Annual Report 2009 Raport Roczny 2009 AGH University of Science and Technology

Annual Report 2009 Raport Roczny 2009 AGH University of Science and Technology
AGH University of Science and Technology
Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science
Annual Report 2009
Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. S. Staszica
Wydział Fizyki i Informatyki Stosowanej
Raport Roczny 2009
WYDZIAŁ FIZYKI
I INFORMATYKI STOSOWANEJ
Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science
Wydział Fizyki i Informatyki Stosowanej AGH
Dean
prof. dr hab. inż. Wojciech Łużny
Deputy Dean for General Affairs
prof. dr hab. inż. Marek Przybylski
Deputy Dean for Education
dr hab. Andrzej Lenda, prof. AGH
Deputy Dean for Student Affairs
dr inż. Krzysztof Malarz
Administrative Director
dr inż. Janusz Chmist
Address of the Faculty Office
AGH University of Science and Technology
(Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. Stanisława Staszica)
al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków, Poland
Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science
ul. Reymonta 19, 30-059 Kraków, Building D-10
Phones
+48 12 633 37 40, +48 12 617 29 53
fax
+48 12 634 00 10
E-mail address
[email protected], [email protected]
Web-page
www.pacs.agh.edu.pl
Contents
Spis treści
Preface
5
Physicists – Doctors Honoris Causa of AGH
University of Science and Technology,
Honorary Consuls of AGH-UST
and AGH-UST Honorary Professors
7
Departments, Groups and Leaders,
Achievements in 2009
9
PhD Students
27
Selected results
29
Third-party funds
93
Umowy UE realizowane w 2009
Other grants
93
95
Publications
113
Conferences presentations and seminars
137
Scientific events
165
Books and book chapters
Artykuły w czasopismach z listy filadelfijskiej
Materiały konferencyjne zagraniczne
Referaty opublikowane w Polsce
Inne czasopisma
Invited lectures
Contributed presentations
Habilitations and PhD defenses
Organized conferences
Faculty seminars
113
115
127
129
133
137
139
165
166
167
Preface
Wstęp
The Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science (FPACS) is one of the fifteen Faculties of the
AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow. The origins of the Faculty are dated back to
1919, when the Academy of Mining was founded, within which the Chair of Physics was erected. It
has undergone several organizational transformations until in 1991 the AGH Senate has decided
to form the Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Techniques. In 2004 the name was changed to Faculty
of Physics and Applied Computer Science, accordingly to the changes in the fields of scientific and
educational activity.
Scientific activity of the Faculty comprises both basic and applied research in solid state physics,
nuclear and elementary particles physics, medical physics and physics of the environment.
There are six departments within the Faculty:
1. Department of Applied Informatics and Computational Physics
(Katedra Informatyki Stosowanej i Fizyki Komputerowej)
2. Department of Applied Nuclear Physics
(Katedra Zastosowań Fizyki Jądrowej)
3. Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics
(Katedra Fizyki Medycznej i Biofizyki)
4. Department of Solid State Physics
(Katedra Fizyki Ciała Stałego)
5. Department of Particle Interaction and Detection Techniques
(Katedra Oddziaływań i Detekcji Cząstek)
6. Department of Condensed Matter Physics
(Katedra Fizyki Materii Skondensowanej)
All together 180 persons are employed including 130 scientists and 50 technical and administrative
staff. There are 40 full professors and 75 assistant professors or post-docs.
Faculty offers several degree programs leading to B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees.
The undergraduate studies consist of seven-semester bachelor programs in three distinct areas:
technical physics, medical physics and applied computer science. They are followed by three-semester graduate programs, leading to the M.Sc. degree in the various specialisations.
Area: Medical Physics; specialisations:
Dosimetry and Electronics in Medicine,
Imaging and Biometrics,
Area: Technical Physics; specialisations:
Computer Physics,
Solid State Physics,
Nuclear Physics,
Environmental Physics,
Area: Applied Computer Science; specialisation:
Computer Techniques in Science and Technology.
Faculty members teach both general physics courses and selected branches of physics for students
of twelve Faculties of the AGH-UST. The teaching covers both reading lectures as well as organizing tutorials (physics problems classes) and laboratory work. Faculty’s teaching assignments for
students of other faculties include both undergraduate and graduate levels. Some of lectures are
offered in English.
Faculty organizes complementary courses for the 1st year students of the University in physics and
mathematics. The aim of the courses is to fill possible gaps in the high-school education that discourage young candidates from electing technical- and science-oriented areas of study and – for
the candidates who undertook such studies – increase the efficiency of the training.
Faculty hosts three four-year programs of Ph.D. Studies in Physics. The first of them are the regular
Ph.D. studies in the fields related to the research interests of Faculty members, i.e. technical nuclear
physics, condensed matter physics, high energy physics, nuclear electronics, environmental physics.
The second Ph.D. program started on the 1st October 2009 co-organized with Cracow’s Institute
of Nuclear Physics and Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry (both Institutes are units of the
Polish Academy of Science – PAS). The program under the name “Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Studies
(ISD): New Materials for Modern Technologies and Future Energetics” is financed by the EU
Structural Funds (Program: Kapitał Ludzki). The ISD goal is training high-class specialists, with the
Ph.D. degree, in fields recognized as strategically important in EU and presented under the general
terms: Info, Bio, Nano and Techno. The program of the Ph.D. studies covers a wide variety of physical, chemical and technological topics in materials science and modern energetics.
Finally, the third Ph.D. program run in co-operation with Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry of PAS and selected research institutes of 10 European countries is a common International
PhD program in Nanoscience. The project is financed by European Union Innovative Economy
Program acting via Foundation for Polish Science. It had been selected for financial support as one
of three projects in the first call for the International PhD Studies Programs and started in September 2008.
Research is scheduled for 4 or 5 years, of which 6 to 24 months the students will spend abroad,
mostly in Western European institutes that belong to the consortium.
Faculty offers also a three semester Post-diploma (part-time) Study for Teachers. The studies are intended for primary and secondary school teachers, who want to gain additional qualifications giving them right to teach: physics, mathematics, chemistry, computer science, natural sciences and
technical education.
Physicists – Doctors Honoris
Causa of AGH University
of Science and Technology
Prof. Marian Mięsowicz
1979
Prof. Andrzej Oleś
1995
Prof. Michał Heller
1996
Prof. Andrzej Z. Hrynkiewicz
1999
Prof. Manuel Ricardo Ibarra
2008
Physicist – Honorary Consul
of AGH-UST
prof. Rolf-Dieter Heuer (General Director of CERN)
2009
Physicist – AGH-UST Honorary
Professor
prof. Jerzy Niewodniczański
2009
Long-term visitors
October 2008-March 2009 – Advera Mwijage from Tanzania, scholarship
holder UNESCO – 6 months (to K. Kułakowski)
October 2009 - Sukriti Bhattacharya, PhD student from Universita
Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Italy, 1 month (to K. Saeed)
Mr. Christian Priesley Kofi DAGADU (to M. Lankosz / Z. Stegowski)
Department of Nuclear Engineering & Material Science
National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission
P.O. Box Lg 80, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
Fellowship from IAEA Vienna
Departments, Groups and
Leaders, Achievements in 2009
Katedry, Zespoły i ich Kierownicy,
Najważniejsze osiągnięcia
w 2009 r.
Department of Solid State Physics
Katedra Fizyki Ciała Stałego
Staff
Head
prof. dr hab. Kapusta Czesław, full professor
Magnetic Bulk- and Nanomaterials Group
Zespół Badań Magnetycznych, Elektrycznych i Strukturalnych
prof. dr hab. Kapusta Czesław, full professor
dr Japa Ewa, associate professor
dr Przewoźnik Janusz, associate professor
dr inż. Sikora Marcin, associate professor
dr Żukrowski Jan, associate professor
mgr inż. Lemański Andrzej, teaching assistant
mgr inż. Michalik Jan, teaching assistant
dr inż. Rybicki Damian, teaching assistant
mgr inż. Pilipowicz Aleksander Syrek Jolanta
mgr inż. Musiał Wacław
Kazała Tadeusz
Bąkowski Mariusz
Magnetic, Electrical and Structural Research Group
Zespół Badań Magnetycznych, Elektrycznych i Strukturalnych
dr hab. Paja Antoni, associate professor
dr Gondek Łukasz, associate professor
dr inż. Niewolski Janusz, teaching assistant
Superconducting and Magnetic Materials Group
Zespół Materiałów Nadprzewodzących i Magnetycznych
prof. dr hab. Kołodziejczyk Andrzej, full professor
dr hab. inż. Kozłowski Andrzej, associate professor
dr hab. inż. Tarnawski Zbigniew, associate professor
dr inż. Chmist Janusz, associate professor
dr inż. Tokarz Waldemar, associate professor
dr Woch Wiesław, associate professor
mgr Zalecki Ryszard
Surface Nanostructures Group
Zespół Nanostruktur Powierzchniowych
prof. dr hab. Korecki Józef, full professor
dr Karaś Wojciech, associate professor
dr Ślęzak Tomasz, associate professor
dr inż. Ślęzak Michał
dr Strzelczyk Bartosz
dr Zając Marcin
prof. dr hab. inż. Przybylski Marek, associate professor
Activity
Activity in Scientific Boards, Academies, Scientific Societies, Committees etc.
A. Paja
• Member of the Interdisciplinary Committee for Supporting International Scientific Cooperation at
the Ministry of Science and Higher Education
• Member of the Control Committee of the Cracow Division of the Polish Physical Society (finishing
his term)
• President of the General Control Committee of the Polish Physical Society (commencing his term)
• Associate Editor of the Research Journal of Physics
Cz. Kapusta
• Member of the Condensed Matter Board of the European Physical Society, since 2005.
• Member of the Committee of the CMD’23 European Physical Society Conference, Warsaw, August
2010.
• Chairman of the Kraków-Katowice Division of the Societas Humboldtiana Polonorum, 2004-2009.
10
PROFILE
Scientific activity of the Department concentrates on the studies of structural, magnetic and electronic properties and phenomena in the nano- and sub-nanometric thin films and multilayers, in
the rare earth-3d element intermetallics and their interstitial solutions of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen, in superconductors, including the HTc ones, in magnetic oxides, including the colossal - and
low field magnetoresistive ones, in nanoparticle magnetic materials for MRI contrast and magnetic
hyperthermia as well as in disordered metallic materials.
The experimental facilities of the Department include:
1. MBE set-up for preparation and analysis of thin films and nanostructures, equipped with LEED,
AES, MOKE and CEMS with UHV sample transfer possibility.
2. ARUPS-XPS spectrometer.
3. VSM, AC susceptometer, ESR spectrometer, set-up for magnetoresistance measurements with
closed circle refrigerator and calorimeter for specific heat measurements in 2-300 K range.
4. X-ray diffractometer with temperature controll within 2-450 K range.
5. Physical Property Measurement System (Quantum Design model, closed circle liquifier) equipped with 9 Tesla magnet, 2-400 K (VSM: 2-1100 K) temperature range.
6. Moessbauer spectrometers (4) for 6 isotopes, 4-1000 K temperature range.
7. NMR spectrometers for proton resonance (15 MHz) and for magnetic materials, 5-1000 MHz, closed circle refrigerator, 2-300 K.
The research staff of the Department extensively uses synchrotron beamlines as well as neutron
and muon facilities at the laboratories abroad.
ACHIEVEMENTS
• Implementation of the nuclear resonant scattering of synchron radiation for magnetic characterization of complex metal and oxide nanostructures.
• Determination of the crystal field levels splitting in RPdIn (R = Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds.
• Formulation of the general calculation scheme for the resistivity of binary and ternary disordered
systems.
• Determination of the nature of magnetostructural transition in Ca2FeReO6 with high pulsed field
XMCD.
• The first direct observation of lattice dynamics at the Verwey transition in magnetite.
• Determination of bismuth valence in a Tl0.7Bi0.3Sr1.6Ba0.4CaCu2Oy superconductor from X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.
• Determination of individual site structural, magnetic and electronic properties of a new iron(II)octacyanoniobate(IV) ferromagnet with TC 43 K.
11
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics
Katedra Fizyki Medycznej i Biofizyki
Staff
Head
prof. dr hab. inż. Lankosz Marek, associate professor
Biomedical and Environmental Research Group
Zespół Badań Biomedycznych i Środowiskowych
prof. dr hab. inż. Lankosz Marek, associate professor
dr inż. Węgrzynek Dariusz, assistant professor
dr inż. Chwiej Joanna, assistant professor
dr inż. Furman Leszek, assistant professor
dr inż. Samek Lucyna, assistant professor
dr inż. Szczerbowska-Boruchowska Magdalena, assistant professor
dr inż. Stęgowski Zdzisław, assistant professor
dr inż. Dudała Joanna, teaching assistant
mgr Ostachowicz Beata, teaching assistant
inż. Wierzbicki Adam
mgr Ostrowski Antoni
mgr inż. Kochańska-Donizak Elżbieta
Tomasik Ryszard
Molecular Biophysics and Bioenergetics Group
Zespół Biofizyki Molekularnej i Bioenergetyki
dr hab. Burda Kvetoslava, associate professor
dr Fiedor Joanna, teaching assistant
Biomedical Imaging and Modeling Group
Zespół Obrazowania i Modelowania
dr hab. Wasilewska-Radwańska Marta, associate professor
dr inż. Jung Aleksandra, assistant professor
dr inż. Matusiak Katarzyna, teaching assistant
dr Matuszak Zenon, assistant professor
prof. dr hab. Figiel Henryk, full professor
dr Turek Krzysztof, assistant professor
Moessbauer Spectroscopy Group
Zespół Spektroskopii Mössbauerowskiej
prof. dr hab. Dubiel Stanisław, full professor
dr inż. Cieślak Jakub, assistant professor
12
ACTIVITY
Kvetoslava Burda
• A member of the Organizing Committee of Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications, Held
in Cracow at the Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science AGH University of Science and
Technology, 28-29 May, 2009
• A member of Scientific Council at Multidisciplinary School of Engineering in Biomedicine, AGH
University of Science and Technology
Stanisław M. Dubiel
• Member of Board of Polish Physical Society (2005-2009)
• Fellow Institute of Physics (London) (since 2002)
• Member of Research Boards of Advisers, The American Biographical Institute (since 2005)
Henryk Figiel
• Member of the Main Board of the Polish Physical Society
• Chairman of the Auditorial Comission od the Polish Society of Neutron Diffraction
• Chairman of the Auditorial Comission od the Polish Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Association
• Chairman of the board of BIOMAR Consortium
• Member of the Programme Board of the Inter-Faculty School of Biomedical Engineering
• Member of International Steering Committee of the International Symposia on Metal Hydrogen
Systems
• Member of the Advisory Board of the 40th Meeting of Polish Physicists
• Member of the Scientific Committee of the Second Polish Forum - Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Technology
Aleksandra Jung
• Vice Chairman of the Krakow Branch of the Polish Society of Medical Physics
Marek Lankosz
• Member of X-Ray Spectrometry Advisory Board (since 2008)
• Member of Scientific Council of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (since 2002)
• Chairman of the Organizing Committee of the International Conference on Development and
Applications of Nuclear Technologies NUTECH 2011 (since 2008)
• Member Committee of Nuclear Technology at the National Atomic Energy Agency (since 2009)
Zdzisław Stęgowski
• Member Committee of Nuclear Technology at the National Atomic Energy Agency (since 2009)
• Member of Editorial Board – Nucleonic Bulletin
Marta Wasilewska-Radwańska
• Associate Editor in Physica Medica: European Journal of Medical Physics (2008)
• Polish Society of Medical Physics (PSMP), Secretary General (since 2005)
• European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), Chair of the Education and
Training Committee (since 2007)
• Member of the Committee of Medical Physics, Radiobiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Division
VI Medical Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences (since 2007) and Chair of the Radiation Hygiene
Commission (since 2007)
• Member of the Commission (at the Ministry of Health) for standard procedures and external clinical audits in nuclear medicine (since 2009)
• Member of the Editorial Board of the Polish Journal of Medical Physics and Engineering (since 1998)
• Associate Editor of the Physica Medica: European Journal of Medical Physics (since 2008)
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Dariusz Węgrzynek
• Secretary of the Organizing Committee of the International Conference on Development and
Applications of Nuclear Technologies NUTECH 2011 (since 2008)
Post-graduated fellows
Mr. Christian Priesley Kofi DAGADU
Department of Nuclear Engineering & Material Science
National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission
P.O. Box Lg 80, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
Fellowship from IAEA Vienna
ACHIEVEMENTS
Moessbauer Spectroscopy Group
• Determination with NMR techniques of a sub-lattice magnetism for sigma-FeV alloys.
• Measurement and theoretical calculation of partial phonon density of states and related thermodynamic properties for a quasi-equiatomic Fe-Cr alloy in alpha and sigma phases.
• Demonstration of a correlation between colour and amount of Fe-containing minerals in samples
of ochres from Roussillon.
Biomedical Imaging and Modeling Group
• The description of toxin removing dynamics by particular components of the “Prometheus” system.
• Construction of resonance r.f. coils for low field Magnetic Resonance Imaging system
Biomedical and Environmental Research Group
• Coordination of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Project RER/2/005 “Characterizing Seasonal Variations in Elemental Particulate Matter Concentrations in European Urban and Rural Areas under
Different Climate Conditions”- 2009-2011
• Development of statistical methods for identification of the sources of particulate matter and
determination of mass contribution.
• Determination of the possible mechanisms of neuroprotective action of tacrolimus in epileptic
rat brain. In light of the obtained results the neuroprotective action of FK-506 is both a result of
calcineurin inhibition and direct blockade of K+ channels (calcineurin-dependent and calcineurinindependent mechanism).
• Development of computer method for matrix and geometrical effects elimination in XRF micro
spectroscopy of single grains
Molecular Biophysics and Bioenergetics Group
• Demonstration that protonation and deprotonation processes may modify the spin state of nonheme iron on the acceptor site of photosynthetic reaction centers of type Q.
• Comprehensive thermodynamic description of association of membrane proteins.
• We found that tumor cells are less responsive to the topographical features of the substratum that
their normal counterparts.
• We showed that ionizing radiation stimulates protective mechanisms in the erythrocyte membranes.
14
PROFILE
The Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics was reorganized in September 2009. The part of
the Nuclear Methods Group was transferred form Department of Applied Nuclear Physics to DMPB.
A new established team was named Biomedical and Environmental Research Group. Also the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Group and Biomedical Imaging and Modelling Group have been merged
since September 2009 following retirement of prof. Marta Wasilewska-Radwańska.. The new group
named Biomedical Imaging and Modeling Group under leadership of prof. Henryk Figiel was established. The scientific profile of the group continues activities of the joined groups.
ACTIVITIES
Moessbauer Spectroscopy Group
Our research interests include two areas: (1) solid state physics and (2) bio-farmaceutico-medical
physics. Our current activities of the former are concentrated on experimental and theoretical investigation of various physical properties of the sigma-phase in binary alloy systems (e. g. FeCr, FeV,
CoCr) as well as dynamical properties of poly- and nanocrystalline bcc Fe-Cr alloys, using various
experimental (e. g. Mössbauer Spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Neutron Diffraction,
Magnetometry) and theoretical (e. g. Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker Green’s function) methods. Regarding the latter, we are interested in forms and properties of iron present in samples of an organic
origin (e. g. ferritin) as well as those having application in medicine (e.g. medicaments).
Biomedical Imaging and Modeling Group
The scientific subjects of the group consist of:
• nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
• optical imaging
• modeling of physiological processes
• nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging and Quality Assurance procedures.
Research concerning MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is focused on the low-field imaging systems based on permanent magnets. The other research interest of the group encompasses problems related to cancer radio- and phototherapy of melanomas and free radical processes in biology.
These include both experimental and theoretical investigations. The group develops mathematical
modeling of selected physiological processes. It focuses especially on application of compartment
modeling for extracorporeal liver support therapy. The scientific activity of the group concerns also
nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging and QA (Quality Assurance) procedures and in this field designing of phantoms for static and dynamic studies was succesfuly developed..
Biomedical and Environmental Research Group
The research at the Biomedical and Environmental Research Group relates to the development and
application of nuclear analytical methods and examination of dynamic systems. The main topics of
interest are biomedical research, environmental science, and protection of cultural heritage. Of particular importance is the investigation of the role of biomodulators in the biochemical mechanisms
of the pathogenesis and progress of brain gliomas, neurodegeneration, and epilepsy. The elemental and molecular chemical micro imaging is performed with the use of the techniques based on
synchrotron radiation, i.e. synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF), X-ray absorption near
edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared micro spectroscopy (FTIR).
15
Another research topics of interest are development and applications of methods based on X-ray
micro-beams for investigating chemical element distributions in heterogeneous samples and utilization of coherent synchrotron beams in studies of living organisms. A research is conducted on
utilization of coherent synchrotron beam for investigating the morphology/physiology of insectvectors transmitting malaria (anopheles mosquito) and African trypanosomiasis (glossina fly) diseases.
The investigations in environmental science are connected with the influence of air pollution on
cultural heritage and on urban and rural environments. Samples of air particulate matter are collected in historical buildings (churches, museums) and in urban and rural areas. Statistical methods are
used for identification of possible sources of air pollutants emission.
The scope of research is also application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods for prediction of related physical phenomena and evolution of dynamic system. The CFD results are validated by radiotracer experiments. These methods have been applied to characterize flow in jet mixers
and in hydrocyclone classifiers.
The laboratory is equipped with state-of-art facilities including X-ray fluorescence and infrared
confocal microscopes, multifunctional X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for localized and bulk ultra
trace analysis of organic (infrared microscopy) and inorganic (X-ray fluorescence) compounds in
various kinds of samples.
Department of Condensed Matter Physics
Katedra Fizyki Materii Skondensowanej
Head
prof. dr hab. Wolny Janusz, full professor
prof. dr hab. Kaprzyk Stanisław, full professor
prof. dr hab. inż. Łużny Wojciech, full professor
prof. dr hab. Sikora Wiesława, associate professor
prof. dr hab. inż. Wierzbanowski Krzysztof, full professor
prof. dr hab. inż. Zięba Andrzej, associate professor
dr hab. inż. Toboła Janusz, associate professor
dr hab. inż. Baczmański Andrzej, assistant professor
dr hab. inż. Tarasiuk Jacek, assistant professor
dr inż. Armatys Paweł, assistant professor
dr inż. Bernasik Andrzej, assistant professor
dr Bombik Andrzej, assistant professor
dr inż. Haberko Jakub, assistant professor
dr inż. Kulka Jan, assistant professor
dr Nizioł Jacek, assistant professor
dr Pytlik Łucjan, assistant professor
dr inż. Wroński Sebastian, assistant professor
mgr inż. Wawszczak Roman, teaching assistant
dr inż. Wiendlocha Bartłomiej, teaching assistant
Błaszczyk Władysław
Skotnicki Ryszard
16
Activity
K. Wierzbanowski
• Member of Board of review: Archives of Metallurgy and Materials (PAN)
• Reviewer of Physical Review Letters (PRL)
• Participation is scientific committee of the conference on Conf. on Mechanical Stress Evaluation by
Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation: MECA SENS V – Mito, Japan (2009)
J. Wolny
• Member of Committee of Crystallography, Polish Academy of Science
W. Sikora
• Member of Committee of Crystallography, Polish Academy of Science
A. Zięba
• Member of Main Board, Polish Physical Society
• Member of Commission of Rewards and Distinctions, Polish Physical Society
• Member of Section of Foundations of Metrology of Committee of Metrology and
Measurement Equipment, Polish Academy of Sciences
Profile
Scientific activities of the Department are mainly focused on the following topics:
• Properties and symmetry analysis of selected phases of ordered structures
• Studies of aperiodic structures
• Deformation, recrystallisation and stress in materials
• Electron structure of the solid state
• Polymer research
• Theory of measurement uncertainty
Achievements
• Morphology studies of organic solar cells indicate strong correlation between structure and their
performance.
• Study of Sb as an amphoteric dopant in PbTe semiconductor.
• Interpretation of Compton profiles in exotic LaFeO1-xFxAs superconductor.
• Explanation of strong thermoelectric properties in Zintl phases Mo3-xRuxSb7 and Mo3Sb7-xTex.
• Application of the symmetry analysis method based on the theory of group representations to
construction of models describing behavior of complex social systems in different evacuation scenarios.
• Analysis of recovery of polycrystalline copper in room temperature.
• Method of 3-D visualization of the structure and mechanical properties of human bone on the
basis of computer tomography scans
• Structure refinement of different CMA.
17
Department of Applied Informatics
Katedra Informatyki Stosowanej
Head
prof. dr hab. Kułakowski Krzysztof, full professor
Complex Systems Group
Zespół Układów Złożonych
prof. dr hab. Kułakowski Krzysztof, full professor
prof. dr hab. Maksymowicz Andrzej, full professor
prof. dr hab. Spałek Józef, full professor
prof. dr hab. inż. Kąkol Zbigniew, full professor
dr hab. inż. Saeed Khalid, associate professor
dr hab. Lenda Andrzej, associate professor
dr inż. Dydejczyk Antoni, assistant professor
dr inż. Gawroński Przemysław, assistant professor
dr inż. Gronek Piotr, assistant professor
dr inż. Krawczyk Małgorzata, assistant professor
dr inż. Malarz Krzysztof, assistant professor
dr inż. Wołoszyn Maciej, assistant professor
mgr inż. Panasiuk Piotr, teaching assistant
mgr inż. Szczepański Adam, teaching assistant
dr inż. Kawecka-Magiera Barbara, senior lecturer
dr inż. Malinowski Janusz, lecturer
dr inż. Krupińska Grażyna, senior lecturer
mgr inż. Wolak Tomasz
Theory of Nanomaterials and Nanodevices Group
Zespół Teorii Nanostruktur i Nanourządzeń
prof. dr hab. Bednarek Stanisław, full professor
prof. dr hab. Adamowski Janusz, full professor
dr hab. inż. Horzela Andrzej
prof. dr hab. Jeżabek Marek, full professor
dr hab. inż. Szafran Bartłomiej, assistant professor
dr inż. Chwiej Tomasz, assistant professor
dr inż. Spisak Bartłomiej, assistant professor
Activity
Krzysztof Malarz
• Member of Cracow Branch Council, Polish Physical Society - (1999-2009)
• Managing Editor, Central European Journal of Physics (since 2006)
• Member of the Local Organizing Committee, 40th Meeting of Polish Physicists
• Member of the Scientific Council, 5th Polish Conference on Computer Games Engineering
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Józef Spałek
• Member of the Science Council, Ministry of Science and Higher Education for the period 2008-11.
Khalid Saeed
• Editor-in-Chief of International Journal on Computer Information Systems and Industrial Management Applications (since 2008), Publishers: MIR Labs, USA
• Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Biometrics (since 2007) Publishers: Inderscience, UK
• Conference General Chair, ICBAKE 2009 – International Multi-Conference on Biometrics and Kansei
Engineering, June 25-28, Cieszyn, Poland
• Conference General Chair, CISIM 2009, December 9-11, Coimbatore, India
• Member of International Scientific Committee, The 16th International Multiconference on Advanced Computer Systems, 14-16 October 2009, Międzyzdroje, Poland
• Member of the Program Committee, The Fifth International Workshop on Artificial Neural Networks and Intelligent Information Processing (ANNIIP 2009), Italy - Milan, 4 - 5 July 2009
Zbigniew Kąkol
• Vice Rector for Education
• Member of Jury of the Małopolska Grant Foundation „Sapere Auso”
• Member of Board of the Zielinscy Foundation of Educational Help for Young People
Krzysztof Kułakowski
• Member of the Organizing and Scientific Committee, Fourth Polish Symposium of Econo- and Sociophysics, May 7-9, 2009, Rzeszów, Poland
• Chair of the Organizing Committee, ICBAKE 2009 – International Multi-Conference on Biometrics
and Kansei Engineering, June 25-28, Cieszyn, Poland
Guests
• October 2008-March 2009 – Advera Mwijage from Tanzania, scholarship holder UNESCO
– 6 months (to K. Kułakowski)
• October 2009 - Sukriti Bhattacharya, PhD student from Universita Ca’ Foscari di Venezia, Italy,
1 month (to K. Saeed)
Profile
Research is conducted in a few threads; below the topics are mentioned which are concentrated in
the Complex Systems Group. One of them is connected with the collaboration with the Departmento Fisica de Materiales at the Universidad del Pais Vasco, Spain. This research deals with modeling
the stray field of amorphous microscopic wires of complex domain structure, including simulations
of the process of remagnetization of these wires due to their bistability. Another research deals
with modeling sociological processes in general frames of game theory. Since 2009, the subject
is conducted in frames of 7FP EU on applications of complexity theory to socio-technical systems.
Our contribution is based on our earlier experiences on cellular automata and complex networks,
and it is a continuation of these topics. Our new direction of research is biometrics. This research
area deals with the applications of computer science, in particular the pattern recognition, to the
methods of human identification and verification.
Achievements
A new numerical simulation of the influence of age-modified mutation rate on biological aging,
with the explanation of the Mathuzalem effect.
19
Department of Particle Interaction and Detection
Techniques
Katedra Oddziaływań i Detekcji Cząstek
Staff
Head
prof. dr hab. Kisielewska Danuta, full professor
Elementary Particles Physics Group
Zespół Fizyki Cząstek Elementarnych
prof. dr hab. Kisielewska Danuta, full professor
prof. dr hab. Muryn Bogdan, full professor
dr hab. inż. Przybycień Mariusz, associate professor
dr inż. Adamczyk Leszek, assistant professor
dr inż. Bołd Tomasz, assistant professor
dr inż. Grabowska-Bołd Iwona, assistant professor
dr inż. Obłąkowska-Mucha Agnieszka, assistant professor
dr inż. Szumlak Tomasz, assistant professor
dr Szuba Janusz, teaching assistant
dr inż. Ciba Krzysztof
Nuclear Electronics and Radiation Detection Group
Zespół Elektroniki Jądrowej i Detekcji Promieniowania
prof. dr hab. inż. Dąbrowski Władysław, full professor
dr hab. inż. Idzik Marek, assistant professor
prof. dr hab. Jeleń Kazimierz, full professor
dr inż. Fiutowski Tomasz, assistant professor
dr inż.. Hottowy Paweł, assistant professor
dr inż. Kowalski Tadeusz, assistant professor
dr inż. Mindur Bartosz, assistant professor
dr inż. Skoczeń Andrzej, assistant professor
dr inż. Świentek Krzysztof, assistant professor
dr inż. Wiącek Piotr, assistant professor
mgr Aguilar Jonathan, research assistant
mgr Ambalathankandy Prasoon, research assistant
mgr Imran Ahmed Mohammed, research assistant
mgr Koperny Stefan, teaching assistant
mgr inż. Dwużnik Michał, research assistant
mgr inż. Prochal Bogusław
Filipek Wiesław
Jędrzejowski Franciszek
Pieron Jacek
Tora Tadeusz
20
Activity
K. Jeleń
• Head of AGH Centre of Energy Studies (from 2009)
• Member of Scientific Council of the Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish
Academy of Sciences (2008-2011)
• Member of Scientific Council of the Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM (2008-2011)
• Chairmen of Scientific Council of Małopolska & Podkarpacie Clean Energy Cluster (from 2009)
• Member of Council for Atomic Energy Matters of National Atomic Energy Agency (2009-2012)
• Member of Monitoring Committee EURATOM Fission – National Contact Point.
D. Kisielewska
• Member of the Physics Committee of III Department of Polish Academy of Sciences (2007-2010)
• Member of Scientific Council of The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish
Academy of Sciences (2008-2011)
• Member of Scientific Council of The Andrzej Sołtan Institute for Nuclear Studies (2008-2011)
• Member of High Energy Physics Committee of Council for Atomic Energy Matters of National
Atomic Energy Agency (2009-2012)
• Member of Central Committee of the Scientific Degrees (2007-2010)
W. Dąbrowski
• Member of the Consortium Council of the National Centre for Hadron Radioteraphy.
• Member of the editorial board of the Journal of Instrumentation.
• Member of the editorial board of the Nukleonika journal
• Member of the International Advisory Committee of the Seventh Ineternational Meeting on Front
End Electronics for Particle Physics, Photon Science, and Related Applications, Long Island, New
York, May 18-21, 2009.
M. Przybycień
• Member of the Local Organizing Committee of The 2009 Europhysics Conference
on High Energy Physics, 16-22 July 2009, Krakow, Poland.
Achievements
• Measurement of charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarized electron beam at HERA (ZEUS experiment)
• Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA (ZEUS experiment)
• Commissioning of the Semiconductor Tracker and the Transition Radiation Detector in the ATLAS
experiment at CERN (as member of the ATLAS Collaboration)
• Design and manufacturing of new front-end chip ABCN25 for readout of silicon strip detectors in
the Super LHC environment.
• Development of fully integrated Analog-to-Digital Converter for the Luminosity Detector at the
International Linear Collider.
• Demonstration of functionality and performance of 512-electrode system for simultaneous electrical stimulation and recoding from retina tissue
• Preparation for collection and analysis of the real data in the LHCb experiment:
improvement of the silicon vertex locator detector (VELO),
progress in the development of new trigger philosophy,
determination of the selection criteria for new processes of the beauty mesons decays.
21
Profile
The scientific activity of Department cover three areas of research:
• basic research of elementary constituents of the matter and their interactions in high energy collisions
• design and construction of detectors and readout electronics for high energy physics experiments
and other applications
• instrumentation for neuroscience experiment and investigation of interfaces between electronic
circuits and live neuronal tissues.
The high energy experiments are long term projects and because of high cost of large accelerators
and detection facilities they are performed by large international collaborations. Our participation
in experiments is as complete as possible and covers all phases of the projects: preparations of the
research programs, design and construction of the experimental apparatus, data analyses as well as
maintaining and upgrading detector systems.
Currently we participate in analysis of data from three experiments, which have finished data taking:
• ZEUS e±p at HERA (DESY),
• DELPHI e+e- at LEP (CERN),
• OPAL e+e- at LEP (CERN).
Over last decade have contributed to design and construction of two new experiments:
• ATLAS pp at LHC (CERN),
• LHCb pp at LHC (CERN),
and in the coming years we will focus on running these two experiments and on data analysis.
In parallel, we carry out R&D programs aiming at development of the detector concepts and new
detector technologies for an upgrade of the ATLAS experiment and for a future experiment at the
International Linear Collider.
The activity in the area of front-end electronics focuses on development of circuits and system for
readout of position sensitive detectors employing Application Specific Integrated Circuits. The Department is a member of the EUROPRACTICE organisation, which offers access to CAD tools and
prototyping using advanced semiconductor technologies. We carry out development of readout
ASICs for the following detector technologies:
• tracking detectors for high energy physics experiments based on silicon microstrip detectors,
• detectors for X-ray imaging based on silicon microstrip detectors,
• detectors for neutron imaging based on Micro Strip Gas Chambers (MSGC),
• detectors for charge particles and X-ray imaging based on Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM).
Particular attention is paid to radiation effects in semiconductor devices and circuits, which are of
primary importance in the front-end electronics for readout of silicon strip detectors in the high
energy physics experiments.
In the area of neuroscience we focus on development of systems for imaging of neural activity in
live neural tissues. A common aim of various research projects is to develop two ways communication between live neurons and electronic circuits, which require electrical stimulation of neurons
with arbitrary spatial and temporal patterns and simultaneous recording of elicited neuron responses. The developed experimental systems are based on multielectrode arrays array and ASICs.
In collaboration with various collaborators in the area of neuroscience we develop specific systems
for investigation of different neural tissues, including retina, brain, cortex, and participate also in
analysis of data from neuroscience experiments.
22
Department of Applied Nuclear Physics
Katedra Zastosowań Fizyki Jądrowej
Staff
Head
prof. dr hab. inż. Różański Kazimierz, full professor
Physics of Functional Materials Group
Zespół Fizyki Materiałów Funkcjonalnych
prof. dr hab. Pszczoła Jarosław, associate professor
Environmental Physics Group
Zespół Fizyki Środowiska
prof. dr hab. inż. Różański Kazimierz, full professor
dr inż. Duliński Marek, assistant professor
dr inż. Kuc Tadeusz, assistant professor
dr inż. Nęcki Jarosław, assistant professor
dr inż. Nguyen Dinh Chau, assistant professor
dr inż. Przybyłowicz Wojciech, assistant professor
dr inż. Rosiek Janusz, assistant professor
dr inż. Wachniew Przemysław, assistant professor
dr inż. Zimnoch Mirosław, assistant professor
dr inż. Gorczyca Zbigniew, teaching assistant
dr inż. Jodłowski Paweł, teaching assistant
mgr Fiedorowicz Justyna
mgr inż. Mróz Halina
Pach Franciszek
Wróblewski Ryszard
Nuclear Methods Group
Zespół Metod Jądrowych
prof. dr hab. inż. Kreft Andrzej, associate professor
dr Bolewski Andrzej, assistant professor
dr inż. Ciechanowski Marek, assistant professor
dr Czapliński Wilhelm, assistant professor
dr inż. Petryka Leszek, assistant professor
dr hab. inż. Markowicz Andrzej, associate professor
23
Activity
K. Różański
• Member of the Council for Atomic Energy Matters of the National Atomic Energy Agency
• Member of the Polish National Committee, International Geosphere and Biosphere Programme of
the International Council for Science
• Member of the Editorial Board of the journal “Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies” (since
2000)
• Vice-chairman of the Society of Research on Environmental Changes “GEOSPHERE”
A. Kreft
• Member of the Council for Atomic Energy Matters of the National Atomic Energy Agency
• Chairman of the Commission Nuclear Techniques of the Council for Atomic Energy Matters
• Member of the Coordinator Team of the Clean Energy Cluster
J. Pszczoła
• Member of the Interfaculty Commission of Technical Sciences of the Polish Academy of Arts and
Sciences
Profile
Department Applied Nuclear Physics (DANP) is composed of three groups: (i) Environmental Physics Group, (ii) Nuclear Methods Group, and (iii) Functional Materials Group. Research activities of
DANP cover selected topics of nuclear physics and its applications in areas such as environmental
sciences, material sciences as well as industrial applications of nuclear methodologies. Moreover,
DANP is responsible for two specializations being thought in the framework of the Technical Physics discipline offered by the Faculty at B.Sc. and M.Sc. level.
Major instrumentation available at DANP:
• an arc melting system with contact-less ignition for synthesis of materials,
• a system to measure magnetoelectric effect of materials,
• analytical system for low-level tritium assay in natural waters,
• analytical systems for determination of isotope ratios of light elements (2H/1H, 13C/12C, 14C/12C,
15N/14N, 18O/16O) in environmental materials (water, rocks and deposits, gases, organic matter),
• analytical systems for detection of trace compounds (ppm, ppb, and ppt level) in the atmosphere.
Achievements
• Completion of comprehensive, multidisciplinary study of natural analogue site, Ruprechtov, Czech
Republic, with the aid of isotope and geochemical tools.
• Completion of a reconnaissance study aimed at determination of natural radioactivity levels and
annual radiation doses for a large set of bottled waters currently available on the market in southern Poland.
• Publication of a monograph entitled „Thermodynamic and isotopic model of carbon dioxide exploitation during periodic operation of Zuber I borehole in the Krynica Spa”.
• Realization of the measuring system for magnetoelectric effect
• Determination of the influence of 3d-electrons on the band structure, magnetic and electrical
properties and hyperfine interactions observed in rare earth – transition metal compounds
24
Administration Staff
Administracja, Obsługa
dr inż. Chmist Janusz
Kalinowska Jadwiga bibliotekarz
mgr Wijas Aneta
mgr Waluś Grażyna
mgr inż. Horzemska-Ciślak Marta
mgr inż. Hamerla Katarzyna
mgr Starmach Agnieszka
Baliga Ewa
inż. Bonczarowski Roman
Czech Kazimierz
Flis Grzegorz
Leśniak Ewa
Lipniacka Jolanta
Olszyńska Elżbieta
mgr Sobczyk Krystyna
Stefanko Agnieszka
Wolak Celina
Sikora Franciszek
Setkowicz Stanisław
Wydmański Kazimierz
Berski Marek
Kozera Jan
Setkowicz Piotr
Baran Stanisława
Jastrzębska Danuta
Łapczyńska Małgorzata
Pabiś Dorota
Wójtowicz Lucyna
Wróbel Maria
Teaching Support Group
Zespół Obsługi Dydaktyki
dr hab. Lenda Andrzej, associate professor
dr Sanok Zofia, assistant professor
mgr Kułakowska Magdalena, senior lecturer
inż. Chmieliński Adam
inż. Cyganik Stanisław
inż. Skalski Andrzej
Ciślak Adam
Jędrzejowski Franciszek
Opoka Zenon
25
CERN
Staff
mgr inż. Dubert Paweł
mgr inż. Dubert Anna
mgr inż. Gaj Wawrzyniec
mgr inż. Gorzawski Arkadiusz
Seweryn Grzegorz
mgr inż. Skała Aleksander
Baran Krzysztof
26
PhD Students
Name
Ahmed Mohammed
Ambalathankandy Prasoon
Augstyńska Dominika
Brożek Marcin
Dulińska Justyna
Dworak Andrzej
Dziedzic Justyna
Gach Grzegorz
Gieszczyk Wojciech
Jamrozik Agnieszka
Janc Krzysztof
Karczmarska Agnieszka
Kocjan Przemysław
Kołodziej Tomasz
Krzak Małgorzata
Kuczera Paweł
Kutorasiński Kamil
Lewkowicz Aneta
Marciszko Marianna
Nosek Magdalena
Oćwieja Magdalena
Onik Katarzyna
Pajor Anna
Pasek Wojciech
Pawłowski Jarosław
Perzanowski Marcin
Proniewski Bartosz
Przyborowski Dominik
Skubis Anna
Smolik Damian
Surmacz Kamil
Szkudlarek Aleksandra
Wodniak Iwona
Wójcik Anna Katarzyna
Wroński Marcin
Wróbel Paweł
Zielińska Alicja
Zegrodnik Michał ISD
Bartyzel Jakub
Drogowska Karolina
Gajda Paweł
Grynkiewicz Przemysław
Hałas Agnieszka
Jabłońska Magdalena
Kozioł Anna
Kulis Szymon
Łysoń Barbara
Nowak Jakub
Year
1
1
1
1 ISD
1
1
1 ISD
1
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1
1 ISD
1
1
1
1
1 ISD
1 ISD
1 ISD
1
1
1 ISD
2
2 MPD
2
2
2 MPD
2
2
2
2
2
27
Supervisor
dr. hab. M. Idzik
dr. hab. M. Idzik
prof. K. Strzałka (UJ)
dr hab. P. Łodziana (IFJ PAN)
prof. M. Lankosz
prof. Z. Burda (UJ)
prof. P. Warszyński (IKiFP PAN)
prof. D Kisielewska
doc. P. Olko (IFJ PAN)
dr hab. K. Burda
dr hab. J. Tarasiuk
doc. M. Wolny-Marszałek (IFJ PAN)
dr hab. K. Saeed
dr. hab. A. Kozłowski
prof. P. Warszyński (IKiFP PAN)
prof. J. Wolny
dr hab. J. Toboła
prof. M. Witko (IKiFP PAN)
dr hab. A Baczmański
doc. P. Weroński (IFJ PAN)
prof. Z. Adamczyk (IKiFP PAN)
doc. M. Derewiński (IKiFP PAN)
prof. P. Warszyński (IKiFP PAN)
dr hab. B. Szafran
prof. S. Bednarek
doc. M. Wolny-Marszałek (IFJ PAN)
prof. H. Figiel
dr. hab. M. Idzik
prof. S. Bednarek
prof. W. Batko (AGH-WIMiR)
dr hab. K. Saeed
prof. Cz. Kapusta
doc. K. Drozdowicz (IFJ PAN)
doc. J. Mietelski (IFJ PAN)
prof. K. Wierzbanowski
prof. M. Lankosz
prof. W. Dąbrowski
prof. J. Spałek
prof. K. Różański
dr hab. Z. Tarnawski
prof. S. Taczanowski (AGH WEiP)
prof. S. Bednarek
dr hab. K. Burda
prof. H. Figiel
prof. J. Korecki
dr hab. M. Idzik
dr hab. K. Zakrzewska (AGH-WEAIiE)
prof. K. Różański
Name
Nowak Michał
Oettingen Mikołaj
Pohorecka Maria
Poniedziałek Maciej
Rybak Marcin
Rydygier Przemysław
Sarna Michał
Selvaraj Babu Nivas
Senderowska Katarzyna
Śleziak Monika
Szumniak Paweł
Tomkowicz Joanna
Wójcik Grzegorz
Ziarek Marcin
Żychowicz Dariusz
Adamska Anna Maria
Bochenek Michał
Broniec Anna
Czyżycki Mateusz
Kaczmarska Magdalena
Kowalik Marcin
Koźlak Kamil
Ornat Maurycy
Padoł Anna
Smoleń Magdalena
Szklarska-Łukasik Monika
Świebocka Joanna
Wójcik Paweł
Zaleski Aliaksandr
Chodak Jacek
Dudek Remigiusz
Matlak Krzysztof
Seremak-Peczkis Paulina
Sowa Anna
Tabiś Wojciech
Wach Paulina
Duda Michał
Freindl Kinga
Haduch Jerzy
Jeleń Dorota
Krawczyk Artur
Kuna (Bartyzel) Agnieszka
Lasyk Łukasz
Łabno Bartłomiej
Półtorak Karolina
Pycia (Manterys) Marta
Stępień Joanna
Zwoźniak Agnieszka
Żywczak Antoni
Year
2 MPD
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2 MPD
2 MPD
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3 MPD
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
28
Supervisor
dr hab. B. Szafran
dr hab. J. Cetnar (AGH WEiP)
dr hab. K.Urbańska UJ
dr hab. B. Szafran
prof. K. Kułakowski
prof. W. Dąbrowski
dr hab. K. Burda
prof. H. Figiel
doc. M. Witek (IFJPAN)
prof. M. Mazurkiewicz (AGH-WGiG)
prof. S. Bednarek
prof. K. Kułakowski
prof. S. Taczanowski (AGH WEiP)
prof. H. Figiel
prof. H. Figiel
dr hab. H. Nhu-Tarnawska (UP)
prof. W. Dąbrowski
dr hab. P. Augustyniak (AGH WEAIiE)
prof. M. Lankosz
dr hab. K. Burda
prof. A. Kołodziejczyk
prof. H. Figiel
prof. A. Paja
prof. Cz. Kapusta
dr hab. P. Augustyniak (AGH WEAIiE)
prof. J. Pszczoła
prof. H. Figiel
prof. J. Adamowski
prof. T. Stobiecki (AGH WEAIiE)
dr hab. P. Augustyniak (AGH WEAIiE)
prof. S. Bednarek
prof. J. Korecki
prof. Cz. Kapusta
prof. J. Adamowski
prof. A. Kozłowski
prof. K. Różański
prof. J. Wolny
prof. J. Korecki
prof. H. Figiel
prof. K. Różański
prof. J. Pszczoła
prof. W. Sikora
doc. R. Kozłowski (IFiKP PAN)
prof. J. Adamowski
prof. W. Dąbrowski
prof. K. Różański
prof. Cz. Kapusta
prof. J. Pszczoła
prof. H. Figiel
Selected results
Numerical simulation of the influence of
age-modified mutation rate on biological aging
A. Z. Maksymowicz
Department of Applied Informatics and Computational Physics
in cooperation with:
M. S. Magdoń-Maksymowicz
Department of Mathematical Statistics, AR-Agricultural University, Kraków
In this study we proved that expected modification of the mutation rate m(a)
with age a does influence overall characteristics of mortality distribution q(a), a fraction of
items eliminated from the population when
we go from age (a) to (a+1) in simulated transition from time (t) to next time step (t+1).
Standard bit-string model of population dynamics, developed by Penna [1], is usually explored for the genetic mutation-based theories of biological aging. The experimentally
observed mortality q(a) dependence follows
the Gompertz exponential law for a above
the minimum reproduction age, which essentially is the result of the Penna model. In this
model a constant mutation rate m is assumed.
However, deviation from the Gompertz law is
observed for the very old items, close to the
maximal age. This needs explanation and one
of the possibilities considered for this effect
may result from an increase of mutation rate
m(a) with age, as discussed in this study.
Population dynamics may be described in terms of number of individuals
n(a,t) at age a and at time t. The sum over
a yields current population n(t), yet usually
we are interested in the equilibrium state,
when after long enough time n(a) = n(a,t).
Mortality q(a) is defined as the percentage
of items eliminated when we go to the next
time step: t → (t+1), a → (a+1). We have q(a) =
1 - n(a+1)/n(a). In the discrete time model, the
transition from time (t) to the next time step
(t+1) results from the balance between death
rate p and birthrate b. If p and b were the only
model parameters (constants), then only unacceptable trivial cases would turn up: either
n=0 for p>b, else we get unlimited population
growth. The so called Verhulst factor restores
the balance within a finite population n. The
basic idea is to replace death rate parameter
p by a suitable function of population n so
that p becomes larger for overpopulated habitat. In the simplest logistic model, death rate
p (known as the Verhulst factor) is assumed to
be proportional the current population n(t),
p(t)=n(t)/N, where N is interpreted as environmental capacity. At equilibrium, this model
yields population n/N=b/(1+b) and age-independent mortality q(a)=n. The advantage of
the Penna model is that it gives mortality q(a)
as increasing function of age a, following the
Gompertz law. Vast literature on biological aging indicates many possible factors that may
contribute to the process of aging. Oxigen
radicals which may damage the genome, programmed cell death after certain number of
cell divisions where telomeres are partly lost
during each division or mutation accumulation are often named as possible reasons for
aging. Asexual version of the Penna model of
population evolution which belongs to mutation accumulation theory, the most popular
foundation of biological aging concept. This
model of biological aging yields results which
basically agree with the Gompertz law. In
asexual version of Penna model, the genome
of a newly born, represented by a computer
29
word with bit value ‘1’ for the bad mutation
so the standard reference model may be recovand ‘0’ for no mutation, is inherited from a sinered by putting slope s=0. The number of itgle parent. The baby’s age a=0 and its genome
erations for typical set of parameters for which
is not just a copy of parent’s - it may acquire at
population distribution reaches equilibrium,
the moment of birth some extra ‘bad’ mutaapart from statistical fluctuations, was of order
tions - each bit may randomly be set to one
of 1000. The computer simulation was carried
with probability m. In the evolution rule leadout for mutation threshold T=1, effective muing from time (t) to (t+1), we count all ‘ones’ in
tation rate m(0) scanned from 0.01 to 0.03, the
the genome of the individual of age a, from bit
slope s was varying from zero to 0.002 (with
position zero to bit a on entry to the new era,
life span of maximum age a=120) and birth
marking them as active. The actual number
rates changing from b=0.1, to b=0.2. (Here the
of activated mutations μ(a) will be checked
‘effective mutation rate m(0)’ is an adjustable
against some threshold value T of maximum
parameters which, by definition, produces the
number of bad mutations at which genetic
same population n for s>0 as the reference set
death occurs. In direct computer simulation,
with s=0.) Example of changes of mortality
the above algorithm is executed in the form
q(a) caused by modification of mutation rate
of iterations over number of time steps necesm(a) is shown below.
sary to reach equilibrium;
in each time step we scan
the population pool and
for each individual the
life game of elimination
due to Verhulst factor, or
genetic death, or for other reasons takes place. If
the individual survives,
it may give birth and the
newly born baby takes
on parent’s genome,
enriched by extra mutations at rate m per bit. For Fig.1. The left figure is the standard Penna model with slope s=0 and
this asexual case, simpler m(0)=0.01 for birth rate b=0.1. Exponential character of mortality q(a)
then the sexual one, an against age a is clearly seen in the whole range of ages until age a=31
analytical solution was of about limit at which genetic death toll makes the population exfound by Coe at al [2] in tinct. The right figure for s>0 illustrates typical tendencies which follow
the form of a map n(a,L,t) assumed monotonic increase of the mutation rate with parent’s age,
→
n(a,L,t+1), where here for slope s=0.001, m(a)=m(0)+s∙a. Note the shift of maximal age to
n(a,L,t) is the population larger values. Points with error bars represent direct simulation results
at given age a of given which were also carried out for reference. Less precise agreement begenome length L at time tween crosses and the solid line for larger a is due to poorer statistics
t. This new characteristics as population at old ages n(a) is greatly reduced, leading to significant
L is defined just as the bit fluctuations in q(a).
position with critical ‘1’ for
the deadly number T of
bad mutations.
The main findings of our studies are:
In our studies we followed the ana1)slowing down mortality rate at the oldest
lytical solution of a master-like type of iterative
old, a sort of Mathuzalem effect, and 2)a shift
equation n(a,L,+t+1)=F{n(a,L,t)} given by Coe,
of the genome length distribution towards
and we adopted it to the case when mutation
larger values. We may conclude that the asrate m(a) depends on parent’s age [3]. We assumed modification of mutation rates tosume a specific m(a) dependence in order to
wards larges values of older individuals may
account for the effect that older individuals
be responsible for the observed in population
may produce less healthy children. The simrelative slowing down mortality for the oldest
plest linear form was proposed, m(a)=m(0)+s∙a,
old items.
30
References:
1
T. J. P. Penna, J. Stat. Phys. 78 (1995) 1629
2
J. B. Coe and Y. Mao, Phys. Rev. E 72 (2005) 051925
3
M. S. Magdoń-Maksymowicz and A. Z. Maksymowicz, Phys. Rev. E 79 (2009) 061919
31
Design of luminosity detector for the future
International Linear Collider
M. Idzik, T. Fiutowski, K. Swientek, J. Aguilar, P. Ambalathankandy, Sz. Kulis,
D. Przyborowski
Nuclear Electronics and Radiation Detection Group, Department of Particle Interactions and Detection Teachniques
in cooperation with:
IFJ PAN Cracow Poland, DESY Zeuthen Germany
To investigate the elementary structure of matter, a powerful accelerators and
sophisticated detecor systems are needed.
Even before the recently completed Large
Hadron Collider (LHC) began to collide particles, it was already known that future linear
e+e- colliders like the International Linear Collider (ILC, www.linearcollider.org/cms/) and
the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC, clic-study.
web.cern.ch/CLIC-Study/), would be needed
for more precise investigations into the nature of the universe. The success of these new
machines will depend greatly on the development of novell detectors, with improvements
in particle identification, track reconstruction,
and energy measurement capabilities even
while operating in a harsh, high-density radiation environment.
Thousands of researchers have
been working for many years on the design
of the future ILC collider [1], the most probable successor of the LHC. One of the challenges for the ILC detectors is to acheive an
unprecedented accuracy of less than 10-3, as
required by the luminosity measurement. The
luminosity of the ILC will be measured by the
LumiCal detector, which constitutes an important part of the Forward Calorimetry region. LumiCal will be built as a Si/W sandwich
calorimeter composed of alternating passive
absorber (W) layers and active sensor (Si) layers. The active part of the LumiCal comprises
30 layers of 300 μm-thick DC-coupled silicon
sensors. Each layer is divided into 48 azimuthal sectors. Each sector, with the inner radius of
8 cm and the outer of 20 cm, is also segmented into 64 radial pads with a constant pitch.
In total, the detection system requires about
2·105 readout pads.
The AGH Nuclear Electronics Group
is a member of the international FCAL collaboration (Forward Calorimetry, www-zeuthen.
desy.de/ILC/fcal/), created in order to develop
and build the detectors working at small polar angles (forward detectors) at the future
linear accelerators, ILC and CLIC. Presently,
the Nuclear Electronics Group, in collaboration with IFJ PAN, is working on a prototype
of the LumiCal detector module. This work is
probably the most solid and advanced contribution of any Polish group towards the
design and construction of the ILC detector
system. The importance of detector development for the ILC experiments has also been
recognised through the European Community R&D programmes. The work by the Nuclear
Electronics Group is supported by participating in the European Framework Programmes.
The development of the infrastructure for
a prototype test of the LumiCal detector is
supported by the 6th Framework Programme
under the EUDET project (www.eudet.org).
EUDET involves 31 well-known European institutions from 12 different countries. ILC detector development is also supported by the
Marie Curie Network through the MC-PAD
project (mc-pad.web.cern.ch/mc-pad/) within
the 7th Framework Programme. The MC-PAD
network is formed by leading european institutions in experimental particle physics (e.g.
CERN, DESY, INFN, GSI, NIKHEF, PSI) in order to
develop novell detection systems for future
experiments. The MC-PAD network supports
young researchers participating in these
works, and some of them work for LumiCal in
the Nuclear Electronics Group AGH.
At present, the work of the Nuclear
Electronics Group is concentrated mainly on
32
the design and prototyping of the LumiCal
tor. The main readout electronics functionalreadout electronics. The design of the Luity is implemented in two integrated circuits:
miCal readout electronics depends on sevthe front-end ASIC [2,4] and the ADC ASIC
eral requirements as well as assumptions
[3,4]. The prototype ASICs are fabricated usconcerning LumiCal architecture. The readout
ing 0.35 μm CMOS technology.
should work in two modes: physics mode and
The front—end ASIC comprises
calibration mode. In physics mode the deteca charge sensitive amplifier, a pole--zero cantor should be sensitive to electromagnetic
cellation circuit (PZC) and a shaper. In order
showers resulting in high energy depositions,
to cope with large charges in physics mode
and the electronics should be able to procand small ones in calibration mode, variable
ess signals of up to 10 pC of ionized charge
gain is implemented in both the charge senor even more per sensor pad. In calibration
sitive amplifier and the shaper. A number of
mode it should be able to detect signals from
measurements have been performed to charrelativistic muons, i.e. should be able to regacterize the gain, noise, speed and other paister minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). This
rameters of the prototype ASIC. An example
means that signals as small as 2 fC (correresult of the gain measured in physics mode
sponding to the low end of the Landau disis shown in fig1.
tribution for MIPs in 300
μm thick silicon) should
be detected. The chosen
sensor geometry results
in a very wide range of
pad capacitance, 10 pF
– 100 pF, connected to
a single readout electronics channel. Because
of very high expected
pad occupancy, the electronics should be fast
enough to resolve signals
from consecutive beam
bunches which are separated in time by about
350 ns. Simulations of Fig.1. Measured and simulated gain of the front-end ASIC in the physLumiCal indicate that the ics mode for different sensor capacitances
reconstruction procedure
needs about 10-bit precision in the measure
This and other measurements conment of deposited energy. Severe requirefirm that the key parameters regarding gain,
ments set on readout electronics power disnoise, and speed are in good agreement with
sipation may be strongly relaxed if a scheme
simulations.
is implemented to switch the power on and
The ADC ASIC is designed using
off between ILC bunch trains. This is feasipipeline architecture which assures a good
ble since in the ILC experiment there will be
compromise between speed, area and power
a pause of about 200 ms after each 1 ms
consumption. A 1.5-bit per stage fully differbunch train. Because about 2·105 readout
ential scheme was chosen for its simplicity
channels need to be contained in a small deand immunity to offsets, crosstalk and other
tector volume, a single channel should not
disturbances. The ASIC comprises a sample
exceed a pitch of about 200 μm. To fulfill the
and hold stage, 9 pipeline stages (containabove requirements, development of muling multiplying analog to digital converters
tichannel, application-specific integrated cirand subADCs), and a digital correction block.
cuits (ASICs) is needed. The general concept
A photograph of the ADC prototype glued and
of a full readout chain comprises a charge
bonded on the PCB board is shown in fig.2.
sensitive amplifier, a shaper, a digitizer (ADC)
To estimate the ASIC performance
with zero suppression, and a data concentraa number of static and dynamic measure-
33
ments were done [3,4]. An example of the
measured ADC transfer function is shown in
fig.3.
Measurements show very small (< 0.5 LSB)
static nonlinearities and good dynamic performance expressed by the high signal to
noise ratio (>58 dB).
To summarize, the development of
readout electronics for the LumiCal detector
seems to be on a good track. Work on the
design and integration of the multichannel
version of the readout is ongoing. When this
has been completed, integration of the full
detector chain – comprising the sensor, the
readout electronics, and the complete detector tungsten plane – will begin.
Fig.2. Photograph of the bonded ADC prototype ASIC
Fig.3. Transfer function of the prototype ADC ASIC
References:
1
G. Aarons, (W. Dąbrowski, M. Idzik, Sz. Kulis, T.Lesiak, B. Pawlik, L.Suszycki, K. Świentek) et al., Internation Linear Collider, Reference Design Report, ILC-2007-001, www.linearcollider.org/cms; International Large Detector, ILD, Letter of Intent www.ilcild.org/documents/ild-letter-of-intent.
2
M.Idzik, Sz. Kulis, D. Przyborowski, “Development of front-end electronics for the luminosity detector at ILC”, 2009 Nuclear Instruments and Methods A 608 pp.169-174.
3
M. Idzik, K. Świentek, Sz. Kulis, “Design and measurements of 10 bit pipeline ADC for the Luminosity Detector at ILC”, Proceedings of Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, TWEPP-09,
Paris, France, 21-25 Sep, 2009.
4
M. Idzik, K. Świentek, T. Fiutowski, Sz. Kulis, D. Przyborowski, P. Ambalathankandy, “Readout electronics for LumiCal detector”, EUDET-Report-2009-09, www.eudet.org/e26/e27/
34
An ongoing analysis of data from large accelerator
facilities: LEP (experiments DELPHI and OPAL),
HERA (experiment ZEUS)
L. Adamczyk, T. Bołd, I. Grabowska-Bołd, D. Kisielewska, B. Muryn,
A. Obłąkowska-Mucha, M. Przybycień, J. Szuba, T. Szumlak
Elementary Particles Physics Group, Department of Particle Interactions and Detection Techniques
In cooperation with:
DELPHI :Collaboration – 59 laboratories from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Finland,
France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK and USA,.
OPAL Collaboration – 34 laboratories from Canada, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Poland, Switzerland, UK and USA,
ZEUS Collaboration – 56 laboratories from Belgium, Canada, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Japan,
Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Spain, UK and USA
The experiments DELPHI and OPAL
at LEP (Large Electron- Positron Collider) in
CERN and ZEUS at HERA ( Hadron Elektron
Ring Anlage) in Hamburg already finished
the data taking but physics analyses of large
data sets are still being continued. In 2009 the
experiments published 22 papers in journals
from the ISI Master Journal List. The most important results are the following.
gies (√s) between 130 GeV and 207 GeV are
consistent with the results obtained by other
experiments as well as with the predictions of
the Standard Model (SM). They allow to set
new limits on the scales of contact interactions, which are found to lie in the range 2–13
TeV, depending on the chirality structure of
the new physics contribution [3].
All measurements performed at
LEP are consistent with the predictions of the
Standard Model. On the other hand we know
that the SM can not be the final picture, because of several theoretical problems. One of
them is known as the hierarchy problem and
is related to the observed weakness of gravity in comparison with other interactions.
Recently a new theory has been proposed
in which large extra spatial dimensions appear. The weakness of gravity results from
the fact that gravitons, which are meant to
mediate the gravitational interactions, in contradiction to other elementary particles, may
propagate also in extra dimensions. Measurement of the cross section for the production
of single photons in e+e− collisions at LEP is
in agreement with expectations from the SM
process e+e− → ν−νγ. The absence of an excess
of events has been used to set a limit of 1.69
TeV at 95% CL on the fundamental mass scale
for the theory with n=1 extra dimension.[2]
DELPHI experiment at LEP
Beam electrons at LEP II, which scatter at very small angles, are a strong source of
quasi-real photons (Q2~0). Studies of inclusive
production of charged hadrons in two-photon collisions allow for tests of perturbative
chromodynamics (QCD). The measured distributions of transverse momentum of particles
produced in this process and the differential cross sections dσ/dpT in pseudorapidity
range |η|<1.5 are in a good agreement with
theoretical computations in LO and NLO [1].
The ratio of cross sections Rb =
σ(e+e- → bb)/σ(e+e- → qq) and the forwardbackward production asymmetry of bottom
quarks in e+e–- collisions at LEP are important parameters in precision studies of electroweak theory, and are sensitive probes of
new physics. Measurements of these quantities performed at the centre-of-mass ener-
35
ZEUS experiment at HERA
in the nucleon. Moreover, the measurement
of the asymmetry parameter A- representing
the difference in the behaviour of negatively
and positively polarized electrons, demonstrates the parity violating effects of electroweak interactions at large space-like photon
virtuality. Results of these measurements are
shown in figures 1 and 2 [5] and agree well
with the predictions of the SM.
Neutral Current DIS is sensitive to
all quark flavours. However, at leading order
only up-type quarks and down-type antiquarks contribute to e-p Charged Current (CC)
DIS. Thus this process is a powerful probe of
flavour-specific parton distribution functions
(PDFs). Due to the chiral nature of the weak
interaction, the SM predicts a linear dependence of CC cross section on the degree of longitudinal polarization of the electron beam.
Results of this analysis [4] agree with SM
predictions. It would be worth stressing that
results from both papers on NC and CC are
shown on the cover pages of the European
Physical Journal C.
The last months of the data taking
at HERA were devoted to the runs at reduced
proton energies of 575 and 460 GeV, necessary to perform a measurement of the longitudinal structure function of proton FL(x,Q2),
which is one of most important measurement at HERA. The reduced cross sections for
ep deep inelastic scattering have been measured at three different center-of-mass energies: 318, 251 and 225 GeV. The knowledge of
The aim of the ZEUS experiment was
the verification of the Standard Model (SM) of
the fundamental interactions and search for a
“new physics” beyond it by investigating the
e-p interactions at the highest energies. After
15 years of successful data taking the HERA
accelerator terminated its operation and after
final “grand reprocessing” of data we continue the analysis. In 2009 the most interesting
results are: measurements of charged and
neutral current deep inelastic cross sections
for longitudinally polarized electron beam [4,
5] and the measurement of the longitudinal
structure function of proton FL[6].
Deep inelastic scattering (DIS) of
leptons off nucleons is a key process the
understanding of the structure of the proton. Neutral Current (NC) DIS is mediated by
photons and Z bosons. The HERA ep collider
with centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV has
expanded the accessible kinematic region for
DIS measurements allowing for direct observation of the effects of the weak interaction
at high values of the negative four-momentum transfer, Q2. In particular, the structure
function xF3 can be obtained from the difference of cross sections in e+p and e-p scattering. At HERA conditions xF3 is dominated by
the interference of photon and Z-exchange.
This furnishes not only a precise test of electro-weak sector of SM but also provides direct
information on the valence quark distribution
Fig. 1 The structure function xF3γZ plotted as a function x.
Fig. 2 (a) The ratio of dσ/dQ2 using positive and negative polarization.
(b) The polarization asymmetry A- as a function of Q2.
36
FL is needed to extract, in a model independent way, the structure function F2 from the
measured cross section. Furthermore, a direct
measurement of FL, which is strongly correlated to the gluon density, allows to constrain
the gluon distribution function in the proton.
Results of this measurement are shown in the
Fig.3 taken from [6]. The measurements provide strong evidence of a non-zero FL.
Fig. 3. The proton structure functions FL and F2
References:
1
Inclusive single-particle production in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector,
DELPHI Collaboration, J.Abdallah et al. (B.Muryn, A.Obłąkowska-Mucha, T.Szumlak) Phys. Lett. B678
(2009) 444
2
Search for one large extra dimension with the DELPHI detector at LEP, DELPHI Collaboration,
J.Abdallah et al. (B.Muryn, A.Obłąkowska-Mucha, T.Szumlak) Eur. Phys. J. C60 (2009) 17.
3
A Study of bb Production in e+e– Collisions at √s = 130 GeV – 207 GeV, DELPHI Collaboration,
J.Abdallah et al. (B.Muryn, A.Obłąkowska-Mucha, T.Szumlak) Eur. Phys. J. C60 (2009) 1.
4
Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally
polarised electron beam at HERA. ZEUS Collaboration, S. Chekanov et al., (L. Adamczyk, T. Bołd, I.
Grabowska-Bołd, D. Kisielewska, J. Łukasik, M. Przybycień, L. Suszycki, J. Szuba) Eur. Phys. J. C 61,
(2009) 223
5
Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e– p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA. . ZEUS Collaboration, S. Chekanov et al., (L. Adamczyk,
T. Bołd, I. Grabowska-Bołd, D. Kisielewska, J. Łukasik, M. Przybycień, L. Suszycki, J. Szuba), Eur. Phys.
J. C 62, (2009) 625
37
6
Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA. , ZEUS Collaboration, S. Chekanov et al., (L. Adamczyk, T. Bołd, I. Grabowska-Bołd, D. Kisielewska, J. Łukasik, M. Przybycień,
L. Suszycki, J. Szuba), Phys. Lett. B 682, (2009) 8
38
Experiments at LHC accelerator – ATLAS and LHCb
T. Bołd, I. W. Dąbrowski, M. Dwużnik, Grabowska-Bołd, D. Kisielewska, S. Koperny,
T. Kowalski, B. Mindur, B. Muryn, A. Obłąkowska-Mucha, M. Przybycień,
K. Senderowska, T. Szumlak
Elementary Particles Physics Group, Department of Particle Interactions and Detection Techniques
in cooperation with:
ATLAS Collaboration and LHCb Collaboration
There is a hope that LHC machine
which has started already to work allows us to
go beyond the Standard Model giving a possibility to discover phenomena of New Physics [1]. In spite of fact that the Standard Model
passed every test performed with use of particle accelerator it cannot explain observation related to the Dark Matter and the Matter-Antimatter Asymmetry. The LHC should
also give an evidence for a physics which is
responsible for the breaking Standard Model
symmetry. Discovery of New Physics can be
based on a direct observations requiring as
high energy as possible (ATLAS experiment)
and indirect phenomena related to degree
of the CP symmetry breaking and rare decays
(LHCb experiment).
ATLAS experiment al LHC
At the end of 2009 LHC machine
succeeded providing stable proton beams
and colliding them so that the experiment
could record sufficient statistics of collision
events to evaluate performance of the detector [6]. Given a major contribution of the
Krakow ATLAS group to design and construction of the Inner Detector performance of
this detector is of our primary interest. Figure 1 shows a scatter plot of hits on barrel
tracks in the first collision events with stable
beams. TRT hits are shown in blue, SCT in red,
and Pixel in green. The data were taken eith
the magnetic field turned on and the curved
tracks can clearly be seen in the TRT. Figure 2
shows X and Y distribution of reconstructed
position of primary vertices.
39
Low-artifact stimulation of neural tissue with high
spatio-temporal resolution
W. Dąbrowski, T. Fiutowski, P. Hottowy, P. Rydygier, A. Skoczeń, P. Wiącek
Nuclear Electronics and Radiation Detection Group, Department of Particle Interaction and Detection Techniques
in cooperation with:
A.M. Litke
Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz
All systems aiming at simultaneous
electrical stimulation and recording from individual neurons using multielectrode arrays
face problems related to the stimulation artefacts. The electrical signals applied to activate
neurons are sensed by all electrodes of the
array as the stimulus-related artefacts, with
amplitudes much larger than the amplitudes
of the recorded action potentials. This effect
can result in saturation of the recording amplifier and makes detection of the neuron response very difficult. Although the artefacts
can be vastly reduced by optimisation of the
stimulation circuitry and experimental protocol [1-3], as well as filtered out during data
analysis [4], the modern systems still cannot
record neural response within at least 2 milliseconds on the stimulating electrode, and
for at least half a millisecond on the near-by
non-stimulating electrodes, following the
stimulus. On the other hand, the delay of
the elicited action potential in response to
the stimulation pulse can be of the order of
100 μs [5] and the duration of the recorded
pulse is of the order of a millisecond. Therefore, detection and proper identification of
fast neuronal responses in such systems are
extremely difficult.
We have developed a new Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) – Stimchip [6] suitable for low-artefact stimulation
of neural networks with complex patterns of
stimulation signals, defined arbitrarily in space
and time. We have proposed a novel stimulation protocol, based on a tri-phase waveform
generated in the constant current mode that
allows for very significant reduction of the artefacts compared to the protocols reported
so far.
The Stimchip has been implemented in a system based on a custom-made
high-density MEA that integrates 61 microelectrodes of 5 μm diameter, arranged in
a hexagonal pattern with 60 μm inter-electrode spacing. Arrays of the same type have
been used previously for electrical stimulation of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in rodents
[4.5], however, using stimulation circuits available in an older integrated circuit [7] with
functionality far more limited compared to
the Stimchip. Performance of the system has
been tested using the retinal ganglion cells
of adult mice. To stimulate individual RGC,
we always applied the stimulus to the single
electrode that recorded action potentials
from this cell with best efficacy (e.g., with best
signal to noise ratio). The resulting triphasic
waveform (positive-negative-positive sequence as shown schematically in Fig. 3A) has
been optimised for best artefact reduction by
tuning the ratio of amplitudes of the first and
the last phases, while keeping the amplitude
of the negative phase constant and the total
charge of the waveform equal to zero. We
have found that the waveforms with relative
amplitudes of 2:-3:1 is close to optimal and
we have used such protocol for all the measurements reported below.
During the stimulation period all
electrodes of the array were disconnected
from the recording amplifiers. All the nonstimulating electrodes were connected back
to amplifiers as soon as 5 μs after the end of
the last phase of the stimulation waveform.
In case of electrodes used for stimulation, we
found that delay of 55 μs resulted in significantly lower artefact than delay of 5 μs and
we used the greater value in all experiments.
40
Figure 3A shows 150 overlaid responses to 0.43 μA stimulation current, recorded on the stimulating electrode. One
can easily notice two classes of the recorded
waveforms. We have classified 130 of the recorded waveforms as the superposition of
stimulation artefacts and the elicited neuronal spikes (red traces), and 20 as the artefacts
only (black traces).
The amplitudes of the recorded
artefacts are within the same range as the
typical amplitudes of the neuronal spikes and
well within the amplifier linear range (+/- 1
mV input signal for the gain set to 800). This
suggests that the system can record the elicited spikes with similar quality as the spikes
generated spontaneously by the neurons.
To verify this, we have averaged the wave-
forms within each of the two classes shown in
Fig. 3A and subtracted the obtained average
waveforms to find the average shape of the
recorded elicited spike (Sekirnjak et al., 2008).
The same procedure has been applied also to
the electrodes adjacent to the one used for
stimulation. The averaged elicited spikes (red
waveforms) overlaid with the averaged spontaneous spikes (blue waveforms) are shown
in Fig. 3B) for the stimulating electrode (central plot in Fig. 3B) and its six neighbours. The
red and the blue waveforms match very well
and are hardly distinguishable. This observation proves that the elicited spikes, after subtracting the artefacts, are not distorted by the
stimulation artefacts, even on the electrode,
which is used for stimulation.
Fig. 1. A) 150 responses to 0.43 μA stimulation pulses recorded on the stimulating electrode. The
only-only responses are shown in black and the responses including spikes are shown in red. B)
Comparison of signals generated on seven electrodes by the same neuron spiking spontaneously
(blue traces) and in response to electrical stimulation (red traces). The relative position of each plot
in the figure follows the position of the corresponding electrode on the MEA layout. The stimulation-elicited signal shapes are shown after only subtraction. The stimulation was applied to the
central electrode.
References:
1
Y. Jimbo, et al., IEEE, Trans. Biomed. Eng. 50 (2), (2003), 241-248.
2
E.A. Brown, et al., IEEE Trans. Biomed. Circuits Syst. 2, (2008), 10-21.
3
U. Frey, et al., Biosens. Bioelectron. 24, (2009), 2191-2198.
4
C. Sekirnjak, P. Hottowy, A. Sher, W. Dąbrowski, A.M. Litke, E.J. Chichilnisky, J. Neurophysiol. 95,
(2006), 3311-3327.
41
5
C. Sekirnjak, P. Hottowy, A. Sher, W. Dąbrowski, A.M. Litke, E.J. Chichilnisky, J. Neurosci. 28, (2008)
4446-4456.
6
P. Hottowy, W. Dąbrowski, A. Skoczeń, P. Wiącek., P., 2008a. Analog Integrated Circuits and Signal
Processing 55, (2008) 239-248.
7
W. Dąbrowski, et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods. Phys. Res. A 541, (2005), 405–411.
42
Bismuth valence in a Tl0.7Bi0.3Sr1.6Ba0.4CaCu2Oy
superconductor from X-ray photoemission
spectroscopy
R. ZALECKI, W.M.WOCH, M. KOWALIK, A. KOŁODZIEJCZYK
Superconducting and Magnetic Materials Group, Department of Solid State Physics
in collaboration with:
G.GRITZNER
Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria
The X-ray electron photoemission
spectra of a Tl0.7Bi0.3Sr1.6Ba0.4CaCu2Oy superconductor were measured with Al Kα and Mg Kα
radiations at room temperature. The ratio of
trivalent Bi3+ to pentavalent Bi5+ bismuth ions
was calculated from the quantitative analysis
of the spin-orbit split spectrum of the Bi 4f
photoelectrons. We found out that the spinorbit split spectrum of the Bi 4f electrons was
enough intensive and resolved for the analysis. The 4f Bi spectrum was compared to the
same spectra of Bi-2223 superconductor and
to the Tl0.6Pb0.4Sr1.6Ba0.4Ca2Cu3Oy superconductor without bismuth [1]. In Bi2223 only one
type of Bi+3 ions is present. The 4f Bi spec-
trum in the Tl0.7Bi0.3Sr1.6Ba0.4CaCu2Oy superconductor consists two contributions due to the
different valences. We have decomposed the
spectrum by the XPS Peak program version
4.1 [2] to get the ratio of Bi3+ to Bi5+. The component from Bi5+ lines is in higher binding energy than from Bi3+ (see the Fig.1).
The conclusion is that Bi is present
in trivalent and in pentavalent form as a reservoir of the superconducting electrons in
the CuO2 plane. The ratio of Bi3+ to Bi5+ was
determined as the ratio of the respective
peak areas of the fitted spectrum and is equal
to1.87 ± 0.02.
Fig.1. 4f Bi spectrum in Tl,Bi-1212 sample together
with the decomposition to two spin-split spectra corresponding to Bi3+ and Bi5+ contributions.
43
References:
1
W.M. Woch, R. Zalecki, A. Kołodziejczyk, H. Sudra, G. Gritzner, Supercond. Sci. Technol. 21 (2008)
085002
2
R.W.M. Kwok, XPS Peak Fitting Program Version 4.1, Department of Chemistry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, www.phy.cuhk.edu.hk/~surface/XPSPEAK.
44
Structural changes at the Verwey transition in Fe3O4
W. TABIŚ, Z. TARNAWSKI, A. KOZŁOWSKI
Department Of Solid State Physics, Superconductiing and Magnetic Materials Group
Z. KĄKOL
Department of Applied Informatics and Computational Physics,
In cooperation with:
JOACHIM KUSZ
Institute of Physics ,University of Silesia ,Uniwersytecka 4, 40- 007 Katowice, Poland
NHU-TARNAWSKA HOA KIM-NGAN
Institute of Physics, Pedagogical University, Kraków, Poland
FEDERICO ZONTONE
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, P.B. 200, F-38043 Grenoble, France
The Verwey transition in magnetite
netic AC susceptibility was measured by the
was studied using X-ray photon correlation
specially constructed setup and the miniature
spectroscopy (XPCS) technique. We have used
Pt thermometer was attached to the sample
the fact that this phase transformation is acto precisely monitor its temperature.
companied by a large latent heat, consumed
The evolution of the (1 1½ 2) superby all, possibly decoupled,
disordering subsystems.
By simultaneous observation of the magnetic
susceptibility and the
(1 1½ 2) super structure
peak intensity at the Verwey temperature T V, (i.e.
while the temperature
is maintained constant),
we could trace all the ongoing processes, trying
to see their temporal dependence and the subtleties of the structural
transition.
The experiment
was performed at ID10A
beam line of ESRF, Grenoble using 7.1 keV radiation with the 10 μm x Fig. 1. Evolution of the (1 1½ 2) superstructure peak on cooling.
1 μm beam size; radiation Left: the peak profiles obtained from the CCD camera at different stagwas monitored by CCD es of the phase transition. The brighter color indicates the stronger
detector. The sample was peak intensity.
0.5 g of stoichiometric Right: full time evolution of the superlattice peak: each 2D CCD (as on
magnetite single crystal the left) image has been projected on 1D space (on the horizontal axis)
synthesized by the skull and each row represents one 2D image. The lower green line indicates
melter technique. Mag- the beginning of the transition and the red one the end of it.
45
structure peak, on cooling, at different stages
of the transition, and
a full time evolution of
this superlattice peak are
shown in Fig.1; the interplay (change of peak
position) between different structural domains is
seen. The temporal analysis of the superstructure
peak evolution and the
susceptibility data is presented in Fig. 2.
It can be infered that although the Fig 2. Temporal dependences of the averaged (1 1½ 2) peak intensity
new phase develops (integrated over main part of CCD screen), and χAC across the Verwey
gradually across the tran- transition on cooling. The sample temperature plateau due to latent
sition (magnetic suscep- heat is also presented.
tibility changes smoothly
and the temperature shows plateau), the new
for temperature plateau) are decoupled at
monoclinic structure seems to change in the
the transition, as found recently [1]. Also, varilow temperature stage of the transition (irreation of the superstructure peak (the change
spective of the T change direction) once the
in its shape and position) suggests a strong
transition is almost completed. This observacompetition between structural domains
tion may confirm that structure, orbital and
while the transition proceeds.
charge order (these two may be responsible
References:
1
Lorenzo J. E., Mazzoli C., Jaouen N., Detlefs C., Mannix D., Grenier S., Joly Y., and Marin C., 2008,
Charge and Orbital Correlations at and above the Verwey Phase Transition in Magnetite, Phys. Rev.
Lett 101, 226401-1-4
46
Magnetism of ultrathin iron films seen by the nuclear
resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation
T. Ślęzak, W. Karaś, M. Zając, M. Ślęzak, K. Freindl, K. Matlak, A. Kozioł-Rachwał,
J. Korecki
Surface Nanostructures Group, Department of Solid State Physics
in cooperation with:
N. Spiridis, D. Wilgocka-Ślęzak,
Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, PAS, Krakow, Poland
S. Stankov, R. Rüffer
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble, France
Conversion electron Mössbauer
spectroscopy proved in the past to be very
useful in studying surface and ultrathin film
magnetism with monolayer resolution [1].
More than twenty years later, its time-domain analogue, the nuclear resonant scattering (NRS) of synchrotron radiation, showed
up to be by orders of magnitude faster and
more efficient. Recent developments at the
beamline ID18 at ESRF Grenoble made possible investigations of complex nanostuctures
in situ, under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) [2,3].
The combination of UHV conditions and the
high brilliance of the third generation synchrotron source provided us unique possibility to probe the evolution of spin structure in
epitaxial Fe films on a tungsten W(110) via the
accumulation of the high quality time spectra,
directly during the 57Fe film growth (Fig.1).
Two different thickness regimes where the
most intriguing properties in the past have
been found were investigated: i) ultrathin
films with the thickness in the range 0.5 - 4
ML when the onset of ferromagnetic behavior is expected, and ii) Fe films with thick-
ness of few tens of ML, in the vicinity of the
in plane spin reorientation transition (SRT).
A complex morphology of the ultrathin Fe
films results in a non-collinear magnetic structure derived from the numerical analysis of the
grazing incidence NRS data. This structure is
related to the film morphology characterized
by a deviation from a layer-by-layer growth
mode and periodic misfit dislocations that
develop beyond the first monolayer. Competition of out-of-plane and in-plane magnetic
anisotropy for double layer Fe patches and for
thicker Fe areas, respectively, leads to a complex spin structure at the buried layers, which
could not be solved using traditional methods. A layer resolved map of the hyperfine
magnetic fields could be obtained for the first
time. Even more spectacular results were obtained for the dynamics of the in-plane SRT.
Based on the NRS analysis, a new model of
the transition has been proposed. The thickness induced transition of the magnetization
from [1-10] to [001] direction originates at the
Fe/W(110) interface and occurs through transient fan-like magnetization structures.
47
Fig. 1. Schematics of the UHV NRS scattering
chamber at ID 18 of the ESRF and NRS time
spectra of selected 57Fe/W(110) films, demonstrating in-plane SRT. Film thickness is given
in monolayers (1 ML corresponds to 2 Å).
References:
1
J.Korecki, U.Gradmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55 (1985) 2491; M. Przybylski, U.Gradmann, Phys. Rev. Lett.
59 (1987) 11522.
2
S. Stankov, R. Rueffer, M. Sladecek, M. Rennhofer, B. Sepiol, G. Vogl, N.Spiridis, T. Ślęzak, J. Korecki,
Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 (2008) 045108
3
S. Couet, Th. Diederich, S. Stankov, K. Schlage, T. Ślęzak, R. Rüffer, J. Korecki, and R. Röhlsberger, Applied Physics Letters, 94 (2009) 162501
48
Individual site structural, magnetic & electronic
properties of iron(II)-octacyanoniobate(IV) ferromagnet
with TC 43 K
J. Żukrowski, Cz. Kapusta
Department of Solid State Physics, Magnetic Bulk- and Nanomaterials Group
in collaboration with:
D. Pinkowicz, R. Podgajny, W. Nitek, B. Sieklucka
Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, 30-060 Kraków, Poland
R. Pełka, M. Bałanda, M. Makarewicz, M. Czapla, D. Zając
H. Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, 31-342 Kraków, Poland
Principal paper:
D. Pinkowicz, R. Podgajny, R. Pełka, W. Nitek, M. Bałanda, M. Makarewicz, M. Czapla,
J. Żukrowski, Cz. Kapusta, D. Zając and B. Sieklucka, Dalton Trans. (2009) 7771
A study of the new octacyanoniobate-based cyano-bridged 3D ferromagnet {[F
eII(H2O)2]2[NbIV(CN)8]·4H2O}n 1, with XANES/EXAFS, IR, UV-Vis, Resonant Raman, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry was
carried out. The compound represents purely
inorganic 3D coordination network representing the basis for the engineering of FeNb cyano-bridged materials with diverse topologies
and desired multifunctionality. It crystallizes in
the tetragonal system, space group I4/m, a =
11.989(5) Å, c = 13.237(5) Å, V = 1902.6(13) Å3.
3D coordination architecture comprises two
types of NbIV-C-N-FeIIHS (HS = high spin) linkages with Fe-N-C angles of 154.5o and 167.5o.
Magnetic measurements reveal ferromagnetic
ordering below TC = 43 K.
XAS experiments have been performed at the beamline CEMO at DORIS III,
in Hasylab, DESY in Hamburg, Germany. The
results obtained for 1 in comparison with
K4[Nb(CN)8].2H2O are presented in Fig. 1. EXAFS spectrum of 1 obtained from Fe:K edge
exhibits one dominant peak at ~ 2.0 Å corresponding to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms
of the first coordination sphere and two minor
peaks at ~ 3.0 Å and ~ 5.2 Å corresponding to
the carbon and niobium atoms, respectively.
Due to the diference of ionic radius of N and
O smaller than the Δν1/2 of EXAFS peak, the
respective peaks are overlaped. EXAFS spectra of 1 and K4[Nb(CN)8].2H2O from the Nb:K
edge exhibit two strong peaks close to 2.1 Å
and 3.2 Å, corresponding to 8 carbon and 8
nitrogen atoms. The additional peak located
slightly above 5.1 Å, exists only in the case of
1 and is attributed to the Fe ions. Results of
the EXAFS studies are in a good agreement
with the bond lengths taken from single
crystal X-Ray diffraction data. XANES studies
show the identical valence state 4+ of Nb in
1 and K4[Nb(CN)8].2H2O and Fe is at 2+ oxidation state. The XANES/EXAFS results at Fe:K
and Nb:K edges confirm the presence of NbIVC-N-FeII linkages.
57
Fe Mössbauer spectrum (Fig. 2)
of 1 at 300 K shows one quadrupole doublet
with δ = 1.03 mm/s (relative to α-iron) and
ΔEQ = 2.48 mm/s, which are characteristic
of FeII in the HS state. As the temperature is
decreased to 80 K there is still one HS iron(II)
doublet (δ = 1.14 mm/s and ΔEQ = 3.34 mm/
s) present. Further decrease of the temperature to the value of 4.2 K results in a complex
spectrum, where both magnetic dipole and
electric quadrupole interactions coexist.
Preliminary analysis of the spectrum
below magnetic transition suggests the pres-
49
ence of two non-equivalent HS iron(II) sites
and interesting magnetic structure of 1. The
presence of the LS iron(II) site in this tempera-
ture and possibility of the spin transition can
be ruled out.
Fig. 1. Phase corrected EXAFS spectra, EXAFS signal χ(k)k3 (upper
inset) and normalized XANES spectra (lower inset) for 1 at the
Fe:K edge (blue solid line), Nb:K edge (green solid line) and for
K4[Nb(CN)8].2H2O at Nb:K edge (pink dotted line).
Fig. 2. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of {[FeII(H2O)2]2[NbIV(CN)8]·4H2O}n 1
at T1 = 300 K, T2 = 80 K, T3 = 4.2 K with isomer shift IS and quadrupole splitting QS values.
50
Determining of the crystal field levels splitting in RPdIn
(R = Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds.
Łukasz Gondek
Magnetic, Electrical and Structural Research Group, Department of Solid State Physics
in collaboration with:
Andrzej Szytuła
Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków
Joanna Czub
Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, AGH
Z. Izaola and E. Kemner
BENSC, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin
RPdIn (R – rare earth) compounds
crystallise within hexagonal ZrNiAl-type
structure. The low symmetry of this structure
results with a very difficult approach to determining of the crystal electric field (CEF) parameters and corresponding CEF levels splitting. Recently, our group have investigated
the Schottky contribution to specific heat of
some selected RPdIn compounds with R =
Ce, Pr and Nd [1]. It was possible to propose
rough CEF splitting schemes, however the accuracy was not sufficient.
We carried out inelastic neutron
scattering experiment in order to achieve
more reliable estimation of the CEF splitting schemes for the above mentioned compounds [2]. The polycrystalline samples were
investigated using NEAT time of flight spectrometer at BENSC in Berlin. The incident neutron energy was set to 10.6 and 18.4 eV. For
extracting phononic contribution the nonmagnetic LaPdIn analogue was investigated
as well. The calibration of the spectrometer
was made using the vanadium standard.
The expected CEF levels schemes
were: 3 doublets for the Ce-based sample; 9
singlets for the Pr-based one and 5 doublets
for the Nd-based compound. Although the
formal symmetry of the ZrNiAl is hexagonal
the set of 9 CEF parameters respective for orthorhombic symmetry must be used as the
point symmetry of the rare earth position is
C2V. Thus, there are no degenerated triplet
and quartet states allowed. The investigation of the CePdIn sample
brought interesting result. It turned out that
no magnetic contribution is visible in both
investigated energy ranges. Such behaviour
originates from highly delocalised Ce4f states,
which are forming a heavy fermion correlated
system at low temperatures.
For the PrPdIn sample clearly visible CEF contribution was evidenced as presented in Fig. 1. It was confirmed that the
ground state is the CEF singlet separated by
1.46 meV from the first excited CEF level. This
energy is quite low giving possibility of magnetic ordering due to mixing those two states
by magnetic exchange interactions. However,
the sample remains non-magnetic down to
1.7 K yielding different origin of its non-magnetic behaviour. Namely, the hybridisation
between the Pr 4f and Pd 4d states is the reason that the sample exhibits non-magnetic
behaviour.
The NdPdIn sample exhibit more
complicated CEF levels schemes as it undergoes magnetic ordering at low temperatures.
Within the magnetically ordered state it exhibits quasi-doublet as the CEF ground state
due to molecular field presence. Above the
ordering temperature the ground state becomes the CEF doublet.
The derived CEF levels schemes are
in a nice agreement with previous estimations obtained by means of Schottky contribution to the specific heat [1].
51
Fig. 1 INS spectra of PrPdIn recorded in different temperatures. The capital letters denote transitions
between certain CEF levels as presented in Fig. 2 [2].
Fig. 2 CEF levels splitting scheme of PrPdIn as
derived from INS spectra. The observed transitions are marked with capital letters. On the
right hand side CEF splitting estimated from
specific heat data is presented [2].
References:
1
Ł. Gondek, A. Szytuła, D. Kaczorowski, K. Nenkov, Solid State Commun. 142 (2007) 556
2
Ł. Gondek, J. Czub, A. Szytuła, Z. Izaola, E. Kemner, Solid State Commun. 149 (2009) 1596
52
General calculation scheme for the resistivity of binary
and ternary disordered systems
A. Paja, M. Ornat
Magnetic, Electrical and Structural Research Group, Department of Solid State Physics
Our previous work on ‘2kF’ scattering and Faber-Ziman has shown that quantum interference effects are a significant part
of the resistivity of disordered systems even
when the experimental resistivity is as low
as 50 μΩ cm. We proved that ‘2kF’ scattering
model should always be used for the resistivity modeling because of the significance of
the quantum interference.
Unfortunately in both ‘2k_F’ scattering, and Faber-Ziman models the electron-ion
scattering is described with use of the pseudopotentials, which has lots of parameters
that strongly affects the final results. This fact
makes both models unstable, and so these
could not be used for the resistivity predictions.
We have recently combined ‘2kF’
scattering model with the Evans model, in
which pseudopotential is replaced by the
scattering matrix operator which is determined on the basis of the phase-shifts. We
have developed existing methods for the
phase-shifts and Fermi energy calculations,
and used several other methods to determine
important material parameters and calculate
the results. In the end we obtained the model
with only two parameters for each element,
and those were assumed to be independent
of the chemical surroundings.
Within this model we performed
calculations for more then thirty binary and
ternary, disordered alloys. Our results shown,
that this model, for the first time, can predict
resistivity of a wide set of
alloys. This was confirmed
for systems made as the
combinations of nine elements (Al, Mg, Ca, Na, Cs,
Rb, Li, Cd, K). One of our
results is presented in Fig.
1.
Besides, we adjusted our method for
disordered alloys with
the hydrogen inserted,
and then we performed
some preliminary calculations, that suggest an
increase of the resistivity
with hydrogen concentration.
Fig. 1 Electrical resistivity of liquid NaCs, KCs and RbCs alloys as a function of composition.
References:
1
M Ornat, A Paja, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter, 20 (2008) 375102
53
Magnetostructural phase transition in Ca2FeReO6
studied with XMCD at 30 T pulsed magnetic field
M. Sikora, J.M. Michalik, Cz. Kapusta
Department of Solid State Physics, Magnetic Bulk- and Nanomaterials Group
in collaboration with:
O. Mathon, P. van der Linden, S. Pascarelli, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility,
Grenoble (France),
J.M. De Teresa, ICMA, Universidad de Zaragoza-CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)
Principal publication:
M. Sikora, O. Mathon, P. van der Linden, J.M. Michalik, J.M. De Teresa, Cz. Kapusta,
and S. Pascarelli, Phys. Rev. B 79, (2009) 220402R
Ordered double perovskites have
(MI) phase transition at TS~150K associated
attracted a substantial attention over the past
with structural deformations of the ReO6 oc10 years, due to strong spin polarization of the
tahedra and redistribution in the Re 5d orbitelectrical carriers and high Curie temperature
als occupancy. Neutron diffraction, high-field
[1,2]. These properties are necessary to obtain
magnetoresistance, and magnetostriction
reasonable magnetoresistance (MR) effects
experiments suggest that at low temperature
at room temperature and lead to applicathe two magnetostructural phases, of contion of the materials in magnetoelectronics.
siderably different electron transport properTherefore, the most promising series, namely
ties, coexist and that their relative population
A2FeMoO6, A2FeReO6, A2CrReO6, and A2CrOsO6
depends on temperature and magnetic field
(A= alkaline earth metals), are intensively exgiving rise to large negative magnetoresistplored to find the material with an optimal
ance, MR~2000% at T=100K [2].
performance. Among the intriguing charac
To investigate the role played by
teristics of these compounds, quite remarkathe Re orbital moment in the mechanism of
ble are the differences in magnetic properties
the structural phase transition a high field
of 4d- and 5d-based analogs despite of their
X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)
almost identical crystal structure. For examexperiment was performed. We studied the
ple, the Re-based double perovskites show
field and temperature evolution of the Re orstrong magnetostructural coupling as well
bital (L) and spin (S) components of the magas considerably higher
Curie temperature than
their Mo-based counterparts. The strong magnetostructural effects are
attributed to the interplay between structural
degrees of freedom with
unquenched Re orbital
moment. This interplay
is especially pronounced
for the Ca2FeReO6 (CFRO)
compound, which undergoes a metal-insulator Fig. 1. Rhenium L2,3-edge XMCD spectra measured at T=10K.
54
netic moment derived from L2,3-edge spectra
(Figure 1) by means of sum rules. The main
challenge was to acquire the spectra at high
magnetic field, B>20T, in a temperature range
wide enough to induce a substantial change
in the relative phase fraction. Such experimental conditions are available only recently
employing the energy dispersive acquisition
technique available at the ID24 beamline
in combination with minipulsed field setup
made by ESRF Sample Environment Laboratory [3].
Analysis of the B and T evolution
of Re orbital-to-spin magnetic moment ratio
gives an unequivocal evidence that the two
magnetocrystalline phases observed in CFRO
are characterized by different spin-orbit coupling. The insulating phase, observed at low
temperature and field, is being suppressed by
the metallic one, characterized by larger ab-
solute value of L/S, either upon heating above
TS or upon application of a strong magnetic
field of several Tesla. The shape comparison
of bulk magnetization with the XMCD derived
Re one (Figure 2) reveals a striking difference,
which is attributed to electron redistribution between anti-ferromagnetically coupled
Re and Fe sites upon temperature and field
change. Quantitative analysis revealed that
Re magnetization is significantly higher, with
respect to bulk, in the insulating phase. This
gives evidence that the metal-insulator phase
transition is accompanied with the evolution
in the population of Re t2g orbitals as well
as with the charge-transfer between Fe and
Re sites. Both effects have a strong influence
on the hopping integral of the double-exchange-like interaction between Re and Fe
sites and, thus, on the electronic properties of
the compound studied.
Fig. 2. Temperature and field evolution of the
normalized Re and bulk magnetizations. The
latter one is adopted from data published in
ref. [4]. Smoothed iso-M curves are presented
at arbitrary values as guides for the eyes.
References:
1
K.-I. Kobayashi, T. Kimura, H. Sawada, K. Terakura, and Y. Tokura, Nature (London) 395, 677 (1998).
2
D. Serrate, J.M. DeTeresa, and M.R. Ibarra, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19, 023201 (2007).
3
P. van der Linden, O. Mathon, C. Strohm, and M. Sikora, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 075104 (2008).
4
J. M. Michalik, J.M. DeTeresa, J. Blasco, P.A. Algarabel, M.R. Ibarra, C. Kapusta,
and U. Zeitler, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19, 506206 (2007).
55
Bilirubin removal during extracorporeal liver support
therapy with FPSA Prometheus
A. JUNG, M. ZADORA,
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Biomedical Imaging and Modeling Group,
in cooperation with
P. KRISPER, R. STAUBER, B. HADISH, H. HOLZER
Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University, Graz, Austria
D. SCHNEDITZ
Institute of Physiology, Medical University, Graz, Austria
Extracorporeal liver support therapy
is currently available and mostly two systems:
MARS (Molecular Adsorbents Recirculating
System) and Prometheus (FPSA, Fractionated
Plasma Separation and Adsorption) are used
in clinical practice. Both systems are more
complex than hemodialysis as not only watersoluble toxins but also protein bound ones are
removed during the treatment. Prometheus
system consists of few elements: AlbuFlow
membrane, which separates albumin bound
toxins and high-flux membrane FX50 in the
primary circuit, as well as two adsorbers in the
secondary circuit (Prometh02, Prometh01).
Therefore removal characteristics of toxins
are also complex and very important to clarify and characterize the efficiency of ELS systems. Among the many substances removed
during FPSA different forms of bilirubin were
measured by standard laboratory tests. Unconjugated bilirubin was relatively poorly
removed during Prometheus treatment and
was prone to measurement errors leading to
inconsistent and implausible data. Thus we
concentrated on conjugated bilirubin to better understand the removal process for the
different components of the Prometheus system. To this end the clearance and the solute
removal provided by mentioned membranes
and adsorbers were separately analyzed. The
study was done in 8 acute-on-chronic liver
failure patients during eighteen treatments.
Conjugated bilirubin concentrations were
measured at least 5 times during each treatment for the same flow rates recommended
by the manufacturer. Samples were taken
from 6 points of the Prometheus system:
4 samples represented inflow and outflow
concentrations in primary and secondary
circuit and 2 samples represented points between membranes and between adsorbers.
The results of concentration changes allowed
calculating clearance and removal rate of
conjugated bilirubin for the whole ELS system, for the ELS system without FX50 dialyzer,
for the FX50 dialyzer itself, for adsorbers together and separately. Clearance calculations
were corrected for the effect of ultrafiltration
when necessary (ultrafiltration was provided
in 6 treatments).
Conjugated bilirubin concentration significantly (p<0.001) and concomitantly declined during 8 h of ELS treatment
at all sampling points in the primary circuit.
In the secondary circuit conjugated bilirubin
concentration was considerably lower and
remained constant or slightly increased at
different sampling points throughout the
ELS treatment. Conjugated bilirubin clearance for the ELS system dropped to about
half of its starting value, irrespective whether
it included the high flux FX50 dialyzer or not
(p<0.001). The most significant drop occurred
during the first 2 h of treatment. Conjugated
bilirubin clearance for the FX50 dialyzer was
much lower and approximately 15% of overall conjugated bilirubin clearance. It was not
significantly changing during the treatment.
Considering that the high-flux dialyzer is used
for elimination of water-soluble solutes, its
small contribution to overall clearance of conjugated bilirubin is understandable. The rapid
decrease in adsorber clearance indicated saturation in the adsorptive process. This pattern
56
is to be expected and indicates that overall
clearance was controlled by the adsorber and
not by the albumin filter. Moreover, clearance
for the second adsorber was higher than for
the first adsorber indicating that conjugated
bilirubin was removed more efficiently with
the second adsorber. When considering conjugated bilirubin removal rate the decrease
over time was even more obvious for the
whole system and for the joint adsorbers
(p<0.001). Notice that the overall removal rate
remained above the average generation rate
0.33±0.15 mg/min estimated elsewhere. The
fractional removal for conjugated bilirubin
was about 85% for adsorbers and 15% for the
FX50 dialyzer confirming previous conclusions.
Summarizing, bilirubin clearance
and removal rate significantly declined for the
whole system and for adsorbers during ELS
therapy. Therefore, when extending the treatment time the removal of albumin bound solutes such as conjugated bilirubin is done with
much reduced efficiency. More detailed studies regarding the duration, timing, and the
dose of ELS therapy delivered to the patients
and its direct medical benefits are necessary.
References:
1
P. Krisper, R. Stauber, Nephrology, 3, 267-76 (2007)
2
J. Stange, S.R. Mitzner, T. Risler, C.M. Erley, W. Lauchart, H. Goehl, S. Klammt, P. Peszynski, J. Freytag,
H. Hickstein, M. Löhr, S. Liebe, W. Schareck, U.T. Hopt, R. Schmidt, Artif Organs, 23, 319-30 (1999)
3
K.Rifai, T. Ernst, U. Kretschmer, MJ. Bahr, A. Schneider, C. Hafer, H. Haller, M.P. Manns, D. Fliser, J. Hepatol, 6, 984-90 (2003)
4
A. Jung, P. Krisper, B. Haditsch, R. Stauber, H. Holzer, D. Schneditz, Blood Purif., 24 413–422 (2006)
5
V. Stadlbauer, P. Krisper, U. Beuers, B. Haditsch, D. Schneditz, A. Jung, C. Putz-Bankuti, H. Holzer,
M. Trauner, R.E. Stauber, ASAIO J., 53, 187-193 (2007)
6
P. Krisper, B. Haditsch, R. Stauber, A. Jung, V. Stadlbauer, M. Trauner, H. Holzer, D. Schneditz, J Hepatol, 43, 451-57 (2005)
7
A. Jung, P. Krisper, M. Zadora, B. Haditsch, R. Stauber, H. Holzer, D. Schneditz, IFMBE Proceedings,
25, 620-23 (2009)
57
Molecular interactions in biological systems.
K.BURDA, J.FIEDOR, M.SARNA, A.HAŁAS, M.KACZMARSKA
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Molecular Biophysics and Bioenergetics Group,
M. ZAJĄC, T. ŚLĘZAK, K. MATLAK, J.KORECKI
Surface Nanostructures Group, Department of Solid State Physics
in cooperation with:
A. ORZECHOWSKA
Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków
L. FIEDOR, K. STAŁKA, Z. MADEJA, J. DRUKAŁA, K.MIĘKUS, E.WYBIERALSKA
Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Kraków
M. FORNAL, T. GRODZICKI
Department of Internal Medicine and Gerontology, Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University,
Kraków
M. LIPIŃSKA, E. KOCHOWSKA, K. KOZAK
Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Kraków
A. CHUMAKOV
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, Grenoble Cedex, France
M. TRILEK
Photon Systems Instruments, Brno, Czech Republic
Molecular interactions in biological systems.
The recognition of the primary
processes that occurs on the molecular and
submolecular level as well as the internal
and external factors influencing them, is extremely crucial for proper understanding of
functioning of versatile biological systems.
One of such example is electron
transfer and energy trapping by photosynthetic subunits. Non-heme iron in photosynthetic reaction centers of type Q, in which
quinone molecules are the primary (QA) and
secondary (QB) electron acceptors, is one
of the most intriguing components of these
centers. This iron and the arrangement of its
binding site are conserved by the evolution.
One can find it in the purple bacteria and in
photosystem II (PSII) of higher plants. For instance, non-heme Fe located between two
quinone acceptors can act either as an electron/group transfer center or a coordination
center. However, there is no experimental
evidence for an Fe2+ → Fe3+ transition dur-
ing QA → QB electron transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center [1]. Although,
in the case of PSII thylakoids isolated from
a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant deficient in photosystem I it was observed that
copper ions Cu2+ enhance the covalence of
bonds to non-heme iron [2, 3] Now we show
that the non-heme iron in the bacterial reaction center exists in two forms, the high and
low spin ferrous states, and that Cu2+ ions
cause its transition to a new diamagnetic
state. This results in a magnetic decoupling of
the metallic center from the primary quinone
acceptor. We suggest that Cu2+ ions disrupt
the hydrogen bond network which stabilizes
the quinone–iron complex. These observations shed new light on the functioning of
non-heme iron in Q-type reaction centers,
whose spin state may reflect the hydrogen
bond network in the vicinity of the quinone–
iron complex. Mössbauer spectroscopy and
nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering
58
association of transmembrane helices is relevant for crystallization of membrane proteins
as it explains in thermodynamic terms the action of amphiphiles used for crystallization of
membrane proteins in micellar phase.
It is well known that environmental factors are crucial for the interactions between biomolecules or even more complex
systems. All types of tissue show some kind of
patterning and alignment and therefore topographic factors may be crucial for the effective migration of prostate cancer cells during
the metastatic process. The role of substrata
topography in the regulation of cancer cell
motility has been quantitatively studied in
only a few cases. We demonstrated that human (DU-145) and rat (MAT-LyLu and AT-2)
prostate cancer cells are efficiently contact
guided by underlying normal cells when invading surrounding tissues and forming metastases. Prostate cancer cells moving on the
surface of fibroblasts displayed significantly
greater cell displacement than those moving
on plastic substrata [5].
Effects of ionizing radiation on
the stability of biological membranes were
investigated using human erythrocytes as
a model system. We observed that hemolysis
depends on the flux density of alpha particles. We found characteristic time regimes of
increased and decreased stability of erythrocytes isolated from health donors. Absence
of such dependence in the case of diabetic
Fig. 1. Exemplary van’t Hoff plots from which
thermodynamic parameters, ΔH° and ΔS°, of
the formation of complexes, were derived.
Labels: (triangles) carotenoidless complexes
in 0.03% LDAO; (circles) carotenoidless complexes in 0.03% LDAO/15% acetone; (squares)
carotenoid containing complexes in 0.03%
LDAO/15% acetone. All samples were in 20
mM TRIS-HCl pH 7.8.
were used to study interactions between
Cu2+ ions and non-heme iron, and to follow
the dynamics of its binding site in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter
sphaeroides.
The effects of co-solvents and cofactor (carotenoid) on the process of a self-assembling membrane protein were investigated using modular photosynthetic LH1 complex as
a model system. Native chromophores of
LH1, bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid,
are excellent intrinsic spectroscopic reporter
molecules. Their presence
allowed us to follow the association of transmembrane
helices of LH1, without the
use of any external markers, by electronic absorption/emission and circular
dichroism. The assembly
correctness was monitored
by the intra-complex energy
transfer. Both the co-solvent
and carotenoid markedly affect ΔH° and ΔS° associated
with the complex formation
in detergent but the driving
force of the process remains
almost constant due to efficient
enthalpy-entropy
compensation in the system Fig. 2. Topography of an erythrocyte from healthy donor recorded
(Fig. 1) [4]. This effect of co- by use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). A net of spectrins is visusolvent on ΔH° and ΔS° of alized.
59
donors suggests significant differences in
protected mechanism activated in the read
blood cell membranes between erythrocytes
isolated from healthy and diabetic donors.
AFM measurements allowed us to follow
changes in the physico-chemical properties
of the control and irradiated read blood cells
(Fig. 2). Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that
the applied doses of alpha radiation did not
change the structure of hemoglobin [6].
References:
1
S. Hermes, O. Bremm, F. Garczarek, V. Derrien, P. Liebisch, P. Loja, P. Sebban, K. Gerwert, M. Haumann,
Biochemistry 45 (2006) 353
2
C. Jegerschöld, J.B. Arellano, W.P. Schröder, P.J. van Kan, M. Barón, S. Styring, Biochemistry 34 (1995)
12747
3
K. Burda, J. Kruk, J. Stanek, K. Strzałka, G.H. Schmidt, O. Kruse, Acta Phys. Polon. A 109 (2006) 237
4
J. Fiedor, M. Pilch, L. Fiedor J. Phys. Chem. B 113 (2009) 12831
5
M.Sarna, E.Wybieralska, K.Miekus, J.Drukala, Z. Madeja, Mol. Med. Rep. 2 (2009) 865
6
M.Kaczmarska, D.Żydek, M.Fornal, T.Grodzicki, E.Kochowska, K.Kozak, K.Matlak, J.Korecki, K.Burda,
in: Frontiers in Modern Physics and its applications. Conference proceedings, AGH, Kraków (2009)
84
60
Vibrational properties of alpha- and sigma-phase
of Fe-Cr alloy
S.M. DUBIEL and J CIEŚLAK
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Moessbauer Spectroscopy Group
in collaboration with:
W. STURHANH
Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave, Argonne, Illinois
60439, USA
M. STERNIK, P. PIEKARZ and K. PARLIŃSKI
Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342 Kraków, Poland,
S. STANKOV
European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble, France
Fe-Cr alloy system has been of exceptional scientific and technological interest. The former stems from its being a model
alloy system, while the latter is due the fact
that Fe-Cr alloys are the basic ingredient of
stainless steels (SS). Some properties of SS,
like precipitation of a σ-phase, are inherited
from the parent alloy. The σ-phase has a tetragonal structure (type D144h P42/mnm) with
30 atoms distributed over 5 different sites. Its
physical properties are, in general, quite different than those of α-phase of similar composition. Some properties, e. g. magnetic
ones, are even dramatically different, other,
like the Debye temperature, seem to be very
similar. The latter is rather unexpected as the
hardness of σ is by a factor of ∼3 larger than
that of α. To clarify this situation a more detailed knowledge of vibrational properties
of σ and α phases is essential. In addition,
σ a member of Frank-Kasper phases family is
one of the closest low-order crystalline approximants for dodecagonal quasicrystals
which have similar local structural properties with the icosahedral glass (ICG). Thus,
a study of the dynamics of σ should shed some
light on similar properties in ICGs. Challenged
by this and motivated by a lack of available
knowledge on the dynamical properties of
the real σ we have carried out an experimental investigation and theoretical calculations
of the Fe-partial phonon density-of-states
(DOS) for nominally Fe52.5Cr47.5 alloy with
α and σ structures. The vibrational properties
of the samples were studied at sector 3-ID of
the Advanced Photon Source by the method
of nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering
(NRIXS). The following quantities were derived directly from the data: Lamb-Mössbauer
factor, f, kinetic energy per atom, Ek, and the
mean force constant, D. The Fe-partial DOS
was derived by direct data inversion using the
Fourier-Log method under the assumption of
quasi-harmonic vibrations. The consistency of
this procedure was verified by independent
calculation of Lamb-Mössbauer factor, kinetic
energy per atom, and mean force constant
from the DOS and by agreement of these values with same quantities obtained directly
from the data. Then the following quantities
were calculated with the Fe-partial DOS: vibrational specific heat at constant volume, CV,
and vibrational entropy, S. The assignment
of Debye temperatures, ΘD, is based on the
Fig. 1
61
Debye model. Using the values of f and CV,
we determined commonly presented values
for ΘD. In calculations, both phases of Fe-Cr
alloy were modeled by appropriate atomic
configurations placed in a supercell with the
periodic boundary conditions. The disordered α-Fe52.5Cr47.5 alloy was approximated
by α-Fe50Cr50 one, for which we used the 2 ×
2 × 2 bcc cell with 16 atoms. For the sake of
computer and time capacity, we have chosen
at random only five from about 500 different
atomic configurations to be included in our
calculations. The real σ-Fe52.5Cr47.5 sample was
approximated by σ-Fe0.48Cr0.52 one. The latter
was studied in the 1 × 1 × 1 tetragonal supercell with 30 atoms (14 Fe and 16 Cr atoms).
The structure optimization was done using
the spin-polarized density functional total energy calculations performed within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) using
the VASP package. The valence electrons for
each atom are represented by plane wave
expansions. The wave functions in the core
region are evaluated using the full-potential
projector augmented-wave (PAW) method.
The integrations in the reciprocal space were
performed on the 8×8×8 and 4×4×4 grid for
α and σ, respectively. During the optimization, the Hellmann-Feynman (H-F) forces and
the stress tensor were calculated. For the op-
timized structures the phonon dispersions
and density of states were determined using
the direct method. The phonon frequencies
were obtained by the diagonalization of the
dynamical matrix for each wave vector. The
phonon DOS was calculated by the random
sampling on the k-point grid in the reciprocal space, and then the thermodynamic functions were obtained within the harmonic approximation.
In short, we have shown that it is
possible to qualify the α and σ phases of FeCr alloy using the NRIXS method. Distinct
features of 57Fe partial phonon DOS for α and
σ were found and discussed by comparing
with the phonon spectra obtained within the
GGA-PAW method. Various data pertinent to
the dynamics such as Lamb-Mössbauer factor, f, kinetic energy per atom, Ek, and the
mean force constant, D, were directly derived
from the experiment and the theoretical calculations, while vibrational specific heat at
constant volume, CV, and vibrational entropy,
S were calculated with the Fe-partial DOS. Using the values of f and CV, we determined values for Debye temperatures, ΘD. A very good
agreement for some quantities like CV was
obtained from experiment and theory, and
quite good for other ones like D and S. For details see [1].
Table I: Physical quantities derived from the measured and calculated Fe-partial DOS. The units are meV/atom for vibrational
kinetic energy, Ek; kB/atom for vibrational entropy, S, and specific heat CV; N/m for mean force constant, D; K for Debye temperatures, ΘD.
62
References:
1
S. M. Dubiel et al., Vibrational properties of α- and σ-phase Fe-Cr alloy, arXiv: 1001.1211
63
Quantitative elemental microanalysis of individual
particles with the use of X-ray fluorescence method
and Monte Carlo simulation
M. CZYŻYCKI, M. LANKOSZ
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Biomedical and Environmental Research Group
in collaboration with:
M.BIELEWSKI
European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe,
Germany
An influence of the matrix and geometrical effects on chemical composition assessment of individual particles with the use
of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) method was
investigated. Both the matrix and geometrical effects play a meaningful role in analysis of this type of samples. There are many
sources of the single particles. These samples
mostly originate from space dust, air particulate matter, soil dust etc. Particles present in
geological and environmental material very
often take approximately the shape of an oval
or a sphere (or even irregular) form. The geometrical effect is connected with the shape
and diameter of sample. Different shapes and
sizes of individual particles significantly affect
characteristic X-ray intensities excited in grain.
This fact is due to absorption of X-rays in the
sample as well as enhancement of characteristic X-ray lines. Both these effects depend on
sample shape, dimension and chemical composition.
In XRF analysis of individual particles it is not possible to relate as an analytical equation the particle diameter, shape and
chemical composition with the intensities of
excited characteristic lines. For this reason
some analytical approaches applying particle
shape approximations were proposed. A cube
and a prism are quite often used as the fake
solid shape [1]. A competitive approach is to
use the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method.
It offers a possibility to model practically any
shape of particle. The MC models can take
into account other interfering effects difficult
to handle and analytically not solvable.
In present research [2] the iterative
MC method was utilized to calculate elemental composition of glass micro-spheres made
of NIST K3089 material with diameters in the
Table 1. Average elemental concentrations for glass micro-spheres calculated with the use of analytical and MC approaches
64
range from 25 to 45 μm. The thin glass standard NIST SRM 1833 was the material of reference. The MC algorithm simulates interaction
between X-ray photons and matter. The fate
of every individual photon is being tracked
from the point where it hits the sample until
its detections in the X- ray detector. The MC
algorithm requires some input data including the approximate chemical composition
of material, measurement geometry and fundamental parameters. The MC algorithm applied the variance reduction technique. First,
energy and primary photon’s direction are
selected. If the photon was absorbed in material, three possible effects are forced: (1) photoabsorption and characteristic X-ray emission, (2) Rayleigh and (3) Compton scattering.
The probability of reaching the detector by
the outgoing photon is calculated for each
abovementioned interaction path. For each
outgoing photon, a further interaction point
is calculated. If it is located inside the sample,
successive interactions are forced again. In
opposite case, the procedure comes back on
beginning and the next primary photon and
its interaction history are tracked by the outlined scheme.
Comparison between elemental
concentrations obtained by different analytical relationships based on particle shape approximation and these calculated by the MC
method is presented in Tab 1. The MC algorithm provided the most accurate results in
comparison with the considered analytical
approaches. In all compared approaches the
precision (indicated by standard deviation)
increased for high-Z elements regardless of
the approach used, but it was the best for MC
method.
It has been confirmed that XRF
method combined with the iterative MC simulation is a useful tool for determination the
elemental concentrations in individual particles. The MC approach produced more accurate results as compared to analytical non-MC
methods.
References:
1
M. Bielewski, D. Wegrzynek, M. Lankosz, A.Markowicz, E. Chinea-Cano, S. Akoto
Bamford, X-Ray Spectrom. 35 (2006) 238-242.
2
M. Czyzycki, M. Bielewski, M. Lankosz, X-Ray Spectrom. 38 (2009) 487-491.
65
Construction of High Frequency Coils for MRI at 0.088 T
B. PRONIEWSKI, H. FIGIEL
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Biomedical Imaging and Modeling Group,
in cooperation with:
T. PAŁASZ
M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, POLAND
While most of the research in magnetic resonance imaging is focused on the
development and applications of high field
systems, there are certain areas of diagnostic medicine where imaging at low magnetic
field strengths yields comparable results [1].
Utilization of such systems requires specially
designed dedicated rf coils in order to overcome the technical constrains resulting from
working at low magnetic fields. The main
purpose of this work was to obtain images at
0.088T using different types of coils not evaluated in this particular system yet.
For the purpose of this project four
different coils have been designed, constructed and tested, namely two homogeneous
resonators: the solenoid and saddle shape
coils, and two heterogeneous resonators: the
basic planar surface coil and half saddle surface coil. The design process consisted of determining the desired coil dimensions using
available anthropometric data, as well as coil
inductance and magnetic field simulations.
A series capacitive network has been used to
match the designed coils to the spectrometer
at the desired frequency and Q factors have
been evaluated using a spectrum analyzer.
Magnetic field induction generated by the
coils has been measured and compared with
theoretical expectations and the theoretical
field homogeneity has been assessed using
the field histogram method. Images of six
phantoms have been acquired using the constructed coils, which allowed signal to noise
ratio measurements and field profiles to be
determined and compared with field simulations. After the tests with phantoms, images
of an elbow have been successfully obtained
using all of the constructed coils. The solenoid, saddle and planar surface coils provided
good overall image quality. Additionally the
ability to focus the imaging plane at the desired depth with surface coils has been demonstrated (fig. 1). In result it was shown that
imaging at very low fields can be successfully
performed with other than the solenoid coil
configuration.
Fig. 1. Images taken with the surface coil at different depths.
References:
1
J. M. Haduch, H. Figiel, R. P. Banyś, M. Pasowicz, The comparison of low-field and high-field magnetics resonace imaging systems, Pol. J. Radiol. 74(1), 2009, 85-50
66
Neuroprotective action of FK-506 in epileptic rat brain
– the topographic and quantitative elemental analysis
of nervous tissue with the use of X-ray fluorescence
microscopy.
J. CHWIEJ, M. MARCISZKO, J. DULINSKA, M. LANKOSZ, Z.STEGOWSKI
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Biomedical and Environmental Research Group
in cooperation with:
Z. SETKOWICZ, K. JANECZKO
Department of Neurology, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland
K. RICKERS
HASYLAB at DESY, Hamburg, Germany
Epilepsy still constitutes a serious
tion of selected brain areas between epileptic
clinical problem and there is an urgent need
animals treated (SNF) and non-treated (SNS)
for more effective therapeutic strategy. Based
with tacrolimus were investigated.
on clinical studies and animal models of epi
X-ray fluorescence microscopy was
lepsy it is known that even a short episode
applied to analyze the topographic and quanof epileptic convulsions can produce local
titative elemental abnormalities occurring
or remote neurodegenerative changes and
in nervous tissue as a result of pilocarpine
neuronal death in vulnerable rat brain strucinduced epilepsy and neuroprotection with
tures can be observed already after epileptic
tacrolimus. The areas of rat brain that undischarges of 4-16 min duration [1,2]. Minidergo neurodegenertive changes as a result
mization of the changes triggered by spreadof epileptic seizures were selected for invesing seizures is an important goal of modern
tigation. The measurements were carried out
clinical neurology. Compounds that can minimize
the effects of brain injury
by increasing the survival of
nerve cells under pathological conditions are defined
as neuroprotective factors.
One of them is FK-506 (tacrolimus), an immunosuppressive drug widely used
in transplantology [3-5].
The present work
is the continuation of our
previous studies concerning
the elemental abnormalities occurring in rat brain
6 hrs after the induction
of epileptic seizures with
pilocarpine [6]. In frame of
these studies the differences Fig. 1. The maps of elemental distribution obtained for selected FKin the elemental composi- 506–treated epileptic animal.
67
at HASYLAB beamline L. X-ray beam with the
energy of 17 keV was focused with polycapillary optics to the final beam spot of 15 μm.
Raster scanning of the samples generated
2D cartographies revealing the distribution
of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe,
Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb and Sr. The typical maps recorded for selected hippocampal tissue from
epileptic animal treated with FK-506 were
presented in the Figure 1.
The mean masses per unit area of
elements were evaluated for five selected
brain areas, i.e. CA1 and CA3 regions of Ammon’s horn, DG – dentate gyrus and H – hilus
of dentate gyrus and cortex (see also Figure
1). The areas taken into account in calculations were equal to 300 μm times 300 μm. In
order to compare the FK-506–treated epileptic group with untreated epileptic and control
animals, the median values of mass per unit
area were evaluated for all the analyzed brain
areas in the three examined groups. The statistical significance of differences between
medians was tested with non-parametric
U (Mann-Whitney) test.
Many statistically significant differences in elemental composition were observed between epileptic groups treated and
non-treated with tacrolimus. Higher mass per
unit area of phosphorus was noticed in CA1
and CA3 regions of the hippocampus of SNF
animals. Such a result may be an effect of
decreased protein dephosforylation caused
by FK-506 induced inhibition of calcineurin
activity. An increased mass per unit area of
K observed for all the five analyzed brain areas of SNF group may suggest that the neuroprotective action of FK-506 is both a result
of calcineurin inhibition and direct blockade
of K+ channels (calcineurin-dependent and
calcineurin-independent mechanism). Therefore, this is a proof that in some cases both
molecular pathways may be engaged together and with other mechanisms may protect
brain neurons against postepileptic changes.
Acknowledgements
The research leading to these results has received funding from the European
Community’s Seventh Framework Programme
(FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement
n° 226716. This work was also supported by
the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher
Education and the following grants: 82/N-IASFS/2007/0, DESY-D-I-20070053 EC, DESY-DII-20080009 EC and N404 029 31/1636. The
first author is also grateful for support from
the Foundation for Polish Science (Start Programme).
References:
1
D. G. Fujikawa, Brain Research 24 (1996) 11.
2
L. Turski, C. Ikonomidou, W. A. Turski, Z. A. Bortolotto, E. A. Cavalheiro, Synapse 3 (1989) 154.
W. S. Bartynski, Z. Zeigler, M. P. Spearman, L. Lin, R. K. Shadduck, J. Lister, Am J Neuroradiol 22 (2001)
1901.
3
H. Uchino, R. Minamikawa-Tachino, T. Kristián, G. Perkins, M. Narazaki, B. K. Siesjö, F. Shibasaki, Neurobiol Dis 10 (2002) 219.
4
Y. Furuichi, M. Maeda, A. Moriguchi, T. Sawamoto, A. Kawamura, N. Matsuoka, S. Mutoh, T. Yanagihara, J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 23 (2003) 1183.
5
J. Chwiej, W. Winiarski, M. Ciarach, K. Janeczko, M. Lankosz, K. Rickers, Z. Setkowicz, J Biol Inorg
Chem 13 (2008) 1267.
68
Sub-lattice magnetism in sigma-phase Fe-V
compounds
S. M. DUBIEL and J. CIEŚLAK
Department of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Moessbauer Spectroscopy Group
in collaboration with:
J. R. TOZONI, D. C. BRAZ, E.L. G. VIDOTO and T. J. BONAGAMBA
Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, São Carlos,
13560-970, São Paulo, Brazil.
A σ-phase is a product of a solidstate reaction in some alloys in which at least
one constituent is a transition element. It has
a tetragonal crystallographic structure and its
unit cell contains 30 atoms distributed over
5 sites A, B, C, D and E. Due to high coordination numbers (12-15), the phase is a member
of Frank-Kasper phases. Among over 50 binary alloys in which the σ-phase was found,
only that in Fe-Cr and Fe-V alloy systems has
well evidenced magnetic properties. Yet, its
magnetism is not well understood. Some
features like a lack of saturation of magnetisation, even in magnetic field of 15 T, and the
Rhodes-Wohlfarth criterion are in favor of its
itinerant character, but it remains fully open
(a) if both kinds of the constituting atoms
contribute to the magnetism, (b) what are the
values of the magnetic moments localized at
the constituting atoms at different sites and
(c) is the magnetic structure co-linear or not.
The difficulty in answering these questions
arrises on one hand from failure to produce
a big enough single-crystal of σ that could
be used in a neutron-diffraction experiment
to decifer the magnetic structure, and, on
the other, in a lack of high-enough resolution
of the Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) which
partly follows from the weak magnetism of σ,
and partly from its complex crystallographic
structure combined with a chemical disorder
of atom distribution over all sites [1-3]. Here
we report the first successful measurement of
the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra without applying external magnetic field
(so called zero-field NMR) on the σ-Fe100-xVx
samples with x = 34.4, 39.9 and 47.9, which
gives a clear evidence that V atoms occupy
all 5 sites and have a non-zero spin-density
(hyperfine field) that is specific of a given site.
Details on sample preparation and the NMR
experiments are given elsewhere [4].
The resonance lines observed in the
spectra were assigned to the 51V nuclei due
to the following 3 reasons: i) Much higher
natural abundance of the 51V nuclei (99.8%)
as compared to that of 57Fe (2.2%); ii) more
intense giromagnetic factor of 51V nuclei (11.2
MHz/T) in contrast with that of 57Fe (1.4 MHz/
T); and iii) 57Fe hyperfine field distributions
values derived from MS experiments [3]. Additionally, experiments performed on 57Fe-enriched sample with x = 34.4, did not show any
57
Fe signal, corroborating that all the signals
observed should be assigned to 51V nuclei.
The NMR spectra recorded at 4.2 K – see Fig.
1 - were analyzed assuming they consist of
five resonance lines corresponding to the five
sites A, B, C, D and E.
Assuming that each line has
a Lorentzian shape characterized by its position, amplitude and width that were taken as
free parameters, good fits of the spectra were
obtained. A reasonable accord between the
intensities of the lines and the probabilities
of the site occupation by V atoms, as found in
the neutron experiment [5], enables asignement of the resonance lines to particular
sites. The well-defined 5-line structure seen
in the intensity of the spectra means that (1)
the hyperfine field (spin-density) exists on
V atoms occupying all sites, and (2) it is typical
of a given site. The strongest magnetism have
sites A and the weakest one sites D. The estimated average magnetic moment per V atom
obtained with the scaling constant given in
[6], decreases from 0.36 μB for x = 34.4 to 0.20
μB for x = 47.9. The non-zero magnetizm at
69
V atoms in the σ-Fe100-xVx samples is induced
by magnetic Fe-atoms. The evidence for that
is given in Fig. 2. Its left-hand panel shows
the positions of the resonance lines versus
x giving a clear indication that for each site
the strength of magnetism decreases linearly
with x.
In order to compare this behaviour
with that of the average magnetic moment
per Fe atom, <μ>, as determined elsewhere
[3], a weighted average frequency (gravity center), <ν>, of each spectrum was calculated, and the relationship between them
is displayed in the righat-hand panel of Fig.
2. As can be here seen, <ν> is linearly correlated with <μ>, and this, in turn, means that
the hyperfine field (spin-density) observed at
V nuclei has been induced by the magnetic
Fe atoms. This observation is consistent with
the itinerant character of magnetism of the
σ-phase.
In summary, we have succeeded to
record for the first time the NMR spectra on
magnetic σ-phase samples. The spectra give
a clear evidence that in the σ-FeV alloys vanadium atoms occupy all five crystallographic
sites, and all of them have non-zero hyperfine
field, hence a magnetic moment whose value
strongly depends on the site, and for a given
site on a sample composition. The average
hyperfine field (magnetic moment) at 51V
nucleus decreases from <B> = 3.26 T (0.36 μB)
for x = 34.4 to 1.76 T (0.20 μB) for x = 47.9
51
Fig.1 51V NMR spectra recorded at 4.2 K for x = 34.4 (black),
x = 39.9 (red) and x = 47.9 (blue)
Fig. 2 (Left) Line position versus x, as determined from the measured 51V spectra. The solid lines are
to guide the eyes, and (Right) the average frequency of the spectra, <ν> versus the average magnetic moment per Fe atom, <μ>.The line shows the best linear fit to the data.
70
References:
1
J. Cieślak, M. Reissner, W. Steiner and S. M. Dubiel, J. Magn. Magn. Mater., 534 (2004) 272-276
2
J. Cieślak, M. Reissner, W. Steiner and S. M. Dubiel, Phys. Stat. Sol (a), 205 (2008) 1794
3
J. Cieślak, B. F. O. Costa, S. M. Dubiel, M. Reissner and W. Steiner, J. Magn. Magn. Mater., 321 (2009)
2160
4
S. M. Dubiel, J. R. Tozoni, J. Cieślak, D. C. Braz, E.L. G. Vidoto and T. J. Bonagamba, www.arxiv.org:
0906.4458
5
J. Cieślak, M. Reissner, S. M. Dubiel, J. Wernisch and W. Steiner, J. Alloys Comp., 205 (2008) 20.
H. Luetgemeier and S. M. Dubiel, J. Magn. Magn. Mater., 28 (1982) 277.
71
Incompatibility Stresses and Stored Elastic Energy
in Plastically Deformed Copper
A. Baczmański, K. Wierzbanowski
Department of Condensed Matter Physics
in collaboration with:
N. Hfaiedh, M. François
LASMIS, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 11 rue Marie Curie,. B.P. 2060, 10010 Troyes, France
During elasto-plastic deformation
of polycrystalline material the elastic energy
is stored in the material. One can distinguish
two contributions to this energy. The first one
is the elastic energy, connected with residual
stresses, i.e., with grain-grain interaction. Another part of the stored energy is due to the
dislocation density, which is mainly localized
inside grains. The latter one is considered as
a driving force of recrystallization. The stored
energy connected with residual stresses can
also have some influence on recrystallization
but the influence of the energy due to dislocation density on mechanical properties and
on the damage processes is more important.
Both types of energy can be determined experimentally and predicted by deformation
models. In the present work, for the first time
the stored energy related to the residual
stresses is quantitatively determined for polycrystalline grains having different orientations.
The residual stresses in a polycrystalline sample can be described at different
scales of interest. The first order stresses (macro-stresses) are the mean stresses averaged
over a large sample volume containing many
polycrystalline grains, such as the gauge volume in a diffraction experiment. The second
order stresses characterize the deviation of
the stress in a particular grain from the first
order value. These stresses, called also the incompatibility stresses, occur because of small
scale anisotropy or inhomogeneity in the material: for example, due to mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic constants
or plastic flow between different phases or
even individual grains of the material. Finally,
the third order stresses occur on the smallest
scale, over distances within particular grains,
and they arise from such origins as the local
stress fields around dislocations.
The sin2ψ X-ray diffraction method
[1] of stress analysis is based on the measurement of peak positions for a given hkl
reflection and for various directions of the
scattering vector with respect to the sample.
The interplanar spacings are calculated using
Bragg’s law and the macrostresses (first order
stresses) are determined by applying a simple
linear or elliptical regression procedure [1]. A
modified sin2ψ method for quantitative evaluation of the stresses generated due to plastic
incompatibilities (second order stresses) has
been proposed by Baczmanski et al. [2,3]. The
non-standard interpretation of experimental
results allowed the separation of the macrostresses and micro-stresses created due to
the anisotropy of plastic deformation. The
information about tensor of plastic incompatibility stresses, which cannot be obtained
by other methods of stress analysis, is useful
in evaluating such physical properties of the
material as: value of critical stress for slip, surface of plasticity and hysteresis of mechanical
response during cycling loading of the sample. Also, the distribution of the stored energy
is important in the study of texture transformation during the recrystallisation process
[4]. Hence, two types of the stored energy
created during elasto-plastic deformation
are considered in this work, i.e, stored elastic energy caused by plastic incompatibility
stresses (determined using modified sin2ψ
method) and the stored energy, connected
with the dislocation which can be estimated
using the self-consistent model.
In the present work the ODFs and
residual incompatibility stresses created during tensile test in polycrystalline copper were
72
determined using the self-consistent model
[5] and X-ray diffraction measurements [6]. It
was shown that the evolution of the measured texture agrees very well with the model
results when the experimental initial texture
is used in model calculations. During elastoplastic deformation texture slowly changes
and the final orientation distribution function
(ODF) depends strongly on the initial distribution of orientations. In contrast, the distribution of stored elastic energy (caused by
grain incompatibilities) in Euler space rapidly
changed when different type of deformation
was applied (rolling was followed by tensile
test). The distribution of equivalent incompatibility stress is almost independent on the
initial texture and it shows symmetries depending mostly on the type of deformation
(Fig.1).
Comparing distributions of different quantities presented in Fig.1, it can be
concluded that the grains having preferred
orientations created by the deformation possess a minimum stored elastic energy caused
by grain incompatibilities. The model distribution of critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS,
related to the stored energy caused by dislocations) was also plotted in the Euler space
(Fig.1). It was found that the maximum values
of elastic energy caused by grain incompatibilities correspond to minimum values of
CRSS.
Fig. 1 Experimental orientation distribution functions (ODF), stored energy caused by grains incompatibilities (specific elastic energy in kJ/m3) and critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS in MPa) during
tensile test shown in the Euler space. The grain orientations having planes {111}⊥ Σ11 and planes
{110}⊥ Σ11 are indicated by solid and dashed lines, respectively (where Σ11 is a uniaxial stress applied
to the sample during tensile deformation).
References:
1
I. C. Noyan, and J.B. Cohen, Residual Streess: New York: Springer, Verlag, 1987.
2
A. Baczmański, C. Braham, and W. Seiler, Phil. Mag., 83, 3225 (2003
3
A. Baczmanski, P. Lipinski, A. Tidu, K. Wierzbanowski and B. Pathiraj, J. Appl. Cryst, 41, 854 (2008)
4
A. Baczmanski, K. Wierzbanowski, A. Benmarouane, A. Lodini, P. Lipinski and B. Bacroix, Materials
Science Forum, 539-543, 3335 (2007)
5
P. Lipinski, M. Berveiller, E. Reubrez and J. Morreale, Arch. Appl. Mech. 65, 291 (1995).
6
A. Baczmański, N. Hfaiedh, M. François, K. Wierzbanowski, Materials Science and Engineering:
A, 501, 153 (2009).
73
Electronic structure and thermoelectric properties
of Mo3-xRuxSb7 and Mo3Sb7-xTex Zintl phases
J. Toboła, S. Kaprzyk, B. Wiendlocha
Department of Condensed Matter Physics
in collaboration with
C. Candolfi, B. Lenoir, A. Dauscher
Institut Jean Lamour, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Nancy, France
Among narrow-band-gap semiconductors and semimetals, intermetallic Zintl
phases are currently focusing attention due
to their promising thermoelectric properties
[1,2]. These materials are considered to be
valence precise resulting in semiconducting
properties that coupled with complex crystalline structures formed by heavy atoms in
large unit cells constitute the prerequisites
to achieve superior thermoelectric performance. The efficiency of such thermoelectric
device can be improved by increasing the
thermoelectric dimensionless figure of merit
at a temperature T, ZT=S2T / ρλ where S is the
thermopower, ρ the electrical resistivity and
λ the total thermal conductivity. The conflicting requirements on thermal and electric
transport properties involved by this simple
formula makes designing a thermoelectric
material a complex task.
The crystallographic structure of
M3T7 (with M = Nb, Mo, Tc, Re, Ru, Os, Ir, Co,
Ni, Pd and Pt and T = Sb, Te, As, Sn, Si, Al, Ga,
Ge, In, Pb and Tl) can be either described as a
three dimensional arrangement of antiprisms
formed by the T atoms or by considering how
the M and T sublattices (body centered cubic
sublattice of octahedral structures and truncated octahedra, respectively) interpenetrate
each other (Fig. 1). Among the various Zintl
compounds discovered, Mo3Sb7 constitutes
the most intriguing material not only for
its thermoelectric properties but also from
a fundamental point of view, e.g. BCS-like superconducting properties [3] and exotic low
temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility [4,5]. One
of the essential feature of these compounds
concerns the existence of an energy gap [2,6]
separating the valence and conduction bands
and arising from strong d-p orbitals hybridization (Fig. 2). Electronic band structure investigations have shown that driving the system
into a semiconducting regime of conduction
could be realized provided two electrons
(Mo3Sb7) per formula unit are added through
substitutions. Of the various elements that
could bring two additional electrons to the
Mo3Sb7 electronic structure, Te proved to insert the crystalline lattice on the Sb site or Ru
on the Mo site.
The partial substitution of Sb by Te
and Mo by Ru leads to a progressive increase
of the electrical resistivity and thermopower
consistent with electronic structure features
suggested by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker
with the coherent potential approximation
(KKR-CPA) calculations [7-9]. Lattice and atomic coordinates determined from both x-ray and
neutron diffraction studies [10,11] were used
in these computations. Electronic structure calculations of disordered Mo3Sb7-xTex (0.3 ≤ x ≤ 2)
and Mo3-xRuxSb7 (0.1 ≤ x ≤ 1) were performed
in the self-consistent way, in which crystal potential was constructed within the local density
approximation (LDA) applying the Barth-Hedin
formula for the exchange-correlation part. Our
earlier investigations based on total energy
KKR-CPA LDA calculations coupled with neutron diffraction analysis have unequivocally
shown that the Te atoms exhibit strong site
preference for the Sb1 position [11].
Thermoelectric properties including
electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and
thermopower as well as were measured from
5 to 300 K. Moreover, Hall effect, magnetization and specific heat measurements were
carried out in the same temperature range.
Our electron transport experiments revealed that the partial substitution
74
of antimony by tellurium drastically affects
the transport properties of Mo3Sb7 [7]. Even
though the solubility limit of Te precludes
a metal-insulator transition, the magnitude
of both thermopower and electrical resistivity increases with x (Fig. 4). In addition, the
transport data were found to be consistent
with our theoretical KKR-CPA analysis i.e. with
a picture whereby the evolution of the electronic structure can be understood within
a rigid band model (Fig. 4). Introducing tellurium in the structure also leads to a progressive suppression of the magnetic interactions
displayed by the Mo3Sb7 compound [7, 8].
Compelling experimental evidence of this disappearance has been provided by magnetic
susceptibility measurements. Specific heat
analysis has revealed a decrease of both the
electron-phonon coupling constant and the
density of states at the Fermi level in perfect
agreement with our transport data and band
structure calculations, respectively.
Like in Mo3Sb7-xTex, transport and
magnetic susceptibility measurements coupled with KKR-CPA band structure calculations have been performed on a series of
polycrystalline samples for x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.50
and 0.80 [9, 10]. The partial substitution of
Mo by Ru in Mo3-xRuxSb7 has a deep impact
on the magnetic interactions exhibited by
Mo3Sb7 that can be clearly observed on the
magnetic susceptibility data [8]. Even though
the solubility limit of Ru prevents to reach
a semiconducting state, both thermopower
and electrical resistivity values increase with
x, consistent with our KKR-CPA calculations
predicting a rigid-like behaviour of the electronic structure.
The work was partly supported by
the Polish Ministry of Science and Education
under Projects No. N202 2104 33 and No. 44/
N-COST/2007/0. The results were published in
Refs. [7-10].
Fig. 1 Crystal structure of Mo3Sb7: sublattices
are composed of Sb1 (in blue), Sb2 (in red) atoms and Mo octahedral blocks sitting at the
center of Sb1 and Sb2.
Fig. 2 Total and site-decomposed density of
states of Mo3-xRuxSb7 (x=0.5) in the vicinity of
the Fermi level.
75
Fig. 3 Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity measured in the Mo3Sb7-xTex
compounds for x = 0 (°), 0.3 (+), 1 (o), 1.6 (∆)
and 1.8 (q).
Fig. 4 Total density of states in the vicinity of
the Fermi energy in Mo3Sb7-xTex for x = 0.3, 1,
1.6 and 1.8.
References:
1
F. Gascoin, S. Ottensmann, D. Stark, S.M. Haile and G.J. Snyder, Adv. Funct. Mater., 15, 1860 (2005).
2
N. Soheilnia, H. Xu, H. Zhang, T. M. Tritt, I. Swainson, H. Kleinke, Chem. Mater., 19, 4063 (2007).
3
Z. Bukowski, D. Badurski, J. Stepien-Damm, and R. Troć, Solid State Commun. 123, 283 (2002).
4
C. Candolfi, B. Lenoir, A. Dauscher, C. Bellouard, J. Hejtmanek, E. Santava, and J. Tobola, Phys. Rev.
Lett. 99, 037006 (2007).
5
V. H. Tran, W. Miiller, and Z. Bukowski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 137004 (2008).
6
B. Wiendlocha, J. Tobola, M. Sternik, S. Kaprzyk,K. Parlinski and A. M. Oleś, Phys. Rev. B 78, 060507R
(2008).
7
C. Candolfi, B. Lenoir, A. Dauscher, J. Hejtmanek, J. Tobola, Phys. Rev. B 79, 235108 (2009).
8
C. Candolfi, B. Lenoir, A. Dauscher, E. Guilmeau, J. Hejtmanek, J. Tobola, B. Wiendlocha, S. Kaprzyk,
Phys. Rev. B 79, 035114 (2009).
9
C. Candolfi, B. Lenoir, A. Dauscher, J. Hejtmanek, J. Tobola, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155127 (2009).
10
11
C. Candolfi, B. Lenoir, J. Leszczynski, A. Dauscher, J. Tobola, S. J. Clarke, R. I. Smith, Inorganic Chem.
48, 5216 (2009).
C. Candolfi, B. Lenoir, A. Dauscher, J. Tobola, S. J. Clarke and R. I. Smith, Chem. Mat. 20, 6556 (2008).
76
Real space refinement of basic Ni-rich Al-Ni-Co
quasicrystal
P. Kuczera, B. Kozakowski, J. Wolny,
Department of Condensed Matter Physics
Abstract
Initial structure model.
The refinement of a decagonal Al72Ni20Co8 quasicrystal was conducted in
physical space. We used a structure factor obtained in the statistical approach. As a reference lattice we took a rhombic Penrose tiling,
to which we applied overlapping rules for kite
clusters. The resulting structure gives R-factor = 6.0% and Rw-factor = 4.1%. The density
of the refined structure is very close to the experimental one.
The structure of basic Ni-rich decagonal phase is known to consist of a periodic
set of quasiperiodic planes stacked along the
z direction. There are two planes within one
period of the z axis. These planes are related
by a screw axis 105. We assumed that the projection of these two planes along the z axis
results in the Penrose tiling.
Our structure units are thick and
thin rhombuses of Penrose tiling divided
three times with obedience to the inflation
rules. All positions from the 0-th, 1-th, 2-nd,
and 3-rd division are occupied in the initial
model. We, however, also put atoms in several
positions of the fourth division to fulfil the
density restriction. 71 atoms decorating our
structure units were divided into 24 groups.
This division was made according to adherence rules for rhombuses [4,7], overlapping
rules for kite-clusters [5], and the assumption
that the decoration is symmetric with respect
to the longer diagonal of thick rhombus and
shorter of the thin one.
The adherence rules were used for
all decorating atoms since they are essential
for the correctness of the structure factor calculation. Also the assumption of a symmetric
decoration was strictly obeyed. The overlap-
Introduction
There are 8 different decagonal
phases reported in the Al-Ni-Co system [6 and
references therein]. The only phase, for which
a qualitative structure refinement was performed, is the so called basic Ni-rich phase.
The majority of published papers [2,3] focused
however on a higher - dimensional approach
i.e. the atomic surface modelling method. We
present the results of a real space structure
refinement of the basic Ni-rich decagonal
phase based on an X-ray diffraction data set
without referring to the higher - dimensional
properties of decagonal quasicrystals.
The structure factor which was used
for the modelling process was calculated on
the basis of a statistical method described
in [3]. We used rhombic Penrose tiling. Initial
atomic positions were set in the vertices of
rhombuses divided four times with obedience to the inflation rules. Additionally, atoms
were divided into 24 groups. For each group
we optimized probabilities of vertices occupation by Al and TM atoms, a shift from initial
positions and two components of DebyeWaller coefficient. We refined 106 parameters.
The optimization was performed on a set of
averaged and corrected 449 diffraction peaks
taken by Enraf-Nonious CAD-4 four-circle diffractometer [2].
Fig. 1. The division of atoms into 24 groups
77
ping rules for clusters were used solely for the
atoms from the 0-th, 1-th, 2-nd, and 3-rd division, which form a skeleton of the structure.
The division of atoms into groups is illustrated
in the figure 1.
The edge length of our structure
units (a) is 10.29 Å and the period along the
z axis (c) 4.09 Å. Circles and squares distinguish the layers at z = 0.25c and z = -0.25c
respectively. Red symbol colour denotes TM
atoms, purple Al/TM atoms and blue Al atoms.
In the initial model all occupation probabilities are equal to 1. Atoms from 0-th, 1-th, 2-nd,
and 3-rd division are either Al or TM (blue or
red symbols, groups 1-13). The initial concentration of TM atom at the positions of 4-th division is 0.25 (purple symbols, groups 14-24).
A sum of occupancy probabilities for pairs
of atoms indicated by pairs of green circles
which touch each other or overlap is lower
than one. These are flip positions. In each tile
atoms occupy either first or second position.
Exact values of the refined parameters for
each of 24 groups are listed in [1].
Conclusions
We used a conjugated gradient algorithm for the refinement process. The optimized function as well as a complete formula
for the structure factor can be found in [1].
A part of the refined structure is shown in the
figure 2. Red circles denote TM atoms, orange
TM/Al atoms, green Al/TM atoms and blue Al
atoms. Black dots indicate ideal Penrose tiling
positions. Figure 2a shows a projection of the
structure along the z axis. Figures 2b and 2c
show the layers at z = -0.25c and z = 0.25c respectively. The edge length (black lines in the
figures 2b and 2c) was refined to be 10.29 Å
and the period c along the z axis 4.09 Å.
In this paper we have described the
results of the X-ray structure analysis of a decagonal basic Ni-rich Al72Ni20Co8.quasicrystal. The refinement was conducted with only
real space parameters. We used a decorated
rhombic Penrose tiling as an initial structure
for the refinement process. With the statistical
approach we could derive the structure factor
unrelated to the perpendicular space. This is
a very convenient approach as it allows us to
treat atomic positions as phase coefficients of
the Fourier transform. Furthermore, the structure factor we used was derived in a strict; i.e.
without any approximations, mathematical
way.
We obtained R-factor at the level of
8.0% and the Rw-factor at the level of 6.1%.
106 parameters were refined. The resulting
structure has the exact chemical composition
Al72TM28. Our model also gives good values of
density. The refined structure has the point
density 0.0663 Å-3 and overall density 3.89 g/
cm3. The Fobs/Fcalc plot for the final structure in
the logarithmic scale is shown in figure 3.
Fig 2. The refined structure.
Fig. 3. Fcalc/Fobs plot in logarhytmic scale.
Refinement results
78
References:
1
J. Wolny, B. Kozakowski, P. Kuczera, Z. Kristallogr. 223 (2008) 487-850
2
H. Takakura, A. Yamamoto, A. P. Tsai, Acta Cryst. A57 (2001) 576-585
3
A.Cervellino, T.Heibach, W.Steurer, Acta Cryst. B58 (2002) 8-33
4
B.Kozakowski, J.Wolny, Phil. Mag. 86 (2006) 549-555
5
M.Duda., B.Kozakowski, J.Wolny, J. of Non-Crystalline Solids 353 (2007) 2500-2505
6
S.Katrych, W.Steurer, Z. Kristallogr. 219 (2004) 606-613.
7
B. Kozakowski, J.Wolny, arXiv:cond-mat/0503464
79
The symmetry analysis of relations between different
proposed structures of magnesium borohydride
Mg(BH4)
W. Sikora, A. Kuna
Department of Condensed Matter Physics
Metal hydrides are known as safe
media to store hydrogen with high density. In
order to use hydrogen as a fuel in the transport sector, we need not only a light, cheap,
safe and reliable hydrogen storage methods,
but also high hydrogen storage capacity, fast
kinetics and favourable thermodynamics. In
this context light metal borohydrides are attractive due to their high gravimetric and
volumetric hydrogen densities compared to
other complex hydrides. A very promising
candidate for hydrogen storage is magnesium borohydrides, Mg(BH4)2.
Magnesium borohydride has been
known since the 1950s, but the ground-state
structure of it is still under debate. The experimentally [1] and theoretically [2][3][4] proposed structures do not match. The main debated question is related to the lattice stability
of the proposed structures. The important for
this debate occurs the knowledge about the
relations between the symmetry properties
of different type of structures proposed for
stable ground-state of Mg(BH4)2 compound.
The relations between the three space
groups: I41/amd (IT 141), F-4m2 (IT 119), F222
(IT 22) reported in [5] have been found by using the symmetry analysis method based on
the theory of groups and representations. In
particular, small displacements of atomic positions from the initial ones in high symmetry,
parent structure, or changes of sites occupations, can be treated as structural elements to
re-construct the crystal. These relations were
described by k-vectors, which characterized
the relations between crystal lattices, and
connected to given k-vector irreducible representations of high-symmetry space group.
All possible subgroups of I41/amd (IT 141)
group, and corresponding structural changes
have been predicted as belonging to one of
possible, active representation of the higher
symmetry group belonging to k=(0,0,0). Simi-
lar calculations have been made for F-4m2 (IT
119) group as the parent group. The symmetry analysis indicated, that these groups are
connected by group – subgroup relation.
The important results may be summarized as:
I41/amd (141) → τ8 →I-4m2 (119) → τ4
→ F222 (22)
The splitting relations for the
subgroups I-4m2 and F222 for all types of
Mg(BH4)2 atoms are shown in Table 1. The
Wyckoff positions in the group I41/amd: Mg
- 4a and 4b, B - 16h and H - two sets of 16h
and 32i. It should be mentioned that the
F-type cell is 2 times larger as the I-type cell.
This leads to the doubling of the multiplicity
of corresponding Wyckoff positions.
The analysis was obtained by computer program MODY [6]. The program calculates the so called basis vectors of irreducible
representations of a given symmetry group,
which can be used for calculation of possible ordering modes – S- scalar for describing change of probability of sites occupation;
P – polar for describing displacement of atoms from equilibrium positions in high symmetry structure; A – axial for describing ordering of magnetic moments.
Below in Table 2. there is an example with particular data for position 16 h (position 16 h is possible for B and H). From our
point of view the most important is Polar type
– displacement of atoms.
We have derived similar as presented in Table 2. all types of modes (S, P and A),
for all Wyckoff positions and for both space
groups as the parent groups: I41/amd (141)
and τ8 active representation, I-4m2 (119) and
τ4 active representation. The calculations indicate that the deformation of the structure
from I41/amd to F222 is going in two steps.
In each of them the Mg positions does not
change while the B and H atoms move. This
leads to the displacements and deformations
80
of the BH4 thetrahedra surrounding the Mg
atoms. The comparison of the predictions of
the symmetry analysis will be compared with
atoms
I42/amd (141)
Mg
4a
rep. τ8
4b
B
H
16 h
1.16 h
2.16 h
32 i
the predictions of the structure stability calculations and experimental data in a future.
I-4m2 (119)
rep. τ4
F222 (22)
2a
4a
2c
4d
2b
4b
2d
4c
8i1
16k1
8i2
16k2
1. 8i1
1.16k1
1. 8i2
1.16k2
2. 8i1
2.16k1
2. 8i2
2.16k2
16 j1
3.16k1
3.16k2
16 j2
3.16k3
3.16k4
Table 1. Relations between groups and corresponding Wyckoff positions
Wyckoff position
16 h (0, y, z )
Type of modes
Results of calculations
h1 :(0,000 0,485 0,230)
h2 :(0,000 0,015 0,020)
h3 :(0,000 0,985 0,020)
h4 :(0,000 0,515 0,230)
h5 :(0,515 0,000 0,770)
h6 :(0,515 0,500 0,480)
h7 :(0,485 0,500 0,480)
h8 :(0,485 0,000 0,770)
h9 :(0,500 0,985 0,730)
h10:(0,500 0,515 0,520)
h11:(0,500 0,485 0,520)
h12:(0,500 0,015 0,730)
h13:(0,015 0,500 0,270)
h14:(0,015 0,000 0,980)
h15:(0,985 0,000 0,980)
h16:(0,985 0,500 0,270)
S
c8=C
For atoms: h1, h4, h5, h8, h9, h12, h13, h16:
ΔPhj= +C
For atoms: h2, h3, h6, h7, h10, h11, h14, h15:
ΔPhj= -C
P1-version
c8,1=A
For atoms: h1, h2, h9, h10: Rhj= (0,A,0)
For atoms: h3, h4, h11, h12: Rhj= -(0,A,0)
For atoms: h5, h7,h13, h15: Rhj= -(A,0,0)
For atoms: h6, h8, h14, h16: Rhj= (A,0,0)
P2-version
c8,2=B
For atoms: h1, h2, h3, h4, h9, h10, h11, h12: Rhj=
(0, 0,B)
For atoms: h5, h6, h7, h8, h13, h14, h15, h16:
Rhj= - (0, 0,B)
A
c8=M
For atoms: h1, h3, h9, h11: Mhj= (M,0,0)
For atoms: h2, h4, h10, h12: Mhj= - (M,0,0)
For atoms: h5, h6, h13, h14: Mhj= - (0,M,0)
For atoms: h7, h8, h15, h16: Mhj= (0,M,0)
Table 2. I41/amd (141) k=(0,0,0), τ8
81
References:
1
M.D. Riktor, M. H. Søorby, K. Chlopek, M. Fichtner, F. Buchter, A. Z¨uttel, and B.C. Hauback. In situ
synchrotron diffraction studies of phase transitions and thermal decomposition of Mg(BH4)2 and
Ca(BH4)2. J. Mater. Chem., 17:4939–4942, 2007.
2
V. Ozolins, E.H. Majzoub, and C. Wolverton. First-principles prediction of a ground state crystal structure of magnesium borohydride. Phys. Rev. Lett., 100:135501, 2008.
3
J. Voss, J. S. Hummelshj, Z. Lodziana, and T Vegge. Structural stability and decomposition of Mg(BH4)2
isomorphs- an ab initio free energy study. J. Phys.: Condens. Matter, 21, 2009
4
B. Dai, D.S. Sholl, and J.K. Johnson. First-principles study of experiemental and hypothetical Mg(BH4)2
crystal structures. J. Phys. Chem. C, 112:4391–4395, 2008.
5
R. Caputo, A. Tekin, W. Sikora, A. Zuttel: Firs-pronciples determination of the ground-state structure
of Mg(BH4)2 Chemical Physics Letters 480 (2009) 203–209
6
W. Sikora, F.Białas, L. Pytlik ; MODY: a program for calculation of symmetry – adapted functions for
ordered structures in crystals. J. Appl. Cryst. (2004). 37, 1015-1019 (Program available from: novell.
ftj.agh.edu.pl/sikora/mody.htm)
82
Cryogenic Flows in Large Hadron Collider
J. Kulka
Department of Condensed Matter Physics
Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the
world biggest accelerator installed at CERN
on the territory of Switzerland and France
is also the biggest cryogenic system working with liquid helium. Since 2005, when the
underground tunnel, 26.7 km long, became
empty after removing all equipment previously used for electron-positron collider (LEP),
20 persons, staff member of AGH-UST started
the collaboration with CERN in the field of
cryogenic system.
The final energy of accelerated protons should reach 7 TeV. This value and the
bending radius of the existing tunnel (2800m)
give the value of 8.3 tesla for magnetic field
induction. The bending dipole magnets with
a nominal current 11800 amperes are used for
that. Additionally, the quadrupole focusing
magnets inserted every 3 dipole magnets are
supplied with the similar current. Both types
of magnets have a superconducting winding
made of Ni-Ti alloys filament wire. The critical
temperature of this superconductor is 10 K.
System Architecture
a sufficient temperature margin for heat transfer from wires to the cooling liquid helium.
The main two profits of the operation at 1.9
K instead of at conventional 4.5 K are a very
low bulk viscosity of helium and its very large
specific heat. Finally heat conductivity of helium at 1.9 K is 3000 times bigger then that of
cryogenic grade copper. The capton electrical
isolation of the conductor preserves sufficient
porosity and thermal percolation paths.
The LHC cryogenic system must be
able to cool-down one sector of the accelerator in relatively short time of 26 days. It must
survive the resistive transitions of the superconducting winding of the magnets. Such
transitions create not only the pressure increase till 2.0 MPa but also a huge mass flow.
A limited number of access points
(8) and reuse of the four existing LEP refrigerators have an influence in a layout of the LHC
cryogenic system as presented in Fig. 1.
Helium is the only allowed cooling
gas used in the LHC underground installation. The total amount of helium for LHC is
120 tons. It is mainly contained in the magnet
cold masses (60%) and the header C (with
4.5K helium) of cryogenic distribution lines
(28%). The other lines are the recovery one
and their capacity is 7%. Cryoplants located
on a surface contain 5% of total helium inventory. The surface cryogenic system of LHC reuses the infrastructure recovered from previous accelerator.
The superconducting magnet coils
are immersed in a pressurized bath of superfluid helium at about 0.13 MPa and the
maximum temperature of 1.9 K. It makes
Fig. 1. Layout of the cryogenic system (cryogenic distribution line - in blue, superconducting magnets in red). Access point 1 is on
the territory of Switzerland and the rest of access points are in France.
The refrigerator plants are at even
point of LHC. The exception is made in point
1.8 due to the lack of space in point 2 and the
need at point 1.8 for superconducting test
facility. The cooling helium is distributed to
the superconducting magnets through 3.3
. Collaboration Agreement CERN - AGH-UST No.: K1208/
AT/LHC and K1397/AT/LHC.
. L. Evans (ed.), The Large Hadron Collider : a marvel of
technology, Lausanne : EPFL Press, 2009.
83
(3.9 m in diameter) forced the new solution in
magnet construction. Each magnet has two
apertures, in means that both protons beam
pipes are in one iron cold mass. The magnet
string is grouped in to 107 m long lattice cell.
The QRL runs alongside the magnet string
and feeds them via a jumper connection as in
Fig. 3.
The are three helium circuits in the
superconducting magnet. The first one for filling iron yoke one coils ( 0.13 MPa, 4.5 K), the
second for magnet subcooling via heat exchanger (helium pressure 1600 Pa, 1.7K) (line
X and Y in Fig.3.) and the third one for support
and thermal shield (2.0 MPa, 54 K) (line E).
The traveling protons beams induce
the image current in the beam screen and
due to that, screens must be cooled. JouleThomson valve (HX100) produce the superfluid helium before entering tube Y.
The estimated power consumption
of the LHC cryogenic system is 40 MW .
Fig. 2. Cryogenic distribution line in LHC tunnel before superconducting magnets installation. Every 107 m jumper connection between QRL and magnets. Magnet supporting
post already fixed to the floor.
km long sector between the access points.
The cryogenic distribution line (QRL) contains
four pipes for different helium circuits. These
vacuum isolated pipes are held in one cryostat as in Fig.2. A limited space in the tunnel
Fig.3. LHC cryogenic standard cell for magnets in the machine arc.
84
Hyperfine interactions at 57Fe in Ho(Fe1-xCox)2
compounds
M. Bednarski, J. Pszczoła
Department of Applied Nuclear Physics, Functional Materials Physics Group
in collaboration with:
P. Stoch, P. Zachariasz, J. Suwalski
Institute of Atomic Energy, 05-400 Świerk-Otwock
Heavy rare earth (R) - transition metal (M) compounds have been widely studied
for scientic and practical reasons. Recently
the RM2 compounds have been widely used
as strongly magnetostrictive constituents of
composites with piezoceramics in order to
obtain materials with a giant magnetoelectric
effect [1].
The ferrimagnetism of these intermetallics depends on both the rare earth
constituent (4f5d electrons) and the transition
metal constituent (3d electrons) [2,3,4]. Fe/Co
substitution in RFe2 type compounds changes
the number of 3d electrons in the M sublattice, strongly influences the 3d-band and thus
the magnetism, and the hyperfine interactions
[2,3,4]. It was therefore interesting to study the
influence of the 3d-band electron population
on the magnetism of the 3d-sublattice and
especially on the hyperfine interaction parameters in the Ho(Fe1-xCox)2 intermetallics.
The 57Fe Mössbauer patterns, presented in Fig. 1, were collected at 77K by using
a standard transmission technique with a 57Co
in Pd source. Spectra characteristic of the [100]
easy axis of magnetization were fitted considering the random distribution of
the Fe/Co atoms in the transition
metal sublattice.
The random distribution
of the Fe/Co atoms introduces
different neighbourhoods of the
probed iron atom. Particular Fe/Co
surrounding determines locally its
own subspectrum contributing to
the resulting measured Mössbauer
effect pattern and therefore introducing its proper hyperfine interaction parameters. The probability
of particular neighbourhoods and
thus subspectra is described by
Bernoulli distribution.
The average hyperfine
interaction parameters weighted
by the subspectra probabilities,
i.e. the isomer shift IS, the magnetic hyperfine field μ0Hhf and the
quadrupole interaction parameter
QS, determined across the Ho(Fe1Cox)2 series at 77K, are presented
x
in Fig. 2.
Fig. 1. Exemplary 57Fe Mössbauer effect spectra of the A Slater-Pauling type deHo(Fe1-xCox)2 intermetallics (77K).
pendence is observed for the
85
average magnetic hyperfine field. At first,
a weak ferromagnetic type behaviour of the
M-sublattice appears. This means that two
3d subbands with opposite spin are not filled
up [5]. The magnetic hyperfine field across
the Ho(Fe1-xCox)2 series grows with x and the
maximum value of the field is approached at
x=0.3. At this composition the filling up of the
majority 3d subband by 3d electrons is terminated. At higher Co-substitution a strong
ferromagnetic type behaviour of the M-sub-
lattice is observed [5]. The filling-up of the
minority 3d subband still proceeds and the
observed field decreases gradually with x.
The determined hyperfine interaction parameters coincide satisfactorily with
those fragmentary data already known in literature [6].
The compounds with x=0 – 0.4
seem to be the prospective materials as constituents of the magnetoelectric composites.
Fig. 2. Hyperfine interaction parameters of the
Ho(Fe1-xCox)2 series. Open points denote literature
data. IS with respect to iron metal at 300K.
References:
1
M. Fiebig, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 38 (2005) R123
2
P. Stoch , P. Guzdek , A. Stoch, J. Pszczoła, J. Suwalski, J. Alloys Compd, 474 (2009) 42-47
3
A. Stoch , P. Guzdek , P. Stoch, J. Pszczoła, J. Chmist, A. Pańta, K. Kogut, J. Alloys Compd, 467 (2009)
83-87
4
A. Stoch , P. Guzdek , P. Stoch, J. Pszczoła, J. Suwalski, J. Alloys Compd, 467 (2009) 72-77
5
B. Barbara, D. Gignoux, C. Vettier, Lectures on Modern Magnetism, Science Press Beijing, Berlin Heiderlberg, 1988
6
A.P. Guimarães, D.St.P. Bunbury, J. Phys. F: Metal Phys. 3 (1973) 885
86
Oxygen-isotope geothermometers in lacustrine
sediments
K. Różański, M.A. Klisch, P. Wachniew, Z. Gorczyca
Department of Applied Nuclear Physics, Environmental Physics Group
in cooperation with:
T. Goslar, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań
T.W.D. Edwards, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
A. Shemesh, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel
Lake sediments are among the most
valuable of continental paleoclimate archives
[1]. The oxygen-isotope composition of lacustrine carbonates or diatom frustules preserved in lake sediments is frequently used as
a proxy indicator of past climatic and environmental changes. Quantitative interpretation
of such records may be complicated, however, because the 18O signal in these materials
is controlled by two parameters – the isotopic
composition of lake water and its temperature at the time of carbonate or silica production [2]. Here we exploit the opportunity to
couple aquatic cellulose δ18O data with authigenic calcite and diatom silica δ18O data obtained on co-existing material from the same
sedimentary sequence, exploring the notion
that carbonate-cellulose and silica-cellulose
oxygen-isotope geothermometers can be
employed to reconstruct lake water temperature during times of carbonate and silica production. We conducted this comprehensive
test [3] using selected intervals of the sedimentary sequence underlying Lake Gościąż,
central Poland, spanning a broad range of
paleoenvironmental conditions from late Glacial to late Holocene.
The analyzed laminated sediment
consists of five well-dated sections of the
sediment core retrieved in summer 2002 from
the lake. Sections comprising between 100
and 200 years were subdivided into individual samples, each covering 7-15 years. Most
samples yielded reproducible measurements
of calcite and cellulose δ18O; variable diatom
abundance limited silica δ18O measurements
to fewer horizons. Analyses of cellulose and
silica δ18O followed established procedures,
while special treatment of sediment samples
prior to analyses of calcite δ18O was required
due to high MnCO3 content.
Oxygen isotope composition of
aquatic cellulose extracted from organic
fraction of Lake Gościąż sediments allowed
quantitative reconstruction of epilimnion
δ18O values for the past history of the lake.
The inferred δ18Olakewater record provides
a direct evidence of major changes in hydrological balance of the lake in response to climatic shifts. The lake has evolved from fast,
through-flow system during Younger Dryas,
to evaporation-dominated lake during early
Holocene. This transition followed abrupt
amelioration of climate at the YD-PB boundary.
The record of 18O lakewater derived from aquatic cellulose allowed also
quantitative reconstruction of effective epilimnion temperatures using δ18O
records obtained for bulk authigenic calcite and diatom silica preserved in the sediments. The inferred changes of epilimnion
temperatures across the YD-PB boundary
derived from calcite-cellulose geothermometer turned out to be high, in the order 20oC, pointing to substantial warming
during summer months. While the calcitecellulose and silica-cellulose geothermometers produce a similar range of epilimnion
temperature variations for the Younger Dryas period, the readings of silica-cellulose
geothermometer are systematically lower
during late Holocene, consistent with high
diatom productivity in relatively cold water
during the early-spring bloom, while the
larger increase for calcite-inferred temperature likely reflects carbonate precipitation
in warmer waters later in the summer.
87
Combined use of calcite-cellulose
and silica-cellulose geothermometers in this
work has generated unprecedented, quantitative insight into the dynamic thermal and
hydrological responses of a lake system located in the interior of the European continent
to a major, abrupt climate change centred in
the North Atlantic region, and the subsequent
evolution of climate during the Holocene.
This novel multi-isotope approach clearly has
much to offer as a probe of climate-driven
change in continental environments.
Fig.1 Response of Lake Gościaż to climatic changes during late Glacial and Holocene. (a) Evolution
of oxygen-isotope composition (δ18O) of authigenic calcite, aquatic cellulose and diatom silica in
five dated sections of sediment core retrieved from the lake in summer 2002. The YD-PB boundary
is marked by dashed line. (b) Changes of oxygen-isotope composition of epilimnion water in the
lake, inferred from δ18O cellulose. (c) Changes of epilimnion temperatures of Lake Gościaż across
the YD-PB transition and during the Holocene, derived from calcite (ΔTc), calcite-cellulose (ΔTcc) and
silica-cellulose (ΔTsc) geothermometers and related to average conditions during the YD period.
88
References:
1
M.J. Leng, A. Lamb, J. Marshall, B. Wolfe, M. Jones, C. Holmes. In: Isotopes in Palaeoenvironmental
Research, Leng M.J. (ed.) Springer, Dordrecht, 2006.
2
K. Rozanski, S. Johnsen, U. Schotterer, L.G. Thompson, Hydrol. Sci. J., 42 1997 725
3
K. Rozanski, M.A. Klisch, P. Wachniew, Z. Gorczyca, T. Goslar, T.W.D. Edwards,
Shemesh. Geochim. Cosmochim, Acta, 2010, in press
89
Fifteen years of regular measurements of atmospheric
CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios at high mountain site
Kasprowy Wierch, southern Poland
Ł. Chmura, J.M. Nęcki, M. Zimnoch, K. Różański, A. Korus, D. Jeleń
Department of Applied Nuclear Physics, Environmental Physics Group
Gradual increase of atmospheric
CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios over the last 100
years, by far exceeding natural variations,
has been unequivocally attributed to human
activities. Identification and quantification
of sources and sinks of these gases and their
temporal and spatial variability on both global and regional scales is a prerequisite for
a better understanding of the dynamics of
carbon cycle and its response to ever increasing human impact. Development of reliable
carbon cycle models requires high-resolution
observational data of adequate quality.
The Kasprowy Wierch site is located
in the south of Poland, within the High Tatra
Mountains. The meteorological observatory
which hosts the monitoring station is located
on top of a mountain peak called Kasprowy
Wierch (49o14’N, 19o59’E, 1989 m a.s.l., 300
m above the tree line). Climate of Kasprowy
Wierch area is typical for a continental mountain location, with relatively large diurnal
and seasonal variations of temperature, high
precipitation rate, frequent changes of atmospheric pressure and strong winds. Regular observations of atmospheric CH4 and CO2
mixing ratios at Kasprowy Wierch begun in
1994. Continuous measurements using GC
technique were initiated in 1996. The available dataset of CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios at
Kasprowy Wierch comprise a valuable source
of information about temporal variability of
those gases in the atmosphere above central
Europe over the past fifteen years [1,2].
The presented record of carbon
dioxide mixing ratios at Kasprowy Wierch reveals typical behavior of this gas in the atmosphere observed at mid-latitude continental
sites of the Northern Hemisphere. Significant
year-to-year variability of the measured mixing ratios, both with respect to the observed
annual growth rate as well as the amplitude
of seasonal changes, is observed. The winter
maximum ends in spring, when the photosynthetic sink starts to operate. From that time
on, the CO2 mixing ratio gradually decreases,
reaching a minimum in August/September.
Afterwards, the CO2 level increases, reaching
winter maximum in February/March. The average peak-to-peak amplitude for the period
1994-2009 is equal 18,7±1,7 ppm (minimum
value of 14,7 ppm recorded in 2003 and
maximum of 20,7 ppm recorded in 1995) to
be compared with 14,9±1,1 ppm observed at
the Mace Head station, Ireland, representing
marine background conditions [3]. It is worth
to note that the 2003 summer draw-down of
CO2 concentration at Kasprowy Wierch was
anomalously low (peak-to-peak amplitude
of 14.7 ppm, when compared to 20.1 ppm in
2002 and 18.1 ppm in 2004). This effect was
most probably linked to extreme heat wave in
summer 2003 which affected mostly western
Europe and reduced photosynthetic activity
on large areas of the European continent. The
mean annual growth-rate of CO2 mixing ratio
at Kasprowy Wierch, averaged over the observation period (1994-2009), is equal 1,86±0,03
ppm/year, to be compared with 1,91±0,01
ppm/year observed at the Mace Head station.
The length of CO2 deficit season at Kasprowy
Wierch, defined as the period when CO2 mixing ratio remains below the long-term trend
curve, underwent gradual reduction during
the observation period, with the average rate
of ca. 0.5 day/year. This reduction was associated with the increase of average surface air
temperature for the CO2 deficit period by ca.
0.1oC per year and reduction of cumulative
precipitation by ca. 21 mm/year.
No significant seasonal cycle of
methane has been detected at Kasprowy
Wierch. The annual growth-rate of methane
mixing ratio at Kasprowy Wierch, averaged
over the observation period (1994-2009), is
equal 2,4±0,3 ppb/year, to be compared with
90
3,1±0,1 ppb/year for the Mace Head station
[4]. The CH4 mixing ratios observed at Kasprowy Wierch are higher that those recorded
at the Mace Head, the average difference being around 23,0±0,2 ppb for the entire obser-
vation period. This indicates that the European continent acts as a net source of methane
into the atmosphere (leakages from gas distribution systems, leakages from mines, landfills and marshes).
Fig.1. Atmospheric mixing ratios of CO2 (a) and CH4 (b) measured at high mountain site Kasprowy
Wierch, southern Poland, during the period 1994-2009. Selected daily means representing regional
background levels are shown (green and blue dots). Smoothed record for the Mace Head station
(Ireland) representing marine background conditions is also shown (in red).
References:
1
J.M. Necki, M. Schmidt, K. Rozanski, M. Zimnoch, A. Korus, J. Lasa, R. Graul, I. Levin. Tellus, 55B 2003
28.
2
L. Chmura, K. Rozanski, J.M. Necki, M. Zimnoch, A. Korus, M. Pycia. Polish J. of Environ. Stud. 17 2008
859.
3
GLOBALVIEW-CO2: Cooperative Atmospheric Data Integration Project - Carbon Dioxide. ftp.cmdl.
noaa.gov, Path: ccg/co2/GLOBALVIEW, 2008.
4
GLOBALVIEW-CH4: Atmospheric Data Integration Project - Methane. ftp.cmdl.noaa.gov, Path: ccg/
ch4/GLOBALVIEW, 2008.
91
92
Third-party funds
Badania finansowane ze źródeł
zewnętrznych
Umowy UE realizowane w 2009
6th Framework Programme
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
27.27.220.544
EUROTRANS
Jerzy Janczyszyn
Sensitivity Analysis and Validation
of Nuclear Data
and Simulation
Tools
01.04.2005
– 31-03.2010
EUROTRANS
–FI6W –516520
z 14.07.2005
27.27.220.570
EUDET
Leszek
TurczynowiczSuszycki Marek Idzik
Detector
Research and
Development
Towards the
International
Linear Collider
01.01.2006
– 31.12.2010
EUDET RII3
026126
z 13.02.2006
27.27.220.585
EUROHYDROS
Kazimierz
Różański
A European Network for Atmospheric Hydrogen
Observations
and Studies
01.08.2006
– 31.07.2009
EUROHYDROS
GOCE 036916
z 27.09.2006
27.27.220.602
ELSY
Jerzy Cetnar
European Leadcooled System
01.09.2006
– 28.02.2010
ELSY F16W
036439
z 29.11.2006
27.27.220.603
PUMA
Jerzy Cetnar
Plutonium and
Minor Actindes
Management
by Gas-Gooled
Reactors
01.04.2005
– 31.03.2009
PUMA FI6W
036457
z 22.12.2006
93
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
27.27.220.7007
IMECC
Mirosław
Zimnoch
Infrastructure for
Measurement
of the European
Carbon Cycle
01.04.2007
–31.03.2011
IMECC-RII3026188
z 18.09.2007
7th Framework Programme
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
27.27.220.7017
SLHC-PP
Władysław
Dąbrowski
Preparatory Phase of the
Large Hadron
Collider Upgrade
01.04.2008
– 31.03-2011
SLH-PP-212114
(FP7-2007-Infrastructures-1)
z 16.04.2008
27.27.220.7023
MC-PAD ITN
Marek Idzik
Marie Curie Traiing Network on
Particle Detectors
1.11.2008
– 31.10.2012
MC-PAD-214560
z 18.11.2008
27.27.220.7024
SOCIONICAL
Wiesława Sikora
Complex SocioTechnical System
in Ambient Intelligence
01.02.2009
– 31.01.2012
SOCIONICAL
231288
z 11.12.2008
94
Other grants
Granty Ministerstwa Nauki i Szkolnictwa Wyższego
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
18.18.220.575
18
Kozłowski
Andrzej
Badanie przemiany Verveya
w związkach
magnetyki.
2006-06-05
- 2009-06-04
18.18.220.623
18
Toboła Janusz
Teoretyczne ba2007-10-02
dania wybranych - 2009-02-01
układów międzymetalicznych
w aspekcie bliskości stanu nadprzewodzącego i
magnetycznego.
(promotorski – B.
Wiendlocha)
18.18.220.644
18
Wachniew
Przemysław
Czynniki warun- 2008-04-11
kujące zawartość - 2010-04-10
produktów rozpadu promieniotwórczego 226Ra
w glebach.
18.18.220.657
18
Burda Kvetoslava
Mechanizm wydzielania tlenu z
wody w procesie
fotosyntezy.
2008-09-12
- 2011-09-11
18.18.220.658
18
Wolny Janusz
Struktura układów o gigantycznej komórce
elementarnej
na przykładzie
stopu Mg-Al.
(promotorski
– M. Duda)
2008-09-22
- 2010-09-30
18.18.220.663
18
Ślęzak Tomasz
Obniżona symetria translacyjna
a lokalne właściwości magnetyczne
w epitaksjalnych
nanostrukturach
Fe.
2008-10-07
- 2010-10-06
95
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
18.18.220.593
18
Chruściel Edward Naturalna pro2006-11-07
mieniotwórczość - 2009-11-06
wód mineralnych
i swoistych Karpat Polskich
a skład chemiczny i warunki
występowania
tych wód.
18.18.220.674
18
Dąbrowski
Władysław
Rozwój specjalizowanych
układów scalonych o małym
poborze mocy
do wielokanałowej stymulacji
elektrycznej
i rejestracji sygnałów z komórek
nerwowych
w eksperymantach in-vivo.
2009-04-15
- 2012-04-14
18.18.220.622
18
Zimnoch
Mirosław
Ocena wielkości
strumieni gazów
śladowych na
terenie Krakowa
z wykorzystaniem pomiarów
chromatograficznych oraz
sodarowych.
2007-10-01
- 2009-09-30
18.18.220.650
18
Korecki Józef
Wpływ stopni
atomowych
podłoża na magnetyzm ultracienkich warstw
epitaksjalnych
na przykładzie
układu Fe/W.
(promotorski
– M. Ślęzak)
2008-05-20
- 2010-04-30
96
Temat
Czas trwania
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
18.18.220.624
18
Toboła Janusz
Badania dynamiki elektronów
w złożonych
układach międzymetalicznych
z przejściem metal-półprzewodnik w aspekcie
silnych własności
termoelektrycznych.
2007-10-02
- 2009-10-01
18.18.220.659
18
Adamowski
Janusz
Badanie wpływu
potencjału
uwięzienia i zewnętrznego pola
elektrycznego na
oddziaływanie
wymienne pomiędzy elektronami w sprzężonych kropkach
kwantowych.
(promotorski – A.
Kwaśniowski)
2008-09-22
- 2009-12-31
18.18.220.687
18
Różański
Kazimierz
Opracowanie
metody datowania wód
podziemnych
z wykorzystaniem środowiskowych znaczników gazowych
(SF5CF3, SF6,
CFC-12,CFC-13).
2009-10-09
- 2012-04-08
18.18.220.688
18
Cieślak Jakub
Badania struktury elektronowej
i parametrów
nadsubtelnych
fazy sigma wybranych stopów
żelaza.
2009-10-12
- 2012-04-11
97
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
18.18.220.690
18
Lankosz Marek
Badanie wybra2009-10-09
nych pierwiast- 2012-10-08
ków śladowych
i biomolekuł w
glejowych nowotworach mózgu
i ich otoczeniu w
relacji do stopnia
złośliwości guza.
18.18.220.689
18
Kułakowski
Krzysztof
Magnetyzm
sieci nieuporządkowanych.
(promotorski – A.
Mańka-Krasoń)
18.18.220.691
18
Bednarek
Stanisław
Badania teore2009-10-12
tyczne wykorzy- - 2012-10-11
stania oddziaływania spin-orbita
w półprzewodnikach do budowy
kwantowych
bramek logicznych.
2009-10-12
- 2011-01-30
Grant Uczelniany Zamawiany (GUZ)
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
21.10.220.660
21
Jeleń Kazimierz
Analiza możliwo- 2008-06-16
ści wykorzystania - 2009-12-31
ciepła reaktorów
jądrowych w procesach technologicznychn
98
Czas trwania
specjalne programy badawcze (spb) finansowane przez ministerstwo nauki
i szkolnictwa wyższego
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
22.22.220.7009
22
Idzik Marek
Prace badawczo- 2007-08-24
rozwojowe nad
- 2009-12-31
detektorami dla
potrzeb międzynarodowego
liniowego akceleratora ILC.
22.22.220.577
22
Janczyszyn Jerzy
Dane jądrowe
dla transmutacji. akronim:
EUROTRANS-NUDATRA.
2005-04-01
- 2009-03-31
22.22.220.7018
22
Podhorecki
Władysław
Dane jądrowe:
eksperymenty
wzorcowe do
sprawdzenia
danych bibliotek
EFF/EAF.
2008-06-17
- 2008-09-30
22.22.220.7015
22
Zimnoch
Mirosław
Infrastruktura dla
pomiaru obiegu
węgla w skali
Europy.
2008-02-12
- 2011-03-31
22.22.220.329
22
Sikora Wiesława
Złożony system
socjotechniczny
w inteligentnym
środowisku.
Akronim: SOCIONICAL
2009-02-01
- 2013-01-31
22.22.220.7020
22
Dąbrowski
Władysław
Faza przygotowawcza
ulepszacza wielkiego zderzacza
hadronowego.
2008-04-01
- 2011-03-31
22.22.220.7005
22
Cetnar Jerzy
Zagospodarowanie olutonu
i aktynowców
w reaktorach
chłodzonych
gazem.
2007-06-20
- 2009-08-31
99
Czas trwania
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
22.22.220.7014
22
Janczyszyn Jerzy
Działania ekspe- 2008-02-12
rymentalne w za- - 2009-03-31
kresie połaczenia
akceleratora, tarczy spalacyjnej i
podkrytycznego
płaszcza.
22.22.220.7026
22
Cetnar Jerzy
Zagospodarowanie plutonu
i aktynowców
w reaktorach
chłodzonych
gazem.
22.22.220.587
22
Wolny Janusz
Złożone stopy
2006-10-09
metali. Akronim: - 2010-06-30
CMA w ramach
6.PR-Priorytet 3
(NMP).
22.22.220.597
22
Różański Kazimierz
Europejska
2006-11-29
sieć do badań
- 2009-07-31
i obserwacji
atmosferycznego
wodoru.
22.22.220.7008
22
Cetnar Jerzy
Europejski układ
reaktorowy chłodzony ołowiem.
2007-07-25
- 2009-08-31
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
28.28.220.7021
28
Muryn Bogdan
Eksperyment
LHCb w CERN
- uruchomienie detektora
i uczestnictwo
w programie
badawczym.
2008-11-14
- 2010-11-13
2009-01-01
- 2009-08-31
Programy specjalne
100
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
28.28.220.7027
28
Kisielewska
Danuta
Badanie oddzia- 2009-12-15
ływań elektro- 2012-12-14
nów z protonami
w eksperymencie
ZEUS na akceleratorze HERA
w ośrodku DESY
w Hamburgu.
28.28.220.7022
28
Kisielewska
Danuta
Eksperyment ATLAS - rejestracja
i analiza danych
oraz utrzymanie
i rozwój detektorów.
28.28.220.7012
28
Chwiej Joanna
Zaangażowanie
2008-01-02
metali ślado- 2010-12-04
wych w proces
epileptogenezy.
Badania przebiegu zmian neurodegeneracyjnych
i możliwości
zastosowania
czynników neuroprotekcyjnych.
28.28.220.7013
28
Toboła Janusz
Obliczenia
2007-10-30
ab initio dla
- 2010-09-30
materiałów
funkcjonalnych,
kryształow, układów nieuporządkowanych, międzypowierzchni
i powierzchni:
własności elektronowe, fononowe, magnetyczne
i termoelektryczne.
28.28.220.7016
28
Korecki Józef
Epitaksjalne
nanostruktury
metal/tlenek
dla zastosowań
magnetycznych
i katalitycznych.
101
Czas trwania
2009-01-02
- 2009-12-31
2008-03-31
- 2010-09-30
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
28.28.220.7004
28
SzczerbowskaBoruchowska
Magdalena
Promieniowanie 2007-05-16
synchrotronowe - 2010-05-15
w badaniach
akumulacji
i środowiska chemicznego żelaza
w strukturach
tkanki mózgu
w wybranych
schorzeniach
ośrodkowego
układu nerwowego człowieka.
28.28.220.596
28
Kisielewska
Danuta
Badanie oddzia- 2006-11-23
ływań elektro- 2009-11-22
nów z protonami
w eksperymencie
ZEUS na akceleratorze HERA
w ośrodku DESY
w Hamburgu.
28.28.220.7006
28
Wachniew
Przemysław
Dynamiczna
odpowiedż
lodowców Svalbardu na zmiany
klimatu i jej
skutki środowiskowe.
2007-06-08
- 2010-04-07
ISD
Zleceniodawca
Temat
Okres trwania
28.28.220.2001
Janusz Adamowski
Interdyscyplinarne Studia
Doktoranckie
Zaawansowane materiały dla
nowoczesnych technologii
i Energetyki Przyszłości
1.01.2009-31.12.2015
102
Projekty Fundacji Nauki Polskiej
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
72.72.220.8009
72
Korecki Józef
Funkcjonalne
2009-03-01
nanostruktury
- 2013-02-28
dla zastosowań
magnetycznych
i katalitycznych
wytwarzane na
drodze projektowania w skali
atomowej i molekularnej.
72.72.220.8003
72
Szafran Bartłomiej
Cracow interdisciplinary
PhD-project in
nanoscience and
advanced nanostructure
103
Czas trwania
2008-10-01
- 2013-09-10
Projekty zamawiane
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
1.19.220.598
1
Krzysztof
Kułakowski
Zastosowanie
genomiki funkcjonalnej, proteomiki i informatyki do opisu
molekularnych
mechanizmów
działania leków
przeciwdepresyjnych.
2006-12-11
- 2010-05-20
19.19.220.600
19
Schneider
Krystyna
Nanomateriały
magnetyczne
dla zastosowań
biomedycznych.
(POSTDOC)
2006-11-29
- 2009-11-28
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
1.19.220.612
1
Różański
Kazimierz
Inżynieria procesów ogranicznia emisji oraz
utylizacji gazów
szkodliwych
i cieplarnianych.
Projekt zamawiany - Konsorcjum
2007-04-03
- 2010-04-02
Konsorcjum
104
Projekt rozwojowy
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
1.17.220.621
1
Lankosz Marek
Analiza pier2007-04-27
wiastkowa
- 2009-09-30
różnych frakcji
pyłu zawieszonego (PM10/PM2,5)
z zastosowaniem
rentgenowskiej
analizy fluorescencyjnej. Projekt rozwojowy
Zlecenia z placówek naukowych
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
1.1.220.693
1
Duliński Marek
Wykonanie ozna- 2009-10-02
czeń laboratoryj- - 2010-12-31
nych izotopów
stabilnych tlenu
i wodoru oraz
trytu w próbkach
wód podziemnych.
1.1.220.695
1
Duliński Marek
Wykonanie bazy
danych zawierającej informacje
z lat 1970-2009.
105
Czas trwania
2009-11-03
- 2009-12-30
Zlecenia z przemysłu
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
5.5.220.667
5
Duliński Marek
Badanie stężenia 2008-11-20
trytu w próbach - 2009-01-30
solanek z komory
M09 oraz wody
ze zbiornika
wody przemysłowej - jeziornej
5.5.220.692
5
Duliński Marek
Badanie składu
izotopowego
wodoru i tlenu
oraz stężenia trytu w solankach
z wycieków
w Kopalni Soli
Wieliczka pobranych w 2009 r.
2009-11-02
- 2009-12-23
5.5.220.683
5
Jodłowski Paweł
Badanie promieniotwórczości
naturalnej
popiołów z Kotłowni Wydziału
Siłownia.
2009-04-01
- 2009-12-31
5.5.220.684
5
Jodłowski Paweł
Badanie promieniotwórczości
naturalnej
próbek żużla
granulowanego
i pyłu wielkopiecowego.
2009-09-01
– 2009-12-31
5.5.220.667
5
Duliński Marek
Badanie stężenia 2008-11-20
trytu w próbach - 2009-01-30
solanek z komory
M09 oraz wody
ze zbiornika
wody przemysłowej - jeziornej.
106
Czas trwania
Zlecenia z instytucji zagranicznych (export)
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
13.13.220.649
13
Różański
Kazimierz
Przeprowadzenie 2008-05-26
instalacji syste- 2009-02-28
mu wzbogacania
elektrolitycznego
trytu dostarczonego do
partnera zgodnie
z zamówieniem
LEB8004-94174N.
Przeszkolenie
personelu.
13.13.220.669
13
Różański
Kazimierz
Wykonanie
badań składu
izptopowego
próbek wód
podziemnych.
2009-01-02
- 2009-03-30
13.13.220.673
13
Różański
Kazimierz
Wykonanie
i przetestowanie
kompletnego
systemu elektrolitycznego
wzbogacania
próbek wody
do pomiarów
niskich stężeń
trytu.
2009-03-10
- 2009-10-30
13.13.220.670
13
Różański
Kazimierz
Wykonanie
badań składu
izotopowego
próbek wód
podziemnych.
2009-01-02
- 2009-03-30
13.13.220.679
13
Lankosz Marek
Opracowanie
metody oznaczania złota
w krzemianach.
2009-06-02
- 2009-06-30
13.13.220.682
13
Różańsk
Kazimierz
Wykonanie
badań składu
izotopowego
próbek wód
podziemnych.
2009-09-01
- 2009-11-30
107
Czas trwania
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
13.13.220.678
13
Stęgowski
Zdzisław
Przeprowadzenie 2009-04-30
szkolenia dla
- 2011-09-30
stypendysty Międzynarodowej
Agencji Energii
Atomowej
w Wiedniu.
13.13.220.635
13
Dąbrowski
Władysław
Opracowanie
2008-01-15
jednowymiaro- 2010-03-31
wego detektora
do dyfrakcji
promieni X
z polepszoną
rozdzielczością
energetyczną
w oparciu o technologię krzemowych detektorów
mikropaskowych.
13.13.220.619
13
Kulka Jan
Odbiór techniczny oprzyrządowania i sterowania układu
kriogenicznego
w tunelu wielkiego zderzacza
cząstek LHC.
2007-06-22
- 2010-06-30
13.13.220.640
13
Kulka Jan
Inwentaryzacja
systemów chłodzenia i wentylacji akceleratorów
w CERN Genewa.
2008-01-02
- 2010-06-30
13.13.220.557
13
Kulka Jan
Uruchomienie
akceleratora LHC
w zakresie jego
zabezpieczenia
na wypadek
utraty stanu nadprzewodnictwai
uruchomienie
systemu ekstrakcji energii w nim
zgromadzonej.
2006-01-02
- 2010-06-30
108
Czas trwania
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
13.13.220.680
13
Różański
Kazimierz
Instalacja elek2009-07-01
trolitycznego sy- - 2010-03-31
stemu wzbogacania prób wody
do pomiarów
niskich aktywności trytu oraz
przeprowadzenie
szkolenia personelu.
13.13.220.649
13
Różański
Kazimierz
Przeprowadzenie 2008-05-26
instalacji syste- 2009-02-28
mu wzbogacania
elektrolitycznego
trytu dostarczonego do
partnera zgodnie
z zamówieniem
LEB8004-94174N.
Przeszkolenie
personelu.
13.13.220.669
13
Różański
Kazimierz
Wykonanie
badań składu
izptopowego
próbek wód
podziemnych.
109
Czas trwania
2009-01-02
- 2009-03-30
Zlecenia z innych wydziałów
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
14.18.220.686
14
Różański
Kazimierz
Wykonanie 14-tu
oznaczeń trytu
w próbkach
wody wraz
z interpretacją
wyników.
2009-09-28
- 2009-11-15
14.14.220.694
14
Różański
Kazimierz
Wykonanie 30-tu
oznaczeń składu
izotopowego
azotu i tlenu
w azotanach
z prób wód
podziemnych
wraz z interpretacją wyników
pomiarów.
2009-12-15
- 2010-03-15
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
1.78.220.661
1
Korecki Józef
Nanostruktury
magnetyczne
do zastosowania
w elektronice
spinowej
2008-09-01
- 2009-03-01
6.78.220.662
6
Adamowski
Janusz
Badanie
2008-09-01
własności
- 2009-06-30
elektronowych
nanoprzyrządów
półprzewodnikowych stosowanych do przetwarzania informacji
kwantowej.
Sieci naukowe
110
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
Czas trwania
11.78.220.656
11
Burda Kvetoslava
Molekularne
2008-06-15
mechanizmy
- 2009-03-31
oddziaływań
w nanoukładach
biologicznych
oraz w układach
aktywnych
biologicznie
modyfikowanych
nanocząstkami
BIONAN
Zlecenia ze szkół wyższych
Nr umowy
Typ
Kierownik
Temat
6.6.220.681
6
Wachniew
Przemysław
Datowanie
2009-07-10
izotopem ołowiu - 2009-09-15
Pb210 20 próbek
torfu z Puścizny
małej oraz Puścizny krauszowskiej.
111
Czas trwania
112
Publications
Books and book chapters
Books published abroad
1. S. TABAKOC, P. SPRAWLS, (…), M. RADWAŃSKA, (...), Z. MATUSZAK, A. JUNG, K. MATUSIAK, (...)
EMITEL e-Encyclopedia of medical physics and multilingual dictionary of terms
[Dokument elektroniczny].
[London] : EMITEL Consorcium, 2008. — Tryb dostępu: www.emitel2.eu
Book chapters published abroad
1. P.A. MANDÒ, W.J. PRZYBYŁOWICZ
Particle-induced X-ray Emission (PIXE).
in: Encyclopedia of analytical chemistry/(eds.). R.A. Meyers— Wiley & Sons, 2009,
[46 s.] www.mrw.interscience,wiley.com
2. J. TOBOŁA
Calculations of electronic structure and electron transport properties in complex multi-atom thermoelectric systems.
in: Conversion d’energie par effects thermoelectrique : theorie, materiaux et applications/ ed. par
S. Hebert, B. Lenoir et C. Simon.
Nancy: l’Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Nancy, 2009, s. 29-41
Books published in Poland
1. A. BERNASIK
Spektrometria mas jonów wtórnych w badaniach morfologii cienkich warstw mieszanin polimerów.
Kraków: Wydział Fizyki i Informatyki Stosowanej AGH, 2009
2. B. DZIUNIKOWSKI, A. KREFT, A. ZIĘBA; współpr. B. BEDNAREK, G. DOMAŃSKA.
Kronika Wydziału Fizyki i Techniki Jądrowej Akademii Górniczo-Hutniczej 1991- 2000
Kraków: AGH Uczelniane Wydawnictwa Naukowo-Dydaktyczne, 2009.
3. K. JELEŃ, M. CAŁA.
Zarys stanu i perspektyw energetyki polskiej: studium AGH
Kraków : Wydawnictwa AGH, 2009. — 268, [1] s. — (Wydawnictwa Naukowe/Akademia GórniczoHutnicza im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie ; KU 0344).
113
Book chapters published in Poland
1. P. ARMATYS, E. GONDEK, J. NIZIOŁ, M. PODKŁADKO, J. SANETRA, A. DANEL., P. SZLACHCIC
Kopolimery N-winylokarbazolu i 1,3,4-trifenylo-6-winylo-1H-pirazolo[3,4-B] chinolin jako materiały
do budowy komórek elektroluminescencyjnych.
in: Modyfikacja polimerów: stan i perspektywy w roku 2009/ praca zbiorowa pod red. Ryszarda Stellera i Danuty Żuchowskiej
Wrocław: Oficyna Wydawnicza Politechniki Wrocławskiej, 2009. – s. 297-300
2. J. HADUCH, H. FIGIEL, M. PASOWICZ
Obrazowanie magnetyczno-rezonansowe.
in: Podstawy inżynierii biomedycznej T. 1 / pod red. nauk. Ryszarda Tadeusiewicza, Piotra Augustyniaka
Kraków : Wydawnictwa AGH, 2009. — (Wydawnictwa Naukowe/ Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza
im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie; KU 0352). — s. 419–440.
3. E. GONDEK, M. POKLADKO, A. DANEL, J. NIZIOŁ, P. ARMATYS, B. KWIECIEŃ, E. KULIG, J. SANETRA
Efekt fotowoltaiczny na bazie pochodnych pirazolu.
in: Modyfikacja polimerów: stan i perspektywy w roku 2009/ praca zbiorowa pod red. Ryszarda Stellera i Danuty Żuchowskiej
Wrocław: Oficyna Wydawnicza Politechniki Wrocławskiej, 2009. – s. 317-320
4. A. OLEŚ, A. M. KOBOS
Materia lubi symetrię.
in: Po drogach uczonych: z członkami Polskiej Akademii Umiejętności rozmawia Andrzej M. Kobos
Kraków: Wydaw. PAU, 2009, T.4, s. 339-360
5. M. TABEDZKI, M. RYBNIK, K. SAAED
New results for view-based feature extraction method for handwritten worlds recognition without
segmentation.
in: Image processing & communications challenges/ Eds. Ryszard S. Choraś, Antoni Zabłudowski
Warszawa: Academy Publishing EXIT, 2009, S. 193-200
6. A. BŁACHOWSKI, K. RUEBENBAUER, J. ŻUKROWSKI, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, K. WOJCIECHOWSKI, Z. M. STADNIK
Superconducting α-FeSe studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic measurements
in: Problems of modern techniques in engineering and education 2009 / eds.: Paweł Kurtyka,
[et al.]
Pedagogical University of Cracow, Institute of Technology. — Cracow : PU, IoT, cop. 2009.
— S. [1–6].
7. M. WASILEWSKA-RADWAŃSKA, K. MATUSIAK
Terapia radioizotopowa, radiochirurgia.
in: Podstawy inżynierii biomedycznej : [podręcznik akademicki], T. 2 / pod red. nauk. Ryszarda Tadeusiewicza, Piotra Augustyniaka.
Kraków: Wydawnictwa AGH, 2009. — (Wydawnictwa Naukowe / Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza
im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie ; KU 0352). — S. 117–124.
8. K. BURDA
Modelowanie organizmów żywych.
in: Podstawy inżynierii biomedycznej : [podręcznik akademicki], T. 2 / pod red. nauk. Ryszarda Tadeusiewicza, Piotra Augustyniaka.
Kraków: Wydawnictwa AGH, 2009. — (Wydawnictwa Naukowe / Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza
im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie ; KU 0352). —S. 289–300.
114
9. K. JELEŃ, J. NIEWODNICZAŃSKI, S. TACZANOWSKI
Energetyka jądrowa.
in: Zarys stanu i perspektyw energetyki polskiej : studium AGH / red. nauk. Kazimierz Jeleń,
Marek Cała
Kraków: Wydawnictwo AGH, 2009. - S. 145–163.
10. M. WASILEWSKA-RADWAŃSKA
Obrazowanie radioizotopowe – medycyna nuklearna.
in: Podstawy inżynierii biomedycznej : [podręcznik akademicki], T. 1
/ pod red. nauk. Ryszarda Tadeusiewicza, Piotra Augustyniaka.
Kraków: Wydawnictwa AGH, 2009. — (Wydawnictwa Naukowe / Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza
im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie ; KU 0352). — S. 447–456.
Thomson Reuters’ Master Journal List
Artykuły w czasopismach z Listy Filadelfijskiej
1. F.D. AARON, (...), L. ADAMCZYK, (…), T. BOŁD, (...), I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, (...), D. KISIELEWSKA, (...),
J. ŁUKASIK, (...), M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, (...), L. SUSZYCKI, (...) J. SZUBA, (...)
Multi-leptons with high transverse momentum at HERA. : the H1 and ZEUS collaboration.
Journal of High Energy Physics JHEP 10 (2009) 013, 1-17
2. E. ABAT, [ET AL.], T. Z. KOWALSKI, [ET AL.]
Study of the response of the ATLAS central calorimeter to pions of energies from 3 to 9 GeV.
Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators,
spectrometers, detectors and associated equipment (Print) 607 (2009), 372–386
3. G. ABBIENDI, [ET AL.], M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, [ET AL.]
-antihyperon correlations in Z0 decay and investigation of the baryon production mechanism European Physical Journal. C 64 (2009), 609–625
4. J. ABDALLAH, (…), B. MURYN, (…), A. OBŁĄKOWSKA-MUCHA, (…), T. SZUMLAK, (...)
A study of production in collisions at = 130-207 GeV.
European Physical Journal C 60 (2009), 1-15
5. J. ABDALLAH, (…), B. MURYN, (…), A. OBŁĄKOWSKA-MUCHA, (…), T. SZUMLAK, (...)
Correlations between polarization states of particles in the reactions at LEP2 energies 189-209 GeV.
European Physical Journal C 63 (2009), 611-623
6. J. ABDALLAH, (…), B. MURYN, (…), A. OBŁĄKOWSKA-MUCHA, (…), T. SZUMLAK, (...)
Inclusice single-particle production in two-photn collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector.
Physics Letters B 678 (2009), 444-449
7. J. ABDALLAH, (…), B. MURYN, (…), A. OBŁĄKOWSKA-MUCHA, (…), T. SZUMLAK, (...)
Search for one large extra dimension with the DELPHI detector at LEP.
European Physical Journal C 60 (2009), 17-23
115
8. K. AL.-QADI, P. WANG, Z.M. STADNIK, J. PRZEWOŹNIK
Structural, magnetic, and Mössbauer spectral study of the icosahedral quasicrystal
Zn77Fe7Se16 .
Physical Review B 79 (2009), 224202-1-15
9. A. BACZMAŃSKI, N. HFAIEDH, M. FRANÇOIS, K. WIERZBANOWSKI
Plastic incompatibility stresses and stored elastic energy in plastically deformed copper.
Materials Science and Engineering A 501 (2009), 153-165
10. S. BEDNAREK, B. SZAFRAN
Gated combo nanodevice for sequential operations on single electron spin.
Nanotechnology 20 (2009), 065402-1-5
11. C.M. BJÖRSTRÖM SVANSTRÖM, J. RYSZ, A. BERNASIK, A. BUDKOWSKI, FENLING ZHANG,
O. INGANÄS, M. R. ANDERSSON, K. O. MAGNUSSON, J.J. BENSON-SMITH, J. NELSON, E. MOONS
Device performace of APFO-3/PCBM solar cells with controlled morphology.
Advanced Materials 21 (2009), 1-6 4398
12. A. BŁACHOWSKI, K. RUEBENBAUER, J. ŻUKROWSKI
Spin- and charge density around Rh impurity in α-Fe studied by 57Fe
Mössbauer spectroscopy.
Journal of Alloys and Compounds 477 (2009), 4-7
13. A. BŁACHOWSKI, K. RUEBENBAUER, J. ŻUKROWSKI, J. PRZEWOŹNIK
Spin and charge density on iron nuclei in the BCC Fe-Mo alloys studied by 57Fe
Mössbauer spectroscopy.
Journal of Alloys and Compounds 482 (2009), 23-27
14. W. BODNAR, M. SZKLARSKA-ŁUKASIK, P. STOCH, P. ZACHARIASZ, J. PSZCZOŁA, J. SUWALSKI
Hyperfine interactions in Tb0.27Dy0.73(Fe1-xCox)2 compounds at 77 K.
Nukleonika 54 (2009), 4, 227-232
15. M. BOGOVAC, M. JAKŠIĆ, D. WĘGRZYNEK, A. MARKOWICZ
Digital pulse processor for ion beam microprobe imaging.
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 267 (2009), 2073-2076
16. M. BOGOVAC, M. JAKŠIĆ, D. WĘGRZYNEK, A. MARKOWICZ
Digital pulse processor for ion beam microprobe tomography.
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 608 (2009), 157-162
17. M. BRANCEWICZ, A. ANDREJCZUK, Y. SAKURAI, M. ITOU, L. DOBRZYŃSKI, E. ŻUKOWSKI,
S. KAPRZYK
Electron momentum density od hexagonal magnesium studied by high-resolutiom
Compton scattering.
Radiation Physics and Chemistry 78 (2009), S137-S139
18. A. BUDKOWSKI, A. BERNASIK, E. MOONS, M. LEKKA, J. ZEMŁA, J. JACZEWSKA, J. HABERKO,
J. RACZKOWSKA, J. RYSZ, K. AWSIUK
Structures in multiccomponent polymer films: their formation, observation and applications in
electronics and biotechnology.
Acta Physica Polonica A 115 (2009), 2, 435-440
116
19. C. CANDOLFI, B. LENOIR, A. DAUSCHER, E. GUILMEAU, J. HEJTMANEK, J. TOBOŁA,
B. WIENDLOCHA, S. KAPRZYK
Transport propertirs of the Mo3Sb7 compound.
Physical Review B 79 (2009), 035114-1-5
20. C. CANDOLFI, B. LENOIR, A. DAUSCHER, J. HEJTMANEK, J. TOBOŁA
Electronic band structure, transport, and magnetic properties of Mo3-xRuxSb7 .
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 155127-1-10
21. C. CANDOLFI, B. LENOIR, A. DAUSCHER, J. HEJTMANEK, J. TOBOŁA
Low-temperature galvanomagnetic, magnetic, and thermoelectric properties of Mo3Sb7-xTex
(x = 0.0, 0.3, 1.0, 1.6, and 1.8).
Physical Review B 79 (2009), 235108-1-12
22. C. CANDOLFI, B. LENOIR, J. LESZCZYNSKI, A. DAUSCHER, J. TOBOŁA, S.J. CLARKE, R.I. SMITH
Neutron diffraction, electronic band structure, and electrical resistivity of Mo3-xRuxSb7 .
Inorganic Chemistry 48 (2009), 5216-5223
23. R. CAPUTO, A. TEKIN, W. SIKORA, A. ZÜTTEL
First-principles determination of the ground-state structure of Mg(BH4)2.
Chemical Physics Letters 480 (2009), 203-209
24. C.J. CARUANA, M. WASILEWSKA-RADWAŃSKA, A. AURENGO, P.P. DENDY,V. KARENAUSKAITE,
M.R. MALISAN, J.H. MEIJER, V. MORNSTEIN, E. ROKITA, E. VANO, M. WUCHERER
The role of the biomedical physicist in the education of the healthcare professions an EFOMP
project.
Physica Medica 25 (2009), 133-140
25. A. CHAVES, G.A. FARIAS, F.M. PEETERS, B. SZAFRAN
Wave packet dynamics in semiconductor quantum rings of finite width.
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 125331-1-14
26. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Deep inelastic scattering with leading protons or large rapidity gaps at HERA.
Nuclear Physics B 816 (2009), 1-61
27. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Measurement of beauty production from dimuon events at HERA.
Journal of High Energy Physics JHEP 02 (2009) 032
28. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Measurement of charged current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised electron beam at HERA.
European Physical Journal C 61 (2009) 223-235
29. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Measurement of high- neutral current deep inelastic scattering cross sections with a longitudinally
polarized electron beam at HERA.
European Physical Journal C 62 (2009), 625-658
117
30. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Measurement of the charm fragmentation function in photoproduction at HERA.
Journal of High Energy Physics JHEP 04 082 (2009), 1-15
31. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
A measurement of the Q2, W , and t dependences of deeply virtual Compton scattering at HERA.
Journal of High Energy Physics JHEP 05 108 (2009), 1-25
32. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Production of excited charm and charm-strange mesons at HERA.
European Physical Journal C 60 (2009) , 25-45
33. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Search for events with an isolated lepton and missing transverse momentum and a measurement
of production at HERA.
Physics Letters B 672 (2009), 106-115
34. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...) J. SZUBA, (...)
Exclusive photoproduction of mesons at HERA.
Physics Letters B 680, (2009), 4-12
35. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Leading proton production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA
The Journal of High Energy Physics (Online) 06 (2009) 074-1-64
36. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Measurement of helicity distributions in inelastic photoproduction at HERA.
The Journal of High Energy Physics 12 (2009), 007, s. 1-23
37. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA
Physics Letters B 682 (2009), 8-22
38. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Measurement of and production in deep inelastic scattering using a lifetime tag at HERA.
European Physical Journal C 63 (2009), 171-188
39. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Multi-lepton production at high transverse at HERA.
Physics Letters B 680 (2009), 13-23
118
40. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Scaled momentum distributions of charged particles in photoproduction at HERA.
Journal of High Energy Physics JHEP 08 (2009) 77, 1-28
41. S. CHEKANOV, (…), L. ADAMCZYK, T. BOŁD, I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, D. KISIELEWSKA, J. ŁUKASIK,
M. PRZYBYCIEŃ, L. SUSZYCKI, (...), J. SZUBA, (...)
Subject distributions in deep inelastic scattering at HERA.
European Physical Journal C 63 (2009), 527-548
42. A. CHIZHIK, ZHUKOV , J.M. BLANCO, J. GONZALEZ, P. GAWROŃSKI
Experimental determination of limit angle of helical anisotropy in amorphous magnetic microwires.
Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 321 (2009), 803-805
43. W.M. CHMURA, K. RÓŻAŃSKI, T. KUC, Z. GORCZYCA
Comparison of two methods for the determination of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes composition
of dissolved nitrates.
Nukleonika 54 (2009), 1, 17-23
44. T. CHWIEJ, B. SZAFRAN
Pinning of electron densities in quantum rings by defects: symmetry constraints and distribution of
persistent currents.
Physical Review B 79 (2009), 085305-1-14
45. K. CIBA., P. MORAWSKI, B. MURYN, A. OBŁĄKOWSKA-MUCHA, K. SENDEROWSKA, G. POLOK,
M. WITEK
Prospect of the γ CKM angle determination from (1260) decay process.
Acta Physica Polonica B 40 (2009), 1673-1684
46. J. CIEŚLAK, B.F.O. COSTA, S.M. DUBIEL, D. FRUCHART, N.E. SKRYABINA
Hydrogen effect on the sigma-phase in Fe53.8Cr46.2
Journal of Alloys and Compounds 467 (2009), 182-186
47. J. CIEŚLAK, B.F.O. COSTA, S.M. DUBIEL, M. REISSNER, W. STEINER
Magnetic ordering above room temperature in the sigma-phase of Fe66V34.
Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 321 (2009), 2160-2165
48. S. COUET, TH. DIEDERICH, S. STANKOV, K. SCHLAGE, T. ŚLĘZAK, R. RÜFFER, J. KORECKI,
R. RÖHLSBERG
Probing the magnetic state of Fe/FeO/Fe trilayers by multiple isotopic sensor laers.
Applied Physics Letters 94 (2009), 162501-1-3
49. M. CZYŻYCKI, M. BIELEWSKI, M. LANKOSZ
Quantitative elemental analysis of induvidual particles with the use of micro-beam X-ray fluorescence method and Monte Carlo simulation.
X-Ray Spectrometry 38 (2009), 487-491
50. R. DENECKE, J. KORECKI, E. PINČIK, P. JELINEK, K. MALARZ
Solid state surfaces and interfaces.
Central European Journal of Physics 7 (2009), 2, 207-208
119
51. S.M. DUBIEL
Relationship between the magnetic hyperfine field and the magnetic moment.
Journal od Alloys and Compounds 488 (2009), 18-22
52. S.M. DUBIEL
Sigma phase—one of the main reasons for deterioration of stainless steels properties.
Hyperfine Interact 189 (2009), 53-61
53. A. DYDEJCZYK, K. KUŁAKOWSKI, M. RYBAK
The norm game – how a norm fails.
Lecture Notes in Computer Science 5545, (2009), II, 835-844
54. J. FIEDOR, M. PILCH, L. DIEDOR
Tuning the thermodynamics of association of transmembrane helices.
Journal of Physical Chemistry B 113 (2009), 12831-12838
55. P. GAWROŃSKI, A. CHIZHIK, J. GONZALEZ
From the magnetization profile to the stray field of bistable wires.
Physica B 404 (2009) 1477-1480
56. P. GAWROŃSKI, A. CHIZHIK, J. GONZALEZ
Influence of external tensile stress on the stray field of bistable Fe-rich wires.
Physica Status Solidi A 206 (2009), 4, 630-634
57. E. GONDEK, A. DANEL, I.V. KITYK, J. SANETRA, J. NIZIOŁ
Spectral features and parameters of some 1-pyrazolo[3,4-]quinoxaline derivative dye chromophores.
Spectroscopy Letters 42 (2009) 136-141
58. Ł. GONDEK, J. CZUB, A. SZYTUŁA, Z. IZAOLA, E. KEMMER
Crystal field in RpdIn (R = Ce, Pr, Nd) compounds.
Solid State Communications 149 (2009), 1596-1599
59. Ł. GONDEK, D. KACZOROWSKI, A. SZYTUŁA
On the low-temperature properties of TmRu2Si2 .
Solid State Communications 149 (2009), 2181-2184
60. S. GOVENDER, W. PRZYBYŁOWICZ, P. SWART
Removal of heavy metals from solution using biocompatible polymers.
Desalination and Water Treatment 9 (2009), 272-278
61. B. GRZYBOWSKA, M. RUSZEL, K. SAMSON, R. GRABOWSKI, N. SPIRIDIS, K. FREINDL, J. KORECKI
Au/Fe3O4 and Au/Fe2O3 catalysts: physicochemical properties and oxidation of CO and propane.
Polish Journal of Chemistry 83 (2009), 2129-2136
62. M. HASIK, W. TUREK, A. NYCZYK, E. STOCHMAL, A. BERNASIK, A. SNIECHOTA, A. SOŁTYSEK
Application of conjugated polymer-platinum group metal composites as heterogeneous catalysts.
Catalysis Letters 127 (2009), 304-311
63. M. IDZIK, SZ. KULIS, D. PRZYBOROWSKI
Development of front-end electronics for the luminosity detector at ILC.
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 608 (2009), 169-174
120
64. J. JACZEWSKA, A. BUDKOWSKI, A. BERNASIK, I. RAPTIS, E. MOONS, D. GOUSTOURIDIS,
J. HABERKO, J. RYSZ
Ordering domains of spin cast blends of conjugated and dielectric polymers on surfaces patterned
by soft- and photo-lithography.
Soft Matter 5 (2009), 234-241
65. C.M. JAWORSKI, J. TOBOŁA, E.M. LEVIN, K. SCHMIDT-ROHR, J.P. HERENANS
Antimony as an amphoteric dopant in lead telluride.
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 125208-1-10
66. J. KACZMARCZYK, J. SPAŁEK
Superconductivity in an almost localized Fermi liquid of quasiparticles with spin-dependent masses
and effectice-field induced by electron correlations.
Physical Review B 79 (2009) 214519-1-15
67. R. KALINA, B. SZAFRAN, S. BEDNAREK, F.M. PEETERS
Magnetic-field asymmetry of electron wave packet transmission in bent channels capacitivity coupled to a metal gate.
Physical Review Letters 102 (2009), 066807-1-4
68. M. KĄC, J. ŻUKROWSKI, M. TOULEMONDE, R. KRUK, V. TOKMAN, A. POLIT, Y. ZABILA,
A. DOBROWOLSKA, O. SYNASHENKO, M. MARSZAŁEK
Swift iodine ion modification of the structural and magnetotransport propeties of Fe/Cr systems.
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 267 (2009), 925-930
69. S. KEBEDE, Y. TRAVI, K. RÓŻAŃSKI
The 18O and 2H environment of Ethiopian lakes.
Journal of Hydrology 365 (2009), 173-182
70. N.-T.H. KIM-NGAN, A.G. BALOGH, J.D. MEYER, J. BRÖTZ, S. HUMMELT, M. ZAJĄC, T. ŚLĘZAK,
J. KORECKI
Thermal and irradiation induced interdiffusion in Fe3O4/MgO(001) thin film.
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 267 (2009), 1484-1488
71. N.-T.H. KIM-NGAN, A.G. BALOGH, J.D. MEYER, J. BRÖTZ, M. ZAJĄC, T. ŚLĘZAK, J. KORECKI
Thermal and irradiation induced interdiffusion in magnetite thin films grown on magnesium oxide
(001) substrates.
Surface Science 603 (2009), 1175-1181
72. E. KOŚCIEŃ, E. GONDEK, B. JAROSZ, A. DANEL. J. NIZIOŁ, A.V. KITYK
Photoluminescence of 1-phenyl,3-methyl pyrazoloquinoline derivatives.
Spectrochimica Acta Part A 72 (2009), 582-590
73. G. KRÓL, W. TABIŚ, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, T. KOŁODZIEJ, Z. KĄKOL, A. KOZŁOWSKI, Z. TARNAWSKI
Magnetoresistance in magnetite: switching of the magnetic easy axis.
Journal od Alloys and Compounds 480 (2009), 128-130
74. M. KRUPIŃSKI, M. KĄC, A. POLIT, Y. ZABILA, D. A. ZAJĄC, M. MARSZAŁEK, CZ. KAPUSTA,
A. DOBROWOLSKA
XAFS studies of the behaviour of Bi in Co/Cu multilayers
Acta Physica Polonica A 115 (2009), 2, 565-567
121
75. K. KUŁAKOWSKI
Opinion polarization in the Receipt-Accept-Sample model.
Physica A 388 (2009), 469-476
76. K. KUŁAKOWSKI, P. GAWROŃSKI
To cooperate or to defect? Altruism and reputation.
Physica A 388 (2009), 3581-3584
77. A. KWAŚNIOWSKI, J. ADAMOWSKI
Tuning the excharge interaction by an electric field in laterally coupled quantum dots.
Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 21 (2009), 235601-1-12
78. J. LI, M. PRZYBYLSKI, F. YILDIZ, X.-D. MA, Y.Z. WU
Oscillatory magnetic anisotropy originating from quantum well states in Fe films.
Physical Review Letters 102 (2009), 207206-1-4
79. K. ŁĄTKA, J. GURGUL, A.W. PACYNA, V. VERBOVYTSKY, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, C.P. SEBASTIAN,
R. PÖTTGEN
Bulk and local properties of DyRhSn.
Journal of Alloys and Compounds 480 (2009), 81-83
80. W. ŁUŻNY
Soft matter physics and its creator – Pierre-Gilles De Gennes (1932-2007) in memoriam.
Fibres & Textiles in Eastern Europe B 16 (2008), 6, 104-105
81. M.S. MAGDOŃ-MAKSYMOWICZ, A.Z. MAKSYMOWICZ
Numerical solution of the Penna model of biological aging with age-modified mutation rate.
Physical Review E 79 (2009), 061919-1-6
82. A. MAŃKA-KRASOŃ, K. KUŁAKOWSKI
Magnetism of frustrated regular networks.
Acta Physica Polonica B 40 (2009), 5, 1455-1461
83. K. MARS, H. IHOU-MOUKO, G. PONT, J. TOBOŁA, H. SCHERRER
Thermoelectric properties and electronic structure of Bi- and Ag-doped Mg2Si1-xGex compounds.
Journal of Electronic Materials 38 (2009), 7, 1360-1364
84. J. MESJASZ-PRZYBYŁOWICZ, A. BARNABAS, W. PRZYBYŁOWICZ
Root ultrastructure of Senecio coronatus genotypes differing in Ni uptake.
Northeastern Naturalist 16 (2009), (special Issue 5) 351-365
85. J.M. NĘCKI, M. HELIASZ, J. ROSIEK, M. PYCIA, K. RÓŻAŃSKI, L. ŚLIWKA, J. BARTYZEL
Detection of amtmospheric hydrogen using ECD detector doped with N2O.
Chemia Analityczna 54 (2009), 705-716
86. NGUYEN DINH CHAU, B. MICHALEC
Natural radioactivity in bottled natural spring, mineral and therapeutic waters in Poland.
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry 279 (2009), 1, 121-129
87. J. NIZIOŁ, W. BARAN, E. GONDEK, I.V. KITYK, A. MENDYS, M. ŻYLEWSKI, ALI H. RESHAK
Synthesis an NLO properties of new chromophores based on imidazo[1,2- a]pyridine.
Chemical Engineering Communications 196 (2009), 1366-1374
122
88. J. NIZIOŁ, Z. ESSAÏDI, M. BEDNARZ, B. SAHRAOUI
Thermal stability of blends containing azo-carbazole derivatives and epoxy resin, designed for nonlinear optical applications.
Optical Materials 31 (2009), 501-504
89. U. NOSECK, K. RÓŻAŃSKI, M. DULIŃSKI, V. HAVLOVA, O. SRACEK, T. BRASSER, M. HERCIK,
G. BUCKAU
Carbon chemistry and groundwater dynamics at natural analogue site Ruprechtov,
Czech Republic: insights from environmental isotopes.
Applied Geochemistry 24 (2009), 1765-1776
90. M.P. NOWAK, B. SZAFRAN
Spin-coupling effects in two-dimensional circular quantum rings: elliptical deformation of confined
electron density.
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 195319
91. D. PINKOWICZ, R. PODGAJNY, R. PEŁKA, W. NITEK, M. BAŁANDA, M. MAKAREWICZ, M. CZAPLA,
J. ŻUKROWSKI, CZ. KAPUSTA, D. ZAJĄC, B. SIEKLUCKA
Iron(II)-octacyanonionate(IV) ferromagnet with 43 K.
Dalton Transactions (2009), 7771-7777
92. M. POKLADKO, E. GONDEK, J. SANTRA, J. NIZIOŁ, A. DANEL, I.V. KITYK, ALI H. RESHAK
Spectral emission properties of 4-aryloxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1-pyrazolo[3,4- ]quinolines.
Spectrochimica Acta Part A 73 (2009), 281-285
93. F. PRINO, (...), M. IDZIK, (…)
Azimuthal anisotropy relative to the reaction plane in {Pb-Pb} collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon.
European Physical Journal C 61 (2009), 853-858
94. F. ROELOFSE, L.D. ASHWAL, C.A. NINAEDA-VARGAS, W.J. PRZYBYŁOWICZ
Enigmatic textures developed along plagioclase-augite grain boundaries at the base of the Main
Zone, Northern Limb, Bushveld Complex – evidence for late stage melt infiltration into a nearly solidified crystal mush.
South African Journal of Geology 112 (2009), 39-46
95. D. RYBICKI, J. HAASE, M. GREVEN, G. YU, Y. LI, Y CHO, X. ZHAO
Spatial inhomogeneities in single-crystal HgBa2CuO4+δ from 63Cu NMR spin and quadrupole shifts.
Journal of Supeconductivity and Novel Magnetism 22 (2009), 179-183
96. A. SAAD, J. KASIUK, J. FEDOTOVA, E. SZILAGYI, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, CZ. KAPUSTA, M. MARSZAŁEK
Hydrogenation of FeCoZr-Al2O3 nanocomposites studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetometry.
Hyperfine Interact 189 (2009), 111-117
97. L. SAMEK
Chemical characterization of selected metals by X-ray fluorescence method in particulate matter
collected in the area of Krakow, Poland.
Microchemical Journal 92 (2009), 140-144
98. C. SEKIRNJAK, C. HULSE, L.H. JEPSON, P. HOTTOWY, A. SHER,
W. DĄBROWSKI, A.M. LITKE, E.J. CHICHILNISKY
Loss of responses to cisual but not electrical stimulation in ganglion cells of rats with severe photoreceptor degeneration.
Journal of Neurophysiology 102 (2009), 3260-3269
123
99. N.B. SELVARAJ, D. CHAPELLE, D. PERREUX, H. FIGIEL
Modelling the evolution of temperature inside LaNi4.78Sn0.22 storage tank during refueling.
Materials and Design 30 (2009), 954-957
100. P. SEREMAK-PECZKIS, K. SCHNEIDER, W. ZAJĄCZKOWSKI, CZ. KAPUSTA, D. A. ZAJĄC,
P. PASIERB, M. BUĆKO, E. DRÓŻDŻ-CIEŚLA, M. RĘKAS
XAFS study of BaCe1-xTixO3 and Ba1-yCe1-xYxO3 protonic solid electrolytes
Radiation Physics and Chemistry 78 (2009), S86-S88
101. M. SIKORA, O. MALTHON, P. VAN DER LINDEN, J. M. MICHALIK, J. M. DE TERESA, CZ. KAPUSTA,
S. PASCARELLI
Field-induced magnetostructural phase transirion in double perovskite Ca2FeReO6 studied via x-ray
magnetis circular dichroism.
Physical Review B 79 (2009), 220402
102. A. SKOCZEŃ, A. SKAŁA
Testy zabezpieczeń przed skutkami quenchu w nadprzewodzących obwodach LHC.
Przegląd Elektrotechniczny 85 (2009), 7, 73-77
103. A. SKOCZEŃ, A. SKAŁA
Zabezpieczenia nadprzewodzących elementów LHC przed skutkami utraty stanu nadprzewodzącego.
Przegląd Elektrotechniczny 85 (2009), 7, 65-72
104. J. SPAŁEK, A. KOZŁOWSKI, Z. KĄKOL, Z. TARNAWSKI, Y. FUKAMI, F. ONO, R. ZACH, L.J. SPAŁEK,
J.M. HONIG
Verwey transition in magnetite at high pressre: a new quantum critical point at the onset of metallization.
Physica B 404 (2009), 2894-2897
105. B.J. SPISAK, M. WOŁOSZYN
Nonclassical properties of electronic states of aperiodic chains in a homogeneous electric field.
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 035127
106. B.J. SPISAK, M. WOŁOSZYN, A. PAJA
Spin-dependent transport trough metallic system with magnetic impurities.
Acta Physica Polonica A 155 (2009), 1, 266-268
107. A. STOCH, P. GUZDEK, P. STOCH, J. PSZCZOŁA, J. CHMIST, A. PAŃTA, K. KOGUT
Crystal structure and electrical resistivity studies of Dy(Fe0.4Co0.6-xNix)2 intermetallics
Journal of Alloys and Compounds 467 (2009), 83-87
108. A. STOCH, P. GUZDEK, P. STOCH, J. PSZCZOŁA, J. SUWALSKI
Fe Mössbauer effect studies of Dy(Fe0.7-xNixCo0.3)2 intermetallics.
Journal of Alloys and Compounds 467 (2009), 72-77
57
109. P. STOCH, P. GUZDEK, A. STOCH, J. PSZCZOŁA, J. SUWALSKI
Mössbauer effect studies of Dy(Fe0.4Co0.6-xNix)2 intermetallics.
Journal of Alloys and Compounds 474 (2009), 42-47
110. B. SZAFRAN, M.P. NOWAK, S. BEDNAREK, T. CHWIEJ, F.M. PEETERS
Selective suppression of Dresselhaus or Rashba spin-orbit coupling effects by the Zeeman interaction in quantum dots.
Physical Review B 79 (2009), 235303
124
111. B. SZAFRAN, M.R. PONIEDZIAŁEK
Electron transfer through multiterminal quantum ring : magnetic forces and elastic scattering effects.
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 155334
112. B. SZAFRAN, M.R. PONIEDZIAŁEK, F.M. PEETERS
Violation of Onsager symmetry for a ballistic channel Coulomb coupled to a quantum ring.
Europhysics Letters 87 (2009), 47002
113. M. J. SZCZERBA, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, J. ŻUKROWSKI, CZ. KAPUSTA, M. S. SZCZERBA, B. MAJOR
The influence of high temperature plastic deformation on magnetic properties of Ni2MnGa type
single crystals
Archives of Metallurgy and Materials 54 (2009), 2, 439-447
114. A. SZYTUŁA, D. KACZOROWSKI, Ł. GONDEK, A. ARULRAJ, S. BARAN, B. PENC
Magnetic properties of NdAu2Ge2.
Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 321 (2009), 3402-3405
115. T. ŚLĘZAK, S. STANKOC, M. ZAJĄC, M. ŚLĘZAK, K. MATLAK, N. SPIRIDIS, B. LAENENS,
N. PLANCKAERT, M. RENNHOFER, K. FREINDL, D. WILGOCKA-ŚLĘZAK, R. RÜFFER, J. KORECKI
Magnetism of ultra-thin iron films seen by the nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation.
Materials Science-Poland 26 (2008), 4, 885-896
116. M. ŚNIECHOWSKI, J. NIZIOŁ, W. ŁUŻNY
Structural properties of organometallic thin films oriented by corona poling.
Fibres & Textiles in Eastern Europe B 16 (2008), 6, 89-92
117. W. TABIŚ, J. KUSZ, NHU-TARNAWSKA HOA KIM-NGAN, Z. TARNAWSKI, F. ZONTONE, Z. KĄKOL.
A. KOZŁOWSKI
Structural changes at the Verwey transition in Fe3O4
Radiation Physics and Chemistry 78 (2009), S93-S96
118. J. TARASIUK, K. WIERZBANOWSKI, A. LODINI
Use of genetic algorithms for optimisation of materials properties.
Archives of Metallurgy and Materials 54 (2009), 1, 35-39
119. R. TRABELSI, A. KACEM, K. ZOUARI, K. RÓŻAŃSKI
Quantifying regional groundwater flow between Continental Intercalaire and Djeffara aquifers in
southern Tunisia using isotope methods.
Environmental Geology 58 (2009), 171-183
120. C. TSALLIS, G. KANIADAKIS, A. CARBONE, A.M. SCARFONE, K. MALARZ
Advances in statistical physics.
Central European Journal of Physics 7 (2009), 385-386
121. G. VOGL, E. PARTYKA-JANKOWSKA, M. ZAJĄC, A.I. CHUMAKOV
Diffusion jumps of single atoms into vacancies in an iron monolayer studied by nuclear resonant
scattering.
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 115406
125
122. Y.J. WANG, HSIN LIN, B. BARBIELLINI, P.E. MIJNARENDS, S. KAPRZYK, W. AL-SAWAI,
R.S. MARKIEWICZ, A. BANSIL
High resolutions Compton scattering as a probe of the Fermi surface in the iron-based superconductor LaO1-xFxFeAs .
Journal of Superconductivity and Novel Magnetism 22 (2009), 569-573
123. P. WANG, Z.M. STADNIK, K. AL-QUADI, J. PRZEWOŹNIK
A comparative study of the magnetic properties of the 1/1 approximant Ag50In36Gd14 and the icosahedral quasicrystal Ag50In36Gd14 .
Journal of Physics : Condensed Matter 21 (2009), 436007
124. D.H. WEI, C.L. GAO, KH. ZAKERI, M. PRZYBYLSKI
Pd atomic chain formation as a result of submonolayer deposition of 3d metals on Pd(110).
Physical Review Letters 103 (2009), 225504
125. M. WEST, A.T. ELLIS, P.J. POTTS, C. STRELI, C. VANHOOF, D. WĘGRZYNEK, P. WOBRAUSCHEK
Atomic spectrometry update, X-ray fluorescence spevtrometry.
Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry 24 (2009), 1289-1326
126. P. WÓJCIK, B.J. SPISAK, M. WOŁOSZYN, J. ADAMOWSKI
Self-consistent Wigner distribution function study of gate-voltage controlled triple-barrier resonant
tunneling diode.
Semiconductor Science and Technology 24 (2009), 095012
127. S. WROŃSKI, K. WIERZBANOWSKI, B. BACROIX, T. CHAUVEAU, M. WRÓBLEL, A. RAUCH.,
F. MONTHEILLET, M. WROŃSKI
Texture heterogeneity of asymmeyrically cold rollef low carbon steel.
Archives of Metallurgy and Materials 54 (2009), 1, 89-102
128. S. WROŃSKI, K. WIERZBANOWSKI, A. BACZMAŃSKI, A. LODINI, CH. BRAHAM, W. SEILER
X-ray grazing incidence technique—corrections in residual stress measurement—a review.
Powder Diffaction 24 (2009), Suppl. S1, S11-S15
129. F. YILDIZ, M. PRZYBYLSKI, J. KIRSCHNER
Direct evidence of a nonorthogonal magnetization configuration in single crystalline Fe1-xCox/Rh/
Fe/Rh(001) system.
Physical Review Letters 103 (2009), 147203
130. F. YILDIZ, M. PRZYBYLSKI, X.-D. MA, J. KIRSCHNER
Strong perpendicular anisotropy in Fe1-xCox alloy films epitaxially grown a mismatching Pd(001),
Ir(001), and Rh(001) substrates.
Physical Review B 80 (2009), 064415
131. J. ZEMŁA, M. LEKKA, J. RACZKOWSKA, A. BERNASIK, J. RYSZ, A. BUDKOWSKI
Selective protein adsorption on polymer patterns formed by self-organization and soft lithography.
Biomacromolecules 10 (2009), 2101-2109
132. M. ZIMNOCH
Stable isotope composition of carbon dioxide emitted form anthropogenic sources in the Kraków
region, Southern Poland.
Nukleonika 54 (2009), 291-295
126
Conference proceedings published abroad
Materiały konferencyjne opublikowane zagranicą
1. L. ADAMCZYK
Vector mesons and DVCS.
HERA 2008 : proceedings of the Ringberg workshop : New trends in HERA physics 2008 : Tegernsee, Germany, 5–10 October 2008 /
ed. G. Grindhammer [et al.]. — Amsterdam : Elsevier (Nuclear Physics B,
Proceedings Supplements — 2009 vol. 191 s. 241–246.)
2. F. ANGHINOLFI, W. DĄBROWSKI, N. DRESSNANT, J. KAPLON, D. LA MARRA, M. NEWCOMER,
S. PER NECKER, K. PÓŁTORAK, K. ŚWIENTEK
Performance of the ABCN-25 readout chip for the ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade.
Proceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics :
TWEPP-09 : Paris, France, 21-25 September 2009. – Geneva: CERN, 2009
(CERN-2009-006, s. 62-67)
3. M. BOCHENEK, W. DĄBROWSKI, F. FACCIO, J. KAPLON
An integrated DC-DC step-up charge pump step-down converter in 130 nm technology.
Proceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics :
TWEPP-09 : Paris, France, 21-25 September 2009. – Geneva: CERN, 2009
(CERN-2009-006, s. 579-583)
4. S. CHRISTOFIDES, W. SCHLEGEL, R. PADOVANI, P. F. SHARP, TORRESIN, M. WASILEWSKARADWAŃSKA, WIL VAN DER PUTTEN, E. GUIBELALDE, K. U. KASCH
Education and training of the medical physicist in Europe.
World congress on Medical physics and biomedical engineering [Dokument elektroniczny] : 11th
international congress of the IUPESM : for the benefit of the patient : September 7–12, 2009 Munich, Germany/ eds. Olaf Dössel, Wolfgang C. Schlegel. — Berlin ; Heildelberg ; New York : Springer,
cop. 2009. — 1 dysk optyczny (IFMBE Proceedings / ed. R. Magjarevic ; ISSN 1680-0737 ; vol. 25).
5. C. J. CARUANA, M. WASILEWSKA-RADWAŃSKA, A. AURENGO, [ET AL.]
EFOMP Project `Biomedical physics education for the healthcare professions’ – an update for
WC2009 World congress on Medical physics and biomedical engineering [Dokument elektroniczny] : 11th international congress of the IUPESM : for the benefit of the patient : September 7–12,
2009 Munich, Germany / eds. Olaf Dössel, Wolfgang C. Schlegel. — Berlin ; Heildelberg ; New York
: Springer, cop. 2009. — 1 dysk optyczny. — (IFMBE Proceedings / ed. R. Magjarevic ; vol. 25).—
S. 141–144.
6. W. DĄBROWSKI, F. ANGHINOLFI, N. DRESSNANDT, M. DWUŻNIK, [ET. AL.], K. PÓŁTORAK,
K. ŚWIENTEK
Design and performance of the ABCN-25 readout chip for ATLAS inner detector upgrade.
2009 IEEE nuclear science symposium medical imaging conference [Dokument elektroniczny] :
Orlando Florida, 25–31 October : 2009 conference record/ ed. Bo Yu. — [USA : Institute of Electrical
and Electronics Engineers], cop. 2009. —1 dysk optyczny. — S. 373–380.
7. M. DWUŻNIK, S. GONZALEZ-SEVILLA
Replacing full custom DAQ test system by COTS DAQ components on example of ATLAS SCT readout.
Proceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics :
TWEPP-09 : Paris, France, 21-25 September 2009. – Geneva: CERN, 2009
(CERN-2009-006, s. 139-143
127
8. A. JUNG, P. KRISPER, M. ZADORA, B. HADITSCH, R. STAUBER, H. HOLZER, D. SCHNEDITZ
Clearance and rate of conjugated bilirubin removal during extracorporeal liver support therapy
with FPSA Prometheus™
World congress on Medical physics and biomedical engineering [Dokument elektroniczny] : 11th
international congress of the IUPESM : for the benefit of the patient : September 7–12, 2009 Munich, Germany / eds. Olaf Dössel, Wolfgang C. Schlegel. — Berlin ; Heildelberg ; New York : Springer,
cop. 2009. — 1 dysk optyczny. — (IFMBE Proceedings / ed. R. Magjarevic ; vol. 25).— S. 620–623.
9. A. NADY, H. BONNEFOY, V. KLOSEK, M.H. MATHON, A. LODINI, A. BACZMAŃSKI
Finite element analysis and neutron diffraction evaluation of residual stresses in stellite coating
produced by PTA process.
8th International Conference on Residaul Stresses (IRS-8), 4-8 August 2008,
Denver, Colorado USA. — (Advances in X-ray Analysis ; vol. 52 2009, 454-461)
10. NGUYEN DINH CHAU, L. RAJCHEL, J. NOWAK
Natural radioactive elements and chemical composition of some mineral waters of Poland (Polish
Carpathians, Carpathian Foredeep).
LSC 2008, advances in liquid scintillation spectrometry : proceedings of the 2008
International Liquid Scintillation Conference, Switzeland, 25-30 May 2008/ ed. by Jost Eikenberg
[et al.]. – Tucson : Radiocarbon, 2009, s. 381-390
11. K. PÓŁTORAK, C. BALLIF, W. DĄBROWSKI, M. DESPEISSE, P. JARRON, J. KAPLON, N. WYRSCH
Low noise, low power front end electronics for pixelized TFA sensors.
Proceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics: TWEPP-09: Paris, France,
21-25 September 2009. – Geneva: CERN, 2009. (CERN-2009-006, s. 72-77)
12. S.H. SHAIKH, N. CHAKI, M. TABEDZKI, K. SAEED
A view-based approach for recognition of Bengali printed characters.
2009 World Congress on Nature & Bioloogically Inspired Computing NaBIC 2009: 9-11 December
2009, Colmbatore, India : proceedings. — IEEE: Madras, India, 2009. — S. 1005-1009.
13. J. B. SZMANDA, T. KALICKI, E. ŁOKAS, A. MICHNO, B. RADWANEK-BĄK, P. WACHNIEW,
P. SZWARCZEWSKI
A new data of the present day overbank sedimentation in the Vistula river flood plain in the Krakow
Gate.
State of geomorphological research in 2009 : proceedings of the conference : 15.–17. April 2009,
Kašperské Hory, Czech Republic / eds. Pavel Mentlík, Filip Hartvich; Czech Association of Geomorphologists, Department of Geography, University of West Bohemia in Plzen, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague. — [Czech Republic] : Tribun EU, cop. 2009. — (Geomorfologický sborník ; 8). — S. 55–56.
14. M WASILEWSKA-RADWAŃSKA, P. AUGUSTYNIAK
Multidisciplinary school as a BME teaching option
World congress on Medical physics and biomedical engineering [Dokument elektroniczny] : 11th
international congress of the IUPESM : for the benefit of the patient : September 7–12, 2009 Munich, Germany / eds. Olaf Dössel, Wolfgang C. Schlegel. — Berlin ; Heildelberg ; New York : Springer,
cop. 2009. — 1 dysk optyczny. — (IFMBE Proceedings / ed. R. Magjarevic ; vol. 25).— S. 200-203.
15. M. ZIMNOCH, J. GODŁOWSKA
Determination of Rn-222 flux in Kraków urban area using alpha spectrometry and sodar measurements.
Air quality – science and application [Dokument elektroniczny] : 7th international conference: Istanbul, 24–27 March 2009 : proceedings of short papers/ eds. Xavier
Vazhappilly Francis [et al.]. – Hatfield : University of Hertfordshire, 2009. – 1 dysk optyczny. – S. [1–4].
128
Lectures published in Poland
Referaty opublikowane w Polsce
1. G. BUTURYN, A. BACZMAŃSKI, K. WIERZBANOWSKI, J. BONARSKI, L. TARKOWSKI
Stress measurements using Göbel miror and grazing incidence geometry.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 75-77
2. J. CHOWANIEC, M. DULIŃSKI, P. MOCHALSKI, J. NAJMAN, I. ŚLIWKA, A. ZUBER
Gazy szlachetne w wodach termalnych niecki podhalańskiej – wstępne wyniki.
II Ogólnopolski kongres geotermalny [Dokument elektroniczny] : 23–25 wrzesień,
Bukowina Tatrzańska / PSG, KSE, Państwowy Instytut Geologiczny. — [S. l. : s. n., 2009]. — 1 dysk
optyczny. — S. 1–8.
3. J. A. FEDOTOVA, J. V. KASIUK, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, CZ. KAPUSTA, I. AKIMOV, I. A. SVITO
Effect of H and O2 impurities on structure, magnetic and magnetotransport properties of FeCoZrAl2O3 granular nanocomposites. NEET 2009 : New Electrical and Electronic Technologies and their
industrial implementation : 6th international conference : Zakopane, Poland, June 23–26, 2009 /
ed. Tomasz Kołtunowicz ; Lublin University of Technology, Poland. — Lublin :
Lublin University of Technology, [2009]. — S. 76.
4. A. HAŁAS, K. STRZAŁKA, K. BURDA
Influence of copper and cadmium ions on the electron transport in photosystem II.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 81-83
5. M. GRADZIŃSKI, M. CZOP, M. DULIŃSKI, M. GĄSIOROWSKI, J. GRABOWSKI, H. HERCMAN,
P. HOLÚBEK, M. KOVÁČOVA, J. MOTYKA, T. MROZIŃSKA, [ET AL.]
Sesja terenowa A6, Trawertyny wokół Tatr.
LXXIX Zjazd Naukowy Polskiego Towarzystwa Geologicznego : Budowa geologiczna Tatr i Podhala
ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem zjawisk geotermalnych na Podhalu : Bukowina Tatrzańska, 27–30
września 2009 r. : materiały konferenycjne / pod red. Alfreda Uchmana, Józefa Chowańca ; Polskie
Towarzystwo Geologiczne.
Warszawa : Państwowy Instytut Geologiczny – Państwowy Instytut Badawczy, — 2009 . — S. 134–
144.
6. J. HABERKO, A. BERNASIK, W. ŁUŻNY, J. RACZKOWSKA, J. RYSZ, A. BUDKOWSKI
Spontaneous and substrate-induced self-assembly in thin films of conjugated polymers.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 13-15
7. A. JUNG
Technical development of extracorporeal liver support therapy.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009 : conference
proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 16-18
129
8. M. KACZMARSKA, D. ŻYDEK, M. FORNAL, T. GRODZICKI, E. KOCHOWSKA, K. KOZAK, K. MATLAK,
J. KORECKI, K. BURDA
Influence of alpha radiation on the stability of erythrocytes.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 84-86
9. G. KHACHATRYAN, M. NIEZNALSKA, K. LUBERDA-DURNAŚ, K. BURDA, [ET AL.]
Titrimetric determination of the carboxylic and hydroxyl groups in functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009 :
conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 87-88
10. T. KOŁODZIEJ, G. KRÓL, W. TABIŚ, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, Z. TARNAWSKI, Z. KĄKOL, A. KOZŁOWSKI
The switching of magnetic easy axis in Fe3O4 single crystal observed by electrical resistivity changes.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009 :
conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 92-94
11. M. KOWALIK, R. ZALECKI, A. KOŁODZIEJCZYK, J. PRZEWOŹNIK, Cz. KAPUSTA
Photoemission electronic states of collosal magnetoresistive manganites
La0.67Pb0.33MN1-xFexO3 .
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 95-97
12. M. J. KRAWCZYK
Communities in social networks.
ICBAKE 2009: International Conference on Biometrics and Kansei Engineering : 25–28 June 2009,
Cieszyn, Poland/ eds: Khalid Saeed, Ajith Abraham, Piotr Porwik.
S. 111–116. [CD- ROM]
13. P. KUCZERA, B. KOZAKOWSKI, J. WOLNY, R. STRZAŁKA
Real space refinement of basic Ni-rich Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 98-100
14. M. LANKOSZ
Mikroobrazowanie chemiczne tkanek mózgu człowieka z wykorzystaniem metod opartych na promieniowaniu synchrotronowym
Aktualne problemy chemii analitycznej : III seminarium naukowe / red. nauk. (przewodn.) Józef Śliwiok, Irena Baranowska, [et al.]. — Katowice : Górnośląskie
Towarzystwo Przyjaciół Nauk, 2009. — S. 5.
15. K. LUBERDA-DURNAŚ, M. NIEZNALSKA, G. KHACHATRYAN, K. KCHACHATRYAN, P. TOMASIK,
O. MICHALSKI, K. MATLAK, J. KORECKI, L. STOBIŃSKI, K. BURDA
Studies of Fe-binding sites within multi-walled carbon nanotubes using Mössbauer Spectroscopy.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 101-102
130
16. A. MAŃKA-KRASOŃ, K. KUŁAKOWSKI
Frustration and collectivity in spatial networks.
PPAM 2009 : 8th international conference on Parallel Processing & Applied
Mathematics : Poland, Wrocław, September 13–16, 2009. — [Częstochowa : s. n., 2009]. — S. 131
17. A. MARKOWICZ, E. CHINEA-CANO, D. WĘGRZYNEK, R. PADILLA-ALVAREZ
Development and applications of portable XRF spectrometers for in situ characterization of materials.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 25-29
18. B. MURYN
Perspectives on LHC physics.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 62-65
19. M. PŁONKA, P. JAGIELSKI, M. J. DOBRZAŃSKA, A. KAMIŃSKA, W. BIELAŃSKI, D. DROZDOWICZ,
M. LANKOSZ, B. OSTACHOWICZ, W. OPOKA, M. SZLÓSARCZYK, T. BRZOZOWSKI
Wpływ pokwitania na zależność pomiędzy leptyną, ghreliną, BMI a obecność
wybranych pierwiastków w moczu dorastających dziewczynek:
Elektroanaliza w teorii i praktyce : IX konferencja : Kraków, 04–05 czerwca 2009 / red. Janusz Gołaś,
Jerzy Górecki ; Polska Akademia Nauk. Komitet Chemii Analitycznej. Komisja elektroanalizy, [etc.].
— Kraków : AGH Uczelniane
Wydawnictwa Naukowo-Dydaktyczne, 2009. — S. 77–78
20. J. PRZEWOŹNIK, Cz. KAPUSTA
Magnetic and electrical transport properties of the (La0.67A0.33)(Mn1-xSnx)O3-δ (A=Ca,Sr) compounds.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 44-47
21. D. PRZYBOROWSKI, M. IDZIK
Development of a general purpose low-power small-area 10 bit current steering CMOS DAC.
MIXDES 2009 : mixed design of integrated circuits and systems : proceedings of the 16th international conference : Łódź, Poland, 25–27 June, 2009 / ed. Andrzej Napieralski. — Łódź : Department
of Microelectronics and Computer Science.
Technical University of Łódź, 2009. — S. 256–261
22. M. RYBNIK, P. PANASIUK, K. SAEED
User authentication with keystroke dynamics using fixed text.
ICBAKE 2009: International Conference on Biometrics and Kansei Engineering : 25–28 June 2009,
Cieszyn, Poland/ eds: Khalid Saeed, Ajith Abraham, Piotr Porwik. S. 70–75.[CD-ROM]
23. P. RYDYGIER, T. FIUTOWSKI, W. DĄBROWSKI
Design of a low noise, low power, high dynamic range amplifier-filter circuit for recording neural
signals using multielectrode arrays.
MIXDES 2009 : mixed design of integrated circuits and systems : proceedings of the 16th international conference : Łódź, Poland, 25–27 June, 2009 / ed. Andrzej Napieralski. — Łódź : Department
of Microelectronics and Computer Science.
Technical University of Łódź, 2009. — S. 242-247
131
24. K. SAEED, A. SZCZEPAŃSKI
A study on noisy speech recognition
ICBAKE 2009: International Conference on Biometrics and Kansei Engineering : 25–
28 June 2009, Cieszyn, Poland/ eds: Khalid Saeed, Ajith Abraham, Piotr Porwik.
S. 142-147 [CD-ROM]
25. L. SAMEK, M. LANKOSZ, M. CZYŻYCKI
X-ray fluorescence elemental analysis of particulate matter collected in Poland.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 103-105
26. K. SCHNEIDER, CZ. KAPUSTA, D. A. ZAJĄC, J. ŻUKROWSKI,
J. PRZEWOŹNIK, M. SIKORA, C. I. MARQUINA, M. R. IBARRA,A. SWIERCZYNA, A. URBANIK
Carbon coated Fe and Fe3O4 derived nanoparticles for enhanced MRI contrast.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009]. — S. 106–108.
27. M. SIKORA, CZ. KAPUSTA, J. M. DETERESA, K. KNÍZEK, J. MICHALIK, O. MATHON, P. GLATZEL
Magnetic moments in transition metal oxides investigated by hard X-ray spectroscopy.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 50-51
28. W. SZCZERBA, M. SIKORA, D. A. ZAJĄC, M. BOROWIEC, CZ. KAPUSTA, I. MARQUINA.
M. R. IBARRA
XAFS study of naturally oxidized magnetoresistive iron fine particles.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 109-111
29. T. ŚLĘZAK, A. KOZIOŁ, K. MATLAK, R. RÜFFER, M. ŚLĘZAK, M.ZAJĄC, J. KORECKI
Magnetism of ultra-thin iron films seen by the nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 48-49
30. M. TRAFNY, K. DROGOWSKA, A. KOZŁOWSKI, P. A. METCALF, M. SZCZERBA, R. P. SOCHA,
J. PRZEWOŹNIK, Z. TARNAWSKI, [ET AL.]
Characterisation and properties of selected (V1-x(Cr, Ti)x)2O3 thin films.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 114
31. D. WĘGRZYNEK, E. Chinea-Cano, [et al.], A. MARKOWICZ, [et al.]
X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography and fast micro-radiography of malaria transmitting mosquitoes and Tsetse flies.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 30-32
132
32. K. WIERZBANOWSKI, M. WROŃSKI, A. BACZMAŃSKI
Two approaches to lattice rotation in plastic deformation models.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 115-117
33. W. M. WOCH, R. ZALECKI, A. KOŁODZIEJCZYK, G. GRITZNER
Critical currents of (Ti0.5Pb0.5)Sr2(Ca1-xGdx)Cu2Oz bulk superconductors.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 52-54
34. J. WOLNY, M. DUDA, B. KOZAKOWSKI
Complex structure of Mg2Al3 β and β’phases.
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 78-80
35. S. WROŃSKI, K. WIERZBANOWSKI, A. BACZMAŃSKI
Examination of mechanical properties of materials
Frontiers in modern physics and its applications : Kraków, Poland, May 28–29, 2009: conference proceedings / Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science. AGH
Univeristy of Science and Technology. — [Kraków : AGH. FPACS, 2009], S. 41–43
36. A. ZIĘBA
Physical and non-physical quantities and units. A case study of candela.
PTEE 2009 : Proceedings of the SEFI Conference Physics Teaching in Engineering
Education, 10-12 September 2009, Wrocław, Poland, s. 129-132
37. A. ZIĘBA, P. RAMZA
Niepewność wartości średniej serii obserwacji skorelowancy (II).
PPM’09 : Podstawowe Problemy Metrologii : Sucha Beskidzka, 10–13 maja 2009 /Polska Akademia
Nauk. Oddział w Katowicach. — Katowice : Komisja Metrologii Oddziału PAN, [2008].
— (Prace Komisji Metrologii / Oddział PAN w Katowicach. Seria: Konferencje ; nr 12). S. 80–83.
Other journals
Inne czasopisma
1. M. ADAMSKI, K. SAEED
Offline signature identification and verification using noniterative shape context algorithm.
Journal of Medical Informatics & Technologies 13 (2009), 47-52
2. R. BACEWICZ, A. PIETNOCZKA, M. SIKORA
High energy resolution fluorescence detected X-ray absorption at Mn K edge in Cu-III-Sn2:Mn
(III = Al, Ga, In) chalcopyrites.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 190 (2009), 012067
3. Ł. CHMURA, J. NĘCKI, M. ZIMNOCH, A. KORUS, K. RÓŻAŃSKI, D. LIMANÓWKA, M. KARZYŃSKI
Kasprowy a globalne ocieplenie. [Kasprový a globálne otepl’ovanie]
Tatry Wyd. Specjalne, nr 4 (2009), 44-49
133
4. J. CHOWANIEC, W. CIĘŻKOWSKI, M. DULIŃSKI, I. JÓZEFKO, B. PORWISZ, A. ZUBER
Typy chemiczne szczaw w Karpatach fliszowych a wiek wody.
Biuletyn Państwowego Instytutu Geologicznego 436 (2009), 47-54
5. J. CHOWANIEC, M. DULIŃSKI, P. MOCHALSKI, J. NAJMAN, I. ŚLIWKA, A. ZUBER
Rezultaty analiz gazów szlachetnych w wodach termalnych.
Przegląd Geologiczny 57 (2009), 8, 652
6. J. CHOWANIEC, M. DULIŃSKI, P. MOCHALSKI, J. NAJMAN, I. ŚLIWKA, A. ZUBER
Znaczniki środowiskowe w wodach termalnych niecki podhalańskiej.
Przegląd Geologiczny 57 (2009), 8, 685-693
7. J. CHOWANIEC, M. DULIŃSKI, P. MOCHALSKI, J. NAJMAN, I. ŚLIWKA, A. ZUBER
Gazy szlachetne w wodach termalnych niecki podhalańskiej.
Gaz, Woda i Technika Sanitarna 82 (2009), 9, 14-15.
8. H. FIGIEL, P. GONDEK, M. ZIAREK
Samochody napędzane wodorem.
Biuletyn Polskiego Stowarzyszenia Wodoru i Ogniw Paliwowych 4 (2009), 14-23
9. K.N. GHERAB, R. GATRI, J-L FILLAUT, J. LUC, B. SAHRAOUI, J. NIZIOŁ
Design of amorphous thin films of azobenzene containing ruthenium acetylides for optical data
storage.
Nonlinear Optics and Quantum Optics 38 (2009), 281-295
10. J.M. HADUCH, H. FIGIEL, R.P. BANYŚ, M. PASOWICZ
The comparison of low-field and high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems.
Polish Journal od Radiology 74 (2009), 1, 85-90
11. O. IGONKINA, (...), T. BOŁD, (...), I. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD, (...)
Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 160 (2009), 012061
12. T. KUC, K. RÓŻAŃSKI, T. GOSLAR, R. STACHOWICZ-RYBKA
Radiocarbon dating of plant remnants in quaternary sediments at Starunia palaeontological site
and vicinity (Carpathian region, Ukraine).
Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae 79 (2009), 3, 289-296
13. J. KULKA
Techniczne aspekty zderzacza LHC.
Postępy Fizyki 60 (2009), 3, 109-118
14. K. KUŁAKOWSKI
The norm game: punishing enemies and not friends.
Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination 4 (2009), 27-37
15. A. KWAŚNIOWSKI, J. ADAMOWSKI
Exchange interaction tuned by electric field in quantum dots.
Physica Status Solidi C 6 (2009), 4, 821-824
16. NGUYEN DINH CHAU, P. KASPRZYKOWSKI, R. SENIUTA, J. NOWAK, P. OCHMAŃSKI
Izotopy uranu i wód pitnych aglomeracji krakowskiej.
Biuletyn Państwowego Instytutu Geologicznego 436 (2009), 29-34
134
17. NGUYEN DINH CHAU, L. RAJCHEL, M. DULIŃSKI
Aktywność 210Pb w wybranych wodach podziemnych z obszaru Karpat polskich.
Biuletyn Państwowego Instytutu Geologicznego 436 (2009), 35-40
18. M. RYBAK, A. DYDEJCZYK, K. KUŁAKOWSKI
The norm game on a model network: a critical line.
Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 5796, (2009), 565-572
19. M. SARNA, E. WYBIERALSKA, K. MIEKUS, J. DRUKAŁA, Z. MADEJA
Topographical control of prostate cancer cell migration.
Molecular Medicine Reports 2 (2009), 865-871
20. B.J. SPISAK, M. WOŁOSZYN, P. WÓJCIK, G.J. MORGAN
Wigner distribution function description of a multilayered nanostucture with magnetic impurities.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series 193 (2009), 012130
135
136
Conferences presentations
and seminars
Invited lectures
1. ADAMOWSKI J.
Elektronowe kubity spinowe w sprzężonych kropkach kwantowych.
XL Zjazd Fizyków Polskich,
Kraków, 06-11. 09. 2009
2. CARUANA C.J., WASILEWSKA-RADWANSKA M., AURENGO A, DENDY P.P., KARENAUSKAITE V.,
MAKISAN M.R., MEIJER J.H., MIHOVD., MORNSTEIN V.,ROKITA E., VANO E., WUCHERER M.
EFOMP Project on the Role of Biomedical Physics in the Education of Healthcare Professionals: an
Update
VI Symposium on Medical Physics
IV International Symposium on Medical Physics
Szczyrk, 15-18. 06. 2009
3. CHRISTOFIDES S., WASILEWSKA-RADWANSKA M., PUTTEN VAN DER W.J.M., CARUANA C.J.
Medical PhysicsCompetencies in Europe – an EFOMP Inventory
VI Symposium on Medical Physics
IV International Symposium on Medical Physics
Szczyrk, 15-18. 06. 2009
4. DUBIEL S. M.
Iron in living organisms - wygłoszenie referatu
Uniwersytet Coimbra, Portugalia, 30.09.2009
SEMINARIUM
5. IDZIK M.
Readout Electronics.
1st MC-PAD Network Traning on Readout Electronics workshop
Kraków, 17-19. 09. 2009
6. KOŁODZIEJCZYK A., WIENDLOCHA B., ZALECKI R., TOBOŁA J., KAPRZYK S.
Photemission band structure of the weak itinerant ferromagnetic superconductor Y9Co7
XIV Krajowa Szkoła Nadprzewodnictwa;
Nadprzewodnictwo i niejednorodne układy skorelowane.
Ostrów Wielkopolski, 13-17. 10. 2009
7. KREFT A.
Poszanowanie energii, Sesja specjalistyczna S-2.8: „Problemy energetyki w Polsce”
XL Zjazd Fizyków Polskich,
Kraków, 07-11. 09. 2009
137
8. LANKOSZ M.
Mikro-obrazowanie chemiczne tkanek mózgu człowieka z wykorzystaniem metod opartych na
promieniowaniu synchrotronowym.
“Aktualne Problemy Chemii Analitycznej”
Instytut Chemii Uniwersytetu Śląskiego w Katowicach
Katowice, 22. 05. 2009
9. ŁUŻNY W., BERNASIK A., HABERKO J.,BUDKOWSKI A., RACZKOWSKA J., RYSZ J.
Separacja faz w cienkich wieloskładnikowych warstwach polimerów sprzężonych i jej wykorzystanie w plastikowej elektronice.
XL Zjazd Fizyków Polskich
Kraków, 06-11. 09. 2009
10. MARKOWICZ A., CHINEA-CANO E., WĘGRZYNEK D., PADILLA-ALVAREZ R.
Development and applications of portable XRF Spectrometers for in Situ characterization of materials.
Frontiers in Moder Physics and Its Applications
Kraków, 28 – 29. 05. 2009
11. MURYN B.
Perspectives on LHC Physics.
Frontiers in Moder Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28 – 29. 05. 2009
12. PAJA A.
Electron Transport in Disordered Metallic Nanosystems.
The Tenth International School on Theoretical Physics
Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter ( SSPCM’2009)
Myczkowce, 02 - 09. 09. 2009
13. RÓŻAŃSKI K.
Globalne i regionalne zmiany klimatu.
Seminarium Szkoleniowe ”Inżynieria procesów ograniczania emisji oraz utylizacji gazów szkodliwych i cieplarnianych”
Ustroń, 14-16. 10. 2009
14. RYSZ J., BERNASIK A., MOONS E., JACZEWSKA J., BUDKOWSKI A., RACZKOWSKA J.,
HABERKO J., ŁUŻNY W., ZEMŁA J. , LEKKA M., AWSIUK K.
Samo-organizacja w trakcie deponowania warstw mieszanin polimerów funkcjonalnych i jej zastosowania w elektronice i biotechnologii.
XL Zjazd Fizyków Polskich
Kraków, 6-11. 09. 2009
15. SIKORA M.
Magnetic properties studied with XMCD and XES.
8th National Symposium of Synchrotron Users
Podlesice, 24-26.09.2009
16. SIKORA W., BUDZIAK A.
Symmetry Analysis of Possible magnetic Structures and Accompanying Structural Deformations in
Laves Phase C14-typeHydrates
14th International Seminar on Neutron Scattering Investigation in Condensed Matter, organized by
Faculty of physics, Adam Mickiewicz University
Poznań, 14- 16. 05. 2009
138
17. SIKORA W., MALINOWSKI J.
Symmetry analysis in parametrization of complex systems.
Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter (SSPCM 2009): the tenth international
school on Theoretical physics.
Myczkowce, 02- 09. 09. 2009
18. WOCH W.M.,
Properties, critical currents and irreversibility fields of thallium based Superconductors.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28-29.05.2009
19. WOCH W.M., NIEWOLSKI J., TOKARZ W., KOŁODZIEJCZYK A., SUDRA H., GRITZNER G.
Microwave absorption and magnetization of (Tl0.5Pb0.5)Sr2(Ca0.8Gd0.2)Cu2Oz Superconductor.
XIV Krajowa Szkoła Nadprzewodnictwa;
Nadprzewodnictwo i niejednorodne układy skorelowane.
Ostrów Wielkopolski, 13-17. 10. 2009
Contributed presentations
1. ARMATYS P. , GONDEK E., NIZIOŁ J., POKLADKO M., SANETRA J, DANEL A., SZLACHCIC P.
Kopolimery N-winylokarbazolu i 1,3,4-triefenylo-6-winylo-1H-pirazolo[3,4-b] chinolin jako materiały
do budowy komórek elektroluminescencyjnych.
Modyfikacja Polimerów. Stan i perspektywy w roku 2009, Politechnika Wrocławska.
Karczowiska k/ Legnicy, 23. 09. 2009
POSTER
2. AWSIUK K., BERNASIK A., KITSARA M., RACZKOWSKA J., HABERKO J., RYSZ J., PETROU P.,
BUDKOWSKI A.
Surfaces with uniform and non-uniform protein coverage studied by AFM and angleresolved XPS.
13th European Conference on applications of Surface and Interface Analysis
(ECASIA’09)
Antalya, Turcja, 18- 23. 10. 2009
POSTER
3. BARTYZEL J., RÓŻAŃSKI K.
Measurements of H2 soil uptake in Krakow –an update.
Hydrogen Soil Uptake Workshop
Heidelberg, Germany, 24- 25. 02. 2009
ORAL
4. BARTYZEL J., PYCIA M., NĘCKI J., RÓŻAŃSKI K.,
Seasonal variability of soil sink for atmospheric hydrogen: a case from southern Poland.
European Geophysical Union 2009
Austria, Vienna, 19- 25. 04. 2009
POSTER
5. BARTYZEL J., ROSIEK J., RÓŻAŃSKI K., STURGES W.T.
Atmospheric concentrations of SF5CF3 over central Europe during the period 2001-2008.
Fifth International Symposium on Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases (NCGG-5)
Wageningen, The Netherland, 30. 06- 03. 07. 2009
ORAL
139
6. BEDNAREK S.
Operacje na spinie pojedynczego elektronu w zastosowaniu do budowy bramek logicznych komputera kwantowego.
III Krajowa Konferencja Nanotechnologii Nano2009
Warszawa,22-26. 06. 2009
PLENARY LECTURE
7. BEDNAREK S., SZAFRAN B. ,GRYNKIEWICZ P., SZUMNIAK P.,
Electron spin read-out without external magnetic field.
5th International School and Conference on Spintronics and Quantum
Information Technology
Kraków, 07- 11. 07. 2009
POSTER
8 BEDNAREK S., SZAFRAN B., SZUMNIAK P., GRYNKIEWICZ P.
Electron spin read-out in the absence of external magnetic.
Fifth International School and Conference on Spintronics and Quantum Information
Technology, SPINTECH V
Kraków,07-11. 07. 2009
POSTER
9 BIERNACKA K., GĄSKA K.
X-ray study of cobalt ferrites
Erasmus Intensive Program 2009
Bonn, Germany, 06-17 . 05. 2009
POSTER
10. BOCHENEK M., DĄBROWSKI W., FACCIO F., KAPLON J.
An integrated DC-Dc step-up charge pump and step-down converter in 130 nm technology.
TWEPP-09 Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics
Paris, France, 21-25. 09. 2009
POSTER
11. BRAHAM C., BACZMAŃSKI A., WAWSZCZAK R., SEILER W., WIERZBANOWSKI K.
Incompatibility Stresses and Stored Elastic Energy In Single – Phase and Two-Phase
Polycrystalline Materials.
International Conference on Processing & Manufacturing of Advanced
Materials, Processing , Fabrication, Properties, Applications, H8
Berlin, Germany, 25- 29. 08. 2009
ORAL
12. BURDA K., CHUMAKOV A., ORZECHOWSKA A., LIPIŃSKA M., FIEDOR J., ZAJĄC M., ŚLĘZAK T.,
MATLAK K., STRZAŁKA K.,KORECKI J., FIEDOR L.
Local motions of protein matrix influenced by the spin state of the non-heme iron in
bacterial reaction centers.
4th Conference of Polish Society of Experimental Plant Biology „Experimental Plant
Biology. Why not?!”
Kraków,21-25. 09. 2009
POSTER
140
13. BURDA K., ORZECHOWSKA A., LIPIŃSKA M., FIEDOR J., CHUMAKOV A., ZAJĄC M., ŚLĘZAK T.,
MATLAK M., TRTILEK M., FIEDOR L., STRZAŁKA K., KORECKI J.
Dependence of electron transfer rates on the spin state of the non-heme iron and protein local motions in bacterial reaction centers.
International Conference on the Applications of the Mossbauer Effect, ICAME 2009,
Vienna, Austria,19– 24. 07. 2009
ORAL
14. BUTURYN G., BACZMAŃSKI A., WIERZBANOWSKI K., BONARSKI J., TARKOWSKI L.
Application of Göbel Mirror for Stress Measurement Using Grazing Incidence Geometry.
5-th Int. Conf. on Mechanical Stress Evaluation by Neutron and Synchrotron
Radiation- MECA SENS V.
Mito, Japan, 10- 12. 11. 2009
POSTER
15. BUTURYN G., BACZMAŃSKI A., WIERZBANOWSKI K., BONARSKI J., TARKOWSKI L.
Stress measurements using göbel miror and grazing incidence geometry.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and Its Applications,
Kraków, 28- 29 09. 2009
16. CHAU N. D., KASPRZYKOWSKI P., SENIUTA R., NOWAK J., OCHMAŃSKI P.
Izotopy uranu i radu wód pitnych aglomeracji krakowskiej”
XIV Sympozjum “Współczesne Problemy Hydrogeologii”
Sosnowiec, 16- 18. 09. 2009
POSTER
17. CHAU N. D., NOWAK J.
Jednoczesne oznaczania izotopów radu i ołowiu-210 w próbkach wody.
V Krajowa Konferencja Radiochemii i Chemii Jądrowej
Kraków - Przegorzały, 24- 27. 05. 2009
ORAL
18. CHAU N. D., RAJCHEL L. , DULIŃSKI M.
Aktywność 210Pb w wybranych wodach podziemnych z obszaru Karpat Polskich
XIV Sympozjum “Współczesne Problemy Hydrogeologii”
Sosnowiec, 16- 18. 09.2009
POSTER
19. CIEŚLAK J., TOBOŁA J., DUBIEL S.M., KAPRZYK S.
Theoretical and Mossbauer study of FeCr and FeV sigma-phase.
International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect.
Vienna, Austria, 19- 24. 07. 2009
POSTER
20. CIŚLAK A., KUŁAKOWSKA M.
Kilka demonstracji magnetycznych.
IX Ogólnopolskie Spotkanie Demonstratorów Fizyki,
Łódź, 24 – 26. 06.2009
PREZENTACJA USTNA + POKAZ DEMONSTRACJI
141
21. CHMURA Ł., KORUS A., NĘCKI J., RÓŻAŃSKI K.,ZIMNOCH M.,
Fifteen years of atmospheric CH4 and CO2 mixing ratio measurements at the mountain site Kasprowy Wierch, southern Poland”
European Geophysical Union 2009
Vienna, Austria, 19.- 25. 04. 2009
POSTER
22. CHWIEJ J., JANECZKO K., LANKOSZ M., STĘGOWSKIZ. , RICKERS K., EICHERTD., GIANOCELLI A.,
SETKOWICZ Z.
Elemental analysis of nervous tissue in case of pilocarpine induced epilepsy following the treatment with tacrolimus (FK-506), a neuroprotective agent.
EMAS 2009 - 11th European workshop on Modern developments and applications in microbeam
analysis
Gdynia/Rumia, Gdańsk, 10 – 14. 05. 2009
POSTER
23. CZAPLIŃSKI W., KAMINSKI W., POPOV N.
Przejścia rotacyjne w molekule mionowej deuteru i helu
XL-Zjazd Fizyków Polskich
Kraków,06-11. 09. 2009
POSTER
24. CZYŻYCKI M., LANKOSZ M., BIELEWSKI M.
Quantitative elemental microanalysis of individual particles with use of X-ray
fluorescence method and Monte Carlo simulation.
ICXOM20,20th International Congress on X-Ray Optics and Microanalysis
Karlsruhe, Germany, 14-18. 09. 2009
POSTER
25. DĄBROWSKI W., ANGHINOLFI F., DRESSNANDT N., DWUŻNIK M., KAPLON J., LA MARA D.
Newcomer M., Pernecker S., Półtorak K., Sevilla S.G., Świentek K.
Design and Performance of the ABCN-25 Readout Chip for the ATLAS Inner Detector
Upgrade.
Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference
Orlando Florida USA, 25-31. 10. 2009
POSTER
26. DĄBROWSKI W., PÓŁTORAK K.,BALLIF C., DESPEISSE M., JARRON P., KAPLON J., WYRSCH
Low noise, low power front and electronics for pixelized TFA sensors.
TWEPP-09 Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics
Paris, France, 21-25. 09. 2009
ORAL
27. DOMAŃSKA G., CETNAR J. ,OETTINGEN M.
Improved configuration of ELSY core with nitride fuel in open square SA.
Seventh Eurepean Commision conference on Euratom research and training in reactor
systems, FISA 2009
Prague, Czech Republic, 22-24. 06. 2009
POSTER
28. DUBIEL S. M.,
XL Zjazd Fizykow Polskich,
Kraków, 06-11. 09. 2009
UCZESTNICTWO + PRZEWODNICZENIE SESJI PLENARNEJ
142
29. DUBIEL S. M.
Properties of the sigma-phase in Fe-Cr and Fe-V alloy systems and its relevance to stainless steels.
a) Institute of Physics, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre,
15.03.- 31. 03. 2009
b) Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos
ORAL
30. DUBIEL S. M.
Relationship between the hyperfine field and the magnetic moment in iron alloys and
compounds.
The International Conference on Magnetism – ICM 2009
Karlsruhe, Germany, 26-31. 07. 2009
ORAL
31. DUBIEL S.M., CIEŚLAK J., TARASIUK J.,NIZIOŁ J.
Colours of Ochres from Roussillon.
International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect, ICAME 2009
Vienna, Austria, 19 – 24 .07. 2009
REPORT
32. DUBIEL S.M., CIEŚLAK J., TARASIUK J.,NIZIOŁ J.
Colours of Ochres from Roussillon.
International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect, ICAME 2009
Vienna, Austria, 19 – 24 .07. 2009
POSTER
33. DUBIEL S.M, COSTA B. F., CIEŚLAK J.
On the debye temperature of BCC-Fe-Cr alloys
International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect, ICAME 2009
Vienna, Austria, 19 – 24 . 07. 2009
POSTER
34. DUBOIS M., NADY A., KRAWITZ A., BACZMAŃSKI A., PIRLING T., LODINI A.
Validation of a Finite Element Model by Neutron Diffraction for the Prediction of Peen
Forming.
5-th Int. Conf. on Mechanical Stress Evaluation by Neutron and Synchrotron RadiationMECA SENS V
Mito, Japan, 10- 12. 11. 2009
POSTER
35. DUDA M., KOZAKOWSKI B., WOLNY J.
Complex structure of Mg2Al3 β and β’ phases.
XX International School on Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter
Białowieża, 04- 11. 07. 2009
POSTER
36. DUDA M., KOZAKOWSKI B., WOLNY J.
Hexagonal layers in β and β’ structure of Mg2Al3
1st International Conference on Complex Metallic Alloys and their Complexity.
Nancy, France, 04-07. 10. 2009
POSTER
143
37. DWUŻNIK M., GONZALEZ-SEVILLA S.
Replacing full custom DAQ test by COTS DAQ components on example of ATLAS
SCTreadout.
TWEPP-09 Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics
Paris, France, 21-25. 09. 2009
ORAL
38. Dydejczyk A.,Kułakowski K. and Marcin Rybak
The norm game on a model network: a critical line.
1st International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence - Semantic Web
Social Networks & Multiagent Systems
Wrocław,05- 07. 09. 2009
ORAL
39. FIEDOR J., ORZECHOWSKA A., LIPIŃSKA M., TRTILEK M., FIEDOR L., BURDA K.
Photosynthetic electron transfer in bacterial reaction centers.
4th Conference of Polish Society of Experimental Plant Biology „Experimental Plant
Biology. Why not?!”
Kraków, 21- 25 09.2009
POSTER
40. FIEDOR J., ORZECHOWSKA A., LIPIŃSKA M., TRTILEK M., STRZAŁKA K., FIEDOR L., BURDA K.
Photosynthetic electron transfer in bacterial reaction centers studied by absorption and
thermoluminescence spectroscopies.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
41. FIGIEL H.
XLII Ogólnopolskie Seminarium na Temat Magnetycznego Rezonansu Jądrowego i Jego Zastosowań,
Kraków, 01- 02.12.2009
PRZEWODNICTWO SESJI
42. FIGIEL H., PRONIEWSKI B., ŁAGUDZA E., DROŻDŻ A.
IV International Symposium on Medical Physics
Szczyrk, 15 – 18. 06. 2009
H. Figiel – PRZEWODNICTWO SESCJI
43. FIGIEL H, SKÓRKA T.
Aspekty fizyczne i rozwój obrazowania magnetyczno – rezonansowego.
XL Zjazd Fizyków Polskich,
Kraków, 06-11.09.2009
Członek Naukowego Komitetu Doradczego
REFERAT
44. FIGIEL H., ŻYWCZAK A., SELVARAJ N. B.
II polskie Forum – Ogniwa Paliwowe i Technologie Wodorowe,
Kocierz, 07-10. 09. 2009
H. Figiel – CZŁONEK KOMITETU ORGANIZACYJNEGO
144
45. GAWROŃSKI P., CHIZHIK A., JUAN M. BLANCO J. M., GONZALEZ J.
Influence of the circular magnetic field and the external stress on the remagnetization process in
Fe-rich amorphous wires.
Soft Magnetic Materials 19
Turyn, Włochy, 06-09. 09. 2009
POSTER
46. GRABOWSKA-BOŁD I., BOŁD T.
The atlas experiment at the large hadron collider.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
47. GONDEK E., POKLADKO M., DANEL A., NIZIOŁ J., ARMATYS P., KWIECIEŃ B., KULIG E., SANETRA J.
Efekt fotowoltaiczny na bazie pochodnych pirazolu.
Modyfikacja Polimerów. Stan i perspektywy w roku 2009, Politechnika Wrocławska.
Karczowiska k/ Legnicy, 23. 09. 2009
POSTER
48. HABERKO J., BERNASIK A., ŁUŻNY W., RACZKOWSKA J., RYSZ J., BUDKOWSKI A.
Spontaneous and substrate- induced self-assembly is thin films of conjugated polymers.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
ORAL PAPER
49. HAŁAS A., STRZAŁKA K., BURDA K.
Influence of copper and cadmium ions on the electron transport in photosystem II.
Conference DSB 09,
Aberdeen, UK, 13-20. 09. 2009
POSTER
50. HAŁAS A., STRZAŁKA K., BURDA K.;
Influence of copper and cadmium ions on the electron transport in photosystem II.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28- 29. 09. 2009
POSTER
51. HAŁAS A., STRZAŁKA K.,BURDA K.;
Inhibitory action of copper and cadmium ions on electron transfer in photosystem II”.
4th Conference of Polish Society of Experimental Plant Biology „Experimental Plant
Biology.Why not?!”
Kraków,21-25. 09.2009
POSTER
52. HARAŃCZYK H., CZAK J., NOWAK P., NIZIOŁ J.
Initial phases of dry DNA rehydration by NMR and sorption isotherm.
XLIV Zakopane School of Physics: International Symposium: breaking frontiers:
Submicron structures in physics and biology.
Zakopane, 18- 23. 05. 2009
The Henryk Niewodniczański Institute of Nuclear Physics, PAN, Kraków
REPORT
145
53. IHOU-MOUKO H., MERCIER C., MARS K., PONT G., TOBOŁA J., SCHERRER H.,
Thermoelectric properties of the solid solutions Mg2Si1-xGex doped with Bi and Ga.
International Conference on Thermoelectrics ICT2009.
Freiburg, Germany, 26- 30. 07. 2009
POSTER
54. JABŁOŃSKA M., TYRANKIEWICZ U.,SKÓRKA T., FIGIEL H., SEINZE-PALUCHOWSKA, WOŹNIAK M.,
CHŁOPICKI S.,
Wieloparametrowa ocena MR czynności serca w obrazowaniu mysiego modelu niewydolności
Tgaq*44.
XLII Ogólnopolskie Seminarium na Temat Magnetycznego Rezonansu Jądrowego
i Jego Zastosowań.
Kraków, 01-02.12. 2009
POSTER
55. JANCZYSZYN J.
Benchmark for:
Radionuclides production
Heat generation
Rates in LEAD TARGET exposed to 660 mEv PROTONS
IAEA Coordinated Research Project “Analytical and Experimental Benchmark
Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)” seminar
Vienna, Austria, 25 – 30. 01. 2009
ORAL
56. JAWORSKI C.M., CHEN H.Y., SAVVIDES N., WIENDLOCHA B., TOBOŁA J., HEREMANS J.P.
Experimental and theoretical investigations of the hole Fermi surface Mg2Sn.
International Conference on Thermoelectrics ICT2009.
Freiburg, Germany, 26 – 30. 07. 2009
ORAL
57. JELEŃ D., RÓŻAŃSKI K.,ZIMNOCH M., KUC T.
Assessing diurnal changes of carbon budget in the urban atmosphere: combined use of
CO2,13CO2/12CO2, 12C18O16O/12C16O2 and 14CO2/12CO2 mixing ratios.
X Isotope Workshop
Złotniki Lubańskie, 22- 26. 06. 2009
ORAL
58. JODŁOWSKI P., KALITA S.J.
Laboratorium spektrometrii gamma do dokładnych pomiarów stężeń radionuklidów
w próbkach środowiskowych.
V Krajowa Konferencja Radiochemii i Chemii Jądrowej
Kraków-Przegorzały, 24- 27. 05. 2009
ORAL
59. JONCOUR L.L., PANICAUD B., BACZMAŃSKI A., FRANCOIS M., BRAHAM CH., BUTURYN G. AND
PARADOWSKA A.
Large Deformation and Mechanical Effects of Damage in Aged Duplex Steel.
Book of Abstracts of the 5-th Int. Conf. On Mechanical Sress Evaluation by Neutron and Synchrotron
Radiation – MECA SENS V
Mito, Japan, 10-12. 10.2009
ORAL
146
60. JUNG A.
Technical Development of Extracorporeal Liver Support Therapy.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
ORAL
61. JUNG A., KRISPER P. , ZADORA M. , HADITSCH B. ,STAUBER R. , HOLZERH., SCHNEDITZD.
Clearance and rate of conjugated bilirubin removal during extracorporeal liver supporttherapy with
FPSA Prometheus.
11th World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering.
Munich, Germany, 07-12. 09. 2009
ORAL
62. KACZMARSKA M., ŻYDEK D., FORNAL M., GRODZICKI T., KOCHOWSKA, E., KOZAK K., MATLAK
K.,KORECKI J., BURDA K.
Influence of alpha radiation on the stability of erythrocytes.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków,28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
63. KHACHATRYAN G., NIEZNALSKA M., LUBERDA-DURNAŚ K.,BURDA K., KHACHATRYAN K.,
MICHALSKI O., TOMASIK P., STOBIŃSKI L.
Titrimetric determination of the carboxylic and hydroxyl groups in functionalized multi- walled carbon nanotubes.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków,28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
64. KLISCH M., RÓŻAŃSKI K., WACHNIEW P.,
The influence of hydrological processes and climatic changes on carbon and nitrogen
cycles in Lake Gościąż- from Younger Dryas to late Holocene.
European Geophysical Union 2009
Vienna, Austria, 19.04.-25.04.2009
POSTER
65. KLISCH M., RÓŻAŃSKI K., WACHNIEW P.
Changes of hydrology and carbon cycling In a mid-latitude lake from Late Glacial to late
Holocene: model-data comparison for lake Gościaż, central Poland
X Isotope Workshop
Złotniki Lubańskie,22- 26. 06. 2009
POSTER
66. KOŁODZIEJ T., KRÓL G., TABIŚ W., TARNAWSKI Z., KĄKOL Z., PRZEWOŹNIK J., KOZŁOWSKI A.
The switching of magnetic easy axis in Fe3O4 single crystal observed by electrical resistivitychanges.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków,28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
67. KOPEĆ M., CETNAR J.
Heliumproduction predictionin gascooledHTRusing full coresimulation.
Seventh Eurepean Commision conference on Euratom research and training in reactor systems,
FISA 2009,
Prague, Czech Republic, 22-24. 06. 2009
POSTER
147
68. KOWALIK M., ZALECKI R., KOŁODZIEJCZYK A.,
Electronic states of collosal magnetoresistive manganites La0.67Pb0.33Mn1-xFexO3 from
photoemission spectroscopy
8 Narodowa Konferencja Użytkowników Promieniowania Synchrotronowego KSUPS-8
Podlesice, 24-26. 09. 2009
POSTER
69. KOWALIK M., ZALECKI R., KOŁODZIEJCZYK A., PRZEWOŹNIK J., KAPUSTACz.
Photoemission electronic states of colossal magnetoresistive manganites La0.67Pb0.33(Mn1xFex)O3
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
70. KOZIOŁ A.
Growth and Spin Structure of Ultrathin Fe Films on W(110).
International Summer School Physics of Funcional Micro-and Nanostructures.
Hamburg, Germany, 14-26. 09. 2009
POSTER
71. KOZIOŁ A., KOZIOŁ A., MATLAK K, ŚLĘZAK M., ŚLĘZAK T., ZAJAC M., RÜFFER R., KORECKI J.
Growth and Spin Structure of Ultrathin Fe Films on W(110).
20th International Colloquium on Magnetic Films and Surfaces
Berlin, Germany, 20-24. 07. 2009
POSTER
72. KOZŁOWSKI A.
Axis switching studied by magnetic and electrical measurements.
Workshop, Magnetite 2009,
Prague, Czech Republic, 28-29. 01. 2009
ORAL
73. KRAWCZYK M.
Communities in social networks.
International Multi-Conference on Biometrics and Kansei Engineering ICBAKE
Cieszyn, 25-28. 06. 2009
ORAL
74. KRAWCZYK M.
Communities in networks.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications,
Kraków,28-29.05. 2009
ORAL
75. KRAWCZYK M.
Identification of communities in social networks.
The 2009 International Conference on Advances in Social Networks Analysis and Mining.
Athens, Greece, 20-22. 07. 2009
POSTER.
76. KUCZERA P., KOZAKOWSKI B., STRZAŁKA R., WOLNY J.
Physical space structure refinement of the Basic Ni-rich decagonal Al-Ni-C0 quasicrystal.
51 Konwersatorium Krystalograficzne
Wrocław, 25 –27. 06. 2009
POSTER
148
77. KUCZERA P., KOZAKOWSKI B., STRZAŁKA R., WOLNY J.
Physical space structure refinement of the Basic Ni-rich decagonal Al-Ni-C0 quasicrystal.
XX International School on Physics and Chemistry of Condensed Matter
Białowieża, 04- 11. 07. 2009
POSTER
78. KUCZERA P., KOZAKOWSKI B., WOLNY J., STEURER W.
Real space structure refinement of the Basic Ni-richdecagonal Al-Ni-Co phase.
6th InternationalConference on APERIODIC’09
Liverpool, UK,13-18. 09. 2009
POSTER
79. KUCZERA P., KOZAKOWSKI B., WOLNY J., STREURERW.
Decagonal Al-Ni-Co quasicrystal superstructure type I refinement – preliminary results.
1st International Conference on Complex Metallic Alloys and their Complexity
(C-MAC 1)
Nancy, France,04-07. 10.2009
POSTER
80. KUCZERA P., KOZAKOWSKI B., WOLNY J., STRZAŁKA R.
Real space refinement of basic Ni-RICH Al-Ni-Co Quasicrystal.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and Its Applications,
Kraków,28-29.05. 2009
POSTER
81. KULIS SZ., IDZIK M., SWIENTEK K.,
Design and measurements of 10 bit pipeline ADC for the Luminosity
Detector at ILC”
Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, TWEPP-09.
Paris, France, 21-25.09. 2009
POSTER
82. KUŁAKOWSKI K.
Altruism and reputation - cooperation within groups.
ECCS’09,European Conference on Complex Systems.
University ofWarwick, UK, 21- 25.09. 2009
ORAL
83. KUŁAKOWSKI K., DYDEJCZYK A., RYBAK M.
The norm game – how a norm fails
ICCS 2009,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana USA, 25-27.05. 2009
ORAL
84. KUŁAKOWSKI K., DYDEJCZYK A., RYBAK M.
The norm game – how a norm fails
International Workshop on Coping with Crises in Complex Socio-Economic System.
ETH Zurich , Switzerland,8-13, 06. 2009
ORAL
149
85. KUŁAKOWSKI K., GRONEK P.
Model Zallera opinii publicznej z oddziaływaniami.
4 Ogólnopolskie Sympozjum FENS 2009
Rzeszów,07-09. 05. 2009
ORAL
86. KUŁAKOWSKI K., GRONEK P.
The zaller-deffuant model of mass opinion
Dynamics days europe 2009
Göttingen, germany, 31.08-04. 09. 2009
POSTER
87. KUŁAKOWSKI K., MAŃKA-KRASOŃ A.,MWIJAGE A.
Star-clique transformation and degree correlations in networks.
Summer Solstice 2009 International Conference on Discrete Models of Complex
Systems.
Gdańsk, 22-24. 06. 2009
ORAL
88. KUŁAKOWSKI K., NAWOJCZYK M.,
Sociophysics - an astriding science
Society-Culture-Technology at the Dawn of the 21st Century, AGH-UST
Kraków, 21-22 . 09. 2009
ORAL
89. KUNA A., SIKORA W.
Symmetry analysis of behavior of family {R_{6}M_{23}} compounds under hydrogeneration .
1st International Conference on Complex Metallic Alloys and their Complexity
(C-MAC 1),
France, 04-07. 10. 2009
POSTER
90. KUNA A., SIKORA W.,
Symmetry Analysis of Hydrogen Related Structural Transformations.
3th Hydrogen&Energy Symposium.
Braunwald, Switzerland, 25 – 30. 01. 2009
POSTER
91. KUNA A., SIKORA W.
Symmetry analysis in the investigation of magnetic and structural phase
Transitions in Hydrates R_6 M_23 D_x Type Compounds.
14th International Seminar on Neutron Scattering Investigation in Condensed Matter,Faculty of
Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University
Poznań, 14- 16. 05. 2009
ORAL PAPER
92. KUNA A., SIKORA W.
Symmetry analysis in the investigation of magnetic and structural phase transitions in hydrides
{R_{6}M_{23}D_{x}} type compounds.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28–29. 05. 2009
POSTER
150
93. KUNA A., SIKORA W.
The symmetry analysis of structural deformations related with hydrogen
implementation in borohydrides.
Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter (SSPCM 2009) : the tenth international
school on Theoretical physics.
Myczkowce,02- 09. 09. 2009
ORAL PAPER
94. KWAŚNIOWKI A.
Electrical Control of Exchange Interation Between Electrons in Nanowrite Quantum Dots.
35. First NanoToday Conference
Singapore, 02- 05. 08. 2009
POSTER
95. KWAŚNIOWSKI A.
Kwantowa bramka logiczna XNOR na spinach elektronów w poczwórnej kropce kwantowej.
Sympozjum Sieci Laboratorium Fizycznych Podstaw Przetwarzaniainformacji
Sopot,23-25. 04. 2009
CONTRIBUTED PRESENTATION
96. KWAŚNIOWSKI A., ADAMOWSKI J.
Spin-charge conversion in proposed realization of exclusive NOR gate on elektron spin qubits in
quadruple quantum dots.
5th International School and Conference on Spintronics and Quantum Information, Technology.
Kraków, 07-11. 07. 2009
POSTER PRESENTATION
97. LANKOSZ M., SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., CHWIEJ J.,WÓJCIK S., ADAMEK D.,
KRYGOWSKA-WAJS A.,TOMIK B., SETKOWICZ Z., STEGOWSKI Z., RICKERS K.,ZAJĄC D., SUSINI J.
58-th Annual Confrerence on Applications of X-ray Analysis:
Denver X-ray Conference.
Collorado Springs, CO, USA,, 27-31. 07. 2009
ORAL
98. LUBERDA-DURNAŚ K., NIEZNALSKA M., TOMASIK P., KHACHATRYAN G., KHACHATRYAN K.,
MICHALSKI O.,STOBIŃSKI L., MATLAK K., KORECKI J., BURDA K.
Studies of Fe-binding sites within multi-walled carbon nanotubes using Moessbauer spectroscopy”
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków,28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
99. ŁABNO B.,PYTLIK L., ADAMOWSKI J., WOLNY J., DUDA M.
Configuration energy analysis of Beta-Mg2Al3 cluster structure.
6th International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals
Liverpool, UK,13-18. 09. 2009
POSTER
100. MALARZ K., KUŁAKOWSKI K.
Indifferents as an interface betwech Contra and Pro
4th Polish Symposium on Econo- and Sociophysics
Rzeszów, 07- 09. 05. 2009
ORAL
151
101. MAŃKA-KRASOŃ A., KUŁAKOWSKI K.
Frustration and collectivity in spatial networks.
PPAM 2009 9th International Conference On Parallel Processing and Applied Mathematics.
Workshop on Collective Complex Systems
Wrocław, 13- 16.09. 2009
ORAL
102. MATLAK K., FREINDL K., KOZIOŁ A., SLEZAK T., SLEZAK M., SPIRIDIS N., WILGOCKA-SLEZAK D.,
KORECKI J.
Hyperfine fields at the Fe(001)/MgO(001) interfaces studied by CEMS.
European Conference on Surface Science, ECOSS.
Parma, Italy, 30 .08–04. 09. 2009
POSTER
103. NĘCKI J.M., BOCZEK S., RÓŻAŃSKI K.
Reconnaissance measurements of soil respiration fluxes of CO2 and CH4 in the Podhale region,
southern Poland.
8th International Carbon Dioxide Conference.
Jena, Germany, 13- 19. 09. 2009
POSTER
104. NIZIOŁ J., PIELICHOWSKI J.
NLO properties of poled azocarbazole- epoxy composite.
10 ICFPAM : 10th International Conference on Frontiers of Polymers and Advanced
Materials.
Santiago de Chile, 28.09. – 02. 10. 2009
PAPER
105. NOWAK M.P, SZAFRAN B., BEDNAREK S., CHWIEJ T., PEETERS F.M.
Purification of the spin-orbit coupling type by the Zeeman effect in quantum dots
Fifth International School and Conference on Spintronics and Quantum Information
Technology, SPINTECH V.
Kraków,07-11. 07. 2009
POSTER
106. ONDEK E., POKLADKO M.,DANEL A., NIZIOŁ J. ,ARMATYS P., KWIECIEŃ B.,KULIG E., SANETRA J.
Efekt fotowoltaiczny na bazie pochodnych pirazolu.
Modyfikacja Polimerów.
Karczowiska k/ Legnicy, 20- 23. 09. 2009
POSTER
107. PIŚ K., MALARZ K.
Spins Flips Avalanches in Long-range Interacting Spin Systems.
Frontiers in Moder Physics and Its Applications
Kraków, 28 – 29. 05. 2009
ORAL
108. POHORECKI W., BILSKI P.,KUC T., OSTACHOWICZ B.
Thermoluminescent method for measurements of tritium production in neutronic experiments”
Lumdetr 2009 (7th Int. Conf. on Luminescence Detectors and Transformers of Ionizing Radiation)
Kraków, 12- 17. 07. 2009
POSTER
152
109. PONIEDZIAŁEK M.R., SZAFRAN B.
Violation of Onsager symmetry in single-electron transport through a cavity coupled to a charged
quantum ring.
XXXVIII International School and Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors.
“Jaszowiec”, Krynica Zdrój,20-26.06. 2009
CONTRIBUTED PLENARY TALK
110. PRONIEWSKI B., FIGIEL H., PAŁASZ T.,
Konstrukcja cewek w.cz. do systemu obrazowaniaz polem 0.088 T
XLII Ogólnopolskie Seminarium na Temat Magnetycznego Rezonansu Jądrowego i Jego Zastosowań.
Kraków, 01-02. 12. 2009
POSTER
111. PRZEWOŹNIK J., KAPUSTA CZ.
Magnetic and electrical transport properties of the (La0.67A 0.33)(Mn1-xSnx)O3- δ(A=Ca, Sr) compounds.
Frontiers in Moder Physics and Its Applications
Kraków, 28 – 29. 05. 2009
ORAL
112. PRZYBOROWSKI D., MAREK IDZIK M.
Development of a General Purpose Low–power Small–area 10 bit
Current Steering CMOS DAC”
16th International Conference Mixed Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems MIXDES09
Łódź, 25-27. 06. 2009
ORAL
113. RÓŻAŃSKI K., ROEDENBECK C., NEUBERT R., LEVIN I.
Long-term observations of fossil fuel CO2 over Europe and comparison with transported inventories.
ICOS Workswhop on Determining European fossil fuel Co2 – recent developments in modelling and
observations.
Heidelberg, Germany, 04- 05. 05. 2009
ORAL
114. SAMEK L.
a)”Proper heating of historic wooden churches- characterization of air flows, particulate deposition
and strains in the wood”- bilateral cooperation Flanders-Poland.
b)”Influence of the excessive use of a museum on the condition of ancient monuments based on
the case of Royal Museum in the Wawel Castle in Krakow, Poland”- bilateralcooperation FlandersPoland.
c) Intelligent system for air pollution measurements as a tool for air protection managment” – projekt badawczy z IChiTJ w Warszawie
Planning and Coordination Meeting.
Vienna, Austria, 29 – 30. 01. 2009
ORAL
115. SAMEK L., LANKOSZ M., CZYŻYCKI M.,
X-ray fluorescence elemental analysis of particulate matter collected in Poland.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28-29. 09. 2009
POSTER
153
116. SARNA M.,DRUKAŁA J., SZYMOŃSKI M.,MADEJA Z.
Topographical guidance of tumor cells migrating on multiple grooved substrata.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków,28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
117. SCHNEIDER K., KAPUSTA Cz., ZAJĄC D.A., ŻUKROWSKI J., PRZEWOŹNIK J., SIKORA M.,
MARQUINA C.I., IBARRA M.R., ŚWIERCZYNA A., URBANIK A.
Carbon Coated Fe and Fe3O4 derived nanoparticles for enhanced mri contrast.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków,28-29. 05. 2009
118. SELVARAJ N.B., CHAPELLE D., PERREUX D.,FIGIEL H.,
2D Modelling of temperature evolution inside a metal hydride storage tank during refueling.
II polskie Forum – Ogniwa Paliwowe i Technologie Wodorowe.
Kocierz, 0 7-10. 09. 2009
POSTER
119. SEREMAK- PECZKIS P., SCHNEIDER K., ZAJĄCZKOWSKI W., KAPUSTA CZ., SIKORA M.,
ZAJĄC D.A., PASIERB P., BUĆKO M., DROŻDŻ-CIEŚLA E., RĘKAS M.
Xafs study of BaCe1-xTixO3 and Ba1-yCe1-xYxO3protonic solid electrolytes.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications,
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
120. SIKORA M.
Magnetic circular dichroism in resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and under high pulsed magnetic
field.
International workshop on the science and instrumentation at the European XFEL.
Budapeszt, Węgry 09-11. 12. 2009 r.
ORAL
121. SIKORA M., GLATZEL P.
2p-5d RIXS of tungsten and rhenium oxides.
Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering Workshop
Francja, 29.06.-1. 07. 2009
POSTER
122. SIKORA M., KAPUSTA CZ., KNIZEK K., JIRAK Z.,GLATZEL P.
X-ray spectroscopic study of transition metals’ charge and spin state in LaMn1-xCoxO3 perovskite
series.
XL Zjazd Fizyków Polskich,
Kraków,06-11. 09. 2009
POSTER
123. SIKORA M., KAPUSTA CZ., J.M. DE TERESA, KNIZEK K., MICHALIK J., MATHON O., GLATZEL P.
Magnetic moment in transition metal oxides investigated by hard X-ray spectroscopy.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications,
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
ORAL
154
124. SIKORA W., FIGIEL H., BUDZIAK A.,
Analysis of possible magnetic structures in {ErMn_{2}D_{2}}deuteride.
3th International Symposium Hydrogen&Energy.
Braunwald, Switzerland, 25 – 30. 01.2009
ORAL
125. SIKORA W., KUNA A.
Symmetry analysis of hydrogen related structural transformations.
3th International Symposium Hydrogen&Energy.
Braunwald, Switzerland, 25 – 30. 01. 2009
POSTER
126. SIKORA W., KUNA A.
Symmeetry analysis of behavior of family {R_{6}M_{23}} compounds under hydrogeneration.
International Conference on Complex Metallic Alloys and their Complexity.
Nancy, France, 04- 07. 10. 2009
POSTER
127. SIKORA W., KUNA A.
The symmetry analysis of structural deformations and associated magnetic orderings related with
hydrogen implementation in intermetallic
{R_{6}M_{23}}compounds.
51 Konwersatorium Krystalograficzne = Polish Crystallographic Meeting :
III sesjanaukowa i warsztaty PTK
Wrocław, 25–27. 06. 2009
ORAL PAPER
128. SPISAK B. J., WOŁOSZYN M., WÓJCIK P., ZEGRODNIK M.
The Wigner function description of the multilayered nanostructure with magnetic impurities.
16th Interantional Conference on Electron Dynamics In Semiconductors,
Optoelectronicsand Nanostructures
Montpellier, France, 24-28. 08. 2009
POSTER
129. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M.
Biochemical Characterization of Brain Glioma Tissue Using Synchrotron Radiation Microprobe.
4th SOLEIL Users’Meeting, Ecole Polytechnique-Palaiseau
Auditorium ARAGO,
St. Aubin, Francja,21 – 22. 01. 2009
POSTER
130. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., CHWIEJ J., LANKOSZ M., WÓJCIK S., ADAMEK D.,
KRYGOWSKA-WAJS A.
Neuroimaging with Synchrotron Radiation Based Techniques in Parkinson’s Disease.
International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease (ICAD 2009)
Vienna, Austria, 11-16. 07. 2009
POSTER
155
131. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., CHWIEJ J., WÓJCIK S., SMYKLA A., STĘGOWSKI Z.,
LANKOSZ M., ADAMEK D., KRYGOWSKA-WAJS A.
Synchrotron radiation microbeam analysis of nervous tissue in neurological disorders.
EMAS 2009, 11th European workshop on Modern Developments and Applications in
Microbeam Analysis.
Gdynia/Rumia, Gdańsk, 10-14. 05. 2009.
POSTER
132. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., KRYGOWSKA-WAJS A., RAK M., THOR P.
Wpływ stymulacji nerwu błędnego na skład biochemiczny tkanki mózgu szczurów– w odniesieniu
do choroby Parkinsona.
IV Zjazd Sekcji Schorzeń Pozapiramidowych Polskiego Towarzystwa Neurologicznego.
Bronisławów, 21-24. 05. 2009
POSTER
133. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., LANKOSZ M., ADAMEK D., SMYKLA A.
Determination of Biochemical Composition of Human Brain Gliomas with the Use of Synchrotron
Radiation
HASYLAB User’s Meeting
Hamburg, Germany, 30. 01. 2009
POSTER
134. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., LANKOSZ M., SMYKLA A., ADAMEK D.
Synchrotron Radiation as a Tool of Biochemical Analysis in Brain Cancers.
VIII Krajowe Sympozjum Użytkowników Promieniowania Synchrotronowego.
Podlesice,24-26. 09. 2009
POSTER
135. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., LANKOSZ M. , STĘGOWSKI Z., ADAMEK D.
Biochemical Characterization of Brain Glioma Tissue Using Synchrotron Radiation Microprobe.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków,28- 29. 05. 2009
ORAL
136. SZCZERBOWSKA-BORUCHOWSKA M., SMYKLA A., ,LANKOSZ M., ADAMEK D.
Biochemical Characterization of Brain Glioma Tissue Using Synchrotron Radiation Microprobe.
4th SOLEIL Users’Meeting,
Ecole Polytechnique-Palaiseau
Paris, Francja, 21 - 22 01. 2009
POSTER
137. ŚLĘZAK T., KOZIOŁ A., MATLAK K., RÜFFER R., ŚLĘZAK M., ZAJĄC M., KORECKIJ.
Magnetism of ultra-thin iron films seen by the nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28–29. 05. 2009
REPORT
138. ŚLĘZAK M., KOZIOŁ A, MATLAK K., ŚLĘZAK T., ZAJĄC M. , RÜFFER R., KORECKI J.
Growth and Spin Structure of Ultrathin Fe Films on W(110).
European Conference on Surface Science, ECOSS
Parma, Italy, 30. 08 –0 4. 09. 2009
POSTER
156
139. ŚLĘZAK T., ŚLĘZAK M., SPIRIDIS N., FREINDL K., ZAJĄC M., STANKOV S., RÜFFER R.,KORECKI J.
Interlayer exchange coupling induced suppression of spin fluctuations in Fe(001) monolayer as
seen from Grazing Incidence Nuclear Resonant Scattering of X-rays.
Polarized Neutrons and Synchrotron X-rays for Magnetism,
Bonn, Germany, 02-05. 08. 2009
ORAL
140. ŚLĘZAK T., ŚLĘZAK M., SPIRIDIS N., FREINDL K., ZAJĄC M., STANKOV S., RÜFFER R., KORECKI J.
Magnetism of ultrathin iron films seen by the nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotronradiation.
International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect.
Austria, 19-24. 07. 2009
ORAL
141. ŚLĘZAK T.,ŚLĘZAK M., SPIRIDIS N., FREINDL K., ZAJĄC M., STANKOV S., RÜFFER R., KORECKI J.
Magnetism of ultrathin iron films seen by the nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation.
International Conference on the Application of the Mossbauer Effect (ICAME2009)
Vienna, Austria, 19-24. 07. 2009
ORAL
142. TABIŚ W., KUSZ J., N.-T.H.KIM-NGAN, Z.TARNAWSKI, ZONTONE F., KĄKOL Z., KOZŁOWSKI A.,
KOŁODZIEJ T.
Kinetics of the Verway transition in magnetite
8 Narodowa Konferencja Użytkowników Promieniowania Synchrotronowego
KSUPS-8
Podlesice, 24-26. 09. 2009
POSTER
143. TABIŚ W., TARNAWSKI Z.,
Coherent radiation studies of the Verwey transition.
Workshop, Magnetite 2009,
Prague, Czech Republic,28-29. 01. 2009
ORAL
144. TOBOŁA J., KASPRZYK S., WIENDLOCHA B.
Study of fermi surface properties in disordered thermoelectric from multiply scattering theory calculations.
International Conference on Thermoelectrics ICT2009
Freiburg, Germany, 26- 30. 07. 2009
INVITED
145. TOBOŁA J., MAZET T., RECOUR Q., MALAMAN B.
Symposium “Magnetocalorics and Magnetic Cooling”, Electronic structure of pure and Fe-substituted Mn3Sn2 magneto-caloric systems.
European Congress and Exhibition on Advanced Materials Processes,
EUROMAT2009
Glasgow, UK, 07- 10. 09. 2009
ORAL
146. TOMALA B.
Force of sounds – acoustic levitertion
XXIV International Conference of Physics Students ICPS 2009.
Croatia, Zagreb, 10-18. 08. 2009
POSTER
157
147. TOMKOWICZ J.
Statistics of spin avalanches in antiferromagnetic nano-networks.
ECCS’09,European Conference on Complex Systems,
University of Warwick, UK, 21-25. 09. 2009
POSTER + ORAL
148. TRAFNY M., DROGOWSKA K., KOZŁOWSKI A. METCALF P.A., SZCZERBA M., SOCHA R. P.,
PRZEWOŹNIK J., TARNAWSKI Z., KIM-NGAN N. -T. H., BALOGH A.G., SITKO D.
Characterisation and properties of selected (V1-x(Cr, Ti)x)2O3 thin films.
International Conference “Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków,28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
149. WACH P., RÓŻAŃSKI K., ZIMNOCH M., KOZAK K.
Temporal variability of Radon-222 in near-ground atmosphere.
Radon in Environment 2009
Zakopane,10-14. 05. 2009
POSTER
150. WACH P., WACHNIEW P., RÓŻAŃSKI K., ZIMNOCH M., BOŃCZYK M.
Atmospheric concentrations and soil fluxes of radon- 222 in Krakow, southern Poland.
X Isotope Workshop
Złotniki Lubańskie, 22- 26. 06. 2009
POSTER
151. WACHNIEW P.
Subsurface biogeochemical processes influence chemistry of an Arctic proglacial stream.
HydroEco 2009,
Vienna, Austria,20-23. 04. 2009
ORAL
152. WACHNIEW P.
The hyporheic zone: the hidden dimension of a river.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków, 27-28. 05. 2009
153. WACHNIEW P.
Współczesna depozycja pozakorytowa w przełomowych odcinkach dolin Wisły i Warty w świetle
badań interdyscyplinarnych”
Konferencja Geomorfologów Polskich „Metody badań w geomorfologii”
Kielce,28- 30. 09. 2009
ORAL
154. WACHNIEW P., KALICKI T.,ŁOKAS E., MICHNO A., RADWANEK-BĄK B., SZMAŃDA
J.,SZWARCZEWSKI P.
Last century overbank deposition in the gorge sections of the Vistula and
Warta rivers (Poland): a multidisciplinary study.
GSA Annual Meeting,
Portland, Oregon, USA, 18-21. 10. 2009
POSTER
158
155. WACHNIEW P., MAZUR P., BODZIONY M., OSTACHOWICZ B.
The hydrochemistry of a retreating arctic glacier and its proglacial zone.
GSA Annual Meeting,
Portland, Oregon, USA, 18-21. 10. 2009
ORAL
156. WASILEWSKA-RADWAŃSKA M., AUGUSTYNIAK P.
Multidisciplinary School as a BME Teaching Option”
World Congress 2009 Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering,
Munich, Germany, 07- 12. 09. 2009
ORAL
157. WASILEWSKA-RADWAŃSKA M., STĘPIEŃ A. ,MATUSIAK K., PAWLUS J., JAMROZIK A.
Deconvolution Method Used for Estimation of Radiotracer Transit in Dynamic Kidneys Scintigraphy
VI Symposium on Medical Physics
IV International Symposium on Medical Physics
Szczyrk, 15-18. 06. 2009
REFERAT ORAL
158. WAWSZCZAK R., BRAHAMC., BACZMAŃSKI A., SEILER W., WRÓBEL M., WIERZBANOWSKI K.
Residual Stresses and Stored Energy During Recovery Process.
5-th Int. Conf. on Mechanical Stress Evaluation by Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation- MECA SENS
V
Mito, Japan, 10- 12. 11. 2009
POSTER
159. WĘGRZYNEK D., CHINEA-CANO E.,BRICENO R.D.,HELINSKI M., MARKOWICZ A., WOBRAUSCHEK P., STRELI CH., ZOEGER N., SIMON R., WEITKAMP T., RACK A.,T. DOS SANTOS ROLO.
X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography and fast micro-radiography of malaria transmitting mosquitoes and tsetse flies, mosquitoes and tsetse flies.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków, 27-28. 05. 2009
ORAL
160. WIENDLOCHA B.,TOBOLA J., KAPRZYK S.
First principles study of electronic structure and electron-phonon coupling in superconductors.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
ORAL
161. WIERZBANOWSKI K., BACZMAŃSKI A., TARASIUK J., LIPIŃSKI P., WROŃSKI M.
Mechanical model predictions for Al3Mg2alloy.
1st International Conference on Complex Metallic Alloys and their Complexity
Nancy, France, 04- 07. 10. 2009
POSTER
162. WIERZBANOWSKI K., TARASIUK J., LODINI A.
Optimization of Material Properties Using Genetic Algorithms.
5-th Int. Conf. on Mechanical Stress Evaluation by Neutron and Synchrotron
Radiation- MECA SENS V
Mito, Japan, 10- 12. 11. 2009
ORAL PRESENTATION
159
163. WNĘK A., WOLNY J.
Analiza widma dyfrakcyjnegodwuwymiarowego, aperiodycznego ciągu
Thue- Morse’a.
51 Konwersatorium Krystalograficzne.
Wrocław, 25-27. 06. 2009
POSTER
164. WOCH W.M., CHROBAK M., KOŁODZIEJCZYK A.,
Analysis of resistive superconducting transition of a (Tl0.6Pb0.24Bi0.16)(Ba0.2Sr1.8)Ca2Cu3Oy film on single
lanthanium aluminate.
XIV Krajowa Szkoła Nadprzewodnictwa; Nadprzewodnictwo i niejednorodne układy Skorelowane.
Ostrów Wielkopolski, 13-17. 10. 2009
POSTER
165. WOCH W.M., DUJAVOVA A., ZALECKI R., KOŁODZIEJCZYK A., SOJKOVA M., CHROMIK S.
Susceptibility of (Tl1.85 Re0.15) Ba2Ca2 Cu3O10.3 thin film on sapphire substrate with CeO buffer layer.
XIV Krajowa Szkoła Nadprzewodnictwa; Nadprzewodnictwo i niejednorodne układy Skorelowane.
Ostrów Wielkopolski, 13-17. 10. 2009
POSTER
166. WOCH W.M., ZALECKI R., KOŁODZIEJCZYK A., GRITZNER G.
Critical currents of(Tl0.5 Pb0.5)Sr2(Ca1-xGdx)Cu2Oz bulk superconductors.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
ORAL
167. WOJCIECHOWSKI K., SCHMID M., TOBOŁA J., KOZA M.M., OLECH A., ZYBALA R.
Influence of doping on structural and thermoelectric properties of AgSbSe2
International Conference on Thermoelectrcs ICT2009.
Freiburg, Germany, 26- 30. 07. 2009
POSTER
168. WOLNY J., DUDA M., KOZAKOWSKI B.
Complex structure of Mg2Al3 β and β’ phases.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
POSTER
169. WOLNY J., DUDA M., KOZAKOWSKI B.
Complex structure of Mg2Al3 β and β’ phases.
51 Konwersatorium Krystalograficzne
Wrocław, 25 – 27. 06. 2009
ORAL
170. WOLNY J., DUDA M., KOZAKOWSKI B.
Simple model of Mg2Al3 : β and β’ phases.
6th International Conference on Aperiodic Crystals.
Liverpool, UK, 13- 18. 09. 2009
ORAL
160
171. WOŁOSZYN M., SPISAK B.J., WÓJCIK P., ZEGRODNIK M.
The Wigner function approach to spin-dependent electronic transport in presence of magnetic impurities
SPINTECH V
Kraków, 07 – 11. 07. 2009
POSTER
172. WROŃSKI S., WIERZBANOWSKI K., BACROIX B., WRÓBEL M., WROŃSKI M.
Crystallographic Textures Variation in Asymmetrically Rolled Steel.
International Conference on Processing & Manufacturing of Advanced Materials,
Processing, Fabrication, Properties, Applications.
Berlin, Germany, 25- 29. 08. 2009
POSTER
173. WROŃSKI S., WIERZBANOWSKI K., BACZMAŃSKI A.
Examination of mechanical properties of materials.
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications.
Kraków, 28-29. 05. 2009
ORAL
174. ZAJĄC M., ŚLĘZAK, T. ŚLĘZAK, K. MATLAK, N. SPIRIDIS, K. FREINDL, J. KORECKI
Magnetic and structural properties of epitaxial Fe/Fe3O4 trilayers.
European Conference on Surface Science, ECOSS
Parma, Italy, 30. 08.– 04. 09. 2009
POSTER
175. ZAJĄC M., ŚLĘZAK T., ŚLĘZAK M., SPIRIDIS N., FREINDL K., WILGOCKA- ŚLĘZAK D., MATLAK K.,
ZACKIEWICZ E., KORECKI J.
Oxygen adsorption on Fe(110).
24, International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect,
Austria,19-24. 07. 2009
POSTER
176. ZALECKI R., WOCH W.M., KOWALIK M., KOŁODZIEJCZYK A.,
Bismuth valences in a Tl0.7Bi0.3Ba0.4Sr1.6CaCu2Oy superconductor from X-ray photoemission Spectroscopy.
XIV Krajowa Szkoła Nadprzewodnictwa; Nadprzewodnictwo i niejednorodne układy Skorelowane.
Ostrów Wielkopolski, 13-17.10. 2009
POSTER
177. ZIĘBA A..
Physical and non-physical quantities and units. A case study of candela.
Proceedings of the SEFI Conference: Physics Teaching in Engineering Education.
Institute of Physics, Wrocław University of Technology
Wrocław, Poland, 10-12. 09. 2009.
ORAL
178. ZIĘBA A., RAMZA P.
Niepewność wartości średniej serii obserwacji skorelowanych (II).
(Uncertainty of the mean of autocorrelated observations (II)).
Materiały VII KonferencjiNaukowo-Technicznej Podstawowe Problemy Metrologii
PPM’09,
Sucha Beskidzka, 10–13. 05. 2009.
ORAL
161
179. ZIMNOCH M., NĘCKI J.M., GODŁOWSKA J., RÓŻAŃSKI K.
Assessment of surface CO2 fluxes in the urban area using sodar measurements.
8th International Carbon Dioxide Conference
Jena, Germany, 13-18. 09. 2009
POSTER
180. ZIMNOCH M., GODŁOWSKA J.
Determination of Rn-222 Flux in Kraków urban area using Alpha spectrometry and sodar measurements.
7th International Conference on Air Quality – Science and Application (formerly
Urban Quality Conference)
Istambul, Turcja, 24-27. 03. 2009
ORAL
181. ŻYWCZAK A., SHINYA DAIGO,GONDEK Ł., AKITO TAKASAKI, FIGIEL H.
Hydryding of Ti45Zr38Ni17-xFex and Ti45Zr38Ni17-xFex Cox nano-compounds.
Hydrogen-Metal Systems
Lucca (Bagra) Italy, 12-17. 07. 2009
POSTER
182. ŻYWCZAK A., SHINYA DAIGO , GONDEK Ł, AKITO TAKASAKI, FIGIEL H.
Hydrogenation of Ti45Zr38Ni17-xCox nano-alloy.
II polskie Forum – Ogniwa Paliwowe i Technologie Wodorowe
Kocierz, 07-10. 09. 2009
POSTER
162
163
164
Scientific events
Titles, positions, etc.
Full professor position
prof. dr hab. Stanisław Bednarek
01-07-2009
prof. dr hab. inż. Marek Lankosz
01-11-2009
Associate professor position
dr hab. inż. Khalid Saeed
01-10-2009
Habilitations and PhD Defenses
Habilitations
dr Jerzy Szczęsny
7.12.2009r (Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny w Krakowie)
PhD defenses
1. mgr inż. Barbara Toczek
prof. Barbara Wosiek - IFJ PAN
obrona – 26.01.2009r - Katedra Oddziaływań i Detekcji Cząstek
2. mgr inż. Katarzyna Matusiak
dr hab. M. Wasilewska-Radwańska
obrona – 11.03.2009r – Katedra Fizyki Medycznej i Biofizyki
3. mgr inż. Jan Michalik
prof. Cz. Kapusta
obrona – 23.03.2009r – wyróżnienie - Katedra Fizyki Ciała Stałego – doktorat polsko-hiszpański
4. mgr inż. Bartłomiej Wiendlocha
dr hab. inż. J. Toboła
obrona – 22.05.2009r – wyróżnienie - Katedra Fizyki Materii Skondensowanej
5. mgr inż. Renata Kopeć
doc. dr hab. P. Olko IFJ PAN
obrona –8.06.2009r – Katedra Fizyki Medycznej i Biofizyki
6. mgr Vit Prochazka
prof. Cz. Kapusta
obrona – 25.09.2009r – Katedra Fizyki Ciała Stałego – doktorat polsko-czeski
165
7. mgr inż. Michał Ślęzak
prof. J. Korecki
obrona – 2.10.2009r - Katedra Fizyki Ciała Stałego
8. mgr inż. Marzena Kastyak
prof. M. Lankosz
obrona – 12.10.2009r – Katedra Zastosowań Fizyki Jądrowej
9. mgr inż. Artur Kwaśniowski
prof. J. Adamowski
obrona – 16.10.2009r – Katedra Informatyki Stosowanej i Fizyki Komputerowej
10. mgr inż. Wojciech Szczerba
prof. Cz. Kapusta
obrona – 26.10.2009r – wyróżnienie - Katedra Fizyki Ciała Stałego.
11. mgr inż. Katarzyna Grymek
prof. M. Dziedzicka-Wasylewska UJ
obrona – 21.12.2009r – Katedra Fizyki Medycznej i Biofizyki
(nadanie stopnia doktora i wyróżnienie zatwierdzone przez RW w dniu 1.02.2010r)
Organized Conferences
1st MC-PAD Network Traning on Readout Electronics workshop
Cracow, September 17-19, 2009
XL Zjazd Fizyków Polskich
Kraków, 6 - 11 września 2009
The 2009 Europhysics Conference on High Energy Physics
Cracow, 16 - 22 July, 2009
International Multi-Conference on Biometrics and Kansei Engineering
Cieszyn, 25 - 28 June 2009
COMMON Europe Congress 2009
Kraków, 6 - 9 June 2009
Frontiers in Modern Physics and its Applications
Kraków, 28 - 30 May 2009
Cracow Epiphany Conference on Hadron Interactions at the Dawn of the LHC
5 – 7 January 2009, Cracow, Poland
Planning and Coordination Meeting, Krakow, 17-19 Czerwiec 2009
Miejsce konferencji-hotel Cracovia, w ramach projektu Technical Cooperation Project RER/2/005
“Characterizing Seasonal Variations in Elemental Particulate Matter Concentrations in European
Urban and Rural Areas under Different Climatic Conditions”, prezentacja projektów, które były i są
przeze mnie realizowane związanych z zanieczyszczeniami pyłowymi powietrza, L. Samek, oral, organizacja konferencji (20 uczestników- 9 państw)
166
Faculty Seminars
2009/01/09
“W kierunku protezy siatkówki oka wysokiej rozdzielczości - badania podstawowe i wyzwania techniczne”, dr inż. Paweł Hottowy (University of California, Santa Cruz)
2009/01/16
1. “Eksperymentalne badanie procesów m-atomowych i m-molekularnych w katalizie mionowej reakcji syntezy jądrowej”, dr inż. Mariusz Filipowicz (Katedra Zrównoważonego Rozwoju Energetycznego WPiE AGH)
2. “ Krótkie omówienie wybranych punktów regulaminu studiów “, dr inż. Krzysztof Malarz (WFiIS
AGH)
2009/01/23
“Nowe metody i technologie w nauczaniu fizyki - CLICKERS”, prof. Teresa Wrześniewska (University
of British Columbia, Canada)
2009/02/20
“Seminarium dydaktyczne”, dr hab. Andrzej Lenda, dr inż. Krzysztof Malarz (WFiIS AGH)
2009/02/27
“Aspekty techniczne LHC”, dr inż. Jan Kulka (KFMS WFiIS AGH)
2009/03/06
“Operacje na spinie pojedynczego elektronu w zastosowaniu do budowy bramek logicznych komputera kwantowego”, prof. dr hab. Stanisław Bednarek (KISiFK WFiIS AGH)
2009/03/13
“Jak zmienia się funkcja falowa elektronu, gdy w ciele stałym lokalizuje się na atomie?”, prof. dr hab.
Józef Spałek (IF UJ i WFiIS AGH)
2009/03/20
“Defect structure and oxygen diffusion in ferroelectric ceramics”, Dr. habil. Adam Balogh (Institute
of Materials Science, Technische universitat Darmstadt)
2009/03/27
“Akceleracja obliczeń metodami sprzętowymi w ACK CYFRONET AGH”, prof. dr hab. Kazimierz Wiatr
(ACK CYFRONET AGH)
2009/04/3
“Obliczenia ab initio struktury elektronowej i dynamiki sieci zdefektowanego układu o silnych korelacjach elektronowych”, dr Urszula Wdowik (Wydział Matematyczno-Fizyczno-Techniczny, UP Kraków)
2009/04/17
“Badania struktur cienkich warstw polimerowych metodą spektrometrii mas jonów wtórnych”,
dr inż. Andrzej Bernasik (Katedra Fizyki Materii Skondensowanej WFiIS AGH)
2009/04/24
“Udział studentów WFiIS w projekcie ESMO (European Student Moon Orbiter)”, Łukasz Chmiel
(V rok FT WFiIS)
167
2009/05/08
“Energetyka jądrowa - stan obecny i perspektywy rozwoju”, prof. dr hab. Jerzy Niewodniczański
(KZFJ WFiIS AGH)
2009/05/15
“Faza geometryczna w fizyce klasycznej i kwantowej - kilka prostych przykładów”,
dr Wilhelm Czapliński (KZFJ WFiIS AGH)
2009/05/22
“Badanie materiałów polikrystalicznych w aspekcie optymalizacji ich własnosci”, dr inż. Sebastian
Wroński (Katedra Fizyki Materii Skondensowanej WFiIS AGH, Laboratoire des Proprietes Mecaniques et Thermodynamiques des Materiaux CNRS, Universite Paris 13, Francja)
2009/06/06
“Techniczne aspekty LHC. Udział WFiIS AGH w uruchomieniu akceleratora”, dr inż. Jan Kulka
(Katedra Fizyki Materii Skondensowanej WFiIS AGH)
2009/09/25
“What can we learn about the substrate channelling mechanism of a multi-enzyme complex by
protein crystallography?”, Professor Kosuke Morikawa (The Takara Bio Endowed Division, Institute
for Protein Research, Osaka University, Open Laboratories of Advanced Bioscience and Biotechnology, Osaka, Japan)
2009/10/02
“Seminarium dziekańskie”, prof. dr hab. inż. Wojciech Łużny, prof. dr hab. inż. Marek Przybylski,
dr hab. Andrzej Lenda oraz dr inż. Krzysztof Malarz (WFiIS AGH)
2009/10/09
“Osobliwości dynamiki finansów”, prof. dr hab. Stanisław Drożdż (Zakład Teorii Systemów Złożonych IFJ PAN)
2009/10/16
Uroczyste seminarium z okazji 80-tych urodzin prof. dr. hab. inż. Kazimierza Przewłockiego
2009/10/23
“Granice poznania w fizyce”, prof. dr hab. Krzysztof A. Meissner (Instytut Fizyki Teoretycznej Wydział
Fizyki UW)
2009/11/06
“Rezonansowe tworzenie molekuł mionowych helu i wodoru oraz ich rotacyjna deekscytacja”,
dr Wilhelm Czapliński (Katedra Zastosowań Fizyki Jądrowej WFiIS AGH)
2009/12/04
“Sprawy dydaktyczne. Wydziałowy System Zapewnienia Jakości Kształcenia”, dr hab. Andrzej Lenda
oraz dr inż. Krzysztof Malarz (WFiIS AGH)
2009/12/11
“Polska Infrastruktura Informatycznego Wspomagania Nauki w Europejskiej Przestrzeni Badawczej
– PL-Grid”, dr Mariusz Sterzel (ACC Cyfronet AGH)
168
169
AGH University of Science and Technology
Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science
Annual Report 2009
Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. S. Staszica
Wydział Fizyki i Informatyki Stosowanej
Raport Roczny 2009
Raport opracował: prof. dr hab. inż. Marek Przybylski
Projekt graficzny, skład: yk studio
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