NS 30000/iX Operations and Maintenance Reference Manual

NS 30000/iX Operations and Maintenance Reference Manual
NS 3000/iX Operations and Maintenance
Reference Manual
HP e3000 MPE/iX Computer Systems
Edition 8
Manufacturing Part Number: 36922-90042
E0801
U.S.A. August, 2001
Notice
The information contained in this document is subject to change
without notice.
Hewlett-Packard makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this
material, including, but not limited to, the implied warranties of
merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard
shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for direct, indirect,
special, incidental or consequential damages in connection with the
furnishing or use of this material.
Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of
its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard.
This document contains proprietary information which is protected by
copyright. All rights reserved. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation
without prior written permission is prohibited, except as allowed under
the copyright laws.
Restricted Rights Legend
Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to
restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) of the Rights in
Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.
Rights for non-DOD U.S. Government Departments and Agencies are
as set forth in FAR 52.227-19 (c) (1,2).
Acknowledgments
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.
Hewlett-Packard Company
3000 Hanover Street
Palo Alto, CA 94304 U.S.A.
© Copyright 1988–1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1998 and 2001 by
Hewlett-Packard Company
Contents
1. Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Creating Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Creation Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The NS 3000/iX Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Your Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Obtaining Information About Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Troubleshooting Process Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2. Operating Your Network
Starting Links and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start a Network Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start a Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start a Host-Based X.25 Link. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start Network Loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Start Network Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Verifying Network Connections and Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Check the Network Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
XPVAL Line Test Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Message Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Packet Verification Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Send and Receive Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Socket Creation Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checksum Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Miscellaneous Test Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Test Suggestions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Validate Network Services in Batch Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Validate Network Services Interactively . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Test RDBA Using NSTEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping Links and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stop Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stop a Single Network Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stop All Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Abort Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stop Network Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stop a Single Network Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stop All Network Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stop a Host-Based X.25 Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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3. Getting Information About the Network
Verifying Software Versions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
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Verify Version of Data Communications Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Verify Version of Network Transport Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Verify Version of Network Services Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
Displaying Configuration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Display Local Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Display Link Configuration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Display Network Directory Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Displaying Status Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Display Link Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Display Network Transport Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Display General Transport Status. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Display Status of a NET. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Display Status of an NI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Display Protocol Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Display Network Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Display Active Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Display Active Users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Display Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Displaying Network Performance Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Monitor Round Trip Response Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Monitor Resource Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Get a One-Line Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Get a Detailed Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Measure Network Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
Displaying Connection Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Run PING from the Command Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Stopping PING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Error and Information Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
User Input Errors (Menu-Driven) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
User Input Errors (Command-Line) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51
Networking Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52
Internal Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Displaying X.25 Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Verify X.25 Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Monitor X.25 Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Logging and Tracing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Logging Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
Tracing Facility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
Trace Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56
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Format Log and Trace Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Format X.25 Log Files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4. Troubleshooting Process
Identifying Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Characterize the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Identify the Cause of Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5. Common Network Problems
Interactive or Programmatic Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Command Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Line Opening Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Line Closing Errors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NMS Utility Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nodal Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Recent Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigate the Link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, 100Base-T Link Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NS Point-to-Point 3000/iX Link Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DTC/X.25 iX Network Link Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investigate the Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Common Problems and Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Invalid Software Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MPE/iX Configuration Incorrect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Insufficient MPE/iX Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corrupt Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corrupt Network Directory File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Incompatible Configuration File Version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Insufficient Configuration File Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retransmission Timeout Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetIPC Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetIPC Shutdown Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Transport Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6. Using NETTOOL
NETTOOL Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Types of Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Core Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Associated Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User Provided Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Available Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Using NETTOOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Running NETTOOL Interactively. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Getting Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
Using Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Global Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Running NETTOOL in Batch Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Using the NETTOOL Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
CONFIGURATION SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87
Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
IPCINT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
LOOPINIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89
NAME-ADDRESS MANAGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
NMDUMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
NSTEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
NSLOGON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94
PING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94
QVALNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
RESOURCE MONITOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
SOCKINFO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
STATUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
X25CHECK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
X25STAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101
XPPERF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102
XPVAL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103
Adding Your Own Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Add User Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104
Add User Provided Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105
7. Commands
LINKCONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Example 1: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
Example 2: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112
NETCONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
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Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NETCONTROL ADDLINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NETCONTROL DELLINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NETCONTROL START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NETCONTROL STATUS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NETCONTROL STOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NETCONTROL TRACEON and TRACEOFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
116
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118
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119
119
119
120
120
121
121
121
122
122
123
123
124
124
125
126
126
126
128
128
128
129
130
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132
132
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135
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Contents
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .139
NETCONTROL UPDATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .140
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142
NETCONTROL VERSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .144
NSCONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147
NSCONTROL ABORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149
NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151
NSCONTROL LOADKEYS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
NSCONTROL LOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
NSCONTROL SERVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157
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Contents
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NSCONTROL START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NSCONTROL STATUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NSCONTROL STOP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NSCONTROL VERSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Example 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RESUMENMLOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SHOWNMLOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SWITCHNMLOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
158
158
159
159
159
160
161
161
162
163
163
163
163
164
164
165
166
166
167
167
167
169
169
169
170
170
170
170
170
171
172
172
172
172
173
173
173
173
174
174
174
174
9
Contents
Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .175
A. LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAP-B Link Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .178
STATISTICS Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .181
RESET Parameter Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
ALL Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183
NS 3000/iX LAN Link Statistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .184
STATISTICS Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186
NS 3000/iX IEEE 802.5/Token Ring Link Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192
STATISTICS Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .193
NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194
STATISTICS Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .195
ALL Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
DIAGNOSTIC Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .196
Flag Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .198
NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
STATISTICS Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201
NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208
STATISTICS Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .219
STATISTICS Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .222
RESET Parameter Fields. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
ALL Parameter Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225
B. Submitting an CR
10
Figures
Figure 4-1. Characterizing the Problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Figure 7-1. The NETCONTROL Entities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
11
Figures
12
Tables
Table 1-1. Tools for Obtaining Network Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Table 5-1. Nodal Troubleshooting Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Table 6-1. Differences in Tool Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Table 6-2. The NETTOOL Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Table 7-1. NS 3000/iX Network Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Table 7-2. NETCONTROL Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
13
Tables
14
Preface
Network Services for MPE/iX based systems are provided by an HP
data communications product named NS 3000/iX. This manual
describes the system-level commands and utilities used to perform
network operations, maintenance, and troubleshooting after the initial
network configuration.
NS 3000/iX enables your HP e3000 to communicate with other HP
computer systems as part of a distributed network. These systems can
be other HP e3000s, HP 9000s, HP 1000s, and PCs. Networks operating
over NS 3000/iX links can be interconnected. When two or more
networks are connected in this manner, the resulting network is called
an internetwork. A network or internetwork can be created using one of
the following NS 3000/iX links:
• NS Point-to-Point 3000/iX Link
• X.25 iX System Access
• ThinLAN 3000/iX Link (includes the ThickLAN option for coaxial
cable) and EtherTwist option for twisted-pair wiring.
• Token Ring/iX Link
• Fiber Distributed Data Interface/iX Link
• HP-PB 100VG-AnyLAN Network Adapter
• HP-PB 100Base-T Network Adapter
Special Note
MPE/iX, Multiprogramming Executive with Integrated POSIX, is the
latest in a series of forward-compatible operating systems for the
HP e3000 line of computers.
In HP documentation and in talking with HP e3000 users, you will
encounter references to MPE XL, the direct predecessor of MPE/iX.
MPE/iX is a superset of MPE XL. All programs written for MPE XL will
run without change under MPE/iX. You can continue to use MPE XL
system documentation, although it may not refer to features added to
the operating system to support POSIX (for example, hierarchical
directories).
Intended
This manual is intended for those with data communications
Audience of this experience. Also required is knowledge of the MPE/iX operating system
Manual
at the system supervisor level, and a familiarity with the SYSGEN
dialogue, resource management, and console commands.
Organization of
the Manual
You can use this manual as either a command reference or a user’s
guide, depending on your needs. It contains the following sections:
• Chapter 1 , “Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations,” provides a general
15
description of the operations and maintenance functions required for
your NS network. It includes a table that can help you determine
which tool to use to obtain specific information about your network.
• Chapter 2 , “Operating Your Network,” provides step-by-step
instructions for starting and stopping network links and services
and for verifying network connections and services.
• Chapter 3 , “Getting Information About the Network,” provides
step-by-step instructions for obtaining information about software
version numbers, network configuration, link status, network status,
Network Services status, and network performance.
• Chapter 4 , “Troubleshooting Process,” provides a generalized
problem-solving strategy for identifying problems with the network’s
operation.
• Chapter 5 , “Common Network Problems,” provides strategies for
dealing with interactive or programmatic problems, command
errors, nodal problems, link problems, and software problems.
• Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” describes the NETTOOL diagnostic
utility and provides step-by-step instructions for using each of the
available diagnostics within NETTOOL.
• Chapter 7 , “Commands,” describes the MPE/iX commands for
NS 3000/iX link products.
• Appendix A , “LINKCONTROL Command,” defines the fields output
by the LINKCONTROL STATUS command and its associated
parameters.
• Appendix B , “Submitting an CR,” describes how to submit a Change
Request (CR) and forward it to your HP Service Representative.
Related
Publications
The following manuals may be of interest to you when working with the
NS 3000/iX network services and link products:
For the NS 3000/iX Links
• HP e3000/iX Network Planning and Configuration Guide
• Configuring and Managing Host-Based X.25 Links
• Using the Node Management Services (NMS) Utilities
• NS 3000/iX NMMGR Screens Reference Manual
• HP SNMP/XL User’s Guide
• Berkeley Sockets/iX Reference Manual
• NetIPC 3000/XL Programmer’s Reference Manual
• HP36923A LAN 3000/iX Link and Terminal LAN Link Hardware
Reference Manual
16
• LAN Cable and Accessories Installation Manual
• Central Bus Programmable Serial Interface Installation and
Reference Guide
• HP 28663A EtherTwist Hub Installation Guide
For the NS 3000/iX Services
• Using NS 3000/iX Network Services
For Either the NS 3000/iX Links or Services
• NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual
For the Distributed Terminal Subsystem (DTS)
• Configuring Systems for Terminals, Printers, and Other Serial
Devices
• Using the OpenView DTC Manager
17
18
1
Overview of NS 3000/iX
Operations
In the daily operations of the NS 3000/iX network communications
products, you will need to perform a number of management tasks.
These tasks include starting and stopping Network Services or links,
verifying network connections, obtaining status information, and
troubleshooting problems that might occur on the network.
Hewlett-Packard provides a number of tools to help you in performing
these functions. The tools are included with the networking software
and their use is detailed in this manual.
This chapter provides an overview of the normal operations and
maintenance functions required for your NS network. It includes
general information on the following topics:
• Creating your network.
• Operating your network.
• Obtaining information about your network.
• Troubleshooting your network.
19
Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Creating Your Network
Creating Your Network
This manual assumes that you have a functional network with at least
one NS 3000/iX link properly configured to allow data communications
to occur between systems. If you have not yet created your network, or
if you need to make modifications to your network configuration, you
will need to use the HP e3000/iX Network Planning and Configuration
Guide. An overview of the procedures required to plan and configure
the network is provided below.
Network Creation Overview
1. Check that the hardware components required for NS 3000/iX have
been installed and verified according to the procedures in the
hardware installation manuals listed in the preface of this manual.
2. Use the software verification procedures described in this manual to
check that the data communications software has been installed
properly.
3. Plan your network configuration by filling out the worksheets
provided in the HP e3000/iX Network Planning and Configuration
Guide.
4. Configure the transport and links by using the NMMGR.PUB.SYS
utility to update the configuration file and, if required, the network
directory file.
5. Validate the network transport to check for consistency of
configuration values.
6. Cross-validate the NMMGR configuration file with the system
configuration files within SYSGEN.
20
Chapter 1
Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Creating Your Network
The NS 3000/iX Products
An NS 3000/iX network consists of one or more of the available
NS 3000/iX link products configured to allow communications between
systems (nodes) on the network. The Network Services are available to
allow users to perform applications across the network.
Your network will include one or more of the following link products:
• ThinLAN 3000/iX Link. Supports IEEE802.3/Ethernet LAN
connections.
• Token Ring/iX. Supports IEEE802.5 token ring LAN connections.
• NS Point-to-Point Network Link/iX. Supports LAP-B connections
over leased lines or switched auto-dial lines.
• X.25 iX System Access. Supports connections to X.25 public or
private data networks.
• Fiber Distributed Data Interface/iX. Provides a single-attach
connection to an FDDI network through an FDDI concentrator.
• HP-PB 100VG-AnyLAN Network Adapter. Connects an
HP e3000 computer using the HP-PB backplane to a
100VG-AnyLAN network.
• HP-PB 100Base-T Network Adapter. Connects an HP e3000
computer using the HP-PB backplane to a 100Base-T network.
The following Network Services are available to run over the
NS 3000/iX link products:
• Virtual Terminal (VT). Creates an interactive session on another
system in the network. Multiple concurrent sessions are possible.
• Remote File Access (RFA). Allows I/O operations to files and
devices on remote systems.
• Remote DataBase Access (RDBA). Allows access to turboIMAGE
databases on remote nodes.
• Network File Transfer (NFT). Allows transfer of files from one
node to another.
• Remote Process Management (RPM). Allows the creation and
termination of processes on remote nodes.
Chapter 1
21
Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Operating Your Network
Operating Your Network
You perform most of the daily operations required by the NS network
through the use of the provided NS 3000/iX network commands.
Complete information on the syntax and function of all the commands
is contained in Chapter 7 , “Commands,” of this manual.
The NETCONTROL START command allows you to initiate the network
transport as well as the individual networks on an active transport.
The NETCONTROL STOP command allows you to stop an individual NI or
all active entities of the network transport.
To start and stop the Network Services after the network is started, you
use the NSCONTROL START and NSCONTROL STOP commands. The
NSCONTROL ABORT command is useful when you need to terminate
services immediately.
See Chapter 2 , “Operating Your Network,” for step-by-step instructions
for using these commands.
22
Chapter 1
Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Obtaining Information About Network
Obtaining Information About Network
You may need to obtain many different kinds of information about your
network and its operations. This information ranges from the version
numbers of the software modules you are running to complete
statistical summaries of events that are taking place on a specific link.
The tools and commands that are available to help you obtain the
various types of information are summarized in Table 1-1. Once you
have determined which command or tool you need to use, you can refer
to the detailed information about that tool in a later chapter of this
manual.
Table 1-1
Tools for Obtaining Network Information
To Get Information About...
Use...
Refer to...
Active log file
SHOWNMLOG
Chapter 7
Active Network Services
NSCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
Active NIs
NETCONTROL STATUS
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 3, 6
Buffers
NETCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 3, 6
Configuration
CONFIGURATION
SUMMARY NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 6
Configuration (link)
LINKCONTROL
Chapter 3, 7
Configuration (network interface)
NETCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
Control requests
LINKCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Devices
NETCONTROL STATUS
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 7
Chapter 6
Exception requests
LINKCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Header data
NETCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Home network
NETCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
Linkname
LINKCONTROL
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Link statistics
LINKCONTROL
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Link type
LINKCONTROL
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Chapter 1
23
Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Obtaining Information About Network
Table 1-1
Tools for Obtaining Network Information
To Get Information About...
Use...
Refer to...
Log file
SHOWNMLOG
Chapter 7
Messages
NETCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 6
Network interface type
NETCONTROL STATUS
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Network directory
CONFIGURATION
SUMMARY NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 6
Network Services
NSCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
Network Services events
NSCONTROL LOG
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 7
Chapter 6
Network Services servers
NSCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
Network Services users
NSCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
NI protocols
NETCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
NI start and stop times
NETCONTROL STATUS
Chapter 3, 7
Nodal management events
NETCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Node name
NETCONTROL STATUS
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Number of bytes transmitted
LINKCONTROL
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 7
Chapter 6
Number of frames transmitted
LINKCONTROL
Chapter 7
Performance
X25CHECK
PING
LOOPINIT
RESOURCE MONITOR
XPPERF
Chapter 3, 6
Chapter 3, 6
Chapter 3, 6
Chapter 6
Chapter 6
Protocol Statistics
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 6
Read and write requests
LINKCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Round trip response times
LOOPINIT NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
State transitions
NETCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Status requests
LINKCONTROL TRACE
NMDUMP NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
24
Chapter 1
Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Obtaining Information About Network
Table 1-1
Tools for Obtaining Network Information
To Get Information About...
Use...
Refer to...
Transmission errors
LINKCONTROL
STATUS NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 7
Chapter 6
Version numbers (network transport)
NETCONTROL VERSION
Chapter 3, 7
Version numbers (network services)
NSCONTROL VERSION
Chapter 3, 7
Version numbers (NMS)
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS
Chapter 3
X.25 connection response
X25CHECK NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 6
X.25 connection statistics
X25STAT NETTOOL
Chapter 3, 6
Chapter 1
25
Overview of NS 3000/iX Operations
Troubleshooting Network
Troubleshooting Network
From time to time you may experience problems on your network.
Often, you can easily diagnose and correct the problems without the
need to contact a Hewlett-Packard service representative. You may
choose to perform some troubleshooting operations on your own,
following the guidelines provided in this manual.
Troubleshooting Process Overview
When problems occur, it is helpful to follow a logical process of
characterizing and identifying the problem so that you can determine
the appropriate course of action to take. Chapter 4 , “Troubleshooting
Process,” of this manual suggests a process to follow when
troubleshooting problems with network connections.
Chapter 5 , “Common Network Problems,” summarizes most of the
common types of problems that might occur on your network. Once you
have identified the problem following the process described in Chapter
4 , “Troubleshooting Process,” use Chapter 5 , “Common Network
Problems,” as a guide to the actions you can take to resolve the problem.
If you are unable to identify or resolve a network problem using the
information provided in Chapter 4 , “Troubleshooting Process,” and
Chapter 5 , “Common Network Problems,” of this manual, consult your
Hewlett-Packard service representative.
Tools
Hewlett-Packard provides a range of tools to help you perform line
verification or run software or hardware diagnostics. You run most of
the network diagnostic tools using the NETTOOL utility. NETTOOL
provides a set of core functions and an interface for running software
and line verification tools that were run standalone on earlier versions
of MPE. Help information is available when you use NETTOOL. You can
also develop your own tools to run as part of the NETTOOL package.
See Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for a complete discussion of
NETTOOL and instructions for using each of the NETTOOL diagnostics.
26
Chapter 1
2
Operating Your Network
During normal operations of your network, you will need to do little
more than to start and stop the network links and services. You may
also need to verify a communications link or perform a quick validation
of a Network Service.
This chapter provides instructions for using the provided tools or
commands to perform the following operations:
• Start network links and services.
• Verify network connections and services.
• Stop network links and services.
27
Operating Your Network
Starting Links and Services
Starting Links and Services
You use the NETCONTROL START command to start the network links
and the NSCONTROL START command to start the Network Services. You
must start at least one link before you can start Network Services.
When you start the first link, the network transport is initiated as well.
The network transport is the software responsible for sending data
out over the appropriate communications links, receiving incoming
data, and routing incoming or outgoing data to the appropriate
destinations. It includes the general protocols and the network
interfaces.
Start a Network Link
You will need to issue a start command for each network interface (NI)
you want to activate. The NET and GATE keywords allow you to specify
the NI that you want to start. Use NET with the network interface name
associated with the link you want to initiate. Use GATE with the
network interface name of the gateway half you want to initiate.
The first NETCONTROL START command you enter will initiate the
network transport software, including the configured protocols. You can
initiate the network transport by itself by entering the NETCONTROL
START command without any keywords, but you will not be able to
communicate with any other nodes on the network.
The NETCONTROL START command requires NM capability.
Start a Link
Issue the following command to start an NS link:
NETCONTROL START;NET=NIname
The NIname is the network interface name that you configured through
NMMGR. Start other links as required by entering the command using the
appropriate NI names.
Start a Host-Based X.25 Link
If your network includes X.25 links and you are using host-based
network management, you will need to use the DTCCNTRL command
before you issue the NETCONTROL START command for the X.25 NI.
DTCCNTRL starts X.25 and PAD support for the DTC/X.25 Network
Access card. Issue the following command (System Operator capability
required):
DTCCNTRL DTC=dtcname;CARD=cardnumber;FUNC=function
28
Chapter 2
Operating Your Network
Starting Links and Services
where function is one of the following:
STARTX25
to start X.25 services;
STARTPADSUP to start PAD support services;
STARTBOTH
to start X.25 and PAD support services.
For more information on starting host-based X.25 links as well as other
uses of the DTCCNTRL command, see Configuring and Managing
Host-Based X.25 Links.
NOTE
If you are starting an X.25 link for a system using PC-based network
management or if you are not starting an X.25 link, you do not need to
use the DTCCNTRL command.
Start Network Loopback
You must start the loopback NI if you wish to perform local loopback or
to DSLINE to the local node. Enter the following command:
NETCONTROL START;NET=loopbackNIname
where loopbackNIname is the name configured for the loopback NI.
LOOP is the default name.
NOTE
If you use guided configuration to create any NI, a loopback network
interface, whose NI name is LOOP, is automatically generated.
Start Network Services
You can start all the available Network Services with a single
command, or you can start one or more individual services. To start all
Network Services enter the following command:
NSCONTROL START
To start one or more of the individual services, enter the command
followed by an equal sign and a list of the desired services, separated by
commas. For example, to start only Virtual Terminal and Reverse
Virtual Terminal for users on remote nodes, enter the following
command:
NSCONTROL START=VT,VTR
See Chapter 7 , “Commands,” for complete details on the use and
syntax of NETCONTROL START and NSCONTROL START.
Chapter 2
29
Operating Your Network
Verifying Network Connections and Services
Verifying Network Connections and Services
Several line verification tests are available to help you verify the
operation of NS 3000/iX services and link products.
NSLOGON establishes temporary connections to other nodes to verify
that the network transport is operating correctly between the two
nodes using the connection.
XPVAL is an interactive test that uses the NetIPC intrinsics to make
sure that the network transport is working correctly.
QVALNS and NSTEST both perform a quick validation of the Network
Services. QVALNS runs through a job while NSTEST runs interactively.
You can run all of these tests either standalone or through the NETTOOL
utility. Hewlett-Packard suggests that you run them through the
NETTOOL utility to take advantage of its facilities, including online help.
Check the Network Transport
Perform the following steps to use XPVAL to check the network
transport. (Note that you may also use NSLOGON to establish a
temporary connection between nodes to check the network services. See
Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for more information.)
1. Make sure the network transport is active on this node and on any
other node that will be a part of this test.
2. Run the NETTOOL utility by entering the program name:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
3. Enter XPVAL to run the transport validation.
4. XPVAL will run a local program (XPVALLOC) and will prompt you for
the information it needs to perform the validation. To check the local
transport, enter information about the local loopback NI.
5. To check the transport between the local node and a remote node,
make sure XPVAL is running on the remote node as well and enter
information about the remote node.
6. XPVAL will run a one minute connection test to verify the operation of
the transport and report any errors it encounters. See information
on the error messages.
30
Chapter 2
Operating Your Network
Verifying Network Connections and Services
XPVAL Line Test Error Messages
Error messages for the XPVAL line tests appear in inverse video at the
system console. Some errors allow the test to continue, so they may
scroll off the top of the terminal screen. Copy the error message
information for further diagnosis.
Error Message Categories
Errors from the XPVAL line tests fall into the following categories:
• Packet verification errors.
• Send and receive failures.
• Socket creation failures.
• Checksum errors.
• Miscellaneous errors.
Packet Verification Errors
Packet verification errors indicate problems with either the packet size
or the character received. Packet Verification Errors will not abort the
XPVAL line tests. Their error messages may scroll off the top of the
console terminal screen, preceding a “TCP TEST FAILED” or console
message. Packet verification errors are listed below:
MESSAGE: RECEIVE PACKET IS INCORRECT SIZE Expected nn
Bytes. Received mm Bytes.
CAUSE: Either message packet was partially lost, or “send” and
“receive” are not synchronized.
ACTION: Usually packets will resynchronize with the start of the next
segment of the test. However if errors continue for each packet, check
surrounding errors, then rerun the test. If problems continue, see
MESSAGE: RECEIVE PACKET NOT VERIFIED First Byte not verified
is: xx Should be: y, received: z.
CAUSE: Either byte in packet has changed (bit error) or packets are
unsynchronized.
ACTION: Usually packets will resynchronize with the start of the next
segment of the test.
However if errors continue for each packet, check surrounding errors,
then rerun the test. If problems continue, see Appendix B , “Submitting
an CR.”
Chapter 2
31
Operating Your Network
Verifying Network Connections and Services
Send and Receive Failures
Most Send and Receive failures are timing-related. They usually do not
abort the tests. Listed below are the Send and Receive failures which do
not abort the tests:
Send and Receive Errors
TCP MESSAGE RECEIVE FAILED Packet #
IPCSEND FAILED Packet #
DATA RECEIVE FAILED Packet #
Local}
1ST MASTER SEND FAILED
SEND FAILED Packet #
{Remote}
{Remote}
{Remote,
{Local}
{Local}
Summary Messages:
TCP TEST FAILED
LOCAL: SEND TO REMOTE FAILED
LOCAL: RECEIVE FROM REMOTE FAILED
LOCAL: SEND AND RECEIVE FAILED
REMOTE: RECEIVE FROM LOCAL FAILED
REMOTE: END TO LOCAL FAILED
REMOTE: RECEIVE AND SEND FAILED
Note the location in the program where the error occurred. For each
error, examine the SOCKERR numbers and the Protocol Module
numbers returned. Save the error information. Follow the “Actions” for
the Protocol Module or NetIPC SOCKERRs, both listed in the
NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual.
Socket Creation Failures
Socket creation failures and Network IPC Connection errors cause a
test to terminate. Listed below are Socket Errors which abort the tests:
Socket Errors
UNABLE TO CREATE SOCKET
CONNECTION REQUEST FAILED
RESPONSE TO CONNECTION FAILED
LOCAL IPCRECVCN FAILED
{Local & Remote}
{Remote}
{Remote}
{Local}
Following these errors on the console screen are a SOCKERR and a
Protocol Module error. Copy the error messages on the user and system
console terminals. Follow the “Action” for the SOCKERR and PM
errors, respectively listed in “Network Interprocess Communication
Errors” and “Network Transport Protocol Errors” in the NS 3000/iX
Error Messages Reference Manual.
Checksum Errors
The XPVAL software line tests enable checksum in the TCP protocol of
the network transport subsystem. “Checksum” errors may be returned
to either console. If “Checksum” errors appear along with “Send and
32
Chapter 2
Operating Your Network
Verifying Network Connections and Services
Receive failures” listed above, then your system may have hardware
link problems; see “Investigating the Link” in the NS 3000/iX Error
Messages Reference Manual.
Miscellaneous Test Errors
Certain errors may appear in all software line tests which do not fit in
the categories described above. They are listed here.
SOCKERR #
MESSAGE: PCERRMSG FAILED (SOCKERR #)
CAUSE: Error message could not be acquired from the message
catalogue SOCKCAT.NET.SYS.
ACTION: Ensure that the message catalog exists. Examine errors
returned to the console before and after this error.
SOCKERR #
MESSAGE: IPCSHUTDOWN FAILED
CAUSE: Socket could not be closed.
ACTION: Examine errors returned to the console before this error. Take
action for appropriate SOCKERR.
General Test Suggestions
If the following SOCKERRs appear together, then the network may be
“too busy” — that is, coordinating too many processes — to permit
proper operation of the XPVAL tests:
Error Message
REMOTE ABORTED THE CONNECTION
SOCKET TIMEOUT
and
CONNECTION REQUEST FAILED
RESPONSE TO CONNECTION FAILED
LOCAL IPCRECVCN FAILED
Wait until network activity lessens to execute the tests.
Examine the Protocol Module errors regarding the TCP entity. Protocol
Module errors are listed in the “Network Transport Protocol Errors”
table in the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual.
Chapter 2
33
Operating Your Network
Verifying Network Connections and Services
Validate Network Services in Batch Mode
Perform the following steps to use QVALNS to check the Network
Services. The services tested are VT, RFA, NFT, RPM, and RDBA. (Note
that it is not possible to use passwords with QVALNS. If passwords are
required, run NSTEST instead.)
1. Make sure the network transport and Network Services are running
on all nodes that are to be a part of this test.
2. Run the NETTOOL utility by entering the program name:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
3. Enter QVALNS to run the Network Services validation in batch mode.
4. When prompted, enter the name of the destination node to which
you want to connect. (This is the same as entering the command RUN
QVALNS.NET.SYS;INFO=nodename outside of NETTOOL.)
5. QVALNS will stream a job that tests the network services. The
program will display any errors encountered on the system console.
Validate Network Services Interactively
Perform the following steps to use NSTEST to check the Network
Services. It is possible to use passwords with this test.
1. Make sure the network transport and Network Services are running
on all nodes that are to be a part of this test.
2. Run the NETTOOL utility by entering the program name:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
3. Enter NSTEST to run the Network Services validation in interactive
mode.
4. When prompted, enter the name of the service you want to test. You
should always test VT first so that NSTEST can set up a remote
session.
5. When prompted, enter the name of the destination node to which
you want to connect.
6. When prompted, enter a logon string for the destination node. Enter
other values as required. The tool will test the Network Service you
selected.
34
Chapter 2
Operating Your Network
Verifying Network Connections and Services
Test RDBA Using NSTEST
To test RDBA, the data base RDBAT must reside in the home group of
the remote system. This is not a problem when you run QVALNS, because
that program creates the database and then purges it when it finishes.
If you want to test RDBA using NSTEST, perform the following steps.
1. Obtain a temporary copy of the job JQVALNS.NET.SYS. If this file is
not available, run QVALNS to create it.
2. Find the commands in this job which purge the database. They will
be very near the end of the job. Delete these lines using your favorite
editor.
3. Stream the job you just edited. When it finishes, the database will be
intact so that NSTEST will run.
4. After NSTEST completes, purge the database to save space on your
disk.
Chapter 2
35
Operating Your Network
Stopping Links and Services
Stopping Links and Services
You use the NSCONTROL STOP command to stop the Network Services
and the NETCONTROL STOP command to stop the links and transport.
You should always stop all Network Services before you stop the
network transport.
Stop Network Services
NSCONTROL STOP allows all processes that are currently using the
services to end normally before the services are actually terminated. If
you need to stop the services immediately and do not wish to wait until
current processes complete, use the NSCONTROL ABORT command. Be
aware that using this command will cause errors to processes that are
currently using the services.
Stop a Single Network Service
To stop a specific Network Service or group of Network Services while
the remaining active services remain active, enter the NSCONTROL
STOP command followed by an equal sign and a list of the services you
wish to stop. For example, to stop Remote File Access for both local and
remote users, enter the following command:
NSCONTROL STOP=RFA,RFAL
Stop All Network Services
To stop all Network Services enter the following command:
NSCONTROL STOP
Current active processes that are using the services will be allowed to
complete before the services are terminated.
Abort Network Services
To terminate all Network Services regardless of whether or not
currently active processes are using the services, enter the following
command:
NSCONTROL ABORT
36
Chapter 2
Operating Your Network
Stopping Links and Services
Stop Network Interfaces
Stop a Single Network Interface
Issue the following command to stop a single network interface:
NETCONTROL STOP;NET=NIname
The NIname is the network interface name that you configured through
NMMGR. Stop other interfaces as required by entering the command
using the appropriate NI names.
Stop All Network Interfaces
When you enter the STOP command with no keywords, all entities of the
network transport are terminated. (You must terminate the Network
Services before stopping the network transport. You will also need to
use the DTCCNTRL command if you have an active host-based X.25
interface.) Enter the following command:
NETCONTROL STOP
Stop a Host-Based X.25 Interface
If the interface you are stopping is a host-based X.25 interface, you
must also issue a DTCCNTRL STOP command after you stop the network
transport. Enter the commands as shown below:
NSCONTROL STOP
NSCONTROL ABORT
NETCONTROL STOP
DTCCNTRL DTC=dtcname;CARD=cardnumber;FUNC=function
where function is one of the following:
STOPX25
to stop X.25 services;
STOPPADSUP
to stop PAD support services;
STOPBOTH
to stop both X.25 and PAD support services.
Chapter 2
37
Operating Your Network
Stopping Links and Services
38
Chapter 2
3
Getting Information About the
Network
A great deal of information about the network and network connections
is available to you through use of various commands and tools provided
by the network. This chapter describes the various types of information
that you might need access to, describes the tools available for
displaying the information, and provides step-by-step instructions for
obtaining information where appropriate.
This chapter includes instructions for displaying the following types of
information:
• Software version numbers.
• Information about network configuration.
• Status information about link activity, network connections, and
Network Services.
• Network performance information (from monitoring network
operations).
39
Getting Information About the Network
Verifying Software Versions
Verifying Software Versions
Each data communications product consists of a variety of software
modules. Each module has an individual version number.
The software modules of all Hewlett-Packard data communications
products use a standard version stamp, with the following format:
v
The version number of the software. This corresponds
to a major revision or a version for a new or revised
system environment.
u
The update level of the software. This corresponds to a
significant revision in product functionality.
f
The fix level of the software. This corresponds to a new,
supported revision of the software.
i
The internal fix level of the software. This is for
differentiating special releases of software that do not
correspond to a normal release cycle.
A subsystem is a grouping of software modules. The software modules
within each subsystem usually have a common or similar function.
NS 3000/iX is grouped into the following subsystems:
• The Network Services.
• Network transport.
• Node management services.
• Link support services.
• Node management configurator.
The vuuff version stamp fields of the software modules must be the
same for all configured software, but the internal fix iii fields may
differ.
40
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Verifying Software Versions
Verify Version of Data Communications Software
Use the NMMAINT utility to display the individual and overall version
numbers for all software modules of NS 3000/iX, SNA IMF, and SNA
NRJE Network Services, as well as the SNA and NS 3000/iX network
link products.
1. Enter the command:
RUN NMMAINT.PUB.SYS
2. If the version, update, and fix levels of these modules do not match,
the subsystem will not work correctly. Include the information
provided by NMMAINT in any change request (CR) you submit to
Hewlett-Packard. See Appendix B , “Submitting an CR,” for
information about submitting CRs.
Verify Version of Network Transport Software
To display the version numbers of all of the software modules for the
network transport, use the MOD option of the NETCONTROL VERSION
command as shown below:
NETCONTROL VERSION=MOD
Verify Version of Network Services Software
To display the version numbers of all of the software modules for the
Network Services, use the MOD option of the NSCONTROL VERSION
command as shown:
NSCONTROL VERSION=MOD
Chapter 3
41
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Configuration Information
Displaying Configuration Information
You can display information about the location configuration file or
network directory file using the CONFIGURATION SUMMARY available as
part of NETTOOL. You can also use this tool to compare one configuration
file to another.
You can access information about configured network names and
addresses using the NAME-ADDRESS MANAGER which is also available
through NETTOOL.
Display Local Configuration
Perform the following steps to display a summary of the local system’s
configuration:
1. Run the NETTOOL utility by entering the program name:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Enter CONFIG to run the CONFIGURATION SUMMARY tool. The CONFIG
menu will appear.
3. Enter SUMMARY to display a summary of the network transport and
logging configuration values. (Note that logging values may not be
recorded for some MPE/iX releases.)
Display Link Configuration Information
You can display the configuration values for a specific link (excluding
X.25 links) by using the LINKCONTROL STATUS command. (You can also
use the STATUS NETTOOL.)
• To display configuration values for a link on the local node called
SYSLINK, enter the following command at the MPE prompt:
LINKCONTROL SYSLINK;STATUS=Configuration
See Chapter 7 , “Commands,” for more information on using
LINKCONTROL. See Appendix A , “LINKCONTROL Command,” for
information on the LINKCONTROL status displays.
42
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Configuration Information
Display Network Directory Configuration
Perform the following steps to display a summary of the local system’s
network directory configuration:
1. Run the NETTOOL utility by entering the program name:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Enter CONFIG to run the CONFIGURATION SUMMARY tool. The CONFIG
menu will appear.
3. Enter NETDIR to display a summary of the network directory
configuration.
Chapter 3
43
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Status Information
Displaying Status Information
Using the various commands and utilities available to you, you can
obtain status displays on nearly every aspect of NS 3000/iX. Status
displays can help you identify the entities of your network that are
currently active or in use. They can also help you diagnose deficiencies
in the configured resources that are required for network traffic, such
as transmission buffers.
The LINKCONTROL STATUS, NETCONTROL STATUS, and NSCONTROL
STATUS commands allow you to display status information about the
link, network transport, and services, respectively. The STATUS tool
available as part of NETTOOL allows you to display status of the network
interfaces and their associated links.
Display Link Status
You can display various levels of status information for a link on the
local node using the LINKCONTROL STATUS command.
To display all available status information about a link on the local
node called SYSLINK, enter the following command:
LINKCONTROL SYSLINK;STATUS=All
See Chapter 7 , “Commands,” for more information on using
LINKCONTROL. See Appendix A , “LINKCONTROL Command,” for
information on the LINKCONTROL status displays.
You can also use NETTOOL STATUS to display link status. See Chapter 6 ,
“Using NETTOOL,” for information on running NETTOOL STATUS.
Display Network Transport Status
You can display network transport status for a specific network
interface or protocol configured on the local node using the NETCONTROL
STATUS command. You can also use this command to display only
general transport information. In all cases, if the entity is not active,
NS 3000/iX will display a warning message telling you that the entity is
inactive.
Display General Transport Status
To display the status of the general transport, enter the following
command at the MPE prompt:
NETCONTROL STATUS
44
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Status Information
Display Status of a NET
To display the status of a NET configured as LAN1, enter the following
command at the MPE prompt:
NETCONTROL STATUS;NET=LAN1
Display Status of an NI
To display the status of an NI configured as LAN1, enter the following
command at the MPE prompt:
NETCONTROL STATUS;NI=LAN1
Display Protocol Status
You can display the status of a general protocol (TCP or PXP), or of a
network interface protocol (PROBE, ARP, IP, DIAL or X25) by using the
PROT= keyword.
To display the status of the ARP protocol on the LAN1 NI, you would
enter the following command at the MPE prompt:
NETCONTROL STATUS;NI=LAN1;PROT=ARP
Display Network Services
For the Network Services, you can display the status of users, services,
or servers.
Display Active Services
To display the services that are currently enabled on the local node,
enter the following command at the MPE prompt:
NSCONTROL STATUS=SERVICES
Display Active Users
To display the number of active users of the Network Services on the
local node, enter the following command at the MPE prompt:
NSCONTROL STATUS=USERS
Display Servers
The servers are the processes that are available to control the network
services. You may need to alter the minimum or maximum number of
servers available.
To see status information about the available servers, enter the
following command at the MPE prompt:
NSCONTROL STATUS=SERVERS
Chapter 3
45
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Network Performance Information
Displaying Network Performance Information
You can display network performance information using a number of
the tools available through NETTOOL. LOOPINIT, RESOURCE MONITOR,
and XPPERF all provide performance monitoring features.
Monitor Round Trip Response Time
The LOOPINIT tool allows you to send a series of packets to a specific
remote node and display the minimum, maximum, and average times
required for the packets to complete the round trip. Chapter 6 , “Using
NETTOOL,” includes step-by-step instructions for running LOOPINIT.
Monitor Resource Usage
The RESOURCE MONITOR tool allows you to display the current usage of
specified resources. This is useful in situations where you suspect
over-utilization of a resource.
This tool provides two types of displays: the one-line (non-verbose)
display and the detailed (verbose) display. The one-line format lists
current use of resources, the maximum experienced (high-water mark),
and the maximum allowable usage for specified resources. See the
following example.
The verbose mode displays information about a particular item,
providing an interpretation of resource usage and pointing to possible
relationships with configurable parameters.
Get a One-Line Display
Perform the following steps produce a resource display in non-verbose
mode.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the RESOURCE MONITOR tool from the main menu by entering
the RESOURCE command. A new menu will appear.
46
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Network Performance Information
3. Enter DISPLAY to display resource usage. The tool will produce a
table similar to the following:
THU, MAR 12, 1992,
9:23:39 AM
Item Subsystem Name
G/N
1
NS XPORT
TCP_CNTL (G)
2
NS XPORT
CP_POOL_ (G)
3
NS XPORT
1088____ (G)
4
NS XPORT
ROUTER__ (N)
5
NS XPORT
ROUTER__ (N)
6
NS XPORT
ROUTER__ (N)
7
NS XPORT
GPROT
(G)
8
NS XPORT
TCP_SIP
(G)
9
NS XPORT
UDP
(G)
10
NS XPORT
TCP_PM
(G)
11
NS XPORT
ROUTER__ (G)
12
NS XPORT
IP_NI
(G)
13
NS XPORT
IP_NI
(G)
14
NS XPORT
(G)
15
NS XPORT
(G)
16
NS XPORT
(G)
[4]RESOURCE>>
Description
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Control Buf
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Pool
Used
0
0
5
0
0
0
525
616
50
33
680
50
50
1
9
1
High
0
7
15
7
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Max
120 :)
256 :)
240 :)
128 :)
30 :)
20 :)
523 :)
616 :)
512 :)
2048 :)
680 :)
2048 :)
512 :)
1024 :)
360 :)
611 :)
The column after the maximum allowable usage is an indication of
actual usage that may point to over-utilization of a resource. The “:(”
indicates normal usage, and the “:)” indicates possible overutilization of
a resource. In this example, item 7 shows an indication of
overutilization. You could use the verbose mode to obtain a detailed
display of that item’s resource usage.
Get a Detailed Display
1. While still in the RESOURCE menu, enter detail to toggle the setting
of this switch to the detailed mode.
2. Enter ITEM. This will allow you to select the item from the one-line
list that you want to display.
3. Enter the item number. For example, you would enter the number 7
to display item #7. RESOURCE MONITOR will produce the detailed
display.
Measure Network Performance
You can measure the performance of various aspects of the network,
such as the TCP/IP protocol stack, the UDP/IP protocol stack, or X.25
level 3 direct access, using the XPPERF tool. This tool runs by itself or as
one of the NETTOOL tools. See Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for
instructions on running this tool using the NETTOOL interface.
Chapter 3
47
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Connection Information
Displaying Connection Information
The PING tool allows you to confirm the reachability of a remote node
that supports the internet protocol.
You can also use PING to estimate the round trip times before
proceeding with lengthy transactions. If you send four or more bytes of
data with the echo request, PING displays the round trip times in
milliseconds. However, since the echo is performed at layer 3, PING is
not the appropriate tool to use when attempting to find out if a
particular application is available on the remote node or to estimate
application-level round trip times.
You can run PING by itself or as one of the NETTOOL tools. See Chapter
6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for instructions on running this tool using the
NETTOOL interface.
Run PING from the Command Line
You can run PING from the command line by using an INFO string. The
INFO string must contain the IP address of the remote node and,
optionally, the number of packets and number of bytes:
:RUN PING.NET.SYS;INFO=“ipaddress[,packets][,bytes]”
The default number of packets is a continuous stream and the default
number of bytes is 64.
Stopping PING
You can enter [CONTROL]-Y at any time to exit. The program exits
without displaying the menu when run from the command line.
The following examples illustrate using PING with the INFO string. In
each case, the parameters echoed by PING are also given.
Within the INFO string, commas are required to separate parameters.
48
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Connection Information
Example 1
This example shows using an INFO string containing all three
parameters.
:RUN PING.NET.SYS;INFO="15.13.131.59,10,100"
---- PING/iX (ICMP Echo Requestor) : Version X0100003 ---PARAMETERS INPUT:
Remote IP address in hex
Number of packets
Number of data bytes
:$0F0D833B
: 10
: 100
---- PING $0F0D833B : 100 byte packet(s), 10 packet(s) ---100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
from
from
from
from
from
from
from
from
from
from
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
1, time =
2, time =
3, time =
4, time =
5, time =
6, time =
7, time =
8, time =
9, time =
10, time =
25
23
24
24
25
24
25
24
26
25
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
---- $0F0D833B PING Statistics ---10 packet(s) transmitted, 10 packet(s) received, 0 % packet loss
round trip (ms) min/avg/max = 23 / 25 / 26
Chapter 3
49
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Connection Information
Example 2
This example shows an INFO string containing the IP address, and five
packets. Note that the number of bytes has been defaulted by omitting
it in the info string.
:RUN PING.NET.SYS;INFO="15.13.131.59,5"
---- PING/iX (ICMP Echo Requestor) : Version X0100003 ---PARAMETERS INPUT:
Remote IP address in hex : $0F0D833B
Number of packets
: 5
Number of data bytes
: Default of 64 bytes
---- PING $0F0D833B : 64 byte packet(s), 5 packet(s) ---64
64
64
64
64
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
byte(s)
from
from
from
from
from
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
$0F0D833B
:
:
:
:
:
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
icmp_seq
=
=
=
=
=
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
time
time
time
time
time
=
=
=
=
=
26
24
23
23
24
ms
ms
ms
ms
ms
---- $0F0D833B PING Statistics ---5 packet(s) transmitted, 5 packet(s) received, 0 % packet loss
round trip (ms) min/avg/max = 23 / 24 / 26
Example 3
This example shows an INFO string using the default for number of
packets, a continuous stream, of five bytes each. Output is not shown.
PING will continue to send data until [CONTROL]-Y is entered.
:RUN PING.NET.SYS;INFO="15.13.131.59,,5"
---- PING/iX (ICMP Echo Requestor) : Version X0100003 ---PARAMETERS INPUT:
Remote IP address in hex : $0F0D833B
Number of packets
: Default of continuous stream
Number of data bytes
: 5
50
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Connection Information
Error and Information Messages
In addition to the normal reply message details and statistics, PING can
display informational and/or error messages. These messages are given
below, with an explanation and action to be taken for each message.
User Input Errors (Menu-Driven)
MESSAGE: Invalid IP address. Press RETURN to quit.
CAUSE: An IP address with invalid syntax has been entered for the IP
address prompt. The correct syntax for an IP address is A.B.C.D —
where A, B, C, and D are decimal numbers in the range 0–255.
ACTION: Enter an IP address with valid syntax or press [RETURN] to
quit.
MESSAGE: Invalid number of packets. Press RETURN for default of
infinite packets.
CAUSE: An invalid number of packets value has been entered for the
number of packets prompt. A valid input is a decimal number in the
range 1–65534.
ACTION: Enter a valid number of packets value or press [RETURN] to
choose the default of sending a continuous stream of packets.
MESSAGE: Invalid number of bytes. Press RETURN for default of
64 bytes.
CAUSE: An invalid number of bytes value has been entered for the
number of bytes prompt. A valid input is a decimal number in the range
0–2048.
ACTION: Enter a valid number of bytes value or press [RETURN] to
choose the default of sending 64 data bytes per packet.
User Input Errors (Command-Line)
MESSAGE: Parameter input error. Quitting...
CAUSE: An irrecoverable error occurred while trying to read the user
parameter, either interactively or from the INFO string. This normally
happens only when one of the input parameters was out of bounds by
an extreme amount.
ACTION: Check the parameters to find the incorrect one and input a
valid value.
MESSAGE: Remote IP address is a required parameter.
CAUSE: An IP address was not passed in the INFO string.
ACTION: Pass an IP address as the first parameter within the INFO
string.
Chapter 3
51
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Connection Information
MESSAGE: Invalid IP address.
CAUSE: An IP address with invalid syntax has been entered in the INFO
string. The correct syntax for an IP address is A.B.C.D — where A, B, C,
and D are decimal numbers in the range 0–255.
ACTION: Pass a valid IP address within the INFO string.
MESSAGE: Invalid number of packets. Valid range: 1–65534
CAUSE: An invalid number of packets value has been passed in the INFO
string. A valid input is a decimal number in the range 1–65534.
ACTION: Pass a valid value for the number of packets within the INFO
string, or omit it to choose the default of sending a continuous stream of
packets.
MESSAGE: Invalid number of bytes. Valid range: 0–2048
CAUSE: An invalid number of bytes value has been passed in the INFO
string. A valid input is a decimal number in the range 0–2048.
ACTION: Pass a valid value for the number of bytes within the INFO
string, or omit it to choose the default of 64 bytes.
Networking Errors
MESSAGE: Receive timeout occurred. Shutting Down...
CAUSE: The PING process has not received any response to its requests
for two minutes. It shuts itself down, assuming that the local or the
remote side is inactive.
ACTION: This could indicate that the remote node is unreachable. Also
check if the local node is congested or hung causing the local ICMP
Server not to respond. (The local ICMP Server interacts with PING to
send ICMP Echo Requests to the remote and passes incoming replies to
the right PING/iX process.)
MESSAGE: Cannot contact local ICMP Server. Shutting down...
CAUSE: PING/iX was not able to contact the local ICMP Server.
ACTION: Check if the transport is active. If not, start the transport.
MESSAGE: Server not accepting requests, as it is busy. Please try
later.
CAUSE: Only 15 PING processes can be active at any time. That is, only
15 users can run PING at the same time. Additional users trying to run
PING will get this error message.
ACTION: Wait and try later. One of the other PING processes might have
completed, allowing you to run the program.
52
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying Connection Information
MESSAGE: Cannot resolve path to remote. Path Error, Parm =
#Parm_Value. Refer PATH RESULT CODES table in NS 3000/iX Error
Messages Manual.
CAUSE: A suitable path out of the local node to reach the remote node
could not be found.
ACTION: Look up the table mentioned in the message, under the
Parm_Value code, and take the action recommended therein.
MESSAGE: Arithmetic trap Parm. Program Quitting.
CAUSE: This is an internal error.
ACTION: Submit an CR with the Parm value, a description of what you
were trying to do, and any other abort output that is printed on the
terminal.
Internal Errors
The following messages are all internal errors, and should not happen
under normal circumstances. In each case, submit an CR.
• Error opening $STDIN. Program quitting.
• Error opening $STDLIST. Program quitting.
• Cannot create port. Program quitting.
• Internal Error in server. Shutting Down…
• Buffer Error in server. Shutting Down…
Chapter 3
53
Getting Information About the Network
Displaying X.25 Information
Displaying X.25 Information
Several special tools are available to you for use with X.25 network
connections. X25CHECK allows you to verify connectivity between two
nodes on an X.25 network. X25STAT allows you to monitor the status
and statistics for X.25 NIs.
You can run both X25CHECK and X25STAT standalone or from within
NETTOOL. Running them from NETTOOL allows you to access help
information about the tools. See Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for
instructions on running these programs from within NETTOOL.
Verify X.25 Connections
Use X25CHECK to create connections to remote X.25 nodes and verify
their response. X25CHECK/X25SERVR is actually a pair of programs.
X25CHECK runs on the local node which X25SERVR runs on the remote
node. The two work together to diagnose conditions between the nodes.
X25CHECK runs at level 3 on the local node. It tries to establish a virtual
circuit with the remote node. After the virtual circuit is established,
X25CHECK sends the same message to the remote node five times. The
program then measures the time period between sending the message
and receiving a response from the remote node.
See Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for instructions on running
X25CHECK.
Monitor X.25 Status
Use X25STAT to monitor status and statistics for X.25 connections. The
program will display the contents of the internal X.25 tables, including:
• Global information that is relevant to all connections.
• Socket table information used for level 3 access.
• Connection table information.
• Facilities table information.
• Path table information.
X25STAT displays the information only once. If you want to update the
information display you must run the tool again.
54
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Logging and Tracing
Logging and Tracing
Both logging and tracing services are available to you for use as
diagnostic and debugging aids.
Logging records subsystem events as selected by the way you have
configured logging through NMMGR. Use logging in problem
determination and in monitoring network usage and resources.
Tracing is provided at both the user level and at an internal level.
User-level tracing provides a record of data communications subsystem
intrinsic calls. Internal level tracing records internal state transitions
and the sequences of module execution within data communications
subsystems. You should only use internal tracing under the
recommendation of an HP service representative.
Logging Facility
Node management services, NMS, provides logging services for
Network Services, NetIPC, network transport, and all data
communications links. Logging is performed at three levels: network
logging, event logging, and link level logging. Network logging records
the usage of the communications network resources. It serves as a tool
in resolving network problems. Event logging records the major
subsystem events. The NSCONTROL command with the LOG= option can
be used to enable or disable detailed event logging for the Network
Services (see Chapter 7 , “Commands,” for more information). The link
level logs to MPE/iX log files only.
You can configure logging to record messages to the console, to a log file,
or to both for each individual subsystem. See the HP e3000/iX Network
Planning and Configuration Guide or the NS 3000/iX NMMGR
Screens Reference Manual for information on how to configure logging.
Three commands are available to help you manage log files. SHOWNMLOG
displays the name of the current log file and shows the space that is
still available in the file. SWITCHNMLOG allows you to close the current
log file before it is full and open a new one. RESUMENMLOG allows you to
reactivate logging after a recoverable error. See Chapter 7 ,
“Commands,” for information on these commands.
Chapter 3
55
Getting Information About the Network
Logging and Tracing
Tracing Facility
Tracing is provided for the Network Services subsystem, Network
Interprocess Communication (NetIPC), the network transport
subsystem, and the link subsystems. You enable tracing for the
Network Services by the DSLINE command for each user’s services.
Network Service tracing is used to trace messages generated by your
applications. For more information, see Using NS 3000/iX Network
Services.
You enable tracing for NetIPC applications with the NetIPC intrinsic
IPCCONTROL, which is explained in the NetIPC 3000/XL Programmer’s
Reference Manual.
You can selectively enable tracing for the network transport with the
NETCONTROL command see Chapter 7 , “Commands.” You can enable
tracing at the link level in the NMMGR configuration for some links, as
explained in the NS 3000/iX Screens Reference Manual. You can also
enable link level tracing with the LINKCONTROL command.
Trace Files
Network transport trace records are written to disk files and are of file
type NTRAC. Trace files are named either by explicitly specifying a file
name (in the configuration file or with the NETCONTROL command) or by
using the default trace file filename. If you explicitly specify a file name,
the contents of the file are overwritten each time a new trace is started.
No warning is issued. If you use the default file name, NMS uses
NMTCnnnn.PUB.SYS as a file name. In the file name, nnnn is a number
from 0000 to 9999. Each time a new trace is started, NMS opens a new
file and increments nnnn by one, thus creating a new file name. If this
new trace file name is the name of a file that already exists, NMS
continues to increment nnnn by one until it produces the name of a new
(non-existing) file. If the NMS trace facility reaches an end-of-file mark
while recording to a disk file, it wraps subsequent entries around to the
beginning of the file and overwrites the previous entries.
Format Log and Trace Files
You can format log and trace files into a readable format using the
NMDUMP utility. You can run NMDUMP by itself or as one of the NETTOOL
tools. See Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for step-by-step instructions
for running NMDUMP using NETTOOL.
NMDUMP allows you to select specific subsystems and message types for
formatting. (Note that you must have configured logging so that
messages of the type you select are recorded.) For example, you may
only need to see critical error messages for a LAN link. NMDUMP will let
you select just these messages to be formatted. See Using the Node
Management Services (NMS) Utilities for a table of the logging
subsystems and message types that you can select for formatting.
56
Chapter 3
Getting Information About the Network
Logging and Tracing
Format X.25 Log Files
Messages for X.25 links are not recorded to the same logging file as
messages for other links. If you need to format log messages for a
host-based X.25 link, you should see Configuring and Managing
Host-Based X.25 Links for information on using the EVLOG formatter. If
you are logging messages for an X.25 link with PC-based network
management, see Using the OpenView DTC Manager for information.
Chapter 3
57
Getting Information About the Network
Logging and Tracing
58
Chapter 3
4
Troubleshooting Process
Troubleshooting data communications problems can be a very involved
process since there are many hardware and software components to
investigate. You will be able to quickly identify and resolve some
problems, however. These include invalid software installation, version
incompatibilities, insufficient MPE/iX resources, corrupt configuration
files, programming or command errors, and file system errors.
Other problems will require more investigation. Once you identify the
problem, it is likely that you will be able to resolve the problem using
the suggestions in this chapter or the detailed instructions provided in
the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual.
This chapter includes information on the following topics:
• How to identify problems.
• Characterizing problems.
• Identifying possible causes of problems.
Once you have identified the problem and the possible cause, use the
strategies described in Chapter 5 , “Common Network Problems,” to
further isolate and correct the problem.
59
Troubleshooting Process
Identifying Problems
Identifying Problems
The usual method of identifying problems is to characterize the
situation in which the problem occurs and then investigate which of the
possible causes are actually responsible for the problem. Finding the
cause is often sufficient to suggest the resolution of the problem. For
example, assume that the problem is characterized as “the user is
unable to open a line with the DSLINE command.” A possible cause is
that the user entered a command using incorrect syntax. You would
resolve the problem by correcting the command and reissuing it.
However, if the syntax was correct, you would have to look for another
possible cause, such as an inactive link or a failure of the remote node.
Thus, in most cases you start with the characterization of the problem
and investigate the possible causes. The difficult part of troubleshooting
is to identify the actual cause of the problem. Once you know the actual
cause, you can take the appropriate action to resolve the problem.
Characterize the Problem
It is important to ask questions when you are trying to characterize a
problem. Start with global questions and gradually get more specific.
Depending on the response, you ask another series of question, until
you have enough information to understand exactly what happened.
Key questions to ask are as follows:
1. Was an error message generated? Use the NS 3000/iX Error
Messages Reference Manual to look up the cause of the error and
take the action suggested. If this does not resolve the problem,
continue with the next question.
2. Is the problem isolated to one user or program? If so, continue to the
next question. If more than one user is involved, proceed to
question 6.
3. Did the user perform the operation correctly? Was syntax correct?
Does the user have the correct logon and authority to use the
command or service? Correct any problems found. If the operation
was correct, continue with the next question.
4. Did the problem occur while the user was running a program? Were
there program errors? If so, investigate and correct the program
errors. Otherwise, continue with the next question.
5. Did the problem occur while attempting to open a line or transmit
data? If so, investigate the connection between this system and the
remote system.
60
Chapter 4
Troubleshooting Process
Identifying Problems
6. If more than one user is involved, does the problem affect all users?
The entire node? If so, has anything changed recently? Some
possibilities are:
• New software and hardware installation.
• Same hardware but changes to the software. Has the
configuration file been modified? Has the MPE/iX configuration
been changed?
• Same software but changes to the hardware.
7. Do you suspect hardware or software?
It is often difficult to determine whether the problem is hardware or
software related. Symptoms that mean you should suspect the
hardware are:
• Bad LAN card or PSI dumps.
• Link level errors, either returned to the user or logged to the
console. This includes CI errors, NMERR errors, power fails, and
link shutdowns.
• Lost data—data is sent but not received at the link destination.
(This could also be caused by a software problem.)
Symptoms that mean you should suspect the software are:
• Logging messages at the console.
• Network Services errors returned to users or programs.
• MPE/iX file system (FSERR) or command interface (CIERR)
errors (except “Remote Not Responding” errors).
• Data corruption.
• Terminal hangs.
• Intermittent errors.
• Network-wide problems.
Identify the Cause of Problems
The type of investigation that you use to identify the possible causes of
a problem depends on whether the problem affects one user or an
individual situation, or if the problem is node-wide. Once you have the
answers to the questions listed previously, use the flowchart in Figure
4-1 as a guide and see Chapter 5 , “Common Network Problems,” for a
problem resolution strategy.
Chapter 4
61
Troubleshooting Process
Identifying Problems
Figure 4-1
Characterizing the Problem
62
Chapter 4
5
Common Network Problems
This chapter presents strategies for dealing with some of the more
common network problems. Once you have characterized a problem and
identified a possible cause using the troubleshooting guidelines
provided in Chapter 4 , “Troubleshooting Process,” find the problem in
this chapter and follow the strategy presented here to resolve the
problem.
This chapter provides strategies for dealing with the following types of
network problems:
• Interactive or programmatic problems.
• Command errors.
• Nodal problems.
• Link problems.
• Software problems.
63
Common Network Problems
Interactive or Programmatic Problems
Interactive or Programmatic Problems
The first step in investigating interactive or programmatic problems is
to examine any error message returned. If you have received a specific
error message, find it in the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference
Manual and take the action recommended. Most error messages are
easily understood by the user or programmer, although some of the
explanations refer to internal procedures comprehensible only to
qualified HP representatives. Users are not expected to understand
these explanations, but they should take the actions listed.
Program Errors
If the user is using any of the programmatic capabilities of NS 3000/iX
and an intrinsic completes with an error, the recovery procedure
depends upon the intrinsic. How you check for the error code depends
on which service you are using.
• If a NetIPC intrinsic was issued that received a condition code
indicating an error, use the IPCCHECK intrinsic to obtain additional
details. Always check for the PM error code; this is essential to
identify the cause if the network transport is unable to complete a
request.
• If a file system intrinsic was issued that received a condition code
indicating an I/O error occurred, use the FCHECK intrinsic to obtain
additional details.
64
Chapter 5
Common Network Problems
Command Errors
Command Errors
If you are using the interactive capabilities of NS 3000/iX and
associated links and receive an error, refer to “NS 3000/iX Network
Services Error Messages” in the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference
Manual.
The command errors fit into four categories:
• Syntax errors or invalid options. These errors result from user
errors when issuing the command. They are readily corrected by
checking for the correct syntax and reissuing the command.
• Warnings. If a command is executable but may give unexpected
results, a warning is issued. This would occur in a situation where
conflicting options were specified. The warning informs you which
option was actually used (or not used).
• Resource Errors. These errors occur when a system resource
needed for the execution of the command is not available. If they
occur, you can wait and reissue the command later, when the
resource may be available. If resource errors happen frequently the
configuration or resource allocation of the system may be
inadequate. The network manager may need to investigate further.
• Internal Errors. These errors indicate that the software is
malfunctioning. If they ever occur, notify your HP representative.
The network manager should follow the steps outlined in Appendix
B , “Submitting an CR.”"
For syntax errors and warnings, consult the reference pages in this
manual for that command’s correct syntax and options, or refer to
Using NS 3000/iX Network Services.
Line Opening Errors
There are several reasons why a DSLINE command for opening a
communications line might be rejected. Some line opening errors
actually occur when a REMOTE HELLO (or DSCOPY, or programmatic
RPMCREATE or FOPEN) is executed, not when the DSLINE is done. The
following list summarizes the likely causes of line opening failures:
• The user made a syntax error in the DSLINE command.
• The user specified an erroneous nodename or envid in the DSLINE
command. The node name must match the one configured for the
system the user is trying to reach. Make sure that all users know the
correct node names. You may want to post a map with the configured
node names for all the nodes on the network. The correct node
names can be checked in the network directory (if one is being used).
Chapter 5
65
Common Network Problems
Command Errors
• A network was not started by the local console operator, the remote
console operator, or any intermediate nodes. Check that all required
commands have been issued on the local, remote, and intermediate
nodes. The network interfaces, the LAN NI, the loopback NI,
point-to-point NI, X.25 NI, token ring NI, and gateway half NI, must
be initialized with NETCONTROL START commands. The DTC/X.25
Network Access card in the DTC must be started; refer to Using the
OpenView DTC Manager or Configuring and Managing Host-Based
X.25 Links. The Network Services must be initialized with the
NSCONTROL START command. Some links may also need to be started
by NETCONTROL ADDLINK commands. Links can be configured not to
be started when a NETCONTROL START command is executed and be
started via NETCONTROL ADDLINK. Links may have been closed by
NETCONTROL DELLINK or may have been closed because an
irrecoverable error was detected on the line.
• The remote node may not be operational.
• The remote operator may have lowered the session limit. This would
cause a failure in a REMOTE HELLO or a DSCOPY or RPMCREATE that
tried to automatically log on to a session.
• The local console operator may have used the service list of the
NSCONTROL command to limit the Network Services to incoming
users only. On the remote node, the operator may have limited the
Network Services to outgoing only. This would cause a REMOTE
HELLO, DSCOPY, remote FOPEN, or RPMCREATE to fail, depending on
which services were not started.
• If the line is a dial up line, a failure in a REMOTE HELLO, DSCOPY or
RPMCREATE can be caused by the following:
— If auto dial, the number was busy, wrong, or was never answered
at the remote computer.
— The security strings did not match at either the local or remote
node (if security was enabled).
— The IP address of the remote node was not configured as a
candidate for use of this link.
— If the link is a shared dialup link, a failure will occur if the link is
connected to a node different than the one issued in the DSLINE
command.
— When a REMOTE HELLO is issued which causes the phone to be
dialed, there is a window in which subsequent REMOTE HELLOs
from other users will be rejected. The window is from the time the
auto dial starts (or dial request) to when the connection is
established.
• A REMOTE HELLO, DSCOPY or RPMCREATE will fail if the IP address of
the remote node configured in the network directory does not match
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Chapter 5
Common Network Problems
Command Errors
the IP address of the remote node configured in the NS
Configuration file.
• All virtual terminals on the remote node are already in use, which
means there are no remote resources available to establish a remote
session. This would cause a failure in a REMOTE HELLO or a DSCOPY or
RPMCREATE that tried to automatically log on to a session.
• Someone has exclusive access to the specified line or the user
requested exclusive access to a line that is already in use.
• Someone is exclusively accessing a server program. For example,
someone is executing the STORE command or a SYSGEN system
backup on DSSERVER.NET.SYS.
• There is a hardware problem—the communications device is not
responding correctly.
Line Closing Errors
There are several reasons why a DSLINE command for closing a
communications line might be rejected. The following list summarizes
the likely causes of line closing failures:
• The user made a syntax error in the DSLINE command.
• The user specified an erroneous nodename or envid in the DSLINE
command. The nodename must match the one configured with
NMMGR. Make sure that all users know the correct nodenames. You
may want to post a map with the configured nodenames for all the
nodes on the network.
• The remote node may not be operational.
• There is a hardware problem — the communications device is not
responding correctly.
NMS Utility Errors
A file system error (FSERR) may have occurred while attempting to
access the configuration file. Try to access the configuration file under
the same user ID using NMMGR. Use the NMMGR Error screen to find
out what the underlying FSERR is. A complete listing of NMS error
messages is available in Using the Node Management Services (NMS)
Utilities. Correct the problem and retry.
Chapter 5
67
Common Network Problems
Nodal Problems
Nodal Problems
The first step in investigating nodal problems is to examine any error
message returned. Error messages returned by NS 3000/iX and
associated links are listed in the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference
Manual, along with their meaning and recommended recovery action.
If you have received a specific error message, find it in the manual and
take the action recommended. Only if there is no clear error or the
recommended action does not correct the problem is it necessary to
investigate further. Follow the strategy shown in Figure 4-1.
Recent Changes
If you begin experiencing problems immediately following either a new
installation or changes to the software or hardware, often you can
easily identify what is causing the problem. Table 5-1 shows the
symptoms and possible causes for a new installation, changed software
and changed hardware, respectively. This table also suggests a course of
action for situations where no recent changes have been made.
Once you have identified the possible cause, you may need to isolate the
actual cause. Proceed to Investigate the Software or Investigate the
Link, depending on the nature of the possible cause. For more
information on some of the possible causes, including what to do when
you have isolated the actual cause, proceed to Determine the Action. If
the recommended action is to contact an HP representative, use the
guidelines in Appendix A of the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference
Manual.
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Chapter 5
Common Network Problems
Nodal Problems
Table 5-1
Nodal Troubleshooting Strategy
Changes
Symptom
Possible Causes
New installation
Console locked or
hung;serious failures.
Software installation invalid.
System abort
Configuration incorrect, serious internal
error.
System abort
Configuration incorrect, serious internal
error.
DSCOPY command aborts.
NFTCAT.NET.SYS is bad; incompatible
version, or MAKECAT was not done.
Hardware changes
Unable to use NS.
For LAN, LAN card not properly
connected to MAU or network cable,
(LOOP, twisted pair) or cable not
properly installed (missing or bad
terminator, twisted pair not connected to
hub). For Fiber Distributed Data
Interface/iX, either the Media Interface
Connector (MIC) receptacle is not
properly connected to the FDDI device
adapter or the FDDI concentrator. For
NS 3000/iX Point-to-Point, either the PSI
card is not properly connected to the
cable, or the cable is improperly installed
(missing or bad terminator). Also check
all modem or other connections. For
DTC/X.25 iX Network Links, the
DTC/X.25 Network Access card may not
be properly installed in the DTC.
No changes
Unable to use services or a
warning that old services
are being used.
NSCONTROL has been stopped or network
has been shut down, or NSCONTROL has
been issued to limit the number of active
servers.
Cannot connect to remote
system.
See “Line Opening Errors.”
Software changes
Chapter 5
69
Common Network Problems
Investigate the Link
Investigate the Link
The following is a strategy to use to identify and solve link problems.
You should use this strategy if you are not sure what is causing the
problem because many times errors in the upper level software are due
to hardware problems. You can also use this strategy if you have
identified a hardware-related possible cause and need to isolate the
actual cause.
LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, 100Base-T
Link Problems
For problems that involve LAN, Token Ring, FDDI, 100VG-AnyLAN, or
100Base-T link, use the following strategy where applicable:
• Issue the LINKCONTROL linkname; STATUS=DIAGSTATS command.
Inspect the output and attempt to identify the problem. Refer to the
Online Diagnostic Subsystem Manual, Volume I, for a detailed
analysis of the fields displayed. Retain a copy of the output from this
command for your Hewlett-Packard representative.
• Run PING to confirm whether or not the remote node is reachable.
See Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for instructions on running
PING.
• If PING fails, use the LAN node diagnostic that is appropriate for the
type of card on your system:
Card
Online Diagnostic
LAN
LANDAD
LAN3PBB
CONSOLAN
Token Ring
LAN5PBB
FDDI
FDDIPBA
100VG-AnyLAN
VGPBA
100Base-T
VGPBA
Refer to your hardware documentation for information on these
diagnostics. These diagnostics are online tools that verify the
hardware components by running the self-test, then a series of tests
of the cables and connectors.
• If a failure has taken place, give the files NMLGxx.PUB.SYS and
NETDMPnn.PUB.SYS to your Hewlett-Packard representative for
additional analysis.
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Investigate the Link
If the problem is easily reproducible, and link level tracing was
inactive when the problem took place, turn on tracing using the
LINKCONTROL command. When the problem has been reproduced,
turn off trace and give this trace file to your Hewlett-Packard
representative for additional analysis. If a hardware failure takes
place while trace is active, give the files NMLGxx.PUB.SYS and
NETDMPnn.PUB.SYS to your HP representative as well.
The log message contains an error code, such as an NMERR.
Information on the cause and recovery of these errors can be found
in the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual. Keep a copy of
the log file and the output. If you need to submit an CR, send the log
file and output to your Hewlett-Packard representative.
• If link level logging is not enabled, enable it through NMMGR so
that the information will be available if this problem can be
repeated.
NS Point-to-Point 3000/iX Link Problems
The NS Point-to-Point 3000/iX link (router link) is connected with a
programmable serial interface (PSI) card. For problems that involve the
PSI, use the following strategy where applicable:
• Issue the LINKCONTROL linkname; STATUS=DIAGSTATS command.
Inspect the output and attempt to identify the problem. Refer to
Appendix A , “LINKCONTROL Command,” for a detailed analysis of
the fields displayed. Retain a copy of the output from this command
for your Hewlett-Packard representative.
• Run PING to confirm whether or not the remote node is reachable.
See Chapter 6 , “Using NETTOOL,” for instructions on running
PING.
• If PING fails, use PSIDAD. PSIDAD is an on-line diagnostic tool. It
verifies the PSI components by running the PSI self-test, then
extends the testing as far into the communications network as
possible, depending on which equipment is connected to the PSI.
Refer to the On-Line Diagnostic Subsystem Manual, Volume I, for
instructions.
• If a PSI failure has taken place, give the files NMLGxx.PUB.SYS and
NETDMPnn.PUB.SYS to your Hewlett-Packard representative for
additional analysis.
• If the problem is easily reproducible, and link level tracing was
inactive when the problem took place, turn on tracing using the
LINKCONTROL command. When the problem has been reproduced,
turn off tracing. Save both the raw trace file and the formatted
output for your Hewlett-Packard representative for analysis. It is
important to save any PSI dump file (NETDMPnn.PUB.SYS) that is
created while link level tracing was enabled. Send both the PSI
Chapter 5
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Common Network Problems
Investigate the Link
dump file and the link trace file to your Hewlett-Packard
representative for additional analysis.
• Check the MPE/iX log file for I/O error logging. Format the log file.
Keep a copy of the file and the output for your Hewlett-Packard
representative to study.
NOTE
If you lose connections on an NS 3000/iX Point-to-Point link as a result
of successive power failures, you can recover the connections by issuing
the following commands:
NETCONTROL NET=niName;DELLINK=linkName
NETCONTROL NET=niName;ADDLINK=linkName
DTC/X.25 iX Network Link Problems
The DTC/X.25 iX Network Link operates using a DTC/X.25 Network
Access card on the DTC. For problems that involve the DTC, perform
the following steps when applicable:
• Issue the LINKCONTROL linkname; STATUS=DIAGSTATS command on
the LAN link, where linkname is the name of the DTS link. Inspect
the output and attempt to identify the problem. Retain a copy of the
output from this command for your Hewlett-Packard representative.
• Use the OpenView DTC Manager to verify the status of the
DTC/X.25 Network Access card if you are using PC-based network
management. Use TermDSM to verify the status of the DTC/X.25
Network Access card if you are using host-based network
management.
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Common Network Problems
Investigate the Software
Investigate the Software
Follow the strategy described below to identify and solve any problems
that might involve software.
• There may be version incompatibilities between different software
subsystems. This is essential to check for if new software has
recently been installed on your node. Use the software verification
utility NMMAINT to display the version identification numbers of the
software modules. Compare the first five characters of these version
IDs with those listed as compatible with each other in the System
Status Bulletin, Software Release Bulletin, N00N files or other HP
source. If a discrepancy is found, locate a known set of compatible
software and install it.
• Issue the LINKCONTROL STATUS command. Inspect the output and
attempt to identify the problem. Refer to Appendix A ,
“LINKCONTROL Command,” for a detailed analysis of the fields
displayed. Retain a copy of the output from this command for your
Hewlett-Packard representative.
• Check the configuration file. Use NMMGR to print the data screens.
Inspect the output and attempt to identify the problem. Follow the
suggestions provided in the section “Corrupt Configuration Files”
later in this section. Retain a copy of the output for your
Hewlett-Packard representative.
• In general, the log files are the best source of information. They
should be checked for any problem encountered. Use the command
SWITCHNMLOG to isolate the specific log file immediately after the
problem occurs. Use the time range option of NMDUMP whenever
possible to further narrow the focus on when the problem occurred.
Inspect the formatted output and attempt to identify the problem.
Retain a copy of the output from the log file for your HP
representative.
• If the cause of the problem cannot be isolated with any other means,
or if the recommended action has not resolved a problem, then use
the line tests described in this manual. The intent is to verify each
component of the hardware and software individually in hopes of
isolating the faulty component. Inspect the output and attempt to
identify the problem. Retain a copy of the output from these tests for
your HP representative.
• If the problem is easily repeated and NMS tracing was inactive
when the problem took place, turn on tracing using the NETCONTROL
TRACE command. When the problem has been reproduced, turn off
tracing and give this trace file to your HP representative for
additional analysis.
Chapter 5
73
Common Network Problems
Investigate the Software
• If the problem causes a system failure, take a full memory dump of
the system. Format the system dump with the Dump Analysis Tool
(DAT) and send the formatted tape to your HP representative.
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Chapter 5
Common Network Problems
Common Problems and Actions
Common Problems and Actions
Invalid Software Installation
A software installation may be invalid. Run NMMAINT.PUB.SYS to obtain
a listing of version IDs for NMS and for all of the NMS dependent
subsystems.
Locate the overall version IDs for each subsystem. Check that these
subsystems are the correct version for operation with the associated
link.
MPE/iX Configuration Incorrect
Refer to System Startup, Configuration, and Shutdown to obtain an I/O
listing of the system. Check that the drivers are correctly configured.
Insufficient MPE/iX Resources
There may be insufficient MPE/iX resources, such as configured table
sizes. Refer to the recommendations for system tables provided in
System Startup, Configuration, and Shutdown. Reconfigure MPE/iX to
fix any problems found and restart the system.
Corrupt Configuration File
The configuration file is possibly corrupt. If the error persists, use
NMMGR to manually check the configuration file (if possible). Check to
see that all data records have been created. If bad records seem to be
localized to a particular item, delete that item and reconfigure it. If
necessary, RESTORE a known good backup copy of the file.
Corrupt Network Directory File
If the network directory file is open in NMMGR during a system failure,
starting the network transport with NETCONTROL START does not
recover the network directory file. Run NMMGR in maintenance mode
as follows:
:FILE NMMGRCMD=$STDINX
:RUN NMMGR.PUB.SYS
NM Configuration Manager 32098-20012 A.02.00 (C) Hewlett Packard Co.
NMMGROPENDIR NSDIR.NET.SYS
NETWORK DIRECTORY: Recovering file NSDIR.NET.SYS
NMMGREXIT
1986
After recovering the file, stop and restart the network transport as
described in Chapter 2 , “Operating Your Network,” of this manual.
Chapter 5
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Common Network Problems
Common Problems and Actions
Incompatible Configuration File Version
Run the NMMGRVER.PUB.SYS program to convert the old configuration
file to the new format. Refer to the Using the NMS Utilities manual for
more information.
Insufficient Configuration File Values
Only change the configured values in the configuration file for a
persistent or widespread problem. The configured values apply to
communication over all the connections and with all the remote nodes
in the internet. The default values are calculated to provide good
performance in a variety of situations. Changes to these values may
improve one situation but affect other situations adversely. If the
recommended action for a particular error or log message is to change
the configured value, do so only for an extremely high number of log
messages or for repeated error messages. Consult your HP
representative for more information.
Retransmission Timeout Errors
The network transport provides reliable end-to-end communication. As
part of ensuring reliable receipt of packets, the transport protocol TCP
keeps track of the packets transmitted. If TCP does not receive an
acknowledgment within the configured time period, TCP retransmits
the packet. If the packet is retransmitted the maximum number of
times configured and is still unacknowledged, then TCP logs a
retransmission timeout error and aborts the connection.
The transport protocol PXP may also log a retransmission timeout
error. This occurs in much the same way as described for TCP, although
PXP retransmits requests, not packets, and waits for replies, not
acknowledgments. PXP is only used whenever an IPCLOOKUP is issued
as part of a NetIPC application, and only communicates with the socket
registry.
Retransmission timeouts can occur for the following reasons:
• Packets were transmitted to a remote node which was not active or
which terminated before the packet arrived.
• Excessive node loads took place during connection establishment.
• The remote node experienced congestion or lack of buffers.
• Possible link or configuration problems.
If a retransmission error is returned in a log message or in an IPCCHECK
error code for NetIPC applications, first check that the remote node is
up and that its transport has been started. If so, check if the
retransmission timeout error is an isolated event or an ongoing
problem. Examine a formatted log file for the period up to and including
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Chapter 5
Common Network Problems
Common Problems and Actions
the error.
If the problem is ongoing, then take the appropriate action:
• If the log messages show initial TCP connection failures due to a
heavily loaded remote node, configure a longer Initial
Retransmission Interval for the Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) Configuration Screen. This is in the NETXPORT branch of the
NMMGR network configuration. Also, you can increase the
connection assurance interval on this screen if there are a large
number of TCP connections configured.
• If there are IPCLOOKUP failures, and the log messages show PXP
timeouts due to a heavily loaded remote node, configure a longer
default retransmission interval for the PXP data screen. This is also
in the NETXPORT branch.
• If the problem affects established connections and none of the above
conditions apply, then configure a longer retransmission interval
upper bound, or configure a higher number of maximum
retransmissions per packet for the Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) Configuration Screen.
NetIPC Errors
NetIPC programmatically creates processes on both local and remote
systems. These processes must be released, along with any descriptors
and resources, after the program completes. Unless these process are
terminated properly, errors may result.
NetIPC Shutdown Errors
The NetIPC call IPCSHUTDOWN releases a descriptor and any resources
that are associated with it. Since system resources are used as long as
call sockets and destination sockets exist, it is important that
application programs release the sockets whenever they are no longer
needed.
Before a process terminates, it should terminate its connection with
IPCSHUTDOWN. Because this termination takes effect very quickly, all of
the data that is in transit on the connection is lost when the connection
is shut down. As a result, the processes that share a connection must
cooperate to ensure that no data is lost. Indications of a faulty
shutdown procedure on an individual or application level are:
• If you receive log messages or NetIPC error codes where the
recommended action for some of the log messages is to increase the
number of TCP connections, and the connections are not currently
active.
• If the TCP PM log message indicates that a packet was received
after the IPCSHUTDOWN call but before the TCP connection was fully
deleted.
Chapter 5
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Common Network Problems
Common Problems and Actions
Indication of a faulty shutdown procedure on a nodal level is an
incomplete shutdown of the network transport.
Network Transport Shutdown
Shutting down the network transport via the NETCONTROL STOP
command requires that all NetIPC call sockets, all TCP connections,
and all PXP sockets are closed. An error (Transport Shutting) is
returned to all open sockets. Until this error is received by the user and
the reply sent to TCP/PXP by NetIPC, the network transport does not
terminate. The Network Services shut down completely even if an
NSCONTROL ABORT has not been issued. However, it is important that
user applications always have a send or receive posted on any open
socket so that the shutdown error is delivered to them.
The only way to tell if the network transport has completely shut down
is to check the log file for the Control Process; Transport Stopped and
the TCP SIP/ General Protocol Stop nodal log messages. If these
messages have not been logged, the network transport is waiting for an
open socket and cannot completely terminate. The network transport
may be re-initialized even though the “old” transport has not
completely terminated. The two versions do not interfere with each
other, and the old one goes away when its last open socket is finally
closed. This old transport does not use any CPU and does not retain
“ownership” of the links, but the data structures that wait on the open
connection do use virtual memory.
If you find any of these indications, check any NetIPC applications for a
faulty shutdown procedure. Refer to the NetIPC 3000/XL
Programmer’s Reference Manual.
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Chapter 5
6
Using NETTOOL
The NETTOOL utility allows you to run a complete set of networking
diagnostic programs under a common user interface. It provides help
information on its commands and on its core functions. It also allows
you to add your own applications, so that you can perform diagnostic
operations common to your site while taking advantage of the NETTOOL
user interface and facilities.
This chapter describes NETTOOL and its operation. It includes
information on the following topics:
• Tools available in NETTOOL.
• How to use NETTOOL.
• How to use each of the NETTOOL tools.
• How to add your own tools to NETTOOL.
79
Using NETTOOL
NETTOOL Tools
NETTOOL Tools
Each of the NETTOOL tools provides a specific functionality that will
assist you in troubleshooting network problems, monitoring resources,
or simply accessing information about your network and its operations.
Types of Tools
There are three types of tools that run in the NETTOOL environment.
Core tools and Associated tools are provided by Hewlett-Packard and
are always available to you. User tools are applications that you
develop at your local site but choose to attach to the NETTOOL utility for
ease of use and convenience. Instructions for attaching user tools are
included later in this chapter.
Core Tools
Core tools are those tools that are an integral part of the NETTOOL
package. Core tools run only as part of NETTOOL and have a consistent
user interface. While running a core tool, you can use any of the
NETTOOL commands and access the NETTOOL help system. Help is
available on all aspects of the core tools. All core tools recognize
[CONTROL]-Y inputs.
Associated Tools
Associated tools are tools that were developed as standalone programs
but that Hewlett-Packard has attached to the NETTOOL environment for
convenience. These are programs that have proven useful for one
purpose or another.
Because associated tools were developed independently of NETTOOL,
they may have a different look and feel from the core tools. While you
are running an associated tool from within NETTOOL, you will not be
able to access the NETTOOL commands or help information.
User Provided Tools
User provided tools are programs that you have developed locally but
wish to include as part of the NETTOOL environment. You can provide
your own help information for user tools and access the information
using the NETTOOL facility. However, NETTOOL help information will not
be available from within a user tool.
A major advantage to attaching user tools to NETTOOL is that you are
then able to run all such tools from one point in the MPE file system.
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Chapter 6
Using NETTOOL
NETTOOL Tools
Differences
Table 6-1 summarizes the differences between core tools, associated
tools, and user tools.
Table 6-1
Differences in Tool Types
Core
Associated
User
Consistent user interface
Yes
No
No
Access NETTOOL help within tool
Yes
No
No
Use NETTOOL global commands
Yes
No
No
Control-Y recognized
Yes
Tool dependent
Tool dependent
Run standalone
No
Yes
Yes
HP factory support
Yes
Yes
No
Chapter 6
81
Using NETTOOL
NETTOOL Tools
Available Tools
Table 6-2 summarizes the tools available in NETTOOL, the type of each
tool, and the function of each tool.
Table 6-2
The NETTOOL Tools
Tool
Type
Function
CONFIGURATION SUMMARY
Core
Displays a summary of the information in the
configuration or directory file.
filters
Core
Displays global filter setup.
IPCINT
Associated
Provides a command interface to IPC.
LOOPINIT
Associated
Monitors round-trip response time between nodes.
NAME-ADDRESS MANAGER
Core
Displays local cache of node names and addresses.
NMDUMP
Associated
Provides formatting and analysis capabilities for
system dumps.
NSTEST
Associated
Interactively provides a quick validation of the
Network Services.
NSLOGON
Associated
Establishes temporary connections between nodes
to quickly validate the network transport.
PING
Core
Allows the local system to send a message to one
or more remote nodes and examine their
response.
QVALNS
Associated
Provides a quick validation of the Network
Services. Runs in program mode.
RESOURCE MONITOR
Core
Displays the internal resources for the network
transport.
SOCKINFO
Associated
Displays socket information.
STATUS
Core
Displays the status of the network interfaces and
the associated links.
X25CHECK
Associated
Creates connections to remote X.25 nodes and
verifies their response.
X25STAT
Associated
Monitors the status and statistics for X.25
network interfaces. Also displays internal data
structures.
XPPERF
Associated
Provides a cursory performance measurement.
XPVAL
Associated
Provides a quick validation of the network
transport.
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Using NETTOOL
Using NETTOOL
Using NETTOOL
You can run NETTOOL either interactively or through a batch job. In
interactive mode, you can take advantage of the flexibility provided by
the NETTOOL menu structure. You can also access the available help
information.
If you need to perform a simple operation, however, you might choose to
run in program mode, passing the information required to run the tool
you have chosen in the run command.
Running NETTOOL Interactively
To run NETTOOL interactively, perform the following steps.
1. Enter the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Enter the command from the main menu that corresponds to the tool
that you want to use. NETTOOL will launch the tool you select.
3. For instructions on running a tool, see the section that describes that
tool.
NOTE
NETTOOL can also accept an info string from the :RUN command. For
example, you could enter the following command to run the
NAME-ADDRESS MANAGER to display the name cache:
:RUN NETTOOL.NET.SYS;INFO="NAMEADDR;CACHE;NAME;QUIT"
Getting Help
Help is available on any command that is valid at the current point in
the NETTOOL command tree. It is not possible, however, to direct the
output of a help request using the OUTFILE command.
• To see a list of the commands available at the current menu, type:
HELP (or ?)
• To see a list of the available commands with a one line description,
type:
HELP COMMANDS
• To see a description of a specific NETTOOL command, type:
HELP commandname
If the same command is available in several menus, the help
Chapter 6
83
Using NETTOOL
Using NETTOOL
information you see will be the information that pertains to the way
the command operates for the current menu. Abbreviations are not
allowed for the command name.
• To get general information on NETTOOL use, type:
HELP OPERATION
• To get help on adding comments to input scripts, type:
HELP COMMENT
• To get help on executing MPE commands from within NETTOOL (the
colon capability), type:
HELP COLON
• To browse the entire help text, type:
HELP BROWSE
Using Commands
To execute a command within NETTOOL, you enter the command and
any parameters required for the desired execution of the command.
Each menu provides a list of the commands that are available at that
point in the NETTOOL utility. Commands may be abbreviated.
Commands may be chained together, up to 150 characters total.
Separate the individual commands by semicolons. For example:
NAMEADDR;CACHE;OUTFILE myfile;FILTERS
If any command requires the inclusion of a semicolon, then that
command must be the last one in a command string.
Global Commands
A number of commands are available from all NETTOOL menus. These
commands are listed below along with their function.
DATA
Enable/disable NETTOOL data going to $STDLIST. If you
have not defined an output file with an OUTFILE
command, data will go to $STDLIST regardless of this
setting. If you have defined an output file and the data
flag is on, data goes to both $STDLIST and the data file.
If you have defined an output file and the data flag is
off, data goes only to the data file. The data flag is on by
default. See also MESSAGES command.
DEBUG
Enter the MPE debug facility. Return to NETTOOL when
done.
DO
Execute a specific command from the redo stack, using
the syntax DO commandnumber. If no commandnumber is
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Using NETTOOL
Using NETTOOL
specified, execute the previous command.
EXIT
Step back one level in the command menus. If you enter
this command from the root level, NETTOOL will prompt
you to determine if you really meant to quit.
HELP
See a list of commands available.
HELP ALL
View all the help text for the current menu.
HELP BROWSE Browse through the entire help file for all of NETTOOL.
HELP COMMANDS See a list of commands with one line descriptions.
HELP command Get detailed help on the specified command.
INFILE
Redirect NETTOOL input commands from the file
specified, using the syntax INFILE
filename[.group[.account]]. NETTOOL will read and
execute commands from this file until all commands are
executed or an error is encountered in the command
input.
LISTREDO
Show a list of previously executed commands (the redo
stack).
MAIN
Return directly to the root menu.
MANUAL
Format the NETTOOL manual into a file for printing.
MENUS
Turn on/off the available commands display. Command
displays are on by default.
MESSAGES
Enable/disable NETTOOL messages going to an OUTFILE.
If the messages flag is on, messages will go to the file
defined in the OUTFILE command, if the file exists. If
the messages flag is off, messages will go only to
$STDLIST. It is not possible to prevent messages from
going to $STDLIST. The messages flag is on by default.
See also DATA command.
OUTFILE
Redirect NETTOOL output to the file specified, using the
syntax OUTFILE filename[.group[.account]]. The
redirection will remain in effect until you issue a new
command to specify a different output file, cancel
redirection by entering the OUTFILE RESET command,
or exit NETTOOL.
QUIT
Exit NETTOOL from any point in the menus.
REDO
Make changes to last command and then execute the
command again. You can choose a command from the
redo stack by specifying its command number using the
syntax REDO commandnumber. The “d”, “i”, and “r” edit
commands are allowed as well as direct replacement.
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SETVAR
Set variable to given value using the syntax SETVAR
variable value.
SHOWVARS
Show the variables in use.
VERSION
Display the revision numbers of NETTOOL modules and
of the NS transport.
:
Interactively execute MPE commands.
:MPEcommand Execute one or more MPE commands then return to
NETTOOL.
#
Designates a comment. Comments may be inserted in a
command string or in an INFILE record. Comments
must be separated from any previous text in a record or
string by a semicolon.
?
Shows the current menu.
Running NETTOOL in Batch Mode
You can run NETTOOL from a job with very few restrictions. The
commands can come from either a job file or from an input file. For
example, you could use the following job to print a copy of the NETTOOL
manual in batch mode:
!job nettool,user/userpass.account/acctpass;outclass=pp,2
!nettool.net.sys
:file printdev;dev=pp;env=elite2.hpenv.sys
manual
*printdev
60
quit
!eoj
You could perform the same operation using an INFILE for the user
input, as follows:
!job nettool,user/userpass.account/acctpass;outclass=pp,2
!nettool.net.sys;info=“infile filename”
!eoj
The input file must contain all the user input, including the QUIT
command.
Keep the following in mind when running NETTOOL in batch mode:
• Be sure to consider any optional parameters. For example, if an
output file for a command might already exist, you will need to tell
the program whether or not to purge it.
• Help is not available on the commands or user tools if an INFILE is
active.
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Using the NETTOOL Tools
The following sections describe each of the available tools and provide
information on their use. You can access additional information from
within NETTOOL by asking for help on the tool from the main menu.
NOTE
You can use abbreviations for the NETTOOL commands. The
abbreviations must uniquely identify the command at the current
menu.
CONFIGURATION SUMMARY
The CONFIGURATION SUMMARY tool provides options that let you display
information from the network configuration and network directory files.
To use this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the CONFIGURATION SUMMARY tool from the main menu by
entering the CONFIG command. A new menu will appear.
3. Select the menu item or items needed to display the information you
want to see. The available choices are described as follows.
SUMMARY
Select this command to generate a summary of the
configuration file, NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS. Optionally, you
can specify a different configuration file using the
syntax:
SUMMARY confilename
You can also specify a different file using the conffile
command.
NETDIR
Select this command to generate a summary of the
network directory file, NSDIR.NET.SYS.
COMPARE
Select this command to compare the contents of two
configuration files. You can specify the files to use in the
command, using the syntax:
COMPARE altfile conffile
If you do not specify an altfile, the program will
prompt you for one. If you do not specify a conffile,
the program will use NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS.
You can limit the comparison to just a subset of records
using the subtree option.
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filters
This option displays the current values of the global
filters, conffile, altfile, and subtree, as well as the
current settings of the global filters.
conffile
Use this option to select a configuration file for the
SUMMARY and COMPARE options.
altfile
Use this option to select an alternate file for the
COMPARE option.
subtree
Allows you to specify a subset of records to be compared
by the COMPARE option. For example, if you specify
NETXPORT.NI.LAN1, the program will check only those
screens in the file whose name starts with
NETXPORT.NI.LAN1.
To set this value back to the default (root), press
[RETURN] at the subtree prompt.
Filters
The filters tool displays global filter setup.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the filters tool from the main menu by entering the filters
command. Filter options will be displayed as follows:
NOTE
INFILE:
default
none
OUTFILE:
default
none
MESSAGES FLAG:
default
none
DATA FLAG:
default
none
MENUS FLAG:
default
none
NODE NAME FILTER:
default
none
IP address:
default
none
GFLAGS
default
none
GFLAGS is a toggle key. It could be “SET” or “NOT SET” by typing
“GF”.
If GFLAGS is “SET” then global and local filters will be the same.
If GFLAGS is “NOT SET” then only the local filter will change and local
will take priority over the global filter.
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IPCINT
The IPCINT tool provides a command interface to IPC. To use this tool,
perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the IPCINT tool from the main menu.
3. Enter a NetIPC intrinsic abbreviation. You will be prompted for any
parameters required by the intrinsic.
4. To exit the tool, type ex at the prompt.
IPCINT creates a log file, IPCLOG, to track its actions.
LOOPINIT
The LOOPINIT tool sends a series of packets to a specific remote node
and monitors the round-trip response time. It displays the minimum
time, maximum time, and the average time. To use this tool, perform
the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the LOOPINIT tool from the main menu.
3. You will be prompted for a remote node name. Enter the name of the
node that you want the test packets sent to. If you wish, you may
enter the local node name.
4. You will be prompted to specify information on frame text or for
frame length, if you do not specify frame text. Enter values as
required.
5. You will be prompted for the number of frames to be sent. Enter the
number desired.
LOOPINIT will display the minimum, maximum, and average times, in
milliseconds, required for the frames to make the round trip. It will also
allow you to display a histogram which graphically represents the
times. If you choose not to display the histogram, simply enter an N at
the prompt.
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NAME-ADDRESS MANAGER
The NAME-ADDRESS MANAGER tool provides options that let you display
the local cache of node names and addresses. This tool is useful in
detecting duplicate IP addresses and permits you to clear entries in the
name cache if necessary. To use this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the NAME-ADDRESS MANAGER tool from the main menu by
entering the NAMEADDR command. A new menu will appear.
3. Select the menu item or items needed to display the information you
want to see. The available choices are described as follows.
CACHE
90
Select this item to display or delete information stored
in the name and address cache. A new menu will
appear presenting you with the choices as described:
NAME
Select to display name cache entries as
specified by nodefilter. If looking for
duplicate IP addresses, set nodefilter
to @. (If the filter is not set, it displays
all names.)
DELNAME
Select to delete a name entry from
cache. Syntax is DELPATH nodename.
This is useful in case of a duplicate
name in the name cache.
DELPATH
Select to delete a name entry from
cache plus IP address mapping. Syntax
is DELPATH nodename.
LOCAL
Select to display local node name.
TOTALS
Select to display total number of names
in cache and total number of names in
directory.
filters
Select to see current filter settings for
this menu. Also displays the global
settings (INFILE, OUTFILE, messages
flag, data flag, and menus flag).
nodefilter
Select to set the name filter (@, #, and ?
wildcards are allowed).
ipfilter
Select to set the IP address filter. Enter
a single address or @ for all. Enter the
IP address as four positive integers
between 0 and 255 separated by
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periods or blanks (for example,
15.123.44.98).
MAPPINGS
Select this item to obtain information about the
correspondence between IP addresses and link
addresses or to delete mappings from the table. A new
menu will appear presenting you with the choices as
described:
MAPPING
Select to display all mappings between
IP address and link address for those
entries selected by subnetfilter and
addrfilter.
DELMAPPING
Select to delete mapping information of
IP address to network address. Syntax
is DELMAPPING ipaddress. For
example,
DELMAPPING 15.13.128.1
TOTALS
Select to display total number of
mappings.
filters
Select to see current filter settings for
this menu. Also displays the global
settings (INFILE, OUTFILE, messages
flag, data flag, and menus flag)
subnetfilter Select to set the subnet filter. Specify
the name used in the NETCONTROL
command.
ROUTING
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addrfilter
Select to set the address filter. You will
be prompted for the address type.
Enter IP, ETHER802, X25, or NONE as
required.
sorting
Select to specify the sorting method for
the output of the MAPPING option. You
will be prompted for the sort type.
Enter IP or LINKADDR as desired.
Select this item to obtain information about the
gateways used to access different subnets. A new menu
will appear presenting you with the choices as
described:
ROUTING
Select to display routing information as
specified by the networkfilter and
gatewayfilter settings.
DELROUTING
Select to delete specified routing.
GATELIST
List all started DCNs, (gateways).
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GATE UP
A specific gateway (Active).
GATE DOWN
A specific gateway (Not Active).
STATISTICS
Display the statistics; IP Route
statistics, IP update routing table etc.
TOTALS
Select to display total number of
routings.
filters
Select to see current filter settings for
this menu. Also displays the global
settings (INFILE, OUTFILE, messages
flag, data flag, and menus flag).
networkfilter Select to set the networkfilter.
Enter a single IP address or @ for all.
Enter the IP address as four positive
integers between 0 and 255 separated
by periods (for example,
15.123.44.98).
gatewayfilter Select to set the gatewayfilter.
Enter a single gateway IP address or @
for all. Enter the IP address as four
positive integers between 0 and 255
separated by periods (for example,
15.123.44.98).
PATH
92
Select to obtain information about the different
addresses or names used at different layers in order to
access a remote destination. You will be prompted to
specify the type of information you need. Enter NAME or
ADDRESS as desired.
NAME
Select to display addresses at different
levels.
ADDRESS
Select IP address to get corresponding
path information for that IP address.
filters
Select to see current global filter
settings. Displays the settings of
INFILE, OUTFILE, messages flag, data
flag, and menus flag.
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NMDUMP
NMDUMP is one of the node management services (NMS) utilities. You use
this tool to decode and format log records or trace messages so that they
can be more easily read and analyzed.
NOTE
You cannot use NMDUMP to format X.25 log or trace files. For information
on X.25 logging and tracing, refer to Using the OpenView DTC Manager
for PC-based systems or to Configuring and Managing Host-Based X.25
Links for host-based systems.
Perform the following steps to format records from the current log file.
1. At the MPE prompt, enter the SHOWNMLOG command to obtain the
name of the current log file. Record this name. You will need to enter
the name of the file you want to format when you run NMDUMP.
2. At the MPE prompt, enter the SWITCHNMLOG command to close the
current log file and begin recording log and trace information to a
new log file.
3. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
4. Select the formatting tool from the main menu by entering the
NMDUMP command. The NMDUMP menu will appear.
5. Select the menu options that will allow you to specify the type of
records to format (log or trace).
6. Select additional menu options as required to specify the exact
information you want to format.
7. When prompted for the name of a file to format, enter the file name
you recorded in step 1. You will also be prompted to enter a name for
the output file. The default output file is $STDLIST.
8. To exit NMDUMP at any time, enter // at any prompt.
See Using the Node Management Services (NMS) Utilities for more
information on the options available in NMDUMP.
NSTEST
The NSTEST tool allows you to test the Network Services interactively.
To use this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
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The root menu will appear.
2. Select the NSTEST tool from the main menu.
3. When prompted, enter the name of the service you want to test. You
should always test VT first so that NSTEST can set up a remote
session.
4. When prompted, enter the name of the destination node to which
you want to connect.
5. When prompted, enter a logon string for the destination node. Enter
other values as required. The tool will test the Network Service you
selected.
6. Test other services as required.
NSLOGON
The NSLOGON tool allows you quickly verify that the network transport
is operating correctly. It uses the NetIPC intrinsics to establish a
connection to a well-known server on a remote node. Therefore, both the
network transport and the Network Services must be started on all
nodes before you use this tool. You can choose whether to contact all
nodes or selected nodes by responding to the NSLOGON prompts. To use
this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the NSLOGON tool from the main menu.
3. You will be prompted to specify whether or not you want to logon to
all nodes in the directory. Answer yes or press [RETURN] to logon to
all nodes, otherwise answer no.
4. Respond to additional prompts as required.
5. NSLOGON will produce a list of node names along with an indication of
whether or not the logon to each node was successful.
PING
The PING tool allows you to test remote connections by sending
messages to one or more remote nodes and examining their response.
To use this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
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2. Select the PING tool from the main menu by entering the PING
command. A new menu will appear.
3. Select the menu item or items needed to perform the PING requests
you want to perform. The available choices are described here.
PING
This option sends ICMP echo requests to remote
systems. On receiving the ICMP echo replies, the
program displays the number of packets sent and
received and the time that it took each packet to
complete the round trip.
You can specify the destination by name or by IP
address. If you specify by name, you can choose a single
node or a set of nodes by using wildcards (@, #, and ?). If
you specify by address, the ping will go to that specific
address. Enter the IP address as four positive integers
between 0 and 255 separated by periods or blanks (for
example, 15.123.44.98).
RANGEPING
Use to send ping messages to a range of IP addresses.
The syntax is RANGEPING lowerip higherip. Enter
the IP address as four positive integers between 0 and
255 separated by periods (for example, 15.123.44.98).
If you do not enter the boundary IP addresses the
program will prompt for them.
GATEPING
Use to send ping messages to each of the existing
gateways in the nodes routing table.
filters
Select to see current filter settings for this menu. Also
displays the global settings (INFILE, OUTFILE,
messages flag, data flag, and menus flag).
number
Use to specify the number of packets the program sends
for each request. The range is from 1 to 1,000,000. The
default is 5.
size
Use to specify the size of the packets the program sends
for each request. The range is from 8 to 2,048 bytes.
The default is 64.
nodefilter
Use to select multiple nodes to be acted on by
subsequent PING requests (@, #, and ? wildcards are
allowed).
ipfilter
Use to select a remote IP address to be acted on by
subsequent PING requests. Enter the IP address as four
positive integers between 0 and 255 separated by
periods or blanks (for example, 15.123.44.98).
Standalone PING requires periods.
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QVALNS
The QVALNS tool allows you to test the Network Services in program
mode. To use this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Make sure the network transport and Network Services are running
on all nodes that are to be a part of this test.
2. Run the NETTOOL utility by entering the program name:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
3. Enter QVALNS to run the Network Services validation in batch mode.
4. When prompted, enter the name of the destination node to which
you want to connect. (This is the same as entering the command RUN
QVALNS.NET.SYS;INFO=nodename outside of NETTOOL.)
5. QVALNS will stream a job that tests the network services. The
program will display any errors encountered on the system console.
RESOURCE MONITOR
The RESOURCE MONITOR tool provides options that let you display
resource usage according to the current settings of the resource filters.
To use this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the RESOURCE MONITOR tool from the main menu by entering
the RESOURCE command. A new menu will appear.
3. Select the menu item or items needed to display the resource
information you want to see. The available choices are described
here.
DISPLAY
Use to display resource usage for the resources
specified by the type parameter.
CLEAR
Use to set the high-water mark values for a chosen item
to zero.
RESET
Use to reset all resource filter values to their defaults.
filters
Select to see current filter settings for this menu. Also
displays the global settings (INFILE, OUTFILE,
messages flag, data flag, and menus flag).
detail
Use to toggle between detailed (verbose) and one-line
(non-verbose) modes. Verbose mode displays
information about a particular item detailing
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interpretation of resource usage and pointing to
possible relationships with configurable parameters.
Non-verbose mode displays current, maximum
experienced (high-water mark), and maximum
allowable usage for the resources specified. Default is
non-verbose.
item
Use to select a particular item from the one-line display
so that you can obtain detailed information on that
item.
refresh
Use to set the number of times the program will display
resource usage before returning control to you. Default
is one cycle. Selecting [CONTROL]-Y will also return
control.
type
Use to select which resource types the program will
display in the one-line (non-verbose) mode. Default is to
display all resource types.
used
Use to suppress display of entries that are currently
unused. Default is to display resources regardless of
usage.
delay
Use to select the interval (in seconds) between displays
of resource usage. Use this option in conjunction with
refresh in order to monitor the activity of resource
usage. Default is a delay of 1 second.
SOCKINFO
The SOCKINFO tool displays sockets information.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the SOCKINFO tool from the main menu by entering the
following SOCKINFO syntax:
SOCKINFO [filter][,pin]
filter
program name in the form: file.group.account; or
user name in the form: user.account.
pin
display for the specified PIN instead of starting out
in Global Display.
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3. If filters are not used, SOCKINFO will print a Global Display like the
following:
GLOBAL DISPLAY
Host=sampsys
Gsxds=$a.d5690000 10:30 am
------------------------------------------------------------------------Pin User
Program
Job
Pri
Skts
59 (system process)
snmp.net.sys
cq152
2
61 (system process)
sockreg.net.sys
lq149
1
63 (system process)
dsdad.net.sys
lq149
14
69 joe.mpe
vtserver.net.sys
s538
lq100
1
70 bob.mpeix
vtserver.net.sys
s546
lq100
1
79 spool,unispool.sys
system3.unispool.sys
j138
de208
2
80 spool,unispool.sys
system6.unispool.sys
j138
de202
0
81 spool,unispool.sys
system6.unispool.sys
j138
de202
1
82 spool,unispool.sys
system3.unispool.sys
j138
de206
0
: etc...
447 veruser.nmpascal
vtserver.net.sys
s570
lq152
1
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Totals: 153 processes, including 1 locked semaphore; 177 sockets.
4. Select the options needed to display the information you want to see
by typing one of the single characters as shown here:
98
?
Print help text.
:
Enter MPE command mode.
A
For an interpreted and raw dump of a socket data
structure. (PM capability required, must be in
Process Display mode)
C
List all open call sockets and datagram sockets.
D
Call HPDEBUG. (PM capability required)
E
Exit this program.
F
Define Global Display filters.
G
Enter Global Display mode.
H
Print a history of processes displayed.
I
List configured IP addresses.
L
Display locked LSI semaphore entries. (PM
capability required)
M
Toggle display of internet address/host name in
Socket Display.
O
Toggle display of object addresses, enter Global
Display.
P
Enter Process Display mode.
Q
Enable/disable semaphore queuing. (Default is to
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not queue)
R
Enter Destination Display mode. (Must be in
Process mode)
S
For an interpreted dump of a socket data structure.
(Must be in Process Display mode)
T
Enable/disable tracing.
V
Print the SOCKINFO version number.
Y
Define new timeout value, in seconds. (Default is 0 :
disabled)
5. To return to NETTOOL, type E.
STATUS
The STATUS tool provides options that let you display the status of the
network interfaces and their associated links. To use this tool, perform
the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the STATUS tool from the main menu by entering the STATUS
command. A new menu will appear.
3. Select the menu item or items needed to display the information you
want to see. The available choices are described here.
NOTE
NODE
Select to display the local node name, the domain name
if one is configured, the CPU type, the MPE version, the
transport version, and the transport start time. The
display information is from the configuration file (not
the name cache displayed when you use the
NAME-ADDRESS tool).
INTERFACES
Use to obtain a list of all the network interfaces and the
links configured for those NIs. (You can obtain
additional information about the links using the
LINKCONTROL command or the X25STAT tool. You can
obtain additional information about NIs using the
NETCONTROL command.)
TCPSTAT
Use to display TCP global statistics and connection
table information. Available commands for the TCPSTAT
menu are TCPGLOBAL, CONNTABLE, and
CONNINFORMATION.
CONNINFORMATION — function not available at this time.
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IPSTAT
Use to display IP statistics for the network specified by
niname. If you have not set niname, you will see
statistics for all NIs.
LKSTAT
Use to display statistics for the link whose name has
been set by lkname. If you have not set lkname you will
see statistics for all links. (The statistics shown will be
the same as those displayed by the LINKCONTROL
command.)
PROBESTAT
Use to display probe statistics for inbound and
outbound packets for the network specified by niname.
If you have not set niname, you will see statistics for all
NIs.
ARPSTAT
Use to display ARP statistics for the network specified
by the niname command. If you have not set niname,
you will see statistics for all NIs.
UDPSTAT
Use to display global UDP statistics or to report UDP
sockets statistics information for the network specified
by niname. If you have not set niname, you will see
statistics for all NIs.
filters
Select to see current filter settings for this menu. Also
displays the global settings (INFILE, OUTFILE,
messages flag, data flag, and menus flag)
niname
Use to set the name of the network interface for the
ARPSTAT, IPSTAT, PROBESTAT, TCPSTAT, and UDPSTAT
commands to act upon. The default is @ (display
statistics for all NIs).
lkname
Use to set the name of the link for the LKSTAT command
to act upon.
detail
Use this toggle to specify the level of detail that the
program will display. If this filter is set, the program
will display full statistics for the link. If it is not set, the
program will display only summary statistics.
refresh
Use to set the number of times the program will display
statistics before returning control to you. Default is one
cycle. Selecting [CONTROL]-Y will also return control.
delay
Use to set the number of seconds which will be inserted
as a delay after each statistics display. If the refresh
filter is set to a value of 1, the delay filter has no effect.
If you enter the delay command and press [RETURN],
the default value of 1 second is set.
Note that the delay time is in addition to any
processing time for the program. That is, setting a
delay of 1 does not guarantee that the statistics
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measurements will occur at one second intervals. You
should view this parameter as a means of causing
successive measurements to be space by at least the
delay time.
recent
Use this filter to select whether the displayed statistics
will be adjusted to show only the data which occurred
recently. If the flag is not set (the default), the program
will display all statistics totals.
X25CHECK
The X25CHECK tool creates connections to remote X.25 nodes and
verifies their response. It also provides information that allows
estimation of the performance of the network and its load. The remote
node runs a background program, X25SERVR, that responds to
X25CHECK. To use this tool, perform the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the X25CHECK tool from the main menu.
3. You will be prompted for a remote node name and network name.
Enter the name of the node and network that you want the test
packets sent to. If you wish, you may enter the local node name.
4. X25CHECK will set up a VC to the remote node and send ten
messages. The remote node will echo the messages back. At the end
of the test, the program clears the connection but keeps the server
running so that you can set up a connection to if different node if you
desire.
5. To terminate the server, use [BREAK] and ABORT or ABORTJOB.
X25STAT
The X25STAT tool monitors the status and statistics for X.25 network
interfaces It displays internal data structures. To use this tool, perform
the following steps.
1. Run NETTOOL by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the X25STAT tool from the main menu.
3. You will be prompted to enter either a table specification or a counter
specification; both cannot be entered on the same command line. (If
an NI name is not entered on the command line, X25STAT will
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display only the started X.25 NI.)
4. The program will display the contents of the internal X.25 tables.
The information prints only once. To get new, updated information,
you will need to run X25STAT again.
XPPERF
The XPPERF tool measures the performance of the TCP/IP protocol
stack, the UDP/IP stack, or X.25 level 3 direct access. The program
interfaces to the transport through the IPC intrinsics. You must run
XPPERF on both the local system and a remote system for the test to
work, with the program on the remote system started first. To use this
tool, perform the following steps.
1. Have someone at the remote location run NETTOOL on the remote
system by entering the program name at the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. The remote user should select the XPPERF tool from the main menu.
3. The remote user will be prompted for the protocol, the mode
(master/slave), and other test values. The user must specify slave as
the mode. The remote user should set other values as agreed upon.
4. Run NETTOOL on the local system by entering the program name at
the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
5. Select the XPPERF tool from the main menu.
6. Respond to the prompts as required, or press [RETURN] to accept
defaults. For the local system, you must specify master as the mode.
7. XPPERF will write the measured data to a file named XPERFD in the
local group.
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XPVAL
The XPVAL tool provides a quick validation of the transport by setting
up a connection between two nodes. You must run XPVAL on both the
local system and a remote system for the test to work, with the program
on the local system started first. To use this tool, perform the following
steps.
1. Run NETTOOL on the local system by entering the program name at
the MPE prompt:
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
The root menu will appear.
2. Select the XPVAL tool from the main menu.
3. XPVAL will prompt you for information it needs to run the validation.
Respond as required.
4. Make sure XPVAL is running on the remote node as well and have the
remote user enter information about the remote node.
5. XPVAL will run a one minute connection test to verify the operation of
the transport and report any errors it encounters.
See Chapter 2 , “Operating Your Network,” for a list of XPVAL line
test error messages.
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Adding Your Own Tools
Adding Your Own Tools
You can add you own diagnostic tools to by following some simple rules.
You can also provide help information on the user-provided tools.
Add User Tools
Information needed to run a user-provided tool must reside in
USERINFO.NET.SYS. You can create this file with any text editor. It
must have a record length of 80 characters or less.
You can describe up to 20 user tools in the file. For each tool, two types
of entries are needed: the one word command which will initiate the
tool from the root level of NETTOOL, and a list of the MPE commands
required to start the tool (as if it were being used standalone).
The first character in the tool command must be alphabetic. The
command can be up to 20 characters in length. It must not duplicate
any NETTOOL global command, core tool name, or associated tool name.
The first character in a line containing an MPE command must be an
exclamation mark. Characters may be either lower or upper case, but
NETTOOL does not distinguish between the two. NETTOOL does not
interpret the string after the exclamation mark in any way. Up to 79
characters may follow the exclamation mark.
The list of MPE commands must follow the command name. For
example, a valid set of entries in the file might be:
NEATPROG2
!file input=fromhere.pub.sys
!file output=tohere.net.sys
!run myprog.maui.hawaii;info="map, 26, verbose";lib=p
TESTTOOL
!run testtool.net.sys
To run MYPROG.MAUI.HAWAII from the NETTOOL root, a user would enter
the command NEATPROG2. To run TESTTOOL.NET.SYS, the user would
enter TESTTOOL.
Any first character in a line other than !, a..z, or A..Z is an error and
will cause all subsequent entries to be ignored. Also, if you specify more
than five MPE commands for a tool, all subsequent entries in the file
will be ignored. Blank lines have no effect. Lines with only a ! will be
sent to MPE as a carriage return.
A sample USERINFO file is included as part of the NETTOOL package.
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Adding Your Own Tools
Add User Provided Help
To provide help on user tools, you must create the file
USERHELP.NET.SYS. This file should contain help text for all user tools
defined in USERINFO.net.sys.
Use the following format for help text:
1. There must be an \ENTRY=ROOT block which gives a one word list of
the user-defined NETTOOL commands. These commands are the same
as those defined in USERINFO.NET.SYS. This is the text that will be
displayed when the user types help with no parameters at root level.
2. Within the \ENTRY=ROOT block, there must be an \item=commands
block that contains a one line description of the user-defined
commands that run the tools. This is the text that will be displayed
when the user types help commands at the root level.
3. Within the \ENTRY=ROOT block, there must be an
\ITEM=command_name block for each of the tools. These blocks
contain the text that is displayed when the user types help
command_name at the root level where command_name is a user
command defined in USERINFO.NET.SYS.
4. There must be an \ALL directive at the end of the help text.
A sample USERhelp file is included as part of the NETTOOL package.
For a user-defined tool defined as follows:
mytool
!file input=parms.net.sys
!run myprog.net.sys
The user help might look like this:
\ENTRY=ROOT
MYTOOL
MYTOOL
\ITEM=COMMANDS
MYTOOLExamines the path cache and purges all entries
\ITEM=MYTOOL
If you suspect that the path cache is out of unused
entries or that duplicate IP addresses have been
defined, use MYTOOL to clear the entire cache.
\ALL
1. You must format the help file into a help catalog using
MAKECAT.PUB.SYS, as follows:
file input=sourcefilename
run makecat.pub.sys,help
rename helpcat,userhelp.net.sys
reset input
Here, sourcefilename is your unformatted help file and helpcat is
the file name reserved by MAKECAT for its output.
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7
Commands
This section describes the NS 3000/iX network commands for the
NS 3000/iX services and associated links. The commands are listed in
alphabetical order and described in Table 7-1.
NOTE
You must have NM capability to execute any of the following
commands.
Table 7-1
NS 3000/iX Network Commands
Command
Description
LINKCONTROL
Provides link information, or activates or deactivates link level
tracing.
LINKCONTROL STATUS
Requests status information about the link.
LINKCONTROL TRACE
Activates or deactivates link level tracing.
NETCONTROL
Initiates, terminates, and controls the operation of the network
transport.
NETCONTROL ADDLINK
Dynamically adds a configured network link to the active network
configuration.
NETCONTROL DELLINK
Dynamically deletes a configured network link from the active
network configuration.
NETCONTROL START
Initiates the network transport functional entities.
NETCONTROL STATUS
Displays the status of the network transport functional entities.
NETCONTROL STOP
Terminates the network transport functional entities. Immediately
terminates the Network Services. (You should always terminate
Network Services via NSCONTROL commands first.)
NETCONTROL TRACE
Enables or disables message tracing for a specified network
transport functional entity.
NETCONTROL UPDATE
Dynamically updates selected network transport configuration
parameters for an active network interface.
NETCONTROL VERSION
Displays the version of the software modules of the network
transport.
NSCONTROL
Initiates, terminates and controls the operation of the Network
Services.
NSCONTROL ABORT
Immediately terminates the Network Services.
NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON
Enables or disables the autologon feature for the NFT, RFA, and
RPM remote network services.
NSCONTROL LOADKEYS
Loads the Network Services command keywords. Used for
localization.
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Commands
Table 7-1
NS 3000/iX Network Commands
Command
Description
NSCONTROL LOG
Enables or disables detailed logging (configured as CLAS0004 of
SUB0006) for the Network Services.
NSCONTROL SERVER
Alters the characteristics of the Network Services server processes.
NSCONTROL START
Initiates the Network Services.
NSCONTROL STATUS
Displays status information about the Network Services.
NSCONTROL STOP
Allows existing users to continue with current task, but prevents
initiation of any new tasks or new users for the Network Services.
NSCONTROL VERSION
Displays the version of the software modules of the Network
Services.
RESUMENMLOG
Resumes logging after a recoverable error.
SHOWNMLOG
Displays the identification number and available space of the log
file.
SWITCHNMLOG
Closes the current log file and creates and opens a new one.
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LINKCONTROL
LINKCONTROL
Activates or deactivates link level tracing on a specified
communications link. Provides link transmission error statistics and/or
configuration information.
Syntax
LINKCONTROL linkname
[A(ll)
]
[C(onfiguration)]
{;STATUS=} [L(inkstate)
]
{,
} [S(tat)istics)) ]
[D(iag(stats)) ]
[R(eset)
]
[,DATA
]
[ON] [,ALL
]
LINKCONTROL Linkname;TRACE=[OFF] [,PARTIAL][,buffsize][,tracefile]
[,FULL
]
Use
Available
In Session?
In Job?
In Break?
Programmatically?
Breakable?
Capabilities?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
NM
Parameters
linkname
The configured name of an active data communications
link. Only the link name specified in the LINK portion
of the configuration file (@LINK.linkname) is valid. The
character @ may be used to signify all active links.
(Partial wildcards, such as [email protected], are not allowed,
however.)
STATUS
Requests status information about the link. May not be
used with the TRACE option. For all options, displays the
linkname, linktype, and additional information as
follows:
ALL
Chapter 7
Prints the information displayed by the
LINKSTATE, CONFIGURATION, and
STATISTICS parameters. These
parameters are described more fully
later in this section. Additional
information about the LINKCONTROL
command and its parameters can be
109
Commands
LINKCONTROL
found in Appendix A ,
“LINKCONTROL Command.”
CONFIGURATION Prints the information displayed by
the LINKSTATE parameter along with
link configuration information for the
link. The link configuration data
consists mainly of the configuration
information that was input for this link
during NMMGR configuration. The
fields that are displayed by this
parameter are described in Appendix
A , “LINKCONTROL Command.”
LINKSTATE
Prints link status information,
including the link name, link type, and
the current status of the link.
DIAGSTATS
Prints the information displayed by the
LINKSTATE, CONFIGURATION, and
STATISTICS parameters along with
additional diagnostic statistics.
STATISTICS
Prints the information displayed by the
LINKSTATE command and link
statistics, including accumulated error
information. This includes such
information as the number of data
bytes sent and received, and the
number of frames sent and received.
The fields that are displayed by this
parameter are described in Appendix
A , “LINKCONTROL Command.”
RESET
Resets the accumulated data and link
statistics that are displayed by the
previously described parameters to 0.
Displays the same fields that are
displayed by the STATISTICS
parameter.
The STATUS and TRACE parameters are mutually
exclusive and may not be specified together in a
LINKCONTROL command.
TRACE
Activates link-level tracing. Only one active trace is
allowed per link. If a trace is already active, issuing the
command a second time will result in a TRACE
REQUEST FAILED error message (NMERR 182).
If TRACE is specified, either ON or OFF must also be
specified.
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LINKCONTROL
ON
Turns link level tracing on.
OFF
Turns link level tracing off. Any
subsequent subparameters are checked
for syntax but are otherwise ignored.
DATA
(LAN and token ring links only) Traces
all read and write requests. If neither
DATA nor ALL is specified, DATA is the
default.
ALL
(LAN and token ring links only) Traces
all read, write, control, status, and
exception requests.
PARTIAL
(Point-to-Point only) Trace all read,
write, control, status, and exception
requests. Only the first 16 bytes of data
are traced for reads or writes.
FULL
(Point-to-Point only) Traces the full
data field for all read, write, control,
status, and exception requests. If
neither PARTIAL nor FULL is specified,
PARTIAL is the default.
buffsize
The trace buffer size in memory, in
kilobytes. This area is used to buffer
trace data before it is written to disk.
Allowable values are from 1 to 16.
tracefile
Actual file designator of the disk file
where the trace is to be written. If not
specified, the trace will automatically
be written to a file with the name
NMTCnnnn.PUB.SYS, where nnnn is a
value between 0000 and 9999. If the
filename is specified without group or
account names, the current group and
account names are used.
TRACE may not be specified in a LINKCONTROL command
also containing STATUS.
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Commands
LINKCONTROL
Discussion
The LINKCONTROL command returns link statistics and configuration
information or activates or deactivates link level tracing on the
specified link. The NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS and the link must be active for
this command to be operative.
If a trace option that is inapplicable for a certain link is specified for
that link, then the default for that link type will be used.
The LINKCONTROL command does not work on an X.25 link because the
link is in the DTC. For equivalent functionality, use the OpenView DTC
Manager for PC-based X.25 links or TermDSM for host-based X.25
links.
Example 1:
LINKCONTROL SYSLINK, ALL
Linkname: SYSLINK
Linktype: IEEE8023
Physical Path:
Inbound Buffer Size:
Inbound Number of Buffers:
Inbound Buffers Available:
Current Station Address:
Default Station Address:
Current Receive Filter:
Current Multicast Addresses:
09-00-09-00-00-01
Transmits no error
Transmits error
Out of Tx bufs
Transmits deferred
Transmits 1 retry
Transmits 1 retry
Transmits 16 collisions
Transmits late collision
802 chip restarts
Heartbeat losses
Linkstate: CONNECTED
4.3
1536
64
56
08-00-09-00-EE-8C
08-00-09-00-EE-8C
bad(0) multi(1) broad(1) any(0)
19231
0
0
370
16
15
0
0
0
0
Receives no error
Receives error
Out of Rx bufs
Carrier losses
Reflectometer
CRC errors
Whole byte errors
Size range errors
Frame losses
2493981
16
2
0
0
12
11
0
10
Example 2:
:LINKCONTROL SYSLINK;TRACE=ON,DATA,8
Trace has been successfully enabled for SYSLINK.
The trace file, for SYSLINK, is NMTC0006.PUB.SYS.
:LINKCONTROL SYSLINK;TRACE=OFF
Trace has been successfully disabled for SYSLINK.
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NETCONTROL
NETCONTROL
Command used to initialize, terminate, and control the operation of the
network transport.
Syntax
{function}[;function]
NETCONTROL {entity }[;entity ]
Use
Available
In Session?
YES
In Job?
YES
In Break?
NO
Programmatically?
YES
Breakable?
NO
Capabilities?
NM
Parameters
function
Only one of each type of function is recommended on a
command line. Refer to function descriptions on the
following pages. The functions are:
ADDLINK
DELLINK
START
STATUS
STOP
TRACEOFF
TRACEON
UPDATE
VERSION
Only one of each type of function (START, TRACE, etc.)
is recommended on a command line. For example, the
command:
:NETCONTROL
TRACEON=HDM;START;TRACEON=HD;NET=LAN1
is not recommended because TRACEON appears twice
and also appears with START.
entity
One or more of the entities defined for NETCONTROL. The
keywords for these entities are shown in Figure 7-1.
NET
Specifies a group entity that consists of a network
interface which is not a gateway half, and all the
protocol modules that are configured for that network
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Commands
NETCONTROL
interface. Not all functions may be applied as a group;
see the individual command functions for details.
GATE
Specifies a group entity that consists of a configured
gateway half network interface, and all the protocol
modules that are configured for that network interface.
Not all functions may be applied as a group; see the
individual command functions for details.
Note: This keyword cannot be used to select true
“gateways” as configured in the INTERNET subtree
under a network interface.
PROT
Specifies a particular general protocol module or a
particular network interface protocol module upon
which a function will act.
NI
Specifies a particular network interface upon which a
function will act. Usually used in conjunction with the
PROT= keyword to access a particular network interface
protocol. See the individual command functions for
details.
Discussion
The NETCONTROL command is composed of functions (START, STOP,
STATUS, etc.) to be executed against one or more entities shown in
Figure 7-1.
Notice that the first seven entities are composed of groups of modules.
For example, let us look at the third entity, labeled 3. This entity,
NET=niName where niName is the configured LAN niName, combines
the network interface (NI) configured for any LAN link and the
protocols configured for that NI, which can include IP, ARP, and Probe.
The remaining three entities, numbers 8–10 in Figure 7-1, allow exact
specification of one and only one module of the network transport. This
is especially useful when troubleshooting. Refer to NETCONTROL STATUS
and NETCONTROL TRACE for more information.
For information on how the entities are affected by a particular
function, refer to the command page for that function.
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NETCONTROL
Figure 7-1
The NETCONTROL Entities
Chapter 7
115
Commands
NETCONTROL
Example
This example illustrates how each NETCONTROL command is used. See
individual commands for further details and examples.
To check the level of transport software installed, enter
:NETCONTROL VERSION
To start a transport having a LAN network named “LAN1” plus a
loopback network named “LOOP” and a router network named
“ROUTER1”, having links “PSI40” and “PSI48” under it, enter
:NETCONTROL START; NET=LAN1
:NETCONTROL START; NET=ROUTER1
:NETCONTROL START; NET=LOOP
To then enable the NS 3000/iX Services (DSCOPY, etc.), enter
:NSCONTROL START
To now take down the “PSI40” link on the “ROUTER1” network because
someone wants to use that link for RJE/iX access, (the other link
“PSI48” is still available to the router), enter
:NETCONTROL DELLINK=PSI40; NET=ROUTER1
To check if the PROBE protocol is running on the “LAN1” network,
enter
:NETCONTROL STATUS=ALL; NI=LAN1; PROT=PROBE
To bring the PSI link “PSI40” back online after RJE/iX users have
finished with it, enter
:NETCONTROL ADDLINK=PSI40; NET=ROUTER1
To update the “ROUTER1” network with new node mappings added to
the NMCONFIG file without stopping that network, enter
:NETCONTROL UPDATE=MAPPING; NET=ROUTER1
To start TCP message and data tracing for all networks (since TCP is a
general protocol), enter
:NETCONTROL TRACEON=MHD; PROT=TCP
To stop the NS 3000/iX Services, enter
:NSCONTROL STOP
To stop all networks, tracing, and the entire transport, enter
:NETCONTROL STOP
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NETCONTROL ADDLINK
NETCONTROL ADDLINK
Dynamically adds a configured network link to the active network
interface.
Syntax
NETCONTROL ADDLINK=linkName; {NET=niName
}
{GATE=gatehalfName}
Parameters
ADDLINK=linkName
Specifies the name of the link to be dynamically added
to the specified active NI. The linkname must be a valid
NI link name configured in the NMMGR Link Selection
screen and also in the Network Interface Links screen
under the specified “niname” or “gatehalfname” NI. If
already added, an “ALREADY STARTED” error will
occur, or if the linkname is not valid, a “NOT
CONFIGURED” error will occur.
NET=niName
Specifies the name of an active network interface under
which the specified linkname is configured. Enter any
valid NI name from the NMMGR Network Interface
Configuration screen which is not a gateway half. If this
NI is not active, a “NOT STARTED” error will occur.
GATE=gatehalfName
Specifies the name of an active gateway half network
interface under which the specified linkname is
configured. Enter any valid gatehalf NI name from the
NMMGR Network Interface Configuration screen. If
this NI is not active, a “NOT STARTED” error will
occur.
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Commands
NETCONTROL ADDLINK
Discussion
This command adds an already configured link to an active network
interface without having to first bring down and then restart the
network interface or the entire transport. This can be a link for a
newly-configured node mapping, a link being shared with another
subsystem such as RJE/iX or SNA/iX, or a link being restarted after an
earlier failure due to link errors. Note that some link errors are so
serious that an ADDLINK cannot restore use of the link.
The control process will create a new link driver for the specified link
and bind it to the existing network interface and its network interface
protocols.
This function is mainly used with router NI types.
Example
To add the linkname “PSI48” to the active NI “ROUTER1”, enter
:NETCONTROL ADDLINK=PSI48; NET=ROUTER1
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NETCONTROL DELLINK
NETCONTROL DELLINK
Dynamically deletes a configured network link from the active network
interface.
Syntax
NETCONTROL DELLINK=linkName; {NET =niName
}
{GATE=gatehalfName}
Parameters
DELLINK=linkName
Specifies the name of the link to be dynamically deleted
from the specified active NI. The linkname must be a
valid NI link name configured in the NMMGR Link
Selection screen and also in the Network Interface
Links screen under the specified “niname” or
“gatehalfname” NI. If already deleted, a “NOT
STARTED” error will occur, or if the linkname is not
valid, a “NOT CONFIGURED” error will occur.
NET=niName
Specifies the name of an active network interface under
which the specified linkname is configured. Enter any
valid NI name from the NMMGR Network Interface
Configuration screen which is not a gateway half. If this
NI is not active, a “NOT STARTED” error will occur.
GATE=gatehalfName
Specifies the name of an active gateway half network
interface under which the specified linkname is
configured. Enter any valid gatehalf NI name from the
NMMGR Network Interface Configuration screen. If
this NI is not active, a “NOT STARTED” error will
occur.
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Commands
NETCONTROL DELLINK
Discussion
This command deletes a previously configured and started link from an
active network interface without having to bring down the entire
network interface or transport. This command is particularly useful
when making cabling or modem changes, to make a device unusable for
security reasons, or when sharing a device with other subsystems such
as RJE/iX or SNA/iX. Certain types of errors can also sometimes be
cleared by a DELLINK followed by an ADDLINK.
The control process will unbind the network interface protocols and
network interface from the existing link driver, then terminate that
link driver. Depending on the link type, the link driver may not actually
terminate if other links are still bound. The network interface and its
protocols remain active until that NI is stopped using the NETCONTROL
STOP command.
This function is mainly used with router NI types.
Example
To delete the linkname “PSI48” from the active NI “ROUTER1”, enter
:NETCONTROL DELLINK=PSI48; NET=ROUTER1
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NETCONTROL START
NETCONTROL START
Initiates the network transport, including the control process, general
protocols, network interfaces, and their protocols. Also initiates
individual network interfaces on an active transport.
Syntax
NETCONTROL START
[;{NET=niName
}]
{GATE=gatehalfName}
Parameters
START
This function, if issued when transport is not active,
initializes the control process and general protocols.
When NET or GATE is also used, all configured protocols
and associated modules for the specified network
interface will be initialized as well, however only one
such keyword may be specified per command. If you are
starting several network interfaces, several commands
will be required.
Unless you start network interfaces, no internetwork
communications will be possible.
If the general protocols fail to start, a NETCONTROL
STOP command may be required before another start
can be attempted.
NET=niName
Specifies the name of a configured network interface to
be started. All protocols and links configured to initially
start for that NI will also be started. Enter any valid NI
name from the NMMGR Network Interface
Configuration screen which is not a gateway half. If
neither NET nor GATE are specified, only the control
process and general protocols will start. Otherwise if
this is the first START, those will be started before the
specified NET or GATE. If the specified entity is already
running, an “ALREADY STARTED” error will occur.
GATE=gatehalfName
Specifies the name of a configured gateway half
network interface to be started. All protocols and links
configured to initially start for that NI will also be
started. Enter any valid gatehalf NI name from the
NMMGR Network Interface Configuration screen. The
niName discussion for NET and GATE applies to gatehalf
name also.
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Commands
NETCONTROL START
Discussion
In order for internetwork communications to be possible, you must
activate at least one network interface using the NET keyword.
When this command is entered with an X.25 NI name, the system
accesses the DTC/X.25 Network Access subsystem to verify that the
X.25 line is started. If the line is not started, the command fails. If the
X.25 line is started, the command is successfully completed if
everything is correct. This enables the X.25 address that is associated
with this system in the DTC/X.25 Network Access, and connections can
be generated or accepted from this system.
Example 1
In Example 1, the node has one LAN link configured (LAN1) plus
loopback (LOOP). Starting the network requires issuing a NETCONTROL
START for each configured network interface (NET=niName). Once both
network interfaces (and related entities) of the network transport have
been successfully initiated, as indicated by the lack of error messages,
any other related subsystems installed on the node can be initiated.
This node, as is typically the case, has NS 3000/iX Services installed.
:NETCONTROL START;NET=LAN1
:NETCONTROL START;NET=LOOP
:NSCONTROL START
Refer to the NSCONTROL command pages in this section for more
information.
Be aware that to successfully initialize a node, the commands must be
issued in the order shown: first all required NETCONTROL commands,
then any NSCONTROL commands.
This first example provides an overview of initializing a node, showing
where NETCONTROL fits into the process. The next five examples
examine the START function and how it affects the entities defined for
initialization (Figure 7-1). As will be shown in the examples, the
keywords included with the START function and the entities affected
determine which events occur at initialization. To understand this
relationship, it is helpful to see the events that occur when the network
transport is initialized.
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NETCONTROL START
Example 2
Example 2 shows the events associated with the START function at
initiation. As indicated in the status report, the general transport is not
active. Therefore, the first events of initiation are to initialize the
control process (CP) and the general protocols. Compare the displayed
events to the defined entities of Figure 7-1. The events displayed in this
example show creation of the general protocols. The START function
always creates the control process and the general protocols, if they do
not already exist, before acting on any of the other entities.
:NETCONTROL STATUS
TRANSPORT NOT ACTIVE. (NETXPORTWARN 0001)
ENCOUNTERED ONE OR MORE WARNINGS WHILE PROCESSING COMMAND.
(CIWARN 4437)
:NETCONTROL START
** NETXPORT Control Process; Transport start
- Loc: 50; Class: 4; Parm= $0000002C; PIN: 44
** NETXPORT TCP; General protocol start
- Loc: 18501; Class: 4; Parm= $00865910; PortID: $FFFFDFF1
** NETXPORT UDP; General protocol start
- Loc: 19; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF2
** NETXPORT IP Update; General protocol start
- Loc: 3; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF4
** NETXPORT Net Timers; Starting
- Loc: 4440; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFED
The initiation events shown in this example are always executed for the
first NETCONTROL START command, whether or not a network interface
is specified. However, once the general transport is initialized,
subsequent NETCONTROL START commands do not change the modules
of the general transport.
Example 3
Example 3 displays the error message that will appear if you issue a
NETCONTROL START command when the control process is already
initialized.
:NETCONTROL START
ALREADY STARTED. (NETXPORTERR 4045)
ENCOUNTERED ONE OR MORE ERRORS WHILE PROCESSING COMMAND.
Chapter 7
(CIERR 4436)
123
Commands
NETCONTROL START
Example 4
In Example 4, the LAN NI, configured as LAN1, is started on the first
NETCONTROL START command. Notice that the initiation events to
initialize the general protocols are immediately followed by the start of
the LAN NI with its associated protocols: IP, probe, and ARP. Compare
the displayed events to the defined entities of Figure 7-1. The events
displayed show creation of the control process, the general protocols,
and the LAN NI entities.
:NETCONTROL START;NET=LAN1
** NETXPORT Control Process; Transport start
- Loc: 50; Class: 4; Parm= $0000002C; PIN: 44
** NETXPORT TCP; General protocol start
- Loc: 18501; Class: 4; Parm= $00865910; PortID: $FFFFDFF1
** NETXPORT UDP; General protocol start
- Loc: 19; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF2
** NETXPORT IP Update; General protocol start
- Loc: 3; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF4
** NETXPORT Net Timers; Starting
- Loc: 4440; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFED
** NETXPORT Map Tbl; Mapping Table Created
- Loc: 1; Class: 4; Parm= $95C80250; PortID: $95C80250
** NETXPORT LAN NI; Network interface start
- Loc: 28; Class: 4; Parm= $95CC8000; PortID: $FFFFFE88
** NETXPORT IP; Protocol start
- Loc: 102; Class: 4; Parm= $D4FD8000; PortID: $FFFFFE84
** NETXPORT Probe; Protocol start
- Loc: 35; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF3
** NETXPORT ARP; Protocol start
- Loc: 3; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF5
Example 5
Example 5 shows the initiation events for the loopback network
interface. For this example, the loopback NI is configured as LOOP and
the general protocols are already active.
:NETCONTROL START;NET=LOOP
** NETXPORT Map Tbl; Mapping Table Created
- Loc: 1; Class: 4; Parm= $D5208250; Pin: 0
** NETXPORT Loopback NI; Network interface start
- Loc: 28; Class: 4; Parm= $96038000; PortID: $FFFFFE8A
** NETXPORT IP; Protocol start
- Loc: 102; Class: 4; Parm= $D5218000; PortID: $FFFFFE89
Notice that only the Loopback NI and its associated protocol, Internet
Protocol (IP), are started; there was a previously issued NETCONTROL
START command. Compare the displayed events to the defined entities
of Figure 7-1. The events displayed show creation of the Loopback NI
entity.
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Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL START
Example 6
Starting the LAN NI, configured as LAN1, when the general protocols
are already active, gives you the following:
:NETCONTROL START;NET=LAN1
** NETXPORT Map Tbl; Mapping Table Created
- Loc: 1; Class: 4; Parm= $D5C80250; Pin: 0
** NETXPORT LAN NI; Network interface start
- Loc: 28; Class: 4; Parm= $96430000; PortID: $FFFFFE81
** NETXPORT IP; Protocol start
- Loc: 102; Class: 4; Parm= $D5CD0000; PortID: $FFFFFE88
** NETXPORT Probe; Protocol start
- Loc: 35; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF3
** NETXPORT ARP; Protocol start
- Loc: 3; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF5
Notice that only the LAN NI and its associated protocols are started.
Compare the displayed events to the defined entities of Figure 7-1. The
events displayed show creation of the LAN NI entity.
Chapter 7
125
Commands
NETCONTROL STATUS
NETCONTROL STATUS
Displays status and configuration information for the transport entity
specified.
Syntax
NETCONTROL STATUS[=ALL] [;{NI=niName [;PROT=niProt]} ]
{NET=niname
}
{GATE=gatehalfname
}
{PROT=gProt
}
Parameters
STATUS[=ALL] Specifies that any additional status information
should be displayed, if additional data is available
beyond the default.
NI=niname
Specifies the name of a configured network interface to
display the status of. Enter any valid NI name from the
NMMGR Network Interface screen which is not a
gateway half. If the specified NI was not previously
configured and started, an “ENTITY NOT ACTIVE”
error will occur. If transport was not previously started,
a “TRANSPORT NOT ACTIVE” warning will occur.
Specifying NI=niname without the ;PROT= option
displays status for the network interface itself.
NET=niName
Specifies the name of a configured network interface
which is not a gatehalf. Enter any valid NI name, as
configured with NMMGR.
GATE=gatehalfname
Specifies the name of a configured gateway half
network interface to display the status of. Enter any
valid gatehalf NI name from the NMMGR Network
Interface Configuration screen. If the specified gatehalf
NI was not previously configured and started, an
“ENTITY NOT ACTIVE” error will occur. If transport
was not previously started, a “TRANSPORT NOT
ACTIVE” warning will occur.
126
Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL STATUS
PROT=gProt PROT=niProt
Specifies that a protocol is the pertinent entity for each
specified function to act on. Enter the name of the
protocol, as follows:
Chapter 7
gprot
Specifies the name of one transport
general protocol to display the status
of. Valid inputs are TCP, UDP, PXP, or
IPU. If the specified protocol did not
start or is not one of these inputs, an
“ENTITY NOT ACTIVE” error will
occur. If transport was not previously
started, a “TRANSPORT NOT
ACTIVE” warning will occur.
niprot
Specifies the name of one network
interface protocol to display the status
of; must be used in conjunction with the
NI=niname parameter. Valid inputs
depend on the NI type, as shown here.
If the specified protocol did not start, is
not configured, or is not one of these
inputs, an “ENTITY NOT ACTIVE”
error will occur. If transport was not
previously started, a “TRANSPORT
NOT ACTIVE” warning will occur.
NI Type:
Valid Network
Interface Protocol
Names
LAN
IP, PROBE, ARP
TOKEN
IP, ARP
FDDI
IP, ARP
100VG-AnyLAN
IP, PROBE, ARP
100Base-T
IP, PROBE, ARP
ROUTER
IP, DIAL
X.25
IP, X25
GATEHALF
IP, DIAL
LOOP
IP
127
Commands
NETCONTROL STATUS
Discussion
This command displays status and configuration data for the active
transport, using several different output formats depending on the
keywords specified. Some of the formats are specific to the control
process, a network interface, or a specific protocol. Any entities which
are not active cannot have their status displayed.
This command differs from other NETCONTROL commands in that it
produces warnings, not errors, if transport is not active. This is often
used to determine if transport as a whole is running or not.
NOTE
HP does not recommend combining this function on the same command
line as other functions, in an attempt to determine if the other function
worked.
NOTE
The output format of all NETCONTROL commands is subject to change
without notice. Programs which are developed to postprocess
NETCONTROL output should not depend on the exact format (spacing,
alignment, number of lines, upper or lower case, or spelling) of any
NETCONTROL command output.
Example 1
Example 1 is a sample of the output that is displayed when the
NETCONTROL STATUS command is issued without specifying a network
interface or general protocol.
:NETCONTROL STATUS
GENERAL TRANSPORT STATUS
TRANSPORT STARTED
: MON, FEB 17, 1992,
: MON, FEB 3, 1992,
FLAGS
MAX NETWORK INTERFACES
MAX NODE NAMES
LOG ID
TRACE ID
CONTROL PROCESS PORT ID
:
:
:
:
:
:
$000014C0
32
360
$00040003
$00000000
$FFFFFF37
HOME NETWORK
CONFIGURATION FILE
TRACE MASK
NODE NAME
:
:
:
:
LAN1
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
$00000000
NODEA.XLNET.ACCTG
8:49 AM
2:25 PM
Example 2
Example 2 is a sample of the output that is displayed when you issue
the NETCONTROL STATUS command specifying the LAN1 network
interface via the NI= parameter.
128
Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL STATUS
:NETCONTROL STATUS;NI=LAN1
NETWORK INTERFACE REPORT
NETWORK INTERFACE STARTED
FLAGS
NIB - PCB LINK INFO
NIB - NIB LINK INFO
NI PROTOCOLS
MAPPING TABLE SIZE
MAPPING TABLE ID
OUTBOUND BUFFERS
NETWORK INTERFACE TYPE
PORT ID
WRITE BUFFER INFO
STORE/FORWARD BUFFER INFO
TRACE ID'S
NAME
NETWORK IP ADDRESS
NETWORK SUBNET MASK
TRACE MASK
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
DEVICE INFORMATION
:
DEVICE
DEVICE TYPE
LINK BUFFER SIZE
PROTOCOLS CONNECTED
PHONE NUMBER INDEX
TRAN PORT INFO
:
:
:
:
:
:
MON, FEB 17, 1992, 8:52 AM
MON, FEB 3, 1992, 2:33 PM
$00000006
FIRST $452C4290
NEXT $00000000
CURRENT $00000000 MAXIMUM $00000004
$00000400
$C8B80250
SIZE $000005EA NUMBER $00000100
LAN
$FFFFFF21
POOL $0000000A
POOL $0000000A
TRACE $00000000
LAN1
$0F0D7033
15.13.112.51
$FFFFF800
255.255.248.0
$00000000
SYSLINK (# 0)
$000005EA
$00000004
$00000000
PORT ID $FFFFFF20
Example 3
Example 3 is a sample of the output that is displayed when the
NETCONTROL STATUS command is issued and the LAN1 network
interface and the PROBE protocol are specified.
:NETCONTROL STATUS;NI=LAN1;PROT=PROBE
NETWORK INTERFACE PROTOCOL STATUS : WED, JAN 19, 1994,
PROTOCOL STARTED
: WED, JAN 19, 1994
4:23 PM
PROTOCOL NAME
PROTOCOL ID
PROTOCOL FLAGS
TRACE MASK
:
:
:
:
PROBE
$00000503
$00000000
$00000000
PCB LINK INFO
TRACE ID'S
PORT ID
NETWORK NAME
:
:
:
:
NEXT $4533FA58
TRACE $00000000
$FFFFC77
LAN1
Chapter 7
3:31 PM
129
Commands
NETCONTROL STATUS
Example 4
Example 4 is a sample of the output that is displayed when the
NETCONTROL STATUS command is used specifying the LAN1 network
interface via the NET= parameter.
:NETCONTROL STATUS;NET=LAN1
NETWORK STATUS : WED, JAN 19, 1994, 3:31 PM
PROTOCOL STARTED : WED, JAN 19, 1994, 4:23 AM
PROTOCOL NAME
PROTOCOL ID
PROTOCOL FLAGS
TRACE MASK
:
:
:
:
IP
$00000500
$00000000
$00000000
PCB LINK INFO
: NEXT $00000000
TRACE ID'S
: TRACE $00000000
PORT ID
: $FFFFFC78
NETWORK NAME
: LAN1
NETOWRK IP ADDRESS
: $0C0E84A6
NETWORK SUBNET MASK
: $FF000000
12.14.132.166
255.0.0.0
Example 5
Example 5 is a sample of the output that is displayed when the
NETCONTROL STATUS command is issued and the LAN1 network
interface and the ARP protocol is specified.
:NETCONTROL STATUS; NI=LAN1; PROT=ARP
NETWORK INTERFACE PROTOCOL STATUS : WED, JAN 26,
1994, 1:55 PM
PROTOCOL STARTED : WED, JAN 26, 1994, 1:55 PM
PROTOCOL NAME
PROTOCOL ID
PROTOCOL FLAGS
TRACE MASK
:
:
:
:
ARP
$00000508
$00000000
$00000000
PCB LINK INFO
TRACE ID'S
PORT ID
NETWORK NAME
:
:
:
:
NEXT $4533FDC0
TRACE $00000000
$FFFFFF10
LAN1
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Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL STATUS
To report the status of the control process, enter
:NETCONTROL STATUS
GENERAL TRANSPORT STATUS : WED, JAN 26, 1994, 9:12 AM
TRANSPORT STARTED
: WED, JAN 26, 1994, 3:57 AM
FLAGS
MAX NETWORK INTERFACES
MAX NODE NAMES
LOG ID
TRACE ID
CONTROL PROCESS PORT ID
:
:
:
:
:
:
$000014C0
32
360
$00000003
$00010081
$FFFFFC8E
HOME NETWORK
CONFIGURATION FILE
TRACE MASK
NODE NAME
:
:
:
:
LAN1
NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS
$00000040
NODE.DOMAIN.ORG
If the control process is not active, you will see a warning
:NETCONTROL STOP
:NETCONTROL STATUS
TRANSPORT NOT ACTIVE. (NETXPORTWARN 0001)
NOTE
The output format of all NETCONTROL commands is subject to change
without notice. Programs which are developed to postprocess
NETCONTROL output should not depend on the exact format (spacing,
alignment, number of lines, upper or lower case, or spelling) of any
NETCONTROL command output.
Chapter 7
131
Commands
NETCONTROL STOP
NETCONTROL STOP
Terminates individual network interfaces on an active transport, or the
entire transport and all its network interfaces.
Syntax
NETCONTROL STOP [;{NET=niName
}]
{GATE=gatehalfName}
Parameters
STOP
This function, if issued without parameters when
transport is active, irrecoverably stops the entire
transport. When NET or GATE is specified, only that one
network interface and its attached protocols are
terminated; all other network interfaces and protocols
will continue to operate.
NET=niName
Specifies the name of a configured network interface to
be terminated, which was previously started. All
protocols and links configured under that NI will also
be terminated. Enter any valid NI name from the
NMMGR Network Interface screen which is not a
gateway half. If neither NET nor GATE are specified, the
entire transport will be terminated, including all links,
NIs, protocols, and the control process. If transport or
the specified NI was not running, a “NOT STARTED”
error will occur.
GATE=gatehalfName
Specifies the name of a configured gateway half
network interface to be terminated, and which was
previously started. All protocols and links configured
under that NI will also be terminated. Enter any valid
gatehalf NI name from the NMMGR Network Interface
Configuration screen. The niName discussion for NET
and GATE applies to gatehalf name also.
132
Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL STOP
Discussion
If STOP is issued without the NET or GATE keyword, all entities of the
network transport are terminated. If STOP is combined with the
keyword NET, only the specified non-gatehalf network interface is
terminated. If STOP is combined with the keyword GATE, only the
specified gateway half is terminated.
When this command is entered with an X.25 NI name, the system
accesses the DTC/X.25 Network Access Subsystem to disable the X.25
address that is associated with this system. The DTC/X.25 Network
Access then no longer accepts connections for this system. There is no
impact on the connections established between any other systems and
the DTC/X.25 Network Access.
Example 1
Example 1 shows how NETCONTROL fits into the process of terminating a
node. In example 1, the node has an NS 3000/iX Link. The NSCONTROL
command prevents users or programs from accessing any network
services. (Refer to the NSCONTROL command page in this section for a
complete description of NSCONTROL.) NETCONTROL STOP terminates all
active entities of the network transport.
NOTE
When multiple NETCONTROL or NSCONTROL commands are embedded in
UDC’s, commandfiles, or batch jobs, HP recommends the use of :PAUSE
commands between commands, to give each time to execute before
starting the next command.
:NSCONTROL STOP
:NSCONTROL ABORT
:NETCONTROL STOP
Example 2
Example 2 shows which network transport entities are affected by the
STOP function. As will be shown in examples 3 and 4, the keywords
included with the STOP function determine which entities are affected.
:NETCONTROL STOP
** NETXPORT ARP; Protocol stop
- Loc: 27; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFFE89
** NETXPORT Probe; Protocol stop
- Loc: 37; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFFE89
** NETXPORT IP; Protocol stop
- Loc: 105; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFFE89
** NETXPORT Control Process; Device Shutdown Warning
- Loc: 283; Class: 3; Parm= $04F502E6; PortID: $FFFFFE8A
** NETXPORT LAN NI; Network interface stop
- Loc: 29; Class: 4; Parm= $96430000; PortID: $FFFFFE81
** NETXPORT Map Tbl; Mapping Table Deleted
Chapter 7
133
Commands
NETCONTROL STOP
- Loc: 2; Class: 4; Parm= $D5208250; PortID: $D5208250
** NETXPORT IP Update; General protocol stop
- Loc: 19; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFFE88
** NETXPORT UDP; General protocol stop
- Loc: 25; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF3
** NETXPORT Net Timers; Stopping
- Loc: 4040; Class: 4; Parm= $96430000; PortID: $FFFFFE81
** NETXPORT Control Process; Transport stop
- Loc: 51; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF0
Example 3
Example 3 shows what happens if the general transport and both
network interfaces are active, and the user specifies the Loopback NI.
Notice that the STOP function acts only on the Loopback NI entity. The
general transport is still active.
:NETCONTROL STOP;NET=LOOP
** NETXPORT IP; Protocol stop
- Loc: 105; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFFE7F
** NETXPORT Loopback NI; Network interface stop
- Loc: 29; Class: 4; Parm= $96F80000; PortID: $FFFFFE88
** NETXPORT Map Tbl; Mapping Table Deleted
- Loc: 2; Class: 4; Parm= $96F78250; Pin: 0
Example 4
In Example 4, only the general transport and the LAN are active. The
STOP function terminates the LAN NI entity. The general transport is
still active.
:NETCONTROL STOP;NET=LAN1
** NETXPORT ARP; Protocol stop
- Loc: 27; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFFF04
** NETXPORT Probe; Protocol stop
- Loc: 37; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFDFF0
** NETXPORT IP; Protocol stop
- Loc: 105; Class: 4; Parm= $00000000; PortID: $FFFFFE84
** NETXPORT Control Process; Device Shutdown Warning
- Loc: 283; Class: 3; Parm= $04F502E6; PortID: $FFFFFE8A
** NETXPORT LAN NI; Network interface stop
- Loc: 29; Class: 4; Parm= $D8020000; PortID: $FFFFFE85
** NETXPORT Map Tbl; Mapping Table Deleted
- Loc: 2; Class: 4; Parm= $97480250; PortID: $97480250
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Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL TRACEON and TRACEOFF
NETCONTROL TRACEON and TRACEOFF
Enables or disables message tracing for the specified transport entity.
Syntax
NETCONTROL {TRACEON=type[,options]} [;{NI=niName [;PROT=niprot]} ]
{TRACEOFF
}
{NET=niName
}
{GATE=gatehalfname
}
{PROT=gprot
}
where the parameter option has the following options:
[DISC][,[filename][,[recsize][,filesize] ]]
Parameters
TRACEON
Enables tracing for the one entity specified by the NI,
PROT, NET, or GATE keywords, or for the control process
if none of those keywords are specified. The control
process will be started if it is not already running. This
function cannot be used to modify any parameters of
tracing which has already been enabled. If tracing is
already enabled for the specified entity, a
“PREVIOUSLY ENABLED” error will occur.
type
(Required). Specifies the type of data to trace from the
specified entity. This field is made up of one or more of
the following key letters, concatenated, and entered in
any order:
M—
H—
D—
S—
B—
N—
Trace Messages
Trace Packet Header Data
Trace Packet Data
Trace State Transitions
Trace Buffers
Trace Nodal Management Events
Recommended type setting is MHD. There is no
default.
options
NOTE
Specifies additional information about where to put the
collected trace data. There are several parameters.
A comma must precede a parameter whenever (a) that parameter is
included or (b) that parameter is omitted but any other parameter
which follows it is included.
DISC
Chapter 7
(Optional). Trace information will be
written to a disc file, specified by the
135
Commands
NETCONTROL TRACEON and TRACEOFF
filename parameter. DISC is the
default and the only valid input.
NOTE
Tracing to tape is no longer available on MPE/iX.
filename
(Optional). The name of the file to
which trace data will be written. The
default is to automatically create the
next highest numbered
NMTCnnnn.PUB.SYS file, where nnnn is
a 4-digit number, for each TRACEON
command entered.
If you wish several TRACEON commands
to trace to the same file, you must
specify that filename using this
parameter. You may choose an
automatically created file for this
purpose.
TRACEOFF
recsize
(Optional). Logical record size of the
records in the file to which trace data
will be written, in number of 16-bit
words. This is an internal limit for the
tracing facility; the physical record size
is always 128. Valid range is
5<=recsize<=1024. Default is 128.
filesize
(Optional). Maximum number of
records in the trace file. When this limit
is reached, the file “wraps”, and tracing
continues. The valid range is
32<=filesize<=32000. Default is 1024.
Disables previously enabled tracing for one entity,
which is specified by the NI, PROT, NET, or GATE
keywords, or for the control process if none of those
keywords are specified. If tracing is not enabled for the
specified entity, a “NOT TRACING” error will occur.
NI=niname
Specifies the name of a configured network interface
the trace will apply to. Enter any valid NI name from
the NMMGR Network Interface screen which is not a
gateway half. If the specified NI was not previously
configured and started, a “NOT STARTED” error will
occur.
Specifying NI=niname without the ;PROT= option, or
NET=niname, starts tracing for the network interface
itself.
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Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL TRACEON and TRACEOFF
NET=niName
Specifies the name of a configured network interface
which is not a gatehalf. Enter any valid NI name, as
configured with NMMGR. Using this parameter, the
function applies only to the network interface itself, not
to any attached protocols.
GATE=gatehalfName
Specifies the name of a configured gateway half
network interface to start tracing on. Enter any valid
gatehalf NI name from the NMMGR Network Interface
Configuration screen. If the specified gatehalf NI was
not previously configured and started, a “NOT
STARTED” error will occur.
PROT=gprot PROT=niProt
Specifies that a protocol is the pertinent entity for each
specified function to act on. Enter the name of the
protocol, as follows:
Chapter 7
gprot
Specifies the name of one transport
general protocol to start tracing on.
Valid inputs are TCP, UDP, PXP, or
IPU. If the specified protocol did not
start or is not one of these inputs, a
“NOT ACTIVE” error will occur.
niprot
Specifies the name of one network
interface protocol to start tracing on;
must be used in conjunction with the
NI=niname parameter. Valid inputs
depend on the NI type, as shown here.
If the specified protocol did not start, is
not configured, or is not one of these
inputs, a “NOT ACTIVE” error will
occur.
137
Commands
NETCONTROL TRACEON and TRACEOFF
NI Type:
Valid Network Interface
Protocol Names
LAN
IP, PROBE, ARP
TOKEN
IP, ARP
FDDI
IP, ARP
100VG-AnyLAN
IP, PROBE, ARP
100Base-T
IP, PROBE, ARP
ROUTER
IP, DIAL
X.25
IP, X25
GATEHALF
IP, DIAL
LOOP
IP
Discussion
The tracing functions allow you to enable collection of internal
information about what the various transport modules are doing, or
what packets are being sent and received at the transport level.
Using TRACEON you instruct a specific module not only to begin tracing,
but also what kind of data to trace and what file to put it in. Tracing
continues until explicitly stopped via a matching TRACEOFF command,
or until the specified module, or all of transport, is stopped. If multiple
modules had tracing enabled to capture a problem, stopping transport
is the usual way to stop all tracing.
For most problems you will need to enable TCP tracing, and for IP
store-and-forward problems you should enable IP tracing; see the
examples for sample commands. For link-related problems you should
enable link tracing (see the LINKCONTROL command). Other NS tracing
can be enabled under the guidance of your HP support representative.
When tracing is enabled successfully, the name of the active trace file is
displayed. You should write this down as it will not be repeated at
TRACEOFF time; otherwise, to determine which trace file contains the
desired data, check trace file creation times by using :LISTF
NMTC####.PUB.SYS,3.
As soon as your problem has been duplicated, you should stop tracing to
avoid having the file “wrap” and overwrite the data. At completion of
tracing, a trace file may be formatted using the NMDUMP.PUB.SYS utility.
Much of the information traced will be meaningful only to HP support
personnel.
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Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL TRACEON and TRACEOFF
Example
To enable TCP tracing, enter
:NETCONTROL TRACEON=MHD; PROT=TCP
TRACE FILE IS NMTC0128.PUB.SYS. (NETXPORT 2000)
To disable TCP tracing, enter
:NETCONTROL TRACEOFF; PROT=TCP
To enable control process tracing, TCP tracing, and IP tracing on the
“LAN1” NI, all to the same file, enter
:NETCONTROL START; NET=LAN1
:NETCONTROL TRACEON=MHDSBN
TRACE FILE IS NMTC0129.PUB.SYS. (NETXPORT 2000)
:NETCONTROL TRACEON=MHD,DISC,NMTC0129.PUB.SYS; PROT=TCP
TRACE FILE IS NMTC0129.PUB.SYS. (NETXPORT 2000)
:NETCONTROL TRACEON=MHD,DISC,NMTC0129.PUB.SYS; NI=LAN1; PROT=IP
TRACE FILE IS NMTC0129.PUB.SYS. (NETXPORT 2000)
To disable all this tracing once enabled, enter
:NETCONTROL TRACEOFF; NI=LAN1; PROT=IP
:NETCONTROL TRACEOFF; PROT=TCP
:NETCONTROL TRACEOFF
Chapter 7
139
Commands
NETCONTROL UPDATE
NETCONTROL UPDATE
Dynamically updates selected network transport parameters and
configuration information.
Syntax
{INTERNET}
{MAPPING }
NETCONTROL UPDATE= {NETDIR }; {NET=niName
}
{X25
} {GATE=gatehalfName}
{ALL
}
Parameters
{INTERNET}
{MAPPING } Specifies which configuration areas will be dynamically
UPDATE = {NETDIR } updated. The areas possible depends on the network type.
{X25
}
{ALL
}
INTERNET
Adds to IPU all gateway data currently configured for
the specified network interface or gateway half,
meaning all gateways appearing in the NMMGR
Neighbor Gateways screen (subtree
NETXPORT.NI.niname.INTERNET) and all Reachable
Network data configured under each of those gateways.
These screens contain information describing the
gateways for all directly connected networks and
gateway halves, as well as all networks the gateways
can reach. Valid for all NI types except Loopback.
MAPPING
Adds all router mappings currently configured for the
specified router network interface, to that NI’s mapping
table, meaning all mappings appearing in that NI’s
NMMGR Point-to-Point Mapping Configuration screen
and the Point-to-Point Reachable Nodes screens under
it. Information will be overlaid based on matching
IP-Device mapping records. This allows changing
routes as well as adding new reachable nodes. Valid for
router NI types only.
NETDIR
Adds all currently configured Network Directory
(NSDIR.NET.SYS) entries, whose address types apply to
the specified network interface’s type, to the mapping
table for that NI. Valid for LAN, FDDI,
100VG-AnyLAN, 100Base-T and Token Ring NI types
only.
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NETCONTROL UPDATE
X25
Adds all currently configured Network Directory
(NSDIR.NET.SYS) entries having X.25 or IP address
types and matching entries in the NMMGR X.25 SVC
Address Key Paths screen, to the specified X.25
network interface’s mapping table and X.25 protocol
module. This allows adding new SVC destinations or
adding a new node to the L.U.G. (Local User Group)
table. Valid for X.25 NI types only.
ALL
The control process will update all areas which apply to
the specified network interface or gateway half's type.
Areas not supported for that NI type will not be
updated. Updating will occur in this order: INTERNET,
MAPPING, NETDIR, X25.
NET=niName
Specifies the name of a configured network interface to
be updated, which has already been started. Enter any
valid NI name from the NMMGR Network Interface
Configuration screen which is not a gateway half. If the
specified NI is not configured and started, a “NOT
STARTED” error will occur.
GATE=gatehalfName
Specifies the name of a configured gateway half
network interface to be updated, which has already
been started. Enter any valid gatehalf NI name from
the NMMGR Network Interface Configuration screen.
If the specified NI is not configured and started, a “NOT
STARTED” error will occur.
Discussion
The update function updates transport with certain configuration
changes already made through NMMGR. In this way, those kinds of
changes can become active without having to first take down and then
restart the network or the entire transport.
The types of changes which can be updated are those concerned with
addresses of reachable nodes and networks ONLY; others, such as
timeout changes, require stopping and restarting transport to take
effect. UPDATE’s keywords (NETDIR, INTERNET, etc.) localize which
kind of configuration data will be updated. This command can be
entered at any time after the specified NI has been started.
Not all options are valid for all network interface types. Table 7-2
summarizes the applicability of the various UPDATE options to each
NI type.
Chapter 7
141
Commands
NETCONTROL UPDATE
Table 7-2
NOTE
NETCONTROL Update
NI Type
Valid Update Options
LAN
INTERNET, NETDIR, ALL
TOKEN
INTERNET, NETDIR, ALL
FDDI
INTERNET, NETDIR, ALL
100VG-AnyLAN
INTERNET, NETDIR, ALL
100Base-T
INTERNET, NETDIR, ALL
ROUTER
INTERNET, MAPPING, ALL
X.25
INTERNET, X25, ALL
GATEHALF
INTERNET, ALL
LOOP
ALL
Dynamic updating is additive, so obsolete data can accumulate,
possibly resulting in table overflows. If table overflows do occur which
prevent access to the desired nodes, transport must be stopped and
restarted to clear the condition.
Example
To update the “LAN1” network with new node addresses just added to
the Network Directory (NSDIR.NET.SYS), enter
:NETCONTROL UPDATE=NETDIR; NET=LAN1
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NETCONTROL VERSION
NETCONTROL VERSION
Displays the version numbers for the network transport software
modules.
Syntax
NETCONTROL VERSION[=MOD]
Parameters
VERSION[=MOD]
Displays the overall version of the
network transport. If qualified with the
MOD keyword, displays the version of
each of the software modules of the
network transport and the overall
version.
Discussion
The VERSION function of the NETCONTROL command allows you to check
the version numbers of the network transport modules to ensure that
they are compatible and up-to-date, or simply to confirm which version
is installed on your system. Unlike most other NETCONTROL commands,
transport does not need to be started to use this command.
Output from this command is the same as that produced by the
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS utility.
Example 1
Example 1 shows how to display the overall version number of the
network transport.
:NETCONTROL VERSION
NS3000/iX Transport 32098-20033
Chapter 7
overall version = B.05.07
143
Commands
NETCONTROL VERSION
Example 2
To look at the version numbers of the individual modules, you specify
the MOD keyword. You will see a display like the one shown in
example 2. Note that the version numbers shown here are only
examples, and should not be used to check any actual installation.
:NETCONTROL VERSION=MOD
NS3000/iX Transport 32098-20033
NM program file:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
Catalog file:
CM program file:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NM program file:
Catalog file:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
SL procedure:
NM program file:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
module versions:
NETCP.NET.SYS
NET_CF_VERS
NET_IPC_VERS
NET_IPC_VERS2
NET_IPC_VERS3
NET_IPC_VERS4
SIVERS
PIVERS
SOCKCAT.NET.SYS
SOCKREG.NET.SYS
NWTMVERS
TI_T1_VERS
PT2PNSTN.NET.SYS
NETMSG.NET.SYS
NET'UI'VERS
NET'SL'VERS
NET_NI_VERS
NET'PROBE'VERS
NET_ARP_VERS
NET'DIAL'VERS
TCPSIP.NET.SYS
NET'STUB'VERS
NET_TCP_VERS
NET_UDP_VERS
NET_DICT_VERS
NET'PXP0'VERS
NET'PXP1'VERS
NET_IP_VERS
NET'IPU'VERS
NET_X25_VERS
NET'PD'VERS
NET_PD_VERS
NET_MAP_VERS
NET_GLBL_VERS
NET_REG_VERS
NET'REG'CM'VERS
DCLDM_FMT_VERS
DCLDM_PS_VERS
DCLDM_CONF_VERS
NSLOPENLINK_VERS
RLM_SERVER_VERS
RLM_CONFIG_VERS
144
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
B0507048
B0700013
B0507029
B0507012
B0507012
B0507011
B0507009
B0507012
B0507001
B0507003
B0507007
B0507001
B0507001
B0507022
B0507014
B0507009
B0507016
B0507001
B0507010
B0507010
B0507000
B0507016
B0507131
B0507013
B0507000
B0507002
B0507004
B0507019
B0507006
B0507016
B0507024
B0507030
B0507057
B0507024
B0507000
B0507000
B0507000
B0507000
B0507000
B0507003
B0507003
B0507002
Chapter 7
Commands
NETCONTROL VERSION
NL
SL
NL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
NL
NM
NM
NL
procedure:
procedure:
procedure:
procedure:
procedure:
procedure:
procedure:
procedure:
procedure:
program file:
program file:
procedure:
RLM_LOAD_TABLE_VERS
RLM_FMT_VERS
NET_FC_VERS
SOCKIOVERS
SOCKACCESSVERS
SOCKMISC1VERS
SUBSYS3FMTVERS
SUBSYS5FMTVERS
LEVEL2_RESOLVE_VERS
ICMPSERV.NET.SYS
NETTOOL.NET.SYS
NETTMRVERS
NS 3000/iX Transport 32098-20033
Chapter 7
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
B0507000
B0507002
B0507003
B0507016
B0507016
B0507015
B0507004
B0507001
B0507002
B0507004
B0507011
B0507036
overall version = B.05.07
145
Commands
NSCONTROL
NSCONTROL
Initiates, terminates, and controls the Network Services subsystem of
NS 3000/iX.
Syntax
NSCONTROL function[;function]…
Use
Available
In Session?
YES
In Job?
YES
In Break?
YES
Programmatically?
YES
Breakable?
NO
Capabilities?
NM
Parameters
function
Only one of each type of function is recommended on a
command line. Refer to function descriptions on the
following pages. The functions are:
START[=services]
STOP[=services]
ABORT
AUTOLOGON
LOADKEYS
146
LOG
SERVER
STATUS
VERSION
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL
Discussion
NS 3000/iX Network Services are composed of user services, each of
which performs a specific task. These services are VT, Reverse VT, NFT,
RPM, RFA, RDBA, LOOPBACK and NSSTAT. Refer to Using
NS 3000/iX Network Services for details on Network Services.
To function, Network Services require Network Interprocess
Communication (NetIPC), the user interface included with NS 3000/iX
links. NetIPC is used extensively by the Network Services when
processing change requests and is available for use in customer
applications. It is not a service in the same sense as VT or RFA, since it
consists of a set of intrinsics and associated code in the system SL and
NL. NetIPC intrinsics are described in the NetIPC 3000/XL
Programmer’s Reference Manual.
The NETCONTROL START command must be issued before NSCONTROL
START. This is because the NETCONTROL command controls the network
transport subsystem, which must be initiated before the Network
Services or any NetIPC application can successfully execute. NetIPC
depends on the network transport to identify sockets and exchange
messages. Refer to the NETCONTROL START command, also described in
this section.
Chapter 7
147
Commands
NSCONTROL ABORT
NSCONTROL ABORT
Immediately terminates all the servers and services of the Network
Services.
Syntax
NSCONTROL ABORT
Parameters
ABORT
Immediately terminates all NS servers and services
without allowing existing processes to run to
completion. Useful in cases where you need to
terminate Network Services immediately regardless of
whether or not existing processes terminate normally.
Note that STOP is the normal way to shutdown Network
Services.
Discussion
There are two NSCONTROL functions that you can use to terminate the
Network Services. Before using either method, be sure to warn all users
that their network services are about to be closed.
• NSCONTROL STOP allows existing users to continue using the services
until they finish their tasks and prevents any new users from using
the services. Using NSCONTROL STOP is the recommended way to
terminate the Network Services. It allows the services to terminate
gracefully.
• NSCONTROL ABORT immediately terminates all the services and all
the server processes. Use NSCONTROL ABORT only when you don't
care about letting existing processes run to completion. Anyone
using a service finds their task (REMOTE, DSCOPY, and so forth)
immediately terminated.
HP recommends that you use the sequence of NSCONTROL STOP followed
by NSCONTROL ABORT to ensure that you terminate all Network
Services. Special situations where this may be appropriate include
when the system is being prepared for software installation, or when
the system needs to be taken down for maintenance. Abnormal
situations can occur when an application has been incorrectly
implemented. If you cannot terminate the session by any other method,
use NSCONTROL ABORT to terminate all Network Services. This will clear
any problems. The sequence to use prior to issuing the NSCONTROL
ABORT command is shown in example 1; an abnormal situation is
described in example 2.
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Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL ABORT
Example 1
Issue a message to all users to stop using the Network Services. Use
whatever method is appropriate for your installation. Then use the
following to terminate the Network Services:
NSCONTROL ABORT
Prevents any users or programs from accessing Network Services.
Example 2
If a remote session has been terminated by the user but still shows as
active on a SHOWJOB display, use ABORTJOB to terminate the session.
In the unlikely event that ABORTJOB does not work, use NSCONTROL
ABORT. Be sure to follow the sequence shown in the examples before
issuing the NSCONTROL ABORT command.
:NSCONTROL STATUS=USERS
NO CURRENT NETWORK SERVICE USERS
Checks that all users of the Network Services are finished.
:NSCONTROL ABORT
Terminates all users, services, and server processes.
Chapter 7
149
Commands
NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON
NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON
Enables or disables the autologon feature of certain NS 3000/iX
services.
Syntax
NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON=[{ON } [,ALL]]
[{OFF} [,service[,service]...]
Parameters
AUTOLOGON
Enables or disables the automatic logon feature
available with the NFT, RFA, and RPM services. If
AUTOLOGON is not enabled, users must create a remote
session with the REMOTE HELLO command prior to
executing these services.
ON
Enables autologon for an NS 3000/iX
service.
OFF
Disables autologon for an NS 3000/iX
service.
ALL
Alters the autologon state for the NFT,
RFA, and RPM services.
The services that allow autologon are:
NFT
Changes autologon capability for the
NFT service.
RFA
Changes autologon capability for the
RFA service.
RPM
Changes autologon capability for the
RPM service.
Defaults: ON and ALL.
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NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON
Discussion
NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON allows the user the ability to disable and
re-enable autologon for the NS 3000/iX services supporting this feature.
Autologon is enabled at NS 3000/iX startup. NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON
must be executed after the NSCONTROL START command. When the
NS 3000/iX services are stopped, the autologon option resets to the
default.
Disabling autologon may be important on those systems that use a
logon UDC to help enforce system security. With autologon enabled (the
default), a remote user can access local NFT, RFA and RPM services
without executing logon UDC’s. With autologon disabled, remote users
must first establish a remote session with the REMOTE HELLO command,
and thus execute any preset logon UDC(s), before using an NS 3000/iX
service.
It is recommended that users with security logon UDCs disable
autologon for all services in order to preserve the security of the system
from remote users. Incoming requests attempting to use the autologon
feature will fail, since a remote session cannot be established
automatically.
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151
Commands
NSCONTROL LOADKEYS
NSCONTROL LOADKEYS
Loads the Network Services command keywords.
Syntax
NSCONTROL LOADKEYS
Parameters
LOADKEYS
Loads the Network Services command keywords from
the ASCAT.NET.SYS catalog. You need to use this
command only if the catalog is modified, such as for
localization.
Discussion
The LOADKEYS function is only used to switch between pre-prepared
ASCAT.NET.SYS catalogs. When the node is initiated, the Network
Services command keywords are automatically loaded into an extra
data segment from the ASCAT.NET.SYS catalog. This is done to ensure
fast access to the command keywords during command parsing.
However, it might be useful to have commands in the appropriate
language of the installation. If so, the LOADKEYS function is used to
reload the alternate catalog into the extra data segment without having
to coolstart the system. Make a copy and a listing of the catalog before
switching catalogs.
Example
:HELLO MANAGER.SYS,NET
Logon to the NET group in the SYS account
:RENAME ASCAT,ASCATOLD
Rename the old catalog.
:RENAME ASCATNEW, ASCAT
Substitute the new catalog for the old
:NSCONTROL LOADKEYS
Reload the catalog.
NOTE
If an NSCONTROL command reports CIERR 5077, follow this example to
restore the old ASCAT catalog and contact your HP representative for
assistance.
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Commands
NSCONTROL LOG
NSCONTROL LOG
Enables or disables detailed event logging for the Network Services.
Syntax
[{,ALL
}
]
{ON } [{,RPM
} {,LOW} ]
NSCONTROL LOG={OFF} [{,ENV
} {,HIGH}]
[{,DSDAD
}
]
[{,VTSERVER}
]
[{,DSSERVER}
]
Parameters
LOG
Enables or disables NMS logging of Network Services
detailed events, configured as SUB0006, CLAS0004 in
the NMCONFIG.PUB.SYS configuration file. Detailed
events are only used for troubleshooting and are
normally disabled.
ON
Enables detailed logging of the
specified Network Service modules.
OFF
Disables detailed logging of the
specified Network Service modules.
For each Network Services software module, two levels
of event logging are provided. These are HIGH, which
logs all events, and LOW, the default, which logs a
subset of the events, as specified below.
ALL
LOW — Logs LOW events for all modules.
HIGH — Logs HIGH events for all
modules.
RPM
LOW — Logs RPMCREATE and RPMKILL
requests.
HIGH — Same as LOW.
ENV
LOW — Logs environment information
from DSLINE and REMOTE HELLO
commands.
HIGH — Same as LOW, plus environment
table locking and use counts.
DSDAD
Chapter 7
LOW — Logs creation and deletion of
sockets, ports, and server processes.
153
Commands
NSCONTROL LOG
HIGH — Same as LOW, plus all received
change requests and internal messages
between DSDAD and server processes.
VTSERVER
LOW — Logs internal initialization
messages between DSDAD and user
processes.
HIGH — Same as LOW, plus all received
messages from other processes.
DSSERVER
LOW — Logs internal initialization
messages between DSDAD and user
processes.
HIGH — Same as LOW, plus all received
messages from other processes.
Defaults: ALL and LOW
Discussion
One of the log classes defined for the Network Services is detailed event
logging, which records normal Network Services events. When first
started and during normal operation, the Network Services detailed
event logging is disabled in order to avoid the overhead of frequent
logging. Typically, detailed event logging is only enabled to investigate
a specific action or series of events if required for troubleshooting.
When detailed event logging is enabled, the log messages destination is
determined by the configuration of NMMGR logging subsystem 6
class 4 (SUB0006, CLAS0004). The log file is the recommended
destination for detailed logging. Logging detailed events to the system
console is not recommended, since the log messages tend to clutter the
console screen.
Example
The example below logs the environment information from DSLINE and
REMOTE HELLO commands and the change requests received by the
DSDAD process. You might use this type of event logging to monitor
usage of the Network Services. The destination for CLAS0004 of
SUB0006 specified in the NMMGR logging configuration should be to
the NM log file, not the system console.
:NSCONTROL LOG=ON,ENV,LOW;LOG=ON,DSDAD,HIGH
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NSCONTROL SERVER
NSCONTROL SERVER
Alters the characteristics of the Network Services server processes.
Syntax
{servername}
NSCONTROL SERVER= {ALL
}[,minservers][,maxservers]
Parameters
SERVER
Dynamically alters the minimum or maximum number
of servers.
serverName
Specifies the type of server for which you want to alter
the available number of server processes. The servers
that control the network services are:
ALL
DSSERVER
The specified options apply to the
server that controls RFA, RDBA, PTOP,
and RPM. Default minserver, maxserver
values are 0, 300 respectively.
LOOPBACK
The specified options apply to the
server used by the LOOPBACK services.
Default minserver, maxserver values
are 0, 300 respectively.
NFT
The specified options apply to the
server that controls NFT. Default
minserver, maxserver values are 0, 300
respectively.
NSSTATUS
The specified options apply to the
server that controls NSSTAT (and
NSTATL) services. Default minserver,
maxserver values are 0, 300
respectively.
VTSERVER
The specified options apply to the
server that controls VT and REVERSE
VT. Default minserver, maxserver
values are 0, 300 respectively.
If you specify ALL in place of a servername, the specified
options apply to all servers (NFT, DSSERVER, LOOPBACK,
NSSTATUS, VTSERVER).
Default: ALL
There may be additional servers to control if other
network products, such as Personal Productivity
Chapter 7
155
Commands
NSCONTROL SERVER
Center, are installed. Refer to that network product’s
documentation to obtain the appropriate server names.
minservers
The minimum number of servers which will be in
existence at all times. This includes active and reserved
servers. These servers are created immediately on the
initiation of Network Services and are then kept in
reserve until a change request is received. Once the
change request is completed, the server is returned to
reserve status. If necessary, additional servers are
created immediately to fit the new minimum specified.
Valid range: 0–1250; however, see the following note.
Default: 0
maxservers
The maximum number of servers. If necessary, reserved
servers will be terminated to fit the new maximum.
However, a server that is in use will not be terminated
until it is returned to the reserved server pool.
Limits in the number of allowed processes and internal
data structures can prevent you from reaching the
maximum number of servers. Valid range: 0–32767;
however, see the following note.
Default: Varies by server
NOTE
The total number of all active servers may not exceed 1250. The sum of
all minservers must always be 1250 or less. You may specify a number
greater than 1250 as one or more maxservers values, but there will
never be more than a total of 1250 servers of all kinds at any one time.
Discussion
The number of server processes is controlled with the SERVER function.
The maximum number of servers limits how many processes of each
server type can be in existence at any time. If the servers are at the
maximum limit and a new change request (such as a DSCOPY or REMOTE
HELLO) is received, the request will be rejected. By setting a maximum
limit, you can control the amount of process resources available for
NS 3000/iX.
Because the creation and initialization of a server takes time, using
reserved servers decreases the set up time for a change request. A
reserved server is created ahead of time and is held in reserve until a
change request is received. The minimum number of servers controls
the number of reserved processes for each type of server. The number
set for the minimum does not limit the number of concurrent users of
the Network Services. If there are more concurrent users than the
minimum number of servers specified, new users can use the Network
Services, but there is a delay while the additional servers are created.
156
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL SERVER
There is no simple formula for determining how many precreated
servers to specify. Since each precreated server consumes one set of
process resources, including process related system table entries and
virtual memory for stack space, the number chosen must be a tradeoff
between using system resources and allowing fast service response. The
node manager needs to estimate, on the average, the number of
concurrent users of each type of server. This number is used for the
minimum number of servers of each type. Since the DSSERVER process is
used by several services, and some of these services are active for a long
time, it makes sense to allocate a larger number of DSSERVER servers
than NFT, VTSERVER, LOOPBACK or NSSTATUS servers.
An alternative to allocating a greater number of DSSERVER servers is to
allocate the program files NFT.NET.SYS, VTSERVER.NET.SYS,
DSSERVER.NET.SYS, LOOPBACK.NET.SYS, and NSSTATUS.NET.SYS. This
alternative is most advantageous for DSSERVER, where the allocation of
the program file is a significant portion of the set up time. The NFT
server must read keywords and messages from the NFTCAT2 catalog as
well as allocate the program file when the server is created, so the
performance gain is not as great as for DSSERVER.
Creating reserved servers or using the allocation alternative means
that the program file is in use, just as when a program is run. Since the
program file is in use, it cannot be purged, replaced, or backed up.
Before any software installation, when the program files are replaced or
backed up, check that the program files are not allocated and that there
are no reserved servers.
Example
The following command sets the minimum number of DSSERVER
processes to five and the maximum to 10. Five reserved DSSERVER
processes are created immediately and are available for future change
requests. The minimum number of servers, which includes both
reserved and active servers, is restricted to five. When an active server
is returned to the reserved pool, if there are already five reserved
servers, the extra server is terminated. The maximum limit means that
if there are 10 DSSERVER processes active, any new change requests will
be rejected.
:NSCONTROL SERVER=DSSERVER,5,10
Chapter 7
157
Commands
NSCONTROL SERVER
Example
If you execute the following command, there will be 10 server processes
created for NFT, 10 for VTSERVER, 10 for DSSERVER, 10 for LOOPBACK, and
10 for NSSTATUS. Later, when users issue change requests (such as
DSCOPY and REMOTE HELLO), they do not have to wait for the servers to
be created. The maximum number of servers is unchanged.
:NSCONTROL SERVER=ALL,10
Example
In the following example, the node manager has chosen to allocate the
program file used for the DSSERVER servers and to establish two
reserved servers for NFT. To limit the system resources available, the
maximum number of servers is set to 10 for both server types. In this
way, performance is improved with a minimum amount of system
resources used. Notice that the SERVER function can be repeated;
multiple instances of NSCONTROL functions are allowed on the same
command line.
:ALLOCATE DSSERVER.NET.SYS
:NSCONTROL SERVER=NFT,2,10;SERVER=DSSERVER,,10
:NSCONTROL STATUS=SERVERS
SERVER
MIN
MAX
DEBUG
LOOPBACK
NFT
0
2
300
10
OFF
OFF
PIN
247
187
DSSERVER
NSSTATUS
VTSERVER
0
0
0
10
300
300
158
JOBNUM
STATUS
SERVICES
RESERVED
RESERVED
OFF
OFF
OFF
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL START
NSCONTROL START
Enables the Network Services.
Syntax
NSCONTROL START[=service[,service]…]
Parameters
START[=services]
Enables the Network Services (VT, Reverse VT, NFT,
RFA, RDBA, RPM, LOOPBACK, and NSSTAT). The first START
creates the Network Services control process, called
DSDAD. The optional service list (services) allows you to
select which of the services are enabled for local or
remote use.
Default (if the service list is omitted): enables all
services for both local and remote use.
The services which allow users on remote nodes to use
resources on the local node are as follows:
Chapter 7
LOOPBACK
Allows remote users to use the
loopback diagnostic server on the local
node.
NFT
Allows remote users to transfer files to
or from the local node using the DSCOPY
command and intrinsic.
NSSTAT
Allows remote users to use the
NSSTATUS intrinsic to retrieve network
services information from the local
node.
RFA
Allows remote users to access files on
the local node, using the RFA and RDBA
services.
RPM
Allows remote users to create and kill
processes on the local node using the
Remote Process Management service.
VT
Allows remote users to logon to a
session on the local node.
VTR
Allows remote users to access local
terminals using the Reverse VT
service.
159
Commands
NSCONTROL START
VTA
Allows remote users who are running
the Virtual Terminal service over TCP
implementations which only support
the ARPA standard stream mode flow
control mechanisms to log onto the
local node.
The services which allow users on the local node to use
resources on remote nodes are:
NFTL
Allows local users to transfer files to or
from remote nodes using the DSCOPY
command and intrinsics.
NSSTATL
Allows local users to use the NSSTATUS
intrinsic to retrieve network services
information from the local and remote
nodes.
RFAL
Allows local users to open and access
files and databases on remote nodes,
using the RFA and RDBA services.
RPML
Allows local users to create and kill
processes on the local and remote nodes
using the RPM service.
VTL
Allows local users to log onto remote
nodes using the REMOTE HELLO
command.
VTRL
Allows local users to access terminals
on remote nodes using the Reverse VT
service.
Discussion
If you issue an NSCONTROL START without specifying a service list, the
default is to start all services. You use the service list if you wish to
select which services to start, and whether local or remote users are
allowed to use the services. To allow remote users to use VT, VTR, VTA,
NFT, RFA/RDBA, NSSTAT, LOOPBACK, and RPM on your local node, you
must START the appropriate remote services. Additionally, if you wish to
allow local users to use VT, NFT, RFA/RDBA, RPM, and NSSTAT to remote
nodes, you must START the appropriate local services.
You must issue the NETCONTROL START command before the NSCONTROL
START command. This is because the Network Services depend on the
network transport subsystem. Refer to the NETCONTROL START
command for more information.
160
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL START
Example 1
Example 1 shows the command sequence necessary to start the
Network Services. Enter the NETCONTROL START command to initiate
the network transport before the NSCONTROL START command, as
shown in the example. Issuing the NSCONTROL START creates the DSDAD
process and starts all the user services.
To successfully initialize a node, the commands must be issued in the
order specified. At least one of the required NETCONTROL START
commands must be issued first, before the NSCONTROL START command.
:NETCONTROL START;NET=LAN1
:NSCONTROL START
Example 2
For security reasons, the node manager for this node has decided to
restrict the Network Services to outgoing only. The command shown in
example 2 enables users on the local node to use resources on remote
nodes. The reverse is not true. Users on remote nodes are not allowed to
logon or use any of the services on the local node. The status display
shows all the local services enabled and all the remote services
disabled.
:NSCONTROL START=VTL,VTRL,NFTL,RFAL,RPML
VTL NETWORK SERVICE STARTED.
VTRL NETWORK SERVICE STARTED.
NFTL NETWORK SERVICE STARTED.
RFAL NETWORK SERVICE STARTED.
RPML NETWORK SERVICE STARTED.
:NSCONTROL STATUS=SERVICES
SERVICE
TYPE
VTA
NSSTATL
NSSTAT
LOOPBACK
RPML
RPM
PTOPL
PTOP
RFAL
RFA
NFTL
NFT
VTRL
VTR
VTL
VT
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
STARTED
NO
NO
NO
NO
YES
NO
NO
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO
YES
NO
Chapter 7
SERVER
VTSERVER
NSSTATUS
NSSTATUS
LOOPBACK
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
RASERVER
NFT
NFT
VTSERVER
VTSERVER
VTSERVER
VTSERVER
DESCRIPTION
INCOMING STREAM MODE VIRTUAL TERMINAL
OUTGOING NSSTATUS SERVICE
INCOMING NSSTATUS SERVICE
INCOMING LOOPBACK SERVICE
OUTGOING REMOTE PROCESS MANAGEMENT
INCOMING REMOTE PROCESS MANAGEMENT
OUTGOING PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM COMMUNICATION
INCOMING PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM COMMUNICATION
OUTGOING REMOTE FILE ACCESS
INCOMING REMOTE FILE ACCESS
OUTGOING NETWORK FILE TRANSFER
INCOMING NETWORK FILE TRANSFER
OUTGOING REVERSE VIRTUAL TERMINAL
INCOMING REVERSE VIRTUAL TERMINAL
OUTGOING VIRTUAL TERMINAL
INCOMING VIRTUAL TERMINAL
161
Commands
NSCONTROL START
Example 3
The network transport must be initialized before you can issue the
NSCONTROL START command. If not, the error messages shown in
example 3 are displayed.
:NSCONTROL START
TRANSPORT NOT INITIALIZED (DSERR 644)
INVALID CONTROL OPTION (CIERR 5062)
162
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL STATUS
NSCONTROL STATUS
Displays information about the Network Services.
Syntax
[=USERS
]
[=SERVICES]
NSCONTROL STATUS [=SERVERS ]
[=ALL
]
[=SUMMARY ]
Parameters
STATUS
Displays information about the Network Services. Can
be used to check if the Network Services were
successfully initiated, or to check on the current status
using the following parameters:
USERS
Displays the sessions on the node that
are associated with the Network
Services.
SERVICES
Displays information about the
services.
SERVERS
Displays information about the servers.
SUMMARY
Displays a summary of the information
about services, servers, and users.
ALL
Displays all available information
about services, servers, and users.
You can qualify the STATUS function with one
parameter or with a list of parameters separated by
commas.
Default: ALL
Discussion
This function displays information on those local sessions that were
created by a DSLINE and REMOTE HELLO and on those remote sessions
that were created by a REMOTE HELLO. The STATUS display does not list
information on either local sessions that are using DSCOPY without a
REMOTE HELLO or temporary remote sessions created by NFT, RFA, or
RPM.
The following examples show the information provided by the STATUS
function of the NSCONTROL command.
Chapter 7
163
Commands
NSCONTROL STATUS
Example 1
The following example shows the status of the Network Services. Local
means the service gives local users access to remote resources; remote
means the service gives remote users access to local resources. Server
indicates the type of server, NFT or DSSERVER, used for the service. For
this example, all the services were started as indicated by YES in the
STARTED column of the display. A NO in that column would indicate that
the service was not started. You can use the STATUS display to verify
whether each individual service is started or not, and whether it is
available for local or remote use. This is helpful when using the optional
services list of the NSCONTROL START and STOP functions.
:NSCONTROL STATUS=SERVICES
SERVICE
TYPE
STARTED
VTA
NSSTATL
NSSTAT
LOOPBACK
RPML
RPM
PTOPL
PTOP
RFAL
RFA
NFTL
NFT
VTRL
VTR
VTL
VT
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
LOCAL
REMOTE
DESCRIPTION
VTSERVER
NSSTATUS
NSSTATUS
LOOPBACK
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
DSSERVER
RASERVER
NFT
NFT
VTSERVER
VTSERVER
VTSERVER
VTSERVER
INCOMING
OUTGOING
INCOMING
INCOMING
OUTGOING
INCOMING
OUTGOING
INCOMING
OUTGOING
INCOMING
OUTGOING
INCOMING
OUTGOING
INCOMING
OUTGOING
INCOMING
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
SERVER
STREAM MODE VIRTUAL TERMINAL
NSSTATUS SERVICE
NSSTATUS SERVICE
LOOPBACK SERVICE
REMOTE PROCESS MANAGEMENT
REMOTE PROCESS MANAGEMENT
PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM COMMUNICATION
PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM COMMUNICATION
REMOTE FILE ACCESS
REMOTE FILE ACCESS
NETWORK FILE TRANSFER
NETWORK FILE TRANSFER
REVERSE VIRTUAL TERMINAL
REVERSE VIRTUAL TERMINAL
VIRTUAL TERMINAL
VIRTUAL TERMINAL
Example 2
Example 2 shows the status of the servers. Here the minimum number
of NFT servers is 0 and the maximum is 300 (the defaults). There are no
NFT servers created. The minimum number of VTSERVERS is 6 and the
maximum is 300. One, with process ID number (PIN) 50, is active,
being used for the VT service with session #S1. The other five are not
being used but are in reserve.
:NSCONTROL STATUS=SERVERS
SERVER
RASERVER
NSSTATUS
LOOPBACK
VTSERVER
MIN
MAX
0
0
0
6
300
300
300
300
ACTIVE
RESERVED
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
5
DEBUG
PIN
STATUS
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
50
164
JOBNUM
#S1
ACTIVE
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL STATUS
51
49
41
58
57
NFT
DSSERVER
0
0
300
300
0
0
0
0
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
RESERVED
TOTAL NUMBER OF ACTIVE SERVERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF RESERVED SERVERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF SERVERS:
OFF
OFF
1
5
6
Example 3
In example 3, assume that a user has entered the following commands
on NODE1:
:HELLO MANAGER.SYS
:DSLINE NODE2
:REMOTE HELLO MGR.TELESUP
The result on NODE1 is:
:NSCONTROL STATUS=USERS
JOBNUM
SESSION
ID
TYPE
SERVICES
USER.ACCOUNT
NODENAME
#S1
#060507
#031237
LOCAL
VT
MANAGER.SYS
NODE2.DOMAIN.ORGANIZATION
TOTAL NUMBER OF LOCAL NS USERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF REMOTE NS USERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF NS USERS:
1
0
1
and on NODE2:
:NSCONTROL STATUS=USERS
JOBNUM
SESSION
ID
TYPE
SERVICES
USER.ACCOUNT
NODENAME
#S3
#031237
#060507
REMOTE
ORIGIN
MGR.TELESUP
NODE1.DOMAIN.ORGANIZATION
TOTAL NUMBER OF LOCAL NS USERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF REMOTE NS USERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF NS USERS:
0
1
1
The display on NODE2 shows the remote session for MGR.TELESUP from
the REMOTE HELLO on NODE1. As illustrated in example 3, the session
IDs can be used to match up the local and remote sessions. The local
session on NODE1, with ID #060500, is the origin of the remote session
on NODE2, with ID #031237.
Chapter 7
165
Commands
NSCONTROL STATUS
Example 4
In the following example, the Network Services have not been started
(no NSCONTROL START has not been issued). The system response to the
NSCONTROL STATUS=USERS,SERVICES command shows that there are
no Network Services users and no Network Services currently active.
:NSCONTROL STATUS=USERS,SERVICES
NO CURRENT NETWORK SERVICE USERS
NO NETWORK SERVICES ARE CURRENTLY ACTIVE
Example 5
Example 5 shows the brief summary of users, services, and servers
information. This is an abbreviated display of STATUS=ALL.
:NSCONTROL STATUS=SUMMARY
TOTAL NUMBER OF LOCAL NS USERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF REMOTE NS USERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF NS USERS:
1
0
1
OUTGOING SERVICES
SERVICE
STARTED
INCOMING SERVICES
SERVICE
STARTED
NSSTATL
RPML
PTOPL
RFAL
NFTL
VTRL
VTL
SERVER
FEATURES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
VTA
NSSTAT
LOOPBACK
RPM
PTOP
RFA
NFT
VTR
VT
MIN
MAX
ACTIVE
RESERVED
0
0
0
6
0
0
300
300
300
300
300
300
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
RASERVER
NSSTATUS
LOOPBACK
VTSERVER
NFT
DSSERVER
TOTAL NUMBER OF ACTIVE SERVERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF RESERVED SERVERS:
TOTAL NUMBER OF SERVERS:
166
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
FEATURES
AUTOLOGON OFF
AUTOLOGON ON
AUTOLOGON ON
DEBUG
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
1
5
6
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL STOP
NSCONTROL STOP
Terminates Network Services subsystem.
Syntax
NSCONTROL STOP[=service[,service]…]
Parameters
STOP=services
Terminates the Network Services subsystem. STOP
executes a “graceful” shutdown of Network Services.
Existing users of the service can continue until they
complete their NS activity, but new users are prevented
from using the services. The optional service list
(services) allows you to select which of the services are
disabled for local or remote use. When all Network
Services are stopped, the DSDAD process will terminate.
Default (if the service list is omitted): terminates all
services for both local and remote use.
The services list is the same as for the START function,
except that the specified services are stopped, not
started.
Specifying the following services prevents users on
remote nodes from using resources on the local node:
Chapter 7
LOOPBACK
Prevents remote users from using the
loopback diagnostic server on the local
node.
NFT
Prevents remote users from
transferring files to or from the local
node using the DSCOPY command and
intrinsic.
NSSTAT
Prevents remote users from using the
NSSTATUS intrinsic to retrieve network
services information from the local
node.
RFA
Prevents remote users from accessing
files on the local node.
RPM
Prevents remote users from creating
and killing processes on the local node
using the Remote Process Management
167
Commands
NSCONTROL STOP
service.
VT
Prevents remote users from logging
onto the local node using the REMOTE
HELLO command.
VTR
Prevents remote users from accessing
local terminals using the Reverse VT
service.
VTA
Prevents remote users who are running
the Virtual Terminal service over TCP
implementations which only support
the ARPA standard stream mode flow
control mechanisms to log onto the
local node.
Specifying the following services prevents users on the
local node from using resources on remote nodes:
168
NFTL
Prevents local users from transferring
files to or from remote nodes using the
DSCOPY command and intrinsics.
NSSTATL
Prevents local users from using the
NSSTATUS intrinsic to retrieve network
services information from the local and
remote nodes.
RFAL
Prevents local users from opening and
accessing files and databases on remote
nodes using the RFA and RDBA services.
RPML
Prevents local users from creating and
killing processes on the local and
remote nodes using the RPM service.
VTL
Prevents local users from logging onto
remote nodes using the REMOTE HELLO
command.
VTRL
Prevents local users from accessing
terminals on remote nodes using the
Reverse VT service.
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL STOP
Discussion
NSCONTROL STOP is the normal way to shut down the Network Services.
It allows existing users to continue using the services until they finish
their tasks, but prevents any new users from using the services. The
ABORT function, on the other hand, immediately terminates all the
services and all the server processes. Anyone using a service will find
their task (DSCOPY, for example) immediately terminated. See the
discussion of NSCONTROL ABORT.
Example 1
Example 1 shows NSCONTROL STOP without the service list. All Network
Services are stopped. Any active servers are allowed to continue until
finished with the current task, at which point they are terminated. No
new change requests are accepted. When all the servers and services
are stopped, the DSDAD process terminates. In the example, an
NSCONTROL ABORT command is issued after the NSCONTROL STOP
command to make sure all Network Services activity is stopped.
:NSCONTROL STOP
:NSCONTROL ABORT
:NETCONTROL STOP
{users and servers allowed to finish}
{terminates all network services activity}
{terminates all network transport activity}
Example 2
The NSCONTROL STOP=VT,VTA,VTR command shown in the following
example stops the VT, VTA, and Reverse VT services. This prevents
remote users from logging on to the local node using REMOTE HELLO and
from opening local terminals using Reverse VT. If there are any other
active Network Services, they remain available.
:NSCONTROL STOP=VT,VTA,VTR
Chapter 7
169
Commands
NSCONTROL VERSION
NSCONTROL VERSION
Displays the version numbers for the Network Services software
modules and the overall subsystem version.
Syntax
NSCONTROL VERSION[=MOD]
Parameters
VERSION[=MOD]
Displays the overall version of the
Network Services. If qualified with the
MOD keyword, displays the version of
each of the software modules of the
Network Services as well as the overall
version.
Discussion
The software modules of all HP products have a version identification
number which includes the version, update, and fix level of the software
module. The VERSION function of the NSCONTROL command allows you to
check the version numbers of the Network Services software modules to
ensure that they are compatible and up-to-date. The display is the same
as that for NMMAINT except that only the Network Services
subsystem is displayed.
Example 1
In example 1, the information that is provided includes the version
number of the Network Services.
:NSCONTROL VERSION
NS3000/iX Transport 32098-20033
170
overall version = B.05.00
Chapter 7
Commands
NSCONTROL VERSION
Example 2
To see the version numbers of the individual modules, you would
specify the command using the MOD keyword. The result would be a
display similar to the one shown in example 2:
:NSCONTROL VERSION=MOD
Network Services individual module versions:
NM Program:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
Catalog file:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
CM Program:
CM Program:
CM Program:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
CM Program:
CM Program:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NL procedure:
NM Program:
NM Program:
CM Program:
SL procedure:
SL procedure:
CM Program:
NL procedure:
Catalog file:
SL procedure:
NL procedure:
CM Program:
NL procedure:
DSDAD.NET.SYS
ASCXVERS
ASBUFVERS
ASENVVERS
DSUTILVERS
SUBSYS6FMTVERS
ASCAT.NET.SYS
VTSRVTVER
VTS_LDMVER
VTS_UTILVER
LOOPBACK.NET.SYS
LOOPINIT.NET.SYS
NSSTATUS.NET.SYS
NSSTATUSNMVERS
NSINFONMVERS
CONFPROG.NET.SYS
MASTMAKE.NET.SYS
VTS_SMVER
NSUTILNMVERS
ASCXNMVERS
ASENVNMVERS
RASERVER.NET.SYS
VTSERVER.NET.SYS
DSSERVER.NET.SYS
ASRFAVERS
ASPTOPVERS
NFT.NET.SYS
NFTNMVERS
NFTCAT2.NET.SYS
ASRPMVERS
RPMNMVERS
RPMDAD.NET.SYS
RFANMVERS
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
Version:
B0010005
B0010006
B0010000
B0010005
B0010005
B0010001
B0010001
B0010000
B0010003
B0010003
B0010000
B0010000
B0010002
B0010001
B0010002
B0010000
B0010000
B0010003
B0010003
B0010002
B0010002
B0010002
B0010004
B0010000
B0010002
B0010001
B0010013
B0010001
B0010001
B0010001
B0010001
B0010003
B0010001
Network Services overall subsystem version = B.00.10
Chapter 7
171
Commands
RESUMENMLOG
RESUMENMLOG
Resumes logging after a recoverable error.
Syntax
RESUMENMLOG
Use
Available
In Session?
YES
In Job?
YES
In Break?
YES
Programmatically?
YES
Breakable?
NO
Capabilities?
NM
Discussion
RESUMENMLOG causes the resumption of logging to the NM disk log file
upon the correction of a recoverable I/O error.
For example assume that the system is on line, NM logging is enabled,
and a recoverable error occurs on NMLG file number 104. The error is
corrected and the RESUMENMLOG command is entered. The following
message is then displayed on the system console:
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn.
NM LOGGING RESUMED
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn ON
Refer to the NS 3000/iX Error Messages Reference Manual for more
information on recoverable errors.
172
Chapter 7
Commands
SHOWNMLOG
SHOWNMLOG
Displays the number and available space of the log file.
Syntax
SHOWNMLOG
Use
Available
In Session?
YES
In Job?
YES
In Break?
YES
Programmatically?
YES
Breakable?
NO
Capabilities
NM
Discussion
SHOWNMLOG displays the number of the current NMLG file and the
percentage of available file space currently used.
The information appears in the following format:
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn IS mm% FULL
where nnnn is the NMLG file number and mm is the percentage of file
space used.
If network logging is disabled due to an irrecoverable error, NMS
displays the following message explaining the cause. The manager will
have to do a warm or cool start to bring up the system again.
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn ERROR #nn. NM LOGGING STOPPED. (NMCNERR 36)
If network logging is enabled but currently suspended due to a
recoverable error, NMS displays the following messages explaining the
cause. Once the error is corrected, the manager can then issue the
RESUMENMLOG command explained in this section.
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn IS mm% FULL
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn ERROR #mm. NMLOGGING SUSPENDED.(NMCNERR 38)
Chapter 7
173
Commands
SWITCHNMLOG
SWITCHNMLOG
Closes the current log file and creates and opens a new one.
Syntax
[UPDATE
]
SWITCHNMLOG [filenumber]
Use
Available
In Session?
YES
In Job?
YES
In Break?
YES
Programmatically?
YES
Breakable?
NO
Capabilities?
NM
Parameters
UPDATE
Allows you to update logging configuration for all
subsystems actively logging without stopping
transport. To change the logging configuration, use the
node management configurator (NMMGR). Refer to the
NS 3000/iX Screens Reference Manual or to the
HP e3000/iX Network Planning and Configuration
Guide for more information on configuring logging.
Once changes are made, issue the SWITCHNMLOG
UPDATE command so that the changes take effect.
The UPDATE option may not be used with the
filenumber option.
filenumber
Switches the log file to a file with the specified number.
The value for filenumber must be an integer from 0 to
9999. For example,
SWITCHNMLOG 10
makes NMLG0010 the current log file. If you specify a
number that is already being used, then the next
available consecutive number is used.
The filenumber option may not be used with the
UPDATE option.
174
Chapter 7
Commands
SWITCHNMLOG
Discussion
SWITCHNMLOG closes the current NMLG file and creates and opens a
new one. When you enter SWITCHNMLOG, NMS displays the message:
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn IS mm% FULL
NMLG FILE NUMBER pppp ON
where nnnn is the previous NMLG FILE number, mm is the percentage
of file space used, and pppp is the newly opened file numbered one more
than the last file number.
If network logging is disabled due to an irrecoverable error when
SWITCHNMLOG is entered, NMS displays the following message
explaining the cause. The system will need to be brought back up with a
warm or cool start.
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn ERROR #nn. NM LOGGING STOPPED. (NMCNERR 36)
If network logging is enabled but currently suspended due to a
recoverable error, NMS displays the following message explaining the
cause. When the problem is corrected, the manager can issue the
RESUMENMLOG command.
NMLG FILE NUMBER nnnn ERROR #nn. NM LOGGING SUSPENDED. (NMCNERR 38)
Chapter 7
175
Commands
SWITCHNMLOG
176
Chapter 7
A
LINKCONTROL Command
This appendix defines the fields output by the LINKCONTROL STATUS
command and its associated parameters. The LINKCONTROL STATUS
command enables you to obtain link configuration and statistical data
which you can use for monitoring and debugging the link. This
command has several parameters, each of which provides different
configuration or statistical data. The parameters described in this
appendix are as follows:
• LINKSTATE
• CONFIGURATION
• STATISTICS
• ALL
• RESET
The STATUS=DIAGSTAT command returns information intended for HP
diagnostic use. Its output is not explained in this manual. After issuing
this command you should send the output to your HP representative.
The LINKCONTROL command displays specific information relating to
the type of link that is monitored. The LINKCONTROL command can be
used to obtain information about the following types of NS 3000/iX
links:
• NS 3000/iX LAP-B links
• NS 3000/iX IEEE 802.3 or LAN links
• NS 3000/iX IEEE 802.5/Token Ring links
• NS 3000/iX Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) links
• NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN links
• NS 3000/iX 100Base-T links
• NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX links
The LINKCONTROL command does not work on an X.25 link because the
card is located in the DTC. For equivalent functionality, use the
OpenView DTC manager.
177
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAP-B Link Statistics
NS 3000/iX LAP-B Link Statistics
The following section describes the data that is output when you issue
the LINKCONTROL command to obtain statistics relating to NS 3000/iX
LAP-B Links.
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields
The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=LINKSTATE command:
Linkname:
LAPB20
Linktype:
LAPB
Linkstate:
CONNECTED LEVEL 2
Linkname — The Linkname field specifies the name of the link.
Linktype — This Linktype specifies the type of link, such as LAP-B or
IEEE 802.3, that is being monitored.
Linkstate — The Linkstate field specifies the current state of the link.
The possible link states are as follows:
• Not connected.
• Connected level 1.
• Connected level 2.
• Connecting level 1.
• Connecting level 2.
• Disconnecting level 1.
• Disconnecting level 2.
In this example, the current state of the LAPB link named LAPB20 is
CONNECTED LEVEL 2.
The LINKSTATE parameter fields are displayed whenever you enter the
LINKCONTROL Status command, regardless of which other parameters
are specified.
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields
The CONFIGURATION parameter for LAP-B links displays the LINKSTATE
parameter fields and many additional fields. These additional fields
display information that is related to the link configuration and which,
except for the Cable Type parameter, are input through the NMMGR
configuration program.
178
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The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=CONFIGURATION command:
Physical Path
Phone Number
Modullo Count
Local Mode
LAPB Parm K
LAPB Parm T1
LAPB Parm N2
24
9D1D40898765432
8
HP-HP
7
300 hsec
20
Cable Type
RS232
Buffer Size
Connect Timeout
Local Timeout
Transmission Speed
1024 Bytes
60 sec
900 sec
64000 bps
Phone Number — The Phone Number field displays the current
automatic dial phone number, as specified in the NMMGR
configuration file.
Modulo Count — The Modulo Count field displays the maximum
frame sequence number allowable for any frame in the network. This
field can be set to a value of 8 or 128, meaning that frames are
numbered from either 0 through 7, or 0 through 127.
Cable Type — The Cable Type field displays the cable type that is
currently connected to the PSI card. This data is provided by the PSI
card and cannot be configured through NMMGR. The possible values
for this field are as follows:
• RS232
• V35
• Modem Eliminator
• RS366
• RS449
• Loopback
• None
Local Mode — The Local Mode field displays the value specified for
local mode in the NMMGR link screen. The possible values for this field
are as follows:
• HP–HP, for connection to another HP device configured as
HP Point-to-Point.
• DTE, for connection to a device that is configured as a DCE.
• DCE, for connection to a device that is configured as a DTE.
Buffer Size — The Buffer Size field displays the current buffer size.
This value will be equal to the buffer size configured in the NMMGR
Link screen plus 4 bytes of overhead that is added by the level 3
protocol.
Appendix A
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LAPB Parm K — The LAPB Parm K field displays the configured
number of unacknowledged frames that are allowed in the network at
any given time. For example, if this value is set to seven (7) for a node,
and that node transmits seven (7) packet frames onto the network, it
cannot transmit another frame until one or more of the transmitted
frames are acknowledged.
Connect Timeout — The Connect Timeout field displays the current
logical link level 2 connection timeout. The Connect Timeout parameter
sets the amount of time a node will wait for a logical connection to a
remote node to be established. If this timer expires, the node aborts the
connection attempt. The abort process can take several additional
seconds.
LAPB Parm T1 — The LAPB Parm T1 field displays the current value
of the T1 timer. The T1 timer waits the specified number of
hundredths-of-seconds for a particular frame to be acknowledged. A
frame that is transmitted, but not acknowledged, before the T1 timer
expires, is retransmitted.
Local Timeout — The Local Timeout field displays the value specified
for the Local timer. This timer, also called a heartbeat timer, is used to
monitor whether the system and/or the PSI card are functioning. The
PSI card, and the system, transmit a signal, called a heartbeat signal,
to each other on a specified schedule. If, for example, the heartbeat does
not arrive at the PSI card from the system (or vice-versa), the card or
system waits the number of seconds specified by this field. If no
heartbeat arrives before this timer expires, the link is dropped. You can
determine whether the PSI card or the system failed by checking to see
which device is still active. The default for this field is 60 seconds and it
is recommended that you do not change the value of this field. The PSI
always waits 20 seconds longer than the system waits before it drops
the link.
LAPB Parm N2 — The LAPB Parm N2 field displays the maximum
number of times a frame is retransmitted after the LAPB Parm T1
expires. The frame is retransmitted at the LAPB Parm T1 interval for
the number of times specified in this field. When this count is depleted,
the frame is retransmitted at 20 second intervals. If no response is
received after these transmissions, the link is brought down.
A node that is configured with the value specified, will attempt to
retransmit an unacknowledged frame a maximum of 20 times at T1
intervals.
Transmission Speed — The Transmission Speed field displays the
current transfer rate, or clocking, configured for the node in the
NMMGR Link screen. If modems are used, the modems will control the
clocking. The PSI card transmits at the clocking setting of the modem
and ignores the value configured in this field.
180
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NS 3000/iX LAP-B Link Statistics
STATISTICS Parameter Fields
The STATISTICS parameter for LAP-B links displays many fields in
addition to the LINKSTATE parameter fields. The CONFIGURATION
parameter fields are not displayed with this parameter. The following is
an example of the data that is displayed when you issue the
LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=STATISTICS command:
Connection Duration
Data Bytes Sent
Overhead Bytes Sent
Total Frames Sent
Data Frames Sent
Aborted Frames Sent
DSR Losses
CTS Carrier Losses
DCD Carrier Losses
23:25:01
63650
8592
1430
1253
62650
0
0
0
Tracing
Data Bytes Received
Overhead Bytes Receivedf
Total Frames Received
Data Frames Received
Aborted Received
Oversized Frames Received
Receive Overruns
CRC Errors
Statistics Resets
OFF
62300
8550
1425
1246
0
0
0
0
0
Connect Duration — The Connect Duration field displays the length
of time that the current logical (level 2) connection has existed. If there
is no active connection, this field displays the length of time that the
most recently established connection was in existence. This field is
reset with each new connection.
Tracing — The Tracing field specifies whether tracing is currently
enabled or disabled.
Data Bytes Sent — The Data Bytes Sent field displays the number of
bytes that have been transmitted in the data portion of all data frames.
Data Bytes Received — The Data Bytes Received field displays the
number of bytes that have been received in the data portion of all data
frames.
Overhead Bytes Sent — The Overhead Bytes Sent field displays the
total number of flags, level 2 address and control bytes, and frame check
sequence (FCS) bytes transmitted. This value should be equal to six
times the total number of frames transmitted.
Overhead Bytes Received — The Overhead Bytes Received field
displays the total number of flags, level 2 address and control bytes, and
FCS bytes received. This value should be equal to six times the total
number of frames transmitted.
Total Frames Sent — The Total Frames Sent field displays the total
number of frames transmitted.
Total Frames Received — The Total Frames Received field displays
the total number of frames received.
Data Frames Sent — The Data Frames Sent field displays the total
number of transmitted data frames.
Appendix A
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Data Frames Received — The Data Frames Received field displays
the total number of received data frames.
Aborted Frames Sent — The Aborted Frames Sent field displays the
number of frames which were aborted before they were received.
Normally, this number should be quite low (below 3% of the total
number of frames sent). A large number could point to a noisy line or a
weak or bad clock signal sent by a modem. If this value becomes larger
than 3% of the total number of frames sent, and you feel that network
performance is being affected, contact your HP representative.
Aborted Frames Received — The Aborted Frames Received field
displays the number of frames which were aborted after they were
received. Normally, this number should be quite low (below 3% of the
total number of frames received). A large number could point to a noisy
line or a weak or bad clock signal sent by a modem. If this value
becomes larger than 3% of the total number of frames received, and you
feel that network performance is being affected, contact your
HP representative.
DSR Losses — The DSR Losses field displays the number of times the
PSI detected a temporary loss of the Data Set Ready (DSR) signal on
the cable. On most lines, this will remain at a value of zero, although
some modems will periodically drop signals for very short intervals.
Oversized Frames Received — The Oversized Frames Received field
displays the number of frames received that exceed the maximum
configured buffer size as configured in the Link screen of NMMGR. A
number other than zero in this field indicates that the remote buffer
size configuration is greater than the local buffer size configuration.
One or both configurations must be modified so that the two buffer sizes
are identical.
CTS Carrier Losses — The CTS Carrier Losses field displays the
number of times the PSI detected a temporary loss of the Clear to Send
(CTS) signal on the cable. On most lines, this will remain at a value of
zero, although some modems will periodically drop signals for very
short intervals.
Receive Overruns — The Receive Overruns field displays the number
of times that the PSI card had to discard a frame because the PSI card
could not process the data as quickly as it arrived. A number in this
field that is greater than 3% of the total number of received frames
indicates a possible problem with the PSI card. If this number
continues to increase, contact your HP representative.
DCD Carrier Losses — The DCD Carrier Losses field displays the
number of times the PSI detected a temporary loss of the Data Carrier
Detect (DCD) signal on the cable. On most lines, this will remain at a
value of zero, although some modems will periodically drop signals for
very short intervals.
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CRC Errors — The CRC Errors field displays the number of frames
that were received with a bad Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC)
checksum. A large number (greater than 1% of the total number of
packets) indicates that a problem may exist in the connection between
the PSI and the modem, or between the two modems.
Statistics Resets — The Statistics Resets field displays the number of
times that the statistics buffer (which contains the values for all of the
aforementioned fields) was reset. This value is reset each time the link
is restarted.
RESET Parameter Fields
The RESET parameter for LAP-B links resets all of the accumulated
statistics for the links. This command also displays all of the
LINKSTATE, CONFIGURATION, and STATISTICS parameter fields. Refer to
the STATISTICS parameter for a description of the displayed fields.
ALL Parameter Fields
The ALL parameter for LAP-B links displays all of the LINKSTATE,
CONFIGURATION, and STATISTICS parameter fields. This is an example
of the ALL parameter output:
Linkname:
LAPB20
Linktype:
Physical Path
Phone Number
Modulo Count
Local Mode
24
9D1D40898765432
8
HP-HP
LAPB Parm K
LAPB Parm T1
LAPB Parm N2
7
300 hsec
20
Connection Duration
Data Bytes Sent
Overhead Bytes Sent
Total Frames Sent
Data Frames Sent
Aborted Frames Sent
DSR Losses
CTS Carrier Losses
DED Carrier Losses
23:25:01
62650
8592
1430
1253
62650
0
0
0
Appendix A
LAPB
Linkstate:
Cable Type
Buffer Size
CONNECTED LEVEL 2
RS232
1024 Bytes
Connect Timeout
Local Timeout
Transmission Speed
60 sec
900 sec
64000 bps
Tracing
Data Bytes Received
Overhead Bytes Received
Total Frames Received
Data Frames Received
Aborted Received
Oversized Frames Received
Receive Overruns
CRC Errors
Statistics Resets
OFF
62300
8550
1425
1246
0
0
0
0
0
183
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAN Link Statistics
NS 3000/iX LAN Link Statistics
The following section describes the data that is output when you issue
the LINKCONTROL command to obtain statistics relating to NS 3000/iX
LAN Links.
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields
The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=LINKSTATE command:
Linkname:
SYSLINK
Linktype:
IEEE802.3
Linkstate:
CONNECTED
Linkname — The Linkname field specifies the name of the link.
Linktype — The Linktype field specifies the type of link, such as
LAP-B or IEEE 802.3, that is being monitored.
Linkstate — The Linkstate field specifies the current state of the link.
The possible link states are as follows:
• Connected
• Not connected
NOTE
Some of the parameter descriptions that follow vary according to
whether your LAN card is a CIO card or an NIO card.
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields
The CONFIGURATION parameter for IEEE 802.3 links displays several
fields in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter field. The following is an
example of the data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
linkname;STATUS=CONFIGURATION command:
Physical Path:
Inbound Buffer Size:
Inbound Number of Buffers:
Inbound Buffers Available:
Current Station Address:
Default Station Address:
Current Receive Filter:
Current Multicast Addresses:
4.6
1536 (CIO only)
64 (CIO only)
41 (CIO only)
08-00-09-02-3D-9B
08-00-09-02-3D-9B
bad(0) multi(1) broad(1) any(0)
09-00-09-00-00-01
Physical Path — The Physical Path field displays the current physical
path for the LAN card as specified in the NMMGR configuration file.
Inbound Buffer Size — The Inbound Buffer Size field displays the
current size of the receive buffer that are configured for this system
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through NMMGR. This field will not print for NIO cards, since there
may be multiple inbound buffer sizes.
Inbound Number of Buffers — The Inbound Number of Buffers field
displays the number of receive buffers that are configured for this
system through NMMGR. This field will not print for NIO cards.
Inbound Buffers Available — The Inbound Buffers Available field
displays the number of unused or unassigned Inbound Buffers that are
available to this system. This field will not print for NIO cards.
Current Station Address — The Current Station Address field is a
display of the six (6) byte address to which the node is configured to
respond. This address is used whenever frames are sent to the network
media. The default station address is used unless it is overridden in the
NMMGR link configuration screen. If this field is changed, then the
station address of this node is changed. Make sure that you note this
new address in the system manager log.
Default Station Address — The Default Station Address field is the
default value for the Current Station Address described above. The
default station address is determined by the specific LAN card. It is
also printed on the LAN card. If the card is changed for any reason, the
Default Station Address of this node will change.
Current Receive Filter — The Current Receive Filter field has a
current value. The current value is currently used by the LAN card.
Receive Filter bad ( ) — The Receive Filter bad ( ) field is either
enabled (1) or disabled (0). When enabled, any bad frames that are
received by the LAN are passed to the driver. When disabled, bad
frames are discarded. Any bad frames are counted in the statistics.
Receive Filter multi ( ) — The Receive Filter multi ( ) field is either
enabled (1) or disabled (0). When enabled, you can specify a list of
specified multicast frames to be received by the LAN hardware card.
The list can contain up to 64 multicast addresses to be downloaded to
the LAN and is displayed when this field is entered.
Receive Filter broad ( ) — The Receive Filter broad ( ) field is either
enabled (1) or disabled (0). When enabled, the LAN card receives
frames sent to the broadcast address.
Receive Filter any ( ) — The Receive Filter any ( ) field is either
enabled (1) or disabled (0). When enabled, the LAN card attempts to
receive all frames from the network media. When disabled, only those
frames sent to the LAN card are received.
Receive Filter k_pckts() (NIO card only) — The Receive Filter
k_pckts() filed is either enabled (1) or disabled (0). When enabled, the
LAN card keeps frames received from the network media, even if no
buffers are currently posted to the card. If this option is not enabled,
the frames will be dropped.
Appendix A
185
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Receive Filter x_pckts() (NIO card only) — The Receive Filter
x_pckts() field is either enabled (1) or disabled (0). When enabled, any
XID or TEST commands sent to DSAP 0 will be responded to by the
driver, and not the card.
Current Multicast Addresses — The Current Multicast Addresses
field contains a list of all multicast addresses to which the LAN card
responds. The default multicast address list contains no addresses. If
no multicast addresses are specified, the following message is printed:
Current multicast address list is empty
Multicast addresses are configured through NMMGR. The maximum
number of multicast addresses allowed is 16. The meanings of the
following specific multicast addresses are as follows:
09-00-09-00-00-01
Probe address
09-00-09-00-00-02
Second probe address
09-00-09-00-00-03
LAN analysis (LANDAD)
09-00-09-00-00-04
DTC boot address
STATISTICS Parameter Fields
The STATISTICS parameter for IEEE 802.3 links displays many fields
in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter fields. The CONFIGURATION
parameter fields are not displayed when this parameter is used. The
following is an example of the data that is displayed when you issue the
LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=STATISTICS command:
Transmits no error
Transmits error
Out of TX bufs
Transmits deferred
Transmits 1 retry
Transmits >1 retry
Transmits 16 collisions
Transmits late collision
802 chip restarts
Heartbeat losses
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Receives no error
Receives error
Out of Rx bufs
Carrier losses
Reflectometer
CRC errors
Whole byte errors
Size range errors
Frame losses
343
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
This command displays statistics about data transmitted across the
link. All field values, except for those under Receive Filter, are
summations. Over time, the values in these fields reach their maximum
possible value. When this occurs, these fields can only be reset
manually.
Transmits no error — The Transmits no error field specifies the
number of frames that were successfully transmitted onto the medium.
This includes the number of frames that were successfully transmitted
on the first attempt, as well as frames that were successfully
186
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transmitted after being deferred or that experienced one or more
collisions. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is 4294967295.
Receives no error — This field specifies the number of frames that
were successfully received over the medium. This includes the number
of frames that were successfully received on the first attempt, as well as
frames that were successfully received after being deferred or that
experienced one or more collisions. The maximum value of this 32-bit
field is 4294967295.
Transmits error — The Transmits error field specifies the number of
transmission errors sent across the link. The value in this field specifies
the number of frames which, due to errors on the link, were never
transmitted. Although this value is commonly greater than 5% of the
total number of frames transmitted, if it reaches or exceeds 5% of the
total number of frames, check the hardware or check to see if the LAN
is overloaded.
Receives error — The Receives error field specifies the number of
transmission errors that were received from the link. The value in this
field specifies the number of frames which were received, but were
corrupted due to errors on the link. This value includes all frames
which were discarded because of the setting of the current receive filter.
Out of Tx bufs (CIO card only) — The Out of Tx bufs field specifies the
number of times that the LAN device adaptor (DA) reported to the
driver that no transmit buffers were available. The maximum value of
this 32-bit field is 4294967295.
Out of Rx bufs (CIO card only) — The Out of Rx bufs field indicates
the number of times the LAN card reported to the driver that no receive
buffers were available. This indicates only that the next buffer space
was full and that the buffer pointer could not be incremented to an
available buffer (the buffer pointer is incremented only after the driver
requests the next frame). This also does not indicate that any frames
were lost, however if another frame arrives before a receive buffer is
made available, that frame will be lost. The value of this field should be
very low. Retransmissions will occur if the link is out of Rx bufs. The
maximum value for this 32-bit field is 4294967295.
Transmits deferred — The Transmits deferred field indicates the
number of frames that deferred to other traffic before being transmitted
onto the network. This means that the LAN card had to wait for carrier
to drop, and stay dropped for 9.6 nanoseconds, before attempting to
transmit the frame. This statistic only counts the number of frames
that were deferred and later transmitted without collision.
Carrier losses — The Carrier losses field indicates that the
transmitting node turned off the carrier signal on the cable. This
occurred for one of the following reasons:
Appendix A
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• The stub cable is not connected to the frontplane connector.
• The AUI (or AUI pigtail for ThinMAU) is not connected to the stub
cable.
• The MAU is broken.
• If using thick LAN cable, there may be a short close to the MAU
(ThinLAN cable shorts show up as a retry error as described in the
Transmits 16 collision field description).
If the LAN continuously loses carrier, the problem is probably caused
by a disconnected AUI or stub cable. Make sure that all connectors from
the frontplane of the LAN hardware card to the MAU are connected
securely.
NOTE
Collisions occur on IEEE 802.3 Local Area Network (LAN) links
whenever two nodes on the link attempt to transmit data at the same
time. When a collision occurs, the nodes which were involved in the
collision each wait a random amount of time, called random backoff,
before attempting to again transmit the packet along the link. If
collisions continuously occur, check the terminators. Many of the fields
described in this section are incremented whenever a collision occurs.
Transmits 1 retry — This field indicates the number of frames that
collided once before being transmitted successfully. This means that the
random backoff strategy was only used once.
Reflectometer (CIO card only) — The reflectometer field is similar in
function to a TDR (Time Domain Reflectometer). The statistic holds the
time count between the pulse and a reflection. Whenever a retry error
occurs, the time in bit times (100ns) from when the frame started to
transmit until the collision occurred is stored by this statistic. This can
be useful for grossly determining the location of an opening in a cable,
or possibly, a short in a ThinLAN cable. This field is erased after every
transmit and is not updated after an external loopback frame is
transmitted onto the link.
While this statistic may aid in pinpointing a problem without the need
to do an actual TDR test, it should be noted that this statistic calculates
the distance using a rough estimate (bit time) and can be inaccurate.
This statistic should never be used as the only means of locating a cable
fault. However, if this field is not equal to 0, then the hardware of the
node is a likely cause of the failure.
The reflectometer field, for a thick LAN cable, is calculated in the
following manner:
The ThickLAN velocity of propagation
Where c (the speed of light)
The bandwidth of a LAN
188
=
=
=
.77c
3x10 E8
10Mb/sec.
Appendix A
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAN Link Statistics
Before determining the level of cable fault isolation, you must first
determine how many meters of the cable are covered per bit time. You
then divide .77c by 10Mb/sec. This translates into:
7x10E-2) x (3x10E8)
__________________
10E6 b/sec)
= 231 meters
Therefore, in order to pinpoint a fault in a thick LAN cable by the value
of this field, multiply the field value by 231 meters.
The accuracy of the reflectometer field is plus or minus 1/2 bit time, or
115m. Using this calculation, the location of the cable fault is
determined by the following formula:
(value of field x 231 meters) +\- 115m
Since the maximum length of a cable is 500m, the value of this field
would be 0, 1 or 2, and would pinpoint a cable fault to 1 of 3 sections of
cable.
If this value were to be used for isolating a cable fault in a ThinLAN
cable, the value 0.65 would be substituted for .77c in the calculation
above. (The ThinLAN velocity of propagation is .65c).
Transmits >1 retry — The Transmits >1 retry field indicates the
number of frames that collided more than one, but fewer than 16 times,
before being transmitted successfully onto the link. If the frame was not
transmitted successfully (more than 16 attempts were made without
success), then the card aborts transmission of this frame, and it counts
the event as a retry error (see the Transmits 16 collision field).
CRC errors — The CRC errors field specifies the number of cyclic
redundancy check (CRC) errors that were seen on the link. A CRC error
indicates that the frame was checked using CRC-32 frame-checking,
but that the value obtained by the CRC did not match the CRC value
contained within the packet.
Normally there will be an equal number of alignment errors. If
alignment errors occur frequently, one of the following may be the
cause:
• A LAN card is not listening to the link before transmitting.
• A repeater that is performing poorly.
• A section of LAN coax which contains an impedance.
• The driver level of a MAU is set too low.
Transmits 16 collisions — The Transmits 16 collisions field indicates
the number of times a frame or frames were not transmitted because 16
consecutive collisions occurred. This commonly occurs in the protocol
during periods of high network utilization. If your node is experiencing
continuous retry errors, the problem is most likely that a terminator
Appendix A
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has been removed from the cable. Other possible causes include the
following:
• There is an opening in the cable.
• If ThinLAN cable is used, the AUI may be disconnected.
• The LAN cable may shorted.
Whole byte errors — The Whole byte errors field is the number of
frames received that were not an integer multiple number of bytes long.
This occurs when an entire byte is not transmitted. This usually also
causes the CRC error to be set.
Transmits late collision — This field indicates that a frame was
active in the network for a longer time than is permitted by the
protocol. The IEEE 802.3 protocol expects each frame to be transmitted
within one slot time (the expected time for a 512 bit packet to traverse
the entire network). The slot time exceeds the amount of time a single
frame should need to traverse the entire network.
A value in this field indicates that a network problem caused a late
collision. A late collision is one in which the collision occurs after one
slot time has passed and another node, sensing that the network is
inactive, begins to transmit a frame. Late collisions are caused by one of
the following:
• Broken LAN cards in the network.
• A network that is too long.
A network can be made too long by installing too many repeaters
between nodes. HP MAUs inform the LAN card of collisions after the
512 bit timer expires even though IEEE 802.3 standards do not require
the MAU to monitor the link beyond that time. No attempt is made to
retransmit a frame after a late collision.
Size range errors — The Size range errors field indicates the number
of frames received that are not within the allowable size range. The
allowable size range is 64–1518 bytes long. Unless the save bad frames
bit is set on the LAN hardware card, the LAN hardware card throws
these packets out.
802 chip restarts — The 802 chip restarts field was initially used to
count the number of times that a specific version of the LAN chip locked
up. This problem was remedied by a new version of that chip, however,
this field still returns a value when one of the following events occurs:
• An AUI cable that is shorted and sending an intermittent signal to
any of the connectors.
• Infinite deferral errors.
• “Jabbering” MAU.
190
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• Noise from another node.
• Bad chips.
The value of the 802 chip restarts field provides information about the
performance of the LAN card and the status of the LANCE chip status
for overflow/underflow errors (this is monitored by firmware).
Frame losses — The frame losses field indicates the number of times
that the LAN controller chip indicated that it has lost a frame. After
some delta period of time following a transmission, no collision detect is
seen. This is typically because there are no free receive buffers when a
frame arrives.
Receives Dropped (NIO card only) — The Receives Dropped field
indicates the total number of frames that were dropped because there
was no receive buffer posted.
Receives Broadcast (NIO card only) — The Receives Broadcast field
indicates the total number of frames received that were addressed to a
broadcast address. If no broadcasts have been received, check the
current receive filter to ensure that broadcasts are enabled. If
broadcasts are enabled and no broadcasts have been received, this may
be an indication of a faulty LAN card.
Receives Multicast (NIO card only) — The Receives Multicast field
indicates the total number of frames received that were addressed to a
multicast address. If no multicast frames are being received, check to
make sure that the desired multicast address(es) are listed as part of
the current multicast addresses.
Heartbeat losses — The Heartbeat losses field indicates that no SQE
heartbeat was seen after a transmission and when IEEE 802.3 stub
cable was connected. After a successful transmission, the 802.3 MAU
sends an SQE message, called a “heartbeat,” through the Control In
wire of the AUI. This heartbeat function lets the card know that the
MAU is still functioning properly.
NOTE
This statistic is not to be set if the Ethernet stub cable is connected.
Appendix A
191
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX IEEE 802.5/Token Ring Link Statistics
NS 3000/iX IEEE 802.5/Token Ring Link
Statistics
The following section describes the data that is output when you issue
the LINKCONTROL command to obtain statistics relating to NS 3000/iX
IEEE 802.5 Links.
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields
The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=LINKSTATE command:
Linkname:
TR1
Linktype:
IEEE8025
Linkstate:
CONNECTED
Linkname — The Linkname field specifies the name of the link.
Linktype — The Linktype field specifies the type of link, such as
LAP-B or IEEE 802.5, that is being monitored.
Linkstate — The Linkstate field specifies the current state of the link.
The possible link states are as follows:
• Connected
• Not connected
• Retry
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields
The CONFIGURATION parameter for IEEE 802.5 links displays several
fields in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter field. The following is an
example of the data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
linkname;STATUS=CONFIGURATION command:
Physical Path:
48
Current Station Address:
Default Station Address:
Functional Address Mask:
Data Rate: 16 Mbps
10-00-90-90-C8-46
10-00-90-90-C8-46
00-00-00-00
Physical Path — The Physical Path field displays the current physical
path for the Token Ring card as specified in the NMMGR configuration
file.
Data Rate — The data rate that the card is configured to operate at.
This is set to either 4 or 16 Mbps by a jumper on the card.
Current Station Address — The Current Station Address field is a
display of the six (6) byte address to which the node is configured to
respond. This address is used whenever frames are sent to the network
media. The default station address is used unless it is overridden in the
NMMGR link configuration screen. If this field is changed, then the
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LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX IEEE 802.5/Token Ring Link Statistics
station address of this node is changed. Make sure that you note this
new address in the system manager log.
Default Station Address — The Default Station Address field is the
default value for the Current Station Address described above. The
default station address is determined by the specific Token Ring card.
Functional Address Mask — Bits set in this 4 octet field indicate
functional addresses to which the Token Ring card may respond.
STATISTICS Parameter Fields
The STATISTICS parameter for IEEE 802.5 links displays many fields
in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter fields. The CONFIGURATION
parameter fields are not displayed when this parameter is used. The
following is an example of the data that is displayed when you issue the
LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=STATISTICS command:
Physical Path:
48
Data Rate: 16 Mbps
Transmits no error:
Transmit byte count:
Transmit errors:
0
0
0
Receives no error:
Receive byte count:
Receive errors:
0
0
0
This command displays statistics about data transmitted across the
link. All field values are summations. Over time, the values in these
fields reach their maximum possible value. When this occurs, these
fields can only be reset manually.
Transmits no error — The Transmits no error field specifies the
number of frames that were successfully transmitted onto the medium.
The maximum value of this 32-bit field is 4294967295.
Receives no error — This field specifies the number of frames that
were successfully received over the medium. The maximum value of
this 32-bit field is 4294967295.
Transmit byte count — This field specifies the transmit byte count.
Receive byte count — This field specifies the receive byte count.
Transmit errors — The Transmit errors field specifies the number of
transmission errors sent across the link. The value in this field specifies
the number of frames which, due to errors on the link, were never
transmitted.
Receive errors — The Receive errors field specifies the number of
transmission errors that were received from the link. The value in this
field specifies the number of frames which were received, but were
corrupted due to errors on the link. This value includes all frames
which were discarded because of the setting of the current receive filter.
Appendix A
193
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics
NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics
The following section describes the data that is output when you issue
the LINKCONTROL command to obtain statistics relating to NS 3000/iX
FDDI Links.
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields
The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=LINKSTATE command:
Linkname:
FDDILINK
Linktype:
FDDI
Linkstate:
RING UP
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields
The CONFIGURATION parameter for FDDI links displays several fields in
addition to the LINKSTATE parameter field. The following is an example
of the data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
linkname;STATUS=CONFIGURATION command:
Physical Path:
0/28
Current Station Address:
08-00-09-09-63-67
Default Station Address:
08-00-09-09-63-67
Current Multicast Address List is empty
Physical Path — The Physical Path field displays the current physical
path for the FDDI card as specified in the NMMGR configuration file.
Current Station Address — The Current Station Address field is a
display of the six (6) byte address to which the node is configured to
respond. This address is used whenever frames are sent to the network
media. The default station address is used unless it is overridden in the
NMMGR link configuration screen. If this field is changed, then the
station address of this node is changed. Make sure that you note this
new address in the system manager log.
Default Station Address — The Default Station Address field is the
default value for the Current Station Address described above. The
default station address is determined by the specific FDDI card.
Current Multicast Address List — This is a list of all multicast
addresses that have been configured for this link. These multicast
addresses are those to which this node will now respond.
194
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NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics
STATISTICS Parameter Fields
The STATISTICS parameter for FDDI links displays many fields in
addition to the LINKSTATE parameter fields. The CONFIGURATION
parameter fields are not displayed when this parameter is used. The
following is an example of the data that is displayed when you issue the
LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=STATISTICS command:
Transmits no error
SMT uni xmits
SMT non-uni xmits
SMT xmit bytes
Transmit errors
Receive errors
Receives not copied
41337
16347
16406
2392533
0
4
0
Receives no error
SMT uni rec
SMT non-uni rec
SMT rec bytes
SMT rec errors
Receives lost
Receives discarded
41859
16347
16347
2386662
0
26
212
This command displays statistics about the data transmitted across the
link. All field values are summations.
Transmits no error — The number of frames that were successfully
transmitted by this station. This count excludes all MAC frames.
Receives no error — The number of frames addressed to and
successfully received by this station.
SMT uni xmits — The number of unicast frames transmitted by the
SMT module on this station (reference: FDDI Station Management
Standards document)
SMT uni rec — The number of unicast frames received by the SMT
module on this station (reference: FDDI Station Management
Standards document)
SMT non-uni xmits — The number of non-unicast (multicast and
broadcast) frames transmitted by the SMT module on this station
(reference: FDDI Station Management Standards document)
SMT non-uni rec — The number of non-unicast (multicast and
broadcast) frames received by the SMT module on this station
(reference: FDDI Station Management Standards document)
SMT xmit bytes — The number of bytes of data transmitted by the
SMT module on this station.
SMT rec bytes — The number of bytes of data received by the SMT
module on this station.
Transmit errors — The number of frames aborted or not transmitted
by this station.
SMT rec errors — The number of frames with errors received by the
SMT module on this station.
Receive errors — The number of all error frames that were detected
by this station and no previous station.
Appendix A
195
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics
Receives lost — The number of frames received that had an error.
Receives not copied — The number of frames addressed to this
station but not copied into a receive buffer because there was no room
for them.
Receives discarded — The number of frames received by this station
that were discarded due to errors, invalid addresses, or lack of
resources.
ALL Parameter Fields
The ALL parameter for FDDI links displays a combination of all fields
presented by the LINKSTATE, CONFIGURATION, and STATISTICS
commands. Please reference the previous sections for descriptions of
the various fields.
DIAGNOSTIC Parameter Fields
The DIAGNOSTIC parameter for FDDI links displays all fields presented
by the ALL parameter plus several additional fields that might be useful
for HP representatives trying to debug FDDI link related problems.
Brief descriptions will be given here; however, please note that some
descriptions will be meaningful only to HP factory representatives. The
following is an example of the additional fields displayed by this
command.
Writes completed
Write bytes
Unicast writes
Multicast writes
Broadcast writes
Writes aborted
Outbound high water
Num of heartbeats
Number of users
Num of power fails
Ring up time
Ring drops
Loquix reinits
Lan_in_active
Configured
Ring_op
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3494
1
0
3494
0
0
Reads completed
Read bytes
Unicast reads
Multicast reads
Broadcast reads
Reads aborted
Non-routable reads
Subset buffer reqs
Num of subset bufs
Queued buffer reqs
Read buffs in pool
Read buffs avail
Read buffer size
SMT events
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
62
0
63
49
5312
8
ON
ON
ON
Reserved 1
Reserved 3
0
0
Reserved 2
Reserved 4
0
0
Writes completed — The number of data packets successfully sent
from the driver to the FDDI card. The maximum value is two billion
(2^31).
196
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LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics
Reads completed — The number of packets received from the FDDI
card by the driver. The maximum value is two billion (2^31).
Write bytes — The total number of bytes in all packets transmitted by
the driver. The maximum value is one quadrillion (10^15).
Read bytes — The total number of bytes in all packets received by the
driver. The maximum value is one quadrillion (10^15).
Unicast writes — The number of unicast packets transmitted by the
driver.
Unicast reads — The number of unicast packets received by the
driver.
Multicast writes — The number of multicast packets transmitted by
the driver.
Multicast reads — The number of multicast packets received by the
driver.
Broadcast writes — The number of broadcast packets transmitted by
the driver.
Broadcast reads — The number of broadcast packets received by the
driver.
Writes aborted — The number of times the transmit abort bit was set
in the IO_RX_STATUS register at the completion of a packet
transmission.
Reads aborted — The number of times the status length field in the
read buffer trailer indicated that the received buffer is not valid.
Outbound high water — The maximum number of outbound packets
queued within the driver awaiting transmission.
Non-routable reads — The number of inbound packets that did not
have a valid destination SAP address.
Num of heartbeats — The number of heartbeat requests passed
between the driver and the card. Also the number of seconds since the
driver was configured (one heartbeat per second).
Subset buffer reqs — The number of times the driver has made a
subset allocation buffer manager request.
Number of users — The number of network transports that have
configured with the driver.
Num of subset bufs — The total number of buffers received from all
the subset allocation requests made during the life of the driver.
Dividing this number by the Subset buffer reqs value yields the average
number of buffers returned per request.
Num of power fails — The number of times that a system powerfail
has been detected during the life of the driver.
Appendix A
197
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics
Queued buffer reqs — The number of times the driver has made a
queued buffer manager request.
Ring up time — The number of seconds the FDDI ring has been up
since the driver was started. Subtracting this number from the Num of
heartbeats value will provide the number of seconds that the ring has
been down. Note the ring being down does not by itself indicate a
problem with this node. The ring will not be up unless the FDDI
concentrator and other nodes are configured and active.
Read buffs in pool — The number of buffers in the inbound buffer
pool.
Ring drops — The number of times the ring down signal has been
received during the life of the driver.
Read buffs avail — The number of buffers in the inbound buffer pool
that are currently queued within the driver.
Loquix reinits — The number of times the Loquix chip has been
reinitialized.
Read buffer size — The size in bytes of the buffers in the inbound
buffer pool.
SMT events — The number of SMT events received by the driver.
Flag Status
The status of several flags are printed here. If a flag’s status is not
reported here then that flag is NOT set. The meaning each flag is
briefly described here.
Io_tx — The IO_TX_STATUS register has been read since the last card
interrupt.
Io_cmd — The IO_CMD_STATUS register has been read since the last
card interrupt.
Lan_in_active — An inbound DMA buffer has been posted to the card.
Lan_out_active — An outbound DMA is currently active.
Ctrl_out_active — An outbound control operation is currently active.
Configured — The FDDI card has been successfully configured.
Trace_on — Tracing has been enabled for this FDDI link.
Reset_on — The FDDI card is currently being reset.
Pfail_on — The FDDI card is currently recovering from a powerfail.
Bmgr_queued_aloc_on — A buffer manager queued allocation
request is pending.
Config_on — The FDDI card is currently being configured.
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LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX FDDI Link Statistics
Post_read_pending — The driver is temporarily out of inbound
buffers to post to the card.
Ring_op — The FDDI card is signaling that the FDDI ring is
operational.
Ctrl_response_pending — The driver has a control response pending
on the card.
Free_space_pending — A free space request is pending against the
card.
Bad_card_on — A problem with the FDDI card has been detected.
Do_bind_on — The FDDI driver is being started and initialized.
Download_on — The FDDI card firmware is being downloaded to the
card.
Statistics_on. A statistics request is pending against the card.
Reserved 1: Reserved for future use.
Reserved 2: Reserved for future use.
Reserved 3: Reserved for future use.
Reserved 4: Reserved for future use.
Appendix A
199
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
The following section describes the data that is output when you issue
the LINKCONTROL command to obtain statistics relating to NS 3000/iX
100VG-AnyLAN Links.
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields
The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=LINKSTATE command:
Linkname:
SYSLINK
Linktype:
VG8023
Linkstate:
CONNECTED
Linkname — The Likname field specifies the name of the link.
Linktype — The Linktype field specifies the type of link, such as
LAP-B, 100VG-802.3, or IEEE 802.3, that is being monitored.
Linkstate — The Linkstate field specifies the current state of the link.
The possible link states are as follows:
• Connected
• Not connected
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields
The CONFIGURATION parameter for 100VG-AnyLAN links displays
several fields in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter field. This is an
example of the data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
linkname;STATUS=CONFIGURATION command:
Physical Path:
10/4/8
Current Station Address:
08-00-09-DD-CC-99
Default Station Address:
08-00-09-DD-CC-99
Current Multicast Addresses:
99-00-09-00-00-01 09-00-09-00-00-03 09-00-09-00-00-04
09-00-09-00-00-06
Physical Path — The Physical Path field displays the current physical
path for the adapter card as specified in the NMCONFIG configuration
file.
Current Station Address — The Current Station Address field is a
display of the six (6) byte address to which the node is configured to
respond. This address is used whenever frames are sent to the network
media. The default station address is used unless it is overridden in the
NMMGR link configuration screen. If this field is changed, then the
station address of this node is changed. Make sure that you note this
new address in the system manager log.
Default Station Address — The Default Station Address field is the
default value for the Current Station Address described previously. The
200
Appendix A
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
default station address is determined by the specific adapter card. It is
also printed on a small label attached to a circuit board on the adapter
card. If the adapter card is changed for any reason, the Default Station
Address of this node will change.
Current Multicast Address List — The Current Multicast Addresses
field contains a list of all multicast addresses to which the adapter card
responds. The default multicast address list contains no addresses. If
no multicast addresses are enabled, the follow message is printed:
Current multicast address list is empty
Multicast addresses are configured automatically by the network
transport(s) using the adapter card. The maximum number of multicast
addresses allowed is 16. An example of multicast addresses are:
09-00-09-00-00-01
Probe address
09-00-09-00-00-02
Second probe address
09-00-09-00-00-04
DTC boot address
STATISTICS Parameter Fields
The STATISTICS parameter for 100VG-AnyLAN links displays many
fields in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter fields. The
CONFIGURATION parameter fields are not displayed when this
parameter is used. For an example of the data that is displayed when
you issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=STATISTICS command:
Transmit bytes norm
Transmit byets hipri
Transmits norm
Transmits hipri
Transmits no error
Transmits dropped
Trans underruns
Recv overruns
Recv deferred
CRC or Maxsize error
Code or Align error
Link disconnects
Link speed
Link mode
Link training result
NOTE
1456044817
62029
2707747
712
2708459
0
0
0
123
0
0
0
100
100VG
CONNECTED
Receive bytes norm
Receive bytes hipri
Receives norm
Receives hipri
Recv broadcast norm
Recv broadcast hipri
Recv multicast norm
Recv multicast hipri
Receives no error
Recv dropped: addr
Recv dropped: buffer
Recv driooedL dna
Recv dropped: other
Secs since clear
5308537515
0
5302073790
0
47068412
0
1300291
0
664709473
16002992
262
0
24785
6173798
Some of the parameter descriptions vary according to whether the
adapter card is operating at 100Mbps or 10Mbps speed. For a 100VG
adapter card operating in 10Base-T mode, refer to 100Base-T statistics.
This command displays statistics about data transmitted and received
across the link. Many field values are summations. Over time, the
Appendix A
201
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
values in these fields reach their maximum possible value. When this
occurs, these fields can only be reset manually.
Transmit bytes norm — Total number of bytes successfully
transmitted onto the medium at normal priority. This includes unicast,
broadcast, and multicast frames. It also includes frames for which
normal priority was requested, but which were later automatically
boosted to demand priority by the 100VG-AnyLAN network. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million Gbytes. In the example above, 1.45 billion bytes were
transmitted, or about 1.38 Gbytes.
Transmit bytes hipri — Total number of bytes successfully
transmitted onto the medium at high (demand) priority. This includes
unicast, broadcast, and multicast frames. It does not include frames for
which normal priority was originally requested, but which were later
automatically priority-boosted by the 100VG-AnyLAN network. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million Gbytes. In the example above, 62,029 high priority bytes have
been transmitted, or about 60K bytes.
Transmits norm — Total number of frames successfully transmitted
onto the medium at normal priority. This includes unicast, broadcast,
and multicast frames. It also includes frames for which normal priority
was requested, but which were later automatically boosted to demand
priority by the 100VG-AnyLAN network. The byte count given by
Transmit bytes norm is distributed over this number of frames. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million billion frames. In the previous example, 2.71million frames
were transmitted at normal priority.
Transmits hipri — Total number of frames successfully transmitted
onto the medium at high (demand) priority. This includes unicast,
broadcast, and multicast frames. It does not include frames for which
normal priority was originally requested, but which were later
automatically priority-boosted by the 100VG network. The byte count
given by Transmit bytes hipri is distributed over this number of frames.
The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about
99 million billion frames. In the example above, 712 frames were
transmitted at high priority.
Transmits no error — Total number of frames the adapter card
reports it successfully transmitted onto the medium. These adapter
card statistics are periodically read, and are accumulated by the link
driver. The total includes all unicast, broadcast, and multicast frames,
at both normal and high (demand) priority. It should equal the sum of
(Transmits norm + Transmits hipri). The maximum printable value of
this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the
previous example, 2.71 million frames were transmitted regardless of
priority level.
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NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
Transmits dropped — Total number of frames the link driver
discarded because the transmit queue was full, or because the data to
be sent was fragmented beyond recognition. The maximum value of this
32-bit field is 2147483647. It would be unusual for this statistic to
contain a nonzero value.
Trans underruns — Total number of frames aborted by the adapter
card during transmission because the remaining data was not made
available to the transmit hardware fast enough. It indicates unexpected
latency on the dedicated internal bus onboard the adapter card. If this
condition occurs, the adapter will automatically adjust to improve the
latency, and retransmit the aborted frame automatically. The maximum
value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. For this statistic, a value of less
than 3 would be considered normal.
Recv overruns — Total number of address-matched frames that could
not be received into the adapter card, either because prior data was not
being removed by the receive hardware fast enough, or because their
size exceeded the maximum frame size. May indicate unexpected
latency on the dedicated internal bus onboard the adapter card, which
cannot be automatically adjusted by the link driver. The maximum
value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. It would be unusual for this
statistic to contain a nonzero value.
Recv deferred — Number of times an address-matched receive frame
was temporarily held (queued) by the link driver, because of a
momentary lack of DMA resources. Once those resources became
available, the frame was automatically transferred to the host. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million billion frames. In the previous example, 123 frames were
temporarily held.
CRC or Maxsize error — Number of cyclic redundancy check (CRC)
errors or oversized frames that were seen during reception by the link.
A CRC error indicates that the frame was checked using CRC-32
frame-checking, but that the value obtained by the CRC did not match
the CRC value contained at the end of the frame. CRC errors do not
include frames having alignment or coding errors. Oversized frames are
those longer than 1518 bytes. These adapter card statistics are
periodically read, and are accumulated by the link driver. The
maximum value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. A nonzero value in
this statistic could indicate a defective cable, adapter, or hub, a loose
connection, presence of severe electrical noise along the cable path, or a
misbehaving application, adapter, or hub at the transmission end.
Code or Align error — Number of frames received with an alignment
error (not an even multiple of 4 bits of data) or code errors (an error
signal was received from the 100VG-AnyLAN receive hardware). These
adapter card statistics are periodically read, and are accumulated by
the link driver. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. If
Appendix A
203
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
alignment errors occur frequently, one of the following may be the
cause:
• A 100VG-AnyLAN adapter card is not operating to within 802.12
specifications.
• A 100VG-AnyLAN hub is performing poorly.
• The 100VG-AnyLAN cable is not CAT-3 or CAT-5 grade.
• A section of 100VG-AnyLAN cable contains wire pairs which are not
properly twisted, paired, or of equal length.
Link disconnects — Number of times the link driver noticed the link
had previously been established, but was no longer up. This may occur
because the cable was unplugged, the hub was powered off, the hub
automatically requested a reconnect, or normally (at link shutdown
time). This total does not include repetitive, failed attempts by the link
driver to reestablish the link. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647.
Link speed — Maximum link speed (either 100 or 10) in millions of
bits per second, the link is currently configured to operate at. When
displaying a 100VG-AnyLAN link operating in 100VG-AnyLAN mode,
this value will always be 100. When a 100VG-AnyLAN link is operating
in 10Base-T mode, this value will always be 10.
Link mode — Electrical mode the link is currently operating at. When
displaying a 100VG-AnyLAN link operating in 100VG-AnyLAN mode,
this value will always be “100VG-AnyLAN”. When a 100VG-AnyLAN
link is operating in 10Base-T mode, this value will be “10Base-T”.
Link training result — The result of the last automatic
100VG-AnyLAN “link training” operation performed during link
establishment. If the cable is connected to an operational
100VG-AnyLAN hub port, the link is configured for 100VG-AnyLAN
operation in NMCONFIG, and the link driver has been started, this
value should be “CONNECTED”. Most other values indicate a problem
with the hub port, the connection to that 100VG-AnyLAN hub port, or
the cable grade is not CAT-3 or CAT-5.
Receive bytes norm — Total number of bytes successfully received
over the medium at normal priority. This includes unicast, multicast,
broadcast, and link training frames. It does not include frames received
by the adapter card but dropped because no upper layer protocol had
requested those frames, or because the link was disconnected. The
maximum value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million
Gbytes. In the example above, 5.30 billion bytes were received, or about
5.06 Gbytes.
Receive bytes hipri — Total number of bytes successfully received
over the medium at high (demand) priority. This includes unicast,
multicast, and broadcast frames. It also includes frames for which
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NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
normal priority was originally requested by the sender, but which were
later automatically priority-boosted by the 100VG-AnyLAN network. It
does not include frames received by the adapter card but dropped
because no upper layer protocol had requested those frames, or because
the link was disconnected. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit
field is 17 digits, or about 99 million Gbytes. In the example above, no
high priority data has been received.
Receives norm — Total number of unicast frames (addressed to this
specific adapter card) which were successfully received over the
medium at normal priority and forwarded to an upper layer protocol
such as IP. This includes link training frames received from the
100VG-AnyLAN hub. It does not include unicast frames received but
dropped for any reason. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit
field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous
example, 2.07 million unicast frames were received at normal priority
and forwarded to upper layers.
Receives hipri — Total number of unicast frames (addressed to this
specific adapter card) which were successfully received over the
medium at high (demand) priority and forwarded to an upper layer
protocol such as IP. This includes unicast frames for which normal
priority was originally requested by the sender, but which were later
automatically priority-boosted by the 100VG-AnyLAN network. It does
not include unicast frames received but dropped for any reason. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million billion frames. In the previous example, no frames have been
received at high priority.
Recv broadcast norm — Total number of frames addressed to a
broadcast address which were successfully received over the medium at
normal priority and forwarded to an upper layer protocol such as ARP.
This does not include broadcast frames received but dropped for any
reason. The maximum value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million billion frames. In the previous example, 47.1 million broadcast
frames were received at normal priority and forwarded to upper layers.
Recv broadcast hipri — Total number of frames addressed to a
broadcast address which were successfully received over the medium at
high (demand) priority and forwarded to an upper layer protocol such
as ARP. This includes broadcast frames for which normal priority was
originally requested by the sender, but which were later automatically
priority-boosted by the 100VG-AnyLAN network. It does not include
broadcast frames received but dropped for any reason. The maximum
printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion
frames. In the previous example, no frames have been received at high
priority.
Recv multicast norm — Total number of frames addressed to a
multicast address which were successfully received over the medium at
normal priority and forwarded to an upper layer protocol such as
Appendix A
205
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
PROBE. This does not include multicast frames received but dropped
for any reason. Upper layer protocols register desired multicast
addresses with the link driver during initialization. The maximum
printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion
frames. In the previous example, 1.30 million multicast frames were
received at normal priority and forwarded to upper layers.
Recv multicast hipri — Total number of frames addressed to a
multicast address which were successfully received over the medium at
high (demand) priority and forwarded to an upper layer protocol such
as PROBE. This includes multicast frames for which normal priority
was originally requested by the sender, but which were later
automatically priority-boosted by the 100VG-AnyLAN network. It does
not include multicast frames received but dropped for any reason.
Upper layer protocols register desired multicast addresses with the link
driver during initialization. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit
field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous
example, no frames have been received at high priority.
Receives no error — Total number of frames the adapter card reports
it successfully received over the medium. These adapter card statistics
are periodically read, and are accumulated by the link driver. This
includes both normal and high (demand) priority frames. It does not
include any frames the adapter card detected errors against. The total
should approximate the sum of all frames forwarded to upper layer
protocols, plus all frames dropped for any reason. The maximum
printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion
frames. In the previous example, 6.64 million frames were received
successfully by the adapter card, then either forwarded or dropped.
Recv dropped: addr — Total number of frames received by the
adapter card, but dropped because no upper layer protocol had
requested future reception of those frames, or because that protocol
unbound itself from the link while the received frame was still in
motion. Older, intelligent adapter cards can invisibly receive and drop
these frames, often without ever reporting them as statistics. But
today’s adapters are not intelligent, and require link driver
involvement. For users unfamiliar with seeing it, this statistic may
seem excessive. But it is important because it gives an indication of the
amount of unnecessary traffic present on the network segment to which
the adapter card is connected. High values may indicate a need to
resegment the network, since systems and their adapters are spending
a large amount of time and resources recognizing and dropping frames
they do not care to see. High volumes of such traffic can also limit
network bandwidth. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is
17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example,
out of 66.4 million frames received, 16.0 million have been dropped
based on address: about 24% of all frames received are then being
dropped. This level would be considered typical or perhaps a little high.
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NS 3000/iX 100VG-AnyLAN Link Statistics
Recv dropped: buffer — Total number of frames received from the
adapter card, but dropped because no data buffers were available from
the upper layer protocol requesting to receive these frames. This is a
relatively common occurrence, amounting to flow control for all
protocols sharing those buffers. Many protocols include built-in
mechanisms for detecting lost frames and requesting their
retransmission from the remote side. The maximum value of this 32-bit
field is 2147483647. In the previous example, out of 66.4 million frames
received, 262 have been dropped for lack of buffer resources; any
similar level would be considered normal.
Recv dropped: dma — The link driver design now queues frames
under conditions of low DMA resources, so this statistic is now obsolete,
should never contain a nonzero value, and may be deleted in a future
release.
Recv dropped: other — Sum total number of frames received from
the adapter card, but dropped because: an upper layer protocol error
was returned; the required address format was not supported; the
frame arrived while the link driver was in an unusual state; or for
perfect multicast filtering reasons. The maximum value of this 32-bit
sum is 2147483647. In the previous example, 24785 frames have been
dropped for one or more of the reasons listed; this number would be
considered high, and further investigation might be needed if it appears
to be impacting any applications.
Secs since clear — The number of seconds elapsed since statistics
were last reset via the LINKCONTROL linkname; STATUS=RESET
command. This gives the sample time over which the displayed
statistics have been collected. Per-time-unit figures may then be
calculated if desired. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647, or about 68 years.
Appendix A
207
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
The following section describes the data that is output when you issue
the LINKCONTROL command to obtain statistics relating to NS 3000/iX
100Base-T Links.
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields
The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=LINKSTATE command:
Linkname:
SYSLINK
Linktype:
PCI 100BT
Linkstate:
CONNECTED
Linkname — The Likname field specifies the name of the link.
Linktype — The Linktype field specifies the type of link, such as
LAP-B, 100BT, or IEEE 802.3, that is being monitored, and the type of
I/O bus it is installed on (will be preceded with “PCI” for PCI 100Base-T
links).
Linkstate — The Linkstate field specifies the current state of the link.
The possible link states are as follows:
• Connected
• Not connected
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields
The CONFIGURATION parameter for 100Base-T links displays several
fields in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter field. This is an example
of the data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
linkname;STATUS=CONFIGURATION command:
Physical Path:
10/4/8
Current Station Address:
08-00-09-DD-A2-5C
Default Station Address:
08-00-09-DD-A2-5C
Current Multicast Addresses:
99-00-09-00-00-01 09-00-09-00-00-03 09-00-09-00-00-04
09-00-09-00-00-06
Physical Path — The Physical Path field displays the current physical
path for the adapter card as specified in the NMCONFIG configuration
file.
NOTE
On PCI 100Base-T links, the physical path generally has more
components and is a “longer” path (e.g., 1/12/0/0). Otherwise, output for
PCI links is the same as HP-PB.
Current Station Address — The Current Station Address field is a
display of the six (6) byte address to which the node is configured to
respond. This address is used whenever frames are sent to the network
208
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NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
media. The default station address is used unless it is overridden in the
NMMGR link configuration screen. If this field is changed, then the
station address of this node is changed. Make sure that you note this
new address in the system manager log.
Default Station Address — The Default Station Address field is the
default value for the Current Station Address described above. The
default station address is determined by the specific adapter card. On
HP-PB systems, it is also printed on a small label attached to a circuit
board on the adapter card.
NOTE
This printed label is not available for PCI adapter cards. If the adapter
card is changed for any reason, the Default Station Address of this node
will change.
Current Multicast Address List — The Current Multicast Addresses
field contains a list of all multicast addresses to which the adapter card
responds. The default multicast address list contains no addresses. If
no multicast addresses are enabled, the follow message is printed:
Current multicast address list is empty
Multicast addresses are configured automatically by the network
transport(s) using the adapter card. For PCI 100BT links, the
maximum number of multicast addresses currently allowed is 14 (this
is due to an implementation decision regarding how the PCI 100BT
card manages multicast addresses). An example of multicast addresses
are:
09-00-09-00-00-01
Probe address
09-00-09-00-00-02
Second probe address
09-00-09-00-00-04
DTC boot address
STATISTICS Parameter Fields
The STATISTICS parameter for 100Base-T links displays many fields in
addition to the LINKSTATE parameter fields. The CONFIGURATION
parameter fields are not displayed when this parameter is used. For an
example of the data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
linkname;STATUS=STATISTICS command:
Transmit bytes
Transmits
Transmits no error
Transmits dropped
Transmits deferred
Transmits 1 retry
Transmits >1 retry
Trans 16 collisions
Trans late collision
Trans underruns
Appendix A
10191188
127700
127700
0
1738
86
179
0
0
0
Receive bytes
Receives
Receives broadcast
Receives multicast
Receives no error
CRC or Maxsize error
Code or Align error
Recv dropped: addr
Recv dropped: buffer
Recv dropped: dma
495231926
113968
3955124
1743137
15688503
0
0
9876255
0
0
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NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
Carrier losses
Link disconnects
Link speed
Link duplex
Link mode
0
0
10
Half
100Base-TX
Recv
Recv
Recv
Link
Secs
dropped: other
deferred
overruns
auto sensed
since clear
19
0
0
No
2602760
The following example of the LINKCONTROL output for a PCI 100Base-T
link (some of the statistics differ for PCI).
Transmit bytes
10191188
Transmits
127700
Transmits no error
127700
Transmits dropped
0
Transmits deferred
1738
Transmits 1 retry
86
Transmits >1 retry
179
Trans 16 collisions
0
Trans late collision
0
Trans underruns
0
Carrier losses
0
Trans jabber timeout
0
Link disconnects
0
Link speed
10
Link duplex
Half
Link mode
100Base-TX Addon
NOTE
Receive bytes
Receives unicast
Receives broadcast
Receives multicast
Receives no error
Recv CRC error
Recv maxsize error
Recv dropped: addr
Recv dropped: buffer
Recv dropped: descr
Recv dropped: other
Recv watchdg timeout
Recv collisions
Recv overruns
Link auto sensed
Secs since clear
495231926
113968
3955124
1743137
15688503
0
0
9876255
0
0
19
0
0
0
No
5259
Some of the parameter descriptions vary according to whether the
adapter card is operating at 100Mbps or 10Mbps speed. Most also apply
to an HP-PB 100VG-AnyLAN card operating in 10Base-T mode.
This command displays statistics about data transmitted and received
across the link. Many field values are summations. Over time, the
values in these fields reach their maximum possible value. When this
occurs, these fields can only be reset manually.
Transmit bytes — Total number of bytes successfully transmitted
onto the medium. This includes unicast, broadcast, and multicast
frames that were successfully transmitted on the first attempt, as well
as frames that were successfully transmitted after being deferred or
that experienced one or more collisions. The maximum printable value
of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million Gbytes. In the
previous example, 10.1 million bytes were transmitted, or about
9.7 Mbytes.
Transmits — Total number of frames successfully transmitted onto
the medium at normal priority. This includes unicast, broadcast, and
multicast frames that were successfully transmitted on the first
attempt, as well as frames that were successfully transmitted after
being deferred or that experienced one or more collisions. The byte
count given by Transmit bytes is distributed over this number of
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NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
frames. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or
about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example, 127700 frames
were transmitted at normal priority.
Transmits no error — Total number of frames the adapter card
reports it successfully transmitted onto the medium. These adapter
card statistics are periodically read, and are accumulated by the link
driver. The total includes all unicast, broadcast, and multicast frames
that were successfully transmitted on the first attempt, as well as
frames that were successfully transmitted after being deferred or that
experienced one or more collisions. It should equal the value of
“Transmits”. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17
digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example,
127700 frames were transmitted.
Transmits dropped — Total number of frames the link driver
discarded because the transmit queue was full, or because the data to
be sent was fragmented beyond recognition. The maximum value of this
32-bit field is 2147483647. It would be unusual for this statistic to
contain a nonzero value.
NOTE
Collisions occur on 100Base-T Local Area Network links whenever two
nodes on the link attempt to transmit data at the same time. When a
collision occurs, each node involved in the collision waits a random
amount of time, called random backoff, before attempting to again
transmit the frame along the link. Many of the fields described in this
section are incremented whenever a collision occurs.
Transmits deferred — Total number of frames that were deferred to
other network traffic before their initial transmission onto the network.
This means that the 100Base-T card had to wait for carrier to drop and
stay dropped for a few nanoseconds, before attempting to transmit the
frame. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or
about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example, 1738 transmit
frames were deferred.
Transmits 1 retry — This field indicates the number of frames that
collided once before being transmitted successfully. This means that the
random backoff strategy was only used once. The maximum printable
value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames.
In the example above, 86 frames were transmitted after only one
collision. This statistic is not logged when the adapter card is operating
in full duplex mode, and would print as 0.
Transmits >1 retry — This field indicates the number of frames that
collided more than once, but fewer than 16 times, before being
transmitted successfully onto the link. If the frame was not transmitted
successfully (more than 16 attempts were made without success), then
the card aborts transmission of this frame, and it counts the event in
the “Trans 16 collisions” field. The maximum printable value of this
64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the
Appendix A
211
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NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
previous example, 179 frames were transmitted after experiencing
between 2 and 15 collisions. This statistic is not logged when the
adapter card is operating in full duplex mode, and would print as 0.
Trans 16 collisions — This field indicates the number of times a
frame was not transmitted, because 16 consecutive collisions occurred.
This can occur during periods of high network utilization. If the node is
experiencing many Trans 16 errors, possible causes include the
following:
• The network is saturated with traffic.
• There is a short in the cable.
• There is an opening in the cable.
The maximum value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. This statistic is
not logged when the adapter card is operating in full duplex mode, and
would print as 0.
Trans late collision — This field indicates that a frame was active in
the network for a longer time than is permitted by the protocol. No
attempt is made to retransmit a frame after a late collision. The
IEEE 802.3 protocol expects each frame to be transmitted within one
slot time (the expected time for a 512 bit frame to traverse the entire
network). The slot time exceeds the amount of time a single frame
should need to traverse the entire network.
A value in this field indicates that a network problem caused a late
collision. A late collision is one in which the collision occurs after one
slot time has passed and another node, sensing that the network is
inactive, begins to transmit a frame. Late collisions are caused by one of
the following:
• A network that is too long.
• Broken 100Base-T cards in the network.
A network can be made too long by installing too many repeaters
between nodes. The 100Base-T card hardware detects collisions after
the 512 bit timer expires even though IEEE 802.3 standards do not
require the link to be monitored beyond that time. The maximum value
of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. This statistic is not logged when the
adapter card is operating in full duplex mode, and would print as 0.
Trans underruns — Total number of frames aborted by the adapter
card during transmission because the remaining data was not made
available to the transmit hardware fast enough. It indicates unexpected
latency on the dedicated internal bus onboard the adapter card. If this
condition occurs, the adapter will automatically adjust to improve the
latency, and retransmit the aborted frame automatically. The maximum
value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. For this statistic, a value of less
than 3 would be considered normal.
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NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
Carrier losses — This field indicates that the transmitting node
turned off the carrier signal on the cable. A carrier loss occurs when a
receive carrier was not detected after a slottime from the start of
transmission. The carrier must be present continuously from the start
until the end of transmission to prevent an error. If the 100Base-T link
continuously loses carrier, the problem is probably caused by a faulty
hub or cable, or a disconnected cable somewhere else within the
network, along the path between the target nodes. The maximum value
of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. This statistic is not logged when the
adapter card is operating in full duplex mode, and would print as 0.
NOTE
The PCI 100Base-T adapter card reports both “loss of carrier” (during
transmission) and “no carrier” (no carrier detected at start of
transmission) as distinct events. For PCI, the “carrier losses” statistic
represents the sum of the “no carrier” and “loss of carrier” events.
Trans jabber timeouts — The number of times the adapter card
transmitted onto the LAN for too long, and had to be forced to stop. This
should only occur if the adapter card or hub are faulty. The maximum
value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. This statistic is displayed for
PCI 100Base-T only.
Link disconnects — Number of times the link driver noticed the link
had previously been established, but was no longer up. This may occur
because the cable was unplugged, the hub was powered off, the hub
automatically requested a reconnect, or normally (at link shutdown
time). This total does not include repetitive, failed attempts by the link
driver to reestablish the link. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647.
Link speed — Maximum link speed (either 100 or 10) in million bits
per second, the link is currently configured to operate at. When
displaying a 100Base-T link operating in 100Base-T mode, this value
will always be 100. When a 100Base-T link is operating in 10Base-T
mode, this value will always be 10.
Link mode — Electrical mode the link is currently operating at. When
displaying a 100Base-T link operating in 100Base-T mode, this value
will always be “100Base-T”. When it is operating in 10Base-T mode,
this value will be “10Base-T”. For PCI, the type of card (e.g., “Addon”)
may also be shown here.
Receive bytes — Total number of bytes successfully received over the
medium. This includes unicast, multicast, broadcast, and that were
successfully received on the first attempt, as well as frames that were
successfully received after being deferred or that experienced one or
more collisions. The maximum value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or
about 99 million Gbytes. In the previous example, 495 million bytes
were received, or about 472 Mbytes.
Appendix A
213
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
Receives / Receives Unicast — Total number of unicast frames
(addressed to this specific adapter card) which were successfully
received over the medium and forwarded to an upper layer protocol
such as IP. This includes unicast frames that were successfully received
on the first attempt, as well as unicast frames that were successfully
received after being deferred, or that experienced one or more collisions.
It does not include unicast frames received but dropped for any reason.
The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about
99 million billion frames. In the previous example, 113968 unicast
frames were received and forwarded to upper layers.
NOTE
This has been renamed “Receives Unicast” in the PCI statistics display
to better distinguish this statistic from the other receive statistics, but
the meaning is the same as before.
Receives broadcast — Total number of frames addressed to a
broadcast address which were successfully received over the medium
and forwarded to an upper layer protocol such as IP. This includes
broadcast frames that were successfully received on the first attempt,
as well as broadcast frames that were successfully received after being
deferred, or that experienced one or more collisions. It does not include
broadcast frames received but dropped for any reason. The maximum
printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion
frames. In the previous example, 3.96 million broadcast frames were
received and forwarded to upper layers.
Receives multicast — Total number of frames addressed to a
multicast address which were successfully received over the medium
and forwarded to an upper layer protocol such as IP. This includes
multicast frames that were successfully received on the first attempt,
as well as multicast frames that were successfully received after being
deferred, or that experienced one or more collisions. It does not include
multicast frames received but dropped for any reason. The maximum
printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion
frames. In the previous example, 1.74 million multicast frames were
received and forwarded to upper layers.
Receives no error — Total number of frames the adapter card reports
it successfully received over the medium. These adapter card statistics
are periodically read, and are accumulated by the link driver. This
includes all address-matched unicast, broadcast, and multicast frames
received without error. It does not include frames not addressed to the
adapter card, frames dropped for any reason, or any frames the card
detected errors against. The total should approximate the sum of all
frames forwarded to upper layer protocols. The maximum printable
value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames.
In the example above, 15.7 million frames were received successfully by
the adapter card, then either forwarded or dropped.
214
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NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
CRC or Maxsize error — Number of cyclic redundancy check (CRC)
errors or oversized frames that were seen during reception by the link.
A CRC error indicates that the frame was checked using CRC-32
frame-checking, but that the value obtained by the CRC did not match
the CRC value contained at the end of the frame. CRC errors do not
include frames having alignment or coding errors. Oversized frames are
those longer than 1518 bytes. These adapter card statistics are
periodically read, and are accumulated by the link driver. The
maximum value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. A nonzero value in
this statistic could indicate a defective cable, adapter, or hub, a loose
connection, presence of severe electrical noise along the cable path, or a
misbehaved application, adapter, or hub at the transmission end. For
PCI 100Base-T, these statistics (CRC error, Maxsize error) are reported
separately by the adapter card and are displayed separately (Recv CRC
error, Recv Maxsize error).
Code or Align error — Number of frames received with an alignment
error (not an even multiple of 4 bits of data) or code errors (an error
signal was received from the 100Base-T receive hardware). These
adapter card statistics are periodically read, and are accumulated by
the link driver. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647.
This statistic is not applicable to PCI and is not displayed for PCI
100Base-T links. If alignment errors occur frequently, one of the
following may be the cause:
• A 100Base-T adapter card is not operating to within 802.3
specifications.
• A 100Base-T hub is performing poorly.
• The 100Base-T cable is not CAT-5 grade.
• A section of 100Base-T cable contains wire pairs which are not
properly twisted, paired, or of equal length.
Recv dropped: addr — Total number of frames received by the
adapter card, but dropped because no upper layer protocol had
requested future reception of those frames, or because that protocol
unbound itself from the link while the received frame was still in
motion. Older, intelligent adapter cards can invisibly receive and drop
these frames, often without ever reporting them as statistics. But
today’s adapters are not intelligent, and require link driver
involvement. For users unfamiliar with seeing it, this statistic may
seem excessive. But it is important because it gives an indication of the
amount of unnecessary traffic present on the network segment to which
the adapter card is connected. High values may indicate a need to
resegment the network, since systems and their adapters are spending
a large amount of time and resources recognizing and dropping frames
they do not care to see. High volumes of such traffic can also limit
network bandwidth. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is
17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example,
out of 15.7 million frames received, 9.87 million have been dropped
Appendix A
215
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
based on address: about 63 percent of all frames received are then being
dropped. This level would be considered high.
Recv dropped: buffer — Total number of frames received from the
adapter card, but dropped because no data buffers were available from
the upper layer protocol requesting to receive these frames. This is a
relatively common occurrence, amounting to flow control for all
protocols sharing those buffers. Many protocols include built-in
mechanisms for detecting lost frames and requesting their
retransmission from the remote side. The maximum value of this 32-bit
field is 2147483647. In the previous example, out of 66.4 million frames
received, 262 have been dropped for lack of buffer resources; any
similar level would be considered normal.
Recv dropped: dma — The link driver design now queues frames
under conditions of low DMA resources, so this statistic is now obsolete,
should never contain a nonzero value, and may be deleted in a future
release. This statistic is not applicable to PCI and is not displayed for
PCI 100Base-T links.
Recv dropped descr — Total number of times the adapter card
reported it was unable to receive a frame because of a problem with the
receive instructions specified by the software driver. The maximum
value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. It would be unusual for this
statistic to contain a nonzero value. This statistic is only applicable for
PCI 100Base-T links.
Recv dropped: other — Sum total number of frames received from
the adapter card, but dropped because: an upper layer protocol error
was returned; the required address format was not supported; the
frame arrived while the link driver was in an unusual state; or for
perfect multicast filtering reasons. The maximum value of this 32-bit
sum is 2147483647. In the previous example, 24785 frames have been
dropped for one or more of the reasons listed; this number would be
considered high, and further investigation might be needed if it appears
to be impacting any applications.
Recv deferred — Number of times an address-matched receive frame
was temporarily held (queued) by the link driver, because of a
momentary lack of DMA resources. Once those resources became
available, the frame was automatically transferred to the host. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million billion frames. In the previous example, 123 frames were
temporarily held. This statistic is not applicable to PCI and is not
displayed for PCI 100Base-T links.
Recv overruns — Total number of address-matched frames that could
not be received into the adapter card, either because prior data was not
being removed by the receive hardware fast enough, or because their
size exceeded the maximum frame size. May indicate unexpected
latency on the dedicated internal bus onboard the adapter card, which
cannot be automatically adjusted by the link driver. The maximum
216
Appendix A
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. It would be unusual for this
statistic to contain a nonzero value.
The following receive statistics are only applicable for PCI 100Base-T
links:
Recv watchdg timeout — The number of times the adapter card tried
to receive from the LAN for too long, and had to be forced to stop. This
should only occur if the adapter card, the hub, or another adapter card
on the network, are faulty. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647.
Recv collisions — This field indicates that a frame was active in the
network for a longer time than is permitted by the protocol, and
damaged a frame being received. No attempt is made to re-receive a
frame damaged by a late collision. The IEEE 802.3 protocol expects
each frame to be transmitted within one slot time (the expected time for
a 512 bit frame to traverse the entire network). The slot time exceeds
the amount of time a single frame should need to traverse the entire
network.
A value in this field indicates that a network problem caused a late
collision. A late collision is one in which the collision occurs after one
slot time has passed and another node, sensing that the network is
inactive, begins to transmit a frame. Late collisions are caused by one of
the following:
• A network that is too long.
• Broken 100Base-T cards in the network.
A network can be made too long by installing too many repeaters
between nodes. The 100Base-T card hardware detects receive collisions
occurring after the 512 bit timer expires even though IEEE 802.3
standards do not require the link to be monitored beyond that time. The
maximum value of this 32-bit field is 2147483647. This statistic is not
logged when the adapter card is operating in full duplex mode, and
would print as 0. Not applicable to HP-PB.
Link auto sensed — A value of Yes indicates the local adapter card
attempted to autonegotiate its speed and duplex settings, and the
remote side returned a set of remote capabilities to the local adapter
card, meaning the remote also supports the autonegotiation feature.
The “Link speed” and “Link mode” fields report the settings chosen by
the two sides. A value of No indicates the remote side did not return a
set of capabilities although the local adapter card attempted to
autonegotiate, and the “Link speed” and “Link mode” fields report the
driver’s best-guess settings. “No” is also shown when the local adapter
card is configured in NMCONFIG to use fixed speed and duplex
settings.
Appendix A
217
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX 100Base-T Link Statistics
Secs since clear — The number of seconds elapsed since statistics
were last reset via the LINKCONTROL linkname; STATUS=RESET
command. This gives the sample time over which the displayed
statistics have been collected. Per-time-unit figures may then be
calculated if desired. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647, or about 68 years.
218
Appendix A
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
The following section describes the data that is output when you issue
the LINKCONTROL command to obtain statistics relating to NS 3000/iX
LAPBMUX Links.
LINKSTATE Parameter Fields
The following is an example of the data that is displayed when you
issue the LINKCONTROL linkname;STATUS=LINKSTATE command:
Linkname:
PLSPLNK7
Linktype:
PCI LAPBMUX
Linkstate:
CONNECTED LEVEL 2
Linkname — The Likname field specifies the name of the link.
Linktype — The Linktype field specifies the type of link, such as
LAP-B, LAPBMUX, 100BT, or IEEE 802.3, that is being monitored, and
the type of I/O bus it is on (will be preceded with “PCI” for PCI
LAPBMUX links).
Linkstate — The Linkstate field specifies the current state of the link.
The possible link states are as follows:
• Not connected
• Connected level 1.
• Connected level 2
• Connecting level 1.
• Connecting level 2.
• Disconnecting level 1.
• Disconnecting level 2.
In this example, in LINKSTATE Command for LAP-B Link, the current
state of the LAPB link named PLAPLNK7 is CONNECTED LEVEL 2.
The LINKSTATE parameter fields are displayed whenever you enter the
LINKCONTROL Status command, regardless of which other parameters
are specified.
CONFIGURATION Parameter Fields
The CONFIGURATION parameter for LAPBMUX links displays the
LINKSTATE parameter fields and many additional fields. These
additional fields display information that is related to the link
configuration and which, except for the Cable Type parameter, are
input through the NMMGR configuration program
LAPBMUX CONFIGURATION Parameter Output provides an example of the
data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
Appendix A
219
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
linkname;STATUS=CONFIGURATION command:
Linkname:
PLAPLNK7
Linktype:
Physical Path:
Physical interface
Transmission speed
Clock source
Local mode
Connect timeout :sec
Adapter timeout :sec
PCI LAPBMUX
0/6/2/1.7
V.35
20480009
External
DTE
900
10
Linkstate: CONNECTED LEVEL 2
LAPB parm T1 :sec
LAPB parm N2 :retry
LAPB parm K
Module Count
Buffer size :bytes
3
20
7
8
4096
Physical Path — The Physical Path field displays the current physical
path for the adapter card as specified in the NMCONFIG configuration
file.
NOTE
On PCI LAPBMUX links, the physical path generally has more
components and is a “longer” path (e.g., 0/6/0/1.2, in which 0/6/0/1 is the
path .2 is the port number) along with the port number associated with
that link. The output for PCI links is different from that HP-PB.
Physical Interface — The Cable Type field displays the cable type
that is currently connected to the PSI card. This data is provided by the
PSI card and cannot be configured through NMMGR. The possible
values for this field are as follows:
• RS232
• V.35
• None
Transmission Speed — The Transmission Speed field displays the
current transfer rate, or clocking, configured for the node in the
NMMGR Link screen. If modems are used, the modems will control the
clocking. The ACC card transmits at the clocking setting of the modem
and ignores the value configured in this field.
Clocking Source — The Clocking source field displays the clocking,
configured for the node in the NMMGR Link screen. The possible types
of clocking source are:
• External
• Internal
If modems are used, the modems will control the clocking and clocking
source should be configured as “External”. If the node is connected to
other node which requires clocking, then it should be configured as
“Internal”.
Local Mode — The Local Mode field displays the value specified for
local mode in the NMMGR link screen. The possible values for this field
220
Appendix A
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
are as follows:
• DTE, for connection to a device that is configured as a DCE.
• DCE, for connection to a device that is configured as a DTE.
Connect Timeout — The Connect Timeout field displays the current
logical link level 2 connection timeout. The Connect Timeout
parameter sets the amount of time a node will wait for a logical
connection to a remote node to be established. If this timer expires, the
node aborts the connection attempt. The abort process can take several
additional seconds.
Adapter Timeout — The Adapter Timeout field displays the value
specified for the Adapter timer. This timer, also called a heartbeat
timer, is used to monitor whether the system and/or the ACC card are
functioning. The ACC card, and the system, transmit a signal, called a
heartbeat signal, to each other on a specified schedule. If, for example,
the heartbeat does not arrive at the PSI card from the system (or
vice-versa), the card or system waits the number of seconds specified by
this field. If no heartbeat arrives before this timer expires, the link is
dropped. You can determine whether the PSI card or the system failed
by checking to see which device is still active. The default for this field
is 60 seconds and it is recommended that you do not change the value of
this field. The PSI always waits 20 seconds longer than the system
waits before it drops the link.
LAPB Parm T1 — The LAPB Parm T1 field displays the current value
of the T1 timer. The T1 timer waits the specified number of
hundredths-of-seconds for a particular frame to be acknowledged. A
frame that is transmitted, but not acknowledged, before the T1 timer
expires, is retransmitted.
LAPB Parm N2 — The LAPB Parm N2 field displays the maximum
number of times a frame is retransmitted after the LAPB Parm T1
expires. The frame is retransmitted at the LAPB Parm T1 interval for
the number of times specified in this field. When this count is depleted,
the frame is retransmitted at 20 second intervals. If no response is
received after these transmissions, the link is brought down.
A node that is configured with the value specified in LAP-B
CONFIGURATION Parameters output will attempt to retransmit an
unacknowledged frame a maximum of 20 times at T1 intervals.
LAPB Parm K — The LAPB Parm K field displays the configured
number of unacknowledged frames that are allowed in the network at
any given time. For example, if this value is set to seven (7) for a node,
and that node transmits seven (7) packet frames onto the network, it
cannot transmit another frame until one or more of the transmitted
frames are acknowledged.
Modulo Count — The Modulo Count field displays the maximum
frame sequence number allowable for any frame in the network. This
Appendix A
221
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
field can be set to a value of 8 or 128, meaning that frames are
numbered from either 0 through 7, or 0 through 127.
Buffer Size — The Buffer Size field displays the current buffer size.
This value will be equal to the buffer size configured in the NMMGR
Link screen plus 4 bytes of overhead that is added by the level 3
protocol.
STATISTICS Parameter Fields
The STATISTICS parameter for LAPBMUX links displays many fields
in addition to the LINKSTATE parameter fields. The CONFIGURATION
parameter fields are not displayed when this parameter is used. For an
example of the data that is displayed when you issue the LINKCONTROL
linkname;STATUS=STATISTICS command:
Transmit bytes
TransmitS
Transmits ctrl bytes
Transmit ctrl
Transmit overruns
Tx deferred: iova
Tx deferred: buffer
Level-2 connects
Level-2 disconnects
Connect timeouts
11543567876
13166130
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
Receive bytes
ReceiveS
Receive ctrl bytes
Receive ctrl
Receive overruns
Recv deferred: iova
Recv dropped: buffer
Recv dropped: addr
Recv dropped: other
Secs since clear
32948732576
18338778
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
173980
This command displays statistics about data transmitted and received
across the link. Many field values are summations. Over time, the
values in these fields reach their maximum possible value. When this
occurs, these fields can only be reset manually.
Transmit bytes — Total number of bytes successfully transmitted
onto the medium. This includes normal data bytes as well as control
data bytes. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17
digits, or about 99 million Gbytes. In the previous example, 10.1 million
bytes were transmitted, or about 9.7 Mbytes.
Transmits — Total number of frames successfully transmitted onto
the medium at normal priority. Normal data as well as the control data
frames. The byte count given by Transmit bytes is distributed over this
number of frames. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is
17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example
above, 127700 frames were transmitted at normal priority.
Transmit ctrl bytes — Total number of control bytes successfully
transmitted onto the medium. The maximum printable value of this
64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million Gbytes. In the previous
example, 0 control data bytes were transmitted.
Transmit ctrl — Total number of control frames successfully
transmitted onto the medium at normal priority. The byte count given
222
Appendix A
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
by Transmit ctrl bytes is distributed over this number of frames. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million billion frames. In the previous example, 0 control frames were
transmitted at normal priority.
Transmits overruns — Total number of frames that were deferred to
other network traffic before their initial transmission onto the network.
This means that the 100Base-T card had to wait for carrier to drop and
stay dropped for a few nanoseconds, before attempting to transmit the
frame. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or
about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example, 1738 transmit
frames were deferred.
Level-2 connects — Number of times the link driver noticed the link
had previously been established, but was no longer up. This may occur
because the cable was unplugged, the hub was powered off, the hub
automatically requested a reconnect, or normally (at link shutdown
time). This total does not include repetitive, failed attempts by the link
driver to reestablish the link. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647.
Level-2 disconnects — Number of times the link driver noticed the
link had previously been established, but was no longer up. This may
occur because the cable was unplugged, the hub was powered off, the
hub automatically requested a reconnect, or normally (at link shutdown
time). This total does not include repetitive, failed attempts by the link
driver to reestablish the link. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647.
Receive bytes — Total number of bytes successfully transmitted onto
the medium. This includes normal data bytes as well as control data
bytes. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or
about 99 million Gbytes. In the previous example, 10.1 million bytes
were transmitted, or about 9.7 Mbytes.
Receives — Total number of frames successfully received from the
card at normal priority. This includes normal data as well as control
data frames. The byte count given by Receive bytes is distributed over
this number of frames. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field
is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example,
127700 frames were transmitted at normal priority.
Receive ctrl bytes — Total number of control bytes successfully
received from the card. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit
field is 17 digits, or about 99 million Gbytes. In the previous example,
10.1 million bytes were received, or about 9.7 Mbytes.
Receive ctrl — Total number of control frames successfully received
from the card at normal priority. The byte count given by Receive Ctrl
bytes is distributed over this number of frames. The maximum
printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99 million billion
frames. In the previous example, 0 control frames were received at
Appendix A
223
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
normal priority.
Receive overruns — Total number of frames that were deferred to
other network traffic before their initial transmission onto the network.
This means that the 100Base-T card had to wait for carrier to drop and
stay dropped for a few nanoseconds, before attempting to transmit the
frame. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or
about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example, 1738 transmit
frames were deferred.
Recv dropped: buffer — Total number of frames received from the
adapter card, but dropped because no data buffers were available from
the upper layer protocol requesting to receive these frames. This is a
relatively common occurrence, amounting to flow control for all
protocols sharing those buffers. Many protocols include built-in
mechanisms for detecting lost frames and requesting their
retransmission from the remote side. The maximum value of this 32-bit
field is 2147483647. In the example above, out of 66.4 million frames
received, 262 have been dropped for lack of buffer resources; any
similar level would be considered normal.
Recv dropped: addr — Total number of frames received by the
adapter card, but dropped because no upper layer protocol had
requested future reception of those frames, or because that protocol
unbound itself from the link while the received frame was still in
motion. Older, intelligent adapter cards can invisibly receive and drop
these frames, often without ever reporting them as statistics. But
today’s adapters are not intelligent, and require link driver
involvement. For users unfamiliar with seeing it, this statistic may
seem excessive. But it is important because it gives an indication of the
amount of unnecessary traffic present on the network segment to which
the adapter card is connected. High values may indicate a need to
resegment the network, since systems and their adapters are spending
a large amount of time and resources recognizing and dropping frames
they do not care to see. High volumes of such traffic can also limit
network bandwidth. The maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is
17 digits, or about 99 million billion frames. In the previous example,
out of 15.7 million frames received, 9.87 million have been dropped
based on address: about 63% of all frames received are then being
dropped. This level would be considered high.
Recv dropped: other — Sum total number of frames received from
the adapter card, but dropped because: an upper layer protocol error
was returned; the required address format was not supported; the
frame arrived while the link driver was in an unusual state; or for
perfect multicast filtering reasons. The maximum value of this 32-bit
sum is 2147483647. In the example above, 24785 frames have been
dropped for one or more of the reasons listed; this number would be
considered high, and further investigation might be needed if it appears
to be impacting any applications.
224
Appendix A
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
Recv deferred — Number of times an address-matched receive frame
was temporarily held (queued) by the link driver, because of a
momentary lack of DMA resources. Once those resources became
available, the frame was automatically transferred to the host. The
maximum printable value of this 64-bit field is 17 digits, or about 99
million billion frames. In the previous example, 123 frames were
temporarily held.
Secs since clear — The number of seconds elapsed since statistics
were last reset via the LINKCONTROL linkname; STATUS=RESET
command. This gives the sample time over which the displayed
statistics have been collected. Per-time-unit figures may then be
calculated if desired. The maximum value of this 32-bit field is
2147483647, or about 68 years.
RESET Parameter Fields
The RESET parameter for LAPBMUX links reset all the accumulated
statistics for the links, The command also displays all of the LINKSTATE,
CONFIGURATION, and STATISTICS parameter fields. Refer to the
STATISTICS parameter for a description of the displayed fields.
ALL Parameter Fields
The ALL parameter for LAPBMUX links displays all of the LINKSTATE,
CONFIGURATION, and STATISTICS parameter fields. This is an example
of the ALL parameter output:
Linkname:
PLAPLNK7
Linktype:
PCI LAPBMUX
Physical Path:
Physical interface
Transmission speed
Clock source
Local mode
Connect timeout :sec
Adapter timeout :sec
0/6/2/1.7
V.35
56000
External
DTE
900
10
Transmit bytes
TransmitS
Transmits ctrl bytes
Transmit ctrl
Transmit overruns
Tx deferred: iova
Tx deferred: buffer
Level-2 connects
Level-2 disconnects
Connect timeouts
11543567876
13166130
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
Appendix A
Linkstate: CONNECTED LEVEL 2
LAPB parm T1 :sec
LAPB parm N2 :retry
LAPB parm K
Module Count
Buffer size :bytes
Receive bytes
ReceiveS
Receive ctrl bytes
Receive ctrl
Receive overruns
Recv deferred: iova
Recv dropped: buffer
Recv dropped: addr
Recv dropped: other
Secs since clear
3
20
7
8
4096
32948732576
18338778
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
173980
225
LINKCONTROL Command
NS 3000/iX LAPBMUX Link Statistics
226
Appendix A
B
Submitting an CR
For further assistance from HP, document the problem as an CR
(change request) and forward it to your HP Service Representative.
Include the following information where applicable:
• A characterization of the problem. Describe the events leading up to
and including the problem. Attempt to describe the source of the
problem. Describe the symptoms of the problem and what led up to
the problem.
Your characterization should include: MPE/iX commands;
communication subsystem commands; job streams; result codes and
messages; and data that can reproduce the problem.
Illustrate as clearly as possible the context of any message(s).
Prepare copies of information displayed at the system console and
user terminal.
• Obtain the version, update and fix information for all software using
NMMAINT.PUB.SYS. This allows Hewlett-Packard to determine if the
problem is already known, and if the correct software is installed at
your site.
• Record all error messages and numbers that appear at the user
terminal and the system console.
• Run NMDUMP.PUB.SYS to format the NM log file that was active when
the problem occurred (NMLGnnnn.PUB.SYS). You may need to issue
the MPE/iX command SWITCHNMLOG to free the NM log file.
Using NMDUMP, format the log file for NETXPORT (3),
NETIPC (5), Network Services (6) and link manager (8) information.
Inspect the formatted output and try to locate errors. Prepare the
formatted output and a copy of the log file for your Hewlett-Packard
representative to further analyze.
• Prepare a listing of the configuration file and the MPE/iX I/O
configuration you are using for your Hewlett-Packard representative
to further analyze. Inspect the output and try to locate errors.
• Try to determine the general area within the software where you
think the problem exists. Refer to the appropriate reference manual
and follow the guidelines presented in that manual.
• Issue the LINKCONTROL linkname; STATUS= command for each link.
Retain the output for your Hewlett-Packard representative to
further analyze.
• Document your interim, or “workaround” solution. The cause of the
problem can sometimes be found by comparing the circumstances in
which it occurs with the circumstances in which it does not occur.
• Create copies of any NS 3000/iX or NetIPC user trace, network
transport trace and communication link trace files that were active
227
Submitting an CR
when the problem occurred for your Hewlett-Packard representative
to further analyze.
• In the event of a system failure, a full memory dump must be taken.
• Make any NI DMPxxx files available for your HP service
representative.
228
Appendix B
Index
Numerics
802 chip restarts, 190
A
aborted frames received, 182
aborted frames sent, 182
B
Bad_card_on, 199
Bmgr_queued_aloc_on, 198
broadcast reads, 197
broadcast writes, 197
buffer size, 179
C
cable type, 179
card, 70
carrier losses, 187
clear to send (CTS), 182
code or align error, 204
commands
COMPARE, 87
DATA, 84
DEBUG, 84
DO, 85
EXIT, 85
HELP, 85
HELP ALL, 85
HELP BROWSE, 85
HELP command, 85
HELP COMMANDS, 85
INFILE, 85
LINKCONTROL, 107
LINKCONTROL STATUS, 107
LINKCONTROL TRACE, 107
LISTREDO, 85
MAIN, 85
MANUAL, 85
MENUS, 85
MESSAGES, 85
NETCONTROL, 107
NETCONTROL ADDLINK, 107
NETCONTROL DELLINK, 107
NETCONTROL START, 107
NETCONTROL STATUS, 107
NETCONTROL STOP, 107
NETCONTROL TRACE, 107
NETCONTROL UPDATE, 107
NETCONTROL VERSION, 107
NETDIR, 87
NSCONTROL, 107
Index
NSCONTROL ABORT, 107
NSCONTROL AUTOLOGON, 107
NSCONTROL LOADKEYS, 107
NSCONTROL LOG, 108
NSCONTROL SERVER, 108
NSCONTROL START, 108
NSCONTROL STATUS, 108
NSCONTROL STOP, 108
NSCONTROL VERSION, 108
OUTFILE, 85
QUIT, 85
REDO, 85
RESUMENMLOG, 108
SETVAR, 86
SHOWNMLOG, 108
SHOWVARS, 86
SUMMARY, 87
SWITCHNMLOG, 108
VERSION, 86
COMPARE command, 87
Config_on, 198
configured, 198
connect duration, 181
connect timeout, 180
CRC, 183
CRC errors, 183, 189
crc or maxsize error, 203
Ctrl_out_active, 198
Ctrl_response_pending, 199
CTS
clear to send, 182
CTS carrier losses, 182
current multicast address list, 194, 201, 209
current multicast addresses, 186
current receive filter, 185
current station address, 185, 193, 194, 200, 209
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC), 183
D
data bytes received, 181
data bytes sent, 181
Data Carrier Detect (DCD), 182
DATA command, 84
data frames received, 182
data frames sent, 181
data rate, 192
DCD, 182
Data Carrier Detect, 182
DCD carrier losses, 182
DEBUG command, 84
default station address, 185, 193, 194, 201
DO command, 85
229
Index
Do_bind_on, 199
Download_on, 199
DSR losses, 182
local mode, 179
local timeout, 180
loquix reinits, 198
E
errors
internal, 65
resource, 65
syntax, 65
EXIT command, 85
M
MAIN command, 85
MANUAL command, 85
MENUS command, 85
MESSAGES command, 85
modulo count, 179
multicast reads, 197
multicast writes, 197
multicast writes., 197
F
Fiber Distributed Data Interface/iX, 21
frame losses, 191
Free_space_pending, 199
functional address mask, 193
H
heartbeat losses, 191
HELP ALL command, 85
HELP BROWSE command, 85
HELP command, 85
HP-PB 100Base-T Network Adapter, 21
HP-PB 100VG-AnyLAN Network Adapter, 21
I
inbound buffer size, 185
inbound buffers available, 185
inbound number of buffers, 185
INFILE command, 85
internal errors, 65
invalid options, 65
Io_cmd, 198
Io_tx, 198
Io_tx., 198
L
Lan_in_active, 198
Lan_out_active, 198
LAPB parm K, 180
LAPB parm N2, 180
LAPB parm T1, 180
link disconnects, 204
link mode, 204
link speed, 204
link training result, 204
linkname, 178, 184, 192, 200, 208, 219
linkstate, 178, 184, 192, 200, 208, 219
linktype, 178, 184, 192, 200, 208, 219
LISTREDO command, 85
230
N
NETDIR command, 87
Network File Transfer (NFT), 21
network transport, 28
non-routable reads, 197
NS Point-to-Point Network Link/iX, 21
NSLOGON, 30
NSTEST, 30
num of heartbeats, 197
num of power fails, 197
num of subset bufs, 197
number of users, 197
O
online diagnostic, 70
Out of Rx bufs, 187
Out of Tx bufs, 187
outbound high water, 197
OUTFILE command, 85
overhead bytes received, 181
overhead bytes sent, 181
oversized frames received, 182
P
Pfail_on, 198
phone number, 179
physical path, 184, 192, 194, 200, 208
Post_read_pending, 199
Q
queued buffer reqs, 198
QUIT command, 85
QVALNS, 30
R
read buffer size, 198
Index
Index
read buffs avail, 198
read buffs in pool, 198
read bytes, 197
reads aborted, 197
reads completed, 197
receive byte count, 193
receive bytes hipri, 205
receive bytes norm, 204
receive errors, 193, 195
Receive File
any, 185
bad, 185
broad, 185
multi, 185
receive filter k_pckts(), 185
receive filter x_pckts(), 186
receive overruns, 182
receives broadcast, 191
receives discarded, 196
receives dropped, 191
receives error, 187
receives hipri, 205
receives lost, 196
receives multicast, 191
receives no error, 187, 193, 195, 206
receives norm, 205
receives not copied, 196
recv broadcast hipri, 205
recv broadcast norm, 205
recv deferred, 203
recv dropped
addr, 206
buffer, 207
dma, 207
other, 207
recv multicast hipri, 206
recv multicast norm, 206
recv overruns, 203
REDO command, 85
reflectometer, 188
Remote DataBase Access (RDBA), 21
Remote File Access (RFA), 21
Remote Process Management (RPM), 21
Reset_on, 198
resource errors, 65
ring drops, 198
ring up time, 198
Ring_op, 199
SHOWVARS command, 86
size range errors, 190
SMT events, 198
SMT non-uni rec, 195
SMT non-uni xmits, 195
SMT rec bytes, 195
SMT rec errors, 195
SMT uni rec, 195
SMT uni xmits, 195
SMT xmit bytes, 195
statistics resets, 183
Statistics_on, 199
subset buffer reqs, 197
SUMMARY command, 87
syntax errors, 65
S
secs since clear, 207
SETVAR command, 86
W
warnings, 65
whole byte errors, 190
Index
T
ThinLAN 3000/iX Link, 21
Token Ring/iX, 21
total frames received, 181
total frames sent, 181
Trace_on, 198
tracing, 181
trans underruns, 203
transmission speed, 180
transmit byte count, 193
transmit bytes hipri, 202
transmit bytes norm, 202
transmit errors, 193, 195
transmits >1 retry, 189
transmits 1 retry, 188
transmits 16 collisions, 190
transmits deferred, 187
transmits dropped, 203
transmits error, 187
transmits hipri, 202
transmits late collision, 190
transmits no error, 187, 193, 195, 202
transmits norm, 202
U
unicast reads, 197
unicast writes, 197
V
VERSION command, 86
Virtual Terminal (VT), 21
231
Index
write bytes, 197
writes aborted, 197
writes completed, 196
X
X.25 iX System Access, 21
XPVAL, 30
232
Index
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