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UFC 3-810-01N
1 March 2016
UNIFIED FACILITIES CRITERIA (UFC)
NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
FOR FACILITY CONSTRUCTION
APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED
UFC 3-810-01N
1 March 2016
UNIFIED FACILITIES CRITERIA (UFC)
NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING FOR FACILITY CONSTRUCTION
Any copyrighted material included in this UFC is identified at its point of use.
Use of the copyrighted material apart from this UFC must have the permission of the
copyright holder.
U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS
NAVAL FACILITIES ENGINEERING COMMAND (Preparing Activity)
AIR FORCE CIVIL ENGINEER CENTER
Record of Changes (changes are indicated by \1\ ... /1/)
Change No.
Date
Location
This UFC supersedes UFC 3-800-10N, Final Draft dated July 2006.
UFC 3-810-01N
1 March 2016
FOREWORD
The Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) system is prescribed by MIL-STD 3007 and provides
planning, design, construction, sustainment, restoration, and modernization criteria, and applies
to the Military Departments, the Defense Agencies, and the DoD Field Activities in accordance
with USD (AT&L) Memorandum dated 29 May 2002. UFC will be used for all DoD projects and
work for other customers where appropriate. All construction outside of the United States is
also governed by Status of Forces Agreements (SOFA), Host Nation Funded Construction
Agreements (HNFA), and in some instances, Bilateral Infrastructure Agreements (BIA.)
Therefore, the acquisition team must ensure compliance with the most stringent of the UFC, the
SOFA, the HNFA, and the BIA, as applicable.
UFC are living documents and will be periodically reviewed, updated, and made available to
users as part of the Services’ responsibility for providing technical criteria for military
construction. Headquarters, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (HQUSACE), Naval Facilities
Engineering Command (NAVFAC), and Air Force Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC) are
responsible for administration of the UFC system. Defense agencies should contact the
preparing service for document interpretation and improvements. Technical content of UFC is
the responsibility of the cognizant DoD working group. Recommended changes with supporting
rationale should be sent to the respective service proponent office by the following electronic
form: Criteria Change Request. The form is also accessible from the Internet sites listed below.
UFC are effective upon issuance and are distributed only in electronic media from the following
source:
• Whole Building Design Guide web site http://dod.wbdg.org/.
Hard copies of UFC printed from electronic media should be checked against the current
electronic version prior to use to ensure that they are current.
AUTHORIZED BY:
JAMES C. DALTON, P.E.
JOSEPH E. GOTT, P.E.
Chief, Engineering and Construction
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Chief Engineer
Naval Facilities Engineering Command
EDWIN H. OSHIBA, SES, DAF
MICHAEL McANDREW
Deputy Director of Civil Engineers
DASD (Facilities Investment and Management)
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense
(Energy, Installations, and Environment)
DCS/Logistics, Engineering &
Force Protection
UFC 3-810-01N
1 March 2016
UNIFIED FACILITIES CRITERIA (UFC)
NEW SUMMARY SHEET
Document: UFC 3-810-01N, Navy and Marine Corps Environmental Engineering for
Facility Construction
Superseding: UFC 3-800-10N, Final Draft, Environmental Engineering for Facility
Construction.
Description: This UFC provides specific criteria on environmental engineering design
topics as they relate to project development of demolition, renovation and site
development projects. In these situations, it is primarily intended to address hazardous
waste management. It is organized into technical requirements and design
deliverables. Requirements for design deliverables beyond or in more detail of what is
already required by a Core UFC or by FC 1-300-09N and are provided for NAVFAConly.
Reasons for Document:
•
Provide criteria for meeting Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)
standards, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements, and other
Federal, state, and local laws and regulations.
•
Provide technical requirements for hazardous waste field investigation and
design criteria in the development of reports, specifications, and drawings.
•
Establish minimum technical requirements and deliverables, including
environmental reports, specifications and drawings, in support of design
activities.
•
Define minimum requirements for specifications and contract drawings as they
relate to hazardous materials.
Impact: By providing standardized criteria for the identification of hazardous materials
during design it is expected that construction schedules and cost for change orders will
be reduced by having adequate hazardous waste information included in the contract
documents during the bidding process.
Unification Issues: Requirements in this FC conform to Navy instructions and
manuals. These requirements include NAVY specific requirements that have not been
unified. These Navy requirements may not work for Army and Air Force operations
because of their organizational and operational differences.
UFC 3-810-01N
1 March 2016
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................... 1
1-1
BACKGROUND. ....................................................................................... 1
1-2
PURPOSE AND SCOPE. .......................................................................... 1
1-3
APPLICABILITY. ....................................................................................... 1
1-4
GENERAL BUILDING REQUIREMENTS. ................................................ 1
1-5
REFERENCES. ......................................................................................... 2
1-6
GLOSSARY. .............................................................................................. 2
CHAPTER 2 TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS ................................................................ 3
2-1
PERMITS. .................................................................................................. 3
2-2
REGULATORY NOTIFICATIONS. ............................................................ 3
2-3
DESIGN CRITERIA. .................................................................................. 3
2-4
FIELD INVESTIGATION............................................................................ 4
2-4.1
2-5
Safety .................................................................................................... 4
ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS. ................................................ 4
2-5.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys and Sampling – Asbestos..... 4
2-5.2
Laboratory – Asbestos. .......................................................................... 5
2-5.3
Control of Regulated Asbestos-Containing Materials. ........................... 5
2-6
PAINT. ....................................................................................................... 5
2-6.1
Lead-Based Paint in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities. ..... 5
2-6.2
Lead-Based Paint in Commercial or Industrial Facilities ........................ 7
2-6.3
Paint – Lead, Cadmium, Chromium, and Other Hazardous Metals. ...... 7
2-7
RADON...................................................................................................... 8
2-7.1
Radon Mitigation. ................................................................................... 8
2-7.2
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling – Radon. ....... 8
2-8
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS.......................................................... 8
2-8.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling –
Polychlorinated Biphenyls. ..................................................................... 8
2-8.2
Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls. ........................................... 8
2-9
LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE COMPONENTS. ........................................ 9
2-9.1
Conducting Field Investigations and Surveys – Low-Level Radioactive
Components. ......................................................................................... 9
2-10
ANIMAL DROPPINGS. ............................................................................. 9
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2-10.1
2-11
Conducting Field Investigations and Surveys – Animal Droppings. ....... 9
MOLD AND SPORES................................................................................ 9
2-11.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys and Sampling – Molds and
Spores. .................................................................................................. 9
2-11.2
Laboratory – Molds and Spores. .......................................................... 10
2-12
STORAGE TANKS. ................................................................................. 10
2-12.1
Tank Installation................................................................................... 11
2-12.2
Tank Removal...................................................................................... 11
2-13
CONTAMINATED SOIL OR GROUNDWATER. ..................................... 12
2-13.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling –
Contaminated Soil or Groundwater...................................................... 12
2-13.2
Laboratory – Contaminated Soil or Groundwater................................. 12
2-14
CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT OF SOLID AND HAZARDOUS
WASTE. ................................................................................................ 12
2-14.1
Hazardous Waste Accumulation. ......................................................... 13
2-14.2
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling– Solid and
Hazardous Waste. ............................................................................... 16
2-14.3
Laboratory – Solid and Hazardous Waste. .......................................... 16
2-15
OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS. ..................................... 16
2-15.1
National Environmental Policy Act. ...................................................... 16
2-15.2
Cultural Resources. ............................................................................. 17
2-15.3
Air Quality. ........................................................................................... 18
2-15.4
Wetlands/Waters of the United States. ................................................ 18
2-15.5
Natural Resources. .............................................................................. 19
2-16
CHLORDANE. ......................................................................................... 20
2-16.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys – Chlordane. ....................... 20
2-16.2
Laboratory – Chlordane. ...................................................................... 21
2-16.3
Control of Chlordane. ........................................................................... 21
CHAPTER 3 DELIVERABLES ..................................................................................... 23
3-1
FIELD INVESTIGATION REPORT .......................................................... 23
3-1.1
Drawings .............................................................................................. 23
3-1.2
Report – Asbestos. .............................................................................. 24
3-1.3
Report – Lead Based Paint in Target Housing and Child Occupied
Facilities. .............................................................................................. 24
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3-1.4
Report – Paint. ..................................................................................... 24
3-1.5
Report – Radon. .................................................................................. 25
3-1.6
Report – Polychlorinated Biphenyls. .................................................... 25
3-1.7
Report –Low-Level Radioactive Components. ..................................... 25
3-1.8
Report – Animal Droppings. ................................................................. 25
3-1.9
Report – Molds and Spores. ................................................................ 25
3-1.10
Report – Tanks. ................................................................................... 26
3-1.11
Report – Contaminated Soil or Groundwater. ...................................... 26
3-1.12
Report – Waste Characterization. ........................................................ 26
3-1.13
Report – Chlordane. ............................................................................ 26
3-2
SPECIFICATIONS AND DRAWINGS. .................................................... 27
3-2.1
Design Build Design Submittals (Post Award). .................................... 27
3-2.2
Specifications....................................................................................... 27
3-2.3
Asbestos. ............................................................................................. 27
3-2.4
Lead-Based Paint. ............................................................................... 28
3-2.5
Paint. ................................................................................................... 29
3-2.6
Radon. ................................................................................................. 30
3-2.7
Polychlorinated Biphenyls. ................................................................... 30
3-2.8
Low-Level Radioactive Components. .................................................. 30
3-2.9
Mercury. ............................................................................................... 31
3-2.10
Animal Droppings. ............................................................................... 31
3-2.11
Molds and Spores. ............................................................................... 32
3-2.12
Tank Removal...................................................................................... 32
3-2.13
Contaminated Soil or Groundwater...................................................... 33
3-2.14
Specifications for Waste. ..................................................................... 33
3-3
COST ESTIMATES. ................................................................................ 33
CHAPTER 4 HANDLING AND STORAGE................................................................... 35
4-1
HANDLING AND STORAGE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL. ................ 35
4-2
HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSPORTATION. ................................... 35
4-2.1
Department of Transportation Requirements. ...................................... 35
4-2.2
Shipping Name. ................................................................................... 35
4-2.3
Packaging, Marking, and Labeling. ...................................................... 35
4-2.4
Placards. .............................................................................................. 36
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4-2.5
Proper Container. ................................................................................ 36
APPENDIX A REFERENCES ....................................................................................... 37
APPENDIX B BEST PRACTICES ................................................................................ 41
B-1
ASBESTOS. ............................................................................................ 41
B-2
LEAD BASED PAINT IN TARGET HOUSING AND CHILD-OCCUPIED
FACILITIES. .......................................................................................... 41
B-3
PAINT – LEAD, CADMIUM, CHROMIUM, AND OTHER HAZARDOUS
METALS. ............................................................................................... 41
B-4
RADON.................................................................................................... 42
B-5
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS........................................................ 42
B-6
ANIMAL DROPPINGS. ........................................................................... 42
B-6.1
Histoplasmosis..................................................................................... 42
B-6.2
Hantavirus............................................................................................ 42
B-7
MOLDS AND SPORES. .......................................................................... 43
B-8
STORAGE TANKS. ................................................................................. 43
B-9
CONTAMINATED SOIL OR GROUNDWATER. ..................................... 43
B-10
SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE. ...................................................... 43
B-10.1
Nonhazardous Waste. ......................................................................... 43
B-10.2
Universal Waste................................................................................... 44
B-10.3
Used Oil. .............................................................................................. 45
B-11
CULTURAL RESOURCES...................................................................... 45
B-11.1
Archaeology. ........................................................................................ 46
B-11.2
Architectural. ........................................................................................ 46
B-12
CHLORDANE. ......................................................................................... 46
B-13
REFERENCES. ....................................................................................... 47
APPENDIX C GLOSSARY ........................................................................................... 49
C-1
ACRONYMS ............................................................................................ 49
TABLES
Table 2-1 Regulatory References ................................................................................. 14
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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
1-1
BACKGROUND.
Environmental Engineering combines the principles of engineering and science to
protect the environment, preserve resources, and enhance public health. Congress has
enacted various acts to improve or protect the natural environment, clean up polluted
sites, and protect human health by providing requirements for drinking water,
wastewater management, clean air, and various other issues that affect public health.
This legislation establishes conditions requiring Federal agencies to implement projects
in a manner that maintains or enhances the environment and public health.
1-2
PURPOSE AND SCOPE.
This document provides technical criteria and outlines technical requirements for the
more typical aspects of the Environmental Engineering. It is not intended to cover all
aspects of Environmental Engineering. It is primarily intended for building demolition
and building renovation projects. It does introduce other topics such as cultural
resources preservation, wetlands protection, and remediation of contaminated soil and
groundwater. While topics such as contaminated soil and groundwater are introduced,
this UFC is not intended to cover the remediation of all hazardous materials. Where
remediation of specific hazardous materials not covered in this criteria is warranted,
contact the appropriate Environmental Engineering media manager. Many of these
topics are considered during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process.
This UFC assumes that appropriate NEPA actions have been accomplished prior to
committing resources to any proposed activity. Many facilities were constructed with
materials that are now considered hazardous to worker safety and the environment.
Removal and disposal of these materials requires a complex analysis of Federal, state,
and local regulations to determine the appropriate methods for removing and disposing
of these hazardous materials. Use this UFC to determine the minimum environmental
engineering design requirements. State and local regulations may be more stringent.
Where other state or local criteria regulatory requirements exist, comply with the more
stringent requirements.
1-3
APPLICABILITY.
This UFC applies to all military service elements and contractors involved in the
planning, design, and construction of Navy and Marine Corps facilities worldwide.
1-4
GENERAL BUILDING REQUIREMENTS.
Comply with UFC 1-200-01, General Building Requirements. UFC 1-200-01 provides
applicability of model building codes and unique government criteria for typical design
disciplines and building systems, as well as for accessibility, antiterrorism, security, high
performance and sustainability requirements, and safety. Use this UFC in addition to
UFC 1-200-01 and other UFCs and Government criteria referenced therein.
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1-5
REFERENCES.
Appendix A contains a list of references used in this document. The publication date of
the code or standard is not included in this document. In general, the latest available
issuance of the reference is used.
1-6
GLOSSARY.
Appendix C contains acronyms and abbreviations used in this document.
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CHAPTER 2 TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS
Identification and compliance with all Federal, state and local environmental regulations
requires comprehensive environmental investigations, analysis, design and engineering.
A lack of these comprehensive environmental tasks and efforts leads to increased
project schedules and costs, and potential Notices of Violations (NOV) and fines.
2-1
PERMITS.
Identify, assist or provide, as applicable, all permits, approvals and fees required for the
design, construction and operation of the proposed project from Federal, state and local
regulatory authorities or overseas equivalent. Comply with FC 1-300-09N for
professional registration requirements. Licensure in the state where the project is
located may be required to obtain permits and approvals. Coordinate with the
Installation Environmental (EV) staff to obtain the project NEPA documentation, as
applicable, for project specific requirements. For areas outside of the United States and
its territories and possessions with host nation agreements, follow design approval
procedure as directed in project scope and by the Government Project Manager. For
areas outside of the United States and its territories and possessions without Host
nation agreements, the Government will review and approve environmental plans.
2-2
REGULATORY NOTIFICATIONS.
Identify all regulatory notification requirements in accordance with Federal, state, and
local regulations. Where the Navy needs to provide public notification, coordinate with
the Government Project Manager and the Installation EV staff. Require the Contractor
to provide copies of all regulatory notifications to the Government Project Manager and
the Installation EV staff. Typically, regulatory notifications are provided for the following
(this listing is not all inclusive): demolition, renovation, national pollutant discharge
elimination system defined site work, or remediation of hazardous materials (such as
asbestos, hazardous waste, and lead-based paint).
2-3
DESIGN CRITERIA.
Contact the Installation EV program staff for specific environmental requirements for the
project location. Design projects in accordance with applicable requirements of the
local regulatory agency with jurisdiction over the installation and the criteria in this UFC;
whichever is more stringent.
Provide design in accordance with the following criteria precedence:
•
Federal regulations required for installations in the United States, U.S.
Territories, and U.S. Possessions governed by U.S. law
•
Department of Defense Policies
•
Department of the Navy Policies
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•
State and local regulations for the project location
•
Final Governing Standards (FGS) and Overseas Environmental Baseline
Guidance Document (OEBGD)
•
Protection of natural resources and minimization of potential environmental
impacts
2-4
FIELD INVESTIGATION
Comply with EM 385-1-1 and all safety and environmental regulations during field
investigations, surveys, sampling, abatement and removal procedures, material
management, and waste management. Take precautions to protect human health and
the environment as required by Federal, state, and local regulations and DoD policy.
Ensure that the contract documents include information and survey data sufficient to
identify and quantify the materials listed in the following paragraphs.
Complete all field investigations (e.g., information gathering, surveys, sampling and
testing), for the environmentally sensitive materials indicated below. Each Installation
maintains record files pertaining to the environmental aspects of previously constructed
projects. Contact the Installation EV program staff and obtain all existing surveys, test
reports and drawings prior to beginning field investigations.
2-4.1
Safety
Comply with the Occupational Safety and Health Standards established in 29 CFR
1910. Verify that all preconstruction work performed and construction contract
requirements, such as facility surveys, sampling, testing, and field investigations,
comply with OSHA requirements for respiratory protection, noise exposure, permitrequired confined-space entry, personal protective equipment, protection of building
occupants, and similar.
2-5
ASBESTOS-CONTAINING MATERIALS.
These requirements do not apply to new construction where no existing buildings or
structures are present. Prepare specifications in accordance with the applicable
requirements of 40 CFR 61.145, Subpart M, for any project that involves disturbance or
removal of regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACM). Navy policy requires
elimination of the asbestos hazard. Refer to OPNAV M-5090.1 Section Asbestos.
Do not remove installed RACM that are in good condition for the sole purpose of
eliminating asbestos. Identify RACM that will not be disturbed or do not have the
potential to be disturbed during the construction activities, and manage in place.
2-5.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys and Sampling – Asbestos.
Perform facility asbestos investigation, survey and sampling in accordance with 40 CFR
763 prior to any renovation, alteration, repair, or demolition project that will disturb
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building materials regardless of the age of the existing construction. For Federal
requirements, refer to http://www2.epa.gov/asbestos/building-owners-andmanagers#renovations. Data from previous asbestos surveys may be available from the
Installation EV staff. Earlier surveys may not have included all suspect RACM that will
be impacted by the project. This may include, but is not limited to, roofing materials,
crawl-space soils, and confined utility chases. Provide personnel who are currently
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) accredited asbestos inspectors to perform
ACM sampling.
2-5.2
Laboratory – Asbestos.
Use laboratories that are fully equipped and proficient in conducting analyses of suspect
RACM bulk samples in accordance with 40 CFR 763, are accredited by the National
Institute of Standards and Technology/National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation
Program (NITS/NV LAP), and are a successful participant and maintain proficiency in
the NITS/NV LAP sponsored quality assurance program for asbestos identification.
2-5.3
Control of Regulated Asbestos-Containing Materials.
Federal law defines demolition activities and renovation activities, and establishes
different requirements for each one. Identify what requirements apply to the project,
based on the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)
compliant survey, and prepare specifications that describe the applicable RACM control
methods, notification requirements, and workers’ minimum certification requirements.
Before beginning any demolition or renovation activities, determine the potential for
releasing asbestos. NESHAP classifies RACM into three categories: friable, Category I
nonfriable, and Category II nonfriable. Identify which categories apply to the project and
remove the RACM following the applicable control methods. Identify which non-friable
RACM have a potential to become friable during demolition and renovation activities
and remove the materials following friable control methods. Identify the requirements
for notification to the regulatory agency and include in the specifications.
2-6
PAINT.
2-6.1
Lead-Based Paint in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities.
These requirements apply to projects involving the renovation, alteration, or repair of
any target housing or child-occupied facility. Child-occupied facilities may include, but
are not limited to, daycare centers, preschools, or kindergarten classrooms.
Federal regulations include specific requirements for any work in a child-occupied
facility under EPA Title X and EPA RRP Rule. EPA Title X is not limited to residential
units, and also applies to child-occupied facilities. Design and perform all phases of
work relating to Lead-Based Paint in accordance with EPA Title X and EPA RRP Rule.
2-6.1.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling – LeadBased Paint in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities.
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Evaluate all surfaces impacted by the project for lead-based paint, including, but not
limited to, painted surfaces (interior and exterior), dust, and soil. Perform all sampling
and testing in accordance with EPA Title X and EPA RRP Rule. Sampling and testing
will include x-ray fluorescence (XRF), bulk, wipe, water, and soil sampling as required
by EPA Title X and EPA RRP Rule. Provide EPA accredited professionals to perform
the lead-based paint field work, sampling, and risk assessment.
2-6.1.2
Laboratory – Lead-Based Paint in Target Housing and ChildOccupied Facilities.
Use laboratories that meet all the requirements of EPA Title X, EPA RRP Rule, and
laboratories performing analysis for lead-based paint chip, air, water, soil, or wipe
samples. Laboratories must be fully accredited by the EPA National Lead Laboratory
Accreditation Program (NLLAP) and rated proficient in the EPA Environmental Lead
Proficiency in Analytical Testing (ELPAT) Program. The EPA list of accredited
laboratories is available on the following website: http://www2.epa.gov/lead/nationallead-laboratory-accreditation-program-nllap.
2-6.1.3
Removal of Lead-Based Paint in Target Housing and ChildOccupied Facilities.
Abatement is a lead-based paint hazard-reduction method that is designed to
permanently eliminate lead-based paint or lead-based hazards. Permanent removal is
defined as having a 20-year expected life. Require abatement to be performed by
certified abatement workers who successfully completed an EPA accredited abatement
worker course and who are supervised by an abatement supervisor certified under EPA
or under a state program authorized by EPA. Abatement activities include:
•
Removing lead-based paint and its dust.
•
Permanently encapsulating or enclosing the lead-based paint.
•
Replacing components with lead-based paint.
•
Removing or permanently covering lead-contaminated soil.
Prior to clearing an area in which lead-based paint abatement has been performed,
collect and analyze a representative clearance sample by a certified individual and an
accredited laboratory, in accordance with the EPA RRP Rule. Require the Contractor to
comply with the EPA RRP Rule in the specifications.
Residential lead-based paint may be disposed of in construction and demolition (C&D)
landfills in accordance with 66 FR 53535 in addition to being disposed of in municipal
solid waste landfills.
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2-6.2
Lead-Based Paint in Commercial or Industrial Facilities
In order to dispose of lead-based paint waste from industrial or commercial sources,
take a representative sample of the waste material and require analysis using the
toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Samples equal to or greater than 5.0
milligrams per liter (mg/L) TCLP are considered hazardous and need to be disposed of
in an approved hazardous waste landfill. Samples less than 5.0 mg/L TCLP are
considered nonhazardous and may be disposed of in a municipal solid waste landfill or
a C&D landfill. Indicate final disposition of the waste material in accordance with the
test results.
2-6.3
Paint – Lead, Cadmium, Chromium, and Other Hazardous Metals.
Paints containing lead, cadmium and chromium are often found as protective coatings
on structural steel, tanks, piping, metal building components, or exterior coatings on
metal surfaces and are used in current operational processes in various facilities, such
as aircraft maintenance hangars, ship maintenance and repair facilities, and similar
types of facilities. Require control and management of dust and particulates containing
lead, cadmium, chromium, and other hazardous metals generated from construction
activities in accordance with 40 CFR 745, to avoid contaminated indoor air or
contaminated dust on building surfaces.
Identify the potential factors that affect the thresholds and exposures to building
occupants and construction workers in accordance with EPA Title X and state codes
and laws. Require facility engineering controls, building occupant protection,
construction activity requirements for worker protection, and any additional
requirements for safe environmental conditions in the specifications.
2-6.3.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling – Paint.
Monitor worker exposure in accordance with OSHA Standards. Use ASTM Standards
and EPA or HUD Guidelines for air monitoring criteria. Evaluate anticipated waste
materials as part of the field investigation and sampling. Refer to paragraph entitled
“Control and Management of Solid and Hazardous Waste” for additional requirements.
2-6.3.2
Laboratory – Paint.
Use laboratories that are fully accredited by the EPA NLLAP and rated proficient in the
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; EPA ELPAT to perform analysis
for air samples. Refer to the paragraph entitled “Laboratory - Lead-Based Paint in
Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities” for a link to the EPA website to verify the
list of accredited laboratories.
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2-7
RADON.
2-7.1
Radon Mitigation.
Implement a radon mitigation system design in new or renovated, altered, or repaired
occupied facilities as described in UFC 3-101-01. For any occupied building renovation,
alteration, or repair, identify the levels of indoor radon. In addition, comply with ASTM
E2121, Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program – Guidance Document for
Navy Family Housing, Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program – Guidebook
for Naval Shore Installations, and state specific documents from the EPA for additional
information concerning radon zones, and level of risk (low, medium, high), whichever is
more stringent.
2-7.2
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling – Radon.
Use short-term testing detectors or long-term alpha tracking detectors to determine if
radon is present at the project site. The short-term test is typically 90 days and the
long-term test can be up to one year. Confirm with the Installation’s EV staff that the
radon detection devices and the sampling strategies and procedures comply with the
Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program (NAVRAMP). Obtain all existing
radon test information from Installation EV staff.
2-8
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS.
Eliminate Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) containing materials from all Navy
equipment and all electrical distribution systems. Refer to OPNAV M-5090.1, Section,
Polychlorinated Biphenyls.
2-8.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling –
Polychlorinated Biphenyls.
Obtain a current environmental survey from Installation EV staff that indicates the status
of PCB in the building to be renovated, repaired, altered, or demolished. Provide an
inspector who is familiar with the various uses of PCB. Based on the age of the facility
and the extent of the project, determine the potential PCB sources. During the field
survey, the inspector is to examine the potential PCB sources for labeling and
manufacturer information. If there is no label that states “non-PCB”, contact the
manufacturer for more information or assume the source contains PCB.
2-8.2
Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls.
Manage and dispose of PCB in accordance with the Toxic Substance Control Act
(TSCA) and with state and local requirements. Dispose of PCB materials at facilities
meeting the requirements of incineration or in a chemical waste landfill as required by
40 CFR 761 Subpart D. Contractors are required to comply with all Navy-applicable
PCB requirements while performing work onsite.
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2-9
LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE COMPONENTS.
Components that may contain low-level radioactive (LLR) material include thermostats,
switches, smoke detectors, High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps and exit signs. If
there is no label or a warning on the label that states the contents of the source,
assume it contains LLR material.
2-9.1
Conducting Field Investigations and Surveys – Low-Level
Radioactive Components.
Obtain a current environmental survey from Installation EV staff that indicates the status
of LLR components in the building to be altered, renovated, repaired, or demolished.
Provide an inspector familiar with the various building components that could contain
LLR material. Based on age of the facility and the extent of the project, determine
potential sources. During the field survey, the inspector is to examine the potential
sources for labeling. If there is no label that states the contents contain potential LLR
material, contact the manufacturer for more information or assume the source contains
LLR material.
2-10
ANIMAL DROPPINGS.
2-10.1
Conducting Field Investigations and Surveys – Animal Droppings.
Testing soil and air samples for Histoplasma is not likely to be useful because the
fungus is thought to be common in the environment in certain areas, and positive or
negative results in soil samples does not mean the soil is a source of infection or that
the fungus is not there. Treat soils, buildings, or other areas with bat droppings or bird
manure as containing the Histoplasma virus. Use best practice document DHHS 2005109 when conducting surveys or preparing specification for building renovation,
alteration, or demolition projects. Do not stir up dust by sweeping or vacuuming areas
containing rodent droppings or nesting material as it may contain Hantavirus. Use
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cleaning up after rodents for cleanup
requirements. http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/index.html
2-11
MOLD AND SPORES.
These requirements apply to sites and projects where any existing building(s) or
structure(s) will be renovated, altered, repaired, or demolished. These requirements do
not apply to new construction where no existing buildings or structures are present.
Design moisture barriers and retarders as defined in UFC 3-101-01. Additional
requirements can be found in EPA 402-K-01-001.
2-11.1
Spores.
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys and Sampling – Molds and
During field investigations for hazardous constituents, areas with chronic moisture may
be found and recognized as potentially containing harmful molds. Renovations,
alterations, or repairs that involve unoccupied areas of a building often include
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significant water damage and fungal growth, which could pose a hazard to construction
workers, the design team, and to occupants of other parts of the building. Complete the
Microbial Assessment Survey and Report prior to the preparation of the project
specifications. Provide a qualified microbial assessor that meets at least one of the
following criteria to complete the survey:
•
Bachelor’s degree from an accredited university or college with a major in
engineering, architecture, building construction, occupational health,
microbiology, occupational safety, or a related natural or physical science. An
additional 2 years’ experience in conducting microbial investigations is required.
•
Associates degree from an accredited university or college with a concentration
in environmental, natural, or physical sciences. An additional 4 years’
experience in conducting microbial investigations is required.
•
Certification as an industrial hygienist as certified by the American Board of
Industrial Hygienists, safety professional as certified by the Board of Certified
Safety Professionals or engineer. An additional one year of experience in
conducting microbial investigations is required.
•
Certification by the American Council for Accredited Certification as a CouncilCertified Indoor Environmental Consultant, Council-Certified Indoor
Environmentalist, Council-Certified Mold Consultant, Council-Certified Microbial
Investigator, Council-Certified Residential Mold Inspector, Council-Certified Mold
Remediation Supervisor, or Council-Certified Mold Remediator.
Provide a microbial assessor familiar with signs of potential mold problems, including
stains or discoloration of walls, ceilings, or carpets; swelling or sagging of building
components; standing or dripping water; rot (wet or dry); and musty odors. Types of
samples include air samples, bulk samples (chunks of carpet, wallboard, insulation, and
similar), and water samples from drains and cooling pans. Collect samples using sterile
materials and containers, and ship overnight for next day delivery in accordance with
instructions provided by the laboratory. Use a laboratory with special expertise in mold
analysis. Longer shipping time must be approved by the laboratory.
2-11.2
Laboratory – Molds and Spores.
Use laboratories that are fully accredited by the Environmental Microbiology Proficiency
in Analytical Testing program of the American Industrial Hygiene Association to perform
analyses for fungi (molds) or bacteria.
2-12
STORAGE TANKS.
These requirements apply to hazardous waste storage tanks regulated under 40 CFR
264 Subpart J and 40 CFR 265 Subpart J. UFC 3-460-01 covers the general
environmental criteria and standards for storage tanks containing regulated substances
subject to the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part
280. Evaluate sites with known tanks, known soil, or groundwater contamination at the
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beginning of the design of facility renovations, repairs, demolition, and construction so
appropriate precautions can be taken to protect workers and the environment prior to
excavation.
2-12.1
Tank Installation.
Projects that include the installation of new storage tanks, including reinstalled tanks or
replaced tanks, used to contain hazardous waste at treatment, storage, and disposal
facilities are subject to Federal regulation and are to comply with the requirements set
forth in 40 CFR 264 Subpart J and 40 CFR 265 Subpart J. Design storage tanks to
meet Federal regulation for tank location, secondary containment, cathodic protection,
leak-detection system, leak-detection testing, and similar.
2-12.2
Tank Removal.
These requirements apply to sites and projects where aboveground storage tanks
(AST) or underground storage tanks (UST) are known to exist. Obtain copies of
available reports, such as tank integrity assessment reports, groundwater sampling and
testing, contaminated soil sampling and testing, and Closure Reports from the
Installation EV staff. Coordinate with the Installation EV staff in order to determine the
requirements to initiate a permanent closure process of the storage tank as applicable.
Closure activities are regulated at the state level. Storage tanks and piping systems
may be permanently closed by removing them from the ground, or by decontaminating
and filling the empty tanks with an inert solid material, which is referred to as being
“closed in-place”. Dispose of AST or UST following the hazardous waste requirements
discussed in the paragraph entitled “Hazardous Waste”.
2-12.2.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling – Storage
Tanks.
Where the construction site contains tanks, a site inspection must be performed.
Before performing field investigations and sampling, obtain all available information
regarding AST and UST from the Installation EV staff. Develop a soil and groundwater
sampling and testing plan. See paragraph entitled “Conducting Field Investigations,
Surveys and Sampling – Contaminated Soil and Groundwater”. Encompass all tank
system components. Include information such as the age of the unit, corrosionsprotection measures in place, and results of prior leak tests or inspections of the tank.
See information required in the paragraph entitled “Report - Tanks”.
2-12.2.2
Laboratory – Storage Tanks.
Use laboratories to analyze potentially contaminated soils, free product, or sludge that
are fully equipped and proficient in conducting analysis in accordance with EPA SW846, EPA 540/R-99/008, EPA-540-R-014-002, EPA-540-R-04-004, and certified by the
National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference (NELAC).
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2-13
CONTAMINATED SOIL OR GROUNDWATER.
These requirements apply to sites and projects where contaminated soil or groundwater
is known to exist. Evaluate sites with known soil or groundwater contamination during
the planning phase and before initiating any facility design work. Obtain copies of
available reports, such as groundwater sampling and testing, contaminated soil
sampling and testing, and remediation reports, from the Installation EV staff.
Coordinate with the Installation EV staff to identify permit conditions applicable to soil,
restrictions on land development, and other requirements that must be considered for
the project. Prepare specifications and construction documents that accurately convey
existing site conditions as they pertain to soil and groundwater contamination. Manage
and dispose of contaminated soils and groundwater in accordance with the
requirements described in the paragraph entitled “Hazardous Waste”.
2-13.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling –
Contaminated Soil or Groundwater.
When the construction site is known to contain contaminated soil or groundwater and no
determination actions have been started, perform a site inspection. Before field
investigation and sampling, obtain all available information regarding contaminated soil
or groundwater from the Installation EV staff. Develop a soil and groundwater sampling
and testing plan that contains, at a minimum, the procedure for collecting samples, the
frequency of the sampling events, the test methods that will be employed, type of
sampling design and sampling density, error Type, confidence level and procedure for
handling samples. Follow EPA Soil Screening Guidance (SSG). The SSG presents a
framework for developing risk-based, soil screening levels (SSL) for protection of
human health. Screening levels are not national cleanup levels; instead, they are
intended to streamline the evaluation and cleanup of site soils by helping site managers
eliminate areas, pathways and chemicals of concern at National Priority List sites. See
information required in the paragraph entitled “Report - Contaminated Soil or
Groundwater”.
2-13.2
Laboratory – Contaminated Soil or Groundwater.
Use laboratories that are fully equipped and proficient in conducting analysis in
accordance with EPA SW-846, EPA 540/R-99-008, EPA-540-R-04-004, and certified by
the NELAC to analyze potentially contaminated soils or groundwater.
2-14
WASTE.
CONTROL AND MANAGEMENT OF SOLID AND HAZARDOUS
Disposal or ultimate disposition of waste materials is performed on all projects. Waste
reduction in the form of recycling or reuse is encouraged. Require the Contractor to
develop a waste management and reduction plan to be used during construction.
Coordinate with the Installation EV staff and identify materials suitable for recycling or
reuse, taking into account the Installation’s recycling program. If disposal or ultimate
disposition of hazardous or contaminated materials, soils, or groundwater are part of the
project a waste characterization is required. Consult regional, state, and local
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regulations for more stringent threshold levels. To determine whether a waste fails the
toxicity characteristic, perform a TCLP analysis on the waste. Note the TCLP analysis
differs from total constituent laboratory analysis; TCLP analysis is only for disposal
needs. However, total analysis may also be needed. Solid or nonhazardous waste
accumulation requirements can be found, if regulated, within state-specific regulations
and should follow industry standard.
2-14.1
Hazardous Waste Accumulation.
Require accumulation and storage of contaminated media and any debris according to
applicable requirements while awaiting transportation and disposal. Require
coordination with the Installation EV staff to determine what quantity may be stored onsite. Accumulate and manage any hazardous waste generated in accordance with 40
CFR 262, 40 CFR 264, and 40 CFR 265, Installation, state-specific and local
requirements, whichever are more stringent.
2-14.1.1
Hazardous Waste.
Federal regulations define waste as hazardous when it exhibits a hazardous
characteristic (such as ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity) as specified in 40
CFR 261, Subpart C, or when the waste contains a listed hazardous waste as identified
in 40 CFR 261, Subpart D. RCRA requires that solid wastes be properly characterized
at the point of generation. RCRA regulates “cradle to grave” control over hazardous
wastes. Request recycling and reuse of waste classified as hazardous, in accordance
with the requirements in 40 CFR 261.6.
Require treatment of hazardous wastes in accordance with 40 CFR 268. This section
identifies treatment standards for hazardous waste that must be met before waste may
be disposed (placed on the land). Follow the requirements of 40 CFR 262, 40 CFR
264, and 40 CFR 265 when accumulating hazardous waste onsite. Coordinate with the
Installation EV staff for generator status of the Installation and applicability, including
instances when an EPA identification (ID) number is required, accumulation
requirements regarding quantities and time allowed, inspections, required
documentation and labeling, reporting, training, and contingency planning. Table 2-1
identifies regulatory references that provide requirements for each of these. States may
have more stringent requirements than Federal regulations provide. Determine state
requirements for hazardous wastes prior to generation, characterization, classification,
and disposal to determine the most stringent requirement.
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Table 2-1 Regulatory References
Conditionally Exempt
Small Quantity
Generators
Small Quantity
Generators
Large Quantify
Generators
Quantity Limits ≤100 kilogram (kg) per
>100 <1,000 kg per
month
month
≤1 kg per month of acute §262.34(d)
hazardous waste
≤100 kg per month of
acute spill residue or soil
§§261.5(a) and (e)
≥1,000 kg per month
>1 kg per month of
acute hazardous
waste
>100 kg/month of
acute spill residue or
soil
Part 262 and
§261.5(e)
EPA ID
Number
Not required
Required
§262.12
Required
§262.12
On-Site
Accumulation
Quantity
≤1,000 kg
≤1 kg acute
≤100 kg of acute spill
residue or soil
§§261.5(f)(2) and (g)(2)
≤6,000 kg
§262.34(d)(1)
No limit
Accumulation
Time Limits
None
≤180 days or
≤270 days (if greater
than 200 miles)
§§262.34(d)(2) and (3)
≤90 days
§262.34(a)
Storage
Requirements
None
Basic requirements with
technical standards for
tanks or containers
§§262.34(d)(2) and (3)
Full compliance for
management of
tanks, containers,
drip pads, or
containment
buildings
§262.34(a)
Sent To:
State-approved or RCRA RCRA permitted/interim RCRA permitted/
permitted/ interim status status facility
interim status facility
facility
§262.20(b)
§262.20(b)
§§261.5(f)(3) and (g)(3)
Manifest
Not required
Required
§262.20
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Required
§262.20
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Conditionally Exempt
Small Quantity
Generators
Small Quantity
Generators
Large Quantify
Generators
Biennial Report Not required
Not required
Required
§262.41
Personnel
Training
Not required
Basic training required
§262.34(d)(5)(iii)
Required
§262.34(a)(4)
Contingency
Plan
Not required
Basic plan
§262.34(d)(5)(i)
Full plan required
§262.34(a)(4)
Emergency
Procedures
Not required
Required
§262.34(d)(5)(iv)
Full plan required
§262.34(a)(4)
Yes
§§262.30-262.33
Yes
§§262.30-262.33
Department of Yes
Transportation (if required by DOT)
(DOT)
Transport
Requirements
2-14.1.2
Universal Waste.
The regulations govern the collection and management of batteries, pesticides,
mercury-containing equipment, and lamps, thus facilitating environmentally sound
collection and proper recycling or treatment. Comply with the Federal universal waste
regulations set forth in 40 CFR 273. States may modify the universal waste rule and
add additional universal waste(s) in individual state regulations. Coordinate with the
Installation EV staff and research the specific state for additional regulations that apply.
Universal waste may be accumulated for up to one year from the date when the waste
is generated. In most cases, universal waste (such as, lamps and batteries) are
“generated” when they are removed from service.
2-14.1.3
Used Oil.
Comply with EPA required practices in 40 CFR 270, called "management standards,"
developed for used oil. These include proper labeling, proper and maintained
containers, spill and leak prevention, and proper recordkeeping. Comply with
additional, more stringent state requirements, if applicable. States may have additional
more stringent requirements.
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2-14.2
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys, and Sampling– Solid and
Hazardous Waste.
Require a waste characterization study (including solid and liquids) before disposing of
potentially unknown hazardous or contaminated wastes. In order to determine if
anticipated construction waste (solid or liquid) is within regulatory limits for disposal and
ultimate disposition as a nonhazardous material, request the analysis of a
representative sample of the waste stream in accordance with Federal regulations using
the appropriate EPA analytical methods. Perform this sampling in accordance with
RCRA procedures, state, and local regulations and with EPA and state guidelines for
avoiding exposure to human health and the environment. Establish a health and safety
program to be followed during the sample collection process, select the statistical
method to be followed, and set a quality control procedure for the data collection in
accordance with EPA 530-D-02-002. Collect a representative sample of the anticipated
waste stream; it may be necessary to collect subsamples of various materials to collect
an accurate heterogeneous waste stream sample. To accomplish the analysis of a
heterogeneous waste stream, collect a composite sample that can be analyzed in
accordance with Federal regulations, EPA protocols, and ASTM Standards. The
representative composite sample should be prepared from samples of each of the
different building material categories, and then mixed in proportion to the percentage by
weight of the different components in the anticipated waste stream. Patch and repair
sample locations with suitable materials. Consult a qualified laboratory for required
sample quantities to obtain accurate analysis. Should other sampling methodologies be
used, request coordination with onsite personnel before sample collection and analysis.
2-14.3
Laboratory – Solid and Hazardous Waste.
Use laboratories that are fully equipped and proficient in conducting analysis in
accordance with EPA SW-846, EPA 540/R-99-008, EPA-540-R-04-004, and NELAC
certified to perform analysis for potential hazardous waste.
2-15
OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS.
2-15.1
National Environmental Policy Act.
NEPA and 40 CFR Parts 1500-1508, require Federal agencies to assess and consider
the potential impacts to the environment by their proposed actions that occur within the
United States. Executive Order (EO) 12114, requires similar assessment and
consideration as NEPA, but applies to proposed actions occurring outside the United
States. A NEPA analysis should be completed prior to beginning design. NEPA is
prepared based on previous findings, anticipated building use and planned building
locations. NEPA documentation addresses the requirements in Federal statute or EO
that applies to the resources found within the project area.
Obtain the NEPA documentation prepared for the project from the Installation EV staff.
The NEPA documentation identifies any sensitive resources that exist within or adjacent
to the site and any mitigation or avoidance measures that are required. Comply with
measures identified in the NEPA documentation and include them as contract
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requirements. If conditions change from what was analyzed in the NEPA document,
such as a change in use, location on the site, the addition of or change in location of
supporting facilities, or discovery of new information about the site, contact the
Installation EV staff to determine if a modification to the NEPA document is required.
2-15.2
Cultural Resources.
Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) requires Federal
agencies to consider the effects of actions they fund or approve on any district, site,
building, structure, or object that is listed in or eligible for listing in the National Register
of Historic Places (NRHP). The primary agency for enforcement of NHPA is the State
Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO). Federal agencies must comply with Section 106
of the NHPA by adherence to the regulations found at 36 CFR 800. The Native
American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990 (NAGPRA); 43 CFR 10
provides a process for Federal agencies and museums to return certain Native
American cultural items -- human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects
of cultural patrimony -- to lineal descendants and culturally affiliated Indian tribes.
NAGPRA includes provisions for unclaimed and culturally unidentifiable Native
American cultural items, intentional and inadvertent discovery of Native American
cultural items on Federal and tribal lands, and penalties for noncompliance and illegal
trafficking. NAGPRA outlines the treatment, repatriation, and disposition of such
resources and ensures consultation with associated tribes or lineal descendants.
Obtain documentation from Installation EV staff regarding any known historic properties
or the potential to discover historic properties within the project site and any mitigation
required to avoid an adverse effect to historic properties. Comply with state and local
preservation laws in addition to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act
(NHPA).
2-15.2.1
Archaeology.
Comply with the Archaeological Resource Protection Act of 1979; 16 U.S.C. 470aa470mm. The Act defines regulations for excavating archaeological sites and requires
that a permit be obtained from the Federal land manager when excavation or the
removal of any archaeological resource occurs on public or Native American lands.
Obtain from Installation EV staff any measures, such as buffer areas, that were agreed
upon during the Section 106 process. Include these measures and the necessary
language to ensure protection of any archaeological resources, as contract
requirements.
2-15.2.2
Architectural.
Obtain information on historic architectural resources from the Installation EV staff and
include any mitigation measures as contract requirements. Refer to UFC 3-101-01 for
projects involving historic architectural resources.
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2-15.2.3
Inadvertent Discoveries.
These requirements apply to all projects that include ground disturbance. Include
procedures for the Contractor to follow should an archaeological site be discovered
during construction. If any previously unidentified prehistoric- or historic-period
archaeological sites (for example, human skeletal remains or burials and artifacts) are
discovered during construction activities, suspend all ground-disturbing activities and
then notify the Installation EV staff and Contracting Officer. Consultation with SHPO,
interested Native American tribes, and other interested parties should occur as
appropriate regarding the site’s eligibility for listing in the NRHP, project impacts,
necessary mitigation, and other treatment measures.
2-15.2.4
Tribal Consultation.
Obtain from the Installation EV staff any measures, such as buffer areas that were
agreed upon during tribal consultation. Include these measures as contract
requirements.
2-15.3
Air Quality.
These requirements apply to sites and projects with new or existing facilities and with
new or existing stationary air emissions sources. Comply with Clean Air Act (CAA)
requirements and state and local regulations. Coordinate with the Installation EV staff
and provide the necessary information and require purchased equipment meets the
necessary regulations. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) include
air quality standards that are implemented at the state level in the State Implementation
Plan required under Section 110 of the CAA. Verify whether the project is located in an
EPA nonattainment area for criteria pollutants and identify in the construction
documents how this affects the project construction schedule and cost. Provide the
Installation EV staff with the information necessary for obtaining a new or updating the
existing air permits.
Verify whether asphalt pavement plants in the project area have production limitations
due to what is called “summer ozone season” and design accordingly. These limitations
will affect the Contractor’s schedule and construction phasing.
Permanent equipment such as new boilers and emergency power generators must be
added to the Installation’s air permit as required by applicable regulations. Coordinate
with the Installation EV staff to determine conditions that require adding emission
sources used during construction to the air permit, and require the Contractor to comply
with these requirements.
2-15.4
Wetlands/Waters of the United States.
These requirements apply to project sites where there are wetlands and other waters of
the United States (streams, rivers, and bays). The discharge of dredged or fill material
into waters of the United States is regulated under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act.
Comply with Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. Obtain documentation from the
Installation EV staff to identify the location of wetlands or other waters of the United
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States on or adjacent to the project area. Avoid impacts to jurisdictional wetlands or
waters of the United States to the maximum extent practicable or minimize impacts if
they are unavoidable. Coordinate with the Project Manager to determine if alternative
sites may be explored to minimize wetland impacts. Notify the Installation EV staff to
determine if the NEPA documentation requires an amendment. If impacts to the
jurisdictional wetlands or waters of the United States cannot be avoided, obtain all
Federal and state permits before initiating any land-disturbance activities. Require the
Contractor to comply with all wetland permit conditions. Coordinate with the Installation
EV staff to determine suitable mitigation options.
2-15.5
Natural Resources.
Obtain documentation from the Installation EV staff to identify what natural resources
are located on or within the project area.
2-15.5.1
Threatened and Endangered Species/Critical Habitat.
Require compliance with the Endangered Species Act and protect threatened and
endangered species and the habitat upon which these species rely. Obtain the
documentation from Installation EV staff, to include mitigation measures, as contract
requirements, to protect threatened and endangered species and critical habitat that
could be located on or in the vicinity of the project area. Implement and monitor
mitigation measures. Provide implementation or monitoring reports, as necessary, to
the Installation EV staff.
2-15.5.2
Migratory Bird Treaty Act.
Design in compliance with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) between the United
States, Canada, Japan, Mexico, and Russia. The MBTA makes it unlawful to take, kill,
or possess listed birds, unless permitted by regulation. Implement measures identified
by the Installation EV staff to ensure compliance with MBTA requirements.
2-15.5.3
Essential Fish Habitat.
The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act requires Federal
agencies to consider impacts to essential fish habitat (EFH) from projects they
authorize, fund, or undertake. EFH is defined as those waters and substrates
necessary to fish for spawning, breeding, feeding, or growth to maturity. These
requirements apply to projects in or adjacent to EFH. In accordance with 50 CFR 600,
Subpart J, Federal agencies must consider impacts to EFH from projects they
authorize, fund, or undertake. Obtain the EFH assessment from the Installation EV staff
and include the conservation recommendations made by the National Marine Fisheries
Service as contract requirements.
2-15.5.4
Marine Mammal Protection Act.
The Marine Mammal Protection Act; 50 CFR 18 prohibits, with certain exceptions, the
take of marine mammals in United States waters. These requirements apply to projects
in or adjacent to the marine environment (oceans or seas). Obtain the documentation
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from Installation EV staff to determine what mitigation measures are required as
contract requirements to protect marine mammals.
2-15.5.5
Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.
The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act; 50 CFR 22 requires the protection of the
bald eagle and the golden eagle by prohibiting, except under certain specified
conditions, the taking, possession, and commerce of bald and golden eagles. Obtain
the documentation from Installation EV staff to determine if bald or golden eagles are
located on or in the vicinity of the project area and include the mitigation measures as
contract requirements to ensure their protection.
2-15.5.6
Stormwater Management and Erosion and Sediment Control.
Projects with land disturbance activities greater than one acre require coverage under
the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program. Most
states are authorized to implement the NPDES permitting program. Refer to the EPA
website for the list of states authorized to implement this permitting program:
http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/npdes/basics/State-and-Tribal-Program-AuthorizationStatus.cfm. Obtain the NPDES permit through EPA for all other states. Obtain from the
Installation EV staff the regional permitting requirements and copies of all existing
stormwater and erosion and sediment control permits that affect or encompass the
project site. Identify all permit conditions that affect the design and include them in the
specifications or on the drawings. Design stormwater management facilities and erosion
and sediment controls in accordance with UFC 3-201-01.
2-16
CHLORDANE.
These requirements apply to sites and projects where existing building(s) or structure(s)
will be renovated, altered, repaired, or demolished as part of the scope of work. These
requirements do not apply to new construction where no existing buildings or structures
are present. Specification preparation must comply with the applicable requirements of
40 CFR 260 – 40 CFR 270, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.
2-16.1
Conducting Field Investigations, Surveys – Chlordane.
Prior to demolition of structures, it may be necessary to determine if chlordane was
used to prevent termites. If adequate pesticide application records exist, it may be
possible to confirm or rule out the use of chlordane or similar products. If adequate
records do not exist, sample the soil around the foundation of a building scheduled for
demolition. Chlordane was typically applied in a swath approximately 12-18 inches (300
to 450 mm) below the surface of the ground and approximately 12-18 inches (300 to
450 mm) away from the foundation. It may also have been injected through boreholes
into the subsurface soil under concrete slab foundations. Sampling and analysis of the
soil may be necessary along the foundation of suspect buildings.
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2-16.2
Laboratory – Chlordane.
Laboratories performing analysis for chlordane in soil must be fully equipped and
proficient in conducting analyses according to RCRA and SW-846, and accredited by
the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and National Voluntary
Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP).
2-16.3
Control of Chlordane.
Chlordane is very stable and does not readily degrade or migrate in the environment. It
is highly insoluble in water and if left undisturbed it will continue to serve its intended
purpose for many years. Properly applied chlordane tends to only become a problem
when disturbed, as in building demolition. Under RCRA regulations, as long as the soil
remains undisturbed chlordane does not present a regulatory issue. It may even be
acceptable to excavate chlordane contaminated soil to remove the foundation and place
the soil back in the excavation site provided there is not subsequent disturbance or
construction on the site. However, if the soil will be moved to another location or
disturbed as part of new construction efforts, chlordane may present a hazardous waste
disposal issue or costly environmental cleanup. It is very important that steps be taken
prior to demolition to minimize the risk to the environment, site workers, or future users
of the site.
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CHAPTER 3 DELIVERABLES
This chapter identifies the expected level of detail and quality of all deliverables. The
following information is critical to ensure contract documents are complete and
biddable. Provide all deliverables in accordance with FC 1-300-09N and the following
requirements.
3-1
FIELD INVESTIGATION REPORT
Each Installation maintains record files pertaining to the environmental aspects of
previously constructed projects. Utilize these resources and include applicable record
files as an attachment to the required reports. Submit separate reports, including
drawings, addressing each of the following environmentally sensitive materials:
•
Asbestos
•
Paint - Lead-Based Paint in Target Housing and Child Occupied Facilities
•
Paint – Lead, Cadmium, Chromium, and other Hazardous Metals
•
Radon
•
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
•
Low-Level Radioactive Components
•
Animal Droppings
•
Molds and Spores
•
Tanks
•
Contaminated Soil or Groundwater
•
Waste Characterization
•
Chlordane
For Design-Build projects, provide field investigation reports in Part 6 of the Request for
Proposal (RFP). Provide specifications in Part 5 as required by the contract.
3-1.1
Drawings
Provide scaled and dimensioned drawings, within the reports, showing existing site
conditions and existing buildings or structures. Drawings must contain enough
information to do quantity takeoffs for cost estimating purposes. Indicate project
location and facility number. For buildings, provide drawings showing floor plans, and
interior and exterior sections as applicable. Provide dimensions (e.g., building, rooms,
halls) and room numbers to allow for easy alignment in the field. Include drawing notes
indicating:
•
type and location of the work associated with the project
•
sample locations
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1 March 2016
•
extents of environmentally sensitive materials
•
condition, and form of environmentally sensitive materials
•
extents of environmentally sensitive materials in poor condition requiring
removal
•
extents of environmentally sensitive materials in good condition that may
remain if not disturbed
•
components (e.g., mercury tubes, ballasts) containing environmentally
sensitive materials; show locations and indicate the number of
components to be removed
•
access restrictions, utilities, and equipment that hinder access or egress
(include dimensions for the restricted openings)
•
components or environmentally sensitive materials to be removed or
segregated prior to mass demolition
3-1.2
Report – Asbestos.
Provide an asbestos report when asbestos field investigation work has occurred or
when a prior asbestos report has been used to identify ACM and include the following
information: a narrative summary of the work that identifies the project description,
location, previous survey data, and additional ACM identified. List the areas, types,
locations, and quantities of ACM and any contamination that will affect the project.
Provide sample descriptions, results, locations, location maps, and photographic
documentation. Obtain a copy of the Asbestos Survey Data Template located at
http://www.wbdg.org/references/pa_dod_ntools.php. Include copies of the EPA
asbestos inspector and the laboratory accreditation that performed the work.
3-1.3
Facilities.
Report – Lead Based Paint in Target Housing and Child Occupied
Provide a lead-based paint report and include a narrative summary of the work that
identifies the project description, test results (including negative results), location,
previous survey data, components with lead-based paint, and rationale for removal or
abatement. Include all the requirements of EPA Title X and EPA RRP Rule. Include
copies of all EPA lead accreditation certificates for the professionals that performed the
sampling and analytical work, including the risk assessor, lead workers, samplers, and
laboratory.
3-1.4
Report – Paint.
Provide a paint report and include a narrative summary of the work that identifies the
project description, location, previous survey data, additional lead, cadmium or
chromium paint identified, sample descriptions, results, locations, location maps, and
photographic documentation. Include a description and full characterization of all waste
streams (that is, hazardous, to include all waste codes, or nonhazardous). List the
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UFC 3-810-01N
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areas, types, and locations of paint and any contamination that will affect the project,
including soil and dust. Include copies of all accreditation certificates, licenses,
certificates, sampling plans, and analyses and test reports identified above.
3-1.5
Report – Radon.
Provide a radon report and include a narrative summary of the work that identifies the
project description, location, and test results provided by onsite personnel. Provide
research on potential radon in the area in the report. Briefly summarize precautions that
need to be taken to address radon. Refer to EPA Radon Mitigation Standards (RMS)
and radon-resistant new construction techniques.
3-1.6
Report – Polychlorinated Biphenyls.
Provide a PCB report and include a narrative summary of the work that identifies the
project description, location, previous survey data, and additional PCB identified. List
the areas, types, and location of PCB-containing lighting ballasts and all other PCBcontaining equipment and any contamination that will affect the project. Summarize
state or local laws that affect PCB removal and disposal and ultimate disposition for the
project, such as project size, limitations on removal methods, and monitoring
requirements. Include notification requirements, permit fees, licensing, or other
specialized requirements.
3-1.7
Report –Low-Level Radioactive Components.
Provide a LLR components report and include a list of the areas surveyed, types of LLR
components, location of LLR components, method of disposal and any additional
information that may impact the project. Provide photographic documentation of LLR
components.
3-1.8
Report – Animal Droppings.
Provide animal droppings report and include a narrative summary of the work that
identifies the project description, location, and conditions found at the site. Provide
photographic documentation of contaminated areas. Briefly summarize precautions that
need to be taken to protect workers, building occupants, and the environment.
3-1.9
Report – Molds and Spores.
Provide a mold (microbial) assessment survey report and include a narrative summary
of the work that identifies the project description, location, previous survey data, and
additional mold identified. Determine the quantities, classification, and location of mold
and any contamination that will impact the project. Briefly summarize precautions that
need to be taken to protect workers, building occupants, and the environment. Provide
copies of laboratory testing and classification reports and laboratory certifications.
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3-1.10
Report – Tanks.
Provide a tank report and include the following information: contents of tank, size of
tank, approximate location of tank, associated pipelines (including construction, size,
and linear footage per diameter), existing soil conditions associated with tank, age of
tank, and tank construction material. Document the quantity of remaining hazardous or
toxic waste products in AST and UST. Coordinate with Installation EV staff to
determine all requirements associated with removal, disposal, and ultimate disposition
of the remaining product in a tank. Provide copies of laboratory certification and state or
local accreditation certificates with the report. Include copies of all certificates of
analyses or test reports with the report, including but not limited to NELAC certification
under EPA program.
3-1.11
Report – Contaminated Soil or Groundwater.
Provide a contaminated soil or groundwater report and include the following information:
type of hazardous constituents, approximate location of the contamination on the site,
approximate depth of contamination, existing soil and site conditions, approximate
quantities of contaminated soil or groundwater, and calculations with assumptions made
in determining the estimated quantities. Include copies of all certificates of analyses or
test reports with the report, including but not limited to NELAC certification under EPA
program.
3-1.12
Report – Waste Characterization.
Provide a waste characterization report and include the following information: sample
methodology, descriptions, results, locations, location maps, and photographic
documentation. Specifically itemize anticipated waste materials to be generated during
construction and provide the method of disposal and ultimate disposition for hazardous
and nonhazardous wastes. Provide copies of laboratory certification and state and local
accreditation certificates with the report. Include copies of all certificates of analyses or
test reports with the report, including but not limited to NELAC certification under EPA
program.
3-1.13
Report – Chlordane.
Provide a chlordane report when chlordane field investigation work has occurred or
when a prior chlordane report has been used to identify contaminated soil and include
the following information: a narrative summary of the work that identifies the project
description, location, previous survey data, and additional contaminated areas
identified. List the areas, types, locations, and quantities of contaminated soil that will
affect the project. Provide sample descriptions, results, locations, location maps, and
photographic documentation.
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3-2
SPECIFICATIONS AND DRAWINGS.
3-2.1
Design Build Design Submittals (Post Award).
The Contractor’s Designer of Record (DOR) is responsible for verifying all site
information furnished in the Government issued Design Build RFP. The Contractor’s
DOR must verify existing site conditions and provide any additional field investigation
needed to support the development of the final design and construction of the project.
When the Contractor’s DOR conducts additional sampling the Government furnished
information provided in the RFP must be updated and used during project design to
develop drawings and specifications for final design and construction of the project.
3-2.2
Specifications.
Edit UFGS 01 57 19 to include paragraphs for asbestos, lead-based paint,
polychlorinated biphenyls, or low-level radioactive components when those materials or
components are part of the project. Specify disposal requirements based on project
location. Review Federal, state and local disposal regulations before specifying
disposal of any type of waste and comply with the most stringent requirement.
UFGS 01 57 19.01 20 is a regional supplement to UFGS 01 57 19 and contains state
and local requirements applicable to the project for specific project locations. Review
and edit UFGS 01 57 19.01 20 as applicable.
3-2.3
Asbestos.
Provide an EPA accredited Asbestos Project Designer to prepare asbestos
specifications and drawings.
3-2.3.1
Specifications for Asbestos.
Edit the guide specification for asbestos removal using UFGS 02 82 16.00 20. Indicate
the type and location of the asbestos and to provide a description and rationale for
removal. Identify conditions that affect access or egress for workers and equipment,
such as confined spaces, crawl spaces, or elevated working surfaces. Identify utility
systems (HVAC, steam, electrical, and similar) required to be shut down during the
project. Where the building is to remain partially occupied during construction,
temporary utilities may be required. Where the building is to remain partially occupied
by the Government during construction, specifically identify utility shutdowns to the
project manager, in writing. Indicate work area isolation requirements. Indicate
disposal and ultimate disposition requirements. Summarize conditions that affect
asbestos removal and disposal or ultimate disposition for the project, such as project
size, limitations on removal methods, and air monitoring requirements. Include
notification requirements, permit fees, licensing, or other specialized requirements.
Some jurisdictions may require third-party monitoring during the construction phase for
asbestos abatement activities. Depending on the regulatory requirement, a separate
contract to the third party (that is, a contact separate from the construction contract)
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may be required. Consult a local asbestos manager or regulatory expert. If
replacement materials are required, coordinate with the architect.
3-2.3.2
Drawings for Asbestos.
Provide scaled and dimensioned drawings for floor plans or building sections showing all
ACM. Provide building and room dimensions allowing easily established alignment in
the field. If asbestos is present and will not be disturbed by the project, provide a
drawing note indicating the type and location of the ACM with a note that the material is
not to be disturbed by project work. For ACM impacted by the project, indicate location,
condition, and form of all ACM to be removed, as well as the structures, utilities, and
equipment that hinder access or egress. Provide dimensions for access or egress to
crawl spaces, attics, chases, or restrictive areas that affect asbestos removal personnel
or equipment. Identify rooms by name and number.
3-2.4
Lead-Based Paint.
Provide an EPA accredited Lead Paint Project Designer in accordance with EPA Title X
and EPA RRP Rule to prepare the lead-based paint removal specifications drawings.
3-2.4.1
Specifications for Lead-Based Paint.
Edit the guide specification for lead-based paint using UFGS 02 82 33.13 20, or UFGS
02 83 13.00 20. Indicate building components with lead-based paint that will be
affected by the work. Identify conditions that affect access or egress for workers and
equipment, such as confined spaces, crawl spaces, or elevated working surfaces.
Identify utility systems (HVAC, steam, electrical, and similar) that may require shutdown
during the project. Where the building is to remain partially occupied by the
Government during construction, identify utility shutdowns to the Government’s project
manager, in writing. Indicate work area isolation requirements. Summarize state or
local laws that affect child-occupied facilities and lead-based paint removal,
containment, disposal, or ultimate disposition for the project, such as project size,
limitations on removal methods, and air monitoring requirements. Include notification
requirements, permit fees, licensing, final clearance criteria (dust wipes, soil sampling,
and similar), disposal and ultimate disposition requirements, or other specialized
requirements. Indicate disposal and ultimate disposition requirements. If replacement
materials are required, coordinate with architect.
3-2.4.2
Drawings for Lead-Based Paint.
Information regarding paint as it pertains to child-occupied facilities may be detailed on
the demolition drawings by adding notes indicating that lead-based paint abatement
activities be conducted in accordance with the appropriate corresponding specification
section and EPA Title X and EPA RRP Rule. Indicate existing lead-based paint
affected by the project on the drawings using a chart or some other method to display
the laboratory results of the lead analysis. For abatement drawings, provide scaled and
dimensioned drawings and floor plans or building sections showing all items from which
the hazardous paint will be removed, replaced, or encapsulated. Indicate all locations
of hazardous paint to be removed, as well as structures, utilities, and equipment that
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hinder access or egress. Provide dimensions for access or egress to crawl spaces,
attics, or restrictive areas that affect removal personnel or equipment.
3-2.5
Paint.
Provide an EPA accredited Lead Project Designer to prepare lead, cadmium, and
chromium specifications and drawings.
3-2.5.1
Specifications for Paint.
Edit UFGS 02 82 33.13 20, or UFGS 02 83 13.00 20 to include requirements for the
removal of paint containing lead cadmium, and chromium. Describe all the different
scenarios that will be encountered in the project (that is, “tasks” per OSHA). Clearly
identify all the areas with paint on the construction documents and outline the protocol
for providing protection of workers and the environment during all construction activities.
Identify conditions that affect access or egress for workers and equipment, such as
confined spaces, crawl spaces, or elevated working surfaces. Identify utility systems
(HVAC, steam, electrical, and similar) that may require shutdown during the project.
Where the building is to remain partially occupied by the Government during
construction, identify utility shutdowns to the Government’s project manager, in writing.
Indicate work area isolation requirements. Include state and local regulations,
notification requirements, permit fees, licensing, or other specialized requirements.
Identify the appropriate clearance level required for the Contractor to attain when
finishing the construction activities that generate dust, fumes, or debris. Thoroughly
research the clearance level for each type of construction project and the differences
established based upon the nature of the project. Indicate disposal and ultimate
disposition requirements and any special waste segregation requirements.
3-2.5.2
Drawings for Paint.
Information regarding paint as it pertains to demolition work may be detailed on the
demolition drawings by adding notes indicating that specific requirements and
demolition activities must be conducted in accordance with the appropriate
corresponding specification section and title. Indicate on the drawings all existing paint
determined from the field survey to contain detectable levels of lead, cadmium, and
chromium using a chart or some other method to display the laboratory results of the
lead analysis. For abatement drawings, provide scaled and dimensioned drawings and
floor plans or building sections showing all items from which the hazardous paint (lead,
cadmium, or chromium containing) will be removed (and hence abated). Examples of
this include wood molding or steel structures that are to be salvaged and reused in the
finished project but are coated with paints that contain the identified hazardous metal.
Indicate all locations of hazardous paint to be removed, as well as structures, utilities,
and equipment that hinder access or egress. Provide dimensions for access or egress
to crawl spaces, attics, or restrictive areas that affect removal personnel or equipment.
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3-2.6
Radon.
3-2.6.1
Specifications for Radon.
Edit the guide specifications for radon mitigation using UFGS 31 21 13. A licensed
professional mechanical consultant must handle specifications for radon remediation.
Develop specifications in accordance with EPA RMS and radon-resistant new
construction techniques.
3-2.7
Polychlorinated Biphenyls.
3-2.7.1
Specifications for Polychlorinated Biphenyls.
Edit the guide specification for PCB removal using UFGS 02 84 16 or UFGS 02 84 33.
Indicate existence of PCB and detail equipment that contains PCB. Provide description
of how PCB containing materials will be handled. Indicate the disposal and ultimate
disposition requirements, which may include recycling.
3-2.7.2
Drawings for Polychlorinated Biphenyls.
Provide drawings that indicate the PCB-containing component to be removed, including
locations and quantities. Indicate in the notes how the Contractor is to distinguish
between PCB and PCB-free components. For light fixtures, provide exact number of
lighting fixtures to be removed. Drawing notes or symbols allow the Contractor to do an
accurate takeoff of the number of ballasts to be removed. As an alternative, if Electrical
Demolition drawings are part of the same contract and they have sufficient detail to
show all electrical fixtures, then the lamps and ballasts may be shown on these
drawings. Clearly indicate in the notes the components to be removed prior to any
additional demolition.
3-2.8
Low-Level Radioactive Components.
3-2.8.1
Specifications for Low-Level Radioactive Components.
Comply with OPNAV M-5090.1 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Program and
contact Naval Sea Systems Command Detachment (NAVSEADET), Radiological Affairs
Support Office (RASO) to determine the requirements applicable to the project. Edit
UFGS 01 57 19 to include requirements for LLR component removal, containment,
storage and disposal. If any LLR components are indicated in the Low-Level
Radioactive Components Report, provide requirements for removal, containment,
storage and disposal. Indicate disposal and ultimate disposition requirements, including
information such as notification requirements, permit fees, licensing, or other specialized
requirements.
3-2.8.2
Drawings for Low-Level Radioactive Components.
If LLR components are indicated in the Low-Level Radioactive Components Report,
provide drawings that indicate the LLR components to be removed, including locations
and quantities. Indicate disposal and ultimate disposition requirements. As an
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alternative, use Electrical and Fire Protection Demolition drawings; provide sufficient
detail on these drawings to show all components. Clearly indicate in the notes the LLR
components to be removed prior to facility demolition.
3-2.9
Mercury.
3-2.9.1
Specifications for Mercury.
Edit the guide specification for mercury removal using UFGS 02 84 16. If mercury tubes
or the other items listed are present, indicate their existence. Provide a description and
the methodology for removal, containment, and sampling. Summarize state or local
laws that affect removal and disposal or ultimate disposition for the project, such as
project size, limitations on removal methods, and monitoring requirements. Include
notification requirements, permit fees, licensing, or other specialized requirements.
Indicate disposal and ultimate disposition requirements. Investigate companies that
recycle used mercury-containing devices and require recycling to the extent practical.
3-2.9.2
Drawings for Mercury.
Provide drawings that indicate the mercury tubes to be removed, including locations and
quantities. As an alternative, use Electrical Demolition drawings that have sufficient
detail to show all components. Clearly indicate in the notes the components to be
removed before any additional demolition.
3-2.10
Animal Droppings.
3-2.10.1
Specifications for Animal Droppings.
Edit UFGS 01 57 19 to include requirements to for the removal of animal droppings.
Identify conditions that affect access or egress for workers and equipment, such as
confined spaces, crawl spaces, or elevated working surfaces. Identify utility systems
(HVAC, steam, electrical, and similar), required to be shut down during the project.
Where the building is to remain partially occupied during construction, temporary utilities
may be required. Indicate work area isolation requirements. Include requirements for
disposal, ultimate disposition, project size, and limitations on removal methods. A
certified industrial hygienist must review the specifications.
3-2.10.2
Drawings for Animal Droppings.
If animal droppings are present, indicate their existence, location, and approximate
quantity. Provide removal notes that describe equipment, precautions for removal
personnel (such as using personal protection equipment), precautions for protecting
occupants, and techniques for removal. Indicate disposal and ultimate disposition
requirements.
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3-2.11
Molds and Spores.
3-2.11.1
Specifications for Molds and Spores.
Edit the guide specification to address mold and spore remediation using UFGS 02 85
00.00 20. Identify conditions that affect access or egress for workers and equipment,
such as confined spaces, crawl spaces, or elevated working surfaces. Identify utility
systems (HVAC, steam, electrical, and similar) required to be shut down during the
project. Where the building is to remain partially occupied during construction,
temporary utilities may be required. Indicate work area isolation requirements. Indicate
disposal and ultimate disposition requirements. Summarize state or local laws that
affect removal and disposal or ultimate disposition for the project, such as project size,
limitations on removal methods, and air monitoring requirements. A certified industrial
hygienist must review the specifications.
3-2.11.2
Drawings for Molds and Spores.
Indicate the areas where mold is located and include a description or listing of all
affected building components. Provide removal notes that describe equipment,
precautions for removal personnel (such as using personal protection equipment),
precautions for protecting occupants, and techniques for removal.
3-2.12
Tank Removal.
The drawings and specifications together must provide the Contractor with sufficient
information to determine quantities of materials, material classification (hazardous,
nonhazardous, and special waste), and regulatory testing requirements.
3-2.12.1
Specifications for Tank Removal.
Edit the guide specification for tank removal using UFGS 02 65 00. Several
environmental issues must be addressed when removing and disposing of AST or UST.
Determine the correct collection and disposal and ultimate disposition procedures for
items, such as cleaning water, rinse water, and existing sludge or product in the tank.
Require that the Construction Contractor certify that the removed tanks were rendered
unusable before transportation to the disposal or ultimate disposition site. Incorporate
any specific confirmatory soil samples to prove clean conditions. Include state and local
environmental requirements relative to tank closure and removal in the specifications.
Describe tanks, including their type, size, contents, and piping. Describe how much
product will be left in the tank and who will be responsible for removing any existing
product. Describe all required construction activities, such as gas-free tank, cleaning,
removing fuel lines, draining fuel lines, and testing of cleaning residue, sludge, water
and product for disposal and ultimate disposition purposes. A registered Professional
Engineer or Professional Geologist must prepare the specification.
3-2.12.2
Drawings for Tank Removal.
Provide separate Tank Removal drawings or use civil drawings to indicate aboveground
storage tanks (AST) or underground storage tanks (UST) that are to be removed or
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cleaned. Clearly indicate tank contents and the quantity of remaining product, water, or
sludge in the notes. Provide an overview of the steps to cleaning and removing the
tank. Indicate the disposal and ultimate disposition requirements for the product in the
tank. Coordinate closely with Installation EV staff to determine if the tank product may
be disposed of on Base; if so, clearly indicate on the drawings where the disposal and
ultimate disposition facilities are located. Include photographs of the removed tank to
show it has been rendered unusable, as contract requirements.
3-2.13
Contaminated Soil or Groundwater.
The drawings and specifications together must provide the Contractor with sufficient
information to determine type and quantities of materials, disposal and ultimate
disposition classification (hazardous, nonhazardous, special waste), and regulatory
testing requirements.
3-2.13.1
Specifications for Contaminated Soil or Groundwater.
Edit the guide specification for contaminated soil or groundwater using UFGS 02 61 13,
UFGS 02 61 23. Provide detailed requirements for worker protection, collecting
groundwater, stockpiling contaminated soil, testing, and disposing of the wastes. For
any new construction that requires dealing with contaminated soil or groundwater,
clearly state all information pertaining to the existing conditions at the site. Comply with
regulations regarding worker protection and additional requirements defined by EPA,
the regulating authority for the site, or as applicable per EM 385-1-1. Indicate the
existence of contaminated soil and groundwater and source of information. List all
reports that contain existing analytical information on the existing site conditions.
Describe which site controls will be used during construction (e.g. the use of organic
vapor analytes or meters and equipment to test and monitor atmosphere), and all
analytical requirements for testing and disposal and ultimate disposition of the
contaminated material. Indicate the handling and disposal or ultimate disposition
procedures.
3-2.13.2
Drawings for Contaminated Soil or Groundwater.
Provide separate drawings or use civil drawings that indicate the extent of known or
suspected soil or groundwater contamination. Indicate the type and level of
contamination.
3-2.14
Specifications for Waste.
Waste requirements are handled within various design specification sections. Refer to
previous design specification requirements, see paragraph entitled “Control and
Management of Solid and Hazardous Waste” and the applicable portions of this
Chapter.
3-3
COST ESTIMATES.
Coordinate with the lead discipline to determine the extent of the work and develop cost
estimates. Include estimated quantities, unit costs and total costs for each type of
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environmentally sensitive material, such as floor tile containing asbestos, insulation
containing asbestos and lead-contaminated soil. Do not provide lump-sum quantities
and costs. Provide unit pricing for each type of environmentally sensitive material
encountered during field investigation or previously known to exist in UFGS 01 20 00.00
20.
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CHAPTER 4 HANDLING AND STORAGE
Use the following information to assist in the preparation of the project specifications.
4-1
HANDLING AND STORAGE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIAL.
Properly store, manage, and maintain hazardous materials, such as fuels. Provide
storage in accordance with Safety Data Sheets. Storage and handling of hazardous
materials are regulated under 29 CFR, National Fire Protection Association and the
American Petroleum Institute. Small flammable containers must be stored within a
proper flammable storage cabinet. Fuel storage at quantities greater than 1,320 gallons
require the preparation and implementation of a Spill Prevention, Control, and
Countermeasures Plan, as described in 40 CFR 112. Certain hazardous materials may
also be regulated under the Department of Homeland Security, Title 6 CFR 27.
4-2
HAZARDOUS MATERIAL TRANSPORTATION.
Hazardous material; 49 CFR 171.8, is a substance or material that the Secretary of
Transportation has determined is capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health,
safety, and property when transported in commerce, and has designation as hazardous
under the Federal Hazardous Materials Transportation Law; 49 U.S.C. 5103. The term
includes hazardous substances, hazardous wastes, marine pollutants, elevated
temperature materials, materials designated as hazardous in the Hazardous Materials
Table 49 CFR 172.101, and materials that meet the defining criteria for hazard classes
and divisions in 49 CFR 173.
4-2.1
Department of Transportation Requirements.
Requirements under 49 CFR 171-180 apply to all offsite shipments of hazardous
materials. Provide a DOT-trained individual to verify that the requirements of 49 CFR
171-180 are met.
4-2.2
Shipping Name.
Material that exhibits one of the nine DOT hazard class characteristics (for example,
explosives, gases, flammable liquids, flammable solids, oxidizing substances, toxics or
poisons, radioactive materials, corrosive substances, or miscellaneous hazards) is
regulated under DOT rules for the transportation of hazardous material. Provide a
proper shipping name for each shipment of a suspected hazardous material using the
Hazardous Materials Table in 49 CFR 172.101. DOT-trained personnel must make all
determinations.
4-2.3
Packaging, Marking, and Labeling.
Mark the shipping name, hazard class, identification number, technical names (if
applicable), EPA markings and waste code numbers, and consignee or consignor
designations on packages for shipment 49 CFR 172.301. Once a waste is
characterized, determine the appropriate label in accordance with the Hazardous
Materials Table in 49 CFR 172.101.
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4-2.4
Placards.
Provide DOT-trained personnel to determine the appropriate placards. Specific placard
descriptions are found starting at 49 CFR 172.521. If a placard is required, it must be
affixed on each side and each end of the vehicle.
4-2.5
Proper Container.
Use the appropriate United Nations (UN) approved container in accordance with 49
CFR 172.101, 49 CFR 172.102, and 49 CFR 173.
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APPENDIX A REFERENCES
EXECUTIVE ORDER
EO 12114, Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions
CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS
6 CFR 27, Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards
29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety & Health Standards
36 CFR 800, Protection of Historic Properties
40 CFR 61.145, SUBPART M, National Emission Standard for Asbestos
40 CFR 112, Oil Pollution Prevention
40 CFR 260, Hazardous Waste Management System: General
40 CFR 261, Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste
40 CFR 261, SUBPART C, Characteristics of Hazardous Waste
40 CFR 261, SUBPART D, Lists of Hazardous Wastes
40 CFR 262, Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste
40 CFR 264 Subpart J, Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste
Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities
40 CFR 264 Subpart J, Tank Systems
40 CFR 265, Interim Status Standards For Owners And Operators Of Hazardous Waste
Treatment, Storage, And Disposal Facilities
40 CFR 265 Subpart J, Tank Systems
40 CFR 268, Land Disposal Restrictions
40 CFR 270, EPA Administered Permit Programs: The Hazardous Waste Permit
Program
40 CFR 273, Standards for Universal Waste Management
40 CFR 745, Lead Based Paint Poisoning Prevention in Certain Residential Structures
40 CFR 761, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Manufacturing Process, Distribution in
Commerce, and Use Prohibitions
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40 CFR 763, Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan
40 CFR Parts 1500-1508, Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of
the National Environmental Policy Act
43 CFR 10, Native American Graves Protection And Repatriation Regulations
49 CFR 171-180, Transportation
50 CFR 18, Marine Mammals
50 CFR 22, Eagle Permits
50 CFR 600 Subpart J, Essential Fish Habitat (EFH)
OTHER FEDERAL STANDARDS AND DOCUMENTS – GENERAL
16 U.S.C. 470aa-470mm, Archaeological Resource Protection Act of 1979
49 U.S.C. 5103, General Regulatory Authority
EPA Title X, The Residential Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act
EPA RRP Rule, Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule 2008
and associated amendments
EPA SW-846, Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste, Physical/Chemical Methods
EPA 402-K-01-001, Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings
EPA 530-D-02-002, RCRA Waste Sampling Draft Technical Guidance
EPA 540/R-99/008, USEPA Contract Laboratory Program National Functional
Guidelines for Organic Data Review
EPA-540-R-014-002, National Functional Guidelines for Superfund Organic Methods
Data Review
EPA-540-R-04-004, Institutional Controls: A Citizen’s Guide to Understanding
Institutional Controls at Superfund, Brownfields, Federal Facilities, Underground
Storage Tank, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Cleanups
HUD Guidelines, Second Edition, Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of LeadBased Paint Hazards in Housing
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FEDERAL REGISTER
66 FR 53535, Criteria for Classification of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices
and Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills: Disposal of Residential Lead-Based
Paint Waste; October 23, 2001
INDUSTRY STANDARDS
ASTM E2121, Standard Practice for Installing Radon Mitigation Systems in Existing
Low-Rise Residential Building
US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS
EM 385-1-1, Safety and Health Requirements
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program – Guidance Document for Navy
Family Housing
Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program – Guidebook for Naval Shore
Installations
OPNAV M-5090.1, Chief of Naval Operations Environmental Readiness Program
Manual
NAVAL SEA SYSTEMS COMMAND DETACHMENT
Radiological Affairs Support Office
https://www.nko.navy.mil/group/raso/low-level-rad-waste
FACILITIES CRITERIA
http://www.wbdg.org/ccb/browse_cat.php?o=29&c=4
FC 1-300-09N, Navy and Marine Corps Design Procedures
UNIFIED FACILITIES CRITERIA
http://www.wbdg.org/ccb/browse_cat.php?o=29&c=4
UFC 1-200-01, General Building Requirements
UFC 3-101-01, Architecture
UFC 3-201-01, Civil Engineering
UFC 3-460-01, Design Petroleum Fuel Facilities
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UNIFIED FACILITIES GUIDE SPECIFICATIONS
http://www.wbdg.org/ccb/browse_cat.php?c=3
UFGS 01 22 00.00 20, Price and Payment Procedures
UFGS 01 57 19, Temporary Environmental Controls
UFGS 01 57 19.01 20, Supplemental Temporary Environmental Controls
UFGS 02 61 13, Excavation and Handling of Contaminated Material
UFGS 02 61 23, Removal and Disposal of PCB Contaminated Soils
UFGS 02 65 00, Underground Storage Tank Removal
UFGS 02 82 16.00 20, Engineering Control of Asbestos Containing Materials
UFGS 02 82 33.13 20, Removal/Control and Disposal of Paint with Lead
UFGS 02 83 13.00 20, Lead in Construction
UFGS 02 84 16, Handling of Lighting Ballasts and Lamps Containing PCBs and
Mercury
UFGS 02 84 33, Removal and Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
UFGS 02 85 00.00 20, Mold Remediation
UFGS 31 21 13, Radon Mitigation
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APPENDIX B BEST PRACTICES
The best practices detailed herein apply to all sites and each project should be
evaluated individually (if they are governed by regulation then they are a requirement
and not a best practice). Neglecting to address the items listed below may result in
unnecessary exposure to human health and the environment, changes in the project
scope and be potentially subject the Government to regulatory notice of violations.
B-1
ASBESTOS.
RACM are commonly found in building materials and related products. Asbestoscontaining products are available today and are often used in the form of tars, sealants,
caulks, coatings, insulation, and roofing materials.
B-2
LEAD BASED PAINT IN TARGET HOUSING AND CHILDOCCUPIED FACILITIES.
When dealing with target housing and child-occupied facilities, lead-based paint is
defined by EPA and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as
any paint, varnish, shellac, or other coating that contains lead equal to or greater than
1.0 milligram per square centimeter (mg/cm2) as measured by XRF analyzer or
laboratory analysis, or 0.5 percent by weight as measured by laboratory analysis. This
is not the OSHA definition of lead-containing paint.
A child-occupied facility is defined as a building, or portion of a building, constructed
prior to 1978, visited regularly by the same child (6 years of age or younger) on at least
two different days within any week (Sunday through Saturday period), provided that
each day’s visit lasts at least 3 hours, the combined weekly visits last at least 6 hours,
and the combined annual visits last at least 60 hours.
B-3
PAINT – LEAD, CADMIUM, CHROMIUM, AND OTHER
HAZARDOUS METALS.
Many painted surfaces contain lead, cadmium, chromium, and other hazardous metals
that may be regulated by the RCRA when these coated surfaces are disturbed by
renovation, alteration, repair, or demolitions activities. These coatings are commonly
found in buildings and steel structures, and on fuel piping and on every type of surface
that can be painted or coated. Thresholds, exposures, and engineering controls for
paint containing lead, cadmium, chromium, or other hazardous metals differ depending
on a variety of factors including, but not limited to, whether or not these paints are used
in operational processes, are painted surfaces of building components or exterior
coatings, and are disturbed during construction activities. When investigation,
sampling, renovation or demolition occurs, there are hazards associated with the
generation of dust, debris, and fumes. The OSHA Standards cite requirements for work
activities that can create an unsafe condition with regards to worker protection. These
include, but are not limited to manual demolition, paint scraping, heat-gun applications,
power tooling with dust collection, power tooling without dust collection, rivet busting,
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cleanup activities with dry abrasives, movement or removal of enclosures, abrasive
blasting, welding, cutting, and burning on steel structures.
B-4
RADON.
Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is a byproduct of naturally decaying
uranium. The amount of uranium beneath the earth’s surface varies greatly with
geographic location and soil type. As the uranium decays below a building surface, it
creates a radon gas that may penetrate through cracks and openings in the building’s
foundation or basement. Buildings that have a tight shell have increased chances for
radon being trapped within the structure.
B-5
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS.
Polychlorinated biphenyls are commonly referred to as PCB or PCBs are a group of
toxic substances with chlorinated compounds that are either oily liquids or solids. PCB
are typically colorless or light yellow. Some common PCB manufacturer product trade
names are as follows: Apirolio, Aroclor, Asbestol, Bakola 131, Chlorextol, Clophen,
Inerteen, Kanechlor, No-Flamol, Pyralene, Pyranol, Saf-T- Kuhl and Sovol. PCB were
used for many years in electrical equipment as coolants and lubricants because they
are good insulators that tend not to burn. The EPA banned the manufacturing of PCB in
1977 and regulated PCB as a toxic substance under the Toxic Substance Control Act
(TSCA). Current PCB regulations can be found in 40 CFR 761.
Products manufactured prior to 1977 that may contain PCB include light ballasts,
transformers, capacitors, heat transfer fluids, lubricants, hydraulic fluids, compressor oil,
paints, plastics, asphalt roofing materials, paints, and caulk.
B-6
ANIMAL DROPPINGS.
B-6.1
Histoplasmosis.
Histoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by inhaling the spores of a fungus called
Histoplasma capulatum. The fungus is most associated with bird manure or bat
droppings. The organism can be carried on the wings, feet, and beaks of birds and
infected soil under roosting sites or manure accumulations inside or outside buildings.
The fungus also grows in soils with high nitrogen content, especially those enriched with
bird manure or bat droppings. Histoplasmosis is most commonly transmitted when the
spores become airborne, often during cleanup or demolition projects. Areas with an
increased number of infections are located in central and eastern states, along the
valleys of the Ohio, Mississippi, and St. Lawrence Rivers and the Rio Grande.
B-6.2
Hantavirus.
Hantavirus is carried by rodents, especially mice and rats. The virus is found in their
urine, droppings, and saliva. Potential sites where people may be exposed to the virus
are outbuildings or sheds located in forests and fields that offer a suitable habitat for the
virus’s rodent hosts. The virus is mainly transmitted to people when they breathe in air
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contaminated with the virus. When fresh rodent urine, droppings, or nesting materials
are stirred up, tiny droplets containing the virus get into the air.
B-7
MOLDS AND SPORES.
Thousands of different types or species of fungi or "molds" are normally present in the
environment, and many can grow within a building and cause occupants and workers
discomfort or harm. Some fungi are toxic (that is, they secrete mycotoxins, which are
harmful if inhaled or ingested), and many can cause allergic reactions of various types
in susceptible people. Internal infections can also be caused by fungi, but are rare in
people with normal immune systems. Fungi are commonly found in buildings that have
flooding or long-term water damage from broken pipes, roof leaks, sewage backups,
poor drainage, condensation, or inadequate HVAC system design. Because leaks can
occur inside walls, in crawl spaces, in ventilation systems, or in enclosed ceiling areas,
they may not be visible to the occupants.
B-8
STORAGE TANKS.
The majority of AST or UST contain petroleum products or other hazardous substances.
Until the mid-1980s, most UST were made of bare steel that could corrode over time
and allow the contents to leak into the surrounding soils and groundwater, causing harm
to the environment and human health. Similar conditions are associated with AST.
B-9
CONTAMINATED SOIL OR GROUNDWATER.
There are instances where construction will occur on sites that are known to have
contaminated soil or groundwater. The area could also be classified as a “past
hazardous waste site” or “Installation Restoration” (IR) site. IR is a comprehensive
program to identify, investigate, and clean up hazardous substances, pollutants, and
contaminants at Installations. Sites include those contaminated by past defense
activities that require clean up under the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation, and Liability Act as amended by Superfund Amendments and
Reauthorization Act, and certain corrective actions required by RCRA.
B-10
SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE.
Solid waste is defined as a solid, liquid, semi-solid, or contained gaseous waste. A solid
waste may be a hazardous waste or a nonhazardous waste.
B-10.1
Nonhazardous Waste.
Nonhazardous waste is solid waste that does not meet the RCRA or state criteria for
hazardous waste. Nonhazardous wastes are regulated for disposal and may contain
toxic chemicals or physically hazardous components. Some materials may be assumed
nonhazardous because of the nature of the waste and the waste generation process.
Examples include petroleum-contaminated soil and C&D debris.
Nonhazardous waste is a broad category that includes a range of materials with various
management requirements. Nonhazardous wastes are generally regulated under state
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solid waste regulations. Some states call nonhazardous waste solid waste, special
waste, industrial waste, or non-RCRA regulated waste. Review state solid waste
regulations and determine state specific definitions. Nonhazardous waste
classifications include waste that is excluded from, or does not meet, hazardous waste
criteria, waste containing contaminants at concentrations less than hazardous waste
thresholds (for example, ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity), or wastes that are
prohibited from being disposed of at a subtitle D municipal solid waste landfill.
Nonhazardous waste may consist of contaminated environmental media, debris, or
wastes. These wastes generally have less stringent storage, transport, and disposal
requirements than hazardous wastes. Consider managing these wastes through waste
minimization, reuse or recycling, and cost control.
B-10.2
Universal Waste.
Prior to demolition, facility should be cleared of any potential universal wastes,
specifically fluorescent lamps and mercury containing electrical equipment such as
thermostats or switches. EPA universal waste regulations streamline hazardous waste
management standards for federally designated "universal wastes," which include:
•
Batteries: “Battery” means a device consisting of one or more electrically
connected electrochemical cells that are designed to receive, store, and deliver
electric energy. An electrochemical cell is a system consisting of an anode,
cathode, and an electrolyte, plus such connections (electrical and mechanical) as
may be needed to allow the cell to deliver or receive electrical energy. The term
battery also includes an intact, unbroken battery from which the electrolyte has
been removed.
•
Pesticides: “Pesticide” means any substance or mixture of substances intended
for preventing, destroying, repelling, or mitigating any pest, or intended for use as
a plant regulator, defoliant, or desiccant, other than any article that:
o Is a new animal drug under Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA)
section 201(w), or
o Is an animal drug that has been determined by regulation of the Secretary of
Health and Human Services not to be a new animal drug, or
o Is an animal feed under FFDCA section 201(x) that bears or contains any
substances described by the paragraphs above.
•
Mercury-containing equipment: “Mercury-containing equipment” means a device
or part of a device (including thermostats, but excluding batteries and lamps) that
contains elemental mercury integral to its function.
•
Lamps: A “lamp” is the bulb or tube portion of an electrical lighting device that
may contain hazardous materials such as mercury or lead. Examples of
common types of lamps containing hazardous materials include fluorescent,
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high-intensity discharge (HID), neon, mercury vapor, high-pressure sodium, and
metal halide. Many lighting companies produce "low-level" mercury-containing
lamps and claim they do not constitute a hazardous waste for disposal. In
accordance with Federal law, the generator must prove that the lamps are
nonhazardous if they choose to manage and dispose of them as such. Testing
of the lamps may be performed if it will result in a cost-saving solution.
Otherwise, consider the lamps as hazardous, and properly manage and dispose
them. The ultimate responsibility lies in the waste generator to determine the
proper management and disposal of this waste.
B-10.3
Used Oil.
Used oil is any petroleum-based or synthetic fluid that has been used and is regulated
under 40 CFR 279. During normal use, impurities such as dirt, metal scrapings, water,
or chemicals may get mixed in with the oil, so that in time, the oil no longer performs
well. Eventually, this used oil is replaced with virgin or re-refined oil to perform
correctly. To meet EPA's definition of used oil, a substance must meet three criteria:
Origin: The first criterion for identifying used oil is based on the origin of the oil. Used
oil must have been refined from crude oil or made from synthetic materials. Animal and
vegetable oils are excluded from EPA's definition of used oil.
Use: The second criterion is based on whether and how the oil is used. Oils used as
lubricants, hydraulic fluids, heat transfer fluids, buoyants, and for other similar purposes
are considered used oil. Unused oil such as bottom clean-out waste from virgin fuel oil
storage tanks or virgin fuel oil recovered from a spill, do not meet EPA's definition of
used oil because these oils have never been "used." EPA's definition also excludes
products used as cleaning agents or solely for their solvent properties, as well as certain
petroleum-derived products like antifreeze and kerosene.
Contaminants: The third criterion is based on whether or not the oil is contaminated
with either physical or chemical impurities during use. In other words, to meet EPA's
definition, used oil must become contaminated as a result of being used. This aspect of
EPA's definition includes residues and contaminants generated from handling, storing,
and processing used oil. Physical contaminants could include metal shavings, sawdust,
or dirt. Chemical contaminants could include solvents, halogens, or saltwater.
B-11
CULTURAL RESOURCES.
The term “cultural resources” includes archaeological sites, Native American and other
traditional cultural resources, historic buildings and structures, significant objects,
planned landscapes, and historic districts. The term “historic properties” is a technical
term from the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) to denote properties
that have recognized public significance. The NHPA, 54 United States Code U.S.C.
300101 et seq., is one of the primary Federal statutes designed to protect cultural
resources. The implementing regulation for NHPA is the Protection of Historic
Properties; 36 CFR 800. Historic properties are defined in 36 CFR 800.16 as places
listed in or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). These
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properties may include districts, sites, buildings, structures, objects, and landscapes
significant in American history, prehistory, architecture, archaeology, engineering, and
culture. They include properties that belong to the prehistoric era as well as the historic
era. Generally, properties must be at least 50 years of age to be eligible for the NRHP,
unless they are proven to have exceptional importance. The NHPA also provides for
consultation with Native American groups when a proposed project might affect cultural
or traditional places or resources that have value to a Native American tribal group
derived from the role the property plays in the community’s historically rooted beliefs,
customs, and practices.
B-11.1
Archaeology.
The Archaeological Resource Protection Act of 1979 recognizes that archaeological
resources are an irreplaceable component of the heritage of the United States.
Prehistoric archaeological resources are physical properties resulting from human
activities that predate written records and generally are identified as isolated finds or
sites. Prehistoric resources may include areas such as village sites, temporary camps,
lithic scatters, roasting pits or hearths, milling features, petroglyphs, rock features, and
burial sites. Historic archaeological site types, which result from human activities that
occurred after European settlement, include town sites, homesteads, agricultural or
ranching features, mining-related features, refuse concentrations, and features or
artifacts associated with early military use of the land.
B-11.2
Architectural.
Historic architectural resources include fabricated, aboveground resources resulting
from human activities that occurred after European settlement. These resources may
include buildings such as houses, churches, barns, and lighthouses; early military
buildings such as hangars, administration buildings, barracks, officers’ quarters,
warehouses, and guardhouses; and structures such as roads, bridges, and culverts.
B-12
CHLORDANE.
Chlordane was used extensively as an insecticide in the United States. It was sold from
1948 to 1988, both as a dust and an emulsified solution. The most common use of
chlordane was for termite control. It was poured or injected around foundations to
protect homes and buildings from termite damage. Its use was especially high in areas
where termites caused structural damage, such as the southern U.S. Though banned
for use on crops by 1978, its use for protection of buildings continued for another 10
years. In 1988, all commercial and domestic use of chlordane in the U.S. was banned
by the EPA. Chlordane, heptachlor, and similar products can be expected to be found
around the foundation of wooden (and possibly other) structures constructed prior to
1988. It is linked to various health effects on humans. Chlordane and similar products
may still be in use in other countries.
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B-13
REFERENCES.
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
DHHS 2005-109, Histoplasmosis Protecting Workers at Risk
CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS
36 CFR 800, Protection of Historic Properties
40 CFR 279, Standards for the Management of Used Oil
40 CFR 761, Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Manufacturing Process, Distribution in
Commerce, and Use Prohibitions
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This Page Intentionally Left Blank
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APPENDIX C GLOSSARY
C-1
ACRONYMS
ACM
Asbestos-Containing Materials
AFCEC
Air Force Civil Engineer Center
AST
Aboveground Storage Tank
BIA
Bilateral Infrastructure Agreement
C&D
Construction and Demolition
CAA
Clean Air Act
CDC
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
CFR
Code of Federal Regulations
DHHS
Department of Health and Human Services
DoD
United States Department of Defense
DOR
Designer of Record
EFH
Essential Fish Habitat
ELPAT
Environmental Lead Proficiency in Analytical Testing
EO
Executive Order
EPA
United States Environmental Protection Agency
EV
Environmental
FC
Facilities Criteria
FFDCA
Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act of 1938
FGS
Final Governing Standards
FR
Federal Register
HID
High Intensity Discharge
HUD
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
ID
Identification
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IR
Installation Restoration
kg
Kilogram
LLR
Low-Level Radioactive
MBTA
Migratory Bird Treaty Act
mg/cm2
Milligrams per Square Centimeter
mg/L
Milligrams per Liter
NAAQC
National Ambient Air Quality Standards
NAGPRA
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act of 1990
NAVLAP
National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation
NAVRAMP
Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program
NAVSEADET
Naval Sea Systems Command Detachment
NELAC
National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference
NEPA
National Environmental Policy Act
NESHAP
National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air
NHPA
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966
NIST
National Institute of Standards and Technology
NLLAP
National Lead Laboratory Accreditation Program
NRHP
National Register of Historic Places
OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
PCB
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
PCBs
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
PPP
Pollution Prevention Plan
RACM
Regulated Asbestos-Containing Materials
RCRA
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act
RMS
Radon Mitigation Standards
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RASO
Radiological Affairs Support Office
RFP
Request for Proposal
RRP
Renovation, Repair, and Painting
SHPO
State Historic Preservation Office
SOFA
Status of Forces Agreement
SSG
Soil Screening Guidance
SSL
Soil Screening Level
TCLP
Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure
TSCA
Toxic Substance Control Act
UFC
Unified Facilities Criteria
UFGS
Unified Facility Guide Specifications
UN
United Nations
USACE
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
U.S.C.
United States Code
UST
Underground Storage Tank
XRF
X-Ray Fluorescence
51
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