BI Redirection Handbook

BI Redirection Handbook
1
REDIRECTION
HANDBOOK
SECONDARY
2
Table of Contents
Definition of Emotional Disturbance
Services for Students with Emotional/Behavior Problems
Educational Placement Options
Goal of the Behavior Intervention Program
Things To Be Done Day By Day
Critical elements
Redirection
o Overview of the Redirection Program
o Behavior Intervention Redirection Program
o Campus Management System
o Redirector Responsibilities
o Staff orientation
o Portfolio
o Point Sheet / Behavior Card Systems
o Steps to Independence
o Point Sheet Procedures
o Procedures for Completing the Point Sheet
o Troubleshooting Point Sheets
o Behavior Card Procedures
o A Monitoring Schedule
o Monitoring Continuum
o Observation Logs
o Progress Charts
o Procedures for Contacting a Redirector
o Redirection Format
o Intensive Redirection Format
o Procedures for Debriefing
o Paraprofessional Duties and Responsibilities
4
5
6
7
8- 8.2
8.3
9
10
11-12
13-14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23-24
25
26
27-29
30
31
32
33
34-35
Social Skills
o Social Skills Lesson Components
o Social Skills Topics
36
37-40
41-42
Room Structure
o Sample BI Room Schedule
o Classroom Rules
o Intensive Redirection Rules
o Positive and Negative Consequences
43
44
45
46
47
Reinforcement
o Reinforcement Procedures
o Ticket Procedures
o Store Procedures
o Friday Reward Procedures
48
49
50
51-52
53-57
3
o Contracts
o Long Term Incentives
58
59
Consequence Flow Charts
o Tardy
o Profanity
o Refusal to Work
o Refusal to Follow Directions
o Disrespectful
o Walking Out of Class
o Physical/Verbal Aggression
60
61-62
63-64
65-66
67-68
69-70
71-72
73
Addressing Challenging Behaviors
o Persistent Misbehavior
o Staffings
o Staffing Agenda
o BAC Procedures
74
75
76
77
78-80
Crisis Management
o Guidelines for Crisis Prevention
o Restraint Forms
81
82-87
88-93
Teacher Toolbox
o Strategies interrupting crisis behavior
94-106
107-116
Responsibilities of the ARD Teacher
117-124
4
Definition of Emotional Disturbance
IDEA includes a definition of Emotional Disturbance with criteria that must be met if students are to
be served in this category. This definition is a useful guideline for all teachers who are interested in
understanding the nature of students’ emotional and behavioral problems. It describes the term
emotional disturbances in this way:
The term means a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period
of time and to a marked degree, which adversely affects the educational performance:
a. An inability to learn which cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors
b. An inability to build or maintain satisfactory relationships with peers and teachers
c. Inappropriate types of behaviors or feelings under normal circumstances
d. A general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression
e. A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems
The term includes children who are schizophrenic. The term does not include children who are
socially maladjusted, unless it is determined that they are emotionally disturbed. (Federal Register)
If a student meets the criteria for the emotional disturbed category and the disability interferes with
performance in school, he/she may qualify for special education services.
5
Services for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Problems
Many students in public schools experience emotional and/or behavioral problems. When students’
emotional and behavioral problems are long-term and have a negative impact on educational
performance, these students may qualify for services under Section 504 of the Vocational
Rehabilitation Act or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).
If students meet the IDEA criteria for the emotional disturbance (ED) category, then they qualify for
special education services. Each student in special education has an Individualized Education
Plan (IEP), which describes the students’ individual goals and objectives, both academic and social,
any related services for which the student qualifies, and the instructional arrangement for the
student throughout his/her school day. Many students in special education also have a Behavioral
Intervention Plan (BIP) included in their IEP. The purpose of the BIP is to clearly articulate behavioral
goals for the student, positive teaching strategies that will be used to teach those behaviors, negative
consequences for misbehavior, and methods and procedures for evaluating progress. The IEP for
each student in the ED category should include a BIP.
6
Educational Placement Options for Students with Emotional/Behavioral
Disorders
In accordance with the IDEA all students in the Brownsville Independent School District who qualify
for Special Education are served in the least restrictive environment with their non-disabled peers.
Placement decisions are made on an individual case-by-case basis. Students who are classified as ED
and/or other students whose needs warrant special programming may be educated in any
combination of instructional placements. These combinations may include:
•
General education classes.
o Academic support provided by General Ed. Teacher and/or Inclusion teacher.
•
General education classes.
o Behavioral support provided by redirection staff.
•
Resource Room for specific subjects.
o Academic support provided by resource room teacher.
•
Behavior Intervention Classroom.
o Support provided by redirection staff.
Behavior
support
provided by
redirection
staff.
Academic
support
provided by
classroom
teacher.
7
Goals of the Behavior Intervention (BI) Program
All teachers and families want their students to succeed in school, both behaviorally and
academically. Because their behavior often interferes with learning, students with serious
emotional/behavioral problems require IEP goals that address both of these areas. BISD’s Behavior
Intervention Program has several goals. These goals apply to all students in the program and are
most critical for students whose needs require placement in Behavior Intervention Classes and the
Redirection Program. They include:
•
To improve student behavior.
•
To develop self-awareness, self-monitoring, and self control.
•
To maximize academic achievement, including instruction at enrolled grade level.
•
To maximize integration into general education environments.
To provide social
skills so that they
may become
productive members
of society.
8
Things To Be Done By Day One
Acquire class roster
Create Paraprofessional Schedule
Review psychologicals
o Note recommendations


Academic
Behavioral
Review IEP’s/FBA’s/BIP’s
o Note




Goals
Objectives
Related services
Accommodations/Modifications
Campus orientation



Inform all staff about redirection program
Inform teachers of students they will serve
Inform faculty and staff of procedures for contacting a redirector, crisis
procedures, point sheet procedures

Train BI paraprofessionals on procedures for redirecting students
Prepare Administrator Folders

Provide Campus Administration with a copy of BIP’s- BIP’s should be
placed in a centralized location





Student Schedule
FBA/BIP
Discipline to be applied (regular or other)
Notes on psychological recommendations
BI contact and crisis procedures
Develop Monitoring Schedules
Prepare interest inventory
2
Arrange classroom
o Carrels
o Desks
o Student materials
o Reinforcement area
o Cooling off area
o Store-Inventory items
Post management system
o Class rules
o Positive consequences
o Negative consequences
o Progress charts (point Sheet, contracts, tickets, etc.)
o Reinforcement procedures/schedules
Decide on organizational system for Health Quest/Social Skills work folders
o Notes
o Daily work
o Social Skills
o Tests
Prepare Student Portfolios (see handbook)
Design Point Sheet and Percentages for Earning Reinforcement
Prepare Observation Logs
Copy Redirection Forms
o Debriefing/discussion sheets
o Intensive redirection
o Contracts
o Point Sheets
o Incident Log
3
Behavior Intervention Secondary
Critical Elements
1. WALL DISPLAYS
□ Classroom Rules
□ Intensive Redirection Rules
□ Continuum of Positive and
Negative Consequences
□ Consequence Flow Charts
□ Continuum of reinforcement
o Daily Reinforcement
o Friday Reward
o Store
□ BI Room Hours
□ Social Skills
□ Crisis Management Plan(s)
o Acting Out Person
o Suicidal Outcry
o Medical Emergency
2. ROOM ARRANGEMENT
□ Classroom is clean and neatly
arranged
□ Instructional Area
□ Redirection/Cool Down Area
□ Reinforcement Area
□ Class Store
Special Services
expects all of these
critical elements to be
visibly present.
This is NonNegotiable!!
3. STUDENT /STAFF GROUPING
□ Monitoring Schedule of students
which includes all staff
o Maintained in staff binders
o Rotation Schedule
4. INSTRUCTIONAL MANAGEMENT
□ Scheduled Social Skills Period
□ Social Skills Lesson Plans –
correlated to IEP
□ Documentation of classroom
observations
□ Student portfolios
□ Data Collections
5. STUDENT MANAGEMENT
□ Evidence of:
o Monitoring
o Redirections
o Debriefings
o Reinforcements
o Consequences
o Conferences
o Staffings
o Progress Charts
o Monitoring of grades
o Co-planning/coordination
9
Overview of the Redirection Program
Redirection is a campus behavior management system designed to empower students to take
responsibility for their own behaviors.
Students receive instructional/behavioral support in:
• General education classes
• Resource
• CMC/Inclusion
• Unstructured time
o Lunch
o Hallways
o Transition
o Before and after school
The system is designed to:
• Keep students in their scheduled classes
• Address the student’s social or performance skill deficits
• Teach problem solving skills
• Provide the students with the skills to cope/deal with stressful or negative situations
(development of a plan of action)
• Build self esteem
• Provide students the opportunity to learn alongside their peers while practicing appropriate
social skills
• Allow access to programs such as ROTC, Art, Music, etc.
• Prepare students to function independently in society
Redirection IS:






Positive behavior support
A consequence
Non-Confrontational
Quick
In the mainstream
A safe place for
learning replacement
behaviors
Redirection IS NOT:
 A punishment
 Negative consequence
 Confrontational
 CMC
 ISS
 Student hangout
10
Behavior Intervention Redirection Program
=
Building Integrity
The design of the BI program fosters building and maintaining strong ties between students,
teachers, administration and redirectors. The program is set up so that all students (whether
enrolled in social skills or not) receive redirection, social skills, reinforcement and support provided by
the Redirectors. Enrolling students in the BI social skills course facilitates this process. Students that
are not enrolled are contacted through other means such as, redirection, between classes, during the
lunch hour, after school or with approved passes.
It is strongly recommended to complete both a staff orientation and a student orientation at
the beginning of the year. The purpose of the orientations is to:
o Ensure that all faculty/staff understand the BI Redirection Program.
 Staff may be informed through presentations and/or information letters.
o Arrange introductions between students, Redirectors, Administrators, Counselors, Security,
and Hall monitors.
o Provide a copy of student BIP’s to teachers and administration.
o Present and explain the BI Redirection Program.
o Begin the process of building rapport.
o Introduce students to other peers in the program so they can recognize they are not being
singled out.
Inform all teachers/administrators working with students about student orientation by
requesting special permission for students to be released at a designated time on a specific day.
Students will need a pass to attend.
The BI population is transient throughout the day, therefore meetings between students and
staff need to be arranged to address reinforcement, contracts, progress, or other program related
issues. If the student is unable to meet with the staff during non-instructional time, then special
requests can be made for the student to be released a few minutes before the end of a class period.
This should only be allowed if a student has completed his or her work and the teacher is in
agreement.
11
Campus Management System
Students:
• Must take courses in regular education or resource settings, as per IEP.
• Follow class and campus requirements
• Maintain a point sheet to aid in monitoring behavior until behavior goals have been mastered
• Cooperate with the redirection team
• Complete debriefings (forms are filed in the portfolio)
• Aid in the development of an action plan that addresses problem areas
• Utilize social skills
Redirection Staff:
• Follow guidelines for redirection program
General Ed. /Special Ed. Teachers:
• Implement classroom management plan
• Provide direct instruction and grades
• Maintain open communication lines with Redirectors
• Contact Redirectors as needed
• Complete student point sheets
• Follow Behavior Intervention Plan
• Implement accommodations/modifications
• Follow crisis management plan
• Address the reason for redirection
• Attend co-planning
Administration:
• Implement discipline as closely as possible to the student code of conduct
• Coordinate with Redirector in attending to disciplinary issues
• Follow crisis management plan in accordance with Senate Bill 1196 (Refer to modules 1-7)
Security:
• Notifies Redirectors of any concerns
• Responds to requests for assistance
• Follow crisis management plan
• Maintains open communication line with Redirectors
12
Office Staff:
• Follows crisis management plan for contacting Redirectors
• Alerts administration in the event of a crisis
Campus Counselors:
• Assists in developing schedules for BI student.
• Attends to BI students during crisis.
Nurse:
• Maintains open line of communication with Redirectors
• Follows crisis management plan
• Provides consultations concerning medical history
The Redirector must establish and preserve a “Team Approach”.
13
Redirector Responsibilities
•
Provide campus wide training/in-service to ensure that all staff have an understanding of:
o the redirection program
o point sheet procedures/behavior card/behavior monitoring systems
o when to contact a redirector
o how to contact the redirector
•
Provide administrators with student information packet:
o Behavior Intervention Student Form
o Student schedule
o FBA/BIP/Contract
o Review psychologicals
•
Provide teachers with copies of IEP’s/BIP’s/Accommodations and Modifications
•
Coordinate with teachers:(Coordination Form)
o Progress reports every three weeks
o Behavioral concerns/documentation every six weeks
o Review IEP/BIP/Accommodations and Modifications every six weeks
•
Attend, pass and maintain CPI certification
o Monthly team practice
o Documentation of practice sessions
•
Develop/implement/practice crisis management plan(s)/Follow District Policy
 Acting out person
 Outcry
 Medical emergency
•
Develop lesson plans and teach a social skills period daily
•
Follow a daily schedule that monitors students:
o behavior
o grades
o attendance
•
Setup account through district grade monitoring system
o Monitor grades weekly
•
Provide behavioral support in the regular ed. classroom, resource, or CMC as needed.
•
Maintain ongoing documentation
•
Maintain observation log for each student (Observation Forms)
14
•
Maintain student portfolio
□ Binder with dividers/tabs:
o Student data/ Communication logs/Class schedule
o Modifications/Progress reports
o Incident log/Reinforcement log/Office referrals/debrief
o Conference forms (students/parents/teachers)
o ARD information = IEP/FBA/BIP/FBA questionnaire
o Daily Observation Logs
o Coordination Day
o Progress charts/Behavior graphs
o Point sheet/contract
o Miscellaneous
o Attendance/Tardies
o Point sheets
o Redirection
o Intensive Redirection
o ISS/OSS
o Referrals
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Monitors student point sheets/behavior cards
Reinforce appropriate behaviors
Maintain BI Store
Provide weekly rewards/reinforcers
Coordinate with Redirectors on a daily basis
Responds to request for redirector
Follows CPI de-escalation continuum when addressing behavior.
Responsible for receiving and/or escorting students to BI room
Coordinates with administration concerning disciplinary actions
Implements consequences
Maintains home/school connection
Conducts parent conferences/home visits
Conducts staffings
Obtain consent for FBA
Conducts functional behavioral assessments
Drafts behavior intervention plans
Monitors and evaluates behavior intervention plans
Documents behavior intervention plan implementation
Coordinates with Sp. Ed./Reg. Ed. Counselors
Coordinates with Behavior Specialists
Communicates with outside agencies
15
Staff Orientation
1. Select a time to meet with the campus staff. (staff development, faculty meeting, department
meetings)
2. Present the “Redirection Program” basics.
•
•
•
•
Agenda
Introduction of BI program/staff
Teacher responsibilities
Redirector responsibilities/Teacher support
Contacting BI staff
Student Orientation
1. Select a day and time during the first week of school.
2. Inform and invite the special education administrator.
3. Inform all teachers working with students about the orientation day and ensure they are in
agreement to permit the student to attend.
4. Prepare student passes.
5. Distribute passes on the day of the orientation.
Agenda
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction of staff
Icebreaker to identify students names
Distribute information sheet, to be completed by students (Name, nickname, address,
phone #, etc.)
Conduct interest inventory with students
Complete student orientation packet
Discuss the following:
o How the staff guides and supports students
o Monitoring procedures
o How to contact/request help from BI staff
o Redirection procedures
o Reinforcement systems (example: tickets, point sheets)
o Address student questions
Student orientation
must be completed
with each incoming
student throughout
the year
16
Portfolio
The Redirection teacher will maintain a working portfolio for each student.
Divide as follows:
Tab 1: Student Data/Communication Log/Class Schedule
Tab 2: Accommodations/Progress Reports
Tab 3: Incident Log/Reinforcement Log/Office Referrals/Debriefing Forms
Tab 4: Conference Forms (students/parents/teachers)
Tab 5: ARD Information=IEP/FBA/BIP/FBA Questionnaire
Tab 6: Coordination Day
Tab 7: Progress Charts/Behavioral Graphs
Tab 8: Point Sheet/Contract
Tab 9: Miscellaneous
Remember:
The Portfolio is a
working document
intended to be used
with the students!
17
Point Sheet / Behavior Card Systems
Monitoring systems are the foundation of the BI program. It provides students feedback on their
behavior, documents progress, determines reinforcement and is a daily line of communication
between the home and school.
Secondary BI units will implement the Point Sheet System or the Behavior Card System.
Point Sheet
Students begin on a daily point sheet monitoring system and earn the opportunity to progress to a 6
week monitoring system.
This system allows the student to take responsibility for their own behavior and gives them control
over the amount of monitoring they receive.
Behavioral Progress Report Continuum
•
•
•
•
Daily point sheet
Weekly behavioral progress report
Three week behavioral progress report
Six week behavioral progress report
Most Restrictive
Least Restrictive
Incoming 9th grade
students will
resume on the
continuum where
they ended the 8th
grade school year.
Incoming 6th grade
students must begin
on a daily point
sheet and/or closely
monitored.
Students new to the
district must begin
on a daily point
sheet.
18
Steps to Independence
Daily Point Sheet/Behavior Card
Remains on Daily Point
Sheet/Behavior Card
until criteria is met.
Met
Weekly Behavioral Report
•
Met % for 3 consecutive weeks
No office referrals that relate to
target behavior(s)
No more than 1intensive
redirection
Progressions are
designed to
empower the
students and are not
intended to be
punitive.
Met
Not met
•
•
Three Week Behavioral Report
•
•
•
Met % for 2 consecutive three week
cycles
No office referrals that relate to
target behavior
No more than 2 intensive
redirection
Met
•
•
•
Not met
•
Met % for 3 consecutive weeks
No office referrals that relate to
Not met
target behavior(s)
No more than 1intensive redirection
Not met
•
•
Six Week Behavioral Report
Meets % for six week cycle
No office referrals that relate to
target behavior
No intensive redirection
Met
KEEP UP
THE GOOD
WORK!
19
Point Sheet Procedures
•
Daily point sheet (See Toolbox)
o Redirector provides student with a point sheet each day at a designated time and place.
o Student transports point sheet to each class
o Classroom teacher completes and initials point sheet
o Student meets with Redirector in the afternoon at a designated time and place to review
points
o Redirector provides student feedback and documents points
o Student obtains parent signature and turns in completed point sheet to the Redirector the
following morning
o Redirector files point sheet in portfolio
•
Weekly Progress Report (See Toolbox)
o Redirector e-mails the classroom teachers the weekly progress report
o Classroom teachers complete and return the progress report
o Redirector meets with the student on a designated day and time to review the progress
report, provide feedback and document progress.
o Redirector reinforces student
o Redirector files progress report in portfolio
•
Three Week Progress Report (See Toolbox)
o Redirector e-mails classroom teacher the Three Week Progress Report
o Classroom teachers complete and return the progress report
o Redirector meets with the student at the end of the three week period on a designated
date, time and place to review progress report, provide feedback, and reinforce student
and document progress.
o Redirector files report in portfolio
•
Six Week Progress Report (See Toolbox)
o Redirector e-mails classroom teacher the Six Week Progress Report
o Classroom teachers complete and return the progress report
o Redirector meets with the student at the end of the six week period on a designated
date, time and place to review progress report, provide feedback, and reinforce student
and document progress.
o Redirector files report in portfolio
20
Procedures for Completing Point Sheets
For appropriate behaviors:
o A (√) is placed in the appropriate slot at the end of the period.
For inappropriate behaviors:
o Students are given a verbal warning paired with a circle warning.
o If the student does not comply or correct the behavior within 30-60 seconds an (x) is
placed within the circle warning.
o If the student does comply a (√) is placed within the circle warning.
__ ___ ____ _____ ___ ____ ___ ___ __ _ ___ ___ ____ _ ___ __ __ __ __ __ __
Procedures for Completing Point Sheets
For appropriate behaviors:
o A (√) is placed in the appropriate slot at the end of the period.
For inappropriate behaviors:
o Students are given a verbal warning paired with a circle warning.
o If the student does not comply or correct the behavior within 30-60 seconds an (x) is
placed within the circle warning.
o If the student does comply a (√) is placed within the circle warning.
Attach to point
sheets at the
beginning of the
school year and as
needed.
21
Troubleshooting the Point Sheet
Student is refusing to carry point sheet:
o Problem solve with student to determine reason for noncompliance
o Develop a discrete system of delivery
o Ensure that the student understands the reason for and the importance of the point
sheet
o Maintain a structured system where students know exactly:
•
The # of points required to qualify for reinforcement
•
The # of points that will earn them a negative consequence
•
The requirements needed to progress through point sheet phases
o Entice students with creative/interesting reinforcers or activities
o Implement structured consequences for not complying with the point sheet, such as:
•
Phone call home
•
Parent conference
•
Lunch detention
•
After school detention
Point sheet is not completely filled out:
o Ensure that classroom teachers understand the point sheet procedures
o The designated Redirector and student will meet for problem solving with the teachers
that did not complete the point sheet
o Contract with student
o Implement consequences for point sheet noncompliance
Student does not return signed point sheet:
o Conference with parent
o Implement consequences
Remember:
All Point Sheets
Should Be
Individualized
22
Behavior Card Procedures
•
Behavior cards are used to monitor Behavior Intervention Plan goals. Each behavior card is
individualized and includes the behavior goals from the students BIP.
•
While in the classroom, teachers monitor the targeted behavior/s. The classroom teacher will
initial the behavior card at the end of the class period when the student performs the
behavior/s indicated on the card. If the student does not display the behavior/s indicated, the
classroom teacher will circle the period and not initial the card.
•
The designated Redirector and student will meet for problem solving with the teachers that did
not initial the behavior card. Student/Teacher/Redirector conferences take place during lunch
or at the end of the day.
•
Redirectors meet with students at the end of each day to evaluate the behavior card and
implement structured reinforcers or consequences.
•
Guidelines for using behavior cards:
o Develop a delivery system or a “pick up” station for distributing behavior cards on a
daily basis
o Review/check the behavior card throughout the day
o Develop requirements for earning reinforcement/consequences on an individual basis
o Ensure teachers understand the procedures for the behavior card
o Chart data
o Maintain a behavior card file
o Update behavior card after each annual ARD.
Remember point
sheets and behavior
cards are intended
to be a positive
teaching tool!
23
A Monitoring Schedule
The Redirection teacher will develop and post a schedule that monitors:
• student arrival
• breakfast
• transitions
• instructional periods (resource, CMC, PE )
• assemblies
• passes (restroom breaks, library, office, nurse)
• lunch (campuses with multiple lunch periods will have schedules that reflect different lunch
hours for Redirectors)
• lunch detention
• dismissal/pick up
A monitoring schedule is based on individual student needs. Some students require more
monitoring time than others. (See monitoring continuum)
A schedule is designed so that every member of the BI Team has contact with each student.
Schedules are rotated among teachers and paraprofessionals on a daily or weekly basis to
maintain teacher-student connections.
Teachers and paraprofessionals monitor and work with students in their scheduled classrooms.
At no time are staff scheduled to remain in the BI room with the exception of social skills.
Students are
monitored in ISS by
redirection staff.
A Manifestation
must be conducted
nearing a 10 day
removal .
24
REDIRECTION
**Schedule may change due to student class changes*
* Lunch periods for each Redirector will vary weekly *
Name
1st
Period
O.C.C.
313
Solis
2nd Period
3rd Period
4th Period
5th Period
English
319
Hinojosa
P.E.
Gym
Martinez
Lunch
O.C.C.
313
I.Solis
Science
103
Rocha
Math
219
Resendez
LUNCH
History
205
J.Mancilla
s
Reading
317
Y.Garcia
O.C.C.
313
Solis
P.E.
GYM
Martine
z
O.C.C.
313
I.Solis
O.C.C.
313
Solis
O.C.C.
313
Solis
Math
219
Resendez
ESL III
200
E.Rodrigue
z
Science
324
P.Rudnik
Math
219
Resendez
ESL III
320
Pinales
Gym
Alaniz
Reading
317
Garcia
Lunch
Lunch
History
217
Hesseling
History
221
Showalter
Reading
218
Vacancy
Math
321
Guerra
Science
203
Myers
Science
324
Rudnik
LUNCH
Alvaro
O.C.C.
313
Solis
LOTC
316
Hinojosa
Science
324
P.Rudnik
ESL III
320
Pinales
LUNCH
Jose
O.C.C.
313
I.Solis
Science
324
Rudnik
Reading
218
Vacancy
Math
321
Guerra
LUNCH
Ofelia
O.C.C.
313
I.Solis
P.E.
Gym
Cerda
Math
219
Resendez
Reading
317
Garcia
LUNCH
Andy
O.C.C.
313
Solis
LOTC
316
Hinojosa
Reading
317
Garcia
Lunch
Science
206
Avalos
Josua
O.C.C.
313
I.Solis
English
319
Hinojosa
Health
323
E.Salinas
LUNCH
History
102
J.Sauceda
Juan
David
Delfino
Fernando
Carmen
Celeste
David
Math
219
Resendez
History
205
Mancillas
Reading
317
Garcia
LUNCH
6th
Period
Science
206
Avalos
7th Period
8th Period
Math
219
Resendez
Reading
317
Garcia
P.E.
Gym
Martinez
English
319
Hinojosa
English
319
Hinojosa
Science
Avalos
206
Math
219
Resendez
Reading
301
Schrock
English
319
Hinojosa
LUNCH
Choir
Fabela
History
102
J.Sauced
a
Reading
317
Garcia
Art
205
Hernande
z
Reading
317
Y.Garcia
English
319
Hinojosa
P.E.
Alaniz
History
217
Hesselin
g
Reading
218
Anzaldu
a
History
217
Hesselin
g
History
217
Hesselin
g
Math
105
Torres
Math
219
Resende
z
LOTC
317
Hinojosa
Math
327
Rodriguez
Math
327
Rodriguez
History
322
J.Lopez
P.E.
Gym
Alaniz
English
320
Pinales
English
319
Hinojosa
Science
207
Lozano
English
Art
200
332
E. Rodriguez Hack
Science
202
J.Gracia
Reading
Y.Garcia
317
25
Monitoring Continuum
In Class Monitoring
Most Restrictive
Least Restrictive
Monitored full period
Monitored 75% of period
Monitored 50% of period
Monitored 25% of period
Check 2 times during period
Check once during period
Spot check
Weekly conference
3 week conference
6 week conference
Monitoring Transitions
Most Restrictive
Least Restrictive
Escort 5 minutes before the bell
Escort during transition
Shadow during transition
Check 5 minutes after the bell
Check during instructional period
Check at the end of the period
Spot check
Weekly conference
3 week conference
6 week conference
Remember:
Some students may need
to be monitored from the
moment they arrive at
designated drop off point
to the moment they are
picked up at the end of
the day.
26
Observation Logs
Observation logs are maintained for each student on a daily basis. The Redirectors are responsible
for completing the observation log for each student on their monitoring schedule. The log is used to
document:
•
•
•
•
Monitoring times
Student behavior
Student behavioral/academic progress
Teacher concerns
Monitoring schedules are designed so that Redirectors have contact with all students throughout the
day. Because schedules are rotated periodically, observation logs are rotated as well. A system for
rotating/handling the observation logs needs to be in place. The system for handling this
documentation may be as follows:
•
•
•
A designated area/time to drop off and pick up observation logs
A filing system to drop off and pick up the observation logs
A designated meeting place for exchanging observation logs in between classes or rotation
schedules.
Address each time
slot on the
observation log.
Provide written
explanations for
incomplete time
slots on the
observation log.
27
Progress Charts
Behavior is a primary focus in the BI Unit. Behavior is tracked and progress is recorded. The posting
of progress charts contributes to meeting student behavior goals. Progress charts serve as:
•
•
•
•
A visual representation of progress
A reminder of behavioral goals
Student feedback
A reference to determine students:
o Strengths and weaknesses
o Requirements for reinforcement
o Behavioral patterns
o Discipline/Attendance record
Students
29
Arturo
36
Chris
36
8/31
9/1
9/2
31 T 28 T
32
35
36
Carlos 17 R 29 T
9/5
9/6
9/7
9/8
9/9
9/12
9/13
9/14
9/15
9/16
/
O
IR
ISS
30
34
18 R
ISS
ISS
HSS
29
34
36
36
36
35
34
35
35
34
36
35
36
IR
31
13 R
IR
IR
33
31
34
29
15 R
ISS
ISS
ISS
Tota
l
8/30
Tota
l
8/29
3 weeks
Dates
Jack
34
33
29
32
19
IR
32
32
34
36
34
34
35
36
31
Taylor
32
32
36
35
34
36
33
32
31
34
33
21
IR
29
32
Mikey
/
/
33
30
20 T
32
19
IR
IR
27
31
33
34
X
28
8T
HSS
HSS
IR
32
31
33
32
32
32
27
29
Daniel 19 T
19 T 24 T
Joe
/
33
36
X
36
35
X
32
34
34
35
X
X
36
36
Andy
31
36
36
36
35
34
33
36
36
36
/
33
32
33
26
# = Points earned (highlight if reaching % criteria)
IR = Intensive Redirection
/ = Excused absence
OSS = Out of School Suspension
O = Lost/No point sheet
X = Unexcused Absence
= Behavior card completed
ISS = In School Suspension
R = Referral
T = Tardy
Tota
l
Progress Chart
Meeting the required weekly
% of points qualifies student
for Friday Reward.
30
Procedures for Contacting a Redirector
1. Classroom teacher signals the office through the intercom and requests a
Redirector.
2. The office staff notifies the Redirector as to where they are needed through a 2way radio. (It is the Redirector’s responsibility to train the office staff on the
contact procedures.)
3. The redirection team responds by promptly reporting to the crisis.
4. The redirection teacher assesses the situation, while the redirection teams
remains in the background on alert.
5. If necessary, the Redirection Team will request additional support from
administration and/or security.
In the event of a crisis,
follow CPI procedures
and the campus crisis
management plan.
Review the BIP after
each crisis. If
necessary, update
FBA and draft a new
BIP.
31
Redirection Format
Continuum of Steps
Step 1: Eye contact/visual cue
Step 2: Verbal directive
If compliant:
• Praise (Verbal, Non-verbal & Immediate reinforcement)
If non-compliant:
Set limits
o State what the inappropriate behavior is
o State the desired/appropriate behavior
o State the positive and negative consequences
o Allow the student time to make a choice
If compliant:
• Praise
If non-compliant:
• Continue on to step 3
Step 3: Redirection in the hall
• Set Limits (see above)
• Provide/review/practice skill
• Offer choices/Cool down time
If compliant:
• Praise
• Return to classroom to implement skill
If non-compliant:
• Continue on to step 4
Step 4: Escort to BI room
• Begin I ntensive R edirection
32
Intensive Redirection Format
Continuum of Steps
Intensive redirection takes place in the redirection room and occurs when the student is
in the anxiety or defensive stage of the crisis development escalation model.
Steps for Intensive Redirection
Step 1:
Escort to BI room “cool down area” requesting assistance when necessary
Step 2:
Prompt student to use cool down steps
Step 3:
Set timer for 5 minutes of compliance
• Document on Intensive Redirection Taking Control Chart
Step 4:
Check for compliance at the end of the 5 minute period
(Give a simple directive to assess compliance)
If compliant:
 Continue to Step 5
If non-compliant:
 Continue in 5 minute intervals until student has gained
composure and is compliant.
Step 5:
Guide the student in the completion of the Debriefing Form
Step 6:
Develop a plan of action with the student
(Contract, plan of apology, a negotiation process, etc.)
Step 7:
Provide, review or practice appropriate behaviors/social skills
Step 8:
Implement consequence
(Therapeutic Rapport/CPI Coping Model)
This step CAN NOT be skipped.
Step 9:
Return student to regular schedule to implement the plan of action. (The
goal is for the student to return to his regular schedule within one class
period.)
Intensive redirection is complete as soon as the student is compliant and a
new plan of action has been developed.
Intensive redirection is not ISS.
DO NOT
require student
to do
ANYTHING
while ‘cooling
off’.
The Redirector is responsible
for documentation that supports
the implementation of each of these steps.
33
Procedures for Debriefing
The redirection debriefing form needs to be completed whenever a student:
o has been verbally or physically aggressive
o receives an office referral
o requires intensive redirection
The purpose of the form is to allow the student to:
o reflect on their actions/decisions
o take responsibility for their behavior
o acknowledge and accept the consequences for their actions
o gain the knowledge and skills needed to make better decisions in the future
The debriefing form correlates with the Crisis Prevention and Intervention (CPI) model
for therapeutic rapport.
The debriefing
should generate
quality
student/teacher
conversations that
are reflected on the
debriefing form.
34
Paraprofessional Duties and Responsibilities
Classroom Organization and Duties
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Creating and maintaining filing systems for materials and students.
Preparing displays, schedules, and bulletin boards
Duplicating materials
Typing instructional materials
Creating seating arrangements for various small group activities
Taking Attendance
Locating instructional materials
Student Assessment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Observing and recording academic behavior and progress
Checking student work
Keeping anecdotal records on student performance
Completing informal observation of student performance
Administering teacher – made tests
Becoming familiar with the student’s I.E.P.
Direct Instruction:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Reinforcing subjects which have been taught by the teacher such as reading,
math, spelling, vocabulary, P.E., and Adapted P.E.
Assisting small groups of students
Working one-to-one with students
Presenting information to a whole class
Providing appropriate feedback to students
Listening to students read
Modifying written materials (i.e., tape-record stories)
Helping students work on projects or assignments
Helping students select library books
Actively participate
Personal Care Management:
•
•
•
•
Assisting students with tasks such as mobility, feeding, dressing, toileting, etc.
Providing specialized care for students under the supervision of the school nurse.
Maintain an inventory of supplies and initiate requests for supplies
Ensure that all required health, hygiene, and dietary needs are available for oncampus and off campus activities.
35
Behavior Management:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Monitoring and supervising students in P. E., recess, lunchroom, etc.
Monitoring student behavior with tracking charts, contracts, BIPs.
Monitoring small and large groups
Assisting teachers with strategies to reinforce appropriate behavior
Checking that students complete tasks and meet deadlines
Helping build self-esteem in students
Working with Parents:
•
•
Directing parents to appropriate resources and personnel
Directing parent concerns to classroom teachers
Working with staff:
•
•
•
•
•
Co-Planning
Planning and be prepared, asking questions
Working with assigned teacher(s)
Providing on-going communication regarding students
Following the chain of command (teacher, administrator, special education
supervisor, special education director)
Miscellaneous Duties:
•
•
•
Completing documentation and paperwork for supplemental duties
Performing other duties as assigned by administration, i.e., monitoring the
lunchroom, assisting with bus duties and supervising students in community
setting
Appropriate professional attire
36
Social Skills
Today our young people are faced with an increasing difficult world. Substance abuse,
economic pressures, family problems and the lure of gangs and delinquency threaten
our students both emotionally and physically. In order to deal with these issues,
students must have sufficient tools and skills. Social skills instruction helps students
learn the skills that are required so that they can successfully cope with these pressures
and interact with others in socially acceptable ways. Social skills also help the students
to be able to make healthy, safe choices in a variety of social situations. And to learn
that actions have consequences, positive and/or negative.
Typically, students in the behavior intervention unit lack appropriate social skills.
Social skills are a planned lesson and must be taught on a daily basis.
Lesson plans should correlate with the student’s behavior intervention plans and needs.
Research indicates that children with social skill deficits may develop the following
behaviors:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Aggressive / anti- social behavior
Juvenile delinquency
Abusive behaviors
Mental health disorders
Loneliness and despondency
School failure/dropout
Drug and alcohol abuse
Unemployment
37
Social Skills Lesson Components
Objective
Rational
Modeling
Role Play
Rehearsal
Practice
Coaching
Feedback
Generalization
38
Social Skills Lesson Components
Objective – A social skill lesson is much like any other lesson. The objective is stated
and written on the board at the beginning of the lessons.
Rationale – Here the teacher explains to the students the importance of learning the
skill. The personal benefits and relevance are made clear.
Modeling – First, demonstrate and ask for the students to help you. Emphasis must be
on the skill steps. Have students state how the steps were demonstrated.
Role Play - To start with an indirect approach, the teacher could start with lessons
such as having the students write a true story or a movie about themselves at school or
at home, with other kids. The story or movie should incorporate the skill of the week.
Role Play and Rehearsal – Follow these steps to role play and rehearse with the
students: (The more you follow all the components that have been outlined for you,
the easier the lessons will become. It will seem awkward for the students at first. Keep
rehearsing and it will soon become a routine for them.)
1. Select a volunteer or encourage a student to help you
2. Student must state:
• Who is involved in the situation
• What is happening
• What he/she will
3. Select another student to role play with the first
Student and follow step # 2
4. Instruct the other students ( observers ) to carefully
watch the role play. Pay close attention to skill steps.
5. Begin role play with a quick phrase such as, “Action”
6. Watch carefully to make sure students respond appropriately.
Do not allow any physical contact or verbal abuse.
If problems occur: see Coaching Step #1 – 4
39
Practice – Continue selecting volunteers and follow the same procedures until all
students have had an opportunity to role play.
Coaching – Watch the role play carefully to make sure that students respond
appropriately and effectively, allow him/her to complete the role play.
If he/she fails to use the appropriate skill steps: (that is, if he/she begins to use
inappropriate or ineffective behavior)
1. Discuss the importance of being good observers of each other’s behavior.
This can be done by reminding students that they can learn a lot from each
other, and that they can help each other learn new ways of getting along.
• Instruct group members that an important part of the social skills group is
being able to give each other ideas about what they are doing well
(behaviors that other kids like), and ideas about what they are not doing
well (actions that other students may not like, or that could be changed).
2. Teach students five steps for giving feedback:
• Use a nice voice.
• Look at the person.
• Wait for an appropriate time.
• Start by saying something positive
(something that the person is doing well ).
• Provide a suggestion for changing a particular behavior.
3. Encourage students to use statements that are common in their vocabulary.
This increases the chance that they will use similar statements in other
situations. It also increases the chance that the receiver of the feedback will
take it seriously. For example, a statement such as “That was great the way
you dept your cool when Rex tried to get into a fight!”
• Model what giving feedback looks like, using several examples.
• Have students practice by giving feedback to leaders following modeling
examples.
• Suggest that students provide feedback during discussions, role plays, and
other times during group.
• Discuss opportunities that students have outside of the group when they
give feedback using the techniques learned in group.
• Throughout all group sessions, provide ample opportunities for students
to give each other appropriate feedback.
40
Generalization - There are five basic steps to promoting generalization with the use of
reinforcement, prompting, and modeling:
1. Recognize opportunities for students to use the positive social skills that were
taught in social skills training.
2. Reinforce all attempts that students make to use skills with a statement such as,
“Nice Job for using (or trying to use) the steps of joining in!”
3. If students fail to attempt a skill, prompt them with a statement such as, “This is
a good time for you to try the steps of problem solving.” Next:
• If students fail to attempt the steps after the prompt, reinforce them with
a statement such as, “I like the way you tried using the steps of selfcontrol!”
• If students use the steps appropriately, reinforce them with statement
such as, “Great job using the steps of problem solving!”
4. If students fail to attempt the skill or perform it inappropriately, model it by
acting out the steps. Next:
5. If students fail to attempt the skill, or their attempts are
Skill unsuccessful, provide feedback and instruction on how to use the skill with a
statement such as, “When you lose a game, first stop and count to five. Then
think about your choices and the consequences.” Prompt students to use skills at
a later date with a statement such as, “Why don’t you try to use the steps of
self-control later when you have the problem again?”
41
Social Skills Topics
Orientation – Why you are here / How you are special
Being Responsible
Mainstreaming
Following Directions
Team Building
Task Completion
Bus Behavior
Cafeteria/P.E. Behavior
Setting Goals
Building Self-Esteem / Self – Confidence
Impulse Control (Self-Control / Failure / Disappointment)
Coping Skills (Relaxation / Stress Reduction)
Coping Skills (Dealing with Feelings)
Coping Skills (Family Violence / Holiday Stress)
Telling the Truth / Fact and Fantasy
Making Friends
Making and Keeping Friends
Communication Skills (Verbal and Non-verbal)
Communication Skills (Accepting Negative and Positive Feedback)
Accepting Responsibility
Interpersonal Relations (Conflict Resolution)
Interpersonal Relations (Attitude and Getting Along with Others)
Personal Hygiene
Social Eating
Peer Pressure (Positive and Negative)
Peer Pressure (Refusal Skills)
Being Assertive (Passive, Aggressive, Assertive)
Being Assertive (Verbal Requests)
Classroom Behaviors Necessary for Mainstreaming
Decision Making / Problem Solving
Building Violence Prevention Skills
Drug Awareness
42
Social Skills
•
•
•
•
•
•
Social skills are incorporated into the SE Health Quest course on a daily basis.
A new social skill is introduced at the beginning of every week.
The social skill is taught, practiced and reinforced throughout the week.
Students are tested on the social skill at the end of the week.
The social skills are posted in a designated area of the classroom as they are
presented.
Social skills are reviewed and re-emphasized throughout the year whenever a
student exhibits a skill or performance deficit.
43
Room Structure
The redirection room is a structured environment where:
• Students receive social skills instruction
• Behaviors are redirected
• Students are reinforced
• Students cool down
The redirection room is NOT:
• ISS
• Content mastery center
• A place to socialize
Redirection
room is a
SAFE
ZONE.
The following items must be posted:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
BI Room Hours
Classroom Rules
Continuum of Positive and Negative Consequences
Intensive Redirection Rules
Continuum of Reinforcement
Social Skills
Student Progress Charts
Crisis Management Plan
Consequence Flow Charts
The BI Room
should only be
open for social
skills,
scheduled
reinforcement
and redirection.
44
SAMPLE BI ROOM SCHEDULE
8:00 – 8:40
Daily
12:00 – 1:00
Lunch
Monday, Wednesday, Friday
3:45 – 4:20
End of the day
45
Classroom Rules
Follow Directions
Respect Others/Speak Appropriately
Be Prepared/On Time
Complete Assignments
46
Intensive Redirection Rules
Remain Seated
Remain Quiet
Raise Your Hand
Complete Debriefing
47
Positive & Negative Consequences
Consequence charts need to be posted. It is essential that all students
have a clear understanding of the consequences associated with particular
behaviors. The posting and implementation of consequence charts will
also assist Redirectors in maintaining a fair and consistent BI program.
Positive Consequences:
1. Earn positive reactions from others
2. Earn points
3. Earn privileges
4. Earn tickets
5. Purchase store merchandise
6. Friday rewards
7. Reduced monitoring
Negative Consequences:
1. Warning
2. Points are not earned
3. Not eligible for privileges
4. Not eligible for Friday reward
5. Increased monitoring
6. Parent notification
7. Office referral
8. Designated discipline procedures
48
Reinforcement
One of the most important and effective strategies in changing behavior is the
use of positive reinforcement. When positive reinforcement is used consistently
positive behaviors increase.
As the student progresses through the program, the goal is to decrease the
amount of tangible reinforcers earned and increase non-tangible reinforcers.
By decreasing extrinsic motivation and increasing intrinsic motivation, students will have
a smoother transition to post-secondary life
The reinforcement system needs to be comprised of systematic reinforcement
schedules that include hourly, daily, weekly and long term reinforcers. Some students
may require an individualized reinforcement system. If this is the case, the
reinforcement plan needs to be outlined in the BIP.
Visible evidence of reinforcement strategies is essential. Reinforcement
schedules should be presented visually to ensure a clear understanding of the system
and because not all students process information that is presented verbally. The
posting of visual reinforcement schedules also contributes to an overall classroom
climate that is pleasant and motivating.
49
Required Reinforcement
BI Store
Immediate Positive Reinforcement
Friday Reward
50
Ticket Procedures
Students earn tickets throughout the day when they demonstrate
appropriate behaviors.
Example:
• In class on time
• Prepared for class
• On task
• Completed assignments
• Good participation
• Being polite
• Helping others
• Good grades
• Demonstrating social skills
• Complying with directives
• Cooling down appropriately
• Initialed behavior card
• Accepting consequences
Tickets are
always
earned.
Never taken
away.
There are three ways tickets may be disbursed:
• Redirectors initial and hand them out and students are responsible for saving
them
• Redirectors hand them out, students sign and return to redirectors who then
save them
• Redirectors verbally gives tickets and documents on daily observation log
Students should be earning an average of 20 tickets per day or 3 tickets per
period.
Students who are spot checked receive tickets between periods.
The tickets are exchanged for tangibles from the Class Store on a weekly
basis.
Tickets may also, in coordination with the store, be used for:
1. Raffles
2. Privileges
3. Access to computers and/or game systems
51
Store Procedures
The Redirection teacher will maintain a class store. The students will have the
opportunity to trade tickets for tangible items a minimum of once a week.
1. Post Store Schedule
Example:
Lion’s Pride
Open
Friday
12 – 1 pm
2. Stock store/Price items (garage sale dots work well)
Example:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pens
Pencils
Notebooks
Folders
Highlighters
Post its
Bottled water
Blank CD’s
CD cases
Glow sticks
Key chains
Colored computer paper
Nutritional snacks
Hygiene items
Mp3 players
Flash drives
Skateboards
Remember—
Network in the
community.
3. At the predetermined time the students are allowed to go to the BI room and
exchange their tickets for a tangible item.
Conduct
interest
inventory.
52
BI Store
Open Friday’s
12:00 - 1:00
Blank CD’s
Water
CD Player Gift Certificates
Snacks
Tickets will be earned daily and may be used to buy store merchandise.
53
Friday Reward Procedures
One of the most important and effective strategies in changing student behavior is the
use of positive reinforcement. Friday Reward is a key element in a class-wide
management system.
The steps for implementing the Friday Reward are:
•
Create and post a Friday Reward chart.
•
Determine the criteria for earning Friday Reward. The criteria should be based on
the students’ IEP.
•
On the first day of the week, inform the students what the Friday Reward will be
or you may allow the students to vote on a reward of their choice or from the
reward menu.
•
Remember to change the reward choices often to maintain high student interest.
•
Discuss with the students the criteria for earning Friday Reward.
•
Post the reward choice (include a picture if possible) to serve as a reminder of
what they are working for throughout the week.
•
Post or tally daily points on the Friday Reward chart so the students may monitor
their progress.
•
On Friday total the points on the chart to determine which students have met the
criteria for the reward.
54
Friday Reward
Friday Reward Criteria:
•
•
Students on daily point sheets/behavior cards qualify for Friday Reward when
they have met the criteria.
Students on three or six progress reports qualify for Friday Reward if they do not
receive any office referrals for the week.
Post required criteria to qualify for Friday Reward.
(See reinforcement schedules)
Friday
•
•
•
•
•
•
reward activities include, but are not limited to:
Celebrations
Video game tournaments
Luncheons/Breakfasts
Pizza
Movies
Desserts
Friday Reward takes place on Fridays during social skills class. Students who are not
scheduled for social skills, participate in Friday Reward before/after school or during
lunch.
Post Friday Reward Activity
55
Reinforcement Schedule
Students on Point Sheets
150 POINTS
=
Participate in Friday Reward
Movies
Video games
Celebrations
Food
Friday reward time should not exceed 45 minutes.
56
Reinforcement Schedule
Students on Progress Reports
No Office Referrals
=
Participate in Friday Reward
Movies
Video games
Celebrations
Food
This is only for students monitored by progress reports.
57
Reinforcement Schedule
5 Behavior Cards
With a minimum of 6 initials per card
=
Participate in Friday Reward
Movies
Video games
Celebrations
Food
58
Contracting
The contracting equation is:
Behavior = Reward
Behavior contracts will include the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
The dates the agreement begins and ends.
Behaviors targeted for change (measurable).
Amount and/or kind of reward/reinforcer to be earned.
Schedule of reinforcers delivery.
Signatures of all those involved (student, teacher, parent).
Schedule for review of progress (daily is best).
Contracts will be closed out every 3 weeks.
Contracts will be reviewed on Friday’s and
closed out every 3 weeks.
Sept. 9th
Oct. 21st
Nov. 11th
Dec 2nd
Dec 21st
59
Long Term Incentive
1st Semester
Teacher buys lunch combo
On December 18th
for
Perfect Attendance
August
24th
From
– December 21st
60
Consequence
Flow Charts
61
Tardy
1st Offense
Warning
2nd-5th Offense
Lunch Detention
6th Offense
Shadow for 3 Days
7th Offense
Escort for 3 Days
8 or More
Escort 5 minutes before
the bell
62
Tardy
1st Offense
2nd-5th Offense
6th Offense
7th Offense
8 or More
63
Profanity
1st Offense
Lunch Detention
2nd-3rd Offense
2 days lunch detention
Call parents
4th Offense
Office referral
1 day ISS
3 days monitoring in class
Teacher/ parent conference
5th Offense
Office referral
3 days ISS
3 days monitoring in class
Parent/administrator conference
6 or More
Office referral
ISS
Call parents
Increased monitoring
64
Profanity
1st Offense
2nd-3rd Offense
4th Offense
5th Offense
6 or More
65
Refusal to
work
1st Offense
Warning
2nd-4th Offense
Complete work in
lunch detention
5th Offense
Intensive redirection
Phone call home
6th Offense
Intensive redirection
Conference with parents
7 or More
Office referral
ISS
66
Refusal to
work
1st Offense
2nd-4th Offense
5th Offense
6th Offense
7 or More
67
Refusal to follow
directions
1st Offense
Warning
2nd Offense
Student / Teacher
Conference
3rd Offense
Call home
Lunch detention
4th Offense
Increased monitoring
5 or More
Administrator/parent/
teacher/student
conference
68
Refusal to follow
directions
1st Offense
2nd Offense
3rd Offense
4th Offense
5 or More
69
Disrespectful
attitude/tone/gestures
1st Offense
Warning
Redirection
2nd-3rd Offense
Lunch detention
4th Offense
Parent / teacher conference
5th Offense
ISS
BISD police
70
Disrespectful
attitude/tone/gestures
1st Offense
2nd-3rd Offense
4th Offense
5th Offense
71
Walking out of
class
1st Offense
Warning / Redirection
2nd Offense
Redirection
Teacher/Teacher conference
3rd Offense
2-3 days of monitoring
Phone call to parent
72
Walking out of
class
1st Offense
2nd Offense
3rd Offense
73
Physical Aggression
Verbal Aggression
Threats
Stealing
Drugs
Weapons
Inappropriate Use of
technology/social media
Office
Referral
*(See Student Code of
conduct)
74
ADDRESSING
CHALLENGING
BEHAVIORS
75
Persistent Misbehavior
In the event that a student displays persistent misbehavior:
Review the psychological
Ensure that modifications are being implemented appropriately
Conference with student
Conference with parent
Teacher/parent/administrator conference
Review the FBA (revise if necessary)
Review the BIP and its implementation (revise if necessary)
Develop a teacher/student contract
Increase monitoring
Increase/change reinforcers
Change consequences
Contact outside agencies (Probation officer, Tropical Texas, etc.)
Refer family to outside agencies
Consult with Sp. Ed. counselor
Consult with Behavior Specialist
Consult with Sp. Ed. Supervisor
Staffing
Alternative placement
should never be
considered until the
above actions have
been taken and
documented.
76
Staffings
Staffings are held when BI students are experiencing considerable difficulty.
The purpose of a staffing is to review all pertinent information and develop a specific
plan of action.
Staffings should include the following:
Redirector
Sp. Ed. Administrator
Sp. Ed. Counselor
Behavior Specialist
Regular Ed. Teacher(s)
Staffings may also include but are not limited to the following:
Nurse
Sp. Ed. Supervisor
Regular Ed. Counselor
Parent
Outside agencies
Prior to consideration
of placement at BAC
for persistent
misbehavior, a
staffing must be held.
77
Staffing Agenda
Introductions
Review data:
Psychological
FIE
Functional Behavioral Assessment Questionnaires
Office referrals/Consequences
Functional Behavioral Assessment
Behavior Intervention Plan/Documentation
Point sheets/Behavior Cards/Incident logs/Observation logs
Implementation of Modifications
Miscellaneous
Target behavior(s)
Develop a plan of action
Student
Date
Attendance
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
1.
Targeted Behaviors:
2.
3.
Brief description of plan of action
______
____________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
78
79
Major points to follow as per Special Services Guidelines:
Please be advised that the decision to proceed with removals will be
made by home campus administration, but, it is highly recommended
that first time discretionary offenders not be sent to BAC.
Instead:




Review IEP Schedule of Services
Review and/or revise FBA and/or BIP
Campus Administrator(s) should give the ARD Teacher,
classroom teachers, and other school staff an opportunity
to implement interventions and strategies.
Campus administrator may consider other campus-based
disciplinary options. 
Refer to BI Handbook for procedures relating to
removal of students in the BI Program.
Note: Any timeline exceeding 7 days from Infraction date to
Hearing date and MDR without an approved extension letter signed
by BAC Administrator will be referred to Special Services for review.
STEP 1- Staffing- “Staffing Checklist” http://www.bisd.us/SpecialServices/
STEP 2 – Home campus will submit preliminary packet following BAC packet
checklist for Special Services approval and then BAC approval to
continue with hearing process.
STEP 3 – The Placement ARD will be collaboratively scheduled by home campus
and BAC. Please ensure that all items below are addressed prior to the
ARD:
Schedule of Services (SOS)
Instruction Accommodations
Placement ARD Requirements
8 BAC 45 minute courses
Must match SOS and State Testing Page
Individual Education Plan
State Testing Worksheet
Current dates of implementation needed
Must match Instructional Accommodations
FBA
Revised draft to be presented at Placement ARD
BIP
Revised draft to be presented at Placement ARD
80
Needed immediately after Placement ARD:




Rewards/Incentives (Tangibles) as stated in student Behavior
Intervention Plan
Summary of ARD Assessment Decision Form
Provide Review 360 intervention documentation to BAC packet
Provide Staffing Checklist to the BAC packet
Additional Notes:
ARDs and Amendments while the student is at BAC:
For all ARDS and Amendments, BAC representative will assist home
campuses in providing invitation to parents.
Home Campus:
•
•
•
•
•
Annual ARD
8th Grade Transition ARD
Promotion/Graduation ARD
Special ARD (State Testing or Change of Instructional Placement)
Amendments to Schedule of Services and State Testing*
*(Home campus will collaborate with BAC to ensure that
appropriate courses correlate with student’s Graduation plan and
campus course availability)
•
•
•
•
Failure ARD
Special “Return” ARD
MDR/Placement ARD to JJAEP (if necessary)
Amendments (other than those listed above)
BAC:
Note: BAC Case Manager will collaborate with Home Campus SE Case
Manager and will participate along with the student via phone. Failure to
notify DAEP of amendments addressing changes to Schedule of Services
and state testing within reasonable time may jeopardize graduation
requirements and accurate testing for SE students.
Re-evaluations at BAC:
The Home Campus Diagnostician will be responsible for administering all
re-evaluations.
Special Education Transportation:
Special Education Transportation will continue if it is already a related
service at the home campus. No other type of transportation is provided
while the student is at BAC.
BISD does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, age, disability or genetic information in employment
or provision of services, programs or activities. BISD no discrimina a base de raza, color, origen nacional, sexo, religión, edad,
discapacidad o información genética en el empleo o en la provisión de servicios, programas o actividades.
81
Crisis Management
82
GUIDELINES FOR THE PREVENTION OF A CRISIS
1. Establish an atmosphere of trust.
2. Teach the rules.
3. Consequences for rule infractions should be known ahead of time and
consistently enforced.
4. Rule infractions should be dealt with unemotionally.
5. Students should be allowed to save face: not lose self-respect.
6. Do not make threats. Power struggles should be avoided.
7. Expectations should be clearly defined, and teachers should check to see if
they are understood by the students.
8. Model calm, composed behavior. (Especially in stressful situations)
9. Avoid fault finding. The “What” of behavior should be discussed (not the
“Why”). Questions such as “What are you doing?” are preferable to “Why are
you doing that?”
10. Do not argue with students. Remember, it is not always necessary to have
the last word to be right.
11. Attempts should be made to intervene with the behavior before conflict
develops.
12. Use Common Sense!
83
84
BI CRISIS MANAGEMENT PLAN
Definition of Crisis: A Crisis exists when a student poses a serious threat to the
safety of themselves/other students/faculty/staff/property.
The CRISIS MANAGEMENT PLAN will be implemented using the BISD approved modelCPI (Crisis Prevention Institute) when the BI staff or the administration deems it an
emergency situation. The plan will be implemented quickly, quietly and efficiently.
Disruption of the school schedule should be kept to a minimum.
The plan will be practiced with the BI students before a crisis occurs and reviewed as
necessary.
1. Safety of student in crisis is aided by removing other students, furniture and
school items from immediate area. At least two CPI trained adults will remain
with the student in crisis. If additional assistance is needed, the administration
will assist in bringing in other members of the Crisis Team. Office staff will
receive advanced instruction in what to do when BI staff calls for immediate
assistance.
2. Other BI students will be led from the classroom in an orderly manner with the
staff member assigned by the BI Teacher or the administration. The BI students
will never be sent from the room without a staff member.
3. Places for other BI students to go during a crisis (examples of possible choices):
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
Content Mastery Center
Nurses office
Room # ____
Library
Cafeteria
4. A box with independent level activities, pencils, crayons, etc. will be prepared in
advance and left ready to take with the students going to the new location.
5. When student in crisis is back in control, one of the staff members helping with
the crisis will go get the rest of the class.
6. If the student coming out of a crisis requires a change of scenery or a quiet
place, the regular education counselor’s office may be used.(or any other area
deemed appropriate by the administration or the BI teacher)
85
If unable to reach parent/guardian or anyone on the emergency phone list, a
staff member will be assigned to stay with the child until arrangements are
made. The inability to reach anyone on the emergency list will be documented
and the BI teacher will contact parents for possible reasons and new emergency
contacts.
7. If more than one BI student is in serious crisis simultaneously, additional help
will be required from other CPI trained staff members. The administration/BI
teacher will direct these requests.
8. DUTIES
BI Staff:
Exhaust all CPI techniques.
Implement Crisis Plan as practiced.
Follow BI teacher directions quietly and efficiently.
Remain calm and neutral.
If student is restrained, all appropriate forms (Written
Notification of Use of Restraint: Internal Tracking Form,
Special Ed Written Summary of Restraint Form, and PEIMS
Child Restraint Form 435) should be completed and given to the
appropriate campus personnel.
On the day of the restraint an attempt must be made to verbally
notify parents
Parents must receive written notification within one school day of
the event
Office Staff:
If BI staff calls asking for immediate assistance, an administrator
must be found and sent immediately.
BI Crisis situations and information should not be discussed with
anyone other than the administration, BI staff, and those involved.
(Only to the extent necessary to maintain the safety and security of
the student(s)).
If a parent calls the office for more information, only the BI teacher
or administrator should answer their questions.
Remain calm and neutral.
Nurse:
Respond to call from BI staff in timely manner.
Staff will advise if it is urgent.
Document checking the student after physical restraint.
86
R egular Education/ Special Education Counselor:
Will be advised of the crisis situation and called in only if needed.
Counselor’s office will be used only if needed.
Follow up discussion between the student who was in crisis and the
counselor may be recommended.
Behavior Specialist:
Will be called in only when needed.
Can provide recommendations or new strategies when needed.
Other CP I trained staff:
Will be called in only if needed.
Adm inistration:
Implement their duties in the crisis plan when necessary.
Confidentiality is
the LAW!!!
87
I have read and understand m y roles and responsibilities in the (CP I ) Crisis
M anagem ent P lan.
Signatures:
BI Staff:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Office Staff:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Nurse:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Reg. Ed./Sp. Ed. Counselor:
________________________________
________________________________
Behavior Specialist:
________________________________
________________________________
Other CPI trained staff:
________________________________
________________________________
Administrator:
88
Written Notification of Use of Restraint:
Internal Tracking Form
Student Name:___________________________________ Date:____________________________
Name of Staff Members Administering Restraint: Date of Restraint Training:*
________________________________________ _________________________________
________________________________________ _________________________________
________________________________________ _________________________________
*Personnel called upon to use restraint who have not received prior training must receive training within 30
school days.
Administrator Notification
(must occur the same day that the restraint occurred)
Type of Notification:
� Verbal � Written
Date of notification: _________ Time: _________
Name of Administrator Notified:___________________
Parent Notification
(good faith effort must be made to verbally notify parent the same day as the restraint occurred, written notification must
be placed in mail or otherwise provided to parent within one day of the use of restraint)
Type of Notification:
� Telephone – Date:__________ � In-person – Date:__________ � Written – Date: _________
Comments:
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
_____
Name of Person Notifying Parent of Use of Restraint: __________________________________________
White Copy: Administrator
Yellow Copy: Special Education Eligibility Folder
Pink Copy: Teacher
Updated Summer 2015
89
This form can be found on the Special Services website under forms.
Updated Summer 2015
90
This form can be found on the Special Services website under forms.
Updated Summer 2015
91
This form can be found on the Special Services website under forms.
Updated Summer 2015
92
(Cover Letter: Written Summary of Restraint Use)
Date:
Dear
Your child was involved in an emergency situation on (date) that resulted in the use of
physical restraint. Attached is a summary of the incident and a written description of the
physical restraint used, including the behaviors your child exhibited before physical
restraint was used. During the time of restraint, your child was observed by staff trained
in the use of physical interventions for any signs of physical distress. The use of restraint
ended as soon as the emergency situation no longer existed. This information is provided
for your review and to seek your input into this situation.
The attached information will be filed in your child’s special education eligibility folder
so that the Admission, Review and Dismissal (ARD) Committee may use this
information in considering the need for changes in your child’s Individualized Education
Program (IEP) and/or Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP). Please call (insert name and
phone number) if you would like to schedule an ARD Committee meeting to review your
child’s IEP or BIP.
Commissioner’s Rule for Special Education, Section 89.1053. Procedures for the Use of
Restraint and Time-Out, states that restraint of a student with a disability may be used
only in a clearly defined emergency situation. Schools must inform parents when it
becomes necessary to use restraint in an effort to protect the student, other students or
prevent serious property damage.
Please contact (insert name and phone number) if you would like to schedule a
conference to discuss the behaviors leading up to the use of physical restraint. If you
have other questions, please contact me at (insert phone number).
Sincerely,
Campus Administrator
cc: Special Education Eligibility Folder
Enclosure
Updated Summer 2015
93
Fecha
Estimado/a
Su hijo/a estuvo involucrado en una situación de emergencia el (fecha) que resultó en el
uso de contención física. Adjuntamos un resumen del incidente y una descripción por
escrito de la contención física usada, incluyendo los comportamientos presentados por su
hijo antes de haberse usado la contención física. Durante el período de contención física,
su hijo estuvo bajo la observación del personal capacitado en el uso de intervenciones
físicas para ver si presentaba alguna manifestación de agotamiento físico. El uso de
contención física finalizó en cuanto dejó de existir la situación de emergencia. Le
proporcionamos esta información para su consideración y para que nos dé su opinión en
relación con esta situación.
La información adjunta se archivará en la carpeta de elegibilidad de educación especial
de su hijo para que el comité de admisión, revisión y retiro (ARD) pueda usar esta
información al tomar en cuenta la necesidad de cambios en el programa educativo
individualizado (IEP) y/o el plan de intervención debido a la conducta (BIP). Por favor
llame a (inserte nombre y número de teléfono) si desea programar una reunión con el
comité ARD para revisar el IEP o el BIP de su hijo.
Los Reglamentos del Comisionado para la Educación Especial, Sección 89.1053.
Procedimientos para el Uso de Contención Física y Separación, indica que la contención
física de un estudiante con alguna discapacidad puede ser usado sólo en una situación de
emergencia claramente definida. Las escuelas deben informarle a los padres cuando es
necesario usar la contención física para intentar proteger al estudiante, a los otros
estudiantes o para prevenir daños graves a la propiedad.
Por favor comuníquese con (inserte nombre y número de teléfono) si desea programar
una reunión para hablar sobre la conducta que llevó al uso de la contención física. Si
tiene otras preguntas, comuníquese conmigo llamando al (inserte número de teléfono).
Muy atentamente,
Administrador de la escuela
cc: Carpeta de Elegibilidad para la Educación Especial
Anexos
Updated Summer 2015
94
TOOLBOX
Updated Summer 2015
95
Feelings Chart
5
How I feel

I need some help!
4

I’m really upset.
3

I’ve got a problem.
2

Things are pretty good.
1

Feeling great!
Updated Summer 2015
What I can do
96
Tips for Teachers Who Supervise Paraprofessionals
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
If your paraprofessional is new, gradually phase him/her into full responsibility.
Constant communication regarding daily planning, schedules and routines is important.
Include paraprofessionals in teacher in –services training
Provide time for paraprofessionals to meet with you. Even if it means only 15 minutes each
day. Communication is very important. Schedule the time.
Clearly delineate responsibilities. Paraprofessionals need to know “What are they expected to
do”.
Provide opportunities for recognition
Offer on going training.
Provide networking opportunities, paraprofessionals can visit model classrooms throughout the
district.
Discuss the disabilities, challenges, or special needs of each student.
Keep your paraprofessional informed about special events, field trips, etc.
Handle all concerns immediately.
Prepare for the first day of class.
Plan for the first two weeks before school starts
Explain and demonstrate classroom management strategies
Don’t let concerns/problems/issues go unresolved. Sit down and discuss them. Seek
assistance from an administrator or supervisor to keep things going smoothly.
Encourage new ideas and remain open to suggestions.
Don’t ASSUME!
Don’t expect the paraprofessional to do something you wouldn’t do.
Rotate unpleasant tasks such as changing diapers with the paraprofessional. They are a
support for you and for students, not a maid.
Updated Summer 2015
97
Incident Log
Student __________________________
Date
Refusal to
work
Disruptive
A = Redirection
B = Intensive Redirection
C = Contract
D = Phone call home
E = Parent conference
F = Office referral
Updated Summer 2015
Left
class
Campus:_______________________
Disrespectful
Profanity
G =ISS
H =OSS
I = Police report
J = BAC
K = JJAEP
Physical
Aggression
Drugs
Other
Action
Taken
98
Reward Log
Student: ______________________________
Date
Type
A= Computer time
B= Board Games
C= Card Games
D= Listening to music
E= Extra tickets
Updated Summer 2015
Period/Time
Campus:________________
For
G= PS2, Nintendo DS, Wii
H= Trading in BI store
I= Food Item
J= Friday fun
K= Token/coin
F= Other ___________
99
Special Services Behavior Intervention Unit
Tangible Incentives Receipt Log
School: __________________
Teacher: __________________
Room#___________
Include tangible behavioral incentive items with the value of over $1.00 given to students
purchased using Special Education funds (ear buds, cologne, perfume, nail polish, etc.).
Item Name
Name of Student/ID#
Student’s Signature
Distribution
Date
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Teacher’s Signature:__________________________ Date:_______________
Due Date: For clearance at the end of the year to Cluster Supervisor
Updated Summer 2015
100
Special Services Behavior Intervention Unit Inventory
School: __________________
Teacher: __________________
Room#___________
Include tangible behavioral incentive items with a value of over $1.00 purchased using Special
Education funds (gaming systems, ear buds, cologne, perfume, nail polish, etc.).
Item Name
Ex:
Cologne
Beginning Quantity
Due to SPED Supervisor
by 1st Friday in
September
3
Purchased
Quantity
5
Number
Distributed
End of Year
Balance
Attach Tangible
Incentives Receipt Log
Due to SPED Supervisor at
EOY Clearance
7
1
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
Teacher’s Signature:____________________________ Date:_______________
Updated Summer 2015
101
Weekly Behavioral Progress Report
Student_____________________
Reg.Ed.Teacher_______________
Sp.Ed. Teacher________________
(Circle)
123456
six weeks
Date____________
Subject__________
Period___________
1. Are there any behavioral difficulties that need to be addressed at this time?
□ Yes
□ No
2. Does the student need more assistance or monitoring in your class?
□ Yes
□ No
3. Is there anything I can do to help you with this student at this time?
□ Yes
□ No
4. Has the student___________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
5. Has the student __________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
6. Has the student__________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
Comments_________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________
Please return by_________________________________.
(Insert Date)
Updated Summer 2015
102
Three Week Behavioral Progress Report
Student_____________________
Reg.Ed.Teacher_______________
Sp.Ed. Teacher________________
(Circle)
123456
six weeks
Date____________
Subject__________
Period___________
1. Are there any behavioral difficulties that need to be addressed at this time?
□ Yes
□ No
2. Does the student need more assistance or monitoring in your class?
□ Yes
□ No
3. Is there anything I can do to help you with this student at this time?
□ Yes
□ No
4. Has the student___________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
5. Has the student __________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
6. Has the student__________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
Comments_________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________
Please return by_________________________________.
(Insert Date)
Updated Summer 2015
103
Six Week Behavioral Week Progress Report
Student_____________________
Reg.Ed.Teacher_______________
Sp.Ed. Teacher________________
(Circle)
123456
six weeks
Date____________
Subject__________
Period___________
1. Are there any behavioral difficulties that need to be addressed at this time?
□ Yes
□ No
2. Does the student need more assistance or monitoring in your class?
□ Yes
□ No
3. Is there anything I can do to help you with this student at this time?
□ Yes
□ No
4. Has the student___________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
5. Has the student __________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
6. Has the student__________________________________?
□Yes
□ No
(Insert Target BIP Behavior)
Comments_________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________
Please return by_________________________________.
(Insert Date)
Updated Summer 2015
104
Updated Summer 2015
105
Updated Summer 2015
106
Updated Summer 2015
107
Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Pre-Correcting Problem Behavior
Pre-Correction is a proactive strategy designed to prevent or interrupt predictable problem behavior
from occurring and increase the likelihood of expected behavior taking place. Essentially, the teacher
anticipates problem behavior based on the student(s) previous behavior patterns or knowledge of
student behavior in general. Given this information, the teacher takes measures to disrupt this
behavior pattern.
For example, the teacher knows that when the students come back from an
assembly, they are likely to be noisy and unruly. So the teacher meets them at the door and has a
task ready for them as soon as they enter the room.
In general, pre-correction strategies require knowing what sets off the behavior (triggers) and the
likely problem behavior. Given this information, the teacher can develop strategies to offset the
problem behavior and facilitate acceptable behavior.
Pre-correction procedures, used in conjunction with correction procedures, provide educators with a
very effective and efficient method for preventing and managing a wide range of problem behavior
that occurs in classroom and school settings. The combined uses of these two procedures involve
seven basic steps:
1. Identifying the Context (trigger) and the Predictable Problem Behavior
2. Specifying Expected Behaviors
3. Modifying the Context
TBSI
4. Conducting Behavior Rehearsals
5. Providing Strong Reinforcement for Expected Behaviors
Module 5
6. Prompting Expected Behaviors
7. Monitoring the Plan
Case Study
The complete seven-step, pre-correction procedure is illustrated in an example involving a student
who comes in from recess shouting, laughing, and pushing other students. Every day the teacher
spends a considerable amount of time trying to get him settled so she can hand out materials and
explain the math class. It often takes 5-7 minutes to gain control of him and have the class engaged
with the math activity. The teacher examined the situation closely and developed the following precorrection plan.
Updated Summer 2015
108
Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Pre-Correcting Problem Behavior
Pre-Correction Checklist and Plan
Teacher: S. Endow Student: Dominic
Date: 4/2/01 Class: Grade 3
1. Context Transition from recess to the classroom
Problem Behavior Shouting, laughing, pushing; down time before he
complies with directions and becomes on task.
2. Expected Behavior Enter room quietly, hands to self, go straight to
desk and begin entry task on chalkboard.
3. Context Modification Teacher meets students at door, has them wait a
few seconds until everyone is in line, reminds them
to go straight to their desks and begin the math
puzzle that is on the chalkboard.
4. Behavior Rehearsal Teacher reminds Dominic just before recess to
come into the room quietly, go to his desk and start
the math activity and Dominic was asked to repeat
the expectations.
5. Strong Reinforcement Dominic was told that if he could follow the rules
coming into class after recess, the teacher would be
very pleased and that he could earn some free time
on the computer (one of his favorite choice
activities).
6. Prompts The teacher meets the class at the door and
gestures for everyone to be quiet and points to the
math activity on the board. She catches Dominic
and says, “Let’s get started real quickly on the math
puzzle.”
7. Monitoring Plan The teacher uses her watch to measure how long it
takes Dominic to reach his des and begin work after
he passes through the door.
Walker, Colvin & Ramsey (1995) pp. 176-183.
Updated Summer 2015
109
Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Utilizing Effective Correction Procedures for
Attention-Getting Behavior
The need for attention has been identified as one of the most common explanations for problem
behavior in the classroom, such as student talk-outs, interruptions, off task behavior, clowning around
behavior, and repeated requests for assistance. However, a relatively common experience for
teachers is that when they address these relatively minor problem behaviors, the students react and
exhibit worse behavior. Then the teacher has to deal with the more serious behavior which could
possibly lead to crisis behavior. To prevent this kind of escalation it is critical for teachers to have
simple, efficient and non-inflammatory procedures for correcting minor attention-getting behavior. The
goal of these strategies is to interrupt the chain of behavior and assist the student to engage in the
present activities in the classroom.
Use a correction plan that contains a series of steps in which the least intrusive step is used first and
more intrusive measures come into play only if the problem behavior persists. For example:
1. Remove attention from the student who is displaying inappropriate attention getting behavior, and
acknowledge other students nearby who are exhibiting the expected behavior.
2. Redirect the student to the expected behavior with a gesture or verbal prompt, and be sure to
acknowledge subsequent cooperation and displays of expected behavior by the student.
3. Secure the student’s attention and clearly inform him or her of the expected behavior, provide
immediate opportunities for practice, and acknowledge the changed behavior when it occurs.
4. Deliver a brief warning by providing an opportunity for the student to choose between displaying
the expected behavior and experiencing a penalty or loss of privilege.
5. Deliver the penalty or loss of privilege in a matter-of-fact matter (for example, timeout or loss of
some recess time) and do not argue with the student about details of the penalty.
CAUTION: Do not become engaged in a power struggle with the student in using these procedures. If
the student begins to escalate delay responding and utilize the procedures suggested in the topic,
Managing Agitation.
Colvin & Lazar (1997) p.79. Colvin, (1999), Defusing Anger and Aggression Video (Vignette # 1).
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Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Managing Off-Task Behavior
Off-task behavior is one of the most common minor problem behaviors teachers have to deal with in
the classroom. This behavior can readily escalate to more serious behavior if it is not managed
carefully. There are two broad reasons for students to display off-task behavior; (a) to obtain attention
from the teacher or other students, and (b) to avoid the task because they cannot do the work or are
bored with it. If the teacher believes that the off-task behavior is motivated by attention needs then
follow the procedures listed in utilizing Effective Correction Procedures
for Attention-Getting Behavior. If the motivation is avoidance then the teacher needs to assess the
student’s skill level and proceed accordingly. For example, if the student can demonstrate mastery of
the topic, new or more challenging work needs to be provided. However, if the student does not have
the skills for the task then more instruction is needed such as more explanations or easier practice
examples need to be provided.
Note: In trying to determine the motivation for off-task behavior, whether it is attention-getting or
avoidance, it is better to start with the hypothesis that the explanation is avoidance, that is assess the
student’s skill level. The student’s subsequent behavior will provide the necessary feedback.
Colvin & Lazar (1997) pp.57-61.
Colvin (1999), Defusing Anger and Aggression Video (Vignette #1).
Colvin, Ainge & Nelson (1997),pp.47-51.
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Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Managing Agitation
Sometimes students are already agitated when they enter a situation and as soon as a demand is
placed on them or their behavior is corrected, they can escalate to quite serious explosive behavior.
For example, Jamie’s body language and tone of voice indicate he is upset. The teacher asks him to
sit down and begin his work. He then uses profanities and storms out of the classroom. However, this
escalation may have been defused if the teacher had used techniques to settle the student down
before the direction to begin work was given.
There are two basic steps for addressing agitation; (a) identify the signs of agitation and, (b) utilize
techniques for defusing agitation.
Signs of Agitation
Students show agitation by either increasing distracting behavior or decreasing active, engaged
behavior. Here are some examples of increases in distracting behavior: darting eyes, nonconversational language, “busy” hands, moving in and out of groups, frequent off-task and on-task
behavior, starting and stopping activities and moving around the room.
On the other hand, students may be agitated and not show it. These students display agitation by
displaying decreases in behavior and less engagement in activities such as: staring into space,
subdued language, contained hands, lack of interaction and involvement in activities, withdrawal from
groups, lack of responding in general and avoidance of eye contact.
Techniques for Defusing Agitation
Once the teacher recognizes that the student is agitated, the primary goal is to use strategies to calm
the student down and carefully assist him or her to become engaged in the class activity. Because
these strategies are essentially supportive in nature, it is very important to use them early, (before the
behavior becomes serious), otherwise the teacher may reinforce the serious behavior. The key is
timing. Use the following techniques at the earliest indications of agitation:
1. Teacher support: Communicate concern to the student.
2. Space: Provide the student with an opportunity to have some isolation from the rest of the class.
3. Choices: Give the student some choices or options.
4. Preferred activities: Allow the student to engage in a preferred activity for a
short period of time to help regain focus.
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Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Managing Agitation
5. Teacher proximity: Move near or stand near the student.
6. Independent activities: Engage the student in independent activities to provide
isolation.
7. Movement activities: Use activities or tasks that require movement, such as
running errands, cleaning the chalkboard, or distributing papers.
8. Involvement of the student: Where possible involve the student in the plan. In
this way there is more chance of ownership and generalization to other settings.
9. Relaxation activities: Use audiotapes, drawing activities, breathing and
relaxation techniques.
10. Use passive activities: Use activities that have low demand on the students
such as reading to the class, or have them watch an instructional video tape.
Since agitation is a very common predictor of serious or crisis behavior, it is very
important for teachers to develop a sharp eye in identifying agitation as early as
possible and implement strategies that are designed to calm the student down and
reorient the student to the current class activity.
Walker, Colvin & Ramsey (1995), pp. 72-119.
Colvin (1999), Defusing Anger and Aggression Video (Vignette #3).
Colvin, Ainge & Nelson (1997),pp.47-51.
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Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Managing Provocative or Challenging Behavior
Sometimes a student will break a rule deliberately to challenge the teacher. Quite
often the teacher will address the problem and give the student a direction, which the
student will refuse to follow. In this way the student sets the stage for confrontation.
For example, a student wears a T-shirt that has a rude message on it. The teacher
addresses the issue telling the student that the shirt is a violation of the school dress
code and that he needs to go to the restroom and turn it inside out. The student
refuses to follow the direction and a confrontation scene is established. In other
words the stage is set for escalation. The student’s behavior will escalate or become
defused depending for the most part on how the teacher addresses the problem.
There are three clear steps for defusing this kind of challenging behavior.
1. State the rule or expectation that is being challenged in a calm yet firm manner.
2. Request explicitly for the student to take care of the problem.
3. Lead the student to consider options or present options on how to take care of the
problem.
For example, in the case of the student with the offensive T-shirt, the teacher would
take him aside and say, “Joe, that T-shirt is not acceptable in a public school. It has
a rude message.” (State the Rule). “I need you to take care of it please.” (Ask the
student to take charge of the problem). “What is your plan?” If the student does not
come up with a plan the teacher could say something like, “You can turn it inside out,
get a shirt from the gym or wear a jacket. I don’t care but I need you to take care of it
please.” (Review options).
Colvin, Ainge & Nelson (1997),pp.47-51.
Colvin (1999), Defusing Anger and Aggression Video (Vignette #2).
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Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Responding to Disrespectful Behavior
Another common strategy students use to engage staff is to use disrespectful
behavior. These behaviors include negative comments towards staff, insults,
profanity, and verbal abuse. If the teacher takes these behaviors personally and
reacts strongly then the student could likely react as well and exhibit even more
serious behavior such as serious threats or even assault. Again the question arises,
“Could this situation have been defused versus escalated.” The key in managing
these behaviors is to realize that the student is trying to control the situation by
“pressing buttons” to obtain an emotional reaction from the teacher. Four steps are
suggested for defusing these situations and avoiding escalation to crisis behavior:
1. Delay responding: Clearly the student is setting up the teacher for a reaction.
By delaying responding, pausing slightly, the teacher communicates to the
student that he or she is in control of his or her behavior and will not simply react.
2. Studiously avoid using escalating prompts: These are reactive teacher
behaviors that are likely to escalate the student such as agitation, frustration,
cornering the student, touching, grabbing, nagging, discrediting remarks and
challenging the student.
3. Calmly respond to the problem behavior in a firm but controlled tone: For
example, the teacher might say, “Michael, that language is unacceptable and I am
going to follow-up on this shortly.”
4. Deliver an appropriate negative consequence: Provide independent task for
the class to perform. Approach the student privately. Deliver a negative
consequence that has been preplanned and specified within the class rules.
Such consequences may include response cost techniques, loss of privileges,
detention, etc.
Here are some additional guidelines for approaching a student who is being
disrespectful or possibly dangerous: Move slowly and deliberately toward the
problem situation, speak privately, calmly and respectfully, minimize body language,
keep a reasonable distance, establish eye-level position where possible, be brief,
focus on expected behavior, withdraw if the problem escalates and acknowledge
cooperation where appropriate.
In general, effective management of disrespect is largely determined by how we
respond. If we are controlled and respectful we are more likely to defuse the
situation and avoid escalation to crisis behavior.
Colvin (1999), Defusing Anger and Aggression Video (Vignette # 3).
Colvin (In Preparation), Classroom Management Systems, p.13.
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Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Establishing Limits and Defusing Defiance
One of the most troublesome behaviors that teachers face in a classrooms is noncompliance,
defiance or insubordination. This behavior of refusing to follow
directions is problematic for three important reasons; (a) teachers need cooperation
from students in order to teach and (b) non-compliance quickly disrupts the
teaching/learning process and (c) non-compliance can easily escalate to serious or
crisis behavior. Teachers need strategies that can help them establish limits with
their students (i.e., break-up sustained non-compliance), establish cooperation and
to avoid escalation to serious behavior. Three main steps are involved in defusing
non-compliance and establishing cooperation: (a) pre-teach, (b) deliver the choices
to the student in a non-confrontational manner, and (c) follow-through based on the
student response.
1. Pre-teach the procedures: The purpose of this step is to make sure that the
student understands the procedures. Carefully rehearse and explain the
procedures to the class or individual students. For younger students it is important
to model the procedures. The pre-teaching should occur at a neutral time or time
when the student is relatively calm.
2. Present choices in a non-confrontational manner by:
(a) Present the expected behavior and a negative consequence as a decision
(place responsibility on the student).
(b) Allow a few seconds for the student to decide (to allow the student to calm
down, process the choices and to save face).
(c) Withdraw from the student and attend to other students. This also helps the
student to save face, leaves them with the decision and helps the teacher to
disengage and manage the rest of the class.
3. Follow through: If the student chooses the expected behavior, briefly
acknowledge the choice and continue with the class activity. If the student does
not choose the expected behavior follow through with the negative consequence.
Example
Students are engaged in working on some math problems except for Sarah who is
wandering the room. The teacher followed the usual procedures of attending to the
students on task and providing some prompts for Sarah to sit down and begin her
work. The teacher then said, “Sarah. Look it really is time for get started on you
math.” Sarah says, “No way. I am not doing any dumb math.” The teacher pauses,
acknowledges a student on task then approaches Sarah and says as privately as
possible, “Sarah, you are asked to start your math (expected behavior) or you are
going to have to do it at recess (negative consequence). You have a few seconds to
decide.” The teacher leaves Sarah and moves to assist or check on the work of
some other students. When the teacher returns to Sarah she has moved to her desk
and opened a book mumbling that she still doesn’t like math. The teacher,
approaches her says very quietly, “Thank you Sarah for getting started on your
math.” The teacher then leaves Sarah.
In general the key to managing non-compliance and for setting limits lies in the
teacher’s delivery. Present the expected behavior and a negative consequence as a
choice, give the student some time to decide and then withdraw for a few seconds.
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Strategies Interrupting Crisis Behavior:
Managing Threats and Intimidating Behavior
Students may escalate to a point of serious confrontational behavior involving
threats and intimidation. The teacher may follow the procedures for establishing
limits and the student reacts instantly by delivering a serious threat to the teacher. At
this point imminent danger is a critical consideration. The primary concern here is to
avoid escalating the student or putting the student in a position that he or she feels
compelled to follow-through with the threat. The key here is to disengage and get
assistance. Teachers should not feel compelled or pressured to manage this
situation by themselves. Their safety is the controlling variable, which means that the
teacher’s response is designed to disengage. There are three critical steps for the
teacher to follow in response to a threat:
1. Pause: Look at the student, look down. Communicate that you are thinking. It
is very important to delay responding.
2. Disengage: Look at the student and say something like, “Just a second,” and
pull away. Keep in mind that when a student makes a threat they give you
some time to respond.
3. Seek assistance: Withdraw from the student and seek assistance from
another teacher and follow your school procedures.
The most important consideration in defusing this situation is to prevent further
escalation. The student threat will be followed up, typically through an office referral.
Colvin, Ainge & Nelson (1997),pp.47-51.
Colvin (1999), Defusing Anger and Aggression Video (Vignette # 6).
Colvin (2000), Managing Threats Video.
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Responsibilities of the
ARD Teacher
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RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE ARD TEACHER
Yearly Responsibilities
I.
Beginning of The Year
A. Develop a Student Working Folder on each student. (see checklist)
1. A “student working folder” contains confidential information as
identified on the “checklist”
2. The word “working” implies that the ARD teacher will use each
student’s folder regularly for purposes such as:
• Documenting progress of I.E.P. goals and objectives;
• Maintaining logs of communication with parents, regular
education teachers, special education teachers, related
service providers and others (as necessary);
• Locating current information (i.e.,
accommodations/modifications, specific goals and
objectives, data collection sheets, anecdotal notes, etc.)
quickly and efficiently;
• Using information in folders, in conjunction with formal and
informal assessments, to draft I.E.P. goals and objectives;
• Taking the folder to ARD meetings to review I.E.P. goals
and objectives, review BIPs, report progress, verify
demographic information, etc.
3. Purpose of a student working folder: It is a teacher resource file
used to collect important data necessary in developing the
student’s I.E.P. It should not be an auditable file, but is open to
record requests. The file should be adapted by the teacher for
their use and an on going document. Tabs or sections can be
used in organizing the data.
4. NOTE:
Every ARD teacher will maintain and monitor this
“student working” folder regularly on each special education
student.
B. Review student’s eligibility folders.
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C. Ensure that the student has appropriate goals and objectives for all
instructional and related services. If appropriate, an ARD or ARD
Amendment should be held for revisions.
D. Print copies of the schedule of services for all assigned students.
1. Check schedule with IEP
2. If there is a discrepancy, discuss with the campus diagnostician
and administrator to make changes that affect instructional
arrangement, modifying course content, increasing or decreasing
time spent in special education and/or assessment decisions that
will require an ARD or ARD amendment.
E. Make copies of the accommodation/modification page, BIP and the IEP
and deliver to each teacher working with the student.
1. Paperwork should be given to the teachers prior to the first day
of school.
2. Keep documentation of the delivery of this paperwork in the
working folder.
F. It is strongly recommended that the ARD teacher make an initial contact
with parent(s) during the first two weeks of the school year in order to
establish a positive relationship with the parent(s).
G. Within the first three weeks, review the student’s IEP, schedule of
services, and deliberations to ensure that all services are in place.
1. Includes related services, modifications, adaptive P.E., assistive
technology support, training for staff, or any other support or
service addressed in the ARD.
2. If services have not been provided by the third week, notify the
service provider, campus special education administrator, and
the cluster supervisor.
3. Confirm all information within the student file on IEPPlus.
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II.
During the Year
A. Monitor each student’s progress on a regular basis.
1. Areas to be checked:
a. Grades
b. Behavior
c. Attendance
2. Monitor student progress once each three week period.
3. If a student is failing then monitor one time a week and
collaborate with the student’s teachers and parents.
4. Assure that Progress Reports for instructional and related
services are collected and sent home every six (6) weeks.
5. Progress must be documented for every goal and objective each
grading period.
6. Notify Lead Teacher/Department Head if IEP report cards can’t
be sent home due to another teacher or related service
personnel failing to turn in their progress report with copy to
campus administrator.
B. The ARD teacher is responsible for checking the ARD schedule.
1. All annual ARDs must be held before the annual due date to
comply with state and federal guidelines.
2. The ARD teacher is responsible for inviting related/instructional
services personnel at least two weeks before the ARD.
Related/Instructional services personnel need enough time to
plan for the ARD and prepare the IEP related to their area.
3. The ARD teacher is responsible that all individuals involved in the
preparation of the IEP have completed their area of the IEP.
4. The ARD teacher is responsible for finalizing all ARD meetings for
security.
5. The ARD documents should be finalized immediately following
the ARD and copies given to the parents. If the parent is not
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provided a copy at the end of the meeting, this must be noted in
the deliberations with the date of delivery.
C. Be aware of the need for a BIP or to revise a BIP for any student whose
behavior interferes with their learning or the learning of others.
1. Collect pertinent information for the functional behavioral
assessment.
2. Present a draft of the FBA/BIP to the ARD Committee for
revision/approval.
III. End of the Year
1. Complete the Teacher Clearance Forms
2. Complete all end of year clearance procedures as per assigned
campus.
3. Make sure that all ARDs and Amendments held during the year
are finalized and filed in the eligibility folder.
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ARD Meeting Responsibilities of the Teacher
I.
Prior to an ARD Meeting
A. The ARD teacher is responsible for collecting data to determine the
student’s strengths and weaknesses to write an appropriate PLAAFP
(Present levels of academic achievement and functional performance).
Data that may be used include, but not limited to: progress reports from
previous IEP, report card, state testing reports, information from
Gradespeed, work samples, test samples, information provided by the
general education teacher, discipline referrals, absence reports and
information provided by the parents. If appropriate, administer or
update a criterion referenced test (Brigance) one month prior to the
annual ARD. All the data is used to write an appropriate PLAAFP and
draft IEP goals and objectives.
B. Contact related services/instructional staff who provide services two (2)
weeks prior to scheduled ARD.
C. Draft goals and objectives prior to the ARD meeting.
D. Collect information that is needed to assist the ARD Committee.
• Attendance information
• Discipline referrals
• Copies of report cards
• Most recent progress reports from all regular and special education
teachers.
• Information results for last state assessment
• Transcript (H.S. Only)
E. Determine if staffing is needed.
F. Complete all pages to the ARD document.
1. Review and change: - PLAAFP. The PLAAFP must include all areas
that student receives services i.e. speech, OT, PT, counseling,
Limited English Proficient, etc.
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2. The special education teacher must contact the related services
personnel at least two weeks before the ARD so they can enter
the PLAAFP, goals and objectives (if appropriate), and schedule of
services.
3. “Draft” appropriate goals and objectives for all areas of need.
4. “Draft” Schedule of Services of the ARD document. It is important
to receive input from all teachers working directly with the student
(general education, speech, VI, AI teachers, etc.)
5. Related Services personnel are responsible for entering the
frequency and duration of services on the schedule of services.
Teachers must not change or delete these services. If the teacher
opens an ARD, deletes the ARD due to mistakes, and re-opens a
new ARD, the teacher must email the related services personnel
again so they can re-enter their services.
6. Determine appropriate State and Local Assessments for all grade
levels.
7. Review the results of the previous state assessments.
8. The ARDC must follow the participation requirements for STAAR,
STAAR-A, STAAR ALTERNATE 2
G. Send home a “Draft” copy of the suggested IEP before the ARD
meeting.
1. Parents should receive a copy of the proposed IEP which is clearly
marked as “Draft”
2. A memo which explains that their input is being solicited and that
goals and objectives may be added or deleted upon their
recommendation at the ARD meeting.
3. Meet with the parent(s) if necessary.
II.
ARD Meeting Responsibilities
A. Follow the ARD agenda provided in this manual or other agenda as
needed.
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B. Present all information collected: competencies, attendance, review IEP,
current progress, discipline, referrals, and recommendations for
appropriate services.
C. Teacher should be prepared for an active role during the meeting.
D. Strive to involve the parent in all decisions.
E. Decisions should be made in the best interest of the student that allow
for parent and school to reach consensus.
F. ARDs should be finalized and a copy of the ARD document be provided
to the parent at the end of the ARD. If the parent is not provided a
copy at the end of the meeting, this must be noted in the deliberations
with the date of delivery.
G. Provide copies of the IEP goals, objectives and accommodations to all
staff working with the student ASAP (within 3 days).
H. The special education teacher is responsible to turn in the original ARD
forms to the diagnostician or clerk for filing in the eligibility folder. ARD
documents must be filed in the eligibility folder within 5 days of the
meeting.
III. Amendment to the ARD
A. Teachers, Speech Pathologist, and Diagnosticians need to review ARD
documents for accuracy before the meeting is finalized.
B. If corrections are needed, the ARD teacher will need to prepare an ARD
amendment, with parent consent, or hold another ARD meeting.
IV.
Graduating Students (High School Only)
A. Summary of Performance (SOP) needs to be drafted prior to and fully
developed at the graduation ARD. This document needs to include
recommendations on how to assist the child with a disability in meeting
the child’s academic achievement and functional performance. This
document will include recommendations on how to assist the child with
a disability in meeting the child’s postsecondary goals and must consider
the views of the student/parent and recommendations from adult
service agencies as appropriate.
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NOTES
Updated Summer 2015
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