Apple | GeoPort Telecom Adapter Kit | User`s guide | Apple GeoPort Telecom Adapter Kit User`s guide

Apple GeoPort Telecom Adapter Kit User`s guide
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Installing Your Hardware
In this chapter
m Your modem package
m Connecting the GeoPort Telecom Adapter
m Connecting internal modems
1
Your modem package
Your modem package contains hardware and software that
bring fax, data, Internet access, and address book capabilities
to your computer.
If your modem was not installed either at the factory or by
your Apple-authorized service provider, your package
contains one of the following modems
m GeoPort Telecom Adapter
m PC Card modem
Your package also contains
m a telephone cord
m a CD-ROM or set of disks (if your software is not preinstalled
on your computer) containing
M the Apple Telecom software
M the following user’s guides in Adobe Acrobat format
Apple Address Book User’s Guide
Apple Fax User’s Guide
Apple Fax Scripting Guide
Apple Telecom AT Command Set
On Performa computers, you can find the Apple
Address Book User’s Guide and Apple Fax User’s Guide in
the Applications Section of the Launcher.
Note:
m this guide, Getting Started With Apple Telecom
2
Chapter 1
Where to begin
To get started using your hardware and software, turn to the
appropriate section in this chapter for information about
connecting your modem hardware, then proceed to
Chapter 2 for instructions on installing the software.
m If you have the GeoPort Telecom Adapter, follow the
instructions for connecting the adapter in the section
“Connecting your GeoPort Telecom Adapter.”
m If you have the GeoPort Internal Modem or the Express
Modem, follow the instructions for connecting it to the
telephone line in the section “Connecting your internal
modem.”
m If you have a PC Card modem, follow the instructions for
connecting it to your computer in the manual that
accompanies the modem.
If you are using a PC Card modem, you need to
choose the correct port setting from the Apple Serial Modem
control panel before you can begin to use it.
Important
See: Chapter 5, “Using Your Modem” for information about
choosing settings in the Apple Serial Modem control panel.
Installing Your Hardware
3
Other items you may need
To use your hardware and software you may also need
m
An analog telephone line Your modem is designed for
use with a traditional analog telephone system. Most homes
use an analog system. Many offices and hotels, however, use
a Private Branch Exchange (PBX) with digital extensions. If
your office or hotel room uses a digital extension, contact
the office telephone manager or service provider about
acquiring the use of an analog line.
m
A modular connector on your telephone line If your
telephone cord cannot be removed from the wall or has a
nonstandard connector, you may need a modular adapter or
a telephone installation that provides a modular connector.
Ask your local telephone service provider for assistance in
selecting the most appropriate solution for a modular
connector.
If you are missing something If you are missing
something in your package, contact your Apple-authorized
service provider, or refer to the service and support
materials that came with your computer for a number to call.
4
Chapter 1
Connecting your GeoPort Telecom
Adapter
To connect your Macintosh to your telephone line, plug one
end of the GeoPort Telecom Adapter into your Macintosh
and the other end into your telephone wall socket and
telephone.
Connecting the adapter to your computer
To connect the adapter to your computer
1 Locate the modem port at the back of your computer.
The modem port is marked with the W icon.
2 Plug the adapter’s cable into your computer’s modem port,
as illustrated below.
Modem port located on
the back of the computer
Installing Your Hardware
5
Connecting the adapter to the
telephone line
You need a standard telephone wall socket to connect the
adapter to your analog telephone line using the supplied
cable. If the supplied cable does not reach your telephone
outlet, you can buy a longer one from a telephone
equipment provider.
1 Locate the telephone cable that comes with your adapter
package.
2 Locate the line port at the end of the adapter.
The line port is marked
with this icon.
3 Plug one end of the cable into the line port.
4 Plug the other end of the cable into your telephone
wall socket.
6
Chapter 1
5 Locate the telephone port at the end of the adapter.
6 Plug your telephone into the telephone port.
Your installation should look similar to the illustration
below.
W Modem port located on
the back of the computer.
Telephone
Telephone
wall jack
Line port
Q Telephone port
Once the adapter is connected to your computer and
telephone line, you are ready to install the software (if it is
not already installed).
See: Chapter 2, “Installing Your Software.”
Installing Your Hardware
7
Connecting your internal modem
The Express Modem hardware in your PowerBook or
PowerBook Duo and, in some configurations, the GeoPort
Internal Modem hardware are installed either at the factory
or, if purchased separately, by your Apple-authorized service
provider.
In order to use your modem, you need to connect it to an
analog telephone line using the supplied telephone cord.
To connect the modem to a telephone line
1 Plug one end of the phone cord into the appropriate port on
your computer.
Refer to your Macintosh user’s manual for the location of the
correct port.
2 Plug the other end of the phone cord into your telephone
wall socket.
Once the modem is connected to your telephone line, you
are ready to install the software (if it is not already installed).
See: Chapter 2, “Installing Your Software.”
Important If you have a GeoPort Internal Modem installed
in your computer, do not connect anything to the external
modem port because only the installed modem is active. Any
program that reads or writes to the external modem port is
redirected to the internal modem.
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Chapter 1
C
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Installing Your Software
In this chapter
m What the Installer does
m Installing the software
m Accessing the user’s guides
Before you begin
Important If you have a Performa computer, all the
software you need is already installed. Skip most of this
chapter, going directly to the last section, “Accessing the
User’s Guides.”
Make sure you have connected your modem to your
computer and your telephone line according to the
installation instructions in Chapter 1 or according to the
manual that came with your modem.
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Installing the Apple Telecom software
If your Apple Telecom software is not preinstalled on your
computer, it comes on a CD-ROM or set of disks. The folder
called Apple Telecom Disk 1 contains the Installer program
that places the necessary software on your hard disk.
What the Installer does
The Installer creates a folder called Telecom Applications
and places it at the top level of your hard disk. It places the
following folders inside this folder
m
Address Book Folder
m
Fax Folder which contains programs and files related to
which contains programs and files
related to Apple Address Book
Apple Fax
The Installer places the Apple Telecom Status program in
the Apple (K) menu, and places the modem control panel
in the Control Panels folder of the System Folder.
The Installer creates a folder called Telecom Documents and
places it at the top level of your hard disk. This folder
contains a CCL file for use with AppleLink. The CCL files for
use with Apple Remote Access are installed directly in the
Extensions folder of the System Folder.
The Installer also places all the appropriate program
extension files in the Extensions folder of the System Folder.
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Chapter 2
If you are upgrading
If you are installing this version of the Apple Telecom
software over an older version, use the Easy Install option
rather than the Custom Install option. This ensures that all
files are updated as necessary.
The Installer does the following with the existing
Express Fax files
m Removes all program files except for Fax Cover.
m Moves Sent and Received faxes to the new Fax Folder inside
the Telecom Applications folder. You can open and view
these faxes within Apple Fax.
m Converts the Fax Terminal log file to a SimpleText document
and places it in the new Fax Folder inside the Telecom
Applications folder. You can open and view this document
using SimpleText.
m Preserves all Fax Terminal address books in their own
folders. You can convert a Fax Terminal address book to
Apple Address Book format using the Address Book
Translator included in the Address Book Folder inside the
Telecom Applications folder.
m Moves all Express Fax cover pages to the new Fax Folder
inside the Telecom Applications folder. You cannot open
these cover pages using Apple Fax, but you can open them
using Fax Cover and, for example, copy and paste portions of
them to new Apple Fax cover pages.
Installing Your Software
11
Installing the software
To install the Apple Telecom software
1 Turn on your computer.
2 Insert the CD-ROM in your CD-ROM drive or Disk 1 in your
disk drive, then open the Apple Telecom Disk 1 window.
3 Double-click the Installer icon.
An introductory dialog similar to the following appears.
4 Click Continue.
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Chapter 2
An Easy Install dialog box similar to the following appears.
Easy Install automatically detects the Macintosh model you
are using and installs the software you need.
5 Make sure the hard disk indicated is where you want to
install the software.
If the wrong disk name appears, click the Switch Disk button
until the disk you want appears.
6 Click Install.
A message informs you when the installation is complete.
You need to restart your computer in order to use your
newly installed software.
7 Click Restart to restart your computer and activate the
software.
Installing Your Software
13
Accessing the user’s guides
If not preinstalled on your computer, the Adobe Acrobat
Reader program and the following user’s guides in Acrobat
format are included on your CD-ROM or set of disks in the
User’s Guides folder.
m Apple Address Book User’s Guide
m Apple Fax User’s Guide
m Apple Fax Scripting Guide
m Apple Telecom AT Command Set
If you have a Performa: On Performa computers, these
guides are already installed. (The Apple Address Book
User’s Guide and Apple Fax User’s Guide can be found
in the Applications section of the Launcher on Performa
computers.)
These guides provide complete information about using
Apple Address Book and Apple Fax and about preparing
scripts for Apple Fax. Refer to these guides for more
complete explanations of the tasks described in this guide
and for other detailed information about how to use these
programs.
To access a user’s guide, you must first install Adobe Acrobat
Reader on your hard disk (if not already installed).
To install Acrobat Reader
1 If necessary, copy the Acrobat Reader folder to your hard
disk.
2 Open the Acrobat Reader folder, then double-click the
Installer to install Acrobat Reader on your hard disk.
3 Click Restart to restart your computer and activate the
software.
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Chapter 2
To access a user’s guide
1 If necessary, copy the User’s Guides folder to your hard disk.
2 Double-click a user’s guide icon to open it.
The Acrobat Reader program opens and displays the user’s
guide cover page.
3 Use the Toolbar to browse through the document.
m Use the browse buttons to page through the document.
First page
of document
Backward/forward
one page at a time
Last page of document
Display previous/
redisplay current
page view
m Click on a title in the Table of Contents to move to that
section, or a page number in the index to move to that page.
m Use the Bookmarks and Page icon to display the list of
contents in outline form, then click on a title to move to
that section.
Installing Your Software
15
m Use the Thumbnails and Page icon to display a miniature
representation of each page of the document, then click on
a page to move to it.
m Use the Find icon to search for a word or phrase in the
document.
m Use the Page Number box at the bottom of the window to go
to a specific page.
m Use the Magnification box at the bottom of the window to
resize the display.
See also: Acrobat Reader Online Guide available from the
Guide menu or from the Acrobat Help folder on your hard
disk for more information about using Adobe Acrobat Reader.
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Chapter 2
C
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Setting Up the
Apple Telecom Software
In this chapter
m Setting up Apple Address Book
m Setting up Apple Fax
Before you begin
Make sure that you have installed the hardware and software
according to the steps described in Chapters 1 and 2.
Note: This chapter is derived from information contained in
the Apple Address Book User’s Guide and Apple Fax User’s
Guide. Refer to these guides—included on your CD-ROM or
set of disks, or preinstalled on your hard disk in Acrobat
format—for complete information about using these
programs. (On Performa computers, these guides can be
found in the Applications section of the Launcher.)
See also: The “Quick Reference Guide” at the back of this
guide for step-by-step instructions for the most important
tasks you need to know in order to get started using Apple
Address Book and Apple Fax.
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Setting up Apple Address Book
The first time you open Apple Address Book the Personal
Info dialog appears for you to enter some personal
information. This information appears on your fax cover
pages.
Starting and configuring for the first time
To start Apple Address Book
1 Open the Telecom Applications folder, then open the
Address Book folder.
If you have a Performa computer, click the Apple Address
Book button in the Applications section of the Launcher.
2 Open the Apple Address Book program by double-clicking it.
The Personal Info dialog box appears.
Country pop-up menu
provides name and
country code.
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Chapter 3
3 Enter the information you want in the appropriate fields.
This information is stored in both the Apple Address Book
and Apple Fax preferences. You can modify this information
in the Personal Info preferences of either program: updating
one updates the other. If you have already opened and
entered personal information in Apple Fax, this information
appears in the Personal Info dialog when you open Apple
Address Book.
If your country does not appear in the Country pop-up
menu, add it to the Apple Address Book Country
preferences, then update the Apple Address Book Personal
Info preferences.
See: Apple Address Book User’s Guide for information about
using the Apple Address Book preferences.
4 Click OK.
A standard file dialog box appears prompting you to create a
new address book.
Setting Up the Apple Telecom Software
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5 Enter a name and choose a location for the address book,
then click Save.
A new, empty address book window appears.
You can create as many address books as you want to
organize your information. Each address book that you
create is an independent file with no relationship to other
address books.
To create a new address book from within the program
1 Choose New from the File menu.
The standard file dialog box appears.
2 Enter a name and choose a location for the address book,
then click Save.
Each address book you create is recorded in the Apple
Address Book preferences. You can access and use these
address books from Apple Fax.
See also: The “Quick Reference Guide” for instructions on
adding a new entry to an address book.
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Chapter 3
Setting up Apple Fax
The first time you open Apple Fax a setup window appears
for you to choose your modem.
If you have a Performa: If you have a Performa computer,
Apple Fax is already set up for you. You can skip to the next
section, “Faxing a Document.”
Starting and configuring for the first time
To start Apple Fax
1 Choose Apple Telecom Status from the Apple (K) Menu.
Apple Telecom Status appears.
Apple Fax icon
2 Click the Apple Fax icon, or choose Open Apple Fax from
the File menu.
Setting Up the Apple Telecom Software
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Apple Fax opens and presents the setup window.
3 Read the introductory text, then click Next or select
Choosing a Modem from the Topic pop-up menu.
The Choosing a Modem panel appears
4 Choose your modem type from the modem pop-up menu,
then click Next.
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Chapter 3
The Changing your settings panel appears.
The descriptive text explains how to change these and other
settings in Apple Fax preferences.
See: Apple Fax User’s Guide for information about using the
Apple Fax preferences.
5 Click Done to confirm your settings and close the setup
window.
Important If you are using a PC Card modem, you need to
choose the correct port setting from the Apple Serial Modem
control panel before you can begin sending or receiving
faxes.
See: Chapter 5, “Using Your Modem” for information about
choosing settings in the Apple Serial Modem control panel.
Setting Up the Apple Telecom Software
23
After you start and configure Apple Fax the first time, the
Apple Fax main window appears in Outgoing view.
Incoming
view
Outgoing
view
Access other program
features with these buttons.
The Apple Fax main window has two distinct views—
Outgoing view and Incoming view. Outgoing view displays
all of your sent faxes and Incoming view your received faxes.
You choose the view you want by clicking on either the
Outgoing or Incoming icon in the upper left of the
main window.
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Chapter 3
Faxing a document
With Apple Fax you can open a document and send it
immediately as a fax, even when the Apple Fax program itself
is not open. You can send documents as faxes from any
program that prints, such as a word processor, spreadsheet,
or graphics program.
To send a fax from an open document
1 Make sure that the document you want to send as a fax is
open and active.
2 Hold down the Control and Shift keys while choosing Print
from the File menu.
The Fax Sender dialog box appears.
Note: This keyboard shortcut does not work if you have
QuickDraw GX installed. To send a fax with QuickDraw GX,
you must create a desktop printer icon for Fax Sender GX.
See: “Using Fax Sender GX” in this chapter.
Setting Up the Apple Telecom Software
25
3 Prepare the Fax Sender dialog, then click Send.
For your convenience, a sample document in SimpleText
format called My First Fax is included in the Fax Folder
inside the Telecom Applications folder on your hard disk.
This document contains step-by-step instructions for
preparing Fax Sender and sending your first fax.
See also: The “Quick Reference Guide” at the end of this
guide for instructions on sending a fax from an open
document, from the Quick Fax window, or from Apple
Address Book.
Note: If you did not create an address book and add entries
to it, no address book appears in Fax Sender or the Quick
Fax window.
Using Fax Sender Page Setup
You can also use the Fax Sender Page Setup dialog box to
format a document according to the requirements of your
recipient. For example, if you are faxing to the U.S., use US
Letter format; if you are faxing to Europe, use A4 Letter.
1 Hold down the Control and Shift keys while choosing Page
Setup from the File menu.
The Fax Sender Page Setup dialog box appears.
2 Set up the document according to your recipient’s
requirements, then click OK.
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Chapter 3
Selecting Fax Sender from the Chooser
If you do not have a printer, or if you plan on sending faxes
often, you can make Fax Sender the selected output device
for all your documents, just as you normally select a printer.
When Fax Sender is the selected output device, each time
you print from a program or from the system your document
is sent as a fax instead.
To make Fax Sender the selected output device
1 Open the Chooser from the Apple (K) menu.
The Chooser appears.
2 Select the Fax Sender icon from the upper left panel.
3 Close the Chooser.
Fax Sender remains selected until you choose another
device in the Chooser.
Setting Up the Apple Telecom Software
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Using Fax Sender GX
If you have QuickDraw GX installed as part of your system,
use the Chooser to create a desktop printer icon for Fax
Sender GX.
To choose Fax Sender GX
1 Open the Chooser from the Apple menu.
The Chooser appears.
2 Select the Fax Sender GX icon from the upper left panel,
then click Create.
A printer icon for Fax Sender GX appears on the desktop.
Now you can send documents as faxes just by dragging and
dropping them onto this icon.
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Chapter 3
3 Close the Chooser.
4 Open the document you want to send as a fax, then choose
Print from the File menu of your program; or drag a
document file onto the desktop printer icon.
The Fax Sender GX print dialog box appears.
5 Make sure that Fax Sender GX is selected in the Print to:
pop-up menu, then click Fax.
Fax Sender GX images your fax. When imaging is complete,
the Fax Sender print dialog box appears for you to prepare
your fax for transmission.
Setting Up the Apple Telecom Software
29
Preparing to receive faxes
To set Apple Fax to receive faxes automatically
1 Display the Apple Fax main window.
2 Set the Fax Answering button to on.
Apple Fax now manages the reception of incoming faxes
automatically. Reception takes place in the background, so
that the Apple Fax window does not have to be in front, or
even open, in order to receive a fax.
Note: Make sure that the Express Modem control panel or
Apple Serial Modem control panel is set to auto-answer. If it
is not, you will not receive incoming faxes, even with Fax
Answering on.
See: Chapter 5, “Using Your Modem” for information about
setting auto-answer.
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Chapter 3
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Using Apple Telecom Status
In this chapter
m Opening Apple Telecom Status
m Monitoring fax activity
m Canceling a fax
m Quitting Apple Telecom Status
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Introducing Apple Telecom Status
You use Apple Telecom Status to access Apple Fax and to
monitor the current fax activity on your modem. The
Telecom Status panel takes up a minimal amount of space
on the desktop.
The Installer places the Apple Telecom Status program in
the Apple (K) menu for easy access.
Opening Apple Telecom Status
To open Apple Telecom Status
1 Choose Apple Telecom Status from the Apple (K) menu.
You can also access Apple Telecom Status from the button
bar of the Apple Fax window.
Telecom Status
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Chapter 4
The Apple Telecom Status panel appears.
Graphic display shows
modem ready to receive
fax calls.
Zoom box
Text explanation of
current modem status.
Cancels current
fax transmission.
Opens Apple Fax
When the panel first opens, the program displays the default
status of “Waiting for a call” (or “Idle” if auto-answer is Off).
The graphic display shows the Apple Fax program icon, if it
is in auto-answer mode.
To open Apple Fax, click the Apple Fax button, or choose
Open Apple Fax from the File menu.
Using Apple Telecom Status
33
Understanding the display
The status display changes when you send a fax or when you
receive an incoming fax.
For example, at the start of an outgoing call, Apple Telecom
Status displays information similar to the following
Summary of call
information.
Accompanying graphic
The status information changes as Apple Fax passes through
the stages of dialing, ringing, making a connection, sending a
fax, and disconnecting.
Note: When you send a fax, use Apple Telecom Status to
monitor the progress of the fax transmission. Use Outgoing
view in the Apple Fax window to confirm the final status of
the fax (Sent, Failed, or Canceled).
When you receive an incoming fax, the status display
monitors the progress of the communication. Messages that
may appear during fax transmission are appended to the
bottom of the panel
Click here to clear
the message.
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Chapter 4
Canceling a fax
You can cancel fax transmission at any time. The Apple
Telecom Status panel is the only place from which you can
cancel a fax.
To cancel a fax
1 Confirm the progress of the call in the Telecom Status panel.
2 Click the Cancel button.
The call is canceled. The Apple Fax window displays a status
of “Transmission canceled” for any intended recipients.
The Telecom Status display reads
3 Click the cross icon to clear the message.
Using Apple Telecom Status
35
Quitting Apple Telecom Status
You can quit Apple Telecom Status at any time. Quitting the
program does not affect the operation of Apple Fax.
To quit Apple Telecom Status
1 Choose Quit from the File menu.
By default Apple Telecom Status is set in the Apple Fax
preferences to open automatically whenever there is fax
activity.
See also: Apple Fax User’s Guide for information about
setting the Apple Fax preferences.
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Using Your Modem
In this chapter
m What modems do
m Using the modem control panel
m Auto-answer and incoming call management
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What modems do
Modems allow computers to communicate over telephone
lines. While computers manipulate information in digital
format, most telephone systems carry information as analog
(wave) signals. Therefore, in order for computers to
communicate over the PSTN (Public Switched Telephone
Network), information must be converted to and from digital
and analog formats. A modem (modulator/demodulator)
handles these format conversions. The modem of the
sending computer converts information from digital format
to an analog signal by a process called modulation. The
modem of the receiving computer converts the analog signal
back to digital format by a process called demodulation.
Modems also dial, establish connections, and control the
flow of data across the telephone line so that transmission
takes place with optimal speed and accuracy.
Setting up a connection
Before two computers can exchange data over telephone
lines, their modems must establish a connection and agree
on how data will be transmitted.
Your modem is already set to make the best possible
connection automatically. See Appendix A for a complete list
of specifications and default settings.
Note: In general, it is best to accept your modem’s
automatic settings. If you want to control the speed, error
control, and data compression settings yourself, see the
Apple Telecom AT Command Set guide or the user’s guide
that came with your data communications software.
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Chapter 5
Determining the speed
Initially, your modem tries to connect at its fastest speed,
which is either 28800 or 14400 bits per second (bps). If the
remote modem cannot connect at this speed, your modem
falls back to the next highest speed. Fallback continues until
the two modems agree on the highest speed supported by
both.
Error control
Error control is used by modems to ensure data accuracy.
Your modem and the remote modem must agree on an
error control method. Your modem will try to use one of
two types of error control, V.42 or MNP class 2–4. If the
remote modem does not support either of these types of
error control, no error control is used.
Data compression
Data compression increases the speed of your modem by
eliminating gaps and redundancies in the data. With data
compression enabled, the speed can increase up to 4 times
the non-compression speed.
Your modem can use two different types of data
compression, V.42 bis or MNP class 5. If the remote modem
does not support either of these types of data compression,
no data compression is used.
Using Your Modem
39
Using the modem control panel
The modem control panel serves as a central point for
controlling and monitoring modem functions. While most
communications programs allow you to set the same
functions as the control panel, control panel settings take
precedence over program settings. You may want to check
the settings in the control panel if a program does not
behave as intended.
Although your modem hardware has only one physical
connection to the phone line, the modem software can open
more than one logical connection—also called association—
for voice, fax, and data. The settings in the modem control
panel are therefore general and apply to all associations.
The Express Modem software can open associations for
voice, fax, and data. The Apple Serial Modem software can
open either associations for voice and fax or open an
association for data. A data association in Apple Serial
Modem software overrides fax and voice associations.
See also: “Incoming call management” in this chapter for
more information about how the modem software manages
incoming calls to the various communications programs
installed on your computer.
Note: Some of the settings described in this section may
not appear on your control panel, depending on your
computer model.
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Chapter 5
Turning the modem on and off
(Express Modem only)
If the Express Modem software is off, it is turned on
automatically when a program needs it for an outgoing
communication. But while it is on the modem uses about
600K of system memory, so you may want to turn it off when
you do not need it. The On/Off buttons in the Express
Modem control panel indicate whether the modem software
is running.
Important Remember that turning the modem off
overrides the auto-answer setting of any communications
program that uses the Express Modem software. You will not
be able to receive incoming calls with the modem off.
To turn the modem off
1 Open the Express Modem control panel.
The control panel appears.
2 Click the Off button.
The following alert appears.
3 Click OK to turn the modem off.
Using Your Modem
41
Choosing the port setting
(Apple Serial Modem only)
If you are using a serial modem, such as a PC Card modem,
then after you connect it to your computer you need to
choose the port setting in the Apple Serial Modem control
panel. This tells the Apple Serial Modem software the
location of the modem.
To choose the port setting
1 Open the Apple Serial Modem control panel.
The control panel appears. The Modem field displays the
name of the modem hardware.
2 Choose the port where the modem is attached to the
computer from the Port pop-up menu.
Using data communications programs
Choose the logical port setting “Data Port” in the connection
settings of your data communications programs. This setting
allows you to open a data connection while your fax and
voice programs are set to auto-answer.
Fax and voice activity is suspended while a data connection
is open. After the data connection is closed, control of the
modem returns to the fax and voice programs.
If you do not use the “Data Port” setting, then attempting to
open a data connection with fax or voice set to auto-answer
produces a “Modem in use” error message.
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Chapter 5
Using the modem settings
The Express Modem settings are contained in two panels:
General Settings and Advanced Options. Use the pop-up
menu to display either panel.
Using Your Modem
43
The Apple Serial Modem settings are contained in the
Settings section of the control panel.
Country Telecom Settings (Express Modem only)
The Country Telecom Settings are information fields that
display the current country and the allowed range for the
number of rings for auto-answer, based on your hardware
installation. You cannot edit these fields.
Apple Serial Modem software also manages the
country-specific ring range value, but does not display it.
Note:
Auto-answer incoming calls
When “Auto-answer incoming calls” is selected—and at least
one program is set to auto-answer—the modem software
automatically answers incoming calls after the number of
rings specified in the ring number field. Calls are answered
according to priorities described in the section “Incoming
call management” in this chapter.
44
Chapter 5
The checkbox and ring number field override the
auto-answer setting of any communications program that
uses the modem software. If you want to receive calls in any
of your communications programs, make sure that this
checkbox is selected and the number of rings specified.
If you want to prevent your modem from answering
incoming calls, deselect the checkbox. If you do this, the
modem will not answer calls even if other communications
programs are set to auto-answer.
If your modem shares the same line with your
telephone, and you want to make sure that the modem does
not answer your incoming calls before you do, you can
either deselect the “Auto-answer incoming calls” checkbox
or set the number of rings to a high value.
Note:
Call Saver mode
You can use Call Saver mode to save money on connection
charges when retrieving voice messages remotely from your
voice mail. If there are new messages and Call Saver mode is
selected, the modem answers at the number of rings set in
the Call Saver ring number field. If the modem does not
answer after the Call Saver ring number setting, you still have
time to hang up.
In order to use Call Saver mode correctly, the value in the
Call Saver ring number field must be at least two rings less
than the value in the auto-answer ring number field. For
example, you can set auto-answer to 5 rings and Call Saver to
2 rings. If your voice mail does not respond by the third ring,
then you know that there are no new messages.
Using Your Modem
45
Ring Sound
Choose the sound that your Macintosh plays when you
receive an incoming call from the Ring Sound pop-up menu.
You can also install and use your own sounds.
See the Macintosh Guide in the Guide menu or the
documentation that came with your computer for
information about installing additional sounds.
Use internal modem (Express Modem only)
The “Use internal modem instead of Modem Port” checkbox
is only available on certain Macintosh PowerBook
computers. It does not appear, for example, if your
computer uses the GeoPort Telecom Adapter, as the setting
is done automatically.
This feature redirects all modem activity from the modem
port to the internal modem.
For example, if you use a non-CTB compatible program with
the Express Modem hardware, you need to select this
checkbox. This enables non-CTB programs that use Serial
Port A (Modem Port) to communicate with the Express
Modem software.
If you plan to use another serial device on your Modem Port,
such as a printer, you need to deselect the checkbox.
Note: Either checkbox setting is acceptable for Apple
Remote Access.
Important Applications that use a non-standard means of
accessing a modem (for example, bypassing the serial driver
and directly controlling the hardware, or implementing an
alternative to the standard serial driver) cannot be used with
the Express Modem software.
46
Chapter 5
Progress sounds (Express Modem only)
MENU SETTING
MEANING
Use application settings
Allows you to control the speaker
volume from the application
setting and Sound control panel.
Turn off
Turns the speaker off for applications
that use the modem.
Same as setting ATM=0 for all
modem applications.
Keep on until carrier
Leaves the speaker on until Carrier
is established.
Same as setting ATM=1 for all
modem applications.
Fax progress sound (Apple Serial Modem only)
You can monitor the progress sounds of a sent fax by
selecting the “Fax progress sound” checkbox (the default).
Deselect the checkbox to turn off all sounds during fax send
or receive.
Using Your Modem
47
Transfer of unidentified incoming calls
(Express Modem only)
Your modem identifies the type of incoming call by
detecting the calling tones sent by modems and fax
machines. Since not all devices use calling tones, some calls
cannot be identified. To enable the modem to answer
unidentified calls—when calling tone detection is
unsuccessful—use the “Transfer incoming calls” buttons to
choose the program to answer unidentified calls.
If you are going to receive voice calls, choose “Voice.” If you
are going to receive data calls, choose “Data.” If you expect
to receive both voice and data calls, ask your callers to send a
data calling tone when calling your machine.
Make sure you set the program designated to handle
unidentified calls (voice, fax, or data) to auto-answer.
Note: Transfer of unidentified calls is performed
automatically in the Apple Serial Modem software, but for fax
and voice calls only.
Ignore dial tone when dialing
When the “Ignore dial tone when dialing” checkbox (known
as blind dialing) is selected, the modem dials even though a
dial tone cannot be detected. This is a useful feature for
locations with a PBX system, such as hotels, where the
modem may have difficulty recognizing the PBX dial tone.
Selecting the checkbox has the same effect as setting the AT
command ATX3 for all programs.
Leaving “Ignore dial tone when dialing” deselected allows
you to control blind dialing at the program level.
See also: The ATX command in the Apple Telecom AT
Command Set guide.
48
Chapter 5
Wake Macintosh on ring (Express Modem only)
The “Wake Macintosh on ring” checkbox is only available on
certain Macintosh PowerBook computers. When a ring signal
is detected on the telephone line, your PowerBook wakes up
and—provided Express Modem and at least one program are
set to auto-answer—answers the call.
When the checkbox is selected, the PowerBook wakes up for
an incoming call even if Express Modem is turned off, or
neither the modem nor any program are set to auto-answer.
When the checkbox is deselected, the PowerBook will not
wake up, so an incoming call is not answered even if Express
Modem and a program are set to auto-answer.
Note: “Wake Macintosh on ring” is also an internal function
of certain Power Macintosh computers, though for these
computers the checkbox is not available in the control panel.
Your computer will wake up whenever there is an incoming
call, provided Express Modem and at least one
communications program are set to auto-answer.
Using Your Modem
49
Using the status display
The status display provides you with ongoing information
about the status of the modem, including current state, type
of connection, and call progress.
The Express Modem status display is available from the
pop-up menu. The display provides additional information
for outgoing data calls, including connection speed, error
control, and data compression.
Graphical
display of call
progress and
modem status.
Connect
protocol and
other messages.
Messages concerning type
of call and modem status.
50
Chapter 5
The Apple Serial Modem status display appears in the Status
section of the control panel.
Status information.
You can view the connection process by stages: idle,
preparing for connection, opening a connection, and
progress of connection. The modem software monitors each
stage, displaying messages and icons.
The Status display also shows all alert messages. You can use
this display for troubleshooting purposes if you have a
problem with a connection.
Using Your Modem
51
Incoming call management
Your modem is designed to answer incoming calls,
determine their type, and manage the open associations for
the communications programs on your computer. This
function is known as incoming call management.
When a call comes in, the modem software tries to identify
the type of call by detecting calling tones. It then checks to
see which programs are set to auto-answer and connects the
incoming call to the appropriate program.
While the modem is on, it answers calls automatically
according to the following set of rules and priorities
m The modem only answers if “Auto-answer incoming calls” is
selected in the control panel.
m The modem only answers if at least one program is set to
auto-answer.
m If several different programs are set to auto-answer, the
modem uses calling tone detection to identify the type of
call, then sends it to the corresponding program.
m Under certain conditions, if no calling tone is detected, the
call is passed to the program designated in the “Transfer
incoming calls” setting (for Express Modem), if there is an
association of that type open.
m If no association of the appropriate type is open, the call is
resolved according to an internal hierarchy.
52
Chapter 5
Setting auto-answer at the program level
You need to set auto-answer in your communications
program in order to receive incoming calls automatically.
The following table tells you how to set auto-answer in the
various programs that work with modem software.
TYPE OF PROGRAM
HOW TO SET AUTO-ANSWER
Terminal emulators
Set the program’s S0 register. See the
program’s user’s guide for
information on setting the S0 register,
or use the AT commands listed in
the Apple Telecom AT Command Set
guide.
Apple Remote Access
and other servers
Use an ARA CCL file. CCL files are
provided with the modem software.
See Appendix B, “Tips and
Troubleshooting.”
Apple Fax
Set Fax Answering to On in the
Apple Fax window.
Using Your Modem
53
Setting manual answer at the program level
Turn auto-answer off in a program if you need to handle
incoming calls manually.
The following table tells you how to set manual answer in
the various programs that work with modem software.
TYPE OF PROGRAM
HOW TO SET MANUAL ANSWER
Terminal emulators
Set the program’s S0 register to 0 to
turn off auto-answer. To answer a call
manually, issue the ATA command.
See the program’s user’s guide for
information on setting the S0 register,
or use the AT commands listed in the
Apple Telecom AT Command Set
guide.
Apple Remote Access
and other servers
Apple Remote Access must be set to
auto-answer.
Apple Fax
Set Fax Answering to Off in the Apple
Fax window. See the Apple Fax User’s
Guide for information about
answering a fax call manually.
54
Chapter 5
A
P
P
E
N
D
I
X
A
Technical Specifications
In this appendix
This appendix contains technical specifications for the
following hardware and software
m GeoPort Telecom Adapter
m GeoPort Internal Modem
m Express Modem
m Apple Serial Modem software
m Express Modem software
55
GeoPort Telecom Adapter, GeoPort Internal
Modem, and Express Modem hardware
HARDWARE SPECIFICATIONS
Power requirements
The GeoPort Telecom Adapter
operates from the computer’s
power, via the cable that connects
the adapter to the computer. The
cable’s connector has an extra pin
that powers the adapter. A separate
power supply or battery is not
needed.
Quadra 660AV and 840AV do not
support connections at 28800 bps.
Operating voltage
and current
5V ±5% @  500 mA.
Operating and storage environment
Operating temperature
10° C to 40° C (50° F to 104° F)
Operating humidity
20% to 90%, noncondensing at a
temperature range of 25° C to 40° C
(77° F to 104° F)
Operating altitude
0 to 2135 m (0 to 7703 ft.)
Storage temperature
-40° C to +65° C
(-40° F to +149° F)
56
Appendix A
Apple Serial Modem software
MODEM
ITU V21
300 bps
Full Duplex
ITU V22
1200 bps
Full Duplex
ITU V22 Bis
2400 bps
Full Duplex
ITU V23
1200/75-75/1200 bps
Full Duplex
ITU V32 Bis
14400 bps
Full Duplex
ITU V34
28800 bps
Full Duplex
U.S. Standards
Bell 103 and 212A
Full Duplex
FAX
ITU V27 ter
4800 bps
Half Duplex
ITU V29
9600 bps
Half Duplex
ITU V17
14400 bps
Half Duplex
Technical Specifications
57
GENERAL
Command set
Hayes compatible, TR29 class 2 Group 3 fax,
voice macro commands
Error correction
MNP4-V42
Data compression
MNP5-V42 bis
Serial speed
300 to 115200 bps
Line speed
75, 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 7200, 9600,
14400, 28800
Data format
Serial, binary, asynchronous, 7 or 8 bits,
even or odd parity
Dialing
Tone or pulse
Voice functions
Automatic detection of fax or voice calls,
answering machine, local record/playback
Parameters
Saved in non-volatile memory
Command buffer
64 characters
58
Appendix A
Express Modem software
COMMAND SET
AT Command Set
Extended Hayes AT command set
DATA COMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS
28800, 26400, 24000, 21600, 19200,
16800, 14400, 12000, 9600, 7200,
2400, 4800 bps
14400, 12000, 9600, 7200, 4800 bps
9600, 4800 bps
2400 bps
1200 bps
1200 bps
1200/75 bps
75/1200 bps
300 bps
300 bps
ITU V.34 (GeoPort only/
not available on Quadra AV
computers)
ITU V.32 bis
ITU V.32
ITU V.22 bis
Bell 212A
ITU V.22
ITU V.23
ITU V.23
ITU V.21
Bell 103
GROUP 3 FAX COMMUNICATION STANDARDS
2400, 4800 bps
7200, 9600 bps
12000, 14400 bps
ITU V.27 ter
ITU V.29
ITU V.17 (not available on
Quadra AV computers)
ERROR CONTROL
ITU V.42
MNP Classes 2–4
Fax Error Correction Mode (ECM)
ITU T.30
DATA COMPRESSION
ITU V.42 bis (up to 4:1 compression)
MNP Class 5 (up to 2:1 compression)
Technical Specifications
59
DIALING CAPABILITY
Tone/pulse dialing
Auto or manual dialing and answering
DATA TRANSMISSION AND FORMAT
Full or half duplex operation
Asynchronous or framed modes
Character formats
5, 6, 7, 8 data bits
1 or 2 stop bits
Odd, even, or no parity
MEMORY REQUIREMENTS
The Express Modem software uses approximately 600 K of system
RAM when the modem application is turned on.
60
Appendix A
A
P
P
E
N
D
I
X
B
Tips and Troubleshooting
In this appendix
m Checking the installation
m Common problems
m Setting up Apple Remote Access
61
Checking the installation
A good place to begin for resolving problems that arise
during setup is to double-check your installation.
1 Unplug and reconnect the telephone cable to ensure a good
connection. Check all other connections.
2 If you are using the Express Modem software, make sure it is
on. Open the Express Modem control panel and check
the setting.
If the On button is not selected, click On. If the On button
does not stay selected, or if the control panel does not
appear, try reinstalling the software.
If you still have trouble, see the resource materials that came
with your Macintosh for a service number to call. Your
service provider can make sure that the modem software is
correctly installed and that your modem is functioning
properly.
Checking the telephone line
Make sure your modem is communicating with the
telephone line.
1 Depending on your computer, open the Monitors and
Sounds control panel or the Sound control panel, and check
that the volume is set above the lowest mark.
By increasing the volume, you can verify both that there is a
dial tone when you try to open communications and that the
modem can dial telephone numbers.
62
Appendix B
2 Open your communications program and enter terminal
mode.
Terminal mode sends the characters you type on the
keyboard to your modem and displays them on the screen.
3 Try dialing your own telephone number.
If you hear a busy signal, you are properly connected.
4 If you do not hear a dial tone, test your telephone line by
connecting a working telephone and cable to the line.
Plug the telephone into the wall jack to verify the dial tone.
If there is none, the telephone line is the source of the
problem. The telephone line may be a digital line, in which
case the modem will not work.
5 If you hear a dial tone on your telephone but not through
your modem, test your modem’s telephone cable by
connecting it to the wall jack and to the telephone.
If there is no dial tone, the telephone cable is the source of
the problem. Return it to your service provider for
replacement.
6 If your modem still has no dial tone, see the service and
support information that came with your computer for a
number to call.
If your modem needs repair, take it to an
Apple-authorized service provider. Do not attempt to repair
or reinstall modem hardware yourself.
WARNING
Tips and Troubleshooting
63
Verifying that your software
is properly installed
You can check that the Apple Telecom software is properly
installed by watching the bottom of your screen when you
restart your computer. You will see the Apple Fax and
modem icons, as illustrated below. The Apple Fax and
Express Modem icons are animated: the paper emerges from
the fax machine on the Apple Fax icon and the buttons on
the phone are pressed on the Express Modem icon.
Apple Fax
Express Modem
Apple Serial Modem
For Express Modem, you can also check the control panel
directly. If the Express Modem software is installed and a
program has opened an association with the modem, the
Modem button in the Express Modem control panel is
set to On.
64
Appendix B
Common problems
Q:
I have trouble connecting to a remote fax.
1 If telephone line quality is poor, you may need to send the
fax several times.
2 You may have trouble sending or receiving a fax at the same
time you are transferring files across an AppleTalk network
using File Sharing. In this case, do not transfer files while
sending or receiving your fax.
3 Try sending faxes with both V.17 and ECM turned on (if your
configuration supports this feature). If you encounter
difficulties, turn off V.17 first. If the problem persists,
turn off ECM. (You turn V.17 and ECM on and off in the
Apple Fax Modem preferences.)
4 If fax transmission fails, you can choose to resend only the
pages not already sent by selecting “Resend only pages not
already sent” in the Modem preferences of Apple Fax
Preferences.
Q:
I have trouble receiving incoming calls.
1 Make sure that your communications program is set to
auto-answer.
For Apple Fax, make sure that Fax Answering is set to On.
Check the appropriate setting for auto-answer in your
communications program or terminal emulator.
2 Open the modem control panel and make sure the
“Auto-answer incoming calls” checkbox is selected.
Tips and Troubleshooting
65
I archived some fax documents from the “Sent Fax
Documents” and “Received Fax Documents” folders. When I
put them back, some of them did not appear in the Apple
Fax lists.
Q:
Sent and received fax documents are different file types. If
you put a received fax into the “Sent Fax Documents” folder,
for example, it does not show up in the list. Be sure to
archive sent and received faxes separately.
When I try to open Apple Fax or my communications
program, I get a message that says there is not enough
memory.
Q:
1 Quit any programs that you are not currently using.
2 Close any windows that you don’t need open.
3 If you are using Express Modem software, try turning off the
modem in the Express Modem control panel. It may be
loaded into memory in such a way that the largest free block
is not big enough, but the total of available blocks is. Turning
off the modem frees up approximately 600K of memory.
When a program like Apple Fax needs the modem, it will
turn it on again automatically. Of course, you should not
turn off the modem while using it for a voice, fax, or data
connection.
66
Appendix B
Setting up Apple Remote Access
Your modem installation includes Apple Remote Access
(ARA) CCL files for all supported modems. To use a CCL file
with Apple Remote Access
1 Make sure Apple Remote Access is properly installed.
2 If the CCL files are not in the Extensions folder, drag or copy
them to the Extensions folder.
3 Double-click the Remote Access Setup control panel.
4 Select the CCL file for your modem from the Modem pop-up
menu (the GeoPort/Express Modem file or the Apple Serial
Modem file).
Tips and Troubleshooting
67
5 Select the icon from the Port pop-up menu that corresponds
to your hardware installation.
m For GeoPort (including GeoPort Internal Modem), choose
Modem Port.
m For Express Modem hardware, choose Internal Modem.
m For Apple Serial Modem hardware, choose Data Port.
6 Close the Remote Access Setup control panel and open the
Apple Remote Access program.
See also: Apple Remote Access User’s Guide for more
information about making a connection using Apple
Remote Access.
68
Appendix B
G
L
O
S
S
A
R
Y
A
Transmission of a continuously
variable signal as opposed to a discretely variable signal.
Physical quantities such as temperature are continuously
variable and so are described as analog. Data characters, on
the other hand, are coded in discrete separate pulses or
signal levels, and are described as digital. The normal way of
transmitting a telephone or voice signal has been analog, but
now digital encoding is coming into use over trunk lines.
Compare with digital signal.
analog transmission
The connection mode in which the
modem answers the telephone.
answer mode
A program that puts the resources
and capabilities of the computer to use for some specific
purpose or task, such as word processing, database
management, graphics, or telecommunications.
application program
asynchronous
Not synchronized by or with a
clocking signal.
Transmission in which
each information character is individually synchronized,
usually by the use of start and stop bits. The gap between
each character isn’t necessarily fixed. Compare with
synchronous transmission.
asynchronous transmission
A modem capability that allows automatic
answer when the phone rings.
auto-answer
The ability to initiate a connection with another
modem automatically.
auto-dial
69
B
Unit of analog signaling speed taken from the name
Baudot. The speed in baud is equal to the number of signal
events per second, regardless of the information content of
those signals. Compare with bps.
baud
The representation of numbers in terms of powers
of 2, using the digits 0 and 1. Commonly used in computers,
since the values 0 and 1 can easily be represented in physical
form in a variety of ways, such as the presence or absence of
current, positive or negative voltage, or a white or black dot
on the display screen.
binary
A binary digit (0 or 1); the smallest possible information
unit, consisting of a simple two-way choice, such as yes or
no, on or off.
bit
Blind dialing allows the modem to dial out
even though no dial tone can be detected (may not be
available in your country).
blind dialing
(bits per second) The basic unit for measurement of
digital data communications transfer rate. Usually refers to
the rate at which the information is transmitted. Sometimes
inaccurately called the baud rate. Compare with baud.
bps
70
Glossary
C
An abbreviation for connection control language. This
language is used to write connect sequence files, sometimes
called CCL files or scripts.
CCL
Any symbol that has a widely understood
meaning. Some characters, such as letters, numbers, and
punctuation marks, can be displayed on the monitor screen
and printed on a printer. Others are used to control various
functions of the computer.
character
A number or symbol used to represent some piece of
information in a compact or easily processed form.
code
A communication from the user to a computer
system (usually typed from the keyboard) directing it to
perform some immediate action.
command
The state the modem is in when
keyboard input is recognized by communications software as
command codes to be executed. Compare with terminal
mode and online state.
command state
The condition of being
connected to and accessible by another computer.
communications session
A list of changeable modem characteristics
that must be properly set to allow a computer to
communicate with a modem.
configuration
A physical device such as a plug, socket, or
jack used to connect one hardware component of a system
to another.
connector
The amount of time spent online with an
information service, usually billed at an hourly rate.
connect time
Glossary
71
D
Any type of information, such as numbers, letters, or
symbols, that can be processed by a computer.
data
A collection of information organized in a form
that can be accessed and processed by a computer system.
database
A broad term covering any
exchange of information between computers or similar
systems over telephone lines or computer networks.
data communications
The various methods used to save
storage space by reducing or eliminating gaps, redundancies,
empty fields, and unnecessary data.
data compression
The common form of number representation
used in everyday life, in which numbers are expressed in
terms of powers of 10, using the ten digits 0 through 9.
decimal
A value, action, or setting that is automatically
used by a computer system when no other explicit
information has been given.
default
To recover the information being
transmitted by a modulated signal. For example, a
conventional radio receiver demodulates an incoming
broadcast signal to convert it into sound emitted by a
speaker.
demodulate
A piece of equipment connected to a computer. A
modem is a device.
device
(1) One of the characters, 0 through 9, used to
express numbers in decimal form. (2) One of the characters
used to express numbers in some other form, such as 0 and
1 in binary or 0 through 9 and A through F in hexadecimal.
digit
72
Glossary
A discrete or discontinuous signal; one
whose various states are discrete intervals apart. Compare
with analog transmission.
digital signal
digital to analog converter
A device that converts data
from digital to analog form.
duplex transmission
Two-way transmission.
E
To send a signal back to the originating device for
display or verification.
echo
error code
A number or other symbol representing a type
of error.
A process that analyzes data blocks and
calculates information about their content. The resulting
error-control information is transmitted with the data so that
the remote computer can verify data integrity.
error control
A software protocol for
error correction used for fax transmission and reception.
ECM is helpful when telephone line quality is poor, but it is
not supported by most older fax machines.
error correction mode (ECM)
A message displayed or printed to notify
the user of an error or problem in the execution of a
program.
error message
Use of an extra bit set to 0 or 1 as necessary
to make an even number of 1 bits in a character. For
example, the 7-bit ASCII code for the letter A (1000001) has
two 1 bits; for even parity, the transmitting device appends
an eighth bit equal to 0 so that the total number of 1 bits
remains even (01000001). The receiving device can count
the bits as a way of checking for transmission errors.
even parity
Glossary
73
F
The process modems use to find a common
connection speed, starting at the highest rate supported or
set by both modems.
fallback
A machine that can scan a page and then
transmit the image of the page over telephone lines; a
receiving machine prints a copy of the original page.
fax machine
A program that passively awaits an
incoming call for faxes. Apple Fax is an example of a fax
server program.
fax server program
A method of signaling between computers
so that pauses in data transmission allow time for data to be
received.
flow control
In typography, a complete set of characters, letters,
and symbols in one size and style.
font
The form in which data is stored, manipulated, or
transferred.
format
(1) A setting causing characters that you enter
on your computer to be echoed from a remote system. (2) A
four-wire communications circuit or protocol that allows
simultaneous two-way transmission.
full duplex
G
A device that connects
between your computer’s modem port and the Public
Switched Telephone Network. Selecting the appropriate
GeoPort Telecom Adapter depends on the telephone
network capabilities and the country where used.
GeoPort Telecom Adapter
A digital document facsimile transmission
procedure on the Public Switched Telephone Network.
Group 3 fax
74
Glossary
H
(1) A setting causing characters that you
enter on your computer to be echoed not from a remote
system but on your screen. (2) A two-wire circuit designed
for communications in either direction but not both
directions simultaneously.
half-duplex
A protocol for devices to exchange
information about the communications connection itself,
such as when to start and stop transmitting.
handshaking
host computer
The Macintosh in which your modem is
installed.
I
(1) Information transferred into a computer from
some external source, such as the keyboard, a disk drive, or
a modem. (2) The act or process of transferring such
information.
input
The devices, rules, or conventions by which one
component of a system communicates with another.
interface
Input/output; the transfer of information into and out
of a computer.
I/O
ITU
International Telecommunications Union.
J
A socket used for a telephone line or other electrical
connections.
jack
Glossary
75
L
A method of communication in which your
modem or software displays data “locally” on your screen,
without relying on the host computer to echo the characters
back.
local echo
To type a command to the host computer that
terminates the communications session.
log off
To enter a series of responses to prompts by the
host computer to identify yourself, your password,
sometimes your terminal, and so forth, to start a
communications session.
log on
M
A large computer whose speed
and storage capacity allow it to handle huge amounts of data
and work with many terminals.
mainframe computer
millisecond
One thousandth of a second; abbreviated ms.
An abbreviation for Microcom Networking Protocol.
MNP Classes 2–4 are error control protocols. MNP Class 5 is
a data compression protocol.
MNP
A device for converting digital information into
tones that can be transmitted over telephone lines. The
tones are modulated (changed in frequency, amplitude, or
phase) to represent the information; modem stands for
“modulator/demodulator.”
modem
To modify or alter a signal to transmit
information; for example, conventional broadcast radio
transmits sound by modulating the amplitude (amplitude
modulation, or AM) or the frequency (frequency
modulation, or FM) of a carrier signal.
modulate
76
Glossary
O
Use of an extra bit set to 0 or 1 as necessary to
make the total number of 1 bits in a character an odd
number. For example, the 7-bit ASCII code for the letter A
(1000001) has two 1 bits; for odd parity, the transmitting
device appends an eighth bit equal to 1 (11000001) so that
the total number of 1 bits remains odd. The receiving device
can count 1 bits as a way of checking for transmission errors.
odd parity
Your equipment takes control of the telephone
line (picks up the receiver).
off-hook
Your equipment releases (hangs up) the
telephone line.
on-hook
The state the modem is in when data is
being exchanged with another computer over the telephone
line. Compare with terminal mode.
online state
P
A method of detecting errors in data transmission.
Due to higher-quality telephone lines and higher-level error
control protocols, many host computers don’t support
parity.
parity
A check bit appended to an array of binary digits
to make the sum of all the binary digits, including the check
bit, always odd or always even.
parity bit
parity error
Absence of the correct parity bit in a received
character.
Private Branch Exchange. An automatic switchboard
for handling large concentrations of telephones (usually
digital extensions).
PBX
Glossary
77
The point of connection (usually physical) between a
computer and a peripheral device, another computer, or a
network.
port
An agreement between computers about the
form and content of the information they exchange.
protocol
The process of reaching
agreement between computers about the form and content
of the data they exchange.
protocol negotiation
PSTN
Public Switched Telephone Network.
An abrupt and relatively short change in voltage,
either positive or negative, resulting in the conveyance of
data in a circuit.
pulse
R
A computer other than your
Macintosh, but connected to it, either directly or through
your modem and telephone lines. A remote computer can
be at any distance from your computer, from right beside it
to thousands of miles away.
remote computer
A modular phone jack and receptacle for telephone
equipment.
RJ-11
78
Glossary
S
Data that is transmitted one bit
at a time over one wire, as compared with parallel
communication, where data is transmitted several bits at a
time over several wires.
serial communication
A socket (or port) on the
back of your computer designed to connect with a device
that receives characters one at a time (serially).
serial interface connection
A modem that uses a serial interface and
serial communications.
serial modem
Having a constant time interval between
successive bits, characters, or events. The term implies that
all the equipment in the system is in step.
synchronous
A transmission process
such that between any two significant instances there is
always an integral number of unit (time) intervals.
synchronous transmission
T
The transmission of information
across long distances, such as over telephone lines.
telecommunications
An input/output device consisting of a
typewriter-like keyboard and a display device, used for
communicating with a large computer. Personal computers
typically have all or part of a terminal built into them.
terminal
Software that transforms your
Macintosh into a remote terminal for any dial-up computer
system.
terminal emulation
Glossary
79
The communications software mode of
operation in which keyboard input is sent to the modem,
which recognizes it as commands or passes it on to the
remote modem. Compare with command state.
terminal mode
The effective data transfer rate measured in
bps. This rate is a combination of the connection rate and
data compression. A compressed version of a file transfers
more quickly than an uncompressed version, even though
the connection rate is the same.
throughput
A method of dialing by sending dual-tone
multi-frequency (DTMF) signals over the phone line.
tone-dialing
V
An ITU protocol defining the frequency and
modulation used between two high-speed fax machines
(12000, 14400 bps) (not available on Quadra AV
machines/may not be available in your country).
V.17
An ITU protocol defining the frequency and
modulation used between two high-speed modems (9600,
4800 bps).
V.32
An ITU protocol defining the frequency and
modulation used between two high-speed modems (7200,
12000, 14400 bps).
V.32 bis
An ITU protocol defining the frequency and
modulation used between two high-speed modems (up to
28800 bps).
V.34
V.42
An ITU error control protocol.
V.42 bis
80
An ITU data compression protocol.
Glossary
X
A protocol to send files from one computer to
another, that informs you if an error occurs. Also known as
MODEM7.
XModem
A handshake protocol (transmit-On/transmitOff) used by computers and intelligent terminals to control
the flow of data between the systems.
XON/XOFF
Glossary
81
I
N
A
Adobe Acrobat Reader 14-16
Apple Address Book
creating a new address
book 19-20
creating a new entry
92-93
described xi
installation 10
sending a fax 90
setting up 18-20
Apple Fax
described xii
Fax Sender GX 25,28-29
faxing 25-26,88-89
installation 10
receiving faxes 30
setting up 21-30
troubleshooting 65-66
Apple menu 10,21,32
Apple Remote Access
10,46,53,54,67-68
Apple Serial Modem control
panel
choosing the modem
port 23,42
and data communications
42
fax progress sound 47
ring range value 44
specifications 57-58
status display 51
unidentified calls 48
D
E
X
Apple Telecom
installation 10-13
Apple Telecom Status
canceling a fax 35
described x
installation 10
quitting 36
status display 34
AppleLink 10
AppleTalk 65
ATX command 48
Auto-answer 30,41,44-45,
49,52-54,65
B, C, D
Blind dialing 48
CCL files 10,67-68
Control panel
using 40-51
Data compression 39,59
Data Port 42,68
Dialing
testing 63
83
E
F, G, H
Electronic user’s guides
2,14-16
Error control 39,59
Express Fax files 11
Express Modem
hardware specifications
56
software specifications
59-60
Express Modem control
panel 43,64
number of associations
40
progress sounds 47
ring range value 44
status display 50
turning on and off
41,62,66
using internal modem 46
External modem port
and internal modem 8
Faxing
from Apple Address
Book 90
from Apple Fax 89
canceling a fax 35
common problems 65-66
a document 25-26,88
monitoring fax
transmission 34,91
page setup 26
GeoPort Telecom Adapter
connecting 5-7
Hardware installation 3-8
Hardware specifications
56
84
I
Incoming call management
40,44,52
Installation
checking 62-64
hardware 3-8
software 10-13
Installer 10-11
Internal modem
and Apple Remote
Access 68
connecting 8
and external modem
port 8
Index
M
MNP 39
Modem
auto-answer 30,41,4445,49,52-54,65
connecting 3
control panel 40-51
defined 38
internal 8,46,68
GeoPort Telecom Adapter
5-7,46
serial 3,67
specifications 56
speed 39
status display 50-51
R, S, T, W
Remote Access Setup control
panel 67-68
Ring sound 46
Serial modem
choosing the modem
port 3,23,42
and data communications
42
specifications 57-58
Sound
controlling the
volume 62
Status display 34,50-51
Technical specifications
56-60
Telephone line 4,6-8,62-63
Terminal emulator 53-54
Troubleshooting 62-66
Wake Macintosh on
ring 49
Index
85
Quick Reference Guide
In this chapter
This chapter provides quick start information for performing
important tasks with Apple Telecom, including
m Sending a fax
m Monitoring and canceling a fax
m Creating an address book entry
See also: Apple Address Book User’s Guide and Apple Fax
User’s Guide for complete information about using these
programs.
87
Sending a document as a fax
1 Open the document you wish to fax.
2 Type Control-Shift (ç) and
3 Prepare the Fax Sender dialog
2 Add a note to the cover page.
1 Choose a cover page.
3 Type a fax number here, or...
...drag and drop recipients from the address book.
Click here to choose another address book.
4 Click
88
Quick Reference Guide
Sending a fax from Apple Fax
1 Open the Quick Fax window
2 Prepare the Quick Fax window
1 Choose a cover page.
2 Fill in the Cover Page Subject field...
...and text.
4 Click here for a
file dialog to
enclose files for
faxing.
3 Click here to
add recipients...
...or type a fax number.
Choose your files and
click here to add them
to the list, then...
...click here to add the
list to the Enclosures
field. Make sure the files’
programs are installed
on your computer.
3 Click
Quick Reference Guide
89
Sending a fax from Apple Address Book
1 Select an entry
2 then click
3 Prepare the Standard Mailer window
1 Click here to
add recipients.
4 Add a note to
the cover page.
3 Choose a
2 Fax name.
5 Click here to
enclose files for
faxing.
cover page.
Suggest button
sets dial string
to automatic
dial settings.
4
Choose an entry...
90
...to modify its dial
string, if necessary.
Quick Reference Guide
Monitoring and canceling a fax
Description of fax
progress.
Click here to cancel
fax transmission.
Graphic changes during fax send.
Click here to clear
the message.
Quick Reference Guide
91
Creating a new entry in Apple Address Book
1 Choose the type of entry you want to create
2 Type the information for the entry in the available fields
Angle brackets
identify information
to enter in each field.
Use the TAB key
or the mouse to
move from field to field.
Entry information is saved automatically as you move
from field to field, or when you close the window or quit the
program.
3 Always use Country pop-up menus for addresses and
numbers.
92
Quick Reference Guide
4 Select a field that contains information and
Choose here to mark a number
as first choice for dialing.
Preferred info marker appears
as a dot next to field ( ).
Choose here to mark one field
only for Entry List display.
Vital info marker appears as
an exclamation point next to
field ( ).
Change any
field label, or...
...enter your
own labels.
5 Add notes or associate files with the entry
Enter notes of up to
32,000 characters.
Click here for a file
dialog to associate
files with the entry.
Quick Reference Guide
93

Getting Started With
Apple Telecom
Communications kit for your
Macintosh computer
K Apple Computer, Inc.
© 1996 Apple Computer, Inc. and its licensors. All rights reserved.
© 1996 AirGo Communications, Inc. and Dayna Communications, Inc. All rights
reserved.
Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or part, without
the written consent of Apple. Your rights to the software are governed by the
accompanying software license agreement.
The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and
other countries. Use of the “keyboard” Apple logo (Option-Shift-K) for commercial
purposes without the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark
infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws.
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate.
Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors.
Apple, the Apple logo, AppleScript, GeoPort, Macintosh, the Mac OS logo, Performa,
PowerTalk, PlainTalk, and Power Macintosh are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.,
registered in the U.S.A. and other countries.
Finder, the GeoPort logo, Mac, and System 7 are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc.
Adobe, Acrobat, the Acrobat logo, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and PostScript
are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated or its subsidiaries and may be
registered in certain jurisdictions.
EasyReader, the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software application included
with Apple Fax, uses a neural network recognition system developed by Mimetics.
Additional language dictionaries can be obtained by contacting Mimetics at the
following address:
Mimetics
5, Central Park
Avenue Sully Prud’homme
92298 Châtenay-Malabry
France
FastPrint is a trademark of Mimetics.
Hayes is a trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc.
QuarkXPress is a registered trademark of Quark, Inc.
Touch-Tone is a trademark of Western Electric.
Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes
neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with
regard to the performance or use of these products.
C
O
N
T
E
N
T
S
Communications regulation information vii
Preface How to Use This Book xv
What this guide contains xvi
What you need xvii
Introducing the Apple Telecom software xviii
Apple Telecom Status features xviii
Apple Address Book features xix
Apple Fax features xx
Chapter 1 Installing Your Hardware 1
Your modem package 2
Where to begin 3
Other items you may need 4
Connecting your GeoPort Telecom Adapter 5
Connecting your internal modem 8
Chapter 2 Installing Your Software 9
Installing the Apple Telecom software 10
What the Installer does 10
If you are upgrading 11
Installing the software 12
Accessing the user’s guides 14
iii
Chapter 3 Setting Up the Apple Telecom
Software 17
Setting up Apple Address Book 18
Starting and configuring for the first time 18
Setting up Apple Fax 21
Starting and configuring for the first time 21
Faxing a document 25
Using Fax Sender Page Setup 26
Selecting Fax Sender from the Chooser 27
Using Fax Sender GX 28
Preparing to receive faxes 30
Chapter 4 Using Apple Telecom Status 31
Introducing Apple Telecom Status 32
Opening Apple Telecom Status 32
Understanding the display 34
Canceling a fax 35
Quitting Apple Telecom Status 36
iv
Contents
Chapter 5 Using Your Modem 37
What modems do 38
Setting up a connection 38
Determining the speed 39
Using the modem control panel 40
Turning the modem on and off
(Express Modem only) 41
Choosing the port setting
(Apple Serial Modem only) 42
Using the modem settings 43
Using the status display 50
Incoming call management 52
Setting auto-answer at the program level 53
Setting manual answer at the program level 54
Contents
v
Appendix A Technical Specifications 55
GeoPort Telecom Adapter, GeoPort Internal Modem,
and Express Modem hardware 56
Apple Serial Modem software 57
Express Modem software 59
Appendix B Tips and Troubleshooting 61
Checking the installation 62
Checking the telephone line 62
Verifying that your software is properly installed 64
Common problems 65
Setting up Apple Remote Access 67
Glossary 69
Index 83
Quick Reference Guide 87
vi
Contents
Communications regulation information
The following information is provided in compliance with US FCC
(Federal Communications Commission) and Canadian DOC
(Department of Communications) regulations.
FCC statement
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the
specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. See instructions if
interference to radio or television reception is suspected.
Radio and television interference
The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can
radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used
properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it
may cause interference with radio and television reception.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the
limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the
specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are
designed to provide reasonable protection against such
interference in a residential installation. However, there is no
guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation.
You can determine whether your computer system is causing
interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was
probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices.
vii
If your computer system does cause interference to radio or
television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or
more of the following measures:
m Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops.
m Move the computer to one side or the other of the television
or radio.
m Move the computer farther away from the television or radio.
m Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from
the television or radio. (That is, make certain the computer and the
television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit
breakers or fuses.)
If necessary, consult an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple.
See the service and support information that came with your Apple
product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television technician for
additional suggestions.
Important Changes or modifications to this product not
authorized by Apple Computer, Inc., could void the FCC
Certification and negate your authority to operate the product.
This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that
included the use of Apple peripheral devices and Apple shielded
cables and connectors between system components. It is important
that you use Apple peripheral devices and shielded cables and
connectors between system components to reduce the possibility
of causing interference to radios, television sets, and other
electronic devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral devices and the
proper shielded cables and connectors through an Appleauthorized dealer. For non-Apple peripheral devices, contact the
manufacturer or dealer for assistance.
viii
Communications Regulation Information
DOC statement
DOC Class B Compliance This digital apparatus does not
exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions from digital
apparatus as set out in the interference-causing equipment
standard entitled “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003 of the Department
of Communications.
Observation des normes—Classe B Cet appareil
numérique respecte les limites de bruits radioélectriques
applicables aux appareils numériques de Classe B prescrites dans la
norme sur le matériel brouilleur : “Appareils Numériques”,
NMB-003 édictée par le ministre des Communications.
VCCI statement
Notify your telephone company
Some telephone companies require that you notify the local
business office when you hook up a modem to their lines.
Communications Regulation Information
ix
Information you need in the United States
The GeoPort Telecom Adapter and the GeoPort Internal Modem
complie with Part 68 of the FCC rules. On the back of this
equipment is a label that contains, among other information, the
FCC registration number and ringer equivalence number (REN). If
requested, provide this information to your telephone company.
m Ringer equivalence number (REN): 0.8B
The REN is useful to determine the quantity of devices you may
connect to your telephone lines and still have all those devices ring
when your telephone number is called. In most, but not all areas,
the sum of the RENs of all devices connected to one line should not
exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices you may
connect to your line, as determined by the REN, you should contact
your local telephone company to determine the maximum REN for
your calling area.
m Telephone jack type: USOC, RJ-11
An FCC-compliant telephone cord and modular plug are provided
with this equipment. This equipment is designed to be connected
to the telephone network or premises wiring using a compatible
modular jack that complies with Part 68 rules. See the installation
instructions for details.
Telephone line problems
If your telephone doesn’t work, there may be a problem with your
telephone line. Disconnect the modem to see if the problem goes
away. If it doesn’t, report the problem either to your local
telephone company or to your company’s telecommunications
people.
x
Communications Regulation Information
If disconnecting the modem eliminates the problem, the modem
itself may need service. See the service and support information
that came with your Apple product for instructions on how to
contact Apple or an Apple-authorized service provider for
assistance.
If you do not disconnect your modem when it is adversely affecting
the telephone line, the telephone company has the right to
disconnect your service temporarily until you correct the problem.
The telephone company will notify you as soon as possible. Also,
you will be informed of your right to file a complaint with the FCC.
The telephone company may make changes in its facilities,
equipment, operations, or procedures that could affect the
operation of your equipment. If this happens, the telephone
company will provide advance notice in order for you to make the
necessary modifications to maintain uninterrupted service.
The GeoPort Telecom Adapter and the GeoPort Internal Modem
will not work with party lines, cannot be connected to a coinoperated telephone, and may not work with a private branch
exchange (PBX).
Telephone Consumer Protection Act
The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it unlawful
for any person to use a computer or other electronic device to send
any message via a telephone fax machine unless such message
clearly contains in a margin at the top or botton of each transmitted
page or on the first page of the transmission, the date and time it
was sent and an identification of the business or other identity, or
other individual sending the message and the telephone number of
the sending machine of such business, entity, or individual.
Communications Regulation Information
xi
Information you need in Canada
The Canadian Department of Communications (DOC) label
identifies certified equipment. This certification means that the
equipment meets certain telecommunications network protective,
operational, and safety requirements. The Department does not
guarantee the equipment will operate to a user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, make sure that you are permitted
to connect to the facilities of the local telecommunications
company. Be sure you use an acceptable method of connection to
install the equipment. In some cases, you may extend the
company’s internal wiring for single-line individual service by
means of a certified telephone extension cord. Be aware, however,
that compliance with these conditions may not prevent degradation
of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized
Canadian maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any
equipment malfunctions or repairs or alterations that you make to
this equipment may cause the telecommunications company to
request that you disconnect the equipment.
In Canada, contact Apple at:
7495 Birchmount Road
Markham, Ontario
L3R 5G2
800-263-3394
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical
ground connections of the power utility, telephone lines, and
internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected
together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural
areas.
xii
Communications Regulation Information
WARNING Users should not attempt to make such connections
themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric inspection
authority or electrician.
m Load number: 15
The load number (LN) assigned to each terminal device denotes
the percentage of the total load to be connected to the telephone
loop that is used by the device, to prevent overloading. The
termination of a loop may consist of any combination of devices,
subject only to the requirement that the sum of the load numbers
of all devices does not exceed 100.
m Telephone jack type: CA-11
Communications Regulation Information
xiii
P
R
E
F
A
C
E
How to Use This Book
This guide provides complete information about connecting
your modem hardware and installing and starting to use
your Apple Telecom software.
It is assumed that you are familiar with basic Macintosh
desktop operations. If not, refer to the Macintosh Guide in
the Guide h menu (the Guide menu is the one with the
question mark icon), or the documentation that came with
your computer.
xv
What this guide contains
This guide contains five chapters, two appendixes, and a
Quick Reference Guide.
m
Chapter 1
explains how to connect your modem
hardware.
m
Chapter 2
m
Chapter 3
m
Chapter 4
explains how to install the Apple Telecom
software and access the electronic user’s guides. (With
Performa computers, Apple Telecom software comes
already installed.)
explains how to set up and start to use the two
main programs of the Apple Telecom software: Apple
Address Book and Apple Fax.
explains how to use the Apple Telecom Status
program.
m
Chapter 5
m
Appendix A
introduces basic information about data
communications and explains how to use the modem
control panel.
contains hardware and software technical
specifications.
m
Appendix B
m
Quick Reference Guide
provides advice on checking your installation
and troubleshooting, and on setting up Apple Remote
Access for use with your modem software.
at the back of this guide
contains step-by-step instructions for the most important
tasks you need to know in order to get started using Apple
Address Book and Apple Fax.
xvi
Preface
What you need
To use Apple Telecom you need
m System 7.1 or later
m one of the following modems (Performa computers already
come with one of these modems.)
GeoPort/Express Modem family
M GeoPort Telecom Adapter
M GeoPort Internal Modem
M Apple Express Modem
Apple Serial Modem family
M supported PC Card modem
To use the drag and drop capabilities of Apple Telecom you
also need
m System 7.5 or later, or the Macintosh Drag & Drop extension
for System 7.1.2
Preface
xvii
Introducing the Apple Telecom software
The Apple Telecom software consists of
m A control panel and communications tools specific to your
modem hardware
m Apple Telecom Status, for providing quick access to Apple
Fax and for monitoring fax activity on the modem
m Apple Address Book, for creating and recording entries in
your own address books and for sending faxes to one or
more entries directly from an address book
m Apple Fax, for sending, monitoring, and managing faxes
The exact components and programs of the Apple
Telecom software installed on your computer depend on
your computer and modem configuration.
Note:
Apple Telecom Status features
Apple Telecom Status software allows you to monitor the
current fax activity on your modem and to open Apple Fax.
An alias of Apple Telecom Status is placed in the Apple menu
for easy access.
Features of the Apple Telecom Status program include
m Compact display panel
m Graphical and textual description of modem activity
m Open Apple Fax
m Cancel the current fax activity
xviii
Preface
Apple Address Book features
Apple Address Book software allows you to create your own
detailed individual, company, and distribution list entries,
and to import entries from other programs. Apple Address
Book also works together with Apple Fax to initiate a
communication directly from an address book entry.
Features of the Apple Address Book program include
m Entry panel for preparing detailed entries
m Numerous display options for presenting information
according to your needs
m Powerful search facility
m Easy-to-use import and export facility
m Send a fax to an entry directly from an address book
m Location settings for automatically displaying the correct dial
string to and from any location
m Calling card support
m Access and use address books directly from Apple Fax
without opening the Apple Address Book program
Preface
xix
Apple Fax features
Apple Fax software supports Group 3 fax send and receive
capability. It allows you to convert any Macintosh document
to fax format and send it to a dedicated fax machine or to
another computer capable of receiving faxes.
Features of the Apple Fax program include
m V.17, V.29, and V.27 ter ITU (depending on your modem)
high-speed, reliable fax send and receive at 14400, 12000,
9600, 7200, 4800, and 2400
m Easy send and forward of fax documents to one or several
recipients
m Single-sheet Quick Fax send, with or without enclosures
m Automatic fax resend if transmission fails on first attempt
m Viewing, printing, and editing of faxes
m Personalized fax cover page design
m OCR (Optical Character Recognition) feature for converting
all or part of a fax to text
xx
Preface
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