2013 Annual Report of the WFP Executive Board to ECOSOC and the FAO Council

2013 Annual Report of the WFP Executive Board to ECOSOC and the FAO Council
July 2014
C 2015/LIM/10 - CL 150/12
E
CONFERENCE
Thirty-ninth Session
Rome, 16-20 June 2015
2013 Annual Report of the WFP Executive Board to ECOSOC and the
FAO Council
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2013 Annual Report of the WFP
Executive Board to ECOSOC and the
FAO Council
Table of contents
Page
Decision taken by the WFP Executive Board with respect to the
Annual Performance Report for 2013 (Decision 2014/EB.A/2)
i
WFP Annual Performance Report for 2013
1
i
Decision 2014/EB.A/2 of the Executive Board of the World Food Programme adopted by
the Board at its annual session of 2014 (3-6 June 2014)
Annual report for 2013 to the Economic and Social Council and the Council of the
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
The Board approved the Annual Performance Report for 2013 (WFP/EB.A/2014/4*), noting
that it provided a comprehensive record of WFP’s performance for the year. In accordance with
decision 2004/EB.A/11, the Board requests that the Annual Report be forwarded to ECOSOC
and the FAO Council along with the Board’s decisions and recommendations.
3 June 2014
ii
Executive Board
Annual Session
Rome, 3–6 June 2014
ANNUAL
REPORTS
Agenda item 4
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE
REPORT FOR 2013
For approval

E
Distribution: GENERAL
WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
21 May 2014
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH
*Reissued for technical reasons
This document is printed in a limited number of copies. Executive Board documents are
available on WFP’s Website (http://www.wfp.org/eb).
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
NOTE TO THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
This document is submitted to the Executive Board for approval.
The Secretariat invites members of the Board who may have questions of a technical nature with
regard to this document to contact the WFP staff focal points indicated below, preferably well in
advance of the Board’s meeting.
Deputy Executive Director, OM and
Chief Operating Officer:
Mr A. Abdulla
tel.: 066513–2401
Assistant Executive Director, OS:
Mr R. Lopes da Silva
tel.: 066513–2200
Assistant Executive Director, RM and Mr M. Juneja
Chief Financial Officer:
tel: 066513-2885
Assistant Executive Director, PG:
Ms E. Rasmusson
tel.: 066513–2005
Director, RMP:
Mr C. Kaye
tel.: 066513–2197
Chief, RMPP:
Mr N. Brömme
tel.: 066513-3121
Programme Adviser, RMPP:
Mr C. Martino
tel.: 066513–3576
OM: Operations Management Department
OS: Operations Services Department
PG: Partnership and Governance Services Department
RM: Resource Management and Accountability Department
RMP: Performance Management and Monitoring Division
RMPP: Performance Management and Reporting Branch
Should you have any questions regarding matters of dispatch of documentation for the
Executive Board, please contact the Conference Servicing Unit (tel.: 066513–2645).
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DRAFT DECISION
The Board approves the Annual Performance Report for 2013 (WFP/EB.A/2014/4*),
noting that it provides a comprehensive record of WFP’s performance for the year.
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Table of Contents
Page
7
Draft Decision
Foreword by the Executive Director
11
Executive Summary
13
PART I: Introduction
21
Strategic Context
22
WFP’s Response
25
40
PART II: Performance Results by Strategic Objective
Overview
40
Results by Strategic Objective
46
PART III: Organizational Performance by Management Result Dimension
62
Overview
62
Results by Management Result Dimension
63
PART IV: Looking Forward
80
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Page
ANNEXES
I.
WFP’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT
GOALS
88
II.
A – WFP STRATEGIC RESULTS FRAMEWORK
(STRATEGIC PLAN 2008–2013)
90
B – OUTCOME PERFORMANCE REPORTING
101
C – METHODOLOGY – ASSESSMENT OF STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES
104
D – OUTPUT PERFORMANCE REPORTING
105
A – KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2013
107
B – METHODOLOGY – ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT
RESULT DIMENSIONS
110
IV.
ACTIVITIES OF THE ETHICS OFFICE – ANNUAL REPORT 2013
111
V.
WFP EMPLOYEES WITH CONTRACTS OF ONE YEAR OR LONGER
118
VI.
GLOBAL FOOD AID PROFILE
119
VII.
WFP FOOD PROCUREMENT IN 2013
120
VIII.
TOTAL CONFIRMED CONTRIBUTIONS IN 2013
124
IX.
A – DIRECT EXPENSES BY REGION AND CATEGORY, 2010–2013
128
B – DIRECT EXPENSES BY COUNTRY, REGION AND
PROGRAMME CATEGORY, 2010–2013
130
C – DIRECT EXPENSES BY COUNTRY, SPECIAL STATUS CATEGORY
AND REGION, 2010–2013
133
A – UNITED NATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION
PARTNERSHIPS
134
B – 2013 COLLABORATION WITH CIVIL SOCIETY PARTNERS
135
XI.
WFP INDICATORS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE
QUADRENNIAL COMPREHENSIVE POLICY REVIEW
136
XII.
OVERVIEW OF ORGANIZATIONAL STRENGTHENING
137
III.
X.
ACRONYMS USED IN THE DOCUMENT
147
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HOW TO USE THIS REPORT
This year’s Annual Performance Report follows the format established in 2011. It provides an analysis of
WFP’s achievements in terms of the Strategic Plan (2008–2013). The report is in four parts:
Part I: Introduction – the strategic context in which WFP’s activities were undertaken.
Part II: Performance Results by Strategic Objective – the achievements of WFP’s operations at the output
and outcome levels against each Strategic Objective.
Part III: Organizational Performance by Management Result Dimension – the work done to support
WFP’s Strategic Objectives.
Part IV: Looking Forward – future challenges and opportunities.
Annexes – detailed statistics and performance information.
WFP may be conceived as a building, with foundations, pillars and roof. The foundations are the
Management Result Dimensions, which relate to the way in which WFP provides services, answering the
question: “Is WFP doing things right?” When it achieves excellence under each dimension, WFP delivers
better services to its beneficiaries. The Management Result Dimensions support the Strategic Results
Framework, which is concerned with WFP’s effectiveness in serving its beneficiaries under the five Strategic
Objectives, answering the question: “Is WFP doing the right things?” The framework embodies results that
affect beneficiaries directly and constitutes the pillars of the building. The roof is WFP’s mission.
What?
(SRF)
WFP mission
SO 1
SO 2
SO 3
SO 5
SO 4
How?
(MRDs)
Securing Resources
Stewardship
Learning and Innovation
Internal Business Processes
Operational Efficiency
The following colour coding indicates progress against the Strategic Objectives and Management
Result Dimensions.
Annexes II-C and III-B sets out approach used to report overall achievements.
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FOREWORD BY THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Extraordinary demands, rapid responses and progressive transformation made 2013 a remarkable
year for WFP. This Annual Performance Report details the actions taken to respond to immediate
needs and to address the challenge of eliminating hunger in our lifetimes. It has several new
features: we have enhanced outcome-level analysis at the regional and global levels and we set
out WFP commitments to the Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review, which involve the
harmonization of annual reporting requirements with those of the Economic and Social Council
of the United Nations and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
Despite a small reduction in the number of hungry people in 2013, hunger continued to take its
relentless toll on hundreds of millions of people. One person in eight did not have enough
nutritious food to eat, of whom 98 percent lived in developing countries; 60 percent of them were
women. And a quarter of the world’s children under 5 failed to reach their growth potential—
with long-lasting consequences.
In 2013, WFP responded to four major emergencies. The urgency, scale and complexity of the
crises in the Central African Republic, the Philippines, South Sudan and the Syrian Arab Republic
required Level 3 responses. And the deteriorating situations in the Democratic Republic of the
Congo, Mali, Somalia and Yemen required Level 2 responses from WFP’s regional teams.
The crisis in the Syrian Arab Republic is unparalleled in complexity and scale, with negative
effects on the people in the country and the region increasing daily. Nevertheless, WFP’s staff,
partners and contributors showed outstanding determination in providing food assistance, and
by the end of the year WFP’s operations distributed sufficient food to meet the needs of
4.5 million people. Restrictions to humanitarian access require WFP to use last-resort logistics
approaches to reach those in need whenever necessary and wherever they are.
The crisis also takes its toll on vulnerable families in the region. In partnership with the
governments of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, WFP assisted 1.5 million
Syrian refugees. Cash and voucher transfers formed a significant proportion of the regional
response, enabling food markets and people to contribute to the response.
Meeting these needs and the needs of other countries tested the limits of WFP’s response systems.
But we met the challenge head-on, thanks to the contributions of governments, partners and
individuals. WFP worked with 1,300 non-governmental organization partners to distribute
USD 4.3 billion worth of assistance through 198 projects in 75 countries. We reached
81 million people.
Programmes to save lives and protect livelihoods in emergencies under Strategic Objective 1
accounted for 73 percent of programming expenditure, and 54 percent of the people we serve. Of
WFP’s assistance, 10 percent of WFP beneficiaries received cash or vouchers, continuing the
upward trend in market-based approaches in WFP’s operations. Children continued to be our
primary focus: they accounted for two-thirds of our beneficiaries. For the children most in need
we implemented nutrition-specific actions to prevent and reduce acute and chronic malnutrition.
This accounted for 13 percent of our activities.
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Various factors combined to reduce the number of people reached by WFP in 2013. The financial
demands of the Level 3 emergencies had an effect on smaller operations, and funding shortfalls
in “forgotten emergencies” resulted in a reduction in the number of people that WFP could serve
directly. Improved food security enabled WFP to scale down some emergency operations, for
example in Pakistan where the effects of the severe 2012 monsoon had receded. WFP continued
to hand operations over to national authorities: the school feeding programme in Kenya is an
example. And WFP’s targeting and re-verification procedures were refined.
The organizational strengthening exercise Fit for Purpose continued throughout 2013.
Five workstreams reached interim objectives in organizational design, executive management and
strategic planning, and significant progress was made in the remaining nine workstreams, notably
in business processes and human resource management. The Scoping Business Process Review
identified 38 improvement initiatives that will maximize performance, efficiency, accountability
and alignment with the Strategic Objectives.
The Board’s approval of the Strategic Plan (2014–2017) is an evolutionary step: the plan enables
WFP to address food insecurity and malnutrition, and to achieve Zero Hunger – our ultimate
mission. The Strategic Plan increases our focus on the poorest and most vulnerable women, men,
boys and girls, and sets out the ways in which WFP will reduce risk and vulnerability to break the
cycle of hunger. The plan is based on the principle that our people are at the centre of WFP: to
achieve our ambitions we need a motivated, capable, committed and diverse workforce, which
will be achieved through initiatives such as the Local Staff Transfer Project.
WFP will continue its evolution in 2014, ensuring that we fulfil our responsibilities to vulnerable
people affected by crises and to those suffering from chronic hunger and malnutrition. We will
continue to serve our beneficiaries, the governments that invest in us and the partners with whom
we work. We will improve the efficiency and effectiveness of WFP to minimize our costs and
maximize our outcomes. We will broaden our donor base through a new corporate partnership
programme and increase the number of individual donors so that we can minimize shortfalls in
our operations. And we will develop innovations such as the Food Security Climate Resilience
Facility to address the causes and consequences of hunger.
The challenge of hunger is enormous. But let that not deter us. Hunger may be intergenerational,
but we can achieve much in a single generation. With hunger at the centre of sophisticated
programmes and strong partnerships, we can solve this problem. The possibilities are unlimited.
In the words of Nelson Mandela: “It always seems impossible until it is done.”
Ertharin Cousin
Executive Director
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Undernourishment and undernutrition continued to decline in 2013 but the prevalence of hunger
remained unacceptably high, especially among vulnerable women and children. In view of
current population growth and climate change, food insecurity is likely to increase.
In 2013, WFP launched responses to four Level 3 crises – in the Central African Republic,
the Philippines, South Sudan and the Syrian Arab Republic – that stretched its capacities and
resources and those of the humanitarian community. WFP’s leadership in food security, logistics
and emergency telecommunications helped the United Nations and its partners to address the
needs of the hungry; its food-assistance tools supported social safety nets, and its specialized
nutritional products were used to address the causes and effects of hunger and support
sustainability. These successes were made possible by the generosity of the donors, who in spite
of global austerity provided the second highest level of funding in WFP’s history.
In total, 80.9 million people – most of whom were women and children – received direct food
assistance transfers from WFP in 75 countries in 2013. This figure exceeds the targeted number of
planned beneficiaries. While the number of people receiving direct food assistance transfers is
only a fraction of the world’s undernourished people who receive support, it is important to
recognize that WFP food assistance programmes have positive impacts on many more people.
WFP’s growing suite of assistance modalities is supporting the attainment of food security for
many more than those who receive food, cash or vouchers. For example, studies suggest that the
number of people who benefit from asset-creation activities may be between 20 to 40 percent
higher than the number who receive food assistance under the activity. WFP activities that include
behavioural change communication can provide benefits at the local level that go beyond the
benefits of direct food assistance transfers.
WFP is moving toward a more robust and comprehensive method of identifying and counting
those who benefit from WFP’s food assistance. Beyond beneficiaries of direct food assistance
transfers, WFP recognizes two additional tiers of beneficiaries that benefit from programmes
although they do not receive food or cash transfers directly. The second tier includes users of
assets that WFP programmes have established or rehabilitated, smallholders that participate in
Purchase for Progress, and people receiving behaviour-change messages that form part of WFP
nutrition interventions. A third tier of beneficiaries includes those who benefit indirectly from the
impact of WFP programmes, capacity development and technical assistance. Cash and voucher
transfers also supported local economies, which helped to protect lives and livelihoods. In Jordan,
the value of vouchers distributed in 2013 was estimated at 0.3 percent of gross domestic product,
generating an estimated USD 100 million for the national economy. If WFP had opted for in-kind
food transfers, the country would have lost out on many additional benefits.
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Most undernourished people now reside in middle-income countries, and WFP accordingly
provides technical assistance for governments developing food-security and nutrition policies
and safety-net programmes. This support cannot readily be measured in terms of beneficiary
numbers, however: assistance in designing a school feeding programme, for example, can bring
about benefits for millions of vulnerable children. Innovative technologies to improve the
efficiency of public distribution systems, projects supporting local production of supplementary
foods and knowledge transfers to enhance food-security analysis and targeting are examples of
WFP’s work.
During the 5 year pilot period, WFP helped to stimulate local economies by procuring 400,000 mt
of food through Purchase for Progress from 390 farmers’ organizations representing 1 million
farmers. By tackling the roots of hunger and protecting fragile environments through resilience
and capacity development, WFP helped to empower vulnerable people to achieve food security
in the future.
The Secretary-General’s Zero Hunger Challenge is a bold vision for the eradication of hunger. It
is the foundation of the Strategic Plan (2014–2017), reflecting WFP’s commitment to its five pillars:
eliminating stunting among children under 2, guaranteeing universal access to adequate and
nutritious food, ensuring that food systems are sustainable, increasing the productivity and
incomes of smallholder farmers by 100 percent, and eliminating waste. WFP will help to
coordinate United Nations and country-level actions addressing the challenge, co-leading the
working groups on pillars 1 and 2, and ensuring linkages with the targets of the World Health
Assembly for improving maternal, infant and child nutrition.
Through its partnerships, WFP will address the goal of achieving universal food security through
sustainable agriculture and food systems and will support the post-2015 development agenda for
international investments for the coming years in line with the five targets adopted by the
Rome-based agencies. In 2013, WFP worked in partnerships with 1,300 non-governmental
organizations, United Nations organizations, donors and governments.
WFP’s performance was enhanced by Fit for Purpose, which involved the empowerment of the
country offices and concomitant changes at Headquarters. Progress was made in all
seven organizational strengthening themes during 2013, despite the pressures of the
Level 3 emergencies.
In 2013, WFP updated its gender indicators to cut across all the Strategic Objectives to address the
needs of hungry women and girls and ensure that all projects were gender-sensitive. The use of
the gender marker in new projects rose from 24 percent in 2012 to 50 percent in 2013: WFP is on
track to achieving its goal of meeting gender standards in all projects by 2015, and is committed
to all fifteen of the standards in the United Nations System-Wide Action Plan.
In 2013, WFP and other agencies started to implement the recommendations of the
2013 Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review to promote coherence in the United Nations
system. In line with these, WFP will continue to develop its partnerships with governments, the
private sector, non-governmental organizations, civil society and United Nations agencies.
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Performance reporting is essential to ensure that WFP delivers value for money. A recent review
by the Multilateral Organization Performance Assessment Network highlighted the rigour of
WFP’s performance-management systems and identified areas for improvement. Performance
measurement against the Strategic Objectives was enhanced in 2013 to include outcome-level
results (see Part II).
This Annual Performance Report reviews WFP’s performance in 2013 in terms of the
Strategic Plan and Management Plan, the Strategic Results Framework and the Management
Results Framework.
WFP’s Performance against the Strategic Objectives
Strategic Objective 1: Save lives and protect livelihoods in emergencies
WFP performed consistently well in emergencies, which was notable in view of the many
limitations to humanitarian access as a result of conflict. It was strongly supported in this work
by its donors and partners.
Work under Strategic Objective 1 focused on nutrition in the first 1,000 days of life to prevent and
reduce acute malnutrition, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Levels of acute malnutrition
stabilized or fell in 90 percent of projects. Adherence to anti-retroviral and tuberculosis therapy
improved, indicating that food provided at health facilities enabled patients to make regular visits.
WFP’s specialized nutritional products and complementary activities made significant
contributions to improved nutrition, and school feeding was effective in keeping children in
school, even in emergency settings. Other activities included the distribution of fuel-efficient
stoves to 70,000 households and help in limiting environmental degradation.
Strategic Objective 2: Prevent acute hunger and invest in disaster preparedness and
mitigation measures
Household and community resilience to disasters and climate change was reinforced by
WFP’s safety-net initiatives such as food assistance for assets, particularly where the activities
complemented each other and where the most vulnerable women were targeted. Cash transfers
enhanced the quality and quantity of food consumption in many countries.
Progress was made in disaster preparedness through the development for governments of
systems for early warning, food security monitoring and disaster preparedness, supported by
advocacy at the policy level. Lack of government data limited the ability to report progress in
some cases, but this will be addressed by capacity-development initiatives for
government officials.
Strategic Objective 3: Restore and rebuild lives and livelihoods in post-conflict, post-disaster or
transition situations
WFP performed strongly in Strategic Objective 3. Community asset scores increased in all projects,
and household food consumption increased in 85 percent of projects; 25,000 communities
benefited from improved infrastructures to mitigate shocks. School feeding resulted in increased
enrolment, with retention rates mainly stable. Strong performance was evident in the reduction
of acute malnutrition and stunting and in recovery rates in anti-retroviral and
tuberculosis therapy.
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Strategic Objective 4: Reduce chronic hunger and undernutrition
Variable performance in some activities may be accounted for in terms of operational contexts.
WFP increased its focus on capacity development, institutional strengthening, planning and
investments, for which it is difficult to discern change on an annual basis. Some progress was
made in nutrition outcomes, and some projects achieved excellent results in treating acute
malnutrition with a combination of targeted supplementary feeding, effective nutrition education
messages and household food vouchers.
Progress was mixed in school feeding projects. Enrolment rates increased, but pass rates remained
unchanged: clearly, additional inputs are needed to ensure that children can learn. Partnerships
with specialist education organizations are critical for progress in this outcome.
Strategic Objective 5: Strengthen the capacities of countries to reduce hunger, including through
hand-over strategies and local purchase
WFP allocated a larger share of resources to government capacity development in 2013 than in
2012, and strong progress resulted; South-South cooperation led by the WFP Brazil Centre of
Excellence made a significant contribution. WFP trained national officials with a view to
developing government-led hunger solutions, especially school feeding and food-security
programming, and 232 WFP-managed programmes were handed over to governments.
National capacities were built up through the Purchase for Progress pilot, which concluded in
December. In its five years WFP signed contracts for 400,000 mt of food in the 20 pilot countries
and USD 150 million was put into the hands of farmers, many of whom were women. The
contribution of Purchase for Progress to sustainability was reflected in the sale of 200,000 mt of
food to other buyers.
It was further noted that local purchases helped support local production and reduced costs and
lead-time, resulting in more efficient delivery of assistance to beneficiaries. At times, local
purchases also led to substantial savings in comparison with import parity prices. In Senegal, local
food procurement in areas with surplus production boosted agricultural development in
communities deprived of alternative income opportunities and with limited access to markets. It
encouraged communities and authorities to recognize and take advantage of the production
potential with a view to contributing to and ultimately taking ownership of their safety nets. In
the State of Palestine, the inclusion of milk in the voucher basket led to an expansion of supply in
retail stores to meet the demand. Local food purchases also supported the Palestinian economy,
helped maintain a continuous supply of food and reduced transportation costs.
WFP’s Performance against the Management Result Dimensions
Performance was generally positive, reflecting progress in securing resources, stewardship,
learning and innovation and internal business processes; some progress was made in operational
efficiency. Fit for Purpose contributed significantly to this achievement.
Funding levels were high but did not fully meet all needs, especially in the
“forgotten emergencies.” Stronger performance is needed in terms of resourcing and efficiency.
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Management Result Dimension 1 – Securing resources
Confirmed contributions to WFP in 2013 were USD 4.38 billion,1 12 percent more than in 2012,
which covered 62 percent of the programme of work, 7 percent more than in 2012. Factors
underlying this growth include a 12 percent rise in multi-year donations, and joint
resource-mobilization and donor briefings with other United Nations agencies.
WFP performance in achieving gender parity remained stable. The proportion of women in senior
positions was unchanged at 36 percent in 2013, and women accounted for half of international
P1–P4 promotions.
Management Result Dimension 2 – Stewardship
Strong performance was recorded. Funds were used as planned and unspent project balances
reduced; between 2012 and 2013 the percentage of undistributed food at year’s end decreased
from 9.6 percent to 8 percent, but the percentage of undelivered cash and vouchers remained
unchanged.
WFP’s presence in conflict areas increased the need for staff security measures; the number of
security incidents rose by 15 percent. There was increased compliance with minimum operating
security standards compared with 2012, but implementation of the recommendations of the
security assessment missions was slow.
WFP’s internal control frameworks worked well in 2013. Annual performance plans and
risk registers are complete in most country offices, and compliance with the performance and
competency enhancement system rose from 81 percent in 2012 to 96 percent in 2013. All managers
required to complete an annual statement of assurance did so, enabling the Executive Director to
sign the Statement on Internal Control.
WFP managed its brand image and reputation effectively to generate income and visibility. Media
coverage increased, and an independent analysis of coverage of WFP in the Level 3 emergencies
was overwhelmingly positive.
Management Result Dimension 3 – Learning and innovation
Some progress was made in identifying and disseminating lessons learned, especially in
evaluations. WFP evaluated 66 percent of projects closed in 2013 at least once during their
lifetimes; the target for the coming years is to evaluate all projects at least once.
The lessons-learned database for emergency responses was launched in 2013. Lessons learned are
now identified after every Level 3 emergency, and the regional bureaux have a toolkit for reviews
after Level 2 responses. WFP trained its own staff and national officials to enhance capacities in
programme areas such as school feeding.
This figure differs from the contribution revenue reported in the 2013 audited financial statements because of the
different treatment of multi-year revenue, the exclusion of contributions with a bilateral funding window, and the
exclusion of contribution revenue adjustments such as unspent balances and write-downs.
1
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Management Result Dimension 4 – Internal business process
The Business Process Review assessed process areas in terms of performance, cost, quality,
accountability and alignment with the Strategic Objectives: its recommendations are being
implemented, and additional changes will be introduced in 2014.
WFP procured 2.1 million mt of food in 91 countries in 2013 valued at USD 1.2 billion. Of this
tonnage, 79 percent was purchased in developing countries.
WFP performed strongly in delivering food on time: 80 percent of food was delivered within
contractual periods. WFP also improved its food-safety and food-incident management systems
in partnership with external experts. The timeliness and quality of internal business processes
improved: more food was shipped on time, for example, resulting in savings of USD 11.35 million.
Cost savings and efficiency gains resulted from innovations such as the use of biometrics in food
distributions and inter-agency collaborations (see Part III).
Management Result Dimension 5 – Operational efficiency
The annual cost of food assistance per beneficiary increased from USD 38.75 to USD 48.57 between
2012 and 2013. This was because: i) proportionally more food assistance was provided over longer
periods; ii) cash and voucher operations were scaled up; iii) beneficiary numbers declined
following the shift to targeted recovery assistance; iv) several operations introduced more
expensive nutrition products; and v) the response in the Syrian Arab Republic accounted for a
major share of operational costs.
WFP created the Preparedness and Response Enhancement Programme in 2013 to enhance
partnerships with national authorities and to provide efficient and effective emergency responses
for up to 6 million beneficiaries. In 2013, the average lead time of 106 days for normal operations
was reduced by 71 percent – well above the 50 percent target, and an improvement on 2012 –
through the use of the Forward Purchase Facility, which also helped to accelerate responses in
sudden-onset emergencies.
Looking Forward
Fit for Purpose will continue in 2014, and its effects will begin to be realized in improved outcomes
that will enhance WFP’s future activities and improved performance management systems that
will capture results and communicate the positive impact of WFP’s activities more consistently.
The following principles will underpin WFP’s work in the coming years:
1 – People
WFP is developing its People Strategy to build a capable, balanced workforce. Diversity and
gender are integral components of the strategy.
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2 – Partnerships
WFP aims to be the partner of choice in programmes addressing hunger. The new
Corporate Partnership Strategy will guide the development of partnerships at all levels.
WFP is engaged with partners in the Zero Hunger Challenge and will continue to be part of
discussions on the post-2015 agenda while focusing on the Millennium Development Goals in
countries with severe nutrition and food security challenges.
3 – Processes and Systems
WFP will continue to enhance its transactional processes to improve productivity and reduce unit
costs. Cost drivers will be investigated to ensure that WFP operations achieve optimum outcomes:
for every decision made, every programme launched and every dollar spent, WFP will track the
results for beneficiaries.
4 – Programmes
Purchase for Progress will continue to leverage WFP’s purchasing power to support local food
markets. Work in nutrition, home-grown school feeding and resilience and climate change
adaptation will become more effective, and the scaling up of cash and vouchers will continue
where appropriate under the System for Cash Operations.
5 – Funding and Accountability
Increased accountability among staff and managers is a priority for 2014. Executive management
compacts will enhance the accountability of senior staff and optimize performance, and WFP will
improve office-level performance planning and review and enhance individual staff appraisals.
WFP will continue to increase the number of donors to provide the resources it needs. The
Private-Sector Partnerships and Fundraising Strategy (2013–2017) will help to maximize resources
and enhance capacity development. The advances made through Fit for Purpose are evident, but
more work remains to be done in terms of investments in innovative, effective and efficient
food-assistance approaches, which must be implemented with increasing urgency.
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PART I – INTRODUCTION
1.
The mission of the World Food Programme (WFP) is to end global hunger. To achieve this,
WFP works with governments and other partners to ensure that hungry people have access to
nutritious food all year round, and particularly during crises.
2.
WFP’s work is outlined by the Strategic Plan (2008–2013) and operationalized through the
Strategic Results Framework (SRF) and Management Results Framework (MRF). This Annual
Performance Report (APR) assesses WFP’s performance in 2013 against these frameworks, in
accordance with the United Nations principles for harmonizing results reporting.2
3.
Analysis of all projects reporting on key outcome indicators showed that strong progress
was made against Strategic Objective 1 – Save lives and protect livelihoods in emergencies;
Strategic Objective 2 – Prevent acute hunger and invest in disaster preparedness and mitigation
measures; Strategic Objective 3 – Restore and rebuild lives and livelihoods in post-conflict,
post-disaster or transition situations; and Strategic Objective 5 – Strengthen the capacities of
countries to reduce hunger, including through hand-over strategies and local purchase. Some
progress was made in addressing Strategic Objective 4 – Reduce chronic hunger and
undernutrition, but it was uneven. Part II of this APR gives more detailed information.
4.
Analysis of WFP’s management of its operations showed strong progress against
indicators in four of the Management Result Dimensions (MRDs) – Securing Resources,
Stewardship, Learning and Innovation and Internal Business Processes, and some progress in
Operational Efficiency. For more information, see Figure 1 and Part III.
Figure 1: Assessment of WFP’s Performance in 2013
United Nations Development Group and the High-Level Committee on Management. 2011. Common Principles on
Results Reporting: a UNDG-HLCM Joint Study. Final Report. New York.
2
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Strategic Context
5.
Complex emergencies resulting from conflict and large-scale population displacements
persisted in 2013, with serious implications for food security. Obstacles to humanitarian access
were numerous, and there were significant threats to humanitarian staff from armed groups who
were not concerned with humanitarian principles. Humanitarian organizations in these countries
recognized the need to make clear to local populations the distinction between humanitarian
workers and peacekeepers.
6.
The emergency in the Syrian Arab Republic was unprecedented in terms of the security
challenges and the effects on civilians. The political transition in Yemen involved conflict in the
north and secessionist movements in the south. The continuing conflict in eastern areas of the
Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) prolonged the desperate humanitarian situation
affecting 2.6 million people. In the Central African Republic sectarian violence caused internal
displacements and movements of refugees. The volatile security situation in northern Mali caused
a significant deterioration in food security across the country, and hostilities broke out in
South Sudan in December 2013, undoing much of the progress made since independence in 2011.
Four trends in food security that shape the need for food assistance
7.
Food security is defined by four dimensions: availability, economic and physical access,
utilization and stability.3 Trends in 2013 related to these dimensions are considered below.
Extreme weather threatened food security in fragile environments
8.
The 2013 report of the Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change stated that changes
in weather patterns resulting from global warming would raise levels of food insecurity,4 noting
that a large proportion of those needing food assistance live in fragile and resource-depleted
environments.
9.
There were fewer extreme weather events in 2013 than in previous years, but those that
occurred were severe: i) typhoon Haiyan affected millions of people in the Philippines;
ii) cyclone Mahasen affected 1.5 million people in Myanmar and Bangladesh; iii) flooding after
torrential rain affected 250,000 people in northern India, Indonesia and Nepal; iv) floods
devastated large parts of Madagascar and Mozambique; v) heavy rain and flash floods affected
500,000 people in the Sudan; and vi) the Sahel drought continued, despite improved rainfall.
Food prices remained high in 2013
10.
Between 2012 and 2013, world food imports declined by 3 percent to USD 1.15 trillion,
easing the burden on low-income, food-importing countries. Food prices remained high but
stable: the average FAO Food Price Index declined by 2 percent to 210 points in 2013, but was well
above the price levels observed during the 2007–2008 crisis (see Figure 2).5
Defined in the 2009 declaration of the World Summit on Food Security. FAO, IFAD and WFP. 2013. The State of
Food Insecurity in the World 2013. The multiple dimensions of food security. Rome, FAO.
4 See: http://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/wg1/
5 See: http://www.fao.org/worldfoodsituation/foodpricesindex/en/ The statistics reported here and in Figure 2 were
obtained on 9 January 2014.
3
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Figure 2: FAO Food Price Index from 2000 to 2013
Source: FAO Food Price Index (normalized to 100 in 2002–2004). Includes cereals, oilseeds, dairy products, meat and sugar.
The world’s population grew, and became more urbanized and concentrated in middle-income countries
11.
The global population grew by 1 billion between 2000 and 2013, mainly in
developing countries.6 The projected increase in population by 2050 would require global food
production to be scaled up by 60 percent.7 Half of the world’s people live in urban areas, and the
proportion is expected to increase as people migrate from rural areas,8 resulting in greater
pressure on food production.
12.
Three quarters of poor, food-insecure people live in middle-income countries,9 and the
proportion is likely to increase as more countries transition to middle-income status. Economic
growth can increase incomes and reduce hunger, but only if growth is inclusive and sustained.10
Economic growth enables governments to take the lead in addressing domestic food-security
concerns.
13.
Economic growth, increased urbanization and the shift to middle-income status may be
accompanied by shifts in dietary preference to resource-intensive products – which further
increases the demand for agricultural production. Such dietary changes may cause the “double
burden of malnutrition” in which over-nutrition and undernutrition exist in the same
population.11
United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. 2013. World Population Prospects: the
2012 Revision. New York.
7Alexandratos, N. and Bruinsma, J. 2012. World Agriculture Towards 2030/2050: The 2012 revision. ESA Working Paper
No. 12-03. Rome, FAO. Available at: http://www.fao.org/docrep/016/ap106e/ap106e.pdf
8 Cohen, B. 2006. Urbanization in developing countries: Current trends, future projections, and key challenges for
sustainability. Elsevier: Technology in Society, 28 (2006) 63–80.
9 Summer, A. 2010. Global poverty and the new bottom billion: What if three-quarters of the world’s poor live in middle-income
countries? Brighton UK, Institute of Development Studies. The World Bank classifies countries with gross national
income (GNI) per capita between USD 1,026 and USD 12,475 as middle-income countries.
10 FAO, IFAD and WFP. 2013. The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2013. The multiple dimensions of food security.
Rome, FAO
11 FAO, IFAD and WFP. 2013. The State of Food and Agriculture, 2013. Rome, FAO.
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Needs were high, but access to safety nets was low
14.
After the food and fuel price crises of 2007–2008, many developing countries invested in
safety-net programmes providing transfers of cash, food or vouchers for vulnerable and
food-insecure people to reduce the impact of rising food prices, augment incomes and increase
resilience. Safety nets are particularly important in areas at risk of environmental degradation and
natural disasters in that they encourage sustainable agricultural practices and protect livelihoods.
15.
In 2013, there were 98 countries with national safety net programmes, compared with 72
in 2000.12 Safety-net policies were established in 20 countries in sub-Saharan Africa and South
Asia, and 80 percent of developing countries had plans to establish or enhance safety nets.13 The
G20 Development Working Group and the Busan Partnership for Effective Development
Cooperation highlighted the importance of embedding food security and nutrition in national
safety-net policies.
16.
But access to social protection remained limited in many contexts: 60 percent of the people
in developing countries and 75 percent of households in sub-Saharan Africa did not have access
to any form of social protection.14
The number of undernourished people declined but remained unacceptably high
17.
An estimated 842 million people were undernourished in 2013, 12 percent of the
global population. This figure has declined by 173 million since 1992, and by 26 million since
2012.10 Reductions in undernourishment have been notable but uneven; levels are still
unacceptably high, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (see Figure 3). An estimated 60 percent of
undernourished people are women and girls; 20 percent are children under 5.15 Many countries
will not achieve the Millennium Development Goal of reducing hunger by half by 2015.16
Figure 3: Prevalence of Undernourishment, by Region, 1990–2013
Source: FAO, IFAD and WFP. 2013. The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2013. The multiple dimensions of food security. Rome, FAO.
World Bank. 2013. Closing the Gap: The State of Social Safety Nets 2013. Washington DC.
International Monetary Fund and World Bank. 2012. Safety Nets Work: During Crisis and Prosperity. Washington DC.
14 World Bank. 2012. The World Bank 2012–2022 Social Protection and Labor Strategy. Washington DC.
15 United Nations Economic and Social Council. 2007. Report of the Secretary-General: Strengthening efforts to eradicate
poverty and hunger, including through the global partnership for development (E/2007/71). New York.
16 See Annex I and United Nations. 2013. The Millennium Development Goals Report 2013. Available at:
http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/report-2013/mdg-report-2013-english.pdf
12
13
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18.
The global prevalence of stunting among children under 5 fell from 40 percent in 1990 to
26 percent in 2011, but levels are still alarmingly high in some areas. Of 165 million stunted
children, 80 percent live in 14 countries; the prevalence of stunting is at least 40 percent in
21 countries in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. 17,18 Despite the downward trend, there are
more stunted children than there were 20 years ago in some countries in Africa.19
19.
Undernutrition has profound implications for health, cognitive development and
educational achievement, with consequent effects on economies and development. Economic
losses caused by undernutrition among children under 5 were estimated at 6 percent of gross
domestic product (GDP) in Uganda and 17 percent in Ethiopia.19 Investments in innovative
food-assistance approaches to eliminate hunger must continue with increasing urgency.
WFP’s Response
20.
WFP provided direct food-assistance transfers for 80.9 million people in 75 countries in
2013, most of whom were women and children (see Figure 4). There were four Level 3 emergencies
in 2013 that required exceptional resources and response flexibility, and ongoing
Level 2 emergencies in the DRC, Mali, Somalia and Yemen. Calls on WFP’s response systems had
never been so great, yet the challenges were met.
21.
But WFP’s food assistance has positive effects for many more people. Most of the world’s
undernourished people now reside in middle-income countries, because rising national incomes
have generated the political will and the resources to address food insecurity and malnutrition.
As a result, demand from host governments is increasing for technical assistance to develop
food-security and nutrition policies and national safety-net programmes, and to increase
capacities in ministries to implement them.
22.
This support is difficult to quantify in terms of beneficiary figures: technical assistance for
designing a national school feeding programme, for example, can ultimately benefit millions of
children. Innovative technologies that improve the efficiency of public distribution systems,
projects supporting local production of supplementary foods and knowledge transfers to improve
food security analysis are examples of WFP’s support that cannot be quantified in terms of
beneficiaries of direct food assistance transfers. The impact of WFP’s work clearly extends beyond
the number of people receiving direct assistance, and will be reflected in the increased capacity of
governments in low-income and middle-income countries to enable vulnerable people to
access food.
23.
Cash and voucher transfers and other mechanisms enabled WFP to address hunger in
contexts ranging from towns in middle-income countries to refugee settings and underdeveloped
rural areas. Activities supporting resilience and P4P enabled WFP to help communities to improve
safety nets and develop sustainable food systems. In line with its shift to food assistance, WFP
enhanced institutional capacities and developed market-based instruments for government-led
initiatives addressing hunger.
UNICEF. 2013. Improving Child Nutrition. The achievable imperative for global progress. New York. Available at:
http://www.unicef.org/media/files/nutrition_report_2013.pdf
18 WHO. 1995. Physical status: the use and interpretation of anthropometry. Report of a WHO Expert Committee.
WHO Technical Report Series 854. Geneva. Available at: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/trs/WHO_TRS_854.pdf
19 African Union Commission and the New Partnership for Africa´s Development (NEPAD) Planning and
Coordinating Agency. 2013. The Cost of Hunger in Africa (First Phase). Available at:
http://static.squarespace.com/static/527789a2e4b0a23a823e44cd/t/5285ea9ee4b08b1cf596c783/1384508062371/COHA%2
0Brief%20English.pdf
17
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24.
WFP ensures that its programmes respond to the needs of girls, boys, women and men by
using the gender marker, and it implements the recommendations of the
Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review (QCPR) to promote coherence in the United Nations.
The changes implemented under Fit for Purpose will enable WFP to perform at the highest level
in the years to come.
25.
Contributions to WFP in 2013 were the highest since 2008, reflecting donors’ confidence
and growing understanding of the importance of food assistance in a changing global
environment. But because the funding was not evenly spread, shortfalls were experienced in
several operations – particularly those that did not make headlines – and assistance for some of
the most vulnerable populations fell below expectations.
Figure 4: Countries with WFP beneficiaries in 2013
WFP ensured access to food in complex emergency situations
26.
The humanitarian emergency in the Syrian Arab Republic was WFP’s largest operation
in 2013: activities supporting 1.2 million people in January were scaled up to assist 4.5 million by
the end of the year. Food assistance included a voucher-based nutrition programme for pregnant
and lactating women and blanket supplementary feeding for children under 2. WFP also provided
technical advice for 14 organizations about operations in chemically contaminated environments.
Widespread fighting and numerous checkpoints limited access to people in need. Contractors
transporting WFP food were frequently subjected to banditry, car-jackings and abduction.
WFP staff members, particularly national staff, were exposed to high levels of insecurity.
27.
In Yemen, humanitarian access was frequently restricted by conflict in the north,
secessionist movements in the south and extremism throughout the country. Abductions of
international staff were a serious concern, exemplified by the kidnapping of a United Nations
Children´s Fund (UNICEF) staff member in October. Despite the challenges, and by assessing and
managing the risks, WFP scaled up its assistance during the year to reach 5 million people.
28.
Militias were a significant threat to humanitarian actors in eastern DRC, but WFP
nonetheless provided food assistance for 2 million people per month through food distributions
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and cash and voucher transfers. The deployment of the United Nations Force Intervention Brigade
by the Stabilization Mission introduced additional challenges for WFP and other humanitarian
organizations.
29.
In Mali, the conflict in the north hindered relief and resilience work. With its partners,
WFP reached internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees among 768,000 beneficiaries in
2013.
30.
In the Sudan, WFP assisted 3.7 million people in 2013. Fighting in South Kordofan in
November interrupted food distributions, and in Darfur security challenges in the form of
car-jackings and conflict continued to limit access and put staff at risk.
31.
In response to sectarian violence in the Central African Republic in December 2013, WFP
scaled up its assistance to reach 237,000 people. The collapse of social, economic and
law-enforcement institutions led to looting, theft and threats to women. In response, WFP scaled
up its food assistance and provided additional security training for its staff.
The Zero Hunger Challenge
The Zero Hunger Challenge is a bold vision for the eradication of hunger. It was established by the United Nations
Secretary-General in 2012 to coordinate food-security and nutrition programmes on five pillars: i) zero stunted
children under 2; ii) universal access to adequate food all year round; iii) development of sustainable food systems;
iv) doubling of productivity and incomes among smallholder farmers; and v) zero loss or waste of food. Businesses,
civil-society leaders, United Nations organizations, NGOs and governments have made commitments to scale up
and coordinate their actions on the basis of the five pillars.
WFP, FAO and IFAD worked together in 2013 to align their policies and plans with the Zero Hunger Challenge.
WFP’s holistic approach and leadership in food security is reflected in its commitments to all five pillars.
The Zero Hunger Challenge is reflected in the Strategic Plan (2014–2017). Under the auspices of the High-Level
Task Force on Global Food Security, WFP will lead coordination in the United Nations system and at the country
level. It will co-lead the task force working group on pillar 1 with FAO, UNICEF and the World Health Organization
(WHO) to reduce stunting and will ensure direct linkages with the six targets of the 2012 World Health Assembly
for improving maternal, infant and child nutrition and addressing micronutrient deficiencies. WFP will co-lead the
working group with FAO on pillar 2.
32.
When typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines in November 2013, WFP launched a
USD 88 million emergency operation in the worst-affected areas – Leyte, Samar, Northern Cebu
and Panay Island. By the end of December 2013, WFP had reached 1 million beneficiaries
including 40,000 children under 5 with food and cash transfers.
The complex emergencies involved an increased number of security incidents
33.
In the Level 3 emergencies, WFP had to enhance its security systems to ensure the safety
of personnel exposed to high levels of risk. No WFP staff member was killed in the line of duty,
but 1,031 security incidents were reported that involved WFP staff, contractors or partners, of
which 72 percent were work-related – an increase of 15 percent from 2012.
WFP focused on the first 1,000 days, micronutrient deficiencies and adolescent girls
34.
Because the first 1,000 days of life are the “window of opportunity” to prevent irreversible
damage to development, WFP provided complementary foods for children aged 6–23 months to
prevent stunting. In Mozambique and Malawi, WFP and its partners gathered evidence on
stunting prevention during 13 nutrition interventions for children aged 6–23 months. In
partnership with UNICEF, WFP treated 3.1 million children for moderate acute malnutrition,
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3.1 million for acute malnutrition and 287,000 for stunting; of these children, 56 percent were aged
6–23 months. WFP also provided nutrition products for 3.3 million pregnant and lactating women,
and nutrition counselling and messages to increase the effectiveness of treatment. WFP reached
out to the families of young children as part of its targeting of men and boys to promote
gender equality.
35.
The Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) movement, of which WFP is a member, mobilized
political commitment by 46 governments to good nutrition during the first 1,000 days. WFP
participated in the Renewed Efforts to Address Child Hunger and Undernutrition (REACH)
initiative, which continued to increase national capacities for nutrition-sensitive programming.
36.
In response to recent evidence that undernutrition during pregnancy accounts for up to
20 percent of stunting, WFP launched a partnership with the United Nations Population
Fund (UNFPA) and UNICEF to improve nutrition among adolescent girls in order to break the
intergenerational cycle of hunger.20
37.
WFP continued to scale up the development and use of nutritious complementary foods,
many of which were produced locally. With Royal DSM, WFP improved micronutrient
fortification in its food-assistance transfers, and supported the Clinton Health Access Initiative in
advising governments on local production of nutritious complementary foods.
WFP supported safety nets by providing adequate food all year round
38.
WFP supports and implements safety nets to ensure that adequate food is available to
vulnerable people all year round. In many countries, households headed by women were often
more food-insecure than those headed by men: to address gender gaps in access to food and to
ensure that the most vulnerable people were reached, WFP adapted its safety-net programmes to
local contexts.
Assistance beyond direct food transfers: WFP’s 3S model enhances India’s Targeted Public Distribution System –
the world’s largest social safety net
India’s Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) serves 65 million poor families in India with subsidized monthly
supplies of wheat, rice, sugar and kerosene. The TPDS operation involves procurement, transport, storage and
distribution through 500,000 Fair Price shops.
There is significant variation in the performance of TPDS: studies in the last decade show that between 30 percent and
58 percent of food grains do not reach the intended families, that vulnerable families are poorly targeted and that lack
of transparency has led to “leakages” – food leaving the system illegally. Corrective measures have been applied but
inefficiencies remain, with grave implications for the most vulnerable people.
Building on its 50 years of working with the Government to improve India’s safety nets, WFP recently shifted from
providing food aid to delivering advice and technical support to improve the TPDS under a memorandum of
understanding signed with the Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution. WFP also led the
development of the TPDS (Secure, Strengthen, Save (3S) model – a national technology-led best-practice framework for
delivering subsidized food.
The TPDS 3S model uses biometric identification to help state governments to allocate food subsidies to the most
vulnerable people and ensure that those who are not entitled are excluded. It also helps state governments to eliminate
illegal transfers of subsidized food and to make deliveries to beneficiaries more convenient.
Cash and vouchers
Bhutta, Z., Das, J., Rizvi, A., Gaffey, M., Walker, N., Horton, S., Webb, P., Lartey, A. and Black, R. 2013.
Evidence-based interventions for improvement of maternal and child nutrition: What can be done and at what cost? Available
at: http://thousanddays.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Nutrition2_p40_65.pdf
20
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39.
Cash and vouchers were distributed to support access to a balanced food basket when the
option was cost-effective, as determined by WFP assessments of operational contexts and
beneficiary needs. In 2013, cash and vouchers reached 7.9 million beneficiaries in 88 programmes
in 52 countries; related expenditures amounted to 14 percent of WFP’s total projects expenditures.
The emergency operation for Syrian refugees, WFP’s largest cash and voucher programme, had
cash and voucher expenditures at USD 317 million.
40.
WFP began to use cash and vouchers in 2008, since when expenditures have grown
twenty-fold; between the end of 2012 and the end of 2013 the programme increased from
USD 207 million to USD 539 million. The use of electronic transfers, which are harder to
counterfeit than cash or paper vouchers, has risen three-fold since 2011.
41.
WFP’s cash and voucher transfers helped to protect lives and livelihoods through support
for local economies. In Jordan, the value of voucher-based transfers was estimated at 0.3 percent
of GDP in 2013, with an estimated USD 100 million generated for the national economy: if WFP
had opted for in-kind food transfers, most of the benefits would have accrued outside the
country.21
Assisting Syrian refugees in Lebanon with e-vouchers
Syrian refugees in Lebanon received paper vouchers and electronic vouchers; the latter are also known as e-vouchers
or e-cards. Paper vouchers required beneficiaries to purchase their food all at once, but the e-vouchers could be used
at any time at any of WFP’s designated shops. The e-vouchers were automatically recharged every month through
partner banks, and because beneficiaries did not need to come to distribution sites their safety was enhanced.
By the end of 2013, WFP had changed from paper to e-vouchers in Lebanon for 98 percent of the 542,000 targeted
refugee beneficiaries. Experts from WFP’s partner MasterCard helped with the roll-out. WFP will scale up the use
of e-vouchers in Egypt, Iraq and Jordan in 2014.
School feeding
42.
School feeding continued to be one of WFP’s largest programmes, accounting for
25 percent of beneficiaries. WFP’s Brazil Centre of Excellence provided technical assistance and
supported countries in the transition to national ownership.
43.
WFP’s revised school feeding policy addresses five objectives: safety nets, nutrition,
education, local agriculture and the transition to national ownership. Innovative modalities
piloted in 70 percent of country offices included new food types, linkages with smallholder
farmers and cash and vouchers. With the transfer of the El Salvador school feeding programme
to the Government in 2013, the number of countries completing the transition rose to 38.
44.
WFP’s leadership in school feeding was reflected in the publication of The State of School
Feeding Worldwide 2013, written in collaboration with the World Bank and the Partnership for
Child Development.22 The study noted that 38 countries had scaled-up school feeding in response
to crisis since 2008, underscoring its importance as a social safety net.23
45.
WFP, UNICEF and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural
Organization (UNESCO) launched the Nourishing Bodies Nourishing Minds initiative at the
WFP. 2014. Economic impact study: Direct and indirect impact of the WFP food voucher programme in Jordan. Available at:
http://www.wfp.org/content/jordan-economic-impact-study-wfp-food-voucher-programme-april-2014
22 See: http://www.wfp.org/content/state-school-feeding-worldwide-2013
23 WFP was not present in all these countries.
21
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World Economic Forum in 2013 to improve vulnerable children’s access to quality education. It
was piloted in Haiti, Mozambique, the Niger and Pakistan.
WFP leveraged its expertise in resilience-building and climate change adaptation to support
access to adequate food in sustainable food systems
46.
WFP contributed to building resilience through complementary programmes such as asset
creation, nutrition, safety nets, food assistance for assets (FFA) and by building the capacities of
communities and governments in disaster risk management and response mechanisms. The
FFA activities reached 15.1 million beneficiaries in 52 countries in 2013.
47.
Helping governments and communities to manage climate risks and adapt to climate
change is becoming increasingly important. In Ethiopia and Senegal, the R4 Rural Resilience
Initiative helped food-insecure communities to build resilience against recurrent weather
disasters through risk-management approaches involving insurance, natural resource
management, microcredit and savings.
48.
WFP continued to work with the Global Framework for Climate Services to reduce
vulnerability to weather hazards in Malawi and the United Republic of Tanzania, in partnership
with other United Nations organizations and research institutions.
49.
The Climate Adaptation, Management and Innovation Initiative (C-ADAPT) helped to
develop ways to analyse the effects of climate change on food security and livelihoods. In
partnership with the NGO project Concern International, the WFP-supported Livelihoods,
Early Assessment and Protection tool was used to provide pastoralists in Ethiopia with satellite
information on vegetation and pasture conditions.
50.
To enhance disaster risk management related to extreme weather, WFP and the
African Union established the African Risk Capacity (ARC) in 2012, under which 43 African
governments are developing continental standards for contingency planning. The ARC has
capitalization of USD 150 million and is ready to offer drought insurance to its members from
2014. Six countries will take out insurance in 2014, and an additional ten are expected to request
cover in 2015.
Through the P4P pilot WFP increased the productivity and income of smallholder farmers and
supported the transition to sustainable food systems
51.
The P4P pilot to increase the productivity and incomes of smallholder farmers, especially
women, ended in December 2013: it had enabled WFP to experiment with new ways of leveraging
its purchasing power to support agricultural and market development in low-income countries.
During the pilot, WFP signed contracts for 400,000 mt of food valued at USD 150 million in
20 countries procured from smallholder farmers. Food sold by P4P-supported farmers to other
markets exceeded 200,000 mt. The P4P partners trained 500,000 farmers.
52.
The single largest P4P food purchase was 19,000 mt in Ethiopia, facilitated by collaboration
among donors, banks, farmers’ organizations, NGOs and the Government; this enabled WFP to
sign additional contracts. In El Salvador, capacity development provided by WFP and its partners
helped P4P farmers to develop logotypes and barcodes for sales to buyers such as supermarkets.
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53.
P4P also connected agriculture with nutrition, gender and advocacy. In Mali, P4P helped
women farmers to improve yields and provided nutrition education with a view to enriching
children’s diets. In Afghanistan, P4P helped to establish a national millers’ association to improve
national quality standards for wheat.
Gender and the P4P Pilot
The P4P pilot showed how gender considerations can be embedded in WFP projects. An initial objective was to
promote participation by women smallholder farmers in WFP’s food-procurement operations. Many country office
teams supported P4P by raising awareness about the importance and economic value of gender equality in
households and farmers’ organizations. Women members of P4P farmers’ organizations increased to 300,000
in 2013.
WFP is committed to increasing this figure, which accounts for only 29 percent of the membership of farmers’
organizations and 35 percent of leadership positions.
Progress on Gender
54.
In 2013, a gender perspective was incorporated into the SRF and MRF, committing WFP
to meet the 15 standards of the United Nations System-Wide Action Plan (UN SWAP) by the end
of 2014. To achieve this, WFP introduced the Gender Mainstreaming and Accountability
Framework with business owners for each standard; this model was cited by UN-Women as an
example of good practice (see Part IV).
55.
The proportion of new projects with gender marker code 2A or 2B has doubled since
24
2012, and WFP is on track to achieve its target of 100 percent of new projects with a 2A or 2B
code.
56.
Mainstreaming was supported by the evaluation of the 2009 gender policy, whose findings
were discussed at internal consultations and a learning workshop. Other evaluations also helped
to ensure gender-sensitive approaches in WFP programmes: the 2014–2018 DRC Country Strategy
document, for example, includes detailed gender analysis and gender-sensitive solutions based
on the country portfolio evaluation.
Capacity development and South–South cooperation
57.
Capacity development for governments and South–South cooperation continued in 2013.
Support for government-led initiatives to reduce stunting and develop market-based instruments
for addressing hunger was a priority for middle-income countries.
58.
In 2013, half of WFP’s projects included a capacity-development component to help
governments to eliminate hunger;25 expenditures amounted to USD 38 million – 1 percent of
WFP’s programme of work.26 Food security analysis was a component in 80 percent of services
for governments, school feeding in 75 percent, nutrition in 60 percent, emergency preparedness
and disaster risk reduction in 50 percent, and productive safety nets in 40 percent. Capacity
development and knowledge sharing were major elements of P4P and REACH.
Gender code 2A means that gender is mainstreamed and that the project is likely to contribute significantly to
gender equality. Gender code 2B means that the principal purpose of the project is to advance gender equality.
25 Survey of Capacity Development Activities at WFP, March 2014.
26 This value is derived from expenditures on capacity development and augmentation, minus special operations.
WFP is improving reporting on the percentage of programme funds allocated to national capacity enhancement in
line with the QCPR.
24
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59.
Disaster response preparedness simulations were carried out in three countries; WFP also
worked with 20 national disaster management authorities to develop country-level plans and
helped governments to develop policy, strategy, technical and legal frameworks; FFA
programmes in ten countries were designed to mitigate risks from natural disasters.
60.
The WFP Centre of Excellence against Hunger in Brazil is a prominent example of
South-South cooperation; expenditure since 2009 amounts to USD 7.1 million. In 2013, the centre
supported five national policy consultations, deployed consultants in six countries and sent
technical missions to another six. Nine countries27 completed study tours, bringing the number of
countries supported to 23. The results are impressive: 13 countries are designing and piloting new
school feeding policies. The centre co-hosted the Global Child Nutrition Forum in Brazil in
May 2013: 250 participants from 41 countries attended, including 24 ministers of state;
40 WFP staff also participated.
South–South cooperation in Latin America to support food and nutrition security
WFP has a long history of working with governments on technical assistance and development projects related to
food and nutrition security, facilitating dialogue on food security and nutrition policies, cost-effective practices,
learning and financing opportunities.
In Chile, the Agencia de Cooperación Internacional works with WFP to scale up nutrition in the first 1,000 days. The
Fondo Chile Contra el Hambre y la Pobreza (the Chile Fund against Poverty and Hunger), a South–South mechanism
financed by the Government, also supported nutrition initiatives in Guatemala and Honduras with technical
assistance and training.
In Guatemala, WFP supported national nutrition programmes such as the Plan Hambre Cero with the Agencia de
Cooperación Internacional and the Fondo Chile Contra el Hambre y la Pobreza, which also supported a pilot project that
provided a complementary fortified food product for children and training for healthcare workers in the
Intibucá region of Honduras, where chronic undernutrition is prevalent.
Making WFP Fit for Purpose
61.
The 2012 APR reported on the start of the Fit for Purpose process. The main principles of
the new organizational design are: i) beneficiaries are the focus of WFP’s work; ii) country offices
are WFP’s centre of gravity, with decision-making authority located as close as possible to the
point of implementation; iii) the regional bureaux manage, oversee and support country offices in
a single line of accountability; and iv) unity of purpose and corporate identity are fostered through
functional networks and a focus on cost-effectiveness (see Annex XII).
Côte d'Ivoire, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Honduras, Lesotho, Nigeria,
the Philippines and Zambia.
27
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Figure 5: WFP’s organizational strengthening during 2013
Strategy
62.
The Strategic Plan (2014–2017) reflects WFP’s shift to food assistance, which requires
adjustments in its culture, systems, tools and skills. In 2013, workshops involving field staff
identified various obstacles affecting the new Strategic Plan and recommended 40 actions to
address them; these have been mainstreamed into WFP’s priorities.
Organization Design
63.
The new organizational design implemented in 2013 involved a shift of staff and budgets
to the field, with concomitant changes at Headquarters. A reassignment exercise involving
100 senior staff posts and 450 professional posts, supported by an agreed separation programme,
resulted in the departure of 12 directors, 28 professionals and 11 general service staff.
64.
The regional bureaux are now the first line of support for WFP’s country operations. A
gap analysis in 2013 helped to define and coordinate the roles of the regional bureaux and to put
in place the required expertise, functions and budgetary allocations.
65.
A review of WFP’s country office presence and operating model was carried out in the last
quarter of 2013 on the basis of indicators that prioritize the needs of beneficiaries; it identified
17 countries for further analysis in the first half of 2014 to provide inputs for future
Management Plans. WFP has in the past completed several country presence reviews, but this
workstream led to a management tool that provides guidance and a decision-making structure
for future application.
66.
WFP has developed and piloted robust tools for determining the resource levels needed
to implement operations; these are being refined for roll-out to all country offices. It has also
developed new criteria, terms of reference and nomenclature for its liaison and
communications offices.
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Human Resource Management
67.
In 2013, the promotion and reassignment processes were revised to include more rigorous
review of candidates based on written submissions, increased involvement of senior management
and feedback for unsuccessful applicants. Of 535 eligible professional staff 87 were promoted, of
whom 72 percent were field-based staff. The Performance and Competency Enhancement (PACE)
process was increasingly used to evaluate individual performance and enhance accountability.
68.
WFP has enhanced the working conditions of national staff – 85 percent of the workforce
– rationalized recruitment processes and introduced the “one-time review” to enable long-serving
national staff to become eligible for fixed-term or permanent appointments. The locally recruited
staff transfer project will move staff from United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
regulations to those of WFP and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the
United Nations (FAO). A field pilot tested the replacement of service contracts with fixed-term
appointments or special-service agreements. A new human resources policy will be considered
by the Board at its 2014 Annual Session.
Business Processes
69.
The Business Process Review (BPR) identified 38 short-term and long-term improvements
for implementation in: i) supply chain management; ii) programme cycle management;
iii) resource management, allocation and utilization; and iv) monitoring, reporting and
evaluation. Four more processes will be assessed in 2014, and improvements will be implemented
as they are agreed.
Partnerships
70.
WFP aims to be the partner of choice in food assistance, building on its extensive
experience with international and private-sector organizations. WFP participated in the
implementation of QCPR recommendations to increase the coherence of United Nations countrylevel activities, and the Corporate Partnership Strategy will be considered by the Board at its 2014
Annual Session. WFP partners with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) on
implementation of the Transformative Agenda, and with the Open Working Group on Sustainable
Development Goals.
71.
The 2013 annual partnership consultation, the largest to date, brought together 60 NGOs
and civil-society organizations. Partners from NGOs and the Red Cross and Red Crescent
Movement distributed 2.4 million mt of food in 2013 – 77 percent of WFP’s assistance.
72.
The Rome-based agencies (RBAs) continued to support the Committee on World
Food Security in the Zero Hunger Challenge; and on behalf of the RBAs and UN-Women, WFP
held an appeal consultation with all Board members with a view to mobilizing resources for the
empowerment of rural women. WFP, FAO and the International Fund for Agricultural
Development (IFAD) participated in the P4P technical review panel, and FAO supported P4P
farmers’ organizations in several countries. Leveraging their experience with P4P, FAO and WFP
continued the Purchase from Africans for Africa pilot initiated by the Government of Brazil as a
South–South cooperation.
Executive Management
73.
A review of WFP’s executive management in 2013 identified ways of enhancing
performance management and managers’ accountability, and of nurturing the next generation of
WFP leaders; this was supported with special training for women staff.
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Culture of Commitment, Communication and Accountability
74.
An assessment of WFP by the Multilateral Organisation Performance Assessment
Network (MOPAN) in 2013 (see box below) reaffirmed the relevance of Fit for Purpose and
identified other areas where improvements could be made.
75.
Reflecting its commitment to accountability and transparency, WFP adopted International
Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) reporting standards and in 2013 published IATI-compliant
data related to all its activities. WFP is a leader in the United Nations in this regard.
76.
New channels of communication to foster staff engagement included the
Executive Director’s “Just Ask” page in WFPgo, quarterly meetings for all staff led by the
Executive Director and regular video-linked meetings on various topics led by senior managers.
Follow up of the 2012 global staff survey continued.
77.
Performance compacts were introduced in 2013 for the Deputy Executive Director,
Assistant Executive Directors and the Chief of Staff. Performance planning and review processes
shifted from a compliance basis to a performance-information basis; WFP also revised the MRF,
which sets out results and targets for all offices in support of the Strategic Plan (2014–2017). The
performance and risk organizational management information system (PROMIS) was
implemented in one more region and was reconfigured to reflect the revised MRF and
performance planning and review processes.
The MOPAN assessment of WFP
WFP’s strengths

WFP is appreciated because it is a results-oriented organization that responds rapidly to emergencies and
humanitarian needs, drawing on its extensive reach, logistics capabilities and field presence.

WFP is committed to results-based management and to achieving humanitarian and development results; it is
appreciated for its contingency planning, needs assessments and consultations with partners.

WFP delegates decision-making to its country offices and regional bureaux.

WFP has sound financial accounting systems, internal and external audit functions, and procedures for
managing procurement, contracts and risks.

WFP manages knowledge well; the Office of Evaluation is independent and capable, and documents are
published.

WFP is a respected inter-agency partner in appeals and participates in the Consolidated Appeals Process; it
makes a strong contribution to the cluster system.

WFP harmonizes its procedures with its partners.
Areas for improvement

WFP should review its mandate: some stakeholders are concerned that the shift to food assistance may lead
WFP into development programming and hence duplicate the work of other United Nations agencies.

WFP accounts for resource allocations and expenditures by Strategic Objective, but not its outputs and
outcomes: the development of results-based budgeting should continue.
For the full text, see: http://static.mopanonline.org/brand/upload/documents/Main_Findings-_WFP_2013_Assessment_1.pdf
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WFP made institutional changes to enhance its capacity to respond to multiple
large emergencies
78.
The Preparedness and Response Enhancement Programme (PREP) entered its final year
of implementation. Its objectives were to enhance: i) WFP’s capacities to support emergency
responses for up to 6 million beneficiaries; ii) the accountability and coherence of WFP’s response
management; and iii) partnerships with national authorities and international organizations to
optimize humanitarian responses. PREP also facilitated the integration of the
IASC Transformative Agenda into WFP’s systems, and guidance developed for Country Directors
and managers governed their inter-agency leadership roles.28
79.
The Analysis and Early Warning Unit (AEW) was established in 2013 to help with the
management of contextual risk through the dissemination of data on meteorology and conflict
and economic analysis. WFP also provided partners with satellite data through the
cluster system. In 2013, the mapping platform was rolled out in the Level 3 responses in the Syrian
Arab Republic and the Philippines to enable real-time data entry for use by humanitarian
partners; the WFP analysis in the Philippines led to a rapid needs assessment and an emergency
operation within a few days.
80.
Information management was established as one of WFP’s 12 functional areas to provide
a common basis for decision-making during emergencies. The Corporate Response emergency
operation (EMOP) Facility (CREF), which applies revised procedures and delegations of authority
in corporate emergency situations, was developed to enhance responses to large-scale
sudden-onset emergencies.
81.
To ensure that capacity needs were met in emergencies, the emergency response roster
was established to provide a pool of experienced WFP staff for deployment at short notice.
Accountability to populations affected by crises
To improve its accountability to populations affected by crises, WFP participated in the Communicating with
Disaster-Affected Communities network and as Chair of the IASC task team coordinated joint missions to
emergency operations to build capacity and share good practices.
In the Philippines, a joint plan outlined activities and responsibilities for prevention of sexual exploitation and
abuse and for communications with communities; consultations with women, men, children, adolescents and the
elderly led to rapid adjustments in the responses of several agencies. WFP also developed approaches for serving
populations affected by crisis in the Central African Republic and Mali.
The regional bureau in Eastern and Central Africa and country offices in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso,
Djibouti, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Jordan, Kenya, Malawi, Pakistan, the Philippines, the Syrian Arab Republic and
Somalia were supported with feedback and advice throughout the year.
Resource mobilization was enhanced
82.
WFP received a record level of funding in 2013 in response to the Level 3 emergencies.
Resource mobilization was enhanced under Fit for Purpose and between 2012 and 2013 the
volume of multi-year funds increased by 12 percent, and the number of strategic partnership
agreements increased from four to five.
WFP Leadership in IASC Clusters (OED 2013/016); The Role of Country Directors in the Humanitarian Country
Team (OED 2013/015).
28
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83.
WFP increasingly leveraged its partnerships to mobilize resources: examples include
partnering with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to
engage with donors with regard to refugee and internally displaced persons (IDP) operations,
joint donor briefings at the field level with other United Nations agencies and working with the
United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) to advocate for
greater donor response to the crisis in the Syrian Arab Republic.
84.
Partnerships with the private sector were also developed: the number of donors was
unchanged, but funding increased from USD 64.4 million in 2012 to USD 88.4 million in 2013, well
above the target of USD 65 million. WFP confirmed 30,000 new individual donors in 2013, a
17 percent increase from 2012.
85.
There was, however, a contrast between the response to the Level 3 crises and the
“forgotten emergencies”. In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and the DRC, for
example, assistance for the targeted populations fell by 70 percent. Multilateral donations enabled
WFP to extend a lifeline to the most vulnerable people in these operations.
The Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review
86.
The QCPR for 2013–2016 addresses the funding of United Nations development activities
and the functioning and effectiveness of the development system; the priorities include transition,
gender, capacity development and results-based management. The Strategic Plan (2014–2017) is
aligned with the QCPR,29 and WFP is implementing it in coordination with other United Nations
organizations through the United Nations Development Group (UNDG) and the High-Level
Committee on Management (HLCM).
87.
The Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC) required United
Nations funds and programmes to report annually on the implementation of the QCPR in their
strategic plans from 2014;30 a similar decision was made by the FAO Council, and the Board’s
annual report to ECOSOC and the FAO Council has therefore been merged into this APR. In 2013,
ECOSOC also requested analysis of QCPR implementation on the basis of common indicators:
these have been agreed with UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF and UN-Women and are part of WFP’s
2014–2017 MRF.
88.
WFP continued to work with UNDG on collective planning in country programmes in the
Plurinational State of Bolivia, Cameroon, Egypt, Guinea, Lesotho, Liberia, Nepal and Nicaragua
in alignment with United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAFs), and in
Sierra Leone the United Nations Transitional Joint Vision (2013–2014), which temporarily
replaced the UNDAF. WFP cooperated with UNICEF, UNDP and UNFPA on simplification of the
approval process, which was accepted by the Board at its 2014 First Regular Session.31
89.
All of WFP’s active projects used common tools and principles for results-based
management, as defined in UNDG guidance. All project documents and reports included logical
frameworks linking expected outputs and outcomes and indicators for monitoring as required by
the QCPR. The introduction of business rules for the SRF will ensure that specific targets are
included in all frameworks from 2014 onwards.
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/1.
ECOSOC Resolution E/2013/L.17.
31 WFP/EB.1/2014/11-B.
29
30
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90.
As requested by the QCPR, in 2013 the UNDG agreed a formula to share the costs of the
Resident Coordinator system. WFP’s share – USD 1.26 million – was included in the
Management Plan approved by the Board at its 2013 Second Regular Session.29
91.
The QCPR provisions for simplifying and harmonizing business practices are being
implemented through the UNDG and the HLCM in human resources, finance, procurement,
information management, communication and communications technology; WFP is, for example,
improving connectivity and information security at its country offices, and United Nations
agencies explored common approaches to cloud computing and cyber security. The Delivering
as One countries have introduced joint procurement and long-term agreements leading to
economies of scale for certain products. In October 2013, the HLCM opened a pilot common
services centre in Brazil.
92.
In 2013, WFP helped to develop standard operating procedures for programming,
leadership, business operations, funding and communications for countries adopting
Delivering as One. Guidance will be published in 2014 to help country offices to
operationalize them.
93.
The Board will be updated on QCPR decisions requiring its engagement at its 2015
First Regular Session.
Conclusions
94.
WFP made major contributions to reducing hunger and vulnerability in 2013, notably in
the Level 3 emergencies. Its response was significantly enhanced by PREP and partnerships with
United Nations organizations and NGOs. WFP tackled the drivers of hunger through the
Zero Hunger Challenge and innovative approaches such as local procurement and cash and
voucher transfer mechanisms, whose effectiveness was augmented by greater gender sensitivity.
The implementation of Fit for Purpose in 2013 will optimize WFP’s performance in the years
ahead enabling it to deliver the Strategic Plan (2014–2017) and to confirm its position as the
world’s food-assistance organization.
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PART II – PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE
95.
Part II presents findings from the assessment of WFP’s performance against its
Strategic Objectives as outlined in the 2008–2013 Strategic Results Framework (SRF).32 The
assessment was based on the Standard Projects Reports (SPRs) for WFP projects operational in
2013: these include data such as the number of beneficiaries served and results for SRF indicators
included in logical frameworks. Global and regional analyses of outcome-level results and
examples of successes support the quantitative account of WFP’s achievements in 2013.
Overview of WFP Projects in 2013
96.
WFP managed 198 active projects33 in 75 countries in 2013 to assist 80.9 million
beneficiaries with targeted transfers of cash, vouchers or food; of these beneficiaries 7.9 million
received cash or voucher transfers, reflecting an average annual increase of 64 percent in the use
of these modalities (see Figure 6).34
Figure 6: Cash and Voucher Beneficiaries (2009–2013)
97.
WFP’s programmes in 2013 distributed 3.1 million mt of food and USD 506 million in cash
and voucher transfers. The value of cash and vouchers increased to 20 percent of the value of food
transfers in 2013.35
See Annex II-A.
Projects with food distribution or an activity such as a special operation during the reporting period.
34 The percentage in Figure 6 is the compound annual growth rate.
35 The value of food transfers includes food, external transport and landside transport, storage and handling costs.
32
33
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98.
The range of WFP’s activities in emergency, relief and development contexts is reflected
in the operations in progress in 2013: 61 protracted relief and recovery operations (PRROs),
37 country programmes (CPs), 33 emergency operations (EMOPs),36 33 special operations (SOs),
26 development projects (DEVs) and 8 preparedness activities.37 This distribution is similar
to 2012.
99.
Partnerships were critical to the implementation of all activities. In 2013, WFP worked with
United Nations organizations, local and international NGOs and community-based
organizations. The main United Nations partner in programme implementation was UNICEF,
which was involved in 70 percent of WFP’s projects, and the number of partnerships with FAO,
the IFAD, the World Health Organization (WHO), UNDP and UNHCR increased from 2012.38
100.
WFP also collaborated with 1,300 NGO partners, 85 percent of which were national or
community-based, and 40 partners from the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.39 Many
partners implemented activities that complemented WFP programmes: an example is UNICEF’s
WASH programme promoting access to safe water and sanitation. WFP also liaised with partners,
particularly the RBAs, in policy discussions on food security.
101.
Half of WFP’s beneficiaries were assisted through general food distributions in emergency
contexts (see Figure 7). FFA and school feeding contributing to safety nets and resilience
accounted for 40 percent of beneficiaries, and an additional 13 percent benefited from activities to
reduce malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Children were the primary focus of WFP’s
support, accounting for 64 percent of beneficiaries. Women and children together accounted for
84 percent.
Figure 7: Beneficiaries by Activity and Type
Includes immediate-response EMOPs.
These are activated in crises and financed through project budgets. If there is no alternative funding source, the
Immediate Response Account is used. Special preparedness activities may not involve food aid and do not exceed
USD 300,000; they must be completed within three months of approval. Immediate Response Account funding cannot
be requested more than once for the same activity.
38 See Annex X-A.
39 See Annex X-B.
36
37
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102.
WFP’s programme expenditure was USD 4.3 billion in 2013. Strategic Objective 1
accounted for the largest share of expenses, and of beneficiaries. Assistance under
Strategic Objective 1 accounted for 73 percent of direct expenses and had the highest ratio of
expenses to beneficiaries: this reflects WFP’s intention to meet the food needs of all beneficiaries
in emergencies (see Figure 8). In contrast, 7 percent of expenses under Strategic Objective 4
contributed to addressing chronic hunger affecting 18 percent of beneficiaries.
103.
Expenditures under Strategic Objective 5 grew from 1 percent to 2 percent of expenditures
between 2012 and 2013, reflecting WFP’s shift from food aid to food assistance using a range of
capacity-development activities. Strategic Objective 5 has no direct food transfer beneficiaries, but
the activities provided benefits for many households, communities and governments.
Figure 8: Outputs by Strategic Objective
Beneficiary Trends in 2013
104.
The number of beneficiaries receiving food, cash or vouchers fell by 17 percent from
97.2 million in 2012 to 80.9 million in 2013, exceeding the 71 million anticipated in the
Management Plan (2013–2015). The reduction was mainly driven by falls in beneficiary numbers
in large operations: 2 million fewer beneficiaries were recorded in Afghanistan, Kenya, the Niger
and Pakistan in 2013 than in 2012. And it occurred in spite of the considerable scale-up in response
to the needs of the 7 million beneficiaries in the Level 3 emergencies in the Philippines and the
Syrian Arab Republic.
105.
This downward trend resulted from positive circumstances in some countries, and
challenges in others. In Afghanistan, WFP reduced the number of activities and focused on a
smaller number of beneficiaries who were severely food-insecure because humanitarian access
was limited; where populations were displaced, particularly because of conflict, there were fewer
emergency general food distributions, but the proportion of people with acceptable food
consumption increased from 15 percent to 42 percent in 2013. In Kenya, beneficiary numbers fell
as a result of improved food security following rains in the arid north, continuing hand-over of
WFP school feeding beneficiaries to the government programme and a decline in the number of
refugees. The main factor in Ethiopia was the graduation of 890,000 beneficiaries from the
productive safety net programme in five of the eight project regions, which led to improvements
in community asset scores.
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106.
In Pakistan, WFP began to phase out general food distributions for IDPs who returned or
resettled after the 2012 floods and to plan for the integration of school feeding into the
Government’s programme in areas affected by conflict. It also implemented a programme in
collaboration with OCHA and other organizations to enhance disaster preparedness and response
capacities among district-level government officials. In the Niger, WFP supported long-term
resilience-building following the 2012 food and nutrition crisis by developing human capital and
increasing agricultural production in line with the Nigeriens nourrissent les Nigeriens initiative, and
collaborated with the Government and communities in the establishment of asset-management
committees, improvements to early-warning systems and safety nets, and the promotion of
women’s leadership.
107.
The number of beneficiaries also declined significantly in other countries – Somalia is an
example – where WFP transitioned from emergency response to resilience-building to enhance
community assets and capacities. The significant scaling up of livelihood activities resulted in
demonstrable improvements in outcomes: 100 percent of assisted communities increased their
asset scores, for example, exceeding the 80 percent target.
WFP’s reach extends beyond direct recipients of food assistance
WFP provided food, cash and vouchers for 80.9 million people in 2013 – but its food assistance has positive effects for
many more people than this. The value of WFP’s assistance and the increasing sophistication of its approaches need to
be understood.
Recognizing that it has to account accurately for the value of its assistance, WFP has begun work to refine the definition
of the kinds of people who benefit from its support, as shown in the diagram below. Systems have yet to be put in place
to capture more accurately the numbers of people benefiting from activities such as asset creation, capacity development
and behavioural change communication (BCC), so analysis in this Annual Performance Report covers only direct
recipients of WFP food, cash and voucher transfers, as shown in Tier 1 in the diagram. Estimates of indirect beneficiary
numbers can be made for asset creation, for example, but further study is required to establish country-specific
estimates. Initial reviews suggest that the figures may be up to 40 percent higher. This report provides some examples
of WFP’s reach beyond the people targeted for food assistance, but the figures should be treated with caution.
Persons benefiting only at impact
level from WFP programmes,
capacity development and/or
technical assistance.
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Progress towards gender equity
108.
WFP’s reporting on gender equality has steadily improved over time. Only 40 projects
reported on gender indicators in 2012, but in 2013 the figure was 69 – a 73 percent increase. Further
progress is expected under the new SRF, which contains three cross-cutting gender indicators.
The other indicators reported in the SPRs will be incorporated into the criteria for a gender marker
code of 2A or 2B.24
109.
More women than men received WFP food assistance, but fewer women than men were
involved in food management and distribution. Table 1 reflects progress since 2012, but more
attention is needed in this area. It is encouraging, however, that the ratio of women to men in
food-management committees moved towards parity and that most projects included sound
reasons for gender-sensitive programming.
110.
There was a decrease in 2013 in the percentage of projects that incorporated activities to
raise awareness of ways in which gender equality can increase WFP’s effectiveness and initiatives
to reduce the risk of sexual and gender-based violence. Good practices included the following:

In the Sudan, where more than twice as many women than men were targeted for food
or voucher transfers, 87 percent of households reported that women made decisions
about food purchases.

In all distribution points in Pakistan, separate entrances, waiting areas and counters were
established for women with a view to increasing the number of women staff.

In Haiti, WFP provided food assistance for nine safe houses that gave victims of
gender-based violence a safe space to break the cycle of violence and regain control over
their lives.
111.
A 10 percent decrease in the ratio of women to men among food monitors caused concern
because it could compromise the accuracy of information on sensitive issues such as gender-based
violence. A possible explanation is that more projects reported on the food monitor indicator in
2013, providing greater accuracy; another is the overall low ratio of women to men among
WFP staff in some contexts. WFP is designing strategies to improve the gender balance among
its staff.
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Table 1: Progress Towards Gender Equality40
Indicator
Ratio of women to men for:
Leadership positions of food assistance/
distribution management committees
2013
2012
0.86
0.75
Food management committee members trained on
food distribution
0.85
0.77
Holding household food entitlements
0.94
1.51
Food monitors
0.40
0.54
Percentage of projects with:
Initiatives to reduce sexual or gender-based violence
59
70
Activities to raise awareness of gender equality
77
87
Training on food distribution which included
reasons for gender-sensitive provision of food
98
90
Overall Performance
112.
WFP’s progress in 2013 is reflected in Table 2. Notable progress was made in
Strategic Objectives 1, 2, 3 and 5, which cover emergencies, nutrition and resilience-building
activities, safety nets, local purchases and national capacity development. Progress was also noted
in Strategic Objective 4 in terms of reducing chronic hunger and undernutrition through
programming that included, nutrition activities and safety nets.
Table 2: Overall Performance by Strategic Objective
Strategic Objectives
Performance
1 – Save lives and protect livelihoods in emergencies
Strong progress
2 – Prevent acute hunger and invest in disaster preparedness and
mitigation measures
3 – Restore and rebuild lives and livelihoods in post-conflict, post-disaster or
transition situations
Strong progress
Strong progress
4 – Reduce chronic hunger and undernutrition
Some progress
5 – Strengthen the capacities of countries to reduce hunger, including through
hand-over strategies and local purchases
Strong progress
40
Based on 40 SPRs in 2012 and 69 SPRs in 2013.
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At the outcome level, achievements in 2013 included:
113.

reduction or stabilization of undernutrition for 7.2 million children under 5;

acceptable food consumption scores reached by 18.7 million people;

increased household or community resilience in 24 countries as a result of asset
restoration or asset creation; and

increased national capacities for food security, disaster preparedness, school feeding
and nutrition in 15 countries.
114.
Resource allocation was correlated with performance by Strategic Objective. Comparison
of expenses and beneficiary numbers by Strategic Objective, as shown in Figure 8, indicates that
average expenditure per beneficiary was highest for Strategic Objective 1, which showed the
strongest performance, and lowest for Strategic Objective 4, which showed the
weakest performance.
115.
Caution is needed, however, in taking this correlation to mean that greater expenditures
led to better results. The factors underlying strong performance vary by Strategic Objective: they
include financing, context, project design and partnerships that might not be within
WFP’s control. It is essential to identify the success factors and challenges underlying the results
in order to improve performance in the future.
Results by Strategic Objective
116.
Progress at the Strategic Objective level was determined by the outcomes measured by the
corporate indicators in the 2008–2013 SRF.41 Trends were assessed for each outcome-level
indicator.42 In some cases analysis was based on a limited number of projects, which may reflect
difficulties in obtaining data or meeting the necessary conditions.43 For nutrition indicators,
performance in relation to international Sphere standards was also assessed.44
Strategic Objective 1: Save lives and protect livelihoods in emergencies
Strong Progress
117.
Strong progress was achieved under Strategic Objective 1 in saving lives and protecting
livelihoods in emergency contexts. This result is reinforced by WFP’s responses to a record
number of Level 3 emergencies, which involved assisting more beneficiaries than planned. WFP’s
good performance was facilitated by strong donor support, coordination with other
United Nations organizations and effective partnerships with NGOs. The results overall were
positive, but in some cases performance was hampered by logistics constraints and limited access
because of conflict.
118.
Strategic Objective 1 is associated with four outcomes, three of which showed strong
progress in 2013 with some progress in the other. Results for each outcome are shown in Table 3
and discussed below.
See Annex II-C.
Assessed in 116 EMOPs, PRROs, CPs and DEVs, 58 percent of WFP projects in 2013 with duration of more than
6 months, which provided a baseline and a 2013 follow-up value.
43 Outcomes for which progress was assessed in fewer than five projects are noted in the progress summary.
44 The Sphere project sets minimum standards by which the humanitarian community responds to the needs of people
affected by disaster or conflict. See: http://www.sphereproject.org
41
42
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Table 3: Outcome 1.1 Reduced or stabilized acute malnutrition in target groups
of children and/or populations
Strong progress
Outcome Indicator
Performance
Prevalence of acute malnutrition among children under 5 (weight-for-height)
Prevalence of low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC)
Supplementary feeding recovery rate
Supplementary feeding death rate
Supplementary feeding default rate
Supplementary feeding non-response rate
119.
Results from outcome-level indicators suggest strong progress in reducing or stabilizing
acute malnutrition in targeted populations. Of projects that measured acute malnutrition by
weight-for-height or MUAC, 86 percent noted stabilization or a trend towards improvement. With
regard to supplementary feeding, death rates decreased in all projects and recovery rates
stabilized or increased in 94 percent of projects. Better recovery rates were accompanied by
reductions in malnutrition in most projects where trends for both indicators were reported. The
assessment of supplementary feeding was reinforced by an assessment against Sphere standards.
Performance analysis against Sphere standards
The comparison of 2013 values for outcome indicators related to treatment of acute malnutrition with Sphere
standards showed that 80 percent of projects met agreed standards during the year, with strong progress overall.
Indicator
Target (%)
% projects met target
Supplementary feeding recovery rate
>75
91
Supplementary feeding death rate
<3
100
Supplementary feeding default rate
<15
86
Supplementary feeding non-response rate
<5
89
120.
A large number of projects were in sub-Saharan Africa, reflecting WFP’s focus on countries
where the levels of stunting among children were highest.19 The introduction and consistent
supply of special nutrition products such as SuperCereal was a positive factor in several projects
in Asia. Integrated complementary interventions such as hygiene promotion and counselling for
mothers were noted as success factors in Ethiopia, Somalia and the United Republic of Tanzania.
Collaboration over several years with governments and other partners to increase capacities in
health centres and improve linkages with healthcare systems contributed to the positive trends.
But such factors were not present in all cases: in the DRC, for example, there were difficulties in
finding reliable implementing partners in areas with limited accessibility, progress was
consequently limited.
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Table 4: Outcome 1.2 Improved food consumption over assistance period for
target households
Outcome Indicator
Some progress
Performance
Household food consumption score
121.
Progress was made in terms of increasing the level of acceptable household food
consumption in emergency contexts. In projects experiencing positive trends, the share of the
population with acceptable food consumption increased substantially. But these successes were
offset by decreases in acceptable food consumption in 25 percent of projects.
122.
Strong progress in the Latin America and Caribbean region was attributed to WFP’s timely
provision of adequate rations and complementary activities such as educational training and
counselling. Challenges encountered in other regions included pipeline breaks and limited
funding for complementary activities. Harvest yields, rainfall levels and changes in conflict
situations, which were outside WFP’s control, also affected food consumption. A significant
deterioration in food consumption in the Syrian Arab Republic, for example, stemmed from
increased insecurity and decreased food access. In DRC, limited performance in this indicator was
attributed to an influx of refugees with limited coping strategies, with consequent stretching of
limited resources.
Table 5: Outcome 1.3 Stabilized enrolment of girls and boys at
high risk of drop-out from targeted primary schools
Fewer than 5
projects
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
Retention rate
123.
Strong progress was made in maintaining or increasing retention rates, though only a few
projects reported against this indicator. This result suggests that school meals were effective in
keeping children in school in emergency contexts. In Colombia, retention was maintained in areas
with the highest levels of violence, displacement and food insecurity. Although the retention rate
declined in northern Mali as a result of conflict, school feeding promoted the reopening of
primary schools and the restoration of normal lives for vulnerable children.
Table 6: Outcome 1.4 Maintained access to services for ART,*
TB** treatment and/or PMTCT***
Outcome Indicator
Fewer than 5
projects
Strong progress
Performance
ART default rate
*
Anti-retroviral therapy.
Tuberculosis.
*** Prevention of mother-to-child transmission.
**
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124.
Access to HIV treatment was measured as the rate of default – the rate at which
beneficiaries miss the next scheduled medical visit. The sample was limited, but reductions in
missed appointments were noted in all projects and the default rate reached zero at the final
assessment point in all anti-retroviral therapy (ART) projects. Performance was strong when
measured against Sphere standards. In DRC, high nutritional recovery rates confirmed that food
provided at health facilities enabled regular visits for treatment even in complex scenarios,
thereby ensuring that defaults were reduced and the effectiveness of treatment was improved.
Performance analysis against Sphere standards
The comparison of 2013 values for outcome indicators related to ART, TB and PMTCT with Sphere standards
showed that all projects met the international 15 percent standard during the year, with strong progress overall.
Table 7: Outputs under Strategic Objective 1
Output
Performance
Food and non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers distributed in sufficient
quantity and quality to target groups of women, men, girls and boys under
secure conditions
125.
Strong performance at the output level contributed to the achievements under
Strategic Objective 1. WFP distributed larger amounts of food, cash and vouchers through
16,000 schools and health centres to meet the needs of more beneficiaries than had been
anticipated. Fuel-efficient stoves were distributed to 70,000 households, reducing air pollution
and limiting deforestation in fragile environments.45
Strategic Objective 2: Prevent acute hunger and invest in disaster
preparedness and mitigation measures
Strong Progress
126.
Projects reporting performance under Strategic Objective 2 made strong progress through
investments in disaster preparedness and response at the community level. The SRF defines
three outcomes that are associated with Strategic Objective 2: food consumption and reducing
hazard risks showed strong progress, and some progress was noted for early-warning systems.
127.
Results under Strategic Objective 2 suggest that community resilience to natural disasters
and climate change was enhanced by WFP’s activities such as FFA and safety net initiatives. By
supporting communities in the construction or repair of embankments, flood and cyclone shelters,
irrigation and drainage canals, roads, wells and latrines, WFP enabled beneficiaries to devote time
to build assets instead of applying day-to-day survival strategies.
45
See Annex II-D.
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Table 8: Outcome 2.1 Early-warning systems, contingency plans, food security
monitoring systems put in place/enhanced with WFP capacity-development
support
Outcome Indicator
Some progress
Performance
Disaster preparedness index
128.
The index reflects government capacity to manage information related to disaster
preparedness and food security. Half of the projects that reported on this indicator noted
improving trends; the remainder noted no change.
129.
Building consensus was highlighted as a success factor in developing capacities for
disaster preparedness. In Haiti, WFP brought together government entities to reach a common
understanding of food security and integrated contingency plans. In the Philippines,
WFP-supported modifications to early-warning systems and the development of contingency
plans helped to improve the disaster preparedness index. Several projects that included the index
in their logical frameworks were unable to report because they could not obtain sufficient data
from governments; in Ethiopia, no change was observed because the national disaster risk
management policy, to which WFP contributed, had not yet been implemented.
Table 9: Outcome 2.2 Adequate food consumption over assistance period
reached for target households at risk of falling into acute hunger
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
Household food consumption score
130.
An acceptable level of household food consumption was achieved by a stable or increasing
share of targeted households at risk of acute hunger in 80 percent of projects. But in a few projects
deteriorating trends were a concern in that fewer than half of the targeted households had
acceptable food consumption at the final assessment.
131.
In Honduras, acceptable food consumption was maintained among targeted households
affected by unemployment resulting from the coffee rust infestation as a result of services such as
training for employment. Alliances with local organizations and NGOs were also noted as success
factors. In Burkina Faso, cash transfers provided by WFP increased the quantity and quality of
food consumed: beneficiaries reported consuming three meals instead of two, and that meals were
richer in pulses and animal protein.
Table 10: Outcome 2.3 Hazard risk reduced at community level in
target communities
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
Household asset score
Community asset score
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132.
Stable or positive trends were noted in all projects that reported household or community
asset scores, suggesting that WFP’s interventions restored and built productive assets and in turn
increased household and community resilience. Food consumption stabilized or improved in
some of these projects as well. A synthesis of five FFA evaluations in 2013 helped to validate these
findings: it noted that FFA contributed strongly to resilience, but that the effects on food security
and diet diversity were mixed.46
133.
Gender-sensitive programming and partnerships were significant factors in high
household asset scores in Bangladesh: the project targeted ultra-poor women, and the
Government and NGOs provided complementary activities. A portfolio of FFA activities
providing robust safety nets also helped to improve resilience: examples include the productive
safety net projects in Mozambique and the United Republic of Tanzania whereby WFP helped to
create or repair community assets such as roads, wells, latrines and irrigation systems. The
integration of FFA projects in the same geographic area, for example in Chad, also helped to
improve community resilience.
Table 11: Outputs under Strategic Objective 2
Output
Performance
Disaster mitigation measures set in place with WFP capacity development support
Food and non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers distributed in sufficient
quantity and quality to target groups of women, men, girls and boys under
secure conditions
Built or restored disaster mitigation assets by target communities
WFP’s disaster-prevention programmes positively affect the lives of many more people
than the direct recipients of food assistance
Peru is susceptible to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and to coastal landslides and flooding caused by el Niño.
The Government must therefore maintain adequate capacity at the local, regional and central levels to respond to
natural disasters and other emergencies.
In 2013, WFP provided practical training in food management, food distribution and emergency preparedness for
staff from the National Institute for Civil Defence, local emergency response teams and government officials in
six regions. The trainees took on responsibility for emergency assistance in a large-scale disaster in these regions,
which are home to an estimated 1.9 million people. Only a few food-insecure at the time, but this could change in
the event of an emergency. The residents in the regions were indirect beneficiaries of this capacity-augmentation
provided by WFP.
134.
Progress at the outcome level under Strategic Objective 2 was supported by strong
performance at the output level. WFP supported the development of 13 contingency plans and
12 disaster preparedness and risk management tools, which were incorporated into government
functions and budgets. This led to increases in the disaster preparedness index in some countries.
And 21,000 government staff were trained in contingency planning, early-warning systems and
food-security monitoring. Activities under Strategic Objective 2 protected or rehabilitated
117,723 ha of land and constructed 157 bridges and 197 wells.45
46
Annual Evaluation Report, 2013 (WFP/EB.A/2014/7-A).
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Strategic Objective 3: Restore and rebuild lives and livelihoods in
post-conflict, post-disaster or transition situations
Strong Progress
135.
Strong progress was achieved under Strategic Objective 3. WFP’s activities were notable
in relation to increasing access to assets, stabilizing school enrolment and enabling households to
achieve adequate food consumption. Good progress was also observed in nutrition activities such
as those addressing acute malnutrition and stunting and in ART and tuberculosis (TB) treatment,
but it compared unfavourably with the results of nutrition activities under Strategic Objective 1.
Table 12: Outcome 3.1 Adequate food consumption over assistance period
reached for target households, communities, IDPs and refugees
Strong progress
Outcome Indicator
Performance
Household food consumption score
136.
Improving trends in household food consumption were noted in 85 percent of projects,
and the proportion of populations with acceptable food consumption increased; no project
reported a deteriorating trend. This indicates that food security increased as a result of WFP’s
resilience-building activities.
137.
Success factors included the adjustment of programme designs to meet beneficiary needs,
and partnership building. In OMP, for example, targeting approaches were refined, rations were
reviewed and partnerships were established to ensure that complementary activities were
provided. In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, successes included securing access to the
most vulnerable people and improving food security through increasing women’s consumption
of pulses. In Nepal, vegetables grown by beneficiaries in refugee camps complemented general
food distributions and increased dietary diversity. Other positive trends beyond the scope of WFP
may have contributed to successes: in the United Republic of Tanzania, for example, improved
consumption scores were attributed to greater availability of food in markets.
Table 13: Outcome 3.2 Increased access to assets in fragile, transition situations
for target communities
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
Community asset score
138.
Community asset scores increased in all projects, reflecting WFP’s success in building
assets with a view to restoring and building livelihoods. This strong performance was the outcome
of improving trends in all projects. Similar performance was observed for the same indicator
under Strategic Objective 2. Evaluations of the impact of FFA in five countries provide further
evidence of the relevance of FFA in restoring livelihoods and community assets in the long term
and in promoting food and employment benefits in the short term.46
139.
The involvement of communities in decision-making contributed to positive results, for
example in the Latin America and Caribbean region where communities identified the assets they
needed to develop. Building assets to increase trade, agricultural production, market access and
security were cited as success factors: infrastructure development had a positive impact on
markets in Djibouti, Myanmar and the State of Palestine, in South Sudan cattle raiding decreased
when new roads were built, and in the Kyrgyz Republic new or restored assets helped to increase
security and agricultural productivity.
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By helping to create or repair assets WFP can affect the lives of many more than recipients of food assistance*
Many people other than direct recipients of food transfers benefit from assets such as roads and watershed-protection
services built or rehabilitated by WFP. In Ethiopia, the productive safety net programme built dams and repaired
gullies, roads and classrooms in 60 woredas (districts) to benefit 1.8 million people who were not receiving food or
vouchers and were hence not recorded. Increased food production resulting from a fertilizer project under the
Managing Environmental Resources to Enable Transitions to More Sustainable Livelihoods programme benefited
40,515 people in addition to the intended beneficiaries.
* Figures
are estimates only.
Table 14: Outcome 3.3 Stabilized enrolment for girls and boys, including IDPs
and refugees, in assisted schools at pre-crisis levels
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
Retention rate
Enrolment rate
140.
Improvement in school enrolment and stable retention were achieved in most projects,
indicating that one of the most effective outcomes of school feeding was encouraging children to
enrol in school. The results reported show that performance in terms of retention rates was
comparable under Strategic Objectives 1 and 3.
141.
Experience in projects reflects several factors outside the control of WFP that affect
educational outcomes, and indicates mitigating actions. In Ecuador, a stabilized retention rate was
a significant achievement in view of the tensions involving refugees from Colombia: WFP’s
promotion of joint participation in activities such as the preparation of school meals helped to ease
relations and keep children in school. In Kenya, the construction of new schools and the addition
of a double shift contributed to increased enrolment, and in the Islamic Republic of Iran learning
and educational outcomes were improved as a result of take-home rations for refugee girls and
collaboration with partners to provide complementary inputs. In South Sudan, insecurity and
government austerity measures led to high turnover of teachers and a consequent reduction in
enrolment rates.
Table 15: Outcome 3.4 Reduced acute malnutrition and stunting in
target groups of children and/or populations
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
Prevalence of acute malnutrition among children under 5
Prevalence of low MUAC
Supplementary feeding recovery rate
Supplementary feeding death rate
Supplementary feeding default rate
Supplementary feeding non-response rate
Prevalence of stunting among children under 2
142.
Strong progress was made in reducing acute malnutrition and stunting. The success
factors and challenges were similar to those noted for nutrition outcomes under Strategic
Objective 1.
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WFP nutrition projects can affect the lives of many more than direct beneficiaries *
WFP nutrition programmes involve behaviour changes as a result of communications promoting good nutrition
practices, which also reach people and families who are not enrolled. The Bangladesh country programme nutrition
education component, for example, was delivered at open-air sessions to 2 million people – but the project recorded
only the 130,000 beneficiaries who received food transfers.
*
Figures are estimates.
143.
Success factors in nutrition outcomes in transition settings included partnerships and
counselling and education for mothers. WFP faced challenges in Haiti, for example, because it was
unable to identify partners who could provide complementary activities, but WFP’s counselling
for mothers promoted continued visits to clinics even when children showed signs of
improvement, and its special nutrition products enhanced outcomes. A decline in stunting in
Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya was attributed to SuperCereal+ given to children
aged 6–23 months. WFP will continue to contribute to reducing stunting, in line with pillar 1 of
the Zero Hunger Challenge.
Performance analysis against Sphere standards
Two thirds of projects met the Sphere standards during 2013.
Indicator
Target (%)
% projects met target
Supplementary feeding recovery rate
>75
67
Supplementary feeding death rate
<3
88
Supplementary feeding default rate
<15
56
Supplementary feeding non-response rate
<5
100
Table 16: Outcome 3.5 Improved nutritional recovery of
ART and/or TB treatment clients
Outcome Indicator
Less than 5
projects
Strong progress
Performance
ART nutritional recovery rate
TB nutritional recovery rate
144.
Only a small number of projects reported, but stable or improving recovery rates were
noted for most projects providing ART or TB treatment and 70 percent met Sphere standards.
Even so, the populations targeted for these interventions remained in great need of WFP
assistance.
145.
In Zimbabwe, progress was impeded during the rainy season by outbreaks of diarrhoea
among 20 percent of the targeted population. In Djibouti, WFP increased the TB nutritional
recovery rate despite limited capacities in health centres and the challenges of working with a
nomadic population. In Côte d’Ivoire, recovery rates fell when reductions to the ration resulted in
individuals sharing food with household members.
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Table 17: Outputs under Strategic Objective 3
Output
Performance
Food and non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers distributed in sufficient
quantity and quality to target groups of women, men, girls and boys under
secure conditions
Developed, built or restored livelihood assets by targeted communities and
individuals
146.
Strong performance was also observed at the output level for Strategic Objective 3. The
building of structures designed to mitigate the impact of shocks benefited 25,000 communities,
210,000 m3 of earth dams and flood-protection dikes were constructed and 9,830 km of roads were
built or repaired.45
Strategic Objective 4: Reduce chronic hunger and undernutrition
Some Progress
147.
WFP’s performance under Strategic Objective 4 was mixed, reflecting divergent results in
terms of four different outcomes. Reporting rates for nutrition projects were low, and the total
number of reporting projects was too small to draw inferences for one outcome.
148.
Progress in nutrition outcomes appears to have been slow: measurable improvements in
stunting prevalence were not observed in most of the countries reporting. The factors affecting
this performance include: i) challenges arising from changes requiring increased focus on capacity
development, institutional strengthening, planning and investments; ii) the multi-sectoral nature
of programmes under Strategic Objective 4, which means that results are not just a reflection of
WFP’s work; and iii) the introduction of prevention of stunting micronutrient programming,
which are new areas for WFP. At the global level WFP is committed to the Zero Hunger Challenge
and the Nutrition for Growth Compact.
149.
Other results show that school feeding incentivizes children to enrol in school. Attendance
rates did not change significantly, but this is because high attendance had already been achieved
at the first assessment in several projects. Progress on gender ratios appeared slow because many
projects had already reached or surpassed parity. WFP can contribute to educational outcomes
through its school feeding programmes, but other inputs are needed to achieve quality of
education: the Nourishing Bodies, Nourishing Minds partnership, for example, launched in 2013
by WFP, UNICEF and UNESCO coordinates activities that help children to achieve their full
potential.
Table 18: Outcome 4.1(a) Increased production capacity for fortified
foods, including complementary foods and specialized nutritional
products
Less than 5
projects
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
% increase in production of fortified foods including complementary foods and
specialized nutritional products
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150.
This indicator was introduced with the 2012 nutrition policy, which may explain the
limited number of projects that reported on it in 2013. In Cuba, strong progress was attributed to
WFP’s collaboration with the Government to produce special nutrition products locally. WFP also
contributed to the production of fortified foods in Ethiopia, and is working with the Clinton
Health Access Initiative to increase the availability of fortified foods for young children and
pregnant and lactating women.
Table 19: Outcome 4.1(b) Adequate food consumption reached over
assistance period for targeted households
Outcome Indicator
Less than 5
projects
No progress
Performance
Household food consumption score
151.
Only two projects reported on this indicator, so it is difficult to draw conclusions as to
outcomes. Changes in the indicator over time were minimal, indicating no change in the
proportion of people with adequate food consumption or levels of chronic hunger. Food security
at the final point of assessment was relatively high in that the proportion of people with acceptable
food consumption was 70 percent in both projects. But many projects reporting under
Strategic Objectives 1, 2 and 3 reported significantly lower levels of acceptable food consumption.
152.
A funding shortfall in Ethiopia restricted outputs and limited outcomes. School feeding in
Kenya failed to attract more children to school, as reflected in falls in the enrolment and
attendance indicators, and so did not contribute to enhanced food consumption scores. Food
consumption scores for ART patients in Kenya were stabilized because rations accompanying
treatment at clinics were withdrawn.
Table 20: Outcome 4.2 Increased access to education and human capital
development in assisted schools
Outcome Indicator
Some progress
Performance
Enrolment rate
Attendance rate
Gender ratio
Pass rate
153.
The diversity of results for school feeding and education highlights the effectiveness of the
activity, but emphasizes the challenges. Strong performance was achieved in terms of enrolment,
which increased in 17 of 18 projects. The stabilization of attendance at above 90 percent in several
projects suggests that the most vulnerable populations were not targeted or that the indicator
should not have been included in the logical frameworks. A similar issue was noted for the ratio
of girls to boys, which in many cases was close to parity: at the final assessment point, 77 percent
of projects had a gender ratio of at least nine girls to ten boys. Of the 17 projects reporting on
pass rates, only eight noted improvements: this was a result of teachers’ strikes, poor school
facilities and low achievement at the national level. No progress was recorded with respect to pass
rates, which were particularly low in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi.
154.
Progress in terms of enrolment and attendance was strong in the Latin America and
Caribbean region as a result of sound educational policy and the recognition of school feeding as
a safety net. In the Plurinational State of Bolivia and Nicaragua, for example, education was
promoted through national campaigns and laws. In Honduras, school meals were a reliable safety
net for vulnerable families affected by climatic shocks, who continued to send their children to
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school. In Chad, pass rates were influenced by changes in the national education system that
included more rigorous application of promotion criteria. Gender-specific programming may also
have affected the results: in the Congo and Zambia, separate latrines for girls and boys provided
by WFP and its partners helped to improve gender ratios and educational outcomes.
WFP’s school feeding capacity development can affect the lives of many more than direct recipients of
food assistance*
WFP works with governments and other partners to create an enabling environment for reducing hunger through
capacity development and technical assistance, which reach a large number of people who may not be beneficiaries.
In Bangladesh, for example, WFP’s capacity support unit in the Directorate of Primary Education provided technical
assistance for the Government in scaling up its school feeding programme to assist 1.7 million children – but another
1.1 million benefited from WFP-assisted school feeding. WFP’s technical support for national safety net and earlywarning systems helped to improve the food security of every person reached. By supporting changes in policy and
practice, WFP contributes to positive change for millions of people.
*
Figures are estimates.
155.
Slow progress in enrolment and attendance was often ascribed to factors outside
WFP’s control: examples include school fees in the United Republic of Tanzania, and teachers’
strikes in Guinea-Bissau, Kenya and Lesotho; insecurity related to elections was also a factor in
Kenya. Programming decisions also had implications: in Malawi, for example, expansion of the
programme to under-resourced schools in food-insecure areas increased enrolment but reduced
pass rates, probably because the incoming children were from disadvantaged backgrounds.
Several projects highlighted the importance of partnerships in improving pass rates, for example
in Bangladesh and Kenya.
Table 21: Outcome 4.3 Improved nutritional status of target groups of women,
girls and boys
Some progress
Outcome Indicator
Performance
Prevalence of stunting among targeted children under 2
Prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in women and children
156.
The fact that a reduction in stunting was not recorded in 2013 does not imply that projects
were ineffective, because the window of opportunity is 1,000 days – longer than the annual
reporting period. No changes were reported in five countries, but Ghana reported an
improvement that may have resulted from intensive follow up by WFP and the Ghana health
service. Restricted access to care was a challenge in several projects. In Indonesia and Lesotho,
projects had not been operational for long enough to produce evidence of reductions in stunting.
Improved multi-sectoral programming, better coordination, more accurate data collection and
longer programmes would lead to stronger results.
Complementary approaches to enhancing nutrition can reach many more than direct recipients of
food assistance*
WFP produced and distributed fortified foods in Cuba and provided complementary activities to encourage good
nutritional practices. In a communications campaign, for example, WFP coordinated messages on optimum eating
and nutrition and on prevention of anaemia throughout the country.
The campaign reached the 996,500 direct beneficiaries – but its total coverage was in the region of 1.6 million people,
many of whom were women of reproductive age whose children may also be considered as beneficiaries.
*
Figures are estimates.
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157.
Challenges in measuring iron-deficiency anaemia probably contributed to a low reporting
rate; and factors other than dietary iron intake can influence anaemia. Large-scale surveys are
needed to ascertain statistically significant differences for this indicator. The national nutritional
surveillance system in Cuba reported a reduction in anaemia prevalence, to which fortified foods,
training for health workers and a communication campaign to improve household eating
contributed.
Table 22: Outcome 4.4 Improved adherence to ART and/or success of
TB treatment for target cases
Strong progress
Outcome Indicator
Performance
ART adherence rate
ART nutritional recovery rate
TB treatment success rate
TB treatment nutritional recovery rate
158.
Projects to improve adherence to ART and/or success in TB treatment made progress
during 2013 in that 60 percent of projects reporting ART/TB nutritional recovery rates met the
Sphere standards.
159.
In OMP, success factors for ART and TB treatment included provision of sufficient food,
nutritional counselling and monitoring of beneficiaries. In the Congo, the targeting of other
vulnerable groups was a success factor because it reduced the associated stigma. Food assistance
provided through vouchers, which enabled beneficiaries to buy their preferred foods, may have
helped to improve adherence rates: in Swaziland, the TB success rate increased but the nutritional
recovery rate remained low because food and drugs were not always distributed at the same sites.
WFP will accordingly align its food assistance with the government-led TB control programme to
address this issue.
Table 23: Outputs under Strategic Objective 4
Output
Performance
Food and non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers distributed in sufficient
quantity and quality to target groups of women, men, girls and boys under
secure conditions
160.
Performance at the output and outcome levels for Strategic Objective 4 was strong. WFP
delivered food assistance through 80,000 schools and 4,700 health centres, provided deworming
treatment for children in WFP-assisted schools, and supported government deworming
campaigns; it also supported 10,000 cooks. WFP trained 2,000 counterpart staff in maternal and
child health and nutrition.45
Strategic Objective 5: Strengthen the capacities of countries to reduce
hunger, including through hand-over strategies and local purchase
Strong Progress
161.
Investment for activities under Strategic Objective 5 in 2013 amounted to USD 57 million,
2 percent of total expenditures, more than in any of the previous four years. Strong performance
was based on positive results for two outcomes.
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162.
WFP helped to enhance national capacities in various ways. In some countries, it
stimulated local economies by procuring food from farmers’ associations and retailers. It provided
technical assistance for some governments to implement and scale up school feeding programmes
and build the relevant policy and legislative frameworks, and supported governments in
developing capacities for vulnerability analysis and disaster management. Progress was made in
these areas but the capacities of some governments remained fairly low, highlighting the need for
continued support.
Table 24: Outcome 5.1 Increased marketing opportunities at national level
with cost-effective WFP local purchases
Strong progress
Outcome Indicator
Performance
Food purchased locally, as % of food distributed in-country
163.
Stabilized or improving trends in the share of food purchased in-country were noted in
two-thirds of projects. Deteriorating trends in other projects were often caused by factors outside
the control of the project: in Nicaragua, for example, a decline in 2013 resulted from a reduction
in in-kind donations, whereas cash donations in the previous year had been used for local
purchases.
P4P affects the lives of many more than direct recipients of food assistance
Purchase for Progress (P4P) supports smallholder farmers and traders through indirect association with
WFP programmes: millions of people who receive no direct food assistance benefit indirectly.
In Ethiopia, for example, WFP supported 16 cooperatives through P4P purchases from an estimated 572,000 farmers,
none of whom were beneficiaries under current counting rules.
In Uganda, WFP supports 1,048 farmers’ groups through services such as training in post-harvest management and
business practices. The groups comprise 62,643 farming households – 375,858 individuals. With WFP’s support they
grow and sell good-quality produce and access national and regional markets, thereby increasing their incomes and
improving their livelihoods. In 2013, WFP bought 2,354 mt of maize and beans from these groups – which over
five years sold an average 1,245 mt of food per year worth USD 2.2 million to buyers other than WFP.
164.
Success factors and challenges were linked to local contexts. Local purchases helped
support local production while reducing costs and lead-time, resulting in more efficient delivery
of assistance to beneficiaries. Local purchases sometimes offered good value for money in
comparison with import parity prices, leading to substantial savings. In Senegal, local food
procurement in areas with surplus production boosted agricultural development in communities
with few alternative income opportunities and limited access to markets. It encouraged
communities and authorities to take advantage of the production potential, with a view to
contributing to – and ultimately taking ownership of – their safety nets. In the State of Palestine,
the inclusion of milk in the voucher basket stimulated an increase in supply in shops to
meet demand.
Table 25: Outcome 5.2 Progress made towards nationally owned hunger solutions
Outcome Indicator
Strong progress
Performance
National capacity index
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165.
Measuring the development of national capacities is essential in hand-over strategies.
Improvements in the national capacity index (NCI) were achieved in 70 percent of projects, with
variations according to the type of capacity index assessed. Food-security NCI increased for all
projects that reported trends; the school feeding capacity index increased in 50 percent of projects.
Various success factors influenced improvements in national capacity indexes; some were
linked with WFP investments. WFP worked with the governments of Cambodia and Bangladesh
to build policy and legal frameworks for school feeding. In the State of Palestine, the
Central Bureau of Statistics endorsed the socio-economic and food-security survey by WFP and
the Government for use in its national system. A visit by representatives from Lesotho to the
Brazil Centre of Excellence helped to increase government capacities for taking over the school
feeding programme by 2018.
166.
Table 26: Outputs under Strategic Objective 5
Output
Performance
Food purchased locally
Capacity and awareness developed through WFP-led activities
167.
A large number of government officials and national staff were trained in thematic areas
such as school feeding – 19,000 people – and national food-security programmes – 2,500 people.
Capacity development related to policies, strategies or legislation was provided for 1,797 staff of
governments and national partners. With regard to hand-overs, 11 WFP-managed hunger
solutions and 221 WFP-managed systems for disaster preparedness, risk management and
food-security monitoring were being transferred to governments. Food was purchased locally
from 200 farmers’ groups and 66,000 individual farmers, many of whom were women. 45 Some of
these farmers were supported by the P4P pilot.
Conclusions
168.
WFP’s projects demonstrated progress in all Strategic Objectives. A range of activities was
used to meet the needs of the hungry poor, and the reach of this work extended well beyond direct
beneficiaries: users of assets created, smallholder farmers and beneficiaries of changed policies
and practices all benefited. The success factors and challenges in all Strategic Objectives will
inform project implementation in 2014 with a view to improving performance.
169.
Increased gender sensitivity in programming, reflected in increased use of the gender
marker, enhanced the impact of WFP’s programmes. Other factors contributing to high
performance included more partnerships and greater flexibility in programming resulting from
cash and voucher options.
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170.
Challenges that impeded progress for some outcomes, particularly under
Strategic Objective 4, were identified. Corrective measures will be taken in the coming year:
i) projects must provide a rationale for including the attendance indicator in logical frameworks
when attendance rates are already high; ii) where projects have achieved gender parity, a target
analysis will complement future analyses of progress; iii) the inputs provided by WFP partners
will be reviewed to identify ways of improving the quality of education; and iv) WFP’s school
feeding programmes will seek to serve meals before classes begin so that children focus on
learning rather than their stomachs, and will provide regular deworming. WFP will continue to
advocate for multi-year funding to prevent the pipeline breaks that limit the effectiveness of
school feeding.
171.
More has to be done to ensure progress in nutrition programmes. The challenges in
reporting on anaemia and stunting indicators and the constraints in interpreting the results
contributed to the decision to exclude them from the SRF, even though the outcomes remain
relevant in WFP’s work and its support for national governments. WFP will seek to tailor ART
and TB treatment programmes to address specific needs, for example through more counselling
and monitoring and by improving the referral system between communities and health facilities.
It will also continue to develop governments’ capacities to provide food assistance for people
living with HIV and TB patients, using cash and vouchers when applicable, and to prevent
national health systems from becoming overburdened.
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PART III – ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE BY
MANAGEMENT RESULT DIMENSION
Overview
172.
Part III presents findings from the assessment of WFP’s performance against its MRDs as
outlined in the 2008–2013 MRF. The strategic results reflect what WFP did; the
management results indicate how these results were achieved (see Figure 9).
Figure 9: WFP’s 2013 Management Result Dimensions
And effectively achieve our strategic results.
Benefits accruing to beneficiaries
From which we deliver operational efficiency …
Operational efficiency
Internal business processes
Which is leveraged through a culture of learning
and innovation, ...
Learning and innovation
Over which we exercise stewardship, ...
Stewardship
We secure resources (people, funding) based on
needs, …
Securing resources
Management Result
Dimensions
And supported by internal processes, ...
173.
Each MRD is defined by a set of management results, which are measured in terms of key
performance indicators and targets. The MRDs are unchanged since 2009, but some indicators
have been added to enhance reporting on effectiveness and efficiency. New indicators introduced
in 2013 related to the quality of internal business processes, identification and documentation of
lessons and control frameworks.
174.
In terms of MRDs 1–4 WFP made strong progress, and some progress in MRD 5
(see Table 27); these positive results were reflected in the recent independent assessment of WFP
by MOPAN. In particular, WFP performed well in securing contributions to deliver its
programme of work. The increase in confirmed contributions between 2012 and 2013 reflected an
increase in multi-year contributions: early and more predictable contributions enable WFP to plan
and assist beneficiaries more quickly and effectively. WFP also performed well with regard to
utilizing the funds according to plan: the percentage of undistributed food for ongoing projects
was smaller than in the previous year. WFP continued its strong performance in other aspects of
stewardship such as the effectiveness of managerial controls and public visibility, and steadily
improved its performance in innovation and learning lessons from experience by documenting
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and disseminating recommendations for improvement: the launch in 2013 of the Lessons Learned
Database for emergency responses, for example, enables WFP staff to review recommendations
from emergencies and track their implementation. Good performance in business processes
continued in logistics, procurement and IT. Although there was an increase in the annual cost per
beneficiary in 2013, analysis shows that longer project duration and cost increases in particular
operations – the response in the Syrian Arab Republic is an example – account for increased
averages.
Table 27: Overall Performance by Management Result Dimension
Management Result Dimensions
Performance
1 – Securing resources
Strong progress
2 – Stewardship
Strong progress
3 – Learning and innovation
Strong progress
4 – Internal business processes
Strong progress
5 – Operational efficiency
Some progress
Management Result Dimension 1 – Securing Resources
175.
This dimension reflects WFP’s performance in mobilizing financial and human resources
to carry out its work. Strong performance is mainly attributable to overall increases in funding.
The profile of international professional staff remained unchanged (see Table 28).
Table 28: Overall Performance in Securing Resources
Management Results
Funding was secured against planned needs
Predictable contributions have grown
A stable base of reserve funding is maintained
The staff profile we need to deliver on our strategy is available
Strong progress
Performance
Funding secured against planned needs increased
176.
WFP received USD 4.38 billion in confirmed contributions in 2013, the second highest level
in its history and 18 percent higher than anticipated in the Management Plan.47 This strong
performance is attributable primarily to commitments from the Organisation for
Economic Cooperation and Development–Development Assistance Committee (OECD-DAC)
countries and multi-donor funds to the emergencies in the Syrian Arab Republic, which received
USD 819 million, and the Philippines. Joint resource mobilization and donor briefings with United
Nations agencies contributed to the enhanced donor response.
This figure differs from the contribution revenue in the 2013 audited financial statements because of: i) different
treatment of multi-year revenue; ii) exclusion of contributions with a bilateral funding window; and iii) exclusion of
contribution revenue adjustments such as unspent balances and write-downs.
47
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177.
WFP’s donor base broadened to include Guinea-Bissau and the Economic Community of
West African States (ECOWAS). Also notable were increases in contributions from previous years
from Belgium, Germany, Japan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.
178.
Contributions from the private sector increased by 39 percent to USD 88.4 million between
2012 and 2013: a notable instance was the USD 13.5 million rapidly raised for the emergency
response in the Philippines. In 2013, WFP confirmed 30,000 new individual donors – 17 percent
more than in 2012 – and increased the number of currencies that can be accepted online from six
in 2011 to 11 in 2013. Online donations can now be made in 15 languages.
179.
Although the volume of confirmed contributions increased, operational requirements
declined by 2 percent. The funding received for the response in the Syrian Arab Republic in 2013
was offset by a USD 70 million fall between 2012 and 2013 in funding for operations in
Afghanistan, Chad, Democratic People´s Republic of Korea (DPRK), Kenya, the Niger, Pakistan
and the Sudan reflecting smaller numbers of beneficiaries in some of these countries, even though
they were affected by security issues, bad weather and shifts from emergency to protracted relief
and recovery operations (see Part II). Operational requirements were reduced in 70 percent of
programmes. The share of programme needs met by contributions to the programme of work
increased from 55 percent in 2012 to 62 percent in 2013.
Multi-year funds increased but multilateral contributions decreased as a share of
confirmed contributions
180.
Flexible long-term funding, which is central to good humanitarian donorship, enables
WFP to maximize its effectiveness. The 12 percent increase in confirmed contributions between
2012 and 2013 was partly a result of a 31 percent increase in multi-year contributions to
USD 503 million, and the share of multi-year contributions in overall funding increased from
10 percent to 11 percent. In 2013, Ireland became a strategic partner, and Belgium and the
Republic of Korea signed new multi-year agreements; various donors identified WFP as a partner
of choice for multi-year contributions.
181.
But the share of multilateral contributions missed the target of 11 percent, continuing the
downward trend from 2011 that stems from substantial reductions in contributions from two
multilateral donors rather than a shift among core donors. Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany,
Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom are WFP’s major
multilateral supporters: each provided at least USD 10 million in multilateral funds in 2013, giving
WFP a maximum of flexibility. The document WFP’s Use of Multilateral Funding, produced for the
first time in 2013, will give multilateral donors additional visibility and might help to increase
other donors’ understanding of the benefits of multilateral funding.
A stable base of reserve funding was maintained
182.
WFP has three reserves for funding activities – the Operational Reserve, the
Immediate Response Account (IRA) and the Programme Support and Administrative (PSA)
Equalization Account. An increase in reserve funding was achieved in 2013 as a result of a balance
in the PSA Equalization Account that was higher than expected. Actual contributions in 2013
exceeded the expected funding levels in the 2013 Management Plan, which included a target
Equalization Account balance.
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The diversity of international professional staff remained relatively constant
183.
The percentage of women international professional staff improved to 42 percent in 2013,
but it has not changed significantly since 2002 and is still below the parity target. The proportion
of women in P5 posts or higher is stable at 36 percent; the proportion of senior staff from
developing countries increased to 29 percent. Of the P1 to P3 staff promoted in 2013, 38 percent
were from developing countries and 54 percent were women.
184.
In 2013, WFP prepared a strategy to promote greater diversity and inclusion as part of the
new People Strategy (see Part IV).
Management Result Dimension 2 – Stewardship
185.
Stewardship encompasses all issues relating to management of the resources under
WFP’s control. Progress in utilizing funds according to plan, ensuring the safety and well-being
of staff, minimizing WFP’s environmental footprint, improving managerial controls and
enhancing WFP’s visibility is set out below.
Table 29: Overall Performance in Stewardship
Strong progress
Management Results
Funds are utilized according to plan
Security and safety of staff, premises and operations are increased
Well-being of staff is increased
The greenhouse gas footprint of WFP is minimized
Effective control frameworks are in place
WFP brand and public awareness are managed to increase positive visibility
Performance
Funds were utilized according to plan
186.
For the second year WFP tracked the utilization of funding with a view to minimizing
transfers of unused funds at the end of projects – a major concern for donors. WFP sought to limit
the volume of year-end transfers of food and cash and vouchers to 10 percent of funds received.
In 2013, the proportion of undistributed food in ongoing projects was 8 percent – an improvement
from the previous year.
187.
The percent of undelivered cash and vouchers remained unchanged from 2012 at 6
percent, well within the target of 10 percent. This level of undelivered balances is mainly
attributable to the Syrian regional emergency, delays in distribution due to security issues, the
overall increase in the use of cash and voucher modalities, and in some cases a reduction in the
number of beneficiaries assisted.
188.
In projects closed during 2013 the level of transfers was 3 percent, well below the
10 percent target and a reflection of good financial housekeeping. Unspent project balances at the
end of the year amounted to 0.05 percent of the resources allocated, was an improvement from
2012 and closer to the zero target.
189.
Under Fit for Purpose, WFP piloted resource assessments in Afghanistan, Chad and DRC
to promote forward-looking resource management at the country level. Similar projects are
planned for other countries.
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Security and safety of staff, premises and operations was increased
190.
The increased level of security and safety of WFP staff, premises and operations in 2013 is
reflected in the 88 percent compliance with minimum operating security standards (MOSS)
against the corporate target of 70 percent. The percentage of outstanding SAM recommendations
fell, but the target was not reached. Field security officers were not present in several country
offices where they had been recommended, resulting in reliance on security focal points to
coordinate with Country Directors. The reallocation of resources for the Level 3 emergency
response in the Syrian crisis delayed the deployment of field security personnel in some country
offices.
191.
There was a 15 percent increase in reported security incidents, reflecting WFP’s
challenging operational environments. The highest numbers of incidents were 152 in South
Sudan, 146 in the Sudan, 80 in the Syrian Arab Republic, 55 in Kenya and 51 in Afghanistan.
Criminal actions accounted for 58 percent of reported incidents in 2013, traffic accidents for
24 percent, armed conflict for 13 percent, civil unrest for 3 percent and terrorism for 3 percent.
WFP is committed to ensuring the security and safety of staff through effective security risk
management.
Staff well-being increased
192.
Actions taken in 2013 under Fit for Purpose to enhance staff well-being – an essential
component of an engaged and effective workforce – included the appointment of a health adviser
to monitor health issues in emergencies and promote preventive measures, and an appraisal by
the Medical Service of staff health – the first in WFP. There were 2,500 visits to the Medical Service,
and no change in the number of days lost to sickness and injury – which in WFP is significantly
below the average for other organizations, as reflected in the 2012 WFP Global Staff Survey.48
193.
The Medical Service advised staff deployed to the four Level 3 emergencies on personal
health, and supported country offices in addressing public health concerns such as outbreaks of
leishmaniasis in the Syrian Arab Republic and chikungunya49 in the Philippines.
WFP’s greenhouse gas footprint declined
194.
WFP’s greenhouse gas footprint lightened for the third consecutive year to 78,898 mt of
CO2-equivalent, 8.3 percent below the 2008 baseline, largely because WFP’s aviation services
carried out fewer food airlifts; but emissions from commercial air travel were 60 percent higher
than in 2008. Greenhouse gas emissions from buildings and vehicles fell slightly as country offices
in Ecuador, Ethiopia and the Sudan pioneered reduction strategies.
195.
Under WFP’s Energy Efficiency Programme (see Box) cost-effective energy management
in Headquarters, the regional bureaux and country offices will be introduced in 2014.
WFP’s Energy Efficiency Programme
The programme made its first round of awards to eight projects in 2013. This investment of USD 273,000 is expected
to save USD 303,000 per year in fuel and maintenance costs to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 661 mt, enabling WFP
to save up to USD 1.5 million over the lifetime of the new equipment. The most cost-effective actions involved the
World Health Organization. 2010. The case for paid sick leave. World Health Report, Background Paper, No 9. Geneva.
It is difficult to compare statistics on sick leave because organizations use different calculations.
49 Mosquito-borne fever similar to dengue.
48
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introduction of LED light bulbs: projects in Afghanistan, Guatemala and the State of Palestine, for example, provide
lighting that cuts electricity consumption by 80 percent.
Internal control systems were improved
196.
As part of the Fit for Purpose workstream on enhancing managerial performance, WFP
provided training for managers and promoted stakeholder engagement and field-focused
support.
197.
The percentage of offices with annual performance plans declined in 2013, partly because
new divisions established at Headquarters developed their plans after the deadline and in less
detail than existing units – whose plans improved markedly. All reviewed performance plans met
WFP’s quality standards with regard to completeness, alignment and clarity. In 90 percent of
country offices annual performance plans were used to manage operations throughout 2013; in
some regions the figure was 100 percent.
198.
The percentage of WFP offices with risk registers increased during 2013. Compliance
among country offices reached 94 percent, largely because of the use of enterprise risk
management in project planning and the risk-management support provided for the Level 2 and
Level 3 emergencies.
199.
WFP focused in 2013 on improving the quality and timeliness of individual performance
management. One outcome was significant improvement in the completion rate for PACE:
96 percent of international staff had completed PACE by the revised target date – 15 percent more
than in 2012. At the senior level, compliance with PACE increased from 59 percent in 2012 to
91 percent in 2013. The improvements in the PACE process were a result of increased support for
staff and managers provided through workshops, toolkits, guides and “drop-in” sessions.
200.
WFP implemented most audit recommendations in 2013, and collaborated with the
Inspector General on a comprehensive clean-up exercise. There were 271 recommendations
outstanding at the end of 2012, of which 22 were high-risk and 249 were medium-risk. By the end
of 2013, this figure had been reduced to 106, of which only 4 were high-risk. WFP prioritizes the
implementation of internal audit recommendations, and regular reports are made to the
Audit Committee on outstanding high-risk issues.
201.
All managers completed an assurance statement at the end of 2013 with regard to internal
and financial controls: these statements enabled the Executive Director to provide a letter of
representation to the External Auditor. Managers also responded to questions on internal controls
derived from WFP’s Internal Control Framework. The assurance statements were the main means
of identifying strengths and weaknesses in WFP’s internal control system.
202.
Post-delivery losses in 2013 remained well below the 2 percent target. Of the 3.8 million mt
of food handled, 25,013 mt – 0.66 percent – was recorded as post-delivery losses, a decrease of
0.11 percent from 2012. Losses recorded in South Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic and Yemen
accounted for nearly 60 percent of the 2013 total.
The WFP brand and public awareness were managed to increase positive visibility
203.
WFP increased its engagement with governments, opinion leaders, the private sector and
the general public through traditional and new media. References to WFP’s work were monitored
in 60,560 news clips in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy,
Japan, Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States of America;
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worldwide, WFP was mentioned in 80,341 news clips. The increase from 2012 is largely
attributable to the high media profile given to the four Level 3 emergencies in 2013.
204.
WFP used web-based tools and social media in innovative ways to mobilize advocacy and
funding and generated 3.3 million subscribers on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Freerice, up
from 1.1 million in 2012. Visits to wfp.org in the available languages reached 5.3 million.
205.
The combination of pro-bono advertising for WFP in the media, cinemas, taxis, airports,
metro stations and outdoor advertising spaces was worth millions of dollars in 2013. The
estimated value of donated space for TV spots and print advertising alone was USD 42.1 million.
206.
In the fourth quarter of 2013, an independent analysis of media coverage of WFP with
regard to the Level 3 emergencies in the Central African Republic, the Philippines, South Sudan
and the Syrian Arab Republic was overwhelmingly positive, with 97 percent of articles giving a
favourable message. Quarterly analyses of media coverage will be started in 2014.
Management Result Dimension 3 – Learning and Innovation
207.
Learning and innovation relates to the identification, documentation and dissemination of
lessons learned and skills needed to improve WFP’s performance. The analysis below focuses on
progress in documenting and reporting lessons learned, implementing evaluation
recommendations and learning and knowledge management.
Table 30: Overall Performance in Learning and Innovation
Strong progress
Management Results
Performance
Identification, documentation and dissemination of lessons are encouraged
Staff capacity is developed to deliver WFP’s strategy
Identification, documentation and dissemination of lessons were improved
208.
WFP continued to enhance its learning from experience by using systematic processes
initiated in 2010 to document, follow up and disseminate recommendations and lessons for
improvement. Lessons-learned exercises are conducted after every Level 3 emergency, and the
regional bureaux carry out a review after each Level 2 emergency response. The lessons learned
database for emergency responses was launched in 2013 to enable WFP staff to review
recommendations from previous emergencies and track their implementation;
630 recommendations are currently stored. An emergency training and deployment strategy is
now in place, and in 2013 the first Functional and Support Training for Emergency Response
(FASTER) took place with a view to increasing the number of trained staff on the
Emergency Response Roster.
209.
Evaluations of operations are one such mechanism for learning and improvement. Of all
projects closed in 2013, WFP had evaluated 66 percent at least once during implementation; the
target for the coming years is 100 percent. The 16 evaluations of projects closed during 2013
included evaluations commissioned by country offices and country portfolio evaluations by the
Office of Evaluation. The findings of the decentralized evaluations of entire operations and of
individual project components inform decision-making and project design. Evaluations of
operations by the Office of Evaluation will increase to 30 per year by 2015; 12 were carried out
in 2013.
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210.
WFP tracks the implementation of all recommendations from centralized evaluations. By
the end of 2013, 79 percent of follow-up actions on recommendations from 49 evaluation reports
had been implemented; 84 actions are pending. This rate of implementation is higher than that in
comparable organizations, but WFP is committed to increasing it. Each action has a timeline and
identified managers are accountable for implementation.
211.
Several lessons from previous emergency responses were applied in the Philippines:
experienced staff and support functions were deployed before the typhoon made landfall, and
blanket food distributions prevented the kind of unrest experienced in Haiti in 2010. The
WFP cash team in the Syrian regional crisis learned from its experiences and coordinated with
other agencies and clusters as to transfer dates so that beneficiaries received cash transfers from
different sources at the same time: this reduced the risk of beneficiaries using the WFP transfer to
buy items other than food. Post-distribution monitoring showed that this approach was
successful.
Staff capacities were enhanced
212.
WFP continued to develop tools for augmenting staff capacities in 2013, in line with
Fit for Purpose. The middle-manager programme for P3 and P4 staff and national officers at
equivalent grades attracted 295 staff, of whom 34 percent were women, in 13 countries.
Management assessment centre sessions supported the development of 41 staff at P4 and above,
of whom 37 percent were women.
213.
The WFP learning management system was expanded in 2013 to include 200 courses and
450 video simulations. Of 20,460 course registrations, 25 percent were completed, and 28 new
courses were supported by the training team during various phases of the learning cycle.
214.
WFP training included two programmes in English and French to enhance knowledge
about school feeding: 53 programme officers from 35 countries, of whom 73 percent were national
staff, and representatives from governments and NGOs were trained. The Emergency
Preparedness and Response Package (EPRP) web tool had been rolled out in 92 percent of WFP
country offices by the end of 2013.
Management Result Dimension 4 – Internal Business Processes
215.
The Business Process Review, which assesses WFP’s business activities in terms of
performance, cost, quality, accountability and alignment with the Strategic Objectives, identified
30 short-term and long-term improvements in supply-chain management, programme-cycle
management, resource allocation and utilization, and monitoring, reporting and evaluation.
Several short-term improvements were implemented during 2013.
Efficiency Savings
New software to scale up cash and voucher transfers
As WFP’s use of cash and voucher transfer grows, new challenges emerge. Until recently there was no standard
software for managing cash and voucher transfers or for tracking recipients but in 2013, WFP launched the online
SCOpe. Because many operational areas have limited internet coverage, an offline module can be used for beneficiary
registrations and transactions. SCOpe combines the best features of the systems used by country offices to deliver
electronic vouchers into a standard software package.
SCOpe registration of beneficiaries has begun in Somalia, and WFP is preparing to roll out SCOpe in Dadaab refugee
camp in Kenya and to use it to register 3,000 households in the arid northern regions. SCOpe will become operational
in many more countries in 2014.
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Table 31: Overall Performance in Internal Business Processes
Management Results
Internal Business Processes are efficiently managed
Strong progress
Performance
WFP’s business processes operated in a timely manner
216.
The percentage of financial contributions registered within 30 days increased from
75 percent in 2012 to 82 percent in 2013, but remained below the 100 percent target. The increase
was largely a result of prompt registration of locally negotiated contributions from the private
and public sectors.
217.
In 2013, 81 percent of food procured was delivered to WFP by contractual deadlines, a
slight improvement from prior years. Delivery delays do not necessarily reflect poor performance
by suppliers: it may reflect requests by WFP to postpone deliveries because of concerns such as
insecurity, adjustments to beneficiary numbers or insufficient warehouse capacity. WFP
continued to make purchases on the basis of the import parity price comparison, which compares
food prices in local, regional and international markets, including transport costs to final
destination points.
218.
In 2013, 87 percent of contracted non-food items were received on time, including goods
obtained by competition or waiver. As with food deliveries, delays do not necessarily reflect the
performance of suppliers: factors such as customs clearance can affect delivery dates.
Efficiency savings: RBA collaboration on “reverse auctions”
In October 2013, the WFP-led common procurement team of the Rome-based agencies issued a tender for electricity
services using a combination of closed tendering and a “reverse-auction” process. The top six bidders identified in the
tendering process were given three days to make anonymous online offers of their best prices. As a result, electricity
services were obtained at a price 10 percent less than the previous contract, even though electricity costs are rising.
Joint tendering by the three agencies optimizes economies of scale by combining demand. The “reverse auctions” are
part of the “In-Tend” software, which is designed to facilitate public procurement and promote competition among
suppliers while maintaining the transparency and confidentiality of the tender process. The approach will be replicated
in 2014 for other goods and services.
219.
Loss of internet connectivity in WFP offices averaged 4 minutes in 24 hours. The
introduction of shared platforms for web-based applications reduced server costs by 90 percent
and increased the timeliness of service provision.
Efficiency savings: online meetings save time, money and CO2
Remote meeting technology enables WFP to maximize participation in collaborative projects and minimize travel costs
and greenhouse gas emissions. A recent consultation organized by the Office of Evaluation used a combination of live
conference sessions and online materials supported by discussion groups to obtain feedback from a large number of
people in WFP. A workshop addressing the same objective would have cost USD 159,000 in travel costs, and 79.4 mt in
greenhouse gas emissions.
220.
Continuity of delivery is critical for effective food assistance, and hence an indicator of
performance. WFP therefore tracks its ability to advance funds and to make food available for sale
to countries.
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221.
Advance financing is essential to ensuring the continuity of WFP operations. In 2013,
USD 165 million from the Immediate Response Account, USD 635 million from the Working
Capital Financing Facility and USD 486 million from the Forward Purchase Facility (FPF) were
used to meet emergency needs, fill pipelines or reduce delivery times in advance of contributions.
This accounts for 46 percent of WFP’s cash resources, well above the target of 25 percent of funds
being available for advances.
222.
The FPF enables WFP to buy food on the basis of aggregated regional needs and funding
forecasts and hence exploit favourable market conditions. In 2013, WFP purchased a net 50
342,000 mt of food through FPF, exceeding its target of 300,000 mt and nearly doubling the
tonnage acquired in 2012.
Cost Savings
Forward planning and purchasing
WFP continues to expand the use of the FPF, which is an aggregated-demand approach to procurement in developing
markets and the purchase of non-cereal foods; it has a spending ceiling of USD 300 million. In 2013, 955,000 mt of food
was purchased through FPF and an average supply line of 342,000 mt was maintained: 30 country offices bought
873,000 mt from the FPF inventory and benefited from an average lead time of two and a half months, an improvement
of 71 percent.
In the East Africa supply line, 80 percent of the food purchased – 477,000 mt – was delivered to country offices through
FPF, with an average lead time of 89 days, which is 82 percent less than in conventional purchases. In the West Africa
supply line, half of the food purchased – 128,000 mt – was delivered through FPF, leading to an average 84-day decrease
in lead times; the average for conventional purchases is 104 days. The North Africa and Middle East supply line, which
was established in December 2012, delivered 210,000 mt of food to operations in the region through FPF, 72 percent of
the regional total. WFP also initiated an FPF supply line in southern Africa, which delivered 58,000 mt of food to projects
in the region with an average lead time of 83 days compared with the 120 days needed for conventional purchases.
Quality of core internal business processes was demonstrated
223.
WFP chartered 69 ships and booked 43,000 containers in 2013 to carry 1.95 million mt of
food. The timeliness of ocean transport in 2013 – 75 percent of cargoes were dispatched within
contract delivery periods – reflects the efficiency of WFP’s shipping service in coordinating
deliveries with suppliers and country offices. Through its experience with shipping and in view
of the volume of food involved, WFP was able to negotiate favourable prices and avoid
contracting shipping services through suppliers; savings were also made through arrangements
made for the unloading and bagging for some shipments. WFP’s overall saving on ocean freight
was USD 11.35 million in 2013, USD 3 million more than in 2012.
Efficiency Savings
Food supply agreements and the Syrian Arab Republic
The numerous operational challenges in the Syrian Arab Republic call for innovative solutions. One example is the
shift from spot tendering to procuring food in neighbouring Turkey.
In November 2013, WFP signed food supply agreements for 36,000 mt of lentils from Turkey, six-months supply. The
timing of the agreement in the post-harvest period secured advantageous prices; the price of lentils gradually
increased afterwards. Food supply agreements are in place with suppliers in Turkey for lentils, bulgur wheat and
pasta to complement food from FPF. WFP has so far saved USD 530,000 through these agreements.
224.
Food quality and safety require constant attention. In 2013, three country offices
implemented at least one module of the new Food Quality Software (FOQUS), whose roll-out is a
step forward in addressing food quality and safety risks. Because roll-out was slower than
50
Balance of FPF stock that remained available for purchase by projects throughout 2013.
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planned, and because feedback from country offices led to some re-design, the target of ten offices
using the software in 2013 was not achieved. WFP is on track to implement the system in 22 offices
by the end of 2014. FOQUS will deploy: i) an improved system to prevent food-quality defaults;
ii) a food-incident management system with defined roles and responsibilities; and
iii) partnerships with external experts who can provide technical guidance. A policy for the
labelling of pre-packaged foods was established in 2013.
Efficiency Savings
The Global Vehicle Leasing Programme
The Global Vehicle Leasing Programme purchases vehicles from manufacturers and leases them to country offices.
Wholesale prices are on average 20 percent less than the prices country offices would pay to local suppliers. This
approach was used to buy 1,800 vehicles, with cost savings of USD 2 million in 2013. WFP’s vehicle fleet is renewed
every five years to minimize maintenance costs, enhance fuel efficiency and optimize resale values.
Management Result Dimension 5 – Operational Efficiency
225.
Operational Efficiency refers to all issues related to the timeliness, cost-efficiency, and
appropriateness of WFP response. The analysis below focuses on different aspects of operational
efficiency in terms of corporate indicators and examples of actions to optimize the timeliness and
effectiveness of operations.
Cost Savings
UNHAS Performance Management Project
During 2013, WFP developed a tool that supports results-based decision making through the automatic calculation,
measurement and visualization of effectiveness and efficiency in the United Nations Humanitarian
Air Service (UNHAS).
The new decision-making tool will help systematically identify opportunities to make strategic and operational
improvements; UNHAS will optimize fleet and flight planning accordingly. This will result in WFP delivering greater
value for money, through greater access for clients to UNHAS services, more efficient operating costs and the
optimization of the aircraft chartering services.
Table 32: Overall Performance in Operational Efficiency
Management Results
Cost efficiency delivery is ensured
Timely response to assessed needs
Appropriate strategic response is provided
Some progress
Performance
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Costs were increased by more frequent assistance and the large-scale response in the
Syrian Arab Republic
226.
The cost of food assistance per beneficiary in 2013 was USD 48.57 – 25 percent more than
in 2012. This includes all annual expenditures by WFP operations on direct beneficiaries
(“targeted persons provided with food assistance”)51 – food, cash, vouchers and capacity
development and augmentation. Direct beneficiaries are currently recorded only for food and
cash/voucher transfers.52 The increase is attributable to:

proportionally more food assistance being provided over longer periods;

significant scaling up of cash and voucher operations; and

a reduction in beneficiary numbers as WFP shifted to targeted assistance in several
large operations.
227.
WFP provided a larger proportion of food assistance in 2013 than in 2012; the food transfer
value and the value of cash/voucher transfers per beneficiary were higher, of which only a
proportion is attributable to higher food costs or voucher values as a result of rising prices. The
increase can primarily be explained by the extended duration of assistance interventions in 2013:
some projects ran for longer periods than in 2012 and involved more feeding days, increasing
operational costs for the same number of beneficiaries.
228.
A review of the monthly cost per beneficiary taking into account the effect of changes in
project duration illustrates some of the cost drivers. But a few projects experienced significantly
increased monthly beneficiary costs that were not attributable to increased duration: in some
projects, the increase resulted from replacing in-kind food assistance with vouchers, which incur
significant start-up costs. Modifications to the food basket in the Syrian emergency operation to
offset a reduction in household incomes affected the cost per beneficiary; additional costs were
also incurred when WFP introduced lipid-based nutrient supplements and ready-to-eat rations
during the initial days of displacement. WFP also had to cover the costs of offices in Jordan,
Lebanon and Turkey to manage the transition from short-term to long-term crisis response.
229.
A significant element in increased costs was the increase in the use of cash and vouchers
compared with 2012. This was largely driven by the response to the long-term crisis in the
Syrian Arab Republic, where expenditures for food assistance through cash and voucher transfers
to vulnerable Syrian populations in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq and Turkey affected by the events in
the Syrian Arab Republic rose from USD 14 million in 2012 to USD 317 million in 2013 as the
duration of cash and voucher transfers was extended and the value of vouchers increased in some
instances.53 Start-up costs for printing and distributing paper vouchers or switching to e-vouchers
were a factor in some operations as cash and voucher transfer programmes were introduced and
scaled up.
The duration of individual operations is not captured by the annual cost per beneficiary calculation, which does not
take the duration of assistance per beneficiary into account. A comparable monthly beneficiary cost can only be
calculated in the planning stage.
52 The cost components covered are: i) food transfers; ii) external transport; iii) landside transport, storage and
handling; iv) other direct operational costs; v) cash and voucher transfers; vi) cash and voucher related costs; and
vii) capacity development and augmentation transfers.
53 2012 expenditures only include cost for cash and voucher transfers while 2013 expenditures also include cash and
voucher related costs.
51
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230.
Several operations continued to shift from emergency relief to targeted recovery and
assistance, with a focus on resilience. This reduced the numbers of people receiving assistance
from WFP, particularly in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Kenya, Pakistan and Somalia. Costs also
increased as a number of large-scale operations introduced products such as corn-soya blend
(CSB)+ and CSB++, Plumpy’Doz and Plumpy’Sup to address acute malnutrition.
231.
Longer periods of food assistance contributed to positive outcomes for beneficiaries
during 2013 (see Part II). Analysis of several large projects showed improvements in threequarters of reported household food consumption scores averaging 17 percent more than in 2012.
Improvements registered in these projects for prevalence of acute malnutrition among children
under 5 were on average 28 percent more than in 2012.
232.
The cost of food transfers decreased slightly in 2013, but there was a larger decline in the
associated delivery costs. The proportion of associated costs to total food costs decreased from
41 percent to 36 percent over the year. This trend is evident in landside transport, storage and
handling (LTSH) costs, which decreased by 13 percent compared with 2012.55 WFP distributed
proportionally more food to its beneficiaries in 2013 but spent less on deliveries, particularly in
large operations where economies of scale could be exploited.
Food transfer costs relate to the costs of food distributed to beneficiaries. Associated costs include external
transport, landside transport, storage and handling (LTSH) and other direct operational costs.
55 LTSH comprises costs required to care for and deliver food from the completion of external transport to the
final destination.
54
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Efficiency Savings
Using biometrics in general food distributions in refugee camps in Kenya
In October 2013 routine fingerprint checks were introduced in Dadaab and Kakuma refugee camps to prevent the use
of ration cards by people uneligible for general food distributions. In partnership with UNHCR, WFP checks the
fingerprints of every person collecting food against UNHCR’s registration database.
After three months there was a 17 percent decrease in the number of rations distributed in the camps (see chart), saving
2,892 mt of food valued at USD 2.9 million.
The project cost USD 4.3 million in the start-up year, with annual costs projected at USD 2 million. With reductions in
annual food requirements of USD 12 million, the costs of the new system are expected to be recovered in the first few
months of 2014. Monitoring data suggest that the programme is working well, and that the fall in beneficiary numbers
was a result of the fingerprint checks. The populations in the camps were stable during the period. Fingerprints could
be matched for most eligible beneficiaries, but additional verification by photograph or interview was needed in
4 percent of cases. No change in food prices was noted in surrounding areas. Most beneficiaries reported satisfaction
with the new system.56
Kakuma
Dadaab
600 000
528 089
500 000
Beneficiaries
-17%
440 272
400 000
300 000
403 895
334 347
200 000
100 000
124 194
105 925
Sept 15, 2013
Dec 15, 2013
0
Timely responses to assessed needs
233.
Analysis of the relevant indicators – including response time in sudden-onset emergencies,
advance financing availability and lead-time reduction – showed that performance against this
management result was mixed. As part of the organizational strengthening exercise, the PREP
was created to optimize partnerships with national authorities and to enable WFP to prepare and
implement more efficient and effective emergency responses by 2014. Through PREP, WFP has
also begun to internalize the Transformative Agenda of the IASC.
Bauer, J.M., Akakpo, K., Enlund, M. and Passeri, S. 2013. A new tool in the toolbox: using mobile text for food security
surveys in a conflict setting. Humanitarian Practice Network's Online Exchange. Available at: http://www.odihpn.org/thehumanitarian-space/news/announcements/blog-articles/a-new-tool-in-the-toolbox-using-mobile-text-for-foodsecurity-surveys-in-a-conflict-setting
56
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Efficiencies: Supply Chain Management
During 2013, WFP faced a major challenge in maintaining supply chains for the Level 3 emergencies in the
Central African Republic, the Philippines, the Syrian Arab Republic and South Sudan, which required 450,000 mt of
food delivered through several corridors to ensure that 6.5 million people received timely humanitarian assistance.
To respond to this challenge, the Supply Chain Management Working Group was set up and a supply chain
management report dashboard was generated within 48 hours of emergencies to visualize aspects of the supply chains:
needs, funding, advance financing options such as the Forward Purchase Facility, and updated sourcing, delivery and
distribution status and options.
In addition, a pipeline management tool was developed, and capacities in the Logistics Development Unit were
augmented to prepare the dashboard and help budget services in Headquarters manage the high number of requests
for advance financing. In the case of Level 3 emergencies, resource management analysts were sent to emergency
locations to accommodate the increased workload.
During the emergency operation (EMOP) for the Syrian Arab Republic, the dashboard informed decisions for
optimizing the food basket, and on sourcing, delivery and the use of advance financing. This minimized pipeline breaks;
90 percent of EMOP beneficiaries were reached in 2013.
234.
WFP’s Level 3 sudden-onset emergency response in November 2013 to provide food
assistance for people affected by typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines reached the beneficiaries
within 96 hours; the target time was 72 hours. WFP had no operational presence in the area, but
some staff had been deployed just before the typhoon made landfall and first responders were
deployed within 24 hours. The response was delayed by factors such as the scale of destruction
affecting land, air and sea transport facilities: the fact that WFP was unable to provide food
assistance within 72 hours will be reviewed in evaluations and audits of the response and in the
Level 3 lessons-learned exercise.
Efficiency Savings
Using SMS for food security surveys in a conflict setting
Collecting data on household food security through mobile telephones may be cheaper and faster than through
WFP’s standard interviews. A WFP field test compared face-to-face emergency food security assessment with mobile
text surveys in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which was experiencing conflict,
restricted humanitarian access and large-scale displacement.
Data obtained through mobile texts was found to be more efficient in terms of cost and time than face-to-face surveys
to monitor trends in the reduced coping strategies index; data quality was comparable. But the quality of data
obtained from face-to-face surveys for the food consumption score, which had more questions and was more
complex, was higher. The field test highlighted the potential of mobile text surveys in areas where humanitarian
access is limited in that data can be collected without risk to staff. Mobile text surveys could be used to enhance the
Integrated Food Security Phase Classification vulnerability assessment process, which relies on up-to-date household
food security information. The findings from the field test include:
Face-to-face:
6 weeks for 2,700 questionnaires
USD 22 per person
Mobile text survey:
1–2 weeks for 1,000–2,000 questionnaires
USD 5 per person
235.
Improvements were noted, however, in other measures of response time. For projects that
did not include a sudden-onset emergency, the lead time from purchase requisition to delivery of
food to the recipient country was reduced by 70 percent as a result of using FPF. In 2013, the
average lead time of 106 days for normal operations was reduced by 71 percent overall – well
above the 50 percent target and an improvement on 2012. When food purchases were made with
a combination of the advance financing mechanism and FPF, the average lead time was reduced
by 83 percent.
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Appropriate strategic response was provided
236.
Since the presentation of the Management Plan (2013–2015), significant changes have been
made to the programme of work. The proportion of resources spent on emergencies was
20 percent higher than planned as a result of the expansion of the Syrian Arab Republic crisis and
the activation of three other Level 3 emergencies. One consequence was that investment in the
Strategic Objectives was reduced, except for Strategic Objective 5, but capacity development was
maintained at the planned level throughout.
237.
Expenditures for Strategic Objective 1 remained as planned, with slight increases in the
proportion of programmes with general food distribution components. Consequently, there was
less general food distribution under Strategic Objective 2, with more resources allocated to food
assistance for assets. The average deviation of expenditures by activity type in all the Strategic
Objectives amounted to 3 percent. Twelve countries were identified to undertake the strategic
planning process in line with UNDAFs, national planning processes and WFP’s project cycle, of
which eight implemented the actions on time in 2013, exceeding the target.
238.
Significant progress was made in 2013 in mainstreaming gender into WFP’s programming.
The proportion of new projects with a gender marker code of 2A or 2B, which show that gender
concerns are adequately addressed, doubled to 50 percent in 2013 from 24 percent in 2012. The
proportion with a gender marker code of 0, which means that gender concerns are not adequately
addressed, decreased by half (see Figure 10). WFP is on track to achieve the target of 100 percent of
new projects with a gender marker code of 2A by the end of 2014, thanks largely to training in the
regional bureaux for Country Directors, Deputy Country Directors and Heads of Programme.
Figure 10: Progress made since 2012 with the Gender Marker
239.
One challenge in achieving a gender marker code of 2 is the availability of gender-sensitive
food-security data at the field level and constructing the gender marker code, particularly in
sudden-onset emergencies. The proportion of projects with a gender marker code was 17 percent
for emergency operations, 56 percent for PRROs and 67 percent for development projects and
country programmes. WFP will therefore establish the relevant good practices, develop analytical
tools, provide training at the field level and share knowledge across the organization.
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240.
Adequate reporting rates on indicators such as the gender marker code are instrumental
for reviewing project results and identifying improvements. In 2013, WFP reported for the last
time against the indicators in the 2008–2013 SRF. For all projects, WFP reported on 73 percent of
the outcome indicators in the logical frameworks. This slight decrease from 2012 is largely
attributable to: i) contextual factors that impeded WFP's access to intervention areas for primary
monitoring and data collection, resulting in increased reliance on cooperating partners; and
ii) prioritization of monitoring resources to start the collection of data on the new SRF indicators.
241.
Various initiatives to improve monitoring came to fruition in 2013. The 2014–2017 SRF
approved by the Board included improved measurement indicators and normative business rules
intended to enhance outcome monitoring; WFP’s first standard operating procedures for
monitoring were also issued. Additional monitoring and evaluation (M&E) staff were deployed
to each regional bureau in late 2013, and corporate monitoring guidance materials and guidance
notes for the SRF indicators were updated. The first module of the Country Office Monitoring and
Evaluation Tool – WFP’s first overall monitoring system – was implemented in all country offices
during 2013.
242.
The 2014–2017 SRF includes several new indicators, so further fluctuation in the reporting
rate is to be expected. Measures in 2014 to mitigate this concern include the development of
guidance notes covering all indicators, training, financial support for countries needing assistance
in outcome monitoring, and the launch of an online M&E learning platform.
Conclusions
243.
WFP’s strong performance in 2013 in relation to the Strategic Plan was supported by the
MRDs and the roll-out of Fit for Purpose. Fundraising was generally successful, reflecting global
understanding of the importance of food assistance, especially in emergencies; WFP will continue
to advocate for multilateral funding and a larger resource base with a view to enhancing overall
performance. The representation of women and diversity in senior positions were stable but low
in 2013: improvement will be a major issue in the coming years. Completion rates for PACE among
international and senior staff exceeded 90 percent, substantially more than in previous years: this
will support the People Strategy from 2014.
244.
Attention will be given to areas of limited progress. Work to support learning and
innovation – notably PREP – was undertaken, but was unevenly spread across WFP. The security
of WFP’s facilities and staff increased in 2013, but hazards also increased: it is critical that more is
done to ensure that we reach the most vulnerable people. The cost per beneficiary was higher in
2013, but so was the average value of transfers to beneficiaries in terms of feeding days, resilience
and specialized nutritional products. The concentration of resources on fewer beneficiaries
resulted in the strong performance noted in Part II, even allowing for the realignment of funding
in response to the Level 3 emergencies. WFP will continue to seek efficiencies with a view to
maximizing value for our beneficiaries. The initiatives to increase value for money are highlighted
in the efficiency vignettes.
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PART IV – LOOKING FORWARD
245.
WFP recognizes the importance of a results-based culture in which successes and
challenges are noted and communicated. Performance assessment – a defining aspect of this
culture – shapes decisions made with a view to maximizing value for money and building public
interest in addressing the challenges of hunger. For every decision, every programme and every
dollar spent, WFP will track the results in terms of service to its beneficiaries and progress towards
Zero Hunger.
246.
WFP’s performance in 2013 was enhanced by the initiatives of the organizational
strengthening exercise and the focus on the country offices for the delivery of food assistance. This
process will continue in 2014, and the positive changes promised through the Framework for
Action will start to take effect. Part of this organizational change is the development of enhanced
performance management systems that will be more consistent and comprehensive in capturing
results and communicating the benefits of WFP’s operations.
The Strategic Plan (2014–2017)
247.
The Strategic Plan (2014–2017) sets out the drivers for priority action in 2014. It
consolidates the shift from food aid to food assistance and re-commits WFP to responding to
shocks, restoring and rebuilding lives and livelihoods, reducing vulnerability and building lasting
resilience. The four Strategic Objectives ensure a commitment to building national capacities and
to ensuring that all activities are gender-sensitive.
248.
To deliver the Strategic Plan, WFP will optimize its management practices in terms of
five priorities (see Figure 11):

People. WFP will be people-centred, investing in staff capability and performance in a
culture of commitment, communication and accountability.

Partnerships. WFP will be the preferred partner for beneficiaries, communities,
governments, United Nations agencies, NGOs and the private sector.

Processes and Systems. WFP will have optimum processes and systems for project design
and implementation, supply chains, learning, knowledge-sharing and innovation.

Programmes. WFP will have programmes that deliver effectively and efficiently to
beneficiaries and that build capacities.

Accountability and Funding. WFP will be transparent, providing value for money and being
accountable for all resources, and it will be fully funded.
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Figure 11: Organizational Strengthening and WFP’s Five Attributes
Priority 1: People
WFP will invest in staff capabilities and performance
249.
The shift to food assistance requires WFP staff to extend their capabilities so that they can
respond to needs ranging from reducing malnutrition in complex emergencies to addressing the
root causes of hunger through resilience-building and capacity development activities. WFP’s
success depends on the ability of its staff to respond rapidly and effectively to changing
operational and global conditions.
250.
WFP is therefore developing a People Strategy to build an engaged workforce with the
skills to fill a variety of roles. Linkages between accountability and performance will be reinforced,
and investments in staff in the country offices, regional bureaux and Headquarters will be made.
WFP will define career paths for different job levels and functions. Career development tools will
be enhanced and linked with recruitment and performance management. The strategy will ensure
that all WFP employees see themselves as part of a team and that they are committed to delivering
the Strategic Plan.
251.
The People Strategy aims to increase gender parity and the representation of international
professionals from developing countries, particularly at the leadership level. This will be achieved
by ensuring that diversity and inclusion are intrinsic elements in promotions, reassignments,
external appointments and the planned leadership and career-development programme for
women at the P4 to D1 levels.
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Priority 2: Partnerships
WFP will be the preferred and trusted partner
252.
WFP aims to be the partner of choice in programmes that contribute to the elimination of
hunger. A Corporate Partnership Strategy is being developed for this purpose that will guide the
development of partnerships at country offices, regional bureaux and Headquarters. WFP’s
traditional partnerships with governments, United Nations agencies and international NGOs will
be augmented by partnerships with regional organizations, local NGOs, commercial companies
and philanthropic foundations.
253.
WFP is engaged with partners in the Zero Hunger Challenge, and will work with WHO
and UNICEF to reduce stunting among children and with FAO to promote access to adequate
food all year round through activities such as safety nets and cash and voucher transfers. With
FAO, IFAD, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and Bioversity International,
WFP will continue to promote sustainable food systems by working with governments on policies
and capacities to manage disaster risks; it will also contribute to the doubling of productivity and
incomes among smallholder farmers through P4P and the rehabilitation of productive assets with
IFAD, the World Bank and FAO. And WFP will work with FAO to develop improved,
cost-effective storage systems with a view to minimizing post-harvest losses.
254.
WFP will remain focused on the MDGs, particularly for countries with severe nutrition
and food-security challenges, and will continue to engage in the post-2015 development agenda.
With the RBAs and other partners, WFP will work to break the cycle of hunger for the most
vulnerable and to address the underlying causes of food insecurity and malnutrition by helping
to develop sustainable agricultural and food access systems. The focus on food security, nutrition
and sustainable agriculture in the post-2015 development agenda is justified by studies showing
that reductions in poverty do not translate into proportional reductions in food insecurity or
improved nutritional outcomes.10
255.
The post-2015 development agenda includes Sustainable Development Goals to be
adopted by United Nations Member States in September 2015. The adoption of the Hyogo
Framework for Action 2 is planned for March 2015, and parties to the United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate Change are committed to reaching a new agreement in December 2015.
WFP remains committed to supporting the Committee on World Food Security with regard to the
post-2015 development agenda and to dialogue and advocacy with NGO and private-sector
partners, and it will be involved in preparations for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit, which
is expected to lead to significant changes in the humanitarian system.
Priority 3: Processes and Systems
WFP will be more efficient
256.
Recommendations from the Business Process Review to enhance efficiency were
implemented in 2013. WFP will continue to develop efficient processes to improve productivity
and minimize unit costs in 2014, and will implement the QCPR decisions in relation to achieving
efficiency savings.
257.
To ensure that operational decisions are securely evidence-based, WFP is developing a
knowledge-management strategy that includes plans to develop a single access point for all
knowledge needs. Data will be accessible to all staff to support their daily decision-making.
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258.
In view of the significant efficiencies achieved through the FPF in terms of reduced lead
times and food purchases made when conditions are favourable, the facility will be extended to
enhance WFP’s supply chains. This will involve the alignment of WINGS II and other information
and reporting systems with the FPF business processes with a view to maximizing the
transparency, traceability and visibility of FPF transactions.
259.
The new System for Cash Operations (SCOpe) will increase the cost-efficiency of
WFP’s supply chains and support the scale-up of cash and voucher programmes. WFP will
establish SCOpe as a comprehensive tool for managing operations that use immediate cash,
cash accounts, paper vouchers and electronic vouchers.
260.
The leveraging of complementarities among United Nations agencies will be explored in
cash and voucher operations: WFP and UNHCR, for example, are working on an integrated
system to provide food and housing assistance for Syrian refugees in Egypt.
Priority 4: Programmes
WFP will deliver effectively and efficiently, and will build capacity
261.
WFP’s performance in 2013 was marked by strong performance in its response to the
four Level 3 emergencies and clear progress in Strategic Objective 5 for the first time. The mixed
progress in Strategic Objective 4 will be addressed through analysis of outcomes and the contexts
of operations that made slow progress (see Part II).
262.
To ensure that its programmes deliver equitably to girls, boys, women and men, WFP will
develop a new gender policy based on an evaluation of the 2009 policy. The aim is to improve
gender mainstreaming throughout the programme cycle by ensuring that all new projects get a
gender marker score of 2A or 2B, and meet or exceed United Nations System-Wide Action
Plan (SWAP) performance standards by the end of 2014.
263.
The P4P pilot, which built up WFP’s expertise in promoting the incomes and productivity
of smallholder farmers, has been incorporated into the Strategic Plan (2014–2017). The
P4P programme will continue to leverage WFP’s purchasing power for the development of local
agricultural markets, and it will be integrated with activities addressing nutrition, home-grown
school feeding and resilience and climate-change adaptation with a view to greater effectiveness
and impact.
264.
WFP will launch the Food Security Climate Resilience Facility (FoodSECuRE) in 2014, an
innovative funding method that will provide financing to tackle the climate-induced food
insecurity that is expected to affect an additional 100 million to 200 million people by 2050; it will
be a viable mechanism for supporting resilience-building before and after climatic shocks. It will
be deployed initially in the Horn of Africa, the Sahel and South Asia.
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Priority 5: Accountability and Funding
WFP will be accountable and will provide value for money
265.
Recent reviews of WFP’s management processes, requested by donors, show that it is a
pace-setter in the United Nations in terms of transparency, risk management, oversight and
fiscal management.57 The MOPAN review identified opportunities for mainstreaming gender
equality and results-based budgeting, which will be a priority from 2014, along with work on
ways of demonstrating value for money in line with Fit for Purpose.
266.
The business rules accompanying the new SRF will specify minimum requirements for
measurement of outcome-level indicators such as setting baselines and targets with a view to
improving reporting and accountability. WFP will also enhance decentralized evaluations.
267.
In moving to performance-based budgeting, WFP will link the PSA and extra-budgetary
resource requests with performance under the 2014–2017 MRF: this will ensure that allocations
reflect corporate priorities and provide a consistent basis for reporting in relation to budget
allocations. The Management Plan (2015–2017) will have provisions to increase this linkage
between budgeting and performance.
268.
The Financial Framework Review will help to improve the stability of funding to enable
WFP to implement more efficient and effective operations. The various working capital and
advance funding facilities will be rationalized with a view to increasing their flexibility, and WFP
will review its approach to indirect support costs in consultation with the Board.
269.
Improving accountability will remain a priority. The new executive management
compacts will increase accountability among senior staff, and office-level performance planning
and review and individual staff appraisals will be enhanced. WFP will reflect the guidance issued
by COSO in its internal control system.
270.
WFP will continue to contribute to reporting on United Nations system-wide results
through the QCPR on issues such as gender, transition and capacity development. From 2015, this
information will inform the Secretary-General’s annual report to ECOSOC on the implementation
of the QCPR. The standard operating procedures for countries adopting Delivering as One will
include annual reporting on United Nations country-level results, to which WFP country offices
will contribute.
271.
WFP will continue to seek to increase the number of donors and to increase the share of
multi-year and multilateral funds for its operations in line with the 2013–2017 private-sector
partnerships and fundraising strategy, and will also assess the capacity-building components of
private-sector partnerships.
MOPAN. 2014. The 2013 MOPAN Assessment Report on WFP. Available at: http://www.mopanonline.org.
Department for International Development (United Kingdom) (DFID). 2013. Multilateral Aid Review Update:
Driving reform to achieve multilateral effectiveness. Available at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/264615/MAR-review-dec13.pdf
57
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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Conclusions
272.
WFP will continue to adapt, improve and innovate in seeking to eliminate hunger.
Performance reporting will be vital in decision-making in the context of decreasing ODA and
pressure from stakeholders to demonstrate results.
273.
This APR reflects significant achievements in terms of the Strategic Objectives and
management results, and improved performance reporting. Areas where WFP can do even better
are highlighted, and the continued implementation of organizational strengthening and the
deployment of more effective operational tools will enable WFP to improve its performance in the
years ahead and transform the lives of the hungry poor.
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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013| WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
ANNEXES
page
I.
WFP’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT
GOALS
88
II.
A – WFP STRATEGIC RESULTS FRAMEWORK
(STRATEGIC PLAN 2008–2013)
90
B – OUTCOME PERFORMANCE REPORTING
101
C – METHODOLOGY – ASSESSMENT OF STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES
104
D – OUTPUT PERFORMANCE REPORTING
105
A – KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS 2013
107
B – METHODOLOGY – ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT
RESULT DIMENSIONS
110
IV.
ACTIVITIES OF THE ETHICS OFFICE – ANNUAL REPORT 2013
111
V.
WFP EMPLOYEES WITH CONTRACTS OF ONE YEAR OR LONGER
118
VI.
GLOBAL FOOD AID PROFILE
119
VII.
WFP FOOD PROCUREMENT IN 2013
120
VIII.
TOTAL CONFIRMED CONTRIBUTIONS IN 2013
124
IX.
A – DIRECT EXPENSES BY REGION AND CATEGORY, 2010–2013
128
B – DIRECT EXPENSES BY COUNTRY, REGION AND
PROGRAMME CATEGORY, 2010–2013
130
C – DIRECT EXPENSES BY COUNTRY, SPECIAL STATUS CATEGORY
AND REGION, 2010–2013
133
A – UNITED NATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION
PARTNERSHIPS
134
B – 2013 COLLABORATION WITH CIVIL SOCIETY PARTNERS
135
XI.
WFP INDICATORS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE
QUADRENNIAL COMPREHENSIVE POLICY REVIEW
136
XII.
OVERVIEW OF ORGANIZATIONAL STRENGTHENING
137
III.
X.
ACRONYMS USED IN THE DOCUMENT
147
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ANNEX I: WFP’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS
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ANNEX II-A: WFP STRATEGIC RESULTS FRAMEWORK (STRATEGIC PLAN 2008–2013)
Please note:
The framework pertains to all results obtained with WFP assistance and support
(for households, communities, governments and other entities such as schools).
Indicators are distinguished in the framework by font type as follows:

Regular text: Internationally recognized indicators, based on agreed standards and used
by United Nations agencies

Bold: Developed in cooperation with WFP’s operational partners

Italic: WFP-specific methodological standards
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STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: SAVE LIVES AND PROTECT LIVELIHOODS IN EMERGENCIES
Goals
1.
2.
3.
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 4
To save lives in emergencies and reduce acute malnutrition caused by shocks to below emergency levels
To protect livelihoods and enhance self-reliance in emergencies and early recovery
To reach refugees, IDPs and other vulnerable groups and communities whose food and nutrition security has been
adversely affected by shocks
Outcome
Outcome 1.1: Reduced or
stabilized acute malnutrition
in target groups of children
and/or populations
Corporate target and performance measure1
Project target and data source
1.1.1 Prevalence of acute
malnutrition among children
under 52 (weight-for-height
as %)3
Reduction in acute malnutrition prevalence
achieved among children under 5 for 80% of
projects
Target: Population-specific – Reduction in acute malnutrition prevalence rate
Source: Survey data and/or monitoring data
Stabilized prevalence of acute malnutrition among
children under 5 for 80% of projects
Target: Population-specific – Acute malnutrition prevalence rate stabilized at
pre-emergency levels
Source: Survey data and/or monitoring data
1.1.2 Prevalence of low MUAC
among children under 54, 5
Low MUAC prevalence stabilized for 80% of
projects
Target: Population-specific – Stabilized prevalence of low MUAC
Source: Survey data or assessment data
1.1.3 Supplementary feeding
performance rates6
Target met for 80% of projects
Target: Population-specific7
Source: Programme monitoring
1.2.1 Household food consumption
score9
Score exceeded the threshold for 80% of projects
Target: Food consumption score exceeded 21 or 2810 for target households
Source: Annual survey data
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1
Only projects aligned with a specific Strategic Objective report on corporate indicators. Results analysis will only include data reported from these projects.
2
Projects targeting children under 2 should measure prevalence of acute malnutrition of this target group.
3
The prevalence rate of acute malnutrition among children under 5 is a proxy for the nutritional status of the population.
4
Prevalence of low MUAC among children under 5 is a proxy for the nutritional status of the population.
5
Projects targeting children under 2 should measure prevalence of low MUAC in this target group.
6
Recovery, Death, Default and Non-response rates. These rates only apply in the context of treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (targeted interventions).
7
SPHERE standards (Recovery rate > 75%; Death rate < 3%; Default rate < 15%; Non-response rate < 5%) should be used as guidance.
Livelihood activities with food-security objectives contribute to this outcome (indicator to measure livelihood/asset protection is under development). Results will be
disaggregated by target groups: IDPs, refugees, conflict- and/or disaster-affected households with schoolchildren or hosting orphans and other vulnerable children (OVC).
8
Along with the household food consumption score, country offices are recommended to measure the coping strategy index. Dietary diversity scores can also be computed from
the Household Food Consumption Score module to indicate changes in the quality of the diets.
9
10
Threshold depends on local eating habits and diet composition.
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Outcome 1.2: Improved food
consumption over assistance
period for target households8
Indicator
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1: SAVE LIVES AND PROTECT LIVELIHOODS IN EMERGENCIES
Goals
1. To save lives in emergencies and reduce acute malnutrition caused by shocks to below emergency levels
2. To protect livelihoods and enhance self-reliance in emergencies and early recovery
3. To reach refugees, IDPs and other vulnerable groups and communities whose food and nutrition security has been
adversely affected by shocks
Outcome
Indicator
Project target and data source
1.3.1 Retention rate
Retention rate met for 80% of projects
Target: Retention rate reached 70% for girls and boys in emergency
situations
Source: Survey data
Outcome 1.4: Maintained
access to services for
anti-retroviral therapy (ART),
tuberculosis (TB) treatment
and/or prevention of
mother-to-child transmission
(PMTCT)
1.4.1. Default rate11
Target met for 80% of projects
Target: Default rate <15%
Source: Programme monitoring
Output 1.1:12 Food and
non-food items, cash
transfers and vouchers
distributed in sufficient
quantity and quality to target
groups of women, men, girls
and boys under secure
conditions (to be used for
Strategic Objectives 1–4)
Indicator
1.1.1
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Number of women, men, girls and boys receiving food, non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers, by category, activity, transfer modality and as % of
planned
1.1.2
Tonnage of food distributed, by type, as % of planned distribution13
1.1.3 (a) Quantity of fortified foods, complementary foods and specialized nutritional products distributed, by type, as % of planned distribution
1.1.3 (b) Quantity of fortified foods, complementary foods and specialized nutritional products distributed, by type, as % of actual distribution
1.1.4
Quantity of non-food items distributed, by type, as % of planned distribution
1.1.5
Total amount of cash transferred to beneficiaries
1.1.6
Total food/cash equivalent of vouchers distributed
1.1.7
WFP expenditures related to distribution of food, non-food items, cash transfers and vouchers, by activity and transfer modality (USD)
1.1.8
Number of institutional sites assisted (e.g. schools, health centres, etc.)
1.1.9
Number of United Nations agencies/international organizations that collaborate in the provision of complementary inputs and services
1.1.10
Number of NGOs that collaborate in the provision of complementary inputs and services
1.1.11
Number of joint United Nations programmes/activities
This indicator will be reported towards universal access to services for ART, TB treatment and/or PMTCT.
This is the corporate output to be reported for all activities that include distribution of food and/or non-food items. Additional outputs are to be reported as they apply, by
Strategic Objective.
12
13
Planned distribution includes quantity, quality and timeliness.
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Outcome 1.3: Stabilized
enrolment of girls and boys
at high risk of dropping-out
from target primary schools
Output
11
Corporate target and performance measure1
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 4
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2: PREVENT ACUTE HUNGER AND INVEST IN DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND
MITIGATION MEASURES
Goals
1.
2.
To support and strengthen capacities of governments to prepare for, assess and respond to acute hunger arising
from disasters
To support and strengthen resiliency of communities to shocks through safety nets or asset creation, including
adaptation to climate change
Outcome
Indicator
Corporate target and performance
measure
Project target and data source
Outcome 2.1: Early-warning systems;
contingency plans;14 food security monitoring
systems set in place and enhanced with
WFP capacity development support
2.1.1 Disaster
preparedness index
Government capacity strengthened as
per plan for 80% of countries supported
Target: Disaster preparedness index reached at or greater than 7, indicating
that government capacity in disaster preparedness and food security
information management increased with WFP support
Source: Annual monitoring and/or survey data
Outcome 2.2: Adequate food consumption
over assistance period reached for target
households at risk of falling into acute
hunger
2.2.1 Household food
consumption score15
Score exceeded the threshold for 80%
of projects
Target: Food consumption score stabilized at or greater than 35/42 for target
households
Source: Annual survey data
Outcome 2.3: Hazard risk reduced at
community level in target communities
2.3.1 Household asset
score16
Risk reduction and disaster mitigation
assets increased for 80% of projects
2.3.2 Community asset
score17
Risk reduction and disaster mitigation
assets increased for 80% of projects
Target: Asset score threshold set to capture increase (created or restored) in
household disaster mitigation assets over base level
Source: Survey data
Target: Asset score threshold set to capture increase (created or restored) in
community disaster mitigation assets over base level
Source: Survey data
Refers to government or inter-agency contingency plans.
Along with the household food consumption score, country offices are recommended to measure the coping strategy index. Dietary diversity scores can also be computed from
the household food consumption score module to indicate changes in the quality of the diets.
15
16
In this context, household disaster mitigation assets include both natural (e.g. water, fruit trees) and physical (e.g. plough, fishing gear) assets.
17
In this context, community disaster mitigation assets include both natural (e.g. shelterbelts, trees planted) and physical (e.g. dykes, shock-resistant roads) assets.
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14
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 7
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2: PREVENT ACUTE HUNGER AND INVEST IN DISASTER PREPAREDNESS AND
MITIGATION MEASURES
Goals
1.
2.
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 7
To support and strengthen capacities of governments to prepare for, assess and respond to acute hunger arising
from disasters
To support and strengthen resiliency of communities to shocks through safety nets or asset creation, including
adaptation to climate change
Outcome
Output
Indicator
Corporate target and performance
measure
Project target and data source
Indicator
(refer to Output 1.1 for distribution of food
and non-food items, cash transfers and
vouchers)
2.1.1 Risk reduction and disaster preparedness and mitigation systems set in place, by type (early-warning systems; contingency plans; food security
monitoring systems, etc.)
Output 2.3: Built or restored disaster
mitigation assets by target communities
2.3.1 Risk reduction and disaster mitigation assets created or restored, by type and unit of measure (area in hectares protected/improved; number of trees
planted; dams constructed, etc.)
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Output 2.1: Disaster mitigation measures set
in place with WFP capacity development
support
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3: RESTORE AND REBUILD LIVES AND LIVELIHOODS IN POST-CONFLICT,
POST-DISASTER OR TRANSITION SITUATIONS
Goals
1. To support the return of refugees and IDPs through food and nutrition assistance
2. To support the re-establishment of livelihoods and food and nutrition security of communities and families affected by
shocks
3. To assist in establishing or rebuilding food supply or delivery capacities of countries and communities affected by shocks
and help to avoid the resumption of conflicts
Outcome
Indicator
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 7
Corporate target and performance
measure
Project target and data source
3.1.1 Household food
consumption score19
Score exceeded the threshold for 80%
of projects
Target: Food consumption score exceeded 35/42 for target households
Source: Annual monitoring and/or survey data
Outcome 3.2: Increased access to assets in
fragile, transition situations for target
communities
3.2.1 Community asset
score20
Functioning, useful productive assets
increased for 80% of projects
Target: Asset score threshold set to capture increase (created or
restored) in functioning productive community assets over base level
Source: Survey data
Outcome 3.3: Stabilized enrolment for girls
and boys, including IDPs and refugees, in
assisted schools at pre-crisis levels
3.3.1
Retention rate met for 80% of projects
Target: Retention rate reached 85% for girls and boys in post-crisis
situations
Source: Survey data
3.3.2 Enrolment: average21
annual rate of change in
numbers of girls and
boys enrolled
Annual rate of increase of 5% met or
exceeded for 80% of projects
Target: Annual rate of increase in numbers of girls and boys enrolled
reached 5%
Source: Annual monitoring and/or survey data
3.4.1 Prevalence of acute
malnutrition among
children under 5
(weight-for-height as %)
Reduction in acute malnutrition
prevalence achieved among children
under 5 for 80% of projects
Target: Population-specific – Reduction in acute malnutrition prevalence
rate
Source: Survey data and/or monitoring data
3.4.2 Prevalence of
low MUAC among
children under 5
Low MUAC prevalence stabilized for
80% of projects
Target: Population-specific – Stabilized prevalence of low MUAC
Source: Survey data and/or assessment data
Outcome 3.4 (a): Reduced acute malnutrition
in target groups of children and/or populations
Retention rate
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Results will be disaggregated by target groups: IDPs, refugees, conflict-affected, disaster-affected, households with schoolchildren or hosting orphans and OVC. Mitigation and
safety-net programmes, for households affected by HIV, contribute to this outcome. Household support can also contribute to improved adherence to ART or improved success of
TB treatment for the individual client.
18
Along with the household food consumption score, country offices are recommended to measure the coping strategy index. Dietary diversity scores can also be computed from
the household food consumption score module to indicate changes in the quality of the diets.
19
20
In this context, community assets include natural (e.g. ponds, springs), physical (e.g. dams, roads to markets) and social infrastructure (e.g. schools, health centres) assets.
21
Average is calculated by dividing the sum of annual rate of change of each school surveyed by total number of target schools.
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Outcome 3.1: Adequate food consumption
over assistance period reached for target
households, communities, IDPs and
refugees18
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3: RESTORE AND REBUILD LIVES AND LIVELIHOODS IN POST-CONFLICT,
POST-DISASTER OR TRANSITION SITUATIONS
Goals
1. To support the return of refugees and IDPs through food and nutrition assistance
2. To support the re-establishment of livelihoods and food and nutrition security of communities and families affected by
shocks
3. To assist in establishing or rebuilding food supply or delivery capacities of countries and communities affected by shocks
and help to avoid the resumption of conflicts
Outcome
Indicator
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 7
Corporate target and performance
measure
Project target and data source
Target met for 80% of projects
Target: Population-specific23
Source: Programme monitoring
Outcome 3.4 (b): Reduced stunting in
targeted children/targeted populations in
post-crisis situations
3.4.4 Prevalence of stunting
among children under 2
(height-for-age as %)
Reduction in stunting prevalence
achieved among children under 2 for
80% of projects
Target: Population-specific – Reduction in prevalence rate of stunting
Source: Survey data and/or monitoring data
Outcome 3.5: Improved nutritional recovery
of ART and/or TB treatment clients
3.5.1 Nutritional recovery
rate24
Target met for 80% of projects
Target: Nutritional recovery rate >75%
Source: Programme monitoring
Output
Indicator
(refer to Output 1.1 for distribution of food
and non-food items, cash transfers and
vouchers)
Output 3.2: Developed, built or restored
livelihood assets by targeted communities and
individuals
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22
3.2.1 Number of community assets created or restored by targeted communities and individuals, by type and unit of measure
Recovery, death, default and non-response rates. These rates only apply in the context of treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (targeted interventions).
23 SPHERE standards (Recovery rate > 75%; Death rate < 3%; Default rate < 15%; Non-response rate < 5%) should be used as guidance
24
This indicator will be reported separately for ART and/or TB treatment.
.
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
3.4.3 Supplementary
feeding
performance rates22
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4: REDUCE CHRONIC HUNGER AND UNDERNUTRITION
Goals
1. To help countries bring undernutrition below critical levels and break the intergenerational cycle of chronic hunger
2. To increase levels of education and basic nutrition and health through food and nutrition assistance and food and
nutrition security tools
3. To meet the food and nutrition needs of those affected by HIV/AIDS, TB and other pandemics
Outcome
Indicator
4.1.1
Outcome 4.1(b): Adequate food
consumption reached over assistance
period for targeted households25
Outcome 4.2: Increased access to
education and human capital development
in assisted schools
% increase in production of
fortified foods, including
complementary foods and
specialized nutritional
products
Corporate target and performance
measure
Project target and data source
Production target met for 80% of
countries supported
Target: Percentage increase in production over assistance period, by
commodity type established for each country assisted
Source: Capacity assessment
4.1.2 Household food
consumption score26
Score exceeded the threshold for 80%
of projects
Target: Food consumption score exceeded 35/42 in targeted households
Source: Annual household survey or monitoring data
4.2.1 Enrolment: average27
annual rate of change in
number of girls and boys
enrolled
Annual rate of increase of 6% met or
exceeded for 80% of projects
Target: Annual rate of increase reached 6%
Source: Annual monitoring and/or survey data
4.2.2 Attendance rate: number of
schooldays in which girls
and boys attended classes,
as % of total number of
schooldays
Attendance rate of 90% met or
exceeded for 80% of projects
Target: Attendance rate reached 90%
Source: Annual monitoring and/or survey data
4.2.3 Gender ratio: ratio of girls
to boys enrolled
Gender ratio set at 1 for 95% of
projects
Target: Gender ratio set at 1
Source: Annual monitoring and/or survey data
4.2.4
Pass rate of 50% met or exceeded for
80% of projects
Target: Pass rate reached 50%
Source: Survey data from sampled schools
Pass rate for girls and boys
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Mitigation and safety-net programmes, for households affected by HIV contribute to this outcome. Household support can also contribute to improved adherence to ART or
improved success of TB treatment for the individual client.
25
Along with the household food consumption score, country offices are recommended to measure the coping strategy index. Dietary diversity scores can also be computed from
the household food consumption score module to indicate changes in the quality of the diets.
26
27
Average is calculated by dividing the sum of annual rate of change of each school surveyed by total number of target schools.
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Outcome 4.1(a): Increased production
capacity for fortified foods, including
complementary foods and specialized
nutritional products, in countries
supported by WFP
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4: REDUCE CHRONIC HUNGER AND UNDERNUTRITION
Goals
1. To help countries bring undernutrition below critical levels and break the intergenerational cycle of chronic hunger
2. To increase levels of education and basic nutrition and health through food and nutrition assistance and food and
nutrition security tools
3. To meet the food and nutrition needs of those affected by HIV/AIDS, TB and other pandemics
Outcome
Outcome 4.3: Improved nutritional status
of target groups of women, girls and boys
Corporate target and performance
measure
Project target and data source
4.3.1 Prevalence of stunting
among target children
under 2 (height-for-age
as %)28
Nutritional target reached for 80% of
projects
Target: 10% reduction29 in stunting prevalence per year
Source: Monitoring data and/or survey data
4.3.2 Prevalence of iron
deficiency anaemia (IDA)
among target women and
children30
Nutritional target reached for 80% of
projects
Targets: – 10% reduction in IDA prevalence per year if fortified food provided
– 20% reduction in IDA prevalence per year if multiple-micronutrient
powder provided
Source: Monitoring data and/or survey data
4.4.1
ART adherence rate32
ART adherence rate target reached
for 80% of projects
Target: Population-specific – Adherence rate to ART
Source: Monitoring data and/or survey data
4.4.2
TB treatment success
rate33
Treatment success rate34 of 85%
reached for 65% of projects
Target: 85% TB treatment success rate35
Source: Monitoring data and/or survey data
Output
Indicator
(refer to Output 1.1 for distribution of food
and non-food items, cash transfers and
vouchers)
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28
Prevalence of stunting among target children under 5 (height-for-age as %) should be used for projects of a 5-year duration (refer to Indicator Compendium: project-specific ).
29
Indicates percent reduction, not a percentage point reduction.
<110 g/l for pregnant women; <120 g/l for non-pregnant women; <110 g/l for children aged 6–59 months; <115 g/l for schoolchildren 5–11 years;
<120 g/l for schoolchildren 12–14 years.
30
31
Case of tuberculosis refers to a patient in whom tuberculosis has been confirmed by bacteriology or diagnosed by a clinician (WH0, 2007).
32
For projects performing Care and Treatment programmes, it is mandatory to report ART nutritional recovery rate in addition to ART adherence rate.
33
For projects performing Care and Treatment programmes, it is mandatory to report TB nutritional recovery rate in addition to TB treatment success rate.
34
TB treatment success rate is % of TB cases who are cured plus % of those with a course of treatment completed (WHO, 2007).
35
WHO’s international target for patients going on TB treatment (WHO, 2007); Global tuberculosis control: surveillance, planning, financing (WHO, 2008)
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Outcome 4.4 : Improved adherence to
ART and/or success of TB treatment for
target cases31
Indicator
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5: STRENGTHEN THE CAPACITIES OF COUNTRIES TO REDUCE HUNGER,
INCLUDING THROUGH HAND-OVER STRATEGIES AND LOCAL PURCHASE
Goals
1.
2.
3.
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 8
To use purchasing power to support the sustainable development of food and nutrition security systems,
and transform food and nutrition assistance into a productive investment in local communities
To develop clear hand-over strategies to enhance nationally owned hunger solutions
To strengthen the capacities of countries to design, manage and implement tools, policies and programmes
to predict and reduce hunger
Outcome
Indicator
Corporate target and performance
measure
Project target and data source
5.1.1 Food purchased locally, as %
of food distributed in-country
Target met for food purchased locally in 80%
of countries supported
Target: Set for country – % increase in food purchased locally and cost-effectively
Source: Annual monitoring data and cost-effectiveness analysis
Outcome 5.2:
Progress made
towards nationally
owned hunger
solutions36
5.2.1 National capacity index (NCI),
by hunger solution
Target met for 80% of projects
Target: Set for country – Threshold set to capture increase in national capacity (based
on initial assessment, by hunger solution)
Source: Capacity assessment exercise
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Hunger solutions are about investing in people through effective, targeted social protection programmes, including sustainable home-grown and country-led responses to the
urgent challenges of hunger and malnutrition facing the most vulnerable and poor people. Hunger solutions include P4P activities, targeted productive and social safety net
programmes, home-grown school feeding, nutrition programmes, enhancing the resilience of vulnerable people through community-level disaster risk reduction, risk transfer and
insurance schemes, natural resources management, asset creation, livelihoods diversification and infrastructure development programmes.
36
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Outcome 5.1:
Increased marketing
opportunities at
national level with
cost-effective WFP
local purchases
STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5: STRENGTHEN THE CAPACITIES OF COUNTRIES TO REDUCE HUNGER,
INCLUDING THROUGH HAND-OVER STRATEGIES AND LOCAL PURCHASE
Goals
1.
2.
3.
Impact: Contribution to MDGs 1 and 8
To use purchasing power to support the sustainable development of food and nutrition security systems,
and transform food and nutrition assistance into a productive investment in local communities
To develop clear hand-over strategies to enhance nationally owned hunger solutions
To strengthen the capacities of countries to design, manage and implement tools, policies and programmes
to predict and reduce hunger
Output
Indicator
Output 5.1: Food
purchased locally
5.1.1
Tonnage of food purchased locally, by type and country classification
Output 5.2: Capacity
and awareness
developed through
WFP-led activities
5.2.1
5.2.2
5.2.3
5.2.4
Number of government/national partner staff receiving WFP technical assistance and training37
Number of national food security/nutrition programmes38 receiving WFP technical assistance
WFP expenditures for technical assistance to strengthen national capacity (USD)
Number of WFP-managed hunger solutions, systems and tools39 handed over to the national government
National food security/nutrition programmes refer to programmes that are government owned and managed, supported by WFP technical assistance (e.g. public food
distribution system, national school feeding programmes, etc.) and/or programmes which are in transition to national ownership (i.e. in hand-over to government).
38
WFP's supporting analysis tools to implement hunger solutions are tailored, together with the required targeting and monitoring institutional tools – vulnerability and food security
analysis, comprehensive food security and vulnerability analysis, early warning systems, needs assessment, contingency planning, market analysis – to the needs of the most
vulnerable countries and communities. Operational tools used are as follows: local and international tendering processes, modalities (like food, cash and vouchers), food, cash or
vouchers distribution mechanisms, food processing, food management, food ration calculation, cash/voucher entitlement calculation, general food distribution methodology,
beneficiary registration, etc.
39
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Technical assistance and training refers to capacity development support: to facilitate the transition to national ownership of WFP-supported programmes and/or to strengthen
national programmes owned and managed by government. It includes assistance to develop policy frameworks. Training intended to facilitate and strengthen WFP programmes
should not be accounted for.
37
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Excludes projects which did not provide, at minimum, a baseline and a 2013 follow-up value
Depending on outcome and intervention type, may include only improvement (*) or improvement and
stabilization (**) trends
3 Results are assessed as per methodology described in Annex II.C
4 Projects targeting children under 2 to measure the prevalence of acute malnutrition among children under 2
2
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5
Prevalence of stunting among target children under 5 (height-for-age as %) is used for projects of a 5-year duration
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ANNEX II-C: METHODOLOGY – ASSESSMENT OF STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES
Step 1: The assessment of results by Strategic Objective is based on outcome data reported in the SPRs of
EMOPs, PRROs, CPs and development projects (DEVs). Two criteria must be met for projects to form part
of the analysis:


minimum duration criterion: the project must have a total duration of more than six months or
must have started prior to July 2013 – it must be active for more than six months in the
reporting year;
trend reporting criterion: the project must report at least a baseline and a 2013 follow-up value.
Step 2: For projects that meet these criteria, trend analysis is conducted at the outcome indicator level,
using indicators from the Strategic Results Framework 2008–2013. There are three possible trend
scenarios: improvement, stabilization or deterioration. A traffic light system is applied as follows.
Traffic light
Strong progress
More than 65% of projects show positive outcome trends1
Some progress
Between 50% and 65% of projects show positive outcome trends
No progress
Less than 50% of projects show positive outcome trends
For example, under “supplementary feeding recovery rate” in Strategic Objective 1, 33 projects reported
trends, with 31 showing improvement or stabilization – both of which are seen as positive in the context
of the outcome of “reduce or stabilize acute malnutrition”. The score is therefore 31/33, or 94 percent,
corresponding to “strong progress”.
Step 3: Progress is assessed at the outcome level. Each outcome has one or more corresponding outcome
indicators. For each outcome, numerical values are assigned to performance based on its corresponding
indicators, as follows.
Traffic light
Index
Strong progress
3
Some progress
2
No progress
1
An average is calculated across indicator results to arrive at the result at the outcome level.
For example, the outcome “hazard risk reduced at the community level in target communities” is
measured by two indicators: i) community asset score; and ii) household asset score. For both indicators,
performance at the indicator level shows “strong progress” – a value of 3 is assigned. The average score is
therefore (3+3)/2 = 3, corresponding to “strong progress”.
Step 4: Repeat Step 3 to assess performance at the Strategic Objective level based on performance at the
outcome level.
Depending on outcome and intervention type, may include only improvement or both improvement and
stabilization trends
1
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







Includes output data for Strategic Results Framework (2008–2013) output indicators reported in operational section
of SPRs.
2 Colour coding is assigned as per standard thresholds explained in Annex II-C
1
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






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≥
≥
≥
≥
≥
≤
≤
≤
≥
≤
≤
CO2
≤
≤
1
Against 2008 baseline.
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≥
≥
100
≤
≥
≥
≥
≥
≥
≥
≥
≤
≤
≤
≤
≥
≥
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≤
≥
≥
≥
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ANNEX III-B: METHODOLOGY – ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT RESULT DIMENSIONS
Step 1: Calculate achievement of Key Performance Indicator against its target and define the
level of improvement, or ‘traffic light’.
Traffic Light
Strong
progress
Actual value on or with minimal deviation from target
Some progress
No progress
Actual value with some deviation from target
Actual value with deviation from target above acceptable range
For example: percent gross needs of funding met, Target = 61 and Actual = 55,
Target type = Achievement. The score is: 55/61*100 = 90
90 percent of the target was achieved, corresponding to ‘Strong progress.’
Step 2: Assign an Index value for each KPI traffic light
Traffic Light
Strong
progress
Index
Some progress
2
No progress
1
3
For example: percent gross needs of funding met – if traffic light is green, it is an indication of
‘Strong progress’ with an Index of 3.
Step 3: Calculate the arithmetic average of KPI indexes to assess the achievement of the
management result
For example: ‘Funding is secured against planned needs’ is measured by two KPIs:
KPI
Confirmed contributions as % of expected
funding in Management Plan
% gross needs of funding met
Index
3
3
The arithmetic average is 3 corresponding to the index value of the management result.
Step 4: Assign a traffic light for the management result index value
Index
Traffic Light
> or = 2.5
Strong progress
> or = 1.5
Some progress
< 1.5
No progress
For example: The index value is 3. “Funding is secured against planned needs” is assessed as
“strong progress”.
Step 5: Repeat the same methodology from Step 2 to 4 to assess the Management Result
Dimensions based on the achievements of the management result.
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ANNEX IV: ACTIVITIES OF THE ETHICS OFFICE – ANNUAL REPORT 2013
Introduction and Background
1.
The WFP Ethics Office was established in January 2008 pursuant to the Secretary-General’s
Bulletin ST/SGB/2007/11 “United Nations system-wide application of ethics: separately
administered organs and programmes”. The primary objective of the Ethics Office is to assist the
Executive Director in ensuring that all staff members of the organization observe and perform
their functions in consistency with the highest standards of integrity as required by the Charter of
the United Nations, and in accordance with the Standards of Conduct for the International
Civil Service. The strategy for achieving this goal is to foster a culture of ethics, transparency and
accountability. The principal responsibilities of the Ethics Office include:
A. Financial and conflict of interest disclosure (ref. ED Circular 2008/004 and
ED Circular 2008/002 )
B. Protection against retaliation (ref. ED Circular 2008/003)
C. Confidential advice (ref. ED Circular 2008/002)
D. Training, education and outreach (ref. ED Circular 2008/002)
E. Standard-setting (ref. ED Circular 2008/002)
F. Formulating, reviewing and disseminating policies
(ref. Ed Circular 2008/002)
G. Participation in the Ethics Panel of the United Nations and the
Ethics Network for Multilateral Organizations (ref. ED Circular 2008/002;
ST/SGB/2007/11)
2.
This report of the WFP Ethics Office has been prepared pursuant to Section 5.4 of
ST/SGB/2007/11 which requires the Ethics Offices in the United Nations Secretariat and the
separately administered organs and programmes to prepare annual reports for review by the
United Nations Ethics Committee, renamed the Ethics Panel of the United Nations (EPUN).
3.
The present report provides an assessment of the activities undertaken by the WFP
Ethics Office during the period 1 January–31 December 2013.
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Activities of the WFP Ethics Office
A.
Financial and conflict of interest disclosure
4.
WFP’s policy on financial and conflict of interest disclosure was adopted in April 2008
pursuant to Executive Director’s Circular 2008/004 and was first implemented in 2009. The policy
is a key component of WFP’s commitment to transparency and public confidence-building. The
Financial and Conflict of Interest Disclosure Programme (FDP) acts as a safeguard and risk
management tool for both staff members and the organization as a whole. The Ethics Office is
mandated to administer the FDP in order to identify, manage and mitigate personal conflicts of
interest. The financial disclosure questionnaires and statements are reviewed by an external
reviewer, under the supervision of the WFP Ethics Office.
5.
In 2013, the Ethics Office implemented its fifth annual financial disclosure exercise for the
period 1 January–31 December 2012 and completed the review of statements from the previous
year’s exercise. Eligible staff members included all staff at the D-1 and D-2 levels, as well as all
Country Directors, whatever their grades, Heads of Office/Sub-Office, Heads of Area Office and
staff at the chief level. The filing population also included all staff members whose occupational
duties included procurement authority to release purchase orders of any type; all oversight
(audit/investigations, inspections), investment (Treasury), legal – with the exception of the
Administrative and Employment Law Branch – and procurement officers; as well as all staff
members who were members of a vendor management committee or had regular access to
procurement. During the 2013 cycle, 996 WFP employees – representing 7.7 percent of the total
staff population – were identified by senior unit or country office managers for completion of a
questionnaire on eligibility for the FDP and on actual or potential conflicts of interest, and for
completion of a financial disclosure statement if necessary. This total represents a slight increase
(1.2 percent) over the previous year as indicated in Figure 1. The fluctuation of these figures is
mainly because of refinements in the eligibility criteria in the light of previous experience.
Figure 1: Financial and Conflict of Interest Disclosure Participation by Calendar Year (2009–2013)
Number of staff invited to file
1 491
1 226
996
845
540
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
6.
All staff invited to participate in the 2013 FDP cycle were asked to complete a conflict of
interest and eligibility questionnaire consisting of a series of questions revolving mainly around
the most common conflicts of interest confronting WFP employees as identified from previous
exercises. The conflict of interest questionnaire requests staff to provide information on any
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relationships they or their dependent family members may have had with any WFP vendors or
partners or governments, and to report any outside activities, receipt of gifts or awards, family
relations in the United Nations, landlord/renter relations, etc. Completion of the questionnaire is
designed to elicit or uncover potential conflicts of interest that may damage the reputation of the
organization, before they occur. The questionnaire makes it easier to identify a conflict of interest
because it focuses on the relationships and transactions between a staff member and a vendor or
restricted entity.
7.
The questionnaire also includes questions designed to confirm whether a staff member
meets the eligibility requirements for filing a full financial disclosure statement in light of his/her
actual functions during the year under review. Only staff members whose questionnaires revealed
potential conflicts of interest or who responded positively to the questions concerning eligibility
were required to file full financial disclosure statements. The filtering effect of the conflict of
interest questionnaire reduced the number of full financial disclosure statements that needed to
be filed by 345, as the responses to the questionnaire revealed staff members whose actual
functions during the year did not warrant the filing of a full statement. The questionnaire also
reinforces filers’ obligations to avoid conflicts of interest.
8.
The annual exercise took place over 30 days from 8 April to 7 May 2013.
9.
In implementing the 2013 FDP exercise, the Ethics Office responded, as always, to a large
number of e-mail messages, telephone calls and direct office visits regarding filing requirements.
10.
During implementation of the 2013 FDP exercise, action was taken to improve the security
of communications between the external reviewers and the staff being asked to submit further
data or clarifications. This was achieved by including a new module in the secure financial
disclosure programme database rather than relying on normal e-mail exchanges. The security
improvement was introduced in response to concerns expressed by staff.
11.
By the end of the 2013 exercise, 974 out of 996 eligible staff had completed a conflict of
interest questionnaire. Of the remaining staff, 21 were granted approved exemptions,1 while one
did not file a questionnaire despite repeated reminders. Of the staff members submitting
questionnaires, 651 subsequently completed a financial disclosure statement: four staff members
were exempted on the grounds that they had left WFP or were on extended sick or maternity
leave; and one staff member failed to file, again despite repeated reminders. The cases of the two
staff members who failed to file questionnaires or full statements are still being followed up, and
may be referred to the Human Resources Division for disciplinary action. The compliance rate for
the 2013 FDP was thus 99.8 percent.
12.
Review of the statements and questionnaires filed by 974 staff members revealed a
potential conflict of interest in two cases, or 0.2 percent. The conflicts involved personal
investments and the acceptance of gifts/hospitality. Work is still in progress to clarify and resolve
these conflicts of interest (Table 1).
TABLE 1: STATUS OF FINDINGS OF THE REVIEW OF FINANCIAL
DISCLOSURE STATEMENTS/QUESTIONNAIRES
Finding on Review of Financial Disclosure
Year submitted
Percent
Statements/Questionnaires
Exemptions were granted to staff who had been separated after the initial list of eligible staff was compiled, for staff
on secondment, for staff whose current duties were subsequently found not to correspond to the eligibility criteria,
and for one staff member on extended sick leave.
1
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Status
2013
%
No actual or potential conflicts of interest found
972
99.8
2
0.2
974
100.00
Actual or potential conflicts of interest found and in
process of being resolved
Grand Total
13.
In order to complete the review of questionnaires and financial disclosure statements,
more information was requested from some of the staff who filed. Additional information
requested included the names and locations of assets and other details regarding other staff
income, profits, liabilities and supplements. Companies and organizations affiliated with staff
were reviewed against the WFP vendor list consisting of more than 2,000 companies.
B.
Protection against retaliation
14.
It is the duty of all staff to report any breach of WFP’s regulations and rules to officials
whose responsibility is to take appropriate action and to cooperate with WFP’s oversight
functions. An individual who makes such a report in good faith has the right to be protected
against retaliation. Among the key responsibilities of WFP’s Ethics Office is to enhance protection
against retaliation for individuals who report misconduct, provide information in good faith on
wrongdoing by one or more employees, or cooperate with a duly authorized audit or
investigation. The main objective of the policy is to ensure that staff members who have a duty to
report misconduct and cooperate with audits and investigations are not prevented from doing so
out of fear of retaliation.
15.
During the 2013 reporting period, the Ethics Office received three requests for protection
against retaliation. This is slightly fewer than in the previous year, when the Ethics Office
responded to five such requests. Preliminary reviews carried out by the Ethics Office in all of these
cases resulted in a finding that there was no prima facie case of retaliation, and the complainants
were so informed.
C.
Confidential advice
16.
The Ethics Office is mandated to provide advice to staff and management in a confidential
setting in an effort to prevent, identify or manage actual or potential conflicts of interest, and to
advise on other matters relating to ethical behaviour and standards. This activity not only helps
staff maintain high professional and ethical standards but also helps to avoid or manage situations
that could give rise to a conflict of interest.
17.
During the reporting period, the Ethics Office registered 102 requests for advice on issues
unrelated to financial disclosure or protection against retaliation, slightly down from the
122 requests in the previous year. The nature of these requests (Figure 2) included advice on
conflicts of interest: outside activities (67 percent), the acceptance of gifts or favours (18 percent),
employment and post-employment related (2 percent), and others, including the Standards of
Conduct for International Civil Servants (10 percent). These are in addition to the requests for
protection against retaliation referred to in the previous paragraph (3 percent).
Figure 2: Requests for Advice – Categories
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Request for Advice - Conflicts of Interest
2%
18%
3%
10%
67%
Conflicts of interest, outside activities
Standards of conduct, other complaints
Protection aginst retaliation
Gifts, awards and hospitality
Employment related
D.
Training, education and outreach
18.
Training, education and outreach activities are key functions of the WFP Ethics Office. The
activities of the Ethics Office continued during 2013, but were somewhat constrained by the
absence of a full-time director. Training will be a priority for the new director of the Ethics Office,
who has taken up her post in April 2014.
19.
The WFP Ethics Office has a United Nations online ethics training course available for all
staff on its website, and is planning to update and improve this course during 2014 and to make
it mandatory.
20.
During 2013, the Ethics Office continued to brief new associate experts on ethical standards
and the functions of the Ethics Office, and collaborated with the offices of the WFP and UNHCR
Ombudsmen as well as with the UNHCR Ethics Office on joint training of WFP and UNHCR
Respectful Workplace Advisors (RWAs) as “Ethics Ambassadors” in the Middle East,
North Africa, Eastern Europe and Central Asia region (Dubai, May 2013), and of selected RWAs
from countries in Africa, the Middle East and the Far East (Addis Ababa, November 2013). About
100 RWAs have been trained and now function as Ethics Ambassadors covering all WFP regions.
They act as focal points for ethics issues in country offices and provide colleagues with a
confidential, neutral contact point and source of information and support when experiencing a
workplace conflict or ethical challenge. They refer to the Office of the Ombudsman and the
Ethics Office at Headquarters for advice, consultation and updating on the latest relevant policies
and practices.
21.
The Ethics Office responded to requests for advice from various regions by producing an
“Ethics Guidance Note on Workplace Relationships”, which analyses the issues involved and
presents practical guidance. In cooperation with the Human Resources Division, the Legal Office,
the Office of the Inspector General, the Office of the Ombudsman and the Policy, Programme and
Innovation Division, work is now under way on the development of a Code of Conduct for WFP.
E.
Standard-setting and policy support
22.
Fostering a corporate culture of ethics, transparency and accountability requires frequent
and consistent advocacy. Over the course of 2013, the Ethics Office continued to provide guidance
to management on the incorporation of ethical standards in organizational practices and
processes, consistent with promulgation of the revised Standards of Conduct for the International
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Civil Service. The Ethics Office was also involved in an ongoing review of WFP’s protection from
retaliation policy.
F.
Ethics Panel of the United Nations and the Ethics Network for Multilateral
Organizations
23.
The Ethics Panel of the United Nations (EPUN or Panel) was originally established as the
United Nations Ethics Committee by the Secretary-General under bulletin ST/SGB/2007/11
in 2007. It was renamed in April 2013. The panel is mandated to establish a unified set of ethical
standards and policies of the United Nations Secretariat and of the separately administered organs
and programmes, and to consult on certain important and particularly complex cases and issues
having United Nations system-wide implications. In 2013, for example, the EPUN reviewed the
operation of financial disclosure programmes and issues connected with the reform of protection
against retaliation policies in the United Nations and its funds and programmes.
24.
The membership of the EPUN comprises the heads of the ethics offices of the separately
administered organs and programmes of the United Nations and the Ethics Office of the
United Nations Secretariat. As of 31 December 2013, the panel consisted of the following members:
the Ethics Office of the United Nations Secretariat (chair), UNDP, UNICEF, UNFPA, UNOPS,
WFP, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the
Near East (UNRWA) and UNHCR.
25.
As per the provision of the Secretary-General’s Bulletin on United Nations system-wide
application of ethics, the WFP Ethics Office participates in EPUN meetings. As a member of the
EPUN, the Ethics Officer ad interim participated in all but one of the monthly meetings as well as
the Ethics Network meeting held in 2013. During the reporting period, the EPUN addressed a
number of issues of common interest including parameters of confidentiality of an ethics office,
harmonization and coherence on ethics advice, implementation of financial disclosure
programmes, review of the annual reports of EPUN members, and protection against retaliation
policies and practices. The work of the panel is reflected in the Report of the Secretary-General to
the 68th Session of the General Assembly “Activities of the Ethics Office” (doc. A/68/348).
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26.
In support of the Secretary-General’s promotion of system-wide collaboration on
ethics-related issues within the United Nations family, an Ethics Network for Multilateral
Organizations was established on 21 June 2010. Members of the Network include ethics officers
and related professionals from the United Nations Secretariat, United Nations funds, programmes
and specialized agencies, international financial institutions, including the World Bank, the
International Monetary Fund and other multilateral entities. Having held five meetings since its
establishment, one of which occurred during the reporting period, the network has thus far
focused its collaborative efforts on the development of a compendium of practices in relation to
the functions of an ethics office and on the exchange of experience and materials in the areas of
surveys, ethics training, financial disclosure and ethics advisory services.
Conclusion
27.
After five years of operation, the Ethics Office continues to assert its relevance and its role
in fostering a culture of ethics, integrity and accountability within the organization while fulfilling
its growing mandated responsibilities and overcoming staff constraints. Given the growth each
year in the number of queries or requests for advice addressed to the Ethics Office, the office is
hard-pressed to respond to the demands on it under its current staffing. This pressure has been
exacerbated by the fact that the Ethics Office has been headed by a part-time Ethics Officer
ad interim since the retirement of the previous director in December 2012. A new Ethics Director
was recruited from more than 100 applicants. Ms Bonnie Green, who took up her functions in
April 2014, is a highly qualified and respected professional ethics practitioner with extensive
experience in the development and implementation of ethics policies in large organizations.
28.
The EPUN has proved itself to be a useful mechanism for ensuring a coherent application
of ethics standards and for enhancing synergy within the United Nations. Collegial exchange
within this community of practice has enabled the WFP Ethics Office to maintain currency in the
field and follow best practices.
29.
It is expected that work on the drafting of a Code of Conduct for WFP will have been
completed by the time this report is released. It is recommended that swift action be taken by
management to promulgate the code as a focal point for raising the visibility of ethical standards
in WFP and implementing a new training and communications strategy on ethics.
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Excludes temporary contracts of 11 months or less such as those for short-term international professionals,
consultants, short-term general service, special service agreements, interns, author's contract, fellowship, United
Nations and WFP volunteers and casual labourers.
2 Data extracted on 13 January 2014 from WINGS II.
1
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Food aid deliveries (million mt)
Global food aid deliveries
Of which by WFP
Food aid deliveries by commodity
Cereals
Non-cereals
Global food aid deliveries (%)
Deliveries by channel
Bilateral
Multilateral
Non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
Food aid deliveries by category
Emergency
Project
Programme
Food aid deliveries by region
Sub-Saharan Africa
Asia
Eastern Europe and Commonwealth of
Independent States (CIS)
Latin America and the Caribbean
Middle East and North Africa
Sources: WFP/International Food Aid Information System (INTERFAIS), 28 February 2014
*2013 Figures are provisional
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With per capita GNI of USD1,005 in 2010
With per capita GNI of USD1,006 – USD3,975 in 2010
3 With per capita GNI of USD3,976 – USD12,275 in 2010
1
2
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Ȏ
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17
18
19
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The USD 4,382 million represents donor confirmed contributions for contribution year 2013. This figure is not fully
aligned with the contributions revenue of USD 4,380 million reported in the 2013 audited financial statements. The
differences that occur are as a result of: a) differing treatment of multi-year revenue; b) exclusion of contributions with
bilateral funding window; and c) exclusion of contribution revenue adjustments such as unspent balances and writedowns.
1
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ANNEX IX-A: DIRECT EXPENSES1 BY REGION AND CATEGORY, 2010–2013
2010
USD thousand
GRAND TOTAL
DEVELOPMENT
RELIEF
4 000 330
2011
2012
%
USD thousand
%
100
3 768 990
100
USD thousand
4 148 105
2013
%
100
USD thousand
%
4 264 693
100
287 842
7
315 986
8
348 672
8
376 914
9
3 220 081
80
2 925 212
78
3 288 536
79
3 329 431
78
Emergency
1 660 195
1 367 243
1 403 214
1 558 453
PRRO
1 559 885
1 557 969
1 885 322
1 770 979
SPECIAL OPERATIONS
221 510
6
217 619
6
216 068
5
205 947
5
BILATERALS, TRUST FUNDS AND OTHERS 2
270 898
7
310 173
8
294 830
7
352 401
8
2 340 804
100
2 180 900
100
2 677 966
100
2 303 104
100
SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
Percentage of all regions
RELIEF
Emergency
PRRO
SPECIAL OPERATIONS
BILATERALS AND TRUST FUNDS
ASIA
Percentage of all regions
DEVELOPMENT
RELIEF
58
65
54
169 819
7
200 771
9
219 450
8
196 580
9
1 978 477
85
1 762 579
81
2 241 753
84
1 877 037
82
890 118
794 411
1 088 359
1 026 227
968 168
674 843
1 215 525
1 202 194
131 967
6
148 010
7
168 616
6
167 439
7
60 540
3
69 540
3
48 147
2
62 049
3
895 743
100
796 289
100
771 925
100
576 443
100
84 286
9
62 301
8
83 324
11
95 961
17
769 909
86
695 828
87
633 179
82
442 918
77
22
21
19
14
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 128
Emergency
440 383
279 982
179 106
23 666
PRRO
329 525
415 846
454 073
419 252
SPECIAL OPERATIONS
BILATERALS AND TRUST FUNDS
35 622
4
24 529
3
33 925
4
23 280
4
5 927
1
13 631
2
21 497
3
14 284
2
1
Excludes programme support and administrative costs.
2
Operational Expenses includes General Fund, Special Accounts and Trust Funds that cannot be apportioned by project/operation.
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
DEVELOPMENT
59
ANNEX IX-A: DIRECT EXPENSES1 BY REGION AND CATEGORY, 2010–2013
2010
USD thousand
EASTERN EUROPE AND CIS
Percentage of all regions
DEVELOPMENT
RELIEF
29 313
2011
2012
%
USD thousand
%
100
29 716
100
1
USD thousand
1
23 756
2013
%
100
1
USD thousand
%
24 697
100
1
2 550
9
9 693
33
10 051
42
14 838
60
26 060
89
19 529
66
13 303
56
9 496
38
Emergency
12 683
15 446
204
157
PRRO
13 376
4 083
13 099
9 339
SPECIAL OPERATIONS
BILATERALS AND TRUST FUNDS
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
Percentage of all regions
RELIEF
Emergency
PRRO
2
188
1
135
1
56
0
-1
0
305
1
267
1
306
1
362 832
100
282 025
100
159 539
100
151 660
100
13 541
4
21 584
8
20 094
13
26 606
18
237 827
66
180 844
64
81 733
51
62 084
41
9
7
4
4
177 783
128 683
4 920
3 199
60 044
52 161
76 813
58 884
SPECIAL OPERATIONS
47 122
13
10 775
4
7 395
5
4 695
3
BILATERALS AND TRUST FUNDS
64 342
18
68 822
24
50 317
32
58 275
38
MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA
197 617
100
275 331
100
346 684
100
895 025
100
Percentage of all regions
DEVELOPMENT
RELIEF
Emergency
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 129
PRRO
SPECIAL OPERATIONS
BILATERALS AND TRUST FUNDS
5
7
8
22
13 952
7
19 933
7
16 836
5
13 732
2
181 221
92
235 415
86
319 016
92
858 334
96
122 337
149 605
198 071
773 500
58 883
85 811
120 945
84 834
446
0
17 584
6
5 226
2
7 608
1
1 998
1
2 399
1
5 606
2
15 352
2
1
Excludes programme support and administrative costs.
2
Operational Expenses includes General Fund, Special Accounts and Trust Funds that cannot be apportioned by project/operation.
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
DEVELOPMENT
704
ANNEX IX-B: DIRECT EXPENSES1 BY COUNTRY, REGION AND PROGRAMME CATEGORY, 2010–2013
(USD thousand)
2010
Development
Relief
2011
Special
Oper.
Bilaterals
Trust Funds
Total
Development
Relief
Special
Oper.
and Others2
GRAND TOTAL
287 842
3 220 081
221 510
2012
Bilaterals
Trust Funds
Total
Development
Relief
2013
Special
Oper.
Bilaterals
Trust Funds
and Others2
270 898
4 000 330
315 986
2 925 212
217 619
Total
Development
Relief
Special
Oper.
Bilaterals
Trust Funds
310 173
3 768 990
348 672
3 288 536
216 068
Total
and Others2
and Others2
294 830
4 148 105
376 914
3 329 431
205 947
352 401
4 264 693
SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
Angola
35
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Benin
1 856
959
-
0
2 815
806
5 068
-
2
5 876
-94
579
110
55
651
2 379
345
-0
436
3 160
Burkina Faso
5 484
11 386
-
1 011
17 881
4 125
8 645
-
1 191
13 961
7 144
35 450
-
1 632
44 226
4 602
29 802
3
954
35 361
Burundi
Cameroon
Cape Verde
-
-
35
-
-
-
-
-
-
22 918
-
31
22 948
3 382
15 899
-
68
19 349
5 458
14 852
-
414
20 724
4 596
18 354
-
517
23 468
2 165
14 212
-
47
16 424
33
16 548
-
269
16 850
2 074
14 485
-
161
16 719
1 369
9 272
-
17
10 658
630
-
-
-
630
175
-
-
-
175
228
-
-
1
229
419
-
-
-
419
Central African Republic
3 599
17 563
2 695
45
23 902
3 624
13 545
4 610
842
22 621
2 333
15 009
5 893
105
23 341
1 038
16 739
5 977
82
23 837
Chad
6 678
127 362
11 685
832
146 557
8 025
143 694
16 152
19
167 890
6 686
149 684
14 072
185
170 628
3 886
125 167
12 475
723
142 251
Congo
-
11 383
226
-
11 610
-824
12 267
257
-
11 699
3 735
5 865
221
27
9 848
5 092
5 043
82
229
10 446
Congo, Dem. Rep. of the
-
115 237
19 990
1 234
136 461
-
122 519
18 618
2 427
143 564
-
101 966
21 483
5 197
128 646
-
140 821
20 651
5 007
166 479
25 529
Côte d'Ivoire
1 043
6 338
0
37
7 418
2 563
29 945
4 146
103
36 757
99
26 487
3 604
511
30 701
287
22 111
965
2 166
Djibouti
801
8 137
-
-0
8 938
925
11 370
-
33
12 327
966
15 174
-
88
16 228
343
12 252
-0
57
Eritrea
-
35
-
-
35
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Ethiopia
26 247
416 298
3 125
32 859
478 529
27 029
339 050
3 837
21 981
391 897
28 448
316 969
6 509
6 715
358 641
26 626
278 125
9 429
12 088
326 268
Gambia
1 267
543
-
128
1 939
1 891
-128
-
263
2 026
3 060
9 301
-
59
12 419
2 269
2 088
-
16
4 374
Ghana
4 370
1 889
-0
911
7 169
3 461
7 014
11
1 615
12 101
6 858
11 456
26
1 880
20 220
7 482
1 447
2
1 477
10 408
Guinea
1 920
2 939
273
7
5 139
2 630
9 488
9
72
12 199
5 032
3 272
-
98
8 401
4 913
1 708
-
-
-
4 700
-
649
5 348
84
6 952
-
929
7 966
3 087
61
-
463
3 610
938
2 180
-
285
3 404
21 655
191 706
-
1 264
214 625
21 702
228 590
-
1 373
251 665
20 646
306 776
-
1 122
328 544
17 822
174 685
-
2 290
194 797
957
5 742
-
157
6 856
3 688
1 636
-
961
6 285
4 899
2 757
-
748
8 404
5 944
11 476
-
349
17 769
Liberia
2 354
14 511
1 535
683
19 084
-26
32 892
1 104
630
34 600
5 644
20 847
403
2 210
29 103
7 405
12 975
66
1 869
22 315
Madagascar
7 982
7 532
-
437
15 951
7 634
7 450
-
256
15 340
6 930
8 793
-
77
15 800
6 725
6 053
-
150
Malawi
7 423
9 818
-
695
17 936
12 465
7 593
-
793
20 851
12 870
22 997
-
1 147
37 014
11 505
59 996
-
1 904
73 405
Mali
5 258
6 628
-
1 432
13 318
8 389
7 237
59
1 659
17 344
11 376
51 383
536
2 427
65 722
24 861
77 287
7 776
2 516
112 439
Mauritania
4 149
7 503
-
801
12 453
8 430
2 120
-
1 334
11 885
3 796
27 992
3 638
-4 419
31 008
1 877
27 737
4 745
1 007
35 365
Mozambique
3 863
19 165
46
1 443
24 516
5 260
24 165
0
3 112
32 537
8 263
12 636
307
1 864
23 070
12 350
7 166
1 126
2 508
23 149
Kenya
Lesotho
Namibia
6 621
12 928
-
746
-
89
835
-
870
-
-0
870
-
591
-
31
622
-
222
-
605
828
Niger
7 211
127 635
6 796
239
141 880
6 119
89 677
8 687
2 193
106 676
6 030
210 362
10 408
849
227 649
-21 895
76 635
7 506
1 395
63 642
Rwanda
8 324
9 830
-
653
18 807
5 919
10 608
-
1 893
18 420
5 303
12 061
-
1 346
18 710
1 834
14 491
-
1 477
17 802
665
-
-
78
743
819
-
-
102
921
850
-
-
20
869
611
-
-
-
611
1 931
9 120
-
1 960
13 011
1 438
13 454
-
1 321
16 214
6 033
30 897
-
1 563
38 493
6 918
29 886
-
1 175
37 979
Sao Tome and Principe
Senegal
Sierra Leone
815
8 880
62
1 600
11 356
6 080
8 397
-
1 272
15 750
5 102
6 107
-
412
11 621
9 019
1 036
-
591
10 645
Somalia
-
104 916
13 362
1 611
119 889
-
116 098
20 657
728
137 484
-
196 505
28 113
16
224 634
-
138 200
27 472
93
165 765
South Sudan
-
-
-
-
-
-
-1 021
9 010
616
8 605
-
225 019
46 196
2 943
274 158
-
208 369
46 567
4 051
258 987
1 639
545 624
71 617
704
619 584
51
363 926
60 707
9 315
434 000
-
266 252
25 897
7 044
299 193
-
225 377
22 507
637
248 521
-
3 282
-
132
3 415
-
2 133
-
196
2 330
940
1 724
-
67
2 731
4 058
1 153
-
995
6 207
15 961
16 648
209
1 502
34 320
18 960
17 398
92
1 195
37 644
15 962
18 821
-
1 306
36 090
14 666
15 854
-
1 937
32 457
-
1 647
-
7
1 654
-
952
-
487
1 440
139
85
312
6
542
302
188
22
4
516
Uganda
16 838
38 017
-0
913
55 768
27 486
21 104
-10
2 322
50 903
25 165
27 173
-3
1 668
54 003
20 034
33 871
-0
1 866
55 771
Zambia
6 740
8 372
-
1 305
16 416
8 427
3 426
-
1 086
12 939
4 398
530
-
1 293
6 221
6 325
387
-
1 723
8 435
89 605
Sudan
Swaziland
Tanzania (United Republic of)
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 130
Togo
Zimbabwe
Other Regional Expenses
TOTAL REGION
1
Excludes programme support and administrative costs.
2 Includes all Expenses for Bilaterals, Trust Funds, General Fund and Special Accounts.
Negative figures represent financial adjustments.
-
79 123
350
676
80 148
6
61 925
-
946
62 876
-
70 827
-
452
71 279
-
87 982
-
1 623
-4
98
-2
4 367
4 460
-7
75
63
5 935
6 066
-12
8
890
6 366
7 253
-19
554
68
7 230
7 832
169 819
1 978 477
131 967
60 540
2 340 804
200 771
1 762 579
148 010
69 540
2 180 900
219 450
2 241 753
168 616
48 147
2 677 966
196 580
1 877 037
167 439
62 049
2 303 104
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Guinea-Bissau
12 652
ANNEX IX-B: DIRECT EXPENSES1 BY COUNTRY, REGION AND PROGRAMME CATEGORY, 2010–2013
(USD thousand)
2010
Develop-
Relief
ment
2011
Special
Bilaterals
Oper.
Trust Funds
and Others
Total
Develop-
Relief
ment
2012
Special
Bilaterals
Oper.
Trust Funds
2
and Others
Total
Develop-
Relief
2013
Special
ment
Bilaterals
Oper.
Total
Trust Funds
2
Develop-
Relief
ment
Special
Bilaterals
Oper.
Trust Funds
and Others2
and Others
Total
2
ASIA
Afghanistan
Bangladesh
-
142 559
13 553
494
156 606
-
179 219
14 487
582
194 289
-
189 158
15 003
2 204
206 364
-
144 434
14 316
5 067
163 818
42 492
32 793
-
453
75 738
36 783
4 581
-
2 635
44 000
38 156
2 415
-
1 547
42 118
48 744
3 105
-
1 945
53 794
Bhutan
2 027
-
-
19
2 046
1 873
-
-
36
1 909
1 994
-
-
2
1 995
2 151
-
-
5
2 156
Cambodia
1 455
14 597
-
219
16 272
5 181
9 698
-
391
15 269
17 615
5 165
-
569
23 349
16 332
175
-
739
17 246
India
9 530
-
-
953
10 482
6 203
-1
-
3 345
9 547
3 115
-1
-
11 103
14 217
1 888
-
-
1 722
3 611
-
8 488
1 519
423
10 429
-
6 763
663
1 069
8 494
1 943
1 297
1 648
1 110
5 998
3 967
-
-
505
4 472
Indonesia
Korea, D.P.R. of
Lao People's Dem. Rep.
Myanmar
Nepal
Pakistan
Philippines
Sri Lanka
Timor-Leste
Other Regional Expenses
TOTAL REGION
-
29 780
-
692
30 472
-
38 791
-
35
38 825
-
96 519
-
19
96 538
-
11 414
-
52
11 466
6 808
8 454
-
182
15 444
4 504
4 595
-
604
9 703
6 209
112
-
398
6 719
9 631
-
-
603
10 233
47 007
-
20 872
295
11
21 178
-
27 286
394
84
27 764
-
34 230
16
231
34 477
-
46 331
73
603
7 137
49 660
-
133
56 931
4 925
42 782
-1
116
47 822
7 774
27 733
-
1 253
36 760
7 109
16 493
-
1 524
25 126
13 728
347 829
17 690
868
380 116
2 749
327 778
7 058
1 614
339 198
294
238 414
16 689
787
256 184
-
168 464
1 178
172
169 814
-
38 458
940
126
39 524
-
20 829
38
203
21 071
-
19 675
416
334
20 425
-
40 639
7 645
254
48 539
1 109
-
71 366
4 995
1 221
404
31
465
73 727
5 863
221
-137
27 607
5 854
1 015
464
70
1 281
28 913
7 462
726
5 499
18 092
369
116
37
139
1 151
19 074
7 056
1 123
5 015
11 842
19
68
-
8
134
13 041
5 168
-
56
-
859
915
-
45
410
1 566
2 022
-
-
-0
651
650
-
-
-
951
951
84 286
769 909
35 622
5 927
895 743
62 301
695 828
24 529
13 631
796 289
83 324
633 179
33 925
21 497
771 925
95 961
442 918
23 280
14 284
576 443
1 302
2 669
3 632
EASTERN EUROPE AND CIS
Armenia
106
1 424
-
-
1 531
-
-
3 971
1 868
957
-
-
2 825
3 543
88
-
-
-
-
-
88
88
-
-
-
16
16
-
-
-
17
Georgia
-
4 331
7
-
4 338
-
764
5
53
822
-
473
-
5
478
-
381
-
-
381
Kyrgyz Republic
-
12 046
697
-1
12 742
-
13 841
183
64
14 088
-
7 977
135
195
8 306
866
7 209
56
249
8 380
-
421
-
-
421
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2 444
7 621
-
-
10 065
8 391
2 255
-
101
10 747
8 183
3 897
-
51
12 131
10 428
1 818
-
41
12 287
-
Azerbaijan
Tajikistan
Uzbekistan
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Other Regional Expenses
-
217
-
-
217
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2 550
26 060
704
-1
29 313
9 693
19 529
188
305
29 716
10 051
13 303
135
267
23 756
14 838
9 496
56
306
24 697
TOTAL REGION
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 131
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Russian Federation
17
ANNEX IX-B: DIRECT EXPENSES1 BY COUNTRY, REGION AND PROGRAMME CATEGORY, 2010–2013
(USD thousand)
2010
Develop-
Relief
ment
2011
Special
Bilaterals
Oper.
Trust Funds
and Others
Total
Develop-
Relief
ment
2012
Special
Bilaterals
Oper.
Trust Funds
2
and Others
Total
Develop-
Relief
2013
Special
ment
Bilaterals
Oper.
Total
Trust Funds
2
Develop-
Relief
ment
Special
Bilaterals
Oper.
Trust Funds
and Others2
and Others
Total
2
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN
Bolivia (Plurinational State of)
2 574
Chile
Colombia
Cuba
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
2 468
-
3 296
-
6 198
1 030
798
-
2 525
688
1 626
-
-
442
-
-
442
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-2
19 743
-
12 741
2 559
32 483
7 601
947
-1
24 722
-
12 222
1 955
36 944
-
7 784
-
5 174
697
12 957
-
12 808
-
8 276
805
21 084
3 119
213
236
-
162
611
914
20
-
469
1 403
250
715
-
280
1 244
202
1 247
-
13 177
14 626
-
-
-
60
60
-
-
-
1 341
1 341
-
-
-
930
930
-
-
-
748
748
-15
2 540
-
1 578
4 103
-2
1 430
-
2 612
4 040
-2
3 170
-
1 638
4 807
-5
3 290
-
1 860
5 145
El Salvador
-
3 338
-
22 522
25 859
-
1 403
-
16 739
18 142
-
2 469
-
12 564
15 033
-
2 746
-
4 731
7 476
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
711
548
4 807
13 504
188 537
3 094
47 122
-
1 519
175
20 538
15 733
236 382
28 439
3 225
11 183
6 579
139 344
610
10 775
-
3 712
632
25 229
13 517
150 752
37 022
2 657
4 731
6 793
5 357
55 911
994
7 395
-
1 682
920
23 489
9 696
68 957
31 276
1 891
14 332
5 677
4 988
31 947
1 329
4 695
-
969
3 731
20 559
7 848
54 705
27 565
948
-
815
9
7 585
15
687
956
459
-
1 255
644
1 520
5 400
956
643
2 345
58 275
151 660
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Other Regional Expenses
1 525
-7
3 186
-0
296
-
1 154
386
6 103
1 147
3 868
13 541
237 827
47 122
64 342
362 832
-
-
TOTAL REGION
3 630
-
-
-
4 423
894
38
-
1 709
1 376
8 640
9
1 709
2 308
21 584
180 844
10 775
68 822
282 025
-
3 401
-
-
-
4 371
264
2 119
-
781
1 350
781
3 733
3 458
-1
366
20 094
81 733
7 395
50 317
159 539
26 606
62 084
4 695
-
2 417
-
-
797
15
-
-
MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA
Algeria
Egypt
Iran, Islamic Republic of
Jordan
Lebanon
Libya
Syrian Arab Republic
TOTAL REGION
OTHER
1
1 434
19 461
-
18 261
-
133
18 394
-
25 602
-
44
25 646
-
21 910
-
-2
21 908
-
44
8 511
9 687
4 422
-
187
14 296
10 061
56
-
2 849
12 966
10 446
11 477
-
330
22 253
3 035
-
-
3 035
-
3 550
-
-
3 550
-
1 264
-
-
1 264
-
2 452
-
-
271
16 402
-
-
16 673
1 542
14 496
5 913
-
21 952
527
17 982
2 180
77
20 766
157
27 421
-
14 006
41 584
-
-
-
102
102
-
-
-
147
147
0
15 060
-
1 430
16 490
587
140 596
-
79
141 262
142 904
562
-
Morocco
State of Palestine
Tunisia
Turkey
Yemen
Other Regional Expenses
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
22 204
11 240
-
33 444
-
16 947
1 239
-
18 186
-
142 904
438
124
-
-
76 304
123
-0
76 427
-
68 380
18
101
68 500
-
56 170
-
82
56 252
26
-
68 096
49
116
26
68 261
1 796
31 981
-
38
33 815
6 863
39 836
-
48
46 748
2 859
65 540
956
10
69 366
-
263 019
6 441
-7
269 454
-
-
1 504
-
-
-
3 417
-
35 296
177
323
-
57
324
39 092
502
13 952
181 221
446
1 998
3 694
26 588
5 648
138 091
-
-
Excludes programme support and administrative costs.
2
Includes all Expenses for Bilaterals, Trust Funds, General Fund and Special Accounts.
Negative figures represent financial adjustments.
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1 840
-
56 803
1 513
412
-
1 291
490
5 949
60 347
2 004
197 617
19 933
235 415
17 584
2 399
174 021
1 702
31 018
16 534
155 476
-
5 949
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
108 084
10 806
851
-
837
278
113 160
11 084
46
2 469
-
537
49 681
128 974
829
994
-0
315
515
584
49 681
132 752
1 343
275 331
16 836
319 016
5 226
5 606
346 684
13 732
858 334
7 608
15 352
895 025
204 729
-1 084
-448
771
168 996
168 234
29 197
79 564
2 869
202 136
313 765
-
-
-
3 388
-
-
1 504
-
2 452
-
-
-
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 132
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Iraq
18 027
8 467
ANNEX IX-C: DIRECT EXPENSES1 BY COUNTRY, SPECIAL STATUS CATEGORY AND REGION, 2010–2013
2010
USD thousand
DEVELOPMENT AND RELIEF:
2011
%
USD thousand
2012
%
USD thousand
2013
%
USD thousand
%
3 507 923
100.0
3 241 198
100.0
3 637 208
100.0
3 706 345
100.0
Least developed countries
2 371 939
67.6
2 102 005
64.9
2 496 957
68.7
2 211 899
59.7
Low-income, food-deficit countries
3 308 053
94.3
3 010 605
92.9
3 205 532
88.1
2 436 605
65.7
2 148 296
61.2
1 963 350
60.6
2 461 202
67.7
2 073 617
55.9
854 194
24.4
758 129
23.4
716 503
19.7
538 879
14.5
28 610
0.8
29 222
0.9
23 354
0.6
24 334
0.7
Latin America and the Caribbean
251 367
7.2
202 428
6.2
101 827
2.8
88 690
2.4
Middle East and North Africa
195 173
5.6
255 349
7.9
335 852
9.2
872 065
23.5
287 842
100.0
315 986
100.0
348 657
100.0
376 914
100.0
Least developed countries
204 474
71.0
228 630
72.4
270 246
77.5
265 853
70.5
Low-income, food-deficit countries
276 860
96.2
306 835
97.1
342 237
98.2
330 901
87.8
169 819
59.0
200 771
63.5
219 450
62.9
196 580
52.2
84 286
29.3
62 301
19.7
83 324
23.9
95 961
25.5
BY SPECIAL STATUS CATEGORY2
BY REGION/COUNTRY GROUP
Sub-Saharan Africa
Asia
Eastern Europe and CIS
BY SPECIAL STATUS CATEGORY2
BY REGION/COUNTRY GROUP
Sub-Saharan Africa
Asia
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 133
Eastern Europe and CIS
1
2
2 550
0.9
9 693
3.1
10 051
2.9
14 838
3.9
Latin America and the Caribbean
13 541
4.7
21 584
6.8
20 094
5.8
26 606
7.1
Middle East and North Africa
13 952
4.8
19 933
6.3
16 836
4.8
13 732
3.6
Exclusive of programme support and administrative costs.
Actual classifications for each year.
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
DEVELOPMENT:
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
ANNEX X-A: UNITED NATIONS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION PARTNERSHIPS
PARTNERS
No. of
projects
No. of
countries
No. of
projects
No. of
countries
No. of
projects
No. of
countries
UNICEF
FAO
WHO
UNDP
UNHCR
International Red Cross and
Red Crescent Movement (ICRC,
IFRC, National Red Cross and
Red Crescent Societies)
UNFPA
UNAIDS
OTHERS*
IOM
World Bank
IFAD
ILO
UNESCO
UN-Women**
UN-HABITAT
UNEP
* OTHERS include entities such as United Nations missions.
** Unifem was merged with UN-Women in January 2011.
*** Acronyms are listed at the end of the document.
Projects are categorized at the activity level for country programmes, and the country level for regional projects.
Special operations are excluded.
1
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 134
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
669 (26%)
448 (17%)
625 (24%)
570 (22%)
270 (11%)
In order to portray a more complete snapshot of collaboration carried out in 2013, not only with NGOs, but also with
members of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, these partnerships have been incorporated into the above
indicative figures under the generic term of ‘partner’.
1
Additional Notes:
In 2013 WFP worked with a total of 1,380 partners; 201 international and 1,179 national. The number of
partners displayed in the above tables cannot be added to result in the total sum because individual partners
may collaborate with WFP in a variety of programme activities/provide various services, therefore causing
overlap.
The number of partners reflected in any given cell is indicative only of the total count of distinct organizations
and does not demonstrate the size of the partners’ collaboration.
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 135
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ANNEX XI: WFP INDICATORS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE
QUADRENNIAL COMPREHENSIVE POLICY REVIEW (QCPR)1
QCPR-related indicators
2013 (%)
% projects with gender marker code 2A or 2B
50
% of country offices using common results-based management (RBM) tools and principles
100
% of countries having an up-to-date disaster risk reduction strategy
90
% of WFP country programmes (new) with outcomes consistent with UNDAF
100
% of Member States represented by the Executive Board giving positive feedback on the
quality of corporate reporting on results and mandates,
i.e. the Annual Performance Report
100
This is a subset of the common QCPR-related indicators agreed with UNICEF, UNDP and UNFPA. The complete set
of indicators that can be tracked by WFP has been built into the 2014 results frameworks and will be reported through
the Annual Performance Report for 2014.
1
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 136
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
ANNEX XII: OVERVIEW OF ORGANIZATIONAL STRENGTHENING
The organizational strengthening effort was launched in 2012, financed by a supplementary
PSA allocation of USD 20 million approved by the Board as part of the Management Plan (2013–2015)
to establish: i) a change-management package focusing on implementation of the Framework for
Action; and ii) a transition fund to provide flexibility in managing staff changes.
Part 1 of the APR outlines the organizational improvements; this Annex provides additional
information on the range of actions implemented in the change management package, building on the
interim report included in the Management Plan (2014–2016).
ALLOCATIONS AND EXPENDITURES
Of the USD 20 million supplementary PSA allocation, USD 19.1 million – 96 percent – was spent
in 2013:
i)
ii)
USD 10.1 million for costs related to managing staff changes: agreed separations of
12 Directors (USD 2.1 million), 28 international professionals (USD 3.2 million) and
11 general service staff (USD 1.3 million), amounting to USD 6.7 million, and additional
costs of USD 3.4 million related to international staff reassignments; and
USD 9.9 million to finance the seven themes, as shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1: Supplementary PSA allocations by organizational strengthening theme
Human
Resources transition costs
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 137
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
Objective and rationale
Activities
Outputs and impact
STRATEGY
1.1
Operationalizing the
Strategic Plan
Completed
Phase 1
Identify and remove obstacles that prevent WFP
from fully implementing the Strategic Plan.
Rationale
WFP introduced a number of new tools to
implement the shift to food assistance, but they
were not always aligned with identified needs and
not consistently integrated into WFP’s business
processes.
Consultations with Regional Directors and
Country Directors developed
recommendations for investments at the
regional and country levels; the findings
were presented to the Executive
Management Group (EMG) for approval.
Phase 2
ORGANIZATION DESIGN
2.1
Transition to new organization
design
Completed
Ensure effective implementation of the new
organization design.
Rationale
The process requires coordination to ensure a
smooth transition.
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 138
Phase 1
•
Preparation and implementation of the
special reassignment process.
Phase 2
•
Defining requirements, establishing a
transition support unit and developing
transition checklists.
Phase 3
•
•
Institutionalization of the changes,
ensuring effective hand-over.
New organization design implemented
as planned in February 2013 to
empower country offices
Senior staff and staff reassignment
completed: 100 senior managers and
450 professional staff
Global relocation tool launched
Learning and feedback used to inform
regular reassignments and other
human resources (HR) processes
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Coordination with other change
processes; consideration of approved
recommendations during preparation of
the Management Plan (2014–2016) and
preparation of a QCPR reference group
document.
• Gaps in meeting the Strategic
Objectives assessed
• 40 recommendations for actions,
investments, savings and process
improvements
• Inputs to the Management Plan
(2014–2016)
• Lessons learned gathered to support
implementation of the new
Strategic Plan
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
2.2
Implementation of organization
design at regional bureaux
Completed
Objective and rationale
Ensure effective and coordinated implementation
of the redefined role of the regional bureaux.
Rationale
Enable the regional bureaux to support
WFP operations more effectively by reviewing and
adapting operational and organizational structures
in the light of regional strategies and country
office needs.
Activities
Phase 1
Gap analysis of regional bureau roles and
accountabilities to assess deficiencies,
identify areas for investment and define
actions to establish the required expertise
and capacities.
Phase 2
Assist transition planning at workshops for
deputy regional directors; develop an
action plan for the transition.
Phase 3
Outputs and impact
•
•
•
•
•
•
Integrate regional bureau requirements
into the Management Plan (2014–2016).
In progress
Assess WFP’s country presence and operating
models against the Strategic Plan (2014–2017),
hunger and malnutrition trend lines and
partnership opportunities.
Rationale
WFP’s field presence enables it to address food
insecurity by assisting beneficiaries in
emergencies and supporting economic and social
development. It must match beneficiaries’ needs
to make WFP’s responses efficient and effective.
Phase 1
•
Gather information about WFP’s
presence, operating models and
resources to establish a baseline.
Phase 2
•
Develop country assessment criteria and
frameworks in consultation with internal
stakeholders.
Phase 3
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Develop options for future country
presence and operating models on the
basis of Phase 2 for the
Management Plan (2015–2017).
•
Country Office Presence and
Operating Model Review (COPrOM)
developed for annual input into future
Management Plans
Standard assessment approach for
country presence developed from
consultations with internal
stakeholders; based on beneficiary
needs, national capacities and
national income
17 countries identified for further
analysis; template developed for the
2014 COPrOM to be carried out by the
regional bureaux and country offices,
supported by the office of the Deputy
Executive Director/Chief Operating
Officer (DED/COO)
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
2.3
Review of country office
presence and operating
models
Standard template for the
organizational structure and functions
of regional bureaux
Gap analysis, and measures to enable
regional bureaux to fulfil their new role
Regional bureau transition plans
Relevant functions transferred from
Headquarter to regional bureaux
Structural gaps addressed in
budget allocations
Support for country offices provided in
line with targets
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
Objective and rationale
Activities
Outputs and impact
•
•
2.4
Improving resource
management in country offices
In progress
Improving resource management with a view to
efficiency and effectiveness
Rationale
Because they are closest to beneficiaries, the
country offices are WFP’s centre of gravity; they
must be empowered to utilize resources
appropriately.
Phase 1
•
Baseline data gathering and development
of benchmarking tool
Phase 2
•
Develop method for improved efficiency
assessment in the largest country offices
Phase 3
•
COPrOM can be validated externally;
provides an entry point for
consultation with national counterparts
Options for future to be developed in
2014
Methods and tools for reviewing
resource management
Pilot projects lead to improved budget
utilization
Methods and tools refined and handed
over as planned in 2014
2.5
Liaison office presence review
Completed
Review of liaison and communication offices to
develop guidance for optimum performance and
value for money.
Rationale
Phase 1
Liaison offices handle donor relations,
inter-agency relations and communications under
more effective terms of reference.
Identify and implement changes
Develop criteria for assessing liaison
offices and apply them
Phase 2
•
•
•
Assessment criteria for liaison offices
New terms of reference
Optimized processes
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ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Pilot projects in selected country offices to
compile action plans and roadmap for
hand-over of toolkit.
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
Objective and rationale
Activities
Outputs and impact
HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
3.1
Review of HR processes and
identification of improvements
In progress
Review recruitment, reassignment and promotion
processes, with reference to performance
management, to enhance personnel management
and development processes.
Rationale.
Fit for Purpose identified personnel management
issues.
Phase 1
Review current HR processes
Phase 2
Identify and prioritize improvements
Phase 3
Finalize recommendations for HR strategy
2014–2017
Phase 4
•
•
•
•
Implement recommendations
•
•
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 141
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
•
Report on HR processes
Implementation plan
Enhanced promotion exercise
positively received; promising
candidates identified
Job evaluation framework, leadership
development programme, career
framework programme, diversity
strategy, HR strategy all
commissioned at the end of 2013
Recommendations for HR strategy in
terms of organizational development,
employee engagement, talent
development and performance
management
Capacity development for HR staff to
support role as business partners
Technology-based systems to improve
HR performance planned for 2014
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
3.2
Locally-recruited staff transfer
project
In progress
Objective and rationale
Establish contracting and administrative systems
to move national staff from UNDP to WFP/FAO
regulations.
Rationale
Executive Director’s decision.
Activities
Phase 1
Identify issues to be addressed,
implementation options and procedures.
Phase 2
Develop new policy, with administrative
and legal procedures.
Phase 3
Outputs and impact
•
•
•
Assess options for transfer of fixed-term
staff to FAO contracts with payroll,
benefits and entitlements outsourced to
UNDP in Copenhagen on a cost-recovery
basis.
Phase 4
National staff brought under FAO
regulations; UNDP manages social
security, pensions and work-related
accident or illness claims.
New manual, IT systems and
processes
Pilot review of contract types for local
field staff to test replacement of
service contracts with fixed-term
appointments or special service
agreements
3.3
Strategy for managing and
developing staff
In progress
Develop a strategy for managing and developing
WFP’s workforce to support the new organization
design.
Rationale
The WFP HR strategy requires updating to reflect
Fit for Purpose and the Strategic Plan
(2014–2016).
Phase 1
Review reports from the corporate skill
audit review, the HR process review and
the global staff survey.
Phase 2
Define staff management initiatives.
Phase 3
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 142
Implement initiatives regarding learning
and organizational development.
•
•
•
•
Strategy for managing and developing
WFP’s workforce
Review of WFP’s capacity
development programmes for staff
Re-launch of global leadership
programme
New learning and development
framework and new learning system
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Update HR data in WINGS; issue new
contracts to national staff.
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
Objective and rationale
Activities
Outputs and impact
BUSINESS PROCESSES
4.1
Scoping business processes
review
In progress
Phase 1
Align core business processes with the new
organization design.
Rationale
Identify areas for improvement at process
optimization workshops.
Phase 2
Need to address gaps and misalignments in
current processes.
Identify areas requiring further study, and
extend process review to cover
administrative and HR processes.
Phase 3
Implement improvements
•
•
•
PARTNERSHIPS
5.1
Developing a partnership
strategy
In progress
Phase 1
Identify actions for enhancing existing
partnerships and building new ones, particularly at
the field level.
Rationale
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 143
Need for effective partnerships to leverage
comparative advantages and achieve economies.
Establish principles and practices to
govern partnering arrangements and
guide partner selection for approval by the
Board.
Phase 2
•
•
Develop an implementation plan.
Phase 3
Implement priority actions.
•
Partnership strategy for approval at
EB.A/2014
Action plan to position WFP as the
“partner of choice” in food assistance,
develop partnering principles,
reinforce understanding of WFP’s
unique value proposition, select
partners and manage partnerships
Partnership resource centre to be
created; other actions to follow
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
38 improvements presented to EMG,
13 prioritized, for supply chain
management, programme cycle
management, resource management
and utilization, and monitoring,
reporting and evaluation
HR, operations, administration and
security included in phase 2
Improvements in programme cycle
management, UNDAF/Country
Programme Action Plan (CPAP)
processes and partnership templates,
food procurement, goods and services
procurement, supply chain
management, customer relations and
country-office evaluations.
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
Objective and rationale
Activities
Outputs and impact
EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT
6.1
Improving managers’
performance and accountability
In progress
Identify measures to enhance managers’
performance and develop the next generation of
WFP leaders, especially women.
Rationale
Need for rigour in the performance management
process in terms of holding managers
accountable for the utilization of resources,
achievement of results and adherence to policy.
Develop performance compacts for senior
managers covering accountability and
delegated authority
Develop improved regular processes for
performance planning and results reviews
at the individual, country office and
Headquarters levels
Implement systems such as PROMIS to
support decision-making
Develop an accountability framework
for WFP
•
•
•
•
•
6.2
Review of executive
management
Completed
Review executive decision-making and
management processes to ensure accountability
and oversight.
Rationale
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 144
Need for effective decision-making structures and
information flows for decentralization to the field.
Phase 1
•
Analysis of current processes,
committees and the Office of the
Executive Director (OED)
Phase 2
•
Identification of options for improvement
Phase 3
Implementation of changes to OED and
committees
•
•
Improvements to EMG in
decision-making and tracking of
follow-up
Improved functioning of leadership
group of the Executive Director,
DED/COO, AEDs and Chief of Staff,
with end-of-year performance
monitoring
Independent end-of-year assessment
of executive management
OED focused on supporting the
Executive Director and effective
executive management.
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
•
Performance compacts for DEDs,
Assistant Executive Directors (AEDs)
and Chief of Staff
Improved results review process for
senior managers
Revised office-level performance
planning and review process, with
emphasis on feedback by reporting
offices; revised guidance and training.
Improved linkages between
office-level performance management
and individual performance
management
2014–2017 Management Results
Framework (MRF) integrated into
PROMIS
PROMIS rolled out in one additional
region in 2013
DETAILS OF THE OBJECTIVES, RATIONALE AND PROGRESS OF EACH WORKSTREAM
Workstream
Objective and rationale
Activities
Outputs and impact
CULTURE OF COMMITMENT, COMMUNICATION AND ACCOUNTABILITY
7.1
New approaches to
communication and learning
In progress
Develop a culture of commitment, communication
and accountability.
Rationale
Communication and learning are important in
other workstreams: communication and feedback
mechanisms are needed to enable senior
management to promote and track the change in
culture.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 145
•
•
Just-Ask has 11,865 page views by
the end of 2013; quarterly all-staff
meetings led by the
Executive Director; regular
open-forum meetings/video
conferences on particular topics; 2013
Global Management Meeting in Rome
has 2,000 page views
2012 global staff survey followed up
by units and supported the
Ombudsman
Internal website used for corporate
messaging
Executive management messages
cascaded
New graphics for the APR
Translation of 15 WFPgo pages; New
to WFP, Staff Counselling and Ethics
now available in Spanish and French
WFP joins the Communicating with
Disaster Affected
Communities (CDAC) network to
improve communications with
communities and prevent sexual
exploitation and abuse.
Online media and communications
manual for staff
Independent analysis of WFP’s media
coverage is 97% positive
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
Define and establish channels of
communication such as:
• executive management dialogue with
staff;
• quarterly staff meetings led by the
Executive Director, with additional
meetings as needed;
• institutionalization of Just-Ask for
questions for the Executive Director
• global staff surveys
• translation of WFPgo into more
languages
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 146
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
ACRONYMS USED IN THE DOCUMENT
AED
Assistant Executive Director
APR
Annual Performance Report
ARC
African Risk Capacity
ART
anti-retroviral therapy
C&V
cash and vouchers
CERF
Central Emergency Response Fund
CIS
Commonwealth of Independent States
COSO
Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission
CP
country programme
CSB
corn-soya blend
DED/COO
Deputy Executive Director/Chief Operating Officer
DEV
development project
DPRK
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
DRC
Democratic Republic of the Congo
ECOSOC
Economic and Social Council of the United Nations
ECOWAS
Economic Community of West African States
EMG
Executive Management Group
EMOP
emergency project
EPUN
Ethics Panel of the United Nations
FAO
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
FDP
Financial and Conflict of Interest Disclosure Programme
FFA
food assistance for assets
FoodSECuRE
Food Security Climate Resilience Facility
FOQUS
Food Quality Software
FPF
Forward Purchase Facility
GDP
gross domestic product
GNI
gross national income
HLCM
High-Level Committee on Management
HR
human resources
IATI
International Aid Transparency Initiative
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 147
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
IDA
iron deficiency anaemia
IDP
internally displaced person
IFAD
International Fund for Agricultural Development
IOM
International Organization for Migration
IRA
Immediate Response Account
KPI
key performance indicator
LTSH
landside transport, storage and handling
M&E
monitoring and evaluation
MDG
Millennium Development Goal
MOPAN
Multilateral Organization Performance Assessment Network
MOSS
minimum operating security standards
MRD
Management Results Dimension
MRF
Management Results Framework
MUAC
mid-upper arm circumference
NGO
non-governmental organization
OCHA
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
ODA
official development assistance
OED
Office of the Executive Director
OMP
Panama Regional Bureau (Latin America and the Caribbean)
OVC
orphans and other vulnerable children
P4P
Purchase for Progress
PACE
Performance and Competency Enhancement (process)
PMTCT
prevention of mother-to-child transmission
PREP
Preparedness and Response Enhancement Programme
PROMIS
Performance and Risk Management Organizational
Management System
PRRO
protracted relief and recovery operation
PSA
Programme Support and Administrative (budget)
QCPR
Quadrennial Comprehensive Policy Review
RBA
Rome-based agency
REACH
Renewed Efforts Against Child Hunger and Undernutrition
RWA
Respectful Workplace Advisor
SAM
security assessment mission
SCOpe
System for Cash Operations
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 148
ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT FOR 2013 | WFP/EB.A/2014/4*
SO
special operation
SO
Strategic Objective
SPR
Standard Project Report
SRF
Strategic Results Framework
TB
tuberculosis
TPDS
India’s Targeted Public Distribution System
UN SWAP
United Nations System-Wide Action Plan
UNDAF
United Nations Development Assistance Framework
UNDG
United Nations Development Group
UNDP
United Nations Development Programme
UNESCO
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
UNFPA
United Nations Population Fund
UNHAS
United Nations Humanitarian Air Service
UNHCR
Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
UNICEF
United Nations Children’s Fund
UN-Women
United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the
Empowerment of Women
WHO
World Health Organization
WINGS
WFP’s Information Network and Global System
AR-EBA2014-12561E-RTR-12870E
WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME | 149
Table of contents
Page
WFP Executive Board's decisions and recommendations for 2013:

Section I: Decisions and recommendations of the First Regular
Session of the Executive Board, 2013 (Rome, 18–19 February
2013)

Section II: Decisions and recommendations of the Annual Session
of the Executive Board, 2013 (Rome, 3–6 June 2013)
15

Section III: Decisions and recommendations of the Second Regular
Session of the Executive Board, 2013
(Rome, 4–7 November 2013)
35
3
i
Annual report of the WFP Executive Board to the Economic and Social Council and the
FAO Council on its activities in 2013
In accordance with General Regulation VI.3 and pursuant to Executive Board decision
2000/EB.A/2, the Executive Board of the World Food Programme has the honour to present to
the Economic and Social Council and the FAO Council its report for consideration.
1
SECTION I
Executive Board Bureau
Executive Board
First Regular Session
Rome, 18–19 February 2013
VERIFICATION OF
ADOPTED DECISIONS
AND
RECOMMENDATIONS
Agenda item 14
E
President:
Mr Vladimir Kuznetsov
(Russian Federation)
Alternate:
Ms Marieta Okenková
(Slovakia)
Vice-President:
H.E. Evelyn A. Stokes-Hayford
(Ghana)
Alternate:
H.E. Frank Mutubila
(Zambia)
Member:
Mr Lupino Lazaro, Jr
(Philippines)
Alternate:
H.E. Hassan Janabi
(Iraq)
Member:
H.E. Miguel Ruíz-Cabañas Izquierdo
(Mexico)
Alternate:
Ms Sylvia María Leticia Wohlers de Meie
(Guatemala)
Member:
H.E. Thomas Wriessnig
(Germany)
Alternate:
Ms Elizabeth Petrovski
(United States of America)
Rapporteur:
Ms Silvia María Álvarez Rossell
(Cuba)
DECISIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE FIRST
REGULAR SESSION OF THE
EXECUTIVE BOARD, 2013
Distribution: GENERAL
WFP/EB.1/2013/14
19 February 2013
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH
This document is printed in a limited number of copies. Executive Board documents are
available on WFP’s WEB site (http://www.wfp.org/eb).
TABLE OF CONTENTS
page
Adoption of the Agenda
6
Election of the Bureau and Appointment of the Rapporteur
6
CURRENT AND FUTURE STRATEGIC ISSUES
2013/EB.1/1
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
7
ANNUAL REPORTS
2013/EB.1/2
Annual Report for 2012 to ECOSOC and FAO Council
7
RESOURCE, FINANCIAL AND BUDGETARY MATTERS
2013/EB.1/3
Appointment of the Inspector General and Director of the Oversight Office
8
EVALUATION REPORTS
2013/EB.1/4
Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluation on the
8
Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted
Refugee Situations in Chad and Management Response
2013/EB.1/5
Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluation on the
9
Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted
Refugee Situations in Bangladesh and Management Response
2013/EB.1/6
Synthesis Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact
Evaluations on the Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable
Solutions in Protracted Refugee Situations and Management Response
4
9
page
WEST AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.1/7
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Burkina Faso 200509
10
2013/EB.1/8
Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—
10
Niger 200051
SOUTHERN AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.1/9
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Zimbabwe 200453
10
ORGANIZATIONAL AND PROCEDURAL MATTER
2013/EB.1/10
Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board (2013–2014)
11
ADMINISTRATIVE AND MANAGERIAL MATTERS
2013/EB.1/11
Reports by the Joint Inspection Unit Relevant to the Work of WFP
11
SUMMARY OF THE WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
2013/EB.1/12
Summary of the Work of the Second Regular Session of the
11
Executive Board, 2012
Annex I
Agenda
12
5
DECISIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Adoption of the Agenda
The Board adopted the Agenda.
18 February 2013
Election of the Bureau and Appointment of the Rapporteur
In accordance with the Rules of Procedure of the Board, the Board elected
Mr Vladimir Kuznetsov (Russian Federation, List E) as President for a one-year
term. Ms Marieta Okenková (Slovakia, List E) was elected as Alternate.
The Board elected H.E. Evelyn A. Stokes-Hayford (Ghana, List A) as
Vice-President. H.E. Frank Mutubila (Zambia, List A) was elected as Alternate.
The Board elected as members of the Bureau, representing the other three WFP
electoral lists, for a one-year term: Mr Lupino Lazaro, Jr (Philippines, List B); H.E.
Miguel Ruíz-Cabañas Izquierdo (Mexico, List C); and H.E. Thomas Wriessnig
(Germany, List D). Elected as Alternates were: H.E. Hassan Janabi (Iraq, List B);
Ms Sylvia María Leticia Wohlers de Meie (Guatemala, List C); and
Ms Elizabeth Petrovski (United States of America, List D).
In accordance with Rule XII of its Rules of Procedure, the Board appointed
Ms Silvia María Álvarez Rossell (Cuba, List C) Rapporteur of the First Regular
Session of 2013.
18 February 2013
6
The decisions and recommendations in the current report will be implemented by the Secretariat in
the light of the Board’s deliberations, from which the main comments will be reflected in the
summary of the work of the session.
CURRENT AND FUTURE STRATEGIC ISSUES
2013/EB.1/1
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
The Board took note of the presentation by the Executive Director. The main points
of the presentation and the Board’s comments would be contained in the summary
of the work of the session.
18 February 2013
ANNUAL REPORTS
2013/EB.1/2
Annual Report for 2012 to ECOSOC and FAO Council
The Board approved the “Annual Report for 2012 to ECOSOC and FAO Council”
(WFP/EB.1/2013/4). In accordance with decision 2004/EB.A/11, the Board
requested that the Annual Report be forwarded to ECOSOC and the FAO Council
along with the Board’s decisions and recommendations.
18 February 2013
7
RESOURCE, FINANCIAL AND BUDGETARY MATTERS
2013/EB.1/3
Appointment of the Inspector General and Director of the Oversight Office
Following the recommendation by the Executive Director, the Board approved the
appointment of Mr David Johnson (United Kingdom) as Inspector General and
Director of the Oversight Office for a term of four years from 1 April 2013 to
31 March 2017.
19 February 2013
EVALUATION REPORTS
2013/EB.1/4
Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluation on the
Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted
Refugee Situations in Chad and Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact
Evaluation on the Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in
Protracted Refugee Situations – Chad” (WFP/EB.1/2013/6-A + Corr.1) and the
management response in WFP/EB.1/2013/6-A/Add.1 and encouraged further
action on the recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the
Board during its discussion.
18 February 2013
8
2013/EB.1/5
Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluation on the
Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted
Refugee Situations in Bangladesh and Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact
Evaluation on the Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in
Protracted Refugee Situations – Bangladesh” (WFP/EB.1/2013/6-B) and the
management response in WFP/EB.1/2013/6-B/Add.1 and encouraged further
action on the recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the
Board during its discussion.
18 February 2013
2013/EB.1/6
Synthesis Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluations
on the Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted
Refugee Situations and Management Response
The Board took note of “Synthesis Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP
Impact Evaluations on the Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in
Protracted Refugee Situations” (WFP/EB.1/2013/6-C) and the management
response in WFP/EB.1/2013/6-C/Add.1 and encouraged further action on the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
18 February 2013
9
WEST AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.1/7
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Burkina Faso 200509
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation Burkina
Faso
200509
“Building
Resilience
and
Reducing
Malnutrition”
(WFP/EB.1/2013/8-A/1).
19 February 2013
2013/EB.1/8
Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—
Niger 200051
The Board approved the budget increase of US$163.9 million for protracted relief
and recovery operation Niger 200051, with a ten-month extension from 1 March to
31 December 2013 (WFP/EB.1/2013/8-B).
19 February 2013
SOUTHERN AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.1/9
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Zimbabwe 200453
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery and operation
Zimbabwe 200453 “Responding to Humanitarian Needs and Strengthening
Resilience to Food Insecurity” (WFP/EB.1/2013/8-A/2).
19 February 2013
10
ORGANIZATIONAL AND PROCEDURAL MATTERS
2013/EB.1/10
Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board (2013–2014)
The Board takes note of the “Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive
Board (2013–2014)” (WFP/EB.1/2013/10) as proposed by the Bureau and the
Secretariat, and as amended by the addition of an update of WFP’s Gender Policy
for consideration at the Second Regular Session in 2014.
19 February 2013
ADMINISTRATIVE AND MANAGERIAL MATTERS
2013/EB.1/11
Reports by the Joint Inspection Unit Relevant to the Work of WFP
The Board took note of the information and recommendations in “Reports by the
Joint Inspection Unit Relevant to the Work of WFP” (WFP/EB.1/2013/11/Rev.1).
19 February 2013
SUMMARY OF THE WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
2013/EB.1/12
Summary of the Work of the Second Regular Session of the
Executive Board, 2012
The Board approved the document “Draft Summary of the Work of the
Second Regular Session of the Executive Board, 2012”, the final version of which
would be embodied in the document WFP/EB.2/2012/15.
19 February 2013
11
ANNEX I
AGENDA
1.
Adoption of the Agenda (for approval)
2.
Election of the Bureau and Appointment of the Rapporteur
3.
Current and Future Strategic Issues
4.
Annual Reports
 Annual Report for 2012 to ECOSOC and FAO Council (for approval)
5.
Resource, Financial and Budgetary Matters
 Appointment of the Director of the Oversight Office (for approval)
6.
Evaluation Reports (for consideration)
a)
Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluation on the Contribution
of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted Refugee Situations in Chad
and Management Response
b) Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluation on the Contribution
of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted Refugee Situations in
Bangladesh and Management Response
c)
Synthesis Summary Report of the Joint UNHCR/WFP Impact Evaluations on the
Contribution of Food Assistance to Durable Solutions in Protracted Refugee Situations and
Management Response
OPERATIONAL MATTERS
7.
Country Programmes (for approval on a no-objection basis)

12
Nicaragua 200434 (2013–2018)
8.
Projects for Executive Board Approval (for approval)
a) Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations
 Burkina Faso 200509
 Zimbabwe 200453
b) Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations
 Niger 200051
9.
Reports of the Executive Director on Operational Matters (for information)
a) Development Projects approved by the Executive Director
(1 January–31 December 2012)

Guinea Bissau 200322

Sao Tome and Principe 200295

Togo 200304

Swaziland 200353

Swaziland 200420

Tunisia 200493
b) Budget Increases to Development Activities approved by the Executive Director
(1 January–31 December 2012)
c) Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations approved by the Executive Director
(1 July–31 December 2012)

Algeria 200301
d) Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations approved by the
Executive Director (1 July–31 December 2012)
13
e) Emergency Operations approved by the Executive Director or by the
Executive Director and the Director-General of FAO (1 July–31 December 2012)
10.
Organizational and Procedural Matters
 Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board (2013–2014) (for information)
11.
Administrative and Managerial Matters
 Reports by the Joint Inspection Unit Relevant to the Work of WFP (for consideration)
12.
Summary of the Work of the Second Regular Session of the Executive Board, 2012
(for approval)
13.
Other Business
 Oral Report on the Joint Meeting of the Executive Boards of UNDP/UNFPA/UNOPS,
UNICEF, UN-Women and WFP (for information)
14.
14
Verification of Adopted Decisions and Recommendations
SECTION II
Executive Board Bureau
Executive Board
Annual Session
Rome, 3–6 June 2013
VERIFICATION OF
ADOPTED DECISIONS
AND
RECOMMENDATIONS
Agenda item 14
E
President:
Mr Vladimir Kuznetsov
(Russian Federation)
Alternate:
Ms Marieta Okenková
(Slovakia)
VicePresident:
H.E. Evelyn A. Stokes-Hayford
(Ghana)
Alternate:
H.E. Frank Mutubila
(Zambia)
Member:
Mr Lupino Lazaro, Jr
(Philippines)
Alternate:
H.E. Hassan Janabi
(Iraq)
Member:
H.E. Miguel Ruíz-Cabañas Izquierdo
(Mexico)
Alternate:
Ms Sylvia María Leticia Wohlers de Meie
(Guatemala)
Member:
H.E. Thomas Wriessnig
(Germany)
Alternate:
Ms Elizabeth Petrovski
(United States of America)
Rapporteur:
Ms Andrée-Caroline Mebandé Bate
(Cameroon)
DECISIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
ANNUAL SESSION OF THE
EXECUTIVE BOARD, 2013
Distribution: GENERAL
WFP/EB.A/2013/14
6 June 2013
ORIGINAL: FRENCH
This document is printed in a limited number of copies. Executive Board documents are
available on WFP’s WEB site (http://www.wfp.org/eb).
TABLE OF CONTENTS
page
Adoption of the Agenda
19
Appointment of the Rapporteur
19
CURRENT AND FUTURE STRATEGIC ISSUES
2013/EB.A/1
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
19
ANNUAL REPORTS
2013/EB.A/2
Annual Performance Report for 2012
20
2013/EB.A/3
WFP Strategic Plan (2014–2017)
20
2013/EB.A/4
WFP Private-Sector Partnerships and Fundraising Strategy (2013–2017)
21
2013/EB.A/5
Update on WFP’s Role in the Humanitarian Assistance System
21
2013/EB.A/6
Update on the Nutrition Policy
21
POLICY ISSUES
RESOURCE, FINANCIAL AND BUDGETARY MATTERS
2013/EB.A/7
Audited Annual Accounts, 2012
21
2013/EB.A/8
Appointment of Two Executive Board Members to the Selection Panel for the
22
Appointment/Renewal of Two Audit Committee Members
2013/EB.A/9
Review of Financial Regulation 9.2 – Timing of the Management Plan
23
2013/EB.A/10
Annual Report of the Audit Committee
23
2013/EB.A/11
Annual Report of the WFP Inspector General and Note by the
24
Executive Director on the Annual Report of the WFP Inspector General
16
page
2013/EB.A/12
Report of the External Auditor on Working with Cooperating Partners and
24
WFP Management Response
2013/EB.A/13
Report of the External Auditor on the Use of Cash and Vouchers and
25
WFP Management Response
2013/EB.A/14
Report on the Implementation of the External Auditor Recommendations
26
EVALUATION REPORTS
2013/EB.A/15
Annual Evaluation Report 2012 and Management Response
26
WEST AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.A/16
Summary Evaluation Report—The Niger Country Portfolio (2007–2011) and
27
Management Response
2013/EB.A/17
Development Projects—Côte d’Ivoire 200465
27
EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.A/18
Country Programmes—Rwanda Draft Common Country Programme
27
(2013–2018)
SOUTHERN AFRICA PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.A/19
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Democratic Republic of the
28
Congo 200540
ASIA REGIONAL BUREAU
2013/EB.A/20
Summary Evaluation Report—Timor-Leste Country Portfolio (2008–2012) and
28
Management Response
2013/EB.A/21
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Democratic People’s Republic
28
of Korea 200532
17
page
MIDDLE EAST, NORTH AFRICA, EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA BUREAU
2013/EB.A/22
Summary Evaluation Report—The Kyrgyz Republic Country Portfolio
29
(2008–2012) and Management Response
2013/EB.A/23
Country Programmes—Egypt Country Programme 200238 (2013–2017)
29
2013/EB.A/24
Development projects—Yemen 200432
29
Report on the Joint Field Visit of the Executive Boards of
30
OTHER BUSINESS
2013/EB.A/25
UNDP/UNFPA/UNOPS, UNICEF, UN-WOMEN and WFP to Bangkok, Thailand
and the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
SUMMARY OF THE WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
2013/EB.A/26
Summary of the Work of the First Regular Session of the Executive Board,
30
2013
Annex I
18
Agenda
31
DECISIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Adoption of the Agenda
The Board adopted the Agenda.
3 June 2013
Appointment of the Rapporteur
In accordance with Rule XII of its Rules of Procedure, the Board appointed
Ms Andrée-Caroline Mebandé Bate (Cameroon, List A) Rapporteur of the
Annual Session of 2013.
3 June 2013
The decisions and recommendations in the current report will be implemented by the Secretariat in
the light of the Board’s deliberations, from which the main comments will be reflected in the
summary of the work of the session.
CURRENT AND FUTURE STRATEGIC ISSUES
2013/EB.A/1
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
The Board took note of the presentation by the Executive Director. The main points
of the presentation and the Board’s comments would be contained in the summary
of the work of the session.
3 June 2013
19
ANNUAL REPORTS
2013/EB.A/2
Annual Performance Report for 2012
The
Board
approved
the
Annual
Performance
Report
for
2012
(WFP/EB.A/2013/4/Rev.1), noting that it provides a comprehensive record of
WFP’s performance for the year.
3 June 2013
POLICY ISSUES
2013/EB.A/3
WFP Strategic Plan (2014–2017)
The
Board
approved
the
WFP
Strategic
Plan
(2014–2017)
(WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/1), in accordance with General Rule VI.1. It looked forward
to the submission of the Strategic Results Framework at its Second Regular Session
in November 2013.
The Board also took note of the comments of the Advisory Committee on
Administrative
and
Budgetary
Questions
(ACABQ)
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
Food
Finance
and
Agriculture
Committee
Organization
of
the
United
Nations
(FAO)
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
3 June 2013
20
2013/EB.A/4
WFP Private-Sector Partnerships and Fundraising Strategy (2013–2017)
The Board approved “WFP Private-Sector Partnerships and Fundraising Strategy
(2013–2017)” (WFP/EB.A/2013/5-B).
4 June 2013
2013/EB.A/5
Update on WFP’s Role in the Humanitarian Assistance System
The Board took note of “Update on WFP’s Role in the Humanitarian Assistance
System” (WFP/EB.A/2013/5-C).
5 June 2013
2013/EB.A/6
Update on the Nutrition Policy
The Board took note of “Update on the Nutrition Policy” (WFP/EB.A/2013/5-E).
5 June 2013
RESOURCE, FINANCIAL AND BUDGETARY MATTERS
2013/EB.A/7
Audited Annual Accounts, 2012
The Board:
i) approved the 2012 Annual Financial Statements of WFP, together with the
Report of the External Auditor, pursuant to General Regulation XIV.6 (b);
ii) noted the funding from the General Fund of US$632,889 during 2012 for
the write-off of cash losses and receivables; and
iii) noted post-delivery losses of commodities during 2012 forming part of the
operating expenses for the same period.
21
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
4 June 2013
2013/EB.A/8
Appointment of Two Executive Board Members to the Selection Panel for
the Appointment/Renewal of Two Audit Committee Members
The Board approved the following appointments to the selection panel of
Audit Committee members in relation to the selection or renewal, as appropriate,
of two Audit Committee members:
 Mr Zulfiqar Haider Khan, Alternate Permanent Representative of
Pakistan, as representative of the Executive Board
 Mr Benito Santiago Jiménez Sauma, Alternate Permanent Representative
of Mexico, as representative of the Executive Board
and requested the selection panel to report its recommendations to the
Executive Director and the President of the Board.
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
4 June 2013
22
2013/EB.A/9
Review of Financial Regulation 9.2 – Timing of the Management Plan
The Board approved a change to Financial Regulation 9.2 by which the proposed
Management Plan shall be circulated to members of the Board no later than 30 days
before its last regular session of each calendar year. It requested that the Secretariat
provide a draft of the key extracts of the Management Plan 10 days prior to the last
informal consultation on the proposed Management Plan so that all comments and
concerns could be taken into consideration before the document is finalized.
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
5 June 2013
2013/EB.A/10
Annual Report of the Audit Committee
The Board took note of “Annual Report of the Audit Committee”
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6-D/1).
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
4 June 2013
23
2013/EB.A/11
Annual Report of the WFP Inspector General and Note by the
Executive Director on the Annual Report of the WFP Inspector General
The Board took note of “Annual Report of the WFP Inspector General”
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6-E/1 + Corr.1) and the note by the Executive Director
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6-E/1/Add.1) and noted that the oversight work performed and
reported did not disclose any significant weaknesses in the internal control,
governance or risk management processes in place across WFP that would have a
pervasive effect on the achievement of WFP’s objectives.
The Board encouraged management to take advantage of the opportunities for
further improvement highlighted in the report.
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
4 June 2013
2013/EB.A/12
Report of the External Auditor on Working with Cooperating Partners and
WFP Management Response
The Board took note of “Report of the External Auditor on Working with
Cooperating Partners” (WFP/EB.A/2013/6-F/1*) and the management response in
WFP/EB.A/2013/6-F/1/Add.1
and
encouraged
further
action
on
the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
24
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
4 June 2013
2013/EB.A/13
Report of the External Auditor on the Use of Cash and Vouchers and
WFP Management Response
The Board took note of “Report of the External Auditor on the Use of Cash and
Vouchers”
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6-G/1)
WFP/EB.A/2013/6-G/1/Add.1
and
and
the
encouraged
management
further
response
action
on
in
the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
4 June 2013
25
2013/EB.A/14
Report on the Implementation of the External Auditor Recommendations
The Board took note of “Report on the Implementation of the External Auditor
Recommendations” (WFP/EB.A/2013/6-H/1).
The
Board
also
took
note
of
the
comments
of
the
ACABQ
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/2, WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/2) and the
FAO
Finance
Committee
(WFP/EB.A/2013/6(A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,J,K)/3,
WFP/EB.A/2013/5-A/3).
4 June 2013
EVALUATION REPORTS
2013/EB.A/15
Annual Evaluation Report 2012 and Management Response
The Board took note of “Annual Evaluation Report 2012” (WFP/EB.A/2013/7-A)
and management response in WFP/EB.A/2013/7-A/Add.1, and encouraged further
action on the recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the
Board during its discussion.
5 June 2013
26
WEST AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.A/16
Summary Evaluation Report—The Niger Country Portfolio (2007–2011) and
Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Evaluation Report – The Niger
Country
Portfolio
(2007–2011)”
(WFP/EB.A/2013/7-C/Rev.1)
and
the
management response in WFP/EB.A/2013/7-C/Add.1, and encouraged further
action on the recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the
Board during its discussion.
5 June 2013
2013/EB.A/17
Development Projects—Côte d’Ivoire 200465
The Board approved the proposed development project Côte d’Ivoire 200465 –
“Support for the Integrated Programme for Sustainable School Feeding”
(WFP/EB.A/2013/9-A/1).
5 June 2013
EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.A/18
Country Programmes—Rwanda Draft Common Country Programme
(2013–2018)
The Board approved common country programme Rwanda (2013–2018)
(WFP/EB.A/2013/8/2) and the WFP Results and Resources Framework
(WFP/EB.A/2013/8/2/Add.1), for which the total cost to WFP is US$31 million.
5 June 2013
27
SOUTHERN AFRICA PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.A/19
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Democratic Republic of the
Congo 200540
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation
Democratic Republic of the Congo 200540 “Targeted Food Assistance to Victims
of Armed Conflict and other Vulnerable Groups” (WFP/EB.A/2013/9-B/2).
5 June 2013
ASIA REGIONAL BUREAU
2013/EB.A/20
Summary Evaluation Report—Timor-Leste Country Portfolio (2008–2012)
and Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Evaluation Report – Timor-Leste
Country Portfolio (2008–2012)” (WFP/EB.A/2013/7-D) and the management
response in WFP/EB.A/2013/7-D/Add.1, and encouraged further action on the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
6 June 2013
2013/EB.A/21
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Democratic People’s Republic
of Korea 200532
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 200532 “Nutrition Support for Children
and Women” (WFP/EB.A/2013/9-B/1).
6 June 2013
28
MIDDLE EAST, NORTH AFRICA, EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA BUREAU
2013/EB.A/22
Summary Evaluation Report—The Kyrgyz Republic Country Portfolio
(2008–2012) and Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Evaluation Report – The Kyrgyz Republic
Country Portfolio (2008–2012)” (WFP/EB.A/2013/7-B) and the management
response in WFP/EB.A/2013/7-B/Add.1, and encouraged further action on the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
6 June 2013
2013/EB.A/23
Country Programmes—Egypt Country Programme 200238 (2013–2017)
After due consideration, the Board approved, on an extraordinary basis, the
proposed country programme Egypt 200238 (2013–2017) (WFP/EB.A/2013/8/1),
for which the food requirement is 74,022 mt at a cost of US$52.0 million and the
voucher requirement is US$9.3 million; with associated costs, the total cost to WFP
is US$87.2 million.
6 June 2013
2013/EB.A/24
Development projects—Yemen 200432
The Board approved the proposed development project Yemen 200432 “Food
Assistance to Promote Girls’ Education” (WFP/EB.A/2013/9-A/2).
6 June 2013
29
OTHER BUSINESS
2013/EB.A/25
Report on the Joint Field Visit of the Executive Boards of
UNDP/UNFPA/UNOPS, UNICEF, UN-WOMEN and WFP to Bangkok, Thailand
and the Republic of the Union of Myanmar
The Board took note of the report on the joint field visit of the Executive Boards of
UNDP/UNFPA/UNOPS, UNICEF, UN-Women and WFP to Bangkok, Thailand
and the Republic of the Union of Myanmar (WFP/EB.A/2013/13/Rev.1).
6 June 2013
SUMMARY OF THE WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
2013/EB.A/26
Summary of the Work of the First Regular Session of the Executive Board,
2013
The Board approved the document “Draft Summary of the Work of the
First Regular Session of the Executive Board, 2013”, the final version of which
would be embodied in the document WFP/EB.1/2013/12.
6 June 2013
30
ANNEX I
AGENDA
1.
Adoption of the Agenda (for approval)
2.
Appointment of the Rapporteur
3.
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
4.
Annual Reports
 Annual Performance Report for 2012 (for approval)
5.
Policy Issues
a) WFP Strategic Plan (2014–2017) (for approval)
b) WFP Private-Sector Partnerships and Fundraising Strategy (2013–2017) (for approval)
c) Update on WFP’s Role in the Humanitarian Assistance System (for information)
d) Update on WFP’s Response to HIV and AIDS (for information)
e) Update on the Nutrition Policy (for information)
f)
Update on the Implementation of the WFP Gender Mainstreaming Accountability
Framework (for information)
6.
Resource, Financial and Budgetary Matters
a) Audited Annual Accounts, 2012 (for approval)
b) Appointment of Two Executive Board Members to the Selection Panel for the
Appointment/Renewal of Two Audit Committee Members (for approval)
c) Review of Financial Regulation 9.2 – Timing of the Management Plan (for approval)
d) Annual Report of the Audit Committee (for consideration)
e) Annual Report of the WFP Inspector General (for consideration) and Note by the
Executive Director (for consideration)
31
f)
Report of the External Auditor on Working with Cooperating Partners and Management
Response (for consideration)
g) Report of the External Auditor on the Use of Cash and Vouchers and
Management Response (for consideration)
h) Report on the Implementation of the External Auditor Recommendations
(for consideration)
i)
Financial Rules Update (for information)
j)
Report of the Executive Director on the Utilization of Contributions and Waivers
of Costs (General Rules XII.4 and XIII.4 (h)) (for information)
k) Report
on
the
Utilization
of
WFP’s
Advance
Financing
Mechanisms
(1 January–31 December 2012) (for information)
7.
Evaluation Reports (for consideration)
a) Annual Evaluation Report, 2012 and Management Response
b) Summary Evaluation Report — The Kyrgyz Republic Country Portfolio (2008–2012)
and Management Response
c) Summary Evaluation Report — The Niger Country Portfolio (2007–2011) and
Management Response
d) Summary Evaluation Report — Timor-Leste Country Portfolio (2008–2012) and
Management Response
e) Implementation Status of Evaluation Recommendations (for information)
32
Operational Matters
8.
Country Programmes (for approval)
 Egypt Country Programme 200238 (2013–2017)
 Rwanda Draft Common Country Programme, 2013–2018
9.
Projects for Executive Board Approval (for approval)
a) Development projects
 Côte d’Ivoire 200465
 Yemen 200432
b) Protracted relief and recovery operations
 Democratic People’s Republic of Korea 200532
 Democratic Republic of the Congo 200540
10.
Organizational and Procedural Matters
 Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board (2013–2014) (for information)
11.
Administrative and Managerial Matters
a) Address by Staff Representative Bodies to the Board
b) Report on Post-Delivery Losses for the Period 1 January–31 December 2012
(for information)
c) Update on WFP Food Procurement (for information)
d) Statistical Report on WFP International Professional Staff and Higher Categories
(for information)
e) WFP Security Report (for information)
12.
Summary of the Work of the First Regular Session of the Executive Board, 2013
(for approval)
33
13.
Other Business
a) Report on the Joint Field Visit of the Executive Boards of UNDP/UNFPA/UNOPS,
UNICEF, UN-Women and WFP (for information)
b) Oral Report on the Joint Meeting of the Executive Board Bureaux of
UNDP/UNFPA/UNOPS, UNICEF, UN-Women and WFP (for information)
14.
34
Verification of Adopted Decisions and Recommendations
SECTION III
Executive Board Bureau
Executive Board
Second Regular Session
Rome, 4–7 November 2013
VERIFICATION OF
ADOPTED DECISIONS
AND
RECOMMENDATIONS
Agenda item 12
E
President:
Mr Vladimir Kuznetsov
(Russian Federation)
Alternate:
Ms Marieta Okenková
(Slovakia)
VicePresident:
H.E. Evelyn Anita Stokes-Hayford
(Ghana)
Alternate:
H.E. Frank Mutubila
(Zambia)
Member:
Mr Lupino Lazaro, Jr
(Philippines)
Alternate:
H.E. Hassan Janabi
(Iraq)
Member:
H.E. Miguel Ruíz-Cabañas Izquierdo
(Mexico)
Alternate:
Ms Sylvia María Leticia Wohlers de Meie
(Guatemala)
Member:
H.E. Thomas Wriessnig
(Germany)
Alternate:
Ms Elizabeth Petrovski
(United States of America)
Rapporteur:
Ms Marieta Okenková
(Slovakia)
DECISIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE
SECOND REGULAR SESSION OF THE
EXECUTIVE BOARD, 2013
Distribution: GENERAL
WFP/EB.2/2013/12/Rev.1
7 November 2013
ORIGINAL: ENGLISH
This document is printed in a limited number of copies. Executive Board documents are
available on WFP’s WEB site (http://www.wfp.org/eb).
TABLE OF CONTENTS
page
Adoption of the Agenda
39
Appointment of the Rapporteur
39
CURRENT AND FUTURE STRATEGIC ISSUES
2013/EB.2/1
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
39
2013/EB.2/2
WFP’s Role in Peacebuilding in Transition Settings
40
2013/EB.2/3
WFP Strategic Results Framework (2014–2017)
40
2013/EB.2/4
Revised School Feeding Policy
41
2013/EB.2/5
Update on Collaboration among the Rome-Based Agencies
41
POLICY ISSUES
RESOURCE, FINANCIAL AND BUDGETARY MATTERS
2013/EB.2/6
WFP Management Plan (2014–2016)
41
EVALUATION REPORTS
2013/EB.2/7
Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food for Assets on
43
Livelihood Resilience in Bangladesh (2008–2011) and Management Response
2013/EB.2/8
Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food for Assets on
43
Livelihood Resilience in Nepal (2002–2010) and Management Response
WEST AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
36
2013/EB.2/9
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Mali CP 105830
44
2013/EB.2/10
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Chad DEV 200288
44
page
2013/EB.2/11
Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—
44
Chad 200289
2013/EB.2/12
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—The Niger 200583
45
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/13
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Central America 200490
45
ASIA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/14
Development Projects—Bhutan 200300
46
2013/EB.2/15
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Afghanistan 200447
46
SOUTHERN AFRICA PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/16
Summary Evaluation Report—The Congo Country Portfolio (2009–2012) and
47
Management Response
2013/EB.2/17
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Madagascar CP 103400
47
2013/EB.2/18
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—United Republic of
47
Tanzania 200603
2013/EB.2/19
Report on the Field Visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo of the
48
WFP Executive Board
MIDDLE EAST, NORTH AFRICA, EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA REGIONAL
PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/20
Summary Evaluation Report—The Sudan Country Portfolio (2010–2012) and
48
Management Response
37
page
EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/21
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Burundi CP 200119
49
2013/EB.2/22
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—South Sudan 200572
49
2013/EB.2/23
Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—
49
Ethiopia 200290
ORGANIZATIONAL AND PROCEDURAL MATTERS
2013/EB.2/24
Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board (2014–2015)
50
SUMMARY OF THE WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
38
2013/EB.2/25
Summary of the Work of the Annual Session of the Executive Board, 2013
50
Annex I
Agenda
51
DECISIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Adoption of the Agenda
The Board adopted the Agenda.
4 November2013
Appointment of the Rapporteur
In accordance with Rule XII of its Rules of Procedure, the Board appointed
Ms Marieta Okenková (Slovakia, List E) Rapporteur of the Second Regular Session
of 2013.
4 November 2013
The decisions and recommendations in the current report will be implemented by the Secretariat in
the light of the Board’s deliberations, from which the main comments will be reflected in the
summary of the work of the session.
CURRENT AND FUTURE STRATEGIC ISSUES
2013/EB.2/1
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
The Board took note of the presentation by the Executive Director. The main points
of the presentation and the Board’s comments would be contained in the summary
of the work of the session.
4 November 2013
39
POLICY ISSUES
2013/EB.2/2
WFP’s Role in Peacebuilding in Transition Settings
The Board approved “WFP’s Role in Peacebuilding in Transition Settings”
(WFP/EB.2/2013/4-A/Rev.1), noting that:

the Board looked forward to being informed on progress in implementing
the policy at the Second Regular Session of the Board in 2014; and

the Board looked forward to considering a timetable for the review of the
relevant transition-related policies at the Annual Session of the Board in
2014.
5 November 2013
2013/EB.2/3
WFP Strategic Results Framework (2014–2017)
Having considered WFP’s strategic and management results frameworks
(2014–2017) (WFP/EB.2/2013/4-B/Rev.1), the Board:
 approved the Strategic Results Framework (2014–2017); and
 took note of the Management Results Framework (2014–2017).
The Board looked forward to receiving further information on WFP’s
comprehensive performance management system at its First Regular Session in
2014.
5 November 2013
40
2013/EB.2/4
Revised School Feeding Policy
The Board approved “Revised School Feeding Policy” (WFP/EB.2/2013/4-C).
4 November 2013
2013/EB.2/5
Update on Collaboration among the Rome-Based Agencies
The Board took note of “Update on Collaboration among the Rome-Based
Agencies” (WFP/EB.2/2013/4-D).
4 November 2013
RESOURCE, FINANCIAL AND BUDGETARY MATTERS
2013/EB.2/6
WFP Management Plan (2014–2016)
Having considered the WFP Management Plan (2014–2016), as submitted by the
Executive Director in document WFP/EB.2/2013/5-A/1 the Board:
i)
took note of the projected operational requirements of US$5.86 billion for
2014, excluding any provision for unforeseen emergencies and including
direct support costs, as outlined in Section II;
ii)
took note that the 2014 Programme Support and Administrative
appropriation assumes a funding level of US$4.20 billion in 2014;
iii)
approved a 2014 Programme Support and Administrative appropriation
of US$281.8 million, to be allocated as follows:
Programme support: regional bureaux and
US$96.7 million
country offices
Programme support: Headquarters
US$55.5 million
41
Management and administration
Total
iv)
US$129.6 million
US$281.8 million
approved a supplementary Programme Support and Administrative
appropriation of US$9.2 million, as outlined in Section III;
v)
approved expenditures of up to US$10.0 million funded from the
General Fund for the United Nations Department of Safety and Security
and for the WFP Security Emergency Fund;
vi)
approved an indirect support cost recovery rate of 7.0 percent for 2014;
vii) approved an increase in the Working Capital Financing Facility fund
level, from US$557.0 million to US$607.0 million, through increasing the
Operational Reserve by US$8.3 million in order to be able to meet a
sudden surge in supply chain capacity in any emergency; and
viii) authorized the Executive Director to adjust the Programme Support and
Administrative component of the budget in accordance with any variation
in the volume of operational requirements of more than 10 percent from
levels outlined in Section II.
The Board also took note of the comments of the Advisory Committee on
Administrative and Budgetary Questions (WFP/EB.2/2013/5(A,B)/2) and the Food
and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Finance Committee
(WFP/EB.2/2013/5(A,B)/3).
5 November 2013
42
EVALUATION REPORTS
2013/EB.2/7
Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food for Assets on
Livelihood Resilience in Bangladesh (2008–2011) and Management
Response
The Board took note of “Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food
for
Assets
on
Livelihood
(WFP/EB.2/2013/6-A/Rev.1)
WFP/EB.2/2013/6-A/Add.1,
Resilience
and
and
in
the
Bangladesh
management
encouraged
further
(2008–2011)”
response
action
on
in
the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
6 November 2013
2013/EB.2/8
Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food for Assets on
Livelihood Resilience in Nepal (2002–2010) and Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food
for
Assets
on
Livelihood
(WFP/EB.2/2013/6-B/Rev.1)
and
Resilience
the
in
Nepal
management
(2002–2010)”
response
in
WFP/EB.2/2013/6-B/Add.1/Rev.1, and encouraged further action on the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
6 November 2013
43
WEST AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/9
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Mali CP 105830
The Board approved the proposed budget increase of US$48.8 million for
Mali country programme 105830 (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-B/3), with a 12-month
extension from 1 January to 31 December 2014.
5 November 2013
2013/EB.2/10
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Chad DEV 200288
The Board approved the proposed budget increase of US$17.8 million for Chad
development project 200288 (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-B/1), with a two-year extension
from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2015.
5 November 2013
2013/EB.2/11
Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—
Chad 200289
The Board approved the proposed budget increase of US$151.3 million for Chad
protracted relief and recovery operation 200289 “Targeted Food Assistance for
Refugees and Vulnerable People Affected by Malnutrition and Recurrent Food
Crises” (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-D/2), with a one-year extension from 1 January to
31 December 2014.
5 November 2013
44
2013/EB.2/12
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—The Niger 200583
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation – the
Niger 200583 “Saving Lives, Protecting Livelihoods and Enhancing the Resilience
of Chronically Vulnerable Populations” (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-C/3/Rev.1).
5 November 2013
LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/13
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Central America 200490
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation
Central America 200490 “Restoring Food Security and Livelihoods for
Vulnerable Groups Affected by Recurrent Shocks in El Salvador, Guatemala,
Honduras and Nicaragua” (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-C/4).
5 November 2013
ASIA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/14
Development Projects—Bhutan 200300
The Board approved the proposed development project Bhutan 200300 “Improving
Children’s Access to Education” (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-A).
6 November 2013
45
2013/EB.2/15
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—Afghanistan 200447
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation
Afghanistan 200447 “Assistance to Address Food Insecurity and Undernutrition”
(WFP/EB.2/2013/7-C/1) and recommended that subject to developments in 2014:

the implementation arrangement be re-examined regarding the participation
of relevant stakeholders in the implementation of the PRRO, as part of the
regular and on-going consultations of WFP; and

the PRRO be reviewed with respect to its size, components and geographic
coverage, and adjusted as appropriate.
6 November 2013
46
SOUTHERN AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/16
Summary Evaluation Report—The Congo Country Portfolio (2009–2012)
and Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Evaluation Report – The Congo Country
Portfolio (2009–2012)” (WFP/EB.2/2013/6-D) and the management response in
WFP/EB.2/2013/6-D/Add.1,
and
encouraged
further
action
on
the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
6 November 2013
2013/EB.2/17
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Madagascar CP 103400
The Board approved the proposed budget increase of US$18 million for
Madagascar country programme 103400 (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-B/2), with a
12-month extension from 1 January to 31 December 2014.
6 November 2013
2013/EB.2/18
Protracted
Relief
and
Recovery
Operations—United
Republic
of
Tanzania 200603
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation
United Republic of Tanzania 200603 “Food Assistance for Refugees”
(WFP/EB.2/2013/7-C/2).
6 November 2013
47
2013/EB.2/19
Report on the Field Visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo of the
WFP Executive Board
The Board took note of “Report on the Field Visit to the Democratic Republic of
the Congo of the WFP Executive Board” (WFP/EB.2/2013/11).
6 November 2013
MIDDLE EAST, NORTH AFRICA, EASTERN EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIA REGIONAL
PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/20
Summary Evaluation Report—The Sudan Country Portfolio (2010–2012) and
Management Response
The Board took note of “Summary Evaluation Report – The Sudan Country
Portfolio (2010–2012)” (WFP/EB.2/2013/6-C) and the management response in
WFP/EB.2/2013/6-C/Add.1,
and
encouraged
further
action
on
the
recommendations, taking into account considerations raised by the Board during
its discussion.
7 November 2013
48
EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA REGIONAL PORTFOLIO
2013/EB.2/21
Budget Increases to Development Activities—Burundi CP 200119
The Board approved the proposed budget increase of US$61.1 million for
Burundi country programme 200119 (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-B/4/Rev.1), with a
two-year extension from 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2016.
7 November 2013
2013/EB.2/22
Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—South Sudan 200572
The Board approved the proposed protracted relief and recovery operation
South Sudan 200572 “Food and Nutrition Assistance for Relief and Recovery,
Supporting Transition and Enhancing Capabilities to Ensure Sustainable Hunger
Solutions” (WFP/EB.2/2013/7-C/5 + Corr.1).
7 November 2013
2013/EB.2/23
Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations—
Ethiopia 200290
The Board approved the proposed budget increase of US$508.6 million for
Ethiopia protracted relief and recovery operation 200290 “Responding to
Humanitarian
Crises
(WFP/EB.2/2013/7-D/1),
and
Enhancing
with
an
Resilience
18-month
to
Food
Insecurity”
extension
from
1 January 2014 to 30 June 2015.
7 November 2013
49
ORGANIZATIONAL AND PROCEDURAL MATTERS
2013/EB.2/24
Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board (2014–2015)
The Board approved “Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board
(2014–2015)” (WFP/EB.2/2013/9/Rev.1) as proposed by the Bureau and the
Secretariat.
6 November 2013
SUMMARY OF THE WORK OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD
2013/EB.2/25
Summary of the Work of the Annual Session of the Executive Board, 2013
The Board approved the document “Draft Summary of the Work of the Annual
Session of the Executive Board, 2013”, the final version of which would be
embodied in the document WFP/EB.A/2013/15.
7 November 2013
50
ANNEX I
AGENDA
1.
Adoption of the Agenda (for approval)
2.
Appointment of the Rapporteur
3.
Opening Remarks by the Executive Director
4.
Policy Issues
a)
WFP’s Role in Peacebuilding in Transition Settings (for approval)
b) WFP Strategic Results Framework (2014–2017) (for approval)
c) Revised School Feeding Policy (for approval)
d) Update on Collaboration among the Rome-Based Agencies (for consideration)
e) Compendium of WFP Policies Relating to the Strategic Plan (for information)
5.
Resource, Financial and Budgetary Matters
a)
WFP Management Plan (2014–2016) (for approval)
b) Work Plan of the External Auditor for the Period July 2013 to June 2014
(for information)
6.
Evaluation Reports (for consideration)
a)
Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food for Assets on Livelihood
Resilience in Bangladesh (2008–2011) and Management Response
b) Summary Report of the Evaluation of the Impact of Food for Assets on Livelihood
Resilience in Nepal (2002–2010) and Management Response
c) Summary Evaluation Report – The Sudan Country Portfolio (2010–2012) and
Management Response
51
d) Summary Evaluation Report – The Congo Country Portfolio (2009–2012) and
Management Response
Operational Matters
7.
Projects for Executive Board Approval (for approval)
a)
Development projects
 Bhutan 200300
b) Budget increases to development activities
 Burundi CP 200119
 Chad DEV 200288
 Madagascar CP 103400
 Mali CP 105830
c) Protracted relief and recovery operations
 Afghanistan 200447
 Central America 200490
 The Niger 200583
 South Sudan 200572
 United Republic of Tanzania 200603
d) Budget increases to PRROs
 Chad 200289
 Ethiopia 200290
52
8.
Reports of the Executive Director on Operational Matters (for information)
a)
Protracted relief and recovery operations approved by the Executive Director
(1 January–30 June 2013)
 Islamic Republic of Iran 200310
 Yemen 200305
 Côte d’Ivoire 200464
 Guinea-Bissau 200526
 Liberia 200550
 Mauritania 200474
b) Budget Increases to Protracted Relief and Recovery Operations Approved by the
Executive Director (1 January–30 June 2013)
c) Emergency
Operations
Approved
by
the
Executive
Director
or
by
the
Executive Director and the Director-General of FAO (1 January–30 June 2013)
9.
Organizational and Procedural Matters
 Biennial Programme of Work of the Executive Board (2014–2015) (for approval)
10.
Summary of the Work of the Annual Session of the Executive Board, 2013
(for approval)
11.
Other Business
 Report on the Field Visit to the Democratic Republic of the Congo of the WFP
Executive Board (for information)
12.
Verification of Approved Decisions and Recommendations
ECOSOC-12922E-WFP EB Decs and Recs 2013
53
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