University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee Exploring the Urban Environment Fall Semester 2015

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee Exploring the Urban Environment Fall Semester 2015
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Urban Studies 250 LEC 001 (27833) - Exploring the Urban Environment
Fall Semester 2015
Syllabus
Course Information
Class Meetings:
Class Location:
Instructor:
Office:
Office Hours:
Email:
Tuesday & Thursday 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
BOL B60 (Bolton Hall, 3210 N. Maryland Ave.)
Salman Hussain
Bolton 780
3:30 – 4:30pm (or by appointment)
[email protected]
Course Description
This multidisciplinary course will look at the nature of the city, representations of the city, the processes
that influence urban change, and the future of the city with an emphasis on global cities. Throughout the
course, we will touch on many basic urban themes and theories including culture, transportation,
segregation, sustainability, urban social movements, and popular culture, etc. As we build up a
background in basic urban theories through our readings and audio-visual materials including films,
written and verbal assignments will provide students the opportunity to develop individual perspectives,
explore specific interests, and become familiar with urban scholars and scholarly resources, and make
connections between theory and current events (in Milwaukee as well as other national and international
cities).
There are a number of issues and themes within urban studies and this course will aim to survey a diverse,
though not exhaustive, selection of those themes. By the end of the semester every student should be able
to identify some of the major challenges facing American and international cities today. This will include
issues related to housing, mobility, violence, gender and sexuality, the environment, and so forth. The
overarching objective is to provide students with the beginnings of a foundation in urban studies theory
and current events by bringing in case studies from across the globe; further, this course will give students
a sense of the many issues within urban studies in need of ongoing research and intervention and thus aid
in identifying potential future areas of study and focus.
Course Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this course, students will:
- Have an understanding of the multi-disciplinary nature of urban studies.
- Be able to critically engage with social science literature relevant to Urban Studies.
- Have an introductory knowledge of scholarly discourse on a selection of topics relevant to the
urban environment.
- Be able to view and analyze a particular city and/or an urban issue within the context of the course
themes.
- Be able to engage in informed academic discussion on a range of themes relevant to the urban
environment.
- Be knowledgeable about and able to access and utilize scholarly resources in urban studies.
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UW Shared Learning (SL) Goals Assessed:
-
Effective Communication Skills including listening, speaking, reading, writing, and information
literacy.
Intercultural Knowledge and Competence including the ability to interact with and work with
people from diverse backgrounds and cultures; to lead or contribute support to those who lead; and
to empathize with and understand those who are different than they are.
Social Sciences Goals Assessed:
-
Recognize and analyze intrapersonal, interpersonal, and/or socio-cultural factors associated with individual
behavior, collective action, or societal development.
Identify and critically evaluate the function, structure and development of human collectivities,
organizations, institutions, and cultures, their infrastructures and interrelationships.
Class Structure
Class will meet weekly on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:00 – 3:15pm. During class periods, content
will be provided via lectures with video excerpts if needed, intended to prompt discussion on the assigned
readings, key concepts, and current events related to the weekly topics. A portion of each class period will
be utilized for students to complete prompted written responses, give short oral presentations, participate
in small group activities, or for administering pop quizzes.
Each week will be assigned a theme and lectures and discussions will be based upon assigned readings,
typically a journal article or book excerpt. Class assignments will be diverse in order to reach all learning
and contribution strengths and will include short presentations, discussions, quizzes, and papers. The
selected themes can be found in the class schedule below.
In general for this course, student assessment (grades) are based on your ability to process, understand,
and communicate the course content as well as your ability to express your individual perspective on and
opinions about the themes. Communication with the instructor regarding missing class, questions about
assignments, and so forth is highly encouraged if and whenever needed.
Required Course Materials
All readings will be provided electronically via the D2L website or, if needed, by email. Students are
responsible for downloading and reading all assigned reading (and printing it if you prefer to review hard
copies) prior to the week’s first class session (Tuesday) in order to prepare in advance for class
discussion. Students are also responsible for promptly informing the instructor if they have any
difficulties accessing class materials so that they can be emailed or otherwise distributed.
If there is a need to change or revise reading assignments as the semester progresses, students will be
notified and all final reading selections will be provided by the Thursday prior to the week of the assigned
reading, barring any unforeseeable delays.
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Assignments and Grading
A total of 470 points is required to receive an A in the course and at 350 points are required to receive a
C- grade. Following is a description of each of the course assignments.
Attendance/Participation/Preparation: 75 points (15%)
It is critical that students attend all classes in order to successfully complete the graded assignments.
Excessive absences, tardiness, and lack of preparation and participation will be noted and addressed.
Most of the semester’s class sessions will have a five minute written response activity, each of
which is worth three (3) points with a total of 75 points possible. These cannot be made up outside
of class.
Oral Presentations: 50 points each, 100 points total (all students are required to do one reading
synopsis and one city connection presentation) (20%)
Each oral presentation should be 5-7 minutes in length; supporting materials (i.e. PowerPoint,
handouts) are not required but can be used if appropriate, particularly for City Connection.
- Reading Synopsis: Student should provide a summary of the reading assignment including the
main points, conclusions, and relevance to the weekly theme. Students should include their
analysis and/or opinion on the paper and/or the author’s position.
- City Connection: Student should present elements of the theme and/or reading for that week
within the context of a city of their choice (national or international). Images encouraged.
Pop Quizzes / Homework Assignments: 75 points total (15%)
Up to five unannounced quizzes or homework assignments of various formats and point allocations
will be given throughout the semester. Missed quizzes and homework cannot be made up at a later
time unless arranged in advance.
Mid-Term Exam: 50 points (10%)
This exam will be written and may include multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions.
Final Quiz: 25 points (5%)
This quiz will be written and may include multiple choice, short answer, and essay questions. The
date for the quiz will be announced in class.
Final Paper - City Analysis: 150 points (30%)
Choose three of the course themes and present an analysis of those themes for a city of your choice
(national or international). Detailed length and content guidelines are provided on D2L.
Additional Points and Extra Credit Opportunities
Students wishing to complete extra credit assignments must discuss this with and receive approval from
the instructor prior to completing the assignment. Extra credit cannot be used to substitute for the two
required Oral Presentations, City Analysis Paper, or Mid-Term Exam (i.e. if a student has not completed
the mandatory assignments they are not eligible for extra credit).
Up to two additional pre-approved assignments: 25 points each
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Students interested in additional extra credit can discuss possible assignments with the instructor. Each
assignment should include a 750-1000 write-up and can include, for example, writing a reading
response on an approved source (article, book section, etc.), watching an urban studies-related
documentary or film, or attending an Urban Studies Program event.
Grading scale
Assignment
Attendance/Participation/Preparation (assessed via daily
responses)
Oral Presentations (two presentations, 50 points each)
City Analysis Paper
Mid-Term Exam
Final Quiz
Pop Quizzes / Homework
Total
Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
Percentage (%)
94 – 100
90 – 94
88 – 90
84 – 88
80 – 84
78 – 80
74 – 78
70 – 74
68 – 70
64 – 68
60 – 64
59 and below
Points
470 – 500
450 – 469
440 – 449
420 – 439
400 – 419
390 – 399
370 – 389
350 – 369
340 – 349
320 – 339
300 – 319
299 and below
4
Points
75
% of Grade
15%
100
150
75
25
75
500
20%
30%
15%
5%
15%
100%
Course Schedule
Week
Dates
1
Thursday,
September 3
2
Tuesday,
September 8
Thursday,
September
10
3
Tuesday,
September
15
Thursday,
September
17
Tuesday,
September
22
Thursday,
September
24
4
5
Tuesday,
September
29
Theme
Introductions
The Urban
Environment,
Classics
Readings and Assignments1
Begin reading for Week 2
 “The City” (pg 4-11) in Key Concepts in Urban Studies
(Gottdiener & Budd)
 Sennet, Introduction to Classical Essays on The Culture of
Cities
Recommended:
 Simmel, “Metropolis and Mental Life”
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/content/bpl_images/conte
nt_store/sample_chapter/0631225137/bridge.pdf; “The
Stranger” http://www.wattis.org/MEDIA/00413.pdf
 Saskia Sassen, “The Global City: Introducing a Concept” in
The Blackwell City Reader
Global Cities,
World Cities
 Elizabeth Wilson, The Sphinx in The City: Urban Life, the
Control of Disorder, and Women, Chapter 8: “World Cities”
p121-134
“Third World”  Mike Davis, Introduction to Planet of Slums, p1-19
Cities / Cities  Robert Neuwirth, Shadow Cities: A Billion Squatters a New
of the Global
Urban World, Chapter 2: “Nairobi: The Squatter Control”
South, The
p.67-99.
Urban Poor
 Tom Angotti, “Apocalyptic anti-urbanism: Mike Davis and his
planet of slums” International Journal of Urban and Regional
Research, Volume 30.4 December 2006 961–7.
http://abahlali.org/files/2007review%20of%20Planet%20of%20Slums.pdf
(contd.)
 Steve Macek, “Demonizing the Inner City - Ideology and the
Urban Poor”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pebSQW7FCzw
Recommended
 Michael Katz, The Undeserving Poor, Ch 4, “Interpretations of
Poverty in Post-industrial city” p124-184.
 Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers
Public Space
and Urban
Movements
 Tahrir Square: Social Media, Public Space (Elshahed)
https://placesjournal.org/article/tahrir-square-social-mediapublic-space/
1
All reading assignments subject to change as needed and based on class progression; final selections will be provided by the
Thursday of the week prior.
5
Thursday,
October 1
Housing and
Homelessness
Tuesday,
October 6
6
Segregation
Thursday,
October 8
Tuesday,
October 13
Thursday,
October 15
7
Tuesday,
October 20
8
Thursday,
October 22
 “New Ways of Thinking About Space” (Sennet)
http://www.thenation.com/article/new-ways-thinking-aboutspace/
 “One Lasting Occupy Effect: An Awareness of Private
“Public” Spaces (Scola) https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/onelasting-occupy-effect-an-awareness-of-private-public-spaces
 “The Case for a Right to Housing” (Hartman) 1
http://www.nhi.org/online/issues/148/righttohousing.html
 Anti-homeless spikes: ‘Sleeping rough opened my eyes to the
city’s barbed cruelty’ (Andreou)
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/feb/18/defensivearchitecture-keeps-poverty-undeen-and-makes-us-more-hostile
 “How We Built the Ghettos: A brief introduction to America's
long history of racist housing policy.” (Bouie)
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/03/13/how-webuilt-the-ghettos.html
 Ta Naheisi Coates, “The Case for Reparations” Part I, II
http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/05/the-casefor-reparations/361631/
 Ta Naheisi Coates’ Atlantic Essay. Part V, VI, VII
http://www.theatlantic.com/features/archive/2014/05/the-casefor-reparations/361631/
Recommended:
 Segregation: A Global History.
 Caldeira, “Fortified Enclaves: The New Urban Segregation”
p.83-107 in Theorizing The City: The New Urban
Anthropology Reader (ed. Setha Low).
 Displacement Decathlon (Vale)
https://placesjournal.org/article/the-displacement-decathlon/
Sarah Schulman, Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost
Imagination, Chapter 1: “The Dynamics of Death
Displacement /
and Replacement”
Gentrification
http://www.ucpress.edu/content/chapters/11510.ch01.pdf
Recommended:
 The Pacification of Rio, as Observed from a Gondola
http://bostonreview.net/world/moran-thomas-rio-favelatourism-teleferico-world-cup
 Slumgawk Millionaires (Zaidi) http://www.sundayguardian.com/artbeat/slumgawk-millionaires
Review
Discussion
Stuart Hall, “Cosmopolitan Promises, Multicultural Realities”
in Divided Cities: Oxford Amnesty Lectures.
Mid-Term
Exam
6
Tuesday,
October 27
9
Thursday,
October 29
10
11
Tuesday,
November 3
Thursday,
November 5
Tuesday,
November
10
Thursday,
November
12
Tuesday,
November
17
12
13
2
3
Thursday,
November
19
Tuesday,
November
24
Accessing
Utilizing
Scholarly
Class will meet in the Golda Meir Library for a library
Resources, Prep instruction session
for City
Analysis Paper
 Soft City (1998), Ch1,2, pp9-38.
Representations  S. Sontag, “The Imagination of Disaster,” Commentary,
I
October 1965, pp.42–48.
https://americanfuturesiup.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/sontag
-the-imagination-of-disaster.pdf
Representations
II
Gender,
Sexuality, and
the City
Gyan Prakash, Mumbai Fables, Ch 8: “Avenger on the Street”
p289-324.
Elsheshtawy, “The Prophecy of Code 46: Afuera in Dubai,
or Our Urban Future,” http://iaste.berkeley.edu/pdfs/22.2cSpr11Elsheshtawy.pdf
 Spain, How Women Saved the City (excerpt).
 Phadke et al., Why Loiter?: Women And Risk On Mumbai
Streets (excerpt).
 Yvonne P. Doderer, “LGBTQs in the City, Queering Urban
Space” International Journal of Urban and Regional
Research, Volume 35.2, March 2011, p. 431–6.
 PBS documentary, Stonewall Uprising
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/introdu
ction/stonewall-intro/
 Benson, “The urbanization of the Eastern Gray Squirrel in the
United States” Journal of American History (2013) 100 (3):
691-710. http://jah.oxfordjournals.org/content/100/3/691.full
Urban Animals
 “Year of the dog” (Sengupta)
http://www.livemint.com/Leisure/X0TzzEoIc4AZXMvZLWh
ZiJ/Bonds--Year-of-the-dog.html
 Karachi’s Urban Heat wave
http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2015/06/22/national/karachiUrban Ecology, an-urban-heat-island-effect/
Sustainability  “Transforming Milwaukee’s Vacant Lots Into A New
Agricultural Economy”2 (Coren)
http://www.fastcoexist.com/3020099/transformingmilwaukees-vacant-lots-into-a-new-agricultural-economy
Urban
Revitalization
“12 Strategies That Will Transform Your City’s Downtown”3
(Future Structure)
The old heart of Milwaukee’s African America could beat again
http://urbanmilwaukee.com/2013/08/18/bronzeville-the-old-
http://www.fastcoexist.com/3020099/transforming-milwaukees-vacant-lots-into-a-new-agricultural-economy
http://www.futurestructure.com/news/12-Strategies-That-Will-Transform-Your-Citys-Downtown.html
7
heart-of-milwaukees-african-america-could-beat-again/
Recommended:
“From brew town to cool town: Neoliberalism and the creative
city development strategy in Milwaukee” (Zimmerman)
http://www.thecyberhood.net/documents/papers/zimmerman08.
pdf
Thursday,
November
26
Thanksgiving
Holiday
No Class
Roads and
mobility
 Nigel Thrift, “Driving in the city” in The Blackwell City
Reader
 Catherine Lutz, “The U.S. car colossus and the production of
inequality” American Ethnologist, Volume 41, Issue 2, May
2014 Pages 232–245.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/amet.12072/full
 “Lahore’s Elite Logic” (Jan)
http://www.tanqeed.org/2013/08/lahores-elite-logic/
 What Does Racism Have to Do With Gridlock? In Atlanta,
everything.
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2014
/01/atlanta_s_snow_fiasco_the_real_problem_in_the_south_is
n_t_weather_it_s_history.html
Tuesday,
December 1
14
Thursday,
December 3
Tuesday,
December 8
15
Thursday,
December
10
16
Streets,
Sidewalks,
Walking
 Holston, “The Modernist City and the Death of the Street”
p.245-276 in Theorizing The City: The New Urban
Anthropology Reader (ed. Setha Low).
 Jane Jacobs, “The Uses of Sidewalks: Safety”
 Nightwalking: a subversive stroll through the city streets”
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/mar/27/nightwalking
-subversive-city-streets-london-matthew-beaumont
 Cadogan, “Due North” http://www.vqronline.org/essaysarticles/2014/09/due-north
Recommended:
 Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking, Chapter 11:
“The Solitary Stroller and the City” p171-195.
Tuesday, December 15th – Last day to turn in Extra Credit
City Analysis Papers Due by Midnight Wednesday, December 16th
Classroom Civility
Students and faculty alike should strive to create a class environment that reflects mutual respect and the
importance of learning. If a student’s behavior threatens to disrupt that environment, the faculty member
has a responsibility to seek resolution to the problem. Students are expected to be respectful of the
8
instructor and their fellow students during class time. Side conversations while the instructor or other
students are talking will not be tolerated. If a student is disruptive, the professor reserves the right to ask
the student to leave the classroom.
In order to maintain an environment conducive to education, the use of cell phones (including for text
messaging), MP3 players, or any other electronic devices is prohibited during class time. Text messaging
during class is not appropriate and will not be allowed. Use of laptops or tablets is allowed during class,
so long as you are working on class-related material (note taking, reading the book or article in electronic
format, etc.). Use of laptops and tablets for non-classroom related activities (Facebook, game playing,
watching TV, etc.) is unacceptable.
Academic Conduct
You are expected to do your own work in this class and properly cite any ideas or quotes from other
sources. Citations should follow a generally accepted format (APA, MLA, Chicago). Plagiarism,
cheating, and other forms of academic misconduct will be dealt with in accordance to the guidelines of
the university. Academic dishonesty includes failing to cite published work or someone else’s ideas,
purchasing a paper from another student or online, using another student’s work as your own, directly
copying from a source without quoting the author, submitting your own work from another class, etc.
The university’s policy on plagiarism and academic integrity can be viewed online at
http://www4.uwm.edu/osl/dean/conduct.cfm. Any student caught engaging in plagiarism will receive a
failing grade for this course, NO EXCEPTIONS!
Desire2Learn (D2L)
This course has a D2L site that will be used for communication throughout the semester. Check in weekly
for announcements, updates, and links to relevant articles and other resources. Assigned readings (or links
to the assigned readings) will be posted on D2L on the content page under the topic heading for the week
they are assigned. Students may see these materials there anytime, using a standard web browser (see
below). D2L will also be used for posting grades. If you have trouble with D2L or have not used it yet,
please see the following information on accessing and navigating D2L.
Using UW-Milwaukee Desire2Learn (D2L) course web sites
Recommended browsers: For a PC-compatible computer, use either Internet Explorer or
Firefox. For Apple (Mac) computers, Safari or Firefox are recommended. The browser needs “Sun Java
Runtime Environment” (Java-scripting) enabled for a recent version of Java.
NOTE: A complete and up-to-date list of recommended browsers and settings can always be found at:
https://www4.uwm.edu/technology/help/. Please contact the UWM Help Desk, as described below, if you
have questions about these requirements.
To find and browse the D2L course web site
1. From to the UWM home page (http://www.uwm.edu) click on the dropdown menu to select D2L
Course Access – OR – go directly to the D2L login page at http://D2L.uwm.edu.
9
2. Click on the button that says “UWM ePanther” to access D2L utilizing your UWM ePanther
account.
3. On the Desire2Learn Welcome screen, type in your ePanther Username (your ePanther campus
email, but without the “@uwm.edu) and Password. Then hit [Login].
4. On the D2L MyHome screen, go to the drop down menu (“Select a course”) at the top of the
screen. You’ll see your active courses here.
5. Click any course title to see the Course Home page. Click “Content” in the navigation bar to begin
exploring the site.
6. If you have any difficulty getting into the course web site, please close down your web Browser
completely and open it up again. Then try logging on again, using the instructions above. If you
do not know your ePanther username or password, please get help as indicated below.
7. When you are finished looking around your D2L course sites, always click on “Logout” which
can be found in the drop down menu under your name in the top right corner of the screen. This is
especially important if you are in a computer lab. Otherwise, the next person who uses the
machine will be using your D2L account!
What to do if you have problems with Desire2Learn (D2L)
If you have any difficulties with D2L, including problems with your login (e.g., you forgot your
password, or if you just can’t get on), please contact the UWM Help Desk.
You can contact the Help Desk by doing one of the following:
 Report the problem via online web form at GetTechHelp.uwm.edu
 Call the UWM Help Desk at (414)229-4040 if you are in Metro Milwaukee (or just dial 4040 on
a UWM campus phone).
 Go to Bolton 225 (this lab is not open all day or on weekends – call (414)229-4040 for specific
hours)
 From outside the 414 or 262 area codes, but from within the USA, you may call the UWM Help
Desk at 1-877-381-3459.
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UNIVERSITY AND URBAN STUDIES PROGRAMS POLICIES
The Secretary of the University maintains a web page that contains university policies that affect the
instructor and the students in this course, as well as essential information specific to conduct of the
course. The link to that web page is: http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/SecU/SyllabusLinks.pdf
University Policy on Credit Hours. It is expected and necessary for students to spend time outside of
scheduled classtime to prepare for and study materials from course sessions. The amount of time that
students spend on coursework outside of classtime can be expected to be relatively proportionate to the
number of credit hours that the course is valued at.
The credit hour policy states:
“Study leading to one semester credit represents an investment of time by the average student of
not fewer than 48 hours for class contact in lectures, for laboratories, examinations, tutorials and
recitations, and for preparation and study; or a demonstration by the student of learning equivalent
to that established as the expected product of such a period of study.”
Based on federal and university expectations, as Urban Studies 250 is a 3-credit course, students should
expect and prepare to spend a minimum of 144 hours outside of classtime on preparation and work related
to the course. Taking into consideration that the number of hours demanded of students outside of class
will fluctuate based on the scheduling of exams and major assignments, students should anticipate
investing 6-7 hours per week on the course outside of class.
Students with Disabilities. Verification of disability, class standards, the policy on the use of alternate
material and test accommodations can be found at the following: http://www4.uwm.edu/sac/SACltr.pdf
Religious Observances. Policies regarding accommodations for absences due to religious observance are
found at the following: http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S1.5.htm
Students called to active Military Duty. Accommodations for absences due to call-up of reserves to
active military duty are found at the following (Editorially Revised, 3/25/09):
Students: http://www4.uwm.edu/current_students/military_call_up.cfm
Incompletes. You may be given an incomplete if you have carried a course successfully until near the
end of the semester but, because of illness or other unusual and substantiated cause beyond your control,
have been unable to take or complete the final examination or to complete some limited amount of course
work. An incomplete is not given unless you prove to the instructor that you were prevented from
completing the course for just cause as indicated above. The conditions for awarding an incomplete to
graduate
and
undergraduate
students
can
be
found
at
the
following:
http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S31.pdf
Discriminatory Conduct (such as sexual harassment). Discriminatory conduct will not be tolerated by
the University. It poisons the work and learning environment of the University and threatens the careers,
educational experience and well-being of students, faculty and staff. Policies regarding discriminatory
conduct can be found at:
http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S47.pdf
11
Academic Misconduct. Students are responsible for the honest completion and representation of their
work, for the appropriate citation of sources, and for respect of others' academic endeavors. Policies for
addressing students cheating on exams or plagiarism can be found at the following:
http://www4.uwm.edu/acad_aff/policy/academicmisconduct.cfm
Complaint Procedures. Students may direct complaints to the Urban Studies Programs Director or the
Associate Dean for Social Sciences in the College of Letters & Sciences. If the complaint allegedly
violates a specific university policy, it may be directed to the Urban Studies Programs Director, the
Associate Dean for Social Sciences in the College of Letters & Sciences, or to the appropriate university
office
responsible
for
enforcing
the
policy.
Policies
may
be
found
at:
http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S49.7.htm
Grade Appeal Procedures. A student may appeal a grade on the grounds that it is based on a capricious
or arbitrary decision of the course instructor. Such an appeal shall follow the established procedures
adopted by the department, college, or school in which the course resides or in the case of graduate
students, the Graduate School. These procedures are available in writing from the respective department
chairperson or the Academic Dean of the College/School. Procedures for student grade appeal can be
found at: http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S28.htm
The S.A.F.E. Campaign. Safety Awareness for Everyone describes initiatives to increase campuswide
awareness of how to stay safe. One of UWM’s S.A.F.E. campus goals is to create a culture of awareness
among students, faculty, staff, and parents. The Campus Health & Safety Web site at
www.campussafety.uwm.edu (red link at the bottom of the UWM home page) centralizes emergency and
routine safety information and communications. All faculty, students, and staff are encouraged to enroll
in the S.A.F.E. Alert system to receive emergency-information text message alerts. Sign up at the above
site.
Other. The final exam requirement, the final exam date requirement, etc. can be found at the following:
http://www4.uwm.edu/secu/docs/other/S22.htm
For information on how to access other university policies, students can consult the UWM website or
inquire with the instructor or other university faculty or staff.
(Editorially Revised, 8/26/11)
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