Datalogic | GWY-01-PBS-01 | Specifications | Datalogic GWY-01-PBS-01 Specifications

Datalogic GWY-01-PBS-01 Specifications
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Escort Memory Systems®, and the Escort Memory Systems logo, Subnet16™, RFID
AT WORK™.
Third party product names mentioned herein are used for identification purposes only
and may be trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective companies:
NXP, Rockwell Automation (ControlLogix, RSLogix), Texas Instruments, Infineon,
Modicon, Belden, Microsoft and the Open DeviceNet Vendor Association (ODVA).
E S C O R T M E M O R Y S YS T E M S
GWY- 01- DNT-01
Subnet16™ DeviceNet Gateway Manual – Rev. 02
For the GWY-01-DNT-01 Gateway Interface Module
COPYRIGHT © 2008 DATALOGIC AUTOMATION SRL, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
ESCORT MEMORY SYSTEMS
GWY-01-DNT-01
S UBNET 16™ D EVICE N ET G ATEWAY
I NTERFACE M ODULE
High frequency, Multi-protocol, RFID Interface Module for DeviceNet
O PERATOR ’ S M ANUAL
How to Install, Configure and Operate
Escort Memory Systems’
Subnet16 DeviceNet Gateway
PAGE 3 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
REGULATORY COMPLIANCE
REGULATORY COMPLIANCE
FCC PART 15.105
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B
digital device, pursuant to part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to
provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation.
This equipment uses, generates, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not
installed and used in accordance with these instructions, may cause harmful
interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that
interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause
harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by
turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the
interference by one or more of the following measures:
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
FCC PART 15.21
Users are cautioned that changes or modifications to the unit not expressly approved
by Escort Memory Systems may void the user’s authority to operate the equipment.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2)
this device must accept any interference that may cause undesired operation.
CE
This product complies with the following regulatory specifications: EN 60950, EN300-330, EN-300-683, IEC 68-2-1, IEC 68-2-6, IEC 68-2-27 and IEC 68-2-28.
TELEC
This product complies with TELEC Regulations for Enforcement of the Radio Law
Article 6, section 1, No. 1.
PAGE 4 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CONTENTS
CONTENTS
CONTENTS ................................................................................ 5
LIST OF TABLES ....................................................................... 8
LIST OF FIGURES ...................................................................... 9
CHAPTER 1:
1.1
GETTING STARTED ........................................... 10
Introduction ...................................................................................... 10
1 .1 .1
The Subnet16™ Gateway...................................................................................... 10
1.2
Subnet16 DeviceNet Gateway Features............................................ 10
1.3
About this Manual............................................................................. 11
1 .3 .1
1 .3 .2
Who Should Read this Manual?............................................................................. 11
HEX Notation.......................................................................................................... 11
1.4
Gateway Dimensions ........................................................................ 12
1.5
Installation Guidelines ..................................................................... 13
1 .5 .1
1 .5 .2
1 .5 .3
1.6
Hardware Requirements ........................................................................................ 13
Installation Precautions .......................................................................................... 13
Network & Power Considerations .......................................................................... 13
Installing the Gateway ...................................................................... 14
CHAPTER 2:
2.1
Operating Modes .............................................................................. 16
2 .1 .1
2 .1 .2
2 .1 .3
2.2
Front Panel LEDs ................................................................................................... 18
External Connectors ......................................................................... 19
2 .3 .1
2 .3 .2
2.4
Subnet16™ ............................................................................................................ 16
Mux32™ ................................................................................................................. 16
DIP-Switch Setting ................................................................................................. 17
LED Indicators .................................................................................. 18
2 .2 .1
2.3
GATEWAY OVERVIEW ....................................... 16
DeviceNet / Power Connector................................................................................ 19
Subnet16 Connector Pin Descriptions ................................................................... 20
Power & Wiring ................................................................................. 21
2 .4 .1
2 .4 .2
2 .4 .3
2 .4 .4
Power Requirements.............................................................................................. 21
Total System Current Consumption ....................................................................... 21
Cable Voltage Drop ................................................................................................ 22
Subnet16 Gateway Hardware Details .................................................................... 23
2.5
Node ID Configuration & Management ............................................. 24
2.6
Gateway and Subnet Node Naming .................................................. 25
2.7
Configuration Tools .......................................................................... 26
2 .7 .1
2 .7 .2
Cobalt Dashboard .................................................................................................. 26
C-Macro Builder ..................................................................................................... 27
CHAPTER 3:
RFID COMMAND MACROS ................................. 28
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CHAPTER 4:
CONTENTS
COMMAND MAPPING ......................................... 30
4.1
CBx Command Protocol Overview ................................................... 30
4.2
CBx - Command Packet Structure .................................................... 31
4.3
CBx - Response Packet Structure .................................................... 32
4.4
CBx Commands Table ...................................................................... 33
4.5
CBx Command Protocol Examples ................................................... 36
4 .5 .1
4 .5 .2
4 .5 .3
4 .5 .4
CBx - Controller Command Example ..................................................................... 36
CBx - Controller Response Example ..................................................................... 37
CBx - Gateway Command Example ...................................................................... 37
CBx - Gateway Response Example....................................................................... 38
4.6
CBx Error Response Packet Structure ............................................. 40
4.7
CBx Error Code Table ....................................................................... 41
4 .7 .1
4.8
CBx - Error Response Example ............................................................................. 43
Notification Messages ...................................................................... 43
4 .8 .1
4 .8 .2
4 .8 .3
Notification Message Table.................................................................................... 44
Notification Mask Example..................................................................................... 45
Notification Message Packet Structure .................................................................. 45
CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE .................................... 46
5.1
DeviceNet Overview.......................................................................... 46
5.2
DeviceNet Configuration .................................................................. 46
5 .2 .1
5 .2 .2
5 .2 .3
5 .2 .4
5 .2 .5
Importing the Gateway .EDS File........................................................................... 46
Configuring Gateway and PLC DeviceNet Communications ................................. 47
Configuring Data Rate and Node Address............................................................. 53
DeviceNet - Exchanging Data and Handshaking................................................... 53
DeviceNet - Handshaking Example ....................................................................... 54
APPENDIX A: TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS ............................ 56
APPENDIX B: MODELS AND ACCESSORIES ............................ 57
Subnet16™ Gateway Interface Modules ................................................... 57
RFID Controllers ....................................................................................... 57
Cobalt HF-Series RFID Controllers ...................................................................................... 57
Cobalt C0405-Series RFID Controllers ................................................................................ 58
Cobalt C1007-Series RFID Controllers ................................................................................ 58
HF-0405-Series RFID Controllers ........................................................................................ 58
Cobalt HF-Series Antennas.................................................................................................. 57
Software & Demonstration Kits ................................................................ 59
Software Applications ........................................................................................................... 59
Demonstration Kits ............................................................................................................... 59
Power Supplies ......................................................................................... 60
EMS RFID Tags ......................................................................................... 60
Subnet16 Cables & Accessories............................................................... 61
APPENDIX C: NETWORK DIAGRAMS ....................................... 62
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CONTENTS
Subnet16 Gateway –ThickNet Network Diagram................................................................. 63
Subnet16 Gateway – ThinNet Network Diagram ................................................................. 64
APPENDIX D: ASCII CHART .................................................... 65
WARRANTY ............................................................................. 67
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
LIST OF TABLES
LIST OF TABLES
Table 2-1: Front Panel LEDs................................................................................................................ 18
Table 2-2: DeviceNet LED Behavior .................................................................................................... 18
Table 2-3: Power Supplies Part Numbers............................................................................................ 21
Table 2-3: Gateway and Node Naming – CBx Command IDs............................................................. 25
Table 4-1: CBx Command Packet Structure........................................................................................ 31
Table 4-2: CBx - Response Packet Structure ...................................................................................... 32
Table 4-3: CBX Commands Table ....................................................................................................... 36
Table 4-4: Node Status Byte Definition Table...................................................................................... 39
Table 4-5: CBx Error Code Table ........................................................................................................ 42
Table 4-6: Notification Message Table ................................................................................................ 44
Table 4-7: Notification Message - Packet Structure ............................................................................ 45
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
LIST OF FIGURES
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1-1: GWY-01-DNT-01 Dimensions ........................................................................................... 12
Figure 1-2: Drop-T Connectors and Terminating Resistors................................................................. 14
Figure 1-3: Subnet16 ThinNet Cable ................................................................................................... 15
Figure 1-4: Subnet16 ThickNet Cable.................................................................................................. 15
Figure 2-1: GWY-01-DNT-01: DeviceNet Interface Connector - Pinout .............................................. 19
Figure 2-2: Subnet16 Connector Pin Descriptions .............................................................................. 20
Figure 2-3: Cobalt Dashboard.............................................................................................................. 26
Figure 2-4: C-Macro Builder................................................................................................................. 27
Figure 5-1: Configuring Gateway for DeviceNet - Going Online.......................................................... 47
Figure 5-2: Scanning Node Addresses on a DeviceNet Network ........................................................ 48
Figure 5-3: Updating Configuration in RSNetWorx.............................................................................. 49
Figure 5-4: Editing the Gateway’s DeviceNet I/O Parameters............................................................. 50
Figure 5-5: 1756-DNB/A Input Properties Tab..................................................................................... 51
Figure 5-6: 1756-DNB/A Output Properties Tab.................................................................................. 52
Figure 5-7: Gateway I/O Controller Tags (in RSLogix 5000) ............................................................... 54
PAGE 9 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CHAPTER 1:
GETTING STARTED
CHAPTER 1:
GETTING STARTED
1.1
INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the GWY-01-DNT-01 Operator’s Manual. This manual will assist you in
the installation, configuration and operation of Escort Memory Systems’ Subnet16
DeviceNet Gateway Interface Module.
The DeviceNet Gateway can control up to 16 passive high frequency read/write
Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) controllers. In order to meet and exceed the
requirements of the industrial automation industry, the DeviceNet Gateway and EMS
RFID controllers are designed to be compact, reliable and rugged.
1.1.1
The Subnet16™ Gateway
Subnet16™ is a 16-Node Multidrop bus architecture and protocol that provides
connectivity for up to 16 RFID controllers through a single Gateway device.
The DeviceNet Gateway supports DeviceNet standards and is compatible with EMS’
C-Series and Cobalt HF-Series RFID controllers, LRP, HMS and T-Series RFID tags.
Many of EMS’ legacy RFID controllers with MUX32™ capability are also compatible
with the Gateway.
1.2
S U B N E T 16 D E V I C E N E T G A T E W A Y F E A T U R E S
•
Multi-Drop capable; controls up to 16 RFID reader/writers, each functioning
independently and simultaneously.
•
DeviceNet compliant through ODVA's Independent Conformance Testing
Laboratories
•
Operational power is supplied directly from the Subnet 16TM network
•
Communicates with read/write passive RFID tags
•
IP30 Rated Field Mountable metallic enclosure
•
Small footprint provides ease of mounting (76mm x 89mm x 33mm).
•
Selectable data transfer rate (125K baud, 250K baud, 500K baud). 10/100 Mbps
•
Selectable DeviceNet node addressing (0 to 63), default is 63
•
LED status indicators for network status, module status, command execution, tag
presence, error indication, and power
•
FCC/CE Agency compliant (for noise immunity)
•
Supports controller macro functionality
•
Flash memory for software updates
•
Real-time Calendar/Date functions
•
OnDemand Utilities for legacy support of PLC5E and RA SCL5/05 PLCs
•
Downward compatible with most EMS Mux32™ compliant products
PAGE 10 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
1.3
CHAPTER 1:
GETTING STARTED
•
Auto configuration of RFID controllers, automatic Node ID number assignment
•
Node Fault Detection
•
Isolated power and bus interfaces
•
ARM7 processing power
ABOUT THIS MANUAL
This manual provides guidelines and instructions for installing, configuring and
operating Escort Memory Systems’ Subnet16 DeviceNet Gateway Interface Module
(GWY-01-DNT-01).
This document does NOT include explicit details regarding each of the Gateway’s
RFID commands. Specific RFID command related information is available in the CBx
Command Protocol – Reference Manual, which is available at www.ems-rfid.com.
However, this manual does explain the process of issuing commands from a host PC
or Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) to a Subnet16 Gateway, Subnet network
and attached RFID controllers.
NOTE:
-Throughout this manual, the GWY-01-DNT-01 is referred to as the “Subnet16
Gateway” or simply “the Gateway”.
- C -Series RFID Controllers and Cobalt HF-Series RFID Controllers are referred to as
C-Series Controllers, Cobalt Controllers, or just “the Controller.”
-In addition, the terms “Subnet Node Number”, “Node ID” and “Controller ID” are used
interchangeably.
1.3.1
Who Should Read this Manual?
This manual should be read by those who will be installing, configuring and operating
the Gateway. This may include the following people:
Hardware Installers
System Integrators
Project Managers
IT Personnel
System and Database Administrators
Software Application Engineers
Service and Maintenance Engineers
1.3.2
HEX Notation
Throughout this manual, numbers expressed in Hexadecimal notation are prefaced
with “0x”. For example, the number "10" in decimal is expressed as "0x0A" in
hexadecimal. See Appendix D for a chart containing Hex values, ASCII characters
and their corresponding decimal integers.
PAGE 11 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
1.4
CHAPTER 1:
GETTING STARTED
GATEWAY DIMENSIONS
Figure 1-1: GWY-01-DNT-01 Dimensions
PAGE 12 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
1.5
1.5.1
CHAPTER 1:
GETTING STARTED
INSTALLATION GUIDELINES
H a r d w a r e R e q u i r e m e n ts
The following components are required for a complete Subnet16 RFID system:
One Subnet16 DeviceNet Gateway Interface Module
One ControlLogix PLC or other DeviceNet-capable host
One to 16 RS485-based RFID controllers (Cobalt or HF-0405-Series)
Adequate length cabling, connectors and terminators
Sufficient power, supplied via DeviceNet network cabling, capable of
powering the Gateway and its RFID controllers
EMS’ HMS-Series, LRP-Series or T-Series RFID tags
1.5.2
I n s ta l l a t i o n P r e c a u t i o n s
Route cables away from motors, solenoids, unshielded cables and any wiring
that carries high voltage or high current.
Review the power requirements of your RFID network and provide a suitable
power supply.
The Gateway is designed to withstand 8kV of direct electro-static discharge
(ESD) and 15kV of air gap discharge. However, it is not uncommon for some
applications to generate considerably higher ESD levels. Always use
adequate ESD prevention measures to dissipate potentially high voltages.
Avoid mounting the Gateway or its RFID controllers near sources of EMI
(electro-magnetic interference) or near devices that generate high ESD
levels.
Perform a test phase by constructing a small scale, independent network that
includes only the essential devices required to test your RFID application
(use EMS approved Subnet16 cables and accessories).
Cables should only cross at perpendicular intersections.
1.5.3
Network & Power Considerations
•
Refer to the network diagrams in Appendix C. Choose the network
architecture (ThickNet vs. ThinNet) that best suits your RFID requirements.
•
Construct your chosen network using only EMS approved Subnet16 cables,
Drop-T connectors, Terminating Resistors and accessories.
•
Review the power requirements of your RFID network and provide a suitable
power supply. (See Appendix B for power supplies offered by EMS).
IMPORTANT NOTE: It is strongly recommended that power be applied directly to the
Subnet16 TM Network trunk and distributed through drop cables to the Gateway and
RFID controllers.
PAGE 13 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
1.6
CHAPTER 1:
GETTING STARTED
INSTALLING THE GATEWAY
The GWY-01-DNT-01 supports DeviceNet communications and can be connected to
a LAN and/or Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) via DeviceNet-compatible
cabling.
Follow the Steps Below to Install the Gateway
1. Note the Installation Guidelines in Chapter 1, Section 1.5.
2. Securely mount the Gateway to your chosen location using two M5 (#10)
screws, lock washers and nuts. The Gateway may be mounted in any
orientation, but should be aligned in such a manner that the LED
indicators can be seen during operation.
3. Attach one end of a 5-pin, male-to-male, M12, ThinNet drop cable (EMS
P/N: CBL- 1481-XX) to the 5-pin, female, M12 connector on the
Gateway. Connect the other end of this 5-pin, male-to-male, M12,
ThinNet drop cable to the 5-pin, female, M12 connector on EITHER a
ThickNet to ThinNet Drop-T Connector OR a ThinNet to ThinNet
Drop-T Connector (as per your network and RFID application
requirements). See figure below for Drop-T connectors.
Figure 1-2: Drop-T Connectors and Terminating Resistors
4. Attach one end of a male-to-female trunk cable to each mating connector
on the Drop-T Connector. Continue connecting trunk cables and Drop-T
connectors as needed. Note: trunk length should not exceed 300m for
ThickNet and 20m for ThinNet.
5. Connect the male end of a 5-pin, male-to-female ThinNet drop cable to
the female end on your Drop-T connector(s). Attach the remaining
female end of the ThinNet drop cable to the 5-pin, male, M12 connector
on a Cobalt HF and/or C-Series Controller (RS485 models).
6. Repeat Step 5 for each RFID controller you plan to install. Note:
maximum drop cable length is 2m.
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CHAPTER 1:
GETTING STARTED
Figure 1-3: Subnet16 ThinNet Cable
7. For ThickNet Networks: Using a 5-pin, female, 7/8 - 16, ThickNet to
Bare Wire Leads cable (EMS P/N: CBL-1495-XX), connect the bare
wires to your power supply (SHIELD wire connected to GND). Attach the
female, ThickNet end to the 5-pin, male, ThickNet end on a Drop-T
connector (EMS P/N: CBL-1526).
8. For ThinNet Networks: Using a 5-pin, female, M12, ThinNet to Bare
Wire Leads cable (EMS P/N: CBL-1494-XX), connect the bare wires to
your power supply (SHIELD wire connected to GND). Attach the female,
ThinNet end to the 5-pin, male, ThinNet end on a Drop-T connector
(EMS P/N: CBL-1486).
Figure 1-4: Subnet16 ThickNet Cable
9. Attach a DeviceNet-compatible data cable to the 5-pin, male M12
interface connector on the Gateway. Connect the other end of this cable
to your DeviceNet network.
10. Turn your power supply ON. The green PWR (power) LED on the
Gateway will illuminate. After the boot process is complete, the amber
DeviceNet LED will also glow to indicate that the Gateway is in
DeviceNet mode. The “DeviceNet” LED may appear green or red (solid
or flashing) depending on the status of the connection with your
DeviceNet network (see Table 2-2 in Section 2.2.1 for the behavior of the
Gateway’s DeviceNet LED).
O P T IO N A L S T E P S F O R A D D ITI O N A L C O N F I G U R A T ION
Steps 11 - 12 below are considered optional and only need to be completed by users
that wish to modify their Gateway’s internal configuration.
11. To modify the Gateway’s internal configuration, connect a USB cable to
the USB interface connector on the Gateway. Connect the other end of
this cable to a USB port on your host computer.
12. Download the Cobalt Dashboard Utility from www.ems-rfid.com and
install the software on your host computer. Use the Dashboard Utility to
connect, via USB, to the Gateway. You will then be able to use the
Cobalt Dashboard Utility to configure the Gateway and send RFID
commands for testing purposes.
XX = length in Meters
GWY-01-DNT-01 DEVICENET FACTORY DEFAULTS
Node Address: 63
Data Rate: 125Kb (via 5-pin DeviceNet connection)
PAGE 15 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
2.1
OPERATING MODES
Subnet16 Gateways have two modes of operation: Subnet16™ and Mux32™.
Operating modes are set by configuring one of the eight DIP-switches on the unit’s
circuit board assembly (Refer to Section 2.1.3 for DIP-switch access and setting).
2.1.1
Subnet16™
Subnet16™ is an advanced feature-rich network protocol that supports a subset of
the EMS Mux32 legacy protocol. The advanced features implemented in the
Subnet16 protocol allow the Gateway to assign individual Node ID values
automatically to each RFID controller connected on the Subnet bus. Subnet16 also
allows the Gateway to detect when a new controller is connected to the Subnet or
when a controller “falls off the bus” (stops responding).
Through the Subnet16 protocol, the Gateway is able to store a backup copy of each
RFID controller’s custom configuration settings. In the event that an RFID controller
fails, the stored configuration settings can be automatically reassigned to a
replacement RFID controller.
Real-time clock functionality is supported in Subnet16 mode. Host-bound data
packets are automatically Time/Date stamped as they pass through the Gateway and
on to the host.
Many of the RFID commands supported by the Gateway and RFID controllers will
only function when the Gateway is in Subnet16 mode.
2.1.2
Mux32™
Mux32 is a well-established, multi-drop protocol incorporated into many of EMS’ prior
products including HMS-Series and LRP-Series RFID Controllers. Most, but not all,
HMS and LRP commands supported by MUX32 are also supported by the Gateway
(when in Mux32 mode). Legacy Mux32 controllers must support the “ABx Fast”
command protocol to work with the Gateway in Mux32 Mode. For more information
regarding ABx Fast, please see the ABx Fast Protocol – Reference Manual available
online at www.ems-rfid.com.
Many advanced Subnet16 features are not available when the Gateway is running in
Mux32 mode. RFID controllers must be assigned a unique Node ID number (via
Configuration Tag) prior to being attached to the Gateway’s Subnet.
Note that the Gateway does not support Node IDs 17-31. Node IDs 0 and 32 are
reserved for special cases described later in this manual.
NOTE: The Gateway communicates over the RS-485 physical layer using these two
protocols only, but it is not a generic RS-485 device.
RS-485 cabling requirements are the same for both protocols.
PAGE 16 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
2.1.3
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
DIP-Switch Setting
The operating modes are set by configuring one of the eight DIP-switches on the
unit’s main board. To access these DIP-switches, remove the four screws securing
the lid to the base of the enclosure. After removing the lid, locate the DIP-switch
block containing eight small DIP-switches.
ON
DIP-Switch # 2
OFF
The DIP-Switch # 2 selects the Gateway’s Operating Mode, thereby determining
whether the device powers-up in Subnet16 mode or in Mux32 mode.
• DIP-Switch 2 ON = Subnet16 (Default Setting)
When this DIP-switch is ON, upon power-up, the Gateway will enter Subnet16
mode, enabling the Subnet16 protocol and expanded feature set.
• DIP-Switch 2 OFF = Mux32
When this DIP-switch is OFF, upon power-up, the Gateway will enter Mux32
mode.
The user should NOT modify any other DIP-switch.
PAGE 17 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
2.2
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
LED I N D I C A T O R S
The Gateway has four LED indicators located on the front panel of the unit. The
LEDs display everything from bus and DeviceNet activity, to diagnostic information
and power status.
2.2.1
Front Panel LEDs
LED NAME
LED COLOR
DESCRIPTION
PWR
Green
The PWR (power) LED will light and remain
ON while power is applied to the Gateway.
BUS
Amber
The BUS LED will flash ON and OFF to
indicate that data is being transmitted
between the Gateway and one or more RFID
controllers.
DEVICENET
Amber
For the DEVICENET LED description, see
table below.
ERR
Red
The ERR (error) LED will turn ON when the
Gateway experiences an error condition.
This LED will be cleared when the next valid
command is received by the Gateway.
Table 2-1: Front Panel LEDs
The table below describes the behavior of the DeviceNet LED indicator.
D EVICENET LED IS:
IND ICATES:
Off
Gateway is not online or not powered
Solid Green
Gateway is operational, online AND a connection is
established
Flashing Green
Gateway is operational and online, but with no established
I/O connections (idle on the network) or Gateway is online
and needs commissioning
Flashing Red
Recoverable fault detected and/or the Gateway’s I/O
connection timed out
Solid Red
Unrecoverable fault detected (for example, a duplicate node
address was encountered rendering Gateway unable to
communicate)
Table 2-2: DeviceNet LED Behavior
PAGE 18 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
2.3
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
EXTERNAL CONNECTORS
The Gateway has the following external connectors:
DeviceNet Connector (5-pin, male, M12 - for DeviceNet connection)
USB Connector (USB type B, female - for establishing a direct serial
connection with a host computer for the purpose of configuring the Gateway)
Subnet16™ RS485 Connector (5-pin, female, M12 – for connecting to the
Subnet16 network and RFID controllers)
2.3.1
DeviceNet / Power Connector
GWY-01-DNT-01 Five-Pin Interface Connector – Pinout
Figure 2-1: GWY-01-DNT-01: DeviceNet Interface Connector - Pinout
See Section 2.4 for more information regarding power and wiring for the Gateway.
PAGE 19 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
2.3.2
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
Subnet16 RS485 Connector Pin Descriptions
Figure 2-2: Subnet16 RS485 Connector Pin Descriptions
PAGE 20 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
2.4
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
POWER & WIRING
The information presented below is provided to assist the installer in determining the
amount of power that will be required by the Gateway and its Subnet network.
2.4.1
P o w e r R e q u i r e m e n ts
Power is applied directly to the Subnet16 TM Network trunk and distributed through
drop cables to the Gateway and the RFID controllers attached (see Appendix C for
network diagrams).
The Gateway requires an electrical supply voltage of 18~30VDC and has a power
draw of 2.88W (120mA @ 24VDC, 1 Amp peak). Use a regulated power supply that
is capable of delivering these requirements.
EMS P/N:
00-1166
00-1167
00-1168
DESCRIPTION
45W, 24VDC, 1.88A max
100W, 24VDC, 4.17A max
120W, 24VDC, 5.0A max
Table 2-3: Power Supplies Part Numbers
In addition, each RFID controller connected to the Gateway via the Subnet16 network
will also require power.
The information presented below is provided to assist you in determining the power
requirements of your RFID application.
2.4.2
To ta l S y s t e m C u r r e n t C o n s u m p t i o n
Maximum Gateway Current = 120mA @ 24VDC (2.88W)
Maximum RFID Controller Current = (refer to controller’s specifications for
more information)
C0405-485 controllers = 100mA
C1007-485 controllers = 150mA
Cobalt HF-CNTL-485 controllers = 400mA
HF-0405-485 controllers = 150mA
CALCULATING TOTAL SYSTEM CURRENT CONSUMPTION
To calculate the total amount of current required to operate the Gateway and any
number of attached RFID controllers, follow the formula below.
Total Current Consumption = [Maximum Gateway Current + (Maximum Controller
Current x Number of Controllers)] x 1.1 (to add a 10% safety margin)
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CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
EXAMPLE
For a Subnet16 Gateway network with eight C0405-485 RFID Controllers:
Total Current Required = [0.120A + (0.100A X 8)] x 1.1 = 1.012A
2.4.3
C a b l e Vo l ta g e D r o p
In addition, each RFID controller on the Subnet will experience a certain amount of
voltage drop depending on the length of the cable.
CABLE RESISTANCE
PER
METER
ThinNet = .05413 ohms per meter
ThickNet = .0105 ohms per meter
CALCULATING VOLTAGE DROP
Voltage Drop = [(Max Controller Current X Number of Controllers) X (Cable
Resistance per Meter X Cable Length in Meters)]
EXAMPLE
For a ThinNet network with eight C0405-485 RFID Controllers at a cable length of 20
meters:
Voltage Drop = (0.100A x 8) X (.05413 X 20) = 0.866VDC
It is recommended that the voltage drop calculation be conducted on the RFID
controller that is farthest from the Gateway, as it will experience the greatest voltage
drop.
CURRENT RATING
FOR
CABLES
ThinNet Cable Current Rating = 6.4A
ThickNet Cable Current Rating = 17.6A (power and ground); 13.6A (data)
12mm Connector Current Rating = 3A
PAGE 22 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
2.4.4
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
S u b n e t 1 6 G a t e w a y H a r d w a r e D e ta i l s
The Gateway incorporates an ARM7 micro-controller, a power supply circuit (with
protected input and output circuits), a real- time clock and an opto-isolated Subnet16
interface (with diagnostic functionality). Subnet16 serial communication is protected
by EMI filters and diodes for fault tolerance.
The outer housing of the Gateway is a fabricated stainless steel enclosure that is
rated NEMA 1 and IP30. A mounting bracket is incorporated into the enclosure to
provide ease of installation. Four Philips head screws secure the cover to the base.
Removing these four screws and the cover is required to access the DIP-switch block.
NOTE:
IP30 – Ingress Protection against solid objects over 2.5mm (tools and wires)
-Ingress Protection (IP) ratings are developed by the European Committee for Electro
Technical Standardization (CENELEC) - IEC/EN Publication 60529
NEMA Type 1 - Enclosures are constructed for indoor use, provide a degree of
protection to personnel against incidental contact with the enclosed equipment and
provide a degree of protection against falling dirt.
- NEMA Standards Publication 250-2003
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2.5
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
N O D E ID C O N F I G U R A T I O N & M A N A G E M E N T
Only RS485-based RFID controllers can be connected to a Gateway’s Subnet
network and each must be assigned a unique Node ID value between 1 and 16.
When an RFID controller is connected to the Gateway’s Subnet network, the
Gateway will query the new controller to obtain certain configuration values
(specifically the Node ID number). If the Gateway does not detect a Node ID conflict,
it will “allow” the RFID controller onto the Subnet network.
By using the Cobalt HF
Configuration Tag that is
included with each RS485based Cobalt and HF-Series
RFID Controller, the Node ID
value can be dynamically
assigned by the Gateway or
can be manually assigned by
the user.
For the Gateway to
dynamically assign a Node
ID value to a controller, the
controller must first be
initialized with the Node ID
value of zero. This is the
equivalent of having no Node
ID assigned (note: all EMS
RS485-based controllers ship
with their Node ID value set
to 0).
When a controller (that is set
to Node ID 0) is connected to
the Subnet, it will not initially
be recognized by the
Gateway until the
Configuration Tag is placed
in the antenna’s RF field and
power to the controller is cycled. A few seconds after power is cycled to the controller
while the Configuration Tag is in RF range, the controller will display its new assigned
Node ID value in binary code from right to left using the five amber LEDs on the
controller.
When dynamically assigning a Node ID value for a new controller, the Gateway will
either assign the next available Node ID value or the value that the Gateway
recognizes as offline or “missing” – that is, a Node ID value that previously existed,
but has since disappeared from the network.
Because the Gateway stores a backup of each Subnet Node’s configuration, should
an RFID controller ever fail, a replacement controller can be installed quickly and
easily. The new controller will be automatically assigned the same Node ID value and
configuration as the replaced controller, provided the Configuration Tag is introduced
to the antenna field after startup.
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2.6
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
GATEWAY AND SUBNET NODE NAMING
The Gateway can store a 64-byte ASCII string for each of the 16 Subnet Nodes and
one 64-byte ASCII string for the Gateway itself. These text strings can be used to
assign logical or “user friendly” names to the Gateway and its Subnet Nodes.
For example, you could assign the Gateway a logical name such as “PRODUCTION
LINE 1” and then name the controller connected to Subnet Node 01 “PRODUCTION
STATION 1.” The controller at Subnet Node 02 could then be named “PRODUCTION
STATION 2” (and so forth).
Gateway and Node names can be retrieved and edited by issuing specific commands
to the Gateway (which are covered later in this manual). See the table below for
specific CBx protocol command ID numbers.
Gateway and Node Naming – CBx Command IDs
GATEWAY
NODE
GET
NAME
Command 0x11
Command 0x30
SET
NAME
Command 0x21
Command 0x40
Table 2-4: Gateway and Node Naming – CBx Command IDs
Gateway and Node naming can also be accomplished through the Cobalt Dashboard
software utility (see Chapter 2, Section 2.7.1, “Cobalt Dashboard” for information).
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2.7
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
CONFIGURATION TOOLS
Escort Memory Systems offers the following powerful RFID configuration utilities for
Microsoft Windows XP and Windows 2000 based systems:
•
Cobalt Dashboard
•
C-Macro Builder
These configuration tools can be downloaded from the Escort Memory Systems
website:
http://www.ems-rfid.com/
2.7.1
Cobalt Dashboard
The Cobalt Dashboard™ is a Windows-based software application that provides
users with complete control over their EMS RFID Solution. Users can monitor their
entire RFID system, from the tag level, to the RFID controller, to the Gateway, and to
the host.
Figure 2-3: Cobalt Dashboard
Cobalt Dashboard Features:
Complete Subnet Node configuration
Data packet inspection and Subnet network health monitoring
Software downloading and firmware upgrade installation routines
Gateway and Subnet Node “Friendly” Name Assignment (users can quickly and
easily assign logical “friendly” names to the Gateway and its Subnet Nodes).
Supports Ethernet, DeviceNet, Profibus and RS232 interfaces
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2.7.2
CHAPTER 2:
GATEWAY OVERVIEW
C-Macro Builder
C-Macro Builder™ is an easy to use GUI-driven utility for Windows that allows users
to create powerful RFID command macro programs.
Figure 2-4: C-Macro Builder
When used in conjunction with the Cobalt Dashboard, users can easily download,
erase, backup and manage multiple RFID command macros and macro triggers for
each Subnet Node.
See Chapter 3 “RFID Command Macros” for more on macros.
NOTE:
For specific information regarding the configuration and use of either of these utilities,
please see the accompanying documentation included when downloading each
software application.
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CHAPTER 3:
RFID COMMAND MACROS
CHAPTER 3:
RFID COMMAND MACROS
What are RFID Command Macros?
RFID Command Macros are a powerful feature of EMS’ Cobalt, C-Series and HF0405-Series Controllers. Macros are simple programs that direct a controller to
execute multiple pre-programmed instructions.
Because macros reside within the controller’s internal memory, they can be
programmed to instruct the controller to automatically read and/or write a specified
set of data to an RFID tag without the controller ever having to receive a command
from the host. In fact, the controllers do not even require a connection to a host in
order to execute macros.
Each macro can contain up to 255 bytes of data and each supported controller can
store up to eight macros at a time. Though they are stored locally on the controller,
macros are also backed up in the Gateway’s flash memory as well.
Why use macros?
The power of macros is in distributed intelligence, the reduction in network bus traffic
and the ability to accelerate routine decision making at the point of data collection.
What can macros do?
In addition to the automated reading and writing of data, macro capabilities include:
•
The ability to write time stamps to RFID tags
•
The ability to filter command responses to only those of interest to the host
(such as when an error occurs or when a tag has arrived in the RF field)
•
The ability to harness powerful logic and triggering capabilities such as; read,
write, start/stop continuous read, data compare, branch, transmit custom
string, and set outputs.
What is a macro trigger?
Macros are initiated by “triggers.” Triggers can be configured in numerous ways. A
simple command from the host, such as “execute macro number three” can be
considered a trigger.
Triggers can be configured, for example, to activate a macro when a tag enters or
leaves a controller’s RF field.
EMS RFID controllers can store up to eight separate triggers in addition to the eight
macros they can also house. Any trigger can activate any of the eight stored macros.
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CHAPTER 3:
RFID COMMAND MACROS
How are macros created?
Macros are created using the powerful, yet simple, C-MacroBuilder™ utility from
EMS. The tool’s easy to use GUI allows the user to create powerful RFID macro
programs quickly and easily.
When used with EMS’ Cobalt Dashboard™ utility, users can effortlessly download,
erase, and manage their macros and triggers, as well as set the operational
configurations of their RFID controllers and Subnet16™ Gateways.
Which communication interfaces support the use of macros?
Macros (and the Dashboard and C-Macro Builder utilities) support communications
with Cobalt, C-Series and HF-0405-Series Controllers across Ethernet, DeviceNet,
Profibus, RS232 and USB interfaces.
What happens to existing Macros if a controller must be replaced?
When using a Subnet16 Gateway, users do not need to worry. Macros and triggers
normally residing in an RFID controller’s flash memory are always backed up in the
Gateway’s flash memory as well. Therefore, if a controller should ever require
replacement, all existing macro and trigger settings are automatically exported from
the Gateway to the new RFID controller.
In short, when an RFID controller is initially connected to the Gateway, macro and
trigger data from the controller’s flash memory is compared to the macro and trigger
data backed up in the Gateway from the previous RFID controller. If the data does
not match that which is stored on the Gateway, the controller’s flash memory will be
overwritten with the backed up data stored in the Gateway’s flash memory.
How can I learn more about the Dashboard and C-Macro Builder?
More information regarding macros, triggers, uploading, downloading, configuring
and monitoring EMS RFID equipment is available in the respective User’s Manuals
for these products, which are available on the EMS website at: www.ems-rfid.com.
PAGE 29 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
A command is initiated by a host PC or Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) and is
distributed to the Gateway over a network connection. Once issued, the command is
then executed directly by the Gateway or is otherwise routed to the appropriate RFID
controller (specified by its numerical “Node ID” value, for which there are 16).
In general, there are two types of commands that can be issued:
Controller Commands - commands intended for one of the attached RFID
controllers. “Read Data” and “Write Data” are two common controller commands.
Gateway Commands - commands intended for the Gateway itself. Gateway
commands are those commands that query the Gateway for information or
instruct the Gateway to perform a task. The commands “Get Node Status List”
and “Set Notification Mask” are examples of Gateway commands.
4.1
CB X C O M M A N D P R O T O C O L O V E R V I E W
In order to execute RFID commands properly, the RFID device and host computer
must be able to communicate using the same language. The language that is used to
communicate is referred to as the Command Protocol. The command protocol used
by GWY-01-DNT-01 is called “CBx.”
The CBx Command Protocol is an advanced protocol that supports Multi-drop
Subnet16 networking with TCP/IP, DeviceNet and Industrial Ethernet applications. It
is based on a double-byte oriented packet structure where commands always contain
a minimum of six data “words” (12 bytes) - even when one or more packet elements
are not applicable to the command.
The CBx packet structures described herein are protocol independent and can be
implemented the same for all protocols (Ethernet/IP, Modbus TCP, DeviceNet, etc.).
ATTENTION: For complete command and response packet structures and examples of
each RFID command, please refer to the CBx Command Protocol – Reference
Manual available at www.ems-rfid.com
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4.2
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CB X - C O M M A N D P A C K E T S T R U C T U R E
Below is the packet structure of a standard CBx command.
WORD #
C O M M AN D P AC K E T E L E M E N T
MSB
LSB
01
Overall Length: 2-byte value indicating the
number of “words” in the command packet.
This value will always be at least 6 words.
0x00
0x06 + (number
of any additional
words)
02
Command ID: 0xAA + 1-byte value
indicating command to perform.
0xAA
<Command ID>
03
0x00 in MSB, Node ID in LSB
0x00
<Node ID>
04
Timeout Value: 2-byte integer for the
length of time allowed for the completion of
the command, measured in 1 millisecond
units, where 0x07D0 = 2000 x .001 = 2
seconds.
0x07
0xD0
05
Start Address: 2-byte integer indicating the <Start MSB>
location of tag memory where a Read/Write
operation will begin (when applicable).
<Start LSB>
06
Block Size: 2-byte integer indicating the
number of bytes that are to be read from or
written to a tag beginning at the specified
Start Address (when applicable).
<Length
MSB>
<Length LSB>
07
Additional Data Byte Values 1 & 2: holds
2 bytes of data used for fills, writes, etc.
(when applicable)
<D1>
<D2>
08
Additional Data Byte Values 3 & 4: (when
applicable)
<D3>
<D4>
Table 4-1: CBx Command Packet Structure
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4.3
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CB X - R E S P O N S E P A C K E T S T R U C T U R E
After performing a command, the Gateway or RFID controller will issue a host-bound
response packet. Below is the packet structure of a standard CBx response message.
WORD #
R E S P O N S E P AC K E T E L E M E N T
MSB
LSB
01
Overall Length: 2-byte integer indicating
the number of “words” in the response
packet. This value will always be at least 6
(+ number of any data words retrieved).
0x00
0x06 + (number
of any retrieved
words)
02
0xAA in MSB
Command Echo in LSB
0xAA
<Command
Echo>
03
Instance Counter: 1-byte value indicating
the number of responses generated by the
Node ID identified in the LSB (see details
below).
<IC>
<Node ID Echo>
Node ID Echo: 1-byte value indicating the
Node ID of the controller that performed
the command.
04
Month and Day Timestamp
<Month>
<Day>
05
Hour and Minute Timestamp
<Hour>
<Minute>
06
Second Timestamp in MSB
Additional Data Length in LSB: 1-byte
value indicates number of additional bytes
retrieved.
<Second>
<N-bytes>
07
Retrieved Data Bytes 1 and 2: holds 2
bytes of retrieved data from tag reads,
serial numbers, etc. (when applicable)
<D1>
<D2>
Table 4-2: CBx - Response Packet Structure
INSTANCE COUNTER
The Instance Counter is a one-byte value used by the Subnet16 Gateway to track
the number of responses generated by the controller at a given Node ID. The
Gateway tallies, in its internal RAM, separate Instance Counter values for each Node
ID.
A Node ID’s Instance Counter will be incremented by one following each response. If,
for example, the controller at Node 01 has generated 10 responses, its Instance
Counter value will read 0x0A. However, when the Gateway is rebooted or powercycled, the Instance Counter values for all Node IDs will be reset to zero (0x00).
PAGE 32 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
4.4
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CB X C O M M A N D S T A B L E
The table below lists the CBx protocol RFID commands supported by the Gateway
and EMS’ RFID Controllers.
C O M M AN D I D
C O M M AN D N AM E
DESCRIPTION
RFID Tag Commands
0x02
Lock Memory Block
Write protects a block of tag
memory
0x04
Fill Tag
Writes a specified data byte value
to all defined tag addresses
0x05
Read Data
Reads a specified length of data
from a contiguous (sequential)
area of tag memory
0x06
Write Data
Writes a specified number of
bytes to a contiguous area of tag
memory
0x07
Read Tag ID
Reads a tag’s unique tag ID
number
0x08
Tag Search
Instructs the controller to search
for a tag in its RF field
0x0C
Execute Macro
Instructs the controller to execute
one of its eight possible macros
0x0D
Start Continuous
Read
Instructs the controller to start or
stop Continuous Read mode.
0x0E
Read Tag ID and
Data
Reads a tag’s ID and the
requested number of bytes from
tag memory
0x0F
Start Continuous
Read Tag ID and
Data
Places the controller into (or out
of) Continuous Read mode and
(when evoked) will retrieve a tag’s
ID.
Gateway Information Commands
0x10
Get Gateway
Software Version
Retrieves the version number of
the firmware code installed on the
Gateway
0x11
Get Gateway Name
Retrieves the Gateway’s userdefined ASCII name
0x12
Get Dipswitch
Settings
Retrieves the status of the
Gateway configuration
dipswitches
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CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
C O M M AN D I D
C O M M AN D N AM E
DESCRIPTION
0x13
Get Node Status
List
Retrieves the operational status of
the Gateway Subnet Nodes
0x14
Get Notification
Mask
Retrieves the user-defined 16-bit
“Notification Mask” that
determines for which events the
Gateway notifies the host PC
0x15
Get Last Gateway
Error
Retrieves information from the
Gateway regarding the last or
most recent error that was
experienced
0x16
Get Gateway Time
Retrieves the current date and
time as set internally on the
Gateway
0x1C
Get Subnet Baud
Rate
Retrieves the baud rate of the
Subnet network
0x21
Set Gateway Name
Writes to flash memory, a userdefined “friendly” name for the
Gateway
0x24
Set Notification
Mask
Used to customize or modify the
Gateway’s 16-bit Notification
Mask
0x26
Set Gateway Time
Used to set the Gateway’s
internal clock and calendar
0x2C
Set Subnet Baud
Rate
Used to modify and store changes
to the Subnet network baud rate
RFID Controller Commands
0x30
Get Controller
Name
Retrieves the controller’s userdefined name
0x33
Get Controller
Configuration
Retrieves the controller’s
configuration settings
0x38
Get Controller Info
Retrieves hardware, firmware and
serial number information from
the controller
0x40
Set Controller
Name
Used to set (create or modify) the
user-defined name for the
controller
0x43
Set Controller
Configuration
Used to set (configure or modify)
the controller’s configuration
parameters and settings
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CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
C O M M AN D I D
C O M M AN D N AM E
DESCRIPTION
0x4E
Set Controller Time
Used to set the time for the
controller
0x53
Initialize Controller
Removes all configuration
settings stored for the controller
0x54
Reset Controller
Resets power to the controller
Gateway Subnet Commands
0x60
Initialize Gateway
Clears all Subnet Node
configuration information stored in
the Gateway’s flash memory
0x61
Reset Gateway
Performs an electrical reset of the
Gateway
0x62
Initialize All Nodes
Removes all stored configuration
information for all nodes and
reconfigures them to factory
defaults
0x63
Initialize All Node
Macros
Removes all stored macros from
all nodes
0x70
Start Subnet
Instructs the Gateway to begin
“polling” the Subnet network
0x71
Move Controller
Used to move all stored
configuration data for a particular
Node ID to another specified
Node ID
0x79
Clear Pending
Response
Deletes all pending or buffered
responses in the Gateway and
resets all Instance Counters to
zero
Multi-Tag RFID Commands
0x92
Multi-Tag Read ID
and Data All
Retrieves the tag ID number and a
contiguous segment of data from all
RFID tags in range
0x95
Multi-Tag Block
Read All
Retrieves a contiguous segment of
data from all RFID tags in range
0x96
Multi-Tag Block
Write All
Writes a contiguous segment of data
to all RFID tags in range
0x97
Multi-Tag Get
Inventory
Retrieves the tag ID number from all
RFID tags found in range
PAGE 35 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
C O M M AN D I D
0x98
0xA5
0xA6
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
C O M M AN D N AM E
DESCRIPTION
Multi-Tag Search
All
Checks for the presence of RFID tags
in RF range and returns only the
number of tags found
Multi-Tag Block
Read by ID
Reads a contiguous segment of data
from a specific RFID tag identified by
its tag ID
Multi-Tag Block
Write by ID
Writes a contiguous segment of data
to a specific RFID tag identified by its
tag ID
Table 4-3: CBX Commands Table
4.5
4.5.1
CB X C O M M A N D P R O T O C O L E X A M P L E S
CBx - Controller Command Example
In the example below, Command 0x05 (Read Data) is issued to the RFID controller
at Node 01. The controller is instructed to read four bytes of data from a tag
beginning at tag address 0x0020. The Timeout Value, measured in milliseconds, is
set for two seconds for the completion of this command (0x07D0 = 2000 x .001 = 2
seconds).
WORD
PACKET ELEMENET
MSB
LSB
01
Overall Length of Command (in “words”)
0x00
0x06
02
0xAA in MSB
Command ID in LSB: (0x05 - Read Data)
0xAA
0x05
03
0x00 in MSB
Node ID in LSB: (0x01)
0x00
0x01
04
Timeout Value: (2 seconds)
0x07
0xD0
05
Start Address: (0x0020)
0x00
0x20
06
Read Length: (4 bytes)
0x00
0x04
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
4.5.2
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CBx - Controller Response Example
Below is a controller’s response after successfully completing the Read Data
command (as issued in the previous example).
WORD
4.5.3
PACKET ELEMENT
MSB
LSB
01
Overall Length of Response (in “words”)
0x00
0x08
02
0xAA in MSB
Command Echo in LSB: (0x05 - Read Data)
0xAA
0x05
03
Instance Counter in MSB
Node ID Echo in LSB
<IC>
0x01
04
Month and Day Timestamp (March 19th)
0x03
0x13
05
Hour and Minute Timestamp (10:11: AM)
0x0A
0x0B
06
Seconds Timestamp in MSB: (36 seconds)
Additional Data Length in LSB (4 bytes)
0x24
0x04
07
Retrieved Data (bytes 1 and 2)
0x01
0x02
08
Retrieved Data (bytes 3 and 4)
0x03
0x04
CBx - Gateway Command Example
In this example, the host issues Command 0x13 (Get Node Status List), which
retrieves from the Gateway, a list that indicates the operating status of the 16 Nodes.
WORD
DESCRIPTION
MSB
LSB
01
Overall Length of Command (in “words”)
0x00
0x06
02
0xAA in MSB
0xAA
0x13
0x00
0x20
Command ID in LSB: (0x13 - Get Node Status List)
03
0x00 in MSB
Node ID in LSB: (0x20 = Gateway Node 32)
04
Not Used: 0x00, 0x00 (default)
0x00
0x00
05
Not Used: 0x00, 0x00 (default)
0x00
0x00
06
Not Used: 0x00, 0x00 (default)
0x00
0x00
Note that even though the last three words (6 bytes) of this command are not used,
these parameters still require zero’s (0x00, 0x00) and are to be included when
calculating Overall Length.
PAGE 37 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
4.5.4
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CBx - Gateway Response Example
Below is the Gateway response to the command “Get Node Status List” (as issued in
the previous example).
WORD
DESCRIPTION
MSB
LSB
01
Overall Length of Response (in “words,” not
including the previous 2-bytes – CBx Header and
Node ID Echo)
0x00
0x0E
02
0xAA in MSB
0xAA
0x13
<IC>
0x20
Command Echo in LSB: (0x13)
03
Instance Counter in MSB
Node ID Echo in LSB (0x20 = Gateway Node 32)
04
Month and Day Timestamp (March 19th)
0x03
0x13
05
Hour and Minute Timestamp (10:11: AM)
0x0A
0x0B
06
Seconds Timestamp in MSB: (36 seconds)
0x24
0x10
Additional Data Length in LSB: (16 bytes)
07
Status of Node ID 1 and 2
0x00
0x00
08
Status of Node ID 3 and 4
0x04
0x00
09
Status of Node ID 5 and 6
0x00
0x04
0A
Status of Node ID 7 and 8
0x00
0x00
0B
Status of Node ID 9 and 10
0x00
0x00
0C
Status of Node ID 11 and 12
0x00
0x00
0D
Status of Node ID 13 and 14
0x00
0x00
0E
Status of Node ID 15 and 16
0x00
0x00
In the above example, the Node Status Byte “0x04” (meaning “Controller Healthy”)
was reported for Nodes 03 and 06, indicating that the Gateway recognizes
functioning RFID controllers at Node 03 and Node 06. (See the Node Status Byte
Definition Table below for more information).
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CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
Node Status Byte Definition Table
NODE
STATUS
BYTE
NODE
STATUS
STATUS DESCRIPTION
0
CONTROLLER
INACTIVE
The controller at this node has not responded to a
poll for at least 40 seconds.
If a controller does eventually respond at this
Node ID, its status will be changed to “0x04 CONTROLLER HEALTHY.”
1
CONTROLLER
STOPPED
RESPONDING
The controller at this node has not responded to a
poll in over 10 seconds.
If the controller does not respond to a poll within
another 30 seconds, its status will be changed to
“0x00 - CONTROLLER INACTIVE.”
If the controller does eventually respond to a poll,
its status will be changed back to “0x04 CONTROLLER HEALTHY”
2
CONTROLLER
HAS PROBLEM
The controller at this node has missed at least 3
consecutive polls.
If the controller does not respond to a poll within
another 10 seconds, its status will be changed to
“0x01 - CONTROLLER STOPPED
RESPONDING.”
If the controller does eventually respond to a poll,
its status will be changed back to “0x04 CONTROLLER HEALTHY.”
3
CONTROLLER
EXPECTED
SOON
This Node Status indicates that a controller is
temporarily disconnected or that it is being moved
to another Node ID.
Because a controller is “expected” to appear
soon, the Gateway will poll this node more
frequently than other ‘inactive’ nodes.
4
CONTROLLER
HEALTHY
The controller at this node is healthy and
responding to polls.
However, if the controller misses 3 consecutive
polls, its status will be changed to “0x02 CONTROLLER HAS PROBLEM.”
5
CONTROLLER
DOWNLOADING
This status is only applied to a controller that is
currently downloading and installing new firmware
to its flash memory.
To optimize polling and allow for the fastest
possible firmware installation, the Gateway will
temporarily halt the polling of this node until the
controller has finished its installation.
Table 4-4: Node Status Byte Definition Table
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4.6
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CB X E R R O R R E S P O N S E P A C K E T S T R U C T U R E
Below is the packet structure of a CBx error response. Note that the one-byte Error
Code value is returned in the MSB of the seventh data word.
ERROR RESPONSE ELEMENT
MSB
LSB
Overall Length: 2-byte value indicating the
number of “words” in the Response Packet.
This value will always be at least 7 words (6 +
1 for the error code).
0x00
0x07
Error Flag: 0xFF in the MSB indicates that an
error occurred.
Error Information Byte: 0xFF in the LSB
indicates that a controller-based error
occurred. Any value other than 0xFF indicates
that a Gateway-based error occurred (and
indicates the command that was attempted
when the error occurred).
0xFF
0xFF
Instance Counter: This 1-byte value tallies the <IC>
number of responses from a given Node ID.
Node ID Echo: The 1-byte LSB value indicates
the Node ID of the controller for which the
command was intended.
0x01
Month and Day Timestamp
<Month>
<Day>
Hour and Minute Timestamp
<Hour>
<Minute>
Seconds Timestamp in MSB
Number of Additional Bytes Retrieved in
LSB (0x01 for error responses)
<Seconds>
0x01
Error Code: 1-byte Error Code in MSB
0x00 in LSB
<Error Code>
0x00
Table 4-4: CBx Error Response Packet Structure
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4.7
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CB X E R R O R C O D E T A B L E
ERROR
CODE
ERROR
DESCRIPTION
0x04
FILL TAG FAILED
Fill Tag Command Failed
0x05
READ DATA FAILED
Read Data Command Failed
0x06
WRITE DATA FAILED
Write Data Command Failed
0x07
READ TAG ID FAILED / TAG
SEARCH FAILED
Read Tag ID Command Failed, Tag
Search Command Failed and/or No Tag
Found
0x21
INVALID SYNTAX
Command Contained a Syntax Error
0x23
INVALID TAG TYPE
Invalid Tag Type Specified
0x30
INTERNAL CONTROLLER
ERROR
Generic Internal Controller Error
0x31
INVALID CONTROLLER TYPE
Invalid Controller Type (when Setting
Configuration)
0x34
INVALID VERSION
Invalid Software Version Specified (when
Setting Configuration)
0x35
INVALID RESET
Invalid Hardware Reset
0x36
WRITE CONFIGURATION
FAILED
Set Configuration Command Failed
0x37
READ CONFIGURATION
FAILED
Get Configuration Command Failed
0x80
UNKNOWN GATEWAY
ERROR
Generic Gateway Error – an
undetermined error occurred.
0x81
COMMAND MALFORMED
Generic Command Syntax Error
0x82
COMMAND PROTOCOL
MISMATCH
An invalid protocol value was specified in
the command
0x83
COMMAND INVALID OPCODE
An invalid Opcode (Command ID
number) was specified in the command
0x84
COMMAND INVALID
PARAMETER
A parameter specified in the command
was invalid
0x85
COMMAND INVALID
CONTROLLER ID
A Controller ID (Node ID) specified in the
command was invalid, or no controller
detected/present at the specified node
0x86
COMMAND INACTIVE
CONTROLLER ID
A Controller ID (Node ID) specified in the
command is currently inactive.
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CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
0x87
SUBNET DEVICE SELECT
FAILED
Internal Subnet Error – the specified
Subnet device failed.
0x88
SUBNET DEVICE FAILED TO
ACKNOWLEDGE
Internal Subnet Error - the specified
Subnet device failed to respond to the
Gateway’s polling.
0x89
SUBNET RESPONSE
MALFORMED
Internal Subnet Error – a controller
returned a malformed response.
0x8A
SUBNET RESPONSE
TIMEOUT
Internal Subnet Error – a controller was
unable to generate a response before
timeout was reached.
0x8B
SUBNET RESPONSE INVALID
CHECKSUM
Internal Subnet Error – a controller
generated a response that has an invalid
checksum.
0x8C
SUBNET DEVICE CONFLICT
DETECTED
Internal Subnet Error – a Node ID
conflict has been detected
0x8D
BUFFER OVERFLOW
Internal Gateway Error – Gateway buffer
limit was exceeded
0x8E
FLASH FAILURE
Internal Gateway Error – Gateway flash
memory failure
0x92
SUBNET16 ONLY COMMAND
A Subnet16-only command was issued
when in MUX32 mode.
0x93
NODE MISMATCH ERROR
The Node ID specified in the command
did not match the Node to which the
command was sent.
0x94
CRC ERROR
Cyclic Redundancy Check Error
0x95
PROTOCOL ERROR
Internal Communications Error
Table 4-5: CBx Error Code Table
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4.7.1
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
CBx - Error Response Example
Below is an example of a typical controller generated error response following a
failed Read Data Command. For this example, a “tag not found” error was generated.
4.8
E R R O R R E S P O N S E P AR AM E T E R
MSB
LSB
0x00 in MSB
Overall Length of Response in LSB
(in words)
0x00
0x07
Error Flag in MSB
Error Information Byte in LSB
0xFF
0xFF
0x00 in MSB
Node ID Echo in LSB
0x00
0x01
Month and Day Timestamp:
(March 19th)
0x03
0x13
Hour and Minute Timestamp
(9:30: AM)
0x09
0x1E
Seconds Timestamp in MSB
(:03 seconds)
Number of Additional Bytes Retrieved in LSB
(0x01 for error responses)
0x03
0x01
Error Code in MSB: (0x07 = “Tag not Found”)
0x00 in LSB
0x07
0x00
NOTIFICATION MESSAGES
Notification Messages are small host-bound informational packets of data that are
issued by the Gateway when a specified Notification Event (or series of events)
occurs within the Gateway or on the Subnet network. For example, the Gateway can
be configured to send the host a Notification Message when a controller is attached,
or removed, or experiences a problem.
The Gateway stores nine different Notification Messages internally (all of which are
enabled by default). A 16-bit value, called the Notification Mask, controls which
Notification Events trigger Notification Messages to the host. Bits 01 through 09 in the
16-bit Notification Mask correspond to the nine possible Notification Messages. The
remaining 7 bits (bits 10-16) are not implemented at this time (default value is zero
for each bit).
Notification Messages are enabled by changing the associated bit from zero to one
within the Notification Mask. A bit is either set to “0” (OFF – disabled) or “1” (ON –
enabled). When a bit is turned ON, the related Notification Message will be enabled.
The next time the enabled Notification Event occurs, the corresponding Notification
Message will be generated and immediately delivered to the host.
When a Notification Message is generated, it is written to the Node Output Page of
the controller that triggered the Notification Event. Notification Messages include a
one-byte value indicating which of the nine possible Notification Events occurred.
Notification Messages also contain a one-byte value that identifies the affected Node
ID.
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CHAPTER 4:
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For Notification Messages, a handshaking scheme of enabling and clearing a specific
bit in the Output Data Ready Mask is implemented (as previously explained).
To enable all nine Notification Messages, the 2-byte Notification Mask would read:
0x01FF.
16-bit Notification Mask - Binary Representation
-when enabling all nine Notification Messages:
(0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1) (1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1) = 0x01FF
[Bit 16 -
4.8.1
- Bit 09]
[Bit 08 -
- Bit 01]
N o t i f i c a t i o n M e s s a g e Ta b l e
The following table contains a listing of the nine possible Notification Messages.
BIT
NOTIFICATION
MESSAGE
EVENT DESCRIPTION
1
CONTROLLER IS HEALTHY
2
CONTROLLER HAS PROBLEM Sent whenever a controller is marked ‘Has
Problem’
3
CONTROLLER STOPPED
RESPONDING
Sent whenever a controller is marked ‘Stopped
Responding’
4
CONTROLLER DEACTIVATED
Sent whenever a controller is deactivated (is
marked ‘Inactive’)
5
CONTROLLER MISSED POLL
Sent whenever a controller misses a poll
6
CONTROLLER ADDRESS
CONFLICT
Sent whenever the Gateway detects a Node ID
conflict
7
CONTROLLER
CONFIGURATION FAILURE
Sent whenever the Gateway fails to configure a
controller
8
TAG PRESENT AT NODE*
Sent whenever a tag is first recognized in the RF
field of the specified node
9
TAG NOT PRESENT AT
NODE*
Sent when no tag is recognized or when a
previously recognized tag is no longer
acknowledged in the specified node’s RF field
Sent whenever the status of a controller changes
to ‘Healthy’
Table 4-6: Notification Message Table
* Tag Presence must be enabled on the RFID controller.
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4.8.2
CHAPTER 4:
COMMAND MAPPING
Notification Mask Example
In the following example, an RFID controller is attached to the Gateway’s Subnet
network. After power is applied to the controller, the Gateway immediately attempts
to determine its Node ID (Node 04 in this example). After recognizing a stored Node
ID configuration, the Gateway allows the device onto the Subnet network.
Now if bit 01 in the Notification Mask was enabled (set to one = ON), Notification
Event 01 would be triggered and the Gateway would immediately write Notification
Message 01 to Node Output Page 36 (the Node Output Page number for Node ID
04). The Notification Message would indicate that a new controller was recognized at
Node 04 and is functioning properly (i.e. the controller is healthy).
If, on the other hand, the recently connected controller does not power-up, or fails to
initialize properly, and bit 02 in the Notification Mask is enabled, Notification Event
02 will be triggered, in which case the Gateway will write Notification Message 02 to
Node Output Page 36. This message informs the host that the controller at Node 04
is experiencing a problem.
4.8.3
Notification Message Packet Structure
DESCRIPTION
MSB
LSB
Overall Length of Notification
Message (in words)
0x00
0x06
0xFE in MSB = Notification Message
Flag
0xFE
<Notification Event>
<IC>
0x04
Month and Day Timestamp
<Month>
<Day>
Hour and Minute Timestamp
<Hour>
<Minute>
Seconds Timestamp in MSB
<Second>
0x00
Notification Event in LSB
Instance Counter in MSB (a
Notification Message is considered a
response; therefore the Instance
Counter will be incremented by one)
Node ID in LSB (04 for the above
example)
0x00 in LSB
Table 4-7: Notification Message - Packet Structure
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CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE
CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE
5.1
DEVICENET OVERVIEW
DeviceNet is a digital, multi-drop network based on the CAN (Controller Area
Network) specification, which permits easy connectivity between industrial controllers
and I/O devices.
When the Gateway is connected to a DeviceNet network, it is considered an
individual node for which a unique Node Address number between 1 and 63 is
assigned (this is not to be confused with a Subnet Node ID number, for which the
Gateway has 16). The DeviceNet Gateway conforms to the standards set by the
Open DeviceNet Vendor Association (ODVA).
5.2
5.2.1
DEVICENET CONFIGURATION
Importing the Gateway .EDS File
After making all necessary hardware connections, the next step in configuring the
GWY-01-DNT-01 for DeviceNet is to import the .EDS file.
NOTE: Electronic Data Sheets (*.EDS) are basic text files that are utilized by network
configuration tools to identify and configure hardware devices for DeviceNet networks.
A typical .EDS file contains a description of the product, its device type, hardware
version and configurable parameters.
The .EDS file (filename: “DeviceNet EDS.zip”) for the GWY-01-DNT-01 is available
on Escort Memory Systems’ Web site (www.ems-rfid.com).
1. Download the .EDS file to the computer running your network’s Rockwell
Automation software (i.e. the host computer).
2. Using the EDS Hardware Installation Tool, located in the RSLinx™ Tools
program group, import the .EDS file into your RSNetWorx/DeviceNet system.
Refer to Rockwell Automation’s documentation for specific instructions.
3. After you have imported the .EDS file, close and restart all Rockwell
Automation programs. If you are uncertain which programs to close, cycle
power to the host computer after importing the .EDS file.
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5.2.2
CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE
Configuring Gateway and PLC DeviceNet
Communications
After importing the .EDS file and rebooting the host computer (or after restarting your
Rockwell Automation software), follow the steps below to continue configuring
DeviceNet network communications between the Gateway and a ControlLogix PLC.
1
On the host computer, start RSNetWorx for DeviceNet.
2
Go online (click NETWORK and select ONLINE).
Figure 5-1: Configuring Gateway for DeviceNet - Going Online
3
Select the appropriate
DeviceNet network and
then click “OK.”
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The Scanner Configuration Applet in RSNetWorx will begin scanning the specified
network. This procedure may take some time depending on the speed of the bus and
the number of devices connected.
Node addresses are scanned from zero to 63. The default node address for the
Gateway is 63.
Figure 5-2: Scanning Node Addresses on a DeviceNet Network
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4
CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE
When the scan operation has completed, click “UPLOAD”, in the Scanner
Configuration Applet dialog box, to update the configuration of the RSNetWorx
software.
Figure 5-3: Updating Configuration in RSNetWorx
NOTE: The 1756-DNB/A is a Series A DeviceNet Bridge / Scanner Module.
After updating the software, the
Gateway should be recognized on
the network and the device name,
“63, Cobalt DN Gateway”, should
be displayed under “Available
Devices.”
5
Highlight the Gateway in the
Available Devices list, and add
it to the Scanlist field on the
right hand side of the dialogue
box. Click “Apply” and then
“OK.”
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The Gateway will be added to the list of DeviceNet hardware in RSNetWorx.
6
Next, select the Gateway from the list of DeviceNet hardware and edit its I/O
Parameters. Set the Input Size and Output Size parameters according to your
application requirements, then click “OK.” In the example below, 30 input bytes
and 30 output bytes will be scanned per polling cycle.
7
NOTE: Strobed mode is not supported by the GWY-01-DNT-01.
Figure 5-4: Editing the Gateway’s DeviceNet I/O Parameters
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CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE
The following images display the Input and Output properties tabs (in RSNetWorx
for DeviceNet) for the 1756-DNB/A DeviceNet Bridge / Scanner Module after running
the Scanner Configuration Applet for a second time. The scanner module, in this
case, only identified one node, the Gateway, at node address 63. The tabs are used
to identify where input and output data is mapped for each identified node. In the
image below, input data is mapped to start at 1:I.Data(0).0 on the PLC.
8
Run the Scanner Configuration Applet and verify the mapping of the address
where the PLC will write input data for the Gateway.
Figure 5-5: 1756-DNB/A Input Properties Tab
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9
CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE
Next, verify the mapping of the address where the PLC will retrieve output data
from the Gateway. In the image below, output data is mapped to start at
1:O.Data(0).0 on the PLC.
Figure 5-6: 1756-DNB/A Output Properties Tab
10 Lastly, click “Apply” and select “YES” to download the configuration and
mapping settings from RSNetWorx to the PLC.
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5.2.3
CHAPTER 5:
DEVICENET INTERFACE
C o n f i g u r i n g D a ta R a t e a n d N o d e A d d r e s s
As noted, each device, computer and controller on a DeviceNet network is
considered an individual node for which a unique Node Address number (between 0
and 63) is assigned. The node address provides a means of numerically identifying
each device on a DeviceNet network.
Prior to operating the GWY-01-DNT-01, you must verify that it has been configured
for the same Data Rate as your network and that it has been assigned a suitable
node address value. The Gateway supports data
rates of 125Kb (default), 250Kb and 500Kb and
FACTORY DEFAULT
supports node addresses 1 – 63 (default: 63).
CONFIGURATION:
To change the data rate or node address, use
either the "Node Commissioning" tool in
Data Rate = 125Kb
RSNetWorx for DeviceNet or Escort Memory
Node Address = 63
Systems’ “Cobalt Dashboard” utility running on a
host computer that is connected to the USB port
on the Gateway. The Cobalt Dashboard utility is
available online at www.ems-rfid.com.
NOTE: When using node commissioning in RSNetWorx for DeviceNet, modify only one
parameter at a time (either data rate or node address). After changing the data rate,
you must manually cycle power to your DeviceNet network for the change to take effect.
5.2.4
D e v i c e N e t - E x c h a n g i n g D a ta a n d H a n d s h a k i n g
After the Gateway has been properly configured for your DeviceNet network, it will be
possible to send the Gateway commands using Escort Memory Systems’ CBx RFID
Command Protocol. For reference, the CBx Protocol – Reference Manual is
available online at www.ems-rfid.com.
However, to ensure that messages to and from the Gateway are properly delivered
and received, a handshaking mechanism has been implemented that uses a pair of
dedicated words in the exchange.
The first two words in the Input Controller Tag and Output Controller Tag are
dedicated to handshaking. When new information is generated, the data-producing
device increments the counter value stored in the second word of a controller tag
(either Input or Output, depending on the device). The data-consuming device,
copies that same value to the counter in the first word of the reciprocal (or opposite)
controller tag. This handshaking scheme signals to the data producer that the
information has been received.
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The image below displays an example of the data contained in the two I/O Controller
Tags for the Gateway.
Figure 5-7: Gateway I/O Controller Tags (in RSLogix 5000)
5.2.5
DeviceNet - Handshaking Example
This example describes the sequence of events for a simple command and
response. All data is written in 2-byte WORD format and stored in 2-byte “registers.”
The Output Controller Tag holds command data written by the PLC. The Input
Controller Tag holds response data generated by the Gateway. Handshaking is
implemented using the first two words (Words 0 and 1) in both Input Controller Tag
and Output Controller Tags.
1. The PLC writes a command to the Output Controller Tag, starting with the 2-byte
Consume Data Size value at Local:2:O.Data [2] (which is the third register of the
Output Controller Tag). The remainder of the command packet is then written, 2byte per register, to the Output Controller Tag, starting at the fourth register,
Local:2:O.Data [3]. After writing the command packet data to the appropriate
registers, the PLC increments the counter value stored at Local:2:O.Data [1]
(the second register in the Output Controller Tag).
2. The counter at Local:2:O.Data [1] is copied by the Gateway to Local:2:I.Data
[0] (the first register of the Input Controller Tag) which signals the PLC that the
command has been received by the Gateway.
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DEVICENET INTERFACE
3. Following execution of the command, the Gateway writes its response to the
Input Controller Tag, starting with the 2-byte Produce Data Size, at
Local:2:I.Data [2] and the actual data beginning at Local:2:I.Data [3]. It then
increments the counter value at Local:2:I.Data [1]. This alerts the PLC to the
new data available (the Gateway generated response, in this case).
4. After processing the response information, the PLC copies the counter from
Local:2:I.Data [1] to Local:2:O.Data [0], which signals to the Gateway that the
PLC has retrieved the response data.
OUTPUT CONTROLLER TAG
CONTROLLER T AG
LOCATION AND DATA
DESCRIPTION
Local:2:O.Data [0]
(4) The PLC copies the value at 2:I:Data[1] here to
acknowledge receipt of the response
Local:2:O.Data [1]
(1) The PLC increments this counter value after copying
a command in Consume Data
Local:2:O.Data [2]
Consume Data Size
Local:2:O.Data [3]
First WORD of Consume Data (Command from PLC)
Local:2:O.Data [xxx]
xxx WORD of Consume Data
INPUT CONTROLLER TAG
CONTROLLER T AG
LOCATION AND DATA
DESCRIPTION
Local:2:I.Data [0]
(2) The value at 2:O:Data[1] is copied here by the
Gateway to acknowledge receipt of a command
Local:2:I.Data [1]
(3) The Gateway increments this counter to signal that a
response is available
Local:2:I.Data [2]
Produce Data Size
Local:2:I.Data [3]
First WORD of Produce Data (Response from Gateway)
Local:2:I.Data [xxx]
xxx WORD of Produce Data
NOTE: A ladder logic example illustrating the implementation of this handshaking
strategy can be downloaded from the technical support area of the EMS website.
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GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX A:
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
APPENDIX A:
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
ELECTRICAL
Supply Voltage
10~30VDC
Power Consumption
120mA @ 24VDC (2.88W)
COMMUNICATION
Communication Interfaces
Point-to-Point: RS485
Multi-drop: Subnet16, MUX32
DeviceNet
RFID Interface:
Gateway HF-Series RFID System
RF Output Power:
1W
Air Protocols
ISO 15693, ISO 14443 A
Air Protocol Speed:
26.5kBaud / 106kBaud with CRC error detection
RS485 Baud Rates
9600 (default), 19.2k, 38.4k, 57.6k, 115.2k
MECHANICAL
Dimensions
76mm x 89mm x 33mm
Weight
.24 KG (.53 lbs)
Enclosure:
Stainless Steel 304 (18-8)
ENVIRONMENTAL
Operating Temperature
-20° to 50°C (-4° to 122°F),
Storage Temperature
-40° to 85°C (-40° to 185°)
Humidity
90% Non-Condensing
Protection Class
IP30
Shock Resistance
IEC 68-2-27 Test EA 30g, 11 milliseconds, 3 shocks
each axis
Vibration Resistance
IEC 68-2-6 Test FC 1.5mm; 10 to 55Hz;
2 hours each axis
NOTE: Specifications are subject to change without notice.
PAGE 56 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX B:
MODELS AND ACCESSORIES
APPENDIX B:
MODELS AND ACCESSORIES
Datalogic Automation designs, manufactures and distributes a wide range of high
frequency (HF) RFID equipment including RFID controllers, network interface
modules (Gateways and Hubs), RFID tags and the cables needed to make it all work.
This portion of the manual lists the products and accessories available for the
Gateway and HF-Series RFID product family. To purchase any of the items listed
below contact your EMS distributor or visit our Web site: http://www.ems-rfid.com.
S U B N E T 16™ G A T E W A Y I N T E R F A C E M O D U L E S
GWY-01-DNT-01
Subnet16™ DeviceNet Gateway
GWY-01-232-01
Subnet16™ RS232 Gateway
GWY-01-IND-01
Subnet16™ Industrial Ethernet Gateway
GWY-01-TCP-01
Subnet16™ TCP/IP Gateway
RFID C O N T R O L L E R S
Cobalt HF-Series RFID Controllers
There are six models of the Cobalt HF RFID Controller:
for RS232 interface connections
HF-CNTL-232-02
HF-CNTL-485-02
(*)
for Subnet16 Multidrop connections
HF-CNTL-USB-02
for USB interface connections
HF-CNTL-IND-02
for Industrial Ethernet and standard TCP/IP connections
HF-CNTL-DNT-02
for DeviceNet connections
HF-CNTL-PBS-02
for Profibus connections
C o b a l t H F - S e r i e s A n t e n n a s ( c o m pa t i b l e w i t h t h e C o b a l t H F Series Controllers above)
There are four models of the Cobalt HF Antenna:
HF-ANT-1010-01
10cm x 10cm
HF-ANT-2020-01
20cm x 20cm
PAGE 57 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX B:
MODELS AND ACCESSORIES
HF-ANT-3030-01
30cm x 30cm
HF-ANT-0750-01
7cm x 50cm (for conveyor applications)
Cobalt C0405-Series RFID Controllers
There are three models of the Cobalt C0405 RFID Controller:
C0405-232-01
C0405-485-01
for RS232 interface connections
(*)
C0405-USB-01
for Subnet16 Multidrop connections
for USB 2.0 interface connections
Cobalt C1007-Series RFID Controllers
There are three models of the Cobalt C1007 RFID Controller:
C1007-232-01
C1007-485-01
for RS232 interface connections
(*)
C1007-USB-01
for Subnet16 Multidrop connections
for USB 2.0 interface connections
HF-0405-Series RFID Controllers
There are three models of the HF-0405 RFID Controller:
HF-0405-232-01
for RS232 interface connections
HF-0405-422-01
for RS422 interface connections
HF-0405-485-01(*)
for Subnet16 Multidrop connections
(*) Models compatible with GWY-01-232-01
PAGE 58 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX B:
MODELS AND ACCESSORIES
SOFTWARE & DEMONSTRATION KITS
S o ft w a r e A p p l i c a t i o n s
Cobalt Dashboard
Communicate in real time with one or more readers directly or via Multi-drop network.
Allows users to configure, monitor and control their RFID devices from anywhere on
their network.
C-Macro Builder
An easy to use GUI-driven utility that provides rapid development and implementation
of custom RFID macros.
NOTE:
Software utilities and User’s Manuals are available at www.ems-rfid.com
D e m o n s t r a t i o n K i ts
00-1182
RS485 Industrial Ethernet Gateway Demo Display Kit (includes three C0405-485-01
controllers, one GWY-01-IND-01 Gateway, one HMS150 tag, one LRP125S tag, one
LRP250 tag, display board, cables, power supply and carrying case).
00-1219
RS485 TCP/IP Gateway Demo Display Kit (includes three C0405-485 controllers,
one GWY-01-TCP-01 Gateway, one HMS150 tag, one LRP250 tag, one LRP125S
tag, display board, cables, power supply and carrying case).
PAGE 59 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX B:
MODELS AND ACCESSORIES
POWER SUPPLIES
00-1166
1.88A max @ 24VDC (45W), Universal Input (90-264VAC, 47-63Hz), 5.5x2.5mm
plug, positive tip; Note: Requires country specific power cord to mate to IEC 320
power cord receptacle.
00-1167
4.17A max @ 24VDC (100W), Universal Input (90-264VAC, 47-63Hz), 5.5x2.5mm
plug, positive tip; Note: Requires country specific power cord to mate to IEC 320
power cord receptacle.
00-1168
5.0A max @ 24VDC (120W), Universal Input (88-132VAC/176-264VAC switch
selectable, 47-63Hz) DIN Rail Mount; Note: AC wire receptacles are spring clamp for
direct wire connection.
EMS RFID T A G S
Escort Memory Systems designs and manufactures several lines of RFID tags. LRPS, HMS and T-Series passive read/write RFID tags are specially suited for the
Gateway and EMS RFID Controllers.
PAGE 60 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX B:
MODELS AND ACCESSORIES
S U B N E T 16 C A B L E S & A C C E S S O R I E S
EMS P/N
DESCRIPTION
CBL-1478
Cable Assembly: RS232/Power (2.5mm DC Jack), 2m
CBL-1480-XX
Cable: M12, 5-pin, Male/Female, ThinNet
CBL-1481-XX
Cable: M12, 5-pin, Male/Male, ThinNet
CBL-1481-02
Cable: M12, 5-pin, Male/Male, ThinNet, 2m (Gateway to Drop-T)
CBL-1482-XX
Cable: M12, 5-pin, Male/Right-Angle Female, ThinNet
CBL-1483-XX
Cable: 7/8–16, 5-pin, Male/Female, ThickNet
CBL-1484-XX
Cable: 7/8-16, 5-pin, Right-Angle Male/Bare Wire, ThickNet
CBL-1485
Drop-T Connector: 5-pin, 7/8-16 F / M12 F / 7/8-16 M (ThickNet to ThinNet)
CBL-1486
Drop-T Connector: 5-pin, M12, F/F/M (ThinNet to ThinNet)
CBL-1487
Field Mountable Connector: 5-pos, Straight Female M12,
CBL-1488-XX
Cable: 8-pin, Female M12 / Bare Wires
CBL-1489
Termination Resistor Plug: 7/8-16, Male, 5-pin, (ThickNet)
CBL-1490
Termination Resistor Plug: M12, Male, 5-pin, (ThinNet)
CBL-1491
Connector: 5-pos, Right-Angle Female M12, Field Mountable
CBL-1492-XX
Cable: 8-pin, Right-Angle Female M12 / Bare Wires
CBL-1493
Connector: 8-pos, Straight Female M12, Field Mountable
CBL-1494-01
Cable: M12, 5P, F/Bare Wire Leads, ThinNet, 1M
CBL-1495-XX
Cable: 7/8-16, 5P F/Bare Wire Leads
CBL-1496
Plug: Termination Resistor, M12, 5P, F
CBL-1497
Plug: Termination Resistor, 7/8-16, 5P, F
CBL-1498-02
Cable: M12, 5P, M/Bare Wire Leads, THINNET, 2M
CBL-1513
Cable Assembly: M12, 5-Pin, Male, Reverse Keyed to Type A, USB, 3M
CBL-1514
Connector: M12, Male, 5-Pin, Straight, Reverse Keyed (for USB)
CBL-1515-05
Cable: Category 5E Shielded Ethernet/M12, 5-Pin, Male, D-Code, 5M
XX = Length in Meters
PAGE 61 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX C:
NETWORK DIAGRAMS
APPENDIX C:
NETWORK DIAGRAMS
Subnet16 Gateway: ThickNet Network Diagram
Subnet16 Gateway: ThinNet Network Diagram
PAGE 62 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX C:
NETWORK DIAGRAMS
Subnet16 Gateway –ThickNet Network Diagram
PAGE 63 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX C:
NETWORK DIAGRAMS
Subnet16 Gateway – ThinNet Network Diagram
PAGE 64 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX D:
ASCII CHART
APPENDIX D:
ASCII CHART
PAGE 65 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
APPENDIX D:
ASCII CHART
PAGE 66 OF 67
GWY-01-DNT-01 MANUAL – REV. 02
WARRANTY
WARRANTY
Datalogic Automation warrants that all products of its own manufacturing conform to Datalogic
Automation’s specifications and are free from defects in material and workmanship when used under
normal operating conditions and within the service conditions for which they were furnished. The obligation
of Datalogic Automation hereunder shall expire one (1) year after delivery, unless otherwise specified, and
is limited to repairing, or at its option, replacing without charge, any such product that in Datalogic
Automation’s sole opinion proves to be defective within the scope of this Warranty.
In the event Datalogic Automation is not able to repair or replace defective products or components within
a reasonable time after receipt thereof, Buyers shall be credited for their value at the original purchase
price. Datalogic Automation must be notified in writing of the defect or nonconformity within the warranty
period and the affected product returned to Datalogic Automation factory or to an authorized service center
within thirty (30) days after discovery of such defect or nonconformity. Shipment shall not be made without
prior authorization by Datalogic Automation.
This is Datalogic Automation's sole warranty with respect to the products delivered hereunder. No
statement, representation, agreement or understanding oral or written, made by an agent, distributor,
representative, or employee of Datalogic Automation which is not contained in this warranty, will be binding
upon Datalogic Automation, unless made in writing and executed by an authorized Datalogic Automation
employee.
Datalogic Automation makes no other warranty of any kind what so ever, expressed or implied, and all
implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular use which exceed the aforementioned
obligation are here by disclaimed by Datalogic Automation and excluded from this agreement.
Under no circumstances shall Datalogic Automation be liable to Buyer, in contract or in tort, for any special,
indirect, incidental, or consequential damages, expenses, losses or delay however caused. Equipment or
parts that have been subject to abuse, misuse, accident, alteration, neglect, unauthorized repair or
installation are not covered by warranty. Datalogic Automation shall make the final determination as to the
existence and cause of any alleged defect. No liability is assumed for expendable items such as lamps and
fuses.
No warranty is made with respect to equipment or products produced to Buyer’s specification except as
specifically stated in writing by Datalogic Automation in the contract for such custom equipment. This
warranty is the only warranty made by Datalogic Automation with respect to the goods delivered hereunder,
and may be modified or amended only by a written instrument signed by a duly authorized officer of
Datalogic Automation and accepted by the Buyer.
Extended warranties of up to five years are available for purchase for most Escort Memory Systems
products. Contact Datalogic Automation or your distributor for more information.
Escort Memory Systems™ and the Escort Memory Systems logo are registered trademarks of Datalogic
Automation.
Copyright © 2008 Datalogic Automation S.r.l., ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
PAGE 67 OF 67
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