AEB SUB 05D Specifications

AEB SUB 05D Specifications
AE8-1368 R2
December 2012
AE8-1368 R2
CoreSense™ Diagnostics v2.11 for Copeland Discus™ Compressors
Table of Contents
1.0 Overview
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17
4.18
4.19
4.20
1.1 Functionality
1.1.1 Diagnostics
1.1.2 Communication
1.1.3 Fault History
1.2 Features
1.2.1 Compressor Protection
1.2.2 Remote Reset
1.2.3 Failsafe Operation
1.2.4 Welded Contactor Protection
1.2.5 Crank Case Heater Control
1.2.6 Start-up Delay Feature
1.2.7 “Jog” feature
1.2.8 Dipswitch Settings
5.0 Stand Alone Installation & Operation
6.0 Compressor Status Codes & Troubleshooting
1.3 Modulation Control
1.4 Application Restrictions
6.1
6.2
2.0 Installation Instructions
2.1 Mounting and Installation
2.2 Terminal Box Connections
2.2.1 Current Sensing Module
2.2.2 Fan Connections
2.3 Controller Requirements
2.4 Communications Network
2.5 Network Terminations and Cable Routing
2.5.1 RS485 Wiring Types
2.6 CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Service
Instructions
2.7 Compatibility of Service Compressors
2.8 CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Model Numbers
3.0 Quick Start Guide
4.0 Commissioning Procedure
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
Dip Switch Configuration
Network Setup
Enhanced Suction Group Setup
Associations
Proofing
Failsafe
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Setup Screens
Unloader Configuration
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Demand Cooling Configuration
Crankcase Heater Control
Anti Short Cycle
MCC Value
Compressor Voltage
Compressor Frequency
Language
Voltage Balance
Inputs
Outputs
ID Configuration
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Navigation
1
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
6.11
6.12
6.13
6.14
6.15
6.16
6.17
6.18
6.19
6.20
6.21
6.22
6.23
6.24
6.25
Definitions
Event Priority and Troubleshooting
6.2.1 Event Priority & Anti Short Cycle Delay
6.2.2 LED Interpretation
Event Priority Table
Emergency Work-Around Procedures
Normal Running
Normal Off
Welded Contactor Warning
Module Low Voltage Trip
Connection Lost CT to Sensor
Rack Controller Lockout
Fault Temperature Probe
Fail-Safe Inoperable
Locked Rotor Trip / Lockout
No Communication
Motor Temperature Trip
No Communication to Sensor Module
Unloader Short
Unloader Open
Contactor Coil Lockout
Protector Trip
Voltage Imbalance Trip
Low Suction Pressure Trip
Phase Loss Trip / Lockout
No 3-Phase Power
Low Oil Pressure Warning / Lockout
AE8-1368 R2
6.26
6.27
6.28
6.29
6.30
6.31
Control Module Failure Lockout
Sensor Module Failure
High Discharge Pressure Trip
Discharge Temperature Lockout
Current Overload Trip
Rapid Compressor Cycling with Constant
Demand
6.32 Discharge Temperature Probe Fault Trip
6.33 Comp Low Voltage Trip/Lockout
7.0 Service Instructions
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
8.0 Compressor Changeout Instructions
9.0 Removal Of 2D / 3D
10.0 Installation Of 2D / 3D
11.0 Removal Of 4D
12.0 Installation Of 4D
13.0 Removal Of 6D
14.0 Installation Of 6D
Appendix
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
Control Module Replacement
Sensor Module Replacement
Installation Torque Values
Demand Cooling Service Procedures
Temperature Probe Inspection
Coil Inspection and Replacement
Injection Valve Replacement
Terminal Box Diagram
Harness Wiring Diagram
Transformer Selection and Contactor Control
Dielectric Test (Hi-Pot)
Compressor Drawings
Technical Support Information
Service Parts List
1.0 Overview of the Copeland Discus Compressor
with CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 is now available on 2D,
3D, 4D and 6D compressors and integrates a number
of important sensing and compressor protection
functions. This product provides for on/off control of the
compressor, capacity modulation (both conventional
blocked suction and with Copeland Discus Digital™
capacity modulation) and for communication of the
compressor status to the rack controller through
a network using MODBUS for Intelligent Store
communication protocol. Protection against low oil
pressure, excessive discharge temperature, high
discharge pressure and low suction pressure is
standard on every Copeland Discus compressor
with CoreSense Diagnostics. A 2-line liquid crystal
display on the front of the compressor indicates the
operational status of the compressor with a choice
of 5 languages. An LED on the compressor control
module indicates at a glance whether or not there are
any compressor faults.
The “2.11 version” of this product provides the same
basic protection and feature package as the previous
“1.0” product, but with enhancements such as additional
motor protection, accessory proofing and modulation
control and demand cooling control.
Note: Throughout this manual the term “Control
Module” refers to the electronic control box on the
front of the compressor which contains the display and
reset buttons. The “Sensor Module” is located inside
the terminal box.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
2
Figure 1.1
1.1 Functionality
1.1.1 Diagnostics
The status of the Copeland Discus compressor with
CoreSense Diagnostics may be viewed at any time on
the LCD display by pushing the Display button on the
front of the control module. Normal conditions will be
accompanied by a steady green LED (light emitting
diode) on the front of the control module.
If a fault occurs that doesn’t interfere with the ability
of the compressor to run, the LED will transition to a
flashing green. The display will provide a description of
the fault. This is referred to as a warning.
A trip or lockout condition will result in a flashing red
LED. This is an indication of a condition that is keeping
the compressor from running.
AE8-1368 R2
As with all conditions, the status of the compressor and
the display code are transmitted to the rack controller
where they may be viewed.
The status codes are discussed below in Section 6.0.
Troubleshooting flowcharts to assist with resolution of
each of the warnings, trips and lockouts may also be
found in Section 6.0.
1.1.2 Communications
Communication between the rack controller and each
CoreSense Diagnostics module is through an RS485
network with MODBUS. The two-wire communication
cable is daisy-chained from one compressor to the
next on each rack.
Compressor operations such as on/off control,
modulation operation, transmission of compressor
status and run proofing are all accomplished through
the communication network. Password protected
remote reset of certain compressor lockouts may also
be done through the communication network if this
functionality has been enabled through the controller.
Capacity modulation functions are discussed in detail
in Section 1.3, and in Commissioning / Suction Group
Setup Section 4.3.
The Emerson Retail Solutions’ controller E2, version
2.6 or higher, may be configured to send alarms
for different levels of compressor faults, such as for
warnings, trips and lockouts.
The Failsafe mode may be configured to turn the
compressor on or off in the event of a communications
failure. This configuration is accomplished via a
dipswitch setting inside the lower cover of the control
module.
1.1.3 Fault History
The 10 most recent warnings, trips or lockouts may
be observed through the E2 alarm history screen. An
8 –day log of each fault is also available as well as an
accumulated record for the history of the compressor.
Graphing features available with the E2 controller
provide a powerful diagnostics tool to help understand
the source of system or compressor faults. Date
and time stamping of faults and alarms can help to
associate the fault with system events (such as defrost
cycles).
Like previous versions of Intelligent Store Discus, the
CoreSense Diagnostics module will store the fault
history record.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
3
1.2 Features
1.2.1 Compressor Protection
Compressor protection may be in the form of a TRIP,
where the compressor will be shut off until the fault
condition no longer exists (and in some cases a
minimum off-time is satisfied), or a LOCKOUT. A
LOCKOUT is a condition whereby the compressor will
remain off until the fault condition no longer exists AND
the manual reset button is pushed (or power to the
control module is cycled). Lockouts may also be reset
from the E2 or remotely through Site Manager, including
oil pressure if remote re-set has been enabled for this
fault (this is password protected). A WARNING is a
fault that doesn’t keep the compressor from running
(an example is an open or shorted unloader coil).
The following compressor protection features are
provided on all Copeland Discus compressors with
CoreSense Diagnostics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
High discharge pressure
Low suction pressure
Discharge temperature
Line-break motor protection (2D / 3D)
Motor temperature protection (CoreSense
Diagnostics replaces the solid-state module used
on 4D / 6D compressors)
Low voltage
Power interrupt motor protection
Welded contactor protection
Loss of phase motor protection
Low oil pressure (CoreSense Diagnostics
replaces the Copeland™ brand Sentronic+™ oil
pressure protection modules).
Part winding start failure
Locked rotor and settable MCC protection
Shorted unloader coil protection
Shorted contactor or pilot relay coil protection
The following options are available with Copeland
Discus compressors with CoreSense Diagnostics:
• Crank case heater control
• Blocked suction modulation (4D/6D compressors)
• Discus Digital™ capacity modulation (3D/4D/ 6D)
Note: The conventional blocked suction or
Moduload valving MAY NOT be activated
to perform in a digital fashion. These valve
mechanisms have not been designed to
work reliably in a digital fashion. Only use
this feature with Discus Digital™ modulation
hardware.
AE8-1368 R2
1.2.2 Remote Reset
The oil pressure lockout may be reset through the E2
or remotely through Site Manager if the reset option is
enabled.
This is not to be confused with single-phase protection
at start-up or while running. In that case, the contactor
will be instructed to “open”, shutting down the
compressor.
The service contractor and end user policies need
to be considered when deciding whether to enable
or disable the oil pressure remote reset feature. The
default condition is to “disable” this feature.
1.2.5 Crank Case Heater (CCH) Control
Refer to Section 4, Figure 4.15 for enabling or
disabling this remote reset.
The appropriate voltage supply to the CCH power input
terminals (115 V / 230 V) is required.
1.2.3 Failsafe Operation
1.2.6 Start-up Delay Feature
The FAILSAFE mode may be configured at any time
by setting the #10 dipswitch to the “on” or “off” position
as desired. The failsafe condition is acted upon by the
compressor in the event that communication is lost
for 5 or more minutes. Upon the re-establishment of
communication to the rack controller the run command
from the rack controller overrides the failsafe command.
To reduce the sudden in-rush of power associated
with multiple compressors starting at one time,
compressor start-ups are staggered slightly at the end
of the anti-short cycle delay. The delay is equal to 100
milliseconds x node number. Therefore node number
4 will start 0.3 seconds after node number 1. Refer to
the status code table to see which events trigger an
anti-short cycle delay.
The failsafe switch position may be changed at anytime.
However, the module must be reset before the control
module recognizes a change in the switch position.
When the compressor is running in the failsafe “on”
position, all of the compressor protection features are
enabled with the exception of welded contactor.
There are different philosophies regarding the failsafe
settings. One suggestion is to observe the typical
“percent of full load capacity” required to satisfy
demand (this is perhaps seasonal). Setting the
switches to provide this capacity (with perhaps a little
reserve) is one approach.
As with all dipswitch positions, a legend may be found
inside the lower cover of the control module that
explains the switch positions.
1.2.4 Welded Contactor Protection
Voltage is sensed at the motor terminals of the
Copeland Discus compressor with CoreSense
Diagnostics. If voltage is present after the contactor
has been signaled to “open”, the module will send a
welded contactor alarm to the E2. The E2 then issues
a run command to the module to load the contactor,
bringing all three legs of the power supply to the
compressor back on line. This prevents a single-phase
motor burn. The compressor will run continuously until
the unit is manually shut down or the alarm is cleared
in the E2. Safety devices (pressure switches and motor
protection) will attempt to override this feature.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
4
The sensor module contains an on-board CCH control
relay. An auxiliary contactor is no longer required to
turn the heater on when the compressor turns off.
1.2.7 “Jog” Feature
The reset button on the front of the control module
may be used as an emergency shutdown, such as
for clearing liquid during a start-up. After the module
re-boots (approximately 30 seconds) the compressor
will run again. The reset button may be pushed as
necessary to stop the compressor.
1.2.8 Dipswitch Settings
Dipswitch selection for the address, baud rate, parity,
operating and failsafe mode selection simplify service
and start-up procedures. At initial power-up or after
pushing the Reset button, the following information will
be displayed on the LCD:
Control Module Firmware Version
Sensor Module Firmware Version
Node Address
Baud Rate
(9600 or 19200)
Parity
(Parity or No Parity)
Mode
(Network or Stand-Alone)
Failsafe
(ON or OFF)
1.3 Modulation Control
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 can control blocked
suction (conventional unloading) valves or Digital
unloading valves without separate relay outputs or
the need for an IDCM module. Demand from the rack
controller to the unloader valve is through the RS 485
communication network and the actual on/off control is
facilitated by the control module.
AE8-1368 R2
Digital modulation will be available for the 3D, 4D and
6D compressor. The E2 can control any combination
of compressors, blocked suction compressors and/
or digital compressors. When more than one digital
compressor is in a suction group, only one compressor
at any given time will be operating in a “digital” mode
(i.e. modulating in a pulse-width fashion).
Blocked suction (and Moduload) compressors are set
up in the suction group as stages (i.e. the compressor
is one stage and each unloader is one stage). The total
output of the compressor (horsepower or capacity)
is the sum output of each individual stage. When
an unloader stage is “on” it is producing capacity
(this is when the solenoid is de-activated, or “off”). If
you override an unloader stage “off”, the solenoid is
energized.
When setting up the suction group using Digital
compressors, the compressor is one stage (regardless
of the number of unloaders). A 3D Digital, 4D Digital,
6D Digital with one unloader or a 6D Digital with 2
unloaders are all configured as one stage.
The digital control cycle is by default a 20 second
period. Within this period the output of the compressor
will be pulsed to produce (on average) the capacity
requested by the controller. The advantages of Digital
control are significant:
• Dramatically reduced compressor contactor
cycling
For proper Demand Cooling control, the following
firmware versions are required: control module 1.30F05 or later, sensor module - 2.00F03 or later.
Low Temperature Operation – The CoreSense
Diagnostics electronics are designed to operate
between -25°F and 150°F. At temperatures below 0°F
the LCD display may be “slow”, but the compressor
status information in the E2 is up-to-date.
2.0 Installation Instructions
Emerson Climate Technologies requires that all
customers review the recommended guidelines in
the published Application Engineering Bulletins, and
ensure that best engineering practices are followed
in the use of Copeland™ compressors. Emerson
Application Engineering Bulletins can be found on our
website, www.EmersonClimate.com under the section
titled “Online Product Information." The advice and
conclusion by Emerson represents our best judgment
under the circumstances, but such advice given and/or
conclusion made, or results obtained shall be deemed
used at your sole risk.
Modulation Control - CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11
RS 485
Communication
• Tighter control of pressure or temperature
• Reduced set-point error
Refer to Figure 1.2 for a comparison between the
modulation control requirements with and without
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11. The conventional
control arrangement that is depicted shows a
compressor without modulation, a compressor with
conventional blocked suction modulation and one with
Digital modulation.
Modulation Control w/o CoreSense Diagnostics
1.4 Application Restrictions
Variable Speed – CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 is not
approved for use with variable speed drives. Other
devices on the rack may use variable speed, but
the compressor itself may not be modulated with an
inverter.
Demand Cooling – The Copeland Discus compressor
with CoreSense Diagnostics is equipped with Demand
Cooling capability, and as such may be used as an
R407A / R407C low temperature compressor.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
5
IDCM Module
Figure 1.2 – Modulation Control
AE8-1368 R2
2.1 Mounting and Installation
The Copeland Discus compressor with CoreSense
Diagnostics is designed and engineered for use in
a supermarket rack application. Its environmental
restrictions are not different than other Copeland
Discus™ compressors. As such, the compressor must
be in an equipment room, rack house or roof enclosure
to prevent direct precipitation on the compressor. The
following clearance provisions must be considered
when designing the rack for use with a Copeland Discus
compressor with CoreSense Diagnostics:
• Removal of the lower cover of the control module
for access to dip-switches and the communication
network connector
• Removal of the control module for service
reasons
• Removal of the pressure switch cover (2D / 3D)
for service reasons
• Removal of the harness cover shroud (4D / 6D)
• Removal of terminal box lids for service reasons
auxiliary contact on the contactor is not required.
Use AMP terminals (2x) 520194-2
• Copeland Discus compressor with CoreSense
Diagnostics use the same motor terminal
connections.
While the Copeland Discus compressor with
CoreSense Diagnostics is primarily intended for use in
supermarket rack applications, it is possible to utilize
this technology in other applications without a
communication network. Configuring the dipswitch
settings to the “stand alone” position allows the
compressor and unloaders to be controlled by a 24 volt
signal to input leads in the terminal box. Protection,
control and diagnostic features are still functioning
while in the stand-alone control mode.
Refer to customer drawings in Appendix F for
dimensional envelopes of CoreSense Diagnostics.
Inherent in the functionality of the control module
is short-circuit protection for the following circuits:
Unloader coil operation and contactor output.
Additional electrical requirements and specifications
(such as transformer selection) are provided in
Appendix C.
2.2 Terminal Box Connections
Refer to Figure 2.1 for terminal box connection
locations.
Feature
Electrical Requirements
CoreSense Diagnostics
Supply Voltage
(Module Power)
24 volts AC
Class II power supply
Pilot Circuit Voltage
(Contactor Output)
24 volts AC
(supplied by CoreSense
Diagnostics v2.11 to the pilot
relay, or contactor)
Crank Case Heater
voltage supply
115/208/230 per customer
specification
Compressor Motor
Model Dependent
Head Fan
Per OEM Wiring
2.2.1 Current Sensing Module
All Copeland Discus compressors with CoreSense
Diagnostics use a current sensing module in the
terminal box. One of the motor power leads passes
through the “toroid” (current sensor). Information from
the current sensor is used to determine running amps,
power consumption and locked rotor conditions.
The following terminal box connections must be made
by the original equipment manufacturer:
• Module power – 24 volts AC supplied by a Class
II power supply. This powers the electronics,
unloaders, crank case heater relay, and contactor
output (to load the pilot relay or contactor). Use
AMP terminals (2x) 520184-2
• Contactor – Output connections to the contactor
pilot relay or contactor coil. Use AMP terminals
(2x) 520183-2 or 520184-2
• Crank case heater power supply – 115vac or
208/230vac. A switching relay inside the sensor
module controls the crank case heater. An
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
6
There are 3 voltage sensing leads attached to the motor
terminals and connected to the sensor module. Two
of the leads are white, and one is black. For proper
calculation of power factor and motor power it is
necessary for the black voltage sensing lead and
the power lead through the current sensor to be
connected to the same motor terminal.
Motor Power
24v AC Class II
Power Supply
Crank Case
Heater Power
Contactor Output to
Control Contactor
Figure 2.1 – Terminal Box Connections
AE8-1368 R2
Refer to Figure 2.2 for sensor module lead connections.
regarding the CoreSense Diagnostics compatible rack
controller.
2.2.2 Fan Connections
2.4 Communications Network
• Copeland Discus compressors with CoreSense
Diagnostics are not shipped from the factory with
fans installed. OEM installation of fans should
follow established regulatory, OEM engineering
and end user specifications regarding wiring.
The CoreSense Diagnostics module and rack
controller communicate with each other using
MODBUS communications protocol. The wiring
network uses RS485 hardware connections at each
node. The CoreSense Diagnostics communication
cable terminates in the rack controller at an interface
card and is routed to each compressor in a daisy-chain
format. Refer to Figures 2.5, 2.6 and 2.7.
• Head fan requirements for these compressors
are identical to other Discus compressors. Refer
to Application Engineering Bulletin AE4-1135.
2.3 Controller Requirements
One E2 controller can control two racks. One daisy
chain may be used for 2 racks, but two RS-485
connections are available on the Network Interface
Board if two parallel daisy-chains are preferred. The
CoreSense Diagnostics Network Interface Board is
shown on Figure 2.6
The control network utilizes an open MODBUS
protocol. Rack controller manufacturers may develop
equipment to interface with and control Copeland
Discus compressors with CoreSense Diagnostics.
For Non-Emerson Retail Solutions products, consult
with the controller manufacturer regarding controller
compatibility with CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11.
One E2 controller can control 4 suction groups, with up
to 16 stages in each suction group.
For the Emerson Retail Solutions E2 controller, it
must be equipped with an Emerson Retail Solutions
CoreSense Diagnostics Network Interface Board
(Emerson Retail Solutions part number 637-4890).
The controller firmware must be revision level
2.60F01 or higher.
2.5 Network Terminations and Cable Routing
Each compressor (network node) has a jumper that
must be positioned to define whether or not the node
is in the middle or end of the daisy-chain. The last
compressor in the daisy-chain is “terminated” and
the jumpers must be set accordingly. The E2 jumpers
on the Network Interface Board are always set for
Refer to Emerson Retail Solutions E2 RX Refrigeration
Controller manual 026-1610 for detailed information
Sensor Module Connections
Input VAC
To
Contactor
or Pilot
Relay
24 VAC Class II Output
Black
CCH
(From harness in terminal box)
White
Terminal Plate
or Fusite
Crank Case Heater
Power Supply
(115 or 230 VAC)
CONTROL
MODULE
CCH
POWER COMM
T1
BLACK
L1
T2
WHITE
L2
WHITE
T3
24
VAC
IN
24
VAC
OUT
VOLTAGE SENSING LEAD
L3
SENSOR MODULE
L2
L3
CURRENT SENSING L1
POWER LEAD
Important! Black Voltage Sensing
Lead Connected to Same
Terminal as Current Sensor
Power Lead
CT
L1
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Figure 2.2
Sensor Module Wiring
7
AE8-1368 R2
“terminated” (refer to Figure 2.6).
2.5.1 RS485 Communication Wiring Types
The communications wire to the compressor may be
routed into the rear of the side conduit (2D / 3D) and
along the channel which leads into the control module.
The 4D and 6D wire routing can be alongside the wire
harness and into the control module.
A shielded, twisted pair cable such as Belden #8761
(22AWG) should be used for the communication wiring.
Appropriate use of strain reliefs will prevent damage to
the circuit board connector in the event of an accidental
mechanical load to the communication wire. Note that
the rear of the 2D / 3D conduit contains a tie-wrap
feature for anchoring the communication wire. Refer to
Figure 2.9 for photos of wire routing.
Important ! Note that the RS485 is polarity sensitive.
“Pos” wires must connect to other “Pos” terminals, and
“Neg” wires must connect to other “Neg” terminals.
The shield wire is connected to the center terminal,
or “0 volt” position. Refer to Section 6.15 for voltage
specifications and troubleshooting.
Figure 2.5
RS-485 Daisy-Chain
Configuration
2.6 CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Service
Instructions
Refer to Sections 3, 4, 6 and 7 of this document
for commissioning, service and troubleshooting
instructions.
2.7 Compatibility of Service Compressors
The following S/Ns may be used to determine whether
service compressors are compatible with CoreSense
Diagnostics hardware and accessories:
2D built on or after
S/N 04D
3D built on or after
S/N 04D
4D built on or after
S/N 05D
6D built on or after
S/N 05D
Figure 2.6
CoreSense Diagnostics Network Interface Board
Figure 2.9
2D / 3D Communication Wire Routing
Figure 2.8
Communication Wiring and Jumper Positions
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Figure 2.7
Two Rack Daisy-Chain
8
AE8-1368 R2
2.8 CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Model Numbers
Factory built Discus compressors with an S/E (the
last 3 digits in the model number) beginning with “A”
are Copeland Discus compressors with CoreSense
Diagnostics. Models with an S/E that begins with "AD"
are equipped with Demand Cooling. The remaining
numbers define the service valve configuration as well
as crankcase heater presence.
3.0 CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Quick Start Guide
1) Module Power
Apply power to the CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11
sensor modules located in the compressor terminal
box. Power requirements for the CoreSense
Diagnostics v2.11 modules is a 24VAC supply
provided by a class II transformer. For additional
information on transformer selection including
VA requirements refer to Appendix C of this
document.
2) Communication Wiring
Connect the CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 control
modules to the rack controller by configuring
the RS-485 communications network. The
communication cable terminates in the rack
controller on the Network Interface Board, and is
routed to each of the compressors in a daisy-chain
format. For communications to function properly
the termination jumpers at the rack controller and
each module should be set according to their
position in the chain. The end devices (including
the rack controller) should be set to the terminated
position. The devices in the middle of the chain
should be set to unterminated. The CoreSense
Diagnostics v2.11 control modules have the
ability to communicate to E2 or non-E2 rack
controllers. Set the controller jumper accordingly.
Refer to Figure 3.0 below to locate the position
of the termination and controller jumpers on each
control module. For a complete description of the
communications network refer to Section 2.4.
For details on troubleshooting problems with the
communications network refer to Section 6.15.
3) Verify DIP-Switch Settings
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 devices are equipped
with a DIP switch to set the node address. In
addition, this DIP switch determines the baud rate,
parity, control mode, and failsafe settings of the
module. Refer to Figure 3.0 below for details:
4.0 CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Commissioning
Procedure
As with other devices, the CoreSense Diagnostics
v2.11 modules must first be commissioned to establish
communications with the rack controller. During the
commissioning process the E2 will recognize the
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 modules in order as
designated by the node address settings on the
module DIP switches.
Important Note: The following commissioning
instructions pertain to E2 controllers with version
3.02F01 or later firmware. If you have an earlier
version of firmware we recommend that you upgrade
to the latest version available.
To determine the firmware revision level in the E2
follow these steps:
1. From the main menu select 7 (System
Configuration)
2. Press 3 (System Information)
3. Press 4 (Firmware Revision)
Figure 3.0 – Control Module Instruction Label
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Printed in the U.S.A.
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AE8-1368 R2
The E2 should look like Figure 4.1.
4.1 Dip Switch Configuration
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 devices are equipped
with a DIP switch to set their node address. In addition,
this DIP switch determines the baud rate, parity, control
mode, and failsafe settings of the module. Refer to
Figure 4.2 below for details:
To ensure proper communications, follow these steps:
1. Each CoreSense Diagnostics device that is
connected to a rack controller should have a
unique node address (as determined by the DIP
switch settings).
2. The communications jumper should be set for
E2 communication if connected to an E2 rack
controller.
3. The last CoreSense Diagnostics device in the
daisy-chain should have the communication
jumper in the “terminated” position. In addition,
the E2 should have the communication jumpers
in the “terminated” position.
4. The parity for each of the CoreSense Diagnostics
devices should be set to none. This can be
accomplished by setting DIP switch number 8 to
the down position.
5. The baud rate for each of the CoreSense
Diagnostics devices should be set according to
the rack controller. To determine the baud rate in
the E2, follow these steps:
a. From the main menu select 7 (System
Configuration)
b. Press 3 (System Information)
c.
Press 1 (General Controller Info)
d. Access the Serial Communications Tab by
pressing CTRL + 3
e. Use the Page Down button or scroll down to
view the MODBUS communication settings.
Note: The default location for CoreSense
diagnostic modules is the COM4 port, but
there may be multiple MODBUS networks
running on one E2. Be sure to select the
proper network.
The E2 should look like Figure 4.3 (following page).
Be sure that the DIP switch settings on each module
for the CoreSense Diagnostics devices match the
settings for the MODBUS network.
4.2 Network Setup
Once the DIP switch settings have been verified for
each CoreSense Diagnostics module, you will need to
establish communications with the new devices. Begin
Figure 4.1 - Firmware Revision
Figure 4.2 - Control Module Instruction Label
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Printed in the U.S.A.
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the network setup by following these steps:
2. Press 7 (Network Setup)
1. From the main menu select 7 (System
Configuration)
2. Press 7 (Network Setup)
3. Press 2 (Connected I/O Boards and Controllers)
4. Press Ctrl + 3 (ECT Tab)
3. Press 1 (Network Summary)
The E2 should look like Figure 4.5
4. Highlight the appropriate CoreSense Diagnostics
device and press F4: Commission
5. Select the desired address and press Enter.
Verify the address and press Enter again.
The E2 should look like the Figure 4.4.
Enter the number of CoreSense Diagnostics devices
under ISD-2.0.
To establish communications with the new devices
follow these steps:
1. From the main menu select 7 (System
Configuration)
6. Repeat this process for each device.
Once a device has been successfully commissioned,
the firmware version will be displayed and the status
will be shown as online (Figure 4.6)
4.3 Enhanced Suction Group Setup
In order for the E2 to control compressor operation the
proper input and output values must be entered into
the system. This is accomplished by creating a suction
group application in the rack controller. Programming
of the suction group will depend upon the system
as well as the options desired by the end user. The
following section covers the steps necessary to setup
the sample rack shown in Figure 4.8.
From the Main Menu:
Figure 4.3 – Serial Communications Setup Screen
Figure 4.5 – Network Summary Screen
Figure 4.4 – Connected I/O Devices Screen
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1. Press 6 (Add/Delete Application)
2. Press 1 (Add Application)
3. Press F4 (Lookup) and select Enhanced Suction
Group from the option list.
4. Enter the number of suction groups controlled by
this E2.
5. When prompted by the E2 to edit the application,
Press Y for yes.
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This will open the suction group setup screen as shown
below in Figure 4.7.
•
From this screen you can edit the name of the suction
group, select the control type, and enter the number
of stages. The number of stages can be determined
as follows:
•
•
A standard compressor (no unloader) will count
as one stage.
•
A compressor equipped with digital unloading will
count as one stage.
A compressor with one bank of standard unloading
will count as two stages.
A compressor with two banks of standard
unloading (6D only) will count as three stages.
To continue the suction group setup process:
Figure 4.7– Enhanced Suction General Setup Screen
Figure 4.6 - Network Summary Screen
Figure 4.8 - Enhanced Suction Stage Setup Screen(s)
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1. Press F2 (Next Tab) until the Stage Setup screen
is displayed.
2. Under Type, select Comp for compressor, Unld
for unloader, or Dgtl for digital.
3. Under Capacity, enter the compressor capacity in
BTU/hr or the compressor horsepower for each
stage. The E2 will use this value as the expected
output for each stage and w ill cycle the stages
according to the required demand.
Note: For a compressor equipped with an unloader
(blocked suction or Moduload, but NOT digital) the
horsepower should be divided between the compressor
and unloader stages. A compressor with an unloader
can be considered to be two different compressors
from a control standpoint. When the suction group
status screen shows the unloader to be “OFF” and
the comp (compressor) to be “ON’, the compressor
is running “unloaded”, i.e. the unloaded portion of
the compressor is not contributing to generation of
capacity. If the comp and unloader are both “ON”, the
compressor is running at full capacity.
When these steps have been completed, the
compressor setup screen(s) should look like Figure
4.8.
4.4 Associations
In order the provide compressor control, each
CoreSense Diagnostics device must be associated
with its appropriate suction group. To make these
associations, follow these steps:
1. From the main
Configuration)
menu
select
7
(System
two values are not equal for an amount of time longer
than the programmed proof delay, the rack controller will
display a Proof Fail condition for that module. The rack
controller will deactivate the Proof Fail once the module
proofing output matches the command from the E2.
To configure proofing simply highlight the appropriate
cell under the Proof column. Use the Previous/Next
buttons on the E2 to toggle between the YES and NO
settings. The rack controller will make the necessary
associations between the module and suction group.
4.6 Failsafe
The compressor failsafe mode may be configured by
setting the number 10 DIP switch located on each
CoreSense Diagnostics control module. With the switch
in the up position the compressor will be set for failsafe
ON in the event that communications with the rack
controller is lost for 5 or more minutes. If the switch is in
the down position the compressor will be set for failsafe
OFF. Keep in mind that once a DIP switch setting is
changed, a reset of the control module is required
for the control module to recognize the change.
The default setting for all Copeland Discus
compressors with CoreSense Diagnostics leaving the
factory is failsafe “ON”. If the rack has not yet been
commissioned, system charging may be accomplished
by supplying pilot circuit power to the compressor with
the rack controller OFF. After 5 minutes the CoreSense
Diagnostics module will send a run command to the
contactor/pilot relay. Compressors with power to the
contactors will then RUN with protection features in
place (e.g. suction and discharge pressure, discharge
temperature, motor protection).
2. Press 7 (Network Setup)
3. Press 4 (Controller Associations)
4. Press 4 (Compressor)
The E2 should look like Figure 4.9.
Enter the appropriate stage numbers. The example in
Figure 4.9 shows five compressors with a selection of
standard, blocked suction and digital unloading.
4.5 Proofing
Also located on the Compressor Association Screen
are the settings for compressor proofing. Proofing
verifies that the compressors are turning ON and OFF
as commanded by the suction group requirements.
With proofing enabled the rack controller compares the
digital command sent to the CoreSense Diagnostics
module with a digital output from the module. If the
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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Figure 4.9
Compressor Association Screen
AE8-1368 R2
While running in failsafe mode the compressor will
continue to run until either a fault occurs or until
communications is re-established with the rack
controller. This is to say that the only system controls
in place to cycle the compressor are the high and low
pressure safety controls. The trip/reset values for the
high and low pressure controls are 360/250psi and
3/10psi (-2/8psi for R407A and R407C compressors)
respectively. While it is not recommended to run the
compressors in failsafe mode for long periods, it may
be desirable to use adjustable low pressure cutouts
to stage the compressors. This will allow for finer
compressor control over the fixed value switch. To
apply an adjustable pressure cutout you may simply
wire it in place of the existing pressure switch.
4.7 CoreSense Diagnostics v.2.11 Setup Screens
The CoreSense Diagnostics module has many
configurable settings that can be programmed through
the E2.
Important Note: E2 firmware versions 3.02F01 and
later have an improved offline programming feature.
This feature ensures that modules retain the factory
preset programming. In order to update the module
configuration, follow these steps:
1. After navigating the setup screens and making
the desired changes return to the CoreSense
Diagnostics summary screen as shown in Figure
4.17.
4. To program the module with changes made in
the E2, press 2 Send E2 Cfg to Device. To verify
module settings press 1 Send Device Cfg to E2.
To access the configuration screens for the CoreSense
Diagnostics modules follow these steps:
1. From the main menu press 5 (Configured
Applications)
2. Press 104 (ISD 2.0)
3. Highlight the desired device and press F5
(Setup)
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.10.
On the General tab the device name is displayed. The
default naming convention is shown as the device type
(ISD2) followed by the device number (equal to the node
address). If it is desired to have the device renamed
in terms of the suction group for easier identification
simply type over the default information using the E2
keypad. Note that the name is limited to 14 characters.
If additional characters are needed, information may be
entered in the cell next to Long Name.
To access additional configuration settings for the
module Press Ctrl+2 to navigate to the Setup tab.
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.11.
The parameters that can be set from this screen include:
3. Press 9 Application Commands. The E2 screen
should look like Figure 4.17c
unloaders
crankcase heater control
anti-short cycle time
maximum continuous current (MCC)
compressor voltage
compressor frequency
Figure 4.10 – ISD Setup Screen (General Tab)
Figure 4.11 – ISD Setup Screen (Setup Tab)
2. Press Enter to reveal the device Actions Menu
as shown in Figure 4.17b
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3. Press F5 (Setup)
language
voltage imbalance
demand cooling
4. Press F2 (Next Tab)
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.11
4.8 Unloader Configuration
The unloader configuration settings are preloaded
at the factory and will match the requirements of the
compressor. The Unloader Mod Type setting of Digital
is for digital unloading only. For compressors without
unloaders or for those with non-digital unloading
(blocked suction) the Unloader Mod Type should be
set to None.
For proper operation when in the Digital Modulation
mode, the number of banks (Bank Config) must
be correct. 3D compressors have one bank, 4D
compressors have two banks and 6D compressors
have three banks.
If this configuration is changed in the field (for
example to add Digital Modulation as a field upgrade),
please follow these steps to configure the suction
group and the compressor associations:
Amend the number of stages in the suction group
if necessary (see section 4.3). Then, change the
compressor associations as follows:
1. From the main menu select 7 (System
Configuration)
2. Press 7 (Network Setup)
3. Press 4 (Controller Associations)
4. Press 4 (Compressor)
Referring to Figure 4.9 (section 4.4), delete the
suction group association and set the stages to
“zero” for this compressor. Stair-step out. Next, reenter the association screen and re-establish the
suction group and the proper stage number. Note:
for a digital compressor, the compressor (regardless
of the number of unloaders) will be just one stage.
Re-establishing the association is done to allow the
suction group to see that the compressor is now a
Digital compressor (or is no longer a digital, as the
case may be).
4.9 Demand Cooling Configuration
Demand Cooling configuration settings are preloaded
at the factory and will match the requirements of the
compressor. To verify the settings or to enable demand
cooling follow these steps:
1. From the main menu select 5 (Configured
Applications)
4.10 Crankcase Heater Control
The parameter labeled ISD CCH control determines
whether the heater is to be controlled by the module
or by an external means such as an auxiliary contact.
Setting this value to “enabled” allows the heater to be
controlled by the CoreSense Diagnostics module.
The parameter labeled Crankcase Algorithm determines
how the CoreSense Diagnostics module will control
the switching of the heater. With this parameter set to
continuous, the heater will be activated any time that
the compressor is OFF. This operation is the same
as if the heater were controlled by a set of auxiliary
contacts
4.11 Anti Short Cycle
The parameter labeled Anti Short Cycle determines
the minimum off time for compressors before they
restart. This value is set to reduce the number of start/
stop cycles on the compressor. The default value is 0.1
minutes or 6 seconds. This value may be set from 0.1
to 2 minutes.
4.12 MCC Value
The parameter labeled MCC Value is the maximum
continuous current for the compressor. This value
is set to provide additional motor protection for the
compressor. This value is programmed based upon
the current requirements of each compressor model.
(For dual voltage motors, the MCC value will be set to
the 460 volt value. If the compressor is run at a different
voltage the MCC value may be adjusted accordingly).
4.13 Compressor Voltage
The value for compressor voltage is preloaded at the
factory. If the compressor is to be operated at a voltage
other than the value listed, the proper voltage must be
entered into this field.
4.14 Compressor Frequency
The value for compressor frequency is preloaded at
the factory. If the compressor is to be operated at a
frequency other than the value listed, the proper
frequency must be entered into this field.
2. Press 104 (ISD 2.0)
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Demand Cooling control is provided by the Unloader
2 solenoid output. Setting the Unloader 2 value to
Demand Cooling will allow the Demand Cooling valve
to be cycled properly based on the compressor head
temperature.
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4.15 Language
The LCD display on the CoreSense Diagnostics
control module can be set to display messages in
multiple languages. The available options are English,
Spanish, Portuguese, French and German.
4.16 Voltage Imbalance
The voltage imbalance setting determines the
maximum percentage of voltage imbalance on the
three compressor phases. If the measured voltage
exceeds the imbalance setting, the module will alarm
and shut down the compressor. The default setting for
this parameter is 5%.
4.17 Inputs
The compressor input values for each module are
located on the Input tab. To navigate to this screen
press Ctrl+3.
The E2 should look like Figure 4.12.
The input values as shown are automatically mapped
by the E2 during the commissioning process. This
takes place when the compressor associations are
made. Refer to Section 4.4 of this document for
additional details concerning this process.
4.18 Outputs
Similarly, the compressor output values for each
module are located on the Output tab. To navigate to
this screen press Ctrl+4.
The E2 should look like Figure 4.13.
As with the input values, the output values as shown
are automatically mapped by the E2 during the
commissioning process. This takes place when the
compressor associations are made. Refer to Section
4.4 of this document for additional details concerning
this process.
4.19 ID Configuration
The ID Config tab contains information about the
compressor identification such as the model and serial
number. To navigate to this screen press Ctrl+7.
The E2 should look like Figure 4.14.
Figure 4.12 – ISD Setup Screen (Inputs Tab)
It also contains additional fields for Customer ID,
Customer Name, and Location. These fields are
provided for the end user and are meant to be populated
during the commissioning process. This identification
information can be useful when performing remote
compressor diagnostics.
Figure 4.13 – ISD Setup Screen (Outputs Tab)
Figure 4.14 – ISD Setup Screen (ID Config Tab)
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As with other alarms in the E2, the alarms associated
with the Copeland Discus compressorswith CoreSense
Diagnostics can be programmed for different levels. To
view the alarm settings navigate to the Alarms tab by
pressing Ctrl+8.
modules using the E2 rack controller follow these
steps:
1. From the main menu select 5 (Configured
Applications)
2. Press 104 (ISD 2.0)
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.15.
The E2 should look like Figure 4.16.
Use the Previous/Next buttons on the E2 to scroll
through the various settings of:
Alarm
Failure
Notice
Disabled
4.20 CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Navigation
To access information from the CoreSense Diagnostics
This screen provides a general summary of all
CoreSense Diagnostics devices that are connected
to the rack controller. It gives information on the run
status as well as more detailed information such as
the discharge temperature and current draw of each
compressor. This screen also shows the status of the
device such as whether it is online or alarming and if
the device has been commissioned. To view additional
information, select the desired device using the arrow
key and press “Enter”.
The E2 screen should now look like Figure 4.17.
This screen provides additional compressor
information such as the model and serial number.
It also provides run history information such as
compressor run time and the number of compressor
starts. If the compressor is equipped with unloaders
the unloader run time will also be displayed. For more
detailed information about each compressor highlight
the compressor name as shown on Figure 4.17 and
press Enter. Press 6 (Detailed Status).
There are many useful screens located in the detailed
status area. To monitor the status of the compressor
motor, navigate to the Windings tab by pressing Ctrl+5.
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.19.
This screen shows the current draw of the motor and
Figure 4.15 – ISD Setup Screen (Alarms Tab)
Figure 4.17 – Compressor Information Screen
Figure 4.16 – ISD Summary Screen
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AE8-1368 R2
the voltage at each compressor terminal. In addition,
the starting current is shown as Locked Rtr Cur.
(Note: This value is the first cycle peak current and
will be slightly higher than the published steady state
RMS locked rotor value). Power factor and power
consumption are also listed.
In addition to compressor run history, the CoreSense
Diagnostics v2.11 module also retains a history log of
the most recent alarms. To access this information,
press Ctrl+8.
For more information on the compressor run history
navigate to the History tab by pressing Ctrl+6.
The screen will display the last ten alarms that have
occurred with alarm number one being the most recent.
To determine the time at which a particular alarm has
occurred, consult the E2 alarm screen which will
display a time stamp of each event.
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.20.
While basic compressor information such as run hours
is listed on the ISD summary screen, the history screen
includes additional information such as a short cycle
counter and low oil run time. This information can be
useful in diagnosing compressor issues.
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.21.
For a running count of all events and alarms related
to CoreSense Diagnostics press Ctrl+9 to access the
Alarm Table tab.
The E2 screen should look like Figure 4.22.
L1
R PHS Volts
B PHS Volts
L2
L3
Y PHS Volts
Figure 4.19 – Detailed Status Screen (Windings Tab)
Figure 4.21 – Detailed Status Screen (Alarm History Tab)
Figure 4.20 – Detailed Status Screen (History Tab)
Figure 4.22
ISD Detailed Status Screen (Alarm Table Tab)
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Printed in the U.S.A.
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AE8-1368 R2
The screen will display each of the related events in
a table format with an indication of whether the event
has occurred. The columns labeled 1 through 8 at
the top represent days of the week with number 1
being the current day of operation. In addition, the
count column serves as a running counter of each
alarm since the device has been commissioned. In
the event that a compressor needs to be replaced,
this history information will be zeroed when a new
control module is connected.
Note that the dipswitch settings must be set for “Stand
Alone” control. Dipswitch #9 must be “down” to enable
stand alone input. Note that a change in the dipswitch
position will not be seen by the control module unless
the “reset” button has been pushed after the dipswitch
is repositioned.
•
A 24 volt signal to the demand input will turn the
compressor “on”.
•
A 24 volt signal to the unloader will energize
the unloader (energizing the unloader reduces
compressor capacity.)
5.0 Stand-Alone Installation and Operation
A Stand-Alone control configuration has been
established to allow control of the compressor
contactor and unloader(s) in a condensing unit or
other application when the network mode is not used.
Control of the contactor and unloader is through a
24 volt AC signal supplied to spare leads inside the
terminal box.
Please refer to Figure 5.1 of the wiring diagram that
shows the 24 volt power supply and the stand-alone
input connections. It is important that the 24 volt signal
to the input leads comes from the same leg of the
transformer as the left-hand side sensor module power
lead. There is no danger or risk of electrical damage if
the input comes off of the other transformer leg, but the
input demands will not function.
•
Failsafe operation is not enabled when in standalone mode.
Stand-alone operation may be enabled for service
reasons even if a communication network is used.
Communication of information is not affected by
operation in the stand-alone mode. To convert back to
Network mode, the reset button must be pushed for the
control module to recognize the new dipswitch position.
6.0 Compressor Status Codes
The CoreSense Diagnostics control module has a LED
& LCD to display the compressor status. The bicolor
LED provides basic diagnostics to aid in troubleshooting
of the system or compressor.
• Steady Green: An indication of normal operation.
There are no faults or issues with the compressor.
to
Demand input Orange
Unloader 2 input Violet
Unloader 1 input Yellow
Class II 24
VAC Power
Supply
● ●
●
Demand (on-off) and
Unloaders are from the
Power Leg that Connects
to the Connector Tab on
the Left Side
Harness to
Control
Module
24V Power Black
24V Power White
Terminal Box
Figure 5.1
Stand-Alone Input Power Supply
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Printed in the U.S.A.
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• Flashing Green: An indication that there is a
warning condition. The compressor can still be
running.
• Flashing Red: An indication that the compressor
has tripped or is in lockout state.
• Solid Red: An indication that the control module
has failed.
6.1 Definitions
• Trip: The module has shut off the compressor due
to a fault condition. The compressor will be available
to run when the fault condition no longer exists, and
the minimum off time has been satisfied.
• Lockout: The module has shut off the compressor
due to a fault condition. The compressor will NOT
be available to run when the fault condition has
been cleared until the reset button is pushed or a
remote reset has been activated or the module has
been power cycled.
6.2 Event Priority and Troubleshooting
6.2.1 Event Priority and Anti-Short-Cycle Delay
After a trip occurs the compressor will run when the
condition that leads to the trip is cleared. Many of the
trip conditions have a minimum off-time associated with
them (i.e. if the condition clears itself very quickly, the
minimum off-time requirement must still be satisfied
before the compressor will run). This minimum off-time
is listed in the last column of the table in section 6.3.
Between normal run cycles and after trips the antishort-cycle time delay must also be satisfied. By default
this setting is 0.1 minutes (6 seconds). If the minimum
anti-short-cycle delay (ASCD) controls the start of the
compressor there will be an additional delay of 0.1
seconds x the node number (e.g. node #7 will have a
delay of 0.7 seconds). The purpose of this feature is
to prevent compressors from starting at the same time,
thereby significantly reducing the electrical in-rush that
the main bus will see.
6.2.2 LED Interpretation
There are two surface mount LED’s beside the RS485
communication connector on the control module. These
are useful when diagnosing communication issues
between the rack controller and the control module.
To aid with the troubleshooting process, the event
priority table is shown in section 6.3. There is a
hierarchy of display, meaning that multiple events may
occur at the same time and the highest priority event will
be displayed on the LCD screen and on the E2 screen.
This priority is in general a function of how critical the
fault is. Lockouts have priority over trips, and trips have
priority over warnings. The lowest priority events are
those that are considered “normal” conditions.
The left side LED is amber and indicates the receipt of a
communication transmission. The right side LED is red
and indicates a transmission from the control module to
rack controller.
The table includes not only the description of the event
but also the display text and the corresponding LED
behavior on the front of the control module. Without
having to activate the LCD display (by pushing the
“display” button), the LED will convey the compressor
status: lockout or trip (flashing red), warning (flashing
green), or normal (steady green).
Refer to Figure 6.1 on the following page for a
description of the functionality of each module.
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20
There is a bi-color LED in the sensor module that is
green when power is available, and flashes red when
there is an alarm condition associated with a condition
that is sensed by the sensor module.
AE8-1368 R2
Module Function Architecture
Control Module
Sensor Module
Controller Communications
Sensor Module Communications
Contactor Operation
Unloader Operation
Motor Temperature Protection (4D/6D)
Pressure Switch Status
Demand Cooling Operation
Discharge Temperature
Oil Pressure Protection
Supply Voltage Protection
Configuration Settings
Model Number
Operating History
Advanced Motor Protection
• Locked Rotor
• Missing Phase
• Current Overload
• Voltage Imbalance
• Low Motor Voltage
• Part Winding Start
Monitor
• Welded Contactor
Detection
Crank Case Heater Control
Voltage Sensing
Module to Module
Communications
CONNECTOR - RS 485
CONNECTOR - CONTROL MODULE - SENSOR MODULE
COMMUNICATION
CONNECTOR L.O.P
CONNECTOR - JUMPER
CONNECTOR - 18 PIN
Current Sensor
Current Measuring
Figure 6.1
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COMMUNICATION PLUG
CONNECTOR - JUMPER
SWITCH - DIP
CONNECTOR - 12 PIN
AE8-1368 R2
6.3 Event Priority Table
Priority Type
Event
Control module
LCD Display
Control module
LED
Delay Time
1
Lockout
Repeated Phase loss for 10
times
“Phase Loss”
“Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
2
Lockout
Repeated locked rotor for 10
times
“Locked Rotor”
“Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
3
Lockout
Contactor coil over current
“Contactor Coil“
“Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
4
Lockout
Discharge temperature lockout
“Discharge Temp”
“Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
5
Lockout
Discharge pressure lockout
“High Discharge”
“Pressure Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
6
Lockout
Low Oil Pressure lockout
“Low Oil Pressure”
“Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
7
Lockout
Repeated Part Winding trip
for 10 times
“Part Winding”
“Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
8
Lockout
Disabled by rack controller
“Rack Controller”
“Lockout”
Flashing RED
NA
9
Trip
High discharge pressure
“High Discharge”
“Pressure Trip”
Flashing RED
ASCD
10
Trip
Motor Temp Sensor Trip
“Motor Temp Trip”
“Control module”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 2 min
11
Trip
Phase loss trip
“Phase Loss Trip”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 5 min
12
Trip
Locked Rotor Trip
“Locked Rotor”
“Trip”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 5 min
13
Trip
Welded Contactor Warning
“Welded Contactor”
“Warning”
Flashing RED
NA
14
Warning
Low Suction Pressure
“Low Suction”
“Pressure Trip”
Flashing Red
ASCD
15
Trip
Voltage Imbalance
“Voltage“
“Imbalance Trip”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 5 min
16
Trip
Current Over load trip
“Current Overload”
“Trip”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 5 min
17
Trip
No 3-phase compressor power “No 3-Phase Power”
“Trip”
Flashing RED
NA
18
Trip
Current Overload
“Current Overload”
“Trip”
Flashing Red
Max of ASCD and 5 min
19
Trip
Part Winding Start Failure
“Part Winding”
“Trip”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 5 min
20
Trip
Module Supply voltage Trip
“Module Low”
“Voltage Trip”
Flashing RED
ASCD
21
Trip
Compressor low voltage trip
“Compressor Low”
“Voltage Trip”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 2 min
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
22
AE8-1368 R2
Control module
LCD Display
Control module
LED
Delay Time
Discharge temperature trip
“Discharge Temp”
“Trip”
Flashing RED
Max of ASCD and 2 min
Warning
Loss of communication
between control module& E2
“No Communication”
“Failsafe ON” (or OFF)
Flashing
GREEN
NA
24
Warning
sensor module failure
“Sensor Module”
“Failure”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
25
Warning
Loss of Communication
(control to sensor module)
“No Communication”
“To Sensor module”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
26
Warning
Low oil pressure warning
“Normal Running”
“Low Oil Pressure”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
27
Warning
Connection lost between CT & “Connection Lost”
sensor module
“CT To Sensor”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
28
Warning
Unloader1 over-current
warning
“Normal Running”
“Unloader1 Short”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
29
Warning
Unloader2 over-current
warning
“Normal Running”
“Unloader2 Short”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
30
Warning
Unloader1 open circuit
“Normal Running”
“Unloader1 Open”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
31
Warning
Unloader2 open circuit
“Normal Running”
“Unloader2 Open”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
32
Warning
Open Thermistor
“Normal Running”
“Fault Temp Probe”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
33
Warning
Unloader1 over-current
warning
“Normal Off”
“Unloader1 Short”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
34
Warning
Unloader2 over-current
warning
“Normal Off”
“Unloader2 Short”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
35
Warning
Unloader1 open circuit
“Normal Off”
“Unloader1 Open”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
36
Warning
Unloader2 open circuit
“Normal Off”
“Unloader2 Open”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
37
Warning
Open Thermistor
“Normal Off”
“Fault Temp Probe”
Flashing
GREEN
NA
38
Normal
Normal Run
“Normal Running”
Solid GREEN
NA
39
Normal
Normal Off
“Normal Off”
Solid GREEN
NA
40
Normal
Anti Short cycle timer running
“Anti short cycle”
“Time XX.X m Left”
Solid GREEN
NA
Priority Type
Event
22
Trip
23
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
23
AE8-1368 R2
6.4 Emergency Work-Around Procedures
False motor trips or lockouts:
In the event that a compressor fails to run due to an
electronic module failure, the following work-around
procedures are listed to assist the technician with
gaining temporary control of the compressor until
replacement parts may be obtained. The situations
listed below will not compromise the fundamental safe
operation of the compressor or agency listed motor
protection features. There will be some increased risk
of compressor damage associated with the loss of the
module’s functionality. The service technician must
determine whether the risks of temporarily running the
compressor in this situation are warranted.
Faults that are associated with the sensor module or
current sensor (see Figure 6.1 above) are advanced
protection features beyond the basic motor
temperature or current limiting protection available
on all discus compressors. If troubleshooting leads
to the conclusion that the trips or lockouts are false,
the sensor module communication harness may
be unplugged from the control module. This will
generate a “no communication to sensor module”
warning but will allow the compressor to run. If the
sensor module communication is unplugged - all
of the advanced motor protection features will be
bypassed. If the problem is associated with the
current sensor itself, this may be unplugged from the
sensor module leaving fundamental communication
between the sensor and control module intact.
Refer to the troubleshooting charts in the following
sections before resorting to these emergency service
options.
Controller fails to call the compressor “on” but
network communication is active:
Unplug the RS485 connector at the control module.
Set the “failsafe” dipswitch to the “run” position and
then press the control module “reset” button. After 5
minutes the compressor will run in the failsafe mode.
Pressure switch and motor protection features will
still function.
Failed discharge temperature probe resulting in
false discharge temperature trip:
Unplug the discharge temperature probe. This will
generate “Fault Temperature Probe” warnings but
will not prevent the compressor from running.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
24
Emergency By-Pass Procedure:
Refer to Section 6.13: Fail-Safe Inoperable.
AE8-1368 R2
6.5
Normal Running
Has the rack controller
issued a run command?
Yes
Is the compressor
running?
Yes
Normal Operation
No
No
Normal Running:
•
•
•
Demand is present
Current > 5 amps
Motor voltage is
present
• No faults
The control module will
display amperage and
discharge temperature
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Does the E2 show a status
code of “No communication
to Control Module”?
Yes
Normal Operation. The
module has gone into “loss of
communications” mode and the
failsafe is set to ON. Refer to
section 6.14 for the
communications
troubleshooting procedure.
25
No
Communications
Delay of several
seconds between E2
screen and compressor
response
AE8-1368 R2
Normal – OFF
Fail Safe - OFF
6.6
•
•
•
•
No Demand
Motor Current < 5 amps
No Voltage
No Communication; Fail Safe
Set For “Off”
Yes
Is the compressor OFF?
Has the rack controller
issued a run command?
No
Yes
Has the contactor been
manually closed?
Does the rack controller
show a status code of “No
Communication to Control
Module”?
No
No
Yes
Is compressor
Current < 5
Amps?
Yes
Normal Operation. A run
command has not been
issued by the rack controller.
The module does not detect
a running compressor when
the contactor is manually
closed
No
No
No
Yes
Check that the motor
power lead passes
through the CT in the
terminal box. This power
lead should be from the
terminal with the black
voltage sensing lead.
Normal
If the displayed
current is incorrect vs
actual measured
compressor current,
replace the CT
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
26
Normal Operation. A
run command has not
been issued by the rack
controller
Normal Operation. The module
has gone into “loss of
communications” mode and the
failsafe setting is “off”. Refer to
secion 6.16 for communications
troubleshooting.
A communication delay of
several seconds is normal
between the display
status and the
compressor status
Verify that the #9
dipswitch is in the “up”
position for network
mode
Note: After every shut-down, there is a predetermined off-time before the compressor
is allowed to run again. This is shown as
“Anti Short Cycle Time xx.x Left” The
default setting is 0.1 minutes, configurable
through the setup option for each
compressor (see “Configured Applications”
on the E2 menu).
AE8-1368 R2
Forced Run
Welded Contactor Warning
6.7
Is the
compressor in
the “forced run”
condition?
Yes
Throw the compressor
motor breaker to shut
down the compressor
Note: An open high or low pressure
switch will interrupt the welded
contactor protection feature by opening
the contactor circuit
No
Are there intermittent alarms
for Welded Contactor, and ‘No
Comms to Sensor Module”
warnings?
No
Diagnose for
intermittent
contactor weld
Yes
Clear the welded
contactor alarm in the
E2
Verify communication
connectors are solidly
engaged. If
connections are good,
replace the sensor
module.
Note: Welded Contactor looks for the presence of motor
voltage after the command to “open” the contactor has been
sent. The E2 will re-load the contactor to prevent singlephase damage to the motor.
Three scenarios can generate symptoms of a welded
contactor: 1) A welded or sticking contactor, 2) A welded or
sticking pilot relay or 3) A welded or sticking relay switch onboard the control module.
Measure voltage at the
contactor or pilot relay
coil (whichever is driven
by the output from the
ISD compressor)
Is voltage
present?
The following procedure may be followed to help diagnose
the problem
Yes
Failed ISD control
module relay.
Replace control
module
No
Does relay or
contactor remain
stuck?
Yes
Replace the contactor
or relay that has failed
No
Intermittent weld of
contactor, pilot relay or
control module relay.
Replace component that
appears damaged or
continue to monitor closely
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Graph the voltage
vs demand to
verify this
diagnosis
27
AE8-1368 R2
Module Low Voltage Trip
6.8
Sensor Module input voltage
must be greater than 16.5 volts
Check the Sensor Module supply voltage
at the leads connected to the terminal
labeld “24 VAC IN” in the terminal box.
Is the voltage below 16.5 volts?
Normal Operation. Check the supply voltage at the
transformer. Correct the low voltage condition.
Voltage must be above 16.5 V for module to reset.
Verify proper transformer VA rating and wiring size
(See Appendix C). Replace the transform if
necessary.
Yes
No
Reonnect the sensor module power
leads. Check the voltage on pins 4 and
15 of the 18-pin AMP connector to the
control module. Is the voltage below 16.5
V?
Yes
Check the white plug connector at the sensor
module and be sure that it is completely
engaged. If movement of the connector
causes intermittent power, resize the
receptacle pins or replace the harness
No
White Power Connector At
Sensor Module
Check the continuity of the wires in the
cable harness from pins 4 and 15 of
the 18-pin AMP connector. Do the
readings indicate a poor connection or
a broken wire? (See Appendix B)
Note: The 24VAC supply voltage to the control module
is also used to provide power to the unloader coil(s) if
present. In the event of intermittent low voltage trips it
may be helpful to check the transformer output voltage
while overriding the unloader coil ON with the rack
controller. This can be done by forcing the unloader
stage “OFF”.
If powering the unloader coil(s) causes the supply power to
the module to drop below 16.5 v, check to be certain that
the transformer meets the proper VA requirements. Refer
to Appendix C of this manual for information concerning
proper transformer selection.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
28
AE8-1368 R2
6.9
Connection Lost CT to sensor
CT is the Current Sensing Transducer, located in
the terminal box. It is the round “toroid” that one
of the motor power leads passes through. This
code is generated when it is unplugged from the
Sensor Module, or the motor power lead isn’t
passing through the CT.
Verify if the CT connector is
connected to the sensor module
No
Connect the 4 pin
Current Sensor
connector into the
sensor module
Yes
Is the motor power
lead passing through
the CT?
The motor power lead
from the terminal with
the black voltage
sensing lead must
pass through the CT
No
Yes
Resistance across these pins is less than
1 ohm
Is there continuity between pin
3 & 4 of the Current Sensing
connector? The resistance
should be less
than 1
ohm
No
Replace the Current
Sensing Module
Yes
When the compressor is
running, are Amps and Volts
correctly displayed on the ISD:
Details / Windings tab?
No
Faulty sensor
module or
connector misinstalled
Current Sensing Module connection
to Sensor Module
Current Sensing Module
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
29
Yes
Inspect the wire harness
connector to assure that
the pins are fully
engaged. Replace the
CT if harness repair is
not possible.
AE8-1368 R2
6.10
Rack Controller Lockout
The rack controller, in rare
instances, may determine
that it is necessary to shut
down the compressor
Investigate the cause
of the shutdown and
reset the E2 alarm in
order to restart the
compressor
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
30
AE8-1368 R2
6.11
Fault Temperature Probe
The temperature probe is an “NTC” device. Its resistance increases with decreasing
temperature. This fault is generated by an “open” thermistor circuit, and as such will generate
a reading of a low temperature (-40F or +327F with some versions of control module). This
assessment is only made if the control module temperature is greater than -30F.
Temperature probe connections should be coated with
NyoGel 760G lubricant. Kit # 9170001-00
Normal Operation
Connect the
harness to the
temperature probe
Is the discharge temperature
probe properly connected to the
harness, and lubricated with
NyoGel 760G lubricant?
No
Replace
temperature probe
Temperature
60F
70F
80F
90F
Resistance
141K ohms
107K ohms
82K ohms
66K ohms
Opened harness
circuit. Verify that
the harness is fully
engaged to the low
voltage connector
at the control
module. Perform
continuity check of
harness to isolate
fault. Refer to the
wiring diagram in
the appendix.
Yes
No
Unplug the
temperature probe
and check the
resistance of the
probe vs the
attached table
Does the probe indicate
the correct resistance?
(open resistance exceeds
2MΩ)
Yes
Temporarily “short”
across the sensor
connectors on the
harness. Do not
distort the connectors
when doing this.
Yes
Does the error code remain?
(a shorted probe will give a
reading of 327F)
No
Low Voltage Connector
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
31
Intermittent probe
failure, loose
connector pins or
intermittent
harness failure
AE8-1368 R2
Fail-Safe Inoperable
6.12
The fail-safe feature exists for conditions involving the loss
of communication to the controller (wire failure, controller
failure, etc.). In the event of an electronics failure of the
control module, the use of an emergency jumper may be
used to force the compressor “on” while still utilizing the
high and low pressure switches on the compressor.
Connect the jumper between the contactor
connection that goes to the black contactor
output wire
When using this jumper, note that the following protection
features are bypassed at your own risk:
4D / 6D motor protection is disabled
Oil pressure protection
Discharge temperature protection
All protection features provided by the sensor module
Unloader operation
Connect the other end of the jumper to one
of the low pressure switch tabs. If the
compressor fails to run, reconnect the low
pressure switch wire and then connect the
jumper to the other tab
2D and 3D line-break protection is still operable with this
by-pass arrangement
Emergency By -Pass Jumper
Terminal Box
Demand input Orange
Unloader 2 input Violet
Unloader 1 input Yellow
Class II 24
VAC Power Supply
Oil
Pressure
Wiring Side
Views
S S S C
Black
LPCO
HPCO
Or
Black
Or
Or
Contactor
Unloader
#1
Jumper
Motor Sensors Not
on 2D / 3D
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
32
6 5 4
3 2
Unloader
#2 (not on
2D/ 3D)
1
Blue
Blue 2D / 3D only
Blue 2D / 3D only
Blue 2D / 3D only
Blue 2D / 3D only
Yellow
Yellow
Violet
Violet
24V Power White
White
White
Blue
24V Power Black
Contactor
Output Contactor Output
11 1 10
Blue
6 14 3 12 2
RED
RED
7 8 16 15 4 5 13
Disch
Temp
Probe
AE8-1368 R2
Locked Rotor Trip / Lockout
6.13
A detected locked rotor condition (at start-up or while running) will shut the compressor off for
5 minutes. After 5 minutes, an attempt will be made to run again if demand is still present.
After 10 consecutive locked rotor trips, the control module will transition to a LOCKOUT
condition A reset is necessary in order for the module to run again.
If the compressor is locked out, RESET the module to enable it to run again.
Does the compressor appear
to start before the control
module shuts it down for
locked rotor?
No
Normal Operation
Perform normal locked
rotor diagnosis (voltage,
valve plate, etc)
Yes
Normal Operation
perform normal
locked rotor
diagnosis (voltage,
valve plate, etc)
Yes
Does the compressor continue
to draw high (above MCC)
current even though it
appears to start?
No
Temporarily
disconnect the
communication
line to the sensor
module (at the
sensor module or
at the control
module)
Does the compressor start?
(unplugging the comm line
disables this protection
feature)
No
Yes
Note: This locked rotor value is the
peak locked rotor amperage
recorded for this start cycle. It will
typically be much greater than the
listed locked rotor value which is a
steady-state RMS value
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
33
Compare locked rotor and
running AMPS history at
the E2 for this compressor
vs others. If the
compressor current > 25
amps when the
compressor is off, the CT
or sensor module has
failed. Replace the CT if
the displayed values are
significantly different from
an independent amp
clamp.
Electrical or
mechanical fault
with compressor or
system
AE8-1368 R2
No Communication
6.14 a
“No Communication” will be shown on the ISD display. It
will be seen in the E2 detail status screen as the ISD
Display Code, and the Network Status will be “Offline”.
After 5 minutes of no communication, the control module
of the compressor will revert to the Failsafe run state.
The control module must be “on” and
the RS485 connector must be plugged
in to the control module and to the E2
controller (see E2 connection in photo
on the right)
Yes
This flow chart assumes that the initial commissioning
process has been completed to establish the node on the
network.
Are termination jumpers properly set
(At compressor and at E2)? Is Parity
jumper “down” for use with E2? For E2
controllers, the Modbus jumper must be
set to “ECT”
Yes
Does each compressor on the
network have a unique
address?
Yes
Look at amber LED on
the left side of the control
module RS485
connector
Are the amber or red
lights on all
compressors
continuously on?
Set dipswitches for
correct node and
“reset” module
Do you have one
transformer powering
more than one sensor
module?
With a common
transformer, left Yes
side power
connector tabs to
use a common
supply leg, and
each right tab to
use a common
supply leg (see
schematic below)
Yes
Is the amber light of this
compressor
continuously on?
Yes
Plug in the interface
board connector.
Measure voltage at the
control module
connector
Verify that there are no
unfiltered variable
frequency drives that are
generating excessive
electrical noise
Yes
2.3 to 2.6 volts
DC?
•
•
24 v
Sensor
Module
Sensor
Module
Figure 1.0
Fair-Rite Filter
Installed on RS-485
Communication Line
•
Polarity of power connections for common transformer
34
Correct the polarity
of the wires at the
RS485 connector
on this compressor
Unplug the RS485
connector(s) from
the network interface
board and check DC
voltage (left pin to
center, right pin to
center)
Is there 2.3 to 2.6 volts
at the control module
RS485 connector?
Comm Wire Fault
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
No
Yes
No
No
Set termination
jumpers
No
Correct the polarity
of wires at RS485
connector at E2
No
No
Communication
Card and
Connector
No
-Verify that the
shield connection
is made at the E2
RS485 connector
-Faulty interface
board in E2
Verify polarity of the white/black
power supply leads going to the
control module. Refer to wiring
diagram in appendix. White
lead is by the connector latch at
the sensor module and goes to
control module pin #4.
If electrical noise is suspected,
a communication noise filter
from “Fair-Rite Products Corp.
p/n 0431173551may be
installed on the communication
line. See figure 1.0. Three
passes through the filter are
recommended.
Faulty control module
AE8-1368 R2
6.14b
No Communication to Rack Controller
(Continued)
Amber or Red
lights of all or
several
compressors are
continuously ON
Verify that the RS485
connector polarity is
correct at the controller
or at each compressor
Problem
persists?
Unplug the RS485
connector on all
compressors, plug back
one at a time to isolate
which compressor is
causing the problem
When the trouble compressor is
identified:
- Look for grounded (pinched)
low pressure switch lead under a
fan bracket leg
- Unplug the oil pressure harness.
If the problem goes away, replace
the oil sensor
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Done
No
Does the
problem
persist?
35
Yes
Look elsewhere for a location on the
harness that is grounded to the
compressor. If the fault comes and goes
with the compressor run requests, look
on the pilot circuit wires or pressure
switch leads. Other possibilities include
the unloader harness wires.
AE8-1368 R2
Motor Temperature Trip
6.15
Motor temperature protection for 4D and 6D compressors utilizes
3 temperature sensors in the motor. The temperature sensor
resistance is measured by the control module to determine
whether or not to shut down the motor. The motor temperature
set point is not configurable (it is a fixed value).
Normal reset requires that the compressor be off for 2 minutes
and the sensor temperatures be below a reset resistance (see
below)
Verify that the low voltage connector is
plugged into the control module
Emergency Sensor Bypass Instructions:
In
t he unlik ely event that ONE sensor
may be damage d and have an op en
circuit, the con trol module will prevent
compressor operation even though the
motor may b e in oth erwise perfe ct
condition. If su ch a situa tion should be
encountered in the fiel d , an em ergency
means of operating the compressor can
be us ed until s uch time as a
replacement can be made . Disconnect
the orange lead that is connected to the
faulty sensor , and mov e it to th e
common (black wire ) post. Stack the
two rin g terminal s (one bla ck and one
orange) together on the common post.
See emergency
bypass
instructions above
Caution: High Voltage Inside
Terminal Box
Check the motor sensor
resistance (this may be checked
at the control module by
unplugging the low voltage
harness
Allow the compressor to cool for
one hour. Verify proper nut
torque (20 in-lb) of motor
temperature terminal strip nuts in
the terminal box. The sensor to
common resistance on a cold
motor should be between 20 and
250 ohms. Reset values for a hot
motor are 2700 – 4500 ohms.
No
Are the
sensors within
spec?
Yes
Does the fault
remain?
No
C S1 S2 S3
OR Bk Bk Bk
Resolve source of
high motor
temperature
Low Voltage Connector
Open end view of low voltage harness,
unplugged from the control module
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
36
Motor Sensor Resistance
Values:
Cold:
20 – 100 ohms
Reset after trip: 2750 ohms
Yes
Possible Causes:
1.) Open circuit in harness
2.) Connector pin not
engaging at connector on
control module
3.) Faulty control module
AE8-1368 R2
6.16
No Communication to Sensor Module
This code results when the
sensor module communication
harness is unplugged for 1
minute, or the control module
fails to communicate with the
sensor module for 1 minute
Remove the
Bottom cover of the
control module
Is the control module to sensor module
communication harness properly plugged
into the connector (see photo below)?
No
Properly plug the harness
into the connector
Yes
Open the
terminal box
(Caution: High
Voltage on
Terminal Posts).
Correct Connector
Orientation: Locking
Tab In Front
Incorrect :
Locking Tab To
Side
Orientation of communication harness
connector
Replace the sensor
module
Is the harness plugged into
the sensor module?
Yes
No
Plug the harness into
the sensor module
Communication Harness Connector
Locations on Control and Sensor Module
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
37
AE8-1368 R2
Unloader Short
6.17
The unloader short protects the harness and electronics from high current (2
s0.5 Amps) associated with a shorted coil or harness. The control module
must be reset to allow the unloader to be operated again.
Unplug the
connector to the
unloader coil
Is the coil
resistance less
than 5 ohms?
Replace the
unloader coil
Yes
No
With the unloader
output unplugged,
force the unloader
stage “off” to
energize the circuit
Does the Unloader Short
fault still appear?
Yes
Compressor harness short or
failed control module
No
Replace coil
(failure under
load)
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
38
AE8-1368 R2
Unloader Open
6.18
The “open” unloader coil detection is based
on a low current flow (<200 mA) through the
unloader coil. This feature is disabled for the
Demand Cooling solenoid coil
Unplug the
connector to the
unloader coil
Is the coil resistance
greater than 120 ohms?
(nominal coil resistance 6
Ω)
Yes
Replace the
unloader coil
No
With the unloader
output plugged in,
force the unloader
stage “off” to
energize the
circuit. Measure
voltage across the
coil.
Is the coil getting
approximately 24 volts AC
across it?
Yes
Suspect intermittent open
circuit in harness
No
Harness failure or
control module
relay output
failure.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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39
AE8-1368 R2
Contactor Coil Lockout
6.19
Turn off the pilot circuit and
“open” the motor power
breaker.
The contactor coil lockout protects the circuit from high current (3 + 0.5
amps) resulting from a “shorted” coil or harness. The control module
must be re-set to clear the lockout.
Unplug the contactor output
leads at the contactor (or pilot
relay). Measure the contactor
(or pilot relay) coil resistance
Is the coil resistance less
than the mfgs’ minimum
specified?
Yes
Replace the relay
or contactor coil
No
With the contactor
output unplugged,
turn on pilot circuit
and send a “run”
command
Does the compressor
generate a “No 3-phase
power” fault?
No
Does the compressor still
generate a contactor coil
lockout?
Yes
Replace coil
(failure under
load)
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40
Yes
Compressor harness short or
failed control module
- Unplug the contactor output
connectors in the terminal
box and repeat the test to
help determine the location
of the wiring short.
AE8-1368 R2
Protector Trip
6.20
This fault pertains to 2D and 3D compressors with internal line
break protectors. The presence of motor voltage without current
flow is the symptom used to detect a protector trip. Current flow
is measured by the Current Sensing Module (“CT”, for Current
Transducer)
Is the
compressor
running?
Yes
Possible Causes:
1.) Motor lead not passing through CT
2.) CT not plugged into sensor module, or pins
in connector not engaged
3.) Faulty CT – check resistance of CT through
pins 1 and 2 of the connector (see below)
4.) Faulty sensor module
No
Normal Operation
The internal protector
has tripped. The
compressor will restart
when the motor has
adequately cooled
View of the open end of
the CT connector that
plugs into the sensor
module
Resistance between pins
1 and 2 = 60 – 80 ohms
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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41
AE8-1368 R2
6.21
Voltage Imbalance Trip
Check compressor power supplied to the
contactor. Is the voltage difference between
any of the power leads greater than the
percentage that is set in the E2? See the
configuration tab for this compressor.
No
Reset the sensor module by
turning off the pilot circuit power.
Note: Before turning the module
on, wait approximately 5 seconds
to allow for a proper reset.
Yes
Normal Operation. Voltage
imbalances that are 5% or greater
can cause overheating and
subsequent damage to the
compressor motor. Address the
voltage imbalance before
restarting the compressor
Does the module return to
normal operation?
No
Are the voltage sensing leads
connected properly? Refer to
figure 6.24
No
Repair the connections
Figure 6.24 Voltage Lead Connections
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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42
Yes
Normal Operation.
The module has
sensed a voltage
imbalance condition.
AE8-1368 R2
Low Suction Pressure Trip
6.22
Is the suction pressure
below 5 psi?
No
Will the pressure
switch reset within
specified range?
Yes
No
Normal Operation
Compressor will
restart when
suction pressure
increases above
reset level
Replace Low
Pressure Cut Out
Switch
2D / 3D
Yes
Normal Operation
4D
Low Pressure Cut Out Switch Locations
Non-Demand Cooling Low Pressure Switch Settings:
Opens
1 to 5 psi
Closes 8 to 12 psi
Demand Cooling Low Pressure Switch Settings:
Opens
-5 to +1 psi
Closes
5 to 11 psi
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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43
6D
AE8-1368 R2
6.23
Phase Loss Trip / Lockout
A phase loss trip occurs if one or two phases of the motor are not
receiving voltage. The compressor will shut off and remain off for 5
minutes before trying again. If the phase loss occurs for 10
consecutive attempts, a lockout will occur. A lockout requires that
the module be reset to allow the compressor to run. Every
successful re-start will decrement the lockout counter by one.
Normal Operation
Determine cause
of missing phase
or voltage
imbalance
Voltage sensing
leads not
connected to motor
terminals.
Is full voltage present at
each terminal when the
contactor is loaded?
No
Missing Phase Voltage Imbalance
During Start-up
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Yes
Note that during a
light-load running
condition, the
missing-phase
voltage imbalance
may not be very
large
Missing Phase Voltage Imbalance
While Running
44
AE8-1368 R2
No 3-Phase Power
6.24
No 3-phase power fault occurs if a run command has been sent
from the control module to the contactor (or pilot relay) and voltage
isn’t present at the motor terminals. This will not result in a lockout
condition; If demand remains, the compressor will continue to
attempt to run until voltage at the motor is present. This fault will
typically occur during start-up.
Faulty contactor
coil, pilot relay coil
or rack wiring
Normal Operation
Main breaker is
thrown or other
compressor power
supply issue
Yes
No
Is the
compressor
running?
Is the compressor
contactor or pilot relay
closed?
Yes
No
Yes
Is 24v present at
“Contactor Output” of
harness in T-Box?
No
Voltage sensing
leads not
connected to
motor terminals,
or faulty sensor
module
Plug the
connector into
the control
module.
Yes
Is the low voltage
harness connector
unplugged from the
control module?
No
Open harness or
Faulty control module
relay
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45
AE8-1368 R2
Normal Running Low Oil Pressure
6.25
Followed By
Low Oil Pressure Lockout
Is oil present in the
sight glass?
Yes
Is the harness connector at
the oil pump pressure sensor
fully engaged?
No
Reconnect
No
Install jumper across
the harness connector
pins
No
Resolve reservoir oil
supply problem or oil
level control setting
issues
Yes
Disconnect harness at the
sensor. Is the oil pump sensor
“open” while the compressor
runs?
Yes
Verify proper engagement
of connector onto sensor
Measure oil pump pressure. Is
the differential pressure relative
to the crankcase (suction) greater
than 7– 9 psi?
Does the Module
display change to
“Normal Running”?
Yes
No
Faulty Sensor.
Check for missing
o-ring or clogged
sensor screen
No
Compressor Issue.
Possible Causes: Faulty oil
pump. Clogged strainer
screen. Worn bearings.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Yes
46
Loose harness
connection in front box.
If all connections are
tight, replace Module
AE8-1368 R2
6.26
Control Module Failure Lockout
Reset the Control
Module by pressing the
“Reset” button on the
front of the unit
Does the module continue to
display the “Control Module
Failure Lockout” code?
No
The module has
returned to
Normal Operation
Yes
Reset the module by turning it off
and back on. Note: Before turning
the module on, wait approximately 5
seconds to allow for a proper reset.
Yes
Does the module continue to
display the “Control Module
Failure Lockout” code?
No
The module has
returned to
Normal Operation
Yes
Replace the
Control Module
The Control Module Failure Lockout code results when
the module fails an internal diagnostic test.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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47
AE8-1368 R2
6.27
Sensor Module Failure
Reset the Control
Module by pressing the
“Reset” button on the
front of the unit
Does the module continue to
display the “Sensor Module
Failure” code?
No
The module has
returned to
Normal Operation
Yes
Reset the sensor module by turning
off the pilot circuit power. Note:
Before turning the module on, wait
approximately 5 seconds to allow for
a proper reset.
Yes
Does the module continue to
display the “Sensor Module
Failure” code?
No
The module has
returned to
Normal Operation
Yes
Replace the
Sensor Module
Note: The compressor will continue to run
without a functioning sensor module, however,
there will not be enhanced motor protection
The Sensor Module Failure code results when the
module fails an internal diagnostic test.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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48
AE8-1368 R2
6.28
High Discharge Pressure Trip
Is the Service
Valve Open?
Open the Valve
No
Yes
Is the system discharge
pressure above the preset
trip point?
Yes
Resolve system
pressure issue
Yes
Replace the switch
if it fails to reset
below 250 psi.
No
Check the continuity
across the pressure switch.
Is the circuit open?
No
Verify that the connections
to the pressure switches
are tight and made
properly. Refer to Figure
5.1
High Pressure Settings
Opens 360 psi
Resets 250 psi
After verifying that system
pressures are not unsafe,
temporarily bypass the
switch. If contactor chatter
condition or trips are
eliminated, replace the
switch
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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49
AE8-1368 R2
6.29
Discharge Temperature Trip / Lockout
Does this
compressor have
liquid injection?
Yes
See Section 6.32b
Yes
Is the head temperature probe reading
properly (with an ohmmeter across the
probe’s connecotrs), or based upon the
display or controller readout? Reference
the resistance table
No
Replace the head
temperature
probe
NO
Does the temperature reading
reach high levels immediately
after compressor start-up (before
the head becomes hot)?
Pinched or
grounded
harness or probe
lead
Yes
Is the system
operating with
excessive
superheat?
No
Adjust the
system
Yes
No
Yes
Corrupted
configuration value in
the control module.
Contact Emerson
Tech Support for help
in resetting the value
in the control module
Is the compressor
tripping / locking out
below the proper trip
setting (see table)?
DLT Trip Settings
4D / 6D 310oF
2D / 3D 280oF
Is the discharge
temperature higher than
like models in the same
suction group?
No
Yes
NO
Diagnose cause of
compressor
inefficiency (e.g.
gasket or reed
failure, head fan
failure, etc)
Investigate system
issues leading to
high temperature
(e.g. high head
pressure)
Temperature
Resistance
60F
70F
80F
90F
141K ohms
107K Ohms
82K Ohms
66K Ohms
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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50
AE8-1368 R2
6.29 b
Discharge Temperature Trip / Lockout
With Demand Cooling
Is liquid being injected into the
compressor when required? The
display will show, “Iiquid
injecting”
Is the system
operating with
proper superheat?
Yes
Adjust the
system to reduce
excessive
superheat
No
Yes
No
Are there any gaps in
discharge temperature
data (loss of data), or
temperature probe fault
warnings?
Yes
Is the liquid level in the
receiver adequate to maintain
a steady supply to the
injection valve?
Diagnose
temperature
probe faults
No
Yes
Is current flowing through the
injection coil and magnetic
pull developed by the coil?
Yes
Are there any
shorted coil
warnings?
Check the liquid
line for a plugged
injector screen
No
If 24 VAC is developed
across the coil but no
magnetic pull force is
developed and no
amperage, replace the coil
Verify that the
harness isn’t
shorted, or
replace the coil
Note: This coil has a diode in it. In one direction, the circuit will
test “open”. The other direction will give varying resistance
readings depending upon the ohmmeter
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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51
No
Resolve defrost
cycle or system
charge issues
leading to low
liquid
AE8-1368 R2
Current Overload Trip
6.30
This fault is a result of continuous compressor current that exceeds the configuration (MCC) limit by 10% for 60
seconds as determined by the current sensing transducer. This is independent of the compressor protector or
motor temperature sensors.
The comp will auto-reset after 2 minutes (plus any remaining anti-short cycle time).
The MCC (maximum continuous current)
may be edited through the E2 setup screen
for each compressor
Graph the
amperage
preceding the fault
No
Troubleshoot for high
current. Verify that the
CT reads the correct
amperage. Replace the
CT if necessary
Is the compressor current in the
graph lower than the published
MCC value for this compressor,
voltage and refrigeratnt?
Yes
Refer to section 4.x and
read back the MCC value
for this control module.
Re-load the value if it has
changed from the
published (RLA x 1.4)
MCC value
Yes
Look in the setup
tab for this
compressor to
determine the
MCC trip point
Did the compressor trip
at a current level less
than shown in the setup
tab?
No
If the MCC value shown
on the setup tab is less
than the published MCC
value for this compressor,
voltage and refrigerant,
reload the MCC value per
section 4.x instructions
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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52
AE8-1368 R2
Rapid Compressor Cycling with
Constant Demand; Contactor Chatter
6.31
Inspect for:
•
Loose connection in the contactor coil power circuit
•
Loose connection at the white sensor module connector
that supplies 24V to the control module. Re-size the
connector pin sockets or replace the harness.
Reference 6.8 – Module Low Voltage Trip
•
High pressure switch intermittent open circuit. Refer to
6.3, High Pressure Discharge Pressure Trip. After
verifying that high head pressures are not the problem,
temporarily bypass the pressure switch to see if the
switch is the root cause.
•
Undersized transformer. Reference the appendix for
sizing of the transformer. This may occur if an unloader
has been added to the compressor as an aftermarket
upgrade.
•
Auxiliary contactor miswired into the pilot circuit
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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53
AE8-1368 R2
6.32
Discharge Temperature Probe Fault Trip
This fault occurs when there is an “open” temperature probe
circuit and the compressor is configured to run with Demand
Cooling
Refer to 6.12, Fault Temperature probe, to resolve the
temperature probe fault condition
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
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54
AE8-1368 R2
6.33
Comp Low Voltage Trip / Lockout*
*This condition will result in a Lockout after 10 consecutive events
Are the sensor module
voltage sensing lease
connected to the motor
terminals?
No
Connect as shown in
Figure 2.2
Yes
Is the proper 3-phse
voltage being
supplied to the
compressor?
Yes
Confirm that the
CoreSense module has
been programmed with
the proper voltage setting
(refer to section 4.7)
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
55
No
Correct Power
Supply Issue
AE8-1368 R2
7.0 Service Instructions
7.2 Sensor Module Replacement
7.1 Control Module Replacement
The CoreSense Diagnostics compressor sensor
module relays information concerning the compressor
current and voltage to the control module. If a
failure would occur to the sensor module the control
module would display "No Communications to
Sensor Module". While the compressor would remain
functional, enhanced motor protection features would
be disabled. The features affected are:
- Locked Rotor Protection
In the event of a control module failure, contact the
Emerson Climate Technologies Wholesaler to obtain
a replacement device. The last two digits of the
part number (XX) designate the software version
loaded into the module. The control module used for
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 is universal for all 2D,
3D, 4D, and 6D compressors.
To perform the installation of the new control module
follow these steps:
1. Remove power to the affected control module.
Once power has been removed, both the LCD
and LED display on the front of the module will
be dark.
2. Access the control module electrical connections
by removing the access cover at the bottom of
the module.
3. Unplug all of the control module connections
located on the bottom edge of the control module
circuit board.
4. Remove the remaining four screws that secure
the control module to the mounting plate.
5. Note the DIP switch settings. If the module was
operating properly before failure, transfer those
settings to the new control module. Otherwise
refer to Section 4.1 to determine the proper
settings. The same can be said for both the
controller and termination jumpers on the new
control module.
6. Attach the new control module to the mounting
plate using the four screws removed in step 4.
7. Make all harness connections removed in step
number 3.
8. Apply power to the module. Once powered,
the control module will display the DIP switch
settings on the LCD. Verify that these settings are
correct. With the proper DIP switch settings, the
new module will be ready for normal operation.
Refer to instruction sheet provided with the
new control module for additional programming
steps.
9. Using the provided packaging from the
replacement module, return the failed unit to
your Emerson Climate Technologies Wholesaler
for a refund on your core charge or warranty
replacement of the failed module.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
56
- Welded Contactor Protection
- Voltage Imbalance Protection
- Low Voltage Protection
Basic compressor motor protection based on internal
line break sensors (2D/3D) or PTC's (4D/6D) will still
be present.
In the event of a sensor module failure, contact
an Emerson Wholesaler to obtain a replacement
device. There are two versions of the sensor module
depending upon the application. Part number 5430062-XX is the standard version of the sensor module
used on compressors without part-winding start. Part
number 543-0082-XX is the sensor module used on
compressors with part-winding start. The last two digits
of the part number (XX) designate the software version
loaded into the module.
To perform the installation of the new control module
follow these steps:
1. Remove power to the affected device. Be sure
to switch power off to both the compressor and
module. Always turn off compressor power
before working on connections in the compressor
terminal box. Once power has been removed,
both the LCD and LED display on the sensor
module will be dark. If the module in question is
powering a crankcase heater, be sure that this
power is switched as well.
2. Remove the terminal box cover to access the
sensor module. The LED on the sensor module
should be dark indicating that 24V power has
been removed.
3. Disconnect all connections going to the sensor
module. These connections include:
•
•
•
Compressor Voltage Sensors (x3)
Current Sensor (x2 if compressor is partwinding start)
Crankcase Heater Supply and Power (if
present)
AE8-1368 R2
•
•
24VAC input power to the sensor module
24VAC output power to the control module
4. Remove the two retaining nuts securing the
sensor module to the terminal box and remove
the module.
5. Install the new module by reversing the steps
listed above. When re-connecting the compressor
voltage sensors be sure that the black lead
is connected to the compressor terminal
corresponding to the current sensor.
6. Once the new module has been secured to the
terminal box replace the terminal box cover and
secure in place.
7. Apply power to the compressor and module. Once
the unit has been powered up the control module
should display a message of Normal Running or
Normal OFF.
7.3 Installation Torque Values
Component
Torque Value
Control Module Mounting Screws
85-105
in*lb
Control Module Mounting
Bracket Nuts
42-50
ft*lb
Sensor Module Mounting Nuts
26-31
in*lb
Pressure Cutouts
(585-0125-03/-04)
95-108
in*lb
Pressure Cutouts (Other)
160-180
in*lb
Temperature Probe
170-200
in*lb
Current Sensor Mounting Nuts
26-31
in*lb
Motor Terminal Nuts
75-85
in*lb
Solenoid Valve Nuts/Bolts
42-50
ft*lb
120-180
in*lb
Schrader Fittings (1/8" NPT)
7.4 Demand Cooling Service Procedures
The demand cooling valve injects liquid refrigerant
into the suction manifold to keep the discharge gas
temperature within a safe operating range. Excessive
discharge gas temperature will lead to ring and cylinder
wear, valve wear and oil coking. Each Copeland
Discus compressor with CoreSense Diagnostics
has a temperature probe in the head to continually
monitor the discharge gas temperature. The injection
valve is energized when the temperature of the probe
exceeds the “Injection Start” temperature. When
the probe temperature drops below the “Injection
Stop” temperature, the injection valve closes (is
de-energized). Refer to Table 7.0 for reference
temperatures by model.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
57
Note that the temperatures shown for 2D and 3D
Copeland Discus compressors with CoreSense
Diagnostics are lower than for standard demand
cooling compressors. This is to compensate for the
updated probe location used on the Copeland Discus
compressors with CoreSense Diagnostics. The
actual peak gas temperatures inside the head are
correspondingly higher and will be at the standard
demand cooling levels during injection start, injection
stop and at the maximum trip temperature.
The following demand cooling service procedures are
covered below:
• Temperature probe inspection
• Coil inspection and replacement
• Injection valve replacement
Table 7.0
Head
Temperature
(°F)
Standard
Demand
Cooling
2D/3D
CoreSense
Diagnostics
4D/6D
CoreSense
Diagnostics
Maximum (Trip)
310
290
310
Liquid Injection
Start
292
276
282
Liquid Injection
Stop
282
272
273
Table 7.1 Temperature Probe Resistance
Thermometer
Temp. (F°)
Calculated
Sensor
Resistance
(Ohms)
Thermometer
Temp. (F°)
Calculated
Sensor
Resistance
(Ohms)
59
141426
86
72504
60.8
135000
87.8
69480
62.6
128907
89.6
66609
64.4
123129
91.4
63864
66.2
117639
93.2
61254
68
112437
95
58770
69.8
107478
96.8
56394
71.6
102762
98.6
54126
73.4
98289
100.4
51966
75.2
94041
102.2
49914
77
90000
104
47943
78.8
86139
105.8
46053
80.6
82476
107.6
44262
82.4
78984
109.4
42543
84.2
75663
AE8-1368 R2
7.5 Temperature Probe Inspection
Erroneous temperature probe readings may be due
to “sprung” connections at the harness, or corrosion
on the harness connector surfaces. A reading of
approximately 0F and a display code of “Fault Temp
Probe Trip” is indicative of an open circuit or poor
electrical connection. Unplug the temperature probe
from the harness and measure the probe resistance to
determine whether the probe itself is faulty.
a torch. Evacuate the compressor per accepted
industry practice. Unsolder the injection tube
from the liquid line. A wet rag around the valve is
recommended for additional protection.
3. Unplug and remove the injection coil.
4. Loose the flare fitting that attaches the injection
valve to the compressor body (It may be necessary
to remove the sheetmetal enclosure on the 6D
compressor to gain access to this fitting.)
Refer to Table 7.1 for expected resistance values based
on probe temperature.
5. Install a new valve and torque the flare fitting to
15 ft-lb.
Plug the connector back in and look at the head
temperature for this compressor on the E2 screen.
Agreement between the calculated probe temperature
based on resistance and the E2 temperature indicate the
harness connection is good. An extreme temperature
indicates the probe is faulty. A probe temperature based
on resistance that seems reasonable based on the
approximate temperature of the head indicates the probe
itself is not faulty. If the E2 shows a head temperature
that is obviously not correct, visually inspect the harness
connector to look for signs of corrosion or for “sprung”
female terminals in the harness. If the terminals appear
to be “sprung”, carefully squeezing the outside of the
plug to reconfigure their shape may yield acceptable
contact. If the connections are not repairable, refer to
Appendix G for a list of service replacement parts.
Nyogel 760G lubricating grease is used in the connector
to prevent fretting and corrosion.
6. Install the injection coil and reconnect the wiring
harness.
7. Reconnect the liquid line to the new valve. Note
that trimming the injection valve tube may damage
the internal strainer. Emerson recommends that
modifications not be made to the tube. Use the
same flame precautions as in step 2.
8. Use approved refrigeration service procedures to
evacuate the compressor and liquid line. Make
certain that liquid is available to the injection valve
by opening the supply valve.
The following instructions assume that the same
control module and sensor module will be used on the
new compressor. If these modules are to be replaced,
refer to Section 7.0 of this document.
9.0 Removal of the Compressor (2D/3D)
7.6 Coil Inspection and Replacement
Refer to figures in Appendix E for the location of the
injection coil. The coil may be removed by unplugging
the harness from the coil and lifting the coil. Coils used
on Copeland Discus compressors with CoreSense
Diagnostics are 24VAC.
7.7 Injection Valve Replacement (4D and 6D)
Reference Drawing of Enclosure and Accessories
Note: There are no unique injection valve service
procedures for the 2D/3D Copeland Discus
compressors with CoreSense Diagnostics. Use
conventional 2D/3D valve change-out procedures
and keep the torch flame away from the conduit
wire harness to avoid damage.
1. Disconnect power to the compressor and module.
2. After isolating the liquid line by closing the shutoff,
relieve trapped pressure by actuating the solenoid.
This is very important! When heated, pressures
generated by trapped refrigerant may lead to a
ruptured tube. Wear safety goggles when using
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
8.0 Compressor Changeout Instructions
58
1. Turn off power to the compressor, crankcase
heater, and CoreSense Diagnostics modules.
2. Isolate the compressor and evacuate per
accepted industry practice.
3. Inside the terminal box:
• Remove compressor power terminal lugs
• Disconnect/Unplug connections to the sensor
module including:
- voltage sensing leads
- crankcase heater output
- communication cable (to control module)
- 24VAC power output (to control module)
- Remove terminal box anchor screws
holding the box to the compressor (4x)
4. Remove screws that secure wiring harness
assembly to terminal box (2x)
5. Lift off terminal box.
6. Remove side cover screws to access pressure
controls (2x)
7. Unplug leads to high and low pressure switch,
temperature probe, and unloader (if present).
AE8-1368 R2
Figure 7.1
2D/3D CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Assembly Reference Drawing
8. Remove access cover on control module (two
screws).
9. Unplug RS-485 communications plug.
10. Unplug the harness to the oil pressure switch.
11. Remove housing cover nuts securing control
module mounting plate to compressor. (x2)
12. Remove control module and harness assembly
as a unit by pulling it off towards the front of the
compressor.
13. Remove the compressor from the rack using proper
tools and procedures to assure safety, and to
prevent damage to the rack or other compressors.
10.0 Installation of the compressor (2D/3D)
1. Mount the new compressor in the rack, lifting
and maneuvering the compressor in a manner to
prevent personal injury and damage to the other
compressors on the rack.
2. Install the control module and harness assembly
on the new compressor as a unit.
3. Install the housing cover nuts securing the control
module mounting plate to the compressor. (x2)
4. Transfer the temperature sensor and pressure
control fittings to the head and body of the new
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
59
Figure 7.2 – 2D/3D Terminal Box Connections
compressor. Use of a thread sealing compound
is recommended. Connect temperature probe to
wiring harness.
5. Install high pressure cutout switch (RED DOT 360 psi) on the head, and low pressure cutout
switch (WHITE DOT - 3 psi) on the compressor
body. Double Check Positions! Connect pressure
controls to wiring harness (HPCO-RED leads and
LPCO-BLUE leads).
AE8-1368 R2
Figure 7.3
4D CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Assembly Reference Drawing
6. Install the terminal box on the compressor by
routing the harness leads through the provided
opening in the bottom of the box. Secure to the
compressor using the four anchor screws.
7. Secure the wiring harness assembly to the
terminal box by installing two screws.
8. Inside the terminal box:
•
•
Connect compressor power terminal lugs
Connect wires to the sensor module including:
-
voltage sensing leads
crankcase heater output
communication cable (to control module)
24VAC power output (to control module)
9. Reconnect the RS-485 communications plug.
Figure 7.4 – 4D Terminal Box Connections
10. Reconnect the harness to the oil pressure sensor.
11. Replace the terminal box cover and secure with
two screws.
11.0 Removal of the Compressor (4D)
12. Reinstall the side cover over the pressure controls.
1. Turn off power to the compressor, crankcase
heater, and CoreSense Diagnostics modules.
13. Reinstall the control module access cover and
secure with two screws.
2. Isolate the compressor and evacuate per accepted
industry practice.
14. Apply power to the compressor and CoreSense
Diagnostics modules.
3. Inside the terminal box
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
60
• Remove compressor power terminal lugs
AE8-1368 R2
• Remove terminal box grounding strap
• Remove the compressor motor sensor leads
• Disconnect the compressor voltage sensing
leads
• Remove terminal box anchor screws holding
the box to the compressor
7. Reconnect the pressure controls to wiring harness
(HPCO-RED leads and LPCO-BLUE leads).
4. Remove the side cover to access the high pressure
control.
10. Reconnect the harness to the head temperature
probe and unloader (if present).
5. Unplug leads to high and low pressure switches,
temperature probe, and unloader (if present).
11. Reinstall the side cover and secure with four
screws
6. Remove access cover on control module (two
screws).
12. Replace the terminal box cover and secure with
two screws.
7. unplug all harness connections at the control
module.
13. Reinstall the control module access cover and
secure with two screws.
8. Unplug RS-485 communications plug.
14. Apply power to the compressor and CoreSense
Diagnostics modules.
9. Unplug the harness to the oil pressure switch.
10. Lift off terminal box with the wiring harness
attached.
11. Remove the two nuts securing the control module
mounting bracket to the compressor
12. Remove control module from the compressor.
13. Remove the compressor from the rack using proper
tools and procedures to assure safety, and to
prevent damage to the rack or other compressors.
12.0 Installation of the Compressor (4D)
1. Mount the new compressor in the rack, lifting
and maneuvering the compressor in a manner to
prevent personal injury and damage to the other
compressors on the rack.
2. Transfer the temperature sensor and pressure
control fittings to the head and body of the new
compressor. Use of a thread sealing compound is
recommended.
3. Install high pressure cutout switch (RED DOT
- 360 psi) on the head, and low pressure cutout
switch (WHITE DOT - 3 psi) on the compressor
body. Double Check Positions!
4. Install the terminal box on the compressor. Secure
to the compressor using the four anchor screws.
5. Inside the terminal box
•
•
•
•
Connect compressor power terminal lugs
Connect terminal box grounding strap
Connect motor sensor leads
Connect the compressor voltage sensing
leads
6. Install the control module mounting bracket on
the compressor.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
61
8. Reconnect all plugs at the control module
including the RS-485 communications plug.
9. Reconnect the harness to the oil pressure sensor.
13.0 Removal of the compressor (6D)
1. Turn off power to the compressor, crankcase
heater, and CoreSense Diagnostics modules.
2. Isolate the compressor and evacuate per accepted
industry practice.
3. Inside the terminal box
•
•
•
•
Remove compressor power terminal lugs
Remove terminal box grounding strap
Remove the compressor motor sensor leads.
Disconnect the compressor voltage sensing
leads
• Remove terminal box anchor screws holding
the box to the compressor
4. Remove access cover on control module (two
screws).
5. Unplug all harness connections at the control
module including the RS-485 communications plug.
6. Disconnect the oil pressure and head temperature
harness from the compressor.
7. Remove side cover and control module mounting
nuts (6x).
8. Remove the side cover and control module as an
assembly to access the high and low pressure
controls.
9. Unplug leads to high and low pressure switches,
and unloaders (if present).
10. Lift off terminal box with the wiring harness
attached.
11. Remove the compressor from the rack using proper
tools and procedures to assure safety, and to
prevent damage to the rack or other compressors.
AE8-1368 R2
Figure 7.5
6D CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 Assembly Reference Drawing
14.0 Installation of the compressor (6D)
1. Mount the new compressor in the rack, lifting
and maneuvering the compressor in a manner to
prevent personal injury and damage to the other
compressors on the rack.
2. Transfer the temperature sensor and pressure
control fittings to the head and body of the new
compressor. Use of a thread sealing compound is
recommended.
3. Install high pressure cutout switch (RED DOT
- 360 psi) on the head, and low pressure cutout
switch (WHITE DOT - 3 psi) on the compressor
body. Double Check Positions!
4. Install the terminal box on the compressor. Secure
to the compressor using the four anchor screws.
5. Inside the terminal box
• Connect compressor power terminal lugs
• Connect terminal box grounding strap
• Connect motor sensor leads
• Connect the compressor voltage sensing leads
6. Reconnect the pressure controls to wiring harness
(HPCO-RED leads and LPCO-BLUE leads).
7. Reinstall the side cover and control module as an
assembly. Fasten to compressor with mounting
nuts (6x).
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
62
Figure 7.6 – 6D Terminal Box Connections
8. Reconnect all plugs at the control module including
the RS-485 communications plug.
9. Reconnect the harness to the oil pressure sensor.
10. Reconnect the harness to the head temperature
probe and unloaders (if present).
11. Replace the terminal box cover and secure with
two screws.
12. Reinstall the control module access cover and
secure with two screws.
13. Apply power to the compressor and CoreSense
Diagnostics modules.
AE8-1368 R2
Appendix A
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
63
AE8-1368 R2
ACROSS THE LINE CONNECTED
PART WINDING START CONNECTED
LINE VOLTAGE
400-460
02
01
03
ACROSS THE LINE CONNECTED
LINE VOLTAGE
200-240
CONTROL CIRCUIT
VOLTAGE
01 02 03
01 02 03
L1 L2 L3
L1 L2 L3
T1 T2 T3
C1
T1 T2 T3
C2
LINE VOLTAGE
200-240
02
01
C1
03
TD
1
2
3
7
8
9
5
6
4
C2
1
2
3
7
8
9
1
2
3
7
8
9
052-2435-00 02/09
TD
CONTROLS
CONTACTOR
CONTROL CIRCUIT
4
WIRING DIAGRAM
5
4
5
6
120/240 VAC
INPUT
CONTROL MODULE COMM
CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
EXTERNAL POWER SUPPLY
24 VAC
OUTPUT
ELECTRICAL SYMBOL
LEGEND
CONTACTOR COIL
C1
MODULE POWER 24 VAC
NORMALLY OPEN TIME
CLOSED CONTACT
CCH
POWER
COMPRESSOR
WIRING
HARNESS
T1
T2
T3
T7
T8
T9
6
NORMALLY OPEN
CONTACTOR CONTACTS
CCH
MAX ONE SECOND
TIME DELAY
TD
BLACK
WHITE
WHITE
CONTROL CONTACTS
SHOWN CLOSED
CURRENT
SENSOR 2
PWS ONLY
L7
L8
L9
CURRENT
SENSOR 1
L1
L2
L3
BLACK
WHITE
CURRENT SENSING
CONTACTORS
WHEN CHECKING MOTOR PROTECTION SYSTEM:
MODULE POWER MUST BE DISCONNECTED BEFORE CHECKING MOTOR
SENSORS.
USE OHMMETER ONLY TO CHECK SENSOR RESISTANCE.
DO NOT SHORT ACROSS THE TERMINALS.
SENSOR RESISTANCE MEASURED FROM TERMINALS (C TO S1,S2,S3)
WITH MOTOR TEMPERATURE BELOW 60° C (140° F), SHOULD BE
WITHIN THE FOLLOWING LIMITS: 30 TO 2400 OHMS.
REFER TO EMERSON AE BULLETIN #10-1264.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
1
2
3
7
8
9
4
5
6
USE COPPER CONDUCTORS ONLY.
USE MINIMUM 75° C (167° F) WIRE FOR AMPACITY DETERMINATION.
USE THIS EQUIPMENT ON A GROUNDED SYSTEM ONLY.
PRIMARY SINGLE PHASE FAILURE PROTECTION IS PROVIDED.
OPTIONAL CRANKCASE HEATER, FAN OR CAPACITY CONTROL
VALVE(S) MUST BE CONNECTED ONLY TO THEIR RATED VOLTAGE.
OVERCURRENT PROTECTION DEVICE RATING AND TYPE MUST BE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH REGULATORY AGENCY END PRODUCT
APPROVALS - SEE SYSTEM NAMEPLATE.
64
MOTOR WINDING
CONNECTIONS
AE8-1368 R2
PART WINDING START CONNECTED
ACROSS THE LINE CONNECTED
LINE VOLTAGE
CONTROL CIRCUIT
VOLTAGE
01 02 03
01 02 03
L1 L2 L3
L1 L2 L3
T1 T2 T3
C1
T1 T2 T3
C2
LINE VOLTAGE
02
01
C1
03
TD
C2
1
2
3
7
8
9
1
2
3
7
8
9
052-2436-00 02/09
TD
CONTROLS
CONTACTOR
CONTROL CIRCUIT
WIRING DIAGRAM
120/240 VAC
INPUT
CONTROL MODULE COMM
CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
EXTERNAL POWER SUPPLY
24 VAC
OUTPUT
ELECTRICAL SYMBOL
LEGEND
C1
MODULE POWER 24 VAC
CCH
POWER
COMPRESSOR
WIRING
HARNESS
T1
T2
T3
T7
T8
T9
NORMALLY OPEN
CONTACTOR CONTACTS
CCH
TD
BLACK
WHITE
WHITE
CONTACTOR COIL
NORMALLY OPEN TIME
CLOSED CONTACT
MAX ONE SECOND
TIME DELAY
CONTROL CONTACTS
SHOWN CLOSED
CURRENT
SENSOR 2
PWS ONLY
L7
L8
L9
CURRENT
SENSOR 1
L1
L2
L3
BLACK
WHITE
CURRENT SENSING
CONTACTORS
WHEN CHECKING MOTOR PROTECTION SYSTEM:
MODULE POWER MUST BE DISCONNECTED BEFORE CHECKING MOTOR
SENSORS.
USE OHMMETER ONLY TO CHECK SENSOR RESISTANCE.
DO NOT SHORT ACROSS THE TERMINALS.
SENSOR RESISTANCE MEASURED FROM TERMINALS (C TO S1,S2,S3)
WITH MOTOR TEMPERATURE BELOW 60° C (140° F), SHOULD BE
WITHIN THE FOLLOWING LIMITS: 30 TO 2400 OHMS.
REFER TO EMERSON AE BULLETIN #10-1264.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
1
2
3
7
8
9
USE COPPER CONDUCTORS ONLY.
USE MINIMUM 75° C (167° F) WIRE FOR AMPACITY DETERMINATION.
USE THIS EQUIPMENT ON A GROUNDED SYSTEM ONLY.
PRIMARY SINGLE PHASE FAILURE PROTECTION IS PROVIDED.
OPTIONAL CRANKCASE HEATER, FAN OR CAPACITY CONTROL
VALVE(S) MUST BE CONNECTED ONLY TO THEIR RATED VOLTAGE.
OVERCURRENT PROTECTION DEVICE RATING AND TYPE MUST BE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH REGULATORY AGENCY END PRODUCT
APPROVALS - SEE SYSTEM NAMEPLATE.
65
MOTOR WINDING
CONNECTIONS
AE8-1368 R2
ACROSS THE LINE CONNECTED
MOTOR WINDING CONNECTIONS
LINE VOLTAGE
1
02
1
2
03
2
3
3
WIRING DIAGRAM
120/240 VAC
INPUT
CONTROL MODULE COMM
CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER
EXTERNAL POWER SUPPLY
24 VAC
OUTPUT
MODULE POWER 24 VAC
CCH
POWER
COMPRESSOR
WIRING
HARNESS
CCH
T1
T2
T3
BLACK
WHITE
WHITE
CURRENT
SENSOR 1
L1
L2
L3
BLACK
WHITE
CURRENT SENSING
CONTACTOR
USE COPPER CONDUCTORS ONLY.
WHEN CHECKING MOTOR PROTECTION SYSTEM:
USE MINIMUM 75° C (167° F) WIRE FOR AMPACITY DETERMINATION.
MODULE POWER MUST BE DISCONNECTED BEFORE CHECKING MOTOR
SENSORS.
USE THIS EQUIPMENT ON A GROUNDED SYSTEM ONLY.
PRIMARY SINGLE PHASE FAILURE PROTECTION IS PROVIDED.
USE OHMMETER ONLY TO CHECK SENSOR RESISTANCE.
DO NOT SHORT ACROSS THE TERMINALS.
OPTIONAL CRANKCASE HEATER, FAN OR CAPACITY CONTROL
VALVE(S) MUST BE CONNECTED ONLY TO THEIR RATED VOLTAGE.
SENSOR RESISTANCE MEASURED FROM TERMINALS (C TO S1,S2,S3)
WITH MOTOR TEMPERATURE BELOW 60° C (140° F), SHOULD BE
WITHIN THE FOLLOWING LIMITS: 30 TO 2400 OHMS.
REFER TO EMERSON AE BULLETIN #10-1264.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
OVERCURRENT PROTECTION DEVICE RATING AND TYPE MUST BE
IN ACCORDANCE WITH REGULATORY AGENCY END PRODUCT
APPROVALS - SEE SYSTEM NAMEPLATE.
66
052-2437-00 02/09
01
AE8-1368 R2
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
67
AE8-1368 R2
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
68
AE8-1368 R2
Appendix B
v
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
69
AE8-1368 R2
Appendix C
Transformer Selection And Contactor Control
Power requirements for controlling CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 compressor operation must be
provided by a Class 2 24VAC transformer. This voltage is used for powering the CoreSense Diagnostics
v2.11 module, crankcase heater relay, unloaders, pilot duty relay or contactor coil. This voltage can be used
for contactor coils providing the total load on the class 2 transformer does not exceed 100VA. When the
loading on a class 2 transformer exceeds 100VA, it will be necessary to use a pilot duty relay which meets
the electrical and mechanical characteristics to adequately carry the required loading. Transformer loading
should be evaluated from both the Steady State/Continuous/Sealed, and Inrush VA’s published by the
manufacturer. It is recommended that pilot duty relays be used when NEMA contactors are specified for the
compressor.
In selecting the VA of the class 2 transformer, the total load characteristics of the circuit must be evaluated.
These are the total steady state, (sealed) VA, and the total inrush VA of all the devices the transformer will
be operating at any given time. Table C-1 shows the steady state and inrush VA’s for devices such as:
CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 control and sensor modules, crankcase heater relay, pilot duty relay and
unloader. If other devices than this are used, steady state and inrush VA must also be considered in the
transformer selection. The device manufacturers should provide this information.
The 5 steps for selecting the transformer are:
1. Determine your primary and secondary voltage requirements, as well as the supply frequency i.e. 60hz,
50 hz.
2. Determine the inrush and sealed VA of all components (including lights, etc.) that might be in thecircuit.
3. Determine the sum of all sealed VA values.
4. Determine the transformer total inrush VA by summing the component sealed VA and inrush VA.
Total Inrush VA = Σ Sealed VA + Σ Inrush VA
5. Take the sealed VA value from step (3) and the total inrush value from step (4).Refer to the transformer
regulation table, using the 95% secondary voltage with a 40% power factor.Select a nameplate VA rating
that satisfies both the sealed VA and the total inrush VA of the transformer.
Table C-1
(Device Inrush And Sealed VA’s)
Device
VA Inrush
VA Sealed
CoreSense Diagnostics Modules
3.78
3.78
Crankcase Heater Relay
.96
.96
**Pilot Duty Relay
24
10
37.4
18
*Unloader (One)
*6D compressors may use 2 unloaders
** Stancor Type 91 Relay PN 91-901
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
70
AE8-1368 R2
Table C-2 shows the recommended class 2 transformer for individual compressor models for CoreSense
Diagnostics v2.11 applications when a pilot duty relay is used.
Table C-2
(Recommended Minimum Class 2 Transformers for Compressor Models
Using a Stancor Pilot Duty Relay)
Class 2 Transformer Size
Model
VA Inrush
VA Sealed
CoreSense Diagnostics
v2.11 With Pilot Duty Relay
2D
27.78
13.78
40VA
3D No Unloader
27.28
13.78
40VA
3D One Unloader
65.18
31.78
40VA
4D No Unloader
27.78
13.78
40VA
4D One Unloader
65.18
31.78
40VA
6D No Unloader
27.78
13.78
40VA
6D One Unloader
65.18
31.78
40VA
*6D Two Unloaders
102.58
49.78
75VA
Example of transformer size calculation:
Using Formula A, transformer regulation Table C-5, and a 3D compressor with one unloader, calculate the
total inrush VA and steady state VA for devices that will be powered. Refer to Table C3 for VA values.
This compressor will have inrush and sealed VA’s for the following devices:
Table C-3
Inrush VA
Sealed VA
CoreSense Diagnostics Modules
3.78 VA
3.78 VA
Pilot Duty Relay
24 VA
10 VA
One Unloader
37.4 VA
18 VA
Total Inrush VA
65.18 VA
31.78 VA
Formula A
TOTAL INRUSH VA = Σ VA sealed + ΣVA inrush
TOTAL INRUSH = 96.96 VA (This is the value used for inrush @ 40% PF and 95% secondary voltage)
Next, refer to the transformer regulation Table C-5, and select a transformer for the total sealed VA. This is
a 40VA transformer. Using the column 95% secondary column ensure that the inrush VA is
greater than that calculated above, (72.5 VA). As seen from this transformer regulation table, a 40VA
transformer is sufficient to handle the calculated sealed VA as well as the total inrush VA.
NOTE: The transformer regulation table shown here is just a guide for these calculation. The transformer
manufacturer can supply a specific transformer regulation table for their product and should be used in
determining transformer size.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
71
AE8-1368 R2
Example of transformer size calculation when contactor is directly powered by the class 2 transformer:
Again, use the same 3D example with one unloader, calculate the total inrush VA and steady state VA for
devices that will be powered. Refer to Table C-4 for VA values. The contactor selected for this example is a
Square D NEMA size 00. The contactor specification indicates 33 VA sealed and 165 VA inrush. Direct
control eliminates the use of a pilot duty
Table C-4
Inrush VA
Sealed VA
CoreSense Diagnostics Modules
3.78 VA
3.78 VA
One Unloader
37.4 VA
18 VA
Nema 00 Contactor
165 VA
33 VA
206.18 VA
54.78 Va
Total VA
Formula A
TOTAL INRUSH VA = Σ VA sealed + Σ VA inrush
TOTAL INRUSH VA = 260.96 VA (Use this inrush value for transformer selection)
From transformer regulation Table C-5, select a transformer greater that the sealed VA of 54.78 VA. This
would be a 60 VA transformer and the inrush is 250 VA, which is greater than the 206.18 calculated above.
We would therefore select a 75 VA transformer from this table to satisfy the sealed and inrush VA’s for this
example.
When contactors are powered directly by the class 2 transformer, it is essential to use the manufacturer
inrush and sealed VA values for the selected contactor because these can vary by a significant amount.
This is true when using a Definite Purpose Contactor or a NEMA style contactor from different manufactures.
Keep in mind, you cannot exceed 100VA sealed and stay within the UL guidelines for class 2 circuits.
A wire size Table C-6 is also provided as a reference, actual wire size specified must conform to local and
NEC (National Electrical Code)
Transformer Regulation Table C-5
(Consult Transformer Manufacturer For The Particular Product/Brand)
24 VAC Class 2 Transformer Data
Transformer Regulation Data
Stancor/White Rodgers
Part Number
Continuous VA
Transformer Nameplate
Inrush VA @ 40% Power Factor
95% Secondary Voltage
T40-24F3 / 90-T40F3
40
160
T50-24C3 / 90-T50C3
50
205
T60-24C3 / 90-T60C3
60
250
T75-24C3 / 90-T75C3
75
325
T100-24C2 / 90-T100C2
100
450
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
72
AE8-1368 R2
Example Of Determining Wire Length:
25 FT
Contactor
Transformer
TOTAL LENGTH OF WIRE = 4 STRANDS X 25 FT
TOTAL LENGTH OF WIRE = 100 FT
Table C-6
Wire Sizing
Recommended Secondary (24V) Minimum American Wire Size (AWG)
These Sizes Will Keep Voltage Drops To Less Than One Volt With XFMR Producing Rated Current
Continuous
VA XFMR
Nameplate
25 Linear Ft.
Wire Size
AWG
50 Linear Ft.
Wire Size
AWG
75 Linear Ft.
Wire Size
AWG
100 Linear Ft.
Wire Size
AWG
40
18
18
18
14
50
18
18
16
14
60
18
18
16
14
75
18
16
16
12
100
18
16
14
12
• Wire size shown in this table is suggested when contactor coil is powered by the 24 volt CoreSense
Diagnostics v2.11 module.
NOTE: For reliability, Emerson recommends that the temperature class of the transformer be a minimum of
CLASS B (130 degrees C) (Ambient + Internal Temperature) In addition, it is recommended that Inrush VA
at 40% power factor use the 95% Secondary voltage. This accounts for a 10% variance in the supply
voltage. If at all possible, the primary transformer should be wired for 208/230 volts or higher to reduce
voltage droop on the secondary due to higher currents and resulting voltage drops. Adequate ventilation is
required to ensure that ambient and internal temperatures do not exceed the temperature class of the
transformer, and that sufficient mounting hardware be used to support the weight.
Pilot Duty Relays:
Relays are available in many sizes and configurations having high mechanical and electrical reliability along
with manageable cost. Like transformers, relays are sized according to their Steady State/Continuous and
Inrush VA’s published by the manufacturer.
Some of the benefits of using a pilot duty relay would be lower transformer cost due to lower VA and system
wire size. Care should be given to NEMA style contactors with 24V coils because total VA can be exceeded
in class 2 circuits quickly because of the high inrush VA and sealed VA associated with them. Pilot duty
relays can be advantageous in these situations by transferring system voltage and current to these higher
power devices. It is recommended that a pilot duty relay be used with any NEMA contactor.
Relays such as Stancor 91-901 DPDT or 184-912 SPNO have been used with success in applications
where transformer loading exceeded 100VA and a pilot duty relay was required.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
73
AE8-1368 R2
Wiring schematic showing the use of a pilot duty relay to control contactor with system voltage and/or 24 volt
direct control of contactor from CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11 module:
Figure C-1
Using Pilot Duty Relay
for Contactor Coil
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Figure C-2
Using Direct 24 Volt Control
for Contactor Coil
74
AE8-1368 R2
Appendix D
Dielectric Test (Hi-Pot), Megger, of Copeland Discus Compressors with CoreSense Diagnostics
Fitted with Sensors and Control Module. (4 & 6 D Models)
WARNING:
Performing Hi Voltage test to a compressor must be performed by an experienced and qualified
individual. Hi Voltage is dangerous and could result in severe damage to equipment, personal
injuries, or death. Follow all specifications, local and national codes, and procedures when
performing Hi Voltage test.
Steps to follow:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Ensure power to compressor and other associated electrical devices is off.
Ensure that compressor body is grounded.
Ensure that compressor is not in a vacuum.
Inside the compressor terminal box, remove the (4) sensor leads from the sensor terminalboard.
(1 black and 3 orange) insulate the terminals on these 4 leads to prevent accidentalcontact with Hi
Voltage.
5. Short the (4) sensor terminal post and connect to a good ground.
6. Apply the proper Hi Pot Voltage from each of the motor power terminals to ground. Never applyHi
Pot Voltage across motor power terminals.
For compressors using line break protection, (2 & 3D), follow steps 1, 2, 3, & 6 above.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
75
AE8-1368 R2
Appendix E
2D Drawing With Demand Cooling
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
76
AE8-1368 R2
3D Drawing With Demand Cooling
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
77
AE8-1368 R2
4D Drawing With Demand Cooling
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
78
AE8-1368 R2
6D Drawing With Demand Cooling
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
79
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
80
brand products
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE
THIS DRAWING AND INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN ARE THE EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY OF
EMERSON CLIMATE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. AND SHALL BE RETURNED UPON DEMAND AND SHALL NOT BE
REPRODUCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART TO ANYONE ELSE OR USED,
WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF EMERSON CLIMATE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
AE8-1368 R2
2D Compressor Drawing
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
81
brand products
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE
THIS DRAWING AND INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN ARE THE EXCLUSIVE PROPERTY OF
EMERSON CLIMATE TECHNOLOGIES, INC. AND SHALL BE RETURNED UPON DEMAND AND SHALL NOT BE
REPRODUCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART TO ANYONE ELSE OR USED,
WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF EMERSON CLIMATE TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
AE8-1368 R2
3D Compressor Drawing
AE8-1368 R2
4D Compressor Drawing
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
82
AE8-1368 R2
6D Compressor Drawing
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
83
AE8-1368 R2
Appendix F
Technical Support
For technical support or assistance in resolving issues with the Copeland Discus compressor with CoreSense
Diagnostics, contact the Emerson Retail Solutions support line. The contact number is (770)-425-2724.
Emerson Retail Solutions does not provide parts support. Contact your Emerson Climate Technologies Wholesaler
for service parts.
Appendix G
CoreSense Diagnostics Service Parts List
Kit Part Number
Description
Model
980-0074-00
Module Upgrade Kit; Conversion of ISD v2.0 to CoreSense Diagnostics v2.11
All
917-0001-00
Nyogel Kit; Connector Lubricant for discharge temperature probe
All
943-0013-02
Control Module Kit
All
943-0062-02
Sensor Module Kit
All
929-0067-00
Electrical Assembly Harness Kit
943-0064-00
Current Sensor Kit
976-0003-00
Conduit-Wire Assembly Kit
2D/3D
918-0028-11
Crankcase Heater Kit (240V)
2D/3D
918-0028-17
Crankcase Heater Kit (240V)
4D/6D
923-0073-00
Unloader Coil Kit (Moduload and Blocked Suction)
3D/4D/6D
923-0084-00
Digital Unloader Coil Kit (24VAC)
3D/4D/6D
929-0071-00
Oil Pressure Harness Kit
All
985-0109-07
Temperature Probe Sensor Kit
All
985-0125-00
High Pressure Switch (Cut-out: 375 Cut-in: 265)
All
985-0125-04
High Pressure Switch (Cut-out: 550 Cut-in: 450) for R410A
All
985-0183-01
Low Pressure Switch (White Dot; Cut-out: 3 Cut-in: 12)
All
985-0125-02
Low Pressure Switch (White Dot; Cut-out: -2 Cut-in: 8) for R407A/R407C
All
998-0326-00
Moduload Valve Kit (without coil)
3D
998-0212-00
Unloader Valve Kit (without coil; NON-digital)
910-0111-00
Digital Unloader Valve Kit (without coil)
4D/6D
All
Kit Part Number
Description
4D/6D
3D/4D/6D
Model
910-0351-00
2D Demand Cooling Valve kit (valve only)
2D
910-0351-02
3D Demand Cooling Valve kit (valve only)
3D
910-0351-03
4D Demand Cooling Valve kit (valve only)
4D
910-0356-00
6D Demand Cooling Valve kit (valve only)
6D
910-0351-04
6D Demand Cooling Valve Assembly kit (valve, tube assembly and coil)
6D
910-0069-00
Demand Cooling Coil Kit (24VAC)
All
The contents of this publication are presented for informational purposes only and are not to be construed as warranties or guarantees, express or implied, regarding the products or
services described herein or their use or applicability. Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc. and/or its affiliates (collectively "Emerson"), as applicable, reserve the right to modify the design or
specifications of such products at any time without notice. Emerson does not assume responsibility for the selection, use or maintenance of any product. Responsibility for proper selection,
use and maintenance of any Emerson product remains solely with the purchaser or end user.
© 2012 Emerson Climate Technologies, Inc.
Printed in the U.S.A.
84
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