available.
and
of
the
faor
the
gloves
Available
monitoring
equipment
for agent
GB is the M8/M9 DetecMONITORING:
blue
band tube,
M256/M256Al
kits,
bubbler,
Depot
tor paper,
detector
ticket,
System
(DAAMS),
Automatic
Continuous
Air Monitoring
Area
Air
Monitoring
Demilitarization
Chemical
Agent
real
time monitoring
(RTM),
System
(ACAMS),
M8/M43,
M8Al/M43A2,
Hydrogen
Flame Photometric
Emission
Concentrator
(DCAC),
CAM-Ml,
and Miniature
Chemical
Agent
Monitor
(MINICAM).
Detector
(HYFED),
---------------------------------------------------------------------------SECTION IX - SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS
--__-_--_-----------____I_______________---------------------------.-------PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN HANDLING AND STORING:
will
be incorporated.
No smoking,
eating
and
the buddy
system
In handling,
Containers
should
be
drinking
in areas
containing
agent
is
permitted.
(either
visually
or by a detector
kit).
periodically
inspected
for
leaks
Decontamtringent
control
over
all
personnel
practices
must be exercised.
Exits
must
be
designed
to
nation
equip
shall
be conveniently
located.
eye-wash
stations,
and personal
rapid
evacuation.
Chemical
showers,
permit
must be provided.
Wash hands before
meals and each
cleanliness
facilities
thoroughly
with
special
attention
given
to hair,
face,
shower
worker
will
plenty
of soap before
leaving
at the end of the work
and hands,
using
~, neck,
day.
OTHER PRECAUTIONS:
containers
when in
Agents
storage
must be double
contained
in
or when outside
of ventilation
additional
information
see "AMC-R 385-131,
ical
Agents
H, HD, HT, GB, and VX" and "USAEHA
cupational
Health
Guidelines
for the Evaluation
Exposure
to Nerve
Agents
GA, GB, GD, and VX".
liquid
and
hood.
vapor
tight
Safety
Regulations
for ChemTechnical
Guide No. 169,
OcOccupational
and Control
of
--\ For
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
X - TRANSPORTATION
SECTION
PROPER SHIPPING
Poisonous
NAME:
Poison
DOT HAZARD CLASSIFICATION:
DOT LABEL:
.
'a
OT MARXING:
DOT PLuWARD:
PRECAUTIONS
Poison
n.o.s.
A
Gas
Poisonous
NA19SS
POISON
liquid,
DATA
liquid,
n.o.s.
(Isopropyl
methylphosphonofluoridate)
GAS
TO BE TAKEN
IN
TRANSPORTATION:
Motor
vehicles
will
be
plac-
4.
a&d
regardless
of
information
regarding
I
,
i'
"-'of
I
k SO-6 deals
agent
will
quantity.
shipment
specifically
be escorted
EMERGENCY ACCIDENT
VIII.
and
Driver
conditions
shall
with
the shipment
in accordance
with
PRECAUTIONS
be given
full
and
case of emergency,
in
of chemical
AR 740-32.
AND PROCEDURES:
See
agents.
sections
Complete
Shipments
IV,
VII,
and
f
--,
L -----------Development
and Engineering
Center,
the
Chemical
Research,
1 While
Dept.
of
the
Army
believes
that
the
data
contained
herein
are
factual
and
the
opinion
1
expressed
are those
of qualified
experts
regarding
the results
of the
tests
conducted,
the data
are not to be taken
as a warranty
or representation
for
1,..__which
Chemical
Research,
Development
and
the Department
of the
Army
or
They
are
offered
solely
Engineering
Center
assumes
legal
responsibility.
I
for your
consideration,
investigation,
and
verification.
Any
use of these
data and information
must be determined
by the user
to be in accordance
with
I applicable
State,
and local
laws and regulations.
Federal,
1.
ADDENDUM A
'\. 1.
Acute
Physiological
Site
of
Effects:
Signs
Action
and
Following
Sympotoms
Local
Exposure
I\
Muscarine-likeMiosis,
marked,
usually
(pinpoint),
sometimes
Pupils
,.-
Ciliary
Frontal
headache,
eye pain on
focusing,
slight
dimness
of vision,
occasional
nausea
and vomiting.
body
Hyperemia.
Conjunctivae
Y.
Nasal
Bronchial
mucous
tree
membranes
Rhinorrhea,
Tightness
prolonged
tive
of
increased
hyperexnia.
in chest,
sometimes
wheezing
expiration
broncho-constriction
secretion,
cough.
Following
;\
Bronchial
maximal
unequal.
tree
Systemic
with
sugges
or
Absorption
Tightness
in chest,
with
prolonged
expiration
suggestive
wheezing,
broncho-constriction
or increased
secretion,
dyspnea,
slight
pain
in
chest,
increase
bronchial
seketion,
cough,
c
-..,
i
^-.
edema,
cyanosis.
Gastrointestinal
Anorexia,
nausea,
vomiting,
abdomina
cramps,
epigastric
and substernal
tightness
(cardiospasm)
with
"heartburn"
and eructation,
diarrhea,
involuntary
defecation.
tenesmus,
Sweat
Increased
glands
>
sweating.
Salivary
glands
Increased
salivation.
Lacrimal
glands
Increased
lacrimation.
Heart
Slight
Pupils
Slight
later
Ciliary
bradycardia.
miosis,
maximal
Blurring
body
Frequency,
Bladder
\
pulmonary
of
occasionally
unequal,
miosis
(pinpoint).
vision.‘
involuntary
micturition
Nicotine-likeStriated
Sympathetic
x
..
t .'
-
2.
mild weakness r muscula
Easy fatigue,
fasciculations,
cramps,
twitching,
generalized
weakness,
including
muscles
of respiration,
with
dyspnec
and cyanosis.
muscle
Central
nervous
Chronic
Physiological
a.
unless
central
b.
Pallor;
pressure.
ganglia
Acute
occasional
elevation
Effects:
Exposure.
Exposure.
bloc
Giddiness,
tension,
anxiety,
jitterrestlessness,
emotional
iness,
excessive
dreaming,
lability,
nightmares,
headaches,
insomnia,
tremor,
withdrawal
and depression,
bursts
of slow waves of elevated
on overvoltage
in EEG, especially
ventilation,
drowsiness,
difficult
slowness
on recall,
concentration,
slurred
speedh,
ataxia,
confusion,
generalized
weakness,
coma, with
absence
of reflexes,
Cheyne-Stokes
respirations,
convulsions,
depression
of respiratory
and circulator_k
with
dyspnea
cyanosis,
and
centers,
fall
in blood
pressure.
system
If recovery
from nerve
agent
poisoning
occurs,
it will
anoxia
or convulsions
have gone unchecked
so long ,that
nervous
system
changes
due to anoxemia
have occurred.
Chronic
of
be complete
irreversible
I ,7
:I
. ..I.
:
. .
I
t
The inhibition
of cholinesterase
enzymes
throughout
the body by nerve
is more or _less-_ irreversible
so that
their
effects
are prolonged.
Tents
I(’c: .&il the tissue
cholinesterase
enzymes
are restored
to normal
activity,
by very
slow
regeneration
over a period
of weeks or 2 to 3 months
if
t probably
there
is a period
of increased
susceptibility
to the effects
damage is severe,
of another
exposure
to any nerve
agent.
During
this
period
the effects
of
repeated
exposures
are cumulative;
after
a single
exposure,
daily
exposure
to
t concentrations
of a nerve
agent
insufficient
to product
symptoms
may result
ix
-, the onset
of
symptoms
after
several
days.
Continued
daily
exposure
may
be
I’
by increasingly
severe
effects.
After
symptoms
subside,
increased
I followed
susceptibility
persists
for one to several
days.
The degree
of exposure
/ required
to produce
recurrence
of symptoms,
and the severity
of these
symptoms,
depend
on duration
of exposure
and time
intervals
between
exposures.
Increased
susceptibility
is
not
limited
to
the
particular
nerve
agent
t
initially
absorbed.
t.
1
I.
t
Estimates
be affected
below.
have been
(EtSO's)
Degree
of
Effectiveness
Et50
t
-\
I’
t\
r1
in
1.5
3.0
6.0
Moderate
Incap.
Severe
Incap.
f:i
7.0
very
2.0
‘--~4.s
9.5
_-.
made for the times
at
at median
incapacitating
E
13.5
which
1ct50
50% of exposed
sub:jects
doses.
These are presented
Exposure
mg min/m3
min
27 _
27
40
0.5
2.0
10.0
z3
56
0.5
2.0
10.0
Time
0.5
Severe
Incap.
t;
72
2.0
10.0
Death
70
70
103
0.5
2.0
10.0
Exposure
to high
concentrations
mental
confusion
and collaspe
,--. self-aid.
If this
happens,
would
of nerve
agent
may bring
on incoordination,
so rapidly
that
the casualty
cannont
perform
the man nearest
to him will
give
first
aid.
:\
_\
Onset
Time
of
Symptoms.
Wheq Effects
Route
Absorption
of
Description
of Effects
Appear
After
Exposure
Vapor
Local
Lungs
Rhinorrhea,
tightness
Vapor
Local
Eyes
Conjunctival
hyperemia
Miosis,
eye pain,
frontal,headache.
One to
minutes
Vapor
Systemic
Lungs
eyes
Muscarine-like,
nicotine-like
and central
nervous
system
effects.
(S ee 2a above)
Less than
1 min
to a few min
after
moderate
or marked
exposoure;
about
30
min after
mild
exposure.
or
in
Liquid
Local
Eyes
Same as vapor
Liquid
Local
Ingestion
Gastrointestinal.
2a above).
Liquid
Local
Skin
Local
sweating
twitching.
Xquid
Systemic
Lungs
See
Liquid
systemic
Eyes
Same as
Liquid
Systemic
Skin
Generalized
Liquid
Systemic
Ingestion
Gastrointestinal
above).
Onset
Time
Types of
Effects
of
Symptoms.
effects.
(See
and
About
after
muscular
2a above.
for
Vapor
Local
Lungs
A few
Vapor
Local
Eyes
Miosis
24 hours
Vapor
Systemic
Lungs
Liquid
Local
Eyes.
eyes
several
several
30 min.
ingestion
3 m.in to
2 hour
Several
minutes
vapor
Several
minutes
sweating.
15 minutes
hours
to
15 minutes
2 hours
to
(See
Duration
Mild
Exposure
One to
minutes
Instantly
2a
(cont'd)
Route
of
Absorption
or
nasal
hyperemia
chest,
wheezing
of
Effects
After
Severe
Exposure
hours
.
Several
hours
Similar
effects
to
of
vapor
1 to
2 days
3 to
2 to
14 days
S days
8 days
2
.
l
<
L&id
Local
Ingestion
3 days
S days
Aquid
Local
Skin
3 days
S days
Liquid
Systemic
Lungs
1 to
S days
Liquid
Systemic
Eyes
2,to
4 days
Liquid
Systemic
Skin
2 to
S days
Liquid
Systemic
Ingestion
3 to
5 days
ADDENDUM B
First
aid
procedures.
Exposed
personnel
will
be removed
immediately
to an uncontaminated
a.
Personnel
handling
casualty
cases will
give
consideration
atmosphere.
and
will
take
precautions
and employ
the prerequisite
safety
their
own
protective
equipment
to avoid
becoming
exposed
themselves.
Due to the rapid
CAUTION:
ant
that
decontamination
off excessive
agent
prior
effects
of nerve
of personnel
not
to decontamination
agents,
it is extremely
be delayed
by attempting
with
sodium
hypochlorite.
to
importto blot
then
be
decontaminated
by washing
the contamib.
The casualty
will
nated
areas
with
commercial
liquid
household
bleach
(nominal
5% solution
hyor 10 percent
sodium
carbonate
solution)
and flushing
with
clean
pochlorite
bleach
followed
by copious
soap and water
wash.
excess
water
to
remove
victim
until
decontamination'
has
been
comMask
will
be
left
,on
the
pleted
unless
it has been determined
that
areas
of the face were contaminated and the mask must
be removed
to facilitate
decontamination.
After
declothing
will
be
removed
and
skin
contaminated
the
contamination,
will
be completed
decontamination
If possible,
contamination
washed
away.
before
the casualty
is taken
to the aid station
or medical
facility.
decontaminating
facial
areas
to avoid
must
be
taken
when
Care
CAUTION:
water
shall
be
Only
clean
getting
the hypochlorite
into
the eye or mouth.
Skin
surfaces
decontaminated
with
eyes
or
mouth.
used
when
flushing
the
be
thoroughly
flushed
with
water
to prevent
skin
irritation
should
bleach
from the bleach.
If there
is no apparent
breathing,
or
immediately
(mouth-to-mouth,
started
situation
will
dictate
method
of choice,
when
resuscitation
mouth-to-mouth
use
personnel
annrnnri7it.e
and
when
trained
C.
-rT--T-----
-~
L
artifical
resuscitation
will
be
The
with
mechanical
resuscitator).
face.
Do not
e.g.,
contaminated
When
facial
contamination
exists.
available,
cardiopulmonary
are
ti \
f
t
\
I
.
1
resuscitation
’
(CPR)
may be necessary.
I
f’
, /R
b
L
I-*
individual
d.
An
;xhibits
definite
signs
intramusclar
injection
Some of the
(1)
rhea (runny
nose)
and/or
(bronchial
constriction).
t
I
local
nausea
1
I
t
-\
t
fl-..
t
I
e-,
’
has
who
or symptoms
immediately
Some of the
(2)
muscular
twitching
or vomiting.
Although
(3)
sign of agent
exposure,
is the only
sign
present.
ly to the medical
facility
received
a known
exposure
of agent
with
the MARK I kit
agent
exposure
or
shall.
be
given
auto-injectors.
who
an
early
symptoms
tightness
in
exposure
may be rhinorof a vapor
chest
with
shortness.
of breath
the
early
or
of
at
symptoms
sweating
~>
a percutaneous
the area of
exposux:e
may
exposure
followed
be
by
of the pupils)
may be an early
myosis
(p in-pointing
an injection
shall
not be administered
when
myosis
the individual
shall
be taken
immediateInstead,
for observation.
(4)
Injections
using
the MARK I kit
injectors
(or atropine
only
if
directed
by the local
physician)
may be repeated
at 5 to 20 minute
intervals
have
if signs
and symptoms
are progressing
until
three
series
of injections
No more injections
shall
be given
unless
directed
by the
been administered.
shall
be maintained
of all
In
addition,
a record
physician-in-charge.
injections
given.
in
by
(5)
Administer,
(or atropine
if directed
bf agent
exposure.
rapid
succession,
the local
physician)
all
three
in the
MARK I kit
injectors
case of SEVERE signs
I.
-.
e.
If
resuscitation
tems are not
contamination
indicated,
should
available.
exists.
be
CPR should
be.started
immediately.
Mouth-to-mouth
when approved
mask-bag
or oxygen
de:Livery
sysused
Do not use mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation
when facial
Atropine
does not act as a prophylactic
CAUTION:
exposure
has been ascertained.
tered
until
an agent
U.S.
and
shall
not
be
&minis-
ARMY CHEMICAL
301-278-5201
Ask for CRDEC Staff
Duty Officer
LETHAL
NERVE AGENT
(VX)
GENERAL INFORMATION
""uFA~s'
/
U.S.
ARMY ARMAMENT, MUNITIONS
CHEMICAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT
;;W&ER SMCCR-CMS-E
ABERbEEN
PROVING GROUND, MD
AND CHEMICAL C
AND ENGINEERING
bhMAND
21010-5423
:i
/ /\ \
\
,JPOIs*N\
\ GAS/
\ /
‘“’
DATE:
3 Dee 1990
U.S. ARMY CHEMICAL
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT
AND ENGINEERING CENTER
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA
sHEET
LETHAL NERVE AGENT (W)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Emergency Telephone
#s:
CRDEC Safety
Office
301-671-4411
0700-1700
EST After
normal duty
hours:
301-278-5201
Ask
for
CRDEC
Staff
/<
Duty Officer
SECTION I - GENERAL INFORMATION
-------------------------------i-----------------------------------------------MANUFACTURER'S ADDRESS:
CAS REGISTRY NUMBER:
U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT, MUNITIONS AND CHEMICAL COMMAND
CHEMICAL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
ATTN:
SMCCR-CMS-E
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, MD 21010-5423
50782-69-9,
51848"47-6,
53800-40-1,
70938-84-o
CHEMICAL NAME:
Phosphonothioic
acid,
methyl-,
S-(2-bis(l-methylethylamino)ethyl)
ester
O-ethyl
S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)
methylphosphonothioate
S-2-Diisopropylaminoethyl
O-ethyl
methylphosphonothioate
,-2(2-Diisopropylamino)ethyl)
O-ethyl
methylphosphonothiolate
O-ethyl
S-(2-diisoproplyaminoethy)
methylphosphonothioate
O-ethyl
S-(2-diisoproplyaminoethy)
methylthiolphosphonoate
O-ethyl
TRADE NAMEANDSYNONYMS:
vx
EA 1701
TX60
CHEMICAL FAMILY:
sulfinated
organophosphorus
compound
FORMULA/CHEMICAL STRUCTURE:
Cl1
H26 N 02
/CH3
P S
/
CH
\
CH3-P -S-CH2-CH2NI
0-C2H5
NFPA 704 SIGNAL:
Health
Flammability
Reactivity-
4
- 1
1
/\
/\.
/\I
A
(4
Y
Xl
V
>
/v
SECTION II - COMPOSITION
---------____--____--------------------------------------------------------
\CH3
2
... NAm
BY WEIGHT
CllH26N02PS
vx
LIMIT
. 00001 mg/m3
100%
________-_------------------------------------------------------------------
SECTION III
- PHYSICAL DATA
------------------------
-------------------------------BOILING
,’
\
b
POINT
.
(DEG
VAPOR PRESSURE (mm Hg):
0.0007
VAPOR DENSITY (AIR=l):
9.2
SOLUBILITY
I
DEG F
IN WATER:
C):
-----------------___
568 (298)
@ 25 Deg C
*/
moderate
APPEARANCE AND ODOR: Colorless
in appearance
to motor oil.
to
straw
colored
liquid
& odorless,
similar
--------------------________----------------------------------------~-----.----------
SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA
-I---------------------------------------------------------------~---------FLASHPOINT:
FLAMMABILITY
) .
i:
159 Deg C (McCutchan
LIMITS
(% by volume):
Not Available
LOWER EXPLOSIVE LIMIT:
Not Applicable
,PPER EXPLOSIVE LIMIT:
Not Applicable
Water mist,
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA:
methods that will
cause splashing
’ -\
- Young)
Avoid using
fog, foam, C02.
or spreading
of the VX.
extinguishing
extinguishing
SPECIAL FIRE FIGHTING PROCEDURES: All persons not engaged in
involving
VX
Fires
the fire
should be immediately
evacuated
from the area.
When
to
uncontrolled
areas.
should be contained
to prevent
contamination
firecontaining
agents,
responding
to a fire
alarm in buildings
or areas
fighting
personnel
should wear full
firefighter
protective
clothing
(without
TAP clothing)
during
chemical
agent firefighting
and fire
rescue operations.
full
facepiece,
Positive
pressure,
required.
Respiratory
protection
is
breathing
apparatus
(SCBA) will
be worn where
NIOSH-approved
self-contained
by the fire
chief
of
there is danger of oxygen deficiency
and when directed
series
The
M9
or
Ml7
operations
officer.
chemical
accident/incident
(CAI)
mask may be worn
in
lieu
of
SCBA when there
is
no danger of oxygen
In
cases where firefighters
are responding
to a chemical
accideficiency.
they
dent/incident
for rescue/reconnaissance
purposes
vice
firefighting,
will
wear appropriate
levels
of protective
clothing
(see Section
8).
Skin contact
with V-agents
must be avoided at all
fumes.
Do not
breathe
Although
the fire
may- destroy
most of the agent,
care must still
be
times.
further
not
contaminated
-liquids
do
the
agent
or
taken
to
assure
Contact
with VX or VX vapors can be
sewers.
areas
or
other
contaminated
fatal.
UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS:
None known.
-~~----~~~~~~~~--~~_________________----~~~~~-~~~~~------~~~-~~~-----~~--~~~-~~~~~~-~~~~--
------_______----___---------
SECTION V - HEALTH HAZARD DATA
_--______----____------------------~-----------
1 G-hour workday
of
a 40-hour
work week is an 8-hour
time weighted
average
(TWA) of 0.00001 mg/m3 (9X10-7 ppm).
This value is based on the TWA of VX
t as proposed
in the USAEHA Technical
Guide 169, t~Occupational
Health GuideEvaluation
ines for the
of
and Control
Exposure
to Nerve
Occupational
*(
I--_&gents GA, GB, GD, and VXY
To date,
however,
the
Occupational
Safety
and
Health
Administration
(OSHA)
has
not
promulgated
permissible
exposure
t
concentration
for VX.
VX is not listed
by the International
Agency for Research on,Cancer
w=C),
American Conference
of Governmental
Industrial
Hygienists
(ACGIH),,
Occupational
Safety
and Health Administration
(OSHA), or National
Toxicology
Program (NTP) as a carcinogen.
t
;
1
anticholinergic
agent
with
median
EFFECTS OF OVEREXPOSURE: VX is a lethal
= 0.135 mg/kg; ID50 (Skin) - 0.07 - 0.71
man being:
LD50 (Skin)
dose
in
Lct50
(inhalation)
= 30 mg min/m3;
LCt50 (inhalation)
- 24 mg min/m3.
w/W
t
1’
-1
a.
following
(1) Local
!
sensation
t
i
tightness
after
One to several
minutes
acute symptoms appear:
effects
(lasting
l-15
Miosis
On Eyes:
on eyes.
(a)
days,
airborne
increases
with
of pupils);
(constriction
Rhinorrhea
salivation,
(b) By Inhalation:
wheezing,
in chest,
to
overexposure
nasal
the
dose:):
redness.,
nose),
vomiting.
(runny
nausea,
VX,
pressure
congestion,
dose):
By Inhalation
(increases
with
Systemic
Effects
salivation
and
difficulty;
.xcessive
secretion
causing
coughing/breathing
\i..
involuntary
cramps;
stomach,
diarrhea:
sweating;
vomiting,
cramps;
CNS
muscle
_
twitching/muscle
generalized
urination/defecation:
depression
including
anxiety,
restlessness,
giddiness,
insomnia,
excessive
tremor,
With more severe exposure,
also headache,
dreaming
and nightmares.
impairment,
confusion,
memory
.., drowsiness,
difficulty,
concentration
unsteadiness
on standing
or walking.
-.
(2)
b.
appear:
-\ abdominal
(1)
Local
(a)
On Eyes:
:i
(c)
On Skin:
(2)
Systemic
liquid
VX,
the
following
acute
symptoms
Miosis,
redness,
Salivation,
involuntary
sweating,
Effects:
muscle
similar
pressure
sensation
anorexia,
defecation,
on eyes,.
nausea,
heartburn.
vomiting,
twitching.
to generalized
effects
from
exposure
thinking
forgetfulness,
to
vx causes
overexposure
.
Chronic
Although
ceraches/pains.
muscular
disturbances,
difficzlty,
vision
shown to
be teratogenic
in animals,
been
brganophosphate
pesticides
have
these effects
have not been documented
in carefully
controlled
toxicological
evaluations
-\
to
Effects
(b) By Ingestion:
cramps, diarrhea,
to airborne.VX.
,\
overexposure
After
**
for
See Addendum
EMERGENCY
ANn
VX.
A for
FTRST-ATD
detailed
information.
PROCEDURES:
**
t
I-.
I
.-
t
I
severe'signs
of agent exposure
appear (chest tighterls,
pupil
constriction
incoordination,
etc.),
immediately
administer,
in
rapid
succession,
kll
three Nerve Agent Antidote
Kit(s),
if directed
Mark I injectors
(or atropine
)y the local
physician).
Injections
using the Mark I kit
injectors
may be
repeated
at 5 to 20 minute
intervals
if signs and symptoms
are
progressing
until
three series
of injections
have been administered.
No more injections
will
be given unless directed
by medical
personnel.
In addition,
a record
will
be maintained
of all
injections
given.
If breathing
has stopped,
give
artificial
respiration.
should be used when
Mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation
approved
mask-bag or oxygen delivery
systems are not available.
Do not use
mouth-to-mouth
facial
contamination
exists.
resuscitation
when
If
breathing
is difficult,
administer
oxygen.
Seek medical
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
EYE CONTACT: IMMEDIATELY flush
eyes with water for lo-15 minutes,
then don
respiratory
protective
mask.
Although
miosis
(pinpointing
of the pupils)
may be an early
sign
of
agent
exposure,
an injection
will
not be administered when miosis
is the only sign present.
Instead,
the individual
will
be
taken IMMEDIATELY to the medical
treatment
facility
for observation.
I
I-
-\
protective
mask and remove contaminated
SKIN CONTACT:
Don respiratory
clothing.
Immediately
wash contaminated
skin with a solution
of
5% househould bleach,
rinse well with water to remove excess bleach followed
by copious soap and water wash.
Administer
nerve agent
antidote
kit,.
Mark
I,
only if local
sweating
and muscular
twitching
symptoms are observed.
Seek
medical
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
INGESTION:
gastrointestinal.
Seek medical
-_
Y.
\\.c **
,
Do
not
induce
vomiting.
IMMEDIATELY administer
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
See Addendum B for
detailed
First
Nerve
instructions.
**
SECTION VI - REACTIVITY
-----------------------------------------------------------------.-----------
STABILITY:
Relatively
stable
purity
decomposed at a rate of
symptoms
are
likely
to be
Agent Antidote
Kit,
Mark
I.
DATA
Unstabilized
at
room temperature.
5% a month at 71 Deg C.
VX of 95%
.1 HAZARDOUS DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS: During basic hydrolysis
of VX up to about
10% of
the agent is converted
to EA2192 (diisopropylaminoethyl
methylphosphonothioic
acid).
Based
on the
concentration
of EA2192 expected
to be
formed
during
hydrolysis
and its toxicity
(1.4 mg/kg dermal in r'abbit
at 24
a Class B poison
would result.
hours in a lo/90 wt% ethanol/water
solution),
-,
."
which
uses both HTH and NaOH, destroys
VX
The large scale decon procedure,
contains
Typically
the large scale product
by oxidation
and hydrolysis.
at 24 hours.
At pH 12, the EA2192 in the large scale
0.2 - 0.4 wt% EA2192
Thus the 90 day holding
period
at
product
has a half-life
of about 14 days.
pH 12 results
in about a 64-fold
reduction
of EA2192 (six half-lives).
This
holding
period
has been shown to be sufficient
to reduce the toxicity
of the
.
product
below that of a Class B poison.
2'\
Other
less toxic
products
Icid,
diisopropylaminoethyl
ethanol.
--+
The small scale decontamination
VX thus no EA2192 is formed.
are
ethyl
methylphosphonic
diethyl
mercaptan,
procedure
uses
acid,
methylphosphinic
and
methylphosphonate,
sufficient
HTH to
oxidize
all
t
1
.--N’-~------*
t
--------------
if
_--------------____---------------------------------------------
SECTION VII
- SPILL,
LEAK,
AND DISPOSAL
PROCEDURES
_--------------------------------------------
w------.-s-
--_____
,.l?EPS TO BE TAKEN IN CASE MATERIAL IS RELEASED OR SPILLED:
If leaks or spills
occur,
only personnel
in full
protective
clothing
(See
Section
8 ) will
remain in area.
In case of personnel
contamination
see
Section
V "Emergency
and First
Aid Instructions".
Spills
must be
contained
with vermiculite,
diatomaceous
earth,
clay or fine sand.
This
by covering
containment
is followed
by the following
treatment:
j /
RECOMMENDEDLABORATORY PROCEDURES (For Quantities
less than 50 grams):
If the active
chlorine
of the Calcium Hypochlorite
(HTH) is at least 55 percent,
then 80 grams of a 10 percent
slurry
is required
for each gram of
VX.
HTH
is
required
if
the
chlorine
activity
of
*the
HTH
is
Proportionally
more
The mixture
is
agitated
as the VX is added and the
lower than 55 percent.
If phasing of the VX/deagitation
is maintained
for a minimum of one hour.
an amount of denatured
eth(ano1 equal
con solution
continues
after
5 minutes,
agent/decon
shall
be added to assist
miscito a 10 Wt percent
of the total
NOTE: ETHANOL SHOULD BE MINIMIZED TO PREVENT THE-FORMATION OF A
bility.
of the one hour agitation
the decon mixHAZARDOUS WASTE. Upon completion
Conduct
general
area monture shall
be adjusted
to a pH between 10 and 11.
itoring
to confirm
that the atmospheric
concentrations
do not exceed the
airborne
exposure
limit
(see Sections
2 and 8).
RECOMMENDED FIELD
(NOTE: These
-afety
Office.)
(For
can only
PROCEDURES
procedures
Quantities
greater
than 50 grams):
be used with the approval
of the CRDEC
100 milliliters
of denatured
An alcoholic
HTH mixture
is prepared
by adding
This mixture
ethanol
to a 900 milliliter
slurry
of 10 percent
HTH in water.
HTH can react with the ethanol.
should be make just prior
to use since the
is used for each gram of VX. AgiFourteen
grams of alcoholic
HTH solution
Continue
the agitation
tate the decontamination
mixture
as the VX is added.
This reaction
is reasonable
exothermic:
and evolfor a minimum of one hour.
reaction
gases should: be routed
The evolved
off
gassing.
ves substantial
through
a d&contaminate
filled
scrubber
prior
to release
through
filtration
systems.
After
completion
of the one hour minimum agitation,
10 percent
Sodium Hydroxide
is added in a quantity
equal to that necessary
to assure that
Hold the
a pH of 12.5 is maintained
for a period
not less than 24 hours.
material
at a pH between 10 and 12 for a period
not less than 90 days to
ensure that a hazardous
intermediate
material
is not formed.
of the drum shall
be decontaminated
and
After
sealing
the head, the exterior
shall
be
All leaking
containers
then labeled
IAW EPA and DOT regulations.
conand exterior
overpacked
with vermiculite
placed
between the interior
Dispose
of
tainers.
Decontaminate
and label
IAW EPA and DOT regulations.
Conduct general
methods
provided
below.
the material
IAW waste disposal
area monitoring
to confirm
that the atmospheric
concentrations
do not exceed
the airborne
exposure
limit
(see Sections
2 and 8).
Hypochlorite
Calcium
If the alcoholic
the following
decontaminants
may be used
solution
Decontamination
f preference:
and
Sodium
Hypochlorite.
Slurry
(STB),
WASTE
containing
toxified
a.+inn
in
DISPOSAL
METHOD:
contaminated
or
procedures
VX (using
an
PDA
annynved
(HTH) mixture
is not available
then
instead
and are listed
in the order
No. 2 (DS2), Supertropical
Bleach
burying
of VX
burning
or
pit
with
VX in any quantity
is prohibitesd.
Open
incinerator
above)
can be thermally
i.n accordance
. destroyed
.
with
approprlate
or items
The deby
inciner.
provl-
NOTE::
Waste.
c
,-,
Some states
define
decontaminated
surety
material
as a RCRA Hazardous
-------------------------------------------
----------------
SECTION VIII
-----------------------------------
-----.---w
- SPECIAL PROTECTION INFORMATION
-------------___--------------.--
---____
----a----
RESPIRATORY PROTECTION:
ri
RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
I
mask shall
M9 t M17, or M40 series
available
for escape as necessary.
VX CONCENTRATION
Less than
0.00001
0.00001
mg/m3 to
mg/m3
0.02
mg/m3
Greater
unknown
I
M9 or M40 series
mask with Level A or
Level B protective
ensemble
(see AMCR
385-131 for determination
of appropriate
level) .
Demilitarization
or Toxicological
Self-Contained
approval
from
-\
than
0.02
mg/m3 or
be
Protective
Ensemble (DPE)
Agent Protective
Ensemble
(TAPES), used with prior
AK Field
Safety Activity.
DPE or TAPES used with prior
approval
.
from AMC Field
Safety
Activity.
NOTE: When DPE or TAPES is not available
the M9 or M40 series
mask with Level A
However,
protective
ensemble can be used.
use time shall
be restricted
to the
extent
operationally
feasible,
and may not
exceed one hour.
As an additional
precaution,
the cuffs of
the sleeves
and the legs of the Hi3 suit shal:
be taped to the gloves
and boots to reduce
aspiration.
'% Local
mg/m3.
exhaust:
Must
be filtered
or scrubbed
to
limit
exit
cont.
to
.00001
laboratory
hoods
shall
have
an average inward face
Special:
Chemical
velocity
of 100 linear
feet per minute
(lfpm)
+ 10 percent
with the velocity
at any point
not deviating
from the average face velocity
by more than
20
percent.
Laboratory
hoods
shall
be located
such
that cross-drafts
do
A visual
performance
velocity.
not exceed 20 percent
of the inward
face
smoke-producing
devices
shall
be performed
in assessing
the
test
utilizing
ability
of the hood to contain
agent VX.
.--
.
Hoods should
Emergency backup power necessary.
operations.
after
modification
or maintenance
formed 20 cm inside
hood face.
3ther:
Recirculation
connection
between
permitted.
PROTECTIVE GLOVES:
be tested
semi-annually
or
Operations
should be per-
areas
or exhaust
air from agent
agent areas and other areas through
Butyl
glove M3 and M4
Chemical
Protective
Norton,
Glove
is
prohibited.
ventilation
system
Set
No
is
.. .
PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT:
~~11
protective
clothing
will
consist
of
Mg
mask and hood, M3 butyl
rubber suit,
M2Al butyl
boots,
M3
or
~4 gloves,
nimpregnated
underwear;
or demilitarization
protective
ensemble (;DPE). For
Il-\ ,aboratory
operations,
wear lab coats,
gloves and mask readily
available.
OTHER
In addition,
daily
clean
smock,
required
when handling
contaminated
foot
lab
covers,
animals.
head
and
will
covers
be
-.' MONITORING: Available
monitoring
equipment
for &gent HD is the M8/M9 detector paper,
detector
ticket,
M256/M256Al kits,
bubbler,
Depot Area Air Monitoring
System (DAMMS), Automated
Continuous
Air Monitoring
System
(ACAMS),
Real-Time
Monitor
(RTM), Demilitarization
Chemical
Agent Concentrator
(DCAC),
M8/M43,
M8Al/M43Al,
CAM-Ml,
Hydrogen
Flame Photometric
Emission
Detector
Chemical
Agent Monitor
(MINICAM).
(HYFED), and the Miniature
I
'I
--_-____-------------------------------------------------------------------SECTION IX - SPECIAL PRECAUTIONS
PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN HANDLING AND STORING:
In handling,
the buddy system will
be incorporated.
No smoking,
eating,
and.
'I drinking
in areas containing
agent
is
permitted.
Containers
.should
be
I
periodically
inspected
for
leaks
(either
visually
or by a detector
kit).
over
Stringent
control
all
personnel
practices
must be exercised.
Decontamination
equipment
shall
be conveniently
located.
Exits.
must
be
I
designed
to
permit
rapid evacuation.
Chemical
showers,
eye-was'h stations
Wash hands
before
and personal
cleanliness
facilities
must be provided.
1
Teals
and
each
worker
will
shower
thoroughly
with
special
attention
given
to
I \ .air,
end
of soap before
leaving
at the
face, neck, and hands, using plenty
( of the workday.
1
OTHER PRECAUTIONS: Agent must be double contained
in liquid
and vapor tight
container
when
in storage
or
when
outside
of
ventilation
hood.
\
for
For
additional
information
see AMC-R 385-131,
"Safety
Regulations
Chemical Agents H, HD, HT, GB and WC" and WSAEHA Technical
Guide No. 169,
Occupational
Health
Guidelines
for the Evaluation
and Control
of Occupational Exposure
to Nerve Agents GA, GB, GD, and VX".
SECTION X - TRANSPORTATION DATA
PROPER SHIPPING
NAME:
DOT HAZARD CLASS:
DOT LABEL:
,.
l,
n
Poison
DOT MARKING:
DOT PLACARD:
Poisonous
Poison
liquid,
n.o.s.
A
gas
(O-ethyl
S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl)
Poisonous
liquid,
n.o.s.
methyl
phosphonothioate)
NA 1955
POISON GAS
EMERGENCY ACCIDENT PRECAUTIONS AND PROCEDURES:
VIII.
PRECAUTIONS TO BE
placarded,
regardless
i nfnrmat-i
hn
reaardino
TAKEN
of
IN
quantity.
shi.nment
TRANSPORTATION:
and
Driver
conditions
shall
Sections
See
in
Motor
be given
case
of
IV,
vehicles
full
and
emerqency.
VII
and
will
complete
be
AR50-6
C
'% Chile
department
r\
Chemical
the
Research
Development
and Engineering
Center,
of the Army beJ.ieves
that
the
contained
herein
data
are
the
factual
and
opinions
of qualified
experts
expressed
those
are
regarding
the results
of the tests
conducted,
the data are not to
be taken
as a warranty
or
representation
for which the Department
Of the Army or
Chemical
Center
assumes
Research
Development
and Engineering
legal
your
responsibility.
are
They
offered
consideration,
for
solely
investigation,
and verification.
Any use of these data and information
must
be determined
by
the
accordance
user
to
be
in
with applicable
and local
laws and regulations.
Federal,
State,
ADDENDUMA
1.
Acute
Physiological
Site
Effects:
of Action
,
Signs
and Sympotoms
Following
f..
Local
Exposure
Muscarine-likemarked, usually
maximal
Miosis,
sometimes unequal.
(pinpoint),
Pupils
Ciliary
body
Frontal
headache,
eye pain on
slight
dimness of vision,
focusing,
occasional
nausea and vomiting.
Conjunctivae
Hyperemia.
Nasal
Rhinorrhea,
mucous membranes
Bronchial
tree
Tightness
in chest,
sometimes with
prolonged
wheezing
expiration
sugges
tive
of broncho-constriction
or
increased
secretion,
cough.
Following
Bronchial
tree
Gastrointestinal
hyperemia.
Systemic
Absorption
Tightness
in chest,
with prolonged
expiration
suggestive
of
wheezing,
broncho-constriction
or increased
secretion,
dyspnea,
slight
pain in
increased
bronchial
secretio:
chest,
edema, cyanosis.
cough, pulmonary
Anorexia,
nausea, vomit:ing,
abdomin
ep'igastric
and substernal
cramps,
tiahtness
(cardiospasm)
with
"heart
Sweat glands
Increased
sweating.
Salivary
glands
Increased
salivation.
Lacrimal
glands
Increased
lacrimation.
Heart
Slight
Pupils
Slight
later
Ciliary
body
Frequent,
muscle
Sympathetic
,
2.
ganglia
Central
nervous
Chronic
Physiological
a.
unless
central
b.
"-\
of vision.
involuntary
micturition
Easy fatigue,
mild weakness,
muscul;
twitching,
fasciculations,
cramps,
generalized
weakness,
including
muscles of respiration,
with dyspnez
and cyanosis.
Pallor,
occasional
pressure.
system
Acute
elevation
Effects:
Exposure.
If recovery
from nerve agent poisoning
occurs,
it will
anoxia or convulsions
have gone unchecked
so long that
nervous-system
changes due to anoxemia have occurred.
Chronic
of bloc
Giddiness,
tension,
anxiety,
jitteriness,
restlessness,
emotional
lability,
excessive
dreaiming,
insomnia,
nightmares,
headaches,
tremor,
withdrawal
and depression,
bursts
of slow waves of elevated
voltage
in EEG, especially
on overventilation,
drowsiness,
difficult
concentration,
slowness
on recall,
confusion,
slurred
speech,
ataxia,
generalized
weakness,
coma, with
absence of reflexes,
Cheyne-Stokes
respirations,
convulsions,
depression of respiratory
and circulatorcenters,
with dyspnea,
cyanosis,
ani
fall
in blood pressure.
\..I
:I
occasionally
unequal,
(pinpoint).
miosis
Nicotine-likeStriated
-\
miosis,
tidximal
Blurring
Bladder
.\
bradycardia.
be complete
irreversible
Exposure.
The inhibition
of cholinesterase
enzymes throughout
the body by nerve
agents is more or less irreversible
so that their
effects
are prlolonged.
Until
the tissue
cholinesterase
enzymes are restored
to normal a'ctivity,
probably
by very slow regeneration
over a period
of weeks or 2 to 3 months i
damage is severe there
is a period
of increased
susceptibility
to the effect
During
this
period
the effects
of
of another
exposure
to any nerve agent.
7-eneatcJd
Qvnncllres
are
-cllrnlll
ative:
aft-.er
A sinale
exPosure,
dailv
exposure
t
lowed by increasingly
severe
sceptibility
persists
for one
to produce recurrence
c eguired
of
.I :ymptoms, depend on duration
' Increased
susceptibility
is not
initially
absorbed.
Estimates
have been made for the times as which 50% of exposed subjects
be affected
(EtSO's)
at median incapacitating
doses.
These are presented
below.
\
Et50
Degree of
Effectiveness
-.
’
(,.(
-\
--\
-\
.,
1ct50
Exposure
mg min/m3
min
\
effects.
After
symptoms subside,
increasedThe degree of exposure
to serveral
days.
and the severity
of these
of symptoms,
exposure
and time intervals
between exposure5
limited
to the particular
nerve agent
Moderate
Incap.
27
27
40
0.5
2.0
10.0
1.0
3.8
7.8
Severe
Incap.
37
37
56
0.5
2.0
10.0
2.0
very
47
47
72
0.5
2.0
10.0
6.5
9.0
13.5
Death
70
70
103
0.5
2.0
10.0
Severe
Incap.
Time
min
1.5
3.0
6.0
1.5
9.5
WOU~C
Exposure to high concentrations
of nerve agent may bring
on incoordination,
mental confusion
and collapse
so rapidly
that the casualty
cannot perform
the man nearest
to him will
give first
aid.
self&aid.
If this happens,
Onset
Types of
Effects
Time of Symptons.
Route of
- Absorption
Whlen Effects
Appear After
Exposure
Description
of Effects
nasal hyperemia
in chest,
wheezing
Vapor
Local
Lungs
Rhinorrhea,
tightness
Vapor
Local
Eyes
Conjectival
Miosis,
frontal
eye pain,
hyperemia
headache.
.
One to several
minutes
One to several
minutes
-\
.
’
effects.
c
Liquid
Local
Eyes
Same as vapor
Liquid
Local
Ingestion
Gastrointestinal.
2a above).
Liquid
Local
Skin
Local sweating
twitching.
Liquid
Systemic
Lungs
See 2a above.
Liquid
Systemic
Eyes
Same as for
Liquid
Systemic
Skin
Generalized
Liquid
Systemic
Ingestion
Gastrointestinal
above).
Onset
Time of
Types of
Effects
Symptoms.
after
moderate
or marked expo:
oure; about 30
min after
mild
exposure.
(See 2a above)
Instantly
effects.
About
after
,(See
and muscular
minutes
vapor
Several
minutes
sweating.
15 minutes
hours
to
15 minutes
2 hours
to
(See 2a
Duration
Mild
Exposure
of Effects
After
Severe
Exposure
.
Vapor
Local
Lungs
A few hours
1 to
2 days
Vapor
Local
Eyes
Miosis
24 hours
3 to
2 to
14 days
5 days
Vapor
Systemic
Lungs
Liquid
Local
8 days
Several
hours
Eyes
Similar
effects
to
of vapor
Liquid
Local
Ingestion
3 days
5 days
Liquid
Local
Skin
3 days
5 days
Liquid
;ystemic
Lungs
1 to
5 days
Liquid
Systemic
Eyes
2 to
4 days
Liquid
Skin
2 to
5 days
C*rctr\mic
or eyes
3 min to 2 hour
Several
(cont'd)
Route of
Absorption
30 min.
ingestion,
2
.Syst.etnic
ADDENDUM B
First
Aid
Procedures.
a.
Exposed
personnel
be removed
will
immediately
to an uncontaminatec
atmosphere.
Personnel
handling
casualty
cases will
give
consideration
tc
their
own safety
and will
take
precautions
and employ the prerequiste
protective
equipment
to avoid becoming exposed themselves.
CAUTION: Due to
the
rapid
important
that decontamination
blot off excessive
agent prior
,
,-1
effects
of
nerve
of personnel
not
to decontamination.
agents,
be delayed
it
is
extremely
by attempting
to
b. The casualty
will
then be decontaminated
by immediately
removing
any
contaminated
clothing
the
contaminated
areas
with copious
and washing
amounts of soap and water,
5% sodium
hypochlorite
solution,
or
liquid
household
bleach
(nominal
5% solution
sodium hypochlorite)
and flushing
with
clean
water.
Mask will
be left
on the victim
until
decontamintion
has been
completed
unless
it
has
been
determined
that
areas
of
the
face
were
contaminated
and the
mask must be removed to facilitate
decontamination.
After
decontamination,
the contaminated
clothing
will
be removed
and skin
Y,.- contamination
washed
away.
If possible,
decontamination
will
b'e completed
before the casualty
is taken to the aid station
or medical
facility.
I((.
\
CAUTION: Care must
be taken when decontaminating
facial
areas to
avoid
getting
the hypochlorite
into the eyes or mouth.
Only clean water shall
be
used when flushing
the eyes or mouth.
Skin
surfaces
decontaminated
with
bleach
should
be thoroughly
flushed
with water to prevent
skin irritation
from
the
bleach.
If there is no apparent
breathing,
artifical
resuscitation
will
be
started
The
immediately
(mouth-to-mouth,
or with mechanical
resuscitator).
situation
will
dictate
method of choice,
e.g.,
contaminated
Do not
face.
use mouth-to-mouth
resuscitation
When
when facial
contamination
exists.
appropriate,
and when trained
personnel
are
available,
cardio-pulmonary
resuscitation
(CPR) may be necessary.
C.
-\
d.
An
definite
with the
individual
who has received
a known agent
signs or symptoms of agent exposure
shall
Nerve Agent Antidote
Kit,
MARK I.
(1)
Some of the early
symptoms
of
a vapor
the chest with
(runny nose) and/or
tightness
in
chial
constriction).
(2)
muscular
romiting.
agent
(3)
Some of
twitching
Although
exposure,
only
sign
present.
the medical
facility
symptomsi
the early
or sweating
at the
of
area
exposure
or who exhibits
be injected
immediately
exposure
shortness-of
percutaneous
of exposure
may be rhinorrhea
breath
(bron-
exposure
followed
may be local
by nausea
or
myosis
(pin-pointing
of the pupils)
may be an early
sign
of
not be administered
when myosis
is the
a MARK I Kit shall
the individual
shall
be
taken
immediately
tc
Instead,
for observation.
/\
1’ ’ \\
DATE:
U.S. ARMY CHEMICAL
RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT
AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
/'POISON
\
\ GAS /
\
\
/'
\I
3 Dee 1990
Emergency
Telephone
#s:
CRDEC Safety
Office
301-671-4411
0700-1700
EST After
normal
duty
hours:
301-278-5201
Ask for CRDEC Staff
Duty Officer
MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET
HT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------SECTION I - GENERAL INFORMATION
I
I
MANUFACTURER'S
NAME:
MANUFACTURER'S
ADDRESS:
CAS REGISTRY
CHEMICAL
NUMBER:
Department
of
the
Army
U.S. ARMY ARMAMENTI MUNITIONS AND CHEMICAL COMMAND
CHEMICAL RESEARCH, DEVRLOPMENT AND ENGINEERING
CENTER
ATTN:
SMCCR-CMS-E
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND; MD 21010-5423
Not
Available
NAME:
HD : Bis-(2-chloroethyl)
T : Bis-[2-(2-chloroethylthio)-ethyl]
Alternate
‘\
chemical
See
sulfide
ether
names:
components
(HD,
T)
TRADE NAME AND SYNONYMS:
HT
Sulfur
CHEMICAL
,
FAMILY:
Chlorinated
- Mustard
sulfur
compound
FORMULA/CHEMICAL
STRUCTURE:
Mixture
Sulfur
Mustard,
(T) by weight
HD:
c4 H8 Cl2 s
T:
C8 H16 Cl2 0 S2
NFPA 704
SIGNAL:
----------------------------
Health
Flammability
Reactivity,.
4
(Vesicant)
of
60% Sulfur
- 1
1
------------------------------------~-----------
SECTION
II
- COMPOSITION
Mustard
(HD)
and
40%
FORMULA
INGREDIENTS
NAME
PERCENTAGE
BY WEIGHT
*
HT
* See Section
AIRBORNE
EXPOSURE LIMIT
100
(AEL)
mg/m3
0.003
I
__________________-----------------------------------------------.-----------
SECTION III
- PHYSICALDATA
_______________--_-----------------------------------------------.----------BOILING
No constant
POINT:
VAPOR PRESSURE
VAPOR DENSITY
SOLUBILITY
(torr):
0.104
(AIR=l):
6.92
IN WATER:
SPECIFIC
GRAVITY
FREEZING
(MELTING)
AUTOIGNITION
VISCOSITY
boiling
0.0
POINT:
EVAPORATION
(mg/m3):
RATE:
6.05
831
Data
at
not
DEG C
to
20 DEG. C
1.3
DEG C
DEG F (DEG C):
(CENTISTOKES):
228
insoluble.
1.265
(H20=1):
Above
@ 25 DEG C
Practically
TEMPERATURE
VOLATILITY
point.
Data
not
available
@ 20 DEG C
@ 25 DEG C
available
.
APPEARANCE & ODOR:
Odor:
Garlic-like
Appearance:
Highly
viscous
clear
to
pale
yellow
liquid
___--__---__--__------------------------------------------------------------
SECTION IV - FIRE
---------------------------------------------------------------------------FLASHPOINT:
(METHOD USED):
FLAMMABILITY
LIMITS
EXTINGUISHING
methods
that
will
(% by
MEDIA:
splash
approximately
volume):
Data
Water,
fog,
or spread
foam,
mustard.
UNUSUAL FIRE & EXPLOSION HAZARDS:
oxides
in a fire.
Unburned
agent
and vesicant
effects.
May
vapors
AND EXPLOSION
100
not
C02.
DATA
DEG C (method
unknown)
.
available
Avoid
produce
hydrogen
may be present
use
of
.extinguishinc_
chloride
and can
and
cause
sulfur
toxic
-SPECIAL FIRE FIGHTING
PROCEDURES:
All
persons
not engaged
in
extinguishins
the fire
should
be immediately
evacuated
from the area.
Fires
involving
H?
should
be contained
to prevent
contamination
to
uncontrolled
areas.
Wher
responding
to a fire
alarm
in buildings
or
areas
firecontaining.agents,
fighting
personnel
should
wear full
firefighter
protective
clothing
(without
during
chemical
agent
firefighting
and fire
rescue
operations
TAP clothing)
required.
Positive
pressure,
Respiratory
protection
is
full
facepiece
breathing
NIOSH-approved
self-contained
apparatus
(SCBA) will
ble worn whert
there
is danger
of oxygen
deficiency
and
when directed
by the fire
chief
o.
deficiency.
nt/incident
c ..~ll
wear
cases
where
firefighters
for
rescue/reconnaissance
appropriate
levels
of protective
In
are responding
pruposes
vice
clothing
(see
no danger
on oxygen
to a chemical
accifirefighting,
they
Section
8).
____________________------------------------------------------------SECTION V - HEALTH HAZARD DATA
________________________________________------------------------------------
--w-w--
;-"AIRBORNE
EXPOSURE
LIMIT
(AEL):
The AEL for HT‘is
0.003
mg/m3 as
proposed
in the USAEHA Technical
Guide
No. 173,
"Occupational
Health
Guideflines
for
the Evaluation
and Control
of Occupational
Exposure
to Mustard
Agents
H,
HD,
I and
HT".
No individual
should
be intentionally
exposed
to any direct
skin
or eye contact.
,-\HD,
a component
of HT, is
tional
Agency
for Research
recognized
on Cancer
as a
(IARC).
human
carcinogen
by the
Intema-
EFFECTS
OF OVEREXPOSURE:
HT is a vesicant
-(causing
blisters).
Since
HT
contain6
HD,
HT is an alkylating
agent
producing
cytotoxic
actiain
on
the
'. hematopoietic
(blood-forming)
tissues
which
are especially
sensitive.
The
of detoxification
of HT in the body i.6 very
slow and repeated
i-' rate
exposure
I produce
a cumulative
effect.
Median
lethal
and incapacitating
dose6 of HT in
man have
not been established.
However,
the inhalation
LCt50s
i.n
certain
animal
species
have been established
as follows:
Dog:
'-‘c'uinea
,bbit:
!(
Maximum
100 200 mg-min/m3
3000 - 6000 mg-min/m3
3000 - 6000 mg-min/m3
Mouse:
820
Pig:
safe
Ct
for
" ACUTE PHYSIOLOGICAL
.
mg-min/m3
HD for
skin
and
ACTION
OF HT IS
eyes
are
CLASSIFIED
5 and
2 mg-min/m3,
respectively.
AS LOCAL AND SYSTEMIC.
LOCALLY,
HT affects
both
the eyes and the skin.
SKIN damage
occ:urs
after
percutaneous
resorption.
Being
lipid
soluble,
HT can be resorbed
into
all
organs.
Skin
penetration
is
rapid
without
skin
irritation.
Swelling
(blisters)
and reddening
(erythema)
of the skin
occurs
after
a latency
period
‘I\ of 4-24 hours
following
the exposure,
depending
on the degree
of exposure
and
individual
sensitivity.
The skin
healing
process
is very
slow.
Tender
skin,
mucous
membranes,
and perspiration
covered
skin
are more sensitive
to
the
effects
HT's effect
on the skin,
however,
is less than on the
eyes.
of HT.
Local
action
on
the
eyes produces
severe
necrotic
damage
and
loss
of
eyesight.
of eyes to HT vapor
or
EXpOSUre
aerosol
produces'
lacrimation,
? photophobia,
and inflammation
of the conjunctiva
and cornea.
SYSTEMIC
ACTIONS occur
primarily
through
inhalation
and ingestion.
The
HT
vapor
or
aerosol
is less
toxic
to the skin
or eyes than
the
liquid
form.
When inhaled,
the upper
respiratory
tract
(nose,
throat,
trachea)
is inflamed
after
a few
hours
latency
period,
accompanied
by
sneezing,
coughing
and
/-- bronchitis,
appetite,
diarrhea,
fever,
and
apathy.
loss
of
Exposure
t0
nearly
lethal
doses
of HT can produce
injury
to bone marrow,
lymph nodes,
and
>leen
as
indicated
by a drop
in WBC count
and, therefore,
results
in
an
ix ,'
,ncreased
susceptability
to local
and systemic
infections.
Ingestion
of
HT
will
produce
severe
stomach
pains,
vomiting,
and bloody
stools
after
a 15-20
latency
period.
i-x minute
CHRONIC
EXPOSURE
to
HT can
cause
sensitization,
chronic
lung
impairment,
1 r\
’
-
(cough;
respiratory
I
shortness
tract,
;.(,'YERGENCY
of
and
AND FIRST
breath,
skin,
AID
chest
pain)
and leukemia.
and
It
cancer
of the
may also
cause
mouth,
birth
throat,
defects.
PROCEDURES:
INHALATION:
Remove
from the source
IMMEDIATELY.
If
stopped,
give
artifical
respiration.
If breathing
is difficult,
Seek medical
attention
IMMEDIATELY.
oxygen.
Speed in decontaminating
EYE CONTACT:
Remove person
from the liquid
source,
flush
by tilting
the head to the side,
pulling
the
Do
and pouring
water
slowly
into
the eyes.
if necessary,
protect
eyes by means of dark
victim
to the medical
facility
IMMEDIATELY.
breathing
ha5
administer
the eyes is absolutely
the eyes immediately
eyelids
apart
with
not cover
eyes with
or opaque
goggles.
essential.
$with
water
the
fingers
bandages
but,
Transfer
the
Don respiratory
protection
mask and gloves;
remove
SKIN CONTACT:
Flush
skin
and clothes
with
5 percent
from
agent
source
immediately.
hypochlorite
solution
or liquid
household
bleach,
then
wash contaminated
and
water.
If
shower
facilities
area
with
soap
are
available,
thoroughly
and transfer
to medical
facility
IMMEDIATELY.
medical
INGESTION:
attention
Do not induce
IMMEDIATELY.
vomiting.
Give
victim
'SECTION VI - REACTIVITY
--------------------___c__I_____________--------------------------,----------
milk
to
drink.
victim
sodium
skin
wash
Seek
DATA
, Y
Stable
at
'XBILITY:
.AG
C to 185 DEG C.
and has been known to
it
INCOMPATIBILITY:
Will
corrode
'* C.
I-?
ambient
HT is
remain
Condition6
steel
at
temperatures.
DeCOmpOSitiOn
a persistent
agent
depending
active
for up 50 three
year6
to
a rate
HAZARDOUS DECOMPOSITION:
bis-(2-(2-hydroxyethylthio)
HT will
ethyl
HAZARDOUS POLYMERIZATION:
Will
avoid.
Rapidly
of .OOOl in.
of
hydrolyze
ether.
not
to
temperature
is 165
on pH and moisture,
in soil.
corrosive
steel
per
form
HCl,
to'.brass
@ 65 DEG
month @ 65 DEG C.
thiodiglycol,
and
occur.
--------_-----------_________c__________--------------------------.----------
SECTION
VII
- SPILL,
LEAK,
AND DISPOSAL
PROCEDURES
STEPS TO BE TAKEN IN CASE MATERIAL
IS
RELEASED
OR SPILLED:
'Only personnel
1 in
full
protective
clothing
will
be allowed
in an area
where HT $.s spilled
(See section
8).
In case of personnel
contamination
see section
V "Emergency
and FirSt
Aid Instructions."
RECOMMENDED FIELD PROCEDURES:
Spills
of
HT must
be
contained
by
using
vermiculite,
diatoinaceous
earth,
clay- or fine
sand
and
neutralized
as pos'y sible
using
copious
amounts
of
5.25
percent
Sodium
Hypochloritc
solution.
and place
in approved
DOT containers.
Scoop up all
material
Cover the con:,?nts
of
the
drum with
decontaminating
solution
as above.
The exterior
of
.le drum shall
be decontaminated
and then labeled
IAW EPA and-DOT
regulations
be
overpacked
with
vermiculite
placed
between
All
leaking
containers
shall
the interior
and exterior
containers.
Decontaminate
and label
IAW EPA and
Dispose
of the material
used to decontaminate
I' DOT regulations.
exterior
oi
local
regulations.
drum
IAW Federal,
and
Conduct
general
state
are2
I '7
.
-
.
monitoring
with
an approved
mospheric
concentrations
do
tions
2 and 8).
i
,
I
t,(I
t
monitor
(See Section
not exceed
the airborne
8)
to confirm
that
the atexposure
limit
(see Sec-
.f 5.25 percent
Sodium
Hypochlorite
solution
is not available
then
the
following
decontaminants
instead
and
are
listed
in
the order
of
may
be
used
preference:
Calcium
No . 2 (DS2)
Hypochlorite,
Decontamination
Solution
and
Super
Tropical
Bleach
Slurry
(STB).
WARNING:
undiluted
Calcium
Pure,
liquid
blister
agent.
Hypochlorite
(HTH) will
burn
on contact
with
~
s-\
RECOMMENDED LABORATORY PROCEDURES: A minimum of 65 crams of decon
solution
is
one
hour.
Agitation
allowed
to agitate
for
a minimum
of
is not necessary
following
the first
hour
if a single
phase is obtained.
At
the
end of
24
the
resulting
solution
shall
be adjusted
to a pH between
hours,
10 and 11.
use
of
active
chlorine
by
acidic
potassium
iodide
Test for presence
of
iodine
color.
Place
3
ml
of
the
decontaminate
in a
solution
to
give
free
I’ .-, test
Add several
crystals
of Potassium
Iodine
and swirl
tube.
to dissolve.
Add
3 ml
of
50 wt
percent
Sulfuric
Acid:water
and
swirl.
IMMEDIATE
the
presence
of active
chlorine.
Iodine
color
indicates
If negative,
add
solution
to the decontamination
additional
5.25 percent
Sodium
Hypochlorite
then
test
again
chlorine..
two
hours,
for active
solution,
wait
Continue
procedure
until
positive
chlorine
is
given
by
solution.
_-\
I
t
A 10 w-t percent
dium Hypochlorite.
test
as described
HTH
(calcium
hypochlorite)
65 grams
of
Use
for
Sodium
Hypochlorite.
dedon
mixture
per
may be substituted
for
gram of HT and continue
Sothe
and place
in approved
DOT containers.
Cover the
conmaterial
,-~..Scoop up all
the
drum
with
decontaminating
solution
as above.
The exterior
of
ents of
r !. ;he drum
shall
be
decontaminated
and then labeled
IAW EPA and DOT regulations.
Al.1
leaking
containers
shall
be
overpacked
with
vermiculite
placed
between
the
interior
and exterior
containers.
Decontaminate
and label
IAF
EPA and DOT regulations.
Dispose
of the material
IAW waste
disposal
methods
provided
below.
Dispose
of the material
used to decontaminate
exterior
of
" drum IAW Federal,
state
and local
regulations.
Conduct
general
area monitoring with
an approved
monitor
to
confirm
that
the atmospheric
concentrations
do not exceed
the airborne
exposure
limits
(see Section
8).
NOTE:
Surfaces
contaminated
with
HT and then
HT vapor
to produce
a physiological
,-_j sufficient
rinse-decontaminated
response.
may evolve
All
neutralized
material
should
be collected,
conWASTE DISPOSAL METHOD:
tained
and thermally
decomposed
in an EPA permitted
incinerator
for decontamwhich
will
filter
or scrub
toxic
inated
HT (see note),
by-products
from effluent
air before
discharge
to the atmosphere.
Any contaminated
protective
should
be decontaminated
using
HTH or bleach
and analyzed
to assure
,Y clothing
(3X) level.
it is free
of detectable
contamination
The clothing
<should ther
be sealed
in plastic
bags inside
properly
labeled
drums
and held
for shipDecontamination
of waste
or excess
material
ment back to the DA issue
point.
shall
be accomplished
in accordance
with
the following
procedure
outlined
above with
the following
exception:
,I.
--HT on laboratory
glassware
may be oxidized
by its
vigorous
reactior
,G.th concentrated
nitric
acid.
\
containing
or contaminated
with
Hl
Open pit
burning
or burying
of HT or items
in any quantity
is prohibited.
Note:
Some states
consider
certain
decontaminated
surety
agents
as RCRA haz-
1 ./ ,
.
ardous
taken.
.H
waste.
Local
regulations
--------------------_L___
must
--------------
SECTION
be considered
---------m--_-e___
VIII
- SPECIAL
, _.. ___________________________________L____-------------------------~----------
RESPIRATORY
Concentration
---------------------
-/
I.
, .\
k
disposal
action
-------em-.-__
PROTECTION
is
--F-M--
INFORMATION
PROTECTION:
(mg/m3)
,,-L
Less than or equal
,
to 0.003
as an
I
8-hr
TWA
,
before
Respiratory
Protection/Ensemble
___--_-__-------------------------------.---------~\
Required;
Protective
mask not required
provided
that:
Continuous
real-time
monitoring
(with
(a>
alarm
capability)
is conducted
in the
work area at the 0.003
mg/m3 level
of
detection.
M9, Ml7 or M40 mask is available
and
PI
donned
if concentrations
exceed
0.003
mg/m3.
Exposure
has been limited
to the extent
(c)
practicable
by engineering
controls
(remote
operations,
ventilation,
and
process
isolation)
or work practicles.
If these
following
conditions
applies:
are
not
met
then
the
Full
facepie?e,
chemical
canister,
airpurifying
respirators.
(The X9, M17, or
M40 series
or other
certified
equivalent
masks acceptable
for this
purpose
in conjunction
with
the M3 toxicological
agent
protective
(TAP) suit
for dermal
protection.)
“- Greater
than
0.003
as an
8-hr
TWA
The Demilitarization
Protective
Ensemble
30
mil,
may
be
used
with
prior
WE),
approval
from the AMC Field
Safety
Activity
Use time
for the 30 mil
DPE must restricted
to two hours
or less.
When 30 mil DPE is not available
the
NOTE:
M9 or M40 series
mask with
Level
A protective
ensemble
including
impregnated
innerwear
can
be used.
However,
use time
shall
be restricted
to the extent
operationally
feasible,.
and may
not exceed
one hour.
As an additional
precaution,
the cuffs
of
sleeves
and the legs
of the M3 suit
shall
taped
to the gloves
and boots
to reduce
aspiration.
.:
"
the
be
VENTILATION:
tipecial.
Chemical
laboratory
hoods
shall
have
an
inward
face
average
velocity
of
100 linear
feet
per minute
(lfpm)
plus
or minus
10% with
the
at any point.not
deviating
from the average
face velocity
velocity
by
more
Laboratory
hoods
shall
be located
such that
cross
drafts
than
20%.
do
not
I ,.
exceed
20% of
f
producing
smoke
f - hood to contain
I
, I
f
-
A visual
inward
face
velocity.
devices
shall
be performed
in
agent
HT.
EYE
hazard
I*
1
f
,-,
)1
Utilizing
of
the
Recirculation
Jther.
of exhaust
air
from agent
areas
is
Prohibited.
NO
-.connection
between
agent
area
and other
areas-through
the ventilation
sys tern
Emergency
backup
power is necessary.
is
permitted.
Hoods should
be
tested
or after
modification
or maintenance
operations.
semi-annually
Operations
should
be performed
20 cm inside
hoods.
' PROTECTIVE
GLOVES:
(M3, M4, gloveset).
..-*
test
ability
performance
assessing
the
PROTECTION:
use goggles
MANDATORY.
As a minimum,
and face-shield.
Butyl
Toxicological
chemical
goggles
Agent
will
Protective
be worn.
gloves
For
splash
EQUIPMENT:
Full
protective
clothing
will
consist
of
PROTECTIVE
OTHER
the
M3 butyl
rubber
suit
with
hood,
M2Al boots,
M3 gloves,
impregnated
underwear,
or the Demilitarization
Protective
M9 series
mask and coveralls
(if
desired),
For general
lab work,
gloves
and lab coat
shall
:be worn with
Ensemble
(DPE).
M9 or Ml7 mask readily
available.
In
addition,
foot
covers,
when handling
head covers
and
contaminated
are required.
Available
monitoring
equipment
MONITORING:
tor paper,
blue
band tube,
M256/M256Al
kits,
Automated
Continuous
toring
System
(DAMMS),
CAM-Ml,
Hydrogen
Flame Photometric
Emission
'.ure Chemical
Agent
Monitor
(MINICAM).
lab
animals,
a daily
c.lean
smock,
for
agent
HT is the MB/M9 detecbubbler,
Depot Area Air MoniAir Monitoring
System
(ACAMS),
Detector
(HYFED),
and the Minia-
SECTION IX - SPECIAL
--------------------___________c________-------------------------.-----------
PRECAUTIONS
2.
PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN IN HANDLING AND STORING:
system
the
"buddy"
(two-man)
will
be used.
Containers
During
handling,
inspected
for
leaks,
either
using
a
should
be periodically
visually
or
detector
kit,
and prior
to transferring
the containers
from storage
to
work
areas.
Stringent
control
over
all
personnel
handling
HT must
be exercised.
,--, Chemical
showers,
eyewash
stations,
and personal
cleanliness
facilities
must
Wash
hands
be
provided.
before
meals
and
each
worker
will
shower
thoroughly
with
special
attention
given
to hair,
face,
neck,
and Ihands,
using
plenty
of soap before
leaving
at the end of the workday.
No smoking,
eating,
or
drinking
is permitted
at the work site.
Decontamination
equipment
shall
Exits
must be designed
to permit
rapid
evacuation.
be conveniently
located.
,- HT should
made
of
glass
for Research
Development
be stored
in containers
steel
containers
for large
Test
and Evaluation
(RDTE) quantities
or one-ton
liquid-tight
containers
when
quantities.
Agent
shall
be double-contained
in
in storage.
,".
-.~
See
AMC-R
OTHER PRECAUTIONS:
GB and
Agents
H, HD, and HT,
Health
No. 173,
"Occupational
Occupational
Exposure
to Mustard
ration.
---------_-__--___----------------------------------------------------------
"Safety
Regulations
for
Chemical
385-131,
VX," ~ 9 Ott 1987 and USAEHA Technical
Guide
Guidelines
for the Evaluation
and Control
of
Agents
H, HD, and HT," for additional
infor-
SECTION X - TRANSPORTATIONDATA
------_-_____-____----------------------------------------------------------
PROPER SHIPPING
NAME:
Poisonous
liquid,
,
3T HAZARD CLASSIFICATION:
Poison
A
I
)(r..
DOT LABEL:
Poison
Gas
DOT MARKING:
I
Poisonous
liquid,
n.o.s.
[2-(2-chloroethylthis)-ethyl]
n.o.s.
(Bis-(2-chloroethyl)
ether)
POISON GAS
I -'DOT PLACARD:
I
PRECAUTIONS
TO BE TAKEN
IN
TRANSPORTATION:
placarded
regardless
of quantity.
Driver
shall
information
regarding
shipment
and conditions
in
deals
specifically
with
the shipment
of chemical
--will
be escorted
in accordance
with
AR 740-32.
EMERGENCY ACCIDENT
VIII.
PRECAUTIONS
AND PROCEDURES:
sulfide,
NA 1955
and
Bis-
/
Motor
be given
case of
agents.
See
vehicles
will
be
full
and
complete
emergency.
AR 50-6
Shipment
of
agents
sections
IV,
VII,
and
While
Chemical
Research
the
Development
and
Engineering
Center,
Department
of the Army believes
that
contained
the
data
herein
are
the
opinions
factual
expressed
those
and
are
of qualified
experts
regarding
the results
of the tests
conducted,
the data
are not to
be
taken
representation
for which
the Department
of the Army
or
as
a warranty
or
Development
Chemical
Research
and
Engineering
Center
assumes
legal
are
responsibility.
They
offered
solely
for
consideration,
YOU
lvestigation,
and verification.
Any use of these
data and information
must
user
de determined
by
the
'to
be
in
accordance
with
applicable
and local
laws
and regulations.
Federal,
State,
ATTACHMENT
D
BAKER ENVIRONMENTAL,
SAFETY STANDARD OPERATING
) r.=
I
I
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
Confined Space Entry Program
2.0
Respiratory Protection Program
3.0
Care and Cleaning of Personal Protective Equipment
4.0
Sanitation/Site
5.0
Safe Boat Operations
6.0
Drum Sampling Procedures
Precautions
INC.
PROCEDURES
m
1.1
1.0 - CONFINED
SPACE
ENTRY
PROGRAM
INTRODUCTION
All confined space entries shall be performed in accordance with the following program based
on the “Criteria
Document for a Recommended Standard for Working in Confined Spaces,”
issued by NIOSH. A confined space refers to a space, which by design has limited open:ings for
entry and exit, unfavorable natural ventilation
contaminants,
which could contain or produce dangerous. air
and which is not intended for continuous employee occupancy.
Confined spaces include, but are not limited to, storage tanks, compartments of ships, process
vessels, pits, silos, degreasers, reaction vessels, boilers, ventilation
tunnels, underground
utility
vaults, and pipelines.
and exhaust ducts, sewers,
If there is a question as to whether or not
an area should be considered as a confined space, appropriate
safety personnel should be
consulted prior to entry.
1.2
HAZARD
Identify
and evaluate each hazard of the permit spaces. Hazardous substances should be
identified
through the use of Drager tubes and/or direct reading instruments
OVA meters.
Level/Oxygen
1.3
IDENTIFICATION
Oxygen and explosive levels will
be monitored
such as IINu or
using a Lower Explosive
(LEL/O$ meter.
HAZARD
CONTROL
Establish and implement the means, procedures, and practices by which the permit spaces can
be entered safely. Ventilation
and area cleaning should be considered in addition to personal
protective equipment.
1.4
PERMIT
SYSTEM
Complete the confined space entry permit, as attached. This form must be posted at the point
of entry and is valid for eight consecutive hours. After eight hours, or sooner if there is reason
to believe that conditions
may have changed, additional
readings and a new form must be
filled out. Forms must be returned to the on-site Health and Safety officer (HSO).
1.5
EMPLOYEE
INFORMATION
Signs shall be posted near permit spaces to notify employees as to what hazards may be
present and that only authorized entrants may enter.
1.6
EMPLOYEE
TRAINING
All employees entering
or directly involved in the confined space activities
40-hour health and safety training
site-specific training
must com,plete a
course in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.120. Additionally,
must be conducted regarding the hazards associated with each particular
entry.
1.7
EQUIPMENT
All equipment must be inspected and maintained
necessary for safe entry.
be thoroughly
to ensure the proper use of the equipment,
Respirators and emergency equipment, lanyard, harness, etc. must
inspected prior to the confined space entry.
kept in the project file.
Records of the inspection shall be
The equipment shall be adequately decontaminated
following
each
entry.
1.8
RESCUE
Ensure that procedures and equipment necessary to rescue entrants from permit spaces are
implemented and provided. The buddy system shall be used for all entries. The attached table
provides a list of requirements
with respect to each entry classification.
The following items
describe the three confined space entry classifications.
I
CLASS A
e
l
l
l
Immediate Danger to Life and Health (IDLH) condition exists
Should only be entered under emergency conditions (Level A or B)
Efforts should be made to reduce IDLH levels such as ventilation, cleaning, etc.
IDLH conditions may include:
) Oxygen levels below 19.5% or greater than 25%
) LEL levels 20% or greater
I
II
f
) I.‘,
CLASSB
I
l
l
t
l
t
III
I-\
t
CLASSC
t
l
l
l
I
I
I
,-_
,
,
-\
----__l_-“-,__..-...I-- _..l........--.----
Dangerous, but not IDLH conditions
Levels of protection can range from C to A
Range of conditions:
F Oxygen from to 19.5% to 21.5%
) LEL levels from 10% to 19%
Low Hazard Potential
Requires no modification of work procedures
Range of conditions:
b Oxygen levels from 19.5% to 22%
) LEL levels less than 10%
I ,,--,
CONF’INED
SPACE
ITEM
t
t
t
R
I
ENTRY
CLASS
A CLASS
B CLAE;SC
1.
Permit
X
X
X-
2.
Atmospheric Testing
X
X
X-
3.
Monitoring
X
0
0-
4.
Medical Surveillance
X
X
0-
5.
Training of Personnel
X
X
X-
6.
Labeling and Posting
X
X
X-
7.
Preparation
Isolate/Lockout/Tag
X
X
X
Purge and Ventilate
X
x-
o-
Cleaning Procedures
0
0
0-
Requirements for Special Equipment/Tools
X
X
0-
Procedures
Initial Plan
X
X
X
Standby
X
X
0-
Communication/Observation
X
X
X
Rescue
X
X
X
Work
X
X
X-
Safety Requirement and Clothing
Head Protection
0
0
0
Hearing Protection
0
0
0-
Hand Protection
X
0
0-
Foot Protection
X
0
0-
Body Protection
X
0
0-
Respiratory Protection
X
X
0-
Safety Belts
X
X
X-
Life Lines, Harness
X
X
X-
10. Rescue Equipment
X
X
X-
11.
X
X
X-
I
8.
I
--.
I
9.
RecordkeepingExposure
X - Indicates requirements
0 - Indicates determination
by the qualified individual
-
q
I
0
CONFINED SPACE ENTRY PERMIT
HAZARDOUS AREA ENTRY PERMIT
1
T--,LOCATION and DESCRIPTION
of Confined Space
I
Date
PURPOSE of Entry
Time
a.m.1p.m.
JOB/SITE
Expiration
a.m./p.m.
“’ PERSON in Charge of Work
Yes
SAFETY REQUIREMENTS
1
No
Tripod Emergency Escape Unit
Lifelines
Fire Extinguishers
Lighting
Protective Clothing
Respirator
Secure Area
-> Breathing Apparatus
Resuscitator - Inhalator
T
Yes
Escape Harness
Lock Out - De-Energize
-% Lines Broken - Capped or Blanked
Purge - Flush and Vent
Ventilation
TEST(S) TO BE TAKEN
Valid for One &Hour Entry
No
Yes
No
CONCENTRATION
INSTRUMENT USED
AND DATE CALIBRATED
% of Oxygen
% of L.E.L.*
Carbon Monoxide
Aromatic Hydrocarbon
,-~ Hydrocyanic Acid
Hydrogen Sulfide
Sulfur Dioxide
Ammonia
Other:
‘-I Other:
*L.E.L. = Lower Explosion Level
Atmosphere Tester:
Note:
Name (print)
Signature
Continuous/periodic tests shall be established before beginning job. Any questions pertaining to test requirements
contact the Site Health and Safety Officer.
Title
Safety Standby Person(s)
Supervisor authorizing
ALL COPIES OF PERMIT
all above conditions specified
WILL
REMAIN
AT JOB SITE UNTIL
JOB IS COMPLETED.
m
2.1
2.0 - RESPIRATORY
PROTECTION
PROGRAM
INTRODUCTION
In accordance with OSHA requirements
Environmental,
protection
Inc.% (Baker’s) program
for its employees.
protective equipment, training,
(29 CFB 1910.1341, this document represents Baker
governing
the selection
and use of respiratory
It is Baker’s policy to provide its employees with the proper
and medical surveillance necessary to protect individuals
any potential hazards which may be present during the tasks performed throughout
of each individual’s
employment.
This program specifically
from
the course
describes the prqcedures which
have been established and implemented for the use of respiratory
protection equipment.
The
effectiveness of this program shall be reevaluated on an annual basis and appropriate changes
shall be made if deemed necessary.
2.2
EMPLOYER
RESPONSIBILITY
Baker shall provide its employees the respiratory
protection equipment which is appropriate
and suitable for the purpose intended, when such equipment is necessary to protect the health
of the employee.
2.3
EMPLOYEE
RESPONSIBILITY
The employee shall use the respiratory
and training
protection provided in accordance with instructions
received, and shall report any malfunction
of the equipment to a responsible
The employee shall not wear contact lenses in atmospheres
person.
protection
is required.
Corrective
lens inserts will be provided,
where respiratory
at Baker’s expense, for
employees who require corrective lenses.
2.4
HAZARD
ASSESSMENT
The key elements of a respiratory
inhalation
variety
protection program must start with an assessment of the
and ingestion hazards present in the work area. Because Baker’s services involve a
of environmental
and industrial
hygiene studies, it is not practical to identify
all
possible hazards to which all employees could be exposed within
the scope of this document.
Therefore, it is essential that a task specific assessment be conducted prior to the initiation
of
any activities on a given project. This task specific assessment may be part of the site-specific
Health and Safety Plan.
After a task-specific
concentrations
assessment is completed and it is determined
that airborne
exposure
exceed or may exceed the recommended limits, engineering and administrative
controls should be implemented, whenever feasible.
If the exposure cannot be reduced, or it is not feasible to reduce the airborne exposure below
the recommended limits, respirators will be selected by the Site Health and Safety OfIicer on
the basis of:
Toxicity
Maximum Expected Concentration
Oxygen Levels
Warning properties of the substance(s) involved
Sorbent Limitations
Facepiece Fit
Mobility
Requirements
Type of Use (routine, escape, or emergency entry)
Possibility
of Ingestion of Toxic Materials
Respirator Attributes
2.5
TRAINING
Each respirator
explanations
wearer shall be given training,
by a qualified individual,
which will include
and discussions of:
0
Opportunity
to wear respiratory protection in an uncontaminated
environment.
l
Respirator Fit Testing (qualitative)
l
The respiratory hazard(s) and what may occur if the respirator is not used properly.
l
The reasons for selecting a particular
l
The function, capabilities,
l
The method of donning the respirator and checking its fit and operation.
l
The proper wearing of the respirator.
type of respirator.
and limitations
of the selected respirator.
I
i
I.
e
Respirator maintenance, repair, and cleaning.
l
Recognizing and handling emergency situations.
Respirator training
I
training
will be conducted on an annual basis, at a minimum.
Records of the
will be maintained for a minimum of 30 years following termination
~I
employment for each employee.
2.6
and fit-testing
of
TYPES OF RESPIRATORS
Baker provides
employees with the North
(Model 7600) air purifying
Brand half-face
(Model 7700) and full-face
respirators, positive pressure 30-minute Self-Contained
Breathing
Apparatus (SCBAs) (Model 800), positive pressure supplied airline respirators, with 5Iminute
I.;
t
escape air cylinders (Model 35500). Only respiratory
approval agencies (e.g., NIOSH, MSHA) according to Title 30, Part II of the Code of Federal
Regulations, will be distributed
to Baker employees. As an alternate air purifying
Baker will also keep, on-hand, the MSA ultra twin full-face respirator.
who regularly
I--
equipment certified by the apprlopriate
respirator,
All Baker employees
perform tasks requiring respiratory protection will be issued their own half-face
or full-face respirator, provided the employee can achieve a proper fit and is medically capable
of wearing the equipment.
Because 30-minute SCBAs, positive pressure supplied airline respirators, and 5minute
air cylinders
are used less frequently,
this equipment will be distributed
escape
on an as-needed
basis.
2.7
AIR QUALITY
Compressed and liquid air used for respiration
meet at least the requirements
Compressed Gas Association
shall be of high purity.
of the specification for Grade D breathing
Commodity Specification
G-7.1-1966.
Breathing
ai.r shall
air as described in
Breathing
air may be
supplied to respirators from cylinders or air compressors. Oxygen must never be used with air
line respirators.
Air cylinders
Specification
shall be tested and maintained
Regulations
of the Department
couplings shall be incompatible
as prescribed
of Transportation
in the Shipping
Container
(49 CFR Part 178). Air line
with outlets for other gas systems to prevent inadvertent
servicing of air line respirators with nonrespirable
gases or oxygen.
- -
Breathing
gas containers shall be marked in accordance with American National
Method of marking Portable Compressed Gas Containers to Identify the Material
Standard
Contained,
248.1-1954; Federal Specification BB-A-1034a, June 21,1968, Air, Compressed for Breathing
t
Purposes; or Interim
L _
Apparatus, Self-Contained.
2.8
CLEANING
Federal
Specification
GG-B-00675b,
April
27, 1965, Breathing
AND MAINTENANCE
Respirator maintenance will be performed by each trained individual
on a regular basis. The
maintenance shall be carried out on a schedule which ensures that each respirator wearer is
provided with a respirator that is clean and in good operating condition.
Respiratory
personnel.
equipment that is used on an as-needed basis shall be maintained
This equipment shall be cleaned/sanitized,
by qualified
then rinsed and air-dried,
after each
use. Inspections shall be conducted before and after each use.
I ‘-*
Respiratory
equipment that has been issued to an employee shall be cleaned/sanitized
rinsed and air-dried
then
by the wearer on a schedule (specified by OSHA in 29 CFR 1910.134)
which ensures that it will be maintained
in clean and good operating condition.
Inspiections
shall be conducted on a regular basis during usage and prior to each project requiring
the
potential usage of the equipment.
All respirators shall be stored in a plastic bag within a cool/dry location, in a manner that will
protect them against dust, sunlight,
heat, extreme cold, excessive moisture,
or damaging
chemicals. They shall be stored to prevent distortion of rubber or other elastomer parts,.
Parts replacement and repairs shall be performed only by appropriate personnel. Equ.ipment
requiring
repairs shall be reported to appropriate Baker personnel.
Examples of inspection
forms are included at the end of this text.
2.9
FIT-TESTING
Each respirator wearer shall be provided with a respirator that can properly form a secure face
to mask seal. Each wearer shall be fit-tested prior to issuance of the respirator using either an
irritant
smoke or odorous vapor, or other suitable test agent. Retesting shall be performed, at
- I
a minimum,
I
r*,
t
1
t
was previously
qualitatively
t
/ .,
on an annual basis or if a different model respirator, other than the model he/she
tit-tested for, is to be used by the wearer. Air purifying
respirators fit-tested
will be assigned a protection factor of 10 (APF = 10).
Facial hair, which interferes with the normally effective face to mask seal, is prohibited., Each
respirator wearer shall be required to check the seal of the respirator by negative and positive
pressure checks prior to entering a harmful atmosphere.
t
I ,..*
I
2.10
MEDICAL
SURVEILLANCE
Personnel who are or may be assigned to tasks requiring
a medical surveillance
use of respirators shall participate
program on an annual basis. The medical surveillance
include, but may not be limited to, a physical and a pulmonary
in
program shall
function test conducted by the
company’s physician and at the expense of the company. Test parameters included in Baker’s
medical surveillance
program is included as Attachment
A in each site-specific Health and
Safety Plan.
2.11
LIMITATIONS
Wearing any respirator, alone or in conjunction with other types of protective equipment, will
impose some physiological
stress on the wearer. Therefore, selection of respiratory
devices will be based on the breathing
amount of protection
Additional
requirements
resistance, weight of the respirator,
needed as well as the individual’s
concerns regarding the limitations
tolerance
protective
the type and
of the given device.
of different types of PPE and the monitoring
for heat stress/strain will be addressed in the Health and Safety Plan under the
Heat Stress section.
-
-
/
SCBA AND SAR (WITH S-MINUTE
Txw
(SCBA or SAR)
Cylinder
Condition
(Damaged or
Undamaged)
Cylinder
(Full or MT)
Facepiece
and Hoses
Connections
(Damaged or
Undamaged)
(Damaged or
Undamaged)
ESCAPE TANK) DAILY
Apparatus
Complete
Cleaned
and
Sanitized
(Yea/No)
(Yea/No)
INSPECTION
-
-c--w
-
:
FORM
Remarks
Inspected
BY
(Initials)
-
:
Date
Inspected
-;---I_
FULL-FACE
Tne
Clean and
Sanitized
+
=OK
X=NotOK
No Cracks,
Tears, or
Holes
---
--I
>
HEADSTRAPS OR
HEADBANDS
Proper Shape
and
Flexibility
Air Purifying
Element
Holders
Operate
Correctly
Proper
Storage
Free From
Heat, Dirt,
Sunlight, etc.
No Signs of
Wear or
Tears
Buckles
Function
Properly
RESPIRATOR INTERIOR
No Foreign
Material
Under
Valve Seat
No Cracks or
Tears in
Valves or
Valve Bodies
._
J
AND HALF-FACE RESPIRATOR
INSPECTION FORM
FACE PIECE
Inspection Date
--3
\
,
1
Valve Covers
and Bodies in
Good Conditiin
and Installed
Correctly
‘Z
3.0 - CARE AND CLEANING
OF PERSONAL
PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT
INTRODUCTION
3.1
The following procedures cover the care and cleaning of Levels D, C, and B personal protective
equipment.
inclusive.
Note: These are general procedures that apply to most situations and are not all
Procedures are subject to change at the direction
of the Site Health and. Safety
Officer (SHSO).
3.2
EQUIPMENT
3.2.1
Chemical
0
CARE
Resistant
Suit (Levels C and B)
Before donning, inspect suit for holes or tears; check to see that zippers are operable;
and look for signs of suit degradation.
0
When wearing, avoid contact with contaminated material where possible; be a.ware of
sharp objects that can tear suit; periodically
look over suit to check for major rips or
tears.
0
While decontaminating,
material
remove gross excess of material from suit; remove suit so that
does not contact inner suit; place clothing
in properly
labeled disposal
containers.
3.2.2
0
Inner/Outer
Gloves (Levels D through
Look for rips, tears, or degradation
B)
of material.
Replace as necessary or at the
direction of the SHSO.
3.2.3
0
Chemically
Resistant
Nondisposable
Boots (Levels C and B)
boots are to be examined
on a daily basis before and after use.
Disposable boots should be examined prior to donning and while in use. Dispose of
according to site procedures.
3.2.4
0
Safety Shoes/Boots
(Levels D through
B)
Examine daily for gauges, open seams, etc., anything that would lessen the integrity
of
the boot. Replace as shoe/boot becomes worn.
3.2.5
0
3.2.6
0
Hard Hats (Levels D through
Should be visually inspected before donning for fit, cracks, and overall condition.
Safety Glasses/Goggles
Should be visually
condition.
3.2.7
l
B)
(Levels D and Cl
inspected before donning for cracks, deteriorated parts, and overall
Replace as necessary.
Respirators
(Levels C and B)
Procedures for care of respiratory
protective equipment are covered in Attschmlent D -
Baker SOPS.
3.2.8
Hearing
Protection
(Levels D through
B)
0
Disposable - Replace daily, or as material becomes worn or dirty.
0
Reusable - Inspect before use, clean regularly, replace parts as necessary.
3.3
EQUIPMENT
CLEANING
General procedures for cleaning of equipment are listed below. Site-specific concerns will be
addressed by the SHSO prior to and during site activities.
is covered under Attachment
3.3.1
Gross Physical
,
equipment
D - Baker SOPS.
Removal
Large amounts of contaminated
disposable wipe.
Cleaning of respiratory
soil is scraped off with a tongue depressor, or wiped off using a
3.3.2
Physical/Chemical
Removal
The residual contamination
will be scrubbed with a soft-bristled,
long-handled
brush using a
nonphosphate detergent solution.
3.3.3
~I
Rinsing/Dilution
The detergent
solution
pressurized sprayer.
and residual
contaminants
will be rinsed with tap water using a
4.0 - SANITATION/SITE
SANITATION
4.1
I
“7
I
l
A supply of clearly marked potable water, tightly closed, and equipped with a tap.
l
Single service disposal cups.
l
Outlets for non-potable water, clearly marked, for fire fighting,
Cross-contamination
/-\
l
I
PRECAUTIONS
One toilet facility
or other purposes.
of the potable supply shall be prevented.
which is either
chemical,
recirculating,
combustion,
or flush,
depending on local code requirements.
I
I
l
i-x
A place for food handling meeting all applicable laws, otherwise, suitable alternatives
to such facilities will be provided (i.e., nearby restaurants, food wagons, etc.).
t
l
Clean wash water will be available in the decontamination
zone and the Baker Site
Trailer.
SITE PRECAUTIONS
4.2
l
Eating, drinking,
probability
chewing gum or tobacco, smoking, or any practice that increases the
of hand-to-mouth
transfer and ingestion of material,
is prohibited
in any
area designated as contaminated.
l
Smoking will not be allowed in areas where flammable materials are present.
l
Hands and face must be thoroughly
l
Whenever decontamination
procedures for outer garments are in effect, the entire
body should be thoroughly
washed as soon as possible after the protective garment is
removed.
washed upon leaving the work area.
l
No contaminated
work garments are to be worn off site.
l
Contact lenses are not permitted to be worn on site.
l
No facial hair which interferes
with a satisfactory
fit of the mask-to-face
seal, is
allowed on personnel required to wear respirators.
l
Contact with contaminated
or potentially
contaminated
surfaces should be avoided.
Wherever possible, do not walk through puddles, leachate, discolored surfaces, kneel
on ground, lean, sit or place equipment on drums/containers.
l
Medicine and alcohol can potentiate
the effects from exposure to toxic chemicals.
Prescribed drugs should not be taken by personnel where the potential for absorption,
inhalation,
or ingestion
qualified physician.
of toxic substances exist unless specifically
approved by a
Alcoholic beverage intake should be minimized or avoided during
after-hour operations.
l
Alcoholic beverages are prohibited on site.
l
Personal radios, TVs, and tape players are prohibited on site.
l
Firearms are prohibited on site.
l
All personnel will observe any posted sign, warning,
contaminated areas.
fence, or barrier posted around
5.0 - SAFE
5.1
BOAT
OPERATIONS
OBJECTIVE
To provide safe operating procedures while performing sampling activities from a boat.
5.2
EQUIPMENT
Refer to Attachment
A, “Federal Requirements
for Recreational Boats,” for a list of required
equipment.
5.3
PRELIMINARY
ACTIVITIES
Ensure that requirements
of Transportation,
governing the safe operation of a boat, published by the Department
United States Coast Guard (Attachment
A) are reviewed prior to placing
the boat in the water.
5.4
OPERATING
PROCEDURE
Operate the boat according to the Department
Regulations (Attachment
5.5
of Transportation,
A), where applicable.
REFERENCES
U.S. Department
of Transportation,
United States Coast Guard.
Recreational Boats. United States Coast Guard, Washington,
*
United States Coast Guard
Federal Requirements
for
D. C. 20593.*
It is recognized that these requirements are directed towards recreational boating, but
Baker Environmental, Inc. believes that the topics of discussion included in this reference
are applicable to the size of boat, and activities to be performed during environmental
sampling.
U.b.LA$JUI I I I \er Ii
,
-
ATTACHMENT A
of Transportation
United
Coast
c- BE SAFE ON THE WATER
---
L
,I
1
t
KNOW...
The stabilily a& haadiing of the boat you are
using.
a
How to use the equipment ou the boat.
a
The waters you will be usiag, tides, curren(s, sand
bars, and other hazuds.
a
T&c wealher
a
The safety devices and emergency equipment
Make sure that life jackets fit propedy.
CJ
The navigation rules and observe the courtesies of
safe boating.
a
Your pef3xaal limitalions and responsiiities.
lbposwe to sun, witid, cold water, all
dkct your ability to read.
a
That it iltegal to operate a vessel while intoxicated If you add alcohol or drugs to boafing, the
w
I
I
f
u
I-
condi~tiocls.
is
Nsulcs call be WlL
. . . BEFORE YOU GO!
!I
i
:,-.
:_.
_.
States
Guard
-
Federal Requirements
for Recreational
Boats.
1
I!.
*I.
FLOAT
PLAN
this
Complete this pa&c, before going boating and leave it
with a reliable person who can be depended upon to
notify
the Coast Cutid or other rescue organization,
should you not rctum as scheduled. Do not file this
plan
with
the Coast
Guard.
1. NAME OF PERSON REPORTJNC
NUMBER.
2. DESCRtPTION
COMR
TION NO.
OF BOAT.
TRIM
ANDTELEPHONE
TYPE
REGtStlL4__
NAME
LENGTH
3.
TERSONS ABOARD
ADDRESSCTEIXPHONENO.
AGE
Allundocumentedvesselsequipped
sion machinery
4. DoANYoFTHE
PROt3LEM7
PERSONSABOARDHAVEAMEDICAL
xFso,wHKr?
5. ENGINETYPE
NO. OF ENGINES
Iaws,
HT.
must be registered
withpmpulin the State of
principal use A certificate of number will be issued
upon registering the vesseL The& numbers must be
displayed on your vesseb Some States require all
vessels tobenumber~,checkwithyourStateboating
authori
for numbering requirements.
FUELCAPACITY
6.
SURVIVAL EQUIPE!NTz (CHECK AS APPROPRIATE)
PFDa
MIRROR
FLARES
SMOKESLCNALS
FLASHUGI IT
WATER
PADDLES
-ANCHOR
OTHERS
EPIRB
RAFT OR DINGHY
7.
RADIO YES/NO
FREQS.
A documented vessel. is not exempt from apphcabIeStateor Federal taxes, nor is its operator exempt
from compliance with Federal or State equipment
carriage requirements
DISPLAY
TYPE
8. TRtP EXPECTATIONS:
FROM
EXPECfTORETURNBY,
NOEVENTLATERTHAN
LEAVE AT
GOING
TO
cmtiE)mm
9. ANYOl’HERl’ERTINENTlNFO.
10. AUl-Oh4OBlLE
LICENSE
NIX
TRAILER
COIX)R AND MAKE OF AUTO
WlffiRE PARKED
OF NUMBER
Nknbers must be painted or permanently attached to each side of the forward half of the vesseL
The Coast Guard and many States issue two validations&hers. Theymustbeaffiiedwithinsixinchesof
the registration number. No other letters or numbers
may be displayed nearby.
cl
LICENSE
II. 1FNOTREtURNEDBY
CALL Tl LE COAST GWARD, OR
12. TELEPHONE
the Federal e&pmen(
REGISTRATION
AND
NUMBERING
REQUIREMENTS
rNF0.
NAME
contains
To insure compliance with State boating
contact your State boating safety agency.
MAKE
OTIIER
pamphlet
carriage requirements for recreational vessels. The
owner/opfxator
may be required to comply with
additionalregulationsspecifktotheStateinwhid\the
vessel is Fegistened or operated. state laws vary. A
vessel in compliance with the laws of the State of
registration, may not meet the requirements of another State where it may be operating.
nicker
.mE)
(LOCAL
AUl-HORll-Yl
NUMBERS
3
2
_-;>
. . ::>.-.
CERTIFXCATE
maw Enfomement (continued)
OF NUMBER
Theowner/operatorofavesselmustcarryavaiid
certificate of number whenever the vessel is in use
WhenavesselismovecitoanewStateofprindpaIuse,
the certificate of number is valid for 60 days.
TheCoastGuardmay~seativilpenaltyupto
$1,000 for failure to: comply with numbering require
merits; comply with equipment requirements; report
a boating accident; or comply with other Federal
regulations. Failure to comply with theunified Inland
Rules of the Road (Inland Navigation Rules Act of
1 1980) can result in a civil penalty up to $5,000.
TheCoast Guard issues thecertificate of numbers
in Alaska.
OF CHANGES
NOTIFICATION
Improper use of a radiotelephone is a criminal
offense. The use of obscene, indecent or profane
language during radio communications is punishable
by a.$10,000fine, imprisonment for two years or both.
Other penalties exist for misuse of a radio, such as
improper use of ChanneI 16 VI-IFFM.
The owner of a vessel must notify the agency
whichissued thecertificateof numbers withinl5days
ifz
l
l
The vessel is transferred, destroyed, abandoned, lost, stolen or recovered.
Channel 16 is a caIiing and distress channel. It is
not to be used for conversation or radio checks. Such
trafficshouldbeconductedonanauthorized
working
chan.neL
The certificate of number is Iost, destroyed
or the ownefs address changes
If the certificate of number becomes invalid for
any reason, it must be surrendemd in the manner
prescribed by the issuing authority within 15 days.
LAW ENFORCEMENT
A vessel underway, &hen hailed by ACoast
Guard vessel is required to heave to, or maneuver in
such a manner that permits a boarding officer to come
aboard.
Other Federal, State and 10ca.Ilaw enforcement
officiais may board and examineyourvess4whether
it is numbered, unnumbered or documented. Coast
Guard law enforcement personnel may also be found
aboard other vessels.
OPERATING A VESSEL WHILE INTOMCATED became a specific federal offense effective
January 13,19&38. The final rule set standards for
-deWmining when an individual is intoxicate& The
BAC is -10% (.08% in Utah) for operators of reccvational vessels being used only for pleasure ‘Violators
axe sub&t to civil penalty not to exceed $lW or
criminal penalty not to exceed$5&XXJ,1 yearimprisonmentor both.
NEGLIGENT or GROSSLY NEGLIGEZVT OPERATION of a vesseI which endangers lives and
property is prohibited by law. The Coast Guard may
impose a civiI per&y
for negIigent o,peration.
GROSSLY NEGLIGENT OPERATIOti is a criminal
offense and an operator may be fined up to $S,OOO,
imprisoned for one year, or both Some examples of
* actions that may constitute negligent or grossly negiigent operation are:
j
0 Operating a boat in a swimming area.
l Operating a boat whileunder
the influence
of alcoho1 or drugs
l Excessive speed in the vicinity of other boats
or in dangerous waters.
l Hazardous water skiing practices
l Bowriding, also riding on seatba& gunwale
or transom.
‘5
4
_-_--
.
-.
_____-__ --_
- - _.
__.
__ _ ___-_.. .- __.--....
- -TERMINATION
OF USE
A Coast Guard boarding officer who observes a
boat being operated in an UNSAFE CONIXTfON,
specifically defined by law or regulation, and who
determines that an ESPECIALLY HAZARDOUS
CONDlTION exists, may direct the operator to take
inltnediate steps to correct the condition, in&ding
returning lo port. Termination of unsafe use may be
imposed for:
l
Insufficient number of CG Approved
Personal Rotation Devices (PFDs).
e Insufficient fire extinguishers.
l
Overloading beyond manufacturers
recommended safe loading capacity.
l
Improper navigation light display.
0 Fuel leakage
l Fuel in bilges.
0 Impmper ventilation.
l Improper backfire flame contmL
l
Operating in mgulated boating areas during
predetemtined adverse conditions.
(Applies in 13th CG District Only).
8 Manifestly unsafe voyage.
An operator who refuses to terminate the unsafe
use of a vessel can be cited for failure to compJy with
the directions of a Coast Guard boarding officer, as
well as for the specific violations which were the basis
for the termination order. Violators may be fined not
n\orethan$1WOorirnprisonednotmorethanoneyear
or both.
COAST
..
PERSONAL
FLOTATION
DEVICES
PFDs must be Coast Guard Approved, :in good
and serviceablecondition, and of appropriate size for
the intended user. Wearable PFDs must be readily
aoxssibte, meaning you must be able to put them on
inamasonableamount oftimeinanemergency(vessel
sinking, on fire, etc). They should not be stowed in
plasticbags,in lockedorclosed compartmentsorhave
other gear stowed on top of them. Throwable devices
must be immediately availabIe for use. Though not
required, a PFD should be worn at ail times when the
vessel is underway. A wearable PFD can save your
life; but only if you wear it.
Boats less than 16 feet in length (including canoes
and kayaks of any Iength) must be equipped with one
Type I, II, III., IV or V PFD for each person aboard.
Boats 16 feet and longer must be equipped with
oneTypeI,II,IIIorVforeachpersonaboardPL.USone
Type IV.
Federal law does not require PFDs on racing
shells, rowing skulls and racing kayaks; State laws
=‘Y.
TYPES OF PFDS
A TYPE I PFD, or OFFSHORE LIFE JACKET
pmvides the most buoyancy. It is effective for a11
waters; especialiy open, rough or remote waters
where rescue may be delayed. It is designed to turn
most unconscious wearers in the water to a face-up position. The Type I comes in two sizes. The ad.ult size
provides at least 22 pounds buoyancy, the child sti
11 pounds, minim=
GUARD APPROVED
EQUIPMENT
The Coast Guard sets minimumsafety standards
for vessels and associated equipment. To meet these
standards various equipment must be Coast Guard
approved. “Coast Guard Approved Equipment” has
been determined to be in compliance with USCG
specitications and regulations relating to performance, construction or materials.
6
fPI?DS,
Off-shore
Lifcjrcket
7
.7
Types
of PPDs (continued)
Types
of PPDe
(continued)
,
or THROWABLE DBV~CE is
intended
inland water with heavy boat
traffic, where help is always p=enL It is designed to
be thrown to a person in the water and grasped and
held by the user until rescued. II is not designed to be
worn. TypNdevices
includebuoyantcushions,ring
A TYPE
N pm,
for calm,
i-7
buoys and horseshoe buoys.
. .
NcaAhore
Buoymt
Vest
A TYPE II PFb, or NEAR-SHORE BUOYANT
VEST is intended for calm, inland water or where
lhere is a good chance of quick rescue This type will
turnSOME unconscious wearers to a face-up position
in the water. The turning action is not as pronounced
nnd it wilI not turn as many persons under the same
conditions as aTypeL An adult sizedeviceprovides
nt least I5 l/2 pounds buoyancy, a medium d\ild s’kze
Frovides I1 pounds. Infantand smaIlch.ildsizeseach
Frovide aCleast 7 pounds buoyancy.
l-hmwrbk Device
A TYPE V PFD, or SPECIAL USE DBVICB is
intended for specific activities and may be carried
instead of another PFD only if used according to the
approval conditions on the label. SOme Type V devices provide significant hypothermia prutection.
Varieties include de&suits, work vests, board sailing
vests and Hybrid PFDs.
Plotation
Aid
ATYPEIIIPFD,orFLOTATXONAID
isgoodfor
:ahn, inland water, or where there is agood chance of
quick rescue. It is designed so wearers can place
hemselves in a face-up position in the water. The
vearer may have to tilt head back to avoid turning
ace-down in the water. The Type III has the same
ninimum buoyancy as a Type II PFD. It cxxnes in
“any styles, colors and sizes and is generaIly the most
xxnfortable type for continuous wear. float coats,
ishingvestsand vestsdesignedwitl~featuressuitable
or various sports activities are examples of this type
‘PD.
A TYPE V HYBRID INFLATABLE: PFO is the
IeastbuIkyofallPFDtypes.
I~containsasmallamount
of inherent buoyancy, and an inflatable chamber. Its
performanceisequaltoaTypelICormP~(asnoted
on the PFD label) when inflaled. Hybrid PFDs must be
worn when underway to be acceptable.
8
-s-...-
..
-I___________
-___
.
_
.__.
.
-.
WATER SKIING
A waterskier, whilebeingtowed,
isconsideredon
board the vessel and a PF’D is required for the purposes of comphance with the PFD carriage require
ments. Although not requifed by Federal law it is
advisableand recommended for askier to weara PPD
designed and intended to withstand the impact off
hitting the water at high speed as when a skier falls.
“JmJ>act Class” marking refers to PFD strength,not
personal protection. SomeState laws requireskiers to
wear a PPD.
VISUAL DISTRESS SIGNALS
All vessels, used on coastal waters, the Great
Lakes, territorial seas and those waters connected
directly to them, up to a point where a body of water
is less than two miles wide, must be equipped with
visual distress signals. Vessels owned in the United
States operating on the high seas must be equipped
withvisualdistresssignals.
Thefollowingvesselsare
not required to carry day signals but must carry night
signals when operating from sunset to sumis
0 Recreational boats .less
. than 16 feet in length
l Boats participating
in organized.e+ents such
as races, regattas or marine parades.
l
Open sailboats less than 26 feet in length not
equipped with propulsion machinery.
l
Manually propelled boats.
PYROTECHNIC
VISUAL DISIRRSS SIGNAlS
mrrst beCoastGuardApproved,inserviceablecondi-
tion and readily accessible. They are marked with a
date showing the service life, which must not be
expired. Launchers manufactured before January 1,
1981, intended for use with approved signals, are not
required to be Coast Guard Approved. If pyrotechnic
devicesareselected,aminimumof
threearerequimd.
Phat is three signals for day use and three signals for
night. Some pyrotechnic signals meet both day and
night use requirements. Pyrotechnic devices should
be stored in a cool, dry location. A watertight container painted red or orange and prominently marked
“DlSlRESS SIGNALS” is recommended.
tJ$iCG Approved Pyrotechnic Visual Distress
Sign& and Associated Devices include:
Pyrotechnic red flares, hand-held or aerial.
o Pyrotechnic orange smoke, hand-held or
floating.
0 Launchers for aerial red meteors or
parachute flares.
l
NON-PYROTECHNIC VISUAL DISTRESS SlGNAIS must be in serviceable condition, rea.dily accessible and certified by the manufacturer as complying
with USCG requirements, they include:
.
l Orange distress flag
l Electric distress light
The distress flag is a daysigna1 only. It must be at
least3x3feetwithabladcsquareandballortanorange
background. It is most distinctive when attached and
waved ona paddleorboathookor
flownmoma mast.
Theelectricdistresslightisacc+pt~fornightuse
only and must automatically flash the international
SOS distress signal c*.--***). This is an unmistakable
distresssignal Astandard flashlight is not iacceptable
as a visual diitress signat
Under Inland Navigation Rules, a high intensity
white light flashing at regular intervals from SO-70
times per minute is considered a distress signal.
Strobe lights used in inland waters shall only be used
as a-distress signaL
Regulations prohibit display of visual distress
signals on the water under any circumstances except
when assistance is required to prevent irmnediate or
potential danger to persons on board a vessel.
All distress signals have distinct advantages and
disadvantages, no single device is ideal under all
conditions or suitable for all purposes. Pyrotechnics
are excellent distress signals, universally recognized.
However, there is potential for injjry and property
damage if not properly handled. These devices produce a very hot flame, the residue can cause bums and
ignite flammable material Pistol launched and handheld parachute flares and meteors have many characteristics of a firearm and must be handled with caution.
10
.
.
._
_
.
. -
..
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
Approv& extinguishers are classified by a letter
and number symbol. The letter indicates the type fire
the unit is designed to extinguish (Type B designed to
extinguish fIammableIiquidssuch as gasoline,oiI and
grease fires). The numberindicates therelativesizeof
the extinguisher (minimum extinguishing
agent
weight).
Approved extinguishers are hand-portable, either B-I or B-II classification and have the following
characteristics:
Foartl
(GUlS.1
1.25
co,
JLBSl
25
VY
Cliernical
(LBSl
Halon
ILBS)
4
2
25
15
10
10
Fire extinguishers are required if any oneormore
>f the following conditions exist
DInboard engines.
l Closed compartments under thwarts and seats
where portable fuel tanks may be stored.
Drychemical fireottinguisherswithoutgaug~or
indicating devices must be inspected every 6 mcds.
if the gross weight of a carbon dioxide (COG extinguisherisreduced by moretha.nlO%of thenetweight,
the extinguisher is not acceptable and must be recharged.
Check extinguishers regularly to ensure gauges
are free and nozzles are clear.
Minimum dumber of hand portable fire extinguishers required:
VESSEL
LENGTH
NO FIXED
SYSTEM
1 B-I
Less than 26
2
&I or 1 &II
26’ to less than 40’
3B-IorlEu
40’ to 65
andlE1
l Closed 1iving spaces.
l CIosed stowage compartments in which combustible or flammabIe materials are stored.
12
0
1 B-I
.2EIorlEII
Coast Guard Approved exting&hers are
identified by the following marking on the label:
“Marine Type USCG Approved, Size. . ., Type.. .,
[email protected]/ . . . /“, etc
l DoubIe bottoms not seaIed to the huII or
which are not completely fi&d with
flotation materials.
l Pem~anently instaIled fuel tanks. Fuel tanks
secured so they cannot be moved in case of
fire or other emergency are considered * per
manently in&&d.
There are no gaIlon ca
pacity limits to determine if a fuel tank is
portable. If the weight of a fuel tank is such
that persons on board cannot move it, the
Coast Guard considers it pemumently
installed.
WITH
APPROVED
FIXED
SY!3-I-EM
TYF of
E?A$zhelv
13
BACKFIRE
FLAP&
COtiTROL
l’OWERED
Gasoline engines installed in a vesseI after April
2!5,1940, except outboard motors, must be equipped
with an acceptable means of backfire flame contmL
The device must besuitably attached to the air intake
with a fIametigh1 connection and is required to be
Coast Guard approved.
VENTILATION
Vessels built after JuIy 31,198O that have gasoline
engines, with a cranking motor (starter), for eIectrica1
generation, mechanical power or propuIsion in a
cIosed compartment are required to have a powered
ventilation system This includes each compartment
with such an engine.
., . . . .
No person may operateavessel built after juIy31,
1980 with a gasoline engine in a closed compa:rtment
unIess it is equipped with an operabIe ventilation
system that meets Coast Guard standards. The operator is required to keep the system in operating condition and ensure cowls and ducting am not blocked or
tom.
S&ND
-
/
Back Fii Fhxtc Arrester
REQUIRED
NONAPPROVED
EQUIPMENT
NATUIUL
VENTILATXON
AU vessels with propulsion machinery that use
gasoline for fueI, with enclosed engine and/or fueI
tank compartments built after April 25, 1940 and
before August I, 1980 are required to have natural
ventilation.
SIGNALLLNG
DEVICES
ReguIationsdonotspecificaIIyrequirevesseIsless
than 12 meters to caq a whistle, homor bell. However, the navigation rules require sound signals to be
madeundercertaincircumstances.
Meeting,cmssing
and overtaking situations described in Navigation
Rules section are examples of when sound signals are
required. Recreational vessels are also required to
sound fog signals during periods of reduced visiibiity.
Therefore, you must have some means of making an
efficient sound signal.
. 2. ..:
.:..
:
‘_.
.:s.~.I.
Vessels 12 meters or more in length are required
to carry on board a power whistle or power helm and
a bell.
Natural ventilation consists of at least two ventilation ducts fitted with cowls or their equivalent for
the purpose of efficiently ventilating the bilges of
every engine and fuel tank compartment. At least one
exhaust duct extending to the lower portion of the
bilge and at least one intake duct extending to a point
midway to the bilge or at least below the level of the
carburetor air intake is required.
i..---,
;:::>
...-.I.
:..
Vessels built after Jury 31, 1978, but prior to
August 1,1980, have no requirement forventibtionof
the fuel tank compartment if there is no electrical
source in the compartment and the tank vents to the
outside of the vessel.
-- -______-
- --------_ _-_.--.
,._
NAVIGATION
RULES
NAVIGATION
LIGHT3
’
Recreational vesseIs are required to display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise and other
periods of reduced visibilitytfog, rain, haze&c). The
U. S. Coast Guard Navigation Rules, International Inland encompasses lighting requirements for every
description of watercraft. The information provided
here is intended for power-driven and sailing vessels
less than 20 meters.
The Navigation Rules establish actions tobe taken
by vessels to avoid collision. The vessel operator is
responsible for knowing and foIIowing applicable
navigation rules. The following diagrams describe the
whistlesignals and actions to be taken by recreational
vesseis in a crossing, meeting and overtaking situation. These are basic examples, for further information cons& the NAVIGATION RULES International
- inland (COMDTtNST M166722A).
POWER DRIVEN VESSELS
Power-driven vessels of less than 20 meters, sha!l
exhibitnavigationlightsasshown
inPigure1. Vessels
of less than 12 meters in length, may show th.e fights
ineitherFiirelorl?igure2
Power-driven vessels of less than 7 meters whose
maximumspedcannotscceed’lknotsmayatI\ibitan
a&round white light, and if pra&abIe sidelights
instead of the lights prescribed above, in International Waters only.
(1==I
OvertMng Situations
Sailing, vessels operating under machinery, or
under sail and machinery are considered power
driven and must diiplay the lights prescribed for a
power-driven vesseL
SAILING
Sailing vessels less than20 meters exhibit navigationIightsshowninPigures3or4ormaybecombined
in a single lantern carried at the top of the mast as
shown in Figure 5.
international Rules apply outside established
linesof demarcationand Inland Rulesapply insidethe
lines. Demarcation Iines are printed on most navigational charts and are published in the Navigation
Rules.
Sailing vessels less than 7 meters may carry an
eIectric torch or lighted lantern showing a white light
17
16
,-, .._._-. _.-..
.
I.,
.
.
.
.
----- -_-___
.
VESSELS AND VESSELS UNlDER
OARS
-.
-
_..________--_______- __.__---..___.
._
.
Sailing
Vessels and V~sscls Under Oars (continued)
Vessels under saiI aIs0 being
PropeIled by machil
cry, must exhibit forward, where it can best be seen,
amkal shape, apex down (See Figure 7). Vesseh me:
than 12 meters are not required to exhibit the daysha
in Inland Waters.
DTVMG OPERATIONS
The Navigational Rules require vessels restricted i
ability to maneuver to dispIay appropriate day shakw
To meet this re’quirement, recreational vessels engage
in diving activities may exhibit a rigid replica of tI
international code flag “A” not less than one meter i
height (See Figure 8).
to be displayed in sufficient time to prevent collision
(see Figure 6), if practicable, the lights prescribed for
sailing vessels less than 20 meters should be dispIayed.
This requirement does not affect the use of there
andwhitediver’sflagwhichmayberequiredbyState~
local law to mark the diver’s location under water. Tf
“A” fIag is a navigation signal advertising the vessel
r&ricted maneuverabiity.
It does not pertain to tI
diver.
DAY SHAE’ES
REQUIREDBETWEEN SUNRISE AND SUNSET
Vessels under oars may display the lights prescribed forsailing vessels, but if not, must have ready
at hand an electric torch or lighted lantern showing a
white Iight to be shown in sufficient time to prevent
collision (see Figure 6).
LXGKTS POR ANCHORED
VESSELS
Power-driven vesseIs and sailing vessels at anchor must display anchor lights. An anchor light for
a vessel Iess than 20 meters in length is an a&round
white light visible for 2 miles exhibited where it can
bestbeseen.
Vessels less than 7 meters are not required to
display anchor lights unless anchored in or near a
narrow channeI, fairway or anchorage or where other
vessels normaIIy navigate.
AnchorlightsarenotrequiredonvesseIs1esstha.n
20 meters, anchored in special anchorages designated
by the Secretary of Transportation in Inland Waters.
18
-“r
_
_
.
_
-
_
-
The operator of each self-propelSed vessel 12
metersormoreinlengthisrequired
tocarryonboard,
and maintain for ready reference, a copy of the InIand
Navigation Rules while operating on Inland waters,
subject to a penalty for failure to comply of not more
than$S,OOO.Copies of the rules may be obt:ained from
the Superintendent of Docume nts, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 20402 (tel: (202)
783-3238). Stock number 050412402053, $6.00 each.
19
.
.
_-
-
-
- -
__
we-.
-
POLLUTION
Marine
REGkATIONS
c. size
d. coIor
REPORTING
e. substance
f. timeobserved
Avoid flame, physical contact or inhaIation
fumes near any source of poktion.
Reguhtions issued under the FederaI Water Pollution Control Act require aU vessels with machinery
propulsion to have a capacity to retain oily mixtures
on board. A fixed or portable means to discharge oily
waste to a reception facitity is required. A bucket or
bailer is suitable as a portable means of discharging
oily waste on recreationaI vessels.
AFORh,lALREPORTOFAFATA~MlJSTBE
FILED WITHIN 48 HOURS. If, as a result of a boating
or related equipment accident, a person sustains injuries that require more than first aid, a formaI report
must be filed.
DISCHARGE OF OIL PROEIIBITED
.
:.
ACCIDENTS INVOLVING MORE THAN $200
DAMAGEMUSTBE REPORTED WITHIN IO DAYS.
A formal report must be made if properly damage
exceeds $200; or there is a complete loss of a vessel.
If you need further information regarding accident reporting, please caII the Boating Safely Hotline,
800-268-5647.
21
20
_______-
:
ACCIDENTS
Date, time and exact location of the
accident;
l Name of each person who died or
disappeared;
l Number and name of the vessel; and
-0 Names and’addresses of the owner and
operator.
Vessels 26 feel in length and over must display a
placard at least 5 by 8 inches, made of durable mate
ria& fixed in a conspicuous plrtce in the machinery
spaces,orallhebiIgepumpcontroIstation,statingthe
folIowing.
_.
BOATING
l
No person may intentionally drain oil or oily
waste from any source into the bilge of any vesseL
. --._--. _.-_..
.’
AII boating accidents or accidenls resulting from
the use of related equipment (which meet the ‘criteria
below), must be reported by the operator or owner of
the vessel to the proper marine law enfonement
authoxityfortheStateinwhkhtheaccidentoocurnxL
..
IMMEDIATENOTIlKATIONREQUIREDFOR
FATALACCIIXNTS.
If a person dies or disappears
as a result of a recreational boating accident th.e nearest State boating authority must be notified without
delay, providing the following information:
of
The Federal Water Pollution Control Act
prohibils thediilargeof
oiioroilywssteinto
or upon the navigabIe waters of the United
States or the waters ol the contiguous zone if
suchdischargecauafilmorsheenupon,or
d&&oration of, the surface of the water, or
causes a sludge or emulsion beneath the surface of the waler. Violators are subject to a
pen&y of $S,lKKl.
Devices
sanitation
A1lrecreationalboatswilhinstalled
toiletfacilities
must have an operable marine sanitation device
(h4SD) on board. Vessels 65 feet and under may use a
Type I, II or III MSD. Vessels over 65 feet must install
aTypeIIorIIIMSD.
AIIinstaIIedMSDsmust
beCoast
Guard certified. Coast Guard certified devices are so
labeled except for some holding tanks, which are
certified by definition under the regulations.
The Refuse Act of 1899 prohibils throwing, discharging or depositing any refuse matter of any kind
(including trash, garbage, oil and other liquid pollutants) into the walers of the United States. The Federal
WatcrPollulionControIActprohibitsthcdischargeof
oiI or hazardous substances which may be ham&I
into U. S. navigable walers. You must immediately
notify the U. S. Coasl Guard if your vessel discharges
oil or hazardous substances into the water. CaII lollfree 800-424-8802 (In Washington, D. C. (202) 2672675). Report the following information:
a. location
b. source
-
-., --
,-____________ - -_.....-._..--....
&ERN
RENDERING
The master or person in dlarge of a vessel is
obligated by Iaw lo provide assistance that can be
safely provided to any individual al sea in danger of
being Iosl, and is subjecl to a fine and/or imprisonment for failure to do so.
ADDITIONAL
EQUIPMENT
ADVICE
AND
Aslheoperatorand/orowneryouareresponsible
for the prudent and safe operation of yourvesse1, and
for the lives and safely of your passengers and others
around you. You should become familiar with Federal, Stale and local rules and regulations regarding
safe boat operation and attempt to Iearn and practice
good seamanship, boathandling, navigation and pi10tin&&
Besides meeting the legal requirements, prudent
boaters carry additional safely’equipment.
ADDITIONAL
ANCHORING
.
ASSISTANCE
MEANS OF PROPULSION
VesseIs less than 16 feet should carry alter&ate
propulsion, sudt as a paddle or oars. If an alternate
means of mechanicaI propulsion is carried it should
use a separate fuel tank and starting source than the
main propulsion motor. . _
ANCHORING
AI1 vessels shouId be equipped with an anchor
and line of suitable size and length for the vessel and
waters in which it is being operated. Choose the right
anchor for your vessel and the type of bottom you
expect to be anchoring in.
To anchor, bring the bow into the wind or current
and put the engine in neutral. When the vessel comes
to a stop, lower, do not throw, the anchor over the
bow. The anchor line should be 5 to 7 times the depth
of water.
4
/LlGmHT
Anchoring a small boat by the stern has caused
many to capsize and sink. The transom is usually
squared off and has less freeboard than the bow. In a
current, the stem can be puUed under by lhe force of
the waler. The boat is aIso vulnerable lo swamping by
waveaclion. The weight of a motor, fuel tank,orolher
gear in thestern increases the risk Do nol: anchor
by
the slemll
Ail vessels should carry at Ieast one effective
man4 device (portable bilge pump, bucket, scoop,
etc.) for bailing water, in addition lo any installed
electric biIge pump.
FLRSTAID
As the operator of a smaii boat you should consider taking a First Aid cotuse and becoming proficient in ifs application A first aid kit and mamu&
bandages, gauze, adhesive taw antiseptic aspirin,
etc. is suggested.
LOADING
YOUR VESSEL
Keep the load low and evemy distributed. Do not
exceed the “II. S. Coast Guard MaximumCapacities”
label. If there is no capacity Label use the following
formuIa to determine the maximum number of persons you can safely carry in calm weathen
.I
<
Average Weight 150 Ibs per person
I
Eidlt
I
tiJ_L
People=
.!+!?!
Length is determined by measuring in a straight
line from the foremost part to the aftermost of the
vessel, parallel to the centerline, exclusive of sheer.
Bowsprils, rudders, outboard motors and simiIar fittings are not included in the measurement.
23
PUBLING PRBCAUTLONS
Pill portable tanksoff thevessel. Closeall hatches
and other openings before fueling. Extinguish smoking materials. Secure all electrical equipment, radios,
stoves and other appliances. Secure all engines and
motors.
Wipe up any spilled fuel immediately. Open al1
hatches to air out the vessel. Run the blower five
minutes, and then check the biIges for fuel vapors
before starting the engine. NEVER start the engine
until all traces of fuel vapors are eIiminated.
PUBLTANKS
Ensure portable fuel tanks are constructed of
sturdy material and in good condition, free of ex<?essive corrosion and do not leak The vents on portable
tanks must be operable and the tanks should have a
vapor-tight, leak-proof cap. Do not allow excessive
movement of portable tanks.
Permanent fuel tanks and lines should be free of
corrosionand mustnotleak. Tanksmustbeventedto
the outside of the huh. The fiLl pipe and plate must fit
tightly and be located outside of closed compartments.
PUEL MANAGEMENT
Practice the “One-Third Rule” by using one-third
of the fuel going out, one-third to get back and onerT third in reserve.
All equipment and supplies should be properly
secured. Keep decks and other spaces clean, free of
clutter and trash. The vessel shouki be free of fire
hazards with clean bilges and in good condition.
Inspection and required maintenance .on a regular
schedule will ensure the hull and superstructure
remain sound. Ensure all repairs are made properly
and with marine rated parts. You should carry a few
tools, spare parts and learn how to make minor rep&S.
FLOAT PLAN
Tell a friend or relative where you are going and
when you plan to return. Make sure they have a
description of yourvessel and other information that
will make identification easier should the need arise.
An example is provided on the inside front cover.
WEATHER
Check weather reports before leaving shore and
remain watchful for signs of bad weather. E&ome
familiar with National Weather Service Storm Advisory Signals and know where they are displayed.
SMALL BOATS AND WATER ACTKVXlBS
Most hunters and anglers do not think of themselves as boaters. But many use smaU semi-v hull
vessels,Xatbottomjon boats or canoes to pursue their
sport. These boats tend to be unstable and easily
capsized. Capsizings, sinkings, and falls overboard
account 70% of boating fatalities and are directly
related topoorstability.Thesefactsmeancaren\ustbe
usedinopemtingsmallboats.Youmusthaveagreater
awareness of the boat’s limitations and the skill and
knowledge to overcome them
Standing in a small boat raises the center of gravity, often to the point of capsizing. Standing for any
reasonorevenchangingpositioninasmallboatcanbe
dangerous, as is sitting on the gunnels orseat backs or
in a pedestal seat while underway. A wave or sudden
turn may cause a fall overboard or capsizing because
of the raised center of gravity.
24
+.i
-1
25
-y--.
- _-_______ - __.-____________
. .._.
!
SURVIVAL
HYPOTHERMIA
Hypothermia
is the loss of body heat, immersion
in watcrspeeds the loss of heat. If your boat capsizes
it will Iikely float on or just below the surface. Vessels
built after 1978 will support you even if full of water
or capsized. To reduce the effects of hypothermia
get
in or on the boat. Try to get as much of your body out
of the water as possible. if you can’t get in the boat a
I’FD will enable you to keep your head out of the
water. This is very important
because about 50% of
body heat toss is from the head.
SUDDEN
.
Sudden immersion
in cold water can induce
rapid, uncontrolled
breathing,
cardiac arrest, and
other Lifethreatening
situations which can result in
a drowning.
Wearing a PFD will prevent this. If you
must enter the waler, bulton up your clothing, wear a
I’FD, cover your head if possible and enter the water
slowly.
COLD WATER
.._.. _.._..._.__.
._._....__
.._
..
_x_.--“-_“p”_
._I(___
-,.1-,,1”l___“--.9.--~
Feet in Decimals
50 Meters (M)
20 Meters (M)
12 M
10 M
~\
8M
7M
6M
SM
4M
2.5 M
1M
&et and Inches
164’ 1,‘2”
65’7 1./2”
394 l/T
32’9 3/4”
26’3”
23’11 l/2”
19’8 l/4’
16’4 X/4”
13’1 l/2”
8’2 l/2”
3’3 l,/,,,
164.0 ft.
65.6 ft.
39.4 ft.
32.8 ft.
26.2 ft.
23.0 ft.
19.7 ft.
16.4 ft.
13.1 ft.
8.2 ft.
3.3 ft.
Boating Safety is no accident. To build
sound knowledge,
proficiency
and confidence, the key& to safe boating, take a boating safety course.
,.--._
.,; Coust Guard
l30dbg ZiGM3ty
Hodhe:
Biv
800-368-5647
--c~---.--^--_“_xI
For more information
on boating safety
and boating comes, contact youx State
Boating Agency, local Coast Guard
District or call the Boating Safety Hotline.
27
26
-
I
Metric Measure
DROWNING
It may be possible to revive a drowning
victim
who has been under water for considerable time and
shows no signs of life. Increasingly
numerous documented cases exist where victims have been resuscise< tated with no apparent harmful effects after long
immersions.StartCPRimmediatelyandget
thevictim
to
a
hospital
as
quickly
as
possible.
1111
!
____
’
DISAPPEARANCE
SYNDROME
I,-, _-__..----___.
OF METRIC
TO
u. S. UNITS
TKI’S
It is a comma
belief that someone dressed in
heavyclothingorwademwiIlsinkimmediatelyifthey
falIoverboard.This
is not true. Airtrapped
in clothing
provides considerable
flotation, bending the knees
will trap air in waders, providing add it ional flotation.
Tostay afIoat, remain calm, do not thrash about or try
to remove clothing or footwear, this leads to exhaustion and increases the loss of air that keeps you afloat.
Keep your knees bent, float on your back and paddle
slowly to safety.
*
CONVERSXON
..-.-.
- ___.
_ . ..-_.
Section 6.0 - Drum Sampling
Procedures
(SOP F108 - Baker’s Standard Operating Procedures for
Administrative,
Field, and Technical Activities, Volume II)
SOP F108
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 1 of 9
DRUM SAMPLING
1.0
PURPOSE
The purpose of this SOP is intended to provide general information
in the field.
However, due to widely varied (and potentially
for the sampling of drums
hazardous1 conditions posed by
drum sampling, specific SOPS must be determined on a case-by-case basis. Actual
drum
sampling will be conducted by qualified individuals.
2.0
SCOPE
This SOP provides information
to assist in ensuring that safe procedures are followed as
applicable to the inspection, opening, and sampling of drums in the field. Levels of protection
required during drum sampling will be specific to each location; therefore, protection levels
will be addressed in the site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP).
3.0
DEFINITIONS
Bung - a threaded metal or plastic plug usually positioned at the top or side of a drum.
Over Pack - a metal or plastic drum-like
container that is larger than the container(s) stored
therein.
Lab Pack - a drum holding multiple
individual
containers of laboratory materials normally
surrounded by cushioning absorbent material.
4.0
RESPONSIBILITIES
Project Manager - The Project Manager is responsible for ensuring that project-specific. plans
are in accordance with these procedures where applicable, or that other approved procedures
are developed.
The Project Manager is responsible for development
of documentation
of
procedures which deviate from those presented herein.
Site Health and Safety Officer (HSO) - The Site HSO is responsible for ensuring that the
proper respiratory and personal protective equipment for each member of the sampling team is
SOP F108
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 2 of 9
selected in compliance with the HASP, and coordinating
these efforts with the Field Team
Leader.
Field Team Leader - The Field Team Leader is responsible for selecting and detailing the drum
sampling techniques and equipment
to be used. It is the responsibility
Leader to ensure that these procedures are implemented
Field Investigation
personnel performing
of the Field Team
in the field and to ensure that the
drum sampling activities
have been briefed and
trained to execute these procedures.
Field Investigation
Personnel - It is the responsibility
of the Field Investigation
Personnel to
follow these procedures or to follow documented project-specific procedures as directed ‘by the
Field Team Leader and Project Manager.
for documenting
The Field Investigation
Personnel are responsible
all sampling data on the appropriate Drum Sample Characterization
Sheet
and in the Field Logbook.
PROCEDURES
5.0
It is anticipated
handling;
that the procedures for drum sampling may include a limited
degree of
therefore, it will be necessary to inspect for certain conditions prior to sampling
drums.
Inspection
5.1
Prior to sampling, drums will be visually
inspected to gain as much information
as possible
about their contents. Items to consider during inspection include:
l
Symbols, wording, labels, or other marks on the drum indicating that its contents are
hazardous, e.g., radioactive, explosive, corrosive, toxic, or flammable.
l
Symbols, wording, labels, or other marks on a drum indicating that it contains
discarded laboratory chemicals, reagents, or other potentially dangerous materials in
small-volume individual containers.
l
Signs of deterioration
l
Signs of the chemical nature of the contents, such as residue, crystal buildup, etc. at
bung opening, etc.
l
Signs that the drum is under pressure such as swelling and bulging.
such as corrosion, rust, and leaks.
SOP F108
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/19/92
Page 3 of 9
l
Special drum types (refer to Table 1).
l
Configuration
l
Drum standing upright, tilted, or lying on its side.
l
Accessibility
Monitoring
of the drumhead.
of the drum.
will be conducted around the drums using instruments
survey instrument,
such as a gamma radiation
organic vapor monitor (OVA or HNu), calorimetric tubes (Dr$iger tubes),
and a combustible gas meter. The results can be used to classify the drums into categories
such as radioactive,
leaking/deteriorating,
bulging,
explosive/shock-sensitive,
or laboratory
packs.
When drums exhibit
the characteristics
of the aforementioned
categories, the following
procedures will be followed:
l
Radioactive Wastes - If the drum exhibits radiation levels above background, normally
0.01-0.02 mrem/hr (milliroentgen
equivalent
in man per hour), that are less than or
equal to 2 mrem/hr, there is a possible radiation
investigation
source present.
with caution, and inform the Site HSO.
Continue
If the radiation
the
levels are
greater than 2 mrem/hr there is a potential radiation hazard. Work will stop, and the
Field Team Leader and Project Manager will be notified so that new procedures can be
implemented.
l
Explosive or Shock-Sensitive
Waste - If handling
is necessary, exercise extreme
caution, have non-essential personnel move to a safe distance, and use a grappler unit
constructed
for explosive
containment
for initial
handling.
Use non-sparking
equipment and/or remote control devices, if available.
l
Bulging Drums - Do not move drums under internal pressure unless proper equipment
is used, such as a grappler unit constructed for explosive containment.
l
Packaged Laboratory
Wastes (Lab Packs) - Lab Packs can be an ignition
fires and sometimes contain shock-sensitive
opened, a chemist or other qualified individual
materials.
source for
Once a lab pack has been
should inspect, classify and segregate
SOP F108
Revision N’o.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 4 of 9
,
TABLE
SPECIAL
Polyethylene
or PVC-lined
Drums
DRUM
1
TYPES
Often contain strong acids or bases. If the lining
is punctured, the substance will usually corrode
the steel, resulting in a significant leak or spill.
Exotic Metal Drums (e.g., aluminum,
nickel, stainless steel, or other unusual
metal)
Very expensive drums that usually contain a.n
extremely dangerous an&or corrosive/reactive
material.
Single-Walled
Drums
Pressure Vessel
These drums have fittings for both product filling
and placement of an inert gas, such as nitrogen.
May contain reactive, flammable, or explosive
substances.
Laboratory
Packs
used as a
Used for disposal of expired chemicals and process
samples from university laboratories, hospitals,
and similar institutions. Individual containers
within the lab pack are often not packed in
absorbent material. They may contain incompatible materials, radioisotopes, shock-sensitive,
highly volatile, highly corrosive, or extremely
toxic exotic chemicals. Laboratory packs can be
an ignition source for fires at hazardous waste
sites.
SOP FL08
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 5 of 9
the bottles (without opening), according to the hazards of the wastes. The objective of
such a classification
system is to ensure safe segregation of the lab packs’ contents
(refer to Table 2 for an example of a lab pack classification).
If crystalline
material is
noted at the neck of any bottle, handle it as a shock-sensitive waste due to the potential
presence of picric acid, potassium permanganate or explosive mixtures resulting when
the aqueous solution crystallizes,
or other inimical
materials, and obtain advice from
qualified personnel prior to handling.
Until drum contents are characterized, sampling personnel will assume that unlabeled drums
contain hazardous materials.
Personnel also should be aware that drums are frequently
mislabeled and may not contain the material identified.
Drum
5.2
Opening
Drums are to be opened and sampled in place. For opening drums manually, equipment such
as a nonsparking
metal (bronze/manganese, aluminum,
molybdenum) bung/plug wrench and
a drum deheading device will be used for waste contents that are known to be nonreactive and
nonexplosive, within a structurally
sound drum.
While opening drums manually with a bung wrench, the following procedures will be used:
*
Drums will be positioned bung up, or, for drums with bungs on the side, laid on their
sides with the bung plug up.
l
Use a wrenching
motion that is a slow and steady pull across the drum, using a
“cheater bar” if the leverage for unscrewing the bung is poor.
l
If there is evidence of incompatible
release of potentially
immediately
chemical reactions, a sudden pressure buildup, or a
toxic fumes while the bung is being loosened, field personnel will
leave the area and arrange for remote drum opening equipment to be
used.
l
If the drum cannot be opened successfully using a nonsparking
other methods of drum opening (deheading or puncturing)
hand wrench, then
must be considered.
SOP FL08
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 6 of 9
TABLE 2
LAB PACK CLASSIFICATION
EXAMPLES
Examples
\
Classification
[norganic acids
Hydrochloric Acid
Sulfuric Acid
inorganic bases
Sodium hydroxide
Potassium hydroxide
Strong oxidizing agents
Ammonium nitrate
Barium nitrate
Sodium chlorate
Sodium peroxide
Strong reducing agents
Sodium thiosulfate
Oxalic acid
Sodium sulphite
Anhydrous organics and
organometallics
Tetraethyl lead
Phenylmercuric chloride
Anhydrous inorganics and
metal hydrides
Potassium hydride
Sodium hydride
Sodium metal
Potassium
Toxic organics
PCBs
Insecticides
Flammable organics
Hexane
Toluene
Acetone
Inorganics
Sodium carbonate
Potassium chloride
Inorganic cyanides
Potassium cyanide
Sodium cyanide
Copper cyanide
SOP F108
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 7 of 9
l
If the drum shows signs of swelling or bulging, perform all steps slowly.
Prom a
remote location, relieve excess pressure prior to opening using the devices listed below,
if possible.
If performing
manually,
place a barrier such as an explosion-resistant
plastic shield between the worker and bung to deflect any gas, liquid, or solids which
may be expelled as the bung is loosened.
Whenever possible, use the following remote-controlled
l
l
l
devices for opening drums:
A pneumatically operated impact wrench to remove drum bungs.
A hydraulically or pneumatically operated drum piercer.
A backhoe equipped with bronze spikes for penetrating drum tops (typical in largescale operations).
If a supplied-air
respiratory
protection
system is used, the bank of air cylinders
must be
maintained outside of the work area.
If personnel must be located near the drums being opened, place explosion-resistant
shields between them and the drums, in case of detonation.
equipment,
monitoring
equipment,
plastic
Locate controls for drum opening
and tire suppression equipment behind the expl’osion-
resistant plastic shield.
When feasible, monitor air quality continuously
to the potential
source of contaminants,
during drum opening, and as close as possible
i.e., placing as close as practical without hindering
drum opening operations, and hang or balance the drum opening equipment to minimize
exertion.
Do not use picks, chisels, etc. to open drums manually.
Open exotic metal drums and polyethylene
removing or manually drilling
Do not open or sample individual
or polyvinylchloride-lined
(PVC-lined) drums
by
the bung, while exercising extreme caution.
containers within laboratory packs.
Reseal open bungs and/or drill openings as soon as possible, with new bungs or plugs to avoid
explosions and/or vapor generation.
If an open drum cannot be resealed, place the drum into
SOP F108
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 8 of 9
an overpack. Plug any openings in pressurized drums with pressure venting caps set to a s-psi
release to allow venting of vapor pressure.
Decontaminate
incompatible
and/or dispose of sampling
wastes and contaminating
equipment
after each use to avoid mixing
subsequent samples. 1
Drum Sampling
5.3
Drum sampling can be a very hazardous activity because it often involves direct contact with
unidentified
wastes. Prior to collecting any sample, field team personnel will become familiar
with the procedures identified in the Sampling Plan.
Certain
information
can be construed from the drumhead configuration
prior to sampling,
such as:
l
l
l
Removable “Whole” Lid = designed to contain solid material
Bung opening = designed to contain liquids
Drum Liner = may contain a highly corrosive or otherwise hazardous material
When manually sampling from a drum, use the following techniques:
l
Keep sampling personnel at a safe distance while drums are being opened. Sample
only after opening procedures are complete.
l
Do not lean over or between other drums to reach the drum being sampled.
l
Cover drum tops with plastic sheeting or other suitable uncontaminated
materials to
avoid excessive contact with the drum tops.
l
Never stand on drums.
Use mobile steps or another platform to achieve the h.eight
necessary to safely sample from the drums.
l
Obtain samples with either glass rods or vacuum pumps.
items such as discarded rags during sampling.
pumping to minimize damage to pumps.
Do not use contaminated
Glass rods will be removed prior to
SOP F108
Revision No.: 0
Date: 01/10/92
Page 9 of 9
s
Identify each drum with a sample number.
Characterization
Sheet and permanently
Record the number on the Drum Waste
on the drum (mark lid and side) using either
a label, permanent marker, or spray paint.
/ -,
6.0
QUALITY
ASSURANCE
\
RECORDS
Quality assurance records shall consist of completed Drum Waste Characterization
Sheets and
data entered into the Field Logbook. A sample Drum Waste Characterization
Sheet is
attached.
7.0
REFERENCES
NIOSH/OSHA/USCG/EPA,
1985. Occupational
Hazardous Waste Site Activities.
Safetv and Health
U.S. Department
Guidance Manual
for
of Health and Human Services, Public
Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National
Institute
for Occupational Safety and
Health. Publication No. 85-115.
U.S. EPA, 1986. Drum Handling
Practices at Hazardous Waste Sites.
Wickline, and Hodge, JRB Associates, McLean, Virginia.
Wetzel, Furman,
Publication No. 86-165362.
NIOSH, 1990. NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Institute
Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati,
Ohio. Publication
No. 90-117.
for
ATTACHMENT
DRUM
WASTE
A
CHARACTERIZATION
SHEET
BAKER ENVIRONMENTAL,
INC.
DRUM WASTE CHARACTERIZATION
SHEET
PROJECT:
CT0 NUMBER:
IXSPECTION
DATE:
WEATHER:
BAKER REPRESENTATIVE:
MONITORING
CALIBRATION
PRE-INSPECTION
LEVEL
2
3
TYPE
Drum
Xumber
Size
CONDITION
rngitf
un
ring top)
Structural
Integrity
Sealed/Exterior
Contamination
5
OVERPACKING
Fit
Overpack
Y/N
Required
Y/N
I
AIR MONITORING
OF PROTECTION:
4
I
EQUIPMENT
(Serial Number):
DATE/TIME/INITIALS:
I
SCAN:
-&k-p
Headspace
Reading
Volume
:
Phases
Sample
ID
Number
8
Sample Type
(Sludge,
Liquid,
Sediment)
I
II:
----i
6-A
‘,
,“r,‘
1
“a
<
’
pa\
m
_
6-a
*da,
;
e++.
\
6
,--A
m
Attachment E
Enviro-nmental
Haaaids [email protected]
Ititernational,
Inc. (%HS) b
Standard-Operating
Prdcedti.res
_
'%X0 Work Plan
Remedial
1.
Investigation
INTRODUCTION
The EHS team has extensive
and survey
operations
addition,
based
Ordnance
Disposal
deal
Addendum"
with
the
with
EOD and Ordnance
of hazardous
contaminated
on our many years
of experience
Specialists,
unique
provides
information
approach
that
challenge
on the
will
our
of
general
be implemented
sites.
personnel
locating
Clearance
In
as Explosive
are
well
equipped
UXO.
This
section
management
to support
to
and technical
the
survey
operations.
The logistic
procedures
requirements
correctly,
identified
will
safely
of the
l
ensure
key management
are discussed
The general
Responsible
in
level
EHS Program
all
are
carried
The responsibilities
subsections
responsibility
overall
operations
and operational
management
Manager
for
that
and effectively.
The key upper
Manager.
action
MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATION
EHS management
authority
emergency
are discussed.
1. .l.
out
and standard
that
and
personnel
follow.
personnel
he has is
- Charles
E. Wharton
program
management
is
the
defined
EHS Program
below:
and coordination,
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 2
contract
Inc.
Procedures
administration,
resources
to
machines
ensure
project
EHS personnel,
and all
authorized
personnel
will
and control
while
and experience
safety
program
School
clearance
personnel
accidents
(explosive
are
Reporting
by EHS.
clearance
EOD-trained
responsibility
experience
in military
and individually,
and authority
appropriate
All
at the
action
whenever
personnel
EOD publications,
are
to correct
to prevent
an unsafe
familiar
condition
with
identification
responsibilities
and authority
of these
below:
Supervise-r
to
the
EHS Program
Manager,
the
the!
guidles,
publications.
defined
EHS Site
on-site
on-site
Collectively
or industrial)
safety
The specific
personnel
0
for
have been fully
or foreseen.
and associated
extensive
and administered
be responsible
or take
60-series
of the
the
or
direct
safety.
the
work,
Military
be directed
operations.
have
stop
observed
Because
EOD, and have extensive
problems,
U.S.
will
material,
be under
of EHS personnel,
key EHS personnel
Naval
on site.
will
and ordnance
EOD range
is
Personnel
requiring
operations
these
_t
Key Operational/Safety
The key EHS personnel
U.S.
completion.
of necessary
operations
EOD training
All
application
on-site
supervision
ordnance
1
and contract
1 . . l-.2.
All
- Enc.
Site
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Inc.
Procedures
Page 3
Supervisor
is
coordination
ensure
Health
emergency
response
Safety
for
administration
coordinating
and safety
the
the
pertaining
and any other
personnel
or equipment
responsibility,
personnel
of
of the
to safety
is
procedural,
He will
during
handling
control
on-site
and disposal
requiring
on-site.
on-
and for
general,
activities
local
and day-to-day
herein.
excavation,
of
EHS
Commensurating
with
he has the
authority
to stop
when an unsafe
condition
develops
admittance
to the
when operations
an accident
are
or other
site
the
for
of
Supervisor
all
specified
Slearch
responsible
arrival
implementation
ordnance,
to prevent
EHS Site
with
througlh
in support
and conducting
training
activity
Also
procedures
search/clearance
on-site
the
He
required
Supervisor
of safety
procedures
this
until
teams.
the
recording
is
to
activity.
used comply
Site
thle
personnel
survey
Officer
action
Officer,
responsible
the
including
and Safety
initial
event
for
and
including
of required
procedures
SOP's,
directing
site
:I
I
the
the direction
operations,
In an emergency,
on-site
all
daily
areas
that
and Excavation
data.
for
and supervision
and prepare
will
1
responsible
of all
assignment
clear
- Enc.
all
and
of unauthorized
in progress.
emergency
In the
situation,
he
EHS International,
Standard Operating
Page 4
will
Inc.
Procedures
coordinate
on-site
with
emergency
implementation
local
reports.
In addition,
of weekly
equipment
(.T
ensure
maintenance
including
required
the performance
checks,
records,
update
conduct
of personnel
required
periodic
and equipment,
and
operations.
to the
EHS Site
EOD/HAZMATTECH is
areas
that
being
safe
access
to ensure
safety
is
adherence
they
until
relieved
are
clear
undertaken
to procedures,
initiate
by the
experience
with
of the survey
emergency
in
during
their
procedures
Officer.
EHS has gained
and
inspect
GENERAL TECHNICAL APPROACH
Based on the
that
in such areas
of an emergency
immediate
Safety
also
compliance
and the well-being
event
to ensure
of UXO hazards
being
In the
will
-responsible
He will
requirements,
area,
the
available.
operations
team members.
Supervisor,
directly
investigated
and observe
1..2.
the
procedures,
he will
all
EHS EODHAZMATTECH
Reporting
, -.,
Officer
and submitting
and training
survey
& Safety
apd ,direct
authorities
inspections
observe
Health
operations
notifying
safety
the
1
of emergency
maintenance
0
- Enc.
Military
EHS International,
Standard
Page 5
Inc.
Operating
Procedures
- Enc.
clearance
operations,
previous
the U.S.
Army Corps
of Engineers
assist
this
project
Using
EHS will
project
with
the
complete
all
actual
records,
following
both
for
EHS will
approach.
and points
available
clearance
a picture
boundaries
and private%industry,
the
of contact
information
The information
site.
projects
R_e.cc,rd. Review
..-- -- __
the data,
assess
Survey/Clearance
utilizing
1 . . 2..1.
1
will
data
as possible
on the use of-the
be evaluated
obtained
on site
of the
of ordnance-related
interviewed,
levels,
and combined
to generate
types,
contamination
within
as
and
the project
site.
1..2..2.
A surface
specialists
landfill
Clearance
visual
will
will
be collected.
will
be placed
with
in
agreed
the
_Site Perimeter
1.
Using
a visual
Unexploded
at a designated
with
the
consisting
search
ordnance
Unexploded
accordance
with
sweep team,
conduct
areas.
of handfills
of two EOD trained
and clearance
items
and ordnance
ordnance
that
ordnance
holding
Standard
of
Operating
debris
can be safely
area
moved
and dealt
Procedures
as
COR.
Determination
__._------.-_--marking
stakes
and Surface
.
and lines
Sweep Procedures
as necessary,
mark the
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 6
outer
Inc.
Procedures
perimeter
Additional
ensure
2.
Clear
3.
footage
the
area
my be added
to
surface
scrap
metal
items.
survey
necessary,
to achieve
scrape
the
top
to be surveyed.
highest
t,o\ the perimeter
of miscellaneous
a geophysical
off
to be surveyed.
coverage.
ordnance
Conduct
1
of each site
complete
and/or
- Enc.
of the
entire
area.
an effective
geophysical
6" to 12" of the
surface
Record
and mark
concentrations
areas
of magnetic
If
survey,
of the
which
area
have the
and metallic
anomalies.
4.
Using
marking
outer
perimeter
1 . . 2..3.
of the
26 Ordnance
approved
for
held
site.
survey.
locator
detecting
unit
a fixed
conduct
and uses
distance
team will
ordnance
apart
Electromagnetic
will
the most
recent
items.
changes
search
Detector
be used
for
the
EOD forces
The locator
aligned
in
the
(MK
military
Military
magnetometers,
to detect
by an EOD
electromagnetic
in use by the U.S.
2 fluxgate
areas.
be assisted
a subsurface
The MK 26 is
subsurface
burial
mark the
Survey
and White/Eagle
and is
as necessary,
suspected
The Foerster
Locator)
subsurface
of the
survey
and will
landfill
and lines
Geophy.sical
The geophysical
specialist
stakes
earth's
is a handand mounted
ambient
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 7
magnetic
soil
to
field
Inc.
Procedures
caused
conditions.
the
disturbance
versus
geodetic
depth
general
terms.
a depth
of
of
contact
the
grid
is
found,
determine
if
contact
spot
is
the
Any
procedures.
the
grid
survey
will
EHS will
access
be present
to all
excavations
below
his
the
zone is
hand to
surface.
will
If
will
for
each
be accomplished
with
standard
to
will
the
mark the
established
be present
one
When a
operator
The items
ensure
then
EOD
safety
be recorded
sheets.
WELL INSTALLATION,
1..3.
to
along
search
with
and in accordance
excavations.
data
out
In
to 6 meters.
check
locatbr
item
a 60 mm projectile
deemed necessary
An EOD technician
of the
contamination.
on or just
fade
the
operator.
MK 26 and
will
ordnance
hand tools
on the
Site/pit
is
excavations
all
size
detect
subsurface
contact
by
are provided
whether
of the
use the
specialist
the
and to verify
clear
for
until
by hand or with
on the
easily
will
caused
The detection
experience
the
buried,
indicates
and a 155 mm projectile
line
and continue
landfill.
signal
the MK 26 will
The EOD specialist
side
and metered~signal
dependent
and on the
3 meters
or disturbances
or metal-related.
of the MK 26 is
its
1
metal
an audio
The metered
is
capability
by ferrous
Both
operator.
- Enc.
during
locations
SAMPLING AND TRENCH EXCAVATIONS
all
where
and scrapings
field
operations
activity
will
is
taking
be conducted
and will
place.
using
,.,-,.
,
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 8
standard
sites
_-,
EOD procedures
or buried
general
approach
collecting
for
In advance
10'
will
be cleared
assist
of
Both
Procedures.
/‘-.
site
in
Mechanized
to clear
scrub
drilling
equipment
designated
probe
This
procedure
feet
on all
before
ranges
being
of
will
impact
(2)
a site
sites,
the
Standard
effectiveness
of the
are
after,
the
surface
sweep.
be followed
at a minimum
and ranges
that
well
at the
on
auger
to clear
detonated.
be used to
be surface
the MK26 lowered
ranges
will
to enable
will
way
in diameter
and be operated
ranges
access
by EHS personnel
to be installed
or impact
two feet
obstacles
will
Operating
locators
be used and operated
that
The
for
a minimum
60 feet
and nonferrous
will
Wells
. Every
initially
and the
any UXO as per
to have access
site.
of operations.
of approximately
a high
detonated,
EHS EOD specialists
and any underground
Demolition/Burn
..
area
equipment
ordnance
the
be as follows:
to the well
ferrous
achieving
will
installation,
access
Many of
and excavating
required
of well
and well
precautions.
the many years
preparing
data
sweep the
1
or incendiary
throughout
survey
surface
- Enc.
and safety
have had explosive,
burned
of
Inc.
Procedures
another
will
be removed
(2)
to a depth
ordnance
cleared
two feet.
of
(20)
was buried
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 9
Inc.
Procedures
1 * . 3..2.
Trench
- Enc.
Excavations
1..3..2..1.
EHS personnel
sites.
at the
made with
digging
will
conduct
locations,
of the waste
of the waste,
samples.
toxic,
the
Should
a remote
and place
At this
it
excavation
of the
(can)
will
an appropriately
Plan
contact,
waste
out
through
the
middle
be the
width
of
the
for
of the
the
until
hand
the
surface
of the
be highly
nature
to take
waste
hazardous
or
the
sample
container.
Exavation
Procedures
a trench
to be dug out
burial
site.
back hoe/bucket
bottom/or
is
and depending
be used to extract
a path
a precise
required;
be activated
Site/Pit
and mark
down until
the
designed
1..3..2..2.
1.
if
SOP will
nature
method
in
point,
in
contact
On identification
appropriate
the designates
excavate
may continue
explored.
the
at
6" per sweep until
to identify
the
dump is
excavations
used will
(about
be initiated
outcome,
the
equipment
dumped material).
will
upon the
,
General
-_-
The mechanized
manner
1
water
The trench
and will
of the
burial
will
continue
site
is
determined.
2.
Initial
excavation
hand tools
suspected
will
to carefully
UXO until
be conducted
remove
positive
by hand or using
the dirt
identification
surrounding
can be
the.
EHS International,
Operating
Standard
Page 10
Inc.
Procedures
If
made.
- Enc.
1
deemed necessary,
remote
handling
equipment
may be required.
3.
Once located,
determine
safety
4.
Remove all
5.
Slowly
the
identify
factors
surface
personnel
the
UXO from
the
next
to the
trench.
on Excavation
modified
the
instance,
e
Position
.
chemical
accordance
it
7.
following
the
other
course
equipment
The excavated
area.
and place
procedures
it
on
from
of
the
In this
the UXO to be
from
the
the
side
final
side.
of the
UXC
exposed.
excavation.
excavation/removal
of UXO from
will
be removed
and handlled
SOP.
material
the
explosive/propellant/
they
found,
for
be used.
that
or nearly
for
may be
equipment
will
such
dirt
partially
UXO or bulk
approved
removal.
and upon
procedures
to hand tools
are
the
is
the
the UXO.
remove
materials
with
surrounding
Carefully
during
area,
dirt
can be approach
Revert
the pit
a pit,
uncovered
until
If,
from
use of mechanical
the
for
positive
by EHS, excavation
of
UXO to
of explosive/chemical
to permit
excavation
from
- following
of UXO removed
recommendation
exposed
excavation
identification/determination
hazard
the
to be considered
unnecessary
lift
Follow
6.
carefully
will
be placed
in an isolated
in
EHS International,
Standard
Page 11
Inc.
Operating
area
Procedures
within
the
ordnance
types
related
take
retreat
i
at
the
drums.
air
near
30 feet
then
protective
clothing
the
be overpacked.
the
designated
location
Safety
the
philosophy.
directly
experience
hazardous
the
are
will
wear
the
hazard.
The
Personnel
will
pit.
personnel
store
The
will
the drum at a
or at any other
trained
in
is
management
appropriate
all
foremost
operations.
The Site
in
the
and operational
supervisory
and responsibility
situations.
monitor
excavation
and equipment
Inc.
involved
of
site.
personnel
Fully
for
the
vicinity
readings
Qualified
on site
work
EHS International,
will
and properly
location
at
of
drum from
contents
to
Will
the
be removed.
will
drum will
are calm
from
personnel
appropriate
move
activities
personnel
any unusual
necessary
drums
various
excavation
HNU analyzers
carefully
identify
normal
up wind
If
the
winds
Unnecessary
stop.
drums.
the
estimate
all
the materials.
OVA and/or
around
and
catalog
The excavation
discovered,
exhibited,
dirt
9.
of
least
the
EHS will
on a day when the
are
will
activities
found
found.
dispersion
any drums
1
site.
metal
place
minimize
If
existing
and quantities
will
8.
- Enc.
personnel
are
They have the
to identify
Manager,
potentially
Safety
,
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 12
Inc.
Procedures
Officer,
action
encountered.
the
until
\
stop
when an unsafe
Standard
is
authority
situation
is
will
be employed
of ordnance
determined
that
anId
and take
work
EOD procedures
investigation/handling
it
the
have
to immediately
corrective
10.
1
and EOD Technicians
responsibility
in
- Enc.
no explosive
related
items
hazard
exists.
Restoration
After
each burial
pit
and metallic
debris,
conform
the
with
has been cleared
the
area
be filled
will
surrounding
of exposed
UXO
in to
terrain.
, -\
1..3..2..3.
i’
Personal
Protective
Clothing
Vapor Monitoring
Procedures
:
1.
The level
of protective
operation
is
level
dependent
required
for
army chemical
This
Plan.
2.
will
normally
provision
for
All
trenching/excavating/soil
with
analysis.
munitions
the
be either
Health
Level
OVA/HNU
(Level
.
will
in areas
C).
not
with
will
be
D or C, with
as necessary.
movement
in
'The
and Safety
upgrading/downgrading
be accomplished
monitoring
with
an
been contaminated
or chemical
accordance
the
will
,’
in
hazard
for
and excavating
of having
agents
required
upon the
scraping
known or suspected
determined
clothing
and_
in work areas
Continuous
be required.
Negative
1...,
EHS International.
Standard
Operating
Page 13
Inc.
Procedures
results
will
not
automaticlly
OVA/HNU will
a decision
elevated
during
doing
the
locators
whether
levels
being
operations.
In the
the
to evacuate
or
of work and
continue
work
in
to ensure
of
areas
escort
soil
prior
maximum safety
sampling,
ordnance
to a soil
sample
extracted.
1..4.
FACILITIES
To support
will
stopping
EHS will
sampling
in sample
readings
clothing.
required
case
justify
Elevated
in
If
and water
be used
clothing.
of protective
soil
will
be used to
result
1..3..2..4.
personnel
1
of protective
downgrading
on the
- Enc.
the
AND EQUIPMENT
overall
project,
-facilities
be marshalled
as indicated
in
The equipment
listed
will
operations
0
support
and emergency
Communications
emergency
transceivers
land
line
below
provided
or mobile
following
paragraphs.
be utiliied
for
general
support:
- On site
operations
the
and equipment
will
communications
be provided
will
normal
or
by portable
to key personnel.
telephone
for
A commercial
be available
for
direct-communications.
e
/-
Vehicles
- One passenger
vehicle
will
be available
on-
(,-
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Inc.
Procedures
Page 14
site
,-\
for
Field
general
bucket
1 . . 4..2.
,-.y
(MK 26)
locator.
hand tools.
,“\
Lease
a LS-2800
(
equipment,
Soil
- On site
contamination
use.
Emergency
and
and clean
samples.
will
be accomplished
plus
of recorded
tracked
back
contacts
backhoe
hoe,
1..4..2..1.
low
will
is
and any other
front
or case W-20 front
using
a White/Eagle
Where deep excavation
i.e.,
equivalent,
for
locator.,
Excavation
usinq
cross
and logistic
Detection/Excavation ---d-L-- and Clearance
Equipment/Material
detection
ordnance
Trailer
prevent
and tools
1
administration
Decontamination
operational,
Ordnance
- Enc.
end loader,
the
Foerster
frequency
be accomplished
required,
EHS will
necessary
Case 580 or
end loader
Miscellaneous
Equipment
List
Gloves
Boots
Mosquito
Safety
Lotion
Glasses
Helmets/Hard
dealing
with
Tools.
‘---m.-
suspected
Hand
Tape,
black
Chain
with
/ -\
---.----.-~.-
Hats
hooks
(Note:
UXO's)
hard
hats
will
not
be worn when
c..
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 15
Shovels,
spade
Support
Tire
Inc.
Procedures
for
both
repair,
- Enc.
1
and flat,
short
diesel
and gas
equipment
and
long
handle
~L
repair
Phone service
Surveyor's
3 pkgs
all
colors
l/2
inch
of stakes
2 coils
of
starting
250'
tape,
line,
fluid
surveyor's
Decon tubs,
--\
tape
2 cases
bleach
1 . . 4..2..2.
i..
aothes
Day / Size
2 Pr
_
Large
Tyvex
2 Pr
Large
Saranex
2 Pr
Large
Filters
1 Pr - Purple
Respirators
1 Ea
Tape
1 Case
Coveralls
1 Ea
Yellow
Boots,
boots
Knee
3 Pr
Inner
gloves
2 Pr
Outer
gloves
2Pr
SCBA's
. .
for
with
a dedicated
mask.
Workinq
One extra
bottle
per
rig.
EHS International.
Standard
Operating
Page 16
Airlines
operations
with
Inc.
Procedures
- Enc.
1
sufficient
hoses
and
air
supply
for
level
B
..
i ,
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 17
1 . . 5.
Inc.
Procedures
STANDARD
The following
routine
local
area
due to the
provide
gener‘a'l
and operating
procedures
employment
laborers
nature
opportunity
if
of
will
required
the
thoroughly
work
for
task
and the
this
potential
Following
for
project.
hazards
as to the
the
However,
expected,
be necessary:
hires
physical
will
be
nature
of the
hazards.
- Personnel
known allergies
bites
dismissal:
D
to be used b!y
be provided
and the
briefed
Known allergies
all
constitute
on
EmDl oyment
PKqs_onnel
consideration
of the areas listed
below will
e
Physical
Conditioning
- Potential
0
information
on site.
1 . . 5..1.
Equal
1
PROCEDURES
paragraphs
administrative
EHS while
- Enc.
will
or previous
be asked
reactions
to
to insect
or medication.
employment,
grounds
Failure
dismissal
for
to
the
conditions
termination
attend
with
(dismissal
after
Possession
of
training
no pay)
listed
and will
or daily
below
result
sessions
in
immediate
briefings
one warning).
or being
under
the
list
influence
of
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 18
Inc.
Procedures
- Enc.
alcohol
or drugs
at the
Failure
to comply
with
site
etc.)
failure
(.dismissal
0
Unexcused
absence
1 . . 5..2.
General
Procedures
-.- -.....
.--- __--.
-.-- ___
below
will
be followed
procedures
may be altered
maximize
by the
Safety
if
imposed
restrictions
e
one warning).
one warning).
gn.d..Daily
routine
---_Routine
prescribed
on the
site.
These
that
concern
safety)
those
Officer-as
deemed appropriate
and to facilitate
additional
On-Site
Restrictions
on-site
on the
operations,
contractor
personnel
several
restrictions
will
visitors.
These
and authorized
are:
Access
authorized
- Will
be limited
visitors
to the
and only
contractor
via
the
or
office
.
facilities.
-\
.
<
I
i
to
required.
1..5..2..1.
During
in an
one warning).
after
working
(except
productivity
training,
after
and daily
while
and routines
smoking
(dismissal
procedures
safety
after
Malingering
(dismissal
dismissal).
to wear protective
0
The general
1’_1
I
(i.e.,
area,
clothing,
(immediate
prescribed
procedures/regulations
unauthorized
1
Vehicles
- Only
contractor
vehicles
will
be
be
-.
( _I
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 19
Inc.
Procedures
permitted
on the
activities
3
are
Unauthorized
the
site
If
It
where
ordnance-related
in progress.
~\
be reported
is
unauthorized
and subject
- Any. observed
to the
continuation
unauthorized
Note:
site
1
Vehicles/Personnel
will
radio.
- Enc.
of work
Safety
poses
personnel,
work
will
recognized
that
control
personnel
on site
to the
cooperation
Officer
a hazard
on
via
to
be stopped.
of
will
be difficult
of
the Range Control
authorities.
1..5..2..2.
The on-site
(tentative)
0
Daily
daily
Working
routine
Periods
a 3O-minute
rest
is
as follows:
Sunday-Friday
Saturday
Rest
to be used
Hours
0730-1730
0
Routine
periods
off
- two fifteen
lunch
at
minute
break.
the
rest
(Additional
discretion
of
periods
and
on-station
the
Site
Supervisor.
0
Daily
Briefings
- The designated
members
on work
Safety
planned
'Officer
for
that
will
brief
the Team
day and provide
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 20
other
pertinent
- Enc.
Several
types
be conducted
Checklists
EHS Site
frequencies.
on the
types
for
these
In addition
to
and Maintenance
and maintenance
by the
at varying
information
Safety
of safety
on-site
1
information.
1 . . 5..2..3.
Inspections
Officer
Inc.
Procedures
Supervisor,
Table
l-l
and frequency
inspections
inspections
will
will
Safety
provides
of these
inspections.
be provided
at the work
site.
Supervisor/Safety
all
types
at
the
inspection
Officer
least
will
listed,
conduct
the
random
Site
inspections
of
once each week.
Table
l-l
SAFETY AND MAINTENANCE INSPECTIONS
TYPE
‘I,
-\
*
NAME
FREQUENCY
DAILY
WEEKLY
MONTHLY
RESPONSIBILITY
M
Vehicle
X
Operator
S
Protective
clothing
X
Site
Supervisor
M
First
Aid
Equipment
Site
Supervisor
M
ABC
Extinguisher
Site
Manager
S
Fire
X
X
X
All
Key
REMARKS
Each vehicle
Each Kit
EHS International,
Standard
Operating
Page 21
a
Hazards
S
Operational
MK 26
M
White/Eagle
\S = Safety
M= Maintenance
- Enc.
1
Personnel
X
All Key
Personnel
X
Operator
,
M
Inc.
Procedures
X
Operator
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